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Sample records for linking biomarker community

  1. Community Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mary

    1975-01-01

    At Moraine Valley Community College (Illinois), a chain of events, programs, activities, and services has linked the college and community in such areas as fine arts, ethnic groups, public services, community action, community service, and community education. (Author/NHM)

  2. Linking Archaeal Molecular Diversity and Lipid Biomarker Composition in a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda; Orphan, Victoria; Turk, Kendra; Embaye, Tsegereda; Kubo, Mike; Summons, Roger

    2005-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers for discrete microbial groups are a valuable tool for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. Lipid biomarkers can establish organism source and function in contemporary microbial ecosystems (membrane lipids) and by analogy, potential relevance to the fossilized carbon skeletons (geolipids) extracted from ancient sedimentary rock. The Mars Exploration Rovers have provided clear evidence for an early wet Mars and the presence of hypersaline evaporitic basins. Ongoing work on an early Earth analog, the hypersaline benthic mats in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, may provide clues to what may have evolved and flourished on an early wet Mars, if only for a short period. Cyanobacterial mats are a pertinent early Earth analog for consideration of evolutionary and microbial processes within the aerobic photosynthetic and adjacent anoxic layers. Fluctuations in physio-chemical parameters associated with spatial and temporal scales are expressed through vast microbial metabolic diversity. Our recent work hopes to establish the dynamic of archaeal diversity, particularly as it relates to methane production in this high sulfate environment, through the use of lipid biomarker and phylogenetic analyses. Archaeal 16s rRNA and mcrA gene assemblages, demonstrated distinct spatial separation over the 130 mm core of at least three distinct genera within the order Methanosarcinales, as well as an abundance of uncultured members of the Thermoplasmales and Crenarchaeota. Ether-bound lipid analysis identified abundant 0-alkyl and 0-isopranyl chains throughout the core, and the presence of sn-2 hydroxyarchaeol, a biomarker for methylotrophic methanogens. A unique ether isoprenoid chain, a C30:1 , possibly related to the geolipid squalane, a paleobiomarker associated with hypersaline environments, was most abundant within the oxic-anoxic transition zone.

  3. Developing community friendly appropriate biomarkers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this presentation we discuss the statistical methodology used in the development of biomarkers to track disease as an outcome for nutrition or exercise interventions in community settings. Obesity and co-morbidities are of growing concern. Nutrition and physical activity interventions have been d...

  4. Community Links as Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleine, Patricia A.; Webb, James T.

    This chapter examines issues in cultivating community resources in programs for gifted and talented children. First, ways to meet the affective needs of gifted children are considered and the importance of bridging the gap between home and school and resolving conflicts is stressed. Ten hindrances to the optimum development of children are…

  5. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsege; Turk, Kendra A.

    2003-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments where microorganisms had virtually no competition apart from the harsh conditions of hypersalinity, desiccation and intense light. Today, the modern counterparts of these microbial ecosystems find appropriate niches in only a few places where extremes eliminate eukaryotic grazers. Answers to many outstanding questions about the evolution of microorganisms and their environments on early Earth are best answered through study of these extant analogs. Lipids associated with various groups of bacteria can be valuable biomarkers for identification of specific groups of microorganisms both in ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids) and contemporary microbial communities (membrane lipids). Use of compound specific isotope analysis adds additional refinement to the identification of biomarker source, so that it is possible to take advantage of the 3C-depletions associated with various functional groups of organisms (i.e. autotrophs, heterotrophs, methanotrophs, methanogens) responsible for the cycling of carbon within a microbial community. Our recent work has focused on a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico which support the abundant growth of Microcoleus-dominated microbial mats. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface.

  6. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsege; Turk, Kendra A.

    2003-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments where microorganisms had virtually no competition apart from the harsh conditions of hypersalinity, desiccation and intense light. Today, the modern counterparts of these microbial ecosystems find appropriate niches in only a few places where extremes eliminate eukaryotic grazers. Answers to many outstanding questions about the evolution of microorganisms and their environments on early Earth are best answered through study of these extant analogs. Lipids associated with various groups of bacteria can be valuable biomarkers for identification of specific groups of microorganisms both in ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids) and contemporary microbial communities (membrane lipids). Use of compound specific isotope analysis adds additional refinement to the identification of biomarker source, so that it is possible to take advantage of the 3C-depletions associated with various functional groups of organisms (i.e. autotrophs, heterotrophs, methanotrophs, methanogens) responsible for the cycling of carbon within a microbial community. Our recent work has focused on a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico which support the abundant growth of Microcoleus-dominated microbial mats. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface.

  7. Biomarkers in Pediatric Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an infectious disease caused by bacteria, viruses, or a combination of these infectious agents. The severity of the clinical manifestations of CAP varies significantly. Consequently, both the differentiation of viral from bacterial CAP cases and the accurate assessment and prediction of disease severity are critical for effectively managing individuals with CAP. To solve questionable cases, several biomarkers indicating the etiology and severity of CAP have been studied. Unfortunately, only a few studies have examined the roles of these biomarkers in pediatric practice. The main aim of this paper is to detail current knowledge regarding the use of biomarkers to diagnose and treat CAP in children, analyzing the most recently published relevant studies. Despite several attempts, the etiologic diagnosis of pediatric CAP and the estimation of the potential outcome remain unsolved problems in most cases. Among traditional biomarkers, procalcitonin (PCT) appears to be the most effective for both selecting bacterial cases and evaluating the severity. However, a precise cut-off separating bacterial from viral and mild from severe cases has not been defined. The three-host protein assay based on C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), plasma interferon-γ protein-10 (IP-10), and micro-array-based whole genome expression arrays might offer more advantages in comparison with former biomarkers. However, further studies are needed before the routine use of those presently in development can be recommended. PMID:28218726

  8. Biomarkers in Pediatric Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2017-02-19

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an infectious disease caused by bacteria, viruses, or a combination of these infectious agents. The severity of the clinical manifestations of CAP varies significantly. Consequently, both the differentiation of viral from bacterial CAP cases and the accurate assessment and prediction of disease severity are critical for effectively managing individuals with CAP. To solve questionable cases, several biomarkers indicating the etiology and severity of CAP have been studied. Unfortunately, only a few studies have examined the roles of these biomarkers in pediatric practice. The main aim of this paper is to detail current knowledge regarding the use of biomarkers to diagnose and treat CAP in children, analyzing the most recently published relevant studies. Despite several attempts, the etiologic diagnosis of pediatric CAP and the estimation of the potential outcome remain unsolved problems in most cases. Among traditional biomarkers, procalcitonin (PCT) appears to be the most effective for both selecting bacterial cases and evaluating the severity. However, a precise cut-off separating bacterial from viral and mild from severe cases has not been defined. The three-host protein assay based on C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), plasma interferon-γ protein-10 (IP-10), and micro-array-based whole genome expression arrays might offer more advantages in comparison with former biomarkers. However, further studies are needed before the routine use of those presently in development can be recommended.

  9. Biomarkers linking PCB exposure and obesity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somiranjan; Murinova, Lubica; Trnovec, Tomas; Loffredo, Christopher A; Washington, Kareem; Mitra, Partha S; Dutta, Sisir K

    2014-01-01

    Recently the prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically across much of the world. Obesity, as a complex, multifactorial disease, and its health consequences probably result from the interplay of environmental, genetic, and behavioral factors. Several lines of evidence support the theory that obesity is programmed during early development and that environmental exposures can play a key role. We therefore hypothesize that the current epidemic might associated with the influence of chemical exposures upon genetically controlled developmental pathways, leading to metabolic disorders. Some environmental chemicals, such as PCBs and pesticide residues, are widespread in food, drinking water, soil, and they exert multiple effects including estrogenic on cellular processes; some have been shown to affect the development of obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. To bring these lines of evidence together and address an important health problem, this narrative review has been primarily designed to address PCBs exposures that have linked with human disease, obesity in particular, and to assess the effects of PCBs on gene expression in a highlyexposed population. The results strongly suggest that further research into the specific mechanisms of PCBs-associated diseases is warranted.

  10. Neuroantibody Biomarkers: Links and Challenges in Environmental Neurodegeneration and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    El-Fawal, Hassan A. N.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of neurodegenerative (ND) and autoimmune diseases (AID) remain idiopathic. The contribution of environmental chemicals to the development of these disorders has become of great interest in recent years. A convergence of mechanism between of ND and AID development has also emerged. In the case of ND, including neurotoxicity, the focus of this review, work over the last two decade in the realm of biomarker development, indicates that the immune response provides a venue whereby humoral immunity, in the form of autoantibodies to nervous system specific proteins, or neuroantibodies (NAb), may provide, once validated, a sensitive high throughput surrogate biomarker of effect with the potential of predicting outcome in absence of overt neurotoxicity/neurodegeneration. In addition, NAb may prove to be a contributor to the progression of the nervous system pathology, as well as biomarker of stage and therapeutic efficacy. There is a compelling need for biomarkers of effect in light of the introduction of new chemicals, such as nanoengineered material, where potential neurotoxicity remains to be defined. Furthermore, the convergence of mechanisms associated with ND and AID draws attention to the neglected arena of angiogenesis in defining the link between environment, ND, and AID. PMID:25045531

  11. Influence of Inter-Community Link Strength on Community Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qian-Jin; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2013-09-01

    This paper mainly discusses how the strength of inter-community links affects the synchronization state of the whole network and the individual community. It is found, when the inter-community link number is neither too small nor too large and the overall coupling strength takes right values, there will be an optimal inter-community link strength value, in which the community networks are in a balance region where the individual community is maximally independent, while the information transmission remains effective among different communities. Combining the result of this paper and that of the number of inter-community links, it is easy to help us find the most effective community networks.

  12. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Biomarkers Linked to Lung Metastatic Potential and Cell Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Garibay, Gorka; Herranz, Carmen; Llorente, Alicia; Boni, Jacopo; Serra-Musach, Jordi; Mateo, Francesca; Aguilar, Helena; Gómez-Baldó, Laia; Petit, Anna; Vidal, August; Climent, Fina; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Cordero, Álex; González-Suárez, Eva; Sánchez-Mut, José Vicente; Esteller, Manel; Llatjós, Roger; Varela, Mar; López, José Ignacio; García, Nadia; Extremera, Ana I.; Gumà, Anna; Ortega, Raúl; Plà, María Jesús; Fernández, Adela; Pernas, Sònia; Falo, Catalina; Morilla, Idoia; Campos, Miriam; Gil, Miguel; Román, Antonio; Molina-Molina, María; Ussetti, Piedad; Laporta, Rosalía; Valenzuela, Claudia; Ancochea, Julio; Xaubet, Antoni; Casanova, Álvaro; Pujana, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare lung-metastasizing neoplasm caused by the proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells that commonly carry loss-of-function mutations in either the tuberous sclerosis complex 1 or 2 (TSC1 or TSC2) genes. While allosteric inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has shown substantial clinical benefit, complementary therapies are required to improve response and/or to treat specific patients. However, there is a lack of LAM biomarkers that could potentially be used to monitor the disease and to develop other targeted therapies. We hypothesized that the mediators of cancer metastasis to lung, particularly in breast cancer, also play a relevant role in LAM. Analyses across independent breast cancer datasets revealed associations between low TSC1/2 expression, altered mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway signaling, and metastasis to lung. Subsequently, immunohistochemical analyses of 23 LAM lesions revealed positivity in all cases for the lung metastasis mediators fascin 1 (FSCN1) and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (ID1). Moreover, assessment of breast cancer stem or luminal progenitor cell biomarkers showed positivity in most LAM tissue for the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), integrin-ß3 (ITGB3/CD61), and/or the sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) proteins. The immunohistochemical analyses also provided evidence of heterogeneity between and within LAM cases. The analysis of Tsc2-deficient cells revealed relative over-expression of FSCN1 and ID1; however, Tsc2-deficient cells did not show higher sensitivity to ID1-based cancer inhibitors. Collectively, the results of this study reveal novel LAM biomarkers linked to breast cancer metastasis to lung and to cell stemness, which in turn might guide the assessment of additional or complementary therapeutic opportunities for LAM. PMID:26167915

  13. Link prediction based on local community properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu-Hua; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Ling, Fei; Cheng, Zhi; Weng, Guo-Qing; Huang, Yu-Jiao

    2016-09-01

    The link prediction algorithm is one of the key technologies to reveal the inherent rule of network evolution. This paper proposes a novel link prediction algorithm based on the properties of the local community, which is composed of the common neighbor nodes of any two nodes in the network and the links between these nodes. By referring to the node degree and the condition of assortativity or disassortativity in a network, we comprehensively consider the effect of the shortest path and edge clustering coefficient within the local community on node similarity. We numerically show the proposed method provide good link prediction results.

  14. Teachers' Link to Community Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia Education Fund, Charleston.

    This directory consists of profiles of more than 500 companies and organizations which responded to a West Virginia Education Fund survey during the summer of 1990. The purposes of the directory are: (1) to provide a reference that helps educators locate resources from business, industry and community groups; (2) to initiate and facilitate…

  15. Teachers' Link to Community Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia Education Fund, Charleston.

    This directory consists of profiles of more than 500 companies and organizations which responded to a West Virginia Education Fund survey during the summer of 1990. The purposes of the directory are: (1) to provide a reference that helps educators locate resources from business, industry and community groups; (2) to initiate and facilitate…

  16. UniPep - a database for human N-linked glycosites: a resource for biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Loriaux, Paul; Eng, Jimmy; Campbell, David; Keller, Andrew; Moss, Pat; Bonneau, Richard; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Yong; Wollscheid, Bernd; Cooke, Kelly; Yi, Eugene C; Lee, Hookeun; Peskind, Elaine R; Zhang, Jing; Smith, Richard D; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2006-01-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in proteomic analyses of plasma for the purpose of discovering biomarkers. Profiling N-linked glycopeptides is a particularly promising method because the population of N-linked glycosites represents the proteomes of plasma, the cell surface, and secreted proteins at very low redundancy and provides a compelling link between the tissue and plasma proteomes. Here, we describe UniPep - a database of human N-linked glycosites - as a resource for biomarker discovery. PMID:16901351

  17. Blood-borne biomarkers and bioindicators for linking exposure to health effects in environmental health science.

    PubMed

    Wallace, M Ariel Geer; Kormos, Tzipporah M; Pleil, Joachim D

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health science aims to link environmental pollution sources to adverse health outcomes to develop effective exposure intervention strategies that reduce long-term disease risks. Over the past few decades, the public health community recognized that health risk is driven by interaction between the human genome and external environment. Now that the human genetic code has been sequenced, establishing this "G × E" (gene-environment) interaction requires a similar effort to decode the human exposome, which is the accumulation of an individual's environmental exposures and metabolic responses throughout the person's lifetime. The exposome is composed of endogenous and exogenous chemicals, many of which are measurable as biomarkers in blood, breath, and urine. Exposure to pollutants is assessed by analyzing biofluids for the pollutant itself or its metabolic products. New methods are being developed to use a subset of biomarkers, termed bioindicators, to demonstrate biological changes indicative of future adverse health effects. Typically, environmental biomarkers are assessed using noninvasive (excreted) media, such as breath and urine. Blood is often avoided for biomonitoring due to practical reasons such as medical personnel, infectious waste, or clinical setting, despite the fact that blood represents the central compartment that interacts with every living cell and is the most relevant biofluid for certain applications and analyses. The aims of this study were to (1) review the current use of blood samples in environmental health research, (2) briefly contrast blood with other biological media, and (3) propose additional applications for blood analysis in human exposure research.

  18. Biomarkers and community indices as complementary tools for environmental safety.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Paule; Cossu-Leguille, Carole

    2003-03-01

    Research on biomarkers as early bioindicators of perturbation in populations and individuals has been gaining ground over the last decade. This ecotoxicological approach relies on the fact that changes occur at low levels of organization before the community is affected and thus they can be monitored to assess environmental safety. Changes may concern behavior, physiology, biochemistry, or genomic structure and functioning, and may impair population dynamics in the long-term. Ecotoxicity studies based on biomarkers allow us to measure the impact of environmental stressors and to easily follow the evolution of the systems towards degradation or restoration. Over and above their use as simple indices of exposure to specific pollutants, biomarkers can give an insight into ecosystem health. The results of our experience in field studies involving ecotoxicologists and ecologists will be presented in order to illustrate the relevance of such an integrating strategy for environmental quality assessment.

  19. Evolutionary link community structure discovery in dynamic weighted networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Liu, Caihong; Wang, Jiajia; Wang, Xiang; Zhou, Bin; Zou, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Traditional community detection methods are often restricted in static network analysis. In fact, most of networks in real world obviously show dynamic characteristics with time passing. In this paper, we design a link community structure discovery algorithm in dynamic weighted networks, which can not only reveal the evolutionary link community structure, but also detect overlapping communities by mapping link communities to node communities. Meanwhile, our algorithm can also get the hierarchical structure of link communities by tuning a parameter. The proposed algorithm is based on weighted edge fitness and weighted partition density so as to determine whether to add a link to a community and whether to merge two communities to form a new link community. Experiments on both synthetic and real world networks demonstrate the proposed algorithm can detect evolutionary link community structure in dynamic weighted networks effectively.

  20. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda; Orphan, Victoria; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra; Kubo, Mike; Summons, Roger

    2004-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. Various lipids associated with specific microbial groups can serve as biomarkers for establishing organism source and function in contemporary microbial ecosystems (membrane lipids), and by analogy, potential relevance to ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids). As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments. Our recent work has focused on lipid biomarker analysis of a potential analogue for such ancient mats growing in a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The aerobic, surface layer of this mat (0 to 1 mm) contained a variety of ester-bound fatty acids (FA) representing a diverse bacterial population including cyanobacteria, sulphate reducers (SRB) and heterotrophs. Biomarkers for microeukaryotes detected in this layer included sterols, C-20 polyunsaturated FA and a highly branched isoprenoid, diagnostic for diatoms. Cyanobacteria were also indicated by the presence of a diagnostic set of mid-chain methylalkanes. C-28, to C-34 wax esters (WXE) present in relatively small amounts in the upper 3 mm of the mat are considered biomarkers for green non-sulphur bacteria. Ether-bound isoprenoids were also identified although in considerably lower abundance than ester-bound FA (approx. 1:l0). These complex ether lipids included archatol, hydroxyarchaeol and a C-40 tetraether, all in small amounts. After ether cleavage with boron tribromide, the major recovered isoprenyl was a C-30:1. This C(sub 30;1) yelded squalane after hydrogenation, a known geobiomarker for hypersaline environments in ancient oils and sediments. In this mat, it represents the dominant Archaeal population. The carbon isotopic composition of biomarker lipids were generally depleted relative to the bulk organic material (delta C-13 TOC -10%). Most

  1. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda; Orphan, Victoria; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra; Kubo, Mike; Summons, Roger

    2004-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. Various lipids associated with specific microbial groups can serve as biomarkers for establishing organism source and function in contemporary microbial ecosystems (membrane lipids), and by analogy, potential relevance to ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids). As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments. Our recent work has focused on lipid biomarker analysis of a potential analogue for such ancient mats growing in a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The aerobic, surface layer of this mat (0 to 1 mm) contained a variety of ester-bound fatty acids (FA) representing a diverse bacterial population including cyanobacteria, sulphate reducers (SRB) and heterotrophs. Biomarkers for microeukaryotes detected in this layer included sterols, C-20 polyunsaturated FA and a highly branched isoprenoid, diagnostic for diatoms. Cyanobacteria were also indicated by the presence of a diagnostic set of mid-chain methylalkanes. C-28, to C-34 wax esters (WXE) present in relatively small amounts in the upper 3 mm of the mat are considered biomarkers for green non-sulphur bacteria. Ether-bound isoprenoids were also identified although in considerably lower abundance than ester-bound FA (approx. 1:l0). These complex ether lipids included archatol, hydroxyarchaeol and a C-40 tetraether, all in small amounts. After ether cleavage with boron tribromide, the major recovered isoprenyl was a C-30:1. This C(sub 30;1) yelded squalane after hydrogenation, a known geobiomarker for hypersaline environments in ancient oils and sediments. In this mat, it represents the dominant Archaeal population. The carbon isotopic composition of biomarker lipids were generally depleted relative to the bulk organic material (delta C-13 TOC -10%). Most

  2. Linking Biomarker and Comparative Omics to Pathogens in Legumes.

    PubMed

    Diapari, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    It is envisioned that a more precise study of the association between the traits and biomarkers will dramatically decrease the time and costs required to bring new improved disease resistance lines to market. The field of omics has an enormous potential to assess diseases more precise, including the identification and understanding of pathogenic mechanisms in legume crops, and have been exemplified by a relatively large number of studies. Recently, molecular genetic studies have accumulated a huge amount of genotypic data, through a more affordable next generation sequencing (NGS) technology, causing the omics approaches to fall behind. In this paper I provide an overview of genomics and proteomics and their use in legume crops, including the use of comparative genomics to identify homologous markers within legume crops.

  3. Identification of hybrid node and link communities in complex networks.

    PubMed

    He, Dongxiao; Jin, Di; Chen, Zheng; Zhang, Weixiong

    2015-03-02

    Identifying communities in complex networks is an effective means for analyzing complex systems, with applications in diverse areas such as social science, engineering, biology and medicine. Finding communities of nodes and finding communities of links are two popular schemes for network analysis. These schemes, however, have inherent drawbacks and are inadequate to capture complex organizational structures in real networks. We introduce a new scheme and an effective approach for identifying complex mixture structures of node and link communities, called hybrid node-link communities. A central piece of our approach is a probabilistic model that accommodates node, link and hybrid node-link communities. Our extensive experiments on various real-world networks, including a large protein-protein interaction network and a large network of semantically associated words, illustrated that the scheme for hybrid communities is superior in revealing network characteristics. Moreover, the new approach outperformed the existing methods for finding node or link communities separately.

  4. Identification of hybrid node and link communities in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dongxiao; Jin, Di; Chen, Zheng; Zhang, Weixiong

    2015-03-01

    Identifying communities in complex networks is an effective means for analyzing complex systems, with applications in diverse areas such as social science, engineering, biology and medicine. Finding communities of nodes and finding communities of links are two popular schemes for network analysis. These schemes, however, have inherent drawbacks and are inadequate to capture complex organizational structures in real networks. We introduce a new scheme and an effective approach for identifying complex mixture structures of node and link communities, called hybrid node-link communities. A central piece of our approach is a probabilistic model that accommodates node, link and hybrid node-link communities. Our extensive experiments on various real-world networks, including a large protein-protein interaction network and a large network of semantically associated words, illustrated that the scheme for hybrid communities is superior in revealing network characteristics. Moreover, the new approach outperformed the existing methods for finding node or link communities separately.

  5. Identification of hybrid node and link communities in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongxiao; Jin, Di; Chen, Zheng; Zhang, Weixiong

    2015-01-01

    Identifying communities in complex networks is an effective means for analyzing complex systems, with applications in diverse areas such as social science, engineering, biology and medicine. Finding communities of nodes and finding communities of links are two popular schemes for network analysis. These schemes, however, have inherent drawbacks and are inadequate to capture complex organizational structures in real networks. We introduce a new scheme and an effective approach for identifying complex mixture structures of node and link communities, called hybrid node-link communities. A central piece of our approach is a probabilistic model that accommodates node, link and hybrid node-link communities. Our extensive experiments on various real-world networks, including a large protein-protein interaction network and a large network of semantically associated words, illustrated that the scheme for hybrid communities is superior in revealing network characteristics. Moreover, the new approach outperformed the existing methods for finding node or link communities separately. PMID:25728010

  6. Ecology and distribution of a new biomarker linked to 1,2-dichloropropane dechlorination in subsurface environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Crespo, E.; Loeffler, F. E.

    2011-12-01

    Reductive dechlorination plays a major role in the transformation and detoxification of chlorinated solvents, including chlorinated ethenes. Molecular biological tools are being applied at contaminated sites in order to assess the process-specific biomarkers that impact site performance, and to monitor the progress of bioremediation approaches. The few current biomarker genes in use provide an incomplete picture of the reductively dechlorinating bacterial community; this is a limitation for implementing enhanced bioremediation and monitored natural attenuation as cleanup strategies at chlorinated solvent contaminated sites. Reductively dehalogenating organisms, particularly Dehalococcoides (Dhc) strains, possess multiple reductive dehalogenase (RDase) genes, which are promising targets to specifically monitor dehalogenation processes of interest. Dehalococcoides populations in two highly enriched cultures (RC and KS) have been implicated in the reductive dechlorination of dechlorination of 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-D), a widespread halogenated organic pollutant, to the non-toxic propene. Using a combined approach of transcription, expression and molecular analysis a new biomarker linked to 1,2-dichloropropane has been identified in Dhc strains RC and KS providing for the first time, convincing evidence of a specific RDase implicated in 1,2-D dechlorination to propene. Further analyses imply that new biomarker is in a "mobile DNA segment", a genomic island (GI) of horizontal gene transfer origin. A valid quantitative PCR approach was designed to detect and enumerate this gene in cultures and environmental samples; this will be a useful to bioremediation practitioners to more efficiently implement reductive dechlorination as a remediation tool. The new biomarker has been identified in fresh water sediment samples from different geographical locations in Europe, North and South America. Further research aims to shed light on RDase gene dissemination and the adaptation

  7. Biomarker as a Research Tool in Linking Exposure to Air Particles and Respiratory Health

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Some of the environmental toxicants from air pollution include particulate matter (PM10), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), and ultrafine particles (UFP). Both short- and long-term exposure could result in various degrees of respiratory health outcomes among exposed persons, which rely on the individuals' health status. Methods. In this paper, we highlight a review of the studies that have used biomarkers to understand the association between air particles exposure and the development of respiratory problems resulting from the damage in the respiratory system. Data from previous epidemiological studies relevant to the application of biomarkers in respiratory system damage reported from exposure to air particles are also summarized. Results. Based on these analyses, the findings agree with the hypothesis that biomarkers are relevant in linking harmful air particles concentrations to increased respiratory health effects. Biomarkers are used in epidemiological studies to provide an understanding of the mechanisms that follow airborne particles exposure in the airway. However, application of biomarkers in epidemiological studies of health effects caused by air particles in both environmental and occupational health is inchoate. Conclusion. Biomarkers unravel the complexity of the connection between exposure to air particles and respiratory health. PMID:25984536

  8. Immunization Coverage Surveys and Linked Biomarker Serosurveys in Three Regions in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Travassos, Mark A.; Beyene, Berhane; Adam, Zenaw; Campbell, James D.; Mulholland, Nigisti; Diarra, Seydou S.; Kassa, Tassew; Oot, Lisa; Sequeira, Jenny; Reymann, Mardi; Blackwelder, William C.; Wu, Yukun; Ruslanova, Inna; Goswami, Jaya; Sow, Samba O.; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Steinglass, Robert; Kebede, Amha; Levine, Myron M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Demographic and health surveys, immunization coverage surveys and administrative data often divergently estimate vaccination coverage, which hinders pinpointing districts where immunization services require strengthening. We assayed vaccination coverage in three regions in Ethiopia by coverage surveys and linked serosurveys. Methods Households with children aged 12–23 (N = 300) or 6–8 months (N = 100) in each of three districts (woredas) were randomly selected for immunization coverage surveys (inspection of vaccination cards and immunization clinic records and maternal recall) and linked serosurveys. IgG-ELISA serologic biomarkers included tetanus antitoxin ≥ 0.15 IU/ml in toddlers (receipt of tetanus toxoid) and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) anti-capsular titers ≥ 1.0 mcg/ml in infants (timely receipt of Hib vaccine). Findings Coverage surveys enrolled 1,181 children across three woredas; 1,023 (87%) also enrolled in linked serosurveys. Administrative data over-estimated coverage compared to surveys, while maternal recall was unreliable. Serologic biomarkers documented a hierarchy among the districts. Biomarker measurement in infants provided insight on timeliness of vaccination not deducible from toddler results. Conclusion Neither administrative projections, vaccination card or EPI register inspections, nor parental recall, substitute for objective serological biomarker measurement. Including infants in serosurveys informs on vaccination timeliness. PMID:26934372

  9. Immunization Coverage Surveys and Linked Biomarker Serosurveys in Three Regions in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Travassos, Mark A; Beyene, Berhane; Adam, Zenaw; Campbell, James D; Mulholland, Nigisti; Diarra, Seydou S; Kassa, Tassew; Oot, Lisa; Sequeira, Jenny; Reymann, Mardi; Blackwelder, William C; Wu, Yukun; Ruslanova, Inna; Goswami, Jaya; Sow, Samba O; Pasetti, Marcela F; Steinglass, Robert; Kebede, Amha; Levine, Myron M

    2016-01-01

    Demographic and health surveys, immunization coverage surveys and administrative data often divergently estimate vaccination coverage, which hinders pinpointing districts where immunization services require strengthening. We assayed vaccination coverage in three regions in Ethiopia by coverage surveys and linked serosurveys. Households with children aged 12-23 (N = 300) or 6-8 months (N = 100) in each of three districts (woredas) were randomly selected for immunization coverage surveys (inspection of vaccination cards and immunization clinic records and maternal recall) and linked serosurveys. IgG-ELISA serologic biomarkers included tetanus antitoxin ≥ 0.15 IU/ml in toddlers (receipt of tetanus toxoid) and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) anti-capsular titers ≥ 1.0 mcg/ml in infants (timely receipt of Hib vaccine). Coverage surveys enrolled 1,181 children across three woredas; 1,023 (87%) also enrolled in linked serosurveys. Administrative data over-estimated coverage compared to surveys, while maternal recall was unreliable. Serologic biomarkers documented a hierarchy among the districts. Biomarker measurement in infants provided insight on timeliness of vaccination not deducible from toddler results. Neither administrative projections, vaccination card or EPI register inspections, nor parental recall, substitute for objective serological biomarker measurement. Including infants in serosurveys informs on vaccination timeliness.

  10. Serum glycoprotein-derived N- and O-linked glycans as cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Ying; Hao, Cui; Zeng, Xuan; He, Yanli; Zeng, Pengjiao; Guo, Zhihua; Zhang, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of cancer is the key to improving survival. Since most clinically used serum cancer biomarkers are either glycoproteins or glycan structures that can be recognized by specific monoclonal antibodies, developing glycan structure-based biomarkers from human serum/plasma glycoproteins through mass spectrometry (MS) analysis are active research field during the past decades. Numerous studies have shown that changes in serum/plasma glycan structures occur during cancer initiation, progression, and treatment. This review describes N- and O-linked glycan structures identified from serum/plasma glycoprotein (s) by MS analysis with focus on alterations associated with different types of human cancers. The global changes in serum N- and O-linked glycan structures, especially the glycans that are not made by cancer cells such as B lymphocyte-derived IgG and liver-synthesized haptoglobin and α1 acid glycoprotein, suggest that glycans might be the long sought diagnostic biomarkers associated with system malfunction in the blood circulation of cancer patients. Therefore, N- and O-linked glycan structures have great potential to serve as cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment monitoring biomarkers to facilitate personalized medicine. PMID:27904760

  11. Biomarkers Linking PCB Exposure and Obesity£

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Somiranjan; Murinova, Lubica; Trnovec, Tomas; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Washington, Kareem; Mitra, Partha S.; Dutta, Sisir K.

    2015-01-01

    Recently the prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically across much of the world. Obesity, as a complex, multifactorial disease, and its health consequences probably result from the interplay of environmental, genetic, and behavioral factors. Several lines of evidence support the theory that obesity is programmed during early development and that environmental exposures can play a key role. We therefore hypothesize that the current epidemic might associated with the influence of chemical exposures upon genetically controlled developmental pathways, leading to metabolic disorders. Some environmental chemicals, such as PCBs and pesticide residues, are widespread in food, drinking water, soil, and they exert multiple effects including estrogenic on cellular processes; some have been shown to affect the development of obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. To bring these lines of evidence together and address an important health problem, this narrative review has been primarily designed to address PCBs exposures that have linked with human disease, obesity in particular, and to assess the effects of PCBs on gene expression in a highly-exposed population. The results strongly suggest that further research into the specific mechanisms of PCBs-associated diseases is warranted. PMID:25420728

  12. Correlations between Community Structure and Link Formation in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; He, Jia-Lin; Kapoor, Komal; Srivastava, Jaideep

    2013-01-01

    Background Links in complex networks commonly represent specific ties between pairs of nodes, such as protein-protein interactions in biological networks or friendships in social networks. However, understanding the mechanism of link formation in complex networks is a long standing challenge for network analysis and data mining. Methodology/Principal Findings Links in complex networks have a tendency to cluster locally and form so-called communities. This widely existed phenomenon reflects some underlying mechanism of link formation. To study the correlations between community structure and link formation, we present a general computational framework including a theory for network partitioning and link probability estimation. Our approach enables us to accurately identify missing links in partially observed networks in an efficient way. The links having high connection likelihoods in the communities reveal that links are formed preferentially to create cliques and accordingly promote the clustering level of the communities. The experimental results verify that such a mechanism can be well captured by our approach. Conclusions/Significance Our findings provide a new insight into understanding how links are created in the communities. The computational framework opens a wide range of possibilities to develop new approaches and applications, such as community detection and missing link prediction. PMID:24039818

  13. Linking biomarkers to reproductive success of caged fathead minnows in streams with increasing urbanization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crago, J.; Corsi, S.R.; Weber, D.; Bannerman, R.; Klaper, R.

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive and oxidative stress biomarkers have been recommended as tools to assess the health of aquatic organisms. Though validated in the laboratory, there are few studies that tie a change in gene expression to adverse reproductive or population outcomes in the field. This paper looked at 17 streams with varying degrees of urbanization to assess the use of biomarkers associated with reproduction or stress in predicting reproductive success of fathead minnows. In addition, the relationship between biomarkers and water quality measures in streams with varying degrees of urbanization was examined. Liver vitellogenin mRNA was correlated with reproduction within a period of 11. d prior to sampling irrespective of habitat, but its correlation with egg output declined at 12. d and beyond indicating its usefulness as a short-term biomarker but its limits as a biomarker of total reproductive output. Stress biomarkers such as glutathione S-transferase may be better correlated with factors affecting reproduction over a longer term. There was a significant correlation between GST mRNA and a variety of anthropogenic pollutants. There was also an inverse correlation between glutathione S-transferase and the amount of the watershed designated as wetland. Egg production over the 21-d was negatively correlated with the amount of urbanization and positively correlated to wetland habitats. This study supports the development of multiple biomarkers linking oxidative stress and other non-reproductive endpoints to changes in aquatic habitats will be useful for predicting the health of fish populations and identifying the environmental factors that may need mitigation for sustainable population management. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Virtual Rural Community Development: Human Links That Sustain Web Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, Larry K.; Evans, Wayne H.; Marmet, Kathy

    Outmigration in the rural Upper Midwest prompted a group of citizens and University of South Dakota faculty to form the Center for the Advancement of Rural Communities (ARC). ARC considers how to stimulate traditionally competitive and isolated South Dakota peoples to collaborate for economic, social, educational, political, and cultural gains. As…

  15. Linking Knowledge and Action: PRI's Community Consultant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Gregory P.

    Within the Partnership for Rural Improvement (PRI), community consultants operate within three complex sets of relationships: client groups, the organizational structure of PRI, and the local operational base. Community consultants are responsible for developing and facilitating rural development and for providing assistance in community and…

  16. Linking Knowledge and Action: PRI's Community Consultant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Gregory P.

    Within the Partnership for Rural Improvement (PRI), community consultants operate within three complex sets of relationships: client groups, the organizational structure of PRI, and the local operational base. Community consultants are responsible for developing and facilitating rural development and for providing assistance in community and…

  17. Link community detection using generative model and nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    He, Dongxiao; Jin, Di; Baquero, Carlos; Liu, Dayou

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of communities in complex networks is a fundamental data analysis problem with applications in various domains. While most of the existing approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, recent studies have shown the advantages and uses of link community discovery in networks. Generative models provide a promising class of techniques for the identification of modular structures in networks, but most generative models mainly focus on the detection of node communities rather than link communities. In this work, we propose a generative model, which is based on the importance of each node when forming links in each community, to describe the structure of link communities. We proceed to fit the model parameters by taking it as an optimization problem, and solve it using nonnegative matrix factorization. Thereafter, in order to automatically determine the number of communities, we extend the above method by introducing a strategy of iterative bipartition. This extended method not only finds the number of communities all by itself, but also obtains high efficiency, and thus it is more suitable to deal with large and unexplored real networks. We test this approach on both synthetic benchmarks and real-world networks including an application on a large biological network, and compare it with two highly related methods. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach over competing methods for the detection of link communities.

  18. Link Community Detection Using Generative Model and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongxiao; Jin, Di; Baquero, Carlos; Liu, Dayou

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of communities in complex networks is a fundamental data analysis problem with applications in various domains. While most of the existing approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, recent studies have shown the advantages and uses of link community discovery in networks. Generative models provide a promising class of techniques for the identification of modular structures in networks, but most generative models mainly focus on the detection of node communities rather than link communities. In this work, we propose a generative model, which is based on the importance of each node when forming links in each community, to describe the structure of link communities. We proceed to fit the model parameters by taking it as an optimization problem, and solve it using nonnegative matrix factorization. Thereafter, in order to automatically determine the number of communities, we extend the above method by introducing a strategy of iterative bipartition. This extended method not only finds the number of communities all by itself, but also obtains high efficiency, and thus it is more suitable to deal with large and unexplored real networks. We test this approach on both synthetic benchmarks and real-world networks including an application on a large biological network, and compare it with two highly related methods. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach over competing methods for the detection of link communities. PMID:24489803

  19. Link community detection based on line graphs with a novel link similarity measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guishen; Huang, Lan; Wang, Yan; Pang, Wei; Ma, Qin

    2016-02-01

    Link community gradually unfolds its capacity in complex network research. In this paper, a novel link similarity measure on line graphs is proposed. This measure can be adapted to different types of networks with an adjustable parameter. We prove its value converges to a limit on line graphs with the relationship of the nonneighbor links taken into account. Based on this similarity measure, we propose a novel link community detection algorithm for link clustering on line graphs. The detection algorithm combines the novel link similarity measure with the classic Markov Cluster (MCL) Algorithm and determines the link community partitions by calculating an extended modularity measure. Extensive experiments on two types of complex networks demonstrate the effectiveness, reliability and rationality of our solution in contrast to the other two classical algorithms.

  20. Linking the Classroom to the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlacek, Nancy; Young, Jay A.; Acharya, Chetana; Botta, Dianne; Burbacher, Thomas M.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the Youth Network for Healthy Communities (YNHC). YNHC is a teacher-driven project in Washington State. Through YNHC, students research environmental health issues in their communities and present their findings to other students throughout the state via videoconferencing. YNHC focuses on environmental health science in the…

  1. Strong Community, Deep Learning: Exploring the Link

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Carole; Ramondt, Leonie; Smiley, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    This explores the constructivist understanding that shared practitioner research in collaborative online spaces leads to deeper learning. The research was developed within the context of building the National College of School Leaderships (NCSLs) online learning communities. A community and a learning scale, both emerging through grounded…

  2. Measurement of inflammatory biomarkers in synovial tissue extracts by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, Sanna; Firestein, Gary S; Boyle, David L

    2003-11-01

    We developed methods for measuring inflammatory biomarkers (cytokines, chemokines, and metalloproteinases) in synovial biopsy specimens from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). Soluble extracts of synovial fragments were prepared with mild detergent and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and matrix metalloproteinase 3. The optimal detergent was 0.1% Igepal CA-630, which interfered minimally with ELISA detection but extracted 80% of IL-6 from synovial tissue. Upon spiking, 81 to 107% of added biomarkers could be recovered. To determine within-tissue variability, multiple biopsy specimens from each RA synovial extract were analyzed individually. A resulting coefficient of variation of 35 to 62% indicated that six biopsy specimens per synovial extract would result in a sampling error of < or = 25%. Preliminary power analysis suggested that 8 to 15 patients per group would suffice to observe a threefold difference before and after treatment in a serial biopsy clinical study. The previously described significant differences in IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha levels between RA and OA could be detected, thereby validating the use of synovial extracts for biomarker analysis in arthritis. These methods allow monitoring of biomarker protein levels in synovial tissue and could potentially be applied to early-phase clinical trials to provide a preliminary estimate of drug efficacy.

  3. Linking case management and community development.

    PubMed

    Austin, Carol D; McClelland, Robert W; Gursansky, Di

    2006-01-01

    Case management, in various forms, is now institutionalized as a core part of policy and programs designed to deliver home- and community-based services to older adults. The case management role, in theory, requires attention to both client and system goals, although in practice the system goals that have received most attention have been gatekeeping and resource allocation. While case managers have been admonished to find and develop resources in the community, this has primarily taken the form of including informal services in individual client care plans. What has been missing is focused attention to the potential of the community as a nurturing environment with the capacity to support older adults and their caregivers. Sustainable care for older adults cannot be achieved by formal service and family support alone. This article proposes the creation of linkages between case managers, who build the service arrangements for older people, and community developers, who are responsible for building community capacity and social capital. It is argued that this linkage is essential for establishing the foundations of a caring community with the capacity to support older people.

  4. Active semi-supervised community detection based on must-link and cannot-link constraints.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianjun; Leng, Mingwei; Li, Longjie; Zhou, Hanhai; Chen, Xiaoyun

    2014-01-01

    Community structure detection is of great importance because it can help in discovering the relationship between the function and the topology structure of a network. Many community detection algorithms have been proposed, but how to incorporate the prior knowledge in the detection process remains a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose a semi-supervised community detection algorithm, which makes full utilization of the must-link and cannot-link constraints to guide the process of community detection and thereby extracts high-quality community structures from networks. To acquire the high-quality must-link and cannot-link constraints, we also propose a semi-supervised component generation algorithm based on active learning, which actively selects nodes with maximum utility for the proposed semi-supervised community detection algorithm step by step, and then generates the must-link and cannot-link constraints by accessing a noiseless oracle. Extensive experiments were carried out, and the experimental results show that the introduction of active learning into the problem of community detection makes a success. Our proposed method can extract high-quality community structures from networks, and significantly outperforms other comparison methods.

  5. Communities of Coaches: The Missing Link

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnson, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    Interscholastic coaches have unique needs relative to how they learn their practice and progress toward higher levels of professional comfort and competence. The purpose of this article is to review the professional development needs of interscholastic coaches and suggest the use of social-learning techniques, specifically communities of practice,…

  6. Linking Distance Education to Sustainable Community Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Michael

    This paper explores the emerging relationship between distance education and sustainable development. After ranging through the literature on sustainable community development, this essay concludes that above all it must be unified: it must combine the traditional economic criteria for success (profits and employment) with a fusing of community…

  7. Linking Schools & Community Services: Resource Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mastny, Aleta You, Comp.

    This resource directory begins by asserting that a lack of information sharing across interprofessional disciplines presents a barrier to the development of school-community partnerships. It attempts to address this problem by bringing together a body of information and resources that deal with a variety of social issues. All organizations listed…

  8. Environmental Justice: A Crucial Link between Environmentalism and Community Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Mick

    2002-01-01

    Environmental justice provides a linking theme with which community development workers and environmental activists can build cross-sectoral coalitions. Examples of Australian environmental problems illustrate constraints that must be overcome. Building vertical and horizontal links between and within nongovernmental organizations is one solution.…

  9. Learning Community Link: Enhancing Learning Using Telecommunication Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Michael; Beach, Bonnie; Isman, Aytekin

    1997-01-01

    Telecommunication technologies (computers with Internet/e-mail capabilities, desktop videoconferencing units, and fiber-based video links) provided by the Learning Community Link did indeed expand typical school boundaries and did increase communication possibilities for teachers and students. Using the power of computers to communicate, analyze…

  10. Linking Academic and Community Guidelines for Community-Engaged Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLugan, Robin Maria; Roussos, Stergios; Skram, Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Research universities seeking to promote community-engaged scholarship (CES), defined here as research of mutual benefit to community and academic interests, will discover that it requires capacity building and institutional support. At the University of California at Merced, our 7-year experience in building a new public research university that…

  11. Linked Learning Communities. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Linked learning communities in postsecondary education are programs defined by having social and curricular linkages that provide undergraduate students with intentional integration of the themes and concepts that they are learning. The theory behind these programs is that active learning in a community-based setting can improve academic outcomes…

  12. Collaborative Links with the Community: Lessons from Exemplary Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bruce L.; Rossman, Gretchen B.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the Department of Education's Secondary Schools Recognition Program shows that exemplary secondary schools often have formed collaborative links with their communities. The five ways schools do this are: recruiting volunteers, aggressive public relations, attracting financial resources, school members volunteering in the community, and…

  13. Home-School Links: Networking the Learning Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    The topic of networking the learning community with home-school links is addressed in four papers: "Internet Access via School: Expectations of Students and Parents" (Roy Crotty); "The School Library as Community Information Gateway" (Megan Perry); "Rural Access to the Internet" (Ken Eustace); and "NetDay '96:…

  14. Linking symbiont community structures in a model arbuscular mycorrhizal system.

    PubMed

    Meadow, James F; Zabinski, Catherine A

    2012-05-01

    • The influence of plant communities on symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities is difficult to study in situ as both symbionts are strongly influenced by some of the same soil and environmental conditions, and thus we have a poor understanding of the potential links in community composition and structure between host and fungal communities. • AMF were characterized in colonized roots of thermal soil Mimulus guttatus in both isolated plants supporting AMF for only a few months of the growing season and plants growing in mixed plant communities composed of annual and perennial hosts. Cluster and discriminant analysis were used to compare competing models based on either communities or soil conditions. • Mimulus guttatus in adjacent contrasting plant community situations harbored distinct AMF communities with few fungal taxa occurring in both community types. Isolated plants harbored communities of fewer fungal taxa with lower diversity than plants in mixed communities. Host community type was more indicative than pH of AMF community structure. • Our results support an inherent relationship between host plant and AMF community structures, although pH-based models were also statistically supported. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Biomarkers in community-acquired pneumonia: A state-of-the-art review

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Renato; Ramos-Lima, Luis Francisco; do Amaral Oliveira, Vivian; Sanvicente, Carina; Pacheco, Elyara F.; Rosa, Karoline Dalla

    2012-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) exhibits mortality rates, between 20% and 50% in severe cases. Biomarkers are useful tools for searching for antibiotic therapy modifications and for CAP diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up treatment. This non-systematic state-of-the-art review presents the biological and clinical features of biomarkers in CAP patients, including procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, copeptin, pro-ANP (atrial natriuretic peptide), adrenomedullin, cortisol and D-dimers. PMID:23184211

  16. Linked Vocabulary API for the Earth Sciences Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zednik, S.; Fox, P. A.; Fu, L.; West, P.; Ma, X.

    2014-12-01

    The Linked Vocabulary API is a specification for publishing RESTful APIs of vocabularies represented in the Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) as Linked Data on the web. This work began as part of the Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Vocabularies (CMSPV) project in response to the need for a standard manner for agencies to publish and consume hierarchical vocabularies on the web. The RESTful architecture of the API provides a simple mechanism for consumption of full vocabularies, single vocabulary terms, related terms, and searches on terms. The Linked Data nature of the API promotes interoperability by exposing vocabulary resources as resolvable URIs that may be referenced from other vocabularies or sources of Linked Data and by allowing the published vocabulary to contain references as links to terms from other vocabularies. The Linked Vocabulary API is formally defined in a Linked Data API specification and may be deployed using standard implementations of the Linked Data API such as the Epimorphics Linked Data API (ELDA). Recent presentations of work done with the Linked Vocabulary API as part of the CMSPV project have resulted in the API receiving growing interest from the broader scientific community. In this contribution we present the Linked Vocabulary API design and deployment process.

  17. Towards precision medicine: discovering novel gynecological cancer biomarkers and pathways using linked data.

    PubMed

    Jha, Alokkumar; Khan, Yasar; Mehdi, Muntazir; Karim, Md Rezaul; Mehmood, Qaiser; Zappa, Achille; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich; Sahay, Ratnesh

    2017-09-19

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is playing a key role in therapeutic decision making for the cancer prognosis and treatment. The NGS technologies are producing a massive amount of sequencing datasets. Often, these datasets are published from the isolated and different sequencing facilities. Consequently, the process of sharing and aggregating multisite sequencing datasets are thwarted by issues such as the need to discover relevant data from different sources, built scalable repositories, the automation of data linkage, the volume of the data, efficient querying mechanism, and information rich intuitive visualisation. We present an approach to link and query different sequencing datasets (TCGA, COSMIC, REACTOME, KEGG and GO) to indicate risks for four cancer types - Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma (OV), Uterine Corpus Endometrial Carcinoma (UCEC), Uterine Carcinosarcoma (UCS), Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Endocervical Adenocarcinoma (CESC) - covering the 16 healthy tissue-specific genes from Illumina Human Body Map 2.0. The differentially expressed genes from Illumina Human Body Map 2.0 are analysed together with the gene expressions reported in COSMIC and TCGA repositories leading to the discover of potential biomarkers for a tissue-specific cancer. We analyse the tissue expression of genes, copy number variation (CNV), somatic mutation, and promoter methylation to identify associated pathways and find novel biomarkers. We discovered twenty (20) mutated genes and three (3) potential pathways causing promoter changes in different gynaecological cancer types. We propose a data-interlinked platform called BIOOPENER that glues together heterogeneous cancer and biomedical repositories. The key approach is to find correspondences (or data links) among genetic, cellular and molecular features across isolated cancer datasets giving insight into cancer progression from normal to diseased tissues. The proposed BIOOPENER platform enriches mutations by filling in

  18. Biomarker reconstruction of phytoplankton productivity and community structure changes in the Japan Sea over the last 166 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, L.; Zhang, R.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; Shi, X.; Zhao, M.

    2009-12-01

    Glacial/interglacial changes in surface hydrography and sea level caused the drastic variations of ocean circulation and ecosystem structure in the Japan Sea. Previous reconstructions of ecosystem structure using microfossils revealed increases in productivity and a shift from calcareous to siliceous plankton during the last two glacial to interglacial transitions. Muti-biomarkers are analyzed to further study the changes in productivity and phytoplankton community structure in the Japan Sea over the last 166 ka. The following biomarkers are used as productivity proxies: brassicasterol for diatoms, C37:2+C37:3 alkenones for coccolithophorids, dinosterol for dinoflagellates, cholesterol for zooplankton. The reconstructed SST oscillated between 3.8 and 21.5°C with maximum values during MIS 5.3 and minimum values during MIS 6. During the last 166 ka, the content of brassicasterol varied between 15.7 ng/g and 5552 ng/g, dinosterol between 8.9 and 1297 ng/g, alkenones between 24.5 and 20179 ng/g, their total contents (as an indicator of marine organic matter) varied between 45.9 and 23354.5 ng/g. The content of n-alkanols (C28OH+C30OH+C32OH) ( as a proxy for terrestrial organic matter input) ranged from 569 to 17504 ng/g. The marine organic matter to terrestrial organic matter ratio varied between 0.03 and 2.64. Biomarker records indicate high content values occurred during both glacial periods and interglacial periods, but the ratios of marine to terrestrial organic matter were generally higher during interglacial periods. High biomarker contents during interglacials are interpreted to be caused by high productivity, whereas high contents during glacials were related to better preservation of organic matters due to euxinic conditions. In contrast to previous results, our biomarker records reveal a shift from a diatom-dominated phytoplankton community during the glacials to a coccolithophorid-dominated community during the interglacials. The glacial decrease in

  19. Community Websites: Linking the Personal to Urban History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wildt, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    New technology enables museums and other heritage institutions to establish more personal links with their audience, and hopefully by doing so make history more compelling to them. The author explores some Dutch practices with interactive community websites and other ways of making connections between personal stories and urban history.

  20. Community Websites: Linking the Personal to Urban History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wildt, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    New technology enables museums and other heritage institutions to establish more personal links with their audience, and hopefully by doing so make history more compelling to them. The author explores some Dutch practices with interactive community websites and other ways of making connections between personal stories and urban history.

  1. Addition of Inflammatory Biomarkers Did Not Improve Diabetes Prediction in the Community: The Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Dallmeier, Dhayana; Larson, Martin G.; Wang, Na; Fontes, João D.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Prior studies have reported conflicting findings with regard to the association of biomarkers in the prediction of incident type 2 diabetes. We evaluated 12 biomarkers as possible diabetes predictors in the Framingham Heart Study. Methods and Results Biomarkers representing inflammation (C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor receptor 2, osteoprotegerin, and fibrinogen), endothelial dysfunction (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), vascular damage (CD40-ligand, P-selectin, and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 mass and activity), and oxidative stress (urinary isoprostanes) were measured in participants without diabetes attending the Offspring seventh (n=2499) or multiethnic Omni second (n=189) examination (1998–2001). Biomarkers were loge transformed and standardized. Multivariable logistic regression tested each biomarker in association with incident diabetes at a follow-up examination (the Offspring eighth and Omni third examination; mean 6.6 years later), with adjustment for age, sex, cohort, body mass index, fasting glucose, systolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and smoking. C statistics were evaluated with and without inflammatory markers. In 2638 participants (56% women, mean age 59 years), 162 (6.1%) developed type 2 diabetes. All biomarkers, excluding osteoprotegerin, were associated with the outcome with adjustment for age, sex, and cohort; however, none remained significant after multivariable adjustment (all P>0.05). The c statistic from the model including only clinical covariates (0.89) did not statistically significantly improve after addition of biomarkers (all P>0.10). Conclusions Biomarkers representing different inflammatory pathways are associated with incident diabetes but do not remain statistically significant after adjustment for established clinical covariates. Inflammatory biomarkers might not be an effective resource to predict

  2. Community detection in networks with positive and negative links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traag, V. A.; Bruggeman, Jeroen

    2009-09-01

    Detecting communities in complex networks accurately is a prime challenge, preceding further analyses of network characteristics and dynamics. Until now, community detection took into account only positively valued links, while many actual networks also feature negative links. We extend an existing Potts model to incorporate negative links as well, resulting in a method similar to the clustering of signed graphs, as dealt with in social balance theory, but more general. To illustrate our method, we applied it to a network of international alliances and disputes. Using data from 1993-2001, it turns out that the world can be divided into six power blocs similar to Huntington’s civilizations, with some notable exceptions.

  3. Linking environmental variability to population and community dynamics: Chapter 7

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pantel, Jelena H.; Pendleton, Daniel E.; Walters, Annika W.; Rogers, Lauren A.

    2014-01-01

    Linking population and community responses to environmental variability lies at the heart of ecology, yet methodological approaches vary and existence of broad patterns spanning taxonomic groups remains unclear. We review the characteristics of environmental and biological variability. Classic approaches to link environmental variability to population and community variability are discussed as are the importance of biotic factors such as life history and community interactions. In addition to classic approaches, newer techniques such as information theory and artificial neural networks are reviewed. The establishment and expansion of observing networks will provide new long-term ecological time-series data, and with it, opportunities to incorporate environmental variability into research. This review can help guide future research in the field of ecological and environmental variability.

  4. Linking pediatric primary care obesity management to community programs.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adolfo J; Hartman, Jennifer; Grodecki, Jennifer; Clavier, Alejandro; Ghaey, Kamala; Elsner, Mary; Moore, Chantal; Reina, Olga Ochoa; Binns, Helen J

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for obesity management in primary care call for linking to community services. The Promoting Health Project (PHP) was a multi-component, practice-based intervention aimed at improving care of obese children, including referrals to community services. Promoting Health Project staff identified and interviewed representatives of 40 nutrition or physical activity services/programs. Quality improvement (QI) teams at three practices worked to improve overweight/obesity identification and care and implement practice-to-community connections that used the information gathered from the programs/ services. A practice community coordinator (PCC) facilitated interactions between practices, community programs and families. Researchers tracked patients referred, PCC to family interactions, and time spent. They surveyed parents of referred patients and interviewed key clinicians. Forty-six patients participated in programs. Substantial efforts were necessary to create smooth referral systems. Family motivation was perceived as a limiting factor in program attendance. Clinicians were satisfied with systems established. Effectively linking practitioners to community programs requires the use of additional resources.

  5. Watershed Urbanization Linked to Differences in Stream Bacterial Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Hosen, Jacob D.; Febria, Catherine M.; Crump, Byron C.; Palmer, Margaret A.

    2017-01-01

    Urbanization strongly influences headwater stream chemistry and hydrology, but little is known about how these conditions impact bacterial community composition. We predicted that urbanization would impact bacterial community composition, but that stream water column bacterial communities would be most strongly linked to urbanization at a watershed-scale, as measured by impervious cover, while sediment bacterial communities would correlate with environmental conditions at the scale of stream reaches. To test this hypothesis, we determined bacterial community composition in the water column and sediment of headwater streams located across a gradient of watershed impervious cover using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Alpha diversity metrics did not show a strong response to catchment urbanization, but beta diversity was significantly related to watershed impervious cover with significant differences also found between water column and sediment samples. Samples grouped primarily according to habitat—water column vs. sediment—with a significant response to watershed impervious cover nested within each habitat type. Compositional shifts for communities in urbanized streams indicated an increase in taxa associated with human activity including bacteria from the genus Polynucleobacter, which is widespread, but has been associated with eutrophic conditions in larger water bodies. Another indicator of communities in urbanized streams was an OTU from the genus Gallionella, which is linked to corrosion of water distribution systems. To identify changes in bacterial community interactions, bacterial co-occurrence networks were generated from urban and forested samples. The urbanized co-occurrence network was much smaller and had fewer co-occurrence events per taxon than forested equivalents, indicating a loss of keystone taxa with urbanization. Our results suggest that urbanization has significant impacts on the community composition of headwater streams

  6. Active link selection for efficient semi-supervised community detection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liang; Jin, Di; Wang, Xiao; Cao, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Several semi-supervised community detection algorithms have been proposed recently to improve the performance of traditional topology-based methods. However, most of them focus on how to integrate supervised information with topology information; few of them pay attention to which information is critical for performance improvement. This leads to large amounts of demand for supervised information, which is expensive or difficult to obtain in most fields. For this problem we propose an active link selection framework, that is we actively select the most uncertain and informative links for human labeling for the efficient utilization of the supervised information. We also disconnect the most likely inter-community edges to further improve the efficiency. Our main idea is that, by connecting uncertain nodes to their community hubs and disconnecting the inter-community edges, one can sharpen the block structure of adjacency matrix more efficiently than randomly labeling links as the existing methods did. Experiments on both synthetic and real networks demonstrate that our new approach significantly outperforms the existing methods in terms of the efficiency of using supervised information. It needs ~13% of the supervised information to achieve a performance similar to that of the original semi-supervised approaches. PMID:25761385

  7. Linking community size structure and ecosystem functioning using metabolic theory.

    PubMed

    Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Allen, Andrew P

    2012-11-05

    Understanding how biogeochemical cycles relate to the structure of ecological communities is a central research question in ecology. Here we approach this problem by focusing on body size, which is an easily measured species trait that has a pervasive influence on multiple aspects of community structure and ecosystem functioning. We test the predictions of a model derived from metabolic theory using data on ecosystem metabolism and community size structure. These data were collected as part of an aquatic mesocosm experiment that was designed to simulate future environmental warming. Our analyses demonstrate significant linkages between community size structure and ecosystem functioning, and the effects of warming on these links. Specifically, we show that carbon fluxes were significantly influenced by seasonal variation in temperature, and yielded activation energies remarkably similar to those predicted based on the temperature dependencies of individual-level photosynthesis and respiration. We also show that community size structure significantly influenced fluxes of ecosystem respiration and gross primary production, particularly at the annual time-scale. Assessing size structure and the factors that control it, both empirically and theoretically, therefore promises to aid in understanding links between individual organisms and biogeochemical cycles, and in predicting the responses of key ecosystem functions to future environmental change.

  8. Public participation and marginalized groups: the community development model [Link

    PubMed Central

    O’Keefe, Eileen; Hogg, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To develop ways of reaching house‐bound people and enabling them to give their views in planning and monitoring health and social care. Strategy HealthLINK – a project based in a community health council – explored ways of involving older house‐bound people in the London Borough of Camden, in planning and monitoring health and social care using community development techniques. Results HealthLINK set up an infrastructure to enable house‐bound people to have access to information and to enable them to give their views. This resulted in access for health and local authorities to the views of house‐bound older people and increased the self esteem and quality of life of those who became involved. Conclusions Community development approaches that enable an infrastructure to be established may be an effective way of reaching marginalized communities. However, there are tensions in this approach between the different requirements for public involvement of statutory bodies and of users, and between representation of groups and listening to individual voices. PMID:11281901

  9. Community detection, link prediction, and layer interdependence in multilayer networks.

    PubMed

    De Bacco, Caterina; Power, Eleanor A; Larremore, Daniel B; Moore, Cristopher

    2017-04-01

    Complex systems are often characterized by distinct types of interactions between the same entities. These can be described as a multilayer network where each layer represents one type of interaction. These layers may be interdependent in complicated ways, revealing different kinds of structure in the network. In this work we present a generative model, and an efficient expectation-maximization algorithm, which allows us to perform inference tasks such as community detection and link prediction in this setting. Our model assumes overlapping communities that are common between the layers, while allowing these communities to affect each layer in a different way, including arbitrary mixtures of assortative, disassortative, or directed structure. It also gives us a mathematically principled way to define the interdependence between layers, by measuring how much information about one layer helps us predict links in another layer. In particular, this allows us to bundle layers together to compress redundant information and identify small groups of layers which suffice to predict the remaining layers accurately. We illustrate these findings by analyzing synthetic data and two real multilayer networks, one representing social support relationships among villagers in South India and the other representing shared genetic substring material between genes of the malaria parasite.

  10. Community detection, link prediction, and layer interdependence in multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bacco, Caterina; Power, Eleanor A.; Larremore, Daniel B.; Moore, Cristopher

    2017-04-01

    Complex systems are often characterized by distinct types of interactions between the same entities. These can be described as a multilayer network where each layer represents one type of interaction. These layers may be interdependent in complicated ways, revealing different kinds of structure in the network. In this work we present a generative model, and an efficient expectation-maximization algorithm, which allows us to perform inference tasks such as community detection and link prediction in this setting. Our model assumes overlapping communities that are common between the layers, while allowing these communities to affect each layer in a different way, including arbitrary mixtures of assortative, disassortative, or directed structure. It also gives us a mathematically principled way to define the interdependence between layers, by measuring how much information about one layer helps us predict links in another layer. In particular, this allows us to bundle layers together to compress redundant information and identify small groups of layers which suffice to predict the remaining layers accurately. We illustrate these findings by analyzing synthetic data and two real multilayer networks, one representing social support relationships among villagers in South India and the other representing shared genetic substring material between genes of the malaria parasite.

  11. Inflammatory biomarkers as predictors of hospitalization and death in community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Salanitro, Amanda H; Ritchie, Christine S; Hovater, Martha; Roth, David L; Sawyer, Patricia; Locher, Julie L; Bodner, Eric; Brown, Cynthia J; Allman, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with multimorbidity may be at increased risk of hospitalization and death. Comorbidity indexes do not capture severity of illness or healthcare utilization; however, inflammation biomarkers that are not disease-specific may predict hospitalization and death in older adults. We sought to predict hospitalization and mortality of older adults using inflammation biomarkers. From a prospective, observational study, 370 community-dwelling adults 65 years or older from central Alabama participated in an in-home assessment and provided fasting blood samples for inflammation biomarker testing in 2004. We calculated an inflammation summary score (range 0-4), one point each for low albumin, high C-reactive protein, low cholesterol, and high interleukin-6. Utilizing Cox proportional hazards models, inflammation summary scores were used to predicted time to hospitalization and death during a 4-year follow up period. The mean age was 73.7 (±5.9 yrs), and 53 (14%) participants had summary scores of 3 or 4. The rates of dying were significantly increased for participants with inflammation summary scores of 2, 3, or 4 (hazard ratio (HR) 2.22, 2.78, and 7.55, respectively; p<0.05). An inflammation summary score of 4 significantly predicted hospitalization (HR 5.92, p<0.05). Community-dwelling older adults with biomarkers positive for inflammation had increased rates of being hospitalized or dying during the follow up period. Assessment of the individual contribution of particular inflammation biomarkers in the prediction of health outcomes in older populations and the development of validated summary scores to predict morbidity and mortality are needed.

