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Sample records for links renal reabsorption

  1. Tubular reabsorption in normal renal function.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, W J

    1984-01-01

    The purpose here is to examine in relation to normal renal function three factors which might affect tubular reabsorption: (1) The reabsorption of SO4, PO4, K, Cl, HCO3 and water are all linked to the reabsorption of Na. This would amount to the reabsorption by the tubules of a net reabsorbate of a composition similar to Locke's fluid. Fixed linkage of the reabsorption of a substance to the reabsorption of Na would be a very effective way of maintaining its plasma concentration within a narrow range. The substance would be retained unless its plasma concentration exceeds a threshold value and then small increase in plasma concentration determines its excretion. (2) The rate of reabsorption of Na and substances linked to it is increased when the volume of the intraluminal fluid is increased. This would explain why there is only a small increase in the excretion of Na and other electrolytes when glomerular filtration rate is increased after a meal of meat. (3) Plasma protein concentration affects tubular reabsorption. This would explain why fall in plasma protein is a main agent determining Na excretion in normal animals. Trying to see 'how far the observed facts can be brought into accord with a theory' reveals the difficulty of applying critical tests. On the one hand, the theories are not stated quantitatively in reference to the small changes of normal life; rather the evidence is from experiments with large changes. On the other hand, the small changes within the range of normal function, while themselves statistically significant, are too small for effective investigation of circumstances which may modify them. In the examples discussed here, we cannot say more than that the theories could explain the facts and their participation cannot be excluded.

  2. Angiotensin II natriuresis and antinatriuresis: role of renal artery pressure, renal hemodynamics, and tubular reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Olsen, M E; Hall, J E; Montani, J P; Guyton, A C

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of changes in renal artery pressure (RAP), renal hemodynamics, and tubular reabsorption in mediating the natriuretic and antinatriuretic actions of angiotensin II (AII). In anesthetized dogs, endogenous AII formation was blocked with SQ-14225 and AII was infused i.v. at rates of 5-1215 ng/kg/min while RAP was either servo-controlled at the normal level or permitted to increase. When RAP was servo-controlled to prevent a rise i RAP, AII infusion at all rates from 5-1215 ng/kg/min decreased urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) and fractional sodium excretion (FENa), while increasing fractional reabsorption of lithium (FRLi), an index of proximal tubule fractional sodium reabsorption and distal fractional sodium reabsorption (FRDNa): When RAP was permitted to increase, AII infusion rates up to 45 ng/kg/min decreased UNaV, and FENa, while increasing FRLi and FRDNa. However, at 135 ng/kg/min and above, UNaV and FENa increased while FRLi and FRDNa decreased when RAP was allowed to rise, even though RBF and FF were not substantially different from the values observed when RAP was servo-controlled. Filtered sodium load was slightly higher when RAP was permitted to increase during AII infusion, compared to the dogs in which RAP was servo-controlled, although the differences were not statistically significant. Thus, even very large doses of AII cause antinatriuresis when RAP was prevented from increasing. The natriuretic effect of high dose of AII is caused by increased RAP which decreases fractional sodium reabsorption in proximal and distal tubules and causes slight increases in sodium delivery to the tubules.

  3. Cubilin is an albumin binding protein important for renal tubular albumin reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Birn, H; Fyfe, J C; Jacobsen, C; Mounier, F; Verroust, P J; Orskov, H; Willnow, T E; Moestrup, S K; Christensen, E I

    2000-05-01

    Using affinity chromatography and surface plasmon resonance analysis, we have identified cubilin, a 460-kDa receptor heavily expressed in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells, as an albumin binding protein. Dogs with a functional defect in cubilin excrete large amounts of albumin in combination with virtually abolished proximal tubule reabsorption, showing the critical role for cubilin in the uptake of albumin by the proximal tubule. Also, by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry we show that previously identified low-molecular-weight renal albumin binding proteins are fragments of cubilin. In addition, we find that mice lacking the endocytic receptor megalin show altered urinary excretion, and reduced tubular reabsorption, of albumin. Because cubilin has been shown to colocalize and interact with megalin, we propose a mechanism of albumin reabsorption mediated by both of these proteins. This process may prove important for understanding interstitial renal inflammation and fibrosis caused by proximal tubule uptake of an increased load of filtered albumin.

  4. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption during exercise-induced hypervolemia in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagashima, K.; Wu, J.; Kavouras, S. A.; Mack, G. W.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that renal tubular Na(+) reabsorption increased during the first 24 h of exercise-induced plasma volume expansion. Renal function was assessed 1 day after no-exercise control (C) or intermittent cycle ergometer exercise (Ex, 85% of peak O(2) uptake) for 2 h before and 3 h after saline loading (12.5 ml/kg over 30 min) in seven subjects. Ex reduced renal blood flow (p-aminohippurate clearance) compared with C (0.83 +/- 0.12 vs. 1.49 +/- 0.24 l/min, P < 0.05) but did not influence glomerular filtration rates (97 +/- 10 ml/min, inulin clearance). Fractional tubular reabsorption of Na(+) in the proximal tubules was higher in Ex than in C (P < 0.05). Saline loading decreased fractional tubular reabsorption of Na(+) from 99.1 +/- 0.1 to 98.7 +/- 0.1% (P < 0.05) in C but not in Ex (99.3 +/- 0.1 to 99.4 +/- 0.1%). Saline loading reduced plasma renin activity and plasma arginine vasopressin levels in C and Ex, although the magnitude of decrease was greater in C (P < 0.05). These results indicate that, during the acute phase of exercise-induced plasma volume expansion, increased tubular Na(+) reabsorption is directed primarily to the proximal tubules and is associated with a decrease in renal blood flow. In addition, saline infusion caused a smaller reduction in fluid-regulating hormones in Ex. The attenuated volume-regulatory response acts to preserve distal tubular Na(+) reabsorption during saline infusion 24 h after exercise.

  5. Renal Sodium- and Potassium-Activated Adenosine Triphosphatase and Sodium Reabsorption in the Hypothyroid Rat

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Adrian I.; Lindheimer, Marshall D.

    1973-01-01

    The relationship between net tubular reabsorption of sodium and renal microsomal sodium- and potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase (Na-K-ATPase) was evaluated in hypothyroid and hyperthyroid rats and in age-matched euthyroid controls. Tubular sodium reabsorption per gram of kidney was lower in thyroidectomized rats than in controls (186±14 vs. 246±12 μeq/min; P < 0.005) and was accompanied by a quantitatively similar reduction in Na-K-ATPase specific activity (49.4±2.4 vs. 65.8±2.3 μmol inorganic phosphate (Pt)/mg protein per h; P < 0.001). This decrement was present in both cortex and outer medulla, and was limited to Na-K-ATPase since other representative enzymes not involved in sodium transport (magnesium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase [Mg-ATPase], glucose-6-phosphatase, 5′-nucleotidase) remained unchanged or increased in the hypothyroid animals. Conversely, Na-K-ATPase rose when sodium reabsorption increased in euthyroid rats treated with triiodothyronine. Subsequent experiments were performed to determine to what extent the decrease in Na-K-ATPase is due to lack of thyroid hormone per se or to an adaptive response to decreased reabsorptive sodium load. Triiodothyronine in concentrations of 10-12 to 10-5 M had no effect in vitro on microsomal Na-K-ATPase of either thyroidectomized or euthyroid rats. When hypothyroid rats were uninephrectomized or treated with methylprednisolone, sodium reabsorption per gram kidney increased markedly and was similar to that of intact controls. Despite persistence of the hypothyroid state, Na-K-ATPase specific activity also increased to levels not significantly different from euthyroid animals. These data suggest that decreased tubular sodium transport is a major determinant of the reduction in renal Na-K-ATPase in thyroid deficiency since the latter can be reversed by increasing sodium reabsorption during continuing hypothyroidism. Furthermore, the modest sodium leak of hypothyroid animals does not appear to

  6. Cubilin Is Essential for Albumin Reabsorption in the Renal Proximal Tubule

    PubMed Central

    Amsellem, Sabine; Gburek, Jakub; Hamard, Ghislaine; Nielsen, Rikke; Willnow, Thomas E.; Devuyst, Olivier; Nexo, Ebba; Verroust, Pierre J.

    2010-01-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis is responsible for protein reabsorption in the proximal tubule. This process involves two interacting receptors, megalin and cubilin, which form a complex with amnionless. Whether these proteins function in parallel or as part of an integrated system is not well understood. Here, we report the renal effects of genetic ablation of cubilin, with or without concomitant ablation of megalin, using a conditional Cre-loxP system. We observed that proximal tubule cells did not localize amnionless to the plasma membrane in the absence of cubilin, indicating a mutual dependency of cubilin and amnionless to form a functional membrane receptor complex. The cubilin-amnionless complex mediated internalization of intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complexes, but megalin considerably increased the uptake. Furthermore, cubilin-deficient mice exhibited markedly decreased uptake of albumin by proximal tubule cells and resultant albuminuria. Inactivation of both megalin and cubilin did not increase albuminuria, indicating that the main role of megalin in albumin reabsorption is to drive the internalization of cubilin-albumin complexes. In contrast, cubulin deficiency did not affect urinary tubular uptake or excretion of vitamin D-binding protein (DBP), which binds cubilin and megalin. In addition, we observed cubilin-independent reabsorption of the “specific” cubilin ligands transferrin, CC16, and apoA-I, suggesting a role for megalin and perhaps other receptors in their reabsorption. In summary, with regard to albumin, cubilin is essential for its reabsorption by proximal tubule cells, and megalin drives internalization of cubilin-albumin complexes. These genetic models will allow further analysis of protein trafficking in the progression of proteinuric renal diseases. PMID:20798259

  7. Cubilin is essential for albumin reabsorption in the renal proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Amsellem, Sabine; Gburek, Jakub; Hamard, Ghislaine; Nielsen, Rikke; Willnow, Thomas E; Devuyst, Olivier; Nexo, Ebba; Verroust, Pierre J; Christensen, Erik I; Kozyraki, Renata

    2010-11-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis is responsible for protein reabsorption in the proximal tubule. This process involves two interacting receptors, megalin and cubilin, which form a complex with amnionless. Whether these proteins function in parallel or as part of an integrated system is not well understood. Here, we report the renal effects of genetic ablation of cubilin, with or without concomitant ablation of megalin, using a conditional Cre-loxP system. We observed that proximal tubule cells did not localize amnionless to the plasma membrane in the absence of cubilin, indicating a mutual dependency of cubilin and amnionless to form a functional membrane receptor complex. The cubilin-amnionless complex mediated internalization of intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complexes, but megalin considerably increased the uptake. Furthermore, cubilin-deficient mice exhibited markedly decreased uptake of albumin by proximal tubule cells and resultant albuminuria. Inactivation of both megalin and cubilin did not increase albuminuria, indicating that the main role of megalin in albumin reabsorption is to drive the internalization of cubilin-albumin complexes. In contrast, cubulin deficiency did not affect urinary tubular uptake or excretion of vitamin D-binding protein (DBP), which binds cubilin and megalin. In addition, we observed cubilin-independent reabsorption of the "specific" cubilin ligands transferrin, CC16, and apoA-I, suggesting a role for megalin and perhaps other receptors in their reabsorption. In summary, with regard to albumin, cubilin is essential for its reabsorption by proximal tubule cells, and megalin drives internalization of cubilin-albumin complexes. These genetic models will allow further analysis of protein trafficking in the progression of proteinuric renal diseases.

  8. Vascular contractile reactivity in hypotension due to reduced renal reabsorption of Na(+) and restricted dietary Na().

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Saeed; Rapoport, Robert M; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2017-03-01

    Reduced renal Na(+) reabsorption along with restricted dietary Na(+) depletes intravascular plasma volume which can then result in hypotension. Whether hypotension occurs and the magnitude of hypotension depends in part on compensatory angiotensin II-mediated increased vascular resistance. We investigated whether the ability of vascular resistance to mitigate the hypotension was compromised by decreased contractile reactivity. In vitro reactivity was investigated in aorta from mouse models of reduced renal Na(+) reabsorption and restricted dietary Na(+) associated with considerable hypotension and renin-angiotensin system activation: (1) the Na(+)-Cl(-)-Co-transporter (NCC) knockout (KO) with Na(+) restricted diet (0.1%, 2 weeks) and (2) the relatively more severe pendrin (apical chloride/bicarbonate exchanger) and NCC double KO. Contractile sensitivity to KCl, phenylephrine, and/or U46619 remained unaltered in aorta from both models. Maximal KCl and phenylephrine contraction expressed as force/aorta length from NCC KO with Na(+)-restricted diet remained unaltered, while in pendrin/NCC double KO were reduced to 49 and 64%, respectively. Wet weight of aorta from NCC KO with Na(+)-restricted diet remained unaltered, while pendrin/NCC double KO was reduced to 67%, consistent with decreased medial width determined with Verhoeff-Van Gieson stain. These findings suggest that hypotension associated with severe intravascular volume depletion, as the result of decreased renal Na(+) reabsorption, may in part be due to decreased contractile reactivity as a consequence of reduced vascular hypertrophy.

  9. A Model of Peritubular Capillary Control of Isotonic Fluid Reabsorption by the Renal Proximal Tubule

    PubMed Central

    Deen, W. M.; Robertson, C. R.; Brenner, B. M.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model of peritubular transcapillary fluid exchange has been developed to investigate the role of the peritubular environment in the regulation of net isotonic fluid transport across the mammalian renal proximal tubule. The model, derived from conservation of mass and the Starling transcapillary driving forces, has been used to examine the quantitative effects on proximal reabsorption of changes in efferent arteriolar protein concentration and plasma flow rate. Under normal physiological conditions, relatively small perturbations in protein concentration are predicted to influence reabsorption more than even large variations in plasma flow, a prediction in close accord with recent experimental observations in the rat and dog. Changes either in protein concentration or plasma flow have their most pronounced effects when the opposing transcapillary hydrostatic and osmotic pressure differences are closest to equilibrium. Comparison of these theoretical results with variations in reabsorption observed in micropuncture studies makes it possible to place upper and lower bounds on the difference between interstitial oncotic and hydrostatic pressures in the renal cortex of the rat. PMID:4696761

  10. Renal carbonic anhydrases are involved in the reabsorption of endogenous nitrite.

    PubMed

    Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine; Schwarz, Alexandra; Böhmer, Anke; Beckmann, Bibiana; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias; Michaelsen, Jan T; Stichtenoth, Dirk O; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2012-02-15

    Nitrite (ONO(-)) exerts nitric oxide (NO)-related biological actions and its concentration in the circulation may be of particular importance. Nitrite is excreted in the urine. Hence, the kidney may play an important role in nitrite/NO homeostasis in the vasculature. We investigated a possible involvement of renal carbonic anhydrases (CAs) in endogenous nitrite reabsorption in the proximal tubule. The potent CA inhibitor acetazolamide was administered orally to six healthy volunteers (5 mg/kg) and nitrite was measured in spot urine samples before and after administration. Acetazolamide increased abruptly nitrite excretion in the urine, strongly suggesting that renal CAs are involved in nitrite reabsorption in healthy humans. Additional in vitro experiments support our hypothesis that nitrite reacts with CO(2), analogous to the reaction of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) with CO(2), to form acid-labile nitrito carbonate [ONOC(O)O(-)]. We assume that this reaction is catalyzed by CAs and that nitrito carbonate represents the nitrite form that is actively transported into the kidney. The significance of nitrite reabsorption in the kidney and the underlying mechanisms, notably a direct involvement of CAs in the reaction between nitrite and CO(2), remain to be elucidated.

  11. Aromatase Deficient Female Mice Demonstrate Altered Expression of Molecules Critical for Renal Calcium Reabsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öz, Orhan K.; Hajibeigi, Asghar; Cummins, Carolyn; van Abel, Monique; Bindels, René J.; Kuro-o, Makoto; Pak, Charles Y. C.; Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2007-04-01

    The incidence of kidney stones increases in women after the menopause, suggesting a role for estrogen deficiency. In order to determine if estrogen may be exerting an effect on renal calcium reabsorption, we measured urinary calcium excretion in the aromatase-deficient female mouse (ArKO) before and following estrogen therapy. ArKO mice had hypercalciuria that corrected during estrogen administration. To evaluate the mechanism by which estrogen deficiency leads to hypercalciuria, we examined the expression of several proteins involved in distal tubule renal calcium reabsorption, both at the message and protein levels. Messenger RNA levels of TRPV5, TRPV6, calbindin-D28K, the Na+/Ca++ exchanger (NCX1), and the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA1b) were significantly decreased in kidneys of ArKO mice. On the other hand, klotho mRNA levels were elevated in kidneys of ArKO mice. ArKO renal protein extracts had lower levels of calbindin-D28K but higher levels of the klotho protein. Immunochemistry demonstrated increased klotho expression in ArKO kidneys. Estradiol therapy normalized the expression of TRPV5, calbindin-D28K, PMCA1b and klotho. Taken together, these results demonstrate that estrogen deficiency produced by aromatase inactivation is sufficient to produce a renal leak of calcium and consequent hypercalciuria. This may represent one mechanism leading to the increased incidence of kidney stones following the menopause in women.

  12. Mangiferin Inhibits Renal Urate Reabsorption by Modulating Urate Transporters in Experimental Hyperuricemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Gao, Lihui; Niu, Yanfen; Zhou, Yuanfang; Lin, Hua; Jiang, Jing; Kong, Xiangfu; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Mangiferin, a natural glucosyl xanthone from the leaves of Mangifera indica L., was previously shown to exert potent hypouricemic effects associated with inhibition of the activity of xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase. The present study aimed to evaluate its uricosuric effect and possible molecular mechanisms underlying the renal urate transporters responsible for urate reabsorption in vivo. Mangiferin (1.5-24.0 mg/kg) was administered intragastrically to hyperuricemic mice and rats induced by the intraperitoneal injection of uric acid and potassium oxonate, respectively. The uricosuric effect was evaluated by determining the serum and urinary urate levels as well as fractional excretion of uric acid (FEUA). The mRNA and protein levels of renal urate-anion transporter 1 (URAT1), organic anion transporter 10 (OAT10), glucose transporter 9 (GLUT9), and PDZ domain-containing protein (PDZK1) were analyzed. The administration of mangiferin significantly decreased the serum urate levels in hyperuricemic mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In hyperuricemic rats, mangiferin also reduced the serum urate levels and increased the urinary urate levels and FEUA. These results indicate that mangiferin has uricosuric effects. Further examination showed that mangiferin markedly inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of renal URAT1, OAT10, and GLUT9 in hyperuricemic rats, but did not interfere with PDZK1 expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that mangiferin promotes urate excretion by the kidney, which may be related to the inhibition of urate reabsorption via downregulation of renal urate transporters.

  13. Chronic glucose infusion causes sustained increases in tubular sodium reabsorption and renal blood flow in dogs.

    PubMed

    Brands, Michael W; Bell, Tracy D; Rodriquez, Nancy A; Polavarapu, Praveen; Panteleyev, Dmitriy

    2009-02-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that inducing hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia in dogs, by infusing glucose chronically intravenously, would increase tubular sodium reabsorption and cause hypertension. Glucose was infused for 6 days (14 mg.kg(-1).min(-1) iv) in five uninephrectomized (UNX) dogs. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal blood flow (RBF) were measured 18 h/day using DSI pressure units and Transonic flow probes, respectively. Urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) decreased significantly on day 1 and remained decreased over the 6 days, coupled with a significant, sustained increase in RBF, averaging approximately 20% above control on day 6. Glomerular filtration rate and plasma renin activity (PRA) also increased. However, although MAP tended to increase, this was not statistically significant. Therefore, the glucose infusion was repeated in six dogs with 70% surgical reduction in kidney mass (RKM) and high salt intake. Blood glucose and plasma insulin increased similar to the UNX dogs, and there was significant sodium retention, but MAP still did not increase. Interestingly, the increases in PRA and RBF were prevented in the RKM dogs. The decrease in UNaV, increased RBF, and slightly elevated MAP show that glucose infusion in dogs caused a sustained increase in tubular sodium reabsorption by a mechanism independent of pressure natriuresis. The accompanying increase in PRA, together with the failure of either RBF or PRA to increase in the RKM dogs, suggests the site of tubular reabsorption was before the macula densa. However, the volume retention and peripheral edema suggest that systemic vasodilation offsets any potential renal actions to increase MAP in this experimental model in dogs.

  14. Local pH domains regulate NHE3-mediated Na+ reabsorption in the renal proximal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Burford, James L.; McDonough, Alicia A.; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2014-01-01

    The proximal tubule Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3), located in the apical dense microvilli (brush border), plays a major role in the reabsorption of NaCl and water in the renal proximal tubule. In response to a rise in blood pressure NHE3 redistributes in the plane of the plasma membrane to the base of the brush border, where NHE3 activity is reduced. This NHE3 redistribution is assumed to provoke pressure natriuresis; however, it is unclear how NHE3 redistribution per se reduces NHE3 activity. To investigate if the distribution of NHE3 in the brush border can change the reabsorption rate, we constructed a spatiotemporal mathematical model of NHE3-mediated Na+ reabsorption across a proximal tubule cell and compared the model results with in vivo experiments in rats. The model predicts that when NHE3 is localized exclusively at the base of the brush border, it creates local pH microdomains that reduce NHE3 activity by >30%. We tested the model's prediction experimentally: the rat kidney cortex was loaded with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, and cells of the proximal tubule were imaged in vivo using confocal fluorescence microscopy before and after an increase of blood pressure by ∼50 mmHg. The experimental results supported the model by demonstrating that a rise of blood pressure induces the development of pH microdomains near the bottom of the brush border. These local changes in pH reduce NHE3 activity, which may explain the pressure natriuresis response to NHE3 redistribution. PMID:25298526

  15. Targeting renal glucose reabsorption to treat hyperglycaemia: the pleiotropic effects of SGLT2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Vallon, Volker; Thomson, Scott C

    2017-02-01

    Healthy kidneys filter ∼160 g/day of glucose (∼30% of daily energy intake) under euglycaemic conditions. To prevent valuable energy from being lost in the urine, the proximal tubule avidly reabsorbs filtered glucose up to a limit of ∼450 g/day. When blood glucose levels increase to the point that the filtered load exceeds this limit, the surplus is excreted in the urine. Thus, the kidney provides a safety valve that can prevent extreme hyperglycaemia as long as glomerular filtration is maintained. Most of the capacity for renal glucose reabsorption is provided by sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 in the early proximal tubule. In the absence or with inhibition of SGLT2, the renal reabsorptive capacity for glucose declines to ∼80 g/day (the residual capacity of SGLT1), i.e. the safety valve opens at a lower threshold, which makes it relevant to glucose homeostasis from day-to-day. Several SGLT2 inhibitors are now approved glucose lowering agents for individuals with type 2 diabetes and preserved kidney function. By inducing glucosuria, these drugs improve glycaemic control in all stages of type 2 diabetes, while their risk of causing hypoglycaemia is low because they naturally stop working when the filtered glucose load falls below ∼80 g/day and they do not otherwise interfere with metabolic counterregulation. Through glucosuria, SGLT2 inhibitors reduce body weight and body fat, and shift substrate utilisation from carbohydrates to lipids and, possibly, ketone bodies. Because SGLT2 reabsorbs sodium along with glucose, SGLT2 blockers are natriuretic and antihypertensive. Also, because they work in the proximal tubule, SGLT2 inhibitors increase delivery of fluid and electrolytes to the macula densa, thereby activating tubuloglomerular feedback and increasing tubular back pressure. This mitigates glomerular hyperfiltration, reduces the kidney's demand for oxygen and lessens albuminuria. For reasons that are less well understood, SGLT2 inhibitors are

  16. Semi-mechanistic kidney model incorporating physiologically-relevant fluid reabsorption and transporter-mediated renal reabsorption: Pharmacokinetics of γ-hydroxybutyric acid and L-lactate in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Rutwij A.; Morris, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    This study developed a semi-mechanistic kidney model incorporating physiologically-relevant fluid reabsorption and transporter-mediated active reabsorption. The model was applied to data for the drug of abuse γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), which exhibits monocarboxylate transporter (MCT1/SMCT1)-mediated renal reabsorption. The kidney model consists of various nephron segments – proximal tubules, Loop-of-Henle, distal tubules, and collecting ducts – where the segmental fluid flow rates, volumes, and sequential reabsorption were incorporated as functions of the glomerular filtration rate. The active renal reabsorption was modeled as vectorial transport across proximal tubule cells. In addition, the model included physiological blood, liver, and remainder compartments. The population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed using ADAPT5 for GHB blood concentration-time data and cumulative amount excreted unchanged into urine data (200–1000 mg/kg IV bolus doses) from rats (Felmlee et al (PMID: 20461486)). Simulations assessed the effects of inhibition (R=[I]/KI=0–100) of renal reabsorption on systemic exposure (AUC) and renal clearance of GHB. Visual predictive checks and other model diagnostic plots indicated that the model reasonably captured GHB concentrations. Simulations demonstrated that the inhibition of renal reabsorption significantly increased GHB renal clearance and decreased AUC. Model validation was performed using a separate dataset. Furthermore, our model successfully evaluated the pharmacokinetics of L-lactate using data obtained from Morse et al (PMID: 24854892). In conclusion, we developed a semi-mechanistic kidney model that can be used to evaluate transporter-mediated active renal reabsorption of drugs by the kidney. PMID:26341876

  17. Analysis of the effect of canagliflozin on renal glucose reabsorption and progression of hyperglycemia in zucker diabetic Fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Chiaki; Xu, Jun Zhi; Lee, Seunghun Paul; Qi, Jenson; Kimata, Hirotaka; Kakimoto, Tetsuhiro; Nakayama, Keiko; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Taniuchi, Nobuhiko; Hikida, Kumiko; Matsushita, Yasuaki; Arakawa, Kenji; Saito, Akira; Ueta, Kiichiro; Shiotani, Masaharu

    2014-11-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) plays a major role in renal glucose reabsorption. To analyze the potential of insulin-independent blood glucose control, the effects of the novel SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin on renal glucose reabsorption and the progression of hyperglycemia were analyzed in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. The transporter activity of recombinant human and rat SGLT2 was inhibited by canagliflozin, with 150- to 12,000-fold selectivity over other glucose transporters. Moreover, in vivo treatment with canagliflozin induced glucosuria in mice, rats, and dogs in a dose-dependent manner. It inhibited apparent glucose reabsorption by 55% in normoglycemic rats and by 94% in hyperglycemic rats. The inhibition of glucose reabsorption markedly reduced hyperglycemia in ZDF rats but did not induce hypoglycemia in normoglycemic animals. The change in urinary glucose excretion should not be used as a marker to predict the glycemic effects of this SGLT2 inhibitor. In ZDF rats, plasma glucose and HbA1c levels progressively increased with age, and pancreatic β-cell failure developed at 13 weeks of age. Treatment with canagliflozin for 8 weeks from the prediabetic stage suppressed the progression of hyperglycemia, prevented the decrease in plasma insulin levels, increased pancreatic insulin contents, and minimized the deterioration of islet structure. These results indicate that selective inhibition of SGLT2 with canagliflozin controls the progression of hyperglycemia by inhibiting renal glucose reabsorption in ZDF rats. In addition, the preservation of β-cell function suggests that canagliflozin treatment reduces glucose toxicity via an insulin-independent mechanism.

  18. Interleukin-1 decreases renal sodium reabsorption: possible mechanism of endotoxin-induced natriuresis

    SciTech Connect

    Caverzasio, J.; Rizzoli, R.; Dayer, J.M.; Bonjour, J.P.

    1987-05-01

    Administration of pyrogen or endotoxins such as Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide can elicit a marked increase in urinary sodium excretion. This response occurs without any elevation in the filtered load of sodium and it does not appear to be prostaglandin mediated. The various effects produced by endotoxins appear to have interleukin-1 as a common mediator. In the present work, the authors have studied whether human recombinant interleukin-1..beta.. (hrIL-1) could affect the renal handling of sodium and thus, could be implicated in natriuretic response to pyrogens or endotoxins. They observed that hrIL-1 intravenously injected into conscious rats provokes a marked increase in sodium excretion. This natriuretic response was not associated with any increase in glomerular filtration rate (clearance of (/sup 3/H)inulin), nor was it accompanied by significant changes in the urinary excretion of potassium, calcium, or inorganic phosphate. The only concomitant alteration was a decrease in urinary pH. Pretreatment with indomethacin abolished the effect of hrIL-1 on urinary pH but did not modify the natriuretic response. In conclusion, hrIL-1 elicits a selective decrease in tubular sodium reabsorption, which does not appear to involve a change in prostaglandin synthesis. This observation strongly suggests that interleukin-1 could be a key mediator in endotoxin-induced natriuresis.

  19. Impact of genetic knockout of PEPT2 on cefadroxil pharmacokinetics, renal tubular reabsorption, and brain penetration in mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Ocheltree, Scott M; Hu, Yongjun; Keep, Richard F; Smith, David E

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of PEPT2, a proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter of the SLC15 family, on the disposition of the antibiotic cefadroxil in the body, particularly the kidney and brain. Pharmacokinetic, tissue distribution, and renal clearance studies were performed in wild-type and PEPT2 null mice after intravenous bolus administration of [(3)H]cefadroxil at 1, 12.5, 50, and 100 nmol/g body weight. Studies were also performed in the absence and presence of probenecid and quinine. Cefadroxil disposition kinetics was clearly nonlinear over the dose range studied (1-100 nmol/g), which was attributed to both saturable renal tubular secretion and reabsorption of the antibiotic. After an intravenous bolus dose of 1 nmol/g cefadroxil, PEPT2 null mice exhibited a 3-fold greater total clearance and 3-fold lower systemic concentrations of drug compared with wild-type animals. Renal clearance studies further demonstrated that the renal reabsorption of cefadroxil was almost completely abolished in PEPT2 null versus wild-type mice (3% versus 70%, p < 0.001). Of the 70% of cefadroxil reabsorbed in wild-type mice, PEPT2 accounted for 95% and PEPT1 accounted for 5% of reabsorbed substrate. Tissue distribution studies indicated that PEPT2 had a dramatic effect on cefadroxil tissue exposure, especially in brain where the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-to-blood concentration ratio of cefadroxil was 6-fold greater in PEPT2 null mice compared with wild-type animals. These findings demonstrate that renal PEPT2 is almost entirely responsible for the reabsorption of cefadroxil in kidney and that choroid plexus PEPT2 limits the exposure of cefadroxil (and perhaps other aminocephalosporins) in CSF.

  20. Renal tissue citrate: independence from citrate utilization, reabsorption, and pH.

    PubMed

    Anaizi, N H; Cohen, J J; Black, A J; Wertheim, S J

    1986-09-01

    During alkalosis in vivo, renal tissue [citrate] [( citrate]t) increases and citrate reabsorption (Tcit) and utilization (Qcit) simultaneously decrease. The decrease in Qcit is interpreted to cause the increased [citrate]t, which in turn decreases Tcit X Renal citrate handling and [citrate]t could be regulated by other mechanisms, since alkalosis changes [substrate] and [H+] in extracellular (ECF) and intracellular (ICF) fluid. Also, since high plasma [citrate] decreases ionized [Ca2+] (Cai), it is not possible to determine in vivo whether there is a maximum for Tcit or Qcit and whether change in extracellular fluid (delta ECF) pH affects these maxima. We perfused the substrate-limited isolated rat kidney for either 110 (n = 36) or 50 min (n = 44) at pH 7.2, 7.4, or 7.6; pH was changed by varying [HCO3-]; Cai was held constant at approximately 2.5 meq/liter. When citrate was the only substrate available in a Krebs-Ringer-HCO3 perfusate containing 6% substrate-free albumin, both Qcit and Tcit had maximal rates: Qcit much greater than Tcit; at pH 7.6, Qcit and Tcit were significantly reduced below their values at pH 7.2 or 7.4. In contrast to in vivo observations, [citrate]t was not significantly increased at high ECF pH. To test whether [citrate]t in the perfused kidney can increase in alkalosis, 11 additional perfusions were done in the presence of glucose plus lactate plus malate but without added citrate: [citrate]t = 0.6 mumol X g-1 at pH 7.6 and 0.3 mumol X g-1 at pH 7.2 (P less than 0.01); no citrate was detectable in the perfusate, and urinary citrate excretion was negligible. Thus, in the isolated rat kidney, an increase in [citrate]t occurred in alkalosis and was derived from precursors and not from citrate in the ECF. Overall, when only citrate was available to the isolated kidney during alkalosis, a significant rise in [citrate]t did not occur, although Vmax for Tcit and Qcit decreased. These effects of alkalosis on Tcit are consistent with observations

  1. Increase in SGLT1-mediated transport explains renal glucose reabsorption during genetic and pharmacological SGLT2 inhibition in euglycemia.

    PubMed

    Rieg, Timo; Masuda, Takahiro; Gerasimova, Maria; Mayoux, Eric; Platt, Kenneth; Powell, David R; Thomson, Scott C; Koepsell, Hermann; Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    In the kidney, the sodium-glucose cotransporters SGLT2 and SGLT1 are thought to account for >90 and ∼3% of fractional glucose reabsorption (FGR), respectively. However, euglycemic humans treated with an SGLT2 inhibitor maintain an FGR of 40-50%, mimicking values in Sglt2 knockout mice. Here, we show that oral gavage with a selective SGLT2 inhibitor (SGLT2-I) dose dependently increased urinary glucose excretion (UGE) in wild-type (WT) mice. The dose-response curve was shifted leftward and the maximum response doubled in Sglt1 knockout (Sglt1-/-) mice. Treatment in diet with the SGLT2-I for 3 wk maintained 1.5- to 2-fold higher urine glucose/creatinine ratios in Sglt1-/- vs. WT mice, associated with a temporarily greater reduction in blood glucose in Sglt1-/- vs. WT after 24 h (-33 vs. -11%). Subsequent inulin clearance studies under anesthesia revealed free plasma concentrations of the SGLT2-I (corresponding to early proximal concentration) close to the reported IC50 for SGLT2 in mice, which were associated with FGR of 64 ± 2% in WT and 17 ± 2% in Sglt1-/-. Additional intraperitoneal application of the SGLT2-I (maximum effective dose in metabolic cages) increased free plasma concentrations ∼10-fold and reduced FGR to 44 ± 3% in WT and to -1 ± 3% in Sglt1-/-. The absence of renal glucose reabsorption was confirmed in male and female Sglt1/Sglt2 double knockout mice. In conclusion, SGLT2 and SGLT1 account for renal glucose reabsorption in euglycemia, with 97 and 3% being reabsorbed by SGLT2 and SGLT1, respectively. When SGLT2 is fully inhibited by SGLT2-I, the increase in SGLT1-mediated glucose reabsorption explains why only 50-60% of filtered glucose is excreted.

  2. Long-term regulation of arterial pressure, glomerular filtration and renal sodium reabsorption by angiotensin II in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Guyton, A C; Smith, M J; Coleman, T G

    1980-12-01

    1. This study was designed to quantify the role of angiotensin II in determining the chronic relationships between arterial pressure, renal haemodynamics and sodium excretion. 2. In six control dogs sodium balance was achieved during chronic increases in sodium intake from 5 to 495 mmol/day with small increases in arterial pressure (7mmHg), moderate increases in glomerular filtration rate (19%) and decreases in filtration fraction. Similar increases in sodium intake in dogs whose circulating levels of angiotensin II were fixed, due to a constant intravenous infusion of 4.85 pmol of angiotensin II min-1 kg-1, caused large increases in arterial pressure (42%), glomerular filtration rate (31%), filtration fraction and calculated renal sodium reabsorption above control. In six dogs whose angiotensin II formation was blocked by SQ 14 225, sodium balance at intakes of 5-80 mmol/day occurred at reduced arterial pressure, glomerular filtration rate, filtration fraction and sodium reabsorption although plasma aldosterone concentration was not substantially different from that in control dogs. At sodium intakes above 240 mmoL/day arterial pressure was not altered by SQ 14 225. 3. These data indicate that during chronic variations in sodium intake angiotensin II plays a major role, independently of changes in plasma aldosterone concentration, in allowing sodium balance without large fluctuations in glomerular filtration rate or arterial pressure. The mechanism whereby angiotensin II conserves sodium chronically is through increased sodium reabsorption, since steady-state sodium reabsorption was increased by angiotensin II and decreased by SQ 14 225.

  3. The Cap1–claudin-4 regulatory pathway is important for renal chloride reabsorption and blood pressure regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yongfeng; Yu, Miao; Yang, Jing; Gonzales, Ernie; Perez, Ronaldo; Hou, Mingli; Tripathi, Piyush; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S.; Hamm, L. Lee; Hou, Jianghui

    2014-01-01

    The paracellular pathway through the tight junction provides an important route for transepithelial chloride reabsorption in the kidney, which regulates extracellular salt content and blood pressure. Defects in paracellular chloride reabsorption may in theory cause deregulation of blood pressure. However, there is no evidence to prove this theory or to demonstrate the in vivo role of the paracellular pathway in renal chloride handling. Here, using a tissue-specific KO approach, we have revealed a chloride transport pathway in the kidney that requires the tight junction molecule claudin-4. The collecting duct-specific claudin-4 KO animals developed hypotension, hypochloremia, and metabolic alkalosis due to profound renal wasting of chloride. The claudin-4–mediated chloride conductance can be regulated endogenously by a protease—channel-activating protease 1 (cap1). Mechanistically, cap1 regulates claudin-4 intercellular interaction and membrane stability. A putative cap1 cleavage site has been identified in the second extracellular loop of claudin-4, mutation of which abolished its regulation by cap1. The cap1 effects on paracellular chloride permeation can be extended to other proteases such as trypsin, suggesting a general mechanism may also exist for proteases to regulate the tight junction permeabilities. Together, we have discovered a theory that paracellular chloride permeability is physiologically regulated and essential to renal salt homeostasis and blood pressure control. PMID:25157135

  4. Teaching the Renal Tubular Reabsorption of Glucose Using Two Classic Papers by Shannon et al.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braga, Valdir A.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the transport along the nephron uses membrane proteins and exhibits the three characteristics of mediated transport: saturation, specificity, and competition. Glucose reabsorption in the nephron is an excellent example of the consequences of saturation. Two classic papers by James A. Shannon and colleagues clearly show the ability of the…

  5. Local pH domains regulate NHE3-mediated Na⁺ reabsorption in the renal proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Burford, James L; McDonough, Alicia A; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2014-12-01

    The proximal tubule Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3), located in the apical dense microvilli (brush border), plays a major role in the reabsorption of NaCl and water in the renal proximal tubule. In response to a rise in blood pressure NHE3 redistributes in the plane of the plasma membrane to the base of the brush border, where NHE3 activity is reduced. This NHE3 redistribution is assumed to provoke pressure natriuresis; however, it is unclear how NHE3 redistribution per se reduces NHE3 activity. To investigate if the distribution of NHE3 in the brush border can change the reabsorption rate, we constructed a spatiotemporal mathematical model of NHE3-mediated Na(+) reabsorption across a proximal tubule cell and compared the model results with in vivo experiments in rats. The model predicts that when NHE3 is localized exclusively at the base of the brush border, it creates local pH microdomains that reduce NHE3 activity by >30%. We tested the model's prediction experimentally: the rat kidney cortex was loaded with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, and cells of the proximal tubule were imaged in vivo using confocal fluorescence microscopy before and after an increase of blood pressure by ∼50 mmHg. The experimental results supported the model by demonstrating that a rise of blood pressure induces the development of pH microdomains near the bottom of the brush border. These local changes in pH reduce NHE3 activity, which may explain the pressure natriuresis response to NHE3 redistribution.

  6. Targeting renal glucose reabsorption for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus using the SGLT2 inhibitor dapagliflozin.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Serge A; Whaley, Jean M; Tirmenstein, Mark; Poucher, Simon M; Reilly, Timothy P; Boulton, David W; Saye, Joanne; List, James F; Parikh, Shamik

    2012-07-01

    Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) plays a key role in glucose homeostasis as the key transporter responsible for most renal glucose reabsorption in the proximal tubules of the kidney. Dapagliflozin is a potent, selective, and reversible inhibitor of SGLT2 that lowers blood glucose levels in an insulin-independent fashion. This novel agent has been studied extensively in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In these clinical trials, dapagliflozin significantly decreased glycated hemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose levels when administered alone or as add-on treatment in patients who were already receiving metformin, a sulfonylurea (glimepiride), pioglitazone, or insulin. Moreover, dapagliflozin decreased body weight when taken as monotherapy or in combination with metformin, a sulfonylurea, or insulin, and mitigated weight gain in patients receiving pioglitazone. Consistent with preclinical toxicology studies, dapagliflozin has a manageable adverse event profile that is largely predictable from its mechanism of action. While there are no clinically significant negative effects on renal function or electrolytes, dapagliflozin treatment is associated with increased frequencies of urinary tract infections and vulvovaginitis/balanitis. With a mechanism of action that is distinct from and complementary to that of existing antihyperglycemic therapies, dapagliflozin is an effective antihyperglycemic agent that is well tolerated and may enhance weight loss. As such, dapagliflozin promises to become an important adjunctive therapy for comprehensive treatment of T2DM.

  7. Application of Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Explore the Role of Kidney Transporters in Renal Reabsorption of Perfluorooctanoic Acid in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Worley, Rachel Rogers; Fisher, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Renal elimination and the resulting clearance of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the serum exhibit pronounced sex differences in the adult rat. The literature suggests that this is largely due to hormonally regulated expression of organic anion transporters (OATs) on the apical and basolateral membranes of the proximal tubule cells that facilitate excretion and reabsorption of PFOA from the filtrate into the blood. Previously developed PBPK models of PFOA exposure in the rat have not been parameterized to specifically account for transporter-mediated renal elimination. We developed a PBPK model for PFOA in the male and female rat to explore the role of Oat1, Oat3, and Oatp1a1 in sex-specific renal reabsorption and excretion of PFOA. Descriptions of the kinetic behavior of these transporters were extrapolated from in vitro studies and the model was used to simulate time-course serum, liver, and urine data for intravenous (IV) and oral exposures in both sexes. Model predicted concentrations of PFOA in the liver, serum, and urine showed good agreement with experimental data for both the male and female rat indicating that in vitro derived physiological descriptions of transporter-mediated renal reabsorption can successfully predict sex-dependent excretion of PFOA in the rat. This study supports the hypothesis that sex-specific serum half-lives for PFOA are largely driven by expression of transporters in the kidney and contributes to the development of PBPK modeling as a tool for evaluating the role of transporters in renal clearance. PMID:26522833

  8. Renal sodium reabsorption following induction of and recovery from volume expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, T. F.; Weinman, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    In the rat, infusion of a volume of isotonic saline equal to 2% of body weight resulted in an 82% increase in the delivery of filtrate out of the proximal tubule but little or, in some animals, no change in the urinary excretion of sodium. By contrast, further degrees of volume expansion resulted in lesser increases in the distal delivery of filtrate, but were associated with a marked increase in the urinary excretion of sodium. Sixty minutes following completion of volume expansion, while the animals were still in positive sodium balance, the urinary excretion of sodium decreased 52% compared to a decrease of only 24% in the distal delivery of filtrate. During the course of progressive volume expansion and during the recovery phase, there was a dissociation between alterations in sodium reabsorption in the proximal convoluted tubule and in the whole kidney. These studies indicate that although the proximal tubule is more sensitive to changes in the extracellular fluid volume, distal nephron sites are ultimately responsible both for the natriuresis of volume expansion and the relative antinatriuresis of the recovery periods.

  9. AKAP220 manages apical actin networks that coordinate aquaporin-2 location and renal water reabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Jennifer L.; Ogier, Leah; Forbush, Katherine A.; Bucko, Paula; Gopalan, Janani; Seternes, Ole-Morten; Langeberg, Lorene K.; Scott, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Filtration through the kidney eliminates toxins, manages electrolyte balance, and controls water homeostasis. Reabsorption of water from the luminal fluid of the nephron occurs through aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water pores in principal cells that line the kidney-collecting duct. This vital process is impeded by formation of an “actin barrier” that obstructs the passive transit of AQP2 to the plasma membrane. Bidirectional control of AQP2 trafficking is managed by hormones and signaling enzymes. We have discovered that vasopressin-independent facets of this homeostatic mechanism are under the control of A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 220 (AKAP220; product of the Akap11 gene). CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and imaging approaches show that loss of AKAP220 disrupts apical actin networks in organoid cultures. Similar defects are evident in tissue sections from AKAP220-KO mice. Biochemical analysis of AKAP220-null kidney extracts detected reduced levels of active RhoA GTPase, a well-known modulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Fluorescent imaging of kidney sections from these genetically modified mice revealed that RhoA and AQP2 accumulate at the apical surface of the collecting duct. Consequently, these animals are unable to appropriately dilute urine in response to overhydration. We propose that membrane-proximal signaling complexes constrained by AKAP220 impact the actin barrier dynamics and AQP2 trafficking to ensure water homeostasis. PMID:27402760

  10. Use of systems pharmacology modeling to elucidate the operating characteristics of SGLT1 and SGLT2 in renal glucose reabsorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yasong; Griffen, Steven C; Boulton, David W; Leil, Tarek A

    2014-01-01

    In the kidney, glucose in glomerular filtrate is reabsorbed primarily by sodium-glucose cotransporters 1 (SGLT1) and 2 (SGLT2) along the proximal tubules. SGLT2 has been characterized as a high capacity, low affinity pathway responsible for reabsorption of the majority of filtered glucose in the early part of proximal tubules, and SGLT1 reabsorbs the residual glucose in the distal part. Inhibition of SGLT2 is a viable mechanism for removing glucose from the body and improving glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Despite demonstrating high levels (in excess of 80%) of inhibition of glucose transport by SGLT2 in vitro, potent SGLT2 inhibitors, e.g., dapagliflozin and canagliflozin, inhibit renal glucose reabsorption by only 30-50% in clinical studies. Hypotheses for this apparent paradox are mostly focused on the compensatory effect of SGLT1. The paradox has been explained and the role of SGLT1 demonstrated in the mouse, but direct data in humans are lacking. To further explore the roles of SGLT1/2 in renal glucose reabsorption in humans, we developed a systems pharmacology model with emphasis on SGLT1/2 mediated glucose reabsorption and the effects of SGLT2 inhibition. The model was calibrated using robust clinical data in the absence or presence of dapagliflozin (DeFronzo et al., 2013), and evaluated against clinical data from the literature (Mogensen, 1971; Wolf et al., 2009; Polidori et al., 2013). The model adequately described all four data sets. Simulations using the model clarified the operating characteristics of SGLT1/2 in humans in the healthy and diabetic state with or without SGLT2 inhibition. The modeling and simulations support our proposition that the apparent moderate, 30-50% inhibition of renal glucose reabsorption observed with potent SGLT2 inhibitors is a combined result of two physiological determinants: SGLT1 compensation and residual SGLT2 activity. This model will enable in silico inferences and predictions related to SGLT1/2 modulation.

  11. Exaggerated natriuretic response to isotonic volume expansion in hypertensive renal transplant recipients: evaluation of proximal and distal tubular reabsorption by simultaneous determination of renal plasma clearance of lithium and 51Cr-EDTA.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, A H; Knudsen, F; Danielsen, H; Pedersen, E B; Fjeldborg, P; Madsen, M; Brøchner-Mortensen, J; Kornerup, H J

    1987-02-01

    In fourteen hypertensive and fourteen normotensive renal transplant recipients, and in a group of thirteen healthy controls, changes in natriuresis, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and tubular reabsorption of sodium were determined in relation to intravenous infusion of 2 mmol isotonic sodium chloride per kg body weight. An exaggerated natriuresis was demonstrated in the hypertensive renal transplant recipients. This new finding indicates that the augmented natriuresis following plasma volume expansion, which is a characteristic finding in subjects with arterial hypertension, is not mediated by the renal nerves. Investigation of the tubular reabsorption rates of sodium by simultaneous determination of the renal clearance of 51Cr-EDTA and lithium showed that in the hypertensives the changes in tubular handling of sodium were different from those registered in the normotensive subjects. The increased sodium excretion in the hypertensive renal transplant recipients was caused by an increased output of sodium from the proximal tubules which was not fully compensated for by an increased distal reabsorption. Whether this increased delivery of sodium to the distal segments was caused by changes in GFR or in the proximal tubular reabsorption of sodium could not be clarified in the present study and warrants further investigations.

  12. Use of systems pharmacology modeling to elucidate the operating characteristics of SGLT1 and SGLT2 in renal glucose reabsorption in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yasong; Griffen, Steven C.; Boulton, David W.; Leil, Tarek A.

    2014-01-01

    In the kidney, glucose in glomerular filtrate is reabsorbed primarily by sodium-glucose cotransporters 1 (SGLT1) and 2 (SGLT2) along the proximal tubules. SGLT2 has been characterized as a high capacity, low affinity pathway responsible for reabsorption of the majority of filtered glucose in the early part of proximal tubules, and SGLT1 reabsorbs the residual glucose in the distal part. Inhibition of SGLT2 is a viable mechanism for removing glucose from the body and improving glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Despite demonstrating high levels (in excess of 80%) of inhibition of glucose transport by SGLT2 in vitro, potent SGLT2 inhibitors, e.g., dapagliflozin and canagliflozin, inhibit renal glucose reabsorption by only 30–50% in clinical studies. Hypotheses for this apparent paradox are mostly focused on the compensatory effect of SGLT1. The paradox has been explained and the role of SGLT1 demonstrated in the mouse, but direct data in humans are lacking. To further explore the roles of SGLT1/2 in renal glucose reabsorption in humans, we developed a systems pharmacology model with emphasis on SGLT1/2 mediated glucose reabsorption and the effects of SGLT2 inhibition. The model was calibrated using robust clinical data in the absence or presence of dapagliflozin (DeFronzo et al., 2013), and evaluated against clinical data from the literature (Mogensen, 1971; Wolf et al., 2009; Polidori et al., 2013). The model adequately described all four data sets. Simulations using the model clarified the operating characteristics of SGLT1/2 in humans in the healthy and diabetic state with or without SGLT2 inhibition. The modeling and simulations support our proposition that the apparent moderate, 30–50% inhibition of renal glucose reabsorption observed with potent SGLT2 inhibitors is a combined result of two physiological determinants: SGLT1 compensation and residual SGLT2 activity. This model will enable in silico inferences and predictions related to SGLT1

  13. pH gradient as an additional driving force in the renal re-absorption of phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Strévey, J; Giroux, S; Béliveau, R

    1990-01-01

    The effects of the Na+ gradient and pH on phosphate uptake were studied in brush-border membrane vesicles isolated from rat kidney cortex. The initial rates of Na(+)-dependent phosphate uptake were measured at pH 6.5, 7.5 and 8.5 in the presence of sodium gluconate. At a constant total phosphate concentration, the transport values at pH 7.5 and 8.5 were similar, but at pH 6.5 the influx was 31% of that at pH 7.5. However, when the concentration of bivalent phosphate was kept constant at all three pH values, the effect of pH was less pronounced; at pH 6.5, phosphate influx was 73% of that measured at pH 7.5. The Na(+)-dependent phosphate uptake was also influenced by a transmembrane pH difference; an outwardly directed H+ gradient stimulated the uptake by 48%, whereas an inwardly directed H+ gradient inhibited the uptake by 15%. Phosphate on the trans (intravesicular) side stimulated the Na(+)-gradient-dependent phosphate transport by 59%, 93% and 49%, and the Na(+)-gradient-independent phosphate transport by 240%, 280% and 244%, at pH 6.5, 7.5 and 8.5 respectively. However, in both cases, at pH 6.5 the maximal stimulation was seen only when the concentration of bivalent trans phosphate was the same as at pH 7.5. In the absence of a Na+ gradient, but in the presence of Na+, an outwardly directed H+ gradient provided the driving force for the transient hyperaccumulation of phosphate. The rate of uptake was dependent on the magnitude of the H+ gradient. These results indicate that: (1) the bivalent form of phosphate is the form of phosphate recognized by the carrier on both sides of the membrane; (2) protons are both activators and allosteric modulators of the phosphate carrier; (3) the combined action of both the Na+ (out/in) and H+ (in/out) gradients on the phosphate carrier contribute to regulate efficiently the re-absorption of phosphate. PMID:2244874

  14. Claudin-16 and claudin-19 interaction is required for their assembly into tight junctions and for renal reabsorption of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianghui; Renigunta, Aparna; Gomes, Antonio S; Hou, Mingli; Paul, David L; Waldegger, Siegfried; Goodenough, Daniel A

    2009-09-08

    Claudins are tight junction integral membrane proteins that are key regulators of the paracellular pathway. Defects in claudin-16 (CLDN16) and CLDN19 function result in the inherited human renal disorder familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC). Previous studies showed that siRNA knockdown of CLDN16 in mice results in a mouse model for FHHNC. Here, we show that CLDN19-siRNA mice also developed the FHHNC symptoms of chronic renal wasting of magnesium and calcium together with defective renal salt handling. siRNA knockdown of CLDN19 caused a loss of CLDN16 from tight junctions in the thick ascending limb (TAL) without a decrease in CLDN16 expression level, whereas siRNA knockdown of CLDN16 produced a similar effect on CLDN19. In both mouse lines, CLDN10, CLDN18, occludin, and ZO-1, normal constituents of TAL tight junctions, remained correctly localized. CLDN16- and CLDN19-depleted tight junctions had normal barrier function but defective ion selectivity. These data, together with yeast two-hybrid binding studies, indicate that a heteromeric CLDN16 and CLDN19 interaction was required for assembling them into the tight junction structure and generating cation-selective paracellular channels.

  15. Selective SGLT2 inhibition by tofogliflozin reduces renal glucose reabsorption under hyperglycemic but not under hypo- or euglycemic conditions in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Takumi; Fukazawa, Masanori; Honda, Kiyofumi; Yata, Tatsuo; Kawai, Mio; Yamane, Mizuki; Murao, Naoaki; Yamaguchi, Koji; Kato, Motohiro; Mitsui, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Sachiya; Kawabe, Yoshiki

    2013-02-15

    To understand the risk of hypoglycemia associated with urinary glucose excretion (UGE) induced by sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) inhibitors, it is necessary to know the relationship between the ratio of contribution of SGLT2 vs. SGLT1 to renal glucose reabsorption (RGR) and the glycemic levels in vivo. To examine the contributions of SGLT2 and SGLT1 in normal rats, we compared the RGR inhibition by tofogliflozin, a highly specific SGLT2 inhibitor, and phlorizin, an SGLT1 and SGLT2 (SGLT1/2) inhibitor, at plasma concentrations sufficient to completely inhibit rat SGLT2 (rSGLT2) while inhibiting rSGLT1 to different degrees. Under hyperglycemic conditions by glucose titration, tofogliflozin and phlorizin achieved ≥50% inhibition of RGR. Under hypoglycemic conditions by hyperinsulinemic clamp, RGR was reduced by 20-50% with phlorizin and by 1-5% with tofogliflozin, suggesting the smaller contribution of rSGLT2 to RGR under hypoglycemic conditions than under hyperglycemic conditions. Next, to evaluate the hypoglycemic potentials of SGLT1/2 inhibition, we measured the plasma glucose (PG) and endogenous glucose production (EGP) simultaneously after UGE induction by SGLT inhibitors. Tofogliflozin (400 ng/ml) induced UGE of about 2 mg·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ and increased EGP by 1-2 mg·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹, resulting in PG in the normal range. Phlorizin (1,333 ng/ml) induced UGE of about 6 mg·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ and increased EGP by about 4 mg·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹; this was more than with tofogliflozin, but the minimum PG was lower. These results suggest that the contribution of SGLT1 to RGR is greater under lower glycemic conditions than under hyperglycemic conditions and that SGLT2-selective inhibitors pose a lower risk of hypoglycemia than SGLT1/2 inhibitors.

  16. TRPV5-mediated Ca2+ Reabsorption and Hypercalciuria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renkema, Kirsten Y.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.; Bindels, René J. M.

    2007-04-01

    The concerted action of the intestine, kidney and bone results in the maintenance of a normal Ca2+ balance, a mechanism that is tightly controlled by the calciotropic hormones vitamin D, parathyroid hormone and calcitonin. Disturbances in the Ca2+ balance have been linked to diverse pathophysiological disorders like urolithiasis, hypertension, electroencephalogram abnormalities and rickets. Importantly, the final amount of Ca2+ that is released from the body is determined in the distal part of the nephron, where active Ca2+ reabsorption occurs. Here, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid member 5 (TRPV5), a highly Ca2+-selective channel, has been recognized as the gatekeeper of active Ca2+ reabsorption. The in vivo relevance of TRPV5 has been further investigated by the characterization of TRPV5 knockout (TRPV5-/-) mice, which exhibit severe disturbances in renal Ca2+ handling, such as profound hypercalciuria, intestinal Ca2+ hyperabsorption and reduced bone thickness. Hypercalciuria increases the risk of kidney stone formation in these mice. This review highlights our current knowledge about TRPV5-mediated Ca2+ reabsorption and emphasizes the physiological relevance and the clinical implications related to the TRPV5-/- mice model.

  17. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-03-22

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD.

  18. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  19. Genetic diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets in a cohort study: Tubular reabsorption of phosphate and 1,25(OH)2D serum levels are associated with PHEX mutation type

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic Hypophosphatemic Rickets (HR) is a group of diseases characterized by renal phosphate wasting with inappropriately low or normal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D) serum levels. The most common form of HR is X-linked dominant HR (XLHR) which is caused by inactivating mutations in the PHEX gene. The purpose of this study was to perform genetic diagnosis in a cohort of patients with clinical diagnosis of HR, to perform genotype-phenotype correlations of those patients and to compare our data with other HR cohort studies. Methods Forty three affected individuals from 36 non related families were analyzed. For the genetic analysis, the PHEX gene was sequenced in all of the patients and in 13 cases the study was complemented by mRNA sequencing and Multiple Ligation Probe Assay. For the genotype-phenotype correlation study, the clinical and biochemical phenotype of the patients was compared with the type of mutation, which was grouped into clearly deleterious or likely causative, using the Mann-Whitney and Fisher's exact test. Results Mutations in the PHEX gene were identified in all the patients thus confirming an XLHR. Thirty four different mutations were found distributed throughout the gene with higher density at the 3' end. The majority of the mutations were novel (69.4%), most of them resulted in a truncated PHEX protein (83.3%) and were family specific (88.9%). Tubular reabsorption of phosphate (TRP) and 1,25(OH)2D serum levels were significantly lower in patients carrying clearly deleterious mutations than in patients carrying likely causative ones (61.39 ± 19.76 vs. 80.14 ± 8.80%, p = 0.028 and 40.93 ± 30.73 vs. 78.46 ± 36.27 pg/ml, p = 0.013). Conclusions PHEX gene mutations were found in all the HR cases analyzed, which was in contrast with other cohort studies. Patients with clearly deleterious PHEX mutations had lower TRP and 1,25(OH)2D levels suggesting that the PHEX type of mutation might predict the XLHR phenotype severity. PMID

  20. Renal Response to L-Arginine in Diabetic Rats. A Possible Link between Nitric Oxide System and Aquaporin-2

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, María C.; Albertoni Borghese, María F.; Balonga, Sabrina E.; Lavagna, Agustina; Filipuzzi, Ana L.; Elesgaray, Rosana; Costa, María A.; Majowicz, Mónica P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether L-Arginine (L-Arg) supplementation modifies nitric oxide (NO) system and consequently aquaporin-2 (AQP2) expression in the renal outer medulla of streptozotocin-diabetic rats at an early time point after induction of diabetes. Male Wistar rats were divided in four groups: Control, Diabetic, Diabetic treated with L-Arginine and Control treated with L-Arginine. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity was estimated by [14C] L-citrulline production in homogenates of the renal outer medulla and by NADPH-diaphorase staining in renal outer medullary tubules. Western blot was used to detect the expression of AQP2 and NOS types I and III; real time PCR was used to quantify AQP2 mRNA. The expression of both NOS isoforms, NOS I and NOS III, was decreased in the renal outer medulla of diabetic rats and L-Arg failed to prevent these decreases. However, L-Arg improved NO production, NADPH-diaphorase activity in collecting ducts and other tubular structures, and NOS activity in renal homogenates from diabetic rats. AQP2 protein and mRNA were decreased in the renal outer medulla of diabetic rats and L-Arg administration prevented these decreases. These results suggest that the decreased NOS activity in collecting ducts of the renal outer medulla may cause, at least in part, the decreased expression of AQP2 in this model of diabetes and constitute additional evidence supporting a role for NO in contributing to renal water reabsorption through the modulation of AQP2 expression in this pathological condition. However, we cannot discard that another pathway different from NOS also exists that links L-Arg to AQP2 expression. PMID:25111608

  1. Role of distal reabsorption and peritubular environment in glomerulotubular balance.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    Total kidney glomerulotubular balance was examined during aortic constriction and release in saline-loaded dogs and in dogs undergoing water diuresis. Aortic constriction lowered the glomerular filtration rate by 45% in both groups, and glomerulotubular balance, as judged by changes in absolute sodium reabsorption, was also comparable. During water diuresis, a linear relationship was observed between free water clearance and urine flow during all maneuvers, suggesting that distal sodium reabsorption is related primarily to distal delivery. The results suggest that if alterations in the peritubular environment are responsible for the changes in tubular sodium reabsorption during aortic constriction in the saline- or water-loaded dog, then a change in renal plasma flow, and presumably delivery rate of oncotic force, may be the most likely mediator.

  2. Evidence for bicarbonate-dependent magnesium reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A; Langberg, H; Dibona, G; Kiil, F

    1983-01-01

    During ethacrynic acid administration about 50% of the filtered load of magnesium is reabsorbed. To examine whether the remaining component of magnesium reabsorption is bicarbonate-dependent, i.e. varies with factors known to alter passive reabsorption, experiments were performed in anesthetized dogs. During ethacrynic acid administration MgCl2 infusion raised the plasma concentration of magnesium (PMg) from 0.64 +/- 0.05 to 3.06 +/- 0.27 mM and doubled magnesium reabsorption. The infusion of acetazolamide at high PMg reduced bicarbonate reabsorption by 41 +/- 3% and magnesium reabsorption by 31 +/- 16%. When plasma pH was reduced to 7.04 +/- 0.02 and increased to 7.83 +/- 0.02 by altering PCO2 at a constant plasma bicarbonate concentration of 31.2 +/- 0.8 mM, magnesium and bicarbonate reabsorption were correlated (r = 0.82). The infusion of mannitol, which acts by reducing passive solute transport without affecting bicarbonate reabsorption, halved magnesium reabsorption. By combining mannitol and acetazolamide infusions, only 6 +/- 4% of the filtered magnesium was still reabsorbed. These results indicate that the reabsorption of magnesium remaining after the infusion of ethacrynic acid and after raising PMg varies with changes in PCO2 and is inhibited by the infusion of acetazolamide and mannitol as expected for bicarbonate-dependent passive reabsorption.

  3. Cubilin and amnionless mediate protein reabsorption in Drosophila nephrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fujian; Zhao, Ying; Chao, Yufang; Muir, Katherine; Han, Zhe

    2013-02-01

    The insect nephrocyte and the mammalian glomerular podocyte are similar with regard to filtration, but it remains unclear whether there is an organ or cell type in flies that reabsorbs proteins. Here, we show that the Drosophila nephrocyte has molecular, structural, and functional similarities to the renal proximal tubule cell. We screened for genes required for nephrocyte function and identified two Drosophila genes encoding orthologs of mammalian cubilin and amnionless (AMN), two major receptors for protein reabsorption in the proximal tubule. In Drosophila, expression of dCubilin and dAMN is specific to nephrocytes, where they function as co-receptors for protein uptake. Targeted expression of human AMN in Drosophila nephrocytes was sufficient to rescue defective protein uptake induced by dAMN knockdown, suggesting evolutionary conservation of Cubilin/AMN co-receptors function from flies to humans. Furthermore, we found that Cubilin/AMN-mediated protein reabsorption is required for the maintenance of nephrocyte ultrastructure and fly survival under conditions of toxic stress. In conclusion, the insect nephrocyte combines filtration with protein reabsorption, using evolutionarily conserved genes and subcellular structures, suggesting that it can serve as a simplified model for both podocytes and the renal proximal tubule.

  4. SGLT2 mediates glucose reabsorption in the early proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Vallon, Volker; Platt, Kenneth A; Cunard, Robyn; Schroth, Jana; Whaley, Jean; Thomson, Scott C; Koepsell, Hermann; Rieg, Timo

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding for the Na(+)-glucose co-transporter SGLT2 (SLC5A2) associate with familial renal glucosuria, but the role of SGLT2 in the kidney is incompletely understood. Here, we determined the localization of SGLT2 in the mouse kidney and generated and characterized SGLT2-deficient mice. In wild-type (WT) mice, immunohistochemistry localized SGLT2 to the brush border membrane of the early proximal tubule. Sglt2(-/-) mice had glucosuria, polyuria, and increased food and fluid intake without differences in plasma glucose concentrations, GFR, or urinary excretion of other proximal tubular substrates (including amino acids) compared with WT mice. SGLT2 deficiency did not associate with volume depletion, suggested by similar body weight, BP, and hematocrit; however, plasma renin concentrations were modestly higher and plasma aldosterone levels were lower in Sglt2(-/-) mice. Whole-kidney clearance studies showed that fractional glucose reabsorption was significantly lower in Sglt2(-/-) mice compared with WT mice and varied in Sglt2(-/-) mice between 10 and 60%, inversely with the amount of filtered glucose. Free-flow micropuncture revealed that for early proximal collections, 78 ± 6% of the filtered glucose was reabsorbed in WT mice compared with no reabsorption in Sglt2(-/-) mice. For late proximal collections, fractional glucose reabsorption was 93 ± 1% in WT and 21 ± 6% in Sglt2(-/-) mice, respectively. These results demonstrate that SGLT2 mediates glucose reabsorption in the early proximal tubule and most of the glucose reabsorption by the kidney, overall. This mouse model mimics and explains the glucosuric phenotype of individuals carrying SLC5A2 mutations.

  5. Effects of photon reabsorption phenomena in confocal micro-photoluminescence measurements in crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roigé, A.; Alvarez, J.; Jaffré, A.; Desrues, T.; Muñoz, D.; Martín, I.; Alcubilla, R.; Kleider, J.-P.

    2017-02-01

    Confocal micro-photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy has become a powerful characterization technique for studying novel photovoltaic (PV) materials and structures at the micrometer level. In this work, we present a comprehensive study about the effects and implications of photon reabsorption phenomena on confocal micro-PL measurements in crystalline silicon (c-Si), the workhorse material of the PV industry. First, supported by theoretical calculations, we show that the level of reabsorption is intrinsically linked to the selected experimental parameters, i.e., focusing lens, pinhole aperture, and excitation wavelength, as they define the spatial extension of the confocal detection volume, and therefore, the effective photon traveling distance before collection. Second, we also show that certain sample properties such as the reflectance and/or the surface recombination velocity can also have a relevant impact on reabsorption. Due to the direct relationship between the reabsorption level and the spectral line shape of the resulting PL emission signal, reabsorption phenomena play a paramount role in certain types of micro-PL measurements. This is demonstrated by means of two practical and current examples studied using confocal PL, namely, the estimation of doping densities in c-Si and the study of back-surface and/or back-contacted Si devices such as interdigitated back contact solar cells, where reabsorption processes should be taken into account for the proper interpretation and quantification of the obtained PL data.

