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Sample records for linking microbial oxidation

  1. Disruption of secondary structure by oxidative stress alters the cross-linking pattern of myosin by microbial transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunqiang; Xiong, Youling L

    2015-10-01

    Porcine myofibrillar protein (MP) was oxidatively stressed in an iron-H2O2 radical-producing system then subjected to microbial transglutaminase (TGase, E:S=1:20) at 4°C. Changes in the MP secondary structure and cross-linking site on myosin (subfragments S1, S2, rod, light meromyosin, and heavy meromyosin) after TGase treatment were investigated. Circular dichroism and FTIR recorded unraveling of helixes caused by both oxidation and TGase. The loss of α-helix due to TGase treatment was oxidation-dependent, namely, mild oxidation (0.1-1mM H2O2)>non-oxidation>moderate oxidation (5-20mM H2O2). Moreover, oxidation altered the myosin cross-linking pattern: TGase-initiated S1 cross-linking (which dominated non-oxidized MP) partially shifted to the rod under 0.1-0.5mM H2O2 and extensively to the S2 site with 20mM H2O2. Unraveling of the helical structure and formation of disulfide bonds due to oxidation were implicated in the altered myosin cross-linking pattern during subsequent TGase reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Formation of Deep Sea Umber Deposits Linked to Microbial Metal Oxidation at the South Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaotong; Ta, Kaiwen; Chen, Shun; Zhang, Lijuan; Xu, Hengchao

    2015-04-01

    Umber deposits are important metalliferous deposits, which occur in off-axis half-graben structures at ancient and modern ocean floor. The genesis of umber deposits has remained controversial for several decades. Recently, microbial Fe(II) oxidation associated with low-temperature diffuse venting has been identified as a key process for the formation of umber deposits, but the exact biochemical mechanisms involved to the precipitation of Mn oxides and co-precipitation of Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides in umber deposits still remain unknown. Here, we used nano secondary ion mass spectrometer, synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and molecular techniques to demonstrate the coexistence of two types of metal-oxidizing bacteria within deep-sea hydrothermal umber deposits at the South Atlantic Ridge, where we found unique spheroids composed of biogenic Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides in the deposits. Our data suggest that Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides are metabolic by-products of lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria and heterotrophic Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria, respectively. The hydrothermal vents fuel lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, which constitute a trophic base that may support the activities of heterotrophic Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The biological origin of umber deposits underscore the importance of geomicrobiologcial interaction in triggering the formation of deep-sea deposits, with important implications for the generation of submarine Mn deposits and crusts.

  3. Linking methane oxidation with perchlorate reduction: a microbial base for possible Martian life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Carlstrom, C.; Baesman, S. M.; Coates, J. D.; Oremland, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    Recent observations of methane (CH4) and perchlorate (ClO4-) within the atmosphere and surface of Mars, respectively, provide impetus for establishing a metabolic linkage between these compounds whereby CH4 acts as an electron donor and perchlorate acts as an electron acceptor. Direct linkage through anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) has not been observed. However, indirect syntrophic oxygenase-dependent oxidation of CH4 with an aerobic methane oxidizer is feasible. The pathway for anaerobic dissimilatory perchlorate reduction includes 3 steps. The first 2 are sequential reductions of (1) perchlorate to chlorate and (2) chlorate to chlorite, mediated by perchlorate reductase. The third step is disproportionation of chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen, mediated by chlorite dismutase. Utilization of thusly derived oxygen by hydrocarbon-degrading organisms in anoxic environments was first demonstrated by Coates et. al. (1998)1, however the link to aerobic methane oxidation was not examined at that time. Here, we systematically explore the potential for several species of aerobic methanotrophs to couple with chlorite during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. In one experiment, 0.5 kPa CH4 was completely removed in one day from the headspace of combined cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB and Methylococcus capsulatus in the presence of 5 mM chlorite. Oxidation of labeled 14CH4 to 14CO2 under similar conditions was later confirmed. Another experiment demonstrated complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 over several days by Methylobacter albus strain BG8 with strain CKB in the presence of 5 mM chlorite. Finally, we observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing natural soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and strain CKB and in the presence of 10 mM chlorite. This soil, collected from a pristine lake shoreline, demonstrated endogenous methane, perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite uptake. Other soil and

  4. Linking microbial oxidation of arsenic with detection and phylogenetic analysis of arsenite oxidase genes in diverse geothermal environments.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, N; Macur, R E; Korf, S; Ackerman, G; Taylor, W P; Kozubal, M; Reysenbach, A-L; Inskeep, W P

    2009-02-01

    The identification and characterization of genes involved in the microbial oxidation of arsenite will contribute to our understanding of factors controlling As cycling in natural systems. Towards this goal, we recently characterized the widespread occurrence of aerobic arsenite oxidase genes (aroA-like) from pure-culture bacterial isolates, soils, sediments and geothermal mats, but were unable to detect these genes in all geothermal systems where we have observed microbial arsenite oxidation. Consequently, the objectives of the current study were to measure arsenite-oxidation rates in geochemically diverse thermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) ranging in pH from 2.6 to 8, and to identify corresponding 16S rRNA and aroA genotypes associated with these arsenite-oxidizing environments. Geochemical analyses, including measurement of arsenite-oxidation rates within geothermal outflow channels, were combined with 16S rRNA gene and aroA functional gene analysis using newly designed primers to capture previously undescribed aroA-like arsenite oxidase gene diversity. The majority of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences found in acidic (pH 2.6-3.6) Fe-oxyhydroxide microbial mats were closely related to Hydrogenobaculum spp. (members of the bacterial order Aquificales), while the predominant sequences from near-neutral (pH 6.2-8) springs were affiliated with other Aquificales including Sulfurihydrogenibium spp., Thermocrinis spp. and Hydrogenobacter spp., as well as members of the Deinococci, Thermodesulfobacteria and beta-Proteobacteria. Modified primers designed around previously characterized and newly identified aroA-like genes successfully amplified new lineages of aroA-like genes associated with members of the Aquificales across all geothermal systems examined. The expression of Aquificales aroA-like genes was also confirmed in situ, and the resultant cDNA sequences were consistent with aroA genotypes identified in the same environments. The aroA sequences

  5. Protein oxidation at different salt concentrations affects the cross-linking and gelation of pork myofibrillar protein catalyzed by microbial transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunqiang; Xiong, Youling L; Chen, Jie

    2013-06-01

    In a fabricated then restructured meat product, protein gelation plays an essential role in producing desirable binding and fat-immobilization properties. In the present study, myofibrillar protein (MFP) suspended in 0.15, 0.45, and 0.6 M NaCl was subjected to hydroxyl radical stress for 2 or 24 h and then treated with microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) in 0.6 M NaCl (E : S = 1 : 20) at 4 and 15 °C for 2 h. Protein cross-linking and dynamic rheological tests were performed to assess the efficacy of MTGase for mediating the gelation of oxidized MFP. MTGase treatments affected more remarkable polymerization of myosin in oxidized MFP than in nonoxidized, especially for samples oxidized at 0.6 M NaCl. Notably, the extent of MTGase-induced myosin cross-linking at 15 °C in oxidized MFP improved up to 46.8%, compared to 31.6% in nonoxidized MFP. MTGase treatment at 4 °C for MFP oxidized in 0.6 M NaCl, but not MFP oxidized in 0.15 M NaCl, produced stronger gels than nonoxidized MFP (P < 0.05). The final (75 °C) storage modulus (G') of oxidized MFP gels was significantly greater than that of nonoxidized, although the G' of the transient peak (∼44.5 °C) showed the opposite trend. Overall, oxidation at high salt concentrations significantly improved MTGase-mediated myosin cross-linking and MFP gelation. This might be because under this condition, MTGase had an increased accessibility to glutamine and lysine residues to effectively initiate protein-protein interactions and gel network formation. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Simultaneous wastewater treatment and bioelectricity production in microbial fuel cells using cross-linked chitosan-graphene oxide mixed-matrix membranes.

    PubMed

    Holder, Shima L; Lee, Ching-Hwa; Popuri, Srinivasa R

    2017-05-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are emerging technology for wastewater treatment by chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction and simultaneous bioelectricity production. Fabrication of an effective proton exchange membrane (PEM) is a vital component for MFC performance. In this work, green chitosan-based (CS) PEMs were fabricated with graphene oxide (GO) as filler material (CS-GO) and cross-linked with phosphoric acid (CS-GO-P(24)) or sulfuric acid (CS-GO-S(24)) to determine their effect on PEM properties. Interrogation of the physicochemical, thermal, and mechanical properties of the cross-linked CS-GO PEMs demonstrated that ionic cross-linking based on the incorporation of PO4(3-) groups in the CS-GO mixed-matrix composites, when compared with sulfuric acid cross-linking commonly used in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) studies, generated additional density of ionic cluster domains, rendered enhanced sorption properties, and augmented the thermal and mechanical stability of the composite structure. Consequently, bioelectricity performance analysis in MFC application showed that CS-GO-P(24) membrane produced 135% higher power density than the CS-GO-S(24) MFC system. Simultaneously, 89.52% COD removal of primary clarifier municipal wastewater was achieved in the MFC operated with the CS-GO-P(24) membrane.

  7. Linked metatranscriptomic and geochemical data indicate microbial succession in naturally reduced aquifer sediments dominated by H2-oxidizing Comamonadaceae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Bill, M.; Chakraborty, R.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.; Beller, H. R.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we sought to better understand what natural organic matter fuels heterotrophic microbial communities in the anoxic subsurface at the Rifle (CO) site and what genes may be diagnostic of that activity. We conducted a 20-day microcosm experiment with naturally reduced zone (NRZ) sediments and collected replicate samples every 5 days for omics (metagenome and metatranscriptome) and biogeochemical measurements (e.g., continuous CO2 production, H2, CH4, acetate, DOC, Fe(II), sulfate, NH4+, spectroscopic analyses of sediment OM). No electron donors were added other than the NRZ sediment, which is enriched in organic matter relative to typical Rifle aquifer material. The microcosms were constructed and incubated under anaerobic conditions in serum bottles with a N2headspace. Biogeochemical measurements indicate that the decomposition of native organic matter occurred in different phases, including depletion of DOC and release of CO2 during the first week of incubation, followed by a pulse of acetogenesis and methanogenesis after 2 weeks (with acetogenesis dominating carbon flux after 2 weeks). While H2 remained below detection levels throughout the study, a peak of [NiFe] uptake hydrogenase, acetyl-CoA synthetase, urease, and nitrate reductase transcripts belonging to the Comamonadaceae family occurred at day 15. Some members of Comamonadaceae are facultative H2-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs and fix carbon via the acetogenic Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. Comamonadaceae plateaued at 73% of the metagenome at this time and represented 69% of the metatranscriptome, succeeding the S-oxidizing Sulfurimonas genus. Sulfurimonas species were the dominant group at day 0, accounting for 43% of the metagenome and 25% of the metatranscriptome, decreasing to 11% in both the metagenome and metatranscriptome by day 10. Less abundant but still present were transcripts for genes involved in cellulose degradation (glycosyl hydrolases), and glycolysis (phosphofructokinase

  8. Biological consilience of hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide in plants: Gases of primordial earth linking plant, microbial and animal physiologies.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Hideo; Cohen, Michael F

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced in the mammalian body through the enzymatic activities of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST). A growing number of studies have revealed that biogenic H2S produced in tissues is involved in a variety of physiological responses in mammals including vasorelaxation and neurotransmission. It is now evident that mammals utilize H2S to regulate multiple signaling systems, echoing the research history of the gaseous signaling molecules nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) that had previously only been recognized for their cytotoxicity. In the human diet, meats (mammals, birds and fishes) and vegetables (plants) containing cysteine and other sulfur compounds are the major dietary sources for endogenous production of H2S. Plants are primary producers in ecosystems on the earth and they synthesize organic sulfur compounds through the activity of sulfur assimilation. Although plant H2S-producing activities have been known for a long time, our knowledge of H2S biology in plant systems has not been updated to the extent of mammalian studies. Here we review recent progress on H2S studies, highlighting plants and bacteria. Scoping the future integration of H2S, NO and O2 biology, we discuss a possible linkage between physiology, ecology and evolutional biology of gas metabolisms that may reflect the historical changes of the Earth's atmospheric composition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Microbial Formaldehyde Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy J. Donohue

    2004-12-09

    This project analyzed how cells sense and generate energy from formaldehyde oxidation. Formaldehyde is a toxin that is produced naturally, chemically or by metabolism of a wide variety of methyl-containing compounds. Our goals are to identify how cells sense the presence of this toxic compound and determine how they generate energy and nutrients from the oxidation of formaldehyde. This research capitalizes on the role of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides glutathione dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (GSH FDH) in a formaldehyde oxidation pathway that is apparently found in a wide variety of microbes, plants and animals. Thus, our findings illustrate what is required for a large variety of cells to metabolize this toxic compound. A second major focus of our research is to determine how cells sense the presence of this toxic compound and control the expression of gene products required for its detoxification.

  10. Microbial oxidation of dimethylnaphthalene isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Miyachi, Nobuya; Tanaka, Tohru; Suzuki, Takaya; Hotta, Yasushi ); Omori, Toshio )

    1993-05-01

    Few studies have focused on the microbial oxidation and metabolism of dimethylnaphthalenes (DMNs), which are supplied from the light oil fraction of crude oil. This report describes the isolation of 2,6-DMN-utilizing bacteria, the identification of the isolates (Alcaligenes sp. strain D-59, Pseudomonas sp. strains D-87 and D-186), the accumulation of 2,6-naphthalene dicarboxylic acid (NDCA) from 2,6-DMN, the identification of some metabolic intermediates of 2,6-DMN, and a proposal of a metabolic pathway of 2,6-DMN. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Microbial Formation of Manganese Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Anthony C.; Madgwick, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Microbial manganese oxidation was demonstrated at high Mn2+ concentrations (5 g/liter) in bacterial cultures in the presence of a microalga. The structure of the oxide produced varied depending on the bacterial strain and mode of culture. A nonaxenic, acid-tolerant microalga, a Chlamydomonas sp., was found to mediate formation of manganite (γ-MnOOH). Bacteria isolated from associations with crude cultures of this alga grown in aerated bioreactors formed disordered γ-MnO2 from Mn2+ at concentrations of 5 g/liter over 1 month, yielding 3.3 g of a semipure oxide per liter. All algal-bacterial cultures removed Mn2+ from solution, but only those with the highest removal rates formed an insoluble oxide. While the alga was an essential component of the reaction, a Pseudomonas sp. was found to be primarily responsible for the formation of a manganese precipitate. Medium components—algal biomass and urea—showed optima at 5.7 and 10 g/liters, respectively. The scaled-up culture (50 times) gave a yield of 22.3 g (53 mg/liter/day from a 15-liter culture) of semipure disordered γ-MnO2, identified by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and had a manganese oxide O/Mn ratio of 1.92. The Mn(IV) content in the oxide was low (30.5%) compared with that of mined or chemically formed γ-MnO2 (ca. 50%). The shortfall in the bacterial oxide manganese content was due to biological and inorganic contaminants. FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron diffraction studies have identified manganite as a likely intermediate product in the formation of disordered γ-MnO2. PMID:16348459

  12. Linking Biogeochemistry to Microbial Diversity Using New 13C Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggs, E. M.

    2005-12-01

    The use of 13C enables us to overcome uncertainties associated with soil C processes and to assess the links between species diversity and ecosystem function. Recent advances in stable isotope techniques enable determination of process rates, for example CH4 oxidation by direct measurement of 13C-CH4 and 13C-CO2. This overcomes uncertainties associated with reliance on changes in net CH4 emission, which may have compromised some earlier studies as both methanogenesis and CH4 oxidation may occur simultaneously in soil, providing significant advances in our understanding of the process of CH4 oxidation. These stable isotope techniques can be combined with molecular techniques (analysis of gene expression, stable isotope probing (SIP)) to relate the measured process to the microbial populations responsible. Here we will give a synthesis of results from experiments in which we applied 13C-CH4 to accurately determine CH4 oxidation rates in soils, and also present results of 13C-SIP from which we can identify the key players in the microbial population that are using the applied 13C substrate. With the 13C-CH4 technique we were able to provide direct evidence of inhibition of CH4 oxidation following fertiliser application (50-300 kg N ha-1) that was less under elevated pCO2, and evidence for anaerobic CH4 oxidation occurring in soil at 75% soil water filled pore space that would not have been apparent from changes in net CH4 emissions. 13C-SIP both through plants (using 13C-CO2) and directly into soil (using 13C-methane and -organic substrates) has revealed how key players in C utilisation vary under different soil conditions, for example, under improved and unimproved grasslands.

  13. Microbial acetone oxidation in coastal seawater

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Joanna L.; Beale, Rachael; Sargeant, Stephanie L.; Tarran, Glen A.; Nightingale, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Acetone is an important oxygenated volatile organic compound (OVOC) in the troposphere where it influences the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. However, the air-sea flux is not well quantified, in part due to a lack of knowledge regarding which processes control oceanic concentrations, and, specifically whether microbial oxidation to CO2 represents a significant loss process. We demonstrate that 14C labeled acetone can be used to determine microbial oxidation to 14CO2. Linear microbial rates of acetone oxidation to CO2 were observed for between 0.75-3.5 h at a seasonally eutrophic coastal station located in the western English Channel (L4). A kinetic experiment in summer at station L4 gave a Vmax of 4.1 pmol L-1 h-1, with a Km constant of 54 pM. We then used this technique to obtain microbial acetone loss rates ranging between 1.2 and 42 pmol L-1 h-1.(monthly averages) over an annual cycle at L4, with maximum rates observed during winter months. The biological turnover time of acetone (in situ concentration divided by microbial oxidation rate) in surface waters varied from ~3 days in February 2011, when in situ concentrations were 3 ± 1 nM, to >240 days in June 2011, when concentrations were more than twofold higher at 7.5 ± 0.7 nM. These relatively low marine microbial acetone oxidation rates, when normalized to in situ concentrations, suggest that marine microbes preferentially utilize other OVOCs such as methanol and acetaldehyde. PMID:24904556

  14. Role of oxidants in microbial pathophysiology.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R A; Britigan, B E

    1997-01-01

    Reactive oxidant species (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, hypohalous acid, and nitric oxide) are involved in many of the complex interactions between the invading microorganism and its host. Regardless of the source of these compounds or whether they are produced under normal conditions or those of oxidative stress, these oxidants exhibit a broad range of toxic effects to biomolecules that are essential for cell survival. Production of these oxidants by microorganisms enables them to have a survival advantage in their environment. Host oxidant production, especially by phagocytes, is a counteractive mechanism aimed at microbial killing. However, this mechanism may be contribute to a deleterious consequence of oxidant exposure, i.e., inflammatory tissue injury. Both the host and the microorganism have evolved complex adaptive mechanisms to deflect oxidant-mediated damage, including enzymatic and nonenzymatic oxidant-scavenging systems. This review discusses the formation of reactive oxidant species in vivo and how they mediate many of the processes involved in the complex interplay between microbial invasion and host defense. PMID:8993856

  15. Metal Oxide Reduction Linked to Anaerobic Methane Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Oni, Oluwatobi E; Friedrich, Michael W

    2017-02-01

    Microbial methanotrophy is important in mitigating methane emissions to the atmosphere. Geochemical evidence suggests the occurrence of anaerobic methane oxidation with metal oxides in natural environments. A study has now identified, for the first time, novel freshwater archaea of the order Methanosarcinales that can oxidize methane with Fe(III) and Mn(IV) minerals as electron acceptors.

  16. Biofilm and dental implant: The microbial link

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Sangeeta

    2013-01-01

    Mouth provides a congenial environment for the growth of the microorganisms as compared to any other part of the human body by exhibiting an ideal nonshedding surface. Dental plaque happens to be a diverse community of the microorganisms found on the tooth surface. Periodontal disease and the peri-implant disease are specific infections that are originating from these resident microbial species when the balance between the host and the microbial pathogenicity gets disrupted. This review discusses the biofilms in relation to the peri-implant region, factors affecting its presence, and the associated treatment to manage this complex microbial colony. Search Methodology: Electronic search of the medline was done with the search words: Implants and biofilms/dental biofilm formation/microbiology at implant abutment interface/surface free energy/roughness and implant, periimplantitis/local drug delivery and dental implant. Hand search across the journals – clinical oral implant research, implant dentistry, journal of dental research, international journal of oral implantology, journal of prosthetic dentistry, perioodntology 2000, journal of periodontology were performed. The articles included in the review comprised of in vivo studies, in vivo (animal and human) studies, abstracts, review articles. PMID:23633764

  17. Linking microbial community structure and microbial processes: An empirical and conceptual overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bier, R.L.; Bernhardt, E.S.;; Boot, C.M.; Graham, E.B.;; Hall, E.K.; Lennon, J.T.; Nemergut, D.R.; Osborne, B.B.; Ruiz-Gonzalez, C.; Schimel, J.P.; Waldrop, Mark P.; Wallenstein, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of microbial ecology is to identify links between microbial community structure and microbial processes. Although this objective seems straightforward, there are conceptual and methodological challenges to designing studies that explicitly evaluate this link. Here, we analyzed literature documenting structure and process responses to manipulations to determine the frequency of structure-process links and whether experimental approaches and techniques influence link detection. We examined nine journals (published 2009–13) and retained 148 experimental studies measuring microbial community structure and processes. Many qualifying papers (112 of 148) documented structure and process responses, but few (38 of 112 papers) reported statistically testing for a link. Of these tested links, 75% were significant and typically used Spearman or Pearson's correlation analysis (68%). No particular approach for characterizing structure or processes was more likely to produce significant links. Process responses were detected earlier on average than responses in structure or both structure and process. Together, our findings suggest that few publications report statistically testing structure-process links. However, when links are tested for they often occur but share few commonalities in the processes or structures that were linked and the techniques used for measuring them.

  18. Linking microbial community structure and microbial processes: an empirical and conceptual overview.

    PubMed

    Bier, Raven L; Bernhardt, Emily S; Boot, Claudia M; Graham, Emily B; Hall, Edward K; Lennon, Jay T; Nemergut, Diana R; Osborne, Brooke B; Ruiz-González, Clara; Schimel, Joshua P; Waldrop, Mark P; Wallenstein, Matthew D

    2015-10-01

    A major goal of microbial ecology is to identify links between microbial community structure and microbial processes. Although this objective seems straightforward, there are conceptual and methodological challenges to designing studies that explicitly evaluate this link. Here, we analyzed literature documenting structure and process responses to manipulations to determine the frequency of structure-process links and whether experimental approaches and techniques influence link detection. We examined nine journals (published 2009-13) and retained 148 experimental studies measuring microbial community structure and processes. Many qualifying papers (112 of 148) documented structure and process responses, but few (38 of 112 papers) reported statistically testing for a link. Of these tested links, 75% were significant and typically used Spearman or Pearson's correlation analysis (68%). No particular approach for characterizing structure or processes was more likely to produce significant links. Process responses were detected earlier on average than responses in structure or both structure and process. Together, our findings suggest that few publications report statistically testing structure-process links. However, when links are tested for they often occur but share few commonalities in the processes or structures that were linked and the techniques used for measuring them.

  19. Linking phylogenetic and functional diversity to nutrient spiraling in microbial mats from Lower Kane Cave (USA).

    PubMed

    Engel, Annette Summers; Meisinger, Daniela B; Porter, Megan L; Payn, Robert A; Schmid, Michael; Stern, Libby A; Schleifer, K H; Lee, Natuschka M

    2010-01-01

    Microbial mats in sulfidic cave streams offer unique opportunities to study redox-based biogeochemical nutrient cycles. Previous work from Lower Kane Cave, Wyoming, USA, focused on the aerobic portion of microbial mats, dominated by putative chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing groups within the Epsilonproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. To evaluate nutrient cycling and turnover within the whole mat system, a multidisciplinary strategy was used to characterize the anaerobic portion of the mats, including application of the full-cycle rRNA approach, the most probable number method, and geochemical and isotopic analyses. Seventeen major taxonomic bacterial groups and one archaeal group were retrieved from the anaerobic portions of the mats, dominated by Deltaproteobacteria and uncultured members of the Chloroflexi phylum. A nutrient spiraling model was applied to evaluate upstream to downstream changes in microbial diversity based on carbon and sulfur nutrient concentrations. Variability in dissolved sulfide concentrations was attributed to changes in the abundance of sulfide-oxidizing microbial groups and shifts in the occurrence and abundance of sulfate-reducing microbes. Gradients in carbon and sulfur isotopic composition indicated that released and recycled byproduct compounds from upstream microbial activities were incorporated by downstream communities. On the basis of the type of available chemical energy, the variability of nutrient species in a spiraling model may explain observed differences in microbial taxonomic affiliations and metabolic functions, thereby spatially linking microbial diversity to nutrient spiraling in the cave stream ecosystem.

  20. Microbial oxidation of pyrrhotites in coal chars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, K.W.; Risatti, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans to oxidize pyrrhotite minerals occurring in coal chars was investigated, to evaluate the feasibility of microbial char desulphurization. Bio-oxidation of pyrrhotites in chars produced by two different processes was demonstrated conclusively. Microbial removal of sulphur from a char and its parent coal proceeded at the rate of 3.5% and 12% day-1, respectively with a total of 48% and 81% removal after 27 days. The pH of shake flask cultures containing the coal dropped naturally to a final value of 2.2, while the pH of cultures containing the corresponding char rose and had to be lowered artificially with additional acid. Amending char cultures with elemental sulphur to increase acidity upon bio-oxidation and prevent precipitation of ferric iron was successful; however, the extent of pyrrhotite removal, as demonstated by X-ray diffraction analysis, was not improved. As yet, there is no explanation for the failure of microbial removal of pyrrhotitic sulphur to go to completion. ?? 1988.

  1. Direct Evidence Linking Soil Organic Matter Development to Microbial Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenbach, C.; Grandy, S.

    2013-12-01

    Despite increasing recognition of microbial contributions to soil organic matter (SOM) formation there is little experimental evidence linking microbial processes to SOM development and the mechanisms responsible remain unclear. Specifically, if stable SOM is largely comprised of microbial products, we need to better understand the soil conditions that influence microbial biomass production and ultimately its stability. Microbial physiology, such as microbial growth efficiency (MGE) and rate (MGR) have direct influences on microbial biomass production and are highly sensitive to resource quality. Therefore, the importance of resource quality on SOM is not necessarily a function of resistance to decay but the degree to which it optimizes microbial biomass production. While resource quality may have an indirect effect on SOM abundance via its influence on microbial physiology, SOM stabilization of labile microbial products may rely heavily on a soil's capacity to form organo-mineral interactions. To examine the relative importance of soil microbial community function, resource quality and mineralogy on direct microbial contributions to SOM formation and stability, an ongoing 15-mo incubation experiment was set up using artificial, initially C- and microbial-free soils. Soil microcosms were constructed by mixing sand with either kaolinite or montmorillonite clays followed with a natural soil microbial inoculum. For both soil mineral treatments, weekly additions of glucose, cellobiose, or syringol are carried out, with an additional treatment of plant leachate to serve as a reference. This simplified system allows us to determine if, in the absence of plant-derived C, microbial products using simple substrates can result in chemically complex SOM similar to natural soils. Over the course of the incubation, MGE, MGR, microbial activity, and SOM accumulation rates are monitored. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) is used to track the microbial

  2. Microbial geomorphology: A neglected link between life and landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viles, Heather A.

    2012-07-01

    Whilst recognition is increasing that life and landscapes are intimately related, as evidenced by growing research into ecosystem engineering, biogeomorphology and allied topics, the microbial contribution to such interactions has been relatively neglected. A revolution in environmental microbiology, based on molecular techniques, is now driving a reconsideration of the role of microbial processes in geomorphology at all scales. Recent research illustrates the hitherto unknown microbial diversity present in many extreme geomorphic environments, such as hyperarid deserts, subglacial lakes, hot springs, and much richer microbial life than previously suspected within the soils and sediments that blanket most other landscapes. Such microbial communities have been found to play important geomorphic roles across a wide range of environments, notably in weathering, precipitation of minerals and protecting surfaces from erosion. These geomorphic roles can also be conceptualised as examples of ecosystem engineering, and can pave the way for further plant-geomorphology and zoogeomorphology processes. Three key aspects which emerge from a review of microbial influences on Earth surface processes are a) that microbes play roles on a continuum from full control to passive involvement, b) that complex and widespread communities of microorganisms are involved and c) that microbial activity usually affects several Earth surface processes at once. Examples of the contribution of microbial life to geomorphology over long, medium and short timescales suggest that microorganisms play key geomorphological roles in two major situations; on the cusp between stable states, and in extreme environments where higher plant and animal life is limited and many abiotic processes are also constrained. The dominant link between microbial life and geomorphology appears to take on different forms depending on the timescale under consideration, with a stabilising microbial role apparent over short

  3. Carbon isotope fractionation during microbial methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, James F.; Fritz, Peter

    1981-09-01

    Methane, a common trace constituent of groundwaters, occasionally makes up more than 20% of the total carbon in groundwaters1,2. In aerobic environments CH4-rich waters can enable microbial food chain supporting a mixed culture of bacteria with methane oxidation as the primary energy source to develop3. Such processes may influence the isotopic composition of the residual methane and because 13C/12C analyses have been used to characterize the genesis of methanes found in different environments, an understanding of the magnitude of such effects is necessary. In addition, carbon dioxide produced by the methane-utilizing bacteria can be added to the inorganic carbon pool of affected groundwaters. We found carbon dioxide experimentally produced by methane-utilizing bacteria to be enriched in 12C by 5.0-29.6‰, relative to the residual methane. Where methane-bearing groundwaters discharged into aerobic environments microbial methane oxidation occurred, with the residual methane becoming progressively enriched in 13C. Various models have been proposed to explain the 13C/12C and 14C content of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of groundwaters in terms of additions or losses during flow in the subsurface4,5. The knowledge of both stable carbon isotope ratios in various pools and the magnitude of carbon isotope fractionation during various processes allows geochemists to use the 13C/12C ratio of the DIC along with water chemistry to estimate corrected 14C groundwater ages4,5. We show here that a knowledge of the carbon isotope fractionation between CH4 and CO2 during microbial methane-utilization could modify such models for application to groundwaters affected by microbial methane oxidation.

  4. Altering petrology through microbial dissimilatory phosphite oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Figueroa, I.; Coates, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) takes advantage of various microbial metabolisms to increase hydrocarbon and energy yield by improving oil flow and flood water sweep in a reservoir during tertiary recovery. Wormholing at the injection well is believed to be the result of the large drop in pressure when water exits the injection well and enters the unconsolidated reservoir matrix. One possible means of prevent this event is to consolidate the rock matrix immediately around the injection well to create a permeable zone of stable petrology. Many microbial processes are known to result in the precipitation of ionic components into their environment creating solid-phase minerals. Such processes could be judiciously applied to bind unconsolidated matrices in order to form a permeable concreted rock matrix, which would minimize wormholing events and thus improve floodwater sweep. However, to date, apart from the application of urea oxidation creating calcium carbonate precipitation, there has been little investigation of the applicability of these precipitated bioconcretions to MEOR strategies and none to control wormholing events. Here we present a novel approach to altering rock petrology to concrete unconsolidated matrices in the near well environment by the biogenesis of authigenic minerals through microbial dissimilatory phosphite oxidation. Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans, strain FiPS-3 is currently the only isolated organism capable of using phosphite (HPO32-) as an electron donor for growth. This process, known as dissimilatory phosphite oxidation (DPO), can be coupled to either sulfate reduction or homoacetogenesis and leads to the accumulation of inorganic phosphate in the medium. The resulting insoluble mineral phases can coat the rock environment resulting in a concretion binding the unconsolidated matrix particles into a single phase. In this study we demonstrate that DPO can effectively produce calcium or magnesium phosphate minerals in packed glass

  5. Exploring Microbial Iron Oxidation in Wetland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Muyzer, G.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; den Oudsten, F.; Laanbroek, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and is essential for life. Because of its importance, iron cycling and its interaction with other chemical and microbial processes has been the focus of many studies. Iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) have been detected in a wide variety of environments. Among those is the rhizosphere of wetland plants roots which release oxygen into the soil creating suboxic conditions required by these organisms. It has been reported that in these rhizosphere microbial iron oxidation proceeds up to four orders of magnitude faster than strictly abiotic oxidation. On the roots of these wetland plants iron plaques are formed by microbial iron oxidation which are involved in the sequestering of heavy metals as well organic pollutants, which of great environmental significance.Despite their important role being catalysts of iron-cycling in wetland environments, little is known about the diversity and distribution of iron-oxidizing bacteria in various environments. This study aimed at developing a PCR-DGGE assay enabling the detection of iron oxidizers in wetland habitats. Gradient tubes were used to enrich iron-oxidizing bacteria. From these enrichments, a clone library was established based on the almost complete 16s rRNA gene using the universal bacterial primers 27f and 1492r. This clone library consisted of mainly α- and β-Proteobacteria, among which two major clusters were closely related to Gallionella spp. Specific probes and primers were developed on the basis of this 16S rRNA gene clone library. The newly designed Gallionella-specific 16S rRNA gene primer set 122f/998r was applied to community DNA obtained from three contrasting wetland environments, and the PCR products were used in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. A second 16S rRNA gene clone library was constructed using the PCR products from one of our sampling sites amplified with the newly developed primer set 122f/998r. The cloned 16S rRNA gene

  6. Thermodynamic constraints on microbial iron oxide reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, S.; Behrends, T.; Haese, R.; van Cappellen, P.

    2003-04-01

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous reactive constituents of soils, sediments and aquifers. They exhibit large surface areas which bind trace metals, nutrients and organic molecules. Under suboxic conditions, iron oxides can reductively dissolve via several abiotic and microbial pathways. In particular, they serve as terminal electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic matter by iron reducing bacteria. The aim of our study was to determine the thermodynamic energy yields of dissimilatory iron reduction for different Fe(III) substrates. We used the facultative anaerobic gram-positive bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens as model iron reducing bacterium, with ferrihydrite, hematite, goethite or Fe(III)-salicylate as electron acceptor, and lactate as electron donor. Experiments were conducted in an anaerobic pH-stat batch reactor, equipped with a polarographic electrode to monitor in situ the dissolved ferrous iron activity. The stoichiometry of total Fe(II) production and acid consumption during the experiments indicated that lactate was oxidized to acetate. From the Fe(II) activity and redox potential measurements, free energy yields were calculated for Fe(III) reduction coupled to lactate oxidation. The results showed that the redox potential of the overall reaction was poised by equilibrium between the Fe(III)-substrate and aqueous Fe(II). Hence, the energy yields decreased in the order ferrihydrite > Fe(III)-salicylate > hematite > goethite. Accumulation of Fe(II) in solution only caused small decreases in the energy yields over the course of the experiments. Cessation of iron reduction, which was observed in all experiments, was therefore not due to thermodynamic limitation, but more likely reflected the decline in cell level of activity.

  7. Using fine-scale high-resolution sampling to link Fe oxide-dominated hydrothermal vent-generated microbial mat morphology with community structure composition at Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, K. W.; Hilton, T. S.; Kimber, J.; Jesser, K. J.; Fullerton, H.; McAllister, S.; Chan, C. S.; Emerson, D.; Moyer, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    The scale at which sampling can be carried out in the deep ocean has largely been determined by the limits of robotic instrument manipulation at depth. Bulk sampling, via push cores, suction, or scoop samplers, collects mat material from heterogeneous microbial communities living in environments variable not only laterally with respect to an active vent (direct versus diffuse vent flow), but also with respect to depth across the steep redox gradient separating reduced hydrothermal fluid from oxygenated seawater. While initially unavoidable, these kinds of sampling strategies can only go so far in describing the intricate microbial ecology interactions occurring at hydrothermal vents. For this reason, a syringe sampler was developed for this study to sample targeted observable mat morphologies of surface mat material at small spatial scales. Multiple 'BioMat' samples (~ 20) were collected in 2013 from active, Fe oxide-dominated mats from several vent sites at Loihi Seamount, Hawaii, all experience temperatures ranging from 20 to 46°C. Quantitative-PCR (Q-PCR) primers were designed to detect the relative abundance of the marine iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria. At Pohaku Vents, which is perched on the upper lip of the caldera, the average relative abundance of Zetaproteobacteria was significantly higher at 79.2% of the total microbial mat community. Two other sites within the caldera (Hiolo North and Hiolo South) had 26.8% and 36.9% Zetaproteobacteria, respectively. In addition, Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of these samples showed that the Pohaku Vent microbial mat community fingerprints all grouped together into a single cluster much more closely and with much less variability than with those from either Hiolo North or South. Finally, it was also observed that there were site-specific gross morphological characteristics associated with these microbial mats including veils, curds, and amorphous particles. It is presently

  8. Anaerobic oxidation of arsenite linked to chlorate reduction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Milner, Lily; Field, Jim A

    2010-10-01

    Microorganisms play a significant role in the speciation and mobility of arsenic in the environment. In this study, the oxidation of arsenite [As(III)] to arsenate [As(V)] linked to chlorate (ClO₃⁻) reduction was shown to be catalyzed by sludge samples, enrichment cultures (ECs), and pure cultures incubated under anaerobic conditions. No activity was observed in treatments lacking inoculum or with heat-killed sludge, or in controls lacking ClO₃⁻. The As(III) oxidation was linked to the complete reduction of ClO₃⁻ to Cl⁻, and the molar ratio of As(V) formed to ClO₃⁻ consumed approached the theoretical value of 3:1 assuming the e⁻ equivalents from As(III) were used to completely reduce ClO₃⁻. In keeping with O₂ as a putative intermediate of ClO₃⁻ reduction, the ECs could also oxidize As(III) to As(V) with O₂ at low concentrations. Low levels of organic carbon were essential in heterotrophic ECs but not in autotrophic ECs. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated that the ECs were dominated by clones of Rhodocyclaceae (including Dechloromonas, Azospira, and Azonexus phylotypes) and Stenotrophomonas under autotrophic conditions. Additional phylotypes (Alicycliphilus, Agrobacterium, and Pseudoxanthomonas) were identified in heterotrophic ECs. Two isolated autotrophic pure cultures, Dechloromonas sp. strain ECC1-pb1 and Azospira sp. strain ECC1-pb2, were able to grow by linking the oxidation of As(III) to As(V) with the reduction of ClO₃⁻. The presence of the arsenite oxidase subunit A (aroA) gene was demonstrated with PCR in the ECs and pure cultures. This study demonstrates that ClO₃⁻ is an alternative electron acceptor to support the microbial oxidation of As(III).

  9. Mechanistic links between gut microbial community dynamics, microbial functions and metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Connie WY; Lam, Yan Y; Holmes, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbes comprise a high density, biologically active community that lies at the interface of an animal with its nutritional environment. Consequently their activity profoundly influences many aspects of the physiology and metabolism of the host animal. A range of microbial structural components and metabolites directly interact with host intestinal cells and tissues to influence nutrient uptake and epithelial health. Endocrine, neuronal and lymphoid cells in the gut also integrate signals from these microbial factors to influence systemic responses. Dysregulation of these host-microbe interactions is now recognised as a major risk factor in the development of metabolic dysfunction. This is a two-way process and understanding the factors that tip host-microbiome homeostasis over to dysbiosis requires greater appreciation of the host feedbacks that contribute to regulation of microbial community composition. To date, numerous studies have employed taxonomic profiling approaches to explore the links between microbial composition and host outcomes (especially obesity and its comorbidities), but inconsistent host-microbe associations have been reported. Available data indicates multiple factors have contributed to discrepancies between studies. These include the high level of functional redundancy in host-microbiome interactions combined with individual variation in microbiome composition; differences in study design, diet composition and host system between studies; and inherent limitations to the resolution of rRNA-based community profiling. Accounting for these factors allows for recognition of the common microbial and host factors driving community composition and development of dysbiosis on high fat diets. New therapeutic intervention options are now emerging. PMID:25469018

  10. Microbial communities involved in electricity generation from sulfide oxidation in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Chen, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Feng; Mu, Zhe-Xuan; Wang, Hua-Lin; Zeng, Raymond J; Liu, Xian-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Wei, Li; Ma, Fang

    2010-10-15

    Simultaneous electricity generation and sulfide removal can be achieved in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). In electricity harvesting from sulfide oxidation in such an MFC, various microbial communities are involved. It is essential to elucidate the microbial communities and their roles in the sulfide conversion and electricity generation. In this work, an MFC was constructed to enrich a microbial consortium, which could harvest electricity from sulfide oxidation. Electrochemical analysis demonstrated that microbial catalysis was involved in electricity output in the sulfide-fed MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities could perform catalysis independently, and synergistic interactions occurred when the two communities worked together. A 16S rRNA clone library analysis was employed to characterize the microbial communities in the MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities shared similar richness and diversity, while the LIBSHUFF analysis revealed that the two community structures were significantly different. The exoelectrogenic, sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria were found in the MFC anodic chamber. The discovery of these bacteria was consistent with the community characteristics for electricity generation from sulfide oxidation. The exoelectrogenic bacteria were found both on the anode and in the solution. The sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were present in greater abundance on the anode than in the solution, while the sulfate-reducing bacteria preferably lived in the solution.

  11. Cross-linking of bovine and caprine caseins by microbial transglutaminase and their use as microencapsulating agents for n-3 fatty acids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine and caprine caseins were cross-linked with microbial transglutaminase (mTG). The mTG-cross-linked bovine or caprine casein dispersion, mixed with 14.5% maltodextrin (DE = 40), was used to prepare emulsions with 10.5% algae oil. Oxidative stability of emulsions was evaluated by peroxide valu...

  12. Anaerobic methane oxidation driven by microbial reduction of natural organic matter in a tropical wetland.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Edgardo I; Prieto-Davó, Alejandra; López-Lozano, Nguyen E; Hernández-Eligio, Alberto; Vega-Alvarado, Leticia; Juárez, Katy; García-González, Ana Sarahí; López, Mercedes G; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2017-03-24

    Wetlands constitute the main natural source of methane on Earth due to their high content of natural organic matter (NOM), but key drivers such as electron acceptors supporting methanotrophic activities in these habitats are poorly understood. We performed anoxic incubations using freshly collected sediment along with water samples harvested from a tropical wetland, amended with (13)C-methane (0.67 atm) to test the capacity of its microbial community to perform anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) linked to the reduction of the humic fraction of its NOM. Collected evidence demonstrates that electron-accepting functional groups (e.g. quinones) present in NOM fueled AOM by serving as terminal electron acceptor. Indeed, while sulfate reduction was the predominant process accounting for up to 42.5% of the AOM activities, microbial reduction of NOM concomitantly occurred. Furthermore, enrichment of wetland sediment with external NOM provided complementary electron-accepting capacity, which reduction accounted for ∼100 nmol (13)C-CH4 oxidized cm(-3) d(-1) Spectroscopic evidence showed that quinone moieties were heterogeneously distributed in the wetland sediment, and that their reduction occurred during the course of AOM. Moreover, an enrichment derived from wetland sediments performing AOM linked to NOM reduction stoichiometrically oxidized methane coupled to the reduction of the humic analogue, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate. Microbial populations potentially involved in AOM coupled to microbial reduction of NOM were dominated by divergent biota from putative AOM-associated archaea. We estimate that this microbial process could potentially contribute to the suppression of up to 114 Tg CH4 yr(-1) in coastal wetlands and more than 1,300 Tg yr(-1) considering the global wetland area.Importance Identifying key processes governing methane emissions from natural systems is of major importance considering the global warming effects triggered by this greenhouse gas. AOM coupled

  13. Microbial Lithotrophic Oxidation of Structural Fe(II) in Biotite

    SciTech Connect

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Wu, Tao; Blothe, Marco; Roden, Eric E.

    2012-06-08

    Microorganisms are known to participate in the weathering of primary phyllosilicate minerals through production of organic ligands and acids, and through uptake of products of weathering. Here we show that a lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture (Straub, 6 1996) can grow via oxidation of structural Fe(II) in biotite, a Fe(II)-rich trioctahedral mica found in granitic rocks. Oxidation of silt/clay sized biotite particles was detected by a decrease in extractable Fe(II) content and simultaneous nitrate reduction. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirmed structural Fe(II) oxidation. Approximately 107 cells were produced per {micro}mol Fe(II) oxidized, in agreement with previous estimates of the growth yield of lithoautotrophic circumneutral-pH Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) resulted in biotite alterations similar to those found in nature, including decrease in unit cell b-dimension toward dioctahedral levels and iron and potassium release. The demonstration of microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) suggests that microorganisms may be directly responsible for the initial step in the weathering of biotite in granitic aquifers and the plant rhizosphere.

  14. Microbial Life in Soil - Linking Biophysical Models with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Tecon, R.; Ebrahimi, A.; Kleyer, H.; Ilie, O.; Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial life in soil occurs within fragmented aquatic habitats in complex pore spaces where motility is restricted to short hydration windows (e.g., following rainfall). The limited range of self-dispersion and physical confinement promote spatial association among trophically interdepended microbial species. Competition and preferences for different nutrient resources and byproducts and their diffusion require high level of spatial organization to sustain the functioning of multispecies communities. We report mechanistic modeling studies of competing multispecies microbial communities grown on hydrated surfaces and within artificial soil aggregates (represented by 3-D pore network). Results show how trophic dependencies and cell-level interactions within patchy diffusion fields promote spatial self-organization of motile microbial cells. The spontaneously forming patterns of segregated, yet coexisting species were robust to spatial heterogeneities and to temporal perturbations (hydration dynamics), and respond primarily to the type of trophic dependencies. Such spatially self-organized consortia may reflect ecological templates that optimize substrate utilization and could form the basic architecture for more permanent surface-attached microbial colonies. Hydration dynamics affect structure and spatial arrangement of aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities and their biogeochemical functions. Experiments with well-characterized artificial soil microbial assemblies grown on porous surfaces provide access to community dynamics during wetting and drying cycles detected through genetic fingerprinting. Experiments for visual observations of spatial associations of tagged bacterial species with known trophic dependencies on model porous surfaces are underway. Biophysical modeling provide a means for predicting hydration-mediated critical separation distances for activation of spatial self-organization. The study provides new modeling and observational tools that

  15. Microbial Life in Soil - Linking Biophysical Models with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Dani; Tecon, Robin; Ebrahimi, Ali; Kleyer, Hannah; Ilie, Olga; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Microbial life in soil occurs within fragmented aquatic habitats formed in complex pore spaces where motility is restricted to short hydration windows (e.g., following rainfall). The limited range of self-dispersion and physical confinement promote spatial association among trophically interdepended microbial species. Competition and preferences for different nutrient resources and byproducts and their diffusion require high level of spatial organization to sustain the functioning of multispecies communities. We report mechanistic modeling studies of competing multispecies microbial communities grown on hydrated surfaces and within artificial soil aggregates (represented by 3-D pore network). Results show how trophic dependencies and cell-level interactions within patchy diffusion fields promote spatial self-organization of motile microbial cells. The spontaneously forming patterns of segregated, yet coexisting species were robust to spatial heterogeneities and to temporal perturbations (hydration dynamics), and respond primarily to the type of trophic dependencies. Such spatially self-organized consortia may reflect ecological templates that optimize substrate utilization and could form the basic architecture for more permanent surface-attached microbial colonies. Hydration dynamics affect structure and spatial arrangement of aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities and their biogeochemical functions. Experiments with well-characterized artificial soil microbial assemblies grown on porous surfaces provide access to community dynamics during wetting and drying cycles detected through genetic fingerprinting. Experiments for visual observations of spatial associations of tagged bacterial species with known trophic dependencies on model porous surfaces are underway. Biophysical modeling provide a means for predicting hydration-mediated critical separation distances for activation of spatial self-organization. The study provides new modeling and observational tools

  16. Potential for microbial oxidation of ferrous iron in basaltic glass.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Mai Yia; Shelobolina, Evgenya S; Roden, Eric E

    2015-05-01

    Basaltic glass (BG) is an amorphous ferrous iron [Fe(II)]-containing material present in basaltic rocks, which are abundant on rocky planets such as Earth and Mars. Previous research has suggested that Fe(II) in BG can serve as an energy source for chemolithotrophic microbial metabolism, which has important ramifications for potential past and present microbial life on Mars. However, to date there has been no direct demonstration of microbially catalyzed oxidation of Fe(II) in BG. In this study, three different culture systems were used to investigate the potential for microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in BG, including (1) the chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing "Straub culture"; (2) the mixotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing organism Desulfitobacterium frappieri strain G2; and (3) indigenous microorganisms from a streambed Fe seep in Wisconsin. The BG employed consisted of clay and silt-sized particles of freshly quenched lava from the TEB flow in Kilauea, Hawaii. Soluble Fe(II) or chemically reduced NAu-2 smectite (RS) were employed as positive controls to verify Fe(II) oxidation activity in the culture systems. All three systems demonstrated oxidation of soluble Fe(II) and/or structural Fe(II) in RS, whereas no oxidation of Fe(II) in BG material was observed. The inability of the Straub culture to oxidize Fe(II) in BG was particularly surprising, as this culture can oxidize other insoluble Fe(II)-bearing minerals such as biotite, magnetite, and siderite. Although the reason for the resistance of the BG toward enzymatic oxidation remains unknown, it seems possible that the absence of distinct crystal faces or edge sites in the amorphous glass renders the material resistant to such attack. These findings have implications with regard to the idea that Fe(II)-Si-rich phases in basalt rocks could provide a basis for chemolithotrophic microbial life on Mars, specifically in neutral-pH environments where acid-promoted mineral dissolution and

  17. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation

    DOEpatents

    Rondinone, Adam J.; Moon, Ji Won; Love, Lonnie J.; Yeary, Lucas W.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2015-09-08

    The invention is directed to a method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles, the method comprising: (i) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbial-mediated formation of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprise: metal-reducing microbes, a culture medium suitable for sustaining said metal-reducing microbes, an effective concentration of one or more surfactants, a reducible metal oxide component containing one or more reducible metal species, and one or more electron donors that provide donatable electrons to said metal-reducing microbes during consumption of the electron donor by said metal-reducing microbes; and (ii) isolating said metal oxide nanoparticles, which contain a reduced form of said reducible metal oxide component. The invention is also directed to metal oxide nanoparticle compositions produced by the inventive method.

  18. Microbial oxidation and assimilation of propylene.

    PubMed Central

    Cerniglia, C E; Blevins, W T; Perry, J J

    1976-01-01

    Hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms in our culture collection oxidized propylene but could not utilize it as the sole source of carbon and energy. When propane-grown cells of Mycobacterium convulutum were placed on propylene, acrylate, the terminally oxidized, three-carbon unsaturated acid, accumulated. A mixed culture and an axenic culture (strain PL-1) that utilized propylene as the sole source of carbon and energy were isolated from soil. Respiration rates, enzyme assays, fatty acid profiles, and 14CO2 incorporation experiments suggest that both the mixed culture and strain PL-1 oxidize propylene via attack at the double bond, resulting in a C2+C1 cleavage of the molecule. PMID:1008555

  19. Methane oxidation linked to chlorite dismutation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Carlström, Charlotte I.; Coates, John D.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the potential for CH4 oxidation to be coupled with oxygen derived from the dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate, chlorate, or via chlorite (ClO−2) dismutation. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO−4 and ClO−3 could be inferred from the accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in soil slurries prepared from exposed freshwater lake sediment, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soil enriched in methanotrophs. In contrast, ClO−2 amendment elicited such activity. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the headspace of cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata CKB incubated with either Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8 in the presence of 5 mM ClO−2. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing soil enriched in methanotrophs when co-incubated with D. agitata CKB and 10 mM ClO−2. However, to be effective these experiments required physical separation of soil from D. agitata CKB to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although a link between ClO−2 and CH4 consumption was established in soils and cultures, no upstream connection with either ClO−4 or ClO−3 was discerned. This result suggests that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was negligible, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs. PMID:24987389

  20. Methane oxidation linked to chlorite dismutation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Carlström, Charlotte I.; Coates, John D.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the potential for CH4 oxidation to be coupled with oxygen derived from the dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate, chlorate, or via chlorite (ClO−2) dismutation. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO−4 and ClO−3 could be inferred from the accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in soil slurries prepared from exposed freshwater lake sediment, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soil enriched in methanotrophs. In contrast, ClO−2 amendment elicited such activity. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the headspace of cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata CKB incubated with either Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8 in the presence of 5 mM ClO−2. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing soil enriched in methanotrophs when co-incubated with D. agitata CKB and 10 mM ClO−2. However, to be effective these experiments required physical separation of soil from D. agitata CKB to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although a link between ClO−2 and CH4 consumption was established in soils and cultures, no upstream connection with either ClO−4 or ClO−3 was discerned. This result suggests that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was negligible, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs.

  1. Microbial metabolic exchange—the chemotype-to-phenotype link

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Vanessa V; Liu, Wei-Ting; Pogliano, Kit

    2013-01-01

    The function of microbial interactions is to enable microorganisms to survive by establishing a homeostasis between microbial neighbors and local environments. A microorganism can respond to environmental stimuli using metabolic exchange—the transfer of molecular factors, including small molecules and proteins. Microbial interactions not only influence the survival of the microbes but also have roles in morphological and developmental processes of the organisms themselves and their neighbors. This, in turn, shapes the entire habitat of these organisms. Here we highlight our current understanding of metabolic exchange as well as the emergence of new technologies that are allowing us to eavesdrop on microbial conversations comprising dozens to hundreds of secreted metabolites that control the behavior, survival and differentiation of members of the community. The goal of the rapidly advancing field studying multifactorial metabolic exchange is to devise a microbial ‘Rosetta stone’ in order to understand the language by which microbial interactions are negotiated and, ultimately, to control the outcome of these conversations. PMID:22173357

  2. Microbial manganese oxide formation and interaction with toxic metal ions.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Naoyuki; Tani, Yukinori; Sakata, Masahiro; Iwahori, Keisuke

    2007-07-01

    Diverse bacteria and fungi oxidize Mn(II) enzymatically and produce insoluble Mn(III, IV) oxides, and these organisms are considered to be the primal agents for the occurrence of natural Mn oxide phases in most environments. Biogenic Mn oxides have a high sorption capacity for metal cations and an ability to oxidize numerous inorganic and organic compounds, owing to their structural and redox features. Thus, the microbial process is of significance in both biogeochemical and biotechnological contexts. In this article we summarize the enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation and interactions of biogenic Mn oxides with toxic metal and metalloid ions. Although Mn oxide formation by fungi has not been fully characterized yet, recent researches with ascomycetes emphasize the similarity between the bacterial and fungal Mn(II) oxidation with respect to the involved catalyst (i.e., multicopper oxidase-type enzymes) and the reaction product [i.e., layer-type Mn(IV) oxides]. Laboratory cultures of bacterial and fungal Mn oxidizers are expected to provide fundamental knowledge in their potential use for remediation of environments and effluents contaminated with toxic metal(loid) ions.

  3. Linking Microbial Community Structure to Function in Representative Simulated Systems

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Ian M.; Wilder, Hailey A.; Quazi, Shanin J.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria are generally studied as a single strain under ideal growing conditions, although these conditions are not the norm in the environments in which pathogens typically proliferate. In this investigation, a representative microbial community along with Escherichia coli O157:H7, a model pathogen, was studied in three environments in which such a pathogen could be found: a human colon, a septic tank, and groundwater. Each of these systems was built in the lab in order to retain the physical/chemical and microbial complexity of the environments while maintaining control of the feed into the models. The microbial community in the colon was found to have a high percentage of bacteriodetes and firmicutes, while the septic tank and groundwater systems were composed mostly of proteobacteria. The introduction of E. coli O157:H7 into the simulated systems elicited a shift in the structures and phenotypic cell characteristics of the microbial communities. The fate and transport of the microbial community with E. coli O157:H7 were found to be significantly different from those of E. coli O157:H7 studied as a single isolate, suggesting that the behavior of the organism in the environment was different from that previously conceived. The findings in this study clearly suggest that to gain insight into the fate of pathogens, cells should be grown and analyzed under conditions simulating those of the environment in which the pathogens are present. PMID:23396331

  4. Linking microbial ultrastructure and physiology to iron depositional processes in deep sea hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. S.; Fleming, E. J.; Emerson, D.; Edwards, K. J.

    2008-12-01

    Clara S. Chan, Emily Fleming, David Emerson, Katrina J. Edwards Iron microbial mats have been discovered in a variety of deep-sea hydrothermal environments and are increasingly being recognized as more seafloor is explored. The predominant structures found in many of these mats are iron oxyhydroxide-rich filaments. One of the most common structures is a helical stalk bearing a resemblance to the twisted stalk of the terrestrial iron-oxidizing microbe, Gallionella ferruginea. While Gallionella has not been detected in, or isolated from, these mats microaerophilic iron-oxidizing, a stalk- forming bacterium, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans (PV-1 and related strains) has been isolated from mats at the Loihi seamount in Hawaii (Emerson et al. 2007, PLoS One 2(8): e667). Fossilized aggregates of iron filaments have been observed in the rock record (e.g. Little et al. 2004, Geomicrobiol. J. 21:415), and may represent ancient versions of these microbial mats. If this is shown to be true, such filaments would represent one of the few microfossil morphologies that can be linked to a specific microbial metabolism. We have used a combination of test tube culturing, microslide culturing, time lapse microscopy, and electron microscopy to study Mariprofundus stalk morphology and genesis and link these details to physiological responses to environmental chemistry. The goals include determining specific attributes of stalk morphology that can be used to determine the biogenicity of putative iron microfossils, and interpret the conditions of the depositional environment. Light microscopic observation of microslide cultures over the course of several days allowed for determination of bacterial response to developing oxygen and Fe(II) gradients. Once gradients have been established, given an abundant supply of oxygen, cells congregate in a band perpendicular to the gradient and stalks are formed, growing in the direction of increasing oxygen (and decreasing Fe) concentration. This

  5. Oxidation of aromatic contaminants coupled to microbial iron reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Baedecker, M.J.; Lonergan, D.J.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Siegel, D.I.

    1989-01-01

    THE contamination of sub-surface water supplies with aromatic compounds is a significant environmental concern1,2. As these contaminated sub-surface environments are generally anaerobic, the microbial oxidation of aromatic compounds coupled to nitrate reduction, sulphate reduction and methane production has been studied intensively1-7. In addition, geochemical evidence suggests that Fe(III) can be an important electron acceptor for the oxidation of aromatic compounds in anaerobic groundwater. Until now, only abiological mechanisms for the oxidation of aromatic compounds with Fe(III) have been reported8-12. Here we show that in aquatic sediments, microbial activity is necessary for the oxidation of model aromatic compounds coupled to Fe(III) reduction. Furthermore, a pure culture of the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium GS-15 can obtain energy for growth by oxidizing benzoate, toluene, phenol or p-cresol with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor. These results extend the known physiological capabilities of Fe(III)-reducing organisms and provide the first example of an organism of any type which can oxidize an aromatic hydrocarbon anaerobically. ?? 1989 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. Linking microbial carbon utilization with microbially-derived soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenbach, Cynthia M.; Grandy, A. Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Soil microbial communities are fundamental to plant C turnover, as all C inputs eventually pass through the microbial biomass. In turn, there is increasing evidence that this biomass accumulates as a significant portion of stable soil organic matter (SOM) via physiochemical interactions with the soil matrix. However, when exploring SOM dynamics, these two processes are often regarded as discrete from one another, despite potentially important linkages between microbial C utilization and the fate of that biomass C as SOM. Specifically, if stable SOM is largely comprised of microbial products, we need to better understand the soil C inputs that influence microbial biomass production and microbial C allocation. Microbial physiology, such as microbial growth efficiency (MGE), growth rate and turnover have direct influences on microbial biomass production and are highly sensitive to resource quality. Therefore, the importance of resource quality on SOM accumulation may not necessarily be a function of resistance to decay but the degree to which it optimizes microbial biomass production. To examine the relationship between microbial C utilization and microbial contributions to SOM, an ongoing 15-mo incubation experiment was set up using artificial, initially C- and microbial-free soils. Soil microcosms were constructed by mixing sand with either kaolinite or montmorillonite clays followed with a natural soil microbial inoculum. For both soil mineral treatments, weekly additions of glucose, cellobiose, or syringol are carried out, with an additional treatment of plant leachate to serve as a reference. This simplified system allows us to determine 1) if, in absence of plant-derived C, chemically complex SOM similar to natural soils can accumulate through the production of microbial residues and 2) how differences in C utilization of simple substrates, varying in energy yields, influence the quantity and chemistry of newly formed SOM. Over the course of the incubation, MGE

  7. Biomimetic and microbial reduction of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, W.T.; Le, U.; Ronda, S.

    1995-12-31

    The biomimetic reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) by dithiothreitol in the presence of cyanocobalamin and cobalt-centered porphyrins has been investigated. Reactions were monitored directly using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy vapor-phase spectra. Reaction rates were twofold faster for the corrin than for the cobalt-centered porphyrins. The stoichiometry showed the loss of two molecules of NO per molecule of N{sub 2}O produced. We have also demonstrated that the facultative anaerobe and chemoautotroph, Thiobacillus denitrificans, can be cultured anoxically in batch reactors using NO as a terminal electron acceptor with reduction to elemental nitrogen (N{sub 2}). We have proposed that the concentrated stream of NO{sub x}, as obtained from certain regenerable processes for the gas desulfurization and NO{sub x} removal, could be converted to N{sub 2} for disposal by contact with a culture of T. denitrificans. Four heterotrophic bacteria have also been identified that may be grown in batch cultures with succinate, yeast extract, or heat and alkali pretreated sewage sludge as carbon and energy sources and NO as a terminal electron acceptor. These are Paracoccus dentrificans, Pseudomonas denitrificans, Alcaligens denitrificans, and Thiophaera pantotropha.

  8. Microbial production and oxidation of methane in deep subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotelnikova, Svetlana

    2002-10-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize present studies on microbial production and oxidation of methane in the deep subterranean environments. Methane is a long-living gas causing the "greenhouse" effect in the planet's atmosphere. Earlier, the deep "organic carbon poor" subsurface was not considered as a source of "biogenic" methane. Evidence of active methanogenesis and presence of viable methanogens including autotrophic organisms were obtained for some subsurface environments including water-flooded oil-fields, deep sandy aquifers, deep sea hydrothermal vents, the deep sediments and granitic groundwater at depths of 10 to 2000 m below sea level. As a rule, the deep subterranean microbial populations dwell at more or less oligotrophic conditions. Molecular hydrogen has been found in a variety of subsurface environments, where its concentrations were significantly higher than in the tested surface aquatic environments. Chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms from deep aquifers that could grow on hydrogen and carbon dioxide can act as primary producers of organic carbon, initiating heterotrophic food chains in the deep subterranean environments independent of photosynthesis. "Biogenic" methane has been found all over the world. On the basis of documented occurrences, gases in reservoirs and older sediments are similar and have the isotopic character of methane derived from CO 2 reduction. Groundwater representing the methanogenic end member are characterized by a relative depletion of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in combination with an enrichment in 13C in inorganic carbon, which is consistent with the preferential reduction of 12CO 2 by autotrophic methanogens or acetogens. The isotopic composition of methane formed via CO 2 reduction is controlled by the δ13C of the original CO 2 substrate. Literature data shows that CH 4 as heavy as -40‰ or -50‰ can be produced by the microbial reduction of isotopically heavy CO 2. Produced methane may be oxidized

  9. Microbially mediated cobalt oxidation in seawater revealed by radiotracer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.G.; Fisher, N.S. )

    1993-12-01

    The influence of microbial activity on Co and Mn oxidation in decomposing diatom cultures was determined with radiotracer techniques. Adding a consortium of microorganisms collected from coastal seawater (0.2-3-[mu]m size fraction) to the cultures increased particulate Co formation rates at 18[degrees]C by an order of magnitude (to 3.8% d[sup [minus]1]) and particulate Mn formation rates 3-fold (to 7.9% d[sup [minus

  10. Nanosized Iron Oxide Colloids Strongly Enhance Microbial Iron Reduction▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Julian; Heister, Katja; Hofmann, Thilo; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial iron reduction is considered to be a significant subsurface process. The rate-limiting bioavailability of the insoluble iron oxyhydroxides, however, is a topic for debate. Surface area and mineral structure are recognized as crucial parameters for microbial reduction rates of bulk, macroaggregate iron minerals. However, a significant fraction of iron oxide minerals in the subsurface is supposed to be present as nanosized colloids. We therefore studied the role of colloidal iron oxides in microbial iron reduction. In batch growth experiments with Geobacter sulfurreducens, colloids of ferrihydrite (hydrodynamic diameter, 336 nm), hematite (123 nm), goethite (157 nm), and akaganeite (64 nm) were added as electron acceptors. The colloidal iron oxides were reduced up to 2 orders of magnitude more rapidly (up to 1,255 pmol h−1 cell−1) than bulk macroaggregates of the same iron phases (6 to 70 pmol h−1 cell−1). The increased reactivity was not only due to the large surface areas of the colloidal aggregates but also was due to a higher reactivity per unit surface. We hypothesize that this can be attributed to the high bioavailability of the nanosized aggregates and their colloidal suspension. Furthermore, a strong enhancement of reduction rates of bulk ferrihydrite was observed when nanosized ferrihydrite aggregates were added. PMID:19915036

  11. Microbial acceleration of aerobic pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH.

    PubMed

    Percak-Dennett, E; He, S; Converse, B; Konishi, H; Xu, H; Corcoran, A; Noguera, D; Chan, C; Bhattacharyya, A; Borch, T; Boyd, E; Roden, E E

    2017-09-01

    Pyrite (FeS2 ) is the most abundant sulfide mineral on Earth and represents a significant reservoir of reduced iron and sulfur both today and in the geologic past. In modern environments, oxidative transformations of pyrite and other metal sulfides play a key role in terrestrial element partitioning with broad impacts to contaminant mobility and the formation of acid mine drainage systems. Although the role of aerobic micro-organisms in pyrite oxidation under acidic-pH conditions is well known, to date there is very little known about the capacity for aerobic micro-organisms to oxidize pyrite at circumneutral pH. Here, we describe two enrichment cultures, obtained from pyrite-bearing subsurface sediments, that were capable of sustained cell growth linked to pyrite oxidation and sulfate generation at neutral pH. The cultures were dominated by two Rhizobiales species (Bradyrhizobium sp. and Mesorhizobium sp.) and a Ralstonia species. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing and genome reconstruction indicated the presence of Fe and S oxidation pathways in these organisms, and the presence of a complete Calvin-Benson-Bassham CO2 fixation system in the Bradyrhizobium sp. Oxidation of pyrite resulted in thin (30-50 nm) coatings of amorphous Fe(III) oxide on the pyrite surface, with no other secondary Fe or S phases detected by electron microscopy or X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Rates of microbial pyrite oxidation were approximately one order of magnitude higher than abiotic rates. These results demonstrate the ability of aerobic microbial activity to accelerate pyrite oxidation and expand the potential contribution of micro-organisms to continental sulfide mineral weathering around the time of the Great Oxidation Event to include neutral-pH environments. In addition, our findings have direct implications for the geochemistry of modern sedimentary environments, including stimulation of the early stages of acid mine drainage formation and mobilization of pyrite-associated metals

  12. Microbially Induced Iron Oxidation: What, Where, How

    SciTech Connect

    SCHIERMEYER,ELISA M.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; NORTHUP,DIANA E.

    2000-08-15

    From the results of the different bacterial cells seen, it is fairly certain that Gallionella is present because of the bean-shaped cells and twisted stalks found with the TEM. The authors cannot confirm, though, what other iron-oxidizing genera exist in the tubes, since the media was only preferential and not one that isolated a specific genus of bacteria. Based on the environment in which they live and the source of the water, they believe their cultures contain Gallionella, Leptothrix, and possibly Crenothrix and Sphaerotilus. They believe the genus Leptothrix rather than Sphaerotilus exist in the tubes because the water source was fresh, unlike the polluted water in which Sphaerotilus are usually found. The TEM preparations worked well. The cryogenic method rapidly froze the cells in place and allowed them to view their morphology. The FAA method, as stated previously, was the best of the three methods because it gave the best contrast. The gluteraldehyde samples did not come out as well. It is possible that the gluteraldehyde the authors prepared was still too concentrated and did not mix well. Although these bacteria were collected from springs and then cultured in an environment containing a presumably pure iron-bearing metal, it seems the tube already containing Manganese Gradient Medium could be used with a piece of metal containing these bacteria. A small piece of corroding metal could then be inserted into the test tube and cultured to study the bacteria.