  12. Linking ‘toxic outliers’ to environmental justice communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Mary B.; Munoz, Ian; JaJa, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Several key studies have found that a small minority of producers, polluting at levels far exceeding group averages, generate the majority of overall exposure to industrial toxics. Frequently, such patterns go unnoticed and are understudied outside of the academic community. To our knowledge, no research to date has systematically described the scope and extent of extreme variations in industrially based exposure estimates and sought to link inequities in harm produced to inequities in exposure. In an analysis of all permitted industrial facilities across the United States, we show that there exists a class of hyper-polluters—the worst-of-the-worst—that disproportionately expose communities of color and low income populations to chemical releases. This study hopes to move beyond a traditional environmental justice research frame, bringing new computational methods and perspectives aimed at the empirical study of societal power dynamics. Our findings suggest the possibility that substantial environmental gains may be made through selective environmental enforcement, rather than sweeping initiatives.

  13. Linking sub-cellular biomarkers to embryo aberrations in the benthic amphipod Monoporeia affinis.

    PubMed

    Reutgard, Martin; Furuhagen, Sara

    2016-04-01

    To adequately assess and monitor environmental status in the aquatic environment a broad approach is needed that integrates physical variables, chemical analyses and biological effects at different levels of the biological organization. Embryo aberrations in the Baltic Sea key species Monoporeia affinis can be induced by both metals and organic substances as well as by hypoxia, increasing temperatures and malnutrition. This amphipod has therefore been used for more than three decades as a biological effect indicator in monitoring and assessment of chemical pollution and environmental stress. However, little is known about the sub-cellular mechanisms underlying embryo aberrations. An improved mechanistic understanding may open up the possibility of including sub-cellular alterations as sensitive warning signals of stress-induced embryo aberrations. In the present study, M. affinis was exposed in microcosms to 4 different sediments from the Baltic Sea. After 88-95 days of exposure, survival and fecundity were determined as well as the frequency and type of embryo aberrations. Moreover, oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC) was assayed as a proxy for antioxidant defense, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level as a measure of lipid peroxidation and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity as an indicator of neurotoxicity. The results show that AChE and ORAC can be linked to the frequency of malformed embryos and arrested embryo development. The occurrence of dead broods was significantly associated with elevated TBARS levels. It can be concluded that these sub-cellular biomarkers are indicative of effects that could affect Darwinian fitness and that oxidative stress is a likely mechanism in the development of aberrant embryos in M. affinis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An electronic medical record-linked biorepository to identify novel biomarkers for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zi; Kalloo, Fara S; Dalenberg, Angela K.; Kullo, Iftikhar J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVD), a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, is increasing in prevalence in the developing world. We describe an approach to establish a biorepository linked to medical records with the eventual goal of facilitating discovery of biomarkers for AVD. Methods: The Vascular Disease Biorepository at Mayo Clinic was established to archive DNA, plasma, and serum from patients with suspected AVD. AVD phenotypes, relevant risk factors and comorbid conditions were ascertained by electronic medical record (EMR)-based electronic algorithms that included diagnosis and procedure codes, laboratory data and text searches to ascertain medication use. Results: Up to December 2012, 8800 patients referred for vascular ultrasound examination and non-invasive lower extremity arterial evaluation were approached, of whom 5268 consented. The mean age of the initial 2182 patients recruited was 70.4 ± 11.2 years, 62.6% were men and 97.6% were whites. The prevalences of AVD phenotypes were: carotid artery stenosis 48%, abdominal aortic aneurysm 21% and peripheral arterial disease 38%. Positive predictive values for electronic phenotyping algorithms were>0.90 for cases (and>0.95 for controls) for each AVD phenotype, using manual review of the EMR as the gold standard. The prevalences of risk factors and comorbidities were as follows: hypertension 78%, diabetes 29%, dyslipidemia 73%, smoking 70%, coronary heart disease 37%, heart failure 12%, cerebrovascular disease 20% and chronic kidney disease 19%. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates the feasibility of establishing a biorepository of plasma, serum and DNA, with relatively rapid annotation of clinical variables using EMR-based algorithms. PMID:24689004

  15. HomeLink Support Technologies at Community Living Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Derek D.

    2013-01-01

    What if your existing home could be made smarter and detect when you need support? What if there was a new way to deliver care to you right when you needed and only for as long as necessary? These questions, and others like them, have guided Community Living Opportunities, Inc. (CLO) in the innovation of service delivery methods. In concert with HomeLink Support Technologies, CLO has pioneered technology that revolutionizes the manner with which services are delivered to adults with disabilities. PMID:25729510

  16. Linking xenobiotic exposure to adverse biological effects in ecotoxicological assessments: The role of biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.E.; Collier, T.K.; Johnson, L.L.; Casillas, E.; Arkoosh, M.A.; Varanasi, U.

    1995-12-31

    Biomarkers of contaminant exposure have been developed and are being successfully applied to a wide range of aquatic species. To improve the utility of biomarkers in the practical assessment of the impact of xenobiotics on aspects of ecosystem integrity requires the identification of biomarkers that are also indicators of adverse physiological effect. Moreover, it is important to determine if the use of biomarkers can improve the ability to diagnose potential adverse effects at the population level. Currently, the authors are evaluating the potential of a battery of molecular and cellular biomarkers in both fish and invertebrates to strengthen linkages between exposure and effects on growth, reproduction and survival of marine species. Concerted field and laboratory studies are employed to delineate dose-response for biomarkers, identify levels at which effects are observed in indigenous species, and to substantiate causality between exposure and the above physiological effects. However, to identify further causal relationships between physiological effects on individuals and population level impacts that are associated with xenobiotic exposure is currently a significant challenge. Their current efforts are focusing on constructing population models using estimates of mortality and reproductive success in a benthic fish, and on constructing population growth curves for a bivalve. Both species were sampled from a range of contaminated sites in Puget Sound, WA, and analyses included measurement of biomarkers to identify or strengthen associations between exposure and estimated population level impacts. Overall, these recent findings demonstrate that properly validated biomarkers are useful in substantiating linkages between environmental contamination and physiological effects that may lead to adverse population level impacts.

  17. Links between plant community composition, soil organic matter quality and microbial communities in contrasting tundra habitats.

    PubMed

    Eskelinen, Anu; Stark, Sari; Männistö, Minna

    2009-08-01

    Plant communities, soil organic matter and microbial communities are predicted to be interlinked and to exhibit concordant patterns along major environmental gradients. We investigated the relationships between plant functional type composition, soil organic matter quality and decomposer community composition, and how these are related to major environmental variation in non-acid and acid soils derived from calcareous versus siliceous bedrocks, respectively. We analysed vegetation, organic matter and microbial community compositions from five non-acidic and five acidic heath sites in alpine tundra in northern Europe. Sequential organic matter fractionation was used to characterize organic matter quality and phospholipid fatty acid analysis to detect major variation in decomposer communities. Non-acidic and acidic heaths differed substantially in vegetation composition, and these disparities were associated with congruent shifts in soil organic matter and microbial communities. A high proportion of forbs in the vegetation was positively associated with low C:N and high soluble N:phenolics ratios in soil organic matter, and a high proportion of bacteria in the microbial community. On the contrary, dwarf shrub-rich vegetation was associated with high C:N and low soluble N:phenolics ratios, and a high proportion of fungi in the microbial community. Our study demonstrates a strong link between the plant community composition, soil organic matter quality, and microbial community composition, and that differences in one compartment are paralleled by changes in others. Variation in the forb-shrub gradient of vegetation may largely dictate variations in the chemical quality of organic matter and decomposer communities in tundra ecosystems. Soil pH, through its direct and indirect effects on plant and microbial communities, seems to function as an ultimate environmental driver that gives rise to and amplifies the interactions between above- and belowground systems.

  18. A biomarker record of temperature and phytoplankton community in Okinawa Trough since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Jiaping

    2017-04-01

    A variety of biomarkers were examined from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) core 1202B to reconstruct temperature and phytoplankton community structures in the southern Okinawa Trough for the past ca. 20000 years. Two molecular temperature proxies (Uk37 and TEX86) show 5-6 ℃ warming during the glacial/interglacial transition. Prior to the Holocene, the Uk37-derived temperature was generally 1-4 ℃ higher than TEX86-derived temperature. This difference, however, was reduced to <1 ℃ in the Holocene when the Kuroshio Current was intensified. Correspondingly, the phytoplankton biomarkers (e.g., C37:2 alkenone, brassicasterol, C30 1,15-diols and dinosterol) suggest a shift of planktonic community assemblages with coccolithophorids becoming more abundant in the Holocene at the expense of diatoms/dinoflagellates. Such a shift is related to the variability of nutrient, temperature and salinity in the Okinawa Trough, controlled by the sea level and the intensity of Kuroshio Current. The phytoplankton community change may have profound implications on atmospheric CO2 fluctuations during glacial/interglacial cycles since diatoms and dinoflagellates have a higher efficiency of biological pump than coccolithophorids.

  19. Community-based knowledge transfer and exchange: Helping community-based organizations link research to action

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Community-based organizations (CBOs) are important stakeholders in health systems and are increasingly called upon to use research evidence to inform their advocacy, program planning, and service delivery efforts. CBOs increasingly turn to community-based research (CBR) given its participatory focus and emphasis on linking research to action. In order to further facilitate the use of research evidence by CBOs, we have developed a strategy for community-based knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) that helps CBOs more effectively link research evidence to action. We developed the strategy by: outlining the primary characteristics of CBOs and why they are important stakeholders in health systems; describing the concepts and methods for CBR and for KTE; comparing the efforts of CBR to link research evidence to action to those discussed in the KTE literature; and using the comparison to develop a framework for community-based KTE that builds on both the strengths of CBR and existing KTE frameworks. Discussion We find that CBR is particularly effective at fostering a climate for using research evidence and producing research evidence relevant to CBOs through community participation. However, CBOs are not always as engaged in activities to link research evidence to action on a larger scale or to evaluate these efforts. Therefore, our strategy for community-based KTE focuses on: an expanded model of 'linkage and exchange' (i.e., producers and users of researchers engaging in a process of asking and answering questions together); a greater emphasis on both producing and disseminating systematic reviews that address topics of interest to CBOs; developing a large-scale evidence service consisting of both 'push' efforts and efforts to facilitate 'pull' that highlight actionable messages from community relevant systematic reviews in a user-friendly way; and rigorous evaluations of efforts for linking research evidence to action. Summary Through this type of strategy

  20. Interplay of community dynamics, temperature, and productivity on the hydrogen isotope signatures of lipid biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiah Ladd, S.; Dubois, Nathalie; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition (δ2H) of lipid biomarkers has diverse applications in the fields of paleoclimatology, biogeochemistry, and microbial community dynamics. Large changes in hydrogen isotope fractionation have been observed among microbes with differing core metabolisms, while environmental factors including temperature and nutrient availability can affect isotope fractionation by photoautotrophs. Much effort has gone into studying these effects under laboratory conditions with single species cultures. Moving beyond controlled environments and quantifying the natural extent of these changes in freshwater lacustrine settings and identifying their causes is essential for robust application of δ2H values of common short-chain fatty acids as a proxy of net community metabolism and of phytoplankton-specific biomarkers as a paleohydrologic proxy. This work targets the effect of community dynamics, temperature, and productivity on 2H/1H fractionation in lipid biomarkers through a comparative time series in two central Swiss lakes: eutrophic Lake Greifen and oligotrophic Lake Lucerne. Particulate organic matter was collected from surface waters at six time points throughout the spring and summer of 2015, and δ2H values of short-chain fatty acids, as well as chlorophyll-derived phytol and the diatom biomarker brassicasterol, were measured. We paired these measurements with in situ incubations conducted with NaH13CO3, which were used to calculate the production rates of individual lipids in lake surface water. As algal productivity increased from April to June, net discrimination against 2H in Lake Greifen increased by as much as 148 ‰ for individual fatty acids. During the same time period in Lake Lucerne, net discrimination against 2H increased by as much as 58 ‰ for individual fatty acids. A large portion of this signal is likely due to a greater proportion of heterotrophically derived fatty acids in the winter and early spring, which are displaced by

  1. Biomarkers of Delirium in a Low-Risk Community-Acquired Pneumonia-Induced Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, Cristiane Damiani; Vuolo, Francieli; Generoso, Jaqueline; Soares, Márcio; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, João; Ritter, Cristiane; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    There are different theories about the pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE), and the majority of our knowledge was derived from critically ill patients. 7In less severe sepsis, it is probable that neuroinflammation can be a major aspect of SAE development. We hypothesized that in non-severe septic patients, blood biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial activation, coagulation, and brain function would be different when compared to patients with and without brain dysfunction. A total of 30 patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)-induced sepsis were included of which 10 (33 %) developed SAE. Eight medical patients admitted to the general ward, except due to sepsis or infection, which developed delirium were included as delirium, non-sepsis group. From all measured biomarkers, only brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTES), and interleukin (IL)-10 where significantly different when compared to SAE and sepsis groups. In addition, SAE patients presented higher levels of BDNF, vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB/BB and RANTES when compared to delirium patients. In conclusion, the profile of biomarkers differs between SAE, sepsis, and delirium patients, suggesting that pathways related to SAE are different from delirium and from sepsis itself.

  2. Microphytobenthos biomass and community composition studied by pigment biomarkers: importance and fate in the carbon cycle of a tidal flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranguet, C.; Herman, P. M. J.; Sinke, J. J.

    1997-12-01

    Microphytobenthos biomass and community composition were studied by the use of pigment biomarkers during one year at a tidal flat located in the Westerschelde (SW Netherlands). Benthic microphytes appeared to be an important carbon source in the Westerschelde, especially in the central part of the flat with a mean biomass as high as 65 mg Chl a m -2 in the superficial 1 mm of sediment. Diatoms (fucoxanthin, Chl c) dominated the population during both spring and autumn blooms. In summer microphytobenthic biomass decreased, and diatoms coexisted with Cyanobacteria (zeaxanthin) and Euglenophyceae (Chl b, zeaxanthin and lutein). The shift in the community composition may possibly be linked with the decrease in silicon concentration in the overlying water. The degradation and recycling of microphytobenthic biomass was assessed by the study of degraded chlorophyll pigments, and pigments in deeper sediment layers. The fate of microphytobenthos appears to include rapid bacterial degradation in spring, episodic grazing by benthic animals in surface layers of sediments in the centre of the flat, and export by resuspension in sediments more exposed to currents.

  3. Multiple Inflammatory Biomarkers in Relation to Cardiovascular Events and Mortality in the Community

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Renate B.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Larson, Martin G.; Yamamoto, Jennifer F.; Fontes, João D.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rong, Jian; Levy, Daniel; Keaney, John F.; Wang, Thomas J.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that chronic low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress are related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Approach and Results We examined 11 established and novel biomarkers representing inflammation and oxidative stress (C-reactive protein [CRP], fibrinogen, interleukin-6, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (mass and activity), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, myeloperoxidase, CD40 ligand, P-selectin, tumor necrosis factor receptor II [TNFRII]) in relation to incident major CVD and mortality in the community. We studied 3035 participants (mean age 61±9 years, 53% women). During follow-up (median 8.9 years), 253 participants experienced a CVD event and 343 died. CRP (hazard ratios [HR] reported per standard deviation ln-transformed biomarker, 1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.35; nominal P=0.02) and TNFRII (HR 1.15, 95% CI; 1.01-1.32; nominal P=0.04) were retained in multivariable-adjusted models for major CVD, but were not significant after adjustment for multiple testing. The biomarkers related to mortality were TNFRII (HR 1.33, 95% CI: 1.19-1.49; P<0.0001); ICAM-1 (HR 1.24, 95% CI: 1.12-1.37; P<0.0001), and interleukin-6 (HR 1.25, 95% CI: 1.12-1.39; P<0.0001). The addition of these markers to the model including traditional risk factors increased discrimination and reclassification for risk of death (P<0.0001), but not for CVD. Conclusions Of 11 biomarkers, TNFRII was associated nominally with incident major CVD, and significantly with all-cause mortality, which renders it an interesting target for future research. The combination of TNFRII with CRP in relation to CVD and with interleukin-6 to mortality increased the predictive ability in addition to CVD risk factors for total mortality but not for incident CVD. PMID:23640499

  4. Cytokines and Chemokines as Biomarkers of Community-Acquired Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, David A.; Andersen, Nancy; Beran, Ondřej; Marešová, Vilma

    2013-01-01

    Routinely used biomarkers of bacterial etiology of infection, such as C-reactive protein and procalcitonin, have limited usefulness for evaluation of infections since their expression is enhanced by a number of different conditions. Therefore, several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were analyzed with sera from patients hospitalized for moderate bacterial and viral infectious diseases. In total, 57 subjects were enrolled: 21 patients with community-acquired bacterial infections, 26 patients with viral infections, and 10 healthy subjects (control cohorts). The laboratory analyses were performed using Luminex technology, and the following molecules were examined: IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, INF-γ, MIP-1β, and MCP-1. Bacterial etiology of infection was associated with significantly (P < 0.001) elevated serum concentrations of IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α in comparison to levels observed in the sera of patients with viral infections. In the patients with bacterial infections, IL-1Ra and IL-8 demonstrated positive correlation with C-reactive protein, whereas, IL-1Ra, TNF-α, and MCP-1 correlated with procalcitonin. Furthermore, elevated levels of IL-1Ra, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased within 3 days of antibiotic therapy to levels observed in control subjects. The results show IL-1Ra as a potential useful biomarker of community-acquired bacterial infection. PMID:23690657

  5. Cytokines and chemokines as biomarkers of community-acquired bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Holub, Michal; Lawrence, David A; Andersen, Nancy; Davidová, Alžběta; Beran, Ondřej; Marešová, Vilma; Chalupa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Routinely used biomarkers of bacterial etiology of infection, such as C-reactive protein and procalcitonin, have limited usefulness for evaluation of infections since their expression is enhanced by a number of different conditions. Therefore, several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were analyzed with sera from patients hospitalized for moderate bacterial and viral infectious diseases. In total, 57 subjects were enrolled: 21 patients with community-acquired bacterial infections, 26 patients with viral infections, and 10 healthy subjects (control cohorts). The laboratory analyses were performed using Luminex technology, and the following molecules were examined: IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, TNF- α , INF- γ , MIP-1 β , and MCP-1. Bacterial etiology of infection was associated with significantly (P < 0.001) elevated serum concentrations of IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF- α in comparison to levels observed in the sera of patients with viral infections. In the patients with bacterial infections, IL-1Ra and IL-8 demonstrated positive correlation with C-reactive protein, whereas, IL-1Ra, TNF- α , and MCP-1 correlated with procalcitonin. Furthermore, elevated levels of IL-1Ra, IL-6, and TNF- α decreased within 3 days of antibiotic therapy to levels observed in control subjects. The results show IL-1Ra as a potential useful biomarker of community-acquired bacterial infection.

  6. Interpreting Recent Water Quality Changes in Florida Bay in a Paleoecological Context Using Diatoms and Linked Organic Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiser, E. E.; Wachnicka, A.; Xu, Y.; Jaffe, R.; Fourqurean, J.

    2005-05-01

    Recent alterations in the quality and quantity of freshwater flowing into Florida Bay from the Everglades and surrounding landscape of south Florida has altered the salinity and nutrient regime of the Bay. To interpret these changes with respect to natural variability in this ecosystem we conducted a multiproxy paleoecological investigation at several sites in the Bay. Sediments were cored to bedrock, chronologically calibrated using conventional radiometric methods and sampled at 2 cm intervals for a variety of paleoenvironmental proxies including diatoms, organic biomarkers and nutrient concentrations. Interpretations of paleoenvironmental settings were based on habitat specificities of diatoms and their relationships to biomarkers and nutrients determined by a survey of the modern environment. Signatures in basal peat deposits suggest fresh to brackish-water mangrove-dominated communities existed in central Florida Bay as little as 2000 YBP. Overlying marl contains benthic diatom assemblages indicative of a shallow, seagrass-dominated marine environment that experienced large, decadal-scale fluctuations in salinity. Recent sediments (<100 years) reveal a third zone that contains a flora that is compositionally dissimilar to those occurring in the past. Together with organic biomarkers, phosphorus and nitrogen data, the recent diatom record generally suggests a transition to conditions favoring proliferation of planktonic algae over benthic epiphytes, suggesting displacement of primary production from seagrass beds (which have declined in aerial extent) to the plankton as water-borne nutrients become more available. Several sites show an increase in diatom-inferred salinity after 1990, while the amplitude of fluctuation in salinity has declined.

  7. Care Transitions and Adult Day Services Moderate the Longitudinal Links between Stress Biomarkers and Family Caregivers' Functional Health.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin; Almeida, David M; Rovine, Michael J; Zarit, Steven H

    2017-05-19

    Stress biomarkers have been linked to health and well-being. There are, however, few studies on how dysregulation in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic nervous system actually affects functional health of family caregivers of persons with dementia. Further, it is not clear whether and how factors affecting caregiving stressor exposures such as care transitions and adult day services (ADS) use may affect such association. First, to examine the association of daily stress biomarkers and functional health over time among family caregivers of persons with dementia. Second, to examine effects of care transitions and ADS use on the association between baseline stress biomarkers and functional health over time. At baseline, caregivers provided 5 saliva samples each day during an 8-day diary study, where all caregivers were having a varying number of ADS days per week. There were 2 longitudinal follow-ups at 6 and 12 months on ADS use, care transitions, and caregivers' functional health. The average daily total output across days was computed at baseline for salivary cortisol, the sulfated form of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA-s), and salivary alpha amylase (sAA), which were used as predictors of caregivers' longitudinal functional limitation trajectories. Care transitions and total number of ADS days per week at baseline were considered as moderators of the associations between stress biomarkers and health over time. The associations between functional limitation trajectories and daily total outputs of cortisol and sAA were modified by ADS use and care transitions. Among caregivers who experienced a transition, and who used less than average ADS days per week, lower daily cortisol total output and lower daily sAA total output were associated with increasing functional limitations. Caregivers who experienced a transition but used greater than average ADS days per week did not show such patterns of association. No significant effect was found for DHEA

  8. Heterogeneity of neuroanatomical patterns in prodromal Alzheimer's disease: links to cognition, progression and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aoyan; Toledo, Jon B; Honnorat, Nicolas; Doshi, Jimit; Varol, Erdem; Sotiras, Aristeidis; Wolk, David; Trojanowski, John Q; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-12-20

    Individuals with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease clinical diagnoses can display significant phenotypic heterogeneity. This variability likely reflects underlying genetic, environmental and neuropathological differences. Characterizing this heterogeneity is important for precision diagnostics, personalized predictions, and recruitment of relatively homogeneous sets of patients into clinical trials. In this study, we apply state-of-the-art semi-supervised machine learning methods to the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging cohort (ADNI) to elucidate the heterogeneity of neuroanatomical differences between subjects with mild cognitive impairment (n = 530) and Alzheimer's disease (n = 314) and cognitively normal individuals (n = 399), thereby adding to an increasing literature aiming to establish neuroanatomical and neuropathological (e.g. amyloid and tau deposition) dimensions in Alzheimer's disease and its prodromal stages. These dimensional approaches aim to provide surrogate measures of heterogeneous underlying pathologic processes leading to cognitive impairment. We relate these neuroimaging patterns to cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, white matter hyperintensities, cognitive and clinical measures, and longitudinal trajectories. We identified four such atrophy patterns: (i) individuals with largely normal neuroanatomical profiles, who also turned out to have the least abnormal cognitive and cerebrospinal fluid biomarker profiles and the slowest clinical progression during follow-up; (ii) individuals with classical Alzheimer's disease neuroanatomical, cognitive, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and clinical profile, who presented the fastest clinical progression; (iii) individuals with a diffuse pattern of atrophy with relatively less pronounced involvement of the medial temporal lobe, abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 values, and proportionally greater executive impairment; and (iv) individuals with notably focal involvement of the medial

  9. IDBD: infectious disease biomarker database.

    PubMed

    Yang, In Seok; Ryu, Chunsun; Cho, Ki Joon; Kim, Jin Kwang; Ong, Swee Hoe; Mitchell, Wayne P; Kim, Bong Su; Oh, Hee-Bok; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2008-01-01

    Biomarkers enable early diagnosis, guide molecularly targeted therapy and monitor the activity and therapeutic responses across a variety of diseases. Despite intensified interest and research, however, the overall rate of development of novel biomarkers has been falling. Moreover, no solution is yet available that efficiently retrieves and processes biomarker information pertaining to infectious diseases. Infectious Disease Biomarker Database (IDBD) is one of the first efforts to build an easily accessible and comprehensive literature-derived database covering known infectious disease biomarkers. IDBD is a community annotation database, utilizing collaborative Web 2.0 features, providing a convenient user interface to input and revise data online. It allows users to link infectious diseases or pathogens to protein, gene or carbohydrate biomarkers through the use of search tools. It supports various types of data searches and application tools to analyze sequence and structure features of potential and validated biomarkers. Currently, IDBD integrates 611 biomarkers for 66 infectious diseases and 70 pathogens. It is publicly accessible at http://biomarker.cdc.go.kr and http://biomarker.korea.ac.kr.

  10. Putative link between Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage serotype and community association.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, D H; Saberesheikh, S; Kearns, A M; Saunders, N A

    2012-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from humans can be broadly separated into 3 groups: healthcare-associated (HA), community-associated (CA), and livestock-associated (LA) MRSA. Initially based on epidemiological features, division into these classes is becoming increasingly problematic. The sequencing of S. aureus genomes has highlighted variations in their accessory components, which likely account for differences in pathogenicity and epidemicity. In particular, temperate bacteriophages have been regarded as key players in bacterial pathogenesis. Bacteriophage-associated Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes (luk-PV) are regarded as epidemiological markers of the CA-MRSA due to their high prevalence in CA strains. This paper describes the development and application of a partial composite S. aureus virulence-associated gene microarray. Epidemic, pandemic, and sporadic lineages of UK HA and CA S. aureus were compared. Phage structural genes linked with CA isolates were identified and in silico analysis revealed these to be correlated with phage serogroup. CA strains predominantly carried a PVL-associated phage either of the A or Fb serogroup, whilst HA strains predominantly carried serogroup Fa or B phages. We speculate that carriage of a serogroup A/Fb PVL-associated phage rather than the luk-PV genes specifically is correlated with CA status.

  11. Five Cities, One Vision. CORAL: Linking Communities, Children and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James G. Irvine Foundation, San Francisco, CA.

    This booklet describes the CORAL (Communities Organizing Resources To Advance Learning) program within five California communities: Pasadena, Long Beach, San Jose, Fresno, and Sacramento. This initiative, begun in 1999, is committed to a community-based and community-building approach to supporting learning and focuses on improving academic…

  12. Five Cities, One Vision. CORAL: Linking Communities, Children and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James G. Irvine Foundation, San Francisco, CA.

    This booklet describes the CORAL (Communities Organizing Resources To Advance Learning) program within five California communities: Pasadena, Long Beach, San Jose, Fresno, and Sacramento. This initiative, begun in 1999, is committed to a community-based and community-building approach to supporting learning and focuses on improving academic…

  13. Teaching Inquiry with Linked Classes and Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piercey, Victor; Cullen, Roxanne

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve problem-solving dispositions, a section of an inquiry-based math sequence for first-year business students was linked with a section of our general education English sequence. We describe how the linked classes worked and compare some preliminary results from linked and unlinked sections of the math sequence.

  14. Teaching Inquiry with Linked Classes and Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piercey, Victor; Cullen, Roxanne

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve problem-solving dispositions, a section of an inquiry-based math sequence for first-year business students was linked with a section of our general education English sequence. We describe how the linked classes worked and compare some preliminary results from linked and unlinked sections of the math sequence.

  15. Novel serologic biomarkers provide accurate estimates of recent Plasmodium falciparum exposure for individuals and communities.

    PubMed

    Helb, Danica A; Tetteh, Kevin K A; Felgner, Philip L; Skinner, Jeff; Hubbard, Alan; Arinaitwe, Emmanuel; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Ssewanyana, Isaac; Kamya, Moses R; Beeson, James G; Tappero, Jordan; Smith, David L; Crompton, Peter D; Rosenthal, Philip J; Dorsey, Grant; Drakeley, Christopher J; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2015-08-11

    Tools to reliably measure Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) exposure in individuals and communities are needed to guide and evaluate malaria control interventions. Serologic assays can potentially produce precise exposure estimates at low cost; however, current approaches based on responses to a few characterized antigens are not designed to estimate exposure in individuals. Pf-specific antibody responses differ by antigen, suggesting that selection of antigens with defined kinetic profiles will improve estimates of Pf exposure. To identify novel serologic biomarkers of malaria exposure, we evaluated responses to 856 Pf antigens by protein microarray in 186 Ugandan children, for whom detailed Pf exposure data were available. Using data-adaptive statistical methods, we identified combinations of antibody responses that maximized information on an individual's recent exposure. Responses to three novel Pf antigens accurately classified whether an individual had been infected within the last 30, 90, or 365 d (cross-validated area under the curve = 0.86-0.93), whereas responses to six antigens accurately estimated an individual's malaria incidence in the prior year. Cross-validated incidence predictions for individuals in different communities provided accurate stratification of exposure between populations and suggest that precise estimates of community exposure can be obtained from sampling a small subset of that community. In addition, serologic incidence predictions from cross-sectional samples characterized heterogeneity within a community similarly to 1 y of continuous passive surveillance. Development of simple ELISA-based assays derived from the successful selection strategy outlined here offers the potential to generate rich epidemiologic surveillance data that will be widely accessible to malaria control programs.

  16. Novel serologic biomarkers provide accurate estimates of recent Plasmodium falciparum exposure for individuals and communities

    PubMed Central

    Helb, Danica A.; Tetteh, Kevin K. A.; Felgner, Philip L.; Skinner, Jeff; Hubbard, Alan; Arinaitwe, Emmanuel; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Ssewanyana, Isaac; Kamya, Moses R.; Beeson, James G.; Tappero, Jordan; Smith, David L.; Crompton, Peter D.; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Dorsey, Grant; Drakeley, Christopher J.; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Tools to reliably measure Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) exposure in individuals and communities are needed to guide and evaluate malaria control interventions. Serologic assays can potentially produce precise exposure estimates at low cost; however, current approaches based on responses to a few characterized antigens are not designed to estimate exposure in individuals. Pf-specific antibody responses differ by antigen, suggesting that selection of antigens with defined kinetic profiles will improve estimates of Pf exposure. To identify novel serologic biomarkers of malaria exposure, we evaluated responses to 856 Pf antigens by protein microarray in 186 Ugandan children, for whom detailed Pf exposure data were available. Using data-adaptive statistical methods, we identified combinations of antibody responses that maximized information on an individual’s recent exposure. Responses to three novel Pf antigens accurately classified whether an individual had been infected within the last 30, 90, or 365 d (cross-validated area under the curve = 0.86–0.93), whereas responses to six antigens accurately estimated an individual’s malaria incidence in the prior year. Cross-validated incidence predictions for individuals in different communities provided accurate stratification of exposure between populations and suggest that precise estimates of community exposure can be obtained from sampling a small subset of that community. In addition, serologic incidence predictions from cross-sectional samples characterized heterogeneity within a community similarly to 1 y of continuous passive surveillance. Development of simple ELISA-based assays derived from the successful selection strategy outlined here offers the potential to generate rich epidemiologic surveillance data that will be widely accessible to malaria control programs. PMID:26216993

  17. Temporal organization of phytoplankton communities linked to physical forcing.

    PubMed

    Winder, Monika; Hunter, Deborah A

    2008-05-01

    The performance of individual phytoplankton species is strongly governed by the thermal stratification's impact on vertical mixing within the water column, which alters the position of phytoplankton relative to nutrients and light. The present study documents shifts in phytoplankton structure and vertical positioning that have accompanied intensified long-term stratification in a natural ecosystem. Ordination analysis is used to extract gradients in phytoplankton composition in Lake Tahoe, an extremely nutrient-poor lake, over a 23-year period of records. Community structure in the 1980s was associated most strongly with resource availability (low nitrogen to phosphorus ratios, deeper euphotic zone depth), while intensified stratification dominated the phytoplankton structure since the late 1990s. Within diatoms, small-sized cells increased with reduced mixing, suggesting that suppressed turbulence provides them with a competitive advantage over large-sized cells. Among the morphologically diverse chlorophytes, filamentous and coenobial forms were favored under intensified stratification. The selection for small-sized diatoms is accompanied by a shoaling trend in their vertical position in the water column. In contrast, the motile flagellates displayed a deeper vertical positioning in recent years, indicating that optimal growth conditions shifted likely due to reduced upwelling of nutrients. As the thermal stratification of lakes and oceans is strongly linked to climate variables, the present study confirms that climate warming will alter phytoplankton structure and dynamics largely through effects on nutrient availability and sinking velocities. Intensified stratification should favor the expansion of small-sized species and species with the capability of buoyancy regulation, which may alter primary productivity, nutrient recycling, and higher trophic productivity.

  18. Direct Evidence Linking Soil Organic Matter Development to Microbial Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenbach, C.; Grandy, S.

    2013-12-01

    Despite increasing recognition of microbial contributions to soil organic matter (SOM) formation there is little experimental evidence linking microbial processes to SOM development and the mechanisms responsible remain unclear. Specifically, if stable SOM is largely comprised of microbial products, we need to better understand the soil conditions that influence microbial biomass production and ultimately its stability. Microbial physiology, such as microbial growth efficiency (MGE) and rate (MGR) have direct influences on microbial biomass production and are highly sensitive to resource quality. Therefore, the importance of resource quality on SOM is not necessarily a function of resistance to decay but the degree to which it optimizes microbial biomass production. While resource quality may have an indirect effect on SOM abundance via its influence on microbial physiology, SOM stabilization of labile microbial products may rely heavily on a soil's capacity to form organo-mineral interactions. To examine the relative importance of soil microbial community function, resource quality and mineralogy on direct microbial contributions to SOM formation and stability, an ongoing 15-mo incubation experiment was set up using artificial, initially C- and microbial-free soils. Soil microcosms were constructed by mixing sand with either kaolinite or montmorillonite clays followed with a natural soil microbial inoculum. For both soil mineral treatments, weekly additions of glucose, cellobiose, or syringol are carried out, with an additional treatment of plant leachate to serve as a reference. This simplified system allows us to determine if, in the absence of plant-derived C, microbial products using simple substrates can result in chemically complex SOM similar to natural soils. Over the course of the incubation, MGE, MGR, microbial activity, and SOM accumulation rates are monitored. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) is used to track the microbial

  19. The Critical Link: Community Colleges and the Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcone, Lisa, Ed.

    In 1993, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) sponsored five activities designed to build the capacity of community colleges to respond to workforce development needs of employers and employees through contract training services. Three of these activities targeted community college-based business/industry liaisons, who provide a…

  20. The Critical Link: Community Colleges and the Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcone, Lisa, Ed.

    In 1993, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) sponsored five activities designed to build the capacity of community colleges to respond to workforce development needs of employers and employees through contract training services. Three of these activities targeted community college-based business/industry liaisons, who provide a…

  1. Discovering link communities in complex networks by an integer programming model and a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenping; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Liu, Hongwei; Zhang, Shihua

    2013-01-01

    Identification of communities in complex networks is an important topic and issue in many fields such as sociology, biology, and computer science. Communities are often defined as groups of related nodes or links that correspond to functional subunits in the corresponding complex systems. While most conventional approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, some recent studies start partitioning links to find overlapping communities straightforwardly. In this paper, we propose a new quantity function for link community identification in complex networks. Based on this quantity function we formulate the link community partition problem into an integer programming model which allows us to partition a complex network into overlapping communities. We further propose a genetic algorithm for link community detection which can partition a network into overlapping communities without knowing the number of communities. We test our model and algorithm on both artificial networks and real-world networks. The results demonstrate that the model and algorithm are efficient in detecting overlapping community structure in complex networks.

  2. Linking Workforce Development to Economic Development: A Casebook for Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, William J., Ed.; Gerity, Patrick E., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Linking Workforce Development to Economic Development: A Casebook for Community Colleges" is a compilation of best practice examples, which illustrate what it takes for community colleges to achieve their goal of helping people acquire education and skills, helping employers, supporting communities, and building the nation. The book is…

  3. Linking Workforce Development to Economic Development: A Casebook for Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, William J., Ed.; Gerity, Patrick E., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Linking Workforce Development to Economic Development: A Casebook for Community Colleges" is a compilation of best practice examples, which illustrate what it takes for community colleges to achieve their goal of helping people acquire education and skills, helping employers, supporting communities, and building the nation. The book is…

  4. Cross-Site Soil Microbial Communities under Tillage Regimes: Fungistasis and Microbial Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yrjälä, Kim; Alakukku, Laura; Palojärvi, Ansa

    2012-01-01

    The exploitation of soil ecosystem services by agricultural management strategies requires knowledge of microbial communities in different management regimes. Crop cover by no-till management protects the soil surface, reducing the risk of erosion and nutrient leaching, but might increase straw residue-borne and soilborne plant-pathogenic fungi. A cross-site study of soil microbial communities and Fusarium fungistasis was conducted on six long-term agricultural fields with no-till and moldboard-plowed treatments. Microbial communities were studied at the topsoil surface (0 to 5 cm) and bottom (10 to 20 cm) by general bacterial and actinobacterial terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analyses. Fusarium culmorum soil fungistasis describing soil receptivity to plant-pathogenic fungi was explored by using the surface layer method. Soil depth had a significant impact on general bacterial as well as actinobacterial communities and PLFA profiles in no-till treatment, with a clear spatial distinction of communities (P < 0.05), whereas the depth-related separation of microbial communities was not observed in plowed fields. The fungal biomass was higher in no-till surface soil than in plowed soil (P < 0.07). Soil total microbial biomass and fungal biomass correlated with fungistasis (P < 0.02 for the sum of PLFAs; P < 0.001 for PLFA 18:2ω6). Our cross-site study demonstrated that agricultural management strategies can have a major impact on soil microbial community structures, indicating that it is possible to influence the soil processes with management decisions. The interactions between plant-pathogenic fungi and soil microbial communities are multifaceted, and a high level of fungistasis could be linked to the high microbial biomass in soil but not to the specific management strategy. PMID:22983972

  5. Learning communities: the link to recruitment and retention.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Sherry; Polifroni, E Carol

    2005-01-01

    The professional learning community is a strategy to help staff development educators address recruitment and retention and organizational culture. The purpose of this article is to analyze the concept of learning communities and discuss their potential to increase the recruitment and retention of new graduate nurses and returning practitioners to the nursing profession. Incorporating learning communities into the healthcare organization will decrease the number of nurses leaving nursing, foster retention, and thus, enhance recruitment.

  6. Linking classroom learning to the community through service learning.

    PubMed

    Trail Ross, Mary Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Service learning is valued as a means of providing education to students and service to the community. The purpose of this article is to describe the incorporation of service learning in an undergraduate baccalaureate level Gerontology nursing course. Details of the service learning experience, community agency partnership, the students' reflections, evaluations from both the students and community agency staff, and faculty challenges are presented. This information may be useful to others who are considering service learning as a strategy for educating students while providing service to the community.

  7. Linking community programs in environment to programs in population: towards sustainable communities that sustain sanctuaries.

    PubMed

    Cincotta, R P

    1994-01-01

    This article briefly reviews several nongovernmental organization (NGO) programs that address environmental and population issues. A framework is constructed that identifies how linked programs are supposed to work. The potential for sustainable communities is explored. It is concluded that sanctuaries in developing countries will not survive unless population in surrounding communities is stabilized and the economic and ecological relationships between the community and the sanctuary ecosystem are sustainable. In developed countries resource needs must be identified in regional planning in order for environmental protection to occur. The author finds that NGOs can be instrumental in securing community participation in environmental protection. NGOs operating in Chiapas, Mexico, provide management assistance and public health and family planning awareness to displaced indigenous farmers and conservative professionals. Another NGO outside the Ranthambhore National Park in Rajasthan, India, works to promote alternative fuel and grazing sources among local farmers. Near Chautara, in Nepal, farmers are aided by NGOs in laying sanitary water pipes, which reduces the amount of women's time required for fetching water and increases the amount of time women can spend gardening or getting involved in environmental projects. NGO efforts that reduce women's time absorbed by domestic burdens help women fulfill family planning desires and allow for greater investment in the education of children. Environmental sustainability will be dependent on family planning and other population-related processes and on the awareness that public health is an environmental issue. Opposition to integrated environment and population programs stems from donor opposition, opposition to investment in low-density areas, and a priority on biodiversity issues over development of public health services near sanctuaries. This paper was presented at an international forum at the George Washington

  8. Methylglyoxal in diabetes: link to treatment, glycaemic control and biomarkers of complications.

    PubMed

    Beisswenger, Paul J

    2014-04-01

    Diabetic complications are major health problems worldwide, with the cost of caring for diabetes rising to US$245 billion in 2012 in the U.S.A. alone. It is widely recognized that non-enzymatic glycation in diabetes is a major cause of damage and dysfunction of key vascular cells. MG (methylglyoxal) is directly toxic to tissues, and is a major precursor of AGEs (advanced glycation end-products). Various propensities to diabetic complications are seen among individuals with diabetes, with accelerated rates occurring in some individuals with modest hyperglycaemia, while others never progress in spite of poor glycaemic control over many years. Since production and detoxification of MG is ultimately controlled by enzymatic mechanisms, both genetic and environmental factors could regulate tissue glycation and potentially account for these variable complication rates. Activation of pathways that determine MG levels occurs in susceptible patients, indicting an important role in pathogenesis. MG leads to formation of specific AGEs, which are likely to predict propensity to diabetic complications. We have shown recently that three specific plasma AGE biomarkers [MG-H1 (MG-derived hydroimidazolones), CEL (Nε-carboxyethyl-lysine) and CML (Nε-carboxymethyl-lysine)] predict biopsy-documented fast DN (diabetic nephropathy) progression. Since two of the predictive biomarkers are MG end-products, these outcomes support a role for MG in the development of DN. Our studies on MG and its end-products have also shown anti-complication effects of the drug metformin, which binds and inactivates MG, thus reducing MG-related AGEs. We have also shown that reducing post-meal glucose decreases MG levels, as well as levels of MG-related AGEs. Our clinical outcome studies have been based on the novel concept that the unique glycation products that we can measure reflect the activity of specific chemical pathways that are selectively activated by hyperglycaemia in patients that are inherently

  9. Linking richness, community variability, and invasion resistance with patch size.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, Piers K; Johnson, Craig R

    2006-11-01

    The influence of community dynamics on the success or failure of an invasion is of considerable interest. What has not been explored is the influence of patch size on the outcomes of invasions for communities with the same species pool. Here we use an empirically validated spatial model of a marine epibenthic community to examine the effects of patch size on community variability, species richness, invasion, and the relationships between these variables. We found that the qualitative form of the relationship between community variability and species richness is determined by the size of the model patch. In small patches, variability decreases with species richness, but beyond a critical patch size, variability increases with increasing richness. This occurs because in large patches large, long-lived colonies attain sufficient size to minimize mortality and dominate the community, leading to decreased species richness and community variability. This mechanism cannot operate on smaller patches where the size of colonies is limited by the patch size and mortality is high irrespective of species identity. Further, invasion resistance is strongly correlated with community variability. Thus, the relationship between species richness and invasion resistance is also determined by patch size. These patterns are generated largely by an inverse relationship between colony size and mortality, and they depend on the spatial nature and patch size of the community. Our results suggest that a continuum of possible relationships can exist between species richness, community variability, invasion resistance, and area. These relationships are emergent behaviors generated by the individual properties of the particular component species of a community.

  10. Instructional Technology as Link between University and Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossett, Allison

    1981-01-01

    Examines the proclaimed dichotomy between real and unreal, theory and practice, actual and idealized notions of community needs and university attitudes with regard to training, and describes how San Diego State University's Educational Technology program attempts simultaneously to educate graduate students and serve its community. (Author/MER)

  11. Linking communities to formal health care providers through village health teams in rural Uganda: lessons from linking social capital.

    PubMed

    Musinguzi, Laban Kashaija; Turinawe, Emmanueil Benon; Rwemisisi, Jude T; de Vries, Daniel H; Mafigiri, David K; Muhangi, Denis; de Groot, Marije; Katamba, Achilles; Pool, Robert

    2017-01-11

    Community-based programmes, particularly community health workers (CHWs), have been portrayed as a cost-effective alternative to the shortage of health workers in low-income countries. Usually, literature emphasises how easily CHWs link and connect communities to formal health care services. There is little evidence in Uganda to support or dispute such claims. Drawing from linking social capital framework, this paper examines the claim that village health teams (VHTs), as an example of CHWs, link and connect communities with formal health care services. Data were collected through ethnographic fieldwork undertaken as part of a larger research program in Luwero District, Uganda, between 2012 and 2014. The main methods of data collection were participant observation in events organised by VHTs. In addition, a total of 91 in-depth interviews and 42 focus group discussions (FGD) were conducted with adult community members as part of the larger project. After preliminary analysis of the data, we conducted an additional six in-depth interviews and three FGD with VHTs and four FGD with community members on the role of VHTs. Key informant interviews were conducted with local government staff, health workers, local leaders, and NGO staff with health programs in Luwero. Thematic analysis was used during data analysis. The ability of VHTs to link communities with formal health care was affected by the stakeholders' perception of their roles. Community members perceive VHTs as working for and under instructions of "others", which makes them powerless in the formal health care system. One of the challenges associated with VHTs' linking roles is support from the government and formal health care providers. Formal health care providers perceived VHTs as interested in special recognition for their services yet they are not "experts". For some health workers, the introduction of VHTs is seen as a ploy by the government to control people and hide its inability to provide health

  12. Bile acid aspiration associated with lung chemical profile linked to other biomarkers of injury after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Neujahr, D C; Uppal, K; Force, S D; Fernandez, F; Lawrence, C; Pickens, A; Bag, R; Lockard, C; Kirk, A D; Tran, V; Lee, K; Jones, D P; Park, Y

    2014-04-01

    Aspiration of gastrointestinal contents has been linked to worse outcomes following lung transplantation but uncertainty exists about underlying mechanisms. We applied high-resolution metabolomics of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in patients with episodic aspiration (defined by bile acids in the BALF) to identify potential metabolic changes associated with aspiration. Paired samples, one with bile acids and another without, from 29 stable lung transplant patients were studied. Liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectroscopy was used to interrogate metabolomic contents of these samples. Data were obtained for 7068 ions representing intermediary metabolites, environmental agents and chemicals associated with microbial colonization. A substantial number (2302) differed between bile acid positive and negative samples when analyzed by false discovery rate at q = 0.01. These included pathways associated with microbial metabolism. Hierarchical cluster analysis defined clusters of chemicals associated with bile acid aspiration that were correlated to previously reported biomarkers of lung injury including T cell granzyme B level and the chemoattractants CXCL9 and CXCL10. These data specifically link bile acids presence in lung allografts to inflammatory pathways known to segregate with worsening allograft outcome, and provide additional mechanistic insight into the association between reflux and lung allograft injury.

  13. A pH Indicator-linked Immunosorbent assay following direct amplification strategy for colorimetric detection of protein biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fengying; Jiao, Lei; Miao, Luyang; Wei, Qin; Li, He

    2017-04-15

    A new pH indicator-linked immunosorbent assay (PILISA) reached pg/mL sensitivity based on pH indicator molecules loaded carbon nitride nanosheets as signal enhancer has been developed for colorimetric detection of protein biomarkers. As the secondary antibody binds to the carbon nitride nanosheets, the carbon nitride nanosheets and pH indicator complex as the signal amplification platform for colour change by detecting absorbance of pH indicator. The colour change was resulted from the releasing of pH indicator molecules from carbon nitride nanosheets triggered by alkali solution (AS). In this novel PILISA, the intensity absorbance of pH indicator is proportional to the concentration of the disease marker. The outstanding detection performance of the PILISA can be attributed to the following reasons: (1) ultrathin carbon nitride nanosheets with a larger surface area could adsorb abundant phenolphthalein (PP) molecules through hydrophobic interactions as well as the resulted PP anions can be free easily released into aqueous solution, leading to an obvious allochroic response; (2) the signal intensity is precisely determined by the amount of PP molecules loading onto the carbon nitride nanosheets surface, which ensures simple, low-cost and stable colorimetric detection. As expected, this new PILISA method offered an enzyme-free approach followed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay format, which showed great promising potential as an innovative robust assay method for practical clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Linking species abundance distributions and body size in monogenean communities.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Robert; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2008-06-01

    Parasite communities are characterised by one or a few numerically dominant species and many rare species. Although this pattern is well recognised, its underlying causes remain unknown. In this study, we tested whether variation in abundance among species within parasite communities can be explained by interspecific variation in body size. We used data on nine fish species (families Serranidae and Lethrinidae) from New Caledonia, each harbouring strictly host-specific diplectanid monogenean species with very uneven abundances. On each fish species, the most abundant monogenean species accounted for between one half and two thirds of all individuals recovered from the community, and its abundance was between 2 and 114 times greater than that of the second-most abundant species. However, there was no convincing evidence that the ratio of abundance values between the two most abundant species in a community co-varied with the ratio in their body sizes; thus, size differences cannot explain these differences in abundances between common species. It is surprising to note that in two of the three communities with enough species for an analysis to be performed, body size tended to correlate positively with abundance among all species of diplectanid monogeneans. Thus, although body size variation on its own cannot account for the pronounced differences in abundance among monogenean species within the same community, body size remains an important determinant of abundance as it relates to life-history traits underpinning reproductive rates and population growth in these unsaturated communities.

  15. Utilization of DNA-protein cross-links as a biomarker of chromium exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Zhitkovich, A; Voitkun, V; Kluz, T; Costa, M

    1998-01-01

    Human exposure to carcinogenic Cr(VI) compounds is found among workers in a large number of professional groups, and it can also occur through environmental pollution. A significant number of toxic waste sites contain Cr as a major contaminant. In this paper we summarize our efforts to apply measurements of DNA-protein cross-links (DPC) as test for biologically active doses of Cr(VI). DPC were found at elevated levels in lymphocytes in several human populations with low to medium Cr exposures. At high exposure to Cr(VI), exemplified by a group of Bulgarian chromeplaters, DPC plateaued and adducts' levels were similar to those found in environmentally exposed individuals. Lymphocytic DPC correlated strongly with Cr levels in erythrocytes that are indicative of Cr(VI) exposure. DPC in lymphocytes were not confounded by such variables as smoking, age, body weight, gender, or ethnicity. A new version of the cross-link assay offers improved sensitivity and requires a small amount of biologic material. Preliminary results indicate that the ability of DPC to reach detectable levels at low levels of Cr exposure could be related to a lack of repair of these lesions in lymphoid cells. Cr(III)-mediated cross-links of DNA with peptide glutathione or single amino acids were mutagenic in human cells, with a relationship of higher molecular weight of the peptide/amino acid correlating with a more potent mutagenic response. We speculate that bulky DPC could also have a significant promutagenic effect. The current methodology does not allow specific determination of Cr-induced DPC; however, demonstrated sensitivity of DPC measurements and the assay's large sample capacity may allow this assay to be used as the initial screening test for the occurrence of DNA damage in Cr(VI)-exposed populations. PMID:9703480

  16. Linking community resources in diabetes care: a role for technology?

    PubMed

    Tung, Elizabeth L; Peek, Monica E

    2015-07-01

    Designing and implementing effective lifestyle modification strategies remains one of the great challenges in diabetes care. Historically, programs have focused on individual behavior change with little or no attempt to integrate change within the broader social framework or community context. However, these contextual factors have been shown to be associated with poor diabetes outcomes, particularly in low-income minority populations. Recent evidence suggests that one way to address these disparities is to match patient needs to existing community resources. Not only does this position patients to more quickly adapt behavior in a practical way, but this also refers patients back to their local communities where a support mechanism is in place to sustain healthy behavior. Technology offers a new and promising platform for connecting patients to meaningful resources (also referred to as "assets"). This paper summarizes several noteworthy innovations that use technology as a practical bridge between healthcare and community-based resources that promote diabetes self-care.

  17. Testing pathways linking exposure to community violence and sexual behaviors among African American youth.

    PubMed

    Voisin, Dexter R; Hotton, Anna L; Neilands, Torsten B

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to community violence and HIV sexual risks are two major public health concerns among youth. This study tests various pathways linking exposure to community violence and sexual behaviors among African American adolescents. Using a sample of 563 (61% females) African American youth attending high school we examined whether problematic psychological symptoms, low school engagement, and/or negative perceptions of peer norms about safer sex functioned as pathways linking exposure to community violence and sexual behaviors. Major findings indicated that, for boys, the relationship between exposure to community violence and sexual début and sexual risk behaviors were linked by aggression. In addition, the relationship between exposure to community violence and sexual risk behaviors were linked by negative perceptions of peer attitudes about safer sex. For girls, the relationship between exposure to community violence and sexual début was linked by aggression and negative perceptions of peer attitudes about safer sex. These findings provide support for pathways linking exposure to community violence to sexual behaviors.

  18. Testing Pathways Linking Exposure to Community Violence and Sexual Behaviors Among African American Youth

    PubMed Central

    Hotton, Anna L.; Neilands, Torsten B.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to community violence and HIV sexual risks are two major public health concerns among youth. This study tests various pathways linking exposure to community violence and sexual behaviors among African American adolescents. Using a sample of 563 (61 % females) African American youth attending high school we examined whether problematic psychological symptoms, low school engagement, and/or negative perceptions of peer norms about safer sex functioned as pathways linking exposure to community violence and sexual behaviors. Major findings indicated that, for boys, the relationship between exposure to community violence and sexual début and sexual risk behaviors were linked by aggression. In addition, the relationship between exposure to community violence and sexual risk behaviors were linked by negative perceptions of peer attitudes about safer sex. For girls, the relationship between exposure to community violence and sexual début was linked by aggression and negative perceptions of peer attitudes about safer sex. These findings provide support for pathways linking exposure to community violence to sexual behaviors. PMID:24327295

  19. Structured decision making as a method for linking quantitative decision support to community fundamental objectives

    EPA Science Inventory

    Decision support intended to improve ecosystem sustainability requires that we link stakeholder priorities directly to quantitative tools and measures of desired outcomes. Actions taken at the community level can have large impacts on production and delivery of ecosystem service...

  20. Structured decision making as a method for linking quantitative decision support to community fundamental objectives

    EPA Science Inventory

    Decision support intended to improve ecosystem sustainability requires that we link stakeholder priorities directly to quantitative tools and measures of desired outcomes. Actions taken at the community level can have large impacts on production and delivery of ecosystem service...

  1. Building healthy communities for children: The transportation link

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, H.

    1995-09-01

    Two concepts are essential to a definition of a healthy community: social justice and ecological sustainability. These principles must be at the heart of creating healthy communities, cities, and regions. Children and young people are an integral part of socially just and ecologically sustainable communities. Transportation and land-use policies are critical tools for shaping healthy communities, cities, and regions. The health impacts of the private automobile and its full cost to society, including public health and environmental damage costs, need to be clearly understood. The developing physiology of children put them at particular risk to medical impacts of automobile emissions and air pollution. The public health impacts of transportation and land-use policies cannot be divorced from the planning and decision-making process. Transit, bicycle, and pedestrian-oriented transportation modes can serve the transportation needs of children and can stimulate land uses more conducive to a healthy social, economic, and environmental quality of life. This article comments on the combined issues of social justice and ecological sustainability for building the best communities for meeting the needs of children and young adults. 3 refs.

  2. Sediment biomarker, bacterial community characterization of high arsenic aquifers in Jianghan Plain, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hengpeng; Yang, Zeyu; Wu, Xiang; Wang, Jingwen; Du, Dongyun; Cai, Jian; Lv, Kangle; Chen, Huiyun; Mei, Jingkun; Chen, Mengqi; Du, Hong

    2017-02-01

    Representative biomarkers (e.g., n-alkanes), diversity and microbial community in the aquifers contaminated by high concentration of arsenic (As) in different sediment depth (0–30 m) in Jianghan Plain, Hubei, China, were analyzed to investigate the potential mechanism of As enrichment in groundwater. The concentration of As was abundant in top soil and sand, but not in clay. The analysis of the distribution of n-alkanes, CPI values, and wax to total n-alkane ratio (Wax(n)%) indicated that the organic matter (OM) from fresh terrestrial plants were abundant in the shallow sediment. However, n-alkanes have suffered from significant biodegradation from the depth of 16 m to 30 m. The deposition of fresh terrestrial derived organic matters may facilitate the release of As from sediment to groundwater in the sediment of 0–16 m. However, the petroleum derived organic matters may do the favor to the release of As in the deeper section of borehole (16 m to 30 m). The 16S rRNA gene sequences identification indicated that Acidobacteria, Actinomycetes and Hydrogenophaga are abundant in the sediments with high arsenic. Therefore, microbes and organic matters from different sources may play important roles in arsenic mobilization in the aquifers of the study area.

  3. Sediment biomarker, bacterial community characterization of high arsenic aquifers in Jianghan Plain, China

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hengpeng; Yang, Zeyu; Wu, Xiang; Wang, Jingwen; Du, Dongyun; Cai, Jian; Lv, Kangle; Chen, Huiyun; Mei, Jingkun; Chen, Mengqi; Du, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Representative biomarkers (e.g., n-alkanes), diversity and microbial community in the aquifers contaminated by high concentration of arsenic (As) in different sediment depth (0–30 m) in Jianghan Plain, Hubei, China, were analyzed to investigate the potential mechanism of As enrichment in groundwater. The concentration of As was abundant in top soil and sand, but not in clay. The analysis of the distribution of n-alkanes, CPI values, and wax to total n-alkane ratio (Wax(n)%) indicated that the organic matter (OM) from fresh terrestrial plants were abundant in the shallow sediment. However, n-alkanes have suffered from significant biodegradation from the depth of 16 m to 30 m. The deposition of fresh terrestrial derived organic matters may facilitate the release of As from sediment to groundwater in the sediment of 0–16 m. However, the petroleum derived organic matters may do the favor to the release of As in the deeper section of borehole (16 m to 30 m). The 16S rRNA gene sequences identification indicated that Acidobacteria, Actinomycetes and Hydrogenophaga are abundant in the sediments with high arsenic. Therefore, microbes and organic matters from different sources may play important roles in arsenic mobilization in the aquifers of the study area. PMID:28165031

  4. Linking Community Resources in Diabetes Care: a Role for Technology?

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Monica E.

    2015-01-01

    Designing and implementing effective lifestyle modification strategies remains one of the great challenges in diabetes care. Historically, programs have focused on individual behavior change with little or no attempt to integrate change within the broader social framework or community context. However, these contextual factors have been shown to be associated with poor diabetes outcomes, particularly in low-income minority populations. Recent evidence suggests that one way to address these disparities is to match patient needs to existing community resources. Not only does this position patients to more quickly adapt behavior in a practical way, but this also refers patients back to their local communities where a support mechanism is in place to sustain healthy behavior. Technology offers a new and promising platform for connecting patients to meaningful resources (also referred to as “assets”). This paper summarizes several noteworthy innovations that use technology as a practical bridge between healthcare and community-based resources that promote diabetes self-care. PMID:25994856

  5. Lifelong Career Development Handbook: Linking Community Services for Disabled Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brolin, Donn E.; And Others

    Designed for use by those who work with the disabled, this handbook explains and provides procedures for implementing the Lifelong Career Development (LCD) Model. (Designed for implementation at the community college level, the LCD model provides a competency-based approach to meeting the career development needs of disabled people and provides…

  6. Community Involvement: Linking Parents and Non-Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenner, Lynn; Gribbin, Randall

    1992-01-01

    To ensure the success of its enrichment activities program, a Texas elementary school formed principal assistants committees (PACs) comprised of highly diverse community volunteer coordinators. In the PAC program, parents, nonparents, and educators work together, sharing problems and solutions while supporting each others' efforts. Sidebars list…

  7. A Tiered Model for Linking Students to the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Laura Landry; Gerard, Jean M.; Sturm, Michael R.; Wooldridge, Deborah G.

    2016-01-01

    A tiered practice model (introductory, pre-internship, and internship) embedded in the curriculum facilitates community engagement and creates relevance for students as they pursue a professional identity in Human Development and Family Studies. The tiered model integrates high-impact teaching practices (HIP) and student engagement pedagogies…

  8. Linking Microbial Community Structure to Function in Representative Simulated Systems

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Ian M.; Wilder, Hailey A.; Quazi, Shanin J.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria are generally studied as a single strain under ideal growing conditions, although these conditions are not the norm in the environments in which pathogens typically proliferate. In this investigation, a representative microbial community along with Escherichia coli O157:H7, a model pathogen, was studied in three environments in which such a pathogen could be found: a human colon, a septic tank, and groundwater. Each of these systems was built in the lab in order to retain the physical/chemical and microbial complexity of the environments while maintaining control of the feed into the models. The microbial community in the colon was found to have a high percentage of bacteriodetes and firmicutes, while the septic tank and groundwater systems were composed mostly of proteobacteria. The introduction of E. coli O157:H7 into the simulated systems elicited a shift in the structures and phenotypic cell characteristics of the microbial communities. The fate and transport of the microbial community with E. coli O157:H7 were found to be significantly different from those of E. coli O157:H7 studied as a single isolate, suggesting that the behavior of the organism in the environment was different from that previously conceived. The findings in this study clearly suggest that to gain insight into the fate of pathogens, cells should be grown and analyzed under conditions simulating those of the environment in which the pathogens are present. PMID:23396331

  9. "Why Fly That Way?" Linking Community and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greely, Kathy

    This book tells the story of a year in one middle school teacher's class full of lively young adolescents, highlighting exemplary ways of learning and types of schooling. This alternative model of education shows how a strong, supportive community is essential in helping students reach their highest potential. The book includes: specific projects…

  10. A Tiered Model for Linking Students to the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Laura Landry; Gerard, Jean M.; Sturm, Michael R.; Wooldridge, Deborah G.

    2016-01-01

    A tiered practice model (introductory, pre-internship, and internship) embedded in the curriculum facilitates community engagement and creates relevance for students as they pursue a professional identity in Human Development and Family Studies. The tiered model integrates high-impact teaching practices (HIP) and student engagement pedagogies…

  11. Vitellogenin assay by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay as a biomarker of endocrine disruptor chemicals pollution.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mansour

    2007-09-15

    Research is ongoing to develop screening and testing programmes for endocrine disrupting effects of new chemicals and in the focus of this development are the fish test species common carp (Cyprinus carpio). In this study we have developed quantitative enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for VTS in common carp. The working range of the ELISA was 11.25 to 2000 ng mL(-1) (75-25% specific binding/maximum antibody binding [B/B0]) with a 50% B/B0 intra- and interassay variation of 3.9% (n=10) and 12.5% (n=30), respectively. This ELISA is capable of detecting VTG as low as 6 ng mL(-1) and can accurately detect VTG in even 10 microL of plasma. The ELISA was applied to measurement of VTG production by male carp (Cyprinous carpio, Cyprinidae) fish exposure to ethynylestradiol. The results showed that the amount of VTG produced in plasma of exposed fish increased in logaritmic order comparing to the control group and the ELISA described here could be used as an indicator of water pollution to estrogenic pollutants.