  6. Localization of a renal sodium-phosphate cotransporter gene to human chromosome 5q35

    SciTech Connect

    Kos, C.H.; Tenenhouse, H.S. ); Tihy, F.; Lemieux, N. ); Econs, M.J. ); Murer, H. )

    1994-01-01

    Several Mendelian disorders of renal phosphate reabsorption, associated with hypophosphatemia and bone disease, have been described. These include X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets with hypercalciuria, hypophosphatemic bone disease, and autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets. The underlying mechanisms for renal phosphate wasting in these disorders remain unknown. The proximal tubule is the major site of renal phosphate reabsorption. Thus, mutations in genes that participate in the transepithelial transport of phosphate in this segment of the nephron may be responsible for these disorders. Recently, a cDNA encoding a renal proximal tubular, brush-border membrane Na[sup +]-phosphate cotransporter (NaP[sub i]-3) was cloned from human kidney cortex. As a first step in establishing whether mutations in the NaP[sub i]-3 gene are the cause of inherited disorders in phosphate homeostasis, the authors sought to determine its chromosomal localization. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Augmented bicarbonate reabsorption by both the proximal and distal nephron maintains chloride-deplete metabolic alkalosis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Wesson, D E

    1989-01-01

    Whether augmented bicarbonate reabsorption by renal tubular epithelium contributes to the maintenance of chloride-deplete metabolic alkalosis is not clear. This study used free-flow micropuncture to investigate bicarbonate reabsorption by surface nephron segments in a rat model of diuretic-induced alkalosis compared to control. The proximal and distal nephron of the alkalotic animals had higher values for both delivered load to and absolute reabsorption from these segments. The proximal tubules of alkalotic and control animals had similar values for the slopes of the linear regression of delivered load vs. reabsorption and for the bicarbonate tubular fluid to plasma (TF/P) ratio at the late proximal tubule. By contrast, the corresponding analysis for the distal segment of alkalotic animals revealed a greater slope (0.98 vs. 0.81, P less than 0.003) and a smaller bicarbonate TF/P ratio at the late distal tubule (0.10 vs. 0.16, P less than 0.006). The data indicate that augmented bicarbonate reabsorption by both the proximal and distal nephron contributes to maintaining the alkalosis of this model. The data suggest primary stimulation of bicarbonate reabsorption in the distal nephron and load-dependent reabsorption in the proximal tubule. PMID:2808701

  8. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  9. Isosmotic volume reabsorption in rat proximal tubule

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical model incorporation both active and passive forces has been developed for fluid reabsorption from split oil droplets in rat intermediate and late proximal tubule. Of necessity, simplifying assumptions have been introduced; we have assumed that the epithelium can be treated as a single membrane and that the membrane "effective" HCO3 permeability is near zero. Based on this model with its underlying assumptions, the following conclusions are drawn. Regardless of the presence or absence of active NaCl transport, fluid reabsorption from the split oil droplet is isosmotic. The reabsorbate osmolarity can be affected by changes in tubular permeability parameters and applied forces but is not readily altered from an osmolarity essentially equal to that of plasma. In a split droplet, isosmotic flow need not be a special consequence of active Na transport, is not the result of a particular set of permeability properties, and is not merely a trivial consequence of a very high hydraulic conductivity; isosmotic flow can be obtained with hydraulic conductivity nearly an order of magnitude lower than that previously measured in the rat proximal convoluted tubule. Isosmotic reabsorption is, in part, the result of the interdependence of salt and water flows, their changing in parallel, and thus their ratio, the reabsorbate concentration being relatively invariant. Active NaCl transport can cause osmotic water flow by reducing the luminal fluid osmolarity. In the presence of passive forces the luminal fluid can be hypertonic to plasma, and active NaCl transport can still exert its osmotic effect on volume flow. There are two passive forces for volume flow: the Cl gradient and the difference in effective osmotic pressure; they have an approximately equivalent effect on volume flow. Experimentally, we have measured volume changes in a droplet made hyperosmotic by the addition of 50 mM NaCl; the experimental results are predicted reasonably well by our theoretical model

  10. Isosmotic volume reabsorption in rat proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Warner, R R; Lechene, C

    1980-11-01

    A theoretical model incorporation both active and passive forces has been developed for fluid reabsorption from split oil droplets in rat intermediate and late proximal tubule. Of necessity, simplifying assumptions have been introduced; we have assumed that the epithelium can be treated as a single membrane and that the membrane "effective" HCO3 permeability is near zero. Based on this model with its underlying assumptions, the following conclusions are drawn. Regardless of the presence or absence of active NaCl transport, fluid reabsorption from the split oil droplet is isosmotic. The reabsorbate osmolarity can be affected by changes in tubular permeability parameters and applied forces but is not readily altered from an osmolarity essentially equal to that of plasma. In a split droplet, isosmotic flow need not be a special consequence of active Na transport, is not the result of a particular set of permeability properties, and is not merely a trivial consequence of a very high hydraulic conductivity; isosmotic flow can be obtained with hydraulic conductivity nearly an order of magnitude lower than that previously measured in the rat proximal convoluted tubule. Isosmotic reabsorption is, in part, the result of the interdependence of salt and water flows, their changing in parallel, and thus their ratio, the reabsorbate concentration being relatively invariant. Active NaCl transport can cause osmotic water flow by reducing the luminal fluid osmolarity. In the presence of passive forces the luminal fluid can be hypertonic to plasma, and active NaCl transport can still exert its osmotic effect on volume flow. There are two passive forces for volume flow: the Cl gradient and the difference in effective osmotic pressure; they have an approximately equivalent effect on volume flow. Experimentally, we have measured volume changes in a droplet made hyperosmotic by the addition of 50 mM NaCl; the experimental results are predicted reasonably well by our theoretical model.

  11. Insulin increases sodium reabsorption in diluting segment in humans: evidence for indirect mediation through hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, C E; van Buren, M; Bijlsma, J A; Koomans, H A

    1991-08-01

    To examine the mechanism of renal sodium (Na) and potassium (K) retention during insulin infusion, seven healthy volunteers underwent clearance studies without (time control) and with insulin infusion (40 mU bolus, followed by 1 mU/kg/min for 150 min). Maximal free water clearance and fractional lithium clearance (FELi) were used to analyze renal sodium handling. Insulin decreased Na excretion (from 189 +/- 25 to 121 +/- 19 mumol/min, P less than 0.01) and K excretion (from 64 +/- 8 to 19 +/- 1 mumol/min, P less than 0.01), but did not change in glomerular filtration rate. FELi increased from 29.8 +/- 1.9 to 32.3 +/- 1.9% (P less than 0.05), minimal urine osmolality decreased from 59 +/- 3 to 46 +/- 3 mOsm/kg (P less than 0.01), and the diluting segment reabsorption index increased from 88.0 +/- 0.9 to 93.7 +/- 0.9%, P less than 0.01). Insulin also decreased plasma K, from 3.91 +/- 0.08 to 3.28 +/- 0.08 mmol/liter, P less than 0.01. In a third clearance study KCl was infused simultaneously (3.75 mumol/kg/min) to prevent this fall in plasma K. In this study insulin had no effect on Na and K excretion and diluting segment reabsorption, but the rise in FELi remained. In a fourth clearance study NaCl (3.75 mumol/kg/min) instead of KCl was infused together with insulin. This maneuver did not prevent the Na and K retaining effect of insulin, nor any of its effects on renal sodium handling parameters. These data suggest that Na and K retention during insulin infusion are largely secondary to hypokalemia, which causes increased reabsorption in the diluting segment.

  12. Acute inhibition of NCC does not activate distal electrogenic Na+ reabsorption or kaliuresis

    PubMed Central

    Craigie, Eilidh; Homer, Natalie Z. M.; Mullins, John J.; Bailey, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Na+ reabsorption from the distal renal tubule involves electroneutral and electrogenic pathways, with the latter promoting K+ excretion. The relative activities of these two pathways are tightly controlled, participating in the minute-to-minute regulation of systemic K+ balance. The pathways are interdependent: the activity of the NaCl cotransporter (NCC) in the distal convoluted tubule influences the activity of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) downstream. This effect might be mediated by changes in distal Na+ delivery per se or by molecular and structural adaptations in the connecting tubule and collecting ducts. We hypothesized that acute inhibition of NCC activity would cause an immediate increase in Na+ flux through ENaC, with a concomitant increase in renal K+ excretion. We tested this using renal clearance methodology in anesthetized mice, by the administration of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) and/or benzamil (BZM) to exert specific blockade of NCC and ENaC, respectively. Bolus HCTZ elicited a natriuresis that was sustained for up to 110 min; urinary K+ excretion was not affected. Furthermore, the magnitude of the natriuresis was no greater during concomitant BZM administration. This suggests that ENaC-mediated Na+ reabsorption was not normally limited by Na+ delivery, accounting for the absence of thiazide-induced kaliuresis. After dietary Na+ restriction, HCTZ elicited a kaliuresis, but the natiuretic effect of HCTZ was not enhanced by BZM. Our findings support a model in which inhibition of NCC activity does not increase Na+ reabsorption through ENaC solely by increasing distal Na+ delivery but rather by inducing a molecular and structural adaptation in downstream nephron segments. PMID:24402096

  13. Changes in Proximal and Distal Tubular Reabsorption Produced by Rapid Expansion of Extracellular Fluid*

    PubMed Central

    Hayslett, John P.; Kashgarian, Michael; Epstein, Franklin H.

    1967-01-01

    Acute infusions of isotonic saline in the rat cause an increase in glomerular filtration rate and in the excretion of salt and water. The kidney swells, due to expansion of tubular and interstitial volume. Despite the increase in tubular diameter, transit time through the proximal tubules and loops of Henle is decreased, presumably owing to a greatly accelerated rate of tubular flow. Proximal tubular reabsorption, measured in blocked tubules, is inhibited in a way that cannot be ascribed to changes in tubular diameter. The prolongation of proximal reabsorptive half-time is not affected by the administration of aldosterone. It occurs equally in rats chronically loaded with or deprived of salt, and it is therefore not likely that it is influenced by the renal content of renin. In contrast, reabsorption from the distal convoluted tubule is enhanced by saline infusion. This change is observed in segments of tubules blocked with oil and isolated from their glomeruli and thus appears to occur independently of changes in glomerular filtration or tubular flow. Images PMID:6027087

  14. Enhanced Distal Nephron Sodium Reabsorption in Chronic Angiotensin II Infused Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Seth, Dale M.; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Chronic angiotensin II (Ang II) infusions enhance urinary excretion of angiotensinogen suggesting augmentation of distal nephron sodium reabsorption. To assess if chronic Ang II infusions (15 ng/min for 2 weeks) enhance distal nephron sodium reabsorption, we compared sodium excretion before and following blockade of the two main distal nephron sodium transporters by iv amiloride (5 mg/kg body weight) plus bendroflumethiazide (12 mg/kg body weight) in male C57/BL6 anesthetized control mice (n=10) and in chronic Ang II-infused mice (n=8). Chronic Ang II infusions increased systolic blood pressure to 141±6 mm Hg compared to 106±4 mm Hg in control mice. After anesthesia, mean arterial pressure averaged 97±4 mm Hg in chronic Ang II-infused mice compared with 94±3 mm Hg in control mice allowing comparison of renal function at similar arterial pressures. Ang II-infused mice had lower urinary sodium excretion (0.16±0.04 versus 0.30±0.05 μEq/min, P<0.05), higher distal sodium reabsorption (1.74±0.18 versus 1.12±0.18 μEq/min, P<0.05) and higher fractional reabsorption of distal sodium delivery (91.1±1.8% versus 77.9±4.3 %, P<0.05) than control mice. Urinary Ang II concentrations, measured during distal blockade, were greater in Ang II infused mice (1235.0±277.2 versus 468.9±146.9 fmol/ml, P<0.05). In chronic Ang II-infused mice treated with spironolactone (n=5), fractional reabsorption of distal sodium delivery was similarly augmented as in chronic Ang II infused mice (94.6±1.7%, P<0.01). These data provide in vivo evidence that there is enhanced distal sodium reabsorption dependent on sodium channel and Na+-Cl− cotransporter activity and increased urinary Ang II concentrations in mice infused chronically with Ang II. PMID:19487583

  15. [Role of V1- and V2-receptors in mechanism of physiological paradox--an increase of reabsorption of the solute free water and simultaneous rise of diuresis].

    PubMed

    Kanashkina, T A; Kuznetsova, A A; Shakhmatova, E I; Natochin, Iu V

    2006-10-01

    In experiments on non-anesthetized rats with administration into stomach of water (5 ml/100 g body mass) direct correlation has been found between an increase of diuresis and excretion of solute free water (r = 0.98, p < 0.01), while after injection to these animals of 5 x 10(-11) M arginine-vasotocin - between an increase of diuresis and simultaneous rise reabsorption of solute free water (r = 0.8, p < 0.01). The rise of diuresis after the vasotocin injection is due to inhibition of sodium re- absorption, with the solute excretion fraction increasing from 2.6 +/- 0.2 % to 11.9 +/- 1.2, p < 0.001. A similar physiological paradox - an increase of diuresis with the simultaneous increase of reabsorption of solute free water - has been revealed at night hours in children with tendency for nocturnal enuresis (r = 0.64, p < 0.01). Mechanism responsible for this phenomenon consists in a rise of diuresis due to a decrease of sodium ion reabsorption in the ascending Henle loop limb. A problem is discussed of the homeostatic significance of a decrease of sodium reabsorption combined with an increase of solute-free water reabsorption; it is suggested that this phenomenon is based on a redistribution of reabsorption inside the nephron - a decrease of ion and water reabsorption in the initial parts of the nephron distal segment and an increase of solute free water reabsorption with the antidiuretic hormone-stimulated high osmotic permeability of terminal parts of renal tubules. An intraperitoneal injection of V1-anatagonist (OPC-21268) decreased the natriuretic component of response to arginine-vasotocin, while injection of V2-antagonist (OPC-31260) eliminated the antidiuretic component.

  16. Animal Models to Study Links between Cardiovascular Disease and Renal Failure and Their Relevance to Human Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, Tim D.; Holt, Stephen G.; Smith, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    The close association between cardiovascular pathology and renal dysfunction is well documented and significant. Patients with conventional risk factors for cardiovascular disease like diabetes and hypertension also suffer renal dysfunction. This is unsurprising if the kidney is simply regarded as a “modified blood vessel” and thus, traditional risk factors will affect both systems. Consistent with this, it is relatively easy to comprehend how patients with either sudden or gradual cardiac and or vascular compromise have changes in both renal hemodynamic and regulatory systems. However, patients with pure or primary renal dysfunction also have metabolic changes (e.g., oxidant stress, inflammation, nitric oxide, or endocrine changes) that affect the cardiovascular system. Thus, cardiovascular and renal systems are intimately, bidirectionally and inextricably linked. Whilst we understand several of these links, some of the mechanisms for these connections remain incompletely explained. Animal models of cardiovascular and renal disease allow us to explore such mechanisms, and more importantly, potential therapeutic strategies. In this article, we review various experimental models used, and examine critically how representative they are of the human condition. PMID:26441970

  17. Megalin and cubilin in proximal tubule protein reabsorption: from experimental models to human disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Rikke; Christensen, Erik Ilsø; Birn, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Proximal tubule protein uptake is mediated by 2 receptors, megalin and cubilin. These receptors rescue a variety of filtered ligands, including biomarkers, essential vitamins, and hormones. Receptor gene knockout animal models have identified important functions of the receptors and have established their essential role in modulating urinary protein excretion. Rare genetic syndromes associated with dysfunction of these receptors have been identified and characterized, providing additional information on the importance of these receptors in humans. Using various disease models in combination with receptor gene knockout, the implications of receptor dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney injury have been explored and have pointed to potential new roles of these receptors. Based on data from animal models, this paper will review current knowledge on proximal tubule endocytic receptor function and regulation, and their role in renal development, protein reabsorption, albumin uptake, and normal renal physiology. These findings have implications for the pathophysiology and diagnosis of proteinuric renal diseases. We will examine the limitations of the different models and compare the findings to phenotypic observations in inherited human disorders associated with receptor dysfunction. Furthermore, evidence from receptor knockout mouse models as well as human observations suggesting a role of protein receptors for renal disease will be discussed in light of conditions such as chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and hypertension.

  18. X chromosome inactivation pattern in female carriers of X linked hypophosphataemic rickets.

    PubMed Central

    Orstavik, K H; Orstavik, R E; Halse, J; Knudtzon, J

    1996-01-01

    X linked hypophosphataemia (XLH) results from an abnormality of renal tubular phosphate reabsorption. The disorder is inherited as an X linked dominant trait and the gene has been mapped to Xp22.1-p22.2. A candidate gene (PEX) has recently been isolated. The most striking clinical features are growth retardation and skeletal abnormalities. As expected for X linked dominant disorders, females are less affected. However, such a gene dosage effect does not exist for renal phosphate reabsorption. Preferential X chromosome inactivation has been proposed as a possible explanation for this lack of gene dosage. We have examined the X inactivation pattern in peripheral blood cells from 12 females belonging to seven families with XLH using PCR analysis at the androgen receptor locus. The X inactivation pattern in these patients did not differ significantly from the pattern in 30 healthy females. The X inactivation pattern in peripheral blood cells does not necessarily reflect the X inactivation pattern in renal cells. However, the finding of a normal distribution of X inactivation in peripheral blood cells indicates that the similarity in the renal handling of phosphate in male and female patients is not related to a ubiquitous preferential X inactivation. Images PMID:8863165

  19. NEK8 Links the ATR-regulated Replication Stress Response and S-phase CDK Activity to Renal Ciliopathies

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Lin, Jia-Ren; Vannier, Jean-Baptiste; Slaats, Gisela G.; Kile, Andrew C.; Paulsen, Renee D.; Manning, Danielle K.; Beier, David R.; Giles, Rachel H.; Boulton, Simon J.; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Renal ciliopathies are a leading cause of kidney failure, but their exact etiology is poorly understood. NEK8/NPHP9 is a ciliary kinase associated with two renal ciliopathies in humans and mice, nephronophthisis (NPHP) and polycystic kidney disease. Here, we identify NEK8 as a key effector of the ATR-mediated replication stress response. Cells lacking NEK8 form spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) which further accumulate when replication forks stall, and they exhibit reduced fork rates, unscheduled origin firing, and increased replication fork collapse. NEK8 suppresses DSB formation by limiting cyclin A-associated CDK activity. Strikingly, a mutation in NEK8 that is associated with renal ciliopathies affects its genome maintenance functions. Moreover, kidneys of NEK8 mutant mice accumulate DNA damage, and loss of NEK8 or replication stress similarly disrupts renal cell architecture in a 3D-culture system. Thus, NEK8 is a critical component of the DNA damage response that links replication stress with cystic kidney disorders. PMID:23973373

  20. NEK8 links the ATR-regulated replication stress response and S phase CDK activity to renal ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Lin, Jia-Ren; Vannier, Jean-Baptiste; Slaats, Gisela G; Kile, Andrew C; Paulsen, Renee D; Manning, Danielle K; Beier, David R; Giles, Rachel H; Boulton, Simon J; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2013-08-22

    Renal ciliopathies are a leading cause of kidney failure, but their exact etiology is poorly understood. NEK8/NPHP9 is a ciliary kinase associated with two renal ciliopathies in humans and mice, nephronophthisis (NPHP) and polycystic kidney disease. Here, we identify NEK8 as a key effector of the ATR-mediated replication stress response. Cells lacking NEK8 form spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that further accumulate when replication forks stall, and they exhibit reduced fork rates, unscheduled origin firing, and increased replication fork collapse. NEK8 suppresses DSB formation by limiting cyclin A-associated CDK activity. Strikingly, a mutation in NEK8 that is associated with renal ciliopathies affects its genome maintenance functions. Moreover, kidneys of NEK8 mutant mice accumulate DNA damage, and loss of NEK8 or replication stress similarly disrupts renal cell architecture in a 3D-culture system. Thus, NEK8 is a critical component of the DNA damage response that links replication stress with cystic kidney disorders.

  1. Renal Integrin-Linked Kinase Depletion Induces Kidney cGMP-Axis Upregulation: Consequences on Basal and Acutely Damaged Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Peñalver, José Luis; Griera, Mercedes; García-Jerez, Andrea; Hatem-Vaquero, Marco; Ruiz-Torres, María Piedad; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is activated by nitric oxide (NO) and produces cGMP, which activates cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKG) and is hydrolyzed by specific phosphodiesterases (PDE). The vasodilatory and cytoprotective capacity of cGMP-axis activation results in a therapeutic strategy for several pathologies. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a major scaffold protein between the extracellular matrix and intracellular signaling pathways, may modulate the expression and functionality of the cGMP-axis–related proteins. We introduce ILK as a novel modulator in renal homeostasis as well as a potential target for cisplatin (CIS)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) improvement. We used an adult mice model of depletion of ILK (cKD-ILK), which showed basal increase of sGC and PKG expressions and activities in renal cortex when compared with wildtype (WT) littermates. Twenty-four h activation of sGC activation with NO enhanced the filtration rate in cKD-ILK. During AKI, cKD-ILK maintained the cGMP-axis upregulation with consequent filtration rates enhancement and ameliorated CIS-dependent tubular epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and inflammation and markers. To emphasize the role of cGMP-axis upregulation due to ILK depletion, we modulated the cGMP axis under AKI in vivo and in renal cultured cells. A suboptimal dose of the PDE inhibitor ZAP enhanced the beneficial effects of the ILK depletion in AKI mice. On the other hand, CIS increased contractility-related events in cultured glomerular mesangial cells and necrosis rates in cultured tubular cells; ILK depletion protected the cells while sGC blockade with ODQ fully recovered the damage. PMID:26562149

  2. PGC1α-dependent NAD biosynthesis links oxidative metabolism to renal protection

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Mei T.; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K.; Berg, Anders H.; Khankin, Eliyahu V.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Kim, Wondong; Clish, Clary B.; Stillman, Isaac E.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Rhee, Eugene P.; Parikh, Samir M.

    2016-01-01

    The energetic burden of continuously concentrating solutes against gradients along the tubule may render the kidney especially vulnerable to ischemia. Indeed, acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 3% of all hospitalized patients.1,2 Here we show that the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator, PGC1α,3,4 is a pivotal determinant of renal recovery from injury by regulating NAD biosynthesis. Following renal ischemia, PGC1α−/− mice developed local deficiency of the NAD precursor niacinamide (Nam), marked fat accumulation, and failure to re-establish normal function. Remarkably, exogenous Nam improved local NAD levels, fat accumulation, and renal function in post-ischemic PGC1α−/− mice. Inducible tubular transgenic mice (iNephPGC1α) recapitulated the effects of Nam supplementation, including more local NAD and less fat accumulation with better renal function after ischemia. PGC1α coordinately upregulated the enzymes that synthesize NAD de novo from amino acids whereas PGC1α deficiency or AKI attenuated the de novo pathway. Nam enhanced NAD via the enzyme NAMPT and augmented production of the fat breakdown product beta-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB), leading to increased prostaglandin PGE2, a secreted autocoid that maintains renal function.5 Nam treatment reversed established ischemic AKI and also prevented AKI in an unrelated toxic model. Inhibition of β-OHB signaling or prostaglandins similarly abolished PGC1α-dependent renoprotection. Given the importance of mitochondrial health in aging and the function of metabolically active organs, the results implicate Nam and NAD as key effectors for achieving PGC1α-dependent stress resistance. PMID:26982719

  3. PGC1α drives NAD biosynthesis linking oxidative metabolism to renal protection.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mei T; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K; Berg, Anders H; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Bhasin, Manoj K; Kim, Wondong; Clish, Clary B; Stillman, Isaac E; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Rhee, Eugene P; Parikh, Samir M

    2016-03-24

    The energetic burden of continuously concentrating solutes against gradients along the tubule may render the kidney especially vulnerable to ischaemia. Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 3% of all hospitalized patients. Here we show that the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator, PGC1α, is a pivotal determinant of renal recovery from injury by regulating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis. Following renal ischaemia, Pgc1α(-/-) (also known as Ppargc1a(-/-)) mice develop local deficiency of the NAD precursor niacinamide (NAM, also known as nicotinamide), marked fat accumulation, and failure to re-establish normal function. Notably, exogenous NAM improves local NAD levels, fat accumulation, and renal function in post-ischaemic Pgc1α(-/-) mice. Inducible tubular transgenic mice (iNephPGC1α) recapitulate the effects of NAM supplementation, including more local NAD and less fat accumulation with better renal function after ischaemia. PGC1α coordinately upregulates the enzymes that synthesize NAD de novo from amino acids whereas PGC1α deficiency or AKI attenuates the de novo pathway. NAM enhances NAD via the enzyme NAMPT and augments production of the fat breakdown product β-hydroxybutyrate, leading to increased production of prostaglandin PGE2 (ref. 5), a secreted autacoid that maintains renal function. NAM treatment reverses established ischaemic AKI and also prevented AKI in an unrelated toxic model. Inhibition of β-hydroxybutyrate signalling or prostaglandin production similarly abolishes PGC1α-dependent renoprotection. Given the importance of mitochondrial health in ageing and the function of metabolically active organs, the results implicate NAM and NAD as key effectors for achieving PGC1α-dependent stress resistance.

  4. Hypouricaemia and hyperuricosuria in familial renal glucosuria

    PubMed Central

    Aires, Inês; Santos, Ana Rita; Pratas, Jorge; Nolasco, Fernando; Calado, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Familial renal glucosuria is a rare co-dominantly inherited benign phenotype characterized by the presence of glucose in the urine. It is caused by mutations in the SLC5A2 gene that encodes SGLT2, the Na+-glucose cotransporter responsible for the reabsorption of the bulk of glucose in the proximal tubule. We report a case of FRG displaying both severe glucosuria and renal hypouricaemia. We hypothesize that glucosuria can disrupt urate reabsorption in the proximal tubule, directly causing hyperuricosuria. PMID:26064518

  5. Genetic loci associated with renal function measures and chronic kidney disease in children: the Pediatric Investigation for Genetic Factors Linked with Renal Progression Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, Matthias; Wong, Craig S.; Wühl, Elke; Epting, Daniel; Luo, Li; Hoppmann, Anselm; Doyon, Anke; Li, Yong; Sözeri, Betül; Thurn, Daniela; Helmstädter, Martin; Huber, Tobias B.; Blydt-Hansen, Tom D.; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Mehls, Otto; Melk, Anette; Querfeld, Uwe; Furth, Susan L.; Warady, Bradley A.; Schaefer, Franz; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children is characterized by rapid progression and a high incidence of end-stage renal disease and therefore constitutes an important health problem. While unbiased genetic screens have identified common risk variants influencing renal function and CKD in adults, the presence and identity of such variants in pediatric CKD are unknown. Methods The international Pediatric Investigation for Genetic Factors Linked with Renal Progression (PediGFR) Consortium comprises three pediatric CKD cohorts: Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD), Effect of Strict Blood Pressure Control and ACE Inhibition on the Progression of CRF in Pediatric Patients (ESCAPE) and Cardiovascular Comorbidity in Children with CKD (4C). Clean genotype data from >10 million genotyped or imputed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were available for 1136 patients with measurements of serum creatinine at study enrolment. Genome-wide association studies were conducted to relate the SNPs to creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcrea) and proteinuria (urinary albumin- or protein-to-creatinine ratio ≥300 and ≥500 mg/g, respectively). In addition, European-ancestry PediGFR patients (cases) were compared with 1347 European-ancestry children without kidney disease (controls) to identify genetic variants associated with the presence of CKD. Results SNPs with suggestive association P-values <1×10−5 were identified in 10 regions for eGFRcrea, four regions for proteinuria and six regions for CKD including some plausible biological candidates. No SNP was associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5×10−8). Investigation of the candidate genes for proteinuria in adults from the general population provided support for a region on chromosome 15 near RSL24D1/UNC13C/RAB27A. Conversely, targeted investigation of genes harboring GFR-associated variants in adults from the general population did not reveal significantly associated SNPs in

  6. The innervation of the kidney in renal injury and inflammation: A cause and consequence of deranged cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Mohammed H; Johns, Edward J

    2017-02-09

    Extensive investigations have revealed that renal sympathetic nerves regulate renin secretion, tubular fluid reabsorption and renal haemodynamics which can impact on cardiovascular homoeostasis normally and in pathophysiological states. The significance of the renal afferent innervation and its role in determining the autonomic control of the cardiovascular system is uncertain. The transduction pathways at the renal afferent nerves have been shown to require pro-inflammatory mediators and TRPV1 channels. Reno-renal reflexes have been described, both inhibitory and excitatory, demonstrating that a neural link exists between kidneys and may determine the distribution of excretory and haemodynamic function between the two kidneys. The impact of renal afferent nerve activity on basal and reflex regulation of global sympathetic drive remains opaque. There is clinical and experimental evidence that in states of chronic kidney disease and renal injury there is infiltration of T-helper cells with a sympatho-excitation and blunting of the high and low pressure baroreceptor reflexes regulating renal sympathetic nerve activity. The baroreceptor deficits are renal nerve-dependent as the dysregulation can be relieved by renal denervation. There is also experimental evidence that in obese states there is a sympatho-excitation and disrupted baroreflex regulation of renal sympathetic nerve activity which is mediated by the renal innervation. This body of information provides an important basis for directing greater attention to the role of renal injury/inflammation causing an inappropriate activation of the renal afferent nerves as an important initiator of aberrant autonomic cardiovascular control. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Renal conservation of ketone bodies during starvation.

    PubMed

    Sapir, D G; Owen, O E

    1975-01-01

    Renal handling of acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate was studied in 12 obese subjects undergoing total starvation. Simultaneously, the acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and inulin clearance rates were measured, and acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate reabsorption rates were calculated. Renal clearance of blood acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate remained constant. In contrast, acetoacetate reabsorption rate increased significantly from 47 plus or minus 10 mumoles/min on day 3 to 106 plus or minus 15, 89 plus or minus 10, and 96 plus or minus 10 mumoles/min on days 10, 17, and 24, respectively. Similarly, beta-hydroxybutyrate reabsorption rate increased significantly from 154 plus or minus 27 mumoles/min on day 3 to 419 plus or minus 53, 399 plus or minus 25, and 436 plus or minus 53 mumoles/min on days 10, 17, and 24, respectively. Both acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate reabsorption rates increased linearly when plotted against their filtered loads. Thus, no tubular maximal transport rate exists for acetoacetate or beta-hydroxybutyrate during physiologic ketonemia. Conservation 450-500 mmoles of ketone bodies/day prevents large urinary losses of cations during prolonged starvation. Since ammonium becomes the major cation excreted during prolonged fasting, the increased renal reabsorption of ketone bodies minimizes body protein loss and aids in maintaining high circulating acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations.

  8. Metabolic alkalosis in the rat. Evidence that reduced glomerular filtration rather than enhanced tubular bicarbonate reabsorption is responsible for maintaining the alkalotic state.

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, M G; Liu, F Y

    1983-01-01

    Maintenance of chronic metabolic alkalosis might occur by a reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) without increased bicarbonate reabsorption or, alternatively, by augmentation of bicarbonate reabsorption with a normal GFR. To differentiate these possibilities, free-flow micropuncture was performed in alkalotic Munich-Wistar rats with a glomerular ultrafiltrate total CO2 concentration of 46.5 +/- 0.9 mM (vs. 27.7 +/- 0.9 mM in controls). Alkalotic animals had a markedly reduced single nephron GFR compared with controls (27.4 +/- 1.5 vs. 51.6 +/- 1.6 nl/min) and consequently unchanged filtered load of bicarbonate. Absolute proximal bicarbonate reabsorption in alkalotic animals was similar to controls (981 +/- 49 vs. 1,081 +/- 57 pmol/min), despite a higher luminal bicarbonate concentration, contracted extracellular volume, and potassium depletion. When single nephron GFR during alkalosis was increased toward normal by isohydric volume expansion or in another group by isotonic bicarbonate loading, absolute proximal bicarbonate reabsorption was not substantially augmented and bicarbonaturia developed. To confirm that a fall in GFR occurs during metabolic alkalosis, additional clearance studies were performed. Awake rats were studied before and after induction of metabolic alkalosis associated with varying amounts of potassium and chloride depletion. In all cases, the rise in blood bicarbonate concentration was inversely proportional to a reduction in GFR; filtered bicarbonate load remained normal. In conclusion, a reduction in GFR is proposed as being critical for maintaining chronic metabolic alkalosis in the rat. Constancy of the filtered bicarbonate load allows normal rates of renal bicarbonate reabsorption to maintain the alkalotic state. Images PMID:6853706

  9. Job stress strengthens the link between metabolic risk factors and renal dysfunction in adult men.

    PubMed

    Tsurugano, Shinobu; Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Takeuchi, Takeaki; Nomura, Kyoko; Yano, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The metabolic risk factors obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia are closely associated with renal dysfunction. As psychosocial stress affects these risk factors, here, we examined relationships between metabolic risk factors and renal function, and their association with job stress. The participants were 1,231 Japanese male office workers attending annual health examinations. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was determined using the equation recommended by the Japanese Society for Nephrology: eGFR (mL/min/1.73 m(2)) = 194 × age(-0.287) × Cr(-1.094). Job stress was measured using the Job Content Questionnaire based on the job demand-control model. The job strain index equaled the job demand scores divided by the job control scores. The participants were classified into four ordinal groups of job strain index, based on previous studies (i.e., ≤ 0.4 the lowest, 0.4-0.5 lower, 0.5-0.6 higher, or ≥ 0.6 the highest). A significant correlation was found between lowered eGFR and each of the metabolic risk factors waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol (p < 0.001). Furthermore, job stress had an interactive effect on the relationships between eGFR and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and triglycerides, depending on the job strain index (highest vs. lowest) (p < 0.05). The highly stressed workers exhibited a close association of eGFR with metabolic risk factors like hypertension and dyslipidemia. Therefore, intensive management may be important for preventing the progression of renal dysfunction and cardiovascular complications in those experiencing stress.

  10. Acetazolamide serves as selective delivery vehicle for dipeptide-linked drugs to renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cazzamalli, Samuele; Dal Corso, Alberto; Neri, Dario

    2016-01-01

    In most cases, cytotoxic drugs do not preferentially accumulate at the tumor site, causing unwanted toxicities and preventing dose escalation to therapeutically active regimens. Here, we show that acetazolamide derivatives, which bind to carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) on the surface of kidney cancer cells, selectively deliver payloads at the site of disease, sparing normal organs. Biodistribution studies, performed in tumor-bearing mice with acetazolamide derivatives bearing a technetium-99m chelator complex or a red fluorophore as payload, revealed a preferential tumor accumulation of the compound at doses up to 560 nmol/Kg. The percentage of injected dose per gram in the tumor was dose-dependent and revealed optimal tumor:organ ratios at 140 nmol/Kg, with a tumor:blood ratio of 80:1 at 6 h. Acetazolamide, coupled to potent cytotoxic drugs via a dipeptide linker, exhibited a potent antitumor activity in nude mice bearing SKRC-52 renal cell carcinomas, while drug derivatives devoid of the acetazolamide moiety did not exhibit any detectable anticancer activity at the same doses. The observation of tumor regression with a noninternalizing ligand and with different cytotoxic moieties (MMAE and PNU-159682) indicates a general mechanism of action, based on the selective accumulation of the product on tumor cells, followed by the extracellular proteolytic release of the cytotoxic payload at the neoplastic site and the subsequent drug internalization into tumor cells. Acetazolamide-based drug conjugates may represent a promising class of targeted agents for the treatment of metastatic kidney cancer, as the majority of human clear cell renal cell carcinomas are strongly positive for CAIX. PMID:27609641

  11. Increased Milk Protein Concentration in a Rehydration Drink Enhances Fluid Retention Caused by Water Reabsorption in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Saito, Yuri; Ashida, Kinya; Yamaji, Taketo; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Oda, Munehiro

    2015-01-01

    A fluid-retention effect is required for beverages that are designed to prevent dehydration. That is, fluid absorbed from the intestines should not be excreted quickly; long-term retention is desirable. Here, we focused on the effect of milk protein on fluid retention, and propose a new effective oral rehydration method that can be used daily for preventing dehydration. We first evaluated the effects of different concentrations of milk protein on fluid retention by measuring the urinary volumes of rats fed fluid containing milk protein at concentrations of 1, 5, and 10%. We next compared the fluid-retention effect of milk protein-enriched drink (MPD) with those of distilled water (DW) and a sports drink (SD) by the same method. Third, to investigate the mechanism of fluid retention, we measured plasma insulin changes in rats after ingesting these three drinks. We found that the addition of milk protein at 5 or 10% reduced urinary volume in a dose-dependent manner. Ingestion of the MPD containing 4.6% milk protein resulted in lower urinary volumes than DW and SD. MPD also showed a higher water reabsorption rate in the kidneys and higher concentrations of plasma insulin than DW and SD. These results suggest that increasing milk protein concentration in a beverage enhances fluid retention, which may allow the possibility to develop rehydration beverages that are more effective than SDs. In addition, insulin-modifying renal water reabsorption may contribute to the fluid-retention effect of MPD.

  12. Cross-linked gelatin microspheres with continuously tunable degradation profiles for renal tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Serban, Monica A; Knight, Toyin; Payne, Richard G; Basu, Joydeep; Rivera, Elias A; Robbins, Neil; McCoy, Darell; Halberstadt, Craig; Jain, Deepak; Bertram, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Collagen and gelatin-based biomaterials are widely used in tissue engineering applications. Various methods have been reported for the cross-linking of these macromolecules for the purpose of delaying their biodegradation to prolong their in vivo residence (in tissue engineering applications) or tailoring their drug releasing capacity (when used as drug carriers). In this study, a carbodiimide-based cross-linking method, also used in the production of United States Food and Drug Administration-approved products, was employed to obtain differentially cross-linked gelatin beads. The colorimetric determination of the in vitro enzymatic susceptibility of the beads indicated that the resistance to degradation linearly correlated with the concentration of carbodiimide used for the cross-linking reaction. This result was also confirmed in vivo by the histological evaluation of the residence time of orthotopically injected cell-seeded beads. These data would indicate that the production of gelatin-based microbeads with tunable degradation profiles might be applicable toward the development of products that catalyze regeneration of kidney and other solid organs.

  13. Free-flow reabsorption of glucose, sodium, osmoles and water in rat proximal convoluted tubule.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, J H; Green, R; Thomas, S

    1979-01-01

    1. Reabsorption of glucose, sodium, total solute (osmoles) and water in the rat proximal tubule (pars convoluta) were studied by free-flow micropuncture at normal (saline-infused), suppressed (saline with phlorizin) and elevated (glucose infusion) glucose reabsorption rates. 2. Phlorizin completely inhibited net glucose reabsorption, approximately halved reabsorption of sodium, total solutes and water, and reduced single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR). 3. In saline and glucose-infused groups, there were no significant differences between SNGFR nor between reabsorptions (fractional and absolute) of either sodium, total solute or water, which were uniformly distributed along segments assessible to micropuncture. 4. Glucose reabsorptive capacity existed along the entire pars convoluta, with highest reabsorptive rates in convolutions closest to the glomerulus (in saline-infused rats, 90% fractional reabsorption at 2 mm, over 95% at end pars convoluta; in glucose-infused rats, 55 and 90%, respectively). 5. In saline and glucose infused rats, a significant correlation existed between net glucose and sodium reabsorption, but the regression slopes differed and correlations became non-significant when the reabsorptive fluxes were factored by SNGFR. 6. For all groups, the majority of tubular fluid (TF) concentrations of osmoles and sodium were lower than those in plasma (over-all mean TFosm)Posm = 0.973 +/- 0.004, P less than 0.001; TFNa /PNa = 0.964 +/- 0.005, P less than 0.001). 7. Correspondingly, calculated osmolal and sodium concentrations in the reabsorbate were greater than those in plasma, and were significantly correlated with distance to puncture site with maximal values in the most proximal convolutions (for osmolality, approximately +79 m-osmole kg-1 water at 1 mm). PMID:469722

  14. Role of the renal sympathetic nerves in renal sodium/potassium handling and renal damage in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianling; He, Qiaoling; Wu, Weifeng; Li, Qingjie; Huang, Rongjie; Pan, Xiaofeng; Lai, Wenying

    2016-01-01

    Renal sympathetic nerve activity has an important role in renal disease-associated hypertension and in the modulation of fluid homeostasis. In the present study, changes in renal function and renal sodium/potassium handling were investigated in groups of 12-week-old male, spontaneously hypertensive rats with renal denervation (RDNX group) or sham denervation (sham group). The RDNX group excreted significantly more sodium than the sham group during the 2-week observation period (P<0.05). Following bilateral renal denervation, the fractional lithium excretion was elevated in the RDNX group compared with the sham group, but no significant effect was observed of renal denervation on the fractional distal reabsorption rate of sodium or the fractional excretion of potassium. Furthermore, the glomerular injury score and the wall-to-lumen ratio of the interlobular artery were significantly lower in the RDNX group than in the sham group (P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study indicates an involvement of the renal sympathetic nerves in the regulation of renal tubular sodium reabsorption in spontaneously hypertensive rats and in the renal damage associated with hypertension. PMID:27698757

  15. Accelerated ageing and renal dysfunction links lower socioeconomic status and dietary phosphate intake

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Ruth; Christensen, Kelly; Mohammed, Suhaib; McGuinness, Dagmara; Cooney, Josephine; Bakshi, Andisheh; Demou, Evangelia; MacDonald, Ewan; Caslake, Muriel; Stenvinkel, Peter; Shiels, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Background We have sought to explore the impact of dietary Pi intake on human age related health in the pSoBid cohort (n=666) to explain the disparity between health and deprivation status in this cohort. As hyperphosphataemia is a driver of accelerated ageing in rodent models of progeria we tested whether variation in Pi levels in man associate with measures of biological ageing and health. Results We observed significant relationships between serum Pi levels and markers of biological age (telomere length (p=0.040) and DNA methylation content (p=0.028), gender and chronological age (p=0.032). When analyses were adjusted for socio-economic status and nutritional factors, associations were observed between accelerated biological ageing (telomere length, genomic methylation content) and dietary derived Pi levels among the most deprived males, directly related to the frequency of red meat consumption. Conclusions Accelerated ageing is associated with high serum Pi levels and frequency of red meat consumption. Our data provide evidence for a mechanistic link between high intake of Pi and age-related morbidities tied to socio-economic status. PMID:27132985

  16. Limited Link between Oxidative Stress and Ochratoxin A—Induced Renal Injury in an Acute Toxicity Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liye; Yu, Tao; Qi, Xiaozhe; Gao, Jing; Huang, Kunlun; He, Xiaoyun; Luo, Haoshu; Xu, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) displays nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. However, in the acute toxicity rat model, there is no evidence on the relationship between OTA and nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. Based on this, the integrated analysis of physiological status, damage biomarkers, oxidative stress, and DNA damage were performed. After OTA treatment, the body weight decreased and AST, ALP, TP, and BUN levels in serum increased. Hydropic degeneration, swelling, vacuolization, and partial drop occurred in proximal tubule epithelial cells. PCNA and Kim-1 were dose-dependently increased in the kidney, but Cox-2 expression and proliferation were not found in the liver. In OTA-treated kidneys, the mRNA expressions of Kim-1, Cox-2, Lcn2, and Clu were dose-dependently increased. The mRNA expressions of Vim and Cox-2 were decreased in OTA-treated livers. Some oxidative stress indicators were altered in the kidneys (ROS and SOD) and livers (SOD and GSH). DNA damage and oxidative DNA damage were not found. In conclusion, there is a limited link between oxidative stress and OTA-induced renal injury in an acute toxicity rat model. PMID:27983637

  17. Zero-reabsorption doped-nanocrystal luminescent solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Christian S; Bradshaw, Liam R; McDowall, Stephen; Gilbertson, John D; Gamelin, Daniel R; Patrick, David L

    2014-04-22

    Optical concentration can lower the cost of solar energy conversion by reducing photovoltaic cell area and increasing photovoltaic efficiency. Luminescent solar concentrators offer an attractive approach to combined spectral and spatial concentration of both specular and diffuse light without tracking, but they have been plagued by luminophore self-absorption losses when employed on practical size scales. Here, we introduce doped semiconductor nanocrystals as a new class of phosphors for use in luminescent solar concentrators. In proof-of-concept experiments, visibly transparent, ultraviolet-selective luminescent solar concentrators have been prepared using colloidal Mn(2+)-doped ZnSe nanocrystals that show no luminescence reabsorption. Optical quantum efficiencies of 37% are measured, yielding a maximum projected energy concentration of ∼6× and flux gain for a-Si photovoltaics of 15.6 in the large-area limit, for the first time bounded not by luminophore self-absorption but by the transparency of the waveguide itself. Future directions in the use of colloidal doped nanocrystals as robust, processable spectrum-shifting phosphors for luminescent solar concentration on the large scales required for practical application of this technology are discussed.

  18. Observations on the mechanism and location of ascites reabsorption in man

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, W.G. Jr.; Ibarra, F.

    1987-04-01

    Animal data indicate that ascites is reabsorbed by a lymphatic mechanism and that these vessels are subdiaphragmatic in location. We evaluated the relative role of lymphatics in ascites reabsorption in man by comparing the ascites clearance and plasma appearance rates of intraperitoneally injected radiolabeled albumin to those of intraperitoneally injected labeled autologous red blood cells, which require, owing to their large size, lymphatic removal, in patients with cirrhosis and ascites. To evaluate the location of reabsorption, we repeated these measurements after replacing ascites in the subdiaphragmatic region with 500-1000 ml of intraperitoneally injected air, reasoning that this maneuver should slow or eliminate ascites reabsorption occurring at this site. We found that the transfer rates of albumin and red cells out of ascites were similar and that creation of pneumoperitoneum did not influence these rates. These data confirm that ascites protein reabsorption occurs via a lymphatic mechanism in man. They suggest, however, that these vessels may not be subdiaphragmatic in location.

  19. Methylene blue solder re-absorption in microvascular anastomoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Jeremy F.; Hepplewhite, J.; Frier, Malcolm; Bell, Peter R. F.

    2003-06-01

    Soldered vascular anastomoses have been reported using several chromophores but little is known of the optimal conditions for microvascular anastomosis. There are some indications of the optimal protein contents of a solder, and the effects of methylene blue on anastomotic strength. The effects of varying laser power density in vivo have also been described, showing a high rate of thrombosis with laser power over 22.9Wcm-2. However no evidence exists to describe how long the solder remains at the site of the anastomosis. Oz et al reported that the fibrin used in their study had been almost completely removed by 90 days but without objective evidence of solder removal. In order to address the issue of solder re-absorption from the site of an anastomosis we used radio-labelled albumin (I-125) incorporated into methylene blue based solder. This was investigated in both the situation of the patent and thrombosed anastomosis with anastomoses formed at high and low power. Iodine-125 (half life: 60.2 days) was covalently bonded to porcine albumin and mixed with the solder solution. Radio-iodine has been used over many years to determine protein turnover using either I-125 or I-131. Iodine-125 labelled human albumin is regularly used as a radiopharmaceutical tool for the determination of plasma volume. Radio-iodine has the advantages of not affecting protein metabolism and the label is rapidly excreted after metabolic breakdown. Labelling with chromium (Cr-51) causes protein denaturation and is lost from the protein with time. Labelled albumin has been reported in human studies over a 21-day period, with similar results reported by Matthews. Most significantly McFarlane reported a different rate of catabolism of I-131 and I-125 over a 22-day period. The conclusion from this is that the rate of iodine clearance is a good indicator of protein catabolism. In parallel with the surgery a series of blank standards were prepared with a known mass of solder to correct for isotope

  20. Water reabsorption capacity of the proximal convoluted tubule: a microperfusion study on rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Corman, B; Roinel, N; De Rouffignac, C

    1981-01-01

    1. The differences in the water reabsorption capacity observed from one proximal tubule to another were investigated in vivo by continuous microperfusion. 2. Two to seven loops were punctured along the same tubule. The [3H]inulin, 22Na, [14C]glucose, sodium, chloride and magnesium concentrations as well as the osmolality of the collected samples were studied as a function of the perfused length. 3. With Ringer bicarbonate solution perfused in Saclay Wistar rats, the water reabsorption capacity ranged from 0 to 3 nl . min-1 . mm-1 depending on the tubule. This reabsorption rate was closely correlated with the unidirectional reabsorption flux of sodium, and with the rise in tubular chloride and magnesium concentrations. 4. In Munich Wistar rats with glomeruli accessible at the kidney surface, tubule perfusion with a Ringer bicarbonate solution showed that the highest water reabsorption rates per mm of tubule were found for the perfusion sites closest to the glomerulus; water fluxes were also positively correlated with glucose transport. 5. In a second series of experiments on Saclay rats, perfusion of a Ringer solution containing a high chloride concentration (137 m-equiv/l.) was unable to increase the water reabsorption rate compared to the control perfusion; here again, water fluxes were positively correlated with glucose transport. PMID:7320874

  1. Role of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor α in control of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)-mediated sodium reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Tengis S; Levchenko, Vladislav; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2014-10-10

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron where it performs sodium reabsorption from the lumen. We have recently shown that ENaC activity contributes to the development of salt-induced hypertension as a result of deficiency of EGF level. Previous studies revealed that Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor α (RhoGDIα) is involved in the control of salt-sensitive hypertension and renal injury via Rac1, which is one of the small GTPases activating ENaC. Here we investigated the intracellular mechanism mediating the involvement of the RhoGDIα/Rac1 axis in the control of ENaC and the effect of EGF on ENaC in this pathway. We demonstrated that RhoGDIα is highly expressed in the cortical collecting ducts of mice and rats, and its expression is down-regulated in Dahl salt-sensitive rats fed a high salt diet. Knockdown of RhoGDIα in cultured cortical collecting duct principal cells increased ENaC subunits expression and ENaC-mediated sodium reabsorption. Furthermore, RhoGDIα deficiency causes enhanced response to EGF treatment. Patch clamp analysis reveals that RhoGDIα significantly decreases ENaC current density and prevents its up-regulation by RhoA and Rac1. Inhibition of Rho kinase with Y27632 had no effects on ENaC response to EGF either in control or RhoGDIα knocked down cells. However, EGF treatment increased levels of active Rac1, which was further enhanced in RhoGDIα-deficient cells. We conclude that changes in the RhoGDIα-dependent pathway have a permissive role in the Rac1-mediated enhancement of ENaC activity observed in salt-induced hypertension.

  2. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    Renal angiogram; Angiography - kidney; Renal angiography; Renal artery stenosis - arteriography ... an artery by a blood clot Renal artery stenosis Renal cell cancer Angiomyolipomas (noncancerous tumors of the ...

  3. Reabsorption of ascites and the factors that affect this process in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Akay, Sinan; Ozutemiz, Omer; Kilic, Murat; Karasu, Zeki; Akyildiz, Murat; Karasulu, Ercument; Baka, Meral; Doganavsargil, Basak; Ersoz, Galip; Ulukaya, Sezgin; Alper, Isik; Ates, Utku; Batur, Yucel

    2008-10-01

    Ascites is one of the main features of liver decompensation in cirrhosis, and it is considered to be a dynamic process. In this study, we aimed to (1) measure the reabsorption rate of ascites; (2) evaluate whether these findings were related to features of ascites, hemodynamics, and serum measurements; and (3) examine morphologic changes in the diaphragm of cirrhotic patients. In all, 42 cirrhotic patients with ascites were enrolled in the study to comprise our study group. Using the dextran 70 test, patient ascites volumes and reabsorption rates were measured. Biopsies from the peritoneal side of the diaphragm were also processed for scanning electron microscopy and lymphatic immunohistochemical studies from the cirrhotic patients and control cadavers. The mean ascites reabsorption rate was 4.5 +/- 4.5 (0.18-14.6) mL/min, which correlated significantly with the calculated ascites volume (r = 0.75, P < 0.001). The mean ascites viscosity was 1.07 +/- 0.07 (0.99-1.17) centipoise, which demonstrated a high degree of negative correlation with the ascites reabsorption rate (r = -0.77, P < 0.001). Patients with a history of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis had significantly lesser ascites reabsorption rates than patients without this particular history. The size of lymphatic stomata in scanning electron microscopy depictions was increased, and lymphatic lacunae were dilated in immunohistochemical studies in the cirrhotic patients with ascites. However, these findings were not uniform in every cirrhotic patient with ascites. The volume and viscosity of ascites seem to influence its reabsorption rate. Additionally, previous episodes of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis may be responsible for the decreased ascites reabsorption rates observed in certain patient populations.

  4. Acute effects of ethanol on renal folate clearance in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenga, B.H.; McMartin, K.E.

    1986-03-05

    Studies of the renal clearance of folic acid in primates demonstrate net reabsorption of folate by a saturable system. The acute administration of ethanol to rats causes a significant increase in urinary folate excretion. The mechanism for this effect is unknown and thus the effect of acute administration of ethanol on the renal absorption and urinary clearance of folate was studied in rats. Folic acid was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats via continuous intravenous infusion in doses ranging from 3-75 micromoles/kg and renal clearance relative to inulin was determined. The effects of various dose levels of ethanol on these parameters were then determined. At a dose of 15 micromoles/kg, the renal clearance of folate relative to that of inulin was about 0.65 mg/min. At a plasma ethanol level about 100 mg/dl, the renal clearance of folate was not markedly altered. These results suggests that there is net reabsorption of folate in the rat kidney and that moderate doses of ethanol have little effect on renal effect on renal folate reabsorption.

  5. Osteomalacia associated with increased renal tubular resorption of phosphate (hypohyperparathyroidism)

    PubMed Central

    Kanis, J. A.; Walton, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl, who presented with joint pains, was found to have hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphataemia due to increased renal tubular reabsorption, increased serum alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteomalacia. These features, which resemble those found in so-called hypohyperparathyroidism, were all rapidly reversed by small doses of cholecalciferol. PMID:183195

  6. A model considering light reabsorption processes to correct in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence spectra in apples.

    PubMed

    Ramos, María E; Lagorio, María G

    2006-05-01

    Chlorophyll-a contained in the peel of Granny Smith apples emits fluorescence upon excitation with blue light. The observed emission, collected by an external detector and corrected by its spectral response, is still distorted by light reabsorption processes taking place in the fruit skin and differs appreciably from the true spectral distribution of fluorescence emerging from chlorophyll molecules in the biological tissue. Reabsorption processes particularly affect the ratio of fluorescence intensities at 680 nm and at 730 nm. A model to obtain the correct spectral distribution of the emission, from the experimental fluorescence recorded at a fluorometer detector and corrected for the detector spectral sensitivity, is developed in the present work. Measurements of the whole fruit reflectance, the peel transmittance and the flesh reflectance allow the calculation of the reabsorption-corrected spectra. The model is validated by comparing the corrected emission spectra with that obtained for a thin layer of apple-peel-chloroplasts, where no reabsorption takes place. It is recommended to correct distortions in emission spectra of intact fruits due to light reabsorption effects whenever a correlation between the physiological state of the fruit and its fluorescence spectra is investigated.

  7. The renal effects of SGLT2 inhibitors and a mini-review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Andrianesis, Vasileios; Glykofridi, Spyridoula; Doupis, John

    2016-12-01

    Sodium-glucose linked transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new and promising class of antidiabetic agents which target renal tubular glucose reabsorption. Their action is based on the blockage of SGLT2 sodium-glucose cotransporters that are located at the luminal membrane of tubular cells of the proximal convoluted tubule, inducing glucosuria. It has been proven that they significantly reduce glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), along with fasting and postprandial plasma glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The glucosuria-induced caloric loss as well as the osmotic diuresis significantly decrease body weight and blood pressure, respectively. Given that SGLT2 inhibitors do not interfere with insulin action and secretion, their efficacy is sustained despite the progressive β-cell failure in T2DM. They are well tolerated, with a low risk of hypoglycemia. Their most frequent adverse events are minor: genital and urinal tract infections. Recently, it was demonstrated that empagliflozin presents a significant cardioprotective effect. Although the SGLT2 inhibitors' efficacy is affected by renal function, new data have been presented that some SGLT2 inhibitors, even in mild and moderate renal impairment, induce significant HbA1c reduction. Moreover, recent data indicate that SGLT2 inhibition has a beneficial renoprotective effect. The role of this review paper is to explore the current evidence on the renal effects of SGLT2 inhibitors.

  8. The renal effects of SGLT2 inhibitors and a mini-review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Andrianesis, Vasileios; Glykofridi, Spyridoula; Doupis, John

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-glucose linked transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new and promising class of antidiabetic agents which target renal tubular glucose reabsorption. Their action is based on the blockage of SGLT2 sodium-glucose cotransporters that are located at the luminal membrane of tubular cells of the proximal convoluted tubule, inducing glucosuria. It has been proven that they significantly reduce glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), along with fasting and postprandial plasma glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The glucosuria-induced caloric loss as well as the osmotic diuresis significantly decrease body weight and blood pressure, respectively. Given that SGLT2 inhibitors do not interfere with insulin action and secretion, their efficacy is sustained despite the progressive β-cell failure in T2DM. They are well tolerated, with a low risk of hypoglycemia. Their most frequent adverse events are minor: genital and urinal tract infections. Recently, it was demonstrated that empagliflozin presents a significant cardioprotective effect. Although the SGLT2 inhibitors’ efficacy is affected by renal function, new data have been presented that some SGLT2 inhibitors, even in mild and moderate renal impairment, induce significant HbA1c reduction. Moreover, recent data indicate that SGLT2 inhibition has a beneficial renoprotective effect. The role of this review paper is to explore the current evidence on the renal effects of SGLT2 inhibitors. PMID:28203358

  9. Fluorescence reabsorption calculation and influence on solid-state optical cooling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Chang, Shengli; Yang, Jiankun; Zhou, Mu; Cao, Dingxiang; Tan, Jichun

    2007-12-10

    The calculation model of fluorescence reabsorption and reemission with consideration of reflection on the boundary and material size using Monte Carlo method is proposed. To validate this stochastic model, experiments were conducted, and the calculated steady state spectra showed a good agreement with measurements. Using the absorption and fluorescence spectra of Yb-doped phosphate glass by careful measurements and corrections, we calculated the redshift in the observed fluorescence spectra and external quantum efficiency caused by fluorescence reabsorption and re-emission for the samples with the geometries of cylinder and cuboid. The calculation results show that the fluorescence reabsorption and re-emission have significant influence on the cooling efficiency. The calculation results also show that the cylinder with small waist beam incident (the incident light beam diameter is much less than the size of the sample, and goes through the center of the sample) is suitable for optical cooling.

  10. An in vivo microperfusion study of distal tubule bicarbonate reabsorption in normal and ammonium chloride rats.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, D Z

    1985-01-01

    For many years it has been thought that distal nephron hydrogen ion secretion can be importantly modulated by factors such as sodium delivery, sodium avidity, and potassium stores. Free flow micropuncture studies have also indicated that the rate of bicarbonate delivery may also alter the rate of bicarbonate reabsorption. The present studies were undertaken to examine possible luminal influences on total CO2 reabsorption in microperfused distal tubules in the rat in vivo. Tubules from normal and acidotic rats were perfused with five solutions in a manner that induced changes in bicarbonate load, sodium and potassium fluxes (JNa, JK), and luminal sulfate concentration. in each collected perfusate, simultaneous analyses were undertaken to determine water reabsorption, Na, and K concentrations using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy and total CO2 by microcalorimetry. Using factorial analysis of covariance to account for confounding effects on total CO2 flux (JtCO2) such as water reabsorption, distal tubules of acidotic rats reabsorbed CO2 in the range of 50-112 pmol X min-1 X mm-1 X These JtCO2 values were not significantly correlated with HCO3 load, JNa, or JK despite changes in the latter from net reabsorption to net secretion. Distal tubules of rats with normal acid-base status had JtCO2 values which were neither significantly different from zero nor correlated with changes in JK and JNa. Further, doubling the load from 250-500 pmol/min (by doubling the perfusion rate of 25-mM HCO3 solutions) did not stimulate JtCO2 in these normal animals. Accordingly, these acute in vivo microperfusion studies indicate for the first time that neither load nor potassium or sodium fluxes are important modulators of distal tubule bicarbonate reabsorption. PMID:2982915

  11. Occupational exposure to lead: effects on renal function

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, C.D.; Hanenson, I.B.; Lerner, S.; Hammond, P.B.; Pesce, A.J.; Pollak, V.E.

    1980-10-01

    Although nephrotoxicity is common following exposure to lead, the dose-response relationship in adults with occupational exposure is not well understood because information is lacking on early nephrotoxic effects. By the time serum urea nitrogen and creatinine levels are elevated, renal damage may be advanced and not fully reversible. Detailed investigations of renal glomerular and tubular function were performed in six adults with occupational exposure to lead. In all patients, the serum creatinine and urea nitrogen concentrations were within the normal range. GFR was decreased in all but two. Glucose reabsorptive capacity (TmG) was decreased in all, and this decrease was disproportionately greater than expected from the reduced GFR in all but one. Normal values for renal plasma flow (RFP) were observed in four of the six, and for rho-aminohippurate (PAH) secretory capacity (TmPAh) in all but one. Bicarbonate reabsorptive capacity (TmHCO3) and urinary excretion of beta2-microglobulin were normal in all. Routine clinical laboratory tests are insensitive for the detection of early renal effects of heavy metal exposure. Measurements of renal tubular reabsorptive capacity for glucose appears to be a sensitive method for the early detection of renal effect of lead.

  12. Relation between BK-α/β4-mediated potassium secretion and ENaC-mediated sodium reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Wen, Donghai; Cornelius, Ryan J; Rivero-Hernandez, Dianelys; Yuan, Yang; Li, Huaqing; Weinstein, Alan M; Sansom, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    The large-conductance, calcium-activated BK-α/β4 potassium channel, localized to the intercalated cells of the distal nephron, mediates potassium secretion during high-potassium, alkaline diets. Here we determine whether BK-α/β4-mediated potassium transport is dependent on epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)-mediated sodium reabsorption. We maximized sodium-potassium exchange in the distal nephron by feeding mice a low-sodium, high-potassium diet. Wild-type and BK-β4 knockout mice were maintained on a low-sodium, high-potassium, alkaline diet or a low-sodium, high-potassium, acidic diet for 7-10 days. Wild-type mice maintained potassium homeostasis on the alkaline, but not acid, diet. BK-β4 knockout mice could not maintain potassium homeostasis on either diet. During the last 12 h of diet, wild-type mice on either a regular, alkaline, or an acid diet, or knockout mice on an alkaline diet, were administered amiloride (an ENaC inhibitor). Amiloride enhanced sodium excretion in all wild-type and knockout groups to similar values; however, amiloride diminished potassium excretion by 59% in wild-type but only by 33% in knockout mice on an alkaline diet. Similarly, amiloride decreased the trans-tubular potassium gradient by 68% in wild-type but only by 42% in knockout mice on an alkaline diet. Amiloride treatment equally enhanced sodium excretion and diminished potassium secretion in knockout mice on an alkaline diet and wild-type mice on an acid diet. Thus, the enhanced effect of amiloride on potassium secretion in wild-type compared to knockout mice on the alkaline diet clarify a BK- α/β4-mediated potassium secretory pathway in intercalated cells driven by ENaC-mediated sodium reabsorption linked to bicarbonate secretion.

  13. Activation of purinergic receptors (P2) in the renal medulla promotes endothelin-dependent natriuresis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Eman Y; Speed, Joshua S; Kasztan, Malgorzata; Jin, Chunhua; Pollock, David M

    2016-08-01

    Renal endothelin-1 (ET-1) and purinergic signaling systems regulate Na(+) reabsorption in the renal medulla. A link between the renal ET-1 and purinergic systems was demonstrated in vitro, however, the in vivo interaction between these systems has not been defined. To test whether renal medullary activation of purinergic (P2) receptors promotes ET-dependent natriuresis, we determined the effect of increased medullary NaCl loading on Na(+) excretion and inner medullary ET-1 mRNA expression in anesthetized adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in the presence and absence of purinergic receptor antagonism. Isosmotic saline (NaCl; 284 mosmol/kgH2O) was infused into the medullary interstitium (500 μl/h) during a 30-min baseline urine collection period, followed by isosmotic or hyperosmotic saline (1,800 mosmol/kgH2O) for two further 30-min urine collection periods. Na(+) excretion was significantly increased during intramedullary infusion of hyperosmotic saline. Compared with isosmotic saline, hyperosmotic saline infused into the renal medulla caused significant increases in inner medullary ET-1 mRNA expression. Renal intramedullary infusion of the P2 receptor antagonist suramin inhibited the increase in Na(+) excretion and inner medullary ET-1 mRNA expression induced by NaCl loading in the renal medulla. Activation of medullary P2Y2/4 receptors by infusion of UTP increased urinary Na(+) excretion. Combined ETA and ETB receptor blockade abolished the natriuretic response to intramedullary infusion of UTP. These data demonstrate that activation of medullary P2 receptors promotes ET-dependent natriuresis in male rats, suggesting that the renal ET-1 and purinergic signaling systems interact to efficiently facilitate excretion of a NaCl load.

  14. Creatinine, urea, uric acid, water and electrolytes renal handling in the healthy oldest old

    PubMed Central

    Musso, Carlos Guido; Álvarez Gregori, Joaquín; Jauregui, José Ricardo; Macías Núñez, Juan Florencio

    2012-01-01

    Renal physiology in the healthy oldest old has the following characteristics, in comparison with the renal physiology in the young: a reduced creatinine clearance, tubular pattern of creatinine back-filtration, preserved proximal tubule sodium reabsorption and uric acid secretion, reduced sodium reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle, reduced free water clearance, increased urea excretion, presence of medulla hypotonicity, reduced urinary dilution and concentration capabilities, and finally a reduced collecting tubules response to furosemide which expresses a reduced potassium excretion in this segment due to a sort of aldosterone resistance. All physiological changes of the aged kidney are the same in both genders. PMID:24175249

  15. Effects of Reabsorption and Spatial Trap Distributions on the Radiative Quantum Efficiencies of ZnO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-06

    in (a)] due to reabsorption, and the probability f reflesc of photon escape due to Fresnel reflection [derived from Eq. (1) and a Kramers- Kronig ...according to Eq. (1) using an index of refraction n(h̄ω) derived from a Kramers- Kronig transformation of the estimated absorption spectrum in Fig. 3(a

  16. Morphological and functional characteristics of the kidney of cartilaginous fishes: with special reference to urea reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Susumu; Kakumura, Keigo; Takagi, Wataru; Hasegawa, Kumi; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2014-12-15

    For adaptation to high-salinity marine environments, cartilaginous fishes (sharks, skates, rays, and chimaeras) adopt a unique urea-based osmoregulation strategy. Their kidneys reabsorb nearly all filtered urea from the primary urine, and this is an essential component of urea retention in their body fluid. Anatomical investigations have revealed the extraordinarily elaborate nephron system in the kidney of cartilaginous fishes, e.g., the four-loop configuration of each nephron, the occurrence of distinct sinus and bundle zones, and the sac-like peritubular sheath in the bundle zone, in which the nephron segments are arranged in a countercurrent fashion. These anatomical and morphological characteristics have been considered to be important for urea reabsorption; however, a mechanism for urea reabsorption is still largely unknown. This review focuses on recent progress in the identification and mapping of various pumps, channels, and transporters on the nephron segments in the kidney of cartilaginous fishes. The molecules include urea transporters, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporters, and aquaporins, which most probably all contribute to the urea reabsorption process. Although research is still in progress, a possible model for urea reabsorption in the kidney of cartilaginous fishes is discussed based on the anatomical features of nephron segments and vascular systems and on the results of molecular mapping. The molecular anatomical approach thus provides a powerful tool for understanding the physiological processes that take place in the highly elaborate kidney of cartilaginous fishes.

  17. Mechanism of NaCl and water reabsorption in the proximal convoluted tubule of rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, K H; Rector, F C

    1976-01-01

    The role of chloride concentration gradients in proximal NaCl and water reabsorption was examined in superficial proximal tubules of the rat by using perfusion and collection techniques. Reabsorptive rates (Jv), chloride concentrations, and transtubular potential difference were measured during perfusion with solutions (A) simulating an ultrafiltrate of plasma; (B) similar to (A) except that 20 meq/liter bicarbonate was replaced with acetate; (C) resembling late proximal fluid (glucose, amino acid, acetate-free, low bicarbonate, and high chloride); and (D) in which glucose and amino acids were replaced with raffinose and bicarbonate was partially replaced by poorly reabsorbable anions (cyclamate,sulfate, and methyl sulfate). In tubules perfused with solutions A and B, Jv were 2.17 and 2.7 nl mm-1 min-1 and chloride concentrations were 131.5 +/- 3.1 and 135 +/- 395 meq/liter, respectively, indicating that reabsorption is qualitatively similar to free-flow conditions and that acetate adequately replaces bicarbonate. With solution C, Jv was 2.10 nl mm-1 min-1 and potential difference was +1.5 +/- 0.2 mV, indicating that the combined presence of glucose, alanine, acetate, and bicarbonate per se is not an absolute requirement. Fluid reabsorption was virtually abolished when tubules were perfused with D solutions; Jv was not significantly different from zero despite sodium and chloride concentrations similar to plasma; chloride concentration was 110.8 +/- 0.2 meq/liter and potential difference was -0.98 mV indicating that chloride was close to electrochemical equilibrium. These results suggest the importance of the chloride gradient to proximal tubule reabsorption in regions where actively reabsorbable solutes (glucose, alanine, acetate, and bicarbonate) are lacking and provide further evidence for a passive model of NaCl and water transport. PMID:993334

  18. FGF23 regulates renal sodium handling and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Andrukhova, Olena; Slavic, Svetlana; Smorodchenko, Alina; Zeitz, Ute; Shalhoub, Victoria; Lanske, Beate; Pohl, Elena E; Erben, Reinhold G

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) is a bone-derived hormone regulating renal phosphate reabsorption and vitamin D synthesis in renal proximal tubules. Here, we show that FGF23 directly regulates the membrane abundance of the Na+:Cl− co-transporter NCC in distal renal tubules by a signaling mechanism involving the FGF receptor/αKlotho complex, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1), and with-no lysine kinase-4 (WNK4). Renal sodium (Na+) reabsorption and distal tubular membrane expression of NCC are reduced in mouse models of Fgf23 and αKlotho deficiency. Conversely, gain of FGF23 function by injection of wild-type mice with recombinant FGF23 or by elevated circulating levels of endogenous Fgf23 in Hyp mice increases distal tubular Na+ uptake and membrane abundance of NCC, leading to volume expansion, hypertension, and heart hypertrophy in a αKlotho and dietary Na+-dependent fashion. The NCC inhibitor chlorothiazide abrogates FGF23-induced volume expansion and heart hypertrophy. Our findings suggest that FGF23 is a key regulator of renal Na+ reabsorption and plasma volume, and may explain the association of FGF23 with cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease patients. PMID:24797667

  19. Theoretical and experimental study on reabsorption effect and temperature characteristic of a quasi-three-level 946nm Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Wan, Yuan; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    The influence of temperature and incident pump power on reabsorption loss is theoretically discussed. Temperature characteristic and reabsorption loss rate of a diode-pumped quasi-three-level 946 nm Nd:YAG laser are investigated. Reabsorption effect has a significant impact on laser performance. The results indicate that reabsorption loss increases as the working temperature rises and decreases with the increased incident pump power.