  13. Effects of Potassium Permanganate Oxidation on Subsurface Microbial Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, Martin A.; Brubaker, Gaylen R.; Westray, Mark; Morris, Damon; Kohler, Keisha; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation has the potential for degrading large quantities of organic contaminants and can be more effective and timely than traditional ex situ treatment methods. However, there is a need to better characterize the potential effects of this treatment on natural processes. This study focuses on potential inhibition to anaerobic dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in soils from a large manufacturing facility as a result of in situ oxidation using potassium permanganate (KMn04)Previous microcosm studies established that natural attenuation occurs on-site and that it is enhanced by the addition of ethanol to the system. A potential remediation scheme for the site involves the use of potassium permanganate to reduce levels of TCE in heavily contaminated areas, then to inject ethanol into the system to "neutralize" excess oxidant and enhance microbial degradation. However, it is currently unknown whether the exposure of indigenous microbial populations to potassium permanganate may adversely affect biological reductive dechlorination by these microorganisms. Consequently, additional microcosm studies were conducted to evaluate this remediation scheme and assess the effect of potassium permanganate addition on biological reductive dechlorination of TCE. Samples of subsurface soil and groundwater were collected from a TCE-impacted area of the site. A portion of the soil was pretreated with nutrients and ethanol to stimulate microbial activity, while the remainder of the soil was left unamended. Soil/groundwater microcosms were prepared in sealed vials using the nutrient-amended and unamended soils, and the effects of potassium permanganate addition were evaluated using two permanganate concentrations (0.8 and 2.4 percent) and two contact times (1 and 3 weeks). TCE was then re-added to each microcosm and TCE and dichloroethene (DCE) concentrations were monitored to determine the degree to which microbial dechlorination occurred following chemical

  14. Genomic markers of ancient anaerobic microbial pathways: sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Teske, Andreas; Dhillon, Ashita; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2003-04-01

    Genomic markers for anaerobic microbial processes in marine sediments-sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and anaerobic methane oxidation-reveal the structure of sulfate-reducing, methanogenic, and methane-oxidizing microbial communities (including uncultured members); they allow inferences about the evolution of these ancient microbial pathways; and they open genomic windows into extreme microbial habitats, such as deep subsurface sediments and hydrothermal vents, that are analogs for the early Earth and for extraterrestrial microbiota.

  15. Linking microbial and ecosystem ecology using ecological stoichiometry: a synthesis of conceptual and empirical approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, E.K.; Maixner, F.; Franklin, O.; Daims, H.; Richter, A.; Battin, T.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, one of the biggest challenges in microbial and ecosystem ecology is to develop conceptual models that organize the growing body of information on environmental microbiology into a clear mechanistic framework with a direct link to ecosystem processes. Doing so will enable development of testable hypotheses to better direct future research and increase understanding of key constraints on biogeochemical networks. Although the understanding of phenotypic and genotypic diversity of microorganisms in the environment is rapidly accumulating, how controls on microbial physiology ultimately affect biogeochemical fluxes remains poorly understood. We propose that insight into constraints on biogeochemical cycles can be achieved by a more rigorous evaluation of microbial community biomass composition within the context of ecological stoichiometry. Multiple recent studies have pointed to microbial biomass stoichiometry as an important determinant of when microorganisms retain or recycle mineral nutrients. We identify the relevant cellular components that most likely drive changes in microbial biomass stoichiometry by defining a conceptual model rooted in ecological stoichiometry. More importantly, we show how X-ray microanalysis (XRMA), nanoscale secondary ion mass spectroscopy (NanoSIMS), Raman microspectroscopy, and in situ hybridization techniques (for example, FISH) can be applied in concert to allow for direct empirical evaluation of the proposed conceptual framework. This approach links an important piece of the ecological literature, ecological stoichiometry, with the molecular front of the microbial revolution, in an attempt to provide new insight into how microbial physiology could constrain ecosystem processes.

  16. Anoxic Oxidation of Arsenite Linked to Denitrification in Sludges and Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenjie; Sierra, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, denitrification linked to the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to arsenate (As(V)) was shown to be a widespread microbial activity in anaerobic sludge and sediment samples that were not previously exposed to arsenic contamination. When incubated with 0.5 mM As(III) and 10 mM NO3−, the anoxic oxidation of As(III) commenced within a few days, achieving specific activities of up to 1.24 mmol As(V) formed g−1 volatile suspended solids d−1 due to growth (doubling times of 0.74 to 1.4 d). The anoxic oxidation of As(III) was partially to completely inhibited by 1.5 and 5 mM As(III), respectively. Inhibition was minimized by adding As(III) adsorbed onto activated aluminum (AA). The oxidation of As(III) was shown to be linked to the complete denitrification of NO3− to N2 by demonstrating a significantly enhanced production of N2 beyond the background endogenous production as a result of adding As(III)-AA to the cultures. The N2 production corresponded closely the expected stoichiometry of the reaction, 2.5 mol As(III) mol−1 N2-N. The oxidation of As(III) linked to the use of common occuring nitrate as an electron acceptor may be an important missing link in the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic. PMID:18762312

  17. Increased electrical output when a bacterial ABTS oxidizer is used in a microbial fuel cell

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a technology that provides electrical energy from the microbial oxidation of organic compounds. Most MFCs use oxygen as the oxidant in the cathode chamber. The present study examined the formation in culture of an unidentified bacterial oxidant and investigated the ...

  18. Linking Microbial Heterotrophic Activity and Sediment Lithology in Oxic, Oligotrophic Sub-Seafloor Sediments of the North Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Aude; Ferdelman, Timothy G.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial heterotrophic activity was investigated in oxic sub-seafloor sediments at North Pond, a sediment pond situated at 23°N on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The North Pond sediments underlie the oligotrophic North Atlantic Gyre at 4580-m water depth and cover a 7–8 million-year-old basaltic crust aquifer through which seawater flows. Discrete samples for experimentation were obtained from up to ~9 m-long gravity cores taken at 14 stations in the North Pond area. Potential respiration rates were determined in sediment slurries incubated under aerobic conditions with 14C-acetate. Microbial heterotrophic activity, as defined by oxidation of acetate to CO2 (with O2 as electron acceptor), was detected in all 14 stations and all depths sampled. Potential respiration rates were generally low (<0.2 nmol of respired acetate cm−3 d−1) in the sediment, but indicate that microbial heterotrophic activity occurs in deep-sea, oxic, sub-seafloor sediments. Furthermore, discernable differences in activity existed between sites and within given depth profiles. At seven stations, activity was increased by several orders of magnitude at depth (up to ~12 nmol of acetate respired cm−3 d−1). We attempted to correlate the measures of activity with high-resolution color and element stratigraphy. Increased activities at certain depths may be correlated to variations in the sediment geology, i.e., to the presence of dark clay-rich layers, of sandy layers, or within clay-rich horizons presumably overlying basalts. This would suggest that the distribution of microbial heterotrophic activity in deeply buried sediments may be linked to specific lithologies. Nevertheless, high-resolution microbial examination at the level currently enjoyed by sedimentologists will be required to fully explore this link. PMID:22207869

  19. Complete cobalt recovery from lithium cobalt oxide in self-driven microbial fuel cell - Microbial electrolysis cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liping; Yao, Binglin; Wu, Dan; Quan, Xie

    2014-08-01

    Complete cobalt recovery from lithium cobalt oxide requires to firstly leach cobalt from particles LiCoO2 and then recover cobalt from aqueous Co(II). A self-driven microbial fuel cell (MFC)-microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) system can completely carry out these two processes, in which Co(II) is firstly released from particles LiCoO2 on the cathodes of MFCs and then reduced on the cathodes of MECs which are powered by the cobalt leaching MFCs. A cobalt leaching rate of 46 ± 2 mg L-1 h-1 with yield of 1.5 ± 0.1 g Co g-1 COD (MFCs) and a Co(II) reduction rate of 7 ± 0 mg L-1 h-1 with yield of 0.8 ± 0.0 g Co g-1 COD (MECs), as well as a overall system cobalt yield of 0.15 ± 0.01 g Co g-1 Co can be achieved in this self-driven MFC-MEC system. Coulombic efficiencies reach 41 ± 1% (anodic MFCs), 75 ± 0% (anodic MECs), 100 ± 2% (cathodic MFCs), and 29 ± 1% (cathodic MECs) whereas overall system efficiency averages 34 ± 1%. These results provide a new process of linking MFCs to MECs for complete recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries with no external energy consumption.

  20. Microbial Ecophysiology is a Missing Link in Emerging Microbial-based Soil Organic Matter Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenbach, C.; Grandy, S.; Frey, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, our epistemology of soil C dynamics has been undergoing a major transformation; where in the past soil organic matter (SOM) formation was attributed to the biochemical recalcitrance of plant litter, we now know that microbially transformed plant residues and microbial necromass are key precursors of SOM formation. SOM formation is thus a result of complex ecological interactions between substrate availability, the soil biological community, and the decomposing environment, and is a function of multiple ecosystem processes related to climate, soil type and their interactions with resident decomposer communities. Under this emerging new view, microbial biomass is treated generally, without consideration of the ecophysiological processes that regulate the chemistry and abundance of biomass production. In reality, biomass inputs are far more complex in terms of their input rates and potential to serve as a precursor to SOM formation. We explore microbial growth efficiencies (MGE) and growth rates and how their expression across different soil environments can be incorporated into our emerging conceptual models of microbial-mediated SOM formation. MGE and growth rates are both poorly understood despite their direct impact on SOM formation. Specifically, the physiological trade-offs associated with growth rates and MGE need to be assessed in terms of their relative influence on microbial inputs to SOM. Additionally, we need a better understanding of the variation in chemistry of cellular biomass, metabolites and exocellular excretions across species. At a broad level, we know that fungal and bacterial cell walls differ in their chemical recalcitrance and organo-mineral interactions but the degree to which this variation results in long-term differences in SOM dynamics remains unknown. To explore these uncertainties, we use a model-based approach to examine how potential tradeoffs between MGE and growth rates, and their responses to varying environmental

  1. Microbial transformations of selenite by methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Eswayah, Abdurrahman S; Smith, Thomas J; Scheinost, Andreas C; Hondow, Nicole; Gardiner, Philip H E

    2017-06-23

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria are well known for their role in the global methane cycle and their potential for microbial transformation of wide range of hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbon pollution. Recently, it has also emerged that methane-oxidizing bacteria interact with inorganic pollutants in the environment. Here, we report what we believe to be the first study of the interaction of pure strains of methane-oxidizing bacteria with selenite. Results indicate that the commonly used laboratory model strains of methane-oxidizing bacteria, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, are both able to reduce the toxic selenite (SeO3(2-)) but not selenate (SeO4(2-)) to red spherical nanoparticulate elemental selenium (Se(0)), which was characterized via energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The cultures also produced volatile selenium-containing species, which suggests that both strains may have an additional activity that can transform either Se(0) or selenite into volatile methylated forms of selenium. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements and experiments with the cell fractions cytoplasm, cell wall and cell membrane show that the nanoparticles are formed mainly on the cell wall. Collectively, these results are promising for the use of methane-oxidizing bacteria for bioremediation or suggest possible uses in the production of selenium nanoparticles for biotechnology.

  2. Microbial arsenic oxidation in a shallow marine hydrothermal vent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amend, J. P.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Pichler, T.; Price, R.; Herndon, E.; Hsia, N.

    2005-12-01

    The toxic effects of arsenic are well documented, but this Group V element can also serve as an energy source to a diverse group of microorganisms. Most of the attention has been on arsenate (AsV) reduction, but the focus is shifting to include arsenite (AsIII) oxidation and subsequent immobilization through coprecipitation with iron (oxy)hydroxides. The shallow marine hydrothermal fluids near Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea are characterized by arsenite concentrations of up to 1,000 μg/L. Directly proximal to the vent orifices, arsenate coprecipitates with 2-line ferrihydrite, coating rocks and corals in red and green biofilms up to 1 cm thick. DNA extracted from these coatings was amplified with archaeal- and bacterial-specific primers, and the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced. Both biofilm samples revealed archaeal communities exclusively composed of uncultured Crenarchaea. The bacterial members are primarily gamma Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes in the red biofilm, but 60% of the community in the green biofilm affiliate with the alpha Proteobacteria and candidate group OP11; there is minimal overlap in bacterial phylotypes between the two coatings. Slurries from these coatings were also used to inoculate geochemically designed growth media supplemented with various redox couples, including aerobic and anaerobic As(III) oxidation. On a medium targeting anaerobic, chemolithoautotrophic arsenic oxidation coupled to ferric iron reduction at 50 °C, predominantly rod-shaped organisms (~5×105 cells/ml) were enriched. In contrast, on an aerobic arsenic oxidation medium, coccoid-shaped organisms (~3×106 cells/ml) were enriched. The respective thermophilic microbial communities may be taking advantage of overall metabolisms represented by H3AsO3(aq) + 2FeOOH(s) + 3H+ = H2AsO4- + 2Fe2+ + 3H2O (1) and H3AsO3(aq) + 1/2O2(aq) = H2AsO4- + H+. (2) To date, no arsenite oxidizers are known to use ferric iron as a terminal electron acceptor (reaction 1). However, this

  3. Sources and Contributions of Oxygen During Microbial Pyrite Oxidation: the Triple Oxygen Isotopes of Sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, K.; Coleman, M. L.; Mielke, R. E.; Young, E. D.

    2008-12-01

    complimentary chemistry data (in progress), we interpret our isotope data to indicate that the biotic fractionation factor ɛ18OSO4-O2 of at least ~ -25 to - 35‰ is augmented by microbially induced kinetic fractionation; it is larger than expected based on published equilibrium values [2,3,4]. Our inferred ɛ18OSO4-H2O of at least ~+10‰ is similar to some reported values. These new insights into the close links between microbial life cycle and sources of sulfate oxygen during sulfide oxidation, and their oxygen isotopic expressions, will help elucidate the role of microbial oxidation in natural systems. If microbial populations in natural systems remain in a perpetual lag-phase due to constrains of chemistry, atmospheric oxygen will imprint its isotopic signature onto sulfate deposits. Ultimately, such data could be used as biosignatures on Early Earth or Mars. [1] Brunner and Coleman (2008) EPSL 270, 63-72. [2] Balci et al. (2007) GCA 71, 3796-3811. [3] Pisapia et al. (2007) GCA 71, 2474-2490. [4] Taylor et al. (1984) GCA 48, 2669-2678.

  4. Microbial reduction of manganese oxides - Interactions with iron and sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Charles R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Alteromonas putrefaciens (strain MR-1) is capable of rapid Mn(IV) reduction under conditions of neutral pH and temperatures characteristic of the Oneida Lake, New York, sediments from which it was isolated. MR-1 also reduces Fe(3+) to Fe(2+), and disproportionates thiosulfate to sulfide and sulfite; independently, the Fe(2+) and sulfide act as rapid reductants of Mn. The addition of Fe(3+) or thiosulfate to cultures of MR-1 in the presence of oxidized Mn increases the rate and the extent of Mn reduction relative to that observed in the absence of Fe(3+) or thiosulfate. Furthermore, when Fe(3+) and Mn oxides are present conjointly, Fe(2+) does not appear until the reduction of the oxidized Mn is complete. These results demonstrate that the observed rates of Fe(2+) and sulfide production may underestimate the total rates of Fe and sulfate reduction in those environments containing oxidized Mn. These results also demonstrate the potential impact that a single microbe can exert on sediment geochemistry, and provide the basis for preliminary models of the complexity of microbial and geochemical interactions that occur.

  5. Effective ammonium removal by anaerobic oxidation in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Dipak A; Ghangrekar, Makarand M

    2015-01-01

    Dual-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs), made of clayware cylinder, were operated at different chemical oxygen demands: ammonium-nitrogen (COD:NH4+) ratio (1:1, 10:1 and 5:1) under batch mode for simultaneous removal of ammonia and organic matter from wastewater. Ammonium-N removal efficiencies of 63-32.66% were obtained for COD:NH4+ ratio of 1:10, respectively. Average COD removal efficiencies demonstrated by these MFCs were about 88%; indicating effective use of MFCs for treatment of wastewater containing organic matter and high ammonia concentration. MFCs operated with COD:NH4+ ratio of 10:1 produced highest volumetric power density of 752.88 mW/m3. The ammonium-N removal slightly increased when microbes were exposed to only ammonium as a source of electron when organic source was not supplemented. When this MFC was operated with imposed potential on cathode and without aeration in the cathode chamber, oxidation of ammonium ions at a faster rate confirmed anaerobic oxidation. During the non-turnover condition of cyclic voltammetry, MFC operated with COD:NH4+ ratio of 10:1 gave higher oxidative and reductive currents than MFC operated with COD:NH4+ ratio of 1:1 due to higher redox species. Successful application of such an anammox process for ammonium oxidation in MFCs will be useful for treatment of wastewater containing higher ammonium concentration and harvesting energy in the form of electricity.

  6. Microbial reduction of manganese oxides - Interactions with iron and sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Charles R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Alteromonas putrefaciens (strain MR-1) is capable of rapid Mn(IV) reduction under conditions of neutral pH and temperatures characteristic of the Oneida Lake, New York, sediments from which it was isolated. MR-1 also reduces Fe(3+) to Fe(2+), and disproportionates thiosulfate to sulfide and sulfite; independently, the Fe(2+) and sulfide act as rapid reductants of Mn. The addition of Fe(3+) or thiosulfate to cultures of MR-1 in the presence of oxidized Mn increases the rate and the extent of Mn reduction relative to that observed in the absence of Fe(3+) or thiosulfate. Furthermore, when Fe(3+) and Mn oxides are present conjointly, Fe(2+) does not appear until the reduction of the oxidized Mn is complete. These results demonstrate that the observed rates of Fe(2+) and sulfide production may underestimate the total rates of Fe and sulfate reduction in those environments containing oxidized Mn. These results also demonstrate the potential impact that a single microbe can exert on sediment geochemistry, and provide the basis for preliminary models of the complexity of microbial and geochemical interactions that occur.

  7. Microbial oxidation of manganese in a North Carolina estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Sunda, W.G.; Huntsman, S.A. )

    1987-05-01

    Experiments were conducted with Mn-54 (++) to determine the kinetics of particulate manganese formation in seawater from the lower Newport River estuary, North Carolina. Dissolved Mn was rapidly converted into particles at constant rates that ranged from 0.36 to 6.2%/h, yielding turnover times of the dissolved manganese pool of 0.7-11 d. Dissolved Mn turnover rates increased with temperature up to a maximum at 25-35 C and also increased with the ratio of particulate to dissolved Mn. These two factors explained most of the variation in the observed turnover rates. The formation of particulate Mn appeared to result primarily from the oxidation of Mn(++) to manganese oxides. However, the oxidation rates were much too rapid to be accounted for by abiotic mechanisms, and the rate was reduced by 97% following heat sterilization of the seawater. In addition, the rates conformed to the Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics model, providing strong evidence that oxidation of Mn in the estuarine samples is microbially catalyzed. This catalysis appears to be instrumental in the rapid redox cycling of Mn and in the scavenging of dissolved Mn onto particles in aquatic systems. 35 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Microbial Methane Oxidation Rates in Guandu Wetland of northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling; Lin, Li-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Wetland is one of the major sources of atmospheric methane. The exact magnitude of methane emission is essentially controlled by microbial processes. Besides of methanogenesis, methanotrophy oxidizes methane with the reduction of various electron acceptors under oxic or anoxic conditions. The interplay of these microbial activities determines the final methane flux under different circumstances. In a tidal wetland, the cyclic flooding and recession of tide render oxygen and sulfate the dominant electron acceptors for methane oxidation. However, the details have not been fully examined, especially for the linkage between potential methane oxidation rates and in situ condition. In this study, a sub-tropical wetland in northern Taiwan, Guandu, was chosen to examine the tidal effect on microbial methane regulation. Several sediment cores were retrieved during high tide and low tide period and their geochemical profiles were characterized to demonstrate in situ microbial activities. Incubation experiments were conducted to estimate potential aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation rates in surface and core sediments. Sediment cores collected in high tide and low tide period showed different geochemical characteristics, owning to tidal inundation. Chloride and sulfate concentration were lower during low tide period. A spike of enhanced sulfate at middle depth intervals was sandwiched by two sulfate depleted zones above and underneath. Methane was accumulated significantly with two methane depletion zones nearly mirroring the sulfate spike zone identified. During the high tide period, sulfate decreased slightly with depth with methane production inhibited at shallow depths. However, a methane consumption zone still occurred near the surface. Potential aerobic methane oxidation rates were estimated between 0.7 to 1.1 μmole/g/d, showing no difference between the samples collected at high tide or low tide period. However, a lag phase was widely observed and the lag phase

  9. [Species and strain composition of microbial associations oxidizing different types of gold-bearing concentrates].

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, T A; Melamud, V S; Savari, E E; Sedel'nikova, G V; Kondrat'eva, T F

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative abundance of microbial species within an association was found to depend on the energy substrate and the oxidation temperature of sulfide minerals. The number of microbial cells varied depending on the position of reactor in the chain, i.e., the stage of the energy substrate oxidation. Microbial associations oxidized the energy substrate more efficiently than any of their individual components. The increase in pulp density up to the solid : liquid ratio of 1 : 2.5 had an unfavorable effect on microorganisms comprising microbial associations.

  10. Magnetic Characterization of Iron Oxide Cross Linked Hydro gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senaratne, U.; Powell, N.; Kroll, E.; Tsoi, G.; Naik, R.; Naik, V.; Vaishnava, P. P.; Wenger, L. E.

    2004-03-01

    Magnetic hydro gels have potential applications in drug delivery, cells sorting, sensors, and actuating technologies. Iron oxide alginate nanocomposites were synthesized following the method of Kroll et al^1 by cross linking sodium alginate with Fe^2+ and Fe^3+ in methanol: water. The ion-cross linked alginate hydro gels are oxidized in an alkaline solution. The resulting hydro gel consists of iron oxide cross linked alginate. The alginate hydro gels are inert to the reaction conditions and therefore the reaction sequence can be repeated. The multiple loadings result in an increase in the amount of iron oxide and the size of the iron oxide nanoparticles in the cross linked hydro gels. The third and sixth loaded iron oxide alginate hydro gels were dried and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry. The XRD patterns have characteristic features of γ- Fe_2O3 or Fe_3O4 phases. The average particle size, calculated from the XRD peaks, for third loaded iron oxide alginate was 2 nm. The zero-field-cooled and field-cooled SQUID measurements show the iron oxide nanoparticles are superparamagnetic with blocking temperature (T_B) of approximately 35 K. Above the blocking temperature, the inverse susceptibility versus temperature relationship does not follow the Curie-Weiss law, indicating strong inter-particle interactions. The M vs. H data above the blocking temperature was fitted with a modified Langevin function to obtain additional information about the iron oxide particle size. Details of the relationship between coercive field and temperature as well as the particle size distribution obtained from XRD and TEM measurements will be presented. *Research supported by NSF grant # DGE ˜980720 **Supported by NSF REU grant # EEC-0097736 ^1E. Kroll, F.M. Winnik, and R.F. Ziolo, Chem. Mater, 8, 1594 (1996).

  11. Stable Isotope Probing: Linking Functional Activity to Specific Members of Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.

    2007-03-12

    Abstract Linking organisms or groups of organisms to specific functions within natural environments is a fundamental challenge in microbial ecology. Advances in technology for manipulating and analyzing nucleic acids have made it possible to characterize the members of microbial communities without the intervention of laboratory culturing. Results from such studies have shown that the vast majority of soil organisms have never been cultured, highlighting the risks of culture-based approaches in community analysis. The development of culture-independent techniques for following the flow of substrates through microbial communities therefore represents an important advance. These techniques, collectively known as stable isotope probing (SIP), involve introducing a stable isotope-labeled substrate into a microbial community and following the fate of the substrate by detecting the appearance of the isotope in diagnostic molecules such as fatty acids and nucleic acids. The molecules in which the isotope label appears provide identifying information about the organism that incorporated the substrate. SIP allows direct observations of substrate assimilation in minimally disturbed communities, and thus represents an exciting new tool for linking microbial identity and function. The use of lipids or nucleic acids as the diagnostic molecule brings different strengths and weaknesses to the experimental approach, and necessitates the use of significantly different instrumentation and analytical techniques. This mini-review provides an overview of the lipid and nucleic acid approaches, discusses their strengths and weaknesses, gives examples of applications in various settings, and looks at prospects for the future of SIP technology.

  12. Microbial functional diversity enhances predictive models linking environmental parameters to ecosystem properties.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jeff R; Welsh, Allana; Hallin, Sara

    2015-07-01

    Microorganisms drive biogeochemical processes, but linking these processes to real changes in microbial communities under field conditions is not trivial. Here, we present a model-based approach to estimate independent contributions of microbial community shifts to ecosystem properties. The approach was tested empirically, using denitrification potential as our model process, in a spatial survey of arable land encompassing a range of edaphic conditions and two agricultural production systems. Soil nitrate was the most important single predictor of denitrification potential (the change in Akaike's information criterion, corrected for sample size, ΔAIC(c) = 20.29); however, the inclusion of biotic variables (particularly the evenness and size of denitrifier communities [ΔAIC(c) = 12.02], and the abundance of one denitrifier genotype [ΔAIC(c) = 18.04]) had a substantial effect on model precision, comparable to the inclusion of abiotic variables (biotic R2 = 0.28, abiotic R2 = 0.50, biotic + abiotic R2 = 0.76). This approach provides a valuable tool for explicitly linking microbial communities to ecosystem functioning. By making this link, we have demonstrated that including aspects of microbial community structure and diversity in biogeochemical models can improve predictions of nutrient cycling in ecosystems and enhance our understanding of ecosystem functionality.

  13. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction-linked neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Torequl

    2017-01-01

    Reactive species play an important role in physiological functions. Overproduction of reactive species, notably reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species along with the failure of balance by the body's antioxidant enzyme systems results in destruction of cellular structures, lipids, proteins, and genetic materials such as DNA and RNA. Moreover, the effects of reactive species on mitochondria and their metabolic processes eventually cause a rise in ROS/RNS levels, leading to oxidation of mitochondrial proteins, lipids, and DNA. Oxidative stress has been considered to be linked to the etiology of many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) such as Alzheimer diseases, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich's ataxia, Huntington's disease, Multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's diseases. In addition, oxidative stress causing protein misfold may turn to other NDDs include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, Kuru, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome, and Fatal Familial Insomnia. An overview of the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction-linked NDDs has been summarized in this review.

  14. Role of microbial processes in linking sandstone diagenesis with organic-rich clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Chapelle, F.H.; Falls, W.F.; Bradley, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    Shows that the processes of microbial organic-acid production (via fermentation) in clays and microbial organic-acid consumption (via sulfate reduction) in sands effectively link organic-rich clays to sandstone diagenesis in the Black Creek Formation of South Carolina. Diagenetic processes have resulted in the formation of 10 volume percent calcite cement, 0.1 volume percent authigenic pyrite, and 1.5 volume percent secondary porosity in Black Creek sands. However, the distribution of these diagenetic processes is not uniform, resulting in net destruction of porosity in some parts of the sand and net porosity enchancement in other parts. -from Authors

  15. Microbial Diversity in Sediments of Saline Qinghia Lake, China:Linking Geochemical Controls to Microbial Ecoloby

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hailiang; Zhang, Gengxin; Jiang, Hongchen; Yu, Bingsong; Chapman, Leah R.; Lucas, Courtney R.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2007-03-30

    Saline lakes at high altitudes represent an important andextreme microbial ecosystem, yet little is known about microbialdiversity in such environments. The objective of this study was toexamine the change of microbial diversity from the bottom of the lake tosediments of 40 cm in depth in a core from Qinghai Lake. The lake issaline (12.5 g/L salinity) and alkaline (pH 9.4) and is located on theQinghai-Tibetan Plateau at an altitude of 3196 m above sea level. Porewater chemistry of the core revealed low concentrations of sulfate andiron (<1 mM), but high concentrations of acetate (40-70 mM) anddissolved organic carbon (1596-5443 mg/L). Total organic carbon and totalnitrogen contents in the sediments were approximately 2 and<0.5percent, respectively. Acridine orange direct count data indicated thatcell numbers decreased from 4 x 10(9) cells/g at the water-sedimentinterface to 6 x 10(7) cells/g wet sediment at the 40-cm depth. Thischange in biomass was positively correlated with acetate concentration inpore water. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) community structure analysesdetermined decrease in the proportion of the Proteobacteria and increasein the Firmicutes with increased depth. Characterization of small subunit(SSU) rRNA genes amplified from the sediments indicated a shift in thebacterial community with depth. Whereas the alpha-, beta-, andgamma-Proteobacteria and the Cytophaga/Flavobacterium/Bacteroides (CFB)were dominant at the water-sediment interface, low G + C gram-positivebacteria (a subgroup of Firmicutes) became the predominant group in theanoxic sediments. Both PLFA and the sequence data showed similar trend.The Proteobacteria, CFB, and gram-positive bacteria are present in othersaline lakes, but the presence of Actinobacteria andAcidobacteria/Holophaga in significant proportions in the Qinghai Lakesediments appears to be unique. The archaeal diversity was much lower,and clone sequences could be grouped in the Euryarchaeota andCrenarchaeota domains. The

  16. Sorption of trivalent cerium by a mixture of microbial cells and manganese oxides: Effect of microbial cells on the oxidation of trivalent cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Jiang, Mingyu; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozai, Naofumi; Yamasaki, Shinya; Yu, Qianqian; Tanaka, Kazuya; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Xia, Xiaobin; Yang, Ke; He, Jianhua

    2015-08-01

    Sorption of Ce by mixtures of synthetic Mn oxides and microbial cells of Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated to elucidate the role of microorganisms on Ce(III) oxidative migration in the environment. The mixtures, upon which Ce was sorbed following exposure to solutions containing 1.0 × 10-4 or 1.0 × 10-5 mol L-1 Ce(III), were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and micro-X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) at synchrotron facilities. A Ce LIII-edge micro XANES spectra analysis was also performed to determine the oxidation states of Ce adsorbed to the Mn oxides and microbial cells in the mixtures. The distribution ratios (Kd) of Ce between the individual solids and solution increased with increasing pH of the solution, and was nearly the same in mixtures containing varying amounts of microbial cells. SEM-EDS and micro-XRF analyses showed that Ce was sorbed by both MnO2 and microbial cells (1.7 × 10-1 or 3.3 × 10-1 g L-1). In addition, nano-particles containing Ce and P developed on the surface of the microbial cells. XANES analysis showed that lower fractions of Ce(III) were oxidized to Ce(IV) in the mixtures containing greater amounts of microbial cells. Micro-XANES analysis revealed that Ce was present as Ce(III) on the microbial cells and as Ce(IV) on Mn oxides. These results strongly suggest that the association of Ce(III) with the microbial cell surface and the formation of Ce phosphate nano-particles are responsible for suppressing the oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) in the mixtures.

  17. Biologically relevant oxidants cause bound proteins to readily oxidatively cross-link at Guanine.

    PubMed

    Solivio, Morwena J; Nemera, Dessalegn B; Sallans, Larry; Merino, Edward J

    2012-02-20

    Oxidative DNA-protein cross-links have received less attention than other types of DNA damage and remain as one of the least understood types of oxidative lesion. A model system using ribonuclease A and a 27-nucleotide DNA was used to determine the propensity of oxidative cross-linking to occur in the presence of oxidants. Cross-link formation was examined using four different oxidation systems that generate singlet oxygen, superoxide, and metal-based Fenton reactions. It is shown that oxidative cross-linking occurs in yields ranging from 14% to a maximal yield of 61% in all oxidative systems when equivalent concentrations of DNA and protein are present. Because singlet oxygen is the most efficient oxidation system in generating DNA-protein cross-links, it was chosen for further analyses. Cross-linking occurred with single-stranded DNA binding protein and not with bovine serum albumin. Addition of salt lowered nonspecific binding affinity and lowered cross-link yield by up to 59%. The yield of cross-linking increased with increased ratios of protein compared with DNA. Cross-linking was highly dependent on the number of guanines in a DNA sequence. Loss of guanine content on the 27-nucleotide DNA led to nearly complete loss in cross-linking, while primer extension studies showed cross-links to predominantly occur at guanine base on a 100-nucleotide DNA. The chemical species generated were examined using two peptides derived from the ribonuclease A sequence, N-acetyl-AAAKF and N-acetyl-AYKTT, which were cross-linked to 2'-deoxyguanosine. The cross-link products were spiroiminodihydantoin, guanidinohydantoin, and tyrosyl-based adducts. Formation of tyrosine-based adducts may be competitive with the more well-studied lysine-based cross-links. We conclude that oxidative cross-links may be present at high levels in cells since the propensity to oxidatively cross-link is high and so much of the genomic DNA is coated with protein.

  18. Linking Microbial Ecology to Geochemistry in Sulfate Reducing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennan, D. M.; Lee, I.; Landkamer, L.; Almstrand, R.; Figueroa, L. A.; Sharp, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    community composition. CCA of Shannon diversity data after one pore volume revealed that zinc removal, walnut shell content, and abundance of delta-Proteobacteria (sulfate reducing organisms) were all corresponding elements. However, after several pore volumes, the walnut shell column was no longer removing Zn as effectively, and community shifts were observed throughout the columns. Analysis of field and laboratory scale microbiological and geochemical shifts, in parallel, gives insight into key biogeochemical variables linked to the performance of passive remediation systems used for the treatment of contaminated MIW, while also providing further insight into metal immobilization at the microbe-mineral interface.

  19. Microbial carbon metabolism associated with electrogenic sulphur oxidation in coastal sediments

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; van de Vossenberg, Jack; Polerecky, Lubos; Malkin, Sairah Y; Schauer, Regina; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Confurius, Veronique; Middelburg, Jack J; Meysman, Filip JR; Boschker, Henricus TS

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a novel electrogenic type of sulphur oxidation was documented in marine sediments, whereby filamentous cable bacteria (Desulfobulbaceae) are mediating electron transport over cm-scale distances. These cable bacteria are capable of developing an extensive network within days, implying a highly efficient carbon acquisition strategy. Presently, the carbon metabolism of cable bacteria is unknown, and hence we adopted a multidisciplinary approach to study the carbon substrate utilization of both cable bacteria and associated microbial community in sediment incubations. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed rapid downward growth of cable bacteria, concomitant with high rates of electrogenic sulphur oxidation, as quantified by microelectrode profiling. We studied heterotrophy and autotrophy by following 13C-propionate and -bicarbonate incorporation into bacterial fatty acids. This biomarker analysis showed that propionate uptake was limited to fatty acid signatures typical for the genus Desulfobulbus. The nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis confirmed heterotrophic rather than autotrophic growth of cable bacteria. Still, high bicarbonate uptake was observed in concert with the development of cable bacteria. Clone libraries of 16S complementary DNA showed numerous sequences associated to chemoautotrophic sulphur-oxidizing Epsilon- and Gammaproteobacteria, whereas 13C-bicarbonate biomarker labelling suggested that these sulphur-oxidizing bacteria were active far below the oxygen penetration. A targeted manipulation experiment demonstrated that chemoautotrophic carbon fixation was tightly linked to the heterotrophic activity of the cable bacteria down to cm depth. Overall, the results suggest that electrogenic sulphur oxidation is performed by a microbial consortium, consisting of chemoorganotrophic cable bacteria and chemolithoautotrophic Epsilon- and Gammaproteobacteria. The metabolic linkage between these two groups is presently unknown and

  20. Microbial carbon metabolism associated with electrogenic sulphur oxidation in coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; van de Vossenberg, Jack; Polerecky, Lubos; Malkin, Sairah Y; Schauer, Regina; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Confurius, Veronique; Middelburg, Jack J; Meysman, Filip J R; Boschker, Henricus T S

    2015-09-01

    Recently, a novel electrogenic type of sulphur oxidation was documented in marine sediments, whereby filamentous cable bacteria (Desulfobulbaceae) are mediating electron transport over cm-scale distances. These cable bacteria are capable of developing an extensive network within days, implying a highly efficient carbon acquisition strategy. Presently, the carbon metabolism of cable bacteria is unknown, and hence we adopted a multidisciplinary approach to study the carbon substrate utilization of both cable bacteria and associated microbial community in sediment incubations. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed rapid downward growth of cable bacteria, concomitant with high rates of electrogenic sulphur oxidation, as quantified by microelectrode profiling. We studied heterotrophy and autotrophy by following (13)C-propionate and -bicarbonate incorporation into bacterial fatty acids. This biomarker analysis showed that propionate uptake was limited to fatty acid signatures typical for the genus Desulfobulbus. The nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis confirmed heterotrophic rather than autotrophic growth of cable bacteria. Still, high bicarbonate uptake was observed in concert with the development of cable bacteria. Clone libraries of 16S complementary DNA showed numerous sequences associated to chemoautotrophic sulphur-oxidizing Epsilon- and Gammaproteobacteria, whereas (13)C-bicarbonate biomarker labelling suggested that these sulphur-oxidizing bacteria were active far below the oxygen penetration. A targeted manipulation experiment demonstrated that chemoautotrophic carbon fixation was tightly linked to the heterotrophic activity of the cable bacteria down to cm depth. Overall, the results suggest that electrogenic sulphur oxidation is performed by a microbial consortium, consisting of chemoorganotrophic cable bacteria and chemolithoautotrophic Epsilon- and Gammaproteobacteria. The metabolic linkage between these two groups is presently unknown and

  1. Toward Linking Aboveground Vegetation Properties and Soil Microbial Communities Using Remote Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Yuki; Gilbert, Jack A.; Larsen, Peter E.; Norgaard, Madeline J.

    2014-04-01

    Despite their vital role in terrestrial ecosystem function, the distributions and dynamics of soil microbial communities (SMCs) are poorly understood. Vegetation and soil properties are the primary factors that influence SMCs. This paper discusses the potential effectiveness of remote sensing science and technologies for mapping SMC biogeography by characterizing surface biophysical properties (e.g., plant traits and community composition) strongly correlated with SMCs. Using remotely sensed biophysical properties to predict SMC distributions is extremely challenging because of the intricate interactions between biotic and abiotic factors and between above- and belowground ecosystems. However, the integration of biophysical and soil remote sensing with geospatial information about the e nvironment holds great promise for mapping SMC biogeography. Additional research needs invol ve microbial taxonomic definition, soil environmental complexity, and scaling strategies. The collaborative effort of experts from diverse disciplines is essential to linking terrestrial surface biosphere observations with subsurface microbial community distributions using remote sensing.

  2. Linking genes to microbial growth kinetics: an integrated biochemical systems engineering approach.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, Michalis; Kiparissides, Alexandros; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Lam, Ming-Chi; Martins Dos Santos, Vitor A P; de Lorenzo, Victor; Pistikopoulos, Efstratios N; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2011-07-01

    The majority of models describing the kinetic properties of a microorganism for a given substrate are unstructured and empirical. They are formulated in this manner so that the complex mechanism of cell growth is simplified. Herein, a novel approach for modelling microbial growth kinetics is proposed, linking biomass growth and substrate consumption rates to the gene regulatory programmes that control these processes. A dynamic model of the TOL (pWW0) plasmid of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 has been developed, describing the molecular interactions that lead to the transcription of the upper and meta operons, known to produce the enzymes for the oxidative catabolism of m-xylene. The genetic circuit model was combined with a growth kinetic model decoupling biomass growth and substrate consumption rates, which are expressed as independent functions of the rate-limiting enzymes produced by the operons. Estimation of model parameters and validation of the model's predictive capability were successfully performed in batch cultures of mt-2 fed with different concentrations of m-xylene, as confirmed by relative mRNA concentration measurements of the promoters encoded in TOL. The growth formation and substrate utilisation patterns could not be accurately described by traditional Monod-type models for a wide range of conditions, demonstrating the critical importance of gene regulation for the development of advanced models closely predicting complex bioprocesses. In contrast, the proposed strategy, which utilises quantitative information pertaining to upstream molecular events that control the production of rate-limiting enzymes, predicts the catabolism of a substrate and biomass formation and could be of central importance for the design of optimal bioprocesses.

  3. Competitive Oxidation Kinetics and Microbial Ecology: Intermediate Sulfur Transformations in Acid Mine Drainage Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschel, G. K.; Hamers, R. J.; Banfield, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that oxidation of pyrite proceeds through several intermediate sulfur species, notably elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, and polythionates (Schippers et al., 1996). However, detailed sampling and analysis of flowing waters and pore waters failed to detect intermediate sulfur species in the 5-way area of the Richmond metal sulfide deposit at the Iron Mountain Mine in northern California. Potential energy available from the oxidation of intermediate sulfur species is considerable, so microbial activity may explain absence of intermediate sulfur compounds at the site. However, the abundance of sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms in areas of active pyrite oxidation at the 5-way is generally low (Bond et al. 2000). Rapid inorganic oxidation rates may prevent microorganisms from utilizing these intermediate sulfur species, thus shaping the structure of microbial communities in acid mine drainage (AMD) environments. Rates and mechanisms of oxidation for tetrathionate and elemental sulfur have been experimentally determined. Batch and flow-through experiments have indicated very slow oxidation of elemental sulfur in inorganic solutions analogous to AMD environments. Results for tetrathionate indicate the importance of non-metabolic and inorganic processes, including surface catalysis and the generation of hydroxyl radicals. Surface catalysis occurs through trithionate on iron oxide surfaces. Hydroxyl radicals may be formed directly by microbes living in proximity to pyrite surfaces, or at pyrite surfaces undergoing wetting and drying cycles. Further experiments investigating the importance of organic compounds associated with iron-oxidizing microorganisms acting as electron transport shuttles and/or wetting agents and ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of potential reactants and intermediates are currently being performed. It is suggested that inorganic processes involved with seasonal wetting and drying of pyritic sediment

  4. Trace Metal Requirements for Microbial Enzymes Involved in the Production and Consumption of Methane and Nitrous Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Jennifer B.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluxes of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere are heavily influenced by microbiological activity. Microbial enzymes involved in the production and consumption of greenhouse gases often contain metal cofactors. While extensive research has examined the influence of Fe bioavailability on microbial CO2 cycling, fewer studies have explored metal requirements for microbial production and consumption of the second- and third-most abundant greenhouse gases, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Here we review the current state of biochemical, physiological, and environmental research on transition metal requirements for microbial CH4 and N2O cycling. Methanogenic archaea require large amounts of Fe, Ni, and Co (and some Mo/W and Zn). Low bioavailability of Fe, Ni, and Co limits methanogenesis in pure and mixed cultures and environmental studies. Anaerobic methane oxidation by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) likely occurs via reverse methanogenesis since ANME possess most of the enzymes in the methanogenic pathway. Aerobic CH4 oxidation uses Cu or Fe for the first step depending on Cu availability, and additional Fe, Cu, and Mo for later steps. N2O production via classical anaerobic denitrification is primarily Fe-based, whereas aerobic pathways (nitrifier denitrification and archaeal ammonia oxidation) require Cu in addition to, or possibly in place of, Fe. Genes encoding the Cu-containing N2O reductase, the only known enzyme capable of microbial N2O conversion to N2, have only been found in classical denitrifiers. Accumulation of N2O due to low Cu has been observed in pure cultures and a lake ecosystem, but not in marine systems. Future research is needed on metalloenzymes involved in the production of N2O by enrichment cultures of ammonia oxidizing archaea, biological mechanisms for scavenging scarce metals, and possible links between metal bioavailability and greenhouse gas fluxes in anaerobic environments where metals may be limiting due to sulfide

  5. Linking Microbial Dynamics and Physicochemical Processes in High-temperature Acidic Fe(III)- Mineralizing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inskeep, W.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial activity is responsible for the mineralization of Fe(III)-oxides in high-temperature chemotrophic communities that flourish within oxygenated zones of low pH (2.5 - 4) geothermal outflow channels (Yellowstone National Park, WY). High-temperature Fe(II)-oxidizing communities contain several lineages of Archaea, and are excellent model systems for studying microbial interactions and spatiotemporal dynamics across geochemical gradients. We hypothesize that acidic Fe(III)-oxide mats form as a result of constant interaction among primary colonizers including Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales) and Metallosphaera spp. (Sulfolobales), and subsequent colonization by archaeal heterotrophs, which vary in abundance as a function of oxygen, pH and temperature. We are integrating a complementary suite of geochemical, stable isotope, genomic, proteomic and modeling analyses to study the role of microorganisms in Fe(III)-oxide mat development, and to elucidate the primary microbial interactions that are coupled with key abiotic events. Curated de novo assemblies of major phylotypes are being used to analyze additional -omics datasets from these microbial mats. Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales) are the dominant bacterial population(s) present, and predominate during early mat development (< 30 d). Other Sulfolobales populations known to oxidize Fe(II) and fix carbon dioxide (e.g., Metallosphaera spp.) represent a secondary stage of mat development (e.g., 14 - 30 d). Hydrogenobaculum filaments appear to promote the nucleation and subsequent mineralization of Fe(III)-oxides, which likely affect the growth and turnover rates of these organisms. Other heterotrophs colonize Fe(III)-oxide mats during succession (> 30 d), including novel lineages of Archaea and representatives within the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota and Nanoarchaeota. In situ oxygen consumption rates show that steep gradients occur within the top 1 mm of mat surface, and which correlate with

  6. Links between plant community composition, soil organic matter quality and microbial communities in contrasting tundra habitats.

    PubMed

    Eskelinen, Anu; Stark, Sari; Männistö, Minna

    2009-08-01

    Plant communities, soil organic matter and microbial communities are predicted to be interlinked and to exhibit concordant patterns along major environmental gradients. We investigated the relationships between plant functional type composition, soil organic matter quality and decomposer community composition, and how these are related to major environmental variation in non-acid and acid soils derived from calcareous versus siliceous bedrocks, respectively. We analysed vegetation, organic matter and microbial community compositions from five non-acidic and five acidic heath sites in alpine tundra in northern Europe. Sequential organic matter fractionation was used to characterize organic matter quality and phospholipid fatty acid analysis to detect major variation in decomposer communities. Non-acidic and acidic heaths differed substantially in vegetation composition, and these disparities were associated with congruent shifts in soil organic matter and microbial communities. A high proportion of forbs in the vegetation was positively associated with low C:N and high soluble N:phenolics ratios in soil organic matter, and a high proportion of bacteria in the microbial community. On the contrary, dwarf shrub-rich vegetation was associated with high C:N and low soluble N:phenolics ratios, and a high proportion of fungi in the microbial community. Our study demonstrates a strong link between the plant community composition, soil organic matter quality, and microbial community composition, and that differences in one compartment are paralleled by changes in others. Variation in the forb-shrub gradient of vegetation may largely dictate variations in the chemical quality of organic matter and decomposer communities in tundra ecosystems. Soil pH, through its direct and indirect effects on plant and microbial communities, seems to function as an ultimate environmental driver that gives rise to and amplifies the interactions between above- and belowground systems.

  7. [Oxidation of sulfur-containing substrates by aboriginal and experimentally designed microbial communities].

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, T A; Bulaev, A G; Roshchupko, P V; Belyĭ, A V; Kondrat'eva, T F

    2012-01-01

    Aboriginal and experimental (constructed of pure microbial cultures) communities of acidophilic chemolithotrophs have been studied. The oxidation of elemental sulfur, sodium thiosulfate, and potassium tetrathionate as sole sources of energy has been monitored. The oxidation rate of the experimental community is higher as compared to the aboriginal community isolated from a flotation concentrate of pyrrhotine-containing pyrite-arsenopyrite gold-arsenic sulfide ore. The degree of oxidation of the mentioned S substrates amounts to 17.91, 68.30, and 93.94% for the experimental microbial community and to 10.71, 56.03, and 79.50% for the aboriginal community, respectively. The degree of oxidation of sulfur sulfide forms in the ore flotation concentrate is 59.15% by the aboriginal microbial community and 49.40% by the experimental microbial community. Despite a higher rate of oxidation of S substrates as a sole source of energy by the experimental microbial community, the aboriginal community oxidizes S substrates at a higher rate in the flotation concentrate of pyrrhotine-containing pyrite-arsenopyrite gold-arsenic sulfide ore, from which it was isolated. Bacterial-chemical oxidation of the flotation concentrate by the aboriginal microbial community allows for the extraction of an additional 32.3% of gold from sulfide minerals, which is by 5.7% larger compared to the yield obtained by the experimental microbial community.

  8. Linking N2O emissions from biochar-amended soil to the structure and function of the N-cycling microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, Johannes; Krause, Hans-Martin; Schuettler, Stefanie; Ruser, Reiner; Fromme, Markus; Scholten, Thomas; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural sources represent about 60% of anthropogenic N2O emissions. Most agricultural N2O emissions are due to increased fertilizer application. A considerable fraction of nitrogen fertilizers are converted to N2O by microbially-mediated processes. Soil amended with biochar has been demonstrated to reduce N2O emissions in the field and in laboratory experiments. Although N2O emission mitigation following soil biochar amendment has been reported frequently the underlying processes and specific role of the nitrogen cycling microbial community in decreasing soil N2O emissions has not been subject of systematic investigation. To investigate the impact of biochar on the microbial community of nitrogen-transforming microorganisms we performed a microcosm study with arable soil amended with different amounts (0%, 2% and 10% (w/w)) of high-temperature wood derived biochar. By quantifying the abundance and activity of functional marker genes of microbial nitrogen fixation (nifH), nitrification (amoA) and denitrification (nirK, nirS and nosZ) using quantitative real-time PCR we found that biochar addition enhanced microbial nitrous oxide reduction and increased the abundance of microorganisms capable of N2-fixation. Soil biochar amendment increased the relative gene and transcript copy numbers of the nosZ-encoded bacterial N2O reductase, suggesting a mechanistic link to the observed reduction in N2O emissions. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the impact of biochar on the nitrogen cycling microbial community and the consequences of soil biochar amendment for microbial nitrogen transformation processes and N2O emissions from soil.

  9. Thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of methane by marine microbial consortia.

    PubMed

    Holler, Thomas; Widdel, Friedrich; Knittel, Katrin; Amann, Rudolf; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Teske, Andreas; Boetius, Antje; Wegener, Gunter

    2011-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. AOM is performed by microbial consortia of archaea (ANME) associated with partners related to sulfate-reducing bacteria. In vitro enrichments of AOM were so far only successful at temperatures ≤25 °C; however, energy gain for growth by AOM with sulfate is in principle also possible at higher temperatures. Sequences of 16S rRNA genes and core lipids characteristic for ANME as well as hints of in situ AOM activity were indeed reported for geothermally heated marine environments, yet no direct evidence for thermophilic growth of marine ANME consortia was obtained to date. To study possible thermophilic AOM, we investigated hydrothermally influenced sediment from the Guaymas Basin. In vitro incubations showed activity of sulfate-dependent methane oxidation between 5 and 70 °C with an apparent optimum between 45 and 60 °C. AOM was absent at temperatures ≥75 °C. Long-term enrichment of AOM was fastest at 50 °C, yielding a 13-fold increase of methane-dependent sulfate reduction within 250 days, equivalent to an apparent doubling time of 68 days. The enrichments were dominated by novel ANME-1 consortia, mostly associated with bacterial partners of the deltaproteobacterial HotSeep-1 cluster, a deeply branching phylogenetic group previously found in a butane-amended 60 °C-enrichment culture of Guaymas sediments. The closest relatives (Desulfurella spp.; Hippea maritima) are moderately thermophilic sulfur reducers. Results indicate that AOM and ANME archaea could be of biogeochemical relevance not only in cold to moderate but also in hot marine habitats.

  10. Microbial oxidation of methane from old landfills in biofilters

    SciTech Connect

    Streese, J.; Stegmann, R

    2003-07-01

    Landfill gas emissions are among the largest sources of the greenhouse gas methane. For this reason, the possibilities of microbial methane degradation in biofilters were investigated. Different filter materials were tested in two experimental plants, a bench-scale plant (total filter volume 51 l) and a pilot plant (total filter volume 4 m{sup 3}). Three months after the beginning of the experiment, very high degradation rates of up to 63 g CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 3}h) were observed in the bench-scale plant at mean methane concentrations of 2.5% v/v and with fine-grained compost as biofilter material. However, the degradation rates of the compost biofilter decreased in the fifth month of the experiment, probably due to the accumulation of exopolymeric substances formed by the microorganisms. A mixture of compost, peat, and wood fibers showed stable and satisfactory degradation rates around 20 g/(m{sup 3}h) at mean concentrations of 3% v/v over a period of one year. In this material, the wood fibers served as a structural material and prevented clogging of the biofilter. Extrapolation of the experimental data indicates that biofilters for methane oxidation have to be at least 100 times the volume of biofilters for odor control to obtain the same cleaning efficiency per unit volume flow of feed gas.

  11. Modeling the link between soil microbial community structure and function in a bottom-up approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, C.; Richter, A.; Franklin, O.; Evans, S. E.; Dieckmann, U.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding mechanisms of soil carbon (C) turnover requires understanding the link between microbial community dynamics and soil decomposition processes. We present here an individual-based model that aims at elucidating this link by a bottom-up approach. Our approach differs from traditional soil C cycling models in that the overall dynamics of soil organic matter turnover emerges as the result of interactions between individual microbes at the soil microsite level, rather than being described by stock and flow rate equations at the bulk soil level. All soil microbes are modeled individually, each belonging to one of several functional groups defined by functional traits. Specifically, functional traits determine (1) growth and turnover rates, (2) production of extracellular enzymes and (3) microbial cell stoichiometry. Our model incorporates competition for space and nutrients (C and nitrogen, N) as well as synergistic interactions between individual microbes in a spatially structured environment represented by a two-dimensional grid. Due to different C and N limitations of different functional groups, community composition is sensitive to the availability of complex and labile C and N. Thus, altered resource availability changes microbial community composition, which in turn affects CO2 and N release from the soil. In our model, microbes constantly alter their own environment through the decomposition of different substrates, thereby exerting a feedback on community composition, which leads to a succession of microbial groups. We used the model's intrinsic link between resource availability, community dynamics and decomposition function to investigate the mechanism underlying the rhizosphere priming effect (i.e. increased decomposition of older soil C triggered by the input of labile C). In particular, we examined the spatial growth of a root releasing exudates of varying C:N ratios under the presence or absence of different functional groups. We find that a

  12. The role of volatile metabolites in microbial communities of the lSS higher plant link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirranen, L. S.; Gitelson, I. I.

    The possibility of controlling the microbial community composition through metabolites produced by microbes has been considered. Basing on the comparative analysis of the experimental data we have revealed the greater contribution of volatile metabolites to microbial interaction than non-volatile. Investigations proved that the interaction between microorganisms through extracted volatile materials is a widespread phenomenon peculiar to many microorganisms. Most cultures inhibited each other's growth, in a number of cases displayed bactericidal action. Stimulatory action occurred 6 - 8 times rarely. The individuality of affect on studied test-cultures growth and the spectrum of microbial resistance to volatile metabolites have been revealed. Based on the comparative cluster analysis of these spectra from 100 studied cultures we have revealed that studied organisms produce a complex of volatile metabolites including 82 inhibiting and 52 stimulating. It was found that excretion of volatile metabolites of studied microorganisms depended upon the culture age, concentration of nutrient medium separate components and volatile by-products excreted by other microorganisms. The production can be increased or decreased by volatile by-products of other microbes. This is related to strain features and the culture age. The prospects of using these regulating metabolites can be defined by the "range", specificity and safety for other members of the microbial community in insufficient concentrations. Volatile metabolites of either plants and microorganisms or other system links - humans and technological equipment installed inside the closed ecosystem - can influence the formation of microbial communities, gas composition of the system atmosphere and state of the plants through the atmosphere. Special experiments showed that volatile microorganism metabolites could accumulate in the environment, dissolve in atmospheric water and maintain their biological activity for many days

  13. Linking Archaeal Molecular Diversity and Lipid Biomarker Composition in a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda; Orphan, Victoria; Turk, Kendra; Embaye, Tsegereda; Kubo, Mike; Summons, Roger

    2005-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers for discrete microbial groups are a valuable tool for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. Lipid biomarkers can establish organism source and function in contemporary microbial ecosystems (membrane lipids) and by analogy, potential relevance to the fossilized carbon skeletons (geolipids) extracted from ancient sedimentary rock. The Mars Exploration Rovers have provided clear evidence for an early wet Mars and the presence of hypersaline evaporitic basins. Ongoing work on an early Earth analog, the hypersaline benthic mats in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, may provide clues to what may have evolved and flourished on an early wet Mars, if only for a short period. Cyanobacterial mats are a pertinent early Earth analog for consideration of evolutionary and microbial processes within the aerobic photosynthetic and adjacent anoxic layers. Fluctuations in physio-chemical parameters associated with spatial and temporal scales are expressed through vast microbial metabolic diversity. Our recent work hopes to establish the dynamic of archaeal diversity, particularly as it relates to methane production in this high sulfate environment, through the use of lipid biomarker and phylogenetic analyses. Archaeal 16s rRNA and mcrA gene assemblages, demonstrated distinct spatial separation over the 130 mm core of at least three distinct genera within the order Methanosarcinales, as well as an abundance of uncultured members of the Thermoplasmales and Crenarchaeota. Ether-bound lipid analysis identified abundant 0-alkyl and 0-isopranyl chains throughout the core, and the presence of sn-2 hydroxyarchaeol, a biomarker for methylotrophic methanogens. A unique ether isoprenoid chain, a C30:1 , possibly related to the geolipid squalane, a paleobiomarker associated with hypersaline environments, was most abundant within the oxic-anoxic transition zone.

  14. Deposition of biogenic iron minerals in a methane oxidizing microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Wrede, Christoph; Kokoschka, Sebastian; Dreier, Anne; Heller, Christina; Reitner, Joachim; Hoppert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The syntrophic community between anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria forms thick, black layers within multi-layered microbial mats in chimney-like carbonate concretions of methane seeps located in the Black Sea Crimean shelf. The microbial consortium conducts anaerobic oxidation of methane, which leads to the formation of mainly two biomineral by-products, calcium carbonates and iron sulfides, building up these chimneys. Iron sulfides are generated by the microbial reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds in the microbial mats. Here we show that sulfate reducing bacteria deposit biogenic iron sulfides extra- and intracellularly, the latter in magnetosome-like chains. These chains appear to be stable after cell lysis and tend to attach to cell debris within the microbial mat. The particles may be important nuclei for larger iron sulfide mineral aggregates.

  15. Microbiome-wide association studies link dynamic microbial consortia to disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Jack A.; Quinn, Robert A.; Debelius, Justine; Xu, Zhenjiang Z.; Morton, James; Garg, Neha; Jansson, Janet K.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Knight, Rob

    2016-07-06

    Rapid advances in DNA sequencing, metabolomics, proteomics and computation dramatically increase accessibility of microbiome studies and identify links between the microbiome and disease. Microbial time-series and multiple molecular perspectives enable Microbiome-Wide Association Studies (MWAS), analogous to Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Rapid research advances point towards actionable results, although approved clinical tests based on MWAS are still in the future. Appreciating the complexity of interactions between diet, chemistry, health and the microbiome, and determining the frequency of observations needed to capture and integrate this dynamic interface, is paramount for addressing the need for personalized and precision microbiome-based diagnostics and therapies.

  16. Nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria as microbial oxidants for rapid biological sulfide removal.

    PubMed

    De Gusseme, Bart; De Schryver, Peter; De Cooman, Michaël; Verbeken, Kim; Boeckx, Pascal; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2009-01-01

    The emission of hydrogen sulfide into the atmosphere of sewer systems induces the biological production of sulfuric acid, causing severe concrete corrosion. As a possible preventive solution, a microbial consortium of nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) was enriched in a continuously stirred tank reactor in order to develop a biological technique for the removal of dissolved sulfide. The consortium, dominated by Arcobacter sp., was capable of removing 99% of sulfide. Stable isotope fractioning of the sulfide indicated that the oxidation was a biological process. The capacity of the NR-SOB consortium for rapid removal of sulfide was demonstrated by using it as an inoculum in synthetic and real sewage. Removal rates up to 52 mg sulfide-S g VSS(-1) h(-1) were achieved, to our knowledge the highest removal rate reported so far for freshwater species in the absence of molecular oxygen. Further long-term incubation experiments revealed the capacity of the bacteria to oxidize sulfide without the presence of nitrate, suggesting that an oxidized redox reserve is present in the culture.

  17. Linking N2O emissions from biochar-amended soil to the structure and function of the N-cycling microbial community.

    PubMed

    Harter, Johannes; Krause, Hans-Martin; Schuettler, Stefanie; Ruser, Reiner; Fromme, Markus; Scholten, Thomas; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural sources represent about 60% of anthropogenic N2O emissions. Most agricultural N2O emissions are due to increased fertilizer application. A considerable fraction of nitrogen fertilizers are converted to N2O by microbiological processes (that is, nitrification and denitrification). Soil amended with biochar (charcoal created by pyrolysis of biomass) has been demonstrated to increase crop yield, improve soil quality and affect greenhouse gas emissions, for example, reduce N2O emissions. Despite several studies on variations in the general microbial community structure due to soil biochar amendment, hitherto the specific role of the nitrogen cycling microbial community in mitigating soil N2O emissions has not been subject of systematic investigation. We performed a microcosm study with a water-saturated soil amended with different amounts (0%, 2% and 10% (w/w)) of high-temperature biochar. By quantifying the abundance and activity of functional marker genes of microbial nitrogen fixation (nifH), nitrification (amoA) and denitrification (nirK, nirS and nosZ) using quantitative PCR we found that biochar addition enhanced microbial nitrous oxide reduction and increased the abundance of microorganisms capable of N2-fixation. Soil biochar amendment increased the relative gene and transcript copy numbers of the nosZ-encoded bacterial N2O reductase, suggesting a mechanistic link to the observed reduction in N2O emissions. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the impact of biochar on the nitrogen cycling microbial community and the consequences of soil biochar amendment for microbial nitrogen transformation processes and N2O emissions from soil.

  18. Linking N2O emissions from biochar-amended soil to the structure and function of the N-cycling microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Harter, Johannes; Krause, Hans-Martin; Schuettler, Stefanie; Ruser, Reiner; Fromme, Markus; Scholten, Thomas; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural sources represent about 60% of anthropogenic N2O emissions. Most agricultural N2O emissions are due to increased fertilizer application. A considerable fraction of nitrogen fertilizers are converted to N2O by microbiological processes (that is, nitrification and denitrification). Soil amended with biochar (charcoal created by pyrolysis of biomass) has been demonstrated to increase crop yield, improve soil quality and affect greenhouse gas emissions, for example, reduce N2O emissions. Despite several studies on variations in the general microbial community structure due to soil biochar amendment, hitherto the specific role of the nitrogen cycling microbial community in mitigating soil N2O emissions has not been subject of systematic investigation. We performed a microcosm study with a water-saturated soil amended with different amounts (0%, 2% and 10% (w/w)) of high-temperature biochar. By quantifying the abundance and activity of functional marker genes of microbial nitrogen fixation (nifH), nitrification (amoA) and denitrification (nirK, nirS and nosZ) using quantitative PCR we found that biochar addition enhanced microbial nitrous oxide reduction and increased the abundance of microorganisms capable of N2-fixation. Soil biochar amendment increased the relative gene and transcript copy numbers of the nosZ-encoded bacterial N2O reductase, suggesting a mechanistic link to the observed reduction in N2O emissions. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the impact of biochar on the nitrogen cycling microbial community and the consequences of soil biochar amendment for microbial nitrogen transformation processes and N2O emissions from soil. PMID:24067258

  19. Anoxic Oxidation of Arsenite Linked to Chemolithotrophic Denitrification in Continuous Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenjie; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Hsu, Ivann; Rowlette, Pieter; Field, Jim A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the anoxic oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) linked to chemolithotrophic denitrification was shown to be feasible in continuous bioreactors. Biological oxidation of As(III) was stable over prolonged periods of operation ranging up to 3 years in continuous denitrifying bioreactors with granular biofilms. As(III) was removed with a high conversion efficiency (> 92%) to arsenate (As(V)) in periods with high volumetric loadings (e.g. 3.5 to 5.1 mmol As Lreactor−1 d−1). The maximum specific activity of sampled granular sludge from the bioreactors was 0.98±0.04 mmol As(V) formed g−1 VSS d−1 when determined at an initial concentration of 0.5 mM As(III). The microbial population adapted to high influent concentrations of As(III) up to 5.2 mM. However, the As(III) oxidation process was severely inhibited when 7.6 to 8.1 mM As(III) was fed. Activity was restored upon lowering the As(III) concentration to 3.8 mM. Several experimental strategies were utilized to demonstrate a dependence of the nitrate removal on As(III) oxidation as well as a dependence of the As(III) removal on nitrate reduction. The molar stoichiometric ratio of As(V) formed to nitrate removed (corrected for endogenous denitrification) in the bioreactors approximated 2.5, indicating complete denitrification was occurring. As(III) oxidation was also shown to be linked to the complete denitrification of NO3− to N2 gas by demonstrating a significantly enhanced production of N2 beyond the background endogenous production in a batch bioassay spiked with 3.5 mM As(III). The N2 production also corresponded closely to the expected stoichiometry of 2.5 mol As(III) mol−1 N2-N for complete denitrification. PMID:19953675

  20. Microbial Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions, Alternative Electron Acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Urigüen, M.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Autotrophic Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium named A6 (A6), part of the Actinobacteria phylum have been linked to anaerobic ammonium (NH4+) oxidation under iron reducing conditions. These organisms obtain their energy by oxidizing NH4+ and transferring the electrons to a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Under environmental conditions, the TEAs are iron oxides [Fe(III)], which are reduced to Fe(II), this process is known as Feammox. Our studies indicate that alternative forms of TEAs can be used by A6, e.g. iron rich clays (i.e. nontronite) and electrodes in bioelectrochemical systems such as Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs), which can sustain NH4+removal and A6 biomass production. Our results show that nontronite can support Feammox and promote bacterial cell production. A6 biomass increased from 4.7 x 104 to 3.9 x 105 cells/ml in 10 days. Incubations of A6 in nontronite resulted in up to 10 times more NH4+ removal and 3 times more biomass production than when ferrihydrite is used as the Fe(III) source. Additionally, Fe in nontronite can be reoxidized by aeration and A6 can reutilize it; however, Fe is still finite in the clay. In contrast, in MECs, A6 harvest electrons from NH4+ and use an anode as an unlimited TEA, as a result current is produced. We operated multiple MECs in parallel using a single external power source, as described by Call & Logan (2011). MECs were run with an applied voltage of 0.7V and different growing mediums always containing initial 5mM NH4+. Results show that current production is favored when anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttled, is present in the medium as it facilitates the transfer of electrons from the bacterial cell to the anode. Additionally, A6 biomass increased from 1 x 104 to 9.77 x 105cells/ml in 14 days of operation. Due to Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium A6's ability to use various TEAs, MECs represent an alternative, iron-free form, for optimized biomass production of A6 and its application in NH4

  1. Oxidative Weathering and Microbial Diversity of an Inactive Seafloor Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimney.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiangtao; Cui, Jiamei; Yang, Qunhui; Cui, Guojie; Wei, Bingbing; Wu, Zijun; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Huaiyang

    2017-01-01

    When its hydrothermal supply ceases, hydrothermal sulfide chimneys become inactive and commonly experience oxidative weathering on the seafloor. However, little is known about the oxidative weathering of inactive sulfide chimneys, nor about associated microbial community structures and their succession during this weathering process. In this work, an inactive sulfide chimney and a young chimney in the early sulfate stage of formation were collected from the Main Endeavor Field of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. To assess oxidative weathering, the ultrastructures of secondary alteration products accumulating on the chimney surface were examined and the presence of possible Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) was investigated. The results of ultrastructure observation revealed that FeOB-associated ultrastructures with indicative morphologies were abundantly present. Iron oxidizers primarily consisted of members closely related to Gallionella spp. and Mariprofundus spp., indicating Fe-oxidizing species likely promote the oxidative weathering of inactive sulfide chimneys. Abiotic accumulation of Fe-rich substances further indicates that oxidative weathering is a complex, dynamic process, alternately controlled by FeOB and by abiotic oxidization. Although hydrothermal fluid flow had ceased, inactive chimneys still accommodate an abundant and diverse microbiome whose microbial composition and metabolic potential dramatically differ from their counterparts at active vents. Bacterial lineages within current inactive chimney are dominated by members of α-, δ-, and γ-Proteobacteria and they are deduced to be closely involved in a diverse set of geochemical processes including iron oxidation, nitrogen fixation, ammonia oxidation and denitrification. At last, by examining microbial communities within hydrothermal chimneys at different formation stages, a general microbial community succession can be deduced from early formation stages of a sulfate chimney to actively mature sulfide

  2. Oxidative Weathering and Microbial Diversity of an Inactive Seafloor Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimney

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiangtao; Cui, Jiamei; Yang, Qunhui; Cui, Guojie; Wei, Bingbing; Wu, Zijun; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Huaiyang

    2017-01-01

    When its hydrothermal supply ceases, hydrothermal sulfide chimneys become inactive and commonly experience oxidative weathering on the seafloor. However, little is known about the oxidative weathering of inactive sulfide chimneys, nor about associated microbial community structures and their succession during this weathering process. In this work, an inactive sulfide chimney and a young chimney in the early sulfate stage of formation were collected from the Main Endeavor Field of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. To assess oxidative weathering, the ultrastructures of secondary alteration products accumulating on the chimney surface were examined and the presence of possible Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) was investigated. The results of ultrastructure observation revealed that FeOB-associated ultrastructures with indicative morphologies were abundantly present. Iron oxidizers primarily consisted of members closely related to Gallionella spp. and Mariprofundus spp., indicating Fe-oxidizing species likely promote the oxidative weathering of inactive sulfide chimneys. Abiotic accumulation of Fe-rich substances further indicates that oxidative weathering is a complex, dynamic process, alternately controlled by FeOB and by abiotic oxidization. Although hydrothermal fluid flow had ceased, inactive chimneys still accommodate an abundant and diverse microbiome whose microbial composition and metabolic potential dramatically differ from their counterparts at active vents. Bacterial lineages within current inactive chimney are dominated by members of α-, δ-, and γ-Proteobacteria and they are deduced to be closely involved in a diverse set of geochemical processes including iron oxidation, nitrogen fixation, ammonia oxidation and denitrification. At last, by examining microbial communities within hydrothermal chimneys at different formation stages, a general microbial community succession can be deduced from early formation stages of a sulfate chimney to actively mature sulfide

  3. Linking Microbial Community Structure to β-Glucosidic Function in Soil Aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Stegen, James C.; McCue, Lee Ann

    2013-10-01

    To link microbial community 16S structure to a measured function in a natural soil we have scaled both DNA and β-glucosidase assays down to a volume of soil that may approach a unique microbial community. β-glucosidase activity was assayed in 450 individual aggregates which were then sorted into classes of high or low activities, from which groups of 10 or 11 aggregates were identified and grouped for DNA extraction and pyrosequencing. Tandem assays of ATP were conducted for each aggregate in order to normalize these small groups of aggregates for biomass size. In spite of there being no significant differences in the richness or diversity of the microbial communities associated with high β-glucosidase activities compared with the communities associated with low β-glucosidase communities, several analyses of variance clearly show that the communities of these two groups differ. The separation of these groups is partially driven by the differential abundances of members of the Chitinophagaceae family. It may be that observed functional differences in otherwise similar soil aggregates can be largely attributed to differences in resource availability, rather than to presence or absence of particular taxonomic groups.

