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Sample records for linoleic acid cla

  1. Chemical characteristics, fatty acid composition and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of traditional Greek yogurts.

    PubMed

    Serafeimidou, Amalia; Zlatanos, Spiros; Laskaridis, Kostas; Sagredos, Angelos

    2012-10-15

    Many studies with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) indicate that it has a protective effect against mammary cancer. Because dairy products are the most important dietary sources of CLA, we have investigated the CLA concentrations and additionally the fatty acid profiles and chemical composition of several commercial, traditional, Greek yogurts from different geographical origin. The fat content of yogurts was in the order of goatCLA/100 g fat. Low-fat milk yogurts showed lower values of c-9, t-11 CLA content on lipid basis compared to full-fat yogurts. Samples from mountain areas showed average c-9, t-11 CLA content higher than those from prairie districts. The highest amounts of saturated fatty acids (SFA) were found in low-fat yogurts, of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in sheep milk yogurts and of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in low-fat cow milk yogurts. PMID:23442628

  2. Chemical characteristics, fatty acid composition and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of traditional Greek yogurts.

    PubMed

    Serafeimidou, Amalia; Zlatanos, Spiros; Laskaridis, Kostas; Sagredos, Angelos

    2012-10-15

    Many studies with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) indicate that it has a protective effect against mammary cancer. Because dairy products are the most important dietary sources of CLA, we have investigated the CLA concentrations and additionally the fatty acid profiles and chemical composition of several commercial, traditional, Greek yogurts from different geographical origin. The fat content of yogurts was in the order of goatCLA/100 g fat. Low-fat milk yogurts showed lower values of c-9, t-11 CLA content on lipid basis compared to full-fat yogurts. Samples from mountain areas showed average c-9, t-11 CLA content higher than those from prairie districts. The highest amounts of saturated fatty acids (SFA) were found in low-fat yogurts, of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in sheep milk yogurts and of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in low-fat cow milk yogurts.

  3. CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACIDS (CLA) DECREASE THE BREAST CANCER RISK IN DMBA-TREATED RATS.

    PubMed

    Białek, Agnieszka; Tokarz, Andrzej; Zagrodzki, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how supplementation of diet of female Sprague-Dawley rats with different doses of conjugated linoleic acids and for a varied period of time influences breast cancer risk, fatty acids profile and lipids peroxidation in chemically induced mammary tumors. Animals were divided into nine groups with different modifications of diet (vegetable oil, 1.0 or 2.0% of CLA) and period of supplementation, which lasted after (A), before (B) and before and after (BA) carcinogenic agent--7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene administration at 50th day of life. Mammary adenocarcinomas occurred in all groups, but CLA supplementation decreased the cancer morbidity. Two percent CLA seems to be excessive because of the coexisting cachexia. Two CLA isomers (9-cis, 11-trans and 10-trans, 12-cis) were detected in tumors but content of rumenic acid was higher. Dietary supplementation significantly influenced some unsaturated fatty acids content (C18:2 n-6 trans, C20:1, C20:5 n-3, C22:2), but the anti- or prooxidant properties of CLA were not confirmed. CLA can inhibit chemically induced mammary tumors development in female rats, but their cytotoxic action seems not to be connected with lipids peroxidation. CLA isomers differ with their incorporation into cancerous tissues and they influence the content of some other fatty acids. PMID:27180424

  4. Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) increases milk yield without losing body weight in lactating sows.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Joo, Young-Kuk; Lee, Jin-Woo; Ha, Young-Joo; Yeo, Joon-Mo; Kim, Wan-Young

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on the performance of lactating sows and piglets as well as the immunity of piglets suckling from sows fed CLA. Eighteen multiparous Duroc sows with an average body weight (BW) of 232.0 ± 6.38 kg were randomly selected and assigned to two dietary treatments (n = 9 for each treatment), control (no CLA addition) and 1% CLA supplementation. For the control diet, CLA was replaced with soybean oil. Experimental diets were fed to sows during a 28-day lactation period. Litter size for each sow was standardized to nine piglets by cross-fostering within 24 hours after birth. Sow milk and blood samples were taken from sows and piglets after 21 and 27 days of lactation, respectively. Loss of BW was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in sows fed control diet compared to sows fed CLA diet. Piglet weights at weaning and weight gain during suckling were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in sows fed CLA compared to sows fed control diet. Serum non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) and urea nitrogen concentrations were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in sows fed CLA than in sows fed soybean oil. IgG concentrations of the groups supplemented with CLA increased by 49% in sow serum (p < 0.0001), 23% in milk (p < 0.05), and 35% in piglet serum (p < 0.05) compared with the control group. Sows fed CLA showed an increase of 10% in milk yield compared with sows fed soybean oil (p < 0.05), even though there was no difference in daily feed intake between the treatments. Milk fat content was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in sows fed CLA than in sows fed soybean oil. Solid-not-fat yield was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in sows supplemented with CLA than in sows fed control diet and also protein-to-fat ratio in milk was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in sows fed CLA compared with the control group. The results show that CLA supplementation to sows increased milk yield without losing BW during

  5. A review on effects of conjugated linoleic fatty acid (CLA) upon body composition and energetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lehnen, Tatiana Ederich; da Silva, Marcondes Ramos; Camacho, Augusto; Marcadenti, Aline; Lehnen, Alexandre Machado

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is highly found in fats from ruminants and it appears to favorably modify the body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors. The capacity of CLA to reduce the body fat levels as well as its benefic actions on glycemic profile, atherosclerosis and cancer has already been proved in experimental models. Furthermore, CLA supplementation may modulate the immune function, help re-synthetize of glycogen and potentiate the bone mineralization. CLA supplementation also could increase the lipolysis and reduce the accumulation of fatty acids on the adipose tissue; the putative mechanisms involved may be its action in reducing the lipase lipoprotein activity and to increase the carnitine-palmitoil-transferase-1 (CAT-1) activity, its interaction with PPARγ, and to raise the expression of UCP-1. Although studies made in human have shown some benefits of CLA supplementation as the weight loss, the results are still discordant. Moreover, some have shown adverse effects, such as negative effects on glucose metabolism and lipid profile. The purpose of this article is to review the available data regarding the benefits of CLA on the energetic metabolism and body composition, emphasizing action mechanisms. PMID:26388708

  6. Conjugated linoleic acids modulate UVR-induced IL-8 and PGE2 in human skin cells: potential of CLA isomers in nutritional photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Storey, Amy; Rogers, Julia S; McArdle, Francis; Jackson, Malcolm J; Rhodes, Lesley E

    2007-06-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), derivatives of linoleic acid found in food products, inhibit chemically induced skin cancers in mice. However, their potential photoprotective properties remain unexplored. We examined whether CLA may modulate ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-8 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)), mediators implicated in UVR-induced inflammation and carcinogenesis, in human skin cells. Since tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is an early mediator of UVR effects, we also examined influence of CLA on TNF-alpha-induced mediator release. HaCaT keratinocytes were supplemented with CLA isomers cis-9-trans-11 (c9,t11-CLA; > or =90%), trans-10-cis-12 (t10,c12-CLA; > or =90%) or all trans-trans isomers (tt-CLA; 23.7%) in tetrahydrofuran/fetal calf serum (THF/FCS) or THF/FCS control. Supplementation of keratinocytes with c9,t11-CLA reduced Ultraviolet B(UVB)-induced IL-8 from 37 113 +/- 2903 pg/ng protein in control cells to 14 167 +/- 2063 pg/ng protein (P < 0.001). Similarly, t10,c12-CLA reduced UVB-induced IL-8 to 9786 +/- 1291.5 pg/ng protein (P < 0.001). Additionally, t10,c12-CLA and tt-CLA inhibited TNF-alpha-induced IL-8 from 11 669 +/- 1692 pg/ng protein in control cells to 5540 +/- 191 (P < 0.001) and 8082 +/- 1298 pg/ng (P < 0.01) protein, respectively. UVB-induced PGE(2) release was reduced by tt-CLA supplementation, from 4.8 +/- 1.2 to 1.6 +/- 0.8 pg/mg protein (P < 0.01), but increased by t10,c12-CLA to 8.8 +/- 1 pg/mg protein (P < 0.001). Influence of CLA on UVB-induced PGE(2) release was further explored in CCD922SK dermal fibroblasts. CLA isomers reduced UVB-induced PGE(2) in fibroblasts, reaching significance with c9,t11-CLA (98 +/- 5 falling to 0 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05). Hence, CLA isomers differentially modulate UVB effects on skin cells in vitro. CLA-containing foods have potential in photoprotection; the cutaneous effects of individual isomers warrant clinical study.

  7. Stability assessment of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) oil-in-water beverage emulsion formulated with acacia and xanthan gums.

    PubMed

    Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Maryam; Goli, Sayed Amir Hossein; Nasirpour, Ali

    2016-05-15

    The development of a conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) oil-in-water beverage emulsion containing acacia gum (AG) and xanthan gum (XG) was investigated. D-optimal design and response surface method was used and 10% w/w AG, 3.5% w/w CLA and 0.3% w/w XG was introduced as the optimum formula. Afterward the effect of storage time on the physicochemical properties of selected formulation including specific gravity, turbidity, viscosity, average droplet size, span, size index, creaming index, oxidation measurements and stability in its diluted form, were determined. Findings revealed that the size of oil droplets increased after six weeks and resulted in instability of the emulsion concentrate. Peroxide value increased until 21 days and then decreased dramatically, whereas TBA and Totox values began to increase after this time. Turbidity loss rate was low demonstrating the good stability of the diluted emulsion. The results revealed that it is possible to produce a stable CLA oil-in-water emulsion for using in beverages.

  8. Stability assessment of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) oil-in-water beverage emulsion formulated with acacia and xanthan gums.

    PubMed

    Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Maryam; Goli, Sayed Amir Hossein; Nasirpour, Ali

    2016-05-15

    The development of a conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) oil-in-water beverage emulsion containing acacia gum (AG) and xanthan gum (XG) was investigated. D-optimal design and response surface method was used and 10% w/w AG, 3.5% w/w CLA and 0.3% w/w XG was introduced as the optimum formula. Afterward the effect of storage time on the physicochemical properties of selected formulation including specific gravity, turbidity, viscosity, average droplet size, span, size index, creaming index, oxidation measurements and stability in its diluted form, were determined. Findings revealed that the size of oil droplets increased after six weeks and resulted in instability of the emulsion concentrate. Peroxide value increased until 21 days and then decreased dramatically, whereas TBA and Totox values began to increase after this time. Turbidity loss rate was low demonstrating the good stability of the diluted emulsion. The results revealed that it is possible to produce a stable CLA oil-in-water emulsion for using in beverages. PMID:26775969

  9. Determination by GC×GC of fatty acid and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomer profiles in six selected tissues of lambs fed on pasture or on indoor diets with and without rumen-protected CLA.

    PubMed

    Pellattiero, Erika; Cecchinato, Alessio; Tagliapietra, Franco; Schiavon, Stefano; Bittante, Giovanni

    2015-01-28

    In this study GC×GC was used to study the effects of pasture, hay, concentrate (indoor), and indoor plus 8 g/day of a rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid (indoor-CLA) diets on the detailed fatty acid (FA) profiles of six tissues (muscles, fatty tissues, and liver) collected from 36 lambs. This powerful technique allowed the quantification of 128 FAs, of which 21 SFAs, 16 MUFAs, 19 PUFAs were identified by reference standards. The diets had similar, but not identical, effects on FA profiles (g/100 g FA) in the various tissues, as both indoor diets reduced total PUFAs (from 8.91 ± 6.27 to 8.06 ± 5.97; p < 0.05) and n-3 PUFAs (from 2.70 ± 2.37 to 1.50 ± 1.69; p < 0.01) and increased n-6 PUFA (from 3.76 ± 2.46 to 4.58 ± 3.42; p < 0.01), branched (from 2.37 ± 2.05 to 3.23 ± 0.54; p < 0.01), odd-chain FAs (from 5.88 ± 5.33 to 7.07 ± 1.51; p < 0.01) compared to pasture. Indoor-CLA increased CLAc9,t11 (from 0.42 ± 0.13 to 0.53 ± 0.19; p < 0.01), CLAt10,c12 (from 0.07 ± 0.06 to 0.12 ± 0.22; p < 0.05), and CLAc11,t13 (from 0.02 ± 0.04 to 0.05 ± 0.04; p < 0.05) compared to indoor. PMID:25525905

  10. Synthesis of conjugated linoleic acid by the linoleate isomerase complex in food-derived lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Yang, B.; Chen, H.; Gu, Z.; Tian, F.; Ross, R. P.; Stanton, C.; Chen, Y. Q.; Chen, W.; Zhang, H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess strains of lactobacilli for their capacity to produce functional fatty acid-conjugated linoleic acid. To assess the linoleate isomerase for CLA production in the most efficient CLA producer. Methods and Results In this study, strains of food-derived lactobacilli were cultured in media with linoleic acid and CLA production was assessed. Most of the selected strains produced CLA at different levels, with Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058 being the most efficient CLA producer converting over 50% of linoleic acid to c9, t11-CLA and t9, t11-CLA. Some intermediates 10-hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic acid, 10-oxo-cis-12-octadecenoic acid and 10-oxo-trans-11-octadecenoic acid were determined via GC-MS. The genes coding the multicomponent linoleate isomerase containing myosin-cross-reactive antigen, short-chain dehydrogenase/oxidoreductase and acetoacetate decarboxylase for CLA production in Lact. plantarum ZS2058 were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. With the mixture of recombinant E. coli, c9, t11-CLA and three kinds of intermediates were produced from linoleic acid, which were in line with those in the lactobacilli. Conclusions The ability for CLA production by lactobacilli exhibited variation. Lactobacillus plantarum and Lact. bulgaricus were the most efficient producers in the selected strains. Lact. plantarum ZS2058 converted linoleic acid to CLAs with 10-hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic acid, 10-oxo-cis-12-octadecenoic acid and 10-oxo-trans-11-octadecenoic acid as intermediates. The multiple-step reactions for CLA production catalysed by multicomponent linoleate isomerase in Lact. plantarum ZS2058 were confirmed successfully. Significance and Impact of the study Multicomponent linoleate isomerase provides important results for the illustration of the mechanism for CLA production in lactic acid bacteria. Food-derived lactobacilli with CLA production ability offers novel opportunities for functional foods development. PMID:24750362

  11. Identification of enriched conjugated linoleic acid isomers in cultures of ruminal microorganisms after dosing with 1-(13)C-linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Jae; Jenkins, Thomas C

    2011-08-01

    Most studies of linoleic acid biohydrogenation propose that it converts to stearic acid through the production of cis-9 trans-11 CLA and trans-11 C18:1. However, several other CLA have been identified in ruminai contents, suggesting additional pathways may exist. To explore this possibility, this research investigated the linoleic acid biohydrogenation pathway to identify CLA isomers in cultures of ruminai microorganisms after dosing with a (13)C stable isotope. The (13)C enrichment was calculated as [(M+1/M)×100] in labeled minus unlabeled cultures. After 48 h incubation, significant (13)C enrichment was observed in seven CLA isomers, indicating their formation from linoleic acid. All enriched CLA isomers had double bonds in either the 9,11 or 10,12 position except for trans-9 cis-11 CLA. The cis-9 trans-11 CLA exhibited the highest enrichment (30.65%), followed by enrichments from 21.06 to 23.08% for trans-10 cis-12, cis-10 trans-12, trans-9 trans-11, and trans-10 trans-12 CLA. The remaining two CLA (cis-9 cis-11 and cis-10 cis-12 CLA) exhibited enrichments of 18.38 and 19.29%, respectively. The results of this study verified the formation of cis-9 trans-11 and trans-10 cis-12 CLA isomers from linoleic acid biohydrogenation. An additional five CLA isomers also contained carbons originating from linoleic acid, indicating that pathways of linoleic acid biohydrogenation are more complex than previously described.

  12. Advances in research on cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid: a major functional conjugated linoleic acid isomer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Lee, Hong Gu

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) consists of a group of positional and geometric conjugated isomers of linoleic acid. Since the identification of CLA as a factor that can inhibit mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, thousands of studies have been conducted in the last several decades. Among the many isomers discovered, cis-9, trans-11 CLA is the most intensively studied because of its multiple, isomer-specific effects in humans and animals. This paper provides an overview of the available data on cis-9, trans-11 CLA, including its isomer-specific effects, biosynthesis, in vivo/in vitro research models, quantification, and the factors influencing its content in ruminant products.

  13. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Production by Bifidobacteria: Screening, Kinetic, and Composition

    PubMed Central

    Amaretti, Alberto; Leonardi, Alan; Quartieri, Andrea; Gozzoli, Caterina; Rossi, Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid involved in a number of health aspects. In humans, CLA production is performed by gut microbiota, including some species of potential probiotic bifidobacteria. 128 strains of 31 Bifidobacterium species were screened with a spectrophotometric assay to identify novel CLA producers. Most species were nonproducers, while producers belonged to B. breve and B. pseudocatenulatum. GC-MS revealed that CLA producer strains yielded 9cis,11trans-CLA and 9trans,11trans-CLA, without any production of other isomers. Hydroxylated forms of LA were absent in producer strains, suggesting that the myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA) protein that exerts hydratase activity is not involved in LA isomerization. Moreover, both CLA producer and nonproducer species bear a MCRA homologue. The strain B. breve WC 0421 was the best CLA producer, converting LA into 68.8% 9cis,11trans-CLA and 25.1% 9trans,11trans-CLA. Production occurred mostly during the lag and the exponential phase. For the first time, production and incorporation of CLA in biomass were assessed. B. breve WC 0421 stored CLA in the form of free fatty acids, without changing the composition of the esterified fatty acids, which mainly occurred in the plasmatic membrane. PMID:27429985

  14. [Bioconversion of conjugated linoleic acid by resting cells of Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058 in potassium phosphate buffer system].

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiao-yan; Chen, Wei; Tian, Feng-wei; Zhao, Jian-xin; Zhang, Hao

    2007-04-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058, which was screened from the Chinese traditional fermented vegetable, has the capacity to convert the linoleic acid (LA) into conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Some specific isomers of CLA with potentially beneficial physiological and anticarcinogenic effects, were efficiently produced from free linoleic acid by washed cells of Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058 under aerobic conditions. The produced CLA isomers are identified as the mixture of cis-9, trans-ll-octadecadienoic acid (CLA1) trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic acid (CLA2), 96.4% of which is CLA1. The washed cells of Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058 producing high levels of c9, t11-CLA were obtained by cultivated in MRS media containing 0.5 mg/mL linoleic acid, indicating that the enzyme system for CLA production is induced by linoleic acid. After a 24-hour bioconversion at 37 degrees C with shaking (120 r/min), 312.4 microg/mL c9, t11-CLA is produced. And after a 36-hour bioconversion, the content of c9, t11-CLA decreases while hydroxy-octadecaenoic acid increases. In addition, the c9, t11-CLA isomer can be transformed to hydroxy- octadecaenoic acid when the mixed CLA (c9, t11-CLA and t10, c12-CLA) were used as the substrate, which suggests that c9, t11-CLA is one of the intermediates of the bioconversion products from free LA by washed cells of Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058.

  15. Growth, carcass characteristics, muscle conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content, and response to intravenous glucose challenge in high percentage Wagyu, Wagyu x Limousin, and Limousin steers fed sunflower oil-containing diet.

    PubMed

    Mir, P S; Mir, Z; Kubert, P S; Gaskins, C T; Martin, E L; Dodson, M V; Calles, J A Elias; Johnson, K A; Busboom, J R; Wood, A J; Pittenger, G J; Reeves, J J

    2002-11-01

    muscle fat content but increased (P = 0.01) conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) concentrations by 339%. Results indicated that IVGTT measures were not appropriate indices of marbling potential in cattle and that dietary oil can enhance CLA content of beef.

  16. The In vitro Effects of Nano-encapsulated Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Stability of Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Fermentation Profiles in the Rumen.

    PubMed

    Heo, Wan; Kim, Eun Tae; Cho, Sung Do; Kim, Jun Ho; Kwon, Seong Min; Jeong, Ha Yeon; Ki, Kwang Seok; Yoon, Ho Baek; Ahn, Young Dae; Lee, Sung Sill; Kim, Young Jun

    2016-03-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the stability of conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) by nano-encapsulation against in vitro ruminal biohydrogenation by microbial enzymatic conversion. CLAs (free fatty acid form of CLA [CLA-FFA], nano-encapsulated CLA-FFA, triglyceride form of CLA [CLA-TG], and nano-encapsulated CLA-TG) were used in the in vitro fermentation experiments. When Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens (B. fibrisolvens) was incubated with CLA-FFAs, the concentrations of cis-9, trans-11 CLA and vaccenic acid (VA) slightly was decreased and increased by nano-encapsulation, respectively. When B. fibrisolvens was incubated with CLA-TG, the concentrations of cis-9, trans-11 CLA and VA decreased, but these were increased when B. fibrisolvens was incubated with nano-encapsulated CLA-TG. The nano-encapsulation was more effective against the in vitro biohydrogenation activity of B.fibrisolvens incubated with CLA-FFA than with CLA-TG. In the in vitro ruminal incubation test, the total gas production and concentration of total volatile fatty acids incubated with nano-encapsulated CLA-FFA and CLA-TG were increased significantly after 24 h incubation (p<0.05). Nano-encapsulated CLA-FFA might, thus, improve the ruminal fermentation characteristics without adverse effects on the incubation process. In addition, nano-encapsulated CLA-FFA increased the population of Fibrobacter succinogenes and decreased the population of B. fibrisolvens population. These results indicate that nano-encapsulation could be applied to enhance CLA levels in ruminants by increasing the stability of CLA without causing adverse effects on ruminal fermentation.

  17. The In vitro Effects of Nano-encapsulated Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Stability of Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Fermentation Profiles in the Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Wan; Kim, Eun Tae; Cho, Sung Do; Kim, Jun Ho; Kwon, Seong Min; Jeong, Ha Yeon; Ki, Kwang Seok; Yoon, Ho Baek; Ahn, Young Dae; Lee, Sung Sill; Kim, Young Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the stability of conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) by nano-encapsulation against in vitro ruminal biohydrogenation by microbial enzymatic conversion. CLAs (free fatty acid form of CLA [CLA-FFA], nano-encapsulated CLA-FFA, triglyceride form of CLA [CLA-TG], and nano-encapsulated CLA-TG) were used in the in vitro fermentation experiments. When Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens (B. fibrisolvens) was incubated with CLA-FFAs, the concentrations of cis-9, trans-11 CLA and vaccenic acid (VA) slightly was decreased and increased by nano-encapsulation, respectively. When B. fibrisolvens was incubated with CLA-TG, the concentrations of cis-9, trans-11 CLA and VA decreased, but these were increased when B. fibrisolvens was incubated with nano-encapsulated CLA-TG. The nano-encapsulation was more effective against the in vitro biohydrogenation activity of B.fibrisolvens incubated with CLA-FFA than with CLA-TG. In the in vitro ruminal incubation test, the total gas production and concentration of total volatile fatty acids incubated with nano-encapsulated CLA-FFA and CLA-TG were increased significantly after 24 h incubation (p<0.05). Nano-encapsulated CLA-FFA might, thus, improve the ruminal fermentation characteristics without adverse effects on the incubation process. In addition, nano-encapsulated CLA-FFA increased the population of Fibrobacter succinogenes and decreased the population of B. fibrisolvens population. These results indicate that nano-encapsulation could be applied to enhance CLA levels in ruminants by increasing the stability of CLA without causing adverse effects on ruminal fermentation. PMID:26950867

  18. Fatty acid composition including cis-9, trans-11 CLA of cooked ground lamb

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little information is available on effect of cooking on beneficial fatty acids such as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The objective of this study was to examine impact of cooking on the FA composition of ground lamb of two different muscles. Samples were p...

  19. Human Breast Milk Enrichment in Conjugated Linoleic Acid After Consumption of a Conjugated Linoleic Acid–rich Food Product: a Pilot Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human breast milk is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic compounds. Some compounds, such as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), come partly from the mother's diet and are produced by the mother's body and secreted into the milk. Although several studies have examined the effect of chronic CLA sup...

  20. C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3 trans and cis fatty acid isomers including conjugated cis delta 9, trans delta 11 linoleic acid (CLA) as well as total fat composition of German human milk lipids.

    PubMed

    Precht, D; Molkentin, J

    1999-08-01

    In particular with respect to infant nutrition knowledge of the current contents of trans fatty acids (TFA) and of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA in human milk lipids is of interest. After pre-separation by Ag-TLC 11 trans-C18:1 isomers could be quantified by GC with a mean total content of 2.40 +/- 0.60 wt% in samples from 40 German women. For the positional isomers t4, t5, t6-8, t9, t10, t11, t12, t13, t14, t15 and t16 contents of 0.02, 0.02, 0.21, 0.37, 0.32, 0.68, 0.23, 0.15, 0.18, 0.09 and 0.14 wt% were established, with vaccenic acid being the predominant isomer. Further, small trans-C14:1 and trans-C16:1 contents of 0.08% and 0.15% on average were found. As the trans-C18:1 isomers also the trans-C16:1 isomers of human milk lipids could for the first time be baseline-resolved by GC to a great extent. Moreover, besides a mean CLA (c9,t11) content of 0.40 +/- 0.09% further 6 cis/trans isomers of linoleic acid with a total content of 1.07 +/- 0.56% on average (w/o CLA) were determined. Further, 4 trans isomers of alpha-linolenic acid could be baseline-resolved exhibiting a total content of 0.11%. Altogether German human milk lipids on average were found to contain 3.81 +/- 0.97% TFA with a range of 2.38-6.03%. Direct connections between the dietary intake of trans-C18:1 isomers and the composition of human milk lipids could be established. The major fatty acids exhibited the following contents (wt%): C4: 0.16, C6: 0.18, C8: 0.06, C10: 0.58, C12: 3.12, C14: 6.43, C16: 25.28, C18: 7.41, C18: 1 (total): 33.67, C18: 2 (total): 10.63 and alpha-C18: 3:0.87.

  1. Refeeding with conjugated linoleic acid increases serum cholesterol and modifies the fatty acid profile after 48 hours of fasting in rats.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Gabriela Salim; Andreoli, María Florencia; Illesca, Paola G; Payão Ovídio, Paula; Bernal, Claudio A; Jordão, Alceu A; Vannucchi, Helio

    2014-12-01

    There is no consensus about the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on lipid metabolism, especially in animals fed a high-fat diet. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the incorporation of CLA isomers into serum, liver and adipose tissue, as well as the oxidative stress generated in rats refed with high-fat diets after a 48 hour fast. Rats were refed with diets containing soybean oil, rich in linoleic acid [7% (Control Group - C) or 20% (LA Group)], CLA [CLA Group - 20% CLA mixture (39.32 mole% c9,t11-CLA and 40.59 mole% t10,c12- CLA)], soybean oil + CLA (LA+CLA Group - 15.4% soybean oil and 4.6% CLA) or animal fat (AF, 20% lard). The CLA group showed lower weight gain and liver weight after refeeding, as well as increased serum cholesterol. The high dietary fat intake induced fat accumulation and an increase in -tocopherol in the liver, which were not observed in the CLA group. Circulating -tocopherol was increased in the CLA and CLA+LA groups. The high- fat diets reduced liver catalase activity. CLA isomers were incorporated into serum and tissues. In this shortterm refeeding experimental model, CLA prevented hepatic fat accumulation, although it produced an increase in serum cholesterol.

  2. The effects of probiotics and prebiotics on the fatty acid profile and conjugated linoleic acid content of fermented cow milk.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Nadia; Pizzolongo, Fabiana; Montefusco, Immacolata; Aponte, Maria; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Romano, Raffaele

    2015-05-01

    The ability of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bb12), to produce conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in association with Streptococcus thermophilus and Lb. bulgaricus during milk fermentation has been evaluated in this study. Pasteurized cow milk and infant formula were used. Infant formula was selected for its high linoleic acid content, for being a source of CLA and for its prebiotic compounds, e.g. galacto-oligosaccharides. The microorganisms were not able to increase the CLA content of the fermented products under the given experimental conditions. No statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) occurred between the CLA content in milk and the fermented samples. The CLA contents of 10 commercial fermented milk products were determined. The highest CLA content was observed in fermented milk containing only Str. thermophilus and Lb. bulgaricus. PMID:25657101

  3. Biological effects of conjugated linoleic acid on obesity-related cancers.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyun-Seuk

    2014-12-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that obesity and overweight play an important role in cancers i.e., breast, colon, endometrial, kidney, pancreatic, and liver. In fact, overweight and obesity are now established risk factors for cancer and cancer-related mortality. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) consists of a group of positional and geometric fatty acid (FA) isomers that are derived from linoleic acid (LA) [18:2(n-6)], which occurs naturally in food with a high concentration in products from ruminant animals. Studies in both in vitro cell and in vivo animal models have shown that CLA, specifically cis 9-trans 11 and trans 10-cis 12 CLA isomer, inhibits the initiation and promotion stages of carcinogenesis, suggesting that CLA has received considerable attention as a chemopreventive agent. In this review, the biological activities and multiple mechanisms of CLA in obesity-related cancers including cell lines, animal models and clinical observations are explained.

  4. Fatty acid profile and proliferation of bovine blood mononuclear cells after conjugated linoleic acid supplementation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are in focus of dairy cattle research because of its milk fat reducing effects. Little is known about the impact of CLA on immune function in dairy cows. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of a long term supplementation of dairy cows with CLA on the fatty acid profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and their proliferation ex vivo. Results The supplementation of dairy cows with either 100 g/d of a control fat preparation (CON, n = 15), 50 g/d of the control fat preparation and 50 g/d CLA supplement – containing 12.0% cis-9, trans-11 and 11.9% trans-10, cis-12 CLA of total fatty acid methyl esters – (CLA-50, n = 15) or 100 g/d of the CLA supplement (CLA-100, n = 16) did not influence the major fatty acids (C18:0, C16:0, cis-9 C18:1, cis-9, cis-12 C18:2, cis-5, cis-8, cis-11, cis-14 C20:4) in the lipid fraction of PBMC. The proportion of trans-10, cis-12 CLA of total fatty acids was increased in both CLA supplemented groups, but there was no effect on the cis-9, trans-11 isomer. Furthermore, the proportion of trans-9 C18:1 and cis-12 C24:1 was reduced in the CLA-100 group. The mitogen stimulated cell proliferation was not influenced by CLA feeding. Conclusion CLA supplementation influenced the FA profile of some minor FA in PBMC, but these changes did not lead to differences in the mitogen induced activation of the cells. PMID:22668674

  5. Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) But Not Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) Reverses Trans-10, Cis-12 Conjugated Linoleic Acid Induced Insulin Resistance in Mice1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: t10, c12-Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) induces insulin resistance and fatty liver in mice which can be reversed by fish oils. We determined if it is eicospentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA) or docoshexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA) that reverses these adverse effects of CLA. Research Design and M...

  6. Isomer-specific regulation of differentiating pig preadipocytes by conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Brandebourg, T D; Hu, C Y

    2005-09-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids are a group of geometric and positional isomers of linoleic acid that decrease body fat in growing animals by a poorly understood mechanism. The objective of this study was to investigate the isomer-specific effect of CLA on the proliferation and differentiation of pig preadipocytes in primary culture. The effect of CLA on preadipocyte proliferation was determined using cleavage of the tetrazolium salt, WST-1, as a marker for proliferation. Preadipocyte number was decreased in a dose-dependent fashion by trans-12,cis-10 CLA (P < 0.05). No other fatty acid affected preadipocyte number. Differentiation was monitored on d 10 after induction morphologically, enzymatically, and by measuring the mRNA abundance of key adipogenic transcription factors. Both a crude CLA preparation containing a mixture of CLA isomers (CLA-mix) and the pure trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomer inhibited glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity in a dose-dependent fashion, with trans-10,cis-12 CLA being more potent (P < 0.01) than the CLA-mix. Cis-9,trans-11 CLA failed to decrease GPDH activity; however, increasing concentrations of cis-9,trans-11 CLA tended to blunt the inhibitory effect of trans-10,cis-12 CLA on GPDH activity (P < 0.09), suggesting that cis-9,trans-11 CLA may antagonize the action of trans-10,cis-12 CLA in porcine adipocytes. Finally, the isomer-specific effect of CLA on adipogenic transcription factor gene expression was investigated. Trans-10,cis-12 CLA decreased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma; P < 0.01) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c; P < 0.05) mRNA, while failing to alter the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha) mRNA. Interestingly, both the CLA-mix and the trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomer increased the mRNA abundance of chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor 1 (COUP-TF; P < 0.002). No other fatty acid affected COUP-TF mRNA levels

  7. Response of milk fatty acid composition to dietary supplementation of soy oil, conjugated linoleic acid, or both.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Schoonmaker, J P; Bradford, B J; Beitz, D C

    2008-01-01

    Thirty-six Holstein cows were blocked by parity and allotted by stage of lactation to 6 treatments to evaluate the effects of dietary soy oil, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA; free acid or calcium salt), or both, on CLA content of milk. Diets were fed for 4 wk and are as follows: (1) control, (2) control + 5% soy oil, (3) control + 1% CLA, (4) control + 1% Ca(CLA)2, (5) control + 1% CLA + 4% soy oil, and (6) control + 1% Ca(CLA)2 + 4% soy oil. Rumen volatile fatty acid concentrations, blood fatty acid concentrations, milk yield, and milk composition were measured weekly or biweekly. Dry matter intake and milk yield were recorded daily. Dietary supplementation of soy oil or CLA had no effect on daily milk yield, milk protein concentration and production, or milk lactose concentration and production. Supplementation of unsaturated fatty acids as soy oil, CLA, or Ca(CLA)2 increased total fatty acid concentration in plasma, decreased milk fat concentration and production, and had no effect on rumen volatile fatty acid concentrations. The weight percentage of CLA in milk was increased from 0.4 to 0.7% with supplementation of 1% CLA, to 1.2% with supplementation of soy oil, and to 1.3% with supplementation of 1% CLA plus soy oil. Supplementation with Ca(CLA)2 or Ca(CLA)2 + soy oil increased the CLA content of milk fat to 0.9 and 1.4%, respectively. In summary, adding 5% soy oil was as effective as supplementing CLA, Ca(CLA)2, or a combination of 1% CLA (free acid or calcium salt) + 4% soy oil at increasing CLA concentrations in milk fat. Feeding CLA as the calcium salt resulted in greater concentrations of CLA in milk fat than did feeding CLA as the free acid. Dietary supplementation of 5% soy oil or 4% soy oil + 1% CLA as the free acid or the calcium salt increased the yield of CLA in milk.

  8. Effect of feeding CLA on plasma and granules fatty acid composition of eggs and prepared mayonnaise quality.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Sara Elizabeth; Proctor, Andrew; Gilley, Alex D; Cho, Sungeun; Martin, Elizabeth; Anthony, Nicholas B

    2016-04-15

    Eggs rich in trans, trans conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) are significantly more viscous, have more phospholipids containing linoleic acid (LA), and more saturated triacylglycerol species than control eggs. However, the fatty acid (FA) composition of yolk plasma and granule fractions are unreported. Furthermore, there are no reports of mayonnaise rheological properties or emulsion stability by using CLA-rich eggs. Therefore, the objectives were (1) compare the FA composition of CLA-rich yolk granules and plasma, relative to standard control and LA-rich control yolks, (2) compare the rheological properties of mayonnaise prepared with CLA-rich eggs to control eggs and (3) compare the emulsion stability of CLA-yolk mayonnaise. CLA-rich eggs and soy control eggs were produced by adding 10% CLA-rich soy oil or 10% of control unmodified soy oil to the hen's diet. The eggs were used in subsequent mayonnaise preparation. CLA-yolk mayonnaise was more viscous, had greater storage modulus, resisted thinning, and was a more stable emulsion, relative to mayonnaise prepared with control yolks or soy control yolks.

  9. Goat milk fat naturally enriched with conjugated linoleic acid increased lipoproteins and reduced triacylglycerol in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Raphaela; Soares, Juliana; Garcia, Hugo; Nascimento, Claudenice; Medeiros, Maria; Bomfim, Marco; Medeiros, Maria Carmo; Queiroga, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Goat milk is source of different lipids, including conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). CLA reduces body fat and protect against cardiovascular diseases. In the present study fat from goat milk naturally enriched with CLA was used. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups that received during a 10 week diet with different lipid sources: soybean oil (CON), coconut oil (CO) and goat milk fat naturally enriched with CLA (GM-CLA). We evaluated the effects of a GM-CLA on biochemistry parameters--high density lipoprotein (HDL), triacylglycerol (TAG), TAG/HDL ratio, total cholesterol and glucose, body weight and histopathological aspects of the intestine and liver. GM-CLA increased body weight from the second to the fifth week of the experiment compared to CON. Feed intake differed between the CON group and GM-CLA early in the first to third week of the experiments and later between the ninth and tenth week. The CLA-diet group showed increased levels of HDL, reduced levels of TAG and TAG/HDL ratio and no effect on LDL, but enhanced total cholesterol. Serum glucose of the GM-CLA group showed no difference from the control group. Thus, a GM-CLA diet promoted growth in young rats and acted as protector of cardiovascular function, but further studies are still needed to clarify these effects. PMID:24662092

  10. Nutrient Regulation: Conjugated Linoleic Acid's Inflammatory and Browning Properties in Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wan; McIntosh, Michael K

    2016-07-17

    Obesity is the most widespread nutritional disease in the United States. Developing effective and safe strategies to manage excess body weight is therefore of paramount importance. One potential strategy to reduce obesity is to consume conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplements containing isomers cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12, or trans-10, cis-12 alone. Proposed antiobesity mechanisms of CLA include regulation of (a) adipogenesis, (b) lipid metabolism, (c) inflammation, (d) adipocyte apoptosis, (e) browning or beiging of adipose tissue, and (f) energy metabolism. However, causality of CLA-mediated responses to body fat loss, particularly the linkage between inflammation, thermogenesis, and energy metabolism, is unclear. This review examines whether CLA's antiobesity properties are due to inflammatory signaling and considers CLA's linkage with lipogenesis, lipolysis, thermogenesis, and browning of white and brown adipose tissue. We propose a series of questions and studies to interrogate the role of the sympathetic nervous system in mediating CLA's antiobesity properties. PMID:27431366

  11. Transfer of conjugated linoleic acids into different tissues of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    von Soosten, Dirk; Kramer, Ronny; Jahreis, Gerhard; Meyer, Ulrich; Flachowsky, Gerhard; Dänicke, Sven

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the transfer of supplemented trans-10,cis-12 (t10,c12) and cis-9, trans-11 (c9,t11) conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) into the body of dairy cows during the first 105 days in milk (DIM). Therefore, five out of 25 first lactation German Holstein cows were slaughtered at 1 DIM without previous CLA or fat supplementation. The remaining animals received daily 6.0 g t10,c12 CLA and 5.7 g c9,t11 CLA as feed supplement (Group CLA, 10 cows) or a stearic acid-based control fat supplement (Group CON, 10 cows). From both groups, five cows were slaughtered at 42 and 105 DIM, respectively. During the slaughter process, the empty body mass of the cow was partitioned into nine fractions (retroperitoneal fat, omental fat, mesenteric fat, subcutaneous fat, meat, bone, offal, hide and mammary gland). The fat content and the fatty acid composition of these fractions were determined. The c9,t11 CLA isomer was detected in all fractions across all groups, but the amount of c9,t11 CLA was not changed because of CLA supplementation. Except for the retroperitonealfat depot, no t10,c12 CLA was detected in the fractions of Group CON. After CLA supplementation, the amount of t10,c12 CLA in the retroperitoneal, mesenteric, subcutaneous, offal and mammary gland fractions was increased. The transfer of t10,c12 CLA into the fractions was more pronounced from 42 until 105 DIM. However, the transfer efficiency of consumed t10,c12 CLA into the fat depot fractions and all fractions was <0.1% and <0.2%, respectively. Overall, the transfer of supplemented CLA isomers into the dairy cow's body was only marginal during the first 105 DIM.

  12. Linoleic acid: between doubts and certainties.

    PubMed

    Choque, Benjamin; Catheline, Daniel; Rioux, Vincent; Legrand, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Linoleic acid is the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acid in human nutrition and represents about 14 g per day in the US diet. Following the discovery of its essential functions in animals and humans in the early 1920's, studies are currently questioning the real requirement of linoleic acid. It seems now overestimated and creates controversy: how much linoleic acid should be consumed in a healthy diet? Beyond the necessity to redefine the dietary requirement of linoleic acid, many questions concerning the consequences of its excessive consumption on human health arise. Linoleic acid is a direct precursor of the bioactive oxidized linoleic acid metabolites. It is also a precursor of arachidonic acid, which produces pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and endocannabinoids. A majority of the studies on linoleic acid and its derivatives show a direct/indirect link with inflammation and metabolic diseases. Many authors claim that a high linoleic acid intake may promote inflammation in humans. This review tries to (i) highlight the importance of reconsidering the actual requirement of linoleic acid (ii) point out the lack of knowledge between dietary levels of linoleic acid and the molecular mechanisms explaining its physiological roles (iii) demonstrate the relevance of carrying out further human studies on the single variable linoleic acid.

  13. Conjugated linoleic acid alters growth performance, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli).

    PubMed

    Dong, Gui-Fang; Liu, Wen-Zuo; Wu, Lin-Zhou; Yu, Deng-Hang; Huang, Feng; Li, Peng-Cheng; Yang, Yan-Ou

    2015-02-01

    Fatty liver syndrome is a prevalent problem of farmed fish. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has received increased attention recently as a fat-reducing fatty acid to control fat deposition in mammals. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether dietary CLA can reduce tissue lipid content of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli) and whether decreased lipid content is partially due to alterations in lipid metabolism enzyme activities and fatty acid profiles. A 76-day feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary CLA on the growth, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish. Five diets containing 0 % (control), 0.5 % (CLA0.5), 1 % (CLA1), 2 % (CLA2), and 3 % (CLA3) CLA levels were evaluated. Results showed that fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed a significantly lower specific growth rate and feed conversion efficiency than those fed with the control diet. Dietary CLA decreased the lipid contents in the liver and intraperitoneal fat with the CLA levels from 1 to 3 %. Fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed significantly higher lipoprotein lipase and hepatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control, and fish fed with 1-3 % CLA diets had significantly higher pancreatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control. Dietary CLA was incorporated into liver, intraperitoneal fat, and muscle lipids, with higher percentages observed in liver compared with other tissues. Liver CLA deposition was at the expense of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). In contrast, CLA deposition appeared to be primarily at the expense of MUFA and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the intraperitoneal fat, whereas in muscle it was at the expense of n-3 PUFA. Our results suggested that CLA at a 1 % dose can reduce liver lipid content without eliciting any negative effect on growth rate in darkbarbel catfish. This lipid-lowering effect could

  14. Kinetics of photoirradiation-induced synthesis of soy oil-conjugated linoleic acid isomers.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishal P; Proctor, Andrew

    2007-02-01

    Photoirradiation of soy oil with UV/visible light has been shown to produce significant amounts of trans,trans conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers through conversion of various synthesized intermediate cis,trans isomers. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics of CLA isomers synthesis to better understand the production of various isomers. Soy oil was irradiated with UV/visible light for 144 h in the presence of an iodine catalyst and CLA isomers analyzed by gas chromatography (GC). Arrhenius plots were developed for the conversion of soy oil linoleic acid (A) to form cis-, trans/trans-, cis-CLA (B), conversion of cis-, trans/trans-, cis-CLA to form trans,trans-CLA (C) with respect to B, and formation of trans,trans-CLA isomers with respect to C. The kinetics of consumption of linoleic acid (LA) to form cis-, trans/trans-, cis-CLA was found to be of second-order with a rate constant of 9.01 x 10-7 L/mol s. The rate of formation of cis-, trans/trans-, cis-CLA isomers depends on the rate of formation from LA and its rate of consumption to form trans,trans-CLA isomers. The conversion of cis-, trans/trans-, cis-CLA isomers to trans,trans-CLA isomers was found to be of first-order with a rate constant of 2.75 x 10-6 s-1. However, the formation of thermodynamically stable trans,trans-CLA isomers (C) with respect to C was found to be a zero-order reaction with a rate constant of 10.66 x 10-7 mol/L s. The consumption of LA was found to be the rate-determining step in the CLA isomers formation reaction mechanism. The findings provide a better understanding of the mechanism of CLA isomers synthesis by photoirradiation and the factors controlling the ratio of various isomers.

  15. Absorption and metabolism of cis-9,trans-11-CLA and of its oxidation product 9,11-furan fatty acid by Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Buhrke, Thorsten; Merkel, Roswitha; Lengler, Imme; Lampen, Alfonso

    2012-04-01

    Furan fatty acids (furan-FA) can be formed by auto-oxidation of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) and may therefore be ingested when CLA-containing foodstuff is consumed. Due to the presence of a furan ring structure, furan-FA may have toxic properties, however, these substances are toxicologically not well characterized so far. Here we show that 9,11-furan-FA, the oxidation product of the major CLA isomer cis-9,trans-11-CLA (c9,t11-CLA), is not toxic to human intestinal Caco-2 cells up to a level of 100 μM. Oil-Red-O staining indicated that 9,11-furan-FA as well as c9,t11-CLA and linoleic acid are taken up by the cells and stored in the form of triglycerides in lipid droplets. Chemical analysis of total cellular lipids revealed that 9,11-furan-FA is partially elongated probably by the enzymatic activity of cellular fatty acid elongases whereas c9,t11-CLA is partially converted to other isomers such as c9,c11-CLA or t9,t11-CLA. In the case of 9,11-furan-FA, there is no indication for any modification or activation of the furan ring system. From these results, we conclude that 9,11-furan-FA has no properties of toxicological relevance at least for Caco-2 cells which serve as a model for enterocytes of the human small intestine.

  16. Lecithin-Based Nano-emulsification Improves the Bioavailability of Conjugated Linoleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Heo, Wan; Kim, Jun Ho; Pan, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Young Jun

    2016-02-17

    In this study, we investigated the effects of lecithin-based nano-emulsification on the heat stability and bioavailability of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in different free fatty acid (FFA) and triglyceride (TG) forms. CLA nano-emulsion in TG form exhibited a small droplet size (70-120 nm) compared to CLA nano-emulsion in FFA form (230-260 nm). Nano-emulsification protected CLA isomers in TG form, but not in free form, against thermal decomposition during the heat treatment. The in vitro bioavailability test using monolayers of Caco-2 human intestinal cells showed that nano-emulsification increased the cellular uptake of CLA in both FFA and TG forms. More importantly, a rat feeding study showed that CLA content in small intestinal tissues or plasma was higher when CLA was emulsified, indicating an enhanced oral bioavailability of CLA by nano-emulsification. These results provide important information for development of nano-emulsion-based delivery systems that improve thermal stability and bioavailability of CLA.

  17. Safflower oil consumption does not increase plasma conjugated linoleic acid concentrations in humans.

    PubMed

    Herbel, B K; McGuire, M K; McGuire, M A; Shultz, T D

    1998-02-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a mixture of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid (LA) with conjugated double bonds. CLA has anticarcinogenic properties and has been identified in human tissues, dairy products, meats, and certain vegetable oils. A variety of animal products are good sources of CLA, but plant oils contain much less. However, plant oils are a rich source of LA, which may be isomerized to CLA by intestinal microorganisms in humans. To investigate the effect of triacylglycerol-esterified LA consumption on plasma concentrations of esterified CLA in total lipids, a dietary intervention (6 wk) was conducted with six men and six women. During the intervention period a salad dressing containing 21 g safflower oil providing 16 g LA/d was added to the subjects' daily diets. Three-day diet records and fasting blood were obtained initially and during dietary and postdietary intervention periods. Although LA intake increased significantly during the dietary intervention, plasma CLA concentrations were not affected. Plasma total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower after addition of safflower oil to the diet. In summary, consumption of triacylglycerol-esterified LA in safflower oil did not increase plasma concentrations of esterified CLA in total lipids.

  18. Effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acids on hepatic and muscle lipids in hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Twibell, R G; Watkins, B A; Rogers, L; Brown, P B

    2000-02-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are the focus of numerous studies, yet the effects of these isomers of octadecadienoic acids have not been evaluated in many species of fish. In this study, graded amounts of CLA--0, 0.5, 0.75, or 1.0% of the diet--were fed to juvenile hybrid striped bass for 8 wk. Dietary treatments were fed to apparent satiation twice daily to triplicate groups of fish initially weighing 13.4 g/fish. Feed intake and weight gain of fish fed 1.0% CLA were significantly reduced compared to fish fed no CLA. Fish fed 0.5 and 0.75% CLA exhibited reduced feed intake similar to fish fed 1.0% CLA, but had growth rates that were not significantly different from those of fish fed no CLA. Feed efficiency improved significantly in fish as dietary CLA concentrations increased. Total liver lipid concentrations were significantly reduced in fish fed the diets containing CLA compared to those of fish fed the control diet, and intraperitoneal fat ratio was significantly lower in fish fed 1.0% CLA compared to fish fed no CLA. Fish fed dietary CLA exhibited significant increases in hepatosomatic index and moisture content of muscle and carcass. The CLA isomers were detected in liver and muscle of fish fed the diets containing CLA, while a low concentration of one isomer was detected in liver and muscle of fish fed the control diet. Dietary CLA resulted in a significant increase in 18:2(c-9,c-12) concentration in liver and muscle, but a significant reduction in 18:1n-7 in these tissues. Furthermore, feeding CLA resulted in a significant increase in the concentration of 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 in liver, but a reduction of these fatty acids in muscle. This study showed that feeding CLA elevated tissue concentrations of these fatty acid isomers, reduced tissue lipid contents, improved feed efficiency, and altered fatty acid concentrations in liver and muscle of fish.

  19. Conjugated Linoleic Acid: Potential Health Benefits as a Functional Food Ingredient.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Ho; Kim, Yoo; Kim, Young Jun; Park, Yeonhwa

    2016-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has drawn significant attention since the 1980s for its various biological activities. CLA consists mainly of two isomers, cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12, and the mixture of these two (CLA mix or 50:50) has been approved for food as GRAS (generally recognized as safe) in the United States since 2008. Along with its original discovery as an anticancer component, CLA has been shown to prevent the development of atherosclerosis, reduce body fat while improving lean body mass, and modulate immune and/or inflammatory responses. This review summarizes the clinical trials involving CLA since 2012; additional uses of CLA for age-associated health issues are discussed; and CLA's potential health concerns, including glucose homeostasis, oxidative stress, hepatic steatosis, and milk-fat depression, are examined. With ongoing applications to food products, CLA consumption is expected to rise and close monitoring of not only its efficacy but also its known and unknown consequences are required to ensure proper applications of CLA.

  20. Effect of conjugated linoleic acid on fungal delta6-desaturase activity in a transformed yeast system.

    PubMed

    Chuang, L T; Thurmond, J M; Liu, J W; Kirchner, S J; Mukerji, P; Bray, T M; Huang, Y S

    2001-02-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA; 18:2), a group of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6), has been shown to modulate immune function through its effect on eicosanoid synthesis. This effect has been attributed to a reduced production of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), the precursor of eicosanoids. Since delta6-desaturase is the rate-limiting enzyme of the n-6 PUFA production, it is our hypothesis that CLA, which has similar chemical structure to LA, interacts directly with delta6-desaturase. A unique and simple model, i.e., baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) transformed with fungal delta6-desaturase gene, previously established, was used to investigate the direct effect of CLA on delta6-desaturase. This model allows LA to be converted to y-linolenic acid (GLA; 18:3n-6) but not GLA to its metabolite(s). No metabolites of CLA were found in the lipids of the yeast transformed with delta6-desaturase. The inability to convert CLA to conjugated GLA was not due to the failure of yeast cells to take up the CLA isomers. CLA mixture and individual isomers significantly inhibited the activity of delta6-desaturase of the transformed yeast in vivo. Even though its uptake by the yeast was low, CLA c9,t11 isomer was found to be the most potent inhibitor of the four isomers tested, owing to its high inhibitory effect on delta6-desaturase. Since CLA did not cause significant changes in the level of delta6-desaturase mRNA, the inhibition of GLA production could not be attributed to suppression of delta6-desaturase gene expression at the transcriptional level.

  1. Effect of trans-10 cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid on bovine oocyte competence and fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Lapa, M; Marques, C C; Alves, S P; Vasques, M I; Baptista, M C; Carvalhais, I; Silva Pereira, M; Horta, A E M; Bessa, R J B; Pereira, R M

    2011-10-01

    The reproductive performance of dairy cows may be improved by feeding conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplements during early lactation. The mechanism of action of t10,c12 CLA is not clearly known. Our objective was to investigate the effect of t10,c12 CLA on oocyte maturation and lipid composition of cumulus oocyte complexes (COC). The developmental potential of oocytes incubated in in vitro maturation (IVM) medium supplemented with t10,c12 CLA to the blastocyst stage and embryo quality were also assessed. In experiment 1, abattoir-derived oocytes were matured in TCM199 + 10% serum supplemented with 100 μM t10,c12 CLA (t10,c12 CLA n = 672) or without it (control n = 672). Mature oocytes were either stained for chromatin configuration or inseminated and cultured for embryo development assessment. In experiment 2, COC and IVM culture media were subjected to fatty acid (FA) analysis prior and after maturation with t10,c12 CLA or without it (control). Total lipids and FA profiles in oocytes, cumulus cells and culture media were determined by gas chromatography. t10,c12 CLA supplementation to IVM medium improved (p = 0.05) embryo quality evaluated morphologically. This effect was associated with t10,c12 CLA presence (3.1 ± 0.7%, p = 0.04) and lower levels of arachidonic acid in FA profile of t10,c12 CLA mature oocytes (immature oocytes = 4.4 ± 1.9%, t10,c12 CLA mature oocytes = 1.0 ± 0.7%, p = 0.05). Differences in myristic and eicotrienoic acids, saturated and unsaturated FA concentrations between oocytes and cumulus cells were detected (p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, the presence of t10,c12 CLA during maturation interfered on lipid metabolism improving bovine oocyte competence to develop into higher quality embryos.

  2. Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation Leads to Downregulation of PPAR Transcription in Broiler Chickens and Reduction of Adipocyte Cellularity

    PubMed Central

    Ramiah, Suriya Kumari; Meng, Goh Yong; Sheau Wei, Tan

    2014-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) act as an important ligand for nuclear receptors in adipogenesis and fat deposition in mammals and avian species. This study aimed to determine whether similar effects are plausible on avian abdominal fat adipocyte size, as well as abdominal adipogenic transcriptional level. CLA was supplemented at different levels, namely, (i) basal diet without CLA (5% palm oil) (CON), (ii) basal diet with 2.5% CLA and 2.5% palm oil (LCLA), and (iii) basal diet with 5% CLA (HCLA).The content of cis-9, trans-11 CLA was between 1.69- and 2.3-fold greater (P < 0.05) than that of trans-10, cis-12 CLA in the abdominal fat of the LCLA and HCLA group. The adipogenic capacity of the abdominal fat depot in LCLA and HCLA fed chicken is associated with a decreased proportion of adipose cells and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). The transcriptional level of adipocyte protein (aP2) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) was downregulated by 1.08- to 2.5-fold in CLA supplemented diets, respectively. It was speculated that feeding CLA to broiler chickens reduced adipocyte size and downregulated PPARγ and aP2 that control adipocyte cellularity. Elevation of CLA isomers into their adipose tissue provides a potential CLA-rich source for human consumption. PMID:25309587

  3. Are conjugated linolenic acid isomers an alternative to conjugated linoleic acid isomers in obesity prevention?

    PubMed

    Miranda, Jonatan; Arias, Noemi; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; del Puy Portillo, María

    2014-04-01

    Despite its benefits, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) may cause side effects after long-term administration. Because of this and the controversial efficacy of CLA in humans, alternative biomolecules that may be used as functional ingredients have been studied in recent years. Thus, conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) has been reported to be a potential anti-obesity molecule which may have additional positive effects related to obesity. According to the results reported in obesity, CLNA needs to be given at higher doses than CLA to be effective. However, because of the few studies conducted so far, it is still difficult to reach clear conclusions about the potential use of these CLNAs in obesity and its related changes (insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, or inflammation).

  4. Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation caused reduction of perilipin1 and aberrant lipolysis in epididymal adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Demin; Li, Hongji; Zhou, Bo; Han, Liqiang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Yang, Guoyu; Yang, Guoqing

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation suppresses perilipin1 in epididymal fat. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conjugated linoleic acid inhibits promoter activity of perilipin1 in 3T3-L1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conjugated linoleic acids elevate basal but blunt hormone-stimulated lipolysis. -- Abstract: Perilipin1, a coat protein of lipid droplet, plays a key role in adipocyte lipolysis and fat formation of adipose tissues. However, it is not clear how the expression of perilipin1 is affected in the decreased white adipose tissues (WAT) of mice treated with dietary supplement of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA). Here we obtained lipodystrophic mice by dietary administration of CLA which exhibited reduced epididymal (EPI) WAT, aberrant adipocytes and decreased expression of leptin in this tissue. We found both transcription and translation of perilipin1 was suppressed significantly in EPI WAT of CLA-treated mice compared to that of control mice. The gene expression of negative regulator tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF{alpha}) and the positive regulator Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) of perilipin1 was up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively. In cultured 3T3-L1 cells the promoter activity of perilipin1 was dramatically inhibited in the presence of CLA. Using ex vivo experiment we found that the basal lipolysis was elevated but the hormone-stimulated lipolysis blunted in adipose explants of CLA-treated mice compared to that of control mice, suggesting that the reduction of perilipin1 in white adipose tissues may at least in part contribute to CLA-mediated alternation of lipolysis of WAT.

  5. Starter cultures and cattle feed manipulation enhance conjugated linoleic acid concentrations in Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Mohan, M S; Anand, S; Kalscheur, K F; Hassan, A N; Hippen, A R

    2013-04-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a fatty acid (FA) that provides several health benefits to humans. The feeding of fish oil-supplemented diets to dairy cows has been extensively studied as a means to improve the CLA content in milk. Several studies have also been conducted on the ability of many microorganisms to produce CLA by utilizing substrates containing linoleic acid. In the present study, the dietary manipulated milk was used in combination with the CLA-producing culture to manufacture Cheddar cheese. The two diets fed to cattle were control and treatment diets to obtain control and treatment milk, respectively. The treatment diet containing fish oil (0.75% of dry matter) was fed to 32 dairy cows grouped in a pen for 18 d to increase the total CLA content in milk. Treatment milk had a CLA content of 1.60 g/100g of FA compared with 0.58 g/100g of FA in control milk obtained by feeding the control diet. A 2 × 2 factorial design with 3 replicates was used to test the combined effect of the CLA-producing starter culture of Lactococcus lactis (CI4b) versus a commercial CLA nonproducing cheese starter as the control culture, and type of milk (control vs. treatment milk) on CLA content in Cheddar cheese. Chemical composition (moisture, salt, fat, and protein) was not affected by the type of culture used. However, the age of the cheese affected the sensory properties and microbiological counts in the different treatments. Ripening with the CI4b culture was found to be effective in further enhancing the CLA content. The CI4b cheeses made from control milk and treatment milk contained 1.09 and 2.41 (±0.18) g of total CLA/100g of FA after 1 mo of ripening, which increased to 1.44 and 2.61 (±0.18) g of total CLA/100g of FA after 6 mo of ripening, respectively. The use of treatment milk resulted in an increase in the CLA isomers (trans-7,cis-9+cis-9,trans-11, trans-9,cis-11+cis-10,trans-12, trans-10,cis-12, cis-9,cis-11, trans-11,cis-13, cis-11,cis-13, trans-11,trans

  6. Starter cultures and cattle feed manipulation enhance conjugated linoleic acid concentrations in Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Mohan, M S; Anand, S; Kalscheur, K F; Hassan, A N; Hippen, A R

    2013-04-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a fatty acid (FA) that provides several health benefits to humans. The feeding of fish oil-supplemented diets to dairy cows has been extensively studied as a means to improve the CLA content in milk. Several studies have also been conducted on the ability of many microorganisms to produce CLA by utilizing substrates containing linoleic acid. In the present study, the dietary manipulated milk was used in combination with the CLA-producing culture to manufacture Cheddar cheese. The two diets fed to cattle were control and treatment diets to obtain control and treatment milk, respectively. The treatment diet containing fish oil (0.75% of dry matter) was fed to 32 dairy cows grouped in a pen for 18 d to increase the total CLA content in milk. Treatment milk had a CLA content of 1.60 g/100g of FA compared with 0.58 g/100g of FA in control milk obtained by feeding the control diet. A 2 × 2 factorial design with 3 replicates was used to test the combined effect of the CLA-producing starter culture of Lactococcus lactis (CI4b) versus a commercial CLA nonproducing cheese starter as the control culture, and type of milk (control vs. treatment milk) on CLA content in Cheddar cheese. Chemical composition (moisture, salt, fat, and protein) was not affected by the type of culture used. However, the age of the cheese affected the sensory properties and microbiological counts in the different treatments. Ripening with the CI4b culture was found to be effective in further enhancing the CLA content. The CI4b cheeses made from control milk and treatment milk contained 1.09 and 2.41 (±0.18) g of total CLA/100g of FA after 1 mo of ripening, which increased to 1.44 and 2.61 (±0.18) g of total CLA/100g of FA after 6 mo of ripening, respectively. The use of treatment milk resulted in an increase in the CLA isomers (trans-7,cis-9+cis-9,trans-11, trans-9,cis-11+cis-10,trans-12, trans-10,cis-12, cis-9,cis-11, trans-11,cis-13, cis-11,cis-13, trans-11,trans

  7. The self-crosslinked ufasome of conjugated linoleic acid: investigation of morphology, bilayer membrane and stability.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ye; Fang, Yun; Ma, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Unsaturated fatty acid liposomes (Ufasomes) have attracted interests because of the ready availability of unsaturated fatty acids and the simple assembly strategy. However, the colloidal instability of the ufasomes hinders them from applying in the fields of drug delivery and food additives. In the present work, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) with triple activities of bioactive, assembling and crosslinking was employed as a new molecular building block to construct ufasome and afterwards crosslinked ufasome. First, CLA ufasome was self-assembled from CLA molecules in response to pH variation, and the suitable CLA concentrations and pH ranges were determined by surface tension measurement and acid-base titration. Subsequently, the self-crosslinked CLA ufasome was prepared by intra-ufasomal crosslinking of conjugated double bonds in the CLA molecules. The morphologies of the self-crosslinked CLA ufasomes were imaged using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), from which the size of 20-50 nm and the bilayer thickness of 2.7±0.5 nm were detected. Most importantly, based on the comparison of the bilayer thicknesses of the different fatty acids, the molecular arrangement in the bilayer membrane of the self-crosslinked CLA ufasome is named "side-by-side" model contrary to the ordinary "tail-to-tail" model. The pH stability of the self-crosslinked CLA ufasome was examined in virtue of dynamic light scattering tests. Finally, in vitro release results of 5-fluorouracil from the self-crosslinked CLA ufasome showed that the process was slow and sustainable.

