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Sample records for linking dwarf galaxies

  1. THE METALLICITY OF VOID DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kreckel, K.; Groves, B.; Croxall, K.; Pogge, R. W.; Van de Weygaert, R.

    2015-01-01

    The current ΛCDM cosmological model predicts that galaxy evolution proceeds more slowly in lower density environments, suggesting that voids are a prime location to search for relatively pristine galaxies that are representative of the building blocks of early massive galaxies. To test the assumption that void galaxies are more pristine, we compare the evolutionary properties of a sample of dwarf galaxies selected specifically to lie in voids with a sample of similar isolated dwarf galaxies in average density environments. We measure gas-phase oxygen abundances and gas fractions for eight dwarf galaxies (M{sub r} > –16.2), carefully selected to reside within the lowest density environments of seven voids, and apply the same calibrations to existing samples of isolated dwarf galaxies. We find no significant difference between these void dwarf galaxies and the isolated dwarf galaxies, suggesting that dwarf galaxy chemical evolution proceeds independent of the large-scale environment. While this sample is too small to draw strong conclusions, it suggests that external gas accretion is playing a limited role in the chemical evolution of these systems, and that this evolution is instead dominated mainly by the internal secular processes that are linking the simultaneous growth and enrichment of these galaxies.

  2. Tidal Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, P.-A.; Mirabel, I. F.; Brinks, E.

    The life and evolution of galaxies are dramatically affected by environmental effects. Interactions with the intergalactic medium and collisions with companions cause major perturbations in the morphology and contents of galaxies: in particular stars and gas clouds may be gravitationally pulled out from their parent galaxies during tidal encounters, forming rings, tails and bridges. This debris of collisions lies at the origin of a new generation of small galaxies, the so-called "tidal dwarf galaxies" (TDGs). The authors have carried out multi-wavelength observations of some 20 TDGs. These systems are made of two stellar components: young stars, formed from the recent collapse of expelled H I clouds, and an older stellar population, tidally pulled out from the disks of their interacting parent galaxies. In the observed TDGs, the current star formation episode is fuelled by a large reservoir of H I gas and is younger than 10 Myr.

  3. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  4. Seeing Baby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible/DSS Click on image for larger version Ultraviolet/GALEX Click on image for larger version Poster Version Click on image for larger version

    The unique ultraviolet vision of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer reveals, for the first time, dwarf galaxies forming out of nothing more than pristine gas likely leftover from the early universe. Dwarf galaxies are relatively small collections of stars that often orbit around larger galaxies like our Milky Way.

    The forming dwarf galaxies shine in the far ultraviolet spectrum, rendered as blue in the call-out on the right hand side of this image. Near ultraviolet light, also obtained by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, is displayed in green, and visible light from the blue part of the spectrum here is represented by red. The clumps (in circles) are distinctively blue, indicating they are primarily detected in far ultraviolet light.

    The faint blue overlay traces the outline of the Leo Ring, a huge cloud of hydrogen and helium that orbits around two massive galaxies in the constellation Leo (left panel). The cloud is thought likely to be a primordial object, an ancient remnant of material that has remained relatively unchanged since the very earliest days of the universe. Identified about 25 years ago by radio waves, the ring cannot be seen in visible light.

    Only a portion of the Leo Ring has been imaged in the ultraviolet, but this section contains the telltale ultraviolet signature of recent massive star formation within this ring of pristine gas. Astronomers have previously only seen dwarf galaxies form out of gas that has already been cycled through a galaxy and enriched with metals elements heavier than helium produced as stars evolve.

    The visible data come from the Digitized Sky Survey of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md. The

  5. Local Universe Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, Claude

    2015-08-01

    One of the outstanding problems in cosmology is addressing the "small-scale crisis" and understanding structure formation at the smallest scales. Standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmological simulations of Milky Way-size DM halos predict many more DM sub-halos than the number of dwarf galaxies observed. This is the so-called Missing Satellites Problem. The most popular interpretation of the Missing Satellites Problem is that the smallest dark matter halos in the universe are extremely inefficient at forming stars. The virialized extent of the Milky Way's halo should contain ~500 satellites, while only ˜100 satellites and dwarfs are observed in the whole Local Group. Despite the large amount of theoretical work and new optical observations, the discrepancy, even if reduced, still persists between observations and hierarchical models, regardless of the model parameters. It may be possible to find those isolated ultra-faint missing dwarf galaxies via their neutral gas component, which is one of the goals we are pursuing with the SKA precursor KAT-7 in South Africa, and soon with the SKA pathfinder MeerKAT.

  6. Magnetised winds in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Y.; Teyssier, R.

    2010-11-01

    Context. The generation and the amplification of magnetic fields in the current cosmological paradigm are still open questions. The standard theory is based on an early field generation by Biermann battery effects, possibly at the epoch of reionisation, followed by a long period of field amplification by galactic dynamos. The origin and the magnitude of the inter-galactic magnetic field is of primordial importance in this global picture, as it is considered to be the missing link between galactic magnetic fields and cluster magnetic fields on much larger scales. Aims: We are testing whether dwarf galaxies are good candidates to explain the enrichment of the Inter-Galactic Medium (IGM): after their discs form and trigger galactic dynamos, supernova feedback will launch strong winds, expelling magnetic field lines in the IGM. Methods: We have performed magneto-hydrodynamics simulations of an isolated dwarf galaxy, which forms self-consistently inside a cooling halo. Using the RAMSES code, we simulated for the first time the formation of a magnetised supernova-driven galactic outflow. This simulation is an important step towards a more realistic modelling using fully cosmological simulations. Results: Our simulations reproduce well the observed properties of magnetic fields in spiral galaxies. The formation and the evolution of our simulated disc leads to a strong magnetic field amplification: the magnetic field in the final wind bubble is one order of magnitude larger than the initial value. The magnetic field in the disc, essentially toroidal, is growing linearly with time as a consequence of differential rotation. Conclusions: We discuss the consequence of this simple mechanism on the cosmic evolution of the magnetic field: we propose a new scenario for the evolution of the magnetic field, with dwarf galaxies playing a key role in amplifying and ejecting magnetic energy in the IGM, resulting in what we call a “cosmic dynamo” that could contribute to the very

  7. Star formation in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shawfeng

    In this thesis, we examine the star formation history and stellar feedback effects of dwarf galaxies under the influence of extragalactic ultraviolet radiation, as well as the evolution of residual gas within tidally-limited dwarf galaxies and globular clusters. Previous work has indicated that the background UV flux can easily ionize the gas within typical dwarf galaxies, delaying or even preventing cooling and star formation within them. Many dwarf galaxies within the Local Group are, however, observed to contain multiple generations of stars, the oldest of which formed in the early epochs of cosmic evolution, when the background UV flux was intense. In order to address this paradox, we consider the dynamical evolution of gas in dwarf galaxies using a one-dimensional, spherically symmetric, Lagrangian numerical scheme which also computes the effects of radiative transfer and photoionization. We include in the scheme a physically-motivated star formation recipe and consider the effects of feedback. This scheme allows us to follow the history of the gas and of star formation within dwarf galaxies, as influenced by both external and internal UV radiation. Our results indicate that star formation in the severe environment of dwarf galaxies is a difficult and inefficient process. In potentials with total mass less than a few 106 M⊙ , and velocity dispersion less than a few km s-1 , residual gas is efficiently photoionized by cosmic background UV radiation. For intermediate mass systems, such as the dSphs around the Galaxy, star formation can proceed within early cosmic epochs despite the intense background UV flux. Triggering processes such as merger events, collisions, and tidal disturbance can lead to density enhancements, reducing the recombination timescale, allowing gas to cool and star formation to proceed. However, the star formation and gas retention efficiency may vary widely in galaxies with similar dark matter potentials, because they depend on many

  8. Uncovering Blue Diffuse Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bethan; Koposov, Sergey; Stark, Daniel; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) and the star-formation within their chemically pristine environments are fundamental to our understanding of the galaxy formation process at early times. However, traditional emission-line surveys detect only the brightest metal-poor galaxies where star-formation occurs in compact, starbursting environments, and thereby give us only a partial view of the dwarf galaxy population. To avoid such biases, we have developed a new search algorithm based on the morphological, rather then spectral, properties of XMPs and have applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database of images. Using this novel approach, we have discovered ~100 previously undetected, faint blue galaxies, each with isolated HII regions embedded in a diffuse continuum. In this talk I will present the first results from follow-up optical spectroscopy of this sample, which reveals these blue diffuse dwarfs (BDDs) to be young, very metal-poor and actively forming stars despite their intrinsically low luminosities. I will present evidence showing that BDDs appear to bridge the gap between quiescent dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies and blue compact galaxies (BCDs) and as such offer an ideal opportunity to assess how star-formation occurs in more `normal' metal-poor systems.

  9. Star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster: the link between molecular gas, atomic gas, and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Corbelli, E.; Bizzocchi, L.; Giovanardi, C.; Bomans, D.; Coelho, B.; De Looze, I.; Gonçalves, T. S.; Hunt, L. K.; Leonardo, E.; Madden, S.; Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Pappalardo, C.; Riguccini, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present 12CO(1-0) and 12CO(2-1) observations of a sample of 20 star-forming dwarfs selected from the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, with oxygen abundances ranging from 12 + log (O / H) ~ 8.1 to 8.8. CO emission is observed in ten galaxies and marginally detected in another one. CO fluxes correlate with the FIR 250 μm emission, and the dwarfs follow the same linear relation that holds for more massive spiral galaxies extended to a wider dynamical range. We compare different methods to estimate H2 molecular masses, namely a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor and one dependent on H-band luminosity. The molecular-to-stellar mass ratio remains nearly constant at stellar masses ≲ 109 M⊙, contrary to the atomic hydrogen fraction, MHI/M∗, which increases inversely with M∗. The flattening of the MH2/M∗ ratio at low stellar masses does not seem to be related to the effects of the cluster environment because it occurs for both Hi-deficient and Hi-normal dwarfs. The molecular-to-atomic ratio is more tightly correlated with stellar surface density than metallicity, confirming that the interstellar gas pressure plays a key role in determining the balance between the two gaseous components of the interstellar medium. Virgo dwarfs follow the same linear trend between molecular gas mass and star formation rate as more massive spirals, but gas depletion timescales, τdep, are not constant and range between 100 Myr and 6 Gyr. The interaction with the Virgo cluster environment is removing the atomic gas and dust components of the dwarfs, but the molecular gas appears to be less affected at the current stage of evolution within the cluster. However, the correlation between Hi deficiency and the molecular gas depletion time suggests that the lack of gas replenishment from the outer regions of the disc is lowering the star formation activity. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30-m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany

  10. Local Group dwarf galaxies: nature and nurture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawala, Till; Scannapieco, Cecilia; White, Simon

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in a high-resolution, hydrodynamical cosmological simulation of a Milky Way sized halo and its environment. Our simulation includes gas cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, metal enrichment and ultraviolet heating. In total, 90 satellites and more than 400 isolated dwarf galaxies are formed in the simulation, allowing a systematic study of the internal and environmental processes that determine their evolution. We find that 95 per cent of satellite galaxies are gas free at z= 0, and identify three mechanisms for gas loss: supernova feedback, tidal stripping and photoevaporation due to re-ionization. Gas-rich satellite galaxies are only found with total masses above ˜5 × 109 M⊙. In contrast, for isolated dwarf galaxies, a total mass of ˜109 M⊙ constitutes a sharp transition; less massive galaxies are predominantly gas free at z= 0, more massive, isolated dwarf galaxies are often able to retain their gas. In general, we find that the total mass of a dwarf galaxy is the main factor which determines its star formation, metal enrichment and its gas content, but that stripping may explain the observed difference in gas content between field dwarf galaxies and satellites with total masses close to 109 M⊙. We also find that a morphological transformation via tidal stripping of infalling, luminous dwarf galaxies whose dark matter is less concentrated than their stars cannot explain the high total mass-to-light ratios of the faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  11. Near-infrared photometry and stellar populations in dwarf elliptical and irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, T. X.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of three different types of dwarf galaxies have been conducted, taking into account low surface brightness (LSB) dwarf irregular (dI) galaxies, dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies, and blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDGs). Near-infrared observations for a large sample of BCDGs have been reported by Thuan (1983). The present paper is concerned with complementary near-infrared observations for a large sample of LSB dI and dE galaxies, and, in addition, with a few additional BCDG observations. In a discussion of dwarf elliptical galaxies, attention is given to an infrared color-color diagram, optical-infrared colors and burst ages, and the UVK color plane. Low surface brightness dwarf irregular galaxies and blue compact dwarf galaxies are considered along with the possible evolutionary scenarios which may link LSB dIs, BCDGs, and dEs.

  12. Morphology and Structures of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Mira; Ann, H. B.

    2016-08-01

    We applied GALFIT and STARLIGHT to the r-band images and spectra, respectively, of ~1,100 dwarf galaxies to analyze the structural properties and stellar populations. In most cases, single component with n = 1 ~ 1.5 well describes the luminosity distribution of dwarf galaxies. However, a large fraction of dS0, dE bc , and dE blue galaxies show sub-structures such as spiral arms and rings. There is a bimodal distributions of stellar ages in dS0 galaxies. But other sub-types of dwarf galaxies show a single peak in the stellar distributions.

  13. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies and resonant orbital coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, J. R.; Miller, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    The structural properties of the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way may be strongly affected by their time-dependent interactions with the 'tidal' field of the Milky Way. A low Q resonance of the tidal driving force with collective oscillation modes of the dwarf system can produce many of the observed properties of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies, including large velocity dispersions that would normally be interpreted as indicating large dynamical masses.

  14. Dwarf galaxy evolution within the environments of massive galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arraki, Kenza S.; Klypin, Anatoly A.; Ceverino, Daniel; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Primack, Joel R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding galaxy evolution depends on connecting large-scale structure determined by the ΛCDM model with, at minimum, the small-scale physics of gas, star formation, and stellar feedback. Formation of galaxies within dark matter halos is sensitive to the physical phenomena occurring within and around the halo. This is especially true for dwarf galaxies, which have the smallest potential wells and are more susceptible to the effects of gas ionization and removal than larger galaxies. At dwarf galaxies scales comparisons of dark matter-only simulations with observations has unveiled various differences including the core-cusp, the missing satellites, and the too-big-to-fail problems. We have run a new suite of hydrodynamical simulations using the ART code to examine the evolution of dwarf galaxies in massive host environments. These are cosmological zoom-in simulations including deterministic star formation and stellar feedback in the form of supernovae feedback, stellar winds, radiation pressure, and photoionization pressure. We simulates galaxies with final halo masses on the order of 1012 M⊙ with high resolution, allowing us to examine the satellite dwarf galaxies and local isolated dwarf galaxies around each primary galaxy. We analyzed the abundance and structure of these dwarfs specifically the velocity function, their star formation rates, core creation and the circumgalactic medium. By reproducing observations of dwarf galaxies in simulations we show how including baryons in simulations relieves tensions seen in comparing dark matter only simulations with observations.

  15. HI in Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grcevich, Jana; Putman, M. E.; Peek, J. E. G.

    2007-12-01

    The HI content of the newly discovered satellites of the Milky Way has not been previously studied. We use HIPASS (HI Parkes All Sky Survey), LAB (Leiden/Argentine/Bonn), and GALFA (Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array) survey data to explore HI in the environment of the newly discovered dwarf galaxies and add this information to what was previously known about HI in the dwarf spheroidal and lower mass dwarf irregular galaxies of the Local Group. All of the new satellites discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data have limits on their HI masses which range from < 13 M⊙ to 3 x 104 M⊙ except for Leo T, which has an HI mass of approximately 105 M⊙. We find that galaxies within 300 kpc of the Milky Way or Andromeda are all undetected in HI to low limits, or have ambiguous detections, while those further than 300 kpc are predominantly detected with masses > 105 M⊙. The most favored explanation for the lack of HI in dwarf galaxies at small galactocentric distances is ram pressure stripping of the gas in the dwarf galaxy by the larger galaxy's hot halo gas. The HI content will also be discussed in terms of the fuel it provides to the Milky Way and the star formation history of the dwarfs. Finally, we discuss the discovery in the GALFA data of discrete HI clouds with dynamical characteristics similar to known dwarf galaxies.

  16. Satellite dwarf galaxies in a hierarchical universe: the prevalence of dwarf-dwarf major mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Alis; Wetzel, Andrew; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea

    2014-10-20

    Mergers are a common phenomenon in hierarchical structure formation, especially for massive galaxies and clusters, but their importance for dwarf galaxies in the Local Group remains poorly understood. We investigate the frequency of major mergers between dwarf galaxies in the Local Group using the ELVIS suite of cosmological zoom-in dissipationless simulations of Milky Way- and M31-like host halos. We find that ∼10% of satellite dwarf galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} that are within the host virial radius experienced a major merger of stellar mass ratio closer than 0.1 since z = 1, with a lower fraction for lower mass dwarf galaxies. Recent merger remnants are biased toward larger radial distance and more recent virial infall times, because most recent mergers occurred shortly before crossing within the virial radius of the host halo. Satellite-satellite mergers also occur within the host halo after virial infall, catalyzed by the large fraction of dwarf galaxies that fell in as part of a group. The merger fraction doubles for dwarf galaxies outside of the host virial radius, so the most distant dwarf galaxies in the Local Group are the most likely to have experienced a recent major merger. We discuss the implications of these results on observable dwarf merger remnants, their star formation histories, the gas content of mergers, and massive black holes in dwarf galaxies.

  17. The Hunt for Dwarf Galaxies' Ancestors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies are typically very faint, and are therefore hard to find. Given that, what are our chances of finding their distant ancestors, located billions of light-years away? A recent study aims to find out.Ancient CounterpartsDwarf galaxies are a hot topic right now, especially as we discover more and more of them nearby. Besides being great places to investigate a variety of astrophysical processes, local group dwarf galaxies are also representative of the most common type of galaxy in the universe. For many of these dwarf galaxies, their low masses and typically old stellar populations suggest that most of their stars were formed early in the universes history, and further star formation was suppressed when the universe was reionized at redshifts of z ~ 610. If this is true, most dwarf galaxies are essentially fossils: theyve evolved little since that point.To test this theory, wed like to find counterparts to our local group dwarf galaxies at these higher redshifts of z = 6 or 7. But dwarf galaxies, since they dont exhibit lots of active star formation, have very low surface brightnesses making them very difficult to detect. What are the chances that current or future telescope sensitivities will allow us to detect these? Thats the question Anna Patej and Abraham Loeb, two theorists at Harvard University, have addressed in a recent study.Entering a New RegimeThe surface brightness vs. size for 73 local dwarf galaxies scaled back to redshifts of z=6 (top) and z=7 (bottom). So far weve been able to observe high-redshift galaxies within the boxed region of the parameter space. JWST will open the shaded region of the parameter space, which includes some of the dwarf galaxies. [Patej Loeb 2015]Starting from observational data for 87 Local-Group dwarf galaxies, Patej and Loeb used a stellar population synthesis code to evolve the galaxies backward in time to redshifts of z = 6 and 7. Next, they narrowed this sample to only those dwarfs for which most star

  18. HI in Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary; Peek, Joshua E. G.

    2008-08-01

    The HI content of the newly discovered satellites of the Milky Way has not been previously studied. We use HIPASS (HI Parkes All Sky Survey), LAB (Leiden/Argentine/Bonn), and GALFA (Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array) survey data to explore HI in the environment of the newly discovered dwarf galaxies and add this information to what was previously known about HI in the dwarf spheroidal and lower mass dwarf irregular galaxies of the Local Group. All of the new satellites discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data have limits on their HI masses which range from <13 Msolar to 3×104 Msolar except for Leo T, which has and HI mass of approximately 105 Msolar. We find that galaxies within 300 kpc of the Milky Way or Andromeda are all undetected in HI to low limits, or have ambiguous detections, while those further than 300 kpc are predominantly detected with masses >105 Msolar. The most favored explanation for the lack of HI in dwarf galaxies at small galactocentric distances is ram pressure stripping of the gas in the dwarf galaxy by the larger galaxy's hot halo gas. Finally, we discuss the discovery in the GALFA data of discrete HI clouds with characteristics similar to known dwarf galaxies.

  19. Neutral Hydrogen in Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grcevich, Jana

    The gas content of the faintest and lowest mass dwarf galaxies provide means to study the evolution of these unique objects. The evolutionary histories of low mass dwarf galaxies are interesting in their own right, but may also provide insight into fundamental cosmological problems. These include the nature of dark matter, the disagreement between the number of observed Local Group dwarf galaxies and that predicted by lambda cold dark matter models, and the discrepancy between the observed census of baryonic matter in the Milky Way's environment and theoretical predictions. This thesis explores these questions by studying the neutral hydrogen (HI) component of dwarf galaxies. First, limits on the HI mass of the ultra-faint dwarfs are presented, and the HI content of all Local Group dwarf galaxies is examined from an environmental standpoint. We find that those Local Group dwarfs within 270 kpc of a massive host galaxy are deficient in HI as compared to those at larger galactocentric distances. Ram-pressure arguments are invoked, which suggest halo densities greater than 2-3 x 10-4 cm-3 out to distances of at least 70 kpc, values which are consistent with theoretical models and suggest the halo may harbor a large fraction of the host galaxy's baryons. We also find that accounting for the incompleteness of the dwarf galaxy count, known dwarf galaxies whose gas has been removed could have provided at most 2.1 x 108 M⊙ of HI gas to the Milky Way. Second, we examine the possibility of discovering unknown gas-rich ultra-faint galaxies in the Local Group using HI. The GALFA-HI Survey catalog is searched for compact, isolated HI clouds which are most similar to the expected HI characteristics of low mass dwarf galaxies. Fifty-one Local Group dwarf galaxy candidates are identified through column density, brightness temperature, and kinematic selection criteria, and their properties are explored. Third, we present hydrodynamic simulations of dwarf galaxies experiencing a

  20. Charting Unexplored Dwarf Galaxy Territory with RR Lyrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Mariah; Willman, Beth

    2015-11-01

    Observational biases against finding Milky Way (MW) dwarf galaxies at low Galactic latitudes (b ≲ 20°) and at low surface brightnesses ({μ }{{V,0}} ≳ 29 mag arcsec{}-2) currently limit our understanding of the faintest limits of the galaxy luminosity function. This paper is a proof-of-concept that groups of two or more RR Lyrae stars could reveal MW dwarf galaxies at d > 50 kpc in these unmined regions of parameter space, with only modest contamination from interloper groups when large halo structures are excluded. For example, a friends-of-friends (FOF) search with a 2D linking length of 500 pc could reveal dwarf galaxies more luminous than {M}{{V}} = -3.2 mag and with surface brightnesses as faint as 31 mag arcsec{}-2 (or even fainter, depending on RR Lyrae specific frequency). Although existing public RR Lyrae catalogs are highly incomplete at d > 50 kpc and/or include <1% of the MW halo’s volume, a FOF search reveals two known dwarfs (Boötes I and Sextans) and two dwarf candidate groups possibly worthy of follow-up. PanSTARRS 1 (PS1) may catalog RR Lyrae to 100 kpc (in the absence of Galactic extinction) which would include up to ˜15% of predicted MW dwarf galaxies. Groups of PS1 RR Lyrae should therefore reveal very low surface brightness and low Galactic latitude dwarfs within its footprint, if they exist. With sensitivity to RR Lyrae to d ≳ 600 kpc, LSST is the only planned survey that will be both wide-field and deep enough to use RR Lyrae to definitively measure the MW’s dwarf galaxy census to extremely low surface brightnesses, and through the Galactic plane.

  1. Mass Modelling of dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentowski, Jarosław; Łokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Prada, Francisco; Mayer, Lucio; Mamon, Gary A.

    2008-05-01

    We study the origin and properties of unbound stars in the kinematic samples of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. For this purpose we have run a high resolution N-body simulation of a two-component dwarf galaxy orbiting in a Milky Way potential. We create mock kinematic data sets by observing the dwarf in different directions. When the dwarf is observed along the tidal tails the kinematic samples are strongly contaminated by unbound stars from the tails. However, most of the unbound stars can be removed by the method of interloper rejection proposed by den Hartog & Katgert. We model the velocity dispersion profiles of the cleaned-up kinematic samples using solutions of the Jeans equation. We show that even for such a strongly stripped dwarf the Jeans analysis, when applied to cleaned samples, allows us to reproduce the mass and mass-to-light ratio of the dwarf with accuracy typically better than 25%.

  2. The Hunt for Missing Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    Theories of galaxy formation and evolution predict that there should be significantly more dwarf galaxies than have been observed. Are our theories wrong? Or are dwarf galaxies just difficult to detect? Recent results from a survey of a galaxy cluster 62 million light-years away suggest there may be lots of undiscovered dwarf galaxies hiding throughout the universe!Hiding in FaintnessThe missing dwarf problem has had hints of a resolution with the recent discovery of Ultra-Diffuse Galaxies (UDGs) in the Coma and Virgo galaxy clusters. UDGs have low masses and large radii, resulting in a very low surface brightness that makes them extremely difficult to detect. If many dwarfs are UDGs, this could well explain why weve been missing them!But the Coma and Virgo galaxy clusters are similar in that theyre both very massive. Are there UDGs in other galaxy clusters as well? To answer this question, an international team of scientists is running the Next Generation Fornax Survey (NGFS), a survey searching for faint dwarf galaxies in the central 30 square degrees of the Fornax galaxy cluster.The NGFS uses near-UV and optical observations from the Dark Energy Camera mounted on the 4m Blanco Telescope in Chile. The survey is still underway, but in a recent publication led by Roberto P. Muoz (Institute of Astrophysics at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile), the team has released an overview of the first results from only the central 3 square degrees of the NGFS field.Surprising DetectionGalaxy radii vs. their absolute i-band magnitudes, for the dwarfs found in NGFS as well as other stellar systems in the nearby universe. The NGFS dwarfs are similar to the ultra-diffuse dwarfs found in the Virgo and Coma clusters, but are several orders of magnitude fainter. [Muoz et al. 2015]In just this small central field, the team has found an astounding 284 low-surface-brightness dwarf galaxy candidates 158 of them previously undetected. At the bright end of this sample are dwarf

  3. Constraining the subgrid physics in simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, Bert; Verbeke, Robbert; De Rijcke, Sven

    2016-05-01

    Simulating dwarf galaxy haloes in a reionizing Universe puts severe constraints on the subgrid model employed in the simulations. Using the same subgrid model that works for simulations without a UV-background (UVB) results in gas-poor galaxies that stop forming stars very early on, except for haloes with high masses. This is in strong disagreement with observed galaxies, which are gas rich and star forming down to a much lower mass range. To resolve this discrepancy, we ran a large suite of isolated dwarf galaxy simulations to explore a wide variety of subgrid models and parameters, including timing and strength of the UVB, strength of the stellar feedback and metallicity-dependent Pop III feedback. We compared these simulations to observed dwarf galaxies by means of the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR), which links the baryonic content of a galaxy to the observationally determined strength of its gravitational potential. We found that the results are robust to changes in the UVB. The strength of the stellar feedback shifts the results on the BTFR, but does not help to form gas-rich galaxies at late redshifts. Only by including Pop III feedback are we able to produce galaxies that lie on the observational BTFR and that have neutral gas and ongoing star formation at redshift zero.

  4. Observing Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Dwarf galaxies in the Local Group are key probes of both dark matter and galaxy formation. They are the smallest, oldest, most dark matter-dominated, and least chemically enriched stellar systems currently known. However, despite two decades of major computational, theoretical, and observational advances in this field, we are still working toward a complete understanding of star and galaxy formation at the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In the last year, large sky surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and Pan-STARRS have made an unprecedented series of discoveries, nearly doubling the population of Milky Way satellite galaxies that was known at the start of 2015. This increase in the number of nearby dwarfs may significantly improve the sensitivity of searches for dark matter annihilation radiation. Many of these new dwarfs are likely to have originated as satellites of the Magellanic Clouds, providing a unique opportunity to study the effect of galactic environment on the formation of the faintest dwarfs. I will provide an overview of recent discoveries and how they fit in to the previously known population of nearby dwarf galaxies, highlighting a few of the most interesting objects from the perspective of dark matter and stellar nucleosynthesis.

  5. Dwarf Galaxies with Active Massive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Greene, J. E.; Geha, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) live at the heart of essentially all massive galaxies with bulges, power AGN, and are thought to be important agents in the evolution of their hosts. However, the birth and growth of the first supermassive BH "seeds" is far from understood. While direct observations of these distant BHs in the infant Universe are unobtainable with current capabilities, massive BHs in present-day dwarf galaxies can place valuable constraints on the masses, formation path, and hosts of supermassive BH seeds. Using optical spectroscopy from the SDSS, we have systematically assembled the largest sample of dwarf galaxies hosting active massive BHs to date. These dwarf galaxies have stellar masses comparable to the Magellanic Clouds and contain some of the least-massive supermassive BHs known.

  6. Massive Star Clusters in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Soeren

    2015-08-01

    Dwarf galaxies are often characterized by very high globular cluster specific frequencies, in some cases exceeding that of the Milky Way by a factor of 100 or more. Moreover, the GCs are typically much more metal-poor than the bulk of the field stars, so that a substantial fraction (up to 20-25% or more) of all metal-poor stars in some dwarf galaxies are associated with GCs. The metal-poor components of these galaxies thus represent an extreme case of the "specific frequency problem". In this talk I will review the current status of our understanding of GC systems in dwarf galaxies. Particular emphasis will be placed on the implications of the high GC specific frequencies for the amount of mass loss the clusters could have experienced and the constraints this provides on theories for the origin of multiple populations in globular clusters.

  7. Star Formation and Feedback in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shawfeng; Lin, D. N. C.; Murray, S. D.

    2003-10-01

    We examine the star formation history and stellar feedback effects of dwarf galaxies under the influence of extragalactic ultraviolet radiation. Previous work has indicated that the background UV flux can easily ionize the gas within typical dwarf galaxies, delaying or even preventing cooling and star formation within them. Many dwarf galaxies within the Local Group are, however, observed to contain multiple generations of stars, the oldest of which formed in the early epochs of cosmic evolution, when the background UV flux was intense. In order to address this paradox, we consider the dynamical evolution of gas in dwarf galaxies using a one-dimensional, spherically symmetric, Lagrangian numerical scheme to compute the effects of radiative transfer and photoionization. We include a physically motivated star formation recipe and consider the effects of feedback. This scheme allows us to follow the history of the gas and of star formation within dwarf galaxies, as influenced by both external and internal UV radiation. Our results indicate that star formation in the severe environment of dwarf galaxies is a difficult and inefficient process. In potentials with total mass less than a few times 106 Msolar and velocity dispersion less than a few kilometers per second, residual gas is efficiently photoionized by cosmic background UV radiation. Since the density scale height of the gas within these galaxies is comparable to their size, gas may be tidally removed from them, leaving behind starless residual dark matter clumps. For intermediate-mass systems, such as the dSphs around the Galaxy, star formation can proceed within early cosmic epochs despite the intense background UV flux. Triggering processes such as merger events, collisions, and tidal disturbance can lead to density enhancements, reducing the recombination timescale, allowing gas to cool and star formation to proceed. However, the star formation and gas retention efficiency may vary widely in galaxies with

  8. Infrared Colors of Dwarf-Dwarf Galaxy Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liss, Sandra; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Johnson, Kelsey; Patton, Dave; Kallivayalil, Nitya

    2015-10-01

    We request Spitzer Warm Mission IRAC Channel 1 & 2 imaging for a sample of 60 isolated dwarf galaxy pairs as a key component of a larger, multi-wavelength effort to understand the role low-mass mergers play in galaxy evolution. A systematic study of dwarf-dwarf mergers has never been done, and we wish to characterize the impact such interactions have on fueling star formation in the nearby universe. The Spitzer imaging proposed here will allow us to determine the extent to which the 3.6 and 4.5 mum bands are dominated by stellar light and investigate a) the extent to which interacting pairs show IR excess and b) whether the excess is related to the pair separation. Second, we will use this IR photometry to constrain the processes contributing to the observed color excess and scatter in each system. We will take advantage of the wealth of observations available in the Spitzer Heritage Archive for 'normal' non-interacting dwarfs by comparing the stellar populations of those dwarfs with the likely interacting dwarfs in our sample. Ultimately, we can combine the Spitzer imaging proposed here with our current, ongoing efforts to obtain groundbased optical photometry to model the star formation histories of these dwarfs and to help constrain the timescales and impact dwarf-dwarf mergers have on fueling star formation. The sensitivity and resolution offered by Spitzer are necessary to determine the dust properties of these interacting systems, and how these properties vary as a function of pair separation, mass ratio, and gas fraction.

  9. FORMATION OF ULTRA-COMPACT BLUE DWARF GALAXIES AND THEIR EVOLUTION INTO NUCLEATED DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-10-10

    We propose that there is an evolutionary link between ultra-compact blue dwarf galaxies (UCBDs) with active star formation and nucleated dwarfs based on the results of numerical simulations of dwarf–dwarf merging. We consider the observational fact that low-mass dwarfs can be very gas-rich, and thereby investigate the dynamical and chemical evolution of very gas-rich, dissipative dwarf–dwarf mergers. We find that the remnants of dwarf–dwarf mergers can be dominated by new stellar populations formed from the triggered starbursts and consequently can have blue colors and higher metallicities (Z ∼ [0.2–1]Z{sub ⊙}). We also find that the remnants of these mergers can have rather high mass densities (10{sup 4} M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −3}) within the central 10 pc and small half-light radii (40−100 pc). The radial stellar structures of some merger remnants are similar to those of nucleated dwarfs. Star formation can continue in nuclear gas disks (R < 100 pc) surrounding stellar galactic nuclei (SGNs) so that the SGNs can finally have multiple stellar populations with different ages and metallicities. These very compact blue remnants can be identified as UCBDs soon after merging and as nucleated dwarfs after the young stars fade. We discuss these results in the context of the origins of metal-rich ultra-compact dwarfs and SGNs.

  10. Stellar feedback in dwarf galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Mashchenko, Sergey; Wadsley, James; Couchman, H M P

    2008-01-11

    Dwarf galaxies pose substantial challenges for cosmological models. In particular, current models predict a dark-matter density that is divergent at the center, which is in sharp contrast with observations that indicate a core of roughly constant density. Energy feedback, from supernova explosions and stellar winds, has been proposed as a major factor shaping the evolution of dwarf galaxies. We present detailed cosmological simulations with sufficient resolution both to model the relevant physical processes and to directly assess the impact of stellar feedback on observable properties of dwarf galaxies. We show that feedback drives large-scale, bulk motions of the interstellar gas, resulting in substantial gravitational potential fluctuations and a consequent reduction in the central matter density, bringing the theoretical predictions in agreement with observations.

  11. Dwarf Galaxies Swimming in Tidal Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This false-color infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows little 'dwarf galaxies' forming in the 'tails' of two larger galaxies that are colliding together. The big galaxies are at the center of the picture, while the dwarfs can be seen as red dots in the red streamers, or tidal tails. The two blue dots above the big galaxies are stars in the foreground.

    Galaxy mergers are common occurrences in the universe; for example, our own Milky Way galaxy will eventually smash into the nearby Andromeda galaxy. When two galaxies meet, they tend to rip each other apart, leaving a trail, called a tidal tail, of gas and dust in their wake. It is out of this galactic debris that new dwarf galaxies are born.

    The new Spitzer picture demonstrates that these particular dwarfs are actively forming stars. The red color indicates the presence of dust produced in star-forming regions, including organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These carbon-containing molecules are also found on Earth, in car exhaust and on burnt toast, among other places. Here, the molecules are being heated up by the young stars, and, as a result, shine in infrared light.

    This image was taken by the infrared array camera on Spitzer. It is a 4-color composite of infrared light, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange), and 8.0 microns (red). Starlight has been subtracted from the orange and red channels in order to enhance the dust features.

  12. The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Andromeda I

    SciTech Connect

    Mould, J.; Kristian, J. Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-05-01

    Images of Andromeda I in the visual and near-infrared show a giant branch characteristic of galactic globular clusters of intermediate metallicity. The distance of the galaxy is estimated from the tip of the giant branch to be 790 + or - 60 kpc. The physical dimensions and luminosity are similar to those of the dwarf spheroidal in Sculptor. There is no evidence for an intermediate age population in Andromeda I, and appropriate upper limits are specified. There is marginal evidence for a color gradient in the galaxy, a phenomenon not previously noted in a dwarf spheroidal. 21 refs.

  13. GIANT GALAXIES, DWARFS, AND DEBRIS SURVEY. I. DWARF GALAXIES AND TIDAL FEATURES AROUND NGC 7331

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, Johannes; Pasquali, Anna; Grebel, Eva K.; Gallagher, John S. III

    2012-12-01

    The Giant GAlaxies, Dwarfs, and Debris Survey (GGADDS) concentrates on the nearby universe to study how galaxies have interacted in groups of different morphology, density, and richness. In these groups, we select the dominant spiral galaxy and search its surroundings for dwarf galaxies and tidal interactions. This paper presents the first results from deep wide-field imaging of NGC 7331, where we detect only four low-luminosity candidate dwarf companions and a stellar stream that may be evidence of a past tidal interaction. The dwarf galaxy candidates have surface brightnesses of {mu}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 23-25 mag arcsec{sup -2} with (g - r){sub 0} colors of 0.57-0.75 mag in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey filter system, consistent with their being dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. A faint stellar stream structure on the western edge of NGC 7331 has {mu}{sub g} Almost-Equal-To 27 mag arcsec{sup -2} and a relatively blue color of (g - r){sub 0} = 0.15 mag. If it is tidal debris, then this stream could have formed from a rare type of interaction between NGC 7331 and a dwarf irregular or transition-type dwarf galaxy. We compare the structure and local environments of NGC 7331 to those of other nearby giant spirals in small galaxy groups. NGC 7331 has a much lower ({approx}2%) stellar mass in the form of early-type satellites than found for M31 and lacks the presence of nearby companions like luminous dwarf elliptical galaxies or the Magellanic Clouds. However, our detection of a few dSph candidates suggests that it is not deficient in low-luminosity satellites.

  14. Starbursts in blue compact dwarf galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, Trinh Xuan

    1987-01-01

    All the arguments for a bursting mode of star formation in blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCD) are summarized. It is shown that spectral synthesis of far-ultraviolet spectra of BCDs constitutes a powerful way to study the star formation history in these galaxies. BCD luminosity functions show jumps and discontinuities. These jumps act like fossil records of the star-forming bursts, aiding in the counting and dating of the bursts.

  15. Tests of modified gravity with dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; VanderPlas, Jake E-mail: vanderplas@astro.washington.edu

    2011-10-01

    In modified gravity theories that seek to explain cosmic acceleration, dwarf galaxies in low density environments can be subject to enhanced forces. The class of scalar-tensor theories, which includes f(R) gravity, predict such a force enhancement (massive galaxies like the Milky Way can evade it through a screening mechanism that protects the interior of the galaxy from this ''fifth'' force). We study observable deviations from GR in the disks of late-type dwarf galaxies moving under gravity. The fifth-force acts on the dark matter and HI gas disk, but not on the stellar disk owing to the self-screening of main sequence stars. We find four distinct observable effects in such disk galaxies: 1. A displacement of the stellar disk from the HI disk. 2. Warping of the stellar disk along the direction of the external force. 3. Enhancement of the rotation curve measured from the HI gas compared to that of the stellar disk. 4. Asymmetry in the rotation curve of the stellar disk. We estimate that the spatial effects can be up to 1 kpc and the rotation velocity effects about 10 km/s in infalling dwarf galaxies. Such deviations are measurable: we expect that with a careful analysis of a sample of nearby dwarf galaxies one can improve astrophysical constraints on gravity theories by over three orders of magnitude, and even solar system constraints by one order of magnitude. Thus effective tests of gravity along the lines suggested by Hui, Nicolis, and Stubbs (2009) and Jain (2011) can be carried out with low-redshift galaxies, though care must be exercised in understanding possible complications from astrophysical effects.

  16. The Unexpected Past of a Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    New Light on Cannibalism in the Local Group of Galaxies The Local Group of Galaxies consists of a few large spiral galaxies - for instance the Milky Way galaxy in which we live, and the Andromeda galaxy that is visible to the unaided eye in the northern constellation of the same name - as well as two dozen much smaller galaxies of mostly irregular shape. Whereas the larger galaxies have extended halos of very old stars, no such halos have ever been seen around the smaller ones. Now, however, Dante Minniti and Albert Zijlstra [1], working at the ESO 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT), have found a large halo of old and metal-poor stars around one of the dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. This finding is quite unexpected. It revises our understanding of star formation in these galaxies and provides important information about the past evolution of galaxies [2]. Galaxy halos The Milky Way galaxy is surrounded by a large, roughly spherical halo of old stars. The diameter is about 100,000 light years and the stars therein, known as Population II stars, are among the oldest known, with ages of 10 billion years or even more. They also differ from the younger stars nearer to the main plane of the Milky Way (in which our 4.7 billion year old Sun is located) by being very metal-poor. Many of the halo stars consist almost solely of hydrogen and helium, reflecting the composition of matter in the young Universe. This halo is important for our understanding of the processes that led to the formation of the Milky Way galaxy. It is believed that many of the halo stars and those of the same type found in globular clusters existed already before the Milky Way had fully formed. Galaxy cannibalism Many astronomers suspect that galaxies evolve and gradually grow larger and heavier by practising cannibalism on their own kind. In this picture, when two galaxies collide in space, the stars and nebulae in the smaller one will disperse and soon be taken over by the larger one, which

  17. Choirs H I galaxy groups: The metallicity of dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Sarah M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Meurer, Gerhardt; Bekki, Kenji; Dopita, Michael A.; Nicholls, David C.; Kilborn, Virginia

    2014-02-10

    We present a recalibration of the luminosity-metallicity relation for gas-rich, star-forming dwarfs to magnitudes as faint as M{sub R} ∼ –13. We use the Dopita et al. metallicity calibrations to calibrate the relation for all the data in this analysis. In metallicity-luminosity space, we find two subpopulations within a sample of high-confidence Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 star-forming galaxies: 52% are metal-rich giants and 48% are metal-medium galaxies. Metal-rich dwarfs classified as tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates in the literature are typically of metallicity 12 + log(O/H) = 8.70 ± 0.05, while SDSS dwarfs fainter than M{sub R} = –16 have a mean metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.28 ± 0.10, regardless of their luminosity, indicating that there is an approximate floor to the metallicity of low-luminosity galaxies. Our hydrodynamical simulations predict that TDGs should have metallicities elevated above the normal luminosity-metallicity relation. Metallicity can therefore be a useful diagnostic for identifying TDG candidate populations in the absence of tidal tails. At magnitudes brighter than M{sub R} ∼ –16, our sample of 53 star-forming galaxies in 9 H I gas-rich groups is consistent with the normal relation defined by the SDSS sample. At fainter magnitudes, there is an increase in dispersion of the metallicity of our sample, suggestive of a wide range of H I content and environment. In our sample, we identify three (16% of dwarfs) strong TDG candidates (12 + log(O/H) > 8.6) and four (21%) very metal-poor dwarfs (12 + log(O/H) < 8.0), which are likely gas-rich dwarfs with recently ignited star formation.

  18. FORMATION OF DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES VIA MERGERS OF DISKY DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Lokas, Ewa L.; Klimentowski, Jaroslaw; Mayer, Lucio; Knebe, Alexander

    2011-10-10

    We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate whether binary mergers between rotationally supported dwarfs can lead to the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Our simulation campaign is based on a hybrid approach combining cosmological simulations and controlled numerical experiments. We select merger events from a Constrained Local Universe simulation of the Local Group (LG) and record the properties of the interacting dwarf-sized halos. This information is subsequently used to seed controlled experiments of binary encounters between dwarf galaxies consisting of exponential stellar disks embedded in cosmologically motivated dark matter halos. These simulations are designed to reproduce eight cosmological merger events, with initial masses of the interacting systems in the range {approx}(5-60) x 10{sup 7} M{sub sun}, occurring quite early in the history of the LG, more than 10 Gyr ago. We compute the properties of the merger remnants as a distant observer would and demonstrate that at least three of the simulated encounters produce systems with kinematic and structural properties akin to those of the classic dSphs in the LG. Tracing the history of the remnants in the cosmological simulation to z = 0, we find that two dSph-like objects remain isolated at distances {approx}> 800 kpc from either the Milky Way or M31. These systems constitute plausible counterparts of the remote dSphs Cetus and Tucana which reside in the LG outskirts, far from the tidal influence of the primary galaxies. We conclude that merging of rotationally supported dwarfs represents a viable mechanism for the formation of dSphs in the LG and similar environments.

  19. Star formation history in forming dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berczik, P.; Kravchuk, S. G.

    The processes of formation and evolution of isolated dwarf galaxies over the Hubble timescale is followed by means of SPH techniques. As an initial protogalaxy perturbation we consider an isolated, uniform, solid -- body rotated sphere involved into the Hubble flow and made of dark and baryonic matter in a 10:1 ratio. The simulations are carried out for the set of models having spin parameters lambda in the range from 0.01 to 0.08 and the total mass of dark matter 1011 M_odot . Our model includes gasdynamics, radiative processes, star formation, supernova feedback and simplified chemistry. The application of modified star formation criterion which accounts for chaotic motions and the time lag between initial development of suitable conditions for star formation and star formation itself (Berczik P.P, Kravchuk S.G. 1997, Ap.Sp.Sci.) provides the realistic description of the process of galaxy formation and evolution. Two parameters: total mass and initial angular momentum of the dwarf protogalaxy play the crucial role in its star formation activity. After the 15 Gyr of the evolution the rapidly rotated dwarf galaxies manifest themselves as an extremly gasrich, heavy element deficient objects showing the initial burst of star formation activity in several spatially separated regions. Slowly rotating objects manifest themselves finally as typical evolved dwarf galaxies.

  20. The Metamorphosis of Tidally Stirred Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Lucio; Governato, Fabio; Colpi, Monica; Moore, Ben; Quinn, Thomas; Wadsley, James; Stadel, Joachim; Lake, George

    2001-10-01

    We present results from high-resolution N-body/SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamic) simulations of rotationally supported dwarf irregular galaxies moving on bound orbits in the massive dark matter halo of the Milky Way. The dwarf models span a range in disk surface density and the masses and sizes of their dark halos are consistent with the predictions of cold dark matter cosmogonies. We show that the strong tidal field of the Milky Way determines severe mass loss in their halos and disks and induces bar and bending instabilities that transform low surface brightness dwarfs (LSBs) into dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) and high surface brightness dwarfs (HSBs) into dwarf ellipticals (dEs) in less than 10 Gyr. The final central velocity dispersions of the remnants are in the range 8-30 km s-1 and their final v/σ falls to values less than 0.5, matching well the kinematics of early-type dwarfs. The transformation requires the orbital time of the dwarf to be <~3-4 Gyr, which implies a halo as massive and extended as predicted by hierarchical models of galaxy formation to explain the origin of even the farthest dSph satellites of the Milky Way, Leo I, and Leo II. We show that only dwarfs with central dark matter densities as high as those of Draco and Ursa Minor can survive for 10 Gyr in the proximity of the Milky Way. A correlation between the central density and the distance of the dwarfs from the primary galaxy is indeed expected in hierarchical models, in which the densest objects should have small orbital times because of their early formation epochs. Part of the gas is stripped and part is funneled to the center because of the bar, generating one strong burst of star formation in HSBs and smaller, multiple bursts in LSBs. Therefore, the large variety of star formation histories observed in Local Group dSphs arises because different types of dIrr progenitors respond differently to the external perturbation of the Milky Way. Our evolutionary model naturally explains the

  1. Stellar Mass Distributions in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxin; Hunter, D.; LITTLE THINGS Team

    2011-01-01

    We present the radial distributions of the stellar mass and the star formation histories for a large sample of dwarf irregular galaxies assembled by the LITTLE THINGS project (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey, http://www.lowell.edu/users/dah/littlethings/index.html). Specifically, utilizing the multi-band data including FUV/NUV/UBV/Hα/3.6μm, and with the CB07 stellar population synthesis models, we analyze the variations of the SEDs as a function of radius. By studying the relationship between the stellar mass, star formation histories, star formation and HI gas, we will discuss the possible star formation modes and the roles played by the stellar mass and gas in determining the star formation in dwarf irregular galaxies in general. We gratefully acknowledge funding for this research from the National Science Foundation (AST-0707563).

  2. POX 186: A Dwarf Galaxy Under Construction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, M. R.; Vacca, W. D.

    2000-12-01

    We have obtained deep images of the ultracompact ( ~ 3'') blue compact dwarf galaxy POX 186 in the F336W, F555W, and F814W filters of the Planetary Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope. We have additionally obtained a low-resolution near ultraviolet spectrum of the object with STIS and combine this with a ground-based spectrum covering the visible continuum and emission lines. Our images confirm this object to be highly compact, with a maximum projected size of only ~ 240 pc, making it one of the smallest galaxies known. We also confirm that the outer regions of the galaxy consist of an evolved stellar population, ruling out earlier speculations that POX 186 is a protogalaxy. However, the PC images reveal the galaxy to have a highly irregular morphology, with a pronounced tidal arm on its western side. This morphology is strongly suggestive of a recent collision between two smaller components which has in turn triggered the central starburst. The F336W image also shows that the material in this tidal stream is actively star forming. Given the very small ( ~ 100 pc) sizes of the colliding components, POX 186 may be a dwarf galaxy in the early stages of formation, which would be consistent with current ``downsizing'' models of galaxy formation in which the least massive objects are the last to form. This work is supported by NASA and the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  3. Suites of dwarfs around Nearby giant galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisina, Elena I.; Makarov, Dmitry I. E-mail: kei@sao.ru

    2014-01-01

    The Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog (UNGC) contains the most comprehensive summary of distances, radial velocities, and luminosities for 800 galaxies located within 11 Mpc from us. The high density of observables in the UNGC makes this sample indispensable for checking results of N-body simulations of cosmic structures on a ∼1 Mpc scale. The environment of each galaxy in the UNGC was characterized by a tidal index Θ{sub 1}, depending on the separation and mass of the galaxy's main disturber (MD). We grouped UNGC galaxies with a common MD in suites, and ranked suite members according to their Θ{sub 1}. All suite members with positive Θ{sub 1} are assumed to be physical companions of the MD. About 58% of the sample are members of physical groups. The distribution of suites by the number of members, n, follows a relation N(n) ∼ n {sup –2}. The 20 most populated suites contain 468 galaxies, i.e., 59% of the UNGC sample. The fraction of MDs among the brightest galaxies is almost 100% and drops to 50% at M{sub B} = –18{sup m}. We discuss various properties of MDs, as well as galaxies belonging to their suites. The suite abundance practically does not depend on the morphological type, linear diameter, or hydrogen mass of the MD, the tightest correlation being with the MD dynamical mass. Dwarf galaxies around MDs exhibit well-known segregation effects: the population of the outskirts has later morphological types, richer H I contents, and higher rates of star formation activity. Nevertheless, there are some intriguing cases where dwarf spheroidal galaxies occur at the far periphery of the suites, as well as some late-type dwarfs residing close to MDs. Comparing simulation results with galaxy groups, most studies assume the Local Group is fairly typical. However, we recognize that the nearby groups significantly differ from each other and there is considerable variation in their properties. The suites of companions around the Milky Way and M31, consisting of the

  4. The dwarf galaxy population of nearby galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisker, Thorsten; Wittmann, Carolin; Pak, Mina; Janz, Joachim; Bialas, Daniel; Peletier, Reynier; Grebel, Eva; Falcon Barroso, Jesus; Toloba, Elisa; Smakced Collaboration, Focus Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Fornax, Virgo, Ursa Major and Perseus galaxy clusters all have very different characteristics, in terms of their density, mass, and large-scale environment. We can regard these clusters as laboratories for studying environmental influence on galaxy evolution, using the sensitive low-mass galaxies as probes for external mechanisms. Here we report on recent and ongoing observational studies of the said clusters with imaging and spectroscopy, as well as on the interpretation of present-day cluster galaxy populations with the aid of cosmological simulations.Multicolor imaging data allow us to identify residual star formation in otherwise red early-type dwarf galaxies, which hold clues to the strength of gas stripping processes. Major-axis spectra and 2D kinematical maps provide insight regarding the amount of rotational support and how much dynamical heating a dwarf galaxy may have experienced. To this end, dedicated N-body simulations that follow the evolution of galaxies since early epochs reveal their path through parameter space, and can be compared to observations in order to understand the time-integrated effect of environmental influence.

  5. Missing dark matter in dwarf galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oman, Kyle A.; Navarro, Julio F.; Sales, Laura V.; Fattahi, Azadeh; Frenk, Carlos S.; Sawala, Till; Schaller, Matthieu; White, Simon D. M.

    2016-08-01

    We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of the APOSTLE project along with high-quality rotation curve observations to examine the fraction of baryons in ΛCDM haloes that collect into galaxies. This `galaxy formation efficiency' correlates strongly and with little scatter with halo mass, dropping steadily towards dwarf galaxies. The baryonic mass of a galaxy may thus be used to place a lower limit on total halo mass and, consequently, on its asymptotic maximum circular velocity. A number of observed dwarfs seem to violate this constraint, having baryonic masses up to 10 times higher than expected from their rotation speeds, or, alternatively, rotating at only half the speed expected for their mass. Taking the data at face value, either these systems have formed galaxies with extraordinary efficiency - highly unlikely given their shallow potential wells - or their dark matter content is much lower than expected from ΛCDM haloes. This `missing dark matter' is reminiscent of the inner mass deficit of galaxies with slowly rising rotation curves, but cannot be explained away by star formation-induced `cores' in the dark mass profile, since the anomalous deficit applies to regions larger than the luminous galaxies themselves. We argue that explaining the structure of these galaxies would require either substantial modification of the standard ΛCDM paradigm or else significant revision to the uncertainties in their inferred mass profiles, which should be much larger than reported. Systematic errors in inclination may provide a simple resolution to what would otherwise be a rather intractable problem for the current paradigm.

  6. DWARF GALAXIES AND THE COSMIC WEB

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez-Llambay, Alejandro; Abadi, Mario G.; Navarro, Julio F.; Gottloeber, Stefan; Steinmetz, Matthias; Yepes, Gustavo; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2013-02-01

    We use a cosmological simulation of the formation of the Local Group of Galaxies to identify a mechanism that enables the removal of baryons from low-mass halos without appealing to feedback or reionization. As the Local Group forms, matter bound to it develops a network of filaments and pancakes. This moving web of gas and dark matter drifts and sweeps a large volume, overtaking many halos in the process. The dark matter content of these halos is unaffected but their gas can be efficiently removed by ram pressure. The loss of gas is especially pronounced in low-mass halos due to their lower binding energy and has a dramatic effect on the star formation history of affected systems. This 'cosmic web stripping' may help to explain the scarcity of dwarf galaxies compared with the numerous low-mass halos expected in {Lambda}CDM and the large diversity of star formation histories and morphologies characteristic of faint galaxies. Although our results are based on a single high-resolution simulation, it is likely that the hydrodynamical interaction of dwarf galaxies with the cosmic web is a crucial ingredient so far missing from galaxy formation models.

  7. GLOBAL H I KINEMATICS IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stilp, Adrienne M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Warren, Steven R.; Skillman, Evan; Ott, Juergen; Koribalski, Baerbel

    2013-03-10

    H I line widths are typically interpreted as a measure of interstellar medium turbulence, which is potentially driven by star formation (SF). In an effort to better understand the possible connections between line widths and SF, we have characterized H I kinematics in a sample of nearby dwarf galaxies by co-adding line-of-sight spectra after removing the rotational velocity to produce average global H I line profiles. These ''superprofiles'' are composed of a central narrow peak ({approx}6-10 km s{sup -1}) with higher-velocity wings to either side that contain {approx}10%-15% of the total flux. The superprofiles are all very similar, indicating a universal global H I profile for dwarf galaxies. We compare characteristics of the superprofiles to various galaxy properties, such as mass and measures of SF, with the assumption that the superprofile represents a turbulent peak with energetic wings to either side. We use these quantities to derive average scale heights for the sample galaxies. When comparing to physical properties, we find that the velocity dispersion of the central peak is correlated with ({Sigma}{sub HI}). The fraction of mass and characteristic velocity of the high-velocity wings are correlated with measures of SF, consistent with the picture that SF drives surrounding H I to higher velocities. While gravitational instabilities provide too little energy, the SF in the sample galaxies does provide enough energy through supernovae, with realistic estimates of the coupling efficiency, to produce the observed superprofiles.

  8. The Unexpected Past of a Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    New Light on Cannibalism in the Local Group of Galaxies The Local Group of Galaxies consists of a few large spiral galaxies - for instance the Milky Way galaxy in which we live, and the Andromeda galaxy that is visible to the unaided eye in the northern constellation of the same name - as well as two dozen much smaller galaxies of mostly irregular shape. Whereas the larger galaxies have extended halos of very old stars, no such halos have ever been seen around the smaller ones. Now, however, Dante Minniti and Albert Zijlstra [1], working at the ESO 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT), have found a large halo of old and metal-poor stars around one of the dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. This finding is quite unexpected. It revises our understanding of star formation in these galaxies and provides important information about the past evolution of galaxies [2]. Galaxy halos The Milky Way galaxy is surrounded by a large, roughly spherical halo of old stars. The diameter is about 100,000 light years and the stars therein, known as Population II stars, are among the oldest known, with ages of 10 billion years or even more. They also differ from the younger stars nearer to the main plane of the Milky Way (in which our 4.7 billion year old Sun is located) by being very metal-poor. Many of the halo stars consist almost solely of hydrogen and helium, reflecting the composition of matter in the young Universe. This halo is important for our understanding of the processes that led to the formation of the Milky Way galaxy. It is believed that many of the halo stars and those of the same type found in globular clusters existed already before the Milky Way had fully formed. Galaxy cannibalism Many astronomers suspect that galaxies evolve and gradually grow larger and heavier by practising cannibalism on their own kind. In this picture, when two galaxies collide in space, the stars and nebulae in the smaller one will disperse and soon be taken over by the larger one, which

  9. Chemical Abundances of Metal-poor stars in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Jablonka, Pascale; Hill, Vanessa; Starkenburg, Else; Lemasle, Bertrand; Shetrone, Matthew; Irwin, Mike; Norris, John; Yong, David; Gilmore, Gerry; Salvadori, Stephania; Skuladottir, Asa; Tolstoy, Eline

    2016-08-01

    Stars in low-mass dwarf galaxies show a larger range in their chemical properties than those in the Milky Way halo. The slower star formation efficiency make dwarf galaxies ideal systems for testing nucleosynthetic yields. Not only are alpha-poor stars found at lower metallicities, and a higher fraction of carbon-enhanced stars, but we are also finding stars in dwarf galaxies that appear to be iron-rich. These are compared with yields from a variety of supernova predictions.

  10. Turbulence and Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollyday, Gigja; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Little Things Team

    2015-01-01

    We are interested in understanding the nature and role of turbulence in the interstellar medium of dwarf irregular galaxies. Turbulence, resulting from a variety of processes, is a potential source for cloud formation, and thus star formation. We have undertaken an indirect analysis of turbulence via the third (skewness) and fourth (kurtosis) moments of the distribution of atomic hydrogen gas densities using the LITTLE THINGS data for a 40-count sample of nearby (<10.3 Mpc) dwarf galaxies. We followed the formulism used by Burkhart et al. (2010) in a study of the SMC. We found that there is evidence of turbulence in dwarf galaxies at a level comparable to that found in the SMC, but we have found no correlation between integrated star formation rates and integrated kurtosis values nor a clear correlation between kurtosis as a function of radius with gas surface density and star formation profiles. We are grateful for a summer internship provided by the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program at Northern Arizona University, run by Dr. Kathy Eastwood and Dr. David Trilling and funded by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-1004107.

  11. The RSA survey of dwarf galaxies, 1: Optical photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vader, J. Patricia; Chaboyer, Brian

    1994-01-01

    We present detailed surface photometry, based on broad B-band charge coupled device (CCD) images, of about 80 dwarf galaxies. Our sample represents approximately 10% of all dwarf galaxies identified in the vicinity of Revised Shapley-Ames (RSA) galaxies on high resolution blue photographic plates, referred to as the RSA survey of dwarf galaxies. We derive global properties and radial surface brightness profiles, and examine the morphologies. The radial surface brightness profiles of dwarf galaxies, whether early or late type, display the same varieties in shape and complexity as those of classical giant galaxies. Only a few are well described by a pure r(exp 1/4) law. Exponential profiles prevail. Features typical of giant disk galaxies, such as exponential profiles with a central depression, lenses, and even, in one case (IC 2041), a relatively prominent bulge are also found in dwarf galaxies. Our data suggest that the central region evolves from being bulge-like, with an r(exp 1/4) law profile, in bright galaxies to a lens-like structure in dwarf galaxies. We prove detailed surface photometry to be a helpful if not always sufficient tool in investigating the structure of dwarf galaxies. In many cases kinematic information is needed to complete the picture. We find the shapes of the surface brightness profiles to be loosely associated with morphological type. Our sample contains several new galaxies with properties intermediate between those of giant and dwarf ellipticals (but no M32-like objects). This shows that such intermediate galaxies exist so that at least a fraction of early-type dwarf ellipticals is structurally related to early-type giants instead of belonging to a totally unrelated, disjunct family. This supports an origin of early-type dwarf galaxies as originally more massive systems that acquired their current morphology as a result of substantial, presumable supernova-driven, mass loss. On the other hand, several early-type dwarfs in our sample are

  12. Revised sizes and positions for the Mailyan dwarf galaxy catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madore, B. F.; Sun, H.; Bennett, J.; Corwin, H. G., Jr.; Helou, G.; Lague, C.; Schmitz, M.; Wu, X.

    1994-01-01

    New positions (good to +/- 15 arcsec), revised sizes, and sample cross-identifications are presented for dwarf galaxies discovered and published by Mailyan (1973, Astrofizika, 9, 33). Of the 104 originally cataloged galaxies we were able to recover only 100, despite an extensive search of the red and blue Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) prints. Over half of the recovered objects were found to correspond to previously cataloged galaxies; few if any of these are dwarf spheriodal galaxies, but rather mostly dwarf irregulars of low surface brightness.

  13. THE OUTER DISKS OF DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Massey, Philip; Wilsey, Nick; Riabokin, Malanka; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Oh, Se-Heon; Anderson, Ed; Nordgren, Tyler E. E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu E-mail: riabokin@msu.edu E-mail: seheon-oh@ast.uct.ac.za E-mail: tyler_nordgren@redlands.edu

    2011-10-15

    In order to explore the properties of extreme outer stellar disks, we obtained ultra-deep V and GALEX ultraviolet (UV) images of four dwarf irregular galaxies and one blue compact dwarf galaxy, and ultra-deep B images of three of these. Our V-band surface photometry extends to 29.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}. We convert the FUV and V-band photometry, along with H{alpha} photometry obtained in a larger survey, into radial star formation rate profiles that are sensitive to timescales from 10 Myr to the lifetime of the galaxy. We also obtained H I-line emission data and compare the stellar distributions, surface brightness profiles, and star formation rate profiles to H I-line emission maps, gas surface density profiles, and gas kinematics. Our data lead us to two general observations. First, the exponential disks in these irregular galaxies are extraordinarily regular. We observe that the stellar disks continue to decline exponentially as far as our measurements extend. In spite of lumpiness in the distribution of young stars and H I distributions and kinematics that have significant unordered motions, sporadic processes that have built the disks-star formation, radial movement of stars, and perhaps even perturbations from the outside-have, nevertheless, conspired to produce standard disk profiles. Second, there is a remarkable continuity of star formation throughout these disks over time. In four out of five of our galaxies the star formation rate in the outer disk measured from the FUV tracks that determined from the V-band, to within factors of five, requiring star formation at a fairly steady rate over the galaxy's lifetime. Yet, the H I surface density profiles generally decline with radius more shallowly than the stellar light, and the gas is marginally gravitationally stable against collapse into clouds. Outer stellar disks are challenging our concepts of star formation and disk growth and provide a critical environment in which to understand processes that mold

  14. Seeking footprints of the primeval Universe in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Sebastian L.

    2015-03-01

    We present the star formation histories (SFHs) of four isolated dwarf galaxies, Cetus, Tucana, LGS-3, and Phoenix, as a function of galactocentric radius. Our results suggest that beyond some distance from the center, there are no significative differences in fundamental properties of these galaxies, such as the star formation rate (SFR) or age-metallicity relation (AMR). The stellar content of this region would be composed of old (>~ 10.5 Gyr) metal-poor stars only. In the innermost regions, dwarf galaxies appear to have formed stars during time intervals which duration varies from galaxy to galaxy. This extended star formation produces the dichotomy between dwarf spheroidal (dSph) and dwarf Transition (dTr) galaxy types.

  15. On the population of H I dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, D.H.; Szomoru, A.; Guhathakurta, P.; Van gorkom, J.H. Groningen, State University Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ Columbia University, New York )

    1991-05-01

    Results are reported from a 21 cm survey of fields in the Perseus-Pisces supercluster and a foreground void, which was designed to find gas-rich dwarf galaxies or optically faint H I clouds with masses greater than 10 to the 8th solar masses. Sixteen objects have been detected in the supercluster, nine of them previously uncataloged. No objects were found in the void fields, an indication that H I dwarf galaxies follow the spatial structure defined by bright galaxies, although the results do not rule out a moderate 'bias' between dwarfs and bright galaxies. The number of galaxies detected is smaller than expected from a simple extrapolation of the optical luminosity function. These data leave no room for a substantial population of H I dwarfs or gas-rich, low surface brightness giants that could have been missed by conventional, optical galaxy catalogs. 24 refs.

  16. Chemical Analysis of the Fornax Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letarte, Bruno

    2007-03-01

    This thesis is entitled “Chemical Analysis of the Fornax Dwarf Galaxy”, and it’s main goal is to determine what are the chemical elements present in the stars of this galaxy in order to try and understand it’s evolution. Galaxies are not “static” objects, they move, form stars and can interact with other galaxies. Studying the stars composing a galaxy can in principle, inform us about its past. Some stars can be as old as the galaxy itself, some can be much younger and we can use this information to study how the stellar spectra have varied with time over the entire history of star formation in this galaxy. Dwarf galaxies are in principle the most simple and straightforward type of galaxy and their study can be used to test numerous theories of the formation and evolution of stars and galaxies in a range of environments. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are small, roughly spherical galaxies that are typically found in the vicinity of larger galaxies, such as the Milky Way. They typically do not have any ongoing star formation, nor do they appear to have any gas associated to them. The abundance ratios of different elements in individual stars with a range of ages provide a detailed insight into the various chemical enrichment processes (e.g., supernovae, stellar winds) which in turn improves our understanding of the global processes of formation and evolution of a galaxy as a whole. An important aspect of this thesis is the pipeline developed to analyse a large number of stellar spectra (~100) in a consistent and statistically robust manner, using tools that are typically used on spectra with twice the resolution and larger wavelength coverage. This required bringing together several complex tasks, including accurate stellar atmospheric models, atomic data for the absorption lines, codes of line formation, EW measurements and signal extraction methods, all of which need to be properly included and treated in order to obtain accurate results. The pipeline

  17. Formation and Evolution of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Igor

    2006-11-01

    This thesis presents observational studies of evolution of dwarf elliptical galaxies. dE's are numerically dominant population in clusters of galaxies, but their origin and evolution is a matter of debate. Several scenarios of gas removal from dE's exist: galactic winds, ram pressure stripping, gravitaional harassment. We present new method to estimate stellar population parameters and internal kinematics, based on fitting observed spectra in the pixel space by PEGASE.HR synthetic populations. We apply this technique to 3D-spectroscopic observations of dE galaxies in the Virgo cluster and nearby groups and multiobject spectroscopy of several dozens of dE's in the Abell 496 cluster. We present discovery of young nuclei in bright dE galaxies in the Virgo cluster. Based on the analysis of observational data we conclude that: (1) there is an evolutionary connection between dE's and dIrr's, (2) the most probable scenario of gas removal is ram pressure stripping by the intergalactic medium.

  18. VCC 2062: an old tidal dwarf galaxy in the Virgo cluster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, P.-A.; Braine, J.; Lisenfeld, U.; Brinks, E.; Boquien, M.

    2007-11-01

    Context: Numerical simulations predict the existence of old Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs) that would have survived several Gyr after the collision lying at their origin. Such survivors, which would by now have become independent relaxed galaxies, would be ideal laboratories, if nearby enough, to tackle a number of topical issues, including the distribution of Dark Matter in and around galaxies. However finding old dwarf galaxies with a confirmed tidal origin is an observational challenge. Aims: A dwarf galaxy in the nearby Virgo Cluster, VCC 2062, exhibits several unusual properties that are typical of a galaxy made out of recycled material. We discuss whether it may indeed be a TDG. Methods: We analysed multi-wavelength observations of VCC 2062, including a CO map acquired with the IRAM 30 m dish, an optical spectrum of its HII regions, GALEX ultraviolet and archival broad-band and narrow-band optical images as well as a VLA HI datacube, originally obtained as part of the VIVA project. Results: VCC 2062 appears to be the optical, low surface brightness counterpart of a kinematically detached, rotating condensation that formed within an HI tail apparently physically linked to the disturbed galaxy NGC 4694. In contrast to its faint optical luminosity, VCC 2062 is characterised by strong CO emission and a high oxygen abundance more typical of spiral disks. Its dynamical mass however, is that of a dwarf galaxy. Conclusions: VCC 2062 was most likely formed within a pre-enriched gaseous structure expelled from a larger galaxy as a result of a tidal interaction. The natural provider for the gaseous tail is NGC 4694 or rather a former companion which subsequently has been accreted by the massive galaxy. According to that scenario, VCC 2062 has been formed by a past tidal encounter. Since its parent galaxies have most probably already totally merged, it qualifies as an old Tidal Dwarf Galaxy.