  12. Isotopic Biomarkers of Nitrogenase Metalloenzymes: Forging Links Between the Cycles of Nitrogen and Trace Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; McRose, D. L.; Darnajoux, R.; Bellenger, J. P.; Kraepiel, A. M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Biological N2 fixation, catalyzed by the metalloenzyme nitrogenase, is a critical process that makes life possible on Earth. Environmental N2 fixation has been automatically attributed to canonical Mo-based nitrogenases despite over two decades of knowledge that two other metalloenzyme forms of nitrogenase exist: those containing catalytic V or Fe-only. A key area of missing information is the contribution of the "alternative" V and Fe-only nitrogenases, as the interpretation of field data to construct budgets and assess N availability depends on the type of nitrogenase metalloenzyme used to fix N2. Additionally, substantial changes in metal speciation over geological time may have favored the use of different metalloenzymes, with implications for evolution of the biosphere. Despite the potential importance of alternative nitrogenases in modern and ancient N cycling, few methods can determine their contributions to environmental N2 fixation. Here, we present new isotopic methods to distinguish between the activities of Mo, V, and Fe-only nitrogenases. We show evidence for alternative N2 fixation in diverse environments (cyanolichens, microbial mats, sediments, leaf litter), thereby linking a key process in the nitrogen cycle to specific metalloenzyme forms of nitrogenase. The results invite a reexamination of the conditions under which the different nitrogenase metalloenzymes are active and may lead to new insights into the coupling of the cycles of nitrogen and trace metals.

  13. Targeted Mass Spectrometric Approach for Biomarker Discovery and Validation with Nonglycosylated Tryptic Peptides from N-linked Glycoproteins in Human Plasma*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jin Young; Park, Gun Wook; Cheon, Mi Hee; Kwon, Kyung-Hoon; Ahn, Yeong Hee; Moon, Myeong Hee; Lee, Hyoung–Joo; Paik, Young Ki; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2011-01-01

    A simple mass spectrometric approach for the discovery and validation of biomarkers in human plasma was developed by targeting nonglycosylated tryptic peptides adjacent to glycosylation sites in an N-linked glycoprotein, one of the most important biomarkers for early detection, prognoses, and disease therapies. The discovery and validation of novel biomarkers requires complex sample pretreatment steps, such as depletion of highly abundant proteins, enrichment of desired proteins, or the development of new antibodies. The current study exploited the steric hindrance of glycan units in N-linked glycoproteins, which significantly affects the efficiency of proteolytic digestion if an enzymatically active amino acid is adjacent to the N-linked glycosylation site. Proteolytic digestion then results in quantitatively different peptide products in accordance with the degree of glycosylation. The effect of glycan steric hindrance on tryptic digestion was first demonstrated using alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) as a model compound versus deglycosylated alpha-1-acid glycoprotein. Second, nonglycosylated tryptic peptide biomarkers, which generally show much higher sensitivity in mass spectrometric analyses than their glycosylated counterparts, were quantified in human hepatocellular carcinoma plasma using a label-free method with no need for N-linked glycoprotein enrichment. Finally, the method was validated using a multiple reaction monitoring analysis, demonstrating that the newly discovered nonglycosylated tryptic peptide targets were present at different levels in normal and hepatocellular carcinoma plasmas. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve generated through analyses of nonglycosylated tryptic peptide from vitronectin precursor protein was 0.978, the highest observed in a group of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. This work provides a targeted means of discovering and validating nonglycosylated tryptic peptides as biomarkers in human plasma

  14. Linking Research and Practice through Teacher Communities: A Place Where Formal and Practical Knowledge Meet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pareja Roblin, Natalie N.; Ormel, Bart J. B.; McKenney, Susan E.; Voogt, Joke M.; Pieters, Jules M.

    2014-01-01

    This study characterises the links between research and practice across 12 projects concerned with the collaborative design of lesson plans by teacher communities (TCs). Analyses focused on sources of knowledge used to inform lesson design, participants' roles and knowledge generated by the teacher community. Three patterns emerged pertaining…

  15. The Community Links of a Sample of People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Louise; Hewson, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Background: In 1995, an unpublished study (S. Hewson & C. Waters) showed that the community links of residents in 11 local National Health Services (NHS) trust houses were meagre, despite the service's stated commitment to community presence and participation. The 1995 study was repeated for the same 11 houses in 2002 to examine whether any…

  16. The Community Links of a Sample of People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Louise; Hewson, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Background: In 1995, an unpublished study (S. Hewson & C. Waters) showed that the community links of residents in 11 local National Health Services (NHS) trust houses were meagre, despite the service's stated commitment to community presence and participation. The 1995 study was repeated for the same 11 houses in 2002 to examine whether any…

  17. Sound Links: Exploring the Social, Cultural and Educational Dynamics of Musical Communities in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartleet, Brydie-Leigh

    2009-01-01

    "Sound Links" examines the dynamics of community music in Australia, and the models it represents for informal music learning and teaching. This involves researching a selection of vibrant musical communities across the country, exploring their potential for complementarity and synergy with music in schools. This article focuses on the…

  18. Linking Research and Practice through Teacher Communities: A Place Where Formal and Practical Knowledge Meet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pareja Roblin, Natalie N.; Ormel, Bart J. B.; McKenney, Susan E.; Voogt, Joke M.; Pieters, Jules M.

    2014-01-01

    This study characterises the links between research and practice across 12 projects concerned with the collaborative design of lesson plans by teacher communities (TCs). Analyses focused on sources of knowledge used to inform lesson design, participants' roles and knowledge generated by the teacher community. Three patterns emerged pertaining…

  19. Sound Links: Exploring the Social, Cultural and Educational Dynamics of Musical Communities in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartleet, Brydie-Leigh

    2009-01-01

    "Sound Links" examines the dynamics of community music in Australia, and the models it represents for informal music learning and teaching. This involves researching a selection of vibrant musical communities across the country, exploring their potential for complementarity and synergy with music in schools. This article focuses on the…

  20. C26:0-Carnitine Is a New Biomarker for X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy in Mice and Man.

    PubMed

    van de Beek, Malu-Clair; Dijkstra, Inge M E; van Lenthe, Henk; Ofman, Rob; Goldhaber-Pasillas, Dalia; Schauer, Nicolas; Schackmann, Martin; Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Vaz, Frédéric M; Kulik, Wim; Wanders, Ronald J A; Engelen, Marc; Kemp, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by mutations in ABCD1 and characterized by very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) accumulation. Virtually all males develop progressive myelopathy (AMN). A subset of patients, however, develops a fatal cerebral demyelinating disease (cerebral ALD). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is curative for cerebral ALD provided the procedure is performed in an early stage of the disease. Unfortunately, this narrow therapeutic window is often missed. Therefore, an increasing number of newborn screening programs are including ALD. To identify new biomarkers for ALD, we developed an Abcd1 knockout mouse with enhanced VLCFA synthesis either ubiquitous or restricted to oligodendrocytes. Biochemical analysis revealed VLCFA accumulation in different lipid classes and acylcarnitines. Both C26:0-lysoPC and C26:0-carnitine were highly elevated in brain, spinal cord, but also in bloodspots. We extended the analysis to patients and confirmed that C26:0-carnitine is also elevated in bloodspots from ALD patients. We anticipate that validation of C26:0-carnitine for the diagnosis of ALD in newborn bloodspots may lead to a faster inclusion of ALD in newborn screening programs in countries that already screen for other inborn errors of metabolism.

  1. Detection of a cancer biomarker protein on modified cellulose paper by fluorescence using aptamer-linked quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Das, Pradip; Krull, Ulrich J

    2017-08-21

    The development of point-of-care bioassays for sensitive screening of protein-based cancer biomarkers would improve the opportunity for early stage diagnosis. A strategy for a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based bioassay has been investigated that makes use of modified cellulose paper for the detection of an epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), which is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is overexpressed in several tumors of epithelial origin. The paper matrix was a substrate for immobilized aptamer-linked quantum dots (QDs-Apt) and Cy3 labeled complementary DNA (cDNA), which served as a donor and an acceptor, respectively. Competitive binding of EpCAM displaced the cDNA, resulting in the reduction of FRET. The paper-based bioassay was able to detect EpCAM in buffer solution as well as in 10% bovine serum solution using a reaction time of no more than 60 minutes. The dynamic range was 1-100 nM in buffer with a precision better than 4%, and the limit of detection was 250 pM in buffer and 600 pM in 10% serum.

  2. C26:0-Carnitine Is a New Biomarker for X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy in Mice and Man

    PubMed Central

    van de Beek, Malu-Clair; Dijkstra, Inge M. E.; van Lenthe, Henk; Ofman, Rob; Goldhaber-Pasillas, Dalia; Schauer, Nicolas; Schackmann, Martin; Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Vaz, Frédéric M.; Kulik, Wim; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Engelen, Marc; Kemp, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by mutations in ABCD1 and characterized by very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) accumulation. Virtually all males develop progressive myelopathy (AMN). A subset of patients, however, develops a fatal cerebral demyelinating disease (cerebral ALD). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is curative for cerebral ALD provided the procedure is performed in an early stage of the disease. Unfortunately, this narrow therapeutic window is often missed. Therefore, an increasing number of newborn screening programs are including ALD. To identify new biomarkers for ALD, we developed an Abcd1 knockout mouse with enhanced VLCFA synthesis either ubiquitous or restricted to oligodendrocytes. Biochemical analysis revealed VLCFA accumulation in different lipid classes and acylcarnitines. Both C26:0-lysoPC and C26:0-carnitine were highly elevated in brain, spinal cord, but also in bloodspots. We extended the analysis to patients and confirmed that C26:0-carnitine is also elevated in bloodspots from ALD patients. We anticipate that validation of C26:0-carnitine for the diagnosis of ALD in newborn bloodspots may lead to a faster inclusion of ALD in newborn screening programs in countries that already screen for other inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:27124591

  3. Linking community and ecosystem development on Mount St. Helens.

    PubMed

    Gill, Richard A; Boie, Jennifer A; Bishop, John G; Larsen, Lindsay; Apple, Jennifer L; Evans, R David

    2006-06-01

    In the two decades following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington State, the N2-fixing colonizer Lupinus lepidus is associated with striking heterogeneity in plant community and soil development. We report on differences in nutrient availability and plant tissue chemistry between older, dense patches (core) of L. lepidus and more recently established low density patches (edge). In addition, we conducted a factorial nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization experiment in core patches to examine the degree of N and P limitation in early primary succession. We found that there were no significant differences in N or P availability between core and edge L. lepidus patches during the dry summer months, although nutrient availability is very low across the landscape. In the high density patches we found lower tissue N content and higher fiber content in L. lepidus tissue than in the younger edge patches. The addition of nutrients substantially altered plant community composition, with N addition causing an increase in other forb biomass and a corresponding competition-induced decline in L. lepidus biomass. The majority of the positive biomass response came from Hypochaeris radicata. In the second year of the fertilization experiment, the addition of N significantly increased total community biomass while L. lepidus biomass declined by more than 50%. The response of every species other than L. lepidus to N additions suggests that N may be the macronutrient most limiting plant production on Mount St. Helens but that the gains in productivity were somewhat offset by a decline of the dominant species. By the third year of the experiment, L. lepidus began to increase in abundance with P addition. This result suggests co-limitation of the community by N and P.

  4. Geochip: A high throughput genomic tool for linking community structure to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Liang, Yuting; He, Zhili; Li, Guanghe; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-30

    GeoChip is a comprehensive functional gene array that targets key functional genes involved in the geochemical cycling of N, C, and P, sulfate reduction, metal resistance and reduction, and contaminant degradation. Studies have shown the GeoChip to be a sensitive, specific, and high-throughput tool for microbial community analysis that has the power to link geochemical processes with microbial community structure. However, several challenges remain regarding the development and applications of microarrays for microbial community analysis.

  5. The Educative Community. Linking the Community, School, and Family. The Professional Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiemstra, Roger

    This book has been created to meet the basic needs of future teachers, educational specialists, parents, and those citizens who desire to become better informed on current educational concepts and practices. Eight chapters discuss the nature of the community, the activation of the educative community, the community school and community education,…

  6. Linking microbial community structure and microbial processes: An empirical and conceptual overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bier, R.L.; Bernhardt, E.S.;; Boot, C.M.; Graham, E.B.;; Hall, E.K.; Lennon, J.T.; Nemergut, D.R.; Osborne, B.B.; Ruiz-Gonzalez, C.; Schimel, J.P.; Waldrop, Mark P.; Wallenstein, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of microbial ecology is to identify links between microbial community structure and microbial processes. Although this objective seems straightforward, there are conceptual and methodological challenges to designing studies that explicitly evaluate this link. Here, we analyzed literature documenting structure and process responses to manipulations to determine the frequency of structure-process links and whether experimental approaches and techniques influence link detection. We examined nine journals (published 2009–13) and retained 148 experimental studies measuring microbial community structure and processes. Many qualifying papers (112 of 148) documented structure and process responses, but few (38 of 112 papers) reported statistically testing for a link. Of these tested links, 75% were significant and typically used Spearman or Pearson's correlation analysis (68%). No particular approach for characterizing structure or processes was more likely to produce significant links. Process responses were detected earlier on average than responses in structure or both structure and process. Together, our findings suggest that few publications report statistically testing structure-process links. However, when links are tested for they often occur but share few commonalities in the processes or structures that were linked and the techniques used for measuring them.

  7. Linking microbial community structure and microbial processes: an empirical and conceptual overview.

    PubMed

    Bier, Raven L; Bernhardt, Emily S; Boot, Claudia M; Graham, Emily B; Hall, Edward K; Lennon, Jay T; Nemergut, Diana R; Osborne, Brooke B; Ruiz-González, Clara; Schimel, Joshua P; Waldrop, Mark P; Wallenstein, Matthew D

    2015-10-01

    A major goal of microbial ecology is to identify links between microbial community structure and microbial processes. Although this objective seems straightforward, there are conceptual and methodological challenges to designing studies that explicitly evaluate this link. Here, we analyzed literature documenting structure and process responses to manipulations to determine the frequency of structure-process links and whether experimental approaches and techniques influence link detection. We examined nine journals (published 2009-13) and retained 148 experimental studies measuring microbial community structure and processes. Many qualifying papers (112 of 148) documented structure and process responses, but few (38 of 112 papers) reported statistically testing for a link. Of these tested links, 75% were significant and typically used Spearman or Pearson's correlation analysis (68%). No particular approach for characterizing structure or processes was more likely to produce significant links. Process responses were detected earlier on average than responses in structure or both structure and process. Together, our findings suggest that few publications report statistically testing structure-process links. However, when links are tested for they often occur but share few commonalities in the processes or structures that were linked and the techniques used for measuring them.

  8. Examining the links between community participation and health outcomes: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rifkin, Susan B

    2014-09-01

    As a key principle of Primary Health Care (PHC) and Health Systems Reform, community participation has a prominent place in the current global dialogue. Participation is not only promoted in the context of provision and utilization of health services. Advocates also highlight participation as a key factor in the wider context of the importance of social determinants of health and health as a human right. However, the evidence that directly links community participation to improved health status is not strong. Its absence continues to be a barrier for governments, funding agencies and health professionals to promote community participation. The purpose of this article is to review research seeking to link community participation with improved health status outcomes programmes. It updates a review undertaken by the author in 2009. The search includes published articles in the English language and examines the evidence of in the context of health care delivery including services and promotion where health professionals have defined the community's role. The results show that in most studies community participation is defined as the intervention seeking to identify a direct causal link between participation and improved health status modeled on Randomized Control studies (RCT). The majority of studies show it is not possible to examine the link because there is no standard definition of 'community' and 'participation'. Where links are found, they are situation-specific and are unpredictable and not generalizable. In the discussion, an alternative research framework is proposed arguing that community participation is better understood as a process. Once concrete interventions are identified (i.e. improved birth outcomes) then the processes producing improved health status outcomes can be examined. These processes may include and can lead to community uptake, ownership and sustainability for health improvements. However, more research is needed to ensure their validity

  9. Links between plant and rhizoplane bacterial communities in grassland soils, characterized using molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Naoise; Daniell, Timothy J; Singh, Brajesh K; Papert, Artemis; McNicol, James W; Prosser, James I

    2005-11-01

    Molecular analysis of grassland rhizosphere soil has demonstrated complex and diverse bacterial communities, with resultant difficulties in detecting links between plant and bacterial communities. These studies have, however, analyzed "bulk" rhizosphere soil, rather than rhizoplane communities, which interact most closely with plants through utilization of root exudates. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that plant species was a major driver for bacterial rhizoplane community composition on individual plant roots. DNA extracted from individual roots was used to determine plant identity, by analysis of the plastid tRNA leucine (trnL) UAA gene intron, and plant-related bacterial communities. Bacterial communities were characterized by analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes using two fingerprinting methods: terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Links between plant and bacterial rhizoplane communities could not be detected by visual examination of T-RFLP patterns or DGGE banding profiles. Statistical analysis of fingerprint patterns did not reveal a relationship between bacterial community composition and plant species but did demonstrate an influence of plant community composition. The data also indicated that topography and other, uncharacterized, environmental factors are important in driving bacterial community composition in grassland soils. T-RFLP had greater potential resolving power than DGGE, but findings from the two methods were not significantly different.

  10. The Effect of a Community-Based, Primary Health Care Exercise Program on Inflammatory Biomarkers and Hormone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Papini, Camila Bosquiero; Nakamura, Priscila M.; Zorzetto, Lucas P.; Thompson, Janice L.; Phillips, Anna C.; Kokubun, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of a community-based exercise program in primary care on inflammatory biomarkers and hormone levels. The 1-year quasiexperimental study involved 13 women (mean age = 56.8 ± 11.4 years) and it was developed in two basic health care units in Rio Claro City, Brazil. The physical exercise intervention was comprised of two, 60-minute sessions/week. The inflammatory biomarkers were measured at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year. Repeated measures ANOVA analyses indicated that the intervention was effective in reducing CRP and TNFα after 1 year compared to baseline and 6 months (P < 0.05). There were no changes in IL10, IL6, and insulin after 1 year. However, leptin significantly increased at 1 year (P = 0.016). The major finding of this study is that a community-based exercise program can result in a decrease or maintenance of inflammatory biomarkers after 1 year, and thus has the potential to be a viable public health approach for chronic disease prevention. PMID:25136143

  11. Phospholipid fatty acid biomarkers in a freshwater periphyton community exposed to uranium: discovery by non-linear statistical learning

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) have been widely used to characterize environmental microbial communities, generating community profiles that can distinguish phylogenetic or functional groups within the community. The poor specificity of organism groups with fatty acid biomarkers in the classic PLFA-microorganism associations is a confounding factor in many of the statistical classification/clustering approaches traditionally used to interpret PLFA profiles. In this paper we demonstrate that non-linear statistical learning methods, such as a support vector machine (SVM), can more accurately find patterns related to uranyl nitrate exposure in a freshwater periphyton community than linear methods, such as partial least squares discriminant analysis. In addition, probabilistic models of exposure can be derived from the identified lipid biomarkers to demonstrate the potential model-based approach that could be used in remediation. The SVM probability model separates dose groups at accuracies of ~87.0%, ~71.4%, ~87.5%, and 100% for the four groups; Control (non-amended system), low-dose (amended at 10 µg U L-1), medium dose (amended at 100 µg U L-1), and high dose (500 µg U L-1). The SVM model achieved an overall cross-validated classification accuracy of ~87% in contrast to ~59% for the best linear classifier.

  12. Linking pollution induced community tolerance (PICT) and microbial community structure in chronically metal polluted estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Lesley A; Grant, Alistair

    2008-03-01

    We tested the ability of pollution induced community tolerance (PICT) to detect the effects of chronic metal pollution on estuarine sediment microbial communities, along a gradient spanning two orders of magnitude in metal concentrations. In tandem, we investigated the associated microbial community structure using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Tolerance of microbes to Cu, measured as IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50%), was strongly correlated with pore water Cu concentration (r(2)=0.842). No strong correlation existed for other metals tested, highlighting the ability of PICT to identify the pollutant causing a toxic effect. There was no correlation between microbial community structure and community tolerance to metals tested, but analysis of community structure did provide some information on reasons for observed PICT response. PICT methodology used here provided a greater strength and consistency of association with pollutant concentration compared to microbial community structure and can be recommended as a sensitive indicator of metal pollution on estuarine sediment microbial communities.

  13. Using the Women's Community Education Approach to Deliver Community Employment Training: A Case Study from Longford Women's Link

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Lorne; Dowd, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The recent economic downturn and surge in unemployment has focused attention on education and training as a strategic response to Ireland's socio-economic crisis. However, that attention has been concentrated on training through statutory institutions, particularly FAS and the VECs. Longford Women's Link, a Women's Community Education centre in Co…

  14. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of organophosphorylated butyrylcholinesterase: A biomarker of exposure to organophosphate agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liming; Du, Dan; Lu, Donglai; Lin, Chiann Tso; Smith, Jordan N.; Timchalk, Charles; Liu, Fengquan; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-05-05

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (sELISA) is developed for detection of organophosphorylated butyrylcholinesterase (OP-BChE), a potential biomarker for human exposure to organophosphate insecticides and nerve agents. A pair of antibodies specific to OP-BChE adduct were identified through systematic screening of several anti BChE antibodies (anti-BChE) and anti-phosphoserine antibodies (anti-Pser) from different sources. The selected anti-BChE (set as capture antibody) antibodies recognize both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated BChE. These antibodies can therefore be used to capture both BChE and OP-BChE from the sample matrices. The anti- Pser (set as detecting antibody) was used to recognize the OP moiety of OP-BChE adducts. With the combination of the selected antibody pair, several key parameters (such as the concentration of anti-BChE and anti-Pser, and the blocking agent) were optimized to enhance the sensitivity and selectivity of the sELISA. Under the optimal conditions, the sELISA has shown a wide linear range from 0.03 nM to 30 nM, with a detection limit of 0.03 nM. Furthermore, the sELISA was successfully applied to detect OP-BChE using in-vitro biological samples such as rat plasma spiked with OP-BChE with excellent adduct recovery (z>99 %). These results demonstrate that this novel approach holds great promise to develop an ELISA kit and offers a simple and cost-effective tool for screening/evaluating exposure to organophosphate insecticides and nerve agents.

  15. Linking the community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plants: a story of interdependence?

    PubMed

    Horn, Sebastian; Hempel, Stefan; Verbruggen, Erik; Rillig, Matthias C; Caruso, Tancredi

    2017-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are crucial to plants and vice versa, but little is known about the factors linking the community structure of the two groups. We investigated the association between AMF and the plant community structure in the nearest neighborhood of Festuca brevipila in a semiarid grassland with steep environmental gradients, using high-throughput sequencing of the Glomeromycotina (former Glomeromycota). We focused on the Passenger, Driver and Habitat hypotheses: (i) plant communities drive AMF (passenger); (ii) AMF communities drive the plants (driver); (iii) the environment shapes both communities causing covariation. The null hypothesis is that the two assemblages are independent and this study offers a spatially explicit novel test of it in the field at multiple, small scales. The AMF community consisted of 71 operational taxonomic units, the plant community of 47 species. Spatial distance and spatial variation in the environment were the main determinants of the AMF community. The structure of the plant community around the focal plant was a poor predictor of AMF communities, also in terms of phylogenetic community structure. Some evidence supports the passenger hypothesis, but the relative roles of the factors structuring the two groups clearly differed, leading to an apparent decoupling of the two assemblages at the relatively small scale of this study. Community phylogenetic structure in AMF suggests an important role of within-assemblage interactions.

  16. Linking community and ecosystem dynamics through spatial ecology.

    PubMed

    Massol, François; Gravel, Dominique; Mouquet, Nicolas; Cadotte, Marc W; Fukami, Tadashi; Leibold, Mathew A

    2011-03-01

    Classical approaches to food webs focus on patterns and processes occurring at the community level rather than at the broader ecosystem scale, and often ignore spatial aspects of the dynamics. However, recent research suggests that spatial processes influence both food web and ecosystem dynamics, and has led to the idea of 'metaecosystems'. However, these processes have been tackled separately by 'food web metacommunity' ecology, which focuses on the movement of traits, and 'landscape ecosystem' ecology, which focuses on the movement of materials among ecosystems. Here, we argue that this conceptual gap must be bridged to fully understand ecosystem dynamics because many natural cases demonstrate the existence of interactions between the movements of traits and materials. This unification of concepts can be achieved under the metaecosystem framework, and we present two models that highlight how this framework yields novel insights. We then discuss patches, limiting factors and spatial explicitness as key issues to advance metaecosystem theory. We point out future avenues for research on metaecosystem theory and their potential for application to biological conservation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  17. Virtual community consultation? Using the literature and weblogs to link community perspectives and health technology assessment

    PubMed Central

    Street, Jackie M.; Braunack‐Mayer, Annette J.; Facey, Karen; Ashcroft, Richard E.; Hiller, Janet E.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background  Community views, expressed in social impact assessments and collected through community consultation, should play an important role in health technology assessment (HTA). Yet HTA methodologists have been slow to include outcomes of these forms of inquiry in analyses, in part because collecting community views is time‐consuming and resource intensive. Objective  To explore how community views sourced from published studies, grey literature and informal internet web pages can inform HTA. Methods  A technology reviewed by Adelaide HTA in 2004 was selected: retinal photography for detection of diabetic retinopathy. Published literature, ‘grey’ literature and informal web pages were searched to examine the availability of evidence about service community and user community views with respect to this technology. Particular efforts were made to source evidence relating to rural, remote and Aboriginal populations. Results  We found that journal articles, reports from the grey literature and informal internet web pages (including blogs and discussion forums) can provide valuable insight into community views. Although there was little empirical evidence relating to the experience of diabetes and diabetes management in rural, remote and Aboriginal communities, there were indications that some evidence may be transferable from other populations. Conclusions  Community perspectives on selected health technologies can be gauged from available resources in published and grey literature and perspectives collected in this way can provide insight into whether the introduction of the technology would be acceptable to the community. The limitations of this approach are discussed. PMID:18430153

  18. Virtual community consultation? Using the literature and weblogs to link community perspectives and health technology assessment.

    PubMed

    Street, Jackie M; Braunack-Mayer, Annette J; Facey, Karen; Ashcroft, Richard E; Hiller, Janet E

    2008-06-01

    Community views, expressed in social impact assessments and collected through community consultation, should play an important role in health technology assessment (HTA). Yet HTA methodologists have been slow to include outcomes of these forms of inquiry in analyses, in part because collecting community views is time-consuming and resource intensive. To explore how community views sourced from published studies, grey literature and informal internet web pages can inform HTA. A technology reviewed by Adelaide HTA in 2004 was selected: retinal photography for detection of diabetic retinopathy. Published literature, 'grey' literature and informal web pages were searched to examine the availability of evidence about service community and user community views with respect to this technology. Particular efforts were made to source evidence relating to rural, remote and Aboriginal populations. We found that journal articles, reports from the grey literature and informal internet web pages (including blogs and discussion forums) can provide valuable insight into community views. Although there was little empirical evidence relating to the experience of diabetes and diabetes management in rural, remote and Aboriginal communities, there were indications that some evidence may be transferable from other populations. Community perspectives on selected health technologies can be gauged from available resources in published and grey literature and perspectives collected in this way can provide insight into whether the introduction of the technology would be acceptable to the community. The limitations of this approach are discussed.

  19. Links between plant and fungal communities across a deforestation chronosequence in the Amazon rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Rebecca C; Paula, Fabiana S; Mirza, Babur S; Rodrigues, Jorge LM; Nüsslein, Klaus; Bohannan, Brendan JM

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the interactions among microbial communities, plant communities and soil properties following deforestation could provide insights into the long-term effects of land-use change on ecosystem functions, and may help identify approaches that promote the recovery of degraded sites. We combined high-throughput sequencing of fungal rDNA and molecular barcoding of plant roots to estimate fungal and plant community composition in soil sampled across a chronosequence of deforestation. We found significant effects of land-use change on fungal community composition, which was more closely correlated to plant community composition than to changes in soil properties or geographic distance, providing evidence for strong links between above- and below-ground communities in tropical forests. PMID:24451208

  20. Links between plant and fungal communities across a deforestation chronosequence in the Amazon rainforest.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Rebecca C; Paula, Fabiana S; Mirza, Babur S; Rodrigues, Jorge L M; Nüsslein, Klaus; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2014-07-01

    Understanding the interactions among microbial communities, plant communities and soil properties following deforestation could provide insights into the long-term effects of land-use change on ecosystem functions, and may help identify approaches that promote the recovery of degraded sites. We combined high-throughput sequencing of fungal rDNA and molecular barcoding of plant roots to estimate fungal and plant community composition in soil sampled across a chronosequence of deforestation. We found significant effects of land-use change on fungal community composition, which was more closely correlated to plant community composition than to changes in soil properties or geographic distance, providing evidence for strong links between above- and below-ground communities in tropical forests.

  1. Geriatric nursing education in community health: CareLink--partnering for excellence.

    PubMed

    Clemmens, Donna; Goldstein, Jill M; Clarke, Kitty; Moriarty, Mari; Soberman, Rhonda Karp; Gardner, Daniel S

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate how participation in the CareLink program influenced the community health knowledge and skill of baccalaureate nursing students regarding the care of community-dwelling older adults. Students were assigned three to four clients each during their 14-week clinical placement with a home care agency, situated in a naturally occurring retirement community or senior center. Students contracted with their clients to set goals and provided standardized health assessments and teaching. Students completed pretest and posttest surveys, and attended focus groups to address their learning. Students' public health nursing and cultural competence improved significantly. The CareLink program provides a meaningful learning experience for baccalaureate nursing students. Attitudes toward older adults and community health nursing in general shifted to acknowledge that older adults have strengths and resilience not previously acknowledged.

  2. Usefulness and prognostic value of biomarkers in patients with community-acquired pneumonia in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; González Del Castillo, Juan; Candel, Francisco Javier

    2017-06-07

    Between all patients treated in the Emergency Department (ED), 1.35% are diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). CAP is the main cause of death due to infectious disease (10-14%) and the most frequent reason of sepsis-septic shock in the ED. In the last decade, the search for objective tools to help establishing an early diagnosis, bacterial aetiology, severity, suspicion of bacteremia and the prognosis of mortality has increased. Biomarkers have shown their usefulness in this matter. Procalcitonin (obtains the highest accuracy for CAP diagnosis, bacterial aetiology and the presence of bacteremia), lactate (biomarker of hypoxia and tissue hypoperfusion) and proadrenomedullin (which has the greatest accuracy to predict mortality which in combination with the prognostic severity scales obtains even better results). The aim of this review is to highlight recently published scientific evidence and to compare the utility and prognostic accuracy of the biomarkers in CAP patients treated in the ED. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Forging links between nutrition and healthcare using community-based partnerships.

    PubMed

    Biel, Melissa; Evans, Susan H; Clarke, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This pilot project tested the feasibility of a community-based partnership between community clinics and food pantries as an approach to combat diet-related illnesses and engage low-income individuals in healthcare. Many communities possess both kinds of agencies, which serve similar clienteles and are geographically near each other, but these types of agencies rarely have partnered. The "LINKS" program built partnerships between clinics and food pantries at 2 sites. For more than 6 months, the clinics conducted health screenings and provided referrals during scheduled pantry food distributions. Results indicate that clinics can effectively partner with food pantries, an overlooked resource for health promotion.

  4. Integrating the environment, the economy, and community health: a Community Health Center's initiative to link health benefits to smart growth.

    PubMed

    McAvoy, Peter V; Driscoll, Mary Beth; Gramling, Benjamin J

    2004-04-01

    The Sixteenth Street Community Health Center (SSCHC) in Milwaukee, Wis, is making a difference in the livability of surrounding neighborhoods and the overall health of the families it serves. SSCHC is going beyond traditional health care provider models and working to link the environment, the economy, and community health through urban brownfield redevelopment and sustainable land-use planning. In 1997, SSCHC recognized that restoration of local air and water quality and other environmental conditions, coupled with restoring family-supporting jobs in the neighborhood, could have a substantial impact on the overall health of families. Recent events indicate that SSCHC's pursuit of smart growth strategies has begun to pay off.

  5. Evaluation of uncertainties associated with the determination of community drug use through the measurement of sewage drug biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Castiglioni, Sara; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Covaci, Adrian; Emke, Erik; Hernández, Félix; Reid, Malcolm; Ort, Christoph; Thomas, Kevin V; van Nuijs, Alexander L N; de Voogt, Pim; Zuccato, Ettore

    2013-02-05

    The aim of this study was to integrally address the uncertainty associated with all the steps used to estimate community drug consumption through the chemical analysis of sewage biomarkers of illicit drugs. Uncertainty has been evaluated for sampling, chemical analysis, stability of drug biomarkers in sewage, back-calculation of drug use (specific case of cocaine), and estimation of population size in a catchment using data collected from a recent Europe-wide investigation and from the available literature. The quality of sampling protocols and analytical measurements has been evaluated by analyzing standardized questionnaires collected from 19 sewage treatments plants (STPs) and the results of an interlaboratory study (ILS), respectively. Extensive reviews of the available literature have been used to evaluate stability of drug biomarkers in sewage and the uncertainty related to back-calculation of cocaine use. Different methods for estimating population size in a catchment have been compared and the variability among the collected data was very high (7-55%). A reasonable strategy to reduce uncertainty was therefore to choose the most reliable estimation case by case. In the other cases, the highest uncertainties are related to the analysis of sewage drug biomarkers (uncertainty as relative standard deviation; RSD: 6-26% from ILS) and to the back-calculation of cocaine use (uncertainty; RSD: 26%). Uncertainty can be kept below 10% in the remaining steps, if specific requirements outlined in this work are considered. For each step, a best practice protocol has been suggested and discussed to reduce and keep to a minimum the uncertainty of the entire procedure and to improve the reliability of the estimates of drug use.

  6. Cold-spotting: linking primary care and public health to create communities of solution.

    PubMed

    Westfall, John M

    2013-01-01

    By providing enhanced primary care and social services to patients with high utilization of expensive emergency and hospital care, there is evidence that their health can improve and their costs can be lowered. This type of "hot-spotting" improves the care of individual patients. It may be that these patients live in communities with disintegrated social determinants of health, little community support, and poor access to primary care. These "cold spots" in the community may be amenable to interventions targeted at linking primary care and public health at broader community and population levels. Building local communities of solution that address the individual and population may help decrease these cold spots, thereby eliminating the hot spots as well.

  7. Linking Classes: Learning Communities, "High" Culture, and the Working Class Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Ginger G.; Buczinsky, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    How do you teach the humanities to working class students living in the shadow of a BP oil refinery? Calumet College uses freshman learning communities that link humanities, social justice, and English composition classes to provide a foundation for college success to predominantly first-generation students who are often underprepared for…

  8. Linking Community Colleges with Economic Development in Florida. ISHE Fellows Program Research Report No. 3, 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyree, Lawrence Worley; McConnell, Nancy Casner

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between business/industry and education in Florida is discussed in this paper with special emphasis on the role of community colleges in fostering and promoting economic development in the state. First, the paper highlights major factors arguing for strong links between education and industry, including the decline of…

  9. Social Networks: A Link between Psychiatric Epidemiology and Community Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llamas, Robert; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Examines the concept of social network as a mediating construct linking psychiatric epidemiology and community mental health. Presents a selective review of studies investigating the structural and interactional features of the social networks of psychiatrically impaired persons. Implications of results are discussed. (Author)

  10. Health Impact Assessment: Linking Public Health to Community Decisions (Cumulative Impacts Community Vulnerability Symposium)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this presentation is to explore how HIA can help inform hazardous waste permitting regulations and incorporate community vulnerability and cumulative impacts to their potential health risks into permitting decision making by the California Department of Toxic Substanc...

  11. Hypersaline Microbial Mat Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra A.; Summons, Roger E.

    2002-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotopic abundances are powerful tools for studies of contemporary microbial ecosystems. Knowledge of the relationship of biomarkers to microbial physiology and community structure creates important links for understanding the nature of early organisms and paleoenvironments. Our recent work has focused on the hypersaline microbial mats in evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, sulfur oxidizing and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface. The delta C-13 of cyanobacterial biomarkers such as the monomethylalkanes and hopanoids are consistent with the delta C-13 measured for bulk mat (-10%o), while a GNS biomarker, wax esters (WXE), suggests a more depleted delta C-13 for GNS biomass (-16%o). This isotopic relationship is different than that observed in mats at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YSNP) where GNS appear to grow photoheterotrophic ally. WXE abundance, while relatively low, is most pronounced in an anaerobic zone just below the cyanobacterial layer. The WXE isotope composition at GN suggests that these bacteria utilize photoautotrophy incorporating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) via the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway using H2S or H2.

  12. Hypersaline Microbial Mat Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra A.; Summons, Roger E.

    2002-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotopic abundances are powerful tools for studies of contemporary microbial ecosystems. Knowledge of the relationship of biomarkers to microbial physiology and community structure creates important links for understanding the nature of early organisms and paleoenvironments. Our recent work has focused on the hypersaline microbial mats in evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, sulfur oxidizing and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface. The delta C-13 of cyanobacterial biomarkers such as the monomethylalkanes and hopanoids are consistent with the delta C-13 measured for bulk mat (-10%o), while a GNS biomarker, wax esters (WXE), suggests a more depleted delta C-13 for GNS biomass (-16%o). This isotopic relationship is different than that observed in mats at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YSNP) where GNS appear to grow photoheterotrophic ally. WXE abundance, while relatively low, is most pronounced in an anaerobic zone just below the cyanobacterial layer. The WXE isotope composition at GN suggests that these bacteria utilize photoautotrophy incorporating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) via the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway using H2S or H2.

  13. Lipid biomarker and microbial community of 49.6°E hydrothermal field at Southwest Indian Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, J.; Chu, F.; Yu, X.; Li, X.; Tao, C.

    2012-12-01

    In 2007, Chinese Research Cruises Discovered the First Active Hydrothermal Vent Field at the Ultraslow Spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. This study intent to get composition, evolution and origin information of lipid compounds in SWIR, and recognize the style of lipid biomarkers which have obviously indicative significance for community structure.Soluble organic matter were extracted from geological samples (including chimney sulfide, oxide, around hydrothermal vents) in Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), and divided into hydrocarbon, fatty acid component by column chromatography. GC, GC-MS, HPLC-MS were applied for composition and abundance analysis. Lipid in hydrothermal sulfide contains obvious isoprenoidal hydrocarbon biomarkers (Sq, IS40) and GDGTs (m/z=653) that associated with methanogenic archaea which belongs to Euryarchaeota, and iso /anti-iso fatty acid (iC15:0, aiC15:0, iC17:0, aiC17:0)which may originated from sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB).Lipids extracted from hydrothermal oxide lack isoprenoidal hydrocarbon, and Ph/C18 (0.57) is much lower than sulfide (1.22). Fatty acid compound of oxide include abundant saturated fatty (C16:0, C18:0) acid and mono-unsaturated fatty acids (C16:1n7, C18:1n7), but much less iso/anti-iso was detected. Lipid composition of hydrothermal oxide showed that archaea activity was seldom in hydrothermal oxide, and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria was the main microbial community.Study of Jaeschke (2010) showed that high temperature hydrothermal venting encompassed different microbial community from low temperature hydrothermal venting. Our study showed that in different stage of hydrothermal, microbial community structure may be distinct.

  14. Verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance as indicators for changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Soares, Tielle; Rossetto, Raffaella; van Veen, Johannes Antonie; Tsai, Siu Mui; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya

    2015-09-01

    Here we show that verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance are extremely sensitive to changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprint and real-time quantitative PCR assay were used to analyze changes in verrucomicrobial communities associated with contrasting soil nutrient conditions in tropical regions. In case study Model I ("Slash-and-burn deforestation") the verrucomicrobial community structures revealed disparate patterns in nutrient-enriched soils after slash-and-burn deforestation and natural nutrient-poor soils under an adjacent primary forest in the Amazonia (R = 0.819, P = 0.002). The relative proportion of Verrucomicrobia declined in response to increased soil fertility after slash-and-burn deforestation, accounting on average, for 4 and 2 % of the total bacterial signal, in natural nutrient-poor forest soils and nutrient-enriched deforested soils, respectively. In case study Model II ("Management practices for sugarcane") disparate patterns were revealed in sugarcane rhizosphere sampled on optimal and deficient soil fertility for sugarcane (R = 0.786, P = 0.002). Verrucomicrobial community abundance in sugarcane rhizosphere was negatively correlated with soil fertility, accounting for 2 and 5 % of the total bacterial signal, under optimal and deficient soil fertility conditions for sugarcane, respectively. In nutrient-enriched soils, verrucomicrobial community structures were related to soil factors linked to soil fertility, such as total nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sum of bases, i.e., the sum of calcium, magnesium and potassium contents. We conclude that community structure and abundance represent important ecological aspects in soil verrucomicrobial communities for tracking the changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility under tropical environmental conditions.

  15. Chip-based Reversed-phase Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry of Permethylated N-linked Glycans: a Potential Methodology for Cancer-biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Alley, William R.; Madera, Milan; Mechref, Yehia; Novotny, Milos V.

    2010-01-01

    The study of protein glycosylation in biological fluids and tissues has substantial medical importance, as changes in glycan structures have now been associated with a number of diseases. Quantification of glycomic-profile changes is becoming increasingly important in the search for disease biomarkers. Here, we report a highly reproducible combination of a glycomic sample preparation/solid-phase derivatization of glycoprotein-derived N-linked glycans with their subsequent microchip-based separation and mass-spectrometric (MS) measurements. Following our previously-described reductive β-elimination for O-linked glycans with ammonia-borane complex to reduce N-linked structures, the N-linked alditol structures are effectively methylated in dimethylformamide medium to avoid artefacts in MS measurements. Reversed-phase microfluidic liquid chromatography (LC) of methylated N-linked oligosaccharide alditols resolved some closely related structures into regular retention increments, aiding in their structural assignments. Optimized LC gradients, together with nanospray MS, have been applied here in the quantitative measurements of N-linked glycans in blood serum, distinguishing breast cancer patients from control individuals. PMID:20491449

  16. Chip-based reversed-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of permethylated N-linked glycans: a potential methodology for cancer-biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Alley, William R; Madera, Milan; Mechref, Yehia; Novotny, Milos V

    2010-06-15

    The study of protein glycosylation in biological fluids and tissues has substantial medical importance, as changes in glycan structures have now been associated with a number of diseases. Quantification of glycomic-profile changes is becoming increasingly important in the search for disease biomarkers. Here, we report a highly reproducible combination of a glycomic sample preparation/solid-phase derivatization of glycoprotein-derived N-linked glycans with their subsequent microchip-based separation and mass-spectrometric (MS) measurements. Following our previously described reductive beta-elimination for O-linked glycans with ammonia-borane complex to reduce N-linked structures, the N-linked alditol structures are effectively methylated in dimethylformamide medium to avoid artefacts in MS measurements. Reversed-phase microfluidic liquid chromatography (LC) of methylated N-linked oligosaccharide alditols resolved some closely related structures into regular retention increments, aiding in their structural assignments. Optimized LC gradients, together with nanospray MS, have been applied here in the quantitative measurements of N-linked glycans in blood serum, distinguishing breast cancer patients from control individuals.

  17. Biomarkers in Veterinary Medicine.

    PubMed

    Myers, Michael J; Smith, Emily R; Turfle, Phillip G

    2017-02-08

    This article summarizes the relevant definitions related to biomarkers; reviews the general processes related to biomarker discovery and ultimate acceptance and use; and finally summarizes and reviews, to the extent possible, examples of the types of biomarkers used in animal species within veterinary clinical practice and human and veterinary drug development. We highlight opportunities for collaboration and coordination of research within the veterinary community and leveraging of resources from human medicine to support biomarker discovery and validation efforts for veterinary medicine.

  18. Bring the Poles to Your Classroom & Community Through Linked Hands-on Learning & IPY Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, M.; Bell, R. E.; Kastens, K. A.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    Two major legacies of the 4th International Polar Year (IPY 2007-9) are a newly galvanized educational community and an immense volume of polar data collected by the global science community. The tremendous new polar datasets represent a unique opportunity to communicate the nature of the changing poles to student and public audiences through this polar savvy educational community if effective approaches to link data and understanding are employed. We have developed a strategy for polar education that leverages the IPY data resources, linked with the polar education hands-on ‘manipulatives’ (materials that students can manipulate in a dynamic manner). This linked approach leverages the fundamental inquiry based learning but recognizes that particularly in the polar sciences the size of the earth, the remoteness of the poles and the scale of its processes make it difficult for students to explore in a hands-on manner. The linking of polar hands-on ‘manipulatives’ with IPY data provides a bridge between the tangible and the global. Alone manipulative activities can be beneficial in their ability to help students visualize a process or behavior, but without a strong link back to the Earth through data or evidence the understanding of the process is not transferred from the classroom model to the full scale Earth. The use of activities or models is beneficial in connecting the learner to the polar process(es), while the IPY data provides a unique opportunity to ground the polar manipulative experiments in real data. This linked strategy emerged from a series of NSF sponsored IPY Polar Fairs at major science museums that reached in excess of 12,000 people. The design of the fairs was that polar scientists developed activities linking low cost hands-on manipulatives to scientific evidence/data that was displayed in posters, images, and video clips. The participating scientists walked the ‘audience’ through the hands-on manipulative, then discussed their

  19. Obesity paradox in patients with community-acquired pneumonia: Is inflammation the missing link?

    PubMed

    Braun, Nina; Hoess, Claus; Kutz, Alexander; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Thomann, Robert; Henzen, Christoph; Zimmerli, Werner; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Positive associations between body mass index (BMI) and clinical outcomes have been found and are called "the obesity survival paradox." However, whether obesity has protective effects or if this paradox is because of confounding remains unclear. Herein, we analyzed the effects of weight on long-term mortality in a large cohort of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and investigated whether the differential effects of obesity on inflammation pathways accounted for mortality differences. For this secondary analysis, we followed prospectively for 6 y 763 CAP patients who were previously included in a multicenter trial (the ProHOSP Trial). To assess associations of BMI with mortality and with several inflammatory biomarker levels, we calculated three regression models adjusted for severity: the pneumonia severity index (PSI); fully adjusted for PSI, age, sex, metabolic factors, cardiovascular diseases, and other comorbidities; and fully adjusted including biomarker levels. Within the 763 patients studied, all-cause 6-y mortality was significantly lower in obese patients (BMI >30 kg/m(2)) compared with normal-weight patients (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m(2)), with a severity-adjusted hazard ratio of 0.641 (95% confidence interval 0.462-0.889) and robust results in fully adjusted and fully adjusted plus biomarker models. No associations of increased BMI and C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, or white blood cell count were found, but BMI > 30 kg/m(2) was associated with higher proadrenomedullin levels. Over a 6-y long-term follow-up, we found obesity to be associated with lower all-cause mortality in CAP patients, confirming the obesity paradox in this population. However, differences in inflammatory pathways did not explain these findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel and conventional biomarkers for the prediction of incident cardiovascular events in the community

    PubMed Central

    Melander, Olle; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Almgren, Peter; Hedblad, Bo; Berglund, Göran; Engström, Gunnar; Persson, Margaretha; Smith, J. Gustav; Magnusson, Martin; Christensson, Anders; Struck, Joachim; Morgenthaler, Nils G.; Bergmann, Andreas; Pencina, Michael; Wang, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Context Prior studies have conflicted regarding how much information novel biomarkers add to cardiovascular risk assessment. Objective To evaluate the utility of biomarkers for predicting cardiovascular risk when added to conventional risk factors, using contemporary biomarkers and newer statistical approaches. Design, Setting, Participants Between 1991 and 1994, 5067 participants (mean age 58, 60% women) without cardiovascular disease from a prospective cohort in Malmö, Sweden underwent measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP), mid-regional-pro-atrial natriuretic peptide, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (N-BNP), mid-regional-pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), lipoprotein-associated phospholipase-2, and cystatin C. Participants were followed until 2006. First cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary death) were ascertained using the Swedish national hospital discharge and cause-of-death registers. Low-, intermediate-, and high-risk were defined as 10-year risks of <6%, 6–19%, or ≥20%, respectively. Main Outcome Measures Incident cardiovascular and coronary events. Results During median follow-up of 12.8 years, there were 418 cardiovascular and 230 coronary events. Models with conventional risk factors had c-statistics of 0.758 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.734–0.781) and 0.760 (0.730–0.789) for cardiovascular and coronary events. Biomarkers retained in backward-elimination models were N-BNP and CRP for cardiovascular events, and N-BNP and MR-proADM for coronary events, which raised the c-statistic by 0.007 (p=0.04) and 0.009 (p=0.08), respectively. The proportion of participants reclassified was modest (8% for cardiovascular risk, 5% for coronary risk). The net reclassification improvement (NRI) was non-significant for cardiovascular events (0.0%, 95%CI, −4.3%–4.3%) and coronary events (4.7%, −0.76%–10.1%). Greater improvements were observed in analyses restricted to intermediate-risk individuals (cardiovascular

  1. The application of a biometric identification technique for linking community and hospital data in rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Odei-Lartey, Eliezer Ofori; Boateng, Dennis; Danso, Samuel; Kwarteng, Anthony; Abokyi, Livesy; Amenga-Etego, Seeba; Gyaase, Stephaney; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Background The reliability of counts for estimating population dynamics and disease burdens in communities depends on the availability of a common unique identifier for matching general population data with health facility data. Biometric data has been explored as a feasible common identifier between the health data and sociocultural data of resident members in rural communities within the Kintampo Health and Demographic Surveillance System located in the central part of Ghana. Objective Our goal was to assess the feasibility of using fingerprint identification to link community data and hospital data in a rural African setting. Design A combination of biometrics and other personal identification techniques were used to identify individual's resident within a surveillance population seeking care in two district hospitals. Visits from resident individuals were successfully recorded and categorized by the success of the techniques applied during identification. The successes of visits that involved identification by fingerprint were further examined by age. Results A total of 27,662 hospital visits were linked to resident individuals. Over 85% of those visits were successfully identified using at least one identification method. Over 65% were successfully identified and linked using their fingerprints. Supervisory support from the hospital administration was critical in integrating this identification system into its routine activities. No concerns were expressed by community members about the fingerprint registration and identification processes. Conclusions Fingerprint identification should be combined with other methods to be feasible in identifying community members in African rural settings. This can be enhanced in communities with some basic Demographic Surveillance System or census information. PMID:26993473

  2. Linking physical education with community sport and recreation: a program for adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Casey, Meghan; Mooney, Amanda; Eime, Rochelle; Harvey, Jack; Smyth, John; Telford, Amanda; Payne, Warren

    2013-09-01

    The engagement of adolescent girls in physical activity (PA) is a persistent challenge. School-based PA programs have often met with little success because of the lack of linkages between school and community PA settings. The Triple G program aimed to improve PA levels of secondary school girls (12-15 years) in regional Victoria, Australia. The program included a school-based physical education (PE) component that uniquely incorporated student-centered teaching and behavioral skill development. The school component was conceptually and practically linked to a community component that emphasized appropriate structures for participation. The program was informed by ethnographic fieldwork to understand the contextual factors that affect girls' participation in PA. A collaborative intervention design was undertaken to align with PE curriculum and coaching and instructional approaches in community PA settings. The theoretical framework for the intervention was the socioecological model that was underpinned by both individual-level (social cognitive theory) and organizational-level (building organizational/community capacity) strategies. The program model provides an innovative conceptual framework for linking school PE with community sport and recreation and may benefit other PA programs seeking to engage adolescent girls. The objective of this article is to describe program development and the unique theoretical framework and curriculum approaches.

  3. Stable Isotope Probing: Linking Functional Activity to Specific Members of Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.

    2007-03-12

    Abstract Linking organisms or groups of organisms to specific functions within natural environments is a fundamental challenge in microbial ecology. Advances in technology for manipulating and analyzing nucleic acids have made it possible to characterize the members of microbial communities without the intervention of laboratory culturing. Results from such studies have shown that the vast majority of soil organisms have never been cultured, highlighting the risks of culture-based approaches in community analysis. The development of culture-independent techniques for following the flow of substrates through microbial communities therefore represents an important advance. These techniques, collectively known as stable isotope probing (SIP), involve introducing a stable isotope-labeled substrate into a microbial community and following the fate of the substrate by detecting the appearance of the isotope in diagnostic molecules such as fatty acids and nucleic acids. The molecules in which the isotope label appears provide identifying information about the organism that incorporated the substrate. SIP allows direct observations of substrate assimilation in minimally disturbed communities, and thus represents an exciting new tool for linking microbial identity and function. The use of lipids or nucleic acids as the diagnostic molecule brings different strengths and weaknesses to the experimental approach, and necessitates the use of significantly different instrumentation and analytical techniques. This mini-review provides an overview of the lipid and nucleic acid approaches, discusses their strengths and weaknesses, gives examples of applications in various settings, and looks at prospects for the future of SIP technology.

  4. Red Blood Cell Fatty Acids and Biomarkers of Inflammation: A Cross-sectional Study in a Community-based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, João D.; Rahman, Faisal; Lacey, Sean; Larson, Martin G.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Harris, William S.; Robins, Sander J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inflammation and inflammatory biomarkers have emerged as integral components and predictors of incident cardiovascular (CV) disease. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (EPA and DHA) have anti-inflammatory properties, and have been variably associated with lower blood pressure, favorable blood lipid changes, and reduced CV events. Methods and Results We examined the cross-sectional association of red blood cell (RBC) fatty acids, representative of body membrane fatty acid composition, with 10 biomarkers active in multiple inflammatory pathways in 2724 participants (mean age 66±9 years, 54% women, 8% minorities) from the Framingham Offspring and minority Omni Cohorts. . After multivariable adjustment, the RBC EPA and DHA content was inversely correlated (all P≤0.001) with 8 markers of inflammation, receptors, or pathways: urinary isoprostanes (r=−0.16); and soluble interleukin-6 (r=−0.10); C-reactive protein (r=−0.08); tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (r=−0.08); intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (r=−0.08); P-selectin (r=−0.06); lipoprotein-associated phospholipase-A2 mass (r=−0.11) and activity (r=−0.08). The correlations for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 was −0.05, P=0.006 and osteoprotegerin (r= −0.06, P=0.002) were only nominally significant. Conclusion In our large community-based study, we observed modest inverse associations between several types of inflammatory biomarkers with RBC omega-3 fatty acid levels. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:25897795

  5. Using a trait-based approach to link microbial community composition and functioning to soil salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Kristin; Fierer, Noah; Rousk, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Our knowledge of the dynamics structuring microbial communities and the consequences this has for soil functions is rudimentary. In particular, predictions of the response of microbial communities to environmental change and the implications for associated ecosystem processes remain elusive. Understanding how environmental factors structure microbial communities and regulate the functions they perform is key to a mechanistic understanding of how biogeochemical cycles respond to environmental change. Soil salinization is an agricultural problem in many parts of the world. The activity of soil microorganisms is reduced in saline soils compared to non-saline soil. However, soil salinity often co-varies with other factors, making it difficult to assign responses of microbial communities to direct effects of salinity. A trait-based approach allows us to connect the environmental factor salinity with the responses of microbial community composition and functioning. Salinity along a salinity gradient serves as a filter for the community trait distribution of salt tolerance, selecting for higher salt tolerance at more saline sites. This trait-environment relationship can be used to predict responses of microbial communities to environmental change. Our aims were to (i) use salinity along natural salinity gradients as an environmental filter, and (ii) link the resulting filtered trait-distributions of the communities (the trait being salt tolerance) to the community composition. Soil samples were obtained from two replicated salinity gradients along an Australian salt lake, spanning a wide range of soil salinities (0.1 dS m-1 to >50 dS m-1). In one of the two gradients salinity was correlated with pH. Community trait distributions for salt tolerance were assessed by establishing dose-dependences for extracted bacterial communities using growth rate assays. In addition, functional parameters were measured along the salt gradients. Community composition of sites was compared

  6. Unraveling the Link between Malnutrition and Adverse Clinical Outcomes: Association of Acute and Chronic Malnutrition Measures with Blood Biomarkers from Different Pathophysiological States.

    PubMed

    Felder, Susan; Braun, Nina; Stanga, Zeno; Kulkarni, Prasad; Faessler, Lukas; Kutz, Alexander; Steiner, Deborah; Laukemann, Svenja; Haubitz, Sebastian; Huber, Andreas; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is associated with poor clinical outcomes. Whether there is a causal relationship or it merely mirrors a severe patient condition remains unclear. We examined the association of malnutrition with biomarkers characteristic of different pathophysiological states to better understand the underlying etiological mechanisms. We prospectively followed consecutive adult medical inpatients. Multivariable regression models were used to investigate the associations between malnutrition - as assessed using the Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS 2002) - and biomarkers linked to inflammation, stress, renal dysfunction, nutritional status and hematologic function. A total of 529 patients were included. In a fully adjusted model, malnutrition was significantly associated with the inflammatory markers procalcitonin (0.20, 95% CI 0.03-0.37), proadrenomedullin (0.28, 95% CI 0.12-0.43) and albumin (-0.39, 95% CI -0.57 to -0.21), the stress marker copeptin (0.34, 95% CI 0.17-0.51), the renal function marker urea (0.23, 95% CI 0.07-0.38), the nutritional markers vitamin D25 (-0.22, 95% CI -0.41 to -0.02) and corrected calcium (0.29, 95% CI 0.10-0.49) and the hematological markers hemoglobin (-0.27, 95% CI -0.43 to -0.10) and red blood cell distribution width (0.26, 95% CI 0.07-0.44). Subgroup analysis suggested that acute malnutrition rather than chronic malnutrition was associated with elevated biomarker levels. Acute malnutrition was associated with a pronounced inflammatory response and an alteration in biomarkers associated with different pathophysiological states. Interventional trials are needed to prove causality. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Step 5: Has Clearly Defined Policies, Procedures for Collaboration, Consultation, Links to Community Resources

    PubMed Central

    Salt, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Step 5 of the Ten Steps of Mother-Friendly Care ensures that the hospital, birth center, or home birth service has clearly defined policies and procedures for collaborating and consulting with other maternity services and for linking the mother and baby to appropriate community services during both the prenatal and the postpartum periods. The rationales and evidence in support of this step are presented. PMID:18523674

  8. Linking Returning Veterans in Rural Community Colleges to Mental Health Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    with mental health problems to care in order to promote successful re-integration into a productive, civilian life. One reintegration domain that is...student veterans ’ mental health needs as they reintegrate and attend two-year community colleges. A concurrent challenge is that many returning student...Linking these suffering student veterans to quality care is critical to their educational success on the new GI bill and their successful re

  9. Carotenoid biomarkers as an imperfect reflection of the anoxygenic phototrophic community in meromictic Fayetteville Green Lake.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K M; Macalady, J L; Fulton, J M; Kump, L R; Schaperdoth, I; Freeman, K H

    2011-07-01

    Organic biomarkers in marine sedimentary rocks hold important clues about the early history of Earth's surface environment. The chemical relicts of carotenoids from anoxygenic sulfur bacteria are of particular interest to geoscientists because of their potential to signal episodes of marine photic-zone euxinia such as those proposed for extended periods in the Proterozoic as well as brief intervals during the Phanerozoic. It is therefore critical to constrain the environmental and physiological factors that influence carotenoid production and preservation in modern environments. Here, we present the results of coupled pigment and nucleic acid clone library analyses from planktonic and benthic samples collected from a microbially dominated meromictic lake, Fayetteville Green Lake (New York). Purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) are abundant and diverse both in the water column at the chemocline and in benthic mats below oxygenated shallow waters, with different PSB species inhabiting the two environments. Okenone (from PSB) is an abundant carotenoid in both the chemocline waters and in benthic mats. Green sulfur bacteria and their primary pigment Bchl e are also represented in and below the chemocline. However, the water column and sediments are devoid of the green sulfur bacteria carotenoid isorenieratene. The unexpected absence of isorenieratene and apparent benthic production of okenone provide strong rationale for continued exploration of the microbial ecology of biomarker production in modern euxinic environments. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Biomarkers of manganese exposure in pregnant women and children living in an agricultural community in California.

    PubMed

    Gunier, Robert B; Mora, Ana Maria; Smith, Donald; Arora, Manish; Austin, Christine; Eskenazi, Brenda; Bradman, Asa

    2014-12-16

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient but at high exposure levels is a neurotoxicant. There is no well-validated biomarker to assess perinatal Mn exposure. A total of 75 mother-child pairs provided blood, urine, and/or deciduous tooth samples. We analyzed Mn in dentin and enamel of shed teeth; maternal, cord, and child blood; and maternal and child urine and examined the interrelationships of Mn levels in all matrices. We observed higher Mn levels in prenatal than postnatal dentin (geometric mean (GM) = 0.51 vs 0.16 Mn:Ca, p < 0.001), maternal blood at delivery than 26 weeks gestation (GM = 20.7 vs. 14.6 μg/L, p = 0.001), and cord blood than child blood at 24 months of age (39.9 vs 25.0 μg/L, p = 0.005). There were no significant correlations between Mn in dentin and Mn concentrations in maternal blood or maternal or child urine. Levels of Mn in prenatal dentin, prenatal maternal blood, and 24 month urine were higher (p < 0.05) among mothers and children living with a farm worker. Prenatal Mn levels in dentin were correlated with Mn loadings and concentrations in prenatal house dust. Levels of Mn measured in tooth dentin constitute a promising biomarker of perinatal exposure.

  11. Linking Microbial Community Structure to β-Glucosidic Function in Soil Aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Stegen, James C.; McCue, Lee Ann

    2013-10-01

    To link microbial community 16S structure to a measured function in a natural soil we have scaled both DNA and β-glucosidase assays down to a volume of soil that may approach a unique microbial community. β-glucosidase activity was assayed in 450 individual aggregates which were then sorted into classes of high or low activities, from which groups of 10 or 11 aggregates were identified and grouped for DNA extraction and pyrosequencing. Tandem assays of ATP were conducted for each aggregate in order to normalize these small groups of aggregates for biomass size. In spite of there being no significant differences in the richness or diversity of the microbial communities associated with high β-glucosidase activities compared with the communities associated with low β-glucosidase communities, several analyses of variance clearly show that the communities of these two groups differ. The separation of these groups is partially driven by the differential abundances of members of the Chitinophagaceae family. It may be that observed functional differences in otherwise similar soil aggregates can be largely attributed to differences in resource availability, rather than to presence or absence of particular taxonomic groups.

  12. Link community detection by non-negative matrix factorization with multi-step similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianchao; Yang, Guoqing; Xu, Tao; Feng, Xia; Wang, Xiao; Li, Qiannan; Liu, Yanbei

    2016-11-01

    Uncovering community structures is a fundamental and important problem in analyzing the complex networks. While most of the methods focus on identifying node communities, recent works show the intuitions and advantages of detecting link communities in networks. In this paper, we propose a non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) based method to detect the link community structures. Traditional NMF-based methods mainly consider the adjacency matrix as the representation of network topology, while the adjacency matrix only shows the relationship between immediate neighbor nodes, which does not take the relationship between non-neighbor nodes into consideration. This may greatly reduce the information contained in the network topology, and thus leads to unsatisfactory results. Here, we address this by introducing multi-step similarities using the graph random walk approach so that the similarities between non-neighbor nodes can be captured. Meanwhile, in order to reduce impact caused by self-similarities (similarities between nodes themselves) and increase importance gained from similarities between other different nodes, we add a penalty term to our objective function. Then an efficient optimization scheme for the objective function is derived. Finally, we test the proposed method on both synthetic and real networks. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  13. Toward Linking Aboveground Vegetation Properties and Soil Microbial Communities Using Remote Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Yuki; Gilbert, Jack A.; Larsen, Peter E.; Norgaard, Madeline J.