  4. Linking catabolism to cyclodextrin extractability: determination of the microbial availability of PAHs in soil.

    PubMed

    Doick, Kieron J; Dew, Nadia M; Semple, Kirk T

    2005-11-15

    When assessing the potential of a contaminated site for bioremediation, it is desirable to know how much of the contaminant(s) is available for microbial degradation, thus allowing the likelihood of successful bioremediation to be predicted. The aims of this study were to investigate the degradation of PAHs in two soils by a catabolic inoculum and indigenous soil microflora and link this to the cyclodextrin extractable fraction in the presence of transformer oil (0.05, 0.01, or 0.005%). This study showed very little difference between indigenous and inoculum-derived degradation for phenanthrene in laboratory-aged soil, and strong relationships were also observed between both of the microbial degradative conditions and the amount of phenanthrene extracted by cyclodextrin. Furthermore, the indigenous degradation of PAHs in a field-contaminated soil showed significant linear correlations with the cyclodextrin extractable fraction, with gradients approximating to 1. There are several novel facets to this study. First, in aged, contaminated soils, indigenous microflora gave an equally sensitive determination of degradative availability as that measured by the catabolic inoculum. Second, this is the first time intrinsic biodegradation of PAHs has been predicted by the cyclodextrin extraction in laboratory-spiked and field-contaminated soils. The cyclodextrin extraction technique represents a powerful tool for predicting the extent of intrinsic and augmented microbial degradation and will be useful in the assessment of contaminated land prior to bioremediation.

  5. A microbial link between elevated CO2 and methane emissions that is plant species-specific.

    PubMed

    Kao-Kniffin, Jenny; Zhu, Biao

    2013-10-01

    Rising atmospheric CO(2) levels alter the physiology of many plant species, but little is known of changes to root dynamics that may impact soil microbial mediation of greenhouse gas emissions from wetlands. We grew co-occurring wetland plant species that included an invasive reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) and a native woolgrass (Scirpus cyperinus L.) in a controlled greenhouse facility under ambient (380 ppm) and elevated atmospheric CO(2) (700 ppm). We hypothesized that elevated atmospheric CO(2) would increase the abundance of both archaeal methanogen and bacterial methanotroph populations through stimulation of plant root and shoot biomass. We found that methane levels emitted from S. cyperinus shoots increased 1.5-fold under elevated CO(2), while no changes in methane levels were detected from P. arundincea. The increase in methane emissions was not explained by enhanced root or shoot growth of S. cyperinus. Principal components analysis of the total phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) recovered from microbial cell membranes revealed that elevated CO(2) levels shifted the composition of the microbial community under S. cyperinus, while no changes were detected under P. arundinacea. More detailed analysis of microbial abundance showed no impact of elevated CO(2) on a fatty acid indicative of methanotrophic bacteria (18:2ω6c), and no changes were detected in the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) relative abundance profiles of acetate-utilizing archaeal methanogens. Plant carbon depleted in (13)C was traced into the PLFAs of soil microorganisms as a measure of the plant contribution to microbial PLFA. The relative contribution of plant-derived carbon to PLFA carbon was larger in S. cyperinus compared with P. arundinacea in four PLFAs (i14:0, i15:0, a15:0, and 18:1ω9t). The δ(13)C isotopic values indicate that the contribution of plant-derived carbon to microbial lipids could differ in rhizospheres of CO(2)-responsive plant

  6. Morphology of biogenic iron oxides records microbial physiology and environmental conditions: toward interpreting iron microfossils.

    PubMed

    Krepski, S T; Emerson, D; Hredzak-Showalter, P L; Luther, G W; Chan, C S

    2013-09-01

    Despite the abundance of Fe and its significance in Earth history, there are no established robust biosignatures for Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. This limits our ability to piece together the history of Fe biogeochemical cycling and, in particular, to determine whether Fe(II)-oxidizers played a role in depositing ancient iron formations. A promising candidate for Fe(II)-oxidizer biosignatures is the distinctive morphology and texture of extracellular Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks produced by mat-forming microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. To establish the stalk morphology as a biosignature, morphologic parameters must be quantified and linked to the microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing metabolism and environmental conditions. Toward this end, we studied an extant model organism, the marine stalk-forming Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1. We grew cultures in flat glass microslide chambers, with FeS substrate, creating opposing oxygen/Fe(II) concentration gradients. We used solid-state voltammetric microelectrodes to measure chemical gradients in situ while using light microscopy to image microbial growth, motility, and mineral formation. In low-oxygen (2.7-28 μm) zones of redox gradients, the bacteria converge into a narrow (100 μm-1 mm) growth band. As cells oxidize Fe(II), they deposit Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks in this band; the stalks orient directionally, elongating toward higher oxygen concentrations. M. ferrooxydans stalks display a narrow range of widths and uniquely biogenic branching patterns, which result from cell division. Together with filament composition, these features (width, branching, and directional orientation) form a physical record unique to microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizer physiology; therefore, stalk morphology is a biosignature, as well as an indicator of local oxygen concentration at the time of formation. Observations of filamentous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide microfossils from a ~170 Ma marine Fe

  7. The sirtuins, oxidative stress and aging: an emerging link.

    PubMed

    Merksamer, Philip I; Liu, Yufei; He, Wenjuan; Hirschey, Matthew D; Chen, Danica; Verdin, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a family of compounds that can oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules and may influence lifespan. Sirtuins are a conserved family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent protein deacetylases that regulate lifespan in many model organisms including yeast and mice. Recent work suggests that sirtuins can modulate ROS levels notably during a dietary regimen known as calorie restriction which enhances lifespan for several organisms. Although both sirtuins and ROS have been implicated in the aging process, their precise roles remain unknown. In this review, we summarize current thinking about the oxidative stress theory of aging, discuss some of the compelling data linking the sirtuins to ROS and aging, and propose a conceptual model placing the sirtuins into an ROS-driven mitochondria-mediated hormetic response.

  8. Linking social and pathogen transmission networks using microbial genetics in giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    PubMed

    VanderWaal, Kimberly L; Atwill, Edward R; Isbell, Lynne A; McCowan, Brenda

    2014-03-01

    Although network analysis has drawn considerable attention as a promising tool for disease ecology, empirical research has been hindered by limitations in detecting the occurrence of pathogen transmission (who transmitted to whom) within social networks. Using a novel approach, we utilize the genetics of a diverse microbe, Escherichia coli, to infer where direct or indirect transmission has occurred and use these data to construct transmission networks for a wild giraffe population (Giraffe camelopardalis). Individuals were considered to be a part of the same transmission chain and were interlinked in the transmission network if they shared genetic subtypes of E. coli. By using microbial genetics to quantify who transmits to whom independently from the behavioural data on who is in contact with whom, we were able to directly investigate how the structure of contact networks influences the structure of the transmission network. To distinguish between the effects of social and environmental contact on transmission dynamics, the transmission network was compared with two separate contact networks defined from the behavioural data: a social network based on association patterns, and a spatial network based on patterns of home-range overlap among individuals. We found that links in the transmission network were more likely to occur between individuals that were strongly linked in the social network. Furthermore, individuals that had more numerous connections or that occupied 'bottleneck' positions in the social network tended to occupy similar positions in the transmission network. No similar correlations were observed between the spatial and transmission networks. This indicates that an individual's social network position is predictive of transmission network position, which has implications for identifying individuals that function as super-spreaders or transmission bottlenecks in the population. These results emphasize the importance of association patterns in

  9. Microbial Methane Oxidation Processes and Technologies for Mitigation of Landfill Gas Emissions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The aim of this paper is to review the present knowledge regarding the microbial methane oxidation in natural or engineered landfill environments with focus on process understanding, engineering experiences and modeling. This review includes seven sections. First, the methane oxidation is put in con...

  10. Use of a Burkholderia cenocepacia ABTS Oxidizer in a Microbial Fuel Cell

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) often use biological processes to generate electrons from organic material contained in the anode chamber and abiotic processes employing atmospheric oxygen as the oxidant in the cathode chamber. This study investigated the accumulation of an oxidant in bacterial cultures...

  11. Microbial oxidation of dispersed graphite by nitrifying bacteria 2011.2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chunlin; Hao, Qingli; Huang, Yang; Yang, Jiazhi; Sun, Dongping

    2013-10-07

    A facile and green microbial method to produce graphite oxide nanosheets and nanoparticles is described. The obtained graphite oxide nanosheets have few layers with 0.7-1.5 nm height and 50-300 nm size. The carbon nanoparticles possess the size of 20-60 nm and the height of 2-4 nm.

  12. Using a trait-based approach to link microbial community composition and functioning to soil salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Kristin; Fierer, Noah; Rousk, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Our knowledge of the dynamics structuring microbial communities and the consequences this has for soil functions is rudimentary. In particular, predictions of the response of microbial communities to environmental change and the implications for associated ecosystem processes remain elusive. Understanding how environmental factors structure microbial communities and regulate the functions they perform is key to a mechanistic understanding of how biogeochemical cycles respond to environmental change. Soil salinization is an agricultural problem in many parts of the world. The activity of soil microorganisms is reduced in saline soils compared to non-saline soil. However, soil salinity often co-varies with other factors, making it difficult to assign responses of microbial communities to direct effects of salinity. A trait-based approach allows us to connect the environmental factor salinity with the responses of microbial community composition and functioning. Salinity along a salinity gradient serves as a filter for the community trait distribution of salt tolerance, selecting for higher salt tolerance at more saline sites. This trait-environment relationship can be used to predict responses of microbial communities to environmental change. Our aims were to (i) use salinity along natural salinity gradients as an environmental filter, and (ii) link the resulting filtered trait-distributions of the communities (the trait being salt tolerance) to the community composition. Soil samples were obtained from two replicated salinity gradients along an Australian salt lake, spanning a wide range of soil salinities (0.1 dS m-1 to >50 dS m-1). In one of the two gradients salinity was correlated with pH. Community trait distributions for salt tolerance were assessed by establishing dose-dependences for extracted bacterial communities using growth rate assays. In addition, functional parameters were measured along the salt gradients. Community composition of sites was compared

  13. Development of microbial spoilage and lipid and protein oxidation in rabbit meat.

    PubMed

    Nakyinsige, K; Sazili, A Q; Aghwan, Z A; Zulkifli, I; Goh, Y M; Abu Bakar, F; Sarah, S A

    2015-10-01

    This experiment aimed to determine microbial spoilage and lipid and protein oxidation during aerobic refrigerated (4°C) storage of rabbit meat. Forty male New Zealand white rabbits were slaughtered according to the Halal slaughter procedure. The hind limbs were used for microbial analysis while the Longissimus lumborum m. was used for determination of lipid and protein oxidation. Bacterial counts generally increased with aging time and the limit for fresh meat (10(8)cfu/g) was reached at d 7 postmortem. Significant differences in malondialdehyde content were observed after 3d of storage. The thiol concentration significantly decreased with increase in aging time. The band intensities of myosin heavy chain and troponin T significantly reduced with increased refrigerated storage while actin remained relatively stable. This study thus proposes protein oxidation as a potential deteriorative change in refrigerated rabbit meat along with microbial spoilage and lipid oxidation.

  14. Cross-linking and rheological changes of whey proteins treated with microbial transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Truong, Van-Den; Clare, Debra A; Catignani, George L; Swaisgood, Harold E

    2004-03-10

    Modification of the functionality of whey proteins using microbial transglutaminase (TGase) has been the subject of recent studies. However, changes in rheological properties of whey proteins as affected by extensive cross-linking with TGase are not well studied. The factors affecting cross-linking of whey protein isolate (WPI) using both soluble and immobilized TGase were examined, and the rheological properties of the modified proteins were characterized. The enzyme was immobilized on aminopropyl glass beads (CPG-3000) by selective adsorption of the biotinylated enzyme on avidin that had been previously immobilized. WPI (4 and 8% w/w) in deionized water, pH 7.5, containing 10 mM dithiothreitol was cross-linked using enzyme/substrate ratios of 0.12-10 units of activity/g WPI. The reaction was carried out in a jacketed bioreactor for 8 h at 40 degrees C with continuous circulation. The gel point temperature of WPI solutions treated with 0.12 unit of immobilized TGase/g was slightly decreased, but the gel strength was unaffected. However, increasing the enzyme/substrate ratio resulted in extensive cross-linking of WPI that was manifested by increases in apparent viscosity and changes in the gelation properties. For example, using 10 units of soluble TGase/g resulted in extensive cross-linking of alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin in WPI, as evidenced by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting results. Interestingly, the gelling point of WPI solutions increased from 68 to 94 degrees C after a 4-h reaction, and the gel strength was drastically decreased (lower storage modulus, G'). Thus, extensive intra- and interchain cross-linking probably caused formation of polymers that were too large for effective network development. These results suggest that a process could be developed to produce heat-stable whey proteins for various food applications.

  15. Intestinal Microbial Metabolites Are Linked to Severity of Myocardial Infarction in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lam, Vy; Su, Jidong; Hsu, Anna; Gross, Garrett J; Salzman, Nita H; Baker, John E

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota determine severity of myocardial infarction in rats. We determined whether low molecular weight metabolites derived from intestinal microbiota and transported to the systemic circulation are linked to severity of myocardial infarction. Plasma from rats treated for seven days with the non-absorbed antibiotic vancomycin or a mixture of streptomycin, neomycin, polymyxin B and bacitracin was analyzed using mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling platforms. Antibiotic-induced changes in the abundance of individual groups of intestinal microbiota dramatically altered the host's metabolism. Hierarchical clustering of dissimilarities separated the levels of 284 identified metabolites from treated vs. untreated rats; 193 were altered by the antibiotic treatments with a tendency towards decreased metabolite levels. Catabolism of the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine was the most affected pathway comprising 33 affected metabolites. Both antibiotic treatments decreased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction in vivo by 27% and 29%, respectively. We then determined whether microbial metabolites of the amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine were linked to decreased severity of myocardial infarction. Vancomycin-treated rats were administered amino acid metabolites prior to ischemia/reperfusion studies. Oral or intravenous pretreatment of rats with these amino acid metabolites abolished the decrease in infarct size conferred by vancomycin. Inhibition of JAK-2 (AG-490, 10 μM), Src kinase (PP1, 20 μM), Akt/PI3 kinase (Wortmannin, 100 nM), p44/42 MAPK (PD98059, 10 μM), p38 MAPK (SB203580, 10 μM), or KATP channels (glibenclamide, 3 μM) abolished cardioprotection by vancomycin, indicating microbial metabolites are interacting with cell surface receptors to transduce their signals through Src kinase, cell survival pathways and KATP channels. These inhibitors have no effect on myocardial infarct size in

  16. Thermodynamic controls on the kinetics of microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Larson, Lance N; Sánchez-España, Javier; Kaley, Bradley; Sheng, Yizhi; Bibby, Kyle; Burgos, William D

    2014-08-19

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a major worldwide environmental threat to surface and groundwater quality. Microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation could be exploited for cost-effective AMD treatment; however, its use is limited because of uncertainties associated with its rate and ability to remove Fe from solution. We developed a thermodynamic-based framework to evaluate the kinetics of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation. We measured the kinetics of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation at five sites in the Appalachian Coal Basin in the US and three sites in the Iberian Pyrite Belt in Spain and found that the fastest rates of Fe(II) oxidation occurred at the sites with the lowest pH values. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the Gibbs free energy of Fe(II) oxidation (ΔG(oxidation)) was also most negative at the sites with the lowest pH values. We then conducted two series of microbial Fe(II) oxidation experiments in laboratory-scale chemostatic bioreactors operated through a series of pH values (2.1-4.2) and found the same relationships between Fe(II) oxidation kinetics, ΔG(oxidation), and pH. Conditions that favored the fastest rates of Fe(II) oxidation coincided with higher Fe(III) solubility. The solubility of Fe(III) minerals, thus plays an important role on Fe(II) oxidation kinetics. Methods to incorporate microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation into active and passive AMD treatment systems are discussed in the context of these findings. This study presents a simplified model that describes the relationship between free energy and microbial kinetics and should be broadly applicable to many biogeochemical systems.

  17. Structural characterization of terrestrial microbial Mn oxides from Pinal Creek, AZ

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, J.R.; Fuller, C.C.; Marcus, M.A.; Brearley, A.J.; Perez De la Rosa, M.; Webb, S.M.; Caldwell, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    The microbial catalysis of Mn(II) oxidation is believed to be a dominant source of abundant sorption- and redox-active Mn oxides in marine, freshwater, and subsurface aquatic environments. In spite of their importance, environmental oxides of known biogenic origin have generally not been characterized in detail from a structural perspective. Hyporheic zone Mn oxide grain coatings at Pinal Creek, Arizona, a metals-contaminated stream, have been identified as being dominantly microbial in origin and are well studied from bulk chemistry and contaminant hydrology perspectives. This site thus presents an excellent opportunity to study the structures of terrestrial microbial Mn oxides in detail. XRD and EXAFS measurements performed in this study indicate that the hydrated Pinal Creek Mn oxide grain coatings are layer-type Mn oxides with dominantly hexagonal or pseudo-hexagonal layer symmetry. XRD and TEM measurements suggest the oxides to be nanoparticulate plates with average dimensions on the order of 11 nm thick ?? 35 nm diameter, but with individual particles exhibiting thickness as small as a single layer and sheets as wide as 500 nm. The hydrated oxides exhibit a 10-?? basal-plane spacing and turbostratic disorder. EXAFS analyses suggest the oxides contain layer Mn(IV) site vacancy defects, and layer Mn(III) is inferred to be present, as deduced from Jahn-Teller distortion of the local structure. The physical geometry and structural details of the coatings suggest formation within microbial biofilms. The biogenic Mn oxides are stable with respect to transformation into thermodynamically more stable phases over a time scale of at least 5 months. The nanoparticulate layered structural motif, also observed in pure culture laboratory studies, appears to be characteristic of biogenic Mn oxides and may explain the common occurrence of this mineral habit in soils and sediments. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Oxidative Stress in Patients with X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Deon, Marion; Marchetti, Desirèe P; Donida, Bruna; Wajner, Moacir; Vargas, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most frequent peroxisomal disorder that is characterized by progressive demyelination of the white matter, adrenal insufficiency, and accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids in body fluid and tissues. This disorder is clinically heterogeneous with seven different phenotypes in male patients and five phenotypes in female carriers. An ultimate treatment for X-ALD is not available. Depending on the rate of the disease progression and the degree of an individual handicap, special needs and challenges vary greatly. The exact mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of this multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder remains obscure. Previous studies has been related oxidative stress with the pathogenesis of several disease that affecting the central nervous system, such as neurodegenerative disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer, and Parkinson diseases. In addition, oxidative damage has been observed in various in vivo and in vitro studies with inborn errors of metabolism, including X-ALD. In this context, this review is focused on oxidative stress in X-ALD, with emphasis on studies using biological samples from patients affected by this disease.

  19. Structural characterization of terrestrial microbial Mn oxides from Pinal Creek, AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, John; Fuller, Christopher; Marcus, Matthew A.; Brearley, Adrian J.; Perez De la Rosa, M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Caldwell, Wendel A.

    2008-03-19

    The microbial catalysis of Mn(II) oxidation is believed to be a dominant source of abundant sorption- and redox-active Mn oxides in marine, freshwater, and subsurface aquatic environments. In spite of their importance, environmental oxides of known biogenic origin have generally not been characterized in detail from a structural perspective. Hyporheic zone Mn oxide grain coatings at Pinal Creek, Arizona, a metals-contaminated stream, have been identified as being dominantly microbial in origin and are well studied from bulk chemistry and contaminant hydrology perspectives. This site thus presents an excellent opportunity to study the structures of terrestrial microbial Mn oxides in detail. XRD and EXAFS measurements performed in this study indicate that the hydrated Pinal Creek Mn oxide grain coatings are layer-type Mn oxides with dominantly hexagonal or pseudo-hexagonal layer symmetry. XRD and TEM measurements suggest the oxides to be nanoparticulate plates with average dimensions on the order of 11 nm thick x 35 nm diameter, but with individual particles exhibiting thickness as small as a single layer and sheets as wide as 500 nm. The hydrated oxides exhibit a 10-A basal-plane spacing and turbostratic disorder. EXAFS analyses suggest the oxides contain layer Mn(IV) site vacancy defects, and layer Mn(III) is inferred to be present, as deduced from Jahn-Teller distortion of the local structure. The physical geometry and structural details of the coatings suggest formation within microbial biofilms. The biogenic Mnoxides are stable with respect to transformation into thermodynamically more stable phases over a time scale of at least 5 months. The nanoparticulate layered structural motif, also observed in pure culture laboratory studies, appears to be characteristic of biogenic Mn oxides and may explain the common occurrence of this mineral habit in soils and sediments.

  20. The use of controlled microbial cenoses in producers' link to increase steady functioning of artificial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somova, Lydia; Mikheeva, Galina; Somova, Lydia

    The life support systems (LSS) for long-term missions are to use cycling-recycling systems, including biological recycling. Simple ecosystems include 3 links: producers (plants), consumers (man, animals) and reducers (microorganisms). Microorganisms are substantial component of every link of LSS. Higher plants are the traditional regenerator of air and producer of food. They should be used in many successive generations of their reproduction in LSS. Controlled microbiocenoses can increase productivity of producer's link and protect plants from infections. The goal of this work was development of methodological bases of formation of stable, controlled microbiocenoses, intended for increase of productivity of plants and for obtaining ecologically pure production of plants. Main results of our investigations: 1. Experimental microbiocenoses, has been produced in view of the developed methodology on the basis of natural association of microorganisms by long cultivation on specially developed medium. Dominating groups are bacteria of genera: Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc, Bifidobacterium, Rhodopseudomonas and yeast of genera: Kluyveromyces, Saccharomyces, Torulopsis. 2. Optimal parameters of microbiocenosis cultivation (t, pH, light exposure, biogenic elements concentrations) were experimentally established. Conditions of cultivation on which domination of different groups of microbiocenosis have been found. 3. It was shown, that processing of seeds of wheat, oats, bulbs and plants Allium cepa L. (an onions) with microbial association raised energy of germination of seeds and bulbs and promoted the increase (on 20-30 %) of growth green biomass and root system of plants in comparison with the control. This work is supported by grant, Yenissey , 07-04-96806

  1. Linking Microbial Activity with Arsenic Fate during Cow Dung Disposal of Arsenic-Bearing Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, T. M.; Reddy, R.; Tan, J.; Hayes, K. F.; Raskin, L.

    2014-12-01

    To address widespread arsenic contamination of drinking water sources numerous technologies have been developed to remove arsenic. All technologies result in the production of an arsenic-bearing waste that must be evaluated and disposed in a manner to limit the potential for environmental release and human exposure. One disposal option that is commonly recommended for areas without access to landfills is the mixing of arsenic-bearing wastes with cow dung. These recommendations are made based on the ability of microorganisms to create volatile arsenic species (including mono-, di-, and tri-methylarsine gases) to be diluted in the atmosphere. However, most studies of environmental microbial communities have found only a small fraction (<0.1 %) of the total arsenic present in soils or rice paddies is released via volatilization. Additionally, past studies often have not monitored arsenic release in the aqueous phase. Two main pathways for microbial arsenic volatilization are known and include methylation of arsenic during methanogenesis and methylation by arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase. In this study, we compare the roles of these two pathways in arsenic volatilization and aqueous mobilization through mesocosm experiments with cow dung and arsenic-bearing wastes produced during drinking water treatment in West Bengal, India. Arsenic in gaseous, aqueous, and solid phases was measured. Consistent with previous reports, less than 0.02% of the total arsenic present was volatilized. A much higher amount (~5%) of the total arsenic was mobilized into the liquid phase. Through the application of molecular tools, including 16S rRNA sequencing and quantification of gene transcripts involved in methanogenesis, this study links microbial community activity with arsenic fate in potential disposal environments. These results illustrate that disposal of arsenic-bearing wastes by mixing with cow dung does not achieve its end goal of promoting arsenic volatilization

  2. From Field to Laboratory: A New Database Approach for Linking Microbial Field Ecology with Laboratory Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Leslie; Keller, R.; Miller, S.; Jahnke, L.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Ames Exobiology Culture Collection Database (AECC-DB) has been developed as a collaboration between microbial ecologists and information technology specialists. It allows for extensive web-based archiving of information regarding field samples to document microbial co-habitation of specific ecosystem micro-environments. Documentation and archiving continues as pure cultures are isolated, metabolic properties determined, and DNA extracted and sequenced. In this way metabolic properties and molecular sequences are clearly linked back to specific isolates and the location of those microbes in the ecosystem of origin. Use of this database system presents a significant advancement over traditional bookkeeping wherein there is generally little or no information regarding the environments from which microorganisms were isolated. Generally there is only a general ecosystem designation (i.e., hot-spring). However within each of these there are a myriad of microenvironments with very different properties and determining exactly where (which microenvironment) a given microbe comes from is critical in designing appropriate isolation media and interpreting physiological properties. We are currently using the database to aid in the isolation of a large number of cyanobacterial species and will present results by PI's and students demonstrating the utility of this new approach.

  3. Linking Microbial Community Structure, Activity and Carbon Cycling in Biological Soil Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, T.; Karaoz, U.; Swenson, J.; Bowen, B.; Northen, T.

    2016-12-01

    Soils play a key role in the global carbon cycle, but the relationships between soil microbial communities and metabolic pathways are poorly understood. In this study, biological soil crusts (biocrusts) from the Colorado Plateau are being used to develop soil metabolomics methods and statistical models to link active microbes to the abundance and turnover of soil metabolites and to examine the detailed substrate and product profiles of individual soil bacteria isolated from biocrust. To simulate a pulsed activity (wetting) event and to analyze the subsequent correlations between soil metabolite dynamics, community structure and activity, biocrusts were wetup with water and samples (porewater and DNA) were taken at various timepoints up to 49.5 hours post-wetup. DNA samples were sequenced using the HiSeq sequencing platform and porewater metabolites were analyzed using untargeted liquid chromatography/ mass spectrometry. Exometabolite analysis revealed the release of a breadth of metabolites including sugars, amino acids, fatty acids, dicarboxylic acids, nucleobases and osmolytes. In general, many metabolites (e.g. amino acids and nucleobases) immediately increased in abundance following wetup and then steadily decreased. However, a few continued to increase over time (e.g. xanthine). Interestingly, in a previous study exploring utilization of soil metabolites by sympatric bacterial isolates from biocrust, we observed xanthine to be released by some Bacilli sp. Furthermore, our current metagenomics data show that members of the Paenibacillaceae family increase in abundance in late wetup samples. Previous 16S amplicon data also show a "Firmicutes bloom" following wetup with the new metagenomic data resolving this at genome-level. Our continued metagenome and exometabolome analyses are allowing us to examine complex pulsed-activity events in biocrust microbial communities specifically by correlating the abundance of microbes to the release of soil metabolites

  4. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs.

    PubMed

    Beam, Jacob P; Bernstein, Hans C; Jay, Zackary J; Kozubal, Mark A; Jennings, Ryan deM; Tringe, Susannah G; Inskeep, William P

    2016-01-01

    Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA), and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3-3.5; temperature = 68-75°C) in YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4-40 days), and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 days, and reached steady-state levels within 14-30 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 days, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 days and in mature Fe(III)-oxide mats (1-2 cm thick). First-order rate constants of Fe(III)-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 to 0.05 day(-1), and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II) is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III)-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III)-oxide mats are also useful for understanding other Fe(II)-oxidizing systems.

  5. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    SciTech Connect

    Beam, Jacob P.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Zackary J.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Jennings, Ryan deM.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Inskeep, William P.

    2016-02-15

    Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA), and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3-3.5; temperature = 68-75°C) in YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4-40 days), and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 days, and reached steady-state levels within 14-30 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 days, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 days and in mature Fe(III)-oxide mats (1-2 cm thick). First-order rate constants of Fe(III)-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 to 0.05 day -1 , and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II) is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III)-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III)-oxide mats are also useful for understanding other Fe(II)-oxidizing systems.

  6. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    PubMed Central

    Beam, Jacob P.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Zackary J.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Jennings, Ryan deM.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Inskeep, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA), and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3–3.5; temperature = 68–75°C) in YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4–40 days), and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 days, and reached steady-state levels within 14–30 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 days, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 days and in mature Fe(III)-oxide mats (1–2 cm thick). First-order rate constants of Fe(III)-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 to 0.05 day−1, and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II) is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III)-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III)-oxide mats are also useful for understanding other Fe(II)-oxidizing systems. PMID:26913020

  7. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    SciTech Connect

    Beam, Jake; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, Mark; Jennings, Ryan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Inskeep, William P.

    2016-02-15

    Iron oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous geobiological features on Earth and occur in extant acidic hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA, and form as a result of microbial processes. The relative contribution of different organisms to the development of these mat ecosystems is of specific interest. We hypothesized that chemolithoautotrophic organisms contribute to the early development and production of Fe(III)-oxide mats, which could support later-colonizing heterotrophic microorganisms. Sterile glass slides were incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs in YNP, and spatiotemporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and abundance of relevant community members were measured. Lithoautotrophic Hydrogenobaculum spp. were first colonizers and the most abundant taxa identified during early successional stages (7 – 40 days). Populations of M. yellowstonensis colonized after ~ 7 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized after 30 days, and emerge as the dominant functional guild in mature iron oxide mats (1 – 2 cm thick) that form after 70 – 120 days. First-order rate constants of iron oxide accretion ranged from 0.05 – 0.046 day-1, and reflected the absolute amount of iron accreted. Micro- and macroscale microterracettes were identified during iron oxide mat development, and suggest that the mass transfer of oxygen limits microbial growth. This was also demonstrated using microelectrode measurements of oxygen as a function of mat depth, which showed steep gradients in oxygen from the aqueous mat interface to ~ 1 mm. The formation and succession of amorphous Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a predictable pattern of distinct stages and growth. The successional stages and microbial signatures observed in these extant Fe(III)-oxide mat communities may be relevant to other past or present Fe(III)-oxide mineralizing systems.

  8. A cobalt complex of a microbial arene oxidation product

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report the first synthesis of a cobalt Cp diene complex wherein the diene is derived by microbial dearomatising dihydroxylation of an aromatic ring. The complex has been characterised crystallographically and its structure is compared to that of an uncomplexed diene precursor. PMID:22152033

  9. Linking potential denitrification rates to microbial gene abundances in multiple boreal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, D. G.; Blazewicz, S.; Herman, D. J.; Firestone, M. K.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    The composition and functioning of boreal ecosystems are vulnerable to changes in climate, leading to changes in season length, fire regimes, and soil moisture status. To investigate the influence of vegetation and soil moisture on microbial nitrogen cycling several disparate boreal ecosystems was studied. The two primary objectives were to: (1) determine whether process rates could be predicted solely from soil physical and chemical characteristics and (2) determine if the abundance of functional genes could be an additional explanatory variable. Surface soils were sampled along an elevation-driven hydrologic gradient at the Bonanza Creek LTER that corresponds with five plant communities typical of interior Alaska. The plant communities included a black spruce stand, a deciduous stand, a tussock grassland, an emergent fen, and a rich fen. We examined the chemical composition of the surface organic moss and soil, measured gross N-mineralization, potential rates of nitrification and denitrification (DEA), and abundances of several functional groups of microorganisms from soil cores collected in mid summer. We used quantitative PCR to assess the gene abundances of ammonia oxidizers and denitrifiers based on a functional gene approach. Here, we focus on potential denitrification rates (PDR), and abundance of denitrifyers carrying NirS and NirK genes (nitrate reductase) and NosZ genes (nitrous oxide reductase). PDR increased dramatically with increasing soil moisture along the gradient, from 1 mg N/m2/h at the dry black spruce site to 300 mg N/m2/h in the rich fen, which is very high compared to other poorly drained soil environments. PDR were linearly related to the abundance of functional genes from the microorganisms responsible for this process. Abundances of NirS, NirK and NosZ genes correlated significantly to PDR (r2 = 0.61 p < 0.0001, r2 = 0.45 p < 0.0003, r2 = 0.81 p < 0.0001, respectively). In addition, PDR were better explained by functional gene abundances

  10. Micro-scale morphology and texture of biogenic iron oxide mats provide a physical record of microbial physiology and oxygen conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krepski, S. T.; Hredzak-showalter, T.; Luther, G. W.; Chan, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    The ability of certain bacteria to deposit Fe oxide minerals has long been recognized. However, we are only beginning to gain greater insights into the physiology and mechanisms of microbial Fe(II) oxidation and biomineralization, due to a small but growing number of isolates and studies on Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB). We recently isolated a novel microaerophilic FeOB, Betaproteobacterium Gallionellales strain R-1 (Genbank accession number JN377592) from a freshwater Fe seep in Newark, Delaware, USA. Much like Gallionella ferruginea (93.6% 16S gene sequence similarity), this organism is a bean-shaped cell that forms mineralized extracellular Fe twisted stalks. Strain R-1 shows remarkable physiologic and morphological similarity to the marine Zetaproteobacterium FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, despite being distantly related. We use M. ferrooxydans and strain R-1 as model organisms to study microbial Fe biomineralization and link the formation of microbial Fe oxide mats to environmental conditions and FeOB physiology. To accomplish this, we construct flat glass microslide growth chambers, used in conjunction with solid-state voltammetric microelectrodes to measure the chemistry of FeOB microenvironments in situ while studying undisturbed microbial growth, motility, and mineral formation. The development of microbial Fe oxide bands (analogs of mats) begins when cells attach to a surface and deposit minerals. In low-oxygen zones of redox gradients, formed in part by microbial respiration, the bacteria converge into a narrow, mineralized growth band. Filaments orient directionally, as quantified with ArcGIS, towards increasing oxygen, and display uniquely biological characteristics such as branching and a narrow range of widths. Thus, the mineralized structures provide a physical record of FeOB physiology. Observations of putative filamentous Fe microfossils in thin section show that these characteristics can be preserved in the geologic record, even if some

  11. The role of microbial diversity in the dynamics and stability of global methane consumption: microbial methane oxidation as a model-system for microbial ecology (ESF EuroDiversity METHECO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenzel, P.; Metheco-Team

    2009-04-01

    Ecosystems collectively determine biogeochemical processes that regulate the Earth System. Loss of biodiversity is detrimental to ecosystems and therefore has been a central issue for environmental scientists. Although microorganisms form a major part of the Earth's biomass and biodiversity, and have a critical role in biogeochemistry and ecosystem functioning, they do not feature highly in ongoing debates about global biodiversity loss, global change and conservations issues. The neglect of microbial diversity in conservation issues is because microbial communities are regarded as being highly redundant, omnipresent, and therefore inextinguishable. This, however, is a misconception. Recently, the application of advanced molecular techniques has indicated that microbial communities display habitat preferences and are not universally distributed. Even the highly diverse microbial communities in soils can be affected by agricultural use, indicating that genetic erosion may potentially affect these communities as well. Moreover, many important environmental functions are catalyzed by specific groups of microbes with a very narrow ecological range. Recovery of these functional microbial communities after disturbance may take decades. Even if the species making up the community do not become extinct and eventually re-colonize an environment, the function and service to the biosphere is lost long enough to exert permanent, irreversible damage to the environment. Considering the global importance of microbes, combined with our ignorance of how the composition and functioning of these communities is affected, necessitates the assessment of the vulnerability and the resilience of microbial diversity. The latter is a pressing concern in biodiversity research and conservation policy, urgently needing attention in order to be able to anticipate environmental challenges we are facing. Our general hypothesis is: microbial diversity is linked to important ecosystem services and

  12. Mechanistic Links Between Oxidative Stress and Disuse Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Smuder, Ashley J.; Criswell, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Long periods of skeletal muscle inactivity promote a loss of muscle protein resulting in fiber atrophy. This disuse-induced muscle atrophy results from decreased protein synthesis and increased protein degradation. Recent studies have increased our insight into this complicated process, and evidence indicates that disturbed redox signaling is an important regulator of cell signaling pathways that control both protein synthesis and proteolysis in skeletal muscle. The objective of this review is to outline the role that reactive oxygen species play in the regulation of inactivity-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. Specifically, this report will provide an overview of experimental models used to investigate disuse muscle atrophy and will also highlight the intracellular sources of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in inactive skeletal muscle. We then will provide a detailed discussion of the evidence that links oxidants to the cell signaling pathways that control both protein synthesis and degradation. Finally, by presenting unresolved issues related to oxidative stress and muscle atrophy, we hope that this review will serve as a stimulus for new research in this exciting field. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 2519–2528. PMID:21457104

  13. Oxidative Stress: A Link between Diabetes Mellitus and Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Monea, Adriana; Mezei, Tibor; Popsor, Sorin; Monea, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate oxidative stress (OS) and histological changes that occur in the periodontium of subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus without signs of periodontal disease and to establish if oxidative stress is a possible link between diabetes mellitus and periodontal changes. Materials and Methods. Tissue samples from ten adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and eight healthy adults were harvested. The specimens were examined by microscope using standard hematoxylin-eosin stain, at various magnifications, and investigated for tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH). Results. Our results showed that periodontal tissues in patients with T2D present significant inflammation, affecting both epithelial and connective tissues. Mean MDA tissue levels were 3.578 ± 0.60 SD in diabetics versus 0.406 ± 0.27 SD in controls (P < 0.0001), while mean GSH tissue levels were 2.48 ± 1.02 SD in diabetics versus 9.7875 ± 2.42 SD in controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Diabetic subjects had higher MDA levels in their periodontal tissues, suggesting an increased lipid peroxidation in T2D, and decreased GSH tissue levels, suggesting an alteration of the local antioxidant defense mechanism. These results are in concordance with the histological changes that we found in periodontal tissues of diabetic subjects, confirming the hypothesis of OS implication, as a correlation between periodontal disease incidence and T2D.

  14. Two-Step Oxidation of Refractory Gold Concentrates with Different Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Hua; Xie, Jian-Ping; Li, Shou-Peng; Guo, Yu-Jie; Pan, Ying; Wu, Haiyan; Liu, Xin-Xing

    2016-11-28

    Bio-oxidation is an effective technology for treatment of refractory gold concentrates. However, the unsatisfactory oxidation rate and long residence time, which cause a lower cyanide leaching rate and gold recovery, are key factors that restrict the application of traditional bio-oxidation technology. In this study, the oxidation rate of refractory gold concentrates and the adaption of microorganisms were analyzed to evaluate a newly developed two-step pretreatment process, which includes a high temperature chemical oxidation step and a subsequent bio-oxidation step. The oxidation rate and recovery rate of gold were improved significantly after the two-step process. The results showed that the highest oxidation rate of sulfide sulfur could reach to 99.01 % with an extreme thermophile microbial community when the pulp density was 5%. Accordingly, the recovery rate of gold was elevated to 92.51%. Meanwhile, the results revealed that moderate thermophiles performed better than acidophilic mesophiles and extreme thermophiles, whose oxidation rates declined drastically when the pulp density was increased to 10% and 15%. The oxidation rates of sulfide sulfur with moderate thermophiles were 93.94% and 65.73% when the pulp density was increased to 10% and 15%, respectively. All these results indicated that the two-step pretreatment increased the oxidation rate of refractory gold concentrates and is a potential technology to pretreat the refractory sample. Meanwhile, owing to the sensitivity of the microbial community under different pulp density levels, the optimization of microbial community in bio-oxidation is necessary in industry.

  15. Oxidant mechanisms in childhood obesity: the link between inflammation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Codoñer-Franch, Pilar; Valls-Bellés, Victoria; Arilla-Codoñer, Angela; Alonso-Iglesias, Eulalia

    2011-12-01

    Evidence of obesity-induced oxidative stress in adults has emerged in the past several years, and similar evidence has been demonstrated in children more recently. The reactive species of oxygen or nitrogen can chemically alter all major classes of biomolecules by modifying their structure and function. Organisms have developed mechanisms to protect biomolecules from the deleterious effects of free radicals. These include the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, as well as water and lipid-soluble antioxidants, such as glutathione, ascorbate (vitamin C), α-tocopherol (vitamin E), and β-carotene. Obesity creates oxidant conditions that favor the development of comorbid diseases. Energy imbalances lead to the storage of excess energy in adipocytes, resulting in both hypertrophy and hyperplasia. These processes are associated with abnormalities of adipocyte function, particularly mitochondrial stress and disrupted endoplasmic reticulum function. In this sense, oxidative stress can also be induced by adipocyte associated inflammatory macrophages. There is a close link among obesity, a state of chronic low-level inflammation, and oxidative stress. In addition, the dysregulation of adipocytokines, which are secreted by adipose tissue and promoted by oxidative stress, act synergistically in obesity-related metabolic abnormalities. Adipocytokines link the local and systemic inflammation responses in the context of obesity. It is thought that the evaluation of oxidative status may allow for the identification of patients at an increased risk of complications. Decreasing the levels of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress in childhood may decrease cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancement of electricity production by graphene oxide in soil microbial fuel cells and plant microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yuko; Yoshida, Naoko; Umeyama, Yuto; Yamada, Takeshi; Tero, Ryugo; Hiraishi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The effects of graphene oxide (GO) on electricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) and plant microbial fuel cell (PMFCs) were investigated. GO at concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.9 g⋅kg(-1) was added to soil and reduced for 10 days under anaerobic incubation. All SMFCs (GO-SMFCs) utilizing the soils incubated with GO produced electricity at a greater rate and in higher quantities than the SMFCs which did not contain GO. In fed-batch operations, the overall average electricity generation in GO-SMFCs containing 1.0 g⋅kg(-1) of GO was 40 ± 19 mW⋅m(-2), which was significantly higher than the value of 6.6 ± 8.9 mW⋅m(-2) generated from GO-free SMFCs (p < 0.05). The increase in catalytic current at the oxidative potential was observed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for GO-SMFC, with the CV curve suggesting the enhancement of electron transfer from oxidation of organic substances in the soil by the reduced form of GO. The GO-containing PMFC also displayed a greater generation of electricity compared to the PMFC with no added GO, with GO-PMFC producing 49 mW⋅m(-2) of electricity after 27 days of operation. Collectively, this study demonstrates that GO added to soil can be microbially reduced in soil, and facilitates electron transfer to the anode in both SMFCs and PMFCs.

  17. Enhancement of Electricity Production by Graphene Oxide in Soil Microbial Fuel Cells and Plant Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yuko; Yoshida, Naoko; Umeyama, Yuto; Yamada, Takeshi; Tero, Ryugo; Hiraishi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The effects of graphene oxide (GO) on electricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) and plant microbial fuel cell (PMFCs) were investigated. GO at concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.9 g⋅kg−1 was added to soil and reduced for 10 days under anaerobic incubation. All SMFCs (GO-SMFCs) utilizing the soils incubated with GO produced electricity at a greater rate and in higher quantities than the SMFCs which did not contain GO. In fed-batch operations, the overall average electricity generation in GO-SMFCs containing 1.0 g⋅kg−1 of GO was 40 ± 19 mW⋅m−2, which was significantly higher than the value of 6.6 ± 8.9 mW⋅m−2 generated from GO-free SMFCs (p < 0.05). The increase in catalytic current at the oxidative potential was observed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for GO-SMFC, with the CV curve suggesting the enhancement of electron transfer from oxidation of organic substances in the soil by the reduced form of GO. The GO-containing PMFC also displayed a greater generation of electricity compared to the PMFC with no added GO, with GO-PMFC producing 49 mW⋅m−2 of electricity after 27 days of operation. Collectively, this study demonstrates that GO added to soil can be microbially reduced in soil, and facilitates electron transfer to the anode in both SMFCs and PMFCs. PMID:25883931

  18. Intestinal Microbial Metabolites Are Linked to Severity of Myocardial Infarction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Vy; Su, Jidong; Hsu, Anna; Gross, Garrett J.; Salzman, Nita H.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota determine severity of myocardial infarction in rats. We determined whether low molecular weight metabolites derived from intestinal microbiota and transported to the systemic circulation are linked to severity of myocardial infarction. Plasma from rats treated for seven days with the non-absorbed antibiotic vancomycin or a mixture of streptomycin, neomycin, polymyxin B and bacitracin was analyzed using mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling platforms. Antibiotic-induced changes in the abundance of individual groups of intestinal microbiota dramatically altered the host’s metabolism. Hierarchical clustering of dissimilarities separated the levels of 284 identified metabolites from treated vs. untreated rats; 193 were altered by the antibiotic treatments with a tendency towards decreased metabolite levels. Catabolism of the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine was the most affected pathway comprising 33 affected metabolites. Both antibiotic treatments decreased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction in vivo by 27% and 29%, respectively. We then determined whether microbial metabolites of the amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine were linked to decreased severity of myocardial infarction. Vancomycin-treated rats were administered amino acid metabolites prior to ischemia/reperfusion studies. Oral or intravenous pretreatment of rats with these amino acid metabolites abolished the decrease in infarct size conferred by vancomycin. Inhibition of JAK-2 (AG-490, 10 μM), Src kinase (PP1, 20 μM), Akt/PI3 kinase (Wortmannin, 100 nM), p44/42 MAPK (PD98059, 10 μM), p38 MAPK (SB203580, 10 μM), or KATP channels (glibenclamide, 3 μM) abolished cardioprotection by vancomycin, indicating microbial metabolites are interacting with cell surface receptors to transduce their signals through Src kinase, cell survival pathways and KATP channels. These inhibitors have no effect on myocardial infarct size in

  19. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, MM; Hoarfrost, AL; Bose, A; Joye, SB; Girguis, PR

    2013-05-14

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C-2), propane (C-3), and butane (C-4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C-1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C-1-C-4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C-1-C-4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75 degrees C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C-2-C-4 alkanes. Maximum C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55 degrees C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C-3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C-4, C-2, and C-1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C-2-C(4)alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C-1 derived from these hydrothermal systems.

  20. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity.

    PubMed

    Adams, Melissa M; Hoarfrost, Adrienne L; Bose, Arpita; Joye, Samantha B; Girguis, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C2), propane (C3), and butane (C4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV, Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C1-C4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C1-C4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75°C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C1-C4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C2-C4 alkanes. Maximum C1-C4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55°C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C4, C2, and C1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C2-C4alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C1 derived from these hydrothermal systems.

  1. Oxygen Effects on Thermophilic Microbial Populations in Biofilters Treating Nitric Oxide Containing Off-Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brady Douglas; Apel, William Arnold; Smith, William Aaron

    2004-04-01

    Electricity generation from coal has increased by an average of 51 billion kWh per year over the past 3 years. For this reason cost-effective strategies to control nitrogen oxides (NOx) from coal-fired power plant combustion gases must be developed. Compost biofilters operated at 55°C at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 13 seconds were shown to be feasible for removal of nitric oxide (NO) from synthetic flue gas. Denitrifying microbial populations in these biofilters were shown to reduce influent NO feeds by 90 to 95% at inlet NO concentrations of 500 ppmv. Oxygen was shown to have a significant effect on the NO removal efficiency demonstrated by these biofilters. Two biofilters were set up under identical conditions for the purpose of monitoring NO removal as well as changes in the microbial population in the bed medium under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Changes in the microbial population were monitored to determine the maximum oxygen tolerance of a denitrifying biofilter as well as methods of optimizing microbial populations capable of denitrification in the presence of low oxygen concentrations. Nitric oxide removal dropped to between 10 and 20% when oxygen was present in the influent stream. The inactive compost used to pack the biofilters may have also caused the decreased NO removal efficiency compared to previous biofiltration experiments. Analysis of the bed medium microbial population using environmental scanning electron microscopy indicated significant increases in biomass populating the surface of the compost when compared to unacclimated compost.

  2. Microbial Ecology Assessment of Mixed Copper Oxide/Sulfide Dump Leach Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, D F; Thompson, D N; Noah, K S

    1999-06-01

    Microbial consortia composed of complex mixtures of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the dissolution of metals from sulfide minerals. Thus, an efficient copper bioleaching operation depends on the microbial ecology of the system. A microbial ecology study of a mixed oxide/sulfide copper leaching operation was conducted using an "overlay" plating technique to differentiate and identify various bacterial consortium members of the genera Thiobacillus, Leptospirillum, Ferromicrobium, and Acidiphilium. Two temperatures (30C and 45C) were used to select for mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria. Cell numbers varied from 0-106 cells/g dry ore, depending on the sample location and depth. After acid curing for oxide leaching, no viable bacteria were recovered, although inoculation of cells from raffinate re-established a microbial population after three months. Due to the low pH of the operation, very few non-iron-oxidizing acidophilic heterotrophs were recovered. Moderate thermophiles were isolated from the ore samples. Pregnant liquor solutions (PLS) and raffinate both contained a diversity of bacteria. In addition, an intermittently applied waste stream that contained high levels of arsenic and fluoride was tested for toxicity. Twenty vol% waste stream in PLS killed 100% of the cells in 48 hours, indicating substantial toxicity and/or growth inhibition. The data indicate that bacteria populations can recover after acid curing, and that application of the waste stream to the dump should be avoided. Monitoring the microbial ecology of the leaching operation provided significant information that improved copper recovery.

  3. Microbial As(III) Oxidation in Water Treatment Plant Filters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exists in two oxidation states in water - arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)]. As(III) is relatively mobile in water and difficult to remove by arsenic-removal treatment processes. Source waters that contain As(III) must add a strong oxidant such as free chlorine or p...

  4. Microbial As(III) Oxidation in Water Treatment Plant Filters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exists in two oxidation states in water - arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)]. As(III) is relatively mobile in water and difficult to remove by arsenic-removal treatment processes. Source waters that contain As(III) must add a strong oxidant such as free chlorine or p...

  5. Postprandial Oxidative Stress and Gastrointestinal Hormones: Is There a Link?

    PubMed Central

    Malinska, Hana; Kahleova, Hana; Topolcan, Ondrej; Vrzalova, Jindra; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Kazdova, Ludmila; Belinova, Lenka; Hill, Martin; Pelikanova, Terezie

    2014-01-01

    direct link observed between gastrointestinal hormones and oxidative stress markers in diabetic patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01572402 PMID:25141237

  6. In Vivo Oxidative Stability Changes of Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene Bearings: An Ex Vivo Investigation.

    PubMed

    Rowell, Shannon L; Reyes, Christopher R; Malchau, Henrik; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2015-10-01

    The development of highly cross-linked UHMWPEs focused on stabilizing radiation-induced free radicals as the sole precursor to oxidative degradation. However, secondary in vivo oxidation mechanisms have been discovered. After a preliminary post-operative analysis, we subjected highly cross-linked retrievals with 1-4 years in vivo durations and never-implanted controls to accelerated aging to predict the extent to which their oxidative stability was compromised in vivo. Lipid absorption, oxidation, and hydroperoxides were measured using infrared spectroscopy. Gravimetric swelling was used to measure cross-link density. After aging, all retrievals, except vitamin E-stabilized components, regardless of initial lipid levels or oxidation, showed significant oxidative degradation, demonstrated by subsurface oxidative peaks, increased hydroperoxides and decreased cross-link density, compared to their post-operative material properties and never-implanted counterparts, confirming oxidative stability changes.

  7. Increased electrical output when a bacterial ABTS oxidizer is used in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Hunter, William J; Manter, Daniel K

    2011-02-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a technology that provides electrical energy from the microbial oxidation of organic compounds. Most MFCs use oxygen as the oxidant in the cathode chamber. This study examined the formation in culture of an unidentified bacterial oxidant and investigated the performance of this oxidant in a two-chambered MFC with a proton exchange membrane and an uncoated carbon cathode. DNA, FAME profile and characterization studies identified the microorganism that produced the oxidant as Burkholderia cenocepacia. The oxidant was produced by log phase cells, oxidized the dye 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), had a mass below 1 kD, was heat stable (121°C) and was soluble in ethanol. In a MFC with a 1000 Ω load and ABTS as a mediator, the oxidizer increased cell voltage 11 times higher than atmospheric oxygen and 2.9 times higher than that observed with ferricyanide in the cathode chamber. No increase in cell voltage was observed when no mediator was present. Organisms that produce and release oxidizers into the media may prove useful as bio-cathodes by improving the electrical output of MFCs.

  8. In Vitro Anti-Oxidant and Anti-Microbial Potentiality Investigation of Different Fractions of Caryota urens Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Shofiul; Mahmud, Md. Kayes; Naquib, Md. Hamza; Hossain, Saad Mosharraf; Alam, Mohammad Nazmul; Uddin, Md. Josim; Sajid, Irfan; Hossain, Muhammad Sazzad; Karim, Md. Salimul; Hasan, Md. Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Caryota urens is a member of the Arecaceae family and a common plant in the Southeast Asian region. This plant has been reported as an anti-microbial agent in recent years. Thus, we aimed to find out the MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) against different pathogenic microorganism. Methods: The leaves of C. urens were extracted and fractioned using different reagents (chloroform, n-hexane and carbon tetrachloride). Disc diffusion method was implemented for the assessment of in vitro anti-microbial potency (500 and 250 µg/disc). Result: The entire fraction showed good effect (with the zone of inhibition 19–25 mm) against both gram positive (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus cereus, Sarina lutea) and gram negative (Vibrio mimicus, Shigella boydii, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacterial pathogens and fungal strains (Aspergillus niger, Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The plants also possess effective free radical scavenging potency with an IC50 of 130.32 µg/mL. Conclusion: This finding reflects a link between the presence of anti-oxidative material and a substantial anti-microbial activity, and substantiates all previous claims against C. urens. PMID:28536384

  9. Iron-mediated microbial oxidation and abiotic reduction of organic contaminants under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Nicole B; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Straub, Kristina L; Fontana, Daniela; Schwarzenbach, René P

    2007-11-15

    In anoxic environments, the oxidation of organic compounds, such as BTEX fuel components, by dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction can generate reactive mineral-bound Fe(II) species, which in turn are able to reduce other classes of organic and inorganic groundwater contaminants. In this study, we designed and evaluated an anaerobic batch reactor that mimicks iron-reducing conditions to investigate the factors that favor the coupling of microbial toluene oxidation and abiotic reduction of nitroaromatic contaminants. We investigated the influence of different Fe(III)-bearing minerals and combinations thereof on the coupling of these two processes. Results from laboratory model systems show that complete oxidation of toluene to CO2 by Geobacter metallireducens in the presence of Fe(III)-bearing minerals leads to the formation of mineral-bound Fe(II) species capable of the reduction of 4-nitroacetophenone. Whereas significant microbial toluene oxidation was only observed in the presence of amorphous Fe(III) phases, reduction of nitroaromatic compounds only proceeded with Fe(II) species bound to crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Our results suggest that in anoxic soils and sediments containing amorphous and crystalline iron phases simultaneously, coupling of microbial oxidation and abiotic reduction of organic compounds may allow for concurrent natural attenuation of different contaminant classes.

  10. Application of microbial inoculants as tools for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from different nitrogen fertilizers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) are increasing due to several factors, including increased use of nitrogen fertilizers. New management tools are needed to reduce N2O emissions from production agriculture. One potential such tool is the use of microbial inoculants, which are increasingly being used ...

  11. The Link between Microbial Diversity and Nitrogen Cycling in Marine Sediments Is Modulated by Macrofaunal Bioturbation

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani Foshtomi, Maryam; Braeckman, Ulrike; Derycke, Sofie; Sapp, Melanie; Van Gansbeke, Dirk; Sabbe, Koen; Willems, Anne; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The marine benthic nitrogen cycle is affected by both the presence and activity of macrofauna and the diversity of N-cycling microbes. However, integrated research simultaneously investigating macrofauna, microbes and N-cycling is lacking. We investigated spatio-temporal patterns in microbial community composition and diversity, macrofaunal abundance and their sediment reworking activity, and N-cycling in seven subtidal stations in the Southern North Sea. Spatio-Temporal Patterns of the Microbial Communities Our results indicated that bacteria (total and β-AOB) showed more spatio-temporal variation than archaea (total and AOA) as sedimentation of organic matter and the subsequent changes in the environment had a stronger impact on their community composition and diversity indices in our study area. However, spatio-temporal patterns of total bacterial and β-AOB communities were different and related to the availability of ammonium for the autotrophic β-AOB. Highest bacterial richness and diversity were observed in June at the timing of the phytoplankton bloom deposition, while richness of β-AOB as well as AOA peaked in September. Total archaeal community showed no temporal variation in diversity indices. Macrofauna, Microbes and the Benthic N-Cycle Distance based linear models revealed that, independent from the effect of grain size and the quality and quantity of sediment organic matter, nitrification and N-mineralization were affected by respectively the diversity of metabolically active β-AOB and AOA, and the total bacteria, near the sediment-water interface. Separate models demonstrated a significant and independent effect of macrofaunal activities on community composition and richness of total bacteria, and diversity indices of metabolically active AOA. Diversity of β-AOB was significantly affected by macrofaunal abundance. Our results support the link between microbial biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in marine sediments, and provided

  12. Oxidative phosphorylation-linked respiration in individual bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Satoshi; Matoba, Satoko; Hashiyada, Yutaka; Aikawa, Yoshio; Ohtake, Masaki; Matsuda, Hideo; Kobayashi, Shuji; Konishi, Kazuyuki; Imai, Kei

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial bioenergetics in mammalian oocytes has not been sufficiently characterized. In this study, the function of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), a major pathway in mitochondria, was investigated in individual bovine oocytes by monitoring oxygen consumption using modified scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). At the germinal vesicle (GV) stage, 65% of basal respiration was used for mitochondrial respiration, which was inhibited by complex IV inhibitor. Around 63% of mitochondrial respiration was coupled to ATP synthesis, as determined by sensitivity to an ATP synthase inhibitor, and the remaining 37% was attributed to proton leak. In contrast, 50% and 43% of mitochondrial respiration were used for ATP synthesis in in vivo- and in vitro-derived metaphase II (MII)-stage oocytes, respectively. ATP-linked respiration, in both in vivo- and in vitro-derived MII-stage oocytes, was significantly lower than in GV-stage oocytes, suggesting that OXPHOS in bovine oocytes is more active at the GV stage compared with the MII stage. Interestingly, basal respiration in in vitro-derived MII oocytes was significantly higher than for in vivo-derived oocytes, reflecting an increase in proton leak. Next, we assessed respiration in MII oocytes cultured for 8 h. The aged oocytes had a significantly reduced maximum respiratory capacity, which was stimulated by a mitochondrial uncoupler, and reduced ATP-linked respiration compared with non-aged oocytes. However, the aging-related phenomenon could be prevented by caffeine treatment. We conclude that OXPHOS in bovine oocytes varies in the transition from GV to MII stage, in vitro maturation and the aging process. This approach will be particularly useful for analyzing mitochondrial bioenergetics in individual mammalian oocytes.

  13. An Experiment in Autotrophic Fermentation: Microbial Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sublette, Kerry L.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which uses an autotrophic bacterium to anaerobically oxidize hydrogen sulfide to sulfate in a batch-stirred tank reactor. Discusses background information, experimental procedure, and sample results of this activity. (CW)

  14. An Experiment in Autotrophic Fermentation: Microbial Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sublette, Kerry L.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which uses an autotrophic bacterium to anaerobically oxidize hydrogen sulfide to sulfate in a batch-stirred tank reactor. Discusses background information, experimental procedure, and sample results of this activity. (CW)

  15. Oxidation of cobalt and manganese in seawater via a common microbially catalyzed pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, James W.; Ho, Jackson

    1996-09-01

    Cobalt and manganese uptake onto suspended particles was studied in waters collected from Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts and the upper water column of the Sargasso Sea using radiotracers, coupled with protocols used previously for Mn and Ce to distinguish biological and redox processes. Cobalt uptake onto suspended particles in Waquiot Bay was dominated by microbial oxidation. Moreover, there was a close relationship between Mn(II) and Co(II) oxidation, with Mn(II) specific rates approximately 7-10x faster. Oxidation of each element obeys Michaelis Menten kinetics, with identifical values of K m in a given sample and values of V max are 7× higher for Mn. Lineweaver-Burk plots, generated from saturation plots for Co and Mn oxidation at different Mn and Co concentrations, demonstrated competitive inhibition between Co and Mn. The results indicate that both elements are co-oxidized via the same microbial catalytic pathway, and that this is probably an important mechanism for the incorporation of Co into marine Mn oxides. In the Sargasso Sea, by contrast, Mn and Co uptake onto suspended particles were completely decoupled. Cobalt uptake was nonoxidative, biologically mediated, and enhanced by low to moderate levels of light. It is probably due primarily to uptake by phytoplankton. Manganese uptake was almost exclusively oxidative and was inhibited by light even at low intensities. The differences probably reflect a higher biological demand for Co in the Sargasso Sea (Co is a biologically essential element), where Co concentrations are low, and lower activity of Mn oxidizing bacteria. Results suggest that higher specific uptake rates of Co than Mn by phytoplankton in oceanic regimes could result in Co having a geochemistry intermediate between Mn and a more nutrient-type element, such as Zn. Nevertheless, Co and Mn cycling are expected to be closely coupled in regions of high microbial Mn oxidizing activity.

  16. Evaluation of aerated biofilter systems for microbial methane oxidation of poor landfill gas.

    PubMed

    Haubrichs, R; Widmann, R

    2006-01-01

    In the long-term, landfills are producing landfill gas (LFG) with low calorific values. Therefore, the utilization of LFG in combined heat and power plants (CHP) is limited to a certain period of time. A feasible method for LFG treatment is microbial CH(4) oxidation. Different materials were tested in actively aerated lab-scale bio-filter systems with a volume of 0.167 m(3). The required oxygen for the microbial CH(4) oxidation was provided through perforated probes, which distributed ambient air into the filter material. Three air input levels were installed along the height of the filter, each of them adjusted to a particular flow rate. During the tests, stable degradation rates of around 28 g/(m(3) h) in a fine-grained compost material were observed at a CH(4) inlet concentration of 30% over a period of 148 days. Compared with passive (not aerated) tests, the CH(4) oxidation rate increased by a factor of 5.5. Therefore, the enhancement of active aeration on the microbial CH(4) oxidation was confirmed. At a O(2)/CH(4) ratio of 2.5, nearly 100% of the CH(4) load was decomposed. By lowering the ratio from 2.5 to 2, the efficiency fell to values from 88% to 92%. By varying the distribution to the three air input levels, the CH(4) oxidation process was spread more evenly over the filter volume.

  17. Long-term effects of nickel oxide nanoparticles on performance, microbial enzymatic activity, and microbial community of a sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Li, Zhiwei; Gao, Mengchun; She, Zonglian; Guo, Liang; Zheng, Dong; Zhao, Yangguo; Ma, Bingrui; Gao, Feng; Wang, Xuejiao

    2017-02-01

    The nitrogen and phosphorus removal, microbial enzymatic activity, and microbial community of a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) were evaluated under long-term exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO NPs). High NiO NP concentration (over 5 mg L(-1)) affected the removal of chemical oxygen demand, nitrogen, and phosphorus. The presence of NiO NP inhibited the microbial enzymatic activities and reduced the nitrogen and phosphorus removal rates of activated sludge. The microbial enzymatic activities of the activated sludge showed a similar variation trend to the nitrogen and phosphorus removal rates with the increase in NiO NP concentration from 0 to 60 mg L(-1). The Ni content in the effluent and activated sludge showed an increasing trend with the increase in NiO NP concentration. Some NiO NPs were absorbed on the sludge surface or penetrate the cell membrane into the interior of microbial cells in the activated sludge. NiO NP facilitated the increase in reactive oxygen species by disturbing the balance between the oxidation and anti-oxidation processes, and the variation in lactate dehydrogenase demonstrated that NiO NP could destroy the cytomembrane and cause variations in the microbial morphology and physiological function. High-throughput sequencing demonstrated that the microbial community of SBR had some obvious changes at 0-60 mg L(-1) NiO NPs at the phyla, class and genus levels.

  18. Habitat-Associated Phylogenetic Community Patterns of Microbial Ammonia Oxidizers

    PubMed Central

    Fernàndez-Guerra, Antoni; Casamayor, Emilio O.

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms mediating ammonia oxidation play a fundamental role in the connection between biological nitrogen fixation and anaerobic nitrogen losses. Bacteria and Archaea ammonia oxidizers (AOB and AOA, respectively) have colonized similar habitats worldwide. Ammonia oxidation is the rate-limiting step in nitrification, and the ammonia monooxygenase (Amo) is the key enzyme involved. The molecular ecology of this process has been extensively explored by surveying the gene of the subunit A of the Amo (amoA gene). In the present study, we explored the phylogenetic community ecology of AOB and AOA, analyzing 5776 amoA gene sequences from >300 isolation sources, and clustering habitats by environmental ontologies. As a whole, phylogenetic richness was larger in AOA than in AOB, and sediments contained the highest phylogenetic richness whereas marine plankton the lowest. We also observed that freshwater ammonia oxidizers were phylogenetically richer than their marine counterparts. AOA communities were more dissimilar to each other than those of AOB, and consistent monophyletic lineages were observed for sediments, soils, and marine plankton in AOA but not in AOB. The diversification patterns showed a more constant cladogenesis through time for AOB whereas AOA apparently experienced two fast diversification events separated by a long steady-state episode. The diversification rate (γ statistic) for most of the habitats indicated γAOA > γAOB. Soil and sediment experienced earlier bursts of diversification whereas habitats usually eutrophic and rich in ammonium such as wastewater and sludge showed accelerated diversification rates towards the present. Overall, this work shows for the first time a global picture of the phylogenetic community structure of both AOB and AOA assemblages following the strictest analytical standards, and provides an ecological view on the differential evolutionary paths experienced by widespread ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms. The emerged

  19. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Ephemeral Wetland Soils are Correlated with Microbial Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wai K.; Farrell, Richard E.; Siciliano, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential far exceeding that of CO2. Soil N2O emissions are a product of two microbially mediated processes: nitrification and denitrification. Understanding the effects of landscape on microbial communities, and the subsequent influences of microbial abundance and composition on the processes of nitrification and denitrification are key to predicting future N2O emissions. The objective of this study was to examine microbial abundance and community composition in relation to N2O associated with nitrification and denitrification processes over the course of a growing season in soils from cultivated and uncultivated wetlands. The denitrifying enzyme assay and N15O3− pool dilution methods were used to compare the rates of denitrification and nitrification and their associated N2O emissions. Functional gene composition was measured with restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles and abundance was measured with quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The change in denitrifier nitrous oxide reductase gene (nosZ) abundance and community composition was a good predictor of net soil N2O emission. However, neither ammonia oxidizing bacteria ammonia monooxygenase (bacterial amoA) gene abundance nor composition predicted nitrification-associated-N2O emissions. Alternative strategies might be necessary if bacterial amoA are to be used as predictive in situ indicators of nitrification rate and nitrification-associated-N2O emission. PMID:21712943

  20. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Ephemeral Wetland Soils are Correlated with Microbial Community Composition.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wai K; Farrell, Richard E; Siciliano, Steven D

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential far exceeding that of CO(2). Soil N(2)O emissions are a product of two microbially mediated processes: nitrification and denitrification. Understanding the effects of landscape on microbial communities, and the subsequent influences of microbial abundance and composition on the processes of nitrification and denitrification are key to predicting future N(2)O emissions. The objective of this study was to examine microbial abundance and community composition in relation to N(2)O associated with nitrification and denitrification processes over the course of a growing season in soils from cultivated and uncultivated wetlands. The denitrifying enzyme assay and [Formula: see text] pool dilution methods were used to compare the rates of denitrification and nitrification and their associated N(2)O emissions. Functional gene composition was measured with restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles and abundance was measured with quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The change in denitrifier nitrous oxide reductase gene (nosZ) abundance and community composition was a good predictor of net soil N(2)O emission. However, neither ammonia oxidizing bacteria ammonia monooxygenase (bacterial amoA) gene abundance nor composition predicted nitrification-associated-N(2)O emissions. Alternative strategies might be necessary if bacterial amoA are to be used as predictive in situ indicators of nitrification rate and nitrification-associated-N(2)O emission.

  1. Microbial Community Response of an Organohalide Respiring Enrichment Culture to Permanganate Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Nora B.; Atashgahi, Siavash; Saccenti, Edoardo; Grotenhuis, Tim; Smidt, Hauke; Rijnaarts, Huub H. M.