  8. Preparation of mono- and diacylglycerols by enzymatic esterification of glycerol with conjugated linoleic acid in hexane.

    PubMed

    Martinez, C E; Vinay, J C; Brieva, R; Hill, C G; Garcia, H S

    2005-04-01

    Esterification of glycerol with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was carried out in hexane. Lipase from Rhizomucor miehei provided a high degree of esterification (80%) in 8 h at 50 degrees C when used at 15% (w/w) in a system containing a 1:2 molar ratio of glycerol to free fatty acids. Esterification levels >80% were obtained in 8 h at 40 degrees C with 15% (w/w) lipase from Candida antarctica at the same molar ratio of reactants. The extent of esterification of CLA was >90% after 4 h of reaction at 50 degrees C with a 5% (w/w) loading of either R. miehei or C. antarctica lipase, together with a 1:1 molar ratio of substrates. Both enzymes incorporated the original CLA as acylglycerol residues in primarily 1,3-diacylglycerol and 1-monoacylglycerol. The CLA-rich acylglycerols can be employed as emulsifiers or as substitutes for natural fats and oils.

  9. Species differences in the metabolism and regulation of gene expression by conjugated linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Moya-Camarena, S Y; Belury, M A

    1999-11-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits carcinogenesis and atherosclerotic plaque formation and delays the onset of diabetes in experimental animals. Whereas a plethora of data has demonstrated beneficial effects in rodent models, little work has been done to determine the role of dietary CLA in human health. The ability of CLA to modulate lipid metabolism appears to be a pivotal mechanism of CLA's beneficial effects in mice and rats. In particular, dietary CLA induces the expression of genes dependent in part on the transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR). Furthermore, several CLA isomers are high-affinity ligands and activators for PPAR alpha. Within various rodent species and strains, dietary CLA exerts varying potencies; therefore, the differences in species' sensitivities are of great importance when trying to extrapolate the rodent data to be relevant in humans. This review presents the latest findings of the ability of CLA to alter lipid metabolism and gene expression in several different strains of mice and rats and speculates on the implications of these findings for human health.

  10. Chemical, physical, and sensory properties of dairy products enriched with conjugated linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Jones, E L; Shingfield, K J; Kohen, C; Jones, A K; Lupoli, B; Grandison, A S; Beever, D E; Williams, C M; Calder, P C; Yaqoob, P

    2005-08-01

    Recent studies have illustrated the effects of cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on human health. Ruminant-derived meat, milk and dairy products are the predominant sources of cis-9,trans-11 CLA in the human diet. This study evaluated the processing properties, texture, storage characteristics, and organoleptic properties of UHT milk, Caerphilly cheese, and butter produced from a milk enriched to a level of cis-9,trans-11 CLA that has been shown to have biological effects in humans. Forty-nine early-lactation Holstein-British Friesian cows were fed total mixed rations containing 0 (control) or 45 g/kg (on dry matter basis) of a mixture (1:2 wt/wt) of fish oil and sunflower oil during two consecutive 7-d periods to produce a control and CLA-enhanced milk, respectively. Milk produced from cows fed the control and fish and sunflower oil diets contained 0.54 and 4.68 g of total CLA/100 g of fatty acids, respectively. Enrichment of CLA in raw milk from the fish and sunflower oil diet was also accompanied by substantial increases in trans C18:1 levels, lowered C18:0, cis-C18:1, and total saturated fatty acid concentrations, and small increases in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid content. The CLA-enriched milk was used for the manufacture of UHT milk, butter, and cheese. Both the CLA-enhanced butter and cheese were less firm than control products. Although the sensory profiles of the CLA-enriched milk, butter, and cheese differed from those of the control products with respect to some attributes, the overall impression and flavor did not differ. In conclusion, it is feasible to produce CLA-enriched dairy products with acceptable storage and sensory characteristics.

  11. Beef conjugated linoleic acid isomers reduce human cancer cell growth even when associated with other beef fatty acids.

    PubMed

    De La Torre, Anne; Debiton, Eric; Juanéda, Pierre; Durand, Denys; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Barthomeuf, Chantal; Bauchart, Dominique; Gruffat, Dominique

    2006-02-01

    Although many data are available concerning anticarcinogenic effects of industrial conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), few studies have reported the antitumour properties of CLA mixtures originating from ruminant products. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro antiproliferative effects of beef CLA mixtures on breast, lung, colon, melanoma and ovarian human cancer cell lines. For this purpose, four fatty acid (FA) extracts prepared from beef lipid and varying in their CLA composition, their corresponding purified CLA-enriched fractions, and mixtures of pure synthetic CLA, the composition of which reproduced that of the four selected beef samples, were tested on cancer cell lines. Cancer cells were exposed for 48 h to medium containing 100 microm-FA and their proliferation was determined by quantifying cellular DNA content (Hoechst 33342 dye). Compared with cells incubated without FA, the number of cancer cells was reduced from 25 to 67 % (P<0.0001) following FA treatment. Antiproliferative effects of CLA mixtures varied in magnitude according to the source of FA, the CLA composition and the cell lines. CLA mixtures naturally present in beef inhibited the proliferation of human cancer cell lines, a high content in cis-trans isomers allowing the most important antiproliferative effect. Beef total FA exhibited a greater growth-inhibitory activity than their corresponding CLA-enriched fractions. These results suggested that either beef FA other than beef CLA could possess antiproliferative properties and/or the existence of complementary effects of non-conjugated FA and CLA, which could favour the antiproliferative properties of beef total FA. PMID:16469152

  12. Beef conjugated linoleic acid isomers reduce human cancer cell growth even when associated with other beef fatty acids.

    PubMed

    De La Torre, Anne; Debiton, Eric; Juanéda, Pierre; Durand, Denys; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Barthomeuf, Chantal; Bauchart, Dominique; Gruffat, Dominique

    2006-02-01

    Although many data are available concerning anticarcinogenic effects of industrial conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), few studies have reported the antitumour properties of CLA mixtures originating from ruminant products. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro antiproliferative effects of beef CLA mixtures on breast, lung, colon, melanoma and ovarian human cancer cell lines. For this purpose, four fatty acid (FA) extracts prepared from beef lipid and varying in their CLA composition, their corresponding purified CLA-enriched fractions, and mixtures of pure synthetic CLA, the composition of which reproduced that of the four selected beef samples, were tested on cancer cell lines. Cancer cells were exposed for 48 h to medium containing 100 microm-FA and their proliferation was determined by quantifying cellular DNA content (Hoechst 33342 dye). Compared with cells incubated without FA, the number of cancer cells was reduced from 25 to 67 % (P<0.0001) following FA treatment. Antiproliferative effects of CLA mixtures varied in magnitude according to the source of FA, the CLA composition and the cell lines. CLA mixtures naturally present in beef inhibited the proliferation of human cancer cell lines, a high content in cis-trans isomers allowing the most important antiproliferative effect. Beef total FA exhibited a greater growth-inhibitory activity than their corresponding CLA-enriched fractions. These results suggested that either beef FA other than beef CLA could possess antiproliferative properties and/or the existence of complementary effects of non-conjugated FA and CLA, which could favour the antiproliferative properties of beef total FA.

  13. Punicic acid from Trichosanthes kirilowii seed oil is rapidly metabolized to conjugated linoleic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gao-Feng; Yuan, Jing-Qun; Li, Duo

    2009-04-01

    The incorporation and metabolism of orally administered punicic acid (PA), one isomer of conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA), in rat tissues and plasma were studied over a 24-hour period. The punic acid was derived from Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim seed oil, a unique PA-containing material, and identified and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that PA was incorporated and metabolized to 9c,11t-conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in rat plasma, liver, kidney, heart, brain, and adipose tissue. The level of PA and CLA in liver and plasma was higher than in brain, heart, kidney, and adipose tissue, and the lowest accumulation occurred in the brain. The observation that PA can be converted into 9c,11t-CLA has gained increased importance since it has been demonstrated that 9c,11t-CLA exerts many biological activities. Therefore natural resources containing CLNA, especially edible T. kirilowii seed, could be a potential dietary source of CLA, following PA metabolism. PA is expected to be used as a functional food and nutraceutical.

  14. Impact of dietary betaine and conjugated linoleic acid on insulin sensitivity, protein and fat metabolism of obese pigs.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fígares, I; Lachica, M; Martín, A; Nieto, R; González-Valero, L; Rodríguez-López, J M; Aguilera, J F

    2012-07-01

    To determine possible mechanisms of action that might explain the nutrient partitioning effect of betaine and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in Iberian pigs and to address potential adverse effects, twenty gilts were restrictively fed from 20 to 50 kg BW Control, 0.5% betaine, 1% CLA or 0.5% betaine + 1% CLA diets. Serum hormones and metabolites profile were determined at 30 kg BW and an oral glucose test was performed before slaughter. Pigs were slaughtered at 50 kg BW and livers were obtained for chemical and histological analysis. Decreased serum urea in pigs fed betaine and betaine + CLA diets (11%; P = 0.0001) indicated a more efficient N utilization. The increase in serum triacylglycerol (58% and 28%, respectively; P = 0.0098) indicated that CLA and betaine + CLA could have reduced adipose tissue triacylglycerol synthesis from preformed fatty acids. Serum glucose, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and non-esterified fatty acids were unaffected. CLA and betaine + CLA altered serum lipids profile, although liver of pigs fed CLA diet presented no histopathological changes and triglyceride content was not different from Control pigs. Compared with controls, serum growth hormone decreased (20% to 23%; P = 0.0209) for all treatments. Although serum insulin increased in CLA, and especially in betaine + CLA pigs (28% and 83%; P = 0.0001), indices of insulin resistance were unaffected. In conclusion, CLA, and especially betaine + CLA, induced changes in biochemical parameters and hormones that may partially explain a nutrient partitioning effect in young pigs. Nevertheless, they exhibited weak, although detrimental, effects on blood lipids. Moreover, although livers were chemically and histologically normal, pigs fed CLA diet challenged with a glucose load had higher serum glucose than controls.

  15. Fatty acid composition, including CLA's isomers and cholesterol content of m. longissimus lumborum and m. semimebranosus of Katahdin, Suffolk, Katahdin x Suffolk, and Suffolk x Katahdin lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids in meat products have important human health implications. Muscle tissues from Katahdin (KK), Suffolk (SS), Katahdin x Suffolk (KS), and Suffolk x Katahdin (SS) lambs were analyzed to determine the effect of breed-type on muscle fatty acid composition, including conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)...

  16. Production of bioactive conjugated linoleic acid by the multifunctional enolase from Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Anaya, Joana; Hernández-Santoyo, Alejandra

    2016-10-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum α-enolase, a multifunctional-anchorless-surface protein belonging to the conserved family of enolases with a central role in glycolytic metabolism, was characterized to have a side role in the intricate metabolism of biohydrogenation of linoleic acid, catalyzing the formation of bioactive 9-cis-11-trans-CLA through dehydration and isomerization of 10-hydroxy-12-cis-octadecenoic acid. The identity of the enolase was confirmed through mass spectrometric analysis that showed the characteristic 442 amino acid sequence with a molecular mass of 48.03kDa. The enolase was not capable of using linoleic acid directly as a substrate but instead uses its hydroxyl derivative 10-hydroxi-12-cis-octadecenoic acid to finally form bioactive conjugated linoleic acid. Biochemical optimization studies were carried out to elucidate the conditions for maximum production of 9-cis-11-trans-CLA and maximum stability of α-enolase when catalyzing this reaction. Furthermore, through structural analysis of the protein, we propose the binding sites of substrate and product molecules that were characterized as two hydrophobic superficial pockets located at opposite ends of the enolase connected through a channel where the catalysis of dehydration and isomerization might occur. These results prove that multifunctional α-enolase also plays a role in cell detoxification from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid, along with the linoleate isomerase complex. PMID:27259647

  17. Concentrations of retinol and tocopherols in the milk of cows supplemented with conjugated linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Gessner, D K; Most, E; Schlegel, G; Kupczyk, K; Schwarz, F J; Eder, K

    2015-12-01

    This study was performed to investigate the hypothesis that supplementation of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) changes the concentrations of retinol and tocopherols in the milk of cows. To investigate this hypothesis, Holstein cows received daily from 3 weeks ante-partum to 14 weeks post-partum either 172 g of a CLA-free rumen-protected control fat (control group, n = 20) or the same amount of a rumen-protected CLA fat, supplying 4.3 g of cis-9, trans-11 CLA and 3.8 g of trans-10, cis-12 CLA per d (CLA group, n = 20). Milk samples (collected at weeks 1, 3, 5, 8 and 11 of lactation) were analysed for retinol, α- and γ-tocopherol concentrations. Milk of cows supplemented with CLA had higher concentrations of retinol (+34%), α-tocopherol (+44%) and γ-tocopherol (+21%) than milk of control cows (p < 0.05). The daily output of these vitamins via milk was also greater in cows of the CLA group than in cows of the control group (+36, 50 and 24% for retinol, α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol, respectively, p < 0.05). In agreement with higher concentrations of tocopherols, concentrations of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, determined in milk of week 5, were lower in cows of the CLA group than in control cows, indicative of a lower susceptibility of milk lipids to peroxidation. Plasma concentrations of retinol and α-tocopherol, determined at 1 and 5 weeks post-partum, were not different between the two groups of cows. In conclusion, this study shows that supplementing dairy cows with a moderate amount of CLA causes an increase of the concentrations of vitamins A and E in the milk and results in an increased output of those vitamins via milk. These effects might be beneficial with respect to the nutritional value of dairy products and the susceptibility of milk fat to oxidative deterioration.

  18. A supplement containing trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid reduces milk fat yield but does not alter organ weight or body fat deposition in lactating ewes.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Liam A; Weerasinghe, Weerasinghe M P B; Wilkinson, Robert G; de Veth, Michael J; Bauman, Dale E

    2010-11-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) have been demonstrated to be a potent inhibitor of milk fat synthesis in ruminants, but effects on carcass composition and organ weight are unknown. Our objectives in this experiment were to determine the dose response of ruminally protected CLA on the performance, organ weight, and fatty acid (FA) composition of early lactation dairy ewes. Twenty-four multiparous dairy ewes were fed a basal diet for 10 wk that was supplemented with a lipid-encapsulated CLA at 1 of 3 levels: no CLA (control, CON), low CLA (L-CLA), or high CLA (H-CLA) to supply 0, 1.5, or 3.8 g/d, respectively, of both trans-10, cis-12 and cis-9, trans-11 CLA. Dry matter intake was not affected (P > 0.05) by dietary treatment. Ewes fed H-CLA had a 13% higher milk yield compared with those receiving either CON or L-CLA. Compared with CON, milk fat yield (g/d) was 14 and 24% lower in ewes fed L-CLA or H-CLA, respectively. Supplementing ewes with CLA did not affect carcass or organ weights, carcass composition, or organ FA content. Compared with ewes receiving the CON diet, CLA supplementation had little effect on the FA composition of the Longissimus dorsi, although cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA were increased in ewes receiving H-CLA. The current findings are consistent with the view that the energy spared by the CLA reduction in milk fat content was mainly partitioned to milk yield and there was no evidence of organ hypertrophy or liver steatosis.

  19. Preparation and characterization of aqueous dispersions of high amylose starch and conjugated linoleic acid complex.

    PubMed

    Seo, Tae-Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Lim, Seung-Taik

    2016-11-15

    Crystalline starch-CLA complexes were prepared by blending an alcoholic solution of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in an aqueous high-amylose maize starch dispersion. Recovery yield of CLA in the precipitates obtained by centrifuging the dispersion was dependent on reaction conditions such as temperature, time and pH. The CLA recovery reached a maximum when the reaction was performed at 90°C for 6h at neutral pH, with 67.7% of the initial CLA being co-precipitated with starch. The precipitates contained amylose-CLA complex exhibiting a V6I-type crystalline structure under X-ray diffraction analysis and a type II polymorph under DSC analysis. Ultrasonic treatment for the re-dispersed starch-CLA complex in water resulted in the reduction of hydrodynamic diameter of the complex particles to 201.5nm. The dispersion exhibited a zeta potential of -27.0mV and remained stable in an ambient storage without forming precipitates for more than 4weeks. PMID:27283663

  20. Effects of whole linseed and rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid enriched diets on beef quality.

    PubMed

    Barahona, M; Olleta, J L; Sañudo, C; Albertí, P; Panea, B; Pérez-Juan, M; Realini, C E; Campo, M M

    2016-04-01

    Instrumental assessments and sensory tests were performed to evaluate the effects of diet and postmortem ageing time (1, 7 and 21 days) on beef quality. A total of 48 Friesian calves were randomly allocated to four dietary treatments: control, whole linseed (10% linseed), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (2% protected CLA), and whole linseed+CLA (10% linseed and 2% protected CLA). Animals were slaughtered at 458±16.6 kg live weight and 11 months of age. Ageing was more significant than diet on most instrumental parameters. Meat from linseed enriched diets had greater drip loss (P⩽0.001) and intramuscular fat (P⩽0.01) than meat from animals fed CLA. Beef aged for 7 and 21 days had lower cooking losses (P⩽0.01) and shear force (P⩽0.001) than beef aged for 1 day. Lightness was affected only by display time. The addition of CLA in the diet increased hue and yellowness, whereas the inclusion of linseed decreased these values, as well as increased redness. Linseed in the diet decreased fat odour (P⩽0.05), but increased beef (P⩽0.01) and liver (P⩽0.05) flavours. Meat aged for 21 days was significantly more rancid (P⩽0.001), even under vacuum storage. Several organoleptic properties were improved with the inclusion of linseed in the diet, whereas they remained unaffected by the inclusion of CLA. PMID:26592312

  1. Characterizations of environmental factors in conjugated linoleic acid production by mixed rumen bacteria.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nag-Jin; Park, Hui Gyu; Kim, Jun Ho; Hwang, Han-Joon; Kwon, Ki Han; Yoon, Jin A; Kwon, Eung Gi; Chang, Jongsoo; Hwang, In Ho; Kim, Young Jun

    2009-10-14

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) production by rumen bacteria is closely related to biohydrogenation of linoleic acid (LA) and affected by various environmental factors. Ruminal biohydrogenation and isomerization were characterized in view of incubation conditions using a mixed culture of microorganisms obtained from surgically prepared cows. Free-floating bacteria (FFB) produced more CLA than particle-attached bacteria (PAB). Some major factors affecting the ruminal environment such as diet, concentrations of fat substrates, incubation time, pre-incubation, and the presence of glucose in the medium were found to be important determinants for the ruminal production of CLA and in a close relationship with biohydrogenation. The mixed bacterial culture, which was pre-exposed to LA, produced more CLA than an unexposed control in a medium containing 30% rumen fluid. The rate of conversion of fat substrate (LA) to hydrogenated products (trans-C18:1, C18:0) was negatively correlated with the initial LA concentration. Overall, the present study showed that CLA accumulation can be increased by modification of diet-induced environmental conditions, which affect changes in ruminal microflora.

  2. Effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid on fatty acid composition and cholesterol content of hen egg yolks.

    PubMed

    Szymczyk, Beata; Pisulewski, Paweł M

    2003-07-01

    The main objectives of the present study were to determine the effect of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers on the fatty acid composition and cholesterol content of egg-yolk lipids. Forty-five 25-week-old laying hens were randomly distributed into five groups of nine hens each and maintained in individual laying cages, throughout 12 weeks of the experiment. They were assigned to the five treatments that consisted of commercial layer diets containing 0, 5, 10, 15 or 20 g pure CLA/kg. Feed intake of hens varied little and insignificantly. Egg mass was uniformly lower (P<0.05) in the hens fed the CLA-enriched diets. Feed conversion efficiency, when expressed per kg eggs, was impaired (P<0.05), although without obvious relation to the dietary CLA concentration. Feeding the CLA-enriched diets resulted in gradually increasing deposition of CLA isomers (P<0.01) in egg-yolk lipids. Saturated fatty acids were increased (P<0.01) and monounsaturated fatty acids decreased (P<0.01). Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), when expressed as non-CLA PUFA, were also significantly decreased (P<0.01). The most striking effects (P<0.01) were observed for palmitic (16 : 0) and stearic (18 : 0) acids, which increased from 23.6 to 34 % and from 7.8 to 18 %, respectively. On the other hand, oleic acid (18 : 1n-9) decreased from 45.8 to 24.3 %. Among non-CLA PUFA, linoleic (18 : 2n-6) and alpha-linolenic (18 : 3n-3) acids were strongly (P<0.01) decreased, from 14.2 to 7.7 % and from 1.3 to 0.3 %, respectively. The same was true for arachidonic (20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic (22 : 6n-3) acids. The cholesterol content of egg yolks, when expressed in mg/g yolk, was not affected by the dietary CLA concentrations. In conclusion, unless the adverse effects of CLA feeding to laying hens on the fatty acid profile of egg yolks are eliminated, the CLA-enriched eggs cannot be considered functional food products. PMID:12844380

  3. Effects of conjugated linoleic acids and dietary concentrate proportion on performance, milk composition, milk yield and metabolic parameters of periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Maria; Meyer, Ulrich; Kersten, Susanne; Spilke, Joachim; Kramer, Ronny; Jahreis, Gerhard; Dänicke, Sven

    2013-06-01

    The study aimed to examine effects of supplemented conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) to periparturient cows receiving different concentrate proportions ante partum (a.p.) to investigate CLA effects on lipid mobilisation and metabolism. Compared to adapted feeding, a high-concentrate diet a.p. should induce a ketogenic metabolic situation post partum (p.p.) to better understand how CLA works. Sixty-four pregnant German Holstein cows had ad libitum access to partial mixed rations 3 weeks prior to calving until day 60 p.p. Ante partum, cows received control fat (CON) or a CLA supplement at 100 g/d, either in a low-concentrate (CON-20, CLA-20) or high-concentrate diet (CON-60, CLA-60). Post partum, concentrate proportion was adjusted, while fat supplementation continued. After day 32 p.p., half of the animals of CLA-groups changed to CON supplementation (CLA-20-CON, CLA-60-CON). A ketogenic metabolic situation p.p. was not achieved and therefore impacts of CLA could not be examined. Live weight, milk yield and composition, blood parameters remained unaffected by the treatments. Only a slightly reduced milk fat yield (not significant) was recorded for Group CLA-20. The proportion of trans-10,cis-12 (t10,c12) CLA in milk fat was significantly increased in CLA-groups compared to CON-groups. With the exception of a reversible CLA effect on milk fat in Group CLA-20, no post-treatment effects occurred. Dry matter intake (DMI) of Group CLA-60 was highest before calving, resulting in a significantly improved estimated energy balance after calving. Ante partum, net energy intakes were significantly increased in high-concentrate groups. Overall, supplemented CLA preparation did not relieve metabolism and lipid mobilisation of early lactating cows. But feeding CLA in a high-concentrate diet a.p. seems to increase DMI and thereby improve the energy balance of cows immediately after calving.

  4. Appraisal of conjugated linoleic acid production by probiotic potential of Pediococcus spp. GS4.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Vinay; Ghosh, Asit Ranjan; Mandal, Badal Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Probiotics with ability to produce conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is considered as an additive health benefit property for its known role in colon cancer mitigation. The conversion involves the biohydrogenation of the unsaturated fatty acid into conjugated form. Probiotic strain Pediococcus spp. GS4 was efficiently able to biohydrogenate linoleic acid (LA) into its conjugated form within 48 h of incubation. Quantum of CLA produced with a concentration of 121 μg/ml and sustained cell viability of 8.94 log cfu/ml maximally. Moreover, antibacterial effect of LA on the strain ability for biohydrogenation was examined at different concentrations and concluded to have a direct relationship between LA and amount of CLA produced. The efficiency of the strain for CLA production at different pH was also estimated and found maximum at pH 6.0 with 149 μg/ml while this ability was reduced at pH 9.0 to 63 μg/ml. Sesame oil, which is rich in the triacylglycerol form of LA, was also found to act as a substrate for CLA production by Pediococcus spp. GS4 with the aid of lipase-catalyzed triacylglycerol hydrolysis and amount of CLA produced was 31 μg/ml at 0.2 % while 150 μg/ml at 1.0 % of lipolysed oil in skim milk medium. Conjugated form was analyzed using UV scanning, RP-HPLC, and GC-MS. This study also focused on the alternative use of lipolysed sesame oil instead of costly LA for biohydrogenation and could be a potential source for the industrial production of CLA. PMID:22971829

  5. The deposition of conjugated linoleic acids in eggs of laying hens fed diets varying in fat level and fatty acid profile.

    PubMed

    Raes, Katleen; Huyghebaert, Gerard; De Smet, Stefaan; Nollet, Lode; Arnouts, Sven; Demeyer, Daniel

    2002-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the incorporation of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) into eggs and its effect on the fatty acid metabolism when layers are fed diets with different fat sources and fat levels. Layers were fed either a low fat diet (LF) or one of three high fat diets based on soybean oil (SB), animal fat (AF) or flaxseed oil (FSO). CLA was added at a concentration of 1 g/100 g feed from two different CLA premixes with a different CLA profile. For the trial, 144 laying hens were allocated to 12 treatments (4 basal fat sources x 3 CLA treatments) with 3 replicates of 4 hens each. No significant differences were observed in feed intake, egg weight, feed conversion or laying rate between chickens fed control and CLA-supplemented diets. Differences in yolk fat, cholesterol or yolk color were not clearly related to the dietary CLA. However, the supplementation of CLA to the diets had clear effects on the fatty acid composition, i.e., a decrease in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and an increase in saturated fatty acids (SFA) was observed, whereas the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) content were essentially unaffected. The results suggest that CLA may influence the activity of the desaturases to a different extent in the synthesis of (n-6) and (n-3) long-chain fatty acids. These effects of CLA depend on the level of (n-6) and (n-3) fatty acids available in the feed. The apparent deposition rate (%) is clearly higher for the c9, t11 isomer than for the t10, c12 isomer. Adding CLA to layers diets rich in (n-3) fatty acids produces eggs that could promote the health of the consumer in terms of a higher intake of (n-3) fatty acids and CLA. PMID:11823576

  6. 10E,12Z-conjugated linoleic acid impairs adipocyte triglyceride storage by enhancing fatty acid oxidation, lipolysis, and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    den Hartigh, Laura J.; Han, Chang Yeop; Wang, Shari; Omer, Mohamed; Chait, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a naturally occurring dietary trans fatty acid found in food from ruminant sources. One specific CLA isomer, 10E,12Z-CLA, has been associated with health benefits, such as reduced adiposity, while simultaneously promoting deleterious effects, such as systemic inflammation, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. The precise mechanisms by which 10E,12Z-CLA exerts these effects remain unknown. Despite potential health consequences, CLA continues to be advertised as a natural weight loss supplement, warranting further studies on its effects on lipid metabolism. We hypothesized that 10E,12Z-CLA impairs lipid storage in adipose tissue by altering the lipid metabolism of white adipocytes. We demonstrate that 10E,12Z-CLA reduced triglyceride storage due to enhanced fatty acid oxidation and lipolysis, coupled with diminished glucose uptake and utilization in cultured adipocytes. This switch to lipid utilization was accompanied by a potent proinflammatory response, including the generation of cytokines, monocyte chemotactic factors, and mitochondrial superoxide. Disrupting fatty acid oxidation restored glucose utilization and attenuated the inflammatory response to 10E,12Z-CLA, suggesting that fatty acid oxidation is critical in promoting this phenotype. With further investigation into the biochemical pathways involved in adipocyte responses to 10E,12Z-CLA, we can discern more information about its safety and efficacy in promoting weight loss. PMID:23956445

  7. trans-10,cis-12-Conjugated Linoleic Acid Instigates Inflammation in Human Adipocytes Compared with Preadipocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Kristina; Kennedy, Arion; West, Tiffany; Milatovic, Dejan; Aschner, Michael; McIntosh, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We showed previously in cultures of primary human adipocytes and preadipocytes that lipopolysaccharide and trans-10,cis-12-conjugated linoleic acid (10,12-CLA) activate the inflammatory signaling that promotes insulin resistance. Because our published data demonstrated that preadipocytes are the primary instigators of inflammatory signaling in lipopolysaccharide-treated cultures, we hypothesized that they played the same role in 10,12-CLA-mediated inflammation. To test this hypothesis, we employed four distinct models. In model 1, a differentiation model, CLA activation of MAPK and induction of interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-6, IL-1β, and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) were greatest in differentiated compared with undifferentiated cultures. In model 2, a cell separation model, the mRNA levels of these inflammatory proteins were increased by 10,12-CLA compared with bovine serum albumin vehicle in the adipocyte fraction and the preadipocyte fraction. In model 3, a co-culture insert model, inserts containing ∼50% adipocytes (AD50) or ∼100% preadipocytes (AD0) were suspended over wells containing AD50 or AD0 cultures. 10,12-CLA-induced IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, and COX-2 mRNA levels were highest in AD50 cultures when co-cultured with AD0 inserts. In model 4, a conditioned medium (CM) model, CM collected from CLA-treated AD50 but not AD0 cultures induced IL-8 and IL-6 mRNA levels and activated phosphorylation of MAPK in naive AD0 and AD50 cultures. Consistent with these data, 10,12-CLA-mediated secretions of IL-8 and IL-6 from AD50 cultures were higher than from AD0 cultures. Notably, blocking adipocytokine secretion prevented the inflammatory capacity of CM from 10,12-CLA-treated cultures. These data suggest that CLA instigates the release of inflammatory signals from adipocytes that subsequently activate adjacent preadipocytes. PMID:20353947

  8. Influence of maternal diet enrichment with conjugated linoleic acids on lipoxygenase metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids in serum of their offspring with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene induced mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Białek, Agnieszka; Jelińska, Małgorzata; Tokarz, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), which are a group of naturally occurring in food isomers of linoleic acid, seem to be active in each step of cancer development. There are many possible mechanisms of this action, and interactions with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in lipoxygenase (LOX) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways are among the most likely ones. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of diet supplementation with CLA of pregnant and breastfeeding Sprague-Dawley female rats on selected polyunsaturated fatty acids and their LOX metabolites concentrations in serum of the progeny with chemically induced mammary tumors. We confirmed that higher supply of CLA in the diet of female rats corresponded with the lower susceptibility to chemically induced mammary tumors in their female offspring. It also influenced the polyunsaturated n-3 and n-6 fatty acid concentrations in serum, as well as the concentrations of their LOX metabolites. The significant negative correlation between the concentrations of two CLA isomers in serum and linoleic acid (p=0.0144, p=0.0098), eicosapentaenoic acid (p=0.0158, p=0.0124), and 5-HEPE (p=0.0014, p=0.01690) and between cis-9, trans-11 CLA and 15-HEPE was detected, whereas arachidonic acid concentration positively correlated with CLA concentration in serum (p=0.0150, p=0.0231). Our results indicate that CLA can compete with PUFA and influence serum concentration of PUFA and their LOX metabolites, which could partly explain the anticancerogenic action of CLA.

  9. Screening of Lactobacillus strains for their ability to produce conjugated linoleic acid in milk and to adhere to the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Castañeda, J; Hernández-Mendoza, A; Astiazarán-García, H; Garcia, H S; Estrada-Montoya, M C; González-Córdova, A F; Vallejo-Cordoba, B

    2015-10-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been shown to provide beneficial effects on health; however, the amount consumed in food is far from that required for the desired effects. Thus, increasing the CLA content in dairy foods through milk fermentation with specific lactic acid bacteria (LAB) offers an interesting alternative. Moreover, some LAB may be able to adhere to the intestinal mucosa and produce CLA through endogenous synthesis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to screen LAB isolates for their ability to produce CLA in skim milk and in simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Additionally, the ability of selected CLA-producing LAB to adhere to the intestinal mucosa in a murine model was assessed. Results showed that of 13 strains of Lactobacillus tested, only 4 were able to produce CLA in skim milk supplemented with linoleic acid (13.44 ± 0.78 to 50.9 ± 0.26 µg/mL). Furthermore, these 4 Lactobacillus strains were able to survive and produce CLA in simulated gastrointestinal conditions and to adhere to the intestinal mucosa of Wistar rats after 7 d of oral inoculation with fluorescently labeled bacteria. Accordingly, these 4 Lactobacillus strains may be used to manufacture fermented dairy foods to increase CLA content, and consumption of these fermented milks may result in CLA produced endogenously by these LAB.

  10. c9,t11-Conjugated linoleic acid ameliorates steatosis by modulating mitochondrial uncoupling and Nrf2 pathway[S

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Maria Pina; Trinchese, Giovanna; Cavaliere, Gina; De Filippo, Chiara; Cocca, Ennio; Gaita, Marcello; Della-Gatta, Antonio; Marano, Angela; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Bergamo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, hepatic steatosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction are key pathophysiological features of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. A conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) mixture of cis9,trans11 (9,11-CLA) and trans10,cis12 (10,12-CLA) isomers enhanced the antioxidant/detoxifying mechanism via the activation of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and improved mitochondrial function, but less is known about the actions of specific isomers. The differential ability of individual CLA isomers to modulate these pathways was explored in Wistar rats fed for 4 weeks with a lard-based high-fat diet (L) or with control diet (CD), and, within each dietary treatment, two subgroups were daily administered with 9,11-CLA or 10,12-CLA (30 mg/day). The 9,11-CLA, but not 10,12-CLA, supplementation to CD rats improves the GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver, mitochondrial functions, and Nrf2 activity. Histological examination reveals a reduction of steatosis in L-fed rats supplemented with both CLA isomers, but 9,11-CLA downregulated plasma concentrations of proinflammatory markers, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress markers in liver more efficiently than in 10,12-CLA treatment. The present study demonstrates the higher protective effect of 9,11-CLA against diet-induced pro-oxidant and proinflammatory signs and suggests that these effects are determined, at least in part, by its ability to activate the Nrf2 pathway and to improve the mitochondrial functioning and biogenesis. PMID:24634500

  11. Effect of conjugated linoleic acid on body fat accretion in overweight or obese children123

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Natalie M; Watras, Abigail C; Carrel, Aaron L; Allen, David B; McVean, Jennifer J; Clark, Robert R; O'Brien, Abigail R; O'Shea, Marianne; Scott, Corey E

    2010-01-01

    Background: Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a supplemental dietary fatty acid that decreases fat mass accretion in young animals. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine CLA's efficacy with regard to change in fat and body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) in children. Design: We conducted a 7 ± 0.5-mo randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of CLA in 62 prepubertal children aged 6–10 y who were overweight or obese but otherwise healthy. The subjects were randomly assigned to receive 3 g/d of 80% CLA (50:50 cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 isomers) or placebo in chocolate milk. Results: Fifty-three subjects completed the trial (n = 28 in the CLA group, n = 25 in the placebo group). CLA attenuated the increase in BMI (0.5 ± 0.8) compared with placebo (1.1 ± 1.1) (P = 0.05). The percentage change in body fat measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was smaller (P = 0.001) in the CLA group (−0.5 ± 2.1%) than in the placebo group (1.3 ± 1.8%). The change in abdominal body fat as a percentage of total body weight was smaller (P = 0.02) in the CLA group (−0.09 ± 0.9%) than in the placebo group (0.43 ± 0.6%). There were no significant changes in plasma glucose, insulin, or LDL cholesterol between groups. Plasma HDL cholesterol decreased significantly more (P = 0.05) in the CLA group (−5.1 ± 7.3 mg/dL) than in the placebo group (−0.7 ± 8 mg/dL). Bone mineral accretion was lower (P = 0.04) in the CLA group (0.05 ± 0.03 kg) than in the placebo group (0.07 ± 0.03 kg). Reported gastrointestinal symptoms did not differ significantly between groups. Conclusions: CLA supplementation for 7 ± 0.5 mo decreased body fatness in 6–10-y-old children who were overweight or obese but did not improve plasma lipids or glucose and decreased HDL more than in the placebo group. Long-term investigation of the safety and efficacy of CLA supplementation in children is recommended. PMID:20200257

  12. 21 CFR 184.1065 - Linoleic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Linoleic acid. 184.1065 Section 184.1065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD...-33-3)), a straight chain unsaturated fatty acid with a molecular weight of 280.5, is a colorless...

  13. Effect of Conjugated Linoleic Acid Feeding on the Growth Performance and Meat Fatty Acid Profiles in Broiler: Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sangbuem; Ryu, Chaehwa; Yang, Jinho; Mbiriri, David Tinotenda; Choi, Chang-Weon; Chae, Jung-Il; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shim, Kwan-Seob; Kim, Young Jun; Choi, Nag-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) feeding on growth performance and fatty acid profiles in thigh meat of broiler chicken was investigated using meta-analysis with a total of 9 studies. Overall effects were calculated by standardized mean differences between treatment (CLA fed) and control using Hedges’s adjusted g from fixed and random effect models. Meta-regression was conducted to evaluate the effect of CLA levels. Subgroups in the same study were designated according to used levels of CLA, CP levels or substituted oils in diets. The effects on final body weight, weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio were investigated as growth parameters. Total saturated and unsaturated fatty acid concentrations and C16:0, C18:0, C18:2 and C18:3 concentrations in thigh meat of broiler chicken were used as fatty acid profile parameters. The overall effect of CLA feeding on final weight was negative and it was only significant in fixed effect model (p<0.01). Significantly lower weight gain, feed intake and higher feed conversion ratio compared to control were found (p<0.05). CLA feeding on the overall increased total saturated fatty acid concentration in broilers compared to the control diet (p<0.01). Total unsaturated fatty acid concentration was significantly decreased by CLA feeding (p<0.01). As for individual fatty acid profiles, C16:0, C18:0 and C18:3 were increased and C18:2 was significantly decreased by CLA feeding (p<0.01). In conclusion, CLA was proved not to be beneficial for improving growth performance, whereas it might be supposed that CLA is effective modulating n-6/n-3 fatty acids ratio in thigh meat. However, the economical compensation of the loss from suppressed growth performance and increased saturated fatty acids with the benefit from enhanced n-6/n-3 ratio should be investigated in further studies in order to propose an appropriate use of dietary CLA in the broiler industry. PMID:25049878

  14. Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation for twelve weeks increases lean body mass in obese humans.

    PubMed

    Steck, Susan E; Chalecki, Allison M; Miller, Paul; Conway, Jason; Austin, Gregory L; Hardin, James W; Albright, Craig D; Thuillier, Philippe

    2007-05-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) alters body composition in animal models, but few studies have examined the effects of CLA supplementation on body composition and clinical safety measures in obese humans. In the present study, we performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to examine the changes in body composition and clinical laboratory values following CLA (50:50 ratio of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 isomers) supplementation for 12 wk in otherwise healthy obese humans. Forty-eight participants (13 males and 35 females) were randomized to receive placebo (8 g safflower oil/d), 3.2 g/d CLA, or 6.4 g/d CLA for 12 wk. Changes in body fat mass and lean body mass were determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Resting energy expenditure was assessed by indirect calorimetry. Clinical laboratory values and adverse-event reporting were used to monitor safety. Lean body mass increased by 0.64 kg in the 6.4 g/d CLA group (P < 0.05) after 12 wk of intervention. Significant decreases in serum HDL-cholesterol and sodium, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, and significant increases in serum alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, and IL-6, and white blood cells occurred in the 6.4 g/d CLA group, although all values remained within normal limits. The intervention was well tolerated and no severe adverse events were reported, although mild gastrointestinal adverse events were reported in all treatment groups. In conclusion, whereas CLA may increase lean body mass in obese humans, it may also increase markers of inflammation in the short term.

  15. The effect of conjugated linoleic acid supplements on oxidative and antioxidative status of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hanschke, N; Kankofer, M; Ruda, L; Höltershinken, M; Meyer, U; Frank, J; Dänicke, S; Rehage, J

    2016-10-01

    Dairy cows develop frequently negative energy balance around parturition and in early lactation, resulting in excessive mobilization of body fat and subsequently in increased risk of ketosis and other diseases. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplements are used in dairy cows mainly for their depressing effect on milk fat content, but are also proposed to have antioxidative properties. As negative energy balance is associated with oxidative stress, which is also assumed to contribute to disease development, the present study was conducted to examine effects of CLA on oxidative and antioxidative status of lactating dairy cows. German Holstein cows (primiparous n=13, multiparous n=32) were divided into 3 dietary treatment groups receiving 100g/d of control fat supplement, containing 87% stearic acid (CON; n=14), 50g/d of control fat supplement and 50g/d of CLA supplement (CLA 50; n=15), or 100g/d of CLA supplement (CLA 100; n=16). The CLA supplement was lipid-encapsulated and contained 12% of trans-10,cis-12 CLA and cis-9,trans-11 CLA each. Supplementation took place between d1 and 182 postpartum; d 182 until 252 postpartum served as a depletion period. Blood was sampled at d -21, 1, 21, 70, 105, 140, 182, 224, and 252 relative to calving. The antioxidative status was determined using the ferric-reducing ability of plasma, α-tocopherol, α-tocopherol-to-cholesterol mass ratio, and retinol. For determination of oxidative status concentrations of hydroperoxides, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), N'-formylkynurenine, and bityrosine were measured. Mixed models of fixed and random effects with repeated measures were used to evaluate period 1 (d -21 to 140) and 2 (d182-252) separately. Cows showed increased oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation during the periparturient period in terms of increased serum concentrations of hydroperoxides and TBARS, which decreased throughout lactation. During period 1, the supplemented cows had lower TBARS

  16. The effect of conjugated linoleic acid supplements on oxidative and antioxidative status of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hanschke, N; Kankofer, M; Ruda, L; Höltershinken, M; Meyer, U; Frank, J; Dänicke, S; Rehage, J

    2016-10-01

    Dairy cows develop frequently negative energy balance around parturition and in early lactation, resulting in excessive mobilization of body fat and subsequently in increased risk of ketosis and other diseases. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplements are used in dairy cows mainly for their depressing effect on milk fat content, but are also proposed to have antioxidative properties. As negative energy balance is associated with oxidative stress, which is also assumed to contribute to disease development, the present study was conducted to examine effects of CLA on oxidative and antioxidative status of lactating dairy cows. German Holstein cows (primiparous n=13, multiparous n=32) were divided into 3 dietary treatment groups receiving 100g/d of control fat supplement, containing 87% stearic acid (CON; n=14), 50g/d of control fat supplement and 50g/d of CLA supplement (CLA 50; n=15), or 100g/d of CLA supplement (CLA 100; n=16). The CLA supplement was lipid-encapsulated and contained 12% of trans-10,cis-12 CLA and cis-9,trans-11 CLA each. Supplementation took place between d1 and 182 postpartum; d 182 until 252 postpartum served as a depletion period. Blood was sampled at d -21, 1, 21, 70, 105, 140, 182, 224, and 252 relative to calving. The antioxidative status was determined using the ferric-reducing ability of plasma, α-tocopherol, α-tocopherol-to-cholesterol mass ratio, and retinol. For determination of oxidative status concentrations of hydroperoxides, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), N'-formylkynurenine, and bityrosine were measured. Mixed models of fixed and random effects with repeated measures were used to evaluate period 1 (d -21 to 140) and 2 (d182-252) separately. Cows showed increased oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation during the periparturient period in terms of increased serum concentrations of hydroperoxides and TBARS, which decreased throughout lactation. During period 1, the supplemented cows had lower TBARS

  17. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation under a High-Fat Diet Modulates Stomach Protein Expression and Intestinal Microbiota in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Alice; Parra, Pilar; Serra, Francisca; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract constitutes a physiological interface integrating nutrient and microbiota-host metabolism. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) have been reported to contribute to decreased body weight and fat accretion. The modulation by dietary CLA of stomach proteins related to energy homeostasis or microbiota may be involved, although this has not been previously analysed. This is examined in the present study, which aims to underline the potential mechanisms of CLA which contribute to body weight regulation. Adult mice were fed either a normal fat (NF, 12% kJ content as fat) or a high-fat (HF, 43% kJ content as fat) diet. In the latter case, half of the animals received daily oral supplementation of CLA. Expression and content of stomach proteins and specific bacterial populations from caecum were analysed. CLA supplementation was associated with an increase in stomach protein expression, and exerted a prebiotic action on both Bacteroidetes/Prevotella and Akkermansia muciniphila. However, CLA supplementation was not able to override the negative effects of HF diet on Bifidobacterium spp., which was decreased in both HF and HF+CLA groups. Our data show that CLA are able to modulate stomach protein expression and exert a prebiotic effect on specific gut bacterial species. PMID:25915857

  18. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation under a High-Fat Diet Modulates Stomach Protein Expression and Intestinal Microbiota in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Alice; Parra, Pilar; Serra, Francisca; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract constitutes a physiological interface integrating nutrient and microbiota-host metabolism. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) have been reported to contribute to decreased body weight and fat accretion. The modulation by dietary CLA of stomach proteins related to energy homeostasis or microbiota may be involved, although this has not been previously analysed. This is examined in the present study, which aims to underline the potential mechanisms of CLA which contribute to body weight regulation. Adult mice were fed either a normal fat (NF, 12% kJ content as fat) or a high-fat (HF, 43% kJ content as fat) diet. In the latter case, half of the animals received daily oral supplementation of CLA. Expression and content of stomach proteins and specific bacterial populations from caecum were analysed. CLA supplementation was associated with an increase in stomach protein expression, and exerted a prebiotic action on both Bacteroidetes/Prevotella and Akkermansia muciniphila. However, CLA supplementation was not able to override the negative effects of HF diet on Bifidobacterium spp., which was decreased in both HF and HF+CLA groups. Our data show that CLA are able to modulate stomach protein expression and exert a prebiotic effect on specific gut bacterial species.

  19. Influence of diet enriched with conjugated linoleic acids on their distribution in tissues of rats with DMBA induced tumors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Backround Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are a group of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid with proven beneficial influence on health. They show e.g. anticarcinogenic, antiobesity, and antiatherogenic effect. Milk, dairy products and meat of poligastric animals are their most valuable dietary sources, with cis-9, trans-11 CLA (RA - rumenic acid) being the predominant isomer. Dietary supplements with CLA became very popular, mainly among the overweight and bodybuilders. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of the food supplements with conjugated linoleic acid on carcinogenesis in female Sprague-Dawley rats and evaluation of CLA and other fatty acids distribution in their bodies. Animals were divided into four groups depending on the diet supplementation (oil or Bio-C.L.A. (Pharma Nord Denmark) given intragastrically) and presence or absence of carcinogenic agent (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]antharcene). Animals were decapitated at 21st week of experiment and serum and microsomes were extracted. Results and conclusions The mammary tumours (adenocarcinoma) occurred in groups treated with DMBA. Diet enriched with CLA decreased the cancer morbidity (67% in Bio-C.L.A. compared to 88% in oil) and delayed the cancer induction (p = 0.0018). There were no differences in body and organs weight. The supplement used in the study was a mixture of several fatty acids with the greatest proportion of CLA isomers: trans-10, cis-12 (33%) and cis-9, trans-11 (31%). Both of them were present in tissues but the content of rumenic acid was greater. Dietary supplementation had also significant impact on other fatty acids content, both in serum and in microsomes. PMID:21044306

  20. Antiproliferative Action of Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Human MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by Enhancement of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication through Inactivation of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Rakib, Md. Abdur; Lee, Won Sup; Kim, Gon Sup; Han, Jae Hee; Kim, Jeong Ok

    2013-01-01

    The major conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers, c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA, have anticancer effects; however, the exact mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. Evidence suggests that reversal of reduced gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in cancer cells inhibits cell growth and induces cell death. Hence, we determined that CLA isomers enhance GJIC in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. The CLA isomers significantly enhanced GJIC of MCF-7 cells at 40 μM concentration, whereas CLA inhibited cell growth and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. CLA increased connexin43 (Cx43) expression both at the transcriptional and translational levels. CLA inhibited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. No significant difference was observed in the efficacy of c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA. These results suggest that the anticancer effect of CLA is associated with upregulation of GJIC mediated by enhanced Cx43 expression through inactivation of NF-κB and generation of ROS in MCF-7 cells. PMID:24371460

  1. 21 CFR 582.5065 - Linoleic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Linoleic acid. 582.5065 Section 582.5065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5065 - Linoleic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Linoleic acid. 582.5065 Section 582.5065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5065 - Linoleic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Linoleic acid. 582.5065 Section 582.5065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5065 - Linoleic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Linoleic acid. 582.5065 Section 582.5065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5065 - Linoleic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Linoleic acid. 582.5065 Section 582.5065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1065 - Linoleic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Linoleic acid. 184.1065 Section 184.1065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1065 - Linoleic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Linoleic acid. 184.1065 Section 184.1065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1065 - Linoleic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Linoleic acid. 184.1065 Section 184.1065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1065 - Linoleic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Linoleic acid. 184.1065 Section 184.1065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  10. Effect of conjugated linoleic acid and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on inflammatory and oxidative stress markers in atherosclerotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Hassan Eftekhari, Mohammad; Aliasghari, Fereshte; Babaei-Beigi, Mohammad Ali; Hasanzadeh, Jafar

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity, mortality, and disability in Iranian people. Inflammation and oxidative processes are key components of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) and omega-3 fatty acid (ω-3 fatty acids) supplementation on inflammation markers and oxidative stress in atherosclerotic patients. METHODS This study was a two-month clinical, randomized trial. 90 volunteers who referred to Emam Reza Heart Clinic of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (Shiraz, Iran) from February to March 2011 and had the inclusion criteria of this study were selected. Participants were classified into 3 groups receiving 3 g/d CLA, 1920 mg/d ω-3, or placebo for 2 months. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were measured before and after supplementation. RESULTS The hs-CRP level decreased significantly in both the omega-3 and CLA group (P < 0.05). IL-6 reduced significantly in the ω-3 group, but the reduction of IL-6 levels in the CLA group was not significant. GPx increased in the CLA and omega-3 groups (P < 0.05). MDA level decreased significantly in both omega-3 and CLA groups (P < 0.05). Comparison between the groups indicates a significant change in CRP levels in the ω-3 group relative to the control group. However, other indices did not cause any significant change in the ω-3 and CLA groups in comparison to the control group. CONCLUSION Diet supplementation with CLA and ω-3 can have a beneficial effect on some indices of inflammatory and oxidative stress. PMID:24575132

  11. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid induces lipolysis in adipose tissue of coconut oil-fed mice but not soy oil-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Ippagunta, S; Hadenfeldt, T J; Miner, J L; Hargrave-Barnes, K M

    2011-09-01

    Mice fed diets containing conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) are leaner than mice not fed CLA. This anti-obesity effect is amplified in mice fed coconut oil-containing or fat free diets, compared to soy oil diets. The present objective was to determine if CLA alters lipolysis in mice fed different base oils. Mice were fed diets containing soy oil (SO), coconut oil (CO), or fat free (FF) for 6 weeks, followed by 10 or 12 days of CLA or no CLA supplementation. Body fat, tissue weights, and ex vivo lipolysis were determined. Relative protein abundance and activation of perilipin, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and adipose differentiation related protein (ADRP) were determined by western blotting. CLA feeding caused mice to have less (P < 0.05) body fat than non-CLA fed mice. This was enhanced in CO and FF-fed mice (CLA × oil source, P < 0.05). There was also a CLA × oil source interaction on lipolysis as CO + CLA and FF + CLA-fed mice had increased (P < 0.05) rates of lipolysis but SO + CLA-fed mice did not. However, after 12 days of CLA consumption, activated perilipin was increased (P < 0.05) only in SO + CLA-fed mice and total HSL and ATGL were decreased (P < 0.05) in CO + CLA-fed mice. Therefore, the enhanced CLA-induced body fat loss in CO and FF-fed mice appears to involve increased lipolysis but this effect may be decreasing by 12 days of CLA consumption.

  12. Effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid on the fatty acid profile and cholesterol content of egg yolks from different breeds of layers.

    PubMed

    Yin, J D; Shang, X G; Li, D F; Wang, F L; Guan, Y F; Wang, Z Y

    2008-02-01

    Brown Dwarf hens and White Leghorn hens were fed corn- and soybean meal-based diets containing 0, 2.5, or 5.0% conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) for 56 d to explore the effects of dietary CLA on the fatty acid profile and cholesterol content of egg yolks from laying hens of different breeds. Four hens were placed in 1 cage, and 3 cages were grouped as 1 replicate, resulting in 6 replicates per treatment. After feeding the experimental diets for 11 d, eggs were collected to determine the fatty acid composition of the egg yolks. From d 54 to 56, eggs were collected to measure the cholesterol content of yolks, and on d 56, a hen was selected randomly from each replicate and bled to determine the cholesterol content in plasma. There was a significant effect of layer breed on layer performance and egg composition. Concentrations of stearic, arachidonic, and docosahexaenoic acids were higher in the yolks of Brown Dwarf hens than in those of White Leghorn hens. Enrichment of cis-11, trans-13 was higher in the yolks of White Leghorns, but cis-10, cis-12 was higher in those of Brown Dwarf hens. In contrast, feed intake and egg weight, as well as yolk weight and its ratio to egg, were decreased by the 5% dietary CLA treatment. Egg production and feed efficiency were not affected by dietary CLA. Concentrations of total CLA and CLA isomers in the yolk lipids increased (P < 0.01) with increasing dietary CLA. Furthermore, yolk cholesterol was increased with increasing dietary CLA (P < 0.01), but this was significantly decreased in Brown Dwarf hens (P < 0.01) by feeding 2.5% CLA. There was no apparent correlation between yolk cholesterol content and serum cholesterol content. In conclusion, Brown Dwarf layers had the breed-specific characteristics of enrichment of CLA isomers and fatty acids in yolk lipids in response to dietary CLA. PMID:18212371

  13. The effects of conjugated linoleic acids on breast cancer: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Arab, Arman; Akbarian, Shahab Aldin; Ghiyasvand, Reza; Miraghajani, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Recently prevention strategies for breast cancer are focused on lifestyle modification such as diet. Some dietary factors such as Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) can lower the risk of breast cancer, metastasis and some factors concerning this malignancy. Many studies have been established in this field, but their results are inconsistent. Therefore, we evaluated this association based on systematic review among published scientific literature. We performed an electronic search using PubMed, Cochrane, Scopus, Google Scholar and Persian database (Iran Medex, magiran) to identify relevant studies. We summarized the findings of 8 papers in this review. Although, three cohort studies were not overall identified a protective effect of CLA dietary intake or CLA content in breast tissue on breast cancer incidence, metastasis and death, one of them showed an inverse association after adjusting for age. Also, among case-control studies a weak inverse association between breast cancer risk and CLA dietary intake and serum levels among post-menopausal women was reported. Besides, a clinical trial showed that some indicator of breast tumor decreased after CLA administration among women with breast adenocarcinoma. Lacking published evidence suggested inconsistent results. So, further well-designed studies are required, particularly in considering the main breast cancer risk factors. PMID:27512684

  14. The effects of conjugated linoleic acids on breast cancer: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Arman; Akbarian, Shahab Aldin; Ghiyasvand, Reza; Miraghajani, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Recently prevention strategies for breast cancer are focused on lifestyle modification such as diet. Some dietary factors such as Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) can lower the risk of breast cancer, metastasis and some factors concerning this malignancy. Many studies have been established in this field, but their results are inconsistent. Therefore, we evaluated this association based on systematic review among published scientific literature. We performed an electronic search using PubMed, Cochrane, Scopus, Google Scholar and Persian database (Iran Medex, magiran) to identify relevant studies. We summarized the findings of 8 papers in this review. Although, three cohort studies were not overall identified a protective effect of CLA dietary intake or CLA content in breast tissue on breast cancer incidence, metastasis and death, one of them showed an inverse association after adjusting for age. Also, among case-control studies a weak inverse association between breast cancer risk and CLA dietary intake and serum levels among post-menopausal women was reported. Besides, a clinical trial showed that some indicator of breast tumor decreased after CLA administration among women with breast adenocarcinoma. Lacking published evidence suggested inconsistent results. So, further well-designed studies are required, particularly in considering the main breast cancer risk factors. PMID:27512684

  15. The conjugated linoleic acid isomer trans-9,trans-11 is a dietary occurring agonist of liver X receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, Josef; Liebisch, Gerhard; Patsch, Wolfgang; Schmitz, Gerd

    2009-10-30

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers are dietary fatty acids that modulate gene expression in many cell types. We have previously reported that specifically trans-9,trans-11 (t9,t11)-CLA induces expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism of human macrophages. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this transcriptional activation, we asked whether t9,t11-CLA affects activity of liver X receptor (LXR) {alpha}, a major regulator of macrophage lipid metabolism. Here we show that t9,t11-CLA is a regulator of LXR{alpha}. We further demonstrate that the CLA isomer induces expression of direct LXR{alpha} target genes in human primary macrophages. Knockdown of LXR{alpha} with RNA interference in THP-1 cells inhibited t9,t11-CLA mediated activation of LXR{alpha} including its target genes. To evaluate the effective concentration range of t9,t11-CLA, human primary macrophages were treated with various doses of CLA and well known natural and synthetic LXR agonists and mRNA expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 was analyzed. Incubation of human macrophages with 10 {mu}M t9,t11-CLA led to a significant modulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1 transcription and caused enhanced cholesterol efflux to high density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein AI. In summary, these data show that t9,t11-CLA is an agonist of LXR{alpha} in human macrophages and that its effects on macrophage lipid metabolism can be attributed to transcriptional regulations associated with this nuclear receptor.

  16. Effect of whole linseed and rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid enriched diets on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and adipose tissue development in young Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Albertí, P; Gómez, I; Mendizabal, J A; Ripoll, G; Barahona, M; Sarriés, V; Insausti, K; Beriain, M J; Purroy, A; Realini, C

    2013-06-01

    Forty-eight young Holstein bulls (slaughtered at 458.6±9.79 kg body weight) were used to evaluate the effect of whole linseed and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation on animal performance, adipose tissue development, and carcass characteristics. The animals were fed with one of four isoenergetic and isoproteic diets: control (0% linseed, 0% CLA), linseed (10% linseed, 0% CLA), CLA (0% linseed, 2% CLA), and linseed plus CLA (10% linseed, 2% CLA). Animal performance and carcass characteristics were unaffected by diet composition. Adding linseed or CLA to the concentrate diet did not result in significant differences in adipocyte size and number or lipogenic enzyme activity. However, while the frequency distribution of subcutaneous adipocyte diameters followed a normal distribution, the frequency distribution of intramuscular adipocyte diameters was not normal in any dietary group (skewness coefficients: 0.8, 1.2, 0.9, 0.8 for control, linseed, CLA, and linseed plus CLA, respectively; P<0.05), indicative of adipocyte proliferation in the intramuscular adipose tissue.