    2014-04-01

    Despite their vital role in terrestrial ecosystem function, the distributions and dynamics of soil microbial communities (SMCs) are poorly understood. Vegetation and soil properties are the primary factors that influence SMCs. This paper discusses the potential effectiveness of remote sensing science and technologies for mapping SMC biogeography by characterizing surface biophysical properties (e.g., plant traits and community composition) strongly correlated with SMCs. Using remotely sensed biophysical properties to predict SMC distributions is extremely challenging because of the intricate interactions between biotic and abiotic factors and between above- and belowground ecosystems. However, the integration of biophysical and soil remote sensing with geospatial information about the e nvironment holds great promise for mapping SMC biogeography. Additional research needs invol ve microbial taxonomic definition, soil environmental complexity, and scaling strategies. The collaborative effort of experts from diverse disciplines is essential to linking terrestrial surface biosphere observations with subsurface microbial community distributions using remote sensing.

  14. Structural changes in soil communities after triclopyr application in soils invaded by Acacia dealbata Link.

    PubMed

    Souza-Alonso, Pablo; Guisande, Alejandra; González, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Triclopyr is a commonly used herbicide in the control of woody plants and can exhibit toxic effects to soil microorganisms. However, the impact on soils invaded by plant exotics has not yet been addressed. Here, we present the results of an 18-month field study conducted to evaluate the impact of triclopyr on the structure of fungal and bacterial communities in soils invaded by Acacia dealbata Link, through the use of denature gradient gel electrophoresis. After triclopyr application, analyses of bacterial fingerprints suggested a change in the structure of the soil bacterial community, whereas the structure of the soil fungal community remained unaltered. Bacterial density and F:B ratio values changed across the year but were not altered due to herbicide spraying. On the contrary, fungal diversity was increased in plots sprayed with triclopyr 5 months after the first application. Richness and diversity (H') of both bacteria and fungi were not modified after triclopyr application.

  15. Characterization of the deep-sea microbial community and investigation of their carbon sources using lipid biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampen, S. W.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schouten, S.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Most marine microbiology studies so far have been devoted to the photic zone, as this is the area where most of the primary production occurs. However, recently several groups of autotrophic organisms belonging to the Thaumarchaeota have been identified in the deep-sea. Thaumarchaeota belong to the Archaea, which form one of the three Domains of life, next to the Eukarya and the Bacteria. While until the 1990s the Archaea were viewed as extremophilic organisms, results obtained over the last twenty years indicate that Thaumarchaeota are an ubiquitous component of marine plankton, being among the most widely distributed and most abundant groups of microorganisms on the planet; Thaumarchaeota even exceed Bacteria in abundance below 1000 m water depth. Despite these findings, our understanding on their physiology and their biogeochemical function remains mostly speculative because only very few of these organisms could be cultivated. The aim of our project is 1) to characterize the microbial community in the deep-sea using lipid biomarkers for Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, 2) to investigate the carbon sources for these organisms using compound specific 13C and 14C analyses and 3) to elucidate the flow of carbon in deep-sea microbial communities using 13C labeling studies. To this end, organic matter has been collected from several locations in the Mediterranean Sea and from the Iceland Basin. Water volumes up to 160 liters were sampled using Niskin bottles which were then filtered on board, while larger volumes, up to 5000 liters, were sampled by deployment of two McLane in-situ pumps at depth. Additional water samples were filtered from the subsurface to distinguish in-situ production from settling organic biomass produced in the upper water column. In addition, 13C labeled glucose, amino acids and sodium bicarbonate were each added to deep-sea water kept in separate 20 liter Nalgene bottles. Incubated water samples and control samples were kept at deep

  16. Linking up with the community: a fertile strategy for a university hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Plochg, Thomas; Delnoij, Diana M.J.; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To systematically identify, describe and characterise the collaborative initiatives, which have been established between the Academic Medical Centre/University of Amsterdam and local health care providers in the adjacent community. Background The viability of university hospitals is jeopardised. Their narrowed orientation on delivering the most advanced services to the sickest patients challenges their missions in patient care, science and education. By linking up with local health care providers, university hospitals create synergistic relationships that should secure these three academic missions for the future. Methods We conducted a multiple case study in two stages. Initially, division leaders and the director of integrated care were consulted to identify all existing collaborative initiatives of the Academic Medical Centre. Successively, face-to-face interviews were held with the leaders of these initiatives. During these interviews data were primarily collected through a questionnaire. Notes of the interviewer, and documents (if available) were also collected. The analysis focused on systematically describing and characterising the initiatives using the concept of ‘community-based integrated care’. Results Twenty-seven heterogeneous initiatives were identified. Half of these initiatives are targeted to the adjacent community of the Academic Medical Centre, but only four of them are initiated on the basis of community information and involve the community and/or patients. Furthermore, the extent of integration differed per dimension. Functional integration within the initiatives has been relatively low, clinical integration mixed, and professional integration quite advanced. Conclusions The results indicate that a considerable number of collaborative initiatives have emerged. Still, these initiatives are loosely ‘community-based’ and hardly focus on the full integration of care services. This suggests that the community linkages of

  17. Linking electronic health records with community-level data to understand childhood obesity risk.

    PubMed

    Tomayko, E J; Flood, T L; Tandias, A; Hanrahan, L P

    2015-12-01

    Environmental and socioeconomic factors should be considered along with individual characteristics when determining risk for childhood obesity. To assess relationships and interactions among the economic hardship index (EHI) and race/ethnicity, age and sex in regard to childhood obesity rates in Wisconsin children using an electronic health record dataset. Data were collected using the University of Wisconsin (UW) Public Health Information Exchange database, which links electronic health records with census-derived community-level data. Records from 53,775 children seen at UW clinics from 2007 to 2012 were included. Mixed-effects modelling was used to determine obesity rates and the interaction of EHI with covariates (race/ethnicity, age, sex). When significant interactions were determined, linear regression analyses were performed for each subgroup (e.g. by age groups). The overall obesity rate was 11.7% and significant racial/ethnic disparities were detected. Childhood obesity was significantly associated with EHI at the community level (r = 0.62, P < 0.0001). A significant interaction was determined between EHI and both race/ethnicity and age on obesity rates. Reducing economic disparities and improving environmental conditions may influence childhood obesity risk in some, but not all, races and ethnicities. Furthermore, the impact of EHI on obesity may be compounded over time. Our findings demonstrate the utility of linking electronic health information with census data to rapidly identify community-specific risk factors in a cost-effective manner. © 2014 World Obesity.

  18. Linking electronic health records with community-level data to understand childhood obesity risk

    PubMed Central

    Tomayko, Emily J.; Flood, Tracy L.; Tandias, Aman; Hanrahan, Lawrence P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Environmental and socioeconomic factors should be considered along with individual characteristics when determining risk for childhood obesity. Objective To assess relationships and interactions among economic hardship index and race/ethnicity, age, and sex in regards to childhood obesity rates in Wisconsin children using an electronic health record dataset. Methods Data were collected using the University of Wisconsin Public Health Information Exchange (PHINEX) database, which links electronic health records with census-derived community-level data. Records from 53,775 children seen at UW clinics from 2007–2012 were included. Mixed effects modeling was used to determine obesity rates and the interaction of EHI with covariates (race/ethnicity, age, sex). When significant interactions were determined, linear regression analyses were performed for each subgroup (e.g., by age groups). Results The overall obesity rate was 11.7%, and significant racial/ethnic disparities were detected. Childhood obesity was significantly associated with EHI at the community level (r=0.62, p<0.0001). A significant interaction was determined between EHI and both race/ethnicity and age on obesity rates. Conclusions Reducing economic disparities and improving environmental conditions may influence childhood obesity risk in some, but not all, races and ethnicities. Furthermore, the impact of EHI on obesity may be compounded over time. Our findings demonstrate the utility of linking electronic health information with census data to rapidly identify community-specific risk factors in a cost-effective manner. PMID:25559099

  19. Signature lipid biomarkers for in situ microbial biomass, community structure and nutritional status of deep subsurface microbiota in relation to geochemical gradients. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C.; Ringelberg, D.B.

    1998-02-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the microbial ecology of the deep subsurface, it was necessary to employ alternate techniques for the identification of microorganisms in situ. Classical microbiological techniques assay only those organisms which are culturable with bias occurring towards the media selected. Since culturable microorganisms typically represents only 0.1 to 10% of the extant microbiota, techniques for the direct assay of microorganisms in situ were needed. The analysis of cellular lipid biomarkers is a technique whereby microbial communities can be assayed directly in a variety of environmental matrices. Through the quantitative recovery of lipid biomarkers, estimations of cell biomass, community composition and community nutritional and/or physiological status can be obtained.

  20. Association of Elevated Amyloid Levels With Cognition and Biomarkers in Cognitively Normal People From the Community

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ronald C.; Wiste, Heather J.; Weigand, Stephen D.; Rocca, Walter A.; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Lowe, Val J.; Knopman, David S.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Machulda, Mary M.; Geda, Yonas E.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The role of amyloid in the progression of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathophysiology is of central interest to the design of randomized clinical trials. The presence of amyloid has become a prerequisite for enrollment in several secondary prevention trials for AD, yet the precise effect of elevated amyloid levels on subsequent clinical and biomarker events is less certain. OBJECTIVE To explore the effect of elevated amyloid levels on subsequent changes in cognition and biomarkers. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A total of 564 cognitively normal individuals (median age, 78 years) from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging, a population-based longitudinal study in Olmsted County, Minnesota, with serial cognitive data were selected for this study. The data used in this study were collected from January 12, 2006, to January 9, 2014. Individuals included in this study had undergone magnetic resonance imaging, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), and Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET at baseline were not cognitively impaired at baseline and had at least 1 clinical follow-up. A subset of 286 individuals also underwent serial imaging. Elevated amyloid level was defined as a standardized uptake value ratio of greater than 1.5 on PiB PET. Associations with baseline amyloid status and baseline and longitudinal change in clinical and imaging measures were evaluated after adjusting for age and hippocampal volume. APOE4 effects were also evaluated. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cognitive measures of memory, language, attention/executive function, visuospatial skills, PiB levels, hippocampal and ventricular volumes, and FDG-PET measures. RESULTS At baseline, 179 (31.7%) individuals with elevated amyloid levels had poorer cognition in all domains measured, reduced hippocampal volume, and greater FDG-PET hypometabolism. Elevated amyloid levels at baseline were associated with a greater rate of cognitive decline in all domains (0.04 to 0.09 z score units per year

  1. APPLICATION OF PHOTOPIGMENT BIOMARKERS FOR QUANTIFYING MICROALGAL COMMUNITY COMPOSITION AND IN SITU GROWTH RATES. (R826938)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In estuarine waters, phytoplankton are exposed to rapidly changing conditions that may affect community structure and function. In this study we determined the effects of mixing, turbidity, and limiting nutrient (N) additions on natural phytoplankton growth rates and algal gro...

  2. APPLICATION OF PHOTOPIGMENT BIOMARKERS FOR QUANTIFYING MICROALGAL COMMUNITY COMPOSITION AND IN SITU GROWTH RATES. (R828677)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In estuarine waters, phytoplankton are exposed to rapidly changing conditions that may affect community structure and function. In this study we determined the effects of mixing, turbidity, and limiting nutrient (N) additions on natural phytoplankton growth rates and algal gro...

  3. APPLICATION OF PHOTOPIGMENT BIOMARKERS FOR QUANTIFYING MICROALGAL COMMUNITY COMPOSITION AND IN SITU GROWTH RATES. (R826938)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In estuarine waters, phytoplankton are exposed to rapidly changing conditions that may affect community structure and function. In this study we determined the effects of mixing, turbidity, and limiting nutrient (N) additions on natural phytoplankton growth rates and algal gro...

  4. Circulating irisin levels as a predictive biomarker for sarcopenia: A cross-sectional community-based study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Seung; Kim, Tae Ho; Nguyen, Tuyet Thi; Park, Kyu-Sang; Kim, Nahyun; Kong, In Deok

    2017-04-10

    Myokines are peptides released by the skeletal muscle, and have gained popularity as potential biomarkers for sarcopenia. Irisin is a recently identified myokine, but its role in pathological sarcopenia remains unclear. We investigated the validity and accuracy of circulating irisin levels as a potential biomarker for sarcopenia. We evaluated the anthropometrics, body composition, sarcopenia-related parameters and serum irisin levels of 715 community-dwelling Koreans. Sarcopenia was determined on the basis of the clinical diagnostic criteria of muscle atrophy and weakness, which were proposed by the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia. Circulating irisin levels were correlated with appendicular lean mass/height(2) (rmen  = 0.275; rwomen  = 0.321) and handgrip strength (rmen  = 0.219; rwomen  = 0.312) in both sexes (all P < 0.01). Furthermore, the mean circulating irisin levels were lower in the sarcopenia group than in the normal group (all P < 0.05). In the logistic regression models, the association between serum irisin concentration and incident sarcopenia persisted even after adjusting for potential confounders, such as sex, age and fat indices (odds ratio 0.20, 95% CI 0.07-0.60; P for trend <0.01). The predictive values of serum irisin for sarcopenia were <1.0 μg/mL in men and <1.16 μg/mL in women, with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves of 0.87 (95% CI 0.77-0.99) and 0.68 (95% CI 0.55-0.81), respectively (all P < 0.01). A low level of circulating irisin is a sensitive marker for muscle weakness and atrophy. Irisin is a potential biomarker for muscle dysfunction that could help predict the onset of sarcopenia and provide new avenues for monitoring age-related muscle changes. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••. © 2017 The Authors Geriatrics & Gerontology International published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Common neighbours and the local-community-paradigm for topological link prediction in bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daminelli, Simone; Thomas, Josephine Maria; Durán, Claudio; Vittorio Cannistraci, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    Bipartite networks are powerful descriptions of complex systems characterized by two different classes of nodes and connections allowed only across but not within the two classes. Unveiling physical principles, building theories and suggesting physical models to predict bipartite links such as product-consumer connections in recommendation systems or drug-target interactions in molecular networks can provide priceless information to improve e-commerce or to accelerate pharmaceutical research. The prediction of nonobserved connections starting from those already present in the topology of a network is known as the link-prediction problem. It represents an important subject both in many-body interaction theory in physics and in new algorithms for applied tools in computer science. The rationale is that the existing connectivity structure of a network can suggest where new connections can appear with higher likelihood in an evolving network, or where nonobserved connections are missing in a partially known network. Surprisingly, current complex network theory presents a theoretical bottle-neck: a general framework for local-based link prediction directly in the bipartite domain is missing. Here, we overcome this theoretical obstacle and present a formal definition of common neighbour index and local-community-paradigm (LCP) for bipartite networks. As a consequence, we are able to introduce the first node-neighbourhood-based and LCP-based models for topological link prediction that utilize the bipartite domain. We performed link prediction evaluations in several networks of different size and of disparate origin, including technological, social and biological systems. Our models significantly improve topological prediction in many bipartite networks because they exploit local physical driving-forces that participate in the formation and organization of many real-world bipartite networks. Furthermore, we present a local-based formalism that allows to intuitively

  6. Biological Database of Images and Genomes: tools for community annotations linking image and genomic information

    PubMed Central

    Oberlin, Andrew T; Jurkovic, Dominika A; Balish, Mitchell F; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-01-01

    Genomic data and biomedical imaging data are undergoing exponential growth. However, our understanding of the phenotype–genotype connection linking the two types of data is lagging behind. While there are many types of software that enable the manipulation and analysis of image data and genomic data as separate entities, there is no framework established for linking the two. We present a generic set of software tools, BioDIG, that allows linking of image data to genomic data. BioDIG tools can be applied to a wide range of research problems that require linking images to genomes. BioDIG features the following: rapid construction of web-based workbenches, community-based annotation, user management and web services. By using BioDIG to create websites, researchers and curators can rapidly annotate a large number of images with genomic information. Here we present the BioDIG software tools that include an image module, a genome module and a user management module. We also introduce a BioDIG-based website, MyDIG, which is being used to annotate images of mycoplasmas. Database URL: BioDIG website: http://biodig.org BioDIG source code repository: http://github.com/FriedbergLab/BioDIG The MyDIG database: http://mydig.biodig.org/ PMID:23550062

  7. Variation in Parasite Communities in Spottail Shiners (Notropis hudsonius) Linked with Precipitation.

    PubMed

    Marcogliese, David J; Locke, Sean A; Gélinas, Malorie; Gendron, Andrée D

    2016-02-01

    The Richelieu River, Quebec, is a highly-regulated waterway subject to numerous anthropogenic influences from municipal effluents and agricultural activities. Parasite communities in 234 spottail shiners (Notropis hudsonius) were examined from 4 localities in late spring 2003 and 2004. Component species richness varied between 15 and 18 species in 2003 but declined to 9 to 13 in 2004, while total parasite abundance was consistently lower in 2003. Parasite component community similarity among localities could not be directly linked to available upstream water quality measurements or anthropogenic activity and was best explained by precipitation. Total precipitation in May 2003 was approximately 40% more than in May 2004, presumably altering patterns of runoff, river flow rates, and water quality. This study suggests that fish parasite species composition and richness in the Richelieu River are influenced by environmental parameters which in turn ultimately are driven by a combination of climatic conditions and anthropogenic activities in the watershed.

  8. Bacterial community dynamics are linked to patterns of coral heat tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Maren; Seneca, Francois O.; Yum, Lauren K.; Palumbi, Stephen R.; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2017-01-01

    Ocean warming threatens corals and the coral reef ecosystem. Nevertheless, corals can be adapted to their thermal environment and inherit heat tolerance across generations. In addition, the diverse microbes that associate with corals have the capacity for more rapid change, potentially aiding the adaptation of long-lived corals. Here, we show that the microbiome of reef corals is different across thermally variable habitats and changes over time when corals are reciprocally transplanted. Exposing these corals to thermal bleaching conditions changes the microbiome for heat-sensitive corals, but not for heat-tolerant corals growing in habitats with natural high heat extremes. Importantly, particular bacterial taxa predict the coral host response in a short-term heat stress experiment. Such associations could result from parallel responses of the coral and the microbial community to living at high natural temperatures. A competing hypothesis is that the microbial community and coral heat tolerance are causally linked. PMID:28186132

  9. Bacterial community dynamics are linked to patterns of coral heat tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Maren; Seneca, Francois O; Yum, Lauren K; Palumbi, Stephen R; Voolstra, Christian R

    2017-02-10

    Ocean warming threatens corals and the coral reef ecosystem. Nevertheless, corals can be adapted to their thermal environment and inherit heat tolerance across generations. In addition, the diverse microbes that associate with corals have the capacity for more rapid change, potentially aiding the adaptation of long-lived corals. Here, we show that the microbiome of reef corals is different across thermally variable habitats and changes over time when corals are reciprocally transplanted. Exposing these corals to thermal bleaching conditions changes the microbiome for heat-sensitive corals, but not for heat-tolerant corals growing in habitats with natural high heat extremes. Importantly, particular bacterial taxa predict the coral host response in a short-term heat stress experiment. Such associations could result from parallel responses of the coral and the microbial community to living at high natural temperatures. A competing hypothesis is that the microbial community and coral heat tolerance are causally linked.

  10. Bacterial community dynamics are linked to patterns of coral heat tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Maren; Seneca, Francois O.; Yum, Lauren K.; Palumbi, Stephen R.; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2017-02-01

    Ocean warming threatens corals and the coral reef ecosystem. Nevertheless, corals can be adapted to their thermal environment and inherit heat tolerance across generations. In addition, the diverse microbes that associate with corals have the capacity for more rapid change, potentially aiding the adaptation of long-lived corals. Here, we show that the microbiome of reef corals is different across thermally variable habitats and changes over time when corals are reciprocally transplanted. Exposing these corals to thermal bleaching conditions changes the microbiome for heat-sensitive corals, but not for heat-tolerant corals growing in habitats with natural high heat extremes. Importantly, particular bacterial taxa predict the coral host response in a short-term heat stress experiment. Such associations could result from parallel responses of the coral and the microbial community to living at high natural temperatures. A competing hypothesis is that the microbial community and coral heat tolerance are causally linked.

  11. Development of a linked perinatal data resource from state administrative and community-based program data.

    PubMed

    Hall, Eric S; Goyal, Neera K; Ammerman, Robert T; Miller, Megan M; Jones, David E; Short, Jodie A; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate a generalizable approach for developing maternal-child health data resources using state administrative records and community-based program data. We used a probabilistic and deterministic linking strategy to join vital records, hospital discharge records, and home visiting data for a population-based cohort of at-risk, first time mothers enrolled in a regional home visiting program in Southwestern Ohio and Northern Kentucky from 2007 to 2010. Because data sources shared no universal identifier, common identifying elements were selected and evaluated for discriminating power. Vital records then served as a hub to which other records were linked. Variables were recoded into clinically significant categories and a cross-set of composite analytic variables was constructed. Finally, individual-level data were linked to corresponding area-level measures by census tract using the American Communities Survey. The final data set represented 2,330 maternal-infant pairs with both home visiting and vital records data. Of these, 56 pairs (2.4 %) did not link to either maternal or infant hospital discharge records. In a 10 % validation subset (n = 233), 100 % of the reviewed matches between home visiting data and vital records were true matches. Combining multiple data sources provided more comprehensive details of perinatal health service utilization and demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics than available from a single data source. Our approach offers a template for leveraging disparate sources of data to support a platform of research that evaluates the timeliness and reach of home visiting as well as its association with key maternal-child health outcomes.

  12. Linking Wildfire and Climate as Drivers of Plant Species and Community-level Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newingham, B. A.; Hudak, A. T.; Bright, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    Plant species distributions and community shifts after fire are affected by burn severity, elevation, aspect, and climate. However, little empirical data exists on long-term (decadal) recovery after fire across these interacting factors, limiting understanding of fire regime characteristics and climate in post-fire community trajectories. We examined plant species and community responses a decade after fire across five fires in ponderosa pine, dry mixed coniferous, and moist mixed coniferous forests across the western USA. Using field data, we determined changes in plant communities one and ten years post-fire across gradients of burn severity, elevation, and aspect. Existing published work has shown that plant species distributions can be accurately predicted from physiologically relevant climate variables using non-parametric Random Forests models; such models have also been linked to projected climate profiles in 2030, 2060, and 2090 generated from three commonly used general circulation models (GCMs). We explore the possibility that fire and climate are coupled drivers affecting plant species distributions. Climate change may not manifest as a slow shift in plant species distributions, but as sudden, localized events tied to changing fire and other disturbance regimes.

  13. Associations between vitamin K status and haemostatic and inflammatory biomarkers in community-dwelling adults: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shea, M Kyla; Cushman, Mary; Booth, Sarah L; Burke, Gregory L; Chen, Haiying; Kritchevsky, Stephen B

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Vitamin K is integral to haemostatic function, and in vitro and animal experiments suggest that vitamin K can suppress production of inflammatory cytokines. To test the hypothesis that higher vitamin K status is associated with lower hemostatic activation and inflammation in community-dwelling adults, we analyzed the cross-sectional association between serum phylloquinone (vitamin K1) with haemostatic and inflammatory biomarkers in 662 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) [mean(SD) age=62(10)y; 46% female; 37% Caucasian, 25% African-American, 25% Hispanic, 13% Chinese-American]. Following adjustment for demographic and lifestyle characteristics, medication use, triglycerides and BMI, those in the highest quartile of serum phylloquinone had significantly lower circulating interleukin-6 [adjusted mean(SEM) pmol/L: quartile 4 (Q4)=1.22(0.07), quartile 1(Q1)=1.45(0.07); p-trend<0.01], CRP [adjusted mean(SEM) mg/dl: Q4=1.57(0.11), Q1=2.08(0.18); p-trend=0.02], soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 [adjusted mean(SEM) ng/ml: Q4=247(11), Q1=288(11); p-trend=0.02], and plasmin-antiplasmin complex [adjusted mean(SEM) nmol/L: Q4=4.02(0.1), Q1=4.31(0.1), p-trend=0.04]. We detected an interaction between age and serum phylloquinone with respect to factor VIII and D-dimer (interaction p-values=0.03 and 0.09 respectively). Among participants ≥70y, serum phylloquinone was inversely associated with factor VIII activity (p-trend=0.06) and positively associated with D-dimer (p-trend=0.01), but was not associated with either marker among participants <70y (both p≥0.38). In contrast, dietary phylloquinone intake was not associated with any inflammatory or haemostatic biomarker evaluated (all p-trend>0.11). These findings are consistent with laboratory-based studies that suggest a possible anti-inflammatory role for vitamin K. Whether or not these associations predict clinical outcomes linked to elevated inflammation or haemostatic activation

  14. Beyond the Classroom: International Education and the Community College. Volume III: Creating Institutional Links in Asia and the Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco, Robert W., Ed.; Shimabukuro, James N., Ed.

    Part of a four-volume set in which community college educators discuss their efforts to internationalize the educational experience of the students and communities they serve, volume III in this series addresses the development of programmatic links among five two-year colleges and institutions in Japan, Taiwan, the People's Republic of China,…

  15. Assessing the Year 1 Effort: A Process Evaluation of Linking Institutional Networks to Community and Kinship Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Eileen

    Linking Institutional Networks to Community and Kinship Systems (LINCKS) is a three year research and demonstration project undertaken by the Washington, D.C. Parent Child Center, Cardozo High School, and the American Institutes for Research to show how communities can work together to better develop their young parent families. The project's…

  16. An Ontario initiative to enhance the effectiveness of AIDS Service Organizations: Community-Linked Evaluation of AIDS Resources.

    PubMed

    Browne, Gina; Browne, Joseph A; McGee, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the rationale, process, and early outcomes of establishing a community-based research unit. The AIDS Bureau of the Ontario Provincial Government established the Community-Linked Evaluation of AIDS Resources Unit (CLEAR), which works in partnership with the AIDS Bureau and 31 of 74 AIDS Service Organizations (ASOs) in Ontario.

  17. Linking participants in school-based sport programs to community clubs.

    PubMed

    Eime, Rochelle M; Payne, Warren R

    2009-03-01

    A decline in youth (12-25 years) participation in sport and physical activity has been reported. School programs that are delivered within schools by external agencies are a key strategy to promote participation in sport and physical activity. It is important that there is a transfer for participants from school-based sport to community opportunities. This study explored the structural links between participation programs conducted in schools and participation in community-based sporting clubs. The study in Victoria, Australia, involved a survey of 49 State Sports Governing Organisations (SSGOs), focus group discussions with 15 representatives from eight of these bodies, in-depth analysis of one school-based sports program that involved the coordinator from the SSGO, three teachers, four parents and one teacher/parent from six participating schools. A majority of SSGOs (59.1%) reported delivering programs within school settings; however they acknowledged that this structure does not represent an efficient or effective way to develop community-level club sports participation and club membership. Facilitators and barriers for transferring participation in school-based sport programs to sustained participation and membership in community club sport are discussed. It is recommended that sports organisations tailor their school-based programs using recognised health promotion planning principles (including community engagement) rather than continuing their current 'one-size-fits-all' approach. This will assist SSGOs and clubs to develop sustainable participation programs and increase club membership. It is recognised that such a change will have significant resource implications due to increased demands on time and human resources.

  18. Southside medical homes network: linking emergency department patients to community care.

    PubMed

    Marr, Amy L; Pillow, Tyson; Brown, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    BBACKGROUND The 14 neighborhoods surrounding University of Chicago Hospitals (UCH) have both Chicago's highest "ambulatory-care-sensitive condition" hospitalization rates and lack of community-based care. To address these problems, in 2004, the Southside Medical Homes (SMH) Network began linking emergency department (ED) patients with 18 community providers. The ED-based patient navigator (patient advocate) is an integral component of this network, and both their current and developing roles will be discussed. MMETHODS Six navigators worked in the UCH-ED approached eligible patients that are flagged by the ED electronic tracking system. Patients were offered the services provided by primary-care referral and appropriate dental, mental health, and substance abuse facilities. Appointments were scheduled, and pertinent ED medical data was faxed to the outlying sites. Navigator roles were expanding with SMH to include: (1) focus on frequent user/chronic disease populations such as sickle cell disease where advocates will expedite a multidisciplinary clinic referral; (2) navigator training to better inform patients of the specific benefits a "medical home" provides for preventive and psychosocial care; (3) and improving navigator, and secondarily, patient knowledge, of community resources: health-education sites, vocational programs, advocacy agencies, support groups, etc. RRESULTS/CONCLUSIONS Data through 01 July 2007 show a monthly average of 950 ED patients surveyed and 80% of these accepting follow-up referral services. Of those patients with ED-scheduled appointments (43%) in community clinics, network data shows patients returning to their referred providers: 39% of patients have been -> or = times. The navigator role is evolving with the expansion of SMH to include: (1) frequent-user population referrals; (2) preventive health education; and (3) utilization of community resources.

  19. Plasma levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 as a biomarker for disease severity of patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pin-Yu; Tsao, Shih-Ming; Chang, Jer-Hwa; Chien, Ming-Hsien; Hung, Wen-Yueh; Huang, Yi-Wen; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is characterized as an acute inflammation of the lung associated with the activation of macrophages and neutrophils. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is an essential adhesion molecule involved in immune cell recruitment in lung inflammation. We investigated whether ICAM-1 is a useful biomarker for assessing the disease severity of hospitalized adult patients with CAP. Plasma soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) levels were measured in 78 patients with CAP and 69 healthy controls by using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The pneumonia severity index scores were used to determine CAP severity in patients upon initial hospitalization. The sICAM-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels decreased significantly in patients with CAP after antibiotic treatment. The plasma concentration of sICAM-1 alone, but not CRP, was correlated with CAP severity according to the pneumonia severity index scores (r=0.431, p<0.001). The sICAM-1 levels in patients with CAP with high mortality risk were significantly higher than those in patients with CAP with medium or low mortality risk. Moreover, the sICAM-1 level showed a significant correlation with the length of hospital stay (r=0.488, p<0.001). Mechanistic investigations found that bacterial lipopolysaccharide induced upregulation of ICAM-1 expression through the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway in RAW264.7 macrophages. Plasma sICAM-1 levels may play a role in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of CAP severity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Two different bacterial community types are linked with the low-methane emission trait in sheep.

    PubMed

    Kittelmann, Sandra; Pinares-Patiño, Cesar S; Seedorf, Henning; Kirk, Michelle R; Ganesh, Siva; McEwan, John C; Janssen, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The potent greenhouse gas methane (CH4) is produced in the rumens of ruminant animals from hydrogen produced during microbial degradation of ingested feed. The natural animal-to-animal variation in the amount of CH4 emitted and the heritability of this trait offer a means for reducing CH4 emissions by selecting low-CH4 emitting animals for breeding. We demonstrate that differences in rumen microbial community structure are linked to high and low CH4 emissions in sheep. Bacterial community structures in 236 rumen samples from 118 high- and low-CH4 emitting sheep formed gradual transitions between three ruminotypes. Two of these (Q and S) were linked to significantly lower CH4 yields (14.4 and 13.6 g CH4/kg dry matter intake [DMI], respectively) than the third type (H; 15.9 g CH4/kg DMI; p<0.001). Low-CH4 ruminotype Q was associated with a significantly lower ruminal acetate to propionate ratio (3.7±0.4) than S (4.4±0.7; p<0.001) and H (4.3±0.5; p<0.001), and harbored high relative abundances of the propionate-producing Quinella ovalis. Low-CH4 ruminotype S was characterized by lactate- and succinate-producing Fibrobacter spp., Kandleria vitulina, Olsenella spp., Prevotella bryantii, and Sharpea azabuensis. High-CH4 ruminotype H had higher relative abundances of species belonging to Ruminococcus, other Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Catabacteriaceae, Coprococcus, other Clostridiales, Prevotella, other Bacteroidales, and Alphaproteobacteria, many of which are known to form significant amounts of hydrogen. We hypothesize that lower CH4 yields are the result of bacterial communities that ferment ingested feed to relatively less hydrogen, which results in less CH4 being formed.

  1. Two Different Bacterial Community Types Are Linked with the Low-Methane Emission Trait in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Kittelmann, Sandra; Pinares-Patiño, Cesar S.; Seedorf, Henning; Kirk, Michelle R.; Ganesh, Siva; McEwan, John C.; Janssen, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    The potent greenhouse gas methane (CH4) is produced in the rumens of ruminant animals from hydrogen produced during microbial degradation of ingested feed. The natural animal-to-animal variation in the amount of CH4 emitted and the heritability of this trait offer a means for reducing CH4 emissions by selecting low-CH4 emitting animals for breeding. We demonstrate that differences in rumen microbial community structure are linked to high and low CH4 emissions in sheep. Bacterial community structures in 236 rumen samples from 118 high- and low-CH4 emitting sheep formed gradual transitions between three ruminotypes. Two of these (Q and S) were linked to significantly lower CH4 yields (14.4 and 13.6 g CH4/kg dry matter intake [DMI], respectively) than the third type (H; 15.9 g CH4/kg DMI; p<0.001). Low-CH4 ruminotype Q was associated with a significantly lower ruminal acetate to propionate ratio (3.7±0.4) than S (4.4±0.7; p<0.001) and H (4.3±0.5; p<0.001), and harbored high relative abundances of the propionate-producing Quinella ovalis. Low-CH4 ruminotype S was characterized by lactate- and succinate-producing Fibrobacter spp., Kandleria vitulina, Olsenella spp., Prevotella bryantii, and Sharpea azabuensis. High-CH4 ruminotype H had higher relative abundances of species belonging to Ruminococcus, other Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Catabacteriaceae, Coprococcus, other Clostridiales, Prevotella, other Bacteroidales, and Alphaproteobacteria, many of which are known to form significant amounts of hydrogen. We hypothesize that lower CH4 yields are the result of bacterial communities that ferment ingested feed to relatively less hydrogen, which results in less CH4 being formed. PMID:25078564

  2. Linking Microbial Community Structure, Activity and Carbon Cycling in Biological Soil Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, T.; Karaoz, U.; Swenson, J.; Bowen, B.; Northen, T.

    2016-12-01

    Soils play a key role in the global carbon cycle, but the relationships between soil microbial communities and metabolic pathways are poorly understood. In this study, biological soil crusts (biocrusts) from the Colorado Plateau are being used to develop soil metabolomics methods and statistical models to link active microbes to the abundance and turnover of soil metabolites and to examine the detailed substrate and product profiles of individual soil bacteria isolated from biocrust. To simulate a pulsed activity (wetting) event and to analyze the subsequent correlations between soil metabolite dynamics, community structure and activity, biocrusts were wetup with water and samples (porewater and DNA) were taken at various timepoints up to 49.5 hours post-wetup. DNA samples were sequenced using the HiSeq sequencing platform and porewater metabolites were analyzed using untargeted liquid chromatography/ mass spectrometry. Exometabolite analysis revealed the release of a breadth of metabolites including sugars, amino acids, fatty acids, dicarboxylic acids, nucleobases and osmolytes. In general, many metabolites (e.g. amino acids and nucleobases) immediately increased in abundance following wetup and then steadily decreased. However, a few continued to increase over time (e.g. xanthine). Interestingly, in a previous study exploring utilization of soil metabolites by sympatric bacterial isolates from biocrust, we observed xanthine to be released by some Bacilli sp. Furthermore, our current metagenomics data show that members of the Paenibacillaceae family increase in abundance in late wetup samples. Previous 16S amplicon data also show a "Firmicutes bloom" following wetup with the new metagenomic data resolving this at genome-level. Our continued metagenome and exometabolome analyses are allowing us to examine complex pulsed-activity events in biocrust microbial communities specifically by correlating the abundance of microbes to the release of soil metabolites

  3. Modeling the link between soil microbial community structure and function in a bottom-up approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, C.; Richter, A.; Franklin, O.; Evans, S. E.; Dieckmann, U.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding mechanisms of soil carbon (C) turnover requires understanding the link between microbial community dynamics and soil decomposition processes. We present here an individual-based model that aims at elucidating this link by a bottom-up approach. Our approach differs from traditional soil C cycling models in that the overall dynamics of soil organic matter turnover emerges as the result of interactions between individual microbes at the soil microsite level, rather than being described by stock and flow rate equations at the bulk soil level. All soil microbes are modeled individually, each belonging to one of several functional groups defined by functional traits. Specifically, functional traits determine (1) growth and turnover rates, (2) production of extracellular enzymes and (3) microbial cell stoichiometry. Our model incorporates competition for space and nutrients (C and nitrogen, N) as well as synergistic interactions between individual microbes in a spatially structured environment represented by a two-dimensional grid. Due to different C and N limitations of different functional groups, community composition is sensitive to the availability of complex and labile C and N. Thus, altered resource availability changes microbial community composition, which in turn affects CO2 and N release from the soil. In our model, microbes constantly alter their own environment through the decomposition of different substrates, thereby exerting a feedback on community composition, which leads to a succession of microbial groups. We used the model's intrinsic link between resource availability, community dynamics and decomposition function to investigate the mechanism underlying the rhizosphere priming effect (i.e. increased decomposition of older soil C triggered by the input of labile C). In particular, we examined the spatial growth of a root releasing exudates of varying C:N ratios under the presence or absence of different functional groups. We find that a

  4. Links Among Warming, Fungal Communities, and Carbon Fluxes in Boreal Forest Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, S. D.; Czimczik, C. I.; Treseder, K. K.

    2006-12-01

    Microbial responses to climate change could drive positive feedbacks to the carbon cycle, particularly in high latitude ecosystems. We used molecular and enzymatic approaches to determine whether fungal communities changed in response to experimental warming in boreal forest ecosystems. We also measured the flux and 14C signature of soil respiration from warmed and unwarmed soils to link microbial responses with the carbon cycle. In an early-successional site recovering from a 1999 fire, warming significantly increased the activities of cellulose- and chitin-degrading enzymes by 17% and 30%, respectively. In a second site dominated by mature black spruce trees, the activity of the chitin-degrading enzyme declined significantly by 24%. However, warming did not affect soil CO2 fluxes in either site, or the source of soil respiration as measured by 14C isotopic analyses in the mature forest site. Together, these results suggest that warming does alter fungal community composition and potentially carbon substrate utilization. However, the total amount and 14C age of microbially-respired carbon does not change. Despite shifts in fungal community composition, ecosystem processes driven by microbial activity may be resistant to climate warming in these well-drained boreal ecosystems.

  5. Linking macroecology and community ecology: refining predictions of species distributions using biotic interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Staniczenko, Phillip P A; Sivasubramaniam, Prabu; Suttle, K Blake; Pearson, Richard G

    2017-06-01

    Macroecological models for predicting species distributions usually only include abiotic environmental conditions as explanatory variables, despite knowledge from community ecology that all species are linked to other species through biotic interactions. This disconnect is largely due to the different spatial scales considered by the two sub-disciplines: macroecologists study patterns at large extents and coarse resolutions, while community ecologists focus on small extents and fine resolutions. A general framework for including biotic interactions in macroecological models would help bridge this divide, as it would allow for rigorous testing of the role that biotic interactions play in determining species ranges. Here, we present an approach that combines species distribution models with Bayesian networks, which enables the direct and indirect effects of biotic interactions to be modelled as propagating conditional dependencies among species' presences. We show that including biotic interactions in distribution models for species from a California grassland community results in better range predictions across the western USA. This new approach will be important for improving estimates of species distributions and their dynamics under environmental change. © 2017 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by CNRS and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Circulating biomarkers in renal cell carcinoma: the link between microRNAs and extracellular vesicles, where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Ana L; Dias, Francisca; Gomes, Mónica; Fernandes, Mara

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a lethal urological cancer, with incidence and mortality rates increasing by 2-3% per decade. The lack of standard screening tests contributes to the fact that one-third of patients are diagnosed with locally invasive or metastatic disease. Moreover, 20-40% of RCC patients submitted to surgical nephrectomy will develop metastasis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs responsible for gene regulation at a post-transcriptional level. It is accepted that they are deregulated in cancer and can influence tumor development. Thus, miRNAs are promising RCC biomarkers, since they can be detected using non-invasive methods. They are highly stable and easier to quantify in circulating biofluids. The elevated miRNA stability in circulating samples may be the consequence of their capacity to circulate inside of extracellular microvesicles (EMVs), for example, the exosomes. The EMVs are bilayered membrane vesicles secreted by all cell types. They can be released in the interstitial space or into circulating biofluids, which allows the travelling, binding and entrance of these vesicles in receptor cells. This type of cell communication can shuttle bioactive molecules between cells, allowing the horizontal transference of genetic material. In this review, we focus on circulating miRNAs (miR-210, miR-1233, miR-221, miR-15a, miR-451, miR-508, miR-378) in the biofluids of RCC patients and attempt to establish the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy, their synergic effects, and the pathways involved in RCC biology. PMID:28326253

  7. Exploring the roles of cannot-link constraint in community detection via Multi-variance Mixed Gaussian Generative Model

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Meng; Jin, Di; He, Dongxiao; Fu, Huazhu; Wang, Jing; Cao, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Due to the demand for performance improvement and the existence of prior information, semi-supervised community detection with pairwise constraints becomes a hot topic. Most existing methods have been successfully encoding the must-link constraints, but neglect the opposite ones, i.e., the cannot-link constraints, which can force the exclusion between nodes. In this paper, we are interested in understanding the role of cannot-link constraints and effectively encoding pairwise constraints. Towards these goals, we define an integral generative process jointly considering the network topology, must-link and cannot-link constraints. We propose to characterize this process as a Multi-variance Mixed Gaussian Generative (MMGG) Model to address diverse degrees of confidences that exist in network topology and pairwise constraints and formulate it as a weighted nonnegative matrix factorization problem. The experiments on artificial and real-world networks not only illustrate the superiority of our proposed MMGG, but also, most importantly, reveal the roles of pairwise constraints. That is, though the must-link is more important than cannot-link when either of them is available, both must-link and cannot-link are equally important when both of them are available. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work on discovering and exploring the importance of cannot-link constraints in semi-supervised community detection. PMID:28678864

  8. Links between the structure of an Antarctic shallow-water community and ice-scour frequency.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kirsty M; Fraser, Keiron P P; Barnes, David K A; Peck, Lloyd S

    2004-09-01

    Ice is a major structuring force in marine and freshwater environments at high latitudes. Although recovery from scouring has been quantified in time, the frequency of scouring in the Antarctic has not. We placed grids of markers at 9-17 m depth at two sites, to study ice-scouring over 2 years at Adelaide island (Antarctic Peninsula). We quantified the time scale of scour frequencies, and linked this to community mortality, age and diversity. Markers were hit from zero to at least three times in 2 years. At the least disturbed site (South Cove) 24% of markers were destroyed per year, whereas in North Cove 60% of markers were destroyed. There were significant differences in scouring frequency between our two sites: a given area in North Cove was on average hit twice as often as one in South Cove. Compared with near shore environments elsewhere, faunas of both sites were characteristic of high disturbance regimes, exhibiting low percent cover, diversity, ages and a high proportion of pioneers. Aspects of the encrusting communities studied reflected the differences between site disturbance regimes. North Cove was scoured twice as often, and bryozoan communities there had half the number of species, two-thirds the space occupation and twice the mortality level of those in South Cove. Maximum age in North Cove bryozoans was also half that in South Cove. Although there are natural disturbance events that rival ice-scouring in either frequency or catastrophic power at lower latitudes, none do both nor across such a wide depth range. We suggest that ice scour effects on polar benthos are even more significant than the same magnitude of disturbance at lower latitudes as recovery rates of high latitude communities are very slow. Climate warming seems likely to increase iceloading of near shore polar waters, so that some of the world's most intensely disturbed faunas may soon suffer even more disturbance.

  9. Linked hydrologic and social systems that support resilience of traditional irrigation communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernald, A.; Guldan, S.; Boykin, K.; Cibils, A.; Gonzales, M.; Hurd, B.; Lopez, S.; Ochoa, C.; Ortiz, M.; Rivera, J.; Rodriguez, S.; Steele, C.

    2015-01-01

    Southwestern US irrigated landscapes are facing upheaval due to water scarcity and land use conversion associated with climate change, population growth, and changing economics. In the traditionally irrigated valleys of northern New Mexico, these stresses, as well as instances of community longevity in the face of these stresses, are apparent. Human systems have interacted with hydrologic processes over the last 400 years in river-fed irrigated valleys to create linked systems. In this study, we ask if concurrent data from multiple disciplines could show that human-adapted hydrologic and socioeconomic systems have created conditions for resilience. Various types of resiliencies are evident in the communities. Traditional local knowledge about the hydrosocial cycle of community water management and ability to adopt new water management practices is a key response to disturbances such as low water supply from drought. Livestock producers have retained their irrigated land by adapting: changing from sheep to cattle and securing income from outside their livestock operations. Labor-intensive crops decreased as off-farm employment opportunities became available. Hydrologic resilience of the system can be affected by both human and natural elements. We find, for example, that there are multiple hydrologic benefits of traditional irrigation system water seepage: it recharges the groundwater that recharges rivers, supports threatened biodiversity by maintaining riparian vegetation, and ameliorates impacts of climate change by prolonging streamflow hydrographs. Human decisions to transfer water out of agriculture or change irrigation management, as well as natural changes such as long-term drought or climate change, can result in reduced seepage and the benefits it provides. We have worked with the communities to translate the multidisciplinary dimensions of these systems into a common language of causal loop diagrams, which form the basis for modeling future scenarios to

  10. Mechanistic links between gut microbial community dynamics, microbial functions and metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Connie WY; Lam, Yan Y; Holmes, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbes comprise a high density, biologically active community that lies at the interface of an animal with its nutritional environment. Consequently their activity profoundly influences many aspects of the physiology and metabolism of the host animal. A range of microbial structural components and metabolites directly interact with host intestinal cells and tissues to influence nutrient uptake and epithelial health. Endocrine, neuronal and lymphoid cells in the gut also integrate signals from these microbial factors to influence systemic responses. Dysregulation of these host-microbe interactions is now recognised as a major risk factor in the development of metabolic dysfunction. This is a two-way process and understanding the factors that tip host-microbiome homeostasis over to dysbiosis requires greater appreciation of the host feedbacks that contribute to regulation of microbial community composition. To date, numerous studies have employed taxonomic profiling approaches to explore the links between microbial composition and host outcomes (especially obesity and its comorbidities), but inconsistent host-microbe associations have been reported. Available data indicates multiple factors have contributed to discrepancies between studies. These include the high level of functional redundancy in host-microbiome interactions combined with individual variation in microbiome composition; differences in study design, diet composition and host system between studies; and inherent limitations to the resolution of rRNA-based community profiling. Accounting for these factors allows for recognition of the common microbial and host factors driving community composition and development of dysbiosis on high fat diets. New therapeutic intervention options are now emerging. PMID:25469018

  11. [Diagnostic and prognostic power of biomarkers to improve the management of community acquired pneumonia in the emergency department].

    PubMed

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Timón Zapata, Jesús; Laserna Mendieta, Emilio José; Sicilia-Bravo, Isabel; Palomo-de Los Reyes, María José; Cabezas-Martínez, Angeles; Laín-Terés, Natividad; Estebaran-Martín, Josefa; Lozano-Ancín, Agustín; Cuena-Boy, Rafael

    2014-04-01

    To analyse the usefulness and performance of several biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP), mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), procalcitonin (PCT)] and lactate in predicting short- and medium-term mortality compared with the prognostic severity scales (PSS) usually employed for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in assessing the aetiological suspicion of infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae and bacteraemia. Observational, prospective and analytical study was conducted on patients who were diagnosed with CAP in our emergency department (ED). The data collected included socio-demographic and comorbidity variables, Charlson index, priority level according to the Spanish Triage System (STS), stage in the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) and in the CURB-65 (confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure and age ≥65years), criteria of severe CAP, microbiological studies, and biomarkers determinations. The patients were followed-up for 180days to calculate the prognostic power and the diagnostic performance for bacteraemia and aetiology. A total of 127patients were finally enrolled in the study. The 30-day mortality was 10.3% (13), and 22.6% (28) at 180 days. Blood cultures were positive in 29 patients (23%) and S.pneumoniae was identified as the responsible pathogen in 28 cases (22.2%). The area under the ROC curve (AUC-ROC) for lactate and MR-proADM to predict 30-day mortality was 0.898 (95%CI: 0.824-0.973; P<.0001) and 0.892 (95%CI: 0.811-0.974; P<.0001), respectively, and for MR-proADM at 180 days it was 0.921 (95%CI: 0.874-0.968; P<.0001). The AUC-ROC for PCT to predict bacteraemia was 0.952 (95%CI: 0.898-1.000; P<.0001) and, considering a cut-off value ≥0.95ng/ml, the negative predictive value (NPV) and the likelihood ratio (LR+) were 97.8% and 9.03, respectively. Using a PCT cut-off value >0.85ng/ml, the NPV and the LR+ were 96.6% and 5.89%, respectively, to predict a S.pneumoniae infection. MR-proADM and lactate showed a similar or even better

  12. A framework linking community empowerment and health equity: it is a matter of CHOICE.

    PubMed

    Rifkin, Susan B

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents a framework to explore the relationship between health equity and community empowerment. It traces the progression of the concept of participation to the present term of empowerment and the links among empowerment, equity, and health outcomes. It argues that the relationship can best be described by using the acronym CHOICE (Capacity-building, Human rights, Organizational sustainability, Institutional accountability, Contribution, and Enabling environment). Based on the concept of development as freedom put forward by Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen, the paper describes how each factor illustrates the relationship between equity and empowerment in positive health outcomes, giving appropriate examples. In conclusion, it is suggested that these factors might form the basis of a tool to assess the relationship between equity and empowerment and its impact on health outcomes.

  13. Linking species abundance distributions in numerical abundance and biomass through simple assumptions about community structure

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Peter A.; Magurran, Anne E.

    2010-01-01

    Species abundance distributions (SADs) are widely used as a tool for summarizing ecological communities but may have different shapes, depending on the currency used to measure species importance. We develop a simple plotting method that links SADs in the alternative currencies of numerical abundance and biomass and is underpinned by testable predictions about how organisms occupy physical space. When log numerical abundance is plotted against log biomass, the species lie within an approximately triangular region. Simple energetic and sampling constraints explain the triangular form. The dispersion of species within this triangle is the key to understanding why SADs of numerical abundance and biomass can differ. Given regular or random species dispersion, we can predict the shape of the SAD for both currencies under a variety of sampling regimes. We argue that this dispersion pattern will lie between regular and random for the following reasons. First, regular dispersion patterns will result if communities are comprised groups of organisms that use different components of the physical space (e.g. open water, the sea bed surface or rock crevices in a marine fish assemblage), and if the abundance of species in each of these spatial guilds is linked to the way individuals of varying size use the habitat. Second, temporal variation in abundance and sampling error will tend to randomize this regular pattern. Data from two intensively studied marine ecosystems offer empirical support for these predictions. Our approach also has application in environmental monitoring and the recognition of anthropogenic disturbance, which may change the shape of the triangular region by, for example, the loss of large body size top predators that occur at low abundance. PMID:20071388

  14. Benthic macroinvertebrate and fish communities in Lake Huron are linked to submerged groundwater vents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, Sanders T.; Biddanda, B.A.; Stricker, C.A.; Nold, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater can be an important source of nutrients and energy to aquatic ecosystems, but quantifying the inputs and biogeochemical importance remains challenging. A series of submerged groundwater vents in northern Lake Huron were examined to determine the linkage between groundwater nutrients and aquatic food webs. We collected samples of key food-web components from groundwater vent and reference habitats and analyzed them for 13C, 15N, and 34S isotopes. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the groundwater was depleted in 13C, while aqueous sulfate was enriched in 34S (mean differences between groundwater and reference sites were -3.9% and +12.0%, respectively). Benthic primary producers, macroinvertebrates, and benthivorous fish had significantly lower ??13C values in groundwater environments, and benthivorous fish were somewhat depleted (-2.5%) in ??34S at groundwater sites compared to reference sites. However, ??15N values were not different between groundwater and reference sites, and pelagic components of the ecosystems (plankton and planktivorous and piscivorous fish) were similar in both ??13C and ??15N. These data suggest benthic metazoan communities surrounding groundwater vents are partially linked to groundwater-derived benthic primary production, while planktivorous and piscivorous communities not directly associated with the benthos do not rely on groundwater nutrients. ?? Inter-Research 2011.

  15. Linking genes to communities and ecosystems: Daphnia as an ecogenomic model.

    PubMed

    Miner, Brooks E; De Meester, Luc; Pfrender, Michael E; Lampert, Winfried; Hairston, Nelson G

    2012-05-22

    How do genetic variation and evolutionary change in critical species affect the composition and functioning of populations, communities and ecosystems? Illuminating the links in the causal chain from genes up to ecosystems is a particularly exciting prospect now that the feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary changes are known to be bidirectional. Yet to fully explore phenomena that span multiple levels of the biological hierarchy requires model organisms and systems that feature a comprehensive triad of strong ecological interactions in nature, experimental tractability in diverse contexts and accessibility to modern genomic tools. The water flea Daphnia satisfies these criteria, and genomic approaches capitalizing on the pivotal role Daphnia plays in the functioning of pelagic freshwater food webs will enable investigations of eco-evolutionary dynamics in unprecedented detail. Because its ecology is profoundly influenced by both genetic polymorphism and phenotypic plasticity, Daphnia represents a model system with tremendous potential for developing a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between traits at the genetic, organismal and population levels, and consequences for community and ecosystem dynamics. Here, we highlight the combination of traits and ecological interactions that make Daphnia a definitive model system, focusing on the additional power and capabilities enabled by recent molecular and genomic advances.

  16. Linking genes to communities and ecosystems: Daphnia as an ecogenomic model

    PubMed Central

    Miner, Brooks E.; De Meester, Luc; Pfrender, Michael E.; Lampert, Winfried; Hairston, Nelson G.

    2012-01-01

    How do genetic variation and evolutionary change in critical species affect the composition and functioning of populations, communities and ecosystems? Illuminating the links in the causal chain from genes up to ecosystems is a particularly exciting prospect now that the feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary changes are known to be bidirectional. Yet to fully explore phenomena that span multiple levels of the biological hierarchy requires model organisms and systems that feature a comprehensive triad of strong ecological interactions in nature, experimental tractability in diverse contexts and accessibility to modern genomic tools. The water flea Daphnia satisfies these criteria, and genomic approaches capitalizing on the pivotal role Daphnia plays in the functioning of pelagic freshwater food webs will enable investigations of eco-evolutionary dynamics in unprecedented detail. Because its ecology is profoundly influenced by both genetic polymorphism and phenotypic plasticity, Daphnia represents a model system with tremendous potential for developing a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between traits at the genetic, organismal and population levels, and consequences for community and ecosystem dynamics. Here, we highlight the combination of traits and ecological interactions that make Daphnia a definitive model system, focusing on the additional power and capabilities enabled by recent molecular and genomic advances. PMID:22298849

  17. A Reemerging Political Space for Linking Person and Community Through Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Bazemore, Andrew; Phillips, Robert L.; Etz, Rebecca S.; Stange, Kurt C.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to understand how national policy key informants perceive the value and changing role of primary care in the context of emerging political opportunities. Methods. We conducted 13 semistructured interviews in May 2011 with leaders of federal agencies, think tanks, nonprofits, and quality standard–defining organizations with influence over health care reform policies and implementation. We recorded the interviews and used an editing and immersion–crystallization analysis approach to identify themes. Results. We identified 4 themes: (1) affirmation of primary care as the foundation of a more effective health care system, (2) the patient-centered medical home as a transitional step to foster practice innovation and payment reform, (3) the urgent need for an increased focus on community and population health in primary care, and (4) the ongoing need for advocacy and research efforts to keep primary care on public and policy agendas. Conclusions. Current efforts to reform primary care are only intermediate steps toward a system with a greater focus on community and population health. Transformed and policy-enabled primary care is an essential link between personalized care and population health. PMID:22690969

  18. A re-emerging political space for linking person and community through primary health care.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sarah A; Bazemore, Andrew; Phillips, Robert L; Etz, Rebecca S; Stange, Kurt C

    2012-06-01

    The goal of the study was to understand how national policy key informants perceive the value and changing role of primary care in the context of emerging political opportunities. Thirteen semistructured interviews were conducted in May 2011 with leaders of federal agencies, think tanks, nonprofits, and quality standard-defining organizations with influence over healthcare reform policies and implementation. Interviews were recorded; an editing and immersion-crystallization analysis approach was used to identify themes. Four themes were identified: (1) affirmation of primary care as the foundation of a more effective healthcare system, (2) the patient-centered medical home as a transitional step to foster practice innovation and payment reform, (3) the urgent need for an increased focus on community and population health in primary care, and (4) the ongoing need for advocacy and research efforts to keep primary care on public and policy agendas. Current efforts to reform primary care are only intermediate steps toward a system with a greater focus on community and population health. Transformed and policy-enabled primary care is an essential link between personalized care and population health. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A reemerging political space for linking person and community through primary health care.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sarah A; Bazemore, Andrew; Phillips, Robert L; Etz, Rebecca S; Stange, Kurt C

    2012-06-01

    We sought to understand how national policy key informants perceive the value and changing role of primary care in the context of emerging political opportunities. We conducted 13 semistructured interviews in May 2011 with leaders of federal agencies, think tanks, nonprofits, and quality standard-defining organizations with influence over health care reform policies and implementation. We recorded the interviews and used an editing and immersion-crystallization analysis approach to identify themes. We identified 4 themes: (1) affirmation of primary care as the foundation of a more effective health care system, (2) the patient-centered medical home as a transitional step to foster practice innovation and payment reform, (3) the urgent need for an increased focus on community and population health in primary care, and (4) the ongoing need for advocacy and research efforts to keep primary care on public and policy agendas. Current efforts to reform primary care are only intermediate steps toward a system with a greater focus on community and population health. Transformed and policy-enabled primary care is an essential link between personalized care and population health.

  20. The role of volatile metabolites in microbial communities of the lSS higher plant link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirranen, L. S.; Gitelson, I. I.

    The possibility of controlling the microbial community composition through metabolites produced by microbes has been considered. Basing on the comparative analysis of the experimental data we have revealed the greater contribution of volatile metabolites to microbial interaction than non-volatile. Investigations proved that the interaction between microorganisms through extracted volatile materials is a widespread phenomenon peculiar to many microorganisms. Most cultures inhibited each other's growth, in a number of cases displayed bactericidal action. Stimulatory action occurred 6 - 8 times rarely. The individuality of affect on studied test-cultures growth and the spectrum of microbial resistance to volatile metabolites have been revealed. Based on the comparative cluster analysis of these spectra from 100 studied cultures we have revealed that studied organisms produce a complex of volatile metabolites including 82 inhibiting and 52 stimulating. It was found that excretion of volatile metabolites of studied microorganisms depended upon the culture age, concentration of nutrient medium separate components and volatile by-products excreted by other microorganisms. The production can be increased or decreased by volatile by-products of other microbes. This is related to strain features and the culture age. The prospects of using these regulating metabolites can be defined by the "range", specificity and safety for other members of the microbial community in insufficient concentrations. Volatile metabolites of either plants and microorganisms or other system links - humans and technological equipment installed inside the closed ecosystem - can influence the formation of microbial communities, gas composition of the system atmosphere and state of the plants through the atmosphere. Special experiments showed that volatile microorganism metabolites could accumulate in the environment, dissolve in atmospheric water and maintain their biological activity for many days

  1. Enhancing community-based rehabilitation for stroke survivors: creating a discharge link.

    PubMed

    Langstaff, Caryn; Martin, Cally; Brown, Gwen; McGuinness, Don; Mather, Jo; Loshaw, Jennifer; Jones, Nancy; Fletcher, Kim; Paterson, John

    2014-01-01

    Intensive poststroke rehabilitation is critical to maximizing outcomes, improving inpatient flow, and decreasing long-term costs. This regional initiative investigated the impact of improving access to timely intensive home-based stroke rehabilitation follow-up care on hospital length of stay (LOS) and readmission rates. The enhanced service was made available across the region's rural geography to new stroke survivors transitioning home who were unable to access outpatient care. All new stroke survivors with ongoing rehabilitation needs being discharged from the hospital and eligible for home care received timely enhanced intensity of home-based rehabilitation services from existing community rehabilitation providers for 2 months after discharge. Five hundred twenty-four stroke survivors received this service over a 3-year period. The service priority rating was increased to reduce wait times to less than 5 days. Collaborative planning across sectors occurred through discharge link meetings. Comparative analysis was used to investigate health system measures before and after service implementation. A 15.7-day decrease in hospital LOS and decreased hospital readmission rates were observed after enhanced service implementation. Functional Independence Measure (FIM) efficiency improved for those discharged from inpatient rehabilitation. Average wait time for community rehabilitation services decreased from 44 days to 4.4 days. The mean total number of community therapy visits more than doubled to an average of 12 per client. The provision of timely more intensive home-based rehabilitation services for new stroke survivors transitioning home and unable to access outpatient care was associated with decreased hospital LOS and decreased readmission rates.

  2. Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) links biodiversity conservation with sustainable improvements in livelihoods and food production.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Dale; Bell, Samuel D; Fay, John; Bothi, Kim L; Gatere, Lydiah; Kabila, Makando; Mukamba, Mwangala; Matokwani, Edwin; Mushimbalume, Matthews; Moraru, Carmen I; Lehmann, Johannes; Lassoie, James; Wolfe, David; Lee, David R; Buck, Louise; Travis, Alexander J

    2011-08-23

    In the Luangwa Valley, Zambia, persistent poverty and hunger present linked challenges to rural development and biodiversity conservation. Both household coping strategies and larger-scale economic development efforts have caused severe natural resource degradation that limits future economic opportunities and endangers ecosystem services. A model based on a business infrastructure has been developed to promote and maintain sustainable agricultural and natural resource management practices, leading to direct and indirect conservation outcomes. The Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) model operates primarily with communities surrounding national parks, strengthening conservation benefits produced by these protected areas. COMACO first identifies the least food-secure households and trains them in sustainable agricultural practices that minimize threats to natural resources while meeting household needs. In addition, COMACO identifies people responsible for severe natural resource depletion and trains them to generate alternative income sources. In an effort to maintain compliance with these practices, COMACO provides extension support and access to high-value markets that would otherwise be inaccessible to participants. Because the model is continually evolving via adaptive management, success or failure of the model as a whole is difficult to quantify at this early stage. We therefore test specific hypotheses and present data documenting the stabilization of previously declining wildlife populations; the meeting of thresholds of productivity that give COMACO access to stable, high-value markets and progress toward economic self-sufficiency; and the adoption of sustainable agricultural practices by participants and other community members. Together, these findings describe a unique, business-oriented model for poverty alleviation, food production, and biodiversity conservation.

  3. Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) links biodiversity conservation with sustainable improvements in livelihoods and food production

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Dale; Bell, Samuel D.; Fay, John; Bothi, Kim L.; Gatere, Lydiah; Kabila, Makando; Mukamba, Mwangala; Matokwani, Edwin; Mushimbalume, Matthews; Moraru, Carmen I.; Lehmann, Johannes; Lassoie, James; Wolfe, David; Lee, David R.; Buck, Louise; Travis, Alexander J.