  19. Testing Modified Gravity with Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghi, Hosein; Amiri, Vahid

    2016-08-01

    The observed velocity dispersion of the classical dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies of the Milky Way (MW) requires the Newtonian stellar mass-to-light (M★/L) ratios in the range of about 10 to more than 100 solar units, that are well outside the acceptable limit predicted by stellar population synthesis (SPS) models. Using Jeans analysis, we calculate the line-of-sight velocity dispersion (σ _ph {los}) of stars in eight MW dSphs in the context of the Modified Gravity (MOG) theory of Moffat, assuming a constant M★/L ratio without invoking the exotic cold dark matter. First, we use the weak field approximation of MOG and assume the two parameters α and μ of the theory to be constant as has already been inferred from fitting to the observed rotational data of the THINGS catalog of galaxies. We find that the derived M★/L ratios for almost all dSphs are too large to be explained by the stellar population values. In order to fit the line-of-sight velocity dispersions of the dSph with reasonable M★/L values we must vary α and μ on a case by case basis. A common pair of values cannot be found for all dSphs. Comparing with the values found from rotation curve fitting, it appears that μ correlates strongly with galaxy luminosity, shedding doubt on it as a universal constant.

  20. Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies: Life in a Rough Neighborhood

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S

    2003-10-16

    Star formation within dwarf galaxies is governed by several factors. Many of these factors are external, including ram-pressure stripping, tidal stripping, and heating by external UV radiation. The latter, in particular, may prevent star formation in the smallest systems. Internal factors include negative feedback in the form of UV radiation, winds and supernovae from massive stars. These act to reduce the star formation efficiency within dwarf systems, which may, in turn, solve several theoretical and observational problems associated with galaxy formation. In this contribution, we discuss our recent work being done to examine the importance of the many factors in the evolution of dwarf galaxies.

  1. Dwarf galaxies in the coma cluster: Star formation properties and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Derek M.

    The infall regions of galaxy clusters are unique laboratories for studying the impact of environment on galaxy evolution. This intermediate region links the low-density field environment and the dense core of the cluster, and is thought to host recently accreted galaxies whose star formation is being quenched by external processes associated with the cluster. In this dissertation, we measure the star formation properties of galaxies at the infall region of the nearby rich cluster of galaxies, Coma. We rely primarily on Ultraviolet (UV) data owing to its sensitivity to recent star formation and we place more emphasis on the properties of dwarf galaxies. Dwarf galaxies are good tracers of external processes in clusters but their evolution is poorly constrained as they are intrinsically faint and hence more challenging to detect. We make use of deep GALEX far-UV and near-UV observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster. This area of the cluster has supporting photometric coverage at optical and IR wavelengths in addition to optical spectroscopic data that includes deep redshift coverage of dwarf galaxies in Coma. Our GALEX observations were the deepest exposures taken for a local galaxy cluster. The depth of these images required alternative data analysis techniques to overcome systematic effects that limit the default GALEX pipeline analysis. Specifically, we used a deblending method that improved detection efficiency by a factor of ˜2 and allowed reliable photometry a few magnitudes deeper than the pipeline catalog. We performed deep measurements of the total UV galaxy counts in our field that were used to measure the source confusion limit for crowded GALEX fields. The star formation properties of Coma members were studied for galaxies that span from starbursts to passive galaxies. Star-forming galaxies in Coma tend to have lower specific star formation rates, on average, as compared to field galaxies. We show that the majority of these galaxies are likely

  2. Cold H I in faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Narendra Nath; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisin, Serafim S.; Begum, Ayesha

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a study of the amount and distribution of cold atomic gas, as well its correlation with recent star formation in a sample of extremely faint dwarf irregular galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Faint Irregular Galaxy GMRT Survey (FIGGS) and its extension, FIGGS2. We use two different methods to identify cold atomic gas. In the first method, line-of-sight H I spectra were decomposed into multiple Gaussian components and narrow Gaussian components were identified as cold H I. In the second method, the brightness temperature (TB ) is used as a tracer of cold H I. We find that the amount of cold gas identified using the TB method is significantly larger than the amount of gas identified using Gaussian decomposition. We also find that a large fraction of the cold gas identified using the TB method is spatially coincident with regions of recent star formation, although the converse is not true. That is only a small fraction of the regions with recent star formation are also covered by cold gas. For regions where the star formation and the cold gas overlap, we study the relationship between the star formation rate density and the cold H I column density. We find that the star formation rate density has a power-law dependence on the H I column density, but that the slope of this power law is significantly flatter than that of the canonical Kennicutt-Schmidt relation.

  3. Chemodynamic Evolution of Dwarf Galaxies in Tidal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, David; Martel, Hugo; Romeo, Alessandro B.

    2016-11-01

    The mass–metallicity relation shows that the galaxies with the lowest mass have the lowest metallicities. As most dwarf galaxies are in group environments, interaction effects such as tides could contribute to this trend. We perform a series of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of dwarf galaxies in external tidal fields to examine the effects of tides on their metallicities and metallicity gradients. In our simulated galaxies, gravitational instabilities drive gas inwards and produce centralized star formation and a significant metallicity gradient. Strong tides can contribute to these instabilities, but their primary effect is to strip the outer low-metallicity gas, producing a truncated gas disk with a large metallicity. This suggests that the effect of tides on the mass–metallicity relation is to move dwarf galaxies to higher metallicities.

  4. The Aromatic Features in Very Faint Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ronin; Hogg, David W.; Moustakas, John

    2011-04-01

    We present optical and mid-infrared photometry of a statistically complete sample of 29 dwarf galaxies (Mr > - 15 mag) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic sample and observed in the mid-infrared with Spitzer IRAC. This sample contains nearby (redshift lsim0.005) galaxies 3 mag fainter than previously studied samples. We compare our sample with other star-forming galaxies that have been observed with both IRAC and SDSS. We examine the relationship of the infrared color, [3.6]-[7.8], sensitive to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance and also hot dust and stellar continuum, with star formation rates (SFRs), oxygen abundances, and radiation hardness, all estimated by optical emission lines. Consistent with studies of more luminous dwarfs, we find that these dwarf galaxies show much redder [3.6]-[7.8] color than luminous galaxies with similar specific SFRs. Unlike luminous galaxies, we find that these dwarf galaxies show no significant dependence at all of the [3.6]-[7.8] color on SFR, oxygen abundance, or radiation hardness, despite the fact that the sample spans a significant range in all of these quantities. When the dwarfs in our sample are compared with more luminous dwarfs, we find that the [3.6]-[7.8] color, potentially tracing the PAH emission, depends on oxygen abundance and radiation hardness. However, these two parameters are correlated with one another as well; we break this degeneracy by looking at the PAH-oxygen abundance relation at a fixed radiation hardness and the PAH-hardness relation at a fixed oxygen abundance. This test shows that the [3.6]-[7.8] color in dwarf galaxies appears to depend more directly on oxygen abundance based on the data currently available.

  5. Galaxies on Top of Quasars: Probing Dwarf Galaxies in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Lorrie; York, D. G.; Noterdaeme, P.; Srianand, R.; Bowen, D. V.; Khare, P.; Bishof, M.; Whichard, Z.; Kulkarni, V. P.

    2013-07-01

    Absorption lines from galaxies at intervening redshifts in quasar spectra are sensitive probes of metals and gas that are otherwise invisible due to distance or low surface brightness. However, in order to determine the environments these absorption lines arise in, we must detect these galaxies in emission as well. Galaxies on top of quasars (GOTOQs) are low-z galaxies found intervening with background quasars in the SDSS. These galaxies have been flagged for their narrow galactic emission lines present in quasar spectra in the SDSS. Typically, the low-z nature of these galaxies allows them to be easily detected in SDSS imaging. However, a number of GOTOQs (about 10%), despite being detected in spectral emission, are NOT seen in SDSS imaging. This implies that these may be dark galaxies, dwarf galaxies, or similarly low surface brightness galaxies. Additionally, about 25% of those detected in imaging are dwarf galaxies according to their L* values. Dwarf galaxies have long been underrepresented in observations compared to theory and are known to have large extents in dark matter. Given their prevalence here in our sample we must ask what role they play in quasar absorption line systems (QSOALS). Recent detections of 21-cm galaxies with few stars imply that aborted star formation in dark matter sub halos may produce QSOALS. Thus, this sub sample of galaxies offers a unique technique for probing dark and dwarf galaxies. The sample and its properties will be discussed, including star formation rates and dust estimates, as well as prospects for the future.

  6. Wave Dark Matter and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, Alan R.

    We explore a model of dark matter called wave dark matter (also known as scalar field dark matter and boson stars) which has recently been motivated by a new geometric perspective by Bray. Wave dark matter describes dark matter as a scalar field which satisfies the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. These equations rely on a fundamental constant Upsilon (also known as the "mass term'' of the Klein-Gordon equation). Specifically, in this dissertation, we study spherically symmetric wave dark matter and compare these results with observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies as a first attempt to compare the implications of the theory of wave dark matter with actual observations of dark matter. This includes finding a first estimate of the fundamental constant Upsilon. In the introductory Chapter 1, we present some preliminary background material to define and motivate the study of wave dark matter and describe some of the properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In Chapter 2, we present several different ways of describing a spherically symmetric spacetime and the resulting metrics. We then focus our discussion on an especially useful form of the metric of a spherically symmetric spacetime in polar-areal coordinates and its properties. In particular, we show how the metric component functions chosen are extremely compatible with notions in Newtonian mechanics. We also show the monotonicity of the Hawking mass in these coordinates. Finally, we discuss how these coordinates and the metric can be used to solve the spherically symmetric Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. In Chapter 3, we explore spherically symmetric solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, the defining equations of wave dark matter, where the scalar field is of the form f(t, r) = eiotF(r) for some constant o ∈ R and complex-valued function F(r). We show that the corresponding metric is static if and only if F( r) = h(r)eia for some constant alpha ∈ R and real-valued function h(r). We describe the

  7. EVOLUTIONARY TRACKS OF TIDALLY STIRRED DISKY DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mayer, Lucio E-mail: stelios@mps.ohio-state.edu

    2011-09-20

    Using collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate the tidal evolution of late-type, rotationally supported dwarfs inside Milky Way sized host galaxies. Our study focuses on a wide variety of dwarf orbital configurations and initial structures. During the evolution, the disky dwarfs undergo strong mass loss, the stellar disks are transformed into spheroids, and rotation is replaced by random motions of the stars. Thus, the late-type progenitors are transformed into early-type dwarfs as envisioned by the tidal stirring model for the formation of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies in the Local Group. We determine the photometric properties of the dwarfs, including the total visual magnitude, the half-light radius, and the central surface brightness as they would be measured by an observer near the galactic center. Special emphasis is also placed on studying their kinematics and shapes. We demonstrate that the measured values are biased by a number of observational effects including the increasing angle of the observation cone near the orbital pericenter, the fact that away from the pericenter the tidal tails are typically oriented along the line of sight, and the fact that for most of the evolution the stellar components of the dwarfs are triaxial ellipsoids whose major axis tumbles with respect to the line of sight. Finally, we compare the measured properties of the simulated dwarfs to those of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. The evolutionary tracks of the dwarfs in different parameter planes and the correlations between their different properties, especially the total magnitude and the surface brightness, strongly suggest that present-day dSph galaxies may have indeed formed from late-type progenitors as proposed by the tidal stirring scenario.

  8. Satellite Quenching and the Lifecycle of Dwarf Galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Colin; Bell, Eric F.

    2015-01-01

    In the past ten years the known population of Local Group dwarf galaxies has expanded substantially, both to greater distances from the Milky Way and to lower dwarf masses. This growing sample allows us to study the dwarf system as a population, and ask if we can see in aggregate the signs of processes that would otherwise be difficult to trace in dwarfs individually. Following this strategy I will discuss how the quenching of dwarf galaxies can be modeled and understood at the population-level, and how we use that to constrain how possible quenching mechanisms must work if they are to reproduce the Local Group system that we see. I show that the distribution of quenched satellites can be reproduced by environmental quenching if and only if a single pericenter passage is sufficient to end star formation in low mass dwarfs. I also show that there is a significant transition in the effectiveness of quenching between low mass dwarfs and dwarfs at Magellanic cloud-like masses, with the higher mass dwarfs much more resilient to quenching. I present both ram pressure and delay time models to try to understand the origin of this transition.

  9. Far-infrared line images of dwarf galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poglitsch, A.; Geis, N.; Herrmann, F.; Madden, S. C.; Stacey, G. J.; Townes, C. H.; Genzel, R.

    1993-01-01

    Irregular dwarf galaxies are about ten times more widespread in the universe than regular spiral galaxies. They are characterized by a relatively low metallicity, i.e., lower abundance of the heavier elements (metals) with respect to hydrogen than in the solar neighborhood. These heavier elements in the form of molecules, atoms, or ions, which have radiative transitions in the infrared play a decisive role in the energy balance of the ISM and thereby for the formation of stars. Dwarf galaxies are thus model cases for the physical conditions in the early phase of the universe. Large Magellanic Cloud: 30 Doradus. The two nearest dwarf galaxies are the Magellanic clouds at a distance approximately 50 kpc. The LMC contains 30 Dor, a region with young, extremely massive stars which strongly interact with the surrounding ISM on account of their stellar winds and intense UV radiation. 30 Dor is the brightest object in the LMC at almost all wavelengths.

  10. On Dark Matter in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M. G.

    2011-07-01

    The small (LV ≤ 107LV,⊙) baryonic components of the Milky Way's dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites contribute small "backgrounds" with regards to estimates of dSph dark matter density profiles and any related predictions of dark matter decay/annihilation signals. As dSphs gain attention from a broad range of physicists interested in dark matter, it becomes important to examine the robustness - with respect to details like modeling assumptions and observational uncertainties - of conclusions regarding the dark matter content of dSphs and the scaling relations derived therefrom. Indeed dSphs seem to contain copious amounts of dark matter. However, the standard Jeans analysis constrains the dark mass enclosed only within the luminous scale radius, and does not reveal the internal dark matter distribution in a model-indepdendent way. Furthermore, new observational results help to identify complexities in internal dSph kinematics and cast doubt on previously apparent similarities among dSph dark matter halos. Further progress in understsanding dark matter on small scales will require consideration of dSphs more as individual galaxies and less as laboratories.

  11. Sweating the small stuff: simulating dwarf galaxies, ultra-faint dwarf galaxies, and their own tiny satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Coral; Oñorbe, Jose; Bullock, James S.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Elbert, Oliver D.; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dušan

    2015-10-01

    We present Feedback in Realistic Environment (FIRE)/GIZMO hydrodynamic zoom-in simulations of isolated dark matter haloes, two each at the mass of classical dwarf galaxies (Mvir ≃ 1010 M⊙) and ultra-faint galaxies (Mvir ≃ 109 M⊙), and with two feedback implementations. The resulting central galaxies lie on an extrapolated abundance matching relation from M⋆ ≃ 106 to 104 M⊙ without a break. Every host is filled with subhaloes, many of which form stars. Each of our dwarfs with M⋆ ≃ 106 M⊙ has 1-2 well-resolved satellites with M⋆ = 3-200 × 103 M⊙. Even our isolated ultra-faint galaxies have star-forming subhaloes. If this is representative, dwarf galaxies throughout the Universe should commonly host tiny satellite galaxies of their own. We combine our results with the Exploring the Local Volume in Simulations (ELVIS) simulations to show that targeting ˜ 50 kpc regions around nearby isolated dwarfs could increase the chances of discovering ultra-faint galaxies by ˜35 per cent compared to random pointings, and specifically identify the region around the Phoenix dwarf galaxy as a good potential target. The well-resolved ultra-faint galaxies in our simulations (M⋆ ≃ 3-30 × 103 M⊙) form within Mpeak ≃ 0.5-3 × 109 M⊙ haloes. Each has a uniformly ancient stellar population ( > 10 Gyr) owing to reionization-related quenching. More massive systems, in contrast, all have late-time star formation. Our results suggest that Mhalo ≃ 5 × 109 M⊙ is a probable dividing line between haloes hosting reionization `fossils' and those hosting dwarfs that can continue to form stars in isolation after reionization.

  12. The Star Formation Properties of Void Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorman, Crystal; Vogeley, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the star formation properties of two large samples of galaxies from the SDSS in large-scale cosmic voids on time scales of 10 Myr and 100 Myr, using Ha emission line strengths and GALEX FUV fluxes, respectively. The first sample consists of 109,818 optically selected galaxies. We find that void galaxies in this sample have higher specific star formation rates (SSFRs; star formation rates per unit stellar mass) than similar stellar mass galaxies in denser regions. The second sample is a subset of the optically selected sample containing 8070 galaxies with reliable S/N HI detections from ALFALFA. For the HI detected sample, SSFRs are similar regardless of large-scale environment. Investigating only the HI detected dwarf galaxies reveals a trend towards higher SSFRs in voids. Furthermore, we estimate the star formation rate per unit HI mass, known as the star formation efficiency (SFE) of a galaxy, as a function of environment. For the overall HI detected population, we notice no environmental dependence. Limiting the sample to dwarf galaxies again reveals a trend towards higher SFEs in voids. These results suggest that void environments provide a nurturing environment for dwarf galaxy evolution.

  13. Conformal Gravity Rotation Curves in Tidal Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James

    2013-04-01

    We extend the application of the conformal gravity theory to tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs). These dwarf galaxies are formed in the tidal tails of collisions of disk galaxies, and are thought to be predominantly composed of material expelled from the galactic disk of a parent galaxy. With any dark matter present in the parent galaxies expected to predominantly be in spherical haloes, tidal galaxies should thus have a very low dark matter content, and thus should not themselves be expected to possess the substantial spherical dark matter haloes that are ordinarily required to accompany and stabilize disk galaxies in standard gravity. In consequence, in the standard dark matter picture TDG rotation curves should not be expected to display any substantial mass discrepancies. Tidal dwarf galaxies thus provide a quite unusual laboratory for exploring the missing mass problem. Rotation curve data have become available for three TDGs associated with the parent galaxy NGC 5291, and it has been shown that there are in fact mass discrepancies, and that a good accounting of the data can be provided by MOND. Here we show that conformal gravity can also provide a good accounting of the data.

  14. Sweating the small stuff: simulating dwarf galaxies, ultra-faint dwarf galaxies, and their own tiny satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Coral Rose

    2016-06-01

    The high dark matter content and the shallow potential wells of low mass galaxies (10^3 Msun < Mstar < 10^9.5 Msun) make them excellent testbeds for differing theories of galaxy formation. Additionally, the recent up-tick in the number and detail of Local Group dwarf galaxy observations provides a rich dataset for comparison to simulations that attempt to answer important questions in near field cosmology: why are there so few observed dwarfs compared to the number predicted by simulations? What shuts down star formation in ultra-faint galaxies? Why do dwarfs have inverted age gradients and what does it take to convert a dwarf irregular (dIrrs) into a dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy?We to attempt to answer these questions by running ultra-high resolution cosmological FIRE simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies. We predict that many ultra-faint dwarfs should exist as satellites of more massive isolated Local Group dwarfs. The ultra-faints (Mstar < 10^4 Msun) formed in these simulations have uniformly ancient stellar populations (> 10 Gyr), having had their star formation shut down by reionization. Additionally, we show that the kinematics and ellipticities of isolated simulated dwarf centrals are consistent with observed dSphs satellites without the need for harassment from a massive host. We further show that most (but not all) observed *isolated* dIrrs in the Local Volume also have dispersion-supported stellar populations, contradicting the previous view that these objects are rotating. Finally, we investigate the stellar age gradients in dwarfs — showing that early mergers and strong feedback can create an inverted gradient, with the older stars occupying larger galactocentric radii.These results offer an interesting direction in testing models that attempt to solve dark matter problems via explosive feedback episodes. Can the same models that create large cores in simulated dwarfs preserve the mild stellar rotation that is seen in a minority of isolated d

  15. The history of the evolution of dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Jennifer Mae

    2003-08-01

    The formation of stars in the smallest galaxies is an important test of the standard paradigm for galaxy formation and evolution. While reasonably successful otherwise, current simulations of hierarchical galaxy formation have great difficulty reproducing the number density, star-formation histories, and structural parameters of local dwarf galaxies. Motivated by these difficulties, we use the observations of both the local dwarf galaxy population and the progenitors of dwarf galaxies in the distant universe, and a new approach to testing galaxy evolution, to trace the evolution and star-formation histories of dwarf galaxies. In the first half of this thesis, we present the results of an HST survey of ˜ 70 dwarf elliptical galaxies (dEs) in the nearby Virgo and Fornax Clusters. By resolving the globular clusters and nuclei from the underlying stars in each dE, we use these three sub- populations to trace the dE star-formation histories. We find that the dE globular cluster candidates are as blue in V I as the metal-poor globular clusters of the Milky Way. The observed correlation of the dE globular cluster systems' V I color with the luminosity of the host dE is strong evidence that the globular clusters were formed within the halos of dEs, and do not have a pre-galactic origin. The blue V I colors of the globular cluster systems and nuclei relative to the dE stellar envelopes require at least two separate star- formation episodes within the dEs. We explore the possibility that many of the dE nuclei are dynamically decayed massive globular clusters. However, we find that dynamical friction appears to be too effective at destroying globular clusters to account for the faint nuclei and the cluster systems observed in low-luminosity dEs, unless the clusters are relatively young or the dEs possess extended dark-matter halos. The extremely blue colors of two nuclei indicate younger ages than the dE stellar halos and globular cluster systems. In the second half of this

  16. New low surface brightness dwarf galaxies detected around nearby spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Riepe, P.; Zilch, T.; Blauensteiner, M.; Elvov, M.; Hochleitner, P.; Hubl, B.; Kerschhuber, G.; Küppers, S.; Neyer, F.; Pölzl, R.; Remmel, P.; Schneider, O.; Sparenberg, R.; Trulson, U.; Willems, G.; Ziegler, H.

    2015-10-01

    We conduct a survey of low surface brightness (LSB) satellite galaxies around the Local Volume massive spirals using long exposures with small amateur telescopes. We identified 27 low and very low surface brightness objects around the galaxies NGC672, 891, 1156, 2683, 3344, 4258, 4618, 4631, and 5457 situated within 10 Mpc from us, and found nothing new around NGC2903, 3239, 4214, and 5585. Assuming that the dwarf candidates are the satellites of the neighboring luminous galaxies, their absolute magnitudes are in the range of -8.6 > M B > -13.3, their effective diameters are 0.4-4.7 kpc, and the average surface brightness is 26ṃ1/□″. The mean linear projected separation of the satellite candidates from the host galaxies is 73 kpc. Our spectroscopic observations of two LSB dwarfs with the Russian 6-meter telescope confirm their physical connection to the host galaxies NGC891 and NGC2683.

  17. THE ACCRETION OF DWARF GALAXIES AND THEIR GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, Craig E.; Ashman, Keith M. E-mail: ashmank@umkc.ed

    2010-12-10

    The question of where the low-metallicity globular clusters in early-type galaxies came from has profound implications for the formation of those galaxies. Our work supports the idea that the metal-poor globular cluster systems of giant early-type galaxies formed in dwarf galaxies that have been subsumed by the giants. To support this hypothesis, two linear relations, one involving globular cluster metallicity versus host galaxy luminosity and one involving metallicity versus velocity dispersion were studied. Tentatively, these relations show that the bright ellipticals do not obey the same trend as the dwarfs, suggesting that the low-metallicity globular clusters did not form within their parent bright ellipticals.

  18. Surveying for Dwarf Galaxies Within Void FN8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Stephen R.

    2016-06-01

    The dwarf galaxy population in low density volumes, or voids, is a test of galaxy formation models and how they treat dark matter; some models say dwarf galaxies cannot be in void centers while others say they can. Since it appears many dwarf galaxies are H-alpha emitters, a well-designed deep survey through a nearby void center will either find nothing, and thus constrain the population there to be at some percentage below the mean, or it will find H-alpha emitters and significantly challenge several otherwise successful theories. Either result is a significant step in better understanding galaxy formation and large-scale structure. In 2013, a redshifted H-alpha imaging survey was begun for dwarf galaxies with ‑14.0 ≤ Mr ≤ ‑12.0 in the heart and back of the void FN8. Our first results have been surprising, furnishing significantly more candidate objects than anticipated. Through the Gemini Fast Turnaround Program, seven spectrum have been obtained, with one spectrum being a strong candidate for habitation within the center of the void.

  19. Unveiling the Secret of a Virgo Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-05-01

    Dwarf galaxies may not be as impressive in appearance as their larger brethren, but they are at least as interesting from a scientific point of view. And sometimes they may have hidden properties that will only be found by means of careful observations, probing the signals of their stars at the faintest level. Such as the entirely unexpected, well developed spiral structure within an otherwise seemingly normal dwarf elliptical galaxy! This is the surprise result of a new study by a team of astronomers [1], headed by Helmut Jerjen from the Australian National University (Canberra) who obtained detailed observations with the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the dwarf galaxy IC 3328 in the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies, some 50 million light-years away. Dwarf galaxies Dwarf galaxies are present in all major clusters of galaxies and dominate by numbers in the universe. They may contain a few (tens of) millions of stars, as compared to galaxies of normal size with hundreds of billions of stars. About two dozen dwarf galaxies are known in the "Local Group" of galaxies of which the Milky Way galaxy in which we live is also a member. The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are some of the best known dwarf galaxies - they are of the irregular type - while NGC 147 and NGC 205, two companions to the great Andromeda Galaxy, are of the elliptical type. Dwarf elliptical galaxies are characterized by their smooth appearance. From various studies, it is known that they are tri-axial ellipsoids of different degrees of elongation. Some are almost spherical while others are more pancake- or cigar-shaped. Like the elliptical galaxies of normal size, dwarf ellipticals are almost pure aggregates of stars. In contrast, spiral galaxies also contain clouds of gas and dust. The visible mass of spiral galaxies is in a rotating disk. Dwarf ellipticals generally keep their form because of the random motions of their stars. VLT observations of dwarf elliptical galaxies Using the FORS1 multi

  20. On the formation of dwarf galaxies and stellar haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. I.; Pontzen, A. P.; Viel, M.

    2006-09-01

    Using analytic arguments and a suite of very high resolution (~103Msolar per particle) cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we argue that high-redshift, z ~ 10, M ~ 108Msolar haloes, form the smallest `baryonic building block' (BBB) for galaxy formation. These haloes are just massive enough to efficiently form stars through atomic line cooling and to hold on to their gas in the presence of supernova (SN) winds and reionization. These combined effects, in particular that of the SN feedback, create a sharp transition: over the mass range 3-10 × 107Msolar, the BBBs drop two orders of magnitude in stellar mass. Below ~2 × 107Msolar, galaxies will be dark with almost no stars and no gas. Above this scale is the smallest unit of galaxy formation: the BBB. We show that the BBBs have stellar distributions which are spheroidal, of low rotational velocity, old and metal poor: they resemble the dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) of the Local Group (LG). Unlike the LG dSphs, however, they contain significant gas fractions. We connect these high-redshift BBBs to the smallest dwarf galaxies observed at z = 0 using linear theory. A small fraction (~100) of these gas-rich BBBs at high redshift fall in to a galaxy the size of the Milky Way (MW). We suggest that 10 per cent of these survive to become the observed LG dwarf galaxies at the present epoch. This is consistent with recent numerical estimates. Those infalling haloes on benign orbits which keep them far away from the MW or Andromeda manage to retain their gas and slowly form stars - these become the smallest dwarf irregular galaxies; those on more severe orbits lose their gas faster than they can form stars and become the dwarf spheroidals. The remaining 90 per cent of the BBBs will be accreted. We show that this gives a metallicity and total stellar mass consistent with the MW old stellar halo.

  1. THE FORNAX DWARF GALAXY AS A REMNANT OF RECENT DWARF-DWARF MERGING IN THE LOCAL GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Yozin, C.; Bekki, K.

    2012-09-01

    We present results from the first numerical analysis to support the hypothesis, first proposed in Coleman et al., that the Fornax dwarf galaxy was formed from the minor merging of two dwarfs about 2 Gyr ago. Using orbits for the Fornax dwarf that are consistent with the latest proper motion measurements, our dynamical evolution models show that the observed asymmetric shell-like substructures can be formed from the remnant of a smaller dwarf during minor merging. These models also predict the formation of diffuse stellar streams. We discuss how these stellar substructures depend on model parameters of dwarf-dwarf merging, and how the intermediate-age subpopulations found in the vicinity of these substructures may be formed from gas accretion in past merger events. We also suggest that one of Fornax's globular clusters originates from a merged dwarf companion, and demonstrate where as yet undetected tidal streams or H I gas formed from the dwarf merging may be found in the outer halo of the Galaxy.

  2. Numerical Simulations of the Metallicity Distribution in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Ripamonti, Emanuele; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Battaglia, G.; Abel, T.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-12-12

    Recent observations show that the number of stars with very low metallicities in the dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way is low, despite the low average metallicities of stars in these systems. We undertake numerical simulations of star formation and metal enrichment of dwarf galaxies in order to verify whether this result can be reproduced with ''standard'' assumptions. The answer is likely to be negative, unless some selection bias against very low metallicity stars is present in the observations.

  3. Stellar kinematics and dark matter in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Giuseppina

    2015-08-01

    In this review I will tour through the most recent findings on the internal kinematic properties of Local Group dwarf galaxies, as determined from extensive spectroscopic surveys of their stellar component.I will also discuss the current status on determinations of the dark matter content and distribution in these objects, with particular focus on the Milky Way dwarf spheroidals, for which the available data-sets allow the application of sophisticated mass modeling techniques.

  4. Gas, Stars, and Star Formation in Alfalfa Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and Hi components of 229 low H i mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H i masses <10(sup 7.7) solar mass and Hi line widths <80 kilometers per second. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M*) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M* approximately less than10(exp 8)M(sub 0) is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper Hi mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M* than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H i depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that Hi disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  5. MAPPING THE EXTENDED H I DISTRIBUTION OF THREE DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Zahedy, Fakhri; Bowsher, Emily C.; Wilcots, Eric M.; Kepley, Amanda A.; Gaal, Veronika E-mail: fsz@mit.edu E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu

    2011-11-15

    We present large field H I-line emission maps obtained with the single-dish Green Bank Telescope centered on the dwarf irregular galaxies Sextans A, NGC 2366, and WLM. We do not detect the extended skirts of emission associated with the galaxies that were reported from Effelsberg observations. The ratio of H I at 10{sup 19} atoms cm{sup -2} to optical extents of these galaxies is instead 2-3, which is normal for this type of galaxy. There is no evidence for a truncation in the H I distribution {>=}10{sup 19} atoms cm{sup -2}.

  6. On the formation of polar ring galaxies and tidal dwarf galaxies in gas-rich galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilborn, Virginia; Sweet, Sarah; Meurer, Gerhardt; Drinkwater, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We are conducting a study of the properties of galaxies and dwarfs in 16 gas-rich galaxy groups identified in the Survey for Ionization in Neutral Gas Galaxies (SINGG; Meurer et al. 2006). We have found a young gas-rich coalescing galaxy group, J1051-17. Key features of this system are gas-rich tidal tails, studded with dwarf galaxies extending 200 kpc which merge in to a low surface brightness polar disk orbiting a very red edge-on host hosting a central AGN. Accretion from the polar disk may be feeding the AGN and powering a galactic wind. The example of this system suggests that tidal interactions with gas rich satellites may be a key process that aligns satellites in to polar planes while fuelling accretion down to the very centres of the host. We discuss the formation scenario of this polar ring galaxy, and investigate the formation of tidal dwarf galaxies in the wider group sample.

  7. DARK SATELLITES AND THE MORPHOLOGY OF DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Helmi, Amina; Starkenburg, E.; Starkenburg, T. K.; Vera-Ciro, C. A.; Sales, L. V.; De Lucia, G.; Li, Y.-S.

    2012-10-10

    One of the strongest predictions of the {Lambda}CDM cosmological model is the presence of dark satellites orbiting all types of galaxies. We focus here on the dynamical effects of such satellites on disky dwarf galaxies, and demonstrate that these encounters can be dramatic. Although mergers with M{sub sat} > M{sub d} are not very common, because of the lower baryonic content they occur much more frequently on the dwarf scale than for L{sub *} galaxies. As an example, we present a numerical simulation of a 20% (virial) mass ratio merger between a dark satellite and a disky dwarf (akin to the Fornax dwarf galaxy in luminosity) that shows that the merger remnant has a spheroidal morphology. Perturbations by dark satellites thus provide a plausible path for the formation of dSph systems. The transition from disky to the often amorphous, irregular, or spheroidal morphologies of dwarfs could be a natural consequence of the dynamical heating of hitherto unobservable dark satellites.

  8. The Violent Interstellar Medium in Dwarf Galaxies: Atomic Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, E.; Walter, F.

    1998-12-01

    We review the morphology of the warm, neutral ISM as observed in the 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen (H I) of several nearby, gas-rich (dIrr) galaxies. The H I emission is dominated by shell-like structures, most likely superbubbles produced by the combined effects of strong stellar winds followed by supernova explosions of stars more massive than M > 8 M-sun within a region of massive star formation, an OB association. Somewhat counter-intuitively, H I superbubbles grow to larger dimensions in dwarf galaxies than in large spiral galaxies like our own or M 31. This can be explained as follows. In dwarf galaxies, the gravitational potential is lower than in spirals. Hence, for similar H I velocity dispersions, the scaleheight of the H I layer will be larger. Then, for comparable H I surface densities, the volume density will be lower. Both effects facilitate the growth to large dimensions of shells in dwarf galaxies and explains why such shells are much less likely to break through the H I layer into the halo. Moreover, dwarf galaxies lack density waves and tend to be dominated by solid-body rotation. As a result, shells will persist much longer than in spirals. A comparison with other galaxies shows that the energies needed to create H I supershells are the same for all types of galaxies, the energy output of a typical star-forming region therefore not being related to its galactic environment, at least to first order. The overall statistical properties of the H I holes and shells in galaxies show clear trends with Hubble type (or rather mass), such as in their diameter distribution, expansion velocities and ages.

  9. Tidal dwarf galaxies and the luminosity-metallicity relation .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, S. M.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Meurer, G.; Bekki, K.; Dopita, M. A.; Kilborn, V.; Nicholls, D.

    We present a recalibration of the luminosity-metallicity relation for gas-rich, star-forming dwarfs to magnitudes as faint as M_R˜ -13. We use the \\citet{Dopita2013} metallicity calibrations to calibrate the relation for all of the data in this analysis. Metal-rich dwarfs classified as tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates in the literature are typically of metallicity 12 + log(O/H) = 8.70 ± 0.05, while SDSS dwarfs fainter than M_R = -16 have a mean metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.28 ± 0.10, regardless of their luminosity. Our hydrodynamical simuations predict that TDGs should have metallicities elevated above the normal luminosity-metallicity relation. Metallicity can therefore be a useful diagnostic for identifying TDG candidate populations in the absence of tidal tails. At magnitudes brighter than M_R˜ -16 our sample of 53 star-forming galaxies in 9 HI gas-rich groups is consistent with the normal relation defined by the SDSS sample. At fainter magnitudes there is an increase in dispersion in metallicity of our sample. In our sample we identify three (16% of dwarfs) strong TDG candidates (12 + log(O/H) > 8.6), and four (21%) very metal poor dwarfs (12 + log(O/H) < 8.0), which are likely gas-rich dwarfs with recently ignited star formation. Further details of this analysis are available in Sweet et al. (2013, ApJ submitted).

  10. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF FOUR LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon; Saha, Abhijit; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J. E-mail: holtz@nmsu.edu

    2015-06-15

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color–color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color–color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%–50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution.

  11. A search for HI in some peculiar faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Ayesha; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2005-09-01

    We present a deep Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) search for HI 21-cm emission from three dwarf galaxies, viz. POX 186, SC 24 and KKR 25. Based, in part, on previous single-dish HI observations, these galaxies have been classified as a blue compact dwarf (BCD), a dwarf irregular and a transition galaxy, respectively. However, in conflict with previous single-dish detections, we do not detect HI in SC 24 or KKR 25. We suggest that the previous single-dish measurements were probably confused with the local Galactic emission. In the case of POX 186, we confirm the previous non-detection of HI but with substantially improved limits on its HI mass. Our derived upper limits on the HI mass of SC 24 and KKR 25 are similar to the typical HI mass limit for dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, whereas in the case of POX 186, we find that its gas content is somewhat smaller than is typical of BCD galaxies.

  12. Dwarf Galaxies with Optical Signatures of Accreting Massive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy; Greene, J.; Geha, M.

    2014-07-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) live at the heart of essentially all massive galaxies with bulges, power AGN, and are thought to be important agents in the evolution of their hosts. Observations of high-redshift quasars demonstrate that supermassive BHs must start out with masses considerably in excess of normal stellar-mass BHs. However, we do not know how the initial ``seed'' BHs formed in the early Universe, how massive they were originally, or what types of galaxies they formed in. While direct observations of distant seed BHs and their hosts in the infant Universe are unobtainable with current capabilities, models of BH growth in a cosmological context indicate that present-day dwarf galaxies can place valuable constraints on seed masses and distinguish between various seed formation mechanisms at early times. Using optical spectroscopy from the SDSS, we have systematically assembled the largest sample of dwarf galaxies hosting AGN to date. These dwarf galaxies have stellar masses comparable to the Magellanic Clouds and contain some of the least-massive supermassive BHs known. I will present results from this study and discuss our ongoing efforts to find additional examples of AGN in dwarfs and help constrain theories for the formation of the first seed BHs at high redshift.

  13. Spectroscopic Metallicities for Fornax Ultracompact Dwarf Galaxies, Globular Clusters, and Nucleated Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieske, S.; Hilker, M.; Infante, L.; Jordán, A.

    2006-05-01

    Various formation channels for the puzzling ultracompact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) have been proposed in the last few years. To better judge some of the competing scenarios, we present spectroscopic [Fe/H] estimates for a sample of 26 compact objects in the central region of the Fornax Cluster, covering the magnitude range of UCDs and bright globular clusters (18 mag-11 mag. This metallicity break is accompanied by a change in the size-luminosity relation for compact objects, as deduced from Hubble Space Telescope imaging: for MV<-11 mag, rh scales with luminosity, while for MV>-11 mag, rh is almost luminosity-independent. In our study we therefore assume a limiting absolute magnitude of MV=-11 mag between UCDs and globular clusters. The mean metallicity of five Fornax nucleated dwarf elliptical galaxy (dE,N) nuclei included in our study is about 0.8 dex lower than that of the UCDs, a difference significant at the 4.5 σ level. This difference is marginally higher than expected from a comparison of their (V-I) colors, indicating that UCDs are younger than or at most coeval to dE,N nuclei. Because of the large metallicity discrepancy between UCDs and nuclei, we disfavor the hypothesis that most of the Fornax UCDs are the remnant nuclei of tidally stripped dE,Ns. Our metallicity estimates for UCDs are closer to but slightly below those derived for young massive clusters (YMCs) of comparable masses. We therefore favor a scenario in which most UCDs in Fornax are successors of merged YMCs produced in the course of violent galaxy-galaxy mergers. It is noted that, in contrast, the properties of Virgo UCDs are more consistent with the stripping scenario, suggesting that different UCD formation channels may

  14. Discovery of a tidal dwarf galaxy in the Leo Triplet

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiel-Wroczyński, B.; Soida, M.; Urbanik, M.; Bomans, D. J. E-mail: soida@oa.uj.edu.pl E-mail: bomans@astro.rub.de

    2014-05-10

    We report the discovery of a dwarf galaxy in the Leo Triplet. Analysis of the neutral hydrogen distribution shows that it rotates independently of the tidal tail of NGC 3628, with a radial velocity gradient of 35-40 km s{sup –1} over approximately 13 kpc. The galaxy has an extremely high neutral gas content, accounting for a large amount of its total dynamic mass and suggesting a low amount of dark matter. It is located at the tip of the gaseous tail, which strongly suggests a tidal origin. If this is the case, it would be one of the most confident and nearest (to the Milky Way) detections of a tidal dwarf galaxy and, at the same time, the object most detached from its parent galaxy (≈140 kpc) of this type.

  15. SURFACE BRIGHTNESS PROFILES OF DWARF GALAXIES. I. PROFILES AND STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Hunter, Deidre A.; Elmegreen, Bruce G. E-mail: dah@lowell.edu

    2013-11-01

    Radial surface brightness profiles of spiral galaxies are classified into three types: (I) single exponential, or the light falls off with one exponential to a break before falling off (II) more steeply, or (III) less steeply. Profile breaks are also found in dwarf disks, but some dwarf Type IIs are flat or increasing out to a break before falling off. Here we re-examine the stellar disk profiles of 141 dwarfs: 96 dwarf irregulars (dIms), 26 Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCDs), and 19 Magellanic-type spirals (Sms). We fit single, double, or even triple exponential profiles in up to 11 passbands: GALEX FUV and NUV, ground-based UBVJHK and Hα, and Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 μm. We find that more luminous galaxies have brighter centers, larger inner and outer scale lengths, and breaks at larger radii; dwarf trends with M{sub B} extend to spirals. However, the V-band break surface brightness is independent of break type, M{sub B} , and Hubble type. Dwarf Type II and III profiles fall off similarly beyond the breaks but have different interiors and IIs break ∼twice as far as IIIs. Outer Type II and III scale lengths may have weak trends with wavelength, but pure Type II inner scale lengths clearly decrease from the FUV to visible bands whereas Type III inner scale lengths increase with redder bands. This suggests the influence of different star formation histories on profile type, but nonetheless the break location is approximately the same in all passbands. Dwarfs continue trends between profile and Hubble types such that later-type galaxies have more Type II but fewer Type I and III profiles than early-type spirals. BCDs and Sms are over-represented as Types III and II, respectively, compared to dIms.

  16. Faint Dwarf Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Taylor, Matthew A.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Eigenthaler, Paul; Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mamon, Gary; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W.; Peng, Eric W.; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range 0.7 ≲ reff/kpc ≲ 1.5 with luminosities of -11.65 ≲ MU ≲ -9.42 and -12.79 ≲ MI ≲ -10.58 mag, corresponding to a color range of (U - I)0 ≃ 1.1 - 2.2 mag and surface brightness levels of μU ≃ 28.1 mag/arcsec2 and μI ≃ 27.4 mag/arcsec2. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z⊙ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range M_*|_{Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{odot } and M_*|_{0.02 Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{6.3-8} M_{odot }. Three dwarfs are older than 1 Gyr, while the other two significantly bluer dwarfs are younger than ˜2 Gyr at any mass/metallicity combination. Altogether, the new LSB dwarf galaxy candidates share properties with dwarf galaxies found throughout the Local Volume and in nearby galaxy clusters such as Fornax. We find a pair of candidates with ˜2 kpc projected separation, which may represent one of the closest dwarf galaxy pairs found. We also find a nucleated dwarf candidate, with a nucleus size of reff ≃ 46 - 63 pc and magnitude MU, 0 = -7.42 mag and (U - I)0 = 1.51 mag, which is consistent with a nuclear stellar disc with a stellar mass in the range 104.9 - 6.5 M⊙.

  17. Star Formation History of the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pino, A.; Aparicio, A.; Gallart, C.; Hidalgo, S.

    2011-07-01

    We present color-magnitude diagrams (CMD) reaching the oldest main sequence turn offs for three fields in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy, obtained with FORS1 at the VLT. One of them is situated at the center of the galaxy while the other two are located at a distance of 10' form the center. We determine the full star formation history (SFH) of the central field, extending to the first star formation events.

  18. Dwarf Galaxies in the Antlia Cluster: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith Castelli, A. V.; Bassino, L. P.; Cellone, S. A.; Richtler, T.; Dirsch, B.; Infante, L.; Aruta, C.; Gómez, M.

    The Antlia cluster (l = 273°, b = 19°) is the third nearest galaxy cluster (d = 35 Mpc) after Virgo and Fornax. In spite of its proximity, it has been poorly investigated. Its population is dominated by early type galaxies, with dwarf ellipticals being the most abundant galaxy type [1]. Here we present the first results of a project aimed to study the galaxy population of the Antlia cluster. Our results correspond to the identification and classification of dwarf galaxies in the central cluster region, extending the list of \\cite{FS90} (FS90 catalogue), a photographic survey that is complete only up to B_T ≃ 18 mag (M_B ≃ -14.7 mag at the Antlia cluster distance). The final aim of our project is to study the luminosity function, morphology and structural parameters of dwarf galaxies in the Antlia cluster with a more complete sample. We also intend to investigate the kinematics of the cluster (50 spectra have been already obtained).

  19. Dwarf Galaxies in the Halo of NGC 891

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Earl

    2014-07-01

    We report the results of a survey of the region within 40 arcmin of NGC 891, a nearby nearly perfectly edge-on spiral galaxy. Candidate "non-stars" with diameters greater than 15 arcsec were selected from the GSC 2.3.2 catalog and cross-comparison of observations in several bands using archived GALEX, DSS2, WISE, and Two Micron All Sky Survey images identified contaminating stars, artifacts, and background galaxies, all of which were excluded. The resulting 71 galaxies, many of which were previously uncataloged, comprise a size-limited survey of the region. A majority of the galaxies are in the background of NGC 891 and are for the most part members of the A347 cluster at a distance of about 75 Mpc. The new finds approximately double the known membership of A347, previously thought to be relatively sparse. We identify a total of seven dwarf galaxies, most of which are new discoveries. The newly discovered dwarf galaxies are dim and gas-poor and may be associated with the previously observed arcs of red giant branch halo stars in the halo and the prominent H I filament and the lopsided features in the disk of NGC 891. Several of the dwarfs show signs of disruption, consistent with being remnants of an ancient collision.

  20. Nebular metallicities in two isolated local void dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, David C.; Jerjen, Helmut; Dopita, Michael A.; Basurah, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Isolated dwarf galaxies, especially those situated in voids, may provide insight into primordial conditions in the universe and the physical processes that govern star formation in undisturbed stellar systems. The metallicity of H II regions in such galaxies is key to investigating this possibility. From the SIGRID sample of isolated dwarf galaxies, we have identified two exceptionally isolated objects, the Local Void galaxy [KK98]246 (ESO 461-G036) and another somewhat larger dwarf irregular on the edge of the Local Void, MCG-01-41-006 (HIPASS J1609-04). We report our measurements of the nebular metallicities in these objects. The first object has a single low luminosity H II region, while the second is in a more vigorous star forming phase with several bright H II regions. We find that the metallicities in both galaxies are typical for galaxies of this size, and do not indicate the presence of any primordial gas, despite (for [KK98]246) the known surrounding large reservoir of neutral hydrogen.

  1. Dwarf galaxies in the halo of NGC 891

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Earl

    2014-07-20

    We report the results of a survey of the region within 40 arcmin of NGC 891, a nearby nearly perfectly edge-on spiral galaxy. Candidate 'non-stars' with diameters greater than 15 arcsec were selected from the GSC 2.3.2 catalog and cross-comparison of observations in several bands using archived GALEX, DSS2, WISE, and Two Micron All Sky Survey images identified contaminating stars, artifacts, and background galaxies, all of which were excluded. The resulting 71 galaxies, many of which were previously uncataloged, comprise a size-limited survey of the region. A majority of the galaxies are in the background of NGC 891 and are for the most part members of the A347 cluster at a distance of about 75 Mpc. The new finds approximately double the known membership of A347, previously thought to be relatively sparse. We identify a total of seven dwarf galaxies, most of which are new discoveries. The newly discovered dwarf galaxies are dim and gas-poor and may be associated with the previously observed arcs of red giant branch halo stars in the halo and the prominent H I filament and the lopsided features in the disk of NGC 891. Several of the dwarfs show signs of disruption, consistent with being remnants of an ancient collision.

  2. Dwarf galaxies in multistate scalar field dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Medina, L. A.; Robles, V. H.; Matos, T.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the velocity dispersion for eight of the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellites in the context of finite temperature scalar field dark matter. In this model the finite temperature allows the scalar field to be in configurations that possess excited states, a feature that has proved to be necessary in order to explain the asymptotic rotational velocities found in low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. In this work we show that excited states are not only important in large galaxies but also have visible effects in dwarf spheroidals. Additionally, we stress that contrary to previous works where the scalar field dark matter halos are consider to be purely Bose-Einstein condensates, the inclusion of excited states in these halo configurations provides a consistent framework capable of describing LSB and dwarf galaxies of different sizes without arriving to contradictions within the scalar field dark matter model. Using this new framework we find that the addition of excited states accounts very well for the raise in the velocity dispersion in Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies improving the fit compared to the one obtained assuming all the dark matter to be in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate.

  3. X-Ray Sources in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy DRACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Dhuga, K.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a spectral analysis of X - ray sources in Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy recently observed by XMM-Newton. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with AGN, few of them possess characteristics of LMXBs and CVs. We also discuss the possibility of the existence of a central IMBH in Draco.

  4. Kinematics of dwarf galaxies in gas-rich groups, and the survival and detectability of tidal dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, Sarah M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Meurer, Gerhardt; Kilborn, Virginia; Audcent-Ross, Fiona; Baumgardt, Holger; Bekki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We present DEIMOS multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) of 22 star-forming dwarf galaxies located in four gas-rich groups, including six newly discovered dwarfs. Two of the galaxies are strong tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates based on our luminosity-metallicity relation definition. We model the rotation curves of these galaxies. Our sample shows low mass-to-light ratios (M/L = 0.73 ± 0.39 M⊙/L⊙) as expected for young, star-forming dwarfs. One of the galaxies in our sample has an apparently strongly falling rotation curve, reaching zero rotational velocity outside the turnover radius of rturn = 1.2re. This may be (1) a polar ring galaxy, with a tilted bar within a face-on disc; (2) a kinematic warp. These scenarios are indistinguishable with our current data due to limitations of slit alignment inherent to MOS-mode observations. We consider whether TDGs can be detected based on their tidal radius, beyond which tidal stripping removes kinematic tracers such as Hα emission. When the tidal radius is less than about twice the turnover radius, the expected falling rotation curve cannot be reliably measured. This is problematic for as much as half of our sample, and indeed more generally, galaxies in groups like these. Further to this, the Hα light that remains must be sufficiently bright to be detected; this is only the case for three (14 per cent) galaxies in our sample. We conclude that the falling rotation curves expected of TDGs are intrinsically difficult to detect.

  5. The unexpected diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oman, Kyle A.; Navarro, Julio F.; Fattahi, Azadeh; Frenk, Carlos S.; Sawala, Till; White, Simon D. M.; Bower, Richard; Crain, Robert A.; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2015-10-01

    We examine the circular velocity profiles of galaxies in Λ cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological hydrodynamical simulations from the EAGLE and LOCAL GROUPS projects and compare them with a compilation of observed rotation curves of galaxies spanning a wide range in mass. The shape of the circular velocity profiles of simulated galaxies varies systematically as a function of galaxy mass, but shows remarkably little variation at fixed maximum circular velocity. This is especially true for low-mass dark-matter-dominated systems, reflecting the expected similarity of the underlying CDM haloes. This is at odds with observed dwarf galaxies, which show a large diversity of rotation curve shapes, even at fixed maximum rotation speed. Some dwarfs have rotation curves that agree well with simulations, others do not. The latter are systems where the inferred mass enclosed in the inner regions is much lower than expected for CDM haloes and include many galaxies where previous work claims the presence of a constant density `core'. The `cusp versus core' issue is thus better characterized as an `inner mass deficit' problem than as a density slope mismatch. For several galaxies, the magnitude of this inner mass deficit is well in excess of that reported in recent simulations where cores result from baryon-induced fluctuations in the gravitational potential. We conclude that one or more of the following statements must be true: (i) the dark matter is more complex than envisaged by any current model; (ii) current simulations fail to reproduce the diversity in the effects of baryons on the inner regions of dwarf galaxies; and/or (iii) the mass profiles of `inner mass deficit' galaxies inferred from kinematic data are incorrect.

  6. The HST Snapshot Survey of Nearby Dwarf Galaxy Candidates. III. Resolved Dwarf Galaxies In and Beyond the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebel, E. K.; Seitzer, P.; Dolphin, A. E.; Geisler, D.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hodge, P. W.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.; Sarajedini, A.; Sharina, M. E.

    1999-12-01

    We present results for several nearby, resolved dwarf galaxies imaged with WFPC2 in the framework of our HST snapshot survey of nearby dwarf galaxy candidates (Seitzer et al., paper I in this series). All data presented here were analyzed with the automated photometry package HSTPHOT (Dolphin et al., paper IV in this series). Our closest target is the recently discovered Cassiopeia dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy (Karachentsev & Karachentseva 1999, A&A, 341, 355), a new Local Group member and companion of M31 (Grebel & Guhathakurta 1999, ApJ, 511, 101). Our WFPC2 snapshot data reveal a pronounced red horizontal branch in Cas dSph. IC 5152 is a dwarf irregular (dIrr) just beyond the Local Group. Our data show a significant intermediate-age population with a strongly tilted asymptotic giant branch (AGB), a substantial young population, and a wide giant branch. Other nearby galaxies to be discussed include NGC 1560, ESO 471-G006, ESO 470-G018, and KK 035. Most of these galaxies are being resolved into stars for the first time. We describe their properties in detail and derive distances for all dwarfs with a well-defined tip of the red giant branch. Membership of these galaxies in nearby groups is discussed. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant GO-08192.97A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. EKG acknowledges support by NASA through grant HF-01108.01-98A from the Space Telescope Science Institute. EKG and IDK are supported by the Henri Chrétien International Research Grant administered by the American Astronomical Society. PG is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.

  7. Analysis of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy Tidal Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Bart; Myers, Jeannette; Rusthoven, Mary; The, Lih-Sin; Hartmann, Dieter

    2007-11-01

    The Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy is one of the satellite galaxies interacting with the Milky Way. Discovered to be located just below the galactic center; this galaxy is currently being tidally disrupted as it approaches the Milky Way disk. We performed a series of N-body simulations of the interaction between Sagittarius and the Milky Way over a 1 Gyr time period leading up to today's position. Here we present our analysis of the tidal tails and compare them to the known tidal structures we observe today.

  8. Star Formation Histories of Dwarf Galaxies: Keys to Galaxy Formation and Dark Matter Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael

    2014-10-01

    We propose to perform a suite of hydrodynamical simulations in order to understand the connection between dwarf galaxy star formation histories, stellar content, and central dark matter densities. This will leverage one of HST's unique and enduring scientific contributions, deep and uniform photometry of nearby dwarf galaxies that enables reconstructions of their ancient {z 6-10} star formation histories, to shed light on some of the main problems in galaxy formation and cosmology.Analysis of HST observations has definitively shown that dwarfs exhibit a surprising variety of star formation histories: some dwarfs host nearly purely ancient populations, while others have formed 90% of their stars after redshift 1. This diversity is unexpected in current theoretical models, which predict primarily old stellar populations in low-mass objects. The topic of star formation histories of dwarfs has also received significant attention recently in the context of possible small-scale problems of the LCDM model: if episodic bursts of star formation inject energy into dwarfs' dark matter halos, it may provide a natural explanation of the observed low densities of dwarf galaxies within LCDM.Our simulations will adopt physically-motivated, explicit feedback prescriptions that are fixed by our knowledge of stellar evolution. We will choose halos having diverse mass assembly histories within a narrow range of mass and compare their star formation histories to HST observations of nearby isolated dwarf galaxies, thereby testing fundamental aspects of galaxy formation modeling and dark matter astrophysics. Data from our simulations will be publicly released via a dedicated website.

  9. The Violent Interstellar Medium of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Fabian

    1999-04-01

    High resolution HI observations of nearby dwarf galaxies (most of which are situated in the M81 group at a distance of about 3.2 Mpc) reveal that their neutral interstellar medium (ISM) is dominated by hole-like features most of which are expanding. A comparison of the physical properties of these holes with the ones found in more massive spiral galaxies (such as M31 and M33) shows that they tend to reach much larger sizes in dwarf galaxies. This can be understood in terms of the galaxy's gravitational potential. The origin of these features is still a matter of debate. In general, young star forming regions (OB-associations) are held responsible for their formation. This picture, however, is not without its critics and other mechanisms such as the infall of high velocity clouds, turbulent motions or even gamma ray bursters have been recently proposed. Here I will present one example of a supergiant shell in IC 2574 which corroborates the picture that OB associations are indeed creating these structures. This particular supergiant shell is currently the most promising case to study the effects of the combined effects of stellar winds and supernova explosions which shape the neutral interstellar medium of (dwarf) galaxies.

  10. Small Stellar Systems in Antlia: Globular Clusters and Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassino, L. P.; Smith Castelli, A. V.; Richtler, T.; Cellone, S.; Gómez, M.; Infante, L.; Aruta, C.; Dirsch, B.

    2009-05-01

    We present the combined results of two investigations of the Antlia galaxy cluster: (1) A study of the globular cluster (GC) systems around NGC 3258 and NGC 3268 (Bassino et al. 2008, MNRAS, 386, 1145), on the basis of V, I photometry performed on FORS1-VLT images. The distance to the galaxies are determined by means of the GC luminosity functions. The GC colour distributions are bimodal, except for the brightest clusters which show unimodal distributions. The radial density profiles of the red (metal-rich) GCs follow closely the V brightness profiles of the galaxies. The existence of intracluster GCs is also discussed. (2) A study of Antlia early-type galaxies in the central region of the cluster (Smith Castelli et al. 2008, MNRAS, 386, 2311), based on wide-field MOSAIC-CTIO images, obtained in the Washington photometric system. We analyze the colour-magnitude relation of early-type dwarf galaxies, previously listed in the Ferguson & Sandage's (1990, AJ, 100, 1) photographic catalog, which follow a very tight sequence. We have found several new dwarf candidates not included in the catalog. In addition, we are studying the properties of several blue compact dwarfs (BCDs) located in the field.

  11. THE PRIMEVAL POPULATIONS OF THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Ferguson, Henry C. E-mail: tumlinson@stsci.edu E-mail: avila@stsci.edu; and others

    2012-07-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of the ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, using deep photometry obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). A galaxy class recently discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the UFDs appear to be an extension of the classical dwarf spheroidals to low luminosities, offering a new front in efforts to understand the missing satellite problem. They are the least luminous, most dark-matter-dominated, and least chemically evolved galaxies known. Our HST survey of six UFDs seeks to determine if these galaxies are true fossils from the early universe. We present here the preliminary analysis of three UFD galaxies: Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Classical dwarf spheroidals of the Local Group exhibit extended star formation histories, but these three Milky Way satellites are at least as old as the ancient globular cluster M92, with no evidence for intermediate-age populations. Their ages also appear to be synchronized to within {approx}1 Gyr of each other, as might be expected if their star formation was truncated by a global event, such as reionization.

  12. Cosmological simulations of dwarf galaxies with cosmic ray feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingjing; Bryan, Greg L.; Salem, Munier

    2016-08-01

    We perform zoom-in cosmological simulations of a suite of dwarf galaxies, examining the impact of cosmic rays (CRs) generated by supernovae, including the effect of diffusion. We first look at the effect of varying the uncertain CR parameters by repeatedly simulating a single galaxy. Then we fix the comic ray model and simulate five dwarf systems with virial masses range from 8 to 30 × 1010 M⊙. We find that including CR feedback (with diffusion) consistently leads to disc-dominated systems with relatively flat rotation curves and constant star formation rates. In contrast, our purely thermal feedback case results in a hot stellar system and bursty star formation. The CR simulations very well match the observed baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, but have a lower gas fraction than in real systems. We also find that the dark matter cores of the CR feedback galaxies are cuspy, while the purely thermal feedback case results in a substantial core.

  13. Evidence for dwarf stars at D of about 100 kiloparsecs near the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Richstone, Douglas; Flynn, Chris

    1992-04-01

    A method is presented for detecting individual, metal-poor, dwarf stars at distances less than about 150 kpc - a method specifically designed to filter out stars from among the much more numerous faint background field galaxies on the basis of broad-band colors. This technique is applied to two fields at high Galactic latitude, for which there are deep CCD data in four bands ranging from 3600 to 9000 A. The field in Sextans probably contains more than about five dwarf stars with BJ not greater than 25.5. These are consistent with being at a common distance about 100 kpc and lie about 1.7 deg from the newly discovered dwarf galaxy in Sextans whose distance is about 85 +/- 10 kpc. The stars lie near the major axis of the galaxy and are near or beyond the tidal radius. The second field, toward the south Galactic pole, may contain up to about five extra-Galactic stars, but these show no evidence for being at a common distance. Possible applications of this type technique are discussed, and it is shown that even very low surface brightness star clusters or dwarf galaxies may be detected at distances less than about 1 Mpc.

  14. Evidence for dwarf stars at D of about 100 kiloparsecs near the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Andrew; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Richstone, Douglas; Flynn, Chris

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for detecting individual, metal-poor, dwarf stars at distances less than about 150 kpc - a method specifically designed to filter out stars from among the much more numerous faint background field galaxies on the basis of broad-band colors. This technique is applied to two fields at high Galactic latitude, for which there are deep CCD data in four bands ranging from 3600 to 9000 A. The field in Sextans probably contains more than about five dwarf stars with BJ not greater than 25.5. These are consistent with being at a common distance about 100 kpc and lie about 1.7 deg from the newly discovered dwarf galaxy in Sextans whose distance is about 85 +/- 10 kpc. The stars lie near the major axis of the galaxy and are near or beyond the tidal radius. The second field, toward the south Galactic pole, may contain up to about five extra-Galactic stars, but these show no evidence for being at a common distance. Possible applications of this type technique are discussed, and it is shown that even very low surface brightness star clusters or dwarf galaxies may be detected at distances less than about 1 Mpc.

  15. NGC 5291: Implications for the Formation of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malphrus, Benjamin K.; Simpson, Caroline E.; Gottesman, S. T.; Hawarden, Timothy G.

    1997-01-01

    The possible formation and evolution of dwarf irregular galaxies from material derived from perturbed evolved galaxies is addressed via an H I study of a likely example, the peculiar system NGC 5291. This system, located in the western outskirts of the cluster Abell 3574, contains the lenticular galaxy NGC 5291 which is in close proximity to a disturbed companion and is flanked by an extensive complex of numerous knots extending roughly 4 min north and 4 min south of the galaxy. In an initial optical and radio study, Longmore et al. (1979, MNRAS, 188, 285) showed that these knots have the spectra of vigorous star-forming regions, and suggested that some may in fact be young dwarf irregular galaxies. High resolution 21-cm line observations taken with the VLA are presented here and reveal that the H I distribution associated with this system encompasses not only the entire N-S complex of optical knots, but also forms an incomplete ring or tail that extends approximately 3 min to the west. The H I associated with NGC 5291 itself shows a high velocity range; the Seashell is not detected. The formation mechanism for this unusual system is unclear and two models - a large, low-luminosity ram-swept disk, and a ram-swept interaction-are discussed. The H I in the system contains numerous concentrations, mostly along the N-S arc of the star-forming complexes, which generally coincide with one or more optical knots; the larger H I features contain several x 10(exp 9) solar mass of gas. Each of the knots is compared to a set of criteria designed to determine if these objects are bound against their own internal kinetic energy and are tidally stable relative to the host galaxy. An analysis of the properties of the H I concentrations surrounding the optical star-forming complexes indicates that at least the largest of these is a bound system; it also possesses a stellar component. It is suggested that this object is a genuinely young dwarf irregular galaxy that has evolved from

  16. New dwarf galaxy candidates in the Centaurus group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Oliver; Jerjen, Helmut; Binggeli, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    Context. Recent studies of the distribution and kinematics of the Milky Way and Andromeda satellite galaxy systems have confirmed the existence of coplanar, corotating structures of galaxies. In addition to the "missing satellite problem", these structures pose a major challenge to the standard ΛCDM scenario of structure formation. Aims: We complement the efforts made by the dwarf galaxy community to extend these studies to other nearby galaxy groups by systematically searching for faint unresolved dwarf members with a low surface brightness in the Southern Centaurus group of galaxies. The aim is to determine whether these coplanar, corotating structures are a universal phenomenon. Methods: We imaged an area of 60 sq. deg (0.3 Mpc2) around the M 83 subgroup with the wide-field Dark Energy Camera (DECam) at the CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope in g and r down to a limiting surface brightness of μr ≈ 30 mag arcsec-2. Various image-filtering techniques were applied to the DECam data to enhance the visibility of extremely low-surface brightness objects. Results: We report the discovery of 16 new dwarf galaxy candidates in the direction of the M 83 subgroup, roughly doubling the number of known dwarfs in that region. The photometric properties of the candidates, when compared to those of the Local Group, suggest membership in the M 83 subgroup. The faintest objects have a central star density of ≈1.3 L⊙ pc-2 and a total magnitude of g = 20.25, corresponding to Mg = -9.55 at the nominal distance of 4.9 Mpc. The sky distribution of the new objects is significantly prolonged toward Cen A, suggesting that many of them belong to the Cen A subgroup or a common halo. We also provide updated surface photometry for the brighter, known dwarf members in the surveyed area. Conclusions: Modern survey CCD cameras and sophisticated detection algorithms can be used to systematically probe the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function around the M 83 subgroup of galaxies. We aim at

  17. Solo dwarfs I: survey introduction and first results for the Sagittarius dwarf irregular galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgs, C. R.; McConnachie, A. W.; Irwin, M.; Bate, N. F.; Lewis, G. F.; Walker, M. G.; Côté, P.; Venn, K.; Battaglia, G.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce the Solitary Local dwarfs survey (Solo), a wide-field photometric study targeting every isolated dwarf galaxy within 3 Mpc of the Milky Way. Solo is based on (u)gi multiband imaging from Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaCam for northern targets, and Magellan/Megacam for southern targets. All galaxies fainter than MV ≃ -18 situated beyond the nominal virial radius of the Milky Way and M31 (≳300 kpc) are included in this volume-limited sample, for a total of 42 targets. In addition to reviewing the survey goals and strategy, we present results for the Sagittarius dwarf irregular galaxy (Sag DIG), one of the most isolated, low-mass galaxies, located at the edge of the Local Group. We analyse its resolved stellar populations and their spatial distributions. We provide updated estimates of its central surface brightness and integrated luminosity, and trace its surface brightness profile to a level fainter than 30 mag arcsec-2. Sag DIG is well described by a highly elliptical (disc-like) system following a single component Sérsic model. However, a low-level distortion is present at the outer edges of the galaxy that, were Sag DIG not so isolated, would likely be attributed to some kind of previous tidal interaction. Further, we find evidence of an extremely low level, extended distribution of stars beyond ˜5 arcmin (>1.5 kpc) that suggests Sag DIG may be embedded in a very low-density stellar halo. We compare the stellar and H I structures of Sag DIG, and discuss results for this galaxy in relation to other isolated, dwarf irregular galaxies in the Local Group.

  18. Gas, Stars, and Star Formation in ALFALFA Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G.

    2012-06-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and H I components of 229 low H I mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H I masses <107.7 M ⊙ and H I line widths <80 km s-1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M *) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M * obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M * <~ 108 M ⊙ is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper H I mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M * than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H I depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that H I disks are more extended than stellar ones. Based on observations made with the Arecibo Observatory and the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). The Arecibo Observatory is operated by SRI International under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (AST-1100968), and in alliance with Ana G. Méndez-Universidad Metropolitana and

  19. Dark subhalo accretion onto dwarf galaxies in CDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, Chervin Fabien Pierre; Penarrubia, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    Baryonic feedback at high redshifts has been proposed to explain the inference of dark matter (DM) cores in low-surface brightness and dwarf spheroidal galaxies. However, in the currently favoured cosmological model, structure grows hierarchically and CDM predicts a myriad of small substructures orbiting dwarf galaxies, some luminous (which habe been observationally identified in recent years), some dark. If such dark subhalos get close enough to the centre of cored dwarfs, they could potentially lead to cusp regrowth.In this talk, I will present the evolution of the DM profiles of dwarf galaxies driven by the accretion of DM substructures through controlled N-body experiments. The initial conditions assume that supernova feedback erases the primordial DM cusps at high redshift of halos with final masses $10^{9}-10^{10} \\rm{M_{\\odot}}$ by z=0. The orbits and masses of the infalling substructures are borrowed from the {\\it Aquarius} cosmological simulations. I will show that some halos that undergo 1:3 down to 1:30 mergers are susceptible to reform a DM cusp by $z\\approx 0$ and how this depends on the internal structure of the infalling substructures. I will show that within CDM a non-negligible level of scatter in the mass profiles of dwarfs is to be expected given their stochastic mass accretion histories and their diverse (observed) star formation histories and that this effect could possibly explain the existence of dense dwarfs like Draco, Ursa Minor or Tucana. I will argue how this process is unique to CDM and may be falsifiable. If time allows, I will show preliminary results from suites of cosmological N-body simulations designed to address the statistics of this effect.

  20. Did Dwarf Galaxies Reionize the Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atek, Hakim; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Jauzac, Mathilde

    2015-08-01

    The identification of the first generation of galaxies and the possible sources of cosmic reionzation is one of the foremost challenges in modern astrophysics. Great progress has been made in characterizing galaxy populations at redshift z=6-7 through photometric observations in blank fields. However, the integrated UV luminosity density of these galaxies remains insufficient to reionize the IGM at z>6 and calls for the contribution of fainter sources. In order to access those intrinsically faint galaxies, we exploit the gravitational lensing magnification offered by massive galaxy clusters. I will present the first results of the Hubble Frontier Fields program that aims at peering deeper into the distant Universe. Using the first HFF clusters, I will show how combining HST capabilities with gravitational telescopes can be an efficient way to probe the galaxy luminosity function to unprecedented depth. We can now put constraints on the faint-end slope of the UV luminosity function at z~7 down to an absolute magnitude of MUV=-15.5 AB, which is about 0.01L*, and two magnitudes deeper than the deep blank fields. I will also discuss the implications of the new constraints on the galaxy UV luminosity density on the cosmic reionization and what the upcoming JWST will achieve in cluster fields.