  20. Acute SGLT inhibition normalizes O2 tension in the renal cortex but causes hypoxia in the renal medulla in anaesthetized control and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Julie; Fasching, Angelica; Pihl, Liselotte; Patinha, Daniela; Franzén, Stephanie; Palm, Fredrik

    2015-08-01

    Early stage diabetic nephropathy is characterized by glomerular hyperfiltration and reduced renal tissue Po2. Recent observations have indicated that increased tubular Na(+)-glucose linked transport (SGLT) plays a role in the development of diabetes-induced hyperfiltration. The aim of the present study was to determine how inhibition of SLGT impacts upon Po2 in the diabetic rat kidney. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin in Sprague-Dawley rats 2 wk before experimentation. Renal hemodynamics, excretory function, and renal O2 homeostasis were measured in anesthetized control and diabetic rats during baseline and after acute SGLT inhibition using phlorizin (200 mg/kg ip). Baseline arterial pressure was similar in both groups and unaffected by SGLT inhibition. Diabetic animals displayed reduced baseline Po2 in both the cortex and medulla. SGLT inhibition improved cortical Po2 in the diabetic kidney, whereas it reduced medullary Po2 in both groups. SGLT inhibition reduced Na(+) transport efficiency [tubular Na(+) transport (TNa)/renal O2 consumption (Qo2)] in the control kidney, whereas the already reduced TNa/Qo2 in the diabetic kidney was unaffected by SGLT inhibition. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that when SGLT is inhibited, renal cortex Po2 in the diabetic rat kidney is normalized, which implies that increased proximal tubule transport contributes to the development of hypoxia in the diabetic kidney. The reduction in medullary Po2 in both control and diabetic kidneys during the inhibition of proximal Na(+) reabsorption suggests the redistribution of active Na(+) transport to less efficient nephron segments, such as the medullary thick ascending limb, which results in medullary hypoxia.

  1. [Inherited tubular renal acidosis].

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Hassan; Hayek, Donia; Nasr, Dhekra; Daudon, Michel; Fadhel Najjar, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a tubulopathy characterized by metabolic acidosis with normal anion gap secondary to abnormalities of renal acidification. RTA can be classified into four main subtypes: distal RTA, proximal RTA, combined proximal and distal RTA, and hyperkalemic RTA. Distal RTA (type 1) is caused by the defect of H(+) secretion in the distal tubules and is characterized by the inability to acidify the urine below pH 5.5 during systemic acidemia. Proximal RTA (type 2) is caused by an impairment of bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubules and characterized by a decreased renal bicarbonate threshold. Combined proximal and distal RTA (type 3) secondary to a reduction in tubular reclamation of bicarbonate and an inability to acidify the urine in the face of severe acidemia. Hyperkalemic RTA (type 4) may occur as a result of aldosterone deficiency or tubular insensitivity to aldosterone. Clinicians should be alert to the presence of RTA in patients with an unexplained normal anion gap acidosis, hypokalemia, recurrent nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. The mainstay of treatment of RTA remains alkali replacement.

  2. The role of reabsorption in the spectral distribution of phytoplankton fluorescence emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D. J.; Mcdermid, I. S.; Kiefer, D. A.; Soohoo, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed to describe an experimentally observed spectral shift in the fluorescence emission from phytoplankton as a result of the internal reabsorption of that emission. This model accounts for both the absorption of the primary excitation and the modification of the fluorescence through the reabsorption of the emitted light by the chloroplast and by the surrounding medium. Comparisons are made between the results of the theoretical model and data derived from experiments using a number of different phytoplankton species, each adapted to varying light conditions. The details of the model are discussed, and the consequences of its interpretation on the spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission from phytoplankton are examined.

  3. The effects of anions on fluid reabsorption from the proximal convoluted tubule of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Green, R; Greenwood, S L; White, S

    1988-01-01

    1. Fluid reabsorption from surface proximal tubules of the rat was measured in vivo using stationary microperfusion techniques. Reabsorptive rate (Jv) was measured from droplets containing chloride as the main reabsorbable anion and when chloride was substituted by bromide, iodide, nitrate, acetate, isethionate or methylsulphate in either the tubular lumen alone or in both lumen and peritubular capillaries. 2. In tubules with an intact blood supply, droplet volume decreased in a manner best described by a single exponential and substitution of chloride by nitrate or bromide had no effect on Jv. Substitution by iodide or acetate inhibited Jv by approximately 17% but substitution by methylsulphate or isethionate caused droplets to transiently increase in volume before shrinkage which was itself inhibited by approximately 50%. The inhibitory action of isethionate was found to be concentration dependent. 3. Recollection and analysis of droplets which were initially free of chloride, containing either nitrate or isethionate, showed that chloride entered these droplets, but that the initial rate of chloride entry was greater for nitrate than isethionate droplets. 4. When tubules and capillaries were perfused with chloride solutions containing no bicarbonate, Jv was reduced to about 20% of the value when peritubular capillary blood flow was intact. Substituting chloride in the tubular and capillary perfusion revealed a sequence for supporting fluid reabsorption that was identical to that when chloride was substituted in tubule fluid alone: bromide = nitrate greater than iodide = acetate greater than isethionate. Addition of 2.0 mmol l-1 NaCN reduced the reabsorptive flux to zero. 5. The results of this study are consistent with transcellular transport of anions across the proximal tubular epithelium. The pathways for anion transport are likely to involve a series of non-selective mechanisms such as anion exchangers. PMID:3256612

  4. Altered renal sodium handling and risk of incident hypertension: Results of the Olivetti Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, Lanfranco; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Iacone, Roberto; Russo, Ornella; Galletti, Ferruccio; Strazzullo, Pasquale

    2017-01-01

    Renal tubular sodium (Na) handling plays a key role in blood pressure (BP) regulation. Several cross-sectional studies reported a positive association between higher proximal tubule fractional reabsorption of Na and BP, but no prospective investigation has been reported of this possible association. Hence, the purpose of this study was to estimate the predictive role of renal Na handling on the risk of incident hypertension and the changes in BP occurring in the 8-year follow-up observation of a sample of initially normotensive men (The Olivetti Heart Study). The study included 294 untreated normotensive non-diabetic men with normal renal function examined twice (1994–95 and 2002–04). Renal tubular Na handling was estimated by exogenous lithium clearance. Fractional reabsorption of Na in proximal and distal tubules was calculated and included in the analysis. At baseline, there was no association between BP and either proximal or distal fractional reabsorption of Na. At the end of the 8-year follow-up, direct associations were observed between baseline proximal (but not distal) Na fractional reabsorption and the changes occurred in systolic and diastolic BP over time (+2.79 and +1.53 mmHg, respectively, per 1SD difference in proximal Na-FR; p<0.01). Also multivariable analysis showed a direct association between baseline proximal Na fractional reabsorption and risk of incident hypertension, independently of potential confounders (OR: 1.34, 95%CI:1.06–1.70). The results of this prospective investigation strongly suggest a causal relationship between an enhanced rate of Na reabsorption in the proximal tubule and the risk of incident hypertension in initially normotensive men. PMID:28196131

  5. The link between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and renal injury in obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thethi, Tina; Kamiyama, Masumi; Kobori, Hiroyuki

    2012-04-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and is associated with chronic kidney disease. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is common in obesity. The RAAS is an important mediator of hypertension. Mechanisms involved in activation of the RAAS in obesity include sympathetic stimulation, synthesis of adipokines in the RAAS by visceral fat, and hemodynamic alterations. The RAAS is known for its role in regulating blood pressure and fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. The role of local/tissue RAAS in specific tissues has been a focus of research. Urinary angiotensinogen (UAGT) provides a specific index of the intrarenal RAAS. Investigators have demonstrated that sex steroids can modulate the expression and activity of the different components of the intrarenal RAAS and other tissues. Our data suggest that obese women without DM and hypertension have significantly higher levels of UAGT than their male counterparts. These differences existed without any background difference in the ratio of microalbumin to creatinine in the urine or the estimated glomerular filtration rate, raising a question about the importance of baseline gender differences in the endogenous RAAS in the clinical spectrum of cardiovascular diseases and the potential utility of UAGT as a marker of the intrarenal RAAS. Animal studies have demonstrated that modifying the amount of angiotensin, the biologically active component of the RAAS, directly influences body weight and adiposity. This article reviews the role of the RAAS in renal injury seen in obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

  6. Monocyte and plasma expression of TAM ligand and receptor in renal failure: Links to unregulated immunity and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Iris J; Hilliard, Brendan A; Ulas, Mehriban; Yu, Daohai; Vangala, Chandan; Rao, Swati; Lee, Jean; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Cohen, Philip L

    2015-06-01

    Chronic inflammation is increased in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Specific immune mechanisms and pathways that drive and maintain chronic inflammation in CKD are not well described. The TAM ligands (Gas6 and protein S) and receptors (Axl and Mer) have been recently recognized as playing a prominent role in immune regulation. The receptors exist in both soluble and cell-bound forms; the soluble receptors (sAxl and sMer) are believed to compete with the bound receptors and thus inhibit their function. In this study, we determined the expression of cell-bound and soluble TAM proteins in patients with CKD. CKD patients had significantly lower expression of Mer in monocytes, yet increased expression of soluble TAM receptors sAxl and sMer in plasma compared to controls. The metalloproteinase ADAM 17, responsible for cleavage of Mer to its soluble form, was increased in patient monocytes. Elevated levels of soluble TAM receptors were more evident in patients with progressive renal failure. These observations suggest that functional deficiency of TAM receptor-mediated regulation of inflammation may contribute to chronic inflammation in patients with CKD.

  7. Effect of skin temperature on the ion reabsorption capacity of sweat glands during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Shamsuddin, A K M; Kuwahara, T; Oue, A; Nomura, C; Koga, S; Inoue, Y; Kondo, N

    2005-07-01

    The effect of skin temperature on the ion reabsorption capacity of sweat glands during exercise in humans is unknown. In this study, eight healthy subjects performed a 60-min cycling exercise at a constant intensity (60% VO(2max)) under moderate (25 degrees C) and cool (15 degrees C) ambient temperatures at a constant relative humidity of 40%. The sweating rate (SR), index of sweat ion concentration (ISIC) by using sweat conductivity, esophageal temperature (Tes), mean skin temperature, and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously under both ambient temperatures. The SR and ISIC were significantly lower at the cool ambient temperature versus the moderate temperature. There were no significant differences in the changes in HR and esophageal temperature between these ambient temperature conditions, while the mean skin temperature was significantly lower at the cool ambient temperature by almost 3 degrees C (P < 0.05). The slopes of the relationships between Tes and the SR and ISIC were significantly lower and the thresholds of these relationships were significantly higher at the cool ambient temperature (P < 0.05). The ion reabsorption capacity of the sweat glands was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in a cool environment (0.21 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.52 +/- 0.06 mg/cm(2)/min at 15 and 25 degrees C, respectively) as evaluated using the relationships for SR and ISIC. The results suggest that the ion reabsorption capacity of the sweat glands is influenced by skin temperature during exercise in humans.

  8. Renal, metabolic and cardiovascular considerations of SGLT2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    DeFronzo, Ralph A; Norton, Luke; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    The kidney has a pivotal role in maintaining glucose homeostasis by using glucose as a metabolic fuel, by producing glucose through gluconeogenesis, and by reabsorbing all filtered glucose through the sodium-glucose cotransporters SGLT1 and SGLT2 located in the proximal tubule. In patients with diabetes, the maximum glucose reabsorptive capacity (TmG) of the kidney, as well as the threshold for glucose spillage into the urine, are elevated, contributing to the pathogenesis of hyperglycaemia. By reducing the TmG and, more importantly, the threshold of glucosuria, SGLT2 inhibitors enhance glucose excretion, leading to a reduction in fasting and postprandial plasma glucose levels and improvements in both insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. The beneficial effects of SGLT2 inhibition extend beyond glycaemic control, however, with new studies demonstrating that inhibition of renal glucose reabsorption reduces blood pressure, ameliorates glucotoxicity and induces haemodynamic effects that lead to improved cardiovascular and renal outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this Review we examine the role of SGLT2 and SGLT1 in the regulation of renal glucose reabsorption in health and disease and the effect of SGLT2 inhibition on renal function, glucose homeostasis, and cardiovascular disease.

  9. Circulating biomarkers in renal cell carcinoma: the link between microRNAs and extracellular vesicles, where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Ana L; Dias, Francisca; Gomes, Mónica; Fernandes, Mara

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a lethal urological cancer, with incidence and mortality rates increasing by 2-3% per decade. The lack of standard screening tests contributes to the fact that one-third of patients are diagnosed with locally invasive or metastatic disease. Moreover, 20-40% of RCC patients submitted to surgical nephrectomy will develop metastasis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs responsible for gene regulation at a post-transcriptional level. It is accepted that they are deregulated in cancer and can influence tumor development. Thus, miRNAs are promising RCC biomarkers, since they can be detected using non-invasive methods. They are highly stable and easier to quantify in circulating biofluids. The elevated miRNA stability in circulating samples may be the consequence of their capacity to circulate inside of extracellular microvesicles (EMVs), for example, the exosomes. The EMVs are bilayered membrane vesicles secreted by all cell types. They can be released in the interstitial space or into circulating biofluids, which allows the travelling, binding and entrance of these vesicles in receptor cells. This type of cell communication can shuttle bioactive molecules between cells, allowing the horizontal transference of genetic material. In this review, we focus on circulating miRNAs (miR-210, miR-1233, miR-221, miR-15a, miR-451, miR-508, miR-378) in the biofluids of RCC patients and attempt to establish the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy, their synergic effects, and the pathways involved in RCC biology. PMID:28326253

  10. The lipid composition of high-density lipoprotein affects its re-absorption in the kidney by proximal tubule epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Breznan, Dalibor; Veereswaran, Vasanthi; Viau, France J; Neville, Tracey A-M; Sparks, Daniel L

    2004-01-01

    The kidney is believed to play a major role in the clearance of apoA-I (apolipoprotein A-I) and HDL (high-density lipoprotein) particles from the bloodstream. Proximal tubule epithelial cells of the kidney appear to prevent the loss of these proteins in the urine by re-absorbing them from the urinary filtrate. Experiments were undertaken to investigate the factors that regulate the renal re-absorption of apoA-I and small HDL in a transformed human proximal tubule epithelial (HKC-8) cell line. Fluorescent microscopic studies show that HKC-8 cells can readily bind and take up HDL particles. Intracellular localization of fluorescently labelled native HDL shows its accumulation in endocytotic vesicles, in a perinuclear region after 1 h. Binding studies reveal a saturable cell association of (125)I-HDL with the HKC-8 cell surface after 2 h. HKC-8 cells do not degrade apoA-I or other HDL-apoproteins. The specific cell association of lipid-free apoA-I is approx. 2-fold less than that observed for native HDL. Similarly, reconstituted HDL prepared from HDL-apoproteins and pure phospholipids also exhibits a low cell association with the HKC-8 cells. In contrast, reconstituted HDL prepared with the extracted lipids of HDL and pure apoA-I exhibits an even higher cell association than that observed with the native lipoprotein. A detailed characterization of the major lipid classes in reconstituted HDL shows that only cholesteryl ester increases the cell association of the recombinant particles. These results show that the cholesteryl ester content of HDL may play an important role in the re-absorptive salvage of HDL by the proximal tubule cells of the kidney. PMID:14711371

  11. Exome capture reveals ZNF423 and CEP164 mutations, linking renal ciliopathies to DNA damage response signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chaki, Moumita; Airik, Rannar; Ghosh, Amiya K.; Giles, Rachel H.; Chen, Rui; Slaats, Gisela G.; Wang, Hui; Hurd, Toby W.; Zhou, Weibin; Cluckey, Andrew; Gee, Heon-Yung; Ramaswami, Gokul; Hong, Chen-Jei; Hamilton, Bruce A.; Červenka, Igor; Ganji, Ranjani Sri; Bryja, Vitezslav; Arts, Heleen H.; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Oud, Machteld M.; Letteboer, Stef J.F.; Roepman, Ronald; Husson, Hervé; Ibraghimov-Beskrovnaya, Oxana; Ysunaga, Takayuki; Walz, Gerd; Eley, Lorraine; Sayer, John A.; Schermer, Bernhard; Liebau, Max C.; Benzing, Thomas; Le Corre, Stephanie; Drummond, Iain; Joles, Jaap A.; Janssen, Sabine; Allen, Susan J.; Natarajan, Sivakumar; O Toole, John F.; Attanasio, Massimo; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Ren, Huanan; Lopez, Irma; Nayir, Ahmet; Stoetzel, Corinne; Dollfus, Helene; Massoudi, Rustin; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Andreoli, Sharon P.; Doherty, Dan G.; Lindstrad, Anna; Golzio, Christelle; Katsanis, Nicholas; Pape, Lars; Abboud, Emad B.; Al-Rajhi, Ali A.; Lewis, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Omran, Heymut; Lee, Eva; Wang, Shaohui; Sekiguchi, JoAnn M.; Saunders, Rudel; Johnson, Colin A.; Garner, Elizabeth; Vanselow, Katja; Andersen, Jens S.; Shlomai, Joseph; Nurnberg, Gudrun; Nurnberg, Peter; Levy, Shawn; Smogorzewska, Agata; Otto, Edgar A.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathies (NPHP-RC) are degenerative recessive diseases that affect kidney, retina and brain. Genetic defects in NPHP gene products that localize to cilia and centrosomes defined them as ‘ciliopathies’. However, disease mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we identify by whole exome resequencing, mutations of MRE11, ZNF423, and CEP164 as causing NPHP-RC. All three genes function within the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, hitherto not implicated in ciliopathies. We demonstrate that, upon induced DNA damage, the NPHP-RC proteins ZNF423, CEP164 and NPHP10 colocalize to nuclear foci positive for TIP60, known to activate ATM at sites of DNA damage. We show that knockdown of CEP164 or ZNF423 causes sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, and that cep164 knockdown in zebrafish results in dysregulated DDR and an NPHP-RC phenotype. We identify TTBK2, CCDC92, NPHP3 and DVL3 as novel CEP164 interaction partners. Our findings link degenerative diseases of kidney and retina, disorders of increasing prevalence, to mechanisms of DDR. PMID:22863007

  12. A distinct X-linked syndrome involving joint contractures, keloids, large optic cup-to-disc ratio, and renal stones results from a filamin A (FLNA) mutation.

    PubMed

    Lah, Melissa; Niranjan, Tejasvi; Srikanth, Sujata; Holloway, Lynda; Schwartz, Charles E; Wang, Tao; Weaver, David D

    2016-04-01

    We further evaluated a previously reported family with an apparently undescribed X-linked syndrome involving joint contractures, keloids, an increased optic cup-to-disc ratio, and renal stones to elucidate the genetic cause. To do this, we obtained medical histories and performed physical examination on 14 individuals in the family, five of whom are affected males and three are obligate carrier females. Linkage analysis was performed on all but one individual and chromosome X-exome sequencing was done on two affected males. The analysis localized the putative gene to Xq27-qter and chromosome X-exome sequencing revealed a mutation in exon 28 (c.4726G>A) of the filamin A (FLNA) gene, predicting that a conserved glycine had been replaced by arginine at amino acid 1576 (p.G1576R). Segregation analysis demonstrated that all known carrier females tested were heterozygous (G/A), all affected males were hemizygous for the mutation (A allele) and all normal males were hemizygous for the normal G allele. The data and the bioinformatic analysis indicate that the G1576R mutation in the FLNA gene is very likely pathogenic in this family. The syndrome affecting the family shares phenotypic overlap with other syndromes caused by FLNA mutations, but appears to be a distinct phenotype, likely representing a unique genetic syndrome.

  13. Renal disposition of colistin in the isolated perfused rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zheng; Wang, Jiping; Nation, Roger L; Li, Jian; Turnidge, John D; Coulthard, Kingsley; Milne, Robert W

    2009-07-01

    Nephrotoxicity is an important limitation to the clinical use of colistin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other gram-negative pathogens. Previous work reported net tubular reabsorption of colistin by the kidney in vivo, but there is no knowledge of its disposition within the kidney. This study investigated the renal disposition and potential transport mechanisms of colistin in the isolated perfused rat kidney (IPK) model by perfusing with colistin sulfate alone (2 microg/ml) or in the presence of potential inhibitors (tetraethylammonium [TEA], glycine-glycine [Gly-Gly], or hydrochloric acid [HCl]) at three different concentrations. When perfused alone, the renal clearances (CL(R)) for colistin A and B (the major components of colistin) in control kidneys were constant and low (mean values < 0.05 ml/min throughout the perfusion). The mean clearance ratios [CR, defined as CL(R)/(f(u) x GFR), where f(u) is the fraction of drug unbound in perfusate and GFR is the glomerular filtration rate] were significantly less than 1. It was concluded that there is net tubular reabsorption of colistin, and this exceeded the reabsorption of water. Less than 10% eliminated from perfusate was recovered in urine, suggesting considerable renal accumulation of colistin. The CR values for colistin were significantly increased when perfused with TEA (500 microM), Gly-Gly (833 microM), and HCl (2,500, 5,000, and 10,000 microM). It is proposed that renal reabsorption of colistin may involve organic cation transporters (inhibited by TEA) and peptide transporters (inhibited by Gly-Gly) and that the process is sensitive to the pH of urine.

  14. Activation of the epithelial Na+ channel in the collecting duct by vasopressin contributes to water reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, Vladislav; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Stockand, James D

    2009-11-01

    We used patch-clamp electrophysiology on isolated, split-open murine collecting ducts (CD) to test the hypothesis that regulation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity is a physiologically important effect of vasopressin. Surprisingly, this has not been tested directly before. We ask whether vasopressin affects ENaC activity distinguishing between acute and chronic effects, as well as, parsing the cellular signaling pathway and molecular mechanism of regulation. In addition, we quantified possible synergistic regulation of ENaC by vasopressin and aldosterone associating this with a requirement for distal nephron Na+ reabsorption during water conservation vs. maintenance of Na+ balance. We find that vasopressin significantly increases ENaC activity within 2-3 min by increasing open probability (P(o)). This activation was dependent on adenylyl cyclase (AC) and PKA. Water restriction (18-24 h) and pretreatment of isolated CD with vasopressin (approximately 30 min) resulted in a similar increase in P(o). In addition, this also increased the number (N) of active ENaC in the apical membrane. Similar to P(o), increases in N were sensitive to inhibitors of AC. Stressing animals with water and salt restriction separately and jointly revealed an important effect of vasopressin: conservation of water and Na+ each independently increased ENaC activity and jointly had a synergistic effect on channel activity. These results demonstrate a quantitatively important action of vasopressin on ENaC suggesting that distal nephron Na+ reabsorption mediated by this channel contributes to maintenance of water reabsorption. In addition, our results support that the combined actions of vasopressin and aldosterone are required to achieve maximally activated ENaC.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Epilepsy, progressive myoclonic 4, with or without renal failure ... failure syndrome action myoclonus–renal failure syndrome AMRF epilepsy, progressive myoclonic 4, with or without renal failure ...

  16. The discovery of the synovial lymphatic stomata and lymphatic reabsorption in knee effusion.

    PubMed

    Ping, Zepeng; Jiang, Tingting; Wang, Chong; Chen, Zhongyi; Chen, Zhongliang; Wang, Jiaxiong; Wang, Li; Wang, Beibei; Xu, Dandan; Liu, Changming; Li, Zhongjie; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    To illustrate the mechanism of lymphatic reabsorption in knee joint effusion. The current investigation employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques to reveal the ultrastructure of the knee synovial membrane in New Zealand rabbits and human. Ultrastructural changes of the synovial lymphatic stomata were observed by using trypan blue absorption and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) digestion methods, and the animal models of synovitis. New Zealand rabbits and human synovial membranes were composed of two types of synovial cells: type A and type B. No lymphatic stomata were found among type A synovial cells, whereas lymphatic stomata with the diameters ranging 0.74-3.26 µm were found in type B synovial cells, and some stomata were closed. After the NaOH digestion, a number of sieve pores, similar to lymphatic stomata in size and shape, were observed in the dense fibrous connective tissue underneath the type B synovial cells. After injecting trypan blue into the rabbit knee joint cavity, absorption of trypan blue through the lymphatic stomata was observed, suggesting the absorption function of the synovial lymphatic stomata. In the rabbit knee joint synovitis models, the synovial lymphatic stomata diameter enlarged. Some macrophages migrated from the lymphatic stomata, indicating that the synovial lymphatic stomata were involved in the joint effusion absorption and inflammatory response. Our study is the first to report the existence of synovial lymphatic stomata in the New Zealand rabbits and human knee joints. Lymphatic stomata may have an important role in the reabsorption of joint effusion.

  17. Does High Alveolar Fluid Reabsorption Prevent HAPE in Individuals with Exaggerated Pulmonary Hypertension in Hypoxia?

    PubMed

    Betz, Theresa; Dehnert, Christoph; Bärtsch, Peter; Schommer, Kai; Mairbäurl, Heimo

    2015-12-01

    An exaggerated increase in pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PAsP) is a highlight of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). However, the incidence of HAPE at 4559 m was much lower in altitude-naïve individuals with exaggerated pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) in normobaric hypoxia than in known HAPE-susceptibles, indicating that elevated PAsP alone is insufficient to induce HAPE. A decreased nasal potential difference (NPD) has been found in HAPE-susceptibles, where, based on animal models, NPD serves as surrogate of alveolar epithelial ion transport. We hypothesize that those HAPE-resistant individuals with high HPV may be protected by elevated alveolar Na and fluid reabsorption, which might be detected as increased NPD. To test this hypothesis, we measured NPD in normoxia of subjects who were phenotyped in previous studies as high altitude tolerant (controls), known HAPE-susceptibles with high HPV (HP+HAPE), as well as individuals with high HPV but without HAPE (HP-no-HAPE) at 4559 m. NPD and amiloride-sensitive NPD were lower in HP+HAPE than in controls, whereas HP-no-HAPE were not different from either group. There were no differences in Cl-transport between groups. Our results show low nasal ion transport in HAPE but higher transport in those individuals with the highest HPV but without HAPE. This indicates that in some individuals with high PAsP at high altitude high alveolar fluid reabsorption might protect them from HAPE.

  18. Reduced Renal Calcium Excretion in the Absence of Sclerostin Expression: Evidence for a Novel Calcium-Regulating Bone Kidney Axis

    PubMed Central

    Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The kidneys contribute to calcium homeostasis by adjusting the reabsorption and excretion of filtered calcium through processes that are regulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25[OH]2D3). Most of the filtered calcium is reabsorbed in the proximal tubule, primarily by paracellular mechanisms that are not sensitive to calcium-regulating hormones in physiologically relevant ways. In the distal tubule, however, calcium is reabsorbed by channels and transporters, the activity or expression of which is highly regulated and increased by PTH and 1α,25(OH)2D3. Recent research suggests that other, heretofore unrecognized factors, such as the osteocyte-specific protein sclerostin, also regulate renal calcium excretion. Clues in this regard have come from the study of humans and mice with inactivating mutations of the sclerostin gene that both have increased skeletal density, which would necessitate an increase in intestinal absorption and/or renal reabsorption of calcium. Deletion of the sclerostin gene in mice significantly diminishes urinary calcium excretion and increases fractional renal calcium reabsorption. This is associated with increased circulating 1α,25(OH)2D3 levels, whereas sclerostin directly suppresses 1α-hydroxylase in immortalized proximal tubular cells. Thus, evidence is accumulating that sclerostin directly or indirectly reduces renal calcium reabsorption, suggesting the presence of a novel calcium-excreting bone-kidney axis. PMID:24876121

  19. Renal abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ataga, K I; Orringer, E P

    2000-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia and the related hemoglobinopathies are associated with a large spectrum of renal abnormalities. The patients have impaired urinary concentrating ability, defects in urinary acidification and potassium excretion, and supranormal proximal tubular function. The latter is manifest by increased secretion of creatinine and by reabsorption of phosphorus and beta(2)-microglobulin. Young patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have supranormal renal hemodynamics with elevations in both effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These parameters decrease with age as well as following the administration of prostaglandin inhibitors. Proteinuria, a common finding in adults with sickle cell disease, may progress to the nephrotic syndrome. Proteinuria, hypertension, and increasing anemia predict end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While ESRD can be managed by dialysis and/or renal transplantation, there may be an increased rate of complications in renal transplant recipients with SCD. Hematuria is seen in individuals with all of the SCDs as well as with sickle cell trait. In most cases the etiology of the hematuria turns out to be benign. However, there does appear to be an increased association between SCD and renal medullary carcinoma. Therefore, those SCD patients who present with hematuria should initially undergo a thorough evaluation in order to exclude this aggressive neoplasm. Papillary necrosis may occur due to medullary ischemia and infarction. Erythropoietin levels are usually lower than expected for their degree of anemia and decrease further as renal function deteriorates. An abnormal balance of renal prostaglandins may be responsible for some of the changes in sickle cell nephropathy. Acute renal failure is a component of the acute multiorgan failure syndrome (MOFS). Finally, progression of sickle cell nephropathy to ESRD may be slowed by adequate control of hypertension and proteinuria. However, the prevention of the

  20. Effect of inhibition of converting enzyme on renal hemodynamics and sodium management in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, V E; Wilson, D M; Burnett, J C; Johnson, C M; Offord, K P

    1991-10-01

    We compared the tubular transport of sodium and the erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransport activity in hypertensive patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and in normotensive control subjects. In addition, we assessed the effects of inhibition of converting enzyme on renal hemodynamics and sodium excretion in hypertensive patients with ADPKD to provide information on mechanisms responsible for the increased renal vascular resistance and filtration fraction and the adjustment of the pressure-natriuresis relationship during saline expansion, observed in patients with ADPKD, hypertension, and preserved renal function. In comparison with normotensive control subjects, the hypertensive patients with ADPKD had lower renal plasma flows, higher renal vascular resistances and filtration fractions, and similar proximal and distal fractional reabsorptions of sodium. The administration of enalapril resulted in significant increases in the renal plasma flow and significant reductions in mean arterial pressure, renal vascular resistance, and filtration fraction, but the glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged. Despite the significant reduction in mean arterial pressure during inhibition of converting enzyme, the distal fractional reabsorption of sodium decreased while the total fractional excretion of sodium remained unchanged or increased slightly. No significant differences were detected between the normotensive control subjects and the hypertensive patients with ADPKD in erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransport activity, plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone concentration, or atrial natriuretic factor. These results suggest that the renal renin-angiotensin system plays a central role in the alterations in renal hemodynamics and sodium management associated with the development of hypertension in ADPKD.

  1. A Comparison of the Segmental Analysis of Sodium Reabsorption during Ringer's and Hyperoncotic Albumin Infusion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jay H.; Osgood, Richard W.; Boonjarern, Sampanta; Ferris, Thomas F.

    1973-01-01

    Studies were designed to compare the segmental analysis of sodium reabsorption along the nephron during volume expansion with either 10% body weight Ringer's or 0.6% body weight hyperoncotic albumin. Total kidney and nephron glomerular filtration rate increased similarly with both, but urinary sodium excretion (12.7 vs. 4.0 μeq/min, P < 0.001) and fractional sodium excretion (5.0 vs. 1.6%, P < 0.001) increased to a greater extent with Ringer's. Fractional reabsorption of sodium in the proximal tubule was diminished in both groups but to a significantly greater extent during Ringer's (P < 0.005). Absolute reabsorption was inhibited only in the Ringer's group. Delivery of filtrate out of the proximal tubule was greater in the Ringer's studies, 45 vs. 37 nl/min (P < 0.001). However, both fractional and absolute sodium delivery to the early and late distal tubule were not significantly different in the two groups. Fractional reabsorption in the collecting duct decreased from 96% in hydropenia to 31% during Ringer's but fell only slightly to 80% in the albumin studies. Absolute collecting duct reabsorption was also greater in the albumin studies, 0.55 vs. 0.21 neq/min (P < 0.001), which could totally account for the difference in urinary sodium excretion between the two groups. 22Na recovery in the final urine after end distal microinjections was 71% during Ringer's infusion and 34% during albumin (P < 0.001). From these data we conclude that: (a) Ringer's solution has a greater inhibitory effect on proximal tubular sodium reabsorption, and (b) in spite of this effect, differences in mucosal to serosal collecting duct sodium transport are primarily responsible for the greater natriuresis during Ringer's infusion. PMID:4727461

  2. Inhibition of renal Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchange in cadmium-intoxicated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Do Whan; Chung, Jin Mo; Kim, Jee Yeun; Kim, Kyoung Ryong; Park, Yang Saeng . E-mail: yspark@ns.kosinmed.or.kr

    2005-04-01

    Chronic exposure to cadmium (Cd) results in bicarbonaturia, leading to metabolic acidosis. To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which renal bicarbonate reabsorption is inhibited, we investigated changes in renal transporters and enzymes associated with bicarbonate reabsorption in Cd-intoxicated rats. Cd intoxication was induced by subcutaneous injections of CdCl{sub 2} (2 mg Cd/kg per day) for 3 weeks. Cd intoxication resulted in a significant reduction in V{sub max} of Na{sup +}/H{sup +} antiport with no changes in K{sub Na} in the renal cortical brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Western blotting of BBM proteins and indirect immunohistochemistry in renal tissue sections, using an antibody against Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchange-3 (NHE3), showed a diminished expression of NHE3 protein in the BBM. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that NHE3 mRNA expression was reduced in the renal cortex. The activity of carbonic anhydrase IV (CA IV) in BBM was not changed. The protein abundance of Na{sup +}-HCO{sub 3}{sup -} cotransporter-1 (NBC1) in whole kidney membrane fractions was slightly attenuated, whereas that of the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase {alpha}-subunit was markedly elevated in Cd-intoxicated animals. These results indicate that Cd intoxication impairs NHE3 expression in the proximal tubule, thereby reducing the capacity for bicarbonate reabsorption, leading to bicarbonaturia in an intact animal.

  3. Kidney-specific WNK1 regulates sodium reabsorption and potassium secretion in mouse cortical collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Baum, Michel; Huang, Chou-Long

    2013-02-15

    Kidney-specific with-no-lysine kinase 1 (KS-WNK1) is a kinase-deficient variant of WNK1 that is expressed exclusively in the kidney. It is abundantly expressed in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and to a lesser extent in the cortical thick ascending limb (cTAL), connecting tubule, and cortical collecting duct (CCD). KS-WNK1 inhibits Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-)- and sodium chloride cotransporter-mediated Na(+) reabsorption in cTAL and DCT, respectively. Here, we investigated the role of KS-WNK1 in regulating Na(+) and K(+) transport in CCD using in vitro microperfusion of tubules isolated from KS-WNK1 knockout mice and control wild-type littermates. Because baseline K(+) secretion and Na(+) reabsorption were negligible in mouse CCD, we studied tubules isolated from mice fed a high-K(+) diet for 2 wk. Compared with that in wild-type tubules, K(+) secretion was reduced in KS-WNK1 knockout CCD perfused at a low luminal fluid rate of ~1.5 nl/min. Na(+) reabsorption and the lumen-negative transepithelial potential difference were also lower in the KS-WNK1 knockout CCD compared with control CCD. Increasing the perfusion rate to ~5.5 nl/min stimulated K(+) secretion in the wild-type as well as knockout CCD. The magnitudes of flow-stimulated increase in K(+) secretion were similar in wild-type and knockout CCD. Maxi-K(+) channel inhibitor iberiotoxin had no effect on K(+) secretion when tubules were perfused at ~1.5 nl/min, but completely abrogated the flow-dependent increase in K(+) secretion at ~5.5 nl/min. These findings support the notion that KS-WNK1 stimulates ROMK-mediated K(+) secretion, but not flow-dependent K(+) secretion mediated by maxi-K(+) channels in CCD. In addition, KS-WNK1 plays a role in regulating Na(+) transport in the CCD.

  4. Tuning luminescence and reducing reabsorption of CdSe quantum disks for luminescent solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huichuan; Xie, Peng; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Baojun

    2015-08-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum disks (QDs) have been synthesized for application in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). Luminescence tuning and reabsorption reduction of the QDs were achieved by controlling their size using a hot injection method. The overlap of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra of the as-prepared CdSe QDs was negligible. The as-prepared CdSe QDs were incorporated into polymethylmethacrylate without aggregation and luminescence quenching. The obtained highly transparent composites with non-affecting light-emitting properties were used as LSCs. The placement of a CdSe QDs doped LSC prototype (10 × 1 × 0.1 cm) on a Si-cell resulted in a 201% increase in the electrical power output of the Si-cell compared with that of the bare Si-cell.

  5. Renal neurohormonal regulation in heart failure decompensation.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Sofia; Agic, Mediha Becirovic; Narfström, Fredrik; Melville, Jacqueline M; Hultström, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Decompensation in heart failure occurs when the heart fails to balance venous return with cardiac output, leading to fluid congestion and contributing to mortality. Decompensated heart failure can cause acute kidney injury (AKI), which further increases mortality. Heart failure activates signaling systems that are deleterious to kidneys such as renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and vasopressin secretion. All three reduce renal blood flow (RBF) and increase tubular sodium reabsorption, which may increase renal oxygen consumption causing AKI through renal tissue hypoxia. Vasopressin contributes to venous congestion through aquaporin-mediated water retention. Additional water retention may be mediated through vasopressin-induced medullary urea transport and hyaluronan but needs further study. In addition, there are several systems that could protect the kidneys and reduce fluid retention such as natriuretic peptides, prostaglandins, and nitric oxide. However, the effect of natriuretic peptides and nitric oxide are blunted in decompensation, partly due to oxidative stress. This review considers how neurohormonal signaling in heart failure drives fluid retention by the kidneys and thus exacerbates decompensation. It further identifies areas where there is limited data, such as signaling systems 20-HETE, purines, endothelin, the role of renal water retention mechanisms for congestion, and renal hypoxia in AKI during heart failure.

  6. Urinary and renal papillary solutes during cyclooxygenase inhibition with ibuprofen

    SciTech Connect

    Passmore, J.C.; Hartupee, D.A.; Jackson, B.A.

    1987-12-01

    We investigated the mechanisms by which prostaglandin synthetase (cyclooxygenase) inhibitors cause antidiuresis and antinatriuresis in anesthetized dogs. Cyclooxygenase inhibition with ibuprofen caused an increased total solute (Na+, K+, and urea) concentration in the renal papilla. Xenon 133 washout studies revealed no change in medullary blood flow. Ibuprofen induced a 147% increase in papillary Na+ concentration, while increasing urea and K+ only 98% and 35%, respectively, suggesting that a Na+ reabsorption mechanism rather than decreased papillary blood flow was responsible for a majority of the increased papillary solute concentration. A decrease in the excretion of Na+, but not of K+ or urea, in treated dogs further implies increased Na+ reabsorption. Thus, it appears that cyclooxygenase inhibition increases papillary solute concentration primarily by increasing Na+ transport into the papilla.

  7. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Discala, V. A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero g or space, in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast 5 of the 7 remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted (C sub Na/GFR, p .05) and their urinary flow rate (V, p .05). Potassium excretion increased (U sub k V, p .05). End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause, in rats, a decrease in distal tubular sodium, water and potassium reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis.

  8. Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter Inhibitors: Effects on Renal and Intestinal Glucose Transport: From Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, Sunder; Polidori, David; Zambrowicz, Brian; Henry, Robert R

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease with disabling micro- and macrovascular complications that lead to excessive morbidity and premature mortality. It affects hundreds of millions of people and imposes an undue economic burden on populations across the world. Although insulin resistance and insulin secretory defects play a major role in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia, several other metabolic defects contribute to the initiation/worsening of the diabetic state. Prominent among these is increased renal glucose reabsorption, which is maladaptive in patients with diabetes. Instead of an increase in renal glucose excretion, which could ameliorate hyperglycemia, there is an increase in renal glucose reabsorption, which helps sustain hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes. The sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitors are novel antidiabetes agents that inhibit renal glucose reabsorption and promote glucosuria, thereby leading to reductions in plasma glucose concentrations. In this article, we review the long journey from the discovery of the glucosuric agent phlorizin in the bark of the apple tree through the animal and human studies that led to the development of the current generation of SGLT2 inhibitors.

  9. Residual renal function: a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, Jerome; Grantham, Jared J

    2017-03-01

    Residual renal function (RRF) in patients undergoing dialysis treatments is currently viewed as glomerular filtrate that has escaped tubular reabsorption. RRF has been quantified as a clearance of urea or creatinine, or urea + creatinine. A major paradigm shift has followed the recognition that a substantial number of organic anion retention solutes (possible "uremic toxins") are protein-bound and therefore are not readily filtered. These protein-bound aryl compounds are secreted by renal tubular organic anion transporters (OATs). This has led to the recognition that RRF in dialysis patients probably represents not only unreabsorbed glomerular filtrate but also a contribution of renal tubular transporters that secrete organic anions. Tubular secretion of hippurate, indoxyl sulfate, and p-cresol sulfate, protein-bound organic anions retained in the plasma of end-stage renal disease patients, can be quantified and used to evaluate the integrity of a function dependent on active solute transport. Here we propose a shift away from the exclusive "glomerulocentric" view of RRF as unreabsorbed glomerular filtrate and of the progression of renal disease as progressive glomerular loss. We expand the definition of RRF to include the combined renal and tubule functions remaining after a disease begins to destroy nephrons and proceeds to anuria. We propose renewed application of the first principles of renal physiology, articulated in the last century by Homer Smith, to the understanding and monitoring of RRF and progression of renal injury in patients during the sometimes long course of and at the end stage of chronic renal disease.

  10. Challenges and intriguing problems in comparative renal physiology.

    PubMed

    Dantzler, William H

    2005-02-01

    The comparative approach has proved important many times in understanding renal function and continues to offer possible approaches to unsolved problems today, in three general areas. (1) Quantification of glomerular ultrafiltration. In contrast to the complex capillary network in the mammalian glomerulus, the glomerulus of the superficial loopless (reptilian-type) avian nephrons consists of a single capillary loop. This structure, in an avian species where it can be approached directly, should for the first time permit accurate determinations of the pressure profiles and the capillary area involved in glomerular ultrafiltration in an animal with high arterial pressure. (2) Fluid reabsorption by proximal renal tubules. In some reptilian proximal renal tubules, isolated and perfused in vitro, isosmotic fluid reabsorption can occur at control rates when lithium replaces sodium or when some other substance replaces sodium or chloride or both in the perfusate and bathing medium simultaneously. Reabsorption at the control rates, regardless of the composition of the perfusate and bathing medium, can be at least partially inhibited by cold and cyanide, but not by blockers of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. It is also independent of the buffer system used, but it is reduced about 20% by removal of colloid from the peritubular fluid. During the substitutions, the surface area of the proximal tubule cells increases dramatically and might permit some insignificant force to be more effective in the reabsorptive process. Understanding the process involved in this, apparently unique coupling of solute and fluid transport, certainly would be very valuable in understanding coupled transport of solutes and water across epithelia in general. (3) Urate secretion by proximal renal tubules. Urate is the major excretory end product of nitrogen metabolism in birds, most reptiles, and a few amphibians. It undergoes net secretion by the renal tubules. It has been possible to learn much about the

  11. Renal function in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Burlet, A; Drukker, A; Guignard, J P

    1999-01-01

    We performed renal function tests in 18 young patients, 1.8-14.6 years of age, with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). Glomerular filtration rate was normal (116 +/- 4.5 ml/min/1.73 m2), and renal plasma flow was decreased (410 +/- 25 ml/min/1.73 m2) with a rise in the filtration fraction (29 +/- 1.1%). The suggested pathophysiologic explanation of these findings is that the blood hyperviscosity seen in patients with CCHD causes an overall increase in renal vascular resistance with a rise in intraglomerular blood pressure. Despite a sluggish flow of blood in the glomerular capillary bed, the effective filtration pressure was adjusted to conserve the glomerular filtration rate. In addition to these renal hemodynamic parameters, we also studied renal acidification and tubular sodium and water handling during a forced water diuresis. Our data indicate that children with CCHD have a mild to moderate normal ion gap metabolic acidosis due to a low proximal tubular threshold for bicarbonate. Proximal tubular sodium and water reabsorption under these conditions were somewhat increased, though not significantly, probably due to intrarenal hydrostatic forces, in particular the rise in the oncotic pressure in the postglomerular capillaries in patients with high hematocrit values. The distal tubular functions such as sodium handling and acidification were not affected.

  12. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad, a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor, in healthy adult males.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zancong; Rowlings, Colin; Kerr, Brad; Hingorani, Vijay; Manhard, Kimberly; Quart, Barry; Yeh, Li-Tain; Storgard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Lesinurad is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of gout. Single and multiple ascending dose studies were conducted to evaluate pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad in healthy males. Lesinurad was administered as an oral solution between 5 mg and 600 mg (single ascending dose; N=34) and as an oral solution or immediate-release capsules once daily (qday) between 100 mg and 400 mg for 10 days under fasted or fed condition (multiple ascending dose; N=32). Following single doses of lesinurad solution, absorption was rapid and exposure (maximum observed plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve) increased in a dose-proportional manner. Following multiple qday doses, there was no apparent accumulation of lesinurad. Urinary excretion of unchanged lesinurad was generally between 30% and 40% of dose. Increases in urinary excretion of uric acid and reductions in serum uric acid correlated with dose. Following 400 mg qday dosing, serum uric acid reduction was 35% at 24 hours post-dose, supporting qday dosing. A relative bioavailability study in healthy males (N=8) indicated a nearly identical pharmacokinetic profile following dosing of tablets or capsules. Lesinurad was generally safe and well tolerated.

  13. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad, a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor, in healthy adult males

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zancong; Rowlings, Colin; Kerr, Brad; Hingorani, Vijay; Manhard, Kimberly; Quart, Barry; Yeh, Li-Tain; Storgard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Lesinurad is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of gout. Single and multiple ascending dose studies were conducted to evaluate pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad in healthy males. Lesinurad was administered as an oral solution between 5 mg and 600 mg (single ascending dose; N=34) and as an oral solution or immediate-release capsules once daily (qday) between 100 mg and 400 mg for 10 days under fasted or fed condition (multiple ascending dose; N=32). Following single doses of lesinurad solution, absorption was rapid and exposure (maximum observed plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration–time curve) increased in a dose-proportional manner. Following multiple qday doses, there was no apparent accumulation of lesinurad. Urinary excretion of unchanged lesinurad was generally between 30% and 40% of dose. Increases in urinary excretion of uric acid and reductions in serum uric acid correlated with dose. Following 400 mg qday dosing, serum uric acid reduction was 35% at 24 hours post-dose, supporting qday dosing. A relative bioavailability study in healthy males (N=8) indicated a nearly identical pharmacokinetic profile following dosing of tablets or capsules. Lesinurad was generally safe and well tolerated. PMID:26170627

  14. Mouse ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) plays a critical role in bile acid reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kihwa; Schmahl, Jennifer; Lee, Jong-Min; Garcia, Karen; Patil, Ketan; Chen, Amelia; Keene, Michelle; Murphy, Andrew; Sleeman, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin is a unique peptide gut hormone that requires post-translational modification to stimulate both feeding and growth hormone release. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) was identified as a specific acyl-transferase for ghrelin, and recent genetic deletion studies of the Goat gene (Goat(-/-)) uncovered the role of ghrelin in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. To further understand the physiological functions of the GOAT/ghrelin system, we have conducted a metabolomic and microarray profile of Goat-null mice, as well as determined Goat expression in different tissues using the lacZ reporter gene. Serum metabolite profile analysis revealed that Goat(-/-) mice exhibited increased secondary bile acids >2.5-fold. This was attributed to increased mRNA and protein expression of the ileal sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ISBT) in the intestinal and biliary tract. Increased expression of additional solute carrier proteins, including Slc5a12 (>10-fold) were also detected in the small intestine and bile duct. Goat staining was consistently observed in the pituitary glands, stomach, and intestines, and to a lesser extent in the gallbladder and pancreatic duct. This is the first report that the GOAT/ghrelin system regulates bile acid metabolism, and these findings suggest a novel function of GOAT in the regulation of intestinal bile acid reabsorption..

  15. Steady-State Fluorescence of Highly Absorbing Samples in Transmission Geometry: A Simplified Quantitative Approach Considering Reabsorption Events.

    PubMed

    Krimer, Nicolás I; Rodrigues, Darío; Rodríguez, Hernán B; Mirenda, Martín

    2017-01-03

    A simplified methodology to acquire steady-state emission spectra and quantum yields of highly absorbing samples is presented. The experimental setup consists of a commercial spectrofluorometer adapted to transmission geometry, allowing the detection of the emitted light at 180° with respect to the excitation beam. The procedure includes two different mathematical approaches to describe and reproduce the distortions caused by reabsorption on emission spectra and quantum yields. Toluene solutions of 9,10-diphenylanthracence, DPA, with concentrations ranging between 1.12 × 10(-5) and 1.30 × 10(-2) M, were used to validate the proposed methodology. This dye has significant probability of reabsorption and re-emission in concentrated solutions without showing self-quenching or aggregation phenomena. The results indicate that the reabsorption corrections, applied on molecular emission spectra and quantum yields of the samples, accurately reproduce experimental data. A further discussion is performed concerning why the re-emitted radiation is not detected in the experiments, even at the highest DPA concentrations.

  16. Renal distal tubular handling of sodium in central fluid volume homoeostasis in preascitic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Sansoe, G; Ferrari, A; Baraldi, E; Castellana, C; De Santis, M C; Manenti, F

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Patients with preascitic liver cirrhosis have an increased central plasma volume, and, for any given plasma aldosterone concentration, they excrete less sodium than healthy controls. A detailed study of the distribution of sodium reabsorption along the segments of the renal tubule, especially the distal one, is still lacking in preascitic cirrhosis.
METHODS—Twelve patients with Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis and nine control subjects (both groups on a normosodic diet) were submitted to the following investigations: (a) plasma levels of active renin and aldosterone; (b) four hour renal clearance of lithium (an index of fluid delivery to the loop of Henle), creatinine, sodium, and potassium; (c) dopaminergic activity, as measured by incremental aldosterone response to intravenous metoclopramide.
RESULTS—Metoclopramide induced higher incremental aldosterone responses, indicating increased dopaminergic activity in patients than controls, which is evidence of an increased central plasma volume (+30 min: 160.2 (68.8) v 83.6 (35.2) pg/ml, p<0.01; +60 min: 140.5 (80.3) v 36.8 (36.1) pg/ml, p<0.01). Patients had increased distal fractional sodium reabsorption compared with controls (26.9 (6.7)% v 12.5 (3.4)% of the filtered sodium load, p<0.05). In the patient group there was an inverse correlation between: (a) absolute distal sodium reabsorption and active renin (r −0.59, p<0.05); (b) fractional distal sodium reabsorption and sodium excretion (r −0.66, p<0.03).
CONCLUSIONS—These data suggest that in preascitic cirrhosis the distal fractional tubular reabsorption of sodium is increased and critical in regulating both central fluid volume and sodium excretion.


Keywords: kidney; sodium handling; lithium clearance; liver cirrhosis; dopamine; central fluid volume PMID:10517915

  17. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    MedlinePlus

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  18. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L.; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental–social cues and physiological–behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time–dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  19. A Renal Olfactory Receptor Aids in Kidney Glucose Handling

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Blythe D.; Cheval, Lydie; Peterlin, Zita; Firestein, Stuart; Koepsell, Hermann; Doucet, Alain; Pluznick, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are G protein-coupled receptors which serve important sensory functions beyond their role as odorant detectors in the olfactory epithelium. Here we describe a novel role for one of these ORs, Olfr1393, as a regulator of renal glucose handling. Olfr1393 is specifically expressed in the kidney proximal tubule, which is the site of renal glucose reabsorption. Olfr1393 knockout mice exhibit urinary glucose wasting and improved glucose tolerance, despite euglycemia and normal insulin levels. Consistent with this phenotype, Olfr1393 knockout mice have a significant decrease in luminal expression of Sglt1, a key renal glucose transporter, uncovering a novel regulatory pathway involving Olfr1393 and Sglt1. In addition, by utilizing a large scale screen of over 1400 chemicals we reveal the ligand profile of Olfr1393 for the first time, offering new insight into potential pathways of physiological regulation for this novel signaling pathway. PMID:27739476

  20. Renal sodium excretion in sons of hypertensive parents.

    PubMed

    Turner, S T; Reilly, S L

    1993-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether renal excretion of sodium is impaired and whether tubular reabsorption of sodium is increased in normotensive white men with a familial predisposition to develop essential hypertension. We compared 11 normotensive sons of two hypertensive parents (SOHT) with 11 normotensive sons of two normotensive parents (SONT); renal sodium handling was assessed after 1 week of low-sodium diet (10 mmol/d) and after 1 week of high-sodium diet (200 mmol/d). The SOHT were on average 5.5 years older than the SONT (46.9 +/- 5.2 [SD] vs 41.4 +/- 4.1, P = .012). On the sixth day of each diet, mean urinary sodium excretion did not differ between the two groups (12.9 +/- 6.3 vs 12.7 +/- 6.7 mmol/d on low-sodium diet, P = .930; 197 +/- 25 vs 200 +/- 27 mmol/d on high-sodium diet, P = .817). On the seventh day of each diet, baseline means for filtered load of sodium, absolute excretion of sodium, fractional excretion of sodium (an index of total tubular sodium reabsorption), and fractional excretion of lithium (an inverse index of proximal tubular sodium reabsorption) also did not differ between the groups. To assess renal sodium handling under non-steady-state conditions, we infused 2 L normal saline intravenously over a 2-hour period. The means for absolute excretion of sodium, fractional excretion of sodium, and fractional excretion of lithium increased from baseline, but the increases did not differ in magnitude between the groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Laparoscopic Renal Cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Marc; Moshfegh, Amiel; Talenfeld, Adam; Del Pizzo, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    In light of evidence linking radical nephrectomy and consequent suboptimal renal function to adverse cardiovascular events and increased mortality, research into nephron-sparing techniques for renal masses widely expanded in the past two decades. The American Urological Association (AUA) guidelines now explicitly list partial nephrectomy as the standard of care for the management of T1a renal tumors. Because of the increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, up to 70% of newly detected renal masses are stage T1a, making them more amenable to minimally invasive nephron-sparing therapies including laparoscopic and robotic partial nephrectomy and ablative therapies. Cryosurgery has emerged as a leading option for renal ablation, and compared with surgical techniques it offers benefits in preserving renal function with fewer complications, shorter hospitalization times, and allows for quicker convalescence. A mature dataset exists at this time, with intermediate and long-term follow-up data available. Cryosurgical recommendations as a first-line therapy are made at this time in limited populations, including elderly patients, patients with multiple comorbidities, and those with a solitary kidney. As more data emerge on oncologic efficacy, and technical experience and the technology continue to improve, the application of this modality will likely be extended in future treatment guidelines. PMID:24596441

  2. Effect of Cuscuta chinensis on renal function in ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sun; Lee, Yun Jung; Kim, Eun Ju; Lee, An Sook; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2011-01-01

    The kidneys play a central role in regulating water, ion composition and excretion of metabolic waste products in the urine. Cuscuta chinensis has been known as an important traditional Oriental medicine for the treatment of liver and kidney disorders. Thus, we studied whether an aqueous extract of Cuscuta chinensis (ACC) seeds has an effect on renal function parameters in ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute renal failure (ARF) rats. Administration of 250 mg/kg/day ACC showed that renal functional parameters including urinary excretion rate, osmolality, Na(+), K(+), Cl(-), creatinine clearance, solute-free water reabsorption were significantly recovered in ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF. Periodic acid Schiff staining showed that administration of ACC improved tubular damage in ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF. In immunoblot and immunohistological examinations, ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF decreased the expressions of water channel AQP 2, 3 and sodium potassium pump Na,K-ATPase in the renal medulla. However, administration of ACC markedly incremented AQP 2, 3 and Na,K-ATPase expressions. Therefore, these data indicate that administration of ACC ameliorates regulation of the urine concentration and renal functions in rats with ischemia/reperfusion-induced ARF.

  3. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero G in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Four rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast, five of the seven remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted and their urinary flow rate. Potassium excretion increased. End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause in the rat a decrease in distal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis. The adequacy of other nonatrial volume control mechanisms in regulating renal salt and water conservation in opposition to the studied atrial-renal (Henry-Gauer) reflex of thoracic vascular distension is confirmed.

  4. Obesity and renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gati, Asma; Kouidhi, Soumaya; Marrakchi, Raja; El Gaaied, Amel; Kourda, Nadia; Derouiche, Amine; Chebil, Mohamed; Caignard, Anne; Perier, Aurélie

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies link obesity, as measured by increased body mass index (BMI) to the incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as well as to the cancer-related mortality of RCC patients. RCC is the third cancer most robustly associated with increased BMI. Understanding the role of the adipose tissue in renal carcinogenesis is therefore of major importance for the development of novel paradigms of RCC prevention and treatment. Here, we discuss the current knowledge on the impact of obesity on the development and progression of RCC as well as the role of adipose tissue-derived hormones (adipokines) in the conflict between growing tumors and the immune system. PMID:24804162

  5. Dietary Intake as a Link between Obesity, Systemic Inflammation, and the Assumption of Multiple Cardiovascular and Antidiabetic Drugs in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Bruna; Maresca, Immacolata Daniela; Germanò, Roberta; Trio, Rossella; Nastasi, Anna Maria; Federico, Stefano; Memoli, Andrea; Apicella, Luca; Memoli, Bruno; Sabbatini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated dietary intake and nutritional-inflammation status in ninety-six renal transplant recipients, 7.2 ± 5.0 years after transplantation. Patients were classified as normoweight (NW), overweight (OW), and obese (OB), if their body mass index was between 18.5 and 24.9, 25.0 and 29.9, and ≥30 kg/m2, respectively. Food composition tables were used to estimate nutrient intakes. The values obtained were compared with those recommended in current nutritional guidelines. 52% of the patients were NW, 29% were OW, and 19% were OB. Total energy, fat, and dietary n-6 PUFAs intake was higher in OB than in NW. IL-6 and hs-CRP were higher in OB than in NW. The prevalence of multidrug regimen was higher in OB. In all patients, total energy, protein, saturated fatty acids, and sodium intake were higher than guideline recommendations. On the contrary, the intake of unsaturated and n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and fiber was lower than recommended. In conclusion, the prevalence of obesity was high in our patients, and it was associated with inflammation and the assumption of multiple cardiovascular and antidiabetic drugs. Dietary intake did not meet nutritional recommendations in all patients, especially in obese ones, highlighting the need of a long-term nutritional support in renal transplant recipients. PMID:23984354

  6. Effect of volume expansion on renal citrate and ammonia metabolism in KCl-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Adler, S; Zett, B; Anderson, B; Fraley, D S

    1975-01-01

    When rats with desoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-induced potassium chloride deficiency are given sodium chloride there is simultaneously a partial correction of metabolic alkalosis and a marked reduction in urinary citrate excretion and renal citrate content. To examine DOCA's role in this phenomenon and to determine how sodium chloride alters renal metabolism, rats were made KC1 deficient using furosemide and a KC1-deficient diet. Renal citrate and ammonia metabolism were then studied after chronic oral sodium chloride administration or acute volume expansion with isotonic mannitol. Although both maneuvers partially corrected metabolic alkalosis, sodium chloride raised serum chloride concentration while mannitol significantly decreased it. Urinary citrate excretion decreased to 10% of control in rats given NaCl and to 50% of control in rats infused with mannitol. The filtered load of citrate was constant or increased indicating increased tubular citrate reabsorption. Renal cortical citrate content also decreased approximately 50%. Renal cortical slices from KCl-deficient rats incubated in low or normal chloride media produced equal amounts of 14CO2 from (1, 5-14C) citrate. In addition, urinary ammonia excretion increased by over 300% in both groups. This occurred in the mannitol group despite increased urinary pH and flow rate indicating a rise in renal ammonia production. It seems that neither DOCA nor an increase in serum chloride concentration explains the experimental results. Rather, it appears that volume expansion is responsible for increased renal tubular citrate reabsorption and renal ammonia production. As these renal metabolic responses ordinarily occur in response to acidosis, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that volume expansion reduces renal cell pH in 3KCl-deficient rats. PMID:239022

  7. The potential role of regucalcin in kidney cell regulation: Involvement in renal failure (Review).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-11-01

    The kidneys play a physiologic role in the regulation of urine formation and nutrient reabsorption in the proximal tubule epithelial cells. Kidney development has been shown to be regulated through calcium (Ca2+) signaling processes that are present through numerous steps of tubulogenesis and nephron induction during embryonic development of the kidneys. Ca2+-binding proteins, such as calbindin-D28k and regucalcin are important proteins that are commonly used as biomarkers in pronephric tubules, and the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme. Previous research on regucalcin focused on Ca2+ sensors that are involved in renal organogenesis and the link between Ca2+-dependent signals and polycystins. Moreover, regucalcin has been highlighted to play a multifunctional role in kidney cell regulation. The regucalcin gene, which is localized on the X chromosome, is regulated through various transcription factors. Regucalcin has been found to regulate intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells. Regucalcin has been demonstrated to regulate the activity of various enzymes that are involved in intracellular signaling pathways. It has been noted that regucalcin suppresses DNA synthesis and regulates the gene expression of various proteins related to mineral transport, transcription factors, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The overexpression of regucalcin has been shown to exert suppressive effects on cell proliferation and apoptotic cell death, which are stimulated by various stimulatory factors. Moreover, regucalcin gene expression was found to to be involved in various pathophysiological states, including renal failure. This review discusses recent findings concerning the potential role of regucalcin as a regulatory protein in the kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells.

  8. Renal plasticity in response to feeding in the Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus.

    PubMed

    Esbaugh, A J; Secor, S M; Grosell, M

    2015-10-01

    Burmese pythons are sit-and-wait predators that are well adapted to go long periods without food, yet subsequently consume and digest single meals that can exceed their body weight. These large feeding events result in a dramatic alkaline tide that is compensated by a hypoventilatory response that normalizes plasma pH; however, little is known regarding how plasma HCO3(-) is lowered in the days post-feeding. The current study demonstrated that Burmese pythons contain the cellular machinery for renal acid-base compensation and actively remodel the kidney to limit HCO3(-) reabsorption in the post-feeding period. After being fed a 25% body weight meal plasma total CO2 was elevated by 1.5-fold after 1 day, but returned to control concentrations by 4 days post-feeding (d pf). Gene expression analysis was used to verify the presence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) II, IV and XIII, Na(+) H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3), the Na(+) HCO3(-) co-transporter (NBC) and V-type ATPase. CA IV expression was significantly down-regulated at 3 dpf versus fasted controls. This was supported by activity analysis that showed a significant decrease in the amount of GPI-linked CA activity in isolated kidney membranes at 3 dpf versus fasted controls. In addition, V-type ATPase activity was significantly up-regulated at 3 dpf; no change in gene expression was observed. Both CA II and NHE3 expression was up-regulated at 3 dpf, which may be related to post-prandial ion balance. These results suggest that Burmese pythons actively remodel their kidney after feeding, which would in part benefit renal HCO3(-) clearance.

  9. Renal Stones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Renal stones are never convenient, but they are a particular concern for astronauts who have limited access to treatment during flight. Researchers are examining how earthbound preventions for renal stone formation work in flight, ensuring missions are not ended prematurely due to this medical condition. The micrograph shows calcium oxalate crystals in urine. These small crystals can develop to form renal stones. Principal Investigator: Dr. Peggy Whitson, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.

  10. Angiotensin II natriuresis and anti-natriuresis: role of renal artery pressure in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Olsen, M E; Hall, J E; Montaini, J P; Guyton, A C

    1984-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of changes in renal artery pressure (RAP), renal haemodynamics, and tubular reabsorption in mediating the natriuretic and anti-natriuretic actions of angiotensin II (ANG II). In anaesthetized dogs, endogenous ANG II formation was blocked with SQ-14225 and ANG II was infused intravenously at rates of 5-1215 ng/kg/min while RAP was either servo-controlled at the normal level or permitted to increase. When RAP was servo-controlled to prevent a rise in RAP, ANG II infusion at all rates from 5-1215 ng/kg/min decreased urinary sodium excretion (INaV) and fractional sodium excretion (FENa), while increasing fractional reabsorption of lithium (FRLi), an index of proximal tubule fractional sodium reabsorption (FRDNa). When RAP was permitted to increase, ANG II infusion rates up to 45 ng/kg/min decreased UNaV, and FENam while increasing FRLi and FRDNa greater than However, at 135 ng/kg/min and above UNaV and FENE increased while FRLi and FRDNa decreased when RAP was allowed to rise, even though renal blood flow and filtration fraction were not substantially different from the values observed when RAP was servo-controlled. Filtered sodium load was slightly higher when RAP was permitted to increase during ANG II infusion, compared to the dogs in which RAP was servo-controlled, although the differences were not statistically significant. Thus, even very large doses of ANG II cause anti-natriuresis when RAP is prevented from increasing. The natriuretic effect of high doses of ANG II is caused by increased RAP which decreases fractional sodium reabsorption in proximal and distal tubules and causes slight increase in sodium delivery to the tubules.

  11. Quantitative photoluminescence of broad band absorbing melanins: a procedure to correct for inner filter and re-absorption effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesz, Jennifer; Gilmore, Joel; Meredith, Paul

    2005-07-01

    We report methods for correcting the photoluminescence emission and excitation spectra of highly absorbing samples for re-absorption and inner filter effects. We derive the general form of the correction, and investigate various methods for determining the parameters. Additionally, the correction methods are tested with highly absorbing fluorescein and melanin (broadband absorption) solutions; the expected linear relationships between absorption and emission are recovered upon application of the correction, indicating that the methods are valid. These procedures allow accurate quantitative analysis of the emission of low quantum yield samples (such as melanin) at concentrations where absorption is significant.