    2011-01-01

    In the Luangwa Valley, Zambia, persistent poverty and hunger present linked challenges to rural development and biodiversity conservation. Both household coping strategies and larger-scale economic development efforts have caused severe natural resource degradation that limits future economic opportunities and endangers ecosystem services. A model based on a business infrastructure has been developed to promote and maintain sustainable agricultural and natural resource management practices, leading to direct and indirect conservation outcomes. The Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) model operates primarily with communities surrounding national parks, strengthening conservation benefits produced by these protected areas. COMACO first identifies the least food-secure households and trains them in sustainable agricultural practices that minimize threats to natural resources while meeting household needs. In addition, COMACO identifies people responsible for severe natural resource depletion and trains them to generate alternative income sources. In an effort to maintain compliance with these practices, COMACO provides extension support and access to high-value markets that would otherwise be inaccessible to participants. Because the model is continually evolving via adaptive management, success or failure of the model as a whole is difficult to quantify at this early stage. We therefore test specific hypotheses and present data documenting the stabilization of previously declining wildlife populations; the meeting of thresholds of productivity that give COMACO access to stable, high-value markets and progress toward economic self-sufficiency; and the adoption of sustainable agricultural practices by participants and other community members. Together, these findings describe a unique, business-oriented model for poverty alleviation, food production, and biodiversity conservation. PMID:21873184

  4. Biomarker-Based HIV Incidence in a Community Sample of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Paris, France

    PubMed Central

    Le Vu, Stéphane; Velter, Annie; Meyer, Laurence; Peytavin, Gilles; Guinard, Jérôme; Pillonel, Josiane; Barin, Francis; Semaille, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Background Population-based estimates of HIV incidence in France have revealed that men who have sex with men (MSM) are the most affected population and contribute to nearly half of new infections each year. We sought to estimate HIV incidence among sexually active MSM in Paris gay community social venues. Methodology/ Principal Findings A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2009 in a sample of commercial venues such as bars, saunas and backrooms. We collected a behavioural questionnaire and blood sample. Specimens were tested for HIV infection and positive specimens then tested for recent infection by the enzyme immunoassay for recent HIV-1 infection (EIA-RI). We assessed the presence of antiretroviral therapy among infected individuals to rule out treated patients in the algorithm that determined recent infection. Biomarker-based cross-sectional incidence estimates were calculated. We enrolled 886 MSM participants among which 157 (18%) tested HIV positive. In positive individuals who knew they were infected, 75% of EIA-RI positive results were due to ART. Of 157 HIV positive specimens, 15 were deemed to be recently infected. The overall HIV incidence was estimated at 3.8% person-years(py) [95%CI: 1.5–6.2]. Although differences were not significant, incidence was estimated to be 3.5% py [0.1–6.1] in men having had a negative HIV test in previous year and 4.8% py [0.1–10.6] in men having had their last HIV test more than one year before the survey, or never tested. Incidence was estimated at 4.1% py [0–8.3] in men under 35 years and 2.5% py [0–5.4] in older men. Conclusions/ Significance This is the first community-based survey to estimate HIV incidence among MSM in France. It includes ART detection and reveals a high level of HIV transmission in sexually active individuals, despite a high uptake of HIV testing. These data call for effective prevention programs targeting MSM engaged in high-risk behaviours. PMID:22768150

  5. Making the links between community structure and individual well-being: community quality of life in Riverdale, Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Raphael, D; Renwick, R; Brown, I; Steinmetz, B; Sehdev, H; Phillips, S

    2001-09-01

    An inquiry into community quality of life was carried out within a framework that recognizes the complex relationship between community structures and individual well-being. Through use of focus groups and key informant interviews, community members, service providers, and elected representatives in a Toronto community considered aspects of their community that affected quality of life. Community members identified strengths of access to amenities, caring and concerned people, community agencies, low-cost housing, and public transportation. Service providers and elected representatives recognized diversity, community agencies and resources, and presence of culturally relevant food stores and services as strengths. At one level, findings were consistent with emerging concepts of social capital. At another level, threats to the community were considered in relation to the hypothesized role neo-liberalism plays in weakening the welfare state.

  6. Mass spectrometry assay as an alternative to the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test for biomarker quantitation in ecotoxicology: application to vitellogenin in Crustacea (Gammarus fossarum).

    PubMed

    Simon, Romain; Jubeaux, Guillaume; Chaumot, Arnaud; Lemoine, Jérôme; Geffard, Olivier; Salvador, Arnaud

    2010-07-30

    Vitellogenin (Vg) is a widespread biomarker for measuring exposure to endocrine disruptors. Vg quantification is usually done by using the ELISA test (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Since this test is specific to a target protein, it can rarely be used with other species due to low cross-reactivity across species. Therefore alternative analytical methods have to be considered as the development of a specific and sensitive ELISA test for each new target is time-consuming and may prove unsuccessful. This paper focuses on the development of a quantitative assay by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of vitelogenin in an invertebrate (Gammarus fossarum) for which no ELISA kit is available. The linearity of the method was within the concentration range 2.5-25,000pg/mL and the limit of detection was estimated at 0.75pg/mL of Vg. This method has been demonstrated to be an alternative to existing immunological methods for quantifying Vg in invertebrates due to its greater sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility (intra- and inter-assay below 15%). This assay was applied for Vg determination in female G. fossarum following exposure to a known endocrine disruptor, methyl farnesoate, in crustaceans. The availability of a quantitative G. fossarum LC-MS/MS assay should open the way for further studies to evaluate xenoestrogen effects in aquatic male G. fossarum.

  7. Plant and soil fungal but not soil bacterial communities are linked in long-term fertilized grassland.

    PubMed

    Cassman, Noriko A; Leite, Marcio F A; Pan, Yao; de Hollander, Mattias; van Veen, Johannes A; Kuramae, Eiko E

    2016-03-29

    Inorganic fertilization and mowing alter soil factors with subsequent effects-direct and indirect - on above- and below-ground communities. We explored direct and indirect effects of long-term fertilization (N, P, NPK, Liming) and twice yearly mowing on the plant, bacterial and fungal communities and soil factors. We analyzed co-variation using 16S and 18S rRNA genes surveys, and plant frequency and edaphic factors across treatments. The plant and fungal communities were distinct in the NPK and L treatments, while the bacterial communities and soil factors were distinct in the N and L treatments. Plant community diversity and evenness had low diversity in the NPK and high diversity in the liming treatment, while the diversity and evenness of the bacterial and fungal communities did not differ across treatments, except of higher diversity and evenness in the liming treatment for the bacteria. We found significant co-structures between communities based on plant and fungal comparisons but not between plant and bacterial nor bacterial and fungal comparisons. Our results suggested that the plant and fungal communities are more tightly linked than either community with the bacterial community in fertilized soils. We found co-varying plant, bacterial and fungal taxa in different treatments that may indicate ecological interactions.

  8. Plant and soil fungal but not soil bacterial communities are linked in long-term fertilized grassland

    PubMed Central

    Cassman, Noriko A.; Leite, Marcio F. A.; Pan, Yao; de Hollander, Mattias; van Veen, Johannes A.; Kuramae, Eiko E.

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic fertilization and mowing alter soil factors with subsequent effects–direct and indirect - on above- and below-ground communities. We explored direct and indirect effects of long-term fertilization (N, P, NPK, Liming) and twice yearly mowing on the plant, bacterial and fungal communities and soil factors. We analyzed co-variation using 16S and 18S rRNA genes surveys, and plant frequency and edaphic factors across treatments. The plant and fungal communities were distinct in the NPK and L treatments, while the bacterial communities and soil factors were distinct in the N and L treatments. Plant community diversity and evenness had low diversity in the NPK and high diversity in the liming treatment, while the diversity and evenness of the bacterial and fungal communities did not differ across treatments, except of higher diversity and evenness in the liming treatment for the bacteria. We found significant co-structures between communities based on plant and fungal comparisons but not between plant and bacterial nor bacterial and fungal comparisons. Our results suggested that the plant and fungal communities are more tightly linked than either community with the bacterial community in fertilized soils. We found co-varying plant, bacterial and fungal taxa in different treatments that may indicate ecological interactions. PMID:27020916

  9. Linking service-learning with community-based participatory research: an interprofessional course for health professional students.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Marianne T; Taylor, Wendell C; Hormann, Mark D; Walker, Thomas; Carroll, Deidra

    2011-01-01

    Service-learning is a valued strategy for educating health professionals. Linking service-learning with community-based participatory research (CBPR) engages students with community stakeholders and faculty in a collaborative process to bring about social change and improved health. The purpose of this paper is to describe a strategy for involving interprofessional students in ongoing faculty CBPR in an underserved community. The process includes the design and implementation of a course that combines weekly seminars with field experiences in the targeted community, emphasizing community assessment, and working with community members to find solutions to health problems. Nursing, public health, and medical students were recruited to the initial course, and offered the opportunity to meet objectives of required components of their disciplinary curriculum. Community members became actively involved in educating students while working to solve identified health problems. Important principles of CBPR--trust, collaboration, excellence in science, and ethics--are emphasized throughout the initiative. This course is now a regular offering for interprofessional students, providing valuable learning experiences for students, faculty, and the community. Ongoing faculty CBPR continues a trusting community-academic relationship and gives the community a voice in the solution for health problems.

  10. Plant and soil fungal but not soil bacterial communities are linked in long-term fertilized grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassman, Noriko A.; Leite, Marcio F. A.; Pan, Yao; de Hollander, Mattias; van Veen, Johannes A.; Kuramae, Eiko E.

    2016-03-01

    Inorganic fertilization and mowing alter soil factors with subsequent effects–direct and indirect - on above- and below-ground communities. We explored direct and indirect effects of long-term fertilization (N, P, NPK, Liming) and twice yearly mowing on the plant, bacterial and fungal communities and soil factors. We analyzed co-variation using 16S and 18S rRNA genes surveys, and plant frequency and edaphic factors across treatments. The plant and fungal communities were distinct in the NPK and L treatments, while the bacterial communities and soil factors were distinct in the N and L treatments. Plant community diversity and evenness had low diversity in the NPK and high diversity in the liming treatment, while the diversity and evenness of the bacterial and fungal communities did not differ across treatments, except of higher diversity and evenness in the liming treatment for the bacteria. We found significant co-structures between communities based on plant and fungal comparisons but not between plant and bacterial nor bacterial and fungal comparisons. Our results suggested that the plant and fungal communities are more tightly linked than either community with the bacterial community in fertilized soils. We found co-varying plant, bacterial and fungal taxa in different treatments that may indicate ecological interactions.

  11. Community Engagement in Health-Related Research: A Case Study of a Community-Linked Research Infrastructure, Jefferson County, Arkansas, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Holly C.; Olson, Mary; Cottoms, Naomi; Bachelder, Ashley; Smith, Johnny; Ford, Tanesha; Dawson, Leah C.; Greene, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Underrepresentation of racial minorities in research contributes to health inequities. Important factors contributing to low levels of research participation include limited access to health care and research opportunities, lack of perceived relevance, power differences, participant burden, and absence of trust. We describe an enhanced model of community engagement in which we developed a community-linked research infrastructure to involve minorities in research both as participants and as partners engaged in issue selection, study design, and implementation. Community Context We implemented this effort in Jefferson County, Arkansas, which has a predominantly black population, bears a disproportionate burden of chronic disease, and has death rates above state and national averages. Methods Building on existing community–academic partnerships, we engaged new partners and adapted a successful community health worker model to connect community residents to services and relevant research. We formed a community advisory board, a research collaborative, a health registry, and a resource directory. Outcome Newly formed community–academic partnerships resulted in many joint grant submissions and new projects. Community health workers contacted 2,665 black and 913 white community residents from December 2011 through April 2013. Eighty-five percent of blacks and 88% of whites were willing to be re-contacted about research of potential interest. Implementation challenges were addressed by balancing the needs of science with community needs and priorities. Interpretation Our experience indicates investments in community-linked research infrastructure can be fruitful and should be considered by academic health centers when assessing institutional research infrastructure needs. PMID:26203813

  12. Community Services and Continuing Education in the Next Decade: Linking to Institutional Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myran, Gunder A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses ways in which community services/continuing education practitioners can strengthen relations with community college presidents by emphasizing institutional and presidential priorities. Considers two options for community services in the coming "instructional effectiveness era": assuming institutional leadership for lifelong…

  13. Supporting Police Community Support Officers to Become Effective School Link Officers: Key Stakeholder Perceptions of a Pilot Professional Development Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lorraine; Trotman, Dave

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a pilot professional development programme designed to support police community support officers (PCSOs) to become effective school link officers (SLOs) within urban secondary schools in the English West Midlands. Findings are presented via perceptions of key stakeholders: SLOs themselves; school-based mentors…

  14. Connecting the Dots: Progress toward the Integration of School Reform, School-Linked Services, Parent Involvement and Community Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Hal; Briar-Lawson, Katharine

    This report describes the outcomes of research that investigated school reform, school-linked services, parent involvement, and community school programs in schools in 36 states. Results found that services were often added on to school sites without any intent to integrate them with school reform; teachers were not directly involved in services;…

  15. Association of Cardiometabolic Genes with Arsenic Metabolism Biomarkers in American Indian Communities: The Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS)

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Poojitha; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Franceschini, Nora; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Gribble, Matthew O.; Haack, Karin; Laston, Sandra; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; North, Kari E.; Lee, Elisa; Yracheta, Joseph; Best, Lyle G.; MacCluer, Jean W.; Kent, Jack; Cole, Shelley A.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2016-01-01

    VS, Gribble MO, Haack K, Laston S, Umans JG, Francesconi KA, Goessler W, North KE, Lee E, Yracheta J, Best LG, MacCluer JW, Kent J Jr., Cole SA, Navas-Acien A. 2017. Association of cardiometabolic genes with arsenic metabolism biomarkers in American Indian communities: the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS). Environ Health Perspect 125:15–22; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP251 PMID:27352405

  16. HUMAN BIOMONITORING TO LINK ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE TO BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abstract and presentation on Human Biomonitoring to Link Environmental Exposure to Biologically Relevant Dose describes the use of biomarkers of exposure, biomarkers of current health state, and biomarker measurements. The abstract and presentation focuses on how biomarkers ...

  17. Rural Student Entrepreneurs: Linking Commerce and Community. (Benefits)[Squared]: The Exponential Results of Linking School Improvement and Community Development, Issue Number Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boethel, Martha

    In many rural areas, both communities and schools are threatened by decreasing population and changing economic conditions. To boost both the local economy and student achievement, a growing number of rural schools are turning to entrepreneurial education. In school entrepreneurship programs, students create small businesses under the guidance of…

  18. MicroRNA-19b is a potential biomarker of increased myocardial collagen cross-linking in patients with aortic stenosis and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Javier; López, Begoña; Ravassa, Susana; Hermida, Nerea; José, Gorka San; Gallego, Idoia; Valencia, Félix; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; de Teresa, Eduardo; Díez, Javier; González, Arantxa

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzed the potential associations of 7 myocardial fibrosis-related microRNAs with the quality of the collagen network (e.g., the degree of collagen fibril cross-linking or CCL) and the enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) responsible for CCL in 28 patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) of whom 46% had a diagnosis of chronic heart failure (HF). MicroRNA expression was analyzed in myocardial and blood samples. From the studied microRNAs only miR-19b presented a direct correlation (p < 0.05) between serum and myocardium. Compared to controls both myocardial and serum miR-19b were reduced (p < 0.01) in AS patients. In addition, miR-19b was reduced in the myocardium (p < 0.01) and serum (p < 0.05) of patients with HF compared to patients without HF. Myocardial and serum miR-19b were inversely correlated (p < 0.05) with LOX, CCL and LV stiffness in AS patients. In in vitro studies miR-19b inhibition increased (p < 0.05) connective tissue growth factor protein and LOX protein expression in human fibroblasts. In conclusion, decreased miR-19b may be involved in myocardial LOX up-regulation and excessive CCL, and consequently increased LV stiffness in AS patients, namely in those with HF. Serum miR-19b can be a biomarker of these alterations of the myocardial collagen network in AS patients, particularly in patients with HF. PMID:28091585

  19. MicroRNA-19b is a potential biomarker of increased myocardial collagen cross-linking in patients with aortic stenosis and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Javier; López, Begoña; Ravassa, Susana; Hermida, Nerea; José, Gorka San; Gallego, Idoia; Valencia, Félix; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; de Teresa, Eduardo; Díez, Javier; González, Arantxa

    2017-01-16

    This study analyzed the potential associations of 7 myocardial fibrosis-related microRNAs with the quality of the collagen network (e.g., the degree of collagen fibril cross-linking or CCL) and the enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) responsible for CCL in 28 patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) of whom 46% had a diagnosis of chronic heart failure (HF). MicroRNA expression was analyzed in myocardial and blood samples. From the studied microRNAs only miR-19b presented a direct correlation (p < 0.05) between serum and myocardium. Compared to controls both myocardial and serum miR-19b were reduced (p < 0.01) in AS patients. In addition, miR-19b was reduced in the myocardium (p < 0.01) and serum (p < 0.05) of patients with HF compared to patients without HF. Myocardial and serum miR-19b were inversely correlated (p < 0.05) with LOX, CCL and LV stiffness in AS patients. In in vitro studies miR-19b inhibition increased (p < 0.05) connective tissue growth factor protein and LOX protein expression in human fibroblasts. In conclusion, decreased miR-19b may be involved in myocardial LOX up-regulation and excessive CCL, and consequently increased LV stiffness in AS patients, namely in those with HF. Serum miR-19b can be a biomarker of these alterations of the myocardial collagen network in AS patients, particularly in patients with HF.

  20. Ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor for PSA biomarker detection in prostate cancer cells using gold nanoparticles/PAMAM dendrimer loaded with enzyme linked aptamer as integrated triple signal amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Kavosi, Begard; Salimi, Abdollah; Hallaj, Rahman; Moradi, Fathollah

    2015-12-15

    In the present study, a triple signal amplification strategy was developed for ultrasensitive immunosensing of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tumor marker. The proposed system was achieved by modification of glassy carbon electrode with graphene oxide/chitosan film and covalently attached of monoclonal PSA antibody and thionine as redox probe onto the modified electrode surface. Then, immunosensing was completed using sandwich-type immunoreaction of the PSA-antigen between anti-PSA immobilized on the graphene/chitosan interface and PSA-aptamer. For improve the sensitivity, polyamidoamine dendrimer-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs-PAMAM) was used for covalent attachment of PSA-aptamer and HRP linked aptamer (Au-PAMA/aptamer-HRP) as electrochemical label in the sandwich format and electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 in the presence of enzymatically oxidized thionine was measured. Under optimized condition, the obtained detection limit and linear concentration range were 10 fg ml(-1)(S/N=3) and 0.1 pg ml(-1) to 90 ngml(-1) respectively, using differential pulse voltammetry as measuring technique. In addition, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used as simple, rapid, low cost label free analytical technique for PSA measurement with detection limit of 5 pg ml(-1) at concentration range up to 35 ng ml(-1). Finally, the immunosensor is used to PSA detection in human serum and prostate tissue samples and the obtained result is well agreed with the values obtained by the standard ELISA method. The obtained results indicate the proposed immunosensor can be used for monitor the differences in PSA concentration in cancer tissue samples which holds great promise in clinical screening of cancer biomarkers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Validation of biomarkers of CVD risk from dried blood spots in community-based research: Methodologies and study-specific serum equivalencies

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsson, Laura B.; Hall, Martica H.; McLean, Shakir; Porter, James H.; Berkman, Lisa; Marino, Miguel; Sembajwe, Grace; McDade, Thomas W.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dried blood spot (DBS) methodology offers significant advantages over venipuncture in vulnerable populations or large-scale studies, including reduced participant burden and higher response rates. Uncertainty about validity of cardiovascular risk biomarkers remains a barrier to wide-scale use. We determined the validity of DBS-derived biomarkers of CVD risk versus gold-standard assessments, and study-specific, serum-equivalency values for clinical relevance of DBS-derived values. Methods Concurrent venipuncture serum and DBS samples (n=150 adults) were assayed in CLIA-certified and DBS laboratories, respectively. Time controls of DBS standard samples were assayed single-blind along with test samples. Linear regression analyses evaluated DBS-to-serum equivalency values; agreement and bias were assessed via Bland-Altman plots. Results Linear regressions of venipuncture values on DBS-to-serum equivalencies provided R2 values for TC, HDL-C, CRP of 0.484, 0.118, 0.666, respectively. Bland-Altman plots revealed minimal systematic bias between DBS-to-serum and venipuncture values; precision worsened at higher mean values of CRP. Time controls reveal little degradation or change in analyte values for HDL-C and CRP over 30 weeks. Conclusions DBS-assessed biomarkers represent a valid alternative to venipuncture assessments. Large studies using DBS should include study-specific serum-equivalency determinations to optimize individual-level sensitivity, viability of detecting intervention effects, and generalizability in community-level, primary prevention interventions. PMID:26652683

  2. Objectively-Measured Sedentary Time and Cardiometabolic Biomarkers in U.S. Hispanic/Latino Adults: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qibin; Strizich, Garrett; Merchant, Gina; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Buelna, Christina; Castañeda, Sheila F.; Gallo, Linda C.; Cai, Jianwen; Gellman, Marc D.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Moncrieft, Ashley E.; Sanchez-Johnsen, Lisa; Schneiderman, Neil; Kaplan, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sedentary behavior is recognized as a distinct construct from lack of moderate-vigorous physical activity and is associated with deleterious health outcomes. Previous studies have primarily relied on self-reported data, while data on the relationship between objectively-measured sedentary time and cardiometabolic biomarkers are sparse, especially among U.S. Hispanics/Latinos. Methods and Results We examined associations of objectively-measured sedentary time (via Actical accelerometers for 7 days) and multiple cardiometabolic biomarkers among 12,083 participants, aged 18–74 years, from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Hispanics/Latinos of diverse backgrounds (Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and South American) were recruited from 4 U.S. cities between 2008 and 2011. Sedentary time (<100 counts/minute) was standardized to 16-hour/day of wear time. The mean sedentary time was 11.9 hours/day (74% of accelerometer wear time). After adjustment for moderate-vigorous physical activity and confounding variables, prolonged sedentary time was associated with decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (P=0.04), and increased triglycerides, 2-hour glucose, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR (all P<0.0001). These associations were generally consistent across age, sex, Hispanic/Latino backgrounds, and physical activity levels. Even among individuals meeting physical activity guidelines, sedentary time was detrimentally associated with several cardiometabolic biomarkers (diastolic blood pressure, HDL-cholesterol, fasting and 2-hour glucose, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR; all P<0.05). Conclusions Our large population-based, objectively-derived data showed deleterious associations between sedentary time and cardiometabolic biomarkers, independent of physical activity, in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos. Our findings emphasize the importance of reducing sedentary behavior for the prevention of cardiometabolic diseases, even in

  3. Inflammation biomarkers in blood as mortality predictors in community-acquired pneumonia admitted patients: Importance of comparison with neutrophil count percentage or neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio

    PubMed Central

    Curbelo, Jose; Luquero Bueno, Sergio; Galván-Román, José María; Ortega-Gómez, Mara; Rajas, Olga; Fernández-Jiménez, Guillermo; Vega-Piris, Lorena; Rodríguez-Salvanes, Francisco; Arnalich, Belén; Díaz, Ana; Costa, Ramón; de la Fuente, Hortensia; Lancho, Ángel; Suárez, Carmen; Ancochea, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The increase and persistence of inflammation in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients can lead to higher mortality. Biomarkers capable of measuring this inadequate inflammatory response are likely candidates to be related with a bad outcome. We investigated the association between concentrations of several inflammatory markers and mortality of CAP patients. Material and methods This was a prospective study of hospitalised CAP patients in a Spanish university hospital. Blood tests upon admittance and in the early-stage evolution (72–120 hours) were carried out, where C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, proadrenomedullin, copeptin, white blood cell, Lymphocyte Count Percentage (LCP), Neutrophil Count Percentage (NCP) and Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR) were measured. The outcome variable was mortality at 30 and 90 days. Statistical analysis included logistic regression, ROC analysis and area-under-curve test. Results 154 hospitalised CAP patients were included. Patients who died during follow-up had higher levels of procalcitonin, copeptin, proadrenomedullin, lower levels of LCP, and higher of NCP and NLR. Remarkably, multivariate analysis showed a relationship between NCP and mortality, regardless of age, severity of CAP and comorbidities. AUC analysis showed that NLR and NCP at admittance and during early-stage evolution achieved a good diagnostic power. ROC test for NCP and NLR were similar to those of the novel serum biomarkers analysed. Conclusions NLR and NCP, are promising candidate predictors of mortality for hospitalised CAP patients, and both are cheaper, easier to perform, and at least as reliable as the new serum biomarkers. Future implementation of new biomarkers would require comparison not only with classic inflammatory parameters like White Blood Cell count but also with NLR and NCP. PMID:28301543

  4. Maintaining Scientific Community Vocabularies in Drupal through Consumption of Linked Open Data and Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, A.; Arko, R. A.; Maffei, A. R.; Chandler, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    In the Summer of 2011, a one-year pilot project was funded by the National Science Foundation to build a pre-cruise planning application using the Drupal content management system (CMS). This application will be used to assist the individual operators of research vessels in the UNOLS fleet. A large portion of the operator's pre-cruise process revolves around a questionnaire presented to the principal investigator(PI) that is used to gather information about the nature of their upcoming cruise. The Drupal-based application will be delivered as a distribution for use by any operator of a UNOLS vessel to construct customized questionnaires and provide an interface for the PI to complete this questionnaire at their leisure. A major goal of the project is to develop an application that will require as little programming maintenance as possible after the initial development effort. One of the strategies employed is the reuse of existing controlled vocabularies and linked open data wherever possible for fields of the questionnaire - most notably to populate the concepts of Country, Organization, Port, and Ship. The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program manages controlled vocabularies for these concepts and currently exposes these concepts as linked open data. Furthermore, R2R has identified the authoritative source for pertinent oceanographic community vocabularies as ICES for Ship, UNOLS for Port, IANA for Organization, ISO for Country, ISO for Language, SeaDataNet for Device, FIPS for State, and IHO for Sea Area as described at http://www.rvdata.us/voc. The scope of the terms provided by these sources matches the scope of the operator's needs for these concepts, and so the application is being designed to automatically consume served information about these vocabulary terms to populate and update Drupal taxonomies for use in the questionnaire. Where newer terms are required for a PI to complete a questionnaire (before they appear in the vocabularies), the Drupal

  5. Metabolic syndrome and inflammatory biomarkers: a community-based cross-sectional study at the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prior studies reported conflicting findings on the association between metabolic syndrome and inflammatory biomarkers. We tested the cross-sectional associations between metabolic syndrome and nine inflammatory markers. Methods We measured C-reactive protein, CD40 ligand, interleukin-6, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, osteoprotegerin, P-selectin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-2 in 2570 Framingham Offspring Study participants free of diabetes and cardiovascular disease at examination 7. Metabolic syndrome was defined by National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. We performed multivariable linear regressions for each biomarker with metabolic syndrome as the exposure adjusting for age, sex, smoking, aspirin use, and hormone replacement. We subsequently added to the models components of the metabolic syndrome as continuous traits plus lipid lowering and hypertension treatments. We considered P < 0.05 as statistically significant. Results Metabolic syndrome was present in 984 (38%) participants and was statistically significantly associated with each biomarker (all P < 0.02) except osteoprotegerin. After adjusting for its component variables, the metabolic syndrome was associated only with P-selectin (1.06 fold higher in metabolic syndrome, 95% CI 1.02, 1.10, p = 0.005). Conclusions Metabolic syndrome was associated with multiple inflammatory biomarkers. However, adjusting for each of its components eliminated the association with most inflammatory markers, except P-selectin. Our results suggest that the relation between metabolic syndrome and inflammation is largely accounted for by its components. PMID:22716219

  6. Linking leaf veins to growth and mortality rates: an example from a subtropical tree community.

    PubMed

    Iida, Yoshiko; Sun, I-Fang; Price, Charles A; Chen, Chien-Teh; Chen, Zueng-Sang; Chiang, Jyh-Min; Huang, Chun-Lin; Swenson, Nathan G

    2016-09-01

    A fundamental goal in ecology is to link variation in species function to performance, but functional trait-performance investigations have had mixed success. This indicates that less commonly measured functional traits may more clearly elucidate trait-performance relationships. Despite the potential importance of leaf vein traits, which are expected to be related to resource delivery rates and photosynthetic capacity, there are few studies, which examine associations between these traits and demographic performance in communities. Here, we examined the associations between species traits including leaf venation traits and demographic rates (Relative Growth Rate, RGR and mortality) as well as the spatial distributions of traits along soil environment for 54 co-occurring species in a subtropical forest. Size-related changes in demographic rates were estimated using a hierarchical Bayesian approach. Next, Kendall's rank correlations were quantified between traits and estimated demographic rates at a given size and between traits and species-average soil environment. Species with denser venation, smaller areoles, less succulent, or thinner leaves showed higher RGR for a wide range of size classes. Species with leaves of denser veins, larger area, cheaper construction costs or thinner, or low-density wood were associated with high mortality rates only in small size classes. Lastly, contrary to our expectations, acquisitive traits were not related to resource-rich edaphic conditions. This study shows that leaf vein traits are weakly, but significantly related to tree demographic performance together with other species traits. Because leaf traits associated with an acquisitive strategy such as denser venation, less succulence, and thinner leaves showed higher growth rate, but similar leaf traits were not associated with mortality, different pathways may shape species growth and survival. This study suggests that we are still not measuring some of key traits related to

  7. Bangladesh Environmental Enteric Dysfunction (BEED) study: protocol for a community-based intervention study to validate non-invasive biomarkers of environmental enteric dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mahfuz, Mustafa; Das, Subhasish; Mazumder, Ramendra Nath; Masudur Rahman, M; Haque, Rashidul; Bhuiyan, Md Muzibur Rahman; Akhter, Hasina; Sarker, Md Shafiqul Alam; Mondal, Dinesh; Muaz, Syed Shafi Ahmed; Karim, A S M Bazlul; Borowitz, Stephen M; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Barratt, Michael J; Petri, William A; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2017-08-11

    Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is a subacute inflammatory condition of the small intestinal mucosa with unclear aetiology that may account for more than 40% of all cases of stunting. Currently, there are no universally accepted protocols for the diagnosis, treatment and ultimately prevention of EED. The Bangladesh Environmental Enteric Dysfunction (BEED) study is designed to validate non-invasive biomarkers of EED with small intestinal biopsy, better understand disease pathogenesis and identify potential therapeutic targets for interventions designed to control EED and stunting. The BEED study is a community-based intervention where participants are recruited from three cohorts: stunted children aged 12-18 months (length for age Z-score (LAZ) <-2), at risk of stunting children aged 12-18 months (LAZ <-1 to -2) and malnourished adults aged 18-45 years (body mass index <18.5 kg/m(2)). After screening, participants eligible for study provide faecal, urine and plasma specimens to quantify the levels of candidate EED biomarkers before and after receiving a nutritional intervention. Participants who fail to respond to nutritional therapy are considered as the candidates for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with biopsy. Histopathological scoring for EED will be performed on biopsies obtained from several locations within the proximal small intestine. Candidate EED biomarkers will be correlated with nutritional status, the results of histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses of epithelial and lamina propria cell populations, plus assessments of microbial community structure. Ethics approval was obtained in all participating institutes. Results of this study will be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT02812615. Registered on 21 June 2016. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly

  8. Urinary Biomarkers KIM-1 and NGAL for Detection of Chronic Kidney Disease of Uncertain Etiology (CKDu) among Agricultural Communities in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Pallagae Mangala C S; Mohammed Abdul, Khaja Shameem; Eakanayake, Eakanayake M D V; Jayasinghe, Sudheera Sammanthi; Jayasumana, Channa; Asanthi, Hewa Bandulage; Perera, Hettiarachigae S D; Chaminda, Gamage G Tushara; Chandana, Ediriweera P S; Siribaddana, Sisira H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease of uncertain etiology (CKDu) is an emerging epidemic among farming communities in rural Sri Lanka. Victims do not exhibit common causative factors, however, histopathological studies revealed that CKDu is a tubulointerstitial disease. Urine albumin or albumin-creatinine ratio is still being used as a traditional diagnostic tool to identify CKDu, but accuracy and prevalence data generated are questionable. Urinary biomarkers have been used in similar nephropathy and are widely recognised for their sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in determining CKDu and early renal injury. However, these biomarkers have never been used in diagnosing CKDu in Sri Lanka. Male farmers (n = 1734) were recruited from 4 regions in Sri Lanka i.e. Matara and Nuwara Eliya (farming locations with no CKDu prevalence) and two CKDu emerging locations from Hambantota District in Southern Sri Lanka; Angunakolapelessa (EL1) and Bandagiriya (EL2). Albuminuria (ACR ≥ 30mg/g); serum creatinine based estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); creatinine normalized urinary kidney injury molecule (KIM-1) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) were measured. Fourteen new CKDu cases (18%) from EL1 and nine CKDu cases (9%) from EL2 were recognized for the first time from EL1, EL2 locations, which were previously considered as non-endemic of the disease and associated with persistent albuminuria (ACR ≥ 30mg/g Cr). No CKDu cases were identified in non-endemic study locations in Matara (CM) and Nuwara Eliya (CN). Analysis of urinary biomarkers showed urinary KIM-1 and NGAL were significantly higher in new CKDu cases in EL1 and EL2. However, we also reported significantly higher KIM-1 and NGAL in apparently healthy farmers in EL 1 and EL 2 with comparison to both control groups. These observations may indicate possible early renal damage in absence of persistent albuminuria and potential capabilities of urinary KIM-1 and NGAL in early detection of renal injury

  9. Urinary Biomarkers KIM-1 and NGAL for Detection of Chronic Kidney Disease of Uncertain Etiology (CKDu) among Agricultural Communities in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed Abdul, Khaja Shameem; Eakanayake, Eakanayake M. D. V.; Jayasinghe, Sudheera Sammanthi; Jayasumana, Channa; Asanthi, Hewa Bandulage; Perera, Hettiarachigae S. D.; Chaminda, Gamage G. Tushara; Chandana, Ediriweera P. S.; Siribaddana, Sisira H.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease of uncertain etiology (CKDu) is an emerging epidemic among farming communities in rural Sri Lanka. Victims do not exhibit common causative factors, however, histopathological studies revealed that CKDu is a tubulointerstitial disease. Urine albumin or albumin-creatinine ratio is still being used as a traditional diagnostic tool to identify CKDu, but accuracy and prevalence data generated are questionable. Urinary biomarkers have been used in similar nephropathy and are widely recognised for their sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in determining CKDu and early renal injury. However, these biomarkers have never been used in diagnosing CKDu in Sri Lanka. Male farmers (n = 1734) were recruited from 4 regions in Sri Lanka i.e. Matara and Nuwara Eliya (farming locations with no CKDu prevalence) and two CKDu emerging locations from Hambantota District in Southern Sri Lanka; Angunakolapelessa (EL1) and Bandagiriya (EL2). Albuminuria (ACR ≥ 30mg/g); serum creatinine based estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); creatinine normalized urinary kidney injury molecule (KIM-1) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) were measured. Fourteen new CKDu cases (18%) from EL1 and nine CKDu cases (9%) from EL2 were recognized for the first time from EL1, EL2 locations, which were previously considered as non-endemic of the disease and associated with persistent albuminuria (ACR ≥ 30mg/g Cr). No CKDu cases were identified in non-endemic study locations in Matara (CM) and Nuwara Eliya (CN). Analysis of urinary biomarkers showed urinary KIM-1 and NGAL were significantly higher in new CKDu cases in EL1 and EL2. However, we also reported significantly higher KIM-1 and NGAL in apparently healthy farmers in EL 1 and EL 2 with comparison to both control groups. These observations may indicate possible early renal damage in absence of persistent albuminuria and potential capabilities of urinary KIM-1 and NGAL in early detection of renal injury

  10. Links between real and virtual networks: a comparative study of online communities in Japan and Korea.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kenichi; Ogasahara, Morihiro

    2007-04-01

    The present study explores how online communities affect real-world personal relations based on a cross-cultural survey conducted in Japan and Korea. Findings indicate that the gratifications of online communities moderate the effects of online communities on social participation. Online communities are categorized into a real-group-based community and a virtual-network-based community. The membership of real-group-based online community is positively correlated with social bonding gratification and negatively correlated with information- seeking gratification. Japanese users prefer more virtual-network-based online communities, while their Korean counterparts prefer real-group-based online communities. Korean users are more active in online communities and seek a higher level of socializing gratifications, such as social bonding and making new friends, when compared with their Japanese counterparts. These results indicate that in Korea, personal relations via the online community are closely associated with the real-world personal relations, but this is not the case in Japan. This study suggests that the effects of the Internet are culture-specific and that the online community can serve a different function in different cultural environments.

  11. Teachers Learning in the Community: A Field Guide. Connections: Linking Work and Learning Series No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Dionisia; Haynes, Leslie

    Increasingly, teachers are connecting with people in the community as part of their professional development. Community organizations provide opportunities for teachers to gain a new perspective on what students need to know to be prepared for a global economy. In addition, experiences in the community can help teachers develop integrated…

  12. Bridging the Gap: Linking Co-Curricular Activities to Student Learning Outcomes in Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storey, Katie Lauren

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which participation in co-curricular events enhances the achievement of student-learning outcomes in community college students. One community college in Illinois--Chicago Metropolitan Area Community College (CMACC), a pseudonym--was selected to research based on its robust co-curricular activity programming.…

  13. Bridging the Gap: Linking Co-Curricular Activities to Student Learning Outcomes in Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storey, Katie Lauren

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which participation in co-curricular events enhances the achievement of student-learning outcomes in community college students. One community college in Illinois--Chicago Metropolitan Area Community College (CMACC), a pseudonym--was selected to research based on its robust co-curricular activity programming.…

  14. Biomarkers of inclusion body myositis.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Steven A

    2013-11-01

    Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is a poorly understood autoimmune and degenerative disorder of skeletal muscle. Here, pathophysiological and diagnostic biomarkers of IBM are reviewed. Muscle histopathological biomarkers have been successful in stimulating the study of IBM pathophysiology for over three decades. Their use as diagnostic biomarkers, in contrast, has significant limitations. A blood biomarker, autoantibodies against a 43-kDa muscle protein reported in 2011, has now been identified as targeting cytoplasmic 5' nucleotidase (cN1A; NT5C1A), a protein involved in nucleic acid metabolism. Diagnostic testing for these autoantibodies is of high diagnostic performance for IBM. Muscle biomarkers have suggested that IBM pathophysiology is linked to myonuclear degeneration and disordered nucleic acid metabolism. A blood biomarker has high diagnostic performance for IBM, and through identification of its target links, IBM autoimmunity and degeneration together, supporting the view that IBM pathophysiology includes abnormal nucleic acid metabolism.

  15. Processes entangling interactions in communities: forbidden links are more important than abundance in a hummingbird-plant network.

    PubMed

    Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Maruyama, Pietro Kiyoshi; Sazima, Marlies

    2014-04-07

    Understanding the relative importance of multiple processes on structuring species interactions within communities is one of the major challenges in ecology. Here, we evaluated the relative importance of species abundance and forbidden links in structuring a hummingbird-plant interaction network from the Atlantic rainforest in Brazil. Our results show that models incorporating phenological overlapping and morphological matches were more accurate in predicting the observed interactions than models considering species abundance. This means that forbidden links, by imposing constraints on species interactions, play a greater role than species abundance in structuring the ecological network. We also show that using the frequency of interaction as a proxy for species abundance and network metrics to describe the detailed network structure might lead to biased conclusions regarding mechanisms generating network structure. Together, our findings suggest that species abundance can be a less important driver of species interactions in communities than previously thought.

  16. Processes entangling interactions in communities: forbidden links are more important than abundance in a hummingbird–plant network

    PubMed Central

    Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Maruyama, Pietro Kiyoshi; Sazima, Marlies

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the relative importance of multiple processes on structuring species interactions within communities is one of the major challenges in ecology. Here, we evaluated the relative importance of species abundance and forbidden links in structuring a hummingbird–plant interaction network from the Atlantic rainforest in Brazil. Our results show that models incorporating phenological overlapping and morphological matches were more accurate in predicting the observed interactions than models considering species abundance. This means that forbidden links, by imposing constraints on species interactions, play a greater role than species abundance in structuring the ecological network. We also show that using the frequency of interaction as a proxy for species abundance and network metrics to describe the detailed network structure might lead to biased conclusions regarding mechanisms generating network structure. Together, our findings suggest that species abundance can be a less important driver of species interactions in communities than previously thought. PMID:24552835

  17. Responses of Soil Bacterial Communities to Nitrogen Deposition and Precipitation Increment Are Closely Linked with Aboveground Community Variation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Xu, Zhuwen; Yang, Shan; Li, Xiaobin; Top, Eva M; Wang, Ruzhen; Zhang, Yuge; Cai, Jiangping; Yao, Fei; Han, Xingguo; Jiang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    It has been predicted that precipitation and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition will increase in northern China; yet, ecosystem responses to the interactive effects of water and N remain largely unknown. In particular, responses of belowground microbial community to projected global change and their potential linkages to aboveground macro-organisms are rarely studied. In this study, we examined the responses of soil bacterial diversity and community composition to increased precipitation and multi-level N deposition in a temperate steppe in Inner Mongolia, China, and explored the diversity linkages between aboveground and belowground communities. It was observed that N addition caused the significant decrease in bacterial alpha-diversity and dramatic changes in community composition. In addition, we documented strong correlations of alpha- and beta-diversity between plant and bacterial communities in response to N addition. It was found that N enriched the so-called copiotrophic bacteria, but reduced the oligotrophic groups, primarily by increasing the soil inorganic N content and carbon availability and decreasing soil pH. We still highlighted that increased precipitation tended to alleviate the effects of N on bacterial diversity and dampen the plant-microbe connections induced by N. The counteractive effects of N addition and increased precipitation imply that even though the ecosystem diversity and function are predicted to be negatively affected by N deposition in the coming decades; the combination with increased precipitation may partially offset this detrimental effect.

  18. Using Faculty Learning Communities to Link FYE and High-Risk Core Courses: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Mo; Campbell, Kendra; Lowery-Hart, Russell D.; Mallard, Jessica; Andersen, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Can success rates in a gateway course be improved by linking it to a college success course? This article describes the results of a pilot study that linked a first-year biology course that had a high drop-out and failure rate to a college success course that included study skills. The proposal to link courses came from the work of a faculty…

  19. Participation in rural community groups and links with psychological well-being and resilience: a cross-sectional community-based study.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Anthony; Fletcher, Gillian; Farmer, Jane; Kenny, Amanda; Bourke, Lisa; Carra, Kylie; Bariola, Emily

    2016-04-08

    Fostering the development of community groups can be an important part of boosting community participation and improving health and well-being outcomes in rural communities. In this article, we examine whether psychological well-being and resilience are linked to participating in particular kinds of rural community groups. We conducted a household survey involving 176 participants aged 18 to 94 years from a medium-sized rural Australian town. We gathered data on psychological well-being (Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale), resilience (Brief Resilience Scale), and the types of community groups that people participated in as well as a range of characteristics of those groups, such as size, frequency of group meetings, perceived openness to new members, and whether groups had leaders, defined roles for members, hierarchies, and rules. Univariable regression analyses revealed significant links between particular group characteristics and individual psychological well-being and resilience, suggesting that the characteristics of the group that an individual participates in are strongly tied to that person's well-being outcomes. Multivariable analyses revealed two significant independent factors. First, psychological well-being was greatest among those who participated in groups without a hierarchy, that is, equal-status relationships between members. Second, resilience was greater among those who reported having a sense of influence within a group. Our findings suggest that policymakers wishing to promote participation in rural community groups for health and well-being benefits may do well to encourage the development of particular characteristics within those groups, in particular equal-status relationships and a sense of influence for all group members.

  20. Using biomarkers in wastewater to monitor community drug use: a conceptual approach for dealing with new psychoactive substances.

    PubMed

    Reid, Malcolm J; Baz-Lomba, J A; Ryu, Yeonsuk; Thomas, Kevin V

    2014-07-15

    Data obtained from the analysis of wastewater from large-scale sewage treatment plants has been successfully applied to study trends in the use of classical illicit drugs such as cocaine, but the dynamic nature of the new psychoactive substances (NPS) market presents a unique set of challenges to epidemiologists. In an attempt to overcome some of the challenges, this paper presents a framework whereby a collection of tools and alternative data-sources can be used to support the design and implementation of wastewater-based studies on NPS use. Within this framework the most likely and most suitable biomarkers for a given NPS are predicted via in-silico metabolism, biotransformation and sorption models. Subsequent detection and confirmation of the biomarkers in samples of wastewater are addressed via high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The proposed framework is applied to a set of test substances including synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones. In general, the in-silico models predict that transformation via N-dealkylation and hydroxylation is likely for these compounds, and that adsorption is expected to be significant for cannabinoids in wastewater. Screening via HRMS is discussed with examples from the literature, and common-fragment searching and mass-defect filtering are successfully performed on test samples such that spectral noise is removed to leave only the information that is most likely to be related to the NPS biomarkers. HRMS screening is also applied to a set of pissoir-sourced wastewater samples and a total of 48 pharmaceuticals and drugs including 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine (oMeOPP) are identified. The framework outlined in this paper can provide an excellent means of maximizing the chances of success when identifying and detecting biomarkers of NPS in wastewater.

  1. From link-prediction in brain connectomes and protein interactomes to the local-community-paradigm in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Alanis-Lobato, Gregorio; Ravasi, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Growth and remodelling impact the network topology of complex systems, yet a general theory explaining how new links arise between existing nodes has been lacking, and little is known about the topological properties that facilitate link-prediction. Here we investigate the extent to which the connectivity evolution of a network might be predicted by mere topological features. We show how a link/community-based strategy triggers substantial prediction improvements because it accounts for the singular topology of several real networks organised in multiple local communities - a tendency here named local-community-paradigm (LCP). We observe that LCP networks are mainly formed by weak interactions and characterise heterogeneous and dynamic systems that use self-organisation as a major adaptation strategy. These systems seem designed for global delivery of information and processing via multiple local modules. Conversely, non-LCP networks have steady architectures formed by strong interactions, and seem designed for systems in which information/energy storage is crucial. PMID:23563395

  2. Linking geology and microbiology: inactive pockmarks affect sediment microbial community structure.

    PubMed

    Haverkamp, Thomas H A; Hammer, Øyvind; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2014-01-01

    Pockmarks are geological features that are found on the bottom of lakes and oceans all over the globe. Some are active, seeping oil or methane, while others are inactive. Active pockmarks are well studied since they harbor specialized microbial communities that proliferate on the seeping compounds. Such communities are not found in inactive pockmarks. Interestingly, inactive pockmarks are known to have different macrofaunal communities compared to the surrounding sediments. It is undetermined what the microbial composition of inactive pockmarks is and if it shows a similar pattern as the macrofauna. The Norwegian Oslofjord contains many inactive pockmarks and they are well suited to study the influence of these geological features on the microbial community in the sediment. Here we present a detailed analysis of the microbial communities found in three inactive pockmarks and two control samples at two core depth intervals. The communities were analyzed using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA V3 region. Microbial communities of surface pockmark sediments were indistinguishable from communities found in the surrounding seabed. In contrast, pockmark communities at 40 cm sediment depth had a significantly different community structure from normal sediments at the same depth. Statistical analysis of chemical variables indicated significant differences in the concentrations of total carbon and non-particulate organic carbon between 40 cm pockmarks and reference sample sediments. We discuss these results in comparison with the taxonomic classification of the OTUs identified in our samples. Our results indicate that microbial communities at the sediment surface are affected by the water column, while the deeper (40 cm) sediment communities are affected by local conditions within the sediment.

  3. Linking Returning Veterans in Rural Community Colleges to Mental Health Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    that is feasible in the community  college  setting and acceptable to this  student  veteran population and their families.  The survey portion of the...partnership with  student  Veterans and  representatives from these community  colleges .     15. SUBJECT TERMS Community, college , student , depression, PTSD...little has been done to address student veterans’ mental health needs as they reintegrate and attend two-year community colleges . A concurrent challenge

  4. Linking community, parenting, and depressive symptom trajectories: testing resilience models of adolescent agency based on race/ethnicity and gender.

    PubMed

    Williams, Amanda L; Merten, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Family stress models illustrate how communities affect youth outcomes through effects on parents and studies consistently show the enduring effects of early community context. The present study takes a different approach identifying human agency during adolescence as a potentially significant promotive factor mediating the relationship between community, parenting, and mental health. While agency is an important part of resilience, its longitudinal effects are unknown, particularly based on gender and race/ethnicity. The purpose of this research was to model the long-term effects of community structural adversity and social resources as predictors of adolescent depressive symptom trajectories via indirect effects of parental happiness, parent-child relationships, and human agency. Latent growth analyses were conducted with 1,796 participants (53% female; 56% White) across four waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health spanning adolescence (Wave 1) through adulthood (Wave 4). The results identified agency as an important promotive factor during adolescence with long-term mental health benefits, but only for White and male participants. For these individuals, community social resources and the quality of the parent-child relationship were related to higher levels of agency and more positive mental health trajectories. Although community social resources similarly benefitted parenting and agency among females and non-White participants, there were no significant links between agency and depressive symptoms for these youth. The results suggest that agency remains an important, but poorly understood concept and additional work is necessary to continue unpacking its meaning for diverse groups of youth.

  5. The GEOSS Science and Technology Stakeholder Network and Service Suite: Linking S&T Communities and GEOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plag, Hans-Peter; Jules-Plag, Shelley

    2015-04-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) developed by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) aims to provide practice-relevant knowledge in support of decision making in a wide range of societal benefit areas. Generating this practice-relevant knowledge based on Earth observations, socio-economic data and models often depends on research, and utilization of the societal benefits of EOs requires the involvement of science and research communities. Building a GEOSS responding to the needs of a wide range of users necessitates contributions from many science and technology (S&T) communities. In particular, a strong engagement of science and technology (S&T) communities in both the development and use of GEOSS is necessary to address the complex issues associated with the on-going transition out of the Holocene. S&T support is needed to improve interoperability between global observing, modeling, and information systems; to enable data integration across disciplinary boundaries; to facilitate data sharing, archiving, dissemination, and reanalysis; to optimize the recording of observations, assimilation of data into models, and generation of data products; to enhance the value of observations from individual observing systems through their integration in the SBAs; and to harmonize well-calibrated, highly accurate, stable, sustained in-situ and satellite observations of the same variable recorded by different sensors and different agencies. Consequently, the GEO Work Plan includes several Tasks focusing on outreach to S&T communities, and most of the GEO Community of Practice have a strong S&T component. The GEOSS S&T Stakeholder Network facilitates input from S&T communities to GEO. Infrastructure serving and linking S&T users communities and GEOSS has been developed and is integrated into a GEOSS S&T Service Suite (GSTSS). The GSTSS has several outreach components for the demonstration of GEOSS and its value for S&T communities, and for services supporting

  6. Linking community and national park development: A case from the Dominican Republic

    Treesearch

    John Schelhas; Ruth E. Sherman; Timothy J. Fahey; James P. Lassoie

    2002-01-01

    National parks have complex relationships with local communities that impact both conservation success and community well-being. Integrated conservation arid development projects have been a key approach to managing these relationships, although their effectiveness has been increasingly questioned. Park-people relationships of the Armando Bermudez National Park in the...

  7. Standing Alone No More: Linking Research to a Writing Course in a Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapchak, Marcia; Cipr, Ava

    2015-01-01

    Collaborating with teaching faculty is a well-established method of making library instruction more meaningful and engaging to students, and learning communities provide an excellent opportunity to work closely with both teaching faculty and a cohort of students. A typical learning community brings students together around a similar discipline or…

  8. Understanding the Link between Social Organization and Crime in Rural Communities.

    PubMed

    Chilenski, Sarah M; Syvertsen, Amy K; Greenberg, Mark T

    Rural communities make up much of America's heartland, yet we know little about their social organization, and how elements of their social organization relate to crime rates. The current study sought to remedy this gap by examining the associations between two measures of social organization - collective efficacy and social trust - with a number of structural community characteristics, local crime rates, and perceptions of safety in a sample of 27 rural and small town communities in two states. Measures of collective efficacy, social trust, and perceived safety, were gathered from key community members in 2006; other measures were drawn from the 2000 Census and FBI Uniform Crime Reporting system. A series of competing hypotheses were tested to examine the relative importance of social trust and collective efficacy in predicting local crime rates. Results do not support the full generalization of the social disorganization model. Correlational analyses showed that neither collective efficacy nor social trust had a direct association with community crime, nor did they mediate the associations between community structural characteristics and crime. However, perceived safety mediated the association between community crime and both measures of social organization. Analyses suggest that social trust may be more important than collective efficacy when understanding the effect of crime on a community's culture in rural areas. Understanding these associations in rural settings can aid decision makers in shaping policies to reduce crime and juvenile delinquency.

  9. Structured decision making as a framework for linking quantitative decision support to community values

    EPA Science Inventory

    Community-level decisions can have large impacts on production and delivery of ecosystem services, which ultimately affects community well-being. But engaging stakeholders in a process to explore these impacts is a significant challenge. The principles of Structured Decision Ma...

  10. Linking Community Communication to Conservation of the Maned Wolf in Central Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bizerril, Marcelo Ximenes A.; Soares, Carla Cruz; Santos, Jean Pierre

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the environmental education (EE) program developed in the neighboring community of Serra da Canastra National Park based on a research project focused on the maned wolf conservation. The article assesses three tools used to foster the community's participation in discussing local issues: (1) communal production of a book…

  11. Linking Parent and Community Involvement with Student Achievement: Comparing Principal and Teacher Perceptions of Stakeholder Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Molly F.; Louis, Karen Seashore

    2009-01-01

    Expanding the sources of leadership in schools has been a reform theme since the mid 1980s. Using exploratory factor analysis and regression, we examine the following questions: (1) How does leadership style affect principals' openness to community involvement? (2) Is a principal's openness to community involvement related to student achievement?…

  12. Exploring Links between Empowerment and Community-Based Arts and Cultural Practices: Perspectives from Barcelona Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrasco, Ruben David Fernández; Monferrer, Moisés Carmona; Tarditi, Andrés Di Masso

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we reflect on the development of community-based arts and cultural (CBAC) practices to promote psychosocial, group/organisational and community changes from the perspective of empowerment. We draw on findings from an initial exploratory phase of an ongoing action-research project in Spain about creative tools that empower artists…

  13. Lessons from Linking Community Education and Social-Work Philosophies and Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Carolyn M. Siemens

    2001-01-01

    Both community education and social work from a settlement house perspective focus on empowerment, problem solving, and increasing participation in lifelong learning. Both fields debate narrow versus broader methods. Collaborative university-community approaches show how their combined philosophies and practices offer reform possibilities. (SK)

  14. Linking Community Context to Quality of Parenting: A Study of Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Ronald L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Iowa study of 207 nonmetropolitan White female-headed families (each a divorced mother, an adolescent in grade 8-9, and a sibling) found that mothers' ineffective parenting styles were related to community disorganization, both directly and indirectly via negative events, lack of social support, and depression. Community disorganization was highly…

  15. Eco-geophysical imaging of watershed-scale soil patterns links with plant community spatial patterns

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The extent to which soil resource availability, nutrients or 1 moisture, control the structure, function and diversity of plant communities has aroused considerable interest in the past decade, and remains topical in light of global change. Numerous plant communities are controlled either by water o...

  16. Understanding the Link between Social Organization and Crime in Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Chilenski, Sarah M.; Syvertsen, Amy K.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Rural communities make up much of America's heartland, yet we know little about their social organization, and how elements of their social organization relate to crime rates. The current study sought to remedy this gap by examining the associations between two measures of social organization – collective efficacy and social trust – with a number of structural community characteristics, local crime rates, and perceptions of safety in a sample of 27 rural and small town communities in two states. Measures of collective efficacy, social trust, and perceived safety, were gathered from key community members in 2006; other measures were drawn from the 2000 Census and FBI Uniform Crime Reporting system. A series of competing hypotheses were tested to examine the relative importance of social trust and collective efficacy in predicting local crime rates. Results do not support the full generalization of the social disorganization model. Correlational analyses showed that neither collective efficacy nor social trust had a direct association with community crime, nor did they mediate the associations between community structural characteristics and crime. However, perceived safety mediated the association between community crime and both measures of social organization. Analyses suggest that social trust may be more important than collective efficacy when understanding the effect of crime on a community's culture in rural areas. Understanding these associations in rural settings can aid decision makers in shaping policies to reduce crime and juvenile delinquency. PMID:26120326

  17. Lessons from Linking Community Education and Social-Work Philosophies and Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Carolyn M. Siemens

    2001-01-01

    Both community education and social work from a settlement house perspective focus on empowerment, problem solving, and increasing participation in lifelong learning. Both fields debate narrow versus broader methods. Collaborative university-community approaches show how their combined philosophies and practices offer reform possibilities. (SK)

  18. Veterans Coming Home to the Community College: Linking Research to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persky, Karen R.; Oliver, Diane E.

    2011-01-01

    Community colleges must prepare for change as increasing numbers of students who are veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars use their post-9/11 GI Bill benefits to join the colleges' diverse student bodies. Based on the findings of a mixed methods case study, needs of veterans at the community college are framed and discussed within five major…

  19. Literacy Outreach: The Community Link. A Guide to Working with Literacy Helpers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Karen Reed; And Others

    This guide, which is addressed to community-based organizations desiring to start or expand existing adult literacy programs, deals with recruiting and training volunteer literacy tutors. Outlined in the guide are strategies for expanding community outreach efforts (identifying who needs help and where help is typically obtained, learning from…

  20. Structured decision making as a framework for linking quantitative decision support to community values

    EPA Science Inventory

    Community-level decisions can have large impacts on production and delivery of ecosystem services, which ultimately affects community well-being. But engaging stakeholders in a process to explore these impacts is a significant challenge. The principles of Structured Decision Ma...

  1. Landscapes for Learning: Growing Children, Youth, Schools, and Communities. Linking Learning with Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Mey, Brenda J.; McDonald, Sian I.

    This booklet provides information on implementing the Landscapes for Learning (LFL) program, which was conceived to bring children, youths, and communities together to learn about landscaping while beautifying local schools and communities. The booklet begins with a discussion of the concept of environmental stewardship. Described next are the…

  2. Linking Community Communication to Conservation of the Maned Wolf in Central Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bizerril, Marcelo Ximenes A.; Soares, Carla Cruz; Santos, Jean Pierre

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the environmental education (EE) program developed in the neighboring community of Serra da Canastra National Park based on a research project focused on the maned wolf conservation. The article assesses three tools used to foster the community's participation in discussing local issues: (1) communal production of a book…

  3. Exploring Links between Empowerment and Community-Based Arts and Cultural Practices: Perspectives from Barcelona Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrasco, Ruben David Fernández; Monferrer, Moisés Carmona; Tarditi, Andrés Di Masso

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we reflect on the development of community-based arts and cultural (CBAC) practices to promote psychosocial, group/organisational and community changes from the perspective of empowerment. We draw on findings from an initial exploratory phase of an ongoing action-research project in Spain about creative tools that empower artists…

  4. Standing Alone No More: Linking Research to a Writing Course in a Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapchak, Marcia; Cipr, Ava

    2015-01-01

    Collaborating with teaching faculty is a well-established method of making library instruction more meaningful and engaging to students, and learning communities provide an excellent opportunity to work closely with both teaching faculty and a cohort of students. A typical learning community brings students together around a similar discipline or…

  5. Deep analyses of the associations of a series of biomarkers with insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes risk in nondiabetic middle-aged and elderly individuals: results from a Chinese community-based study

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shihui; Ping, Ping; Luo, Leiming; Ye, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective The current study was designed to perform deep analyses of the associations of biomarkers, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and homocysteine (Hcy), with insulin resistance (IR), metabolic syndrome (MetS), and diabetes risk and evaluate the abilities of biomarkers to identify IR, MetS, and diabetes risk in Chinese community-dwelling middle-aged and elderly residents. Participants and methods A total of 396 participants older than 45 years underwent physical examinations and laboratory analyses following standardized protocol. Results Serum hs-CRP concentrations were able to identify MetS, Chinese diabetes risk score (CDRS) ≥4, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) <0.9/1.0 mmol/L, and HDL-c <1.0/1.3 mmol/L (P<0.05 for all). Serum NT-proBNP concentrations were able to identify homeostasis model assessment of IR >1.5, CDRS ≥4, overweight, and blood pressure (BP) ≥140/90 mmHg (P<0.05 for all). Serum Hcy concentrations were able to identify CDRS ≥4, general obesity, overweight, and BP ≥140/90 mmHg (P<0.05 for all). Serum hs-CRP concentrations were independently associated with MetS as well as HDL-c <1.0/1.3 mmol/L and HDL-c <0.9/1.0 mmol/L (P<0.05 for all). Serum NT-proBNP concentrations were independently associated with BP ≥140/90 mmHg (P<0.05). Serum Hcy concentrations were independently associated with CDRS ≥4 (P<0.05). Conclusion Serum HDL-c levels were the major determinant of the associations between serum hs-CRP levels and MetS and the key link between inflammation and MetS. There was no other association of these biomarkers with IR, MetS, and diabetes risk after full adjustment. PMID:27822025

  6. Lack of effective communication between communities and hospitals in Uganda: a qualitative exploration of missing links

    PubMed Central

    Rutebemberwa, Elizeus; Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth; Okui, Olico; Walker, Damien; Mutebi, Aloysius; Pariyo, George

    2009-01-01

    Background Community members are stakeholders in hospitals and have a right to participate in the improvement of quality of services rendered to them. Their views are important because they reflect the perspectives of the general public. This study explored how communities that live around hospitals pass on their views to and receive feedback from the hospitals' management and administration. Methods The study was conducted in eight hospitals and the communities around them. Four of the hospitals were from three districts from eastern Uganda and another four from two districts from western Uganda. Eight key informant interviews (KIIs) were conducted with medical superintendents of the hospitals. A member from each of three hospital management boards was also interviewed. Eight focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with health workers from the hospitals. Another eight FGDs (four with men and four with women) were conducted with communities within a five km radius around the hospitals. Four of the FGDs (two with men and two with women) were done in western Uganda and the other four in eastern Uganda. The focus of the KIIs and FGDs was exploring how hospitals communicated with the communities around them. Analysis was by manifest content analysis. Results Whereas health unit management committees were supposed to have community representatives, the representatives never received views from the community nor gave them any feed back from the hospitals. Messages through the mass media like radio were seen to be non specific for action. Views sent through suggestion boxes were seen as individual needs rather than community concerns. Some community members perceived they would be harassed if they complained and had reached a state of resignation preferring instead to endure the problems quietly. Conclusion There is still lack of effective communication between the communities and the hospitals that serve them in Uganda. This deprives the communities of the right to

  7. Linking DNRA community structure and activity in a shallow lagoonal estuarine system

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bongkeun; Lisa, Jessica A.; Tobias, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and denitrification are two nitrate respiration pathways in the microbial nitrogen cycle. Diversity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria have been extensively examined in various ecosystems. However, studies on DNRA bacterial diversity are limited, and the linkage between the structure and activity of DNRA communities has yet to be discovered. We examined the composition, diversity, abundance, and activities of DNRA communities at five sites along a salinity gradient in the New River Estuary, North Carolina, USA, a shallow temporal/lagoonal estuarine system. Sediment slurry incubation experiments with 15N-nitrate were conducted to measure potential DNRA rates, while the abundance of DNRA communities was calculated using quantitative PCR of nrfA genes encoding cytochrome C nitrite reductase, commonly found in DNRA bacteria. A pyrosequencing method targeting nrfA genes was developed using an Ion Torrent sequencer to examine the diversity and composition of DNRA communities within the estuarine sediment community. We found higher levels of nrfA gene abundance and DNRA activities in sediments with higher percent organic content. Pyrosequencing analysis of nrfA genes revealed spatial variation of DNRA communities along the salinity gradient of the New River Estuary. Percent abundance of dominant populations was found to have significant influence on overall activities of DNRA communities. Abundance of dominant DNRA bacteria and organic carbon availability are important regulators of DNRA activities in the eutrophic New River Estuary. PMID:25232351

  8. Psychological Symptoms Linking Exposure to Community Violence and Academic Functioning in African American Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Danielle R.; Lambert, Sharon F.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    African American adolescents are exposed disproportionately to community violence, increasing their risk for emotional and behavioral symptoms that can detract from learning and undermine academic outcomes. The present study examined whether aggressive behavior and depressive and anxious symptoms mediated the association between exposure to community violence and academic functioning, and if the indirect effects of community violence on academic functioning differed for boys and girls, in a community sample of urban African American adolescents (N = 491; 46.6% female). Structural equation modeling was used to examine the indirect effect of exposure to community violence in grade 6 on grade 8 academic functioning. Results revealed that aggression in grade 7 mediated the association between grade 6 exposure to community violence and grade 8 academic functioning. There were no indirect effects through depressive and anxious symptoms, and gender did not moderate the indirect effect. Findings highlight the importance of targeting aggressive behavior for youth exposed to community violence to not only improve their behavioral adjustment but also their academic functioning. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:23277294

  9. Psychological symptoms linking exposure to community violence and academic functioning in African American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Busby, Danielle R; Lambert, Sharon F; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2013-02-01

    African American adolescents are exposed disproportionately to community violence, increasing their risk for emotional and behavioral symptoms that can detract from learning and undermine academic outcomes. The present study examined whether aggressive behavior and depressive and anxious symptoms mediated the association between exposure to community violence and academic functioning, and if the indirect effects of community violence on academic functioning differed for boys and girls, in a community sample of urban African American adolescents (N = 491; 46.6 % female). Structural equation modeling was used to examine the indirect effect of exposure to community violence in grade 6 on grade 8 academic functioning. Results revealed that aggression in grade 7 mediated the association between grade 6 exposure to community violence and grade 8 academic functioning. There were no indirect effects through depressive and anxious symptoms, and gender did not moderate the indirect effect. Findings highlight the importance of targeting aggressive behavior for youth exposed to community violence to not only improve their behavioral adjustment but also their academic functioning. Implications for future research are discussed.