  17. Effect of trans, trans CLA egg enrichment from CLA-rich soy oil on yolk fatty acid composition, viscosity and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Sara E; Gilley, Alex D; Proctor, Andrew; Anthony, Nicolas B

    2015-03-11

    CLA egg accumulation studies using cis, trans (c,t) isomers have been effective, but they reported adverse egg quality. trans, trans (t,t) CLA isomers have shown superior nutritional effects in rodent studies, but reports of t,t CLA-rich yolks are limited. The objectives were to determine the effect of t,t CLA-rich soy oil in feed on egg yolk viscosity, and yolk quality during refrigerated storage. Yolk fatty acids, viscosity, weight, index, moisture, pH, and vitelline membrane strength (VMS) were determined at 0, 20, and 30 storage days. CLA had minimal effect on fatty acid profiles, relative to c,t reports. CLA-rich yolk viscosity was greater than controls, and CLA yolks maintained higher viscosities during storage. Yolk weight and index were not affected by t,t CLA-rich soy oil. Yolks with the greatest CLA concentrations had the greatest VMS after 20 days of storage, and yolks containing lower CLA levels maintained greater VMS throughout 30 days of storage, relative to controls.

  18. Growth performance, carcass characteristics, fatty acid composition and CLA concentrations of lambs fed diets supplemented with different oil sources.

    PubMed

    Badee, Ghlailat; Hidaka, Satoshi

    2014-02-01

    Quality food for human consumption will always be the aim for animal producers. Quantity and composition of fat deposits (fatty acid profile) strongly influences meat quality in ruminants, especially via increasing conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) concentration, which is known to have beneficial anticarcinogenic, antiatherogenic, antidiabetic and cholesterol reduction properties for human health. Awassi lambs are one of the main and most consumed meat sources in the Middle East area; however, studies addressing the fat content of CLA and methods to enhance its concentrations in this breed are still rare. For this reason, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding two different oil sources (soybean oil (SBO) and sunflower oil (SFO) at two levels (1.8 and 3%)) on growth performance, carcass characteristics and fatty acid profile of fat in Awassi lambs. Oil supplementation had no effect on growth performance or carcass characteristics, while fatty acid composition changed according to the site of extraction. CLA concentrations were increased in the tail fat deposit, with 1.8% SBO and in intermuscular fat deposit with 3% SFO. Intermuscular fat is the one most naturally consumed by humans, serving to improve food quality.

  19. Apoptosis induced by t10,c12-conjugated linoleic acid is mediated by an atypical endoplasmic reticulum stress response*

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Lihui; Wu, Yue; Ip, Clement; Meng, Xiaojing; Hsu, Yung-Chun; Ip, Margot M.

    2008-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits rat mammary carcinogenesis, in part by inducing apoptosis of preneoplastic and neoplastic mammary epithelial cells. The current study focused on the mechanism by which apoptosis is induced. In TM4t mammary tumor cells, trans-10,cis-12 (t10,c12)-CLA induced proapoptotic C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP) concurrent with the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Knockdown of CHOP attenuated t10,c12-CLA-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, t10,c12-CLA induced the cleavage of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident caspase-12, and a selective inhibitor of caspase-12 significantly alleviated t10,c12-CLA-induced apoptosis. Using electron microscopy, we observed that t10,c12-CLA treatment resulted in marked dilatation of the ER lumen. Together, these data suggest that t10,c12-CLA induces apoptosis through ER stress. To further explore the ER stress pathway, we examined the expression of the following upstream ER stress signature markers in response to CLA treatment: X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA (unspliced and spliced), phospho-eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), and BiP proteins. We found that t10,c12-CLA induced the expression and splicing of XBP1 mRNA as well as the phosphorylation of eIF2α. In contrast, ATF4 was induced modestly, but not significantly, and BiP was not altered. In summary, our data demonstrate that apoptosis induced by t10,c12-CLA is mediated, at least in part, through an atypical ER stress response that culminates in the induction of CHOP and the cleavage of caspase-12. PMID:18263853

  20. Enhancement of ajoene-induced apoptosis by conjugated linoleic acid in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Della-Fera, Mary Anne; Hausman, Dorothy B; Baile, Clifton A

    2007-06-01

    Ajoene has been shown to induce apoptosis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In this report the effects on apoptosis of combinations of ajoene and trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (t10,c12CLA) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes were investigated. Although t10,c12CLA alone had no effect, ajoene plus t10,c12CLA reduced cell viability more than ajoene alone at 24 h (59.1 vs. 85.9% of control, respectively; p<0.05). Compared to treatment with t10,c12CLA, ajoene increased apoptosis 218% after 24 h (p<0.01), whereas ajoene plus t10,c12CLA increased apoptosis 122% over that caused by ajoene alone (p<0.01). Immunoblotting analysis also indicated that ajoene plus t10,c12CLA caused a greater increase in phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Bax expression and a greater release of mitochondrial proteins (cytochrome c, AIF) than additive responses to each compound alone. Ajoene plus t10,c12CLA also increased ROS production more than that resulting from ajoene treatment alone (264 vs 204% after 40 min, respectively; p<0.01). Furthermore, the antioxidant NAC prevented ROS generation and apoptosis by ajoene plus t10,c12CLA. Interestingly, the combination of ajoene and t10,c12CLA increased NF-kappaB activation and decreased the level of phosphorylated Akt more than each compound alone. Altogether, our observations indicate that t10,c12CLA potentiates the effect of ajoene on apoptosis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  1. Implication of fermentable carbohydrates targeting the gut microbiota on conjugated linoleic acid production in high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Druart, Céline; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Dewulf, Evelyne M; De Backer, Fabienne C; Possemiers, Sam; Van de Wiele, Tom; Moens, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc; Cani, Patrice D; Larondelle, Yvan; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2013-09-28

    In vitro experiments have shown that isolated human gut bacteria are able to metabolise PUFA into conjugated PUFA like conjugated linoleic acids (CLA). The hypothesis of the present paper was that high-fat (HF) diet feeding and supplementation with fermentable carbohydrates that have prebiotic properties modulate the in vivo production of CLA by the mouse gut microbiota. Mice were treated for 4 weeks as follows: control (CT) groups were fed a standard diet; HF groups were fed a HF diet rich in linoleic acid (18 : 2n-6); the third groups were fed with the HF diet supplemented with either inulin-type fructans (HF-ITF) or arabinoxylans (HF-Ax). HF diet feeding increased rumenic acid (cis-9,trans-11-18 : 2 CLA) content both in the caecal and liver tissues compared with the CT groups. ITF supplementation had no major effect compared with the HF diet whereas Ax supplementation increased further rumenic acid (cis-9,trans-11-18 : 2 CLA) in the caecal tissue. These differences between both prebiotics may be linked to the high fat-binding capacity of Ax that provides more substrates for bacterial metabolism and to differential modulation of the gut microbiota (specific increase in Roseburia spp. in HF-Ax v. HF). In conclusion, these experiments supply the proof of concept that the mouse gut microbiota produces CLA in vivo, with consequences on the level of CLA in the caecal and liver tissues. We postulate that the CLA-producing bacteria could be a mediator to consider in the metabolic effects of both HF diet feeding and prebiotic supplementation.

  2. Anti-diabetic Effect of Fermented Milk Containing Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Sun; Lee, Sang-Cheon; Huh, Chang-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a group of positional and geometric isomers of conjugated dienoic derivatives of linoleic acid. CLA has been reported to be able to reduce body fat. In this study, we investigated the antidiabetic effect of fermented milk (FM) containing CLA on type II diabetes db/db mice. Mice were treated with 0.2% low FM, 0.6% high FM, or Glimepiride (GLM) for 6 wk. Our results revealed that the body weight and the levels of fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, and leptin were significantly decreased in FM fed mice compared to db/db mice. Oral glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance were significantly ameliorated in FM fed mice compared to db/db mice. Consistent with these results, the concentrations of serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL cholesterol were also significantly decreased in FM fed mice compared to db/db mice. However, the concentration of HDL cholesterol was significantly higher in FM fed mice compared to db/db mice. These results were similar to those of GLM, a commercial anti-diabetic drug. Therefore, our results suggest that FM has anti-diabetic effect as a functional food to treat type II diabetes mellitus. PMID:27194924

  3. Anti-diabetic Effect of Fermented Milk Containing Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Type II Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Song, Kibbeum; Song, In-Bong; Gu, Hye-Jung; Na, Ji-Young; Kim, Sokho; Yang, Hee-Sun; Lee, Sang-Cheon; Huh, Chang-Ki; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a group of positional and geometric isomers of conjugated dienoic derivatives of linoleic acid. CLA has been reported to be able to reduce body fat. In this study, we investigated the antidiabetic effect of fermented milk (FM) containing CLA on type II diabetes db/db mice. Mice were treated with 0.2% low FM, 0.6% high FM, or Glimepiride (GLM) for 6 wk. Our results revealed that the body weight and the levels of fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, and leptin were significantly decreased in FM fed mice compared to db/db mice. Oral glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance were significantly ameliorated in FM fed mice compared to db/db mice. Consistent with these results, the concentrations of serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL cholesterol were also significantly decreased in FM fed mice compared to db/db mice. However, the concentration of HDL cholesterol was significantly higher in FM fed mice compared to db/db mice. These results were similar to those of GLM, a commercial anti-diabetic drug. Therefore, our results suggest that FM has anti-diabetic effect as a functional food to treat type II diabetes mellitus. PMID:27194924

  4. Analysis of possible influence of conjugated linoleic acid on growth performance and losses of piglets.

    PubMed

    Hadaš, Z; Čechová, M; Nevrkla, P

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of supplementing the feed ration for lactating sows with the conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on the growth performance and losses of piglets from birth to weaning. The monitoring comprised 20 litters in control and 20 litters in experimental group of Czech Large White × Czech Landrace hybrid combination sows. The control group was given a standard feed mixture for lactating sows, and experimental group was fed with the feed mixture supplemented with 2% of CLA, from the day of farrowing to the weaning of piglets, that is for the time of 28 days. The results of the experiment indicate the significantly better parameters of the numbers of reared piglets in the experimental group and the related lower level of losses of piglets from birth to weaning (p < 0.01). However, the feed mixture for lactating sows enriched in conjugated linoleic acid had no significant effect on the growth performance of piglets from birth to weaning (p > 0.05). Sows in the experimental group showed earlier onset of post-partal oestrus after weaning of piglets (p < 0.05). These findings demonstrate that the supplementation of diet for lactating sows with CLA can improve survival of piglets from birth to weaning and shortening of weaning-to-oestrous interval in sows.

  5. Optimization of conjugated linoleic acid triglycerides via enzymatic esterification in no-solvent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Dan; Sun, Xiuqin; Li, Guangyou; Liu, Fayi; Lin, Xuezheng; Shen, Jihong

    2009-09-01

    We compared four esterifiable enzymes. The lipase Novozym 435 possessed the highest activity for the conjugated linoleic acid esterification during the synthesis of triglycerides. The triglycerides were synthesized by esterification of glycerol and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in a no-solvent system using lipase catalysis. We investigated the effects of temperature, enzyme concentration, water content, and time on esterification. Enzyme and water concentrations of up to 1% of the total reaction volume and a system temperature of 60°C proved optimal for esterification. Similarly, when the esterification was carried out for 24 h, the reaction ratio improved to 94.11%. The esterification rate of the rotating screen basket remained high (87.28%) when the enzyme was re-used for the 5th time. We evaluated the substrate selectivity of lipase (NOVO 435) and determined that this lipase prefers the 10,12-octadacadienoic acid to the 9,11-octadecadienoic acid.

  6. Dietary conjugated linoleic acids increase intramuscular fat deposition and decrease subcutaneous fat deposition in Yellow Breed × Simmental cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibo; Dong, Xianwen; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhou, Aiming; Peng, Quanhui; Zou, Huawei; Xue, Bai; Wang, Lizhi

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the effect of dietary conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) on intramuscular and subcutaneous fat deposition in Yellow Breed × Simmental cattle. The experiment was conducted for 60 days. The results showed that the average backfat thickness, (testicles + kidney + pelvic) fat percentage and subcutaneous fat percentage in dietary CLA were significantly lower than in the control group, while intramuscular the fat percentage was significantly higher. Compared to the control group, the Longissimus muscle enzyme activities of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) in dietary CLA and the subcutaneous fat enzyme activities of LPL, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) were significantly increased. Similarly, compared to the control group, the Longissimus muscle sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1), FAS, stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD), ACC, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), heart fatty-acid binding protein (H-FABP) and LPL gene expression in dietary CLA were significant increased, as were the subcutaneous fat of PPARγ, H-FABP, LPL, CPT-1 and HSL in dietary CLA. These results indicated that dietary CLA increases IMF deposition mainly by the up-regulation of lipogenic gene expression, while decreasing subcutaneous fat deposition mainly by the up-regulation of lipolytic gene expression.

  7. Enzymatic synthesis of extremely pure triacylglycerols enriched in conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Wang, Weifei; Xu, Yang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2013-01-01

    This work was objectively targeted to synthesize extremely pure triacylglycerols (TAG) enriched in conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) for medical and dietetic purposes. Extremely pure CLA-enriched TAG was successfully synthesized by using the multi-step process: TAG was primarily synthesized by lipase-catalyzed esterification of CLA and glycerol and then the lower glycerides [monoacylglycerol (MAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG)] in the esterification mixtures was hydrolyzed to free fatty acids (FFAs) by a mono- and di-acylglycerol lipase (lipase SMG1), finally, the FFAs were further separated from TAG by low temperature (150 °C) molecular distillation. The operation parameters for the lipase SMG1-catalyzed hydrolysis were optimized using response surface methodology based on the central composite rotatable design (CCRD). The operation parameters included water content, pH and reaction temperature and all of these three parameters showed significant effects on the hydrolysis of lower glycerides. The optimal conditions were obtained with a water content of 66.4% (w/w, with respect to oil mass), pH at 5.7 and 1 h of reaction time at 19.6 °C. Under these conditions, the content of lower glycerides in the reaction mixture decreased from 45.2% to 0.3% and the purity of CLA-enriched TAG reached 99.7%. Further purification of TAG was accomplished by molecular distillation and the final CLA-enriched TAG product yielded 99.8% of TAG. These extremely pure CLA-enriched TAG would be used for in vivo studies in animals and humans in order to get specific information concerning CLA metabolism. PMID:23945644

  8. Enzymatic synthesis of extremely pure triacylglycerols enriched in conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Wang, Weifei; Xu, Yang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2013-08-13

    This work was objectively targeted to synthesize extremely pure triacylglycerols (TAG) enriched in conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) for medical and dietetic purposes. Extremely pure CLA-enriched TAG was successfully synthesized by using the multi-step process: TAG was primarily synthesized by lipase-catalyzed esterification of CLA and glycerol and then the lower glycerides [monoacylglycerol (MAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG)] in the esterification mixtures was hydrolyzed to free fatty acids (FFAs) by a mono- and di-acylglycerol lipase (lipase SMG1), finally, the FFAs were further separated from TAG by low temperature (150 °C) molecular distillation. The operation parameters for the lipase SMG1-catalyzed hydrolysis were optimized using response surface methodology based on the central composite rotatable design (CCRD). The operation parameters included water content, pH and reaction temperature and all of these three parameters showed significant effects on the hydrolysis of lower glycerides. The optimal conditions were obtained with a water content of 66.4% (w/w, with respect to oil mass), pH at 5.7 and 1 h of reaction time at 19.6 °C. Under these conditions, the content of lower glycerides in the reaction mixture decreased from 45.2% to 0.3% and the purity of CLA-enriched TAG reached 99.7%. Further purification of TAG was accomplished by molecular distillation and the final CLA-enriched TAG product yielded 99.8% of TAG. These extremely pure CLA-enriched TAG would be used for in vivo studies in animals and humans in order to get specific information concerning CLA metabolism.

  9. Effect of cooking methods on fatty acids, conjugated isomers of linoleic acid and nutritional quality of beef intramuscular fat.

    PubMed

    Alfaia, Cristina M M; Alves, Susana P; Lopes, Anabela F; Fernandes, Maria J E; Costa, Ana S H; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Castro, Matilde L F; Bessa, Rui J B; Prates, José A M

    2010-04-01

    The effect of boiling, microwaving and grilling on the composition and nutritional quality of beef intramuscular fat from cattle fed with two diets was investigated. Longissimus lumborum muscle from 15 Alentejano young bulls fed on concentrate or pasture was analyzed. Cooking losses and, consequently, total lipids, increased directly with the cooking time and internal temperature reached by meat (microwaving>boiling>grilling). The major changes in fatty acid composition, which implicated 16 out of 34 fatty acids, resulted in higher percentages in cooked beef of SFA and MUFA and lower proportions of PUFA, relative to raw meat, while conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers revealed a great stability to thermal processes. Heating decreased the PUFA/SFA ratio of meat but did not change its n-6/n-3 index. Thermal procedures induced only slight oxidative changes in meat immediately after treatment but hardly affected the true retention values of its individual fatty acids (72-168%), including CLA isomers (81-128%).

  10. Metabolic regulation of fatty acid esterification and effects of conjugated linoleic acid on glucose homeostasis in pig hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Conde-Aguilera, J A; Lachica, M; Nieto, R; Fernández-Fígares, I

    2012-02-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) are geometric and positional isomers of linoleic acid (LA) that promote growth, alter glucose metabolism and decrease body fat in growing animals, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. A study was conducted to elucidate the effects of CLA on glucose metabolism, triglyceride (TG) synthesis and IGF-1 synthesis in primary culture of porcine hepatocytes. In addition, hormonal regulation of TG and IGF-1 synthesis was addressed. Hepatocytes were isolated from piglets (n = 5, 16.0 ± 1.98 kg average body weight) by collagenase perfusion and seeded into collagen-coated T-25 flasks. Hepatocytes were cultured in William's E containing dexamethasone (10-8 and 10-7 M), insulin (10 and 100 ng/ml), glucagon (0 and 100 ng/ml) and CLA (1 : 1 mixture of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA, 0.05 and 0.10 mM) or LA (0.05 and 0.10 mM). Addition of CLA decreased gluconeogenesis (P < 0.05), whereas glycogen synthesis and degradation, TG synthesis and IGF-1 synthesis were not affected compared with LA. Increased concentration of fatty acids in the media decreased IGF-1 production (P < 0.001) and glycogen synthesis (P < 0.01), and increased gluconeogenesis (P < 0.001) and TG synthesis (P < 0.001). IGF-1 synthesis increased (P < 0.001) and TG synthesis decreased (P < 0.001) as dexamethasone concentration in the media rose. High insulin/glucagon increased TG synthesis. These results indicate that TG synthesis in porcine hepatocytes is hormonally regulated so that dexamethasone decreases and insulin/glucagon increases it. In addition, CLA decreases hepatic glucose production through decreased gluconeogenesis.

  11. Occurrence of conjugated linoleic acid in longissimus dorsi muscle of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and zebu-type cattle raised under savannah conditions.

    PubMed

    de Mendoza, M Giuffrida; de Moreno, L Arenas; Huerta-Leidenz, N; Uzcátegui-Bracho, S; Beriain, M J; Smith, G C

    2005-01-01

    Lipid extracts from longissimus dorsi muscles of 64 water buffaloes and 68 zebu-type cattle were used to quantify the amount (mg/g of lipids) of total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), CLA isomers c9, t11 and t10, c12 and linoleic acid (LA), according to species (buffaloes and cattle), age (slaughter groups at 7, 17, 19 or 24 months of age) and gender (bulls and steers). The effects of gender and age were significant (P<0.05) but marginal. Comparisons of lipid extracts from buffaloes vs. cattle showed that total CLA (1.83 vs. 1.47 mg/g), CLA c9, t11 (1.27 vs. 1.01 mg/g) and CLA t10, c12 (0.56 vs. 0.47 mg/g) isomers as well as the CLA/LA ratio (0.10 vs. 0.07) were higher (P<0.05) in buffalo lipids. Considering the sparingly low lipid concentrations (<2 g/100 g of fresh muscle) none of the meat species should be considered a significant source of CLA.

  12. c9, t11- conjugated linoleic acid induces HCC cell apoptosis and correlation with PPAR-γ signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guozhong; Zhang, Guoqing; Zheng, Xing; Zeng, Yan; Xu, Ziqi; Zeng, Weichi; Wang, Kebing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Cis9, trans11 conjugated linoleic acid (c9, t11-CLA.) is one of the most important isomers of conjugated linoleic acid, which have a strong anti-tumor effects. Based on previous studies, we further explored the molecular mechanism of inducing cells apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 and Hep3B. Methods: Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK-8) assay was used to investigate the effects of c9, t11-CLA on cell viability and cell proliferation ability; The effects of c9, t11-CLA on cell apoptosis was analyzed by DNA ladder assay, immuno-fluorescence and flow cytometry, respectively. Apoptotic related gene (Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bcl-w, Mcl-1, Bax, Bak, Bad, Bid and Bim), PPAR family member (PPAR-α, PPAR-β and PPAR-γ), and Cox2 mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by RT-PCR and western blotting. ELISA assay was used to detect the content of Caspase-3. Results: Our data were confirmed that c9, t11-CLA could inhibit the HCC cells proliferation ability and decrease the cells viability. RT-PCR and western blotting assay verified that c9, t11-CLA obviously increased the transcription and protein expression levels of PPAR-γ. The synchronism and correlation between PPAR-γ and apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3 were found with a dose- and time-dependent manner. PPAR-γ inhibitor GW9662 and activator Rosilitazone were further verified that there was cooperative relation between them. Conclusion: In our study, we first report that c9, t11-CLA induces apoptosis in HCC cells by activation of PPARγ-Bcl-2-Caspase-3 signal pathway. These results indicated that c9, t11-CLA will be useful for clinic therapy of anti-tumor and as a new regulator of PPAR-γ in the future. PMID:26885272

  13. Impact of hedonic evaluation on consumers' preferences for beef attributes including its enrichment with n-3 and CLA fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yasmina; Kallas, Zein; Costa-Font, Montserrat; Gil, José María; Realini, Carolina E

    2016-01-01

    The impact of hedonic evaluation on consumers' preferences for beef attributes was evaluated (origin, animal diet, fat content, color, price) including its enrichment with omega-3 (n-3) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fatty acids. One group of consumers (n=325) received information about n-3 and CLA, while the other group (n=322) received no information. Consumers conducted a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE), using the recently developed Generalized Multinomial Logit model; followed by a blind hedonic evaluation of beef samples, which were identified after tasting, and finally repeated the DCE. Results showed that hedonic evaluation had a significant impact on consumers' preferences, which were similar after tasting for all consumers, with less emphasis on the fat content, color, and origin attributes and greater emphasis on animal diet. Preference for n-3 enriched beef increased, while preference for CLA enriched beef was still not significant after tasting. The information provided had a significant effect on consumers' beef preferences, but no significant impact on beef liking scores.

  14. Impact of hedonic evaluation on consumers' preferences for beef attributes including its enrichment with n-3 and CLA fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yasmina; Kallas, Zein; Costa-Font, Montserrat; Gil, José María; Realini, Carolina E

    2016-01-01

    The impact of hedonic evaluation on consumers' preferences for beef attributes was evaluated (origin, animal diet, fat content, color, price) including its enrichment with omega-3 (n-3) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fatty acids. One group of consumers (n=325) received information about n-3 and CLA, while the other group (n=322) received no information. Consumers conducted a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE), using the recently developed Generalized Multinomial Logit model; followed by a blind hedonic evaluation of beef samples, which were identified after tasting, and finally repeated the DCE. Results showed that hedonic evaluation had a significant impact on consumers' preferences, which were similar after tasting for all consumers, with less emphasis on the fat content, color, and origin attributes and greater emphasis on animal diet. Preference for n-3 enriched beef increased, while preference for CLA enriched beef was still not significant after tasting. The information provided had a significant effect on consumers' beef preferences, but no significant impact on beef liking scores. PMID:26331961

  15. Intake of butter naturally enriched with cis9,trans11 conjugated linoleic acid reduces systemic inflammatory mediators in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Penedo, Letícia A; Nunes, Juliana C; Gama, Marco Antônio S; Leite, Paulo Emilio C; Quirico-Santos, Thereza F; Torres, Alexandre G

    2013-12-01

    A conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) depletion-repletion study was carried out to investigate the effects of dietary c9,t11 CLA on C-reactive protein, transcription factor NFκB, metalloproteinases 2 and 9, inflammatory mediators (adiponectin, TNFα, IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IL-10), body composition, and erythrocyte membrane composition in healthy normal-weight human adults. CLA depletion was achieved through an 8-week period of restricted dairy fat intake (depletion phase; CLA intake was 5.2±5.8 mg/day), followed by an 8-week period in which individuals consumed 20 g/day of butter naturally enriched with c9,t11 CLA (repletion phase; CLA intake of 1020±167 mg/day). The participants were 29 healthy adult volunteers (19 women and 10 men, aged 22 to 36 years), with body mass index between 18.0 and 29.9 kg m(-2). Blood samples were collected at baseline and at the end of both depletion and repletion phases. The content of CLA in erythrocytes decreased during CLA-depletion and increased during CLA-repletion. Intake of CLA-enriched butter increased the serum levels of anti-inflammatory IL-10 but reduced transcription factor NFκB in blood and serum levels of TNFα, IL-2, IL-8 and inactive metalloproteinase-9. Moreover, reduced activity of metalloproteinases 2 and 9 in serum was observed during the CLA-repletion period. In contrast, intake of CLA-enriched butter had no effects on body composition (DXA analysis) as well as on serum levels of adiponectin, C-reactive protein, and IL-4. Taken together, our results indicate that the intake of a c9,t11 CLA-enriched butter by normal-weight subjects induces beneficial changes in immune modulators associated with sub-clinical inflammation in overweight individuals.

  16. Dietary conjugated linoleic acids as free fatty acids and triacylglycerols similarly affect body composition and energy balance in mice.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, A H M; Javadi, M; Beynen, A C; Kocsis, S; Lankhorst, A E; Lemmens, A G; Mohede, I C M

    2003-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) as triacylglycerols (TAG) or free fatty acids (FFA) on body composition and energy balance in mice. We fed four groups of 5-wk-old Balb-C mice (n = 9) semipurified diets containing either CLA (0.5 g CLA/100 g of diet) or high oleic sunflower oil (HOSF) in the form of FFA or TAG for 42 d. Body composition was determined and the energy in the carcasses, excreta and food was measured in a bomb calorimeter. The amount of body fat was 4.72 +/- 0.95 g (17.9 +/- 2.8%) in the HOSF-FFA group, 2.36 +/- 0.29 g (9.4 +/- 1.0%) in the CLA-FFA mice (mean +/- SD, P < 0.05), 4.76 +/- 0.74 g (18.2 +/- 2.2%) in the HOSF-TAG group and 2.32 +/- 0.38 g (9.3 +/- 1.1%) in the CLA-TAG mice (P < 0.05). The percentage of energy intake that was stored in the body was 3.5 +/- 1.2% in the HOSF-FFA group, 0.6 +/- 0.3% in the CLA-FFA group (P < 0.05), 3.5 +/- 1.1% in the HOSF-TAG group and 0.5 +/- 0.4 in the CLA-TAG mice (P < 0.05). Conversely, the percentage of energy intake that was expended as heat was 89.4 +/- 1.2% in the HOSF-FFA group, 92.4 +/- 0.8% in the CLA-FFA mice (P < 0.05), 89.47 +/- 1.23% in the HOSF-TAG group and 92.2 +/- 0.4% in the CLA-TAG group (P < 0.05). Thus, CLA in the form of FFA or TAG had similar effects on body composition and energy balance.

  17. Dietary conjugated linoleic acids as free fatty acids and triacylglycerols similarly affect body composition and energy balance in mice.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, A H M; Javadi, M; Beynen, A C; Kocsis, S; Lankhorst, A E; Lemmens, A G; Mohede, I C M

    2003-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) as triacylglycerols (TAG) or free fatty acids (FFA) on body composition and energy balance in mice. We fed four groups of 5-wk-old Balb-C mice (n = 9) semipurified diets containing either CLA (0.5 g CLA/100 g of diet) or high oleic sunflower oil (HOSF) in the form of FFA or TAG for 42 d. Body composition was determined and the energy in the carcasses, excreta and food was measured in a bomb calorimeter. The amount of body fat was 4.72 +/- 0.95 g (17.9 +/- 2.8%) in the HOSF-FFA group, 2.36 +/- 0.29 g (9.4 +/- 1.0%) in the CLA-FFA mice (mean +/- SD, P < 0.05), 4.76 +/- 0.74 g (18.2 +/- 2.2%) in the HOSF-TAG group and 2.32 +/- 0.38 g (9.3 +/- 1.1%) in the CLA-TAG mice (P < 0.05). The percentage of energy intake that was stored in the body was 3.5 +/- 1.2% in the HOSF-FFA group, 0.6 +/- 0.3% in the CLA-FFA group (P < 0.05), 3.5 +/- 1.1% in the HOSF-TAG group and 0.5 +/- 0.4 in the CLA-TAG mice (P < 0.05). Conversely, the percentage of energy intake that was expended as heat was 89.4 +/- 1.2% in the HOSF-FFA group, 92.4 +/- 0.8% in the CLA-FFA mice (P < 0.05), 89.47 +/- 1.23% in the HOSF-TAG group and 92.2 +/- 0.4% in the CLA-TAG group (P < 0.05). Thus, CLA in the form of FFA or TAG had similar effects on body composition and energy balance. PMID:14519807

  18. The effect of conjugated linoleic acids and omega-3 fatty acids supplementation on lipid profile in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhari, Mohammad Hassan; Aliasghari, Fereshte; Beigi, Mohammad Ali Babaei; Hasanzadeh, Jafar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the most serious cause of mortality in developed and developing countries. Epidemiological studies indicated that dyslipidemia is the major risk factor of CVD. Dyslipidemia can be modified either by proper lifestyle or medical intervention or by the combination of both. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) and ω3 fatty acids have beneficial effects on plasma lipids and lipoproteins. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CLA and omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3 fatty acids) supplementation on lipid profile in atherosclerosis patient. Materials and Methods: This study was a 2-month clinical randomized trial. Ninety atherosclerotic patients with angiographically diagnosed coronary atherosclerosis who were referred to Emam Reza Heart Clinic of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from February to march 2011 were selected if they fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The participants were randomly classified into 3 groups receiving 3 g/d CLA or 1 920 mg/d ω3 or placebo for 2 months. High-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), and total cholesterol were measured before and after the intervention. This study was a two-month clinical randomized trial. Results: Data were analyzed using SPSS software (SPSS Inc, Chicago, version19). Although CLA did not appear to have a significant effect on TG, ω3 supplementation significantly reduced TG level. Consumption of CLA and ω3 supplementation did not significantly affect HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol. Conclusions: ω3 supplementation significantly reduced TG level but CLA and ω3 did not show significant changes in other indices of lipid profile in atherosclerotic patients. PMID:24600599

  19. Preliminary observations on the effects of milk fortification with conjugated linoleic acid in yogurt preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamon, R. V.; Albert, I.; András, C. D.; Csapó, J.; Ibănescu, C.

    2015-04-01

    The fortification and enrichment of food with health benefic natural or natural identical substances creating new functional foods became an important issue for food researchers and processors. However, often occurs that the obtained products (despite of their health benefic activity) cannot be marketed due to strange or accustomed taste and/or texture. The aim of the research was to elucidate the effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) enrichment of raw milk on the rheological properties of the obtained yogurt. The results show that the values of the complex viscosity at 50 rad.s-1 (correlated with the thickness and sliminess of the food gel structures) of the CLA-enriched yogurt was the lowest among the studied samples, meaning the enriched yogurt is more creamy than the commercial products. These observations gave us the hope that, in this case, the texture of enriched product will not present any drawback related to consumer quality judgment.

  20. Physical and chemical stability of gum arabic-stabilized conjugated linoleic acid oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaolin; Xu, Qiong; Tian, Dazhi; Wang, Nana; Fang, Yapeng; Deng, Zhongyang; Phillips, Glyn O; Lu, Jiang

    2013-05-15

    Oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions have been used as a delivery system to protect conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid, from oxidation. Conventional gum arabic (GA) and two matured gum arabic samples (EM2 and EM10) were used as emulsifiers to prepare CLA-in-water emulsions. The emulsions have optimal physical and chemical stability at gum concentrations of 5% for all three gums. Emulsions with higher gum concentrations are more susceptible to lipid oxidation. This is attributed to reduced physical stability at higher gum concentrations because of the coalescence and depletion-induced flocculation of the emulsion droplets. The prooxidants iron and copper intrinsically contained in the gums could also contribute to this instability. Among the three gums, EM10 provides the most effective protection for CLA both physically and chemically, because of its superior interfacial properties over GA and EM2. PMID:23614832

  1. Physical and chemical stability of gum arabic-stabilized conjugated linoleic acid oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaolin; Xu, Qiong; Tian, Dazhi; Wang, Nana; Fang, Yapeng; Deng, Zhongyang; Phillips, Glyn O; Lu, Jiang

    2013-05-15

    Oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions have been used as a delivery system to protect conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid, from oxidation. Conventional gum arabic (GA) and two matured gum arabic samples (EM2 and EM10) were used as emulsifiers to prepare CLA-in-water emulsions. The emulsions have optimal physical and chemical stability at gum concentrations of 5% for all three gums. Emulsions with higher gum concentrations are more susceptible to lipid oxidation. This is attributed to reduced physical stability at higher gum concentrations because of the coalescence and depletion-induced flocculation of the emulsion droplets. The prooxidants iron and copper intrinsically contained in the gums could also contribute to this instability. Among the three gums, EM10 provides the most effective protection for CLA both physically and chemically, because of its superior interfacial properties over GA and EM2.

  2. Short communication: Effect of conjugated linoleic acid on concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins in milk of lactating ewes.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, J O; Most, E; Eder, K

    2015-10-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are well known as milk fat-reducing feed supplements in diets for lactating ruminants. However, their effects on milk concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins are unknown. This study was performed to investigate the hypothesis that CLA affect the concentrations of retinol and tocopherol in ewe milk. For that purpose, group-housed Merino ewes (101 ± 13.7 kg) nursing twin lambs and fed with a hay:concentrate diet were supplemented with either 45 g of a rumen-protected CLA supplement containing 3.4 g of cis-9,trans-11-CLA and 3.4 g of trans-10,cis-12-CLA (CLA group, n=11) or with 45 g of a hydrogenated vegetable fat (control group, n=12) per ewe per day during the first 6 wk of lactation. Feed intake was recorded daily (concentrate) or weekly (hay) per group. Milk spot samples were collected at the beginning of the experiment (5 ± 2.4 d postpartum) and then weekly after lambs had been separated for 2 h from their mothers. The milk fat content was determined and feed and milk were analyzed for concentrations of α-, γ-, and δ-tocopherol and for retinol by HPLC. Dietary intake of tocopherol and retinol was similar in both groups. Feeding CLA decreased milk fat concentration by 23% on average, and during the first 3 wk of the study milk tocopherol concentration tended to be increased by feeding CLA (+17%), but retinol concentrations were not influenced. When related to milk fat, CLA feeding significantly increased both milk tocopherol (+40%) and retinol (+32%) and these effects were evident during the whole experimental period corresponding to the first half of lactation.

  3. Co-treatment with conjugated linoleic acid and nitrite protects against myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Qipshidze-Kelm, Natia; Piell, Kellianne M; Solinger, Jane C; Cole, Marsha P

    2013-01-01

    According to the CDC, the most common type of heart disease is coronary artery disease, which commonly leads to myocardial infarction (MI). Therapeutic approaches to lessen the resulting cardiovascular injury associated with MI are limited. Recently, MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to act as negative regulators of gene expression by inhibiting mRNA translation and/or stimulating mRNA degradation. A single miRNA can modulate physiological or disease phenotypes by regulating whole functional systems. Importantly, miRNAs can regulate cardiac function, thereby modulating heart muscle contraction, heart growth and morphogenesis. MicroRNA-499 (miRNA-499) is a cardiac-specific miRNA that when elevated causes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, in turn preventing cardiac dysfunction during MI. Previous studies revealed that combination treatment with conjugated linoleic acid (cLA) and nitrite preserved cardiovascular function in mice. Therefore, it was hypothesized that cLA and nitrite may regulate miRNA-499, thus providing cardiac protection during MI. To test this hypothesis, 12-week old mice were treated with cLA (10 mg/kg/d-via osmotic mini-pump) or cLA and nitrite (50 ppm-drinking water) 3 days prior to MI (ligation of the left anterior descending artery). Echocardiography and pressure-volume (PV)-loop analysis revealed that cLA and nitrite-treated MI mice had improved heart function (10 days following MI) compared to untreated MI mice. Treatment with cLA and nitrite significantly induced levels of miRNA-499 compared to untreated MI mice. In addition, treatment with cLA and nitrite abolished MI-induced protein expression of p53 and dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP-1). Moreover, the antioxidant enzyme expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was elevated in MI mice treated with cLA and nitrite compared to untreated MI mice. Confocal imaging on heart tissue confirmed expression the levels of HO-1 and p53. Taken together, these results suggest that therapeutic treatment with cLA

  4. Lipid oxidation stability of omega-3- and conjugated linoleic acid-enriched sous vide chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Narciso-Gaytán, C; Shin, D; Sams, A R; Keeton, J T; Miller, R K; Smith, S B; Sánchez-Plata, M X

    2011-02-01

    Lipid oxidation is known to occur rather rapidly in cooked chicken meat containing relatively high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids. To assess the lipid oxidation stability of sous vide chicken meat enriched with n-3 and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fatty acids, 624 Cobb × Ross broilers were raised during a 6-wk feeding period. The birds were fed diets containing CLA (50% cis-9, trans-11 and 50% trans-10, cis-12 isomers), flaxseed oil (FSO), or menhaden fish oil (MFO), each supplemented with 42 or 200 mg/kg of vitamin E (dl-α-tocopheryl acetate). Breast or thigh meat was vacuum-packed, cooked (74°C), cooled in ice water, and stored at 4.4°C for 0, 5, 10, 15, and 30 d. The lipid oxidation development of the meat was estimated by quantification of malonaldehyde (MDA) values, using the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances analysis. Fatty acid, nonheme iron, moisture, and fat analyses were performed as well. Results showed that dietary CLA induced deposition of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers, increased the proportion of saturated fatty acids, and decreased the proportions of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Flaxseed oil induced higher deposition of C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, and C20:4 fatty acids, whereas MFO induced higher deposition of n-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5), and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6; P < 0.05). Meat lipid oxidation stability was affected by the interaction of either dietary oil or vitamin E with storage day. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were found in the CLA treatment than in the MFO and FSO treatments. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were detected in meat samples from the 200 mg/kg of vitamin E than in meat samples from the 42 mg/kg of vitamin E. Nonheme iron values did not affect (P > 0.05) lipid oxidation development. In conclusion, dietary CLA, FSO, and MFO influenced the fatty acid composition of chicken muscle and the lipid oxidation stability of meat over the storage time. Supranutritional

  5. Lipid oxidation stability of omega-3- and conjugated linoleic acid-enriched sous vide chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Narciso-Gaytán, C; Shin, D; Sams, A R; Keeton, J T; Miller, R K; Smith, S B; Sánchez-Plata, M X

    2011-02-01

    Lipid oxidation is known to occur rather rapidly in cooked chicken meat containing relatively high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids. To assess the lipid oxidation stability of sous vide chicken meat enriched with n-3 and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fatty acids, 624 Cobb × Ross broilers were raised during a 6-wk feeding period. The birds were fed diets containing CLA (50% cis-9, trans-11 and 50% trans-10, cis-12 isomers), flaxseed oil (FSO), or menhaden fish oil (MFO), each supplemented with 42 or 200 mg/kg of vitamin E (dl-α-tocopheryl acetate). Breast or thigh meat was vacuum-packed, cooked (74°C), cooled in ice water, and stored at 4.4°C for 0, 5, 10, 15, and 30 d. The lipid oxidation development of the meat was estimated by quantification of malonaldehyde (MDA) values, using the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances analysis. Fatty acid, nonheme iron, moisture, and fat analyses were performed as well. Results showed that dietary CLA induced deposition of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers, increased the proportion of saturated fatty acids, and decreased the proportions of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Flaxseed oil induced higher deposition of C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, and C20:4 fatty acids, whereas MFO induced higher deposition of n-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5), and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6; P < 0.05). Meat lipid oxidation stability was affected by the interaction of either dietary oil or vitamin E with storage day. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were found in the CLA treatment than in the MFO and FSO treatments. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were detected in meat samples from the 200 mg/kg of vitamin E than in meat samples from the 42 mg/kg of vitamin E. Nonheme iron values did not affect (P > 0.05) lipid oxidation development. In conclusion, dietary CLA, FSO, and MFO influenced the fatty acid composition of chicken muscle and the lipid oxidation stability of meat over the storage time. Supranutritional

  6. Moderate doses of conjugated linoleic acid isomers mix contribute to lowering body fat content maintaining insulin sensitivity and a noninflammatory pattern in adipose tissue in mice.

    PubMed

    Parra, Pilar; Serra, Francisca; Palou, Andreu

    2010-02-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) modulates body composition, especially by reducing adipose tissue. However, despite the increasing knowledge about CLA's beneficial effects on obesity management, the mechanism of action is not yet fully understood. Furthermore, in some human studies fat loss is accompanied by impairment in insulin sensitivity, especially when using the trans-10,cis-12 isomer. The aim of this work was to study the effects of moderate doses of CLA on body fat deposition, cytokine profile and inflammatory markers in mice. Mice were orally treated with a mixture of CLA isomers, cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 (50:50), for 35 days with doses of CLA1 (0.15 g CLA/kg body weight) and CLA2 (0.5 g CLA/kg body weight). CLA had discrete effects on body weight but caused a clear reduction in fat mass (retroperitoneal and mesenteric as the most sensitive depots), although no other tissue weights were affected. Glucose and insulin were not altered by CLA treatment, and maintenance of glucose homeostasis was observed even under insulin overload. The study of gene expression (Emr1, MCP-1, IL-6, TNFalpha, PPARgamma2 and iNOS) either in adipocytes and/or in the stromal vascular fraction indicated that CLA does not lead to the infiltration of macrophages in adipose tissue or to the induction of expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The use of a mixture of both isomers, as well as moderate doses of CLA, is able to induce a reduction of fat gain without an impairment of adipose tissue function while preserving insulin sensitivity.

  7. Does trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid affect the intermediary glucose and energy expenditure of dairy cows due to repartitioning of milk component synthesis?

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Jens; Metzger-Petersen, Katrin; Tröscher, Arnulf H A; Südekum, Karl-Heinz

    2015-11-01

    The overall goal of this study was to evaluate if intermediary energy metabolism of cows fed with trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was modified such that milk-energy compounds were produced with less intermediary energy expenditure as compared to control cows. Published data on supplemented CLA were assembled. The extent was calculated to which the trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomer has an impact on glucose and energy conversion in the mammary gland by modifying glucose equivalent supply and energy required for fatty acid (FA) and fat synthesis, and if this will eventually lead to an improved glucose and energy status of CLA-supplemented high-yielding dairy cows. A possible relationship between CLA supplementation level and milk energy yield response was also studied. Calculations were conducted separately for orally and abomasally administered CLA and based on energy required for supply of glucose equivalents, i.e. lactose, glycerol and NADPH2. Further, modifications of milk FA profile due to CLA supplementation were considered when energy expenditures for FA and fat synthesis were quantified. Differences in yields between control and CLA groups were transformed into glucose energy equivalents. Only abomasal infusion (r(2) = 0.31) but not oral CLA administration (r(2) = 0.11) supplementation to dairy cow diets resulted in less glucose equivalent energy. Modifications of milk FA profiles also saved energy but the relationship with CLA supplementation was weaker for abomasal infusion (r(2) = 0.06) than oral administration (r(2) = 0.38). On average, 10 g/d of abomasally infused trans-10, cis-12 CLA saved 1.1 to 2.3 MJ net energy expressed as glucose equivalents, whereas both positive and negative values were observed when the trans-10, cis-12 CLA was fed to the cows. This study revealed a weak to moderate dose-dependent relationship between the amount of trans-10, cis-12 CLA administered and the amount of energy in glucose equivalents and energy for the

  8. Does trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid affect the intermediary glucose and energy expenditure of dairy cows due to repartitioning of milk component synthesis?

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Jens; Metzger-Petersen, Katrin; Tröscher, Arnulf H A; Südekum, Karl-Heinz

    2015-11-01

    The overall goal of this study was to evaluate if intermediary energy metabolism of cows fed with trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was modified such that milk-energy compounds were produced with less intermediary energy expenditure as compared to control cows. Published data on supplemented CLA were assembled. The extent was calculated to which the trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomer has an impact on glucose and energy conversion in the mammary gland by modifying glucose equivalent supply and energy required for fatty acid (FA) and fat synthesis, and if this will eventually lead to an improved glucose and energy status of CLA-supplemented high-yielding dairy cows. A possible relationship between CLA supplementation level and milk energy yield response was also studied. Calculations were conducted separately for orally and abomasally administered CLA and based on energy required for supply of glucose equivalents, i.e. lactose, glycerol and NADPH2. Further, modifications of milk FA profile due to CLA supplementation were considered when energy expenditures for FA and fat synthesis were quantified. Differences in yields between control and CLA groups were transformed into glucose energy equivalents. Only abomasal infusion (r(2) = 0.31) but not oral CLA administration (r(2) = 0.11) supplementation to dairy cow diets resulted in less glucose equivalent energy. Modifications of milk FA profiles also saved energy but the relationship with CLA supplementation was weaker for abomasal infusion (r(2) = 0.06) than oral administration (r(2) = 0.38). On average, 10 g/d of abomasally infused trans-10, cis-12 CLA saved 1.1 to 2.3 MJ net energy expressed as glucose equivalents, whereas both positive and negative values were observed when the trans-10, cis-12 CLA was fed to the cows. This study revealed a weak to moderate dose-dependent relationship between the amount of trans-10, cis-12 CLA administered and the amount of energy in glucose equivalents and energy for the

  9. Evaluating the trans fatty acid, CLA, PUFA and erucic acid diversity in human milk from five regions in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Fan, Yawei; Zhang, Zhiwu; Yu, Hai; An, Yin; Kramer, John K G; Deng, Zeyuan

    2009-03-01

    Human milk was obtained from 97 healthy lactating women from five different regions in China. Twenty-four hour dietary questionnaire identified the foods consumed that showed distinct differences in food types between cities. The southern and central regions had higher levels of total trans fatty acids (TFA) and conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) in human milk than the northern region. The major isomers in human milk from the northern region were vaccenic and rumenic acids, whereas the other regions had a random distribution of these isomers. This was consistent with the isomer distribution in the refined vegetable oils used and their increased formation during high temperature stir-frying. The human milk composition showed little evidence that partially hydrogenated fats were consumed, except eight mothers in Guangzhou who reported eating crackers, plus four other mothers. The TFA concentration in these human milk samples was higher (2.06-3.96%). The amount of n-6 (1.70-2.24%) and n-3 (0.60-1.47%) highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) in human milk and the resultant ratio (1.43-2.95) showed all mothers in China had an adequate supply of HUFA in their diet. Rapeseed oil was consumed evidenced by erucic acids in human milk. The levels of erucic acid were below internationally accepted limits for human consumption. The levels of undesirable TFA and CLA isomers in human milk are a concern. Efforts to decrease the practice of high temperature stir-frying using unsaturated oils, and a promotion to increase consumption of dairy and ruminant products should be considered in China.

  10. Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid Alters Oxidative Stability and Alleviates Plasma Cholesterol Content in Meat of Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Kumari Ramiah, Suriya; Meng, Goh Yong

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on fatty acid composition, lipoprotein content, lipid peroxidation, and meat colour of broiler chickens. A total of 180 broiler chickens were allocated to 3 dietary treatments (0, 2.5, and 5% Lutrell) and given a standard broiler starter diet and finisher diet. Body weight of chickens and feed intake were recorded weekly. After slaughter, the breast meat was aged at 4°C for 0, 3, and 6 days. The fatty acid composition was measured in the breast meat. Body weight (BW) and feed efficiency were decreased by dietary CLA level (P < 0.05). Chicken fed with 2.5% Lutrell had the highest feed intake compared to the control (CON) group. The total CLA increased significantly (P < 0.05) in breast meat from birds supplemented with CLA. Propensity for lipid peroxidation was significantly higher after 6 days of meat storage (P < 0.05) and the redness in chicken breast meat was lower in CLA-fed birds (P < 0.05). It is also notable that a 5% Lutrell supplementation decreased the plasma total cholesterol (TC), low density protein (LDL), and HDL (high-density lipoprotein)/LDL ratio in chickens (P < 0.05). PMID:25386625

  11. 76 FR 32332 - BASF Corp.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use); Methyl Esters of Conjugated Linoleic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... (Animal Use); Methyl Esters of Conjugated Linoleic Acid; Silicon Dioxide AGENCY: Food and Drug... for the safe use of methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) as a source of fatty acids in... part 573) to provide for the safe use of methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11...

  12. Effect of linoleic acid and dietary vitamin E supplementation on sustained conjugated linoleic acid production in milk fat from dairy cows.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell-Megaro, A M; Capper, J L; Weiss, W P; Bauman, D E

    2012-12-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA; cis-9,trans-11 18:2), a bioactive fatty acid (FA) found in milk and dairy products, has potential human health benefits due to its anticarcinogenic and antiatherogenic properties. Conjugated linoleic acid concentrations in milk fat can be markedly increased by dietary manipulation; however, high levels of CLA are difficult to sustain as rumen biohydrogenation shifts and milk fat depression (MFD) is often induced. Our objective was to feed a typical Northeastern corn-based diet and investigate whether vitamin E and soybean oil supplementation would sustain an enhanced milk fat CLA content while avoiding MFD. Holstein cows (n=48) were assigned to a completely randomized block design with repeated measures for 28 d and received 1 of 4 dietary treatments: (1) control (CON), (2) 10,000 IU of vitamin E/d (VE), (3) 2.5% soybean oil (SO), and (4) 2.5% soybean oil plus 10,000 IU of vitamin E/d (SO-VE). A 2-wk pretreatment control diet served as the covariate. Milk fat percentage was reduced by both high-oil diets (3.53, 3.56, 2.94, and 2.92% for CON, VE, SO, and SO-VE), whereas milk yield increased significantly for the SO-VE diet only, thus partially mitigating MFD by oil feeding. Milk protein percentage was higher for cows fed the SO diet (3.04, 3.05, 3.28, and 3.03% for CON, VE, SO, and SO-VE), implying that nutrient partitioning or ruminal supply of microbial protein was altered in response to the reduction in milk fat. Milk fat concentration of CLA more than doubled in cows fed the diets supplemented with soybean oil, with concurrent increases in trans-10 18:1 and trans-11 18:1 FA. Moreover, milk fat from cows fed the 2 soybean oil diets had 39.1% less de novo synthesized FA and 33.8% more long-chain preformed FA, and vitamin E had no effect on milk fat composition. Overall, dietary supplements of soybean oil caused a reduction in milk fat percentage and a shift in FA composition characteristic of MFD. Supplementing diets with vitamin E

  13. Effect of conjugated linoleic acid and vitamin E on glycemic control, body composition, and inflammatory markers in overweight type2 diabetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The healthy properties of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) such as weight loss, reducing cardiovascular risk factors and inflammation have been reported. The trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomer is related to increasing insulin resistance, but the effects of cis-9, trans-11 isomer is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of CLA with and without Vitamin E on body weight, body composition, glycemic index, inflammatory and coagulation factors, lipid profile, serum leptin and adiponectin, malondialdehyde (MDA), and blood pressure in type2 diabetes. Methods 56 patients with type2 diabetes were included in 8 week double-blind control trial that used metformin. They randomly divided into three groups: CLA + VitE, CLA + VitE placebo, CLA placebo + VitE placebo. All variables, anthropometric measurements, and body composition were evaluated at the beginning and the end of study. Statistical analysis and analysis of dietary data were performed using SPSS and nutritionist IV software, respectively. Results There were not any significant differences in variable changes among three groups. However, there was a trend to increase in MDA and decrease in apoB100 among CLA consumers. Conclusion The results of this study showed that administration of CLA supplementation for 8 weeks does not affect any indicators of metabolic control in overweight type2 diabetic patients. PMID:23870044

  14. CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID PROMOTES HUMAN ADIPOCYTE INSULIN RESISTANCE THROUGH NFκB-DEPENDENT CYTOKINE PRODUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Chung1, Soonkyu; Brown2, J. Mark; Provo1, J. Nathan; Hopkins1, Robin; McIntosh1, Michael K.

    2005-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduced the triglyceride (TG) content of human adipocytes by activating mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-related kinase (MEK/ERK) signaling via interleukins-6 (IL-6) and 8 (IL-8). However, the upstream mechanism is unknown. Here we show that CLA increased (≥ 6 h) the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 in cultures containing both differentiated adipocytes and stromal vascular (SV) cells, non-differentiated SV cells, and adipose tissue explants. CLA’s isomer-specific induction of IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was associated with the activation of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) as evidenced by: 1) phosphorylation of IκBα, IκBα kinase (IKK), and NFκB p65; 2) IκBα degradation; and 3) nuclear translocation of NFκB. Pretreatment with selective NFκB inhibitors and the MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 blocked CLA-mediated IL-6 gene expression. Trans-10, cis-12 CLA’s suppression of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake at 24 h was associated with decreased total and plasma membrane glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) proteins. Inhibition of NFκB activation or depletion of NFκB by RNA interference using siNFκB p65 attenuated CLA’s suppression of Glut4 and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) proteins and glucose uptake. Collectively, these data demonstrate for the first time that trans-10, cis-12 CLA promotes NFκB activation and subsequent induction of IL-6 which are, at least in part, responsible for trans-10, cis-12 CLA-mediated suppression of PPARγ target gene expression and insulin sensitivity in mature human adipocytes. PMID:16155293

  15. Enrichment of maternal diet with conjugated linoleic acids influences desaturases activity and fatty acids profile in livers and hepatic microsomes of the offspring with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Białek, Agnieszka; Stawarska, Agnieszka; Tokarz, Andrzej; Czuba, Katarzyna; Konarska, Anna; Mazurkiewicz, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of diet supplementation of pregnant and breast-feeding female Sprague-Dawley rats with conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) on the Δ6- and Δ5-desaturase activity in hepatic microsomes as well as on fatty acids profile and lipids peroxidation in liver and hepatic microsomes of the progeny with chemically induced mammary tumors. Rats were divided into two groups with different diet supplementation (vegetable oil (which did not contain CLA) or CLA). Their female offspring was divided within these groups into two subgroups: (1)--fed the same diet as mothers (K1 - oil, 01 - CLA), and (2)--fed the standard fodder (K2, O2). At 50th day of life, the progeny obtained carcinogenic agent (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene). Higher supply of CLA in diet of mothers resulted in lower susceptibility to chemically induced mammary tumors in their offspring (p = 0.0322). It also influenced the fatty acids profile in livers and in hepatic microsomes, especially polyunsaturated n3 and n6 fatty acids. CLA inhibited the activity of the desaturases, which confirmed that CLA can reduce the level of arachidonic acid directly, reducing linoleic acid content in membranes, or indirectly, through the regulation of its metabolism. We were unable to confirm or deny the antioxidative properties of CLA. Our results indicate that the higher supply of CLA in mothers' diet during pregnancy and breastfeeding causes their incorporation into tissues of children, changes the efficiency of fatty acids metabolism and exerts health-promoting effect in their adult life reducing the breast cancer risk.

  16. Effects of dietary trans-9 octadecenoic acid, trans-11 vaccenic acid and cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Lim, Ji-Na; Lee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sang-Bum; Hwang, Jin-Hee; Jung, U-Suk; Kim, Min-Jeong; Hwang, Dae-Youn; Lee, Sang-Rak; Roh, Sang-Gun; Lee, Hong-Gu

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of dietary trans fatty acids in mice. Following the administration of a 0.5/100 g diet of trans-9 octadecenoic acid (EA), trans-11 vaccenic acid (TVA) or cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) for 4 weeks, the body weights and the weights of the liver, testis and mediastinal adipose tissue (MAT) of the animals gradually decreased (P<0.05). The EA group exhibited the lowest levels of magnesium and triglycerides (P<0.05). CLA increased villus length (P<0.05), while EA and TVA decreased villus length (P<0.05). The TVA group exhibited the lowest levels of low-density lipoprotein and tumor necrosis factor-α (P<0.05). Taken together, EA, TVA and CLA affected the physiological conditions of mice differently. The potential effects of three well-known fatty acids, including trans-9 octadecenoic acid (EA), trans-11 vaccenic acid (TVA) and cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), in animals or humans remain to be elucidated. Therefore, in the present study, 32 animals were randomly divided into four groups and administered a 0.5/100 g diet of EA, TVA or CLA for 4 weeks. The results demonstrated that the body weights and the weights of the liver, testis and mediastinal adipose tissue (MAT) of the animals gradually decreased (P<0.05). Blood was collected individually via the external jugular veins and the EA group exhibited the lowest levels of magnesium and triglycerides (P<0.05). CLA increased villus length (P<0.05), while EA and TVA decreased villus length (P<0.05). The TVA group exhibited the lowest levels of low-density lipoprotein and tumor necrosis factor-α (P<0.05). Taken together, EA, TVA and CLA affected the physiological conditions of mice differently and these may further our understanding of the various effects of these fatty acids on animals and humans.

  17. Enrichment of milk with conjugated linoleic acid by supplementing diets with fish and sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Abo El-Nor, S A H; Khattab, Mostafa S A

    2012-07-15

    There is an increase interesting in enrichment of milk with Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) due to its anti-oxidative and anti-carcinogenic properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of supplementing diets fed to lactating goats with sunflower, fish oil and its blend. Eight lactating Nubian goats were fed a base diet (T1), diet supplemented with 2% sunflower oil (on dry matter (DM) basis) (T2), diet supplemented with 2% fish oil (T3) and diet supplemented with 2% sunflower and fish oil (T4) for 84 day. Milk composition milk fat, protein (%) decreased in T2, T3 and T4 compared with control (T1) while there was no significant differences between treatments in milk lactose content. CLA content in milk fat was higher in response to fish oil or sunflower and fish oil blend compared with control (T1). The results indicated that supplementing diets fed to lactating goats with sunflower, fish oil increased CLA contents in the milk 2-4 times than control.