  1. Herschel's View of LITTLE THINGS Metal-Poor Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigan, Phil; Young, Lisa; Cormier, Diane; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Madden, Suzanne; Little Things

    2015-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies present interesting challenges for the studies of various galaxy properties, due in part to their faintness and their typically low metal content. Low metallicity can lead to quite different physical conditions in the ISM of these systems, which can affect star formation and other processes. To determine the structure of star-forming molecular clouds at low metallicity and moderate star formation rates, far infrared (FIR) fine-structure lines were mapped with Herschel in selected regions of five dwarf irregular galaxies with metal abundances ranging from 13% down to 5% of solar. Abundances of [C II] 158, [O I] 63, [N II] 122, and [O III] 88 microns - the major FIR cooling lines - help to probe the conditions in the gas, and allow us to put these dwarfs in context with spirals and other galaxy types. We report our integrated fluxes and line ratios, and discuss the results: [C II] is the dominant FIR coolant in these systems, and it mostly originates in PDRs instead of the more diffuse phase. Funding for this project was provided by NASA JPL RSA grant 1433776.

  2. The distribution of alpha elements in Andromeda dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Luis C.; Geha, Marla C.; Tollerud, Erik J.

    2014-07-20

    We present alpha to iron abundance ratios for 226 individual red giant branch stars in nine dwarf galaxies of the Andromeda (M31) satellite system. The abundances are measured from the combined signal of Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti lines in Keck/DEIMOS medium-resolution spectra. This constitutes the first large sample of alpha abundance ratios measured in the M31 satellite system. The dwarf galaxies in our sample exhibit a variety of alpha abundance ratios, with the average values in each galaxy ranging from approximately solar ([α/Fe] ∼ + 0.0) to alpha-enhanced ([α/Fe] ∼ + 0.5). These variations do not show a correlation with internal kinematics, environment, or stellar density. We confirm radial gradients in the iron abundance of two galaxies out of the five with sufficient data (NGC 185 and And II). There is only tentative evidence for an alpha abundance radial gradient in NGC 185. We homogeneously compare our results to the Milky Way classical dwarf spheroidals, finding evidence for wider variation in average alpha abundance. In the absence of chemical abundances for the M31 stellar halo, we compare to the Milky Way stellar halo. A stellar halo comprised of disrupted M31 satellites is too metal-rich and inconsistent with the Milky Way halo alpha abundance distribution even if considering only satellites with predominantly old stellar populations. The M31 satellite population provides a second system in which to study chemical abundances of dwarf galaxies and reveals a wider variety of abundance patterns than the Milky Way.

  3. The Extremely Metal-Poor Dwarf Galaxy AGC 198691

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschauer, Alec S.; Salzer, John Joseph; Cannon, John M.; Skillman, Evan D.; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of the nearby dwarf irregular galaxy AGC 198691. This object is part of the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-Mass Dwarfs (SHIELD) sample, which consists of ultra-low HI mass galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast-Acting ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. SHIELD is a multi-configuration Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) study of the neutral gas content and dynamics of galaxies with HI masses in the range of 106-107 M⊙. Our spectral data were obtained using the new high-throughput KPNO Ohio State Multi-Object Spectrograph (KOSMOS) on the Mayall 4-m telescope as part of a systematic study of the nebular abundances in the SHIELD galaxy sample. These observations enable measurement of the temperature sensitive [OIII]λ4363 line and hence the determination of a "direct" oxygen abundance for AGC 198691. We find this system to be an extremely metal-deficient (XMD) galaxy with an oxygen abundance comparable to such objects as I Zw 18, SBS 0335-052W, Leo P, and DDO 68 - the lowest metallicity star-forming systems known. It is worth noting that two of the five lowest-abundance galaxies currently recognized were discovered via the ALFALFA blind HI survey. These XMD galaxies are potential analogues to the first star-forming systems, which through hierarchical accretion processes built up the large galaxies we observe today in the local Universe. Detailed analysis of such XMD systems offers observational constraint to models of galactic evolution and star formation histories to allow a better understanding of the processes that govern the chemical evolution of low-mass galaxies.

  4. The mass dependence of dwarf satellite galaxy quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F. E-mail: ericbell@umich.edu

    2014-09-10

    We combine observations of the Local Group with data from the NASA-Sloan Atlas to show the variation in the quenched fraction of satellite galaxies from low-mass dwarf spheroidals and dwarf irregulars to more massive dwarfs similar to the Magellanic Clouds. While almost all of the low-mass (M {sub *} ≲ 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}) dwarfs are quenched, at higher masses the quenched fraction decreases to approximately 40%-50%. This change in the quenched fraction is large and suggests a sudden change in the effectiveness of quenching that correlates with satellite mass. We combine this observation with models of satellite infall and ram pressure stripping to show that the low-mass satellites must quench within 1-2 Gyr of pericenter passage to maintain a high quenched fraction, but that many more massive dwarfs must continue to form stars today even though they likely fell into their host >5 Gyr ago. We also characterize how the susceptibility of dwarfs to ram pressure must vary as a function of mass if it is to account for the change in quenched fractions. Though neither model predicts the quenching effectiveness a priori, this modeling illustrates the physical requirements that the observed quenched fractions place on possible quenching mechanisms.

  5. The Mass Dependence of Dwarf Satellite Galaxy Quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.

    2014-09-01

    We combine observations of the Local Group with data from the NASA-Sloan Atlas to show the variation in the quenched fraction of satellite galaxies from low-mass dwarf spheroidals and dwarf irregulars to more massive dwarfs similar to the Magellanic Clouds. While almost all of the low-mass (M sstarf <~ 107 M ⊙) dwarfs are quenched, at higher masses the quenched fraction decreases to approximately 40%-50%. This change in the quenched fraction is large and suggests a sudden change in the effectiveness of quenching that correlates with satellite mass. We combine this observation with models of satellite infall and ram pressure stripping to show that the low-mass satellites must quench within 1-2 Gyr of pericenter passage to maintain a high quenched fraction, but that many more massive dwarfs must continue to form stars today even though they likely fell into their host >5 Gyr ago. We also characterize how the susceptibility of dwarfs to ram pressure must vary as a function of mass if it is to account for the change in quenched fractions. Though neither model predicts the quenching effectiveness a priori, this modeling illustrates the physical requirements that the observed quenched fractions place on possible quenching mechanisms.

  6. H ii REGIONS WITHIN A COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD. A NEARLY STARLESS DWARF GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect

    Bellazzini, M.; Magrini, L.; Mucciarelli, A.; Fraternali, F.; Ibata, R.; Martin, N.; Battaglia, G.; Testa, V.; Fumana, M.; Marchetti, A.; Correnti, M.

    2015-02-10

    Within the SECCO survey we identified a candidate stellar counterpart to the Ultra Compact High Velocity Cloud (UCHVC) HVC274.68+74.70-123 that was suggested by Adams et al. to be a possible mini halo within the Local Group of galaxies. The spectroscopic follow-up of the brightest sources within the candidate reveals the presence of two H ii regions whose radial velocity is compatible with a physical association with the UVHVC. The available data do not allow us to give a definite answer on the nature of the newly identified system. A few alternative hypotheses are discussed. However, the most likely possibility is that we have found a new faint dwarf galaxy residing in the Virgo cluster of galaxies, which we name SECCO 1. Independently of its actual distance, SECCO 1 displays a ratio of neutral hydrogen mass to V luminosity of M{sub H} {sub I}/L{sub V}≳20, by far the largest among local dwarfs. Hence, it appears to be a nearly starless galaxy and it may be an example of the missing links between normal dwarfs and the dark mini halos that are predicted to exist in large numbers according to the currently accepted cosmological model.

  7. Early-type dwarf galaxies with multicomponent stellar structure: Are they remnants of disc galaxies strongly transformed by their environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The surface brightness distribution of ~30-40% of the early-type dwarf galaxies with - 18 ≤ MB ≤ -15 in the Virgo and the Coma clusters is fitted by models that include two structural components (Sérsic + exponential) as for bright disc galaxies. Aims: The goal of the present study is to determine whether early-type dwarf galaxies with a two-component stellar structure in the Virgo and the Coma clusters are low-luminosity copies of bright disc galaxies or are the remnants of bright galaxies strongly transformed by cluster environmental effects. Methods: I analysed the location of bright disc galaxies and early-type dwarfs in the rb,e/h- n plane. The location in this plane of the two-component dwarf galaxies was compared with the remnants of tidally disrupted disc galaxies reported by numerical simulations. Results: Bright unbarred disc galaxies show a strong correlation in the rb,e/h-n plane. Galaxies with larger Sérsic shape parameters show a higher rb,e/h ratio. In contrast, two-component early-type dwarf galaxies do not follow the same correlation. A fraction (~55%) of them are located outside the locus defined in this plane by having 95% of bright disc galaxies. This distribution indicates that they are not a low-mass replica of bright disc galaxies. The different location in the rb,e/h- n plane of two-component early-type dwarfs and bright galaxies can be qualitatively explain whether the former are remnants of disc galaxies strongly transformed by tidal processes. Conclusions: The progenitors of ~20-25% of early-type dwarf galaxies with - 18 ≤ MB ≤ -15 in the Virgo and Coma clusters could be bright disc galaxies transformed by effects of the environment. These tidally transformed galaxies can be selected according to their location in the rb,e/h-n plane.

  8. RBS 1032: A TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENT IN ANOTHER DWARF GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect

    Maksym, W. Peter; Lin, Dacheng; Irwin, Jimmy A.

    2014-09-10

    RBS 1032 is a supersoft (Γ ∼ 5), luminous (∼10{sup 43} erg s{sup –1}) ROSAT PSPC source which has been associated with an inactive dwarf galaxy at z = 0.026, SDSS J114726.69+494257.8. We have analyzed an XMM-Newton observation that confirms that RBS 1032 is indeed associated with the dwarf galaxy. Moreover, RBS 1032 has undergone a factor of ∼100-300 decay since 1990 November. This variability suggests that RBS 1032 may not be a steadily accreting intermediate-mass black hole, but rather an accretion flare from the tidal disruption of a star by the central black hole (which may or may not be intermediate-mass). We suggest that additional tidal disruption events may remain unidentified in archival ROSAT data, such that disruption rate estimates based upon ROSAT All-Sky Survey data may need reconsideration.

  9. The Structure of Dark Matter Halos in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.

    1995-07-01

    Recent observations indicate that dark matter halos have flat central density profiles. Cosmological simulations with nonbaryonic dark matter, however, predict self-similar halos with central density cusps. This contradiction has lead to the conclusion that dark matter must be baryonic. Here it is shown that the dark matter halos of dwarf spiral galaxies represent a one-parameter family with self-similar density profiles. The observed global halo parameters are coupled with each other through simple scaling relations which can be explained by the standard cold dark matter model if one assumes that all the halos formed from density fluctuations with the same primordial amplitude. We find that the finite central halo densities correlate with the other global parameters. This result rules out scenarios where the flat halo cores formed subsequently through violent dynamical processes in the baryonic component. These cores instead provide important information on the origin and nature of dark matter in dwarf galaxies.

  10. Spectroscopy of Giants of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, P.; Pasquini, L.; Molaro, P.; Marconi, G.

    The Sagittarius dwarf galaxy, at a distance of only 25 kpc, is undergoing strong tidal disruption and is probably in the process of merging with the Galaxy. This is likely to be just one of the many merger events which have contributed to shape the present day Galaxy. Photometric studies of the Saggitarius dwarf galaxy have suggested a spread in metallicity in the range -0.71 <= [Fe/H] <= -1.58, which may result from different bursts of star formation. From the deep CCD photometry of Marconi et al (1998) we have selected a sample of giants representative of the metallicity spread and acquired intermediate resolution (Δ λ ~3.5 AA) spectra using the ESO NTT telescope and the Multi Object capability of EMMI. These spectra have been used to measure radial velocities, to confirm the membership to the Sgr galaxy, and to provide a metallicity estimate for the sample stars by using spectral synthesis techniques. The present work will allow the selection of primary targets for detailed abundance analysis to be performed at high-resolution with the VLT.

  11. A tidally distorted dwarf galaxy near NGC 4449.

    PubMed

    Rich, R M; Collins, M L M; Black, C M; Longstaff, F A; Koch, A; Benson, A; Reitzel, D B

    2012-02-01

    NGC 4449 is a nearby Magellanic irregular starburst galaxy with a B-band absolute magnitude of -18 and a prominent, massive, intermediate-age nucleus at a distance from Earth of 3.8 megaparsecs (ref. 3). It is wreathed in an extraordinary neutral hydrogen (H I) complex, which includes rings, shells and a counter-rotating core, spanning ∼90 kiloparsecs (kpc; refs 1, 4). NGC 4449 is relatively isolated, although an interaction with its nearest known companion--the galaxy DDO 125, some 40 kpc to the south--has been proposed as being responsible for the complexity of its H I structure. Here we report the presence of a dwarf galaxy companion to NGC 4449, namely NGC 4449B. This companion has a V-band absolute magnitude of -13.4 and a half-light radius of 2.7 kpc, with a full extent of around 8 kpc. It is in a transient stage of tidal disruption, similar to that of the Sagittarius dwarf near the Milky Way. NGC 4449B exhibits a striking S-shaped morphology that has been predicted for disrupting galaxies but has hitherto been seen only in a dissolving globular cluster. We also detect an additional arc or disk ripple embedded in a two-component stellar halo, including a component extending twice as far as previously known, to about 20 kpc from the galaxy's centre.

  12. A tidally distorted dwarf galaxy near NGC 4449.

    PubMed

    Rich, R M; Collins, M L M; Black, C M; Longstaff, F A; Koch, A; Benson, A; Reitzel, D B

    2012-02-01

    NGC 4449 is a nearby Magellanic irregular starburst galaxy with a B-band absolute magnitude of -18 and a prominent, massive, intermediate-age nucleus at a distance from Earth of 3.8 megaparsecs (ref. 3). It is wreathed in an extraordinary neutral hydrogen (H I) complex, which includes rings, shells and a counter-rotating core, spanning ∼90 kiloparsecs (kpc; refs 1, 4). NGC 4449 is relatively isolated, although an interaction with its nearest known companion--the galaxy DDO 125, some 40 kpc to the south--has been proposed as being responsible for the complexity of its H I structure. Here we report the presence of a dwarf galaxy companion to NGC 4449, namely NGC 4449B. This companion has a V-band absolute magnitude of -13.4 and a half-light radius of 2.7 kpc, with a full extent of around 8 kpc. It is in a transient stage of tidal disruption, similar to that of the Sagittarius dwarf near the Milky Way. NGC 4449B exhibits a striking S-shaped morphology that has been predicted for disrupting galaxies but has hitherto been seen only in a dissolving globular cluster. We also detect an additional arc or disk ripple embedded in a two-component stellar halo, including a component extending twice as far as previously known, to about 20 kpc from the galaxy's centre. PMID:22318602

  13. Star Formation Rate in Holmberg IX Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andjelic, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we use previously determined Hα fluxes for dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX (Arbutina et al. 2009) to calculate star formation rate (SFR) in this galaxy. We discuss possible contaminations of Hα flux and, for the first time, we take into account optical emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) as a possible source of contamination of Hα flux. Derived SFR for Holmberg IX is 3.4×10-4M_{⊙} yr-1. Our value is lower then in previous studies, due to luminous shock-heated source M&H 9-10, possible hypernova remnant, which we excluded from the total Hα flux in our calculation of SFR.

  14. Ultradiffuse galaxies: the high-spin tail of the abundant dwarf galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorisco, N. C.; Loeb, A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent observations have revealed the existence of an abundant population of faint, low surface brightness (SB) galaxies, which appear to be numerous and ubiquitous in nearby galaxy clusters, including the Virgo, Coma and Fornax clusters. With median stellar masses of dwarf galaxies, these ultradiffuse galaxies (UDGs) have unexpectedly large sizes, corresponding to a mean SB of 24 ≲ <μe>r mag-1 arcsec2 ≲ 27 within the effective radius. We show that the UDG population represents the tail of galaxies formed in dwarf-sized haloes with higher-than-average angular momentum. By adopting the standard model of disc formation - in which the size of galaxies is set by the spin of the halo - we recover both the abundance of UDGs as a function of the host cluster mass and the distribution of sizes within the UDG population. According to this model, UDGs are not failed L* galaxies, but genuine dwarfs, and their low SB is not uniquely connected to the harsh cluster environment. We therefore expect a correspondingly abundant population of UDGs in the field, with possibly different morphologies and colours.

  15. VERITAS deep observations of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Segue 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Decerprit, G.; Dickherber, R.; Dumm, J.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Ferrer, F.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Godambe, S.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Huan, H.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lee, K.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Ruppel, J.; Saxon, D. B.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Şentürk, G. D.; Skole, C.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Tsurusaki, K.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Vivier, M.; Wagner, R. G.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2012-03-01

    The VERITAS array of Cherenkov telescopes has carried out a deep observational program on the nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy Segue 1. We report on the results of nearly 48 hours of good quality selected data, taken between January 2010 and May 2011. No significant γ-ray emission is detected at the nominal position of Segue 1, and upper limits on the integrated flux are derived. According to recent studies, Segue 1 is the most dark matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal galaxy currently known. We derive stringent bounds on various annihilating and decaying dark matter particle models. The upper limits on the velocity-weighted annihilation cross-section are ⟨σv⟩95%CL≲10-23cm3s-1, improving our limits from previous observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies by at least a factor of 2 for dark matter particle masses mχ≳300GeV. The lower limits on the decay lifetime are at the level of τ95%CL≳1024s. Finally, we address the interpretation of the cosmic ray lepton anomalies measured by ATIC and PAMELA in terms of dark matter annihilation, and show that the VERITAS observations of Segue 1 disfavor such a scenario.

  16. No WIMP mini-spikes in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Wanders, Mark; Bertone, Gianfranco; Weniger, Christoph; Volonteri, Marta E-mail: g.bertone@uva.nl E-mail: c.weniger@uva.nl

    2015-04-01

    The formation of black holes inevitably affects the distribution of dark and baryonic matter in their vicinity, leading to an enhancement of the dark matter density, called spike, and if dark matter is made of WIMPs, to a strong enhancement of the dark matter annihilation rate. Spikes at the center of galaxies like the Milky Way are efficiently disrupted by baryonic processes, but mini-spikes can form and survive undisturbed at the center of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We show that Fermi LAT satellite data allow to set very stringent limits on the existence of mini-spikes in dwarf galaxies: for thermal WIMPs with mass between 100 GeV and 1 TeV, we obtain a maximum black hole mass between 100 and 1000 M{sub ⊙}, ruling out black holes masses extrapolated from the M-σ relationship in a large region of the parameter space. We also performed Monte Carlo simulations of merger histories of black holes in dwarf spheroidals in a scenario where black holes form from the direct collapse of primordial gas in early halos, and found that this specific formation scenario is incompatible at the 84% CL with dark matter being in the form of thermal WIMPs.

  17. Probing Globular Cluster Formation in Low Metallicity Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey E.; Hunt, Leslie K.; Reines, Amy E.

    2008-12-01

    The ubiquitous presence of globular clusters around massive galaxies today suggests that these extreme star clusters must have been formed prolifically in the earlier universe in low-metallicity galaxies. Numerous adolescent and massive star clusters are already known to be present in a variety of galaxies in the local universe; however most of these systems have metallicities of 12 + log(O/H) > 8, and are thus not representative of the galaxies in which today's ancient globular clusters were formed. In order to better understand the formation and evolution of these massive clusters in environments with few heavy elements, we have targeted several low-metallicity dwarf galaxies with radio observations, searching for newly-formed massive star clusters still embedded in their birth material. The galaxies in this initial study are HS 0822+3542, UGC 4483, Pox 186, and SBS 0335-052, all of which have metallicities of 12 + log(O/H) < 7.75. While no thermal radio sources, indicative of natal massive star clusters, are found in three of the four galaxies, SBS 0335-052 hosts two such objects, which are incredibly luminous. The radio spectral energy distributions of these intense star-forming regions in SBS 0335-052 suggest the presence of ~12,000 equivalent O-type stars, and the implied star formation rate is nearing the maximum starburst intensity limit.

  18. The Origin of Dwarf Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa

    2012-10-01

    Abridge. We have conducted a spectrophotometric study of dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo cluster and in regions of lower density. We have found that these galaxies show many properties in common with late-type galaxies but not with more massive early-types (E/S0). The properties of the dEs in Virgo show gradients within the cluster. dEs in the outer parts of the Virgo cluster are kinematically supported by rotation, while those in the center are supported by the random motions of their stars (i.e. pressure supported). The rotationally supported dEs have disky isophotes and faint underlying spiral/irregular substructures, they also show younger ages than those pressure supported, which have boxy isophotes and are smooth and regular, without any substructure. We compare the position of these dEs with massive early-type galaxies in the Faber-Jackson and Fundamental Plane relations, and we find that, although there is no difference between the position of rotationally and pressure supported dEs, both deviate from the relations of massive early-type galaxies in the direction of dwarf spheroidal systems (dSphs). We have used their offset with respect to the Fundamental Plane of E/S0 galaxies to estimate their dark matter fraction. All the properties studied in this work agree with a ram pressure stripping scenario, where late-type galaxies infall into the cluster, their interaction with the intergalactic medium blows away their gas and, as a result, they are quenched in a small amount of time. However, those dEs in the center of the cluster seem to have been fully transformed leaving no trace of their possible spiral origin, thus, if that is the case, they must have experienced a more violent mechanism in combination with ram pressure stripping.

  19. Chemodynamic subpopulations of the Carina dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordopatis, G.; Amorisco, N. C.; Evans, N. W.; Gilmore, G.; Koposov, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    We study the chemodynamical properties of the Carina dwarf spheroidal by combining an intermediate spectroscopic resolution data set of more than 900 red giant and red clump stars, with high-precision photometry to derive the atmospheric parameters, metallicities and age estimates for our targets. Within the red giant branch population, we find evidence for the presence of three distinct stellar subpopulations with different metallicities, spatial distributions, kinematics and ages. As in the Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals, the subpopulation with the lowest average metallicity is more extended and kinematically hotter than all other populations. However, we identify an inversion in the parallel ordering of metallicity, kinematics and characteristic length-scale in the two most metal-rich subpopulations, which therefore do not contribute to a global negative chemical gradient. Contrary to common trends in the chemical properties with radius, the metal richest population is more extended and mildly kinematically hotter than the main component of intermediate metallicity. More investigations are required to ascertain the nature of this inversion, but we comment on the mechanisms that might have caused it.

  20. Chemodynamics of Compact Stellar Systems in NGC 5128: How Similar are Globular Clusters, Ultra-Compact Dwarfs, and Dwarf Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Matthew A.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Harris, Gretchen L.; Harris, William E.; Kissler-Patig, Markus; Hilker, Michael

    2010-04-01

    Velocity dispersion measurements are presented for several of the most luminous globular clusters (GCs) in NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) derived from high-resolution spectra obtained with the UVES echelle spectrograph on the 8.2 m ESO/Very Large Telescope. The measurements are made utilizing a penalized pixel-fitting method that parametrically recovers line-of-sight velocity dispersions. Combining the measured velocity dispersions with surface photometry and structural parameter data from the Hubble Space Telescope enables both dynamical masses and mass-to-light ratios to be derived. The properties of these massive stellar systems are similar to those of both massive GCs contained within the Local Group and nuclear star clusters and ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs). The fundamental plane relations of these clusters are investigated in order to fill the apparent gap between the relations of Local Group GCs and more massive early-type galaxies. It is found that the properties of these massive stellar systems match those of nuclear clusters in dwarf elliptical galaxies and UCDs better than those of Local Group GCs, and that all objects share similarly old (gsim8 Gyr) ages, suggesting a possible link between the formation and evolution of nuclear star clusters in dwarf elliptical galaxies (dE,Ns), UCDs, and massive GCs. We find a very steep correlation between dynamical mass-to-light ratio and dynamical mass of the form Υ _{V}^dyn ∝ M_dyn^{0.24± 0.02} above M}_dyn ≈ 2× 10^6 M sun. Formation scenarios are investigated with a chemical abundance analysis using absorption-line strengths calibrated to the Lick/IDS index system. The results lend support to two scenarios contained within a single general formation scheme. Old, massive, super-solar [α/Fe] systems are formed on short (lsim100 Myr) timescales through the merging of single-collapse GCs which themselves are formed within single, giant molecular clouds. More intermediate- and old-aged (~3-10 Gyr), solar- to sub

  1. TiNy Titans: The Role of Dwarf-Dwarf Interactions in Low-mass Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stierwalt, S.; Besla, G.; Patton, D.; Johnson, K.; Kallivayalil, N.; Putman, M.; Privon, G.; Ross, G.

    2015-05-01

    We introduce TiNy Titans (TNT), the first systematic study of star formation and the subsequent processing of the interstellar medium in interacting dwarf galaxies. Here we present the first results from a multiwavelength observational program based on a sample of 104 dwarf galaxy pairs selected from a range of environments within the spectroscopic portion of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and caught in various stages of interaction. The TNT dwarf pairs span mass ratios of M*,1/M*,2 < 10, projected separations <50 kpc, and pair member masses of 7 < log({{M}*}/{{M}⊙ }) < 9.7. The dwarf-dwarf merger sequence, as defined by TNT at z = 0, demonstrates conclusively and for the first time that the star formation enhancement observed for massive galaxy pairs also extends to the dwarf mass range. Star formation is enhanced in paired dwarfs in otherwise isolated environments by a factor of 2.3 (±0.7) at pair separations <50 kpc relative to unpaired analogs. The enhancement decreases with increasing pair separation and extends out to pair separations as large as 100 kpc. Starbursts, defined by Hα EQW >100 Å, occur in 20% of the TNT dwarf pairs, regardless of environment, compared to only 6%-8% of the matched unpaired dwarfs. Starbursts can be triggered throughout the merger (i.e., out to large pair separations) and not just approaching coalescence. Despite their enhanced star formation and triggered starbursts, most TNT dwarf pairs have similar gas fractions relative to unpaired dwarfs of the same stellar mass. Thus, there may be significant reservoirs of diffuse, non-star-forming neutral gas surrounding the dwarf pairs, or the gas consumption timescales may be long in the starburst phase. The only TNT dwarf pairs with low gas fractions (fgas\\lt 0.4) and the only dwarfs, either paired or unpaired, with Hα EQW < 2 Å are found near massive galaxy hosts. We conclude that dwarf-dwarf interactions are significant drivers of galaxy evolution at the low-mass end, but

  2. A vast, thin plane of corotating dwarf galaxies orbiting the Andromeda galaxy.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Rodrigo A; Lewis, Geraint F; Conn, Anthony R; Irwin, Michael J; McConnachie, Alan W; Chapman, Scott C; Collins, Michelle L; Fardal, Mark; Ferguson, Annette M N; Ibata, Neil G; Mackey, A Dougal; Martin, Nicolas F; Navarro, Julio; Rich, R Michael; Valls-Gabaud, David; Widrow, Lawrence M

    2013-01-01

    Dwarf satellite galaxies are thought to be the remnants of the population of primordial structures that coalesced to form giant galaxies like the Milky Way. It has previously been suspected that dwarf galaxies may not be isotropically distributed around our Galaxy, because several are correlated with streams of H I emission, and may form coplanar groups. These suspicions are supported by recent analyses. It has been claimed that the apparently planar distribution of satellites is not predicted within standard cosmology, and cannot simply represent a memory of past coherent accretion. However, other studies dispute this conclusion. Here we report the existence of a planar subgroup of satellites in the Andromeda galaxy (M 31), comprising about half of the population. The structure is at least 400 kiloparsecs in diameter, but also extremely thin, with a perpendicular scatter of less than 14.1 kiloparsecs. Radial velocity measurements reveal that the satellites in this structure have the same sense of rotation about their host. This shows conclusively that substantial numbers of dwarf satellite galaxies share the same dynamical orbital properties and direction of angular momentum. Intriguingly, the plane we identify is approximately aligned with the pole of the Milky Way's disk and with the vector between the Milky Way and Andromeda.

  3. A vast, thin plane of corotating dwarf galaxies orbiting the Andromeda galaxy.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Rodrigo A; Lewis, Geraint F; Conn, Anthony R; Irwin, Michael J; McConnachie, Alan W; Chapman, Scott C; Collins, Michelle L; Fardal, Mark; Ferguson, Annette M N; Ibata, Neil G; Mackey, A Dougal; Martin, Nicolas F; Navarro, Julio; Rich, R Michael; Valls-Gabaud, David; Widrow, Lawrence M

    2013-01-01

    Dwarf satellite galaxies are thought to be the remnants of the population of primordial structures that coalesced to form giant galaxies like the Milky Way. It has previously been suspected that dwarf galaxies may not be isotropically distributed around our Galaxy, because several are correlated with streams of H I emission, and may form coplanar groups. These suspicions are supported by recent analyses. It has been claimed that the apparently planar distribution of satellites is not predicted within standard cosmology, and cannot simply represent a memory of past coherent accretion. However, other studies dispute this conclusion. Here we report the existence of a planar subgroup of satellites in the Andromeda galaxy (M 31), comprising about half of the population. The structure is at least 400 kiloparsecs in diameter, but also extremely thin, with a perpendicular scatter of less than 14.1 kiloparsecs. Radial velocity measurements reveal that the satellites in this structure have the same sense of rotation about their host. This shows conclusively that substantial numbers of dwarf satellite galaxies share the same dynamical orbital properties and direction of angular momentum. Intriguingly, the plane we identify is approximately aligned with the pole of the Milky Way's disk and with the vector between the Milky Way and Andromeda. PMID:23282362

  4. METALS REMOVED BY OUTFLOWS FROM MILKY WAY DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Martin, Crystal L.; Finlator, Kristian

    2011-12-15

    The stars in the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are significantly more metal-poor than would be expected from a closed box model of chemical evolution. Gas outflows likely carried away most of the metals produced by the dSphs. Based on previous Keck/DEIMOS observations and models, we calculate the mass in Mg, Si, Ca, and Fe expelled from each of eight dSphs. Essentially, these masses are the differences between the observed amount of metals present in the dSphs' stars today and the inferred amount of metals produced by supernovae. We conclude that the dSphs lost 96% to >99% of the metals their stars manufactured. We apply the observed mass function of Milky Way dSphs to the ejected mass function to determine that a single large dSph, like Fornax, lost more metals over 10 Gyr than all smaller dSphs combined. Therefore, small galaxies like dSphs are not significant contributors to the metal content of the intergalactic medium. Finally, we compare our ejected mass function to previous X-ray measurements of the metal content of the winds from the post-starburst dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 1569. Remarkably, the most recent starburst in that galaxy falls exactly on the ejected-mass-stellar-mass relation defined by the Milky Way dSphs.

  5. IN-SPIRALING CLUMPS IN BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Zhang Hongxin; Hunter, Deidre A.

    2012-03-10

    Giant star formation clumps in dwarf irregular galaxies can have masses exceeding a few percent of the galaxy mass enclosed inside their orbital radii. They can produce sufficient torques on dark matter halo particles, halo stars, and the surrounding disk to lose their angular momentum and spiral into the central region in 1 Gyr. Pairs of giant clumps with similarly large relative masses can interact and exchange angular momentum to the same degree. The result of this angular momentum loss is a growing central concentration of old stars, gas, and star formation that can produce a long-lived starburst in the inner region, identified with the blue compact dwarf (BCD) phase. This central concentration is proposed to be analogous to the bulge in a young spiral galaxy. Observations of star complexes in five local BCDs confirm the relatively large clump masses that are expected for this process. The observed clumps also seem to contain old field stars, even after background light subtraction, in which case the clumps may be long-lived. The two examples with clumps closest to the center have the largest relative clump masses and the greatest contributions from old stars. An additional indication that the dense central regions of BCDs are like bulges is the high ratio of the inner disk scale height to the scale length, which is comparable to 1 for four of the galaxies.

  6. Dwarf galaxies in the Coma cluster - I. Velocity dispersion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourkchi, E.; Khosroshahi, H. G.; Carter, D.; Karick, A. M.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Chiboucas, K.; Tully, R. B.; Mobasher, B.; Guzmán, R.; Matković, A.; Gruel, N.

    2012-03-01

    We present the study of a large sample of early-type dwarf galaxies in the Coma cluster observed with DEIMOS on the Keck II to determine their internal velocity dispersion. We focus on a subsample of 41 member dwarf elliptical galaxies for which the velocity dispersion can be reliably measured, 26 of which were studied for the first time. The magnitude range of our sample is -21 < MR < -15 mag. This paper (Paper I) focuses on the measurement of the velocity dispersion and their error estimates. The measurements were performed using penalized pixel fitting (PPXF) and using the calcium triplet absorption lines. We use Monte Carlo bootstrapping to study various sources of uncertainty in our measurements, namely statistical uncertainty, template mismatch and other systematics. We find that the main source of uncertainty is the template mismatch effect which is reduced by using templates with a range of spectral types. Combining our measurements with those from the literature, we study the Faber-Jackson relation (L∝σα) and find that the slope of the relation is α= 1.99 ± 0.14 for galaxies brighter than MR≃-16 mag. A comprehensive analysis of the results combined with the photometric properties of these galaxies is reported in Paper II.

  7. Structural analysis of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, T. A.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Mackey, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present wide-field g- and i-band stellar photometry of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its surrounding area out to four times its half-light radius (rh = 695 pc), based on images obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at the 4-m Blanco telescope at CTIO. We find clear evidence of stellar substructure associated with the galaxy, extending to a distance of 82 arcmin (2 kpc) from its centre. We perform a statistical analysis of the overdensities and find three distinct features, as well as an extended halo-like structure, to be significant at the 99.7 per cent confidence level or higher. Unlike the extremely elongated and extended substructures surrounding the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the overdensities seen around Sextans are distributed evenly about its centre, and do not appear to form noticeable tidal tails. Fitting a King model to the radial distribution of Sextans stars yields a tidal radius rt = 83.2 arcmin ± 7.1 arcmin (2.08 ± 0.18 kpc), which implies the majority of detected substructure is gravitationally bound to the galaxy. This finding suggests that Sextans is not undergoing significant tidal disruption from the Milky Way, supporting the scenario in which the orbit of Sextans has a low eccentricity.

  8. EXPLORING THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIA OF OPTICALLY COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Most, Hans P.; Cannon, John M.; Engstrom, Eric; Fliss, Palmer; Salzer, John J.; Rosenberg, Jessica L. E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu E-mail: jrosenb4@gmu.edu

    2013-06-15

    We present new Very Large Array H I spectral line, archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and archival Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of eight star-forming blue compact dwarf galaxies that were selected to be optically compact (optical radii <1 kpc). These systems have faint blue absolute magnitudes (M{sub B} {approx}> -17), ongoing star formation (based on emission-line selection by the H{alpha} or [O III] lines), and are nearby (mean velocity = 3315 km s{sup -1} {approx_equal} 45 Mpc). One galaxy in the sample, ADBS 113845+2008, is found to have an H I halo that extends 58 r-band scale lengths from its stellar body. In contrast, the rest of the sample galaxies have H I radii to optical-scale-length ratios ranging from 9.3 to 26. The size of the H I disk in the 'giant disk' dwarf galaxy ADBS 113845+2008 appears to be unusual as compared with similarly compact stellar populations.

  9. Discovery of new dwarf galaxies around NGC4631 with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Mikito; Komiyama, Yutaka; Chiba, Masashi

    2015-08-01

    We have been carrying out archaeological surveys of nearby galaxies using the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) on the prime focus of the 8.2m Subaru telescope in order to understand an universal formation scenario of galactic halos, based on wide-field observations of the Local Group galaxies and the Local Volume galaxies. HSC consists of 104 effective 2048 x 4096 CCDs with a scale of 0.17 arcsec per pixel and covers a circular field of view with 1.5 degree in diameter. Especially, it is important to understand the variety of morphology of galactic halos through a detailed comparison of structures already found in the Local Group galaxies with structures recently detected in the Local Volume galaxies. In this conference, we report the discovery of new classical dwarf galaxies in the outskirts of NGC4631, which is a nearby edge-on Local Volume spiral galaxy interacting with the spiral NGC4656, using Subaru/HSC. We have confirmed dwarf galaxies detected by Karachentsev+14 and have newly found 8 uncatalogued dwarf galaxies based on visual inspection. We have measured physical parameters of these dwarf galaxies, such as a total magnitude, a half-light radius and a surface brightness profile described by a sersic parameter, based on our i-band HSC image. Furthermore, we show spatial distribution of blue young stars of each dwarf galaxy and comparisons with UV sources from GALEX. The relation between total absolute magnitude and half-light radius of dwarf galaxies of the NGC4631 group suggests that these dwarf galaxies with brighter total luminosity probably tend to be more extending. Finally, we conclude that provided that the luminosity to half-light radius relation of dwarf galaxies in the NGC4631 group is the same as that observed in the Local Group, the dwarf galaxy system of the NGC4631 group may have formed through the same manner as that of the Local Group.

  10. DARK MATTER HEATING AND EARLY CORE FORMATION IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Madau, Piero; Shen, Sijing; Governato, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    We present more results from a fully cosmological ΛCDM simulation of a group of isolated dwarf galaxies that has been shown to reproduce the observed stellar mass and cold gas content, resolved star formation histories, and metallicities of dwarfs in the Local Volume. Here we investigate the energetics and timetable of the cusp-core transformation. As suggested by previous work, supernova-driven gas outflows remove dark matter (DM) cusps and create kiloparsec-size cores in all systems having a stellar mass M {sub *} > 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}. The {sup D}M core mass removal efficiency{sup —}dark mass ejected per unit stellar mass—ranges today from a few to a dozen, and increases with decreasing host mass. Because dwarfs form the bulk of their stars prior to redshift 1 and the amount of work required for DM heating and core formation scales approximately as M{sub vir}{sup 5/3}, the unbinding of the DM cusp starts early and the formation of cored profiles is not as energetically onerous as previously claimed. DM particles in the cusp typically migrate to 2-3 core radii after absorbing a few percent of the energy released by supernovae. The present-day slopes of the inner DM mass profiles, Γ ≡ dlog M/dlog R ≅ 2.5-3, of the simulated ''Bashful'' and ''Doc'' dwarfs are similar to those measured in the luminous Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. None of the simulated galaxies has a circular velocity profile exceeding 20 km s{sup –1} in the inner 1 kpc, implying that supernova feedback is key to solve the ''too-big-to-fail'' problem for Milky Way subhalos.

  11. Ultracompact Blue Dwarfs: Galaxy Formation in the Local Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Michael

    2004-07-01

    Recent observations suggest that very low-mass galaxies in the local universe are still in the process of formation. To investigate this issue we propose to obtain deep ACS HRC images in the U, V and I bands of a sample of 11 "ultracompact" blue dwarf galaxies {UCBDs} identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These objects are nearby {z < 0.009}, actively star-forming, and have extremely small angular and physical sizes {d < 6" and D < 1 kpc}. They also tend to reside in voids. Our WFPC2 images of the prototype object of this class, POX 186, reveal this tiny object to have a highly disturbed morphlogy indicative of a recent {within 10^8 yr} collision between two small { 100 pc} clumps of stars that could represent the long-sought building blocks predicted by the Press-Schechter model of hierarchical galaxy formation. This collision has also triggered the formation of a "super" star cluster {SSC} at the object's core that may be the progenitor of a globular cluster. POX 186 thus appears to be a very small dwarf galaxy in the process of formation. This exciting discovery strongly motivates HST imaging of a full sample of UCBDs in order to determine if they have morphologies similar to POX 186. HST images are essential for resolving the structure of these objects, including establishing the presence of SSCs. HST also offers the only way to determine their morphologies in the near UV. The spectra of the objects available from the SDSS will also allow us to measure their star formation rates, dust content and metallicities. In addition to potentially providing the first direct evidence of Press-Schechter building blocks, these data could yield insight into the relationship between galaxy and globular cluster formation, and will serve as a test of the recent "downsizing" model of galaxy formation in which the least massive objects are the last to form.

  12. The history of star formation in nearby dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel Ray

    2010-11-01

    We present detailed analysis of color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of resolved stellar populations in nearby dwarf galaxies based on observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). From the positions of individual stars on a CMD, we are able to derive the star formation histories (SFHs), i.e., the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time and metallicity, of the observed stellar populations. Specifically, we apply this technique to a number of nearby dwarf galaxies to better understand the mechanisms driving their evolution. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury program (ANGST) provides multi-color photometry of resolved stars in ˜ 60 nearby dwarf galaxies from images taken with HST. This sample contains 12 dSph, 5 dwarf spiral, 28 dIrr, 12 dSph/dIrr (transition), and 3 tidal dwarf galaxies. The sample spans a range of ˜ 10 in MB and covers a wide range of environments, from highly interacting to truly isolated. From the best fit lifetime SFHs we find three significant results: (1) the average dwarf galaxy formed ˜ 60% of its stars by z ˜ 2 and 70% of its stars by z ˜ 1, regardless of morphological type, (2) the only statistically significant difference between the SFHs of different morphological types is within the most recent 1 Gyr (excluding tidal dwarf galaxies), and (3) the SFHs are complex and the mean values are inconsistent with simple SFH models, e.g., single epoch SF or constant SFH. We then present the recent ( ≲ 1 Gyr) SFHs of nine M81 Group Dwarf Galaxies. Comparing the SFHs, birthrate parameters, fraction of stars formed per time interval, and spatial distribution of stellar components as a function of luminosity, we find only minor differences in SF characteristics among the M81 Group dIs despite a wide range of physical properties. We extend our comparison to select dIs in the Local Group (LG), with similar quality photometry, and again find only minor differences in SF parameters. The lack of a clear trend in SF parameters over

  13. The history of star formation in nearby dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel Ray

    2010-11-01

    We present detailed analysis of color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of resolved stellar populations in nearby dwarf galaxies based on observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). From the positions of individual stars on a CMD, we are able to derive the star formation histories (SFHs), i.e., the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time and metallicity, of the observed stellar populations. Specifically, we apply this technique to a number of nearby dwarf galaxies to better understand the mechanisms driving their evolution. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury program (ANGST) provides multi-color photometry of resolved stars in ˜ 60 nearby dwarf galaxies from images taken with HST. This sample contains 12 dSph, 5 dwarf spiral, 28 dIrr, 12 dSph/dIrr (transition), and 3 tidal dwarf galaxies. The sample spans a range of ˜ 10 in MB and covers a wide range of environments, from highly interacting to truly isolated. From the best fit lifetime SFHs we find three significant results: (1) the average dwarf galaxy formed ˜ 60% of its stars by z ˜ 2 and 70% of its stars by z ˜ 1, regardless of morphological type, (2) the only statistically significant difference between the SFHs of different morphological types is within the most recent 1 Gyr (excluding tidal dwarf galaxies), and (3) the SFHs are complex and the mean values are inconsistent with simple SFH models, e.g., single epoch SF or constant SFH. We then present the recent ( ≲ 1 Gyr) SFHs of nine M81 Group Dwarf Galaxies. Comparing the SFHs, birthrate parameters, fraction of stars formed per time interval, and spatial distribution of stellar components as a function of luminosity, we find only minor differences in SF characteristics among the M81 Group dIs despite a wide range of physical properties. We extend our comparison to select dIs in the Local Group (LG), with similar quality photometry, and again find only minor differences in SF parameters. The lack of a clear trend in SF parameters over

  14. The unique structural parameters of the underlying host galaxies in blue compact dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Janowiecki, Steven; Salzer, John J. E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu

    2014-10-01

    The nature of possible evolutionary pathways between various types of dwarf galaxies is still not fully understood. Blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) provide a unique window into dwarf galaxy formation and evolution and are often thought of as an evolutionary stage between different classes of dwarf galaxies. In this study we use deep optical and near-infrared observations of the underlying hosts of BCDs in order to study the structural differences between different types of dwarf galaxies. When compared with dwarf irregular galaxies of similar luminosities, we find that the underlying hosts of BCDs have significantly more concentrated light distributions, with smaller scale lengths and brighter central surface brightnesses. We demonstrate here that the underlying hosts of BCDs are distinct from the broad continuum of typical dwarf irregular galaxies, and that it is unlikely that most dwarf irregular galaxies can transform into a BCD or vice versa. Furthermore, we find that the starburst in a BCD only brightens it on average by ∼0.8 mag (factor of two), in agreement with other studies. It appears that a BCD is a long-lived and distinct type of dwarf galaxy that exhibits an exceptionally concentrated matter distribution. We suggest that it is this compact mass distribution that enables the strong star formation events that characterize this class of dwarf galaxy, that the compactness of the underlying host can be used as a distinguishing parameter between BCDs and other dwarf galaxies, and that it can also be used to identify BCDs which are not currently experiencing an intense starburst event.

  15. Globular Clusters in the Milky Way and Dwarf Galaxies: A Distribution-Free Statistical Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Saptarshi; Chattopadhyay, Asis Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Tanuka

    2008-08-01

    It has been found that globular clusters (GCs) in dwarf galaxies and those in the Milky Way (MW) outer halo mostly have the same parent distributions, while GCs in the MW disk and inner halo have a different origin from those in dwarf galaxies. Thus, these dwarf galaxies did not play a crucial role in the formation of the Galactic disk or inner halo. In order to investigate this phenomenon in a more objective manner, a statistical comparison of the GCs of our Galaxy and those of neighboring dwarf galaxies has been carried out by a multivariate nonparametric method. For the various parameters of GCs in the MW and in dwarf galaxies, the multivariate Gaussian assumption fails, so a nonparametric method of comparison (instead of multivariate analysis of variance [MANOVA]) has been chosen. The test is performed on GCs of the MW disk, inner halo, and outer halo separately, with GCs from neighboring dwarf galaxies Canis Major, Fornax, and Sculptor, and the LMC dwarf irregular galaxy. The test is also performed for GCs from dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the neighborhood of M31: M33, NGC 147, NGC 185, and NGC 205.

  16. Kinematics of the Ionized Gas in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez-Gutiérrez, Margarita; Rosado, Margarita

    2007-05-01

    Introduction: Some preliminary results focused on the kinematics and dynamics of the ionized gas in the local group dwarf irregular galaxy IC10 are presented. Method: Scanning Fabry-Perot interferometry was performed in the Hα, [SII], [NII] and [OIII] lines. The dedicated ADHOC package was used in the reduction process. Results: On galactic scales the radial velocity field in this galaxy is relatively well behaved, however, the rotation curve has been difficult to obtain. On local scales the kinematics reflects the superposition of shells, filaments, SNRs and diffuse gas. At many of these locations the velocity widths are supersonic and many times larger than those found in the adjacent HII regions. Discussion: This is the first time that the kinematics of the ionized gas in the dwarf irregular IC10 is studied in great detail, literally pixel to pixel with moderate spectral and spatial resolutions. From these preliminary results a very complex behavior of the ionized gas is unveiled, as has been the case for the dwarf irregulars IC1613 and NGC4449, previously studied by our group of collaborators. Further analysis is being carried out.

  17. The evolutionary status of high and extremely low surface brightness dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowiecki, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Studying dwarf galaxies can shed light on the original building blocks of galaxy formation. Most large galaxies are thought to be built up over billions of years through the collisions and mergers of smaller galaxies. The dwarf galaxies we see today are the evolved remnants of those building blocks, and by understanding their nature and evolution, we can study the raw ingredients of galaxy formation. Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies (BCDs) and Almost Dark galaxies are at opposite extremes of today's population of dwarf galaxies. BCDs are exceptionally compact and host very intense starbursts, while Almost Dark galaxies are much more diffuse and have weak stellar populations. This work studies the evolutionary context of BCDs by using deep, high-resolution images to study the detailed structure of their components, and by fitting our multi-wavelength observations with models to describe the properties of their stars, gas, and dust. BCDs appear to have exceptionally compact old stellar populations and unusually large star formation rates, when compared to typical dwarf galaxies. By contrast, the optically faint, gas-dominated Almost Dark galaxies have extremely low star formation rates and weak stellar populations. In particular, one of the Almost Darks studied in this work has very unusual properties and is in disagreement with widely-studied scaling relations for large samples of galaxies. It appears to have too little stellar mass, a distribution of HI that is too extended to be supported by its modest rotation, and the highest well-measured gas mass-to-light ratio ever observed. These two extreme classes may represent evolutionary stages that all galaxies pass through, and appear to be extreme ends of the broad continuum of dwarf galaxy properties. In order to use today's dwarf galaxies as windows into the building blocks of early galaxy formation, these unusual states and evolutionary pathways must be understood.

  18. The evolutionary status of high and extremely low surface brightness dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowiecki, Steven

    2015-07-01

    Studying dwarf galaxies can shed light on the original building blocks of galaxy formation. Most large galaxies are thought to be built up over billions of years through the collisions and mergers of smaller galaxies. The dwarf galaxies we see today are the evolved remnants of those building blocks, and by understanding their nature and evolution, we can study the raw ingredients of galaxy formation. Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies (BCDs) and Almost Dark galaxies are at opposite extremes of today's population of dwarf galaxies. BCDs are exceptionally compact and host very intense starbursts, while Almost Dark galaxies are much more diffuse and have weak stellar populations. This work studies the evolutionary context of BCDs by using deep, high-resolution images to study the detailed structure of their components, and by fitting our multi-wavelength observations with models to describe the properties of their stars, gas, and dust. BCDs appear to have exceptionally compact old stellar populations and unusually large star formation rates, when compared to typical dwarf galaxies. By contrast, the optically faint, gas-dominated Almost Dark galaxies have extremely low star formation rates and weak stellar populations. In particular, one of the Almost Darks studied in this work has very unusual properties and is in disagreement with widely-studied scaling relations for large samples of galaxies. It appears to have too little stellar mass, a distribution of HI that is too extended to be supported by its modest rotation, and the highest well-measured gas mass-to-light ratio ever observed. These two extreme classes may represent evolutionary stages that all galaxies pass through, and appear to be extreme ends of the broad continuum of dwarf galaxy properties. In order to use today's dwarf galaxies as windows into the building blocks of early galaxy formation, these unusual states and evolutionary pathways must be understood.

  19. WFPC2 Observations of the URSA Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.; Burke, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    We present our analysis of archival Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) observations in F555W (approximately V) and F814W (approximately I) of the central region of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The V versus V - I color-magnitude diagram features a sparsely populated blue horizontal branch, a steep thin red giant branch, and a narrow subgiant branch. The main sequence reaches approximately 2 magnitudes below the main-sequence turnoff (V(sup UMi, sub TO) approximately equals 23.27 +/- 0.11 mag) of the median stellar population. We compare the fiducial sequence of the Galactic globular cluster M92 (NGC 6341). The excellent match between Ursa Minor and M92 confirms that the median stellar population of the UMi dSph galaxy is metal poor ([Fe/H](sub UMi) approximately equals [Fe/H](sub M92) approximately equals -2.2 dex) and ancient (age(sub UMi)approximately equalsage(sub M92) approximately equals 14 Gyr). The B - V reddening and the absorption in V are estimated to be E(B - V) = 0.03 +/- 0.01 mag and A(sup UMi, sub V) = 0.09 +/- 0.03 mag. A new estimate of the distance modulus of Ursa Minor, (m - M)(sup UMi, sub 0) = 19.18 +/- 0.12 mag, has been derived based on fiducial-sequence fitting M92 [DELTA.V(sub UMi - M92) = 4.60 +/- 0.03 mag and DELTA(V - I)(sub UMi - M92) = 0.010 +/- 0.005 mag] and the adoption of the apparent V distance modulus for M92 of (m - M)(sup M92, sub V) = 14.67 +/- 0.08 mag (Pont et al. 1998, A&A, 329, 87). The Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is then at a distance of 69 +/- 4 kpc from the Sun. These HST observations indicate that Ursa Minor has had a very simple star formation history consisting mainly of a single major burst of star formation about 14 Gyr ago which lasted approximately < 2 Gyr. While we may have missed minor younger stellar populations due to the small field-of-view of the WFPC2 instrument, these observations clearly show that most of the stars in the central region Ursa Minor dwarf

  20. A New Milky Way dwarf galaxy in Ursa Major

    SciTech Connect

    Willman, Beth; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Martinez-Delgado, David; West, Andrew A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W.; Barentine, J.C.; Brewington, Howard J.; Harvanek, Michael; Kleinman, S.J.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.; /CCPP, New York /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /IAA, Granada /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron. /Apache Point Observ. /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /Fermilab

    2005-03-01

    In this Letter, we report the discovery of a new dwarf satellite to the Milky Way, located at ({alpha}{sub 2000}, {delta}{sub 2000}) = (158.72,51.92) in the constellation of Ursa Major. This object was detected as an overdensity of red, resolved stars in Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. The color-magnitude diagram of the Ursa Major dwarf looks remarkably similar to that of Sextans, the lowest surface brightness Milky Way companion known, but with approximately an order of magnitude fewer stars. Deeper follow-up imaging confirms this object has an old and metal-poor stellar population and is {approx} 100 kpc away. We roughly estimate M{sub V} = -6.75 and r{sub 1/2} = 250 pc for this dwarf. Its luminosity is several times fainter than the faintest known Milky Way dwarfs. However, its physical size is typical for dSphs. Even though its absolute magnitude and size are presently quite uncertain, Ursa Major is likely the lowest luminosity and lowest surface brightness galaxy yet known.

  1. POX 186: A Dwarf Galaxy in the Process of Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Michael R.; Vacca, William D.

    2002-12-01

    We present deep U-, V-, and I-band images of the ``ultracompact'' blue dwarf galaxy POX 186 obtained with the Planetary Camera 2 of the Hubble Space Telescope. We have also obtained a near-ultraviolet spectrum of the object with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and combine this with a new ground-based optical spectrum. The images confirm the galaxy to be extremely small, with a maximum extent of only 300 pc, a luminosity of ~10-4L*, and an estimated mass of ~107 Msolar. Its morphology is highly asymmetric, with a tail of material on its western side that may be tidal in origin. The U-band image shows this tail to be part of a stream of material in which stars have recently formed. Most of the star formation in the galaxy is, however, concentrated in a central, compact (d~10-15 pc) star cluster. We estimate this cluster to have a total mass of ~105 Msolar, to be forming stars at a rate of less than 0.05 yr-1, and to have a maximum age of a few million years. The outer regions of the galaxy are significantly redder than the cluster, with V-I colors consistent with a population dominated by K and M stars. From our analysis of the optical spectrum we find the galaxy to have a metallicity Z~=0.06 Zsolar and to contain a significant amount of internal dust [E(B-V)~=0.28] both values agree with previous estimates. While these results rule out earlier speculation that POX 186 is a protogalaxy, its morphology, mass, and active star formation suggest that it represents a recent (within ~108 yr) collision between two clumps of stars of subgalactic size (~100 pc). POX 186 may thus be a very small dwarf galaxy that, dynamically speaking, is still in the process of formation. This interpretation is supported by the fact that it resides in a void, so its morphology cannot be explained as the result of an encounter with a more massive galaxy. Clumps of stars this small may represent the building blocks required by hierarchical models of galaxy formation, and these results

  2. Footprints of the early Universe in the SFHs of dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, S. L.; LCID Group

    We present the star formation histories (SFHs) as a function of galactocentric radius of four isolated dwarf galaxies, Cetus, Tucana, LGS-3, and Phoenix. Our results suggest that beyond some distance from the center, there are no significative differences in fundamental properties of these galaxies. In the innermost regions, dwarf galaxies appear to have formed stars during time intervals which duration varies from galaxy to galaxy. This extended star formation produces the dichotomy between dwarf spheroidal (dSph) and dwarf Transition (dTr) galaxy types. This behavior is compatible with a scenario in which global reionization stops the star formation in the outer galaxy regions and self-shielding allows extended star formation in the inner regions.

  3. Dark matter searches with Cherenkov telescopes: nearby dwarf galaxies or local galaxy clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Cannoni, Mirco; Zandanel, Fabio; Gómez, Mario E.; Prada, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  4. Dark Matter Searches with Cherenkov Telescopes: Nearby Dwarf Galaxies or Local Galaxy Clusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Cannoni, Mirco; Zandanel, Fabio; Gomez, Mario E.; Prada, Francisco; /IAA, Granada

    2012-06-06

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  5. Dissipative dark matter and the rotation curves of dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, R.

    2016-07-01

    There is ample evidence from rotation curves that dark matter halos around disk galaxies have nontrivial dynamics. Of particular significance are: a) the cored dark matter profile of disk galaxies, b) correlations of the shape of rotation curves with baryonic properties, and c) Tully-Fisher relations. Dark matter halos around disk galaxies may have nontrivial dynamics if dark matter is strongly self interacting and dissipative. Multicomponent hidden sector dark matter featuring a massless `dark photon' (from an unbroken dark U(1) gauge interaction) which kinetically mixes with the ordinary photon provides a concrete example of such dark matter. The kinetic mixing interaction facilitates halo heating by enabling ordinary supernovae to be a source of these `dark photons'. Dark matter halos can expand and contract in response to the heating and cooling processes, but for a sufficiently isolated halo could have evolved to a steady state or `equilibrium' configuration where heating and cooling rates locally balance. This dynamics allows the dark matter density profile to be related to the distribution of ordinary supernovae in the disk of a given galaxy. In a previous paper a simple and predictive formula was derived encoding this relation. Here we improve on previous work by modelling the supernovae distribution via the measured UV and Hα fluxes, and compare the resulting dark matter halo profiles with the rotation curve data for each dwarf galaxy in the LITTLE THINGS sample. The dissipative dark matter concept is further developed and some conclusions drawn.

  6. Structural parameters and blue stragglers in Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Ricardo; Jílková, Lucie; Carraro, Giovanni; Catelan, Márcio; Amigo, Pía.

    2012-04-01

    We present BV photometry of four Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy globular clusters: Arp 2, NGC 5634, Palomar 12 and Terzan 8, obtained with the Danish Telescope at ESO La Silla. We measure the structural parameters of the clusters using a King profile fitting, obtaining the first reliable measurements of the tidal radius of Arp 2 and Terzan 8. These two clusters are remarkably extended and with low concentrations; with a concentration of only c= 0.41 ± 0.02, Terzan 8 is less concentrated than any cluster in our Galaxy. Blue stragglers are identified in the four clusters, and their spatial distribution is compared to those of horizontal branch and red giant branch stars. The blue straggler properties do not provide evidence of mass segregation in Terzan 8, while Arp 2 probably shares the same status, although with less confidence. In the case of NGC 5634 and Palomar 12, blue stragglers are significantly less populous, and their analysis suggests that the two clusters have probably undergone mass segregation. References: (1) <link href="#b56">Peterson (1976)link>; (2) <link href="#b37">Kron, Hewitt & Wasserman (1984)link>; (3) <link href="#b14">Chernoff & Djorgovski (1989)link>; (4) <link href="#b70">Trager, Djorgovski & King (1993)link>; (5) <link href="#b71">Trager et al. (1995)link>; (6) <link href="#b58">Rosenberg et al. (1998)link>; (7) <link href="#b45">Mackey & Gilmore (2003b)link>; (8) <link href="#b46">McLaughlin & van der Marel (2005)link> and (9) <link href="#b10">Carballo-Bello et al. (2012)link>.

  7. STELLAR KINEMATICS OF THE ANDROMEDA II DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Nhung; Geha, M.; Tollerud, E.; Munoz, R. R.; Guhathakurta, P.; Gilbert, K. M.; Bullock, J.; Beaton, R. L.; Majewski, S. R. E-mail: marla.geha@yale.edu

    2012-10-20

    We present kinematical profiles and metallicity for the M31 dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellite galaxy Andromeda II (And II) based on Keck DEIMOS spectroscopy of 531 red giant branch stars. Our kinematical sample is among the largest for any M31 satellite and extends out to two effective radii (r {sub eff} = 5.'3 = 1.1 kpc). We find a mean systemic velocity of -192.4 {+-} 0.5 km s{sup -1} and an average velocity dispersion of {sigma} {sub v} = 7.8 {+-} 1.1 km s{sup -1}. While the rotation velocity along the major axis of And II is nearly zero (<1 km s{sup -1}), the rotation along the minor axis is significant with a maximum rotational velocity of v {sub max} = 8.6 {+-} 1.8 km s{sup -1}. We find a kinematical major axis, with a maximum rotational velocity of v {sub max} = 10.9 {+-} 2.4 km s{sup -1}, misaligned by 67 Degree-Sign to the isophotal major axis. And II is thus the first dwarf galaxy with evidence for nearly prolate rotation with a v {sub max}/{sigma} {sub v} = 1.1, although given its ellipticity of {epsilon} = 0.10, this object may be triaxial. We measured metallicities for a subsample of our data, finding a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.39 {+-} 0.03 dex and an internal metallicity dispersion of 0.72 {+-} 0.03 dex. We find a radial metallicity gradient with metal-rich stars more centrally concentrated, but do not observe a significant difference in the dynamics of the two metallicity populations. And II is the only known dwarf galaxy to show minor axis rotation, making it a unique system whose existence offers important clues on the processes responsible for the formation of dSphs.

  8. CALIBRATING UV STAR FORMATION RATES FOR DWARF GALAXIES FROM STARBIRDS

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Mitchell, Noah P.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2015-08-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation (SF) traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing SF activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color–magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The data sets are from the panchromatic Starburst Irregular Dwarf Survey and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near-UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs—using four different models—agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near-UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far-UV (FUV) predicted fluxes do not. Furthermore, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated FUV luminosities and existing scaling relations, and the SFRs based on the resolved stellar populations. This offset is not driven by different SF timescales, variations in SFRs, UV attenuation, nor stochastic effects. This first comparison between CMD-based SFRs and an integrated FUV emission SFR indicator suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is the theoretical FUV–SFR calibration from stellar evolutionary libraries and/or stellar atmospheric models. We present an empirical calibration of the FUV-based SFR relation for dwarf galaxies, with uncertainties, which is ∼53% larger than previous relations.

  9. Black holes at the centers of nearby dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Edward C.; Shahinyan, Karlen; Sugarman, Hannah R.; Vélez, Darik O.; Eracleous, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Using a distance-limited portion of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7, we have identified 28 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in nearby (d⩽80 Mpc) low-mass, low-luminosity dwarf galaxies. The accreting objects at the galaxy centers are expected to be intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) with M{sub BH}⩽10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙}. The AGNs were selected using several optical emission-line diagnostics after careful modeling of the continuum present in the spectra. We have limited our survey to objects with spectral characteristics similar to those of Seyfert nuclei, excluding emission-line galaxies with ambiguous spectra that could be powered by stellar processes. Thus, as a set, the host galaxies in our sample are the least massive objects in the very local universe certain to contain central black holes. Our sample is dominated by narrow-line (type 2) AGNs, and it appears to have a much lower fraction of broad-line objects than that observed for luminous, optically selected Seyfert galaxies. Given our focus on the nearest objects included in the SDSS, our survey is more sensitive to low-luminosity emission than previous optical searches for AGNs in low-mass galaxies. The [O iii] λ5007 luminosities of the Seyfert nuclei in our sample have a median value of L{sub 5007}=2×10{sup 5} L{sub ⊙} and extend down to ∼10{sup 4} L{sub ⊙}. Using published data for broad-line IMBH candidates, we have derived an [O iii] bolometric correction of log(L{sub bol}/L{sub 5007})=3.0±0.3, which is significantly lower than values obtained for high-luminosity AGNs. Applying this correction to our sample, we obtain minimum black hole mass estimates that fall mainly in the 10{sup 3} M{sub ⊙}–10{sup 4} M{sub ⊙} range, which is roughly where the predicted mass functions for different black hole seed formation scenarios overlap the most. In the stellar mass range that includes the bulk of the AGN host galaxies in our sample, we derive a lower limit on the AGN fraction

  10. The origin of dwarf early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, E.

    2013-05-01

    We have conducted a spectrophotometric study of dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo cluster and in regions of lower density. We have found that these galaxies show many properties in common with late-type galaxies but not with more massive early-types (E/S0). The properties of the dEs in Virgo show gradients within the cluster. dEs in the outer parts of the Virgo cluster are kinematically supported by rotation, while those in the center are supported by the random motions of their stars (i.e. pressure supported). The rotationally supported dEs have disky isophotes and faint underlying spiral/irregular substructures, they also show younger ages than those pressure supported, which have boxy isophotes and are smooth and regular, without any substructure. We compare the position of these dEs with massive early-type galaxies in the Faber-Jackson and Fundamental Plane relations, and we find that, although there is no difference between the position of rotationally and pressure supported dEs, both deviate from the relations of massive early-type galaxies in the direction of dwarf spheroidal systems (dSphs). We have used their offset with respect to the Fundamental Plane of E/S0 galaxies to estimate their dark matter fraction. All the properties studied in this work agree with a ram pressure stripping scenario, where late-type galaxies infall into the cluster, their interaction with the intergalactic medium blows away their gas and, as a result, they are quenched in a small amount of time. However, those dEs in the center of the cluster seem to have been fully transformed leaving no trace of their possible spiral origin, thus, if that is the case, they must have experienced a more violent mechanism in combination with ram pressure stripping, the open problem is that even galaxy harassment does not fully explain the observed properties for the pressure supported dEs in the center of the Virgo cluster.

  11. Variable stars in the dwarf galaxy GR 8 (DDO 155)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Saha, A.; Hoessel, John G.; Danielson, G. Edward

    1995-01-01

    Observations of the resolved stars in dwarf galaxy GR 8, obtained over the period 1980 February to 1994 March, are presented. Thirty-four separate epochs were searched for variable stars, and a total of six were found, of which one has Cepheid characteristics. After correction for Galactic extinction this single Cepheid yields a distance modulus of m - M = 26.75 +/- 0.35. This corresponds to a distance of 2.24 Mpc, placing GR 8 near the Local Group (LG) zero-velocity surface. The other five variable stars are very red, and possibly have long periods of order 100 days or more.

  12. Variable stars in the Pegasus dwarf galaxy (DDO 216)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoessel, J. G.; Abbott, Mark J.; Saha, A.; Mossman, Amy E.; Danielson, G. Edward

    1990-01-01

    Observations obtained over a period of five years of the resolved stars in the Pegasus dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 216) have been searched for variable stars. Thirty-one variables were found, and periods established for 12. Two of these variable stars are clearly eclipsing variables, seven are very likely Cepheid variables, and the remaining three are probable Cepheids. The period-luminosity relation for the Cepheids indicates a distance modulus for Pegasus of m - M = 26.22 + or - 0.20. This places Pegasus very near the zero-velocity surface of the Local Group.

  13. Variable stars in the Leo A dwarf galaxy (DDO 69)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoessel, John G.; Saha, A.; Krist, John; Danielson, G. Edward

    1994-01-01

    Observations of the Leo A dwarf galaxy, obtained over the period from 1980 to 1991 are reported. Forty two separate Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) frames were searched for variable stars. A total of 14 suspected variables were found, 9 had sufficient coverage for period determination, and 5 had Cepheid light curves. Four of these stars fit well on a P-L relation and yield a distance modulus, after correction for Galactic foreground extinction, of m-M = 26.74. This corresponds to a distance of 2.2 Mpc, placing Leo A near the Local Group zero-velocity surface.

  14. Chemical enrichment in Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Donatella

    2016-08-01

    Our view of the Milky Way's satellite population has radically changed after the discovery, ten years ago, of the first Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies (UFDs). These extremely faint, dark-matter dominated, scarcely evolved stellar systems are found in ever-increasing number in our cosmic neighbourhood and constitute a gold-mine for studies of early star formation conditions and early chemical enrichment pathways. Here we show what can be learned from the measurements of chemical abundances in UFD stars read through the lens of chemical evolution studies, point out the limitations of the classic approach, and discuss the way to go to improve the models.

  15. X-ray sources in dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster and the nearby field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulou, Marina; Phillipps, S.; Young, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    The extent to which dwarf galaxies represent essentially scaled down versions of giant galaxies is an important question with regards the formation and evolution of the galaxy population as a whole. Here, we address the specific question of whether dwarf galaxies behave like smaller versions of giants in terms of their X-ray properties. We discuss two samples of around 100 objects each, dwarfs in the Virgo cluster and dwarfs in a large Northern hemisphere area. We find nine dwarfs in each sample with Chandra detections. For the Virgo sample, these are in dwarf elliptical (or dwarf lenticular) galaxies and we assume that these are (mostly) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) [some may be nuclear sources]. We find a detection rate entirely consistent with scaling down from massive ellipticals, viz. about one bright (i.e. LX > 1038 erg s-1) LMXB per 5 × 109 M⊙ of stars. For the field sample, we find one (known) Seyfert nucleus, in a galaxy which appears to be the lowest mass dwarf with a confirmed X-ray emitting nucleus. The other detections are in star-forming dwarf irregular or blue compact dwarf galaxies and are presumably high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB). This time, we find a very similar detection rate to that in large late-type galaxies if we scale down by star formation rate, roughly one HMXB for a rate of 0.3 M⊙ per year. Nevertheless, there does seem to be one clear difference, in that the dwarf late-type galaxies with X-ray sources appear strongly biased to very low metallicity systems.

  16. DGSAT: Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes. I. Discovery of low surface brightness systems around nearby spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanmardi, B.; Martinez-Delgado, D.; Kroupa, P.; Henkel, C.; Crawford, K.; Teuwen, K.; Gabany, R. J.; Hanson, M.; Chonis, T. S.; Neyer, F.

    2016-04-01

    Context. We introduce the Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes (DGSAT) project and report the discovery of eleven low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in the fields of the nearby galaxies NGC 2683, NGC 3628, NGC 4594 (M 104), NGC 4631, NGC 5457 (M 101), and NGC 7814. Aims: The DGSAT project aims to use the potential of small-sized telescopes to probe LSB features around large galaxies and to increase the sample size of the dwarf satellite galaxies in the Local Volume. Methods: Using long exposure images, fields of the target spiral galaxies are explored for extended LSB objects. After identifying dwarf galaxy candidates, their observed properties are extracted by fitting models to their light profiles. Results: We find three, one, three, one, one, and two new LSB galaxies in the fields of NGC 2683, 3628, 4594, 4631, 5457, and 7814, respectively. In addition to the newly found galaxies, we analyse the structural properties of nine already known galaxies. All of these 20 dwarf galaxy candidates have effective surface brightnesses in the range 25.3 ≲ μe ≲ 28.8 mag arcsec-2 and are fit with Sersic profiles with indices n ≲ 1. Assuming that they are in the vicinity of the above mentioned massive galaxies, their r-band absolute magnitudes, their effective radii, and their luminosities are in the ranges -15.6 ≲ Mr ≲ -7.8, 160 pc ≲ Re ≲ 4.1 kpc, and 0.1 × 106 ≲ (L/L⊙)r ≲ 127 × 106, respectively. To determine whether these LSB galaxies are indeed satellites of the above mentioned massive galaxies, their distances need to be determined via further observations. Conclusions: Using small telescopes, we are readily able to detect LSB galaxies with similar properties to the known dwarf galaxies of the Local Group.