    2015-01-01

    While in situ chemical oxidation is often used to remediate tetrachloroethene (PCE) contaminated locations, very little is known about its influence on microbial composition and organohalide respiration (OHR) activity. Here, we investigate the impact of oxidation with permanganate on OHR rates, the abundance of organohalide respiring bacteria (OHRB) and reductive dehalogenase (rdh) genes using quantitative PCR, and microbial community composition through sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. A PCE degrading enrichment was repeatedly treated with low (25 μmol), medium (50 μmol), or high (100 μmol) permanganate doses, or no oxidant treatment (biotic control). Low and medium treatments led to higher OHR rates and enrichment of several OHRB and rdh genes, as compared to the biotic control. Improved degradation rates can be attributed to enrichment of (1) OHRB able to also utilize Mn oxides as a terminal electron acceptor and (2) non-dechlorinating community members of the Clostridiales and Deltaproteobacteria possibly supporting OHRB by providing essential co-factors. In contrast, high permanganate treatment disrupted dechlorination beyond cis-dichloroethene and caused at least a 2–4 orders of magnitude reduction in the abundance of all measured OHRB and rdh genes, as compared to the biotic control. High permanganate treatments resulted in a notably divergent microbial community, with increased abundances of organisms affiliated with Campylobacterales and Oceanospirillales capable of dissimilatory Mn reduction, and decreased abundance of presumed supporters of OHRB. Although OTUs classified within the OHR-supportive order Clostridiales and OHRB increased in abundance over the course of 213 days following the final 100 μmol permanganate treatment, only limited regeneration of PCE dechlorination was observed in one of three microcosms, suggesting strong chemical oxidation treatments can irreversibly disrupt OHR. Overall, this detailed investigation into dose

  2. Microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction potential in Chocolate Pots hot spring, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Fortney, N W; He, S; Converse, B J; Beard, B L; Johnson, C M; Boyd, E S; Roden, E E

    2016-05-01

    Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) is a unique, circumneutral pH, iron-rich, geothermal feature in Yellowstone National Park. Prior research at CP has focused on photosynthetically driven Fe(II) oxidation as a model for mineralization of microbial mats and deposition of Archean banded iron formations. However, geochemical and stable Fe isotopic data have suggested that dissimilatory microbial iron reduction (DIR) may be active within CP deposits. In this study, the potential for microbial reduction of native CP Fe(III) oxides was investigated, using a combination of cultivation dependent and independent approaches, to assess the potential involvement of DIR in Fe redox cycling and associated stable Fe isotope fractionation in the CP hot springs. Endogenous microbial communities were able to reduce native CP Fe(III) oxides, as documented by most probable number enumerations and enrichment culture studies. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR driven by oxidation of acetate, lactate, and H2 . Inhibitor studies and molecular analyses indicate that sulfate reduction did not contribute to observed rates of DIR in the enrichment cultures through abiotic reaction pathways. Enrichment cultures produced isotopically light Fe(II) during DIR relative to the bulk solid-phase Fe(III) oxides. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from enrichment cultures showed dominant sequences closely affiliated with Geobacter metallireducens, a mesophilic Fe(III) oxide reducer. Shotgun metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures confirmed the presence of a dominant G. metallireducens-like population and other less dominant populations from the phylum Ignavibacteriae, which appear to be capable of DIR. Gene (protein) searches revealed the presence of heat-shock proteins that may be involved in increased thermotolerance in the organisms present in the enrichments as well as porin-cytochrome complexes previously shown to be involved in extracellular electron transport. This analysis offers

  3. Microbial Community Response of an Organohalide Respiring Enrichment Culture to Permanganate Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Nora B; Atashgahi, Siavash; Saccenti, Edoardo; Grotenhuis, Tim; Smidt, Hauke; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2015-01-01

    While in situ chemical oxidation is often used to remediate tetrachloroethene (PCE) contaminated locations, very little is known about its influence on microbial composition and organohalide respiration (OHR) activity. Here, we investigate the impact of oxidation with permanganate on OHR rates, the abundance of organohalide respiring bacteria (OHRB) and reductive dehalogenase (rdh) genes using quantitative PCR, and microbial community composition through sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. A PCE degrading enrichment was repeatedly treated with low (25 μmol), medium (50 μmol), or high (100 μmol) permanganate doses, or no oxidant treatment (biotic control). Low and medium treatments led to higher OHR rates and enrichment of several OHRB and rdh genes, as compared to the biotic control. Improved degradation rates can be attributed to enrichment of (1) OHRB able to also utilize Mn oxides as a terminal electron acceptor and (2) non-dechlorinating community members of the Clostridiales and Deltaproteobacteria possibly supporting OHRB by providing essential co-factors. In contrast, high permanganate treatment disrupted dechlorination beyond cis-dichloroethene and caused at least a 2-4 orders of magnitude reduction in the abundance of all measured OHRB and rdh genes, as compared to the biotic control. High permanganate treatments resulted in a notably divergent microbial community, with increased abundances of organisms affiliated with Campylobacterales and Oceanospirillales capable of dissimilatory Mn reduction, and decreased abundance of presumed supporters of OHRB. Although OTUs classified within the OHR-supportive order Clostridiales and OHRB increased in abundance over the course of 213 days following the final 100 μmol permanganate treatment, only limited regeneration of PCE dechlorination was observed in one of three microcosms, suggesting strong chemical oxidation treatments can irreversibly disrupt OHR. Overall, this detailed investigation into dose

  4. Long term performance of an arsenite-oxidizing-chlorate-reducing microbial consortium in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2011-04-01

    A chlorate (ClO(3)(-)) reducing microbial consortium oxidized arsenite (As(III)) to arsenate (As(V)) in an upflow anaerobic sludge-bed bioreactor over 550 days operation. As(III) was converted with high conversion efficiencies (>98%) at volumetric loadings ranging from 0.45 to 1.92 mmol As/(L(reactor)d). The oxidation of As(III) was linked to the complete reduction of ClO(3)(-) to Cl(-) and H(2)O, as demonstrated by a molar ratio of approximately 3.0 mol As(III) oxidized per mole of Cl(-) formed and by the greatly lowered ClO(3)(-)-reducing capacity without As(III) feeding. An autotrophic enrichment culture was established from the bioreactor biofilm. A 16S rRNA gene clone library indicated that the culture was dominated by Dechloromonas, and Stenotrophomonas as well as genera within the family Comamonadaceae. The results indicate that the oxidation of As(III) to less mobile As(V) utilizing ClO(3)(-) as a terminal electron acceptor provides a sustainable bioremediation strategy for arsenic contamination in anaerobic environments.

  5. Long Term Performance of an Arsenite-Oxidizing-Chlorate-Reducing Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenjie; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2011-01-01

    A chlorate (ClO3−) reducing microbial consortium oxidized arsenite (As(III)) to arsenate (As(V)) in an upflow anaerobic sludge-bed bioreactor over 550 d operation. As(III) was converted with high conversion efficiencies (>98%) at volumetric loadings ranging from 0.45 to 1.92 mmol As/(Lreactor d). The oxidation of As(III) was linked to the complete reduction of ClO3− to Cl− and H2O, as demonstrated by a molar ratio of approximately 3.0 mol As(III) oxidized per mole of Cl− formed and by the greatly lowered ClO3−-reducing capacity without As(III) feeding. An autotrophic enrichment culture was established from the bioreactor biofilm. A 16S rRNA gene clone library indicated that the culture was dominated by Dechloromonas, and Stenotrophomonas as well as genera within the family Comamonadaceae. The results indicate that the oxidation of As(III) to less mobile As(V) utilizing ClO3− as a terminal electron acceptor provides a sustainable bioremediation strategy for arsenic contamination in anaerobic environments. PMID:21333531

  6. In vitro study of lipid biosynthesis in an anaerobically methane-oxidizing microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Blumenberg, Martin; Seifert, Richard; Nauhaus, Katja; Pape, Thomas; Michaelis, Walter

    2005-08-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a key process in the global methane cycle, and the majority of methane formed in marine sediments is oxidized in this way. Here we present results of an in vitro 13CH4 labeling study (delta13CH4, approximately 5,400 per thousand) in which microorganisms that perform AOM in a microbial mat from the Black Sea were used. During 316 days of incubation, the 13C uptake into the mat biomass increased steadily, and there were remarkable differences for individual bacterial and archaeal lipid compounds. The greatest shifts were observed for bacterial fatty acids (e.g., hexadec-11-enoic acid [16:1Delta11]; difference between the delta13C at the start and the end of the experiment [Deltadelta13C(start-end)], approximately 160 per thousand). In contrast, bacterial glycerol diethers exhibited only slight changes in delta13C (Deltadelta13C(start-end), approximately 10 per thousand). Differences were also found for individual archaeal lipids. Relatively high uptake of methane-derived carbon was observed for archaeol (Deltadelta13C(start-end), approximately 25 per thousand), a monounsaturated archaeol, and biphytanes, whereas for sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol there was considerably less change in the delta13C (Deltadelta13C(start-end), approximately 2 per thousand). Moreover, an increase in the uptake of 13C for compounds with a higher number of double bonds within a suite of polyunsaturated 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethyleicosenes indicated that in methanotrophic archaea there is a biosynthetic pathway similar to that proposed for methanogenic archaea. The presence of group-specific biomarkers (for ANME-1 and ANME-2 associations) and the observation that there were differences in 13C uptake into specific lipid compounds confirmed that multiple phylogenetically distinct microorganisms participate to various extents in biomass formation linked to AOM. However, the greater 13C uptake into the lipids of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) than into the

  7. Textural and Mineralogical Characteristics of Microbial Fossils in Modern and Ancient Iron (oxyhydr)oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; McPherson, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation contains extensive alkaline saline lacustrine deposits rich in diagenetic iron (oxyhydr)oxides that are well exposed on the Colorado Plateau of the southwestern USA. These early diagenetic iron (oxyhydr)oxide minerals are associated with preserved diatoms and other algal forms, identified via scanning electron microscope (SEM) in thin sections of representative samples. The minerals are also associated with macroscopic bioturbation features (e.g., charophytes, burrows and fossilized dinosaur bones). Algal forms with cellular elaboration are identified by HF dissolution of bioturbation structures and examination with SEM. Collectively, these features suggest biomediated textures are preserved in early diagenetic iron (oxyhydr)oxides, and can persist for tens of millions of years. Modern microbially precipitated iron (oxyhydr)oxides and ~100ka tufa terraces from a cold spring system along Ten Mile Graben in southern Utah, USA are compared with the Morrison examples to identify modern microbial fossils and document any differences and preservation changes during diagenesis over geologic time. Two distinct suites of elements (1. C, Fe, As and 2. C, S, Se) are associated with microbial fossils in both the modern and ancient tufas, as well as the ancient Morrison specimens. The occurrence of these distinctive trace element configurations in the iron (oxyhydr)oxide minerals suggest the suites could be potential markers for biosignatures. The presence of ferrihydrite in ~100ka fossil microbial mats suggests this thermodynamically unstable mineral may also be used as a biomarker. Diagnostic trace element suites and unusual mineral phases warrant further study for their potential as biomarkers. These terrestrial iron (oxyhydr)oxide examples will: 1) document specific biomediated textures and what their origins might be (related to different processes or species), 2) show how they might persist or respond to

  8. Microbial Communities Associated with Biogenic Iron Oxide Mineralization in Circumneutral pH Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. S.; Banfield, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    Lithotrophic growth on iron is a metabolism that has been found in a variety of neutral pH environments and is likely important in sustaining life in microaerophilic solutions, especially those low in organics. The composition of the microbial communities, especially the organisms that are responsible for iron oxidation, and carbon and nitrogen fixation, are not known, yet the ability to recognize these contributions is vital to our understanding of iron cycling in natural environments. Our approach has been to study the microbial community structure, mineralogy, and geochemistry of ~20 cm thick, 100's meters long, fluffy iron oxide-encrusted biological mats growing in the Piquette Mine tunnel, and to compare the results to those from geochemically similar environments. In situ measurements (Hydrolab) and geochemical characterization of bulk water samples and peepers (dialysis sampling vials) indicate that the environment is microaerobic, with micromolar levels of iron, high carbonate and sulfate, and typical groundwater nitrate and nitrite concentrations. 16S rDNA clone libraries show that the microbial mat and water contain communities with considerable diversity within the Bacterial domain, a large proportion of Nitrospira and Betaproteobacteria, and no Archaea. Because clone library data are not necessarily indicative of actual abundance, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was performed on water, mat, and sediment samples from the Piquette mine and two circumneutral iron- and carbonate-rich springs in the Oregon Cascade Range. Domain- and phylum-level probes were chosen based on the clone library results (Nitrospira, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Planctomyces). FISH data reveal spatial associations between specific microbial groups and mineralized structures. The organisms responsible for making the mineralized sheaths that compose the bulk of the iron oxide mat are Betaproteobacteria (probably Leptothrix

  9. Microbial reduction of graphene oxide by Azotobacter chroococcum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Youhu; Niu, Yufang; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Yuanfei; Li, Yunpeng; Qin, Lu-Chang

    2017-06-01

    We report an eco-friendly route for the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) by Azotobacter chroococcum at room temperature. Examinations using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy indicate the formation of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with a low degree of agglomeration. Quantitative analyses of electron diffraction data show that the produced rGO consists of single-layer sheets with a random stacking. It is suggested that the GO was reduced directly by the nitrogenase via sequential additions of electrons and protons followed by dehydration. This approach avoids the use of toxic chemical agents and also reduces the agglomeration of rGO.

  10. The microbial oxidation of (-)-beta-pinene by Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Afgan; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Tahara, Satoshi; Rahman, Atta-ur; Başer, K Hüsnü Can; Demirci, Fatih

    2002-01-01

    (-)-beta-pinene, a flavor and fragrance monoterpene is an important constituent of essential oils of many aromatic plants. It was oxidized by a plant-pathogenic fungus, Botrytis cinerea to afford four metabolites characterized as (-)-6a-hydroxy-beta-pinene, (-)-4beta,5beta-dihydroxy-beta-pinene, (-)-2beta,3beta-dihydroxypinane, and (-)-4beta-hydroxy-beta-pinene-6-one by detailed spectroscopic studies along with other known metabolites.

  11. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    DOE PAGES

    Beam, Jacob P.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Zackary J.; ...

    2016-02-15

    Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA), and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3-3.5; temperature = 68-75°C) inmore » YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4-40 days), and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 days, and reached steady-state levels within 14-30 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 days, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 days and in mature Fe(III)-oxide mats (1-2 cm thick). First-order rate constants of Fe(III)-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 to 0.05 day -1 , and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II) is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III)-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III)-oxide mats are also useful for understanding other Fe(II)-oxidizing systems.« less

  12. Microbial oxidation of elemental selenium in soil slurries and bacterial cultures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowdle, P.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    The microbial oxidation of elemental selenium [Se(O)] was studied by employing 75Se(O) as a tracer. Live, oxic soil slurries demonstrated a linear production of mostly Se(IV), with the formation of smaller quantities of Se(VI). Production of both Se(IV) and Se(VI) was inhibited by autoclaving, formalin, antibiotics, azide, and 2,4-dinitrophenol, thereby indicating the involvement of microbes. Oxidation of Se(O) in slurries was enhanced by addition of acetate, glucose, or sulfide, which implied involvement of chemoheterotrophs as well as chemoautotrophic thiobacilli. Cultures of Thiobacillus ASN-1, Leptothrix MnB1, and a heterotrophic soil enrichment all oxidized Se(O) with Se(VI) observed as the major product rather than Se(IV). This indicated that microbial oxidation in soils is partly constrained by the adsorption of Se(IV) onto soil surfaces. Rate constants for unamended soil slurry Se(O) oxidation ranged from 0.0009 to 0.0117 day-1 which were 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than those reported for dissimilatory Se(VI) reduction in organic-rich, anoxic sediments.The microbial oxidation of elemental selenium [Se(0)] was studied by employing 75Se(0) as a tracer. Live, oxic soil slurries demonstrated a linear production of mostly Se(IV), with the formation of smaller quantities of Se(VI). Production of both Se(IV) and Se(VI) was inhibited by autoclaving, formalin, antibiotics, azide, and 2,4-dinitrophenol, thereby indicating the involvement of microbes. Oxidation of Se(O) in slurries was enhanced by addition of acetate, glucose, or sulfide, which implied involvement of chemoheterotrophs as well as chemoautotrophic thiobacilli. Cultures of Thiobacillus ASN-1, Leptothrix MnB1, and a heterotrophic soil enrichment all oxidized Se(O) with Se(VI) observed as the major product rather than Se(IV). This indicated that microbial oxidation in soils is partly constrained by the adsorption of Se(IV) onto soil surfaces. Rate constants for unamended soil slurry Se(O) oxidation

  13. Linking variations in DOM composition and the microbial community in the water masses of the deep northeast Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansman, R.; Herndl, G. J.

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and microbial communities in the marine environment are inherently linked as microbes consume, produce, and transform dissolved compounds that contribute to the DOM pool. Thus, we might expect the composition of DOM and characteristics of the microbial community to co-vary throughout the water column. However, portions of the DOM pool cycle on varying timescales, ranging from hours to millennia, and the lability and residence times of these fractions may be reflected in their relationship to the dynamics of the in situ microbial community. To explore these associations, we analyzed several components of DOM of various water masses throughout the deep northeast Atlantic Ocean, including the molecular composition of solid phase extracted (SPE) DOM using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and the distribution of dissolved free (DFAA) and total hydrolyzable amino acids (THAA). While SPE-DOM as analyzed by FT-ICR-MS appears to be generally a conservative parameter in northeast Atlantic deep water, other components of the DOM pool vary with depth and latitude similar to changes in the microbial community. For example, DFAA show a more water mass specific distribution, and the relative mol% of the organic acid taurine is increased in subsurface (100 m) samples. Here we demonstrate variability among different fractions of marine DOM by assessing its composition in the deep northeast Atlantic Ocean in the context of microbial abundance, metabolic activity, and community composition.

  14. Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria Mediate Microbial Community Succession and Element Cycling in Launched Marine Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Hideyuki; Hori, Tomoyuki; Aoyagi, Tomo; Takasaki, Mitsuru; Katayama, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    A large amount of marine sediment was launched on land by the Great East Japan earthquake. Here, we employed both on-site and laboratory studies on the launched marine sediment to investigate the succession of microbial communities and its effects on geochemical properties of the sediment. Twenty-two-month on-site survey showed that microbial communities at the uppermost layer (0–2 mm depth) of the sediment changed significantly with time, whereas those at the deeper layer (20–40 mm depth) remained nearly unchanged and kept anaerobic microbial communities. Nine months after the incidence, various sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) prevailed in the uppermost layer, in which afterwards diverse chemoorganotrophic bacteria predominated. Geochemical analyses indicated that the concentration of metals other than Fe was lower in the uppermost layer than that in the deeper layer. Laboratory study was carried out by incubating the sediment for 57 days, and clearly indicated the dynamic transition of microbial communities in the uppermost layer exposed to atmosphere. SOB affiliated in the class Epsilonproteobacteria rapidly proliferated and dominated at the uppermost layer during the first 3 days, after that Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria and chemoorganotrophic bacteria were sequentially dominant. Furthermore, the concentration of sulfate ion increased and the pH decreased. Consequently, SOB may have influenced the mobilization of heavy metals in the sediment by metal-bound sulfide oxidation and/or sediment acidification. These results demonstrate that SOB initiated the dynamic shift from the anaerobic to aerobic microbial communities, thereby playing a critical role in element cycling in the marine sediment. PMID:28217124

  15. Microbial Ecology Assessment of Mixed Copper Oxide/Sulfide Dump Leach Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, Debby Fox; Thompson, David Neal; Noah, Karl Scott

    1999-06-01

    Microbial consortia composed of complex mixtures of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the dissolution of metals from sulfide minerals. Thus, an efficient copper bioleaching operation depends on the microbial ecology of the system. A microbial ecology study of a mixed oxide/sulfide copper leaching operation was conducted using an "overlay" plating technique to differentiate and identify various bacterial consortium members of the genera Thiobacillus, “Leptospirillum”, “Ferromicrobium”, and Acidiphilium. Two temperatures (30°C and 45°C) were used to select for mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria. Cell numbers varied from 0-106 cells/g dry ore, depending on the sample location and depth. After acid curing for oxide leaching, no viable bacteria were recovered, although inoculation of cells from raffinate re-established a microbial population after three months. Due to low the pH of the operation, very few non-iron-oxidizing acidophilic heterotrophs were recovered. Moderate thermophiles were isolated from the ore samples. Pregnant liquor solutions (PLS) and raffinate both contained a diversity of bacteria. In addition, an intermittently applied waste stream that contained high levels of arsenic and fluoride was tested for toxicity. Twenty vol% waste stream in PLS killed 100% of the cells in 48 hours, indicating substantial toxicity and/or growth inhibition. The data indicate that bacteria populations can recover after acid curing, and that application of the waste stream to the dump should be avoided. Monitoring the microbial ecology of the leaching operation provided significant information that improved copper recovery.

  16. Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria Mediate Microbial Community Succession and Element Cycling in Launched Marine Sediment.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Hideyuki; Hori, Tomoyuki; Aoyagi, Tomo; Takasaki, Mitsuru; Katayama, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    A large amount of marine sediment was launched on land by the Great East Japan earthquake. Here, we employed both on-site and laboratory studies on the launched marine sediment to investigate the succession of microbial communities and its effects on geochemical properties of the sediment. Twenty-two-month on-site survey showed that microbial communities at the uppermost layer (0-2 mm depth) of the sediment changed significantly with time, whereas those at the deeper layer (20-40 mm depth) remained nearly unchanged and kept anaerobic microbial communities. Nine months after the incidence, various sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) prevailed in the uppermost layer, in which afterwards diverse chemoorganotrophic bacteria predominated. Geochemical analyses indicated that the concentration of metals other than Fe was lower in the uppermost layer than that in the deeper layer. Laboratory study was carried out by incubating the sediment for 57 days, and clearly indicated the dynamic transition of microbial communities in the uppermost layer exposed to atmosphere. SOB affiliated in the class Epsilonproteobacteria rapidly proliferated and dominated at the uppermost layer during the first 3 days, after that Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria and chemoorganotrophic bacteria were sequentially dominant. Furthermore, the concentration of sulfate ion increased and the pH decreased. Consequently, SOB may have influenced the mobilization of heavy metals in the sediment by metal-bound sulfide oxidation and/or sediment acidification. These results demonstrate that SOB initiated the dynamic shift from the anaerobic to aerobic microbial communities, thereby playing a critical role in element cycling in the marine sediment.

  17. LABORATORY AND FIELD RESULTS LINKING HIGH BULK CONDUCTIVITIES TO THE MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel contaminated layer (i.e. 32-45 cm) was the most geoelectrically conductive and showed the peak microbial activity. Below the saturated zone microbial enhanced mineral weathering increases the ionic concentration of pore fluids, leading to increased bulk electrical conducit...

  18. LABORATORY AND FIELD RESULTS LINKING HIGH BULK CONDUCTIVITIES TO THE MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel contaminated layer (i.e. 32-45 cm) was the most geoelectrically conductive and showed the peak microbial activity. Below the saturated zone microbial enhanced mineral weathering increases the ionic concentration of pore fluids, leading to increased bulk electrical conducit...

  19. Geochemical controls on microbial nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senko, John M.; Suflita, Joseph M.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    After reductive immobilization of uranium, the element may be oxidized and remobilized in the presence of nitrate by the activity of dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacteria. We examined controls on microbially mediated nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation in landfill leachate-impacted subsurface sediments. Nitrate-dependent U(IV)-oxidizing bacteria were at least two orders of magnitude less numerous in these sediments than glucose- or Fe(II)-oxidizing nitrate-reducing bacteria and grew more slowly than the latter organisms, suggesting that U(IV) is ultimately oxidized by Fe(III) produced by nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria or by oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrite that accumulates during organotrophic dissimilatory nitrate reduction. We examined the effect of nitrate and reductant concentration on nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation in sediment incubations and used the initial reductive capacity (RDC = [reducing equivalents] - [oxidizing equivalents]) of the incubations as a unified measurement of the nitrate or reductant concentration. When we lowered the RDC with progressively higher nitrate concentrations, we observed a corresponding increase in the extent of U(IV) oxidation, but did not observe this relationship between RDC and U(IV) oxidation rate, especially when RDC > 0, suggesting that nitrate concentration strongly controls the extent, but not the rate of nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation. On the other hand, when we raised the RDC in sediment incubations with progressively higher reductant (acetate, sulfide, soluble Fe(II), or FeS) concentrations, we observed progressively lower extents and rates of nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation. Acetate was a relatively poor inhibitor of nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation, while Fe(II) was the most effective inhibitor. Based on these results, we propose that it may be possible to predict the stability of U(IV) in a bioremediated aquifer based on the geochemical characteristics of that aquifer.

  20. Analysis of a microbial community oxidizing inorganic sulfide and mercaptans.

    PubMed

    Duncan, K E; Sublette, K L; Rider, P A; Stepp, A; Beitle, R R; Conner, J A; Kolhatkar, R

    2001-01-01

    Successful treatment of refinery spent-sulfidic caustic (which results from the addition of sodium hydroxide solutions to petroleum refinery waste streams) was achieved in a bioreactor containing an enrichment culture immobilized in organic polymer beads with embedded powdered activated carbon (Bio-Sep). The aerobic enrichment culture had previously been selected using a gas mixture of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan (MeSH) as the sole carbon and energy sources. The starting cultures for the enrichment consisted of several different Thiobacilli spp. (T. thioparus, T. denitrificans, T. thiooxidans, and T. neopolitanus), as well as activated sludge from a refinery aerobic wastewater treatment system and sludge from an industrial anaerobic digester. Microscopic examination (light and SEM) of the beads and of microbial growth on the walls of the bioreactor revealed a great diversity of microorganisms. Further characterization was undertaken starting with culturable aerobic heterotrophic microorganisms (sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA coding for 16S rRNA, Gram staining) and by PCR amplification of DNA coding for 16S rRNA extracted directly from the cell mass, followed by the separation of the PCR products by DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). Eight prominent bands from the DGGE gel were sequenced and found to be closest to sequences of uncultured Cytophagales (3 bands), Gram-positive cocci (Micrococcineae), alpha proteobacteria (3 bands), and an unidentified beta proteobacterium. Culturable microbes included several genera of fungi as well as various Gram-positive and Gram-negative heterotrophic bacteria not seen in techniques using direct DNA extraction.

  1. Anaerobic oxidation of methane: an “active” microbial process

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Mengmeng; Ma, Anzhou; Qi, Hongyan; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is an important sink of methane that plays a significant role in global warming. AOM was first found to be coupled with sulfate reduction and mediated by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). ANME, often forming consortia with SRB, are phylogenetically related to methanogenic archaea. ANME-1 is even able to produce methane. Subsequently, it has been found that AOM can also be coupled with denitrification. The known microbes responsible for this process are Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera (M. oxyfera) and Candidatus Methanoperedens nitroreducens (M. nitroreducens). Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera belongs to the NC10 bacteria, can catalyze nitrite reduction through an “intra-aerobic” pathway, and may catalyze AOM through an aerobic methane oxidation pathway. However, M. nitroreducens, which is affiliated with ANME-2d archaea, may be able to catalyze AOM through the reverse methanogenesis pathway. Moreover, manganese (Mn4+) and iron (Fe3+) can also be used as electron acceptors of AOM. This review summarizes the mechanisms and associated microbes of AOM. It also discusses recent progress in some unclear key issues about AOM, including ANME-1 in hypersaline environments, the effect of oxygen on M. oxyfera, and the relationship of M. nitroreducens with ANME. PMID:25530008

  2. Linking pollution induced community tolerance (PICT) and microbial community structure in chronically metal polluted estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Lesley A; Grant, Alistair

    2008-03-01

    We tested the ability of pollution induced community tolerance (PICT) to detect the effects of chronic metal pollution on estuarine sediment microbial communities, along a gradient spanning two orders of magnitude in metal concentrations. In tandem, we investigated the associated microbial community structure using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Tolerance of microbes to Cu, measured as IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50%), was strongly correlated with pore water Cu concentration (r(2)=0.842). No strong correlation existed for other metals tested, highlighting the ability of PICT to identify the pollutant causing a toxic effect. There was no correlation between microbial community structure and community tolerance to metals tested, but analysis of community structure did provide some information on reasons for observed PICT response. PICT methodology used here provided a greater strength and consistency of association with pollutant concentration compared to microbial community structure and can be recommended as a sensitive indicator of metal pollution on estuarine sediment microbial communities.

  3. Rates and potential mechanism of anaerobic nitrate-dependent microbial pyrite oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2012-12-01

    Pyrite (FeS2) is a major iron- and sulfur-containing mineral phase in the environment. Oxidation of pyrite by aerobic micro-organisms has been well investigated. However, the reactivity of pyrite under anoxic conditions is still an open question. In the present paper, we summarize field and laboratory data on this chemolithotrophic respiration process with nitrate as terminal electron acceptor. Geochemical and stable isotope field data indicate that this process is occurring. Laboratory studies are more ambiguous, but recent positive results provide evidence that anaerobic microbial pyrite oxidation can, in fact, occur with nitrate as electron acceptor.

  4. A microbial-mineralization approach for syntheses of iron oxides with a high specific surface area.

    PubMed

    Yagita, Naoki; Oaki, Yuya; Imai, Hiroaki

    2013-04-02

    Of minerals and microbes: A microbial-mineralization-inspired approach was used to facilitate the syntheses of iron oxides with a high specific surface area, such as 253 m(2)g(-1) for maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)) and 148 m(2)g(-1) for hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)). These iron oxides can be applied to electrode material of lithium-ion batteries, adsorbents, and catalysts. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Unraveling the Stratification of an Iron-Oxidizing Microbial Mat by Metatranscriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Quaiser, Achim; Bodi, Xavier; Dufresne, Alexis; Naquin, Delphine; Francez, André-Jean; Dheilly, Alexandra; Coudouel, Sophie; Pedrot, Mathieu; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    A metatranscriptomic approach was used to study community gene expression in a naturally occurring iron-rich microbial mat. Total microbial community RNA was reversely transcribed and sequenced by pyrosequencing. Characterization of expressed gene sequences provided accurate and detailed information of the composition of the transcriptionally active community and revealed phylogenetic and functional stratifications within the mat. Comparison of 16S rRNA reads and delineation of OTUs showed significantly lower values of metatranscriptomic-based richness and diversity in the upper parts of the mat than in the deeper regions. Taxonomic affiliation of rRNA sequences and mRNA genome recruitments indicated that iron-oxidizing bacteria affiliated to the genus Leptothrix, dominated the community in the upper layers of the mat. Surprisingly, type I methanotrophs contributed to the majority of the sequences in the deep layers of the mat. Analysis of mRNA expression patterns showed that genes encoding the three subunits of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoCAB) were the most highly expressed in our dataset. These results provide strong hints that iron-oxidation and methane-oxidation occur simultaneously in microbial mats and that both groups of microorganisms are major players in the functioning of this ecosystem. PMID:25033299

  6. Microbial methane oxidation processes and technologies for mitigation of landfill gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter; Bogner, Jean E; De Visscher, Alex; Gebert, Julia; Hilger, Helene A; Huber-Humer, Marion; Spokas, Kurt

    2009-08-01

    Landfill gas containing methane is produced by anaerobic degradation of organic waste. Methane is a strong greenhouse gas and landfills are one of the major anthropogenic sources of atmospheric methane. Landfill methane may be oxidized by methanotrophic microorganisms in soils or waste materials utilizing oxygen that diffuses into the cover layer from the atmosphere. The methane oxidation process, which is governed by several environmental factors, can be exploited in engineered systems developed for methane emission mitigation. Mathematical models that account for methane oxidation can be used to predict methane emissions from landfills. Additional research and technology development is needed before methane mitigation technologies utilizing microbial methane oxidation processes can become commercially viable and widely deployed.

  7. Soil nitrogen cycling and availability are linked to ammonia oxidizer abundance across a tropical mean annual temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, S.; Litton, C. M.; Giardina, C. P.; Sparks, J. P.; Groffman, P.; Hewson, I.; Fahey, T.

    2016-12-01

    Interactions among environmental variables can obfuscate the primary drivers linking soil microbial community function to ecosystem biogeochemistry. These connections are important to understand in order to predict ecosystem responses to global climate change. In particular, the role of mean annual temperature (MAT) in regulating carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling via microbial communities remains unclear. To study these dynamics in situ, we used a a natural elevation gradient of tropical wet montane forest on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i with established permanent plots. Across the gradient, environmental variables besides MAT remain constant. We studied the abundance and activity of the amoA gene, which regulates the rate-limiting step of nitrification, in ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) with relation to N availability and cycling across increasing MAT. Our results show that the abundance of amoA is positively correlated with MAT (p<0.05; r2=0.34) and that MAT and amoA abundance are the primary predictors of nitrate (NO3-) bioavailability (p<0.05). We also found that the relative expression of amoA (cDNA/DNA) is not correlated with MAT or potential net nitrification rate. Our results indicate the direct role of MAT in ammonia oxidizer community structure and demonstrate feedbacks to nutrient availability in forest systems. These findings suggest that forest primary production and carbon cycling may be affected by AOA and AOB responses to rising MAT.

  8. Two-stage conversion of crude glycerol to energy using dark fermentation linked with microbial fuel cell or microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Chookaew, Teera; Prasertsan, Poonsuk; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2014-03-25

    Crude glycerol is a main byproduct of the biodiesel industry, and the beneficial use of waste glycerol has been a major challenge. This study characterises the conversion of crude glycerol into bioenergy such as H2 and electricity using a two-stage process linking dark fermentation with a microbial fuel cell (MFC) or microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). The results showed that fermentation achieved a maximum H2 rate of 332 mL/L and a yield of 0.55 mol H2/mol glycerol, accompanied by 20% of organic removal. Fed with the raw fermentation products with an initial COD of 7610 mg/L, a two-chamber MFC produced 92 mW/m(2) in power density and removed 50% of COD. The Columbic efficiency was 14%. When fed with 50% diluted fermentation product, a similar power output (90m W/m(2)) and COD removal (49%) were obtained, but the CE doubled to 27%. Similar substrates were used to produce H2 in two-chamber MECs, and the diluted influent had a higher performance, with the highest yield at 106 mL H2/g COD and a CE of 24%. These results demonstrate that dark fermentation linked with MFC/MEC can be a feasible option for conversion of waste glycerol into bioenergy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Petroleum Oxidation in Marine Microcosms by Natural Microbial Assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardlaw, G. D.; Reddy, C. M.; Nelson, R. K.; Ehrhardt, C. J.; Valentine, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    Millions of gallons of petroleum are emitted into marine environments each year and the oxidation of this oil by microbes is an important mechanism for mediating toxicity. In terms of quantity, petroleum is the most abundant organic pollutant impacting marine environments today. Recent advances in chromatography have led to the development of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC &GC). The acronym, GC GC, is used because orthogonal gas chromatographic separations are achieved in both analytical dimensions by using stationary phases with varying partitioning abilities and selectivity. This novel method has greatly expanded the analytical window of petroleum hydrocarbons and was used to track the loss of petroleum hydrocarbons in aerobic marine microcosm experiments. Sediment microcosms were composed of seawater and sediment collected from the Coal Oil Point (COP) seep field off the coast of Santa Barbara, CA. Oil collected directly from the reservoir underlying the seep field was added to each microcosm, and samples were incubated for one year. Net metabolism was tracked by quantifying oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. The loss of petroleum components was tracked with GC GC, whereas the bacterial and archaeal community structures were tracked using T-RFLP. Results of these incubation studies will be presented.

  10. Biomineralization associated with microbial reduction of Fe3+ and oxidation of Fe2+ in solid minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, G.; Dong, H.; Jiang, H.; Kukkadapu, R.K.; Kim, J.; Eberl, D.; Xu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Iron-reducing and oxidizing microorganisms gain energy through reduction or oxidation of iron, and by doing so play an important role in the geochemical cycling of iron. This study was undertaken to investigate mineral transformations associated with microbial reduction of Fe3+ and oxidation of Fe2+ in solid minerals. A fluid sample from the 2450 m depth of the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling project was collected, and Fe3+-reducing and Fe2+-oxidizing microorganisms were enriched. The enrichment cultures displayed reduction of Fe3+ in nontronite and ferric citrate, and oxidation of Fe2+ in vivianite, siderite, and monosulfide (FeS). Additional experiments verified that the iron reduction and oxidation was biological. Oxidation of FeS resulted in the formation of goethite, lepidocrocite, and ferrihydrite as products. Although our molecular microbiological analyses detected Thermoan-aerobacter ethanolicus as a predominant organism in the enrichment culture, Fe3+ reduction and Fe2+ oxidation may be accomplished by a consortia of organisms. Our results have important environmental and ecological implications for iron redox cycling in solid minerals in natural environments, where iron mineral transformations may be related to the mobility and solubility of inorganic and organic contaminants.

  11. Natural occurrence of microbial sulphur oxidation by long-range electron transport in the seafloor.

    PubMed

    Malkin, Sairah Y; Rao, Alexandra M F; Seitaj, Dorina; Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; Zetsche, Eva-Maria; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Boschker, Henricus T S; Meysman, Filip J R

    2014-09-01

    Recently, a novel mode of sulphur oxidation was described in marine sediments, in which sulphide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers was electrically coupled to oxygen reduction at the sediment surface. Subsequent experimental evidence identified that long filamentous bacteria belonging to the family Desulfobulbaceae likely mediated the electron transport across the centimetre-scale distances. Such long-range electron transfer challenges some long-held views in microbial ecology and could have profound implications for sulphur cycling in marine sediments. But, so far, this process of electrogenic sulphur oxidation has been documented only in laboratory experiments and so its imprint on the seafloor remains unknown. Here we show that the geochemical signature of electrogenic sulphur oxidation occurs in a variety of coastal sediment environments, including a salt marsh, a seasonally hypoxic basin, and a subtidal coastal mud plain. In all cases, electrogenic sulphur oxidation was detected together with an abundance of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. Complementary laboratory experiments in intertidal sands demonstrated that mechanical disturbance by bioturbating fauna destroys the electrogenic sulphur oxidation signal. A survey of published geochemical data and 16S rRNA gene sequences identified that electrogenic sulphide oxidation is likely present in a variety of marine sediments with high sulphide generation and restricted bioturbation, such as mangrove swamps, aquaculture areas, seasonally hypoxic basins, cold sulphide seeps and possibly hydrothermal vent environments. This study shows for the first time that electrogenic sulphur oxidation occurs in a wide range of marine sediments and that bioturbation may exert a dominant control on its natural distribution.

  12. Role for Fe(III) minerals in nitrate-dependent microbial U(IV) oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senko, John M.; Mohamed, Yasser; Dewers , Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    Microbiological reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) is a means of preventing the migration of that element in groundwater, but the presence of nitrate in U(IV)-containing sediments leads to U(IV) oxidation and remobilizaton. Nitrite or iron(III) oxyhydroxides may oxidize U(IV) under nitrate-reducing conditions, and we determined the rate and extent of U(IV) oxidation by these compounds. Fe(III) oxidized U(IV) at a greater rate than nitrite (130 and 10 μM U(IV)/day, respectively). In aquifer sediments, Fe(III) may be produced during microbial nitrate reduction by oxidation of Fe(II) with nitrite, or by enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction. To determine which of these mechanisms was dominant, we isolated a nitrate-dependent acetate- and Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium from a U(VI)- and nitrate-contaminated aquifer. This organism oxidized U(IV) at a greater rate and to a greater extent under acetate-oxidizing (where nitrite accumulated to 50 mM) than under Fe(II)-oxidizing conditions. We show that the observed differences in rate and extent of U(IV) oxidation are due to mineralogical differences between Fe(III) produced by reaction of Fe(II) with nitrite (amorphous) and Fe(III) produced enzymatically (goethite or lepidocrocite). Our results suggest the mineralogy and surface area of Fe(III) minerals produced under nitrate-reducing conditions affect the rate and extent of U(IV) oxidation. These results may be useful for predicting the stability of U(IV) in aquifers.

  13. Microbial Iron Oxidation in the Arctic Tundra and Its Implications for Biogeochemical Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Jarrod J.; Benes, Joshua; Bowden, William B.

    2015-01-01

    The role that neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria play in the Arctic tundra is unknown. This study surveyed chemosynthetic iron-oxidizing communities at the North Slope of Alaska near Toolik Field Station (TFS) at Toolik Lake (lat 68.63, long −149.60). Microbial iron mats were common in submerged habitats with stationary or slowly flowing water, and their greatest areal extent is in coating plant stems and sediments in wet sedge meadows. Some Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) produce easily recognized sheath or stalk morphotypes that were present and dominant in all the mats we observed. The cool water temperatures (9 to 11°C) and reduced pH (5.0 to 6.6) at all sites kinetically favor microbial iron oxidation. A microbial survey of five sites based on 16S rRNA genes found a predominance of Proteobacteria, with Betaproteobacteria and members of the family Comamonadaceae being the most prevalent operational taxonomic units (OTUs). In relative abundance, clades of lithotrophic FeOB composed 5 to 10% of the communities. OTUs related to cyanobacteria and chloroplasts accounted for 3 to 25% of the communities. Oxygen profiles showed evidence for oxygenic photosynthesis at the surface of some mats, indicating the coexistence of photosynthetic and FeOB populations. The relative abundance of OTUs belonging to putative Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) averaged around 11% in the sampled iron mats. Mats incubated anaerobically with 10 mM acetate rapidly initiated Fe reduction, indicating that active iron cycling is likely. The prevalence of iron mats on the tundra might impact the carbon cycle through lithoautotrophic chemosynthesis, anaerobic respiration of organic carbon coupled to iron reduction, and the suppression of methanogenesis, and it potentially influences phosphorus dynamics through the adsorption of phosphorus to iron oxides. PMID:26386054

  14. Microbial iron oxidation in the Arctic tundra and its implications for biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Emerson, David; Scott, Jarrod J; Benes, Joshua; Bowden, William B

    2015-12-01

    The role that neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria play in the Arctic tundra is unknown. This study surveyed chemosynthetic iron-oxidizing communities at the North Slope of Alaska near Toolik Field Station (TFS) at Toolik Lake (lat 68.63, long -149.60). Microbial iron mats were common in submerged habitats with stationary or slowly flowing water, and their greatest areal extent is in coating plant stems and sediments in wet sedge meadows. Some Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) produce easily recognized sheath or stalk morphotypes that were present and dominant in all the mats we observed. The cool water temperatures (9 to 11°C) and reduced pH (5.0 to 6.6) at all sites kinetically favor microbial iron oxidation. A microbial survey of five sites based on 16S rRNA genes found a predominance of Proteobacteria, with Betaproteobacteria and members of the family Comamonadaceae being the most prevalent operational taxonomic units (OTUs). In relative abundance, clades of lithotrophic FeOB composed 5 to 10% of the communities. OTUs related to cyanobacteria and chloroplasts accounted for 3 to 25% of the communities. Oxygen profiles showed evidence for oxygenic photosynthesis at the surface of some mats, indicating the coexistence of photosynthetic and FeOB populations. The relative abundance of OTUs belonging to putative Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) averaged around 11% in the sampled iron mats. Mats incubated anaerobically with 10 mM acetate rapidly initiated Fe reduction, indicating that active iron cycling is likely. The prevalence of iron mats on the tundra might impact the carbon cycle through lithoautotrophic chemosynthesis, anaerobic respiration of organic carbon coupled to iron reduction, and the suppression of methanogenesis, and it potentially influences phosphorus dynamics through the adsorption of phosphorus to iron oxides.

  15. LABORATORY AND FIELD RESULTS LINKING HIGH CONDUCTIVITIES TO THE MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of a field and laboratory investigation of unconsolidated sediments contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons and undergoing natural biodegradation are presented. Fundamental to geophysical investigations of hydrocarbon impacted sediments is the assessment of how microbi...

  16. LABORATORY AND FIELD RESULTS LINKING HIGH CONDUCTIVITIES TO THE MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of a field and laboratory investigation of unconsolidated sediments contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons and undergoing natural biodegradation are presented. Fundamental to geophysical investigations of hydrocarbon impacted sediments is the assessment of how microbi...

  17. Electrospun gelatin nanofibers: a facile cross-linking approach using oxidized sucrose.

    PubMed

    Jalaja, K; James, Nirmala R

    2015-02-01

    Gelatin nanofibers were fabricated via electrospinning with minimal toxicity from solvents and cross-linking agents. Electrospinning was carried out using a solvent system based on water and acetic acid (8:2, v/v). Acetic acid concentration was kept as minimum as possible to reduce the toxic effects. Electrospun gelatin nanofibers were cross-linked with oxidized sucrose. Sucrose was oxidized by periodate oxidation to introduce aldehyde functionality. Cross-linking with oxidized sucrose could be achieved without compromising the nanofibrous architecture. Cross-linked gelatin nanofibers maintained the fibrous morphology even after keeping in contact with aqueous medium. The morphology of the cross-linked nanofibrous mats was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Oxidized sucrose cross-linked gelatin nanofibers exhibited improved thermal and mechanical properties. The nanofibrous mats were evaluated for cytotoxicity and cell viability using L-929 fibroblast cells. The results confirmed that oxidized sucrose cross-linked gelatin nanofibers were non-cytotoxic towards L-929 cells with good cell viability.

  18. Cross-linking proteins by laccase-catalyzed oxidation: importance relative to other modifications.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, Charlotte L; Andersen, Mogens L; Degn, Peter E; Nielsen, Jacob H

    2008-12-24

    Laccase-catalyzed oxidation was able to induce intermolecular cross-links in beta-lactoglobulin, and ferulic acid-mediated laccase-catalyzed oxidation was able to induce intermolecular cross-links in alpha-casein, whereas transglutaminase cross-linked only alpha-casein. In addition, different patterns of laccase-induced oxidative modifications were detected, including dityrosine formation, formation of fluorescent tryptophan oxidation products, and carbonyls derived from histidine, tryptophan, and methionine. Laccase-catalyzed oxidation as well as transglutaminase induced only minor changes in surface tension of the proteins, and the changes could not be correlated to protein cross-linking. The presence of ferulic acid was found to influence the effect of laccase, allowing laccase to form irreducible intermolecular cross-links in beta-lactoglobulin and resulting in proteins exercising higher surface tensions due to cross-linking as well as other oxidative modifications. The outcome of using ferulic acid-mediated laccase-catalyzed oxidation to modify the functional properties of proteinaceous food components or other biosystems is expected to be highly dependent on the protein composition, resulting in different changes of the functional properties.

  19. Explicit Microbial Processes to Simulate Methane Production and Oxidation in Wetlands in the GFDL Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolander, S.; Sulman, B. N.; Shevliakova, E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observational studies highlighted the need to include explicit treatment of the soil microbial processes into the next generation of Earth System Models (ESMs). These processes shape most soil biogeochemical cycles and control releases of the most potent greenhouses gases carbon dioxide and methane. Currently global ecosystem models usually parameterize methane production as a fraction of soil heterotrophic respiration. This lumps the pathways of several different functional groups of microbes into one production rate, possibly modified by a number of environmental factor multipliers. Methane oxidation is usually more explicitly modeled by Michaelis-Menten kinetics, but if the maximum rate, before environmental multipliers, is a constant parameter, this essentially implies a constant methanotrophic microbe population size. We present an explicit model for wetland soil microbial processes in an ESM context. We introduce a growth and decomposition model for four functional groups of microbes involved in methane production and oxidation, so microbial populations can grow when conditions are favorable and substrate is available. When soil conditions are anoxic, fermenting microbes transform available soil carbon into intermediate substrates, and two different kinds of methanogenic microbes live on their preferred substrates producing methane. Methane is transported through aerobic layers of the soil column, where methanotrophic microbes oxidize part of the methane, and the rest escapes to the atmosphere. We present initial simulations using the new model in the context of existing measurements of methane emissions and microbial populations at the site level, and discuss the implications of including these processes in an ESM. This explicit process model establishes a foundation for improving dynamic ecosystem-climate feedbacks in ESM simulations, and facilitates more detailed experimental verification of wetland biogeochemical processes.

  20. Microbially catalyzed nitrate-dependent metal/radionuclide oxidation in shallow subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K.; Healy, O.; Spanbauer, T. L.; Snow, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Anaerobic, microbially catalyzed nitrate-dependent metal/radionuclide oxidation has been demonstrated in a variety of sediments, soils, and groundwater. To date, studies evaluating U bio-oxidation and mobilization have primarily focused on anthropogenically U contaminated sites. In the Platte River Basin U originating from weathering of uranium-rich igneous rocks in the Rocky Mountains was deposited in shallow alluvial sediments as insoluble reduced uranium minerals. These reduced U minerals are subject to reoxidation by available oxidants, such nitrate, in situ. Soluble uranium (U) from natural sources is a recognized contaminant in public water supplies throughout the state of Nebraska and Colorado. Here we evaluate the potential of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent microbially catalyzed metal/radionuclide oxidation in subsurface sediments near Alda, NE. Subsurface sediments and groundwater (20-64ft.) were collected from a shallow aquifer containing nitrate (from fertilizer) and natural iron and uranium. The reduction potential revealed a reduced environment and was confirmed by the presence of Fe(II) and U(IV) in sediments. Although sediments were reduced, nitrate persisted in the groundwater. Nitrate concentrations decreased, 38 mg/L to 30 mg/L, with increasing concentrations of Fe(II) and U(IV). Dissolved U, primarily as U(VI), increased with depth, 30.3 μg/L to 302 μg/L. Analysis of sequentially extracted U(VI) and U(IV) revealed that virtually all U in sediments existed as U(IV). The presence of U(IV) is consistent with reduced Fe (Fe(II)) and low reduction potential. The increase in aqueous U concentrations with depth suggests active U cycling may occur at this site. Tetravalent U (U(IV)) phases are stable in reduced environments, however the input of an oxidant such as oxygen or nitrate into these systems would result in oxidation. Thus co-occurrence of nitrate suggests that nitrate could be used by bacteria as a U(IV) oxidant. Most probable number

  1. Linking geology, fluid chemistry, and microbial activity of basalt- and ultramafic-hosted deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments.

    PubMed

    Perner, M; Hansen, M; Seifert, R; Strauss, H; Koschinsky, A; Petersen, S

    2013-07-01

    Hydrothermal fluids passing through basaltic rocks along mid-ocean ridges are known to be enriched in sulfide, while those circulating through ultramafic mantle rocks are typically elevated in hydrogen. Therefore, it has been estimated that the maximum energy in basalt-hosted systems is available through sulfide oxidation and in ultramafic-hosted systems through hydrogen oxidation. Furthermore, thermodynamic models suggest that the greatest biomass potential arises from sulfide oxidation in basalt-hosted and from hydrogen oxidation in ultramafic-hosted systems. We tested these predictions by measuring biological sulfide and hydrogen removal and subsequent autotrophic CO2 fixation in chemically distinct hydrothermal fluids from basalt-hosted and ultramafic-hosted vents. We found a large potential of microbial hydrogen oxidation in naturally hydrogen-rich (ultramafic-hosted) but also in naturally hydrogen-poor (basalt-hosted) hydrothermal fluids. Moreover, hydrogen oxidation-based primary production proved to be highly attractive under our incubation conditions regardless whether hydrothermal fluids from ultramafic-hosted or basalt-hosted sites were used. Site-specific hydrogen and sulfide availability alone did not appear to determine whether hydrogen or sulfide oxidation provides the energy for primary production by the free-living microbes in the tested hydrothermal fluids. This suggests that more complex features (e.g., a combination of oxygen, temperature, biological interactions) may play a role for determining which energy source is preferably used in chemically distinct hydrothermal vent biotopes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Melissa M.; Hoarfrost, Adrienne L.; Bose, Arpita; Joye, Samantha B.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C2), propane (C3), and butane (C4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV, Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C1–C4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C1–C4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75°C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C1–C4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C2–C4 alkanes. Maximum C1–C4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55°C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C4, C2, and C1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C2–C4alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C1 derived from these hydrothermal systems. PMID:23717305

  3. Microbial community structure of a heavy fuel oil-degrading marine consortium: linking microbial dynamics with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon utilization.

    PubMed

    Vila, Joaquim; María Nieto, José; Mertens, Jelle; Springael, Dirk; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2010-08-01

    A marine microbial consortium obtained from a beach contaminated by the Prestige oil spill proved highly efficient in removing the different hydrocarbon families present in this heavy fuel oil. Seawater cultures showed a complete removal of all the linear and branched alkanes, an extensive attack on three to five-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs; including anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene] (30-100%), and a considerable depletion of their alkyl derivatives. Community dynamics analysis revealed that Alcanivorax species, known alkane degraders, predominated in the initial stages. This was followed by an increase in Alphaproteobacteria (i.e. Maricaulis, Roseovarius), which coincided with the depletion of low molecular PAHs. Finally, these were succeeded by Gammaproteobacteria (mainly Marinobacter and Methylophaga), which were involved in the degradation of the high molecular-weight PAHs. The role of these populations in the removal of the specific components was confirmed by the analysis of subcultures established using the aliphatic or the aromatic fraction of the fuel oil, or single PAHs, as carbon sources. The genus Marinobacter seemed to play a major role in the degradation of a variety of hydrocarbons, as several members of this group were isolated from the different enrichment cultures and grew on plates with hexadecane or single PAHs as sole carbon sources.

  4. Soluble microbial products decrease pyrite oxidation by ferric iron at pH < 2.

    PubMed

    Yacob, Tesfayohanes; Pandey, Sachin; Silverstein, Joann; Rajaram, Harihar

    2013-08-06

    Research on microbial activity in acid mine drainage (AMD) has focused on transformations of iron and sulfur. However, carbon cycling, including formation of soluble microbial products (SMP) from cell growth and decay, is an important biogeochemical component of the AMD environment. Experiments were conducted to study the interaction of SMP with soluble ferric iron in acidic conditions, particularly the formation of complexes that inhibit its effectiveness as the primary oxidant of pyrite during AMD generation. The rate of pyrite oxidation by ferric iron in sterile suspensions at pH 1.8 was reduced by 87% in the presence of SMP produced from autoclaved cells at a ratio of 0.3 mg DOC per mg total soluble ferric iron. Inhibition of pyrite oxidation by SMP was shown to be comparable to, but weaker than, the effect of a chelating synthetic siderophore, DFAM. Two computational models incorporating SMP complexation were fitted to experimental results. Results suggest that bacterially produced organic matter can play a role in slowing pyrite oxidation.

  5. [Acclimatization and characteristics of microbial community in sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation].

    PubMed

    Xi, Jing-Ru; Liu, Su-Qin; Li, Lin; Liu, Jun-Xin

    2014-12-01

    The greenhouse effect of methane is 26 times worse than that of carbon dioxide, and wastewater containing high concentrations of sulfate is harmful to water, soil and plants. Therefore, anaerobic oxidation of methane driven by sulfate is one of the effective ways for methane reduction. In this paper, with sulfate as the electron accepter, a microbial consortium capable of oxidating methane under anaerobic condition was cultured. The diversity and characteristics of bacterial and archaeal community were investigated by PCR-DGGE, and phylogenetic analysis of the dominant microorganisms was also carried out. The DGGE fingerprints showed that microbial community structure changed distinctly, and the abundance of methane-oxidizing archea and sulfate-reducing bacteria increased in the acclimatization system added sulfate. After acclimatization, the bacterial diversity increased, while archaea diversity decreased slightly. The representative bands in the DGGE profiles were excised and sequenced. Results indicated that the dominant species in the acclimatization system were Spirochaetes, Desulfuromonadales, Methanosarcinales, Methanosaeta. Methane converted into carbon dioxide while sulfate transformed into hydrogen sulfide and sulfur in the process of anaerobic methane oxidation accompanied by sulphate reduction.

  6. Microbial Diversity and Population Structure of Extremely Acidic Sulfur-Oxidizing Biofilms From Sulfidic Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.; Stoffer, T.; Lyon, E. H.; Macalady, J. L.

    2005-12-01

    Extremely acidic (pH 0-1) microbial biofilms called snottites form on the walls of sulfidic caves where gypsum replacement crusts isolate sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms from the buffering action of limestone host rock. We investigated the phylogeny and population structure of snottites from sulfidic caves in central Italy using full cycle rRNA methods. A small subunit rRNA bacterial clone library from a Frasassi cave complex snottite sample contained a single sequence group (>60 clones) similar to Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Bacterial and universal rRNA clone libraries from other Frasassi snottites were only slightly more diverse, containing a maximum of 4 bacterial species and probably 2 archaeal species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of snottites from Frasassi and from the much warmer Rio Garrafo cave complex revealed that all of the communities are simple (low-diversity) and dominated by Acidithiobacillus and/or Ferroplasma species, with smaller populations of an Acidimicrobium species, filamentous fungi, and protists. Our results suggest that sulfidic cave snottites will be excellent model microbial ecosystems suited for ecological and metagenomic studies aimed at elucidating geochemical and ecological controls on microbial diversity, and at mapping the spatial history of microbial evolutionary events such as adaptations, recombinations and gene transfers.

  7. Microbial regulation of terrestrial nitrous oxide formation: understanding the biological pathways for prediction of emission rates.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hang-Wei; Chen, Deli; He, Ji-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    The continuous increase of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) in the atmosphere due to increasing anthropogenic nitrogen input in agriculture has become a global concern. In recent years, identification of the microbial assemblages responsible for soil N2O production has substantially advanced with the development of molecular technologies and the discoveries of novel functional guilds and new types of metabolism. However, few practical tools are available to effectively reduce in situ soil N2O flux. Combating the negative impacts of increasing N2O fluxes poses considerable challenges and will be ineffective without successfully incorporating microbially regulated N2O processes into ecosystem modeling and mitigation strategies. Here, we synthesize the latest knowledge of (i) the key microbial pathways regulating N2O production and consumption processes in terrestrial ecosystems and the critical environmental factors influencing their occurrence, and (ii) the relative contributions of major biological pathways to soil N2O emissions by analyzing available natural isotopic signatures of N2O and by using stable isotope enrichment and inhibition techniques. We argue that it is urgently necessary to incorporate microbial traits into biogeochemical ecosystem modeling in order to increase the estimation reliability of N2O emissions. We further propose a molecular methodology oriented framework from gene to ecosystem scales for more robust prediction and mitigation of future N2O emissions. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Investigation of acute effects of graphene oxide on wastewater microbial community: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farid; Rodrigues, Debora F

    2013-07-15

    The market for graphene-based products, such as graphene oxide (GO), is projected to reach nearly $675 million by 2020, hence it is expected that large quantities of graphene-based wastes will be generated by then. Wastewater treatment plants will be one of the ultimate repositories for these wastes. Efficient waste treatment relies heavily on the functions of diverse microbial communities. Therefore, systematic investigation of any potential toxic effects of GO in wastewater microbial communities is essential to determine the potential adverse effects and the fate of these nanomaterials in the environment. In the present study, we investigate the acute toxicity, i.e. short-term and high load, effect of GO on the microbial functions related to the biological wastewater treatment process. The results showed that toxic effects of GO on microbial communities were dose dependent, especially in concentrations between 50 and 300mg/L. Bacterial metabolic activity, bacterial viability, and biological removal of nutrients, such as organics, nitrogen and phosphorus, were significantly impacted by the presence of GO in the activated sludge. Furthermore, the presence of GO deteriorated the final effluent quality by increasing the water turbidity and reducing the sludge dewaterability. Microscopic techniques confirmed penetration and accumulation of GO inside the activated sludge floc matrix. Results demonstrated that the interaction of GO with wastewater produced significant amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which could be one of the responsible mechanisms for the toxic effect of GO. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of Anodic Community in Microbial Fuel Cells with Iron Oxide-Reducing Community.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Ishida, Mitsuyoshi; Yamashita, Takahiro

    2016-04-28

    The group of Fe(III) oxide-reducing bacteria includes exoelectrogenic bacteria, and they possess similar properties of transferring electrons to extracellular insoluble-electron acceptors. The exoelectrogenic bacteria can use the anode in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as the terminal electron acceptor in anaerobic acetate oxidation. In the present study, the anodic community was compared with the community using Fe(III) oxide (ferrihydrite) as the electron acceptor coupled with acetate oxidation. To precisely analyze the structures, the community was established by enrichment cultures using the same inoculum used for the MFCs. High-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed considerable differences between the structure of the anodic communities and that of the Fe(III) oxide-reducing community. Geobacter species were predominantly detected (>46%) in the anodic communities. In contrast, Pseudomonas (70%) and Desulfosporosinus (16%) were predominant in the Fe(III) oxide-reducing community. These results demonstrated that Geobacter species are the most specialized among Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for electron transfer to the anode in MFCs. In addition, the present study indicates the presence of a novel lineage of bacteria in the genus Pseudomonas that highly prefers ferrihydrite as the terminal electron acceptor in acetate oxidation.

  10. Effect of Fenton reagent dose on coexisting chemical and microbial oxidation in soil.

    PubMed

    Ndjou'ou, Anne-Clarisse; Bou-Nasr, Joseph; Cassidy, Daniel

    2006-04-15

    The ability of modified Fenton reactions to promote simultaneous chemical and biological oxidation in an artificially contaminated soil was studied in batch laboratory slurry reactors. Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and oxalate (OA) were used to distinguish chemical oxidation from aerobic heterotrophic metabolism. PCE was mineralized by Fenton reactions, but OA was not oxidized. Indigenous soil microorganisms did not degrade added PCE aerobically but readily assimilated OA. Fenton reactions were promoted at the natural soil pH (7.6) by adding H2O2 and Fe(III), with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as a chelator, at a constant molar ratio of H2O2/Fe(III)/NTA of 50:1:1. The *OH-mediated mineralization of PCE was demonstrated by adding 2-propanol (an *OH scavenger), which inhibited PCE oxidation. In subsequent dosing studies, PCE oxidation served as an indicator of Fenton reactions, while OA assimilation, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, and heterotrophic plate counts were indicators of aerobic microbial activity. Increasing Fenton doses to 20 times that required to achieve 95% PCE oxidation only delayed OA assimilation by 500 min and reduced plate counts by 1.5 log units g(-1) soil. Results show that aerobic metabolism can coexist with Fenton oxidation in soils.

  11. Microbial Synthesis of the Forskolin Precursor Manoyl Oxide in an Enantiomerically Pure Form.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten T; Ranberg, Johan Andersen; Christensen, Ulla; Christensen, Hanne Bjerre; Harrison, Scott J; Olsen, Carl Erik; Hamberger, Björn; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Nørholm, Morten H H

    2014-12-01

    Forskolin is a promising medicinal compound belonging to a plethora of specialized plant metabolites that constitute a rich source of bioactive high-value compounds. A major obstacle for exploitation of plant metabolites is that they often are produced in small amounts and in plants difficult to cultivate. This may result in insufficient and unreliable supply leading to fluctuating and high sales prices. Hence, substantial efforts and resources have been invested in developing sustainable and reliable supply routes based on microbial cell factories. Here, we report microbial synthesis of (13R)-manoyl oxide, a proposed intermediate in the biosynthesis of forskolin and other medically important labdane-type terpenoids. Process optimization enabled synthesis of enantiomerically pure (13R)-manoyl oxide as the sole metabolite, providing a pure compound in just two steps with a yield of 10 mg/liter. The work presented here demonstrates the value of a standardized bioengineering pipeline and the large potential of microbial cell factories as sources for sustainable synthesis of complex biochemicals. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Zinc oxide nanoparticles cause inhibition of microbial denitrification by affecting transcriptional regulation and enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Liu, Kun; Li, Mu; Yin, Daqiang

    2014-12-02

    Over the past few decades, human activities have accelerated the rates and extents of water eutrophication and global warming through increasing delivery of biologically available nitrogen such as nitrate and large emissions of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. In particular, nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the most important greenhouse gases, because it has a 300-fold higher global warming potential than carbon dioxide. Microbial denitrification is a major pathway responsible for nitrate removal, and also a dominant source of N2O emissions from terrestrial or aquatic environments. However, whether the release of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) into the environment affects microbial denitrification is largely unknown. Here we show that the presence of ZnO NPs lead to great increases in nitrate delivery (9.8-fold higher) and N2O emissions (350- and 174-fold higher in the gas and liquid phases, respectively). Our data further reveal that ZnO NPs significantly change the transcriptional regulations of glycolysis and polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis, which causes the decrease in reducing powers available for the reduction of nitrate and N2O. Moreover, ZnO NPs substantially inhibit the gene expressions and catalytic activities of key denitrifying enzymes. These negative effects of ZnO NPs on microbial denitrification finally cause lower nitrate removal and higher N2O emissions, which is likely to exacerbate water eutrophication and global warming.

  13. Spontaneous arsenic (III) oxidation with bioelectricity generation in single-chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunlong; Zhang, Baogang; Cheng, Ming; Li, Yalong; Hao, Liting; Guo, Huaming

    2016-04-05

    Arsenic is one of the most toxic elements commonly found in groundwater. With initial concentration of 200μgL(-1), spontaneous As(III) oxidation is realized completely during 7 days operation in single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in the present study, with the maximum power density of 752.6±17mWm(-2). The product is less toxic and mobile As(V), which can be removed from aqueous solution more easily. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis indicates the existence of arsenic-resistant bacteria as Actinobacteria, Comamonas, Pseudomonas and arsenic-oxidizing bacteria as Enterobacter, with electrochemically active bacteria as Lactococcus, Enterobacter. They interact together and are responsible for As(III) oxidation and bioelectricity generation in MFCs. This study offers a potential attractive method for remediation of arsenic-polluted groundwater.

  14. Modeling carbon cycle responses to tree mortality: linking microbial and biogeochemical changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. J.; Trahan, N. A.; Dynes, E. L.; Zobitz, J. M.; Gallery, R.

    2013-12-01

    Amid a worldwide increase in tree mortality, mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) have killed billions of trees from Mexico to Alaska in the last 13 years. This mortality is predicted to influence important carbon, water and energy balance feedbacks on the Earth system. We studied changes in soil biogeochemical cycling and microbial community structure after tree mortality. We show, using a decade long chronosequence, that tree mortality causes no increase in total respiration from local to watershed scales, with corresponding changes in biogeochemical pools of nitrogen and phosphorus. We also found comparable declines in both gross primary productivity and respiration suggesting little change in net flux. We tested the mechanisms controlling these patterns using an ecosystem model; contrasting a simplified microbial subroutine with a 'dead soil' model. We coupled our modeling work with direct measurements of microbial biomass, enzyme kinetics and community structure. The transitory recovery of respiration 6-7 years after mortality was associated with increased microbial biomass, increased incorporation of leaf litter carbon into soil organic matter, and was followed by a secondary decline in respiration during years 8-10. Our findings are consistent with the mechanism of reduced input of new carbon causing a decline in microbial biomass rather than an increased output of older carbon.

  15. ISOGENIE: Linking geochemistry, isotopic chemistry and microbial dynamics & community composition in a thawing permafrost peatland, Stordalen Mire, Abisco, Sweden.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanton, J.; Crill, P. M.; Rich, V.; McCalley, C. K.; Hodgkins, S. B.; Tyson, G.; Logan, T.; Wehr, R.; Mondav, R.; Li, C.; Frolking, S.; Saleska, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    As permafrost thaws, increasing CH4 emissions from northern wetlands are likely to cause positive feedback to atmospheric warming. One of the over-arching goals of this project is to connect geochemical processes, particularly focusing on methane production, to underlying microbial population dynamics and genomics. Recent transformative technical advances in both high throughput investigations of microbial communities and high temporal resolution biogeochemical isotope measurements now permit a uniquely comprehensive approach to opening the microbial "black boxes" that impact carbon cycling on global scales. This project links detailed microbial sampling with detailed geochemical and isotopic sampling on seasonal and diel timescales and has an extensive modeling component. Gas exchange is monitored across the wetland gradients in a series of automated chambers and isotopes of emitted and belowground methane and carbon dioxide are measured with a QC laser system. The mire is in a state of partial thaw. With this thaw is an apparent ecological session in wetland community structure and associated changes in organic matter lability, rates of methane production and microbial community. Our group's study sites range from palsa with underlying permanently frozen peat, to recently collapsed and flooded palsa, to flooded palsa colonized by Sphagnum, to flooded eriophorum sites, to sites populated by Carex, to open water lakes. Across this environmental gradient pH ranges from 4 to 6.5. This change is driven by changes in hydrology as the surface of the thawing permafrost subsides and an adjacent lake drains into the mire. Along this environmental gradient, from palsa to Carex, the lability of the peat increases significantly as determined in incubations of peat material and monitoring of methane and carbon dioxide production rates. Coincident with this environmental gradient is a decrease in the apparent fractionation factor between methane and carbon dioxide and methane

  16. Linking phosphorus availability with photo-oxidative stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Iker; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-05-01

    Plants have evolved a plethora of mechanisms to circumvent the potential damaging effects of living under low phosphorus availability in the soil. These mechanisms include different levels of organization, from root-shoot signalling at the whole-plant level to specific biochemical responses at the subcellular level, such as reductions in photosynthesis and the consequent activation of photo- and antioxidant mechanisms in chloroplasts. Some recent studies clearly indicate that severe phosphorus deficiency can lead to alterations in the photosynthetic apparatus, including reductions in CO2 assimilation rates, a down-regulation of photosynthesis-related genes and photoinhibition at the photosystem II level, thus causing potential photo-oxidative stress. Photo-oxidative stress is characterized by an increased production of reactive oxygen species in chloroplasts, which at low concentrations can serve a signalling, protective role, but when present at high concentrations can cause damage to lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, thus leading to irreversible injuries. We discuss here the mechanisms that phosphate-starved plants have evolved to withstand photo-oxidative stress, including changes at the subcellular level (e.g. activation of photo- and antioxidant protection mechanisms in chloroplasts), cellular and tissular levels (e.g. activation of photorespiration and anthocyanin accumulation) and whole-plant level (alterations in source-sink relationships modulated by hormones). Of particular importance is the current evidence demonstrating that phosphate-starved plants activate simultaneous responses at multiple levels, from transcriptional changes to root-shoot signalling, to prevent oxidative damage. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about the occurrence of photo-oxidative stress in phosphate-starved plants and highlight the mechanisms these plants have evolved to prevent oxidative damage under phosphorus limitation at the subcellular, cellular and whole

  17. Polysulfides Link H2S to Protein Thiol Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Romy; Pálinkás, Zoltán; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Antelmann, Haike; Nagy, Péter

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is suggested to act as a gaseous signaling molecule in a variety of physiological processes. Its molecular mechanism of action was proposed to involve protein S-sulfhydration, that is, conversion of cysteinyl thiolates (Cys-S−) to persulfides (Cys-S-S−). A central and unresolved question is how H2S—that is, a molecule with sulfur in its lowest possible oxidation state (−2)—can lead to oxidative thiol modifications. Results: Using the lipid phosphatase PTEN as a model protein, we find that the “H2S donor” sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) leads to very rapid reversible oxidation of the enzyme in vitro. We identify polysulfides formed in NaHS solutions as the oxidizing species, and present evidence that sulfane sulfur is added to the active site cysteine. Polysulfide-mediated oxidation of PTEN was induced by all “H2S donors” tested, including sodium sulfide (Na2S), gaseous H2S, and morpholin-4-ium 4-methoxyphenyl(morpholino) phosphinodithioate (GYY4137). Moreover, we show that polysulfides formed in H2S solutions readily modify PTEN inside intact cells. Innovation: Our results shed light on the previously unresolved question of how H2S leads to protein thiol oxidation, and suggest that polysulfides formed in solutions of H2S mediate this process. Conclusion: This study suggests that the effects that have been attributed to H2S in previous reports may in fact have been mediated by polysulfides. It also supports the notion that sulfane sulfur rather than sulfide is the actual in vivo agent of H2S signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1749–1765. PMID:23646934

  18. Interpreting and understanding microbial data in validation of ethylene oxide sterilization processes.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Gregg A; Houghtling, Clark C

    2005-01-01

    Ethylene oxide (EtO) sterilization validation programs are based on historical data, industry experience, and theoretical knowledge. When designing a specific program, the knowledge and experience of the individuals responsible often determines how accurately these data, experiences, and theories are applied. The assumptions and premises that form the foundation for the validation program are critical to the ultimate safety ofproducts distributed to the marketplace. Demonstrating appropriate microbial lethality is the ultimate purpose of sterilization validation. When using EtO processes, this is usually dependent on the proper use of biological indicators (Bls) in conjunction with the specific product, load, and cycle to be validated. The authors discuss the use of Bls, determination of microbial lethality, process controls, and variables related to these subjects in order to assist validation teams in designing successful validation programs, and/or problem solving when unexpected results are obtained.