  18. Methods for analysis of conjugated linoleic acids and trans-18:1 isomers in dairy fats by using a combination of gas chromatography, silver-ion thin-layer chromatography/gas chromatography, and silver-ion liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Deng, Zeyuan; Zhou, Jianqiang; Hill, Arthur R; Yurawecz, Martin P; Delmonte, Pierluigi; Mossoba, Magdi M; Dugan, Michael E R; Kramer, John K G

    2004-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are octadecadienoic acids (18:2) that have a conjugated double-bond system. Interest in these compounds has expanded since CLA were found to be associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses such as cancer, metastases, atherosclerosis, diabetes, immunity, and body fat/protein composition. The main sources of these conjugated fatty acids are dairy fats. Rumen bacteria convert polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially linoleic and linolenic acids, to CLA and numerous trans- containing mono- and diunsaturated fatty acids. It has been established that an additional route of CLA synthesis in ruminants and monogastric animals, including humans, occurs via delta9 desaturation of the trans-18:1 isomers. To date, a total of 6 positional CLA isomers have been found in dairy fats, each occurring in 4 geometric forms (cis,trans; trans,cis; cis,cis; and trans,trans) for a total of 24. All of these CLA isomers can be resolved only by a combination of gas chromatography (GC), using 100 m highly polar capillary columns, and silver-ion liquid chromatography, using 3 of these 25 cm columns in series. Complete analysis of all the trans-18:1 isomers requires prior isolation of trans monoenes by silver-ion thin-layer chromatography (TLC), followed by GC analysis using the same 100 m capillary columns operated at low temperatures starting from 120 degrees C. These analytical techniques are required to assess the purity of commercial CLA preparations, because their purity will affect the interpretation of any physiological and/or biochemical response obtained. Prior assessment of CLA preparations by TLC is also recommended to determine the presence of any other impurities. The availability of pure CLA isomers will permit the evaluation and analysis of individual CLA isomers for their nutritional and biological activity in model systems, animals, and humans. These techniques are also essential to evaluate dairy fats for their content of

  19. Effect of Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Boar Semen Quality After Long-term Refrigeration at 17°C.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Smp; Chaveiro, A; Moreira da Silva, F

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the effect of conjugated linoleic acid (10 trans, 12 cis) (CLA) on refrigerated boar sperm quality parameters up to 14 days at 17°C was assessed. Semen was extended in Androhep and divided into four treatments supplemented with CLA (25, 50, 100 and 200 μm) and control group, then kept for 2 h at 22°C. Afterwards an aliquot of each treatment was removed, and mitochondrial activity, viability, lipid membrane peroxidation (LPO) and stability of the sperm plasma membrane were assessed by flow cytometry. The remaining extended semen was maintained at 17°C until 336 h, repeating the same analysis every 48 h. Regarding percentage of live spermatozoa, no statistical differences were observed among treatments up to 96 h. After this time, viability decreased significantly (p < 0.05) for CLA concentrations of 100 and 200 μm. Despite these results, there was an individual response to CLA. Although in the control group, the boar A presented better results when compared with the other boars, especially at concentrations of 50 and 100 μm boar B showed significantly higher results (p < 0.05). Supplementation with CLA improved (p < 0.05) LPO, but not the mitochondrial membrane potential of sperm. The highest two CLA concentrations showed to be toxic for sperm as all results were lower than the observed for the control. In conclusion, CLA at 50 μm seems to be an efficient concentration for reducing the oxidative stress, decreasing LPO, maintaining viability, membrane stability and mitochondrial potential on refrigerated boar spermatozoa. PMID:25976112

  20. The effects of conjugated linoleic acid on growth performance, carcass traits, meat quality, antioxidant capacity, and fatty acid composition of broilers fed corn dried distillers grains with solubles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Nie, Shaoping; Qu, Zhe; Bi, Chongpeng; Shan, Anshan

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on the growth performance, carcass traits, meat quality, antioxidant capacity, and fatty acid composition of broilers fed corn dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS). Four hundred eighty 1-d-old broilers were randomly assigned to 4 groups, consisting of 6 replicates with 20 broilers each. Broilers were allocated 1 of 4 diets and fed for 49 d in a 2 × 2 factorial design. The dietary treatments consisted of 2 levels of DDGS (0 or 15%) and 2 levels of CLA (0 or 1%). The results of growth performance analyses showed that dietary supplementation with 1% CLA, 15% DDGS, or both in broilers had no significant effects on ADG, ADFI, and feed/gain (P > 0.05). Dietary supplementation with 15% DDGS did not significantly affect meat color values, drip loss percentage, pH value at 15 min, crude fat content, or shear force value (P > 0.05). Diets supplemented with 15% DDGS decreased the proportions of saturated fatty acids (P < 0.05) and monounsaturated fatty acids but increased the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the thigh meat (P < 0.05). Diets supplemented with 1% CLA significantly decreased the abdominal fat percentage (P < 0.05). Supplementation with 1% CLA increased the crude fat content and decreased the color (b*) value and shear force value of the breast meat (P < 0.05). Diets supplemented with 1% CLA increased the total superoxide dismutase activity of the serum, breast meat, and liver, and decreased the malondialdehyde content of the serum and breast meat (P < 0.05). Supplementation with 1% CLA decreased the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids and increased the proportion of saturated fatty acids (P < 0.05). Accumulation of CLA in the thigh meat was significantly increased (P < 0.05) with increasing CLA level in the diet. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with 1% CLA had positive effects on meat quality, antioxidant capacity, and fatty acid

  1. Low Dietary c9t11-Conjugated Linoleic Acid Intake from Dairy Fat or Supplements Reduces Inflammation in Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Shane M; Olson, Jake M; Campbell, James P; Bishop, Jeffrey W; Crump, Peter M; Cook, Mark E

    2016-07-01

    Dietary cis-9,trans-11 (c9t11) conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fed at 0.5 % w/w was previously shown to attenuate inflammation in the murine collagen-induced (CA) arthritis model, and growing evidence implicates c9t11-CLA as a major anti-inflammatory component of dairy fat. To understand c9t11-CLA's contribution to dairy fat's anti-inflammatory action, the minimum amount of dietary c9t11-CLA needed to reduce inflammation must be determined. This study had two objectives: (1) determine the minimum dietary anti-inflammatory c9t11-CLA intake level in the CA model, and (2) compare this to anti-inflammatory effects of dairy fat (non-enriched, naturally c9t11-CLA-enriched, or c9t11-CLA-supplemented). Mice received the following dietary fat treatments (w/w) post arthritis onset: corn oil (6 % CO), 0.125, 0.25, 0.375, and 0.5 % c9t11-CLA, control butter (6 % CB), c9t11-enriched butter (6 % EB), or c9t11-CLA-supplemented butter (6 % SB, containing 0.2 % c9t11-CLA). Paw arthritic severity and pad swelling were scored and measured, respectively, over an 84-day study period. All c9t11-CLA and butter diets decreased the arthritic score (25-51 %, P < 0.01) and paw swelling (8-11 %, P < 0.01). Throughout the study, plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) was elevated in CO-fed arthritic mice compared to non-arthritic (NA) mice but was reduced in 0.5 % c9t11-CLA- and EB-fed mice. Interleukin-1β and IL-6 were increased in arthritic CO-fed mice compared to NA mice but were reduced in 0.5 % c9t11-CLA- and EB-fed mice through day 42. In conclusion, 0.125 % c9t11-CLA reduced clinical arthritis as effectively as higher doses, and decreased arthritis in CB-fed mice suggested that the minimal anti-inflammatory levels of c9t11-CLA might be below 0.125 %. PMID:27270404

  2. Fatty acid profile of Canadian dairy products with special attention to the trans-octadecenoic acid and conjugated linoleic acid isomers.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Sanjaya; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Ratnayake, Walisundera M N

    2008-01-01

    Current scientific evidence indicates that consumption of industrial trans fatty acids (TFA) produced via partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils increases the risk of coronary heart disease. However, some studies have suggested that ruminant TFA, especially vaccenic acid (VA or 11t-18:1) and rumenic acid (RA or 9c,11t-18:2), which is a conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomer, may have potential beneficial health effects for humans. To date, no concerted effort has been made to provide detailed isomer composition of ruminant TFA and CLA of Canadian dairy products, information that is required to properly assess their nutritional impacts. To this end, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of popular brands of commercial cheese (n = 17), butter (n = 12), milk (n = 8), and cream (n = 4) sold in retail stores in Ottawa, Canada, in 2006-2007 by silver nitrate thin-layer chromatography and gas liquid chromatography. The average total TFA content of cheese, butter, milk, and cream samples were 5.6, 5.8, 5.8, and 5.5% of total fatty acids, respectively. VA was the major trans-octadecenoic acid (18:1) isomer in all the Canadian dairy samples with average levels of (as % total trans-18:1) 33.9% in cheese, 35.6% in butter, 31.0% milk, and 30.1% in cream. The different dairy products contained very similar levels of CLA, which ranged from 0.5 to 0.9% of total fat. RA was the major CLA isomer of all the dairy products, accounting for 82.4-83.2% of total CLA. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in the fatty acid profile between the 4 different dairy groups, which suggests lack of processing effects on the fatty acid profile of dairy fat.

  3. Fatty Acid Composition and Conjugated Linoleic Acid Content in Different Carcass parts of Dağlıç Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Karabacak, Ali; Boztepe, Saim

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare fatty acid composition and content of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in different regions of sheep carcasses. Lambs of the Dağlıç breed were used for this purpose. Subsequent to a 68-day period of intensive fattening, fatty acids were examined in samples taken from the legs, shoulders, breasts, and ribs of lamb carcasses. According to the analysis, in leg, shoulder, breast, and rib, respectively, total saturated fatty acids (SFA) were found to be 40.38, 42.69, 42.56, and 40.27%, unsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) were found to be 40.38, 44.17, 46.17, and 49.50%, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were found to be 4.79, 4.29, 3.80, and 3.72%, and CLAs were found to be 1.49, 1.69, 1.53, and 1.59%. PMID:24523647

  4. Effects of postweaning administration of conjugated linoleic acid on development of obesity in nescient basic helix-loop-helix 2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo; Kim, Daeyoung; Good, Deborah J; Park, Yeonhwa

    2015-06-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been reported to prevent body weight gain and fat accumulation in part by improving physical activity in mice. However, the effects of postweaning administration of CLA on the development of obesity later in life have not yet been demonstrated. The current study investigated the role of postweaning CLA treatment on skeletal muscle energy metabolism in genetically induced inactive adult-onset obese model, nescient basic helix-loop-helix 2 knockout (N2KO) mice. Four-week-old male N2KO and wild type mice were fed either control or a CLA-containing diet (0.5%) for 4 weeks, and then CLA was withdrawn and control diet provided to all mice for the following 8 weeks. Postweaning CLA supplementation in wild type animals, but not N2KO mice, may activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPARδ) as well as promote desensitization of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and sensitization of protein kinase B (AKT) at threonine 308 in gastrocnemius skeletal muscle, improving voluntary activity and glucose homeostasis. We suggest that postweaning administration of CLA may in part stimulate the underlying molecular targets involved in muscle energy metabolism to reduce weight gain in normal animals, but not in the genetically induced inactive adult-onset animal model.

  5. The effects of conjugated linoleic acid isomers cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 on in vitro bovine embryo production and cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Absalón-Medina, V A; Bedford-Guaus, S J; Gilbert, R O; Siqueira, L C; Esposito, G; Schneider, A; Cheong, S H; Butler, W R

    2014-10-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers can affect the lipid profile and signaling of cells and thereby alter their function. A total of 5,700 bovine oocytes were used in a structured series of experiments to test the effects of CLA cis-9,trans-11 and CLA trans-10,cis-12 in vitro. In experiment 1, high doses of each CLA isomer during in vitro maturation (IVM) were compared with high or low doses during the entire in vitro culture (IVC) of parthenogenetic embryos. High doses of the CLA isomers ranged from 50 to 200 μM and low doses were 15 and 25 μM. In experiment 2, the low doses of each CLA isomer were tested during IVM/IVC on embryos produced by in vitro fertilization (IVF). Experiment 3 compared the effects of 15 μM doses of each CLA isomer during IVM or IVC of IVF embryos. In experiment 4, post-rewarming survival rates and blastomere counts were assessed for embryos supplemented with each CLA isomer during IVM or for 36 h before vitrification. In experiment 1, when either CLA isomer was provided only during IVM, we observed no effects on overall rates of maturation, cleavage, or blastocysts (92.2 ± 1.6%, 78.3 ± 4.1%, and 28.9 ± 5.1%, respectively). However, high doses of each CLA isomer, but not low doses, during the entire embryo culture period decreased blastocyst rates (5-20%) in a dose-dependent manner. Cleavage rates improved with 15 or 50 μM CLA trans-10,cis-12. Progesterone concentrations in maturation media were significantly increased by high doses of each CLA isomer compared with control, but low doses of CLA isomers had no effect. In experiment 2 with IVF embryos, low doses of each CLA isomer did not alter cleavage rates (average 84.9 ± 1.9%) and only 25 μM CLA trans-10,cis-12 during IVC reduced blastocyst rates below those of controls (25.5 ± 2.1 vs. 38.2 ± 2.3%). The lipid content of embryos was increased and relative expression of the BIRC5 (baculoviral IAP repeat containing 5) gene was depressed by CLA trans-10,cis-12. In experiment 3

  6. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Reduces Cholera Toxin Production In Vitro and In Vivo by Inhibiting Vibrio cholerae ToxT Activity.

    PubMed

    Withey, Jeffrey H; Nag, Drubhajyoti; Plecha, Sarah C; Sinha, Ritam; Koley, Hemanta

    2015-12-01

    The severe diarrheal disease cholera is endemic in over 50 countries. Current therapies for cholera patients involve oral and/or intravenous rehydration, often combined with the use of antibiotics to shorten the duration and intensity of the disease. However, as antibiotic resistance increases, treatment options will become limited. Linoleic acid has been shown to be a potent negative effector of V. cholerae virulence that acts on the major virulence transcription regulator protein, ToxT, to inhibit virulence gene expression. ToxT activates transcription of the two major virulence factors required for disease, cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). A conjugated form of linoleic acid (CLA) is currently sold over the counter as a dietary supplement and is generally recognized as safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This study examined whether CLA could be used as a new therapy to reduce CT production, which, in turn, would decrease disease duration and intensity in cholera patients. CLA could be used in place of traditional antibiotics and would be very unlikely to generate resistance, as it affects only virulence factor production and not bacterial growth or survival.

  7. Effects of conjugated linoleic acid and lutein on the growth performance and immune response of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Moraes, M L; Ribeiro, A M L; Santin, E; Klasing, K C

    2016-02-01

    The effects of lutein and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on growth performance and immune response of broiler chickens were evaluated in the presence and absence of Salmonella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) immune challenge. Cobb chicks (360; 1 to 22 d of age) were used in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement of CLA (0, 1, and 2%) and lutein (0 and 50 mg/kg) dietary levels. At d 8 and 15, birds were injected with BSA to assess IgY production. At d 20, birds were injected with LPS. Samples of liver, spleen, and duodenum were collected at 3 and 16 h post-LPS challenge for RT-qPCR analysis of RXRα, RXRγ, PPARα, PPARγ, TLR-4, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, and IL-12 gene expression. CLA decreased BW, BW gain (BWG), and G:F from d 1 to 20, but these effects were reversed when lutein was included in the 1% CLA diet (P < 0.001). The production of IgY anti-BSA increased following a 2% CLA supplementation (P < 0.01). LPS increased the liver:BW ratio at 3 h post-injection (P < 0.001) and decreased BWG at 3, 16, and 40 h (P < 0.001). Lutein decreased plasmatic nitric oxide levels (P < 0.01). LPS downregulated PPARα mRNA in the duodenum (P = 0.02) and liver (P = 0.04), and PPARγ (P = 0.01) and RXRα (P = 0.08) in the spleen; these effects were not reversed by CLA or lutein as initially hypothesized. Although LPS upregulated IL-1β (P = 0.02) and IL-12 (P = 0.07) expression, lutein downregulated these pro-inflammatory cytokines in the liver (P = 0.03 and P = 0.07, respectively). Lutein decreased splenic (P = 0.09) but increased hepatic (P = 0.06) TLR-4 mRNA. A dietary CLA supplementation of 2% increased hepatic RXRα (P = 0.10). In conclusion, CLA decreased broiler chicken growth performance, but lutein could prevent this negative effect (depending on CLA dose). Lutein had an anti-inflammatory effect, and a 2% CLA supplementation improved the humoral immune response. PMID:26527712

  8. Effects of conjugated linoleic acid and lutein on the growth performance and immune response of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Moraes, M L; Ribeiro, A M L; Santin, E; Klasing, K C

    2016-02-01

    The effects of lutein and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on growth performance and immune response of broiler chickens were evaluated in the presence and absence of Salmonella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) immune challenge. Cobb chicks (360; 1 to 22 d of age) were used in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement of CLA (0, 1, and 2%) and lutein (0 and 50 mg/kg) dietary levels. At d 8 and 15, birds were injected with BSA to assess IgY production. At d 20, birds were injected with LPS. Samples of liver, spleen, and duodenum were collected at 3 and 16 h post-LPS challenge for RT-qPCR analysis of RXRα, RXRγ, PPARα, PPARγ, TLR-4, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, and IL-12 gene expression. CLA decreased BW, BW gain (BWG), and G:F from d 1 to 20, but these effects were reversed when lutein was included in the 1% CLA diet (P < 0.001). The production of IgY anti-BSA increased following a 2% CLA supplementation (P < 0.01). LPS increased the liver:BW ratio at 3 h post-injection (P < 0.001) and decreased BWG at 3, 16, and 40 h (P < 0.001). Lutein decreased plasmatic nitric oxide levels (P < 0.01). LPS downregulated PPARα mRNA in the duodenum (P = 0.02) and liver (P = 0.04), and PPARγ (P = 0.01) and RXRα (P = 0.08) in the spleen; these effects were not reversed by CLA or lutein as initially hypothesized. Although LPS upregulated IL-1β (P = 0.02) and IL-12 (P = 0.07) expression, lutein downregulated these pro-inflammatory cytokines in the liver (P = 0.03 and P = 0.07, respectively). Lutein decreased splenic (P = 0.09) but increased hepatic (P = 0.06) TLR-4 mRNA. A dietary CLA supplementation of 2% increased hepatic RXRα (P = 0.10). In conclusion, CLA decreased broiler chicken growth performance, but lutein could prevent this negative effect (depending on CLA dose). Lutein had an anti-inflammatory effect, and a 2% CLA supplementation improved the humoral immune response.

  9. Linoleic acid binding properties of ovalbumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sponton, Osvaldo E; Perez, Adrián A; Carrara, Carlos R; Santiago, Liliana G

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, ovalbumin (OVA) solutions (10 g/L, 50 mM NaCl, pH 7.5) were heat-treated at 75, 80 and 85°C (namely, OVA-75, OVA-80 and OVA-85, respectively), from 0 to 25 min. OVA nanoparticles (OVAn) around 100 nm were obtained. For 3 min of heat treatment, OVAn sizes increased with temperature, but for a heating time longer than 10 min, OVA-75 showed the highest size values. OVAn surface hydrophobicity increased 6-8 folds in comparison with native OVA and wavelength blue shifts of 25-30 nm in maximum fluorescence intensity were registered. These results suggest that buried hydrophobic residues were exposed to the aqueous medium. Binding experiments with linoleic acid (LA) as polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) model were carried out. Firstly, binding ability of OVAn was determined from LA titration curves of intrinsic fluorescence measurements. OVA-85 at 5 min presented the highest binding ability and it was used for further binding properties studies (turbidity, particle size distribution--PSD--analysis and ζ-potential measurements). Turbidity measurement and PSD analysis showed that OVAn-LA nanocomplexes were formed, avoiding LA supramolecular self-assembly formation. The union of LA to OVAn surface confers them significant lower ζ-potential and larger size. Hence, fluorescence and ζ-potential results showed that LA would bind to OVAn by mean of hydrophobic interactions. Information derived from this work could be important to potentially use OVAn as PUFA vehiculization with applications in several industrial sectors (food, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, etc.).

  10. Chemometric analysis of the interactions among different parameters describing health conditions, breast cancer risk and fatty acids profile in serum of rats supplemented with conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Białek, Agnieszka; Zagrodzki, Paweł; Tokarz, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    We investigated how different doses of conjugated linoleic acids applied for various periods of time influence breast cancer risk and fatty acids profile in serum of rats treated or not with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). We also search for interactions among parameters describing health conditions and cancer risk. Animals were divided into 18 groups with different diet modifications (vegetable oil, 1.0%, 2.0% additions of CLA) and different periods of supplementation. In groups treated with DMBA mammary adenocarcinomas appeared. Due to the complexity of experiment apart from statistical analysis a chemometric tool-Partial Least Square method was applied. Analysis of pairs of correlated parameters allowed to identify some regularities concerning the relationships between fatty acid profiles and clinical features of animals. Fatty acids profile was the result of prolonged exposure to high dose of CLA and DMBA administration. These two factors underlined the differences in fatty acids profiles among clusters of animals. PMID:26926361

  11. Effects of conjugated linoleic acid supplementation and feeding level on dairy performance, milk fatty acid composition, and body fat changes in mid-lactation goats.

    PubMed

    Ghazal, S; Berthelot, V; Friggens, N C; Schmidely, P

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this trial was to study the interaction between the supplementation of lipid-encapsulated conjugated linoleic acid (CLA; 4.5 g of cis-9,trans-11 C18:2 and 4.5 g of trans-10,cis-12 C18:2) and feeding level to test if milk performance or milk fatty acid (FA) profile are affected by the interaction between CLA and feeding level. Twenty-four dairy goats were used in an 8-wk trial with a 3-wk adaptation to the experimental ration that contained corn silage, beet pulp, barley, and a commercial concentrate. During the third week, goats were assigned into blocks of 2 goats according to their dry matter intake (DMI), raw milk yield, and fat yield. Each block was randomly allocated to control (45 g of Ca salt of palm oil/d) or CLA treatment. Within each block, one goat was fed to cover 100% (FL100) of the calculated energy requirements and the other was fed 85% of the DMI of the first goat (FL85). Individual milk production and composition were recorded weekly, and milk FA composition was analyzed in wk 3, 5, and 7. Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation reduced milk fat content and fat yield by 17 and 19%, respectively, independent of the feeding level. It reduced both the secretion of milk FA synthesized de novo, and those taken up from the blood. No interaction between CLA and feeding level was observed on milk secretion of any group of FA. The CLA supplementation had no effect on DMI, milk yield, protein, and lactose yields but it improved calculated net energy for lactation balance. Goats fed the FL100 × CLA diet tended to have the highest DMI and protein yield. The interaction between CLA and feeding level was not significant for any other variables. Compared with the goats fed FL100, those fed FL85 had lower DMI, lower net energy for lactation balance, and lower digestible protein in the intestine balance. The body weight; milk yield; milk fat, protein, and lactose yields; and fat, protein, lactose, and urea contents in milk were not affected by

  12. The effect of covalently bonded conjugated linoleic acid on the reduction of oxidative stress and blood coagulation for polysulfone hemodialyzer membrane.

    PubMed

    Kung, Fu-Chen; Yang, Ming-Chine

    2006-05-30

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was covalently bonded to a layer of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) grafted onto the surface of polysulfone (PSF) membranes. The effect of CLA-bonding on oxidative stress and blood coagulation was then evaluated. The surface was characterized with contact angle measurement and FTIR spectroscopy. Blood coagulation, platelet aggregation, and oxidative stress were evaluated using human blood. The complete blood count (CBC) and coagulation time (CT) were evaluated in vitro for hemocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured by the chemiluminescence (CL) method to evaluate the oxidative stress. The results showed that the CLA-bonding PSF membrane exhibited more stable CBC values, longer CT, and less adsorption of plasma proteins than the unmodified PSF membrane. In addition, the CL counts of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide values for CLA-bonding PSF membrane were more stable than for unmodified PSF membrane. These results demonstrate that CLA-bonding can improve the blood compatibility of PSF membrane. The CLA-bonding PSF membrane could offer protection for patients against oxidative stress and could also reduce the dosage of anticoagulant required during hemodialysis.

  13. Medium-chain triglycerides and conjugated linoleic acids in beverage form increase satiety and reduce food intake in humans.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Hannah; Quinn, Paul; Clegg, Miriam E

    2016-06-01

    Both developed and developing countries are seeing increasing trends of obesity in people young and old. It is thought that satiety may play a role in the prevention of obesity by increasing satiety and reducing energy intake. We hypothesized that medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) would increase satiety and decrease food intake compared with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and a control oil. Nineteen healthy participants were tested on 3 separate occasions, where they consumed a beverage test breakfast containing (1) vegetable oil (control), (2) CLA, or (3) MCT. Participants self-requested an ad libitum sandwich buffet lunch. Time between meals, satiety from visual analog scales, energy intake at lunch, and intake for the rest of the day using weighed food diaries were measured. The results indicated that the time until a meal request was significantly different between the 3 meals (P=.016); however, there were no differences in intakes at the ad libitum lunch (P>.05). The CLA breakfast generated the greatest delay in meal time request. There was a difference between the control lipid compared with both the CLA and MCT for energy intake over the remainder of the test day and for total energy intake on the test day (P<.001 for both), with the CLA and MCT resulting in a lower intake than the control throughout the day. There were no significant differences in satiety from visual analog scale scores (P>.05). Both CLA and MCT increased satiety and reduced energy intake, indicating a potential role in aiding the maintenance of energy balance. PMID:27188898

  14. Medium-chain triglycerides and conjugated linoleic acids in beverage form increase satiety and reduce food intake in humans.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Hannah; Quinn, Paul; Clegg, Miriam E

    2016-06-01

    Both developed and developing countries are seeing increasing trends of obesity in people young and old. It is thought that satiety may play a role in the prevention of obesity by increasing satiety and reducing energy intake. We hypothesized that medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) would increase satiety and decrease food intake compared with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and a control oil. Nineteen healthy participants were tested on 3 separate occasions, where they consumed a beverage test breakfast containing (1) vegetable oil (control), (2) CLA, or (3) MCT. Participants self-requested an ad libitum sandwich buffet lunch. Time between meals, satiety from visual analog scales, energy intake at lunch, and intake for the rest of the day using weighed food diaries were measured. The results indicated that the time until a meal request was significantly different between the 3 meals (P=.016); however, there were no differences in intakes at the ad libitum lunch (P>.05). The CLA breakfast generated the greatest delay in meal time request. There was a difference between the control lipid compared with both the CLA and MCT for energy intake over the remainder of the test day and for total energy intake on the test day (P<.001 for both), with the CLA and MCT resulting in a lower intake than the control throughout the day. There were no significant differences in satiety from visual analog scale scores (P>.05). Both CLA and MCT increased satiety and reduced energy intake, indicating a potential role in aiding the maintenance of energy balance.

  15. Production of Conjugated Linoleic and Conjugated α-Linolenic Acid in a Reconstituted Skim Milk-Based Medium by Bifidobacterial Strains Isolated from Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Villar-Tajadura, María Antonia; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luis Miguel; Martín, Virginia; Gómez de Segura, Aránzazu; Rodríguez, Juan Miguel; Fontecha, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Eight bifidobacterial strains isolated from human breast milk have been tested for their abilities to convert linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (LNA) to conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and conjugated α-linolenic acid (CLNA), respectively. These bioactive lipids display important properties that may contribute to the maintenance and improvement human health. Three selected Bifidobacterium breve strains produced CLA from LA and CLNA from LNA in MRS (160–170 and 210–230 μg mL−1, resp.) and, also, in reconstituted skim milk (75–95 and 210–244 μg mL−1, resp.). These bifidobacterial strains were also able to simultaneously produce both CLA (90–105 μg mL−1) and CLNA (290–320 μg mL−1) in reconstituted skim milk. Globally, our findings suggest that these bifidobacterial strains are potential candidates for the design of new fermented dairy products naturally containing very high concentrations of these bioactive lipids. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing CLNA production and coproduction of CLA and CLNA by Bifidobacterium breve strains isolated from human milk in reconstituted skim milk. PMID:25110689

  16. Production of conjugated linoleic and conjugated α-linolenic acid in a reconstituted skim milk-based medium by bifidobacterial strains isolated from human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Villar-Tajadura, María Antonia; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luis Miguel; Martín, Virginia; Gómez de Segura, Aránzazu; Rodríguez, Juan Miguel; Requena, Teresa; Fontecha, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Eight bifidobacterial strains isolated from human breast milk have been tested for their abilities to convert linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (LNA) to conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and conjugated α-linolenic acid (CLNA), respectively. These bioactive lipids display important properties that may contribute to the maintenance and improvement human health. Three selected Bifidobacterium breve strains produced CLA from LA and CLNA from LNA in MRS (160-170 and 210-230 μg mL(-1), resp.) and, also, in reconstituted skim milk (75-95 and 210-244 μg mL(-1), resp.). These bifidobacterial strains were also able to simultaneously produce both CLA (90-105 μg mL(-1)) and CLNA (290-320 μg mL(-1)) in reconstituted skim milk. Globally, our findings suggest that these bifidobacterial strains are potential candidates for the design of new fermented dairy products naturally containing very high concentrations of these bioactive lipids. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing CLNA production and coproduction of CLA and CLNA by Bifidobacterium breve strains isolated from human milk in reconstituted skim milk.

  17. Effects of fat source and dietary sodium bicarbonate plus straw on the conjugated linoleic acid content of milk of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Troegeler-Meynadier, Annabelle; Nicot, Marie-Claude; Enjalbert, Francis

    2007-10-01

    The effects of fat source (0.7 kg of fatty acids from extruded soybeans or palmitic acid), of sodium bicarbonate (0.3 kg) plus straw (1 kg) and the interaction of these treatments on the content of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in the milk of dairy cows were examined. During nine weeks a group of 10 cows received a ration with palmitic acid and bicarbonate plus straw (ration PAB). During three periods of three weeks a second group of 10 cows received successively a ration with extruded soybeans and bicarbonate plus straw (ration ESB), a ration with palmitic acid without bicarbonate or straw (ration PA), and a ration with extruded soybeans without bicarbonate or straw (ration ES). Rations ES and ESB increased the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk, but decreased milk fat content, compared to rations PAB and PA. Ration ESB led to the greatest milk CLA content, by a synergy between the high amount of dietary fat, and the action of bicarbonate plus straw, favouring trans11 isomers of CLA and C18:1, presumably via a ruminal pH near neutrality. Ration ES favoured trans10 isomers, not desaturated in the mammary gland, so that the milk CLA content was lower than with ration ESB, and resulted in the lowest milk fat content. In conclusion, a ration supplemented with both extruded soybeans and bicarbonate plus straw, was an efficient way to increase the CLA content in the milk of dairy cows.

  18. Contents of conjugated linoleic acid isomers in ruminant-derived foods and estimation of their contribution to daily intake in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Martins, Susana V; Lopes, Paula A; Alfaia, Cristina M; Ribeiro, Verónica S; Guerreiro, Teresa V; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Castro, Matilde F; Soveral, Graça; Prates, José A M

    2007-12-01

    The present study provides a detailed overview of the contents of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers in the most consumed Portuguese CLA-rich foods (milk, butter, yoghurt, cheese, beef and lamb meat), by using silver ion-HPLC. In addition, the contribution of these ruminant-derived foods to the daily intake of CLA isomers was estimated based on Portuguese consumption habits. The total CLA concentration in milk and dairy products ranged from 4.00 mg/g fat in yoghurt to 7.22 mg/g fat in butter, and, regarding meats, from 4.45 mg/g fat in intensively produced beef to 11.29 mg/g fat in lamb meat. The predominant CLA isomers identified in these products were cis-9, trans-11 (59.89-79.21 %) and trans-7, cis-9 (8.04-20.20 %). The average estimated total CLA intake for the Portuguese population was 73.70 mg/d. Milk and cheese are probably the two products with the highest contribution to the final CLA intake, as a result of their high fat content and consumption values. The results also suggested that cis-9, trans-11 and trans-7, cis-9 are the isomers most represented, with, respectively, 76.10 and 12.56 % of the total CLA intake. Being the first detailed report on the contents of total and individual CLA isomers in Portuguese commercial ruminant-derived foods, we further discuss the implication of the results for diet characteristics and human health.

  19. Rapeseed or linseed in grass-based diets: effects on conjugated linoleic and conjugated linolenic acid isomers in milk fat from Holstein cows over 2 consecutive lactations.

    PubMed

    Lerch, S; Shingfield, K J; Ferlay, A; Vanhatalo, A; Chilliard, Y

    2012-12-01

    Changes in the distribution of conjugated linoleic (CLA) and conjugated linolenic (CLnA) acid isomers in milk from Holstein cows in response to 4 different oilseed supplements rich in either cis-9 18:1 or 18:3n-3 were determined over 2 consecutive lactations in 58 and 35 cows during the first and second years, respectively. For the first 5 wk of the first lactation, all cows were fed the same diet. Thereafter, cows received 1 of 5 treatments for 2 consecutive lactations, including the prepartum period. Treatments comprised the basal diet with no additional lipid, or supplements of extruded linseeds (EL), extruded rapeseeds (ER), cold-pressed fat-rich rapeseed meal, or whole unprocessed rapeseeds to provide 2.5 to 3.0% of additional oil in diet dry matter. During indoor periods, cows were housed and received a mixture (3:1, wt/wt) of grass silage and hay, whereas cows were at pasture during outdoor periods. Over the entire study, EL resulted in the enrichment of ∆11,13 CLA, ∆12,14 CLA, trans-9,trans-11 CLA, trans-13,trans-15 CLA, ∆9,11,15 CLnA, and cis-9,trans-11,trans-13 CLnA (identified for the first time in bovine milk fat) in milk fat, whereas ER and cold-pressed fat-rich rapeseed meal in particular, increased milk fat trans-7,cis-9 CLA concentration. With the exception of the first indoor period, whole unprocessed rapeseeds decreased cis-9,trans-11 CLA, trans-9,cis-11 CLA, and trans-10,trans-12 CLA abundance. During the second indoor period, EL increased milk trans-9,cis-11 CLA and trans-10,cis-12 CLA concentrations, but the increases in cis-9,trans-11 CLA, cis-12,trans-14 CLA, trans-11,cis-13 CLA, and cis-9,trans-11,cis-15 CLnA concentrations to EL and ER were lower for the second than first indoor period. In contrast to the indoor periods, EL and ER decreased milk cis-9,trans-11 CLA, trans-9,cis-11 CLA, and trans-10,cis-12 CLA concentrations at pasture. The extent of changes in the relative distribution and abundance of CLA and CLnA isomers in milk fat

  20. Cell nanomechanics and focal adhesions are regulated by retinol and conjugated linoleic acid in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, Yaron R; Yakubov, Gleb E; Horton, Michael A; Pelling, Andrew E

    2009-07-15

    Retinol and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) have previously been shown to have an important role in gene expression and various cellular processes, including differentiation, proliferation and cell death. In this study we have investigated the effect of retinol and CLA, both individually and in combination, on the intracellular cytoskeleton, focal adhesions (FAs) and the nanomechanical properties of 3T3 fibroblasts. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in the formation of FAs following treatment with either compound, which was directly correlated to an increase in cell height (>30%) and a decrease in the measured Young's modulus (approximately 28%). Furthermore, treatments with both compounds demonstrated an increased effect and led to a reduction of >70% in the average number of FAs per cell and a decrease of >50% in average cell stiffness. These data reveal that retinol and CLA disrupt FA formation, leading to an increase in cell height and a significant decrease in stiffness. These results may broaden our understanding of the interplay between cell nanomechanics and cellular contact with the external microenvironment, and help to shed light on the important role of retinoids and CLA in health and disease. PMID:19546491

  1. Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation for 8 weeks does not affect body composition, lipid profile, or safety biomarkers in overweight, hyperlipidemic men.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shama V; Jacques, Hélène; Plourde, Mélanie; Mitchell, Patricia L; McLeod, Roger S; Jones, Peter J H

    2011-07-01

    The usefulness of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) as a nutraceutical remains ambiguous. Our objective was, therefore, to investigate the effect of CLA on body composition, blood lipids, and safety biomarkers in overweight, hyperlipidemic men. A double-blinded, 3-phase crossover trial was conducted in overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2)), borderline hypercholesterolemic [LDL-cholesterol (C) ≥ 2.5 mmol/L] men aged 18-60 y. During three 8-wk phases, each separated by a 4-wk washout period, 27 participants consumed under supervision in random order 3.5 g/d of safflower oil (control), a 50:50 mixture of trans 10, cis 12 and cis 9, trans 11 (c9, t11) CLA:Clarinol G-80, and c9, t11 isomer:c9, t11 CLA. At baseline and endpoint of each phase, body weight, body fat mass, and lean body mass were measured by DXA. Blood lipid profiles and safety biomarkers, including insulin sensitivity, blood concentrations of adiponectin, and inflammatory (high sensitive-C-reactive protein, TNFα, and IL-6) and oxidative (oxidized-LDL) molecules, were measured. The effect of CLA consumption on fatty acid oxidation was also assessed. Compared with the control treatment, the CLA treatments did not affect changes in body weight, body composition, or blood lipids. In addition, CLA did not affect the β-oxidation rate of fatty acids or induce significant alterations in the safety markers tested. In conclusion, although no detrimental effects were caused by supplementation, these results do not confirm a role for CLA in either body weight or blood lipid regulation in humans.

  2. In-vitro microbial production of conjugated linoleic acid by probiotic L. plantarum strains: Utilization as a functional starter culture in sucuk fermentation.

    PubMed

    Özer, Cem O; Kılıç, Birol; Kılıç, Gülden Başyiğit

    2016-04-01

    Twenty-three probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum strains were screened in-vitro to determine their ability to produce conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). L. plantarum AA1-2 and L. plantarum AB20-961 were identified as potential strains for CLA production. Optimum conditions for these strains to produce high levels of CLA were determined by evaluating the amount of added hydrolyzed sunflower oil (HSO) and initial pH levels in a nutrient medium. The highest CLA production was obtained in medium with pH6.0 and 2% HSO (P<0.05). Those strains were then used as starter culture in sucuk fermentation. Five sucuk treatments included a control (no starter culture), two sucuk groups with L. plantarum AA1-2 at the initial pH of 5.8 or 6.0 and two sucuk groups with L. plantarum AB20-961 at the initial pH of 5.8 or 6.0. Results indicate that L. plantarum AB20-961 produced higher amount of CLA in sucuk at initial pH of 5.8 and 6.0 levels during first 24h of fermentation compared with other groups. CLA isomer concentration decreased in all sucuk groups during the rest of the fermentation period (P<0.05) and remained quite stable during the storage. This study demonstrated that probiotic L. plantarum AB20-961 can be used in sucuk manufacturing without posing any quality problems.

  3. Effect of conjugated linoleic acid supplementation on body composition, body fat mobilization, protein accretion, and energy utilization in early lactation dairy cows.

    PubMed

    von Soosten, D; Meyer, U; Piechotta, M; Flachowsky, G; Dänicke, S

    2012-03-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of trans-10,cis-12 and cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation on body composition, mobilization or accretion of body fat and protein mass, as well as the energy metabolism of dairy cows during the first 105 d in milk (DIM). For this purpose, a comparative slaughter experiment was conducted with 25 primiparous German Holstein cows. The experiment started at 1 DIM with the slaughter of 5 animals of an initial group receiving no CLA supplement. The remaining animals were fed a CLA supplement (n=10) or a stearic acid-based control fat supplement (CON; n=10) from 1 DIM up to slaughter. After 42 DIM, 5 more cows from each treatment (42-CLA and 42-CON) were slaughtered. The remaining 5 cows in each treatment were slaughtered after 105 DIM (105-CLA and 105-CON). The animals of the CLA groups consumed 6.0 g/d of trans-10,cis-12 CLA and 5.7 g/d of cis-9,trans-11 CLA. During the slaughter process, the empty body mass was recorded and partitioned into 9 fractions (meat, bone, offal, hide, mammary gland, retroperitoneal fat, omental fat, mesenteric fat, and s.c. fat). The fractions were analyzed for dry matter, ether extract, crude protein, and ash to calculate the body composition of the empty body mass at the different slaughter times. The principle of the comparative slaughter technique was applied to estimate body fat or protein mobilization and accretion in the viewed periods from 1 DIM until 42 and 105 DIM. The heat production (HP) was calculated by subtracting the energy in milk and energy changes in body mass from the metabolizable energy intake. The body composition was not affected by CLA supplementation. However, the mobilization of body fat mass from 1 until 42 DIM was 24.1 kg in the 42-CON group and 14.3 kg in the 42-CLA group. This resulted in a trend to lower body mass (fat and protein) mobilization of 10.5 kg in the 42-CLA group. Energy mobilization from body mass was 21.2 MJ/d in

  4. Effects of conjugated linoleic acid supplementation on blood lipids and adiposity of rats fed diets rich in saturated versus unsaturated fat.

    PubMed

    Kloss, Rebecca; Linscheid, Janna; Johnson, Amy; Lawson, Brian; Edwards, Kylie; Linder, Travis; Stocker, Kelly; Petitte, Jeremy; Kern, Mark

    2005-06-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) may decrease adiposity and improve blood lipid profiles under some conditions. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of CLA supplementation on blood lipid profiles and adiposity of rats fed a diet containing a primarily saturated fat versus a diet containing a primarily unsaturated fat. Twenty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of four diets containing coconut oil, coconut oil with CLA, corn oil or corn oil with CLA. After 28 days, blood was collected and serum concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and triacylglycerols (TG) were assessed. Food intake, body weights, and epididymal fat pads were measured. No significant differences (p>0.05) were noted among groups for amount of food consumed, weight gained, food efficiency ratio or serum TG concentrations. TC concentrations were lower (p<0.05) in the CLA-supplemented rats that were fed coconut oil but not those consuming corn oil. Serum HDL-C was lower (p<0.05) in rats consuming corn oil but was not significantly different (p>0.05) for CLA supplemented groups. Epididymal fat pads weighed significantly more (p<0.05) in the coconut oil fed group compared to the corn oil fed group, but there was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the corn oil and coconut oil + CLA group. Overall, this study suggests that CLA is more beneficial for control of blood lipids and adiposity when supplemented to a diet rich in saturated versus unsaturated fat.

  5. The decrease in body fat in mice fed conjugated linoleic acid is due to increases in energy expenditure and energy loss in the excreta.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, A H M; Beynen, A C; Everts, H; Kocsis, S; Katan, M B; Zock, P L

    2002-05-01

    We carried out energy balance studies in four groups of young, growing, 5-wk-old Balb-C mice (n = 12/group) that were either food restricted or nonrestricted and fed high fat diets (38 energy%) with or without 0.93 g/100 g conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) for 39 d. The energy in carcasses, excreta and food was measured in a bomb calorimeter. CLA lowered the percentage of the energy intake that was stored in the body from 1.9 +/- 0.8 to -2.3 +/- 0.7% (mean +/- SD, P < 0.05) in the nonrestricted mice and from 1.4 +/- 1.3 to -2.9 +/- 0.7% (P < 0.05) in the restricted mice. Thus, the CLA-treated mice had a net loss of body energy. The percentage of the energy intake eliminated in the excreta increased from 7.6 +/- 0.9% in controls to 8.7 +/- 1.0% (P < 0.05) in the CLA-treated mice that were nonrestricted and from 7.3 +/- 0.8 to 8.4 +/- 0.6 (P < 0.05) in the restricted mice. The amount of energy ingested minus the amount retained in carcasses and excreta equals the energy expenditure. The percentage of the energy intake that was expended as heat increased from 90.5 +/- 1.2 in controls to 93.6 +/- 1.5% (P < 0.05) in the CLA-treated nonrestricted mice and from 91.3 +/- 1.5 to 94.5 +/- 1.0% (P < 0.05) in the restricted mice. The lower energy storage in the CLA-fed mice was accounted for by an increase in the energy expenditure (74%) and by an increase in energy lost in the excreta (26%). Feeding CLA also increased liver weight, which may warrant further studies on the safety of CLA. PMID:11983818

  6. Conjugated linoleic acids attenuate FSH- and IGF1-stimulated cell proliferation; IGF1, GATA4, and aromatase expression; and estradiol-17β production in buffalo granulosa cells involving PPARγ, PTEN, and PI3K/Akt.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Isha; Singh, Dheer

    2012-09-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has drawn much interest in last two decades in the area ranging from anticancer activity to obesity. A number of research papers have been published recently with regard to CLA's additional biological functions as reproductive benefits. However, not much is known how this mixture of isomeric compounds mediates its beneficial effects particularly on fertility. In this study, we demonstrated the cross talk between downstream signaling of CLA and important hormone regulators of endocrine system, i.e. FSH and IGF1, on buffalo granulosa cell function (proliferation and steroidogenesis). Experiments were performed in primary serum-free buffalo granulosa cell culture, where cells were incubated with CLA in combination with FSH (25 ng/ml) and IGF1 (50  ng/ml). Results showed that 10 μM CLA inhibits FSH- and IGF1-induced granulosa cell proliferation; aromatase, GATA4, and IGF1 mRNA; and estradiol-17β production. Western blot analysis of total cell lysates revealed that CLA intervenes the IGF1 signaling by decreasing p-Akt. In addition, CLA was found to upregulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARG) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) level in granulosa cells. Further study using PPARG- and PTEN-specific inhibitors supports the potential role of CLA in granulosa cell proliferation and steroidogenesis involving PPARG, PTEN, and PI3K/Akt pathway.

  7. Orchidectomy-induced alterations in volumetric bone density, cortical porosity and strength of femur are attenuated by dietary conjugated linoleic acid in aged guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    DeGuire, Jason R; Mak, Ivy L; Lavery, Paula; Agellon, Sherry; Wykes, Linda J; Weiler, Hope A

    2015-04-01

    Age-related osteoporosis and sarcopenia are ascribed in part to reductions in anabolic hormones. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) improves lean and bone mass, but its impact during androgen deficiency is not known. This study tested if CLA would attenuate the effects of orchidectomy (ORX)-induced losses of bone and lean tissue. Male guinea pigs (n=40; 70-72 weeks), were randomized into four groups: (1) SHAM+Control diet, (2) SHAM+CLA diet, (3) ORX+Control diet, (4) ORX+CLA diet. Baseline blood sampling and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans were conducted, followed by surgery 4 days later with the test diets started 7 days after baseline sampling. Serial blood sampling and DXA scans were repeated 2, 4, 8 and 16 weeks on the test diets. Body composition and areal BMD (aBMD) of whole body, lumbar spine, femur and tibia were measured using DXA. At week 16, muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR), volumetric BMD (vBMD), microarchitecture and bone strength were assessed. Body weight declined after SHAM and ORX surgery, with slower recovery in the ORX group. Dietary CLA did not affect weight or lean mass, but attenuated gains in fat mass. Lean mass was stable in SHAM and reduced in ORX by 2 weeks with whole body and femur bone mineral content (BMC) reduced by 4 weeks; CLA did not alter BMC. By week 16 ORX groups had lower free testosterone and myofibrillar FSR, yet higher cortisol, osteocalcin and ionized calcium with no alterations due to CLA. ORX+Control had higher prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and total alkaline phosphatase compared to SHAM+Control whereas ORX+CLA were not different from SHAM groups. Femur metaphyseal vBMD was reduced in ORX+CTRL with the reduction attenuated by CLA. Femur cortical thickness (Ct.Th.) and biomechanical strength were reduced and cortical porosity (Ct.Po.) elevated by ORX and attenuated by CLA. This androgen deficient model with a sarcopenic-osteoporotic phenotype similar to aging men responded to dietary CLA with

  8. Linoleic acid content in adipose tissue and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Riemersma, R A; Wood, D A; Butler, S; Elton, R A; Oliver, M; Salo, M; Nikkari, T; Vartiainen, E; Puska, P; Gey, F

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of an inverse relation between essential fatty acids in adipose tissue, in particular linoleic acid, and mortality from coronary heart disease was studied by a cross sectional survey of random population samples of apparently healthy men aged 40-49 from four European regions with differing mortality from coronary heart disease. The proportion of linoleic acid in adipose tissue was lowest in men from north Karelia, Finland, where mortality from coronary heart disease is highest, and highest in men from Italy, where mortality is lowest, with intermediate proportions in men from Scotland and south west Finland. Similar gradients were observed for the desaturation and elongation products dihomo-gamma-linolenic and arachidonic acid. The proportion of saturated fatty acids in adipose tissue was highest in Finland, intermediate in Scotland, and lowest in Italy. Italian men also had the highest proportion of oleate in their adipose tissue and the lowest proportion of myristoleate and palmitoleate. Finnish men were more obese and had a higher blood pressure. Serum cholesterol concentration was higher in north Karelia and south west Finland than in Scotland or Italy. High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations reflected the regional differences in serum cholesterol, being higher in Finland and lower in Italy. The ratios of HDL cholesterol to total cholesterol, however, did not differ. The regional differences in linoleic acid in adipose tissue remained highly significant when the observed differences in other known risk factors for coronary heart disease among the four areas were taken into account by multivariate analysis. The gradients in proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids probably reflect differences in dietary intake of linoleic acid. PMID:3087455

  9. Synergistic Chemotherapeutic Activity of Curcumin Bearing Methoxypolyethylene Glycol-g-Linoleic Acid Based Micelles on Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Guzzarlamudi, Sofia; Singh, Pankaj K; Pawar, Vivek K; Singh, Yuvraj; Sharma, Komal; Paliwal, S K; Chourasia, Manish K; Ramana, M V; Chaurasia, Mohini

    2016-04-01

    Although curcumin (Cur), has been poised to be an anticancer boon for quite some, its progress from bench to bed has been strained due to various pharmaceutical hurdles. Consequently curcumin has been entrapped in methoxy poly ethylene glycol and linoleic acid conjugated polymeric micelles (PMs) to not only tackle the routine issues but to also provide a synergetic effect against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Optimized PMs of Cur had size 186.53 ± 12.10 nm with polydispersity index 0.143 ± 0.031 and zeta potential -30.1 ± 3.2 mV. Developed formulation (Mpeg-Cla-Cur PMs) was hemocompatible and had high cytotoxicity (IC50 55.80 ± 4.63 µ/mL) against MCF-7 cells in comparison to pure Cur suspension (IC50 75.05 ± 5.75 µg/mL). As postulated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis studies revealed synergetic effect of Mpeg-Cla-Cur PMs with higher cell population in G1 phase in addition to high apoptosis of MCF-7 cells as compared to pure Cur suspension and con- trol group. Pharmacokinetic studies also show PMs enhanced MRT and T1/2 of Cur indicating its longer retention time in body. Mpeg-Cla-Cur PMs might become as an excellent chemotherapeutic alternative candidate for treatment of breast cancer with higher commercial value. PMID:27451784

  10. Human originated bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus PL60, produce conjugated linoleic acid and show anti-obesity effects in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui-Young; Park, Jong-Hwan; Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Baek, Min-Won; Kim, Dong-Jae; Lee, Ki-Eun; Paek, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Yeonhee; Park, Jae-Hak

    2006-07-01

    Many previous studies have reported that conjugated linoleic acid could be produced by starter culture bacteria, but the effects of the bacteria were not investigated. Moreover, there was no evidence of the conjugated linoleic acid-producing bacteria having potential health or nutritional effects related to conjugated linoleic acid, including reducing body fat. Here, we investigated the anti-obesity effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus PL60, a human originated bacterium that produces t10, c12-conjugated linoleic acid, on diet-induced obese mice. After 8 weeks of feeding, L. rhamnosus PL60 reduced body weight without reducing energy intake, and caused a significant, specific reduction of white adipose tissue (epididymal and perirenal). Although the size of epididymal adipocytes was not reduced by L. rhamnosus PL60, apoptotic signals and UCP-2 mRNA levels increased in adipose tissue. Liver steatosis, a well known side effect of CLA, was not observed by L. rhamnosus PL60 treatment; on the contrary it seemed to be normalized. Results showed that the amount of conjugated linoleic acid produced by Lactobacillus rhamnosus PL60 was enough to produce an anti-obesity effect.

  11. Selected nutrient contents, fatty acid composition, including conjugated linoleic acid, and retention values in separable lean from lamb rib loins as affected by external fat and cooking method.

    PubMed

    Badiani, Anna; Montellato, Lara; Bochicchio, Davide; Anfossi, Paola; Zanardi, Emanuela; Maranesi, Magda

    2004-08-11

    Proximate composition and fatty acid profile, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers included, were determined in separable lean of raw and cooked lamb rib loins. The cooking methods compared, which were also investigated for cooking yields and true nutrient retention values, were dry heating of fat-on cuts and moist heating of fat-off cuts; the latter method was tested as a sort of dietetic approach against the more traditional former type. With significantly (P < 0.05) lower cooking losses, dry heating of fat-on rib-loins produced slightly (although only rarely significantly) higher retention values for all of the nutrients considered, including CLA isomers. On the basis of the retention values obtained, both techniques led to a minimum migration of lipids into the separable lean, which was higher (P < 0.05) in dry heating than in moist heating, and was characterized by the prevalence of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. On the whole, the response to cooking of the class of CLA isomers (including that of the nutritionally most important isomer cis-9,trans-11) was more similar to that of the monounsaturated than the polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  12. Maternal conjugated linoleic acid supplementation reverses high-fat diet-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and inflammation in adult male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, C A; Segovia, S A; Markworth, J F; Gray, C; Zhang, X D; Milan, A M; Mitchell, C J; Barnett, M P G; Roy, N C; Vickers, M H; Reynolds, C M; Cameron-Smith, D

    2016-03-01

    A high-saturated-fat diet (HFD) during pregnancy and lactation leads to metabolic disorders in offspring concomitant with increased adiposity and a proinflammatory phenotype in later life. During the fetal period, the impact of maternal diet on skeletal muscle development is poorly described, despite this tissue exerting a major influence on life-long metabolic health. This study investigated the effect of a maternal HFD on skeletal muscle anabolic, catabolic, and inflammatory signaling in adult rat offspring. Furthermore, the actions of maternal-supplemented conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on these measures of muscle phenotype were investigated. A purified control diet (CD; 10% kcal fat), a CD supplemented with CLA (CLA; 10% kcal fat, 1% total fat as CLA), a high-fat (HFD; 45% kcal fat from lard), or a HFD supplemented with CLA (HFCLA; 45% kcal fat from lard, 1% total fat as CLA) was fed ad libitum to female Sprague-Dawley rats for 10 days before mating and throughout gestation and lactation. Male offspring received a standard chow diet from weaning, and the gastrocnemius was collected for analysis at day 150. Offspring from HF and HFCLA mothers displayed lower muscular protein content accompanied by elevated monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-6, and IL-1β concentrations. Phosphorylation of NF-κBp65 (Ser(536)) and expression of the catabolic E3 ligase muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) were increased in HF offspring, an effect reversed by maternal CLA supplementation. The present study demonstrates the importance of early life interventions to ameliorate the negative effects of poor maternal diet on offspring skeletal muscle development. PMID:26632603

  13. Using rumen probes to examine effects of conjugated linoleic acids and dietary concentrate proportion on rumen pH and rumen temperature of periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Petzold, M; Meyer, U; Spilke, J; Dänicke, S

    2014-08-01

    The study aimed to examine the influence of supplemented conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) to periparturient cows receiving different concentrate proportions antepartum on rumen pH (RpH) and rumen temperature (RT). Twenty pregnant German Holstein cows were equipped with rumen probes for continuous RpH and RT measurement in a frequency of 15 min to investigate effects of dietary concentrate and CLA around parturition and the impact of parturition itself on RpH and RT. Cows had ad libitum access to partial mixed rations, 3 weeks prior to calving until day 7 post-partum. Antepartum, cows received 100 g/day control fat (CON) or CLA supplement, either in low (20%; CON-20, CLA-20) or high concentrate diet (60%; CON-60, CLA-60). Post-partum, concentrate proportion was adjusted to 50% while fat supplementation continued. Compared with adapted feeding, high concentrate proportions antepartum tended to increase DMI and reduced RpH. Groups CON-60 and CLA-60 spent more than 4 h per day below RpH 5.6 during late pregnancy, indicating the presence of subacute rumen acidosis (SARA). The RT remained unaffected antepartum. Before calving, cows spent less time below RpH 5.6 and SARA could be detected in each group post-partum. Mean RpH increased slightly antepartum, whereas few hours before parturition a sharp decrease in RpH could be observed, accompanied with increased RT. Overall, it seems that CLA supplementation influences RpH and RT. Bearing in mind that rumen parameters fluctuate during day and herd level must be known, rumen probes for continuous RpH and RT measurement could be a useful management tool for animal health surveillance and may also help to predict parturition.

  14. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid supplementation alters the expression of genes involved in the endocannabinoid system in the bovine endometrium and increases plasma progesterone concentrations.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemi, A; Dirandeh, E; Ansari Pirsaraei, Z; Shohreh, B

    2016-10-01

    Endocannabinoids are derived from phospholipids and reduce fertility by interfering with implantation. Identification of changes in the expression of genes of the endocannabinoid system as a result of dietary inclusion of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is critical to the advancement of our understanding of the nutritional regulation of uterine function. An experiment was conducted on transition cows to evaluate the expression of key endocannabinoid genes in bovine endometrium in response to dietary supplementation with CLA. A total of 16 cows were randomly assigned to two treatments: (1) control (75 g/day palm oil) and (2) CLA (75 g/day CLA) from 21 days prepartum to Day 42 postpartum. Cows underwent uterine biopsy on days 21 and 42 postpartum. The abundance of mRNA encoding endocannabinoid receptor (CNR2), N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPEPLD), fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA), and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) was measured by real-time PCR. Results reported that relative levels of mRNA encoding CNR2 and NAPEPLD were decreased (P < 0.05) compared with control cows between Days 21 and 42 postpartum. Relative levels of mRNA coding for NAAA and MGLL were not different (P > 0.05) in the same situation. Mean plasma progesterone concentrations were higher in CLA-fed cows compared with control cows at Day 42 postpartum (3.51 and 1.42 ng/mL, respectively, P < 0.05). In conclusion, we suggest that the beneficial effects of a diet enriched with CLA are the result of a decrease in relative gene expression of the endocannabinoid receptor (CNR2) and enzymes that synthesize fatty acid amides (NAPEPLD) and of an increase in the expression of PTGS2 that in turn can oxidate endocannabinoids and consequently resulted in increased plasma progesterone concentrations during early lactation. PMID:27262886

  15. Proteomic Analysis Reveals PGAM1 Altering cis-9, trans-11 Conjugated Linoleic Acid Synthesis in Bovine Mammary Gland.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Lee, S B; Hwang, J H; Lim, J N; Jung, U S; Kim, M J; Kang, H S; Choi, S H; Lee, J S; Roh, S G; Lee, H G

    2015-05-01

    cis-9, trans-11 Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is one of the most extensively studied CLA isomers due to its multiple isomer-specific effects. However, the molecular mechanisms of cis-9,trans-11 CLA synthesis in ruminant mammary gland are still not clearly understood. This process may be mediated, to a certain extent, by trans-11 C18:1 regulated by stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1) and/or its syntrophic proteins. This study aimed to investigate the effects of TVA on SCD1-mediated cis-9,trans-11 CLA synthesis in MAC-T cells and its potential molecular mechanism. Results showed that trans-11 C18:1 was continually taken up and converted into cis-9,trans-11 CLA in MAC-T cells during the 4-h incubation of 50 μM trans-11 C18:1. SCD1 protein expression increased more than twofold at 2 h (P < 0.01) and 2.5 h (P < 0.05) before decreasing to less than half of the normal level at 4 h (P < 0.05). One up-regulated (RAS guanyl releasing protein 4 isoform 1 [RASGRP4]) and six down-regulated proteins (glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase 1 [GNPDA1], triosephosphate isomerase [TPI1], phosphoglycerate mutase 1 [PGAM1], heat shock protein beta-1 [HSPB1], annexin A3 [ANXA3], thiopurine S-methyltransferase [TPMT]) were found in MAC-T cells treated with trans-11 C18:1. Of these seven identified proteins, the presence of GNPDA1 and PGAM1 was verified in several models. More trans-11 C18:1 was taken up after PGAM1 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA). In conclusion, our data suggested that PGAM1 may have a negative relationship with SCD1 and seemed to be involved in cis-9, trans-11 CLA synthesis by facilitating the absorption of trans-11 C18:1 in the bovine mammary gland.

  16. A mixture of oleic, erucic and conjugated linoleic acids modulates cerebrospinal fluid inflammatory markers and improve somatosensorial evoked potential in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy female carriers.

    PubMed

    Cappa, Marco; Bizzarri, Carla; Petroni, Anna; Carta, Gianfranca; Cordeddu, Lina; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Vollono, Catello; De Pasquale, Loredana; Blasevich, Milena; Banni, Sebastiano

    2012-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a rare inherited demyelinating disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, mainly hexacosanoic acid (26:0), due to a mutation of the gene encoding for a peroxisomal membrane protein. The only available, and partially effective, therapeutic treatment consists of dietary intake of a 4:1 mixture of triolein and trierucin, called Lorenzo's oil (LO), targeted to inhibit the elongation of docosanoic acid (22:0) to 26:0. In this study we tested whether, besides inhibiting elongation, an enhancement of peroxisomal beta oxidation induced by conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), will improve somatosensory evoked potentials and modify inflammatory markers in adrenoleukodystrophy females carriers. We enrolled five heterozygous women. They received a mixture of LO (40 g/day) with CLA (5 g/day) for 2 months. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by the means of plasma levels of 26:0, 26:0/22:0 ratio, modification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammatory markers and somatosensory evoked potentials. Changes of fatty acid profile, and in particular CLA incorporation, were also evaluated in CSF and plasma. The results showed that CLA promptly passes the blood brain barrier and the mixture was able to lower both 26:0 and 26:0/22:0 ratio in plasma. The mixture improved somatosensory evoked potentials, which were previously found unchanged or worsened with dietary LO alone, and reduced IL-6 levels in CSF in three out of five patients. Our data suggest that the synergic activity of CLA and LO, by enhancing peroxisomal beta-oxidation and preventing 26:0 formation, improves the somatosensory evoked potentials and reduces neuroinflammation.

  17. In-vitro microbial production of conjugated linoleic acid by probiotic L. plantarum strains: Utilization as a functional starter culture in sucuk fermentation.

    PubMed

    Özer, Cem O; Kılıç, Birol; Kılıç, Gülden Başyiğit

    2016-04-01

    Twenty-three probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum strains were screened in-vitro to determine their ability to produce conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). L. plantarum AA1-2 and L. plantarum AB20-961 were identified as potential strains for CLA production. Optimum conditions for these strains to produce high levels of CLA were determined by evaluating the amount of added hydrolyzed sunflower oil (HSO) and initial pH levels in a nutrient medium. The highest CLA production was obtained in medium with pH6.0 and 2% HSO (P<0.05). Those strains were then used as starter culture in sucuk fermentation. Five sucuk treatments included a control (no starter culture), two sucuk groups with L. plantarum AA1-2 at the initial pH of 5.8 or 6.0 and two sucuk groups with L. plantarum AB20-961 at the initial pH of 5.8 or 6.0. Results indicate that L. plantarum AB20-961 produced higher amount of CLA in sucuk at initial pH of 5.8 and 6.0 levels during first 24h of fermentation compared with other groups. CLA isomer concentration decreased in all sucuk groups during the rest of the fermentation period (P<0.05) and remained quite stable during the storage. This study demonstrated that probiotic L. plantarum AB20-961 can be used in sucuk manufacturing without posing any quality problems. PMID:26720888

  18. Detection of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor in various adipose tissue depots of dairy cows supplemented with conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Friedauer, K; Dänicke, S; Schulz, K; Sauerwein, H; Häussler, S

    2015-10-01

    Early lactating cows mobilize adipose tissue (AT) to provide energy for milk yield and maintenance and are susceptible to metabolic disorders and impaired immune response. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), mainly the trans-10, cis-12 isomer, reduce milk fat synthesis and may attenuate negative energy balance. Circulating glucocorticoids (GC) are increased during parturition in dairy cows and mediate differentiating and anti-inflammatory effects via glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the presence of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1). Activated GC are the main ligands for both receptors in AT; therefore, we hypothesized that tissue-specific GC metabolism is effected by varying amounts of GR, MR and 11βHSD1 and/or their localization within AT depots. Furthermore, the lipolytic and antilipogenic effects of CLA might influence the GC/GR/MR system in AT. Therefore, we aimed to localize GR and MR as well as the expression pattern and activity of 11βHSD1 in different AT depots during early lactation in dairy cows and to identify potential effects of CLA. Primiparous German Holstein cows were divided into a control (CON) and a CLA group. From day 1 post-partum (p.p.) until sample collection, the CLA group was fed with 100 g/d CLA (contains 10 g each of the cis-9, trans-11 and the trans-10, cis-12-CLA isomers). CON cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 1, 42 and 105 p.p., while CLA cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 42 and 105 p.p. Subcutaneous fat from tailhead, withers and sternum, and visceral fat from omental, mesenteric and retroperitoneal depots were sampled. The localization of GR and 11βHSD1 in mature adipocytes - being already differentiated - indicates that GC promote other effects via GR than differentiation. Moreover, MR were observed in the stromal vascular cell fraction and positively related to the pre-adipocyte marker Pref-1. However, only marginal CLA effects were observed in this study.