  17. An inefficient dwarf: chemical abundances and the evolution of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ural, Uğur; Cescutti, Gabriele; Koch, Andreas; Kleyna, Jan; Feltzing, Sofia; Wilkinson, Mark I.

    2015-05-01

    We present detailed chemical element abundance ratios of 17 elements with eight ≤ Z ≤ 60 in three metal-poor stars in the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, which we combine with extant data from the literature to assess the predictions of a novel suite of galaxy chemical evolution models. The spectroscopic data were obtained with the Keck/High-Resolution Echelle Spectrograph instrument and revealed low metallicities of [Fe/H] = -2.12, -2.13 and -2.67 dex. While the most metal-poor star in our sample shows an overabundance of [Mn/Fe] and other Fe-peak elements, our overall findings are in agreement with previous studies of this galaxy: elevated values of the [α/Fe] ratios that are similar to, or only slightly lower than, the halo values but with SN Ia enrichment at very low metallicity, as well as an enhancement of the ratio of first to second peak neutron capture elements [Y/Ba] with decreasing metallicity. The chemical evolution models which were tailored to reproduce the metallicity distribution function of the dwarf spheroidal, indicate that Ursa Minor had an extended star formation which lasted nearly 5 Gyr with low efficiency and are able to explain the [Y/Ba] enhancement at low metallicity for the first time. In particular, we show that the present-day lack of gas is probably due to continuous loss of gas from the system, which we model as winds.

  18. The Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy - How dark is it?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Pryor, Carlton; Welch, Douglas L.; Fischer, Philippe

    1993-01-01

    Precise radial velocities obtained with a photon-counting echelle spectrograph for a sample of 17 red giants in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy are presented. The calculation of the systemic velocity and central velocity dispersion of Carina is described, the existing data constraining the structural parameters of Carina are reviewed, and an estimate of the central surface brightness of the galaxy is derived. These data are used to estimate the central mass density of Carina, as well as central and global mass-to-light ratios. It is concluded that the inferred mass densities and mass-density limits for all acceptable models imply the presence of a significant DM component in Carina. DM properties of all well-studied dSph systems are summarized and compared.

  19. The violent interstellar medium of the dwarf galaxy IC 2574.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, F.; Brinks, E.

    The authors present VLA H I-synthesis observations of the Violent Interstellar Medium of the nearby dwarf galaxy IC 2574 (a member of the M81 group of galaxies) at high spatial and velocity resolution. The H I-observations show a stunning amount of detail in the form of H I shells and holes in the neutral interstellar medium of IC 2574, ranging in size from 100 to 1500 pc. The most likely explanation, as has been proposed by previous studies, is combined effects of stellar winds and supernova-explosions of the most massive stars, blowing holes and shells into the interstellar medium. This picture is confirmed by a striking correlation between Hα emission and H I-shells: the smaller holes tend to be filled with Hα emission whereas for the larger H I holes the Hα seems to be restricted to the edges.

  20. The Abundance Spread in the Booetes I Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, John E.; Gilmore, Gerard; Wilkinson, Mark I.; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. Wyn; Zucker, Daniel B.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2008-12-20

    We present medium-resolution spectra of 16 radial velocity red-giant members of the low-luminosity Booetes I dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy that have sufficient S/N for abundance determination, based on the strength of the Ca II K line. Assuming [Ca/Fe] {approx} 0.3, the abundance range in the sample is {delta}[Fe/H] {approx} 1.7 dex, with one star having [Fe/H] = -3.4. The dispersion is {sigma}([Fe/H]) = 0.45 {+-} 0.08-similar to those of the Galaxy's more luminous dSph systems and {omega} Centauri. This suggests that the large mass ({approx}>10{sup 7} M{sub sun}) normally assumed to foster self-enrichment and the production of chemical abundance spreads was provided by the nonbaryonic material in Booetes I.

  1. Dwarfs and Giants in the local flows of galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Emelyanov, N. V.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    We use recent Hubble Space Telescope data on nearby dwarf and giant galaxies to study the dynamical structure and evolutionary trends of the local expansion flows of galaxies. It is found that antigravity of dark energy dominates the force field of the flows and makes them expand with acceleration. It also cools the flows and introduces to them the nearly linear velocity-distance relation with the time-rate close to the global Hubble's factor. There are grounds to expect that this is the universal physical regularity that is common not only for the nearby flows we studied here, but also for all the expansion flows of various spatial scales from the 1 Mpc scale and up to the scale of the global cosmological expansion.

  2. Indirect Dark Matter Detection in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies at VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucci, James; Finley, John P.; Zitzer, Ben

    2014-08-01

    Recent data and cosmological models point to a significant fraction of the Universe comprised of Cold Dark Matter (DM), though little is known about it directly. The most likely explanation for Dark Matter is a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) having a mass as low as 10 GeV to as high as 10 TeV. Many direct and indirect detection schemes have been proposed to search for the elusive particle. Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies (dSphs) orbiting the Milky Way Galaxy are suitable targets for indirect DM detection via gamma-rays because the ratio of their gravitational mass to luminous mass is high and their gamma-ray background from other astrophysical sources is low. We present preliminary results on the VERITAS observations of five dSphs. The thermally-averaged DM annihilation velocity-weighted cross-section can then computed from the gamma-ray flux upper limit.

  3. Black Holes at the Centers of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Edward

    2011-09-01

    As part of a search for intermediate-mass black holes in the local universe, we have assembled a sample of 27 AGNs in dwarf galaxies with absolute magnitudes as faint as -15.5 and stellar masses as low as 4e8 M_sun. Collectively, these are the least massive galaxies known to contain central black holes. Surprisingly, 25 of the objects are narrow-line (type 2) AGNs. As such, they are important in the context of theoretical work, which suggests that at low luminosites AGNs may lack obscuring tori and/or classical broad-line regions. X-ray data will indicate directly whether the AGNs are obscured. The data will also afford measurements of their high-energy luminosities, which will anchor their spectral energy distributions and provide constraints on their black-hole masses.

  4. A violent interaction between the dwarf galaxy UGC 7636 and the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 4472

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Brian R.; Sancisi, Renzo; Henning, Patricia A.; Junor, William

    1994-01-01

    We present new U, B, R, and H I imagery of the Virgo Cluster giant elliptical galaxy NGC 4472 and its interacting dwarf companion galaxy UGC 7636. Using a composite image reconstruction technique, we show that a trail of debris approx. 5 arcmin in length and approx. 1 arcmin in width (30x6 kpc for a Virgo cluster distance of 20 Mpc) is projected northward from the dwarf galaxy. A cloud of H I is projected along the northwest edge of the debris between the dwarf and gE. The dwarf's nuclear morphology is irregular and bow-shaped on what appears to be its leading edge. Apart from a number of isolated blue regions, most of of the trailing debris is similar in color to the dwarf's nucleus. Only a modest enhancement of star formation appears to have been induced by the interaction. Although separated by 15 kpc, the H I and stellar morphologies are remarkably similar. The stars and H I appear to have been tidally distorted in situ, prior to the cloud's removal by ram pressure. If the H I has maintained its shape by magnetic support, a magnetic field strength an order of magnitude larger than the galaxy's is required. Ram pressure deceleration due to the cloud's motion through NGC 4472's x-ray-emitting interstellar medium shold be sufficient for the cloud to become gravitationally bound to NGC 4472. The H I cloud is not self-gravitating and may fragment and be destroyed in the interaction. UGC 7636 will probably be disrupted by NGC 4472's strong tidal forces; the stellar debris will disperse into the Virgo cluster or become bound to NGC 4472's halo on eccentric orbits. The debris captured in the collision will have a negligible impact on NGC 4472's stellar and gaseous content. On the other hand, if similar interactions are common in giant elliptical galaxies, they could alter or deplete surrounding dwarf galaxy populations, fuel bursts of nuclear activity, and perhaps provide a source of magnetic energy to their interstellar media.

  5. Hunting for Infrared Signatures of Supermassive Black Hole Activity in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainline, Kevin; Reines, Amy; Greene, Jenny; Stern, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    In order to explore the origin of the relationship between the growth of a galaxy and its central supermassive black hole, evidence must be found for black holes in galaxies at a wide range in masses. Searching for supermassive black holes in dwarf galaxies is especially important as these objects have less complicated merger histories, and they may host black holes that are similar to early proposed ``seed'' black holes. However, this selection is complicated by the fact that star formation in these dwarf galaxies can often mask the optical signatures of supermassive black hole growth and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in these objects. The all-sky infrared coverage offered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has been used to great success to select AGNs in more massive galaxies, but great care must be used when using infrared selection techniques on samples of dwarf galaxies. In particular, compact, highly star-forming dwarf galaxies can have infrared colors that may lead them to be erroneously selected as AGNs. In this talk, I will discuss recent work exploring infrared selection of AGN candidates in dwarf galaxies, and present a set of potential IR dwarf-galaxy AGN candidates. I will also outline the importance in these results with respect to future selection of AGNs in low-metallicity galaxies at high-redshift.

  6. Discovery of new dwarf galaxies around NGC4631 with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi; Komiyama, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    We have observed on-going interacting galaxies (NGC4631 and NGC4656) using Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam and reduced the data using HSC pipeline and conducted photometry based on DAOphot. Then, we have detected 8 new dwarf galaxy candidates in the outer region of NGC4631 and confirmed the three candidates previously reported by Karachentsev et al. 2014. The 3 or 4 candidates detected in this study may be a star-forming dwarf irregular galaxy and the other 7 candidates may be an old dwarf spheroidal galaxy based on these stellar populations. It looks like that the effective radius - absolute magnitude relation of dwarf galaxies in NGC4631 group is similar to the relation of the Local Group and the other galaxy systems.

  7. H II Regions Within a Compact High Velocity Cloud. A Nearly Starless Dwarf Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, M.; Magrini, L.; Mucciarelli, A.; Beccari, G.; Ibata, R.; Battaglia, G.; Martin, N.; Testa, V.; Fumana, M.; Marchetti, A.; Correnti, M.; Fraternali, F.

    2015-02-01

    Within the SECCO survey we identified a candidate stellar counterpart to the Ultra Compact High Velocity Cloud (UCHVC) HVC274.68+74.70-123 that was suggested by Adams et al. to be a possible mini halo within the Local Group of galaxies. The spectroscopic follow-up of the brightest sources within the candidate reveals the presence of two H ii regions whose radial velocity is compatible with a physical association with the UVHVC. The available data do not allow us to give a definite answer on the nature of the newly identified system. A few alternative hypotheses are discussed. However, the most likely possibility is that we have found a new faint dwarf galaxy residing in the Virgo cluster of galaxies, which we name SECCO 1. Independently of its actual distance, SECCO 1 displays a ratio of neutral hydrogen mass to V luminosity of {{M}H I}/{{L}V}≳ 20, by far the largest among local dwarfs. Hence, it appears to be a nearly starless galaxy and it may be an example of the missing links between normal dwarfs and the dark mini halos that are predicted to exist in large numbers according to the currently accepted cosmological model. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University; and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University of Virginia.

  8. Kinematics, structure and environment of three dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharina, M. E.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the environmental status of three low surface brightnessdwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) KKH65, KK180 and KK227 using the results of our long slitspectroscopic observations at the 6m telescope of the Russian Academy of Sciences and surfacephotometry on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images.The objects were selected by Karachentseva in 2010 as presumably isolated galaxies.The obtained surface brightness profiles demonstrate that our sample dSphs are lesscentrally concentrated than the objects of the same morphological type in the Virgo cluster (VC).Using the derived kinematic data we searched for possible neighbours of the dSphs withinthe projected distances from them Rproj > 500 kpc and with the differences in radial velocities |Δ V| > 500 kms-1. We applied the group finding algorithm byMakarov and Karachentsev to the selected sample.Our analysis shows that the dwarf galaxies of our study are not isolated.KKH65 and KK227 belong to the groups NGC3414and NGC5371, respectively. KK180 is in the VC infall region. We conclude thatit is not possible at the moment to justify the existence of isolated dSphs outsidethe Local Volume. The searches are complicated due to the lack of the accuratedistances to the galaxies farther than 10 Mpc.

  9. THE STELLAR AND GASEOUS CONTENTS OF THE ORION DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, John M.; Haynes, Korey; Most, Hans; Haugland, Kaitlin; Scudder, Jillian; Weindling, Jacob; Salzer, John J.; Sugden, Arthur

    2010-06-15

    We present new Kitt Peak National Observatory 0.9 m optical and Very Large Array H I spectral line observations of the Orion dwarf galaxy. This nearby (D {approx_equal} 5.4 Mpc), intermediate-mass (M{sub dyn{approx_equal}} 1.1 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) dwarf displays a wealth of structure in its neutral interstellar medium, including three prominent 'hole/depression' features in the inner H I disk. We explore the rich gas kinematics, where solid-body rotation dominates and the rotation curve is flat out to the observed edge of the H I disk ({approx}6.8 kpc). The Orion dwarf contains a substantial fraction of dark matter throughout its disk: comparing the 4.7 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun} of detected neutral gas with estimates of the stellar mass from optical and near-infrared imaging (3.7 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}) implies a mass-to-light ratio {approx_equal}13. New H{alpha} observations show only modest-strength current star formation (SF; {approx}0.04 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}); this SF rate is consistent with our 1.4 GHz radio continuum non-detection.

  10. Metal Diffusion in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, David; Martel, Hugo; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-05-01

    We perform a series of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies to compare different metal mixing models. In particular, we examine the role of diffusion in the production of enriched outflows and in determining the metallicity distributions of gas and stars. We investigate different diffusion strengths by changing the pre-factor of the diffusion coefficient, by varying how the diffusion coefficient is calculated from the local velocity distribution, and by varying whether the speed of sound is included as a velocity term. Stronger diffusion produces a tighter [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] distribution in the gas and cuts off the gas metallicity distribution function at lower metallicities. Diffusion suppresses the formation of low-metallicity stars, even with weak diffusion, and also strips metals from enriched outflows. This produces a remarkably tight correlation between “metal mass-loading” (mean metal outflow rate divided by mean metal production rate) and the strength of diffusion, even when the diffusion coefficient is calculated in different ways. The effectiveness of outflows at removing metals from dwarf galaxies and the metal distribution of the gas is thus dependent on the strength of diffusion. By contrast, we show that the metallicities of stars are not strongly dependent on the strength of diffusion, provided that some diffusion is present.

  11. PERSEUS I: A DISTANT SATELLITE DWARF GALAXY OF ANDROMEDA

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Magnier, Eugene A.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Tonry, John L.; Draper, Peter W.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Price, Paul A.; and others

    2013-12-10

    We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Perseus I/Andromeda XXXIII, found in the vicinity of Andromeda (M31) in stacked imaging data from the Pan-STARRS1 3π survey. Located 27.°9 away from M31, Perseus I has a heliocentric distance of 785 ± 65 kpc, compatible with it being a satellite of M31 at 374{sub −10}{sup +14} kpc from its host. The properties of Perseus I are typical for a reasonably bright dwarf galaxy (M{sub V} = –10.3 ± 0.7), with an exponential half-light radius of r{sub h} = 1.7 ± 0.4 arcmin or r{sub h}=400{sub −85}{sup +105} pc at this distance, and a moderate ellipticity (ϵ=0.43{sub −0.17}{sup +0.15}). The late discovery of Perseus I is due to its fairly low surface brightness (μ{sub 0}=25.7{sub −0.9}{sup +1.0} mag arcsec{sup –2}), and to the previous lack of deep, high quality photometric data in this region. If confirmed to be a companion of M31, the location of Perseus I, far east from its host, could place interesting constraints on the bulk motion of the satellite system of M31.

  12. A spectroscopic binary in the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; Hansen, Terese; Feltzing, Sofia; Wilkinson, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    We present the radial velocity curve of a single-lined spectroscopic binary in the faint Hercules dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy, based on 34 individual spectra covering more than 2 yr of observations. This is the first time that orbital elements could be derived for a binary in a dSph. The system consists of a metal-poor red giant and a low-mass companion, possibly a white dwarf, with a 135 day period in a moderately eccentric (e = 0.18) orbit. Its period and eccentricity are fully consistent with metal-poor binaries in the Galactic halo, while the projected semimajor axis is small, at a{sub p} sin i = 38 R {sub ☉}. In fact, a very close orbit could inhibit the production of heavier elements through s-process nucleosynthesis, leading to the very low abundances of neutron-capture elements that are found in this star. We discuss the further implications for the chemical enrichment history of the Hercules dSph, but find no compelling binary scenario that could reasonably explain the full, peculiar abundance pattern of the Hercules dSph galaxy.

  13. Metal Diffusion in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, David; Martel, Hugo; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-05-01

    We perform a series of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies to compare different metal mixing models. In particular, we examine the role of diffusion in the production of enriched outflows and in determining the metallicity distributions of gas and stars. We investigate different diffusion strengths by changing the pre-factor of the diffusion coefficient, by varying how the diffusion coefficient is calculated from the local velocity distribution, and by varying whether the speed of sound is included as a velocity term. Stronger diffusion produces a tighter [O/Fe]–[Fe/H] distribution in the gas and cuts off the gas metallicity distribution function at lower metallicities. Diffusion suppresses the formation of low-metallicity stars, even with weak diffusion, and also strips metals from enriched outflows. This produces a remarkably tight correlation between “metal mass-loading” (mean metal outflow rate divided by mean metal production rate) and the strength of diffusion, even when the diffusion coefficient is calculated in different ways. The effectiveness of outflows at removing metals from dwarf galaxies and the metal distribution of the gas is thus dependent on the strength of diffusion. By contrast, we show that the metallicities of stars are not strongly dependent on the strength of diffusion, provided that some diffusion is present.

  14. Investigation of dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Bothun, G.D.; Mould, J.R.; Wirth, A.; Caldwell, N.

    1985-05-01

    We have obtained 21-cm H I observations of a sample of 32 dwarf irregular (dI) and 12 dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies that are located in the Virgo cluster. Altogether, 18 of 32 DIs were detected in H I, but none of the dEs were detected at a sensitivity level of M/sub Htsi/ = 2--3 x 10/sup 6/ M/sub sun/. The detected dIs have M/sub Htsi/>3 x 10/sup 7/ M/sub sun/. This disparity in H I content between dIs and dEs effectively dispels the possibility that the dEs are presently in a stage of quiescence (hibernation), between bursts of star formation. In order to supplement the 21-cm data, we have acquired optical spectroscopy, CCD images, and infrared photometry for a limited subsample of these dwarfs. The most significant result provided by this additional data is that the dEs, although very H I poor, nevertheless have observed (J-K) colors which indicate somewhat high metallicity, implying some degree of enrichment due to multiple generations of star formation. In contrast, most of the dIs are quite H I rich (with some having fractional H I contents that exceed 30% by mass), yet they are apparently in a quiescent phase, judging by their low central surface brightnesses (<10% of sky) and lack of resolution into obvious regions of star formation. A small gas-poor contingent of dIs have been found but there is no apparent correlation between dI gas content and either their velocity with respect to the Virgo ICM or their position in the cluster. In general, the velocity distribution of the dIs is flat with only a weak peak that corresponds to the mean velocity of the brighter galaxies in Virgo.

  15. Star formation in globular clusters and dwarf galaxies and implications for the early evolution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Douglas N. C.; Murray, Stephen D.

    1991-01-01

    Based upon the observed properties of globular clusters and dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, we present important theoretical constraints on star formation in these systems. These constraints indicate that protoglobular cluster clouds had long dormant periods and a brief epoch of violent star formation. Collisions between protocluster clouds triggered fragmentation into individual stars. Most protocluster clouds dispersed into the Galactic halo during the star formation epoch. In contrast, the large spread in stellar metallicity in dwarf galaxies suggests that star formation in their pregenitors was self-regulated: we propose the protocluster clouds formed from thermal instability in the protogalactic clouds and show that a population of massive stars is needed to provide sufficient UV flux to prevent the collapsing protogalactic clouds from fragmenting into individual stars. Based upon these constraints, we propose a unified scenario to describe the early epochs of star formation in the Galactic halo as well as the thick and thin components of the Galactic disk.

  16. EXTREME EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES IN CANDELS: BROADBAND-SELECTED, STARBURSTING DWARF GALAXIES AT z > 1

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Wel, A.; Rix, H.-W.; Jahnke, K.; Straughn, A. N.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Salmon, B. W.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Weiner, B. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, J. R.; Koo, D. C.; Hathi, N. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Newman, J. A.; Dickinson, M.; De Mello, D. F.; and others

    2011-12-01

    We identify an abundant population of extreme emission-line galaxies (EELGs) at redshift z {approx} 1.7 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey imaging from Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). Sixty-nine EELG candidates are selected by the large contribution of exceptionally bright emission lines to their near-infrared broadband magnitudes. Supported by spectroscopic confirmation of strong [O III] emission lines-with rest-frame equivalent widths {approx}1000 A-in the four candidates that have HST/WFC3 grism observations, we conclude that these objects are galaxies with {approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} in stellar mass, undergoing an enormous starburst phase with M{sub *}/ M-dot{sub *} of only {approx}15 Myr. These bursts may cause outflows that are strong enough to produce cored dark matter profiles in low-mass galaxies. The individual star formation rates and the comoving number density (3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3}) can produce in {approx}4 Gyr much of the stellar mass density that is presently contained in 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} dwarf galaxies. Therefore, our observations provide a strong indication that many or even most of the stars in present-day dwarf galaxies formed in strong, short-lived bursts, mostly at z > 1.

  17. The dynamical and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revaz, Y.; Jablonka, P.; Sawala, T.; Hill, V.; Letarte, B.; Irwin, M.; Battaglia, G.; Helmi, A.; Shetrone, M. D.; Tolstoy, E.; Venn, K. A.

    2009-07-01

    We present a large sample of fully self-consistent hydrodynamical Nbody/Tree-SPH simulations of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). It has enabled us to identify the key physical parameters and mechanisms at the origin of the observed variety in the Local Group dSph properties. The initial total mass (gas + dark matter) of these galaxies is the main driver of their evolution. Star formation (SF) occurs in series of short bursts. In massive systems, the very short intervals between the SF peaks mimic a continuous star formation rate, while less massive systems exhibit well separated SF bursts, as identified observationally. The delay between the SF events is controlled by the gas cooling time dependence on galaxy mass. The observed global scaling relations, luminosity-mass and luminosity-metallicity, are reproduced with low scatter. We take advantage of the unprecedentedly large sample size and data homogeneity of the ESO Large Programme DART, and add to it a few independent studies, to constrain the star formation history of five Milky Way dSphs, Sextans, LeoII, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax. For the first time, [Mg/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams derived from high-resolution spectroscopy of hundreds of individual stars are confronted with model predictions. We find that the diversity in dSph properties may well result from intrinsic evolution. We note, however, that the presence of gas in the final state of our simulations, of the order of what is observed in dwarf irregulars, calls for removal by external processes. Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. XMM-Newton study of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedi, Sara; Sasaki, Manami; Ducci, Lorenzo

    2016-02-01

    Aims: We present the results of the analysis of five XMM-Newton observations of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph). The aim of the work is the study of the X-ray population in the field of the Draco dSph. Methods: We classified the sources on the basis of spectral analysis, hardness ratios, X-ray-to-optical flux ratio, X-ray variability, and cross-correlation with available catalogues in X-ray, optical, infrared, and radio wavelengths. Results: We detected 70 X-ray sources in the field of the Draco dSph in the energy range of 0.2 - 12 keV and classified 18 AGNs, 9 galaxies and galaxy candidates, 6 sources as foreground stars, 4 low-mass X-ray binary candidates, 1 symbiotic star, and 2 binary system candidates. We also identified 9 sources as hard X-ray sources in the field of the galaxy. We derived the X-ray luminosity function of X-ray sources in the Draco dSph in the 2 - 10 keV and 0.5 - 2 keV energy bands. Using the X-ray luminosity function in the energy range of 0.5 - 2 keV, we estimate that ~10 X-ray sources are objects in the Draco dSph. We have also estimated the dark matter halo mass that would be needed to keep the low-mass X-ray binaries gravitationally bound to the galaxy. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA.

  19. Study of bright globular clusters and Ultra-Compact Dwarf galaxies in the Antlia cluster.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caso, J. P.; Bassino, L. P.; Richtler, T.; Smith Castelli, A. V.; Faifer, F. R.; Calderón, J. P.

    A sample of confirmed Ultra-Compact Dwarf galaxies and globular clusters around the giant galaxy NGC 3268 in the Antlia cluster is presented, including their Washington photometry. For the Antlia objects discovered so far, the reliability of a common origin with the globular clusters of the galaxies NGC 3258 and NGC 3268 is analyzed.

  20. Episodic Model For Star Formation History and Chemical Abundances in Giant and Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debsarma, Suma; Chattopadhyay, Tanuka; Das, Sukanta; Pfenniger, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    In search for a synthetic understanding, a scenario for the evolution of the star formation rate and the chemical abundances in galaxies is proposed, combining gas infall from galactic halos, outflow of gas by supernova explosions, and an oscillatory star formation process. The oscillatory star formation model is a consequence of the modelling of the fractional masses changes of the hot, warm and cold components of the interstellar medium. The observed periods of oscillation vary in the range (0.1 - 3.0) × 107 yr depending on various parameters existing from giant to dwarf galaxies. The evolution of metallicity varies in giant and dwarf galaxies and depends on the outflow process. Observed abundances in dwarf galaxies can be reproduced under fast outflow together with slow evaporation of cold gases into hot gas whereas slow outflow and fast evaporation is preferred for giant galaxies. The variation of metallicities in dwarf galaxies supports the fact that low rate of SNII production in dwarf galaxies is responsible for variation in metallicity in dwarf galaxies of similar masses as suggested by various authors.

  1. Episodic model for star formation history and chemical abundances in giant and dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debsarma, Suma; Chattopadhyay, Tanuka; Das, Sukanta; Pfenniger, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    In search for a synthetic understanding, a scenario for the evolution of the star formation rate and the chemical abundances in galaxies is proposed, combining gas infall from galactic haloes, outflow of gas by supernova explosions, and an oscillatory star formation process. The oscillatory star formation model is a consequence of the modelling of the fractional masses changes of the hot, warm and cold components of the interstellar medium. The derived periods of oscillation vary in the range (0.1-3.0) × 107 yr depending on various parameters existing from giant to dwarf galaxies. The evolution of metallicity varies in giant and dwarf galaxies and depends on the outflow process. Observed abundances in dwarf galaxies can be reproduced under fast outflow together with slow evaporation of cold gases into hot gas whereas slow outflow and fast evaporation is preferred for giant galaxies. The variation of metallicities in dwarf galaxies supports the fact that low rate of SNII production in dwarf galaxies is responsible for variation in metallicity in dwarf galaxies of similar masses as suggested by various authors.

  2. A STAR FORMATION LAW FOR DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Hunter, Deidre A. E-mail: dah@lowell.edu

    2015-06-01

    The radial profiles of gas, stars, and far-ultraviolet radiation in 20 dwarf Irregular galaxies are converted to stability parameters and scale heights for a test of the importance of two-dimensional (2D) instabilities in promoting star formation. A detailed model of this instability involving gaseous and stellar fluids with self-consistent thicknesses and energy dissipation on a perturbation crossing time gives the unstable growth rates. We find that all locations are effectively stable to 2D perturbations, mostly because the disks are thick. We then consider the average volume densities in the midplanes, evaluated from the observed H i surface densities and calculated scale heights. The radial profiles of the star-formation rates are equal to about 1% of the H i surface densities divided by the free fall times at the average midplane densities. This 1% resembles the efficiency per unit free fall time commonly found in other cases. There is a further variation of this efficiency with radius in all of our galaxies, following the exponential disk with a scale length equal to about twice the stellar mass scale length. This additional variation is modeled by the molecular fraction in a diffuse medium using radiative transfer solutions for galaxies with the observed dimensions and properties of our sample. We conclude that star formation is activated by a combination of three-dimensional gaseous gravitational processes and molecule formation. Implications for outer disk structure and formation are discussed.

  3. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE PATTERNS AND THE EARLY ENVIRONMENT OF DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Corlies, Lauren; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Bryan, Greg; Tumlinson, Jason

    2013-08-20

    Recent observations suggest that abundance pattern differences exist between low metallicity stars in the Milky Way stellar halo and those in the dwarf satellite galaxies. This paper takes a first look at what role the early environment for pre-galactic star formation might have played in shaping these stellar populations. In particular, we consider whether differences in cross-pollution between the progenitors of the stellar halo and the satellites could help to explain the differences in abundance patterns. Using an N-body simulation, we find that the progenitor halos of the main halo are primarily clustered together at z = 10 while the progenitors of the satellite galaxies remain on the outskirts of this cluster. Next, analytically modeled supernova-driven winds show that main halo progenitors cross-pollute each other more effectively while satellite galaxy progenitors remain more isolated. Thus, inhomogeneous cross-pollution as a result of different high-z spatial locations of each system's progenitors can help to explain observed differences in abundance patterns today. Conversely, these differences are a signature of the inhomogeneity of metal enrichment at early times.

  4. Fourier Transform Power Spectra Analysis of Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxin; Hunter, D. A.; LITTLE THINGS Team

    2012-01-01

    The LITTLE THINGS survey has obtained deep HI emission line maps with the data from VLA B, C and D array configurations for a representative sample of nearby dwarf irregular galaxies, and supplemented this with images from the FUV to the NIR. We present the fourier transform power spectra of the HI maps, FUV and NIR images for a subsample of nearly face-on (minor-to-major axis ratio > 0.8) LITTLE THINGS galaxies in order to examine structures within the galaxies' gas and stellar disks.The radial variations of the power spectra will be compared with global properties. We will also compare the relationship between the gas, star formation and stellar mass on different physical scales and at different radii, and discuss the possibility of using breaks in power-law power spectra to constrain the disk thickness. The LITTLE THINGS team is grateful to the National Science Foundation for funding through grants AST-0707563, AST-0707426, AST-0707468, and AST-0707835 to DAH, BGE, CES, and LMY. HZ was partly supported by NSF of China through grants \\#10425313, \\#10833006 and \\#10621303 to Professor Yu Gao.

  5. A Star Formation Law for Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Hunter, Deidre A.

    2015-06-01

    The radial profiles of gas, stars, and far-ultraviolet radiation in 20 dwarf Irregular galaxies are converted to stability parameters and scale heights for a test of the importance of two-dimensional (2D) instabilities in promoting star formation. A detailed model of this instability involving gaseous and stellar fluids with self-consistent thicknesses and energy dissipation on a perturbation crossing time gives the unstable growth rates. We find that all locations are effectively stable to 2D perturbations, mostly because the disks are thick. We then consider the average volume densities in the midplanes, evaluated from the observed H i surface densities and calculated scale heights. The radial profiles of the star-formation rates are equal to about 1% of the H i surface densities divided by the free fall times at the average midplane densities. This 1% resembles the efficiency per unit free fall time commonly found in other cases. There is a further variation of this efficiency with radius in all of our galaxies, following the exponential disk with a scale length equal to about twice the stellar mass scale length. This additional variation is modeled by the molecular fraction in a diffuse medium using radiative transfer solutions for galaxies with the observed dimensions and properties of our sample. We conclude that star formation is activated by a combination of three-dimensional gaseous gravitational processes and molecule formation. Implications for outer disk structure and formation are discussed.

  6. Alfalfa discovery of the nearby gas-rich dwarf galaxy Leo P. IV. Distance measurement from LBT optical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle; Cannon, John M.; Salzer, John J.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Dolphin, Andrew E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu

    2013-12-01

    Leo P is a low-luminosity dwarf galaxy discovered through the blind H I Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey. The H I and follow-up optical observations have shown that Leo P is a gas-rich dwarf galaxy with both active star formation and an underlying older population, as well as an extremely low oxygen abundance. Here, we measure the distance to Leo P by applying the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) distance method to photometry of the resolved stellar population from new Large Binocular Telescope V and I band imaging. We measure a distance modulus of 26.19{sub −0.50}{sup +0.17} mag corresponding to a distance of 1.72{sub −0.40}{sup +0.14} Mpc. Although our photometry reaches 3 mag below the TRGB, the sparseness of the red giant branch yields higher uncertainties on the lower limit of the distance. Leo P is outside the Local Group with a distance and velocity consistent with the local Hubble flow. While located in a very low-density environment, Leo P lies within ∼0.5 Mpc of a loose association of dwarf galaxies which include NGC 3109, Antlia, Sextans A, and Sextans B, and 1.1 Mpc away from its next nearest neighbor, Leo A. Leo P is one of the lowest metallicity star-forming galaxies known in the nearby universe, comparable in metallicity to I Zw 18 and DDO 68, but with stellar characteristics similar to dwarf spheriodals (dSphs) in the Local Volume such as Carina, Sextans, and Leo II. Given its physical properties and isolation, Leo P may provide an evolutionary link between gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies and dSphs that have fallen into a Local Group environment and been stripped of their gas.

  7. Star Formation at Low Metallicity in Local Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Rubio, Monica; Brinks, Elias; Cortés, Juan R.; Cigan, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The radial profiles of star formation rates and surface mass densities for gas and stars have been compiled for 20 local dwarf irregular galaxies and converted into disk scale heights and Toomre Q values. The scale heights are relatively large compared to the galaxy sizes (~0.6 times the local radii) and generally increase with radius in a flare. The gaseous Q values are high, ~4, at most radii and even higher for the stars. Star formation proceeds even with these high Q values in a normal exponential disk as viewed in the far ultraviolet. Such normal star formation suggests that Q is not relevant to star formation in dIrrs. The star formation rate per unit area always equals approximately the gas surface density divided by the midplane free fall time with an efficiency factor of about 1% that decreases systematically with radius in approximate proportion to the gas surface density. We view this efficiency variation as a result of a changing molecular fraction in a disk where atomic gas dominates both stars and molecules. In a related study, CO observations with ALMA of star-forming regions at the low metallicities of these dwarfs, which averages 13% solar, shows, in the case of the WLM galaxy, tiny CO clouds inside much larger molecular and atomic hydrogen envelopes. The CO cloud mass fraction within the molecular region is only one percent or so. Nevertheless, the CO clouds have properties that are similar to solar neighborhood clouds: they satisfy the size-linewidth relation observed in the LMC, SMC, and other local dwarfs where CO has been observed, and the same virial mass versus luminosity relation. This uniforming of CO cloud properties seems to be the result of a confining pressure from the weight of the overlying molecular and atomic shielding layers. Star formation at low metallicity therefore appears to be a three dimensional process independent of 2D instabilities involving Q, in highly atomic gas with relatively small CO cores, activated at a rate

  8. Unveiling a Rich System of Faint Dwarf Galaxies in the Next Generation Fornax Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Roberto P.; Eigenthaler, Paul; Puzia, Thomas H.; Taylor, Matthew A.; Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Ribbeck, Karen X.; Ángel, Simón; Capaccioli, Massimo; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Galaz, Gaspar; Hempel, Maren; Hilker, Michael; Jordán, Andrés; Lançon, Ariane; Mieske, Steffen; Paolillo, Maurizio; Richtler, Tom; Sánchez-Janssen, Ruben; Zhang, Hongxin

    2015-11-01

    We report the discovery of 158 previously undetected dwarf galaxies in the Fornax cluster central regions using a deep coadded u-, g-, and i-band image obtained with the Dark Energy Camera wide-field camera mounted on the 4-m Blanco telescope at the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory as part of the Next Generation Fornax Survey (NGFS). The new dwarf galaxies have quasi-exponential light profiles, effective radii 0.1 < re < 2.8 kpc, and average effective surface brightness values 22.0 < μi < 28.0 mag arcsec-2. We confirm the existence of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in the Fornax core regions that resemble counterparts recently discovered in the Virgo and Coma galaxy clusters. We also find extremely low surface brightness NGFS dwarfs, which are several magnitudes fainter than the classical UDGs. The faintest dwarf candidate in our NGFS sample has an absolute magnitude of Mi = -8.0 mag. The nucleation fraction of the NGFS dwarf galaxy sample appears to decrease as a function of their total luminosity, reaching from a nucleation fraction of >75% at luminosities brighter than Mi ≃ -15.0 mag to 0% at luminosities fainter than Mi ≃ -10.0 mag. The two-point correlation function analysis of the NGFS dwarf sample shows an excess on length scales below ˜100 kpc, pointing to the clustering of dwarf galaxies in the Fornax cluster core.

  9. THE CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE DRACO DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Judith G.; Huang Wenjin E-mail: hwenjin@astro.washington.edu

    2009-08-20

    We present an abundance analysis based on high-resolution spectra of eight stars selected to span the full range in metallicity in the Draco dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy. We find that [Fe/H] for the sample stars ranges from -1.5 to -3.0 dex. Combining our sample with previously published work for a total of 14 luminous Draco giants, we show that the abundance ratios [Na/Fe], [Mg/Fe], and [Si/Fe] for the Draco giants overlap those of Galactic halo giants at the lowest [Fe/H] probed, but are significantly lower for the higher Fe-metallicity Draco stars. For the explosive {alpha}-elements Ca and Ti, the abundance ratios for Draco giants with [Fe/H] > - 2.4 dex are approximately constant and slightly subsolar, well below values characteristic of Galactic halo stars. The s-process contribution to the production of heavy elements begins at significantly lower Fe metallicity than in the Galactic halo. Using a toy model we compare the behavior of the abundance ratios within the sample of Draco giants with those from the literature of Galactic globular clusters, and the Carina and Sgr dSph galaxies. The differences appear to be related to the timescale for buildup of the heavy elements, with Draco having the slowest rate. We note the presence of a Draco giant with [Fe/H] <-3.0 dex in our sample, and reaffirm that the inner Galactic halo could have been formed by early accretion of Galactic satellite galaxies and dissolution of young globular clusters, while the outer halo could have formed from those satellite galaxies accreted later.

  10. The extended structure of the dwarf irregular galaxy Sagittarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccari, G.; Bellazzini, M.; Fraternali, F.; Battaglia, G.; Perina, S.; Sollima, A.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Testa, V.; Galleti, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present a detailed study of the stellar and H i structure of the dwarf irregular galaxy Sagittarius. We use new deep and wide field photometry to trace the surface brightness profile of the galaxy out to ≃5.0' (corresponding to ≃1600 pc) and down to μV ≃ 30.0 mag/arcsec2, thus showing that the stellar body of the galaxy is much more extended than previously believed, and it is similarly (or more) extended than the overall H i distribution. The whole major-axis profile is consistent with a pure exponential, with a scale radius of ≃340 pc. The surface density maps reveal that the distribution of old and intermediate-age stars is smooth and remarkably flattened out to its edges, while the associated H i has a much rounder shape, is off-centred and presents multiple density maxima and a significant hole. No clear sign of systemic rotation is detectable in the complex H i velocity field. No metallicity gradient is detected in the old and intermediate age population of the galaxy, and we confirm that this population has a much more extended distribution than young stars (age ≲ 1 Gyr). Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under the Program 089.D-0052(A).Table of stellar photometry (IN6) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/570/A78

  11. WISE DISCOVERY OF LOW-METALLICITY BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Roger L.; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Wu Yanling; Yan Lin; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Wu Jingwen; Blain, Andrew; Harrison, Fiona; Madsen, Kristin; Stanford, Spencer A.; Wright, Edward L.

    2011-07-20

    We report two new low-metallicity blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs), WISEP J080103.93+264053.9 (hereafter W0801+26) and WISEP J170233.53+180306.4 (hereafter W1702+18), discovered using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We identified these two BCDs from their extremely red colors at mid-infrared wavelengths and obtained follow-up optical spectroscopy using the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer on Keck I. The mid-infrared properties of these two sources are similar to the well-studied, extremely low metallicity galaxy SBS 0335-052E. We determine metallicities of 12 + log (O/H) = 7.75 and 7.63 for W0801+26 and W1702+18, respectively, placing them among a very small group of very metal deficient galaxies (Z {<=} 1/10 Z{sub sun}). Their >300 A H{beta} equivalent widths, similar to SBS 0335-052E, imply the existence of young (<5 Myr) star-forming regions. We measure star formation rates of 2.6 and 10.9 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} for W0801+26 and W1702+18, respectively. These BCDs, showing recent star formation activity in extremely low metallicity environments, provide new laboratories for studying star formation in extreme conditions and are low-redshift analogs of the first generation of galaxies to form in the universe. Using the all-sky WISE survey, we discuss a new method to identify similar star-forming, low-metallicity BCDs.

  12. The Origin of the Diversity of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revaz, Yves; Jablonka, Pascale

    2010-06-01

    We present a large sample of 166 fully self-consistent hydrodynamical N-body/Tree-SPH simulations of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies [1]. It has enabled us to identify the key physical parameters and mechanisms at the origin of the observed variety in the Local Group dSph properties. Using the recent data of the ESO Large Programme DART, we have constrained the star formation history of four Milky Way dSphs, Sextans, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax. For the first time, [Mg/Fe] vs [Fe/H] diagrams derived from high-resolution spectroscopy of hundreds of individual stars are confronted with model predictions. Global relations of dSph are successfully reproduced. Our study shows that the total initial mass of these systems is the main driver of their evolution and explains the diversity in luminosity and metallicity observed in the Local Group dSphs.

  13. VERITAS limits on dark matter annihilation from dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grube, J.; VERITAS Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    Current cosmological models and data suggest the existence of a Cold Dark Matter (DM) component, however the nature of DM particles remains unknown. A favored candidate for DM is a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) in the mass range from 50 GeV to greater than 10 TeV. Nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph) are expected to contain a high density of Dark Matter with a low gamma-ray background, and are thus promising targets for the detection of secondary gamma rays at very high energies (VHE, E > 0.1 TeV) through the annihilation of WIMPS into SM particles. Presented here are recent VERITAS observations of dSph, including a deep exposure on Segue 1. Limits are derived for various annihilating and decaying dark matter particle models.

  14. X-Ray Sources in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I.

    2016-04-01

    We present the spectral analysis of an 87 ks XMM-Newton observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with active galactic nuclei, few of them possess the characteristics of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and cataclysmic variable (CVs). Our analysis places constraints on the population of X-ray sources with LX > 3 × 1033 erg s-1 in Draco, suggesting that there are no actively accreting black hole and neutron star binaries. However, we find four sources that could be quiescent state LMXBs/CVs associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5 keV.

  15. Dark Matter in γ lines: Galactic Center vs. dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefranc, Valentin; Moulin, Emmanuel; Panci, Paolo; Sala, Filippo; Silk, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide CTA sensitivities to Dark Matter (DM) annihilation in γ-ray lines, from the observation of the Galactic Center (GC) as well as, for the first time, of dwarf Spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). We compare the GC reach with that of dSphs as a function of a putative core radius of the DM distribution, which is itself poorly known. We find that the currently best dSph candidates constitute a more promising target than the GC, for core radii of one to a few kpc. We use the most recent instrument response functions and background estimations by CTA, on top of which we add the diffuse photon component. Our analysis is of particular interest for TeV-scale electroweak multiplets as DM candidates, such as the supersymmetric Wino and the Minimal Dark Matter fiveplet, whose predictions we compare with our projected sensitivities.

  16. A spatial characterization of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy tidal tails

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, Matthew; Cole, Nathan; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Willett, Benjamin; Desell, Travis; Magdon-Ismail, Malik; Szymanski, Boleslaw; Varela, Carlos; Yanny, Brian E-mail: heidi@rpi.edu

    2013-06-01

    We measure the spatial density of F turnoff stars in the Sagittarius dwarf tidal stream, from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, using statistical photometric parallax. We find a set of continuous, consistent parameters that describe the leading Sgr stream's position, direction, and width for 15 stripes in the north Galactic cap, and three stripes in the south Galactic cap. We produce a catalog of stars that has the density characteristics of the dominant leading Sgr tidal stream that can be compared with simulations. We find that the width of the leading (north) tidal tail is consistent with recent triaxial and axisymmetric halo model simulations. The density along the stream is roughly consistent with common disruption models in the north, but possibly not in the south. We explore the possibility that one or more of the dominant Sgr streams has been misidentified, and that one or more of the ''bifurcated'' pieces is the real Sgr tidal tail, but we do not reach definite conclusions. If two dwarf progenitors are assumed, fits to the planes of the dominant and ''bifurcated'' tidal tails favor an association of the Sgr dwarf spheroidal galaxy with the dominant southern stream and the ''bifurcated'' stream in the north. In the north Galactic cap, the best fit Hernquist density profile for the smooth component of the stellar halo is oblate, with a flattening parameter q = 0.53, and a scale length of r {sub 0} = 6.73. The southern data for both the tidal debris and the smooth component of the stellar halo do not match the model fits to the north, although the stellar halo is still overwhelmingly oblate. Finally, we verify that we can reproduce the parameter fits on the asynchronous MilkyWay@home volunteer computing platform.

  17. THE EXTENSIVE AGE GRADIENT OF THE CARINA DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, G.; Irwin, M.; Tolstoy, E.; De Boer, T.; Mateo, M.

    2012-12-20

    The evolution of small systems such as dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) is likely to have been a balance between external environmental effects and internal processes within their own relatively shallow potential wells. Assessing how strong such environmental interactions may have been is therefore an important element in understanding the baryonic evolution of dSphs and their derived dark matter distribution. Here we present results from a wide-area CTIO/MOSAIC II photometric survey of the Carina dSph, reaching down to about two magnitudes below the oldest main-sequence turnoff (MSTO). This data set enables us to trace the structure of Carina in detail out to very large distances from its center, and as a function of stellar age. We observe the presence of an extended structure made up primarily of ancient MSTO stars, at distances between 25' and 60' from Carina's center, confirming results in the literature that Carina extends well beyond its nominal tidal radius. The large number statistics of our survey reveals features such as isophote twists and tails that were undetected in other previous, shallower surveys. This is the first time that such unambiguous signs of tidal disruption have been found in a Milky Way 'classical' dwarf other than Sagittarius. We also demonstrate the presence of a negative age gradient in Carina directly from its MSTOs, and trace it out to very large distances from the galaxy center. The signs of interaction with the Milky Way make it unclear whether the age gradient was already in place before Carina underwent tidal disruption.

  18. Ejection of Supernova-Enriched Gas From Dwarf Disk Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Fragile, P C; Murray, S D; Lin, D C

    2004-06-15

    We examine the efficiency with which supernova-enriched gas may be ejected from dwarf disk galaxies, using a methodology previously employed to study the self-enrichment efficiency of dwarf spheroidal systems. Unlike previous studies that focused on highly concentrated starbursts, in the current work we consider discrete supernova events spread throughout various fractions of the disk. We model disk systems having gas masses of 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}} with supernova rates of 30, 300, and 3000 Myr{sup -1}. The supernova events are confined to the midplane of the disk, but distributed over radii of 0, 30, and 80% of the disk radius, consistent with expectations for Type II supernovae. In agreement with earlier studies, we find that the enriched material from supernovae is largely lost when the supernovae are concentrated near the nucleus, as expected for a starburst event. In contrast, we find the loss of enriched material to be much less efficient (as low as 21%) when the supernovae occur over even a relatively small fraction of the disk. The difference is due to the ability of the system to relax following supernova events that occur over more extended regions. Larger physical separations also reduce the likelihood of supernovae going off within low-density ''chimneys'' swept out by previous supernovae. We also find that, for the most distributed systems, significant metal loss is more likely to be accompanied by significant mass loss. A comparison with theoretical predications indicates that, when undergoing self-regulated star formation, galaxies in the mass range considered shall efficiently retain the products of Type II supernovae.

  19. Stellar Clusters Forming in the Blue Dwarf Galaxy NGC 5253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    Star formation is one of the most basic phenomena in the Universe. Inside stars, primordial material from the Big Bang is processed into heavier elements that we observe today. In the extended atmospheres of certain types of stars, these elements combine into more complex systems like molecules and dust grains, the building blocks for new planets, stars and galaxies and, ultimately, for life. Violent star-forming processes let otherwise dull galaxies shine in the darkness of deep space and make them visible to us over large distances. Star formation begins with the collapse of the densest parts of interstellar clouds, regions that are characterized by comparatively high concentration of molecular gas and dust like the Orion complex (ESO PR Photo 20/04) and the Galactic Centre region (ESO Press Release 26/03). Since this gas and dust are products of earlier star formation, there must have been an early epoch when they did not yet exist. But how did the first stars then form? Indeed, to describe and explain "primordial star formation" - without molecular gas and dust - is a major challenge in modern Astrophysics. A particular class of relatively small galaxies, known as "Blue Dwarf Galaxies", possibly provide nearby and contemporary examples of what may have occurred in the early Universe during the formation of the first stars. These galaxies are poor in dust and heavier elements. They contain interstellar clouds which, in some cases, appear to be quite similar to those primordial clouds from which the first stars were formed. And yet, despite the relative lack of the dust and molecular gas that form the basic ingredients for star formation as we know it from the Milky Way, those Blue Dwarf Galaxies sometimes harbour very active star-forming regions. Thus, by studying those areas, we may hope to better understand the star-forming processes in the early Universe. Very active star formation in NGC 5253 NGC 5253 is one of the nearest of the known Blue Dwarf Galaxies

  20. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS AND THE INHOMOGENEOUS CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE CARINA DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Venn, Kim A.; Divell, Mike; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Irwin, Mike J.; Hill, Vanessa; Jablonka, Pascale; Tolstoy, Eline; Lemasle, Bertrand; Starkenburg, Else; Helmi, Amina; Letarte, Bruno; Baldner, Charles; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Primas, Francesca; Kaufer, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    The detailed abundances of 23 chemical elements in nine bright red giant branch stars in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy are presented based on high-resolution spectra gathered at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and Magellan telescopes. A spherical model atmospheres analysis is applied using standard methods (local thermodynamic equilibrium and plane-parallel radiative transfer) to spectra ranging from 380 to 680 nm. Stellar parameters are found to be consistent between photometric and spectroscopic analyses, both at moderate and high resolution. The stars in this analysis range in metallicity from -2.9 < [Fe/H] <-1.3, and adopting the ages determined by Lemasle et al., we are able to examine the chemical evolution of Carina's old and intermediate-aged populations. One of the main results from this work is the evidence for inhomogeneous mixing in Carina and therefore for a poor statistical sampling of the supernova contributions when forming stars; a large dispersion in [Mg/Fe] indicates poor mixing in the old population, an offset in the [{alpha}/Fe] ratios between the old and intermediate-aged populations (when examined with previously published results) suggests that the second star formation event occurred in {alpha}-enriched gas, and one star, Car-612, seems to have formed in a pocket enhanced in SN Ia/II products. This latter star provides the first direct link between the formation of stars with enhanced SN Ia/II ratios in dwarf galaxies to those found in the outer Galactic halo (Ivans et al.). Another important result is the potential evidence for SN II driven winds. We show that the very metal-poor stars in Carina have not been enhanced in asymptotic giant branch or SN Ia products, and therefore their very low ratios of [Sr/Ba] suggests the loss of contributions from the early SNe II. Low ratios of [Na/Fe], [Mn/Fe], and [Cr/Fe] in two of these stars support this scenario, with additional evidence from the low [Zn/Fe] upper limit for one star. It is

  1. Exploring Optically Compact Dwarf Galaxies for Kinematic Structures and Extended HI Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Most, Hans; Cannon, J. M.; Salzer, J. J.; Rosenberg, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    We present Very Large Array H I spectral line and optical imaging of eight optically compact (optical radii <1 kpc), star-forming dwarf galaxies. These galaxies were chosen because of their optically compact stellar distributions, faint blue magnitudes, ongoing star formation, and relative proximity. The sample includes ADBS 113845+2008, which was found to have an HI halo that extends nearly 40 optical scale lengths from the stellar body (Cannon et al. 2009). Using this larger sample, we are working to discern if the "giant gas disk" dwarf galaxy is common or rare. We are also exploring the kinematics and dark matter contents of each of the sample galaxies.

  2. Globular Clusters, Ultracompact Dwarfs, and Dwarf Galaxies in Abell 2744 at a Redshift of 0.308

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung

    2016-11-01

    We report a photometric study of globular clusters (GCs), ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs), and dwarf galaxies in the giant merging galaxy cluster Abell 2744 at z = 0.308. Color–magnitude diagrams of the point sources derived from deep F814W (rest frame r‧) and F105W (rest frame I) images of Abell 2744 in the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Field show a rich population of point sources, which have colors that are similar to those of typical GCs. These sources are as bright as -14.9\\lt {M}r\\prime ≤slant -11.4 (26.0 < F814W(Vega) ≤ 29.5) mag, being mostly UCDs and bright GCs in Abell 2744. The luminosity function (LF) of these sources shows a break at {M}r\\prime ≈ -12.9 (F814W ≈ 28.0) mag, indicating a boundary between UCDs and bright GCs. The numbers of GCs and UCDs are estimated to be 1,711,640+589,760 ‑430,500 and 147 ± 26, respectively. The clustercentric radial number density profiles of the UCDs and bright GCs show similar slopes, but these profiles are much steeper than those of the dwarf galaxies and the mass density profile based on gravitational lensing analysis. We derive an LF of the red sequence galaxies for -22.9\\lt {M}r\\prime ≤slant -13.9 mag. The faint end of this LF is fit well by a flat power law with α =-1.14+/- 0.08, showing no faint upturn. These results support the galaxy-origin scenario for bright UCDs: they are the nuclei of dwarf galaxies that are stripped when they pass close to the center of massive galaxies or a galaxy cluster, while some of the faint UCDs are at the bright end of the GCs.

  3. How similar is the stellar structure of low-mass late-type galaxies to that of early-type dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janz, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Laine, J.; Salo, H.; Lisker, T.

    2016-09-01

    We analyse structural decompositions of 500 late-type galaxies (Hubble T-type ≥6) from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G; Salo et al.), spanning stellar mass range of about 107 to a few times 1010 M⊙. Their decomposition parameters are compared with those of the early-type dwarfs in the Virgo cluster from Janz et al. They have morphological similarities, including the fact that the fraction of simple one-component galaxies in both samples increases towards lower galaxy masses. We find that in the late-type two-component galaxies both the inner and outer structures are by a factor of 2 larger than in the early-type dwarfs, for the same stellar mass of the component. While dividing the late-type galaxies to low- and high-density environmental bins, it is noticeable that both the inner and outer components of late types in the high local density galaxies are smaller, and lie closer in size to those of the early-type dwarfs. This suggests that, although structural differences between the late- and early-type dwarfs are observed, environmental processes can plausibly transform their sizes sufficiently, thus linking them evolutionarily.

  4. Simulations of the formation of tidal dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzstein, Markus

    2005-02-01

    We present results of numerical simulations of the tidal arms in interacting systems of galaxies. The formation of new dwarf galaxies inside the tidal arms has been studied with very high resolution. We find that in pure N-body simulations, no collapsed objects are formed and that gas efficiently triggers the onset of collapse in tidal tails if the gas distribution in the progenitor disk is extended enough. Using an analysis which closely matches the procedure observers use, we determine detailed kinematical properties for the most massive object formed in the tidal tails of our simulation with gas. Numerical tools for such high resolution simulations are also presented. We have developed VINE, a new N-body SPH code for astrophysical particle simulations. The code uses a binary tree structure for the computation of gravitational interactions. It can make efficient use of the special purpose hardware GRAPE and is parallelized for shared memory supercomputers. A leapfrog and a Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integrator have been implemented together with an individual particle time step scheme. Other implemented features include periodic boundary conditions and cosmological expansion. We present detailed parallel timings of the code.

  5. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies as degenerate gas of free fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Domcke, Valerie; Urbano, Alfredo E-mail: alfredo.urbano@sissa.it

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a simple scenario in which Dark Matter (DM) consists of free fermions with mass m{sub f}. We assume that on galactic scales these fermions are capable of forming a degenerate Fermi gas, in which stability against gravitational collapse is ensured by the Pauli exclusion principle. The mass density of the resulting con figuration is governed by a non-relativistic Lane-Emden equation, thus leading to a universal cored profile that depends only on one free parameter in addition to m{sub f}. After reviewing the basic formalism, we test this scenario against experimental data describing the velocity dispersion of the eight classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Milky Way. We find that, despite its extreme simplicity, the model exhibits a good fit to the data and realistic predictions for the size of DM halos providing that m{sub f}≅ 200 eV. Furthermore, we show that in this setup larger galaxies correspond to the non-degenerate limit of the gas. We propose a concrete realization of this model in which DM is produced non-thermally via inflaton decay. We show that imposing the correct relic abundance and the bound on the free-streaming length constrains the inflation model in terms of inflaton mass, its branching ratio into DM and the reheating temperature.

  6. H I IN LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXIES AND STRIPPING BY THE GALACTIC HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary E E-mail: mputman@astro.columbia.edu

    2009-05-01

    We examine the H I content and environment of all of the Local Group dwarf galaxies (M {sub tot} < 10{sup 10} M {sub sun}), including the numerous newly discovered satellites of the Milky Way and M31. All of the new dwarfs, with the exception of Leo T, have no detected H I. The majority of dwarf galaxies within {approx}270 kpc of the Milky Way or Andromeda are undetected in H I (<10{sup 4} M {sub sun} for Milky Way dwarfs), while those further than {approx}270 kpc are predominantly detected with masses {approx}10{sup 5} to 10{sup 8} M {sub sun}. Analytical ram-pressure arguments combined with velocities obtained via proper motion studies allow for an estimate of the halo density of the Milky Way at several distances. This halo density is constrained to be greater than 2x 10{sup -4}-3 x 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} out to distances of at least 70 kpc. This is broadly consistent with theoretical models of the diffuse gas in a Milky Way-like halo and is consistent with this component hosting a large fraction of a galaxy's baryons. Accounting for completeness in the dwarf galaxy count, gasless dwarf galaxies could have provided at most 2.1 x 10{sup 8} M {sub sun} of H I gas to the Milky Way, which suggests that most of our Galaxy's star formation fuel does not come from accreted small satellites in the current era.

  7. Sulphur in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Including NLTE corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skúladóttir, Á.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Tolstoy, E.; Hill, V.; Salvadori, S.; Korotin, S. A.; Pettini, M.

    2015-08-01

    In Galactic halo stars, sulphur has been shown to behave like other α-elements, but until now, no comprehensive studies have been done on this element in stars of other galaxies. Here, we use high-resolution ESO VLT/FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra to determine sulphur abundances for 85 stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, covering the metallicity range -2.5 ≤ [ Fe / H ] ≤ -0.8. The abundances are derived from the S I triplet at 9213, 9228, and 9238 Å. These lines have been shown to be sensitive to departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e. NLTE effects. Therefore, we present new NLTE corrections for a grid of stellar parameters covering those of the target stars. The NLTE-corrected sulphur abundances in Sculptor show the same behaviour as other α-elements in that galaxy (such as Mg, Si, and Ca). At lower metallicities ([ Fe / H ] ≲ -2) the abundances are consistent with a plateau at [ S / Fe ] ≈ + 0.16, similar to what is observed in the Galactic halo, [ S / Fe ] ≈ + 0.2. With increasing [Fe/H], the [S/Fe] ratio declines, reaching negative values at [ Fe / H ] ≳ -1.5. The sample also shows an increase in [S/Mg] with [Fe/H], most probably because of enrichment from Type Ia supernovae. Based on observations made with ESO/VLT/FLAMES at the La Silla Paranal observatory under program ID 089.B-0304(B).Appendix is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Variable Stars in the Sextans Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, Mario; Fischer, Philippe; Krzeminski, Wojtek

    1995-11-01

    We describe a survey for variable stars in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy based on the analysis of 113 B and 48 V CCD images of four fields covering a total area of 18' x 18'. We have identified 44 variables: 36 RR Lyr star, 6 anomalous Cepheids, one long-period red variable, all probable members of Sextans, and one foreground contact binary. We have used the pulsating stars to derive a true distance modulus of 19.67 +/- 0.15 for Sextans (or D = 86 +/-6 kpc), where the error is primarily due to uncertainties in the luminosity-metallicity relation for RR Lyr stars. Based on our new data we conclude that [Fe/H]_Sex_ = -1.6 +/- 0.2, somewhat higher than the value from Suntzeff et al. (ApJ, 418,208(1993)] obtained from the analysis of fiber spectroscopy of the near-IR Calcium triplet. We present a new deep color- magnitude diagram for Sextans which reveals the presence of a metal-poor population containing stars as young as 2-4 Gyr, consistent with the presence of anomalous Cepheids in the galaxy. This young population may represent as much as 25% of the total stellar content of Sextans. We find a surprisingly strong correlation between the frequency of anomalous Cepheids in dSph galaxies and galaxian luminosity and speculate on the possible origin of this strange effect. The RR Lyr stars in Sextans do not exhibit the Oosterhoff dichotomy observed in globular clusters and in the Galactic halo field.

  9. CO at Low-metallicity: Molecular Clouds in the dwarf galaxy WLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Deidre Ann; Rubio, Monica; Cigan, Phil; Cortes, Juan R.; Elmegreen, Bruce; Brinks, Elias; Simpson, Caroline E.; Young, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Metallicity is not a passive result of galaxy evolution, but a crucial driver. Dwarf galaxies are low in heavy elements, which has important consequences for the ability to form cold, dense clouds that form stars. Molecular cores shrink and atomic envelopes grow in star-forming clouds as the metallicity drops. We are testing this picture of changing structure with metallicity with Herschel [CII]158 micron images of the photo-dissociation regions and ALMA maps of CO in star-forming regions in 4 dwarf irregular galaxies. These galaxies cover a range in metallicity from 13% solar to 5% solar. Here we report on the structure of the molecular clouds in WLM, a dwarf galaxy at 13% solar abundance where we for the first time detected CO emission at such a low heavy element abundance.The Herschel part of this work was supported by grant RSA #1433776 from JPL.

  10. TWO LOCAL VOLUME DWARF GALAXIES DISCOVERED IN 21 cm EMISSION: PISCES A AND B

    SciTech Connect

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C.; Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary E.; Stern, Daniel E-mail: marla.geha@yale.edu E-mail: mputman@astro.columbia.edu

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of two dwarf galaxies, Pisces A and B, from a blind 21 cm H I search. These were the only two galaxies found via optical imaging and spectroscopy of 22 H I clouds identified in the GALFA-H I survey as dwarf galaxy candidates. They have properties consistent with being in the Local Volume (<10 Mpc), and one has resolved stellar populations such that it may be on the outer edge of the Local Group (∼1 Mpc from M31). While the distance uncertainty makes interpretation ambiguous, these may be among the faintest star-forming galaxies known. Additionally, rough estimates comparing these galaxies to ΛCDM dark matter simulations suggest consistency in number density, implying that the dark matter halos likely to host these galaxies are primarily H I-rich. The galaxies may thus be indicative of a large population of dwarfs at the limit of detectability that are comparable to the faint satellites of the Local Group. Because they are outside the influence of a large dark matter halo to alter their evolution, these galaxies can provide critical anchors to dwarf galaxy formation models.

  11. THE MOST METAL-POOR DAMPED Lyα SYSTEMS: AN INSIGHT INTO DWARF GALAXIES AT HIGH-REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Pettini, Max; Jorgenson, Regina A.

    2015-02-10

    In this paper we analyze the kinematics, chemistry, and physical properties of a sample of the most metal-poor damped Lyα systems (DLAs), to uncover their links to modern-day galaxies. We present evidence that the DLA population as a whole exhibits a ''knee'' in the relative abundances of the α-capture and Fe-peak elements when the metallicity is [Fe/H] ≅ –2.0, assuming that Zn traces the buildup of Fe-peak elements. In this respect, the chemical evolution of DLAs is clearly different from that experienced by Milky Way halo stars, but resembles that of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group. We also find a close correspondence between the kinematics of Local Group dwarf galaxies and of high-redshift metal-poor DLAs, which further strengthens this connection. On the basis of such similarities, we propose that the most metal-poor DLAs provide us with a unique opportunity to directly study the dwarf galaxy population more than ten billion years in the past, at a time when many dwarf galaxies were forming the bulk of their stars. To this end, we have measured some of the key physical properties of the DLA gas, including their neutral gas mass, size, kinetic temperature, density, and turbulence. We find that metal-poor DLAs contain a warm neutral medium with T {sub gas} ≅ 9600 K predominantly held up by thermal pressure. Furthermore, all of the DLAs in our sample exhibit a subsonic turbulent Mach number, implying that the gas distribution is largely smooth. These results are among the first empirical descriptions of the environments where the first few generations of stars may have formed in the universe.

  12. Large-scale environmental dependence of gas-phase metallicity in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Kelly; Vogeley, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    We study how the cosmic environment affects galaxy evolution in the Universe by comparing the metallicities of dwarf galaxies in voids with dwarf galaxies in more dense regions. Ratios of the fluxes of emission lines, particularly those of the forbidden [O III] and [S II] transitions, provide estimates of a region's electron temperature and number density. From these two quantities and the emission line fluxes [O II] λ3727, [O III] λ4363, and [O III] λλ4959,5007, we estimate the abundance of oxygen with the Direct Te method. We estimate the metallicity of 37 void dwarf galaxies and 71 dwarf galaxies in more dense regions using spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, as re-processed in the MPA-JHU value-added catalog. We find very little difference between the two sets of galaxies, indicating little influence from the large-scale environment on their stellar evolution. Of particular interest are a number of extremely metal-poor dwarf galaxies that are equally abundant in both voids and denser regions.

  13. Revealing Massive Black Holes in Dwarf Galaxies with X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, A.

    2014-07-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) live at the heart of essentially all massive galaxies, power AGN, and are thought to be important agents in the evolution of their hosts. However, the origin of these monster BHs is largely unknown. While direct observations of the first ``seeds" of supermassive BHs in the infant Universe are unobtainable with current telescopes, finding and studying dwarf galaxies hosting massive BHs today can provide valuable constraints on the masses, host galaxies, and formation mechanism of supermassive BH seeds. We have recently completed the first systematic search for AGN in dwarf galaxies using optical spectroscopy, increasing the number of known dwarfs with massive BHs by more than an order of magnitude (Reines et al. 2013). However, this optical search is biased towards BHs radiating at high fractions of their Eddington limit in galaxies with little on-going star formation. Alternative search techniques and diagnostics at other wavelengths are necessary to make further progress. I will discuss our efforts to find and study massive BHs in dwarf galaxies using observations at X-ray wavelengths. These observations are more sensitive to weakly accreting massive BHs and are already beginning to reveal massive BHs hidden at optical wavelengths in star-forming dwarf galaxies.

  14. TIDAL INTERACTION AS THE ORIGIN OF EARLY-TYPE DWARF GALAXIES IN GROUP ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Ree, Chang H.

    2014-11-20

    We present a sample of dwarf galaxies that suffer ongoing disruption by the tidal forces of nearby massive galaxies. By analyzing structural and stellar population properties using the archival imaging and spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we find that they are likely a ''smoking gun'' example of the formation through tidal stirring of early-type dwarf galaxies (dEs) in the galaxy group environment. The inner cores of these galaxies are fairly intact and the observed light profiles are well fit by the Sérsic functions while the tidally stretched stellar halos are prominent in the outer parts. They are all located within a sky-projected distance of 50 kpc from the centers of the host galaxies and no dwarf galaxies have relative line-of-sight velocities larger than 205 km s{sup –1} to their hosts. We derive the Composite Stellar Population properties of these galaxies by fitting the SDSS optical spectra to a multiple-burst composite stellar population model. We find that these galaxies accumulate a significant fraction of stellar mass within the last 1 Gyr and contain a majority stellar population with an intermediate age of 2 to 4 Gyr. Based on this evidence, we argue that tidal stirring, particularly through the galaxy-galaxy interaction, might have an important role in the formation and evolution of dEs in the group environment where the influence of other gas stripping mechanism might be limited.

  15. ON THE EXTENDED STRUCTURE OF THE PHOENIX DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Aparicio, Antonio; MartInez-Delgado, David; Gallart, Carme E-mail: antapaj@iac.e E-mail: carme@iac.e

    2009-11-01

    We present the star formation history (SFH) and its variations with galactocentric distance for the Local Group dwarf galaxy of Phoenix. They have been derived from a (F555W, F814W) color-magnitude diagram obtained from WFPC2-HST data, which reaches the oldest main-sequence turnoffs. The IAC-star and IAC-pop codes and the MinnIAC suite have been used to obtain the star formation rate as a function of time and metallicity, psi(t, z). We find that Phoenix has had ongoing but gradually decreasing star formation over nearly a Hubble time. The highest level of star formation occurred from the formation of the galaxy till 10.5 Gyr ago, when 50% of the total star formation had already taken place. From that moment, star formation continues at a significant level until 6 Gyr ago (an additional 35% of the stars are formed in this time interval), and at a very low level till the present time. The chemical enrichment law shows a trend of slowly increasing metallicity as a function of time until 6-8 Gyr ago, when metallicity starts to increase steeply to the current value. We have paid particular attention to the study of the variations of the SFH as a function of radius. Young stars are found in the inner region of the galaxy only, but intermediate-age and old stars can be found at all galactocentric distances. The distribution of mass density in alive stars and its evolution with time has been studied. This study shows that star formation started at all galactocentric distances in Phoenix at an early epoch. If stars form in situ in Phoenix, the star formation onset took place all over the galaxy (up to a distance of about 400 pc from the center), but preferentially out of center regions. After that, our results are compatible with a scenario in which the star formation region envelope slowly shrinks as time goes on, possibly as a natural result of pressure support reduction as gas supply diminishes. As a consequence, the star formation stopped first (about 7-8 Gyr ago) in

  16. Surveying for Dwarf Galaxies Within Voids FN2 and FN8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Stephen; Draper, Chris; Moody, J. Ward

    2016-10-01

    The presence or absence of dwarf galaxies with Mr' > -14 in low-density volumes correlates with dark matter halos and how they affect galaxy formation. We are conducting a redshifted Hα imaging survey for dwarf galaxies with Mr' > -13 in the heart of the well-defined voids FN2 and FN8 using the KPNO 4m Mayall telescope and Mosaic Imager. These data have furnished over 600 strong candidates in a four square degree area. Follow-up spectra finding none of these candidates to be within the void volumes will constrain the dwarf population there to be 2 to 8% of the cosmic mean. Conversely, finding even one Hα dwarf in the void heart will challenge several otherwise successful theories of large-scale structure formation.