  12. Signaling Mechanisms that Link Salt Retention to Hypertension: Endogenous Ouabain, the Na+ Pump, the Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger and TRPC Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Blaustein, Mordecai P.; Hamlyn, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Salt retention as a result of chronic, excessive dietary salt intake, is widely accepted as one of the most common causes of hypertension. In a small minority of cases, enhanced Na+ reabsorption by the kidney can be traced to specific genetic defects of salt transport, or pathological conditions of the kidney, adrenal cortex, or pituitary. Far more frequently, however, the salt retention may be the result of minor renal injury or small genetic variation in renal salt transport mechanisms. How the salt retention actually leads to the increase in peripheral vascular resistance (the hallmark of hypertension) and the elevation of blood pressure remain an enigma. Here we review the evidence that endogenous ouabain (an adrenocortical hormone), arterial smooth muscle α2 Na+ pumps, type-1 Na/Ca exchangers, and receptor- and store-operated Ca2+ channels play key roles in the pathway that links salt to hypertension. We discuss cardenolide structure-function relationships in an effort to understand why prolonged administration of ouabain, but not digoxin, induces hypertension, and why digoxin is actually anti-hypertensive. Finally, we summarize recent observations which indicate that ouabain upregulates arterial myocyte Ca2+ signaling mechanisms that promote vasoconstriction, while simultaneously downregulating endothelial vasodilator mechanisms. In sum, the reports reviewed here provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms by which salt retention leads to hypertension. PMID:20211726

  13. Postnatal development of renal function: micropuncture and clearance studies in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Horster, Michael; Valtin, Heinz

    1971-01-01

    Postnatal renal development was studied in dogs between 2 and 77 days. Single, superficial nephrons were evaluated by micropuncture, concurrently with measurements of total renal function and morphometric analyses in the same animals. Glomerular filtration rate for the entire kidney increased linearly from 0.13 ml/min per g kidney weight at 2 days to 0.91 at 77 days. Extraction of p-aminohippurate increased from about 20 to 80%, and renal plasma flow per g kidney weight, measured as Cpah/Epah, increased threefold during the same period. Filtration fraction increased to the mature value during the first half of the postnatal period studied. The clearance of urea per unit of renal mass increased with age, whereas the fraction of filtered urea reabsorbed declined during the early part of the postnatal period. The pattern of fractional urea reabsorption may be due mainly to increased medullary recycling of urea and to a rise in the reabsorption of water from the medullary collecting duct. Urine osmolality was higher than plasma from birth onward and rose with age. Osmolal equality of collecting duct fluid and medullary interstitium reflected mature vasopressin (ADH)-induced water permeability. The rise in urinary concentration was predominantly due to increasing medullary sequestration of urea. Glomerular filtration rate of the superficial nephron increased from 3.2 nl/min at 21 days, when subcapsular nephrons were uniformly patent, to 23.1 at 77 days. Despite this rise in filtered load, fractional reabsorption of sodium and water in superficial proximal tubules was constant and at the mature level from the onset of intratubular perfusion. Changes in arterial plasma protein concentration, in filtration fraction, and in the hydrostatic pressure gradient between proximal tubule and peritubular capillary may interact to maintain glomerulotubular balance. The data, together with results of an accompanying morphological study, demonstrate a sequence of coordinated changes

  14. New molecular players facilitating Mg(2+) reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule.

    PubMed

    Glaudemans, Bob; Knoers, Nine V A M; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M

    2010-01-01

    The renal distal convoluted tubule (DCT) has an essential role in maintaining systemic magnesium (Mg(2+)) concentration. The DCT is the final determinant of plasma Mg(2+) levels, as the more distal nephron segments are largely impermeable to Mg(2+). In the past decade, positional candidate strategies in families with inherited forms of hypomagnesemia have led to the identification of genes involved in Mg(2+) handling. A large fraction of this resides in the DCT, namely, (i) the transient receptor potential channel melastatin subtype 6 (TRPM6), a divalent cation-permeable channel located at the luminal membrane of the DCT, facilitates Mg(2+) entry from the pro-urine into the cell; (ii) the epidermal growth factor is a novel hormone regulating active Mg(2+) transport through TRPM6; (iii) the voltage-gated K(+) channel, Kv1.1, establishes a favorable luminal membrane potential for TRPM6-mediated Mg(2+) transport; (iv) the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase gamma-subunit (gamma-Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase) was identified as mutated protein in a family with isolated dominant hypomagnesemia. The molecular mechanism by which gamma-Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is involved in DCT Mg(2+) handling remains unknown; (v) a high percentage of patients with mutations in the renal transcription factor HNF1B (hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B) gene develop hypomagnesemia; and (vi) Gitelman and EAST/SeSAME syndrome patients suffer from a similar tubulopathy due to mutations in NCC (NaCl cotransporter) and Kir4.1, respectively. In these patients, decreased expression of TRPM6 is proposed to cause hypomagnesemia. Insights into the molecular mechanisms of the identified genes, as well as the identification of novel genes, will further improve our knowledge about renal Mg(2+) handling.

  15. PI3Kβ inhibitor TGX221 selectively inhibits renal cell carcinoma cells with both VHL and SETD2 mutations and links multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chenchen; Sun, Yang; Ding, Guanxiong; Wu, Zhong; Jiang, Haowen; Wang, Lujia; Ding, Qiang; Wen, Hui

    2015-04-08

    We aimed to exploit novel compounds with high selectivity to clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) with common mutations. Using the GDSC databases, we searched for compounds with high selectivity for ccRCC with VHL and/or SETD2 mutations. Clinical impact and gene interactions were analysed using TCGA database. In vitro and in vivo studies were performed to validate the inhibitory effects of the compound. We identified the selective PI3Kβ inhibitor TGX221 as a selective inhibitor for ccRCC with both VHL and SETD2 mutations. TGX221 also targeted cancer cells with CDKN2A and PTEN mutations. Changes in PTEN and CDKN2A gene sets were associated with worsened prognosis of ccRCC. TGX221 substantially and selectively inhibited the down stream products of VHL, SETD2, and PTEN in ccRCC cells with VHL and SETD2 mutations. TGX221 also exhibited significant selectivity in inhibiting cell motility and tumourigenesis of ccRCC cells with VHL and SETD2 mutations. TGX221 is a novel inhibitor with high selectivity for ccRCC with VHL and SETD2 mutations. It also targeted PTEN and CDKN2A mutations. How those genes were associated with PI3Kβ warranted further investigations.

  16. Oxidative stress regulates expression of VEGFR1 in myeloid cells: link to tumor-induced immune suppression in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Kübler, Hubert; Tseng, Timothy; Sakai, Yoshihisa; Su, Zhen; Kaliberov, Sergei; Heiser, Axel; Rosser, Charles; Dahm, Philip; Siemann, Dietmar; Vieweg, Johannes

    2008-07-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associates with overproduction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) due to the mutation/inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene. Herein we demonstrate that implantation of human RCC tumor cells into athymic nude mice promotes the appearance of VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1)/CD11b double-positive myeloid cells in peripheral blood. Avastin-mediated VEGF neutralization was capable of significantly reducing the numbers of circulating VEGFR1+ myeloid cells. Conversely, up-regulation of VEGFR1 by myeloid cells could also be achieved in vitro by coculturing bone marrow cells with RCC-conditioned medium or by short-term exposure of naive myeloid cells to oxidative stress. Treatment of myeloid cells with H2O2, lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal, or an inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase all resulted in increased expression of VEGFR1. Furthermore, after exposure to oxidative stress, myeloid cells acquire immunosuppressive features and become capable of inhibiting T cell proliferation. Data suggest that tumor-induced oxidative stress may promote both VEGFR1 up-regulation and immunosuppressive function in bone marrow-derived myeloid cells. Analysis of tumor tissue and peripheral blood from patients with metastatic RCC revealed that VEGFR1+ cells can be also found in cancer patients. Restoration of immunocompetence in metastatic RCC patients by pharmacological elimination of VEGFR1+ cells may have a significant impact on the therapeutic efficacy of cancer vaccines or other immune-based therapies.

  17. Comparative inhibition by hard and soft metal ions of steroid-binding capacity of renal mineralocorticoid receptor cross-linked to the 90-kDa heat-shock protein heterocomplex.

    PubMed Central

    Galigniana, M D; Piwien-Pilipuk, G

    1999-01-01

    We analysed the inhibitory effects in vitro and in vivo of several metal ions on aldosterone binding to the rat kidney mineralocorticoid receptor with the purpose of assessing possible toxic effects of those ions on sodium retention, as well as to obtain information on receptor structural requirements for ligand binding. For the assays in vitro, the inhibitory effects of 20 metal ions were analysed on steroid-binding capacity for renal receptor cross-linked to 90-kDa heat-shock protein (hsp90) by pretreatment with dimethyl pimelimidate. Cross-linking prevented the artifactual dissociation of hsp90 (and, consequently, the loss of steroid binding) from the mineralocorticoid receptor due to the presence of high concentrations of salt in the incubation medium. Cross-linked heterocomplex showed no difference in ligand specificity and affinity with respect to native receptor, but increased stability upon thermal- or ionic-strength-induced destabilization was observed. Treatments in vitro with metal ions in the range 10(-8)-10(-1) M resulted in a differential inhibitory effect for each particular ion on aldosterone binding. Using the negative logarithm of metal concentration for 50% inhibition, the ions could be correlated with their Klopman hardness constants. The analysis of this relationship led us to postulate three types of reaction: with thiol, imidazole and carboxyl groups. The essential role played by these residues in steroid binding was confirmed by chemical modification of cysteines with dithionitrobenzoic acid, histidines with diethyl pyrocarbonate and acidic amino acids with Woodward's reagent (N-ethyl-5-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulphonate). Importantly, the toxic effects of some metal ions were also observed by treatments in vivo of adrenalectomized rats on both steroid-binding capacity and aldosterone-dependent sodium-retaining properties. We suggest that those amino acid residues are involved in the activation process of the mineralocorticoid receptor upon

  18. Glomerular and Tubular Renal Function after Repeated Once-Daily Tobramycin Courses in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Büscher, Rainer; Grosse-Onnebrink, Jörg; Hoyer, Peter F.; Mellies, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Antibiotic treatment regimens against Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients often include aminoglycoside antibiotics that may cause chronic renal failure after repeated courses. Aminoaciduria is an early marker of acute aminoglycoside-induced renal tubular dysfunction. We hypothesized that urinary amino acid reabsorption is decreased after repeated once-daily tobramycin therapies. Methods. In this prospective cross-sectional study creatinine clearance was estimated by the Schwartz and the Cockcroft-Gault formula. Tubular amino acid reabsorption was determined by ion exchange chromatography in 46 patients with CF who received multiple tobramycin courses (6.3 ± 10.1 (1–57)) in a once-daily dosing regimen and 10 who did not. Results. Estimated creatinine clearance employing the Cockcroft-Gault was mildly reduced in 17/46 (37%) of the patients who received tobramycin and 5/10 (50%) of the patients who did not but in none using the Schwartz formula. No association with lifetime tobramycin courses was found. Tubular amino acid reabsorption was not influenced by the amount of once-daily tobramycin courses. Conclusion. Clinically not significant reduction of eCCL occurred in a minority of CF patients. However, chronic tubular dysfunction was not present in patients with CF repeatedly treated with tobramycin in the once-daily dosing scheme. PMID:28133546

  19. Reduced reabsorption and enhanced propagation induced by large Stokes shift in quantum dot-filled optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hua; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Min; Liu, Wenyan; Xu, Jian; Yu, William W.

    2016-07-01

    With tunable emission wavelength, high photoluminescence quantum yield, and broad absorption, colloidal quantum dots are attractive for the application in optical fiber as dopants. However, most of the quantum dots have a large overlap between their absorption and photoluminescence spectra, resulting in reabsorption loss which hinders the realization of long-distance waveguides. Therefore, ZnCuInS/ZnSe/ZnS quantum dots with large Stokes shift were proposed to fabricate a liquid-core optical fiber in this work. In this work, ZnCuInS/ZnSe/ZnS QDs with an average size of 3.3 nm were synthesized and the optical properties of the QD-filled fiber were also investigated as a function of fiber length and doping concentration. Compared to the control sample filled with CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots, the ZnCuInS/ZnSe/ZnS quantum dot-based waveguides showed reduced reabsorption and enhanced signal propagation, which demonstrates great potential of large Stokes-shift quantum dots in optical waveguide devices.

  20. Estrogen increases renal oxytocin receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, N L; Young, W S; Lolait, S J

    1995-04-01

    Estrogens have been implicated in the sodium and fluid imbalances associated with the menstrual cycle and late pregnancy. An estrogen-dependent role for renal oxytocin receptors in fluid homeostasis is suggested by the present findings which demonstrate that estradiol benzoate treatment increases the expression of the oxytocin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid and 125I-OTA binding to oxytocin receptors in the renal cortex and medullary collecting ducts of ovariectomized female rats. Moreover, estradiol induced high levels of oxytocin receptor expression in outer stripe proximal tubules of ovariectomized female and adrenalectomized male rats. Proximal tubule induction was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the antiestrogen tamoxifen, but cortical expression of oxytocin receptors in macula densa cells was unaffected by tamoxifen. These data demonstrate cell-specific regulation of oxytocin receptor expression in macula densa and proximal tubule cells, and suggest a important role for these receptors in mediating estrogen-induced alterations in renal fluid dynamics by possibly affecting glomerular filtration and water and solute reabsorption during high estrogen states.

  1. Contemporary Renal Cell Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed renal cell cancer incidence patterns in the United States and reviewed recent epidemiologic evidence with regard to environmental and host genetic determinants of renal cell cancer risk. Renal cell cancer incidence rates continued to rise among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, across all age groups, and for all tumor sizes, with the most rapid increases for localized stage disease and small tumors. Recent cohort studies confirmed the association of smoking, excess body weight, and hypertension with an elevated risk of renal cell cancer, and suggested that these factors can be modified to reduce the risk. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between renal cell cancer risk and physical activity and moderate intake of alcohol. Occupational exposure to TCE has been positively associated with renal cell cancer risk in several recent studies, but its link with somatic mutations of the VHL gene has not been confirmed. Studies of genetic polymorphisms in relation to renal cell cancer risk have produced mixed results, but genome-wide association studies with larger sample size and a more comprehensive approach are underway. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors by subtypes of renal cell cancer defined by somatic mutations and other tumor markers. PMID:18836333

  2. Abnormalities of sodium excretion and other disorders of renal function in fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, S P; Arroyo, V A; Moodie, H; Blendis, L M; Williams, R

    1976-01-01

    Renal function was evaluated in 40 patients with fulminant hepatic failure, They were divided into two groups on the basis of glomerular filtration rates greater than 40 ml/min or less than 25 ml/min. A number of patients in group 1 had markedly abnormal renal retention of sodium together with a reduced free water clearance and low potassium excretion which could be explained by increased proximal tubular reabsorption of sodium. The patients in group 2 had evidence that renal tubular integrity was maintained when the glomerular filtration rate was greater than or equal ml/min (functional renal failure), but evidence of tubular damage was present when this was less than 3 ml/min (acute tubular necrosis). PMID:964682

  3. Renal drug transporters and their significance in drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Wang, Joanne

    2016-09-01

    The kidney is a vital organ for the elimination of therapeutic drugs and their metabolites. Renal drug transporters, which are primarily located in the renal proximal tubules, play an important role in tubular secretion and reabsorption of drug molecules in the kidney. Tubular secretion is characterized by high clearance capacities, broad substrate specificities, and distinct charge selectivity for organic cations and anions. In the past two decades, substantial progress has been made in understanding the roles of transporters in drug disposition, efficacy, toxicity and drug-drug interactions (DDIs). In the kidney, several transporters are involved in renal handling of organic cation (OC) and organic anion (OA) drugs. These transporters are increasingly recognized as the target for clinically significant DDIs. This review focuses on the functional characteristics of major human renal drug transporters and their involvement in clinically significant DDIs.

  4. Regulation of the collagen cross-linking enzymes LOXL2 and PLOD2 by tumor-suppressive microRNA-26a/b in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KUROZUMI, AKIRA; KATO, MAYUKO; GOTO, YUSUKE; MATSUSHITA, RYOSUKE; NISHIKAWA, RIKA; OKATO, ATSUSHI; FUKUMOTO, ICHIRO; ICHIKAWA, TOMOHIKO; SEKI, NAOHIKO

    2016-01-01

    Our recent studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression signatures in human cancers revealed that microRNA-26a (miRNA-26a) and microRNA-26b (miRNA-26b) were significantly reduced in cancer tissues. To date, few reports have provided functional analyses of miR-26a or miR-26b in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional significance of miR-26a and miR-26b in RCC and to identify novel miR-26a/b-mediated cancer pathways and target genes involved in RCC oncogenesis and metastasis. Downregulation of miR-26a or miR-26b was confirmed in RCC clinical specimens. Restoration of miR-26a or miR-26b in RCC cell lines (786-O and A498) revealed that these miRNAs significantly inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. Our in silico analysis and luciferase reporter assays showed that lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) and procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 2 (PLOD2) were directly regulated by these miRNAs. Moreover, downregulating the PLOD2 gene significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion in RCC cells. Thus, our data showed that two genes promoting metastasis, LOXL2 and PLOD2, were epigenetically regulated by tumor-suppressive microRNAs, miR-26a and miR-26b, providing important insights into the molecular mechanisms of RCC metastasis. PMID:26983694

  5. Assessment of renal function in workers previously exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed Central

    Elinder, C G; Edling, C; Lindberg, E; Kågedal, B; Vesterberg, O

    1985-01-01

    Cadmium induced renal effects were examined in 60 workers (58 men, 2 women) previously exposed to cadmium. Tubular damage in the form of beta 2-microglobulinuria was found in 40%, and urinary albumin and orosomucoid increased significantly with increasing urinary cadmium and increasing relative clearance of beta 2-microglobulin. It is suggested that increased albumin excretion is secondary to the tubular damage. In no case was typical glomerular proteinuria found that could be related to cadmium. Histories of renal stones were more common among the workers with high urinary cadmium concentrations. The glomerular filtration rate was measured in 17 of the workers who had pronounced tubular dysfunction. The average glomerular filtration rate for these men was less than the age adjusted predicted value (mean = 84%). Furthermore, there was a significant (p less than 0.05) correlation (r = -0.47) between tubular reabsorption loss and a decreased glomerular filtration rate. PMID:3904816

  6. Renal threshold phosphate concentration (TmPO4/GFR).

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, K; Kracht, U; Göpfert, G

    1982-01-01

    The ratio of maximum rate of renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate to glomerular filtration rate (TmPO4/GFR) was determined in 546 schoolchildren, aged between 6 and 17.9 years, using the nomogram of Walton and Bijvoet.1 TmPO4/GFR correlated with chronological age in girls and boys and in each remained significantly higher than in adults. TmPO4/GFR in the children correlated neither with fasting serum immunoreactive calcitonin and parathyroid hormone levels nor with the urinary cyclic AMP excretion. The study showed a parallel decrease in TmPO4/GFR, excretion of total hydroxyproline and serum alkaline phosphatase activities after puberty, with a significant relationship of both these indices of bone turnover to TmPO4/GFR values. This indicates that the high renal phosphate threshold of children may be an important factor for bone mineralisation by providing high extracellular inorganic phosphate concentrations during normal growth. PMID:6280622

  7. Renal Scintigraphy

    MedlinePlus

    ... size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Renal Scintigraphy Sponsored by ...

  8. Photon Emission and Reabsorption Processes in CH3NH3PbBr3 Single Crystals Revealed by Time-Resolved Two-Photon-Excitation Photoluminescence Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takumi; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Nakaike, Yumi; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical processes of radiative recombination of photocarriers and reabsorption of emitted photons in CH3NH3PbBr3 single crystals are studied using time-resolved two-photon-excitation photoluminescence (PL) microscopy. We find that the PL spectrum and its decay dynamics depend on the excitation-depth profile. As the excitation depth increases, the PL spectrum becomes asymmetric, the peak energy redshifts, and the PL decay time becomes longer. These observations can be well explained by a simple model including photon recycling (photon emission and reabsorption) in thick samples with strong band-to-band transitions and high radiative recombination efficiencies.

  9. Future of the Renal Biopsy: Time to Change the Conventional Modality Using Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Khosroshahi, Hamid Tayebi; Sarbaz, Yashar; Shakeri Bavil, Abolhassan

    2017-01-01

    At the present time, imaging guided renal biopsy is used to provide diagnoses in most types of primary and secondary renal diseases. It has been claimed that renal biopsy can provide a link between diagnosis of renal disease and its pathological conditions. However, sometimes there is a considerable mismatch between patient renal outcome and pathological findings in renal biopsy. This is the time to address some new diagnostic methods to resolve the insufficiency of conventional percutaneous guided renal biopsy. Nanotechnology is still in its infancy in renal imaging; however, it seems that it is the next step in renal biopsy, providing solutions to the limitations of conventional modalities. PMID:28316612

  10. Renal handling of terephthalic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, L.M.; Quebbemann, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    By use of the Sperber in vivo chicken preparation method, infusion of radiolabeled terephthalic acid ((/sup 14/C)TPA) into the renal portal circulation revealed a first-pass excretion of the unchanged compound into the urine. This model was utilized further to characterize the excretory transport of (/sup 14/C)TPA and provide information on the structural specificity in the secretion of dicarboxylic acids. At an infusion rate of 0.4 nmol/min. 60% of the (/sup 14/C)TPA which reached the kidney was directly excreted. An infusion rate of 3 or 6 mumol/min resulted in complete removal of (/sup 14/C)TPA by the kidney. These results indicate that TPA is both actively secreted and actively reabsorbed when infused at 0.4 nmol/min and that active reabsorption is saturated with the infusion of TPA at higher concentrations. The secretory process was saturated with the infusion of TPA at 40 mumol/mn. The excretory transport of TPA was inhibited by the infusion of probenecid, salicylate, and m-hydroxybenzoic acid, indicating that these organic acids share the same organic anion excretory transport process. m-Hydroxybenzoic acid did not alter the simultaneously measured excretory transport of p-aminohippuric acid (PAH), suggesting that there are different systems involved in the secretion of TPA and PAH. The structural specificity for renal secretion of dicarboxylic acids was revealed by the use of o-phthalic acid and m-phthalic acid as possible inhibitors of TPA secretion.

  11. Pressure natriuresis and the renal control of arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Jessica R; Bailey, Matthew A

    2014-09-15

    The regulation of extracellular fluid volume by renal sodium excretion lies at the centre of blood pressure homeostasis. Renal perfusion pressure can directly regulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule. This acute pressure natriuresis response is a uniquely powerful means of stabilizing long-term blood pressure around a set point. By logical extension, deviation from the set point can only be sustained if the pressure natriuresis mechanism is impaired, suggesting that hypertension is caused or sustained by a defect in the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and sodium excretion. Here we describe the role of pressure natriuresis in blood pressure control and outline the cascade of biophysical and paracrine events in the renal medulla that integrate the vascular and tubular response to altered perfusion pressure. Pressure natriuresis is impaired in hypertension and mechanistic insight into dysfunction comes from genetic analysis of blood pressure disorders. Transplantation studies in rats show that blood pressure is determined by the genotype of the kidney and Mendelian hypertension indicates that the distal nephron influences the overall natriuretic efficiency. These approaches and the outcomes of genome-wide-association studies broaden our view of blood pressure control, suggesting that renal sympathetic nerve activity and local inflammation can impair pressure natriuresis to cause hypertension. Understanding how these systems interact is necessary to tackle the global burden of hypertension.

  12. Pressure natriuresis and the renal control of arterial blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, Jessica R; Bailey, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of extracellular fluid volume by renal sodium excretion lies at the centre of blood pressure homeostasis. Renal perfusion pressure can directly regulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule. This acute pressure natriuresis response is a uniquely powerful means of stabilizing long-term blood pressure around a set point. By logical extension, deviation from the set point can only be sustained if the pressure natriuresis mechanism is impaired, suggesting that hypertension is caused or sustained by a defect in the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and sodium excretion. Here we describe the role of pressure natriuresis in blood pressure control and outline the cascade of biophysical and paracrine events in the renal medulla that integrate the vascular and tubular response to altered perfusion pressure. Pressure natriuresis is impaired in hypertension and mechanistic insight into dysfunction comes from genetic analysis of blood pressure disorders. Transplantation studies in rats show that blood pressure is determined by the genotype of the kidney and Mendelian hypertension indicates that the distal nephron influences the overall natriuretic efficiency. These approaches and the outcomes of genome-wide-association studies broaden our view of blood pressure control, suggesting that renal sympathetic nerve activity and local inflammation can impair pressure natriuresis to cause hypertension. Understanding how these systems interact is necessary to tackle the global burden of hypertension. PMID:25107929

  13. Carbonic anhydrases in chick extra-embryonic structures: a role for CA in bicarbonate reabsorption through the chorioallantoic membrane.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, M Gabriella

    2004-06-01

    The villus cavity cells, a specific cell type of the chick chorioallantoic membrane, express both cytosolic carbonic anhydrase in their cytoplasm and HCO3(-)/Cl(-) anion exchangers at their basolateral membranes. By immunohistochemical analysis, we show here that villus cavity cells specifically react with antibodies directed against the membrane-associated form of carbonic anhydrase, CAIV. Staining is restricted to the apical cell membranes, characteristically invaginated toward the shell membrane, as well as to endothelia of blood vessels present in the mesodermal layer. The occurrence of a membrane-associated CA form at the apical pole of villus cavity cells, when definitively confirmed, would be fairly consistent with the role proposed for these cells in bicarbonate reabsorption from the eggshell so to prevent metabolic acidosis in the embryo during development.

  14. Luminescent solar concentrators. I. Concentrators based on mixtures of dyes in PMMA. Spectral and luminescent properties, reabsorption and energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetlichnyi, V. A.; Lapin, I. N.; Vaitulevich, E. A.; Biryukov, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    Spectral and luminescent properties of efficient and stable commercial organic dyes in solutions and polymethylmetacrilate (PMMA), absorbing and emitting in wavelength ranges 300-680 nm and 390-750 nm, respectively, are investigated. Using different excitation and registration schemes, it is demonstrated that spectral shifts of initial radiation caused by reabsorption are observed at wavelengths around 1.5 cm. The process of excitation energy transfer from the UV range to the red range of the spectrum is investigated in mixtures of 4-6 dyes of different compositions. The maximum efficiency of radiation transfer from 300 nm to 560-580 nm, exceeding the efficiency of individual fluorophores by a factor of >1.6 is obtained for mixtures of four dyes POPOP(bis-MSB)-Coumarin 30-DCM-Pyrromethene 580 (Rhodamine 11B) in PMMA.

  15. cDNA cloning of the murine PEX gene implicated in X-linked hypophosphatemia and evidence for expression in bone

    SciTech Connect

    Du, L.; Desbarats, M.; Viel, J.

    1996-08-15

    The recently identified human PEX g ene apparently encodes for a neutral endopeptidase that is mutated in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia. The 3{prime} and 5{prime} ends of the coding region of PEX have not been cloned, nor has the tissue expression of the gene been identified. Here we report the isolation and characterization of the complete open reading frame of the mouse Pex gene and the demonstration of its expression in bone. Mouse Pex cDNA is predicted to encode a protein of 749 amino acids with 95% identity to the available human PEX sequence and significant homology to members of the membrane-bound metalloendopeptidase family. Northern blot analysis revealed a 6.6-kb transcript in bone and in cultured osteoblasts from normal mice that was not detectable in samples from the Hyp mouse, the murine homolog of human X-linked hypophosphatemia. Pex transcripts were, however, detectable in Hyp bone by RT-PCR amplification. Of particular interest, a cDNA clone from rat incisor shows 93% sequence identity to the 5{prime} end of Pex cDNA, suggesting that Pex may be expressed in another calcified tissue, the tooth. The association of impaired mineralization of bone and teeth and disturbed renal phosphate reabsorption with altered expression of Pex suggests that the Pex gene product may play a critical role in these processes. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. An experimental renal acidification defect in patients with hereditary fructose intolerance. II. Its distinction from classic renal tubular acidosis; its resemblance to the renal acidification defect associated with the Fanconi syndrome of children with cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Morris, R C

    1968-07-01

    In adult patients with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) fructose induces a renal acidification defect characterized by (a) a 20-30% reduction in tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate (T HCO(3) (-)) at plasma bicarbonate concentrations ranging from 21-31 mEq/liter, (b) a maximal tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate (Tm HCO(3) (-)) of approximately 1.9 mEq/100 ml of glomerular filtrate, (c) disappearance of bicarbonaturia at plasma bicarbonate concentrations less than 15 mEq/liter, and (d) during moderately severe degrees of acidosis, a sustained capacity to maintain urinary pH at normal minima and to excrete acid at normal rates. In physiologic distinction from this defect, the renal acidification defect of patients with classic renal tubular acidosis is characterized by (a) just less than complete tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate at plasma bicarbonate concentrations of 26 mEq/liter or less, (b) a normal Tm HCO(3) (-) of approximately 2.8 mEq/100 ml of glomerular filtrate, and (c) during acidosis of an even severe degree, a quantitatively trivial bicarbonaturia, as well as (d) a urinary pH of greater than 6. That the fructose-induced renal acidification defect involves a reduced H(+) secretory capacity of the proximal nephron is supported by the magnitude of the reduction in T HCO(3) (-) (20-30%) and the simultaneous occurrence and the persistence throughout administration of fructose of impaired tubular reabsorption of phosphate, alpha amino nitrogen and uric acid.A reduced H(+) secretory capacity of the proximal nephron also appears operative in two unrelated children with hyperchloremic acidosis, Fanconi's syndrome, and cystinosis. In both, T HCO(3) (-) was reduced 20-30% at plasma bicarbonate concentrations ranging from 20-30 mEq/liter. The bicarbonaturia disappeared at plasma bicarbonate concentrations ranging from 15-18 mEq/liter, and during moderate degrees of acidosis, urinary pH decreased to less than 6, and the excretion rate of acid was normal.

  17. [Reabsorption of yellow fluorescent protein in the Rana temporaria kidney by receptor-mediated endocytosis].

    PubMed

    Seliverstova, E V; Prutskova, N P

    2014-01-01

    The absorption of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and the expression of the endocytic receptors, megalin and cubilin, were investigated in the renal proximal tubules (PT) in frogs Rana temporaria after parenteral YFP injections. The methods of confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry were used. The dynamics of YFP absorption was analyzed 2 h after injection. The logarithmic time dependence of the accumulation of YFP-containing endocytic vesicles in PT cells and the completion of absorption process 90-120 min after injection were shown. Unlike substantial megalin and cubilin expression 15-30 min after YFP introduction, immunolabeled endocytic receptors were not detected in PT cells after 2 h. The re-injection of YFP led to the appearance of apical endocytic vesicles containing megalin or cubilin colocalized with YFP. At the same time, the decrease of YFP uptake associated with reduction in the number of receptor-containing vesicles was demonstrated, suggesting a failure of megalin and cubilin expression. The decrease of absorption capacity of PT cells after YFP re-injection was similar to that found previously under conditions of the competitive absorption of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and YFP injected in different sequences. The data are the further demonstration of the proposed mechanism limiting the tubular protein absorption in the frog kidney and suggest the involvement of megalin and cubilin in uptake and vesicular transport of YFP.

  18. On the mechanism of renal potassium wasting in renal tubular acidosis associated with the Fanconi syndrome (type 2 RTA)

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Anthony; McSherry, Elisabeth; Morris, R. Curtis

    1971-01-01

    The mechanism of renal potassium wasting in renal tubular acidosis associated with the Fanconi syndrome (type 2 RTA) was investigated in 10 patients, each of whom had impaired proximal renal tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate as judged from a greater than 15-20% reduction of renal tubular bicarbonate reabsorption (THCO3-) at normal plasma bicarbonate concentrations. When the plasma bicarbonate concentration ([HCO3-]p) was experimentally increased to normal levels in three patients with a fractional potassium excretion (CK/Cin) of less than 1.0 during acidosis, CK/Cin and urinary potassium excretion (UKV/Cin) increased strikingly and concurrently with a striking increase in urinary sodium (UNaV/Cin) and bicarbonate (UHCO3-V/Cin) excretion. When [HCO3-]p was increased to normal levels in two patients with a CK/Cin of greater than 1.0 during acidosis and in whom UNaV/Cin and UHCO3-V/Cin were already markedly increased, CK/Cin did not increase further. When [HCO3-]p was decreased to subnormal levels in a patient given ammonium chloride, UKV/Cin, CK/Cin, and UHCO3-V/Cin decreased concurrently. In the six patients in whom [HCO3-]p was maintained at normal levels (oral alkali therapy) for 2 months or longer, CK/Cin was directly related to the urinary excretion rates of sodium and bicarbonate, hence was directly related to the magnitude of reduction of THCO3- at normal [HCO3-]p; CK/Cin was greater than 0.55 in all six patients and greater than 1.0 in four. In eight patients with classic RTA (type 1 RTA), proximal renal tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate was largely intact as judged from a trivial reduction of THCO3- at normal [HCO3-]p. When [HCO3-]p was either increased from subnormal to normal levels, or decreased from normal to subnormal levels, UHCO3-V/Cin remained essentially constant, and UKV/Cin did not change significantly. When correction of acidosis was sustained, UHCO3-V/Cin remained a trivial fraction of that filtered, and CK/Cin was consistently less than 0

  19. Pathogenic GLUT9 mutations causing renal hypouricemia type 2 (RHUC2).

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Y; Matsuo, H; Chiba, T; Nagamori, S; Nakayama, A; Inoue, H; Utsumi, Y; Oda, T; Nishiyama, J; Kanai, Y; Shinomiya, N

    2011-12-01

    Renal hypouricemia (MIM 220150) is an inherited disorder characterized by low serum uric acid levels and has severe complications such as exercise-induced acute renal failure and urolithiasis. We have previously reported that URAT1/SLC22A12 encodes a renal urate-anion exchanger and that its mutations cause renal hypouricemia type 1 (RHUC1). With the large health-examination database of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, we found two missense mutations (R198C and R380W) of GLUT9/SLC2A9 in hypouricemia patients. R198C and R380W occur in highly conserved amino acid motifs in the "sugar transport proteins signatures" that are observed in GLUT family transporters. The corresponding mutations in GLUT1 (R153C and R333W) are known to cause GLUT1 deficiency syndrome because arginine residues in this motif are reportedly important as the determinants of the membrane topology of human GLUT1. Therefore, on the basis of membrane topology, the same may be true of GLUT9. GLUT9 mutants showed markedly reduced urate transport in oocyte expression studies, which would be the result of the loss of positive charges in those conserved amino acid motifs. Together with previous reports on GLUT9 localization, our findings suggest that these GLUT9 mutations cause renal hypouricemia type 2 (RHUC2) by their decreased urate reabsorption on both sides of the renal proximal tubule cells. However, a previously reported GLUT9 mutation, P412R, was unlikely to be pathogenic. These findings also enable us to propose a physiological model of the renal urate reabsorption via GLUT9 and URAT1 and can lead to a promising therapeutic target for gout and related cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Effect of carotid occlusion and of perfusion pressure on renal function in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Kirchheim, H; Ruffmann, K

    1981-06-01

    We studied the effect of bilateral common carotid occlusion (implanted pneumatic cuffs) on renal blood flow (electromagnetic flowmeter) and renal function (implanted ureteral catheter) in nine chronically instrumented, conscious dogs on a high sodium diet (14 mmol/kg body weight per day). By means of suprarenal aortic constriction (pneumatic cuff) the influence of renal perfusion pressure was investigated. There was no change in renal blood flow or glomerular filtration rate (inulin clearance) with either reflexly increasing (+49.6%) or constant renal perfusion pressure. Carotid occlusion caused an increase of urine output by 80.5% and of sodium excretion by 85.3% due to a fall in fractional sodium reabsorption (-0.9%) when renal perfusion pressure was allowed to rise. Neither an increase of diuresis or sodium excretion nor an antinatriuresis was observed when renal perfusion pressure was kept constant during carotid occlusion. We conclude that, in conscious dogs at rest, the moderate sympathetic activation associated with carotid occlusion is too small to induce renal sympathetic vasoconstriction or antinatriuresis. The "carotid sinus polyuria" is a pressure-diuresis.

  1. The Potential Role of Catheter-Based Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Chronic and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Sata, Yusuke; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-07-01

    Sympathetic activation is a hallmark of chronic and end-stage renal disease and adversely affects cardiovascular prognosis. Hypertension is present in the vast majority of these patients and plays a key role in the progressive deterioration of renal function and the high rate of cardiovascular events in this patient cohort. Augmentation of renin release, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renal vascular resistance are direct consequences of efferent renal sympathetic nerve stimulation and the major components of neural regulation of renal function. Renal afferent nerve activity directly influences sympathetic outflow to the kidneys and other highly innervated organs involved in blood pressure control via hypothalamic integration. Renal denervation of the kidney has been shown to reduce blood pressure in many experimental models of hypertension. Targeting the renal nerves directly may therefore be specifically useful in patients with chronic and end-stage renal disease. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of catheter-based renal denervation in patients with impaired kidney function and also reflect on the potential impact on other cardiovascular conditions commonly associated with chronic kidney disease such as heart failure and arrhythmias.

  2. Upregulation of renal BSC1 and TSC in prenatally programmed hypertension.

    PubMed

    Manning, Jennifer; Beutler, Kathleen; Knepper, Mark A; Vehaskari, V Matti

    2002-07-01

    Prenatal factors, especially intrauterine growth retardation, have been shown to correlate with the risk of essential hypertension in adult life, but the mechanisms are unknown. An experimental model of prenatal programming of hypertension in the rat, induced by a maternal low-protein diet during pregnancy, was employed to study the role of renal Na reabsorption in the pathogenesis. The abundance of the apical Na transporter type III Na/H exchanger (NHE3), bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (BSC1), thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransporter (TSC), and the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na channel (ENaC) was determined by semiquantitative immunoblotting in kidneys from the offspring at 4 wk of age, before hypertension became manifest. There were no significant differences between the experimental and control rats in the abundance of NHE3 or any of the ENaC subunits. In contrast, the quantity of BSC1 in the experimental group was increased to 302% of control (P < 0.001) and that of TSC to 157% of control (P < 0.05). Determination of specific mRNA levels by ELISA-linked RT-PCR revealed a significantly increased BSC1 mRNA at 1 day (P < 0.01), 4 wk (P < 0.01), and 8 wk (P < 0.001) of age, and a significantly increased TSC mRNA at 4 wk of age (P < 0.05) in the experimental group. The results suggest that prenatal programming of hypertension involves transcriptional upregulation of Na transport in thick ascending limb and distal convoluted tubule.

  3. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarenal autoregulatory mechanisms maintain renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) independent of renal perfusion pressure (RPP) over a defined range (80–180 mmHg). Such autoregulation is mediated largely by the myogenic and the macula densa-tubuloglomerular feedback (MD-TGF) responses that regulate preglomerular vasomotor tone primarily of the afferent arteriole. Differences in response times allow separation of these mechanisms in the time and frequency domains. Mechanotransduction initiating the myogenic response requires a sensing mechanism activated by stretch of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and coupled to intracellular signaling pathways eliciting plasma membrane depolarization and a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Proposed mechanosensors include epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), integrins, and/or transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Increased [Ca2+]i occurs predominantly by Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCC). Increased [Ca2+]i activates inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) to mobilize Ca2+ from sarcoplasmic reticular stores. Myogenic vasoconstriction is sustained by increased Ca2+ sensitivity, mediated by protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase that favors a positive balance between myosin light-chain kinase and phosphatase. Increased RPP activates MD-TGF by transducing a signal of epithelial MD salt reabsorption to adjust afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. A combination of vascular and tubular mechanisms, novel to the kidney, provides for high autoregulatory efficiency that maintains RBF and GFR, stabilizes sodium excretion, and buffers transmission of RPP to sensitive glomerular capillaries, thereby protecting against hypertensive barotrauma. A unique aspect of the myogenic response in the renal vasculature is modulation of its strength and speed by the MD-TGF and by a connecting tubule glomerular feedback (CT-GF) mechanism

  4. Renal handling of sodium and water in the hypothyroid rat

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Ulrich F.; Barenberg, Robert L.; Chavez, Rafaelita; Vaamonde, Carlos A.; Papper, Solomon

    1972-01-01

    Hypothyroid rats were examined with conventional renal clearance and micropuncture techniques to elicit the mechanism and site within the nephron responsible for the increased salt and water excretion observed in these animals. When compared with age-matched control rats, a decrease in inulin clearance of 30% (P < 0.001) and in Hippuran clearance of 32% (P < 0.005) was observed in the hypothyroid rats. Absolute excretion of sodium and water was increased 3-fold (P < 0.02) and 2-fold (P < 0.025), respectively, while fractional excretion of sodium and water was increased 4.3-fold (P < 0.02) and 2.9-fold (P < 0.05), respectively, in the hypothyroid animals. Fractional proximal reabsorption of sodium as assessed from proximal tubular fluid to plasma ratios of inulin ([TF/P]IN) was found to be decreased by 28% (P < 0.001) in the hypothyroid rats. Superficial single nephron filtration rate was reduced proportionately to the decrease in total filtration rate in the hypothyroid rats. These data indicate that the proximal tubule is one of the sites of diminished sodium and water reabsorption in the hypothyroid rat. The data also suggest that the observed decrease in glomerular filtration rate in the hypothyroid animals is not caused by a decrease in the number of functioning nephrons and that the observed increase in sodium and water excretion is not caused by a redistribution of filtrate from juxtamedullary to superficial nephrons. Although the exact mechanisms of the observed changes in proximal tubular function remain unknown, the data suggest that they are probably related to the lack of thyroid hormone. Whatever their mechanism, it appears that the enhanced sodium and water excretion observed in the hypothyroid animals must be determined by further reduction in tubular sodium reabsorption in the distal nephron. PMID:5024038

  5. Renal Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... as “simple” cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and contain water-like fluid. Renal cysts are fairly common in ... simple kidney cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and only water-like fluid inside. They are fairly common in ...

  6. Effects of positive acceleration /+Gz/ on renal function and plasma renin in normal man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Shubrooks, S. J., Jr.; Fishman, L. M.; Duncan, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of positive radial centrifugation (+Gz) on plasma resin activity (PRA) and renal function were assessed in 15 normal male subjects under carefully controlled conditions of Na, K, and water intake. Twenty minutes of +2.0 Gz resulted in significant decreases in the mean rate of sodium excretion and creatine clearance and in a doubling of PRA in seven sodium-depleted subjects (10 meq Na intake). In eight sodium-replete subjects (200 mq Na intake), 30 min of +2.0 Gz was also associated with a decrease in the mean rate of sodium excretion. As a consequence of a concurrent decrease in creatine clearance, the fractional excretion of sodium during centrifugation did not differ from control, suggesting that the changes in Na excretion were mediated primarily by renal hemodynamic factors, although enhanced renal tubular sodium reabsorption may also have played a role.

  7. In vivo maturation of functional renal organoids formed from embryonic cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Xinaris, Christodoulos; Benedetti, Valentina; Rizzo, Paola; Abbate, Mauro; Corna, Daniela; Azzollini, Nadia; Conti, Sara; Unbekandt, Mathieu; Davies, Jamie A; Morigi, Marina; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    The shortage of transplantable organs provides an impetus to develop tissue-engineered alternatives. Producing tissues similar to immature kidneys from simple suspensions of fully dissociated embryonic renal cells is possible in vitro, but glomeruli do not form in the avascular environment. Here, we constructed renal organoids from single-cell suspensions derived from E11.5 kidneys and then implanted these organoids below the kidney capsule of a living rat host. This implantation resulted in further maturation of kidney tissue, formation of vascularized glomeruli with fully differentiated capillary walls, including the slit diaphragm, and appearance of erythropoietin-producing cells. The implanted tissue exhibited physiologic functions, including tubular reabsorption of macromolecules, that gained access to the tubular lumen on glomerular filtration. The ability to generate vascularized nephrons from single-cell suspensions marks a significant step to the long-term goal of replacing renal function by a tissue-engineered kidney.

  8. In Vivo Maturation of Functional Renal Organoids Formed from Embryonic Cell Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Valentina; Rizzo, Paola; Abbate, Mauro; Corna, Daniela; Azzollini, Nadia; Conti, Sara; Unbekandt, Mathieu; Davies, Jamie A.; Morigi, Marina; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The shortage of transplantable organs provides an impetus to develop tissue-engineered alternatives. Producing tissues similar to immature kidneys from simple suspensions of fully dissociated embryonic renal cells is possible in vitro, but glomeruli do not form in the avascular environment. Here, we constructed renal organoids from single-cell suspensions derived from E11.5 kidneys and then implanted these organoids below the kidney capsule of a living rat host. This implantation resulted in further maturation of kidney tissue, formation of vascularized glomeruli with fully differentiated capillary walls, including the slit diaphragm, and appearance of erythropoietin-producing cells. The implanted tissue exhibited physiologic functions, including tubular reabsorption of macromolecules, that gained access to the tubular lumen on glomerular filtration. The ability to generate vascularized nephrons from single-cell suspensions marks a significant step to the long-term goal of replacing renal function by a tissue-engineered kidney. PMID:23085631

  9. Effects of renal function on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lesinurad in adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Michael; Valdez, Shakti; Zhou, Dongmei; Kerr, Bradley; Lee, Caroline A; Shen, Zancong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lesinurad is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor approved for the treatment of gout in combination with a xanthine oxidase inhibitor (XOI) in patients who have not achieved target serum uric acid (sUA) levels with an XOI alone. Most people with gout have chronic kidney disease. The pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad were assessed in subjects with impaired renal function. Methods Two Phase I, multicenter, open-label, single-dose studies enrolled subjects with normal renal function (estimated creatinine clearance [eCrCl] >90 mL/min; N=12) or mild (eCrCl 60–89 mL/min; N=8), moderate (eCrCl 30–59 mL/min; N=16), or severe (eCrCl <30 mL/min; N=6) renal impairment. Subjects were given a single oral lesinurad dose of 200 mg (N=24) or 400 mg (N=18). Blood and urine samples were analyzed for plasma lesinurad concentrations and serum and urine uric acid concentrations. Safety was assessed by adverse events and laboratory data. Results Mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment increased lesinurad plasma area under the plasma concentration–time curve by 34%, 54%–65%, and 102%, respectively. Lesinurad plasma Cmax was unaffected by renal function status. Lower renal clearance and urinary excretion of lesinurad were associated with the degree of renal impairment. The sUA-lowering effect of a single dose of lesinurad was similar between mild renal impairment and normal function, reduced in moderate impairment, and greatly diminished in severe impairment. Lesinurad increased urinary urate excretion in normal function and mild renal impairment; the increase was less with moderate or severe renal impairment. Lesinurad was well tolerated by all subjects. Conclusion Lesinurad exposure increased with decreasing renal function; however, the effects of lesinurad on sUA were attenuated in moderate to severe renal impairment. PMID:27843295

  10. Effects of "in vivo" administration of baclofen on rat renal tubular function.

    PubMed

    Donato, Verónica; Pisani, Gerardo Bruno; Trumper, Laura; Monasterolo, Liliana Alicia

    2013-09-05

    The effects of the in vivo administration of baclofen on renal tubular transport and aquaporin-2 (AQP2) expression were evaluated. In conscious animals kept in metabolic cages, baclofen (0.01-1mg/kg, s.c.) induced a dose-dependent increment in the urine flow rate (UFR) and in sodium and potassium excretion, associated with an increased osmolal clearance (Closm), a diminished urine to plasma osmolality ratio (Uosm/Posm) and a decrease in AQP2 expression. The above mentioned baclofen effects on functional parameters were corroborated by using conventional renal clearance techniques. Additionally, this model allowed the detection of a diminution in glucose reabsorption. Some experiments were performed with water-deprived or desmopressin-treated rats kept in metabolic cages. Either water deprivation or desmopressin treatment decreased the UFR and increased the Uosm/Posm. Baclofen did not change the Uosm/Posm or AQP2 expression in desmopressin-treated rats; but it increased the UFR and diminished the Uosm/Posm and AQP2 expression in water-deprived animals. These results indicate that in vivo administration of baclofen promotes alterations in proximal tubular transport, since glucose reabsorption was decreased. The distal tubular function was also affected. The increased Closm indicates an alteration in solute reabsorption at the ascending limb of the Henle's loop. The decreased Uosm/Posm and AQP2 expression in controls and in water-deprived, but not in desmopressin-treated rats, lead us to speculate that some effect of baclofen on endogenous vasopressin availability could be responsible for the impaired urine concentrating ability, more than any disturbance in the responsiveness of the renal cells to the hormone.

  11. Dopamine and angiotensin type 2 receptors cooperatively inhibit sodium transport in human renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Gildea, John J; Wang, Xiaoli; Shah, Neema; Tran, Hanh; Spinosa, Michael; Van Sciver, Robert; Sasaki, Midori; Yatabe, Junichi; Carey, Robert M; Jose, Pedro A; Felder, Robin A

    2012-08-01

    Little is known regarding how the kidney shifts from a sodium and water reclaiming state (antinatriuresis) to a state where sodium and water are eliminated (natriuresis). In human renal proximal tubule cells, sodium reabsorption is decreased by the dopamine D(1)-like receptors (D(1)R/D(5)R) and the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT(2)R), whereas the angiotensin type 1 receptor increases sodium reabsorption. Aberrant control of these opposing systems is thought to lead to sodium retention and, subsequently, hypertension. We show that D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation increased plasma membrane AT(2)R 4-fold via a D(1)R-mediated, cAMP-coupled, and protein phosphatase 2A-dependent specific signaling pathway. D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation also reduced the ability of angiotensin II to stimulate phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an effect that was partially reversed by an AT(2)R antagonist. Fenoldopam did not increase AT(2)R recruitment in renal proximal tubule cells with D(1)Rs uncoupled from adenylyl cyclase, suggesting a role of cAMP in mediating these events. D(1)Rs and AT(2)Rs heterodimerized and cooperatively increased cAMP and cGMP production, protein phosphatase 2A activation, sodium-potassium-ATPase internalization, and sodium transport inhibition. These studies shed new light on the regulation of renal sodium transport by the dopaminergic and angiotensin systems and potential new therapeutic targets for selectively treating hypertension.

  12. Relationship between urinary concentrating ability, arginine vasopressin in plasma and blood pressure after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, E B; Danielsen, H; Nielsen, A H; Knudsen, F; Jensen, T; Kornerup, H J; Madsen, M

    1985-06-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and serum osmolality (Sosm) were determined in plasma before and after a 24-h period of water deprivation in 19 patients with post-renal-transplant hypertension (group I), 14 patients with normal blood pressure after renal transplantation (group II), and 16 healthy control subjects (group III). Urine was collected in four periods of 6 h each for measurement of urine volume (V), urine osmolality (Uosm) and tubular capacity for reabsorption of water (Tc water). AVP and Sosm increased significantly in all groups. The AVP levels were the same in groups I and II, but higher in group I than III both before and after water deprivation. In group II, AVP was higher than in group III only after water deprivation; V was significantly reduced in all groups. In groups I and II, V, Tc water and Uosm were the same. In group III, V was significantly lower than in groups I and II in the last three 6-h periods, and in group III, Tc water was higher in the first 6-h period than in groups I and II. There was a significant positive correlation between AVP and Sosm in all groups. In conclusion, renal water excretion cannot be reduced as rapidly and to the same degree in renal transplant recipients as in control subjects because of a decreased renal capacity for reabsorption of water. The higher AVP level in the transplant recipients may be a compensatory phenomenon for the decreased responsiveness of the renal collecting ducts in the transplanted kidneys. The sensitivity of the osmoreceptors to changes in osmotic stimuli was normal.

  13. Endothelin and endothelin receptors in the renal and cardiovascular systems.

    PubMed

    Vignon-Zellweger, Nicolas; Heiden, Susi; Miyauchi, Takashi; Emoto, Noriaki

    2012-10-15

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a multifunctional hormone which regulates the physiology of the cardiovascular and renal systems. ET-1 modulates cardiac contractility, systemic and renal vascular resistance, salt and water renal reabsorption, and glomerular function. ET-1 is responsible for a variety of cellular events: contraction, proliferation, apoptosis, etc. These effects take place after the activation of the two endothelin receptors ET(A) and ET(B), which are present - among others - on cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, smooth muscle and endothelial cells, glomerular and tubular cells of the kidney. The complex and numerous intracellular pathways, which can be contradictory in term of functional response depending on the receptor type, cell type and physiological situation, are described in this review. Many diseases share an enhanced ET-1 expression as part of the pathophysiology. However, the use of endothelin blockers is currently restricted to pulmonary arterial hypertension, and more recently to digital ulcer. The complexity of the endothelin system does not facilitate the translation of the molecular knowledge to clinical applications. Endothelin antagonists can prevent disease development but secondary undesirable effects limit their usage. Nevertheless, the increasing understanding of the effects of ET-1 on the cardiac and renal physiology maintains the endothelin system as a promising therapeutic target.

  14. Obesity-induced hypertension: interaction of neurohumoral and renal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, Michael E

    2015-03-13

    Excess weight gain, especially when associated with increased visceral adiposity, is a major cause of hypertension, accounting for 65% to 75% of the risk for human primary (essential) hypertension. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption impairs pressure natriuresis and plays an important role in initiating obesity hypertension. The mediators of abnormal kidney function and increased blood pressure during development of obesity hypertension include (1) physical compression of the kidneys by fat in and around the kidneys, (2) activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and (3) increased sympathetic nervous system activity. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is likely due, in part, to renal compression, as well as sympathetic nervous system activation. However, obesity also causes mineralocorticoid receptor activation independent of aldosterone or angiotensin II. The mechanisms for sympathetic nervous system activation in obesity have not been fully elucidated but may require leptin and activation of the brain melanocortin system. With prolonged obesity and development of target organ injury, especially renal injury, obesity-associated hypertension becomes more difficult to control, often requiring multiple antihypertensive drugs and treatment of other risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, and inflammation. Unless effective antiobesity drugs are developed, the effect of obesity on hypertension and related cardiovascular, renal and metabolic disorders is likely to become even more important in the future as the prevalence of obesity continues to increase.

  15. Severe hypophosphatemic osteomalacia with Fanconi syndrome, renal tubular acidosis, vitamin D deficiency and primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Bando, Hironori; Hashimoto, Naoko; Hirota, Yushi; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko; Hisa, Itoko; Inoue, Yoshifumi; Imanishi, Yasuo; Seino, Susumu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for back pain with marked thoracic and extremity deformities leading to bed-rest for three years. She was diagnosed with hypophosphatemic osteomalacia based on her symptoms, X-ray and bone scintigram, high serum alkaline phosphatase level, and low serum levels of both phosphorus and 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3) with inhibition of phosphorus reabsorption. Fanconi syndrome with renal tubular acidosis, vitamin D deficiency and primary biliary cirrhosis were related to the pathogenesis of osteomalacia in this case. Several causal diseases may be concomitantly responsible for acceleration of the severity of osteomalacia in this patient.

  16. An experimental renal acidification defect in patients with hereditary fructose intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Morris, R. Curtis

    1968-01-01

    In adult patients with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) fructose induces a renal acidification defect characterized by (a) a 20-30% reduction in tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate (T HCO3-) at plasma bicarbonate concentrations ranging from 21-31 mEq/liter, (b) a maximal tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate (Tm HCO3-) of approximately 1.9 mEq/100 ml of glomerular filtrate, (c) disappearance of bicarbonaturia at plasma bicarbonate concentrations less than 15 mEq/liter, and (d) during moderately severe degrees of acidosis, a sustained capacity to maintain urinary pH at normal minima and to excrete acid at normal rates. In physiologic distinction from this defect, the renal acidification defect of patients with classic renal tubular acidosis is characterized by (a) just less than complete tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate at plasma bicarbonate concentrations of 26 mEq/liter or less, (b) a normal Tm HCO3- of approximately 2.8 mEq/100 ml of glomerular filtrate, and (c) during acidosis of an even severe degree, a quantitatively trivial bicarbonaturia, as well as (d) a urinary pH of greater than 6. That the fructose-induced renal acidification defect involves a reduced H+ secretory capacity of the proximal nephron is supported by the magnitude of the reduction in T HCO3- (20-30%) and the simultaneous occurrence and the persistence throughout administration of fructose of impaired tubular reabsorption of phosphate, alpha amino nitrogen and uric acid. A reduced H+ secretory capacity of the proximal nephron also appears operative in two unrelated children with hyperchloremic acidosis, Fanconi's syndrome, and cystinosis. In both, T HCO3- was reduced 20-30% at plasma bicarbonate concentrations ranging from 20-30 mEq/liter. The bicarbonaturia disappeared at plasma bicarbonate concentrations ranging from 15-18 mEq/liter, and during moderate degrees of acidosis, urinary pH decreased to less than 6, and the excretion rate of acid was normal. PMID:5658593

  17. Mini-review: regulation of the renal NaCl cotransporter by hormones.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Gamba, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    The renal thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter, NCC, is the major pathway for salt reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule. The activity of this cotransporter is critical for regulation of several physiological variables such as blood pressure, serum potassium, acid base metabolism, and urinary calcium excretion. Therefore, it is not surprising that numerous hormone-signaling pathways regulate NCC activity to maintain homeostasis. In this review, we will provide an overview of the most recent evidence on NCC modulation by aldosterone, angiotensin II, vasopressin, glucocorticoids, insulin, norepinephrine, estradiol, progesterone, prolactin, and parathyroid hormone.

  18. Renal denervation for resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Manuel de Sousa; Gonçalves, Pedro de Araújo; Oliveira, Eduardo Infante de; Carvalho, Henrique Cyrne de

    2015-02-01

    There is a marked contrast between the high prevalence of hypertension and the low rates of adequate control. A subset of patients with suboptimal blood pressure control have drug-resistant hypertension, in the pathophysiology of which chronic sympathetic hyperactivation is significantly involved. Sympathetic renal denervation has recently emerged as a device-based treatment for resistant hypertension. In this review, the pathophysiological mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous system and cardiovascular disease are reviewed, focusing on resistant hypertension and the role of sympathetic renal denervation. An update on experimental and clinical results is provided, along with potential future indications for this device-based technique in other cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Renal transport of urate during diuretic-induced hypouricemia.

    PubMed

    Reese, O G; Steele, T H

    1976-06-01

    The effect of two weeks administration of a uricosuric diuretic (SKF-62698) on renal urate handling has been examined in 11 normal men. Plasma urate concentrations had declined by more than 60 per cent after two weeks. Urate excretion per unit of glomerular filtration rate and urate clearance (Curate) per unit of glomerular filtration rate were increased after the administration of SKF-62698. The importance of intact tubular secretion of urate in producing these changes was assessed by administering pyrazinamide, an agent that curtails urate secretion, to each participant. The decrements in urate excretion and clearance produced by pyrazinamide both increased significantly, whereas the residual urate excretion rates and clearances not suppressible by pyrazinamide were only minimally altered by SKF-62698 treatment. These results suggest that the excretion of secreted urate was enhanced by prolonged administration of SKF-62698, probably secondary to the inhibition of postsecretory urate reabsorption. In addition, because the nonsuppressible urate excretion did not decline despite a 63 per cent reduction in the plasma urate, it is likely that the reabsorption of filtered urate also was impaired by SKF-62698.

  20. [Chronic renal insufficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism in rats. Biochemical and histological evaluation].

    PubMed

    Virgós, M J; Menéndez-Rodríguez, P; Serrano, M; González-Carcedo, A; Braga, S; Cannata, J B

    1993-12-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) in rats (surgical nephrectomy, 5/6) as well as its derived bone lesions have been studied. Eighty-five male Wistar rats were used, to which chronic renal failure was induced in 1 or 2 surgical times, the parameters of renal function in basal conditions and at different times after surgery being determined. With the method used chronic renal failure is induced with values of creatinine clearance 2/3 times lower than the initial ones (p < 0.05), which stabilize at the 7th week. On the other hand the parathyroid hormone levels (PTH) in serum triple (from 125 +/- 49 to 395 +/- 191, p < 0.05), and a decrease in the tubular phosphate reabsorption is produced (p < 0.001). In bone histology an increase in resorption and bone formation is observed as well as paratrabecular fibrosis, all of which is compatible with the histological diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism. The model of surgical renal insufficiency with ablation of 5/6 of the renal mass, reduces renal function to 1/3 of the initial values after 7 weeks, this procedure having a 20% global mortality without differences being observed between the carrying out of nephrectomies in 1 or 2 surgical times. This degree of CRF was accompanied by secondary hyperparathyroidism both at the biochemical and histological levels, findings which are of great usefulness for future experimental studies.

  1. A mathematical model of long-term renal sympathetic nerve activity inhibition during an increase in sodium intake

    PubMed Central

    Denizhan, Yagmur; Hester, Robert

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that renal nerves directly affect renal vascular resistance, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renin secretion. Inhibition of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) decreases renal vascular resistance, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renin secretion, leading to an increase in sodium excretion. Although several studies show that inhibition of RSNA promotes sodium excretion during an acute blood volume expansion, there is limited research relating to the importance of RSNA inhibition that contributes to sodium homeostasis during a long-term increase in sodium intake. Therefore, to dissect the underlying mechanisms of sodium excretion, a mathematical model of a cardiovascular system consisting of two kidneys, each with an independent RSNA, was developed. Simulations were performed to determine the responses of RSNA and sodium excretion to an increased sodium intake. In these simulations, RSNA in the left kidney was fixed at its normal steady-state value, while RSNA in the contralateral kidney was allowed to change normally in response to the increased sodium intake. The results demonstrate that the fixed-RSNA kidney excretes less sodium than the intact-RSNA collateral kidney. Because each kidney is exposed to the same arterial pressure and circulatory hormones, the impaired sodium excretion in the absence of RSNA inhibition supports the hypothesis that RSNA inhibition contributes to natriuresis in response to a long-term increase in sodium intake. PMID:24285363

  2. The effect of maleate induced proximal tubular dysfunction on the renal handling of Tc-99m DMSA in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Provoost, A.P.; Van Aken, M.

    1984-01-01

    In the healthy kidney Tc-99m DMSA accumulates in the proximal tubular cells. Consequently, impairment of the reabsorptive function of these cells may alter the renal handling of this static renal imaging agent. The authors investigated in rats the effects of a sodiummaleate (Ma) (2mmol/kg iv) induced proximal tubular dysfunction on the renal accumulation and excretion of Tc-99m DMSA. Such a treatment results in a moderate fall of the glomerular filtration rate, glycosuria, aminoaciduria and a tubular proteinuria. In 7 adult male Wistar rats, Tc-99m DMSA scans were taken before Ma, on the day of treatment, and 1 week thereafter. The accumulation of Tc-99m DMSA in kidneys (Ki) and bladder (Bl) was determined at 1, 2, 4, and 24 hours after i.v. injection. The results, expressed as a percentage of the injected dose, are presented. The findings show that a reversible Ma induced impairment of the proximal reabsorptive capacity severely alters the renal tubular handling of Tc-99m DMSA. In contrast to the control situation, only a small fraction of the DMSA is retained in the kidney and the majority is transported directly to the urinary bladder. When similar alterations are observed in clinical Tc-99m DMSA scans, this may be an indication of an impairment of the proximal tubular function.

  3. Analytical model of photon reabsorption in ZnO quantum dots with size and concentration dependent dual-color photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Baolu; Guo, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yumeng; Fan, Jiyang

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the concentration and size dependent UV/green photoluminescence properties of the ZnO quantum dots (QDs) with sizes in the strong confinement regime. The luminescence characteristics of an ensemble of colloidal semiconductor QDs with quantum confinement effect depend sensitively on particle concentration but this has only been qualitatively understood. By taking ZnO QDs as an ideal prototype, we construct a material-independent theoretical model to study the photon reabsorption phenomenon. The theoretical result agrees well with the experiment. This model can be used to quantitatively study the concentration-dependent luminescence properties of any collection of QDs with considerable size dispersion. On the other hand, the origin of green emission in ZnO QDs remains debated. The comparative study of the size dependence of UV and green emissions in conjunction with the effective-mass approximation calculation suggests that the green emission in the ZnO QDs originates from the conduction band to the deep level transition.

  4. Evaluation of Pharmacokinetic Interactions Between Lesinurad, a New Selective Urate Reabsorption Inhibitor, and Commonly Used Drugs for Gout Treatment.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zancong; Tieu, Kathy; Wilson, David; Bucci, Gail; Gillen, Michael; Lee, Caroline; Kerr, Bradley

    2017-01-11

    Lesinurad is a novel selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor approved for treatment of hyperuricemia associated with gout in combination with xanthine oxidase inhibitors (XOIs). Open-label pharmacokinetic studies were performed in volunteers or subjects with hyperuricemia (serum uric acid ≥ 8 mg/dL) to investigate interactions of lesinurad (with and without concurrent XOIs) with colchicine and 2 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: naproxen and indomethacin. Colchicine studies included consecutive 7-day treatment periods of (1) allopurinol 300 mg, allopurinol 300 mg plus lesinurad 400 or 600 mg, and continued lesinurad 400 or 600 mg; or (2) febuxostat 40 or 80 mg, febuxostat 40 or 80 mg plus lesinurad 400 mg, and continued febuxostat 40 or 80 mg plus lesinurad 600 mg. Naproxen and indomethacin studies included lesinurad 400 mg on day 1, naproxen 250 mg twice daily or indomethacin 25 mg twice daily on days 2-6, and lesinurad 400 mg plus continued naproxen or indomethacin on days 7-13 and the morning of day 14. Lesinurad did not alter the pharmacokinetics of naproxen and modestly altered exposure to colchicine (AUC decrease of ≤ 25%) and indomethacin (AUC increase of ∼35%). Indomethacin did not alter the pharmacokinetics of lesinurad, whereas naproxen modestly decreased the Cmax of lesinurad by ∼27%.

  5. Quantification of re-absorption and re-emission processes to determine photon recycling efficiency in perovskite single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yanjun; Wei, Haotong; Dong, Qingfeng; Huang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    Photon recycling, that is, iterative self-absorption and re-emission by the photoactive layer itself, has been speculated to contribute to the high open-circuit voltage in several types of high efficiency solar cells. For organic–inorganic halide perovskites that have yielded highly efficient photovoltaic devices, however, it remains unclear whether the photon recycling effect is significant enough to improve solar cell efficiency. Here we quantitatively evaluate the re-absorption and re-emission processes to determine photon recycling efficiency in hybrid perovskite with its single crystals by measuring the ratio of the re-emitted photons to the initially excited photons, which is realized by modulating their polarization to differentiate them. The photon recycling efficiencies are revealed to be less than 0.5% in CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3PbBr3 single crystals under excitation intensity close to one sun, highlighting the intrinsically long carrier recombination lifetime instead of the photon-recycling-induced photon propagation as the origin of their long carrier diffusion length. PMID:28220791

  6. Quantification of re-absorption and re-emission processes to determine photon recycling efficiency in perovskite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yanjun; Wei, Haotong; Dong, Qingfeng; Huang, Jinsong

    2017-02-01

    Photon recycling, that is, iterative self-absorption and re-emission by the photoactive layer itself, has been speculated to contribute to the high open-circuit voltage in several types of high efficiency solar cells. For organic-inorganic halide perovskites that have yielded highly efficient photovoltaic devices, however, it remains unclear whether the photon recycling effect is significant enough to improve solar cell efficiency. Here we quantitatively evaluate the re-absorption and re-emission processes to determine photon recycling efficiency in hybrid perovskite with its single crystals by measuring the ratio of the re-emitted photons to the initially excited photons, which is realized by modulating their polarization to differentiate them. The photon recycling efficiencies are revealed to be less than 0.5% in CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3PbBr3 single crystals under excitation intensity close to one sun, highlighting the intrinsically long carrier recombination lifetime instead of the photon-recycling-induced photon propagation as the origin of their long carrier diffusion length.

  7. Renal ischaemia, transient glomerular leak and acute renal tubular damage in patients envenomed by Russell's vipers (Daboia russelii siamensis) in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Tin-Nu-Swe; Tin-Tun; Myint-Lwin; Thein-Than; Tun-Pe; Robertson, J I; Leckie, B J; Phillips, R E; Warrell, D A

    1993-01-01

    Fifty-two patients who had been bitten by Russell's vipers in Myanmar developed acute renal failure (serum creatinine exceeding 1.3 mg/dL). Thirty-four of them (65%) became oliguric, but the other 18 (35%) maintained a urine output of more than 400 mL/24 h. In oliguric patients, gastrointestinal haemorrhages, renal angle tenderness and conjunctival oedema occurred more commonly, and peak serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and the fractional excretion of sodium were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than in non-oliguric patients, indicating a greater degree of renal damage. Urinary concentrations of beta 2 microglobulin and retinol binding protein were raised in most of the patients indicating failure of proximal tubular reabsorption of these proteins, while high urinary N-acetyl glucosaminidase concentrations were consistent with renal tubular damage. Plasma concentrations of active renin were very high, suggesting that renal ischaemia, associated with activation of the renin-angiotensin system, was involved in the development of renal dysfunction.

  8. Multiple Drug Transporters Are Involved in Renal Secretion of Entecavir

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xi; Ma, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Sisi; Weng, Yayun; Lei, Hongmei; Zeng, Su

    2016-01-01

    Entecavir (ETV) is a first-line antiviral agent for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection. Renal excretion is the major elimination path of ETV, in which tubular secretion plays the key role. However, the secretion mechanism has not been clarified. We speculated that renal transporters mediated the secretion of ETV. Therefore, the aim of our study was to elucidate which transporters contribute to the renal disposition of ETV. Our results revealed that ETV (50 μM) remarkably reduced the accumulation of probe substrates in MDCK cells stably expressing human multidrug and toxin efflux extrusion proteins (hMATE1/2-K), organic cation transporter 2 (hOCT2), and carnitine/organic cation transporters (hOCTNs) and increased the substrate accumulation in cells transfected with multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (hMRP2) or multidrug resistance protein 1 (hMDR1). Moreover, ETV was proved to be a substrate of the above-described transporters. In transwell studies, the transport of ETV in MDCK-hOCT2-hMATE1 showed a distinct directionality from BL (hOCT2) to AP (hMATE1), and the cellular accumulation of ETV in cells expressing hMATE1 was dramatically lower than that of the mock-treated cells. The accumulation of ETV in mouse primary renal tubular cells was obviously affected by inhibitors of organic anion transporter 1/3 (Oat1/3), Oct2, Octn1/2, and Mrp2. Therefore, the renal uptake of ETV is likely mediated by OAT1/3 and OCT2 while the efflux is mediated by MATEs, MDR1, and MRP2, and OCTN1/2 may participate in both renal secretion and reabsorption. PMID:27503646

  9. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Martha S; Poole, Judith H

    2002-03-01

    Anatomic and physiologic adaptations within the renal system during pregnancy are significant. Alterations are seen in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration, resulting in changes in normal renal laboratory values. When these normal renal adaptations are coupled with pregnancy-induced complications or preexisting renal dysfunction, the woman may demonstrate a reduction of renal function leading to an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. This article will review normal pregnancy adaptations of the renal system and discuss common pregnancy-related renal complications.