  19. Detection of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor in various adipose tissue depots of dairy cows supplemented with conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Friedauer, K; Dänicke, S; Schulz, K; Sauerwein, H; Häussler, S

    2015-10-01

    Early lactating cows mobilize adipose tissue (AT) to provide energy for milk yield and maintenance and are susceptible to metabolic disorders and impaired immune response. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), mainly the trans-10, cis-12 isomer, reduce milk fat synthesis and may attenuate negative energy balance. Circulating glucocorticoids (GC) are increased during parturition in dairy cows and mediate differentiating and anti-inflammatory effects via glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the presence of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1). Activated GC are the main ligands for both receptors in AT; therefore, we hypothesized that tissue-specific GC metabolism is effected by varying amounts of GR, MR and 11βHSD1 and/or their localization within AT depots. Furthermore, the lipolytic and antilipogenic effects of CLA might influence the GC/GR/MR system in AT. Therefore, we aimed to localize GR and MR as well as the expression pattern and activity of 11βHSD1 in different AT depots during early lactation in dairy cows and to identify potential effects of CLA. Primiparous German Holstein cows were divided into a control (CON) and a CLA group. From day 1 post-partum (p.p.) until sample collection, the CLA group was fed with 100 g/d CLA (contains 10 g each of the cis-9, trans-11 and the trans-10, cis-12-CLA isomers). CON cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 1, 42 and 105 p.p., while CLA cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 42 and 105 p.p. Subcutaneous fat from tailhead, withers and sternum, and visceral fat from omental, mesenteric and retroperitoneal depots were sampled. The localization of GR and 11βHSD1 in mature adipocytes - being already differentiated - indicates that GC promote other effects via GR than differentiation. Moreover, MR were observed in the stromal vascular cell fraction and positively related to the pre-adipocyte marker Pref-1. However, only marginal CLA effects were observed in this study. PMID

  20. Macrophage PPAR gamma Co-activator-1 alpha participates in repressing foam cell formation and atherosclerosis in response to conjugated linoleic acid

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Cathal; Lieggi, Nora T; Barry, Denis; Mooney, Declan; de Gaetano, Monica; James, William G; McClelland, Sarah; Barry, Mary C; Escoubet-Lozach, Laure; Li, Andrew C; Glass, Christopher K; Fitzgerald, Desmond J; Belton, Orina

    2013-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has the unique property of inducing regression of pre-established murine atherosclerosis. Understanding the mechanism(s) involved may help identify endogenous pathways that reverse human atherosclerosis. Here, we provide evidence that CLA inhibits foam cell formation via regulation of the nuclear receptor coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α, and that macrophage PGC-1α plays a role in atheroprotection in vivo. PGC-1α was identified as a hub gene within a cluster in the aorta of the apoE−/− mouse in the CLA-induced regression model. PGC-1α was localized to macrophage/foam cells in the murine aorta where its expression was increased during CLA-induced regression. PGC-1α expression was also detected in macrophages in human atherosclerosis and was inversely linked to disease progression in patients with the disease. Deletion of PGC-1α in bone marrow derived macrophages promoted, whilst over expression of the gene inhibited foam cell formation. Importantly, macrophage specific deletion of PGC-1α accelerated atherosclerosis in the LDLR−/− mouse in vivo. These novel data support a functional role for PGC-1α in atheroprotection. PMID:23964012

  1. Effect of dietary conjugated linoleic acid on marbling and intramuscular adipocytes in pork.

    PubMed

    Barnes, K M; Winslow, N R; Shelton, A G; Hlusko, K C; Azain, M J

    2012-04-01

    Dietary CLA has been reported to decrease backfat and increase marbling in pigs. Our objective was to determine whether the increase in marbling involved changes in intramuscular adipocyte number or size or both. Twenty barrows (53 kg) were penned in pairs and pens were randomly assigned to receive diets containing either 1% soybean oil (SBO) or CLA (60% CLA isomers) for 6 wk. Body weight and feed intake were determined weekly. At slaughter, loin samples were obtained and flash frozen for RNA extraction and real-time reverse-transcription PCR analysis of gene expression. After a 24-h chill, loin eye area and backfat depth were measured and subjective marbling and color scores were assigned. Loin, backfat, and belly fat samples were obtained for fatty acid analysis by gas chromatography. Loin samples were also frozen in ice-cold isopentane for histological analysis of intramuscular adipocytes. Dietary CLA did not affect BW or feed intake at any point (P > 0.10), nor did treatment groups differ in HCW (P = 0.417) or loin color (P = 0.500). The CLA-fed pigs did have less (P = 0.018) backfat and smaller (P = 0.047) loin eye area than SBO-fed pigs and had a trend for an increase (P = 0.069) in marbling score. Relative gene expression for markers of preadipocytes (preadipocyte factor 1; Pref-1), differentiating adipocytes (PPARγ), and mature adipocytes [fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) and perilipin (PLIN)] were determined and normalized to the expression of acidic ribosomal phosphoprotein. No significant differences were detected, but the expression of PPARγ (P = 0.265), PLIN (P = 0.265), and FABP4 (P = 0.148) was numerically greater in CLA-fed pigs than in SBO-fed pigs. Loin samples were stained with Oil Red O to identify intramuscular adipocytes. The average cell area was increased (P = 0.030) in CLA-fed pigs. The cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomers were incorporated (P = 0.006) into backfat and belly fat, but only trans-10,cis-12 CLA was increased in

  2. Dietary linoleic acid-induced alterations in pro- and anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Amit; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon F; Yang, Jun; Blanchard, Helene; Zamora, Daisy; Loewke, James D; Rapoport, Stanley I; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M; Hammock, Bruce D; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic idiopathic pain syndromes are major causes of personal suffering, disability, and societal expense. Dietary n-6 linoleic acid has increased markedly in modern industrialized populations over the past century. These high amounts of linoleic acid could hypothetically predispose to physical pain by increasing the production of pro-nociceptive linoleic acid-derived lipid autacoids and by interfering with the production of anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids derived from n-3 fatty acids. Here, we used a rat model to determine the effect of increasing dietary linoleic acid as a controlled variable for 15 weeks on nociceptive lipid autacoids and their precursor n-6 and n-3 fatty acids in tissues associated with idiopathic pain syndromes. Results Increasing dietary linoleic acid markedly increased the abundance of linoleic acid and its pro-nociceptive derivatives and reduced the abundance of n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their anti-nociceptive monoepoxide derivatives. Diet-induced changes occurred in a tissue-specific manner, with marked alterations of nociceptive lipid autacoids in both peripheral and central tissues, and the most pronounced changes in their fatty acid precursors in peripheral tissues. Conclusions The present findings provide biochemical support for the hypothesis that the high linoleic acid content of modern industrialized diets may create a biochemical susceptibility to develop chronic pain. Dietary linoleic acid lowering should be further investigated as part of an integrative strategy for the prevention and management of idiopathic pain syndromes. PMID:27030719

  3. Trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid reduces neutral lipid content and may affect cryotolerance of in vitro-produced crossbred bovine embryos

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to high neutral lipids accumulation in the cytoplasm, in vitro-produced embryos from Bos primigenius indicus and their crosses are more sensitive to chilling and cryopreservation than those from Bos primigenius taurus. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on the development and cryotolerance of crossbred Bos primigenius taurus x Bos primigenius indicus embryos produced in vitro, and cultured in the presence of fetal calf serum. Bovine zygotes (n = 1,692) were randomly assigned to one of the following treatment groups: 1) Control, zygotes cultured in Charles Rosenkrans 2 amino acid (CR2aa) medium (n = 815) or 2) CLA, zygotes cultured in CR2aa medium supplemented with 100 μmol/L of trans-10, cis-12 CLA (n = 877). Embryo development (cleavage and blastocyst rates evaluated at days 3 and 8 of culture, respectively), lipid content at morula stage (day 5) and blastocyst cryotolerance (re-expansion and hatching rates, evaluated 24 and 72 h post-thawing, respectively) were compared between groups. Additionally, selected mRNA transcripts were measured by Real–Time PCR in blastocyst stage. Results The CLA treatment had no effect on cleavage and blastocyst rates, or on mRNA levels for genes related to cellular stress and apoptosis. On the other hand, abundance of mRNA for the 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate 0-acyltransferase-encoding gene (AGPAT), which is involved in triglycerides synthesis, and consequently neutral lipid content, were reduced by CLA treatment. A significant increase was observed in the re-expansion rate of embryos cultured with trans-10, cis-12 CLA when compared to control (56.3 vs. 34.4%, respectively, P = 0.002). However, this difference was not observed in the hatching rate (16.5 vs. 14.0%, respectively, P = 0.62). Conclusions The supplementation with trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomer in culture medium reduced the lipid content of in vitro produced

  4. Shelf life of ground beef enriched with omega-3 and/or conjugated linoleic acid and use of grape seed extract to inhibit lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Inmaculada; Beriain, María J; Mendizabal, Jose A; Realini, Carolina; Purroy, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The shelf life and oxidative stability of refrigerated raw ground beef enriched with omega-3 and/or conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) were studied. Grape seed extract (GSE) was used to inhibit lipid oxidation in the ground beef. Eight treatments of ground beef were established according to the enrichment of beef (control, enriched with omega-3, with CLA, or with omega-3 plus CLA) and the use of GSE (0 and 250 mg GSE/kg product). Fresh beef was ground and mixed with GSE and salt. Treatments of beef were stored at 2 ± 1°C in aerobic packaging for 0, 1, 3, and 6 days under retail display conditions. Oxidation stability (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances [TBARS]), pH, instrumental color, metmyoglobin formation, and sensory attributes (color and odor) were measured. Omega-3-enriched beef increased the oxidation level at day 6 as determined by TBARS (P < 0.05), but the instrumental color was not affected. The enrichment of CLA improved the coordinates of color (P < 0.05) until day 3 and decreased the oxidation at day 6 (P < 0.05). There were no differences in color and odor values among the types of beef during display, except at day 3, when CLA treatments had the highest scores. Addition of GSE decreased the oxidation level (P < 0.001) and did not affect the instrumental color or the sensory parameters. PMID:26788312

  5. Conjugated linoleic acid-enriched butter improved memory and up-regulated phospholipase A2 encoding-genes in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gama, Marco A S; Raposo, Nádia R B; Mury, Fábio B; Lopes, Fernando C F; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Talib, Leda L; Gattaz, Wagner F

    2015-10-01

    Reduced phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity has been reported in blood cells and in postmortem brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), and there is evidence that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) modulates the activity of PLA2 groups in non-brain tissues. As CLA isomers were shown to be actively incorporated and metabolized in the brains of rats, we hypothesized that feeding a diet naturally enriched in CLA would affect the activity and expression of Pla 2 -encoding genes in rat brain tissue, with possible implications for memory. To test this hypothesis, Wistar rats were trained for the inhibitory avoidance task and fed a commercial diet (control) or experimental diets containing either low CLA- or CLA-enriched butter for 4 weeks. After this period, the rats were tested for memory retrieval and killed for tissue collection. Hippocampal expression of 19 Pla 2 genes was evaluated by qPCR, and activities of PLA2 groups (cPLA2, iPLA2, and sPLA2) were determined by radioenzymatic assay. Rats fed the high CLA diet had increased hippocampal mRNA levels for specific PLA2 isoforms (iPla 2 g6γ; cPla 2 g4a, sPla 2 g3, sPla 2 g1b, and sPla 2 g12a) and higher enzymatic activity of all PLA2 groups as compared to those fed the control and the low CLA diet. The increment in PLA2 activities correlated significantly with memory enhancement, as assessed by increased latency in the step-down inhibitory avoidance task after 4 weeks of treatment (rs = 0.69 for iPLA2, P < 0.001; rs = 0.81 for cPLA2, P < 0.001; and rs = 0.69 for sPLA2, P < 0.001). In face of the previous reports showing reduced PLA2 activity in AD brains, the present findings suggest that dairy products enriched in cis-9, trans-11 CLA may be useful in the treatment of this disease. PMID:25913570

  6. Conjugated linoleic acid-enriched butter improved memory and up-regulated phospholipase A2 encoding-genes in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gama, Marco A S; Raposo, Nádia R B; Mury, Fábio B; Lopes, Fernando C F; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Talib, Leda L; Gattaz, Wagner F

    2015-10-01

    Reduced phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity has been reported in blood cells and in postmortem brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), and there is evidence that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) modulates the activity of PLA2 groups in non-brain tissues. As CLA isomers were shown to be actively incorporated and metabolized in the brains of rats, we hypothesized that feeding a diet naturally enriched in CLA would affect the activity and expression of Pla 2 -encoding genes in rat brain tissue, with possible implications for memory. To test this hypothesis, Wistar rats were trained for the inhibitory avoidance task and fed a commercial diet (control) or experimental diets containing either low CLA- or CLA-enriched butter for 4 weeks. After this period, the rats were tested for memory retrieval and killed for tissue collection. Hippocampal expression of 19 Pla 2 genes was evaluated by qPCR, and activities of PLA2 groups (cPLA2, iPLA2, and sPLA2) were determined by radioenzymatic assay. Rats fed the high CLA diet had increased hippocampal mRNA levels for specific PLA2 isoforms (iPla 2 g6γ; cPla 2 g4a, sPla 2 g3, sPla 2 g1b, and sPla 2 g12a) and higher enzymatic activity of all PLA2 groups as compared to those fed the control and the low CLA diet. The increment in PLA2 activities correlated significantly with memory enhancement, as assessed by increased latency in the step-down inhibitory avoidance task after 4 weeks of treatment (rs = 0.69 for iPLA2, P < 0.001; rs = 0.81 for cPLA2, P < 0.001; and rs = 0.69 for sPLA2, P < 0.001). In face of the previous reports showing reduced PLA2 activity in AD brains, the present findings suggest that dairy products enriched in cis-9, trans-11 CLA may be useful in the treatment of this disease.

  7. Differential effects of linoleic Acid metabolites on cardiac sodium current.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Maddison D; Stimers, Joseph R

    2002-10-01

    9,10-Epoxy-12-octadecenoic acid (EOA), a metabolite of linoleic acid, causes cardiac arrest in dogs. Other metabolites of linoleic acid also have toxic effects. This study investigates the mechanism of action of four of these compounds on cardiac Na(+) current (I(Na)). The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to investigate the effects of EOA, 9,10-dihydroxy-12-octadecenoic acid (DHOA), and their corresponding methyl esters (9,10-epoxy-12-octadecenoic methyl ester, EOM; and 9,10-dihydroxy-12-octadecenoic methyl ester, DHOM) on I(Na) in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. Extracellular application of each compound elicited a concentration-dependent inhibition of I(Na). The dose-response curve yielded 50% inhibition concentrations of 301 +/- 117 microM for DHOA, 41 +/- 6 microM for DHOM, 34 +/- 5 microM for EOA, and 160 +/- 41 microM for EOM. Although there was no effect on activation, 50 microM DHOM, EOA, and EOM significantly hyperpolarized the steady-state inactivation curve by approximately -6 mV. Furthermore, EOM significantly increased the slope of the steady-state inactivation curve. These compounds also seemed to stabilize the inactivated state because the time for recovery from inactivation was significantly slowed from a control value of 12.9 +/- 0.5 ms to 30.5 +/- 3.3, 31.4 +/- 1.4, and 20.5 +/- 1.0 ms by 50 microM DHOM, EOA, and EOM, respectively. These compounds have multiple actions on Na(+) channels and that despite their structural similarities their actions differ from each other. The steady-state block of I(Na) suggests that either the pore is being blocked or the channels are prevented from gating to the open state. In addition, these compounds stabilize the inactivated state and promote increased population of a slower inactivated state. PMID:12235270

  8. Oxidation of linoleic acid encapsulated with gum arabic or maltodextrin by spray-drying.

    PubMed

    Minemoto, Y; Hakamata, K; Adachi, S; Matsuno, R

    2002-01-01

    Linoleic acid was emulsified with gum arabic or maltodextrin at various weight ratios of the acid to the polysaccharide in the presence or absence of a small-molecule emulsifier. The emulsions were spray-dried to produce microcapsules. Emulsions prepared with gum arabic were smaller in droplet size and more stable than those prepared with maltodextrin, and linoleic acid in a gum arabic-based microcapsule was also most resistant to oxidation than that in a maltodextrin-based microcapsule. Although the oil droplet size in the emulsion with maltodextrin decreased and the emulsion stability was improved by addition of a small-molecule emulsifier to linoleic acid, the oxidative stability of the encapsulated linoleic acid was not significantly improved. Encapsulated linoleic acid of small droplet size oxidized more slowly than that of large droplet size.

  9. Refractive Index and Density Measurements of Peanut Oil for Determining Oleic and Linoleic Acid Contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut seed are approximately 50% oil of which > 80% is either oleic or linoleic acid. The oleic/linoleic acid (O/L) ratio largely influences oxidative stability and hence peanut shelf life. Traditional peanut seed have O/L ratios near 1.5-2.0; however, many new cultivars are “high oleic” with O/L...

  10. Density and Refractive Index Measurements of Peanut Oil to Determine Oleic and Linoleic Acid Content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut seed are approximately 50% oil of which > 80% is either oleic or linoleic acid. The oleic/linoleic acid (O/L) ratio largely influences oxidative stability and hence peanut shelf life. Traditional peanut seed have O/L ratios near 2.5; however, many new cultivars are “high oleic” with O/L rat...

  11. The use of 2-dimensional gas chromatography to investigate the effect of rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid, breed, and lactation stage on the fatty acid profile of sheep milk.

    PubMed

    Pellattiero, E; Cecchinato, A; Tagliapietra, F; Schiavon, S; Bittante, G

    2015-04-01

    In this study, 2-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) was used to obtain a detailed fatty acid (FA) profile of sheep milk and to evaluate the effects of a rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid (rpCLA) supply, breed, days in milk (DIM), sampling period, and number of lambs suckling on the FA profile. Twenty-four ewes, from 3 autochthonous breeds of the Veneto Alps (Brogna, Foza, and Lamon), were housed in 6 pens (2 pens/breed), according to DIM (38 ± 23 d) and body weight (61 ± 13 kg). The ewes and their offspring of 3 pens (1 pen/breed) were fed ad libitum a total mixed ration (control), and the other animals received the same diet supplemented with 12 g/d per ewe, plus 4 g/d for each lamb older than 30 d, of an rpCLA mixture. The study lasted 63 d. Two composite milk samples for each ewe were prepared during the first and second months of the trial. The pooled milk samples were analyzed in duplicate for FA profile by 2-dimensional gas chromatography, which allowed us to obtain a detailed FA profile of sheep milk, with 170 different FA detected, including many that were present in small concentrations. The milk relative proportions of individual FA, groups of FA, or FA indices were analyzed by PROC MIXED of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC), considering diet, breed, DIM, and sampling period as sources of variation. The random effect of animal was used to test diet, breed, and DIM, whereas the effects of period were tested on the residual. Breed had a small influence on milk FA profile, mainly on branched- and odd-chain FA. Within breed, animal repeatability for the relative proportions of milk FA was notable for almost all monounsaturated FA and for saturated FA with 14 to 19 carbon atoms, except C16:0, and less so for polyunsaturated FA. The inclusion of rpCLA (CLA cis-9,trans-11 and CLA trans-10,cis-12) increased the presence of the same CLA isomers in the milk as well as that of CLA trans-9,trans-11, and decreased the proportions of de novo

  12. The use of 2-dimensional gas chromatography to investigate the effect of rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid, breed, and lactation stage on the fatty acid profile of sheep milk.

    PubMed

    Pellattiero, E; Cecchinato, A; Tagliapietra, F; Schiavon, S; Bittante, G

    2015-04-01

    In this study, 2-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) was used to obtain a detailed fatty acid (FA) profile of sheep milk and to evaluate the effects of a rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid (rpCLA) supply, breed, days in milk (DIM), sampling period, and number of lambs suckling on the FA profile. Twenty-four ewes, from 3 autochthonous breeds of the Veneto Alps (Brogna, Foza, and Lamon), were housed in 6 pens (2 pens/breed), according to DIM (38 ± 23 d) and body weight (61 ± 13 kg). The ewes and their offspring of 3 pens (1 pen/breed) were fed ad libitum a total mixed ration (control), and the other animals received the same diet supplemented with 12 g/d per ewe, plus 4 g/d for each lamb older than 30 d, of an rpCLA mixture. The study lasted 63 d. Two composite milk samples for each ewe were prepared during the first and second months of the trial. The pooled milk samples were analyzed in duplicate for FA profile by 2-dimensional gas chromatography, which allowed us to obtain a detailed FA profile of sheep milk, with 170 different FA detected, including many that were present in small concentrations. The milk relative proportions of individual FA, groups of FA, or FA indices were analyzed by PROC MIXED of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC), considering diet, breed, DIM, and sampling period as sources of variation. The random effect of animal was used to test diet, breed, and DIM, whereas the effects of period were tested on the residual. Breed had a small influence on milk FA profile, mainly on branched- and odd-chain FA. Within breed, animal repeatability for the relative proportions of milk FA was notable for almost all monounsaturated FA and for saturated FA with 14 to 19 carbon atoms, except C16:0, and less so for polyunsaturated FA. The inclusion of rpCLA (CLA cis-9,trans-11 and CLA trans-10,cis-12) increased the presence of the same CLA isomers in the milk as well as that of CLA trans-9,trans-11, and decreased the proportions of de novo

  13. Tocopherols and tocotrienols in serum and liver of dairy cows receiving conjugated linoleic acids or a control fat supplement during early lactation.

    PubMed

    Sadri, H; Dänicke, S; Meyer, Ulrich; Rehage, J; Frank, J; Sauerwein, H

    2015-10-01

    The fat-soluble vitamin E comprises the 8 structurally related compounds (congeners) α-, β-, γ-, and δ-tocopherol (with a saturated side chain) and α-, β-, γ-, and δ-tocotrienol (with a 3-fold unsaturated side chain). Little is known regarding the blood and liver concentrations of the 8 vitamin E congeners during the transition from pregnancy to lactation in dairy cows. We thus quantified tocopherols (T) and tocotrienols (T3) in serum and liver and hepatic expression of genes involved in vitamin E metabolism in pluriparous German Holstein cows during late gestation and early lactation and investigated whether dietary supplementation (from d 1 in milk) with conjugated linoleic acids (CLA; 100g/d; each 12% of trans-10,cis-12 and cis-9,trans-11 CLA; n=11) altered these compared with control-fat supplemented cows (CTR; n=10). Blood samples and liver biopsies were collected on d -21, 1, 21, 70, and 105 (liver only) relative to calving. In both groups, the serum concentrations of αT, γT, βT3, and δT3 increased from d -21 to d 21 and remained unchanged between d 21 and 70, but were unaffected by CLA. The concentrations of the different congeners of vitamin E in liver did not differ between the CTR and the CLA groups. In both groups, the concentrations of the vitamin E forms in liver changed during the course of the study. The hepatic mRNA abundance of genes controlling vitamin E status did not differ between groups, but α-tocopherol transfer protein and tocopherol-associated protein mRNA increased with time of lactation in both. In conclusion, the concentrations of vitamin E congeners and the expression of genes related to vitamin E status follow characteristic time-related changes during the transition from late gestation to early lactation but are unaffected by CLA supplementation at the dosage used.

  14. Influence of a rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid mixture on carcass traits and meat quality in young Simmental heifers.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, G; Ringseis, R; Shibani, M; Most, E; Schuster, M; Schwarz, F J; Eder, K

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of feeding rumen-protected CLA during the early growing period on physical and chemical beef properties in young Simmental heifers. A total of 36 heifers (5 mo old; initial BW 185 ± 21 kg) were fed 250 g of different rumen-protected fats daily for 16 wk in 1 of 3 treatment groups: 250 g of a CLA-free control fat; 100 g of a CLA fat containing 2.4% of cis-9,trans-11 CLA and 2.1% of trans-10,cis-12 CLA and 150 g control fat; or 250 g of the CLA fat. Heifer growth performance variables as well as carcass weight, classification (conformation and fatness), and weights of organs and fat depots were not affected (P > 0.05) by CLA supplementation. Concentration of trans-10,cis-12 CLA in tissues (LM and subcutaneous fat) was dose-dependently increased (P < 0.01) by CLA supplementation, whereas that of cis-9,trans-11 CLA in these tissues did not differ (P > 0.05) between groups. The ratio of SFA to MUFA was increased (P < 0.01) in tissues of CLA-fed heifers compared with control heifers. Concentration of α-tocopherol in LM was greater (P = 0.01) in heifers of the 2 CLA groups than in control heifers. Other quality characteristics such as drip loss during storage, cooking loss, intramuscular fat content, and color variables in LM did not differ (P > 0.05) between groups. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that feeding rumen-protected CLA during the early growing period changes tissue fatty acid composition but does not influence beef quality variables. Performance variables and carcass traits in young heifers, unlike in pigs and laboratory animals, are not influenced by CLA feeding.

  15. Influence of a rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid mixture on carcass traits and meat quality in young Simmental heifers.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, G; Ringseis, R; Shibani, M; Most, E; Schuster, M; Schwarz, F J; Eder, K

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of feeding rumen-protected CLA during the early growing period on physical and chemical beef properties in young Simmental heifers. A total of 36 heifers (5 mo old; initial BW 185 ± 21 kg) were fed 250 g of different rumen-protected fats daily for 16 wk in 1 of 3 treatment groups: 250 g of a CLA-free control fat; 100 g of a CLA fat containing 2.4% of cis-9,trans-11 CLA and 2.1% of trans-10,cis-12 CLA and 150 g control fat; or 250 g of the CLA fat. Heifer growth performance variables as well as carcass weight, classification (conformation and fatness), and weights of organs and fat depots were not affected (P > 0.05) by CLA supplementation. Concentration of trans-10,cis-12 CLA in tissues (LM and subcutaneous fat) was dose-dependently increased (P < 0.01) by CLA supplementation, whereas that of cis-9,trans-11 CLA in these tissues did not differ (P > 0.05) between groups. The ratio of SFA to MUFA was increased (P < 0.01) in tissues of CLA-fed heifers compared with control heifers. Concentration of α-tocopherol in LM was greater (P = 0.01) in heifers of the 2 CLA groups than in control heifers. Other quality characteristics such as drip loss during storage, cooking loss, intramuscular fat content, and color variables in LM did not differ (P > 0.05) between groups. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that feeding rumen-protected CLA during the early growing period changes tissue fatty acid composition but does not influence beef quality variables. Performance variables and carcass traits in young heifers, unlike in pigs and laboratory animals, are not influenced by CLA feeding. PMID:22573839

  16. Conjugated linoleic acids content in M.longissimus dorsi of Hanwoo steers fed a concentrate supplemented with soybean oil, sodium bicarbonate-based monensin, fish oil.

    PubMed

    Song, M K; Jin, G L; Ji, B J; Chang, S S; Jeong, J; Smith, S B; Choi, S H

    2010-06-01

    We hypothesized that increasing ruminal pH would lead to enrichment of adipose tissue with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Twenty-four Korean native (Hanwoo) steers were used to investigate the additive effects of monensin (30ppm, SO-BM) and/or fish oil (0.7%, SO-BMF) in the diets along with soybean oil (7%) and sodium bicarbonate (0.5%, SO-B) on cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLAs in adipose tissue. The steers were assigned to randomly four groups of six animals each based on body weight. The control group (CON) was fed a commercial concentrate for the late fattening stage. Supplementation of oil and sodium bicarbonate reduced feed intake and daily gain, and fish oil further decreased feed intake (P<0.001) and daily gain (P<0.087) compared to steers fed other diets. Total CLA and CLA isomers in M.longissimus dorsi were not affected when steers were fed SO-B and SO-BM diets compared with those of steers fed CON and SO-BMF diets. However, total poly unsaturated fatty acids were higher (P=0.03) in steers fed SO than in CON steers.

  17. The effect of linoleic acid on the Sauvignon blanc fermentation by different wine yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Casu, Francesca; Pinu, Farhana R; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Greenwood, David R; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2016-08-01

    The level of linoleic acid in the Sauvignon blanc (SB) grape juice affects the development of different aroma compounds during fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118, including key varietal thiols such as 3-mercaptohexanol (3MH) and 3-mercaptohexyl acetate (3MHA). However, it is still unknown if linoleic acid would affect in a similar way other commonly used S. cerevisiae wine strains. Here we investigated the effect of grape juice linoleic acid on the development of aroma compounds and other metabolites of SB wines using different wine yeast strains: EC1118, AWRI796 and VIN13. Linoleic acid clearly affected the levels of acetylated aroma compounds, several amino acids, and antioxidant molecules, independent of yeast strain, but the production of 3MH was affected by linoleic acid in a strain-specific manner. Moreover, the supplementation of deuterium-labelled 3MH also affected the production of varietal thiols in a strain-specific way. Linoleic acid reduced the acetylation process probably by inhibiting an acetyltransferase, an effect that was independent of the yeast strain. However, regulation of the 3MH biosynthesis is strain-specific, which suggests a mindful consideration not only towards the wine yeast but also to the linoleic acid concentration in the grape juice in order to obtain the desired wine aroma characteristics. PMID:27364827

  18. Effects of Oils Rich in Linoleic and α-Linolenic Acids on Fatty Acid Profile and Gene Expression in Goat Meat

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Rajion, Mohamed Ali; Goh, Yong Meng

    2014-01-01

    Alteration of the lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of foods can result in a healthier product. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of flaxseed oil or sunflower oil in the goat diet on fatty acid composition of muscle and expression of lipogenic genes in the semitendinosus (ST) muscle. Twenty-one entire male Boer kid goats were fed diets containing different levels of linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (LNA) for 100 days. Inclusion of flaxseed oil increased (p < 0.05) the α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) concentration in the ST muscle. The diet high in α-linolenic acid (p < 0.05) decreased the arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6) and conjugated linolenic acid (CLA) c-9 t-11 content in the ST muscle. There was a significant (p < 0.05) upregulation of PPARα and PPARγ gene expression and downregulation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) gene in the ST muscle for the high α-linolenic acid group compared with the low α-linolenic acid group. The results of the present study show that flaxseed oil as a source of α-linolenic acid can be incorporated into the diets of goats to enrich goat meat with n-3 fatty acids, upregulate the PPARα and PPARγ, and downregulate the SCD gene expression. PMID:25255382

  19. Comparing subcutaneous adipose tissue in beef and muskox with emphasis on trans 18:1 and conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Michael E R; Kramer, John K G; Robertson, Wayne M; Meadus, William J; Aldai, Noelia; Rolland, David C

    2007-06-01

    Muskox (Ovibos moschatus) are ruminant animals native to the far north and little is known about their fatty acid composition. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (backfat) from 16 wild muskox was analyzed and compared to backfat from 16 barley fed beef cattle. Muskox backfat composition differed substantially from beef and the most striking difference was a high content of 18:0 (26.8 vs. 9.77%). This was accompanied by higher levels of most other saturated fatty acids except beef had more 16:0. Muskox backfat also had a lower level of cis-18:1 and this was related to a lower expression of steroyl-CoA desaturase mRNA. Beef backfat had a higher level of total trans-18:1 (4.25 vs. 2.67%). The most prominent trans-18:1 isomers in beef backfat were 10t-18:1 (2.13%) and 11t-18:1 (0.77%) whereas the most prominent isomers in muskox backfat were 11t-18:1 (1.41%), 13t/14t- (0.27%) and 16t-18:1 (0.23%). The total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content was higher in beef backfat than muskox (0.67 vs. 0.50%) with 9c,11t-18:2 as the most abundant CLA isomer. The second most abundant CLA isomer in beef backfat was 7t,9c-18:2 (0.10%) whereas in muskox it was 11t13c-18:2 (0.04%). Muskox backfat had a higher content of 18:3n-3 and its elongation and desaturation products 20:5n-3, 22:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 and a lower n-6/n-3 ratio. Overall, the high forage diet of muskox seemed to produce a healthier fatty acid profile and highlighted the need to develop feeding strategies for intensively raising beef that will not negatively impacting fatty acid composition.

  20. Comparing subcutaneous adipose tissue in beef and muskox with emphasis on trans 18:1 and conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Michael E R; Kramer, John K G; Robertson, Wayne M; Meadus, William J; Aldai, Noelia; Rolland, David C

    2007-06-01

    Muskox (Ovibos moschatus) are ruminant animals native to the far north and little is known about their fatty acid composition. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (backfat) from 16 wild muskox was analyzed and compared to backfat from 16 barley fed beef cattle. Muskox backfat composition differed substantially from beef and the most striking difference was a high content of 18:0 (26.8 vs. 9.77%). This was accompanied by higher levels of most other saturated fatty acids except beef had more 16:0. Muskox backfat also had a lower level of cis-18:1 and this was related to a lower expression of steroyl-CoA desaturase mRNA. Beef backfat had a higher level of total trans-18:1 (4.25 vs. 2.67%). The most prominent trans-18:1 isomers in beef backfat were 10t-18:1 (2.13%) and 11t-18:1 (0.77%) whereas the most prominent isomers in muskox backfat were 11t-18:1 (1.41%), 13t/14t- (0.27%) and 16t-18:1 (0.23%). The total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content was higher in beef backfat than muskox (0.67 vs. 0.50%) with 9c,11t-18:2 as the most abundant CLA isomer. The second most abundant CLA isomer in beef backfat was 7t,9c-18:2 (0.10%) whereas in muskox it was 11t13c-18:2 (0.04%). Muskox backfat had a higher content of 18:3n-3 and its elongation and desaturation products 20:5n-3, 22:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 and a lower n-6/n-3 ratio. Overall, the high forage diet of muskox seemed to produce a healthier fatty acid profile and highlighted the need to develop feeding strategies for intensively raising beef that will not negatively impacting fatty acid composition. PMID:17492324

  1. Cell density-dependent linoleic acid toxicity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Túlio César; de Moraes, Lídia Maria Pepe; Campos, Elida Geralda

    2011-08-01

    Since the discovery of the apoptotic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, several compounds have been shown to cause apoptosis in this organism. While the toxicity of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) peroxides towards S. cerevisiae has been known for a long time, studies on the effect of nonoxidized PUFA are scarce. The present study deals specifically with linoleic acid (LA) in its nonoxidized form and investigates its toxicity to yeast. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to synthesize PUFA, but can take up and incorporate them into its membranes. Reports from the literature indicate that LA is not toxic to yeast cells. However, we demonstrated that yeast cell growth decreased in cultures treated with 0.1 mM LA for 4 h, and 3-(4,5 dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide reduction (a measure of respiratory activity) decreased by 47%. This toxicity was dependent on the number of cells used in the experiment. We show apoptosis induction by LA concomitant with increases in malondialdehyde, glutathione content, activities of catalase and cytochrome c peroxidase, and decreases in two metabolic enzyme activities. While the main purpose of this study was to show that LA causes cell death in yeast, our results indicate some of the molecular mechanisms of the cell toxicity of PUFA. PMID:21457450

  2. Partial suckling of lambs reduced the linoleic and conjugated linoleic acid contents of marketable milk in Chios ewes.

    PubMed

    Tzamaloukas, O; Orford, M; Miltiadou, D; Papachristoforou, C

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of weaning systems applied in a commercial dairy sheep farm on the fatty acid (FA) composition of marketable milk produced. Forty second parity, purebred Chios ewes were allocated to the following weaning treatments: (a) ewes were weaned from their lambs at 48 h after birth and machine milked twice daily [no lambs (NL) group, n=20]; or, (b) starting 48 h postpartum, ewes were separated from their lambs for 12h during the evening, machine milked once daily the following morning, and lambs were allowed to suckle for 12 h during the day for the first 5 wk of lactation [partial suckling (PS) group, n=20]. After weaning of the PS lambs at wk 6 of age, all ewes were machine milked twice daily. Commercial milk yield and milk composition was recorded weekly (fat, protein, FA content) or fortnightly (somatic cell counts) throughout the first 10 wk of lactation. The PS ewes compared with NL group produced commercial milk lower in milk yield, milk fat, and somatic cell counts, but not in protein content during the first 5-wk period. Such differences were not observed after weaning of the PS lambs. The FA profile of commercial milk was also affected by partial suckling during the preweaning period. Total polyunsaturated FA were higher in NL compared with PS ewe milk at wk 1, 2, 4, and 5 (on average, 21% higher), whereas no differences were detected between NL and PS ewe milk from wk 6 to 10 of lactation. From the polyunsaturated FA, linoleic acid (C18:2 cis-9,cis-12) and conjugated linoleic acid (C18:2 cis-9,trans-11; rumenic acid) were particularly affected, showing on average a reduction of 18 and 38%, respectively. From the monounsaturated FA, vaccenic acid (C18:1 trans-11) was affected during wk 1 and 2 of the treatment period, with the PS ewe milk having reduced content compared with the NL milk. Other unsaturated FA, such as oleic acid and α-linolenic acid, or saturated FA were not found to be affected by the

  3. Excessive dietary linoleic acid induces proinflammatory markers in rats.

    PubMed

    Marchix, Justine; Choque, Benjamin; Kouba, Maryline; Fautrel, Alain; Catheline, Daniel; Legrand, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Following the historical dietary recommendations, the substitution of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for saturated fatty acids (SFAs) resulted in a dramatic increase of linoleic acid (LA) in the Western diet. While proatherogenic properties of SFAs have been described, the involvement of LA on the inflammatory process remains controversial. Herein, we evaluated the effects of an excessive LA intake on the cytokine-induced expression of endothelial adhesion molecules vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), through the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway, in comparison with a control diet and regarding a "positive" SFA diet. Wistar rats were fed experimental diets - a control diet or diets enriched with LA or SFA - for 11 weeks. Plasma lipid parameters and proinflammatory cytokine production such as interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were analyzed. Expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and NF-κB was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. No difference was observed in body weight. The enriched diets did not affect triglyceride and total cholesterol levels in plasma. Our results demonstrated that excessive dietary LA intake increased TNF-α levels (P<.05) in plasma. Rats fed the LA-enriched diet showed a significantly higher expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and NF-κB in aortas. In addition, our results demonstrated that an excess of LA is more efficient to activate endothelial molecular process than an excess of SFA. The present study provides further support for the proinflammatory properties of LA and suggests an LA-derivatives pathway involved in the inflammatory process.

  4. Dietary Medium Chain Fatty Acid Supplementation Leads to Reduced VLDL Lipolysis and Uptake Rates in Comparison to Linoleic Acid Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    van Schalkwijk, Daniël B.; Pasman, Wilrike J.; Hendriks, Henk F. J.; Verheij, Elwin R.; Rubingh, Carina M.; van Bochove, Kees; Vaes, Wouter H. J.; Adiels, Martin; Freidig, Andreas P.; de Graaf, Albert A.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) and linoleic acid follow different metabolic routes, and linoleic acid activates PPAR receptors. Both these mechanisms may modify lipoprotein and fatty acid metabolism after dietary intervention. Our objective was to investigate how dietary MCFA and linoleic acid supplementation and body fat distribution affect the fasting lipoprotein subclass profile, lipoprotein kinetics, and postprandial fatty acid kinetics. In a randomized double blind cross-over trial, 12 male subjects (age 51±7 years; BMI 28.5±0.8 kg/m2), were divided into 2 groups according to waist-hip ratio. They were supplemented with 60 grams/day MCFA (mainly C8:0, C10:0) or linoleic acid for three weeks, with a wash-out period of six weeks in between. Lipoprotein subclasses were measured using HPLC. Lipoprotein and fatty acid metabolism were studied using a combination of several stable isotope tracers. Lipoprotein and tracer data were analyzed using computational modeling. Lipoprotein subclass concentrations in the VLDL and LDL range were significantly higher after MCFA than after linoleic acid intervention. In addition, LDL subclass concentrations were higher in lower body obese individuals. Differences in VLDL metabolism were found to occur in lipoprotein lipolysis and uptake, not production; MCFAs were elongated intensively, in contrast to linoleic acid. Dietary MCFA supplementation led to a less favorable lipoprotein profile than linoleic acid supplementation. These differences were not due to elevated VLDL production, but rather to lower lipolysis and uptake rates. PMID:25049048

  5. Conjugated linoleic acid improves glycemic response, lipid profile, and oxidative stress in obese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi-Mameghani, Mehrangiz; Jamali, Haleh; Mahdavi, Reza; Kakaei, Farzad; Abedi, Rana; Kabir-Mamdooh, Bita

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate if conjugated linoleic acid supplementation (CLA) affects metabolic factors and oxidative stress in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods The study was a randomized, controlled clinical trial conducted in specialized and subspecialized clinics of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences from January 2014 to March 2015. 38 obese NAFLD patients were randomly allocated into either the intervention group, receiving three 1000 mg softgel of CLA with a weight loss diet and 400 IU vitamin E, or into the control group, receiving only weight loss diet and 400 IU vitamin E for eight weeks. Dietary data and physical activity, as well as anthropometric, body composition, metabolic factors, and oxidative stress were assessed at baseline and at the end of the study. Results Weight, body composition, and serum oxidative stress, insulin, and lipid profile significantly improved in both groups, while hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels (P = 0.004), total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein ratio (P = 0.008), low density lipoprotein to high density lipoprotein ratio (LDL/HDL) (P = 0.002), and alanine aminotransferase to aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST) ratio (P = 0.025) significantly decreased in the intervention group. At the end of the study, fat mass (P = 0.001), muscle mass (P = 0.023), total body water (P = 0.004), HbA1c (P < 0.001), triglycerides (P = 0.006), LDL/HDL ratio (P = 0.027), and ALT/AST ratio (P = 0.046) were significantly better in the CLA group than in the control group. Conclusion CLA improved insulin resistance, lipid disturbances, oxidative stress, and liver function in NAFLD. Therefore, it could be considered as an effective complementary treatment in NAFLD. Registration number: IRCT2014020516491N1. PMID:27586548

  6. Production of arachidonic and linoleic acid metabolites by guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oosthuizen, M.J.; Engels, F.; Van Esch, B.; Henricks, P.A.; Nijkamp, F.P. )

    1990-08-01

    Pulmonary epithelial cells may be responsible for regulating airway smooth muscle function, in part by release of fatty acid-derived mediators. Incubation of isolated guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells with radiolabeled arachidonic acid (AA) leads to the production of 5- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5- and 15-HETE) and smaller amounts of leukotriene (LT) B4 and C4 and 12-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT). Epithelial cells also are able to release linoleic acid (LA) metabolites. Incubation with radiolabeled linoleic acid leads to the formation of 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9- and 13-HODE). The biological significance of these mediators produced by epithelial cells is discussed.

  7. Hepatic lipid characteristics and histopathology of laying hens fed CLA or n-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Gita; Goeger, Mary P

    2004-01-01

    The effect of dietary CLA and n-3 PUFA on hepatic TAG accumulation, histopathology, and FA incorporation in lipid classes by laying chickens was investigated. One hundred twenty 30-wk-old single comb white leghorn laying hens were distributed randomly to four treatments (3 replications of 10 birds) and were fed diets containing CLA and animal fat (Diet I), 18:3n-3 (Diet II), or long-chain n-3 FA (Diet III). A sunflower oil (n-6 FA)-based diet vvas the control. Feeding Diet I resulted in an increase in hepatic total lipids (P < 0.05). The liver TAG content was 32.2, 18.9, 29.4, and 18.7 mg/g for hens fed Diet I, Diet II, Diet III, and the control diet, respectively (P< 0.05). The serum TAG was lowest in birds fed Diet II (P < 0.05). Diet I resulted in an increase in the total number of fat vacuoles and lipid infiltration in hepatocytes (P < 0.05). The number of cells with 75% or higher lipid vacuolation was observed only in birds fed Diet I. Feeding diets containing CLA resulted in an increase in the content of the c9,t11 CLA isomer in liver TAG and PC (P < 0.05). No difference was observed in the CLA concentration of hepatic PE fractions. The content of DHA (22:6n-3) was higher in the TAG, PC, and PE of hens fed Diet II and Diet III than Diet I and the control (P < 0.05). Feeding CLA resulted in an increase in total saturated FA in the TAG and PC fractions (P < 0.05). Long-term feeding of CLA in laying birds leads to an increase in liver TAG and may predispose birds to fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome.

  8. Cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA mixture does not change body composition, induces insulin resistance and increases serum HDL cholesterol level in rats.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Mariana Macedo; de Souza, Yamara Oliveira; Dutra Luquetti, Sheila Cristina Potente; Sabarense, Céphora Maria; do Amaral Corrêa, José Otávio; da Conceição, Ellen Paula Santos; Lisboa, Patrícia Cristina; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar; Andrade Soares, Sara Malaguti; Moura Gualberto, Ana Cristina; Gameiro, Jacy; da Gama, Marco Antônio Sundfeld; Ferraz Lopes, Fernando César; González Garcia, Raúl Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic supplements of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) containing 50:50 mixture of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers have been commercialized in some places for reducing body fat. However the safety of this CLA mixture is controversial and in some countries the CLA usage as food supplement is not authorized. Changes in insulinemic control and serum lipids profile are potential negative effects related to consumption of CLA mixture. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of a diet containing mixture of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA on prevention of obesity risk as well as on potential side effects such as insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in Wistar rats. Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following dietary treatments (n=10/group), for 60 days: Normolipidic Control (NC), diet containing 4.0% soybean oil (SO); High Fat-Control (HF-C), diet containing 24.0% SO; High Fat-synthetic CLA (HF-CLA), diet containing 1.5% of an isomeric CLA mixture (Luta-CLA 60) and 22.5% SO. Luta-CLA 60 (BASF) contained nearly 60% of CLA (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA at 50:50 ratio). The HF-CLA diet contained 0.3% of each CLA isomer. HF-CLA diet had no effect on dietary intake and body composition. HF-CLA-fed rats had lower levels of PPARγ protein in retroperitoneal adipose tissue, hyperinsulinemia compared to HF-C-fed rats, hyperglycemia compared to NC-fed rats while no differences in glycemia were observed between NC and HF-C groups, increased HOMA index and higher levels of serum HDL cholesterol. Thus, feeding rats with a high fat diet containing equal parts of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers had no effect on body composition and induced insulin resistance. Despite HF-CLA-fed rats had increased serum HDL cholesterol levels, caution should be taken before synthetic supplements containing cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA are recommended as a nutritional strategy for weight management.

  9. Preparation and characterization Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang for esterification fatty acid (palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulloh, Abdulloh; Aminah, Nanik Siti; Triyono, Mudasir, Trisunaryanti, Wega

    2016-03-01

    Catalyst preparation and characterization of Al3+-bentonite for esterification of palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid has been done. Al3+-bentonite catalyst was prepared from natural bentonite of Turen Malang through cation exchange reaction using AlCl3 solution. The catalysts obtained were characterized by XRD, XRF, pyridine-FTIR and surface area analyser using the BET method. Catalyst activity test of Al3+-bentonite for esterification reaction was done at 65°C using molar ratio of metanol-fatty acid of 30:1 and 0.25 g of Al3+-bentonite catalyst for the period of ½, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hours. Based on the characterization results, the Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang catalyst has a d-spacing of 15.63 Ǻ, acid sites of Brönsted and Lewis respectively of 230.79 µmol/g and 99.39 µmol/g, surface area of 507.3 m2/g and the average of radius pore of 20.09 Å. GC-MS analysis results of the oil phase after esterification reaction showed the formation of biodiesel (FAME: Fatty acid methyl ester), namely methyl palmitate, methyl oleate and methyl linoleate. The number of conversions resulted in esterification reaction using Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang catalyst was 74.61%, 37.75%, and 20, 93% for the esterification of palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid respectively.

  10. Dietary CLA-induced lipolysis is delayed in soy oil-fed mice compared to coconut oil-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Ippagunta, S; Angius, Z; Sanda, M; Barnes, K M

    2013-11-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been shown to cause a reduction in obesity in several species. CLA-induced body fat loss is enhanced when mice are fed coconut oil (CO) and involves increased lipolysis. The objective of this paper was to determine if the CLA-induced lipolysis in mice fed with different oil sources was time-dependent. Mice were fed 7 % soybean oil (SO) or CO diets for 6 week and then supplemented with 0 or 0.5 % CLA for 3, 7, 10 or 14 days. Body fat and ex-vivo lipolysis was determined. Body fat was reduced by CO on day 7 (P < 0.01) and in both CO and SO-fed mice (P < 0.05) in response to CLA on d14. Lipolysis was increased by CLA in CO-fed mice (P < 0.01) but not in SO-fed mice on day 7 and 10, but on day 14 CLA increased lipolysis in both CO- and SO-fed mice (P < 0.001). Expression and activation level of proteins involved in lipolysis and lipogenesis was determined by western blotting and real-time PCR, respectively. No significant differences were detected in protein expression. CO-fed mice had greater fatty acid synthase and stearyl CoA desaturase 1 mRNA expression and less acetyl CoA carboxylase mRNA expression (P < 0.01). Sterol regulatory binding protein 1c was decreased by CLA in CO-fed mice and increased in SO-fed mice (P < 0.05). Malic enzyme expression was increased by CLA (P < 0.001) and CO (P < 0.01). Therefore, CLA-induced lipolysis occurs more rapidly in CO vs SO-fed mice and lipogenesis is decreased in CO-fed mice with CLA supplementation.

  11. The potential benefits of creatine and conjugated linoleic acid as adjuncts to resistance training in older adults.

    PubMed

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Safdar, Adeel

    2008-02-01

    Human aging is associated with a significant reduction in muscle mass (sarcopenia) resulting in muscle weakness and functional limitations in the elderly. Sarcopenia has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and the accumulation of mtDNA deletions. Resistance training increases muscle strength and size and can increase mitochondrial capacity and decrease oxidative stress in older adults. Creatine monohydrate (CrM) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) have biological effects that could enhance some of the beneficial effects of resistance training in older adults (i.e., up arrow fat-free mass, down arrow total body fat). We have completed two resistance-training studies with CrM alone and CrM+CLA supplementation in older adults to evaluate the independent effects of exercise and dietary supplements, as well as their interactive effects. Our studies, and several others, have found that CrM enhanced the resistance exercise mediated gains in fat-free mass and strength. More recently, we found that the addition of CLA also lead to a significant reduction of body fat after six months of resistance training in older adults. Older adults have fewer wild-type mtDNA copies and higher amounts of mtDNA deletions as compared with younger adults in mature skeletal muscle; however, these deletions are not seen in the satellite cell-derived myoblast cultures. These findings, and the fact that mtDNA deletions are lower and wild-type mtDNA copy number is higher after resistance training in older adults, suggests that activation of satellite cells secondary to resistance exercise-induced muscle damage can dilute or "shift" the proportion of mtDNA genotype towards that of a younger adult. Recent evidence suggests that CrM supplementation in combination with strength training can enhance satellite cell activation and total myonuclei number per muscle fiber in young men. Future studies are required to determine whether the mitochondrial adaptations to resistance exercise in older

  12. Total lipids of Sarda sheep meat that include the fatty acid and alkenyl composition and the CLA and trans-18:1 isomers.

    PubMed

    Santercole, Viviana; Mazzette, Rina; De Santis, Enrico P L; Banni, Sebastiano; Goonewardene, Laki; Kramer, John K G

    2007-04-01

    The total lipids of the longissimus dorsi muscle were analyzed from commercial adult Sarda sheep in Sardina taken from local abattoirs, and in the subsequent year from three local farms in the Sassari region that provided some information on the amount and type of supplements fed to the pasture-fed sheep. The complete lipid analysis of sheep meat included the fatty acids from O-acyl and N-acyl lipids, including the trans- and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers and the alk-1-enyl ethers from the plasmalogenic lipids. This analysis required the use of a combination of acid- and base-catalyzed methylation procedures, the former to quantitate the O-acyl, N-acyl and alkenyl ethers, and the latter to determine the content of CLA isomers and their metabolites. A combination of gas chromatographic and silver-ion separation techniques was necessary to quantitate all of the meat lipid constituents, which included a prior separation of the trans-octadecenoic acids (18:1) and a separation of fatty acid methyl esters and the dimethylacetals (DMAs) from the acyl and alk-1-enyl ethers, respectively. The alk-1-enyl moieties of the DMAs were analyzed as their stable cyclic acetals. In general, about half of the meat lipids were triacylglycerols, even though excess fat was trimmed from the meat. The higher fat content in the meat appears to be related to the older age of these animals. The variation in the trans-18:1 and CLA isomer profiles of the Sarda sheep obtained from the abattoirs was much greater than in the profiles from the sheep from the three selected farms. Higher levels of 10t-18:1, 7t9c-18:2, 9t11c-18:2 and 10t12c-18:2 were observed in the commercial sheep meat, which reflected the poorer quality diets of these sheep compared to those from the three farms, which consistently showed higher levels of 11t-18:1, 9c11t-18:2 and 11t13c-18:2. In the second study, sheep were provided with supplements during the spring and summer grazing season, which contributed to higher

  13. Oleic, Linoleic and Linolenic Acids Increase ROS Production by Fibroblasts via NADPH Oxidase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Elaine; Dermargos, Alexandre; Hirata, Aparecida Emiko; Vinolo, Marco Aurélio Ramirez; Carpinelli, Angelo Rafael; Newsholme, Philip; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Curi, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The effect of oleic, linoleic and γ-linolenic acids on ROS production by 3T3 Swiss and Rat 1 fibroblasts was investigated. Using lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence, a dose-dependent increase in extracellular superoxide levels was observed during the treatment of fibroblasts with oleic, linoleic and γ-linolenic acids. ROS production was dependent on the addition of β-NADH or NADPH to the medium. Diphenyleneiodonium inhibited the effect of oleic, linoleic and γ-linolenic acids on fibroblast superoxide release by 79%, 92% and 82%, respectively. Increased levels of p47phox phosphorylation due to fatty acid treatment were detected by Western blotting analyses of fibroblast proteins. Increased p47phox mRNA expression was observed using real-time PCR. The rank order for the fatty acid stimulation of the fibroblast oxidative burst was as follows: γ-linolenic > linoleic > oleic. In conclusion, oleic, linoleic and γ-linolenic acids stimulated ROS production via activation of the NADPH oxidase enzyme complex in fibroblasts. PMID:23579616

  14. The effect of linoleic acid on the whole body synthesis rates of polyunsaturated fatty acids from α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid in free-living rats.

    PubMed

    Domenichiello, Anthony F; Kitson, Alex P; Chen, Chuck T; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Stavro, P Mark; Bazinet, Richard P

    2016-04-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is thought to be important for brain function. The main dietary source of DHA is fish, however, DHA can also be synthesized from precursor omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), the most abundantly consumed being α-linolenic acid (ALA). The enzymes required to synthesize DHA from ALA are also used to synthesize longer chain omega-6 (n-6) PUFA from linoleic acid (LNA). The large increase in LNA consumption that has occurred over the last century has led to concern that LNA and other n-6 PUFA outcompete n-3 PUFA for enzymes involved in DHA synthesis, and therefore, decrease overall DHA synthesis. To assess this, rats were fed diets containing LNA at 53 (high LNA diet), 11 (medium LNA diet) or 1.5% (low LNA diet) of the fatty acids with ALA being constant across all diets (approximately 4% of the fatty acids). Rats were maintained on these diets from weaning for 8 weeks, at which point they were subjected to a steady-state infusion of labeled ALA and LNA to measure DHA and arachidonic acid (ARA) synthesis rates. DHA and ARA synthesis rates were generally highest in rats fed the medium and high LNA diets, while the plasma half-life of DHA was longer in rats fed the low LNA diet. Therefore, increasing dietary LNA, in rats, did not impair DHA synthesis; however, low dietary LNA led to a decrease in DHA synthesis with tissue concentrations of DHA possibly being maintained by a longer DHA half-life.

  15. Development of the Oleic Acid/Linoleic Acid Ratio in High-Oleic Valencia Market Type Peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major fatty acids in peanuts are oleic acid (O), a monounsaturated omega-9, and linoleic acid (L), a polyunsaturated omega-6. Peanuts containing these two fatty acids in a ratio (O/L) above 9 are known as high oleic (HO). Normal oleic (NO) peanuts are those with an O/L ratio less than 9. HO pean...

  16. Effects of chemical and enzymatic modifications on starch-linoleic acid complex formation.

    PubMed

    Arijaje, Emily Oluwaseun; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2017-02-15

    This study investigated the complexation yield and physicochemical properties of soluble and insoluble starch complexes with linoleic acid when a β-amylase treatment was applied to acetylated and debranched potato starch. The degree of acetylation was generally higher in the soluble complexes than in the insoluble ones. The insoluble complexes from the acetylated starch displayed the V-type pattern, whereas, the soluble complexes displayed a mixture of either the A-/V-type or the B-/V-type pattern. Acetylation decreased onset and peak melting temperatures for the insoluble complexes, whereas no melting endotherm was observed in the soluble complexes. Acetylation substantially increased the amount of complexed linoleic acid in the insoluble complexes, but had little positive effect on the formation of the soluble complexes. The β-amylase treatment significantly increased the complexed linoleic content in both soluble and insoluble complexes for the low acetylated starch, but not for the high acetylated starch. PMID:27664602

  17. Vitamin E in foods from high and low linoleic acid diets.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, J; Martin, H L; Lashley, E L; Marshall, M W; Judd, J T

    1986-09-01

    As part of a human diet study, vitamin E activity was estimated in foods used in seven daily menus. Each menu was designed to contain 35% fat calories with either 10 or 30 gm/day of linoleic acid (18:2) and 500 mg/day of cholesterol. To estimate vitamin E activity, each food used in the menus was analyzed for alpha and gamma tocopherol content by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. This article reports the alpha and gamma tocopherol contents of those foods, tocopherol contributions from each food in one sample 2,400-kcal menu, and the mean daily vitamin E activity (milligram alpha tocopherol equivalents) of all seven menus at five caloric levels. Major sources of alpha tocopherol (greater than 10% of the RDA) common to both diets (10 and 30 gm linoleic acid) were olive oil and a few fruits and vegetables. Additional major sources in the 30-gm linoleic acid diets were polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) vegetable oils and margarine. Contrary to a common assumption, increasing the level of PUFA in the menus did not necessarily result in higher milligram equivalents of alpha tocopherol because soybean oil, with a tocopherol composition that is predominantly gamma tocopherol, was the major source of linoleic acid in the diets. Thus, vitamin E activity was not necessarily increased when soybean oil was substituted for a less saturated fat such as olive oil, which has mostly alpha tocopherol.