  17. Panchromatic observations of dwarf starburst galaxies: Infant super star clusters and a low-luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Globular star clusters and supermassive black holes are fundamental components of today's massive galaxies, with origins dating back to the very early universe. Both globular clusters and the seeds of supermassive black holes are believed to have formed in the progenitors of modern massive galaxies, although the details are poorly understood. Direct observations of these low-mass, distant, and hence faint systems are unobtainable with current capabilities. However, gas-rich dwarf starburst galaxies in the local universe, analogous in many ways to protogalaxies at high-redshift, can provide critical insight into the early stages of galaxy evolution including the formation of globular clusters and massive black holes. This thesis presents a panchromatic study of nearby dwarf starburst galaxies harboring nascent globular clusters still embedded in their birth material. Infant clusters are identified via their production of thermal radio emission at centimeter wavelengths, which comes from dense gas ionized by young massive stars. By combining radio observations with complementary data at ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelengths, we obtain a comprehensive view of massive clusters emerging from their gaseous and dusty birth cocoons. This thesis also presents the first example of a nearby dwarf starburst galaxy hosting an actively accreting massive central black hole. The black hole in this dwarf galaxy is unusual in that it is not associated with a bulge, a nuclear star cluster, or any other well-defined nucleus, likely reflecting an early phase of black hole and galaxy evolution that has not been previously observed.

  18. Nature and Nurture of Early-Type Dwarf Galaxies in Low Density Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grützbauch, R.; Annibali, F.; Rampazzo, R.; Bressan, A.; Zeilinger, W. W.

    We study stellar population parameters of a sample of 13 dwarf galaxies located in poor groups of galaxies using high resolution spectra observed with VIMOS at the ESO-VLT [Grützbauch et al., A&A 502, 473 (2009)]. LICK-indices were compared with Simple Stellar Population models to derive ages, metallicities and [α/Fe]-ratios. Comparing the dwarfs with a sample of giant ETGs residing in comparable environments we find that the dwarfs are on average younger, less metal-rich, and less enhanced in alpha-elements than giants. Age, Z, and [α/Fe] ratios are found to correlate both with velocity dispersion and with morphology. We also find possible evidence that low density environment (LDE) dwarfs experienced more prolonged star formation histories than Coma dwarfs, however, larger samples are needed to draw firm conclusions.

  19. Towards a phylogenetic analysis of galaxy evolution: a case study with the dwarf galaxies of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraix-Burnet, D.; Choler, P.; Douzery, E. J. P.

    2006-09-01

    Context: .The Hubble tuning-fork diagram has always been the preferred scheme for classifying galaxies. It is based only on morphology. In contrast, biologists have long taken the genealogical relatedness of living entities into account for classification purposes. Aims: .Assuming branching evolution of galaxies as a "descent with modification", we show here that the concepts and tools of phylogenetic systematics that are widely used in biology can be heuristically transposed to the case of galaxies. Methods: .This approach, which we call "astrocladistics", is applied to dwarf galaxies of the Local Group and provides the first evolutionary tree for real galaxies. Results: .The trees that we present here are solid enough to support the existence of a hierarchical organisation in the diversity of dwarf galaxies of the Local Group. They also show that these galaxies all stem from a common ancestral kind of object. We find that some kinds of dIrrs are progenitors of both dSphs and other kinds of dIrrs. We also identify three evolutionary groups, each one with its own characteristics and own evolution. Conclusions: .The present work opens a new way to analysing galaxy evolution and a path towards a new systematics of galaxies. Work on other galaxies in the Universe is in progress.

  20. Carbon and Oxygen Abundances in Low Metallicity Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Henry, Richard B. C.; Erb, Dawn K.; Carigi, Leticia

    2016-08-01

    The study of carbon and oxygen abundances yields information on the time evolution and nucleosynthetic origins of these elements, yet they remain relatively unexplored. At low metallicities, (12+log(O/H) < 8.0), nebular carbon measurements are limited to rest-frame UV collisionally excited emission lines. Therefore, we present the UV spectrophotometry of 12 nearby low-metallicity high-ionization H ii regions in dwarf galaxies obtained using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We present the first analysis of the C/O ratio in local galaxies based solely on simultaneous significant detections of the UV {{{O}}}+2 and {{{C}}}+2 collisionally excited lines in seven of our targets and five objects from the literature to create a final sample of 12 significant detections. Our sample is complemented by optical SDSS spectra, from which we measured the nebular physical conditions and oxygen abundances using the direct method. At low metallicity, (12+log(O/H) < 8.0), no clear trend is evident in C/O versus O/H for the present sample given the large dispersion observed. When combined with recombination line observations at higher values of O/H, a general trend of increasing C/O with increasing O/H is also viable but with some significant outliers. Additionally, we find the C/N ratio appears to be constant (but with significant scatter) over a large range in oxygen abundance, indicating that carbon is predominantly produced by similar nucleosynthetic mechanisms as nitrogen. If true, and our current understanding of nitrogen production is correct, this would indicate that primary production of carbon (a flat trend) dominates at low metallicity, but quasi-secondary production (an increasing trend) becomes prominent at higher metallicities. A larger sample will be needed to determine the true nature and dispersion of the relation.

  1. M dwarfs, microlensing, and the mass budget of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Flynn, Chris; Gould, Andrew; Kirhakos, Sofia

    1994-01-01

    We show that faint red stars do not contribute significantly to the mass budget of the Galaxy or to microlensing statistics. Our results are obtained by analyzing two long exposures of a high-latitude field taken with the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the newly repaired Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Stars are easily distinguished from galaxies essentially to the limiting magnitudes of the images. We find five stars with 2.0 less than V - I less than 3.0 and I less than 25.3 and no stars with V - I greater than 3.0. Therefore, main-sequence stars with M(sub I) greater than 10 that are above the hydrogen-burning limit in the dark halo or the spheroid contribute less than 6% of the unseen matter. Faint red disk stars, M-dwarfs, contribute at most 15% to the mass of the disk. We parameterize the faint end of the cumulative distribution of stars, Phi, as a function of luminosity L(sub V), d Phi/d ln L(sub V) proportional to L(sub V exp -gamma). For spheroid stars, gamma less than 0.32 over the range 6 less than M(sub V) less than 17, with 98% confidence. The disk luminosity function falls, gamma less than 0, for 15 approximately less than M(sub V) approximately less than 19. Faint red stars in the disk or thick disk, and stars with M(sub V) less than 16 in the spheroid contribute tau less than 10(exp -8) to the optical depth to microlensing toward the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  2. THE ACS LCID PROJECT: ON THE ORIGIN OF DWARF GALAXY TYPES—A MANIFESTATION OF THE HALO ASSEMBLY BIAS?

    SciTech Connect

    Gallart, Carme; Monelli, Matteo; Aparicio, Antonio; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Drozdovsky, Igor; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Mayer, Lucio; Bernard, Edouard J.; Cassisi, Santi; Cole, Andrew A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Navarro, Julio F.; Salvadori, Stefania; Skillman, Evan D.; Stetson, Peter B.; Weisz, Daniel R.

    2015-10-01

    We discuss how knowledge of the whole evolutionary history of dwarf galaxies, including details on the early star formation events, can provide insight on the origin of the different dwarf galaxy types. We suggest that these types may be imprinted by the early conditions of formation rather than only being the result of a recent morphological transformation driven by environmental effects. We present precise star formation histories of a sample of Local Group dwarf galaxies, derived from color–magnitude diagrams reaching the oldest main-sequence turnoffs. We argue that these galaxies can be assigned to two basic types: fast dwarfs that started their evolution with a dominant and short star formation event and slow dwarfs that formed a small fraction of their stars early and have continued forming stars until the present time (or almost). These two different evolutionary paths do not map directly onto the present-day morphology (dwarf spheroidal versus dwarf irregular). Slow and fast dwarfs also differ in their inferred past location relative to the Milky Way and/or M31, which hints that slow dwarfs were generally assembled in lower-density environments than fast dwarfs. We propose that the distinction between a fast and slow dwarf galaxy primarily reflects the characteristic density of the environment where they form. At a later stage, interaction with a large host galaxy may play a role in the final gas removal and ultimate termination of star formation.

  3. Disk dwarf galaxy as the progenitor of the Andromeda giant stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirihara, Takanobu; Miki, Yohei; Mori, Masao; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of the morphology of a progenitor galaxy that has been disrupted and formed a giant southern stellar stream in the halo of Andromeda galaxy(M31). N-body simulations of a minor merger of M31 with a dwarf galaxy suggest that the progenitor's rotation plays an important role in the formation of an asymmetric surface brightness distribution of the stream.

  4. Observations of the impact of starbursts on the interstellar medium in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlowe, Amanda T.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Schommer, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies play a crucial role in our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies, and the concept of supernova-driven mass outflows is a vital ingredient in theories of the structure and evolution of dwarf galaxies. Despite the theoretical importance of these outflows, there is a very limited amount of direct observational evidence for their existence. We have therefore begun a detailed multi-wave-band search for outflows in dwarf (M(sub B) greater than or = -18) galaxies with extensive recent or ongoing centrally concentrated star formation. We report the first results of this search in the present paper. Observations of the ionized gas in dwarf amorphous galaxies with centrally concentrated populations of massive stars provide evidence for the large-scale expansion of their expansion of their ionized interstellar media. Fabry-Perot H alpha images reveal the presence of kiloparsec-scale 'superbubbles' and filaments which tend to be oriented along the galaxy minor axis. These structures are comparable in size to the chracteristic optical sizes of the galaxies, and dominate the morphology of the galaxies at low surface brightness in H alpha. Since expanding structure of this size and velocity are not observed in all low-mass galaxies with recent or ongoing star formation, we suggest that we are witnessing transient events that likely have a relatively low 'duty cycle' in such galaxies. That is, we argue that the particular galaxies in the present paper have had significantly elevated star formation rates over the past 10(exp 7)-10(exp 8) yr (i.e., these are starburst or young poststarburst systems). This interpretation is consistent with the optical colors and emission-line properties of these galaxies.

  5. On the r-process Enrichment of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Linden, Tim

    2016-07-01

    Recent observations of Reticulum II have uncovered an overabundance of r-process elements compared to similar ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UFDs). Because the metallicity and star formation history of Reticulum II appear consistent with all known UFDs, the high r-process abundance of Reticulum II suggests enrichment through a single, rare event, such as a double neutron star (NS) merger. However, we note that this scenario is extremely unlikely, as binary stellar evolution models require significant supernova natal kicks to produce NS–NS or NS–black hole (BH) mergers, and these kicks would efficiently remove compact binary systems from the weak gravitational potentials of UFDs. We examine alternative mechanisms for the production of r-process elements in UFDs, including a novel mechanism wherein NSs in regions of high dark matter (DM) density implode after accumulating a BH-forming mass of DM. We find that r-process proto-material ejection by tidal forces, when a single NS implodes into a BH, can occur at a rate matching the r-process abundance of both Reticulum II and the Milky Way. Remarkably, DM models which collapse a single NS in observed UFDs also solve the missing pulsar problem in the Milky Way Galactic Center. We propose tests specific to DM r-process production which may uncover or rule out this model.

  6. Searching for Tidal Tails in Galactic Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Delgado, David; Aparicio, A.; Gomez-Flechoso, Maria A.

    The formation of the Galactic halo is currently best explained by the combination of two scenarios which previously were regarded as competing models. Based on the kinematics of metal-poor halo field stars, Eggen, Lynden-Bell & Sandage (ELS, 1962) proposed that the halo formed during a rapid, smooth collapse from a homogeneous primordial medium. Searle & Zinn (SZ, 1978) argued a halo formation via the gradual merging of many sub-galactic fragments. The SZ scenario has been strengthened by the observational evidence accumulated during the past decade. The discovery of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Ibata, Gilmore & Irwin 1994), in a process of dissolving into the Galactic halo, argued in favour that accretion events can take place in the Milky Way. The possibility that accretion events may leave observable fossil records in the halo is also supported by theoretical models of tidally disrupted dSph satellites (Johnston, Spergel & Hernquist 1995; Oh, Lin & Aarseth 1995; Piatek & Pryor 1995). We present our preliminary results of a long-term project to investigate the process of accretion and tidal disruption of dSph satellites in the Galactic halo and, in particular, to search for new tidal tails in a sample of nearby dSph satellites of the Milky Way. The presence of a possible tidal debris in Ursa Minor and Sculptor dSphs and the results of our survey for a tidal extension along the NW semimajor axis of Saggitarius is discussed.

  7. A Chemical Evolution Model for the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Jing, Yi Peng

    2016-02-01

    Fornax is the brightest Milky Way (MW) dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its star formation history (SFH) has been derived from observations. We estimate the time evolution of its gas mass and net inflow and outflow rates from the SFH usinga simple star formation law that relates the star formation rate to the gas mass. We present a chemical evolution model on a 2D mass grid with supernovae (SNe) as sources of metal enrichment. We find that a key parameter controlling the enrichment is the mass Mx of the gas to mix with the ejecta from each SN. The choice of Mx depends on the evolution of SN remnants and on the global gas dynamics. It differs between the two types of SNe involved and between the periods before and after Fornax became an MW satellite at time t = tsat. Our results indicate that due to the global gas outflow at t > tsat, part of the ejecta from each SN may directly escape from Fornax. Sample results from our model are presented and compared with data.

  8. Detectability of Ultra Faint Dwarf Galaxies with Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, C.; Antoja, T.; Aguilar, L.; Figueras, F.; Brown, A.; Antiche, E.; Hernández-Pérez, F.; Valenzuela, O.; Aparicio, A.; Hidalgo, S.; Velázquez, H.

    2014-07-01

    We present a technique to detect Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxies (UFDs) in the Galactic Halo, using sky and proper motion information.The method uses wavelet transforms to detect peaks in the sky and proper motion planes, and to evaluate the probability of these being stochastic fluctuations. We aim to map thoroughly the detection limits of this technique. For this, we have produced a library of 15,000 synthetic UFDs, embedded in the Gaia Universe Model Snapshot (GUMS) background (Robin et al. 2012), each at a different distance, different luminosity, half-light radius, velocity dispersion and center-of-mass velocity, varying in ranges that extend well beyond those spanned by known classical and ultra-faint dSphs. We use these synthetic UFDs as a benchmark to characterize the completeness and detection limits of our technique, and present our results as a function of different physical and observable parameters of the UFDs (see full poster for more details at https://gaia.ub.edu/Twiki/pub/GREATITNFC/ProgramFinalconference/Poster_UFGX_Bcn_C_Mateu.pdf).

  9. Comptonization of cosmic microwave background photons in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Evans, N. Wyn; Colafrancesco, S.

    2006-05-01

    We present theoretical modelling of the electron distribution produced by annihilating neutralino dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). In particular, we follow up the idea of Colafrancesco and find that such electrons distort the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. For an assumed neutralino mass of 10 GeV and beam size of 1 arcsec, the SZ temperature decrement is of the order of nano-Kelvin for dSph models with a soft core. By contrast, it is of the order of micro-Kelvin for the strongly cusped dSph models favoured by some cosmological simulations. Although this is out of reach of current instruments, it may well be detectable by future mm telescopes, such as the Atacama Large Millimetre Array. We also show that the upscattered CMB photons have energies within reach of upcoming X-ray observatories, but that the flux of such photons is too small to be detectable now. None the less, we conclude that searching for the dark matter induced SZ effect is a promising way of constraining the dark distribution in dSphs, especially if the particles are light.

  10. On the r-process Enrichment of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Linden, Tim

    2016-07-01

    Recent observations of Reticulum II have uncovered an overabundance of r-process elements compared to similar ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UFDs). Because the metallicity and star formation history of Reticulum II appear consistent with all known UFDs, the high r-process abundance of Reticulum II suggests enrichment through a single, rare event, such as a double neutron star (NS) merger. However, we note that this scenario is extremely unlikely, as binary stellar evolution models require significant supernova natal kicks to produce NS-NS or NS-black hole (BH) mergers, and these kicks would efficiently remove compact binary systems from the weak gravitational potentials of UFDs. We examine alternative mechanisms for the production of r-process elements in UFDs, including a novel mechanism wherein NSs in regions of high dark matter (DM) density implode after accumulating a BH-forming mass of DM. We find that r-process proto-material ejection by tidal forces, when a single NS implodes into a BH, can occur at a rate matching the r-process abundance of both Reticulum II and the Milky Way. Remarkably, DM models which collapse a single NS in observed UFDs also solve the missing pulsar problem in the Milky Way Galactic Center. We propose tests specific to DM r-process production which may uncover or rule out this model.

  11. Delayed star formation in isolated dwarf galaxies: Hubble space telescope star formation history of the Aquarius dwarf irregular

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Andrew A.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Brooks, Alyson M.; Leaman, Ryan E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: abrooks@physics.rutgers.edu

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained deep images of the highly isolated (d = 1 Mpc) Aquarius dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 210) with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaches more than a magnitude below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, allowing us to derive the star formation history (SFH) over the entire lifetime of the galaxy with a timing precision of ≈10% of the lookback time. Using a maximum likelihood fit to the CMD we find that only ≈10% of all star formation in Aquarius took place more than 10 Gyr ago (lookback time equivalent to redshift z ≈ 2). The star formation rate increased dramatically ≈6-8 Gyr ago (z ≈ 0.7-1.1) and then declined until the present time. The only known galaxy with a more extreme confirmed delay in star formation is Leo A, a galaxy of similar M {sub H} {sub I}/M {sub *}, dynamical mass, mean metallicity, and degree of isolation. The delayed stellar mass growth in these galaxies does not track the mean dark matter accretion rate from CDM simulations. The similarities between Leo A and Aquarius suggest that if gas is not removed from dwarf galaxies by interactions or feedback, it can linger for several gigayears without cooling in sufficient quantity to form stars efficiently. We discuss possible causes for the delay in star formation including suppression by reionization and late-time mergers. We find reasonable agreement between our measured SFHs and select cosmological simulations of isolated dwarfs. Because star formation and merger processes are both stochastic in nature, delayed star formation in various degrees is predicted to be a characteristic (but not a universal) feature of isolated small galaxies.

  12. DWARFS GOBBLING DWARFS: A STELLAR TIDAL STREAM AROUND NGC 4449 AND HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION ON SMALL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Delgado, David; Rix, Hans-Walter; Maccio, Andrea V.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Annibali, Francesca; Fliri, Juergen; Zibetti, Stefano; Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Aloisi, Alessandra; Chonis, Taylor S.; Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; Gallego-Laborda, J.; Merrifield, Michael R.

    2012-04-01

    A candidate diffuse stellar substructure was previously reported in the halo of the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 4449 by Karachentsev et al. We map and analyze this feature using a unique combination of deep integrated-light images from the BlackBird 0.5 m telescope, and high-resolution wide-field images from the 8 m Subaru Telescope, which resolve the nebulosity into a stream of red giant branch stars, and confirm its physical association with NGC 4449. The properties of the stream imply a massive dwarf spheroidal progenitor, which after complete disruption will deposit an amount of stellar mass that is comparable to the existing stellar halo of the main galaxy. The stellar mass ratio between the two galaxies is {approx}1:50, while the indirectly measured dynamical mass ratio, when including dark matter, may be {approx}1:10-1:5. This system may thus represent a 'stealth' merger, where an infalling satellite galaxy is nearly undetectable by conventional means, yet has a substantial dynamical influence on its host galaxy. This singular discovery also suggests that satellite accretion can play a significant role in building up the stellar halos of low-mass galaxies, and possibly in triggering their starbursts.

  13. Dense cloud cores revealed by CO in the low metallicity dwarf galaxy WLM.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Monica; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Hunter, Deidre A; Brinks, Elias; Cortés, Juan R; Cigan, Phil

    2015-09-10

    Understanding stellar birth requires observations of the clouds in which they form. These clouds are dense and self-gravitating, and in all existing observations they are molecular, with H2 the dominant species and carbon monoxide (CO) the best available tracer. When the abundances of carbon and oxygen are low compared with that of hydrogen, and the opacity from dust is also low, as in primeval galaxies and local dwarf irregular galaxies, CO forms slowly and is easily destroyed, so it is difficult for it to accumulate inside dense clouds. Here we report interferometric observations of CO clouds in the local group dwarf irregular galaxy Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte (WLM), which has a metallicity that is 13 per cent of the solar value and 50 per cent lower than the previous CO detection threshold. The clouds are tiny compared to the surrounding atomic and H2 envelopes, but they have typical densities and column densities for CO clouds in the Milky Way. The normal CO density explains why star clusters forming in dwarf irregulars have similar densities to star clusters in giant spiral galaxies. The low cloud masses suggest that these clusters will also be low mass, unless some galaxy-scale compression occurs, such as an impact from a cosmic cloud or other galaxy. If the massive metal-poor globular clusters in the halo of the Milky Way formed in dwarf galaxies, as is commonly believed, then they were probably triggered by such an impact.

  14. Dense cloud cores revealed by CO in the low metallicity dwarf galaxy WLM.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Monica; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Hunter, Deidre A; Brinks, Elias; Cortés, Juan R; Cigan, Phil

    2015-09-10

    Understanding stellar birth requires observations of the clouds in which they form. These clouds are dense and self-gravitating, and in all existing observations they are molecular, with H2 the dominant species and carbon monoxide (CO) the best available tracer. When the abundances of carbon and oxygen are low compared with that of hydrogen, and the opacity from dust is also low, as in primeval galaxies and local dwarf irregular galaxies, CO forms slowly and is easily destroyed, so it is difficult for it to accumulate inside dense clouds. Here we report interferometric observations of CO clouds in the local group dwarf irregular galaxy Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte (WLM), which has a metallicity that is 13 per cent of the solar value and 50 per cent lower than the previous CO detection threshold. The clouds are tiny compared to the surrounding atomic and H2 envelopes, but they have typical densities and column densities for CO clouds in the Milky Way. The normal CO density explains why star clusters forming in dwarf irregulars have similar densities to star clusters in giant spiral galaxies. The low cloud masses suggest that these clusters will also be low mass, unless some galaxy-scale compression occurs, such as an impact from a cosmic cloud or other galaxy. If the massive metal-poor globular clusters in the halo of the Milky Way formed in dwarf galaxies, as is commonly believed, then they were probably triggered by such an impact. PMID:26354481

  15. The Number of Tidal Dwarf Satellite Galaxies in Dependence of Bulge Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, Martín; Kroupa, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    We show that a significant correlation (up to 5σ) emerges between the bulge index, defined to be larger for a larger bulge/disk ratio, in spiral galaxies with similar luminosities in the Galaxy Zoo 2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the number of tidal-dwarf galaxies in the catalog by Kaviraj et al. In the standard cold or warm dark matter cosmological models, the number of satellite galaxies correlates with the circular velocity of the dark matter host halo. In generalized gravity models without cold or warm dark matter, such a correlation does not exist, because host galaxies cannot capture infalling dwarf galaxies due to the absence of dark-matter-induced dynamical friction. However, in such models, a correlation is expected to exist between the bulge mass and the number of satellite galaxies because bulges and tidal-dwarf satellite galaxies form in encounters between host galaxies. This is not predicted by dark matter models in which bulge mass and the number of satellites are a priori uncorrelated because higher bulge/disk ratios do not imply higher dark/luminous ratios. Hence, our correlation reproduces the prediction of scenarios without dark matter, whereas an explanation is not found readily from the a priori predictions of the standard scenario with dark matter. Further research is needed to explore whether some application of the standard theory may explain this correlation.

  16. Extreme Emission Line Galaxies in CANDELS: Broad-Band Selected, Star-Bursting Dwarf Galaxies at Z greater than 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDerWel, A.; Straughn, A. N.; Rix, H.-W.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Weiner, B. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, J. R.; Koo, D.; Ferguson, H. C.; Scarlata, C.; Hathi, N. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Newman, J. A.; Kocevski, D. D.; Lai, K.; Grogin, N. A.; Rodney, S. A.; Lee, K.-S.; Guo, Y.

    2011-01-01

    We identify an abundant population of extreme emission line galaxies at redshift z=1.6 - 1.8 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging from Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). 69 candidates are selected by the large contribution of exceptionally bright emission lines to their near-infrared, broad-band fluxes. Supported by spectroscopic confirmation of strong [OIII] emission lines - with equivalent widths approximately 1000A - in the four candidates that have HST/WFC3 grism observations, we conclude that these objects are dwarf galaxies with approximately 10(exp 8) solar mass in stellar mass, undergoing an enormous star-burst phase with M*/M* of only approximately 10 Myr. The star formation activity and the co-moving number density (3.7 x 10(exp -4) Mpc(exp -3)) imply that strong, short-lived bursts play a significant, perhaps even dominant role in the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies at z greater than 1. The observed star formation activity can produce in less than 5 Gyr the same amount of stellar mass density as is presently contained in dwarf galaxies. Therefore, our observations provide a strong indication that the stellar populations of present-day dwarf galaxies formed mainly in strong, short-lived bursts, mostly at z greater than 1.

  17. AGN Absorption Linked to Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneau, Stéphanie

    2014-07-01

    Multiwavelength identification of AGN is crucial not only to obtain a more complete census, but also to learn about the physical state of the nuclear activity (obscuration, efficiency, etc.). A panchromatic strategy plays an especially important role when the host galaxies are star-forming. Selecting far-Infrared galaxies at 0.3galaxies, indicating a physical link between X-ray absorption and either the gas fraction or the gas geometry in the hosts. These findings have implications for our current understanding of both the AGN unification model and the nature of the black hole-galaxy connection.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Dwarf galaxies surface brightness profiles. II. (Herrmann+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, K. A.; Hunter, D. A.; Elmegreen, B. G.

    2016-07-01

    Our galaxy sample (see Table1) is derived from the survey of nearby (>30Mpc) late-type galaxies conducted by Hunter & Elmegreen 2006 (cat. J/ApJS/162/49). The full survey includes 94 dwarf Irregulars (dIms), 26 Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCDs), and 20 Magellanic-type spirals (Sms). The 141 dwarf sample presented in the first paper of the present series (Paper I; Herrmann et al. 2013, Cat. J/AJ/146/104) contains one fewer Sm galaxy and two additional dIm systems than the original survey. A multi-wavelength data set has been assembled for these galaxies. The data include Hα images (129 galaxies with detections) to trace star formation over the past 10Myr (Hunter & Elmegreen 2004, Cat. J/AJ/128/2170) and satellite UV images (61 galaxies observed) obtained with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) to trace star formation over the past ~200Myr. The GALEX data include images from two passbands with effective wavelengths of 1516Å (FUV) and 2267Å (NUV) and resolutions of 4'' and 5.6'', respectively. Three of the galaxies in our sample with NUV data do not have FUV data. To trace older stars we have UBV images, which are sensitive to stars formed over the past 1Gyr for on-going star formation, and images in at least one band of JHK for 40 galaxies in the sample, which integrates the star formation over the galaxy's lifetime. Note that nine dwarfs are missing UB data and three more are missing U-band data. In addition we made use of 3.6μm images (39 galaxies) obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) in the Spitzer archives also to probe old stars. (3 data files).

  19. The same with less: the cosmic web of warm versus cold dark matter dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Darren S.; Schneider, Aurel; Smith, Robert E.; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim; Moore, Ben

    2015-08-01

    We explore fundamental properties of the distribution of low-mass dark matter haloes within the cosmic web using warm dark matter (WDM) and cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological simulations. Using self-abundance-matched mock galaxy catalogues, we show that the distribution of dwarf galaxies in a WDM universe, wherein low-mass halo formation is heavily suppressed, is nearly indistinguishable to that of a CDM universe whose low-mass haloes are not seen because galaxy formation is suppressed below some threshold halo mass. However, if the scatter between dwarf galaxy luminosity and halo properties is large enough, low-mass CDM haloes would sometimes host relatively bright galaxies thereby populating CDM voids with the occasional isolated galaxy and reducing the numbers of completely empty voids. Otherwise, without high mass to light scatter, all mock galaxy clustering statistics that we consider - the auto-correlation function, the numbers and radial profiles of satellites, the numbers of isolated galaxies, and the probability distribution function of small voids - are nearly identical in CDM and WDM. WDM voids are neither larger nor emptier than CDM voids, when constructed from abundance-matched halo catalogues. It is thus a challenge to determine whether the CDM problem of the overabundance of small haloes with respect to the number density of observed dwarf galaxies has a cosmological solution or an astrophysical solution. However, some clues about the dark matter particle and the scatter between the properties of dwarf galaxies and their dark matter halo hosts might be found in the cosmic web of galaxies in future surveys of the local volume.

  20. How the First Stars Shaped the Faintest Gas-dominated Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, R.; Vandenbroucke, B.; De Rijcke, S.

    2015-12-01

    Low-mass dwarf galaxies are very sensitive test-beds for theories of cosmic structure formation since their weak gravitational fields allow the effects of the relevant physical processes to clearly stand out. Up to now, no unified account has existed of the sometimes seemingly conflicting properties of the faintest isolated dwarfs in and around the Local Group, such as Leo T and the recently discovered Leo P and Pisces A systems. Using new numerical simulations, we show that this serious challenge to our understanding of galaxy formation can be effectively resolved by taking into account the regulating influence of the ultraviolet radiation of the first population of stars on a dwarf's star formation rate while otherwise staying within the standard cosmological paradigm for structure formation. These simulations produce faint, gas-dominated, star-forming dwarf galaxies that lie on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation and that successfully reproduce a broad range of chemical, kinematical, and structural observables of real late-type dwarf galaxies. Furthermore, we stress the importance of obtaining properties of simulated galaxies in a manner as close as possible to the typically employed observational techniques.

  1. Gravitational lensing by globular clusters and dwarf galaxies-- the explanation of quasar-galaxy associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushchenko, A.; Kim, C.; Sergeev, A.

    2003-04-01

    Quasar-galaxy associations can be explained as gravitational lensing by globular clusters, located in the halos of the foreground galaxies and dwarf galaxies in small groups of galaxies. We propose an observational test for checking this hypothesis. We used the SUPERCOSMOS sky survey to find the overdensities of star-like sources with zero proper motions in the vicinities of the~foreground galaxies from the CfA3 catalog. The results obtained for 19413 galaxies are presented. We show the results of calculations of number densities of star-like sources with zero proper motions in the vicinity of 19413 galaxies. Two different effects can explain the observational data: lensing by globular clusters and lensing by dwarf galaxies. We carried out the CCD 3-color photometry with the 2.0-m telescope of the~Terskol Observatory and the 1.8-m telescope of the Bohyunsan Observatory (South Korea) to select extremely lensed objects around several galaxies for future spectroscopic observations. From ads Wed Jan 12 06:25:17 2005 Return-Path: Received: (from ads@localhost) by head.cfa.harvard.edu (d/w) id j0CBPHjt007159; Wed, 12 Jan 2005 06:25:17 -0500 (EST) Received: from cfa.harvard.edu (cfa.harvard.edu [131.142.10.1]) by head.cfa.harvard.edu (d/w) with ESMTP id j0CBOuKD007095 for ; Wed, 12 Jan 2005 06:24:56 -0500 (EST) Received: from uqbar.mao.kiev.ua (mao.gluk.org [194.183.183.193]) by cfa.harvard.edu (8.12.9-20030924/8.12.9/cfunix Mast-Sol 1.0) with ESMTP id j0CBOgRv026875 for ; Wed, 12 Jan 2005 06:24:51 -0500 (EST) Received: from maoling.mao.kiev.ua (root@maoling.mao.kiev.ua [194.44.216.101]) by uqbar.mao.kiev.ua (8.11.6/8.11.6) with ESMTP id j0CBOdv08381 for ; Wed, 12 Jan 2005 13:24:39 +0200 Received: from maoling.mao.kiev.ua (gallaz@localhost [127.0.0.1]) by maoling.mao.kiev.ua (8.12.3/8.12.3/Debian-7.1) with ESMTP id j0CBObPb014682 for ; Wed, 12 Jan 2005 13:24:37 +0200 Received: (from gallaz

  2. Chemistry of Stars in the Sculptor Dwarf Galaxy from VLT-FLAMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Hill, V.

    The chemical composition of 91 stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is presented as determined from spectra taken with the FLAMES multiobject spectrograph in the Medusa mode. The analysis methods are outlined. The [α/Fe] ratios are shown for Mg, Ca, and Ti, and compared with those of Galactic stars. Heavy element abundance ratios (Y, Ba, and Eu) are also presented. Since the Sculptor dwarf galaxy has had a significantly different star formation history and chemical evolution than the Galaxy, then comparison of Sculptor's metal-poor (old) stars to similar metallicity stars in the Galaxy can be used to discuss galaxy formation scenarios, as well as test some of our fundamental assumptions in stellar nucleosynthesis.

  3. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XVIII. Star-forming dwarf galaxies in a cluster environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Hunt, L. K.; Madden, S. C.; Hughes, T. M.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bizzocchi, L.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; Cortese, L.; Davies, J.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fritz, J.; Pappalardo, C.; Pierini, D.; Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S.; Vlahakis, C.

    2015-02-01

    To assess the effects of the cluster environment on the different components of the interstellar medium, we analyse the far-infrared (FIR) and submillimetre (submm) properties of a sample of star-forming dwarf galaxies detected by the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). We determine dust masses and dust temperatures by fitting a modified black body function to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Stellar and gas masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and metallicities are obtained from the analysis of a set of ancillary data. Dust is detected in 49 out of a total 140 optically identified dwarfs covered by the HeViCS field; considering only dwarfs brighter than mB = 18 mag, this gives a detection rate of 43%. After evaluating different emissivity indices, we find that the FIR-submm SEDs are best-fit by β = 1.5, with a median dust temperature Td = 22.4 K. Assuming β = 1.5, 67% of the 23 galaxies detected in all five Herschel bands show emission at 500 μm in excess of the modified black-body model. The fraction of galaxies with a submillimetre excess decreases for lower values of β, while a similarly high fraction (54%) is found if a β-free SED modelling is applied. The excess is inversely correlated with SFR and stellar masses. To study the variations in the global properties of our sample that come from environmental effects, we compare the Virgo dwarfs to other Herschel surveys,such as the Key Insights into Nearby Galaxies: Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH), the Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS), and the HeViCS Bright Galaxy Catalogue (BGC). We explore the relations between stellar mass and Hi fraction, specific star formation rate, dust fraction, gas-to-dust ratio over a wide range of stellar masses (from 107 to 1011 M⊙) for both dwarfs and spirals. Highly Hi-deficient Virgo dwarf galaxies are mostly characterised by quenched star formation activity and lower dust fractions giving hints for dust stripping in cluster dwarfs. However, to explain the

  4. An actively accreting massive black hole in the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize2-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Brogan, Crystal L.

    2011-02-01

    Supermassive black holes are now thought to lie at the heart of every giant galaxy with a spheroidal component, including our own Milky Way. The birth and growth of the first `seed' black holes in the earlier Universe, however, is observationally unconstrained and we are only beginning to piece together a scenario for their subsequent evolution. Here we report that the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy Henize2-10 (refs 5 and 6) contains a compact radio source at the dynamical centre of the galaxy that is spatially coincident with a hard X-ray source. From these observations, we conclude that Henize2-10 harbours an actively accreting central black hole with a mass of approximately one million solar masses. This nearby dwarf galaxy, simultaneously hosting a massive black hole and an extreme burst of star formation, is analogous in many ways to galaxies in the infant Universe during the early stages of black-hole growth and galaxy mass assembly. Our results confirm that nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies can indeed form massive black holes, and that by implication so can their primordial counterparts. Moreover, the lack of a substantial spheroidal component in Henize2-10 indicates that supermassive black-hole growth may precede the build-up of galaxy spheroids.

  5. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES OF SEVEN IRREGULAR AND THREE TIDAL DWARF GALAXIES IN THE M81 GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Van Zee, Liese; Lee, Henry; Miller, Bryan W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Lee, Janice C.; Cote, Stephanie; Kennicutt, Robert C. E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.ed E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.ed E-mail: stephanie.cote@nrc-cnrc.gc.c E-mail: bmiller@gemini.ed

    2009-11-01

    We have derived nebular abundances for 10 dwarf galaxies belonging to the M81 Group, including several galaxies which do not have abundances previously reported in the literature. For each galaxy, multiple H II regions were observed with GMOS-N at the Gemini Observatory in order to determine abundances of several elements (oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, neon, and argon). For seven galaxies, at least one H II region had a detection of the temperature sensitive [O III] lambda4363 line, allowing a 'direct' determination of the oxygen abundance. No abundance gradients were detected in the targeted galaxies, and the observed oxygen abundances are typically in agreement with the well-known metallicity-luminosity relation. However, three candidate 'tidal dwarf' galaxies lie well off this relation: UGC 5336, Garland, and KDG 61. The nature of these systems suggests that UGC 5336 and Garland are indeed recently formed systems, whereas KDG 61 is most likely a dwarf spheroidal galaxy which lies along the same line of sight as the M81 tidal debris field. We propose that these H II regions formed from previously enriched gas which was stripped from nearby massive galaxies (e.g., NGC 3077 and M81) during a recent tidal interaction.

  6. An actively accreting massive black hole in the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10.

    PubMed

    Reines, Amy E; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Johnson, Kelsey E; Brogan, Crystal L

    2011-02-01

    Supermassive black holes are now thought to lie at the heart of every giant galaxy with a spheroidal component, including our own Milky Way. The birth and growth of the first 'seed' black holes in the earlier Universe, however, is observationally unconstrained and we are only beginning to piece together a scenario for their subsequent evolution. Here we report that the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 (refs 5 and 6) contains a compact radio source at the dynamical centre of the galaxy that is spatially coincident with a hard X-ray source. From these observations, we conclude that Henize 2-10 harbours an actively accreting central black hole with a mass of approximately one million solar masses. This nearby dwarf galaxy, simultaneously hosting a massive black hole and an extreme burst of star formation, is analogous in many ways to galaxies in the infant Universe during the early stages of black-hole growth and galaxy mass assembly. Our results confirm that nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies can indeed form massive black holes, and that by implication so can their primordial counterparts. Moreover, the lack of a substantial spheroidal component in Henize 2-10 indicates that supermassive black-hole growth may precede the build-up of galaxy spheroids.

  7. PAndAS' CUBS: DISCOVERY OF TWO NEW DWARF GALAXIES IN THE SURROUNDINGS OF THE ANDROMEDA AND TRIANGULUM GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Nicolas F.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Irwin, Mike; Chapman, Scott; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Dubinski, John; Babul, Arif; Navarro, Julio; Fardal, Mark; Lewis, Geraint F.; Rich, R. Michael

    2009-11-01

    We present the discovery of two new dwarf galaxies, Andromeda XXI and Andromeda XXII, located in the surroundings of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies (M31 and M33). These discoveries stem from the first year data of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey, a photometric survey of the M31/M33 group conducted with the Megaprime/MegaCam Wide-Field Camera mounted on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Both satellites appear as spatial overdensities of stars which, when plotted in a color-magnitude diagram, follow metal-poor, [Fe/H] = -1.8, red giant branches at the distance of M31/M33. Andromeda XXI is a moderately bright dwarf galaxy (M{sub V} = -9.9 +- 0.6), albeit with low surface brightness, emphasizing again that many relatively luminous M31 satellites still remain to be discovered. It is also a large satellite, with a half-light radius close to 1 kpc, making it the fourth largest Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy after the recently discovered Andromeda XIX, Andromeda II, and Sagittarius around the Milky Way, and supports the trend that M31 satellites are larger than their Milky Way counterparts. Andromeda XXII is much fainter (M{sub V} = -6.5 +- 0.8) and lies a lot closer in projection to M33 than it does to M31 (42 versus 224 kpc), suggesting that it could be the first Triangulum satellite to be discovered. Although this is a very exciting possibility in the context of a past interaction of M33 with M31 and the fate of its satellite system, a confirmation will have to await a good distance estimate to confirm its physical proximity to M33. Along with the dwarf galaxies found in previous surveys of the M31 surroundings, these two new satellites bring the number of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in this region to 20.

  8. Bulgeless dwarf galaxies and dark matter cores from supernova-driven outflows.

    PubMed

    Governato, F; Brook, C; Mayer, L; Brooks, A; Rhee, G; Wadsley, J; Jonsson, P; Willman, B; Stinson, G; Quinn, T; Madau, P

    2010-01-14

    For almost two decades the properties of 'dwarf' galaxies have challenged the cold dark matter (CDM) model of galaxy formation. Most observed dwarf galaxies consist of a rotating stellar disk embedded in a massive dark-matter halo with a near-constant-density core. Models based on the dominance of CDM, however, invariably form galaxies with dense spheroidal stellar bulges and steep central dark-matter profiles, because low-angular-momentum baryons and dark matter sink to the centres of galaxies through accretion and repeated mergers. Processes that decrease the central density of CDM halos have been identified, but have not yet reconciled theory with observations of present-day dwarfs. This failure is potentially catastrophic for the CDM model, possibly requiring a different dark-matter particle candidate. Here we report hydrodynamical simulations (in a framework assuming the presence of CDM and a cosmological constant) in which the inhomogeneous interstellar medium is resolved. Strong outflows from supernovae remove low-angular-momentum gas, which inhibits the formation of bulges and decreases the dark-matter density to less than half of what it would otherwise be within the central kiloparsec. The analogues of dwarf galaxies-bulgeless and with shallow central dark-matter profiles-arise naturally in these simulations.

  9. The Elusive Old Population of the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Leo I.

    PubMed

    Held; Saviane; Momany; Carraro

    2000-02-20

    We report the discovery of a significant old population in the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy Leo I as a result of a wide-area search with the ESO New Technology Telescope. Studies of the stellar content of Local Group dwarf galaxies have shown the presence of an old stellar population in almost all of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The only exception was Leo I, which alone appeared to have delayed its initial star formation episode until just a few gigayears ago. The color-magnitude diagram of Leo I now reveals an extended horizontal branch, unambiguously indicating the presence of an old, metal-poor population in the outer regions of this galaxy. Yet we find little evidence for a stellar population gradient, at least outside R>2' (0.16 kpc), since the old horizontal branch stars of Leo I are radially distributed as their more numerous intermediate-age helium-burning counterparts. The discovery of a definitely old population in the predominantly young dwarf spheroidal galaxy Leo I points to a sharply defined first epoch of star formation common to all of the Local Group dSph galaxies as well as to the halo of the Milky Way.

  10. THE STELLAR STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES FORMED BY TIDAL STIRRING

    SciTech Connect

    Lokas, Ewa L.; Klimentowski, Jaroslaw; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mayer, Lucio; Callegari, Simone E-mail: stelios@mps.ohio-state.ed

    2010-01-10

    Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we study the stellar properties of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies resulting from the tidally induced morphological transformation of disky dwarfs on a cosmologically motivated eccentric orbit around the Milky Way. The dwarf galaxy models initially consist of an exponential stellar disk embedded in an extended spherical dark matter halo. Depending on the initial orientation of the disk with respect to the orbital plane, different final configurations are obtained. The least evolved dwarf is triaxial and retains a significant amount of rotation. The more evolved dwarfs are prolate spheroids with little rotation. We show that in this scenario the final density distribution of stars can be approximated by a simple modification of the Plummer law. The kinematics of the dwarfs is significantly different depending on the line of sight which has important implications for mapping the observed stellar velocity dispersions of dwarfs to subhalo circular velocities. When the dwarfs are observed along the long axis, the measured velocity dispersion is higher and decreases faster with radius. In the case where rotation is significant, when viewed perpendicular to the long axis, the effect of minor axis rotation is detected, as expected for triaxial systems. We model the velocity dispersion profiles and rotation curves of the dwarfs under the assumption of constant mass-to-light ratio by solving the Jeans equations for spherical and axisymmetric systems and adjusting different sets of free parameters, including the total mass. We find that the mass is typically overestimated when the dwarf is seen along the long axis and underestimated when the observation is along the short or intermediate axis. For the studied cases, the effect of non-sphericity cannot, however, bias the inferred mass by more than 60% in either direction, even for the most strongly stripped dwarf which is close to disruption.

  11. Extended stellar substructure surrounding the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, T. A.; Mackey, A. D.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    We present deep stellar photometry of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy in g- and i-band filters, taken with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo in Chile. Our analysis reveals a large, extended region of stellar substructure surrounding the dwarf, as well as a distinct overdensity encroaching on its tidal radius. A radial profile of the Boötes I stellar distribution shows a break radius indicating the presence of extra-tidal stars. These observations strongly suggest that Boötes I is experiencing tidal disruption, although not as extreme as that exhibited by the Hercules dwarf spheroidal. Combined with revised velocity dispersion measurements from the literature, we see evidence suggesting the need to review previous theoretical models of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  12. ANDROMEDA XXVIII: A DWARF GALAXY MORE THAN 350 kpc FROM ANDROMEDA

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.; Martin, Nicolas F.

    2011-11-20

    We report the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Andromeda XXVIII, using data from the recently released Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8. The galaxy is a likely satellite of Andromeda, and, at a separation of 365{sup +17}{sub -1} kpc, would be one of the most distant of Andromeda's satellites. Its heliocentric distance is 650{sup +150}{sub -80} kpc, and analysis of its structure and luminosity shows that it has an absolute magnitude of M{sub V} = -8.5{sup +0.4}{sub -1.0} and half-light radius of r{sub h} = 210{sup +60}{sub -50} pc, similar to many other faint Local Group dwarfs. With presently available imaging we are unable to determine whether there is ongoing or recent star formation, which prevents us from classifying it as a dwarf spheroidal or a dwarf irregular.

  13. Suppression of star formation in dwarf galaxies by photoelectric grain heating feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, John C.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Dekel, Avishai

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectric heating—heating of dust grains by far-ultraviolet photons—has long been recognized as the primary source of heating for the neutral interstellar medium. Simulations of spiral galaxies have shown some indication that photoelectric heating could suppress star formation; however, simulations that include photoelectric heating have typically shown that it has little effect on the rate of star formation in either spiral galaxies or dwarf galaxies, which suggests that supernovae are responsible for setting the gas depletion time in galaxies. This result is in contrast with recent work indicating that a star formation law that depends on galaxy metallicity—as is expected with photoelectric heating, but not with supernovae—reproduces the present-day galaxy population better than does a metallicity-independent one. Here we report a series of simulations of dwarf galaxies, the class of galaxy in which the effects of both photoelectric heating and supernovae are expected to be strongest. We simultaneously include space- and time-dependent photoelectric heating in our simulations, and we resolve the energy-conserving phase of every supernova blast wave, which allows us to directly measure the relative importance of feedback by supernovae and photoelectric heating in suppressing star formation. We find that supernovae are unable to account for the observed large gas depletion times in dwarf galaxies. Instead, photoelectric heating is the dominant means by which dwarf galaxies regulate their star formation rate at any given time, suppressing the rate by more than an order of magnitude relative to simulations with only supernovae.

  14. Suppression of star formation in dwarf galaxies by photoelectric grain heating feedback.

    PubMed

    Forbes, John C; Krumholz, Mark R; Goldbaum, Nathan J; Dekel, Avishai

    2016-07-28

    Photoelectric heating--heating of dust grains by far-ultraviolet photons--has long been recognized as the primary source of heating for the neutral interstellar medium. Simulations of spiral galaxies have shown some indication that photoelectric heating could suppress star formation; however, simulations that include photoelectric heating have typically shown that it has little effect on the rate of star formation in either spiral galaxies or dwarf galaxies, which suggests that supernovae are responsible for setting the gas depletion time in galaxies. This result is in contrast with recent work indicating that a star formation law that depends on galaxy metallicity--as is expected with photoelectric heating,but not with supernovae--reproduces the present-day galaxy population better than does a metallicity-independent one. Here we report a series of simulations of dwarf galaxies, the class of galaxy in which the effects of both photoelectric heating and supernovae are expected to be strongest. We simultaneously include space and time-dependent photoelectric heating in our simulations, and we resolve the energy-conserving phase of every supernova blast wave, which allows us to directly measure the relative importance of feedback by supernovae and photoelectric heating in suppressing star formation. We find that supernovae are unable to account for the observed large gas depletion times in dwarf galaxies. Instead, photoelectric heating is the dominant means by which dwarf galaxies regulate their star formation rate at any given time,suppressing the rate by more than an order of magnitude relative to simulations with only supernovae.

  15. Suppression of star formation in dwarf galaxies by photoelectric grain heating feedback.

    PubMed

    Forbes, John C; Krumholz, Mark R; Goldbaum, Nathan J; Dekel, Avishai

    2016-07-28

    Photoelectric heating--heating of dust grains by far-ultraviolet photons--has long been recognized as the primary source of heating for the neutral interstellar medium. Simulations of spiral galaxies have shown some indication that photoelectric heating could suppress star formation; however, simulations that include photoelectric heating have typically shown that it has little effect on the rate of star formation in either spiral galaxies or dwarf galaxies, which suggests that supernovae are responsible for setting the gas depletion time in galaxies. This result is in contrast with recent work indicating that a star formation law that depends on galaxy metallicity--as is expected with photoelectric heating,but not with supernovae--reproduces the present-day galaxy population better than does a metallicity-independent one. Here we report a series of simulations of dwarf galaxies, the class of galaxy in which the effects of both photoelectric heating and supernovae are expected to be strongest. We simultaneously include space and time-dependent photoelectric heating in our simulations, and we resolve the energy-conserving phase of every supernova blast wave, which allows us to directly measure the relative importance of feedback by supernovae and photoelectric heating in suppressing star formation. We find that supernovae are unable to account for the observed large gas depletion times in dwarf galaxies. Instead, photoelectric heating is the dominant means by which dwarf galaxies regulate their star formation rate at any given time,suppressing the rate by more than an order of magnitude relative to simulations with only supernovae. PMID:27350244

  16. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT IN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Cannon, John M.; Holtzman, Jon

    2012-06-01

    Using star formation histories derived from optically resolved stellar populations in 19 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we measure the stellar mass surface densities of stars newly formed in the bursts. By assuming a star formation efficiency (SFE), we then calculate the inferred gas surface densities present at the onset of the starbursts. Assuming an SFE of 1%, as is often assumed in normal star-forming galaxies, and assuming that the gas was purely atomic, translates to very high H I surface densities ({approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}), which are much higher than have been observed in dwarf galaxies. This implies either higher values of SFE in these dwarf starburst galaxies or the presence of significant amounts of H{sub 2} in dwarfs (or both). Raising the assumed SFEs to 10% or greater (in line with observations of more massive starbursts associated with merging galaxies), still results in H I surface densities higher than observed in 10 galaxies. Thus, these observations appear to require that a significant fraction of the gas in these dwarf starbursts galaxies was in the molecular form at the onset of the bursts. Our results imply molecular gas column densities in the range 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} for the sample. In the galaxies where CO observations have been made, these densities correspond to values of the CO-H{sub 2} conversion factor (X{sub CO}) in the range >(3-80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, or up to 40 Multiplication-Sign greater than Galactic X{sub CO} values.

  17. DRIVERS OF H I TURBULENCE IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stilp, Adrienne M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Skillman, Evan; Warren, Steven R.; Ott, Juergen; Koribalski, Baerbel

    2013-08-20

    Neutral hydrogen (H I) velocity dispersions are believed to be set by turbulence in the interstellar medium (ISM). Although turbulence is widely believed to be driven by star formation, recent studies have shown that this driving mechanism may not be dominant in regions of low star formation surface density ({Sigma}{sub SFR}), such those as found in dwarf galaxies or the outer regions of spirals. We have generated average H I line profiles in a number of nearby dwarfs and low-mass spirals by co-adding H I spectra in subregions with either a common radius or {Sigma}{sub SFR}. We find that the individual spatially resolved ''superprofiles'' are composed of a central narrow peak ({approx}5-15 km s{sup -1}) with higher velocity wings to either side, similar to their global counterparts as calculated for the galaxy as a whole. Under the assumption that the central peak reflects the H I turbulent velocity dispersion, we compare measures of H I kinematics determined from the superprofiles to local ISM properties, including surface mass densities and measures of star formation. The shape of the wings of the superprofiles do not show any correlation with local ISM properties, which indicates that they may be an intrinsic feature of H I line-of-sight spectra. On the other hand, the H I velocity dispersion is correlated most strongly with baryonic and H I surface mass density, which points toward a gravitational origin for turbulence, but it is unclear which, if any, gravitational instabilities are able to operate efficiently in these systems. Star formation energy is typically produced at a level sufficient to drive H I turbulent motions at realistic coupling efficiencies in regimes where {Sigma}{sub SFR} {approx}> 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, as is typically found in inner spiral disks. At low star formation intensities, on the other hand, star formation cannot supply enough energy to drive the observed turbulence, nor does it uniquely determine the

  18. Using Dwarf Spheroidal Satellites as Probes of Galaxy Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Abrar; Guhathakurta, P.; Gilbert, K. M.; Beaton, R. L.; Tollerud, E. J.; SPLASH Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    We present a Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic study of fifteen dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of the Andromeda galaxy. Our aim is to understand the properties of both the dSphs and Andromeda. Previously, detailed spectroscopic studies were carried out on six of these dSphs using smaller data sets, and limited spectroscopic studies were carried out on the remaining nine. The data sets analyzed in this research include more stars and higher quality data than those of previous studies. In order to accurately study the dSphs, we have developed a method that uses the stars’ velocities, metallicities, and projected distances from the center of each dSph to separate members from non-members of the dSphs. The resulting samples are expected to have a low fraction of contamination by non-members, which makes this method critical for all future studies of Andromeda dSphs. We calculate the mean radial velocities and velocity dispersions of the dSphs, and the new dSph velocity measurements are used to estimate Andromeda's dynamical mass. This mass estimate is more accurate than previous ones because it uses more dynamical tracers. The dSph-based mass estimate is corroborated by a different mass estimate based on the kinematics of Andromeda's field halo stars. This is the first time the mass of Andromeda has been calculated using its halo stars. Future steps will include calculating the dark matter content of the dSphs and comparing their chemical abundances to those of Andromeda's halo, which is made up of former dSphs. This research was supported by the Science Internship Program (SIP) at UCSC and the National Science Foundation.

  19. Antlia B: A Faint Dwarf Galaxy Member of the NGC 3109 Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, D. J.; Spekkens, K.; Crnojević, D.; Hargis, J. R.; Willman, B.; Strader, J.; Grillmair, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report the discovery of Antlia B, a faint dwarf galaxy at a projected distance of ˜72 kpc from NGC 3109 ({M}V ˜ -15 {mag}), the primary galaxy of the NGC 3109 dwarf association at the edge of the Local Group. The tip of the red giant branch distance to Antlia B is D = 1.29 ± 0.10 Mpc, which is consistent with the distance to NGC 3109. A qualitative analysis indicates the new dwarf's stellar population has both an old, metal-poor red giant branch (≳ 10 {{Gyr}}, [Fe/H] ˜ -2), and a younger blue population with an age of ˜200-400 Myr, analogous to the original Antlia dwarf, another likely satellite of NGC 3109. Antlia B has H i gas at a velocity of {v}{helio,{{H}} {{I}}} = 376 km s-1, confirming the association with NGC 3109 (vhelio = 403 km s-1). The H i gas mass (MH i = 2.8 ± 0.2 × 105 {M}⊙ ), stellar luminosity (MV = -9.7 ± 0.6 mag) and half light radius (rh = 273 ± 29 pc) are all consistent with the properties of dwarf irregular and dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Volume, and is most similar to the Leo P dwarf galaxy. The discovery of Antlia B is the initial result from a Dark Energy Camera survey for halo substructure and faint dwarf companions to NGC 3109 with the goal of comparing observed substructure with expectations from the Λ+Cold Dark Matter model in the sub-Milky Way regime.

  20. Deep near-infrared surface photometry and properties of Local Volume dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, T.; Jerjen, H.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Koribalski, B. S.

    2014-11-01

    We present deep H-band surface photometry and analysis of 40 Local Volume galaxies, a sample primarily composed of dwarf irregulars in the Cen A group, obtained using the Infrared Imager and Spectrograph 2 detector at the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope. We probe to a surface brightness of ˜25 mag arcsec-2, reaching a 40 times lower stellar density than the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Employing extremely careful and rigorous cleaning techniques to remove contaminating sources, we perform surface photometry on 33 detected galaxies deriving the observed total magnitude, effective surface brightness and best-fitting Sérsic parameters. We make image quality and surface photometry comparisons to 2MASS and VISTA Hemisphere Survey demonstrating that deep targeted surveys are still the most reliable means of obtaining accurate surface photometry. We investigate the B - H colours with respect to mass for Local Volume galaxies, finding that the colours of dwarf irregulars are significantly varied, eliminating the possibility of using optical-near-infrared colour transformations to facilitate comparison to the more widely available optical data sets. The structure-luminosity relationships are investigated for our `clean' sample of dwarf irregulars. We demonstrate that a significant fraction of the Local Volume dwarf irregular population have underlying structural properties similar to both Local Volume and Virgo cluster dwarf ellipticals. Linear regressions to structure-luminosity relationships for the Local Volume galaxies and Virgo cluster dwarf ellipticals show significant differences in both slope and scatter around the established trend lines, suggesting that environment might regulate the structural scaling relationships of dwarf galaxies in comparison to their more isolated counterparts.

  1. Cores in dwarf galaxies from dark matter with a Yukawa potential.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Abraham; Weiner, Neal

    2011-04-29

    We show that cold dark matter particles interacting through a Yukawa potential could naturally explain the recently observed cores in dwarf galaxies without affecting the dynamics of objects with a much larger velocity dispersion, such as clusters of galaxies. The velocity dependence of the associated cross section as well as the possible exothermic nature of the interaction alleviates earlier concerns about strongly interacting dark matter. Dark matter evaporation in low-mass objects might explain the observed deficit of satellite galaxies in the Milky Way halo and have important implications for the first galaxies and reionization.

  2. ALFALFA Discovery of the Nearby Gas-rich Dwarf Galaxy Leo P. IV. Distance Measurement from LBT Optical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle; Cannon, John M.; Salzer, John J.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Dolphin, Andrew; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Rhode, Katherine L.

    2013-12-01

    Leo P is a low-luminosity dwarf galaxy discovered through the blind H I Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey. The H I and follow-up optical observations have shown that Leo P is a gas-rich dwarf galaxy with both active star formation and an underlying older population, as well as an extremely low oxygen abundance. Here, we measure the distance to Leo P by applying the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) distance method to photometry of the resolved stellar population from new Large Binocular Telescope V and I band imaging. We measure a distance modulus of 26.19^{+0.17}_{-0.50} mag corresponding to a distance of 1.72^{+0.14}_{-0.40} Mpc. Although our photometry reaches 3 mag below the TRGB, the sparseness of the red giant branch yields higher uncertainties on the lower limit of the distance. Leo P is outside the Local Group with a distance and velocity consistent with the local Hubble flow. While located in a very low-density environment, Leo P lies within ~0.5 Mpc of a loose association of dwarf galaxies which include NGC 3109, Antlia, Sextans A, and Sextans B, and 1.1 Mpc away from its next nearest neighbor, Leo A. Leo P is one of the lowest metallicity star-forming galaxies known in the nearby universe, comparable in metallicity to I Zw 18 and DDO 68, but with stellar characteristics similar to dwarf spheriodals (dSphs) in the Local Volume such as Carina, Sextans, and Leo II. Given its physical properties and isolation, Leo P may provide an evolutionary link between gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies and dSphs that have fallen into a Local Group environment and been stripped of their gas. Based on observations made with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Observatory. The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are: The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max

  3. Probing the low surface brightness dwarf galaxy population of the virgo cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. I.; Davies, L. J. M.; Keenan, O. C.

    2016-02-01

    We have used data from the Next Generation Virgo Survey to investigate the dwarf galaxy population of the Virgo cluster. We mask and smooth the data, and then use the object detection algorithm SEXTRACTOR to make our initial dwarf galaxy selection. All candidates are then visually inspected to remove artefacts and duplicates. We derive parameters to best select low surface brightness galaxies using central surface brightness values of 22.5 ≤ μ g0 ≤ 26.0 μg and exponential scale lengths of 3.0 ≤ h ≤ 10.0 arcsec to identify 443 cluster dwarf galaxies - 303 of which are new detections, with a surface density that decreases with radius from the cluster centre. We also apply our selection algorithm to `background', non-cluster, fields and find zero detections. In combination, this leads us to believe that we have isolated a cluster dwarf galaxy population. The range of objects we detect is limited because smaller scale sized galaxies are confused with the background, while larger galaxies are split into numerous smaller objects by the detection algorithm. Combining our data with that from other surveys, we find a faint-end slope to the luminosity function of -1.35 ± 0.03, which is not significantly different to what has previously been found, but is a little steeper than the slope for field galaxies. There is no evidence for a faint-end slope steep enough to correspond with galaxy formation models, unless those models invoke either strong feedback processes or use warm dark matter.

  4. Globular Clusters, Dwarf Galaxies, and the Assembly of the M87 Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Liu, Chengze; Liu, Yiqing

    2016-08-01

    At the center of the nearest galaxy cluster, the Virgo cluster, lies the massive cD galaxy, M87 (NGC 4486). Using data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey, we investigate the relationship between M87, its globular clusters (GCs), and satellite dwarf galaxies. We find that the kinematics of GCs and ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs) are different, indicating that UCDs are not simply massive GCs. We also identify a morphological sequence of envelope fraction around UCDs correlated with cluster-centric distance that suggest UCDs are the result of tidal stripping. Lastly, we find that the [α/Fe] abundance ratios of low-mass early-type galaxies in Virgo exhibit a strong negative gradient within ~ 400 kpc of M87, where the galaxies closest to M87 have the highest values. These satellite galaxies are likely the surviving counterparts of accreted dwarfs that contribute stars to the metal-poor, α-rich stellar halos of massive galaxies. Together, these results describe a dense environment that has had a strong and continuing impact on the evolution of its low-mass neighbors.

  5. The dearth of halo dwarf galaxies: is there power on short scales?

    PubMed

    Kamionkowski; Liddle

    2000-05-15

    N-body simulations of structure formation with scale-invariant primordial perturbations show significantly more virialized objects of dwarf-galaxy mass in a typical galactic halo than are observed around the Milky Way. We show that the dearth of observed dwarf galaxies could be explained by a dramatic downturn in the power spectrum at small distance scales. This suppression of small-scale power might also help mitigate the disagreement between cuspy simulated halos and smooth observed halos, while remaining consistent with Lyman-alpha-forest constraints on small-scale power. Such a spectrum could arise in inflationary models with broken-scale invariance.

  6. The influence of the merger history of dwarf galaxies in a reionized universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, Robbert; Vandenbroucke, Bert; De Rijcke, Sven; Koleva, Mina

    2015-08-01

    In the ΛCDM model, cosmic structure forms in a hierarchical fashion. According to this paradigm, even low-mass dwarf galaxies grow via smooth accretion and mergers. Given the low masses of dwarf galaxies and their even smaller progenitors, the UV background is expected to have a significant influence on their gas content and, consequently, their star formation histories. Generally, cosmological simulations predict that most dwarf systems with circular velocities below ~30 km/s should not be able to form significant amounts of stars or contain gas and be, in effect, "dark" galaxies (Sawala et al. 2013, 2014; Hopkins et al. 2014; Shen et al. 2014). This is in contradiction with the recent discovery of low-mass yet gas-rich dwarf galaxies, such as Leo P (Skillman et al. 2013), Pisces A (Tollerud et al. 2014), and SECCO 1 (Bellazzini et al. 2015). Moreover, Tollerud et al. (2014) point out that most isolated dark-matter halos down to circular velocities of ~15 km/s contain neutral gas, in contradiction with the predictions of current simulations.Based on a suite of simulations of the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies we show that, by reducing the first peak of star formation by including Pop-III stars in the simulations, the resulting dwarf galaxies have severely suppressed SFRs and can hold on to their gas reservoirs. Moreover, we show that the majority of the zero-metallicity stars are ejected during mergers, resulting in an extended, low-metallicity stellar halo. This results in a marked difference between a galaxy's "total" star-formation history and the one read from the stars in the center of the galaxy at z=0. This mechanism leads to the formation of realistic low-mass, gas-rich dwarfs with a broad range of SFHs and which adhere to the observed scaling relations, such as the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation.In short, the simulations presented here are for the first time able to reproduce the observed properties of low-mass, gas-rich dwarfs such as DDO 210

  7. R-process enrichment from a single event in an ancient dwarf galaxy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Alexander P; Frebel, Anna; Chiti, Anirudh; Simon, Joshua D

    2016-03-31

    Elements heavier than zinc are synthesized through the rapid (r) and slow (s) neutron-capture processes. The main site of production of the r-process elements (such as europium) has been debated for nearly 60 years. Initial studies of trends in chemical abundances in old Milky Way halo stars suggested that these elements are produced continually, in sites such as core-collapse supernovae. But evidence from the local Universe favours the idea that r-process production occurs mainly during rare events, such as neutron star mergers. The appearance of a plateau of europium abundance in some dwarf spheroidal galaxies has been suggested as evidence for rare r-process enrichment in the early Universe, but only under the assumption that no gas accretes into those dwarf galaxies; gas accretion favours continual r-process enrichment in these systems. Furthermore, the universal r-process pattern has not been cleanly identified in dwarf spheroidals. The smaller, chemically simpler, and more ancient ultrafaint dwarf galaxies assembled shortly after the first stars formed, and are ideal systems with which to study nucleosynthesis events such as the r-process. Reticulum II is one such galaxy. The abundances of non-neutron-capture elements in this galaxy (and others like it) are similar to those in other old stars. Here, we report that seven of the nine brightest stars in Reticulum II, observed with high-resolution spectroscopy, show strong enhancements in heavy neutron-capture elements, with abundances that follow the universal r-process pattern beyond barium. The enhancement seen in this 'r-process galaxy' is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that detected in any other ultrafaint dwarf galaxy. This implies that a single, rare event produced the r-process material in Reticulum II. The r-process yield and event rate are incompatible with the source being ordinary core-collapse supernovae, but consistent with other possible sources, such as neutron star mergers. PMID

  8. R-process enrichment from a single event in an ancient dwarf galaxy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Alexander P; Frebel, Anna; Chiti, Anirudh; Simon, Joshua D

    2016-03-31

    Elements heavier than zinc are synthesized through the rapid (r) and slow (s) neutron-capture processes. The main site of production of the r-process elements (such as europium) has been debated for nearly 60 years. Initial studies of trends in chemical abundances in old Milky Way halo stars suggested that these elements are produced continually, in sites such as core-collapse supernovae. But evidence from the local Universe favours the idea that r-process production occurs mainly during rare events, such as neutron star mergers. The appearance of a plateau of europium abundance in some dwarf spheroidal galaxies has been suggested as evidence for rare r-process enrichment in the early Universe, but only under the assumption that no gas accretes into those dwarf galaxies; gas accretion favours continual r-process enrichment in these systems. Furthermore, the universal r-process pattern has not been cleanly identified in dwarf spheroidals. The smaller, chemically simpler, and more ancient ultrafaint dwarf galaxies assembled shortly after the first stars formed, and are ideal systems with which to study nucleosynthesis events such as the r-process. Reticulum II is one such galaxy. The abundances of non-neutron-capture elements in this galaxy (and others like it) are similar to those in other old stars. Here, we report that seven of the nine brightest stars in Reticulum II, observed with high-resolution spectroscopy, show strong enhancements in heavy neutron-capture elements, with abundances that follow the universal r-process pattern beyond barium. The enhancement seen in this 'r-process galaxy' is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that detected in any other ultrafaint dwarf galaxy. This implies that a single, rare event produced the r-process material in Reticulum II. The r-process yield and event rate are incompatible with the source being ordinary core-collapse supernovae, but consistent with other possible sources, such as neutron star mergers.

  9. ALFALFA DISCOVERY OF THE NEARBY GAS-RICH DWARF GALAXY LEO P. III. AN EXTREMELY METAL DEFICIENT GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle A.; Olive, Keith A.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W. E-mail: berg@astro.umn.edu E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu; and others

    2013-07-01

    We present KPNO 4 m and LBT/MODS spectroscopic observations of an H II region in the nearby dwarf irregular galaxy Leo P discovered recently in the Arecibo ALFALFA survey. In both observations, we are able to accurately measure the temperature sensitive [O III] {lambda}4363 line and determine a ''direct'' oxygen abundance of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.17 {+-} 0.04. Thus, Leo P is an extremely metal deficient (XMD) galaxy, and, indeed, one of the most metal deficient star-forming galaxies ever observed. For its estimated luminosity, Leo P is consistent with the relationship between luminosity and oxygen abundance seen in nearby dwarf galaxies. Leo P shows normal {alpha} element abundance ratios (Ne/O, S/O, and Ar/O) when compared to other XMD galaxies, but elevated N/O, consistent with the ''delayed release'' hypothesis for N/O abundances. We derive a helium mass fraction of 0.2509{sup +0.0184}{sub -0.0123}, which compares well with the WMAP + BBN prediction of 0.2483 {+-} 0.0002 for the primordial helium abundance. We suggest that surveys of very low mass galaxies compete well with emission line galaxy surveys for finding XMD galaxies. It is possible that XMD galaxies may be divided into two classes: the relatively rare XMD emission line galaxies which are associated with starbursts triggered by infall of low-metallicity gas and the more common, relatively quiescent XMD galaxies like Leo P, with very low chemical abundances due to their intrinsically small masses.