  10. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Persu, Alexandre; Renkin, Jean; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The term “ultima ratio” has multiple, though related, meanings. The motto “ultima ratio regum,” cast on the cannons of the French army of King Louis XIV, meant that war is the last argument of kings, that is, the one to be used after all diplomatic arguments have failed. Along similar lines, we propose that, given the current evidence, renal denervation should be used as a last resort, after state-of-the-art drug treatment optimized at expert centers failed to control blood pressure. PMID:22851728

  11. Temporal changes in floral nectar production, reabsorption, and composition associated with dichogamy in annual caraway (Carum carvi; Apiaceae).

    PubMed

    Langenberger, Michael W; Davis, Arthur R

    2002-10-01

    The dynamics of nectar production were studied in perfect florets of two varieties (Karzo, Moran) of annual caraway (Carum carvi L., Apiaceae). Florets were protandrous and strongly dichogamous, lasting 7-15 d but producing nectar from the stylopodia for 4-12 d, in an interrupted fashion. Nectar secretion began during a floret's phase of stamen elongation and anther dehiscence. After reabsorption of uncollected nectar, at which point nectary surfaces were completely dry, the two styles elongated and a second bout of secretion commenced during the female phase, up to 5 d later, when a floret became receptive to pollination. During the male and female phases, respectively, 0.392 ± 0.064 μL and 1.083 ± 0.261 μL of nectar of similar solute concentration (844 mg/mL) was produced per ten florets. On a daily basis, florets yielded 1.5-fold more nectar in the female than during the male phase. First-time nectar removal throughout the female phase did not match the sum of nectar quantities from male and female phases combined, suggesting that under natural conditions, any uncollected male-phase nectar, once reabsorbed, is not made available to visitors of the same florets when in the female phase. Nectar-sugar composition differed between bouts of secretion; it was hexose-rich (59.6% fructose, 26.9% glucose, 13.6% sucrose) initially, but hexose-dominant (70.2, 26.8, 3.1) during the female phase. A 5.7-fold difference in mean nectar production per floret occurred among plants.

  12. Amino acid infusion blocks renal tubular uptake of an indium-labelled somatostatin analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, P. J.; Wade, A. F.; Gwilliam, M. E.; Peters, A. M.; Myers, M. J.; Gilbey, S. G.; Bloom, S. R.; Calam, J.

    1993-01-01

    The Indium-labelled somatostatin analogue pentetreotide has been successfully developed for imaging of somatostatin receptor positive tumours. However there is significant renal tubular uptake of the radiolabelled peptide, which can obscure upper abdominal tumours and would preclude its use for targeted radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to determine whether amino acid infusion, which has been shown to block renal tubular peptide reabsorption, diminishes renal parenchymal uptake of this radiolabelled analogue. Eight patients being scanned with the 111In-labelled somatostatin analogue, pentetreotide, for localisation of gastroenteropancreatic tumours received an infusion of synthetic amino acids. The ratio of isotope uptake in kidney to that in spleen was assessed, and compared to the ratio for matched control patients, to determine if amino acid infusion reduced renal parenchymal uptake of the radiopharmaceutical. The amount of isotope in the urine was determined to ensure that any effect of the amino acid infusion was unrelated to changes in clearance. Infusion of amino acids significantly reduced renal parenchymal uptake of isotope at 4 h. There was a non-significant increase in urinary clearance of isotope over the 4 h, consistent with reduced reuptake and a lack of effect on glomerular filtration rate. This technique, by preventing renal damage, may allow the use of this somatostatin analogue for local radiotherapy, and could be of wider value in blocking tubular re-uptake of potentially nephrotoxic agents, such as radiolabelled Fab fragments. Images Figure 1 PMID:8099808

  13. SLC5 Sodium-Anion Cotransporters and Renal Urate Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, David B.; Kwon, Charles Y.; Plata, Consuelo; Romero, Michael F.; Zandi-Nejad, Kambiz

    2007-04-01

    Renal urate transport plays a key role in determining the concentration of circulating uric acid. The reabsorption of filtered urate by the renal proximal tubule appears to require apical sodium-dependent anion transport and the apical URAT1 urate-anion exchanger, in that sodium-dependent transport of lactate, ketoacids, nicotinate, and pyrazinoate (PZA) increases the intracellular concentration of substrates for the subsequent exchange with luminal urate. We have identified SLC5A8 and SLC5A12 as candidates for the sodium-anion cotransporter that collaborates with URAT1. Both transporters function as sodium-dependent nicotinate/monocarboxylate/PZA transporters. Localization studies reveal serial co-expression of these transporters with URAT1, with Slc5a12 in the early proximal tubule and Slc5a8 in S2 and S3 segments. Renal urate excretion is conceivably affected by changes in the activity of SLC5A8, SLC5A12, and/or URAT1, with implications for the pathogenesis of hyperuricemia, nephrolithiasis, and related disorders.

  14. [A case of sarcoidosis with hypercalcemia, urolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis and renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Nunohiro, T; Aoi, W; Kadota, J; Ueda, Y; Takahara, O; Yura, M

    1992-08-01

    A sixty nine-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital because of further examination of hypercalcemia. On July 1990, she complained of general fatigue and loss of appetite. She was pointed out to have hypercalcemia (15.1mg/dl), urolithiasis, and renal insufficiency. CT films of the chest showed swelling of the mediastinal lymphnodes and CT of the abdomen nephrocalcinosis. Ga-scintigraphy demonstrated an abnormal accumulation of gallium in the mediastinum. Levels of the parathyroid hormone was normal. Levels of the serum calcium (13.7mg/dl), angiotensin converting enzyme (30.4IU/L) and 1.25 (OH)2D (87PG/ml) were elevated. Giant cells were found in the biopsy specimen of the lung. A significant relationship between the serum calcium and creatinine were observed (r = 0.76, p < 0.02). Proximal fractional reabsorption of sodium showed to be suppressed (47.7%), and distal fractional reabsorption of sodium showed to be normal (88.4%). From these findings hypercalcemia and urolithiasis was suggested to result from sarcoidosis. The hypercalcemia and renal insufficiency improved with corticosteroid therapy.

  15. SGLT2 Inhibitors: Glucotoxicity and Tumorigenesis Downstream the Renal Proximal Tubule?

    PubMed

    Bertinat, Romina; Nualart, Francisco; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2016-08-01

    At present, diabetes mellitus is the main cause of end-stage renal disease. Effective glycaemic management is the most powerful tool to delay the establishment of diabetic complications, such as diabetic kidney disease. Together with reducing blood glucose levels, new anti-diabetic agents are expected not only to control the progression but also to restore known defects of the diabetic kidney. Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are promising anti-diabetic agents that reduce hyperglycaemia by impairing glucose reabsorption in proximal tubule of the kidney and increasing glucosuria. SGLT2 inhibitors have shown to reduce glucotoxicity in isolated proximal tubule cells and also to attenuate expression of markers of overall kidney damage in experimental animal models of diabetes, but the actual renoprotective effect for downstream nephron segments is still unknown and deserves further attention. Here, we briefly discuss possible undesired effects of enhanced glucosuria and albuminuria in nephron segments beyond the proximal tubule after SGLT2 inhibitor treatment, offering new lines of research to further understand the renoprotective action of these anti-diabetic agents. Strategies blocking glucose reabsorption by renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) may be protective for RPTEC, but downstream nephron segments will still be exposed to high glucose and albumin levels through the luminal face. The actual effect of constant enhanced glucosuria over distal nephron segments remains to be established. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1635-1637, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  17. Effect of prostaglandin E1 on certain renal actions of parathyroid hormone

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Nama P.; DeRubertis, Frederick R.; Michelis, Michael F.; Fusco, Robert D.; Field, James B.; Davis, Bernard B.

    1972-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone increased basal adenyl cyclase activity and that increase was inhibited by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). Tissue cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) concentrations were increased by parathyroid hormone and that increase was likewise inhibited by PGE1. Both parathyroid hormone and dibutyryl cyclic AMP increased 32P incorporation into renal cortical phospholipids. PGE1 diminished the effect of parathyroid hormone but not dibutyryl cyclic AMP to influence that parameter. PGE1 likewise modulated the effect of parathyroid hormone but not dibutyryl cyclic AMP to decrease fractional phosphate reabsorption by the renal tubule. It is suggested that PGE1 inhibits the effect of parathyroid hormone by decreasing its effect on adenyl cyclase. Such interaction may be important in modulating the intracellular action of parathyroid hormone on kidney cortex. PMID:4344730

  18. Impairment of renal sodium excretion in tropical residents - phenomenological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, S. K.; Aryee, P. A.; Amuasi, J.; Hesse, I. F. A.; Affram, R. K.

    There is evidence of impaired renal sodium excretion in salt-sensitive African Blacks. A decreased rate of renal sodium chloride (NaCl) excretion, low plasma renin activity and a tendency to elevated blood pressure are the hallmarks of salt sensitivity. Recent evidence indicates that increased proximal and distal tubular fluid reabsorption in some tropical residents may explain the impaired sodium excretion in these people. In this study of a cohort population, we speculated that subjects selected from that population might be salt-sensitive. We therefore measured the sodium balance in 10 normotensive male subjects over 10 consecutive days, after they had ingested a normal or a high amount of sodium, as NaCl (salt) in their diet. We quantified their renal sodium excretion rate by phenomenological analysis of their sodium balance data. We also measured plasma renin activity for 7 consecutive days in a separate group of 6 male and 4 female subjects in order to assess the state of their renin/angiotensin system. We selected all our subjects from a cohort population of 269 subjects randomly selected from a community known to have a high prevalence of primary hypertension. Our data on two separate groups of subjects from the same cohort population revealed delayed renal sodium excretion with t1/2 of about 5 days, compared to published data for normal individuals with t1/2 of less than 24 h. Also, plasma renin activity levels were low. Hence, our subjects are salt-sensitive. Quantification of their renal impairment is important for various reasons: it heightens one's appreciation of the problem of salt retention in African Blacks who are salt-sensitive and it also underlines the importance of the need for further research into the benefits of dietary salt restriction for reducing cardiovascular mortality in African populations, as has been done in some Western countries.

  19. Canagliflozin use in patients with renal impairment-Utility of quantitative clinical pharmacology analyses in dose optimization.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Manoj; Vaidyanathan, Jayabharathi; Marathe, Anshu; Mehrotra, Nitin; Sahajwalla, Chandrahas G; Zineh, Issam; Jain, Lokesh

    2015-06-01

    Canagliflozin (INVOKANA™) is approved as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Canagliflozin inhibits renal sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2), thereby, reducing reabsorption of filtered glucose and increasing urinary glucose excretion. Given the mechanism of action of SGLT2 inhibitors, we assessed the interplay between renal function, efficacy (HbA1c reduction), and safety (renal adverse reactions). The focus of this article is to highlight the FDA's quantitative clinical pharmacology analyses that were conducted to support the regulatory decision on dosing in patients with renal impairment (RI). The metrics for assessment of efficacy for T2DM drugs is standard; however, there is no standard method for evaluation of renal effects for diabetes drugs. Therefore, several analyses were conducted to assess the impact of canagliflozin on renal function (as measured by eGFR) based on available data. These analyses provided support for approval of canagliflozin in T2DM patients with baseline eGFR ≥ 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) , highlighting a data-driven approach to dose optimization. The availability of a relatively rich safety dataset (ie, frequent and early measurements of laboratory markers) in the canagliflozin clinical development program enabled adequate assessment of benefit-risk balance in various patient subgroups based on renal function.

  20. Chloride transporters and receptor-mediated endocytosis in the renal proximal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Devuyst, Olivier; Luciani, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The epithelial cells lining the proximal tubules of the kidney reabsorb a large amount of filtered ions and solutes owing to receptor-mediated endocytosis and polarized transport systems that reflect final cell differentiation. Dedifferentiation of proximal tubule cells and dysfunction of receptor-mediated endocytosis characterize Dent’s disease, a rare disorder caused by inactivating mutations in the CLCN5 gene that encodes the endosomal chloride–proton exchanger, ClC-5. The disease is characterized by a massive urinary loss of solutes (renal Fanconi syndrome), with severe metabolic complications and progressive renal failure. Investigations of mutations affecting the gating of ClC-5 revealed that the proximal tubule dysfunction may occur despite normal endosomal acidification. In addition to defective endocytosis, proximal tubule cells lacking ClC-5 show a trafficking defect in apical receptors and transporters, as well as lysosomal dysfunction and typical features of dedifferentiation, proliferation and oxidative stress. A similar but milder defect is observed in mouse models with defective CFTR, a chloride channel that is also expressed in the endosomes of proximal tubule cells. These data suggest a major role for endosomal chloride transport in the maintenance of epithelial differentiation and reabsorption capacity of the renal proximal tubule. Key points The reabsorptive activity of renal proximal tubule cells is mediated by receptor-mediated endocytosis and polarized transport systems that reflect final cell differentiation. Loss-of-function mutations of the endosomal chloride–proton exchanger ClC-5 (Dent’s disease) cause a major trafficking defect in proximal tubule cells, associated with lysosomal dysfunction, oxidative stress and dedifferentiation/proliferation. A similar but milder defect is associated with mutations in CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). Vesicular chloride transport appears to be important for

  1. The endocannabinoid system in renal cells: regulation of Na+ transport by CB1 receptors through distinct cell signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, L S; Taveira Da Silva, R; Lima, D; Sampaio, C L C; Iannotti, F A; Mazzarella, E; Di Marzo, V; Vieyra, A; Reis, R A M; Einicker-Lamas, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The function of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in renal tissue is not completely understood. Kidney function is closely related to ion reabsorption in the proximal tubule, the nephron segment responsible for the re-absorption of 70–80% of the filtrate. We studied the effect of compounds modulating the activity of cannabinoid (CB) receptors on the active re-absorption of Na+ in LLC-PK1 cells. Experimental Approach Changes in Na+/K+-ATPase activity were assessed after treatment with WIN55,212-2 (WIN), a non-selective lipid agonist, and haemopressin (HP), an inverse peptide agonist at CB1 receptors. Pharmacological tools were used to investigate the signalling pathways involved in the modulation of Na+ transport. Key Results In addition to CB1 and CB2 receptors and TRPV1 channels, the mRNAs encoding for enzymes of the ECS were also expressed in LLC-PK1. WIN (10−7 M) and HP (10−6 M) altered Na+ re-absorption in LLC-PK1 in a dual manner. They both acutely (after 1 min) increased Na+/K+-ATPase activity in a TRPV1 antagonist-sensitive way. WIN's stimulating effect persisted for 30 min, and this effect was partially blocked by a CB1 antagonist or a PKC inhibitor. In contrast, HP inhibited Na+/K+-ATPase after 30 min incubation, and this effect was attenuated by a CB1 antagonist or a PKA inhibitor. Conclusion and Implications The ECS is expressed in LLC-PK1 cells. Both CB1 receptors and TRPV1 channels regulate Na+/K+-ATPase activity in these cells, and are modulated by lipid and peptide CB1 receptor ligands, which act via different signalling pathways. PMID:25537261

  2. Metabolic Syndrome and Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Yi-Jing; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng

    2011-01-01

    Both metabolic syndrome (MetS) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are major global health issues. Current clinical markers used to reflect renal injury include albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Given the same eGFR level, urine albumin might be a better risk marker to predict progression of CKD and future development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Serum Cystatin C is emerging as a new biomarker for early detection of renal injury associated with MetS and cardiovascular risk. In addition to each component, MetS per se influences the incidence and prognosis of renal injury and the odds ratios increased with the increase in the number of metabolic abnormalities. Hyperinsulinemia, activation of rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, increase of oxidative stress, and inflammatory cytokines are proposed to be the plausible biological link between MetS and CKD. Weight control, stick control of blood pressure, glucose, and lipids disorders may lead to lessening renal injury and even the subsequent CVD. PMID:21461396

  3. Applications of urinary proteomics in renal disease research using animal models.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yang; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of renal disease are essential tools in research on kidney disease and have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis. Use of animal models minimises inter-individual differences, allows specific pathological changes to be examined, and facilitates collection of tissue samples. Thus, mechanistic research and identification of biomarkers are possible. Various animal models manifesting specific pathological lesions can be used to investigate acute or chronic kidney disease (CKD). Urine, a terminal metabolic product, is produced via glomerular filtration, reabsorption, and excretion in the tubular and collecting ducts, reflecting the functions of glomeruli or tubular tissue stimulated in various ways or subject to disease. Almost 70 % of urinary proteins originate from the kidney (the other 30 % come from plasma), and urinary sampling is important to noninvasively detect renal disease. Proteomics is powerful when used to screen urine components. Increasingly, urine proteomics is used to explore the pathogenesis of kidney disease in animals and to identify novel biomarkers of renal disease. In this section, we will introduce the field of urinary proteomics as applied in different models of animal renal disease and the valuable role played by proteomics in noninvasive diagnosis and rational treatment of human renal disease.

  4. Transgenic RNAi depletion of claudin-16 and the renal handling of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianghui; Shan, Qixian; Wang, Tong; Gomes, Antonio S; Yan, QingShang; Paul, David L; Bleich, Markus; Goodenough, Daniel A

    2007-06-08

    Tight junctions play a key role in mediating paracellular ion reabsorption in the kidney. Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) is a human disorder caused by mutations in the tight junction protein claudin-16. However, the molecular mechanisms underlining the renal handling of magnesium and its dysfunction causing FHHNC are unknown. Here we show that claudin-16 plays a key role in maintaining the paracellular cation selectivity of the thick ascending limbs of the nephron. Using RNA interference, we have generated claudin-16-deficient mouse models. Claudin-16 knock-down (KD) mice exhibit chronic renal wasting of magnesium and calcium and develop renal nephrocalcinosis. Our data suggest that claudin-16 forms a non-selective paracellular cation channel, rather than a selective Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) channel as previously proposed. Our study highlights the pivotal importance of the tight junction in renal control of ion homeostasis and provides answer to the pathogenesis of FHHNC. We anticipate our study to be a starting point for more sophisticated in vivo analysis of tight junction proteins in renal functions. Furthermore, tight junction proteins could be major targets of drug development for electrolyte disorders.

  5. Tumor Enucleation for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Malkowicz, S. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The increased number of small renal masses (SRMs) detected annually has led to a rise in the use of nephron-sparing surgery (NSS). These techniques aim to preserve the largest amount of healthy renal tissue possible while maintaining the same oncologic outcomes as radical nephrectomy (RN). Additionally, partial nephrectomy (PN) has been linked to a lower risk of chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality when compared to RN. There has been continual progress toward resecting less renal parenchyma. While the predominant surgical method of performing NSS is through traditional PN, simple enucleation (SE) of the tumor has increased in popularity over recent years. SE is a technique that aims to preserve the maximal amount of renal parenchyma possible by utilizing the renal tumor pseudocapsule to bluntly separate the lesion from its underlying parenchyma, offering the smallest possible margin of excised healthy renal tissue. Several studies have demonstrated the oncological safety of SE compared with PN in the treatment of SRMs, with lower overall incidence of positive surgical margins. Additionally, SE has been shown to have similar 5- and 10-year progression-free and cancer-specific survival as PN. We present a review of the literature and an argument for SE to be a routine consideration in the treatment of all renal tumors amenable to NSS.

  6. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products. PMID:27324576

  7. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed ... main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium ...

  8. Primary renal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, K V; Vanikar, A V; Patel, R D; Suthar, K S; Kute, V B; Modi, P R; Trivedi, H L

    2013-09-01

    Primary renal carcinoid tumor is extremely rare and, therefore, its pathogenesis and prognosis is not well known. We report a primary renal carcinoid in a 26-year-old man treated by radical nephrectomy.

  9. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Kidney Failure Kidney failure, also known as renal failure, ... evaluated? How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain ...

  10. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Review Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  11. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C L; Lucas, M J

    2001-09-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue a pregnancy are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Risk is inversely related to the degree of renal insufficiency. Pregnancy-induced changes in the urinary tract can temporarily increase renal function compromise, such as nephrosis, but most often results in no net increase in dysfunction. Common complications of pregnancy--such as hypertension and hypovolemia--can be associated with acute renal injury or aggravation of pre-existing disease.

  12. The link in Linking

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Jane C; Chiale, Pablo A; Gonzalez, Mario D; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    We present 2 cases of the slow-fast form of AVNRT with initially narrow QRS complexes followed by sudden unexpected transition to persistently wide QRS complexes due to aberrant intraventricular conduction. Introduction of a properly timed extrastimulus in one case and critical oscillations in cycle length due to short-long coupling in the second case set the stage for the initial bundle branch block. However, persistence of the aberrancy pattern once the initial event abated was maintained by the "linking" phenomenon. Delayed, retrograde concealed activation from the contralateral bundle branch perpetuated the initial bundle branch block. PMID:23840106

  13. The link in Linking.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Jane C; Chiale, Pablo A; Gonzalez, Mario D; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    We present 2 cases of the slow-fast form of AVNRT with initially narrow QRS complexes followed by sudden unexpected transition to persistently wide QRS complexes due to aberrant intraventricular conduction. Introduction of a properly timed extrastimulus in one case and critical oscillations in cycle length due to short-long coupling in the second case set the stage for the initial bundle branch block. However, persistence of the aberrancy pattern once the initial event abated was maintained by the "linking" phenomenon. Delayed, retrograde concealed activation from the contralateral bundle branch perpetuated the initial bundle branch block.

  14. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Guo, Jin-he; Teng, Gao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a group of metabolic diseases of multiple etiologies. Although great progress has been made, researchers are still working on the pathogenesis of T2DM and how to best use the treatments available. Aside from several novel pharmacological approaches, catheter-based sympathetic renal denervation (RDN) has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. In this article, we will summarize herein the role sympathetic activation plays in the progression of T2DM and review the recent clinical RDN experience in glucose metabolism. We performed systematic review in online databases, including PubMed, EmBase, and Web of Science, from inception until 2015. Studies were included if a statistical relationship was investigated between RDN and T2DM. The quality of each included study was assessed by Newcastle–Ottawa scale score. To synthesize these studies, a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was applied as appropriate. Then, we calculated heterogeneity, performed sensitivity analysis, tested publication bias, and did meta-regression analysis. Finally, we identified 4 eligible articles. In most studies, RDN achieved via novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency energy has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. But the DREAMS-Study showed that RDN did not change median insulin sensitivity nor systemic sympathetic activity. Firstly, the current published studies lacked a proper control group, along with the sample capacity was small. Also, data obtained in the subgroups of diabetic patients were not separately analyzed and the follow-up period was very short. In addition, a reduction in blood pressure accounts for the improvements in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance cannot be excluded. If the favorable result of better glucose metabolism is confirmed in large-scale, randomized studies

  15. Renal Tubular Acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Renal Tubular Acidosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Renal Tubular Acidosis Print A A A What's in ... Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment en español Acidosis tubular renal Each time our internal organs do something, such ...

  16. [Idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Bennani, S; Ait Bolbarod, A; el Mrini, M; Kadiri, R; Benjelloun, S

    1996-06-01

    The authors report a case of idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula. The diagnosis was established angiographically in a 24 year old man presenting gross hematuria. Embolization of the fistula was performed. Efficiency of this treatment was appreciated clinically and by duplex renal ultrasonography. The characteristics of renal arteriovenous fistulas are reviewed.

  17. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome. PMID:27635229

  18. Alteration of renal function of rats following spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Wade, C E; Morey-Holton, E

    1998-10-01

    Following spaceflight, changes in renal function of humans have been suggested. To assess the effects of readaptation on renal function, urine was collected from male rats ( approximately 245 g) over a 2-wk period following a 14-day spaceflight. Rats were assigned to three groups: flight animals (n = 6), flight controls (n = 6) housed in the flight cages on the ground, and vivarium controls (n = 5) housed in standard shoe box cages. Animals were placed into individual metabolic cages for urine collection. Urine output was significantly increased for 3 days following flight. Excretion rates of Na+ and K+ were increased, resulting in an increased osmotic excretion rate. Creatinine excretion rate increased over the first two postflight days. Glomerular filtration rate increased immediately following spaceflight without changes in plasma creatinine, Na+, K+, or osmolality. Increased excretion of solute was thus the result of increased delivery and a decreased percent reabsorption of the filtered load. Osmolal clearance was increased immediately postflight while free water clearance was decreased. In growing rats, the diuresis after short-duration spaceflight is the result of an increase in solute excretion with an accompanying reduction in free water clearance.

  19. Alteration of renal function of rats following spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, C. E.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1998-01-01

    Following spaceflight, changes in renal function of humans have been suggested. To assess the effects of readaptation on renal function, urine was collected from male rats ( approximately 245 g) over a 2-wk period following a 14-day spaceflight. Rats were assigned to three groups: flight animals (n = 6), flight controls (n = 6) housed in the flight cages on the ground, and vivarium controls (n = 5) housed in standard shoe box cages. Animals were placed into individual metabolic cages for urine collection. Urine output was significantly increased for 3 days following flight. Excretion rates of Na+ and K+ were increased, resulting in an increased osmotic excretion rate. Creatinine excretion rate increased over the first two postflight days. Glomerular filtration rate increased immediately following spaceflight without changes in plasma creatinine, Na+, K+, or osmolality. Increased excretion of solute was thus the result of increased delivery and a decreased percent reabsorption of the filtered load. Osmolal clearance was increased immediately postflight while free water clearance was decreased. In growing rats, the diuresis after short-duration spaceflight is the result of an increase in solute excretion with an accompanying reduction in free water clearance.

  20. Proximal renal tubular acidosis: a not so rare disorder of multiple etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Syed K.; Ariceta, Gema; Batlle, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Proximal renal tubular acidosis (RTA) (Type II RTA) is characterized by a defect in the ability to reabsorb HCO3 in the proximal tubule. This is usually manifested as bicarbonate wastage in the urine reflecting that the defect in proximal tubular transport is severe enough that the capacity for bicarbonate reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop and more distal nephron segments is overwhelmed. More subtle defects in proximal bicarbonate transport likely go clinically unrecognized owing to compensatory reabsorption of bicarbonate distally. Inherited proximal RTA is more commonly autosomal recessive and has been associated with mutations in the basolateral sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1). Mutations in this transporter lead to reduced activity and/or trafficking, thus disrupting the normal bicarbonate reabsorption process of the proximal tubules. As an isolated defect for bicarbonate transport, proximal RTA is rare and is more often associated with the Fanconi syndrome characterized by urinary wastage of solutes like phosphate, uric acid, glucose, amino acids, low-molecular-weight proteins as well as bicarbonate. A vast array of rare tubular disorders may cause proximal RTA but most commonly it is induced by drugs. With the exception of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors which cause isolated proximal RTA, drug-induced proximal RTA is associated with Fanconi syndrome. Drugs that have been recently recognized to cause severe proximal RTA with Fanconi syndrome include ifosfamide, valproic acid and various antiretrovirals such as Tenofovir particularly when given to human immunodeficiency virus patients receiving concomitantly protease inhibitors such as ritonavir or reverse transcriptase inhibitors such as didanosine. PMID:23235953

  1. Renal artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    González, J; Esteban, M; Andrés, G; Linares, E; Martínez-Salamanca, J I

    2014-01-01

    A renal artery aneurysm is defined as a dilated segment of renal artery that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal renal artery. Although rare, the diagnosis and incidence of this entity have been steadily increasing due to the routine use of cross-sectional imaging. In certain cases, renal artery aneurysms may be clinically important and potentially lethal. However, knowledge of their occurrence, their natural history, and their prognosis with or without treatment is still limited. This article aims to review the recent literature concerning renal artery aneurysms, with special consideration given to physiopathology, indications for treatment, different technical options, post-procedure complications and treatment outcomes.

  2. An experimental renal acidification defect in patients with hereditary fructose intolerance. I. Its resemblance to renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Morris, R C

    1968-06-01

    In three unrelated patients with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI), but in none of five normal subjects, the experimental administration of fructose invariably induced a reversible dysfunction of the renal tubule with biochemical and physiological characteristics of renal tubular acidosis. During a state of ammonium chloride-induced acidosis, (a) urinary pH was greater than six and the rate of excretion of net acid (titratable acid plus ammonium minus bicarbonate) was inappropriately low, (b) the glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged or decreased modestly, and (c) urinary excretion of titratable acid increased briskly with diuresis of infused phosphate, although urinary pH changed little. The tubular dysfunction, which also includes impaired tubular reabsorption of alpha amino nitrogen and phosphate, persisted throughout administration of fructose and disappeared afterward. The tubular dysfunction was not causally dependent on hypoglucosemia, ammonium chloride-induced acidosis or osmotic diuresis. Rather, it appeared causally related to the fructose-induced metabolic abnormality of patients with HFI. The causal enzymatic defect, the virtual absence of fructose-1-phosphate aldolase, occurs in the kidney as well as in the liver of patients with HFI.

  3. Efficacy of IgM anti-blood type antibody monitoring by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after renal transplantation across the blood barrier: high-dose immunoglobulin administration blocks IgM rather than IgG anti-blood type antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ishida, H; Tanabe, K; Furusawa, M; Isizuka, T; Tokumoto, T; Shimmura, H; Shimizu, T; Miyamoto, N; Hayashi, T; Toma, H

    2004-09-01

    We used an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to investigate the presence of subtypes of anti-blood-type antibodies in patients with biopsy-proven humoral rejection after ABO-incompatible renal transplantation. High agglutinin IgG and IgM anti-blood type antibodies from 12 ABO-incompatible recipients with vascular rejection were separately assessed using an ELISA. Patients who exhibited excellent renal function despite high agglutinin titers of anti-blood-type antibodies(n = 8) were also examined. All 12 rejection patients exhibited highly elevated titers of IgG and IgM, while the eight stable patients exhibited only slightly elevated IgG titers, but not IgM. IgG and IgM titers did not change after plasmapheresis and steroid pulse therapy, whereas IVIg treatment significantly blocked both IgG and IgM, with IgM being blocked to a larger extent than IgG. Blocking of IgM seems to play an important role in improving ABO-incompatible grafts.

  4. Renal xenobiotic transporters are differentially expressed in mice following cisplatin treatment.

    PubMed

    Aleksunes, Lauren M; Augustine, Lisa M; Scheffer, George L; Cherrington, Nathan J; Manautou, José E

    2008-09-04

    The goal of this study was to identify alterations in mRNA and protein expression of various xenobiotic transport proteins in mouse kidney during cisplatin-induced acute renal failure. For this purpose, male C57BL/6J mice received a single dose of cisplatin (18 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle. Four days later, tissues were collected for assessment of plasma BUN, histopathological analysis of renal lesions, and mRNA and Western blot analysis of renal transporters including organic anion and cation transporters (Oat, Oct), organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrp), multidrug resistance proteins (Mdr), breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (Mate). Cisplatin treatment caused necrosis of renal proximal tubules along with elevated plasma BUN and renal kidney injury molecule-1 mRNA expression. Cisplatin-induced renal injury increased mRNA and protein levels of the efflux transporters Mrp2, Mrp4, Mrp5, Mdr1a and Mdr1b. Uptake transporters Oatp2a1 and Oatp2b1 mRNA were also up-regulated following cisplatin. By contrast, expression of Oat1, Oat2, Oct2 and Oatp1a1 mRNA was reduced in cisplatin-treated mice. Expression of several uptake and efflux transporters was unchanged in cisplatin-treated mice. Apical staining of Mrp2 and Mrp4 proteins was enhanced in proximal tubules from cisplatin-treated mice. Collectively, these expression patterns suggest coordinated regulation of uptake and efflux pathways during cisplatin-induced renal injury. Reduced expression of basolateral and apical uptake transporters along with enhanced transcription of export transporters likely represents an adaptation to lower intracellular accumulation of chemicals, prevent their reabsorption and enhance urinary clearance.

  5. Renal uptake of myoglobin is mediated by the endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin.

    PubMed

    Gburek, Jakub; Birn, Henrik; Verroust, Pierre J; Goj, Bogusława; Jacobsen, Christian; Moestrup, Søren K; Willnow, Thomas E; Christensen, Erik I

    2003-09-01

    Nephrotoxicity of myoglobin is well recognized as playing a part in the development of acute renal failure in settings of myoglobinuria. However, the molecular mechanism of myoglobin uptake in renal proximal tubules has not been clarified. Here, we report that the endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin are involved in renal reabsorption of myoglobin. Both receptors were captured from solubilized renal brush-border membranes by affinity chromatography using myoglobin-Sepharose. Myoglobin bound to purified megalin and cubilin with Kd values of 2.0 and 3 microM, respectively, as evaluated by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Apomyoglobin bound to megalin with the same affinity, and the affinity of apomyoglobin to cubilin was reduced (Kd = 5 microM). Radioiodinated myoglobin could be displaced by apomyoglobin in inhibition studies using isolated renal brush-border membranes (Ki approximately 2 microM). Receptor-associated protein as well as antibodies directed against megalin and cubilin markedly inhibited the uptake of fluorescent-labeled myoglobin by cultured yolk sac BN-16 cells. The significance of megalin- and cubilin-mediated endocytosis for myoglobin uptake in vivo was demonstrated by use of kidney-specific megalin knockout mice. Injected myoglobin was extensively reabsorbed by megalin-expressing proximal tubular cells, whereas there was very little uptake in the megalin-deficient cells. In conclusion, this study establishes the molecular mechanism of myoglobin uptake in the renal proximal tubule involving the endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin. Identification of the receptors for tubular uptake of myoglobin may be essential for development of new therapeutic strategies for myoglobinuric acute renal failure.

  6. Link direction for link prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ke-ke; Small, Michael; Yan, Wei-sheng

    2017-03-01

    Almost all previous studies on link prediction have focused on using the properties of the network to predict the existence of links between pairs of nodes. Unfortunately, previous methods rarely consider the role of link direction for link prediction. In fact, many real-world complex networks are directed and ignoring the link direction will mean overlooking important information. In this study, we propose a phase-dynamic algorithm of the directed network nodes to analyse the role of link directions and demonstrate that the bi-directional links and the one-directional links have different roles in link prediction and network structure formation. From this, we propose new directional prediction methods and use six real networks to test our algorithms. In real networks, we find that compared to a pair of nodes which are connected by a one-directional link, a pair of nodes which are connected by a bi-directional link always have higher probabilities to connect to the common neighbours with only bi-directional links (or conversely by one-directional links). We suggest that, in the real networks, the bi-directional links will generally be more informative for link prediction and network structure formation. In addition, we propose a new directional randomized algorithm to demonstrate that the direction of the links plays a significant role in link prediction and network structure formation.

  7. Renal handling of technetium-99m DMSA: Evidence for glomerular filtration and peritubular uptake

    SciTech Connect

    de Lange, M.J.; Piers, D.A.; Kosterink, J.G.; van Luijk, W.H.; Meijer, S.; de Zeeuw, D.; van der Hem, G.K.

    1989-07-01

    The finding of an enhanced excretion of (/sup 99m/Tc)dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) in patients with tubular reabsorption disorders prompted us to investigate the role of filtration in the renal handling of (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA. Our studies in human serum indicated that binding to serum proteins was approximately 90%. Chromatography of human urine and studies in rats showed that the complex was excreted unaltered into the urine. Renal extraction of (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA in a human volunteer was 5.8%. Continuous infusion of (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA in 13 individuals with normal renal function gave the following results (mean +/- s.d.): plasma clearance of (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA 34 +/- 4 ml/min, urinary clearance of (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA 12 +/- 3 ml/min. The calculated filtered load of (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA closely resembled the urinary clearance, whereas the plasma clearance was about three times faster. This indicates that peritubular uptake accounts for approximately 65% and filtration for approximately 35% of the renal handling of (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA.

  8. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  9. Visualization of deep ultraviolet photons based on Förster resonance energy transfer and cascade photon reabsorption in diphenylalanine-carbon nitrides composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Zhixing; Zhou, Weiping; Chen, Zhihui; Wang, Huan; Di, Yunsong; Huang, Shisong

    2016-11-01

    A diphenylalanine (L-Phe-L-Phe, FF)-carbon nitride composite film is designed and fabricated to visualize the deep ultraviolet (DUV, 245-290 nm) photons. The FF film, composed of diphenylalanine molecules, doped with carbon nitrides shows blue emission under excitation of DUV light, which makes the DUV beam observable. Both Förster resonance energy transfer and cascade photon reabsorption contribute to the conversion of photon energy. First, the FF is excited by the DUV photons. On one hand, the energy transfers to the embedded carbon nitrides through nonradiative dipole-dipole couplings. On the other hand, the 284 nm photons emitted from the FF would further excite the carbon nitrides, which will finally convert to blue fluorescence. Herein, the experimental demonstration of a simple device for the visualization of high DUV fluxes is reported.

  10. Renal scintiscanning. A review

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E. Rhys

    1970-01-01

    Renal scintiscanning is a simple investigation that does not require special preparation and is well tolerated by patients. Radiopharmaceuticals used in linear scanning are accumulated in the renal cortex. This accumulation is diminished: (a) when the cortex is destroyed, e.g. by pyelonephritis, injury, etc.; and (b) when the amount available to the cortex is reduced, e.g. by ischaemia. The scintigram depicts the kidneys unimpeded by bowel contents, gives a qualitative assessment of renal function and shows the distribution of zones of normal function. Recent technical improvements show great promise in deriving a quantitative measure of renal function in some circumstances. The location of normally functioning cortex is often important in the management of renal diseases and the value of scintiscanning is then considerable. It is occasionally useful in planning surgery. The anatomy of the renal collecting system can be shown only by urography. High dose techniques achieve this even in the face of renal failure, and scintiscanning has few indications in investigating lesions that distort the renal anatomy, e.g. tumours and cysts. Renal scintiscanning is a very valuable additional method to urography, arteriography and renography in investigation of renal disorders. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:4905447

  11. Renal replacement therapy for acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Macedo, E; Bouchard, J; Mehta, R L

    2009-09-01

    Renal replacement therapy became a common clinical tool to treat patients with severe acute kidney injury (AKI) since the 1960s. During this time dialytic options have expanded considerably; biocompatible membranes, bicarbonate dialysate and dialysis machines with volumetric ultrafiltration control have improved the treatment for acute kidney injury. Along with advances in methods of intermittent hemodialysis, continuous renal replacement therapies have gained widespread acceptance in the treatment of dialysis-requiring AKI. However, many of the fundamental aspects of the renal replacement treatment such as indication, timing of dialytic intervention, and choice of dialysis modality are still controversial and may influence AKI patient's outcomes. This review outlines current concepts in the use of dialysis techniques for AKI and suggests an approach for selecting the optimal method of renal replacement therapy.

  12. Water balance and renal function in two species of African lungfish Protopterus dolloi and Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Patel, Monika; Iftikar, Fathima I; Smith, Richard W; Ip, Yuen K; Wood, Chris M

    2009-02-01

    The basic physiology of water balance and kidney function was characterized in two species of African lungfish, Protopterus dolloi and Protopterus annectens. Diffusive water efflux rate constants were low (0.13 h(-1)-0.38 h(-1) in various series) relative to values in freshwater teleost fish. Efflux rate constants increased approximately 3-fold after feeding in both species, and were greatly decreased after 8 months terrestrialization (P. dolloi only tested). Urine flow rates (UFR, 3.9-5.2 mL kg(-1) h(-1)) and glomerular filtration rates (GFR, 6.6-9.3 mL kg(-1) h(-1)) were quite high relative to values in most freshwater teleosts. However urinary ion excretion rates were low, with net re-absorption of >99% Na(+), >98% Cl(-), and >78% Ca(2+) from the primary filtrate, comparable to teleosts. Net water re-absorption was significantly greater in P. dolloi (56%) than in P. annectens (23%). We conclude that renal function in lungfish is similar to that in other primitive freshwater fish, but there is an interesting dichotomy between diffusive and osmotic permeabilities. Aquatic lungfish have low diffusive water permeability, an important pre-adaptation to life on land, and in accord with greatly reduced gill areas and low metabolic rates. However osmotic permeability is high, 4-12 times greater than diffusive permeability. A role for aquaporins in this dichotomy is speculated.

  13. Mechanism of glucocorticoid effect on renal transport of phosphate.

    PubMed

    Turner, S T; Kiebzak, G M; Dousa, T P

    1982-11-01

    We explored whether glucocorticoid administration, a known stimulus of renal gluconeogenesis (GNG), could decrease avid inorganic phosphate (Pi) reabsorption in rats stabilized on low-phosphorus diet (LPD). Rats adapted to LPD were injected with the glucocorticoid (GCD) triamcinolone acetonide (1.25 or 2.5 mg.100 g body wt-1.day-1 ip) for 2 days; they showed a profound increase in urinary excretion of Pi during the injection period. In clearance studies GCD increased the clearance and fractional excretion of Pi but did not change the filtered load of Pi. Initial "uphill" Na+-gradient (Nao+ greater than Nai+)-dependent uptake of 32Pi by luminal brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles prepared from renal cortex of rats treated with GCD was markedly (greater than 40%) decreased compared with control rats; Na+-gradient-dependent uptake of D-[3H]glucose was not diminished. At the "equilibrium" time interval, measured at 120 min, BBM vesicles from control and GCD-treated rats did not differ in the uptake of 32Pi or D-[3H]glucose. With kinetic analysis, BBM from GCD-treated rats showed a marked decrease (-40%) in the maximum velocity (Vmax) of initial Na+-dependent 32Pi uptake, but the apparent affinity of the BBM transport system for Pi (apparent Km = 0.078 mM Pi) was not different from that of controls. Alkaline phosphatase specific activity was much lower (-40%) in BBM from GCD-treated rats compared with controls, but the activities of three other BBM enzymes (maltase, leucine aminopeptidase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase) were not different. The addition of triamcinolone to BBM in vitro had no effect on either Na+-dependent uptake of 32Pi or alkaline phosphatase activity. The rate of GNG from alpha-ketoglutarate was significantly increased in cortical slices from GCD-treated rats adapted to LPD. Also, the NAD+-to-NADH ratio was higher in the renal cortex of GCD-treated rats, although the total content of NAD [NAD+ + NADH] was not different from controls. Renal excretory

  14. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  15. Forging Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewig, John Warren

    Blacksmiths and their craft have changed with the times, and as times change for teachers, they too should be forgers of links. Teacher-to-teacher links should extend beyond the faculty lounge to support systems and active groups of individuals concerned about each other. Another personal link can be made by developing a grade level, system-wide…

  16. Hypertensive pregnancy disorders and future renal disease.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Steven; Craici, Iasmina

    2014-10-01

    Hypertensive pregnancy disorders affect approximately 6 to 8 % of otherwise normal pregnancies. A growing body of evidence links these disorders with the future development of hypertension, coronary disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease. Larger studies associating hypertensive pregnancy to future development of renal disease have been lacking until recently, with publication of several compelling studies in the last 5 years. In this review, we will focus on the recent evidence associating hypertensive pregnancy disorders with the future development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), as well as the development of microalbuminuria. We will also attempt to answer whether these renal risks are due to direct effects of hypertension during pregnancy, or whether they are due to shared environmental and genetic risk factors.

  17. Endothelial Dysfunction in Renal Failure: Current Update.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Miroslav; Stojanovic, Marko; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is principally characterized by impaired endothelium- dependent transduction mechanisms related to vascular relaxation, as an outcome of decreased release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors, mainly nitric oxide, as well as augmented oxidative stress, increased inflammation and predominance of vascular action produced by endothelium-derived contracting factors. Current data strongly suggest that pathological development of different types of kidney impairment with further progression to renal failure includes notable vascular changes associated with endothelial dysfunction. In accordance, this scientific field represents an advancing area of investigation, involving different biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction linked to renal impairment, as well as clinical findings with new information that can provide a more comprehensive understanding of the role of endothelial dysfunction in kidney disease. With regards to quoted facts, the aim of this article was to review the latest data related to endothelial dysfunction and renal failure by selection of relevant articles released from 2010 to 2015.

  18. Renal pelvis or ureter cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell cancer of the renal pelvis or ureter; Kidney cancer - renal pelvis; Ureter cancer ... Cancer can grow in the urine collection system, but it is uncommon. Renal pelvis and ureter cancers ...

  19. Structural renal changes in obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Amann, Kerstin; Benz, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Overweight, obesity, and associated diseases represent an emerging problem, not only in Western countries but also in the developing world. They are now characterized as epidemic diseases. Obesity is particularly serious because its incidence in children and adolescents increased dramatically: it is estimated that in the United States every eighth adolescent suffers from obesity, which in the long run may reduce life expectancy in the population. Apart from cardiovascular disease (ie, blood pressure, stroke, and coronary heart disease), kidney diseases also have been shown to be associated with obesity. Epidemiologic studies have indicated that obesity can be a risk factor of chronic kidney disease irrespective of the presence or absence of diabetes, arterial hypertension, and other comorbidities. More evidence is accumulated on the link between chronic kidney disease in obesity and abnormalities in adipokine secretion (hyperleptinemia, lack of adiponectin), activation of the renin-angiotensin system, chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, lipid accumulation, impaired renal hemodynamics, and diminished nephron number related to body mass. In general, obesity is known to aggravate the course of many primary renal diseases such as glomerulonephritides, but also impairs renal function after kidney transplantation. Microalbuminuria, proteinuria, hyperfiltration, and impaired renal function are associated with obesity. Histologically, secondary focal segmental sclerosis has been shown to be caused particularly by obesity. Of practical purpose for clinical nephrology, loss of body weight either by lifestyle modification or bariatric surgery improves albuminuria and hyperfiltration in obese patients, making renal disease in obesity accessible for prevention programs. This review specifically addresses the pathogenesis and morphology of renal functional and particularly structural changes in obesity and associated renal disease such as diabetic nephropathy.

  20. Renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

    PubMed

    Najafian, Behzad; Mauer, Michael; Hopkin, Robert J; Svarstad, Einar

    2013-05-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked α-galactosidase A deficiency, resulting in accumulation of glycosphingolipids, especially globotriaosylceramide, in cells in different organs in the body. Renal failure is a serious complication of this disease. Fabry nephropathy lesions are present and progress in childhood while the disease commonly remains silent by routine clinical measures. Early and timely diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy is crucial since late initiation of enzyme replacement therapy may not halt progressive renal dysfunction. This may be challenging due to difficulties in diagnosis of Fabry disease in children and absence of a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of early Fabry nephropathy. Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate and regular assessment for proteinuria and microalbuminuria are useful, though not sensitive enough to detect early lesions in the kidney. Recent studies support the value of renal biopsy in providing histological information relevant to kidney function and prognosis, and renal biopsy could potentially be used to guide treatment decisions in young Fabry patients. This review aims to provide an update of the current understanding, challenges, and needs to better approach renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

  1. Atheroembolic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro

    2010-05-08

    Atheroembolic renal disease develops when atheromatous aortic plaques rupture, releasing cholesterol crystals into the small renal arteries. Embolisation often affects other organs, such as the skin, gastrointestinal system, and brain. Although the disease can develop spontaneously, it usually develops after vascular surgery, catheterisation, or anticoagulation. The systemic nature of atheroembolism makes diagnosis difficult. The classic triad of a precipitating event, acute or subacute renal failure, and skin lesions, are strongly suggestive of the disorder. Eosinophilia further supports the diagnosis, usually confirmed by biopsy of an affected organ or by the fundoscopic finding of cholesterol crystals in the retinal circulation. Renal and patient prognosis are poor. Treatment is mostly preventive, based on avoidance of further precipitating factors, and symptomatic, aimed to the optimum treatment of hypertension and cardiac and renal failure. Statins, which stabilise atherosclerotic plaques, should be offered to all patients. Steroids might have a role in acute or subacute progressive forms with systemic inflammation.

  2. [Sarcoidosis : Renal manifestations].

    PubMed

    Löffler, C; Bergner, R

    2017-04-12

    Renal involvement in sarcoidosis is much more common than generally assumed from old epidemiological studies and is often only detected when actively searched for. Many patients with renal sarcoidosis present with no or only few symptoms. The diagnostic work-up of sarcoidosis should always include a possible renal involvement. In cases of impaired renal function, proteinuria or a pathological urine sediment, a renal biopsy specimen should be obtained to assess the type, severity and prognosis of the kidney disease. Treatment is primarily based on the use of corticosteroids. Steroid-sparing agents, such as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and infliximab can be applied; however, the evidence for efficacy of these therapies is mostly based on case series and expert opinions. Discontinuation of immunosuppression therapy bears a high risk of relapse.

  3. GSK3β Mediates Renal Response to Vasopressin by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Satish; Hao, ChuanMing; Woodgett, James; Harris, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is a key target of drug discovery in several diseases, including diabetes and Alzheimer disease. Because lithium, a potent inhibitor of GSK3β, causes nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, GSK3β may play a crucial role in regulating water homeostasis. We developed renal collecting duct-specific GSK3β knockout mice to determine whether deletion of GSK3β affects arginine vasopressin-dependent renal water reabsorption. Although only mildly polyuric under normal conditions, knockout mice exhibited an impaired urinary concentrating ability in response to water deprivation or treatment with a vasopressin analogue. The knockout mice had reduced levels of mRNA, protein, and membrane localization of the vasopressin-responsive water channel aquaporin 2 compared with wild-type mice. The knockout mice also expressed lower levels of pS256-AQP2, a phosphorylated form crucial for membrane trafficking. Levels of cAMP, a major regulator of aquaporin 2 expression and trafficking, were also lower in the knockout mice. Both GSK3β gene deletion and pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3β reduced adenylate cyclase activity. In summary, GSK3β inactivation or deletion reduces aquaporin 2 expression by modulating adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP generation, thereby impairing responses to vasopressin in the renal collecting duct. PMID:20056751

  4. Molecular clock is involved in predictive circadian adjustment of renal function

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Annie Mercier; Centeno, Gabriel; Pradervand, Sylvain; Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Maquelin, Lionel; Cardinaux, Léonard; Bonny, Olivier; Firsov, Dmitri

    2009-01-01

    Renal excretion of water and major electrolytes exhibits a significant circadian rhythm. This functional periodicity is believed to result, at least in part, from circadian changes in secretion/reabsorption capacities of the distal nephron and collecting ducts. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in the distal nephron segments, i.e., distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and connecting tubule (CNT) and the cortical collecting duct (CCD). Temporal expression analysis performed on microdissected mouse DCT/CNT or CCD revealed a marked circadian rhythmicity in the expression of a large number of genes crucially involved in various homeostatic functions of the kidney. This analysis also revealed that both DCT/CNT and CCD possess an intrinsic circadian timing system characterized by robust oscillations in the expression of circadian core clock genes (clock, bma11, npas2, per, cry, nr1d1) and clock-controlled Par bZip transcriptional factors dbp, hlf, and tef. The clock knockout mice or mice devoid of dbp/hlf/tef (triple knockout) exhibit significant changes in renal expression of several key regulators of water or sodium balance (vasopressin V2 receptor, aquaporin-2, aquaporin-4, αENaC). Functionally, the loss of clock leads to a complex phenotype characterized by partial diabetes insipidus, dysregulation of sodium excretion rhythms, and a significant decrease in blood pressure. Collectively, this study uncovers a major role of molecular clock in renal function. PMID:19805330

  5. Changes in renal function in early pregnancy in women with one kidney.

    PubMed

    Davison, J M

    1978-01-01

    In healthy women the 24-hour endogenous creatinine clearance is elevated by some 50 percent within 6 weeks of conception and an analogous increase of the 24-hour glucose excretion occurs. 24-hour glucose excretion later reverts to normal, reflecting a delayed onset of increased tubular reabsorption.Following unilateral nephrectomy there are marked increases in RPF and GFR in the contralateral kidney. Single hypertrophied kidneys apparently can adapt still further as in normal pregnancy. We have studied 5 women, in satisfactory general health prior to the pregnancy, each with only one kidney, before conception and during early pregnancy. Three had had unilateral nephrectomy for renal trauma 6-9 years earlier. two had received renal allografts 3 years earlier. In all cases the endogenous creatinine clearance began to rise in the second half of the menstrual cycle and when pregnancy supervened it rose rapidly to a peak value of 30-40 percent above the midcycle level within 7-10 weeks of the last menstrual period. That early peak was not always sustained and GFR subsequently fell to a level of 25-30 percent above the midcycle level. These changes in renal function were slower and smaller than in healthy women with 2 kidneys but were compatible with a successful outcome of pregnancy in these five cases.

  6. Filterable plasma concentration, glomerular filtration, tubular balance, and renal clearance of heavy metals and organic substances in metal workers

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, S.; Aono, H.; Yokoyama, K.; Murata, K.

    1986-07-01

    To estimate filterable plasma concentration (FPx), glomerular filtration, tubular balance, and renal clearance of heavy metals and organic substances, the authors examined the regressions of the 24-hr urinary excretion on glomerular filtration rate (GFR, 24-hr endogenous creatinine (Cn) clearance) in 19 gun-metal foundry workers with blood lead (Pb) concentrations of 25-59 micrograms/dl. It was estimated that the proportion of FPx to total plasma concentration was on average 15, 7, 3, 0.6, 0.06, and 0.008% for Pb, cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), chromium (Cr), and copper (Cu), respectively. The estimated FPx value was 2.8 X 10(2), 4, 0.08, and 2.8 X 10(4) micrograms/dl for hippuric acid (HA), delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), coproporphyrin (CP), and total urinary solutes (TUS), respectively. The estimated glomerular filtration was significantly greater than the zero level for all substances but inorganic mercury (Hg). Similarly, the estimated net tubular secretion was significantly greater than the zero level for Cr, Cu, and TUS; the net tubular reabsorption was significantly greater than the zero level for Pb, ALA, and CP. The renal clearance of ''filterable'' plasma substance was significantly greater than GFR for Cr, Cu, and TUS and was significantly smaller for Pb, ALA, and CP. Thus the renal excretory mechanisms of substances were classified into four major categories: glomerular filtration for Cd, Mn, Zn, HA, and Cn; glomerular filtration and net tubular secretion for Cr, Cu, and TUS; glomerular filtration and net tubular reabsorption for Pb, ALA, and CP; and no glomerular filtration, i.e., suspected tubular secretion, for Hg.

  7. Renal mass reduction results in accumulation of lipids and dysregulation of lipid regulatory proteins in the remnant kidney.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Moradi, Hamid; Yuan, Jun; Norris, Keith; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2009-06-01

    A significant reduction of renal mass results in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial injury, culminating in end-stage chronic renal failure (CRF). The accumulation of lipids in the kidney can cause renal disease. Uptake of oxidized lipoproteins via scavenger receptors, reabsorption of filtered protein-bound lipids via the megalin-cubilin complex, and increased glucose load per nephron can promote lipid accumulation in glomerular, tubular, and interstitial cells in CRF. Cellular lipid homeostasis is regulated by lipid influx, synthesis, catabolism, and efflux. We examined lipid-regulatory factors in the remnant kidney of rats 11 wk after nephrectomy (CRF) or sham operation. CRF resulted in azotemia, proteinuria, lipid accumulation in the kidney, upregulation of megalin, cubilin, mediators of lipid influx (scavenger receptor class A and lectin-like oxidized receptor-1), lipid efflux (liver X receptor alpha/beta and ATP-binding cassette transporter), and fatty acid biosynthesis (carbohydrate-response element binding protein, fatty acid synthase, and acetyl-CoA carboxylase). However, factors involved in cholesterol biosynthesis (sterol regulatory element binding protein, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, SCAP, Insig-1, and Insig-2) and fatty acid oxidation (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, acyl-CoA oxidase, and liver-type fatty acid binding protein) were reduced in the remnant kidney. Thus CRF results in heavy lipid accumulation in the remnant kidney, which is mediated by upregulation of pathways involved in tubular reabsorption of filtered protein-bound lipids, influx of oxidized lipoproteins and synthesis of fatty acids, and downregulation of pathways involved in fatty acid catabolism.

  8. Fructokinase activity mediates dehydration-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Roncal Jimenez, Carlos A; Ishimoto, Takuji; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Rivard, Christopher J; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Ejaz, A Ahsan; Cicerchi, Christina; Inaba, Shinichiro; Le, MyPhuong; Miyazaki, Makoto; Glaser, Jason; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; González, Marvin A; Aragón, Aurora; Wesseling, Catharina; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    The epidemic of chronic kidney disease in Nicaragua (Mesoamerican nephropathy) has been linked with recurrent dehydration. Here we tested whether recurrent dehydration may cause renal injury by activation of the polyol pathway, resulting in the generation of endogenous fructose in the kidney that might subsequently induce renal injury via metabolism by fructokinase. Wild-type and fructokinase-deficient mice were subjected to recurrent heat-induced dehydration. One group of each genotype was provided water throughout the day and the other group was hydrated at night, after the dehydration. Both groups received the same total hydration in 24 h. Wild-type mice that received delayed hydration developed renal injury, with elevated serum creatinine, increased urinary NGAL, proximal tubular injury, and renal inflammation and fibrosis. This was associated with activation of the polyol pathway, with increased renal cortical sorbitol and fructose levels. Fructokinase-knockout mice with delayed hydration were protected from renal injury. Thus, recurrent dehydration can induce renal injury via a fructokinase-dependent mechanism, likely from the generation of endogenous fructose via the polyol pathway. Access to sufficient water during the dehydration period can protect mice from developing renal injury. These studies provide a potential mechanism for Mesoamerican nephropathy.

  9. Renal dysfunction and coronary disease: a high-risk combination.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney dysfunction is recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and complicates strategies and treatment. Therefore, it is important for cardiologists not only to detect and measure potential kidney dysfunction, but also to know the mechanisms by which the heart and kidney interact, and recognize that in cases of acute coronary syndrome, the presence of renal dysfunction increases the risk of death. The detection and classification of kidney dysfunction into 5 stages is based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The presence of hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, inflammation, activation of the renin-angiotensin system and specific calcifications are the main mechanisms by which renal dysfunction can induce or compound cardiovascular disease. The magnitude of renal dysfunction is related to the cardiovascular risk; a linear relation links the extent of GFR decrease and the risk of cardiovascular events. Renal dysfunction and acute coronary syndromes are a dangerous combination: more common comorbidities, more frequent contraindications for effective drugs and higher numbers of drug-related adverse events such as bleeding partially explain the higher mortality in patients with renal dysfunction. In addition, despite higher risk, patients with renal dysfunction often receive fewer guideline-recommended treatments even in the absence of contraindications. Renal dysfunction induces and promotes atherosclerosis by various pathophysiologic pathways and is associated with other cardiovascular risk factors and underuse of appropriate therapy. Therefore, the assessment of renal function is an important step in the risk evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease.

  10. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  11. Acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-10-01

    Acute renal failure (now acute kidney injury) is a common complication of critical illness affecting between 30 and 60% of critically ill patients. The development of a consensus definition (RIFLE--risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage system) has allowed standardization of reporting and epidemiological work. Multicenter multinational epidemiological studies indicate that sepsis is now the most common cause of acute renal failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) followed by cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury. Unfortunately, our understanding of the pathogenesis of acute renal failure in these settings remains limited. Because of such limited understanding, no reproducibly effective therapies have been developed. In addition the diagnosis of acute renal failure still rests upon the detection of changes in serum creatinine, which only occur if more than 50% of glomerular filtration is lost and are often delayed by more than 24 hours. Such diagnostic delays make the implementation of early therapy nearly impossible. In response to these difficulties, there has been a concerted effort to use proteomics to identify novel early biomarkers of acute renal failure. The identification and study of neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin has been an important step in this field. Another area of active interest and investigation relates to the role of intravenous fluid resuscitation and fluid balance. Data from large observational studies and randomized, controlled trials consistently indicate that a positive fluid balance in patients with acute renal failure represents a major independent risk factor for mortality and provides no protection of renal function. The pendulum is clearly swinging away from a fluid-liberal approach to a fluid-conservative approach in these patients. Finally, there is a growing appreciation that acute renal failure may identify patients who are at increased risk of subsequent chronic renal dysfunction and mortality, opening the way

  12. Renal oncocytoma: new observations

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, M.J.; Hartman, D.S.; Friedman, A.C.; Sherman, J.L.; Lautin, E.M.; Pyatt, R.S.; Ho, C.K.; Csere, R.; Fromowitz, F.B.

    1984-10-01

    Renal oncocytomas are uncommon, benign tumors that can be treated by local incision or heminephrectomy; their preoperative differentiation from renal cell carcinoma, treated by radical nephrectomy, would be invaluable. A particularly important finding, a central scar, not stressed in previous reports, is frequently demonstrated by CT examination. The authors evaluated radiographic studies of 18 pathologically confirmed cases of oncocytoma and compared findings with results of CT, sonography, and angiogrpahy studies of 18 renal cell carcinoma cases. Oncocytomas can be suggested if a stellate scar is identified within an otherwise homogeneous tumor on ultrasound (US) and CT; if the mass appears homogeneous but no scar is present, angiography should be performed.

  13. Evaluation of Pharmacokinetic Interactions Between Lesinurad, a New Selective Urate Reabsorption Inhibitor, and CYP Enzyme Substrates Sildenafil, Amlodipine, Tolbutamide, and Repaglinide.

    PubMed

    Gillen, Michael; Yang, Chun; Wilson, David; Valdez, Shakti; Lee, Caroline; Kerr, Bradley; Shen, Zancong

    2017-01-09

    Lesinurad is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor approved for the treatment of hyperuricemia associated with gout in combination with xanthine oxidase inhibitors. In vitro assays indicate that lesinurad is an inducer of CYPs in the order CYP3A > CYP2C8 > CYP2C9 > CYP2C19 > CYP2B6 and an inhibitor of CYP2C8 and CYP2C9. To investigate the drug interaction potential of lesinurad, clinical drug interaction studies were conducted. Open-label studies in volunteers investigated the effects of single-/multiple-dose lesinurad on the pharmacokinetics of sildenafil and amlodipine (CYP3A4 induction), tolbutamide (CYP2C9 inhibition/induction), and repaglinide (CYP2C8 inhibition/induction). There was no apparent induction of CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 following repeated lesinurad administration, although no inhibition of CYP2C9 and modest inhibition of CYP2C8 were observed following single-dose lesinurad. Consistent with in vitro observations, lesinurad (200 mg once daily) was an inducer of CYP3A based on the effects on sildenafil exposure. Sildenafil exposure decreased by approximately 34% for Cmax and AUC when administered with multiple-dose lesinurad 200 mg and allopurinol 300 mg, relative to sildenafil alone. During lesinurad therapy, the possibility of reduced efficacy of concomitant drugs that are CYP3A substrates should be considered and their efficacy monitored because of induction of CYP3A by lesinurad.

  14. Photon Reabsorption in Mixed CsPbCl3:CsPbI3 Perovskite Nanocrystal Films for Light-Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Cesium lead halide nanocrystals, CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I), exhibit photoluminescence quantum efficiencies approaching 100% without the core–shell structures usually used in conventional semiconductor nanocrystals. These high photoluminescence efficiencies make these crystals ideal candidates for light-emitting diodes (LEDs). However, because of the large surface area to volume ratio, halogen exchange between perovskite nanocrystals of different compositions occurs rapidly, which is one of the limiting factors for white-light applications requiring a mixture of different crystal compositions to achieve a broad emission spectrum. Here, we use mixtures of chloride and iodide CsPbX3 (X = Cl, I) perovskite nanocrystals where anion exchange is significantly reduced. We investigate samples containing mixtures of perovskite nanocrystals with different compositions and study the resulting optical and electrical interactions. We report excitation transfer from CsPbCl3 to CsPbI3 in solution and within a poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix via photon reabsorption, which also occurs in electrically excited crystals in bulk heterojunction LEDs. PMID:28316756

  15. Megalin and cubilin: synergistic endocytic receptors in renal proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Christensen, E I; Birn, H

    2001-04-01

    The multiligand, endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin are colocalized in the renal proximal tubule. They are heavily expressed in the apical endocytic apparatus. Megalin is a 600-kDa transmembrane protein belonging to the low-density lipoprotein-receptor family. The cytoplasmic tail contains three NPXY motifs that mediate the clustering in coated pits and are possibly involved in signaling functions. Cubilin, also known as the intestinal intrinsic factor-cobalamin receptor, is a 460-kDa receptor with no transmembrane domain and no known signal for endocytosis. Because the two receptors bind each other with high affinity and colocalize in several tissues, it is highly conceivable that megalin mediates internalization of cubilin and its ligands. Both receptors are important for normal tubular reabsorption of proteins, including albumin. Among the proteins normally filtered in the glomeruli, cubilin has been shown to bind albumin, immunoglobulin light chains, and apolipoprotein A-I. The variety of filtered ligands identified for megalin include vitamin-binding proteins, hormones, enzymes, apolipoprotein H, albumin, and beta(2)- and alpha(1)-microglobulin. Loss of these proteins and vitamins in the urine of megalin-deficient mice illustrates the physiological importance of this receptor.

  16. The circadian protein period 1 contributes to blood pressure control and coordinately regulates renal sodium transport genes.

    PubMed

    Stow, Lisa R; Richards, Jacob; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Lynch, I Jeanette; Jeffers, Lauren A; Greenlee, Megan M; Cain, Brian D; Wingo, Charles S; Gumz, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    The circadian clock protein period 1 (Per1) contributes to the regulation of expression of the α subunit of the renal epithelial sodium channel at the basal level and in response to the mineralocorticoid hormone aldosterone. The goals of the present study were to define the role of Per1 in the regulation of additional renal sodium handling genes in cortical collecting duct cells and to evaluate blood pressure (BP) in mice lacking functional Per1. To determine whether Per1 regulates additional genes important in renal sodium handling, a candidate gene approach was used. Immortalized collecting duct cells were transfected with a nontarget small interfering RNA or a Per1-specific small interfering RNA. Expression of the genes for α-epithelial sodium channel and Fxyd5, a positive regulator of Na, K-ATPase activity, decreased in response to Per1 knockdown. Conversely, mRNA expression of caveolin 1, Ube2e3, and ET-1, all negative effectors of epithelial sodium channel, was induced after Per1 knockdown. These results led us to evaluate BP in Per1 KO mice. Mice lacking Per1 exhibit significantly reduced BP and elevated renal ET-1 levels compared with wild-type animals. Given the established role of renal ET-1 in epithelial sodium channel inhibition and BP control, elevated renal ET-1 is one possible explanation for the lower BP observed in Per1 KO mice. These data support a role for the circadian clock protein Per1 in the coordinate regulation of genes involved in renal sodium reabsorption. Importantly, the lower BP observed in Per1 KO mice compared with wild-type mice suggests a role for Per1 in BP control as well.

  17. Renal scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Reid; Daniel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Renal scintigraphy is performed commonly in dogs and cats and has been used in a variety of other species. In a 2012 survey of the members of the Society of Veterinary Nuclear Medicine, 95% of the respondents indicated they perform renal scintigraphy in their practice. Renal scintigraphy is primarily used to assess renal function and to evaluate postrenal obstruction. This article reviews how renal scintigraphy is used in veterinary medicine and describes the methods of analysis. Species variation is also discussed.

  18. Renal and perirenal abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.E.; Andriole, V.T.

    1987-12-01

    Our knowledge of the spectrum of renal abscesses has increased as a result of more sensitive radiologic techniques. The classification of intrarenal abscess now includes acute focal bacterial nephritis and acute multifocal bacterial nephritis, as well as the previously recognized renal cortical abscess, renal corticomedullary abscess, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. In general, the clinical presentation of these entities does not differentiate them; various radiographic studies can distinguish them, however. The intrarenal abscess is usually treated successfully with antibiotic therapy alone. Antistaphylococcal therapy is indicated for the renal cortical abscess, whereas therapy directed against the common gram-negative uropathogens is indicated for most of the other entities. The perinephric abscess is often an elusive diagnosis, has a more serious prognosis, and is more difficult to treat. Drainage of the abscess and sometimes partial or complete nephrectomy are required for resolution. 73 references.

  19. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ureters. Causes Renal papillary necrosis often occurs with analgesic nephropathy . This is damage to one or both ... Treatment depends on the cause. For example, if analgesic nephropathy is the cause, your doctor will recommend ...

  20. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Krapf R, Seldin DW, Alpern RJ. Clinical syndromes of metabolic acidosis. In: Alpern RJ, Caplan M, Moe OW, ... 529. Read More Distal renal tubular acidosis Fanconi syndrome Low potassium level Metabolic acidosis Osteomalacia Respiratory acidosis Rickets Review Date 10/ ...