  18. Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation enhances insulin sensitivity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and glucose transporter type 4 protein expression in the skeletal muscles of rats during endurance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kangok; Song, Youngju; Kwon, Daekeun

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study examined whether conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation affects insulin sensitivity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT-4) protein expressions in the skeletal muscles of rats during endurance exercise. Materials and Methods: Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into HS (high-fat diet (HFD) sedentary group, n = 8), CS (1.0% CLA supplemented HFD sedentary group, n = 8), and CE (1.0% CLA supplemented HFD exercise group, n = 8). The rats in the CE swam for 60 min a day, 5 days a week for 8 weeks. Results: The serum glucose and insulin contents and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) value of the CS and CE were significantly decreased compared to those of the HS. The PPAR-γ protein expressions in the soleus muscle (SOM) and extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) were significantly higher in the CE than in the HS. In addition, the PPAR-γ protein expression in the SOM of the CS was significantly higher than that in the HS. On the other hand, the GLUT-4 protein expression of the SOM in the CE was significantly higher compared to that in the HS. However, there was no significant difference in GLUT-4 protein expression in the EDL among the groups. Conclusion: CLA supplementation with/without endurance exercise has role in improvement of insulin sensitivity. Moreover, when CLA supplementation was accompanied by endurance exercise, the PPAR-γ protein expression in SOM and EDL and the GLUT-4 protein expression in SOM were enhanced compared with the control group. PMID:27096060

  19. Conjugated linoleic acid content of milk and cheese from cows fed extruded oilseeds.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, T R; Helmink, E D; McMahon, D J; Fife, R L; Pariza, M W

    1999-02-01

    Extruded oilseeds were fed to 24 dairy cows to study the influence on the conjugated linoleic acid content of milk and cheese. Cows were fed one of three diets that contained forage and grain in a ratio of 47:53. A control diet containing 13.5% soybean meal was compared with diets containing 12% full fat extruded soybeans or 12% full fat extruded cottonseed. The control, extruded soybean, and extruded cottonseed diets contained 2.73, 4.89, and 4.56% fatty acids, respectively. Measurements were made during the last 5 wk of the 8-wk experiment. The DM intakes and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yields were higher for cows fed the extruded soybean and extruded cottonseed diets than for cows fed the control diet. A tendency for lower fat and protein contents in the milk of cows fed the extruded soybean and extruded cottonseed diets was detected. Most of the C18 fatty acids were increased in the milk and cheese when extruded soybeans and cottonseeds were fed. The conjugated linoleic acid content in milk and cheese increased a mean of 109% when full fat extruded soybeans were fed and increased 77% when cottonseeds were fed compared with the conjugated linoleic acid content when the control diet was fed. Processing the milk into cheese did not alter the conjugated linoleic acid content. The conjugated linoleic acid content of milk and cheese can be increased by the inclusion of full fat extruded soybeans and full fat extruded cottonseeds in the diets of dairy cows.

  20. The biohydrogenation of α-linoleic acid and oleic acid by rumen micro-organisms

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, P. F.; Dawson, R. M. C.

    1966-01-01

    1. α-[U-14C]Linolenic acid was incubated with the rumen contents of sheep and the metabolic products were characterized by thin-layer chromatography, gas–liquid chromatography and absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and infrared. 2. A tentative scheme for the biohydrogenation route to stearic acid is presented. The main pathway is through diconjugated cis–cis–cis-octadecatrienoic acid, non-conjugated trans–cis (cis–trans)-octadecadienoic acid and trans-octadecenoic acid, but other pathways are apparent. 3. Washed rumen micro-organisms possessed only a limited capacity to hydrogenate α-linolenic acid and oleic acid but the rate was greatly stimulated by a factor(s) present in the supernatant rumen liquor. 4. Pure cultures of Clostridium perfringens, Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and a coliform organism isolated from sheep faeces possessed negligible ability to hydrogenate unsaturated fatty acids compared with a mixed population of rumen micro-organisms. Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens slowly converted linoleic acid into octadecenoic acid. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3. PMID:4287407

  1. Individual CLA Isomers, c9t11 and t10c12, Prevent Excess Liver Glycogen Storage and Inhibit Lipogenic Genes Expression Induced by High-Fructose Diet in Rats.

    PubMed

    Maslak, Edyta; Buczek, Elzbieta; Szumny, Antoni; Szczepnski, Wojciech; Franczyk-Zarow, Magdalena; Kopec, Aneta; Chlopicki, Stefan; Leszczynska, Teresa; Kostogrys, Renata B

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of individual conjugated linoleic acid isomers, c9t11-CLA and t10c12-CLA, on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and systemic endothelial dysfunction in rats fed for four weeks with control or high-fructose diet. The high-fructose diet hampered body weight gain (without influencing food intake), increased liver weight and glycogen storage in hepatocytes, upregulated expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1), and increased saturated fatty acid (SFA) content in the liver. Both CLA isomers prevented excessive accumulation of glycogen in the liver. Specifically, t10c12-CLA decreased concentration of serum triacylglycerols and LDL + VLDL cholesterol, increased HDL cholesterol, and affected liver lipid content and fatty acid composition by downregulation of liver SCD-1 and FAS expression. In turn, the c9t11-CLA decreased LDL+VLDL cholesterol in the control group and downregulated liver expression of FAS without significant effects on liver weight, lipid content, and fatty acid composition. In summary, feeding rats with a high-fructose diet resulted in increased liver glycogen storage, indicating the induction of gluconeogenesis despite simultaneous upregulation of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis. Although both CLA isomers (c9t11 and t10c12) display hepatoprotective activity, the hypolipemic action of the t10c12-CLA isomer proved to be more pronounced than that of c9t11-CLA.

  2. Classroom Research: GC Studies of Linoleic and Linolenic Fatty Acids Found in French Fries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, Janice P.; Deboise, Kristen L.; Marshall, Megan R.; Shaffer, Hannah M.; Zafar, Sara; Jones, Kevin A.; Palko, Nick R.; Mitsch, Stephen M.; Sutton, Lindsay A.; Chang, Margaret; Fromer, Ilana; Kraft, Jake; Meister, Jessica; Shah, Amar; Tan, Priscilla; Whitchurch, James

    2002-07-01

    A study of fatty-acid ratios in French fries has proved to be an excellent choice for an entry-level research class. This research develops reasoning skills and involves the subject of breast cancer, a major concern of American society. Analysis of tumor samples removed from women with breast cancer revealed high ratios of linoleic to linolenic acid, suggesting a link between the accelerated growth of breast tumors and the combination of these two fatty acids. When the ratio of linoleic to linolenic acid was approximately 9 to 1, accelerated growth was observed. Since these fatty acids are found in cooking oils, Wichita Collegiate students, under the guidance of their chemistry teacher, decided that an investigation of the ratios of these two fatty acids should be conducted. A research class was structured using a gas chromatograph for the analysis. Separation of linoleic from linolenic acid was successfully accomplished. The students experienced inductive experimental research chemistry as it applies to everyday life. The structure of this research class can serve as a model for high school and undergraduate college research curricula.

  3. Fat area and lipid droplet morphology of porcine oocytes during in vitro maturation with trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid and forskolin.

    PubMed

    Prates, E G; Marques, C C; Baptista, M C; Vasques, M I; Carolino, N; Horta, A E M; Charneca, R; Nunes, J T; Pereira, R M

    2013-04-01

    Lipid droplets (LD) in porcine oocytes form a dark mass reaching almost all cytoplasm. Herein we investigated changes in fat areas, cytoplasmic tone and LD morphology during in vitro maturation (IVM) of porcine oocytes cultured with 100 μM trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (t10,c12 CLA) or 10 μM forskolin at different time periods. Four groups were constituted: control, excipient, t10,c12 CLA and forskolin, with drugs being supplemented during 44 to 48 h and the initial 22 to 24 h in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively. In Experiment 3, forskolin was supplemented for the first 2 h. Matured oocytes were inseminated with frozen-thawed boar semen and cleavage rate recorded. Before and during IVM, samples of oocytes were evaluated for LD, total and fat areas and fat gray value or for meiotic progression. Results showed that forskolin supplementation during 44 to 48 h or 22 to 24 h inhibits oocyte maturation (exp. 1: forskolin = 5.1 ± 8.0%, control = 72.6 ± 5.0%; exp. 2: forskolin = 24.3 ± 7.4%, control = 71.6 ± 5.6%) and cleavage (exp. 1: forskolin = 0.0 ± 0.0%, control = 55.4 ± 4.1%; exp. 2: forskolin = 8.3 ± 3.3%, control = 54.5 ± 3.0%). Forskolin also reduced oocyte and fat areas. In Experiment 3, forskolin negative effect on oocyte maturation and cleavage disappeared, although minor (P ⩽ 0.03) LD and oocyte fat areas were identified at 22 to 24 h of IVM. Oocytes supplemented with t10,c12 CLA during 44 to 48 h presented a lighter (P ⩽ 0.04) colour tone cytoplasm than those of control and forskolin. In conclusion, t10,c12 CLA and forskolin were capable of modifying the distribution and morphology of cytoplasmic LD during porcine oocyte maturation, thus reducing its lipid content in a time-dependent manner.

  4. The role of superoxide in xanthine oxidase-induced autooxidation of linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M J; Mehl, K S; Pryor, W A

    1982-07-25

    The effect of hydroxyperoxyoctadecadienoic acid, e.g. 13-hydroperoxy-cis,9,trans-11-octadecadienoic acid, on the autooxidation of linoleic acid induced by superoxide radical was examined in a system containing xanthine oxidase, acetaldehyde, and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid dissolved in an aqueous phosphate buffer containing 10% ethanol. The superoxide radical is required for autooxidation, as shown by essentially complete inhibition on the addition of superoxide dismutase. Pure linoleic acid was not readily oxidized, but the addition of lipid hydroperoxide markedly stimulated the autooxidation. Addition of 2.8 microM FeCl3 did not produce an increase in the rate of xanthine oxidase-induced autooxidation. Spontaneous autooxidation, a process slower than xanthine oxidase-induced autooxidation, was detectable on the time scale of these observations but was slower than the xanthine oxidase-induced autooxidation. Initiation of linoleic acid autooxidation is postulated to result from a reaction between superoxide and lipid hydroperoxide. The nature of this reaction is uncertain, but it does not appear to depend on iron catalysis. PMID:6282880

  5. Stepwise esterification of phytosterols with conjugated linoleic acid catalyzed by Candida rugosa lipase in solvent-free medium.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos F; Torrelo, Guzman; Vazquez, Luis; Señorans, F Javier; Reglero, Guillermo

    2008-12-01

    We conducted a near quantitative esterification of phytosterols from soybean oil deodorizer distillate with conjugated linoleic acid. We used a 1:1 molar ratio of sterols to conjugated linoleic acid. For that matter, stepwise addition of sterols was investigated. Total sterols were divided into several portions and added sequentially to the reaction mixture. Using this methodology, purities of up to 80% steryl esters were obtained that consumed more than 90% of the total conjugated linoleic acid. In addition, the effects of temperature, amount, and stability of lipase were also evaluated. PMID:19134551

  6. Linoleic acid supplementation results in increased arachidonic acid and eicosanoid production in CF airway cells and in cftr−/− transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Munir M.; Martin, Camilia R.; Andersson, Charlotte; Bhutta, Abdul Q.; Cluette-Brown, Joanne E.; Laposata, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients display a fatty acid imbalance characterized by low linoleic acid levels and variable changes in arachidonic acid. This led to the recommendation that CF patients consume a high-fat diet containing >6% linoleic acid. We hypothesized that increased conversion of linoleic acid to arachidonic acid in CF leads to increased levels of arachidonate-derived proinflammatory metabolites and that this process is exacerbated by increasing linoleic acid levels in the diet. To test this hypothesis, we determined the effect of linoleic acid supplementation on downstream proinflammatory biomarkers in two CF models: 1) in vitro cell culture model using 16HBE14o− sense [wild-type (WT)] and antisense (CF) human airway epithelial cells; and 2) in an in vivo model using cftr−/− transgenic mice. Fatty acids were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and IL-8 and eicosanoids were measured by ELISA. Neutrophils were quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from knockout mice following linoleic acid supplementation and exposure to aerosolized Pseudomonas LPS. Linoleic acid supplementation increased arachidonic acid levels in CF but not WT cells. IL-8, PGE2, and PGF2α secretion were increased in CF compared with WT cells, with a further increase following linoleic acid supplementation. cftr−/− Mice supplemented with 100 mg of linoleic acid had increased arachidonic acid levels in lung tissue associated with increased neutrophil infiltration into the airway compared with control mice. These findings support the hypothesis that increasing linoleic acid levels in the setting of loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function leads to increased arachidonic acid levels and proinflammatory mediators. PMID:20656894

  7. Differential Gene Expression in GPR40-Overexpressing Pancreatic β-cells Treated with Linoleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Su; Yang, So-Young; Han, Joo-Hui; Jung, Sang-Hyuk; Park, Hyun-Soo

    2015-01-01

    "G protein-coupled receptor 40" (GPR40), a receptor for long-chain fatty acids, mediates the stimulation of glucose-induced insulin secretion. We examined the profiles of differential gene expression in GPR40-activated cells treated with linoleic acid, and finally predicted the integral pathways of the cellular mechanism of GPR40-mediated insulinotropic effects. After constructing a GPR40-overexpressing stable cell line (RIN-40) from the rat pancreatic β-cell line RIN-5f, we determined the gene expression profiles of RIN-5f and RIN-40. In total, 1004 genes, the expression of which was altered at least twofold, were selected in RIN-5f versus RIN-40. Moreover, the differential genetic profiles were investigated in RIN-40 cells treated with 30 µM linoleic acid, which resulted in selection of 93 genes in RIN-40 versus RIN-40 treated with linoleic acid. Based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway (KEGG, http://www.genome.jp/kegg/), sets of genes induced differentially by treatment with linoleic acid in RIN-40 cells were found to be related to mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase- and neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction pathways. A gene ontology (GO) study revealed that more than 30% of the genes were associated with signal transduction and cell proliferation. Thus, this study elucidated a gene expression pattern relevant to the signal pathways that are regulated by GPR40 activation during the acute period. Together, these findings increase our mechanistic understanding of endogenous molecules associated with GPR40 function, and provide information useful for identification of a target for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25729276

  8. Heat generates oxidized linoleic acid metabolites that activate TRPV1 and produce pain in rodents.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Amol M; Akopian, Armen N; Ruparel, Nikita B; Diogenes, Anibal; Weintraub, Susan T; Uhlson, Charis; Murphy, Robert C; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2010-05-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is the principal detector of noxious heat in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 is expressed in many nociceptors and is involved in heat-induced hyperalgesia and thermoregulation. The precise mechanism or mechanisms mediating the thermal sensitivity of TRPV1 are unknown. Here, we have shown that the oxidized linoleic acid metabolites 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9- and 13-HODE) are formed in mouse and rat skin biopsies by exposure to noxious heat. 9- and 13-HODE and their metabolites, 9- and 13-oxoODE, activated TRPV1 and therefore constitute a family of endogenous TRPV1 agonists. Moreover, blocking these substances substantially decreased the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rats and mice and reduced nociception. Collectively, our results indicate that HODEs contribute to the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rodents. Because oxidized linoleic acid metabolites are released during cell injury, these findings suggest a mechanism for integrating the hyperalgesic and proinflammatory roles of TRPV1 and linoleic acid metabolites and may provide the foundation for investigating new classes of analgesic drugs.

  9. The significance of linoleic acid in food sources for detritivorous benthic invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Vonk, J. Arie; van Kuijk, Bernd F.; van Beusekom, Mick; Hunting, Ellard R.; Kraak, Michiel H. S.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical composition of organic matter (OM) is a key driver for detritus consumption by macroinvertebrates and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content is considered a candidate indicator of food palatability. Since traditionally used complex natural OM covaries in many quality attributes, it remains uncertain whether benthic invertebrates developed an actual preference for PUFA-rich food. Therefore we aimed to test the influence of the PUFA linoleic acid on OM consumption by aquatic macroinvertebrates using standardized surrogate substrates (decomposition and consumption tablet, DECOTAB) with added linoleic acid (PUFA) in comparison to consumption of DECOTAB containing only cellulose (Standard) or ground macrophytes (Plant). In microcosms, we observed a higher consumption rate of PUFA DECOTAB in comparison to Standard DECOTAB in two functionally distinct invertebrate species (Lumbriculus variegatus and Asellus aquaticus). This effect appeared to be overruled in the field due to unknown sources of natural variation. Although we observed higher consumption rates in species-rich ditches compared to species-poor ditches, consumption rates were comparable for all three types of DECOTAB deployed. Upon reduced food quality and palatability, results presented here hint that PUFA like linoleic acid may be a key OM attribute driving the performance of benthic macroinvertebrates and inherent functioning of aquatic ecosystems. PMID:27767068

  10. Determination of linoleic acid in toothpaste by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Wejnerowska, Grazyna; Gackowska, Alicja; Gaca, Jerzy

    2008-06-01

    A new method for the determination of linoleic acid (LA) in toothpaste by a routine analysis has been proposed. Studies were based on the ISO 5509 procedure, which was modified for the purpose of LA determination in the toothpaste. Gas chromatography (GC) was employed for the qualitative and quantitative determination of linoleic acid methyl ester. The content of LA (5.31%) in sunflower oil added to the toothpaste composition (0.5%) was determined, and then the optimization studies for the determination of LA in the toothpaste samples were carried out. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the procedure developed was 9.96% (n = 9). The quantitative analysis showed that the content of LA in the toothpaste samples studied was 0.0258 +/- 0.0011%. The detection limit of LA in toothpaste was approximately 0.001%.

  11. Transfer of conjugated linoleic acid from sows to their offspring and its impact on the fatty acid profiles of plasma, muscle, and subcutaneous fat in piglets.

    PubMed

    Peng, Y; Ren, F; Yin, J D; Fang, Q; Li, F N; Li, D F

    2010-05-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine if CLA could be transferred from sows to their offspring through the umbilical cord or milk. Eighteen pregnant Dalland sows of mixed parity were used in a completely randomized block design based on parity and BW. The sows were allotted to 1 of 3 groups and fed diets containing 0, 0.5, or 1.0% CLA during the last 50 d of gestation and throughout a 26-d lactation (n = 6). Umbilical cord blood was sampled at parturition. Colostrum and milk were collected from each sow on d 2 and 15 after farrowing. Samples of blood, backfat, and the LM were obtained from piglets at 2 and 26 d of age. Sow reproductive performance and piglet growth were not altered by CLA supplementation during the late gestation and lactation periods. The CLA supplementation of sow diets had an impact on the fatty acid profiles in colostrum and milk. Dietary CLA increased the concentrations of total SFA (linear and quadratic, P < 0.01), but reduced the total MUFA in the colostrum (linear and quadratic, P < 0.01). Although dietary CLA increased the concentrations of total SFA (quadratic, P < 0.01), it had no influence on total MUFA concentrations in the milk. In addition, feeding sows diets supplemented with CLA resulted in increases (linear and quadratic, P < 0.01) in the CLA content of plasma, backfat, and the LM in their offspring. However, trans-10, cis-12-18:2, rather than cis-9, trans-11-18:2, was detected in the umbilical cord blood, which indicates that CLA may be transported from the sow to the fetus in an isomer-specific manner.

  12. Polyesters Based on Linoleic Acid for Biolubricant Basestocks: Low-Temperature, Tribological and Rheological Properties.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Bashar Mudhaffar; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Hairunisa, Nany; Yousif, Emad; Basu, Roma Choudhury

    2016-01-01

    Presently, plant oils which contain high percentage of linoleic acid 1 are perceived to be a viable alternative to mineral oil for biolubricant applications due to their biodegradability and technical properties. In order to get biodegradable lubricant, triester derivatives compounds (1-5) were synthesized and characterized. The processes involved were monoepoxidation of linoleic acid 2, oxirane ring opening 3, esterification 4 and acylation 5. The structures of the products were confirmed by FTIR, 1H and 13C-NMR and LC-MS. The results that showed lowest temperature properties were obtained for triester 5, with a pour point value (PP) of -73°C, highest onset temperature (260°C) and lowest volatility at 0.30%. Viscosity index (VI) increased for the ester's synthetic compounds (2, 3, 4, 5), while the PP decreased. This behavior is the result of the increase of the chain length of the branching agents. Triester based linoleic acid has improved properties such as low-temperature and tribological properties. These results will make it feasible for plant oil to be used for biolubricants, fuels in chain saws, transmission oil and brake fluid.

  13. Polyesters Based on Linoleic Acid for Biolubricant Basestocks: Low-Temperature, Tribological and Rheological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Bashar Mudhaffar; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Hairunisa, Nany; Yousif, Emad; Basu, Roma Choudhury

    2016-01-01

    Presently, plant oils which contain high percentage of linoleic acid 1 are perceived to be a viable alternative to mineral oil for biolubricant applications due to their biodegradability and technical properties. In order to get biodegradable lubricant, triester derivatives compounds (1–5) were synthesized and characterized. The processes involved were monoepoxidation of linoleic acid 2, oxirane ring opening 3, esterification 4 and acylation 5. The structures of the products were confirmed by FTIR, 1H and 13C-NMR and LC-MS. The results that showed lowest temperature properties were obtained for triester 5, with a pour point value (PP) of -73°C, highest onset temperature (260°C) and lowest volatility at 0.30%. Viscosity index (VI) increased for the ester’s synthetic compounds (2, 3, 4, 5), while the PP decreased. This behavior is the result of the increase of the chain length of the branching agents. Triester based linoleic acid has improved properties such as low-temperature and tribological properties. These results will make it feasible for plant oil to be used for biolubricants, fuels in chain saws, transmission oil and brake fluid. PMID:27008312

  14. Polyesters Based on Linoleic Acid for Biolubricant Basestocks: Low-Temperature, Tribological and Rheological Properties.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Bashar Mudhaffar; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Hairunisa, Nany; Yousif, Emad; Basu, Roma Choudhury

    2016-01-01

    Presently, plant oils which contain high percentage of linoleic acid 1 are perceived to be a viable alternative to mineral oil for biolubricant applications due to their biodegradability and technical properties. In order to get biodegradable lubricant, triester derivatives compounds (1-5) were synthesized and characterized. The processes involved were monoepoxidation of linoleic acid 2, oxirane ring opening 3, esterification 4 and acylation 5. The structures of the products were confirmed by FTIR, 1H and 13C-NMR and LC-MS. The results that showed lowest temperature properties were obtained for triester 5, with a pour point value (PP) of -73°C, highest onset temperature (260°C) and lowest volatility at 0.30%. Viscosity index (VI) increased for the ester's synthetic compounds (2, 3, 4, 5), while the PP decreased. This behavior is the result of the increase of the chain length of the branching agents. Triester based linoleic acid has improved properties such as low-temperature and tribological properties. These results will make it feasible for plant oil to be used for biolubricants, fuels in chain saws, transmission oil and brake fluid. PMID:27008312

  15. Effect of dietary linoleic acid on the progression of chronic renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Gregório, S M P; Lemos, C C S; Caldas, M L; Bregman, R

    2002-05-01

    The role of linoleic acid in chronic renal failure (CRF) is controversial. In the present study 21 male Wistar rats submitted to 5/6 renal mass reduction (R) and 16 normal controls (C) were fed a supplement (S) or normal (N) linoleic acid diet for 60 days starting 10 days after CRF. As expected, serum creatinine, cholesterol and triglycerides (mean +/- SEM) were higher in the CRF groups compared to the C groups (P<0.05). The RS group presented lower cholesterol (84 +/- 4 vs 126 +/- 13 mg%) and triglyceride (88 +/- 9 vs 132 +/- 19 mg%) levels compared to the RN group. Proteinuria and kidney weight did not differ between CRF groups. Glomerular area increased 78% in RS and 100% in RN compared to control rats. Glomerular sclerosis index tended to be lower in RS (27%) compared to RN (38%), tubulointerstitial damage was similar between CRF groups (RS = 1.91 +/- 0.2 and RN = 2.14 +/- 0.3), and mesangial fractional volume increased to the same extent in both CRF groups. The data suggest that a linoleic acid-enriched diet did not protect against the progression of CRF after 60 days.

  16. Trans-10,cis-12 CLA increases adipocyte lipolysis and alters lipid droplet-associated proteins: role of mTOR and ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Chung, Soonkyu; Brown, Jonathan Mark; Sandberg, Maria Boysen; McIntosh, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Lipid droplet-associated proteins play an important role in adipocyte triglyceride (TG) metabolism. Here, we show that trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), but not cis-9,trans-11 CLA, increased lipolysis and altered human adipocyte lipid droplet morphology. Before this change in morphology, there was a rapid trans-10,cis-12 CLA-induced increase in the accumulation of perilipin A in the cytosol, followed by the disappearance of perilipin A protein. In contrast, protein levels of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) were increased in cultures treated with trans-10,cis-12 CLA. Immunostaining revealed that ADRP localized to the surface of small lipid droplets, displacing perilipin. Intriguingly, trans-10,cis-12 CLA increased ADRP protein expression to a much greater extent than ADRP mRNA without affecting stability, suggesting translational control of ADRP. To this end, we found that trans-10,cis-12 CLA increased activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin/p70 S6 ribosomal protein kinase/S6 ribosomal protein (mTOR/p70S6K/S6) pathway. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the trans-10,cis-12 CLA-mediated reduction of human adipocyte TG content is associated with the differential localization and expression of lipid droplet-associated proteins. This process involves both the translational control of ADRP through the activation of mTOR/p70S6K/S6 signaling and transcriptional control of perilipin A. PMID:15716587

  17. Oleic acid and linoleic acid from Tenebrio molitor larvae inhibit BACE1 activity in vitro: molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Youn, Kumju; Yun, Eun-Young; Lee, Jinhyuk; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Jeong, Woo-Sik; Jun, Mira

    2014-02-01

    In our ongoing research to find therapeutic compounds for Alzheimer's disease (AD) from natural resources, the inhibitory activity of the BACE1 enzyme by Tenebrio molitor larvae and its major compounds were evaluated. The T. molitor larvae extract and its fractions exhibited strong BACE1 suppression. The major components of hexane fraction possessing both high yield and strong BACE1 inhibition were determined by thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. A remarkable composition of unsaturated long chain fatty acids, including oleic acid and linoleic acid, were identified. Oleic acid, in particular, noncompetitively attenuated BACE1 activity with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) value of 61.31 μM and Ki value of 34.3 μM. Furthermore, the fatty acids were stably interacted with BACE1 at different allosteric sites of the enzyme bound with the OH of CYS319 and the NH₃ of TYR320 for oleic acid and with the C=O group of GLN304 for linoleic acid. Here, we first revealed novel pharmacophore features of oleic acids and linoleic acid to BACE1 by in silico docking studies. The present findings would clearly suggest potential guidelines for designing novel BACE1 selective inhibitors.

  18. Characterisation of a cell wall-anchored protein of Staphylococcus saprophyticus associated with linoleic acid resistance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the second most frequent causative agent of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI), accounting for up to 20% of cases. A common feature of staphylococci is colonisation of the human skin. This involves survival against innate immune defenses including antibacterial unsaturated free fatty acids such as linoleic acid which act by disrupting bacterial cell membranes. Indeed, S. saprophyticus UTI is usually preceded by perineal skin colonisation. Results In this study we identified a previously undescribed 73.5 kDa cell wall-anchored protein of S. saprophyticus, encoded on plasmid pSSAP2 of strain MS1146, which we termed S. saprophyticus surface protein F (SssF). The sssF gene is highly prevalent in S. saprophyticus clinical isolates and we demonstrate that the SssF protein is expressed at the cell surface. However, unlike all other characterised cell wall-anchored proteins of S. saprophyticus, we were unable to demonstrate a role for SssF in adhesion. SssF shares moderate sequence identity to a surface protein of Staphylococcus aureus (SasF) recently shown to be an important mediator of linoleic acid resistance. Using a heterologous complementation approach in a S. aureus sasF null genetic background, we demonstrate that SssF is associated with resistance to linoleic acid. We also show that S. saprophyticus strains lacking sssF are more sensitive to linoleic acid than those that possess it. Every staphylococcal genome sequenced to date encodes SssF and SasF homologues. Proteins in this family share similar predicted secondary structures consisting almost exclusively of α-helices in a probable coiled-coil formation. Conclusions Our data indicate that SssF is a newly described and highly prevalent surface-localised protein of S. saprophyticus that contributes to resistance against the antibacterial effects of linoleic acid. SssF is a member of a protein family widely disseminated

  19. Catalytic production of conjugated fatty acids and oils.

    PubMed

    Philippaerts, An; Goossens, Steven; Jacobs, Pierre A; Sels, Bert F

    2011-06-20

    The reactive double bonds in conjugated vegetable oils are of high interest in industry. Traditionally, conjugated vegetable oils are added to paints, varnishes, and inks to improve their drying properties, while recently there is an increased interest in their use in the production of bioplastics. Besides the industrial applications, also food manufactures are interested in conjugated vegetable oils due to their various positive health effects. While the isomer type is less important for their industrial purposes, the beneficial health effects are mainly associated with the c9,t11, t10,c12 and t9,t11 CLA isomers. The production of CLA-enriched oils as additives in functional foods thus requires a high CLA isomer selectivity. Currently, CLAs are produced by conjugation of oils high in linoleic acid, for example soybean and safflower oil, using homogeneous bases. Although high CLA productivities and very high isomer selectivities are obtained, this process faces many ecological drawbacks. Moreover, CLA-enriched oils can not be produced directly with the homogeneous bases. Literature reports describe many catalytic processes to conjugate linoleic acid, linoleic acid methyl ester, and vegetable oils rich in linoleic acid: biocatalysts, for example enzymes and cells; metal catalysts, for example homogeneous metal complexes and heterogeneous catalysts; and photocatalysts. This Review discusses state-of-the-art catalytic processes in comparison with some new catalytic production routes. For each category of catalytic process, the CLA productivities and the CLA isomer selectivity are compared. Heterogeneous catalysis seems the most attractive approach for CLA production due to its easy recovery process, provided that the competing hydrogenation reaction is limited and the CLA production rate competes with the current homogeneous base catalysis. The most important criteria to obtain high CLA productivity and isomer selectivity are (1) absence of a hydrogen donor, (2

  20. Catalytic production of conjugated fatty acids and oils.

    PubMed

    Philippaerts, An; Goossens, Steven; Jacobs, Pierre A; Sels, Bert F

    2011-06-20

    The reactive double bonds in conjugated vegetable oils are of high interest in industry. Traditionally, conjugated vegetable oils are added to paints, varnishes, and inks to improve their drying properties, while recently there is an increased interest in their use in the production of bioplastics. Besides the industrial applications, also food manufactures are interested in conjugated vegetable oils due to their various positive health effects. While the isomer type is less important for their industrial purposes, the beneficial health effects are mainly associated with the c9,t11, t10,c12 and t9,t11 CLA isomers. The production of CLA-enriched oils as additives in functional foods thus requires a high CLA isomer selectivity. Currently, CLAs are produced by conjugation of oils high in linoleic acid, for example soybean and safflower oil, using homogeneous bases. Although high CLA productivities and very high isomer selectivities are obtained, this process faces many ecological drawbacks. Moreover, CLA-enriched oils can not be produced directly with the homogeneous bases. Literature reports describe many catalytic processes to conjugate linoleic acid, linoleic acid methyl ester, and vegetable oils rich in linoleic acid: biocatalysts, for example enzymes and cells; metal catalysts, for example homogeneous metal complexes and heterogeneous catalysts; and photocatalysts. This Review discusses state-of-the-art catalytic processes in comparison with some new catalytic production routes. For each category of catalytic process, the CLA productivities and the CLA isomer selectivity are compared. Heterogeneous catalysis seems the most attractive approach for CLA production due to its easy recovery process, provided that the competing hydrogenation reaction is limited and the CLA production rate competes with the current homogeneous base catalysis. The most important criteria to obtain high CLA productivity and isomer selectivity are (1) absence of a hydrogen donor, (2

  1. Dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid causes skeletal muscle metabolic abnormalities in Zucker fatty rats through specific modification of fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    Ohminami, Hirokazu; Amo, Kikuko; Taketani, Yutaka; Sato, Kazusa; Fukaya, Makiko; Uebanso, Takashi; Arai, Hidekazu; Koganei, Megumi; Sasaki, Hajime; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Yamamoto, Hironori; Takeda, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    A dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid strongly contributes to the development of metabolic disorders in Zucker fatty rats. However, the underlying mechanisms of the metabolic disorders are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the metabolic disorders were triggered at a stage earlier than the 8 weeks we had previously reported. In this study, we investigated early molecular events induced by the sucrose and linoleic acid diet in Zucker fatty rats by comparison with other combinations of carbohydrate (sucrose or palatinose) and fat (linoleic acid or oleic acid). Skeletal muscle arachidonic acid levels were significantly increased in the sucrose and linoleic acid group compared to the other dietary groups at 4 weeks, while there were no obvious differences in the metabolic phenotype between the groups. Expression of genes related to arachidonic acid synthesis was induced in skeletal muscle but not in liver and adipose tissue in sucrose and linoleic acid group rats. In addition, the sucrose and linoleic acid group exhibited a rapid induction in endoplasmic reticulum stress and abnormal lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. We concluded that the dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid primarily induces metabolic disorders in skeletal muscle through increases in arachidonic acid and endoplasmic reticulum stress, in advance of systemic metabolic disorders. PMID:25147427

  2. Antioxidant effect of non-enzymatic browning reaction products on linoleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, N.S.K.

    1987-01-01

    In aqueous lysine-sucrose model systems, the effects of reaction time, pH and molar ratio were studied on the formation of non-enzymatic browning reaction (NBR) products. The extent of sucrose hydrolysis was measured and the antioxidant effect of NBR products on linoleic acid emulsions was examined. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained at various stages of browning. Sucrose produced NMR produces with lysine in an aqueous system at 100/sup 0/C. The C-13 NMR spectra indicated that the NBR started when sucrose and lysine were dissolved in water. The C-13 NMR spectra also showed that heating did not have an effect on the gross composition of polymeric species. The absorbance at 480 nm of 0.75 M lysine-sucrose solution heated up to 6 hours increased with reaction times. The pH values of heated lysine-sucrose solution gradually decreased with reaction time. When 0.75 M sucrose or lysine solution was heated separately up to 6 hours, there were no changes in absorbance in pH. In the pH range of 3.52-6.35, higher absorbance was obtained from heated lysine-sucrose solution at acidic pH levels than at neutral pH levels. As the concentration of lysine and sucrose solution was increased, the absorbance increased. At longer reaction times or acidic pH levels, enhanced hydrolysis of sucrose to reducing sugars resulted in more NBR products. NBR products obtained at a longer reaction time, an acidic pH, and higher concentration of reactants showed a darker brown color and were effective in preventing the formation of peroxides. The oxygen uptake of linoleic acid emulsion having NBR products was smaller than that of linoleic acid emulsion without NBR products. Based on these results, it was concluded that sucrose may act as an antioxidant in processed foods containing both amino acids and lipids.

  3. Increasing dietary linoleic acid does not increase tissue arachidonic acid content in adults consuming Western-type diets: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Linoleic acid, with a DRI of 12-17 g/d, is the most highly consumed polyunsaturated fatty acid in the Western diet and is found in virtually all commonly consumed foods. The concern with dietary linoleic acid, being the metabolic precursor of arachidonic acid, is its consumption may enrich tissues with arachidonic acid and contribute to chronic and overproduction of bioactive eicosanoids. However, no systematic review of human trials regarding linoleic acid consumption and subsequent changes in tissue levels of arachidonic acid has been undertaken. Objective In this study, we reviewed the human literature that reported changes in dietary linoleic acid and its subsequent impact on changing tissue arachidonic acid in erythrocytes and plasma/serum phospholipids. Design We identified, reviewed, and evaluated all peer-reviewed published literature presenting data outlining changes in dietary linoleic acid in adult human clinical trials that reported changes in phospholipid fatty acid composition (specifically arachidonic acid) in plasma/serum and erythrocytes within the parameters of our inclusion/exclusion criteria. Results Decreasing dietary linoleic acid by up to 90% was not significantly correlated with changes in arachidonic acid levels in the phospholipid pool of plasma/serum (p = 0.39). Similarly, when dietary linoleic acid levels were increased up to six fold, no significant correlations with arachidonic acid levels were observed (p = 0.72). However, there was a positive relationship between dietary gamma-linolenic acid and dietary arachidonic acid on changes in arachidonic levels in plasma/serum phospholipids. Conclusions Our results do not support the concept that modifying current intakes of dietary linoleic acid has an effect on changing levels of arachidonic acid in plasma/serum or erythrocytes in adults consuming Western-type diets. PMID:21663641

  4. CLA supplementation and aerobic exercise lower blood triacylglycerol, but have no effect on peak oxygen uptake or cardiorespiratory fatigue thresholds.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Buckner, Samuel L; Cochrane, Kristen C; Bergstrom, Haley C; Goldsmith, Jacob A; Weir, Joseph P; Housh, Terry J; Cramer, Joel T

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the effects of 6 weeks of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation and moderate aerobic exercise on peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak), the gas exchange threshold (GET), the respiratory compensation point (RCP), and serum concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and glucose in humans. Thirty-four untrained to moderately trained men (mean ± SD; age = 21.5 ± 2.8 years; mass = 77.2 ± 9.5 kg) completed this double-blind, placebo controlled study and were randomly assigned to either a CLA (Clarinol A-80; n = 18) or placebo (PLA; sunflower oil; n = 16) group. Prior to and following 6 weeks of aerobic training (50% VO2 peak for 30 min, twice per week) and supplementation (5.63 g of total CLA isomers [of which 2.67 g was c9, t11 and 2.67 g was t10, c12] or 7.35 g high oleic sunflower oil per day), each participant completed an incremental cycle ergometer test to exhaustion to determine their [Formula: see text] peak, GET, and RCP and fasted blood draws were performed to measure serum concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and glucose. Serum triacylglycerol concentrations were lower (p < 0.05) in the CLA than the PLA group. For VO2 peak and glucose, there were group × time interactions (p < 0.05), however, post hoc statistical tests did not reveal any differences (p > 0.05) between the CLA and PLA groups. GET and RCP increased (p < 0.05) from pre- to post-training for both the CLA and PLA groups. Overall, these data suggested that CLA and aerobic exercise may have synergistic, blood triacylglycerol lowering effects, although CLA may be ineffective for enhancing aerobic exercise performance in conjunction with a 6-week aerobic exercise training program in college-age men.

  5. Effects of abomasal infusion of conjugated linoleic acids, Sterculia foetida oil, and fish oil on production performance and the extent of fatty acid Δ⁹-desaturation in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, M P; Taga, H; Ma, L; Corl, B A; Gervais, R; Lebeuf, Y; Richard, F J; Chouinard, P Y

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), Sterculia foetida oil (STO), and fish oil (FO) on milk yield and composition, milk FA profile, Δ(9)-desaturation activity, and mammary expression of 2 isoforms of stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD-1 and SCD-5) in lactating dairy cows. Eight multiparous Holstein cows (69 ± 13 d postpartum) were used in a double 4 × 4 Latin square design with 28-d periods. For the first 14 d of each period, cows received an abomasal infusion of (1) 406 g of a saturated fatty acid (SFA) supplement (112 g of 16:0 + 230 g of 18:0) used as a control (CTL), (2) 36 g of a CLA supplement (13.9 g of trans-10,cis-12 18:2) + 370 g of SFA, (3) 7 g of STO (3.1g of 19:1 cyclo) + 399 g of SFA, or (4) 406 g of FO (55.2 g of cis-5,-8,-11,-14,-17 20:5 + 59.3 g of cis-4,-7,-10,-13,-16,-19 22:6). Infusions were followed by a 14-d washout interval. Compared with CTL, STO decreased milk yield from 38.0 to 33.0 kg/d, and increased milk fat concentration from 3.79 to 4.45%. Milk fat concentration was also decreased by CLA (2.23%) and FO (3.34%). Milk fat yield was not affected by STO (1,475 g/d) compared with CTL (1,431 g/d), but was decreased by CLA (774 g/d) and FO (1,186 g/d). Desaturase indices for 10:0, 12:0, and 20:0 were decreased, whereas the extent of desaturation of 14:0, 16:0, 17:0, and 18:0 was not affected by CLA treatment compared with CTL. Infusion of STO significantly decreased all calculated desaturase indices compared with CTL; the 14:0 index was reduced by 80.7%. Infusion of FO decreased the desaturase indices for 10:0, 14:0, 20:0, trans-11 18:1, and 18:0. The effect of FO on the 14:0 index indicates a decrease in apparent Δ(9)-desaturase activity of 30.2%. Compared with CTL, mammary mRNA abundance of SCD-1 was increased by STO (+30%) and decreased by CLA (-24%), whereas FO had no effect. No effect was observed on mRNA abundance of SCD-5. In conclusion, abomasal infusion of CLA, STO, and FO

  6. The 10t,12c isomer of conjugated linoleic acid inhibits fatty acid synthase expression and enzyme activity in human breast, colon, and prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lau, Dominic S Y; Archer, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether downregulation of fatty acid synthase (FAS) expression and/or inhibition of its activity by the two major CLA isomers, 10t,12c and 9c,11t CLA, could contribute to their inhibitory effect on the growth of human breast (MCF-7), colon (HT-29) and prostate (LNCaP) cancer cell lines. We first confirmed and extended the results of others showing that the inhibitory action of CLA on proliferation is dependent on the cell type as well as the structure of the isomer, the 10,12 isomer being a more potent inhibitor than the 9,11 isomer in the concentration range 25-100 microM. By Western analysis, we showed that 10,12 CLA downregulated FAS expression in all of the cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner, but the 9,11 isomer had no effect. Both isomers inhibited FAS enzyme activity, but 10,12 CLA was again more potent than the 9,11 isomer. Our results suggest that downregulation of FAS by 10,12 CLA, but not by the 9,11 isomer, as well as inhibition of FAS enzyme activity by both isomers, may contribute to growth inhibition of cancer cells but only at relatively high concentrations.

  7. Relative permittivity behavior and temperature changes in linoleic acid during the phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kościesza, R.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.; Tefelski, D. B.; Kos, A.; Ejchart, W.

    2008-07-01

    In our earlier works several fatty liquids (edible oils and unsaturated fatty acids) which exhibit existence of a new phase induced by high pressure were presented. Conclusion of those experiments is that C=C bonds existence in these liquids plays a dominant role in a new phase occurrence. Relative permittivity in pure acids investigated till now seems to behave in specific way. That is why we decided to investigate linoleic acid (C18H32O2) under high pressure. In our experiment such quantities as: electric capacity, pressure and temperature were recorded. The experimental setup gives us also a possibility to conduct optical investigations. We observed a transmitted and scattered beams of close infrared light (λ = 800nm) in directions 0° and 90° towards the incident beam. Due to the rapid grow of temperature and the rapid change of transmitted and scattered beams we may say that observed phenomenon is a first order phase transition and a proof for the significant change of liquid structure. This paper contains time dependencies of permittivity, temperature, transmitted and scattered light intensity and also permittivity vs. pressure changes during the phase transition in linoleic acid and first of all measured data analysis which lets us explain the transition reasons.

  8. Mosquito larvicidal activity of oleic and linoleic acids isolated from Citrullus colocynthis (Linn.) Schrad.

    PubMed

    Rahuman, A Abdul; Venkatesan, P; Gopalakrishnan, Geetha

    2008-11-01

    In mosquito control programs, botanical origin may have the potential to be used successfully as larvicides. The larvicidal activity of crude acetone, hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol, and petroleum ether extracts of the leaf of Centella asiatica Linn., Datura metal Linn., Mukia scabrella Arn., Toddalia asiatica (Linn.) Lam, extracts of whole plant of Citrullus colocynthis (Linn.) Schrad, and Sphaeranthus indicus Linn. were assayed for their toxicity against the early fourth instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae). The larval mortality was observed after 24 h exposure. All extracts showed moderate larvicidal effects; however, the highest larval mortality was found in whole plant petroleum ether extract of C. colocynthis. In the present study, bioassay-guided fractionation of petroleum ether extract led to the separation and identification of fatty acids; oleic acid and linoleic acid were isolated and identified as mosquito larvicidal compounds. Oleic and Linoleic acids were quite potent against fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti L. (LC50 8.80, 18.20 and LC90 35.39, 96.33 ppm), Anopheles stephensi Liston (LC50 9.79, 11.49 and LC90 37.42, 47.35 ppm), and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (LC50 7.66, 27.24 and LC90 30.71, 70.38 ppm). The structure was elucidated from infrared, ultraviolet, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, 13C-NMR, and mass spectral data. This is the first report on the mosquito larvicidal activity of the reported isolated compounds from C. colocynthis.

  9. Frying stability of high oleic sunflower oils as affected by composition of tocopherol isomers and linoleic acid content.

    PubMed

    Aladedunye, Felix; Przybylski, Roman

    2013-12-01

    The influence of linoleic acid content and tocopherol isomeric composition on the frying performance of high oleic sunflower oil was evaluated during a 14-day restaurant style frying operation. At equal linoleic acid content, no significant difference was observed between high oleic sunflower oil containing only α-tocopherol and the sample containing a mixture of α-, γ-, and δ-isomers as measured by the amount of total polar components, oligomers, anisidine value, and free fatty acids. On the contrary, at similar tocopherol isomeric composition, high oleic sunflower oil containing lower amount of linoleic acid showed superior frying stability compared to the sample with a higher content of linoleic acid, suggesting that the frying performance of high oleic sunflower oil is dictated primarily by the level of linoleic acid, with the tocopherol isomeric composition of the oil having no significant influence. In all oil samples, the loss of γ-tocopherol was higher than the corresponding loss of α-tocopherol. PMID:23870970

  10. Microencapsulation of linoleic acid with low- and high-molecular-weight components of soluble soybean polysaccharide and its oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xu; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Adachi, Shuji; Matsumura, Yasuki; Mori, Tomohiko; Maeda, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Akihiro; Matsuno, Ryuichi

    2003-09-01

    Soluble soybean polysaccharide (SSPS) was fractionated into its low- (LMW) and high-molecular-weight (HMW) components to test their antioxidative and emulsifying properties. Linoleic acid was emulsified with an aqueous solution of SSPS, HMW, a mixture of LMW or HMW with maltodextrin, or maltodextrin alone. The emulsions prepared with SSPS, HWM and the mixture of HMW with maltodextrin were stable. These emulsions were spay-dried to produce microcapsules. The encapsulated linoleic acid was oxidized at 37 degrees C and at various levels of relative humidity. Linoleic acid encapsulated with the mixture of LMW with maltodextrin or HMW was stable to oxidation, and this stability increased as the weight fraction of LMW in the mixture was increased. The LMW components also had high DPPH-radical scavenging activity. These results indicate that LMW played an important role in suppressing or retarding the oxidation of linoleic acid encapsulated with SSPS. The oxidative stability of linoleic acid encapsulated with a mixture of the LMW and HMW components was high at low and high relative humidity, but not at intermediate levels of relative humidity.

  11. Ionic polymeric micelles based on chitosan and fatty acids and intended for wound healing. Comparison of linoleic and oleic acid.

    PubMed

    Bonferoni, M C; Sandri, G; Dellera, E; Rossi, S; Ferrari, F; Mori, M; Caramella, C

    2014-05-01

    Chitosan is well known for its positive properties in wound healing. Also unsaturated fatty acids are described as able to accelerate tissue repairing mechanisms. In this work hydrophobically modified chitosan was obtained by ionic interaction with either oleic or linoleic acid. In aqueous environment self-assembling into nanoparticles occurred. The presence of hydrophobic domains, similar to those present in polymeric micelles, was demonstrated by changes in pyrene spectra. Both oleate and linoleate derivatives showed mucoadhesion behaviour. Cytotoxicity tests on human dermal fibroblasts demonstrated good biocompatibility of especially oleate derivatives. Clarithromycin, a poorly soluble model drug proposed for use in infected wounds was successfully encapsulated in both oleic and linoleic based polymeric micelles. The ionic structure of the carriers is responsible for their loosening at neutral pH and in the presence of salts. This behaviour should impair parenteral administration of the systems, but can be useful for topical delivery where the micelle components, chitosan and fatty acid, can play a positive role in dermal regeneration and tissue repairing.

  12. Probiotic Conjugated Linoleic Acid Mediated Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells by Downregulation of NFκB.

    PubMed

    Kadirareddy, Rashmi Holur; Vemuri, Sujana Ghanta; Palempalli, Uma Maheswari Devi

    2016-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid, a functional lipid, produced from Lactobacillus plantarum (LPCLA), has been demonstrated to possess apoptotic activity. The antiproliferative and apoptotic potential of LPCLA was here evaluated in vitro using the MDAMB231 human breast cancer cell line as a model system. Proliferation of MDA MB231 cells was inhibited with increasing concentrations of LPCLA with altered morphological features like cell detachment, rounding of cells and oligonucleosomal fragmentation of DNA. Flow cytometry confirmed the apoptotic potential of LPCLA by ANNEXIN V/PI double staining. Furthermore, outcome results indicated that the apoptosis was mediated by downregulation of the NF?B pathway which in turn acted through proteasome degradation of I?Bα, inhibition of p65 nuclear translocation, release of cytochromeC from mitochondria and finally overexpression of Bax protein. Thus, conjugated linoleic acid, a natural product derived from probiotics, could therefore be a possible potential chemotherapeutic agent due to its apoptotic activity against estrogen receptor negative breast cancer cells. PMID:27509982

  13. Linoleic and docosahexaenoic acids in human milk have opposite relationships with cognitive test performance in a sample of 28 countries.

    PubMed

    Lassek, W D; Gaulin, S J C

    2014-11-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids play critical roles in brain development and function, and their levels in human breast milk closely reflect the long-term diet. The fatty acid contents of human milk samples from 28 countries were used to predict averaged 2009 and 2012 test scores in mathematics, reading, and science from the Program for International Student Assessment. All test scores were positively related to milk docosahexaenoic acid (r=0.48 to 0.55), and negatively related to linoleic acid (r=-0.28 to -0.56). Together, these two human milk fatty acids explained 46% to 48% of the variance in scores, with no improvement in predictive power when socioeconomic variables were added to the regression. The (log) ratio of linoleic to arachidonic acid was negatively related to scores (r=-0.45 to -0.48). Statistical effects were similar for the two sexes. In a separate US sample, estimated dietary linoleic was negatively related to the levels of all long-chain n-3 and n-6 plasma fatty acids. High levels of dietary linoleic may impair cognition by decreasing both docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids in the brain.

  14. In Vitro characterization of low modulus linoleic acid coated strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite containing PMMA bone cement.

    PubMed

    Lam, W M; Pan, H B; Fong, M K; Cheung, W S; Wong, K L; Li, Z Y; Luk, K D K; Chan, W K; Wong, C T; Yang, C; Lu, W W

    2011-01-01

    Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement is widely used in vertebral body augmentation procedures such as vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty. Filling high modulus PMMA increases the modulus of filled verterbra, increasing the risk of fracture in the adjacent vertebra. On the other hand, in porous PMMA bone cements, wear particle generation and deterioration of mechanical performance are the major drawbacks. This study adopts a new approach by utilizing linoleic acid coated strontium substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticle (Sr-5 HA) and linoleic acid as plasticizer reducing bone cement's modulus with minimal impact on its strength. We determined the compressive strength (UCS) and modulus (Ec), hydrophobicity, injectability, in vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility of this bone cement at different filler and linoleic acid loading. At 20 wt % Sr5-HA incorporation, UCS and Ec were reduced from 63 ± 2 MPa, 2142 ± 129 MPa to 58 ± 2 MPa, 1785 ± 64 MPa, respectively. UCS and Ec were further reduced to 49 ± 2 MPa and 774 ± 70 MPa respectively when 15 v/v of linoleic acid was incorporated. After 7 days of incubation, pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) attached on 20 wt % Sr5-HA and 20 wt % Sr5-HA with 15 v/v of linoleic acid group were higher (3.73 ± 0.01 x 10⁴, 2.27 ± 0.02 x 10⁴) than their PMMA counterpart (1.83 ± 0.04 x 10⁴). Incorporation of Sr5-HA with linoleic acid in monomer phase is more effective in reducing the bone cement's stiffness than Sr5-HA alone. Combination of low stiffness and high mechanical strength gives the novel bone cement the potential for use in vertebroplasty cement applications. PMID:21053263

  15. Production of Palmitoleic and Linoleic Acid in Oleaginous and Nonoleaginous Yeast Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Kolouchová, Irena; Maťátková, Olga; Sigler, Karel; Masák, Jan; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of utilizing both oleaginous yeast species accumulating large amounts of lipids (Yarrowia lipolytica, Rhodotorula glutinis, Trichosporon cutaneum, and Candida sp.) and traditional biotechnological nonoleaginous ones (Kluyveromyces polysporus, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as potential producers of dietetically important major fatty acids. The main objective was to examine the cultivation conditions that would induce a high ratio of dietary fatty acids and biomass. Though genus-dependent, the type of nitrogen source had a higher influence on biomass yield than the C/N ratio. The nitrogen source leading to the highest lipid accumulation was potassium nitrate, followed by ammonium sulfate, which is an ideal nitrogen source supporting, in both oleaginous and nonoleaginous species, sufficient biomass growth with concomitantly increased lipid accumulation. All yeast strains displayed high (70–90%) content of unsaturated fatty acids in total cell lipids. The content of dietary fatty acids of interest, namely, palmitoleic acid and linoleic acid, reached in Kluyveromyces and Trichosporon strains over 50% of total fatty acids and the highest yield, over 280 mg per g of dry cell weight of these fatty acids, was observed in Trichosporon with ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source at C/N ratio 70. PMID:27022398

  16. Production of Palmitoleic and Linoleic Acid in Oleaginous and Nonoleaginous Yeast Biomass.

    PubMed

    Kolouchová, Irena; Maťátková, Olga; Sigler, Karel; Masák, Jan; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of utilizing both oleaginous yeast species accumulating large amounts of lipids (Yarrowia lipolytica, Rhodotorula glutinis, Trichosporon cutaneum, and Candida sp.) and traditional biotechnological nonoleaginous ones (Kluyveromyces polysporus, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as potential producers of dietetically important major fatty acids. The main objective was to examine the cultivation conditions that would induce a high ratio of dietary fatty acids and biomass. Though genus-dependent, the type of nitrogen source had a higher influence on biomass yield than the C/N ratio. The nitrogen source leading to the highest lipid accumulation was potassium nitrate, followed by ammonium sulfate, which is an ideal nitrogen source supporting, in both oleaginous and nonoleaginous species, sufficient biomass growth with concomitantly increased lipid accumulation. All yeast strains displayed high (70-90%) content of unsaturated fatty acids in total cell lipids. The content of dietary fatty acids of interest, namely, palmitoleic acid and linoleic acid, reached in Kluyveromyces and Trichosporon strains over 50% of total fatty acids and the highest yield, over 280 mg per g of dry cell weight of these fatty acids, was observed in Trichosporon with ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source at C/N ratio 70.

  17. Production of Palmitoleic and Linoleic Acid in Oleaginous and Nonoleaginous Yeast Biomass.

    PubMed

    Kolouchová, Irena; Maťátková, Olga; Sigler, Karel; Masák, Jan; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of utilizing both oleaginous yeast species accumulating large amounts of lipids (Yarrowia lipolytica, Rhodotorula glutinis, Trichosporon cutaneum, and Candida sp.) and traditional biotechnological nonoleaginous ones (Kluyveromyces polysporus, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as potential producers of dietetically important major fatty acids. The main objective was to examine the cultivation conditions that would induce a high ratio of dietary fatty acids and biomass. Though genus-dependent, the type of nitrogen source had a higher influence on biomass yield than the C/N ratio. The nitrogen source leading to the highest lipid accumulation was potassium nitrate, followed by ammonium sulfate, which is an ideal nitrogen source supporting, in both oleaginous and nonoleaginous species, sufficient biomass growth with concomitantly increased lipid accumulation. All yeast strains displayed high (70-90%) content of unsaturated fatty acids in total cell lipids. The content of dietary fatty acids of interest, namely, palmitoleic acid and linoleic acid, reached in Kluyveromyces and Trichosporon strains over 50% of total fatty acids and the highest yield, over 280 mg per g of dry cell weight of these fatty acids, was observed in Trichosporon with ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source at C/N ratio 70. PMID:27022398

  18. Linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA improves learning impairment in SAMP8.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsu; Mukasa, Takeshi; Fujikawa, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Iso, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2006-01-23

    In the water-maze test, the linoleic acid derivative, 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), significantly shortened the prolonged latency for accelerated-senescence-prone mice 8 (SAMP8), reaching a level similar to the latency for accelerated-senescence-resistant mice 1 (SAMR1) as control. In the open-field test to assess motor activity, it was confirmed that the DCP-LA effect is not due to increased motor activity. In the passive avoidance test to assess fear memory, DCP-LA had no effect on the latency of acquisition and retention for SAMP8. The results of the present study, thus, suggest that DCP-LA could improve age-related learning impairment by enhancing cognitive functions.

  19. Cardiolipin linoleic acid content and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity are associated in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Val Andrew; McMeekin, Lauren; Saint, Caitlin; LeBlanc, Paul J

    2015-04-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is an inner-mitochondrial membrane phospholipid that is important for optimal mitochondrial function. Specifically, CL and CL linoleic (18:2ω6) content are known to be positively associated with cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity. However, this association has not been examined in skeletal muscle. In this study, rats were fed high-fat diets with a naturally occurring gradient in linoleic acid (coconut oil [CO], 5.8%; flaxseed oil [FO], 13.2%; safflower oil [SO], 75.1%) in an attempt to alter both mitochondrial CL fatty acyl composition and COX activity in rat mixed hind-limb muscle. In general, mitochondrial membrane lipid composition was fairly resistant to dietary treatments as only modest changes in fatty acyl composition were detected in CL and other major mitochondrial phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). As a result of this resistance, CL 18:2ω6 content was not different between the dietary groups. Consistent with the lack of changes in CL 18:2ω6 content, mitochondrial COX activity was also not different between the dietary groups. However, correlational analysis using data obtained from rats across the dietary groups showed a significant relationship (p = 0.009, R(2) = 0.21). Specifically, our results suggest that CL 18:2ω6 content may positively influence mitochondrial COX activity thereby making this lipid molecule a potential factor related to mitochondrial health and function in skeletal muscle.

  20. Short communication: Milk fat depression induced by conjugated linoleic acid and a high-oil and low-fiber diet occurs equally across the day in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Ma, L; Cook, K L; Bauman, D E; Harvatine, K J

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a circadian rhythm of milk and milk component synthesis has been characterized that is partially dependent on the timing of feed intake. Our objective was to determine if inhibition of milk fat synthesis during diet-induced milk fat depression occurred to a higher degree during certain phases of the day. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 2 experiments that induced milk fat depression while milking cows 3 times per day at equal intervals. The response at each milking was analyzed using mixed model ANOVA with repeated measures. In experiment 1, nine multiparous Holstein cows were arranged in a 3×3 Latin square design, and treatments were control, 3-d intravenous infusion of 10 g/d of trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), and a low-forage and high-fat diet for 10 d. In experiment 2, ten multiparous ruminally cannulated cows were arranged in a replicated design and milk samples were collected during a control period or after 5 d of abomasal infusion of 10 g/d of CLA. The daily pattern of milk fat concentration and yield did not differ between treatments in either experiment. In experiment 1, an effect was found of treatment and milking time on milk fat concentration and yield. Similarly, in experiment 2, main effects were found of treatment and milking time on milk fat concentration and an effect of treatment, but no effect of milking time on milk fat yield. Milk fat percent was increased from 3.41 to 4.06% and 3.25 to 3.48% from the morning to the afternoon milking in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Additionally, milk fatty acid profile, including trans intermediates, was changed over the day in experiment 1, but the magnitude of the changes were small and the pattern did not differ among treatments. A daily rhythm of milk fat concentration and yield was observed in cows milked 3 times a day, but milk fat depression decreases milk fat yield equally over the day.

  1. Effect of palmitic acid and linoleic acid on expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in human bone marrow endothelial cells (HBMECs)

    PubMed Central

    Sanadgol, Nima; Mansouri, Kamran; Bahrami, Gholamreza

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The amount and type of fatty acids (FAs) in the diet influence the risk of atherosclerosis. Palmitic acid and linoleic acid exist at high levels in Iranian edible oils. In this study, we investigated the effect of palmitic acid and linoleic acid on expression of soluble and cell-associated forms of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in human bone marrow endothelial cells (HBMECs). Material and methods The endothelial cells were induced with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and thereafter incubated with palmitic or linoleic acid. The level of soluble and cell-associated VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 were analyzed using ELISA and western blot. Results Our findings indicated that palmitic acid up-regulates the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in HBMECs when these cells are induced with TNF-α or LPS. In addition, the results suggest that linoleic acid could sustain up-regulated ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in activated endothelial cells. Conclusions Chronic activation of endothelial cells in the presence of palmitic and linoleic may account for pathogenesis of cardiovascular events. These findings provide further support for the detrimental effects of these fatty acids, especially palmitic acid, in promotion and induction of cardiovascular diseases which are prevalent in the Iranian population. PMID:22661989

  2. Weight gain and psychiatric treatment: Is there a role for green tea and conjugated linoleic acid?

    PubMed

    Katzman, Martin A; Jacobs, Leslie; Marcus, Madalyn; Vermani, Monica; Logan, Alan C

    2007-01-01

    Dietary supplement use is widespread in developed nations. In particular, patients who utilize mental health services also report frequent consumption of dietary supplements, often in relation to management of adverse events and specifically weight gain. Weight gain induced by psychotropic medications can further compound psychological distress and negatively influence compliance. Here we report on four cases of social anxiety disorder treated with the atypical antipsychotic quetiapine. Self-administration of conjugated linoleic acid and green tea extract may have influenced objective anthropomorphic measurements; each patient had an unexpected decrease in total body fat mass, a decrease in body fat percentage and an increase in lean body mass. Since weight gain is a common and undesirable side-effect with psychiatric medications, our observation strongly suggests the need for controlled clinical trials using these agents. PMID:17477874

  3. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058, a probiotic strain with high conjugated linoleic acid production ability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Haiqin; Tian, Fengwei; Zhao, Jianxin; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q; Chen, Wei

    2015-11-20

    Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058 was isolated from sauerkraut and identified to synthesize the beneficial metabolite conjugated linoleic acid. The genome contains a 319,7363-bp chromosome and three plasmids. The sequence will facilitate identification and characterization of the genetic determinants for its putative biological benefits.