  10. Advanced primary care in San Antonio: linking practice and community strategies to improve health.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Robert L; Gonzalez Schlenker, Carolina; Lozano Romero, Raquel; Poursani, Ramin; Bazaldua, Oralia; Davidson, DeWayne; Ann Gonzales, Melissa; Dehoyos, Janie; Castilla, Martha; Corona, Betty A; Tysinger, James; Alsip, Bryan; Trejo, Jonathan; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Improving health among people living in poverty often transcends narrowly focused illness care. Meaningful success is unlikely without confronting the complex social origins of illness. We describe an emerging community of solution to improve health outcomes for a population of 6000 San Antonio, Texas, residents enrolled in a county health care program. The community of solution comprises a county health system, a family medicine residency program, a metropolitan public health department, and local nonprofit organizations and businesses. Community-based activities responding to the needs of individuals and their neighborhoods are driven by a cohort of promotores (community health workers) whose mission encompasses change at both the individual and community levels. Centered on patients' functional goals, promotores mobilize family and community resources and consider what community-level action will address the social determinants of health. On the clinical side, care teams implement population-based risk assessment and nurse care management with a focus on care transitions as well as other measures to meet the needs of patients with high morbidity and high use of health care. Population-based outcome metrics include reductions in hospitalizations, emergency department and urgent care visits, and the associated charges. Promotores also assess patients' progress along the trajectory of their selected functional goals.

  11. Linking variations in DOM composition and the microbial community in the water masses of the deep northeast Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansman, R.; Herndl, G. J.

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and microbial communities in the marine environment are inherently linked as microbes consume, produce, and transform dissolved compounds that contribute to the DOM pool. Thus, we might expect the composition of DOM and characteristics of the microbial community to co-vary throughout the water column. However, portions of the DOM pool cycle on varying timescales, ranging from hours to millennia, and the lability and residence times of these fractions may be reflected in their relationship to the dynamics of the in situ microbial community. To explore these associations, we analyzed several components of DOM of various water masses throughout the deep northeast Atlantic Ocean, including the molecular composition of solid phase extracted (SPE) DOM using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and the distribution of dissolved free (DFAA) and total hydrolyzable amino acids (THAA). While SPE-DOM as analyzed by FT-ICR-MS appears to be generally a conservative parameter in northeast Atlantic deep water, other components of the DOM pool vary with depth and latitude similar to changes in the microbial community. For example, DFAA show a more water mass specific distribution, and the relative mol% of the organic acid taurine is increased in subsurface (100 m) samples. Here we demonstrate variability among different fractions of marine DOM by assessing its composition in the deep northeast Atlantic Ocean in the context of microbial abundance, metabolic activity, and community composition.

  12. Linking the Composition of Bacterial and Archaeal Communities to Characteristics of Soil and Flora Composition in the Atlantic Rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Perim, Julia Elidia; Romagnoli, Emiliana Manesco; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Durrer, Ademir; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2016-01-01

    The description of microbiomes as intrinsic fractions of any given ecosystem is an important issue, for instance, by linking their compositions and functions with other biotic and abiotic components of natural systems and hosts. Here we describe the archaeal and bacterial communities from soils of the Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil. Based on the comparison of three areas located along an altitudinal gradient—namely, Santa Virginia, Picinguaba and Restinga—we detected the most abundant groups of Bacteria (Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria) and Archaea (Thaumarchaeota, Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota). The particular composition of such communities in each of these areas was first evidenced by PCR-DGGE patterns [determined for Bacteria, Archaea and ammonia-oxidizing organisms—ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB)]. Moreover, sequence-based analysis provided a better resolution of communities, which indicated distinct frequencies of archaeal phyla and bacterial OTUs across areas. We found, as indicated by the Mantel test and multivariate analyses, a potential effect of the flora composition that outpaces the effect of soil characteristics (either physical and chemical) influencing the assembly of these microbial communities in soils. Our results indicate a collective role of the ecosystem underlying observed differences in microbial communities in these soils. Particularly, we posit that rainforest preservation also needs to take into account the maintenance of the soil biodiversity, as this is prompted to influence major processes that affect ecosystem functioning. PMID:26752633

  13. Linking the Composition of Bacterial and Archaeal Communities to Characteristics of Soil and Flora Composition in the Atlantic Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Lima-Perim, Julia Elidia; Romagnoli, Emiliana Manesco; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Durrer, Ademir; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2016-01-01

    The description of microbiomes as intrinsic fractions of any given ecosystem is an important issue, for instance, by linking their compositions and functions with other biotic and abiotic components of natural systems and hosts. Here we describe the archaeal and bacterial communities from soils of the Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil. Based on the comparison of three areas located along an altitudinal gradient-namely, Santa Virginia, Picinguaba and Restinga-we detected the most abundant groups of Bacteria (Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria) and Archaea (Thaumarchaeota, Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota). The particular composition of such communities in each of these areas was first evidenced by PCR-DGGE patterns [determined for Bacteria, Archaea and ammonia-oxidizing organisms-ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB)]. Moreover, sequence-based analysis provided a better resolution of communities, which indicated distinct frequencies of archaeal phyla and bacterial OTUs across areas. We found, as indicated by the Mantel test and multivariate analyses, a potential effect of the flora composition that outpaces the effect of soil characteristics (either physical and chemical) influencing the assembly of these microbial communities in soils. Our results indicate a collective role of the ecosystem underlying observed differences in microbial communities in these soils. Particularly, we posit that rainforest preservation also needs to take into account the maintenance of the soil biodiversity, as this is prompted to influence major processes that affect ecosystem functioning.

  14. Exploring ancient microbial community assemblages by creating complex lipid biomarker profiles for stromatolites and microbial mats in Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, E.; Summons, R. E.; Schubotz, F.; Matys, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Stromatolites that are biogenic in origin, a characteristic that can be determined by the coexistence of microbial mats (active microbial communities) and stromatolites (lithified structures) like in Hamelin Pool, comprise one of the best modern analogs to ancient microbial community assemblages. Comprehensive lipid biomarker profiles that include lipids of varying persistence in the rock record can help determine how previously living microbial communities are represented in lithified stromatolites. To create these profiles, the samples analyzed included non-lithified smooth, pustular, and colloform microbial mats, as well as smooth and colloform stromatolites. Select samples were separated into upper and lower layers of 5cm depth each. Intact polar lipids, glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers, and bacteriohopanepolyols were analyzed via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) coupled to a Quadropole Time-of-Flight (QTOF) mass spectrometer; additionally, fatty acids from each sample were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to prove consistent signatures with those determined by Allen et al. in 2010 for similar microbial mat samples. In accordance with those findings, 2-methylhopanoids were detected, as well as limited signals from higher (vascular) plants, the latter of which suggests terrestrial inputs, potentially from runoff. The rarely detected presence of 3-methylhopanoids appears in a significant portion of the samples, though further isolations of the molecule are needed to confirm. While all lipid profiles were relatively similar, certain differences in relative composition are likely attributable to morphological differences of the mats, some of which allow deeper oxygen and/or sunlight penetration, which influence the microbial community. However, overall similarities of transient and persistent lipids suggest that the microbial communities of both the non-lithified microbial mats and stromatolites are similar.

  15. Linking with Community To Reclaim Natural Areas for Education: The McLane Elementary School Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Melinda; Smith, Kathy Kurtz

    2002-01-01

    Describes a project in which students, teachers, and the community work to reclaim neglected wetlands and forested areas for use as an environmental study site for interdisciplinary learning. (Author/MM)

  16. Linking with Community To Reclaim Natural Areas for Education: The McLane Elementary School Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Melinda; Smith, Kathy Kurtz

    2002-01-01

    Describes a project in which students, teachers, and the community work to reclaim neglected wetlands and forested areas for use as an environmental study site for interdisciplinary learning. (Author/MM)

  17. Essential concepts in developing community-university partnerships. CareLink: the Partners in Caring Model.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Henrietta; Shellman, Juliette; Reid, Karen

    2004-01-01

    University and community partnerships are being created to increase community-based educational experiences for nursing students and to assist agencies in facing ever-decreasing resources to pay for health services for clients. Many challenges often burden these partnerships, leading to a less than satisfying experience for all those involved. The Partners in Caring Model described in this article is one approach to forming a successful partnership, proven effective in meeting the educational needs of the University of Connecticut, School of Nursing students, while providing additional resources to the Visiting Nurse Association of Central Connecticut, Inc. Using Anderson and McFarlane's Community as Partner Model as the framework, the essential principles behind the development of this successful partnership are discussed. The Partners in Caring Model demonstrates that community-university partnerships can sustain themselves when the partners have a commitment to care for the population being served, and it is a shared responsibility between education and practice.

  18. Linking Returning Veterans in Rural Community Colleges to Mental Health Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Community Colleges, Veterans 3 Introduction The onset of mental illness typically occurs before age 241 and these disorders account for about...half of the overall burden of illness for adolescents and young adults.2 Early detection and treatment is critical because, if left untreated, mental ...15,16 Another important reason to better understand mental illness on community college campuses is that a substantial number of veterans from

  19. Creating community action plans for obesity prevention using the ANGELO (Analysis Grid for Elements Linked to Obesity) Framework.

    PubMed

    Simmons, A; Mavoa, H M; Bell, A C; De Courten, M; Schaaf, D; Schultz, J; Swinburn, B A

    2009-12-01

    Community-based interventions are an important component of obesity prevention efforts. The literature provides little guidance on priority-setting for obesity prevention in communities, especially for socially and culturally diverse populations. This paper reports on the process of developing prioritized, community-participatory action plans for obesity prevention projects in children and adolescents using the ANGELO (Analysis Grid for Elements Linked to Obesity) Framework. We combined stakeholder engagement processes, the ANGELO Framework (scans for environmental barriers, targeted behaviours, gaps in skills and knowledge) and workshops with key stakeholders to create action plans for six diverse obesity prevention projects in Australia (n = 3), New Zealand, Fiji and Tonga from 2002 to 2005. Some sites included sociocultural contextual analyses in the environmental scans. Target groups were under-5-year-olds (Australia), 4-12-year-olds (Australia) and 13-18-year-olds (all four countries). Over 120 potential behavioural, knowledge, skill and environmental elements were identified for prioritization leading into each 2-day workshop. Many elements were common across the diverse cultural communities; however, several unique sociocultural elements emerged in some cultural groups which informed their action plans. Youth were actively engaged in adolescent projects, allowing their needs to be incorporated into the action plans initiating the process of ownership. A common structure for the action plan promoted efficiencies in the process while allowing for community creativity and innovation. The ANGELO is a flexible and efficient way of achieving an agreed plan for obesity prevention with diverse communities. It is responsive to community needs, combines local and international knowledge and creates stakeholder ownership of the action plan.

  20. Integrating the Environment, the Economy, and Community Health: A Community Health Center’s Initiative to Link Health Benefits to Smart Growth

    PubMed Central

    McAvoy, Peter V.; Driscoll, Mary Beth; Gramling, Benjamin J.

    2004-01-01

    The Sixteenth Street Community Health Center (SSCHC) in Milwaukee, Wis, is making a difference in the livability of surrounding neighborhoods and the overall health of the families it serves. SSCHC is going beyond traditional health care provider models and working to link the environment, the economy, and community health through urban brownfield redevelopment and sustainable land-use planning. In 1997, SSCHC recognized that restoration of local air and water quality and other environmental conditions, coupled with restoring family-supporting jobs in the neighborhood, could have a substantial impact on the overall health of families. Recent events indicate that SSCHC’s pursuit of smart growth strategies has begun to pay off. PMID:15053995

  1. Predator community composition is linked to soil carbon retention across a human land use gradient.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Oswald J; Buchkowski, Robert W; Smith, Jeffrey R; Telthorst, Mark; Rosenblatt, Adam E

    2017-05-01

    Soil carbon (C) storage is a major component of the carbon cycle. Consensus holds that soil C uptake and storage is regulated by plant-microbe-soil interactions. However, the contribution of animals in aboveground food webs to this process has been overlooked. Using insights from prior long-term experimentation in an old-field ecosystem and mathematical modeling, we predicted that the amount of soil C retention within a field should increase with the proportion of active hunting predators comprising the aboveground community of active hunting and sit-and-wait predators. This comes about because predators with different hunting modes have different cascading effects on plants. Our test of the prediction revealed that the composition of the arthropod predator community and associated cascading effects on the plant community explained 41% of variation in soil C retention among 15 old fields across a human land use gradient. We also evaluated the potential for several other candidate factors to explain variation in soil C retention among fields, independent of among-field variation in the predator community. These included live plant biomass, insect herbivore community composition, soil arthropod decomposer community composition, degree of land use development around the fields, field age, and soil texture. None of these candidate variables significantly explained soil C retention among the fields. The study offers a generalizable understanding of the pathways through which arthropod predator community composition can contribute to old-field ecosystem carbon storage. This insight helps support ongoing efforts to understand and manage the effects of anthropogenic land use change on soil C storage. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  2. Linking community and disease ecology: the impact of biodiversity on pathogen transmission.

    PubMed

    Roche, Benjamin; Dobson, Andrew P; Guégan, Jean-François; Rohani, Pejman

    2012-10-19

    The increasing number of zoonotic diseases spilling over from a range of wild animal species represents a particular concern for public health, especially in light of the current dramatic trend of biodiversity loss. To understand the ecology of these multi-host pathogens and their response to environmental degradation and species extinctions, it is necessary to develop a theoretical framework that takes into account realistic community assemblages. Here, we present a multi-host species epidemiological model that includes empirically determined patterns of diversity and composition derived from community ecology studies. We use this framework to study the interaction between wildlife diversity and directly transmitted pathogen dynamics. First, we demonstrate that variability in community composition does not affect significantly the intensity of pathogen transmission. We also show that the consequences of community diversity can differentially impact the prevalence of pathogens and the number of infectious individuals. Finally, we show that ecological interactions among host species have a weaker influence on pathogen circulation than inter-species transmission rates. We conclude that integration of a community perspective to study wildlife pathogens is crucial, especially in the context of understanding and predicting infectious disease emergence events.

  3. Linking community and disease ecology: the impact of biodiversity on pathogen transmission

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Benjamin; Dobson, Andrew P.; Guégan, Jean-François; Rohani, Pejman

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of zoonotic diseases spilling over from a range of wild animal species represents a particular concern for public health, especially in light of the current dramatic trend of biodiversity loss. To understand the ecology of these multi-host pathogens and their response to environmental degradation and species extinctions, it is necessary to develop a theoretical framework that takes into account realistic community assemblages. Here, we present a multi-host species epidemiological model that includes empirically determined patterns of diversity and composition derived from community ecology studies. We use this framework to study the interaction between wildlife diversity and directly transmitted pathogen dynamics. First, we demonstrate that variability in community composition does not affect significantly the intensity of pathogen transmission. We also show that the consequences of community diversity can differentially impact the prevalence of pathogens and the number of infectious individuals. Finally, we show that ecological interactions among host species have a weaker influence on pathogen circulation than inter-species transmission rates. We conclude that integration of a community perspective to study wildlife pathogens is crucial, especially in the context of understanding and predicting infectious disease emergence events. PMID:22966136

  4. Linking fungal communities to wood density loss after 12 years of log decay.

    PubMed

    Kubartová, Ariana; Ottosson, Elisabet; Stenlid, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Changes in biodiversity might alter decomposition processes and, consequently, carbon and nutrient cycling. We examined fungal diversity and density loss in experimental Norway spruce logs after 12 years of decay in a hemiboreal forest. Between 28 and 50% of the original wood biomass remained, depending on the fungal community composition in the log, operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness had only a minor effect on the log biomass. Although the communities were OTU rich (190-340 OTUs per log), the majority of OTUs were infrequent or rare; wood degradation therefore depended mostly on the most abundant OTUs and their decomposing abilities. The least decayed logs were characterized by continuous dominance of an earlier colonizer and by high within-log community diversity, which was significantly related to sample variables (position in log, density and moisture). In the most decayed logs, the earlier colonizers were generally replaced by white-rot species able to exploit the highly decomposed wood. The communities were relatively spatially uniform within whole logs, independent of the sample variables, whereas among-log diversity was high. Importance of fungal community composition in decomposition processes should be taken into account when studying and modeling carbon dynamics in forest ecosystems.

  5. NABIR Assessment Element, Expanded Rapid, Comprehensive, Lipid Biomarker Analysis for Subsurface, Community Composition and Nutritional/Physiological Status as Monitors of Remediation and Detoxification Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    David C. White

    2005-09-14

    NABIR funding at the University of Tennessee Center for Biomarker Analysis (CBA) has led to several key contributions to the investigation of bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. This lab has played an integral part in assessing microbial communities at the field scale at the ORNL FRC (Istok et al., 2004) and two UMTRA sites (Anderson et al., 2003, Chang et al., 2001). Our work over the period of the grant has resulted in 42-peer reviewed publications, 62 presentations (14 of which were international), and one patent pending. Currently CBA has 2 papers in press. The main objectives relating to the field portion of this program were to provide comprehensive biomarker analysis for NABIR collaborators to enhance the understanding of microbial geo-bioprocesses involved in the effective immobilization of metals (We have worked with and published or currently are publishing with 10 groups of NAIBR investigators). The laboratory portion of our research centered on methods development and has led to three major innovations that could result in a systematic way of evaluating sites for potential bioremediation. The first of these is the development of an in situ sampling device (Peacock et al., 2004, Anderson et al., 2003, Istok et al., 2004) for the collection and concentration of microbial biomass. The second is the development of expanded lipid analysis based on the significantly greater sensitivity and selectivity of the LC/MS/MS that allows the analysis of respiratory quinones, diglycerides, sterols, intact phospholipids, poly-hydroxyalkonates, and potentially archaeol, and caldarchaeols from archea. These new analyses are accomplished more rapidly and with increased sensitivities and resolution than in the past (Lytle et al., 2000a, 2000b, 2001a, Geyer et al., 2004). The third advance is the coupling of lipid analysis with 13C enrichment experiments (Lytle et al., 2001b, Geyer et al. 2005). With this technique it is now possible to follow the active portion of

  6. EPILEPSY BIOMARKERS

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Jerome; Pitkänen, Asla; Loeb, Jeffrey A.; Dudek, F. Edward; Bertram, Edward H.; Cole, Andrew J.; Moshé, Solomon L.; Wiebe, Samuel; Fureman, Brandy E.; Jensen, Frances E.; Mody, Istvan; Nehlig, Astrid; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2013-01-01

    Summary A biomarker is defined as an objectively measured characteristic of a normal or pathological biological process. Identification and proper validation of biomarkers of epileptogenesis, the development of epilepsy, and ictogenesis, the propensity to generate spontaneous seizures, might predict the development of an epilepsy condition; identify the presence and severity of tissue capable of generating spontaneous seizures; measure progression after the condition is established; and determine pharmacoresistance. Such biomarkers could be used to create animal models for more cost-effective screening of potential antiepileptogenic and antiseizure drugs and devices, and to reduce the cost of clinical trials by enriching the trial population, and acting as surrogate markers to shorten trial duration. The objectives of the biomarker subgroup for the London Workshop were to define approaches for identifying possible biomarkers for these purposes. Research to identify reliable biomarkers may also reveal underlying mechanisms that could serve as therapeutic targets for the development of new antiepileptogenic and antiseizure compounds. PMID:23909854

  7. Linking frontline work and state-of-the-art knowledge: a community exchange system.

    PubMed

    Indyk, D; Belville, R

    1995-01-01

    When challenged by complex medical and social conditions, local providers must participate in information exchanges, resource sharing, continuing education, and service coordination. A community exchange system, flexible enough to share and adapt new knowledge, and able to provide continuing multidisciplinary training and education across different practice settings, was established for the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS in East Harlem, New York City. The HIV/AIDS community exchange system supports linkages among disciplines within a medical center, communication among the local community-based organizations, and networks between the two settings. The system, as a model, is applicable to complex socio-medical problems such as diabetes, substance abuse, violence, tuberculosis, or geriatrics.

  8. Linking seasonal inorganic nitrogen shift to the dynamics of microbial communities in the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yiguo; Xu, Xiongrong; Kan, Jinjun; Chen, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Seasonal shifts of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and the dynamics of microbial communities for nitrogen transformation were investigated in the water column of Chesapeake Bay. The relative abundance of nitrogen over phosphorus (N) showed a strong seasonal and spatial pattern: gradually decreased from upstream to downstream; high in winter and low in summer. Because the phosphorus concentration remained relatively stable, the spatiotemporal pattern of N implied that a substantial fraction of DIN was removed in the bay, especially in summer. Correlation analyses indicated the functional microbial communities and environmental variables, such as temperature, dissolved oxygen, salinity, played important roles for connecting the seasonal variation of N. Among them, temperature was the trigger factor. High temperature in the summer induced the growth of functional microbes, which subsequently consumed a large portion of DIN inputted from the tributaries and reduced the N. The current study provided the relative importance of microbial communities and environmental variables in driving the DIN loss in the bay.

  9. Linking phytoplankton and bacterioplankton community dynamics to iron-binding ligand production in a microcosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogle, S. L.; Bundy, R.; Barbeau, K.

    2016-02-01

    Several significant lines of evidence implicate heterotrophic bacterioplankton as agents of iron cycling and sources of iron-binding ligands in seawater, but direct and mechanistic linkages have mostly remained elusive. Currently, it is unknown how microbial community composition varies during the course of biogenic particle remineralization and how shifts in community structure are related to sources and sinks of Fe-binding ligands. In order to simulate the rise, decline, and ultimate remineralization of a phytoplankton bloom, we followed the production of different classes of Fe-binding ligands as measured by electrochemical techniques, Fe concentrations, and macronutrient concentrations in a series of iron-amended whole seawater incubations over a period of six days during a California Current Ecosystem Long Term Ecological Research (CCE-LTER) process cruise. At the termination of the experiment phytoplankton communities were similar across iron treatments, but high iron conditions generated greater phytoplankton biomass and increased nutrient drawdown suggesting that phytoplankton communities were in different phases of bloom development. Strikingly, L1 ligands akin to siderophores in binding strength were only observed in high iron treatments implicating phytoplankton bloom phase as an important control. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene surveys, we observed that the abundance of transiently dominant copiotroph bacteria were strongly correlated with L1 concentrations. However, incubations with similar L1 concentrations and binding strengths produced distinct copiotroph community profiles dominated by a few strains. We suggest that phytoplankton bloom maturity influences algal-associated heterotrophic community succession, and that L1 production is either directly or indirectly tied to the appearance and eventual dominance of rarely abundant copiotroph bacterial strains.

  10. Microbial-algal community changes during the latest Permian ecological crisis: Evidence from lipid biomarkers at Cili, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Genming; Wang, Yongbiao; Grice, Kliti; Kershaw, Steve; Algeo, Thomas J.; Ruan, Xiaoyan; Yang, Hao; Jia, Chengling; Xie, Shucheng

    2013-06-01

    Microbialites flourished globally immediately following the latest Permian mass extinction. In this study, lipid biomarker records were analyzed in the Cili section (Hunan Province, South China) in order to determine the types of microbes involved in microbialite formation and their response to contemporaneous environmental changes. Various biomarkers were identified in the aliphatic and aromatic fractions using gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Low abundance of steranes in the microbialite layer suggests that it did not contain large amounts of algae, in striking contrast to the abundant algal fossils and algal-derived steranes present in the underlying (pre-crisis) skeletal limestone. Although pristine/phytane (Pr/Ph) ratios increased in the microbialite layer, covariation of Pr/Ph with the ratio of low- to high-molecular-weight n-alkanes (C20 -/C20 +) suggests that the former proxy was controlled by microbial (particularly cyanobacterial) inputs rather than by redox conditions. The microbialite also yielded low ratios of hopanes to short-chain n-alkanes (HP/Lalk) and high abundances of C21n-alkylcyclohexane, indicating that, in addition to cyanobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, archaea, and possibly acritarchs flourished in the aftermath of the marine extinction event. The upper part of the thinly bedded micritic limestone overlying the microbialite exhibits a bimodal distribution of n-alkanes as well as increased abundances of extended tricyclic terpanes and steranes, suggesting a return of habitable shallow-marine conditions for eukaryotic algae several hundred thousand years after the latest Permian mass extinction. Increases in the dibenzofuran ratio (i.e., DBF/(DBF + DBT + F)) and in the coronene to phenanthrene ratio (Cor/P) in the skeletal limestone immediately below the microbialite are evidence of enhanced soil erosion rates and wildfire intensity, marking the collapse of terrestrial ecosystems. The terrestrial crisis thus slightly

  11. Linking plant communities on land and at sea: The effects of Posidonia oceanica wrack on the structure of dune vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Silvia; Jucker, Tommaso; Carboni, Marta; Acosta, Alicia T. R.

    2017-01-01

    Although terrestrial and marine ecosystems are often perceived as clearly distinct, in coastal areas biological communities on land and at sea are in fact intimately linked. One way in which terrestrial and marine systems interact is through the accumulation of seagrass wrack on beaches, which plays an important role as a nutrient input in coastal dune food webs. Here we test whether accumulated beach-cast wrack also influences the structure and diversity of coastal dune plant communities. Relying on a database of 572 vegetation surveys distributed across the island of Sardinia, we used mixed-effects models to compare the vegetation cover and species richness of plant communities exposed to different amounts of Posidonia oceanica beach-cast wrack. We found that beaches which receive high amounts of P. oceanica wrack have considerably greater vegetation cover (10% on average) than those with fewer deposits. The positive relationship between beach-cast wrack and vegetation cover was especially strong in nearshore plant communities, becoming progressively weaker along the habitat zonation. A similar pattern was found for species richness: beaches with high levels of accumulated wrack had more diverse drift line and foredune plant communities, while habitats further away from the shoreline were unaffected. Our study is the first to present evidence suggesting that activities which reduce wrack accumulation on beaches - either through direct removal of deposits or by causing P. oceanica seabeds to decline - can have effects on both the structure and diversity of coastal dune plant communities. Effective management of Mediterranean coastal dune ecosystems will require developing clear strategies for the removal and relocation of accumulated beach-cast wrack.

  12. Lost in translation: the question of evidence linking community-based arts and health promotion.

    PubMed

    Putland, Christine

    2008-03-01

    Reflecting a wider preoccupation with 'evidence-based-policy', the effectiveness of community-based arts practice designed to promote individual and community level health and well-being is in the spotlight. Evidence is said to remain elusive despite the proliferation of initiatives and government investment. Responses to this issue can broadly be characterized as health perspectives (calling for more scientific approaches to evaluation research that go beyond anecdote and opinion) and arts perspectives (concerned about reductive measures and narrowly prescribed social outcomes). This article seeks to advance an intersectoral dialogue by highlighting the tensions within present approaches and canvassing alternative frameworks.

  13. Linking benthic microbial community dynamics to diel redox variations in a near shore costal environment, Héeia Fishpond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, K. L.; Rogers, K. L.; Wheat, C. G.; Alegado, R.

    2016-12-01

    Microbes play crucial roles in mediating biogeochemical cycling in coastal marine habitats. In shallow coastal ecosystems, excess primary productivity and respiration of pelagic phototrophic organisms generate striking diel variations in dissolved oxygen concentrations, leading to substantial vertical migration of redox transition zones in the sediment. However, the relationship between microbial community dynamics and the establishment of these geochemical gradients, especially over a diel time frame, remains poorly constrained. Here we examine the biogeochemical drivers of diel redox dynamics by integrating comprehensive geochemical, taxonomic, functional gene abundance, and thermodynamic datasets from Héeia Fishpond (HFP) sediment cores. HFP, an 88-acre tidally-influenced, shallow Hawaiian coastal estuarine system, is analogous to a large mesocosm embedded in a natural coastal environment, making it an ideal site for coastal biogeochemical studies. Taxonomic assessments of bacterial diversity via 16S rRNA genes revealed centimeter- scale variability with depth, with similar taxa present in all samples, but their relative abundances varied substantially among horizons. There were significant correlation between changes in geochemical composition and changes in community structure. Additionally, functional gene abundance was correlated with energy potential and aligned with activity. The taxanomic data and porewater geochemistry from HFP sediments suggest that redox variations observed in iron and sulfur speciation result from depth-related changes in microbial activity and community structure over a diel period. By linking community diversity to metabolic activity in the context of the geochemical environment, this research provides valuable insight into the connectivity of iron and sulfur metabolic modes.

  14. Project Link-Four: Pre-Vocational Education for Adults through Community Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stedman, Deborah S.

    The Texas adult performance level (APL) project LINK-FOUR implemented a curriculum based on functional competencies at four sites (Austin, Texarkana, Texas City, and Abilene) and formed linkages with local organizations involved in adult vocational education. The concept on which the project was based was that a set of prevocational skills, plus a…

  15. Making the Link: Service-Learning and Community Education--A Tri-State Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Stanley J.; Herrity, Joe; Bucher, Marlys; Fehsenfeld, Lizanne

    1998-01-01

    The Tri-State Initiative is a collaboration for service learning linking the Iowa Department of Education; Minnesota Department of Children, Families, and Learning; and the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. Six demonstration schools are restructuring using service learning methodology. (SK)

  16. Service-Learning Linking Family Child Care Providers, Community Partners, and Preservice Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Pamela W.; Parker, Tameka S.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of a service-learning project, which was infused into a child development course. The project linked family child care providers, their licensing agency, and 39 preservice teachers in a joint effort to develop a parent handbook to be used by the providers in their child care businesses and to support…

  17. Service-Learning Linking Family Child Care Providers, Community Partners, and Preservice Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Pamela W.; Parker, Tameka S.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of a service-learning project, which was infused into a child development course. The project linked family child care providers, their licensing agency, and 39 preservice teachers in a joint effort to develop a parent handbook to be used by the providers in their child care businesses and to support…

  18. Project Link-Four: Pre-Vocational Education for Adults through Community Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stedman, Deborah S.

    The Texas adult performance level (APL) project LINK-FOUR implemented a curriculum based on functional competencies at four sites (Austin, Texarkana, Texas City, and Abilene) and formed linkages with local organizations involved in adult vocational education. The concept on which the project was based was that a set of prevocational skills, plus a…

  19. Linking Faculty Development to Community College Student Achievement: A Mixed Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Robert W.; Oliver, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    Using a mixed methods, multilevel research design, this pilot inquiry explored the relationship between college faculty professional development and the academic achievement of diverse students by coupling two separate links: (a) the effects that professional development activities have on improving teaching strategies, and (b) the effects these…

  20. Linking Ready Kids to Ready Schools: "Building Policy on State and Community Successes"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    W. K. Kellogg Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    More than 200 educators and child advocates from around the country issued a "call to action" during a historic national forum in late March, mobilizing in Washington to develop policies that will link ready kids to ready schools and set America's youngest learners on a path to lifelong achievement. The two-day event in late…

  1. Linking Faculty Development to Community College Student Achievement: A Mixed Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Robert W.; Oliver, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    Using a mixed methods, multilevel research design, this pilot inquiry explored the relationship between college faculty professional development and the academic achievement of diverse students by coupling two separate links: (a) the effects that professional development activities have on improving teaching strategies, and (b) the effects these…

  2. Linking molecular biomarkers with higher level condition indicators to identify effects of copper exposures on the endangered delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus).

    PubMed

    Connon, Richard E; Beggel, Sebastian; D'Abronzo, Leandro S; Geist, Juergen P; Pfeiff, Janice; Loguinov, Alexander V; Vulpe, Christopher D; Werner, Inge

    2011-02-01

    The delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) is an endangered pelagic fish species endemic to the Sacramento-San Joaquin estuary (CA, USA), and considered an indicator of ecosystem health. Copper is a contaminant of concern in Californian waterways that may affect the development and survival of this endangered species. The experimental combination of molecular biomarkers with higher level effects may allow for interpretation of responses in a functional context that can be used to predict detrimental outcomes caused by exposure. A delta smelt microarray was developed and applied to screen for candidate molecular biomarkers that may be used in monitoring programs. Functional classifications of microarray responses were used along with quantitative polymerase chain reaction determining effects upon neuromuscular, digestive, and immune responses in Cu-exposed delta smelt. Differences in sensitivity were measured between juveniles and larvae (median lethal concentration = 25.2 and 80.4 µg/L Cu(2+), respectively). Swimming velocity declined with higher exposure concentrations in a dose-dependent manner (r =  -0.911, p < 0.05), though was not statistically significant to controls. Genes encoding for aspartoacylase, hemopexin, α-actin, and calcium regulation proteins were significantly affected by exposure and were functionally interpreted with measured swimming responses. Effects on digestion were measured by upregulation of chitinase and downregulation of amylase, whereas downregulation of tumor necrosis factor indicated a probable compromised immune system. Results from this study, and many others, support the use of functionally characterized molecular biomarkers to assess effects of contaminants in field scenarios. We thus propose that to attribute environmental relevance to molecular biomarkers, research should concentrate on their application in field studies with the aim of assisting monitoring programs.

  3. Applying the Learning Community Model to Graduate Education: Linking Research and Teaching between Core Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romsdahl, Rebecca J.; Hill, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    In graduate education, there is often a great divide between classroom learning and research endeavors. Using learning community (LC) values and strategies, our goal is to build stronger and more meaningful ties between these two aspects of graduate education so that students see them as complimentary learning rather than separate components. This…

  4. The Link Between Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer: The Asian American Community

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Moon Chen, Professor of the Department of Internal Medicine and Associate Director of Cancer Control at the University of California-Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, speaks about Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer as a more prevalent problem in the Asian American community.

  5. Linking plant spatitial patterns and ecological processes in grazed Great Basin plant communities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Observational studies of plant spatial patterns are comon but are often criticized for lacing a temporal component and for their inability to disentangle the effect of multiple community-structuring processes on plant spatial patterns. We addressed these criticisms in an observational study of Grea...

  6. Linking Educators' Professional Development to Workplace/Community Learning Experiences. TeachNET Educational Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargent, Thomas A.

    Mindful of the need for quality professional development and its characteristics, large numbers of educators are self-selecting to participate in workplace/community learning (WCL) experiences. Viewed as an alternative to less desirable forms of traditional professional development, WCL displays characteristics of high-quality professional…

  7. Assessing the bias linked to DNA recovery from biofiltration woodchips for microbial community investigation by fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Cabrol, Léa; Malhautier, Luc; Poly, Franck; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we explored methodological aspects of nucleic acid recovery from microbial communities involved in a gas biofilter filled with pine bark woodchips. DNA was recovered indirectly in two steps, comparing different methods: cell dispersion (crushing, shaking, and sonication) and DNA extraction (three commercial kits and a laboratory protocol). The objectives were (a) to optimize cell desorption from the packing material and (b) to compare the 12 combinations of desorption and extraction methods, according to three relevant criteria: DNA yield, DNA purity, and community structure representation by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Cell dispersion was not influenced by the operational parameters tested for shaking and blending, while it increased with time for sonication. DNA extraction by the laboratory protocol provided the highest DNA yields, whereas the best DNA purity was obtained by a commercial kit designed for DNA extraction from soil. After successful PCR amplification, the 12 methods did not generate the same bias in microbial community representation. Eight combinations led to high diversity estimation, independently of the experimental procedure. Among them, six provided highly similar DGGE profiles. Two protocols generated a significantly dissimilar community profile, with less diversity. This study highlighted the crucial importance of DNA recovery bias evaluation.

  8. Linking Family Life and Health Professionals, Volunteers, and Family Life Students in a Community Hospice Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fruit, Dorothy

    This paper describes the Portage County, Ohio community hospice program, emphasizing the linkages between family life specialists, health professionals, volunteers, and students. Hospice service is defined as a specialized, home-based program for the management of pain and other symptoms of terminal illness, with the family as the unit of care.…

  9. Natural Resource Service Learning to Link Students, Communities, and the Land

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    University-based Extension specialists often face the dilemma of scheduling time for both teaching and outreach activities. Service learning projects that give hands-on experience in the application of classroom activities while giving back to the community can bridge this gap. A demonstration forest and service learning techniques were used to…

  10. Louisiana's Ventilator Assisted Care Program: Case Management Services to Link Tertiary with Community-Based Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkhart, Kathryn A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Ventilator Assisted Care Program provides centralized case management services to ventilator-using youths and their families in Louisiana. Case managers develop individualized, comprehensive plans to be implemented locally using community resources; plans are based on needs identified by tertiary care providers and family members and are…

  11. Exploring Possible Links between Professional Learning Communities and Complex Adaptive Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of Professional Learning Communities (PLC), as described by DuFour (2006), has depended upon a balance between teacher buy-in and administrative fiat. The tension between the "bottom-up" character of the former and the "top-down" character of the latter presents a leadership challenge: meeting students' learning…

  12. A Blended Community of Inquiry Approach: Linking Student Engagement and Course Redesign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Norman D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose this article is to describe an institutional initiative created to support faculty engaged in blended course redesign. This Inquiry Through Blended Learning (ITBL) program adapted Garrison, Anderson, and Archer's (2000) Community of Inquiry framework in order to provide faculty participants with a guided inquiry process for discussing…

  13. A Blended Faculty Community of Inquiry: Linking Leadership, Course Redesign, and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Norman; Garrison, Randy

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an institutional course redesign initiative in terms of leadership, support, and preliminary findings, based on the Inquiry Through Blended Learning (ITBL) program created to support faculty engaging in blended course redesign. Garrison, Anderson, and Archer's (2000) Community of Inquiry framework has been adapted to a…

  14. Natural Resource Service Learning to Link Students, Communities, and the Land

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    University-based Extension specialists often face the dilemma of scheduling time for both teaching and outreach activities. Service learning projects that give hands-on experience in the application of classroom activities while giving back to the community can bridge this gap. A demonstration forest and service learning techniques were used to…

  15. Exploring Possible Links between Professional Learning Communities and Complex Adaptive Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of Professional Learning Communities (PLC), as described by DuFour (2006), has depended upon a balance between teacher buy-in and administrative fiat. The tension between the "bottom-up" character of the former and the "top-down" character of the latter presents a leadership challenge: meeting students' learning…

  16. Substance Use in People with Mental Retardation: A Missing Link in Understanding Community Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocco, Karen M.; Harper, Dennis C.

    2002-01-01

    Current literature suggests that people with mental retardation may experience difficulties living in the community which parallel negative consequences associated with substance misuse/abuse in the general population. Data indicate further exploration might be worthwhile. This article critically reviews the available research, identifies areas…

  17. Psychological Symptoms Linking Exposure to Community Violence and Academic Functioning in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, Danielle R.; Lambert, Sharon F.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    African American adolescents are exposed disproportionately to community violence, increasing their risk for emotional and behavioral symptoms that can detract from learning and undermine academic outcomes. The present study examined whether aggressive behavior and depressive and anxious symptoms mediated the association between exposure to…

  18. Understanding Community College Students' Learning Styles and the Link to Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Learning styles have been an area of interest in educational psychology for many decades. However, community college students have been overlooked in learning styles research. To enhance teacher efficacy and student success, it is important to continue to evaluate the relationship between learning styles and academic achievement. The purpose of…

  19. Applying the Learning Community Model to Graduate Education: Linking Research and Teaching between Core Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romsdahl, Rebecca J.; Hill, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    In graduate education, there is often a great divide between classroom learning and research endeavors. Using learning community (LC) values and strategies, our goal is to build stronger and more meaningful ties between these two aspects of graduate education so that students see them as complimentary learning rather than separate components. This…

  20. Understanding Community College Students' Learning Styles and the Link to Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Learning styles have been an area of interest in educational psychology for many decades. However, community college students have been overlooked in learning styles research. To enhance teacher efficacy and student success, it is important to continue to evaluate the relationship between learning styles and academic achievement. The purpose of…

  1. New Song Academy: Linking Education and Community Development To Build Stronger Families and Neighborhoods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Prudence; Fiester, Leila

    This report describes the New Song Academy, led by New Song Urban Ministries (NSUM), which serves preK-8 children in Baltimore, Maryland, and promotes quality education for urban students through partnerships with families and the community. It operates year-round in six 6-week sessions. Despite the often chaotic nature of children's lives outside…

  2. Psychological Symptoms Linking Exposure to Community Violence and Academic Functioning in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, Danielle R.; Lambert, Sharon F.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    African American adolescents are exposed disproportionately to community violence, increasing their risk for emotional and behavioral symptoms that can detract from learning and undermine academic outcomes. The present study examined whether aggressive behavior and depressive and anxious symptoms mediated the association between exposure to…

  3. From the outside Looking in: The Praxis Dilemma of Linking Psychopolitical Validity with Community Policing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Brian N.

    2008-01-01

    The author applies the concept of psychopolitical validity beyond the confines of the academy to the contemporary practice of American community policing. As such, it presents the promise and pitfalls of this potential union by highlighting points of linkage and places of conflict and tension and provides a commentary on the praxis dilemma of…

  4. Louisiana's Ventilator Assisted Care Program: Case Management Services to Link Tertiary with Community-Based Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkhart, Kathryn A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Ventilator Assisted Care Program provides centralized case management services to ventilator-using youths and their families in Louisiana. Case managers develop individualized, comprehensive plans to be implemented locally using community resources; plans are based on needs identified by tertiary care providers and family members and are…

  5. Roger Tory Peterson Institute Links Interdisciplinary Nature Studies to Increased Community Understanding. Rural Trust Featured Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, Elizabeth Higgins

    The Roger Tory Peterson Institute (Jamestown, New York) has been sparking a regional revival in K-12 nature studies and attracting attention from educators across America. Through summer training sessions and workshops, the Institute introduces multidisciplinary teams of teachers and community members to empirical research techniques for observing…

  6. Linked hydrologic and social systems that support resilience of traditional irrigation communities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Southwestern US irrigated landscapes are facing upheaval due to water scarcity and land use conversion associated with climate change, population growth, and changing economics. In the traditionally irrigated valleys of northern New Mexico, these stresses, as well as instances of community longevity...

  7. School-Industry Links. Working Document. European Community Action Programme. Transition of Young People from Education to Adult and Working Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, John

    This report is about recent steps undertaken at national and other levels to help schools in the countries of the European Community develop links with industry or the economic world. It draws particularly on examples from the 30 pilot projects that formed part of the European Community's second program on young people's transition from education…

  8. The Mediating Role of Social Support in the Community Environment--Psychological Distress Link among Low-Income African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jielu; Thompson, Martie P.; Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2009-01-01

    Living in a disordered community is negatively associated with psychological well-being. We investigated the role of social support in the link between community environment and psychological distress in a sample of 152 African American women from low socioeconomic backgrounds in a large metropolitan southeastern city. Structural equation modeling…

  9. Linking Community Hospital Initiatives With Osteopathic Medical Students' Quality Improvement Training: A Pilot Program.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Grace D; Russ, Ronald; Winemiller, Terry R; Mast, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) continues to be a health care challenge, and the literature indicates that osteopathic medical students need more training. To qualify for portions of managed care reimbursement, hospitals are required to meet measures intended to improve quality of care and patient satisfaction, which may be challenging for small community hospitals with limited resources. Because osteopathic medical training is grounded on community hospital experiences, an opportunity exists to align the outcomes needs of hospitals and QI training needs of students. In this pilot program, 3 sponsoring hospitals recruited and mentored 1 osteopathic medical student each through a QI project. A mentor at each hospital identified a project that was important to the hospital's patient care QI goals. This pilot program provided osteopathic medical students with hands-on QI training, created opportunities for interprofessional collaboration, and contributed to hospital initiatives to improve patient outcomes.

  10. A thready affair: linking fungal diversity and community dynamics to terrestrial decomposition processes.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Annemieke; Geydan, Thomas D; Kuyper, Thomas W; de Boer, Wietse

    2013-07-01

    Filamentous fungi are critical to the decomposition of terrestrial organic matter and, consequently, in the global carbon cycle. In particular, their contribution to degradation of recalcitrant lignocellulose complexes has been widely studied. In this review, we focus on the functioning of terrestrial fungal decomposers and examine the factors that affect their activities and community dynamics. In relation to this, impacts of global warming and increased N deposition are discussed. We also address the contribution of fungal decomposer studies to the development of general community ecological concepts such as diversity-functioning relationships, succession, priority effects and home-field advantage. Finally, we indicate several research directions that will lead to a more complete understanding of the ecological roles of terrestrial decomposer fungi such as their importance in turnover of rhizodeposits, the consequences of interactions with other organisms and niche differentiation.

  11. Links between Ammonia Oxidizer Community Structure, Abundance, and Nitrification Potential in Acidic Soils ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huaiying; Gao, Yangmei; Nicol, Graeme W.; Campbell, Colin D.; Prosser, James I.; Zhang, Limei; Han, Wenyan; Singh, Brajesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification and is performed by both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB). However, the environmental drivers controlling the abundance, composition, and activity of AOA and AOB communities are not well characterized, and the relative importance of these two groups in soil nitrification is still debated. Chinese tea orchard soils provide an excellent system for investigating the long-term effects of low pH and nitrogen fertilization strategies. AOA and AOB abundance and community composition were therefore investigated in tea soils and adjacent pine forest soils, using quantitative PCR (qPCR), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and sequence analysis of respective ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes. There was strong evidence that soil pH was an important factor controlling AOB but not AOA abundance, and the ratio of AOA to AOB amoA gene abundance increased with decreasing soil pH in the tea orchard soils. In contrast, T-RFLP analysis suggested that soil pH was a key explanatory variable for both AOA and AOB community structure, but a significant relationship between community abundance and nitrification potential was observed only for AOA. High potential nitrification rates indicated that nitrification was mainly driven by AOA in these acidic soils. Dominant AOA amoA sequences in the highly acidic tea soils were all placed within a specific clade, and one AOA genotype appears to be well adapted to growth in highly acidic soils. Specific AOA and AOB populations dominated in soils at particular pH values and N content, suggesting adaptation to specific niches. PMID:21571885

  12. Student, Home, and School Socio-Demographic Factors: Links to School, Home, and Community Arts Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansour, Marianne; Martin, Andrew J.; Anderson, Michael; Gibson, Robyn; Liem, Gregory Arief D.; Sudmalis, David

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the role of student (e.g., age, language background, gender), home (e.g., parent/caregiver education), and school (e.g., school type, size) socio-demographic factors in students' school (e.g., in-school arts tuition, arts engagement), home (e.g., parent/caregiver-child arts interaction), and community (e.g., arts attendance,…

  13. Student, Home, and School Socio-Demographic Factors: Links to School, Home, and Community Arts Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansour, Marianne; Martin, Andrew J.; Anderson, Michael; Gibson, Robyn; Liem, Gregory Arief D.; Sudmalis, David

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the role of student (e.g., age, language background, gender), home (e.g., parent/caregiver education), and school (e.g., school type, size) socio-demographic factors in students' school (e.g., in-school arts tuition, arts engagement), home (e.g., parent/caregiver-child arts interaction), and community (e.g., arts attendance,…

  14. Associations between dietary patterns and flow cytometry-measured biomarkers of inflammation and cellular activation in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Carotid Artery MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Matijevic, Nena; Follis, Jack L.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Background Specific foods and overall dietary patterns are associated with soluble biomarkers of systemic inflammation and endothelial activation. However, no large epidemiological studies have evaluated relationships between such dietary factors and cell-specific markers of activation and inflammation as measured by flow cytometry. Methods Cell aggregates and multiple platelet and leukocyte markers were quantified by flow cytometry in fresh whole blood from 1,101 white adults participating in the Carotid Artery MRI study, a subset of the larger Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Two dietary patterns (“Healthy” and “Western”) were empirically-derived via principal components analysis using data collected by food frequency questionnaire. Cross-sectional associations between dietary patterns and flow cytometry-measured biomarkers were evaluated, adjusting for demographics and lifestyle factors, including medications use. Results After multivariable adjustment, monocyte lipopolysaccharide receptor (CD14), monocyte toll-like receptor-2, and platelet glycoprotein IIb (CD41) showed inverse associations with the Healthy dietary pattern (p = 0.01, 0.04, and 0.01, respectively). In contrast, the Western dietary pattern was positively associated with CD41 and platelet-granulocyte aggregates (p = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively). Independent of other dietary factors, alcohol consumption was inversely associated with levels of pan leukocyte marker (CD45), P-selectin (CD62P) on PLA1 and on PLA2 platelets, and platelet-monocyte, platelet-granulocyte, and platelet-lymphocyte aggregates. Conclusion Dietary patterns and alcohol intake were each cross-sectionally associated with select markers of cellular activation and inflammation measured by flow cytometry. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that holistic measures of dietary intake are associated with inflammation. PMID:20537646

  15. Linking Bacterial Endophytic Communities to Essential Oils: Clues from Lavandula angustifolia Mill.

    PubMed

    Emiliani, Giovanni; Mengoni, Alessio; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Chiellini, Carolina; Fondi, Marco; Gallo, Eugenia; Gori, Luigi; Maggini, Valentina; Vannacci, Alfredo; Biffi, Sauro; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Fani, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria play a crucial role in plant life and are also drawing much attention for their capacity to produce bioactive compounds of relevant biotechnological interest. Here we present the characterisation of the cultivable endophytic bacteria of Lavandula angustifolia Mill.-a species used since antiquity for its therapeutic properties-since the production of bioactive metabolites from medical plants may reside also in the activity of bacterial endophytes through their direct production, PGPR activity on host, and/or elicitation of plant metabolism. Lavender tissues are inhabited by a tissue specific endophytic community dominated by Proteobacteria, highlighting also their difference from the rhizosphere environment where Actinobacteria and Firmicutes are also found. Leaves' endophytic community resulted as the most diverse from the other ecological niches. Overall, the findings reported here suggest: (i) the existence of different entry points for the endophytic community, (ii) its differentiation on the basis of the ecological niche variability, and (iii) a two-step colonization process for roots endophytes. Lastly, many isolates showed a strong inhibition potential against human pathogens and the molecular characterization demonstrated also the presence of not previously described isolates that may constitute a reservoir of bioactive compounds relevant in the field of pathogen control, phytoremediation, and human health.

  16. Linking Bacterial Endophytic Communities to Essential Oils: Clues from Lavandula angustifolia Mill

    PubMed Central

    Emiliani, Giovanni; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Chiellini, Carolina; Fondi, Marco; Gallo, Eugenia; Gori, Luigi; Maggini, Valentina; Vannacci, Alfredo; Biffi, Sauro; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Fani, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria play a crucial role in plant life and are also drawing much attention for their capacity to produce bioactive compounds of relevant biotechnological interest. Here we present the characterisation of the cultivable endophytic bacteria of Lavandula angustifolia Mill.—a species used since antiquity for its therapeutic properties—since the production of bioactive metabolites from medical plants may reside also in the activity of bacterial endophytes through their direct production, PGPR activity on host, and/or elicitation of plant metabolism. Lavender tissues are inhabited by a tissue specific endophytic community dominated by Proteobacteria, highlighting also their difference from the rhizosphere environment where Actinobacteria and Firmicutes are also found. Leaves' endophytic community resulted as the most diverse from the other ecological niches. Overall, the findings reported here suggest: (i) the existence of different entry points for the endophytic community, (ii) its differentiation on the basis of the ecological niche variability, and (iii) a two-step colonization process for roots endophytes. Lastly, many isolates showed a strong inhibition potential against human pathogens and the molecular characterization demonstrated also the presence of not previously described isolates that may constitute a reservoir of bioactive compounds relevant in the field of pathogen control, phytoremediation, and human health. PMID:24971151

  17. Bird community composition linked to human West Nile virus cases along the Colorado front range.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Valerie J; Goulet, Nicolas E

    2010-12-01

    In the present study, we examined whether bird community composition can predict the annual number of human West Nile virus (WNV) cases on a per county basis in the Colorado Front Range, a region that experienced high numbers of human cases during the early part of the North American epidemic. We analyzed data sets pertaining to birds and human WNV cases from multiple existing databases between the years 2002 and 2008. Based on previous studies that used amplification fractions to compare the relative competence of different bird species, ten bird species that are common in Colorado were selected and categorized as high amplification birds, such as the American Robin (Turdus migratorius), or low amplification birds, such as the American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos). A general linear modeling analysis was used with an information theoretic (AIC) model sorting approach to examine which of the models best predicted the number of human WNV cases per county. Candidate models included year as a covariate and one of several bird community descriptors (e.g., richness, diversity, total bird abundance, high amplification abundance, or low amplification abundance). Results demonstrated that high amplification birds were a significant predictor of human WNV cases between 2002 and 2008. Our results suggest that a small subset of the bird community with high amplification fractions may drive the dynamics of human disease risk for West Nile. This study has implications for surveillance of West Nile and may offer insight into disease risk associated with other vector-borne zoonotic diseases.

  18. Community-integrated omics links dominance of a microbial generalist to fine-tuned resource usage

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Emilie E. L.; Pinel, Nicolás; Laczny, Cédric C.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Lebrun, Laura A.; Roume, Hugo; Lin, Jake; May, Patrick; Hicks, Nathan D.; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Wampach, Linda; Liu, Cindy M.; Price, Lance B.; Gillece, John D.; Guignard, Cédric; Schupp, James M.; Vlassis, Nikos; Baliga, Nitin S.; Moritz, Robert L.; Keim, Paul S.; Wilmes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities are complex and dynamic systems that are primarily structured according to their members’ ecological niches. To investigate how niche breadth (generalist versus specialist lifestyle strategies) relates to ecological success, we develop and apply an integrative workflow for the multi-omic analysis of oleaginous mixed microbial communities from a biological wastewater treatment plant. Time- and space-resolved coupled metabolomic and taxonomic analyses demonstrate that the community-wide lipid accumulation phenotype is associated with the dominance of the generalist bacterium Candidatus Microthrix spp. By integrating population-level genomic reconstructions (reflecting fundamental niches) with transcriptomic and proteomic data (realised niches), we identify finely tuned gene expression governing resource usage by Candidatus Microthrix parvicella over time. Moreover, our results indicate that the fluctuating environmental conditions constrain the accumulation of genetic variation in Candidatus Microthrix parvicella likely due to fitness trade-offs. Based on our observations, niche breadth has to be considered as an important factor for understanding the evolutionary processes governing (microbial) population sizes and structures in situ. PMID:25424998

  19. Analysis of links between groundwater recharge and discharge areas and wetland plant communities distribution in Middle Biebrza Basin, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygoruk, Mateusz; Batelaan, Okke; Okruszko, Tomasz; Kotowski, Wiktor; Rycharski, Marek; Chormanski, Jaroslaw; Miroslaw-Swiatek, Dorota

    2010-05-01

    Natural evolution of wetlands is strongly dependent on groundwater dynamics, soil aeration and climate. These environmental factors determine the constant development of wetland plant communities and peat forming processes. Depending on spatial distribution of groundwater flow systems and recharge and discharge conditions, shallow groundwater can also be influenced by phreatophytic plants. Such feedback plays an important role in wetland development, especially when landuse or climate changes occur. Thus, understanding the links between dynamics of biotopic and biocenotic relations is crucial for wetland management aimed at the comprehensive set of conservation strategies. Main aim of this study was to review links between valuable wetland plant communities and the groundwater recharge/discharge conditions of particular habitats of Middle Biebrza Basin, Poland. The study area consists of various types of wetland landscapes, of which the dominant are fens. Organogenic top layer is intersected locally by sandy dunes and glaci-fluvial residual plateaus. The northern boundary of the study area is covered with an outwash plateau. A three-dimensional regional groundwater flow model was set up to quantify groundwater system and flow paths. Model calibration involved measured heads of the unconfined organogenic top layer and the underlaying, confined sandy aquifer. Measured thickness of unsaturated zone as well as physical parameters of organogenic layer were taken into account in interpretation of shallow groundwater dynamics. Recharge to groundwater was spatially distributed in accordance to analysis of measured precipitation-groundwater level relationships. Cell-by-cell flow analysis and groundwater exfiltration analysis were applied to map groundwater recharge and discharge areas within the modelled area. Results of groundwater modelling were validated with phytosociologic research combined with remote-sensing based spatial analysis of wetland habitats distribution

  20. A three-dimensional numerical model for linking community-wide vapour risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Nizar; Mumford, Kevin G.; Gerhard, Jason I.; O'Carroll, Denis M.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) numerical model that couples contaminant transport in the saturated zone to vapour transport in the vadose zone and vapour intrusion into buildings was developed. Coupling these processes allows the simulation of vapour intrusion, arising from volatilization at the water table, associated with temporally and spatially variable groundwater plumes. In particular, the model was designed to permit, for the first time, 3D simulations of risk at receptors located in the wider community (i.e., kilometre scale) surrounding a contaminated site. The model can account for heterogeneous distributions of permeability, fraction organic carbon, sorption and biodegradation in the vadose and saturated zones. The model formulation, based upon integration of a number of widely accepted models, is presented along with verification and benchmarking tests. In addition, a number of exploratory simulations of benzene and naphthalene transport in a 1000 m long domain (aquifer cross-section: 500 m × 14 m) are presented, which employed conservative assumptions consistent with the development of regulatory guidance. Under these conservative conditions, these simulations demonstrated, for example, that whether houses in the community were predicted to be impacted by groundwater and indoor air concentrations exceeding regulatory standards strongly depended on their distance downgradient from the source and lateral distance from the plume centreline. In addition, this study reveals that the degree of reduction in source concentration (i.e., remediation) required to achieve compliance with standards is less if the risk receptor is in the wider community than at the site boundary. However, these example scenarios suggest that, even considering community receptors, sources with initially high concentrations still required substantial remediation (i.e., > 99% reductions in source concentration). Overall, this work provides insights and a new tool for considering the

  1. A three-dimensional numerical model for linking community-wide vapour risks.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Nizar; Mumford, Kevin G; Gerhard, Jason I; O'Carroll, Denis M

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) numerical model that couples contaminant transport in the saturated zone to vapour transport in the vadose zone and vapour intrusion into buildings was developed. Coupling these processes allows the simulation of vapour intrusion, arising from volatilization at the water table, associated with temporally and spatially variable groundwater plumes. In particular, the model was designed to permit, for the first time, 3D simulations of risk at receptors located in the wider community (i.e., kilometre scale) surrounding a contaminated site. The model can account for heterogeneous distributions of permeability, fraction organic carbon, sorption and biodegradation in the vadose and saturated zones. The model formulation, based upon integration of a number of widely accepted models, is presented along with verification and benchmarking tests. In addition, a number of exploratory simulations of benzene and naphthalene transport in a 1000 m long domain (aquifer cross-section: 500 m×14 m) are presented, which employed conservative assumptions consistent with the development of regulatory guidance. Under these conservative conditions, these simulations demonstrated, for example, that whether houses in the community were predicted to be impacted by groundwater and indoor air concentrations exceeding regulatory standards strongly depended on their distance downgradient from the source and lateral distance from the plume centreline. In addition, this study reveals that the degree of reduction in source concentration (i.e., remediation) required to achieve compliance with standards is less if the risk receptor is in the wider community than at the site boundary. However, these example scenarios suggest that, even considering community receptors, sources with initially high concentrations still required substantial remediation (i.e., >99% reductions in source concentration). Overall, this work provides insights and a new tool for considering the

  2. Linking river flow regimes to riparian plant guilds: a community-wide modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Lytle, David A; Merritt, David M; Tonkin, Jonathan D; Olden, Julian D; Reynolds, Lindsay V

    2017-03-06

    Modeling riparian plant dynamics along rivers is complicated by the fact that plants have different edaphic and hydrologic requirements at different life-stages. With intensifying human demands for water and continued human alteration of rivers, there is a growing need for predicting responses of vegetation to flow alteration, including responses related to climate change and river flow management. We developed a coupled structured population model that coombines stage-specific responses of plant guilds with specific attributes of river hydrologic regime. The model uses information on the vital rates of guilds as they relate to different hydrologic conditions (flood, drought, and baseflow), but deliberately omits biotic interactions from the structure ("interaction neutral"). Our intent was to: 1) consolidate key vital rates concerning plant population dynamics and to incorporate these data into a quantitative framework, 2) determine whether complex plant stand dynamics, including biotic interactions, can be predicted from basic vital rates and river hydrology, and 3) project how altered flow regimes might affect riparian communities. We illustrated the approach using five flow-response guilds that encompass much of the river floodplain community: hydroriparian tree, xeroriparian shrub, hydroriparian shrub, mesoriparian meadow, and desert shrub. We also developed novel network-based tools for predicting community-wide effects of climate-driven shifts and deliberately altered flow regimes. The model recovered known patterns of hydroriparian tree vs. xeroriparian shrub dominance, including the relative proportion of these two guilds as a function of river flow modification. By simulating flow alteration scenarios ranging from increased drought to shifts in flood timing, the model predicted that mature hydroriparian forest should be most abundant near the observed natural flow regime. Multiguild sensitivity analysis identified substantial network connectivity (many

  3. The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples (IMLGS): Linking Digital Data to Physical Samples for the Marine Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroker, K. J.; Jencks, J. H.; Eakins, B.