  10. Surface Brightness Profiles of Dwarf Galaxies. II. Color Trends and Mass Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Hunter, Deidre A.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2016-06-01

    In this second paper of a series, we explore the B - V, U - B, and FUV-NUV radial color trends from a multi-wavelength sample of 141 dwarf disk galaxies. Like spirals, dwarf galaxies have three types of radial surface brightness profiles: (I) single exponential throughout the observed extent (the minority), (II) down-bending (the majority), and (III) up-bending. We find that the colors of (1) Type I dwarfs generally become redder with increasing radius, unlike spirals which have a blueing trend that flattens beyond ˜1.5 disk scale lengths, (2) Type II dwarfs come in six different “flavors,” one of which mimics the “U” shape of spirals, and (3) Type III dwarfs have a stretched “S” shape where the central colors are flattish, become steeply redder toward the surface brightness break, then remain roughly constant beyond, which is similar to spiral Type III color profiles, but without the central outward bluing. Faint (-9 > MB > -14) Type II dwarfs tend to have continuously red or “U” shaped colors and steeper color slopes than bright (-14 > MB > -19) Type II dwarfs, which additionally have colors that become bluer or remain constant with increasing radius. Sm dwarfs and BCDs tend to have at least some blue and red radial color trend, respectively. Additionally, we determine stellar surface mass density (Σ) profiles and use them to show that the break in Σ generally remains in Type II dwarfs (unlike Type II spirals) but generally disappears in Type III dwarfs (unlike Type III spirals). Moreover, the break in Σ is strong, intermediate, and weak in faint dwarfs, bright dwarfs, and spirals, respectively, indicating that Σ may straighten with increasing galaxy mass. Finally, the average stellar surface mass density at the surface brightness break is roughly 1-2 M⊙ pc-2 for Type II dwarfs but higher at 5.9 M⊙ pc-2 or 27 M⊙ pc-2 for Type III BCDs and dIms, respectively.

  11. COMPARING THE OBSERVABLE PROPERTIES OF DWARF GALAXIES ON AND OFF THE ANDROMEDA PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rich, R. M.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Chapman, Scott C.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M.; Irwin, Michael J.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2015-01-20

    The thin, extended planes of satellite galaxies detected around both the Milky Way and Andromeda are not a natural prediction of the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm. Galaxies in these distinct planes may have formed and evolved in a different way (e.g., tidally) from their off-plane neighbors. If this were the case, one would expect the on- and off-plane dwarf galaxies in Andromeda to have experienced different evolutionary histories, which should be reflected by the chemistries, dynamics, and star formation histories of the two populations. In this work, we present new, robust kinematic observations for two on-plane M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies (And XVI and XVII) and compile and compare all available observational metrics for the on- and off-plane dwarfs to search for a signal that would corroborate such a hypothesis. We find that, barring their spatial alignment, the on- and off-plane Andromeda dwarf galaxies are indistinguishable from one another, arguing against vastly different formative and evolutionary histories for these two populations.

  12. HOW THE FIRST STARS SHAPED THE FAINTEST GAS-DOMINATED DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, R.; Vandenbroucke, B.; Rijcke, S. De

    2015-12-20

    Low-mass dwarf galaxies are very sensitive test-beds for theories of cosmic structure formation since their weak gravitational fields allow the effects of the relevant physical processes to clearly stand out. Up to now, no unified account has existed of the sometimes seemingly conflicting properties of the faintest isolated dwarfs in and around the Local Group, such as Leo T and the recently discovered Leo P and Pisces A systems. Using new numerical simulations, we show that this serious challenge to our understanding of galaxy formation can be effectively resolved by taking into account the regulating influence of the ultraviolet radiation of the first population of stars on a dwarf’s star formation rate while otherwise staying within the standard cosmological paradigm for structure formation. These simulations produce faint, gas-dominated, star-forming dwarf galaxies that lie on the baryonic Tully–Fisher relation and that successfully reproduce a broad range of chemical, kinematical, and structural observables of real late-type dwarf galaxies. Furthermore, we stress the importance of obtaining properties of simulated galaxies in a manner as close as possible to the typically employed observational techniques.

  13. The remnant of a merger between two dwarf galaxies in Andromeda II.

    PubMed

    Amorisco, N C; Evans, N W; van de Ven, G

    2014-03-20

    Driven by gravity, massive structures like galaxies and clusters of galaxies are believed to grow continuously through hierarchical merging and accretion of smaller systems. Observational evidence of accretion events is provided by the coherent stellar streams crossing the outer haloes of massive galaxies, such as the Milky Way or Andromeda. At similar mass scales, around 10(11) solar masses in stars, further evidence of merging activity is also ample. Mergers of lower-mass galaxies are expected within the hierarchical process of galaxy formation, but have hitherto not been seen for galaxies with less than about 10(9) solar masses in stars. Here we report the kinematic detection of a stellar stream in one of the satellite galaxies of Andromeda, the dwarf spheroidal Andromeda II, which has a mass of only 10(7) solar masses in stars. The properties of the stream show that we are observing the remnant of a merger between two dwarf galaxies. This had a drastic influence on the dynamics of the remnant, which is now rotating around its projected major axis. The stellar stream in Andromeda II illustrates the scale-free character of the formation of galaxies, down to the lowest galactic mass scales.

  14. The remnant of a merger between two dwarf galaxies in Andromeda II.

    PubMed

    Amorisco, N C; Evans, N W; van de Ven, G

    2014-03-20

    Driven by gravity, massive structures like galaxies and clusters of galaxies are believed to grow continuously through hierarchical merging and accretion of smaller systems. Observational evidence of accretion events is provided by the coherent stellar streams crossing the outer haloes of massive galaxies, such as the Milky Way or Andromeda. At similar mass scales, around 10(11) solar masses in stars, further evidence of merging activity is also ample. Mergers of lower-mass galaxies are expected within the hierarchical process of galaxy formation, but have hitherto not been seen for galaxies with less than about 10(9) solar masses in stars. Here we report the kinematic detection of a stellar stream in one of the satellite galaxies of Andromeda, the dwarf spheroidal Andromeda II, which has a mass of only 10(7) solar masses in stars. The properties of the stream show that we are observing the remnant of a merger between two dwarf galaxies. This had a drastic influence on the dynamics of the remnant, which is now rotating around its projected major axis. The stellar stream in Andromeda II illustrates the scale-free character of the formation of galaxies, down to the lowest galactic mass scales. PMID:24572352

  15. Galaxy Populations and Evolution in Clusters IV Deep H 1 Observations of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conselice, Christopher J.; ONeil, Karen; Gallagher, John S.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present deep Arecibo H I and WIYN optical observations of Virgo Cluster dwarf elliptical galaxies. Based on this data we argue that a significant fraction of low-mass galaxies in the Virgo Cluster recently underwent evolution. Our new observations consist of H I 21 cm line observations for 22 classified dE galaxies with optical radial velocities consistent with membership in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster members VCC 390 and VCC 1713 are detected with H 1 masses M H1= 6 x 10 sup 7 and 8 x 10 sup 7 M , respectively, while MH I values in the remaining 20 dE galaxies have upper limits as low as about 5 x 1O sup 5 M. We combine our results with those for 26 other Virgo Cluster dE galaxies with H 1 observations in the literature, seven of which have H I detection claims.

  16. The frequency and properties of young tidal dwarf galaxies in nearby gas-rich groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Waddell, K.; Spekkens, K.; Chandra, P.; Patra, N.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Wang, J.; Haynes, M. P.; Cannon, J.; Stierwalt, S.; Sick, J.; Giovanelli, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present high-resolution Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) H I observations and deep Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) optical imaging of two galaxy groups: NGC 4725/47 and NGC 3166/9. These data are part of a multi-wavelength unbiased survey of the gas-rich dwarf galaxy populations in three nearby interacting galaxy groups. The NGC 4725/47 group hosts two tidal knots and one dwarf irregular galaxy (dIrr). Both tidal knots are located within a prominent H I tidal tail, appear to have sufficient mass (Mgas ≈ 108 M⊙) to evolve into long-lived tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) and are fairly young in age. The NGC 3166/9 group contains a TDG candidate, AGC 208457, at least three dIrrs and four H I knots. Deep CFHT imaging confirms that the optical component of AGC 208457 is bluer - with a 0.28 mag g - r colour - and a few Gyr younger than its purported parent galaxies. Combining the results for these groups with those from the NGC 871/6/7 group reported earlier, we find that the H I properties, estimated stellar ages and baryonic content of the gas-rich dwarfs clearly distinguish tidal features from their classical counterparts. We optimistically identify four potentially long-lived tidal objects associated with three separate pairs of interacting galaxies, implying that TDGs are not readily produced during interaction events as suggested by some recent simulations. The tidal objects examined in this survey also appear to have a wider variety of properties than TDGs of similar mass formed in current simulations of interacting galaxies, which could be the result of pre- or post-formation environmental influences.

  17. GHOSTS I: A new faint very isolated dwarf galaxy at D = 12 ± 2 Mpc

    SciTech Connect

    Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; Radburn-Smith, David J.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; De Jong, Roelof S.; Streich, David; Vlajić, Marija; Bailin, Jeremy; Holwerda, Benne W.; Alyson Ford, H.; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2014-01-10

    We report the discovery of a new faint dwarf galaxy, GHOSTS I, using HST/ACS data from one of our GHOSTS (Galaxy Halos, Outer disks, Substructure, Thick disk, and Star clusters) fields. Its detected individual stars populate an approximately 1 mag range of its luminosity function (LF). Using synthetic color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) to compare with the galaxy's CMD, we find that the colors and magnitudes of GHOSTS I's individual stars are most consistent with being young helium-burning and asymptotic giant branch stars at a distance of ∼12 ± 2 Mpc. Morphologically, GHOSTS I appears to be actively forming stars, so we tentatively classify it as a dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxy, although future Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations deep enough to resolve a larger magnitude range in its LF are required to make a more secure classification. GHOSTS I's absolute magnitude is M{sub V}∼−9.85{sub −0.33}{sup +0.40}, making it one of the least luminous dIrr galaxies known, and its metallicity is lower than [Fe/H] = –1.5 dex. The half-light radius of GHOSTS I is 226 ± 38 pc and its ellipticity is 0.47 ± 0.07, similar to Milky Way and M31 dwarf satellites at comparable luminosity. There are no luminous massive galaxies or galaxy clusters within ∼4 Mpc from GHOSTS I that could be considered as its host, making it a very isolated dwarf galaxy in the local universe.

  18. HST Imaging of the Local Volume Dwarf Galaxies Pisces A and B: Prototypes for Local Group Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C.; Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary E.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2016-08-01

    We present observations of the Pisces A and B galaxies with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. Photometry from these images clearly resolves a red giant branch (RGB) for both objects, demonstrating that they are nearby dwarf galaxies. We describe a Bayesian inferential approach to determining the distance to these galaxies using the magnitude of the tip of the RGB, and then apply this approach to these galaxies. This reveals the distance to these galaxies as {5.64}-0.15+0.13 {{Mpc}} and {8.89}-0.85+0.75 {{Mpc}} for Pisces A and B, respectively, placing both within the Local Volume but not the Local Group (LG). We estimate the star formation histories of these galaxies, which suggests that they have recently undergone an increase in their star formation rates. Together these yield luminosities for Pisces A and B of {M}V=-{11.57}-0.05+0.06 and -12.9 ± 0.2, respectively, and estimated stellar masses of {log}({M}* /{M}⊙ )={7.0}-1.7+0.4 and {7.5}-1.8+0.3. We further show that these galaxies are likely at the boundary between nearby voids and higher-density filamentary structure. This suggests that they are entering a higher-density region from voids, where they would have experienced delayed evolution, consistent with their recent increased star formation rates. If this is indeed the case, they are useful for study as proxies of the galaxies that later evolved into typical LG satellite galaxies.

  19. HOW TO MAKE AN ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY: TIDAL STIRRING OF DISKY DWARFS WITH SHALLOW DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Lokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mayer, Lucio E-mail: stelios@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2012-05-20

    In recent years the Sloan Digital Sky Survey has unraveled a new population of ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) whose origin remains a puzzle in the vicinity of the Milky Way (MW). Using a suite of collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate the formation of UFDs in the context of the tidal stirring model for the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group (LG). Our simulations are designed to reproduce the tidal interactions between MW-sized host galaxies and rotationally supported dwarfs embedded in 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} dark matter (DM) halos. We explore a variety of inner density slopes {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -{alpha}} for the dwarf DM halos, ranging from core-like ({alpha} = 0.2) to cuspy ({alpha} = 1), and different dwarf orbital configurations. Our experiments demonstrate that UFDs can be produced via tidal stirring of disky dwarfs on relatively tight orbits, consistent with a redshift of accretion by the host galaxy of z {approx} 1, and with intermediate values for the halo inner density slopes ({rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -0.6}). The inferred slopes are in excellent agreement with those resulting from both the modeling of the rotation curves of dwarf galaxies and recent cosmological simulations of dwarf galaxy formation. Comparing the properties of observed UFDs with those of their simulated counterparts, we find remarkable similarities in terms of basic observational parameters. We conclude that tidal stirring of rotationally supported dwarfs represents a viable mechanism for the formation of UFDs in the LG environment.

  20. A UNIVERSAL MASS PROFILE FOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Matthew G.; Penarrubia, Jorge; Evans, N. Wyn; Gilmore, Gerard; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2009-10-20

    We apply the Jeans equation to estimate masses for eight of the brightest dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. For Fornax, the dSph with the largest kinematic data set, we obtain a model-independent constraint on the maximum circular velocity, V {sub max} = 20{sup +4} {sub -3} km s{sup -1}. Although we obtain only lower limits of V {sub max} approx> 10 km s{sup -1} for the remaining dSphs, we find that in all cases the enclosed mass at the projected half-light radius is well constrained and robust to a wide range of halo models and velocity anisotropies. We derive a simple analytic formula that estimates M(r {sub half}) accurately with respect to results from the full Jeans analysis. Applying this formula to the entire population of Local Group dSphs with published kinematic data, we demonstrate a correlation such that M(r {sub half}) propor to r {sup 1.4+}-{sup 0.4} {sub half}, or in terms of the mean density interior to the half-light radius, (rho) propor to r {sup -1.6+}-{sup 0.4} {sub half}. This relation is driven by the fact that the dSph data exhibit a correlation between global velocity dispersion and half-light radius. We argue that tidal forces are unlikely to have introduced this relation, but tides may have increased the scatter and/or altered the slope. While the data are well described by mass profiles ranging over a factor of approx<2 in normalization (V {sub max} approx 10-20 km s{sup -1}), we consider the hypothesis that all dSphs are embedded within a 'universal' dark matter halo. We show that in addition to the power law M propor to r {sup 1.4}, viable candidates include a cuspy 'Navarro-Frenk-White' halo with V {sub max} approx 15 km s{sup -1} and scale radius r {sub 0} approx 800 pc, as well as a cored halo with V {sub max} approx 13 km s{sup -1} and r {sub 0} approx 150 pc. Finally, assuming that their measured velocity dispersions accurately reflect their masses, the smallest dSphs now allow us to resolve dSph densities at radii as small as a

  1. Photometry of the globular cluster system of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibata, Rodrigo

    1996-07-01

    We propose to use the WFPC2 to obtain deep V {F555W} and I {F814W} band images of the globular clusters of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy: M54 {NGC 6715}, Ter 7, Ter 8 and Arp 2. Isochrone fits to these data will yield the accurate ages of M54, Ter 8 and the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy {Sgr}. These age estimates are needed to model the dynamics and evolution of the Sgr system and its interaction with the Milky Way. Sgr is in the final stages of tidal disruption {Velazquez & White 1995}, so its globular clusters will drift away from their parent galaxy and soon disperse into the Galactic halo. Therefore at least some of the globular clusters of giant spiral galaxies like the Milky Way will have been captured from tidally destroyed dwarf galaxies. This statement has fundamental and wide ranging implications for the formation and evolution of globular clusters and spiral galaxies. It is therefore essential to conduct a detailed and accurate comparative study of the stellar populations of the Sgr and Galactic globular clusters, as we propose here. This, in turn, will allow detailed modeling of the chemical and dynamical evolution of Sgr and its globular clusters.

  2. R-process enrichment from a single event in an ancient dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Alexander P.; Frebel, Anna; Chiti, Anirudh; Simon, Joshua D.

    2016-03-01

    Elements heavier than zinc are synthesized through the rapid (r) and slow (s) neutron-capture processes. The main site of production of the r-process elements (such as europium) has been debated for nearly 60 years. Initial studies of trends in chemical abundances in old Milky Way halo stars suggested that these elements are produced continually, in sites such as core-collapse supernovae. But evidence from the local Universe favours the idea that r-process production occurs mainly during rare events, such as neutron star mergers. The appearance of a plateau of europium abundance in some dwarf spheroidal galaxies has been suggested as evidence for rare r-process enrichment in the early Universe, but only under the assumption that no gas accretes into those dwarf galaxies; gas accretion favours continual r-process enrichment in these systems. Furthermore, the universal r-process pattern has not been cleanly identified in dwarf spheroidals. The smaller, chemically simpler, and more ancient ultrafaint dwarf galaxies assembled shortly after the first stars formed, and are ideal systems with which to study nucleosynthesis events such as the r-process. Reticulum II is one such galaxy. The abundances of non-neutron-capture elements in this galaxy (and others like it) are similar to those in other old stars. Here, we report that seven of the nine brightest stars in Reticulum II, observed with high-resolution spectroscopy, show strong enhancements in heavy neutron-capture elements, with abundances that follow the universal r-process pattern beyond barium. The enhancement seen in this ‘r-process galaxy’ is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that detected in any other ultrafaint dwarf galaxy. This implies that a single, rare event produced the r-process material in Reticulum II. The r-process yield and event rate are incompatible with the source being ordinary core-collapse supernovae, but consistent with other possible sources, such as neutron star mergers.

  3. The G-dwarf problem in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caimmi, R.

    2008-07-01

    This paper has two parts: one about observational constraints, and the other about chemical evolution models. In the first part, the empirical differential metallicity distribution (EDMD) is deduced from three different samples involving (i) local thick disk stars derived from Gliese and scaled in situ samples within the range, -1.20⩽[Fe/H]⩽-0.20 [Wyse, R.F.G., Gilmore, G., 1995. AJ 110, 2771]; (ii) 46 likely metal-weak thick disk stars within the range, -2.20⩽[Fe/H]⩽-1.00 [Chiba, M., Beers, T.C., 2000. AJ 119, 2843]; (iii) 287 chemically selected G dwarfs within 25 pc from the Sun, with the corrections performed in order to take into account the stellar scale height [Rocha-Pinto, H.J., Maciel, W.J., 1996. MNRAS 279, 447]; in addition to previous results [Caimmi, R., 2001b. AN 322, 241; Caimmi, R., 2007. NewA 12, 289] related to (iv) 372 solar neighbourhood halo subdwarfs [Ryan, S.G., Norris, J.E., 1991. AJ 101, 1865]; and (v) 268 K-giant bulge stars [Sadler, E.M., Rich, R.M., Terndrup, D.M., 1996. AJ 112, 171]. The metal-poor and metal-rich EDMD related to the thick disk shows similarities with their halo and bulge counterparts, respectively. Then the thick disk is conceived as made of two distinct regions: the halo-like and the bulge-like thick disk, and the related EDMD is deduced. Under the assumption that each distribution is typical for the corresponding subsystem, the EDMD of the thick disk, the thick + thin disk, and the Galaxy, is determined by weighting the mass. In the second part, models of chemical evolution for the halo-like thick disk, the bulge-like thick disk, and the thin disk, are computed assuming the instantaneous recycling approximation. The EDMD data are fitted, to an acceptable extent, by simple models of chemical evolution implying both homogeneous and inhomogeneous star formation, provided that star formation is inhibited during thick disk formation, with respect to the thin disk. The initial mass function (IMF) is assumed to be a

  4. Testing Modified Newtonian Dynamics with Rotation Curves of Dwarf and Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaters, R. A.; Sanders, R. H.; McGaugh, S. S.

    2010-07-01

    Dwarf and low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are ideal objects to test modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND), because in most of these galaxies the accelerations fall below the threshold where MOND supposedly applies. We have selected from the literature a sample of 27 dwarf and LSB galaxies. MOND is successful in explaining the general shape of the observed rotation curves for roughly three quarters of the galaxies in the sample presented here. However, for the remaining quarter, MOND does not adequately explain the observed rotation curves. Considering the uncertainties in distances and inclinations for the galaxies in our sample, a small fraction of poor MOND predictions is expected and is not necessarily a problem for MOND. We have also made fits taking the MOND acceleration constant, a 0, as a free parameter in order to identify any systematic trends. We find that there appears to be a correlation between central surface brightness and the best-fit value of a 0, in the sense that lower surface brightness galaxies tend to have lower a 0. However, this correlation depends strongly on a small number of galaxies whose rotation curves might be uncertain due to either bars or warps. Without these galaxies, there is less evidence of a trend, but the average value we find for a 0 ≈ 0.7 × 10-8 cm s-2 is somewhat lower than derived from previous studies. Such lower fitted values of a 0 could occur if external gravitational fields are important.

  5. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. X. QUANTIFYING THE STAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCY OF NEARBY DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Seth, Anil C.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Weisz, Daniel R.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2012-06-01

    We study the relationship between the field star formation and cluster formation properties in a large sample of nearby dwarf galaxies. We use optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope and from ground-based telescopes to derive the ages and masses of the young (t{sub age} {approx}< 100 Myr) cluster sample. Our data provide the first constraints on two proposed relationships between the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies and the properties of their cluster systems in the low SFR regime. The data show broad agreement with these relationships, but significant galaxy-to-galaxy scatter exists. In part, this scatter can be accounted for by simulating the small number of clusters detected from stochastically sampling the cluster mass function. However, this stochasticity does not fully account for the observed scatter in our data, suggesting that there may be true variations in the fraction of stars formed in clusters in dwarf galaxies. Comparison of the cluster formation and the brightest cluster in our sample galaxies also provide constraints on cluster destruction models.

  6. Stellar kinematics and dark matter in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Giuseppina

    2016-08-01

    In this review I will discuss the current status on determinations of the dark matter content and distribution in Milky Way dwarf spheroidals, for which the available data-sets allow the application of sophisticated mass modeling techniques.

  7. Analysis of Ultra-Compact Dwarf Galaxies in the Antlia cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caso, J. P.; Bassino, L. P.; Smith Castelli, A. V.

    As a continuation of the search for ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) in the central region of the Antlia cluster, a new selection of these object is presented, as well as a comparison between their colour distributions and those of globular cluster candidates. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  8. Neutral Hydrogen Clouds Near Early-Type Dwarf Galaxies of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Antoine; Carignan, Claude; Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2006-06-01

    Parkes neutral hydrogen 21 cm line (H I) observations of the surroundings of nine early-type Local Group dwarfs are presented. We detected numerous H I clouds in the general direction of those dwarfs, and these clouds are often offset from the optical center of the galaxies. Although all the observed dwarfs, except Antlia, occupy phase-space regions where the high-velocity cloud (HVC) density is well above average, the measured offsets are smaller than one would expect from a fully random cloud distribution. Possible association is detected for 11 of the 16 investigated clouds, while for two galaxies, Sextans and Leo I, no H I was detected. The galaxies in which H I clouds were found not to coincide with the optical yet have a significant probability of being associated are the Sculptor dwarf, Tucana, LGS 3, Cetus, and Fornax. If the clouds are indeed associated, these galaxies have H I masses of MHI=2×105, 2×106, 7×105, 7×105, and 1×105 Msolar, respectively. However, neither ram pressure nor tidal stripping can easily explain the offsets. In some cases, large offsets are found where ram pressure should be the least effective.

  9. A supermassive black hole in an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy.

    PubMed

    Seth, Anil C; van den Bosch, Remco; Mieske, Steffen; Baumgardt, Holger; den Brok, Mark; Strader, Jay; Neumayer, Nadine; Chilingarian, Igor; Hilker, Michael; McDermid, Richard; Spitler, Lee; Brodie, Jean; Frank, Matthias J; Walsh, Jonelle L

    2014-09-18

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies are among the densest stellar systems in the Universe. These systems have masses of up to 2 × 10(8) solar masses, but half-light radii of just 3-50 parsecs. Dynamical mass estimates show that many such dwarfs are more massive than expected from their luminosity. It remains unclear whether these high dynamical mass estimates arise because of the presence of supermassive black holes or result from a non-standard stellar initial mass function that causes the average stellar mass to be higher than expected. Here we report adaptive optics kinematic data of the ultra-compact dwarf galaxy M60-UCD1 that show a central velocity dispersion peak exceeding 100 kilometres per second and modest rotation. Dynamical modelling of these data reveals the presence of a supermassive black hole with a mass of 2.1 × 10(7) solar masses. This is 15 per cent of the object's total mass. The high black hole mass and mass fraction suggest that M60-UCD1 is the stripped nucleus of a galaxy. Our analysis also shows that M60-UCD1's stellar mass is consistent with its luminosity, implying a large population of previously unrecognized supermassive black holes in other ultra-compact dwarf galaxies.

  10. A supermassive black hole in an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy.

    PubMed

    Seth, Anil C; van den Bosch, Remco; Mieske, Steffen; Baumgardt, Holger; den Brok, Mark; Strader, Jay; Neumayer, Nadine; Chilingarian, Igor; Hilker, Michael; McDermid, Richard; Spitler, Lee; Brodie, Jean; Frank, Matthias J; Walsh, Jonelle L

    2014-09-18

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies are among the densest stellar systems in the Universe. These systems have masses of up to 2 × 10(8) solar masses, but half-light radii of just 3-50 parsecs. Dynamical mass estimates show that many such dwarfs are more massive than expected from their luminosity. It remains unclear whether these high dynamical mass estimates arise because of the presence of supermassive black holes or result from a non-standard stellar initial mass function that causes the average stellar mass to be higher than expected. Here we report adaptive optics kinematic data of the ultra-compact dwarf galaxy M60-UCD1 that show a central velocity dispersion peak exceeding 100 kilometres per second and modest rotation. Dynamical modelling of these data reveals the presence of a supermassive black hole with a mass of 2.1 × 10(7) solar masses. This is 15 per cent of the object's total mass. The high black hole mass and mass fraction suggest that M60-UCD1 is the stripped nucleus of a galaxy. Our analysis also shows that M60-UCD1's stellar mass is consistent with its luminosity, implying a large population of previously unrecognized supermassive black holes in other ultra-compact dwarf galaxies. PMID:25230660

  11. Beacons in the Dark: Using Novae and Supernovae to Detect Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Charlie; Bullock, James S.

    2015-05-01

    We propose that luminous transients, including novae and supernovae (SNe), can be used to detect the faintest galaxies in the universe. Beyond a few megaparsecs, dwarf galaxies with stellar masses ≲ {{10}6} {{M}⊙ } will likely be too faint and/or too low in surface brightness to be directly detected in upcoming large area ground-based photometric surveys. However, single-epoch Large Synoptic Survey Telescope photometry will be able to detect novae to distances of ˜30 Mpc and SNe to gigaparsec-scale distances. Depending on the form of the stellar mass-halo mass relation and the underlying star formation histories of low-mass dwarfs, the expected nova rates will be a few to ˜100 yr-1 and the expected SN rates (including both type Ia and core-collapse) will be ˜ {{10}2}-{{10}4} within the observable (4π sr) volume. The transient rate associated with intrahalo stars will be comparably large, but these transients will be located close to bright galaxies, in contrast to the dwarfs, which should trace the underlying large-scale structure of the cosmic web. Aggressive follow-up of hostless transients has the potential to uncover the predicted enormous population of low-mass field dwarf galaxies.

  12. A Radio Continuum Study of Dwarf Galaxies: 6 cm imaging of LITTLE THINGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchener, Ben; Brinks, Elias; Heesen, Volker; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Zhang, Hongxin; Rau, Urvashi; Rupen, Michael P.; Little Things Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    To bypass uncertainties introduced by extinction caused by dust at optical wavelengths, we examine to what extent the radio continuum can probe star formation (SF) in dwarf galaxies. We provide VLA 6-cm C-array (4 to 8 GHz) radio continuum images with integrated flux densities for 40 dwarf galaxies taken from LITTLE THINGS. We find 27 harbor significant emission coincident with SF tracers; 17 are new detections. We infer the average thermal fraction to be 39 +- 25%. The LITTLE THINGS galaxies follow the Condon radio continuum - star formation rate (SFR) relation down to an SFR of 0.1 Msol/yr. At lower rates they follow a power-law characterized by a slope of 1.2 +- 0.1 with a scatter of 0.2 dex . We interpret this as an underproduction of the non-thermal radio continuum component. When considering the non-thermal radio continuum to star formation rate slope on its own, we find the slope to be 1.2. The magnetic field strength we find is typically 9.4 +- 3.8 muG in and around star forming regions which is similar to that in spiral galaxies. In a few dwarfs, the magnetic field strength can reach as high as 30 muG in localized 100 pc star forming regions. The underproduction of non-thermal radio continuum is likely due to the escape of Cosmic Ray electrons from the galaxy. The LITTLE THINGS galaxies are consistent with the radio continuum - far infrared luminosity relation. We observe a power-law slope of 1.06 +- 0.08 with a scatter of 0.24 dex which suggests that the 'conspiracy' of the radio continuum - far infrared relation continues to hold even for dwarf galaxies.

  13. A Candidate Massive Black Hole in the Low-metallicity Dwarf Galaxy Pair Mrk 709

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Plotkin, Richard M.; Russell, Thomas D.; Mezcua, Mar; Condon, James J.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.

    2014-06-01

    The incidence and properties of present-day dwarf galaxies hosting massive black holes (BHs) can provide important constraints on the origin of high-redshift BH seeds. Here we present high-resolution X-ray and radio observations of the low-metallicity, star-forming, dwarf-galaxy system Mrk 709 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. These data reveal spatially coincident hard X-ray and radio point sources with luminosities suggesting the presence of an accreting massive BH (M BH ~ 105-7 M ⊙). Based on imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we find that Mrk 709 consists of a pair of compact dwarf galaxies that appear to be interacting with one another. The position of the candidate massive BH is consistent with the optical center of the southern galaxy (Mrk 709 S), while no evidence for an active BH is seen in the northern galaxy (Mrk 709 N). We derive stellar masses of M sstarf ~ 2.5 × 109 M ⊙ and M sstarf ~ 1.1 × 109 M ⊙ for Mrk 709 S and Mrk 709 N, respectively, and present an analysis of the SDSS spectrum of the BH host Mrk 709 S. At a metallicity of just ~10% solar, Mrk 709 is among the most metal-poor galaxies with evidence for an active galactic nucleus. Moreover, this discovery adds to the growing body of evidence that massive BHs can form in dwarf galaxies and that deep, high-resolution X-ray and radio observations are ideally suited to reveal accreting massive BHs hidden at optical wavelengths.

  14. A CANDIDATE MASSIVE BLACK HOLE IN THE LOW-METALLICITY DWARF GALAXY PAIR MRK 709

    SciTech Connect

    Reines, Amy E.; Condon, James J.; Plotkin, Richard M.; Russell, Thomas D.; Mezcua, Mar; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.

    2014-06-01

    The incidence and properties of present-day dwarf galaxies hosting massive black holes (BHs) can provide important constraints on the origin of high-redshift BH seeds. Here we present high-resolution X-ray and radio observations of the low-metallicity, star-forming, dwarf-galaxy system Mrk 709 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. These data reveal spatially coincident hard X-ray and radio point sources with luminosities suggesting the presence of an accreting massive BH (M {sub BH} ∼ 10{sup 5-7} M {sub ☉}). Based on imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we find that Mrk 709 consists of a pair of compact dwarf galaxies that appear to be interacting with one another. The position of the candidate massive BH is consistent with the optical center of the southern galaxy (Mrk 709 S), while no evidence for an active BH is seen in the northern galaxy (Mrk 709 N). We derive stellar masses of M {sub *} ∼ 2.5 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} and M {sub *} ∼ 1.1 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} for Mrk 709 S and Mrk 709 N, respectively, and present an analysis of the SDSS spectrum of the BH host Mrk 709 S. At a metallicity of just ∼10% solar, Mrk 709 is among the most metal-poor galaxies with evidence for an active galactic nucleus. Moreover, this discovery adds to the growing body of evidence that massive BHs can form in dwarf galaxies and that deep, high-resolution X-ray and radio observations are ideally suited to reveal accreting massive BHs hidden at optical wavelengths.

  15. Finding Gas-rich Dwarf Galaxies Betrayed by their Ultraviolet Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Peek, J. E. G.; Putman, Mary; Grcevich, Jana

    2015-08-01

    We present ultraviolet (UV) follow-up of a sample of potential dwarf galaxy candidates selected for their neutral hydrogen (HI) properties, taking advantage of the low UV background seen by the GALEX satellite and its large and publicly available imaging footprint. The HI clouds, which are drawn from published Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array and Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array HI survey compact cloud catalogs, are selected to be galaxy candidates based on their spatial compactness and non-association with known high-velocity cloud complexes or Galactic HI emission. Based on a comparison of their UV characteristics to those of known dwarf galaxies, half (48%) of the compact HI clouds have at least one potential stellar counterpart with UV properties similar to those of nearby dwarf galaxies. If they are galaxies, then the star formation rates, HI masses, and star formation efficiencies of these systems follow the trends seen for much larger galaxies. The presence of UV emission is an efficient method to identify the best targets for spectroscopic follow-up, which is necessary to prove that the stars are associated with compact HI. Furthermore, searches of this nature help to refine the salient HI properties of likely dwarfs (even beyond the Local Group). In particular, HI compact clouds considered to be velocity outliers relative to their neighbor HI clouds have the most significant detection rate of single, appropriate UV counterparts. Correcting for the sky coverage of the two all-Arecibo sky surveys yielding the compact HI clouds, these results may imply the presence of potentially hundreds of new tiny galaxies across the entire sky.

  16. Tidal Interactions at the Edge of the Local Group: New Evidence for Tidal Features in the Antlia Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Samantha J.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Grützbauch, Ruth; Floyd, David J. E.

    2012-10-01

    Using deep B-band imaging down to ~μ B = 26 mag arcsec-2, we present evidence for tidal tails in the Antlia Dwarf galaxy, one of the most distant members of the Local Group. This elongation is in the direction of Antlia's nearest neighbor, the Magellanic-type NGC 3109. The tail is offset by <10° from a vector linking the centers of the two galaxies, indicative of interactions between the pair. Combined with the warped disk previously identified in NGC 3109, Antlia and NGC 3109 must be at a small separation for tidal features to be present in Antlia. We calculate that Antlia cannot be completely disrupted by NGC 3109 in a single interaction unless its orbit pericenter is <6 kpc; however, multiple interactions could significantly alter its morphology. Therefore despite being located right at the edge of the Local Group, environmental effects are playing an important role in Antlia's evolution.

  17. TIDAL INTERACTIONS AT THE EDGE OF THE LOCAL GROUP: NEW EVIDENCE FOR TIDAL FEATURES IN THE ANTLIA DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Penny, Samantha J.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Floyd, David J. E.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Gruetzbauch, Ruth

    2012-10-20

    Using deep B-band imaging down to {approx}{mu}{sub B} = 26 mag arcsec{sup -2}, we present evidence for tidal tails in the Antlia Dwarf galaxy, one of the most distant members of the Local Group. This elongation is in the direction of Antlia's nearest neighbor, the Magellanic-type NGC 3109. The tail is offset by <10 Degree-Sign from a vector linking the centers of the two galaxies, indicative of interactions between the pair. Combined with the warped disk previously identified in NGC 3109, Antlia and NGC 3109 must be at a small separation for tidal features to be present in Antlia. We calculate that Antlia cannot be completely disrupted by NGC 3109 in a single interaction unless its orbit pericenter is <6 kpc; however, multiple interactions could significantly alter its morphology. Therefore despite being located right at the edge of the Local Group, environmental effects are playing an important role in Antlia's evolution.

  18. THE NATURE OF STARBURSTS. II. THE DURATION OF STARBURSTS IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Stark, David; Weisz, Daniel; Cannon, John M.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Williams, Benjamin; Dolphin, Andrew; Hidalgo-RodrIguez, Sebastian

    2010-11-20

    The starburst phenomenon can shape the evolution of the host galaxy and the surrounding intergalactic medium. The extent of the evolutionary impact is partly determined by the duration of the starburst, which has a direct correlation with both the amount of stellar feedback and the development of galactic winds, particularly for smaller mass dwarf systems. We measure the duration of starbursts in twenty nearby, ongoing, and 'fossil' starbursts in dwarf galaxies based on the recent star formation histories derived from resolved stellar population data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. Contrary to the shorter times of 3-10 Myr often cited, the starburst durations we measure range from 450to650 Myr in fifteen of the dwarf galaxies and up to 1.3 Gyr in four galaxies; these longer durations are comparable to or longer than the dynamical timescales for each system. The same feedback from massive stars that may quench the flickering star formation does not disrupt the overall burst event in our sample of galaxies. While five galaxies present fossil bursts, fifteen galaxies show ongoing bursts and thus the final durations may be longer than we report here for these systems. One galaxy shows a burst that has been ongoing for only 20 Myr; we are likely seeing the beginning of a burst event in this system. Using the duration of the starbursts, we calculate that the bursts deposited 10{sup 53.9}-10{sup 57.2} erg of energy into the interstellar medium through stellar winds and supernovae, and produced 3%-26% of the host galaxy's mass.

  19. The Nature of Starbursts. II. The Duration of Starbursts in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Cannon, John M.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Dolphin, Andrew; Hidalgo-Rodríguez, Sebastian; Holtzman, Jon; Stark, David; Weisz, Daniel; Williams, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    The starburst phenomenon can shape the evolution of the host galaxy and the surrounding intergalactic medium. The extent of the evolutionary impact is partly determined by the duration of the starburst, which has a direct correlation with both the amount of stellar feedback and the development of galactic winds, particularly for smaller mass dwarf systems. We measure the duration of starbursts in twenty nearby, ongoing, and "fossil" starbursts in dwarf galaxies based on the recent star formation histories derived from resolved stellar population data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. Contrary to the shorter times of 3-10 Myr often cited, the starburst durations we measure range from 450to650 Myr in fifteen of the dwarf galaxies and up to 1.3 Gyr in four galaxies; these longer durations are comparable to or longer than the dynamical timescales for each system. The same feedback from massive stars that may quench the flickering star formation does not disrupt the overall burst event in our sample of galaxies. While five galaxies present fossil bursts, fifteen galaxies show ongoing bursts and thus the final durations may be longer than we report here for these systems. One galaxy shows a burst that has been ongoing for only 20 Myr we are likely seeing the beginning of a burst event in this system. Using the duration of the starbursts, we calculate that the bursts deposited 1053.9-1057.2 erg of energy into the interstellar medium through stellar winds and supernovae, and produced 3%-26% of the host galaxy's mass. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  20. The same with less: The cosmic web of warm versus cold dark matter dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Darren; Schneider, Aurel; Smith, Robert E.; Stadel, Joachim; Moore, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We explore fundamental properties of the distribution of low mass dark matter halos within the cosmic web using warm dark matter (WDM) and cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological simulations. Using self abundance-matched mock galaxy catalogs, we show that the distribution of dwarf galaxies in a WDM universe wherein low mass halo formation is heavily suppressed, is nearly indistinguishable to that of a CDM universe whose low mass halos are not seen because galaxy formation is suppressed below some threshold halo mass. However, if the scatter between dwarf galaxy luminosity and halo properties is large enough, low mass CDM halos would sometimes host relatively bright galaxies thereby populating CDM voids with the occasional isolated galaxyand reducing the numbers of completely empty voids. Otherwise, without high mass to light scatter, all mock galaxy clustering statistics that we consider-the auto-correlation function, the numbers and radial profiles of satellites, the numbers of isolated galaxies, and the PDF of small voids-are nearly identical in CDM and WDM. WDM voids are neither larger nor emptier than CDM voids, when constructed from abundance- matched halo catalogs. It is thus a challenge to determine whether the CDM problem of the over-abundance of small halos with respect to the number density of observed dwarf galaxies has a cosmological solution or an astrophysical solution. However, some clues about the dark matter particle and the scatter between the properties of dwarfgalaxies and their dark matter halo hosts might be found in the cosmic web of galaxies in future surveys of the local volume.

  1. Molecular gas and star formation in the tidal dwarf galaxy VCC 2062

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenfeld, U.; Braine, J.; Duc, P. A.; Boquien, M.; Brinks, E.; Bournaud, F.; Lelli, F.; Charmandaris, V.

    2016-05-01

    The physical mechanisms driving star formation (SF) in galaxies are still not fully understood. Tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs), made of gas ejected during galaxy interactions, seem to be devoid of dark matter and have a near-solar metallicity. The latter makes it possible to study molecular gas and its link to SF using standard tracers (CO, dust) in a peculiar environment. We present a detailed study of a nearby TDG in the Virgo Cluster, VCC 2062, using new high-resolution CO(1-0) data from the Plateau de Bure, deep optical imaging from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), and complementary multiwavelength data. Until now, there was some doubt whether VCC 2062 was a true TDG, but the new deep optical images from the NGVS reveal a stellar bridge between VCC 2062 and its parent galaxy, NGC 4694, which is clear proof of its tidal origin. Several high-resolution tracers (Hα, UV, 8 μm, and 24 μm) of the star formation rate (SFR) are compared to the molecular gas distribution as traced by the CO(1-0). Coupled with the SFR tracers, the NGVS data are used with the CIGALE code to model the stellar populations throughout VCC 2062, yielding a declining SFR in the recent past, consistent with the low Hα/UV ratio, and a high burst strength. HI emission covers VCC 2062, whereas the CO is concentrated near the HI maxima. The CO peaks correspond to two very distinct regions: one with moderate SF to the NE and one with only slightly weaker CO emission but with nearly no SF. Even where SF is clearly present, the SFR is below the value expected from the surface density of the molecular and the total gas as compared to spiral galaxies and other TDGs. After discussing different possible explanations, we conclude that the low surface brightness is a crucial parameter to understand the low SFR. The reduced data cubes are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A92

  2. The Baryon Cycle of Dwarf Galaxies: Dark, Bursty, Gas-rich Polluters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Sijing; Madau, Piero; Conroy, Charlie; Governato, Fabio; Mayer, Lucio

    2014-09-01

    We present results from a fully cosmological, very high-resolution, ΛCDM simulation of a group of seven field dwarf galaxies with present-day virial masses in the range M vir = 4.4 × 108-3.6 × 1010 M ⊙. The simulation includes a blastwave scheme for supernova feedback, a star-formation recipe based on a high gas density threshold, metal-dependent radiative cooling, a scheme for the turbulent diffusion of metals and thermal energy, and a uniform UV background. The properties of the simulated dwarfs are strongly modulated by the depth of the gravitational potential well. All three halos with M vir < 109 M ⊙ are devoid of stars, as they never reach the density threshold for star formation of 100 atoms cm-3. The other four, M vir > 109 M ⊙ dwarfs have blue colors, low star-formation efficiencies, high cold gas-to-stellar mass ratios, and low stellar metallicities. Their bursty star-formation histories are characterized by peak specific star-formation rates in excess of 50-100 Gyr-1, far outside the realm of normal, more massive galaxies. The median stellar age of the simulated galaxies decreases with decreasing halo mass, with the two M vir ~= 2-3 × 109 M ⊙ dwarfs being predominantly young, and the two more massive systems hosting intermediate and older populations. The cosmologically young dwarfs are lit up by tidal interactions, have compact morphologies, and have metallicities and cold gas fractions similar to the relatively quiescent, extremely metal-deficient dwarf population. Metal-enriched galactic outflows produce sub-solar effective yields and pollute with heavy elements a megaparsec-size region of the intergalactic medium, but are not sufficient to completely quench star-formation activity and are absent in the faintest dwarfs.

  3. The baryon cycle of dwarf galaxies: dark, bursty, gas-rich polluters

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Sijing; Madau, Piero; Conroy, Charlie; Governato, Fabio; Mayer, Lucio

    2014-09-10

    We present results from a fully cosmological, very high-resolution, ΛCDM simulation of a group of seven field dwarf galaxies with present-day virial masses in the range M {sub vir} = 4.4 × 10{sup 8}-3.6 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. The simulation includes a blastwave scheme for supernova feedback, a star-formation recipe based on a high gas density threshold, metal-dependent radiative cooling, a scheme for the turbulent diffusion of metals and thermal energy, and a uniform UV background. The properties of the simulated dwarfs are strongly modulated by the depth of the gravitational potential well. All three halos with M {sub vir} < 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} are devoid of stars, as they never reach the density threshold for star formation of 100 atoms cm{sup –3}. The other four, M {sub vir} > 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} dwarfs have blue colors, low star-formation efficiencies, high cold gas-to-stellar mass ratios, and low stellar metallicities. Their bursty star-formation histories are characterized by peak specific star-formation rates in excess of 50-100 Gyr{sup –1}, far outside the realm of normal, more massive galaxies. The median stellar age of the simulated galaxies decreases with decreasing halo mass, with the two M {sub vir} ≅ 2-3 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} dwarfs being predominantly young, and the two more massive systems hosting intermediate and older populations. The cosmologically young dwarfs are lit up by tidal interactions, have compact morphologies, and have metallicities and cold gas fractions similar to the relatively quiescent, extremely metal-deficient dwarf population. Metal-enriched galactic outflows produce sub-solar effective yields and pollute with heavy elements a megaparsec-size region of the intergalactic medium, but are not sufficient to completely quench star-formation activity and are absent in the faintest dwarfs.

  4. Simulations of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy Collision with the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Jeannette; Snyder, Bart; Rusthoven, Mary; The, Lih-Sin; Hartmann, Dieter

    2007-11-01

    The Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy is one of the satellite galaxies interacting with the Milky Way. Discovered to be located just below the galactic center; this galaxy is currently being tidally disrupted as it approaches the Milky Way disk. We performed a series of N-body/SPH simulations of the interaction between Sagittarius and the Milky Way over a 1 Gyr time period leading up to today's position. These simulations include an updated Milky Way model, gas and star formation. We highlight the creation of the tidal tails and compare them to the known tidal structures we observe today.

  5. Simulating the Interactions of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy and the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusthoven, Mary; Myers, Jeannette; Snyder, Bart; The, Lih-Sin; Hartmann, Dieter

    2007-11-01

    The Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy is one of the satellite galaxies interacting with the Milky Way. Discovered to be located just below the galactic center; this galaxy is currently being tidally disrupted as it approaches the Milky Way disk. We performed a series of four N-body simulations of the interaction between Sagittarius and the Milky Way over a 1 Gyr time period leading up to today's position. Two of the simulations were designed to test the initial conditions used for the Milky Way model. The other two simulations were designed to test what happens when the Milky Way is treated as a static system with only the Sagittarius system evolving with time.

  6. Predicting the Velocity Dispersions of the Dwarf Satellite Galaxies of Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.

    2016-05-01

    Dwarf Spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group are the faintest and most diffuse stellar systems known. They exhibit large mass discrepancies, making them popular laboratories for studying the missing mass problem. The PANDAS survey of M31 revealed dozens of new examples of such dwarfs. As these systems were discovered, it was possible to use the observed photometric properties to predict their stellar velocity dispersions with the modified gravity theory MOND. These predictions, made in advance of the observations, have since been largely confirmed. A unique feature of MOND is that a structurally identical dwarf will behave differently when it is or is not subject to the external field of a massive host like Andromeda. The role of this "external field effect" is critical in correctly predicting the velocity dispersions of dwarfs that deviate from empirical scaling relations. With continued improvement in the observational data, these systems could provide a test of the strong equivalence principle.

  7. Astrophysical tests of modified gravity: the morphology and kinematics of dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, Vinu; Cabré, Anna; Jain, Bhuvnesh; VanderPlas, J.T. E-mail: annanusca@gmail.com E-mail: jakevdp@cs.washington.edu

    2013-08-01

    This paper is the third in a series on tests of gravity using observations of stars and nearby dwarf galaxies. We carry out four distinct tests using published data on the kinematics and morphology of dwarf galaxies, motivated by the theoretical work of Hui et al. (2009) and Jain and Vanderplas (2011). In a wide class of gravity theories a scalar field couples to matter and provides an attractive fifth force. Due to their different self-gravity, stars and gas may respond differently to the scalar force leading to several observable deviations from standard gravity. HI gas, red giant stars and main sequence stars can be displaced relative to each other, and the stellar disk can display warps or asymmetric rotation curves aligned with external potential gradients. To distinguish the effects of modified gravity from standard astrophysical phenomena, we use a control sample of galaxies that are expected to be screened from the fifth force. In all cases we find no significant deviation from the null hypothesis of general relativity. The limits obtained from dwarf galaxies are not yet competitive with the limits from cepheids obtained in our first paper, but can be improved to probe regions of parameter space that are inaccessible using other tests. We discuss how our methodology can be applied to new radio and optical observations of nearby galaxies.

  8. Dynamics of starbursting dwarf galaxies. III. A H I study of 18 nearby objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Federico; Verheijen, Marc; Fraternali, Filippo

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of starbursting dwarf galaxies, using both new and archival H I observations. We consider 18 nearby galaxies that have been resolved into single stars by HST observations, providing their star formation history and total stellar mass. We find that 9 objects have a regularly rotating H I disk, 7 have a kinematically disturbed H I disk, and 2 show unsettled H I distributions. Two galaxies (NGC 5253 and UGC 6456) show a velocity gradient along the minor axis of the H I disk, which we interpret as strong radial motions. For galaxies with a regularly rotating disk we derive rotation curves, while for galaxies with a kinematically disturbed disk, we estimate the rotation velocities in their outer parts. We derive baryonic fractions within about 3 optical scale lengths and find that, on average, baryons constitute at least 30% of the total mass. Despite the star formation having injected ~1056 ergs in the ISM in the past ~500 Myr, these starbursting dwarfs have both baryonic and gas fractions similar to those of typical dwarf irregulars, suggesting that they did not eject a large amount of gas out of their potential wells. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgH I datacubes (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/566/A71

  9. INTERGALACTIC GAS IN GROUPS OF GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL FORMATION AND THE MISSING BARYONS PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect

    Freeland, E.; Wilcots, E. E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu

    2011-09-10

    Radio galaxies with bent jets are predominantly located in groups and clusters of galaxies. We use bent-double radio sources, under the assumption that their jets are bent by ram pressure, to probe intragroup medium (IGM) gas densities in galaxy groups. This method provides a direct measurement of the intergalactic gas density and allows us to probe intergalactic gas at large radii and in systems whose IGM is too cool to be detected by the current generation of X-ray telescopes. We find gas with densities of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} at group radii from 15 to 700 kpc. A rough estimate of the total baryonic mass in intergalactic gas is consistent with the missing baryons being located in the IGM of galaxy groups. The neutral gas will be easily stripped from dwarf galaxies with total masses of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M{sub sun} in the groups studied here. Indications are that intragroup gas densities in less-massive systems like the Local Group should be high enough to strip gas from dwarfs like Leo T and, in combination with tides, produce dwarf spheroidals.

  10. The Most Massive Ultra-compact Dwarf Galaxy in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengze; Peng, Eric W.; Toloba, Elisa; Mihos, J. Christopher; Ferrarese, Laura; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Côté, Patrick; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Cunningham, Emily C.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gwyn, Stephen; Herczeg, Gregory; Lim, Sungsoon; Puzia, Thomas H.; Roediger, Joel; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén; Yin, Jun

    2015-10-01

    We report on the properties of the most massive ultra-compact dwarf galaxy (UCD) in the nearby Virgo Cluster of galaxies using imaging from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey and spectroscopy from Keck/DEIMOS. This object (M59-UCD3) appears to be associated with the massive Virgo galaxy M59 (NGC 4621), has an integrated velocity dispersion of 78 {km} {{{s}}}-1, a dynamical mass of 3.7× {10}8{M}⊙ , and an effective radius (Re) of 25 pc. With an effective surface mass density of 9.4× {10}10{M}⊙ {{kpc}}-2, it is the densest galaxy in the local universe discovered to date, surpassing the density of the luminous Virgo UCD, M60-UCD1. M59-UCD3 has a total luminosity of {M}{g\\prime }=-14.2 mag, and a spectral energy distribution consistent with an old (14 Gyr) stellar population with [Fe/H] = 0.0 and [α /{Fe}]=+0.2. We also examine deep imaging around M59 and find a broad low surface brightness stream pointing toward M59-UCD3, which may represent a tidal remnant of the UCD progenitor. This UCD, along with similar objects like M60-UCD1 and M59cO, likely represents an extreme population of tidally stripped galaxies more akin to larger and more massive compact early-type galaxies than to nuclear star clusters in present-day dwarf galaxies.

  11. The fate of heavy elements in dwarf galaxies - the role of mass and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recchi, S.; Hensler, G.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Energetic feedback from supernovae and stellar winds can drive galactic winds. Dwarf galaxies, due to their shallower potential wells, are assumed to be more vulnerable to this phenomenon. Metal loss through galactic winds is also commonly invoked to explain the low metal content of dwarf galaxies. Aims: Our main aim in this paper is to show that galactic mass cannot be the only parameter determining the fraction of metals lost by a galaxy. In particular, the distribution of gas must play an equally important role. Methods: We performed 2D chemo-dynamical simulations of galaxies characterized by different gas distributions, masses, and gas fractions. Results: The gas distribution can change the fraction of lost metals through galactic winds by up to one order of magnitude. In particular, disk-like galaxies tend to lose metals more easily than roundish ones. Consequently, the final metallicities attained by models with the same mass but with different gas distributions can also vary by up to one dex. Confirming previous studies, we also show that the fate of gas and freshly produced metals strongly depends on the mass of the galaxy. Smaller galaxies (with shallower potential wells) more easily develop large-scale outflows, so that the fraction of lost metals tends to be higher.

  12. The Most Massive Ultra-compact Dwarf Galaxy in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengze; Peng, Eric W.; Toloba, Elisa; Mihos, J. Christopher; Ferrarese, Laura; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Côté, Patrick; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Cunningham, Emily C.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gwyn, Stephen; Herczeg, Gregory; Lim, Sungsoon; Puzia, Thomas H.; Roediger, Joel; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén; Yin, Jun

    2015-10-01

    We report on the properties of the most massive ultra-compact dwarf galaxy (UCD) in the nearby Virgo Cluster of galaxies using imaging from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey and spectroscopy from Keck/DEIMOS. This object (M59-UCD3) appears to be associated with the massive Virgo galaxy M59 (NGC 4621), has an integrated velocity dispersion of 78 {km} {{{s}}}-1, a dynamical mass of 3.7× {10}8{M}ȯ , and an effective radius (Re) of 25 pc. With an effective surface mass density of 9.4× {10}10{M}ȯ {{kpc}}-2, it is the densest galaxy in the local universe discovered to date, surpassing the density of the luminous Virgo UCD, M60-UCD1. M59-UCD3 has a total luminosity of {M}{g\\prime }=-14.2 mag, and a spectral energy distribution consistent with an old (14 Gyr) stellar population with [Fe/H] = 0.0 and [α /{Fe}]=+0.2. We also examine deep imaging around M59 and find a broad low surface brightness stream pointing toward M59-UCD3, which may represent a tidal remnant of the UCD progenitor. This UCD, along with similar objects like M60-UCD1 and M59cO, likely represents an extreme population of tidally stripped galaxies more akin to larger and more massive compact early-type galaxies than to nuclear star clusters in present-day dwarf galaxies.

  13. THE SMALL ISOLATED GAS-RICH IRREGULAR DWARF (SIGRID) GALAXY SAMPLE: DESCRIPTION AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Jerjen, Helmut; Meurer, Gerhardt R.

    2011-09-15

    Using an optically unbiased selection process based on the HIPASS neutral hydrogen survey, we have selected a sample of 83 spatially isolated, gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the southern hemisphere with cz between 350 and 1650 km s{sup -1}, and with R-band luminosities and H I masses less than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. The sample is an important population of dwarf galaxies in the local universe, all with ongoing star formation, and most of which have no existing spectroscopic data. We are measuring the chemical abundances of these galaxies, using the integral-field spectrograph on the Australian National University 2.3 m telescope, the Wide-Field Spectrograph. This paper describes our survey criteria and procedures, lists the survey sample, and reports on initial observations.

  14. A low pre-infall mass for the Carina dwarf galaxy from disequilibrium modelling

    PubMed Central

    Ural, Uğur; Wilkinson, Mark I.; Read, Justin I.; Walker, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter-only simulations of galaxy formation predict many more subhalos around a Milky Way-like galaxy than the number of observed satellites. Proposed solutions require the satellites to inhabit dark matter halos with masses 109–1010 Msun at the time they fell into the Milky Way. Here we use a modelling approach, independent of cosmological simulations, to obtain a pre-infall mass of Msun for one of the Milky Way's satellites: Carina. This determination of a low halo mass for Carina can be accommodated within the standard model only if galaxy formation becomes stochastic in halos below ∼1010 Msun. Otherwise Carina, the eighth most luminous Milky Way dwarf, would be expected to inhabit a significantly more massive halo. The implication of this is that a population of ‘dark dwarfs' should orbit the Milky Way: halos devoid of stars and yet more massive than many of their visible counterparts. PMID:26133650

  15. Metallicity Distribution Functions of Dwarf Galaxies: A Probe of Star Formation History and Baryonic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escala, Ivanna; Kirby, Evan N.; Wetzel, Andrew R.; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2016-06-01

    We examine the metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) of simulated, isolated dwarf galaxies (M_{star} = 4 × 10^{4} - 3 × 10^{8} M_{⊙}) from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project to quantify the impact of star formation history (SFH) and baryonic physics. These high-resolution cosmological simulations include realistic treatments of stellar evolution and complex gas dynamics and do not require the usual approximations (e.g., instantaneous recycling and instantaneous mixing) of analytic chemical evolution models. The evolution of the MDF with redshift informs which processes drive the dominant contributions to the distribution at z = 0, thus enabling a reconstruction of the SFH and gas loss/accretion history. We then compare the theoretical MDFs to the observed MDFs of Local Group dwarf galaxies to infer plausible SFHs for each matched galaxy.

  16. How the first stars shaped the faintest gas-dominated dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, Robbert; Vandenbroucke, Bert; de Rijcke, Sven

    2016-08-01

    Cosmological simulations predict that dark matter halos with circular velocities lower than 30 km/s should have lost most of their neutral gas by heating of the ultra-violet background. This is in stark contrast with gas-rich galaxies such as e.g. Leo T, Leo P and Pisces A, which all have circular velocities of ~15 km/s (Ryan-Weber et al. 2008, Bernstein-Cooper et al. 2014, Tollerud et al. 2015). We show that when we include feedback from the first stars into our models, simulated dwarfs have very different properties at redshift 0 than when this form of feedback is not included. Including this Population-III feedback leads to galaxies that lie on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation over the entire mass range of star forming dwarf galaxies, as well as reproducing a broad range of other observational properties.

  17. Escape fraction of ionizing photons from a dwarf galaxy NGC 4214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yumi; Fouesneau, Morgan; Gordon, Karl D.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Weisz, Daniel R.; Arab, Heddy; Sandstrom, Karin; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that starburst dwarf galaxies played an important role in the early universe. Because these galaxies dominate by number, their leaked ionizing photons are likely main contributors to the reionization of the intergalactic medium (IGM). However, the complex structure of the interstellar medium (ISM) even at the pc scale makes it hard to predict the escape fraction of ionizing photons from high-redshift galaxies accurately. Analogues to their high-redshift counterparts, nearby starburst dwarf galaxies provide excellent laboratories to study the impact of star formation on the surrounding ISM and IGM in detail. Thanks to its proximity, the dwarf galaxy, NGC 4214, has been imaged with the high-resolution of WFC3 on HST from the near-UV to the near-IR (F225W, F336W, F438W, F814W, F110W, and F160W). These observations yielded measurements of the broad spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for ˜36,000 resolved stars within this galaxy. We developed a probabilistic tool (Bayesian Extinction and Stellar Tool, a.k.a. BEAST) to simultaneously infer from their SEDs the stellar properties of individual stars and the intervening dust properties along the line of sight to each star. With the aid of BEAST, we are able to infer the intrinsic ionizing flux produced by individual stars. By comparing this intrinsic ionizing flux with the flux that is used to ionize the ISM in the galaxy, derived based on the extinction-corrected Hα emission, we can estimate the escape fraction and its local variation within the galaxy. Our preliminary results show that the global UV leakage of NGC 4214 is ˜10%.

  18. Extreme Emission Line Galaxies in CANDELS: Broad-Band Selected, Star-Bursting Dwarf Galaxies at Z greater than 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWel, A.; Straughn, A. N.; Rix, H.-W.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Weiner, B. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, J. R.; Koo, D. C.; Ferguson, H. C.; Scarlata, C.; Hathi, N. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Newman, J. A.; Dickinson, M.; Jahnke, K.; Salmon, B. W.; deMello, D. F.; Kkocevski, D. D.; Lai, K.; Grogin, N. A.; Rodney, S. A.; Guo, Yicheng

    2012-01-01

    We identify an abundant population of extreme emission line galaxies (EELGs) at redshift z approx. 1.7 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging from Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). 69 EELG candidates are selected by the large contribution of exceptionally bright emission lines to their near-infrared broad-band magnitudes. Supported by spectroscopic confirmation of strong [OIII] emission lines . with rest-frame equivalent widths approx. 1000A in the four candidates that have HST/WFC3 grism observations, we conclude that these objects are galaxies with approx.10(exp 8) Solar Mass in stellar mass, undergoing an enormous starburst phase with M*/M* of only approx. 15 Myr. These bursts may cause outflows that are strong enough to produce cored dark matter profiles in low-mass galaxies. The individual star formation rates and the co-moving number density (3.7x10(exp -4) Mpc(sup -3) can produce in approx.4 Gyr much of the stellar mass density that is presently contained in 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 9) Solar Mass dwarf galaxies. Therefore, our observations provide a strong indication that many or even most of the stars in present-day dwarf galaxies formed in strong, short-lived bursts, mostly at z > 1.

  19. Young tidal dwarf galaxies around the gas-rich disturbed lenticular NGC 5291

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, P.-A.; Mirabel, I. F.

    1998-05-01

    NGC 5291 is an early type galaxy at the edge of the cluster Abell 3574 which drew the attention because of the unusual high amount of atomic gas ( ~ 5 x 10(10) {M_{\\odot}}) found associated to it. The HI is distributed along a huge and fragmented ring, possibly formed after a tidal interaction with a companion galaxy. We present multi-slit optical spectroscopic observations and optical/near-infrared images of the system. We show that NGC 5291 is a LINER galaxy exhibiting several remnants of previous merging events, in particular a curved dust lane and a counter-rotation of the gas with respect to the stars. The atomic hydrogen has undoubtly an external origin and was probably accreted by the galaxy from a gas-rich object in the cluster. It is unlikely that the HI comes from the closest companion of NGC 5291, the so-called ``Seashell'' galaxy, which appears to be a fly-by object at a velocity greater than 400 km s(-1) . We have analyzed the properties of 11 optical counterparts to the clumps observed in the HI ring. The brightest knots show strong similarities with classical blue compact dwarf galaxies. They are dominated by active star forming regions; their most recent starburst is younger than 5 Myr; we did not find evidences for the presence of an old underlying stellar population. NGC 5291 appears to be a maternity of extremely young objects most probably forming their first generation of stars. Born in pre-enriched gas clouds, these recycled galaxies have an oxygen abundance which is higher than BCDGs ({Z_{\\odot}}/3 on average) and which departs from the luminosity-metallicity relation observed for typical dwarf and giant galaxies. We propose this property as a tool to identify tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) among the dwarf galaxy population. Several TDGs in NGC 5291 exhibit strong velocity gradients in their ionized gas and may already be dynamically independent galaxies. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile

  20. Understanding the shape and diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves in ΛCDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. I.; Iorio, G.; Agertz, O.; Fraternali, F.

    2016-11-01

    The shape and diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves is at apparent odds with dark matter halos in a Λ Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) cosmology. We use mock data from isolated dwarf galaxy simulations to show that this owes to three main effects. Firstly, stellar feedback heats dark matter, leading to a `CORENFW' dark matter density profile with a slowly rising rotation curve. Secondly, if close to a recent starburst, large H I bubbles push the rotation curve out of equilibrium, deforming the rotation curve shape. Thirdly, when galaxies are viewed near face-on, their best fit inclination is biased high. This can lead to a very shallow rotation curve that falsely implies a large dark matter core. All three problems can be avoided, however, by a combination of improved mass models and a careful selection of target galaxies. Fitting our CORENFW model to mock rotation curve data, we show that we can recover the rotation curve shape, dark matter halo mass M200 and concentration parameter c within our quoted uncertainties. We fit our CORENFW model to real data for four isolated dwarf irregulars, chosen to span a wide range of rotation curve shapes. We obtain an excellent fit for NGC 6822 and WLM, with tight constraints on M200, and c consistent with ΛCDM. However, IC 1613 and DDO 101 give a poor fit. For IC 1613, we show that this owes to disequilibria and its uncertain inclination i; for DDO 101, it owes to its uncertain distance D. If we assume iIC1613 ˜ 15° and DDDO101 ˜ 12 Mpc, consistent with current uncertainties, we are able to fit both galaxies very well. We conclude that ΛCDM appears to give an excellent match to dwarf galaxy rotation curves.

  1. Northern dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies. IV - The large-scale space distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, Trinh X.; Alimi, Jean-Michel; Gott, J. Richard, III; Schneider, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported from a statistical analysis of published observational data on a sample of 860 northern dwarf and low-surface-brightness (D/LSB) galaxies with delta = 0 deg or greater and b between -40 and 40 deg, selected from the Uppsala General Catalogue of Galaxies (Nilson et al., 1973). The results are presented in extensive redshift/space maps, histograms, graphs and tables and characterized in detail. It is shown that the distribution of D/LSB galaxies closely resembles that of bright galaxies, apparently ruling out biased-star-formation models predicting a uniform distribution of D/LSBs. Although bright galaxies outside clusters are somewhat more clustered than the H I-rich D/LSBs, the latters' pairwise peculiar velocity (460 + or - 50 km/sec) is similar to that of the former.

  2. PAndAS' CUBS: Discovery of Two New Dwarf Galaxies in the Surroundings of the Andromeda and Triangulum Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Irwin, Mike; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Dubinski, John; Babul, Arif; Chapman, Scott; Fardal, Mark; Lewis, Geraint F.; Navarro, Julio; Rich, R. Michael

    2009-11-01

    We present the discovery of two new dwarf galaxies, Andromeda XXI and Andromeda XXII, located in the surroundings of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies (M31 and M33). These discoveries stem from the first year data of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey, a photometric survey of the M31/M33 group conducted with the Megaprime/MegaCam Wide-Field Camera mounted on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Both satellites appear as spatial overdensities of stars which, when plotted in a color-magnitude diagram, follow metal-poor, [Fe/H] = -1.8, red giant branches at the distance of M31/M33. Andromeda XXI is a moderately bright dwarf galaxy (MV = -9.9 ± 0.6), albeit with low surface brightness, emphasizing again that many relatively luminous M31 satellites still remain to be discovered. It is also a large satellite, with a half-light radius close to 1 kpc, making it the fourth largest Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy after the recently discovered Andromeda XIX, Andromeda II, and Sagittarius around the Milky Way, and supports the trend that M31 satellites are larger than their Milky Way counterparts. Andromeda XXII is much fainter (MV = -6.5 ± 0.8) and lies a lot closer in projection to M33 than it does to M31 (42 versus 224 kpc), suggesting that it could be the first Triangulum satellite to be discovered. Although this is a very exciting possibility in the context of a past interaction of M33 with M31 and the fate of its satellite system, a confirmation will have to await a good distance estimate to confirm its physical proximity to M33. Along with the dwarf galaxies found in previous surveys of the M31 surroundings, these two new satellites bring the number of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in this region to 20. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institute National des Sciences de l'Univers of

  3. REVERSAL OF FORTUNE: INCREASED STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCIES IN THE EARLY HISTORIES OF DWARF GALAXIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Madau, Piero; Weisz, Daniel R.; Conroy, Charlie

    2014-08-01

    On dwarf galaxy scales, the different shapes of the galaxy stellar mass function and the dark halo mass function require a star-formation efficiency (SFE) in these systems that is currently more than 1 dex lower than that of Milky Way-size halos. Here, we argue that this trend may actually be reversed at high redshift. Specifically, by combining the resolved star-formation histories of nearby isolated dwarfs with the simulated mass-growth rates of dark matter halos, we show that the assembly of these systems occurs in two phases: (1) an early, fast halo accretion phase with a rapidly deepening potential well, characterized by a high SFE; and (2) a late, slow halo accretion phase where, perhaps as a consequence of reionization, the SFE is low. Nearby dwarfs have more old stars than predicted by assuming a constant or decreasing SFE with redshift, a behavior that appears to deviate qualitatively from the trends seen among more massive systems. Taken at face value, the data suggest that at sufficiently early epochs, dwarf galaxy halos above the atomic cooling mass limit can be among the most efficient sites of star formation in the universe.

  4. On The gamma-ray emission from Reticulum II and other dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim E-mail: trlinden@uchicago.edu

    2015-09-01

    The recent discovery of ten new dwarf galaxy candidates by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) could increase the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope's sensitivity to annihilating dark matter particles, potentially enabling a definitive test of the dark matter interpretation of the long-standing Galactic Center gamma-ray excess. In this paper, we compare the previous analyses of Fermi data from the directions of the new dwarf candidates (including the relatively nearby Reticulum II) and perform our own analysis, with the goal of establishing the statistical significance of any gamma-ray signal from these sources. We confirm the presence of an excess from Reticulum II, with a spectral shape that is compatible with the Galactic Center signal. The significance of this emission is greater than that observed from 99.84% of randomly chosen high-latitude blank-sky locations, corresponding to a local detection significance of 3.2σ. We caution that any dark matter interpretation of this excess must be validated through observations of additional dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and improved calculations of the relative J-factor of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We improve upon the standard blank-sky calibration approach through the use of multi-wavelength catalogs, which allow us to avoid regions that are likely to contain unresolved gamma-ray sources.