  4. Improved HRGC separation of cis, trans CLA isomers as Diels-Alder adducts of alkyl esters.

    PubMed

    Blasi, F; Giua, L; Lombardi, G; Codini, M; Simonetti, M S; Damiani, P; Cossignani, L

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports the separation of four isomers of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), c,t/t,c-8,10; c,t/t,c-9,11; c,t/t,c-10,12; c,t/t,c-11,13, after reaction of esterification with aliphatic alcohols of different chain length and adduct formation with 4-methyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (MTAD). The high resolution gas chromatographic analyses were carried out using a simple 50-m cyanopropyl polysiloxane capillary column both with a flame ionization detector and a mass spectrometer. The resolution between the two pair of isomers: c,t/t,c-9,11 and c,t/t,c-10,12 and between c,t/t,c-10,12 and c,t/t,c-11,13 isomers were good for all the investigated alkyl esters and increased with the chain length of alcohol esterified to carboxylic moiety of CLA isomers. The most interesting result was relative to the c,t/t,c-8,10 and c,t/t,c-9,11 isomers, critical pair of isomers also when analyzed with a 120-m cyanopropyl polysiloxane capillary column; their resolution also increased from methyl to hexyl esters of CLA isomers and reached an acceptable value (0.8) in the case of hexyl esters. The best resolutions of the four considered CLA isomers were obtained with the hexyl esters of MTAD adducts of the isomers, without excessive analysis time. This method was useful and simple to evaluate the profile of the four main c,t isomers in commercial CLA samples.

  5. Hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids: Oxidised derivatives of linoleic acid and their role in inflammation associated with metabolic syndrome and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vangaveti, Venkat N; Jansen, Holger; Kennedy, Richard Lee; Malabu, Usman H

    2016-08-15

    Linoleic acid (LA) is a major constituent of low-density lipoproteins. An essential fatty acid, LA is a polyunsaturated fatty acid, which is oxidised by endogenous enzymes and reactive oxygen species in the circulation. Increased levels of low-density lipoproteins coupled with oxidative stress and lack of antioxidants drive the oxidative processes. This results in synthesis of a range of oxidised derivatives, which play a vital role in regulation of inflammatory processes. The derivatives of LA include, hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids, oxo-​octadecadienoic acids, epoxy octadecadecenoic acid and epoxy-keto-octadecenoic acids. In this review, we examine the role of LA derivatives and their actions on regulation of inflammation relevant to metabolic processes associated with atherogenesis and cancer. The processes affected by LA derivatives include, alteration of airway smooth muscles and vascular wall, affecting sensitivity to pain, and regulating endogenous steroid hormones associated with metabolic syndrome. LA derivatives alter cell adhesion molecules, this initial step, is pivotal in regulating inflammatory processes involving transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor pathways, thus, leading to alteration of metabolic processes. The derivatives are known to elicit pleiotropic effects that are either beneficial or detrimental in nature hence making it difficult to determine the exact role of these derivatives in the progress of an assumed target disorder. The key may lie in understanding the role of these derivatives at various stages of development of a disorder. Novel pharmacological approaches in altering the synthesis or introduction of synthesised LA derivatives could possibly help drive processes that could regulate inflammation in a beneficial manner. Chemical Compounds: Linoleic acid (PubChem CID: 5280450), 9- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (PubChem CID: 5312830), 13- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (PubChem CID: 6443013), 9-oxo

  6. Effects of conjugated linoleic acids fed to dairy cows during early gestation on hematological, immunological, and metabolic characteristics of cows and their calves.

    PubMed

    Dänicke, S; Kowalczyk, J; Renner, L; Pappritz, J; Meyer, U; Kramer, R; Weber, E-M; Döll, S; Rehage, J; Jahreis, G

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to test the stimulation ability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) expressed as stimulation index (SI) of newborn calves and of their dams fed a control fat supplement (CON, n=6) or 50 and 100g/d of a CLA-containing fat supplement (CLA50, n=5, and CLA100, n=6, respectively) during the preceding lactation period for 182 d after calving. The total intake of cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 CLA by groups CLA50 and CLA100 amounted to 4 and 8 g/d each, respectively. For this purpose, blood was collected immediately after parturition from calves before and after colostrum intake, and from cows after parturition and 21 d later. The SI was related to the fatty acid composition of erythrocyte and milk lipids and to various hematological and clinical-chemical parameters. Retrospective evaluation revealed that depletion time (i.e., the individual period elapsed between the day of terminating the feeding of the experimental diet in the preceding lactation period and the day of calving) ranged from 190 to 262 d, which corresponded to fetal exposure times of 19 to 102 d. The SI from cows increased significantly by 77 and 55%, within 21 d after calving according to the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Alamar Blue assays, respectively. However, feeding of 50 g of the CLA product failed to demonstrate this increase in the MTT assay. Moreover, SI was significantly lower for calves whose dams belonged to the CLA50 group, whereas stimulation ability was comparable for the PBMC from calves whose mothers were treated with CON and CLA100. Plasma metabolites (total bilirubin, total cholesterol, glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, 3-β-hydroxybutyrate, total protein, and albumin) and hematological parameters (hematocrit, white blood cell profile) were not significantly influenced by dietary treatments of the cows in the preceding lactation period. Although the fatty acid pattern of erythrocyte lipids

  7. A High Linoleic Acid Diet does not Induce Inflammation in Mouse Liver or Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Roger A; Garrison, Richard L; Stamatikos, Alexis D; Kang, Minsung; Cooper, Jamie A; Paton, Chad M

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the pro-inflammatory effects of linoleic acid (LNA) have been re-examined. It is now becoming clear that relatively few studies have adequately assessed the effects of LNA, independent of obesity. The purpose of this work was to compare the effects of several fat-enriched but non-obesigenic diets on inflammation to provide a more accurate assessment of LNA's ability to induce inflammation. Specifically, 8-week-old male C57Bl/6 mice were fed either saturated (SFA), monounsaturated (MUFA), LNA, or alpha-linolenic acid enriched diets (50 % Kcal from fat, 22 % wt/wt) for 4 weeks. Chow and high-fat, hyper-caloric diets were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant markers from epididymal fat, liver, and plasma were measured along with food intake and body weights. Mice fed the high SFA, MUFA, and high-fat diets exhibited increased pro-inflammatory markers in liver and adipose tissue; however, mice fed LNA for four weeks did not display significant changes in pro-inflammatory or pro-coagulant markers in epididymal fat, liver, or plasma. The present study demonstrates that LNA alone is insufficient to induce inflammation. Instead, it is more likely that hyper-caloric diets are responsible for diet-induced inflammation possibly due to adipose tissue remodeling.

  8. Enterotoxigenic intestinal bacteria in tropical sprue. IV. Effect of linoleic acid on growth interrelationships of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Mickelson, M J; Klipstein, F A

    1975-01-01

    The factors responsible for colonization of the small intestine by enterotoxigenic coliform bacteria in Puerto Ricans with tropical sprue are unknown, but epidemiological observations have suggested that they may be related to an increased dietary intake of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids, particularly linoleic acid, which is known to exert an inhibitory effect on the growth of gram-positive organisms that normally comprise the flora of the small intestine. We have examined, by using a glucose-limited continuous-culture system, what effect this fatty acid exerts on the growth relationships of enteric gram-positive and coliform bacteria. In this system, colonization by an invading strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae was prevented by the presence of an established culture of Lactobacillus acidophilus, principally by virtue of a lowered pH of the medium that was incompatible with Klebsiella growth. However, when the population density of L. acidophilus was reduced by the presence of a sufficient concentration of linoleic acid, the invading K. pneumoniae successfully colonized the system and, once established, suppressed the growth of L. acidophilus. These observations indicate that, under the conditions of our chemostat, gram-positive enteric bacteria suppress coliform growth and that this effect is reversible by the presence of linoleic acid. It remains to be established, however, what pertinence these in vitro observations have to conditions within the intestinal tract of persons living in the tropics. PMID:811564

  9. Enterotoxigenic intestinal bacteria in tropical sprue. IV. Effect of linoleic acid on growth interrelationships of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, M J; Klipstein, F A

    1975-11-01

    The factors responsible for colonization of the small intestine by enterotoxigenic coliform bacteria in Puerto Ricans with tropical sprue are unknown, but epidemiological observations have suggested that they may be related to an increased dietary intake of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids, particularly linoleic acid, which is known to exert an inhibitory effect on the growth of gram-positive organisms that normally comprise the flora of the small intestine. We have examined, by using a glucose-limited continuous-culture system, what effect this fatty acid exerts on the growth relationships of enteric gram-positive and coliform bacteria. In this system, colonization by an invading strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae was prevented by the presence of an established culture of Lactobacillus acidophilus, principally by virtue of a lowered pH of the medium that was incompatible with Klebsiella growth. However, when the population density of L. acidophilus was reduced by the presence of a sufficient concentration of linoleic acid, the invading K. pneumoniae successfully colonized the system and, once established, suppressed the growth of L. acidophilus. These observations indicate that, under the conditions of our chemostat, gram-positive enteric bacteria suppress coliform growth and that this effect is reversible by the presence of linoleic acid. It remains to be established, however, what pertinence these in vitro observations have to conditions within the intestinal tract of persons living in the tropics. PMID:811564

  10. Production of volatiles in fresh-cut apple: effect of applying alginate coatings containing linoleic acid or isoleucine.

    PubMed

    Maya-Meraz, Irma O; Espino-Díaz, Miguel; Molina-Corral, Francisco J; González-Aguilar, Gustavo A; Jacobo-Cuellar, Juan L; Sepulveda, David R; Olivas, Guadalupe I

    2014-11-01

    One of the main quality parameters in apples is aroma, its main precursors are fatty acids (FA) and amino acids (AA). In this study, alginate edible coatings were used as carriers of linoleic acid or isoleucine to serve as precursors for the production of aroma in cut apples. Apple wedges were immersed in a CaCl2 solution and coated with one of the following formulations: alginate solution (Alg-Ca), Alg-Ca-low-level linoleic acid (0.61 g/Lt), (LFA), Alg-Ca-high-level linoleic acid (2.44 g/L; HFA), Alg-Ca-low-level isoleucine (0.61 g/L; LAA), and Alg-Ca-high-level isoleucine (2.44 g/L; HAA). Apple wedges were stored at 3 °C and 85% relative humidity for 21 d and key volatiles were studied during storage. Addition of precursors, mainly isoleucine, showed to increase the production of some key volatiles on coated fresh-cut apples during storage. The concentration of 2-methyl-1-butanol was 4 times higher from day 12 to day 21 in HAA, while 2-methyl butyl acetate increased from day 12 to day 21 in HAA. After 21 d, HAA-apples presented a 40-fold value of 2-methyl-butyl acetate, compared to Alg-Ca cut apples. Values of hexanal increased during cut apple storage when the coating carried linoleic acid, mainly on HFA, from 3 to 12 d. The ability of apples to metabolize AA and FA depends on the concentration of precursors, but also depends on key enzymes, previous apple storage, among others. Further studies should be done to better clarify the behavior of fresh-cut apples as living tissue to metabolize precursors contained in edible coatings for the production of volatiles. PMID:25296624

  11. Transcriptional analysis reveals a high impact of conjugated linoleic acid on stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 mRNA expression in mice gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Parra, Pilar; Serra, Francisca; Palou, Andreu

    2012-10-01

    We examined the potential implication of skeletal muscle in the fat-lowering effect observed in mice treated with moderate doses of CLA. In experiment 1, mice fed with a standard-fat diet were orally treated with sunflower oil (control) and 3 or 10 mg CLA mixture/day for 37 days. In experiment 2, mice were fed with a high-fat diet for 65 days. For the first 30 days, they received the same doses as in experiment 1 and, from that time onwards, animals received double doses. Gene expression of key proteins involved in fatty acid transport, oxidation, regulation of lipid and carbohydrate utilization, composition of muscle fiber, and thermogenesis were determined and, in most of them, no major impact of CLA was seen. Therefore, enhancement of fatty acid oxidation in muscle did not seem to contribute to the antiobesity effect of CLA as seen in other studies with higher CLA doses. However, a strong induction of classically associated lipogenic genes such as Fasn (up to twofold) and, particularly, Scd1 (up to ninefold) was found. This activation could contribute to a protective role in muscle cells, since expression of ER stress markers was decreased and inversely correlated with the induction of Scd1.

  12. Maternal high-fat diet-induced programing of gut taste receptor and inflammatory gene expression in rat offspring is ameliorated by CLA supplementation.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Clare M; Segovia, Stephanie A; Zhang, Xiaoyuan D; Gray, Clint; Vickers, Mark H

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of a high-fat (HF) diet during pregnancy and lactation influences later life predisposition to obesity and cardiometabolic disease in offspring. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly defined, but one potential target that has received scant attention and is likely pivotal to disease progression is that of the gut. The present study examined the effects of maternal supplementation with the anti-inflammatory lipid, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), on offspring metabolic profile and gut expression of taste receptors and inflammatory markers. We speculate that preventing high-fat diet-induced metainflammation improved maternal metabolic parameters conferring beneficial effects on adult offspring. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to a purified control diet (CD; 10% kcal from fat), CD with CLA (CLA; 10% kcal from fat, 1% CLA), HF (45% kcal from fat) or HF with CLA (HFCLA; 45% kcal from fat, 1% CLA) throughout gestation and lactation. Plasma/tissues were taken at day 24 and RT-PCR was carried out on gut sections. Offspring from HF mothers were significantly heavier at weaning with impaired insulin sensitivity compared to controls. This was associated with increased plasma IL-1β and TNFα concentrations. Gut Tas1R1, IL-1β, TNFα, and NLRP3 expression was increased and Tas1R3 expression was decreased in male offspring from HF mothers and was normalized by maternal CLA supplementation. Tas1R1 expression was increased while PYY and IL-10 decreased in female offspring of HF mothers. These results suggest that maternal consumption of a HF diet during critical developmental windows influences offspring predisposition to obesity and metabolic dysregulation. This may be associated with dysregulation of taste receptor, incretin, and inflammatory gene expression in the gut. PMID:26493953

  13. Effect of substratum, serum and linoleic acid on the lipid synthesis of isolated alveolar type II cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cott, G.R.; Edeen, K.E.; Hale, S.G.; Mason, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    The authors examined the effect of cellular substratum (plastic or amnionic basement membrane (ABM)) and serum additive (fetal bovine (FBS), pork, horse, rat or human) on phospholipid synthesis in alveolar type II cells. The cells were isolated from adult rats, cultured for 48 hours under the various substratum and serum conditions, and then incubated for an additional 2 hours with (1-/sup 14/C) acetate. ABM consistently caused a significant increase in the percent of radiolabel incorporated into phosphatidylcholine (PC) and/or phosphatidylglycerol (PG). Serum also had a significant effect with the highest values of PC and saturated PC being obtained with rat serum and the highest PG values with horse serum. The fatty acid composition of the sera used varied according to species with the largest variations in percent linoleic acid. Supplementing media with linoleic acid resulted in a marked increase in saturated PC values and a fall in PG values. Therefore, they conclude that: 1) ABM improves differentiated function, 2) FBS supplementation may not be optimal, and 3) the different effects of linoleic acid supplementation on PC, saturated PC, and PG values suggests an independent regulation of synthesis for these lipid species in vitro.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase α isoforms in dairy ewes during conjugated linoleic acid induced milk fat depression.

    PubMed

    Ticiani, E; Urio, M; Ferreira, R; Harvatine, K J; De Oliveira, D E

    2016-10-01

    Feeding trans-10, cis-12 CLA to lactating ewes reduces milk fat by down-regulating expression of enzymes involved in lipid synthesis in the mammary gland and increases adipose tissue lipogenesis. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase α (ACC-α) is a key regulated enzyme in de novo fatty acid synthesis and is decreased by CLA. In the ovine, the ACC-α gene is expressed from three tissue-specific promoters (PI, PII and PIII). This study evaluated promoter-specific ACC-α expression in mammary and adipose tissue of lactating cross-bred Lacaune/Texel ewes during milk fat depression induced by rumen-unprotected trans-10, cis-12 CLA supplement. In all, 12 ewes arranged in a completely randomized design were fed during early, mid and late lactation one of the following treatments for 14 days: Control (forage+0.9 kg of concentrate on a dry matter basis) and CLA (forage+0.9 kg of concentrate+27 g/day of CLA (29.9% trans-10, cis-12)). Mammary gland and adipose tissue biopsies were taken on day 14 for gene expression analysis by real-time PCR. Milk fat yield and concentration were reduced with CLA supplementation by 27%, 21% and 35% and 28%, 26% and 42% during early, mid and late lactation, respectively. Overall, our results suggest that trans-10, cis-12 CLA down-regulates mammary ACC-α gene expression by decreasing expression from PII and PIII in mammary gland and up-regulates adipose ACC-α gene expression by increasing expression from PI.

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Chicken Yolk Vitelline Membrane Lipids Using Eggs Enriched With Conjugated Linoleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Sara Elizabeth; Liyanage, Rohana; Lay, Jackson O; Proctor, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The vitelline membrane (VM) encloses the chicken egg yolk, separating it from albumen. The VM weakens during storage, and dietary lipid modification significantly affects its strength. However, no studies have characterize the fatty acyl residue (FA) composition of the VM, and reports of VM isolation and quantified lipid content are inconsistent. Therefore, the objectives of this study were: (1) to develop a washing and isolation method that removes residual yolk from VM without damage; (2) to determine the FA and lipid composition of CLA-rich egg yolk VM, relative to controls; (3) to determine the effect of 20 days of refrigeration on VM FA and lipid composition. To determine VM FA and lipid composition, 36 hens received either a corn-soybean meal-based control diet ("Control"), or the Control supplemented with either 10 % soy oil ("Soy control"), or 10 % CLA-rich soy oil ("CLA") for 30 days. VM were analyzed the day of collection ("fresh"), or after 20 days of refrigeration ("refrigerated"). There were no differences in FA compositions of fresh and refrigerated membranes within a treatment. CLA-rich yolk VM contains CLA, greater SFA, and significantly greater DHA relative to controls. Direct MALDI-TOF-MS identified 15 phosphatidylcholines, three phosphatidylethanolamines, one sphingomyelin, and 15 triacylglycerols in VM. Lipid species that showed significant differences among egg types included nine phosphatidylcholines and six triacylglycerols. MALDI analysis indicated significant differences in nine lipid classes on the VM inner layer. After refrigeration, five lipid classes on the inner layer and seven lipid classes on the outer layer had statistically significant differences among VM types. PMID:27108035

  16. Genotoxicity studies of glycidol fatty acid ester (glycidol linoleate) and glycidol.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Naohiro; Fujii, Kenkichi; Sarada, Miko; Saito, Hitoshi; Kawabata, Masayoshi; Naruse, Kiyoko; Yuki, Katsuyuki; Nakagiri, Hideaki; Honda, Hiroshi; Tamaki, Yasushi; Nishiyama, Naohiro; Kasamatsu, Toshio

    2012-11-01

    Glycidol fatty acid esters (GEs) are found in refined edible oils. Safety concerns have been alleged due to the possible release of glycidol (G), an animal carcinogen. We evaluated the genotoxic potential of glycidol linoleate (GL), a primary GE found in an edible oil (diacylglycerol oil), and G, using three established genotoxicity tests (a bacterial reverse mutation test, an in vitro chromosomal aberration test, and an in vivo bone marrow micronucleus test) under GLP conditions complying with all OECD guidelines. In the bacterial reverse mutation test, GL and G showed positive responses. The positive responses of GL were less than those of G and observed only in strains detecting point mutations where G showed remarkably positive responses. G was involved in the positive response of GL. In the chromosomal aberration test, GL did not induce chromosome aberrations whereas G induced structural chromosome aberrations in the presence and absence of metabolic activation. In the bone marrow micronucleus test, neither GL nor G induced significant increases of micronucleated immature (polychromatic) erythrocytes in bone marrow of test animals. Based on the above results as well as pertinent information on toxicokinetics, GL itself does not play a key role in genotoxic action.

  17. Complexes between ovalbumin nanoparticles and linoleic acid: Stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic aspects.

    PubMed

    Sponton, Osvaldo E; Perez, Adrián A; Carrara, Carlos R; Santiago, Liliana G

    2016-11-15

    Stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of complex formation between heat-induced aggregates of ovalbumin (ovalbumin nanoparticles, OVAn) and linoleic acid (LA) were evaluated. Extrinsic fluorescence data were fitted to modified Scatchard model yielding the following results: n: 49±2 LA molecules bound per OVA monomer unit and Ka: 9.80±2.53×10(5)M. Kinetic and thermodynamic properties were analyzed by turbidity measurements at different LA/OVA monomer molar ratios (21.5-172) and temperatures (20-40°C). An adsorption approach was used and a pseudo-second-order kinetics was found for LA-OVAn complex formation. This adsorption process took place within 1h. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that LA adsorption on OVAn was a spontaneous, endothermic and entropically-driven process, highlighting the hydrophobic nature of the LA and OVAn interaction. Finally, Atomic Force Microscopy imaging revealed that both OVAn and LA-OVAn complexes have a roughly rounded form with size lower than 100nm.

  18. Complexes between ovalbumin nanoparticles and linoleic acid: Stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic aspects.

    PubMed

    Sponton, Osvaldo E; Perez, Adrián A; Carrara, Carlos R; Santiago, Liliana G

    2016-11-15

    Stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of complex formation between heat-induced aggregates of ovalbumin (ovalbumin nanoparticles, OVAn) and linoleic acid (LA) were evaluated. Extrinsic fluorescence data were fitted to modified Scatchard model yielding the following results: n: 49±2 LA molecules bound per OVA monomer unit and Ka: 9.80±2.53×10(5)M. Kinetic and thermodynamic properties were analyzed by turbidity measurements at different LA/OVA monomer molar ratios (21.5-172) and temperatures (20-40°C). An adsorption approach was used and a pseudo-second-order kinetics was found for LA-OVAn complex formation. This adsorption process took place within 1h. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that LA adsorption on OVAn was a spontaneous, endothermic and entropically-driven process, highlighting the hydrophobic nature of the LA and OVAn interaction. Finally, Atomic Force Microscopy imaging revealed that both OVAn and LA-OVAn complexes have a roughly rounded form with size lower than 100nm. PMID:27283701

  19. Delta-6 desaturase from borage converts linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Nimal, Jonathan; Li, Wanli; Liu, Xia; Cao, Wenguang

    2011-07-01

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3 n6) is an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid of the omega-6 family and is found to be effective in prevention and/or treatment of various health problems. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of increasing γ-linolenic acid contents in mammalian cells using the delta-6 gene from Borago officinalis. The borage Δ6-desaturase gene (sDelta-6) was codon-optimized and introduced into HEK293 cells by lipofectin transfection. Co-expression of GFP with sDelta-6 and RT-PCR analysis indicated that sDelta-6 could be expressed in mammalian cells. Subsequently, the heterologous expression of borage Δ6-desaturase was evaluated by fatty acid analysis. Total cellular lipid analysis of transformed cells fed with linoleic acid (LA 18:2 n6) as a substrate showed that the expression of sDelta-6 resulted in an 228-483% (p<0.05) increase of GLA when compared with that in the control cells. The highest conversion efficiency of LA into GLA in sDelta-6(+) cells was 6.9 times higher than that in the control group (11.59% vs. 1.69%; p<0.05). Our present work demonstrated that the sDelta-6 gene from borage could be functionally expressed in mammalian cells, and could convert LA into GLA. Furthermore, this study may pave the way to generate transgenic livestock that can synthesise GLA.

  20. Effects of linoleic acid on sweet, sour, salty, and bitter taste thresholds and intensity ratings of adults.

    PubMed

    Mattes, Richard D

    2007-05-01

    Evidence supporting a taste component for dietary fat has prompted study of plausible transduction mechanisms. One hypothesizes that long-chain, unsaturated fatty acids block selected delayed-rectifying potassium channels, resulting in a sensitization of taste receptor cells to stimulation by other taste compounds. This was tested in 17 male and 17 female adult (mean +/- SE age = 23.4 +/- 0.7 yr) propylthiouracil tasters with normal resting triglyceride concentrations (87.3 +/- 5.6 mg/day) and body mass index (23.3 +/- 0.4 kg/m(2)). Participants were tested during two approximately 30-min test sessions per week for 8 wk. Eight stimuli were assessed in duplicate via an ascending, three-alternative, forced-choice procedure. Qualities were randomized over weeks. Stimuli were presented as room-temperature, 5-ml portions. They included 1% solutions of linoleic acid with added sodium chloride (salty), sucrose (sweet), citric acid (sour), and caffeine (bitter) as well as solutions of these taste compounds alone. Participants also rated the intensity of the five strongest concentrations using the general labeled magnitude scale. The suprathreshold samples were presented in random order with a rinse between each. Subjects made the ratings self-paced while wearing nose clips. It was hypothesized that taste thresholds would be lower and absolute intensity ratings or slopes of intensity functions would be higher for the stimuli mixed with the linoleic acid. Thresholds were compared by paired t-tests and intensity ratings by repeated measures analysis of variance. Thresholds were significantly higher (i.e., lower sensitivity) for the sodium chloride, citric acid, and caffeine solutions with added fatty acid. Sweet, sour, and salty intensity ratings were lower or unchanged by the addition of a fatty acid. The two highest concentrations of caffeine were rated as weaker in the presence of linoleic acid. These data do not support a mechanism for detecting dietary fats whereby fatty

  1. Absorption and metabolism of orally fed arachidonic and linoleic acid in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Melin, T. )

    1988-11-01

    ({sup 3}H)arachidonic (({sup 3}H)20:4) and ({sup 14}C)linoleic acid ({sup 14}C)18:2 were fed to rats in Intralipid or cream. Later (30-240 min) the stomach, small intestine, plasma, and liver were analyzed for radioactivity in different lipid classes. ({sup 3}H)20:4 and ({sup 14}C)18:2 were emptied from the stomach and absorbed by the intestine at similar rates. The ({sup 3}H)20:4:({sup 14}C)18:2 ratio of the lipids in the small intestinal wall increased, however, with time. This was due to a higher retention of ({sup 3}H)20:4 than ({sup 14}C)18:2 in intestinal phospholipids. In contrast, more of the ({sup 14}C)18:2 was in triacylglycerol of the small intestine and plasma. The highest {sup 3}H:{sup 14}C ratios were found in phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol. The {sup 3}H:{sup 14}C ratio of intestinal phosphatidylcholine varied with the type of fat vehicle used, being highest in the Intralipid experiments. After feeding Intralipid (30-60 min), significantly more of the plasma ({sup 3}H)20:4 than plasma ({sup 14}C)18:2 was in diacylglycerol, the {sup 3}H:{sup 14}C ratio of which was much higher than that of plasma free fatty acids. ({sup 3}H)20:4 and ({sup 14}C)18:2 of chyle triacylglycerol are thus metabolized differently.

  2. Angiotensin II modification by decomposition products of linoleic acid-derived lipid hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Oe, Tomoyuki; Lee, Seon Hwa

    2015-09-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are highly susceptible to oxidation induced by reactive oxygen species and enzymes, leading to the formation of lipid hydroperoxides. The linoleic acid (LA)-derived hydroperoxide, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (HPODE) undergoes homolytic decomposition to reactive aldehydes, 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal (ONE), 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal, trans-4,5-epoxy-2(E)-decenal (EDE), and 4-hydroperoxy-2(E)-nonenal (HPNE), which can covalently modify peptides and proteins. ONE and HNE have been shown to react with angiotensin (Ang) II (DRVYIHPF) and modify the N-terminus, Arg(2), and His(6). ONE-derived pyruvamide-Ang II (Ang P) alters the biological activities of Ang II considerably. The present study revealed that EDE and HPNE preferentially modified the N-terminus and His(6) of Ang II. In addition to the N-substituted pyrrole of [N-C4H2]-Ang II and Michael addition products of [His(6)(EDE)]-Ang II, hydrated forms were detected as major products, suggesting considerable involvement of the vicinal dihydrodiol (formed by epoxide hydration) in EDE-derived protein modification in vivo. Substantial amounts of [N-(EDE-H2O)]-Ang II isomers were also formed and their synthetic pathway might involve the tautomerization of a carbinolamine intermediate, followed by intramolecular cyclization and dehydration. The main HPNE-derived products were [His(6)(HPNE)]-Ang II and [N-(HPNE-H2O)]-Ang II. However, ONE, HNE, and malondialdehyde-derived modifications were dominant, because HPNE is a precursor of these aldehydes. A mixture of 13-HPODE and [(13)C18]-13-HPODE (1:1) was then used to determine the major modifications derived from LA peroxidation. The characteristic doublet (1:1) observed in the mass spectrum and the mass difference of the [M+H](+) doublet aided the identification of Ang P (N-terminal α-ketoamide), [N-ONE]-Ang II (4-ketoamide), [Arg(2)(ONE-H2O)]-Ang II, [His(6)(HNE)]-Ang II (Michael addition product), [N-C4H2]-Ang II (EDE-derived N-substituted pyrrole

  3. Angiotensin II modification by decomposition products of linoleic acid-derived lipid hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Oe, Tomoyuki; Lee, Seon Hwa

    2015-09-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are highly susceptible to oxidation induced by reactive oxygen species and enzymes, leading to the formation of lipid hydroperoxides. The linoleic acid (LA)-derived hydroperoxide, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (HPODE) undergoes homolytic decomposition to reactive aldehydes, 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal (ONE), 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal, trans-4,5-epoxy-2(E)-decenal (EDE), and 4-hydroperoxy-2(E)-nonenal (HPNE), which can covalently modify peptides and proteins. ONE and HNE have been shown to react with angiotensin (Ang) II (DRVYIHPF) and modify the N-terminus, Arg(2), and His(6). ONE-derived pyruvamide-Ang II (Ang P) alters the biological activities of Ang II considerably. The present study revealed that EDE and HPNE preferentially modified the N-terminus and His(6) of Ang II. In addition to the N-substituted pyrrole of [N-C4H2]-Ang II and Michael addition products of [His(6)(EDE)]-Ang II, hydrated forms were detected as major products, suggesting considerable involvement of the vicinal dihydrodiol (formed by epoxide hydration) in EDE-derived protein modification in vivo. Substantial amounts of [N-(EDE-H2O)]-Ang II isomers were also formed and their synthetic pathway might involve the tautomerization of a carbinolamine intermediate, followed by intramolecular cyclization and dehydration. The main HPNE-derived products were [His(6)(HPNE)]-Ang II and [N-(HPNE-H2O)]-Ang II. However, ONE, HNE, and malondialdehyde-derived modifications were dominant, because HPNE is a precursor of these aldehydes. A mixture of 13-HPODE and [(13)C18]-13-HPODE (1:1) was then used to determine the major modifications derived from LA peroxidation. The characteristic doublet (1:1) observed in the mass spectrum and the mass difference of the [M+H](+) doublet aided the identification of Ang P (N-terminal α-ketoamide), [N-ONE]-Ang II (4-ketoamide), [Arg(2)(ONE-H2O)]-Ang II, [His(6)(HNE)]-Ang II (Michael addition product), [N-C4H2]-Ang II (EDE-derived N-substituted pyrrole

  4. Dietary Intake and Plasma Metabolomic Analysis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Bipolar Subjects Reveal Dysregulation of Linoleic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Simon J.; Ringrose, Rachel N.; Harrington, Gloria J; Mancuso, Peter; Burant, Charles F; McInnis, Melvin G

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) profiles associate with risk for mood disorders. This poses the hypothesis of metabolic differences between patients and unaffected healthy controls that relate to the primary illness or are secondary to medication use or dietary intake. However, dietary manipulation or supplementation studies show equivocal results improving mental health outcomes. This study investigates dietary patterns and metabolic profiles relevant to PUFA metabolism, in bipolar I individuals compared to non-psychiatric controls. We collected seven-day diet records and performed metabolomic analysis of fasted plasma collected immediately after diet recording. Regression analyses adjusted for age, gender and energy intake found that bipolar individuals had significantly lower intake of selenium and PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (n-3), arachidonic acid (AA) (n-6) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (n-3/n-6 mix); and significantly increased intake of the saturated fats, eicosanoic and docosanoic acid. Regression analysis of metabolomic data derived from plasma samples, correcting for age, gender, BMI, psychiatric medication use and dietary PUFA intake, revealed that bipolar individuals had reduced 13S-HpODE, a major peroxidation product of the n-6, linoleic acid (LA), reduced eicosadienoic acid (EDA), an elongation product of LA; reduced prostaglandins G2, F2 alpha and E1, synthesized from n-6 PUFA; and reduced EPA. These observations remained significant or near significant after Bonferroni correction and are consistent with metabolic variances between bipolar and control individuals with regard to PUFA metabolism. These findings suggest that specific dietary interventions aimed towards correcting these metabolic disparities may impact health outcomes for individuals with bipolar disorder. PMID:24953860

  5. Transcriptomic insights into the molecular response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to linoleic acid hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, P J; Lyons, V; Higgins, V J; Rogers, P J; Bailey, T D; Wu, M J

    2013-12-01

    Eukaryotic microorganisms are constantly challenged by reactive oxygen species derived endogenously or encountered in their environment. Such adversity is particularly applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae under harsh industrial conditions. One of the major oxidants to challenge S. cerevisiae is linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LoaOOH). This study, which used genome-wide microarray analysis in conjunction with deletion mutant screening, uncovered the molecular pathways of S. cerevisiae that were altered by an arresting concentration of LoaOOH (75 μM). The oxidative stress response, iron homeostasis, detoxification through PDR transport and direct lipid β-oxidation were evident through the induction of the genes encoding for peroxiredoxins (GPX2, TSA2), the NADPH:oxidoreductase (OYE3), iron uptake (FIT2, ARN2, FET3), PDR transporters (PDR5, PDR15, SNQ2) and β-oxidation machinery (FAA2, POX1). Further, we discovered that Gpx3p, the dual redox sensor and peroxidase, is required for protection against LoaOOH, indicated by the sensitivity of gpx3Δ to a mild dose of LoaOOH (37.5 μM). Deletion of GPX3 conferred a greater sensitivity to LoaOOH than the loss of its signalling partner YAP1. Deletion of either of the iron homeostasis regulators AFT1 or AFT2 also resulted in sensitivity to LoaOOH. These novel findings for Gpx3p, Aft1p and Aft2p point to their distinct roles in response to the lipid peroxide. Finally, the expression of 89 previously uncharacterised genes was significantly altered against LoaOOH, which will contribute to their eventual annotation. PMID:24074273

  6. 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein gene polymorphisms, dietary linoleic acid, and risk for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2008-10-01

    The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid 5-lipoxygenase pathway has been shown to play a role in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer. We conducted a population-based case-control study among Latina, African-American, and White women from the San Francisco Bay area to examine the association of the 5-lipoxygenase gene (ALOX5) and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein gene (ALOX5AP) with breast cancer risk. Three ALOX5AP polymorphisms [poly(A) microsatellite, -4900 A>G (rs4076128), and -3472 A>G (rs4073259)] and three ALOX5 polymorphisms [Sp1-binding site (-GGGCGG-) variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism, -1279 G>T (rs6593482), and 760 G>A (rs2228065)] were genotyped in 802 cases and 888 controls. We did not find significant main effects of ALOX5 and ALOX5AP genotypes on breast cancer risk that were consistent across race or ethnicity; however, there was a significant interaction between the ALOX5AP -4900 A>G polymorphism and dietary linoleic acid intake (P=0.03). Among women consuming a diet high in linoleic acid (top quartile of intake, >17.4 g/d), carrying the AA genotype was associated with higher breast cancer risk (age- and race-adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.9) compared with carrying genotypes AG or GG. Among women consuming linoleic acid, ALOX5AP -4900 genotype was not associated with breast cancer risk (age- and race-adjusted odds ratio, 0.9; 95% confidence interval, 0.7-1.2). These results support a role for n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in breast carcinogenesis and suggest that epidemiologic studies on dietary fat and breast cancer should take into account genetic predisposition related to n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism.

  7. Raman microspectroscopy of noncancerous and cancerous human breast tissues. Identification and phase transitions of linoleic and oleic acids by Raman low-temperature studies.

    PubMed

    Brozek-Pluska, Beata; Kopec, Monika; Surmacki, Jakub; Abramczyk, Halina

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of Raman studies in the temperature range of 293-77 K on vibrational properties of linoleic and oleic acids and Raman microspectroscopy of human breast tissues at room temperature. Our results confirmed the significant role of unsaturated fatty acids in differentiation of noncancerous and cancerous breast tissues and the role of vibrational spectroscopy in phase transition identification. We have found that vibrational properties are very sensitive indicators to specify phases and phase transitions typical of unsaturated fatty acids at the molecular level. Using Raman spectroscopy we have identified high-temperature, middle-temperature and low-temperature phases of linoleic acid. Results obtained for linoleic acid were compared with parameters characteristic of α and γ phases of oleic acid - the parent compound of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  8. Delta-6 desaturase from borage converts linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Nimal, Jonathan; Li, Wanli; Liu, Xia; Cao, Wenguang

    2011-07-01

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3 n6) is an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid of the omega-6 family and is found to be effective in prevention and/or treatment of various health problems. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of increasing γ-linolenic acid contents in mammalian cells using the delta-6 gene from Borago officinalis. The borage Δ6-desaturase gene (sDelta-6) was codon-optimized and introduced into HEK293 cells by lipofectin transfection. Co-expression of GFP with sDelta-6 and RT-PCR analysis indicated that sDelta-6 could be expressed in mammalian cells. Subsequently, the heterologous expression of borage Δ6-desaturase was evaluated by fatty acid analysis. Total cellular lipid analysis of transformed cells fed with linoleic acid (LA 18:2 n6) as a substrate showed that the expression of sDelta-6 resulted in an 228-483% (p<0.05) increase of GLA when compared with that in the control cells. The highest conversion efficiency of LA into GLA in sDelta-6(+) cells was 6.9 times higher than that in the control group (11.59% vs. 1.69%; p<0.05). Our present work demonstrated that the sDelta-6 gene from borage could be functionally expressed in mammalian cells, and could convert LA into GLA. Furthermore, this study may pave the way to generate transgenic livestock that can synthesise GLA. PMID:21679695

  9. Development and characterization of structured lipids containing capric and conjugated linoleic acids as functional dietary lipid molecules.

    PubMed

    Vu, Phuong-Lan; Shin, Jung-Ah; Lee, Yun-Jeung; Nam, Ha-Young; Lee, Jeung-Hee; Akoh, Casimir C; Lee, Ki-Teak

    2008-03-01

    Recently, dietary oil with high diacylglycerol (DAG) contents, so called DAG-oil, was introduced in Japan and the USA. It was claimed that the oil mostly composed of DAG is metabolized differently from conventional triacylglycerol oil, reducing body weight and fat mass because DAG tends to be oxidized to provide energy rather than stored as fat in the body. Monoacylglcyerol and DAG could be prepared by lipase-catalyzed reactions including hydrolysis, esterification, and glycerolysis. In this study, modified lipid containing some DAG esterified with the health-beneficial medium-chain fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid was produced by lipase-catalyzed reactions. Many health benefits of medium-chain fatty acids (C6:0-C12:0) and conjugated linoleic acid isomers have been reported, including anticarcinogenic and antiatherogenic activities, and being rapid energy sources for humans with little or no deposition as body fat. The produced lipid molecules in this study have potential applications as functional healthy dietary fats and oils.

  10. Effects of extruded linseed supplementation on n-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid in milk and cheese from ewes.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cortés, P; Bach, A; Luna, P; Juárez, M; de la Fuente, M A

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of dietary supplementation of extruded linseed on animal performance and fatty acid (FA) profile of ewe milk for the production of n-3 FA- and conjugated linoleic acid-enriched cheeses. A Manchega ewe flock (300 animals) receiving a 60:40 forage:concentrate diet was divided into 3 groups supplemented with 0, 6, and 12 g of extruded linseed/100 g of dry matter for the control, low, and high extruded linseed diets, respectively. Bulk and individual milk samples from 5 dairy ewes per group were monitored at 7, 14, 28, 45, and 60 d following supplementation. Manchego cheeses were made with bulk milk from the 3 treatment groups. Milk yield increased in dairy ewes receiving extruded linseed. Milk protein, fat, and total solids contents were not affected by linseed supplementation. Milk contents of alpha-linolenic acid increased from 0.36 with the control diet to 1.91% total FA with the high extruded linseed diet. Similarly, cis-9 trans-11 C18:2 rose from 0.73 to 2.33% and its precursor in the mammary gland, trans-11 C18:1, increased from 1.55 to 5.76% of total FA. This pattern occurred with no significant modification of the levels of trans-10 C18:1 and trans-10 cis-12 C18:2 FA. Furthermore, the high extruded linseed diet reduced C12:0 (-30%), C14:0 (-15%) and C16:0 (-28%), thus significantly diminishing the atherogenicity index of milk. The response to linseed supplementation was persistently maintained during the entire study. Acceptability attributes of n-3-enriched versus control cheeses ripened for 3 mo were not affected. Therefore, extruded linseed supplementation seems a plausible strategy to improve animal performance and nutritional quality of dairy lipids in milk and cheese from ewes. PMID:19700673

  11. Current issues surrounding the definition of trans-fatty acids: implications for health, industry and food labels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Proctor, Spencer D

    2013-10-01

    The definition of trans-fatty acids (TFA) was established by the Codex Alimentarius to guide nutritional and legislative regulations to reduce TFA consumption. Currently, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is excluded from the TFA definition based on evidence (primarily preclinical studies) implying health benefits on weight management and cancer prevention. While the efficacy of CLA supplements remains inconsistent in randomised clinical trials, evidence has emerged to associate supplemental CLA with negative health outcomes, including increased subclinical inflammation and oxidative stress (particularly at high doses). This has resulted in concerns regarding the correctness of excluding CLA from the TFA definition. Here we review recent clinical and preclinical literature on health implications of CLA and ruminant TFA, and highlight several issues surrounding the current Codex definition of TFA and how it may influence interpretation for public health. We find that CLA derived from ruminant foods differ from commercial CLA supplements in their isomer composition/distribution, consumption level and bioactivity. We conclude that health concerns associated with the use of supplemental CLA do not repudiate the exclusion of all forms of CLA from the Codex TFA definition, particularly when using the definition for food-related purposes. Given the emerging differential bioactivity of TFA from industrial v. ruminant sources, we advocate that regional nutrition guidelines/policies should focus on eliminating industrial forms of trans-fat from processed foods as opposed to all TFA per se.

  12. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; and others

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis.

  13. Self-assembled β-lactoglobulin-oleic acid and β-lactoglobulin-linoleic acid complexes with antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Fang, B; Zhang, M; Tian, M; Ren, F Z

    2015-05-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (β-LG) can bind to fatty acids such as oleic acid (OA) and linoleic acid (LA). Another whey protein, α-lactalbumin (α-LA), can also bind to OA to give the complex α-LA-OA, which has antitumor properties. Based on reports that the activity of α-LA-OA is highly dependent on OA, as well as the acquisition of similar complexes using other proteins, such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, we speculated whether β-LG could also kill tumor cells after binding to other fatty acids. Therefore, we prepared complexes of β-LG with OA (β-LG-OA) and LA (β-LG-LA) in the current study and evaluated them in terms of antitumor activity and thermostability using the methylene blue method and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. The structural features of these complexes were also evaluated using fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism. The binding dynamics of OA and LA to β-LG were studied using isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell viability results revealed that β-LG-LA and β-LG-OA exhibited similar antitumor activities. Interestingly, the binding of β-LG to LA led to an increase in its thermostability, whereas its binding to OA had very little effect. The environments of the tryptophan residues in the β-LG-OA and β-LG-LA complexes were very different, with the residues being blue- and red-shifted, respectively. Furthermore, the hydrophobic regions in β-LG were buried after binding of OA, which was slightly changed in β-LG-LA. Circular dichroism results showed that β-LG-OA enhanced the tertiary structure, which was partially lost in β-LG-LA. There were more binding sites for OA than for LA on β-LG, although the binding constants of the 2 fatty acids were similar, with both acids interacting with the protein though van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. This study could help provide a deeper understanding of the structural basis for formation of antitumor protein-fatty acid complexes.

  14. Formation of Aldehydic Phosphatidylcholines during the Anaerobic Decomposition of a Phosphatidylcholine Bearing the 9-Hydroperoxide of Linoleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipid oxidation-derived carbonyl compounds are associated with the development of various physiological disorders. Formation of most of these products has recently been suggested to require further reactions of oxygen with lipid hydroperoxides. However, in rat and human tissues, the formation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal is greatly elevated during hypoxic/ischemic conditions. Furthermore, a previous study found an unexpected result that the decomposition of a phosphatidylcholine (PC) bearing the 13-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid under a nitrogen atmosphere afforded 9-oxononanoyl-PC rather than 13-oxo-9,11-tridecadienoyl-PC as the main aldehydic PC. In the present study, products of the anaerobic decomposition of a PC bearing the 9-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid were analysed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. 9-Oxononanoyl-PC (ONA-PC) and several well-known bioactive aldehydes including 12-oxo-9-hydroperoxy-(or oxo or hydroxy)-10-dodecenoyl-PCs were detected. Hydrolysis of the oxidized PC products, methylation of the acids obtained thereby, and subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy with electron impact ionization further confirmed structures of some of the key aldehydic PCs. Novel, hydroxyl radical-dependent mechanisms of formation of ONA-PC and peroxyl-radical dependent mechanisms of formation of the rest of the aldehydes are proposed. The latter mechanisms will mainly be relevant to tissue injury under hypoxic/anoxic conditions, while the former are relevant under both normoxia and hypoxia/anoxia. PMID:27366754

  15. Linoleic acid content of human meibum is associated with telangiectasia and plugging of gland orifices in meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Arita, Reiko; Mori, Naoto; Shirakawa, Rika; Asai, Kei; Imanaka, Takahiro; Fukano, Yasufumi; Nakamura, Masatsugu

    2016-04-01

    To examine the relation between changes in the free fatty acid (FFA) composition of human meibum and both objective signs and subjective symptoms of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD), we analyzed the FFA content of meibum collected from both MGD patients and control subjects. Thirty-eight patients with MGD (13 men and 25 women; mean age ± SD, 66.9 ± 15.0 years) were evaluated. Various objective signs and subjective symptoms of MGD were assessed. Meibum was analyzed by liquid chromatography-Fourier transform mass spectrometry, and the relation between the FFA composition of meibum and each objective sign and subjective symptom was examined by principal component analysis (PCA). No relation was apparent between the FFA composition of meibum and individual subjective symptoms or objective signs of MGD. However, a PCA score plot for meibum samples grouped on the basis of the severity of both telangiectasia and plugging of meibomian gland orifices revealed clear separation of mild and severe groups. This separation of the two groups was largely due to a significantly increased linoleic acid content in meibum of the severe group (3.56%, versus 0.70% of total FFAs in the mild group). The relative amount of linoleic acid in meibum was thus associated with the severity of telangiectasia and plugging of gland orifices in MGD, suggesting that this FFA might contribute to the pathogenesis of these signs.

  16. Formation of Aldehydic Phosphatidylcholines during the Anaerobic Decomposition of a Phosphatidylcholine Bearing the 9-Hydroperoxide of Linoleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Arnold N

    2016-01-01

    Lipid oxidation-derived carbonyl compounds are associated with the development of various physiological disorders. Formation of most of these products has recently been suggested to require further reactions of oxygen with lipid hydroperoxides. However, in rat and human tissues, the formation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal is greatly elevated during hypoxic/ischemic conditions. Furthermore, a previous study found an unexpected result that the decomposition of a phosphatidylcholine (PC) bearing the 13-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid under a nitrogen atmosphere afforded 9-oxononanoyl-PC rather than 13-oxo-9,11-tridecadienoyl-PC as the main aldehydic PC. In the present study, products of the anaerobic decomposition of a PC bearing the 9-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid were analysed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. 9-Oxononanoyl-PC (ONA-PC) and several well-known bioactive aldehydes including 12-oxo-9-hydroperoxy-(or oxo or hydroxy)-10-dodecenoyl-PCs were detected. Hydrolysis of the oxidized PC products, methylation of the acids obtained thereby, and subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy with electron impact ionization further confirmed structures of some of the key aldehydic PCs. Novel, hydroxyl radical-dependent mechanisms of formation of ONA-PC and peroxyl-radical dependent mechanisms of formation of the rest of the aldehydes are proposed. The latter mechanisms will mainly be relevant to tissue injury under hypoxic/anoxic conditions, while the former are relevant under both normoxia and hypoxia/anoxia.

  17. Linoleic acid content of human meibum is associated with telangiectasia and plugging of gland orifices in meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Arita, Reiko; Mori, Naoto; Shirakawa, Rika; Asai, Kei; Imanaka, Takahiro; Fukano, Yasufumi; Nakamura, Masatsugu

    2016-04-01

    To examine the relation between changes in the free fatty acid (FFA) composition of human meibum and both objective signs and subjective symptoms of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD), we analyzed the FFA content of meibum collected from both MGD patients and control subjects. Thirty-eight patients with MGD (13 men and 25 women; mean age ± SD, 66.9 ± 15.0 years) were evaluated. Various objective signs and subjective symptoms of MGD were assessed. Meibum was analyzed by liquid chromatography-Fourier transform mass spectrometry, and the relation between the FFA composition of meibum and each objective sign and subjective symptom was examined by principal component analysis (PCA). No relation was apparent between the FFA composition of meibum and individual subjective symptoms or objective signs of MGD. However, a PCA score plot for meibum samples grouped on the basis of the severity of both telangiectasia and plugging of meibomian gland orifices revealed clear separation of mild and severe groups. This separation of the two groups was largely due to a significantly increased linoleic acid content in meibum of the severe group (3.56%, versus 0.70% of total FFAs in the mild group). The relative amount of linoleic acid in meibum was thus associated with the severity of telangiectasia and plugging of gland orifices in MGD, suggesting that this FFA might contribute to the pathogenesis of these signs. PMID:26919787

  18. Identification of linoleic acid, a main component of the n-hexane fraction from Dryopteris crassirhizoma, as an anti-Streptococcus mutans biofilm agent.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Eun; Pandit, Santosh; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Dryopteris crassirhizoma is a semi-evergreen plant. Previous studies have shown the potential of this plant as an agent for the control of cariogenic biofilms. In this study, the main antibacterial components of the plant were identified by correlating gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data with the antibacterial activity of chloroform and n-hexane fractions and then evaluating the activity of the most potent antibacterial component against Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms. The most potent antibacterial component was linoleic acid, a main component of the n-hexane fraction. Linoleic acid reduced viability in a dose dependent manner and reduced biofilm accumulation during initial and mature biofilm formation. Furthermore, when the biofilms were briefly treated with linoleic acid (10 min/treatment, a total of six times), the dry weight of the biofilms was significantly diminished. In addition, the anti-biofilm activity of the n-hexane fraction was similar to that of linoleic acid. These results suggest that the n-hexane fraction of D. crassirhizoma and linoleic acid may be useful for controlling cariogenic biofilms.

  19. Growth Performance, Meat Quality and Fatty Acid Metabolism Response of Growing Meat Rabbits to Dietary Linoleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Li, R. G.; Wang, X. P.; Wang, C. Y.; Ma, M. W.; Li, F. C.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of different amounts of dietary linoleic acid (LA) on growth performance, serum biochemical traits, meat quality, fatty acids composition of muscle and liver, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT 1) mRNA expression in the liver of 9 wks old to 13 wks old growing meat rabbits. One hundred and fifty 9 wks old meat rabbits were allocated to individual cages and randomly divided into five groups. Animals in each group were fed with a diet with the following LA addition concentrations: 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 g/kg diet (as-fed basis) and LA concentrations were 0.84, 1.21, 1.34, 1.61 and 1.80% in the diet, respectively. The results showed as follows: the dietary LA levels significantly affected muscle color of LL included a* and b* of experimental rabbits (p<0.05). The linear effect of LA on serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol was obtained (p = 0.0119). The saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) contents of LL decreased and the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) content of LL increased with dietary LA increase (p<0.0001). The PUFA n-6 content and PUFA n-3 content in the LL was significantly affected by the dietary LA levels (p<0.01, p<0.05). The MUFAs content in the liver decreased and the PUFAs contents in the liver increased with dietary LA increase (p<0.0001). The PUFA n-6 content and the PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio in the liver increased and PUFA n-3 content in the liver decreased with dietary LA increase (p<0.01). The linear effect of LA on CPT 1 mRNA expression in the liver was obtained (p = 0.0081). In summary, dietary LA addition had significant effects on liver and muscle fatty acid composition (increased PUFAs) of 9 wks old to 13 wks old growing meat rabbits, but had little effects on growth performance, meat physical traits and mRNA expression of liver relative enzyme of experimental rabbits. PMID:25049677

  20. Effect of feeding on conjugated cis delta 9, trans delta 11-octadecadienoic acid and other isomers of linoleic acid in bovine milk fats.

    PubMed

    Precht, D; Molkentin, J

    1997-12-01

    Almost 2000 bovine milk fats were analysed by gas chromatography to investigate the influence of typical barn and pasture feeding of cows on trans-C18:2 isomers (with at least one trans double bond) including the conjugated linoleic acid cis delta9, trans delta11 (c9,t11) as well as the cis delta9, cis delta12 linoleic acid. Moreover, small cow herds were used to determine the influence of pasture Feeding with young and older grass as well as the impact of an energy deficit or the variation of quantity and technical treatment of fed rape-seed on the content of C18:2 isomers in milk fat. The contents of trans-C18:2 (w/o c9,t11) and c9,t11 in 1756 milk fats on average amounted to 0.63% resp. 0.75%. These contents increased from barn feeding, in winter with 0.46% resp. 0.45% over the transiton period in spring and late autumn with 0.66% resp. 0.76% to pasture feeding in summer with 0.87% resp. 1.20%. Milk fat samples from bulk milk obtained weekly during one year from 4 large West German milk collection areas confirmed and completed the data found for the 1756 milk fats. The percentage of linoleic acid with a mean value of 1.24 (n = 1756) varied irregularly during the different feeding periods. The content of the conjugated linoleic acid c9,t11 could be raised considerably up to triple the normal amount by different changes in feeding. However, the content of trans-C18:1 fatty acids was strongly increased as well, respectively.

  1. Effect of feeding on conjugated cis delta 9, trans delta 11-octadecadienoic acid and other isomers of linoleic acid in bovine milk fats.

    PubMed

    Precht, D; Molkentin, J

    1997-12-01

    Almost 2000 bovine milk fats were analysed by gas chromatography to investigate the influence of typical barn and pasture feeding of cows on trans-C18:2 isomers (with at least one trans double bond) including the conjugated linoleic acid cis delta9, trans delta11 (c9,t11) as well as the cis delta9, cis delta12 linoleic acid. Moreover, small cow herds were used to determine the influence of pasture Feeding with young and older grass as well as the impact of an energy deficit or the variation of quantity and technical treatment of fed rape-seed on the content of C18:2 isomers in milk fat. The contents of trans-C18:2 (w/o c9,t11) and c9,t11 in 1756 milk fats on average amounted to 0.63% resp. 0.75%. These contents increased from barn feeding, in winter with 0.46% resp. 0.45% over the transiton period in spring and late autumn with 0.66% resp. 0.76% to pasture feeding in summer with 0.87% resp. 1.20%. Milk fat samples from bulk milk obtained weekly during one year from 4 large West German milk collection areas confirmed and completed the data found for the 1756 milk fats. The percentage of linoleic acid with a mean value of 1.24 (n = 1756) varied irregularly during the different feeding periods. The content of the conjugated linoleic acid c9,t11 could be raised considerably up to triple the normal amount by different changes in feeding. However, the content of trans-C18:1 fatty acids was strongly increased as well, respectively. PMID:9499182

  2. Three hen strains fed photoisomerized trans,trans CLA-rich soy oil exhibit different yolk accumulation rates and source-specific isomer deposition.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Sara E; Gilley, Alex D; Proctor, Andrew; Anthony, Nicholas B

    2015-04-01

    Most CLA chicken feeding trials used cis,trans (c,t) and trans,cis (t,c) CLA isomers to produce CLA-rich eggs, while reports of trans,trans (t,t) CLA enrichment in egg yolks are limited. The CLA yolk fatty acid profile changes and the 10-12 days of feeding needed for maximum CLA are well documented, but there is no information describing CLA accumulation during initial feed administration. In addition, no information on CLA accumulation rates in different hen strains is available. The aim of this study was to determine a mathematical model that described yolk CLA accumulation and depletion in three hen strains by using t,t CLA-rich soybean oil produced by photoisomerization. Diets of 30-week Leghorns, broilers, and jungle fowl were supplemented with 15% CLA-rich soy oil for 16 days, and eggs were collected for 32 days. Yolk fatty acid profiles were measured by GC-FID. CLA accumulation and depletion was modeled by both quadratic and piecewise regression analysis. A strong quadratic model was proposed, but it was not as effective as piecewise regression in describing CLA accumulation and depletion. Broiler hen eggs contained the greatest concentration of CLA at 3.2 mol/100 g egg yolk, then jungle fowl at 2.9 mol CLA, and Leghorns at 2.3 mol CLA. The t,t CLA isomer levels remained at 55% of total yolk CLA during CLA feeding. However, t-10,c-12 (t,c) CLA concentration increased slightly during CLA accumulation and was significantly greater than c-9,t-11 CLA. Jungle fowl had the smallest increase in yolk saturated fat with CLA yolk accumulation.

  3. Metabolomics approach to assessing plasma 13- and 9-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acid and linoleic acid metabolite responses to 75-km cycling.

    PubMed

    Nieman, David C; Shanely, R Andrew; Luo, Beibei; Meaney, Mary Pat; Dew, Dustin A; Pappan, Kirk L

    2014-07-01

    Bioactive oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OXLAMs) include 13- and 9-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acid (13-HODE + 9-HODE) and have been linked to oxidative stress, inflammation, and numerous pathological and physiological states. The purpose of this study was to measure changes in plasma 13-HODE + 9-HODE following a 75-km cycling bout and identify potential linkages to linoleate metabolism and established biomarkers of oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes) and inflammation (cytokines) using a metabolomics approach. Trained male cyclists (N = 19, age 38.0 ± 1.6 yr, wattsmax 304 ± 10.5) engaged in a 75-km cycling time trial on their own bicycles using electromagnetically braked cycling ergometers (2.71 ± 0.07 h). Blood samples were collected preexercise, immediately post-, 1.5 h post-, and 21 h postexercise, and analyzed for plasma cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor), F2-isoprostanes, and shifts in metabolites using global metabolomics procedures with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). 13-HODE + 9-HODE increased 3.1-fold and 1.7-fold immediately post- and 1.5 h postexercise (both P < 0.001) and returned to preexercise levels by 21-h postexercise. Post-75-km cycling plasma levels of 13-HODE + 9-HODE were not significantly correlated with increases in plasma cytokines but were positively correlated with postexercise F2-isoprostanes (r = 0.75, P < 0.001), linoleate (r = 0.54, P = 0.016), arachidate (r = 0.77, P < 0.001), 12,13-dihydroxy-9Z-octadecenoate (12,13-DiHOME) (r = 0.60, P = 0.006), dihomo-linolenate (r = 0.57, P = 0.011), and adrenate (r = 0.56, P = 0.013). These findings indicate that prolonged and intensive exercise caused a transient, 3.1-fold increase in the stable linoleic acid oxidation product 13-HODE + 9-HODE and was related to increases in F2-isoprostanes, linoleate, and fatty acids in the linoleate

  4. Linoleic acid and its metabolites, hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids, stimulate c-Fos, c-Jun, and c-Myc mRNA expression, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, and growth in rat aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, G N; Alexander, R W; Runge, M S

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies from other laboratories suggest that linoleic acid and its metabolites, hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids, play an important role in modulating the growth of some cells. A correlation has been demonstrated between hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids and conditions characterized by abnormal cell growth such as atherosclerosis and psoriasis. To determine if linoleic acid and its metabolites modulate cell growth in atherosclerosis, we measured DNA synthesis, protooncogene mRNA expression, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Linoleic acid induces DNA synthesis, c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc mRNA expression and MAPK activation in VSMC. Furthermore, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, a potent inhibitor of the lipoxygenase system, significantly reduced the growth-response effects of linoleic acid in VSMC, suggesting that conversion of linoleic acid to hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids (HPODEs) is required for these effects. HPODEs also caused significant induction of DNA synthesis, protooncogene mRNA expression, and MAPK activation in growth-arrested VSMC, suggesting that linoleic acid and its metabolic products, HPODEs, are potential mitogens in VSMC, and that conditions such as oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation which provoke the production of these substances may alter VSMC growth. Images PMID:7635978

  5. 21 CFR 573.637 - Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing...-octadecadienoic acids). The food additive, methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10... conditions: (a) The food additive is manufactured by the reaction of refined sunflower oil with methanol...