  19. Linking seasonal inorganic nitrogen shift to the dynamics of microbial communities in the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yiguo; Xu, Xiongrong; Kan, Jinjun; Chen, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Seasonal shifts of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and the dynamics of microbial communities for nitrogen transformation were investigated in the water column of Chesapeake Bay. The relative abundance of nitrogen over phosphorus (N) showed a strong seasonal and spatial pattern: gradually decreased from upstream to downstream; high in winter and low in summer. Because the phosphorus concentration remained relatively stable, the spatiotemporal pattern of N implied that a substantial fraction of DIN was removed in the bay, especially in summer. Correlation analyses indicated the functional microbial communities and environmental variables, such as temperature, dissolved oxygen, salinity, played important roles for connecting the seasonal variation of N. Among them, temperature was the trigger factor. High temperature in the summer induced the growth of functional microbes, which subsequently consumed a large portion of DIN inputted from the tributaries and reduced the N. The current study provided the relative importance of microbial communities and environmental variables in driving the DIN loss in the bay.

  20. Linking geology and microbiology: inactive pockmarks affect sediment microbial community structure.

    PubMed

    Haverkamp, Thomas H A; Hammer, Øyvind; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2014-01-01

    Pockmarks are geological features that are found on the bottom of lakes and oceans all over the globe. Some are active, seeping oil or methane, while others are inactive. Active pockmarks are well studied since they harbor specialized microbial communities that proliferate on the seeping compounds. Such communities are not found in inactive pockmarks. Interestingly, inactive pockmarks are known to have different macrofaunal communities compared to the surrounding sediments. It is undetermined what the microbial composition of inactive pockmarks is and if it shows a similar pattern as the macrofauna. The Norwegian Oslofjord contains many inactive pockmarks and they are well suited to study the influence of these geological features on the microbial community in the sediment. Here we present a detailed analysis of the microbial communities found in three inactive pockmarks and two control samples at two core depth intervals. The communities were analyzed using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA V3 region. Microbial communities of surface pockmark sediments were indistinguishable from communities found in the surrounding seabed. In contrast, pockmark communities at 40 cm sediment depth had a significantly different community structure from normal sediments at the same depth. Statistical analysis of chemical variables indicated significant differences in the concentrations of total carbon and non-particulate organic carbon between 40 cm pockmarks and reference sample sediments. We discuss these results in comparison with the taxonomic classification of the OTUs identified in our samples. Our results indicate that microbial communities at the sediment surface are affected by the water column, while the deeper (40 cm) sediment communities are affected by local conditions within the sediment.

  1. Linking geochemistry to microbial ecology in hot springs: examples from southeastern Asia (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.; Jiang, H.; Hou, W.; Wang, S.; Huang, Q.; Briggs, B. R.; Huang, L.; Hust, W.; Hedlund, B. P.; Zhang, C.; Hartnett, H. E.; Dijkstra, P.; Hungate, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of microbial ecology in high temperature environments, important questions remain as to how geochemical conditions shape microbial ecology in hot springs. In the past three years, we have surveyed a large number of hot springs in three regions of southeastern Asia: Tengchong of Yunnan Province, China; Tibet in China; and the Philippines. These springs possess large gradients in pH (2.5-9.4), temperature (22.1-93.6oC), and water and sediment geochemistry. Within each region, these geochemical conditions are important in shaping microbial community structure and diversity. For example, in the Rehai geothermal field of Tengchong, dominant taxa within the dominant bacterial phylum Aquificae and archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota depended on pH (2.5-9.4), temperature (55.1-93.6), Na-Cl-HCO3 water type and silicate rock lithology. In the Ruidian geothermal region, springs with circum-neutral pH (6.71-7.29), moderate temperature (50-82oC), Na-HCO3 water type, and carbonate-dominated lithology, Hydrogenobacter of Aquificae dominated spring water, but the microbial community in sediments was diverse with abundant novel groups. In Tibet springs with low-moderate temperature (22-75oC) and circum-neutral pH (7.2-8.1), temperature appeared to be the most important factor in determining diversity and community structure. In acidic hot springs of the Philippines (Temperature: 60-92°C, pH 3.72-6.58), microbial communities were predominated by those related to sulfur metabolism, which are different from those in acidic springs of Tengchong. When these three regions are considered together, environmental conditions play a major role in controlling microbial community structure, but geographical location appears to be an important factor as well.

  2. Endogenous and enhanced oxidative cross-linking in wheat flour mill streams

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The oxidative cross-linking of arabinoxylan and protein polymers is partially responsible for variation in end-use quality of wheat flour; specifically, differences in batter viscosity as well as variation in bread and cookie quality. A better understanding of the variation in oxidative cross-linkin...

  3. Microbial oxidation of tetrathionate and elemental sulfur : Insights from S and O isotopes of sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Nurgul; Turchyn, Alexandra; Kurt, Mehmet Ali

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we experimentally evaluate pH and sulfur chemistry associated with abiotic and microbial oxidation of tetrathionate and elemental sulfur under acidic aerobic conditions (pH<4) and pure strain of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans using S and O isotopes of sulfate. Experimental results of batch cultures showed active microbial sulfur processing of tetrathionate and elemental sulfur. Polythionates, principally thiosulfate, sulfate and elemental sulfur accumulated during oxidation of tetrathionate with decreasing pH (2.1) indicating disproportionation reactions In contrast thiosulfate and sulfite was only determined at the early stage of elemental sulfur oxidation and disappeared with decreasing pH and sulfate became dominant sulfur species. Tetrathionate was not determined in biotic or abiotic elemental sulphur experiments. pH decreased in all incubation experiments from starting pH values of 4 to 2 or less for all two sulfur substrates Abiotic control experiments run with either tetrathionate- or elemental sulphur as substrate did not produce significant amount of sulfate and thiosulfate and pH of solution remain static over the course of the experiments. In contrast to elemental sulfur in which the 34SSO4 values showed insignificant sulfur isotope fractionation (ɛSO4-So = -0.9 ‰), Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans selectively fractionated 34S during the oxidation of tetrathionate and produced sulfate enriched in 34S 6.4 ‰ with an average value of 6.9±0.2 ‰ after a month incubation. However, the range of fractionation and time course kinetics of enrichment varied. The contribution of water-derived O to sulfate by So oxidation ranged from 58 % to 103 % and at the initial stage oxidation of elemental sulfur significant O2 contribution into sulfate was estimated. At the end of a month incubation average 87 ±7.0 % of sulfate oxygen was derived from water. The contribution of water-derived O ranged from 53 % to 64 % during microbial oxidation of

  4. Fe(III) oxides accelerate microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation by Klebsiella pneumoniae L17.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Min; Li, Fangbai

    2014-06-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae L17 is a fermentative bacterium that can reduce iron oxide and generate electricity under anoxic conditions, as previously reported. This study reveals that K. pneumoniae L17 is also capable of dissimilatory nitrate reduction, producing NO2(-), NH4(+), NO and N2O under anoxic conditions. The presence of Fe(III) oxides (i.e., α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3) significantly accelerates the reduction of nitrate and generation of electricity by K. pneumoniae L17, which is similar to a previous report regarding another fermentative bacterium, Bacillus. No significant nitrate reduction was observed upon treatment with Fe(2+) or α-FeOOH+Fe(2+), but a slight facilitation of nitrate reduction and electricity generation was observed upon treatment with L17+Fe(2+). This result suggests that aqueous Fe(II) or mineral-adsorbed Fe(II) cannot reduce nitrate abiotically but that L17 can catalyze the reduction of nitrate and generation of electricity in the presence of Fe(II) (which might exist as cell surface-bound Fe(II)). To rule out the potential effect of Fe(II) produced by L17 during microbial iron reduction, treatments with the addition of TiO2 or Al2O3 instead of Fe(III) oxides also exhibited accelerated microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation, indicating that cell-mineral sorption did account for the acceleration effect. However, the acceleration caused by Fe(III) oxides is only partially attributed to the cell surface-bound Fe(II) and cell-mineral sorption but may be driven by the iron oxide conduction band-mediated electron transfer from L17 to nitrate or an electrode, as proposed previously. The current study extends the diversity of bacteria of which nitrate reduction and electricity generation can be facilitated by the presence of iron oxides and confirms the positive role of Fe(III) oxides on microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation by particular fermentative bacteria in anoxic environments.

  5. Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities in reactors with efficient nitrification at low-dissolved oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Colin M.; Camejo, Pamela; Oshlag, J. Zachary; Noguera, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation under low dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions (<0.3 mg/L) were investigated using chemostat reactors. One lab-scale reactor (NS_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) not adapted to low-DO nitrification, while a second reactor (JP_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale WWTP already achieving low-DO nitrifiaction. The experimental evidence from quantitative PCR, rDNA tag pyrosequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) suggested that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the Nitrosomonas genus were responsible for low-DO nitrification in the NS_LowDO reactor, whereas in the JP_LowDO reactor nitrification was not associated with any known ammonia-oxidizing prokaryote. Neither reactor had a significant population of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) or anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) organisms. Organisms isolated from JP_LowDO were capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic ammonia utilization, albeit without stoichiometric accumulation of nitrite or nitrate. Based on the experimental evidence we propose that Pseudomonas, Xanthomonadaceae, Rhodococcus, and Sphingomonas are involved in nitrification under low-DO conditions. PMID:25506762

  6. Microbial Phosphite Oxidation and Its Potential Role in the Global Phosphorus and Carbon Cycles.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, I A; Coates, J D

    2017-01-01

    Phosphite [Formula: see text] is a highly soluble, reduced phosphorus compound that is often overlooked in biogeochemical analyses. Although the oxidation of phosphite to phosphate is a highly exergonic process (E(o)(')=-650mV), phosphite is kinetically stable and can account for 10-30% of the total dissolved P in various environments. There is also evidence that phosphite was more prevalent under the reducing conditions of the Archean period and may have been involved in the development of early life. Its role as a phosphorus source for a variety of extant microorganisms has been known since the 1950s, and the pathways involved in assimilatory phosphite oxidation have been well characterized. More recently, it was demonstrated that phosphite could also act as an electron donor for energy metabolism in a process known as dissimilatory phosphite oxidation (DPO). The bacterium described in this study, Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans strain FiPS-3, was isolated from brackish sediments and is capable of growing by coupling phosphite oxidation to the reduction of either sulfate or carbon dioxide. FiPS-3 remains the only isolated organism capable of DPO, and the prevalence of this metabolism in the environment is still unclear. Nonetheless, given the widespread presence of phosphite in the environment and the thermodynamic favorability of its oxidation, microbial phosphite oxidation may play an important and hitherto unrecognized role in the global phosphorus and carbon cycles.

  7. Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities in reactors with efficient nitrification at low-dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Colin M; Camejo, Pamela; Oshlag, J Zachary; Noguera, Daniel R

    2015-03-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation under low dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions (<0.3 mg/L) were investigated using chemostat reactors. One lab-scale reactor (NS_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) not adapted to low-DO nitrification, while a second reactor (JP_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale WWTP already achieving low-DO nitrifiaction. The experimental evidence from quantitative PCR, rDNA tag pyrosequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) suggested that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the Nitrosomonas genus were responsible for low-DO nitrification in the NS_LowDO reactor, whereas in the JP_LowDO reactor nitrification was not associated with any known ammonia-oxidizing prokaryote. Neither reactor had a significant population of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) or anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) organisms. Organisms isolated from JP_LowDO were capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic ammonia utilization, albeit without stoichiometric accumulation of nitrite or nitrate. Based on the experimental evidence we propose that Pseudomonas, Xanthomonadaceae, Rhodococcus, and Sphingomonas are involved in nitrification under low-DO conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Linking Nitrogen-Cycling Microbial Communities to Environmental Fluctuations and Biogeochemical Activity in a Large, Urban Estuary: the San Francisco Bay-Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) availability is an important factor controlling productivity and thus carbon cycling in estuaries. The fate of N in estuaries depends on the activities of the microbes that carry out the N-cycle, which in turn depend on factors such as organic matter availability, dissolved inorganic N, salinity, oxygen, and temperature. Key microbial N transformations include nitrification (the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate) and denitrification (the anaerobic reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen gas). While denitrification leads to N loss, nitrification is the only link between reduced N (produced by decomposition) and oxidized N (substrates for N loss processes), and both processes are known to produce nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. Understanding controls of N-cycling in the San Francisco Bay-Delta (SFBD)—the largest estuary on the west coast of North America—is particularly important, as this urban estuary is massively polluted with N, even compared to classic "eutrophic" systems. Interestingly, the SFBD has been spared the detrimental consequences of nutrient enrichment, largely due to high suspended sediment concentrations (and thus low light penetration) throughout the water column, combined with high grazing pressure. However, the recent "clearing" of SFBD waters due to a sharp decrease in suspended sediments may significantly alter the ecology of the estuary, by increasing phytoplankton growth. Thus, the SFBD may be losing its historical resilience to eutrophication, and may soon be "high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll" no more. Elucidating the environmental factors affecting the community structure, activity, and functioning of N-cycling microbes in SFBD is crucial for determining how changes in turbidity and productivity will be propagated throughout the ecosystem. While substantial ecological research in the SFBD has focused on phytoplankton and food webs, bacterial and archaeal communities have received far less attention

  9. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction linked to aerobic methane oxidation via chlorite dismutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars is controversial yet the evidence has aroused scientific interest, as CH4 could be a harbinger of extant or extinct microbial life. There are various oxidized compounds present on the surface of Mars that could serve as electron acceptors for the anaerobic oxidation of CH4, including perchlorate (ClO4-). We examined the role of perchlorate, chlorate (ClO3-) and chlorite (ClO2-) as oxidants linked to CH4 oxidation. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction begins with reduction of ClO4- to ClO2- and ends with dismutation of chlorite to yield chloride (Cl-) and molecular oxygen (O2). We explored the potential for aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria to couple with oxygen derived from chlorite dismutation during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the N2-flushed headspace above cell suspensions of methanotrophs (Methylobacter albus strain BG8) and perchlorate reducing bacteria (Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB) in the presence of 5 mM ClO2-. Similar rates of CH4 consumption were observed for these mixed cultures whether they were co-mingled or segregated under a common headspace, indicating that direct contact of cells was not required for methane consumption to occur. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing dried soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and D. agitata CKB and in the presence of 10 mM ClO2-. This soil (seasonally exposed sediment) collected from the shoreline of a freshwater lake (Searsville Lake, CA) demonstrated endogenous CH4 uptake as well as perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite reduction/dismutation. However, these experiments required physical separation of soil from the aqueous bacterial culture to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO4- and ClO3- could be inferred from the

  10. Experimental Evidence Linking Elevated CO2, Rhizosphere C/N Stoichiometry and Microbial Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Y.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Pendall, E.; LeCain, D. R.; Morgan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Soil C storage is a keystone of the global response to climate change. What the relationship between the efficiency of microbial decomposers and soil C storage is, and how changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and nutrient availability will affect this relationship is not understood. Although mechanisms are elusive, there is increased recognition of the importance of the plant rhizosphere in mediating ecosystem-scale impacts of climate change. We investigated the impact of elevated CO2 (eCO2), soil N availability and root tissue stoichiometry on microbial use of soil C. Starting from seed, we grew a temperate grass in its native soil, under 13C labelled ambient and eCO2 atmospheres. This approach enabled us to assess incorporation of plant-derived and native soil organic matter (SOM) C into microbes, dissolved organic C (DOC) and respiration via isotopic partitioning. N availability was modified via alteration of root tissue stoichiometry (with foliar N application) and direct N addition to soil. Microbial communities were assessed with phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). eCO2 increased the respiration of plant-derived C, but decreased CO2production from SOM. This was accompanied by an increase in the SOM-derived microbial C, so that the amount of SOM-derived CO2 per unit of microbial C decreased with eCO2 (lower metabolic quotient, an index of microbial efficiency). SOM-derived microbial C was strongly and negatively related to the pool of SOM-derived DOC, supporting enhanced use of this C source. Together, these results indicate that eCO2 led to an increase in size and efficiency of the microbial populations utilizing SOM-C. Increased grazing, as indicated by more abundant PLFA markers of protozoa under eCO2, may have lowered maintenance-associated respiration, thus increasing efficiency. Greater plant inputs with eCO2 may have provided readily available C for labile-C consuming microbes, thus reducing competitive pressure on SOM-consuming populations, who are

  11. Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction in Chocolate Pots Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortney, N. W.; Roden, E. E.; Boyd, E. S.; Converse, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Previous work on dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) has focused on high temperature, low pH environments where soluble Fe(III) is utilized as an electron acceptor for respiration. Much less attention has been paid to DIR in lower temperature, circumneutral pH environments, where solid phase Fe(III) oxides are the dominant forms of Fe(III). This study explored the potential for DIR in the warm (ca. 40-50°C), circumneutral pH Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) in YNP. Most probable number (MPN) enumerations and enrichment culture studies confirmed the presence of endogenous microbial communities that reduced native CP Fe(III) oxides. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR coupled to acetate and lactate oxidation through repeated transfers over ca. 450 days. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that the dominant organisms in the enrichments were closely affiliated with the well known Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens. Additional taxa included relatives of sulfate reducing bacterial genera Desulfohalobium and Thermodesulfovibrio; however, amendment of enrichments with molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, suggested that sulfate reduction was not a primary metabolic pathway involved in DIR in the cultures. A metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures is underway in anticipation of identifying genes involved in DIR in the less well-characterized dominant organisms. Current studies are aimed at interrogating the in situ microbial community at CP. Core samples were collected along the flow path (Fig. 1) and subdivided into 1 cm depth intervals for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The presence of significant quantities of Fe(II) in the solids indicated that DIR is active in situ. A parallel study investigated in vitro microbial DIR in sediments collected from three of the coring sites. DNA was extracted from samples from both studies for 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic sequencing in order to obtain a

  12. Size dependent microbial oxidation and reduction of magnetite nano- and micro-particles

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James M.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Figueroa, Adriana I.; Qafoku, Odeta; Wang, Chongmin; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Jackson, Michael; Feinberg, Joshua; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The ability for magnetite to act as a recyclable electron donor and acceptor for Fe-metabolizing bacteria has recently been shown. However, it remains poorly understood whether microbe-mineral interfacial electron transfer processes are limited by the redox capacity of the magnetite surface or that of whole particles. Here we examine this issue for the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 and the Fe(III)-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens, comparing magnetite nanoparticles (d ≈ 12 nm) against microparticles (d ≈ 100–200 nm). By integrating surface-sensitive and bulk-sensitive measurement techniques we observed a particle surface that was enriched in Fe(II) with respect to a more oxidized core. This enables microbial Fe(II) oxidation to occur relatively easily at the surface of the mineral suggesting that the electron transfer is dependent upon particle size. However, microbial Fe(III) reduction proceeds via conduction of electrons into the particle interior, i.e. it can be considered as more of a bulk electron transfer process that is independent of particle size. The finding has potential implications on the ability of magnetite to be used for long range electron transport in soils and sediments. PMID:27492680

  13. Effect of Phospholipid on Pyrite Oxidation and Microbial Communities under Simulated Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pierre Louis, Andro-Marc; Yu, Hui; Shumlas, Samantha L; Van Aken, Benoit; Schoonen, Martin A A; Strongin, Daniel R

    2015-07-07

    The effect of phospholipid on the biogeochemistry of pyrite oxidation, which leads to acid mine drainage (AMD) chemistry in the environment, was investigated. Metagenomic analyses were carried out to understand how the microbial community structure, which developed during the oxidation of pyrite-containing coal mining overburden/waste rock (OWR), was affected by the presence of adsorbed phospholipid. Using columns packed with OWR (with and without lipid adsorption), the release of sulfate (SO4(2-)) and soluble iron (FeTot) was investigated. Exposure of lipid-free OWR to flowing pH-neutral water resulted in an acidic effluent with a pH range of 2-4.5 over a 3-year period. The average concentration of FeTot and SO4(2-) in the effluent was ≥20 and ≥30 mg/L, respectively. In contrast, in packed-column experiments where OWR was first treated with phospholipid, the effluent pH remained at ∼6.5 and the average concentrations of FeTot and SO4(2-) were ≤2 and l.6 mg/L, respectively. 16S rDNA metagenomic pyrosequencing analysis of the microbial communities associated with OWR samples revealed the development of AMD-like communities dominated by acidophilic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria on untreated OWR samples, but not on refuse pretreated with phospholipid.

  14. Size dependent microbial oxidation and reduction of magnetite nano- and micro-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, James M.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Figueroa, Adriana I.; Qafoku, Odeta; Wang, Chongmin; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Jackson, Michael; Feinberg, Joshua; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The ability for magnetite to act as a recyclable electron donor and acceptor for Fe-metabolizing bacteria has recently been shown. However, it remains poorly understood whether microbe-mineral interfacial electron transfer processes are limited by the redox capacity of the magnetite surface or that of whole particles. Here we examine this issue for the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 and the Fe(III)-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens, comparing magnetite nanoparticles (d ≈ 12 nm) against microparticles (d ≈ 100–200 nm). By integrating surface-sensitive and bulk-sensitive measurement techniques we observed a particle surface that was enriched in Fe(II) with respect to a more oxidized core. This enables microbial Fe(II) oxidation to occur relatively easily at the surface of the mineral suggesting that the electron transfer is dependent upon particle size. However, microbial Fe(III) reduction proceeds via conduction of electrons into the particle interior, i.e. it can be considered as more of a bulk electron transfer process that is independent of particle size. The finding has potential implications on the ability of magnetite to be used for long range electron transport in soils and sediments.

  15. The influence of in situ chemical oxidation on microbial community composition in groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents.

    PubMed

    Sercu, Bram; Jones, Antony D G; Wu, Cindy H; Escobar, Mauricio H; Serlin, Carol L; Knapp, Timothy A; Andersen, Gary L; Holden, Patricia A

    2013-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation with permanganate has become an accepted remedial treatment for groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents. This study focuses on the immediate and short-term effects of sodium permanganate (NaMnO(4)) on the indigenous subsurface microbial community composition in groundwater impacted by trichloroethylene (TCE). Planktonic and biofilm microbial communities were studied using groundwater grab samples and reticulated vitreous carbon passive samplers, respectively. Microbial community composition was analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and a high-density phylogenetic microarray (PhyloChip). Significant reductions in microbial diversity and biomass were shown during NaMnO(4) exposure, followed by recovery within several weeks after the oxidant concentrations decreased to <1 mg/L. Bray-Curtis similarities and nonmetric multidimensional scaling showed that microbial community composition before and after NaMnO(4) was similar, when taking into account the natural variation of the microbial communities. Also, 16S rRNA genes of two reductive dechlorinators (Desulfuromonas spp. and Sulfurospirillum spp.) and diverse taxa capable of cometabolic TCE oxidation were detected in similar quantities by PhyloChip across all monitoring wells, irrespective of NaMnO(4) exposure and TCE concentrations. However, minimal biodegradation of TCE was observed in this study, based on oxidized conditions, concentration patterns of chlorinated and nonchlorinated hydrocarbons, geochemistry, and spatiotemporal distribution of TCE-degrading bacteria.

  16. Biogeophysical interactions control the formation of iron oxide microbial biofilms in acidic geothermal outflow channels of Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beam, J.; Berstein, H. C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, M. A.; Jennings, R. D.; Inskeep, W. P.

    2012-12-01

    Amorphous iron oxyhydroxide microbial mats in acidic (pH ~ 3) geothermal outflow channels of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are habitats for diverse populations of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms from the domains Archaea and Bacteria. These systems have been extensively characterized with regards to geochemical, physical, and microbiological (e.g., metagenomics) analyses; however, there is minimal data describing the formation of these iron oxide microbial mats. A conceptual model of Fe(III)-oxide microbial mat development was created, which includes four distinct stages. Autotrophic archaea (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis) and bacteria (Hydrogenobaculum spp.) are the first colonizers (Stage I) that provide pools of organic carbon for heterotrophic thermophiles (Stage II). M. yellowstonensis is an autotrophic Sulfolobales that is responsible for the oxidation of Fe(II) and can thus be defined as the mat 'architect' creating suitable habitats for microbial niches (e.g., anaerobic microorganisms) (Stage III). The last phase of mat formation (Stage IV) represents a pseudo-steady state mature microbial mat, which has been the subject of all previous microbial surveys of these systems. The conceptual model for Fe(III)-oxide microbial mat development was tested by inserting glass (SiO2) microscope slides into the main flow channels of two acidic geothermal springs in YNP. Slides were removed at various time intervals and analyzed for total iron accretion, microbial community structure (i.e., 16S rRNA gene abundance), and mRNA expression of community members. Routine geochemical and physical (e.g., flow) parameters were also measured to decipher their relative contribution to mat development. Initial and previous results show that autotrophic microorganisms (e.g, M. yellowstonensis) are often the first to colonize the glass slides and their activity was confirmed by mRNA expression of genes related to iron oxidation and carbon fixation. Heterotrophs are rare

  17. A novel nutritional predictor links microbial fastidiousness with lowered ubiquity, growth rate, and cooperativeness.

    PubMed

    Zarecki, Raphy; Oberhardt, Matthew A; Reshef, Leah; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2014-07-01

    Understanding microbial nutritional requirements is a key challenge in microbiology. Here we leverage the recent availability of thousands of automatically generated genome-scale metabolic models to develop a predictor of microbial minimal medium requirements, which we apply to thousands of species to study the relationship between their nutritional requirements and their ecological and genomic traits. We first show that nutritional requirements are more similar among species that co-habit many ecological niches. We then reveal three fundamental characteristics of microbial fastidiousness (i.e., complex and specific nutritional requirements): (1) more fastidious microorganisms tend to be more ecologically limited; (2) fastidiousness is positively associated with smaller genomes and smaller metabolic networks; and (3) more fastidious species grow more slowly and have less ability to cooperate with other species than more metabolically versatile organisms. These associations reflect the adaptation of fastidious microorganisms to unique niches with few cohabitating species. They also explain how non-fastidious species inhabit many ecological niches with high abundance rates. Taken together, these results advance our understanding microbial nutrition on a large scale, by presenting new nutrition-related associations that govern the distribution of microorganisms in nature.

  18. LINKING MICROBES TO CLIMATE: INCORPORATING MICROBIAL ACTIVITY INTO CLIMATE MODELS COLLOQUIUM

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, Edward; Harwood, Caroline; Reid, Ann

    2011-01-01

    This report explains the connection between microbes and climate, discusses in general terms what modeling is and how it applied to climate, and discusses the need for knowledge in microbial physiology, evolution, and ecology to contribute to the determination of fluxes and rates in climate models. It recommends with a multi-pronged approach to address the gaps.

  19. Linking Soil Microbial Ecology to Ecosystem Functioning in Integrated Crop-Livestock Systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enhanced soil stability, nutrient cycling and C sequestration potential are important ecosystem functions driven by soil microbial processes and are directly influenced by agricultural management. Integrated crop-livestock agroecosystems (ICL) can enhance these functions via high-residue returning c...

  20. Link between microbial composition and carbon substrate-uptake preferences in a PHA-storing community

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Maria G E; Carvalho, Gilda; Kragelund, Caroline; Silva, Ana F; Barreto Crespo, Maria T; Reis, Maria A M; Nielsen, Per H

    2013-01-01

    The microbial community of a fermented molasses-fed sequencing batch reactor (SBR) operated under feast and famine conditions for production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) was identified and quantified through a 16 S rRNA gene clone library and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The microbial enrichment was found to be composed of PHA-storing populations (84% of the microbial community), comprising members of the genera Azoarcus, Thauera and Paracoccus. The dominant PHA-storing populations ensured the high functional stability of the system (characterized by high PHA-storage efficiency, up to 60% PHA content). The fermented molasses contained primarily acetate, propionate, butyrate and valerate. The substrate preferences were determined by microautoradiography-FISH and differences in the substrate-uptake capabilities for the various probe-defined populations were found. The results showed that in the presence of multiple substrates, microbial populations specialized in different substrates were selected, thereby co-existing in the SBR by adapting to different niches. Azoarcus and Thauera, primarily consumed acetate and butyrate, respectively. Paracoccus consumed a broader range of substrates and had a higher cell-specific substrate uptake. The relative species composition and their substrate specialization were reflected in the substrate removal rates of different volatile fatty acids in the SBR reactor. PMID:22810062

  1. Microbial Hub Taxa Link Host and Abiotic Factors to Plant Microbiome Variation

    PubMed Central

    Agler, Matthew T.; Ruhe, Jonas; Kroll, Samuel; Morhenn, Constanze; Kim, Sang-Tae; Weigel, Detlef; Kemen, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Plant-associated microorganisms have been shown to critically affect host physiology and performance, suggesting that evolution and ecology of plants and animals can only be understood in a holobiont (host and its associated organisms) context. Host-associated microbial community structures are affected by abiotic and host factors, and increased attention is given to the role of the microbiome in interactions such as pathogen inhibition. However, little is known about how these factors act on the microbial community, and especially what role microbe–microbe interaction dynamics play. We have begun to address this knowledge gap for phyllosphere microbiomes of plants by simultaneously studying three major groups of Arabidopsis thaliana symbionts (bacteria, fungi and oomycetes) using a systems biology approach. We evaluated multiple potential factors of microbial community control: we sampled various wild A. thaliana populations at different times, performed field plantings with different host genotypes, and implemented successive host colonization experiments under lab conditions where abiotic factors, host genotype, and pathogen colonization was manipulated. Our results indicate that both abiotic factors and host genotype interact to affect plant colonization by all three groups of microbes. Considering microbe–microbe interactions, however, uncovered a network of interkingdom interactions with significant contributions to community structure. As in other scale-free networks, a small number of taxa, which we call microbial “hubs,” are strongly interconnected and have a severe effect on communities. By documenting these microbe–microbe interactions, we uncover an important mechanism explaining how abiotic factors and host genotypic signatures control microbial communities. In short, they act directly on “hub” microbes, which, via microbe–microbe interactions, transmit the effects to the microbial community. We analyzed two “hub” microbes (the

  2. Linking Predation Risk, Herbivore Physiological Stress and Microbial Decomposition of Plant Litter

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Oswald J.; Bradford, Mark A.; Strickland, Michael S.; Hawlena, Dror

    2013-01-01

    The quantity and quality of detritus entering the soil determines the rate of decomposition by microbial communities as well as recycle rates of nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) sequestration1,2. Plant litter comprises the majority of detritus3, and so it is assumed that decomposition is only marginally influenced by biomass inputs from animals such as herbivores and carnivores4,5. However, carnivores may influence microbial decomposition of plant litter via a chain of interactions in which predation risk alters the physiology of their herbivore prey that in turn alters soil microbial functioning when the herbivore carcasses are decomposed6. A physiological stress response by herbivores to the risk of predation can change the C:N elemental composition of herbivore biomass7,8,9 because stress from predation risk increases herbivore basal energy demands that in nutrient-limited systems forces herbivores to shift their consumption from N-rich resources to support growth and reproduction to C-rich carbohydrate resources to support heightened metabolism6. Herbivores have limited ability to store excess nutrients, so stressed herbivores excrete N as they increase carbohydrate-C consumption7. Ultimately, prey stressed by predation risk increase their body C:N ratio7,10, making them poorer quality resources for the soil microbial pool likely due to lower availability of labile N for microbial enzyme production6. Thus, decomposition of carcasses of stressed herbivores has a priming effect on the functioning of microbial communities that decreases subsequent ability to of microbes to decompose plant litter6,10,11. We present the methodology to evaluate linkages between predation risk and litter decomposition by soil microbes. We describe how to: induce stress in herbivores from predation risk; measure those stress responses, and measure the consequences on microbial decomposition. We use insights from a model grassland ecosystem comprising the hunting spider predator (Pisuarina

  3. Microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and Fe cycling in iron-rich freshwater wetland sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, E.E.

    1995-12-31

    The dynamics of Fe cycling and the interaction between microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and other anaerobic microbial respiratory processes were examined in Fe-rich, sulfate-poor freshwater wetland sediments. Sediment incubation experiments demonstrated that reduction of Fe(III) oxides (amorphous, soluble in dilute HCl) dominated anaerobic carbon mineralization at Fe(III) concentrations in excess of 10 mmol per liter wet sediment. The kinetics of Fe(III) reduction were found to be first-order with respect to the concentration of Fe(III) oxide, although estimated first-order rate constants varied in relation to the absolute rates of Fe(III) reduction, suggesting a co-dependency on the concentration of easily degradable organic carbon. High concentrations of amorphous Fe(III) oxides (10-100 mmol L wet sed {sup -1}) were found in surface sediments (0-3 cm) of unvegetated zones of the wetland and in the rhizosphere (0-10 cm) of emergent aquatic plants, sufficient (based on sediment incubation experiments) to allow Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) to dominate anaerobic carbon mineralization. A rapid redox cycling of Fe is apparent in these localized zones based on observed rates of Fe(III) reduction and the abundance/depth distribution of Fe(Ill) oxides. Preliminary culture enrichment studies indicate that FeRB present in these sediments are capable of metabolizing a range of both natural and contaminant aromatic hydrocarbons, which suggests a potential for utilization of natural and/or artificial Fe-rich wetland systems for organic contaminant bioremediation.

  4. Initial Characterization of Carbon Metabolism in Iron Oxidizing Microbial Communities of Acidic Hot Springs in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer, H. W.; Jennings, R. D.; Whitmore, L.; Inskeep, W. P.; Moran, J.

    2012-12-01

    the organism produces during autotrophic growth, and are conducting isotopic labeling experiments to determine if these compounds serve as substrates for the iron oxide mat communities. However, isotopic analysis of DIC in the springs as well as bulk iron oxide mat definitively show that fixation of DIC by M. yellowstonensis is not the only source of C within the mats. Metagenome analysis of the microbial communities and genome analysis of isolates suggest the presence of heterotrophic metabolic pathways. Indeed, initial labeling experiments demonstrate strong heterotrophic metabolism in the iron oxide mats as well as in M. yellowstonensis. Several potential sources of reduced C are available in the springs, but whether any of these potential substrates actually feed the iron mat communities is yet to be determined. Carbon isotope ratios of the bulk iron mat communities and potential heterotrophic C sources suggest that heterotrophic uptake of these sources, like autotrophy of DIC, is not the only source of C in the system. Identifying the major active carbon pools and potential geochemical and microbial carbon links will illuminate carbon cycling in this system and should provide insights into how energy is transferred from key chemolithotrophic reactions to other components of the microbial system.

  5. Immune mechanisms linked to depression via oxidative stress and neuroprogression.

    PubMed

    Bakunina, Nataliia; Pariante, Carmine M; Zunszain, Patricia A

    2015-01-10

    Emerging evidence suggests the significant role of inflammation and oxidative stress as main contributors to the neuroprogression that is observed in major depressive disorder (MDD), where patients show increased inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers. The process of neuroprogression includes stage-related neurodegeneration, cell death, reduced neurogenesis, reduced neuronal plasticity and increased autoimmune responses. Oxidative stress is a consequence of the biological imbalance between Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and antioxidants, leading to the alteration of biomolecules and the loss of control of the intracellular redox-related signaling pathways. ROS serve as crucial secondary messengers in signal transduction and significantly affect inflammatory pathways by activating NF-κB and MAPK family stress kinases. When present in excess, ROS inflict damage, affecting cellular constituents with the formation of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as malondialdehyde, 4-Hydroxynonenal, neoepitopes and damage-associated molecular patterns promoting immune response, and ultimately leading to cell death. The failure of cells to adapt to the changes in redox homeostasis and the subsequent cell death, together with the damage caused by inflammatory mediators, have been considered as major causes of neuroprogression and hence MDD. Both an activated immune-inflammatory system and increased oxidative stress act synergistically, complicating our understanding of the pathogenesis of depression. The cascade of antioxidative and inflammatory events is orchestrated by several transcription factors, with Nrf2 and NF-κB having particular relevance to MDD. This review focuses on potential molecular mechanisms through which impaired redox homeostasis and neuroinflammation can affect the neuronal environment and contribute to depression This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Immune mechanisms linked to depression via oxidative stress and neuroprogression

    PubMed Central

    Bakunina, Nataliia; Pariante, Carmine M; Zunszain, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a significant role for inflammation and oxidative stress as main contributors to the neuroprogression that is observed in major depressive disorder (MDD), where patients show increased inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers. The process of neuroprogression includes stage-related neurodegeneration, cell death, reduced neurogenesis, reduced neuronal plasticity and increased autoimmune responses. Oxidative stress is a consequence of the biological imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants, leading to the alteration of biomolecules and the loss of control of the intracellular redox-related signalling pathways. ROS serve as crucial secondary messengers in signal transduction and significantly affect inflammatory pathways by activating nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase family stress kinases. When present in excess, ROS inflict damage, affecting cellular constituents with the formation of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, neoepitopes and damage-associated molecular patterns promoting immune response, and ultimately leading to cell death. The failure of cells to adapt to the changes in redox homeostasis and the subsequent cell death, together with the damage caused by inflammatory mediators, have been considered as major causes of neuroprogression and hence MDD. Both an activated immune–inflammatory system and increased oxidative stress act synergistically, complicating our understanding of the pathogenesis of depression. The cascade of antioxidative and inflammatory events is orchestrated by several transcription factors, with nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 and nuclear factor-κB having particular relevance to MDD. This review focuses on potential molecular mechanisms through which impaired redox homeostasis and neuroinflammation can affect the neuronal environment and contribute to depression. PMID:25580634

  7. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions, and novel technologies

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Frank; Wunderlin, Pascal; Udert, Kai M.; Wells, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) or the reduction of nitrite (NO−2) to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO−2 to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO−2, NH2OH, and nitroxyl (HNO). Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build

  8. Distinctive microbial ecology and biokinetics of autotrophic ammonia and nitrite oxidation in a partial nitrification bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joon Ho; Yu, Ran; Chandran, Kartik

    2008-08-15

    Biological nitrogen removal (BNR) based on partial nitrification and denitrification via nitrite is a cost-effective alternate to conventional nitrification and denitrification (via nitrate). The goal of this study was to investigate the microbial ecology, biokinetics, and stability of partial nitrification. Stable long-term partial nitrification resulting in 82.1 +/- 17.2% ammonia oxidation, primarily to nitrite (77.3 +/- 19.5% of the ammonia oxidized) was achieved in a lab-scale bioreactor by operation at a pH, dissolved oxygen and solids retention time of 7.5 +/- 0.1, 1.54 +/- 0.87 mg O(2)/L, and 3.0 days, respectively. Bioreactor ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) populations were most closely related to Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter spp., respectively. The AOB population fraction varied in the range 61 +/- 45% and was much higher than the NOB fraction, 0.71 +/- 1.1%. Using direct measures of bacterial concentrations in conjunction with independent activity measures and mass balances, the maximum specific growth rate (micro(max)), specific decay (b) and observed biomass yield coefficients (Y(obs)) for AOB were 1.08 +/- 1.03 day(-1), 0.32 +/- 0.34 day(-1), and 0.15 +/- 0.06 mg biomass COD/mg N oxidized, respectively. Corresponding micro(max), b, and Y(obs) values for NOB were 2.6 +/- 2.05 day(-1), 1.7 +/- 1.9 day(-1), and 0.04 +/- 0.02 mg biomass COD/mg N oxidized, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate that the highly selective partial nitrification operating conditions enriched for a narrow diversity of rapidly growing AOB and NOB populations unlike conventional BNR reactors, which host a broader diversity of nitrifying bacteria. Further, direct measures of microbial abundance enabled not only elucidation of mixed community microbial ecology but also estimation of key engineering parameters describing bioreactor systems supporting these communities. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Microbial utilization of low molecular weight organic substrates in soil depends on their carbon oxidation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna; Smith, Andrew; Jones, Davey; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    Removal of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), originating from plants and microorganisms, from soil solution is regulated by microbial uptake. In addition to the concentration of LMWOS in soil solution, the chemical properties of each substance (e.g. C oxidation state, number of C atoms, number of -COOH groups) can affect their uptake and subsequent partitioning of C within the soil microbial community. The aim of this study was to trace the initial fate of three dominant classes of LMWOS in soil (sugars, carboxylic and amino acids), including their removal from solution and utilization by microorganisms, and to reveal the effect of substance chemical properties on these processes. Soil solution, spiked at natural abundance levels with 14C-labelled glucose, fructose, malate, succinate, formate, alanine or glycine, was added to the soil and 14C was traced in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CO2, cytosol and soil organic carbon (SOC) over 24 hours. The half-life time of all LMWOS in the DOC (T1 /2-solution) varied between 0.6-5.0 min showing extremely fast initial uptake of LMWOS. The T1 /2-solution of substances was dependent on C oxidation state, indicating that less oxidized organic substances (with C oxidation state "0") were retained longer in soil solution than oxidized substances. The LMWOS-C T1 /2-fast, characterizing the half-life time of 14C in the fast mineralization pool, ranged between 30 and 80 min, with the T1 /2-fast of carboxylic acids (malic acid) being the fastest and the T1 /2-fast of amino acids (glycine) being the slowest. An absence of correlation between T1 /2-fast and either C oxidation state, number of C atoms, or number of -COOH groups suggests that intercellular metabolic pathways are more important for LMWOS transformation in soil than their basic chemical properties. The CO2 release during LMWOS mineralization accounted for 20-90% of 14C applied. Mineralization of LMWOS was the least for sugars and the greatest for

  10. Natural occurrence of microbial sulphur oxidation by long-range electron transport in the seafloor

    PubMed Central

    Malkin, Sairah Y; Rao, Alexandra MF; Seitaj, Dorina; Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; Zetsche, Eva-Maria; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Boschker, Henricus TS; Meysman, Filip JR

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a novel mode of sulphur oxidation was described in marine sediments, in which sulphide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers was electrically coupled to oxygen reduction at the sediment surface. Subsequent experimental evidence identified that long filamentous bacteria belonging to the family Desulfobulbaceae likely mediated the electron transport across the centimetre-scale distances. Such long-range electron transfer challenges some long-held views in microbial ecology and could have profound implications for sulphur cycling in marine sediments. But, so far, this process of electrogenic sulphur oxidation has been documented only in laboratory experiments and so its imprint on the seafloor remains unknown. Here we show that the geochemical signature of electrogenic sulphur oxidation occurs in a variety of coastal sediment environments, including a salt marsh, a seasonally hypoxic basin, and a subtidal coastal mud plain. In all cases, electrogenic sulphur oxidation was detected together with an abundance of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. Complementary laboratory experiments in intertidal sands demonstrated that mechanical disturbance by bioturbating fauna destroys the electrogenic sulphur oxidation signal. A survey of published geochemical data and 16S rRNA gene sequences identified that electrogenic sulphide oxidation is likely present in a variety of marine sediments with high sulphide generation and restricted bioturbation, such as mangrove swamps, aquaculture areas, seasonally hypoxic basins, cold sulphide seeps and possibly hydrothermal vent environments. This study shows for the first time that electrogenic sulphur oxidation occurs in a wide range of marine sediments and that bioturbation may exert a dominant control on its natural distribution. PMID:24671086

  11. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    PubMed

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (<1.6 and 1.6-1.8 g cm(-3) ) and bulk soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for

  12. [Effects of methane stress on oxidation rates and microbial community structures in different landfill cover soils].

    PubMed

    He, Ruo; Jiang, Chen-jing; Wang, Jing; Gao, Qing-jun; Shen, Dong-sheng

    2008-12-01

    As compared with the ordinary landfill cover material, clay soil, the effect of methane stress on oxidation rate and microbial community structure was investigated in waste soil (material from biologically treated municipal solid waste). The results showed that the moisture content of the clay soil was low, due to the low water retaining capacity. As environmental temperature and rainfall changed, the clay soil caked and inhibited methanotrophs growth. However, with a high organic matter, water-holding capacity and porosity, the waste soil provided a favor condition for methanotrophs growth and propagation. After exposure to methane flow for 120 days, methane oxidation potential in the middle and bottom layers of the waste soil column increased to 11.25-13.48 micromol/(g x h), which was 10.4-24.5 times higher than that in clay soil column. The topsoils were both found to be dried and inhibit methane oxidation. Methane oxidation (removal) efficiency by the waste soil column reached 48.3% at the end of the experiment, which was 5-6 times higher than that by the clay soil column. The amounts of the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarks 16:1 omega 8c and 18:1 omega 8c for Type I and II methanotrophs, respectively, showed that a strong linear relationship was observed between methane oxidation potential and PLFA 18:1 omega 8c content in soil samples.

  13. Autotrophy as a predominant mode of carbon fixation in anaerobic methane-oxidizing microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Kellermann, Matthias Y; Wegener, Gunter; Elvert, Marcus; Yoshinaga, Marcos Yukio; Lin, Yu-Shih; Holler, Thomas; Mollar, Xavier Prieto; Knittel, Katrin; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2012-11-20

    The methane-rich, hydrothermally heated sediments of the Guaymas Basin are inhabited by thermophilic microorganisms, including anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (mainly ANME-1) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g., HotSeep-1 cluster). We studied the microbial carbon flow in ANME-1/ HotSeep-1 enrichments in stable-isotope-probing experiments with and without methane. The relative incorporation of (13)C from either dissolved inorganic carbon or methane into lipids revealed that methane-oxidizing archaea assimilated primarily inorganic carbon. This assimilation is strongly accelerated in the presence of methane. Experiments with simultaneous amendments of both (13)C-labeled dissolved inorganic carbon and deuterated water provided further insights into production rates of individual lipids derived from members of the methane-oxidizing community as well as their carbon sources used for lipid biosynthesis. In the presence of methane, all prominent lipids carried a dual isotopic signal indicative of their origin from primarily autotrophic microbes. In the absence of methane, archaeal lipid production ceased and bacterial lipid production dropped by 90%; the lipids produced by the residual fraction of the metabolically active bacterial community predominantly carried a heterotrophic signal. Collectively our results strongly suggest that the studied ANME-1 archaea oxidize methane but assimilate inorganic carbon and should thus be classified as methane-oxidizing chemoorganoautotrophs.

  14. Autotrophy as a predominant mode of carbon fixation in anaerobic methane-oxidizing microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Wegener, Gunter; Elvert, Marcus; Yoshinaga, Marcos Yukio; Lin, Yu-Shih; Holler, Thomas; Mollar, Xavier Prieto; Knittel, Katrin; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The methane-rich, hydrothermally heated sediments of the Guaymas Basin are inhabited by thermophilic microorganisms, including anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (mainly ANME-1) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g., HotSeep-1 cluster). We studied the microbial carbon flow in ANME-1/ HotSeep-1 enrichments in stable-isotope–probing experiments with and without methane. The relative incorporation of 13C from either dissolved inorganic carbon or methane into lipids revealed that methane-oxidizing archaea assimilated primarily inorganic carbon. This assimilation is strongly accelerated in the presence of methane. Experiments with simultaneous amendments of both 13C-labeled dissolved inorganic carbon and deuterated water provided further insights into production rates of individual lipids derived from members of the methane-oxidizing community as well as their carbon sources used for lipid biosynthesis. In the presence of methane, all prominent lipids carried a dual isotopic signal indicative of their origin from primarily autotrophic microbes. In the absence of methane, archaeal lipid production ceased and bacterial lipid production dropped by 90%; the lipids produced by the residual fraction of the metabolically active bacterial community predominantly carried a heterotrophic signal. Collectively our results strongly suggest that the studied ANME-1 archaea oxidize methane but assimilate inorganic carbon and should thus be classified as methane-oxidizing chemoorganoautotrophs. PMID:23129626

  15. Crosslink density, oxidation and chain scission in retrieved, highly cross-linked UHMWPE tibial bearings.

    PubMed

    Reinitz, Steven D; Currier, Barbara H; Levine, Rayna A; Van Citters, Douglas W

    2014-05-01

    Irradiated, thermally stabilized, highly cross-linked UHMWPE bearings have demonstrated superior wear performance and improved in vitro oxidation resistance compared with terminally gamma-sterilized bearings, yet retrieval analysis reveals unanticipated in vivo oxidation in these materials despite fewer or no measurable free radicals. There has been little evidence to date that the oxidation mechanism in thermally stabilized materials is the same as that in conventional materials, and so it is unknown whether oxidation in these materials is leading to chain scission and a degradation of mechanical properties, molecular weight, and crosslink density. The aim of this study was to determine whether measured in vivo oxidation in retrieved, highly cross-linked tibial bearings corresponds with a decreasing crosslink density. Analysis of three tibial bearing materials revealed that crosslink density decreased following in vivo duration, and that the change in crosslink density was strongly correlated with oxidation. The results suggest that oxidation in highly cross-linked materials is causing chain scissions that may, in time, impact the material properties. If in vivo oxidation continues over longer durations, there is potential for a clinically significant degradation of mechanical properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Applicability of anaerobic nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation to microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongbo; Carlson, Han K; Coates, John D

    2013-08-06

    Microbial processes that produce solid-phase minerals could be judiciously applied to modify rock porosity with subsequent alteration and improvement of floodwater sweep in petroleum reservoirs. However, there has been little investigation of the application of this to enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Here, we investigate a unique approach of altering reservoir petrology through the biogenesis of authigenic rock minerals. This process is mediated by anaerobic chemolithotrophic nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms that precipitate iron minerals from the metabolism of soluble ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) coupled to the reduction of nitrate. This mineral biogenesis can result in pore restriction and reduced pore throat diameter. Advantageously and unlike biomass plugs, these biominerals are not susceptible to pressure or thermal degradation. Furthermore, they do not require continual substrate addition for maintenance. Our studies demonstrate that the biogenesis of insoluble iron minerals in packed-bed columns results in effective hydrology alteration and homogenization of heterogeneous flowpaths upon stimulated microbial Fe(2+) biooxidation. We also demonstrate almost 100% improvement in oil recovery from hydrocarbon-saturated packed-bed columns as a result of this metabolism. These studies represent a novel departure from traditional microbial EOR approaches and indicate the potential for nitrate-dependent Fe(2+) biooxidation to improve volumetric sweep efficiency and enhance both the quality and quantity of oil recovered.

  17. Adsorption of microbial esterases on Bacillus subtilis-templated cobalt oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eunjin; Ryu, Bum Han; Shim, Hyun-Woo; Ju, Hansol; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, T Doohun

    2014-04-01

    Due to low diffusion rates and large surface areas, nanomaterials have received great interest as supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. Here, the preparation of a cobalt oxide nanoparticle using Bacillus subtilis as a biological template and use of the nanostructure for microbial esterase immobilization is described. Morphological features and size distributions were investigated using electron microscopy (EM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Catalytic properties of enzyme-coated nanostructures were investigated using 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate and p-nitrophenyl (PNP) acetate as model substrates. Enzyme-coated nanostructures were observed to retain ∼85% of the initial activity after 15 successive reaction cycles, and enzyme immobilization processes could be repeated four times without a loss of immobilization potential. The present work demonstrates that B. subtilis-templated cobalt oxide nanoparticles have the potential to be used as biocompatible immobilization materials, and are promising candidates for the preparation of effective nanobiocatalysts.

  18. A grey box model of glucose fermentation and syntrophic oxidation in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    de Los Ángeles Fernandez, Maria; de Los Ángeles Sanromán, Maria; Marks, Stanislaw; Makinia, Jacek; Gonzalez Del Campo, Araceli; Rodrigo, Manuel; Fernandez, Francisco Jesus

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the fermentative and oxidative processes taking place in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) fed with glucose were studied and modeled. The model accounting for the bioelectrochemical processes was based on ordinary, Monod-type differential equations. The model parameters were estimated using experimental results obtained from three H-type MFCs operated at open or closed circuits and fed with glucose or ethanol. The experimental results demonstrate that similar fermentation processes were carried out under open and closed circuit operation, with the most important fermentation products being ethanol (with a yield of 1.81molmol(-1) glucose) and lactic acid (with a yield of 1.36molmol(-1) glucose). A peak in the electricity generation was obtained when glucose and fermentation products coexisted in the liquid bulk. However, almost 90% of the electricity produced came from the oxidation of ethanol.

  19. Synergetic interactions improve cobalt leaching from lithium cobalt oxide in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Li, Tianchi; Liu, Chuan; Quan, Xie; Chen, Lijie; Wang, Aijie; Chen, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt leaching from lithium cobalt oxide is a promising reduction process for recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries, but suffers from consumption of large amount of reductants and energy, and generation of excess secondary polluted sludge. Thus, effective and environmental friendly processes are needed to improve the existing process limitations. Here we reported microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to effectively reduce Co(III) in lithium cobalt oxide with concomitant energy generation. There was a synergetic interaction in MFCs, leading to a more rapid Co(III) leaching at a rate 3.4 times the sum of rates by conventional chemical processes and no-acid controls. External resistor, solid/liquid ratio, solution conductivity, pH and temperature affected system performance. This study provides a new process for recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries with concomitant energy generation from MFCs.

  20. Microbial community structure and occurrence of diverse autotrophic ammonium oxidizing microorganisms in the anammox process.

    PubMed

    Bae, H; Chung, Y-C; Jung, J-Y

    2010-01-01

    The enrichment of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria using an upflow anaerobic sludge bioreactor was successfully conducted for 400 days of continuous operation. The bacterial community structure of anammox bioreactor included Proteobacteria (42%), Chloroflexi (22%), Planctomycetes (20%), Chlorobi (7%), Bacteroidetes (5%), Acidobacteria (2%), and Actinobacteria (2%). All clones of Planctomycetes were affiliated with the anammox bacteria, Planctomycete KSU-1 (AB057453). The presence and diversity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) were identified by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) based on the amoA gene sequences. The AOB in anammox bioreactor were affiliated with the Nitrosomonas europaea cluster. The T-RFLP result of AOA showed the diverse microbial community structure of AOA with three terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs).

  1. Metagenomic Assembly of the Dominant Zetaproteobacteria in an Iron-oxidizing Hydrothermal Microbial Mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, C. L.; Fullerton, H.

    2013-12-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and is potentially one of the most abundant energy sources on the earth as an electron donor for chemolithoautotrophic growth coupled to Fe(II) oxidation. Despite the rapid abiotic oxidation rate of iron, many microbes have adapted to feeding off this fleeting energy source. One such bacterial class is the Zetaproteobacteria. Iron-dominated microbial mat material was collected with a small-scale syringe sampler from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii. From this sample, gDNA was extracted and prepared for paired-end Illumina sequencing. Reconstruction of SSU rDNA genes using EMERGE allowed for comparison to previous SSU rDNA surveys. Clone libraries and qPCR show these microbial mats to be dominated by Zetaproteobacteria. Results from our in silico reconstruction confirm these initial findings. RDP classification of the EMERGE reconstructed sequences resulted in 44% of the community being identified as Zetaproteobacteria. The most abundant SSU rDNA has 99% similarity to Zeta OTU-2, and only a 94% similarity to M. ferrooxidans PV-1. Zeta OTU-2 has been shown to be the most cosmopolitan population in iron-dominated hydrothermal systems from across Pacific Ocean. Metagenomic assembly has resulted in many contigs with high identity to M. ferrooxidans as identified, by BLAST. However, with large differences in SSU rRNA similarity, M. ferrooxidans PV-1 is not an adequate reference. Current work is focusing on reconstruction of the dominant microbial mat member, without the use of a reference genome through an iterative assembly approach. The resulting 'pan-genome' will be compared to other Zetaproteobacteria (at the class level) and the functional ecology of this cosmopolitan microbial mat community member will be extrapolated. Thus far, we have detected multiple housekeeping genes involved in DNA replication, transcription and translation. The most abundant metabolic gene we have found is Aconitase, a key enzyme in the

  2. Linking Sediment Microbial Communities to Carbon Cycling in High-Latitude Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, J. B.; Varner, R. K.; Johnson, J. E.; Owusu-Dommey, A.; Binder, M.; Woodcroft, B. J.; Wik, M.; Freitas, N. L.; Boyd, J. A.; Crill, P. M.; Saleska, S. R.; Tyson, G. W.; Rich, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    It is well recognized that thawing permafrost peatlands are likely to provide a positive feedback to climate change via CH4 and CO2 emissions. High-latitude lakes in these landscapes have also been identified as sources of CH4 and CO2 loss to the atmosphere. To investigate microbial contributions to carbon loss from high-latitude lakes, we characterized sediment geochemistry and microbiota via cores collected from deep and shallow regions of two lakes (Inre Harrsjön and Mellersta Harrsjön) in Arctic Sweden in July, 2012. These lakes are within the Stordalen Mire long-term ecological area, a focal site for investigating the impacts of climate change-related permafrost thaw, and the lakes in this area are responsible for ~55% of the CH4 loss from this hydrologically interconnected system. Across 40 samples from 4 to 40 cm deep within four sediment cores, Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the sedimentary microbiota was dominated by candidate phyla OP9 and OP8 (Atribacteria and Aminicenantes, respectively, including putative fermenters and anaerobic respirers), predicted methanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria, and predicted methanogenic archaea from the Thermoplasmata Group E2 clade. We observed some overlap in community structure with nearby peatlands, which tend to be dominated by methanogens and Acidobacteria. Sediment microbial communities differed significantly between lakes, by overlying lake depth (shallow vs. deep), and by depth within a core, with each trend corresponding to parallel differences in biogeochemical measurements. Overall, our results support the potential for significant microbial controls on carbon cycling in high-latitude lakes associated with thawing permafrost, and ongoing metagenomic analyses of focal samples will yield further insight into the functional potential of these microbial communities and their dominant members.

  3. Nitric Oxide: Exploring the Contextual Link with Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal inflammation is a systematically organized physiological step often triggered to counteract an invading pathogen or to rid the body of damaged and/or dead cellular debris. At the crux of this inflammatory response is the deployment of nonneuronal cells: microglia, astrocytes, and blood-derived macrophages. Glial cells secrete a host of bioactive molecules, which include proinflammatory factors and nitric oxide (NO). From immunomodulation to neuromodulation, NO is a renowned modulator of vast physiological systems. It essentially mediates these physiological effects by interacting with cyclic GMP (cGMP) leading to the regulation of intracellular calcium ions. NO regulates the release of proinflammatory molecules, interacts with ROS leading to the formation of reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and targets vital organelles such as mitochondria, ultimately causing cellular death, a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases. AD is an enervating neurodegenerative disorder with an obscure etiology. Because of accumulating experimental data continually highlighting the role of NO in neuroinflammation and AD progression, we explore the most recent data to highlight in detail newly investigated molecular mechanisms in which NO becomes relevant in neuronal inflammation and oxidative stress-associated neurodegeneration in the CNS as well as lay down up-to-date knowledge regarding therapeutic approaches targeting NO. PMID:28096943

  4. Earliest microbially mediated pyrite oxidation in ~ 3.4 billion-year-old sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacey, David; Saunders, Martin; Brasier, Martin D.; Kilburn, Matt R.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrite (FeS2) oxidation in modern sedimentary environments is neither a purely chemical nor purely microbial process, but it is significantly enhanced by the activity of microorganisms that use reduced forms of iron and sulphur in their metabolisms. On the early Earth, where oxygen levels were thought to be < 10-5 of the present atmospheric level and chemical oxidants scarce, such biological mediation may have been critical in the redox cycles of iron and sulphur. Here, we show that detrital sedimentary pyrite grains in a ~ 3.4 billion-year-old sandstone were colonised by microbial communities. The detrital pyrite comes from the basal quartz arenite member of the 3.43-3.35 Ga Strelley Pool Formation (SPF) in the East Strelley greenstone belt of the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia. Rock chips and petrographic thin sections of black sandstones occurring on two ridges close to the SPF type locality of Strelley Pool were investigated using optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, laser Raman and NanoSIMS. The detrital pyrite grains exhibit laminated carbonaceous coatings of early Archean age, with localised enrichments of nitrogen that are interpreted as the in situ remains of biofilms growing on these nutrient-rich minerals. Pyrite surfaces contain spherical pits, chains of pits and channels that are morphologically distinct from abiotic alteration features. The pits and channels are widespread, have a clustered distribution typical of microbial colonisation, and are closely comparable to biologically mediated microstructures in the younger rock record and those created by extant Fe- and S-oxidising microbes in the laboratory. They are thus interpreted as trace fossils formed by the attachment of bacteria to the pyrite surfaces. A nano-layer and discreet nano-grains of secondary mineral precipitates, namely Fe-oxides belonging to the magnetite-maghaemite group, attest to pyrite oxidation. These are intimately associated with the biofilms and trace fossils, and are interpreted

  5. Community-integrated omics links dominance of a microbial generalist to fine-tuned resource usage

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Emilie E. L.; Pinel, Nicolás; Laczny, Cédric C.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Lebrun, Laura A.; Roume, Hugo; Lin, Jake; May, Patrick; Hicks, Nathan D.; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Wampach, Linda; Liu, Cindy M.; Price, Lance B.; Gillece, John D.; Guignard, Cédric; Schupp, James M.; Vlassis, Nikos; Baliga, Nitin S.; Moritz, Robert L.; Keim, Paul S.; Wilmes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities are complex and dynamic systems that are primarily structured according to their members’ ecological niches. To investigate how niche breadth (generalist versus specialist lifestyle strategies) relates to ecological success, we develop and apply an integrative workflow for the multi-omic analysis of oleaginous mixed microbial communities from a biological wastewater treatment plant. Time- and space-resolved coupled metabolomic and taxonomic analyses demonstrate that the community-wide lipid accumulation phenotype is associated with the dominance of the generalist bacterium Candidatus Microthrix spp. By integrating population-level genomic reconstructions (reflecting fundamental niches) with transcriptomic and proteomic data (realised niches), we identify finely tuned gene expression governing resource usage by Candidatus Microthrix parvicella over time. Moreover, our results indicate that the fluctuating environmental conditions constrain the accumulation of genetic variation in Candidatus Microthrix parvicella likely due to fitness trade-offs. Based on our observations, niche breadth has to be considered as an important factor for understanding the evolutionary processes governing (microbial) population sizes and structures in situ. PMID:25424998

  6. Linking questions to practices in the study of microbial pathogens: sampling bias and typing methods.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Díaz, Elena

    2009-12-01

    The importance of understanding the population genetics and evolution of microbial pathogens is increasing as a result of the spread and re-emergence of many infectious diseases and their impact for public health. In the last few years, the development of high throughput multi-gene sequence methodologies has opened new opportunities for studying pathogen populations, providing reliable and robust means for both epidemiological and evolutionary investigations. For instance, for many pathogens, multilocus sequence typing has become the "gold standard" in molecular epidemiology, allowing strain identification and discovery. However, there is a huge gap between typing a clinical collection of isolates and making inferences about their evolutionary history and population genetics. Critical issues for studying microbial pathogens such as an adequate sampling design and the appropriate selection of the genetic technique are also required, and will rely on the scale of study and the characteristics of the biological system (e.g., multi- vs. single-host pathogens and vector vs. food or air-borne pathogens). My aim here is to discuss some of these issues in more detail and illustrate how these aspects are often overlooked and easily neglected in the field. Finally, given the rapid accumulation of complete genome sequences and the increasing effort on microbiology research, it is clear that now more than ever integrative approaches bringing together epidemiology and evolutionary biology are needed for understanding the diversity of microbial pathogens.

  7. The Photochemical Oxidation of Siderite That Drove Hydrogen Based Microbial Redox Reactions in The Archean Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. D.; Yee, N.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe and molecular hydrogen (H2) is a rich source of electron in a mildly reducing environment for microbial redox reactions, such as anoxygenic photosynthesis and methanogenesis. Subaerial volcanoes, ocean crust serpentinization and mid-ocean ridge volcanoes have been believed to be the major source of the hydrogen flux to the atmosphere. Although ferrous ion (Fe2+) photooxidation has been proposed as an alternative mechanism by which hydrogen gas was produced, ferruginous water in contact with a CO2-bearing atmosphere is supersaturated with respect to FeCO3 (siderite), thus the precipitation of siderite would have been thermodynamically favored in the Archean environment. Siderite is the critical mineral component of the oldest fossilized microbial mat. It has also been inferred as a component of chemical sedimentary protolith in the >3750 Ma Nuvvuagittuq supracrustal belt, Canada and the presence of siderite in the protolith suggests the occurrence of siderite extends to Hadean time. Analyses of photooxidation of siderite suggest a significant flux of hydrogen in the early atmosphere. Our estimate of the hydrogen production rate under Archean solar flux is approximately 50 times greater than the estimated hydrogen production rate by the volcanic activity based on a previous report (Tian et al. Science 2005). Our analyses on siderite photooxidation also suggest a mechanism by which banded iron formation (BIF) was formed. The photooxidation transforms siderite to magnetite/maghemite (spinnel iron oxide), while oxygenic oxidation of siderite leads to goethite, and subsequently to hematite (Fe3+2O3) upon dehydration. We will discuss the photochemical reaction, which was once one of the most ubiquitous photochemical reactions before the rise of oxygen in the atmosphere. Photooxidation of siderite over time by UV light From left to right: UV oxidized siderite, pristine siderite, oxidized siderite by oxygen

  8. Low Stress Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Treated Cotton Fabric Subjected to Zinc Oxide-Anti-Microbial Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Chi-Wai; Lam, Yin-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Cotton fabrics are highly popular because of their excellent properties such as regeneration, bio-degradation, softness, affinity to skin and hygroscopic properties. When in contact with the human body, cotton fabrics offer an ideal environment for microbial growth due to their ability to retain oxygen, moisture and warmth, as well as nutrients from spillages and body sweat. Therefore, an anti-microbial coating formulation (Microfresh and Microban together with zinc oxide as catalyst) was developed for cotton fabrics to improve treatment effectiveness. In addition, plasma technology was employed in the study which roughened the surface of the materials, improving the loading of zinc oxides on the surface. In this study, the low stress mechanical properties of plasma pre-treated and/or anti-microbial-treated cotton fabric were studied. The overall results show that the specimens had improved bending properties when zinc oxides were added in the anti-microbial coating recipe. Also, without plasma pre-treatment, anti-microbial-treatment of cotton fabric had a positive effect only on tensile resilience, shear stress at 0.5° and compressional energy, while plasma-treated specimens had better overall tensile properties even after anti-microbial treatment. PMID:28809311

  9. Characterization of Cytochrome 579, an Unusual Cytochrome Isolated from an Iron-Oxidizing Microbial Community

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Steven; Chan, Clara S; Zemla, Adam; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hwang, Mona; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.; Thelen, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Proteogenomic studies of Fe(II)-oxidizing microbial biofilms collected from an extremely acidic environment have identified a novel, soluble cytochrome as one of the most abundant proteins produced by these communities. This red cytochrome, extracted from biofilms with dilute sulfuric acid and purified by cation exchange chromatography, has an unusual visible spectral signature at 579 nm. Fe(II)-dependent reduction of Cyt579 was thermodynamically favorable at pH>3, raising the possibility that Cyt579 acts as an accessory protein for electron transfer. Transmission electron microscopy of immuno-gold labeled biofilm indicated that the Cyt579 is localized near the bacterial cell surface, consistent with periplasmic localization. Further protein analysis of Cyt579, using preparative chromatofocusing and SDS-PAGE, revealed three forms of the protein that correspond to different N-terminal truncations of the amino acid sequence. Intact protein analysis corroborated the post-translational modifications of these forms and identified a genomically uncharacterized Cyt579 variant. Homology modeling was used to predict the overall cytochrome structure and heme binding site; positions of nine amino acid substitutions found in 3 Cyt579 variants all map to the surface of the protein and away from the heme group. Based on this detailed characterization of Cyt579, we propose that Cyt579 acts an electron transfer protein shuttling electrons derived from Fe(II) oxidation to support critical metabolic functions in the acidophilic microbial community.