  5. The Celestial Buffet: multiple populations and globular cluster formation in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Aaron J.; Wadsley, James; Couchman, H. M. P.; Sills, Alison

    2014-04-01

    We present a framework that explains the commonly observed variation in light element abundances in globular clusters. If globular clusters form in the centres of dwarf galaxies, they will be pumped on to larger orbits as star formation progresses. The potential well will only retain the moderate velocity asymptotic giant branch (AGB) ejecta, the expected source of enrichment, but not supernova ejecta. There is no need to increase the initial cluster mass, a requirement of self-enrichment scenarios, as all the stars within the dwarf can contribute. As the clusters move through the dwarf centre they sweep up a mix of AGB ejecta and in-falling pristine gas to form a second generation of stars. The specific mix will vary in time and is thus able to explain the spread in second generation abundances observed in different clusters. The globular clusters will survive to the present day or be stripped as part of the hierarchical merging process of larger galaxies. We illustrate how this process may operate using a high-resolution simulation of a dwarf galaxy at high redshift.

  6. A single prolific r-process event preserved in an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Alexander; Frebel, Anna; Chiti, Anirudh; Simon, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    The heaviest elements in the periodic table are synthesized through the r-process, but the astrophysical site for r-process nucleosynthesis is still unknown. Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies contain a simple fossil record of early chemical enrichment that may determine this site. Previous measurements found very low levels of neutron-capture elements in ultra-faint dwarfs, preferring supernovae as the r-process site. I present high-resolution chemical abundances of nine stars in the recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf Reticulum II, which display extremely enhanced r-process abundances 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than the other ultra-faint dwarfs. Stars with such extreme r-process enhancements are only rarely found in the Milky Way halo. The r-process abundances imply that the neutron-capture material in Reticulum II was synthesized in a single prolific event that is incompatible with r-process yields from ordinary core-collapse supernovae. Reticulum II provides an opportunity to discriminate whether the source of this pure r-process signature is a neutron star merger or magnetorotationally driven supernova. The single event is also a uniquely stringent constraint on the metal mixing and star formation history of this ultra-faint dwarf galaxy.

  7. The molecular gas reservoir of 6 low-metallicity galaxies from the Herschel Dwarf Galaxy Survey. A ground-based follow-up survey of CO(1-0), CO(2-1), and CO(3-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, D.; Madden, S. C.; Lebouteiller, V.; Hony, S.; Aalto, S.; Costagliola, F.; Hughes, A.; Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Abel, N.; Bayet, E.; Bigiel, F.; Cannon, J. M.; Cumming, R. J.; Galametz, M.; Galliano, F.; Viti, S.; Wu, R.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Observations of nearby starburst and spiral galaxies have revealed that molecular gas is the driver of star formation. However, some nearby low-metallicity dwarf galaxies are actively forming stars, but CO, the most common tracer of this reservoir, is faint, leaving us with a puzzle about how star formation proceeds in these environments. Aims: We aim to quantify the molecular gas reservoir in a subset of 6 galaxies from the Herschel Dwarf Galaxy Survey with newly acquired CO data and to link this reservoir to the observed star formation activity. Methods: We present CO(1-0), CO(2-1), and CO(3-2) observations obtained at the ATNF Mopra 22-m, APEX, and IRAM 30-m telescopes, as well as [C ii] 157μm and [O i] 63μm observations obtained with the Herschel/PACS spectrometer in the 6 low-metallicity dwarf galaxies: Haro 11, Mrk 1089, Mrk 930, NGC 4861, NGC 625, and UM 311. We derived their molecular gas masses from several methods, including using the CO-to-H2 conversion factor XCO (both Galactic and metallicity-scaled values) and dust measurements. The molecular and atomic gas reservoirs were compared to the star formation activity. We also constrained the physical conditions of the molecular clouds using the non-LTE code RADEX and the spectral synthesis code Cloudy. Results: We detect CO in 5 of the 6 galaxies, including first detections in Haro 11 (Z ~ 0.4 Z⊙), Mrk 930 (0.2 Z⊙), and UM 311 (0.5 Z⊙), but CO remains undetected in NGC 4861 (0.2 Z⊙). The CO luminosities are low, while [C ii] is bright in these galaxies, resulting in [C ii]/CO(1-0) ≥ 10 000. Our dwarf galaxies are in relatively good agreement with the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation for total gas. They show short molecular depletion timescales, even when considering metallicity-scaled XCO factors. Those galaxies are dominated by their H i gas, except Haro 11, which has high star formation efficiency and is dominated by ionized and molecular gas. We determine the mass of each ISM phase in

  8. AN UPPER LIMIT ON THE MASS OF THE BLACK HOLE IN URSA MINOR DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Lora, V.; Sanchez-Salcedo, F. J.; Raga, A. C.; Esquivel, A. E-mail: jsanchez@astroscu.unam.mx E-mail: esquivel@nucleares.unam.mx

    2009-07-10

    The well-established correlations between the mass of massive black holes (BHs) in the nuclei of most studied galaxies and various global properties of their hosting galaxy lend support to the idea that dwarf galaxies and globular clusters could also host a BH in their centers. Direct kinematic detection of BHs in dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies is seriously hindered by the small number of stars inside the gravitational influence region of the BH. The aim of this Letter is to establish an upper dynamical limit on the mass of the putative BH in the Ursa Minor (UMi) dSph galaxy. We present direct N-body simulations of the tidal disruption of the dynamical fossil observed in UMi, with and without a massive BH. We find that the observed substructure is incompatible with the presence of a massive BH of (2-3) x 10{sup 4} M {sub sun} within the core of UMi. These limits are consistent with the extrapolation of the M {sub BH}-{sigma} relation to the M {sub BH} < 10{sup 6} M {sub sun} regime. We also show that the BH may be off-center with respect to the center of symmetry of the whole galaxy.

  9. The universal stellar mass-stellar metallicity relation for dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Bullock, James S.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gallazzi, Anna

    2013-12-20

    We present spectroscopic metallicities of individual stars in seven gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrrs), and we show that dIrrs obey the same mass-metallicity relation as the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of both the Milky Way and M31: Z{sub ∗}∝M{sub ∗}{sup 0.30±0.02}. The uniformity of the relation is in contradiction to previous estimates of metallicity based on photometry. This relationship is roughly continuous with the stellar mass-stellar metallicity relation for galaxies as massive as M {sub *} = 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}. Although the average metallicities of dwarf galaxies depend only on stellar mass, the shapes of their metallicity distributions depend on galaxy type. The metallicity distributions of dIrrs resemble simple, leaky box chemical evolution models, whereas dSphs require an additional parameter, such as gas accretion, to explain the shapes of their metallicity distributions. Furthermore, the metallicity distributions of the more luminous dSphs have sharp, metal-rich cut-offs that are consistent with the sudden truncation of star formation due to ram pressure stripping.

  10. A XMM-Newton observation of a sample of four close dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manni, L.; Nucita, A. A.; De Paolis, F.; Testa, V.; Ingrosso, G.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of the analysis of deep archival XMM-Newton observations towards the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Draco, Leo I, Ursa Major II (UMa II) and Ursa Minor (UMi) in the Milky Way neighbourhood. The X-ray source population is characterized and cross-correlated with available databases to infer their nature. We also investigate if intermediate-mass black holes are hosted in the centre of these galaxies. For Draco, we detect 96 high-energy sources, two of them possibly being local stars, while no evidence for any X-ray emitting central compact object is found. Towards the Leo I and UMa II fields of view, we reveal 116 and 49 X-ray sources, respectively. None of them correlates with the putative central black holes and only one is likely associated with a UMa II local source. The study of the UMi dwarf galaxy found 54 high-energy sources and a possible association with a source at the dwarf spheroidal galaxy centre. We put an upper limit on the luminosity of the central compact object of 4.02 × 1033 erg s-1. Furthermore, via the correlation with a radio source near the galactic centre, the putative black hole should have a mass of (2.76^{+32.00}_{-2.54})× 10^6 M_{{{⊙}}} and be radiatively inefficient. This confirms a previous result obtained using Chandra data alone.

  11. Faint blue counts from formation of dwarf galaxies at z approximately equals 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babul, Arif; Rees, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    The nature of faint blue objects (FBO's) has been a source of much speculation since their detection in deep CCD images of the sky. Their high surface density argues against them being progenitors of present-day bright galaxies and since they are only weakly clustered on small scales, they cannot be entities that merged together to form present-day galaxies. Babul & Rees (1992) have suggested that the observed faint blue counts may be due to dwarf elliptical galaxies undergoing their initial starburst at z is approximately equal to 1. In generic hierarchical clustering scenarios, however, dwarf galaxy halos (M is approximately 10(exp 9) solar mass) are expected to form at an earlier epoch; for example, typical 10(exp 9) solar mass halos will virialize at z is approximately equal to 2.3 if the power-spectrum for the density fluctuations is that of the standard b = 2 cold dark matter (CDM) model. Under 'ordinary conditions' the gas would rapidly cool, collect in the cores, and undergo star-formation. Conditions at high redshifts are far from 'ordinary'. The intense UV background will prevent the gas in the dwarf halos from cooling, the halos being released from their suspended state only when the UV flux has diminished sufficiently.

  12. Homogeneous Photometry VI: Variable Stars in the Leo I Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Peter B.; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Bono, Giuseppe; Bernard, Edouard J.; Monelli, Matteo; Iannicola, Giacinto; Gallart, Carme; Ferraro, Ivan

    2014-07-01

    From archival ground-based images of the Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxy, we have identified and characterized the pulsation properties of 164 candidate RR Lyrae variables and 55 candidate anomalous and/or short-period Cepheids. We have also identified 19 candidate long-period variable stars and 13 other candidate variables whose physical nature is unclear, but due to the limitations of our observational material we are unable to estimate reliable periods for them. On the basis of its RR Lyrae star population, Leo I is confirmed to be an Oosterhoff-intermediate type galaxy, like several other dwarf spheroidals. From the RR Lyrae stars we have derived a range of possible distance moduli for Leo I : 22.06 ± 0.08 lsim μ0 lsim 22.25 ± 0.07 mag depending on the metallicity assumed for the old population ([Fe/H] from -1.43 to -2.15). This is in agreement with previous independent estimates. We show that in their pulsation properties, the RR Lyrae stars—representing the oldest stellar population in the galaxy—are not significantly different from those of five other nearby, isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies. A similar result is obtained when comparing them to RR Lyrae stars in recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We are able to compare the period distributions and period-amplitude relations for a statistically significant sample of ab-type RR Lyrae stars in dwarf galaxies (~1300 stars) with those in the Galactic halo field (~14,000 stars) and globular clusters (~1000 stars). Field RRLs show a significant change in their period distribution when moving from the inner (dG lsim 14 kpc) to the outer (dG gsim 14 kpc) halo regions. This suggests that the halo formed from (at least) two dissimilar progenitors or types of progenitor. Considered together, the RR Lyrae stars in classical dwarf spheroidal and ultra-faint dwarf galaxies—as observed today—do not appear to follow the well defined pulsation properties shown by those in either the inner or the outer

  13. Neutral interstellar medium phases and star formation tracers in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigan, Phillip Johnathan

    Dwarf galaxies present interesting observational challenges for the studies of various galaxy properties: despite their abundance and proximity to the Milky Way, they typically have very low surface brightnesses and small physical sizes. Until now, only the extreme variety of dwarfs --- those undergoing strong bouts of star formation --- have been observed in the FIR, due to observational difficulties. However, this population does not represent the majority of dwarfs, which have only moderate star formation rates and extremely low metallicity (the fraction of heavy elements to hydrogen). The advent of the Herschel Space Telescope, with its superior resolution and sensitivity over previous generations of telescopes, has made it possible to measure FIR spectral lines and broadband continuum in normal dwarf galaxies, expanding the scope of studies beyond the brighter, but more extreme, varieties. The general goal of my research was to study the conditions in the interstellar media (ISM) of typical dwarf galaxies. The LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, TheHI Nearby Galaxy Survey) project aims to unravel many mysteries of nearby dwarfs using a suite of multi-wavelength data, and the new additions from Herschel help provide insight into the physics of these systems. I reduced and analyzed FIR fine-structure spectral line data for the LITTLE THINGS sample to study the different phases of the ISM, as well as FIR photometry data to access the dust properties and infrared continuum emission in these systems. The FIR spectral lines are diagnostics for the conditions in the ISM of galaxies, telling us about heating efficiency, the fraction of gas that resides in photodissociation regions (PDRs), abundance of highly ionized gas from massive stars, and other physical descriptions. The photometric continuum observations enable the modeling of interstellar dust properties -- dust plays an important role in shielding and cooling molecular clouds which

  14. ALFALFA Discovery of the nearby Gas-rich Dwarf Galaxy Leo P. III. An Extremely Metal Deficient Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Salzer, John J.; Berg, Danielle A.; Pogge, Richard W.; Haurberg, Nathalie C.; Cannon, John M.; Aver, Erik; Olive, Keith A.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Rhode, Katherine L.

    2013-07-01

    We present KPNO 4 m and LBT/MODS spectroscopic observations of an H II region in the nearby dwarf irregular galaxy Leo P discovered recently in the Arecibo ALFALFA survey. In both observations, we are able to accurately measure the temperature sensitive [O III] λ4363 line and determine a "direct" oxygen abundance of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.17 ± 0.04. Thus, Leo P is an extremely metal deficient (XMD) galaxy, and, indeed, one of the most metal deficient star-forming galaxies ever observed. For its estimated luminosity, Leo P is consistent with the relationship between luminosity and oxygen abundance seen in nearby dwarf galaxies. Leo P shows normal α element abundance ratios (Ne/O, S/O, and Ar/O) when compared to other XMD galaxies, but elevated N/O, consistent with the "delayed release" hypothesis for N/O abundances. We derive a helium mass fraction of 0.2509^{+0.0184}_{-0.0123}, which compares well with the WMAP + BBN prediction of 0.2483 ± 0.0002 for the primordial helium abundance. We suggest that surveys of very low mass galaxies compete well with emission line galaxy surveys for finding XMD galaxies. It is possible that XMD galaxies may be divided into two classes: the relatively rare XMD emission line galaxies which are associated with starbursts triggered by infall of low-metallicity gas and the more common, relatively quiescent XMD galaxies like Leo P, with very low chemical abundances due to their intrinsically small masses. Some of the observations reported here were obtained at the LBT Observatory. The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University, and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The

  15. A Galex/Spitzer/Wise View Of The White Dwarf Population In The Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Mukremin

    We propose to use a unique dataset made available by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to characterize the local white dwarf population in the Galaxy. We have recently identified 40,000 white dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey through high proper motion and optical spectroscopy observations. About 32,000 of these have GALEX ultraviolet observations and 6,000 have Spitzer or WISE infrared observations. Spitzer imaging observations of around 3,000 white dwarfs are available in nearly 8,000 Astronomical Observation Requests. The majority of these data were taken as part of non-white dwarf related projects and they have never been analyzed for our targets. We will use these data and combine ultraviolet, optical, and mid-infrared photometry as well as state of the art model atmospheres to study the Galactic population of white dwarfs. By exploiting the full range of the electromagnetic spectrum available from these missions, we will constrain the physical parameters of 40,000 white dwarfs in the solar neighborhood, create precise white dwarf luminosity functions and constrain the ages and the star formation histories of the Galactic disk and halo. Any deviation from the predicted spectral energy distributions would indicate the presence of companions or circumstellar debris disks. This will be the largest survey of its kind and it will provide the best constraints on the white dwarf luminosity function, and the frequency of stellar and substellar companions, and debris disks around white dwarfs and their progenitor main-sequence stars. These are all exciting results that can realistically be completed within the timescale of this proposal. The 2011 version of the NASA Strategic plan states ``In conjunction with ground and airborne telescopes, our strategy is to design and launch space telescopes that exploit the full range of the electromagnetic spectrum to view the broad diversity

  16. A dwarf galaxy near the sight line to PKS 0454+0356 - A fading 'faint blue galaxy'?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steidel, Charles C.; Dickinson, Mark; Bowen, David V.

    1993-01-01

    We report the discovery of a dwarf galaxy (MB = -17.2 for H0 = 50 km/s per Mpc) at z = 0.072 which is only 4 arcsec (3.7/h(100) kpc) in projection from the line of sight to the bright quasar PKS 0454+0356 (z(em) = 1.345). The dwarf has very blue optical and optical/IR colors and exhibits line emission indicative of ongoing or recent star formation. However, there is no detection of Ca II 3934 A, 3969 A absorption at z(abs) = 0.072 to equivalent width limits (3 sigma) of about 40 mA, which would suggest an H I column density along the line of sight of less than 5 x 10 exp 19/sq cm, if the Ca II/H I ratio is similar to sight lines in the Galaxy. Based on the absence of Ca II absorption and the unusually weak line emission given the very blue color of the dwarf, we speculate that it may be close to exhausting its supply of gas. As its star formation rate declines, the galaxy's blue magnitude should fade substantially, eventually reaching a quiescent state in accord with its K luminosity of about 0.005 L*. Future observations of the sight line to PKS 0454+0356 using HST in search of Mg II resonance lines, or a search for 21 cm absorption against the quasar radio continuum, could place even more stringent limits on the extent of the gas associated with an intrinsically faint, star-forming dwarf.

  17. Constraining ultracompact dwarf galaxy formation with galaxy clusters in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, J.; Hilker, M.; Baumgardt, H.; Griffen, B. F.

    2016-05-01

    We compare the predictions of a semi-analytic model for ultracompact dwarf galaxy (UCD) formation by tidal stripping to the observed properties of globular clusters (GCs) and UCDs in the Fornax and Virgo clusters. For Fornax we find the predicted number of stripped nuclei agrees very well with the excess number of GCs+UCDs above the GC luminosity function. GCs+UCDs with masses >107.3 M⊙ are consistent with being entirely formed by tidal stripping. Stripped nuclei can also account for Virgo UCDs with masses >107.3 M⊙ where numbers are complete by mass. For both Fornax and Virgo, the predicted velocity dispersions and radial distributions of stripped nuclei are consistent with that of UCDs within ˜50-100 kpc but disagree at larger distances where dispersions are too high and radial distributions too extended. Stripped nuclei are predicted to have radially biased anisotropies at all radii, agreeing with Virgo UCDs at clustercentric distances larger than 50 kpc. However, ongoing disruption is not included in our model which would cause orbits to become tangentially biased at small radii. We find the predicted metallicities and central black hole masses of stripped nuclei agree well with the metallicities and implied black hole masses of UCDs for masses >106.5 M⊙. The predicted black hole masses also agree well with that of M60-UCD1, the first UCD with a confirmed central black hole. These results suggest that observed GC+UCD populations are a combination of genuine GCs and stripped nuclei, with the contribution of stripped nuclei increasing towards the high-mass end.

  18. ALFALFA DISCOVERY OF THE NEARBY GAS-RICH DWARF GALAXY LEO P. II. OPTICAL IMAGING OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Haurberg, Nathalie C.; Van Sistine, Angela; Young, Michael D.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Cannon, John M.; Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W. E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu

    2013-06-15

    We present results from ground-based optical imaging of a low-mass dwarf galaxy discovered by the ALFALFA 21 cm H I survey. Broadband (BVR) data obtained with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) are used to construct color-magnitude diagrams of the galaxy's stellar population down to V{sub o} {approx} 25. We also use narrowband H{alpha} imaging from the KPNO 2.1 m telescope to identify a H II region in the galaxy. We use these data to constrain the distance to the galaxy to be between 1.5 and 2.0 Mpc. This places Leo P within the Local Volume but beyond the Local Group. Its properties are extreme: it is the lowest-mass system known that contains significant amounts of gas and is currently forming stars.

  19. A chemical confirmation of the faint Boötes II dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael

    2014-10-10

    We present a chemical abundance study of the brightest confirmed member star of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes II from Keck/HIRES high-resolution spectroscopy at moderate signal-to-noise ratios. At [Fe/H] = –2.93 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.17(sys.), this star chemically resembles metal-poor halo field stars and the signatures of other faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies at the same metallicities in that it shows enhanced [α/Fe] ratios, Solar Fe-peak element abundances, and low upper limits on the neutron-capture element Ba. Moreover, this star shows no chemical peculiarities in any of the eight elements we were able to measure. This implies that the chemical outliers found in other systems remain outliers pertaining to the unusual enrichment histories of the respective environments, while Boo II appears to have experienced an enrichment history typical of its very low mass. We also re-calibrated previous measurements of the galaxy's metallicity from the calcium triplet (CaT) and find a much lower value than reported before. The resulting broad metallicity spread, in excess of one dex, the very metal-poor mean, and the chemical abundance patterns of the present star imply that Boötes II is a low-mass, old, metal-poor dwarf galaxy and not an overdensity associated with the Sagittarius Stream as has been previously suggested based on its sky position and kinematics. The low, mean CaT metallicity of –2.7 dex falls right on the luminosity-metallicity relation delineated over four orders of magnitude from the more luminous to the faintest galaxies. Thus Boötes II's chemical enrichment appears representative of the galaxy's original mass, while tidal stripping and other mass loss mechanisms were probably not significant as for other low-mass satellites.

  20. Effects of star-formation stochasticity on the Lyα and Lyman continuum emission from dwarf galaxies during reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Dijkstra, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Observations of distant galaxies play a key role in improving our understanding of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). The observed Lyα emission line strength - quantified by its restframe equivalent width (EW) - provides a valuable diagnostic of stellar populations and dust in galaxies during and after the EoR. In this paper, we quantify the effects of star-formation stochasticity on the predicted Lyα EW in dwarf galaxies, using the publicly available code slug (used to `Stochastically Light Up Galaxies'). We compute the number of hydrogen ionizing photons, as well as flux in the Far-UV for a set of models with star-formation rates (SFR) in the range 10-3-1 M⊙ yr-1. From these fluxes, we compute the luminosity, Lα, and the EW of the Lyα line. We find that stochasticity alone induces a broad distribution in Lα and EW at a fixed SFR, and that the widths of these distributions decrease with increasing SFR. We parametrize the EW probability density function as an SFR-dependent double power law. We find that it is possible to have EW as low as ˜EW0/4 and as high as ˜3 × EW0, where EW0 denotes the expected EW in the absence of stochasticity. We argue that stochasticity may therefore be important when linking drop-out and narrow-band selected galaxies, when identifying Population III galaxies, and that it may help to explain the large EW (EW ≳ 100-200 Å) observed for a fraction of Lyα selected galaxies. Finally, we show that stochasticity can also affect the inferred escape fraction of ionizing photons from galaxies. In particular, we argue that stochasticity may simultaneously explain the observed anomalous ratios of the Lyman continuum flux density to the (non-ionizing) UV continuum density in the so-called Lyman-Bump galaxies at z = 3.1, as well as the absence of such objects among a sample of z = 1.3 drop-out galaxies.

  1. STAR FORMATION MODELS FOR THE DWARF GALAXIES NGC 2915 AND NGC 1705

    SciTech Connect

    Elson, E. C.; De Blok, W. J. G.; Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.

    2012-01-15

    Crucial to a quantitative understanding of galaxy evolution are the properties of the interstellar medium that regulate galactic-scale star formation activity. We present here the results of a suite of star formation models applied to the nearby blue compact dwarf galaxies NGC 2915 and NGC 1705. Each of these galaxies has a stellar disk embedded in a much larger, essentially starless H I disk. These atypical stellar morphologies allow for rigorous tests of star formation models that examine the effects on star formation of the H I, stellar, and dark matter mass components, as well as the kinematics of the gaseous and stellar disks. We use far-ultraviolet and 24 {mu}m images from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey, respectively, to map the spatial distribution of the total star formation rate surface density within each galaxy. New high-resolution H I line observations obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array are used to study the distribution and dynamics of each galaxy's neutral interstellar medium. The standard Toomre Q parameter is unable to distinguish between active and non-active star-forming regions, predicting the H I disks of the dwarfs to be sub-critical. Two-fluid instability models incorporating the stellar and dark matter components of each galaxy, in addition to the gaseous component, yield unstable portions of the inner disk. Finally, a formalization in which the H I kinematics are characterized by the rotational shear of the gas produces models that very accurately match the observations. This suggests the time available for perturbations to collapse in the presence of rotational shear to be an important factor governing galactic-scale star formation.

  2. Observations of dwarfs in nearby voids: implications for galaxy formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, Simon A.

    2016-10-01

    The intermediate results of the ongoing study of deep samples of ~200 galaxies residing in nearby voids, are presented. Their properties are probed via optical spectroscopy, ugri surface photometry, and HI 21-cm line measurements, with emphasis on their evolutionary status. We derive directly the hydrogen mass M(HI), the ratio M(HI)/LB and the evolutionary parameter gas-phase O/H. Their luminosities and integrated colours are used to derive stellar mass M* and the second evolutionary parameter - gas mass-fraction f g). The colours of the outer parts, typically representative of the galaxy oldest stellar population, are used to estimate the upper limits on time since the beginning of the main SF episode. We compare properties of void galaxies with those of the similar late-type galaxies in denser environments. Most of void galaxies show smaller O/H for their luminosity, in average by ~30\\%, indicating slower evolution. Besides, the fraction of ~10\\% of the whole void sample or ~30\\% of the least luminous void LSB dwarfs show the oxygen deficiency by a factor of 2-5. The majority of this group appear very gas-rich, with f g ~(95-99)%, while their outer parts appear rather blue, indicating the time of onset of the main star-formation episode of less than 1-4 Gyr. Such unevolved LSBD galaxies appear not rare among the smallest void objects, but turned out practically missed to date due to the strong observational selection effects. Our results evidense for unusual evolutionary properties of the sizable fraction of void galaxies, and thus, pose the task of better modelling of dwarf galaxy formation and evolution in voids.

  3. Star Formation Models for the Dwarf Galaxies NGC 2915 and NGC 1705

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elson, E. C.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    Crucial to a quantitative understanding of galaxy evolution are the properties of the interstellar medium that regulate galactic-scale star formation activity. We present here the results of a suite of star formation models applied to the nearby blue compact dwarf galaxies NGC 2915 and NGC 1705. Each of these galaxies has a stellar disk embedded in a much larger, essentially starless H I disk. These atypical stellar morphologies allow for rigorous tests of star formation models that examine the effects on star formation of the H I, stellar, and dark matter mass components, as well as the kinematics of the gaseous and stellar disks. We use far-ultraviolet and 24 μm images from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey, respectively, to map the spatial distribution of the total star formation rate surface density within each galaxy. New high-resolution H I line observations obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array are used to study the distribution and dynamics of each galaxy's neutral interstellar medium. The standard Toomre Q parameter is unable to distinguish between active and non-active star-forming regions, predicting the H I disks of the dwarfs to be sub-critical. Two-fluid instability models incorporating the stellar and dark matter components of each galaxy, in addition to the gaseous component, yield unstable portions of the inner disk. Finally, a formalization in which the H I kinematics are characterized by the rotational shear of the gas produces models that very accurately match the observations. This suggests the time available for perturbations to collapse in the presence of rotational shear to be an important factor governing galactic-scale star formation.

  4. TESTING MODIFIED NEWTONIAN DYNAMICS WITH ROTATION CURVES OF DWARF AND LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Swaters, R. A.; McGaugh, S. S.; Sanders, R. H.

    2010-07-20

    Dwarf and low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are ideal objects to test modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND), because in most of these galaxies the accelerations fall below the threshold where MOND supposedly applies. We have selected from the literature a sample of 27 dwarf and LSB galaxies. MOND is successful in explaining the general shape of the observed rotation curves for roughly three quarters of the galaxies in the sample presented here. However, for the remaining quarter, MOND does not adequately explain the observed rotation curves. Considering the uncertainties in distances and inclinations for the galaxies in our sample, a small fraction of poor MOND predictions is expected and is not necessarily a problem for MOND. We have also made fits taking the MOND acceleration constant, a {sub 0}, as a free parameter in order to identify any systematic trends. We find that there appears to be a correlation between central surface brightness and the best-fit value of a{sub 0}, in the sense that lower surface brightness galaxies tend to have lower a{sub 0}. However, this correlation depends strongly on a small number of galaxies whose rotation curves might be uncertain due to either bars or warps. Without these galaxies, there is less evidence of a trend, but the average value we find for a{sub 0} {approx} 0.7 x 10{sup -8} cm s{sup -2} is somewhat lower than derived from previous studies. Such lower fitted values of a{sub 0} could occur if external gravitational fields are important.

  5. Chemical evolution of r-process elements in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, M. N.; Tsujimoto, T.; Shigeyama, T.; Aoki, W.

    2016-08-01

    A dominant astrophysical site for r-process, which is responsible for producing heavy neutron-capture elements, is unknown. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies around the Milky Way halo provide ideal laboratories to investigate the origin and evolution of r-process elements. We carried out high-resolution spectroscopic observations of three giant stars in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy to estimate their europium abundances. We found that the upper-limits of [Eu/H] are very low in the range [Fe/H] < -2, while this ratio is nearly constant at higher metallicities. This trend is not well reproduced with models which assume that Eu is produced together with Fe by SNe, and may suggest the contribution from other objects such as neutron-star mergers.

  6. COMPLEXITY ON DWARF GALAXY SCALES: A BIMODAL DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION IN SCULPTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Breddels, Maarten A.; Helmi, Amina

    2014-08-10

    In our previous work, we presented Schwarzschild models of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy demonstrating that this system could be embedded in dark matter halos that are either cusped or cored. Here, we show that the non-parametric distribution function recovered through Schwarzschild's method is bimodal in energy and angular momentum space for all of the best-fitting mass models explored. We demonstrate that this bimodality is directly related to the two components known to be present in Sculptor through stellar population analysis, although our method is purely dynamical in nature and does not use this prior information. It therefore constitutes independent confirmation of the existence of two physically distinct dynamical components in Sculptor and suggests a rather complex assembly history for this dwarf galaxy.

  7. Environmental effects on the dwarf elliptical galaxies in the Virgo cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, S.; Okamura, S.; Kodaira, K.; Wakamatsu, K.

    1988-07-01

    Published observational data on 98 Virgo-cluster dwarf ellipticals are compiled and analyzed statistically, applying the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to evaluate the significance of correlations between several photometric parameters and the environmental parameters (1) projected distance from the cluster center, (2) distance from the nearest bright galaxy, and (3) local number density. The results are presented in extensive graphs and discussed in detail, and it is shown that galaxy brightness and diameter are not correlated with (2) or (3), but well correlated with (1), both being greater within 5 deg of the center than beyond that distance. These findings are found to support theoretical models in which dwarf ellipticals either have progenitors with very similar characteristics or form by internally driven mass loss from more massive elliptical systems; models based on ram-pressure stripping or tidal interactions appear to be ruled out. 53 references.

  8. A Tidally Disrupting Dwarf Galaxy in the Halo of NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Sand, David J.; Spekkens, Kristine; Crnojević, Denija; Simon, Joshua D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Strader, Jay; Caldwell, Nelson; McLeod, Brian; Seth, Anil C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of Scl-MM-Dw2, a new dwarf galaxy at a projected separation of ˜50 kpc from NGC 253, as part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor project (PISCeS). We measure a tip of the red giant branch (RGB) distance of 3.12 ± 0.30 Mpc, suggesting that Scl-MM-Dw2 is likely a satellite of NGC 253. We qualitatively compare the distribution of RGB stars in the color-magnitude diagram with theoretical isochrones and find that it is consistent with an old, ˜12 Gyr, and metal-poor, -2.3 \\lt [Fe/H] \\lt -1.1, stellar population. We also detect a small number of asymptotic giant branch stars consistent with a metal-poor 2-3 Gyr population in the center of the dwarf. Our non-detection of HI in a deep Green Bank Telescope spectrum implies a gas fraction {M}{HI}/{L}V\\lt 0.02 {M}⊙ /{L}⊙ . The stellar and gaseous properties of Scl-MM-Dw2 suggest that it is a dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Scl-MM-Dw2 has a luminosity of {M}V=-12.1+/- 0.5 mag and a half-light radius of rh =2.94+/- 0.46 {{kpc}}, which makes it moderately larger than dwarf galaxies in the Local Group of the same luminosity. However, Scl-MM-Dw2 is very elongated (ɛ =0.66+/- 0.06), and it has an extremely low surface brightness ({μ }0,V=27.7+/- 0.6 mag arcsec-2). Its elongation and diffuseness make it an outlier in the ellipticity-luminosity and surface brightness-luminosity scaling relations. These properties suggest that this dwarf is being tidally disrupted by NGC 253.

  9. A Tidally Disrupting Dwarf Galaxy in the Halo of NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Sand, David J.; Spekkens, Kristine; Crnojević, Denija; Simon, Joshua D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Strader, Jay; Caldwell, Nelson; McLeod, Brian; Seth, Anil C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of Scl-MM-Dw2, a new dwarf galaxy at a projected separation of ∼50 kpc from NGC 253, as part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor project (PISCeS). We measure a tip of the red giant branch (RGB) distance of 3.12 ± 0.30 Mpc, suggesting that Scl-MM-Dw2 is likely a satellite of NGC 253. We qualitatively compare the distribution of RGB stars in the color–magnitude diagram with theoretical isochrones and find that it is consistent with an old, ∼12 Gyr, and metal-poor, -2.3 \\lt [Fe/H] \\lt -1.1, stellar population. We also detect a small number of asymptotic giant branch stars consistent with a metal-poor 2–3 Gyr population in the center of the dwarf. Our non-detection of HI in a deep Green Bank Telescope spectrum implies a gas fraction {M}{HI}/{L}V\\lt 0.02 {M}ȯ /{L}ȯ . The stellar and gaseous properties of Scl-MM-Dw2 suggest that it is a dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Scl-MM-Dw2 has a luminosity of {M}V=-12.1+/- 0.5 mag and a half-light radius of rh =2.94+/- 0.46 {{kpc}}, which makes it moderately larger than dwarf galaxies in the Local Group of the same luminosity. However, Scl-MM-Dw2 is very elongated (ε =0.66+/- 0.06), and it has an extremely low surface brightness ({μ }0,V=27.7+/- 0.6 mag arcsec‑2). Its elongation and diffuseness make it an outlier in the ellipticity–luminosity and surface brightness–luminosity scaling relations. These properties suggest that this dwarf is being tidally disrupted by NGC 253.

  10. ASSESSING THE MILKY WAY SATELLITES ASSOCIATED WITH THE SAGITTARIUS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Law, David R.; Majewski, Steven R. E-mail: srm4n@virginia.ed

    2010-08-01

    Numerical models of the tidal disruption of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf galaxy have recently been developed that for the first time simultaneously satisfy most observational constraints on the angular position, distance, and radial velocity trends of both leading and trailing tidal streams emanating from the dwarf. We use these dynamical models in combination with extant three-dimensional position and velocity data for Galactic globular clusters and dSph galaxies to identify those Milky Way satellites that are likely to have originally formed in the gravitational potential well of the Sgr dwarf, and have been stripped from Sgr during its extended interaction with the Milky Way. We conclude that the globular clusters Arp 2, M 54, NGC 5634, Terzan 8, and Whiting 1 are almost certainly associated with the Sgr dwarf, and that Berkeley 29, NGC 5053, Pal 12, and Terzan 7 are likely to be as well (albeit at lower confidence). The initial Sgr system therefore may have contained five to nine globular clusters, corresponding to a specific frequency S{sub N} = 5-9 for an initial Sgr luminosity M{sub V} = -15.0. Our result is consistent with the 8 {+-} 2 genuine Sgr globular clusters expected on the basis of statistical modeling of the Galactic globular cluster distribution and the corresponding false-association rate due to chance alignments with the Sgr streams. The globular clusters identified as most likely to be associated with Sgr are consistent with previous reconstructions of the Sgr age-metallicity relation, and show no evidence for a second-parameter effect shaping their horizontal branch morphologies. We find no statistically significant evidence to suggest that any of the recently discovered population of ultrafaint dwarf galaxies are associated with the Sgr tidal streams, but are unable to rule out this possibility conclusively for all systems.

  11. Assessing the Milky Way Satellites Associated with the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, David R.; Majewski, Steven R.

    2010-08-01

    Numerical models of the tidal disruption of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf galaxy have recently been developed that for the first time simultaneously satisfy most observational constraints on the angular position, distance, and radial velocity trends of both leading and trailing tidal streams emanating from the dwarf. We use these dynamical models in combination with extant three-dimensional position and velocity data for Galactic globular clusters and dSph galaxies to identify those Milky Way satellites that are likely to have originally formed in the gravitational potential well of the Sgr dwarf, and have been stripped from Sgr during its extended interaction with the Milky Way. We conclude that the globular clusters Arp 2, M 54, NGC 5634, Terzan 8, and Whiting 1 are almost certainly associated with the Sgr dwarf, and that Berkeley 29, NGC 5053, Pal 12, and Terzan 7 are likely to be as well (albeit at lower confidence). The initial Sgr system therefore may have contained five to nine globular clusters, corresponding to a specific frequency SN = 5-9 for an initial Sgr luminosity MV = -15.0. Our result is consistent with the 8 ± 2 genuine Sgr globular clusters expected on the basis of statistical modeling of the Galactic globular cluster distribution and the corresponding false-association rate due to chance alignments with the Sgr streams. The globular clusters identified as most likely to be associated with Sgr are consistent with previous reconstructions of the Sgr age-metallicity relation, and show no evidence for a second-parameter effect shaping their horizontal branch morphologies. We find no statistically significant evidence to suggest that any of the recently discovered population of ultrafaint dwarf galaxies are associated with the Sgr tidal streams, but are unable to rule out this possibility conclusively for all systems.

  12. The relation between atomic gas and star formation rate densities in faint dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, Sambit; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Kaisin, Serafim S.; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2014-12-01

    We use data for faint (MB > -14.5) dwarf irregular galaxies drawn from the Faint Irregular Galaxy GMRT Survey to study the correlation between the surface densities of atomic gas (Σgas,atomic) and star formation rate (ΣSFR) in the galaxies. The estimated gas-phase metallicity of our sample galaxies is Z ˜ 0.1 Z⊙. Understanding star formation in such molecule-poor gas is of particular importance since it is likely to be of direct relevance to simulations of early galaxy formation. For about 20 per cent (9/43) of our sample galaxies, we find that the H I distribution is significantly disturbed, with little correspondence between the optical and H I distributions. We exclude these galaxies from the comparison. We also exclude galaxies with very low star formation rates, for which stochastic effects make it difficult to estimate the true star formation rates. For the remaining galaxies, we compute the Σgas,atomic and ΣSFR averaged over the entire star-forming disc of the galaxy. For these galaxies, we find a nearly linear relation between the star formation rate and the atomic gas density, namely {log Σ _{SFR} = 0.91^{+0.23}_{-0.25} log Σ _{gas,atomic} - 3.84^{+0.15}_{-0.19}}. The corresponding gas consumption time-scale is ˜10 Gyr, i.e. significantly smaller than the ˜100 Gyr estimated for the outer regions of spiral galaxies. We also estimate the gas consumption time-scale computed using the global gas content and the global star formation rate for all galaxies with a reliable measurement of the star formation rate, regardless of whether the H I distribution is disturbed or not. The mean gas consumption time-scale computed using this entire gas reservoir is ˜18 Gyr, i.e. still significantly smaller than that estimated for the outer parts of spirals. The gas consumption time-scale for dwarfs is intermediate between the values of ˜100 and ˜2 Gyr estimated for the outer molecule-poor and inner molecule-rich regions of spiral discs.

  13. Radio Continuum and H I Study of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, S.; Kantharia, N. G.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2011-02-01

    The multifrequency radio continuum and 21 cm H I observations of five blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies, Mrk 104, Mrk 108, Mrk 1039, Mrk 1069, and I Zw 97, using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) are presented here. Radio continuum emission at 610 MHz and 325 MHz is detected from all the observed galaxies whereas only a few are detected at 240 MHz. In our sample, three galaxies (Mrk 104, Mrk 108, and Mrk 1039) are members of groups and two galaxies (Mrk 1069 and I Zw 97) are isolated galaxies. The radio emission from Mrk 104 and Mrk 108 is seen to encompass the entire optical galaxy whereas the radio emission from Mrk 1039, Mrk 1069, and I Zw 97 is confined to massive H II regions. This, we suggest, indicates that the star formation in the latter group of galaxies has recently been triggered and that the environment in which the galaxy is evolving plays a role. Star formation rates (SFRs) calculated from 610 MHz emission are in the range 0.01-0.1 M sun yr-1 this is similar to the SFR obtained for individual star-forming regions in BCDs. The integrated radio spectra of four galaxies are modeled over the frequency range where data is available. We find that two of the galaxies, Mrk 1069 and Mrk 1039, show a turnover at low frequencies, which is well fitted by free-free absorption whereas the other two galaxies, Mrk 104 and Mrk 108, show a power law at the lowest GMRT frequencies. The flatter spectrum, localized star formation, and radio continuum in isolated galaxies lend support to stochastic self-propagating star formation. The H I observations of four galaxies, Mrk 104, Mrk 108, Mrk 1039, and Mrk 1069, show extended disks as large as ~1.1-6 times the optical size. All the observed BCDs (except Mrk 104) show rotating disk with a half power width of ~50-124 km s-1. Solid body rotation is common in our sample. We note that the tidal dwarf origin is possible for two of the BCDs in our sample.

  14. THE LINK BETWEEN PLANETARY SYSTEMS, DUSTY WHITE DWARFS, AND METAL-POLLUTED WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Debes, John H.; Walsh, Kevin J.; Stark, Christopher

    2012-03-10

    It has long been suspected that metal-polluted white dwarfs (types DAZ, DBZ, and DZ) and white dwarfs with dusty disks possess planetary systems, but a specific physical mechanism by which planetesimals are perturbed close to a white dwarf has not yet been fully posited. In this paper, we demonstrate that mass loss from a central star during post-main-sequence evolution can sweep planetesimals into interior mean motion resonances with a single giant planet. These planetesimals are slowly removed through chaotic excursions of eccentricity that in time create radial orbits capable of tidally disrupting the planetesimal. Numerical N-body simulations of the solar system show that a sufficient number of planetesimals are perturbed to explain white dwarfs with both dust and metal pollution, provided other white dwarfs have more massive relic asteroid belts. Our scenario requires only one Jupiter-sized planet and a sufficient number of asteroids near its 2:1 interior mean motion resonance. Finally, we show that once a planetesimal is perturbed into a tidal crossing orbit, it will become disrupted after the first pass of the white dwarf, where a highly eccentric stream of debris forms the main reservoir for dust-producing collisions. These simulations, in concert with observations of white dwarfs, place interesting limits on the frequency of planetary systems around main-sequence stars, the frequency of planetesimal belts, and the probability that dust may obscure future terrestrial planet finding missions.

  15. INSIGHTS INTO PRE-ENRICHMENT OF STAR CLUSTERS AND SELF-ENRICHMENT OF DWARF GALAXIES FROM THEIR INTRINSIC METALLICITY DISPERSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Leaman, Ryan

    2012-12-01

    Star clusters are known to have smaller intrinsic metallicity spreads than dwarf galaxies due to their shorter star formation timescales. Here we use individual spectroscopic [Fe/H] measurements of stars in 19 Local Group dwarf galaxies, 13 Galactic open clusters, and 49 globular clusters to show that star cluster and dwarf galaxy linear metallicity distributions are binomial in form, with all objects showing strong correlations between their mean linear metallicity Z-bar and intrinsic spread in metallicity {sigma}(Z){sup 2}. A plot of {sigma}(Z){sup 2} versus Z-bar shows that the correlated relationships are offset for the dwarf galaxies from the star clusters. The common binomial nature of these linear metallicity distributions can be explained with a simple inhomogeneous chemical evolution model, where the star cluster and dwarf galaxy behavior in the {sigma}(Z){sup 2}- Z-bar diagram is reproduced in terms of the number of enrichment events, covering fraction, and intrinsic size of the enriched regions. The inhomogeneity of the self-enrichment sets the slope for the observed dwarf galaxy {sigma}(Z){sup 2}- Z-bar correlation. The offset of the star cluster sequence from that of the dwarf galaxies is due to pre-enrichment, and the slope of the star cluster sequence represents the remnant signature of the self-enriched history of their host galaxies. The offset can be used to separate star clusters from dwarf galaxies without a priori knowledge of their luminosity or dynamical mass. The application of the inhomogeneous model to the {sigma}(Z){sup 2}- Z-bar relationship provides a numerical formalism to connect the self-enrichment and pre-enrichment between star clusters and dwarf galaxies using physically motivated chemical enrichment parameters. Therefore we suggest that the {sigma}(Z){sup 2}- Z-bar relationship can provide insight into what drives the efficiency of star formation and chemical evolution in galaxies, and is an important prediction for galaxy

  16. Sowing the seeds of massive black holes in small galaxies: Young clusters as the building blocks of ultracompact dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Konstantinidis, Symeon; Freitag, Marc Dewi; Coleman Miller, M.; Rasio, Frederic A. E-mail: simos@ari.uni-heidelberg.de E-mail: miller@astro.umd.edu

    2014-02-20

    Interacting galaxies often have complexes of hundreds of young stellar clusters of individual masses ∼10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} in regions that are a few hundred parsecs across. These cluster complexes interact dynamically, and their coalescence is a candidate for the origin of some ultracompact dwarf galaxies. Individual clusters with short relaxation times are candidates for the production of intermediate-mass black holes of a few hundred solar masses, via runaway stellar collisions prior to the first supernovae in a cluster. It is therefore possible that a cluster complex hosts multiple intermediate-mass black holes that may be ejected from their individual clusters due to mergers or binary processes, but bound to the complex as a whole. Here we explore the dynamical interaction between initially free-flying massive black holes and clusters in an evolving cluster complex. We find that, after hitting some clusters, it is plausible that the massive black hole will be captured in an ultracompact dwarf forming near the center of the complex. In the process, the hole typically triggers electromagnetic flares via stellar disruptions, and is also likely to be a prominent source of gravitational radiation for the advanced ground-based detectors LIGO and VIRGO. We also discuss other implications of this scenario, notably that the central black hole could be considerably larger than expected in other formation scenarios for ultracompact dwarfs.

  17. A new galactic chemical evolution model with dust: results for dwarf irregular galaxies and DLA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioannini, L.; Matteucci, F.; Vladilo, G.; Calura, F.

    2016-09-01

    We present a galactic chemical evolution model which adopts updated prescriptions for all the main processes governing the dust cycle. We follow in detail the evolution of the abundances of several chemical species (C, O, S, Si, Fe and Zn) in the gas and dust of a typical dwarf irregular galaxy. The dwarf irregular galaxy is assumed to evolve with a low but continuous level of star formation and experience galactic winds triggered by supernova explosions. We predict the evolution of the gas to dust ratio in such a galaxy and discuss critically the main processes involving dust, such as dust production by AGB stars and Type II SNe, destruction and accretion (gas condensation in clouds). We then apply our model to Damped Lyman-α systems which are believed to be dwarf irregulars, as witnessed by their abundance patterns. Our main conclusions are: i) we can reproduce the observed gas to dust ratio in dwarf galaxies. ii) We find that the process of dust accretion plays a fundamental role in the evolution of dust and in certain cases it becomes the dominant process in the dust cycle. On the other hand, dust destruction seems to be a negligible process in irregulars. iii) Concerning Damped Lyman-α systems, we show that the observed gas-phase abundances of silicon, normalized to volatile elements (zinc and sulfur), are in agreement with our model. iv) The abundances of iron and silicon in DLA systems suggest that the two elements undergo a different history of dust formation and evolution. Our work casts light on the nature of iron-rich dust: the observed depletion pattern of iron is well reproduced only when an additional source of iron dust is considered. Here we explore the possibility of a contribution from Type Ia SNe as well as an efficient accretion of iron nano-particles.

  18. Self-consistent photometric and spectroscopic Star Formation Histories in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Benito, R.; Pérez, E.; Pérez-Montero, E.; González Delgado, R.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    This project aims to unify the spectroscopic and stellar photometric views by performing a comprehensive study of a sample of the nearest Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies (BCDs). We plan to derive Star Formation Histories (SFH) both by means of Color-Magnitude Diagrams (CMDs) from extant Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical imaging and with spectral fitting methods techniques using MUSE, allowing us to obtain state-of-the-art 2D stellar properties and abundances of the gas in BCDs.

  19. Impact of NLTE on research of early chemical enrichment of the dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, Lyudmila; Jablonka, Pascale; North, Pierre; Sitnova, Tatyana

    2016-08-01

    Based on high-resolution observed spectra, the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation, and precise stellar atmosphere parameters, we present the first complete sample of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) with accurate chemical abundances in the very metal-poor (VMP) regime. The obtained stellar elemental ratios are compared with chemical enrichment models, and we show that NLTE is a major step forward for studies of the dSph and the Milky Way (MW) chemical evolution.

  20. ANDROMEDA XXIX: A NEW DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY 200 kpc FROM ANDROMEDA

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Eric F.; Slater, Colin T.; Martin, Nicolas F.

    2011-11-20

    We report the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Andromeda XXIX (And XXIX), using data from the recently released Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8, and confirmed by Gemini North telescope Multi-Object Spectrograph imaging data. And XXIX appears to be a dwarf spheroidal galaxy, separated on the sky by a little more than 15 Degree-Sign from M31, with a distance inferred from the tip of the red giant branch of 730 {+-} 75 kpc, corresponding to a three-dimensional separation from M31 of 207{sup +20}{sub -2} kpc (close to M31's virial radius). Its absolute magnitude, as determined by comparison to the red giant branch luminosity function of the Draco dwarf spheroidal, is M{sub V} = -8.3 {+-} 0.4. And XXIX's stellar populations appear very similar to Draco's; consequently, we estimate a metallicity for And XXIX of [Fe/H] {approx}-1.8. The half-light radius of And XXIX is 360 {+-} 60 pc and its ellipticity is 0.35 {+-} 0.06, typical of dwarf satellites of the Milky Way and M31 at this absolute magnitude range.

  1. Core-collapse Supernovae from the Palomar Transient Factory: Indications for a Different Population in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Nugent, Peter E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Bloom, Joshua S.; Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D. Andrew; Poznanski, Dovi; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Law, Nicholas; Hook, Isobel; Jönsson, Jakob; Blake, Sarah; Cooke, Jeff; Dekany, Richard; Rahmer, Gustavo; Hale, David; Smith, Roger; Zolkower, Jeff; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Henning, John; Bui, Kahnh; McKenna, Dan; Jacobsen, Janet

    2010-09-01

    We use the first compilation of 72 core-collapse supernovae (SNe) from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) to study their observed subtype distribution in dwarf galaxies compared to giant galaxies. Our sample is the largest single-survey, untargeted, spectroscopically classified, homogeneous collection of core-collapse events ever assembled, spanning a wide host-galaxy luminosity range (down to Mr ≈ -14 mag) and including a substantial fraction (>20%) of dwarf (Mr >= -18 mag) hosts. We find more core-collapse SNe in dwarf galaxies than expected and several interesting trends emerge. We use detailed subclassifications of stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe and find that all Type I core-collapse events occurring in dwarf galaxies are either SNe Ib or broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-BL), while "normal" SNe Ic dominate in giant galaxies. We also see a significant excess of SNe IIb in dwarf hosts. We hypothesize that in lower metallicity hosts, metallicity-driven mass loss is reduced, allowing massive stars that would have appeared as "normal" SNe Ic in metal-rich galaxies to retain some He and H, exploding as Ib/IIb events. At the same time, another mechanism allows some stars to undergo extensive stripping and explode as SNe Ic-BL (and presumably also as long-duration gamma-ray bursts). Our results are still limited by small-number statistics, and our measurements of the observed N(Ib/c)/N(II) number ratio in dwarf and giant hosts (0.25+0.3 -0.15 and 0.23+0.11 -0.08, respectively; 1σ uncertainties) are consistent with previous studies and theoretical predictions. As additional PTF data accumulate, more robust statistical analyses will be possible, allowing the evolution of massive stars to be probed via the dwarf-galaxy SN population.

  2. The Star Formation Histories of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies. III. Characterizing Quenching in Low-mass Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the quenching of low-mass galaxies (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 108 {{M}⊙ }) as a function of lookback time using the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies. The SFHs were derived by analyzing color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stellar populations in archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. We find: (1) lower-mass galaxies quench earlier than higher-mass galaxies; (2) inside of Rvirial there is no correlation between a satellite’s current proximity to a massive host and its quenching epoch; and (3) there are hints of systematic differences in the quenching times of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites, although the sample size and uncertainties in the SFHs of M31 dwarfs prohibit definitive conclusions. Combined with results from the literature, we qualitatively consider the redshift evolution (z = 0-1) of the quenched galaxy fraction over ˜7 dex in stellar mass (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 1011.5 {{M}⊙ }). The quenched fraction of all galaxies generally increases toward the present, with both the lowest and highest-mass systems exhibiting the largest quenched fractions at all redshifts. In contrast, galaxies between {{M}\\star } ˜ 108-1010 {{M}⊙ } have the lowest quenched fractions. We suggest that such intermediate-mass galaxies are the least efficient at quenching. Finally, we compare our quenching times with predictions for infall times for low-mass galaxies associated with the MW. We find that some of the lowest-mass satellites (e.g., CVn II, Leo IV) may have been quenched before infall, while higher-mass satellites (e.g., Leo I, Fornax) typically quench ˜1-4 Gyr after infall. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA constract NAS 5-26555.

  3. Multi-Wavelength Study of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies: Properties of Low-Metallicity Interstellar Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliano, Frédéric

    2004-04-01

    This thesis is devoted to the multi-wavelength observations and the modelling of dust, in nearby low-metallicity dwarf galaxies. The main motivations of this project are: (i) the study of dust properties - composition, size distribution, etc. - in non-solar interstellar media; (ii) the study of global spectral energy distributions of dwarf galaxies which are thought, due to their chemical youth, to be similar to primordial galaxies that we can not observe; and (iii) obtaining informations about the chemical evolution of these galaxies by studying the gas-to-dust mass ratio. I begin with the detailed study of mid-infrared ISO spectra of these galaxies. The main spectral characteristics that we outline are: (i) the weakness of the aromatic band emission, compared to what is observed in normal starburst galaxies; (ii) the similarity with Galactic HII region spectra - a steep very small grain continuum and prominent ionic lines. After that, we study the spectra of a more diversified sample - spiral, starburst, dwarf galaxies and HII regions - in order to plot the band ratios. The 6.2/11.3, 7.7/11.3 and 8.6/11.3 correlations are, for the first time, established on such a large sample. They show that dwarf galaxies occupy a particular region in this diagram, different than the one occupied by Galactic HII regions, inducing a different PAH structure - ionization, hydrogenation, size, etc. The second step of this project is the modelling of the spectral energy distributions of four dwarf galaxies (He 2-10, II Zw 40, NGC 1140, NG 1569), from ultraviolet to millimeter. In order to achieve this goal, I have added, to our own observations, data from the litterature. The modelling is done self-consistently, using constraints on dust emission, stellar radiation and on ionic lines. We synthesize the spectral energy distributions of these galaxies, as well as the corresponding extinction curves. The properties that we are able to outline are that: (i) the emission is dominated by

  4. AN IONIZATION CONE IN THE DWARF STARBURST GALAXY NGC 5253

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrow, Jordan; Oey, M. S.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McDonald, Michael; Martin, Crystal L.

    2011-11-01

    There are few observational constraints on how the escape of ionizing photons from starburst galaxies depends on galactic parameters. Here we report on the first major detection of an ionization cone in NGC 5253, a nearby starburst galaxy. This high-excitation feature is identified by mapping the emission-line ratios in the galaxy using [S III] {lambda}9069, [S II] {lambda}6716, and H{alpha} narrowband images from the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter at Las Campanas Observatory. The ionization cone appears optically thin, which suggests the escape of ionizing photons. The cone morphology is narrow with an estimated solid angle covering just 3% of 4{pi} steradians, and the young, massive clusters of the nuclear starburst can easily generate the radiation required to ionize the cone. Although less likely, we cannot rule out the possibility of an obscured active galactic nucleus source. An echelle spectrum along the minor axis shows complex kinematics that are consistent with outflow activity. The narrow morphology of the ionization cone supports the scenario that an orientation bias contributes to the difficulty in detecting Lyman continuum emission from starbursts and Lyman break galaxies.

  5. PAndAS' PROGENY: EXTENDING THE M31 DWARF GALAXY CABAL

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Jenny C.; Irwin, Mike J.; Chapman, Scott C.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Dotter, Aaron L.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Tanvir, Nial R.; Rich, R. Michael

    2011-05-10

    We present the discovery of five new dwarf galaxies, Andromeda XXIII-XXVII, located in the outer halo of M31. These galaxies were discovered during the second year of data from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS), a photometric survey of the M31/M33 subgroup conducted with the MegaPrime/MegaCam wide-field camera on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The current PAndAS survey now provides an almost complete panoramic view of the M31 halo out to an average projected radius of {approx}150 kpc. Here we present for the first time the metal-poor stellar density map for this whole region, not only as an illustration of the discovery space for satellite galaxies, but also as a birds-eye view of the ongoing assembly process of an L{sub *} disk galaxy. Four of the newly discovered satellites appear as well-defined spatial overdensities of stars lying on the expected locus of metal-poor (-2.5 < [Fe/H] < -1.3) red giant branch stars at the distance of M31. The fifth overdensity, And XXVII, is embedded in an extensive stream of such stars and is possibly the remnant of a strong tidal disruption event. Based on distance estimates from horizontal branch magnitudes, all five have metallicities typical of dwarf spheroidal galaxies ranging from [Fe/H] =-1.7 {+-} 0.2 to [Fe/H] =-1.9 {+-} 0.2 and absolute magnitudes ranging from M{sub V} = -7.1 {+-} 0.5 to M{sub V} = -10.2 {+-} 0.5. These five additional satellites bring the number of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in this region to 25 and continue the trend whereby the brighter dwarf spheroidal satellites of M31 generally have much larger half-light radii than their Milky Way counterparts. With an extended sample of M31 satellite galaxies, we also revisit the spatial distribution of this population and in particular we find that, within the current projected limits of the PAndAS survey, the surface density of satellites is essentially constant out to 150 kpc. This corresponds to a radial density distribution of satellites

  6. PAndAS' Progeny: Extending the M31 Dwarf Galaxy Cabal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jenny C.; Irwin, Mike J.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Dotter, Aaron L.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Chapman, Scott C.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Tanvir, Nial R.; Rich, R. Michael

    2011-05-01

    We present the discovery of five new dwarf galaxies, Andromeda XXIII-XXVII, located in the outer halo of M31. These galaxies were discovered during the second year of data from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS), a photometric survey of the M31/M33 subgroup conducted with the MegaPrime/MegaCam wide-field camera on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The current PAndAS survey now provides an almost complete panoramic view of the M31 halo out to an average projected radius of ~150 kpc. Here we present for the first time the metal-poor stellar density map for this whole region, not only as an illustration of the discovery space for satellite galaxies, but also as a birds-eye view of the ongoing assembly process of an L * disk galaxy. Four of the newly discovered satellites appear as well-defined spatial overdensities of stars lying on the expected locus of metal-poor (-2.5 < [Fe/H] < -1.3) red giant branch stars at the distance of M31. The fifth overdensity, And XXVII, is embedded in an extensive stream of such stars and is possibly the remnant of a strong tidal disruption event. Based on distance estimates from horizontal branch magnitudes, all five have metallicities typical of dwarf spheroidal galaxies ranging from [Fe/H] =-1.7 ± 0.2 to [Fe/H] =-1.9 ± 0.2 and absolute magnitudes ranging from MV = -7.1 ± 0.5 to MV = -10.2 ± 0.5. These five additional satellites bring the number of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in this region to 25 and continue the trend whereby the brighter dwarf spheroidal satellites of M31 generally have much larger half-light radii than their Milky Way counterparts. With an extended sample of M31 satellite galaxies, we also revisit the spatial distribution of this population and in particular we find that, within the current projected limits of the PAndAS survey, the surface density of satellites is essentially constant out to 150 kpc. This corresponds to a radial density distribution of satellites varying as r -1, a result

  7. Indications of M-Dwarf Deficits in the Halo and Thick Disk of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konishi, Mihoko; Shibai, Hiroshi; Sumi, Takahiro; Fukagawa, Misato; Matsuo, Taro; Samland, Matthias S.; Yamamoto, Kodai; Sudo, Jun; Itoh, Yoichi; Arimoto, Nubuo; Kajisawa, Masaru; Lyu, Abe; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E.; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Oliver, Guyon; Hashimoto, Jun; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kudo,Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kwon, Jungmi; McElwain, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    We compared the number of faint stars detected in deep survey fields with the current stellar distribution model of the Galaxy and found that the detected number in the H band is significantly smaller than the predicted number. This indicates that M-dwarfs, the major component, are fewer in the halo and the thick disk. We used archived data of several surveys in both the north and south field of GOODS (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey), MODS in GOODS-N, and ERS and CANDELS in GOODS-S. The number density of M-dwarfs in the halo has to be 20 +/- 13% relative to that in the solar vicinity, in order for the detected number of stars fainter than 20.5 mag in the H band to match with the predicted value from the model. In the thick disk, the number density of M-dwarfs must be reduced (52 +/- 13%) or the scale height must be decreased (approximately 600 pc). Alternatively, overall fractions of the halo and thick disks can be significantly reduced to achieve the same effect, because our sample mainly consists of faint M-dwarfs. Our results imply that the M-dwarf population in regions distant from the Galactic plane is significantly smaller than previously thought. We then discussed the implications this has on the suitability of the model predictions for the prediction of non-companion faint stars in direct imaging extrasolar planet surveys by using the best-fit number densities.

  8. Indications of M-Dwarf Deficits in the Halo and Thick Disk of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konishi, Mihoko; Shibai, Hiroshi; Sumi, Takahiro; Fukagawa, Misato; Matsuo, Taro; Samland, Matthias S.; Yamamoto, Kodai; Sudo, Jun; Itoh, Yoichi; Arimoto, Nobuo; Kajisawa, Masaru; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E.; Feldt, Marcus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Oliver; Hashimoto, Jun; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; McElwain, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    We compared the number of faint stars detected in deep survey fields with the current stellar distribution model of the Galaxy and found that the detected number in the H band is significantly smaller than the predicted number. This indicates that M-dwarfs, the major component, are fewer in the halo and the thick disk. We used archived data of several surveys in both the north and south field of GOODS (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey), MODS in GOODS-N, and ERS and CANDELS in GOODS-S. The number density of M-dwarfs in the halo has to be 20+/-13% relative to that in the solar vicinity, in order for the detected number of stars fainter than 20.5 mag in the H band to match with the predicted value from the model. In the thick disk, the number density of M-dwarfs must be reduced (52+/-13%) or the scale height must be decreased ( approx. 600 pc). Alternatively, overall fractions of the halo and thick disks can be significantly reduced to achieve the same effect, because our sample mainly consists of faint M-dwarfs. Our results imply that the M-dwarf population in regions distant from the Galactic plane is significantly smaller than previously thought. We then discussed the implications this has on the suitability of the model predictions for the prediction of non-companion faint stars in direct imaging extrasolar planet surveys by using the best-fit number densities.

  9. Globular Clusters, Ultra-Compact Dwarfs, and the Formation of Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are a distinctive and ubiquitous constituent of galaxy halos. Their existence alludes to an early epoch of galaxy building characterized by the high star formation rates needed to form massive clusters, and a merging process that produced the extended, spheroidal stellar halos in today's galaxies. While studies of stellar halos are generally limited by low surface brightnesses or the faintness of individual halo stars, GCs are bright and compact, making them excellent tracers of stellar halos out to hundreds of megaparsecs. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is a CFHT Large Program that has acquired imaging of the 104 square degrees within the Virgo Cluster's virial radius. This deep and contiguous imaging of the nearest galaxy cluster provides us a new view of globular clusters across the full range of galaxy morphology and mass, as well as in the regions between galaxies. It also provides the first complete census of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs) in Virgo, objects which may be related to massive GCs and galaxy nuclei. In this talk, I will present what we have learned so far about extragalactic GC systems and UCDs from the NGVS, from both photometry and spectroscopy.

  10. Ultra faint dwarf galaxies: an arena for testing dark matter versus modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Weikang; Ishak, Mustapha

    2016-10-01

    The scenario consistent with a wealth of observations for the missing mass problem is that of weakly interacting dark matter particles. However, arguments or proposals for a Newtonian or relativistic modified gravity scenario continue to be made. A distinguishing characteristic between the two scenarios is that dark matter particles can produce a gravitational effect, in principle, without the need of baryons while this is not the case for the modified gravity scenario where such an effect must be correlated with the amount of baryonic matter. We consider here ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies as a promising arena to test the two scenarios based on the above assertion. We compare the correlation of the luminosity with the velocity dispersion between samples of UFD and non-UFD galaxies, finding a significant loss of correlation for UFD galaxies. For example, we find for 28 non-UFD galaxies a strong correlation coefficient of ‑0.688 which drops to ‑0.077 for the 23 UFD galaxies. Incoming and future data will determine whether the observed stochasticity for UFD galaxies is physical or due to systematics in the data. Such a loss of correlation (if it is to persist) is possible and consistent with the dark matter scenario for UFD galaxies but would constitute a new challenge for the modified gravity scenario.

  11. Abundance ratios and IMF slopes in the dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 1396 with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentz, J. J.; La Barbera, F.; Peletier, R. F.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Lisker, T.; van de Ven, G.; Loubser, S. I.; Hilker, M.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Napolitano, N.; Cantiello, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Norris, M.; Paolillo, M.; Smith, R.; Beasley, M. A.; Lyubenova, M.; Munoz, R.; Puzia, T.

    2016-08-01

    Deep observations of the dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxy NGC 1396 (MV = -16.60, Mass ˜4 × 108 M⊙), located in the Fornax cluster, have been performed with the VLT/ MUSE spectrograph in the wavelength region from 4750 - 9350 Å. In this paper we present a stellar population analysis studying chemical abundances, the star formation history (SFH) and the stellar initial mass function (IMF) as a function of galacto-centric distance. Different, independent ways to analyse the stellar populations result in a luminosity-weighted age of ˜ 6 Gyr and a metallicity [Fe/H]˜ -0.4, similar to other dEs of similar mass. We find unusually overabundant values of [Ca/Fe] ˜+0.1, and under-abundant Sodium, with [Na/Fe] values around -0.1, while [Mg/Fe] is overabundant at all radii, increasing from ˜+0.1 in the centre to ˜+0.2 dex. We notice a significant metallicity and age gradient within this dwarf galaxy. To constrain the stellar IMF of NGC 1396, we find that the IMF of NGC 1396 is consistent with either a Kroupa-like or a top-heavy distribution, while a bottom-heavy IMF is firmly ruled out. An analysis of the abundance ratios, and a comparison with galaxies in the Local Group, shows that the chemical enrichment history of NGC 1396 is similar to the Galactic disc, with an extended star formation history. This would be the case if the galaxy originated from a LMC-sized dwarf galaxy progenitor, which would lose its gas while falling into the Fornax cluster.

  12. A unique isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxy at D = 1.9 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Dmitry; Makarova, Lidia; Sharina, Margarita; Uklein, Roman; Tikhonov, Anton; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kirby, Evan; Terekhova, Natalya

    2012-09-01

    We present a photometric and spectroscopic study of the unique isolated nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy KKR 25. The galaxy was resolved into stars with Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 including old red giant branch and red clump. We have constructed a model of the resolved stellar populations and measured the star formation rate and metallicity as a function of time. The main star formation activity period occurred about 12.6-13.7 Gyr ago. These stars are mostly metal poor, with a mean metallicity [Fe/H] ˜ -1 to -1.6 dex. About 60 per cent of the total stellar mass was formed during this event. There are indications of intermediate-age star formation in KKR 25 between 1 and 4 Gyr with no significant signs of metal enrichment for these stars. Long-slit spectroscopy was carried out using the Russian 6-m telescope of the integrated starlight and bright individual objects in the galaxy. We have discovered a planetary nebula (PN) in KKR 25. This is the first known PN in a dSph galaxy outside the Local Group. We have measured its oxygen abundance 12 + log (O/H) = 7.60 ± 0.07 dex and a radial velocity Vh = -79 km s-1. We have analysed the stellar density distribution in the galaxy body. The galaxy has an exponential surface brightness profile with a central light depression. We discuss the evolutionary status of KKR 25, which belongs to a rare class of very isolated dwarf galaxies with spheroidal morphology.