    2016-12-01

    The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples (IMLGS) is a community designed and maintained resource enabling researchers to locate and request seafloor and lakebed geologic samples curated by partner institutions. The Index was conceived in the dawn of the digital age by representatives from U.S. academic and government marine core repositories and the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, now the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), at a 1977 meeting convened by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The Index is based on core concepts of community oversight, common vocabularies, consistent metadata and a shared interface. The Curators Consortium, international in scope, meets biennially to share ideas and discuss best practices. NCEI serves the group by providing database access and maintenance, a list server, digitizing support and long-term archival of sample metadata, data and imagery. Over three decades, participating curators have performed the laborious task of creating and contributing metadata for over 205,000 sea floor and lake-bed cores, grabs, and dredges archived in their collections. Some partners use the Index for primary web access to their collections while others use it to increase exposure of more in-depth institutional systems. The IMLGS has a persistent URL/Digital Object Identifier (DOI), as well as DOIs assigned to partner collections for citation and to provide a persistent link to curator collections. The Index is currently a geospatially-enabled relational database, publicly accessible via Web Feature and Web Map Services, and text- and ArcGIS map-based web interfaces. To provide as much knowledge as possible about each sample, the Index includes curatorial contact information and links to related data, information and images : 1) at participating institutions, 2) in the NCEI archive, and 3) through a Linked Data interface maintained by the Rolling Deck to Repository R2R. Over 43,000 International Geo

  4. Hospital and Community Ampicillin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Are Evolutionarily Closely Linked but Have Diversified through Niche Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    de Regt, Marieke J. A.; van Schaik, Willem; van Luit-Asbroek, Miranda; Dekker, Huberta A. T.; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Koning, Catherina J. M.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Willems, Rob J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (ARE) has emerged as a nosocomial pathogen. Here, we quantified ARE carriage in different community sources and determined genetic relatedness with hospital ARE. Methods and Results ARE was recovered from rectal swabs of 24 of 79 (30%) dogs, 11 of 85 (13%) cats and 0 of 42 horses and from 3 of 40 (8%) faecal samples of non-hospitalized humans receiving amoxicillin. Multi-locus Sequence Typing revealed 21 sequence types (STs), including 5 STs frequently associated with hospital-acquired infections. Genes previously found to be enriched in hospital ARE, such as IS16, orf903, orf905, orf907, were highly prevalent in community ARE (≥79%), while genes with a proposed role in pathogenesis, such as esp, hyl and ecbA, were found rarely (≤5%) in community isolates. Comparative genome analysis of 2 representative dog isolates revealed that the dog strain of ST192 was evolutionarily closely linked to two previously sequenced hospital ARE, but had, based on gene content, more genes in common with the other, evolutionarily more distantly related, dog strain (ST266). Conclusion ARE were detected in dogs, cats and sporadically in healthy humans, with evolutionary linkage to hospital ARE. Yet, their accessory genome has diversified, probably as a result of niche adaptation. PMID:22363425

  5. Changes in determinants of compulsory community treatment over 11 years. A population-based analysis of linked mental health databases.

    PubMed

    Kisely, Steve; Xiao, Jianguo; Jian, Le

    2015-12-15

    Differences in patient characteristics, legislation and service setting may explain variations in the reported efficacy of compulsory treatment orders (CTOs). Our objective was to investigate factors associated with CTO placement in Western Australia and see if there were any changes over the 11 years following their introduction. We used three linked Western Australian databases to compare 2958 patients on community treatment orders with an equal number of controls matched on age, sex and diagnosis, as well as 2832 consecutive controls selected on date of discharge from inpatient care or CTO placement. Multivariate analyses were used to further examine potential predictors of a CTO. The incidence of CTOs, and the characteristics of patients placed on these orders, showed little change over 11 years. They tended to be younger and male with schizophrenia or other non-affective psychotic disorders. Previous health service use as an inpatient or outpatient also predicted compulsory community treatment. Psychiatrists in Western Australia appear to be applying community treatment orders to similar types of patient as elsewhere, but unlike other jurisdictions, use has not increased. We need further research to establish the relative contribution of patient characteristics, legislation and service setting toward the use and outcome of CTOs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Unusually high food availability in Kaikoura Canyon linked to distinct deep-sea nematode community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, D.; Rowden, A. A.; Nodder, S. D.; Berkenbusch, K.; Probert, P. K.; Hadfield, M. G.

    2014-06-01

    Kaikoura Canyon, on the eastern New Zealand continental margin, is the most productive, non-chemosynthetic deep-sea habitat described to date, with megafaunal biomass 100-fold higher than those of other deep-sea habitats. The present study, which focused on free-living nematodes, provides the first comparison of faunal community structure and diversity between Kaikoura Canyon and nearby open slope habitats. Results show substantially higher food availability in the canyon relative to open slope sediments, which probably reflects greater levels of primary productivity above the canyon, coupled with downwelling and/or topographically-induced channelling, which serves to concentrate surface-derived organic matter along the canyon axis. This high food availability appears to be responsible for the elevated nematode biomass in Kaikoura Canyon, with values exceeding all published nematode biomass data from canyons elsewhere. There was also markedly lower local species diversity of nematodes inside the canyon relative to the open slope habitat, as well as a distinct community structure. The canyon community was dominated by species, such as Sabateria pulchra, which were absent from the open slope and are typically associated with highly eutrophic and/or disturbed environments. The presence of these taxa, as well as the low observed diversity, is likely to reflect the high food availability, and potentially the high levels of physically and biologically induced disturbance within the canyon. Kaikoura Canyon is a relatively small habitat characterised by different environmental conditions that makes a disproportionate contribution to deep-sea diversity in the region, despite its low species richness.

  7. Dimensions of oppositionality in a Brazilian community sample: testing the DSM-5 proposal and etiological links.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Fernanda Valle; Polanczyk, Vanoni Guilherme; Goodman, Robert; Rohde, Luis Augusto; Graeff-Martins, Ana Soledade; Salum, Giovanni; Gadelha, Ary; Pan, Pedro; Stahl, Daniel; Stringaris, Argyris

    2013-04-01

    Investigating dimensions of oppositional symptoms may help to explain heterogeneity of etiology and outcomes for mental disorders across development and provide further empirical justification for the DSM-5-proposed modifications of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). However, dimensions of oppositionality have not previously been tested in samples outside Europe or the United States. In this study, we used a large Brazilian community sample to compare the fit of different models for dimensions of oppositional symptoms; to examine the association of psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms with dimensions of oppositionality; and to examine the associations between dimensions of oppositionality and parental history of mental disorders. A Brazilian community sample of 2,512 children 6 through 12 years old were investigated in this study. Confirmatory factorial analyses were performed to compare the fit of alternative models, followed by linear and logistic regression analyses of associations with psychiatric diagnosis and parental history of psychopathology. A three-factor model with irritable, headstrong, and hurtful dimensions fitted best. The irritable dimension showed a strong association with emotional disorders in the child (p<.001) and history of depression (p<.01) and suicidality (p<.05) in the mother. The headstrong dimension was uniquely associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the child (p<.001) and with maternal history of ADHD symptoms (p<.05). The hurtful dimension was specifically associated with conduct disorder (p< .05). Our findings from a large community sample of Brazilian children support a distinction between dimensions of oppositionality consistent with current DSM-5 recommendations and provide further evidence for etiological distinctions between these dimensions. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Linking Attitudes, Policy, and Forest Cover Change in Buffer Zone Communities of Chitwan National Park, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Stapp, Jared R; Lilieholm, Robert J; Leahy, Jessica; Upadhaya, Suraj

    2016-06-01

    Deforestation in Nepal threatens the functioning of complex social-ecological systems, including rural populations that depend on forests for subsistence, as well as Nepal's biodiversity and other ecosystem services. Nepal's forests are particularly important to the nation's poorest inhabitants, as many depend upon them for daily survival. Two-thirds of Nepal's population relies on forests for sustenance, and these pressures are likely to increase in the future. This, coupled with high population densities and growth rates, highlights the importance of studying the relationship between human communities, forest cover trends through time, and forest management institutions. Here, we used surveys to explore how household attitudes associated with conservation-related behaviors in two rural communities-one that has experienced significant forest loss, and the other forest gain-compare with forest cover trends as indicated by satellite-derived forest-loss and -regeneration estimates between 2005 and 2013. Results found a significant difference in attitudes in the two areas, perhaps contributing to and reacting from current forest conditions. In both study sites, participation in community forestry strengthened support for conservation, forest conservation-related attitudes aligned with forest cover trends, and a negative relationship was found between economic status and having supportive forest conservation-related attitudes. In addition, on average, respondents were not satisfied with their district forest officers and did not feel that the current political climate in Nepal supported sustainable forestry. These findings are important as Nepal's Master Plan for the Forestry Sector has expired and the country is in the process of structuring a new Forestry Sector Strategy.

  9. Linking Sediment Microbial Communities to Carbon Cycling in High-Latitude Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, J. B.; Varner, R. K.; Johnson, J. E.; Owusu-Dommey, A.; Binder, M.; Woodcroft, B. J.; Wik, M.; Freitas, N. L.; Boyd, J. A.; Crill, P. M.; Saleska, S. R.; Tyson, G. W.; Rich, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    It is well recognized that thawing permafrost peatlands are likely to provide a positive feedback to climate change via CH4 and CO2 emissions. High-latitude lakes in these landscapes have also been identified as sources of CH4 and CO2 loss to the atmosphere. To investigate microbial contributions to carbon loss from high-latitude lakes, we characterized sediment geochemistry and microbiota via cores collected from deep and shallow regions of two lakes (Inre Harrsjön and Mellersta Harrsjön) in Arctic Sweden in July, 2012. These lakes are within the Stordalen Mire long-term ecological area, a focal site for investigating the impacts of climate change-related permafrost thaw, and the lakes in this area are responsible for ~55% of the CH4 loss from this hydrologically interconnected system. Across 40 samples from 4 to 40 cm deep within four sediment cores, Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the sedimentary microbiota was dominated by candidate phyla OP9 and OP8 (Atribacteria and Aminicenantes, respectively, including putative fermenters and anaerobic respirers), predicted methanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria, and predicted methanogenic archaea from the Thermoplasmata Group E2 clade. We observed some overlap in community structure with nearby peatlands, which tend to be dominated by methanogens and Acidobacteria. Sediment microbial communities differed significantly between lakes, by overlying lake depth (shallow vs. deep), and by depth within a core, with each trend corresponding to parallel differences in biogeochemical measurements. Overall, our results support the potential for significant microbial controls on carbon cycling in high-latitude lakes associated with thawing permafrost, and ongoing metagenomic analyses of focal samples will yield further insight into the functional potential of these microbial communities and their dominant members.

  10. Linking clinical care to community resources for cardiovascular disease prevention: the North Carolina Enhanced WISEWOMAN project.

    PubMed

    Jilcott, Stephanie B; Keyserling, Thomas C; Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D; Rosamond, Wayne; Garcia, Beverly; Will, Julie C; Farris, Rosanne P; Ammerman, Alice S

    2006-06-01

    The Well-Integrated Screening and Evaluation for Women Across the Nation (WISEWOMAN) project addresses the need for effective cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention among underserved, midlife women. We describe an Enhanced Intervention that addressed environmental and individual factors within the context of a clinic-based intervention. We also present the study design and baseline results of the randomized trial to evaluate the enhanced intervention. The multicomponent behavior change intervention addressed many elements of the Chronic Care Model (CCM), including the community resources and policy element, wherein Enhanced Intervention participants were encouraged to overcome environmental barriers to a healthy lifestyle by using community resources. Study participants were enrolled at one community health center; all were low-income, underinsured, midlife (40-64 years) women. A total of 236 participants were randomized to receive the Enhanced Intervention or the Minimum Intervention. At baseline, over three fourths of the participants were overweight or obese. Participants reported a variety of problematic neighborhood characteristics, including a paucity of restaurants with healthy food choices (41% reported as a problem); not enough farmer's markets or produce stands (50%), not enough affordable exercise places (52%), not enough physical activity programs that met women's needs (42%), heavy traffic (47%), and speeding drivers (53%). Overall, women knew little about affordable exercise venues and nutrition classes. In this clinic-based intervention, we addressed environmental factors related to a healthy lifestyle. Results indicate the need for effective and feasible intervention strategies to address the environments in which individuals are making behavior changes. The effectiveness of the WISEWOMAN Enhanced Intervention will be assessed in a randomized trial.

  11. Dimensions of Oppositionality in a Brazilian Community Sample: Testing the DSM-5 Proposal and Etiological Links

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Fernanda Valle; Polanczyk, Guilherme Vanoni; Goodman, Robert; Rohde, Luis Augusto; Graeff-Martins, Ana Soledade; Salum, Giovanni; Gadelha, Ary; Pan, Pedro; Stahl, Daniel; Stringaris, Argyris

    2013-01-01

    Objective Investigating dimensions of oppositional symptoms may help to explain heterogeneity of etiology and outcomes for mental disorders across development and provide further empirical justification for the DSM-5–proposed modifications of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). However, dimensions of oppositionality have not previously been tested in samples outside Europe or the United States. In this study, we used a large Brazilian community sample to compare the fit of different models for dimensions of oppositional symptoms; to examine the association of psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms with dimensions of oppositionality; and to examine the associations between dimensions of oppositionality and parental history of mental disorders. Method A Brazilian community sample of 2,512 children 6 through 12 years old were investigated in this study. Confirmatory factorial analyses were performed to compare the fit of alternative models, followed by linear and logistic regression analyses of associations with psychiatric diagnosis and parental history of psychopathology. Results A three-factor model with irritable, headstrong, and hurtful dimensions fitted best. The irritable dimension showed a strong association with emotional disorders in the child (p<.001) and history of depression (p<.01) and suicidality (p<.05) in the mother. The headstrong dimension was uniquely associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the child (p<.001) and with maternal history of ADHD symptoms (p<.05). The hurtful dimension was specifically associated with conduct disorder (p< .05). Conclusions Our findings from a large community sample of Brazilian children support a distinction between dimensions of oppositionality consistent with current DSM-5 recommendations and provide further evidence for etiological distinctions between these dimensions. PMID:23582870

  12. Microbial Community Dynamics and Activity Link to Indigo Production from Indole in Bioaugmented Activated Sludge Systems

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jie; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Qin, Yujia; Zhou, Jiti; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Biosynthesis of the popular dyestuff indigo from indole has been comprehensively studied using pure cultures, but less has been done to characterize the indigo production by microbial communities. In our previous studies, a wild strain Comamonas sp. MQ was isolated from activated sludge and the recombinant Escherichia coli nagAc carrying the naphthalene dioxygenase gene (nag) from strain MQ was constructed, both of which were capable of producing indigo from indole. Herein, three activated sludge systems, G1 (non-augmented control), G2 (augmented with Comamonas sp. MQ), and G3 (augmented with recombinant E. coli nagAc), were constructed to investigate indigo production. After 132-day operation, G3 produced the highest yields of indigo (99.5 ± 3.0 mg/l), followed by G2 (27.3 ± 1.3 mg/l) and G1 (19.2 ± 1.2 mg/l). The microbial community dynamics and activities associated with indigo production were analyzed by Illumina Miseq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The inoculated strain MQ survived for at least 30 days, whereas E. coli nagAc was undetectable shortly after inoculation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis suggested the abundance of naphthalene dioxygenase gene (nagAc) from both inoculated strains was strongly correlated with indigo yields in early stages (0–30 days) (P < 0.001) but not in later stages (30–132 days) (P > 0.10) of operation. Based on detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and dissimilarity test results, the communities underwent a noticeable shift during the operation. Among the four major genera (> 1% on average), the commonly reported indigo-producing populations Comamonas and Pseudomonas showed no positive relationship with indigo yields (P > 0.05) based on Pearson correlation test, while Alcaligenes and Aquamicrobium, rarely reported for indigo production, were positively correlated with indigo yields (P < 0.05). This study should provide new insights into our understanding of indigo bio-production by microbial communities

  13. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Case Validation in an Anonymized Electronic Medical Record-Linked Expert System.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Maliapen, Mahendran; Ong, Venetia; Jakes, Rupert W; Mundy, Linda M; Jialiang, Li; Tambyah, Paul A

    2017-05-15

    An electronic anonymized patient portal analysis using radiographic reports and admission and discharge diagnoses had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 84.7%, 78.2%, 75%, and 87%, respectively, for community-acquired pneumonia validated against a blinded expert medical review. This approach can help to track antimicrobial use and resistance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A methodological framework for linking bioreactor function to microbial communities and environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    de los Reyes, Francis L; Weaver, Joseph E; Wang, Ling

    2015-06-01

    In the continuing quest to relate microbial communities in bioreactors to function and environmental and operational conditions, engineers and biotechnologists have adopted the latest molecular and 'omic methods. Despite the large amounts of data generated, gaining mechanistic insights and using the data for predictive and practical purposes is still a huge challenge. We present a methodological framework that can guide experimental design, and discuss specific issues that can affect how researchers generate and use data to elucidate the relationships. We also identify, in general terms, bioreactor research opportunities that appear promising. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Linking Climate Change Science and Adaptation Policy at the Community Scale through Anticipatory Governance: A Review of Concepts with Application to Arizona Communities (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D. D.; Quay, R.; Ferguson, D. B.; Buizer, J. L.; Guido, Z.; Chhetri, N.

    2013-12-01

    Scientific consensus and certainty varies regarding the link between climate change, specific natural hazards and extreme events, and local and regional impacts. Despite these uncertainties, it is necessary to apply the best available scientific knowledge to anticipate a range of possible futures, develop mitigation and adaptation strategies, and monitor changes to build resilience. While there is widespread recognition of the need to improve the linkages between climate science information and public policy for adaptation at the community scale, there are significant challenges to this goal. Many community outreach and engagement efforts, for instance, operate using a one-size-fits-all approach. Recent research has shown this to be problematic for local governments. Public policy occurs in a cycle that includes problem understanding, planning and policy approval, and implementation, with ongoing policy refinement through multiple such cycles. One promising approach to incorporating scientific knowledge with uncertainty into public policy is an anticipatory governance approach. Anticipatory governance employs a continual cycle of anticipation (understanding), planning, monitoring, and adaptation (policy choice and implementation). The types of information needed in each of these phases will be different given the nature of each activity and the unique needs of each community. It is highly unlikely that all local governments will be in the same phase of climate adaptation with the same unique needs at the same time and thus a uniform approach to providing scientific information will only be effective for a discrete group of communities at any given point in time. A key concept for the effective integration of scientific information into public discourse is that such information must be salient, credible, and legitimate. Assuming a scientific institution has established credibility with engaged communities, maximizing the effectiveness of climate science requires

  16. A 150-year record of ancient DNA, lipid biomarkers and hydrogen isotopes, tracing the microbial-planktonic community succession controlled by (hydro)climatic variability in a tropical lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smittenberg, Rienk; Yamoah, Kweku; Callac, Nolwenn; Fru, Ernest Chi; Chabangborn, Akkaneewut; Rattray, Jayne; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the decadal variations in phytoplankton communities, and their response to environmental and climatic conditions, from a ˜150 year long sedimentary archive of Lake Nong Thale Prong (NTP), southern Thailand. We applied a combination of analyses: lipid biomarkers, compound-specific hydrogen isotopes, bulk carbon and nitrogen concentrations and isotopes, environmental SEM, and fossil DNA using qPCR targeted to specific taxa. Past hydrological conditions were reconstructed using the hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf wax n-alkanes. Temperatures were reconstructed using the tetraether-based MBT/CBT index, measured using a new and efficient reverse-phase HPLC-MS method. The climatological data compared well with meteorological data from the last decades. Reconstructed drier and warmer conditions from ˜1857-1916 Common Era (CE) coincided with oligotrophic lake water conditions and dominance of the green algae Botryococcus braunii - evidenced by a combination of both fossil DNA and the occurrence of characteristic botryococcene lipids. A change to higher silica (Si) input ˜1916 CE was related to increased rainfall and lower temperatures concurring with an abrupt takeover by diatom blooms lasting for 50 years - as evidenced by ancient DNA, characteristic highly branched isoprenoid lipids, and SEM. From the 1970s onwards, more eutrophic conditions prevailed, and these were likely caused by increased levels of anthropogenic phosphate (P), aided by stronger lake stratification caused by dryer and warmer conditions. The eutrophic conditions led to increased primary productivity in the lake, consisting again of a Botryococcus sp., although this time not producing botryococcene lipids. Moreover, Cyanobacteria became dominant - again evidenced by ancient DNA and the characteristic C19 alkane. Throughout the record, stratification and primary production could be linked to the intensity of methane cycling, by targeting and quantifying the mcrA gene that is used

  17. Surfing the Pacific Island chains: linking internal wave energetics to coral reef benthic community patterns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter Jones, Matilda; Green, Mattias; Gove, Jamison; Williams, Gareth

    2017-04-01

    The ocean is saturated with internal waves at tidal frequency. The energy associated with conversion from barotropic to baroclinic can enhance mixing and upwelling at sites of generation and dissipation, which in turn can drive primary production. Hotspots of internal wave generation are located at sudden changes in topography with the Hawaiian archipelago identified as an area of intense internal wave activity. The role of internal waves as a driver of benthic reef community is unexplored and could be key to coral reefs survival in the unknown future. Using a Pacific wide map of internal wave flux and barotropic-to-baroclinic conversion at an unprecedented 1/30th degree resolution, energy budgets were developed for four islands to evaluate dissipation and generation of internal waves. Spatiotemporal variations in benthic community structure were plotted around each island and related to changes in internal wave energetics using a boosted regression tree. Contrasting spatial patterns and species assemblages were seen around islands with distinct internal wave regimes. The relative importance and influence of internal waves on coral reef ecosystems is evaluated.

  18. Missing link in community psychiatry: When a patient with schizophrenia was expelled from her home.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Ming; Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang; Chien, Yi-Ling; Chen, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Sung-Tai

    2015-06-01

    Treatment and disposition of homeless patients with schizophrenia represent a great challenge in clinical practice. We report a case of this special population, and discuss the development of homelessness, the difficulty in disposition, their utilization of health services, and possible applications of mandatory community treatment in this group of patients. A 51-year-old homeless female was brought to an emergency department for left femur fracture caused by an assault. She was diagnosed with schizophrenia about 20 years ago but received little help from mental health services over the decades. During hospitalization, her psychotic symptoms were only partially responsive to treatment. Her family refused to handle caretaking duties. The social welfare system was mobilized for long-term disposition. Homeless patients with schizophrenia are characterized by family disruption, poor adherence to health care, and multiple emergency visits and hospitalization. We hope this article can provide information about the current mental health policy to medical personnel. It is possible that earlier intervention and better outcome can be achieved by utilizing mandatory community treatment in the future, as well as preventing patients with schizophrenia from losing shelters. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Link between microbial composition and carbon substrate-uptake preferences in a PHA-storing community

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Maria G E; Carvalho, Gilda; Kragelund, Caroline; Silva, Ana F; Barreto Crespo, Maria T; Reis, Maria A M; Nielsen, Per H

    2013-01-01

    The microbial community of a fermented molasses-fed sequencing batch reactor (SBR) operated under feast and famine conditions for production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) was identified and quantified through a 16 S rRNA gene clone library and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The microbial enrichment was found to be composed of PHA-storing populations (84% of the microbial community), comprising members of the genera Azoarcus, Thauera and Paracoccus. The dominant PHA-storing populations ensured the high functional stability of the system (characterized by high PHA-storage efficiency, up to 60% PHA content). The fermented molasses contained primarily acetate, propionate, butyrate and valerate. The substrate preferences were determined by microautoradiography-FISH and differences in the substrate-uptake capabilities for the various probe-defined populations were found. The results showed that in the presence of multiple substrates, microbial populations specialized in different substrates were selected, thereby co-existing in the SBR by adapting to different niches. Azoarcus and Thauera, primarily consumed acetate and butyrate, respectively. Paracoccus consumed a broader range of substrates and had a higher cell-specific substrate uptake. The relative species composition and their substrate specialization were reflected in the substrate removal rates of different volatile fatty acids in the SBR reactor. PMID:22810062

  20. Phenotypic constraints and community structure: linking trade-offs within and among species.

    PubMed

    Angert, Amy L; Kimball, Sarah; Peterson, Megan; Huxman, Travis E; Venable, David L

    2014-11-01

    Trade-offs are central to many topics in biology, from the evolution of life histories to ecological mechanisms of species coexistence. Trade-offs observed among species may reflect pervasive constraints on phenotypes that are achievable given biophysical and resource limitations. If so, then among-species trade-offs should be consistent with trade-offs within species. Alternatively, trait variation among co-occurring species may reflect historical contingencies during community assembly rather than within-species constraints. Here, we test whether a key trade-off between relative growth rate (RGR) and water-use efficiency (WUE) among Sonoran Desert winter annual plants is apparent within four species representing different strategies in the system. We grew progeny of maternal families from multiple populations in a greenhouse common garden. One species, Pectocarya recurvata, displayed the expected RGR-WUE trade-off among families within populations. For other species, although RGR and WUE often varied clinally among populations, among-family variation within populations was lacking, implicating a role for past selection on these traits. Our results suggest that a combination of limited genetic variation in single traits and negative trait correlations could pose constraints on the evolution of a high-RGR and high-WUE phenotype within species, providing a microevolutionary explanation for phenotypes that influence community-level patterns of abundance and coexistence.

  1. Biomarkers for antipsychotic therapies.

    PubMed

    Pich, Emilio Merlo; Vargas, Gabriel; Domenici, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Molecular biomarkers for antipsychotic treatments have been conceptually linked to the measurements of dopamine functions, mostly D(2) receptor occupancy, either by imaging using selective PET/SPECT radioactive tracers or by assessing plasma prolactin levels. A quest for novel biomarkers was recently proposed by various academic, health service, and industrial institutions driven by the need for better treatments of psychoses. In this review we conceptualize biomarkers within the Translational Medicine paradigm whose goal was to provide support to critical decision-making in drug discovery. At first we focused on biomarkers as outcome measure of clinical studies by searching into the database clinicaltrial.gov. The results were somewhat disappointing, showing that out of 1,659 antipsychotic trials only 18 used a biomarker as an outcome measure. Several of these trials targeted plasma lipids as sentinel marker for metabolic adverse effects associated with the use of atypical antipsychotics, while only few studies were aimed to new disease specific biological markers. As an example of a mechanistic biomarker, we described the work done to progress the novel class of glycine transporter inhibitors as putative treatment for negative symptoms of schizophrenia. We also review how large-scale multiplex biological assays were applied to samples from tissues of psychiatric patients, so to learn from changes of numerous analytes (metabolic products, lipids, proteins, RNA transcripts) about the substrates involved in the disease. We concluded that a stringent implementation of these techniques could contribute to the endophenotypic characterization of patients, helping in the identification of key biomarkers to drive personalized medicine and new treatment development.

  2. [A comprehensive signature biomarker analysis of the in-situ viable biomass, community composition, and nutritional status attributes of deep subsurface microbiota]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The TAN sites contains subsurface sediment contaminated with trichloroethylene (TC). A suite of microbiological analyses, including ester-linked phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, were performed to ascertain the microbial ecology associated with TCE degradation processes. The objective of the PLFA analyses were: (1) to determine the distribution of viable microbes throughout a vertical depth profile through the TCE plume, (2) determine the community composition of the viable extant microbiota and (3) relate the data derived from the PLFA analyses to other measures of the in situ microbiota as well as to the presence of TCE degradative products.

  3. Impact of trace element addition on biogas production from food industrial waste--linking process to microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin Mei; Karlsson, Anna; Svensson, Bo H; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    Laboratory-scale reactors treating food industry waste were used to investigate the effects of additions of cobalt (Co), nickel/molybdenum/boron (Ni/Mo/B) and selenium/tungsten (Se/W) on the biogas process and the associated microbial community. The highest methane production (predicted value: 860 mL g(-1) VS) was linked to high Se/W concentrations in combination with a low level of Co. A combination of quantitative real-time PCR of 16S rRNA genes, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library sequencing was used for the community analysis. The T-RFLP data show a higher diversity for bacteria than for archaea in all the treatments. The most abundant bacterial population (31-55% of the total T-RFLP fragments' intensity) was most closely related to Actinomyces europaeus (94% homology). Two dominant archaeal populations shared 98-99% sequence homology with Methanosarcina siciliae and Methanoculleus bourgensis, respectively. Only limited influence of the trace metal additions was found on the bacterial community composition, with two bacterial populations responding to the addition of a combination of Ni/Mo/B, while the dominant archaeal populations were influenced by the addition of Ni/Mo/B and/or Se/W. The maintenance of methanogenic activity was largely independent of archaeal community composition, suggesting a high degree of functional redundancy in the methanogens of the biogas reactors. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Community-based carbon sequestration in East Africa: Linking science and sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultman, N. E.

    2004-12-01

    International agreements on climate change have set the stage for an expanding market for greenhouse gas emissions reduction credits. Projects that can generate credits for trading are diverse, but one of the more controversial types involve biological carbon sequestration. For several reasons, most of the activity on these "sinks" projects has been in Latin America and Southeast Asia. Yet people in sub-saharan Africa could benefit from properly implemented projects. This poster will discuss estimates of the potential and risks of such projects in East Africa, and will describe in detail a case study located in central Tanzania and now part of the World Bank's BioCarbon Fund portfolio. Understanding climate variability and risk can effectively link international agreements on climate change, local realities of individual projects, and the characteristics of targeted ecosystems.

  5. Diabetes Connect: Developing a Mobile Health Intervention to Link Diabetes Community Health Workers with Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Cherrington, Andrea L.; Agne, April A.; Lampkin, Yolanda; Birl, Annie; Shelton, Tanya C.; Guzman, Alfredo; Willig, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Community Health Worker (CHW) interventions can help improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. There is limited evidence on how to effectively integrate CHW programs with primary care efforts. Mobile health technology (mHealth) can connect CHWs to members of the healthcare team and enhance care. We tested a model for the integration of a CHW delivered mHealth intervention to improve diabetes self-management. Seventy-two African American patients with diabetes were followed using the mHealth tool. This project partnered an academic institution, a safety-net clinic, and African American churches. The integration of mHealth technology into CHW programs was successfully achieved and readily accepted. PMID:26353025

  6. Linking Attitudes, Policy, and Forest Cover Change in Buffer Zone Communities of Chitwan National Park, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapp, Jared R.; Lilieholm, Robert J.; Leahy, Jessica; Upadhaya, Suraj

    2016-06-01

    Deforestation in Nepal threatens the functioning of complex social-ecological systems, including rural populations that depend on forests for subsistence, as well as Nepal's biodiversity and other ecosystem services. Nepal's forests are particularly important to the nation's poorest inhabitants, as many depend upon them for daily survival. Two-thirds of Nepal's population relies on forests for sustenance, and these pressures are likely to increase in the future. This, coupled with high population densities and growth rates, highlights the importance of studying the relationship between human communities, forest cover trends through time, and forest management institutions. Here, we used surveys to explore how household attitudes associated with conservation-related behaviors in two rural communities—one that has experienced significant forest loss, and the other forest gain—compare with forest cover trends as indicated by satellite-derived forest-loss and -regeneration estimates between 2005 and 2013. Results found a significant difference in attitudes in the two areas, perhaps contributing to and reacting from current forest conditions. In both study sites, participation in community forestry strengthened support for conservation, forest conservation-related attitudes aligned with forest cover trends, and a negative relationship was found between economic status and having supportive forest conservation-related attitudes. In addition, on average, respondents were not satisfied with their district forest officers and did not feel that the current political climate in Nepal supported sustainable forestry. These findings are important as Nepal's Master Plan for the Forestry Sector has expired and the country is in the process of structuring a new Forestry Sector Strategy.

  7. Linking environmental forcing and trophic supply to benthic communities in the Vercelli Seamount area (Tyrrhenian Sea).

    PubMed

    Covazzi Harriague, Anabella; Bavestrello, Giorgio; Bo, Marzia; Borghini, Mireno; Castellano, Michela; Majorana, Margherita; Massa, Francesco; Montella, Alessandro; Povero, Paolo; Misic, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Seamounts and their influence on the surrounding environment are currently being extensively debated but, surprisingly, scant information is available for the Mediterranean area. Furthermore, although the deep Tyrrhenian Sea is characterised by a complex bottom morphology and peculiar hydrodynamic features, which would suggest a variable influence on the benthic domain, few studies have been carried out there, especially for soft-bottom macrofaunal assemblages. In order to fill this gap, the structure of the meio-and macrofaunal assemblages of the Vercelli Seamount and the surrounding deep area (northern Tyrrhenian Sea - western Mediterranean) were studied in relation to environmental features. Sediment was collected with a box-corer from the seamount summit and flanks and at two far-field sites in spring 2009, in order to analyse the metazoan communities, the sediment texture and the sedimentary organic matter. At the summit station, the heterogeneity of the habitat, the shallowness of the site and the higher trophic supply (water column phytopigments and macroalgal detritus, for instance) supported a very rich macrofaunal community, with high abundance, biomass and diversity. In fact, its trophic features resembled those observed in coastal environments next to seagrass meadows. At the flank and far-field stations, sediment heterogeneity and depth especially influenced the meiofaunal distribution. From a trophic point of view, the low content of the valuable sedimentary proteins that was found confirmed the general oligotrophy of the Tyrrhenian Sea, and exerted a limiting influence on the abundance and biomass of the assemblages. In this scenario, the rather refractory sedimentary carbohydrates became a food source for metazoans, which increased their abundance and biomass at the stations where the hydrolytic-enzyme-mediated turnover of carbohydrates was faster, highlighting high lability.

  8. Intertidal mesograzers in field microcosms: linking laboratory feeding rates to community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ruesink

    2000-05-31

    Mesograzers (herbivores <2.5 cm) are both diverse and abundant, but their relative effects on intertidal communities have rarely been quantified. Here I examine the effects of crustacean and polychaete mesograzers on two intertidal resources, the red alga Odonthalia floccosa Esp. (Falkenb.) and the epiphytic diatom Isthmia nervosa Kütz. The mesograzers were hermit crabs (Pagurus hirsutiusculus (Dana) and P. granosimanus (Benedict)), amphipods (Hyale frequens Stout and H. pugettensis (Dana)), isopod (Idotea wosnesenskii (Brandt)), juvenile kelp crab (Pugettia producta (Randall)), and polychaete worm (Platynereis bicanaliculata (Baird)). Feeding rates on Isthmia, measured in the laboratory for different consumer species and size classes, scaled allometrically with body mass. Consumption rates were 2-23% of body mass daily on a fresh weight basis. However, feeding rates on Odonthalia did not scale, suggesting that size will not always indicate per capita effect. Mesograzer densities were measured on Tatoosh Island, Washington, USA. The mesograzer predicted to have the largest total effect (P. hirsutiusculus), based on densityxfeeding rate, was neither the most abundant nor the most voracious. The validity of these sorts of predictions depends on how well feeding rates measured in the laboratory approximate per capita effects under field conditions. Predictions were compared to observed effects in field microcosms. Given known numbers of mesograzers, predictions were made about the amount of Isthmia biomass that should disappear over 2 weeks from microcosms (9x9x12 cm) anchored in tidepools. Average per capita effects in field microcosms were correlated with laboratory feeding rates, but, for three species with significant feeding on Isthmia, effects were lower than feeding rates predicted. Feeding trials may overestimate community impact because they fail to account for alternative food, search times, resource productivity and stimulation of growth, or interference

  9. Effects of wetland vs. landscape variables on parasite communities of Rana pipiens: links to anthropogenic factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schotthoefer, Anna M.; Rohr, Jason R.; Cole, Rebecca A.; Koehler, Anson V.; Johnson, Catherine M.; Johnson, Lucinda B.; Beasley, Val R.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of several diseases affecting amphibian populations worldwide has prompted investigations into determinants of the occurrence and abundance of parasites in frogs. To understand the spatial scales and identify specific environmental factors that determine risks of parasitism in frogs, helminth communities in metamorphic frogs of the northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens) were examined in relation to wetland and landscape factors at local (1 km) and regional (10 km) spatial extents in an agricultural region of Minnesota (USA) using regression analyses, ordination, and variance partitioning techniques. Greater amounts of forested and woody wetland habitats, shorter distances between woody wetlands, and smaller-sized open water patches in surrounding landscapes were the most consistently positive correlates with the abundances, richness, and diversity of helminths found in the frogs. Wetland and local landscape variables were suggested as most important for larval trematode abundances, whereas local and regional landscape variables appeared most important for adult helminths. As previously reported, the sum concentration of atrazine and its metabolite desethylatrazine, was the strongest predictor of larval trematode communities. In this report, we highlight the additional influences of landscape factors. In particular, our data suggest that anthropogenic activities that have resulted in the loss of the availability and connectivity of suitable habitats in the surrounding landscapes of wetlands are associated with declines in helminth richness and abundance, but that alteration of wetland water quality through eutrophication or pesticide contamination may facilitate the transmission of certain parasite taxa when they are present at wetlands. Although additional research is needed to quantify the negative effects of parasitism on frog populations, efforts to reduce inputs of agrochemicals into wetlands to limit larval trematode infections may be warranted

  10. Linking Environmental Forcing and Trophic Supply to Benthic Communities in the Vercelli Seamount Area (Tyrrhenian Sea)

    PubMed Central

    Covazzi Harriague, Anabella; Bavestrello, Giorgio; Bo, Marzia; Borghini, Mireno; Castellano, Michela; Majorana, Margherita; Massa, Francesco; Montella, Alessandro; Povero, Paolo; Misic, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Seamounts and their influence on the surrounding environment are currently being extensively debated but, surprisingly, scant information is available for the Mediterranean area. Furthermore, although the deep Tyrrhenian Sea is characterised by a complex bottom morphology and peculiar hydrodynamic features, which would suggest a variable influence on the benthic domain, few studies have been carried out there, especially for soft-bottom macrofaunal assemblages. In order to fill this gap, the structure of the meio-and macrofaunal assemblages of the Vercelli Seamount and the surrounding deep area (northern Tyrrhenian Sea – western Mediterranean) were studied in relation to environmental features. Sediment was collected with a box-corer from the seamount summit and flanks and at two far-field sites in spring 2009, in order to analyse the metazoan communities, the sediment texture and the sedimentary organic matter. At the summit station, the heterogeneity of the habitat, the shallowness of the site and the higher trophic supply (water column phytopigments and macroalgal detritus, for instance) supported a very rich macrofaunal community, with high abundance, biomass and diversity. In fact, its trophic features resembled those observed in coastal environments next to seagrass meadows. At the flank and far-field stations, sediment heterogeneity and depth especially influenced the meiofaunal distribution. From a trophic point of view, the low content of the valuable sedimentary proteins that was found confirmed the general oligotrophy of the Tyrrhenian Sea, and exerted a limiting influence on the abundance and biomass of the assemblages. In this scenario, the rather refractory sedimentary carbohydrates became a food source for metazoans, which increased their abundance and biomass at the stations where the hydrolytic-enzyme-mediated turnover of carbohydrates was faster, highlighting high lability. PMID:25343621

  11. Community Theories of Change: Linking Environmental Justice to Sustainability through Stakeholder Perceptions in Milwaukee, (WI, USA).

    PubMed

    Hornik, Kaitlyn; Cutts, Bethany; Greenlee, Andrew

    2016-09-30

    Environmental justice and sustainability are compatible lenses, yet action toward equity is often missing from urban sustainability initiatives. This study aims to assess the cohesion of these frameworks in practice. To do this, we parse individuals' theories of change, or how they identify and propose to resolve environmental injustices in the pursuit of sustainability. We posit that these theories of change are comprised of three main components: (1) perceived environmental benefits and burdens; (2) the causal pathways of environmental and social injustice; and (3) visions for positive change. Drawing from 35 stakeholder interviews in Milwaukee (WI, USA) we examine individual and institutional perspectives on environmental and social change and their links to the production of injustice. Our findings reveal that participants do not distinguish between environmental and social injustices. Instead, both social and environmental factors are implicated in injustice. Furthermore, we identify two mental maps for how social and economic change reproduce injustice. These findings suggest the need to reorient how urban injustice is considered and make efforts to acknowledge how a diversity of operational theories of change could either be divisive or could bring environmental justice and sustainability initiatives together.

  12. Community Theories of Change: Linking Environmental Justice to Sustainability through Stakeholder Perceptions in Milwaukee (WI, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Hornik, Kaitlyn; Cutts, Bethany; Greenlee, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Environmental justice and sustainability are compatible lenses, yet action toward equity is often missing from urban sustainability initiatives. This study aims to assess the cohesion of these frameworks in practice. To do this, we parse individuals’ theories of change, or how they identify and propose to resolve environmental injustices in the pursuit of sustainability. We posit that these theories of change are comprised of three main components: (1) perceived environmental benefits and burdens; (2) the causal pathways of environmental and social injustice; and (3) visions for positive change. Drawing from 35 stakeholder interviews in Milwaukee (WI, USA) we examine individual and institutional perspectives on environmental and social change and their links to the production of injustice. Our findings reveal that participants do not distinguish between environmental and social injustices. Instead, both social and environmental factors are implicated in injustice. Furthermore, we identify two mental maps for how social and economic change reproduce injustice. These findings suggest the need to reorient how urban injustice is considered and make efforts to acknowledge how a diversity of operational theories of change could either be divisive or could bring environmental justice and sustainability initiatives together. PMID:27706068

  13. Linking organ donors and the medical/scientific research community: a US perspective.

    PubMed

    Baldasare, Dolores

    2011-02-01

    The International Institute for the Advancement of Medicine (IIAM) provides non-transplantable organs and tissues for medical and scientific research, education, and drug & device development. The benefits of using human organs and tissues for research are vast, and donating for research provides donor families with a valuable option if their loved one's organs are unsuitable for transplantation. The use of these organs and tissues enables the faster development of more efficacious drugs with improved safety profiles, and enhanced understanding of basic disease processes that directly affect humans. Human organs and tissues offer unique advantages over the use of animal organs and tissues as it is human diseases and conditions which we seek to treat, and so logically the results can be more directly applied. The added advantage of accessing non-transplantable, human organs is that they are in superb condition, and so experiments can be conducted in a very physiologically-relevant system. Although the US is a sizeable country with a large population and individual regulations governing human tissue collection and usage for each of the 50 states comprising the US this article will discuss how IIAM succeeds in immediately linking organ donors and qualified researchers, ultimately to the great benefit of patients.

  14. A tale of two chitons: is habitat specialisation linked to distinct associated bacterial communities?

    PubMed

    Duperron, Sébastien; Pottier, Marie-Anne; Léger, Nelly; Gaudron, Sylvie M; Puillandre, Nicolas; Le Prieur, Stéphanie; Sigwart, Julia D; Ravaux, Juliette; Zbinden, Magali

    2013-03-01

    Although most chitons (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) are shallow-water molluscs, diverse species also occur in deep-sea habitats. We investigated the feeding strategies of two species, Leptochiton boucheti and Nierstraszella lineata, recovered on sunken wood sampled in the western Pacific, close to the Vanuatu Islands. The two species display distinctly different associations with bacterial partners. Leptochiton boucheti harbours Mollicutes in regions of its gut epithelium and has no abundant bacterium associated with its gill. Nierstraszella lineata displays no dense gut-associated bacteria, but harbours bacterial filaments attached to its gill epithelium, related to the Deltaproteobacteria symbionts found in gills of the wood-eating limpet Pectinodonta sp. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope signatures and an absence of cellulolytic activity give evidence against a direct wood-feeding diet; both species are secondary consumers within the wood food web. We suggest that the distinct associations with bacterial partners are linked to niche specialisations of the two species. Nierstraszella lineata is in a taxonomic family restricted to sunken wood and is possibly adapted to more anoxic conditions thanks to its gill-associated bacteria. Leptochiton boucheti is phylogenetically more proximate to an ancestral form not specialised on wood and may itself be more of a generalist; this observation is congruent with its association with Mollicutes, a bacterial clade comprising gut-associated bacteria occurring in several metazoan phyla.

  15. Linking avian communities and avian influenza ecology in southern Africa using epidemiological functional groups

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The ecology of pathogens, and particularly their emergence in multi-host systems, is complex. New approaches are needed to reduce superficial complexities to a level that still allows scientists to analyse underlying and more fundamental processes. One promising approach for simplification is to use an epidemiological-function classification to describe ecological diversity in a way that relates directly to pathogen dynamics. In this article, we develop and apply the epidemiological functional group (EFG) concept to explore the relationships between wild bird communities and avian influenza virus (AIV) in three ecosystems in southern Africa. Using a two year dataset that combined bird counts and bimonthly sampling for AIV, we allocated each bird species to a set of EFGs that captured two overarching epidemiological functions: the capacity of species to maintain AIV in the system, and their potential to introduce the virus. Comparing AIV prevalence between EFGs suggested that the hypothesis that anseriforms (ducks) and charadriiforms (waders) drive AIV epidemiology cannot entirely explain the high prevalence observed in some EFGs. If anseriforms do play an important role in AIV dynamics in each of the three ecosystems, the role of other species in the local maintenance of AIV cannot be ruled out. The EFG concept thus helped us to identify gaps in knowledge and to highlight understudied bird groups that might play a role in AIV epidemiology. In general, the use of EFGs has potential for generating a range of valuable insights in epidemiology, just as functional group approaches have done in ecology. PMID:23101696

  16. Using documents to investigate links between implementation and sustainability in a complex community intervention: the PRISM study.

    PubMed

    Willis, Karen; Small, Rhonda; Brown, Stephanie

    2012-10-01

    The increasing imperative to find what works in health services has meant a rise in research trialing interventions deemed 'complex'. While the strength of these interventions comes from taking a 'whole of problem' approach using multiple and inter-linking strategies, ways of examining implementation are under-explored. Building sustainability is an important part of implementing complex intervention research, but this too has received little exploration in the implementation literature. This paper explores issues of implementation and sustainability by examining the case of PRISM (Program of Resources, Information and Support for Mothers), a community randomised trial in Victoria, Australia aimed at improving maternal health and wellbeing. It examines documents placed on the project website. Three groups of documents relating to implementation of the intervention were examined - implementation reports, media reports and community newsletters. Analysing these documents allowed a focus on the 'work' of the intervention - who does the work and what activities comprise the work - in order to examine implementation as it relates to sustainability. Document analysis provides a useful way of considering implementation and sustainability of complex intervention research. It can 'value add' to findings from process evaluation and extend our understanding of an intervention beyond outcome measures. Analysis of the documents in this case provides insights into why sustainability of an intervention may be difficult to achieve during implementation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Linking internal and external bacterial community control gives mechanistic framework for pelagic virus‐to‐bacteria ratios

    PubMed Central

    Pree, Bernadette; Thingstad, T. Frede

    2016-01-01

    Summary For more than 25 years, virus‐to‐bacteria ratios (VBR) have been measured and interpreted as indicators of the importance of viruses in aquatic ecosystems, yet a generally accepted theory for understanding mechanisms controlling VBR is still lacking. Assuming that the denominator (total bacterial abundance) is primarily predator controlled, while viral lysis compensates for host growth rates exceeding this grazing loss, the numerator (viral abundance) reflects activity differences between prokaryotic hosts. VBR is then a ratio between mechanisms generating structure within the bacterial community and interactions between different plankton functional types controlling bacterial community size. We here show how these arguments can be formalized by combining a recently published model for co‐evolutionary host‐virus interactions, with a previously published “minimum” model for the microbial food web. The result is a framework where viral lysis links bacterial diversity to microbial food web structure and function, creating relationships between different levels of organization that are strongly modified by organism‐level properties such as cost of resistance. PMID:27231817

  18. Linking internal and external bacterial community control gives mechanistic framework for pelagic virus-to-bacteria ratios.

    PubMed

    Våge, Selina; Pree, Bernadette; Thingstad, T Frede

    2016-11-01

    For more than 25 years, virus-to-bacteria ratios (VBR) have been measured and interpreted as indicators of the importance of viruses in aquatic ecosystems, yet a generally accepted theory for understanding mechanisms controlling VBR is still lacking. Assuming that the denominator (total bacterial abundance) is primarily predator controlled, while viral lysis compensates for host growth rates exceeding this grazing loss, the numerator (viral abundance) reflects activity differences between prokaryotic hosts. VBR is then a ratio between mechanisms generating structure within the bacterial community and interactions between different plankton functional types controlling bacterial community size. We here show how these arguments can be formalized by combining a recently published model for co-evolutionary host-virus interactions, with a previously published "minimum" model for the microbial food web. The result is a framework where viral lysis links bacterial diversity to microbial food web structure and function, creating relationships between different levels of organization that are strongly modified by organism-level properties such as cost of resistance. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology Reports published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Building Capacity for Earthquake Monitoring: Linking Regional Networks with the Global Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willemann, R. J.; Lerner-Lam, A.

    2006-12-01

    Installing or upgrading a seismic monitoring network is often among the mitigation efforts after earthquake disasters, and this is happening in response to the events both in Sumatra during December 2004 and in Pakistan during October 2005. These networks can yield improved hazard assessment, more resilient buildings where they are most needed, and emergency relief directed more quickly to the worst hit areas after the next large earthquake. Several commercial organizations are well prepared for the fleeting opportunity to provide the instruments that comprise a seismic network, including sensors, data loggers, telemetry stations, and the computers and software required for the network center. But seismic monitoring requires more than hardware and software, no matter how advanced. A well-trained staff is required to select appropriate and mutually compatible components, install and maintain telemetered stations, manage and archive data, and perform the analyses that actually yield the intended benefits. Monitoring is more effective when network operators cooperate with a larger community through free and open exchange of data, sharing information about working practices, and international collaboration in research. As an academic consortium, a facility operator and a founding member of the International Federation of Digital Seismographic Networks, IRIS has access to a broad range of expertise with the skills that are required to help design, install, and operate a seismic network and earthquake analysis center, and stimulate the core training for the professional teams required to establish and maintain these facilities. But delivering expertise quickly when and where it is unexpectedly in demand requires advance planning and coordination in order to respond to the needs of organizations that are building a seismic network, either with tight time constraints imposed by the budget cycles of aid agencies following a disastrous earthquake, or as part of more informed

  20. Linking Hydro-Meteorological Hazards, Climate and Food Security: an Initiative of International Scientific Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Beer, T.

    2013-05-01

    Humans face climatic and hydro-meteorological hazards on different scales in time and space. In particular natural hazards can have disastrous impact in the short term (flood) and in the long term (drought) as they affect human life and health as well as impacting dramatically on the sustainable development of society. They represent a pending danger for vulnerable lifelines, infrastructure and the agricultural systems that depend on the water supply, reservoirs, pipelines, and power plants. Developed countries are affected, but the impact is disproportionate within the developing world. Extreme natural events such as extreme floods or prolonged drought can change the life and economic development of developing nations and stifle their development for decades. The beginning of the XX1st century has been marked by a significant number of natural disasters, such as floods, severe storms, wildfires, hurricanes, and tsunamis. Extreme natural events cause devastation resulting in loss of human life, large environmental damage, and partial or total loss of infrastructure that, in the longer time, will affect the potential for agricultural recovery. Recent catastrophic events of the early 21st century (e.g. floods in Pakistan and Thailand, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami) remind us once again that there is a strong coupling between complex solid Earth, oceanic, and atmospheric processes and that even developed countries such as Japan are subject to agricultural declines as a result of disastrous hydro-meteorological events. Scientific community recognizes that communication between the groups of experts of various international organizations dealing with natural hazards and their activity in disaster risk reduction and food security needs to be strengthened. Several international scientific unions and intergovernmental institutions set up a consortium of experts to promote studies of weather, climate and their interaction with agriculture, food and their socio

  1. EpiCollect: linking smartphones to web applications for epidemiology, ecology and community data collection.

    PubMed

    Aanensen, David M; Huntley, Derek M; Feil, Edward J; al-Own, Fada'a; Spratt, Brian G

    2009-09-16

    Epidemiologists and ecologists often collect data in the field and, on returning to their laboratory, enter their data into a database for further analysis. The recent introduction of mobile phones that utilise the open source Android operating system, and which include (among other features) both GPS and Google Maps, provide new opportunities for developing mobile phone applications, which in conjunction with web applications, allow two-way communication between field workers and their project databases. Here we describe a generic framework, consisting of mobile phone software, EpiCollect, and a web application located within www.spatialepidemiology.net. Data collected by multiple field workers can be submitted by phone, together with GPS data, to a common web database and can be displayed and analysed, along with previously collected data, using Google Maps (or Google Earth). Similarly, data from the web database can be requested and displayed on the mobile phone, again using Google Maps. Data filtering options allow the display of data submitted by the individual field workers or, for example, those data within certain values of a measured variable or a time period. Data collection frameworks utilising mobile phones with data submission to and from central databases are widely applicable and can give a field worker similar display and analysis tools on their mobile phone that they would have if viewing the data in their laboratory via the web. We demonstrate their utility for epidemiological data collection and display, and briefly discuss their application in ecological and community data collection. Furthermore, such frameworks offer great potential for recruiting 'citizen scientists' to contribute data easily to central databases through their mobile phone.

  2. ISOGENIE: Linking geochemistry, isotopic chemistry and microbial dynamics & community composition in a thawing permafrost peatland, Stordalen Mire, Abisco, Sweden.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanton, J.; Crill, P. M.; Rich, V.; McCalley, C. K.; Hodgkins, S. B.; Tyson, G.; Logan, T.; Wehr, R.; Mondav, R.; Li, C.; Frolking, S.; Saleska, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    As permafrost thaws, increasing CH4 emissions from northern wetlands are likely to cause positive feedback to atmospheric warming. One of the over-arching goals of this project is to connect geochemical processes, particularly focusing on methane production, to underlying microbial population dynamics and genomics. Recent transformative technical advances in both high throughput investigations of microbial communities and high temporal resolution biogeochemical isotope measurements now permit a uniquely comprehensive approach to opening the microbial "black boxes" that impact carbon cycling on global scales. This project links detailed microbial sampling with detailed geochemical and isotopic sampling on seasonal and diel timescales and has an extensive modeling component. Gas exchange is monitored across the wetland gradients in a series of automated chambers and isotopes of emitted and belowground methane and carbon dioxide are measured with a QC laser system. The mire is in a state of partial thaw. With this thaw is an apparent ecological session in wetland community structure and associated changes in organic matter lability, rates of methane production and microbial community. Our group's study sites range from palsa with underlying permanently frozen peat, to recently collapsed and flooded palsa, to flooded palsa colonized by Sphagnum, to flooded eriophorum sites, to sites populated by Carex, to open water lakes. Across this environmental gradient pH ranges from 4 to 6.5. This change is driven by changes in hydrology as the surface of the thawing permafrost subsides and an adjacent lake drains into the mire. Along this environmental gradient, from palsa to Carex, the lability of the peat increases significantly as determined in incubations of peat material and monitoring of methane and carbon dioxide production rates. Coincident with this environmental gradient is a decrease in the apparent fractionation factor between methane and carbon dioxide and methane

  3. Benthic community structure and biomarker responses of the clam Scrobicularia plana in a shallow tidal creek affected by fish farm effluents (Rio San Pedro, SW Spain).

    PubMed

    Silva, Claudio; Mattioli, Mattia; Fabbri, Elena; Yáñez, Eleuterio; Delvalls, T Angel; Martín-Díaz, M Laura

    2012-10-15

    The effects of solid organic wastes from a marine fish farm on sediments were tested using benthic community as ecological indicators and biomarkers in native clam (Scrobicularia plana) as biochemical indicators. The benthic fauna and clam samples were collected in the intertidal sediment in October 2010 from five sites of the Rio San Pedro (RSP) creek, following a gradient of contamination from the aquaculture effluent to the control site. Numbers of species, abundance, richness and Shannon diversity were the biodiversity indicators measured in benthic fauna. Morphological and reproduction status of clams were assessed using the condition factor and gonado-somatic index, respectively. Phase I and Phase II detoxification enzymatic activities (ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), glutathione S-transferase (GST)), antioxidant enzymatic activities (glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR)) and oxidative stress parameters (Lipid Peroxidation (LPO) and DNA strand breaks) were measured in clams' digestive gland tissues. In parallel, temperature and salinity in the adjacent water, redox potential, pH and organic matter in sediment, and dissolved oxygen in the interstitial water were measured. The results suggested that RSP showed a spatial gradient characterised by hypoxia/anoxia, reduced potential, acidic conditions and high organic enrichment in sediments at the most contaminated sites. Significant (p<0.05) decrease of biodiversity indicators were observed in the areas impacted by the aquaculture discharges. Biomarkers did not show a clear pattern and of all biochemical responses tested, GPX, DNA damage and LPO were the most sensitive ones and showed significant (p<0.05) increase in the polluted sites. Benthic biodiversity indicators were significantly (p<0.05) positively correlated with pH, redox potential and dissolved oxygen and negatively correlated with organic matter. On the contrary, antioxidant enzymatic responses (GPX) and oxidative stress

  4. Linked Learning in Porterville: Creating Capacity for Innovation and Change through Collaborative Leadership and Community Engagement. Linked Learning Case Study Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rustique, Elle; Rutherford-Quach, Sara

    2012-01-01

    This case study describes how Porterville Unified School District (PUSD), a rural school district in California's Central Valley, began to fulfill its vision to transform high school and career education through the implementation of Linked Learning. Linked Learning is a state-wide initiative for redesigning large comprehensive high schools into…

  5. Traditional uses of plants in a rural community of Mozambique and possible links with Miombo degradation and harvesting sustainability.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Piero; Mancini, Matteo; Mattioli, Elisabetta; Morganti, Michela; Signorini, Maria Adele

    2014-07-23

    Miombo woodlands play an important role in the livelihood of people living in sub-equatorial African countries, contributing to satisfy basic human needs such as food, medicine, fuelwood and building materials. However, over-exploitation of plant resources and unsustainable harvest practices can potentially degrade forests. The aim of this study was to document the use of Miombo plant products, other than medicinal plants, in local communities, within a wider framework in which we discussed possible links between traditional uses and conservation status of the used species and of the whole Miombo environment. Fieldwork took place in four communities of Muda-Serração, central Mozambique. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 52 informants about their knowledge, use and harvesting practices of useful plants. A survey on local Miombo vegetation was also carried out in order to assess abundance and distribution of useful woody plants cited in the interviews in areas exposed to different exploitation rates. A Conservation Priority index was also applied to rank conservation values of each used woody species. Ninety-eight plants cited by the informants were botanically identified. The most relevant general category was represented by food plants (45 species), followed by handicraft plants (38 species) and domestic plants (37 species). Among the 54 woody species observed in vegetation plots, 52% were cited as useful in the interviews. Twenty-six woody species found in 'natural' Miombo areas were not found in 'degraded' ones: of these, 46% were cited in the interviews (58% in the food category, 50% in the handicraft category, 25% in the domestic category and 8% in the fishing category). Results of conservation ranking showed that 7 woody species deserve conservation priority in the investigated area. This study shows that the communities investigated rely heavily on local forest products for their daily subsistence requirements in food, firewood/charcoal and

  6. Traditional uses of plants in a rural community of Mozambique and possible links with Miombo degradation and harvesting sustainability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Miombo woodlands play an important role in the livelihood of people living in sub-equatorial African countries, contributing to satisfy basic human needs such as food, medicine, fuelwood and building materials. However, over-exploitation of plant resources and unsustainable harvest practices can potentially degrade forests. The aim of this study was to document the use of Miombo plant products, other than medicinal plants, in local communities, within a wider framework in which we discussed possible links between traditional uses and conservation status of the used species and of the whole Miombo environment. Methods Fieldwork took place in four communities of Muda-Serração, central Mozambique. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 52 informants about their knowledge, use and harvesting practices of useful plants. A survey on local Miombo vegetation was also carried out in order to assess abundance and distribution of useful woody plants cited in the interviews in areas exposed to different exploitation rates. A Conservation Priority index was also applied to rank conservation values of each used woody species. Results Ninety-eight plants cited by the informants were botanically identified. The most relevant general category was represented by food plants (45 species), followed by handicraft plants (38 species) and domestic plants (37 species). Among the 54 woody species observed in vegetation plots, 52% were cited as useful in the interviews. Twenty-six woody species found in ‘natural’ Miombo areas were not found in ‘degraded’ ones: of these, 46% were cited in the interviews (58% in the food category, 50% in the handicraft category, 25% in the domestic category and 8% in the fishing category). Results of conservation ranking showed that 7 woody species deserve conservation priority in the investigated area. Conclusions This study shows that the communities investigated rely heavily on local forest products for their daily subsistence

  7. Spatial and temporal variability of biomarkers and microbial diversity reveal metabolic and community flexibility in Streamer Biofilm Communities in the Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Schubotz, F; Meyer-Dombard, D R; Bradley, A S; Fredricks, H F; Hinrichs, K-U; Shock, E L; Summons, R E

    2013-11-01

    Detailed analysis of 16S rRNA and intact polar lipids (IPLs) from streamer biofilm communities (SBCs), collected from geochemically similar hot springs in the Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, shows good agreement and affirm that IPLs can be used as reliable markers for the microbial constituents of SBCs. Uncultured Crenarchaea are prominent in SBS, and their IPLs contain both glycosidic and mixed glyco-phospho head groups with tetraether cores, having 0-4 rings. Archaeal IPL contributions increase with increasing temperature and comprise up to one-fourth of the total IPL inventory at >84 °C. At elevated temperatures, bacterial IPLs contain abundant glycosidic glycerol diether lipids. Diether and diacylglycerol (DAG) lipids with aminopentanetetrol and phosphatidylinositol head groups were identified as lipids diagnostic of Aquificales, while DAG glycolipids and glyco-phospholipids containing N-acetylgycosamine as head group were assigned to members of the Thermales. With decreasing temperature and concomitant changes in water chemistry, IPLs typical of phototrophic bacteria, such as mono-, diglycosyl, and sulfoquinovosyl DAG, which are specific for cyanobacteria, increase in abundance, consistent with genomic data from the same samples. Compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis of IPL breakdown products reveals a large isotopic diversity among SBCs in different hot springs. At two of the hot springs, 'Bison Pool' and Flat Cone, lipids derived from Aquificales are enriched in (13) C relative to biomass and approach values close to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (approximately 0‰), consistent with fractionation during autotrophic carbon fixation via the reversed tricarboxylic acid pathway. At a third site, Octopus Spring, the same Aquificales-diagnostic lipids are 10‰ depleted relative to biomass and resemble stable carbon isotope values of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), indicative of heterotrophy. Other bacterial and archaeal lipids show

  8. Applying recovery biomarkers to calibrate self-report measures of sodium and potassium in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    PubMed

    Mossavar-Rahmani, Y; Sotres-Alvarez, D; Wong, W W; Loria, C M; Gellman, M D; Van Horn, L; Alderman, M H; Beasley, J M; Lora, C M; Siega-Riz, A M; Kaplan, R C; Shaw, P A

    2017-02-16

    Measurement error in assessment of sodium and potassium intake obscures associations with health outcomes. The level of this error in a diverse US Hispanic/Latino population is unknown. We investigated the measurement error in self-reported dietary intake of sodium and potassium and examined differences by background (Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican and South American). In 2010-2012, we studied 447 participants aged 18-74 years from four communities (Miami, Bronx, Chicago and San Diego), obtaining objective 24-h urinary sodium and potassium excretion measures. Self-report was captured from two interviewer-administered 24-h dietary recalls. Twenty percent of the sample repeated the study. We examined bias in self-reported sodium and potassium from diet and the association of mismeasurement with participant characteristics. Linear regression relating self-report with objective measures was used to develop calibration equations. Self-report underestimated sodium intake by 19.8% and 20.8% and potassium intake by 1.3% and 4.6% in men and women, respectively. Sodium intake underestimation varied by Hispanic/Latino background (P<0.05) and was associated with higher body mass index (BMI). Potassium intake underestimation was associated with higher BMI, lower restaurant score (indicating lower consumption of foods prepared away from home and/or eaten outside the home) and supplement use. The R(2) was 19.7% and 25.0% for the sodium and potassium calibration models, respectively, increasing to 59.5 and 61.7% after adjusting for within-person variability in each biomarker. These calibration equations, corrected for subject-specific reporting error, have the potential to reduce bias in diet-disease associations within this largest cohort of Hispanics in the United States.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 16 February 2017; doi:10.1038/jhh.2016.98.

  9. Linking International Development Actors to Geophysical Infrastructure: Exploring an IRIS Community Role in Bridging a Communications Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner-Lam, A.; Aster, R.; Beck, S.; Ekstrom, G.; Fisher, K.; Meltzer, A.; Nyblade, A.; Sandvol, E.; Willemann, R.