  10. OXIDATIVE INACTIVATION OF THE PROTEASOME IN RPE: A POTENTIAL LINK BETWEEN OXIDATIVE STRESS AND UPREGULATION OF IL-8

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are implicated in the pathogenesis of several age-related diseases. Stress-induced overproduction of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8), is one of the early events of inflammation. The objective of this study was to determine potential links betwee...

  11. Preliminary evaluation of a microbial fuel cell treating artificial dialysis wastewater using graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Yuko; Yoshida, Naoko

    2016-02-01

    Artificial dialysis wastewater (ADWW) generally contains 800-2,200 mg L-1 of organic matter. Prior to its discharge to the sewage system, ADWW must be treated in order to reduce organic matter to less than 600 mg L-1. This study assesses the applicability of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to the reduction of organic matter in ADWW as an alternative pre-treatment system to aeration. In the MFC, conductive floccular aggregates microbially produced from graphene oxide (GO-flocs) were applied as an anode material in the MFC. The GO-flocs were obtained by anaerobic incubation of graphene oxide (GO) with microorganisms in ADWW at 28 °C for a minimum of 10 days. During incubation, GO in the mixture was transformed into black conductive floccular aggregates having 0.12 mS cm-1, suggesting the microbial reduction of GO to the reduced form. The produced GO-flocs were then used as the anode material in a cylindrical MFC, which was filled with ADWW and covered with a floating, platinum (Pt)-coated carbon cathode. The MFC was polarized via an external resistance of 10 Ω and applied for 120 days by replacing half of the supernatant of the MFC with fresh ADWW, every 6-9 days. As a result, the MFC achieved a 128 mg L-1 d-1 chemical oxygen demand (CODCr) removal rate. For example, the MFC contained 1,500 mg-CODCr L-1 just after replacement, with this concentration being reduced to 1,000 mg-CODCr L-1 after 6-9 days of incubation. At the same time, the MFC showed an average power density of 28 mW m-2 and a maximum power density of 291 mW m-2. These results suggest that a MFC packed with GO-flocs can be used as an alternative biotreatment system, replacing the energy-intensive aeration process.

  12. Mn(II) oxidation by an ascomycete fungus is linked to superoxide production during asexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Colleen M; Zeiner, Carolyn A; Santelli, Cara M; Webb, Samuel M

    2012-07-31

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive minerals within the environment, where they control the bioavailability of carbon, nutrients, and numerous metals. Although the ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides is scattered throughout the bacterial and fungal domains of life, the mechanism and physiological basis for Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. Here, we use a combination of compound-specific chemical assays, microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy to show that a common Ascomycete filamentous fungus, Stilbella aciculosa, oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn oxides by producing extracellular superoxide during cell differentiation. The reactive Mn oxide phase birnessite and the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are colocalized at the base of asexual reproductive structures. Mn oxide formation is not observed in the presence of superoxide scavengers (e.g., Cu) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidases (e.g., diphenylene iodonium chloride), enzymes responsible for superoxide production and cell differentiation in fungi. Considering the recent identification of Mn(II) oxidation by NADH oxidase-based superoxide production by a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp.), these results introduce a surprising homology between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in the mechanisms responsible for Mn(II) oxidation, where oxidation appears to be a side reaction of extracellular superoxide production. Given the versatility of superoxide as a redox reactant and the widespread ability of fungi to produce superoxide, this microbial extracellular superoxide production may play a central role in the cycling and bioavailability of metals (e.g., Hg, Fe, Mn) and carbon in natural systems.

  13. Mn(II) oxidation by an ascomycete fungus is linked to superoxide production during asexual reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hansel, C. M.; Zeiner, C. A.; Santelli, C. M.; Webb, S. M.

    2012-07-16

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive minerals within the environment, where they control the bioavailability of carbon, nutrients, and numerous metals. Although the ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides is scattered throughout the bacterial and fungal domains of life, the mechanism and physiological basis for Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. Here, we use a combination of compound-specific chemical assays, microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy to show that a common Ascomycete filamentous fungus, Stilbella aciculosa, oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn oxides by producing extracellular superoxide during cell differentiation. The reactive Mn oxide phase birnessite and the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are colocalized at the base of asexual reproductive structures. Mn oxide formation is not observed in the presence of superoxide scavengers (e.g., Cu) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidases (e.g., diphenylene iodonium chloride), enzymes responsible for superoxide production and cell differentiation in fungi. Considering the recent identification of Mn(II) oxidation by NADH oxidase-based superoxide production by a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp.), these results introduce a surprising homology between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in the mechanisms responsible for Mn(II) oxidation, where oxidation appears to be a side reaction of extracellular superoxide production. Finally, given the versatility of superoxide as a redox reactant and the widespread ability of fungi to produce superoxide, this microbial extracellular superoxide production may play a central role in the cycling and bioavailability of metals (e.g., Hg, Fe, Mn) and carbon in natural systems.

  14. Potential impact of microbial activity on the oxidant capacity and organic carbon budget in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaïtilingom, Mickael; Deguillaume, Laurent; Vinatier, Virginie; Sancelme, Martine; Amato, Pierre; Chaumerliac, Nadine; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Within cloud water, microorganisms are metabolically active and, thus, are expected to contribute to the atmospheric chemistry. This article investigates the interactions between microorganisms and the reactive oxygenated species that are present in cloud water because these chemical compounds drive the oxidant capacity of the cloud system. Real cloud water samples with contrasting features (marine, continental, and urban) were taken from the puy de Dôme mountain (France). The samples exhibited a high microbial biodiversity and complex chemical composition. The media were incubated in the dark and subjected to UV radiation in specifically designed photo-bioreactors. The concentrations of H2O2, organic compounds, and the ATP/ADP ratio were monitored during the incubation period. The microorganisms remained metabolically active in the presence of ●OH radicals that were photo-produced from H2O2. This oxidant and major carbon compounds (formaldehyde and carboxylic acids) were biodegraded by the endogenous microflora. This work suggests that microorganisms could play a double role in atmospheric chemistry; first, they could directly metabolize organic carbon species, and second, they could reduce the available source of radicals through their oxidative metabolism. Consequently, molecules such as H2O2 would no longer be available for photochemical or other chemical reactions, which would decrease the cloud oxidant capacity.

  15. Microbially-mediated method for synthesis of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, Tommy J.; Lauf, Robert J.; Moon, Ji-Won; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Love, Lonnie J.; Duty, Chad Edward; Madden, Andrew Stephen; Li, Yiliang; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Rawn, Claudia Jeanette

    2017-09-19

    The invention is directed to a method for producing non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, the method comprising: (a) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbially-mediated formation of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprises i) anaerobic microbes, ii) a culture medium suitable for sustaining said anaerobic microbes, iii) a metal component comprising at least one type of metal ion, iv) a non-metal component comprising at least one non-metal selected from the group consisting of S, Se, Te, and As, and v) one or more electron donors that provide donatable electrons to said anaerobic microbes during consumption of the electron donor by said anaerobic microbes; and (b) isolating said non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, which contain at least one of said metal ions and at least one of said non-metals. The invention is also directed to non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticle compositions produced as above and having distinctive properties.

  16. Microbially-mediated method for synthesis of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, Tommy J.; Lauf, Robert J.; Moon, Ji Won; Rondinone, Adam J.; Love, Lonnie J.; Duty, Chad Edward; Madden, Andrew Stephen; Li, Yiliang; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Rawn, Claudia Jeanette

    2014-06-24

    The invention is directed to a method for producing non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, the method comprising: (a) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbially-mediated formation of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprises i) anaerobic microbes, ii) a culture medium suitable for sustaining said anaerobic microbes, iii) a metal component comprising at least one type of metal ion, iv) a non-metal component containing at least one non-metal selected from the group consisting of S, Se, Te, and As, and v) one or more electron donors that provide donatable electrons to said anaerobic microbes during consumption of the electron donor by said anaerobic microbes; and (b) isolating said non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, which contain at least one of said metal ions and at least one of said non-metals. The invention is also directed to non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticle compositions produced as above and having distinctive properties.

  17. Effects of methane on the microbial populations and oxidation rates in different landfill cover soil columns.

    PubMed

    He, Ruo; Ruan, Aidong; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2007-05-01

    A considerable fraction of methane produced in landfills is oxidized by landfill cover soils. In this work, microbial populations and oxidation rates developed in response to the presence of methane were studied in three soil columns simulated landfill cover soil environments. The population of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria was highest in the waste soil, middle in the clay soil, and lowest in the red soil. After exposure to methane-rich environments, the populations of methanotrophic bacteria showed increases in the waste and clay soils. The population of methanotrophic bacteria increased from 30.77x10(4) to 141.77x10(4) cfu g d.w.-1 in the middle layer of the waste soil column as a function of exposure to methane for 120 days. The populations of methanotrophic bacteria were correlated with the potential methane oxidation rates in the waste and clay soils, respectively. The topsoil was observed to be dried in the three soil columns. Most of methane oxidation occurred at the depth of between 10 and 20 cm in the waste soil column, while it took place mainly at the depth of between 20 and 30 cm in the clay soil column.

  18. Microbial Community Dynamics and Stability during an Ammonia-Induced Shift to Syntrophic Acetate Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Jeffrey J.; Garcia, Marcelo L.; Perkins, Sarah D.; Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Smith, Samuel R.; Muegge, Brian D.; Stadermann, Frank J.; DeRito, Christopher M.; Floss, Christine; Madsen, Eugene L.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digesters rely on the diversity and distribution of parallel metabolic pathways mediated by complex syntrophic microbial communities to maintain robust and optimal performance. Using mesophilic swine waste digesters, we experimented with increased ammonia loading to induce a shift from aceticlastic methanogenesis to an alternative acetate-consuming pathway of syntrophic acetate oxidation. In comparison with control digesters, we observed shifts in bacterial 16S rRNA gene content and in functional gene repertoires over the course of the digesters' 3-year operating period. During the first year, under identical startup conditions, all bioreactors mirrored each other closely in terms of bacterial phylotype content, phylogenetic structure, and evenness. When we perturbed the digesters by increasing the ammonia concentration or temperature, the distribution of bacterial phylotypes became more uneven, followed by a return to more even communities once syntrophic acetate oxidation had allowed the experimental bioreactors to regain stable operation. The emergence of syntrophic acetate oxidation coincided with a partial shift from aceticlastic to hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Our 16S rRNA gene analysis also revealed that acetate-fed enrichment experiments resulted in communities that did not represent the bioreactor community. Analysis of shotgun sequencing of community DNA suggests that syntrophic acetate oxidation was carried out by a heterogeneous community rather than by a specific keystone population with representatives of enriched cultures with this metabolic capacity. PMID:24657858

  19. Potential impact of microbial activity on the oxidant capacity and organic carbon budget in clouds

    PubMed Central

    Vaïtilingom, Mickael; Deguillaume, Laurent; Vinatier, Virginie; Sancelme, Martine; Amato, Pierre; Chaumerliac, Nadine; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Within cloud water, microorganisms are metabolically active and, thus, are expected to contribute to the atmospheric chemistry. This article investigates the interactions between microorganisms and the reactive oxygenated species that are present in cloud water because these chemical compounds drive the oxidant capacity of the cloud system. Real cloud water samples with contrasting features (marine, continental, and urban) were taken from the puy de Dôme mountain (France). The samples exhibited a high microbial biodiversity and complex chemical composition. The media were incubated in the dark and subjected to UV radiation in specifically designed photo-bioreactors. The concentrations of H2O2, organic compounds, and the ATP/ADP ratio were monitored during the incubation period. The microorganisms remained metabolically active in the presence of ●OH radicals that were photo-produced from H2O2. This oxidant and major carbon compounds (formaldehyde and carboxylic acids) were biodegraded by the endogenous microflora. This work suggests that microorganisms could play a double role in atmospheric chemistry; first, they could directly metabolize organic carbon species, and second, they could reduce the available source of radicals through their oxidative metabolism. Consequently, molecules such as H2O2 would no longer be available for photochemical or other chemical reactions, which would decrease the cloud oxidant capacity. PMID:23263871

  20. A methodological framework for linking bioreactor function to microbial communities and environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    de los Reyes, Francis L; Weaver, Joseph E; Wang, Ling

    2015-06-01

    In the continuing quest to relate microbial communities in bioreactors to function and environmental and operational conditions, engineers and biotechnologists have adopted the latest molecular and 'omic methods. Despite the large amounts of data generated, gaining mechanistic insights and using the data for predictive and practical purposes is still a huge challenge. We present a methodological framework that can guide experimental design, and discuss specific issues that can affect how researchers generate and use data to elucidate the relationships. We also identify, in general terms, bioreactor research opportunities that appear promising. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A pan-Precambrian link between deglaciation and environmental oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raub, T.J.; Kirschvink, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Despite a continuous increase in solar luminosity to the present, Earth’s glacial record appears to become more frequent, though less severe, over geological time. At least two of the three major Precambrian glacial intervals were exceptionally intense, with solid evidence for widespread sea ice on or near the equator, well within a “Snowball Earth” zone produced by ice-albedo runaway in energy-balance models. The end of the first unambiguously low-latitude glaciation, the early Paleoproterozoic Makganyene event, is associated intimately with the first solid evidence for global oxygenation, including the world’s largest sedimentary manganese deposit. Subsequent low-latitude deglaciations during the Cryogenian interval of the Neoproterozoic Era are also associated with progressive oxidation, and these young Precambrian ice ages coincide with the time when basal animal phyla were diversifying. However, specifically testing hypotheses of cause and effect between Earth’s Neoproterozoic biosphere and glaciation is complicated because large and rapid True Polar Wander events appear to punctuate Neoproterozoic time and may have episodically dominated earlier and later intervals as well, rendering geographic reconstruction and age correlation challenging except for an exceptionally well-defined global paleomagnetic database.

  2. Methanobactin and the Link between Copper and Bacterial Methane Oxidation.

    PubMed

    DiSpirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D; Murrell, J Colin; Gallagher, Warren H; Dennison, Christopher; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    Methanobactins (mbs) are low-molecular-mass (<1,200 Da) copper-binding peptides, or chalkophores, produced by many methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). These molecules exhibit similarities to certain iron-binding siderophores but are expressed and secreted in response to copper limitation. Structurally, mbs are characterized by a pair of heterocyclic rings with associated thioamide groups that form the copper coordination site. One of the rings is always an oxazolone and the second ring an oxazolone, an imidazolone, or a pyrazinedione moiety. The mb molecule originates from a peptide precursor that undergoes a series of posttranslational modifications, including (i) ring formation, (ii) cleavage of a leader peptide sequence, and (iii) in some cases, addition of a sulfate group. Functionally, mbs represent the extracellular component of a copper acquisition system. Consistent with this role in copper acquisition, mbs have a high affinity for copper ions. Following binding, mbs rapidly reduce Cu(2+) to Cu(1+). In addition to binding copper, mbs will bind most transition metals and near-transition metals and protect the host methanotroph as well as other bacteria from toxic metals. Several other physiological functions have been assigned to mbs, based primarily on their redox and metal-binding properties. In this review, we examine the current state of knowledge of this novel type of metal-binding peptide. We also explore its potential applications, how mbs may alter the bioavailability of multiple metals, and the many roles mbs may play in the physiology of methanotrophs.

  3. Methanobactin and the Link between Copper and Bacterial Methane Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Jeremy D.; Murrell, J. Colin; Gallagher, Warren H.; Dennison, Christopher; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Methanobactins (mbs) are low-molecular-mass (<1,200 Da) copper-binding peptides, or chalkophores, produced by many methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). These molecules exhibit similarities to certain iron-binding siderophores but are expressed and secreted in response to copper limitation. Structurally, mbs are characterized by a pair of heterocyclic rings with associated thioamide groups that form the copper coordination site. One of the rings is always an oxazolone and the second ring an oxazolone, an imidazolone, or a pyrazinedione moiety. The mb molecule originates from a peptide precursor that undergoes a series of posttranslational modifications, including (i) ring formation, (ii) cleavage of a leader peptide sequence, and (iii) in some cases, addition of a sulfate group. Functionally, mbs represent the extracellular component of a copper acquisition system. Consistent with this role in copper acquisition, mbs have a high affinity for copper ions. Following binding, mbs rapidly reduce Cu2+ to Cu1+. In addition to binding copper, mbs will bind most transition metals and near-transition metals and protect the host methanotroph as well as other bacteria from toxic metals. Several other physiological functions have been assigned to mbs, based primarily on their redox and metal-binding properties. In this review, we examine the current state of knowledge of this novel type of metal-binding peptide. We also explore its potential applications, how mbs may alter the bioavailability of multiple metals, and the many roles mbs may play in the physiology of methanotrophs. PMID:26984926

  4. Oxidative stress, cancer, and sleep deprivation: is there a logical link in this association?

    PubMed

    Noguti, Juliana; Andersen, Monica Levy; Cirelli, Chiara; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2013-09-01

    Sleep disorders are associated with various human pathologies and interfere with biological processes essential for health and quality of life. On the other hand, cancer is one of the most common diseases worldwide with an average of 1,500 deaths per day in the USA. Is there a factor common to both sleep disorders and cancer that serves to link these conditions? It is a normal process for cellular metabolism to produce reactive oxidant series (ROS). However, when the production of ROS overcomes the antioxidant capacity of the cell to eliminate these products, the resulting state is called oxidative stress. Oxidative DNA damage may participate in ROS-induced carcinogenesis. Moreover, ROS are also produced in the sleep deprivation process. The aim of this article is to review pathways and mechanisms that may point to oxidative stress as a link between sleep deprivation and cancer.

  5. Denitrifying Bacterial Communities Affect Current Production and Nitrous Oxide Accumulation in a Microbial Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    Vilar-Sanz, Ariadna; Puig, Sebastià; García-Lledó, Arantzazu; Trias, Rosalia; Balaguer, M. Dolors; Colprim, Jesús; Bañeras, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    The biocathodic reduction of nitrate in Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) is an alternative to remove nitrogen in low carbon to nitrogen wastewater and relies entirely on microbial activity. In this paper the community composition of denitrifiers in the cathode of a MFC is analysed in relation to added electron acceptors (nitrate and nitrite) and organic matter in the cathode. Nitrate reducers and nitrite reducers were highly affected by the operational conditions and displayed high diversity. The number of retrieved species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) for narG, napA, nirS and nirK genes was 11, 10, 31 and 22, respectively. In contrast, nitrous oxide reducers remained virtually unchanged at all conditions. About 90% of the retrieved nosZ sequences grouped in a single OTU with a high similarity with Oligotropha carboxidovorans nosZ gene. nirS-containing denitrifiers were dominant at all conditions and accounted for a significant amount of the total bacterial density. Current production decreased from 15.0 A·m−3 NCC (Net Cathodic Compartment), when nitrate was used as an electron acceptor, to 14.1 A·m−3 NCC in the case of nitrite. Contrarily, nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation in the MFC was higher when nitrite was used as the main electron acceptor and accounted for 70% of gaseous nitrogen. Relative abundance of nitrite to nitrous oxide reducers, calculated as (qnirS+qnirK)/qnosZ, correlated positively with N2O emissions. Collectively, data indicate that bacteria catalysing the initial denitrification steps in a MFC are highly influenced by main electron acceptors and have a major influence on current production and N2O accumulation. PMID:23717427

  6. Denitrifying bacterial communities affect current production and nitrous oxide accumulation in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Sanz, Ariadna; Puig, Sebastià; García-Lledó, Arantzazu; Trias, Rosalia; Balaguer, M Dolors; Colprim, Jesús; Bañeras, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    The biocathodic reduction of nitrate in Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) is an alternative to remove nitrogen in low carbon to nitrogen wastewater and relies entirely on microbial activity. In this paper the community composition of denitrifiers in the cathode of a MFC is analysed in relation to added electron acceptors (nitrate and nitrite) and organic matter in the cathode. Nitrate reducers and nitrite reducers were highly affected by the operational conditions and displayed high diversity. The number of retrieved species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) for narG, napA, nirS and nirK genes was 11, 10, 31 and 22, respectively. In contrast, nitrous oxide reducers remained virtually unchanged at all conditions. About 90% of the retrieved nosZ sequences grouped in a single OTU with a high similarity with Oligotropha carboxidovorans nosZ gene. nirS-containing denitrifiers were dominant at all conditions and accounted for a significant amount of the total bacterial density. Current production decreased from 15.0 A · m(-3) NCC (Net Cathodic Compartment), when nitrate was used as an electron acceptor, to 14.1 A · m(-3) NCC in the case of nitrite. Contrarily, nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation in the MFC was higher when nitrite was used as the main electron acceptor and accounted for 70% of gaseous nitrogen. Relative abundance of nitrite to nitrous oxide reducers, calculated as (qnirS+qnirK)/qnosZ, correlated positively with N2O emissions. Collectively, data indicate that bacteria catalysing the initial denitrification steps in a MFC are highly influenced by main electron acceptors and have a major influence on current production and N2O accumulation.

  7. Microbial pathways in colonic sulfur metabolism and links with health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Carbonero, Franck; Benefiel, Ann C.; Alizadeh-Ghamsari, Amir H.; Gaskins, H. Rex

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur is both crucial to life and a potential threat to health. While colonic sulfur metabolism mediated by eukaryotic cells is relatively well studied, much less is known about sulfur metabolism within gastrointestinal microbes. Sulfated compounds in the colon are either of inorganic (e.g., sulfates, sulfites) or organic (e.g., dietary amino acids and host mucins) origin. The most extensively studied of the microbes involved in colonic sulfur metabolism are the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which are common colonic inhabitants. Many other microbial pathways are likely to shape colonic sulfur metabolism as well as the composition and availability of sulfated compounds, and these interactions need to be examined in more detail. Hydrogen sulfide is the sulfur derivative that has attracted the most attention in the context of colonic health, and the extent to which it is detrimental or beneficial remains in debate. Several lines of evidence point to SRB or exogenous hydrogen sulfide as potential players in the etiology of intestinal disorders, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) and colorectal cancer in particular. Generation of hydrogen sulfide via pathways other than dissimilatory sulfate reduction may be as, or more, important than those involving the SRB. We suggest here that a novel axis of research is to assess the effects of hydrogen sulfide in shaping colonic microbiome structure. Clearly, in-depth characterization of the microbial pathways involved in colonic sulfur metabolism is necessary for a better understanding of its contribution to colonic disorders and development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:23226130

  8. Assessing the bias linked to DNA recovery from biofiltration woodchips for microbial community investigation by fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Cabrol, Léa; Malhautier, Luc; Poly, Franck; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we explored methodological aspects of nucleic acid recovery from microbial communities involved in a gas biofilter filled with pine bark woodchips. DNA was recovered indirectly in two steps, comparing different methods: cell dispersion (crushing, shaking, and sonication) and DNA extraction (three commercial kits and a laboratory protocol). The objectives were (a) to optimize cell desorption from the packing material and (b) to compare the 12 combinations of desorption and extraction methods, according to three relevant criteria: DNA yield, DNA purity, and community structure representation by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Cell dispersion was not influenced by the operational parameters tested for shaking and blending, while it increased with time for sonication. DNA extraction by the laboratory protocol provided the highest DNA yields, whereas the best DNA purity was obtained by a commercial kit designed for DNA extraction from soil. After successful PCR amplification, the 12 methods did not generate the same bias in microbial community representation. Eight combinations led to high diversity estimation, independently of the experimental procedure. Among them, six provided highly similar DGGE profiles. Two protocols generated a significantly dissimilar community profile, with less diversity. This study highlighted the crucial importance of DNA recovery bias evaluation.

  9. Formation of single domain magnetite by green rust oxidation promoted by microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Li, Jinhua; Benzerara, Karim; Sougrati, Moulay Tahar; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Bernard, Sylvain; Jumas, Jean-Claude; Guyot, François

    2014-08-01

    Biomineralization of magnetite is a central geomicrobiological process that might have played a primordial role over Earth’s history, possibly leaving traces of life in the geological record or controlling trace metal(loid)s and organic pollutants mobility in modern environments. Magnetite biomineralization has been attributed to two main microbial pathways to date (namely magnetotactic bacteria and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria). Here, we uncover a new route of magnetite biomineralization involving the anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron(II) oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1. Using transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy and rock magnetic analyses, this strain is shown to promote the transformation of hydroxychloride green rust in equilibrium with dissolved Fe(II) to (1) periplasmic lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and (2) extracellular magnetite, thus leading to strong redox heterogeneities at the nanometer scale. On the one hand, lepidocrocite was associated with protein moieties and exhibited an anisotropic texture, with the elongated axis parallel to the cell wall. On the other hand, magnetite crystals exhibited grain sizes and magnetic properties consistent with stable single domain particles. By comparison, abiotic controls led to a very slow (4 months vs. 2 days in BoFeN1 cultures) and incomplete oxidation of hydroxychloride green rust towards magnetite. As this abiotic magnetite exhibited the same size and magnetic properties (stable single domain particles) as magnetite produced in BoFeN1 cultures, only the co-occurrence of textured Fe(III)-oxides and magnetite, associated with the persistence of organic carbon molecules, might constitute valuable biosignatures to be looked for in the geological record. Our results furthermore contribute to a more complex picture of Fe redox cycling in the environment, providing an additional process of Fe(II)-bearing phase

  10. Syntrophic interactions and mechanisms underpinning anaerobic methane oxidation: targeted metaproteogenomics, single-cell protein detection and quantitative isotope imaging of microbial consortia

    SciTech Connect

    Orphan, Victoria Jeanne

    2014-11-26

    Syntrophy and mutualism play a central role in carbon and nutrient cycling by microorganisms. Yet, our ability to effectively study symbionts in culture has been hindered by the inherent interdependence of syntrophic associations, their dynamic behavior, and their frequent existence at thermodynamic limits. Now solutions to these challenges are emerging in the form of new methodologies. Developing strategies that establish links between the identity of microorganisms and their metabolic potential, as well as techniques that can probe metabolic networks on a scale that captures individual molecule exchange and processing, is at the forefront of microbial ecology. Understanding the interactions between microorganisms on this level, at a resolution previously intractable, will lead to our greater understanding of carbon turnover and microbial community resilience to environmental perturbations. In this project, we studied an enigmatic syntrophic association between uncultured methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria. This environmental archaeal-bacterial partnership represents a globally important sink for methane in anoxic environments. The specific goals of this project were organized into 3 major tasks designed to address questions relating to the ecophysiology of these syntrophic organisms under changing environmental conditions (e.g. different electron acceptors and nutrients), primarily through the development of microanalytical imaging methods which enable the visualization of the spatial distribution of the partners within aggregates, consumption and exchange of isotopically labeled substrates, and expression of targeted proteins identified via metaproteomics. The advanced tool set developed here to collect, correlate, and analyze these high resolution image and isotope-based datasets from methane-oxidizing consortia has the potential to be widely applicable for studying and modeling patterns of activity and interactions across a broad range of

  11. Arsenite and ferrous iron oxidation linked to chemolithotrophic denitrification for the immobilization of arsenic in anoxic environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, W.; Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Milner, L.; Oremland, R.; Field, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore a bioremediation strategy based on injecting NO3- to support the anoxic oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) and arsenite (As(III)) in the subsurface as a means to immobilize As in the form of arsenate (As(V)) adsorbed onto biogenic ferric (Fe(III)) (hydr)oxides. Continuous flows and filled columns were used to simulate a natural anaerobic groundwater and sediment system with co-occurring As(III) and Fe(II) in the presence (column SF1) or absence (column SF2) of nitrate, respectively. During operation for 250 days, the average influent arsenic concentration of 567 ??g L-1 was reduced to 10.6 (??9.6) ??g L-1 in the effluent of column SF1. The cumulative removal of Fe(II) and As(III) in SF1 was 6.5 to 10-fold higher than that in SF2. Extraction and measurement of the mass of iron and arsenic immobilized on the sand packing of the columns were close to the iron and arsenic removed from the aqueous phase during column operation. The dominant speciation of the immobilized iron and arsenic was Fe(III) and As(V) in SF1, compared with Fe(II) and As(III) in SF2. The speciation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that microbial oxidation of As(III) and Fe(II) linked to denitrification resulted in the enhanced immobilization of aqueous arsenic in anaerobic environments by forming Fe(III) (hydr)oxide coated sands with adsorbed As(V). ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  12. The Architecture of Iron Microbial Mats Reflects the Adaptation of Chemolithotrophic Iron Oxidation in Freshwater and Marine Environments

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Clara S.; McAllister, Sean M.; Leavitt, Anna H.; Glazer, Brian T.; Krepski, Sean T.; Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Microbes form mats with architectures that promote efficient metabolism within a particular physicochemical environment, thus studying mat structure helps us understand ecophysiology. Despite much research on chemolithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria, Fe mat architecture has not been visualized because these delicate structures are easily disrupted. There are striking similarities between the biominerals that comprise freshwater and marine Fe mats, made by Beta- and Zetaproteobacteria, respectively. If these biominerals are assembled into mat structures with similar functional morphology, this would suggest that mat architecture is adapted to serve roles specific to Fe oxidation. To evaluate this, we combined light, confocal, and scanning electron microscopy of intact Fe microbial mats with experiments on sheath formation in culture, in order to understand mat developmental history and subsequently evaluate the connection between Fe oxidation and mat morphology. We sampled a freshwater sheath mat from Maine and marine stalk and sheath mats from Loihi Seamount hydrothermal vents, Hawaii. Mat morphology correlated to niche: stalks formed in steeper O2 gradients while sheaths were associated with low to undetectable O2 gradients. Fe-biomineralized filaments, twisted stalks or hollow sheaths, formed the highly porous framework of each mat. The mat-formers are keystone species, with nascent marine stalk-rich mats comprised of novel and uncommon Zetaproteobacteria. For all mats, filaments were locally highly parallel with similar morphologies, indicating that cells were synchronously tracking a chemical or physical cue. In the freshwater mat, cells inhabited sheath ends at the growing edge of the mat. Correspondingly, time lapse culture imaging showed that sheaths are made like stalks, with cells rapidly leaving behind an Fe oxide filament. The distinctive architecture common to all observed Fe mats appears to serve specific functions related to chemolithotrophic Fe

  13. Oxidation increases mucin polymer cross-links to stiffen airway mucus gels.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaopeng; Hollinger, Martin; Lachowicz-Scroggins, Marrah E; Kerr, Sheena C; Dunican, Eleanor M; Daniel, Brian M; Ghosh, Sudakshina; Erzurum, Serpel C; Willard, Belinda; Hazen, Stanley L; Huang, Xiaozhu; Carrington, Stephen D; Oscarson, Stefan; Fahy, John V

    2015-02-25

    Airway mucus in cystic fibrosis (CF) is highly elastic, but the mechanism behind this pathology is unclear. We hypothesized that the biophysical properties of CF mucus are altered because of neutrophilic oxidative stress. Using confocal imaging, rheology, and biochemical measures of inflammation and oxidation, we found that CF airway mucus gels have a molecular architecture characterized by a core of mucin covered by a web of DNA and a rheological profile characterized by high elasticity that can be normalized by chemical reduction. We also found that high levels of reactive oxygen species in CF mucus correlated positively and significantly with high concentrations of the oxidized products of cysteine (disulfide cross-links). To directly determine whether oxidation can cross-link mucins to increase mucus elasticity, we exposed induced sputum from healthy subjects to oxidizing stimuli and found a marked and thiol-dependent increase in sputum elasticity. Targeting mucin disulfide cross-links using current thiol-amino structures such as N-acetylcysteine (NAC) requires high drug concentrations to have mucolytic effects. We therefore synthesized a thiol-carbohydrate structure (methyl 6-thio-6-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside) and found that it had stronger reducing activity than NAC and more potent and fast-acting mucolytic activity in CF sputum. Thus, oxidation arising from airway inflammation or environmental exposure contributes to pathologic mucus gel formation in the lung, which suggests that it can be targeted by thiol-modified carbohydrates. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Oxidation increases mucin polymer cross-links to stiffen airway mucus gels

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shaopeng; Hollinger, Martin; Lachowicz-Scroggins, Marrah E.; Kerr, Sheena C.; Dunican, Eleanor M.; Daniel, Brian M.; Ghosh, Sudakshina; Erzurum, Serpel C.; Willard, Belinda; Hazen, Stanley L.; Huang, Xiaozhu; Carrington, Stephen D.; Oscarson, Stefan; Fahy, John V.

    2015-01-01

    Airway mucus in cystic fibrosis (CF) is highly elastic, but the mechanism behind this pathology is unclear. We hypothesized that the biophysical properties of CF mucus are altered because of neutrophilic oxidative stress. Using confocal imaging, rheology, and biochemical measures of inflammation and oxidation, we found that CF airway mucus gels have a molecular architecture characterized by a core of mucin covered by a web of DNA and a rheological profile characterized by high elasticity that can be normalized by chemical reduction. We also found that high levels of reactive oxygen species in CF mucus correlated positively and significantly with high concentrations of the oxidized products of cysteine (disulfide cross-links). To directly determine whether oxidation can cross-link mucins to increase mucus elasticity, we exposed induced sputum from healthy subjects to oxidizing stimuli and found a marked and thiol-dependent increase in sputum elasticity. Targeting mucin disulfide cross-links using current thiol-amino structures such as N-acetylcysteine (NAC) requires high drug concentrations to have mucolytic effects. We therefore synthesized a thiol-carbohydrate structure (methyl 6-thio-6-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside) and found that it had stronger reducing activity than NAC and more potent and fast-acting mucolytic activity in CF sputum. Thus, oxidation arising from airway inflammation or environmental exposure contributes to pathologic mucus gel formation in the lung, which suggests that it can be targeted by thiol-modified carbohydrates. PMID:25717100

  15. Graphite oxide incorporated crosslinked polyvinyl alcohol and sulfonated styrene nanocomposite membrane as separating barrier in single chambered microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudra, Ruchira; Kumar, Vikash; Pramanik, Nilkamal; Kundu, Patit Paban

    2017-02-01

    Different membranes with varied molar concentrations of graphite oxide (GO), 'in situ' polymerized sulfonated polystyrene (SS) and glutaraldehyde (GA) cross linked polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), have been analyzed as an effective and low cost nanocomposite barrier in single chambered microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The synthesized composite membranes, namely GO0.2, GO0.4 and GO0.6 exhibited comparatively better results with reduced water uptake (WU) and swelling ratios (SR) over the native PVA. The variation in properties is illustrated with membrane analyses, where GO0.4 showed an increased proton conductivity (PC) and ion exchange capacity (IEC) of 0.128 S cm-1 and 0.33 meq g-1 amongst all of the used membranes. In comparison, reduced oxygen diffusivity with lower water uptake showed a two-fold decrease in GO0.4 over pure PVA membrane (∼2.09 × 10-4 cm s-1). A maximum power density of 193.6 mW m-2 (773.33 mW m-3) with a current density of 803.33 mA m-2 were observed with GO0.4 fitted MFC, where ∼81.89% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was removed using mixed firmicutes, as biocatalyst, in 25 days operation. In effect, the efficacy of GO incorporated crosslinked PVA and SS nanocomposite membrane has been evaluated as a polymer electrolyte membrane for harnessing bio-energy from single chambered MFCs.

  16. Evidence for nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation as a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bao-lan; Shen, Li-dong; Lian, Xu; Zhu, Qun; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Qian; He, Zhan-fei; Geng, Sha; Cheng, Dong-qing; Lou, Li-ping; Xu, Xiang-yang; Zheng, Ping; He, Yun-feng

    2014-01-01

    The process of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) was recently discovered and shown to be mediated by “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” (M. oxyfera). Here, evidence for n-damo in three different freshwater wetlands located in southeastern China was obtained using stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays, and 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase gene clone library analyses. Stable isotope experiments confirmed the occurrence of n-damo in the examined wetlands, and the potential n-damo rates ranged from 0.31 to 5.43 nmol CO2 per gram of dry soil per day at different depths of soil cores. A combined analysis of 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase genes demonstrated that M. oxyfera-like bacteria were mainly present in the deep soil with a maximum abundance of 3.2 × 107 gene copies per gram of dry soil. It is estimated that ∼0.51 g of CH4 m−2 per year could be linked to the n-damo process in the examined wetlands based on the measured potential n-damo rates. This study presents previously unidentified confirmation that the n-damo process is a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands, and n-damo has the potential to be a globally important methane sink due to increasing nitrogen pollution. PMID:24616523

  17. Evidence for nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation as a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bao-lan; Shen, Li-dong; Lian, Xu; Zhu, Qun; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Qian; He, Zhan-fei; Geng, Sha; Cheng, Dong-qing; Lou, Li-ping; Xu, Xiang-yang; Zheng, Ping; He, Yun-feng

    2014-03-25

    The process of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) was recently discovered and shown to be mediated by "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" (M. oxyfera). Here, evidence for n-damo in three different freshwater wetlands located in southeastern China was obtained using stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays, and 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase gene clone library analyses. Stable isotope experiments confirmed the occurrence of n-damo in the examined wetlands, and the potential n-damo rates ranged from 0.31 to 5.43 nmol CO2 per gram of dry soil per day at different depths of soil cores. A combined analysis of 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase genes demonstrated that M. oxyfera-like bacteria were mainly present in the deep soil with a maximum abundance of 3.2 × 10(7) gene copies per gram of dry soil. It is estimated that ∼0.51 g of CH4 m(-2) per year could be linked to the n-damo process in the examined wetlands based on the measured potential n-damo rates. This study presents previously unidentified confirmation that the n-damo process is a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands, and n-damo has the potential to be a globally important methane sink due to increasing nitrogen pollution.

  18. Feruloylated arabinoxylans are oxidatively cross-linked by extracellular maize peroxidase but not by horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Burr, Sally J; Fry, Stephen C

    2009-09-01

    Covalent cross-linking of soluble extracellular arabinoxylans in living maize cultures, which models the cross-linking of wall-bound arabinoxylans, is due to oxidation of feruloyl esters to oligoferuloyl esters and ethers. The oxidizing system responsible could be H2O2/peroxidase, O2/laccase, or reactive oxygen species acting non-enzymically. To distinguish these possibilities, we studied arabinoxylan cross-linking in vivo and in vitro. In living cultures, exogenous, soluble, extracellular, feruloylated [pentosyl-3H]arabinoxylans underwent cross-linking, beginning abruptly 8 d after sub-culture. Cross-linking was suppressed by iodide, an H2O2 scavenger, indicating dependence on endogenous H2O2. However, exogenous H2O2 did not cause precocious cross-linking, despite the constant presence of endogenous peroxidases, suggesting that younger cultures contained natural cross-linking inhibitors. Dialysed culture-filtrates cross-linked [3H]arabinoxylans in vitro only if H2O2 was also added, indicating a peroxidase requirement. This cross-linking was highly ionic-strength-dependent. The peroxidases responsible were heat-labile, although relatively heat-stable peroxidases (assayed on o-dianisidine) were also present. Surprisingly, added horseradish peroxidase, even after heat-denaturation, blocked the arabinoxylan-cross-linking action of maize peroxidases, suggesting that the horseradish protein was a competing substrate for [3H]arabinoxylan coupling. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cross-linking of extracellular arabinoxylan in living maize cultures is an action of apoplastic peroxidases, some of whose unusual properties we report.

  19. Uncultivated microbial eukaryotic diversity: a method to link ssu rRNA gene sequences with morphology.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Marissa B; Kita, Kelley N; Dawson, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Protists have traditionally been identified by cultivation and classified taxonomically based on their cellular morphologies and behavior. In the past decade, however, many novel protist taxa have been identified using cultivation independent ssu rRNA sequence surveys. New rRNA "phylotypes" from uncultivated eukaryotes have no connection to the wealth of prior morphological descriptions of protists. To link phylogenetically informative sequences with taxonomically informative morphological descriptions, we demonstrate several methods for combining whole cell rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with cytoskeletal or organellar immunostaining. Either eukaryote or ciliate-specific ssu rRNA probes were combined with an anti-α-tubulin antibody or phalloidin, a common actin stain, to define cytoskeletal features of uncultivated protists in several environmental samples. The eukaryote ssu rRNA probe was also combined with Mitotracker® or a hydrogenosomal-specific anti-Hsp70 antibody to localize mitochondria and hydrogenosomes, respectively, in uncultivated protists from different environments. Using rRNA probes in combination with immunostaining, we linked ssu rRNA phylotypes with microtubule structure to describe flagellate and ciliate morphology in three diverse environments, and linked Naegleria spp. to their amoeboid morphology using actin staining in hay infusion samples. We also linked uncultivated ciliates to morphologically similar Colpoda-like ciliates using tubulin immunostaining with a ciliate-specific rRNA probe. Combining rRNA-targeted FISH with cytoskeletal immunostaining or stains targeting specific organelles provides a fast, efficient, high throughput method for linking genetic sequences with morphological features in uncultivated protists. When linked to phylotype, morphological descriptions of protists can both complement and vet the increasing number of sequences from uncultivated protists, including those of novel lineages

  20. Microbial Community Dynamics and Activity Link to Indigo Production from Indole in Bioaugmented Activated Sludge Systems

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jie; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Qin, Yujia; Zhou, Jiti; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Biosynthesis of the popular dyestuff indigo from indole has been comprehensively studied using pure cultures, but less has been done to characterize the indigo production by microbial communities. In our previous studies, a wild strain Comamonas sp. MQ was isolated from activated sludge and the recombinant Escherichia coli nagAc carrying the naphthalene dioxygenase gene (nag) from strain MQ was constructed, both of which were capable of producing indigo from indole. Herein, three activated sludge systems, G1 (non-augmented control), G2 (augmented with Comamonas sp. MQ), and G3 (augmented with recombinant E. coli nagAc), were constructed to investigate indigo production. After 132-day operation, G3 produced the highest yields of indigo (99.5 ± 3.0 mg/l), followed by G2 (27.3 ± 1.3 mg/l) and G1 (19.2 ± 1.2 mg/l). The microbial community dynamics and activities associated with indigo production were analyzed by Illumina Miseq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The inoculated strain MQ survived for at least 30 days, whereas E. coli nagAc was undetectable shortly after inoculation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis suggested the abundance of naphthalene dioxygenase gene (nagAc) from both inoculated strains was strongly correlated with indigo yields in early stages (0–30 days) (P < 0.001) but not in later stages (30–132 days) (P > 0.10) of operation. Based on detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and dissimilarity test results, the communities underwent a noticeable shift during the operation. Among the four major genera (> 1% on average), the commonly reported indigo-producing populations Comamonas and Pseudomonas showed no positive relationship with indigo yields (P > 0.05) based on Pearson correlation test, while Alcaligenes and Aquamicrobium, rarely reported for indigo production, were positively correlated with indigo yields (P < 0.05). This study should provide new insights into our understanding of indigo bio-production by microbial communities

  1. Linking benthic microbial community dynamics to diel redox variations in a near shore costal environment, Héeia Fishpond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, K. L.; Rogers, K. L.; Wheat, C. G.; Alegado, R.

    2016-12-01

    Microbes play crucial roles in mediating biogeochemical cycling in coastal marine habitats. In shallow coastal ecosystems, excess primary productivity and respiration of pelagic phototrophic organisms generate striking diel variations in dissolved oxygen concentrations, leading to substantial vertical migration of redox transition zones in the sediment. However, the relationship between microbial community dynamics and the establishment of these geochemical gradients, especially over a diel time frame, remains poorly constrained. Here we examine the biogeochemical drivers of diel redox dynamics by integrating comprehensive geochemical, taxonomic, functional gene abundance, and thermodynamic datasets from Héeia Fishpond (HFP) sediment cores. HFP, an 88-acre tidally-influenced, shallow Hawaiian coastal estuarine system, is analogous to a large mesocosm embedded in a natural coastal environment, making it an ideal site for coastal biogeochemical studies. Taxonomic assessments of bacterial diversity via 16S rRNA genes revealed centimeter- scale variability with depth, with similar taxa present in all samples, but their relative abundances varied substantially among horizons. There were significant correlation between changes in geochemical composition and changes in community structure. Additionally, functional gene abundance was correlated with energy potential and aligned with activity. The taxanomic data and porewater geochemistry from HFP sediments suggest that redox variations observed in iron and sulfur speciation result from depth-related changes in microbial activity and community structure over a diel period. By linking community diversity to metabolic activity in the context of the geochemical environment, this research provides valuable insight into the connectivity of iron and sulfur metabolic modes.

  2. Repeated application of composted tannery sludge affects differently soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ademir Sérgio Ferreira; Lima, Luciano Moura; Santos, Vilma Maria; Schmidt, Radomir

    2016-10-01

    Repeated application of composted tannery sludge (CTS) changes the soil chemical properties and, consequently, can affect the soil microbial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the responses of soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms to repeated application of CTS. CTS was applied repeatedly during 6 years, and, at the sixth year, the soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms were determined in the soil. The treatments consisted of 0 (without CTS application), 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 t ha(-1) of CTS (dry basis). Soil pH, EC, SOC, total N, and Cr concentration increased with the increase in CTS rate. Soil microbial biomass did not change significantly with the amendment of 2.5 Mg ha(-1), while it decreased at the higher rates. Total and specific enzymes activity responded differently after CTS application. The abundance of bacteria did not change with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment and decreased after this rate, while the abundance of archaea increased significantly with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment. Repeated application of different CTS rates for 6 years had different effects on the soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms as a response to changes in soil chemical properties.

  3. Oxidative stress modulates mitochondrial failure and cyclophilin D function in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    López-Erauskin, Jone; Galino, Jorge; Bianchi, Patrizia; Fourcade, Stéphane; Andreu, Antoni L; Ferrer, Isidre; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Pujol, Aurora

    2012-12-01

    A common process associated with oxidative stress and severe mitochondrial impairment is the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, as described in many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening represents a potential target for inhibiting mitochondrial-driven cell death. Among the mitochondrial permeability transition pore components, cyclophilin D is the most studied and has been found increased under pathological conditions. Here, we have used in vitro and in vivo models of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy to investigate the relationship between the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and redox homeostasis. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurodegenerative condition caused by loss of function of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter, in which oxidative stress plays a pivotal role. In this study, we provide evidence of impaired mitochondrial metabolism in a peroxisomal disease, as fibroblasts in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy cannot survive when forced to rely on mitochondrial energy production, i.e. on incubation in galactose. Oxidative stress induced under galactose conditions leads to mitochondrial damage in the form of mitochondrial inner membrane potential dissipation, ATP drop and necrotic cell death, together with increased levels of oxidative modifications in cyclophilin D protein. Moreover, we show increased expression levels of cyclophilin D in the affected zones of brains in patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy, in spinal cord of a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (Abcd1-null mice) and in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Notably, treatment with antioxidants rescues mitochondrial damage markers in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, including cyclophilin D oxidative modifications, and reverses cyclophilin D induction in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the

  4. Oxidative stress modulates mitochondrial failure and cyclophilin D function in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    López-Erauskin, Jone; Galino, Jorge; Bianchi, Patrizia; Fourcade, Stéphane; Andreu, Antoni L.; Ferrer, Isidre; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    A common process associated with oxidative stress and severe mitochondrial impairment is the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, as described in many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening represents a potential target for inhibiting mitochondrial-driven cell death. Among the mitochondrial permeability transition pore components, cyclophilin D is the most studied and has been found increased under pathological conditions. Here, we have used in vitro and in vivo models of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy to investigate the relationship between the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and redox homeostasis. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurodegenerative condition caused by loss of function of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter, in which oxidative stress plays a pivotal role. In this study, we provide evidence of impaired mitochondrial metabolism in a peroxisomal disease, as fibroblasts in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy cannot survive when forced to rely on mitochondrial energy production, i.e. on incubation in galactose. Oxidative stress induced under galactose conditions leads to mitochondrial damage in the form of mitochondrial inner membrane potential dissipation, ATP drop and necrotic cell death, together with increased levels of oxidative modifications in cyclophilin D protein. Moreover, we show increased expression levels of cyclophilin D in the affected zones of brains in patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy, in spinal cord of a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (Abcd1-null mice) and in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Notably, treatment with antioxidants rescues mitochondrial damage markers in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, including cyclophilin D oxidative modifications, and reverses cyclophilin D induction in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the

  5. Microbial exopolymers link predator and prey in a model yeast biofilm system.

    PubMed

    Joubert, L-M; Wolfaardt, G M; Botha, A

    2006-08-01

    Protistan grazing on biofilms is potentially an important conduit enabling energy flow between microbial trophic levels. Contrary to the widely held assumption that protistan feeding primarily involves ingestion of biofilm cells, with negative consequences for the biofilm, this study demonstrated preferential grazing on the noncellular biofilm matrix by a ciliate, with selective ingestion of yeast and bacterial cells of planktonic origin over attached and biofilm-derived planktonic cells. Introducing a ciliate to two biofilm-forming Cryptococcus species, as well as two bacterial species in a model biofilm system, fluorescent probes were applied to determine ingestion of cellular and noncellular biofilm fractions. Fluoromicroscopy, as well as photometric quantification, confirmed that protistan grazing enhanced yeast biofilm metabolism, and an increase in biofilm biomass and viability. We propose that the extracellular polymeric matrix of biofilms may act as an interface regulating interaction between predator and prey, while serving as source of nutrients and energy for protists.

  6. Linking Microbial Enzymatic Activities and Functional Diversity of Soil around Earthworm Burrows and Casts

    PubMed Central

    Lipiec, Jerzy; Frąc, Magdalena; Brzezińska, Małgorzata; Turski, Marcin; Oszust, Karolina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of earthworms (Lumbricidae) on the enzymatic activity and microbial functional diversity in the burrow system [burrow wall (BW) 0–3 mm, transitional zone (TZ) 3–7 mm, bulk soil (BS) > 20 mm from the BW] and cast aggregates of a loess soil under a pear orchard. The dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase, protease, alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and acid phosphomonoesterase enzymes were assessed using standard methods. The functional diversity (catabolic potential) was assessed using the Average Well Color Development and Richness Index following the community level physiological profiling from Biolog Eco Plates. All measurements were done using soil from each compartment immediately after in situ sampling in spring. The enzymatic activites including dehydrogenase, protease, β-glucosidase and alkaline phosphomonoesterase were appreciably greater in the BW or casts than in BS and TZ. Conversely, acid phosphomonoesterase had the largest value in the BS. Average Well Color Development in both the TZ and the BS (0.98–0.94 A590 nm) were more than eight times higher than in the BWs and casts. The lowest richness index in the BS (15 utilized substrates) increased by 86–113% in all the other compartments. The PC1 in principal component analysis mainly differentiated the BWs and the TZ. Utilization of all substrate categories was the lowest in the BS. The PC2 differentiated the casts from the other compartments. The enhanced activity of a majority of the enzymes and increased microbial functional diversity in most earthworm-influenced compartments make the soils less vulnerable to degradation and thus increases the stability of ecologically relevant processes in the orchard ecosystem. PMID:27625645

  7. Linking Microbial Enzymatic Activities and Functional Diversity of Soil around Earthworm Burrows and Casts.

    PubMed

    Lipiec, Jerzy; Frąc, Magdalena; Brzezińska, Małgorzata; Turski, Marcin; Oszust, Karolina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of earthworms (Lumbricidae) on the enzymatic activity and microbial functional diversity in the burrow system [burrow wall (BW) 0-3 mm, transitional zone (TZ) 3-7 mm, bulk soil (BS) > 20 mm from the BW] and cast aggregates of a loess soil under a pear orchard. The dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase, protease, alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and acid phosphomonoesterase enzymes were assessed using standard methods. The functional diversity (catabolic potential) was assessed using the Average Well Color Development and Richness Index following the community level physiological profiling from Biolog Eco Plates. All measurements were done using soil from each compartment immediately after in situ sampling in spring. The enzymatic activites including dehydrogenase, protease, β-glucosidase and alkaline phosphomonoesterase were appreciably greater in the BW or casts than in BS and TZ. Conversely, acid phosphomonoesterase had the largest value in the BS. Average Well Color Development in both the TZ and the BS (0.98-0.94 A590 nm) were more than eight times higher than in the BWs and casts. The lowest richness index in the BS (15 utilized substrates) increased by 86-113% in all the other compartments. The PC1 in principal component analysis mainly differentiated the BWs and the TZ. Utilization of all substrate categories was the lowest in the BS. The PC2 differentiated the casts from the other compartments. The enhanced activity of a majority of the enzymes and increased microbial functional diversity in most earthworm-influenced compartments make the soils less vulnerable to degradation and thus increases the stability of ecologically relevant processes in the orchard ecosystem.

  8. Microbial response to simulated global change is phylogenetically conserved and linked with functional potential

    PubMed Central

    Amend, Anthony S; Martiny, Adam C; Allison, Steven D; Berlemont, Renaud; Goulden, Michael L; Lu, Ying; Treseder, Kathleen K; Weihe, Claudia; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2016-01-01

    The high diversity of microbial communities hampers predictions about their responses to global change. Here we investigate the potential for using a phylogenetic, trait-based framework to capture the response of bacteria and fungi to global change manipulations. Replicated grassland plots were subjected to 3+ years of drought and nitrogen fertilization. The responses of leaf litter bacteria and fungi to these simulated changes were significantly phylogenetically conserved. Proportional changes in abundance were highly correlated among related organisms, such that relatives with approximately 5% ribosomal DNA genetic distance showed similar responses to the treatments. A microbe's change in relative abundance was significantly correlated between the treatments, suggesting a compromise between numerical abundance in undisturbed environments and resistance to change in general, independent of disturbance type. Lineages in which at least 90% of the microbes shared the same response were circumscribed at a modest phylogenetic depth (τD 0.014–0.021), but significantly larger than randomized simulations predict. In several clades, phylogenetic depth of trait consensus was higher. Fungal response to drought was more conserved than was response to nitrogen fertilization, whereas bacteria responded equally to both treatments. Finally, we show that a bacterium's response to the manipulations is correlated with its potential functional traits (measured here as the number of glycoside hydrolase genes encoding the capacity to degrade different types of carbohydrates). Together, these results suggest that a phylogenetic, trait-based framework may be useful for predicting shifts in microbial composition and functioning in the face of global change. PMID:26046258

  9. NATURAL ARSENIC CONTAMINATION OF HOLOCENE ALLUVIAL AQUIFERS BY LINKED TECTONIC, WEATHERING, AND MICROBIAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linked tectonic, geochemical, and biologic processes lead to natural arsenic contamination of groundwater in Holocene alluvial aquifers, which are the main threat to human health around the world. These groundwaters are commonly found a long distance from their ultimate source of...

  10. NATURAL ARSENIC CONTAMINATION OF HOLOCENE ALLUVIAL AQUIFERS BY LINKED TECTONIC, WEATHERING, AND MICROBIAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linked tectonic, geochemical, and biologic processes lead to natural arsenic contamination of groundwater in Holocene alluvial aquifers, which are the main threat to human health around the world. These groundwaters are commonly found a long distance from their ultimate source of...

  11. Microbial oxidation as a methane sink beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Alexander B.; Dore, John E.; Achberger, Amanda M.; Christner, Brent C.; Mitchell, Andrew C.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Vick-Majors, Trista J.; Priscu, John C.

    2017-08-01

    Aquatic habitats beneath ice masses contain active microbial ecosystems capable of cycling important greenhouse gases, such as methane (CH4). A large methane reservoir is thought to exist beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, but its quantity, source and ultimate fate are poorly understood. For instance, O2 supplied by basal melting should result in conditions favourable for aerobic methane oxidation. Here we use measurements of methane concentrations and stable isotope compositions along with genomic analyses to assess the sources and cycling of methane in Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW) in West Antarctica. We show that sub-ice-sheet methane is produced through the biological reduction of CO2 using H2. This methane pool is subsequently consumed by aerobic, bacterial methane oxidation at the SLW sediment-water interface. Bacterial oxidation consumes >99% of the methane and represents a significant methane sink, and source of biomass carbon and metabolic energy to the surficial SLW sediments. We conclude that aerobic methanotrophy may mitigate the release of methane to the atmosphere upon subglacial water drainage to ice sheet margins and during periods of deglaciation.

  12. Microbial nitrate-dependent cyclohexane degradation coupled with anaerobic ammonium oxidation.

    PubMed

    Musat, Florin; Wilkes, Heinz; Behrends, Astrid; Woebken, Dagmar; Widdel, Friedrich

    2010-10-01

    An anaerobic nitrate-reducing enrichment culture was established with a cyclic saturated petroleum hydrocarbon, cyclohexane, the fate of which in anoxic environments has been scarcely investigated. GC-MS showed cyclohexylsuccinate as a metabolite, in accordance with an anaerobic enzymatic activation of cyclohexane by carbon-carbon addition to fumarate. Furthermore, long-chain cyclohexyl-substituted cell fatty acids apparently derived from cyclohexane were detected. Nitrate reduction was not only associated with cyclohexane utilization but also with striking depletion of added ammonium ions. Significantly more ammonium was consumed than could be accounted for by assimilation. This indicated the occurrence of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) with nitrite from cyclohexane-dependent nitrate reduction. Indeed, nitrite depletion was stimulated upon further addition of ammonium. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes and subsequent cell hybridization with specific probes showed that approximately 75% of the bacterial cells affiliated with the Geobacteraceae and approximately 18% with Candidatus 'Brocadia anammoxidans' (member of the Planctomycetales), an anaerobic ammonium oxidizer. These results and additional quantitative growth experiments indicated that the member of the Geobacteraceae reduced nitrate with cyclohexane to nitrite and some ammonium; the latter two and ammonium added to the medium were scavenged by anammox bacteria to yield dinitrogen. A model was established to quantify the partition of each microorganism in the overall process. Such hydrocarbon oxidation by an alleged 'denitrification' ('pseudo-denitrification'), which in reality is a dissimilatory loop through anammox, can in principle also occur in other microbial systems with nitrate-dependent hydrocarbon attenuation.

  13. Mechanisms for chelator stimulation of microbial Fe(III) -oxide reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Woodward, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms by which nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) stimulated Fe(III) reduction in sediments from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer were investigated in order to gain insight into how added Fe(III) chelators stimulate the activity of hydrocarbon-degrading, Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms in these sediments, and how naturally occurring Fe(III) chelators might promote Fe(III) reduction in aquatic sediments. NTA solubilized Fe(III) from the aquifer sediments. NTA stimulation of microbial Fe(III) reduction did not appear to be the result of making calcium, magnesium, potassium, or trace metals more available to the microorganisms. Stimulation of Fe(III) reduction could not be attributed to NTA serving as a source of carbon or fixed nitrogen for Fe(III)-reducing bacteria as NTA was not degraded in the sediments. Studies with the Fe(III)-reducing microorganism, Geobacter metallireducens, and pure Fe(III)-oxide forms, demonstrated that NTA stimulated the reduction of a variety of Fe(III) forms, including highly crystalline Fe(III)-oxides such as goethite and hematite. The results suggest that NTA solubilization of insoluble Fe(III)-oxide is an important mechanism for the stimulation of Fe(III) reduction by NTA in aquifer sediments.

  14. Quinone-mediated microbial synthesis of reduced graphene oxide with peroxidase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Aijie; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Lv, Hong

    2013-12-01

    The effects of different quinones on graphene oxide (GO) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the peroxidase activity of the resultant reduced graphene oxide (QRGO) were studied. The presence of 100 μM anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate and 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone could lead to 1.6-2.8-fold increase in GO reduction rate, whereas anthraquinone-2-carboxylate slowed down the reduction. The stimulating effects of AQS increased with the increase of its concentration (10-100 μM). The mediated effects were proved by direct GO reduction by microbially reduced AQS. The mediated reduction of GO to QRGO was characterized by UV-vis, XRD, FTIR, Raman spectra, XPS, TEM and AFM, respectively. The as-prepared QRGO possessed peroxidase-like activity, which could catalyze the oxidation of 3,3'5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine by H2O2, and followed Michealis-Menten kinetics. A colorimetric sensor for quantitative determination of glucose based on the peroxidase activity of QRGO was developed over a range of 1-120 μM with a detection limit of 1 μM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biocompatibility of microbially reduced graphene oxide in primary mouse embryonic fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Eppakayala, Vasuki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2013-05-01

    Graphene nanosheet is a one-atom thick planar sheet of sp(2)-bonded carbon atoms, which are densely packed in a honeycomb crystal lattice, attracting tremendous attention from both fundamental research and industrial applications. The synthesis of graphene from graphene oxide (GO) using a biological method is one of the important topics in the areas of nanotechnology, because graphene-based nanomaterials have potential applications. A green, simple and non-toxic method for preparing graphene using biomass of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the reducing reagent is proposed. The resulting microbially reduced graphene oxide (M-rGO) was characterized using a range of analytical techniques. UV-visible spectroscopy confirms the transition of graphene oxide to graphene. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to study the changes in surface functionalities. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to investigate the crystalline nature and the morphologies of prepared graphene respectively. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the M-rGO was investigated using primary mouse embryonic fibroblast (PMEF) cells. The present study suggests that the M-rGO has significant biocompatibility for PMEF cells, even at a high concentration of 100 μg ml(-1). Therefore, the proposed safe and green method confers the M-rGO with a great potential for various biomedical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Microbial cycling, oxidative weathering, and the triple oxygen isotope consequences for marine sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, D. T.; Cowie, B.; Turchyn, A. V.; Antler, G.; Gill, B. C.; Berelson, W.

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms are responsible for most geochemical sulfur cycling in the ocean. On both modern and geological time scales, stable isotope ratios often serve as a mechanism to track conspicuous or coupled microbial processes, which in turn inform burial fluxes. The most common example of this approach is the use of sulfur isotopes in sulfate and sulfide (both aqueous and in mineral form) to track everything from rates of microbial processes through to the presence/absence of certain metabolic processes in a given environment. The use of oxygen isotope ratios in sulfate has developed in a similar fashion, providing complementary information to that of sulfur isotopes. Through our current work, we will extend the application of oxygen isotopes to include the trace stable oxygen isotope, 17O. These data are facilitated by a new laser F2 fluorination technique running at Harvard, and accompanied by the calibration of a suite of common sulfate standards. At first blush, 16O - 17O - 18O systematics should carry mass-dependent microbial fractionations with process-specific mass laws that are resolvable at the level of our analytical precision. We look to calibrate these biogeochemical effects through the integrated picture captured in marine pore water sulfate profiles, where the 18O/16O is known to evolve. In compliment, riverine sulfate (the sulfate input to the ocean) is an oxidative weathering product and is posited to carry a memory effect of tropospheric O2. Interestingly, the 17O/16O of that O2 carries a mass-independent signal reflecting the balance between stratospheric reactions and Earth surface biospheric fluxes. Through this presentation, we look to calibrate the controls on the balance between biospheric and atmospheric contributions to the marine sulfate reservoir. This is enabled by a series of isotope mass-balance models and with the ultimate goal of developing the geological triple oxygen isotope records of sulfate as a new environmental proxy for paleo

  17. Microbially mediated formation of a new REE enriched Mn-oxide, Ytterby mine, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, Susanne; Allard, Bert; Rattray, Jayne E.; Callac, Nolwenn; Skelton, Alasdair; Ivarsson, Magnus; Karlsson, Stefan; Sjöberg, Viktor; Dupraz, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of a black substance seeping from fractured bedrock in a subterranean tunnel revealed a new, microbially mediated, secondary manganese oxide mineralisation, highly enriched in rare earth elements (REEs). This tunnel is dry and at shallow depth and was built to convert the former Ytterby mine, known for the discovery of yttrium (Y), scandium (Sc) and five rare earth elements, into a fuel deposit for the Swedish Armed Forces. As the type locality of these rare earth elements, the Ytterby mine gave its name to yttrium, ytterbium, erbium and terbium. Geochemical analysis shows that the substance is enriched in REEs with concentrations one to two orders of magnitude higher than the surrounding rocks. Elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction establish that the main component is a manganese oxide of the birnessite type (general formula: [Na,Ca]0.5[Mn(III),Mn(IV)]2O4xAq). There are also minor fractions of calcite, some other manganese oxides, feldspars, quartz and about 1% organic matter, but no iron oxides. Leaching studies (sequential and selective) were performed in order to establish how the minor components are associated with the matrix (in the lattice or merely adsorbed on the outer surface). It shows that the Ytterby birnessite contains about 1% REEs in the lattice, as well as calcium but no sodium. Formation of birnessite by manganese oxidizing bacteria is well-known (e.g. Tebo et al, 2004). Quantitative PCR shows that the total number of bacteria in the Ytterby substance is in the order 1010 cells per g substance while the water feeding the fracture has in the order of 106 cells per ml groundwater. qPCR data further confirm that manganese oxidizing microorganisms are present and that the abundance varies with the seasons. Analysis of the precipitated manganese using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy shows that the substance is composed of two or more components, with one part having a biogenic signature. The occurrence of C31 to C35

  18. Distribution of Microbial Arsenic Reduction, Oxidation and Extrusion Genes along a Wide Range of Environmental Arsenic Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Lorena V.; Casamayor, Emilio O.; Chong, Guillermo; Pedrós-Alió, Carles; Demergasso, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The presence of the arsenic oxidation, reduction, and extrusion genes arsC, arrA, aioA, and acr3 was explored in a range of natural environments in northern Chile, with arsenic concentrations spanning six orders of magnitude. A combination of primers from the literature and newly designed primers were used to explore the presence of the arsC gene, coding for the reduction of As (V) to As (III) in one of the most common detoxification mechanisms. Enterobacterial related arsC genes appeared only in the environments with the lowest As concentration, while Firmicutes-like genes were present throughout the range of As concentrations. The arrA gene, involved in anaerobic respiration using As (V) as electron acceptor, was found in all the systems studied. The As (III) oxidation gene aioA and the As (III) transport gene acr3 were tracked with two primer sets each and they were also found to be spread through the As concentration gradient. Sediment samples had a higher number of arsenic related genes than water samples. Considering the results of the bacterial community composition available for these samples, the higher microbial phylogenetic diversity of microbes inhabiting the sediments may explain the increased number of genetic resources found to cope with arsenic. Overall, the environmental distribution of arsenic related genes suggests that the occurrence of different ArsC families provides different degrees of protection against arsenic as previously described in laboratory strains, and that the glutaredoxin (Grx)-linked arsenate reductases related to Enterobacteria do not confer enough arsenic resistance to live above certain levels of As concentrations. PMID:24205341

  19. Distribution of microbial arsenic reduction, oxidation and extrusion genes along a wide range of environmental arsenic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Lorena V; Casamayor, Emilio O; Chong, Guillermo; Pedrós-Alió, Carles; Demergasso, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The presence of the arsenic oxidation, reduction, and extrusion genes arsC, arrA, aioA, and acr3 was explored in a range of natural environments in northern Chile, with arsenic concentrations spanning six orders of magnitude. A combination of primers from the literature and newly designed primers were used to explore the presence of the arsC gene, coding for the reduction of As (V) to As (III) in one of the most common detoxification mechanisms. Enterobacterial related arsC genes appeared only in the environments with the lowest As concentration, while Firmicutes-like genes were present throughout the range of As concentrations. The arrA gene, involved in anaerobic respiration using As (V) as electron acceptor, was found in all the systems studied. The As (III) oxidation gene aioA and the As (III) transport gene acr3 were tracked with two primer sets each and they were also found to be spread through the As concentration gradient. Sediment samples had a higher number of arsenic related genes than water samples. Considering the results of the bacterial community composition available for these samples, the higher microbial phylogenetic diversity of microbes inhabiting the sediments may explain the increased number of genetic resources found to cope with arsenic. Overall, the environmental distribution of arsenic related genes suggests that the occurrence of different ArsC families provides different degrees of protection against arsenic as previously described in laboratory strains, and that the glutaredoxin (Grx)-linked arsenate reductases related to Enterobacteria do not confer enough arsenic resistance to live above certain levels of As concentrations.

  20. Application of electrolysis to stimulate microbial reductive PCE dechlorination and oxidative VC biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Lohner, Svenja T; Tiehm, Andreas

    2009-09-15

    A novel approach was applied to stimulate biodegradation of chloroethenes bya coupled bioelectro-process. In a flow-through column system, microbial dechlorination of tetrachloroethene to cis-dichloroethene, vinyl chloride, and ethene was stimulated by hydrogen produced by water electrolysis. Dechlorinating bacteria (Dehalococcoides spp. and Desulfitobacterium spp.) and also methanogens and homoacetogens were detected in the anaerobic column. Simultaneously, oxidative biodegradation of lower chlorinated metabolites (vinyl chloride) was stimulated by electrolytic oxygen formation in the corresponding aerobic column. The process was stable for more than 100 days and an average removal of approximately 23 micromol/d PCE and 72 micromo/d vinyl chloride was obtained with a current density of 0.05 mA/cm2. Abiotic electrochemical degradation of the contaminants was not observed. Microbial dechlorination correlated with the current densities in the applied range of 0.01-0.05 mA/cm2. The results are promising for environmental applications, since with electrolysis hydrogen and oxygen can be supplied continuously to chloroethene degrading microorganisms, and the supply rates can be easily controlled by adjusting the electric current.

  1. Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria Shunt Carbon to Microbial Mats at a Marine Hydrocarbon Seep

    DOE PAGES

    Paul, Blair G.; Ding, Haibing; Bagby, Sarah C.; ...