  1. Renal primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    PubMed

    Bartholow, Tanner; Parwani, Anil

    2012-06-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors exist as a part of the Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor family. These tumors most commonly arise in the chest wall and paraspinal regions; cases with a renal origin are rare entities, but have become increasingly reported in recent years. Although such cases occur across a wide age distribution, the average age for a patient with a renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor is the mid- to late 20s, with both males and females susceptible. Histologically, these tumors are characterized by pseudorosettes. Immunohistochemically, CD99 is an important diagnostic marker. Clinically, these are aggressive tumors, with an average 5-year disease-free survival rate of only 45% to 55%. Given that renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor bears many similarities to other renal tumors, it is important to review the histologic features, immunostaining profile, and genetic abnormalities that can be used for its correct diagnosis.

  2. Distal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better with treatment. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of distal renal tubular acidosis. Get medical help right away if you develop emergency symptoms ...

  3. 'Transcollateral' Renal Angioplasty for a Completely Occluded Renal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subash; Chadha, Davinder S. Swamy, Ajay

    2011-02-15

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stenting has been effective in the control of hypertension, renal function, and pulmonary edema caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. However, the role of the procedure has not been fully established in the context of chronic total occlusion of renal artery. We report the successful use of this procedure in 57-year-old male patient who reported for evaluation of a recent episode of accelerated hypertension. A renal angiogram in this patient showed ostial stenosis of the right renal artery, which was filling by way of the collateral artery. Renal angioplasty for chronic total occlusion of right renal artery was successfully performed in a retrograde fashion through a collateral artery, thereby leading to improvement of renal function and blood pressure control.

  4. Renal pathology in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Peernel

    2006-01-01

    The class of Reptilia varies widely. Both the gross morphology and microscopic anatomy of the kidneys are specific for each species. In each species of reptile, the physiology of the renal system has adapted to the specific conditions of life, including, among other factors, the type of food, environmental temperature, and the availability of water. The pathology of the kidneys in reptiles has been poorly studied, but in recent years a number of investigators have specifically studied reptilian renal pathology.

  5. [Imaging renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Bazan, F; Busto, M

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the eighth most common malignancy in adults and the most common malignancy in the kidney. It is thus a very common disease for radiologists. This review aims to provide a general overview of the imaging techniques used to diagnose, characterize, and help plan the treatment of renal cell carcinoma as well as to review basic aspects related to staging, imaging-guided percutaneous treatment, and follow-up in the most common clinical scenarios.

  6. Community Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mary

    1975-01-01

    At Moraine Valley Community College (Illinois), a chain of events, programs, activities, and services has linked the college and community in such areas as fine arts, ethnic groups, public services, community action, community service, and community education. (Author/NHM)

  7. Mutations in PCBD1 cause hypomagnesemia and renal magnesium wasting.

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Silvia; de Baaij, Jeroen H F; Ferreira, Patrick; Germann, Roger; de Klerk, Johannis B C; Lavrijsen, Marla; van Zeeland, Femke; Venselaar, Hanka; Kluijtmans, Leo A J; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M

    2014-03-01

    Mutations in PCBD1 are causative for transient neonatal hyperphenylalaninemia and primapterinuria (HPABH4D). Until now, HPABH4D has been regarded as a transient and benign neonatal syndrome without complications in adulthood. In our study of three adult patients with homozygous mutations in the PCBD1 gene, two patients were diagnosed with hypomagnesemia and renal Mg(2+) loss, and two patients developed diabetes with characteristics of maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY), regardless of serum Mg(2+) levels. Our results suggest that these clinical findings are related to the function of PCBD1 as a dimerization cofactor for the transcription factor HNF1B. Mutations in the HNF1B gene have been shown to cause renal malformations, hypomagnesemia, and MODY. Gene expression studies combined with immunohistochemical analysis in the kidney showed that Pcbd1 is expressed in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT), where Pcbd1 transcript levels are upregulated by a low Mg(2+)-containing diet. Overexpression in a human kidney cell line showed that wild-type PCBD1 binds HNF1B to costimulate the FXYD2 promoter, the activity of which is instrumental in Mg(2+) reabsorption in the DCT. Of seven PCBD1 mutations previously reported in HPABH4D patients, five mutations caused proteolytic instability, leading to reduced FXYD2 promoter activity. Furthermore, cytosolic localization of PCBD1 increased when coexpressed with HNF1B mutants. Overall, our findings establish PCBD1 as a coactivator of the HNF1B-mediated transcription necessary for fine tuning FXYD2 transcription in the DCT and suggest that patients with HPABH4D should be monitored for previously unrecognized late complications, such as hypomagnesemia and MODY diabetes.

  8. Renal Proteome in Mice with Different Susceptibilities to Fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Peres-Buzalaf, Camila; Salvato, Fernanda; Labate, Carlos Alberto; Everett, Eric T.; Whitford, Gary Milton; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2013-01-01

    A/J and 129P3/J mouse strains have different susceptibilities to dental fluorosis due to their genetic backgrounds. They also differ with respect to several features of fluoride (F) metabolism and metabolic handling of water. This study was done to determine whether differences in F metabolism could be explained by diversities in the profile of protein expression in kidneys. Weanling, male A/J mice (susceptible to dental fluorosis, n = 18) and 129P3/J mice (resistant, n = 18) were housed in pairs and assigned to three groups given low-F food and drinking water containing 0, 10 or 50 ppm [F] for 7 weeks. Renal proteome profiles were examined using 2D-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. Quantitative intensity analysis detected between A/J and 129P3/J strains 122, 126 and 134 spots differentially expressed in the groups receiving 0, 10 and 50 ppmF, respectively. From these, 25, 30 and 32, respectively, were successfully identified. Most of the proteins were related to metabolic and cellular processes, followed by response to stimuli, development and regulation of cellular processes. In F-treated groups, PDZK-1, a protein involved in the regulation of renal tubular reabsorption capacity was down-modulated in the kidney of 129P3/J mice. A/J and 129P3/J mice exhibited 11 and 3 exclusive proteins, respectively, regardless of F exposure. In conclusion, proteomic analysis was able to identify proteins potentially involved in metabolic handling of F and water that are differentially expressed or even not expressed in the strains evaluated. This can contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying genetic susceptibility to dental fluorosis, by indicating key-proteins that should be better addressed in future studies. PMID:23308176

  9. Link Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoho, Steve

    Link analysis is a collection of techniques that operate on data that can be represented as nodes and links. This chapter surveys a variety of techniques including subgraph matching, finding cliques and K-plexes, maximizing spread of influence, visualization, finding hubs and authorities, and combining with traditional techniques (classification, clustering, etc). It also surveys applications including social network analysis, viral marketing, Internet search, fraud detection, and crime prevention.

  10. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  11. Interpretation of male rat renal tubule tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, I S; Baetcke, K P

    1993-01-01

    Based on an analysis of recent scientific studies, a Technical Panel of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Risk Assessment Forum recently advised EPA risk assessors against using information on certain male rat renal tubule tumors to assess human risk under conditions specified in a new Forum report. Risk assessment approaches generally assume that chemicals producing tumors in laboratory animals are a potential cancer hazard to humans. For most chemicals, including classical rodent kidney carcinogens such as N-ethyl-N-hydroxyethylnitrosamine, this extrapolation remains appropriate. Some chemicals, however, induce accumulation of alpha 2u-globulin (alpha 2u-g), a low molecular weight protein, in the male rat kidney. The alpha 2u-g accumulation initiates a sequence of events that appears to lead to renal tubule tumor formation. Female rats and other laboratory mammals administered the same chemicals do not accumulate low molecular weight protein in the kidney, and they do not develop renal tubule tumors. Because humans appear to be more like other laboratory animals than like the male rat, in this special situation, the male rat is not a good model for assessing human risk. The Forum report stresses the need for full scrutiny of a substantial set of data to determine when it is reasonable to presume that renal tumors in male rats are linked to a process involving alpha 2u-g accumulation and to select appropriate procedures for estimating human risks under such circumstances. PMID:7517352

  12. Therapeutic effects of renal denervation on renal failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Seto, Sai-Wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) is increased in both patients and experimental animals with renal failure. The kidney is a richly innervated organ and has both efferent and afferent nerves. Renal denervation shows protective effects against renal failure in both animals and humans. The underlying mechanisms include a decrease in blood pressure, a decrease in renal efferent SNA, a decrease in central SNA and sympathetic outflow, and downregulation of the reninangiotensin system. It has been demonstrated that re-innervation occurs within weeks after renal denervation in animals but that no functional re-innervation occurs in humans for over two years after denervation. Renal denervation might not be renal protective in some situations including bile duct ligation-induced renal failure and ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury. Catheter-based renal denervation has been applied to patients with both early and end stage renal failure and the published results so far suggest that this procedure is safe and effective at decreasing blood pressure. The effectiveness of renal denervation in improving renal function in patients with renal failure needs to be further investigated.

  13. Update on Renal Mass Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Haifler, Miki; Kutikov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Renal masses are diagnosed with an increasing frequency. However, a significant proportion of these masses are benign, and the majority of malignant tumors are biologically indolent. Furthermore, renal tumors are often harbored by the elderly and comorbid patients. As such, matching of renal tumor biology to appropriate treatment intensity is an urgent clinical need. Renal mass biopsy is currently a very useful clinical tool that can assist with critical clinical decision-making in patients with renal mass. Yet, renal mass biopsy is associated with limitations and, as such, may not be appropriate for all patients.

  14. Malignant renal tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Thomas Ray; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Renal malignancies are common in children. While the majority of malignant renal masses are secondary to Wilms tumor, it can be challenging to distinguish from more aggressive renal masses. For suspicious renal lesions, it is crucial to ensure prompt diagnosis in order to select the appropriate surgical procedure and treatment. This review article will discuss the common differential diagnosis that can be encountered when evaluating a suspicious renal mass in the pediatric population. This includes clear cell sarcoma of the kidney, malignant rhabdoid tumor, renal medullary carcinoma and lymphoma. PMID:28326263

  15. The future of renal denervation in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Sandeep; Bakris, George L

    2014-12-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as inadequate blood pressure control despite three or more antihypertensive medications at maximally tolerated doses, is strongly linked to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Increased renal afferent and efferent sympathetic activity carried by nerves which arborize the adventitia of the renal arteries, appears to be central to the pathobiology of resistant hypertension. Historical experience indicates that surgical denervation and/or sympathectomy often dramatically reduced blood pressure in patients with malignant hypertension. Catheter-based radio-frequency renal denervation was developed in the past decade as a percutaneous adaptation of surgical denervation. Percutaneous renal denervation using a variety of systems has demonstrated to date, in non-randomized and unblinded studies, dramatic reductions in office-based blood pressure, but more modest impact on ambulatory blood pressure. The only single, appropriately powered, blinded, sham-controlled study of renal denervation conducted to date, however, failed to meet its primary endpoint, casting doubt on the value of the therapy. Ancillary benefits of renal denervation have been described in such conditions as diabetes mellitus, heart failure, and sleep apnea but require further study. While renal denervation is already widely available outside of the USA for commercial use, its utility in resistant hypertension must be vetted by further rigorous investigation before its use can be routinely recommended.

  16. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease.

  17. Renal physiology of nocturia.

    PubMed

    Verbalis, Joseph G

    2014-04-01

    Renal function, diurnal fluctuations in arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion, sex, and advanced age affect urine formation and may contribute to nocturia. Renal effects of AVP are mediated by AVP V2 receptors in the kidney collecting duct. Changes in AVP concentration have the greatest relative effects on urine volume when AVP levels are low; therefore small changes can have a large effect on renal water excretion. AVP is the major regulator of water excretion by the kidneys, and AVP levels have been shown to affect nocturnal voiding. Results of several studies show that patients with nocturia had no significant variation in plasma AVP, whereas patients without nocturia had significant diurnal variation in plasma AVP. The V2 receptor gene is located on the X chromosome, which has important sex-specific consequences. For example, mutations in the V2 gene can cause nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, predominantly in men. Age-related changes in water metabolism are associated with overall body composition, kidney, and brain. Older people generally experience decreased extracellular fluid and plasma volume, which leads to increased adverse consequences from net body water gain or loss. Renal function declines with age, and the ability to concentrate urine and conserve sodium is reduced in the elderly. Thirst perception is also decreased in the elderly, who, compared with younger people, tend to hypersecrete AVP in response to higher plasma osmolality, possibly resulting in hyponatremia. These aspects of renal physiology should be considered when antidiuretic drugs are prescribed for the treatment of nocturia.

  18. Visualizing renal primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Verghese, Elizabeth; Martelotto, Luciano G; Cain, Jason E; Galtseva, Alya; Rosenblum, Norman D; Watkins, D Neil; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-03-01

    Renal primary cilia are microscopic sensory organelles found on the apical surface of epithelial cells of the nephron and collecting duct. They are based upon a microtubular cytoskeleton, bounded by a specialized membrane, and contain an array of proteins that facilitate their assembly, maintenance and function. Cilium-based signalling is important for the control of epithelial differentiation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cystic kidney diseases and in renal repair. As such, visualizing renal primary cilia and understanding their composition has become an essential component of many studies of inherited kidney disease and mechanisms of epithelial regeneration. Primary cilia were initially identified in the kidney using electron microscopy and this remains a useful technique for the high resolution examination of these organelles. New reagents and techniques now also allow the structure and composition of primary cilia to be analysed in detail using fluorescence microscopy. Primary cilia can be imaged in situ in sections of kidney, and many renal-derived cell lines produce primary cilia in culture providing a simplified and accessible system in which to investigate these organelles. Here we outline microscopy-based techniques commonly used for studying renal primary cilia.

  19. Role of renal medullary oxidative and/or carbonyl stress in salt-sensitive hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takefumi; Ogawa, Susumu; Cowely, Allen W; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    1. Salt-sensitive hypertension is commonly associated with diabetes, obesity and chronic kidney disease. The present review focuses on renal mechanisms involved in the development of this type of hypertension. 2. The renal medullary circulation plays an important role in the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. In vivo animal studies have demonstrated that the balance between nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the renal medulla is an important element of salt-sensitive hypertension. The medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) in the outer medulla is an important source of NO and ROS production and we have explored the mechanisms that stimulate their production, as well as the effects of NO superoxide and hydrogen peroxide on mTAL tubular sodium reabsorption and the regulation of medullary blood flow. 3. Angiotensin II-stimulated NO produced in the mTAL is able to diffuse from the renal mTAL to the surrounding vasa recta capillaries, providing a mechanism by which to increase medullary blood flow and counteract the direct vasoconstrictor effects of angiotensin II. Enhanced oxidative stress attenuates NO diffusion in this region. 4. Carbonyl stress, like oxidative stress, can also play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease, such as insulin resistance, salt-sensitive hypertension and renal vascular complications. 5. Despite the large number of studies undertaken in this area, there is as yet no drug available that directly targets renal ROS. Oxidative and/or carbonyl stress may be the next target of drug discovery to protect against salt-sensitive hypertension and associated end-organ damage.

  20. Physiological and molecular responses of the goldfish (Carassius auratus) kidney to metabolic acidosis, and potential mechanisms of renal ammonia transport.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Michael J; Wright, Patricia A; Wood, Chris M

    2015-07-01

    Relative to the gills, the mechanisms by which the kidney contributes to ammonia and acid-base homeostasis in fish are poorly understood. Goldfish were exposed to a low pH environment (pH 4.0, 48 h), which induced a characteristic metabolic acidosis and an increase in total plasma [ammonia] but reduced plasma ammonia partial pressure (PNH3). In the kidney tissue, total ammonia, lactate and intracellular pH remained unchanged. The urinary excretion rate of net base under control conditions changed to net acid excretion under low pH, with contributions from both the NH4 (+) (∼30%) and titratable acidity minus bicarbonate (∼70%; TA-HCO3 (-)) components. Inorganic phosphate (Pi), urea and Na(+) excretion rates were also elevated while Cl(-) excretion rates were unchanged. Renal alanine aminotransferase activity increased under acidosis. The increase in renal ammonia excretion was due to significant increases in both the glomerular filtration and the tubular secretion rates of ammonia, with the latter accounting for ∼75% of the increase. There was also a 3.5-fold increase in the mRNA expression of renal Rhcg-b (Rhcg1) mRNA. There was no relationship between ammonia secretion and Na(+) reabsorption. These data indicate that increased renal ammonia secretion during acidosis is probably mediated through Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins and occurs independently of Na(+) transport, in contrast to branchial and epidermal models of Na(+)-dependent ammonia transport in freshwater fish. Rather, we propose a model of parallel H(+)/NH3 transport as the primary mechanism of renal tubular ammonia secretion that is dependent on renal amino acid catabolism.

  1. Nephrology and astrology--is there a link?

    PubMed

    Hughes, S

    1990-07-01

    Astrologers presume a link between the susceptibility of particular organs to disease and signs of the Zodiac. A simple test of the positive connection between renal disease and the sign of Libra was undertaken by studying the birth dates of consecutive nephrology in-patient admissions. No significant link was found on analysis, thus disproving the traditional astrologers' claims.

  2. Effects of an anti-G suit on the hemodynamic and renal responses to positive /+Gz/ acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shubrooks, S. J., Jr.; Epstein, M.; Duncan, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of the currently used U.S. Air Force (CSU-12/P) anti-G suit on renal function during positive radial acceleration (+Gz) were assessed in seven normal male subjects in balance on a 200 meq sodium diet. Following suit inflation in the seated position, +2.0 Gz for 30 min resulted in a decrease in the rate of sodium excretion from 125 plus or minus 19 to 60 plus or minus 14 microeq/min, which persisted during a 25-min recovery period. Fractional excretion of sodium also decreased significantly during +Gz. The magnitude of the antinatriuresis was indistinguishable from that observed during +Gz without suit inflation. In contrast to the antinatriuresis observed during centrifugation without suit, however, the antinatriuresis with suit was mediated primarily by an enhanced tubular reabsorption of sodium.

  3. Metabolic and hemodynamic effects of sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors on cardio-renal protection in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2017-02-08

    The specific Na+/glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2 inhibitors) inhibit glucose reabsorption in proximal renal tubular cells, and both fasting and postprandial glucose significantly decrease due to urinary glucose loss. As a result, pancreatic β-cell function and peripheral insulin action significantly improve with relief from glucose toxicity. Furthermore, whole body energy metabolism changes to relative glucose deficiency and triggers increased lipolysis in fat cells, and fatty acid oxidation and then ketone body production in the liver during treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors. In addition, SGLT2 inhibitors have profound hemodynamic effects including diuresis, dehydration, weight loss, and lowering blood pressure. The most recent findings on SGLT2 inhibitors come from results of the Empagliflozin, cardiovascular outcomes and mortality in type 2 diabetes trial. SGLT2 inhibitors exert extremely unique and cardio-renal protection through metabolic and hemodynamic effects with long-term durability on the reduction of blood glucose, body weight, and blood pressure. Although a site of action of SGLT2 inhibitors is highly specific to inhibit renal glucose reabsorption, whole body energy metabolism and hemodynamic and renal functions are profoundly modulated during the treatment of SGLT2 inhibitors. Previous studies suggest multifactorial clinical benefits and safety concerns of SGLT2 inhibitors. Although ambivalent clinical results of this drug are still under active discussion, the present review summarizes promising recent evidences on the cardio-renal and metabolic benefits of SGLT2 inhibitors in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: renal hypouricemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions renal hypouricemia renal hypouricemia Enable ...

  5. Renal Artery Stent Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy P.; Cooper, Christopher J.; Matsumoto, Alan H.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Pencina, Karol M.; Jamerson, Kenneth; Tuttle, Katherine R.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; D’Agostino, Ralph; Massaro, Joseph; Henrich, William; Dworkin, Lance D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multiple randomized clinical trials comparing renal artery stent placement plus medical therapy with medical therapy alone have not shown any benefit of stent placement. However, debate continues whether patients with extreme pressure gradients, stenosis severity, or baseline blood pressure benefit from stent revascularization. OBJECTIVES The study sought to test the hypothesis that pressure gradients, stenosis severity, and/or baseline blood pressure affects outcomes after renal artery stent placement. METHODS Using data from 947 patients with a history of hypertension or chronic kidney disease from the largest randomized trial of renal artery stent placement, the CORAL (Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions) study, we performed exploratory analyses to determine if subsets of patients experienced better outcomes after stent placement than the overall cohort. We examined baseline stenosis severity, systolic blood pressure, and translesion pressure gradient (peak systolic and mean) and performed interaction tests and Cox proportional hazards analyses for the occurrence of the primary endpoint through all follow-up, to examine the effect of these variables on outcomes by treatment group. RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences in outcomes based on the examined variables nor were there any consistent nonsignificant trends. CONCLUSIONS Based on data from the CORAL randomized trial, there is no evidence of a significant treatment effect of the renal artery stent procedure compared with medical therapy alone based on stenosis severity, level of systolic blood pressure elevation, or according to the magnitude of the transstenotic pressure gradient. (Benefits of Medical Therapy Plus Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions [CORAL]; NCT00081731) PMID:26653621

  6. [Renal duplex: clinical usefulness].

    PubMed

    Miralles, M; Giménez, A; Cairols, M A; Riambau, V; Sáez, A

    1993-01-01

    It is the purpose of this report to focus attention on the clinical usefulness of Renal Duplex for the diagnosis of patients with vasculo-renal diseases in terms of: 1. Accuracy of Duplex/Angiography in the measurement of the renal stenosis degree. 2. Correlationship between Duplex ans Isotopic Renogram with respect to the study of the parenchyma's perfusion. 3. The effect of the inhibitors of the conversor enzyme (Captopril) on the Doppler signal of the parenchyma, comparing it with the results from the captopril test about the peripheral plasmatic renin activity and the isotopic renogram, in patients with vasculo-renal HTA. Results obtains by Duplex and Angiography were compared in 92 renal arteries from 46 patients. For both technics, three degrees of stenosis were established: 0-59%, 60-99% and occlusion. The Duplex technique identified 49/54 stenosis < 60%, 28/33 stenosis > 60% and 5/5 occlusions (Kappa 0.8). Sensibility and specificity of Duplex for the diagnosis of stenosis > 60% were, respectively, 89.5% and 90.7%; with an exactness of 90.2%. The angiographies showed stenosis > 60% in 23 patients with HTA (diastolic pressures > 100 mmHg). In all of the patients, a measurement of the plasmatic renin activity, an isotopic renogram and a Doppler of the interlobar arteries basal and post-captopril, were performed. The correlationship between Duplex and isotopic renogram with respect to the measurement of the relative renal perfusion was statistically significant (r = 0.91; p < 0.0001). The captopril test for renin and isotopic renogram were positives for 5 patients (4 with unilateral stenosis an 1 with bilateral stenosis). All of them showed severe stenosis (> 80%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Oxidant Mechanisms in Renal Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Brian B.; Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Pawar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A common link between all forms of acute and chronic kidney injuries, regardless of species, is enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during injury/disease progression. While low levels of ROS and RNS are required for prosurvival signaling, cell proliferation and growth, and vasoreactivity regulation, an imbalance of ROS and RNS generation and elimination leads to inflammation, cell death, tissue damage, and disease/injury progression. Recent Advances: Many aspects of renal oxidative stress still require investigation, including clarification of the mechanisms which prompt ROS/RNS generation and subsequent renal damage. However, we currently have a basic understanding of the major features of oxidative stress pathology and its link to kidney injury/disease, which this review summarizes. Critical Issues: The review summarizes the critical sources of oxidative stress in the kidney during injury/disease, including generation of ROS and RNS from mitochondria, NADPH oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The review next summarizes the renal antioxidant systems that protect against oxidative stress, including superoxide dismutase and catalase, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems, and others. Next, we describe how oxidative stress affects kidney function and promotes damage in every nephron segment, including the renal vessels, glomeruli, and tubules. Future Directions: Despite the limited success associated with the application of antioxidants for treatment of kidney injury/disease thus far, preventing the generation and accumulation of ROS and RNS provides an ideal target for potential therapeutic treatments. The review discusses the shortcomings of antioxidant treatments previously used and the potential promise of new ones. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 119–146. PMID:26906267

  8. Increased Klk9 Urinary Excretion Is Associated to Hypertension-Induced Cardiovascular Damage and Renal Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Blázquez-Medela, Ana M.; García-Sánchez, Omar; Quirós, Yaremi; Blanco-Gozalo, Victor; Prieto-García, Laura; Sancho-Martínez, Sandra M.; Romero, Miguel; Duarte, Juan M.; López-Hernández, Francisco J.; López-Novoa, José M.; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Early detection of hypertensive end-organ damage and secondary diseases are key determinants of cardiovascular prognosis in patients suffering from arterial hypertension. Presently, there are no biomarkers for the detection of hypertensive target organ damage, most outstandingly including blood vessels, the heart, and the kidneys. We aimed to validate the usefulness of the urinary excretion of the serine protease kallikrein-related peptidase 9 (KLK9) as a biomarker of hypertension-induced target organ damage. Urinary, plasma, and renal tissue levels of KLK9 were measured by the Western blot in different rat models of hypertension, including angiotensin-II infusion, DOCA-salt, L-NAME administration, and spontaneous hypertension. Urinary levels were associated to cardiovascular and renal injury, assessed by histopathology. The origin of urinary KLK9 was investigated through in situ renal perfusion experiments. The urinary excretion of KLK9 is increased in different experimental models of hypertension in rats. The ACE inhibitor trandolapril significantly reduced arterial pressure and the urinary level of KLK9. Hypertension did not increase kidney, heart, liver, lung, or plasma KLK9 levels. Hypertension-induced increased urinary excretion of KLK9 results from specific alterations in its tubular reabsorption, even in the absence of overt nephropathy. KLK9 urinary excretion strongly correlates with cardiac hypertrophy and aortic wall thickening. KLK9 appears in the urine in the presence of hypertension as a result of subtle renal handling alterations. Urinary KLK9 might be potentially used as an indicator of hypertensive cardiac and vascular damage. PMID:26469898

  9. Effect of chronic poisoning with aluminum on the renal handling of phosphate in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; Calvo, M L

    1998-01-16

    The effects of aluminum on renal function and phosphate handling were studied using clearance techniques in chronically-intoxicated rats. Rats were given aluminum hydroxide (80 mg/kg b.w., i.p.), three times per week during 6 months. The phosphate tubular transport capacity was evaluated by determining the maximum tubular transport (TmRPi) and the fractional excretion of phosphate (FE% Pi) during the infusion of phosphate solutions with increasing concentrations (0, 9, 18, 33 mM). Parathyroid gland function was studied using indirect methods: calcemia recovery after EDTA administration and the nephrogenic excretion of cAMP as indicative of renal PTH actions, by RIA. The systemic acid base status was determined and food intake and rat growth were controlled in both groups. No changes were observed in the renal function. Pi reabsorption values per ml glomerular filtration rate (TRPi/GFR microg/ml) for different Pi plasmatic concentrations were distributed following a saturation curve compatible with a saturation kinetics. Aluminum increased TmRPi/GFR in treated animals (T) 76+/-4 as compared with control animals (C) 57+/-7 microg/ml, without a statistical modification in the apparent affinity. The FE% Pi and FE% Na were significantly lower in treated animals than in control animals. There were neither systemic variations in the acid-base balance nor in the Ca and Pi concentrations in plasma. The calcemia recovery following a hypocalcemic stimulus and the nephrogenic excretion of cAMP (T: 44+/-4; C: 91+/-7 pmol/min) were diminished. Considering all these facts, it can be postulated that the aluminum renal effect is associated from a decrease in PTH phosphaturic capacity. Nevertheless, other associated factors like minor phosphate intestinal absorption rate may not be disregarded, even though there were no significant intake variations.

  10. Calcium Extrusion Pump PMCA4: A New Player in Renal Calcium Handling?

    PubMed

    van Loon, Ellen P M; Little, Robert; Prehar, Sukhpal; Bindels, René J M; Cartwright, Elizabeth J; Hoenderop, Joost G J

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) is vital for multiple processes in the body, and maintenance of the electrolyte concentration is required for everyday physiological function. In the kidney, and more specifically, in the late distal convoluted tubule and connecting tubule, the fine-tuning of Ca2+ reabsorption from the pro-urine takes place. Here, Ca2+ enters the epithelial cell via the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor type 5 (TRPV5) channel, diffuses to the basolateral side bound to calbindin-D28k and is extruded to the blood compartment via the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) and the plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase (PMCA). Traditionally, PMCA1 was considered to be the primary Ca2+ pump in this process. However, in recent studies TRPV5-expressing tubules were shown to highly express PMCA4. Therefore, PMCA4 may have a predominant role in renal Ca2+ handling. This study aimed to elucidate the role of PMCA4 in Ca2+ homeostasis by characterizing the Ca2+ balance, and renal and duodenal Ca2+-related gene expression in PMCA4 knockout mice. The daily water intake of PMCA4 knockout mice was significantly lower compared to wild type littermates. There was no significant difference in serum Ca2+ level or urinary Ca2+ excretion between groups. In addition, renal and duodenal mRNA expression levels of Ca2+-related genes, including TRPV5, TRPV6, calbindin-D28k, calbindin-D9k, NCX1 and PMCA1 were similar in wild type and knockout mice. Serum FGF23 levels were significantly increased in PMCA4 knockout mice. In conclusion, PMCA4 has no discernible role in normal renal Ca2+ handling as no urinary Ca2+ wasting was observed. Further investigation of the exact role of PMCA4 in the distal convoluted tubule and connecting tubule is required.

  11. Renal adaptation during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Jani, Alkesh; Martin, Sandra L; Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Edelstein, Charles L

    2013-12-01

    Hibernators periodically undergo profound physiological changes including dramatic reductions in metabolic, heart, and respiratory rates and core body temperature. This review discusses the effect of hypoperfusion and hypothermia observed during hibernation on glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow, as well as specific adaptations in renal architecture, vasculature, the renin-angiotensin system, and upregulation of possible protective mechanisms during the extreme conditions endured by hibernating mammals. Understanding the mechanisms of protection against organ injury during hibernation may provide insights into potential therapies for organ injury during cold storage and reimplantation during transplantation.

  12. Amphibian renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Todd R

    2006-01-01

    Amphibians by nature have an intimate connection with the aquatic environment at some stage of development and fight an osmotic battle due to the influx of water. Many amphibians have acquired a more terrestrial existence at later stages of development and consequently have physiologic adaptations to conserve moisture. Renal adaptations have allowed amphibians successfully to bridge the gap between aqueous and terrestrial habitats. The kidneys, skin,and, in many amphibian species, the urinary bladder play key roles in fluid homeostasis. Renal impairment may be responsible for the clinical manifestation of disease, morbidity, and mortality.

  13. Hypothyroid acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Birewar, Sonali; Oppenheimer, Mark; Zawada, Edward T

    2004-03-01

    Muscular disorders and even hypothyroid myopathy with elevated muscle enzymes are commonly seen in hypothyroidism. In this paper, we report a case of acute renal failure in a 35-year old male patient with myalgia. His serum creatinine reached a level of 2.4 mg/dl. Later, his myalgia was found to be due to hypothyroidism with TSH of over 500 uiv/ml. With thyroid replacement therapy, myalgia and his serum creatinine stabilized and subsequently improved. Hypothyroidism, although rare, has been reported as a definite and authentic cause of rhabdomyolysis. As a result, hypothyroidism must be considered in patients presenting with acute renal failure and elevated muscle enzymes.

  14. Renal Failure in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Balofsky, Ari; Fedarau, Maksim

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure during pregnancy affects both mother and fetus, and may be related to preexisting disease or develop secondary to diseases of pregnancy. Causes include hypovolemia, sepsis, shock, preeclampsia, thrombotic microangiopathies, and renal obstruction. Treatment focuses on supportive measures, while pharmacologic treatment is viewed as second-line therapy, and is more useful in mitigating harmful effects than treating the underlying cause. When supportive measures and pharmacotherapy prove inadequate, dialysis may be required, with the goal being to prolong pregnancy until delivery is feasible. Outcomes and recommendations depend primarily on the underlying cause.

  15. Renal lithiasis and nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Grases, Felix; Costa-Bauza, Antonia; Prieto, Rafel M

    2006-01-01

    Renal lithiasis is a multifactorial disease. An important number of etiologic factors can be adequately modified trough diet, since it must be considered that the urine composition is directly related to diet. In fact, the change of inappropriate habitual diet patterns should be the main measure to prevent kidney stones. In this paper, the relation between different dietary factors (liquid intake, pH, calcium, phosphate, oxalate, citrate, phytate, urate and vitamins) and each type of renal stone (calcium oxalate monohydrate papillary, calcium oxalate monohydrate unattached, calcium oxalate dihydrate, calcium oxalate dihydrate/hydroxyapatite, hydroxyapatite, struvite infectious, brushite, uric acid, calcium oxalate/uric acid and cystine) is discussed. PMID:16956397

  16. Renal adaptation during hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sandra L.; Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Edelstein, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernators periodically undergo profound physiological changes including dramatic reductions in metabolic, heart, and respiratory rates and core body temperature. This review discusses the effect of hypoperfusion and hypothermia observed during hibernation on glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow, as well as specific adaptations in renal architecture, vasculature, the renin-angiotensin system, and upregulation of possible protective mechanisms during the extreme conditions endured by hibernating mammals. Understanding the mechanisms of protection against organ injury during hibernation may provide insights into potential therapies for organ injury during cold storage and reimplantation during transplantation. PMID:24049148

  17. Physiology of the Renal Interstitium

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Long overlooked as the virtual compartment and then strictly characterized through descriptive morphologic analysis, the renal interstitium has finally been associated with function. With identification of interstitial renin- and erythropoietin-producing cells, the most prominent endocrine functions of the kidney have now been attributed to the renal interstitium. This article reviews the functional role of renal interstitium. PMID:25813241

  18. Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Rare Renal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bindroo, Sandiya; Varshney, Neha; Mittal, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma of the kidney is a rare entity with less than one hundred cases reported so far. It was previously considered to have some similarities to various other renal cancers although this tumor has distinct macroscopic, microscopic and immuno-histochemical features. It is now a well-established entity in renal neoplastic pathology and has been recognized as a distinct entity in the 2012 Vancouver classification of renal tumors. This review aims to give an overview of tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma after extensive literature search using PubMed and CrossRef.

  19. Renal diagnosis without renal biopsy. Nephritis and sensorineural deafness.

    PubMed

    Richardson, D; Shires, M; Davison, A M

    2001-06-01

    Two examples of hereditary nephropathy within the context of clinical syndromes are described. Emphasis is put on the ability to make a renal diagnosis without renal biopsy and the benefits of screening relatives once a diagnosis is achieved. A variant of Alport's syndrome with associated macrothrombocytic thrombocytopenia, known as Epstein's syndrome, is reported. In addition siblings with Alström's syndrome characterized by pigmentary retinal degeneration (causing blindness in early childhood), progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive renal failure are reported. Both cases had previously presented for non-renal pathology in advance of the onset of symptomatic renal failure and may have benefited from appropriate screening.

  20. Connexin 30 deficiency impairs renal tubular ATP release and pressure natriuresis.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Arnold; Vargas, Sarah L; Toma, Ildikó; Hanner, Fiona; Willecke, Klaus; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2009-08-01

    In the renal tubule, ATP is an important regulator of salt and water reabsorption, but the mechanism of ATP release is unknown. Several connexin (Cx) isoforms form mechanosensitive, ATP-permeable hemichannels. We localized Cx30 to the nonjunctional apical membrane of cells in the distal nephron and tested whether Cx30 participates in physiologically important release of ATP. We dissected, partially split open, and microperfused cortical collecting ducts from wild-type and Cx30-deficient mice in vitro. We used PC12 cells as ATP biosensors by loading them with Fluo-4/Fura Red to measure cytosolic calcium and positioning them in direct contact with the apical surface of either intercalated or principal cells. ATP biosensor responses, triggered by increased tubular flow or by bath hypotonicity, were approximately three-fold greater when positioned next to intercalated cells than next to principal cells. In addition, these responses did not occur in preparations from Cx30-deficient mice or with purinergic receptor blockade. After inducing step increases in mean arterial pressure by ligating the distal aorta followed by the mesenteric and celiac arteries, urine output increased 4.2-fold in wild-type mice compared with 2.6-fold in Cx30-deficient mice, and urinary Na(+) excretion increased 5.2-fold in wild-type mice compared with 2.8-fold in Cx30-deficient mice. Furthermore, Cx30-deficient mice developed endothelial sodium channel-dependent, salt-sensitive elevations in mean arterial pressure. Taken together, we suggest that mechanosensitive Cx30 hemichannels have an integral role in pressure natriuresis by releasing ATP into the tubular fluid, which inhibits salt and water reabsorption.

  1. Connexin 30 Deficiency Impairs Renal Tubular ATP Release and Pressure Natriuresis

    PubMed Central

    Sipos, Arnold; Vargas, Sarah L.; Toma, Ildikó; Hanner, Fiona; Willecke, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    In the renal tubule, ATP is an important regulator of salt and water reabsorption, but the mechanism of ATP release is unknown. Several connexin (Cx) isoforms form mechanosensitive, ATP-permeable hemichannels. We localized Cx30 to the nonjunctional apical membrane of cells in the distal nephron and tested whether Cx30 participates in physiologically important release of ATP. We dissected, partially split open, and microperfused cortical collecting ducts from wild-type and Cx30-deficient mice in vitro. We used PC12 cells as ATP biosensors by loading them with Fluo-4/Fura Red to measure cytosolic calcium and positioning them in direct contact with the apical surface of either intercalated or principal cells. ATP biosensor responses, triggered by increased tubular flow or by bath hypotonicity, were approximately three-fold greater when positioned next to intercalated cells than next to principal cells. In addition, these responses did not occur in preparations from Cx30-deficient mice or with purinergic receptor blockade. After inducing step increases in mean arterial pressure by ligating the distal aorta followed by the mesenteric and celiac arteries, urine output increased 4.2-fold in wild-type mice compared with 2.6-fold in Cx30-deficient mice, and urinary Na+ excretion increased 5.2-fold in wild-type mice compared with 2.8-fold in Cx30-deficient mice. Furthermore, Cx30-deficient mice developed endothelial sodium channel–dependent, salt-sensitive elevations in mean arterial pressure. Taken together, we suggest that mechanosensitive Cx30 hemichannels have an integral role in pressure natriuresis by releasing ATP into the tubular fluid, which inhibits salt and water reabsorption. PMID:19478095

  2. Inorganic phosphate homeostasis. Renal adaptation to the dietary intake in intact and thyroparathyroidectomized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Tröhler, U; Bonjour, J P; Fleisch, H

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of renal tubular adaptation to variations in dietary inorganic phosphate (Pi) was investigated in intact and thyroparathyroidectomized (TPTX) rats pair-fed diets containing low, normal, and high amounts of Pi for periods up to 10 days. Clearances were measured before and during active i.v. infusions with Pi in conscious animals. Thus tubular reabsorption of phosphate (TRPi) could be assessed over a wide range of plasma phosphate concentrations ([Pi]P1). It was found that the renal tubule could adapt its capacity to transport Pi according to the dietary Pi: TRPi was always higher, for a given [Pi]P1, in the animals fed low than in those fed higher Pi diets. This diet-induced modification also occurred in the absence of thyroparathyroid glands, in the presence of the same calcemia and urinary pH, and during marked extracellular volume expansion. A time-course study in rats TPTX both before and during the administration of the experimental diets showed that a difference in the tubular handling of Pi was detectable as early as 3 days after switching the animals from a normal to low- or high-Pi diets. These results indicate that factors other than parathyroid hormone are implicated in the tubular response to variations in the dietary intake of inorganic phosphate. PMID:3518

  3. Quantitative estimation of transmembrane ion transport in rat renal collecting duct principal cells.

    PubMed

    Ilyaskin, Alexander V; Karpov, Denis I; Medvedev, Dmitriy A; Ershov, Alexander P; Baturina, Galina S; Katkova, Liubov E; Solenov, Evgeniy I

    2014-01-01

    Kidney collecting duct principal cells play a key role in regulated tubular reabsorption of water and sodium and secretion of potassium. The importance of this function for the maintenance of the osmotic homeostasis of the whole organism motivates extensive study of the ion transport properties of collecting duct principal cells. We performed experimental measurements of cell volume and intracellular sodium concentration in rat renal collecting duct principal cells from the outer medulla (OMCD) and used a mathematical model describing transmembrane ion fluxes to analyze the experimental data. The sodium and chloride concentrations ([Na+]in = 37.3 ± 3.3 mM, [Cl-]in = 32.2 ± 4.0 mM) in OMCD cells were quantitatively estimated. Correspondence between the experimentally measured cell physiological characteristics and the values of model permeability parameters was established. Plasma membrane permeabilities and the rates of transmembrane fluxes for sodium, potassium and chloride ions were estimated on the basis of ion substitution experiments and model predictions. In particular, calculated sodium (PNa), potassium (PK) and chloride (PCl) permeabilities were equal to 3.2 × 10-6 cm/s, 1.0 × 10-5 cm/s and 3.0 × 10-6 cm/s, respectively. This approach sets grounds for utilization of experimental measurements of intracellular sodium concentration and cell volume to quantify the ion permeabilities of OMCD principal cells and aids us in understanding the physiology of the adjustment of renal sodium and potassium excretion.

  4. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion and cerebral/renal salt wasting syndrome: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Young; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia (sodium levels of <135 mEq/L) is one of the most common electrolyte imbalances in clinical practice, especially in patients with neurologic diseases. Hyponatremia can cause cerebral edema and brain herniation; therefore, prompt diagnosis and proper treatment is important in preventing morbidity and mortality. Among various causes of hyponatremia, diagnosing syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) and cerebral/renal salt wasting syndrome (C/RSW) is difficult due to many similarities. SIADH is caused by excess of renal water reabsorption through inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, and fluid restriction is the treatment of choice. On the other hand, C/RSW is caused by natriuresis, which is followed by volume depletion and negative sodium balance and replacement of water and sodium is the mainstay of treatment. Determinating volume status in hyponatremic patients is the key point in differential between SIADH and C/RSW. However, in most situations, differential diagnosis of these two diseases is difficult because they overlap in many clinical and laboratory aspects, especially to assess differences in volume status of these patients. Although distinction between the SIADH and C/RSW is difficult, improvement of hypouricemia and an increased fractional excretion of uric acid after the correction of hyponatremia in SIADH, not in C/RSW, may be one of the helpful points in discriminating the two diseases. In this review, we compare these two diseases regarding the pathophysiologic mechanisms, diagnosis, and therapeutic point of view.

  5. Blood pressure and renal function during chronic changes in sodium intake: role of angiotensin.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Guyton, A C; Smith, M J; Coleman, T G

    1980-09-01

    The present study was designed to quantitate the role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in determining the chronic relationships between arterial pressure (AP), renal hemodynamics, and Na excretion. In six control dogs, Na balance was achieved during chronic step increases in Na intake from 5 to 500 meq/day with small increases in AP (<7 mmHg), moderate increases in GFR (19%), and decreases in filtration fraction (FF) and plasma renin activity. Similar increases in Na intake in six dogs with angiotensin II (AII) fixed, due to constant intravenous infusion of 5 ng . kg-1 . min-1 AII, caused large increases in AP (42%), GFR (31%) FF, and calculated renal Na reabsorption (TNa) above control. In six dogs with AII formation blocked with SQ 14,225, Na balance at intakes of 5-80 meq/day occurred at reduced AP, GFR, FF, and TNa, although plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) was not substantially different from that in control dogs. At Na intakes above 240 meq/day, AP was not altered by SQ 14,225. These data indicate that during chronic changes in Na intake the RAS plays a major role, independent of changes in PAC, in allowing Na balance without large changes in GFR or AP. The mechanism whereby AII conserves Na chronically is through increased TNa, since steady-state TNa was increased by AII and decreased by SQ 14,225.

  6. How Do Antihypertensive Drugs Work? Insights from Studies of the Renal Regulation of Arterial Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Digne-Malcolm, Holly; Frise, Matthew C.; Dorrington, Keith L.

    2016-01-01

    Though antihypertensive drugs have been in use for many decades, the mechanisms by which they act chronically to reduce blood pressure remain unclear. Over long periods, mean arterial blood pressure must match the perfusion pressure necessary for the kidney to achieve its role in eliminating the daily intake of salt and water. It follows that the kidney is the most likely target for the action of most effective antihypertensive agents used chronically in clinical practice today. Here we review the long-term renal actions of antihypertensive agents in human studies and find three different mechanisms of action for the drugs investigated. (i) Selective vasodilatation of the renal afferent arteriole (prazosin, indoramin, clonidine, moxonidine, α-methyldopa, some Ca++-channel blockers, angiotensin-receptor blockers, atenolol, metoprolol, bisoprolol, labetolol, hydrochlorothiazide, and furosemide). (ii) Inhibition of tubular solute reabsorption (propranolol, nadolol, oxprenolol, and indapamide). (iii) A combination of these first two mechanisms (amlodipine, nifedipine and ACE-inhibitors). These findings provide insights into the actions of antihypertensive drugs, and challenge misconceptions about the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic efficacy of many of the agents. PMID:27524972

  7. Thyroid hormones increase Na -H exchange activity in renal brush border membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, J.; Sacktor, B.

    1985-06-01

    Na -H exchange activity, i.e., amiloride-sensitive Na and H flux, in renal proximal tubule brush border (luminal) membrane vesicles was increased in the hyperthyroid rat and decreased in the hypothyroid rat, relative to the euthyroid animal. A positive correlation was found between Na -H exchange activity and serum concentrations of thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). The thyroid status of the animal did not alter amiloride-insensitive Na uptake. The rate of passive pH gradient dissipation was higher in membrane vesicles from hyperthyroid rats compared to the rate in vesicles from hypothyroid animals, a result which would tend to limit the increase in Na uptake in vesicles from hyperthyroid animals. Na -dependent phosphate uptake was increased in membrane vesicles from hyperthyroid rats; Na -dependent D-glucose and L-proline uptakes were not changed by the thyroid status of the animal. The effect of thyroid hormones in increasing the uptake of Na in the brush border membrane vesicle is consistent with the action of the hormones in enhancing renal Na reabsorption.

  8. Renal function in hypercalcemic dogs during hydropenia and during saline infusion.

    PubMed

    Lins, L E

    1979-06-01

    The effects of calcium-gluconate infusions on renal function were studied in unanesthetised dogs. Each dog was studied during hydropenia and saline infusion. Hypercalcemia, mean serum calcium 3.85 mmol/l (hydropenia) and 3.62 mmol/l (saline infusion), increased fractional excretion of sodium (CNa/CIn), calcium (CCa/CIn), and magnesium (CMg/CIn). The increase was significantly higher in saline-expanded dogs than in hydropenic dogs. Fractional excretion of potassium (CK/CIn) was increased in hydropenia but remained unchanged in saline-expanded animals. Fractional excretion of phosphate (Cp/CIn) was not consistently changed by hypercalcemia. Fractional excretion of chloride (CCl/CIn) was markedly increased in saline-expanded dogs but was not changed in hydropenia. Urine osmolality was reduced in hydropenic dogs but unchanged in saline-expanded dogs. In hydropenic as well as in saline-expanded dogs tubular reabsorption of solute-free water (TcH2O/CIn) increased during the first hour of hypercalcemia. In hydropenic dogs hypercalcemia caused a slight but significant decrease in blood pH, standard bicarbonate, and base excess. In hydropenic as well as in saline-expanded dogs glomerular filtration rate (CIn), renal plasma flow (CPAH), and filtration fraction were unaffected.

  9. LITHIUM AND RENAL FUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, N.; Trivedi, J.K.; Sethi, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY Thirty patients of affective disorder who were on lithium for a year and thirty patients on antidepressant were studied in detail for renal functions. Our observation is that lithium therapy does not lead to any deterioration in kidney functions. The results are discussed. PMID:21927211

  10. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the ureter (s) or a tube connected to an external drainage bag. Both options are used to unblock the ureters in order to allow proper urine flow from the kidneys if this has been identified as the cause for the renal failure. Surgical treatment such as a urinary stent or ...

  11. Management of Renal Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Nalbant, Ismail; Can Sener, Nevzat; Firat, Hacer; Yeşil, Süleyman; Zengin, Kürşad; Yalcınkaya, Fatih; Imamoglu, Abdurrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Renal cysts have a high prevalence in the general population, and their estimated incidence increases with age. Renal cyst aspiration (usually with sclerotherapy) or open/laparoscopic decortication is a generally effective and safe method in the treatment of symptomatic simple renal cysts. The success rates of laparoscopic decortication and percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy were compared to assist in the decision making for the procedure. Methods: A total of 184 patients with symptomatic simple renal cysts were treated with either laparoscopic decortication in 149 cases or percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy in 35 cases. The follow-up period was approximately 35 months, and the symptomatic and radiologic success rates of the 2 techniques were compared retrospectively. Results: Laparoscopic decortication was found to have high success rates, a low recurrence rate, and minimal morbidity. Percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy is an outpatient procedure with a minimally higher recurrence rate. Conclusion: When a symptomatic cyst is encountered and treatment of the cyst is indicated, laparoscopic decortication is a more efficient method that offers better results than percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy. PMID:25848184

  12. Fish oil supplementation reduces cachexia and tumor growth while improving renal function in tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Isabela; Casare, Fernando; Pequito, Danielle C T; Borghetti, Gina; Yamazaki, Ricardo K; Brito, Gleisson A P; Kryczyk, Marcelo; Fernandes, Luiz Claudio; Coimbra, Terezila M; Fernandez, Ricardo

    2012-11-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the renal function of healthy and tumor-bearing rats chronically supplemented with fish oil (FO), a source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Weanling male rats were divided in two groups, one control (C) and another orally supplemented for 70 days with FO (1 g/kg body weight). After this time, half the animals of each group were injected in the right flank with a suspension of Walker 256 tumor cells (W and WFO). The W group had less proteinemia reflecting cachectic proteolysis, FO reversed this fact. Tumor weight gain was also reduced in WFO. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was not different in FO or W compared to C, but was higher in WFO. Renal plasma flow (RPF) was higher in the FO supplemented groups. The W group had lower plasma osmolality than the C group, but FO supplementation resulted in normalization of this parameter. Fractional sodium excretion (FE(Na+)) of FO rats was similar to C. Proximal Na(+) reabsorption, evaluated by lithium clearance, was similar among the groups. Urinary thromboxane B(2) (TXB(2)) excretion was lower in the supplemented groups. The number of macrophages in renal tissue was higher in W compared to C rats, but was lower in WFO rats compared to W rats. In conclusion, FO supplementation resulted in less tumor growth and cachexia, and appeared to be renoprotective, as suggested by higher RPF and GFR.

  13. Acute-onset hypomagnesemia-induced hypocalcemia caused by the refractoriness of bones and renal tubules to parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Toru; Yamauchi, Mika; Yano, Shozo; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2011-11-01

    Chronic hypomagnesemia is closely associated with hypocalcemia, which is caused by impaired parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion or the refractoriness of bone and renal tubules to PTH. The dominant mechanism of acute-onset, hypomagnesemia-induced hypocalcemia is currently unclear. An 83-year-old man who had undergone chemotherapy with carboplatin for prostate cancer suffered from acute diarrhea and finger paresthesia. Laboratory data confirmed hypocalcemia as well as hypomagnesemia. Urinary calcium levels were not measured. However, the urinary fractional excretion of Mg (FE(Mg)) was elevated. Despite elevated PTH levels, the renal tubular maximal reabsorption rate of phosphate to GFR (TmP/GFR) was elevated, and bone formation and resorption markers were suppressed. A magnesium loading test revealed a clear magnesium deficiency. After administration of magnesium, bone marker levels were increased, and TmP/GFR was reduced to normal levels, despite the persistent elevation of PTH. Serum calcium levels eventually increased to approximately the reference range. Clinical histories and these observations both suggest that when patients with hypomagnesemia-induced hypocalcemia rapidly lose magnesium through complications such as diarrhea, the primary cause may be the refractoriness of bone and renal tubules to PTH, rather than impaired PTH secretion.

  14. Site-Specific Radioiodination of HER2-Targeting Affibody Molecules using 4-Iodophenethylmaleimide Decreases Renal Uptake of Radioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Joanna; Nordeman, Patrik; Honarvar, Hadis; Altai, Mohamed; Orlova, Anna; Larhed, Mats; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small scaffold-based affinity proteins with promising properties as probes for radionuclide-based molecular imaging. However, a high reabsorption of radiolabeled Affibody molecules in kidneys is an issue. We have shown that the use of 125I-3-iodo-((4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl)maleimide (IHPEM) for site-specific labeling of cysteine-containing Affibody molecules provides high tumor uptake but low radioactivity retention in kidneys. We hypothesized that the use of 4-iodophenethylmaleimide (IPEM) would further reduce renal retention of radioactivity because of higher lipophilicity of radiometabolites. An anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) Affibody molecule (ZHER2:2395) was labeled using 125I-IPEM with an overall yield of 45±3 %. 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 bound specifically to HER2-expressing human ovarian carcinoma cells (SKOV-3 cell line). In NMRI mice, the renal uptake of 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 (24±2 and 5.7±0.3 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively) was significantly lower than uptake of 125I-IHPEM-ZHER2:2395 (50±8 and 12±2 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively). In conclusion, the use of a more lipophilic linker for the radioiodination of Affibody molecules reduces renal radioactivity. PMID:25969816

  15. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease.

  16. Chronic renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Susan M; Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Gilstrap, Larry C

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome in women with chronic renal disease. Our search of the literature did not reveal any randomized clinical trials or meta-analyses. The available information is derived from opinion, reviews, retrospective series, and limited observational series. It appears that chronic renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, occurring in 0.03-0.12% of all pregnancies from two U.S. population-based and registry studies. Maternal complications associated with chronic renal disease include preeclampsia, worsening renal function, preterm delivery, anemia, chronic hypertension, and cesarean delivery. The live birth rate in women with chronic renal disease ranges between 64% and 98% depending on the severity of renal insufficiency and presence of hypertension. Significant proteinuria may be an indicator of underlying renal insufficiency. Management of pregnant women with underlying renal disease should ideally entail a multidisciplinary approach at a tertiary center and include a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and a nephrologist. Such women should receive counseling regarding the pregnancy outcomes in association with maternal chronic renal disease and the effect of pregnancy on renal function, especially within the ensuing 5 years postpartum. These women will require frequent visits and monitoring of renal function during pregnancy. Women whose renal disease is further complicated by hypertension should be counseled regarding the increased risk of adverse outcome and need for blood pressure control. Some antihypertensives, especially angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, should be avoided during pregnancy, if possible, because of the potential for both teratogenic (hypocalvaria) and fetal effects (renal failure, oliguria, and demise).

  17. Renal Proximal Tubule Na,K-ATPase is Controlled by CREB Regulated Transcriptional CoActivators as well as Salt Inducible Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Taub, Mary; Garamella, Sudha; Kim, Dongwook; Rajkhowa, Trivikram; Cutuli, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Sodium reabsorption by the kidney is regulated by locally produced natriuretic and anti-natriuretic factors, including dopamine and norepinephrine, respectively. Previous studies indicated that signaling events initiated by these natriuretic and anti-natriuretic factors achieve their effects by altering the phosphorylation of Na,K-ATPase in the renal proximal tubule, and that Protein Kinase A (PKA) and Calcium mediated signaling pathways are involved. The same signaling pathways also control the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase β subunit gene atp1b1 in renal proximal tubule cells. In this report, evidence is presented that 1) both the recently discovered cAMP-Regulated Transcriptional Coactivators (CRTCs), and Salt Inducible Kinase 1 (SIK1) contribute to the transcriptional regulation of atp1b1 in renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells, and 2) that renal effectors including norepinephrine, dopamine, prostaglandins and sodium play a role. Exogenously expressed CRTCs stimulate atp1b1 transcription. Evidence for a role of endogenous CRTCs includes the loss of transcriptional regulation of atp1b1 by a dominant negative CRTC, as well as by a CREB mutant, with an altered CRTC binding site. In a number of experimental systems, SIK phosphorylates CRTCs, which are then sequestered in the cytoplasm, preventing their nuclear effects. Consistent with such a role of SIK in primary RPT cells, atp1b1 transcription increased in the presence of a dominant negative SIK1, and in addition, regulation by dopamine, norepinephrine and monensin was disrupted by a dominant negative SIK1. These latter observations can be explained, if SIK1 is phosphorylated and inactivated in the presence of these renal effectors. Our results support the hypothesis that Na,K-ATPase in the renal proximal tubule is regulated at the transcriptional level via SIK1 and CRTCs by renal effectors, in addition to the previously reported control of the phosphorylation of Na,K-ATPase. PMID:26432356

  18. Transatlantic link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (left) European Geophysical Society (EGS) President Rolf Meissner at AGU Headquarters with (center) Executive Director Fred Spilhaus and (right) Foreign Secretary Juan Roederer. Meissner attended the meeting of AGU's Committee on International Participation (CIP) on February 26, 1988. At that meeting, specific ways of fostering close links between AGU and EGS were discussed.A few weeks later, Roederer and AGU staff, working with EGS Secretary-General Arne Richter at the EGS meeting in Bologna, Italy, March 21-25, planned details of the establishment of an AGU office in Europe. The Copernicus Gesellschaft, a new entity located on the premises of the Max Planck Institute for Aeronomy in Lindau, Federal Republic of Germany, will provide the administrative staff and handle logistics.

  19. H+, Water and Urea Transport in the Inner Medullary Collecting Duct and Their Role in the Prevention and Pathogenesis of Renal Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Susan M.; Klein, Janet D.

    2008-09-01

    The inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) is the final site within the kidney for the reabsorption of urea, water and electrolytes and for the secretion of H+ before the luminal fluid becomes the final urine. Transporters expressed in the IMCD contribute to the generation of the large ion gradients that exist between the interstitium and the collecting duct lumen. Thus, the luminal fluid within the human IMCD can reach an osmolality of 1200 mOsm/kg H2O and a pH of 4. This ability of the human nephron to concentrate and acidify the urine might predispose to stone formation. However, under treatment conditions that predispose to stone formation, such as during hypercalciuria, the kidney mitigates stone formation by reducing solute concentration by reducing H2O reabsorption. Moreover, the kidney attenuates stone formation by tightly controlling acid-base balance, which prevents the bone loss, hypocitraturia and hypercalciuria observed during metabolic acidosis by augmenting net H+ excretion by tightly regulating H+ transporter function and through luminal buffering, particularly with NH3. This article will review the ion transporters present in the mammalian IMCD and their role in the prevention and in the pathogenesis of renal stone formation.

  20. [Tuberculosis after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Korzeniewska, Anna; Dyła, Tomasz; Kosacka, Monika; Jankowska, Renata

    2009-01-01

    Renal transplant recipients carry a relatively high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). In most cases, active TB is the result of reactivation of a latent infection and is located in the lungs. In these patients, clinical presentation of TB can often be atypical and there is a high risk of dissemination and high mortality rates. Therefore, the use of invasive procedures for proper diagnosis is recommended, as well as anti-tuberculosis therapy instituted whenever there is a strong suspicion of TB on clinical grounds, even without microbiological evidence. The treatment of active TB in renal transplant recipients should be the same as in the general population. To avoid graft rejection, blood levels of calcineurin inhibitors should be monitored closely. Prophylaxis is recommended for high-risk patients.

  1. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed

    Jalanko, Hannu; Mattila, Ilkka; Holmberg, Christer

    2016-05-01

    Renal transplantation (RTx) has become an accepted mode of therapy in infants with severe renal failure. The major indications are structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, congenital nephrotic syndrome, polycystic diseases, and neonatal kidney injury. Assessment of these infants needs expertise and time as well as active treatment before RTx to ensure optimal growth and development, and to avoid complications that could lead to permanent neurological defects. RTx can be performed already in infants weighing around 5 kg, but most operations occur in infants with a weight of 10 kg or more. Perioperative management focuses on adequate perfusion of the allograft and avoidance of thrombotic and other surgical complications. Important long-term issues include rejections, infections, graft function, growth, bone health, metabolic problems, neurocognitive development, adherence to medication, pubertal maturation, and quality of life. The overall outcome of infant RTx has dramatically improved, with long-term patient and graft survivals of over 90 and 80 %, respectively.

  2. Renal stones in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Norma; DasGupta, Ranan

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of renal stones during pregnancy is a complex problem. Risks to the fetus from ionising radiation and interventional procedures need to be balanced with optimising clinical care for the mother. Management of such patients requires a clear understanding of available options, with a multidisciplinary team approach. In this review, we discuss the role of different diagnostic tests including ultrasound, magnetic resonance urography, and computerized tomography. We also provide an update on recent developments in the treatment of renal stones during pregnancy. Expectant management remains first-line treatment. Where definitive treatment of the stone is required, new evidence suggests that ureteroscopic stone removal may be equally safe, and possibly better than traditional temporising procedures. PMID:27512433

  3. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  4. [Giant renal angiomyolipoma].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Fernández, G; Mansilla Roselló, A; Rubio Gil, F; Martínez Domínguez, A P; Villar Del Moral, J; Ferrón Orihuela, A

    2003-06-01

    We present a case report of a renal angiomyolipoma with the special feature of its big size at the moment of the diagnosis. It is appreciated an important alteration of the kidney morphology and the repercussion produced in the rest of the abdominal organs. Due to this an exeresis with nefrectomy is performed. We do a bibliographic review and we analyzed the relevant aspects of this tumour.

  5. Renal phosphate handling: Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Narayan; Bhadauria, Dharmendra

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus is a common anion. It plays an important role in energy generation. Renal phosphate handling is regulated by three organs parathyroid, kidney and bone through feedback loops. These counter regulatory loops also regulate intestinal absorption and thus maintain serum phosphorus concentration in physiologic range. The parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, Fibrogenic growth factor 23 (FGF23) and klotho coreceptor are the key regulators of phosphorus balance in body. PMID:23961477

  6. Increased Renal Solute Excretion in Rats Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Charles E.; Moore, A. L.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1995-01-01

    Following space flight a diuresis, due to an increase in free water clearance, has been suggested in humans. To assess the effects of space flight on renal function, rats were flown in space for 14 days. Rats were divided into three groups; vivarium controls (V;n=6; housed 2/shoe box cage), flight controls (FC;n=6; group housed in a flight cage), and flight animals (F;n=6). Upon landing all animals were placed into individual metabolic cages. Urine was collected daily for 7 days and every other day for 14 days. Urine output was increased (p less than 0.05; ANOVA) following flight for 3 days. On postflight day 1, flow rates were, V=6.8 plus or minus 0.9, FC=8.711.8 and F=16.6 plus or minus 2.7 microliter/min. Excretion rates of Na+ and K+ were increased, resulting in an increased osmotic excretion rate (V=7.9 plus or minus 0.9, FC=6.1 plus or minus 0.7 and F=13.5 plus or minus 0.7 uOsm/min). Creatinine excretion rate was increased over the first two postflight days. In the absence of changes in plasma creatinine, Na+, or K+ (samples obtained immediately post flight from similar rats compared to Day 14), GFR was increased following space flight. The increased excretion of solute was thus the result of increased delivery and decreased reabsorption. Osmotic clearance was increased (V=28, FC=27 and F=51 microliter/min), while free water clearance was decreased post flight (V=-21,FC=-18 and F=-34 microliter/min). In rats, the postflight diuresis is the result of an increase in solute (osmotic) excretion with an accompanying reduction in free water clearance.

  7. Mismatch repair genes in renal cortical neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Baiyee, Daniel; Banner, Barbara

    2006-02-01

    Mutation of human mutL homolog 1 (MLH-1) and human mutS homolog 2 (MSH-2) has been linked with the pathogenesis of colorectal carcinoma in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome and other carcinomas. Mutations of these genes in renal cell carcinomas were recently described. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of MLH-1 and MSH-2 in renal cortical neoplasms of various histological types by immunohistochemistry. Thirty-eight (n = 38) resected renal tumors were obtained from the surgical pathology files of the UMass Memorial Healthcare, including clear cell carcinomas (CLEARs, n = 20), papillary carcinomas (PAPs, n = 8), chromophobe carcinomas (CHRs, n = 4), and oncocytomas (ONCs, n = 6). Positive immunostaining for MLH-1 and MSH-2 was graded by the number of positive tumor cell nuclei, as follows: 0, negative; 1, up to one third of positive nuclei; 2, one to two thirds positive; and 3, greater than two thirds positive. Loss of MLH-1 or MSH-2 was defined as a tumor with grade 0 or 1, compared with the normal tubules. Normal tubules and intercalated ducts contained cells positive for MLH-1 and MSH-2 in all cases. For both antibodies, positive staining in tumors ranged from grade 1 to 3 in the CLEAR and PAP but was only grade 2 to 3 in the CHR and ONC. Loss of MLH-1 and/or MSH-2 occurred in malignant tumors but not in ONC. Loss of MLH-1 was present in 8 (40%) of 20 CLEARs and 4 (50%) of 8 PAPs, compared with loss of MSH-2 in 4 (20%) of 20 CLEARs and 1 (25%) of 4 CHRs. Our results suggest that loss of mismatch repair genes is involved in the malignant transformation in some renal carcinomas, particularly those derived from the proximal tubules.

  8. Renal artery aneurysm mimicking renal calculus with hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanwen; Meng, Hongzhou; Cao, Min; Shen, Baihua

    2013-06-01

    A 51-year-old woman was found to have a left renal calculus with hydronephrosis. She underwent unsuccessful extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, leading to the recommendation that percutaneous lithotomy was necessary to remove the renal calculus. In view of the unusual shape of the calculus and absence of abnormalities in urine sediment, preoperative computed tomography and renal angiography were performed, which instead showed a calcified left renal artery aneurysm. Subsequent efforts to perform an aneurysmectomy also failed, eventually necessitating left nephrectomy. This case illustrates the pitfalls in the diagnosis of a renal artery aneurysm, which is a relatively common condition that may have unusual presentations. Hence, it is suggested that the possibility of a renal artery aneurysm be considered in the differential diagnosis when one detects a renal calculus with an unusual appearance. In addition, we propose that 3-dimensional reconstruction computed tomography be performed before considering surgical options for such renal calculi to rule out the possibility of a renal artery aneurysm.

  9. Renal functional outcomes after surgery for renal cortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Julia B.; DeCastro, G. Joel; McKiernan, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, radical nephrectomy represented the gold standard for the treatment of small (≤ 4cm) as well as larger renal masses. Recently, for small renal masses, the risk of ensuing chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease has largely favored nephron-sparing surgical techniques, mainly partial nephrectomy. In this review, we surveyed the literature on renal functional outcomes after partial nephrectomy for renal tumors. The largest randomized control trial comparing radical and partial nephrectomy failed to show a survival benefit for partial nephrectomy. With regards to overall survival, surgically induced chronic kidney disease (GFR < 60 ml/min/ 1.73m2) caused by nephrectomy might not be as deleterious as medically induced chronic kidney disease. In evaluating patients who underwent donor nephrectomy, transplant literature further validates that surgically induced reductions in GFR may not affect patient survival, unlike medically induced GFR declines. Yet, because patients who present with a renal mass tend to be elderly with multiple comorbidities, many develop a mixed picture of medically, and surgically-induced renal disease after extirpative renal surgery. In this population, we believe that nephron sparing surgery optimizes oncological control while protecting renal function.

  10. Management of renal anemia.

    PubMed

    Peco-Antic, Amira

    2005-01-01

    Normochromic normocytic anemia is common in children with chronic renal failure (CRF) when their glomerular filtration rate is below 35 ml/min/1.73 m2 BSA, but it may develop earlier in some forms of renal disease. An inadequate erythropoiesis due to insufficient erythropoietin synthesis in the kidneys is the main cause of renal anemia. Other reasons include reduced red blood cell lifespan, chronic blood loss, iron deficiency, inhibitors of erythropoiesis, and malnutrition. The presence of anemia contributes to many of the symptoms of uremia, including decreased appetite, decreased energy, poor cardiac function, and poor school performance. Therefore, correction of anemia dramatically improves the life of the child with CRF. Presently, the goal of anemia management is to maintain hematocrit concentrations at 33% to 36% and a hemoglobin concentration of at least 11 g/L. This can be accomplished by intravenous or subcutaneous administration of recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO, 100-300 U/kg/week) and iron preparations. If adequate iron stores cannot be maintained with oral therapy (2-3, max 6 mg/kg/day), intravenous iron should be administered. In order to optimize anemia management in children with CRF, future research should be concentrated on the normalization of hemoglobin early in the course of CRF, and the long-term effects on the child's development.