    2008-12-01

    Over the past quarter century, national investments in high-fidelity digital seismograph networks have resulted in a global infrastructure for real-time in situ earthquake monitoring. Many network operators adhere to community-developed standards, with the result that there are few technical impediments to data sharing and real-time information exchange. Two unanswered questions, however, are whether the existing models of international collaboration will ensure the stability and sustainability of global earthquake monitoring, and whether the participating institutions can work with international development agencies and non- governmental organizations in meeting linked development and natural hazard risk reduction goals. Since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, many of these actors are enlarging their commitments to natural hazard risk reduction and building national technical capacities, among broader programs in poverty alleviation and adaptation to environmental stress. Despite this renewed commitment, international development organizations, with notable exceptions, have been relatively passive in discussions of how the existing earthquake monitoring infrastructure could be leveraged to support risk-reduction programs and meet sustainable development goals. At the same time, the international seismological community - comprising universities and government seismological surveys - has built research and education initiatives such as EarthScope, AfricaArray, and similar programs in China, Europe and South America, that use innovative instrumentation technologies and deployment strategies to enable new science and applications, and promote education and training in critical sectors. Can these developments be combined? Recognizing this communication or knowledge gap, the IRIS International Working Group (IWG) explores the link between the activities of IRIS Members using IRIS facilities and the missions of international development agencies, such as US AID, the World

  10. Regional Approach for Linking Ecosystem Services and Livelihood Strategies Under Climate Change of Pastoral Communities in the Mongolian Steppe Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojima, D. S.; Galvin, K.; Togtohyn, C.

    2012-12-01

    Dramatic changes due to climate and land use dynamics in the Mongolian Plateau affecting ecosystem services and agro-pastoral systems in Mongolia. Recently, market forces and development strategies are affecting land and water resources of the pastoral communities which are being further stressed due to climatic changes. Evaluation of pastoral systems, where humans depend on livestock and grassland ecosystem services, have demonstrated the vulnerability of the social-ecological system to climate change. Current social-ecological changes in ecosystem services are affecting land productivity and carrying capacity, land-atmosphere interactions, water resources, and livelihood strategies. The general trend involves greater intensification of resource exploitation at the expense of traditional patterns of extensive range utilization. Thus we expect climate-land use-land cover relationships to be crucially modified by the social-economic forces. The analysis incorporates information about the social-economic transitions taking place in the region which affect land-use, food security, and ecosystem dynamics. The region of study extends from the Mongolian plateau in Mongolia. Our research indicate that sustainability of pastoral systems in the region needs to integrate the impact of climate change on ecosystem services with socio-economic changes shaping the livelihood strategies of pastoral systems in the region. Adaptation strategies which incorporate integrated analysis of landscape management and livelihood strategies provides a framework which links ecosystem services to critical resource assets. Analysis of the available livelihood assets provides insights to the adaptive capacity of various agents in a region or in a community. Sustainable development pathways which enable the development of these adaptive capacity elements will lead to more effective adaptive management strategies for pastoral land use and herder's living standards. Pastoralists will have the

  11. Meeting Report--NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, Tore; Amundson, Sally A,; Blakely, William F.; Burns, Frederic J.; Chen, Allen; Dainiak, Nicholas; Franklin, Stephen; Leary, Julie A.; Loftus, David J.; Morgan, William F.; Pellmar, Terry C.; Stolc, Viktor; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vaughan, Andrew T.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-05-01

    A summary is provided of presentations and discussions from the NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop held September 27-28, 2007, at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Invited speakers were distinguished scientists representing key sectors of the radiation research community. Speakers addressed recent developments in the biomarker and biotechnology fields that may provide new opportunities for health-related assessment of radiation-exposed individuals, including for long-duration space travel. Topics discussed include the space radiation environment, biomarkers of radiation sensitivity and individual susceptibility, molecular signatures of low-dose responses, multivariate analysis of gene expression, biomarkers in biodefense, biomarkers in radiation oncology, biomarkers and triage following large-scale radiological incidents, integrated and multiple biomarker approaches, advances in whole-genome tiling arrays, advances in mass-spectrometry proteomics, radiation biodosimetry for estimation of cancer risk in a rat skin model, and confounding factors. Summary conclusions are provided at the end of the report.

  12. Biomarkers in pediatrics: children as biomarker orphans.

    PubMed

    Savage, William J; Everett, Allen D

    2010-12-01

    Biomarkers have enormous potential to improve patient care by establishing tests of diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment effects. Successfully translating a biomarker from discovery to clinical application demands high-quality discovery research and high-quality clinical studies for biomarker validation; however, there are additional challenges that face biomarker research in pediatrics. There are also additional characteristics of pediatric medicine that make biomarker research especially needed. This review focuses on the fundamentals of biomarkers, the additional considerations needed for applying biomarker research to children, and recommendations for advancing pediatric biomarker research.

  13. A coordinated national model for diabetes prevention: linking health systems to an evidence-based community program.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Deneen; Koehler, Timothy B; Longjohn, Matt; Lever, Jonathan A; Caputo, Nadine F

    2013-04-01

    YMCA Lifestyle Coaches were trained. The program enrolled 2369 participants, and 1723 participants completed the core program at an average service-delivery cost of about $400 each. For those individuals completing the program, average weight loss was about 5%. UHG anticipates that within 3 years, savings from reduced medical spending will outweigh initial costs. Large-scale prevention efforts can be scalable and sustainable with collaboration, health information technology, community-based delivery of evidence-based interventions, and novel payment structures that incentivize efficiency and outcomes linked to better health and lower future costs. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Circulating N-Linked Glycoprotein Side-Chain Biomarker, Rosuvastatin Therapy, and Incident Cardiovascular Disease: An Analysis From the JUPITER Trial.

    PubMed

    Akinkuolie, Akintunde O; Glynn, Robert J; Padmanabhan, Latha; Ridker, Paul M; Mora, Samia

    2016-07-13

    GlycA, a novel protein glycan biomarker of N-acetyl side chains of acute-phase proteins, was recently associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in healthy women. Whether GlycA predicts CVD events in the setting of statin therapy in men and women without CVD but with evidence of chronic inflammation is unknown. In the Justfication for the Use of Statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) trial (NCT00239681), participants with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <130 mg/dL and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) ≥2 mg/L were randomized to rosuvastatin 20 mg/day or placebo. GlycA was quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 12 527 before randomization and 10 039 participants at 1 year. A total of 310 first primary CVD events occurred during maximum follow-up of 5.0 years (median, 1.9). GlycA changed minimally after 1 year on study treatment: 6.8% and 4.7% decrease in the rosuvastatin and placebo groups, respectively. Overall, baseline GlycA levels were associated with increased risk of CVD: multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per SD increment, 1.20 (95% CI, 1.08-1.34; P=0.0006). After additionally adjusting for hsCRP, this was slightly attenuated (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.04-1.35; P=0.01). On-treatment GlycA levels were also associated with CVD; corresponding multivariable-adjusted HRs per SD before and after additionally adjusting for hsCRP: 1.27 (95% CI, 1.13-1.42; P<0.0001) and 1.24 (95% CI, 1.07-1.44; P=0.004), respectively. Tests for heterogeneity by treatment arm were not significant (P for interaction, >0.20). In the JUPITER trial, increased levels of GlycA were associated with an increased risk of CVD events independent of traditional risk factors and hsCRP. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00239681. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  15. Analysis of bacterial core communities in the central Baltic by comparative RNA-DNA-based fingerprinting provides links to structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Brettar, Ingrid; Christen, Richard; Höfle, Manfred G

    2012-01-01

    Understanding structure-function links of microbial communities is a central theme of microbial ecology since its beginning. To this end, we studied the spatial variability of the bacterioplankton community structure and composition across the central Baltic Sea at four stations, which were up to 450 km apart and at a depth profile representative for the central part (Gotland Deep, 235 m). Bacterial community structure was followed by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)- and 16S rRNA gene-based fingerprints using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) electrophoresis. Species composition was determined by sequence analysis of SSCP bands. High similarities of the bacterioplankton communities across several hundred kilometers were observed in the surface water using RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints. In these surface communities, the RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints resulted in very different pattern, presumably indicating large difference between the active members of the community as represented by RNA-based fingerprints and the present members represented by the DNA-based fingerprints. This large discrepancy changed gradually over depth, resulting in highly similar RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints in the anoxic part of the water column below 130 m depth. A conceivable mechanism explaining this high similarity could be the reduced oxidative stress in the anoxic zone. The stable communities on the surface and in the anoxic zone indicate the strong influence of the hydrography on the bacterioplankton community structure. Comparative analysis of RNA- and DNA-based community structure provided criteria for the identification of the core community, its key members and their links to biogeochemical functions.

  16. The Pseudomonas community in metal-contaminated sediments as revealed by quantitative PCR: a link with metal bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Roosa, Stéphanie; Wauven, Corinne Vander; Billon, Gabriel; Matthijs, Sandra; Wattiez, Ruddy; Gillan, David C

    2014-10-01

    Pseudomonas bacteria are ubiquitous Gram-negative and aerobic microorganisms that are known to harbor metal resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps and intracellular redox enzymes. Specific Pseudomonas bacteria have been quantified in some metal-contaminated environments, but the entire Pseudomonas population has been poorly investigated under these conditions, and the link with metal bioavailability was not previously examined. In the present study, quantitative PCR and cell cultivation were used to monitor and characterize the Pseudomonas population at 4 different sediment sites contaminated with various levels of metals. At the same time, total metals and metal bioavailability (as estimated using an HCl 1 m extraction) were measured. It was found that the total level of Pseudomonas, as determined by qPCR using two different genes (oprI and the 16S rRNA gene), was positively and significantly correlated with total and HCl-extractable Cu, Co, Ni, Pb and Zn, with high correlation coefficients (>0.8). Metal-contaminated sediments featured isolates of the Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas lutea and Pseudomonas aeruginosa groups, with other bacterial genera such as Mycobacterium, Klebsiella and Methylobacterium. It is concluded that Pseudomonas bacteria do proliferate in metal-contaminated sediments, but are still part of a complex community.

  17. Linking social, ecological, and physical science to advance natural and nature-based protection for coastal communities.

    PubMed

    Arkema, Katie K; Griffin, Robert; Maldonado, Sergio; Silver, Jessica; Suckale, Jenny; Guerry, Anne D

    2017-07-01

    Interest in the role that ecosystems play in reducing the impacts of coastal hazards has grown dramatically. Yet the magnitude and nature of their effects are highly context dependent, making it difficult to know under what conditions coastal habitats, such as saltmarshes, reefs, and forests, are likely to be effective for saving lives and protecting property. We operationalize the concept of natural and nature-based solutions for coastal protection by adopting an ecosystem services framework that propagates the outcome of a management action through ecosystems to societal benefits. We review the literature on the basis of the steps in this framework, considering not only the supply of coastal protection provided by ecosystems but also the demand for protective services from beneficiaries. We recommend further attention to (1) biophysical processes beyond wave attenuation, (2) the combined effects of multiple habitat types (e.g., reefs, vegetation), (3) marginal values and expected damage functions, and, in particular, (4) community dependence on ecosystems for coastal protection and co-benefits. We apply our approach to two case studies to illustrate how estimates of multiple benefits and losses can inform restoration and development decisions. Finally, we discuss frontiers for linking social, ecological, and physical science to advance natural and nature-based solutions to coastal protection. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  18. Imaging Biomarkers or Biomarker Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Mitterhauser, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Since biomarker imaging is traditionally understood as imaging of molecular probes, we highly recommend to avoid any confusion with the previously defined term “imaging biomarkers” and, therefore, only use “molecular probe imaging (MPI)” in that context. Molecular probes (MPs) comprise all kinds of molecules administered to an organism which inherently carry a signalling moiety. This review highlights the basic concepts and differences of molecular probe imaging using specific biomarkers. In particular, PET radiopharmaceuticals are discussed in more detail. Specific radiochemical and radiopharmacological aspects as well as some legal issues are presented. PMID:24967536

  19. DOES LOWER SUBJECTIVE SOCIAL STATUS YIELD RISKIER BIOMARKER PROFILES?

    PubMed

    Gersten, Omer; Timiras, Paola S; Boyce, W Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Both objective and, more recently, subjective measures of low social status have been linked to poor health outcomes. It is unclear, however, through which precise physiological mechanisms such standing may influence health, although it has been proposed that those of lower status may have biomarker profiles that are more dysregulated (and hence pose a greater risk for poorer health). The main objective of this study was to investigate whether lower subjective social standing is associated with riskier neuroendocrine biomarker profiles. Data were from the Social Environment and Biomarkers of Aging Study (SEBAS), a nationally representative survey of Taiwanese men and women (ages 54-91) conducted in Taiwan in 2000. Five neuroendocrine markers (cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine) were analysed both separately and collectively in an index termed neuroendocrine allostatic load (NAL) in relation to status - both self-reported and as measured through objective socioeconomic status (SES) indicators. For the biomarker DHEAS, some connection was found between its levels and the measures of status, but for the other markers and the NAL index almost no connection was found. The overall negative finding of this paper would be further supported with more and different measures of neuroendocrine system function and a reordering of the subjective social status questions in the survey such that the one probing about status in the community (that has no prompt) was asked before the one probing about status in all of Taiwan (which has a SES prompt).

  20. Achieving Synergy: Linking an Internet-Based Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort to a Community-Based Inception Cohort and Multicentered Cohort in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Kochar, Bharati; Aldridge, Molly; Cook, Suzanne Follan; Bright, Renee; Mallette, Meaghan; Moniz, Heather; Shah, Samir A; LeLeiko, Neal S; Shapiro, Jason; Sands, Bruce E; Chen, Wenli; Jaeger, Elizabeth; Galanko, Joseph; Long, Millie D; Martin, Christopher F; Sandler, Robert S; Kappelman, Michael D

    2016-06-03

    cohort, 436 participants enrolled and linked to the Partners cohort. More women (60% vs 50%) linked and those who linked were predominantly white (96%; P<.01). Crohn's disease patients who linked had lower mean scores on the Harvey-Bradshaw Index (3.6 vs 4.4, P<.01). Ulcerative colitis patients who linked had less extensive disease than those who did not link (45% vs 60%, P<.01). Linkage of CCFA Partners with cohorts such as OSCCAR and SHARE may be a cost-effective way to expand the infrastructure for clinical outcomes and translational research. Although linkage is feasible from a technical, legal, and regulatory perspective, participant willingness appears to be a limiting factor. Overcoming this barrier will be needed to generate meaningful sample sizes to conduct studies of biomarkers, natural history, and clinical effectiveness using linked data.

  1. Implementation of proteomic biomarkers: making it work

    PubMed Central

    Mischak, Harald; Ioannidis, John PA; Argiles, Angel; Attwood, Teresa K; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Broenstrup, Mark; Charonis, Aristidis; Chrousos, George P; Delles, Christian; Dominiczak, Anna; Dylag, Tomasz; Ehrich, Jochen; Egido, Jesus; Findeisen, Peter; Jankowski, Joachim; Johnson, Robert W; Julien, Bruce A; Lankisch, Tim; Leung, Hing Y; Maahs, David; Magni, Fulvio; Manns, Michael P; Manolis, Efthymios; Mayer, Gert; Navis, Gerjan; Novak, Jan; Ortiz, Alberto; Persson, Frederik; Peter, Karlheinz; Riese, Hans H; Rossing, Peter; Sattar, Naveed; Spasovski, Goce; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Vanholder, Raymond; Schanstra, Joost P; Vlahou, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    While large numbers of proteomic biomarkers have been described, they are generally not implemented in medical practice. We have investigated the reasons for this shortcoming, focusing on hurdles downstream of biomarker verification, and describe major obstacles and possible solutions to ease valid biomarker implementation. Some of the problems lie in suboptimal biomarker discovery and validation, especially lack of validated platforms with well-described performance characteristics to support biomarker qualification. These issues have been acknowledged and are being addressed, raising the hope that valid biomarkers may start accumulating in the foreseeable future. However, successful biomarker discovery and qualification alone does not suffice for successful implementation. Additional challenges include, among others, limited access to appropriate specimens and insufficient funding, the need to validate new biomarker utility in interventional trials, and large communication gaps between the parties involved in implementation. To address this problem, we propose an implementation roadmap. The implementation effort needs to involve a wide variety of stakeholders (clinicians, statisticians, health economists, and representatives of patient groups, health insurance, pharmaceutical companies, biobanks, and regulatory agencies). Knowledgeable panels with adequate representation of all these stakeholders may facilitate biomarker evaluation and guide implementation for the specific context of use. This approach may avoid unwarranted delays or failure to implement potentially useful biomarkers, and may expedite meaningful contributions of the biomarker community to healthcare. PMID:22519700

  2. How perceptions of community environment influence health behaviours: using the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity Framework as a mechanism for exploration.

    PubMed

    Nieuwendyk, L M; Belon, A P; Vallianatos, H; Raine, K D; Schopflocher, D; Spence, J C; Plotnikoff, R C; Nykiforuk, C I

    2016-09-01

    Overweight and obesity are influenced by a complex interplay of individual and environmental factors that affect physical activity and healthy eating. Nevertheless, little has been reported on people's perceptions of those factors. Addressing this critical gap and community partner needs, this study explored how people perceived the influence of micro- and macroenvironmental factors on physical activity and healthy eating. Community partners wanted the study results in a format that would be readily and easily used by local decision makers. We used photovoice to engage 35 community members across four municipalities in Alberta, Canada, and to share their narratives about their physical activity and healthy eating. A combination of inductive and deductive analysis categorized data by environmental level (micro vs. macro) and type (physical, political, economic, and sociocultural), guided by the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity Framework. Participants conceptualized health-influencing factors more broadly than physical activity and healthy eating to include "community social health." Participants spoke most often about the influence of the microenvironment (n = 792 ANGELO Framework coding tallies) on their physical activity, healthy eating and community social health in comparison to the macroenvironment (n = 93). Photovoice results provided a visual narrative to community partners and decision makers about how people's ability to make healthy choices can be limited by macroenvironmental forces beyond their control. Focussing future research on macro- and microenvironmental influences and localized community social health can inform practice by providing strategies on how to implement healthy changes within communities, while ensuring that research and interventions echo diverse people's perceptions.

  3. Aggregated silver nanoparticles based surface-enhanced Raman scattering enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for ultrasensitive detection of protein biomarkers and small molecules.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiajie; Liu, Hongwu; Huang, Caihong; Yao, Cuize; Fu, Qiangqiang; Li, Xiuqing; Cao, Donglin; Luo, Zhi; Tang, Yong

    2015-06-02

    Lowering the detection limit is critical to the design of bioassays required for medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and food safety regulations. The current sensitivity of standard color-based analyte detection limits the further use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in research and clinical diagnoses. Here, we demonstrate a novel method that uses the Raman signal as the signal-generating system of an ELISA and combines surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) with silver nanoparticles aggregation for ultrasensitive analyte detection. The enzyme label of the ELISA controls the dissolution of Raman reporter-labeled silver nanoparticles through hydrogen peroxide and generates a strong Raman signal when the analyte is present. Using this assay, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and the adrenal stimulant ractopamine (Rac) were detected in whole serum and urine at the ultralow concentrations of 10(-9) and 10(-6) ng/mL, respectively. The methodology proposed here could potentially be applied to other molecules detection as well as PSA and Rac.

  4. Adapting to Community-Based Learning. (Benefits)[Squared]: The Exponential Results of Linking School Improvement and Community Development, Issue Number Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boethel, Martha

    Building a rural community-school development project where students engage in community-based learning experiences requires changes in the way schools prepare rural youth for the future. This publication examines the kinds of changes a school system must make before planning and implementing community-based learning strategies. Changes in…

  5. Biomarker qualification via public-private partnerships.

    PubMed

    Eck, S L; Paul, S M

    2010-01-01

    Biomarkers linked to patient outcomes (safety and efficacy) have an increasingly important role in drug development. Consequently, validation and qualification of such biomarkers are essential, often requiring large data sets from well-controlled randomized clinical trials. In the December 2009 issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, investigators utilizing data from four pharmaceutical companies and working under the auspices of the Biomarkers Consortium described the utility of adiponectin as an early predictor of glycemic control in diabetic patients taking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists. This work illustrates the advantages of large public-private partnerships for biomarker qualification.

  6. Combined use of Daphnia magna in situ bioassays, biomarkers and biological indices to diagnose and identify environmental pressures on invertebrate communities in two Mediterranean urbanized and industrialized rivers (NE Spain).

    PubMed

    Damásio, Joana; Tauler, Romà; Teixidó, Elisabeth; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcis; Riva, Maria Carmen; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Barata, Carlos

    2008-05-30

    Environmental factors affecting aquatic invertebrate communities were assessed using Daphnia magna in situ bioassays and biological indices based on community assemblages of benthic macroinvertebrates. Investigations were carried out in two heavily industrialized and urbanized river basins from the NE of Spain (Llobregat and Besós). Measures of energy consumption (i.e. algal grazing), and of specific biochemical responses (biomarkers) were conducted on individuals transplanted upstream and downstream from effluent discharges of sewage treatment plants. In both rivers there was a clear deterioration of the ecological water quality parameters and benthic communities towards downstream reaches. In all but one of the 19 locations studied, transplanted organisms were affected in at least one of the five measured responses. In three of them, significant effects were detected in most of the traits considered. Principal Component and Partial Least Square Projections to Latent Structures regression analyses indicated that the measured responses in D. magna in situ bioassays and those of macroinvertebrate assemblages were affected by distinct environmental factors. From up to 20 environmental variables considered, seven of them including habitat degradation, suspended solids, nitrogenous and conductivity related parameters affected macroinvertebrate assemblages. On the other hand, levels of organophosphorus compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were high enough to trigger the responses of D. magna in situ bioassays. These results emphasize the importance of combining biological indices with biomarkers and more generalized and ecologically relevant (grazing) in situ responses to identify ecological effects of effluent discharges from sewage treatment plants in surface waters.

  7. Biomarkers for Heart Failure in Asia.

    PubMed

    Richards, Arthur Mark

    2015-10-01

    Contributions from the Asian biomedical community to knowledge of biomarkers in heart failure have grown rapidly since 2000. Japan has made world-leading contributions in the discovery and application of cardiac natriuretic peptides as biomarkers in heart failure, but there has been rapid growth in reports from China. Contributions also come from Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore, and Hong Kong. Centers in Asia have established clinical cohorts providing powerful platforms for the discovery and validation of biomarkers in heart failure. This century, Asian enquiry into biomarkers in heart failure will include peptides, cytokines, metabolites, nucleic acids, and other analytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Biomarkers of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Rachel, Wojciech; Grela, Agatha; Zyss, Tomasz; Zieba, Andrzej; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the most abundant age-related psychiatric disorders. The outcome of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease has both individual (the patients and their families) and socio-economic effects. The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease doubles after the age of 65 years, every 4.5 years. An etiologically heterogenic group of disorders related to aging as well as genetic and environmental interactions probably underlie the impairment in Alzheimer's disease. Those factors cause the degeneration of brain tissue which leads to significant cognitive dysfunction. There are two main hypotheses that are linked to the process of neurodegeneration: (i) amyloid cascade and (ii) the role of secretases and dysfunction of mitochondria. From the therapeutic standpoint it is crucial to get an early diagnosis and start with an adequate treatment. The undeniable progress in the field of biomarker research should lead to a better understanding of the early stages of the disorder. So far, the best recognised and described biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease, which can be detected in both cerebrospinal fluid and blood, are: beta-amyloid, tau-protein and phosphorylated tau-protein (phospho-tau). The article discusses the usefulness of the known biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease in early diagnosis.

  9. Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Amy, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch focuses on communities. Ethnic groups, religious groups, schools, families, even the Internet, are used as examples of communities in Iowa. Forced communities are exemplified by migration, law, natural disasters, and sometimes education. Photographs from Iowa's past show the changing nature of communities and encourage…

  10. Impacts of organic and inorganic fertilizers on nitrification in a cold climate soil are linked to the bacterial ammonia oxidizer community.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fenliang; Yang, Qianbao; Li, Zhaojun; Wei, Dan; Cui, Xi'an; Liang, Yongchao

    2011-11-01

    The microbiology underpinning soil nitrogen cycling in northeast China remains poorly understood. These agricultural systems are typified by widely contrasting temperature, ranging from -40 to 38°C. In a long-term site in this region, the impacts of mineral and organic fertilizer amendments on potential nitrification rate (PNR) were determined. PNR was found to be suppressed by long-term mineral fertilizer treatment but enhanced by manure treatment. The abundance and structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial (AOB) and archaeal (AOA) communities were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis techniques. The abundance of AOA was reduced by all fertilizer treatments, while the opposite response was measured for AOB, leading to a six- to 60-fold reduction in AOA/AOB ratio. The community structure of AOA exhibited little variation across fertilization treatments, whereas the structure of the AOB community was highly responsive. PNR was correlated with community structure of AOB rather than that of AOA. Variation in the community structure of AOB was linked to soil pH, total carbon, and nitrogen contents induced by different long-term fertilization regimes. The results suggest that manure amendment establishes conditions which select for an AOB community type which recovers mineral fertilizer-suppressed soil nitrification.

  11. Links in a Professional Development Chain: Preservice and Inservice Education for Effective Programs of School, Family, and Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Joyce L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes lessons learned from studies of preservice education and inservice programs of family and community involvement. The research and interventions suggest that a chain of professional development events is needed to prepare educators to conduct and sustain effective programs of school, family, and community partnerships. This…

  12. Improving community development by linking agriculture, nutrition and education: design of a randomised trial of "home-grown" school feeding in Mali.

    PubMed

    Masset, Edoardo; Gelli, Aulo

    2013-02-21

    Providing food through schools has well documented effects in terms of the education, health and nutrition of school children. However, there is limited evidence in terms of the benefits of providing a reliable market for small-holder farmers through "home-grown" school feeding approaches. This study aims to evaluate the impact of school feeding programmes sourced from small-holder farmers on small-holder food security, as well as on school children's education, health and nutrition in Mali. In addition, this study will examine the links between social accountability and programme performance. This is a field experiment planned around the scale-up of the national school feeding programme, involving 116 primary schools in 58 communities in food insecure areas of Mali. The randomly assigned interventions are: 1) a school feeding programme group, including schools and villages where the standard government programme is implemented; 2) a "home-grown" school feeding and social accountability group, including schools and villages where the programme is implemented in addition to training of community based organisations and local government; and 3) the control group, including schools and household from villages where the intervention will be delayed by at least two years, preferably without informing schools and households. Primary outcomes include small-holder farmer income, school participation and learning, and community involvement in the programme. Other outcomes include nutritional status and diet-diversity. The evaluation will follow a mixed method approach, including household, school and village level surveys as well as focus group discussions with small-holder farmers, school children, parents and community members. The impact evaluation will be incorporated within the national monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system strengthening activities that are currently underway in Mali. Baselines surveys are planned for 2012. A monthly process monitoring visits, spot

  13. Improving community development by linking agriculture, nutrition and education: design of a randomised trial of “home-grown” school feeding in Mali

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Providing food through schools has well documented effects in terms of the education, health and nutrition of school children. However, there is limited evidence in terms of the benefits of providing a reliable market for small-holder farmers through “home-grown” school feeding approaches. This study aims to evaluate the impact of school feeding programmes sourced from small-holder farmers on small-holder food security, as well as on school children’s education, health and nutrition in Mali. In addition, this study will examine the links between social accountability and programme performance. Design This is a field experiment planned around the scale-up of the national school feeding programme, involving 116 primary schools in 58 communities in food insecure areas of Mali. The randomly assigned interventions are: 1) a school feeding programme group, including schools and villages where the standard government programme is implemented; 2) a “home-grown” school feeding and social accountability group, including schools and villages where the programme is implemented in addition to training of community based organisations and local government; and 3) the control group, including schools and household from villages where the intervention will be delayed by at least two years, preferably without informing schools and households. Primary outcomes include small-holder farmer income, school participation and learning, and community involvement in the programme. Other outcomes include nutritional status and diet-diversity. The evaluation will follow a mixed method approach, including household, school and village level surveys as well as focus group discussions with small-holder farmers, school children, parents and community members. The impact evaluation will be incorporated within the national monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system strengthening activities that are currently underway in Mali. Baselines surveys are planned for 2012. A monthly

  14. How perceptions of community environment influence health behaviours: using the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity Framework as a mechanism for exploration

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwendyk, L. M.; Belon, A. P.; Vallianatos, H.; Raine, K. D.; Schopflocher, D.; Spence, J. C.; Plotnikoff, R. C.; Nykiforuk, C. I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Overweight and obesity are influenced by a complex interplay of individual and environmental factors that affect physical activity and healthy eating. Nevertheless, little has been reported on people’s perceptions of those factors. Addressing this critical gap and community partner needs, this study explored how people perceived the influence of micro- and macroenvironmental factors on physical activity and healthy eating. Methods: Community partners wanted the study results in a format that would be readily and easily used by local decision makers. We used photovoice to engage 35 community members across four municipalities in Alberta, Canada, and to share their narratives about their physical activity and healthy eating. A combination of inductive and deductive analysis categorized data by environmental level (micro vs. macro) and type (physical, political, economic, and sociocultural), guided by the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity Framework. Results: Participants conceptualized health-influencing factors more broadly than physical activity and healthy eating to include “community social health.” Participants spoke most often about the influence of the microenvironment (n = 792 ANGELO Framework coding tallies) on their physical activity, healthy eating and community social health in comparison to the macroenvironment (n = 93). Photovoice results provided a visual narrative to community partners and decision makers about how people’s ability to make healthy choices can be limited by macroenvironmental forces beyond their control. Conclusion: Focussing future research on macro- and microenvironmental influences and localized community social health can inform practice by providing strategies on how to implement healthy changes within communities, while ensuring that research and interventions echo diverse people’s perceptions. PMID:27670920

  15. Beyond Streptococcus mutans: Dental Caries Onset Linked to Multiple Species by 16S rRNA Community Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Erin L.; Beall, Clifford J.; Kutsch, Stacey R.; Firestone, Noah D.; Leys, Eugene J.; Griffen, Ann L.

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries in very young children may be severe, result in serious infection, and require general anesthesia for treatment. Dental caries results from a shift within the biofilm community specific to the tooth surface, and acidogenic species are responsible for caries. Streptococcus mutans, the most common acid producer in caries, is not always present and occurs as part of a complex microbial community. Understanding the degree to which multiple acidogenic species provide functional redundancy and resilience to caries-associated communities will be important for developing biologic interventions. In addition, microbial community interactions in health and caries pathogenesis are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate bacterial community profiles associated with the onset of caries in the primary dentition. In a combination cross-sectional and longitudinal design, bacterial community profiles at progressive stages of caries and over time were examined and compared to those of health. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used for bacterial community analysis. Streptococcus mutans was the dominant species in many, but not all, subjects with caries. Elevated levels of S. salivarius, S. sobrinus, and S. parasanguinis were also associated with caries, especially in subjects with no or low levels of S. mutans, suggesting these species are alternative pathogens, and that multiple species may need to be targeted for interventions. Veillonella, which metabolizes lactate, was associated with caries and was highly correlated with total acid producing species. Among children without previous history of caries, Veillonella, but not S. mutans or other acid-producing species, predicted future caries. Bacterial community diversity was reduced in caries as compared to health, as many species appeared to occur at lower levels or be lost as caries advanced, including the Streptococcus mitis group, Neisseria, and Streptococcus sanguinis. This may have

  16. Beyond Streptococcus mutans: dental caries onset linked to multiple species by 16S rRNA community analysis.

    PubMed

    Gross, Erin L; Beall, Clifford J; Kutsch, Stacey R; Firestone, Noah D; Leys, Eugene J; Griffen, Ann L

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries in very young children may be severe, result in serious infection, and require general anesthesia for treatment. Dental caries results from a shift within the biofilm community specific to the tooth surface, and acidogenic species are responsible for caries. Streptococcus mutans, the most common acid producer in caries, is not always present and occurs as part of a complex microbial community. Understanding the degree to which multiple acidogenic species provide functional redundancy and resilience to caries-associated communities will be important for developing biologic interventions. In addition, microbial community interactions in health and caries pathogenesis are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate bacterial community profiles associated with the onset of caries in the primary dentition. In a combination cross-sectional and longitudinal design, bacterial community profiles at progressive stages of caries and over time were examined and compared to those of health. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used for bacterial community analysis. Streptococcus mutans was the dominant species in many, but not all, subjects with caries. Elevated levels of S. salivarius, S. sobrinus, and S. parasanguinis were also associated with caries, especially in subjects with no or low levels of S. mutans, suggesting these species are alternative pathogens, and that multiple species may need to be targeted for interventions. Veillonella, which metabolizes lactate, was associated with caries and was highly correlated with total acid producing species. Among children without previous history of caries, Veillonella, but not S. mutans or other acid-producing species, predicted future caries. Bacterial community diversity was reduced in caries as compared to health, as many species appeared to occur at lower levels or be lost as caries advanced, including the Streptococcus mitis group, Neisseria, and Streptococcus sanguinis. This may have

  17. Links between soil microbial communities and plant traits in a species-rich grassland under long-term climate change.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Emma J; Oliver, Anna E; Fridley, Jason D; Askew, Andrew P; Mills, Robert T E; Grime, J Philip

    2017-02-01

    Climate change can influence soil microorganisms directly by altering their growth and activity but also indirectly via effects on the vegetation, which modifies the availability of resources. Direct impacts of climate change on soil microorganisms can occur rapidly, whereas indirect effects mediated by shifts in plant community composition are not immediately apparent and likely to increase over time. We used molecular fingerprinting of bacterial and fungal communities in the soil to investigate the effects of 17 years of temperature and rainfall manipulations in a species-rich grassland near Buxton, UK. We compared shifts in microbial community structure to changes in plant species composition and key plant traits across 78 microsites within plots subjected to winter heating, rainfall supplementation, or summer drought. We observed marked shifts in soil fungal and bacterial community structure in response to chronic summer drought. Importantly, although dominant microbial taxa were largely unaffected by drought, there were substantial changes in the abundances of subordinate fungal and bacterial taxa. In contrast to short-term studies that report high resistance of soil fungi to drought, we observed substantial losses of fungal taxa in the summer drought treatments. There was moderate concordance between soil microbial communities and plant species composition within microsites. Vector fitting of community-weighted mean plant traits to ordinations of soil bacterial and fungal communities showed that shifts in soil microbial community structure were related to plant traits representing the quality of resources available to soil microorganisms: the construction cost of leaf material, foliar carbon-to-nitrogen ratios, and leaf dry matter content. Thus, our study provides evidence that climate change could affect soil microbial communities indirectly via changes in plant inputs and highlights the importance of considering long-term climate change effects, especially

  18. Achieving Synergy: Linking an Internet-Based Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort to a Community-Based Inception Cohort and Multicentered Cohort in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Molly; Cook, Suzanne Follan; Bright, Renee; Mallette, Meaghan; Moniz, Heather; Shah, Samir A; LeLeiko, Neal S; Shapiro, Jason; Sands, Bruce E; Chen, Wenli; Jaeger, Elizabeth; Galanko, Joseph; Long, Millie D; Martin, Christopher F; Sandler, Robert S; Kappelman, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    doctoral degrees, P=.01). In the SHARE cohort, 436 participants enrolled and linked to the Partners cohort. More women (60% vs 50%) linked and those who linked were predominantly white (96%; P<.01). Crohn’s disease patients who linked had lower mean scores on the Harvey-Bradshaw Index (3.6 vs 4.4, P<.01). Ulcerative colitis patients who linked had less extensive disease than those who did not link (45% vs 60%, P<.01). Conclusions Linkage of CCFA Partners with cohorts such as OSCCAR and SHARE may be a cost-effective way to expand the infrastructure for clinical outcomes and translational research. Although linkage is feasible from a technical, legal, and regulatory perspective, participant willingness appears to be a limiting factor. Overcoming this barrier will be needed to generate meaningful sample sizes to conduct studies of biomarkers, natural history, and clinical effectiveness using linked data. PMID:27261008

  19. Final Report for Award #0006731. Modeling, Patterning and Evolving Syntrophic Communities that Link Fermentation to Metal Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, Christopher J.

    2015-07-17

    This project has developed and combined mathematical models, multi-species consortia, and spatially structured environments as an approach for studying metabolic exchange in communities like the ones between fermenters and metal reducers. We have developed novel, broadly-applicable tools for following community dynamics, come to a better understanding of both sugar and lactate-utilization in S. oneidensis, the interactions between carbon and mineral availability, and have a methodology for cell printing to match with spatiotemporal models of consortia metabolism.

  20. Parasites of flounder (Platichthys flesus L.) from the German Bight, North Sea, and their potential use in biological effects monitoring. C. Pollution effects on the parasite community and a comparison to biomarker responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, V.; Zander, S.; Körting, W.; Broeg, K.; von Westernhagen, H.; Dizer, H.; Hansen, P. D.; Skouras, A.; Steinhagen, D.

    2003-10-01

    In the frame of an integrated biological effect monitoring programme, the parasite community of flounder (Platichthys flesus) was investigated at different locations in the German Bight from 1995 to 2000. In order to assess the impact of environmental contamination caused by anthropogenic activities on the parasite community, selected parasitological parameters that displayed significant differences between the sampling sites were subjected to correlation analyses with site-specific contamination and individual pollution loads of their fish hosts. In addition, correlation analyses were conducted with the responses of selected genetic, biochemical, histopathological, physiological and immunological parameters of fish, used as potential biomarkers. In total, 802 flounder were analysed for these parameters. Information on the chemical background at the sampling sites was derived from sediment samples and from 120 samples of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) tissue, collected at each of the sampling sites. Based on chemical data available from the sediment and blue mussel samples, a pollution gradient could be established between the sampling sites for individual contaminants. The relative abundance of Acanthochondria cornuta, Cucullanus heterochrous and Zoogonoides viviparus, and the community measures species richness and number of heteroxenous species decreased with increasing concentrations of individual heavy metals or hydrocarbons in sediment and blue mussel samples. Most of the parasitological parameters significantly reflected the established site-specific contamination gradient, when data were pooled over all sampling campaigns. Significant correlations were also found with the contamination level of individual flounder. The parasitological parameters included the parasite species Lepeophtheirus pectoralis and Lernaeocera branchialis, which were not correlated to site-specific contamination. Several biomarkers were significantly correlated to the abundance of

  1. Biomarkers in Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Marty T; Singh, Jasvinder A

    2011-01-01

    We performed a systematic review of all MEDLINE-published studies of biomarkers in arthroplasty. Thirty studies met the inclusion criteria; majority evaluated biomarkers for osteolysis, aseptic prosthetic loosening, and prosthetic infections. Four studies reported an elevated Cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen (urine or serum) in patients with osteolysis or aseptic prosthetic loosening when compared to appropriate controls. Two or more studies each found elevated C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and interleukin-6 in patients with infected prosthetic joints compared to controls. Most other biomarkers were either examined by single studies or had inconsistent or insignificant associations with outcomes. We conclude that the majority of the biomarkers currently lack the evidence to be considered as biomarkers for arthroplasty outcomes. Further studies are needed. PMID:21584201

  2. Validation of onchocerciasis biomarker N-acetyltyramine-O-glucuronide (NATOG).

    PubMed

    Globisch, Daniel; Eubanks, Lisa M; Shirey, Ryan J; Pfarr, Kenneth M; Wanji, Samuel; Debrah, Alexander Y; Hoerauf, Achim; Janda, Kim D

    2017-08-01

    The Neglected Tropical Disease onchocerciasis is a parasitic disease. Despite many control programmes by the World Health Organization (WHO), large communities in West and Central Africa are still affected. Besides logistic challenges during biannual mass drug administration, the lack of a robust, point-of-care diagnostic is limiting successful eradication of onchocerciasis. Towards the implementation of a non-invasive and point-of-care diagnostic, we have recently reported the discovery of the biomarker N-acetyltyramine-O-glucuronide (NATOG) in human urine samples using a metabolomics-mining approach. NATOG's biomarker value was enhanced during an investigation in a rodent model. Herein, we further detail the specificity of NATOG in active onchocerciasis infections as well as the co-infecting parasites Loa loa and Mansonella perstans. Our results measured by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) reveal elevated NATOG values in mono- and co-infection samples only in the presence of the nematode Onchocerca volvulus. Metabolic pathway investigation of l-tyrosine/tyramine in all investigated nematodes uncovered an important link between the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia and O. volvulus for the biosynthesis of NATOG. Based on these extended studies, we suggest NATOG as a biomarker for tracking active onchocerciasis infections and provide a threshold concentration value of NATOG for future diagnostic tool development. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. A generic operational strategy to qualify translational safety biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Matheis, Katja; Laurie, David; Andriamandroso, Christiane; Arber, Nadir; Badimon, Lina; Benain, Xavier; Bendjama, Kaïdre; Clavier, Isabelle; Colman, Peter; Firat, Hüseyin; Goepfert, Jens; Hall, Steve; Joos, Thomas; Kraus, Sarah; Kretschmer, Axel; Merz, Michael; Padro, Teresa; Planatscher, Hannes; Rossi, Annamaria; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Schuppe-Koistinen, Ina; Thomann, Peter; Vidal, Jean-Marc; Molac, Béatrice

    2011-07-01

    The importance of using translational safety biomarkers that can predict, detect and monitor drug-induced toxicity during human trials is becoming increasingly recognized. However, suitable processes to qualify biomarkers in clinical studies have not yet been established. There is a need to define clear scientific guidelines to link biomarkers to clinical processes and clinical endpoints. To help define the operational approach for the qualification of safety biomarkers the IMI SAFE-T consortium has established a generic qualification strategy for new translational safety biomarkers that will allow early identification, assessment and management of drug-induced injuries throughout R&D.

  4. Modeling water, ecosystems, economics and culture in traditional acequia irrigation communities of New Mexico and their linked watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernald, A.; Tidwell, V. C.; Rivera, J.; Rodriguez, S.; Guldan, S.; Steele, C. M.; Ochoa, C. G.; Hurd, B. H.; Ortiz, M.; Boykin, K.; Cibils, A.

    2012-12-01

    Water scarcity, land use conversion, and cultural and ecosystem changes threaten the way of life for traditional irrigation communities of the semi-arid southwestern United States. Nowhere are traditions as strong or potential upheaval as great as in these communities that rely on acequia irrigation systems. Acequias are ancient ditch systems brought from the Iberian Peninsula to the New World over 400 years ago; they are simultaneously gravity flow water delivery systems and shared water governance institutions. Acequias have survived periods of drought and external shocks from changing economics, demographics, and resource uses. Now, climate change and urbanization threaten water availability, ecosystem functions, and the acequia communities themselves. To explore this issue we translated disciplinary understanding into a uniform format of causal loop diagrams to conceptualize the subsystems of the entire acequia-based human-natural system. Four subsystems are identified in this study: hydrology, ecology, land use/economics, and sociocultural. Important linkages between subsystems were revealed as well as variables indicating community cohesion (e.g., total irrigated land, intensity of upland grazing, mutualism). These results will be tested with field data and modeling exercises to capture tipping points for non-sustainability and thresholds for sustainable water use and community longevity.

  5. Linking optimal foraging behavior to bird community structure in an urban-desert landscape: field experiments with artificial food patches.

    PubMed

    Shochat, Eyal; Lerman, Susannah B; Katti, Madhusudan; Lewis, David B

    2004-08-01

    Urban bird communities exhibit high population densities and low species diversity, yet mechanisms behind these patterns remain largely untested. We present results from experimental studies of behavioral mechanisms underlying these patterns and provide a test of foraging theory applied to urban bird communities. We measured foraging decisions at artificial food patches to assess how urban habitats differ from wildlands in predation risk, missed-opportunity cost, competition, and metabolic cost. By manipulating seed trays, we compared leftover seed (giving-up density) in urban and desert habitats in Arizona. Deserts exhibited higher predation risk than urban habitats. Only desert birds quit patches earlier when increasing the missed-opportunity cost. House finches and house sparrows coexist by trading off travel cost against foraging efficiency. In exclusion experiments, urban doves were more efficient foragers than passerines. Providing water decreased digestive costs only in the desert. At the population level, reduced predation and higher resource abundance drive the increased densities in cities. At the community level, the decline in diversity may involve exclusion of native species by highly efficient urban specialists. Competitive interactions play significant roles in structuring urban bird communities. Our results indicate the importance and potential of mechanistic approaches for future urban bird community studies.

  6. Linking Microbial Community, Environmental Variables, and Methanogenesis in Anaerobic Biogas Digesters of Chemically Enhanced Primary Treatment Sludge.

    PubMed

    Ju, Feng; Lau, Frankie; Zhang, Tong

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the influences of biotic and abiotic factors on microbial community structure and methanogenesis are important for its engineering and ecological significance. In this study, four biogas digesters were supplied with the same inoculum and feeding sludge but operated at different sludge retention time (7 to 16 days) and organic loading rates for 90 days to determine the relative influence of biotic and environmental factors on the microbial community assembly and methanogenic performance. Despite different operational parameters, all digester communities were dominated by Bacteroidales, Clostridiales, and Thermotogales and followed the same trend of population dynamics over time. Network and multivariate analyses suggest that deterministic factors, including microbial competition (involving Bacteroidales spp.), niche differentiation (e.g., within Clostridiales spp.), and periodic microbial immigration (from feed sludge), are the key drivers of microbial community assembly and dynamics. A yet-to-be-cultured phylotype of Bacteroidales (GenBank ID: GU389558.1 ) is implicated as a strong competitor for carbohydrates. Moreover, biogas-producing rate and methane content were significantly related with the abundances of functional populations rather than any operational or physicochemical parameter, revealing microbiological mediation of methanogenesis. Combined, this study enriches our understandings of biological and environmental drivers of microbial community assembly and performance in anaerobic digesters.

  7. Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Kit, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Art in context of community is the theme of this newsletter. The theme is introduced in an editorial "Community-Enlarging the Definition" (Kit Grauer). Related articles include: (1) "The Children's Bridge is not Destroyed: Heart in the Middle of the World" (Emil Robert Tanay); (2) "Making Bridges: The Sock Doll…

  8. Biomarkers and surrogate end points for fit-for-purpose development and regulatory evaluation of new drugs.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J A; Williams, S A; Webster, C J

    2007-01-01

    A consistent framework for the acceptance and qualification of biomarkers for regulatory use is needed to facilitate innovative and efficient research and subsequent application of biomarkers in drug development. One key activity is biomarker qualification, a graded, "fit-for-purpose" evidentiary process linking a biomarker with biology and clinical end points. A biomarker consortium model will distribute cost and risk, and drive efficient execution of research and ultimately regulatory acceptance of biomarkers for specific indications.

  9. Linking microbial community structure and function to seasonal differences in soil moisture and temperature in a Chihuahuan desert grassland.

    PubMed

    Bell, Colin W; Acosta-Martinez, Veronica; McIntyre, Nancy E; Cox, Stephen; Tissue, David T; Zak, John C

    2009-11-01

    Global and regional climate models predict higher air temperature and less frequent, but larger precipitation events in arid regions within the next century. While many studies have addressed the impact of variable climate in arid ecosystems on plant growth and physiological responses, fewer studies have addressed soil microbial community responses to seasonal shifts in precipitation and temperature in arid ecosystems. This study examined the impact of a wet (2004), average (2005), and dry (2006) year on subsequent responses of soil microbial community structure, function, and linkages, as well as soil edaphic and nutrient characteristics in a mid-elevation desert grassland in the Chihuahuan Desert. Microbial community structure was classified as bacterial (Gram-negative, Gram-positive, and actinomycetes) and fungal (saprophytic fungi and arbuscular mycorrhiza) categories using (fatty acid methyl ester) techniques. Carbon substrate use and enzymic activity was used to characterize microbial community function annually and seasonally (summer and winter). The relationship between saprophytic fungal community structure and function remained consistent across season independent of the magnitude or frequency of precipitation within any given year. Carbon utilization by fungi in the cooler winter exceeded use in the warmer summer each year suggesting that soil temperature, rather than soil moisture, strongly influenced fungal carbon use and structure and function dynamics. The structure/function relationship for AM fungi and soil bacteria notably changed across season. Moreover, the abundance of Gram-positive bacteria was lower in the winter compared to Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterial carbon use, however, was highest in the summer and lower during the winter. Enzyme activities did not respond to either annual or seasonal differences in the magnitude or timing of precipitation. Specific structural components of the soil microbiota community became uncoupled from total

  10. Linking phytoplankton community size composition with temperature, plankton food web structure and sea-air CO 2 flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Richardson, Katherine; Bendtsen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Lise-Lotte; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Lyngsgaard, Maren Moltke

    2011-08-01

    Data collected at open water stations (depth>400 m) in all major ocean basins in 2006-2008 are used to examine the relationship between the size structure of the phytoplankton community (determined by size fractionated chlorophyll filtration), temperature and inorganic nutrient availability. A significant relationship ( p<0.0005) was found between community size structure and temperature, with the importance of large cells in the community decreasing with increase in temperature. Although weaker than the temperature relationship, significant relationships were also noted between community cell size and DIN (nitrate, nitrite and ammonium: p=0.034) and phosphate ( p=0.031) concentrations. When the data were divided into two groups of equal size, representing the samples with the highest and lowest DIN/phosphate concentrations, respectively, no difference could be identified between the slopes of the lines representing the relationship between size structure and temperature. There was, however, a difference in the intercepts between the two groups. If the relationship between size and temperature was only a response to nutrient availability, we would expect that the response would be the strongest in the groups with the lowest nutrient concentrations. These results suggest that, in addition to a nutrient effect, temperature may also directly influence the size structure of phytoplankton communities. The size structure of the phytoplankton community in this study correlated to the magnitude of primary production, export production (determined after Laws et al., 2000) and integrated water column chlorophyll. Significant relationships were also found between mesozooplankton production (determined using the proxy of calanoid+cyclopoid nauplii abundance as a percentage of the total number of these copepods) and both temperature and phytoplankton size, with production being the lowest in the warmest waters where phytoplankton were the smallest. In the North Atlantic, export

  11. Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) families dealing with dementia: an examination of the experiences and perceptions of multicultural community link workers.

    PubMed

    Boughtwood, Desiree; Shanley, Chris; Adams, Jon; Santalucia, Yvonne; Kyriazopoulos, Helena; Pond, Dimity; Rowland, Jeffery

    2011-12-01

    Dementia is a chronic illness involving increasing levels of care, often provided by family members, particularly in culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. Multicultural community link workers are often the primary service providers assisting families to access health and welfare services and as such have extensive experience of, and possess in-depth knowledge about, CALD family care-giving for dementia. While research has been undertaken on dementia in CALD communities, this research has not focused on the experiences and perceptions of these multicultural workers with regards to CALD family care-giving. In response to this gap in the research, this paper presents the results of an empirical investigation of multicultural workers' perspectives with regard to the cultural traditions informing CALD family care-giving, CALD families' understandings of the term 'carer' and family arrangements regarding care. Due to their close relationship and knowledge of families, multicultural workers can offer an important perspective that is invaluable in informing the provision of carer education and support within CALD communities.

  12. What can funders do to better link science with decisions? Case studies of coastal communities and climate change.

    PubMed

    Matso, Kalle E; Becker, Mimi L

    2014-12-01

    Many reports and studies have noted that a significant portion of problem-oriented coastal science does not actually link to decisions. Here, three competitively funded project case studies are studied to determine what funders can and should do to better link science with decisions. The qualitative analysis used for this study indicates that the studied program was seen as being unusually attentive to the issue of linking science to decisions, as opposed to simply generating new knowledge. Nevertheless, much of the data indicate that funders can and should do more. Three ideas figured most prominently in the qualitative data: (1) funders should do more to ensure that the problem itself is defined more thoroughly with people who are envisioned as potential users of the science; (2) funders need to allocate more resources and attention to communicating effectively (with users) throughout the project; and (3) funders need to demand more engagement of users throughout the project. These findings have important implications for how funders review and support science, especially when competitive processes are used. Most importantly, funders should adjust what kind of science they ask for. Secondly, funders need to change who is involved in the review process. Currently, review processes focus on knowledge generation, which means that the reviewers themselves have expertise in that area. Instead, review panels should be balanced between those who focus on knowledge generation and those who focus on linking knowledge to decisions; this is a separate but critical discipline currently left out of the review process.

  13. What Can Funders Do to Better Link Science with Decisions? Case Studies of Coastal Communities and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matso, Kalle E.; Becker, Mimi L.

    2014-12-01

    Many reports and studies have noted that a significant portion of problem-oriented coastal science does not actually link to decisions. Here, three competitively funded project case studies are studied to determine what funders can and should do to better link science with decisions. The qualitative analysis used for this study indicates that the studied program was seen as being unusually attentive to the issue of linking science to decisions, as opposed to simply generating new knowledge. Nevertheless, much of the data indicate that funders can and should do more. Three ideas figured most prominently in the qualitative data: (1) funders should do more to ensure that the problem itself is defined more thoroughly with people who are envisioned as potential users of the science; (2) funders need to allocate more resources and attention to communicating effectively (with users) throughout the project; and (3) funders need to demand more engagement of users throughout the project. These findings have important implications for how funders review and support science, especially when competitive processes are used. Most importantly, funders should adjust what kind of science they ask for. Secondly, funders need to change who is involved in the review process. Currently, review processes focus on knowledge generation, which means that the reviewers themselves have expertise in that area. Instead, review panels should be balanced between those who focus on knowledge generation and those who focus on linking knowledge to decisions; this is a separate but critical discipline currently left out of the review process.

  14. SIMULATION COASTAL PLAIN STREAM FISH COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO NONPOINT SOURCE POLLUTION USING LINKED HYDROLOGIC-ECOLOGICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonpoint source pollution is the primary stress in many streams. Characteristic declines in stream fish communities are recognized in streams influenced by nonpoint source pollution, but the processes by which these declines occur are not well understood. Here, predicted time s...

  15. Making Connections: Linking Generalist and Specialist Essentials in Baccalaureate Community/Public Health Nursing Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Carter, Kimberly Ferren; O'Hare, Patricia A.; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the work of a task force to revise public health nursing curriculum that combined the expertise of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and specialty organizations. Discusses the current state of community/public health nursing and the model used to identify core professional knowledge and values underpinning the curriculum.…

  16. Planning in the 90's for Community Colleges: Coping with Rapid Change by Linking Futures Research with Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Diana K.

    The rate of the change now occurring outside of community colleges has made long-range planning an especially difficult task. Futures research, which attempts to forecast future scenarios by studying societal, economic, and demographic trends, can be used effectively to facilitate the institutional planning process by anticipating both internal…

  17. SIMULATION COASTAL PLAIN STREAM FISH COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO NONPOINT SOURCE POLLUTION USING LINKED HYDROLOGIC-ECOLOGICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonpoint source pollution is the primary stress in many streams. Characteristic declines in stream fish communities are recognized in streams influenced by nonpoint source pollution, but the processes by which these declines occur are not well understood. Here, predicted time s...

  18. A Working Partnership for 1993: Linking Community Colleges and Business. Conference Summary.(Sacramento, California, May 13, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1983

    Summaries are provided of the presentations, discussions, and major conclusions of a conference convened in May 1983 to develop mechanisms for improving the linkages between industry and community colleges in California. Introductory material offers an overview of the conference's goals, employment training in California, and the role of the…

  19. Making Connections: Linking Generalist and Specialist Essentials in Baccalaureate Community/Public Health Nursing Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Carter, Kimberly Ferren; O'Hare, Patricia A.; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the work of a task force to revise public health nursing curriculum that combined the expertise of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and specialty organizations. Discusses the current state of community/public health nursing and the model used to identify core professional knowledge and values underpinning the curriculum.…

  20. A Working Partnership for 1993: Linking Community Colleges and Business. Conference Summary.(Sacramento, California, May 13, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1983

    Summaries are provided of the presentations, discussions, and major conclusions of a conference convened in May 1983 to develop mechanisms for improving the linkages between industry and community colleges in California. Introductory material offers an overview of the conference's goals, employment training in California, and the role of the…

  1. Milk fat biomarkers and cardiometabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    Risérus, Ulf; Marklund, Matti

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Dairy is a major food group with potential impact on cardiometabolic health. Self-reported dairy intake has limitations that can partly be avoided by using biomarkers. This review aims to summarize the evidence of odd-chain saturated fatty acids (OCFAs), that is, pentadecanoic acid (C15 : 0) and heptadecanoic acid (17 : 0), as biomarkers of dairy fat intake. In addition, the associations of OCFA biomarkers with cardiometabolic disease will be overviewed. Recent findings Adipose tissue 15 : 0 is the preferred biomarker but also circulating 15 : 0, and to a weaker extent 17 : 0, reflects both habitual and changes in dairy intake. Whereas results from studies assessing cardiovascular outcomes are inconsistent, OCFA biomarkers are overall associated with lower diabetes risk. Residual confounding should however be considered until interventional data and mechanisms are available. Although OCFA biomarkers mainly reflect dairy fat intake, recently proposed endogenous synthesis and metabolism do motivate further research. Summary Taking into account the study population diet and limitations of OCFA biomarkers, both adipose and circulating levels of 15 : 0, in particular, are useful for estimating total dairy fat intake. OCFA biomarkers are overall not linked to cardiovascular disease risk, but a possible beneficial role of dairy foods in diabetes prevention warrant further study. PMID:27906713

  2. Linking community-based blood pressure measurement to clinical care: a randomized controlled trial of outreach and tracking by community health workers.

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, J; Collier, C; Song, L; Martin, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the effectiveness of enhanced tracking and follow-up services provided by community health workers in promoting medical follow-up of persons whose elevated blood pressures were detected during blood pressure measurement at urban community sites. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial, 421 participants received either enhanced or usual referrals to care. Participants were 18 years or older, were either Black or White, and had blood pressure greater than or equal to 140/90 mm Hg and income equal to or less than 200% of poverty. The primary outcome measure was completion of a medical follow-up visit within 90 days of referral. RESULTS: The enhanced intervention increased follow-up by 39.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14%, 71%; P = .001) relative to usual care. Follow-up visits were completed by 65.1% of participants in the intervention group, compared with 46.7% of those in the usual-care group. The number needed to treat was 5 clients (95% CI = 3, 13) per additional follow-up visit realized. CONCLUSIONS: Enhanced tracking and outreach increased the proportion of persons with elevated blood pressure detected during community measurement who followed up with medical care. PMID:10358675

  3. Linking macrobenthic communities structure and zonation patterns on sandy shores: Mapping tool toward management and conservation perspectives in Northern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolet, Céline; Spilmont, Nicolas; Dewarumez, Jean-Marie; Luczak, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    In a context of intensifying anthropogenic pressures on sandy shores, the mapping of benthic habitat appears as an essential first step and a fundamental baseline for marine spatial planning, ecosystem-based management and conservation efforts of soft-sediment intertidal areas. Mapping allows representing intertidal habitats that are basically characterised by abiotic (e.g sediments, exposure to waves…) and biotic factors such as macrobenthic communities. Macrobenthic communities are known to show zonation patterns across sandy beaches and many studies highlighted the existence of three biological zones. We tested this general model of a tripartite biological division of the shore at a geographical scale of policy, conservation and management decisions (i.e. Northern France coastline), using multivariate analyses combined with the Direct Field Observation (DFO) method. From the upper to the lower shores, the majority of the beaches exhibited three macrobenthic communities confirming the existence of the tripartite biological division of the shore. Nevertheless, in some cases, two or four zones were found: (1) two zones when the drying zone located on the upper shore was replaced by littoral rock or engineering constructions and (2) four zones on beaches and estuaries where a muddy-sand community occurred from the drift line to the mid shore. The correspondence between this zonation pattern of macrobenthic communities and the EUNIS habitat classification was investigated and the results were mapped to provide a reference state of intertidal soft-sediment beaches and estuaries. Our results showed evidence of the applicability of this EUNIS typology for the beaches and estuaries at a regional scale (Northern France coastline) with a macroecological approach. In order to fulfil the requirements of the European Directives (WFD and MFSD), this mapping appears as a practical tool for any functional study on these coastal ecosystems, for the monitoring of anthropogenic

  4. Application of RNA Stable Isotope Probing (SIP) to Link Community Activity with Microorganisms Responsible for Autotrophy in the Subseafloor at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, J. A.; Fortunato, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The global ocean comprises the Earth's largest biome, with microorganisms playing a dominant biogeochemical role. However, the potential for production of new microbial biomass within the subseafloor is rarely considered in traditional oceanographic paradigms of carbon cycling or microbial food webs. In this study, we used RNA Stable Isotope Probing (RNA SIP) to determine the microbial community composition and genetic repertoire of active subseafloor autotrophs in warm venting fluids from Axial Seamount. RNA is a responsive biomarker because it is a reflection of cellular activity independent of replication, and RNA SIP thus provides access to both the function of a microbial community and the phylogeny of the organisms accountable for key functions. Diffuse fluids were incubated shipboard at 30°C, 55°C, and 80°C with 13DIC and H2. Metatranscriptomic sequencing of both the enriched and non-enriched RNA was carried out from 13C and 12C controls. In addition, filtered fluid samples were preserved in situ for comparative meta -transcriptomic and -genomic analyses. Diverse lineages of bacteria and archaea and accompanying metabolisms were detected in situ, but RNA SIP results show dominance of three different groups of autotrophs active under each experimental condition. At 30°C, members of the Sulfurimonas genus dominated, with genes for hydrogen oxidation, nitrate reduction, and carbon fixation via the rTCA cycle highly expressed. At 55°C, both Caminibacter and Nautilia transcripts were detected for rTCA cycle, hydrogen oxidation, and nitrate reduction. At 80°C, transcripts for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis mediated by members of Methanocaldococcus were detected. These results suggest the subseafloor hosts various anaerobic chemolithoautotrophs that span a wide temperature range, with hydrogen playing a key role in microbial metabolism. Complementary experiments are currently being carried out on the seafloor with a novel in situ incubator unit to provide

  5. Microbial community dynamics linked to enhanced substrate availability and biogas production of electrokinetically pre-treated waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Westerholm, Maria; Crauwels, Sam; Houtmeyers, Sofie; Meerbergen, Ken; Van Geel, Maarten; Lievens, Bart; Appels, Lise

    2016-10-01

    The restricted hydrolytic degradation rate of complex organic matter presents a considerable challenge in anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS). Within this context, application of pre-treatment of digester substrate has potential for improved waste management and enhanced biogas production. Anaerobic degradation of untreated or electrokinetically pre-treated WAS was performed in two pilot-scale digesters for 132days. WAS electrokinetically pre-treated with energy input 0.066kJ/kg sludge was used in a first phase of operation and WAS pre-treated with energy input 0.091kJ/kg sludge was used in a second phase (each phase lasted at least three hydraulic retention times). Substrate characteristics before and after pre-treatment and effects on biogas digester performance were comprehensively analysed. To gain insights into influences of altered substrate characteristics on microbial communities, the dynamics within the bacterial and archaeal communities in the two digesters were investigated using 16S rRNA gene sequencing (pyrosequencing) and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Specific primers targeting dominant operation taxonomic units (OTUs) and members of the candidate phylum Cloacimonetes were designed to further evaluate their abundance and dynamics in the digesters. Electrokinetic pre-treatment significantly improved chemical oxygen demand (COD) and carbohydrate solubility and increased biogas production by 10-11% compared with untreated sludge. Compositional similarity of the bacterial community during initial operation and diversification during later operation indicated gradual adaptation of the community to the higher solubility of organic material in the pre-treated substrate. Further analyses revealed positive correlations between gene abundance of dominant OTUs related to Clostridia and Cloacimonetes and increased substrate availability and biogas production. Among the methanogens, the genus Methanosaeta dominated in both digesters. Overall, the

  6. Critical tissue residue approach linking accumulated metals in aquatic insects to population and community-level effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Travis S.; Clements, William H.; Zuellig, Robert E.; Mitchell, Katharine A.; Church, Stan E.; Wanty, Richard B.; San Juan, Carma A.; Adams, Monique; Lamothe, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Whole body Zn concentrations in individuals (n = 825) from three aquatic insect taxa (mayflies Rhithrogena spp. and Drunella spp. and the caddisfly Arctopsyche grandis) were used to predict effects on populations and communities (n = 149 samples). Both mayflies accumulated significantly more Zn than the caddisfly. The presence/absence of Drunella spp. most reliably distinguished sites with low and high Zn concentrations; however, population densities of mayflies were more sensitive to