    2017-02-27

    The marine subsurface is a reservoir of the greenhouse gas methane. While microorganisms living in water column and seafloor ecosystems are known to be a major sink limiting net methane transport from the marine subsurface to the atmosphere, few studies have assessed the flow of methane-derived carbon through the benthic mat communities that line the seafloor on the continental shelf where methane is emitted. We analyzed the abundance and isotope composition of fatty acids in microbial mats grown in the shallow Coal Oil Point seep field off Santa Barbara, CA, USA, where seep gas is a mixture of methane andmore » CO2. We further used stable isotope probing (SIP) to track methane incorporation into mat biomass. We found evidence that multiple allochthonous substrates supported the rich growth of these mats, with notable contributions from bacterial methanotrophs and sulfur-oxidizers as well as eukaryotic phototrophs. Fatty acids characteristic of methanotrophs were shown to be abundant and 13C-enriched in SIP samples, and DNA-SIP identified members of the methanotrophic family Methylococcaceae as major 13CH4 consumers. Members of Sulfuricurvaceae, Sulfurospirillaceae, and Sulfurovumaceae are implicated in fixation of seep CO2. The mats’ autotrophs support a diverse assemblage of co-occurring bacteria and protozoa, with Methylophaga as key consumers of methane-derived organic matter. This study identifies the taxa contributing to the flow of seep-derived carbon through microbial mat biomass, revealing the bacterial and eukaryotic diversity of these remarkable ecosystems.« less

  2. Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria Shunt Carbon to Microbial Mats at a Marine Hydrocarbon Seep

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Blair G.; Ding, Haibing; Bagby, Sarah C.; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Redmond, Molly C.; Andersen, Gary L.; Valentine, David L.

    2017-01-01

    The marine subsurface is a reservoir of the greenhouse gas methane. While microorganisms living in water column and seafloor ecosystems are known to be a major sink limiting net methane transport from the marine subsurface to the atmosphere, few studies have assessed the flow of methane-derived carbon through the benthic mat communities that line the seafloor on the continental shelf where methane is emitted. We analyzed the abundance and isotope composition of fatty acids in microbial mats grown in the shallow Coal Oil Point seep field off Santa Barbara, CA, USA, where seep gas is a mixture of methane and CO2. We further used stable isotope probing (SIP) to track methane incorporation into mat biomass. We found evidence that multiple allochthonous substrates supported the rich growth of these mats, with notable contributions from bacterial methanotrophs and sulfur-oxidizers as well as eukaryotic phototrophs. Fatty acids characteristic of methanotrophs were shown to be abundant and 13C-enriched in SIP samples, and DNA-SIP identified members of the methanotrophic family Methylococcaceae as major 13CH4 consumers. Members of Sulfuricurvaceae, Sulfurospirillaceae, and Sulfurovumaceae are implicated in fixation of seep CO2. The mats’ autotrophs support a diverse assemblage of co-occurring bacteria and protozoa, with Methylophaga as key consumers of methane-derived organic matter. This study identifies the taxa contributing to the flow of seep-derived carbon through microbial mat biomass, revealing the bacterial and eukaryotic diversity of these remarkable ecosystems. PMID:28289403

  3. Microbial resistance in relation to catalase activity to oxidative stress induced by photolysis of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Mokudai, Takayuki; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kohno, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the mechanism of microbial resistance to oxidative stress induced by photolysis of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in relation to microbial catalase activity. In microbicidal tests, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans were killed and this was accompanied by production of hydroxyl radicals. C. albicans was more resistant to hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H(2)O(2) than was S. aureus. A catalase activity assay demonstrated that C. albicans had stronger catalase activity; accordingly, catalase activity could be one of the reasons for the resistance of the fungus to photolysis of H(2)O(2). Indeed, it was demonstrated that C. albicans with strong catalase activity was more resistant to photolysis of H(2)O(2) than that with weak catalase activity. Kinetic analysis using a modified Lineweaver-Burk plot also demonstrated that the microorganisms reacted directly with hydroxyl radicals and that this was accompanied by decomposition of H(2)O(2). The results of the present study suggest that the microbicidal effects of hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H(2)O(2) can be alleviated by decomposition of H(2)O(2) by catalase in microorganisms.

  4. The microbiology of biomining: development and optimization of mineral-oxidizing microbial consortia.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, Douglas E; Johnson, D Barrie

    2007-02-01

    Biomining, the use of micro-organisms to recover precious and base metals from mineral ores and concentrates, has developed into a successful and expanding area of biotechnology. While careful considerations are made in the design and engineering of biomining operations, microbiological aspects have been subjected to far less scrutiny and control. Biomining processes employ microbial consortia that are dominated by acidophilic, autotrophic iron- or sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes. Mineral biooxidation takes place in highly aerated, continuous-flow, stirred-tank reactors or in irrigated dump or heap reactors, both of which provide an open, non-sterile environment. Continuous-flow, stirred tanks are characterized by homogeneous and constant growth conditions where the selection is for rapid growth, and consequently tank consortia tend to be dominated by two or three species of micro-organisms. In contrast, heap reactors provide highly heterogeneous growth environments that change with the age of the heap, and these tend to be colonized by a much greater variety of micro-organisms. Heap micro-organisms grow as biofilms that are not subject to washout and the major challenge is to provide sufficient biodiversity for optimum performance throughout the life of a heap. This review discusses theoretical and pragmatic aspects of assembling microbial consortia to process different mineral ores and concentrates, and the challenges for using constructed consortia in non-sterile industrial-scale operations.

  5. Development of Electroactive and Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing (Anammox) Biofilms from Digestate in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Petroni, Gianluca; Mancini, Daniele; Geri, Alberto; Di Palma, Luca; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina

    2015-01-01

    Microbial Fuel cells (MFCs) have been proposed for nutrient removal and energy recovery from different wastes. In this study the anaerobic digestate was used to feed H-type MFC reactors, one with a graphite anode preconditioned with Geobacter sulfurreducens and the other with an unconditioned graphite anode. The data demonstrate that the digestate acts as a carbon source, and even in the absence of anode preconditioning, electroactive bacteria colonise the anodic chamber, producing a maximum power density of 172.2 mW/m(2). The carbon content was also reduced by up to 60%, while anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria, which were found in the anodic compartment of the reactors, contributed to nitrogen removal from the digestate. Overall, these results demonstrate that MFCs can be used to recover anammox bacteria from natural sources, and it may represent a promising bioremediation unit in anaerobic digestor plants for the simultaneous nitrogen removal and electricity generation using digestate as substrate.

  6. Development of Electroactive and Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing (Anammox) Biofilms from Digestate in Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Petroni, Gianluca; Mancini, Daniele; Geri, Alberto; Palma, Luca Di; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina

    2015-01-01

    Microbial Fuel cells (MFCs) have been proposed for nutrient removal and energy recovery from different wastes. In this study the anaerobic digestate was used to feed H-type MFC reactors, one with a graphite anode preconditioned with Geobacter sulfurreducens and the other with an unconditioned graphite anode. The data demonstrate that the digestate acts as a carbon source, and even in the absence of anode preconditioning, electroactive bacteria colonise the anodic chamber, producing a maximum power density of 172.2 mW/m2. The carbon content was also reduced by up to 60%, while anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria, which were found in the anodic compartment of the reactors, contributed to nitrogen removal from the digestate. Overall, these results demonstrate that MFCs can be used to recover anammox bacteria from natural sources, and it may represent a promising bioremediation unit in anaerobic digestor plants for the simultaneous nitrogen removal and electricity generation using digestate as substrate. PMID:26273609

  7. Interfacial electron transfer of Shewanella putrefaciens enhanced by nanoflaky nickel oxide array in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yan; Wu, Xiao-Shuai; Li, Chang Ming

    2014-11-01

    A uniform nanoflaky nickel oxide (NiO) array is constructed on carbon cloth via optimized conditions, and further employed as an anode in Shewanella putrefaciens (S. putrefaciens) microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Results indicate that the NiO nanoflakes/carbon cloth anode significantly improves the MFC performance in comparison to the unmodified carbon cloth, delivering about three times higher power density. This attributes to an enhanced interfacial electron transfer rate between bacteria cell and nanoflaky NiO array-modified carbon fiber and improved adhesion of bacteria cells on the modified carbon fiber for more active reaction centers. Considering the facile synthesis process, low cost and long discharging lifetime, this NiO/carbon cloth anode could be very promising to be applied for high performance, large scale MFCs.

  8. MICROBIAL RESPONSES TO IN SITU CHEMICAL OXIDATION, SIX-PHASE HEATING, AND STEAM INJECTION REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The evaluation of microbial responses to three in situ source removal remedial technologies including permanganate-based in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), six-phase heating (SPH), and steam injection (SI) was performed at Cape Canaveral Air Station in Florida. The investigatio...

  9. MICROBIAL RESPONSES TO IN SITU CHEMICAL OXIDATION, SIX-PHASE HEATING, AND STEAM INJECTION REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The evaluation of microbial responses to three in situ source removal remedial technologies including permanganate-based in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), six-phase heating (SPH), and steam injection (SI) was performed at Cape Canaveral Air Station in Florida. The investigatio...

  10. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria dominate the microbial diversity shift during the pyrite and low-grade pyrolusite bioleaching process.

    PubMed

    Han, Yifan; Ma, Xiaomei; Zhao, Wei; Chang, Yunkang; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Xingbiao; Wang, Jingjing; Huang, Zhiyong

    2013-10-01

    The microbial ecology of the pyrite-pyrolusite bioleaching system and its interaction with ore has not been well-described. A 16S rRNA gene clone library was created to evaluate changes in the microbial community at different stages of the pyrite-pyrolusite bioleaching process in a shaken flask. The results revealed that the bacterial community was disturbed after 5 days of the reaction. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences demonstrated that the predominant microorganisms were members of a genus of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, Thiomonas sp., that subsequently remained dominant during the bioleaching process. Compared with iron-oxidizing bacteria, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were more favorable to the pyrite-pyrolusite bioleaching system. Decreased pH due to microbial acid production was an important condition for bioleaching efficiency. Iron-oxidizing bacteria competed for pyrite reduction power with Mn(IV) in pyrolusite under specific conditions. These results extend our knowledge of microbial dynamics during pyrite-pyrolusite bioleaching, which is a key issue to improve commercial applications.

  11. Biodegradation of organic matter and anodic microbial communities analysis in sediment microbial fuel cells with/without Fe(III) oxide addition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xun; Zhao, Qingliang; Wu, Mingsong; Ding, Jing; Zhang, Weixian

    2017-02-01

    To enhance the biodegradation of organic matter in sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC), Fe(III) oxide, as an alternative electron acceptor, was added into the sediment. Results showed that the SMFC with Fe(III) oxide addition obtained higher removal efficiencies for organics than the SMFC without Fe(III) oxide addition and open circuit bioreactor, and produced a maximum power density (Pmax) of 87.85mW/m(2) with a corresponding maximum voltage (Vmax) of 0.664V. The alteration of UV-254 and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) also demonstrated the organic matter in sediments can be effectively removed. High-throughput sequencing of anodic microbial communities indicated that bacteria from the genus Geobacter were predominantly detected (21.23%) in the biofilm formed on the anode of SMFCs, while Pseudomonas was the most predominant genus (18.12%) in the presence of Fe(III) oxide. Additionally, compared with the open circuit bioreactor, more electrogenic bacteria attached to the biofilm of anode in SMFCs.

  12. Iron isotope fractionation during microbial dissimilatory iron oxide reduction in simulated Archaean seawater.

    PubMed

    Percak-Dennett, E M; Beard, B L; Xu, H; Konishi, H; Johnson, C M; Roden, E E

    2011-05-01

    The largest Fe isotope excursion yet measured in marine sedimentary rocks occurs in shales, carbonates, and banded iron formations of Neoarchaean and Paleoproterozoic age. The results of field and laboratory studies suggest a potential role for microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in producing this excursion. However, most experimental studies of Fe isotope fractionation during DIR have been conducted in simple geochemical systems, using pure Fe(III) oxide substrates that are not direct analogues to phases likely to have been present in Precambrian marine environments. In this study, Fe isotope fractionation was investigated during microbial reduction of an amorphous Fe(III) oxide-silica coprecipitate in anoxic, high-silica, low-sulphate artificial Archaean seawater at 30 °C to determine if such conditions alter the extent of reduction or isotopic fractionations relative to those observed in simple systems. The Fe(III)-Si coprecipitate was highly reducible (c. 80% reduction) in the presence of excess acetate. The coprecipitate did not undergo phase conversion (e.g. to green rust, magnetite or siderite) during reduction. Iron isotope fractionations suggest that rapid and near-complete isotope exchange took place among all Fe(II) and Fe(III) components, in contrast to previous work on goethite and hematite, where exchange was limited to the outer few atom layers of the substrate. Large quantities of low-δ(56)Fe Fe(II) (aqueous and solid phase) were produced during reduction of the Fe(III)-Si coprecipitate. These findings shed new light on DIR as a mechanism for producing Fe isotope variations observed in Neoarchaean and Paleoproterozoic marine sedimentary rocks. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. The anti-microbial activity of electrolysed oxidizing water against microorganisms relevant in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Fenner, D C; Bürge, B; Kayser, H P; Wittenbrink, M M

    2006-04-01

    Standards of the German Association of Veterinary Medicine (DVG) for the evaluation of chemical disinfectants were used to assess the anti-microbial efficacy of electrolysed oxidizing water (EOW). Enterococcus faecium, Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans were exposed to anode EOW (pH, 3.0+/-0.1; oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), +1100+/-50 mV; free chlorine, 400+/-20 mg/l Cl2) and combined EOW (7:3 anode:cathode, v/v; pH, 8.3+/-0.1; ORP, 930-950 mV; free chlorine, 271+/-20 mg/l Cl2). In water of standardized hardness (WSH), all bacterial strains were completely inactivated by a 30 min exposure to maximum 10.0% anode EOW (approximately 40.0 mg/l Cl2) or 50.0% combined EOW (approximately 135.5 mg/l Cl2). The sensitivity ranking order for anode EOW to the bacterial test strains was P. mirabilis>S. aureus>M. avium ssp. avium>E. faecium>P. aeruginosa. P. mirabilis and S. aureus decreased to undetectable levels after 5 min of exposure to 7.5% anode EOW (approximately 30.0 mg/l Cl2). Candida albicans was completely inactivated by a 5-min exposure to 5.0% anode EOW. Both, anode and combined EOW exhibited no anti-microbial activities in standardized nutrient broth or after addition of 20.0% bovine serum to the WSH. Further research is necessary to evaluate the efficacy of EOW as a disinfectant under operating conditions in animal production facilities.

  14. Characterization of Cytochrome 579, an Unusual Cytochrome Isolated from an Iron-Oxidizing Microbial Community▿

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Steven W.; Chan, Clara S.; Zemla, Adam; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Hwang, Mona; Hettich, Robert L.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Thelen, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    A novel, soluble cytochrome with an unusual visible spectral signature at 579 nm (Cyt579) has been characterized after isolation from several different microbial biofilms collected in an extremely acidic ecosystem. Previous proteogenomic studies of an Fe(II)-oxidizing community indicated that this abundant red cytochrome could be extracted from the biofilms with dilute sulfuric acid. Here, we found that the Fe(II)-dependent reduction of Cyt579 was thermodynamically favorable at a pH of >3, raising the possibility that Cyt579 acts as an accessory protein for electron transfer. The results of transmission electron microscopy of immunogold-labeled biofilm indicated that Cyt579 is localized near the bacterial cell surface, consistent with periplasmic localization. The results of further protein analysis of Cyt579, using preparative chromatofocusing and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, revealed three forms of the protein that correspond to different N-terminal truncations of the amino acid sequence. The results of intact-protein analysis corroborated the posttranslational modifications of these forms and identified a genomically uncharacterized Cyt579 variant. Homology modeling was used to predict the overall cytochrome structure and heme binding site; the positions of nine amino acid substitutions found in three Cyt579 variants all map to the surface of the protein and away from the heme group. Based on this detailed characterization of Cyt579, we propose that Cyt579 acts as an electron transfer protein, shuttling electrons derived from Fe(II) oxidation to support critical metabolic functions in the acidophilic microbial community. PMID:18469132

  15. New Aptes Cross-linked Polymers from Poly(ethylene oxide)s and Cyanuric Chloride for Lithium Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigelaar, Dean M.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Kinder, James D.; Bennett, William R.

    2005-01-01

    A new series of polymer electrolytes for use as membranes for lithium batteries are described. Electrolytes were made by polymerization between cyanuric chloride and diamino-terminated poly(ethylene oxide)s, followed by cross-linking via a sol-gel process. Thermal analysis and lithium conductivity of freestanding polymer films were studied. The effects of several variables on conductivity were investigated, such as length of backbone PEO chain, length of branching PEO chain, extent of branching, extent of cross-linking, salt content, and salt counterion. Polymer films with the highest percentage of PEO were found to be the most conductive, with a maximum lithium conductivity of 3.9 x 10(exp -5) S/cm at 25 C. Addition of plasticizer to the dry polymers increased conductivity by an order of magnitude.

  16. Arsenic Redox Transformation as a Consequence of Microbial Reduction of Ferric Iron Oxides and Humic Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amstaetter, K.; Jiang, J.; Navarro, L.; Kappler, A.

    2005-12-01

    The toxic metalloid arsenic represents a significant drinking water contamination in particular in countries such as Bangladesh or Vietnam. In these countries millions of people are directly affected by toxic concentrations of arsenic in drinking water. At neutral pH, arsenate (As(V)), present in anionic form as (H2AsO4)- and (HAsO4)2- (pK1 = 2.2, pK2 = 7.0) is mostly adsorbed to iron(III) and aluminum oxide surfaces. In contrast, arsenite (As(III)), present at neutral pH as uncharged species (H3AsO3, pK1 = 9.2), adsorbs less strongly to aluminum oxides and is assumed to be the more mobile form of arsenic. Natural organic matter (humic substances) was shown to complex As(V) and As(III); in some cases even redox reactions of humic substances with arsenic species were described. Increased As-concentrations in drinking water were suggested to result either from reduction of As(V) to As(III) or from dissolution of iron(III) oxides which leads to the release of adsorbed arsenic. However, the mechanisms leading to mobilization of arsenic are still under debate and the role of humic substances for the mobilization of arsenic is unclear. Fe(III) oxides as well as redox-active natural organic matter (humic substances) can be reduced enzymatically by a variety of microorganisms. Microbial Fe(III) reduction produces Fe(II) that can adsorb to the Fe(III) mineral surface and thus becomes a better reductant. Microbial reduction of humic substances produces reduced humic substances. Both surface-adsorbed Fe(II) and reduced humic substances represent reactive intermediates that potentially can undergo further redox reactions. Here we present recent data on redox transformation of arsenic by both reactive intermediates. Arsenic redox transformation by reactive iron species and reactive humic substances is of particular interest because i) As(III) is more mobile and more toxic than As(V) and ii) in arsenic contaminated areas the presence of arsenic often correlates with the presence

  17. Succession of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the microbial community on corroding concrete in sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Satoshi; Odagiri, Mitsunori; Ito, Tsukasa; Satoh, Hisashi

    2007-02-01

    Microbially induced concrete corrosion (MICC) in sewer systems has been a serious problem for a long time. A better understanding of the succession of microbial community members responsible for the production of sulfuric acid is essential for the efficient control of MICC. In this study, the succession of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in the bacterial community on corroding concrete in a sewer system in situ was investigated over 1 year by culture-independent 16S rRNA gene-based molecular techniques. Results revealed that at least six phylotypes of SOB species were involved in the MICC process, and the predominant SOB species shifted in the following order: Thiothrix sp., Thiobacillus plumbophilus, Thiomonas intermedia, Halothiobacillus neapolitanus, Acidiphilium acidophilum, and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. A. thiooxidans, a hyperacidophilic SOB, was the most dominant (accounting for 70% of EUB338-mixed probe-hybridized cells) in the heavily corroded concrete after 1 year. This succession of SOB species could be dependent on the pH of the concrete surface as well as on trophic properties (e.g., autotrophic or mixotrophic) and on the ability of the SOB to utilize different sulfur compounds (e.g., H2S, S0, and S2O3(2-)). In addition, diverse heterotrophic bacterial species (e.g., halo-tolerant, neutrophilic, and acidophilic bacteria) were associated with these SOB. The microbial succession of these microorganisms was involved in the colonization of the concrete and the production of sulfuric acid. Furthermore, the vertical distribution of microbial community members revealed that A. thiooxidans was the most dominant throughout the heavily corroded concrete (gypsum) layer and that A. thiooxidans was most abundant at the highest surface (1.5-mm) layer and decreased logarithmically with depth because of oxygen and H2S transport limitations. This suggested that the production of sulfuric acid by A. thiooxidans occurred mainly on the concrete surface and the

  18. ACE2 links amino acid malnutrition to microbial ecology and intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Tatsuo; Perlot, Thomas; Rehman, Ateequr; Trichereau, Jean; Ishiguro, Hiroaki; Paolino, Magdalena; Sigl, Verena; Hanada, Toshikatsu; Hanada, Reiko; Lipinski, Simone; Wild, Birgit; Camargo, Simone M R; Singer, Dustin; Richter, Andreas; Kuba, Keiji; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Schreiber, Stefan; Clevers, Hans; Verrey, Francois; Rosenstiel, Philip; Penninger, Josef M

    2012-07-25

    Malnutrition affects up to one billion people in the world and is a major cause of mortality. In many cases, malnutrition is associated with diarrhoea and intestinal inflammation, further contributing to morbidity and death. The mechanisms by which unbalanced dietary nutrients affect intestinal homeostasis are largely unknown. Here we report that deficiency in murine angiotensin I converting enzyme (peptidyl-dipeptidase A) 2 (Ace2), which encodes a key regulatory enzyme of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), results in highly increased susceptibility to intestinal inflammation induced by epithelial damage. The RAS is known to be involved in acute lung failure, cardiovascular functions and SARS infections. Mechanistically, ACE2 has a RAS-independent function, regulating intestinal amino acid homeostasis, expression of antimicrobial peptides, and the ecology of the gut microbiome. Transplantation of the altered microbiota from Ace2 mutant mice into germ-free wild-type hosts was able to transmit the increased propensity to develop severe colitis. ACE2-dependent changes in epithelial immunity and the gut microbiota can be directly regulated by the dietary amino acid tryptophan. Our results identify ACE2 as a key regulator of dietary amino acid homeostasis, innate immunity, gut microbial ecology, and transmissible susceptibility to colitis. These results provide a molecular explanation for how amino acid malnutrition can cause intestinal inflammation and diarrhoea.

  19. Antibiotics and Manure Effects on Microbial Communities Responsible for Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semedo, M.; Song, B.; Sparrer, T.; Crozier, C.; Tobias, C. R.; Phillips, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Agroecosystems are major contributors of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Denitrification and nitrification are the primary pathways of N2O emission in soils. However, there is uncertainty regarding the organisms responsible for N2O production. Bacteria were previously considered the only microbial N2O source, however, current studies indicate that fungi also produce N2O by denitrification. Denitrifying bacteria can be a source or sink of N2O depending on the presence and expression of nitrous oxide reductase genes (nosZ), encoding for the enzyme converting N2O to N2. Fungal denitrification may produce only N2O as an end product due to missing the nosZ gene. Animal manures applied to agricultural fields can transfer antibiotics to soils as a result of antibiotic use in the livestock industry. These antibiotics target mostly bacteria and may promote fungal growth. The growth inhibition of denitrifying bacteria may favor fungal denitrifiers potentially enhancing N2O emissions. Our objective is to examine the effects of antibiotic exposure and manure fertilization on the microbial communities responsible for N2 and N2O production in grasslands. Soil slurry incubations were conducted with tetracycline at different concentrations. A mesocosm experiment was also performed with soil cores exposed to tetracycline and cow manure. Production of N2O and N2 was measured using gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), respectively. Antibiotic inhibition of soil N2 production was found to be dose dependent, reaching up to 80% inhibition with 1g Kg-1 of tetracycline treatment, while N2O production was enhanced up to 8 times. These results suggest higher fungal denitrification with a concomitant decrease in bacterial denitrification after antibiotic exposure. We also found higher N2O fluxes in the soil mesocosms treated with manure plus tetracycline. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) will be conducted to examine the changes in

  20. Potential biological efficacy of Pinus plant species against oxidative, inflammatory and microbial disorders.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aditi; Goyal, Rohit; Sharma, Lalit

    2016-01-28

    Traditionally, Pine has been used to treat oxidative and inflammatory disorders. The study was aimed to investigate biological potential of phytoconstituents of Pinus plant species: Pinus roxburghii, Pinus wallichiana and Pinus gerardiana using in-vitro antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial methods. The hydro-alcoholic extraction of dried plant: stem bark was done and the antioxidant activity was evaluated using free radical scavenging methods for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, (DPPH), nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide radicals, reducing power assays, and total antioxidant capacity. Anti-inflammatory activity was carried out using albumin denaturation and HRBC membrane stabilization assays. Antimicrobial and antifungal activities were also conducted using agar well diffusion method. The qualitative phytochemical analysis of hydro-alcoholic stem bark extracts of three plant species revealed the presence of various biochemical compounds such as alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides, triterpenoids and saponins. Quantitative phytochemical analysis of plant extracts showed the presence of phenolics, flavonoids, tannins, beta-carotene and lycopene. Plant extracts of three pinus species showed significant antioxidant activity against DPPH, nitric oxide and H2O2 radicals. In in-vitro anti-inflammatory investigation, Pinus roxburghii exhibited highest protection against albumin denaturation 86.54 ± 1.85 whereas Pinus gerardiana showed 82.03 ± 2.67. Moreover, plant extracts were found to prevent the growth of microorganisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans showing promising antibacterial and antifungal activities againstCandida albicans. The findings of the present study derived the rational for the therapeutic usage of Pinus which is a highly timber yielding plant from Himalayan region, against oxidative, inflammatory and microbial diseases.

  1. Contrasting effects of Al substitution on microbial reduction of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekstrom, Eileen B.; Learman, Deric R.; Madden, Andrew S.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2010-12-01

    Aluminum, one of the most abundant elements in soils and sediments, is commonly found co-precipitated with Fe in natural Fe(III) (hydr)oxides; yet, little is known about how Al substitution impacts bacterial Fe(III) reduction. Accordingly, we investigated the reduction of Al substituted (0-13 mol% Al) goethite, lepidocrocite, and ferrihydrite by the model dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium (DIRB), Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. Here we reveal that the impact of Al on microbial reduction varies with Fe(III) (hydr)oxide type. No significant difference in Fe(III) reduction was observed for either goethite or lepidocrocite as a function of Al substitution. In contrast, Fe(III) reduction rates significantly decreased with increasing Al substitution of ferrihydrite, with reduction rates of 13% Al-ferrihydrite more than 50% lower than pure ferrihydrite. Although Al substitution changed the minerals' surface area, particle size, structural disorder, and abiotic dissolution rates, we did not observe a direct correlation between any of these physiochemical properties and the trends in bacterial Fe(III) reduction. Based on projected Al-dependent Fe(III) reduction rates, reduction rates of ferrihydrite fall below those of lepidocrocite and goethite at substitution levels equal to or greater than 18 mol% Al. Given the prevalence of Al substitution in natural Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, our results bring into question the conventional assumptions about Fe (hydr)oxide bioavailability and suggest a more prominent role of natural lepidocrocite and goethite phases in impacting DIRB activity in soils and sediments.

  2. Iron Kinetics and Evolution of Microbial Populations in Low-pH, Ferrous Iron-Oxidizing Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rose M; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-08-02

    Iron-rich, acidic wastewaters are commonplace pollutants associated with metal and coal mining. Continuous-flow bioreactors were commissioned and tested for their capacities to oxidize ferrous iron in synthetic and actual acid mine drainage waters using (initially) pure cultures of the recently described acidophilic, iron-oxidizing heterotrophic bacterium Acidithrix ferrooxidans grown in the presence of glucose and yeast extract. The bioreactors became rapidly colonized by this bacterium, which formed macroscopic streamer growths in the flowing waters. Over 97% of ferrous iron in pH 2.0-2.2 synthetic mine water was oxidized (at up to 225 mg L(-1) h(-1)) at dilution rates (D) of 0.6 h(-1). Rates of iron oxidation decreased with pH but were still significant, with influent liquors as low as pH 1.37. When fed with actual mine water, >90% of ferrous iron was oxidized at D values of 0.4 h(-1), and microbial communities within the bioreactors changed over time, with Atx. ferrooxidans becoming increasingly displaced by the autotrophic iron-oxidizing acidophiles Ferrovum myxofaciens, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans (which were all indigenous to the mine water), although this did not have a negative impact on net ferrous-iron oxidation. The results confirmed the potential of using a heterotrophic acidophile to facilitate the rapid commissioning of iron-oxidizing bioreactors and illustrated how microbial communities within them can evolve without compromising the performances of the bioreactors.

  3. Linking quantitative microbial risk assessment and epidemiological data: informing safe drinking water trials in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Enger, Kyle S; Nelson, Kara L; Clasen, Thomas; Rose, Joan B; Eisenberg, Joseph N S

    2012-05-01

    Intervention trials are used extensively to assess household water treatment (HWT) device efficacy against diarrheal disease in developing countries. Using these data for policy, however, requires addressing issues of generalizability (relevance of one trial in other contexts) and systematic bias associated with design and conduct of a study. To illustrate how quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) can address water safety and health issues, we analyzed a published randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the LifeStraw Family Filter in the Congo. The model accounted for bias due to (1) incomplete compliance with filtration, (2) unexpected antimicrobial activity by the placebo device, and (3) incomplete recall of diarrheal disease. Effectiveness was measured using the longitudinal prevalence ratio (LPR) of reported diarrhea. The Congo RCT observed an LPR of 0.84 (95% CI: 0.61, 1.14). Our model predicted LPRs, assuming a perfect placebo, ranging from 0.50 (2.5-97.5 percentile: 0.33, 0.77) to 0.86 (2.5-97.5 percentile: 0.68, 1.09) for high (but not perfect) and low (but not zero) compliance, respectively. The calibration step provided estimates of the concentrations of three pathogen types (modeled as diarrheagenic E. coli, Giardia, and rotavirus) in drinking water, consistent with the longitudinal prevalence of reported diarrhea measured in the trial, and constrained by epidemiological data from the trial. Use of a QMRA model demonstrated the importance of compliance in HWT efficacy, the need for pathogen data from source waters, the effect of quantifying biases associated with epidemiological data, and the usefulness of generalizing the effectiveness of HWT trials to other contexts. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  4. Microwave-assisted cross-linking of milk proteins induced by microbial transglutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Hsieh, Jung-Feng

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the combined effects of microbial transglutaminase (MTGase, 7.0 units/mL) and microwave irradiation (MI) on the polymerization of milk proteins at 30 °C for 3 h. The addition of MTGase caused the milk proteins to become polymerized, which resulted in the formation of components with a higher molecular-weight (>130 kDa). SDS-PAGE analysis revealed reductions in the protein content of β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), αS-casein (αS-CN), κ-casein (κ-CN) and β-casein (β-CN) to 50.4 ± 2.9, 33.5 ± 3.0, 4.2 ± 0.5 and 1.2 ± 0.1%, respectively. The use of MTGase in conjunction MI with led to a 3-fold increase in the rate of milk protein polymerization, compared to a sample that contained MTGase but did not undergo MI. Results of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) indicated that κ-CN, β-CN, a fraction of serum albumin (SA), β-LG, α-lactalbumin (α-LA), αs1-casein (αs1-CN), and αs2-casein (αs2-CN) were polymerized in the milk, following incubation with MTGase and MI at 30 °C for 1 h. Based on this result, the combined use of MTGase and MI appears to be a better way to polymerize milk proteins. PMID:27966639

  5. Microwave-assisted cross-linking of milk proteins induced by microbial transglutaminase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Hsieh, Jung-Feng

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the combined effects of microbial transglutaminase (MTGase, 7.0 units/mL) and microwave irradiation (MI) on the polymerization of milk proteins at 30 °C for 3 h. The addition of MTGase caused the milk proteins to become polymerized, which resulted in the formation of components with a higher molecular-weight (>130 kDa). SDS-PAGE analysis revealed reductions in the protein content of β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), αS-casein (αS-CN), κ-casein (κ-CN) and β-casein (β-CN) to 50.4 ± 2.9, 33.5 ± 3.0, 4.2 ± 0.5 and 1.2 ± 0.1%, respectively. The use of MTGase in conjunction MI with led to a 3-fold increase in the rate of milk protein polymerization, compared to a sample that contained MTGase but did not undergo MI. Results of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) indicated that κ-CN, β-CN, a fraction of serum albumin (SA), β-LG, α-lactalbumin (α-LA), αs1-casein (αs1-CN), and αs2-casein (αs2-CN) were polymerized in the milk, following incubation with MTGase and MI at 30 °C for 1 h. Based on this result, the combined use of MTGase and MI appears to be a better way to polymerize milk proteins.

  6. Molecular characterization of anaerobic sulfur-oxidizing microbial communities in up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating municipal sewage.

    PubMed

    Aida, Azrina A; Hatamoto, Masashi; Yamamoto, Masamitsu; Ono, Shinya; Nakamura, Akinobu; Takahashi, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    A novel wastewater treatment system consisting of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor with sulfur-redox reaction was developed for treatment of municipal sewage under low-temperature conditions. In the UASB reactor, a novel phenomenon of anaerobic sulfur oxidation occurred in the absence of oxygen, nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors. The microorganisms involved in anaerobic sulfur oxidation have not been elucidated. Therefore, in this study, we studied the microbial communities existing in the UASB reactor that probably enhanced anaerobic sulfur oxidation. Sludge samples collected from the UASB reactor before and after sulfur oxidation were used for cloning and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of the 16S rRNA genes of the bacterial and archaeal domains. The microbial community structures of bacteria and archaea indicated that the genus Smithella and uncultured bacteria within the phylum Caldiserica were the dominant bacteria groups. Methanosaeta spp. was the dominant group of the domain archaea. The T-RFLP analysis, which was consistent with the cloning results, also yielded characteristic fingerprints for bacterial communities, whereas the archaeal community structure yielded stable microbial community. From these results, it can be presumed that these major bacteria groups, genus Smithella and uncultured bacteria within the phylum Caldiserica, probably play an important role in sulfur oxidation in UASB reactors. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The unaccounted yet abundant nitrous oxide-reducing microbial community: a potential nitrous oxide sink

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher M; Graf, Daniel RH; Bru, David; Philippot, Laurent; Hallin, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a major radiative forcing and stratospheric ozone-depleting gas emitted from terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. It can be transformed to nitrogen gas (N2) by bacteria and archaea harboring the N2O reductase (N2OR), which is the only known N2O sink in the biosphere. Despite its crucial role in mitigating N2O emissions, knowledge of the N2OR in the environment remains limited. Here, we report a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the nosZ gene coding the N2OR in genomes retrieved from public databases. The resulting phylogeny revealed two distinct clades of nosZ, with one unaccounted for in studies investigating N2O-reducing communities. Examination of N2OR structural elements not considered in the phylogeny revealed that the two clades differ in their signal peptides, indicating differences in the translocation pathway of the N2OR across the membrane. Sequencing of environmental clones of the previously undetected nosZ lineage in various environments showed that it is widespread and diverse. Using quantitative PCR, we demonstrate that this clade was most often at least as abundant as the other, thereby more than doubling the known extent of the overall N2O-reducing community in the environment. Furthermore, we observed that the relative abundance of nosZ from either clade varied among habitat types and environmental conditions. Our results indicate a physiological dichotomy in the diversity of N2O-reducing microorganisms, which might be of importance for understanding the relationship between the diversity of N2O-reducing microorganisms and N2O reduction in different ecosystems. PMID:23151640

  8. Efficient Low-pH Iron Removal by a Microbial Iron Oxide Mound Ecosystem at Scalp Level Run.

    PubMed

    Grettenberger, Christen L; Pearce, Alexandra R; Bibby, Kyle J; Jones, Daniel S; Burgos, William D; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2017-04-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a major environmental problem affecting tens of thousands of kilometers of waterways worldwide. Passive bioremediation of AMD relies on microbial communities to oxidize and remove iron from the system; however, iron oxidation rates in AMD environments are highly variable among sites. At Scalp Level Run (Cambria County, PA), first-order iron oxidation rates are 10 times greater than at other coal-associated iron mounds in the Appalachians. We examined the bacterial community at Scalp Level Run to determine whether a unique community is responsible for the rapid iron oxidation rate. Despite strong geochemical gradients, including a >10-fold change in the concentration of ferrous iron from 57.3 mg/liter at the emergence to 2.5 mg/liter at the base of the coal tailings pile, the bacterial community composition was nearly constant with distance from the spring outflow. Scalp Level Run contains many of the same taxa present in other AMD sites, but the community is dominated by two strains of Ferrovum myxofaciens, a species that is associated with high rates of Fe(II) oxidation in laboratory studies.IMPORTANCE Acid mine drainage pollutes more than 19,300 km of rivers and streams and 72,000 ha of lakes worldwide. Remediation is frequently ineffective and costly, upwards of $100 billion globally and nearly $5 billion in Pennsylvania alone. Microbial Fe(II) oxidation is more efficient than abiotic Fe(II) oxidation at low pH (P. C. Singer and W. Stumm, Science 167:1121-1123, 1970, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.167.3921.1121). Therefore, AMD bioremediation could harness microbial Fe(II) oxidation to fuel more-cost-effective treatments. Advances will require a deeper understanding of the ecology of Fe(II)-oxidizing microbial communities and the factors that control their distribution and rates of Fe(II) oxidation. We investigated bacterial communities that inhabit an AMD site with rapid Fe(II) oxidation and found that they were dominated by two

  9. Simultaneous oxidation of arsenic and antimony at low and circumneutral pH, with and without microbial catalysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asta, M.P.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Blaine, McCleskey R.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic and Sb are common mine-water pollutants and their toxicity and fate are strongly influenced by redox processes. In this study, simultaneous Fe(II), As(III) and Sb(III) oxidation experiments were conducted to obtain rates under laboratory conditions similar to those found in the field for mine waters of both low and circumneutral pH. Additional experiments were performed under abiotic sterile conditions to determine the biotic and abiotic contributions to the oxidation processes. The results showed that under abiotic conditions in aerated Fe(III)-H 2SO 4 solutions, Sb(III) oxidizes slightly faster than As(III). The oxidation rates of both elements were accelerated by increasing As(III), Sb(III), Fe(III), and Cl - concentrations in the presence of light. For unfiltered circumneutral water from the Giant Mine (Yellowknife, NWT, Canada), As(III) oxidized at 15-78??mol/L/h whereas Sb(III) oxidized at 0.03-0.05??mol/L/h during microbial exponential growth. In contrast, As(III) and Sb(III) oxidation rates of 0.01-0.03 and 0.01-0.02??mol/L/h, respectively, were obtained in experiments performed with acid unfiltered mine waters from the Iberian Pyritic Belt (SW Spain). These results suggest that the Fe(III) formed from microbial oxidation abiotically oxidized As(III) and Sb(III). After sterile filtration of both mine water samples, neither As(III), Sb(III), nor Fe(II) oxidation was observed. Hence, under the experimental conditions, bacteria were catalyzing As and Sb oxidation in the Giant Mine waters and Fe oxidation in the acid waters of the Iberian Pyrite Belt. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Arsenate immobilization associated with microbial oxidation of ferrous ion in complex acid sulfate water.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingqun; Lin, Chuxia

    2012-05-30

    Chemical, XRD, SEM, RS, FTIR and XPS techniques were used to investigate arsenate immobilization associated with microbial Fe(2+) oxidation in a complex acid sulfate water system consisting of a modified 9 K solution (pH 2.0) plus As, Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn and Mn. At a 1:12.5:70 molar ratio of As:Fe:S, schweretmannite formation was impeded. This was in contrast with the predominant presence of schwertmannite when the heavy metals were absent, suggesting that a schwertmannite binding model is not valid for explaining arsenate immobilization in the complex system. In this study, arsenate was initially immobilized through co-precipitation with non-Fe metals and phosphate. Subsequently when sufficient Fe(3+) was produced from Fe(2+) oxidation, formation of a mixed iron, arsenate and phosphate phase predominated. The last stage involved surface complexation of arsenate species. Pb appeared to play an insignificant role in arsenate immobilization due to its strong affinity for sulfate to form anglesite. Phosphate strongly competed with arsenate for the available binding sites. However, As exhibited an increased capacity to compete with P and S for available binding sites from the co-precipitation to surface complexation stage. Adsorbed As tended to be in HAsO(4)(2-) form. The scavenged arsenate species was relatively stable after 2464-h aging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Microbial Respiration and Formate Oxidation as Metabolic Signatures of Inflammation-Associated Dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Elizabeth R; Winter, Maria G; Duerkop, Breck A; Spiga, Luisella; Furtado de Carvalho, Tatiane; Zhu, Wenhan; Gillis, Caroline C; Büttner, Lisa; Smoot, Madeline P; Behrendt, Cassie L; Cherry, Sara; Santos, Renato L; Hooper, Lora V; Winter, Sebastian E

    2017-02-08

    Intestinal inflammation is frequently associated with an alteration of the gut microbiota, termed dysbiosis, which is characterized by a reduced abundance of obligate anaerobic bacteria and an expansion of facultative Proteobacteria such as commensal E. coli. The mechanisms enabling the outgrowth of Proteobacteria during inflammation are incompletely understood. Metagenomic sequencing revealed bacterial formate oxidation and aerobic respiration to be overrepresented metabolic pathways in a chemically induced murine model of colitis. Dysbiosis was accompanied by increased formate levels in the gut lumen. Formate was of microbial origin since no formate was detected in germ-free mice. Complementary studies using commensal E. coli strains as model organisms indicated that formate dehydrogenase and terminal oxidase genes provided a fitness advantage in murine models of colitis. In vivo, formate served as electron donor in conjunction with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. This work identifies bacterial formate oxidation and oxygen respiration as metabolic signatures for inflammation-associated dysbiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Microbial oxidation of pyrite coupled to nitrate reduction in anoxic groundwater sediment.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Christian Juncher; Jacobsen, Ole Stig; Elberling, Bo; Aamand, Jens

    2009-07-01

    Although many areas in Denmark are intensively agricultured, the discharge of nitrate from groundwater aquifers to surface water is often lower than expected. In this study it is experimentally demonstrated that anoxic nitrate reduction in sandy sediment containing pyrite is a microbially mediated denitrification process with pyrite as the primary electron donor. The process demonstrates a temperature dependency (Q10) of 1.8 and could be completely inhibited by addition of a bactericide (NaN3). Experimentally determined denitrification rates show that more than 50% of the observed nitrate reduction can be ascribed to pyrite oxidation. The apparent zero-order denitrification rate in anoxic pyrite containing sediment at groundwater temperature has been determined to be 2-3 micromol NO3- kg(-1) day(-1). The in situ groundwater chemistry at the boundary between the redoxcline and the anoxic zone reveals that between 65 and 80% of nitrate reduction in the lower part of the redoxcline is due to anoxic oxidation of pyrite by nitrate with resulting release of sulfate. It is concluded that microbes can control groundwater nitrate concentrations by denitrification using primarily pyrite as electron donor at the oxic-anoxic boundary in sandy aquifers thus determining the position and downward progression of the redox boundary between nitrate-containing and nitrate-free groundwater.

  13. Linking ambient particulate matter pollution effects with oxidative biology and immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Frank J; Fussell, Julia C

    2015-03-01

    Exposure to combustion-related particulate matter (PM), at concentrations experienced by populations throughout the world, contributes to pulmonary and cardiac disease through multiple mechanistic pathways that are complex and interdependent. Current evidence supports an interactive chain of events linking pollution-induced pulmonary and systemic oxidative stress, inflammatory events, and translocation of particle constituents with an associated risk of vascular dysfunction, atherosclerosis, altered cardiac autonomic function, and ischemic cardiovascular and obstructive pulmonary diseases. Because oxidative stress is believed to play such an instrumental role in these pathways, the capacity of particulate pollution to cause damaging oxidative reactions (the oxidative potential) has been used as an effective exposure metric, identifying toxic components and sources within diverse ambient PM mixes that vast populations are subjected to-from traffic emissions on busy roads in urban areas to biomass smoke that fills homes in rural areas of the developing world. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Interactions Between Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-phyllosilicates During Microbial Reduction 2: Natural Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.; Griffin, A. M.; Gorski, C. A.; Shelobolina, E. S.; Xu, H.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Roden, E. E.

    2016-04-19

    Dissimilatory microbial reduction of solid-phase Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates (Fe(III)-phyllosilicates) is an important process in anoxic soils, sediments, and subsurface materials. Although various studies have documented the relative extent of microbial reduction of single-phase Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-phyllosilicates, detailed information is not available on interaction between these two processes in situations where both phases are available for microbial reduction. The goal of this research was to use the model dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium (DIRB) Geobacter sulfurreducens to study Fe(III)-oxide vs. Fe(III)-phyllosilicate reduction in a range of subsurface materials and Fe(III)-oxide stripped versions of the materials. Low temperature (12K) Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to infer changes in the relative abundances of Fe(III)-oxide, Fe(III)-phyllosilicate, and phyllosilicate-associated Fe(II) (Fe(II)-phyllosilicate). A Fe partitioning model was employed to analyze the fate of Fe(II) and assess the potential for abiotic Fe(II)-catalyzed reduction of Fe(III)-phyllosilicates. The results showed that in most cases Fe(III)- oxide utilization dominated (70-100 %) bulk Fe(III) reduction activity, and that electron transfer from oxide-derived Fe(II) played only a minor role (ca. 10-20 %) in Fe partitioning. In addition, the extent of Fe(III)-oxide reduction was positively correlated to surface area-normalized cation exchange capacity and the phyllosilicate-Fe(III)/total Fe(III) ratio, which suggests that the phyllosilicates in the natural sediments promoted Fe(III)-oxide reduction by binding of oxide-derived Fe(II), thereby enhancing Fe(III)-oxide reduction by reducing or delaying the inhibitory effect that Fe(II) accumulation on oxide and DIRB cell surfaces has on Fe(III)-oxide reduction. In general our results suggest that although Fe(III)-oxide reduction is likely to dominate bulk Fe(III) reduction in most subsurface sediments, Fe

  15. Reduced Sulfur in Ashes and Slags from the Gasification of Coals: Availability for Chemical and Microbial Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Strayer, Richard F.; Davis, Edward C.

    1983-01-01

    This study was initiated to determine if reduced sulfur contained in coal gasifier ash and slag was available for microbial and chemical oxidation because eventual large-quantity landfill disposal of these solid wastes is expected. Continuous application of distilled water to a column containing a high-sulfur-content (4% [wt/wt]) gasifier slag yielded leachates with high sulfate levels (1,300 mg of sulfate liter−1) and low pH values (4.2). At the end of the experiment, a three-tube most-probable-number analysis indicated that the waste contained 1.3 × 107 thiosulfate-oxidizing bacteria per g. Slag samples obtained aseptically from the column produced sulfate under both abiotic and biotic conditions when incubated in a mineral nutrient solution. Both microbial and chemical sulfate syntheses were greatly stimulated by the addition of thiosulfate to the slag-mineral nutrient solution. These results led to a test of microbial versus chemical sulfur oxidation in ashes and slags from five gasification processes. Sulfate production was measured in sterile (autoclaved) and nonsterile suspensions of the solid wastes in a mineral nutrient solution. These ashes and slags varied in sulfur content from 0.3 to 4.0% (wt/wt). Four of these wastes demonstrated both chemical (2.0 to 27 μg of sulfate g−1 day−1) and microbial (3.1 to 114 μg of sulfate g−1 day−1) sulfur oxidation. Obvious relationships between sulfur oxidation rate and either sulfur content or particle size distribution of the wastes were not immediately evident. We conclude that the sulfur contained in all but one waste is available for oxidation to sulfuric acid and that microorganisms play a partial role in this process. PMID:16346240

  16. Interactions Between Fe(III)-Oxides and Fe(III)-Phyllosilicates During Microbial Reduction 1: Synthetic Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tao; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Griffin, Aron M.; Gorski, Christopher A.; Konishi, Hiromi; Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.

    2015-11-19

    Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates are the two major iron sources utilized as electron acceptors by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) in anoxic soils and sediments. Although there have been many studies of microbial Fe(III)-oxide and Fe(III)-phyllosilicate reduction with both natural and specimen materials, no controlled experimental information is available on the interaction between these two phases when both are available for microbial reduction. In this study, the model DIRB Geobacter sulfurreducens was used to examine the pathways of Fe(III) reduction in Fe(III)-oxide stripped subsurface sediment that was coated with different amounts of synthetic high surface area goethite. Cryogenic (12K) 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to determine changes in the relative abundances of Fe(III)-oxide, Fe(III)-phyllosilicate, and phyllosilicate-associated Fe(II) (Fe(II)-phyllosilicate) in bioreduced samples. Analogous Mössbauer analyses were performed on samples from abiotic Fe(II) sorption experiments in which sediments were exposed to a quantity of exogenous soluble Fe(II) (FeCl22H2O) comparable to the amount of Fe(II) produced during microbial reduction. A Fe partitioning model was developed to analyze the fate of Fe(II) and assess the potential for abiotic Fe(II)-catalyzed reduction of Fe(III)-phyllosilicatesilicates. The microbial reduction experiments indicated that although reduction of Fe(III)-oxide accounted for virtually all of the observed bulk Fe(III) reduction activity, there was no significant abiotic electron transfer between oxide-derived Fe(II) and Fe(III)-phyllosilicatesilicates, with 26-87% of biogenic Fe(II) appearing as sorbed Fe(II) in the Fe(II)-phyllosilicate pool. In contrast, the abiotic Fe(II) sorption experiments showed that 41 and 24% of the added Fe(II) engaged in electron transfer to Fe(III)-phyllosilicate surfaces in synthetic goethite-coated and uncoated sediment. Differences in the rate of Fe(II) addition and

  17. Microbiome-wide association studies link dynamic microbial consortia to disease.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jack A; Quinn, Robert A; Debelius, Justine; Xu, Zhenjiang Z; Morton, James; Garg, Neha; Jansson, Janet K; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Knight, Rob

    2016-07-07

    Rapid advances in DNA sequencing, metabolomics, proteomics and computational tools are dramatically increasing access to the microbiome and identification of its links with disease. In particular, time-series studies and multiple molecular perspectives are facilitating microbiome-wide association studies, which are analogous to genome-wide association studies. Early findings point to actionable outcomes of microbiome-wide association studies, although their clinical application has yet to be approved. An appreciation of the complexity of interactions among the microbiome and the host's diet, chemistry and health, as well as determining the frequency of observations that are needed to capture and integrate this dynamic interface, is paramount for developing precision diagnostics and therapies that are based on the microbiome.

  18. Microbiome-wide association studies link dynamic microbial consortia to disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Jack A.; Quinn, Robert A.; Debelius, Justine; Xu, Zhenjiang Z.; Morton, James; Garg, Neha; Jansson, Janet K.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Knight, Rob

    2016-07-06

    Rapid advances in DNA sequencing, metabolomics, proteomics and computational tools are dramatically increasing access to the microbiome and identification of its links with disease. In particular, time-series studies and multiple molecular perspectives are facilitating microbiome-wide association studies, which are analogous to genome-wide association studies. Early findings point to actionable outcomes of microbiome-wide association studies, although their clinical application has yet to be approved. An appreciation of the complexity of interactions among the microbiome and the host's diet, chemistry and health, as well as determining the frequency of observations that are needed to capture and integrate this dynamic interface, is paramount for developing precision diagnostics and therapies that are based on the microbiome.

  19. Lanthanide-dependent cross-feeding of methane-derived carbon is linked by microbial community interactions

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Sascha M. B.; Johnson, Timothy; Samadhi Karunaratne, Yasodara; Fu, Yanfen; Beck, David A. C.; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is an important component of local and global carbon cycles that is characterized by tight linkages between methane-utilizing (methanotrophic) and nonmethanotrophic bacteria. It has been suggested that the methanotroph sustains these nonmethanotrophs by cross-feeding, because subsequent products of the methane oxidation pathway, such as methanol, represent alternative carbon sources. We established cocultures in a microcosm model system to determine the mechanism and substrate that underlay the observed cross-feeding in the environment. Lanthanum, a rare earth element, was applied because of its increasing importance in methylotrophy. We used co-occurring strains isolated from Lake Washington sediment that are involved in methane utilization: a methanotroph and two nonmethanotrophic methylotrophs. Gene-expression profiles and mutant analyses suggest that methanol is the dominant carbon and energy source the methanotroph provides to support growth of the nonmethanotrophs. However, in the presence of the nonmethanotroph, gene expression of the dominant methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) shifts from the lanthanide-dependent MDH (XoxF)-type, to the calcium-dependent MDH (MxaF)-type. Correspondingly, methanol is released into the medium only when the methanotroph expresses the MxaF-type MDH. These results suggest a cross-feeding mechanism in which the nonmethanotrophic partner induces a change in expression of methanotroph MDHs, resulting in release of methanol for its growth. This partner-induced change in gene expression that benefits the partner is a paradigm for microbial interactions that cannot be observed in studies of pure cultures, underscoring the importance of synthetic microbial community approaches to understand environmental microbiomes. PMID:28028242

  20. Use of 16S rRNA gene based clone libraries to assess microbial communities potentially involved in anaerobic methane oxidation in a Mediterranean cold seep.

    PubMed

    Heijs, Sander K; Haese, Ralf R; van der Wielen, Paul W J J; Forney, Larry J; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2007-04-01

    This study provides data on the diversities of bacterial and archaeal communities in an active methane seep at the Kazan mud volcano in the deep Eastern Mediterranean sea. Layers of varying depths in the Kazan sediments were investigated in terms of (1) chemical parameters and (2) DNA-based microbial population structures. The latter was accomplished by analyzing the sequences of directly amplified 16S rRNA genes, resulting in the phylogenetic analysis of the prokaryotic communities. Sequences of organisms potentially associated with processes such as anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction were thus identified. Overall, the sediment layers revealed the presence of sequences of quite diverse bacterial and archaeal communities, which varied considerably with depth. Dominant types revealed in these communities are known as key organisms involved in the following processes: (1) anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction, (2) sulfide oxidation, and (3) a range of (aerobic) heterotrophic processes. In the communities in the lowest sediment layer sampled (22-34 cm), sulfate-reducing bacteria and archaea of the ANME-2 cluster (likely involved in anaerobic methane oxidation) were prevalent, whereas heterotrophic organisms abounded in the top sediment layer (0-6 cm). Communities in the middle layer (6-22 cm) contained organisms that could be linked to either of the aforementioned processes. We discuss how these phylogeny (sequence)-based findings can support the ongoing molecular work aimed at unraveling both the functioning and the functional diversities of the communities under study.

  1. Use of 16S rRNA Gene Based Clone Libraries to Assess Microbial Communities Potentially Involved in Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Mediterranean Cold Seep

    PubMed Central

    Haese, Ralf R.; van der Wielen, Paul W. J. J.; Forney, Larry J.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2007-01-01

    This study provides data on the diversities of bacterial and archaeal communities in an active methane seep at the Kazan mud volcano in the deep Eastern Mediterranean sea. Layers of varying depths in the Kazan sediments were investigated in terms of (1) chemical parameters and (2) DNA-based microbial population structures. The latter was accomplished by analyzing the sequences of directly amplified 16S rRNA genes, resulting in the phylogenetic analysis of the prokaryotic communities. Sequences of organisms potentially associated with processes such as anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction were thus identified. Overall, the sediment layers revealed the presence of sequences of quite diverse bacterial and archaeal communities, which varied considerably with depth. Dominant types revealed in these communities are known as key organisms involved in the following processes: (1) anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction, (2) sulfide oxidation, and (3) a range of (aerobic) heterotrophic processes. In the communities in the lowest sediment layer sampled (22–34 cm), sulfate-reducing bacteria and archaea of the ANME-2 cluster (likely involved in anaerobic methane oxidation) were prevalent, whereas heterotrophic organisms abounded in the top sediment layer (0–6 cm). Communities in the middle layer (6–22 cm) contained organisms that could be linked to either of the aforementioned processes. We discuss how these phylogeny (sequence)-based findings can support the ongoing molecular work aimed at unraveling both the functioning and the functional diversities of the communities under study. PMID:17431711

  2. The influence of nitrate, nitrite, and dissolved oxygen on uranium oxidation in the presence of a sediment microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, E.; Bargar, J.; Dam, W. L.; Francis, C.

    2016-12-01

    Although both abiotic and biotic uranium oxidation have been documented, the rate of uranium oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction by bacteria far exceeds observed abiotic oxidation rates. Thus, nitrogen-cycling microbial communities, specifically those involved in denitrification, may be key to understanding uranium mobility and long-standing environmental contamination. Previous studies indicate the addition of nitrate to artificially bioreduced coarse-grained sediments accelerates U(IV) oxidation; however, there is a paucity of information regarding nitrate-U(IV) dynamics in natural sediments and nitrate-reducing communities in the subsurface. Here we investigate how an indigenous microbial community from a naturally-reduced zone (NRZ) responds to an oxidation event. Using flow-through column reactors packed with sterilized or unsterilized fine-grained sediment from a known uranium plume at Riverton, WY, we carried out a laboratory-scale oxidation event by stimulating the columns with an oxidant (either 1mM nitrate, 100μM nitrite, or 268μM oxygen) for 24 days. The objectives of this study were to (1) identify how the type of oxidant introduced affects the denitrifying microbial community from Riverton, WY, and (2) assess over what timescales and to what extent do nitrate, nitrite, and oxygen oxidize uranium in reduced sediments. We found that the abundances of nirK and nirS (functional genes encoding a key denitrification enzyme, nitrite reductase) remained within the range of values observed for whole (unperturbed) sediment cores at Riverton, WY, and that a number of distinct nirK/nirS sequence types emerged. Interestingly, preliminary uranium effluent data suggests that uranium mobilization was highest in the oxygen-stimulated columns. Therefore, although nitrate- and nitrite-amended columns resulted in changes in microbial diversity and abundances, only a minimal increase in the rate of uranium mobilization was observed and oxygen was the most efficient

  3. Cross-linking of chitosan and chitosan/poly(ethylene oxide) beads: a theoretical treatment.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Leticia; Agnely, Florence; Leclerc, Bernard; Siepmann, Juergen; Cotte, Marine; Geiger, Sandrine; Couarraze, Guy

    2007-09-01

    The major aim of this study was to get deeper insight into the process of polymer cross-linking and the resulting structure of beads based on chitosan (CS) or chitosan/poly(ethylene oxide) (CS/PEO) semi-interpenetrating networks (semi-IPNs) as new carrier materials for oral drug delivery. Spherical hydrogels were prepared by a dropping method. The uptake kinetics of the cross-linking agent glyoxal into the beads were monitored and quantitatively described using Fick's second law of diffusion. High-resolution synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy (SIRM) was used to characterize the inner structures of the beads. Importantly, the diffusion of glyoxal through the hydrogels was found to be much slower than the cross-linking reaction and the mesh size of the created networks to be much larger than the hydrodynamic diameter of glyoxal. The presence of PEO chains slightly decreased the diffusivity of glyoxal due to obstruction effects. However, the cross-linking reaction was not affected. Interestingly, the polymers were homogeneously cross-linked throughout the beads, except for a thin outer shell showing an elevated cross-linking density. Thus, the obtained cross-linked hydrogel-based beads exhibit well-defined polymeric structures and offer an interesting potential as novel oral drug delivery systems.

  4. Comparative study on DBPs formation profiles of intermediate organics from hydroxyl radicals oxidation of microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Ou, Tai-You; Wang, Gen-Shuh

    2016-05-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formation from intermediate organics during UV/H2O2 treatment of activated sludge and algae cells under various reaction conditions. The DBPs including trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), haloketones (HKs) and haloacetonitriles (HANs) in UV/H2O2-treated and chlorinated water were measured. The results showed that both dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) increased during the initial stage of UV/H2O2 treatment due to the lysis of sludge and algae cells, which enhanced the formation of both C- and N-DBPs; however, both DOC and DON decreased after longer reaction times. During the UV/H2O2 treatments, THMs formation potential (THMFP) peaked earlier than did HAAs formation potential (HAAFP). This shows that the dissolved organics released from lysis of microbial cells in the early stages of oxidation favor the production of THMs over HAAs; however, HAAs precursors increased with the oxidation time. Chlorination with bromide increased the formation of THMs and HAAs but less HKs and HANs were produced. Comparisons of normalized DBP formation potential (DBPFP) of samples collected during UV/H2O2 treatments of four different types of organic matter showed that the highest DBPFP occurred in filtered treated wastewater effluent, followed by samples of activated sludge, filtered eutrophicated pond water, and samples of algae cells. With increasing oxidation time, the dominant DBP species shifted from THMs to HAAs in the samples of activated sludge and algae cells. The DBPFP tests also showed that more HAAs were formed in biologically treated wastewater effluent, while the eutrophicated source water produced more THMs.

  5. Microbial Iron(II) Oxidation in Littoral Freshwater Lake Sediment: The Potential for Competition between Phototrophic vs. Nitrate-Reducing Iron(II)-Oxidizers

    PubMed Central

    Melton, E. D.; Schmidt, C.; Kappler, A.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of neutrophilic microbial iron oxidation is mainly determined by local gradients of oxygen, light, nitrate and ferrous iron. In the anoxic top part of littoral freshwater lake sediment, nitrate-reducing and phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers compete for the same e− donor; reduced iron. It is not yet understood how these microbes co-exist in the sediment and what role they play in the Fe cycle. We show that both metabolic types of anaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms are present in the same sediment layer directly beneath the oxic-anoxic sediment interface. The photoferrotrophic most probable number counted 3.4·105 cells·g−1 and the autotrophic and mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers totaled 1.8·104 and 4.5·104 cells·g−1 dry weight sediment, respectively. To distinguish between the two microbial Fe(II) oxidation processes and assess their individual contribution to the sedimentary Fe cycle, littoral lake sediment was incubated in microcosm experiments. Nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria exhibited a higher maximum Fe(II) oxidation rate per cell, in both pure cultures and microcosms, than photoferrotrophs. In microcosms, photoferrotrophs instantly started oxidizing Fe(II), whilst nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers showed a significant lag-phase during which they probably use organics as e− donor before initiating Fe(II) oxidation. This suggests that they will be outcompeted by phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers during optimal light conditions; as phototrophs deplete Fe(II) before nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers start Fe(II) oxidation. Thus, the co-existence of the two anaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizers may be possible due to a niche space separation in time by the day-night cycle, where nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers oxidize Fe(II) during darkness and phototrophs play a dominant role in Fe(II) oxidation during daylight. Furthermore, metabolic flexibility of Fe(II)-oxidizing microbes may play a paramount role in the

  6. Soil microbial community responses to contamination with silver, aluminium oxide and silicon dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    McGee, C F; Storey, S; Clipson, N; Doyle, E

    2017-02-14

    Soil microorganisms are key contributors to nutrient cycling and are essential for the maintenance of healthy soils and sustainable agriculture. Although the antimicrobial effects of a broad range of nanoparticulate substances have been characterised in vitro, little is known about the impact of these compounds on microbial communities in environments such as soil. In this study, the effect of three widely used nanoparticulates (silver, silicon dioxide and aluminium oxide) on bacterial and fungal communities in an agricultural pastureland soil was examined in a microcosm-based experiment using a combination of enzyme analysis, molecular fingerprinting and amplicon sequencing. A relatively low concentration of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) significantly reduced total soil dehydrogenase and urease activity, while Al2O3 and SiO2 nanoparticles had no effect. Amplicon sequencing revealed substantial shifts in bacterial community composition in soils amended with AgNPs, with significant decreases in the relative abundance of Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia and an increase in Proteobacteria. In particular, the relative abundance of the Proteobacterial genus Dyella significantly increased in AgNP amended soil. The effects of Al2O3 and SiO2 NPs on bacterial community composition were less pronounced. AgNPs significantly reduced bacterial and archaeal amoA gene abundance in soil, with the archaea more susceptible than bacteria. AgNPs also significantly impacted soil fungal community structure, while Al2O3 and SiO2 NPs had no effect. Several fungal ribotypes increased in soil amended with AgNPs, compared to control soil. This study highlights the need to consider the effects of individual nanoparticles on soil microbial communities when assessing their environmental impact.

  7. Probing the oxidation reduction properties of terrestrially and microbially derived dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fimmen, Ryan L.; Cory, Rose M.; Chin, Yu-Ping; Trouts, Tamara D.; McKnight, Diane M.

    2007-06-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been shown to be an integral component in biogeochemical electron transfer reactions due to its demonstrated ability to facilitate redox reactions. While the role of DOM as a facilitator of electron transfer processes has been demonstrated, greater knowledge would lead to better understanding of the structural components responsible for redox behavior, such as quinones and nitrogen and sulfur (N/S) functional groups. This investigation uses direct scan voltammetry (DSV) coupled with fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy as well as thermochemolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to elucidate the organic moieties responsible for facilitating electron transfer reactions. We contrast electrochemical properties and structural details of three organic matter isolates from diverse sources; Great Dismal Swamp DOM (terrestrially derived, highly aromatic), Pony Lake DOM (microbially derived, highly aliphatic) and Toolik Lake (terrestrially derived, photochemically and microbially altered) with juglone (a redox-active model quinone). Aromatic and phenolic constituents were detected (by 13C NMR) and recovered (by thermochemolysis GC-MS) from all three fulvic acid samples, highlighting the ubiquity of these compounds and suggesting that the quinone-phenol redox couple is not limited to DOM derived from lignin precursors. The range of hydroxy-benzene and benzoic acid derivatives may explain the lack of a single pair of well-defined oxidation and reduction peaks in the DSV scans. The presence of a wide-range of hydroxylated benzoic acid isomers and other redox-active aromatic residues implies that native DOM possesses overlapping redox potentials analogous to their characteristic range of p Ka values.

  8. Microbially Induced Reductive Dissolution of Trace Element-Rich Lacustrine Iron-Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, S. A.; Kulczykci, E.; O'Neill, A. H.; Roberts, J. A.; Fowle, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    Iron (oxy)hydroxides are ubiquitous components of surfacial materials and are often the dominant redox buffering solid phases in soils and sediments. As a result, the geochemical behavior of these minerals has a profound influence on the global biogeochemical cycling of trace elements, including heavy metals and arsenic (As), in addition to nutrients such as, sulfur (S), carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P). Understanding the behavior of trace elements and nutrients during biological and abiotic processes that effect iron (Fe) mineral phase transformations is paramount for predicting their distribution, mobility, and bioavailability in the environment. To evaluate the impact of dissimilatory Fe-reduction (DIR) on trace element mobility we have conducted batch incubations of Fe-rich lateritic lacustrine sediments. In contrast to mid-latitude lakes where Fe (oxy)hydroxides constitute only a small fraction of the total sediment, tropical lake sediments have been known to comprise up to 40-60 wt. % Fe-oxides. Under suboxic and nonsulphidogenic conditions it is likely that DIR plays a prominent role in early diagenesis and therefore may exert control on the fate and distribution of many trace elements in this environment (e.g. Crowe et al. 2004). In batch incubations conducted in a minimal media of similar composition to typical freshwater the lacustrine Fe-oxides were reductively dissolved at a rate very similar to pure synthetic goethite of similar surface area (measured by N2-BET). This is in contrast to the slower rates previously observed for trace element substituted Fe-oxides. These slower rates have been attributed to surface passivation by secondary Al and Cr mineral precipitation. We propose that these passivation effects may be offset in minimal media incubations by enhanced microbial metabolism due the presence of nutrients (P, Co and other metals) in the lacustrine Fe-oxides. These nutrients became available with progressive reduction as the

  9. Combined Flux Chamber and Genomics Approach Links Nitrous Acid Emissions to Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in Urban and Agricultural Soil.

    PubMed

    Scharko, Nicole K; Schütte, Ursel M E; Berke, Andrew E; Banina, Lauren; Peel, Hannah R; Donaldson, Melissa A; Hemmerich, Chris; White, Jeffrey R; Raff, Jonathan D

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is a photochemical source of hydroxyl radical and nitric oxide in the atmosphere that stems from abiotic and biogenic processes, including the activity of ammonia-oxidizing soil microbes. HONO fluxes were measured from agricultural and urban soil in mesocosm studies aimed at characterizing biogenic sources and linking them to indigenous microbial consortia. Fluxes of HONO from agricultural and urban soil were suppressed by addition of a nitrification inhibitor and enhanced by amendment with ammonium (NH4(+)), with peaks at 19 and 8 ng m(-2) s(-1), respectively. In addition, both agricultural and urban soils were observed to convert (15)NH4(+) to HO(15)NO. Genomic surveys of soil samples revealed that 1.5-6% of total expressed 16S rRNA sequences detected belonged to known ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea. Peak fluxes of HONO were directly related to the abundance of ammonia-oxidizer sequences, which in turn depended on soil pH. Peak HONO fluxes under fertilized conditions are comparable in magnitude to fluxes reported during field campaigns. The results suggest that biogenic HONO emissions will be important in soil environments that exhibit high nitrification rates (e.g., agricultural soil) although the widespread occurrence of ammonia oxidizers implies that biogenic HONO emissions are also possible in the urban and remote environment.