  13. The Herschel Dwarf Galaxy Survey. I. Properties of the low-metallicity ISM from PACS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, D.; Madden, S. C.; Lebouteiller, V.; Abel, N.; Hony, S.; Galliano, F.; Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Bigiel, F.; Baes, M.; Boselli, A.; Chevance, M.; Cooray, A.; De Looze, I.; Doublier, V.; Galametz, M.; Hughes, T.; Karczewski, O. Ł.; Lee, M.-Y.; Lu, N.; Spinoglio, L.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The far-infrared (FIR) lines are important tracers of the cooling and physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) and are rapidly becoming workhorse diagnostics for galaxies throughout the universe. There are clear indications of a different behavior of these lines at low metallicity that needs to be explored. Aims: Our goal is to explain the main differences and trends observed in the FIR line emission of dwarf galaxies compared to more metal-rich galaxies, and how this translates in ISM properties. Methods: We present Herschel/PACS spectroscopic observations of the [C ii] 157 μm, [O i] 63 and 145 μm, [O iii] 88 μm, [N ii] 122 and 205 μm, and [N iii] 57 μm fine-structure cooling lines in a sample of 48 low-metallicity star-forming galaxies of the guaranteed time key program Dwarf Galaxy Survey. We correlate PACS line ratios and line-to-LTIR ratios with LTIR, LTIR/LB, metallicity, and FIR color, and interpret the observed trends in terms of ISM conditions and phase filling factors with Cloudy radiative transfer models. Results: We find that the FIR lines together account for up to 3 percent of LTIR and that star-forming regions dominate the overall emission in dwarf galaxies. Compared to metal-rich galaxies, the ratios of [O iii]88/[N ii]122 and [N iii]57/[N ii]122 are high, indicative of hard radiation fields. In the photodissociation region (PDR), the [C ii]157/[O i]63 ratio is slightly higher than in metal-rich galaxies, with a small increase with metallicity, and the [O i]145/[O i]63 ratio is generally lower than 0.1, demonstrating that optical depth effects should be small on the scales probed. The [O iii]88/[O i]63 ratio can be used as an indicator of the ionized gas/PDR filling factor, and is found to be ~4 times higher in the dwarfs than in metal-rich galaxies. The high [C ii]/LTIR, [O i]/LTIR, and [O iii]/LTIR ratios, which decrease with increasing LTIR and LTIR/LB, are interpreted as a combination of moderate far-UV fields and a low

  14. THE NATURE OF STARBURSTS. I. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF EIGHTEEN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Stark, David; Weisz, Daniel; Cannon, John M.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Williams, Benjamin; Dolphin, Andrew; Hidalgo-RodrIguez, Sebastian

    2010-09-20

    We use archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of resolved stellar populations to derive the star formation histories (SFHs) of 18 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies. In this first paper, we present the observations, color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and the SFHs of the 18 starburst galaxies, based on a homogeneous approach to the data reduction, differential extinction, and treatment of photometric completeness. We adopt a star formation rate (SFR) threshold normalized to the average SFR of the individual system as a metric for classifying starbursts in SFHs derived from resolved stellar populations. This choice facilitates finding not only the currently bursting galaxies but also 'fossil' bursts increasing the sample size of starburst galaxies in the nearby (D < 8 Mpc) universe. Thirteen of the eighteen galaxies are experiencing ongoing bursts and five galaxies show fossil bursts. From our reconstructed SFHs, it is evident that the elevated SFRs of a burst are sustained for hundreds of Myr with variations on small timescales. A long >100 Myr temporal baseline is thus fundamental to any starburst definition or identification method. The longer lived bursts rule out rapid 'self-quenching' of starbursts on global scales. The bursting galaxies' gas consumption timescales are shorter than the Hubble time for all but one galaxy confirming the short-lived nature of starbursts based on fuel limitations. Additionally, we find that the strength of the H{alpha} emission usually correlates with the CMD-based SFR during the last 4-10 Myr. However, in four cases, the H{alpha} emission is significantly less than what is expected for models of starbursts; the discrepancy is due to the SFR changing on timescales of a few Myr. The inherently short timescale of the H{alpha} emission limits identifying galaxies as starbursts based on the current characteristics which may or may not be representative of the recent SFH of a galaxy.

  15. Linking dust emission to fundamental properties in galaxies: the low-metallicity picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Madden, S. C.; Galliano, F.; Lebouteiller, V.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; Cormier, D.; Cooray, A.; Cortese, L.; De Looze, I.; Doublier-Pritchard, V.; Galametz, M.; Jones, A. P.; Karczewski, O. Ł.; Lu, N.; Spinoglio, L.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: In this work, we aim to provide a consistent analysis of the dust properties from metal-poor to metal-rich environments by linking them to fundamental galactic parameters. Methods: We consider two samples of galaxies: the Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS) and the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: a Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH), totalling 109 galaxies, spanning almost 2 dex in metallicity. We collect infrared (IR) to submillimetre (submm) data for both samples and present the complete data set for the DGS sample. We model the observed spectral energy distributions (SED) with a physically-motivated dust model to access the dust properties: dust mass, total-IR luminosity, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mass fraction, dust temperature distribution, and dust-to-stellar mass ratio. Results: Using a different SED model (modified black body), different dust composition (amorphous carbon in lieu of graphite), or a different wavelength coverage at submm wavelengths results in differences in the dust mass estimate of a factor two to three, showing that this parameter is subject to non-negligible systematic modelling uncertainties. We find half as much dust with the amorphous carbon dust composition. For eight galaxies in our sample, we find a rather small excess at 500 μm (≤1.5σ). We find that the dust SED of low-metallicity galaxies is broader and peaks at shorter wavelengths compared to more metal-rich systems, a sign of a clumpier medium in dwarf galaxies. The PAH mass fraction and dust temperature distribution are found to be driven mostly by the specific star formation rate, sSFR, with secondary effects from metallicity. The correlations between metallicity and dust mass or total-IR luminosity are direct consequences of the stellar mass-metallicity relation. The dust-to-stellar mass ratios of metal-rich sources follow the well-studied trend of decreasing ratio for decreasing sSFR. The relation is more complex for low-metallicity galaxies with high

  16. OUTSIDE-IN SHRINKING OF THE STAR-FORMING DISK OF DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hongxin; Hunter, Deidre A.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Gao Yu; Schruba, Andreas E-mail: dah@lowell.edu E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com

    2012-02-15

    We have studied multi-band surface brightness profiles of a representative sample of 34 nearby dwarf irregular galaxies. Our data include Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) FUV/NUV, UBV, and H{alpha} and Spitzer 3.6 {mu}m images. These galaxies constitute the majority of the LITTLE THINGS survey (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes-The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey). By modeling the azimuthal averages of the spectral energy distributions with a complete library of star formation histories, we derived the stellar mass surface density distributions and the star formation rate averaged over three different timescales: the recent 0.1 Gyr, 1 Gyr, and a Hubble time. We find that, for {approx}80% (27 galaxies) of our sample galaxies, radial profiles (at least in the outer part) at shorter wavelengths, corresponding to younger stellar populations, have shorter disk scale lengths than those at longer wavelengths, corresponding to older stellar populations. This indicates that the star-forming disk has been shrinking. In addition, the radial distributions of the stellar mass surface density are well described as piece-wise exponential profiles, and {approx}80% of the galaxies have steeper mass profiles in the outer disk than in the inner region. The steep radial decline of the star formation rate in the outer parts compared to that in the inner disks gives a natural explanation for the down-bending stellar mass surface density profiles. Within the inner disks, our sample galaxies on average have constant ratios of recent star formation rate to stellar mass with radius. Nevertheless, {approx}35% (12 galaxies, among which 7 have baryonic mass {approx}<10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} ) of the sample exhibit negative slopes across the observed disk, which is in contrast with the so-called inside-out disk growth scenario suggested for luminous spiral galaxies. The tendency of star formation to become concentrated toward the inner disks in low-mass dwarf irregular galaxies is

  17. Outside-in Shrinking of the Star-forming Disk of Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Xin; Hunter, Deidre A.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Gao, Yu; Schruba, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    We have studied multi-band surface brightness profiles of a representative sample of 34 nearby dwarf irregular galaxies. Our data include Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) FUV/NUV, UBV, and Hα and Spitzer 3.6 μm images. These galaxies constitute the majority of the LITTLE THINGS survey (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes—The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey). By modeling the azimuthal averages of the spectral energy distributions with a complete library of star formation histories, we derived the stellar mass surface density distributions and the star formation rate averaged over three different timescales: the recent 0.1 Gyr, 1 Gyr, and a Hubble time. We find that, for ~80% (27 galaxies) of our sample galaxies, radial profiles (at least in the outer part) at shorter wavelengths, corresponding to younger stellar populations, have shorter disk scale lengths than those at longer wavelengths, corresponding to older stellar populations. This indicates that the star-forming disk has been shrinking. In addition, the radial distributions of the stellar mass surface density are well described as piece-wise exponential profiles, and ~80% of the galaxies have steeper mass profiles in the outer disk than in the inner region. The steep radial decline of the star formation rate in the outer parts compared to that in the inner disks gives a natural explanation for the down-bending stellar mass surface density profiles. Within the inner disks, our sample galaxies on average have constant ratios of recent star formation rate to stellar mass with radius. Nevertheless, ~35% (12 galaxies, among which 7 have baryonic mass lsim108 M ⊙) of the sample exhibit negative slopes across the observed disk, which is in contrast with the so-called inside-out disk growth scenario suggested for luminous spiral galaxies. The tendency of star formation to become concentrated toward the inner disks in low-mass dwarf irregular galaxies is interpreted as a result of their susceptibility to

  18. Bursts of star formation in computer simulations of dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Comins, N.F.

    1984-09-01

    A three-dimensional Stochastic Self-Propagating Star Formation (SSPSF) model of compact galacies is presented. Two phases of gas, active and inactive, are present, and permanent depletion of gas in the form of long lived, low mass stars and remnants occurs. Similarly, global infall of gas from a galactic halo or through galactic cannibalism is permitted. We base our parameters on the observed properties of the compact blue galaxy I Zw 36. Our results are that bursts of star formation occur much more frequently in these runs than continuous nonbursting star formation, suggesting that the blue compact galaxies are probably undergoing bursts rather than continuous, nonbursting low-level star formation activity.

  19. Antlia Dwarf Galaxy: distance, quantitative morphology and recent formation history via statistical field correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Couch, Warrick J.

    2012-01-01

    We apply a statistical field correction technique originally designed to determine membership of high redshift galaxy clusters to Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of the Antlia Dwarf Galaxy; a galaxy at the very edge of the Local Group. Using the tip of the red giant branch standard candle method coupled with a simple Sobel edge detection filter we find a new distance to Antlia of 1.31 ± 0.03 Mpc. For the first time for a Local Group member, we compute the concentration, asymmetry and clumpiness quantitative morphology parameters for Antlia from the distribution of resolved stars in the HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) field, corrected with a new method for contaminants and complement these parameters with the Gini coefficient (G) and the second-order moment of the brightest 20 per cent of the flux (M20). We show that it is a classic dwarf elliptical (C = 2.0, A = 0.063, S = 0.077, G = 0.39 and M20=-1.17 in the F814W band), but has an appreciable blue stellar population at its core, confirming on-going star formation. The values of asymmetry and clumpiness, as well as Gini and M20 are consistent with an undisturbed galaxy. Although our analysis suggests that Antlia may not be tidally influenced by NGC 3109, it does not necessarily preclude such interaction.

  20. Mapping the Properties of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies by Means of Integral Field Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairós, L. M.; Caon, N.; Weilbacher, P.; Papaderos, P.; García-Lorenzo, B.

    Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies are metal-poor and gas-rich systems undergoing intense, spatially extended star-forming activity. These galaxies offer a unique opportunity to investigate dwarf galaxy formation and evolution, and probe violent star formation and its implications on the chemical, dynamical and structural properties of low-mass extragalactic systems near and far. Several fundamental questions in BCD research, such as their star formation histories and the mechanisms that control their cyclic starburst activity, are still far from well understood. In order to improve our understanding on BCD evolution, we are carrying out a comprehensive Integral Field Spectroscopic (IFS) survey of a large sample of BCDs. Integral Field Unit (IFU) spectroscopy provides simultaneously spectral and spatial information, allowing, in just one shot, to study the morphology and evolutionary status of the stellar component, and the physical properties of the warm interstellar medium (e.g., extinction, chemical abundances, kinematics). This ongoing IFS survey will supply much needed local templates that will ease the interpretation of IFS data for intermediate and high-redshift star-forming galaxies.

  1. Satellite accretion in action: a tidally disrupting dwarf spheroidal around the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Martin, Nicolas F.; Morales, Gustavo; Jennings, Zachary G.; GaBany, R. Jay; Brodie, Jean P.; Grebel, Eva K.; Schedler, Johannes; Sidonio, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We report the discovery of NGC 253-dw2, a dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy candidate undergoing tidal disruption around a nearby spiral galaxy, NGC 253 in the Sculptor group: the first such event identified beyond the Local Group. The dwarf was found using small-aperture amateur telescopes, and followed up with Suprime-Cam on the 8 m Subaru Telescope in order to resolve its brightest stars. Using g- and Rc-band photometry, we detect a red giant branch consistent with an old, metal-poor stellar population at a distance of ˜3.5 Mpc. From the distribution of likely member stars, we infer a highly elongated shape with a semimajor axis half-light radius of (2 ± 0.4) kpc. Star counts also yield a luminosity estimate of ˜2 × 106 L⊙,V (MV ˜ -10.7). The morphological properties of NGC 253-dw2 mark it as distinct from normal dSphs and imply ongoing disruption at a projected distance of ˜50 kpc from the main galaxy. Our observations support the hierarchical paradigm wherein massive galaxies continuously accrete less massive ones, and provide a new case study for dSph infall and dissolution dynamics. We also note the continued efficacy of small telescopes for making big discoveries.

  2. A COMPREHENSIVE, WIDE-FIELD STUDY OF PULSATING STARS IN THE CARINA DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Vivas, A. Katherina; Mateo, Mario E-mail: mmateo@umich.edu

    2013-12-01

    We report the detection of 388 pulsating variable stars (and some additional miscellaneous variables) in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy over an area covering the full visible extent of the galaxy and extending a few times beyond its photometric (King) tidal radius along the direction of its major axis. Included in this total are 340 newly discovered dwarf Cepheids (DCs), which are mostly located ∼2.5 mag below the horizontal branch and have very short periods (<0.1 days), typical of their class and consistent with their location on the upper part of the extended main sequence of the younger populations of the galaxy. Several extra-tidal DCs were found in our survey up to a distance of ∼1° from the center of Carina. Our sample also includes RR Lyrae stars and anomalous Cepheids, some of which were found outside the galaxy's tidal radius as well. This supports past works that suggest that Carina is undergoing tidal disruption. We use the period-luminosity relationship for DCs to estimate a distance modulus of μ{sub 0} = 20.17 ± 0.10 mag, in very good agreement with the estimate from RR Lyrae stars. We find some important differences in the properties of the DCs of Carina and those in Fornax and the LMC, the only extragalactic samples of DCs currently known. These differences may reflect a metallicity spread, depth along the line of sight, and/or different evolutionary paths of the DC stars.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Dwarf galaxies surface brightness profiles. I. (Herrmann+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, K. A.; Hunter, D. A.; Elmegreen, B. G.

    2014-07-01

    Our galaxy sample (see Table 1) is from the survey of Hunter & Elmegreen (2004, Cat. J/AJ/128/2170), which includes 94 dwarf Irregulars (dIms), 26 Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCDs), and 20 Magellanic-type spirals (Sms).4 (The Sm F567-2 is missing from this study and two dIms, F473-V1 and F620-V3, have been added.) UBV images from 27 observing runs are given by Hunter & Elmegreen (2006, Cat. J/ApJS/162/49) for 136 dwarfs and images from at least one band of JHK are presented for 41 (26 dIm, 12 BCD, and 3 Sm) from an additional 9 observing runs. The remaining 5 out of 141 galaxies (DDO 125, Mrk 67, NGC 1705, NGC 2101, and NGC 3109) were observed earlier with a different detector and so were not included in Hunter & Elmegreen (2006). Most of the UBV and JHK images were obtained with the Lowell Observatory 1.1m or 1.8m telescopes. Satellite UV images were also obtained with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). GALEX produced images in two passbands: FUV, with a bandpass of 1350-1750Å, an effective wavelength of 1516Å, and a resolution of 4" and NUV with a bandpass of 1750-2800Å, an effective wavelength of 2267Å, and a resolution of 5.6". The FUV and NUV data are on the AB magnitude system whereas the data in all other broad bands are on the Johnson/Cousin system. Hunter et al. (2010AJ....139..447H) analyzed surface photometry and derived SF rates from archival GALEX images of 44 galaxies. (Note that NUV data were available for DDO 88, DDO 165, and DDO 180 but FUV images were not.) Hunter et al. (2011AJ....142..121H) obtained deep GALEX UV images of an additional four galaxies and a deeper image of DDO 53. The LITTLE THINGS team obtained data on another 12 galaxies (Zhang et al., 2012AJ....143...47Z). We obtained mid-infrared (3.6 and 4.5{micro}m) images with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) from the Spitzer archives. Hunter et al. (2006, Cat. J/ApJS/162/49) analyzed data on 21 galaxies in our sample. Other data were taken by several Spitzer Legacy projects: The Local

  4. Simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies formed in dark matter halos with different mass assembly histories

    SciTech Connect

    González-Samaniego, A.; Avila-Reese, V.; Rodríguez-Puebla, A.; Valenzuela, O.; Colín, P.

    2014-04-10

    We present zoom-in N-body/hydrodynamics resimulations of dwarf galaxies formed in isolated cold dark matter (CDM) halos with the same virial mass (M{sub v} ≈ 2.5 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}) at redshift z = 0. Our goals are to (1) study the mass assembly histories (MAHs) of the halo, stellar, and gaseous components; and (2) explore the effects of the halo MAHs on the stellar/baryonic assembly of simulated dwarfs. Overall, the dwarfs are roughly consistent with observations. More specific results include: (1) the stellar-to-halo mass ratio remains roughly constant since z ∼ 1, i.e., the stellar MAHs closely follow halo MAHs. (2) The evolution of the galaxy gas fractions, f{sub g} , are episodic, showing that the supernova-driven outflows play an important role in regulating f{sub g} —and hence, the star formation rate (SFR)—however, in most cases, a large fraction of the gas is ejected from the halo. (3) The star formation histories are episodic with changes in the SFRs, measured every 100 Myr, of factors of 2-10 on average. (4) Although the dwarfs formed in late assembled halos show more extended SF histories, their z = 0 specific SFRs are still below observations. (5) The inclusion of baryons most of the time reduces the virial mass by 10%-20% with respect to pure N-body simulations. Our results suggest that rather than increasing the strength of the supernova-driven outflows, processes that reduce the star formation efficiency could help to solve the potential issues faced by CDM-based simulations of dwarfs, such as low values of the specific SFR and high stellar masses.

  5. Searching for star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Antlia cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaduvescu, O.; Kehrig, C.; Bassino, L. P.; Smith Castelli, A. V.; Calderón, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    Context. The formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in clusters need to be understood, and this requires large aperture telescopes. Aims: In this sense, we selected the Antlia cluster to continue our previous work in the Virgo, Fornax, and Hydra clusters and in the Local Volume (LV). Because of the scarce available literature data, we selected a small sample of five blue compact dwarf (BCD) candidates in Antlia for observation. Methods: Using the Gemini South and GMOS camera, we acquired the Hα imaging needed to detect star-forming regions in this sample. With the long-slit spectroscopic data of the brightest seven knots detected in three BCD candidates, we derived their basic chemical properties. Using archival VISTA VHS survey images, we derived KS magnitudes and surface brightness profile fits for the whole sample to assess basic physical properties. Results: FS90-98, FS90-106, and FS90-147 are confirmed as BCDs and cluster members, based on their morphology, KS surface photometry, oxygen abundance, and velocity redshift. FS90-155 and FS90-319 did not show any Hα emission, and they could not be confirmed as dwarf cluster star-forming galaxies. Based on our data, we studied some fundamental relations to compare star forming dwarfs (BCDs and dIs) in the LV and in the Virgo, Fornax, Hydra, and Antlia clusters. Conclusions: Star-forming dwarfs in nearby clusters appear to follow same fundamental relations in the near infrared with similar objects in the LV, specifically the size-luminosity and the metallicity-luminosity, while other more fundamental relations could not be checked in Antlia due to lack of data. Based on observations acquired at Gemini South (GS-2010A-Q-51 and GS-2012A-Q-59) and ESO VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS).

  6. The Environment of X-Ray Binaries in the Dwarf Starburst Galaxy NGC 1569

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Raines, Steven N.

    2008-05-01

    We use deep, J and Ks observations of NGC 1569 acquired with FLAMINGOS on the KPNO 4-m to search for star cluster counterparts to X-ray binaries identified in archived Chandra images of this dwarf starburst galaxy. Performing near-IR photometry on the star cluster counterparts, we determine their colors, luminosities and masses. Comparing these results to the properties for all clusters in this galaxy, we search for trends in clusters associated with X-ray sources. Combining this study with FISICA, near-IR spectral observations, we further characterize the surroundings to X-ray binaries in NGC 1569. Contrasting this work with findings from a similar study performed on the Antennae galaxies, a large, merging system, we investigate the differences in X-ray binary environments.

  7. DISTANCE TO THE SAGITTARIUS DWARF GALAXY USING MACHO PROJECT RR LYRAE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunder, Andrea; Chaboyer, Brian E-mail: brian.chaboyer@dartmouth.edu

    2009-05-15

    We derive the distance to the northern extension of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf spheroidal galaxy from 203 Sgr RR0 Lyrae stars found in the MACHO database. Their distances are determined differentially with respect to 288 Galactic bulge RR0 Lyrae stars also found in the MACHO data. We find a distance modulus difference of 2.41 mag at l = 5{sup 0} and b = -8{sup 0} and that the extension of the Sgr galaxy toward the galactic plane is inclined toward us. Assuming R {sub GC} = 8 kpc, this implies the distance to these stars is (m - M){sub 0} = 16.97 {+-} 0.07 mag, which corresponds to D = 24.8 {+-} 0.8 kpc. Although this estimate is smaller than previous determinations for this galaxy and agrees with previous suggestions that Sgr's body is truly closer to us, this estimate is larger than studies at comparable galactic latitudes.

  8. Revisiting the Age-Metallicity Relationship of the Fornax spheroidal dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; del Pino, A.; Aparicio, A.; Hidalgo, S.

    We present results about the Age-Metallicity Relationship (AMR) of three fields located in the central region of the spheroidal dwarf galaxy of Fornax; from the birth of the galaxy until 1 Gyr ago; independent of any other previous approach. The resulting AMRs describe the trend of the representative stellar populations in each field; namely; the dominant populations in terms of stellar density. Our results suggest that the innermost regions of Fornax does not contain very old stars (age 12 Gyr); whereas the studied outer fields do not account for star field populations younger than 3 Gyr. On the other side; the AMRs of two fields show possible metallicity bimodality during the first half of the galaxy lifetime. However; more recent star formation processes (age 1-2 Gyr) result in a intrinsic metallicity dispersion smaller than for relatively older generations of stars.

  9. Gas-rich Galaxies in the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey (ALFALFA) -- From HI Dwarfs to Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan

    2013-01-01

    Making use of HI 21 cm line measurements from the ALFALFA survey (α.40) and photometry from the SDSS and GALEX, we investigate the global scaling relations linking stars and gas for 9417 common galaxies (α.40-SDSS-GALEX). Stellar masses (M*) and SFRs are derived from fitting the UV-optical SEDs. 96% of the α.40-SDSS-GALEX galaxies belong to the blue cloud, with the average gas fraction MHI/M* > 1.5. A transition in star formation (SF) properties is found whereby below M* > 109.5M⊙, the slope of the SF sequence changes, the dispersion in the specific star formation rate (SSFR) distribution increases, and the star formation efficiency (SFE) mildly increases with M*. The evolutionary track in the SSFR-M* diagram, as well as that in the CMD, is linked to the HI content; below this transition mass, the SF is regulated strongly by the HI. Comparison of HI and optically selected samples shows that the HI-selected population is less evolved and has overall higher SFR and SSFR at a given M*, but lower SFE and extinction, suggesting either that a bottleneck exists in the HI-to-H2 conversion, or that the very HI-dominated galaxies obey an low efficiency SF law. We show that for a given M*, high gas fraction galaxies reside preferentially in dark matter halos with high spin parameters. In addition, we closely studied 229 low MHI ALFALFA dwarfs with reprocessed GALEX photometry. Many of them are currently undergoing active SF, relative to the past-averaged level, so that the widely used standard formulae calibrated for a continuous SF history systematically overestimate the M* and SFR. Currently, we are gathering multi-wavelength data for the High HI Mass, HI-rich (HIghMass) galaxies identified by the ALFALFA (MHI>1010M⊙ and gas fraction more than 1σ above the mean given their M*). They may be in an arrested stage of evolution, or their huge HI disks may reflect recent baryon accretion. Most of the HIghMass galaxies exhibit strong color gradient and have higher Hα EWs

  10. Star Formation in Extreme Environments: The Case of the Prototypical Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy II Zw 40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepley, Amanda; Leroy, Adam; Johnson, Kelsey; Sandstrom, Karin; Chen, Rosie

    2015-08-01

    With their high star formation rate surface densities and low metallicities, blue compact dwarf galaxies represent one of the most extreme environments for star formation in the local universe: one more akin to that found in high redshift galaxies than in local spirals. Until the advent of ALMA, however, the molecular gas fueling the prodigious star formation in blue compact dwarfs was difficult to observe because these galaxies generally have weak CO emission. In this talk, I present the first detailed study of the molecular gas content (as traced by CO) in the prototypical nearby blue compact dwarf galaxy II Zw 40. Using the extraordinary resolution and sensitivity of our ALMA Cycle 1 observations, we have separated the molecular gas emission into discrete GMC-sized clumps and measured their properties. Surprisingly, we find that -- aside from their low CO luminosities -- the giant molecular clouds in this extreme galaxy have similar properties to clouds in normal spiral galaxies. This discovery suggests that giant molecular clouds share a similar set of properties, despite the differences in their surrounding galactic environment. We suggest that the observed clouds include a range of evolutionary states providing us with important clues about the eventual fate of II Zw 40. Finally, we also report on some of the first observations of dense gas tracers in a Local Group blue compact dwarf, giving a first look at the internal structure of molecular gas in these extreme galaxies.

  11. The relation between stellar populations, structure and environment for dwarf elliptical galaxies from the MAGPOP-ITP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michielsen, D.; Boselli, A.; Conselice, C. J.; Toloba, E.; Whiley, I. M.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Balcells, M.; Cardiel, N.; Cenarro, A. J.; Gorgas, J.; Peletier, R. F.; Vazdekis, A.

    2008-04-01

    Dwarf galaxies, as the most numerous type of galaxy, offer the potential to study galaxy formation and evolution in detail in the nearby universe. Although they seem to be simple systems at first view, they remain poorly understood. In an attempt to alleviate this situation, the MAGPOP EU Research and Training Network embarked on a study of dwarf galaxies named MAGPOP-ITP. In this paper, we present the analysis of a sample of 24 dwarf elliptical galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo cluster and in the field, using optical long-slit spectroscopy. We examine their stellar populations in combination with their light distribution and environment. We confirm and strengthen previous results that dEs are, on average, younger and more metal-poor than normal elliptical galaxies, and that their [α/Fe] abundance ratios scatter around solar. This is in accordance with the downsizing picture of galaxy formation where mass is the main driver for the star formation history. We also find new correlations between the luminosity-weighted mean age, the large-scale asymmetry, and the projected Virgocentric distance. We find that environment plays an important role in the termination of the star formation activity by ram-pressure stripping of the gas in short time-scales, and in the transformation of discy dwarfs to more spheroidal objects by harassment over longer time-scales. This points towards a continuing infalling scenario for the evolution of dEs.

  12. The Central Mass Distribution in Dwarf and Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaters, R. A.; Madore, B. F.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Balcells, M.

    2003-02-01

    We present high-resolution Hα rotation curves for a sample of 15 dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies. From these we derive limits on the slopes of the central mass distributions, using both a direct inversion of the rotation curves and detailed mass models. Assuming that the density distributions of dark matter halos follow a power law at small radii, ρ(r)~r-α, we find inner slopes in the range 0<~α<~1 for most galaxies. Thus, even with the relatively high spatial resolution of the Hα rotation curves presented here, the inner slopes are poorly constrained. In general halos with constant density cores (α=0) provide somewhat better fits, but the majority of our galaxies (~75%) are also consistent with α=1, as long as the R-band stellar mass-to-light ratios are smaller than about 2. Halos with α=1.5, however, are ruled out in virtually every case. In order to investigate the robustness of these results we discuss and model several possible causes of systematic errors, including noncircular motions, galaxy inclination, slit width, seeing, and slit alignment errors. Taking the associated uncertainties into account, we conclude that even for the ~25% of the cases where α=1 seems inconsistent with the rotation curves, we cannot rule out cusp slopes this steep. Inclusion of literature samples similar to the one presented here leads to the same conclusion when the possibility of systematic errors is taken into account. In the ongoing debate on whether the rotation curves of dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies are consistent with predictions for a cold dark matter universe, we argue that our sample and the literature samples discussed in this paper provide insufficient evidence to rule out halos with α=1. At the same time, we note that none of the galaxies in these samples require halos with steep cusps, as most are equally well or better explained by halos with constant density cores.

  13. H I Structure and Kinematics in the LITTLE THINGS Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Nau Raj; Simpson, Caroline E.; LITTLE THINGS Team

    2016-01-01

    We present a catalog and analysis of the properties of neutral hydrogen gas (H I) holes/shells in the LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey) galaxies. LITTLE THINGS uses high angular resolution (~6''), high spectral resolution (≤ 2.6 km s-1), and high sensitivity (≤ 1.1 mJy beam-1 channel-1) H I observations of 41 nearby (≤ 10.3 Mpc) gas-rich dwarf galaxies. We are interested in dwarf galaxies because they are the most common types of galaxies in the local universe and they are believed to be the first galaxies to form in the universe. Here we study the interaction between star formation evolution and the interstellar medium from which stars form. In the sample, we detected 306 holes with sizes ranging from about 38 pc to 2.3 kpc, the expansion rates varying from 5 to 30 km s-1, and the estimated kinetic age varying from 1 Myr to 127 Myr. The distribution of the holes per unit area is found nearly constant both inside (51%) and outside (49%) of the V-band break radius, where the radial luminosity function changes slope. We derived surface and volume porosity and found that porosity doesn't correlate with star formation rate (SFR) for the LITTLE THINGS sample. Assuming that the holes are formed from the stellar feedback, we calculated the supernova rate (SNR) and the SFR. We did find a correlation between the SFR calculated from Hα (a star formation tracer) and the SFR estimated from the SNR, consistent with hole formation from stellar feedback. The relation between the estimated kinetic ages of the holes with the SNR gives the indication of the star formation history.

  14. The Globular Cluster System of the Virgo Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy VCC 1087

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, Michael A.; Strader, Jay; Brodie, Jean P.; Cenarro, A. Javier; Geha, M.

    2006-02-01

    We present an analysis of the globular cluster (GC) system of the nucleated dwarf elliptical galaxy VCC 1087 in the Virgo Cluster based on Keck LRIS spectroscopy and archival Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging. We estimate that VCC 1087 hosts a total population of 77+/-19 GCs, which corresponds to a relatively high V-band specific frequency of 5.8+/-1.4. The g475-z850 color distribution of the GCs shows a blue (metal-poor) peak with a tail of redder (metal-rich) clusters similar in color to those seen in luminous elliptical galaxies. The luminosity function of the GCs is lognormal and peaks at MTOg475=-7.2+/-0.3, MTOz850=-8.1+/-0.2. These peak positions are consistent with those found for luminous Virgo elliptical galaxies, suggesting either the lack of or, surprisingly similarly, the dynamical destruction processes of GCs among dwarf and giant galaxies. Spectroscopy of a subsample of 12 GCs suggests that the GC system is old and coeval (>~10 Gyr), with a fairly broad metallicity distribution (-1.8<~[M/H]<~-0.8). In contrast, an integrated spectrum of the underlying galaxy starlight reveals that its optical luminosity is dominated by metal-rich, intermediate-age stars. The radial velocities of the GCs suggest rotation close to the major axis of the galaxy, and this rotation is dynamically significant with (vrot/σlos)*>1. A compilation of the kinematics of the GC systems of nine early-type galaxies shows surprising diversity in the (vrot/σlos) parameter for GC systems. In this context, the GC system of VCC 1087 exhibits the most significant rotation-to-velocity dispersion signature. Dynamical mass modeling of the velocity dispersion profile of the GCs and galaxy stars suggests fairly constant mass-to-light ratios of ~3 out to 6.5 kpc. The present observations can entertain both baryonic and nonbaryonic solutions, and GC velocities at larger radii would be most valuable with regard to this issue. Finally, we discuss the evolution of VCC 1087

  15. THE FATE OF DWARF GALAXIES IN CLUSTERS AND THE ORIGIN OF INTRACLUSTER STARS. II. COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, Hugo; Barai, Paramita; Brito, William

    2012-09-20

    We combine an N-body simulation algorithm with a subgrid treatment of galaxy formation, mergers, and tidal destruction, and an observed conditional luminosity function {Phi}(L|M), to study the origin and evolution of galactic and extragalactic light inside a cosmological volume of size (100 Mpc){sup 3}, in a concordance {Lambda}CDM model. This algorithm simulates the growth of large-scale structures and the formation of clusters, the evolution of the galaxy population in clusters, the destruction of galaxies by mergers and tides, and the evolution of the intracluster light (ICL). We find that destruction of galaxies by mergers dominates over destruction by tides by about an order of magnitude at all redshifts. However, tidal destruction is sufficient to produce ICL fractions f{sub ICL} that are sufficiently high to match observations. Our simulation produces 18 massive clusters (M{sub cl} > 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) with values of f{sub ICL} ranging from 1% to 58% at z = 0. There is a weak trend of f{sub ICL} to increase with cluster mass. The bulk of the ICL ({approx}60%) is provided by intermediate galaxies of total masses 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} and stellar masses 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} that were tidally destroyed by even more massive galaxies. The contribution of low-mass galaxies to the ICL is small and the contribution of dwarf galaxies is negligible, even though, by numbers, most galaxies that are tidally destroyed are dwarfs. Tracking clusters back in time, we find that their values of f{sub ICL} tend to increase over time, but can experience sudden changes that are sometimes non-monotonic. These changes occur during major mergers involving clusters of comparable masses but very different intracluster luminosities. Most of the tidal destruction events take place in the central regions of clusters. As a result, the ICL is more centrally concentrated than the galactic light. Our results

  16. Spatial Correlation between Dust and Hα Emission in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimmy; Tran, Kim-Vy; Saintonge, Amélie; Accurso, Gioacchino; Brough, Sarah; Oliva-Altamirano, Paola; Salmon, Brett; Forrest, Ben

    2016-07-01

    Using a sample of dwarf irregular galaxies selected from the ALFALFA blind H i-survey and observed using the VIMOS IFU, we investigate the relationship between Hα emission and Balmer optical depth ({τ }{{b}}). We find a positive correlation between Hα luminosity surface density and Balmer optical depth in 8 of 11 at ≥0.8σ significance (6 of 11 at ≥1.0σ) galaxies. Our spaxels have physical scales ranging from 30 to 80 pc, demonstrating that the correlation between these two variables continues to hold down to spatial scales as low as 30 pc. Using the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient to test for correlation between {{{Σ }}}{{H}α } and {τ }{{b}} in all the galaxies combined, we find ρ =0.39, indicating a positive correlation at 4σ significance. Our low stellar-mass galaxy results are in agreement with observations of emission line regions in larger spiral galaxies, indicating that this relationship is independent of the size of the galaxy hosting the emission line region. The positive correlation between Hα luminosity and Balmer optical depth within spaxels is consistent with the hypothesis that young star-forming regions are surrounded by dusty birth-clouds. Based on VLT service mode observations (Programs 081.B-0649 and 083.B-0662) gathered at the European Southern Observatory, Chile.

  17. Simulations of the Interactions of the Sagittarius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy with the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, J. M.; The, L.-S.; Messick, A. G.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2005-05-01

    The Sagittarius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy (SagDEG) is one of the satellite galaxies interacting with the Milky Way. Discovered to be located just below the galactic center; this galaxy is currently being tidally disrupted as it approaches the Milky Way. As the interactions occur between these two galaxies, stars from SagDEG are being transferred to the Milky Way. Currently up to four of the known Milky Way Globular Clusters are suspected of originally being members of SagDEG. To study the interactions of these systems, we performed a series of N-Body/SPH simulations. Included in the Milky Way is the distribution of a Dark Matter Halo, Spheroid, and Disk of both stars and gas. The SagDEG system is modeled similarly. We study the galaxies with both dark matter and without in SagDEG to investigate the effect of dark matter to the interacting galaxies. The aim of this project is to answer the question of whether dark matter in the SagDEG system prevents or aids in the disruption of the system (such as mass transfer), and how different the final distributions of stars are.

  18. DETERMINING THE NATURE OF THE EXTENDED H I STRUCTURE AROUND LITTLE THINGS DWARF GALAXY NGC 1569

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Megan

    2013-06-15

    This work presents an extended, neutral hydrogen emission map around Magellanic-type dwarf irregular galaxy (dIm) NGC 1569. In the spring of 2010, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope was used to map a 9 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 2 Degree-Sign region in H I line emission that includes NGC 1569 and IC 342 as well as two other dwarf galaxies. The primary objective for these observations was to search for structures potentially connecting NGC 1569 with IC 342 group members in order to trace previous interactions and thus, provide an explanation for the starburst and peculiar kinematics prevalent in NGC 1569. A large, half-degree diameter H I cloud was detected that shares the same position and velocity as NGC 1569. Also, two long structures were discovered that are reminiscent of intergalactic filaments extending out in a V-shaped manner from NGC 1569 toward UGCA 92, a nearby dwarf galaxy. These filamentary structures extend for about 1. Degree-Sign 5, which is 77 kpc at NGC 1569. There is a continuous velocity succession with the 0. Degree-Sign 5 H I cloud, filaments, and main body of the galaxy. The 0. Degree-Sign 5 H I cloud and filamentary structures may be foreground Milky Way, but are suggestive as possible remnants of an interaction between NGC 1569 and UGCA 92. The data also show two tidal tails extending from UGCA 86 and IC 342, respectively. These structures may be part of a continuous H I bridge but more data are needed to determine if this is the case.

  19. EVOLUTION OF A DWARF SATELLITE GALAXY EMBEDDED IN A SCALAR FIELD DARK MATTER HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Robles, Victor H.; Matos, T.; Lora, V.; Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J. E-mail: vlora@ari.uni-heidelberg.de

    2015-09-10

    The cold dark matter (CDM) model has two unsolved issues: simulations overpredict the satellite abundance around the Milky Way (MW) and it disagrees with observations of the central densities of dwarf galaxies which prefer constant density (core) profiles. One alternative explanation known as the scalar field dark matter (SFDM) model, assumes that dark matter is a scalar field of mass (∼10{sup −22} eV/c{sup 2}); this model can reduce the overabundance issue due to the lack of halo formation below a mass scale of ∼10{sup 8}M{sub ⊙} and successfully fits the density distribution in dwarfs. One of the attractive features of the model is predicting core profiles in halos, although the determination of the core sizes is set by fitting the observational data. We perform N-body simulations to explore the influence of tidal forces over a stellar distribution embedded in an SFDM halo orbiting a MW-like SFDM host halo with a disk. Our simulations intend to test the viability of SFDM as an alternative model by comparing the tidal effects that result in this paradigm with those obtained in the CDM for similar mass halos. We found that galaxies in subhalos with core profiles and high central densities survive for 10 Gyr. The same occurs for galaxies in low density subhalos located far from the host disk influence, whereas satellites in low density DM halos and in tight orbits can eventually be stripped of stars. We conclude that SFDM shows consistency with results from the CDM for dwarf galaxies, but naturally offer a possibility to solve the missing satellite problem.

  20. Young Star Clusters in the Outer Disks of LITTLE THINGS Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Gehret, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    We examine FUV images of the LITTLE THINGS sample of nearby dwarf irregular (dIrr) and Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies to identify distinct young regions in their far outer disks. We use these data, obtained with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, to determine the furthest radius at which in situ star formation can currently be identified. The FUV knots are found at distances from the center of the galaxies of 1-8 disk scale lengths and have ages of ≤slant 20 Myr and masses of 20 M{}⊙ to 1 × 105M{}⊙ . The presence of young clusters and OB associations in the outer disks of dwarf galaxies shows that dIrrs do have star formation taking place there in spite of the extreme nature of the environment. Most regions are found where the H i surface density is ˜1 M{}⊙ pc-2, though both the H i and dispersed old stars go out much further. This limiting density suggests a cutoff in the ability to form distinct OB associations and perhaps even stars. We compare the star formation rates in the FUV regions to the average rates expected at their radii and beyond from the observed gas, using the conventional correlation for gas-rich regions. The localized rates are typically 10% of the expected average rates for the outer disks. Either star formation in dIrrs at surface densities \\lt 1 {M}⊙ pc-2 occurs without forming distinct associations, or the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation over-predicts the rate beyond this point. In the latter case, the stellar disks in the far-outer parts of dIrrs result from scattering of stars from the inner disk.

  1. Evolution of a Dwarf Satellite Galaxy Embedded in a Scalar Field Dark Matter Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Victor H.; Lora, V.; Matos, T.; Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J.

    2015-09-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) model has two unsolved issues: simulations overpredict the satellite abundance around the Milky Way (MW) and it disagrees with observations of the central densities of dwarf galaxies which prefer constant density (core) profiles. One alternative explanation known as the scalar field dark matter (SFDM) model, assumes that dark matter is a scalar field of mass (˜10-22 eV/c2); this model can reduce the overabundance issue due to the lack of halo formation below a mass scale of ˜108M⊙ and successfully fits the density distribution in dwarfs. One of the attractive features of the model is predicting core profiles in halos, although the determination of the core sizes is set by fitting the observational data. We perform N-body simulations to explore the influence of tidal forces over a stellar distribution embedded in an SFDM halo orbiting a MW-like SFDM host halo with a disk. Our simulations intend to test the viability of SFDM as an alternative model by comparing the tidal effects that result in this paradigm with those obtained in the CDM for similar mass halos. We found that galaxies in subhalos with core profiles and high central densities survive for 10 Gyr. The same occurs for galaxies in low density subhalos located far from the host disk influence, whereas satellites in low density DM halos and in tight orbits can eventually be stripped of stars. We conclude that SFDM shows consistency with results from the CDM for dwarf galaxies, but naturally offer a possibility to solve the missing satellite problem.

  2. Stellar Kinematics and Metallicities in the Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy Reticulum II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, J. D.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Li, T. S.; Nord, B.; Geha, M.; Bechtol, K.; Balbinot, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Lin, H.; Marshall, J.; Santiago, B.; Strigari, L.; Wang, M.; Wechsler, R. H.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T.; Bauer, A. H.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dodelson, S.; Cunha, C. E.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; DES Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    We present Magellan/M2FS, Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE, and Gemini South/GMOS spectroscopy of the newly discovered Milky Way satellite Reticulum II. Based on the spectra of 25 Ret II member stars selected from Dark Energy Survey imaging, we measure a mean heliocentric velocity of 62.8+/- 0.5 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and a velocity dispersion of 3.3+/- 0.7 {km} {{{s}}}-1. The mass-to-light ratio of Ret II within its half-light radius is 470+/- 210 {M}⊙ /{L}⊙ , demonstrating that it is a strongly dark matter-dominated system. Despite its spatial proximity to the Magellanic Clouds, the radial velocity of Ret II differs from that of the LMC and SMC by 199 and 83 {km} {{{s}}}-1, respectively, suggesting that it is not gravitationally bound to the Magellanic system. The likely member stars of Ret II span 1.3 dex in metallicity, with a dispersion of 0.28 ± 0.09 dex, and we identify several extremely metal-poor stars with {{[Fe/H]}}\\lt -3. In combination with its luminosity, size, and ellipticity, these results confirm that Ret II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. With a mean metallicity of {{[Fe/H]}}=-2.65+/- 0.07, Ret II matches Segue 1 as the most metal-poor galaxy known. Although Ret II is the third-closest dwarf galaxy to the Milky Way, the line-of-sight integral of the dark matter density squared is {{log}}10(J)=18.8+/- 0.6 {GeV}{ }2 {{cm}}-5 within 0.°2, indicating that the predicted gamma-ray flux from dark matter annihilation in Ret II is lower than that of several other dwarf galaxies. Based on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility under request number 157689.

  3. Stellar kinematics and metallicities in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Reticulum II

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J. D.

    2015-07-23

    With this study, we present Magellan/M2FS, Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE, and Gemini South/GMOS spectroscopy of the newly discovered Milky Way satellite Reticulum II. Based on the spectra of 25 Ret II member stars selected from Dark Energy Survey imaging, we measure a mean heliocentric velocity of $62.8\\pm 0.5\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$ and a velocity dispersion of $3.3\\pm 0.7\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$. The mass-to-light ratio of Ret II within its half-light radius is $470\\pm 210\\ {M}_{\\odot }/{L}_{\\odot }$, demonstrating that it is a strongly dark matter-dominated system. Despite its spatial proximity to the Magellanic Clouds, the radial velocity of Ret II differs from that of the LMC and SMC by 199 and 83 $\\mathrm{km}\\ {{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$, respectively, suggesting that it is not gravitationally bound to the Magellanic system. The likely member stars of Ret II span 1.3 dex in metallicity, with a dispersion of 0.28 ± 0.09 dex, and we identify several extremely metal-poor stars with ${\\rm{[Fe/H]}}\\lt -3$. In combination with its luminosity, size, and ellipticity, these results confirm that Ret II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. With a mean metallicity of ${\\rm{[Fe/H]}}=-2.65\\pm 0.07$, Ret II matches Segue 1 as the most metal-poor galaxy known. Although Ret II is the third-closest dwarf galaxy to the Milky Way, the line-of-sight integral of the dark matter density squared is ${\\mathrm{log}}_{10}(J)=18.8\\pm 0.6\\;\\;\\mathrm{GeV}{\\;}^{2}\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-5}\\;$ within 0fdg2, indicating that the predicted gamma-ray flux from dark matter annihilation in Ret II is lower than that of several other dwarf galaxies.

  4. VERITAS SEARCH FOR VHE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Furniss, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Duke, C.; Finnegan, G.

    2010-09-10

    Indirect dark matter searches with ground-based gamma-ray observatories provide an alternative for identifying the particle nature of dark matter that is complementary to that of direct search or accelerator production experiments. We present the results of observations of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Draco, Ursa Minor, Booetes 1, and Willman 1 conducted by the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). These galaxies are nearby dark matter dominated objects located at a typical distance of several tens of kiloparsecs for which there are good measurements of the dark matter density profile from stellar velocity measurements. Since the conventional astrophysical background of very high energy gamma rays from these objects appears to be negligible, they are good targets to search for the secondary gamma-ray photons produced by interacting or decaying dark matter particles. No significant gamma-ray flux above 200 GeV was detected from these four dwarf galaxies for a typical exposure of {approx}20 hr. The 95% confidence upper limits on the integral gamma-ray flux are in the range (0.4-2.2) x 10{sup -12}photonscm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. We interpret this limiting flux in the context of pair annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) and derive constraints on the thermally averaged product of the total self-annihilation cross section and the relative velocity of the WIMPs (({sigma}v) {approx}< 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for m {sub {chi} {approx}}> 300 GeV c {sup -2}). This limit is obtained under conservative assumptions regarding the dark matter distribution in dwarf galaxies and is approximately 3 orders of magnitude above the generic theoretical prediction for WIMPs in the minimal supersymmetric standard model framework. However, significant uncertainty exists in the dark matter distribution as well as the neutralino cross sections which under favorable assumptions could further lower this limit.

  5. THRESHING IN ACTION: THE TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A DWARF GALAXY BY THE HYDRA I CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; Burkert, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael; Black, Christine S.; Collins, Michelle L. M.; Hilker, Michael; Benson, Andrew J.

    2012-08-10

    We report on the discovery of strong tidal features around a dwarf spheroidal galaxy in the Hydra I galaxy cluster, indicating its ongoing tidal disruption. This very low surface brightness object, HCC-087, was originally classified as an early-type dwarf in the Hydra Cluster Catalogue (HCC), but our re-analysis of the ESO-VLT/FORS images of the HCC unearthed a clear indication of an S-shaped morphology and a large spatial extent. Its shape, luminosity (M{sub V} = -11.6 mag), and physical size (at a half-light radius of 3.1 kpc and a full length of {approx}5.9 kpc) are comparable to the recently discovered NGC 4449B and the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal, all of which are undergoing clear tidal disruption. Aided by N-body simulations we argue that HCC-087 is currently at its first apocenter, at 150 kpc, around the cluster center and that it is being tidally disrupted by the galaxy cluster's potential itself. An interaction with the nearby (50 kpc) S0 cluster galaxy HCC-005, at M{sub *} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} is rather unlikely, as this constellation requires a significant amount of dynamical friction and thus low relative velocities. The S-shaped morphology and large spatial extent of the satellite would, however, also appear if HCC-087 would orbit the cluster center. These features appear to be characteristic properties of satellites that are seen in the process of being tidally disrupted, independent of the environment of the destruction. An important finding of our simulations is an orientation of the tidal tails perpendicular to the orbit.

  6. DETAILED ABUNDANCES OF TWO VERY METAL-POOR STARS IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2012-12-01

    The most metal-poor stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) can show the nucleosynthetic patterns of one or a few supernovae (SNe). These SNe could have zero metallicity, making metal-poor dSph stars the closest surviving links to Population III stars. Metal-poor dSph stars also help to reveal the formation mechanism of the Milky Way (MW) halo. We present the detailed abundances from Keck/HIRES spectroscopy for two very metal-poor stars in two MW dSphs. One star, in the Sculptor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -2.40. The other star, in the Ursa Minor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -3.16. Both stars fall in the previously discovered low-metallicity, high-[{alpha}/Fe] plateau. Most abundance ratios of very metal-poor stars in these two dSphs are largely consistent with very metal-poor halo stars. However, the abundances of Na and some r-process elements lie at the lower end of the envelope defined by inner halo stars of similar metallicity. We propose that the metallicity dependence of SN yields is the cause. The earliest SNe in low-mass dSphs have less gas to pollute than the earliest SNe in massive halo progenitors. As a result, dSph stars at -3 < [Fe/H] < -2 sample SNe with [Fe/H] << -3, whereas halo stars in the same metallicity range sample SNe with [Fe/H] {approx} -3. Consequently, enhancements in [Na/Fe] and [r/Fe] were deferred to higher metallicity in dSphs than in the progenitors of the inner halo.

  7. Dark matter annihilation and decay in dwarf spheroidal galaxies: the classical and ultrafaint dSphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnivard, V.; Combet, C.; Daniel, M.; Funk, S.; Geringer-Sameth, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Maurin, D.; Read, J. I.; Sarkar, S.; Walker, M. G.; Wilkinson, M. I.

    2015-10-01

    Dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are prime targets for present and future γ-ray telescopes hunting for indirect signals of particle dark matter. The interpretation of the data requires careful assessment of their dark matter content in order to derive robust constraints on candidate relic particles. Here, we use an optimized spherical Jeans analysis to reconstruct the `astrophysical factor' for both annihilating and decaying dark matter in 21 known dSphs. Improvements with respect to previous works are: (i) the use of more flexible luminosity and anisotropy profiles to minimize biases, (ii) the use of weak priors tailored on extensive sets of contamination-free mock data to improve the confidence intervals, (iii) systematic cross-checks of binned and unbinned analyses on mock and real data, and (iv) the use of mock data including stellar contamination to test the impact on reconstructed signals. Our analysis provides updated values for the dark matter content of 8 `classical' and 13 `ultrafaint' dSphs, with the quoted uncertainties directly linked to the sample size; the more flexible parametrization we use results in changes compared to previous calculations. This translates into our ranking of potentially-brightest and most robust targets - namely Ursa Minor, Draco, Sculptor - and of the more promising, but uncertain targets - namely Ursa Major 2, Coma - for annihilating dark matter. Our analysis of Segue 1 is extremely sensitive to whether we include or exclude a few marginal member stars, making this target one of the most uncertain. Our analysis illustrates challenges that will need to be addressed when inferring the dark matter content of new `ultrafaint' satellites that are beginning to be discovered in southern sky surveys.

  8. Effect of black holes in local dwarf spheroidal galaxies on gamma-ray constraints on dark matter annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2014-11-01

    Recent discoveries of optical signatures of black holes in dwarf galaxies indicates that low-mass galaxies can indeed host intermediate massive black holes. This motivates the assessment of the resulting effect on the host dark matter density profile, and the consequences for the constraints on the plane of the dark matter annihilation cross section versus mass, stemming from the nonobservation of gamma rays from local dwarf spheroidals with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We compute the density profile using three different prescriptions for the black hole mass associated with a given spheroidal galaxy, and taking into account the cutoff to the density from dark matter pair-annihilation. We find that the limits on the dark matter annihilation rate from observations of individual dwarfs are enhanced by factors of a few up to 1 06 , depending on the specific galaxy, on the black hole mass prescription, and on the dark matter particle mass. We estimate limits from combined observations of a sample of 15 dwarfs, for a variety of assumptions on the dwarf black hole mass and on the dark matter density profile prior to adiabatic contraction. We find that if black holes are indeed present in local dwarf spheroidals, then, independent of assumptions, (i) the dark matter interpretation of the Galactic center gamma-ray excess would be conclusively ruled out, (ii) wino dark matter would be excluded up to masses of about 3 TeV, and (iii) vanilla thermal relic weakly interacting massive particles must be heavier than 100 GeV.

  9. Leo I - The youngest Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Myung G.; Freedman, Wendy; Mateo, Mario; Thompson, Ian; Roth, Miguel; Ruiz, Maria-Teresa

    1993-01-01

    Deep CCD photometry of about 16,000 stars in the Milky Way's Leo I spheroidal galaxy satellite is reported. An account is given of the features observed in the color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) derived therefrom. A very blue and well-defined red giant branch (RGB) is noted. The CMDs of Leo I shows about 50 anomalous Cepheid candidates; there are another 50 or so asymptotic giant branch stars above the tip of the RGB, including 15 known carbon stars. The mean color of the RGB is estimated at M sub I = -3.5 mag.

  10. Warp or lag? The ionized and neutral hydrogen gas in the edge-on dwarf galaxy UGC 1281

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamphuis, P.; Peletier, R. F.; van der Kruit, P. C.; Heald, G. H.

    2011-07-01

    The properties of gas in the haloes of galaxies constrain global models of the interstellar medium. Kinematical information is of particular interest since it is a clue to the origin of the gas. Until now mostly massive galaxies have been investigated for their halo properties. Here we report on deep H I and Hα observations of the edge-on dwarf galaxy UGC 1281 in order to determine the existence of extraplanar gas and the kinematics of this galaxy. This is the first time a dwarf galaxy is investigated for its gaseous halo characteristics. We have obtained Hα integral field spectroscopy using PPAK at Calar Alto and deep H I observations with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) of this edge-on dwarf galaxy. These observations are compared to 3D models in order to determine the distribution of H I in the galaxy. We find that UGC 1281 has Hα emission up to 25 arcsec (655 pc) in projection above the plane and in general a low Hα flux. Compared to other dwarf galaxies UGC 1281 is a normal dwarf galaxy with a slowly rising rotation curve that flattens off at 60 km s-1 and a central depression in its H I distribution. Its H I extends 70 arcsec (1.8 kpc) in projection from the plane. This gas can be explained by either a warp partially in the line-of-sight or a purely edge-on warp with rotational velocities that decline with a vertical gradient of 10.6 ± 3.7 km s-1 kpc-1. The line-of-sight warp model is the preferred model as it is conceptually simpler. In either model the warp starts well within the optical radius.

  11. Indication of Gamma-Ray Emission from the Newly Discovered Dwarf Galaxy Reticulum II.

    PubMed

    Geringer-Sameth, Alex; Walker, Matthew G; Koushiappas, Savvas M; Koposov, Sergey E; Belokurov, Vasily; Torrealba, Gabriel; Evans, N Wyn

    2015-08-21

    We present a search for γ-ray emission from the direction of the newly discovered dwarf galaxy Reticulum II. Using Fermi-LAT Collaboration data, we detect a signal that exceeds expected backgrounds between ∼2-10  GeV and is consistent with annihilation of dark matter for particle masses less than a few ×10^{2}  GeV. Modeling the background as a Poisson process based on Fermi-LAT diffuse models, and taking into account trial factors, we detect emission with p value less than 9.8×10^{-5} (>3.7σ). An alternative, model-independent treatment of the background reduces the significance, raising the p value to 9.7×10^{-3} (2.3σ). Even in this case, however, Reticulum II has the most significant γ-ray signal of any known dwarf galaxy. If Reticulum II has a dark-matter halo that is similar to those inferred for other nearby dwarfs, the signal is consistent with the s-wave relic abundance cross section for annihilation. PMID:26340176

  12. Indication of Gamma-Ray Emission from the Newly Discovered Dwarf Galaxy Reticulum II.

    PubMed

    Geringer-Sameth, Alex; Walker, Matthew G; Koushiappas, Savvas M; Koposov, Sergey E; Belokurov, Vasily; Torrealba, Gabriel; Evans, N Wyn

    2015-08-21

    We present a search for γ-ray emission from the direction of the newly discovered dwarf galaxy Reticulum II. Using Fermi-LAT Collaboration data, we detect a signal that exceeds expected backgrounds between ∼2-10  GeV and is consistent with annihilation of dark matter for particle masses less than a few ×10^{2}  GeV. Modeling the background as a Poisson process based on Fermi-LAT diffuse models, and taking into account trial factors, we detect emission with p value less than 9.8×10^{-5} (>3.7σ). An alternative, model-independent treatment of the background reduces the significance, raising the p value to 9.7×10^{-3} (2.3σ). Even in this case, however, Reticulum II has the most significant γ-ray signal of any known dwarf galaxy. If Reticulum II has a dark-matter halo that is similar to those inferred for other nearby dwarfs, the signal is consistent with the s-wave relic abundance cross section for annihilation.

  13. USING M DWARF SPECTRA TO MAP EXTINCTION IN THE LOCAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, David O.; West, Andrew A.; Foster, Jonathan B.

    2011-08-15

    We use spectra of more than 56,000 M dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to create a high-latitude extinction map of the local Galaxy. Our technique compares spectra from the stars in the SDSS Data Release 7 M dwarf sample in low-extinction lines of sight, as determined by Schlegel et al., to other SDSS M dwarf spectra in order to derive improved distance estimates and accurate line-of-sight extinctions. Unlike most previous studies, which have used a two-color method to determine extinction, we fit extinction curves to fluxes across the spectral range from 5700 to 9200 A for every star in our sample. Our result is an A{sub V} map that extends from a few tens of pc to approximately 2 kpc away from the Sun. We also use a similar technique to create a map of R{sub V} values within approximately 1 kpc of the Sun and find that they are consistent with the widely accepted diffuse interstellar medium value of 3.1. Using our extinction data, we derive a dust scale height for the local Galaxy of 119 {+-} 15 pc and find evidence for a local dust cavity.

  14. Search for dark matter annihilation signatures in H.E.S.S. observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goudelis, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadsch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morâ, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Serpico, P.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spieß, F.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group are close satellites of the Milky Way characterized by a large mass-to-light ratio and are not expected to be the site of nonthermal high-energy gamma-ray emission or intense star formation. Therefore they are among the most promising candidates for indirect dark matter searches. During the last years the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes observed five of these dwarf galaxies for more than 140 hours in total, searching for TeV gamma-ray emission from annihilation of dark matter particles. The new results of the deep exposure of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the first observations of the Coma Berenices and Fornax dwarves and the reanalysis of two more dwarf spheroidal galaxies already published by the H.E.S.S. Collaboration, Carina and Sculptor, are presented. In the absence of a significant signal new constraints on the annihilation cross section applicable to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are derived by combining the observations of the five dwarf galaxies. The combined exclusion limit depends on the WIMP mass and the best constraint is reached at 1-2 TeV masses with a cross-section upper bound of ˜ 3.9 ×10-24 cm3 s-1 at a 95% confidence level.

  15. The DART imaging and CaT survey of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, G.; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Irwin, M. J.; Letarte, B.; Jablonka, P.; Hill, V.; Venn, K. A.; Shetrone, M. D.; Arimoto, N.; Primas, F.; Kaufer, A.; Francois, P.; Szeifert, T.; Abel, T.; Sadakane, K.

    2006-11-01

    Aims.As part of the DART project we have used the ESO/2.2m Wide Field Imager in conjunction with the VLT/FLAMES GIRAFFE spectrograph to study the detailed properties of the resolved stellar population of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy out to and beyond its tidal radius. Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy has had a complicated evolution and contains significant numbers of young, intermediate age and old stars. We investigate the relation between these different components by studying their photometric, kinematic and abundance distributions. Methods: . We re-derived the structural parameters of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal using our wide field imaging covering the galaxy out to its tidal radius, and analysed the spatial distribution of the Fornax stars of different ages as selected from colour-magnitude diagram analysis. We have obtained accurate velocities and metallicities from spectra in the Ca II triplet wavelength region for 562 Red Giant Branch stars which have velocities consistent with membership of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal. Results: .We have found evidence for the presence of at least three distinct stellar components: a young population (few 100 Myr old) concentrated in the centre of the galaxy, visible as a Main Sequence in the colour-magnitude diagram; an intermediate age population (2-8 Gyr old); and an ancient population (>10 Gyr), which are distinguishable from each other kinematically, from the metallicity distribution and in the spatial distribution of stars found in the colour-magnitude diagram. Conclusions: . From our spectroscopic analysis we find that the "metal rich" stars ([Fe/H]> -1.3) show a less extended and more concentrated spatial distribution, and display colder kinematics than the "metal poor" stars ([Fe/H]<-1.3). There is tentative evidence that the ancient stellar population in the centre of Fornax does not exhibit equilibrium kinematics. This could be a sign of a relatively recent accretion of external material, such as the merger

  16. Theoretical lower limits on sizes of ultrafaint dwarf galaxies from dynamical friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, X.

    2016-11-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are the smallest known stellar systems where under Newtonian interpretations, a significant amount of dark matter is required to explain observed kinematics. In fact, they are, in this sense, the most heavily dark matter-dominated objects known. That, plus the increasingly small sizes of the newly discovered ultrafaint dwarfs, puts these systems in the regime where dynamical friction on individual stars starts to become relevant. We calculate the dynamical friction time-scales for pressure-supported isotropic spherical dark matter-dominated stellar systems, yielding τDF = 0.93(rh/10 pc)2(σ/km s-1) Gyr, where rh is the half-light radius. For a stellar velocity dispersion value of 3 km s-1, as typical for the smallest of the recently detected ultrafaint dwarf spheroidals, dynamical friction time-scales become smaller than the 10 Gyr typical of the stellar ages for these systems, for rh < 19 pc. Thus, this becomes a theoretical lower limit below which dark matter-dominated stellar systems become unstable to dynamical friction. We present a comparison with structural parameters of the smallest ultrafaint dwarf spheroidals known, showing that these are already close to the stability limit derived, any future detection of yet smaller such systems would be inconsistent with a particle dark matter hypothesis.

  17. Dwarf Galaxy Annihilation and Decay Emission Profiles for Dark Matter Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geringer-Sameth, Alex; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Walker, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-ray searches for dark matter annihilation and decay in dwarf galaxies rely on an understanding of the dark matter density profiles of these systems. Conversely, uncertainties in these density profiles propagate into the derived particle physics limits as systematic errors. In this paper we quantify the expected dark matter signal from 20 Milky Way dwarfs using a uniform analysis of the most recent stellar-kinematic data available. Assuming that the observed stellar populations are equilibrium tracers of spherically symmetric gravitational potentials that are dominated by dark matter, we find that current stellar-kinematic data can predict the amplitudes of annihilation signals to within a factor of a few for the ultra-faint dwarfs of greatest interest. On the other hand, the expected signal from several classical dwarfs (with high-quality observations of large numbers of member stars) can be localized to the ~20% level. These results are important for designing maximally sensitive searches in current and future experiments using space and ground-based instruments.

  18. The Merger History, AGN and Dwarf Galaxies of Hickson Compact Group 59

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Gallagher, S. C.; Fedotov, K.; Durrell, P. R.; Tzanavaris, P.; Hill, A. R.; Zabludoff, A. I.; Maier, M. L.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Charlton, J. C.; Johnson, K. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Walker, L. M.; Eracleous, M.; Maybhate, A.; Gronwall, C.; English, J.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Compact group galaxies often appear unaffected by their unusually dense environment. Closer examination can, however, reveal the subtle, cumulative effects of multiple galaxy interactions. Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 59 is an excellent example of this situation. We present a photometric study of this group in the optical (HST), infrared (Spitzer) and X-ray (Chandra) regimes aimed at characterizing the star formation and nuclear activity in its constituent galaxies and intra-group medium. We associate five dwarf galaxies with the group and update the velocity dispersion, leading to an increase in the dynamical mass of the group of up to a factor of 10 (to 2.8 x 10(exp 13) Stellar Mass), and a subsequent revision of its evolutionary stage. Star formation is proceeding at a level consistent with the morphological types of the four main galaxies, of which two are star-forming and the other two quiescent. Unlike in some other compact groups, star-forming complexes across HCG 59 closely follow mass-radius scaling relations typical of nearby galaxies. In contrast, the ancient globular cluster populations in galaxies HCG 59A and B show intriguing irregularities, and two extragalactic HII regions are found just west of B. We age-date a faint stellar stream in the intra-group medium at approx. 1 Gyr to examine recent interactions. We detect a likely low-luminosity AGN in HCG 59A by its approx. 10(exp 40) erg/s X-ray emission; the active nucleus rather than star formation can account for the UV+IR SED. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of galaxy evolution in dense environments.

  19. The evolution of C/O in dwarf galaxies from Hubble Space Telescope FOS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garnett, D. R.; Skillman, E. D.; Dufour, R. J.; Peimbert, M.; Torres-Peimbert, S.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Shields, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    We present UV observations of seven H II regions in low-luminosity dwarf irregular galaxies and the Magellanic Clouds obtained with the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in order to measure the C/O abundance ratio in the interstellar medium (ISM) of those galaxies. We measure both O III 1666 A and C III 1909 A in our spectra, enabling us to determine C(+2)/O(+2) with relatively small uncertainties. The results from our HST observations show a continuous increase in C/O with increasing O/H, consistent with a power law having an index of 0.43 +/- 0.09 over the range -4.7 to -3.6 in log (O/H). One possible interpretation of this trend is that the most metal-poor galaxies are the youngest and dominated by the products of early enrichment by massive stars, while more metal-rich galaxies show increasing, delayed contributions of carbon from intermediate-mass stars. Our results also suggest that it may not be appropiate to combine abundances in irregular galaxies with those in spiral galaxies to study the evolution of chemical abundances. Our measured C/O ratios in the most metal-poor galaxies are consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis from massive stars for Weaver & Woosley's best estimate for the 12C(alpha, gamma) 16O nuclear reaction rate, assuming negligible contanmination from carbon produced in intermediate-mass stars in these galaxies. We detect a weak N III 1750 A multiplet in SMC N88A and obtain interesting upper limits for two other objects. Our 2 sigma uppr limits on the 1750 A feature indicate that the N(+2)/O(+2) ratios in these objects are not significantly larger than the N(+)/O(+) ratios measured from optical spectra. This behavior is consistent with predictions of photionization models, although better detections of N III are needed to confirm the results.

  20. The RR Lyrae variable population in the Phoenix dwarf galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Ordoñez, Antonio J.; Sarajedini, Ata; Yang, Soung-Chul E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.edu

    2014-05-10

    We present the first detailed study of the RR Lyrae variable population in the Local Group dSph/dIrr transition galaxy, Phoenix, using previously obtained HST/WFPC2 observations of the galaxy. We utilize template light curve fitting routines to obtain best fit light curves for RR Lyrae variables in Phoenix. Our technique has identified 78 highly probable RR Lyrae stars (54 ab-type; 24 c-type) with about 40 additional candidates. We find mean periods for the two populations of (P {sub ab}) = 0.60 ± 0.03 days and (P{sub c} ) = 0.353 ± 0.002 days. We use the properties of these light curves to extract, among other things, a metallicity distribution function for ab-type RR Lyrae. Our analysis yields a mean metallicity of ([Fe/H]) = –1.68 ± 0.06 dex for the RRab stars. From the mean period and metallicity calculated from the ab-type RR Lyrae, we conclude that Phoenix is more likely of intermediate Oosterhoff type; however the morphology of the Bailey diagram for Phoenix RR Lyraes appears similar to that of an Oosterhoff type I system. Using the RRab stars, we also study the chemical enrichment law for Phoenix. We find that our metallicity distribution is reasonably well fitted by a closed-box model. The parameters of this model are compatible with the findings of Hidalgo et al., further supporting the idea that Phoenix appears to have been chemically enriched as a closed-box-like system during the early stage of its formation and evolution.

  1. A low pre-infall mass for the Carina dwarf galaxy from disequilibrium modelling.

    PubMed

    Ural, Uğur; Wilkinson, Mark I; Read, Justin I; Walker, Matthew G

    2015-07-02

    Dark matter-only simulations of galaxy formation predict many more subhalos around a Milky Way-like galaxy than the number of observed satellites. Proposed solutions require the satellites to inhabit dark matter halos with masses 10(9)-10(10 )Msun at the time they fell into the Milky Way. Here we use a modelling approach, independent of cosmological simulations, to obtain a pre-infall mass of 3.6(-2.3)(+3.8) × 10(8) Msun for one of the Milky Way's satellites: Carina. This determination of a low halo mass for Carina can be accommodated within the standard model only if galaxy formation becomes stochastic in halos below ∼10(10 )Msun. Otherwise Carina, the eighth most luminous Milky Way dwarf, would be expected to inhabit a significantly more massive halo. The implication of this is that a population of 'dark dwarfs' should orbit the Milky Way: halos devoid of stars and yet more massive than many of their visible counterparts.

  2. An Observational Limit on the Dwarf Galaxy Population of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Alan B.; Hau, George K. T.; Irwin, Mike; Verdugo, Miguel

    2007-02-01

    We present the results of an all-sky, deep optical survey for faint Local Group dwarf galaxies. Candidate objects were selected from the second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey and ESO/Science Research Council survey plates, and follow-up observations were performed to determine whether they were indeed overlooked members of the Local Group. Only two galaxies (Antlia and Cetus) were discovered this way out of 206 candidates. Based on internal and external comparisons, we estimate that our visual survey is more than 77% complete for objects larger than 1' in size and with a surface brightness greater than an extremely faint limit over the 72% of the sky not obstructed by the Milky Way. Our limit of sensitivity cannot be calculated exactly, but it is certainly fainter than 25 mag arcsec-2 in R, probably 25.5 and possibly approaching 26. We conclude that there are at most one or two Local Group dwarf galaxies fitting our observational criteria still undiscovered in the clear part of the sky, and roughly a dozen hidden behind the Milky Way. Our work places the ``missing satellite problem'' on a firm quantitative observational basis. We present detailed data on all our candidates, including surface brightness measurements.