  11. Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients’ clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the “Tower of Babel” of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  12. [Primary renal angiosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Costero-Barrios, Cesáreo B; Oros-Ovalle, Cuauhtémoc

    2004-01-01

    The twenty-fourth case of primary renal angiosarcoma is described, according to the available international literature, this present in a 71-year-old male, a mechanic by trade, without carcinogenic antecedents. Hematuria, pain in flank, and left-side tumoral mass of approximately 20 cm in diameter located in kidney by computerized axial tomography (CT) constituted manifestations. A left nefrectomy was performed. No metastasis was found. The tumor replaced 4/5 of the organ and weighed 1145 g. It showed angiomatous structure with atypical proliferation of endothelial cells in a sinusoldal trauma and anastomosatic vascular channels that invaded neighboring parenchymal and capsule. Tymorous cells were positive for CD31 and CD34 and negative for cytokeratins, S100 and HMB 45 proteins. The patient was subjected to treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy (lineal accelerator), but 12 months after surgery he presented retroperitonal tumoral relapse and hepatic metastasis. Diagnostic differentiation with benign vascular tumors is pointed out, as well as carcinomas and sarcomas that showed an outstanding angiomatous component, both primary and/or secondary. Primary renal angiosarcoma exposes the multiplicity of localizations that it is capable of with a tumor of this type, as well as renal parenquimatous capacity to be the seat of a great variety of neoplasias.

  13. Radionuclide evaluation of renal function.

    PubMed

    Bueschen, A J; Witten, D M

    1979-06-01

    The renal scintillation camera study and the excretory urogram should be considered to be complementary studies. The renal scintillation camera study provides an accurate evaluation of changes in total, differential, and segmental renal function but affords only a gross assessment of anatomic changes. The excretory urogram provides superior information about renal anatomic changes but only inferior information about functional changes of the kidney. The advantages of a renal scintillation camera study with regard to the patient are that it is done in a state of normal hydration, it requires no bowel preparation, it is not associated with allergic reactions, it provides a low radiation exposure, and it is a noninvasive procedure for differential renal function which requires no ureteral catheters.

  14. Scintigraphic imaging in renal infections.

    PubMed

    Rossleigh, M A

    2009-02-01

    The scintigraphic imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of renal infections is renal cortical scintigraphy utilizing [(99m)Tc]dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). This technique is able to demonstrate upper tract involvement with infection and to assess for the presence of renal cortical scarring following a urinary tract infection (UTI). There are recent publications advocating its use to determine which patients need to proceed to further investigation with cystography. It is also being utilized in the evaluation of different treatment regimes used in patients with UTI. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and leukocyte scanning have only a minor role in the diagnosis of renal infection. Their main application is in the diagnosis of renal cyst infections in patients with polycystic renal disease.

  15. Contribution of renal purinergic receptors to renal vasoconstriction in angiotensin II-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Franco, Martha; Bautista, Rocio; Tapia, Edilia; Soto, Virgilia; Santamaría, José; Osorio, Horacio; Pacheco, Ursino; Sánchez-Lozada, L Gabriela; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L Gabriel

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the participation of purinergic P2 receptors in the regulation of renal function in ANG II-dependent hypertension, renal and glomerular hemodynamics were evaluated in chronic ANG II-infused (14 days) and Sham rats during acute blockade of P2 receptors with PPADS. In addition, P2X1 and P2Y1 protein and mRNA expression were compared in ANG II-infused and Sham rats. Chronic ANG II-infused rats exhibited increased afferent and efferent arteriolar resistances and reductions in glomerular blood flow, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), single-nephron GFR (SNGFR), and glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient. PPADS restored afferent and efferent resistances as well as glomerular blood flow and SNGFR, but did not ameliorate the elevated arterial blood pressure. In Sham rats, PPADS increased afferent and efferent arteriolar resistances and reduced GFR and SNGFR. Since purinergic blockade may influence nitric oxide (NO) release, we evaluated the role of NO in the response to PPADS. Acute blockade with N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) reversed the vasodilatory effects of PPADS and reduced urinary nitrate excretion (NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-)) in ANG II-infused rats, indicating a NO-mediated vasodilation during PPADS treatment. In Sham rats, PPADS induced renal vasoconstriction which was not modified by l-NAME, suggesting blockade of a P2X receptor subtype linked to the NO pathway; the response was similar to that obtained with l-NAME alone. P2X1 receptor expression in the renal cortex was increased by chronic ANG II infusion, but there were no changes in P2Y1 receptor abundance. These findings indicate that there is an enhanced P2 receptor-mediated vasoconstriction of afferent and efferent arterioles in chronic ANG II-infused rats, which contributes to the increased renal vascular resistance observed in ANG II-dependent hypertension.

  16. Multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, G.; Glass, T.A.; D'Souza, V.J.; Formanek, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Renal oncocytoma, although rare, is being diagnosed more frequently, and criteria to differentiate it from other tumors have been described. Multiple oncocytomas have been reported, but an association between multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma in the same kidney has not been described. The authors report a case with two oncocytomas and a renal carcinoma in the right kidney as well as a right adrenal adenoma.

  17. Renal medullary ETB receptors produce diuresis and natriuresis via NOS1.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Daisuke; Pollock, Jennifer S; Pollock, David M

    2008-05-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) plays an important role in the regulation of salt and water excretion in the kidney. Considerable in vitro evidence suggests that the renal medullary ET(B) receptor mediates ET-1-induced inhibition of electrolyte reabsorption by stimulating nitric oxide (NO) production. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that NO synthase 1 (NOS1) and protein kinase G (PKG) mediate the diuretic and natriuretic effects of ET(B) receptor stimulation in vivo. Infusion of the ET(B) receptor agonist sarafotoxin S6c (S6c: 0.45 microg x kg(-1) x h(-1)) in the renal medulla of anesthetized, male Sprague-Dawley rats markedly increased the urine flow (UV) and urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) by 67 and 120%, respectively. This was associated with an increase in medullary cGMP content but did not affect blood pressure. In addition, S6c-induced diuretic and natriuretic responses were absent in ET(B) receptor-deficient rats. Coinfusion of N(G)-propyl-l-arginine (10 microg x kg(-1) x h(-1)), a selective NOS1 inhibitor, suppressed S6c-induced increases in UV, UNaV, and medullary cGMP concentrations. Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS (10 microg x kg(-1) x h(-1)) or RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK-LRK(5)H-amide (18 microg x kg(-1) x h(-1)), a PKG inhibitor, also inhibited S6c-induced increases in UV and UNaV. These results demonstrate that renal medullary ET(B) receptor activation induces diuretic and natriuretic responses through a NOS1, cGMP, and PKG pathway.

  18. Aquatic models for the study of renal transport function and pollutant toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.S.

    1987-04-01

    Studies of renal cell transport mechanisms and their impairment by xenobiotics are often limited by technical difficulties related to renal tubule complexity. Problems include the juxtaposition of multiple tubule segments with different transport functions and severely limited access to the tubular lumen. Some limitations can be overcome by the careful selection of an appropriate aquatic experimental system. Two aquatic models for the vertebrate proximal segment are discussed here. The first is the kidney from certain marine flounder, which offers the following advantages: long-term viability, little tissue of nonproximal origin, and easy tubule isolation. Data are presented to demonstrate how studies with flounder kidney can be used to elucidate cellular mechanisms whereby different classes of toxic pollutants may interact. Results from these experiments indicate that the excretion of certain anionic xenobiotics can be delayed (1) by other anionic xenobiotics that compete for secretory transport sites and (2) by compounds that disrupt cellular ion gradients and energy metabolism needed to drive transport. The second system is the crustacean urinary bladder, a simple, flatsheet epithelium. Bladder morphology and transport physiology closely resemble those of vertebrate proximal segment. Electron micrographs show a brush border membrane at the luminal surface, numerous mitochondria, and an infolded serosal membrane, while in vivo and in vitro transport studies show reabsorption of NaCl, nutrients and water and secretion of organic cations; organic anions are secreted in bladders from some species and reabsorbed in others. Moreover, since bladders can be mounted as flat sheets in flux chambers, studies with this tissue avoid the problems of complex renal tubule geometry and tissue heterogeneity and tissue heterogeneity that limit transport studies in proximal tubule.

  19. The future of renal denervation.

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray; Guo, Ling

    2017-05-01

    The rationale for the renal denervation treatment of severe, drug-resistant essential hypertension remains valid, but the field is now at a procedural watershed. With the commonly flawed procedures of the past, most notably in the Symplicity HTN-3 trial, which typically directed ablating energy into the proximal renal arteries, coupled with the absence of testing for achieved denervation, who could guess which of the past negative renal denervation trials, if any, are valid? But renal denervation procedures will now be different in two important ways. First, energy will be directed into the distal renal arteries and renal artery branches, where the renal nerves lie closest to the artery lumen. The need for this change is emphatic and unequivocal. Second, the number of energy point applications will be increased to 12-16 bilaterally. This is required because local perivascular anatomy distorts energy flow, making it unpredictable, so that multiple overlapping energy doses are needed. Applying these principles in experimental animals achieves near-total renal sympathetic nerve ablation, and lowers blood pressure. The "smart" renal denervation trials of the future will include a sham procedure and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure endpoints, but more important than these, which in comparison is clinical trialist "tinkering", will be the procedural revolution in ablative energy delivery.

  20. Haemostatic aspects of renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, P J; Schmidt, E B; Knudsen, F; Nielsen, A H; Kristensen, S D; Dyerberg, J; Kornerup, H J

    1988-01-01

    Platelet function and protein C activity and antigen level was studied in 31 renal transplant recipients and 10 healthy controls. The patients were divided into three groups: (I) cyclosporin treated, (II) azathioprine treated, and (III) azathioprine treated patients with chronic rejection. The platelet function in the renal transplant patients was normal and there was no difference between groups I and II. The specific activity of protein C was decreased in patients after renal transplantation and decreasing protein C activity and progressive renal failure was found to be positively correlated in the azathioprine treated groups.

  1. Solid renal masses in adults

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Mahesh Kumar; Sureka, Binit

    2016-01-01

    With the ever increasing trend of using cross-section imaging in today's era, incidental detection of small solid renal masses has dramatically multiplied. Coincidentally, the number of asymptomatic benign lesions being detected has also increased. The role of radiologists is not only to identify these lesions, but also go a one step further and accurately characterize various renal masses. Earlier detection of small renal cell carcinomas means identifying at the initial stage which has an impact on prognosis, patient management and healthcare costs. In this review article we share our experience with the typical and atypical solid renal masses encountered in adults in routine daily practice. PMID:28104933

  2. Computed tomography of renal oncocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Huntrakoon, M.

    1983-10-01

    Renal oncocytoma is a relatively rare tumor that has an excellent prognosis and usually may be treated adequately by local resection. Preoperative differentiation from renal cell carcinoma, which requires radical nephrectomy, is thus of importance. The computed tomographic (CT) and pathologic features of three incidentally-detected renal oncocytomas were compared with those of six renal cell carcinomas of comparable size. Renal cell carcinoma appears on CT as a solid mass that generally has an indistinct interface with normal renal parenchyma, a lobulated contour, and a nonhomogeneous pattern of contrast enhancement. These features correlate with the pathologic findings of an irregular tumor margin and the frequent presence of tumor hemorrhage and necrosis. Oncocytoma, on the other hand, generally has a distinct margin, a smooth contour, and a homogeneous appearance on contrast-enhanced CT scans. These findings correlate with a smooth tumor margin and absence of tumor hemorrhage and necrosis on pathologic examination. These features are not pathognomonic of oncocytoma, as angiographic evidence suggests that renal cell carcinoma may show both distinct margination and a homogeneous blush in 6% of cases. However, their demonstration by CT should alert radiologists and surgeons to the possibility that a renal mass may be an oncocytoma. Such a presumptive diagnosis then can lead to a surgical approach that allows for renal-conserving surgery.

  3. Image-Guided Renal Intervention.

    PubMed

    Frey, Gregory T; Sella, David M; Atwell, Thomas D

    2015-09-01

    The role of interventional radiology in the management of renal malignancy has expanded in the past 2 decades, largely because of the efficacy of image-guided ablation in treating renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Clinical guidelines now incorporate ablation into standardized RCC management algorithms. Importantly, both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have shown long-term durability in the definitive treatment of RCC, and early outcomes following microwave ablation are equally promising. While selective renal artery embolization has a role in the palliation of select patients with RCC, it can also be used to minimize complications in the ablation of larger renal masses.

  4. Advanced glycation end products in renal failure: an overview.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, M J; Lefrandt, J D; Smit, A J

    2008-12-01

    The article aims to present an overview of the existing knowledge on advanced glycation end products (AGE). They are moieties that bind to proteins, but also lipids and nuclear acids. AGE are formed during glycation and oxidative stress. Accumulation of AGE occurs especially in diabetes and chronic renal failure and plays a major pathogenetic role. The deleterious effects of AGE result from cross-linking of proteins and activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products. AGE accumulation can be noninvasively assessed by the skin autofluorescence reader. In diabetics, the skin autofluorescence predicts cardiac mortality and the occurrence of macro- and microvascular complications. In patients on haemodialysis, skin autofluorescence is highly elevated and predicts mortality. After renal transplantation AGE accumulation is lower than during haemodialysis, but still remains elevated and is a strong risk factor for chronic renal transplant dysfunction. Some of the potential methods to intervene with AGE accumulation are discussed in this article.

  5. Renal responses to acute lead waterborne exposure in the freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Patel, Monika; Rogers, Joseph T; Pane, Eric F; Wood, Chris M

    2006-12-30

    The possible nephrotoxic effects of waterborne lead exposure (as Pb(NO3)2) were investigated in the freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Kidney lead accumulation was time-dependent, increasing upon exposure to 0.57+/-0.01 mg dissolved Pb L(-1) for up to 96 h with a significantly higher burden occurring in the posterior kidney compared to the anterior segment. Urine analyses in trout exposed to 1.20+/-0.09 mg dissolved Pb L(-1) revealed a significant increase in urinary lead excretion rate throughout 96 h of exposure. Urine flow rate and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were not impacted with the exception of a significant decrease in GFR from 84 to 96 h in lead-exposed trout. Urine pH decreased significantly over time in lead-exposed fish. Correspondingly, urine ammonia excretion rate showed a marked increase from 48 h onwards. In experimental fish, urine glucose excretion was significantly greater by 96 h while urine lactate, urea and protein excretion were not significantly altered by lead exposure. The urine excretion rate of Ca2+ increased significantly by approximately 43% after only 24 h of lead exposure, and was maintained at a higher rate than controls for up to 96 h. Magnesium excretion increased in a time-dependent fashion, reaching a two- to three-fold rise by 96 h. In contrast, rates of Na+ and Cl- excretion were decreased in experimental fish by approximately 30% by 48 h, this trend continuing for the duration of lead-exposure. There were no changes in any of these parameters in similarly treated control fish. Clearance ratio analyses indicated progressive decreases in the net reabsorption efficiencies of the renal system for Ca2+, Mg2+, Pb, and glucose, suggesting that the active tubular transport mechanisms for these substances were inhibited by lead exposure, while Na+, K+, Cl-, lactate, and protein reabsorptions were unaffected. Net ammonia secretion increased. We conclude that changes in renal function both reflect and help to minimize

  6. Genetics Home Reference: renal coloboma syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions renal coloboma syndrome renal coloboma syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Renal coloboma syndrome (also known as papillorenal syndrome) is ...

  7. Renal cirsoid arteriovenous malformation masquerading as neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, K; George, D

    1988-12-01

    A woman with renal colic and microscopic hematuria had filling defects in the left renal collecting system detected on excretory urography. A nephrectomy, performed because of suspected malignancy, might have been averted by renal angiography.

  8. D-ribose ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by inhibiting renal inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Masaaki; Ueno, Masaki; Morishita, Jun; Maekawa, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent chemotherapeutic anticancer drugs, but it can produce side effects such as nephrotoxicity. Inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules have important roles in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. D-Ribose is a naturally occurring five-carbon monosaccharide that is found in all living cells, and has anti-inflammatory effects in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effects of D-ribose on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Forty-eight mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, cisplatin, cisplatin + ribose, and ribose. Mice were given cisplatin (20 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally) with or without D-ribose (400 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally, immediately after cisplatin injection). At 72 h after cisplatin injection, we measured serum and renal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and renal monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 concentrations by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; renal expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 mRNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction; serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine; and histological changes. Cisplatin increased serum and renal TNF-α concentrations, renal MCP-1 concentration, and renal ICAM-1 mRNA expression. Treatment with D-ribose attenuated the increase in serum and renal TNF-α concentrations, renal MCP-1 concentration, and renal ICAM-1 mRNA expression. Consequently, cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction and renal tubular necrosis were attenuated by D-ribose treatment. This is believed to be the first time that protective effects of D-ribose on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via inhibition of inflammatory reactions have been investigated. Thus, D-ribose may become a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  9. Delayed rupture of renal artery after renal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Puijlaert, C.B.A.J.; Mali, W.P.; Rosenbusch, G.; van Straalen, A.M.; Klinge, J.; Feldberg, M.A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Two cases are reported in which rupture of the renal artery occurred many hours after renal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Delayed rupture can be recognized by the angiographic appearance and by the presence of persistent flank pain. The typical angiographic finding is a poorly defined zone of contrast medium at the site of perforation.

  10. The renal scan in pregnant renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    With the greater frequency of renal transplant surgery, more female pts are becoming pregnant and carrying to term. In the renal allograft blood vessels and ureter may be compressed resulting in impaired renal function and/or, hypertension. Toxemia of pregnancy is seen more frequently than normal. Radionuclide renal scan monitoring may be of significant value in this high risk obstetrical pt. After being maintained during the pregnancy, renal function may also deteriorate in the post partum period. 5 pregnant renal transplant pts who delivered live babies had renal studies with Tc-99m DTPA to assess allograft perfusion and function. No transplanted kidney was lost during or after pregnancy as a result of pregnancy. No congenital anomalies were associated with transplant management. 7 studies were performed on these 5 pts. The 7 scans all showed the uterus/placenta. The bladder was always distorted. The transplanted kidney was rotated to a more vertical position in 3 pts. The radiation dose to the fetus is calculated at 0.024 rad/mCi administered. This study demonstrates the anatomic and physiologic alterations expected in the transplanted kidney during pregnancy when evaluated by renal scan and that the radiation burden may be acceptable in management of these pts.

  11. Renal cyst puncture studies.

    PubMed

    Lang, E K

    1987-02-01

    The edict to contain costs and meet goals imposed by DRG remuneration policies mandates the work-up of asymptomatic renal mass lesions on an outpatient basis. This proved feasible in 98 per cent of patients. The vast majority of such mass lesions (82 to 90 per cent) is diagnosed with acceptable confidence by computed tomography and sonography alone. For a shrinking group of such patients, yet still 16 to 18 per cent, guided percutaneous aspiration biopsy is necessary to affirm the diagnosis. However, this technique has been refined during recent years to incorporate the use of thin needle equipment and can now be performed on an outpatient basis without significant risk of morbidity. For diagnosing hyperdense inflammatory and infected renal cysts, guided percutaneous aspiration is recommended as the most effective method. This procedure should take precedence over surgical exploration because it can diagnose and provide pertinent bacteriologic information that may determine the course of therapy. In many instances inflammatory cysts or even silent renal abscesses are diagnosed by a percutaneous aspiration technique that is then expanded to serve therapeutic purposes such as percutaneous drainage. Even these procedures can be performed safely on an outpatient basis provided the patient is followed closely. Because complications of percutaneous aspiration procedures are extremely rare, the procedure can be used safely on an outpatient basis. The impact of magnetic resonance imaging on the diagnosis of asymptomatic space-occupying lesions of the kidney is as yet not fully determined; however, this method appears promising for diagnosing some of the refractory lesions such as hemorrhagic cysts, aneurysms, or arteriovenous malformations.

  12. Acute Renal Failure in the Neonate.

    PubMed

    Khan, Owais A; Hageman, Joseph R; Clardy, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in a neonate is a serious condition that impacts 8% to 24% of hospitalized neonates. There is a need for prompt evaluation and treatment to avoid additional complications. In this review, a neonate was found to have renal failure associated with renal vein thrombosis. There are varying etiologies of ARF. Causes of ARF are typically divided into three subsets: pre-renal, renal or intrinsic, and post-renal. Treatment of ARF varies based on the cause. Renal vein thrombosis is an interesting cause of renal or intrinsic ARF and can be serious, often leading to a need for dialysis.

  13. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wehler, Thomas C.; Graf, Claudine; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Brenner, Walburgis; Schadt, Jörg; Gockel, Ines; Berger, Martin R.; Thüroff, Joachim W.; Galle, Peter R.; Moehler, Markus; Schimanski, Carl C.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P = .039), tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005), and low hemoglobin (P = .039). In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma. PMID:19266088

  14. Autopsy Renal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Paueksakon, Paisit; Fogo, Agnes B

    2014-09-01

    We provide an overview of assessment of the kidneys at autopsy, with special considerations for pediatric versus adult kidneys. We describe the approach to gross examination, tissue allocation when needed for additional studies of potential medical renal disease, the spectrum of congenital abnormalities of the kidneys and urinary tract, and approach to cystic diseases of the kidney. We also discuss common lesions seen at autopsy, including acute tubular injury, ischemic versus toxic contributions to this injury, interstitial nephritis, and common vascular diseases. Infections commonly involve the kidney at autopsy, and the key features and differential diagnoses are also discussed.

  15. [Tubular renal acidosis].

    PubMed

    Seidowsky, A; Moulonguet-Doleris, L; Hanslik, T; Yattara, H; Ayari, H; Rouveix, E; Massy, Z A; Prinseau, J

    2014-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTAs) are a group of metabolic disorders characterized by metabolic acidosis with normal plasma anion gap. There are three main forms of RTA: a proximal RTA called type II and a distal RTA (type I and IV). The RTA type II is a consequence of the inability of the proximal tubule to reabsorb bicarbonate. The distal RTA is associated with the inability to excrete the daily acid load and may be associated with hyperkalaemia (type IV) or hypokalemia (type I). The most common etiology of RTA type IV is the hypoaldosteronism. The RTAs can be complicated by nephrocalcinosis and obstructive nephrolithiasis. Alkalinization is the cornerstone of treatment.

  16. Ifosfamide induced renal rickets.

    PubMed

    Lionel, Arul P; Chinnaswamy, Girish; John, Rikki R; Mathai, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    Ifosfamide is commonly used as a chemotherapeutic agent in children. The authors report a 4-y-old boy who developed proximal renal tubulopathy with florid rickets a year after completion of ifosfamide therapy for Ewing's sarcoma. After initiation of treatment, there was complete healing of rickets and he did not need supplements beyond 18 mo. Growth monitoring and musculoskeletal system examination is important in all children who have received ifosfamide therapy. Routine monitoring for nephrotoxicity during and after ifosfamide therapy helps in early identification and intervention.

  17. Disruption of prostaglandin E2 receptor EP4 impairs urinary concentration via decreasing aquaporin 2 in renal collecting ducts

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min; Cao, Rong; Du, Shengnan; Jia, Xiao; Zheng, Senfeng; Huang, Shizheng; Han, Qifei; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Miao, Yifei; Kang, Jihong; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Guan, Youfei

    2015-01-01

    The antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin is a systemic effector in urinary concentration. However, increasing evidence suggests that other locally produced factors may also play an important role in the regulation of water reabsorption in renal collecting ducts. Recently, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor EP4 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. To evaluate the role of EP4 in regulating water homeostasis, mice with renal tubule-specific knockout of EP4 (Ksp-EP4−/−) and collecting duct-specific knockout of EP4 (AQP2-EP4−/−) were generated using the Cre-loxP recombination system. Urine concentrating defect was observed in both Ksp-EP4−/− and AQP2-EP4−/− mice. Decreased aquaporin 2 (AQP2) abundance and apical membrane targeting in renal collecting ducts were evident in Ksp-EP4−/− mice. In vitro studies demonstrated that AQP2 mRNA and protein levels were significantly up-regulated in mouse primary inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells after pharmacological activation or adenovirus-mediated overexpression of EP4 in a cAMP/cAMP-response element binding protein-dependent manner. In addition, EP4 activation or overexpression also increased AQP2 membrane accumulation in a mouse IMCD cell line (IMCD3) stably transfected with the AQP2 gene, mainly through the cAMP/protein kinase A and extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways. In summary, the EP4 receptor in renal collecting ducts plays an important role in regulating urinary concentration under physiological conditions. The ability of EP4 to promote AQP2 membrane targeting and increase AQP2 abundance makes it a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of clinical disorders including acquired and congenital diabetes insipidus. PMID:26100911

  18. Epigenetic Regulation of MicroRNAs Controlling CLDN14 Expression as a Mechanism for Renal Calcium Handling

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yongfeng; Himmerkus, Nina; Plain, Allein; Bleich, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The kidney has a major role in extracellular calcium homeostasis. Multiple genetic linkage and association studies identified three tight junction genes from the kidney—claudin-14, -16, and -19—as critical for calcium imbalance diseases. Despite the compelling biologic evidence that the claudin-14/16/19 proteins form a regulated paracellular pathway for calcium reabsorption, approaches to regulate this transport pathway are largely unavailable, hindering the development of therapies to correct calcium transport abnormalities. Here, we report that treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors downregulates renal CLDN14 mRNA and dramatically reduces urinary calcium excretion in mice. Furthermore, treatment of mice with HDAC inhibitors stimulated the transcription of renal microRNA-9 (miR-9) and miR-374 genes, which have been shown to repress the expression of claudin-14, the negative regulator of the paracellular pathway. With renal clearance and tubule perfusion techniques, we showed that HDAC inhibitors transiently increase the paracellular cation conductance in the thick ascending limb. Genetic ablation of claudin-14 or the use of a loop diuretic in mice abrogated HDAC inhibitor-induced hypocalciuria. The genetic mutations in the calcium-sensing receptor from patients with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) repressed the transcription of miR-9 and miR-374 genes, and treatment with an HDAC inhibitor rescued the phenotypes of cell and animal models of ADH. Furthermore, systemic treatment of mice with antagomiRs against these miRs relieved claudin-14 gene silencing and caused an ADH-like phenotype. Together, our findings provide proof of concept for a novel therapeutic principle on the basis of epigenetic regulation of renal miRs to treat hypercalciuric diseases. PMID:25071082

  19. Stimulation of renal afferent fibers leads to activation of catecholaminergic and non-catecholaminergic neurons in the medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Erika E; Martins, Beatriz S; Milanez, Maycon I O; Lopes, Nathalia R; de Melo, Jose F; Pontes, Roberto B; Girardi, Adriana C; Campos, Ruy R; Bergamaschi, Cássia T

    2017-01-19

    Presympathetic neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) including the adrenergic cell groups play a major role in the modulation of several reflexes required for the control of sympathetic vasomotor tone and blood pressure (BP). Moreover, sympathetic vasomotor drive to the kidneys influence natriuresis and diuresis by inhibiting the cAMP/PKA pathway and redistributing the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) to the body of the microvilli in the proximal tubules. In this study we aimed to evaluate the effects of renal afferents stimulation on (1) the neurochemical phenotype of Fos expressing neurons in the medulla oblongata and (2) the level of abundance and phosphorylation of NHE3 in the renal cortex. We found that electrical stimulation of renal afferents increased heart rate and BP transiently and caused activation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing neurons in the RVLM and non-TH neurons in the NTS. Additionally, activation of the inhibitory renorenal reflex over a 30-min period resulted in increased natriuresis and diuresis associated with increased phosphorylation of NHE3 at serine 552, a surrogate for reduced activity of this exchanger, in the contralateral kidney. This effect was not dependent of BP changes considering that no effects on natriuresis or diuresis were found in the ipsilateral-stimulated kidney. Therefore, our data show that renal afferents leads to activation of catecholaminergic and non-catecholaminergic neurons in the medulla oblongata. When renorenal reflex is induced, NHE3 exchanger activity appears to be decreased, resulting in decreased sodium and water reabsorption in the contralateral kidney.

  20. [Pediatric renal transplant in Japan].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kazuharu

    2010-09-01

    Transplantation is the optimal renal replacement therapy for children with end-stage renal disease. Compared with dialysis, successful transplantation in children and adolescents not only ameliorates uremic symptoms but also allows for significant improvement of delayed growth, sexual maturation, and psychosocial functioning. The child with a well-functioning kidney can enjoy a quality of life that cannot be achieved with dialysis therapy. The 5- and 10-year patient/graft survival rate in transplant recipients are 97.9/88.8% and 96.2%/79.4% based on Japanese Renal Transplant Registry Society data. This article reviews recent reports of pediatric renal transplantation including ABO-incompatible and preemptive renal transplantation in Japan.

  1. Renal denervation and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Michael; Ewen, Sebastian; Kindermann, Ingrid; Linz, Dominik; Ukena, Christian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2014-06-01

    Renal denervation has been developed in order to lower systolic blood pressure in resistant hypertension by a reduction in renal afferent and efferent sympathetic nerve activity. In heart failure sympathetic activation, in particular, renal norepinephrine release is closely associated with morbidity and mortality. Initial studies have shown that renal denervation is able to reduce not only blood pressure but also heart rate, and is associated with a reduction in myocardial hypertrophy, improved glucose tolerance, and ameliorated microalbuminuria. Since some experimental and observational data suggest an antiarrhythmic effect, it is possible that renal denervation might also play a therapeutic role in arrhythmias often occurring in chronic heart failure. The first proof-of-concept studies are planned to evaluate the clinical effect of this pathophysiologically plausible method, which might be able to change clinical practice.

  2. Development of the renal arterioles.

    PubMed

    Sequeira Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Gomez, R Ariel

    2011-12-01

    The kidney is a highly vascularized organ that normally receives a fifth of the cardiac output. The unique spatial arrangement of the kidney vasculature with each nephron is crucial for the regulation of renal blood flow, GFR, urine concentration, and other specialized kidney functions. Thus, the proper and timely assembly of kidney vessels with their respective nephrons is a crucial morphogenetic event leading to the formation of a functioning kidney necessary for independent extrauterine life. Mechanisms that govern the development of the kidney vasculature are poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the anatomical development, embryological origin, lineage relationships, and key regulators of the kidney arterioles and postglomerular circulation. Because renal disease is associated with deterioration of the kidney microvasculature and/or the reenactment of embryonic pathways, understanding the morphogenetic events and processes that maintain the renal vasculature may open new avenues for the preservation of renal structure and function and prevent the progression of renal disease.

  3. Atheroembolic renal disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the kidneys. Causes AERD is linked to atherosclerosis . Atherosclerosis is a common disorder of the arteries. It ... blockages of the kidney blood vessels are severe. Atherosclerosis of the aorta is the most common cause ...

  4. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhi-Xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-Lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care.

  5. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care. PMID:27891093

  6. Uptake and binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Elgavish, A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the interaction of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) using an experimental protocol which allows us to distinguish between ligand binding to the outside of the vesicles vs. uptake and possible binding to the vesicle interior. By examining the association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with BBV as a function of medium osmolarity (300-1100 mosm) to alter intravesicular space, virtually all ligand interaction with BBV was found to represent uptake of intact /sup 125/I-calmodulin into the intravesicular space. Uptake appeared specific by the following criteria: (1) it was largely calcium dependent (2) it was inhibited in a dose dependent fashion by calmodulin and the homologous protein troponin C, but not by unrelated proteins (lysozyme, cytochrome C, insulin) (3) it was inhibited by known calmodulin antagonists (calmidazolium, mellitin, trifluoperazine). Calmodulin uptake may be followed by binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin to intravesicular BBV proteins; calmodulin-binding proteins in BBV with molecular weights of 143K, 118K, 50K, 47.5K, 46.5K and 35K were identified by Western blotting techniques. The specific association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated BBV is of interest in regard to the possible role of this calcium regulatory protein in the protein reabsorptive and ion transport functions of this renal tubular membrane fraction.

  7. Growth in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Ariceta, Gema; Langman, Craig B

    2007-04-01

    Growth failure appears frequently in children with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR) due to hypophosphatemia, disease severity, body disproportion, and primary bone abnormality. Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) increases phosphate tubular reabsorption and phosphate level in blood and, thus, constitutes an attractive but controversial therapy in short children with XLHR, those efficacy was demonstrated in small uncontrolled series. Our aim was to report our experience regarding growth in XLHR. Twenty-seven children with XLHR--20 girls, seven boys--diagnosed at a median (md) of 1.46 years of age, (range 0.39-8.5 years), were studied at 10.12 years of age (1.58-18.56), md (range). All received oral treatment with phosphate and calcitriol. At the first visit, grouped Z-height was -1; (-4.58; 0.54) md (range). After 5 years' follow-up (0.92-15.6), Z-height was -0.91 (- 4.56; 0.17), not different from that at baseline (P = 0.465). In 16 children entirely controlled in our program upon presentation, a "catch up" phenomenon after the rickets had healed (P = 0.823) or throughout the long-term was not observed (P = 0.995). Eight patients had a Z-height 2 years at diagnosis, male gender and non-adherence to treatment. Four children, all boys, received rhGH, and in two cases with sufficient follow up stature normalized. No rhGH side effects were observed, and phosphate and calcitriol doses remained stable. Linear growth failure appeared in a third of XLHR children. Efforts need to be made to reduce the age of diagnosis and to improve adherence to treatment. Treatment with rhGH should be considered early, after the rickets has been controlled, in those patients with impaired growth or delayed diagnosis.

  8. Unfused renal ectopia: a rare form of congenital renal anomaly.

    PubMed

    Nursal, Gül Nihal; Büyükdereli, Gülgün

    2005-09-01

    Unfused crossed renal ectopia observed 1 in 75,000 autopsies is a rare congenital anomaly. Typically one kidney is located in the proximity of the other kidney, and the ureter of the anatomically anomalous kidney crosses the midline to insert to the bladder in its normal anatomic position. Although renal function is usually not affected, the condition is generally accompanied by other congenital anomalies. In this case report, static and dynamic scintigraphic images of two patients with unfused crossed renal ectopia are presented. Besides properties of imaging modalities, clinical features are discussed in light of the available literature.

  9. Evidence for tissue-specific activation of renal angiotensinogen mRNA expression in chronic stable experimental heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Schunkert, H; Ingelfinger, J R; Hirsch, A T; Tang, S S; Litwin, S E; Talsness, C E; Dzau, V J

    1992-01-01

    The intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may contribute to the pathophysiology of heart failure by the generation of angiotensin II at local sites within the kidneys. Angiotensin II may directly influence renal hemodynamics, glomerular contractility, and tubular sodium reabsorption, thereby promoting sodium and fluid retention in this syndrome. In the present study, we examined components of the circulating RAS as well as the intrarenal expressions of renin and angiotensinogen mRNA in rats with stable compensated heart failure (HF) 12 wk after experimental myocardial infarction. Renal angiotensinogen mRNA level in vehicle-treated HF rats increased 47%, as compared with sham control rats (P = 0.001). The increase in angiotensinogen mRNA levels was more pronounced in animals with medium (46%, P < 0.05) and large (66%, P < 0.05) infarcts than in those with small infarcts (31%, P = NS). There were no differences in liver angiotensinogen mRNA, circulating angiotensinogen, angiotensin II, plasma renin concentration (PRC), kidney renin content (KRC), and renal renin mRNA level between sham and HFv. In addition, in a separate group of rats with heart failure, we demonstrated that renal angiotensin II concentration increased twofold (P < 0.05) as compared with that of age-matched sham operated controls. A parallel group of heart failure rats (HFe, n = 11) was treated with enalapril (25 mg/kg per d) in drinking water for 6 wk before these measurements. Blood pressure decreased significantly during treatment (91 vs. 103 mm Hg, P < 0.05). Enalapril treatment in HF rats increased renin mRNA level (2.5-fold, P < 0.005), KRC (5.6-fold, P = 0.005), and PRC (15.5-fold, P < 0.005). The increase in renal angiotensinogen mRNA level observed in HFv rats was markedly attenuated in enalapril treated HF rats (P < 0.001), suggesting a positive feedback of angiotensin II on renal angiotensinogen synthesis. These findings demonstrate an activation of intrarenal RAS, but no changes in

  10. Distant effects of unilateral renal ischemia/reperfusion on contralateral kidney but not lung in rats: the roles of ROS and iNOS.

    PubMed

    Fatemikia, Hossein; Ketabchi, Farzaneh; Karimi, Zynab; Moosavi, Seyed Mostafa Shid

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury is usually associated with distant organ dysfunction. The roles of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in this phenomenon were investigated following 2 h unilateral renal ischemia and 24 h reperfusion. There were 3 groups of rats subjected to either unilateral ischemia/reperfusion (UIR group), unilateral nephrectomy (UNX group), or sham operation. Two further groups were given α-tocopherol and aminoguanidine with UIR (treated-UIR group) and UNX (treated-UNX group). Plasma nitrite/nitrate and malondialdehyde were elevated only in the UIR group. Creatinine clearance and blood flow increased in non-ischemic kidney of the UIR, but not to the same extent as remnant kidney of the UNX group, while they had equal compensatory rises in absolute Na(+) and K(+) excretion and urine flow. Non-ischemic kidney of the treated-UIR group, but not remnant kidney of the treated-UNX group, showed more elevation in blood flow, whereas both kidneys had reductions in absolute Na(+) excretion and urine flow. Respiratory functional variable were not different between all groups. Therefore, 2 h unilateral renal ischemia and 24 h reperfusion did not affect lung but had distant effects on contralateral kidney partly mediated by ROS and NO-derived from iNOS to dampen compensatory increases in renal hemodynamics and to decrease tubular reabsorption.

  11. Effects of supplemental recombinant bovine somatotropin and mist-fan cooling on the renal tubular handling of sodium in different stages of lactation in crossbred Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Boonsanit, Dolrudee; Chanpongsang, Somchai; Chaiyabutr, Narongsak

    2012-08-01

    The effect of supplementary administration of recombinant bovine somatotrophin (rbST) on the renal tubular handling of sodium in crossbred 87.5% Holstein cattle housed in normal shade (NS) or mist-fan cooled (MF) barns was evaluated. The cows were injected with 500 mg rbST at three different stages of lactation. The MF barn housed cows showed a slightly decreased ambient temperature and temperature humidity index, but an increased relative humidity. Rectal temperature and respiration rates were significantly lower in cooled cows. The rbST treated cows, housed in NS or MF barns, showed markedly increased milk yields, total body water, extracellular fluid and plasma volume levels, along with a reduced rate of urine flow and urinary excretion of sodium, potassium and chloride ions and osmolar clearance, in all three stages of lactation. Renal tubular sodium and water reabsorption were increased after rbST administration without any alteration in the renal hemodynamics. Lithium clearance data suggested that the site of response is in the proximal nephron segment, which may be mediated via increases in the plasma levels of aldosterone and IGF-1, but not vasopressin, during rbST administration.

  12. HCO3−-independent conductance with a mutant Na+/HCO3− cotransporter (SLC4A4) in a case of proximal renal tubular acidosis with hypokalaemic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Mark D; Qin, Xue; Williamson, Rosalind C; Toye, Ashley M; Boron, Walter F

    2012-01-01

    The renal electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransporter (NBCe1-A) contributes to the basolateral step of transepithelial HCO3− reabsorption in proximal tubule epithelia, contributing to the buffering of blood pH. Elsewhere in the body (e.g. muscle cells) NBCe1 variants contribute to, amongst other processes, maintenance of intracellular pH. Others have described a homozygous mutation in NBCe1 (NBCe1-A p.Ala799Val) in an individual with severe proximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA; usually associated with defective HCO3− reabsorption in proximal tubule cells) and hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (hypoPP; usually associated with leaky cation channels in muscle cells). Using biotinylation and two-electrode voltage-clamp on Xenopus oocytes expressing NBCe1, we demonstrate that the mutant NBCe1-A (AA799V) exhibits a per-molecule transport defect that probably contributes towards the observed pRTA. Furthermore, we find that AA799V expression is associated with an unusual HCO3−-independent conductance that, if associated with mutant NBCe1 in muscle cells, could contribute towards the appearance of hypokalaemic paralysis in the affected individual. We also study three novel lab mutants of NBCe1-A: p.Ala799Ile, p.Ala799Gly and p.Ala799Ser. All three exhibit a per-molecule transport defect, but only AA799I exhibits an AA799V-like ion conductance. AA799G and AA799S exhibit unusual outward rectification in their HCO3−-dependent conductance and AA799G exhibits reduced sensitivity to both DIDS and tenidap. A799G is the first mutation shown to affect the apparent tenidap affinity of NBCe1. Finally we show that AA799V and AA799I, which accumulate poorly in the plasma membrane of oocytes, exhibit signs of abnormal intracellular accumulation in a non-polarized renal cell-line. PMID:22331414

  13. The Combined Influence of Psychological Factors on Biomarkers of Renal Functioning in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Gholson, Georica K.; Mwendwa, Denée T.; Wright, Regina Sims; Callender, Clive O.; Campbell, Alfonso L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective African Americans are disproportionately affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recent research has documented that psychological factors have a significant influence on the progression and treatment of CKD. However, extant evidence exists that has examined the link between psychological factors and renal function in African Americans. The purpose of the study was to determine if psychological factors were associated with several biomarkers of renal functioning in this group. Participants 129 African American participants, with a mean age of 44.4 years (SD512.25). Design and Setting Data were analyzed from a cross-sectional study entitled Stress and Psychoneuroimmunological Factors in Renal Health and Disease. Main Predictor Measures Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II, Cook Medley Scale, and Perceived Stress Scale-10. Main Outcome Measures Systolic blood pressure, as well as blood and urine samples, were collected and served as biomarkers of renal functioning. Results Our findings indicated that psychological factors were not associated with renal functioning. Age, sex, and systolic blood pressure emerged as significant predictors of renal functioning. Conclusions Depressive symptomatology, perceived stress, and hostility did not influence renal functioning in this sample. This unexpected finding may be attributed to the fact that this sample population was not elevated on depressive symptoms, perceived stress, or hostility. Elevated levels of these psychological factors, as well as other psychological factors associatd with the CKD, may be more influential on renal functioning in African Americans. PMID:26118136

  14. Obesity triggers enhanced MDSC accumulation in murine renal tumors via elevated local production of CCL2.

    PubMed

    Hale, Malika; Itani, Farah; Buchta, Claire M; Wald, Gal; Bing, Megan; Norian, Lyse A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is one of the leading risk factors for developing renal cell carcinoma, an immunogenic tumor that is treated clinically with immunostimulatory therapies. Currently, however, the mechanisms linking obesity with renal cancer incidence are unclear. Using a model of diet-induced obesity, we found that obese BALB/c mice with orthotopic renal tumors had increased total frequencies of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in renal tumors and spleens by d14 post-tumor challenge, relative to lean counterparts. Renal tumors from obese mice had elevated concentrations of the known myeloid cell chemoattractant CCL2, which was produced locally by increased percentages of dendritic cells, macrophages, B cells, and CD45- cells in tumors. MDSC expression of the CCL2 receptor, CCR2, was unaltered by obesity but greater percentages of CCR2+ MDSCs were present in renal tumors from obese mice. Of note, the intracellular arginase levels and per-cell suppressive capacities of tumor-infiltrating and splenic MDSCs were unchanged in obese mice relative to lean controls. Thus, our findings suggest that obesity promotes renal tumor progression via development of a robust immunosuppressive environment that is characterized by heightened local and systemic MDSC prevalence. Targeted intervention of the CCL2/CCR2 pathway may facilitate immune-mediated renal tumor clearance in the obese.

  15. Renal involvement in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sciascia, Savino; Cuadrado, Maria José; Khamashta, Munther; Roccatello, Dario

    2014-05-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease defined by the presence of arterial or venous thrombotic events and/or pregnancy morbidity in patients who test positive for antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs). APS can be isolated (known as primary APS) or associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; known as secondary APS). The kidney is a major target organ in APS and renal thrombosis can occur at any level within the vasculature of the kidney (renal arteries, intrarenal arteries, glomerular capillaries and renal veins); events reflect the site and size of the involved vessels. Histological findings vary widely, including ischaemic glomeruli and thrombotic lesions without glomerular or arterial immune deposits on immunofluorescence. Renal prognosis is affected by the presence of aPLs in patients with lupus nephritis and can be poor. In patients with SLE and aPLs, biopsy should be performed because inflammatory and thrombotic lesions require different therapeutic approaches. Renal involvement in patients with definite APS is treated by anticoagulation with long-term warfarin. The range of renal manifestations associated with APS is broadening and, therefore, aPLs have increasing relevance in end-stage renal disease, transplantation and pregnancy.

  16. Malignancy and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramon

    2003-01-01

    Increased incidence of cancer at various sites is observed in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Certain malignant diseases, such as lymphomas and carcinomas of the kidney, prostate, liver and uterus, show an enhanced prevalence compared with the general population. In particular, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) shows an excess incidence in ESRD patients. A multitude of factors, directly or indirectly associated with the renal disease and the treatment regimens, may contribute to the increased tumor formation in these patients. Patients undergoing renal replacement therapy (RRT) are prone to develop acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD), which may subsequently lead to the development of RCC. In pre-dialysis patients with coexistent renal disease, as in dialysis and transplant patients, the presence of ACKD may predispose to RCC. Previous use of cytotoxic drugs (eg, cyclophosphamide) or a history of analgesic abuse, are additional risk factors for malignancy. Malignancy following renal transplantation is an important medical problem during the follow-up. The most common malignancies are lymphoproliferative disorders (early after transplantation) and skin carcinomas (late after transplantation). Another important confounder for risk of malignancy after renal transplantation is the type of immunosuppression. The type of malignancy is different in various countries and dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Finally, previous cancer treatment in a uremic patient on the transplant waiting list is of great importance in relation to waiting time and post-malignancy screening.

  17. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease. PMID:27479950

  18. [Travel and renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Lavelle, O; Berland, Y

    1997-01-01

    Traveling can be dangerous for subjects with kidney insufficiency. Water loss or septic episodes can further increase renal dysfunction. Poor diet can lead to hyperkaliemia. Immunosuppression not only enhances the risk of infection but also complicates administration of live vaccines. Some antimalarial drugs are contraindicated (e.g. mefloquine) and others must be used with precaution. Prior to departure persons requiring hemodialysis should book sessions at centers listed in specialized guidebooks. In addition to infection, risks for hemodialysis patients include thrombosis of the arteriovenous fistula in case of dehydration or hypotension. In subjects with transplanted kidney, the risk of rejection can be enhanced either by poor compliance with immunodepressor treatment or by vaccination-induced antigenic stimulation. Pre-travel evaluation is necessary to determine metabolic, nutritional, and immune status. Subjects with kidney insufficiency and transplanted kidneys should be informed of the dangers and appropriate action in case of trouble.

  19. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  20. Renal dysplasia in Beagle dogs: four cases.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Marc C; Shoieb, Ahmed M; Shirai, Norimitsu; Boucher, Germaine G; Brodie, Thomas A

    2010-12-01

    Anomalies of renal development comprise abnormalities in the amount of renal tissue (agenesis and hypoplasia); anomalies of renal position, form, and orientation; and renal dysplasia. There are previous reports of canine renal dysplasia in different breeds but none in the Beagle breed. This is the first report of renal dysplasia in this breed of dog. Morphologic descriptions of the range of microscopic features observed in four cases of renal dysplasia from preclinical studies in laboratory Beagle dogs are presented (including persistent primitive mesenchyme, persistence of metanephric ducts, asynchronous differentiation of nephrons, and atypical tubular epithelium), along with a basis for the classification of the lesion.

  1. Management of renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Podymow, Tiina; August, Phyllis; Akbari, Ayub

    2010-06-01

    Although renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, it poses considerable risk to maternal and fetal health. This article discusses renal physiology and assessment of renal function in pregnancy and the effect of pregnancy on renal disease in patients with diabetes, lupus, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, and chronic pyelonephritis. Renal diseases occasionally present for the first time in pregnancy, and diagnoses of glomerulonephritis, acute tubular necrosis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are described. Finally, therapy of end-stage renal disease in pregnancy, dialysis, and renal transplantation are reviewed.

  2. Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Talwalkar, Yeshawant B.; Harner, Marvin H.; Musgrave, James E.; Lawson, Russell K.; Campbell, Robert A.

    1975-01-01

    Thirty-one children received 38 kidney transplants from 22 live and 16 cadaver donors. Among the 31 patients, 25 received one transplant each, 5 received two transplants each and 1 received three transplants. Peritoneal or hemodialysis (or both) was carried out in 22 patients, with an average dialytic maintenance of 12 weeks before transplantation. Posttransplant immunosuppressive therapy included prednisone and azathioprine. Antilymphocyte globulin was administered to 33 recipients as adjunctive immunosuppressive therapy. At present, 23 patients have functioning allografts, 3 are on hemodialysis and 5 are dead. Of 22 live kidney transplants, 18 are presently functioning two months to 14 years after transplantation with an average of 36 months. Of 16 cadaver kidney transplants, 5 are presently functioning 9 to 57 months after transplantation with an average of 32 months. Actuarial live donor allograft survival for one year was 76 percent, for two years was 66 percent and for three years was 64 percent. Cadaver allograft survival was 50 percent, 40 percent and 40 percent, respectively. Complications were urologic and infection related. Of nine recipients with sustained hypertension, in six the condition was due to chronic rejection, while in one it was due to recurrence of the original disease in the allograft. Linear growth was measured in 15 children who were less than 14 years of age at the time of transplantation and in whom allografts survived more than one year. Maximum average linear growth velocity occurred during the first year after transplantation. Our experience indicates pediatric renal transplantation can be successfully used in the treatment of terminal renal failure. PMID:1098288

  3. Renal Cancer in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    González León, Tania; Morera Pérez, Maricela

    2016-01-01

    The increase of the aging population corresponds with the rise of renal cancer in elderly patients. The distinction between functional and chronological age, quality of life, and survival estimate are important issues, among others, that should be considered in the management of renal cancer in elderly patients. We made this review with the purpose of synthesizing the most updated criteria regarding indications and outcomes of the different therapeutic options in the management of elderly patients with renal cancer, beginning from the physiologic considerations that characterize them, their capacity to tolerate different therapeutic possibilities, and the prognosis of the patients' risks and comorbidity assessment.

  4. Imaging of Solid Renal Masses.

    PubMed

    Kay, Fernando U; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Detection of solid renal masses has increased, although it has not resulted in significant mortality reduction from renal cell carcinoma. Efforts for improved lesion characterization have been pursued and incorporated in management algorithms, in order to distinguish clinically significant tumors from favorable or benign conditions. Concurrently, imaging methods have produced evidence supporting their role as useful tools not only in lesion detection but also characterization. In addition, newer modalities, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, and advanced applications of MR imaging, are being investigated. This article reviews the current role of different imaging methods in the characterization of solid renal masses.

  5. Increased Renal Proximal Convoluted Tubule Transport Contributes to Hypertension in Cyp4a14 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Raymond; Chakravarty, Sumana; Zhao, Xueying; Imig, John D.; Capdevila, Jorge H.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Disrupting the enzyme Cyp4a14 in mice leads to hypertension, which is more severe in the male mice and appears to be due to androgen excess. Because the Cyp4a14 enzyme is located in the proximal tubule of the kidney, we hypothesized that there could be dysregulation of transport in this segment that could contribute to the hypertension. Methods Wild-type (SV/129) mice and mice that had targeted disruption of the Cyp4a14 gene were studied. Proximal convoluted tubules (PCT) from knockout and wild-type mice were dissected and perfused in vitrofor measurement of volume absorption (JV). Expression of the sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3 (NHE3), the predominant transporter responsible for sodium transport in this segment, was measured by immunoblot. Renal vascular (afferent arteriole) responses to angiotensin and endothelin were also measured. Results PCT volume absorption was elevated in tubules from the Cyp4a14 knockout mice as compared to the wild-type mice. Brush border membrane NHE3 expression was almost 2-fold higher in Cyp4a14 knockout mice than in wild-type mice. No difference was found in the afferent arteriolar response. Conclusion Thus, hypertension in the Cyp4a14 knockout mice appears to be driven by excessive fluid reabsorption in the proximal tubule, which is secondary to overexpression of NHE3. PMID:19713718

  6. Renal function, aldosterone, and vasopressin excretion following repeated long-distance running.

    PubMed

    Wade, C E; Dressendorfer, R H; O'Brien, J C; Claybaugh, J R

    1981-04-01

    Renal and endocrine responses were studied in 10 male runners during a 20-day 500-km race. Overnight urine and prerun blood samples were taken prior to running on days 1, 2, 5, 8, 14, 17, and 20. Day 13 followed 70 h of rest. Urine flow rate, osmotic clearance, tubular free water reabsorption, urinary vasopressin excretion rate, and body weight were not significantly changed. Creatinine clearance was constant except for an elevation on day 5. Plasma osmolality was elevated on days 2, 14, and 17. Plasma sodium was increased (P less than 0.05) on days 2 and 13 but reduced on day 20. The percentage of filtered sodium excreted was significantly reduced on all nights following running and elevated on recovery day 13. Urinary aldosterone excretion rate was significantly elevated 162, 117, and 97% on days 5, 8, and 20 and returned to control levels on day 13 after 70 h of rest. These data suggest that in response to repeated long-distance running normal fluid balance is regained within 12 h. However, it is necessary to conserve sodium for at least 24 h after exercise as evidenced by the decrease in the percent filtered sodium excreted and continued elevation of aldosterone excretion.

  7. Renal function in suckling and fasting pups of the northern elephant seal.

    PubMed

    Houser, D S; Crocker, D E; Webb, P M; Costa, D P

    2001-06-01

    Elephant seals fast for prolonged periods without access to water. This is made possible, in part, by reductions in urine production. However, the mechanisms involved in reducing urine production are not understood. In this study, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was measured in five northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris) via the inulin clearance technique. Measurements were made during day 9 and day 18-22 of nursing and the second and eighth week of the postweaning fast. Plasma aldosterone and cortisol concentrations, quantified by radioimmunoassay, were measured in eight other weanlings during the second and eighth week of the fast. Mean GFR was 79.3+/-29.3 ml/min during the early suckling period and 78.2+/-17.1, 89.8+/-52.7, and 80.4+/-12.2 ml/min during the late suckling, early fasting and late fasting periods, respectively. Differences between nursing and fasting were insignificant, possibly because reduced protein oxidation during suckling and rapid recruitment of protein for tissue synthesis obviated the need for postprandial hyperfiltration. Alternatively, maintenance of GFR during fasting may facilitate urea concentration by compensating for reductions in the fractional excretion of urea. It is further hypothesized that aldosterone is primarily responsible for mediating renal water reabsorption in this system.

  8. [ADPKD: predictors of Renal Disease progression].

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Dallera, Nadia; Saletti, Arianna; Terlizzi, Vincenzo; Izzi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Factors predicting rapid progression of kidney disease in ADPKD can be divided into genetic (non-modifiable) and clinical (modifiable) risk factors. Patients harbouring PKD1 mutations, in particular if truncating, have a more severe form of ADPKD. Clinical risk factors include decrease in glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow at a young age; high total kidney volume; hypertension and urological complications <35 years; albuminuria/proteinuria. The renal disease is also more severe in males and in subjects with family history of ESRD <55 years. In recent years, two models for predicting progression in ADPKD have been published: the Mayo model, based on height-adjusted TKV, age and eGFR, and the Brest model, based on PKD gene mutation type, gender, and early onset of hypertension and urological complications. With the emergence of new disease-modifying therapies, prediction tools are essential. However, the high variability in ADPKD makes the predicting models difficult to apply on an individual patient basis. Thus, the above-mentioned predicting models should be viewed as complimentary to clinical evaluation and follow-up. In the future, an individual risk score linking genetic, imaging and clinical data might prove the most accurate way of predicting long-term outcome.

  9. An unusual cause of acute renal failure: renal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ozaltin, Fatih; Yalçin, Bilgehan; Orhan, Diclehan; Sari, Neriman; Caglar, Melda; Besbas, Nesrin; Bakkaloglu, Aysin

    2004-08-01

    Renal involvement is a common finding in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Acute renal failure at initial presentation due to lymphomatous infiltration of the kidneys has been described infrequently. We report a 17-year-old male who presented with acute renal failure due to massive lymphomatous infiltration of the kidneys, which necessitated hemodialysis. The diagnosis of B-cell NHL was established by tru-cut biopsy of the kidneys and the patient had an excellent response to high-dose chemotherapy with no major complication. The presence of extrarenal involvement in the testes and the retroperitoneal lymph nodes made the diagnosis of primary renal lymphoma debatable. However, considering the delay in diagnosis and the high proliferative rate of B-cell NHL, we might postulate that the disease had originated primarily in the kidneys. We recommend that in NHL cases with severe renal involvement, full-dose chemotherapy should be instituted with meticulous clinical and laboratory follow-up in order to improve clinical and renal failure status rapidly and to avoid further dissemination of NHL.

  10. [Spontaneous renal artery dissection with renal infarction: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oki, Takashi; Adachi, Hiroyuki; Tahara, Hideo; Kino, Sigeo

    2011-11-01

    A 58-year-old woman visited our hospital with nausea and right flank pain. At first abdominal ultrasonography was performed, suggesting a right renal infarction. Computed tomography (CT) study of the abdomen with intravenous contrast was performed to determine the cause of the symptoms. The scan revealed poor enhancement in the lower half of the right kidney. She was diagnosed with a right renal infarction. She was initially treated with anticoagulant therapy, but 5 days later, she complained of nausea. This time, CT demonstrated exacerbation of a right renal infarction with renal artery dissection. Based on this finding, we performed a right nephrectomy. The result of pathology was segmental arterial mediolysis. She was discharged 12 days after the surgery and is doing well at 6 months after discharge. Spontaneous renal artery dissection is a rare disease. It constitutes approximately 0.05% of arteriographic dissections. In addition, spontaneous renal artery dissection shows nonspecific symptoms. Together, these two factors may cause a delay in diagnosis.

  11. Renal oxygenation in acute renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Amany; Ho, Julie; Ow, Connie P C; Eppel, Gabriela A; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W; Schlaich, Markus P; Evans, Roger G

    2014-05-01

    Tissue hypoxia has been demonstrated, in both the renal cortex and medulla, during the acute phase of reperfusion after ischemia induced by occlusion of the aorta upstream from the kidney. However, there are also recent clinical observations indicating relatively well preserved oxygenation in the nonfunctional transplanted kidney. To test whether severe acute kidney injury can occur in the absence of widespread renal tissue hypoxia, we measured cortical and inner medullary tissue Po2 as well as total renal O2 delivery (Do2) and O2 consumption (Vo2) during the first 2 h of reperfusion after 60 min of occlusion of the renal artery in anesthetized rats. To perform this experiment, we used a new method for measuring kidney Do2 and Vo2 that relies on implantation of fluorescence optodes in the femoral artery and renal vein. We were unable to detect reductions in renal cortical or inner medullary tissue Po2 during reperfusion after ischemia localized to the kidney. This is likely explained by the observation that Vo2 (-57%) was reduced by at least as much as Do2 (-45%), due to a large reduction in glomerular filtration (-94%). However, localized tissue hypoxia, as evidence by pimonidazole adduct immunohistochemistry, was detected in kidneys subjected to ischemia and reperfusion, particularly in, but not exclusive to, the outer medulla. Thus, cellular hypoxia, particularly in the outer medulla, may still be present during reperfusion even when reductions in tissue Po2 are not detected in the cortex or inner medulla.

  12. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling to predict concentrations and actions of sodium-dependent glucose transporter 2 inhibitor canagliflozin in human intestines and renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazumi; Saito, Ryuta; Nakamaru, Yoshinobu; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Canagliflozin is a recently developed sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitor that promotes renal glucose excretion and is considered to inhibit renal SGLT2 from the luminal side of proximal tubules. Canagliflozin reportedly inhibits SGLT1 weakly and suppresses postprandial plasma glucose, suggesting that it also inhibits intestinal SGLT1. However, it is difficult to measure the drug concentrations of these assumed sites of action directly. The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships of canagliflozin remain poorly characterized. Therefore, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of canagliflozin was developed based on clinical data from healthy volunteers and it was used to simulate luminal concentrations in intestines and renal tubules. In small intestine simulations, the inhibition ratios for SGLT1 were predicted to be 40%-60% after the oral administration of clinical doses (100-300 mg/day). In contrast, inhibition ratios of canagliflozin for renal SGLT2 and SGLT1 were predicted to be approximately 100% and 0.2%-0.4%, respectively. These analyses suggest that canagliflozin only inhibits SGLT2 in the kidney. Using the simulated proximal tubule luminal concentrations of canagliflozin, the urinary glucose excretion rates in canagliflozin-treated diabetic patients were accurately predicted using the renal glucose reabsorption model as a PD model. Because the simulation of canagliflozin pharmacokinetics was successful, this PBPK methodology was further validated by successfully simulating the pharmacokinetics of dapagliflozin, another SGLT2 inhibitor. The present results suggest the utility of this PBPK/PD model for predicting canagliflozin concentrations at target sites and help to elucidate the pharmacological effects of SGLT1/2 inhibition in humans. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Why oral calcium supplements may reduce renal stone disease: report of a clinical pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C; Child, D; Hudson, P; Davies, G; Davies, M; John, R; Anandaram, P; De Bolla, A R

    2001-01-01

    Aims—To investigate whether increasing the daily baseline of gut calcium can cause a gradual downregulation of the active intestinal transport of calcium via reduced parathyroid hormone (PTH) mediated activation of vitamin D, and to discuss why such a mechanism might prevent calcium oxalate rich stones. To demonstrate the importance of seasonal effects upon the evaluation of such data. Methods—Within an intensive 24 hour urine collection regimen, daily calcium supplementation (500 mg) was given to five stone formers for a 10 week period during a six month crossover study. In a further population of patients on follow up for previous renal stone disease, observations were made on 1066 24 hour urine samples collected over five years in respect of seasonal effects relevant to the interpretation of the study. Results—In the group of patients on calcium supplements the following results were found. During calcium supplementation, the proportion of urine calcium to oxalate was higher (increased calcium to oxalate molar ratio), the 24 hour urine product of calcium and oxalate did not rise, and urine oxalate was lower during the first six weeks of supplementation. Twenty four hour urine calcium was 10.2% higher than baseline in the final four weeks of the 10 weeks of supplementation. Twenty four hour urine phosphate was 11.4% lower during the first six weeks of supplementation, but then rose while the patients were still on supplementation; renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate (TmP/GFR) mirrored the urine phosphate changes inversely. PTH was higher after stopping supplementation, but 1,25-(OH)2-cholecalciferol changes were not detected. In the 1066 urine samples collected over five years the following results were found. Calcium and oxalate excretion correlated positively and not inversely. Urine calcium and phosphate excretion were 5.5% and 2.5% higher, respectively, in "light" months of the year compared with "dark" months. A post summer decline in both urine

  14. Pregnancy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Karin M; Wu, Danny; Ebcioglu, Zeynep

    2007-12-01

    Women with renal disease face increasing infertility and high-risk pregnancy as they approach end-stage renal disease due to uremia. Renal transplantation has provided these patients the ability to return to a better quality of life, and for a number of women who are of child bearing age with renal disease, it has restored their fertility and provided the opportunity to have children. But, although fertility is restored, pregnancy in these women still harbors risk to the mother, graft, and fetus. Selected patients who have stable graft function can have successful pregnancies under the supervision of a multidisciplinary team involving maternal fetal medicine specialists and transplant nephrologists. Careful observation and management are required to optimize outcome for mother and fetus.

  15. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  16. Drugs in pregnancy. Renal disease.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J E; Maclean, D; Pattison, J M

    2001-12-01

    The management of pregnant women with renal impairment presents a major challenge to obstetricians, nephrologists, and ultimately paediatricians. As renal failure progresses there is an increase in both maternal and fetal complications. Often these women have intercurrent medical conditions and, prior to conception, are receiving a broad range of prescribed medications. A successful obstetric outcome relies upon careful pre-pregnancy counselling and planning, obsessive monitoring during pregnancy, and close liaison between different specialist teams. Experience is mounting in the management of pregnant transplant recipients, but the introduction of newer immunosuppressive agents which have great promise in prolonging graft survival present new problems for those recipients of a kidney transplant who are planning to conceive. We review drug prescription for pregnant patients with renal impairment, end-stage renal failure, or a kidney transplant.

  17. Renal infarction complicating fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gavalas, M; Meisner, R; Labropoulos, N; Gasparis, A; Tassiopoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease that most commonly affects the renal and extracranial carotid arteries. We present 3 cases of renal infarction complicating renal artery FMD in 42-, 43-, and 46-year-old females and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic. In our patients, oral anticoagulation therapy was used to treat all cases of infarction, and percutaneous angioplasty was used nonemergently in one case to treat refractory hypertension. All patients remained stable at 1-year follow-up. This is consistent with outcomes in previously published reports where conservative medical management was comparable to surgical and interventional therapies. Demographic differences may also exist in patients with renal infarction and FMD. A higher prevalence of males and a younger age at presentation have been found in these patients when compared to the general population with FMD.

  18. From Pre-Existing Renal Failure to Perioperative Renal Protection: The Anesthesiologist’s Dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Huti, Gentian; Sula, Hektor; Baftiu, Nehat; Kaci, Myzafer; Bodeci, Artan; Pesha, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Context Pre-existing renal dysfunction presents specific features that anesthesiologists must deal with. Anesthesia and renal function are connected and can interfere with each other. Induced hypotension anesthesia and the toxic effects of anesthetic drugs can further deteriorate renal function. Evidence Acquisition Decreased renal function can prolong anesthetic drug effects by decreased elimination of these drugs. Anesthesia can deteriorate renal function and decreased renal function can interfere with drug elimination leading to their prolonged effect. The anesthesiologist must understand all the physiological aspects of the patient, renal protection, and the relationships between anesthetic drugs and renal function. This review article aims to summarize these aspects. Results Perioperative renal failure and renal protection is a crucial moment in clinical practice of every anesthesiologist. Conclusions Good knowledges for renal function remain a hallmark of daily practice of the anesthesiologist, considering renal function as an important determinant factor in anesthesia practice. PMID:27642570

  19. Arterial spasm during renal angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Beinart, C.; Sos, T.A.; Saddekni, S.; Weiner, M.A.; Sniderman, K.W.

    1983-10-01

    Spasm of the renal arteries during transluminal angioplasty is a well-documented phenomenon with serious potential sequelae, particularly in young patients with fibromusclar dysplasia. The authors report their experience in 98 cases (105 arteries). Tolazoline, lidocaine, nitrates (or calcium blockers, if available), and heparin should be administered either directly into the renal artery or systemically prior to angioplasty to decrease the incidence and severity of spasm.

  20. [Heterolateral renal dystopia (2 cases)].

    PubMed

    Anastasov, G; Peneva, S; Mushmov, D; Salambashev, L

    1982-01-01

    The authors observed two cases with crossed renal dystopia, to which venous urography, renal scintigraphy, echographic and gamma-chamber investigations were performed. The venous urography, in case of the appropriate symptomatics, is stressed to be able to establish the presence of heterolateral dystopia by as far as the distributional function of the anomaly is concerned--the gamma-chamber investigation is with the highest information value.

  1. Malignant tumours after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, D; Reinke, P; Kirchner, S; Schnorr, D; Lindeke, A; Loening, S A

    1996-10-01

    In 1243 patients after renal transplantation, 39 malignant tumours were detected in 37 patients. The average latency period between transplantation and tumour disease was 72 months. Tumours included 8 malignant lymphomas, 7 dermatomas and 24 visceral tumours. The patients who developed a tumour had received fewer blood transfusions before transplantation than a tumour-free control group of 60 patients with renal transplants. Rejection crises occurred in a significantly smaller number of tumour patients compared with the control group.

  2. Renal ammonia metabolism and transport.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Verlander, Jill W

    2013-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism and transport mediates a central role in acid-base homeostasis. In contrast to most renal solutes, the majority of renal ammonia excretion derives from intrarenal production, not from glomerular filtration. Renal ammoniagenesis predominantly results from glutamine metabolism, which produces 2 NH4(+) and 2 HCO3(-) for each glutamine metabolized. The proximal tubule is the primary site for ammoniagenesis, but there is evidence for ammoniagenesis by most renal epithelial cells. Ammonia produced in the kidney is either excreted into the urine or returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. Ammonia excreted in the urine promotes acid excretion; ammonia returned to the systemic circulation is metabolized in the liver in a HCO3(-)-consuming process, resulting in no net benefit to acid-base homeostasis. Highly regulated ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells determines the proportion of ammonia excreted in the urine versus returned to the systemic circulation. The traditional paradigm of ammonia transport involving passive NH3 diffusion, protonation in the lumen and NH4(+) trapping due to an inability to cross plasma membranes is being replaced by the recognition of limited plasma membrane NH3 permeability in combination with the presence of specific NH3-transporting and NH4(+)-transporting proteins in specific renal epithelial cells. Ammonia production and transport are regulated by a variety of factors, including extracellular pH and K(+), and by several hormones, such as mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and angiotensin II. This coordinated process of regulated ammonia production and transport is critical for the effective maintenance of acid-base homeostasis.