  10. Functional consequences of microbial shifts in the human gastrointestinal tract linked to antibiotic treatment and obesity.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Ester; Bargiela, Rafael; Diez, María Suárez; Friedrichs, Anette; Pérez-Cobas, Ana Elena; Gosalbes, María José; Knecht, Henrik; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Artacho, Alejandro; Ruiz, Alicia; Campoy, Cristina; Latorre, Amparo; Ott, Stephan J; Moya, Andrés; Suárez, Antonio; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A P; Ferrer, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The microbiomes in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of individuals receiving antibiotics and those in obese subjects undergo compositional shifts, the metabolic effects and linkages of which are not clearly understood. Herein, we set to gain insight into these effects, particularly with regard to carbohydrate metabolism, and to contribute to unravel the underlying mechanisms and consequences for health conditions. We measured the activity level of GIT carbohydrate-active enzymes toward 23 distinct sugars in adults patients (n = 2) receiving 14-d β-lactam therapy and in obese (n = 7) and lean (n = 5) adolescents. We observed that both 14 d antibiotic-treated and obese subjects showed higher and less balanced sugar anabolic capacities, with 40% carbohydrates being preferentially processed as compared with non-treated and lean patients. Metaproteome-wide metabolic reconstructions confirmed that the impaired utilization of sugars propagated throughout the pentose phosphate metabolism, which had adverse consequences for the metabolic status of the GIT microbiota. The results point to an age-independent positive association between GIT glycosidase activity and the body mass index, fasting blood glucose and insulin resistance (r ( 2) ≥ 0.95). Moreover, antibiotics altered the active fraction of enzymes controlling the thickness, composition and consistency of the mucin glycans. Our data and analyses provide biochemical insights into the effects of antibiotic usage on the dynamics of the GIT microbiota and pin-point presumptive links to obesity. The knowledge and the hypotheses generated herein lay a foundation for subsequent, systematic research that will be paramount for the design of "smart" dietary and therapeutic interventions to modulate host-microbe metabolic co-regulation in intestinal homeostasis.

  11. Tyrosyl radical generated by myeloperoxidase catalyzes the oxidative cross-linking of proteins.

    PubMed

    Heinecke, J W; Li, W; Francis, G A; Goldstein, J A

    1993-06-01

    Phagocytes generate H2O2 for use by a secreted heme enzyme, myeloperoxidase, to kill invading bacteria, viruses, and fungi. We have explored the possibility that myeloperoxidase might also convert L-tyrosine to a radical catalyst that cross-links proteins. Protein-bound tyrosyl residues exposed to myeloperoxidase, H2O2, and L-tyrosine were oxidized to o,o'-dityrosine, a stable product of the tyrosyl radical. The cross-linking reaction required L-tyrosine but was independent of halide and free transition metal ions; the heme poisons azide and aminotriazole were inhibitory. Activated neutrophils likewise converted polypeptide tyrosines to dityrosine. The pathway for oxidation of peptide tyrosyl residues was dependent upon L-tyrosine and was inhibited by heme poisons and catalase. Dityrosine synthesis was little affected by plasma concentrations of Cl- and amino acids, suggesting that the reaction pathway might be physiologically relevant. The requirement for free L-tyrosine and H2O2 for dityrosine formation and the inhibition by heme poisons support the hypothesis that myeloperoxidase catalyzes the cross-linking of proteins by a peroxidative mechanism involving tyrosyl radical. In striking contrast to the pathways generally used to study protein oxidation in vitro, the reaction does not require free metal ions. We speculate that protein dityrosine cross-linking by myeloperoxidase may play a role in bacterial killing or injuring normal tissue. The intense fluorescence and stability of biphenolic compounds may allow dityrosine to act as a marker for proteins oxidatively damaged by myeloperoxidase in phagocyte-rich inflammatory lesions.

  12. Influence of Oxygen and Nitrate on Fe (Hydr)oxide Mineral Transformation and Soil Microbial Communities during Redox Cycling.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Jacqueline; Roden, Eric E; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew

    2016-04-05

    Oscillations between reducing and oxidizing conditions are observed at the interface of anaerobic/oxic and anaerobic/anoxic environments, and are often stimulated by an alternating flux of electron donors (e.g., organic carbon) and electron acceptors (e.g., O2 and NO3(-)). In iron (Fe) rich soils and sediments, these oscillations may stimulate the growth of both Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) and Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), and their metabolism may induce cycling between Fe(II) and Fe(III), promoting the transformation of Fe (hydr)oxide minerals. Here, we examine the mineralogical evolution of lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite, and the adaptation of a natural microbial community to alternating Fe-reducing (anaerobic with addition of glucose) and Fe-oxidizing (with addition of nitrate or air) conditions. The growth of FeRB (e.g., Geobacter) is stimulated under anaerobic conditions in the presence of glucose. However, the abundance of these organisms depends on the availability of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides. Redox cycling with nitrate results in decreased Fe(II) oxidation thereby decreasing the availability of Fe(III) for FeRB. Additionally, magnetite is detected as the main product of both lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite reduction. In contrast, introduction of air results in increased Fe(II) oxidation, increasing the availability of Fe(III) and the abundance of Geobacter. In the lepidocrocite reactors, Fe(II) oxidation by dissolved O2 promotes the formation of ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite, whereas in the ferrihydrite reactors we observe a decrease in magnetite stoichiometry (e.g., oxidation). Understanding Fe (hydr)oxide transformation under environmentally relevant redox cycling conditions provides insight into nutrient availability and transport, contaminant mobility, and microbial metabolism in soils and sediments.

  13. A Novel Lineage of Proteobacteria Involved in Formation of Marine Fe-Oxidizing Microbial Mat Communities

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David; Rentz, Jeremy A.; Lilburn, Timothy G.; Davis, Richard E.; Chan, Clara; Moyer, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    Background For decades it has been recognized that neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are associated with hydrothermal venting of Fe(II)-rich fluids associated with seamounts in the world's oceans. The evidence was based almost entirely on the mineralogical remains of the microbes, which themselves had neither been brought into culture or been assigned to a specific phylogenetic clade. We have used both cultivation and cultivation-independent techniques to study Fe-rich microbial mats associated with hydrothermal venting at Loihi Seamount, a submarine volcano. Methodology/Principle Findings Using gradient enrichment techniques, two iron-oxidizing bacteria, strains PV-1 and JV-1, were isolated. Chemolithotrophic growth was observed under microaerobic conditions; Fe(II) and Fe0 were the only energy sources that supported growth. Both strains produced filamentous stalk-like structures composed of multiple nanometer sized fibrils of Fe-oxyhydroxide. These were consistent with mineralogical structures found in the iron mats. Phylogenetic analysis of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene demonstrated that strains PV-1 and JV-1 were identical and formed a monophyletic group deeply rooted within the Proteobacteria. The most similar sequence (85.3% similarity) from a cultivated isolate came from Methylophaga marina. Phylogenetic analysis of the RecA and GyrB protein sequences confirmed that these strains are distantly related to other members of the Proteobacteria. A cultivation-independent analysis of the SSU rRNA gene by terminal-restriction fragment (T-RF) profiling showed that this phylotype was most common in a variety of microbial mats collected at different times and locations at Loihi. Conclusions On the basis of phylogenetic and physiological data, it is proposed that isolate PV-1T ( = ATCC BAA-1019: JCM 14766) represents the type strain of a novel species in a new genus, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans gen. nov., sp. nov. Furthermore, the strain is the first

  14. A novel lineage of proteobacteria involved in formation of marine Fe-oxidizing microbial mat communities.

    PubMed

    Emerson, David; Rentz, Jeremy A; Lilburn, Timothy G; Davis, Richard E; Aldrich, Henry; Chan, Clara; Moyer, Craig L

    2007-08-01

    For decades it has been recognized that neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are associated with hydrothermal venting of Fe(II)-rich fluids associated with seamounts in the world's oceans. The evidence was based almost entirely on the mineralogical remains of the microbes, which themselves had neither been brought into culture or been assigned to a specific phylogenetic clade. We have used both cultivation and cultivation-independent techniques to study Fe-rich microbial mats associated with hydrothermal venting at Loihi Seamount, a submarine volcano. Using gradient enrichment techniques, two iron-oxidizing bacteria, strains PV-1 and JV-1, were isolated. Chemolithotrophic growth was observed under microaerobic conditions; Fe(II) and Fe(0) were the only energy sources that supported growth. Both strains produced filamentous stalk-like structures composed of multiple nanometer sized fibrils of Fe-oxyhydroxide. These were consistent with mineralogical structures found in the iron mats. Phylogenetic analysis of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene demonstrated that strains PV-1 and JV-1 were identical and formed a monophyletic group deeply rooted within the Proteobacteria. The most similar sequence (85.3% similarity) from a cultivated isolate came from Methylophaga marina. Phylogenetic analysis of the RecA and GyrB protein sequences confirmed that these strains are distantly related to other members of the Proteobacteria. A cultivation-independent analysis of the SSU rRNA gene by terminal-restriction fragment (T-RF) profiling showed that this phylotype was most common in a variety of microbial mats collected at different times and locations at Loihi. On the basis of phylogenetic and physiological data, it is proposed that isolate PV-1(T) ( = ATCC BAA-1019: JCM 14766) represents the type strain of a novel species in a new genus, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans gen. nov., sp. nov. Furthermore, the strain is the first cultured representative of a new candidatus class of the

  15. Cross-linking by protein oxidation in the rapidly setting gel-based glues of slugs

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Andrew; Salt, Michael; Bell, Ashley; Zeitler, Matt; Litra, Noelle; Smith, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The terrestrial slug Arion subfuscus secretes a glue that is a dilute gel with remarkable adhesive and cohesive strength. The function of this glue depends on metals, raising the possibility that metal-catalyzed oxidation plays a role. The extent and time course of protein oxidation was measured by immunoblotting to detect the resulting carbonyl groups. Several proteins, particularly one with a relative molecular mass (Mr) of 165×103, were heavily oxidized. Of the proteins known to distinguish the glue from non-adhesive mucus, only specific size variants were oxidized. The oxidation appears to occur within the first few seconds of secretion. Although carbonyls were detected by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) in denatured proteins, they were not easily detected in the native state. The presence of reversible cross-links derived from carbonyls was tested for by treatment with sodium borohydride, which would reduce uncross-linked carbonyls to alcohols, but stabilize imine bonds formed by carbonyls and thus lead to less soluble complexes. Consistent with imine bond formation, sodium borohydride led to a 20–35% decrease in the amount of soluble protein with a Mr of 40–165 (×103) without changing the carbonyl content per protein. In contrast, the nucleophile hydroxylamine, which would competitively disrupt imine bonds, increased protein solubility in the glue. Finally, the primary amine groups on a protein with a Mr of 15×103 were not accessible to acid anhydrides. The results suggest that cross-links between aldehydes and primary amines contribute to the cohesive strength of the glue. PMID:21525316

  16. Cross-linking by protein oxidation in the rapidly setting gel-based glues of slugs.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Andrew; Salt, Michael; Bell, Ashley; Zeitler, Matt; Litra, Noelle; Smith, Andrew M

    2011-05-15

    The terrestrial slug Arion subfuscus secretes a glue that is a dilute gel with remarkable adhesive and cohesive strength. The function of this glue depends on metals, raising the possibility that metal-catalyzed oxidation plays a role. The extent and time course of protein oxidation was measured by immunoblotting to detect the resulting carbonyl groups. Several proteins, particularly one with a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 165 x 10³, were heavily oxidized. Of the proteins known to distinguish the glue from non-adhesive mucus, only specific size variants were oxidized. The oxidation appears to occur within the first few seconds of secretion. Although carbonyls were detected by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) in denatured proteins, they were not easily detected in the native state. The presence of reversible cross-links derived from carbonyls was tested for by treatment with sodium borohydride, which would reduce uncross-linked carbonyls to alcohols, but stabilize imine bonds formed by carbonyls and thus lead to less soluble complexes. Consistent with imine bond formation, sodium borohydride led to a 20-35% decrease in the amount of soluble protein with a M(r) of 40-165 (x 10³) without changing the carbonyl content per protein. In contrast, the nucleophile hydroxylamine, which would competitively disrupt imine bonds, increased protein solubility in the glue. Finally, the primary amine groups on a protein with a M(r) of 15 x 10³ were not accessible to acid anhydrides. The results suggest that cross-links between aldehydes and primary amines contribute to the cohesive strength of the glue.

  17. Peroxisomal. beta. -oxidation enzyme proteins in adrenoleukodystrophy: distinction between x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.W.; Watkins, P.A.; Osumi, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Moser, H.W.

    1987-03-01

    Very long chain fatty acids, which accumulate in plasma and tissues in x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), neonatal ALD, and the Zellweger cerebrohepatorenal syndrome, are degraded by the peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation pathway, consisting of acyl-CoA oxidase, the bifunctional enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and ..beta..-ketothiolase. A marked deficiency of all three enzyme proteins was reported in livers from patients with the Zellweger syndrome, a disorder in which peroxisomes are decreased or absent. Peroxisomes are not as markedly decreased in neonatal ALD and appear normal in x-linked ALD. Immunoblot analysis of the peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation enzymes revealed an almost complete lack of the bifunctional enzymes in neonatal ALD liver, similar to the finding in Zellweger tissues. In contrast, acyl-CoA oxidase and ..beta..-ketothiolase were present in neonatal ALD liver, although the thiolase appeared to be in precursor form (2-3 kDa larger than the mature enzyme) in neonatal ALD. Unlike either neonatal ALD or Zellweger syndrome, all three peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation enzymes were present in x-linked ALD liver. Despite the absence in neonatal ALD liver of bifunctional enzyme protein, its mRNA was detected by RNA blot analysis in fibroblasts from these patients. These observations suggest that lack of bifunctional enzyme protein in neonatal ALD results from either abnormal translation of the mRNA or degradation of the enzyme prior to its entry into peroxisomes.

  18. Life and Liesegang: Outcrop-Scale Microbially Induced Diagenetic Structures and Geochemical Self-Organization Phenomena Produced by Oxidation of Reduced Iron.

    PubMed

    Kettler, Richard M; Loope, David B; Weber, Karrie A; Niles, Paul B

    2015-08-01

    The Kanab Wonderstone is sandstone (Shinarump Member, Chinle Formation) that is cemented and stained with iron oxide. The iron-oxide cementation and staining in these rocks have been considered examples of the Liesegang phenomenon, but we will show that they comprise a microbially induced structure. The spacing of bands of iron-oxide stain follow the Jablczynski spacing law (wherein the spacing between bands of iron-oxide stain increases as one traverses a series of bands) characteristic of Liesegang. Bands of iron-oxide cement exhibit more variable spacing and exhibit a weak but significant correlation between band thickness and distance between bands of cement. The pore-filling cement contains morphotypes that are similar in size and habit to those exhibited by microaerophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria. Other disseminated iron-oxide mineralization occurs as rhombohedra interpreted to be pseudomorphs after siderite. We interpret the cement to be produced by microbially mediated oxidation of siderite (a typical early diagenetic mineral in fluvial sandstones). Iron-oxidizing bacteria colonized the redox interface between siderite-cemented sand and porous sandstone. Microbes oxidized aqueous Fe(II), generating acid that caused siderite dissolution. The iron-oxide cement is the microbial product of a geochemical drive for organization; whereas the iron-oxide stain is true Liesegang. Together, they comprise a distinctive microbially induced structure with high preservation potential.

  19. Quantification of nitrous oxide (N2O) uptake in boreal forest soils by combining isotopic and microbial approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welti, Nina; Siljanen, Henri; Biasi, Christina; Martikainen, Pertti

    2015-04-01

    The amount of nitrous oxide (N2O) produced during denitrification is highly regulated by the function of the last reductase enzyme (nitrous oxide reductase; nosZ) which is known to be inhibited by oxygen, low pH and low temperature, which are typical characteristics of boreal peatlands and some forest soils. Denitrification can be a sink for N2O, if the last step of the process is very efficient. Generally, the N2O sink potential of soils is poorly constrained; while uptake rates were often observed in field studies, the data was rejected as analytical errors or artifacts. This led to the question: when and by which mechanisms does N2O uptake occur in natural boreal forests? In order to answer this question, we established a 15N2O tracer experiment where the production of 15N2 and consumption of 15N2O were quantified in aerobic and anaerobic conditions followed by abundance analyses of genes and transcripts. The laboratory incubations were complemented with molecular approaches which linked the N2O dynamics with individual microbial species and transcriptomics. The abundance of denitrifying functional genes and gene transcripts reducing nitrous oxide (nosZ) were quantified throughout the experiment with sacrificial sampling in order to solve the role of typical and atypical denitrifying populations on N2O consumption. For this study, a Finnish boreal spruce forest and peatland were selected where previous field measurements have revealed negative N2O fluxes (i.e. N2O uptake). Soil horizons were selected in both the organic layer and uppermost mineral soil layer and in the peat layers 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm, where oxygen is limited and N2O uptake occurs at the field scale. 15N-N2O (99 AT %) was added to an initial N2O concentration of 1.7 ppm. All soils were flushed with 100% helium prior to the N2O addition to ensure that the NO3 stocks were reduced, leaving the added N2O as the sole activator of N2O uptake and primary N source. Aerobic N2O uptake was quantified in

  20. Biochemistry and Ecology of Novel Cytochromes Catalyzing Fe(II) Oxidation by an Acidophilic Microbial Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, S. W.; Jeans, C. J.; Thelen, M. P.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Hettich, R. C.; Chan, C. S.; Banfield, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    An acidophilic microbial community found in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, CA forms abundant biofilms in extremely acidic (pH<1) and toxic metal conditions. In this ecosystem, biological Fe(II) oxidation is critical to the metabolic functioning of the community, and in turn this process generates acid mine drainage, causing an environmental catastrophe. Two conspicuous novel proteins isolated from these biofilms were identified as gene products of Leptospirillum group II and were characterized as cytochromes with unique properties. Sulfuric acid extraction of biofilm samples liberated one of these proteins, a 16 kDa cytochrome with an unusual alpha-band absorption at 579 (Cyt579). Genomic sequencing of multiple biofilms indicated that several variants of Cyt579 were present in Leptospirillum strains. Intact protein MS analysis identified the dominant variants in each biofilm and documented multiple N-terminal cleavage sites for Cyt579. By combining biochemical, geochemical and microbiological data, we established that the sequence variation and N-terminal processing of Cyt579 are selected by ecological conditions. In addition to the soluble Cyt579, the second cytochrome appears as a much larger protein complex of ~210 kDa predominant in the biofilm membrane fraction, and has an alpha-band absorption at 572 nm. The 60 kDa cytochrome subunit, Cyt572, resides in the outer membrane of LeptoII, and readily oxidizes Fe(II) at low pH (0.95 - 3.0). Several genes encoding Cyt572 were localized within a recombination hotspot between two strains of LeptoII, causing a large range of variation in the sequences. Genomic sequencing and MS proteomic studies established that the variants were also selected by ecological conditions. A general mechanistic model for Fe(II) oxidation has been developed from these studies. Initial Fe(II) oxidation by Cyt572 occurs at the outer membrane. Cyt572 then transfers electrons to Cyt579, perhaps representing an initial step in energy flow

  1. Highly Sensitive and Selective Sensor Chips with Graphene-Oxide Linking Layer.

    PubMed

    Stebunov, Yury V; Aftenieva, Olga A; Arsenin, Aleksey V; Volkov, Valentyn S

    2015-10-07

    The development of sensing interfaces can significantly improve the performance of biological sensors. Graphene oxide provides a remarkable immobilization platform for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors due to its excellent optical and biochemical properties. Here, we describe a novel sensor chip for SPR biosensors based on graphene-oxide linking layers. The biosensing assay model was based on a graphene oxide film containing streptavidin. The proposed sensor chip has three times higher sensitivity than the carboxymethylated dextran surface of a commercial sensor chip. Moreover, the demonstrated sensor chips are bioselective with more than 25 times reduced binding for nonspecific interaction and can be used multiple times. We consider the results presented here of importance for any future applications of highly sensitive SPR biosensing.

  2. Response of microbial communities colonizing salt marsh plants rhizosphere to copper oxide nanoparticles contamination and its implications for phytoremediation processes.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Joana P; Almeida, C Marisa R; Andreotti, Federico; Barros, Leandro; Almeida, Tânia; Mucha, Ana P

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate Cu oxide nanoparticles (CuO NP) effect on microbial communities associated with salt marsh plants (Halimione portulacoides and Pragmites australis) rhizosphere and its implications for phytoremediation processes. Experiments were conducted, under controlled conditions, over one week. Rhizosediment soaked in the respective elutriate (a simplified natural medium) with or without plants, was doped with CuO NP or with Cu in ionic form. Microbial community in rhizosediments was characterized in terms of abundance (by DAPI) and structure (by ARISA). Metal uptake by plants was evaluated by measuring Cu in plant tissues (by atomic absorption spectroscopy). Results revealed significant metal uptake but only in plant roots, which was significantly lower (H. portulacoides) or not significant (P. australis) when the metal was in NP form. Microbial community structure was significantly changed by the treatment (absence/presence of Cu, ionic Cu or CuO NP) as showed by multivariate analysis of ARISA profiles and confirmed by analysis of similarities (Global test - one way ANOSIM). Moreover, in P. australis rhizosediments microbial abundance, bacterial richness and diversity indexes were significantly affected (increased or decreased) due to metal presence whereas in H. portulacoides rhizosediment microbial abundance showed a significant decrease, particularly when the metal was in NP form. Accordingly, Cu presence affected the response of the rhizosphere microbial community and in some cases that response was significantly different when Cu was in NP form. The response of the microbial communities to Cu NP might also contribute to the lower metal accumulation by plants when the metal was in this form. So, Cu NP may cause disturbances in ecosystems functions, ultimately affecting phytoremediation processes. These facts should be considered regarding the use of appropriate salt marshes plants to remediate moderately impacted areas such as estuaries

  3. A prototype sensor system for the early detection of microbially linked spoilage in stored wheat grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lacy Costello, B. P. J.; Ewen, R. J.; Gunson, H.; Ratcliffe, N. M.; Sivanand, P. S.; Spencer-Phillips, P. T. N.

    2003-04-01

    Sensors based on composites of metal oxides were fabricated and tested extensively under high-humidity and high-flow conditions with exposure to vapours reported to increase in the headspace of wheat grain (Triticum aestivum cv Hereward) colonized by fungi. The sensors that exhibited high sensitivity to target vapours combined with high stability were selected for inclusion into a four-sensor array prototype system. A sampling protocol aligned to parallel gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and human olfactory assessment studies was established for use with the sensor system. The sensor system was utilized to assess irradiated wheat samples that had been conditioned to 25% moisture content and inoculated with pathogens known to cause spoilage of grain in storage. These included the fungi Penicillium aurantiogriseum, Penicillium vulpinum, Penicillium verrucosum, Fusarium culmorum, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus flavus and the actinomycete, Streptomyces griseus. The sensor system successfully tracked the progress of the infections from a very early stage and the results were compared with human olfactory assessment panels run concurrently. A series of dilution studies were undertaken using previously infected grain mixed with sound grain, to improve the sensitivity and maximize the differentiation of the sensor system. An optimum set of conditions including incubation temperature, incubation time, sampling time, and flow rate were ascertained utilizing this method. The sensor system differentiated samples of sound grain from samples of sound grain with 1% (w/w) fungus infected grain added. Following laboratory trials, the prototype sensor system was evaluated in a commercial wheat grain intake facility. Thresholds calculated from laboratory tests were used to differentiate between sound and infected samples (classified by intake laboratory technicians) collected routinely from trucks delivering grain for use in food manufacture. All samples identified as having

  4. Evaluation of pharmacological induction of fatty acid beta-oxidation in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, M C; Zhang, H P; Smith, K D

    2001-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited neurometabolic disorder associated with elevated levels of saturated unbranched very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA; C > 22:0) in plasma and tissues, and reduced VLCFA beta-oxidation in fibroblasts, white blood cells, and amniocytes from X-ALD patients. The X-ALD gene (ABCD1) at Xq28 encodes the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) that is related to the peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette (ABCD) transmembrane half-transporter proteins. The function of ALDP is unknown and its role in VLCFA accumulation unresolved. Previously, our laboratory has shown that sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA) treatment of X-ALD fibroblasts results in increased peroxisomal VLCFA beta-oxidation activity and increased expression of the X-ALD-related protein, ALDRP, encoded by the ABCD2 gene. In this study, the effect of various pharmacological agents on VLCFA beta-oxidation in ALD mouse fibroblasts is tested. 4PBA, styrylacetate and benzyloxyacetate (structurally related to 4PBA), and trichostatin A (functionally related to 4PBA) increase both VLCFA (peroxisomal) and long-chain fatty acid [LCFA (peroxisomal and mitochondrial)] beta-oxidation. Isobutyrate, zaprinast, hydroxyurea, and 5-azacytidine had no effect on VLCFA or LCFA beta-oxidation. Lovastatin had no effect on fatty acid beta-oxidation under normal tissue culture conditions but did result in an increase in both VLCFA and LCFA beta-oxidation when ALD mouse fibroblasts were cultured in the absence of cholesterol. The effect of trichostatin A on peroxisomal VLCFA beta-oxidation is shown to be independent of an increase in ALDRP expression, suggesting that correction of the biochemical abnormality in X-ALD is not dependent on pharmacological induction of a redundant gene (ABCD2). These studies contribute to a better understanding of the role of ALDP in VLCFA accumulation and may lead to the development of more effective pharmacological therapies. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  5. Evaluating the Role of Microbial Internal Storage Turnover on Nitrous Oxide Accumulation During Denitrification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Guo, Jianhua; Chen, Xueming; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-10-14

    Biological wastewater treatment processes under a dynamic regime with respect to carbon substrate can result in microbial storage of internal polymers (e.g., polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)) and their subsequent utilizations. These storage turnovers play important roles in nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation during heterotrophic denitrification in biological wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the key role of PHB storage turnovers on N2O accumulation during denitrification for the first time, aiming to establish the key relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB storage production. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using N2O data from two independent experimental systems with PHB storage turnovers. The model satisfactorily describes nitrogen reductions, PHB storage/utilization, and N2O accumulation from both systems. The results reveal a linear relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB production, suggesting a substantial effect of PHB storage on N2O accumulation during denitrification. Application of the model to simulate long-term operations of a denitrifying sequencing batch reactor and a denitrifying continuous system indicates the feeding pattern and sludge retention time would alter PHB turnovers and thus affect N2O accumulation. Increasing PHB utilization could substantially raise N2O accumulation due to the relatively low N2O reduction rate when using PHB as carbon source.

  6. Effect of Graphene-Graphene Oxide Modified Anode on the Performance of Microbial Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Na; Ren, Yueping; Li, Xiufen; Wang, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    The inferior hydrophilicity of graphene is an adverse factor to the performance of the graphene modified anodes (G anodes) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this paper, different amounts of hydrophilic graphene oxide (GO) were doped into the modification layers to elevate the hydrophilicity of the G anodes so as to further improve their performance. Increasing the GO doped ratio from 0.15 mg·mg−1 to 0.2 mg·mg−1 and 0.25 mg·mg−1, the static water contact angle (θc) of the G-GO anodes decreased from 74.2 ± 0.52° to 64.6 ± 2.75° and 41.7 ± 3.69°, respectively. The G-GO0.2 anode with GO doped ratio of 0.2 mg·mg−1 exhibited the optimal performance and the maximum power density (Pmax) of the corresponding MFC was 1100.18 mW·m−2, 1.51 times higher than that of the MFC with the G anode. PMID:28335302

  7. Can a microbial fuel cell resist the oxidation of Tomato pomace?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogg, Alex; Gadhamshetty, Venkataramana; Franco, Daniel; Wilder, Joseph; Agapi, Steven; Komisar, Simeon

    2015-04-01

    The Tomato industry in the United States generates ∼40 million metric tons of pomace waste on an annual basis. Here, we demonstrate the use of pomace as the feedstock for electricity production in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). The putative redox-active compounds and the particulate characteristic of the pomace influenced the temporal dynamics of polarization, impedance, and voltammetry response of pomace-MFCs (pMFC). While the open-circuit potential of pMFC was similar to its glucose-control, the polarization response of pMFC (125 W m-2 and 500 mA m-2) was inferior to its glucose-control (290 W m2 and 1300 mA m-2), and this difference increased with increasing scales of current density and time. The pomace oxidation was associated with a redox-active mediator that undergoes a quasi-reversible reaction at higher potential (Ep = 0 V vs Ag/Agcl); its charge transfer impedance appeared as a distinct time constant in the mid-frequency region during AC electrical impedance spectroscopy analysis.

  8. Moisture effects on gas-phase biofilter ammonia removal efficiency, nitrous oxide generation, and microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liangcheng; Kent, Angela D; Wang, Xinlei; Funk, Ted L; Gates, Richard S; Zhang, Yuanhui

    2014-04-30

    We established a four-biofilter setup to examine the effects of moisture content (MC) on biofilter performance, including NH3 removal and N2O generation. We hypothesized that MC increase can improve NH3 removal, stimulate N2O generation and alter the composition and function of microbial communities. We found that NH3 removal efficiency was greatly improved when MC increased from 35 to 55%, but further increasing MC to 63% did not help much; while N2O concentration was low at 35-55% MC, but dramatically increased at 63% MC. Decreasing MC from 63 to 55% restored N2O concentration. Examination of amoA communities using T-RFLP and real-time qPCR showed that the composition and abundance of ammonia oxidizers were not significantly changed in a "moisture disturbance-disturbance relief" process in which MC was increased from 55 to 63% and then reduced to 55%. This observation supported the changes of NH3 removal efficiency. The composition of nosZ community was altered at 63% MC and then was recovered at 55% MC, which indicates resilience to moisture disturbance. The abundance of nosZ community was negatively correlated with moisture content in this process, and the decreased nosZ abundance at 63% MC explained the observation of increased N2O concentration at that condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluating the Role of Microbial Internal Storage Turnover on Nitrous Oxide Accumulation During Denitrification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Guo, Jianhua; Chen, Xueming; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Biological wastewater treatment processes under a dynamic regime with respect to carbon substrate can result in microbial storage of internal polymers (e.g., polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)) and their subsequent utilizations. These storage turnovers play important roles in nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation during heterotrophic denitrification in biological wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the key role of PHB storage turnovers on N2O accumulation during denitrification for the first time, aiming to establish the key relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB storage production. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using N2O data from two independent experimental systems with PHB storage turnovers. The model satisfactorily describes nitrogen reductions, PHB storage/utilization, and N2O accumulation from both systems. The results reveal a linear relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB production, suggesting a substantial effect of PHB storage on N2O accumulation during denitrification. Application of the model to simulate long-term operations of a denitrifying sequencing batch reactor and a denitrifying continuous system indicates the feeding pattern and sludge retention time would alter PHB turnovers and thus affect N2O accumulation. Increasing PHB utilization could substantially raise N2O accumulation due to the relatively low N2O reduction rate when using PHB as carbon source. PMID:26463891

  10. Effects of alkylphosphates and nitrous oxide on microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Bogan, B W; Lahner, L M; Trbovic, V; Szajkovics, A M; Paterek, J R

    2001-05-01

    We conducted a series of liquid-culture experiments to begin to evaluate the abilities of gaseous sources of nitrogen and phosphorus to support biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nutrients examined included nitrous oxide, as well as triethylphosphate (TEP) and tributylphosphate (TBP). Cultures were established using the indigenous microbial populations from one manufactured gas plant (MGP) site and one crude oil-contaminated drilling field site. Mineralization of phenanthrene was measured under alternative nutrient regimes and was compared to that seen with ammoniacal nitrogen and PO(4). Parallel cultures were used to assess removal of a suite of three- to five-ring PAHs. In summary, the abilities of the different communities to degrade PAH when supplemented with N(2)O, TEP, and TBP were highly variable. For example, in the MGP soil, organic P sources, especially TBP, supported a considerably higher degree of removal of low-molecular-weight PAHs than did PO(4); however, loss of high-molecular-weight compounds was impaired under these conditions. The disappearance of most PAHs was significantly less in the oil field soil when organophosphates were used. These results indicate that the utility of gaseous nutrients for PAH bioremediation in situ may be limited and will very likely have to be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

  11. Synergistic effect of titanium dioxide nanocrystal/reduced graphene oxide hybrid on enhancement of microbial electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Long; Qiao, Yan; Wu, Xiao-Shuai; Ma, Cai-Xia; Li, Xin; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-02-01

    A small sized TiO2 nanocrystal (˜10 nm)/reduced graphene oxide (TiO2/rGO) hybrid is synthesized through a sol-gel process for hybrid TiO2/GO followed by solvothermal reduction of GO to rGO and is further used as a microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode. The strong synergistic effect from a large surface area produced by uniformly deposited TiO2 nanocrystals, good hydrophilicity of TiO2 nanocrystals and superior conductivity of rGO leads to significantly improved electrocatalysis. In particular, a direct electrochemistry is realized by generating endogenous flavins from a large amount of microbes grown on the highly biocompatible TiO2 nanocrystals to mediate fast electron transfer between microbes and conductive rGO for a high performance anode. The TiO2/rGO hybrid anode delivers a maximum power density of 3169 mW m-2 in Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 MFC, which is much large than that of the conventional carbon cloth anode and reported TiO2/carbon hybrid anode, thus offering great potential for practical applications of MFC. This work is for the first time to report that the synergistic effect from tailoring the physical structure to achieve small sized TiO2 nanocrystals while rationally designing chemistry to introduce highly conductive rGO and superior biocompatible TiO2 is able to significantly boost the MFC performance.

  12. Nitric oxide: a novel inducer for enhancement of microbial lipase production.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Mesut; Unver, Yagmur; Yildiz, Melike; Ortucu, Serkan; Askin, Hakan

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether exogenous nitric oxide (NO) has a potential beneficial effect on lipase production capacity of some microorganisms. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was used as an exogenous NO donor in production medium. In comparison with the control (0 nM SNP), SNP concentrations from 10 to 100 nM induced lipase production in mesophilic bacterium Bacillus subtilis and cold-adapted yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. Especially, the maximum lipase activities for Y. lipolytica (81.2 U/L) and B. subtilis (74.5 U/L) were attained at 30 and 50 nM SNP concentrations, respectively. When compared to the control, the optimal SNP concentrations resulted in about 5.14 and 2.27-fold increases in lipase activities of B. subtilis and Y. lipolytica, respectively. Besides, it was found that the optimal SNP concentrations provided shorter incubation periods for lipase production. Conversely, no significant positive effect of exogenous NO on lipase production was determined for thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus. This study showed for the first time that exogenous NO could be used as an inducer in the production of microbial lipases.

  13. Effects of Alkylphosphates and Nitrous Oxide on Microbial Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Bogan, Bill W.; Lahner, Lisa M.; Trbovic, Vesna; Szajkovics, Ann M.; Paterek, J. Robert

    2001-01-01

    We conducted a series of liquid-culture experiments to begin to evaluate the abilities of gaseous sources of nitrogen and phosphorus to support biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nutrients examined included nitrous oxide, as well as triethylphosphate (TEP) and tributylphosphate (TBP). Cultures were established using the indigenous microbial populations from one manufactured gas plant (MGP) site and one crude oil-contaminated drilling field site. Mineralization of phenanthrene was measured under alternative nutrient regimes and was compared to that seen with ammoniacal nitrogen and PO4. Parallel cultures were used to assess removal of a suite of three- to five-ring PAHs. In summary, the abilities of the different communities to degrade PAH when supplemented with N2O, TEP, and TBP were highly variable. For example, in the MGP soil, organic P sources, especially TBP, supported a considerably higher degree of removal of low-molecular-weight PAHs than did PO4; however, loss of high-molecular-weight compounds was impaired under these conditions. The disappearance of most PAHs was significantly less in the oil field soil when organophosphates were used. These results indicate that the utility of gaseous nutrients for PAH bioremediation in situ may be limited and will very likely have to be assessed on a case-by-case basis. PMID:11319093

  14. Microbial methane oxidation and chemoauthotrophic communities at the North Alex mud volcano, Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treude, T.; Reischke, S.; Feseker, T.; Hensen, C.

    2009-04-01

    North Alex mud volcano, located on the upper slope of the western Nile deep-sea fan, is characterized by an active seepage center transporting pore fluids and gases from deep subsurface sources to the sediment-water interface. We sampled different locations between the center and rim of the mud volcano with ROV and multicorer to study the activity of benthic microorganisms involved in aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of methane as well as associated chemoautotrophic communities. Highest methanotrophic activity was found in the mud volcano center, where sediments exhibited high methane and sulfide concentrations. Chemoauthotrophic organisms included filamentous sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa spp.) and symbiont bivalves (Calyptogena spp., Acharax spp.). In the vicinity of the southern mud volcano rim a large tubeworm field (Lamellibrachia spp.) was discovered. The field was associated with authigenic carbonate precipitates and chemoautotrophic bivalves of the family Lucinidae. Abundant ray eggs placed within the tubeworm field as well as the presence of small fish, shrimp and squid indicated that this habitat was utilized as a nursery ground by marine organisms that are not typically related to seepage activity. Preliminary data on benthic microbial methane turnover, geochemical gradients as well as temperature profiles across the sediment-water interface will be presented.

  15. Microbial Oxidation of Hg(0) - Its Effect on Hg Stable Isotope Fractionation and Methylmercury Production

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Nathan; Barkay, Tamar; Reinfelder, John

    2016-06-28

    Mercury (Hg) associated with mixed waste generated by nuclear weapons manufacturing has contaminated vast areas of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg) has been formed from the inorganic Hg wastes discharged into headwaters of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). Thus, understanding the processes and mechanisms that lead to Hg methylation along the flow path of EFPC is critical to predicting the impacts of the contamination and the design of remedial action at the ORR. In part I of our project, we investigated Hg(0) oxidation and methylation by anaerobic bacteria. We discovered that the anaerobic bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can oxidize elemental mercury [Hg(0)]. When provided with dissolved elemental mercury, D. desulfuricans ND132 converts Hg(0) to Hg(II) and neurotoxic methylmercury [MeHg]. We also demonstrated that diverse species of subsurface bacteria oxidizes dissolved elemental mercury under anoxic conditions. The obligate anaerobic bacterium Geothrix fermentans H5, and the facultative anaerobic bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Cupriavidus metallidurans AE104 can oxidize Hg(0) to Hg(II) under anaerobic conditions. In part II of our project, we established anaerobic enrichment cultures and obtained new bacterial strains from the DOE Oak Ridge site. We isolated three new bacterial strains from subsurface sediments collected from Oak Ridge. These isolates are Bradyrhizobium sp. strain FRC01, Clostridium sp. strain FGH, and a novel Negativicutes strain RU4. Strain RU4 is a completely new genus and species of bacteria. We also demonstrated that syntrophic interactions between fermentative bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria in Oak Ridge saprolite mediate iron reduction via multiple mechanisms. Finally, we tested the impact of Hg on denitrification in nitrate reducing enrichment cultures derived from subsurface sediments from the Oak Ridge site, where nitrate is a major contaminant. We showed that there is an inverse

  16. Effects of dissimilatory sulfate reduction on FeIII (hydr)oxide reduction and microbial community development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Man Jae; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Brulc, Jennifer M.; Johnston, Eric R.; Skinner, Kelly A.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; O'Loughlin, Edward J.

    2014-03-01

    Although dissimilatory iron and sulfate reduction (DIR and DSR) profoundly affect the biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S in subsurface systems, the dynamics of DIR and DSR in the presence of both FeIII (hydr)oxides and sulfate have not been well-studied with mixed microbial populations. This study examined the response of native microbial communities in subsurface sediment from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Rifle, CO to the availability of sulfate and specific FeIII (hydr)oxide minerals in experimental systems containing lactate as the electron donor, with ferrihydrite, goethite, or lepidocrocite and high (10.2 mM) or low (0.2 mM) sulfate as electron acceptors. We observed rapid fermentation of lactate to acetate and propionate. FeIII reduction was slow and limited in the presence of low-sulfate, but the extent of FeIII reduction increased more than 10 times with high-sulfate amendments. Furthermore, the extent of FeIII reduction was higher in ferrihydrite or lepidocrocite incubations than in goethite incubations. Propionate produced during fermentation of lactate was used as the electron donor for DSR. The concurrence of sulfate reduction and FeII production suggests that FeII production was driven primarily by reduction of FeIII by biogenic sulfide. X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis confirmed the formation of ferrous sulfide and the presence of O-coordinated ferrous species. 16S rRNA-based microbial community analysis revealed the development of distinct communities with different FeIII (hydr)oxides. These results highlight the highly coupled nature of C, Fe, and S biogeochemical cycles during DIR and DSR and provide new insight into the effects of electron donor utilization, sulfate concentration, and the presence of specific FeIII (hydr)oxide phases on microbial community development.

  17. Iron isotope fractionation during microbially stimulated Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balci, N.; Bullen, T.D.; Witte-Lien, K.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Motelica, M.; Mandernack, K.W.

    2006-01-01

    Interpretation of the origins of iron-bearing minerals preserved in modern and ancient rocks based on measured iron isotope ratios depends on our ability to distinguish between biological and non-biological iron isotope fractionation processes. In this study, we compared 56Fe/54Fe ratios of coexisting aqueous iron (Fe(II)aq, Fe(III)aq) and iron oxyhydroxide precipitates (Fe(III)ppt) resulting from the oxidation of ferrous iron under experimental conditions at low pH (<3). Experiments were carried out using both pure cultures of Acidothiobacillus ferrooxidans and sterile controls to assess possible biological overprinting of non-biological fractionation, and both SO42- and Cl- salts as Fe(II) sources to determine possible ionic/speciation effects that may be associated with oxidation/precipitation reactions. In addition, a series of ferric iron precipitation experiments were performed at pH ranging from 1.9 to 3.5 to determine if different precipitation rates cause differences in the isotopic composition of the iron oxyhydroxides. During microbially stimulated Fe(II) oxidation in both the sulfate and chloride systems, 56Fe/54Fe ratios of residual Fe(II)aq sampled in a time series evolved along an apparent Rayleigh trend characterized by a fractionation factor ??Fe(III)aq-Fe(II)aq???1.0022. This fractionation factor was significantly less than that measured in our sterile control experiments (???1.0034) and that predicted for isotopic equilibrium between Fe(II)aq and Fe(III)aq (???1.0029), and thus might be interpreted to reflect a biological isotope effect. However, in our biological experiments the measured difference in 56Fe/54Fe ratios between Fe(III)aq, isolated as a solid by the addition of NaOH to the final solution at each time point under N2-atmosphere, and Fe(II)aq was in most cases and on average close to 2.9??? (??Fe(III)aq-Fe(II)aq ???1.0029), consistent with isotopic equilibrium between Fe(II)aq and Fe(III)aq. The ferric iron precipitation experiments

  18. Anaerobic microbial Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) reduction in coastal marine sediments controlled by organic carbon content.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Katja; Byrne, James M; Glombitza, Clemens; Schmidt, Caroline; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Coastal marine sediments contain varying concentrations of iron, oxygen, nitrate and organic carbon. It is unknown how organic carbon content influences the activity of nitrate-reducing and phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers and microbial Fe-redox cycling in such sediments. Therefore, microcosms were prepared with two coastal marine sediments (Kalø Vig and Norsminde Fjord at Aarhus Bay, Denmark) varying in TOC from 0.4 to 3.0 wt%. The microcosms were incubated under light/dark conditions with/without addition of nitrate and/or Fe(II). Although most probable number (MPN) counts of phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers were five times lower in the low-TOC sediment, phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation rates were higher compared with the high-TOC sediment. Fe(III)-amended microcosms showed that this lower net Fe(II) oxidation in the high-TOC sediment is caused by concurrent bacterial Fe(III) reduction. In contrast, MPN counts of nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers and net rates of nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidation were comparable in low- and high-TOC sediments. However, the ratio of nitratereduced :iron(II)oxidized was higher in the high-TOC sediment, suggesting that a part of the nitrate was reduced by mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers and chemoorganoheterotrophic nitrate-reducers. Our results demonstrate that dynamic microbial Fe cycling occurs in these sediments and that the extent of Fe cycling is dependent on organic carbon content.

  19. Microbially-Mediated Sulfur Oxidation in Diffuse Hydrothermal Vent Fluids at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, N. H.; Butterfield, D. A.; Huber, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Diffusely venting hydrothermal fluids can act as a window to the subseafloor microbial environment, where chemically-reduced hydrothermal fluids mixing with oxygenated seawater in the shallow crust creates chemical disequilibria that chemotrophic microorganisms can exploit for energy gain. At Axial Seamount, an active deep-sea volcano located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, sulfide concentrations have been measured as high as 5770 μM, and sulfide oxidation is quantitatively the most important chemical energy source for microbial metabolism. In addition, studies of microbial population structure indicate that diffuse fluids at Axial are dominated by putative sulfur- and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the Epsilonproteobacteria. To further study this important microbial process, we surveyed diffuse vent samples from Axial over a range of temperature, pH, and sulfide concentrations for the presence and expression of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria using a functional gene approach. Dissolved oxygen concentrations decrease exponentially above 40°C and lower the potential for sulfide oxidation, so we identified six sites of different temperatures, two each in the low (< 30°C), medium (~30°C), and high temperature (30 - 50°C) range. The low temperature sites had sulfide-to-temperature ratios of 1 - 26, the medium from 15 - 29, and the high from 26 - 36. PCR primers were designed to target the sulfur oxidation gene soxB specifically from Epsilonproteobacteria and five of the six sites were positive for soxB in the DNA fraction. Bulk RNA was also extracted from the same sites to examine in situ expression of soxB. Data from these analyses, along with quantification of the soxB gene abundance and expression using quantitative PCR, are currently being carried out. Together, this data set of soxB gene diversity, expression, and abundance along with geochemical data will allow us to quantitatively determine the functional dynamics of sulfide oxidation in the subseafloor at

  20. Carbon dioxide fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and acidothermophilic iron-oxidizing microbial communities from Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Ryan M; Whitmore, Laura M; Moran, James J; Kreuzer, Helen W; Inskeep, William P

    2014-05-01

    The fixation of inorganic carbon has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of diverse organic compounds that support heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of a dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organism (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) originally isolated from these environments. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon dioxide fixation pathway were identified in M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Highly similar M. yellowstonensis genes for this pathway were identified in metagenomes of replicate Fe(III)-oxide mats, as were genes for the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable-isotope ((13)CO2) labeling demonstrated CO2 fixation by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. The results showed that strain MK1 fixes CO2 with a fractionation factor of ∼2.5‰. Analysis of the (13)C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C, and microbial mat C showed that mat C is from both DIC and non-DIC sources. An isotopic mixing model showed that biomass C contains a minimum of 42% C of DIC origin, depending on the fraction of landscape C that is present. The significance of DIC as a major carbon source for Fe(III)-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms (i.e., Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.) in simplified natural communities.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and Acidothermophilic Iron-Oxidizing Microbial Communities from Yellowstone National Park

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Ryan M.; Whitmore, Laura M.; Moran, James J.

    2014-01-01

    The fixation of inorganic carbon has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of diverse organic compounds that support heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of a dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organism (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) originally isolated from these environments. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon dioxide fixation pathway were identified in M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Highly similar M. yellowstonensis genes for this pathway were identified in metagenomes of replicate Fe(III)-oxide mats, as were genes for the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable-isotope (13CO2) labeling demonstrated CO2 fixation by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. The results showed that strain MK1 fixes CO2 with a fractionation factor of ∼2.5‰. Analysis of the 13C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C, and microbial mat C showed that mat C is from both DIC and non-DIC sources. An isotopic mixing model showed that biomass C contains a minimum of 42% C of DIC origin, depending on the fraction of landscape C that is present. The significance of DIC as a major carbon source for Fe(III)-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms (i.e., Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.) in simplified natural communities. PMID:24532073

  2. Molecular Events Linking Oxidative Stress and Inflammation to Insulin Resistance and β-Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Kevin Noel; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Carlessi, Rodrigo; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem; Newsholme, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing worldwide, a consequence of the alarming rise in obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Oxidative stress and inflammation are key physiological and pathological events linking obesity, insulin resistance, and the progression of type 2 DM (T2DM). Unresolved inflammation alongside a “glucolipotoxic” environment of the pancreatic islets, in insulin resistant pathologies, enhances the infiltration of immune cells which through secretory activity cause dysfunction of insulin-secreting β-cells and ultimately cell death. Recent molecular investigations have revealed that mechanisms responsible for insulin resistance associated with T2DM are detected in conditions such as obesity and MetS, including impaired insulin receptor (IR) signalling in insulin responsive tissues, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The aim of the present review is to describe the evidence linking oxidative stress and inflammation with impairment of insulin secretion and action, which result in the progression of T2DM and other conditions associated with metabolic dysregulation. PMID:26257839

  3. Effects of straw incorporation along with microbial inoculant on methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice fields.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Yu, Haiyang; Ma, Jing; Xu, Hua; Wu, Qinyan; Yang, Jinghui; Zhuang, Yiqing

    2015-06-15

    Incorporation of straw together with microbial inoculant (a microorganism agent, accelerating straw decomposition) is being increasingly adopted in rice cultivation, thus its effect on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions merits serious attention. A 3-year field experiment was conducted from 2010 to 2012 to investigate combined effect of straw and microbial inoculant on methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) in a rice field in Jurong, Jiangsu Province, China. The experiment was designed to have treatment NPK (N, P and K fertilizers only), treatment NPKS (NPK plus wheat straw), treatment NPKSR (NPKS plus Ruilaite microbial inoculant) and treatment NPKSJ (NPKS plus Jinkuizi microbial inoculant). Results show that compared to NPK, NPKS increased seasonal CH4 emission by 280-1370%, while decreasing N2O emission by 7-13%. When compared with NPKS, NPKSR and NPKSJ increased seasonal CH4 emission by 7-13% and 6-12%, respectively, whereas reduced N2O emission by 10-27% and 9-24%, respectively. The higher CH4 emission could be attributed to the higher soil CH4 production potential triggered by the combined application of straw and microbial inoculant, and the lower N2O emission to the decreased inorganic N content. As a whole, the benefit of lower N2O emission was completely offset by increased CH4 emission, resulting in a higher GWP for NPKSR (5-12%) and NPKSJ (5-11%) relative to NPKS. Due to NPKSR and NPKSJ increased rice grain yield by 3-6% and 2-4% compared to NPKS, the GHGI values for NPKS, NPKSR and NPKSJ were comparable. These findings suggest that incorporating straw together with microbial inoculant would not influence the radiative forcing of rice production in the terms of per unit of rice grain yield relative to the incorporation of straw alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of trace element addition on biogas production from food industrial waste--linking process to microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin Mei; Karlsson, Anna; Svensson, Bo H; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    Laboratory-scale reactors treating food industry waste were used to investigate the effects of additions of cobalt (Co), nickel/molybdenum/boron (Ni/Mo/B) and selenium/tungsten (Se/W) on the biogas process and the associated microbial community. The highest methane production (predicted value: 860 mL g(-1) VS) was linked to high Se/W concentrations in combination with a low level of Co. A combination of quantitative real-time PCR of 16S rRNA genes, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library sequencing was used for the community analysis. The T-RFLP data show a higher diversity for bacteria than for archaea in all the treatments. The most abundant bacterial population (31-55% of the total T-RFLP fragments' intensity) was most closely related to Actinomyces europaeus (94% homology). Two dominant archaeal populations shared 98-99% sequence homology with Methanosarcina siciliae and Methanoculleus bourgensis, respectively. Only limited influence of the trace metal additions was found on the bacterial community composition, with two bacterial populations responding to the addition of a combination of Ni/Mo/B, while the dominant archaeal populations were influenced by the addition of Ni/Mo/B and/or Se/W. The maintenance of methanogenic activity was largely independent of archaeal community composition, suggesting a high degree of functional redundancy in the methanogens of the biogas reactors. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Linking Changes in Snow Cover with Nitrogen Cycling and Microbial Abundance and Functional Gene Expression in Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyer, C.; Brin, L.; Zebarth, B.; Burton, D.; Wertz, S.; Chantigny, M.

    2016-12-01

    In eastern Canada, climate change-related warming and increased precipitation may alter winter snow cover, with potential consequences for soil conditions, microbes, and N2O fluxes. We conducted a two-year field study with snow removal, passive snow addition, and ambient treatments in a potato-barley crop system. We measured in situ greenhouse gas (N2O and CO2) fluxes and belowground gas accumulation, and quantified abundance and expression of denitrifier (nirS, nirK, nosZ) and nitrifier (ammonium oxidizing archaeal (AOA) and bacterial (AOB) amoA) genes. Soil gas accumulated throughout winter, and surface fluxes were greatest during spring thaw. Greatest mid-winter soil N2O accumulation and spring thaw N2O fluxes were associated with snow removal in winter 1 and ambient snow in winter 2. High N2O accumulation and fluxes may have been due to increased substrate availability with increased frost intensity in removal plots in winter 1, but with greatest water content in ambient plots in winter 2. In each winter, greatest abundances of nirS, nirK gene denitrifiers and/or amoA gene of AOA were observed in the treatments with the greatest N2O accumulation and fluxes. Gene expression did not vary with treatment, but highest expression of amoA gene of AOA and AOB, and nosZ gene was measured near 0ºC, indicating activity during periods of stable snow cover and spring thaw. Results suggest that the magnitude of fluxes during spring thaw were related to soil conditions and microbial communities present during the prior winter, and not solely those during thaw. Furthermore, the effects of changing snow cover on microbes and N2O fluxes were not a straightforward effect of snow depth, but were likely mediated by temperature and moisture.

  6. Metagenomic and biochemical characterizations of sulfur oxidation metabolism in uncultured large sausage-shaped bacterium in hot spring microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Tamazawa, Satoshi; Takasaki, Kazuto; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Kamagata, Yoichi; Hanada, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    So-called "sulfur-turf" microbial mats in sulfide containing hot springs (55-70°C, pH 7.3-8.3) in Japan were dominated by a large sausage-shaped bacterium (LSSB) that is closely related to the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium. Several previous reports proposed that the LSSB would be involved in sulfide oxidation in hot spring. However, the LSSB has not been isolated yet, thus there has been no clear evidence showing whether it possesses any genes and enzymes responsible for sulfide oxidation. To verify this, we investigated sulfide oxidation potential in the LSSB using a metagenomic approach and subsequent biochemical analysis. Genome fragments of the LSSB (a total of 3.7 Mb sequence including overlapping fragments) were obtained from the metagenomic fosmid library constructed from genomic DNA of the sulfur-turf mats. The sequence annotation clearly revealed that the LSSB possesses sulfur oxidation-related genes coding sulfide dehydrogenase (SD), sulfide-quinone reductase and sulfite dehydrogenase. The gene encoding SD, the key enzyme for sulfide oxidation, was successfully cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme clearly showed SD activity with optimum temperature and pH of 60°C and 8.0, respectively, which were consistent with the environmental conditions in the hot spring where the sulfur-turf thrives. Furthermore, the affinity of SD to sulfide was relatively high, which also reflected the environment where the sulfide could be continuously supplied. This is the first report showing that the LSSB harbors sulfide oxidizing metabolism adapted to the hot spring environment and can be involved in sulfide oxidation in the sulfur-turf microbial mats.

  7. Metagenomic and Biochemical Characterizations of Sulfur Oxidation Metabolism in Uncultured Large Sausage-Shaped Bacterium in Hot Spring Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Hideyuki; Kamagata, Yoichi; Hanada, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    So-called “sulfur-turf” microbial mats in sulfide containing hot springs (55–70°C, pH 7.3–8.3) in Japan were dominated by a large sausage-shaped bacterium (LSSB) that is closely related to the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium. Several previous reports proposed that the LSSB would be involved in sulfide oxidation in hot spring. However, the LSSB has not been isolated yet, thus there has been no clear evidence showing whether it possesses any genes and enzymes responsible for sulfide oxidation. To verify this, we investigated sulfide oxidation potential in the LSSB using a metagenomic approach and subsequent biochemical analysis. Genome fragments of the LSSB (a total of 3.7 Mb sequence including overlapping fragments) were obtained from the metagenomic fosmid library constructed from genomic DNA of the sulfur-turf mats. The sequence annotation clearly revealed that the LSSB possesses sulfur oxidation-related genes coding sulfide dehydrogenase (SD), sulfide-quinone reductase and sulfite dehydrogenase. The gene encoding SD, the key enzyme for sulfide oxidation, was successfully cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme clearly showed SD activity with optimum temperature and pH of 60°C and 8.0, respectively, which were consistent with the environmental conditions in the hot spring where the sulfur-turf thrives. Furthermore, the affinity of SD to sulfide was relatively high, which also reflected the environment where the sulfide could be continuously supplied. This is the first report showing that the LSSB harbors sulfide oxidizing metabolism adapted to the hot spring environment and can be involved in sulfide oxidation in the sulfur-turf microbial mats. PMID:23185438

  8. Simultaneous oxidation of arsenic and antimony at low and circumneutral pH, with and without microbial catalysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asta, Maria P.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic and Sb are common mine-water pollutants and their toxicity and fate are strongly influenced by redox processes. In this study, simultaneous Fe(II), As(III) and Sb(III) oxidation experiments were conducted to obtain rates under laboratory conditions similar to those found in the field for mine waters of both low and circumneutral pH. Additional experiments were performed under abiotic sterile conditions to determine the biotic and abiotic contributions to the oxidation processes. The results showed that under abiotic conditions in aerated Fe(III)–H2SO4 solutions, Sb(III) oxidizes slightly faster than As(III). The oxidation rates of both elements were accelerated by increasing As(III), Sb(III), Fe(III), and Cl- concentrations in the presence of light. For unfiltered circumneutral water from the Giant Mine (Yellowknife, NWT, Canada), As(III) oxidized at 15–78 μmol/L/h whereas Sb(III) oxidized at 0.03–0.05 μmol/L/h during microbial exponential growth. In contrast, As(III) and Sb(III) oxidation rates of 0.01–0.03 and 0.01–0.02 μmol/L/h, respectively, were obtained in experiments performed with acid unfiltered mine waters from the Iberian Pyritic Belt (SW Spain). These results suggest that the Fe(III) formed from microbialoxidation abiotically oxidized As(III) and Sb(III). After sterile filtration of both mine water samples, neither As(III), Sb(III), nor Fe(II) oxidation was observed. Hence, under the experimental conditions, bacteria were catalyzing As and Sb oxidation in the Giant Mine waters and Fe oxidation in the acid waters of the Iberian Pyrite Belt.

  9. Temperature response of sulfide/ferrous oxidation and microbial community in anoxic sediments treated with calcium nitrate addition.

    PubMed

    He, Zihao; Long, Xinxian; Li, Luyao; Yu, Guangwei; Chong, Yunxiao; Xing, Wen; Zhu, Ziao

    2017-04-15

    Nitrate-driven sulfide oxidation has been proved a cost-effective way to control sediments odor which has long been a universal problem for urban rivers in south China areas. In this work, sediments treatment experiments under a dynamic variation of temperature from 5 °C to 35 °C with 3% of calcium nitrate added were conducted to reveal the influence of temperature variation on this process. The results showed that microbial community was remarkably restructured by temperature variation. Pseudomonas (15.56-29.31%), Sulfurimonas (26.81%) and Thiobacillus (37.99%) were dominant genus at temperature of ≤15 °C, 25 °C and 35 °C, respectively. It seemed that species enrichment occurring at different temperature gradient resulted in the distinct variation of microbial community structure and diversity. Moreover, nitrate-driven sulfide and ferrous oxidation were proportionally promoted only when temperature increased above 15 °C. The dominant bacteria at high temperature stage were those genus that closely related to autotrophic nitrate-driven sulfide and ferrous oxidizing bacteria (e.g.Thiobacillus, Sulfurimonas and Thermomonas), revealing that promotion of sulfide/ferrous oxidation could be attributed to the change of dominant bacteria determined by temperature variation. Thus, a higher treatment efficiency by calcium nitrate addition for odor control would be achieved in summer than any other seasons in south China areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Oxidative stress: a potential link between emotional wellbeing and immune response.

    PubMed

    Salim, Samina

    2016-08-01

    Emotional wellbeing is central to normal health and good living. Persistent psychological stress often disrupts emotional wellbeing and triggers onset of neuropsychiatric ailments. An integrated, multisystemic stress response involving neuroinflammatory, neuroendocrine and metabolic cascades seem to have some causative links. Of particular interest are the neuroinflammatory processes. Psychological stress has been suggested to negatively affect normal functioning of the immune system contributing to the pathophysiology of some neuropsychiatric conditions. Thus examination of the interaction between the immune system and the central nervous system is likely to reveal molecular targets critical for development of potential therapeutic and preventive measures. This review is a summarized discussion of evidence linking impact of psychological stress on the immune system, with a particular emphasis on oxidative stress mechanisms by which mental stress potentially impacts immune function leading to activation of multiple cascades resulting in subsequent manifestation of psychiatric symptomologies.

  11. Organically linked iron oxide nanoparticle supercrystals with exceptional isotropic mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Axel; Feld, Artur; Kornowski, Andreas; Yilmaz, Ezgi D.; Noei, Heshmat; Meyer, Andreas; Krekeler, Tobias; Jiao, Chengge; Stierle, Andreas; Abetz, Volker; Weller, Horst; Schneider, Gerold A.

    2016-05-01

    It is commonly accepted that the combination of the anisotropic shape and nanoscale dimensions of the mineral constituents of natural biological composites underlies their superior mechanical properties when compared to those of their rather weak mineral and organic constituents. Here, we show that the self-assembly of nearly spherical iron oxide nanoparticles in supercrystals linked together by a thermally induced crosslinking reaction of oleic acid molecules leads to a nanocomposite with exceptional bending modulus of 114 GPa, hardness of up to 4 GPa and strength of up to 630 MPa. By using a nanomechanical model, we determined that these exceptional mechanical properties are dominated by the covalent backbone of the linked organic molecules. Because oleic acid has been broadly used as nanoparticle ligand, our crosslinking approach should be applicable to a large variety of nanoparticle systems.

  12. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Westereng, Bjørge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Jørgensen, Henning; Larsen Andersen, Mogens; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Felby, Claus

    2015-12-21

    Enzymatic oxidation of cell wall polysaccharides by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) plays a pivotal role in the degradation of plant biomass. While experiments have shown that LPMOs are copper dependent enzymes requiring an electron donor, the mechanism and origin of the electron supply in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert.

  13. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Westereng, Bjørge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Jørgensen, Henning; Larsen Andersen, Mogens; Eijsink, Vincent G.H.; Felby, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic oxidation of cell wall polysaccharides by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) plays a pivotal role in the degradation of plant biomass. While experiments have shown that LPMOs are copper dependent enzymes requiring an electron donor, the mechanism and origin of the electron supply in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert. PMID:26686263

  14. Physiologically relevant oxidative degradation of oligo(proline) cross-linked polymeric scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shann S; Koblin, Rachel L; Zachman, Angela L; Perrien, Daniel S; Hofmeister, Lucas H; Giorgio, Todd D; Sung, Hak-Joon

    2011-12-12

    Chronic inflammation-mediated oxidative stress is a common mechanism of implant rejection and failure. Therefore, polymer scaffolds that can degrade slowly in response to this environment may provide a viable platform for implant site-specific, sustained release of immunomodulatory agents over a long time period. In this work, proline oligomers of varying lengths (P(n)) were synthesized and exposed to oxidative environments, and their accelerated degradation under oxidative conditions was verified via high performance liquid chromatography and gel permeation chromatography. Next, diblock copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) were carboxylated to form 100 kDa terpolymers of 4%PEG-86%PCL-10%cPCL (cPCL = poly(carboxyl-ε-caprolactone); i% indicates molar ratio). The polymers were then cross-linked with biaminated PEG-P(n)-PEG chains, where P(n) indicates the length of the proline oligomer flanked by PEG chains. Salt-leaching of the polymeric matrices created scaffolds of macroporous and microporous architecture, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The degradation of scaffolds was accelerated under oxidative conditions, as evidenced by mass loss and differential scanning calorimetry measurements. Immortalized murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages were then seeded on the scaffolds and activated through the addition of γ-interferon and lipopolysaccharide throughout the 9-day study period. This treatment promoted the release of H(2)O(2) by the macrophages and the degradation of proline-containing scaffolds compared to the control scaffolds. The accelerated degradation was evidenced by increased scaffold porosity, as visualized through scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microtomography imaging. The current study provides insight into the development of scaffolds that respond to oxidative environments through gradual degradation for the controlled release of therapeutics targeted to diseases that feature chronic

  15. A link between hyperbilirubinemia, oxidative stress and injury to neocortical synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Brito, Maria Alexandra; Brites, Dora; Butterfield, D Allan

    2004-11-05

    Cytotoxicity by unconjugated bilirubin involves disturbances of membrane structure, excitotoxicity and cell death. These events were reported to trigger elevated free radicals production and impairment of calcium homeostasis, and to result in loss of cell membrane integrity. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate whether interaction of clinically relevant concentrations of free unconjugated bilirubin with synaptosomal membrane vesicles could be linked to oxidative stress, cytosolic calcium accumulation and perturbation of membrane function. Synaptosomal vesicles were prepared from gerbil cortical brain tissue and incubated with purified bilirubin (oxidation were evaluated by immunocytochemistry and phosphatidylserine exposure by annexin V binding. Levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG, respectively), as well as activities of Mg(2+)-ATPase aminophospholipid translocase (flippase) and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, were also measured. Our results showed that bilirubin induced oxidative stress, due to a rise in lipid (>or=10%, P<0.05) and protein oxidation (>or=20%, P<0.01), ROS content (approximately 17%, P<0.01), and a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio (>30%, P<0.01). In addition, synaptosomes exposed to bilirubin exhibited increased externalization of phosphatidylserine (approximately 10%, P<0.05), together with decreased flippase and NA(+),K(+)-ATPase (>or=15%, P<0.05) activities, events that were accompanied by enhanced intracellular calcium levels ( approximately 20%, P<0.01). The data obtained point out that interaction of unconjugated bilirubin with synaptosomal membrane vesicles leads to oxidative injury, loss of membrane asymmetry and functionality, and calcium intrusion, thus potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of

  16. Microbial Abundances Predict Methane and Nitrous Oxide Fluxes from a Windrow Composting System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuqing; Song, Lina; Gao, Xiang; Jin, Yaguo; Liu, Shuwei; Shen, Qirong; Zou, Jianwen

    2017-01-01

    Manure composting is a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) that are two potent greenhouse gases. The CH4 and N2O fluxes are mediated by methanogens and methanotrophs, nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in composting manure, respectively, while these specific bacterial functional groups may interplay in CH4 and N2O emissions during manure composting. To test the hypothesis that bacterial functional gene abundances regulate greenhouse gas fluxes in windrow composting systems, CH4 and N2O fluxes were simultaneously measured using the chamber method, and molecular techniques were used to quantify the abundances of CH4-related functional genes (mcrA and pmoA genes) and N2O-related functional genes (amoA, narG, nirK, nirS, norB, and nosZ genes). The results indicate that changes in interacting physicochemical parameters in the pile shaped the dynamics of bacterial functional gene abundances. The CH4 and N2O fluxes were correlated with abundances of specific compositional genes in bacterial community. The stepwise regression statistics selected pile temperature, mcrA and NH4+ together as the best predictors for CH4 fluxes, and the model integrating nirK, nosZ with pmoA gene abundances can almost fully explain the dynamics of N2O fluxes over windrow composting. The simulated models were tested against measurements in paddy rice cropping systems, indicating that the models can also be applicable to predicting the response of CH4 and N2O fluxes to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and rising temperature. Microbial abundances could be included as indicators in the current carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical models. PMID:28373862

  17. Microbial Abundances Predict Methane and Nitrous Oxide Fluxes from a Windrow Composting System.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuqing; Song, Lina; Gao, Xiang; Jin, Yaguo; Liu, Shuwei; Shen, Qirong; Zou, Jianwen

    2017-01-01

    Manure composting is a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) that are two potent greenhouse gases. The CH4 and N2O fluxes are mediated by methanogens and methanotrophs, nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in composting manure, respectively, while these specific bacterial functional groups may interplay in CH4 and N2O emissions during manure composting. To test the hypothesis that bacterial functional gene abundances regulate greenhouse gas fluxes in windrow composting systems, CH4 and N2O fluxes were simultaneously measured using the chamber method, and molecular techniques were used to quantify the abundances of CH4-related functional genes (mcrA and pmoA genes) and N2O-related functional genes (amoA, narG, nirK, nirS, norB, and nosZ genes). The results indicate that changes in interacting physicochemical parameters in the pile shaped the dynamics of bacterial functional gene abundances. The CH4 and N2O fluxes were correlated with abundances of specific compositional genes in bacterial community. The stepwise regression statistics selected pile temperature, mcrA and NH4(+) together as the best predictors for CH4 fluxes, and the model integrating nirK, nosZ with pmoA gene abundances can almost fully explain the dynamics of N2O fluxes over windrow composting. The simulated models were tested against measurements in paddy rice cropping systems, indicating that the models can also be applicable to predicting the response of CH4 and N2O fluxes to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and rising temperature. Microbial abundances could be included as indicators in the current carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical models.

  18. Preparation and characterization of electrospun in-situ cross-linked gelatin-graphite oxide nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jianchao; Morsi, Yosry; Ei-Hamshary, Hany; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Mo, Xiumei

    2016-01-01

    Electrospun gelatin(Gel) nanofibers scaffold has such defects as poor mechanical property and quick degradation due to high solubility. In this study, the in situ cross-linked electrospinning technique was used for the production of gelatin nanofibers. Deionized water was chosen as the spinning solvent and graphite oxide (GO) was chosen as the enhancer. The morphological structure, porosity, thermal property, moisture absorption, and moisture retention performance, hydrolysis resistance, mechanical property, and biocompatibility of the produced nanofibers were investigated. Compared with in situ cross-linked gelatin nanofibers scaffold, in situ cross-linked Gel-GO nanofibers scaffold has the following features: (1) the hydrophilicity, moisture absorption,