  3. Preoperative evaluation of renal artery in patients with renal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liangsong; Wu, Guangyu; Wang, Jianfeng; Huang, Jiwei; Kong, Wen; Chen, Yonghui; Xue, Wei; Huang, Yiran; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the feasibility of the noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCE-MRA) to evaluate renal arteries before partial nephrectomy (PN). Retrospective analyzed 479 patients who underwent renal surgery between January 2013 and December 2015 with NCE-MRA or computed tomographic angiography (CTA) renal artery image reconstruction preoperative in our department. The renal artery reconstruction score (RARS) was based on the level of artery visualization in a 4-class criterion, and the R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score (R.E.N.A.L), arterial based complexity (ABC) were also analyzed. Of the 479 patients, the overall-lever RARS was 3.62, and the average in 2 groups was no significant difference (NCE-MRA vs CTA, P = 0.072). The performance of NCE-MRA in PN group was similar with CTA. Further comparison demonstrated that the efficiency of NCE-MRA in moderate- or low-degree tumor according to the R.E.N.A.L and ABC complexity less than 3S was equal to CTA. However, high degree (P < 0.001), 3S (P = 0.027), or 3H (P < 0.001) would affect the imaging of renal artery. Intragroup analysis showed that tumor complexity such as max tumor size (r = −o.351, P < 0.001), R.E.N.A.L (r = −0.439, P < 0.001), and ABC (r = −0.619, P < 0.001) were closely correlated with the NCE-MRA performance. The images of 2 sides of the kidney were compared in single person as well, which was meaningful for NCE-MRA patients only (NCE-MRA, P < 0.001; CTA, P = 0.182). The renal artery reconstruction performed by NCE-MRA is feasible and has a similar achievement in the PN potential recipients, with a lower side effect, and meets the requirements for making surgical decision. It has a broad application prospect in clinical practice; however, it still needs to further improve the ability in more complex tumors. PMID:27759632

  4. Treatment of Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism in Post Renal Transplant Recipients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Chronic Allograft Nephropathy; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Disordered Mineral Metabolism; End Stage Renal Disease; Hyperparathyroidism; Hypophosphatemia; Kidney Disease; Kidney Transplantation; Post Renal Transplantation

  5. Gastrointestinal and renal responses to variable water intake in whitebellied sunbirds and New Holland honeyeaters.

    PubMed

    Purchase, Cromwell; Napier, Kathryn R; Nicolson, Susan W; McWhorter, Todd J; Fleming, Patricia A

    2013-05-01

    Nectarivores face a constant challenge in terms of water balance, experiencing water loading or dehydration when switching between food plants or between feeding and fasting. To understand how whitebellied sunbirds and New Holland honeyeaters meet the challenges of varying preformed water load, we used the elimination of intramuscular-injected [(14)C]-l-glucose and (3)H2O to quantify intestinal and renal water handling on diets varying in sugar concentration. Both sunbirds and honeyeaters showed significant modulation of intestinal water absorption, allowing excess water to be shunted through the intestine when on dilute diets. Despite reducing their fractional water absorption, both species showed linear increases in water flux and fractional body water turnover as water intake increased (both afternoon and morning), suggesting that the modulation of fractional water absorption was not sufficient to completely offset dietary water loads. In both species, glomerular filtration rate was independent of water gain (but was higher for the afternoon), as was renal fractional water reabsorption (measured in the afternoon). During the natural overnight fast, both sunbirds and honeyeaters arrested whole kidney function. Evaporative water loss in sunbirds was variable but correlated with water gain. Both sunbirds and honeyeaters appear to modulate intestinal water absorption as an important component of water regulation to help deal with massive preformed water loads. Shutting down glomerular filtration rate during the overnight fast is another way of saving energy for osmoregulatory function. Birds maintain osmotic balance on diets varying markedly in preformed water load by varying both intestinal water absorption and excretion through the intestine and kidneys.

  6. Gadobutrol in Renally Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Michaely, Henrik J.; Aschauer, Manuela; Deutschmann, Hannes; Bongartz, Georg; Gutberlet, Matthias; Woitek, Ramona; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Kucharczyk, Walter; Hammerstingl, Renate; De Cobelli, Francesco; Rosenberg, Martin; Balzer, Thomas; Endrikat, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the potential risk of gadobutrol-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment for the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Materials and Methods We performed a prospective, international, multicenter, open-label study in 55 centers. Patients with moderate to severe renal impairment scheduled for any gadobutrol-enhanced MRI were included. All patients received a single intravenous bolus injection of gadobutrol at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight. The primary target variable was the number of patients who develop NSF within a 2-year follow-up period. Results A total of 908 patients were enrolled, including 586 with moderate and 284 with severe renal impairment who are at highest risk for developing NSF. The mean time since renal disease diagnosis was 1.83 and 5.49 years in the moderate and severe renal impairment cohort, respectively. Overall, 184 patients (20.3%) underwent further contrast-enhanced MRI with other gadolinium-based contrast agents within the 2-year follow-up. No patient developed symptoms conclusive of NSF. Conclusions No safety concerns with gadobutrol in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment were identified. There were no NSF cases. PMID:27529464

  7. Renal radiopharmaceuticals--an update

    SciTech Connect

    Chervu, L.R.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Noninvasive radionuclide procedures in the evaluation of renal disease have been accepted increasingly as effective and valuable alternatives to older clinical methods. The development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals labeled with high photon intensity radionuclides and with /sup 99m/Tc in particular has stimulated this modality during the last few years. Currently several nearly ideal agents are available for anatomical and functional studies of kidney imparting very low absorbed radiation doses. These include /sup 99m/Tc-GHA and /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA for renal morphology and differential function evaluation, /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA for GFR and /sup 123/I orthoiodohippurate for ERPF measurements. A suitable agent as a replacement for the latter labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is actively being sought. Computer-assisted processing of dynamic renal function studies enables the observer to obtain a wealth of information related to the renal extraction, uptake, parenchymal transit and pelvic transit parameters of the agent administered into the bloodstream. Each of these parameters either globally or differentially contributes to a detailed evaluation of renal disease states. Several of these procedures have been validated against classical techniques clinically but more detailed information is being sought with the recently introduced radiopharmaceuticals. With the detailed validation and increasing recognition of the clinical utility of several of the radionuclidic procedures at many centers, it is hoped that radionuclide assessment of renal disorders ultimately will be made available routinely at all medical facilities.

  8. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed Central

    Najarian, J S; Frey, D J; Matas, A J; Gillingham, K J; So, S S; Cook, M; Chavers, B; Mauer, S M; Nevins, T E

    1990-01-01

    The timing of renal transplantation in infants is controversial. Between 1965 and 1989, 79 transplants in 75 infants less than 2 years old were performed: 23 who were 12 months or younger, 52 who were older than 12 months; 63 donors were living related, 1 was living unrelated, and 15 were cadaver donors; 75 were primary transplants and 4 were retransplants. Infants were considered for transplantation when they were on, or about to begin, dialysis. All had intra-abdominal transplants with arterial anastomosis to the distal aorta. Sixty-four per cent are alive with functioning grafts. The most frequent etiologies of renal failure were hypoplasia (32%) and obstructive uropathy (20%); oxalosis was the etiology in 11%. Since 1983 patient survival has been 95% and 91% at 1 and 5 years; graft survival has been 86% and 73% at 1 and 5 years. For cyclosporine immunosuppressed patients, patient survival is 100% at 1 and 5 years; graft survival is 96% and 82% at 1 and 5 years. There was no difference in outcome between infants who were 12 months or younger versus those who were aged 12 to 24 months; similarly there was no difference between infants and older children. Sixteen (21%) patients died: 5 after operation from coagulopathy (1) and infection (4); and 11 late from postsplenectomy sepsis (4), recurrent oxalosis (3), infection (2), and other causes (2). Routine splenectomy is no longer done. There has not been a death from infection in patients transplanted since 1983. Rejection was the most common cause of graft loss (in 15 patients); other causes included death (with function) (7), recurrent oxalosis (3), and technical complications (3). Overall 52% of patients have not had a rejection episode; mean creatinine level in patients with functioning grafts is 0.8 +/- 0.2 mg/dL. Common postoperative problems include fever, atelectasis, and ileus. At the time of their transplants, the infants were small for age; but with a successful transplant, their growth, head

  9. Regulation of Renal Citrate Metabolism by Bicarbonate Ion and pH: Observations in Tissue Slices and Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, David P.

    1967-01-01

    The effect of acid-base balance on the oxidation and utilization of citrate and other organic acids has been studied in tissue slices and isolated kidney mitochondria. The results show that: 1) With bicarbonate-buffered media, citrate oxidation and utilization are inhibited in slices of renal cortex and in kidney mitochondria when [HCO3-] and pH are increased within the physiologic range (pH 7.0 to 7.8; 10 to 60 μmoles HCO3- per ml). When phosphate or Tris buffers are used, no comparable effect on citrate oxidation occurs when pH is varied. 2) This effect is not demonstrable in heart or liver slices when a physiologic buffer is used. 3) α-Ketoglutarate utilization is inhibited in slices of renal cortex under similar conditions. Pyruvate and L-malate utilization are not inhibited in slices or mitochondria. 4) Citrate content in slices of renal cortex incubated with a high [HCO3-] is considerably greater than the concentration found with a low [HCO3-] in the medium. This effect is not duplicated by pH change in a nonbicarbonate buffer system. In mitochondria citrate content is also increased markedly at high bicarbonate concentrations. 5) The kinetic characteristics of the inhibition of citrate oxidation are those of a competitive type of inhibition. 6) When pH was varied with a constant [HCO3-] in the media, citrate oxidation was inhibited by increasing pH in slices of renal cortex but not in mitochondria. On the other hand, when [HCO3-] was increased without change in pH, no decrease in citrate oxidation occurred in slices, but a marked inhibitory effect was found when mitochondria were used. From a comparison of these results with those previously obtained in intact animal experiments, we conclude that the inhibition of citrate oxidation caused by increasing pH and [HCO3-] in slices of renal cortex and kidney mitochondria is an in vitro representation of the inhibition of citrate reabsorption in the nephron that occurs in metabolic alkalosis. Thus, citrate

  10. Renal failure in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Almueilo, Samir H

    2015-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is encountered in 20-25% of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) at the time of diagnosis. There is often a precipitating event. Several biochemical and clinical correlations with renal failure in MM have been reported. Renal failure in MM is associated with worse outcome of the disease. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 64 patients with MM admitted to our institution during the period January 1992 to December 2012. Abnormal renal function was observed in 24 (37.5%) patients and 17 (26.6%) of them had renal failure; 14 of the 17 (82.4%) of patients with renal failure had Stage III MM. Urine Bence- Jones protein was positive in ten (58.8%) patients with renal failure versus ten (21.3%) patients without renal failure (P = 0.004). Potential precipitating factors of renal failure were determined in nine patients. Renal function normalized in 11 patients with simple measures, while six patients required hemodialysis; one remained dialysis dependent till time of death. Early mortality occurred in five (29.4%) patients with renal failure as compared with two (4.3%) patients in the group without renal failure (P = 0.005). In conclusion, renal failure is associated with a higher tumor burden and Bence-Jones proteinuria in patients with MM. It is reversible in the majority of patients; however, early mortality tends to be higher in patients with persistent renal failure.

  11. Renal Transport of Uric Acid: Evolving Concepts and Uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Bobulescu, Ion Alexandru; Moe, Orson W.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its role as a metabolic waste product, uric acid has been proposed to be an important molecule with multiple functions in human physiology and pathophysiology and may be linked to human diseases beyond nephrolithiasis and gout. Uric acid homeostasis is determined by the balance between production, intestinal secretion, and renal excretion. The kidney is an important regulator of circulating uric acid levels, by reabsorbing around 90% of filtered urate, while being responsible for 60–70% of total body uric acid excretion. Defective renal handling of urate is a frequent pathophysiologic factor underpinning hyperuricemia and gout. In spite of tremendous advances over the past decade, the molecular mechanisms of renal urate transport are still incompletely understood. Many transport proteins are candidate participants in urate handling, with URAT1 and GLUT9 being the best characterized to date. Understanding these transporters is increasingly important for the practicing clinician as new research unveils their physiology, importance in drug action, and genetic association with uric acid levels in human populations. The future may see the introduction of new drugs that specifically act on individual renal urate transporters for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. PMID:23089270

  12. Sirtuins and renal diseases: relationship with aging and diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kitada, Munehiro; Kume, Shinji; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    Sirtuins are members of the Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) family, a group of class III deacetylases. Mammals have seven different sirtuins, SIRT1-SIRT7. Among them, SIRT1, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are induced by calorie restriction conditions and are considered anti-aging molecules. SIRT1 has been the most extensively studied. SIRT1 deacetylates target proteins using the coenzyme NAD+ and is therefore linked to cellular energy metabolism and the redox state through multiple signalling and survival pathways. SIRT1 deficiency under various stress conditions, such as metabolic or oxidative stress or hypoxia, is implicated in the pathophysiologies of age-related diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders and renal diseases. In the kidneys, SIRT1 may inhibit renal cell apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, and may regulate lipid metabolism, autophagy, blood pressure and sodium balance. Therefore the activation of SIRT1 in the kidney may be a new therapeutic target to increase resistance to many causal factors in the development of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. In addition, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are implicated in age-related disorders or longevity. In the present review, we discuss the protective functions of sirtuins and the association of sirtuins with the pathophysiology of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy.

  13. Peptide-drug conjugate linked via a disulfide bond for kidney targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Geng, Qian; Sun, Xun; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhi-Rong

    2012-06-20

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, and unfortunately, the therapeutic index of clinically available drugs is limited. Thus, there is a great need to exploit effective treatment strategies, and the carrier-drug approach is an attractive method to improve the kidney specificity of the therapeutic agents. The aim of this present study is to develop a peptide-drug conjugate for the kidney targeted delivery of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril (CAP), since G3-C12 peptide (ANTPCGPYTHDCPVKR) could specifically accumulate in the kidney after intravenous injection. Therefore, FITC labeled G3-C12 peptide (G3-C12-FITC) and peptide-drug conjugate (G3-C12-CAP) with a disulfide bond which can be cleaved by reduced glutathione in the kidney were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The fluorescence imaging of G3-C12-FITC revealed that the labeled peptide specifically accumulated in the kidney soon after i.v. injection to mice, and the accumulation is due largely to the reabsorption of the peptide by the proximal renal tubule cells. Furthermore, in comparison with the corresponding nonconjugated form, a 2.7-fold increase in renal area under concentration-time curve produced by the conjugate was observed in mice. Interestingly, the CAP entirely released in the kidney even at 0.05 h postinjection through disulfide reduction. As a consequence, the in vivo renal ACE inhibition was significantly increased. In conclusion, these findings suggest the potential of G3-C12 peptide serving as a suitable candidate carrier for kidney-targeted drug delivery.

  14. Bicarbonate promotes BK-α/β4-mediated K excretion in the renal distal nephron.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Ryan J; Wen, Donghai; Hatcher, Lori I; Sansom, Steven C

    2012-12-01

    Ca-activated K channels (BK), which are stimulated by high distal nephron flow, are utilized during high-K conditions to remove excess K. Because BK predominantly reside with BK-β4 in acid/base-transporting intercalated cells (IC), we determined whether BK-β4 knockout mice (β4KO) exhibit deficient K excretion when consuming a high-K alkaline diet (HK-alk) vs. high-K chloride diet (HK-Cl). When wild type (WT) were placed on HK-alk, but not HK-Cl, renal BK-β4 expression increased (Western blot). When WT and β4KO were placed on HK-Cl, plasma K concentration ([K]) was elevated compared with control K diets; however, K excretion was not different between WT and β4KO. When HK-alk was consumed, the plasma [K] was lower and K clearance was greater in WT compared with β4KO. The urine was alkaline in mice on HK-alk; however, urinary pH was not different between WT and β4KO. Immunohistochemical analysis of pendrin and V-ATPase revealed the same increases in β-IC, comparing WT and β4KO on HK-alk. We found an amiloride-sensitive reduction in Na excretion in β4KO, compared with WT, on HK-alk, indicating enhanced Na reabsorption as a compensatory mechanism to secrete K. Treating mice with an alkaline, Na-deficient, high-K diet (LNaHK) to minimize Na reabsorption exaggerated the defective K handling of β4KO. When WT on LNaHK were given NH(4)Cl in the drinking water, K excretion was reduced to the magnitude of β4KO on LNaHK. These results show that WT, but not β4KO, efficiently excretes K on HK-alk but not on HK-Cl and suggest that BK-α/β4-mediated K secretion is promoted by bicarbonaturia.

  15. Effects of adenosine infusion into renal interstitium on renal hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowska, D.; Granger, J.P.; Knox, F.G.

    1987-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the hemodynamic effects of exogenous adenosine in the interstitium of the rat kidney. Adenosine or its analogues were infused into the renal interstitium by means of chronically implanted capsules. In fusion of adenosine decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 0.81 +/- 0.06 to 0.37 +/- 0.06 ml/min while having no effect on renal blood flow (RBF). The metabolically stable analogue, 2-chloradenosine (2-ClAdo), decreased GFR from 0.73 +/- 0.07 to 021 +/- 0.06 ml/min. Interstitial infusion of theophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, completely abolished the effects of adenosine and 2-ClAdo on GFR. The distribution of adenosine, when infused into the renal interstitium, was determined using radiolabeled 5'-(N-ethyl)-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a metabolically stable adenosine agonist. After continuous infusion, (/sup 3/H)NECA was distributed throughout the kidney. The effects of NECA to reduce GFR were similar to those of adenosine and 2-ClAdo. They conclude that increased levels of adenosine in the renal interstitium markedly decrease GFR without affecting RBF in steady-state conditions. The marked effects of adenosine agonists during their infusion into the renal interstitium and the complete blockade of these effects by theophylline suggest an extracellular action of adenosine.

  16. Renal Function and Hematology in Rats with Congenital Renal Hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hidenori; Amakasu, Kohei; Tochigi, Yuki; Katayama, Kentaro; Suzuki, Hiroetsu

    2016-02-01

    Renal hypoplasia due to a congenitally reduced number of nephrons progresses to chronic kidney disease and may cause renal anemia, given that the kidneys are a major source of erythropoietin in adults. Hypoplastic kidney (HPK) rats have only about 20% of the normal number of nephrons and develop CKD. This study assessed the renal function and hematologic changes in HPK rats from 70 to 210 d of age. HPK rats demonstrated deterioration of renal excretory function, slightly macrocytic erythropenia at all days examined, age-related increases in splenic hemosiderosis accompanied by a tendency toward increased hemolysis, normal plasma erythropoietin levels associated with increased hepatic and decreased renal erythropoietin production, and maintenance of the response for erythropoietin production to hypoxic conditions, with increased interstitial fibrosis at 140 d of age. These results indicate that increases in splenic hemosiderosis and the membrane fragility of RBC might be associated with erythropenia and that hepatic production of erythropoietin might contribute to maintaining the blood Hgb concentration in HPK rats.

  17. Fluoride-induced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lantz, O; Jouvin, M H; De Vernejoul, M C; Druet, P

    1987-08-01

    Renal fluoride toxicity in human beings is difficult to assess in the literature. Although experimental studies and research on methoxyflurane toxicity have shown frank renal damage, observations of renal insufficiency related to chronic fluoride exposure are scarce. We report a case of fluoride intoxication related to potomania of Vichy water, a highly mineralized water containing 8.5 mg/L of fluoride. Features of fluoride osteosclerosis were prominent and end-stage renal failure was present. The young age of the patient, the long duration of high fluoride intake, and the absence of other cause of renal insufficiency suggest a causal relationship between fluoride intoxication and renal failure.

  18. Diffuse FDG renal uptake in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Navalkissoor, Shaunak; Szyszko, Teresa; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Nunan, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    In patients presenting with acute renal failure and known/suspected lymphoma, the diagnosis of diffuse renal involvement is important, as there is potential for rapid resolution with chemotherapy. Although FDG is excreted through the kidneys and focal renal disease may be difficult to identify, diffuse renal FDG is more easily recognized and is always abnormal. We report a patient presenting with acute renal failure and suspected lymphoma. F-18 FDG PET/CT study demonstrated diffuse increased FDG uptake in bilaterally enlarged kidneys. Following 1 cycle of chemotherapy, the renal function normalized. An interim F-18 FDG PET/CT demonstrated normal size and FDG uptake within both kidneys.

  19. The scintigraphic pattern of renal angiomyolipoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jaikishen, P.; Oster, Z.H.; Atkins, H.L. )

    1990-03-01

    The patterns of renal and gallium scintigraphy in a patient with renal angiomyolipoma are presented. Renal study with Tc-99m DTPA demonstrated a photopenic area in the flow and delayed images. Ga-67 citrate imaging did not show any evidence of increased activity. Although this pattern is also seen in renal cysts, scintigraphy seems to be valuable in the evaluation of angiomyolipoma. It helps differentiate it from renal carcinoma or renal abscess (which may be gallium avid), especially when the tumor is characterized by a paucity of adipose tissue and complicated by hemorrhage, in which case CT and ultrasonographic patterns are not diagnostic.

  20. Renal infarction secondary to ketamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Li; Chen, Jin-Li; Cha, Tai-Lung; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Tang, Shou-Hung; Tsao, Chih-Wei; Meng, En

    2013-07-01

    Renal infarction is an uncommon condition that resulted from inadequate perfusion of the kidney and is easily missed diagnosed due to its nonspecific clinical presentations. Major risk factors for renal infarction are atrial fibrillation, previous embolism, and ischemic and valvular heart disease. Progressive decrease in renal function or even death can occur if renal infarction is not diagnosed accurately and promptly. Ketamine abuse may cause variable urinary tract injury. However, renal infarction caused by ketamine abuse has never been reported. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of renal infarction following nasal insufflation of ketamine.

  1. The Role of Epithelial Sodium Channel ENaC and the Apical Cl-/HCO3- Exchanger Pendrin in Compensatory Salt Reabsorption in the Setting of Na-Cl Cotransporter (NCC) Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Patel-Chamberlin, Mina; Varasteh Kia, Mujan; Xu, Jie; Barone, Sharon; Zahedi, Kamyar; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2016-01-01

    Background The absence of NCC does not cause significant salt wasting in NCC deficient mice under basal conditions. We hypothesized that ENaC and pendrin play important roles in compensatory salt absorption in the setting of NCC inactivation, and their inhibition and/or downregulation can cause significant salt wasting in NCC KO mice. Methods WT and NCC KO mice were treated with a daily injection of either amiloride, an inhibitor of ENaC, or acetazolamide (ACTZ), a blocker of salt and bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubule and an inhibitor of carbonic anhydrases in proximal tubule and intercalated cells, or a combination of acetazolamide plus amiloride for defined durations. Animals were subjected to daily balance studies. At the end of treatment, kidneys were harvested and examined. Blood samples were collected for electrolytes and acid base analysis. Results Amiloride injection significantly increased the urine output (UO) in NCC KO mice (from 1.3 ml/day before to 2.5 ml/day after amiloride, p<0.03, n = 4) but caused only a slight change in UO in WT mice (p>0.05). The increase in UO in NCC KO mice was associated with a significant increase in sodium excretion (from 0.25 mmol/24 hrs at baseline to 0.35 mmol/24 hrs after amiloride injection, p<0.05, n = 4). Daily treatment with ACTZ for 6 days resulted in >80% reduction of kidney pendrin expression in both WT and NCC KO mice. However, ACTZ treatment noticeably increased urine output and salt excretion only in NCC KO mice (with urine output increasing from a baseline of 1.1 ml/day to 2.3 ml/day and sodium excretion increasing from 0.22 mmole/day before to 0.31 mmole/day after ACTZ) in NCC KO mice; both parameters were significantly higher than in WT mice. Western blot analysis demonstrated significant enhancement in ENaC expression in medulla and cortex of NCC KO and WT mice in response to ACTZ injection for 6 days, and treatment with amiloride in ACTZ-pretreated mice caused a robust increase in salt

  2. Human renal allograft blood flow and early renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C B; Etheredge, E E

    1977-01-01

    Renal allograft blood flow (RBF) was measured at operation by electromagnetic flow meter and probes in 45 patients (34 cadaver donors and 11 living related donors). Mean RBF in 26 patients without acute tubular necrosis (ATN), was 412 +/- 80 ml/min and in 19 patients with ATN, 270 +/- 100 ml/min (p less than .001). Only two of 24 transplants (8%) with RBF greater than 350 ml/min had ATN; whereas, 17 of 21 transplants (81 per cent) with RBF less than 350 ml/min had ATN (p less than .001). In cadaver donor transplants, RBF did not correlate with duration of ATN, warm ischemia time, total ischemia time, pulsatile perfusion time or renal vascular resistance during perfusion. Measurement of renal allograft blood flow can predict presence or absence of postoperative ATN in 87% of patients. PMID:335986

  3. [Renal osteodystrophy Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Messa, P

    2003-01-01

    Renal ostedystrophy (ROD) is a major long-term complication in uremic patients. Bone histomorphometry still remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of ROD. However, the low acceptance grade by patients makes bone biopsy a rarely performed and not easily repeatable investigation. No other instrumental assessment has been proved as yet to have sufficient sensitivity for ROD diagnosis. Many biochemical markers have been proposed for a diagnostic role, but few have a real predictive diagnostic value. Serum intact PTH (i-PTH) levels are thought to represent a good predictor of bone lesions. However, although a i-PTH level greater than 450 pg/mL and lower than 120 pg/mL may well predict high and low bone turnover disease respectively, in the wide range of values defined by the above border levels i-PTH does not have a predictive role for ROD. There is as yet no definite proof that the recently developed PTH assays might increase their diagnostic sensitivity. Bone alkaline phosphatase is a more reliable index of bone turnover than i-PTH levels. With regards to Al overload, given that an iron overburden is excluded, serum Al levels lower than 30 ug/L are seldom associated with increased Al deposition; conversely, levels above 60 mg/L are highly diagnostic for Al overload. In the latter condition, a DFO test is recommended. The main goals of ROD treatment are a) to maintain serum i-PTH levels between 120 and 150 pg/mL; b) to bring the phosphate (Pi) concentration under 5.5 mg/dL, Ca concentration between 9.2 and 10.4 mg/dL, and the Ca x Pi product under 55 mg/dL; c) to bring Al concentration under 20 ug/L; and d) to target serum bicarbonate levels between 20 and 24 mmol/L. The main therapeutic approaches include: Dietary Pi intake control (< 1200 mg/day). Intestinal phosphate binding using calcium salts and sevelamer. Calcium salts must be used at a dosage that avoids Ca overload (< 23 g/day). If Pi control is not reached, Mg and Al salts may be added at a dose lower

  4. Renal transplantation in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, S A H; Naqvi, S A A; Zafar, M N

    2002-01-01

    The economic indicators of Pakistan show that the GNP is dollar 70 billion and foreign exchange reserves stand at dollar 8.0 billion and foreign debt at more than dollar 36 billion. Against this backdrop, the government is unlikely to provide state-of-the-art facilities for management of end-stage organ failure. The unequal distribution of wealth leaves more than 40% below the poverty line. Economic solutions are based on temporary fixes where foreign aid and loans keeps the government machinery operational. Many of the basic health measures such as immunization are also foreign funded. Under such a scenario, local philanthropy has come to play a vital role. SIUT developed a model based on self-help--a model based on a community-government partnership, where the doctor plays the pivotal role and the beneficiary is the patient. SIUT acquired funds by developing a community-government partnership. The government fulfills about 40% of the total budget and the rest comes from the community as donations. The scheme has been extremely successful in providing free medical care and renal support to thousands of patients. It has been sustained over the past 15 years through complete transparency, public audit and accountability. These confidence-building means stimulate the community to come forward and donate money, equipment and medicines. The goal of transplantation is to provide organs to all with long-term survival of the graft. The emerging challenges to achieve this goal and efforts that can be made to increase and sustain transplant activity in Pakistan require a concerted effort on the part of the government, society and the medical profession.

  5. Renal Vascular Structure and Rarefaction

    PubMed Central

    Chade, Alejandro R.

    2014-01-01

    An intact microcirculation is vital for diffusion of oxygen and nutrients and for removal of toxins of every organ and system in the human body. The functional and/or anatomical loss of microvessels is known as rarefaction, which can compromise the normal organ function and have been suggested as a possible starting point of several diseases. The purpose of this overview is to discuss the potential underlying mechanisms leading to renal microvascular rarefaction, and the potential consequences on renal function and on the progression of renal damage. Although the kidney is a special organ that receives much more blood than its metabolic needs, experimental and clinical evidence indicates that renal microvascular rarefaction is associated to prevalent cardiovascular diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, and atherosclerosis, either as cause or consequence. On the other hand, emerging experimental evidence using progenitor cells or angiogenic cytokines supports the feasibility of therapeutic interventions capable of modifying the progressive nature of microvascular rarefaction in the kidney. This overview will also attempt to discuss the potential renoprotective mechanisms of the therapeutic targeting of the renal microcirculation. PMID:23720331

  6. Increased immunogenicity is an integral part of the heat shock response following renal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Bidmon, Bettina; Kratochwill, Klaus; Rusai, Krisztina; Kuster, Lilian; Herzog, Rebecca; Eickelberg, Oliver; Aufricht, Christoph

    2012-05-01

    Renal ischemia increases tubular immunogenicity predisposing to increased risk of kidney allograft rejection. Ischemia-reperfusion not only disrupts cellular homeostasis but also induces the cytoprotective heat shock response that also plays a major role in cellular immune and defense processes. This study therefore tested the hypothesis that upregulation of renal tubular immunogenicity is an integral part of the heat shock response after renal ischemia. Expressions of 70 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were assessed in normal rat kidney (NRK) cells following ATP depletion (antimycin A for 3 h) and heat (42°C for 24 h). In vitro, transient Hsp70 transfection and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) transcription factor decoy treatment were performed. In vivo, ischemic renal cortex was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats following unilateral renal artery clamping for 45 min and 24 h recovery. Upregulation of Hsp70 was closely and significantly correlated with upregulation of MHC class II and/or ICAM-1 following ATP depletion and heat injury. Bioinformatics analysis searching the TRANSFAC database predicted HSF-1 binding sites in these genes. HSF-1 decoy significantly reduced the expression of immunogenicity markers in stressed NRK cells. In the in vivo rat model of renal ischemia, concordant upregulation of MHC class II molecules and Hsp70 suggests biological relevance of this link. The results demonstrate that upregulation of renal tubular immunogenicity is an integral part of the heat shock response after renal ischemia. Bioinformatic analysis predicted a molecular link to tubular immunogenicity at the level of the transcription factor HSF-1 that was experimentally verified by HSF-1 decoy treatment. Future studies in HSF-1 knockout mice are needed.

  7. Scrub typhus meningitis in a renal transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Dhanapriya, J.; Dineshkumar, T.; Sakthirajan, R.; Murugan, S.; Jayaprakash, V.; Balasubramaniyan, T.; Gopalakrishnan, N.

    2017-01-01

    Scrub typhus is a rickettsial infection commonly seen in Asia. The clinical presentation ranges from nonspecific febrile illness to potentially fatal multiorgan involvement such as liver, kidney, or lung. Central nervous system involvement is uncommon. We report a 45-year-old female renal transplant recipient who presented with fever, headache, meningeal signs, graft dysfunction, and eschar. IgM antibodies against Orientia tsutsugamushi were positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Despite oral doxycycline therapy for 5 days, she did not improve but responded well to intravenous azithromycin. To the best of our knowledge, scrub typhus as a cause of meningitis in a renal transplant recipient has not been reported so far. PMID:28356672

  8. Renal localization of heparan sulfate proteoglycan by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, D. J.; Oegema, T. R.; Eisenstein, R.; Furcht, L.; Michael, A. F.; Brown, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Glomerular localization of heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HS-proteoglycan) has been studied immunohistochemically with a highly purified antiserum to bovine aorta HS-proteoglycan core protein. The specificity of the antiserum was enhanced by consecutive fibronectin and chondroitin sulfate-dermatan sulfate proteoglycan (CS-DS proteoglycan) affinity chromatography. The affinity-purified HS-proteoglycan antibody lacked cross-reactivity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) with CS-DS proteoglycan, fibronectin, laminin, and Type IV collagen. Reactivity of the antiserum with HS-proteoglycan antigen by ELISA was inhibited by HS core protein derived from CsCl density gradient centrifugation after heparinase treatment of the HS-proteoglycan. Immunofluorescent reactivity of the HS-proteoglycan antiserum was observed with bovine glomerular basement membrane, renal interstitium, Bowman's capsule, renal arterioles, and bovine aorta. No staining was seen with rat, mouse, or human glomeruli. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6222657

  9. AAV-mediated gene therapy in Dystrophin-Dp71 deficient mouse leads to blood-retinal barrier restoration and oedema reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Ophélie; Charles-Messance, Hugo; El Mathari, Brahim; Sene, Abdoulaye; Barbe, Peggy; Fouquet, Stéphane; Aragón, Jorge; Darche, Marie; Giocanti-Aurégan, Audrey; Paques, Michel; Sahel, José-Alain; Tadayoni, Ramin; Montañez, Cecilia; Dalkara, Deniz; Rendon, Alvaro

    2016-07-15

    Dystrophin-Dp71 being a key membrane cytoskeletal protein, expressed mainly in Müller cells that provide a mechanical link at the Müller cell membrane by direct binding to actin and a transmembrane protein complex. Its absence has been related to blood-retinal barrier (BRB) permeability through delocalization and down-regulation of the AQP4 and Kir4.1 channels (1). We have previously shown that the adeno-associated virus (AAV) variant, ShH10, transduces Müller cells in the Dp71-null mouse retina efficiently and specifically (2,3). Here, we use ShH10 to restore Dp71 expression in Müller cells of Dp71 deficient mouse to study molecular and functional effects of this restoration in an adult mouse displaying retinal permeability. We show that strong and specific expression of exogenous Dp71 in Müller cells leads to correct localization of Dp71 protein restoring all protein interactions in order to re-establish a proper functional BRB and retina homeostasis thus preventing retina from oedema. This study is the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies in dealing with diseases with BRB breakdown and macular oedema such as diabetic retinopathy (DR).

  10. Paraneoplastic Cough and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A case of patient with intractable cough due to renal cell carcinoma is reported. The discussion reviews the literature regarding this unusual paraneoplastic manifestation of renal malignancy. PMID:27445553

  11. [Scintigraphic assessment of function in renal dystopia].

    PubMed

    Pilgrim, S

    1998-06-01

    In patients with renal dystopia radionuclide urography in commonly used technique may yield inaccurate results concerning split renal function. In a case of unilateral pelvic kidney a simple strategy to avoid this methodical error is demonstrated.

  12. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Afinitor (Everolimus) Aldesleukin Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  13. Renal tubular function in hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    van 't Hoff, W.; Bicknell, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    Renal tubular function was assessed in a group of patients with mild hyperparathyroidism before and after a mean period of 2.7 years conservative management. It was also assessed, before and after a mean of 3.3 years following surgery in a group of patients with initially higher plasma calcium concentration. Mean maximum urine osmolality was within the accepted range as was the maximum urine plasma hydrogen ion gradient in both groups at the time of diagnosis. No significant change in renal tubular function was observed in either group over the periods of this study. Although deterioration after a long period cannot be excluded, we do not consider that regular assessment of renal tubular function is necessary in the conservative management of primary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:2616415

  14. Renal secondary hyperparathyroidism in dogs.

    PubMed

    Stillion, Jenefer R; Ritt, Michelle G

    2009-06-01

    The parathyroid glands secrete parathyroid hormone (PTH), which is important for maintaining calcium homeostasis. Parathyroid gland hyperplasia and subsequent hyperparathyroidism can occur secondary to chronic renal failure in dogs, resulting in significant alterations in calcium metabolism. Renal secondary hyperparathyroidism is a complex, multifactorial syndrome that involves changes in circulating levels of calcium, PTH, phosphorus, and 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (calcitriol). An increased PTH level can have deleterious effects, including soft tissue mineralization, fibrous osteodystrophy, bone marrow suppression, urolithiasis, and neuropathy. Dietary phosphorus restriction, intestinal phosphate binders, and calcitriol supplementation may slow the progression of renal disease and decrease PTH concentrations in animals with secondary hyperparathyroidism; however, the prognosis for these animals is guarded to poor.

  15. Antiphospholipid syndrome in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Thomas D; Crosthwaite, Amy; Chow, Kevin; Finlay, Moira J; Better, Nathan; Hughes, Peter D; Cohney, Solomon J

    2014-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) may occur in isolation or in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with the potential to cause renal failure via several distinct pathologies. Renal transplantation in the presence of APS carries a risk of early graft loss from arterial or venous thrombosis, or thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Whilst perioperative anticoagulation reduces the risk of large vessel thrombosis, it may result in significant haemorrhage, and its efficacy in preventing post-transplant TMA is uncertain. Here, we report a patient with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) due to lupus nephritis and APS, in whom allograft TMA developed soon after transplantation despite partial anticoagulation. TMA resolved with plasma exchange-based therapy albeit with some irreversible graft damage and renal impairment. We discuss the differential diagnosis of post-transplant TMA, and current treatment options.

  16. Sorafenib in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Davoudi, Ehsan Taghizadeh; bin-Noordin, Mohamed Ibrahim; Javar, Hamid Akbari; Kadivar, Ali; Sabeti, Bahare

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is among most important causes of death in recent decades. Whoever the renal cell carcinoma incidence is low but it seems it is more complicated than the other cancers in terms of pathophysiology and treatments. The purpose of this work is to provide an overview and also deeper insight to renal cell carcinoma and the steps which have been taken to reach more specific treatment and target therapy, in this type of cancer by developing most effective agents such as Sorafenib. To achieve this goal hundreds of research paper and published work has been overviewed and due to limitation of space in a paper just focus in most important points on renal cell carcinoma, treatment of RCC and clinical development of Sorafenib. The information presented this paper shows the advanced of human knowledge to provide more efficient drug in treatment of some complicated cancer such as RCC in promising much better future to fight killing disease.

  17. Idiopathic Renal Infarction Mimicking Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Francesco; Scarano, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Renal infarction is a rare cause of referral to the emergency department, with very low estimated incidence (0.004%–0.007%). Usually, it manifests in patients aged 60–70 with risk factors for thromboembolism, mostly related to heart disease, atrial fibrillation in particular. We report a case of idiopathic segmental renal infarction in a 38-year-old patient, presenting with acute abdominal pain with no previous known history or risk factors for thromboembolic diseases. Because of its aspecific clinical presentation, this condition can mimic more frequent pathologies including pyelonephritis, nephrolithiasis, or as in our case appendicitis. Here we highlight the extremely ambiguous presentation of renal infarct and the importance for clinicians to be aware of this condition, particularly in patients without clear risk factors, as it usually has a good prognosis after appropriate anticoagulant therapy. PMID:28203466

  18. Primary renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor.

    PubMed

    Goel, V; Talwar, V; Dodagoudar, C; Singh, S; Sharma, A; Patnaik, N

    2015-01-01

    Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the kidney is a rare entity. Very few cases of primary renal PNET have been reported to date. Most literature about rPNET is isolated case reports. We report a case of rPNET in a 39-year-old male with a pre-operative diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma with renal vein thrombosis. The patient underwent radical nephrectomy with thrombolectomy, and histopathological examination revealed a highly aggressive tumor composed of monotonous sheets of round cells. Tumor cells were positive for CD 99 and FLI-1, hence confirming the diagnosis of Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor. Post-surgery, patient was given VAC/IE-based adjuvant chemotherapy. In view of highly aggressive nature of this tumor, prompt diagnosis and imparting effective chemotherapy regimen to the patient is required, and it is important to differentiate PNET from other small round-cell tumors because of different therapeutic approach.

  19. Renal masses presenting 25 and 50 years following blunt renal trauma.

    PubMed

    Pruthi, R S; Issa, M M; Kabalin, J N; Terris, M K

    1998-10-01

    The long-term consequences of blunt renal trauma are not well described. We report on 2 patients with a history of blunt renal trauma who presented with radiographically detected renal masses suspicious for renal tumor. Both patients suffered blows to the kidney during boxing matches followed by flank pain and hematuria. The injuries occurred 25 and 50 years prior to the detection of renal masses. Subsequent nephrectomy and histopathological evaluation revealed benign dystrophic renal tissue. These presentations represent probable long-term sequelae of blunt renal trauma.

  20. Integrated imaging of neonatal renal masses.

    PubMed

    Kirks, D R; Rosenberg, E R; Johnson, D G; King, L R

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-three neonatal renal masses were evaluated during a 2-year interval. The final diagnoses in these 33 patients were hydronephrosis [14], multicystic dysplastic kidney [10], renal vein thrombosis [3], obstructed upper pole duplication [2], polycystic kidney disease [2], nephroblastomatosis [1], and mesoblastic nephroma [1]. We recommend an integrated imaging approach that utilizes sonography to clarify anatomy and renal scintigraphy or excretory urography to determine renal function.

  1. Early origin of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Maringhini, Silvio; Corrado, Ciro; Maringhini, Guido; Cusumano, Rosa; Azzolina, Vitalba; Leone, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animals have clearly shown that renal failure may start early in life. 'Fetal programming' is regulated by adaptations occurring in uterus including maternal nutrition, placental blood supply, and epigenetic changes. Low birth weight predisposes to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, adverse postnatal events, wrong nutritional habits may produce renal damage that will become clinically relevant in adulthood. Prevention should start early in children at risk of renal disease.

  2. Characterization of Organic Anion Transporter 2 (SLC22A7): A Highly Efficient Transporter for Creatinine and Species-Dependent Renal Tubular Expression.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Liu, Tongtong; Morse, Bridget L; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Yueping; Qiu, Xi; Chen, Cliff; Lewin, Anne C; Wang, Xi-Tao; Liu, Guowen; Christopher, Lisa J; Marathe, Punit; Lai, Yurong

    2015-07-01

    The contribution of organic anion transporter OAT2 (SLC22A7) to the renal tubular secretion of creatinine and its exact localization in the kidney are reportedly controversial. In the present investigation, the transport of creatinine was assessed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells that stably expressed human OAT2 (OAT2-HEK) and isolated human renal proximal tubule cells (HRPTCs). The tubular localization of OAT2 in human, monkey, and rat kidney was characterized. The overexpression of OAT2 significantly enhanced the uptake of creatinine in OAT2-HEK cells. Under physiologic conditions (creatinine concentrations of 41.2 and 123.5 µM), the initial rate of OAT2-mediated creatinine transport was approximately 11-, 80-, and 80-fold higher than OCT2, multidrug and toxin extrusion protein (MATE)1, and MATE2K, respectively, resulting in approximately 37-, 1850-, and 80-fold increase of the intrinsic transport clearance when normalized to the transporter protein concentrations. Creatinine intracellular uptake and transcellular transport in HRPTCs were decreased in the presence of 50 µM bromosulfophthalein and 100 µM indomethacin, which inhibited OAT2 more potently than other known creatinine transporters, OCT2 and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins MATE1 and MATE2K (IC50: 1.3 µM vs. > 100 µM and 2.1 µM vs. > 200 µM for bromosulfophthalein and indomethacin, respectively) Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that OAT2 protein was localized to both basolateral and apical membranes of human and cynomolgus monkey renal proximal tubules, but appeared only on the apical membrane of rat proximal tubules. Collectively, the findings revealed the important role of OAT2 in renal secretion and possible reabsorption of creatinine and suggested a molecular basis for potential species difference in the transporter handling of creatinine.

  3. [Rare renal anomalies in childhood].

    PubMed

    Arambasić, Jadranka; Puseljić, Silvija; Angebrandt, Snjezana; Puseljić, Ivo

    2003-01-01

    Three patients with megacalycosis, a rare ren anomaly which includes dilatation of all ren calices, are presented. The symptoms of acute uroinfection were present in all three patients. The patients underwent clinical observation, laboratory testing, and renal ultrasound. Ultrasound revealed unilateral hydronephrosis in all three patients. Additional examinations included static and dynamic renal scintigraphy, voiding cystourethrography, and intravenous urography which pointed to unilateral megacalycosis. The symptoms of acute uroinfection were probably triggered by urinary stasis in dilated calices. Surgical intervention is not indicated in megacalycosis. The increasing incidence of uroinfection, urolithiasis and hematuria imposed the need of continuous follow-up in these patients.

  4. Diagnostic management of renal colic.

    PubMed

    Nicolau, C; Salvador, R; Artigas, J M

    2015-01-01

    Renal colic is a common reason for presentation to emergency departments, and imaging has become fundamental for the diagnosis and clinical management of this condition. Ultrasonography and particularly noncontrast computed tomography have good diagnostic performance in diagnosing renal colic. Radiologic management will depend on the tools available at the center and on the characteristics of the patient. It is essential to use computed tomography techniques that minimize radiation and to use alternatives like ultrasonography in pregnant patients and children. In this article, we review the epidemiology, clinical and radiologic presentations, and clinical management of ureteral lithiasis.

  5. Imaging of Renal Medullary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Faiella, Eliodoro; Santucci, Domiziana; Mallio, Carlo Augusto; Nezzo, Marco; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno; Grasso, Rosario Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) is a rare, highly aggressive tumor recognized as an independent pathological entity. African-descent adolescents and young adults with sickle cell hemoglobinopathy are the most affected groups. This rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma has its own morphogenetic and pathological characteristics. The major clinical manifestations include gross hematuria, abdominal or flank pain, and weight loss. The prognosis is very poor, with 95% of cases diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease. In this review, we summarize the morphologic and dynamic characteristics of RMC under various imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance. Differential diagnosis and management strategies are also discussed.

  6. [Managing focal incidental renal lesions].

    PubMed

    Nicolau, C; Paño, B; Sebastià, C

    2016-01-01

    Incidental renal lesions are relatively common in daily radiological practice. It is important to know the different diagnostic possibilities for incidentally detected lesions, depending on whether they are cystic or solid. The management of cystic lesions is guided by the Bosniak classification. In solid lesions, the goal is to differentiate between renal cancer and benign tumors such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma. Radiologists need to know the recommendations for the management of these lesions and the usefulness of the different imaging techniques and interventional procedures in function of the characteristics of the incidental lesion and the patient's life expectancy.

  7. Uric Acid and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2006-01-01

    The interrelationship between uric acid and renal disease is reviewed in a historical context. Four phases can be distinguished--the descriptions of uric acid stones and gravel in the eighteenth century, of chronically scarred kidneys containing urate crystals in the nineteenth, the appearance of the syndrome of acute urate nephropathy following tumour lysis in the mid twentieth century, and finally the realization that soluble urate affects both systemic and glomerular blood vessels, and may play a role in both hypertension and chronic renal damage.

  8. Hypogonadism and renal failure: An update.

    PubMed

    Thirumavalavan, Nannan; Wilken, Nathan A; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of both hypogonadism and renal failure is increasing. Hypogonadism in men with renal failure carries with it significant morbidity, including anemia and premature cardiovascular disease. It remains unclear whether testosterone therapy can affect the morbidity and mortality associated with renal failure. As such, in this review, we sought to evaluate the current literature addressing hypogonadism and testosterone replacement, specifically in men with renal failure. The articles chosen for this review were selected by performing a broad search using Pubmed, Embase and Scopus including the terms hypogonadism and renal failure from 1990 to the present. This review is based on both primary sources as well as review articles. Hypogonadism in renal failure has a multifactorial etiology, including co-morbid conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, old age and obesity. Renal failure can lead to decreased luteinizing hormone production and decreased prolactin clearance that could impair testosterone production. Given the increasing prevalence of hypogonadism and the potential morbidity associated with hypogonadism in men with renal failure, careful evaluation of serum testosterone would be valuable. Testosterone replacement therapy should be considered in men with symptomatic hypogonadism and renal failure, and may ameliorate some of the morbidity associated with renal failure. Patients with all stages of renal disease are at an increased risk of hypogonadism that could be associated with significant morbidity. Testosterone replacement therapy may reduce some of the morbidity of renal failure, although it carries risk.

  9. Impact of pregnancy on underlying renal disease.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Normal pregnancy involves marked renal vasodilation and large increases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Studies in rats reveal that the gestational renal vasodilation is achieved by parallel reductions in tone in afferent and efferent arterioles so GFR rises without a change in glomerular blood pressure. There is some evidence from animal studies that increased renal generation of nitric oxide (NO) may be involved. Although chronic renal vasodilation has been implicated in causing progression of renal disease in nonpregnant states by glomerular hypertension, there are no long-term deleterious effects of pregnancies on the kidney when maternal renal function is normal because glomerular blood pressure remains normal. When maternal renal function is compromised before conception, there are no long-term adverse effects on renal function in most types of renal disease, providing that the GFR is well maintained before conception. When serum creatinine exceeds approximately 1.4 mg/dL, pregnancy may accelerate the renal disease increases and when serum creatinine >2 mg/dL, the chances are greater than 1 in 3 that pregnancy will hasten the progression of the renal disease. The available animal studies suggest that glomerular hypertension does not occur despite diverse injuries. Thus, the mechanisms of the adverse interaction between pregnancy and underlying renal disease remain unknown.

  10. Analog Optical Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Charles H., III

    2004-05-01

    Unlike books that focus on the devices used in links, such as lasers and photodiodes, among others, this text focuses on the next level. It covers the collection of devices that form a link, how the individual device performance affects the link performance, or the reverse. Analog links are used for the distribution of cable TV signals, and in conveying the signals to and from antennas (so called antenna remoting). The design of analog links differs significantly from digital links which are primarily used in telecommunications.

  11. Link performance of mobile optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henniger, H.

    2007-09-01

    High data-rate atmospheric free-space optical (FSO) lasercom systems typically suffer from relatively long time duration link degradations. These are caused by pointing- and tracking-errors or deep signal-fades produced by the index of refraction fluctuations caused by atmospheric turbulence. Based on measurement results we will present in this paper a channel characterization model for free-space optical links. Further a forward-error-correction (FEC) coding scheme is introduced that is able to overcome link outages. The performance of these codes has been proven by measurements. Code design recommendations and validation test results are discussed in this paper.

  12. Automated renal histopathology: digital extraction and quantification of renal pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarder, Pinaki; Ginley, Brandon; Tomaszewski, John E.

    2016-03-01

    The branch of pathology concerned with excess blood serum proteins being excreted in the urine pays particular attention to the glomerulus, a small intertwined bunch of capillaries located at the beginning of the nephron. Normal glomeruli allow moderate amount of blood proteins to be filtered; proteinuric glomeruli allow large amount of blood proteins to be filtered. Diagnosis of proteinuric diseases requires time intensive manual examination of the structural compartments of the glomerulus from renal biopsies. Pathological examination includes cellularity of individual compartments, Bowman's and luminal space segmentation, cellular morphology, glomerular volume, capillary morphology, and more. Long examination times may lead to increased diagnosis time and/or lead to reduced precision of the diagnostic process. Automatic quantification holds strong potential to reduce renal diagnostic time. We have developed a computational pipeline capable of automatically segmenting relevant features from renal biopsies. Our method first segments glomerular compartments from renal biopsies by isolating regions with high nuclear density. Gabor texture segmentation is used to accurately define glomerular boundaries. Bowman's and luminal spaces are segmented using morphological operators. Nuclei structures are segmented using color deconvolution, morphological processing, and bottleneck detection. Average computation time of feature extraction for a typical biopsy, comprising of ~12 glomeruli, is ˜69 s using an Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4790 CPU, and is ~65X faster than manual processing. Using images from rat renal tissue samples, automatic glomerular structural feature estimation was reproducibly demonstrated for 15 biopsy images, which contained 148 individual glomeruli images. The proposed method holds immense potential to enhance information available while making clinical diagnoses.

  13. Renal functional reserve and renal recovery after acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aashish; Mucino, Marìa Jimena; Ronco, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Renal functional reserve (RFR) represents the capacity of the kidney to increase glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in response to certain physiological or pathological stimuli or conditions. Once baseline GFR is determined, RFR can be assessed clinically after an oral protein load or intravenous amino acid infusion. In clinical practice, baseline GFR displays variable levels due to diet or other factors. RFR is the difference between peak 'stress' GFR induced by the test (p.o. or i.v.) and the baseline GFR. In clinical scenarios where hyperfiltration is present (high baseline GFR due to pregnancy, hypertension or diabetic nephropathy, in solitary kidney or kidney donors), RFR may be fully or partially used to achieve normal or supranormal renal function. Since commonly used renal function markers, such as GFR, may remain within normal ranges until 50% of nephrons are lost or in patients with a single remnant kidney, the RFR test may represent a sensitive and early way to assess the functional decline in the kidney. RFR assessment may become an important tool to evaluate the ability of the kidney to recover completely or partially after a kidney attack. In case of healing with a defect and progressive fibrosis, recovery may appear complete clinically, but a reduced RFR may be a sign of a maladaptive repair or subclinical loss of renal mass. Thus, a reduction in RFR may represent the equivalent of renal frailty or susceptibility to insults. The main aim of this article is to review the concept of RFR, its utility in different clinical scenarios, and future perspective for its use.

  14. Vasopressin: the missing link for preeclampsia?

    PubMed Central

    Sandgren, Jeremy A.; Scroggins, Sabrina M.; Santillan, Donna A.; Devor, Eric J.; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.; Pierce, Gary L.; Sigmund, Curt D.; Santillan, Mark K.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a devastating cardiovascular disorder of late pregnancy, affecting 5–7% of all pregnancies and claiming the lives of 76,000 mothers and 500,000 children each year. Various lines of evidence support a “tissue rejection” type reaction toward the placenta as the primary initiating event in the development of preeclampsia, followed by a complex interplay among immune, vascular, renal, and angiogenic mechanisms that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia beginning around the end of the first trimester. Critically, it remains unclear what mechanism links the initiating event and these pathogenic mechanisms. We and others have now demonstrated an early and sustained increase in maternal plasma concentrations of copeptin, a protein by-product of arginine vasopressin (AVP) synthesis and release, during preeclampsia. Furthermore, chronic infusion of AVP during pregnancy is sufficient to phenocopy essentially all maternal and fetal symptoms of preeclampsia in mice. As various groups have demonstrated interactions between AVP and immune, renal, and vascular systems in the nonpregnant state, elevations of this hormone are therefore positioned both in time (early pregnancy) and function to contribute to preeclampsia. We therefore posit that AVP represents a missing mechanistic link between initiating events and established midpregnancy dysfunctions that cause preeclampsia. PMID:25810383

  15. Chemical Renal Denervation in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Consigny, Paul M. Davalian, Dariush; Donn, Rosy Hu, Jie; Rieser, Matthew Stolarik, DeAnne

    2013-12-03

    Introduction: The recent success of renal denervation in lowering blood pressure in drug-resistant hypertensive patients has stimulated interest in developing novel approaches to renal denervation including local drug/chemical delivery. The purpose of this study was to develop a rat model in which depletion of renal norepinephrine (NE) could be used to determine the efficacy of renal denervation after the delivery of a chemical to the periadventitial space of the renal artery. Methods: Renal denervation was performed on a single renal artery of 90 rats (n = 6 rats/group). The first study determined the time course of renal denervation after surgical stripping of a renal artery plus the topical application of phenol in alcohol. The second study determined the efficacy of periadventitial delivery of hypertonic saline, guanethidine, and salicylic acid. The final study determined the dose–response relationship for paclitaxel. In all studies, renal NE content was determined by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results: Renal NE was depleted 3 and 7 days after surgical denervation. Renal NE was also depleted by periadventitial delivery of all agents tested (hypertonic saline, salicylic acid, guanethidine, and paclitaxel). A dose response was observed after the application of 150 μL of 10{sup −5} M through 10{sup −2} M paclitaxel. Conclusion: We developed a rat model in which depletion of renal NE was used to determine the efficacy of renal denervation after perivascular renal artery drug/chemical delivery. We validated this model by demonstrating the efficacy of the neurotoxic agents hypertonic saline, salicylic acid, and guanethidine and increasing doses of paclitaxel.

  16. Linking Policy | Smokefree 60+

    Cancer.gov

    Links to individual pages within the Smokefree 60+ website are permissible, provided attribution is made to 60plus.smokefree.gov and any descriptive notes accurately reflect the content of the linked page(s).

  17. [Renal complications due to desensitization].

    PubMed

    Drouet, M; Sabbah, A; Bonneau, J C; Le Sellin, J

    1986-04-01

    Two observations with induction of renal complications during immunotherapy are reported. For the first patient proteinuria and infections complications happened immediately after a rush immunotherapy with Yellow Jacket Venom Extract. For the second patient an "half-rush" immunotherapy with light doses of phleole extract (cumulative dose: 7 PNU) induced an immediate reaction with rhinitis, conjunctivitis and after 24 hours a macroscopic hematuria.

  18. [Membranous nephritis after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Robles, N R; Gómez Campdera, F; Anaya, F; Niembro, E; Junco, E; Valderrábano, F

    1991-02-01

    8 cases of membranous glomerulonephritis (MG) after renal transplants (RT) are presented; one being a recurrence of the original disease and the other 7 due to a different cause of renal insufficiency. The total incidence of MG after transplantation was 1.63%; 1.39% being the incidence of MG of new cases. Only 1 patient showed decrease of renal function and in this case the MG was accompanied by chronic rejection lesions. There was no sign of neoplasias nor drugs producing MG. As far as chronic infections are concerned, only one patient showed B antigen and it was not observed during the immunofluorescent test in the biopsy. 6 patients had urological complications after the renal transplant (3 cases of urinary fistula; 2 cases of obstructive uropathy; 1 case of short ureter). 2 patients experienced the start of hemodialysis due to focal and segmentary glomerulosclerosis. The beginning of proteinuria commences between 2 and 23 months after the RT (median 13,0 +/- 7,5 moths); with a range of between 2.0 and 12.0 gr/day (median: 6.8 +/- 3,2 Z gr/day), this being nephrotic in 4 cases. Proteinuria improved 1 case, and persisted in the other patients at the same level registered previous to the diagnosis. MG is a non-frequent complication or RT and is usually benign. Patients with post-transplant urologic complications could be considered to have a higher risk of developing a MG "de novo".

  19. Renal replacement therapy in yemen.

    PubMed

    Sheiban, A K; Yehia, A; Mohamed, Y A; Hajar, A R

    1996-01-01

    In this report we present the current status of dialysis and transplantation in Yemen. The reported incidence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in one region of Yemen was estimated as 385 per million population (PMP) per year. The total population of Yemen is also estimated as 16,000,000. Peritoneal dialysis was started in 1980, while hemodialysis was started in 1981. At present there are around 36 hemodialysis machines distributed in the large cities of Yemen. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis is commonly used; however, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis has been out of practice since 1992. Renal transplantation has not yet been started in Yemen; however, at present there are 327 transplant patients being followed up in it. The majority of patients had their grafts from living non related donors abroad. In our experience, such transplantations were associated with high morbidity and mortality, in addition to acquisition of serious, potentially lethal extra-renal medical problems. We believe that there is a wide shortage of renal services in Yemen. Establishing a National Kidney Foundation to organize these services may be helpful.

  20. Renal function in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dabla, Pradeep Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. Cardiovascular and renal complications share common risk factors such as blood pressure, blood lipids, and glycemic control. Thus, chronic kidney disease may predict cardiovascular disease in the general population. The impact of diabetes on renal impairment changes with increasing age. Serum markers of glomerular filtration rate and microalbuminuria identify renal impairment in different segments of the diabetic population, indicating that serum markers as well as microalbuminuria tests should be used in screening for nephropathy in diabetic older people. The American Diabetes Association and the National Institutes of Health recommend Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculated from serum creatinine at least once a year in all people with diabetes for detection of kidney dysfunction. eGFR remains an independent and significant predictor after adjustment for conventional risk factors including age, sex, duration of diabetes, smoking, obesity, blood pressure, and glycemic and lipid control, as well as presence of diabetic retinopathy. Cystatin-C (Cys C) may in future be the preferred marker of diabetic nephropathy due differences in measurements of serum creatinine by various methods. The appropriate reference limit for Cys C in geriatric clinical practice must be defined by further research. Various studies have shown the importance of measurement of albuminuria, eGFR, serum creatinine and hemoglobin level to further enhance the prediction of end stage renal disease. PMID:21537427

  1. Emphysema in the renal allograft

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.L.; Sullivan, B.M.; Fluornoy, J.G.; Gerza, C.

    1985-04-01

    Two diabetic patients in whom emphysematous pyelonephritis developed after renal transplantation are described. Clinical recognition of this unusual and serious infection is masked by the effects of immunosuppression. Abdominal radiographic, ultrasound, and computed tomography findings are discussed. The clinical presentation includes urinary tract infection, sepsis, and acute tubular malfunction of the allograft in insulin-dependent diabetics.

  2. Acute leukaemia following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Subar, M; Gucalp, R; Benstein, J; Williams, G; Wiernik, P H

    1996-03-01

    Four renal transplant patients on immunosuppressive therapy who presented with acute myeloid leukaemia are described. In two cases, azathioprine may have played an important role as a cofactor in leukaemogenesis. In a third case, the alkylating agent cyclophosphamide may have contributed. All patients were treated for leukaemia with full doses of cytotoxic chemotherapy and, in each case, a functioning renal allograft was preserved throughout the treatment despite attenuation of immunosuppressive therapy. Three patients achieved complete remission. Of the three, one is surviving at 2 years and two expired during the pancytopenic phase of their treatment with no active leukaemia present, and with intact renal function. As increasing expertise in the field of organ transplantation allows patients to survive longer, such patients' exposure to immunosuppressive and potentially leukaemogenic drugs is prolonged. The risk of secondary neoplasia has been previously documented in this population. Two of the four cases reported here suffered from polycystic kidney disease as their underlying condition. While this report suggests that the leukaemias are related to renal transplantation, we cannot rule out an association with the underlying disease which led to the transplant. This report further suggests that the leukaemia that develops in such patients may respond to standard therapy, and that such treatment does not compromise the transplanted kidney.

  3. Fibrate therapy and renal function.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2009-09-01

    Fibrates are a class of lipid-lowering medications primarily used as second-line agents behind statins. The adverse-effect profile of fibrates has been marked by a puzzling yet reversible rise in serum creatinine values with their use. It is not known whether this finding represents a true change in renal function. One proposed explanation for this phenomenon is that fibrates increase the production of creatinine, in which case a rise in serum creatinine values would not represent a true deterioration in renal function. An alternative theory is that fibrates reduce the production of vasodilatory prostaglandins, which would lead to a true change in renal function in patients who experience a rise in serum creatinine values. Routine serum creatinine monitoring is advisable in fibrate-treated patients, particularly in those with preexisting renal disease. A 30% increase in serum creatinine values in the absence of other causes of serum creatinine change warrants discontinuation of fibrate therapy. Serum creatinine values can take several weeks to return to their baseline values following discontinuation of a fibrate.

  4. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) remains a major cause of secondary hypertension and renal failure. Randomized, prospective trials show that medical treatment should constitute the main therapeutic approach in ARAS. Regardless of intensive treatment and adequate blood pressure control, however, renal and extra-renal complications are not uncommon. Yet, the precise mechanisms, accurate detection, and optimal treatment in ARAS remain elusive. Strategies oriented to early detection and targeting these pathogenic pathways might prevent development of clinical endpoints. Here, we review the results of recent clinical trials, current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, novel imaging techniques to assess renal damage in ARAS, and treatment options. PMID:25908472

  5. Commercial Web Site Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelwall, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discusses business use of the Web and related search engine design issues as well as research on general and academic links before reporting on a survey of the links published by a collection of business Web sites. Results indicate around 66% of Web sites do carry external links, most of which are targeted at a specific purpose, but about 17%…

  6. Renal lesions of nondomestic felids.

    PubMed

    Newkirk, K M; Newman, S J; White, L A; Rohrbach, B W; Ramsay, E C

    2011-05-01

    To comprehensively evaluate the occurrence of renal lesions in a variety of nondomestic felids, necropsy cases from 1978 to 2008 were reviewed from a municipal zoo and a large cat sanctuary for those in which the kidneys were examined histologically. Seventy exotic felids were identified (25 tigers, 18 lions, 6 cougars, 5 leopards, 3 snow leopards, 3 clouded leopards, 3 Canadian lynx, 2 ocelots, 2 bobcats, 2 cheetahs, 1 jaguar), and their histologic renal lesions were evaluated and compared. The most common lesion was tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN); 36 of 70 (51%) cats were affected to some degree. Lymphocytic interstitial nephritis was the most common lesion in the tigers (9 of 25, 36%) and was rarely seen in other species. Although the renal pelvis was not available for all cats, 28 of 47 (60%) had some degree of lymphocytic pyelitis. There was no significant association between the presence of pyelitis and that of TIN. Only 1 cat had pyelonephritis. Renal papillary necrosis was present in 13 of 70 (19%) cats and was significantly associated with historical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment (odds ratio, 7.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.9 to 26.8). Only 1 cat (lion) had amyloid accumulation, and it was restricted to the corticomedullary junction. Primary glomerular lesions were absent in all cats. Intraepithelial pigment was identified in many of the cats but was not correlated with severity of TIN. Despite several previous reports describing primary glomerular disease or renal amyloidosis in exotic felids, these lesions were rare to absent in this population.

  7. Renal tract malformations: perspectives for nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Kerecuk, Larissa; Schreuder, Michiel F; Woolf, Adrian S

    2008-06-01

    Renal tract malformations are congenital anomalies of the kidneys and/or lower urinary tract. One challenging feature of these conditions is that they can present not only prenatally but also in childhood or adulthood. The most severe types of malformations, such as bilateral renal agenesis or dysplasia, although rare, lead to renal failure. With advances in dialysis and transplantation for young children, it is now possible to prevent the early death of at least some individuals with severe malformations. Other renal tract malformations, such as congenital pelviureteric junction obstruction and primary vesicoureteric reflux, are relatively common. Renal tract malformations are, collectively, the major cause of childhood end-stage renal disease. Their contribution to the number of adults on renal replacement therapy is less clear and has possibly been underestimated. Renal tract malformations can be familial, and specific mutations of genes involved in renal tract development can sometimes be found in affected individuals. These features provide information about the causes of malformations but also raise questions about whether to screen relatives. Whether prenatal decompression of obstructed renal tracts, or postnatal initiation of therapies such as prophylactic antibiotics or angiotensin blockade, improve long-term renal outcomes remains unclear.

  8. Renal amyloidosis. Evaluation by gallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Skinner, M.; Cohen, A.S.; Ngai, S.; Peng, T.T.

    1986-09-01

    A study has been performed to evaluate the efficacy of gallium imaging in the detection of renal amyloidosis. Ten of the 11 patients who had biopsy-proven renal amyloidosis demonstrated marked uptake in both kidneys. One patient revealed moderate gallium uptake in his kidneys. None of the patients had underlying renal or extrarenal pathology other than amyloidosis, which could account for renal gallium uptake (renal infection, neoplasm, hepatic failure or frequent blood transfusions). Four patients also had extrarenal foci of abnormal gallium uptake, suggesting other sites of amyloid deposits. Our data strongly suggest that gallium imaging has a high sensitivity for detection of renal amyloidosis. Its specificity is enhanced significantly by careful review of the clinical history to exclude other known causes of renal gallium uptake. Potentially, gallium imaging may be used to monitor the progress of patients under experimental therapy.

  9. Increased hexokinase II expression in the renal glomerulus of mice in response to arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, Michele D.; Sollome, James J.; Regan, Suzanne; Cardinal, Trevor R.; Hoying, James B.; Brooks, Heddwen L.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2007-10-01

    Epidemiological studies link arsenic exposure to increased risks of cancers of the skin, kidney, lung, bladder and liver. Additionally, a variety of non-cancerous conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease have been associated with chronic ingestion of low levels of arsenic. However, the biological and molecular mechanisms by which arsenic exerts its effects remain elusive. Here we report increased renal hexokinase II (HKII) expression in response to arsenic exposure both in vivo and in vitro. In our model, HKII was up-regulated in the renal glomeruli of mice exposed to low levels of arsenic (10 ppb or 50 ppb) via their drinking water for up to 21 days. Additionally, a similar effect was observed in cultured renal mesangial cells exposed to arsenic. This correlation between our in vivo and in vitro data provides further evidence for a direct link between altered renal HKII expression and arsenic exposure. Thus, our data suggest that alterations in renal HKII expression may be involved in arsenic-induced pathological conditions involving the kidney. More importantly, these results were obtained using environmentally relevant arsenic concentrations.

  10. Emerging roles for renal primary cilia in epithelial repair.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2012-01-01

    Primary cilia are microscopic sensory antennae that cells in many vertebrate tissues use to gather information about their environment. In the kidney, primary cilia sense urine flow and are essential for the maintenance of epithelial architecture. Defects of this organelle cause the cystic kidney disease characterized by epithelial abnormalities. These findings link primary cilia to the regulation of epithelial differentiation an