  6. 21 CFR 573.637 - Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing...-octadecadienoic acids). The food additive, methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10... conditions: (a) The food additive is manufactured by the reaction of refined sunflower oil with methanol...

  7. 21 CFR 573.637 - Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing...-octadecadienoic acids). The food additive, methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10... conditions: (a) The food additive is manufactured by the reaction of refined sunflower oil with methanol...

  8. 21 CFR 573.637 - Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing...-octadecadienoic acids). The food additive, methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10... conditions: (a) The food additive is manufactured by the reaction of refined sunflower oil with methanol...

  9. 21 CFR 573.637 - Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing...-octadecadienoic acids). The food additive, methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10... conditions: (a) The food additive is manufactured by the reaction of refined sunflower oil with methanol...

  10. Influence of low linoleic and linolenic acids in milk replacer on calf performance and lipids in blood plasma, heart, and liver.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, K J; Kramer, J K

    1986-05-01

    In a 6-wk study with 3-d-old calves (n = 32), we compared effects of low or adequate essential fatty acids in milk replacers on calf performance, feed utilization, and fatty acids in blood plasma, heart, and liver lipids. Four dietary treatments were hydrogenated coconut oil, as low-essential fatty acid basal; basal plus linoleic acid; basal plus linoleic plus linolenic acids; tallow control. None of the calves fed low essential fatty acid diet developed any external deficiency signs seen in monogastric animals. Supplementation of basal diet with essential fatty acids had no influence on weight gains, feed efficiency, or digestibility of lipids, nitrogen, and dry matter. Effects of low essential fatty acid intake were decreased resistance of erythrocytes to lysis, and in tissue lipids, marked reduction of linoleic acid and elevation of trienoic acid, palmitoleic acid, and ratio of trienoic acid to arachidonic acid, all indicative of low essential fatty acid status. Essential fatty acid intake in milk replacer may be more important than indicated here for longer term vealer calves, and where stresses, such as infectious diseases and high environmental temperature, are present.

  11. Modelling linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid requirements for infants and young children in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Huffman, Sandra L

    2013-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFAs), linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA), play a critical role in the growth and development of infants and young children. However, national guidelines for recommended intakes of EFAs are lacking in most developing countries. The objective of this study was to convert international EFA recommendations based on % of daily energy intake to recommended daily amounts for children aged 6-23 months in developing countries. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) reports adequate intakes (AIs) for ALA as 0.4-0.6% of energy intake for children 6-23 months of age and as 3.0-4.5% of energy intake for LA. In order to estimate energy intakes, FAO daily energy requirements based on body weight were used. The daily AI amounts for these EFAs were calculated using the median body weight of the World Health Organization (WHO) Growth Standard population and median body weights with varying levels of malnutrition. The AI for ALA is equivalent to 0.3-0.4, 0.3-0.5 and 0.4-0.6 g day(-1), and the AI for LA is equivalent to 2.1-3.1, 2.4-3.5 and 2.8-4.3 g day(-1) for children aged 6-8, 9-11 and 12-23 months, respectively. While the lower median body weights of children in developing countries and associated reduced energy intake recommendations give lower estimated EFA requirements, recommendations based on median body weights in the WHO Reference Growth Standard is suggested. The upper levels of these calculated AIs are lower than or equal to those in North America (ALA: 0.5 and 0.7 g day(-1); LA: 4.6 and 7 g day(-1) for children aged 6-12 months and 1-3 years, respectively). The FAO AIs (g day(-1)) calculated here for ALA and LA can serve as a guideline for developing countries for setting national standards.

  12. Expression analysis identifies FAD2-2 as the olive oleate desaturase gene mainly responsible for the linoleic acid content in virgin olive oil.

    PubMed

    Hernández, M Luisa; Padilla, María N; Mancha, Manuel; Martínez-Rivas, José M

    2009-07-22

    The effect of ripening stage and water regimen on oleate desaturase gene expression levels in the fruit of different olive ( Olea europaea L.) varieties was investigated to elucidate the contribution of each to the linoleic acid content in virgin olive oil. To this end, fatty acid analysis and quantitative real time PCR were performed using distinct olive tissues and different developmental stages from the Picual and Arbequina cultivars. The results showed that the olive FAD2-1, FAD2-2, and FAD6 genes were spatial and temporally regulated. In addition, the data indicated that FAD2-2 seems to be the main gene responsible for the linoleic acid content in the olive fruit mesocarp tissue. This conclusion was also confirmed when the study was extended to Hojiblanca, Picudo, and Manzanilla varieties. With regard to the water regimen, unlike the Picual cultivar, a small increase of linoleic acid was observed in the Arbequina variety cultivated with irrigation, which correlated well with the increase detected for the FAD2-2 gene expression level. All of these data strongly suggest that FAD2-2 is the main gene that determines the linoleic acid content in the virgin olive oil. PMID:19601663

  13. Radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in whole grain of rye, wheat and rice: Effects on linoleic and linolenic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaca, C. E.; Harms-Ringdahl, M.

    Changes in the fatty acid composition in lipids after γ-irradation of whole grain of wheat, rye and rice were examined. The radiosensitivity of linoleic acid (18:2) and linolenic acid (18:3) was studied up to a dose of 63 kGy in seeds with different water content and after a post-irradiation storage time of 2 months. At doses in the range recommended for grain desinfestation, i.e. 0.1-1.0 kGy, no detectable degradation of 18:2 and 18:3 was found, but at the highest dose applied, 63 kGy, a degradation in the range from a few percent up to 40% was observed. Under extreme conditions, i.e. pre- and post-irradation treatment with oxygen, or when the flour prepared from the seeds was mixed with water and heated before the extraction of the lipids, a more pronounced degradation of the unsaturated fatty acids was noticed. Lipid peroxidation induced by γ-irradation was estimated using the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) method. High yields of the TBA-reactive material were formed in the three types of grain investigated corresponding to G-values in the range of 12-18. The influence on peroxidation yields of the water content of the seeds was studied in wheat. The origin of the TBA-reactive material formed in the seeds is not yet known, but could only to a minor extent be due to fatty acid peroxidation.

  14. Optimization of the Hydrolysis of Safflower Oil for the Production of Linoleic Acid, Used as Flavor Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Marya; Husson, Florence; Kermasha, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Commercial lipases, from porcine pancreas (PPL), Candida rugosa (CRL), and Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL IM), were investigated in terms of their efficiency for the hydrolysis of safflower oil (SO) for the liberation of free linoleic acid (LA), used as a flavor precursor. Although PPL, under the optimized conditions, showed a high degree of hydrolysis (91.6%), its low tolerance towards higher substrate concentrations could limit its use for SO hydrolysis. In comparison to the other investigated lipases, Lipozyme TL IM required higher amount of enzyme and an additional 3 h of reaction time to achieve its maximum degree of SO hydrolysis (90.2%). On the basis of the experimental findings, CRL was selected as the most appropriate biocatalyst, with 84.1% degree of hydrolysis. The chromatographic analyses showed that the CRL-hydrolyzed SO is composed mainly of free LA. PMID:26904663

  15. Optimization of the Hydrolysis of Safflower Oil for the Production of Linoleic Acid, Used as Flavor Precursor.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Marya; Husson, Florence; Kermasha, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Commercial lipases, from porcine pancreas (PPL), Candida rugosa (CRL), and Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL IM), were investigated in terms of their efficiency for the hydrolysis of safflower oil (SO) for the liberation of free linoleic acid (LA), used as a flavor precursor. Although PPL, under the optimized conditions, showed a high degree of hydrolysis (91.6%), its low tolerance towards higher substrate concentrations could limit its use for SO hydrolysis. In comparison to the other investigated lipases, Lipozyme TL IM required higher amount of enzyme and an additional 3 h of reaction time to achieve its maximum degree of SO hydrolysis (90.2%). On the basis of the experimental findings, CRL was selected as the most appropriate biocatalyst, with 84.1% degree of hydrolysis. The chromatographic analyses showed that the CRL-hydrolyzed SO is composed mainly of free LA. PMID:26904663

  16. Reducing dietary intake of linoleic acid of mouse dams during lactation increases offspring brain n-3 LCPUFA content.

    PubMed

    Schipper, L; Oosting, A; Scheurink, A J W; van Dijk, G; van der Beek, E M

    2016-07-01

    Omega (n-)3 and n-6 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) accumulation in the infant brain after birth is strongly driven by dietary supply of n-3 and n-6 LCPUFAs and their C18 precursors through breast milk or infant formula. n-3 LCPUFA accretion is associated with positive effects on neurodevelopmental outcome whereas high n-6 LCPUFA accumulation is considered disadvantageous. Maternal diet is crucial for breast milk fatty acid composition. Unfortunately, global increases in linoleic acid (C18:2n-6; LA) intake have dramatically increased n-6 LCPUFA and reduced n-3 LCPUFA availability for breastfed infants. We investigated the effects of reducing maternal dietary LA, or increasing n-3 LCPUFA, during lactation on milk and offspring brain fatty acids in mice. Offspring brain n-3 LCPUFA was higher following both interventions, although effects were mediated by different mechanisms. Because of competitive interactions between n-3 and n-6 fatty acids, lowering maternal LA intake may support neurodevelopment in breastfed infants. PMID:27255638

  17. The Oxidized Linoleic Acid Metabolite-Cytochrome P450 System is Active in Biopsies from Patients with Inflammatory Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ruparel, Shivani; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Eskander, Michael; Rowan, Spencer; de Almeida, Jose F.A.; Roman, Linda; Henry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous TRPV1 agonists such as oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OLAMs) and the enzymes releasing them [e.g., cytochrome P450 (CYP)], are up-regulated following inflammation in the rat. However, it is not known if such agonists are elevated in human inflammatory pain conditions. Since TRPV1 is expressed in human dental pulp nociceptors, we hypothesized that OLAM-CYP machinery is active in this tissue type and is increased under painful inflammatory conditions such as irreversible pulpitis (IP). The aim of this study was to compare CYP expression and linoleic acid (LA) metabolism in normal versus inflamed human dental pulp. Our data showed that exogenous LA metabolism was significantly increased in IP tissues compared to normal tissues and that pretreatment with a CYP inhibitor, ketoconazole, significantly inhibited LA metabolism. Additionally, extracts obtained from LA-treated inflamed tissues, evoked significant inward currents in TG neurons, and were blocked by pretreatment with the TRPV1 antagonist, IRTX. Moreover, extracts obtained from ketoconazole-pretreated inflamed tissues significantly reduced inward currents in TG neurons. These data suggest that LA metabolites produced in human inflamed tissues act as TRPV1 agonists and that the metabolite production can be targeted by CYP inhibition. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of two CYP isoforms, CYP2J and CYP3A1, were shown to be predominately expressed in immune cells infiltrating the inflamed dental pulp, emphasizing the paracrine role of CYP enzymes in OLAM regulation. Collectively, our data indicates that the machinery responsible for OLAM production is up-regulated during inflammation and can be targeted to develop potential analgesics for inflammatory-induced dental pain. PMID:23867730

  18. An insect with a delta-12 desaturase, the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis, benefits from nutritional supply with linoleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstetter, Birgit; Ruther, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The availability of linoleic acid (LA; C18:2∆9,12) is pivotal for animals. While vertebrates depend on a nutritional supply, some invertebrates, including the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis, are able to synthesize LA from oleic acid (OA; C18:1∆9). This raises the question as to whether these animals nevertheless benefit from the additional uptake of LA with the diet. LA plays an important role in the sexual communication of N. vitripennis because males use it as a precursor for the synthesis of an abdominal sex pheromone attracting virgin females. We reared hosts of N. vitripennis that were fed diets enriched in the availability of stearic acid (SA: C18:0), OA or LA. N. vitripennis males developing on the different host types clearly differed in both the fatty acid composition of their body fat and sex pheromone titres. Males from LA-enriched hosts had an almost fourfold higher proportion of LA and produced significantly more sex pheromone than males from SA (2.2-fold) and OA (1.4-fold) enriched hosts, respectively. Our study demonstrates that animals being able to synthesize important nutrients de novo may still benefit from an additional supply with their diet.

  19. An insect with a delta-12 desaturase, the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis, benefits from nutritional supply with linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, Birgit; Ruther, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The availability of linoleic acid (LA; C18:2(∆9,12)) is pivotal for animals. While vertebrates depend on a nutritional supply, some invertebrates, including the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis, are able to synthesize LA from oleic acid (OA; C18:1(∆9)). This raises the question as to whether these animals nevertheless benefit from the additional uptake of LA with the diet. LA plays an important role in the sexual communication of N. vitripennis because males use it as a precursor for the synthesis of an abdominal sex pheromone attracting virgin females. We reared hosts of N. vitripennis that were fed diets enriched in the availability of stearic acid (SA: C18:0), OA or LA. N. vitripennis males developing on the different host types clearly differed in both the fatty acid composition of their body fat and sex pheromone titres. Males from LA-enriched hosts had an almost fourfold higher proportion of LA and produced significantly more sex pheromone than males from SA (2.2-fold) and OA (1.4-fold) enriched hosts, respectively. Our study demonstrates that animals being able to synthesize important nutrients de novo may still benefit from an additional supply with their diet. PMID:27116611

  20. Schistosoma mansoni: possible involvement of protein kinase C in linoleic acid-induced proteolytic enzyme release from cercariae.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Mitsui, Y; Sato, K; Sakamoto, M; Aoki, Y

    1991-04-01

    The possible involvement of protein kinase C and Ca2+ metabolism in the proteolytic enzyme release from schistosome cercariae was studied. Cercariae were placed in dechlorinated tap water containing 0.37 mM calcium in the small glass petri dish and exposed to the stimuli (linoleic acid, phorbol esters, and Ca2+ ionophore) with or without inhibitors of protein kinase C or Ca2+ metabolism. The proteolytic activity of incubation medium of cercariae thus treated was measured by the azocoll assay. The penetration response of cercariae induced by linoleic acid, a physiological stimulus, was mimicked by phorbol esters. When exposed to phorbol esters, 0.02 to 2 microM of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and 0.2 to 2 microM of phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), cercariae ceased the swimming movement, began a rhythmic thrusting of the anterior tip of the parasite, and released the proteolytic enzyme, but they did not shed the tails. Lowering Ca2+ in water by addition of 5 mM ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), phorbol ester-induced release of enzyme was completely inhibited. Phorbol ester-induced release of enzyme was partially inhibited by 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, at a concentration of 100 microM. H-7 alone, at a concentration of 100 microM, did not affect the swimming movement of cercariae. The cercariae were stimulated to release the enzyme by high concentrations (10 and 100 microM) of the Ca2+ ionophore, A23187, but enzyme was not released by low concentrations (0.5 and 1 microM) of this drug. Cercariae exposed to A23187 behaved differently from those exposed to phorbol esters. They ceased swimming, showed strong muscle contraction, and shed their tail. A23187 stimulated cercariae to release the enzyme in the water containing 5 mM EGTA. A23187-induced enzyme release was not inhibited by N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7), a calmodulin

  1. Human term placental lipoxygenase-mediated N-demethylation of phenothiazines and insecticides in the presence of linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Hover, C G; Kulkarni, A P

    2000-09-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that human term placental lipoxygenase (HTPLO) and soybean lipoxygenase (SLO) are capable of mediating N-demethylation of selected phenothiazines and insecticides in the presence of linoleic acid (LA). In addition to being LA dependent, the N-demethylation reaction mediated by HTPLO and SLO was limited by incubation time, pH of the medium, concentration of the enzyme and the substrate. Using Nash reagent to monitor formaldehyde production, the specific activity for LA-dependent N-demethylation of chlorpromazine, a model phenothiazine, was determined to be 1.7+/-0.3 nmoles/min/mg HTPLO. Besides chlorpromazine, N-demethylation of promazine, promethazine and trimeprazine was also observed. The insecticide, aminocarb, displayed a specific activity of 2.2+/-0.3 nmoles/min/mg HTPLO for N-demethylation. Other insecticides, namely chlordimeform, dicrotophos and zectran, were oxidized in a similar manner. As compared with HTPLO, the rates of N-demethylation of phenothiazines and insecticides mediated by SLO were higher. Classical inhibitors of lipoxygenase, as well as antioxidants and free radical scavengers, caused a dose-dependent reduction in the production of formaldehyde from chlorpromazine and aminocarb by HTPLO. These results clearly demonstrate the ability of polyunsaturated free fatty acids to support N-demethylation of xenobiotics via the lipoxygenase pathway.

  2. A Gut Microbial Metabolite of Linoleic Acid, 10-Hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic Acid, Ameliorates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Impairment Partially via GPR40-MEK-ERK Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Junki; Mizukure, Taichi; Park, Si-Bum; Kishino, Shigenobu; Kimura, Ikuo; Hirano, Kanako; Bergamo, Paolo; Rossi, Mauro; Suzuki, Takuya; Arita, Makoto; Ogawa, Jun; Tanabe, Soichi

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbial metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids have attracted much attention because of their various physiological properties. Dysfunction of tight junction (TJ) in the intestine contributes to the pathogenesis of many disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. We evaluated the effects of five novel gut microbial metabolites on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced barrier impairment in Caco-2 cells and dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice. 10-Hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic acid (HYA), a gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid, suppressed TNF-α and dextran sulfate sodium-induced changes in the expression of TJ-related molecules, occludin, zonula occludens-1, and myosin light chain kinase. HYA also suppressed the expression of TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) mRNA and protein expression in Caco-2 cells and colonic tissue. In addition, HYA suppressed the protein expression of TNFR2 in murine intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, HYA significantly up-regulated G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 expression in Caco-2 cells. It also induced [Ca2+]i responses in HEK293 cells expressing human GPR40 with higher sensitivity than linoleic acid, its metabolic precursor. The barrier-recovering effects of HYA were abrogated by a GPR40 antagonist and MEK inhibitor in Caco-2 cells. Conversely, 10-hydroxyoctadacanoic acid, which is a gut microbial metabolite of oleic acid and lacks a carbon-carbon double bond at Δ12 position, did not show these TJ-restoring activities and down-regulated GPR40 expression. Therefore, HYA modulates TNFR2 expression, at least partially, via the GPR40-MEK-ERK pathway and may be useful in the treatment of TJ-related disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25505251

  3. Effect of the inclusion of quebracho tannins in a diet rich in linoleic acid on milk fatty acid composition in dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Toral, P G; Hervás, G; Belenguer, A; Bichi, E; Frutos, P

    2013-01-01

    Despite controversy surrounding the ability of tannins to modulate the fatty acid (FA) profile of ruminant-derived products, reports on this issue are still very limited for dairy sheep. This study was conducted to examine the effect of the inclusion of quebracho tannins in a diet rich in linoleic acid on ewe performance and milk FA composition. Thirty-six lactating ewes were distributed into 6 lots and allocated to 2 treatments (3 lots/treatment): control or quebracho. All sheep received a total mixed ration based on alfalfa hay and a concentrate (forage:concentrate ratio of 40:60) supplemented with 20 g of sunflower oil/kg of dry matter plus 0 (control diet) or 20 g of an extract of quebracho tannins/kg of dry matter (QUE diet). Milk production and composition were analyzed on d 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, and 27 on treatments, and milk FA profile on d 0, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 27. On d 27, samples of rumen fluid were collected for pH, and lactate, ammonia, and volatile FA concentration analysis. Feeding the QUE diet had no apparent effect on animal performance and hardly modified ruminal fermentation characteristics, except for a reduction in the molar proportions of minor volatile FA. Dietary tannins increased the milk concentration of several 18:1 and 18:2 isomers and decreased that of branched-chain FA. Some of these changes were relatively constant throughout the experiment (e.g., cis-12 18:1 and trans-9,cis-12 18:2), whereas others varied over time (e.g., trans-10 18:1, which increased gradually with the QUE diet). Significant differences between treatments in trans-11 18:1 and cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid were only observed on d 3. Overall, addition of quebracho tannins to a diet rich in linoleic acid did not prove useful to beneficially modify milk FA composition, especially over the long term.

  4. Effect of the inclusion of quebracho tannins in a diet rich in linoleic acid on milk fatty acid composition in dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Toral, P G; Hervás, G; Belenguer, A; Bichi, E; Frutos, P

    2013-01-01

    Despite controversy surrounding the ability of tannins to modulate the fatty acid (FA) profile of ruminant-derived products, reports on this issue are still very limited for dairy sheep. This study was conducted to examine the effect of the inclusion of quebracho tannins in a diet rich in linoleic acid on ewe performance and milk FA composition. Thirty-six lactating ewes were distributed into 6 lots and allocated to 2 treatments (3 lots/treatment): control or quebracho. All sheep received a total mixed ration based on alfalfa hay and a concentrate (forage:concentrate ratio of 40:60) supplemented with 20 g of sunflower oil/kg of dry matter plus 0 (control diet) or 20 g of an extract of quebracho tannins/kg of dry matter (QUE diet). Milk production and composition were analyzed on d 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, and 27 on treatments, and milk FA profile on d 0, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 27. On d 27, samples of rumen fluid were collected for pH, and lactate, ammonia, and volatile FA concentration analysis. Feeding the QUE diet had no apparent effect on animal performance and hardly modified ruminal fermentation characteristics, except for a reduction in the molar proportions of minor volatile FA. Dietary tannins increased the milk concentration of several 18:1 and 18:2 isomers and decreased that of branched-chain FA. Some of these changes were relatively constant throughout the experiment (e.g., cis-12 18:1 and trans-9,cis-12 18:2), whereas others varied over time (e.g., trans-10 18:1, which increased gradually with the QUE diet). Significant differences between treatments in trans-11 18:1 and cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid were only observed on d 3. Overall, addition of quebracho tannins to a diet rich in linoleic acid did not prove useful to beneficially modify milk FA composition, especially over the long term. PMID:23164228

  5. Effects of dietary combination of n-3 and n-9 fatty acids on the deposition of linoleic and arachidonic acid in broiler chicken meats.

    PubMed

    Shin, D; Choi, S H; Go, G; Park, J H; Narciso-Gaytán, C; Morgan, C A; Smith, S B; Sánchez-Plata, M X; Ruiz-Feria, C A

    2012-04-01

    To minimize the amount of n-6 fatty acids in broiler chicken meat, 120 Cobb × Ross male broilers were divided into 6 different groups and fed a basal corn-soybean meal diet containing 5% fat from 5 different lipid sources: 1) a commercial mix of animal and vegetable oil, 2) soybean oil and olive oil (2.5% each), 3) flaxseed oil and olive oil (2.5% each), 4) flaxseed oil, eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5; EPA; n-3), and olive oil (2.45, 0.05, and 2.5% respectively; FEO), 5) flaxseed oil, docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6; DHA; n-3), and olive oil (2.45, 0.05, and 2.5% respectively; FDO), and 6) fish oil and olive oil (2.5% each; FHO). At 6 and 9 wk, one bird per pen (4 pens per treatment) was processed, and liver, breast, and thigh samples were collected and used for fatty acid profiles or Δ6- and Δ9-desaturase mRNA gene expression levels. The deposition of linoleic acid (C18:2; n-6) or arachidonic acid (C20:4; n-6) was decreased in breast and thigh muscles of chickens fed n-3 fatty acids for 9 wk compared with chickens fed animal and vegetable oil and soybean oil and olive oil diets (P < 0.05). The addition of EPA to the diet (FEO; P > 0.05) did not reduce the deposition of linoleic acid and arachidonic acid as much as DHA (FDO; P < 0.05), and it suppressed the expression of Δ6- and Δ9-desaturase. When EPA and DHA were blended (FHO) and supplied to broiler chickens for 9 wk, EPA and DHA combination effects were observed on the deposition of LA and arachidonic acid in breast and thigh muscles. Thereby, the addition of a mixed EPA and DHA to a broiler chicken diet may be recommendable to reduce arachidonic acid accumulation in both broiler chicken breast and thigh meats, providing a functional broiler chicken meat to consumers.

  6. Self-assembly and β-carotene loading capacity of hydroxyethyl cellulose-graft-linoleic acid nanomicelles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Guo, Yanzhu; Sun, Runcang; Wang, Xiaohui

    2016-07-10

    A series of linoleic acid conjugated hydroxyethyl cellulose polymers (HEC-g-LA) were synthesized and characterized. And their solubilities in a variety of solvents were compared. The prepared HEC-g-LA polymers showed typical properties of amphiphilic polymers and were able to self-assemble into spherical nanomicelles in aqueous solution. The micelle sizes and critical micelle concentrations (CMC) were found correlated with the molecular structure of polymers, and were varied in the range of 20-50nm and 1.92-21.76μg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, the hydrophobic active component β-carotene (β-C) was successfully encapsulated into the HEC-g-LA micelles by sonication-dialysis method. The β-C encapsulation efficiency and loading content were found to be as high as 84.67% (w/w) and 4.23%. The results of in vitro release showed that the encapsulated β-C was continuously released from the micelles in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) medium for about 7days. The self-assembled HEC-g-LA nanomicelles are potential nanocarriers of hydrophobic active compounds for functional food applications. PMID:27106151

  7. No Difference in Perceived Intensity of Linoleic Acid in the Oral Cavity between Obese and Nonobese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Nuessle, Tiffany M.; Garneau, Nicole L.; Smutzer, Gregory; Mattes, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Findings from studies examining interactions between fat taste and dietary fat intake or body weight are mixed. A convenience sample of 735 visitors to the Denver Museum of Nature & Science ≥8 years old rated the taste intensity of edible taste strips impregnated with varying concentrations (%v/v) of linoleic acid (LA) (blank = 0.0, low = 0.06, medium = 0.15, high = 0.38). Percent body fat (BF%) was measured using bioelectrical impedance. Fat taste intensity was rated as significantly different across all concentrations (P < 0.001) except between the blank and low concentrations (P = 0.1). Ratings increased monotonically across concentrations. Children (<18 years; N = 180) rated all concentrations as more intense than adults (P < 0.001 for all). Women and girls rated the highest concentration as more intense than men and boys (P < 0.02 for all). BF% was not correlated with fat taste intensity ratings. Self-reported dietary intake indicated that obese individuals’ intensity ratings for medium and high concentrations of LA were inversely related to recent mono- and poly-unsaturated fat exposure (r = −0.19 to −0.27; P < 0.03 for all). No such associations were observed in the nonobese group. Findings suggest that factors other than simple adiposity status influence fat taste intensity ratings, and that participants in fat taste studies should receive standardized meals prior to testing. PMID:26232811

  8. Effect of linoleic acid sustained-release microspheres on Microcystis aeruginosa antioxidant enzymes activity and microcystins production and release.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lixiao; Jie, Xiaoting; Wang, Peifang; Li, Shiyin; Wang, Guoxiang; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Acharya, Kumud

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this work was to identify the optimal dose range for good anti-algal effect of linoleic acid (LA) sustained-release microspheres and investigate their impact on the antioxidant enzymes (super oxide dismutase, Catalase and Peroxidase) activity changes of Microcystis aeruginosa, as well as the production and release of microcystins (MCs). Based on measured changes in algal cell density and inhibitory ratio (IR), the optimal dose of LA microspheres was 0.3 g L(-1) with over 90% of IR in this study. The Chlorophyll a content and antioxidant enzymes activity in the LA microspheres group decreased markedly until beyond the minimal detection limit after 16 d and 9 d, respectively. In addition, LA microspheres demonstrated no significant impact on the extracellular release of MCs during the culturing period. The amount of intracellular microcystin-LR (MC-LR) per 10(6) algal cells in LA microspheres group was highest among all groups during the whole experimental process. Under the sustained stress of LA released from LA microspheres, the LA microspheres could decrease the production and release of algal toxins. There was no increase in the total amount of MC-LR in the algal cell culture medium. These indicated that LA sustained-release microspheres represent a high degree of ecological safety and their practical applications for the treatment of water undergoing algal blooms need further study.

  9. How Can Linoleic Acid Be the Preferential Substrate of the Enzyme 15-Lipoxygenase-1? A QM/MM Approach.

    PubMed

    Soler, Jordi; Saura, Patricia; García-López, Diego; Masgrau, Laura; Lluch, José M; González-Lafont, Àngels

    2016-03-01

    The most common substrate of mammalian lipoxygenases (LOXs) is arachidonic acid (AA). However, 15-LOXs can present dual substrate specificity. These LOXs catalyze the peroxidation of AA, initiated by a H-abstraction step (mainly H13-abstraction) by the Fe(III)-OH(-) cofactor, and the peroxidation of linoleic acid (LA) after H11-abstraction. In this paper, QM(B3LYP)/MM(CHARMM) calculations of the rate-limiting H11-abstraction process of LA catalyzed by rabbit 15-LOX-1 (15-rLOX-1) have been carried out using a complete model of the solvated 15-rLOX-1:LA complex. A total of 26 QM/MM potential energy profiles as a function of the H-transfer reaction coordinate have been computed along with one QM/MM free energy profile obtained using the Free Energy Perturbation method. The molecular origin of substrate specificity of 15-rLOX-1 for LA in comparison with AA has been analyzed. In many of the QM/MM reactive 15-rLOX-1:LA energy minima, LA adopts more elongated conformations than AA, although having a shorter carbon chain, because LA has one double bond between C1 and C11 whereas AA has three double bonds between C1 and C13. Consequently, C11 of LA can be located in the same region of the active site as C13 of AA, a zone where H11-abstraction from LA as well as H13-abstraction from AA is not hindered by bulky residue side chains. This explains at a molecular level how 15-LOXs might accommodate and recognize for catalysis two substrates that are different in length by two carbons. Our results also explain why (9Z,11E)-13-hydro(pero)xyoctadeca-9,11-dienoic acid is the major product of the peroxidation and why LA is the preferential substrate of 15-rLOX-1. PMID:26646740

  10. Liver function parameters, cholesterol, and phospholipid α-linoleic acid are associated with adipokine levels in overweight and obese adults.

    PubMed

    Gray, Belinda; Steyn, Frederik; Davies, Peter Stephen Wynford; Vitetta, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Dysregulation of adipose hormones in obesity has been associated with the hastened development of metabolic syndrome and associated chronic disease sequalae including cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study aims to identify common biochemical and anthropometric markers that impact adipose hormones, including adiponectin and leptin. Based on previous literature, it was hypothesized that these would be adversely impacted by liver function parameters, and adiponectin levels would be positively correlated with phospholipid Ω-3 fatty acids. Forty nondiabetic adult subjects (body mass index, ≥ 25.0 kg/m(2)) were recruited. Fasting plasma samples were taken to assess adipokine levels, glucose metabolism, electrolytes, liver enzymes, and blood lipids. Basic anthropometric measurements were also recorded. Adiponectin levels were positively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and negatively correlated with anthropometric measures, insulin, liver enzymes, triglycerides, and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol but not body mass index. Conversely, plasma leptin levels were positively correlated with anthropometric measures, C-reactive protein, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and plasma phospholipid proportions of Ω-3 α linoleic acid but inversely correlated with creatinine levels. These results support other data regarding correlations between adiponectin and relative adipose distribution. Correlations with specific liver enzymes may indicate that adiponectin levels are tied to fatty acid deposition in the liver; however, liver/kidney damage though further mechanistic clarification is required. Leptin levels were associated with measures of adiposity but not liver enzymes. Each of these variables, along with blood lipids, may serve as potential future therapeutic targets for the prevention and management of obesity and related comorbidities. PMID:24916550

  11. How Can Linoleic Acid Be the Preferential Substrate of the Enzyme 15-Lipoxygenase-1? A QM/MM Approach.

    PubMed

    Soler, Jordi; Saura, Patricia; García-López, Diego; Masgrau, Laura; Lluch, José M; González-Lafont, Àngels

    2016-03-01

    The most common substrate of mammalian lipoxygenases (LOXs) is arachidonic acid (AA). However, 15-LOXs can present dual substrate specificity. These LOXs catalyze the peroxidation of AA, initiated by a H-abstraction step (mainly H13-abstraction) by the Fe(III)-OH(-) cofactor, and the peroxidation of linoleic acid (LA) after H11-abstraction. In this paper, QM(B3LYP)/MM(CHARMM) calculations of the rate-limiting H11-abstraction process of LA catalyzed by rabbit 15-LOX-1 (15-rLOX-1) have been carried out using a complete model of the solvated 15-rLOX-1:LA complex. A total of 26 QM/MM potential energy profiles as a function of the H-transfer reaction coordinate have been computed along with one QM/MM free energy profile obtained using the Free Energy Perturbation method. The molecular origin of substrate specificity of 15-rLOX-1 for LA in comparison with AA has been analyzed. In many of the QM/MM reactive 15-rLOX-1:LA energy minima, LA adopts more elongated conformations than AA, although having a shorter carbon chain, because LA has one double bond between C1 and C11 whereas AA has three double bonds between C1 and C13. Consequently, C11 of LA can be located in the same region of the active site as C13 of AA, a zone where H11-abstraction from LA as well as H13-abstraction from AA is not hindered by bulky residue side chains. This explains at a molecular level how 15-LOXs might accommodate and recognize for catalysis two substrates that are different in length by two carbons. Our results also explain why (9Z,11E)-13-hydro(pero)xyoctadeca-9,11-dienoic acid is the major product of the peroxidation and why LA is the preferential substrate of 15-rLOX-1.

  12. Plasma Linoleic Acid Partially Mediates the Association of Bipolar Disorder on Self-Reported Mental Health Scales

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Simon J.; Assari, Shervin; Harrington, Gloria J.; Chang, Ya-Wen; Burant, Charles F.; McInnis, Melvin G.

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that bipolar individuals have reduced quality diets, including lower intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). We have also reported reduced plasma levels of the n-6 PUFA, linoleic acid (LA), and the n-3 PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in bipolar subjects. In the current analysis we hypothesized that LA and EPA plasma levels would mediate lower self-reported mental health and life functioning scores in bipolar subjects. In a cross-sectional study, we collected a 7-day diet record in bipolar (n=56) and control subjects (n=46) followed by a fasted blood draw. We used structured equation modeling path analysis to test for mediating effects of dietary intake and plasma levels of LA and EPA on self-reported mental health questionnaire scores, including the Life Functioning Questionnaire (LFQ), the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), and the Short Form Health Survey (SF12), extracting the mental health component summary score (SF12-MH). We adjusted for age, gender, psychiatric medication use, body mass index (BMI), and total caloric intake as covariates with bipolar disorder as the primary predictor. We found a significant path association from bipolar disorder to lower plasma LA levels (p=0.03) and significant paths from plasma LA to PHQ9 (p=0.05), LFQ (p=0.01) and SF12-MH (p=0.05) scores, such that lower plasma LA predicted worse outcomes. We found no significant paths from plasma EPA levels to any of the outcome measures. These findings suggest that plasma LA levels partially mediate the effect of bipolar disorder on self-reported measures of mental health and life functioning. PMID:26228402

  13. Ethosomes® and transfersomes® containing linoleic acid: physicochemical and technological features of topical drug delivery carriers for the potential treatment of melasma disorders.

    PubMed

    Celia, Christian; Cilurzo, Felisa; Trapasso, Elena; Cosco, Donato; Fresta, Massimo; Paolino, Donatella

    2012-02-01

    Two vesicular colloidal carriers, ethosomes® and transfersomes® were proposed for the topical delivery of linoleic acid, an active compound used in the therapeutic treatment of hyperpigmentation disorders, i.e. melasma, which is characterized by an increase of the melanin production in the epidermis. Dynamic light scattering was used for the physicochemical characterization of vesicles and mean size, size distribution and zeta potential were evaluated. The stability of formulations was also evaluated using the Turbiscan Lab® Expert based on the analysis of sample transmittance and photon backscattering. Ethosomes® and transfersomes® were prepared using Phospholipon 100 G®, as the lecithin component, and ethanol and sodium cholate, as edge activator agents, respectively. Linoleic acid at 0.05% and 0.1% (w/v) was used as the active ingredient and entrapped in colloidal vesicles. Technological parameters, i.e. entrapment efficacy, drug release and permeation profiles, were also investigated. Experimental findings showed that physicochemical and technological features of ethosomes® and transfersomes® were influenced by the lipid composition of the carriers. The percutaneous permeation experiments of linoleic acid-loaded ethosomes® and transfersomes® through human stratum corneum-epidermidis membranes showed that both carriers are accumulated in the skin membrane model as a function of their lipid compositions. The findings reported in this investigation showed that both vesicular carriers could represent a potential system for the topical treatment of hyperpigmentation disorders.

  14. Ethosomes® and transfersomes® containing linoleic acid: physicochemical and technological features of topical drug delivery carriers for the potential treatment of melasma disorders.

    PubMed

    Celia, Christian; Cilurzo, Felisa; Trapasso, Elena; Cosco, Donato; Fresta, Massimo; Paolino, Donatella

    2012-02-01

    Two vesicular colloidal carriers, ethosomes® and transfersomes® were proposed for the topical delivery of linoleic acid, an active compound used in the therapeutic treatment of hyperpigmentation disorders, i.e. melasma, which is characterized by an increase of the melanin production in the epidermis. Dynamic light scattering was used for the physicochemical characterization of vesicles and mean size, size distribution and zeta potential were evaluated. The stability of formulations was also evaluated using the Turbiscan Lab® Expert based on the analysis of sample transmittance and photon backscattering. Ethosomes® and transfersomes® were prepared using Phospholipon 100 G®, as the lecithin component, and ethanol and sodium cholate, as edge activator agents, respectively. Linoleic acid at 0.05% and 0.1% (w/v) was used as the active ingredient and entrapped in colloidal vesicles. Technological parameters, i.e. entrapment efficacy, drug release and permeation profiles, were also investigated. Experimental findings showed that physicochemical and technological features of ethosomes® and transfersomes® were influenced by the lipid composition of the carriers. The percutaneous permeation experiments of linoleic acid-loaded ethosomes® and transfersomes® through human stratum corneum-epidermidis membranes showed that both carriers are accumulated in the skin membrane model as a function of their lipid compositions. The findings reported in this investigation showed that both vesicular carriers could represent a potential system for the topical treatment of hyperpigmentation disorders. PMID:21960035

  15. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of linoleic acid peroxide-derived radicals using electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, H

    2000-12-29

    High-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection (HPLC-ED) was applied to detect 13-hydroperoxide octadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE)-derived radicals such as the pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical. The 13-HPODE-derived radicals were successfully detected using HPLC-ED by the combined use of the spin-trapping technique with alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (4-POBN). The 4-POBN-pentyl radical adduct was detected at the retention time of 18.2 +/- 0.3 min on the elution profile of HPLC-ED with an ODS column (15 cm x 4.6 mm I.D.) using a flow-rate of 1.0 ml/min with 50 mM ammonium acetate in 29% (v/v) aqueous acetonitrile. The 4-POBN-octanoic acid radical adduct was also detected at the retention time of 13.7 +/- 0.7 min using a flow-rate of 1.0 ml/min with 50 mM ammonium acetate in 14% (v/v) aqueous acetonitrile. The concentrations of the 4-POBN radical adducts were determined using HPLC-ED without an internal standard. HPLC-ED is 100 times as sensitive as HPLC-electron spin resonance (ESR) under the ESR and ED conditions employed here. Even 1.8 pmol of the 4-POBN-pentyl (or octanoic acid) radical adduct was detectable using PMID:11204234

  16. Oral Administration of Linoleic Acid Induces New Vessel Formation and Improves Skin Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Hosana G.; Vinolo, Marco A. R.; Sato, Fabio T.; Magdalon, Juliana; Kuhl, Carolina M. C.; Yamagata, Ana S.; Pessoa, Ana Flávia M.; Malheiros, Gabriella; dos Santos, Marinilce F.; Lima, Camila; Farsky, Sandra H.; Camara, Niels O. S.; Williner, Maria R.; Bernal, Claudio A.; Calder, Philip C.; Curi, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Impaired wound healing has been widely reported in diabetes. Linoleic acid (LA) accelerates the skin wound healing process in non-diabetic rats. However, LA has not been tested in diabetic animals. Objectives We investigated whether oral administration of pure LA improves wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Methods Dorsal wounds were induced in streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetic rats treated or not with LA (0.22 g/kg b.w.) for 10 days. Wound closure was daily assessed for two weeks. Wound tissues were collected at specific time-points and used to measure fatty acid composition, and contents of cytokines, growth factors and eicosanoids. Histological and qPCR analyses were employed to examine the dynamics of cell migration during the healing process. Results LA reduced the wound area 14 days after wound induction. LA also increased the concentrations of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (CINC-2αβ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and reduced the expression of macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1). These results together with the histological analysis, which showed accumulation of leukocytes in the wound early in the healing process, indicate that LA brought forward the inflammatory phase and improved wound healing in diabetic rats. Angiogenesis was induced by LA through elevation in tissue content of key mediators of this process: vascular-endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-2 (ANGPT-2). Conclusions Oral administration of LA hastened wound closure in diabetic rats by improving the inflammatory phase and angiogenesis. PMID:27764229

  17. The linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA selectively activates PKC-epsilon, possibly binding to the phosphatidylserine binding site.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Hi, Rika; Mukasa, Takeshi; Fujikawa, Hirokazu; Nagata, Tetsu; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the effect of 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA), a newly synthesized linoleic acid derivative with cyclopropane rings instead of cis-double bonds, on protein kinase C (PKC) activity. In the in situ PKC assay with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, DCP-LA significantly activated PKC in PC-12 cells in a concentration-dependent (10 nM-100 microM) manner, with the maximal effect at 100 nM, and the DCP-LA effect was blocked by GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor, or a selective inhibitor peptide of the novel PKC isozyme PKC-epsilon. Furthermore, DCP-LA activated PKC in HEK-293 cells that was inhibited by the small, interfering RNA against PKC-epsilon. In the cell-free PKC assay, of the nine isozymes examined here, DCP-LA most strongly activated PKC-epsilon, with >7-fold potency over other PKC isozymes, in the absence of dioleoyl-phosphatidylserine and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol; instead, the DCP-LA action was inhibited by dioleoyl-phosphatidylserine. DCP-LA also activated PKC-gamma, a conventional PKC, but to a much lesser extent compared with that for PKC-epsilon, by a mechanism distinct from PKC-epsilon activation. Thus, DCP-LA serves as a selective activator of PKC-epsilon, possibly by binding to the phosphatidylserine binding site on PKC-epsilon. These results may provide fresh insight into lipid signaling in PKC activation.

  18. High levels of stearic acid, palmitoleic acid, and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid and low levels of linoleic acid in serum cholesterol ester are associated with high insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Kurotani, Kayo; Sato, Masao; Ejima, Yuko; Nanri, Akiko; Yi, Siyan; Pham, Ngoc Minh; Akter, Shamima; Poudel-Tandukar, Kalpana; Kimura, Yasumi; Imaizumi, Katsumi; Mizoue, Tetsuya

    2012-09-01

    The association of fatty acid composition with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes has been reported in Western populations, but there is limited evidence of this association among the Japanese, whose populace consume large amounts of fish. To test the hypothesis that high palmitic, palmitoleic, and dihomo-γ-linolenic acids and low levels of linoleic and n-3 fatty acids are associated with higher insulin resistance among the Japanese, the authors investigated the relationship between serum fatty acid composition and serum C-peptide concentrations in 437 Japanese employees aged 21 to 67 years who participated in a workplace health examination. Serum cholesterol ester and phospholipid fatty acid compositions were measured by gas-liquid chromatography. Desaturase activity was estimated by fatty acid product-to-precursor ratios. A multiple regression was used to assess the association between fatty acid and C-peptide concentrations. C-peptide concentrations were associated inversely with linoleic acid levels in cholesterol ester and phospholipid (P for trend = .01 and .02, respectively) and positively with stearic and palmitoleic acids in cholesterol ester (P for trend =.02 and .006, respectively) and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid in cholesterol ester and phospholipid (P for trend < .0001 for both). C-peptide concentrations were not associated with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. C-peptide concentrations significantly increased as δ-9-desaturase (16:1 n-7/16:0) and δ-6-desaturase (18:3 n-6/18:2 n-6) increased (P for trend = .01 and .03, respectively) and δ-5-desaturase (20:4 n-6/20:3 n-6) decreased (P for trend = .004). In conclusion, a fatty acid pattern with high levels of serum stearic, palmitoleic, or dihomo-γ-linolenic acids; δ-9-desaturase (16:1 n-7/16:0) or δ-6-desaturase (18:3 n-6/18:2 n-6) activities; and low levels of serum linoleic acid or δ-5-desaturase (20:4 n-6/20:3 n-6) activity might be associated with higher insulin resistance in Japanese adults.

  19. Insights into the Indian Peanut Genotypes for ahFAD2 Gene Polymorphism Regulating Its Oleic and Linoleic Acid Fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Nawade, Bhagwat; Bosamia, Tejas C.; Thankappan, Radhakrishnan; Rathnakumar, Arulthambi L.; Kumar, Abhay; Dobaria, Jentilal R.; Kundu, Rahul; Mishra, Gyan P.

    2016-01-01

    In peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), the customization of fatty acid profile is an evolving area to fulfill the nutritional needs in the modern market. A total of 174 peanut genotypes, including 167 Indian cultivars, 6 advanced breeding lines and “SunOleic95R”—a double mutant line, were investigated using AS-PCRs, CAPS and gene sequencing for the ahFAD2 allele polymorphism, along with its fatty acid compositions. Of these, 80 genotypes were found having substitution (448G>A) mutation only in ahFAD2A gene, while none recorded 1-bp insertion (441_442insA) mutation in ahFAD2B gene. Moreover, 22 wild peanut accessions found lacking both the mutations. Among botanical types, the ahFAD2A mutation was more frequent in ssp. hypogaea (89%) than in ssp. fastigiata (17%). This single allele mutation, found affecting not only oleic to linoleic acid fluxes, but also the composition of other fatty acids in the genotypes studied. Repeated use of a few selected genotypes in the Indian varietal development programs were also eminently reflected in its ahFAD2 allele polymorphism. Absence of known mutations in the wild-relatives indicated the possible origin of these mutations, after the allotetraploidization of cultivated peanut. The SNP analysis of both ahFAD2A and ahFAD2B genes, revealed haplotype diversity of 1.05% and 0.95%, while Ka/Ks ratio of 0.36 and 0.39, respectively, indicating strong purifying selection pressure on these genes. Cluster analysis, using ahFAD2 gene SNPs, showed presence of both mutant and non-mutant genotypes in the same cluster, which might be due the presence of ahFAD2 gene families. This investigation provided insights into the large number of Indian peanut genotypes, covering various aspects related to O/L flux regulation and ahFAD2 gene polymorphism. PMID:27610115

  20. Insights into the Indian Peanut Genotypes for ahFAD2 Gene Polymorphism Regulating Its Oleic and Linoleic Acid Fluxes.

    PubMed

    Nawade, Bhagwat; Bosamia, Tejas C; Thankappan, Radhakrishnan; Rathnakumar, Arulthambi L; Kumar, Abhay; Dobaria, Jentilal R; Kundu, Rahul; Mishra, Gyan P

    2016-01-01

    In peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), the customization of fatty acid profile is an evolving area to fulfill the nutritional needs in the modern market. A total of 174 peanut genotypes, including 167 Indian cultivars, 6 advanced breeding lines and "SunOleic95R"-a double mutant line, were investigated using AS-PCRs, CAPS and gene sequencing for the ahFAD2 allele polymorphism, along with its fatty acid compositions. Of these, 80 genotypes were found having substitution (448G>A) mutation only in ahFAD2A gene, while none recorded 1-bp insertion (441_442insA) mutation in ahFAD2B gene. Moreover, 22 wild peanut accessions found lacking both the mutations. Among botanical types, the ahFAD2A mutation was more frequent in ssp. hypogaea (89%) than in ssp. fastigiata (17%). This single allele mutation, found affecting not only oleic to linoleic acid fluxes, but also the composition of other fatty acids in the genotypes studied. Repeated use of a few selected genotypes in the Indian varietal development programs were also eminently reflected in its ahFAD2 allele polymorphism. Absence of known mutations in the wild-relatives indicated the possible origin of these mutations, after the allotetraploidization of cultivated peanut. The SNP analysis of both ahFAD2A and ahFAD2B genes, revealed haplotype diversity of 1.05% and 0.95%, while Ka/Ks ratio of 0.36 and 0.39, respectively, indicating strong purifying selection pressure on these genes. Cluster analysis, using ahFAD2 gene SNPs, showed presence of both mutant and non-mutant genotypes in the same cluster, which might be due the presence of ahFAD2 gene families. This investigation provided insights into the large number of Indian peanut genotypes, covering various aspects related to O/L flux regulation and ahFAD2 gene polymorphism. PMID:27610115

  1. Insights into the Indian Peanut Genotypes for ahFAD2 Gene Polymorphism Regulating Its Oleic and Linoleic Acid Fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Nawade, Bhagwat; Bosamia, Tejas C.; Thankappan, Radhakrishnan; Rathnakumar, Arulthambi L.; Kumar, Abhay; Dobaria, Jentilal R.; Kundu, Rahul; Mishra, Gyan P.

    2016-01-01

    In peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), the customization of fatty acid profile is an evolving area to fulfill the nutritional needs in the modern market. A total of 174 peanut genotypes, including 167 Indian cultivars, 6 advanced breeding lines and “SunOleic95R”—a double mutant line, were investigated using AS-PCRs, CAPS and gene sequencing for the ahFAD2 allele polymorphism, along with its fatty acid compositions. Of these, 80 genotypes were found having substitution (448G>A) mutation only in ahFAD2A gene, while none recorded 1-bp insertion (441_442insA) mutation in ahFAD2B gene. Moreover, 22 wild peanut accessions found lacking both the mutations. Among botanical types, the ahFAD2A mutation was more frequent in ssp. hypogaea (89%) than in ssp. fastigiata (17%). This single allele mutation, found affecting not only oleic to linoleic acid fluxes, but also the composition of other fatty acids in the genotypes studied. Repeated use of a few selected genotypes in the Indian varietal development programs were also eminently reflected in its ahFAD2 allele polymorphism. Absence of known mutations in the wild-relatives indicated the possible origin of these mutations, after the allotetraploidization of cultivated peanut. The SNP analysis of both ahFAD2A and ahFAD2B genes, revealed haplotype diversity of 1.05% and 0.95%, while Ka/Ks ratio of 0.36 and 0.39, respectively, indicating strong purifying selection pressure on these genes. Cluster analysis, using ahFAD2 gene SNPs, showed presence of both mutant and non-mutant genotypes in the same cluster, which might be due the presence of ahFAD2 gene families. This investigation provided insights into the large number of Indian peanut genotypes, covering various aspects related to O/L flux regulation and ahFAD2 gene polymorphism.

  2. Regulatory issues related to functional foods and natural health products in Canada: possible implications for manufacturers of conjugated linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Kelley C

    2004-06-01

    The Canadian Food and Drugs Act and Regulations, through its definitions of food and drug, currently restricts health-related claims for foods, food ingredients, and natural health products (NHPs). Over the past few decades, scientific research has led to a large body of information that demonstrates the benefits for health of many food and NHP ingredients. Health Canada recognized the constraints of the current regulatory environment and started to develop regulations related to the allowance of health claims for functional foods and NHPs, including those foods and NHPs that would contain conjugated linoleic acid isomers. Health Canada has 3 initiatives under way in the area of health claims for foods: 1) to adopt the generic health claims of the United States within a Canadian context, 2) to develop scientific standards of evidence and a guidance document for supporting the validity of product-specific claims, and 3) to develop an overall regulatory framework for functional foods. In 2000, Health Canada announced approval for the use of 5 generic diet-related health claims: sodium and hypertension, calcium and osteoporosis, saturated and trans fat and cholesterol and coronary artery disease, fruits and vegetables and cancer, and sugar alcohols and dental caries. Under a separate initiative, Natural Health Products Regulations were published in the Canada Gazette Part II on June 18, 2003. The NHP Regulations came into force on January 1, 2004, with a transition period ranging from 2 y (for site licensing) to 6 y (for product licensing, for products already issued a drug identification number). PMID:15159260

  3. Absorption and metabolism of ( sup 3 H)arachidonic and ( sup 14 C)linoleic acid in essential fatty acid-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelte, L.; Melin, T.; Nilsson, A.; Strandvik, B. )

    1990-07-01

    ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid (20:4) and ({sup 14}C)linoleic acid (18:2) were fed in a triolein emulsion to essential fatty acid-deficient (EFAD) rats and to age-matched controls. Tissues were analyzed for radioactivity of different lipid classes after 1, 2, and 4 h. As in earlier studies, control rats retained more ({sup 3}H)20:4 than ({sup 14}C)18:2 in all organs except adipose tissue. In EFAD rats, recovery of ({sup 14}C)18:2 was increased in small intestine, liver, heart, and kidneys. In comparison to controls, EFAD rats retained much more ({sup 14}C)18:2 in phospholipids of these organs. The increase in the incorporation of both {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C into phosphatidylethanolamine was particularly pronounced. Another striking feature was the drastic increase in the retention after 4 h of {sup 14}C in cardiolipin, which is specifically located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. In contrast, incorporation of both {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C into phosphatidylinositol was decreased or unchanged in EFAD rats. Although fecal fat excretion was increased there was no evidence for a malabsorption or an increased retention in intestinal triacyglycerol of the radioactive fatty acids in EFAD rats. The proportion of ({sup 14}C)18:2 that had been converted to ({sup 14}C)20:4 was generally low but increased significantly with time in the liver and intestine of EFAD rats.

  4. Growth, body fatty acid composition, immune response and resistance to Streptococcus iniae of hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus X O. aureus, fed diets containing various levels of linoleic and linolenic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of dietary linoleic (LA) and linolenic acids (LN) on growth and immunity of all-male hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus × O. aureus, were evaluated for 10 weeks. Fish fed 0.12% LA + 0% LN had the lowest weight gain (WG) but was not significantly different from diets containing 0.5% LA...

  5. Kinetics of heterogeneous reaction of ozone with linoleic acid and its dependence on temperature, physical state, RH, and ozone concentration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guang; Holladay, Sara; Langlois, Danielle; Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Yong

    2013-03-01

    Heterogeneous reaction between ozone and linoleic acid (LA) thin film was investigated by a flow reactor coupled to attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (FR-ATR-IR) over wide ranges of temperature, relative humidity (RH), and ozone concentration under atmospheric pressure condition. Pseudo-first-order rate constants kapp and overall reactive uptake coefficients γ were acquired on the basis of changes in absorbance from peaks located near 1743, 1710, 1172, and 1110 cm(-1), which can be assigned to C═O in ester, C═O in acid, and C-C and C-O stretching modes, respectively. Results showed that the kapp and γ increased nearly by a factor of 6 with increasing temperatures from 258 to 314 K. It was noted the temperature effect on the reaction kinetics was much more pronounced at lower temperatures. Such behavior can be explained by a change in the physical state of LA at lower temperatures. In addition, kapp and γ were enhanced by 2-fold as the RH increased from 0 to 80%. Moreover, the effect of ozone concentration on the reaction kinetics was reported for the first time. kapp was found to display a Langmuir-Hinshelwood dependence on ozone concentration with KO3 = (1.146 ± 0.017) × 10(-15) molecules cm(-3) and k[S] = 0.0522 ± 0.0004 s(-1), where KO3 is a parameter that describes the partitioning of ozone to the thin film surface, and k[S] is the maximum pseudo-first-order coefficient at high ozone concentration. Furthermore, yields and hygroscopic properties of reaction products were also investigated by FTIR spectroscopy. The intensity ratio of two C═O stretching bands, A1743/A1710, which was utilized as an indicator of the product yields, increased sharply with increasing temperatures in the lower temperature region (258-284 K), and then remained nearly constant in the higher temperature region (284-314 K). The product yields showed no significant variation with RH, for the intensity ratio of A1743/A1710 barely changed in the wide RH range 0

  6. Ion pairing with linoleic acid simultaneously enhances encapsulation efficiency and antibacterial activity of vancomycin in solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kalhapure, Rahul S; Mocktar, Chunderika; Sikwal, Dhiraj R; Sonawane, Sandeep J; Kathiravan, Muthu K; Skelton, Adam; Govender, Thirumala

    2014-05-01

    Ion pairing of a fatty acid with an antibiotic may be an effective strategy for formulation optimization of a nanoantibiotic system. The aim of this study was therefore to explore the potential of linoleic acid (LA) as an ion pairing agent to simultaneously enhance encapsulation efficiency and antibacterial activity of triethylamine neutralized vancomycin (VCM) in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs). The prepared VCM-LA2 conjugate was characterized by Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, logP and binding energy calculations. The shifts in the FT-IR frequencies of COOH, NH2 and CO functionalities, an increase in logP value (1.37) and a lower interaction energy between LA and VCM (-125.54 kcal/mol) confirmed the formation of the conjugate. SLNs were prepared by a hot homogenization and ultrasonication method, and characterized for size, polydispersity index (PI), zeta potential (ZP), entrapment efficiency (%EE), surface morphology and physical stability. In vitro antibacterial activity studies against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were conducted. Size, PI and ZP for VCM-LA2_SLNs were 102.7±1.01, 0.225±0.02 and -38.8±2.1 (mV) respectively. SLNs were also stable at 4 °C for 3 months. %EE for VCM-HCl_SLNs and VCM-LA2_SLNs were 16.81±3.64 and 70.73±5.96 respectively, indicating a significant improvement in encapsulation of the drug through ion pairing with LA. Transmission electron microscopy images showed spherical nanoparticles with sizes in the range of 95-100 nm. After 36 h, VCM-HCl showed no activity against MRSA. However, the minimum inhibitory concentration for VCM-HCl_SLNs and VCM-LA2_SLNs were 250 and 31.25 μg/ml respectively against S. aureus, while against MRSA it was 500 and 15.62 μg/ml respectively. This confirms the enhanced antibacterial activity of VCM-LA2_SLNs over VCM-HCl_SLNs. These findings therefore suggest that VCM-LA2_SLNs is a promising nanoantibiotic system for effective treatment against both

  7. Identification of a Δ12 fatty acid desaturase from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) involved in the biosynthesis of linoleic acid by heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruhao; Gao, Lingchao; Yu, Xiaoping; Zheng, Yusheng; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Xinguang

    2016-10-10

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) is one of the highest oil-yield crops in the world. A Δ12-desaturases associated with the primary steps of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) biosynthesis were successfully cloned from oil palm and their functions identified. The open reading frames (ORFs) of egFAD2 (GenBank accession: KT023602) consisted of 1176bp and code for 391 amino acids. Their deduced polypeptides showed 75-93% identity to microsomal Δ12-desaturases from other higher plants, and each contained the three histidine clusters typical of the catalytic domains of such enzymes. RT-PCR experiment indicated that the egFAD2 gene exhibited the highest accumulation in the mesocarp of fruits at 120-140 DAP (i.e. the fourth period of fruit development) and, despite having different expression levels, the other four stages were at significantly lower levels compared with the fourth stage. Plasmid pYES2-egFAD2 was transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain INVSc1 using lithium acetate method for expression under the induction of galactose. Yeast cells transformed with plasmid constructs containing egFAD12 produced an appreciable amount of linoleic acids (18:2(Δ9,)(12)), not normally present in wild-type yeast cells, indicating that the genes encoded functional Δ12-desaturase enzymes. PMID:27370696

  8. Identification of a Δ12 fatty acid desaturase from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) involved in the biosynthesis of linoleic acid by heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruhao; Gao, Lingchao; Yu, Xiaoping; Zheng, Yusheng; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Xinguang

    2016-10-10

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) is one of the highest oil-yield crops in the world. A Δ12-desaturases associated with the primary steps of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) biosynthesis were successfully cloned from oil palm and their functions identified. The open reading frames (ORFs) of egFAD2 (GenBank accession: KT023602) consisted of 1176bp and code for 391 amino acids. Their deduced polypeptides showed 75-93% identity to microsomal Δ12-desaturases from other higher plants, and each contained the three histidine clusters typical of the catalytic domains of such enzymes. RT-PCR experiment indicated that the egFAD2 gene exhibited the highest accumulation in the mesocarp of fruits at 120-140 DAP (i.e. the fourth period of fruit development) and, despite having different expression levels, the other four stages were at significantly lower levels compared with the fourth stage. Plasmid pYES2-egFAD2 was transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain INVSc1 using lithium acetate method for expression under the induction of galactose. Yeast cells transformed with plasmid constructs containing egFAD12 produced an appreciable amount of linoleic acids (18:2(Δ9,)(12)), not normally present in wild-type yeast cells, indicating that the genes encoded functional Δ12-desaturase enzymes.

  9. Linoleic acid and stearic acid elicit opposite effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent signaling pathways in immortalized hypothalamic N38 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songbo; Xiang, Nana; Yang, Liusong; Zhu, Canjun; Zhu, Xiaotong; Wang, Lina; Gao, Ping; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang; Shu, Gang; Jiang, Qingyan

    2016-03-18

    The regulation of food intake is a promising way to combat obesity. It has been implicated that various fatty acids exert different effects on food intake and body weight. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of linoleic acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) on agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression and secretion in immortalized mouse hypothalamic N38 cells and to explore the likely underlying mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that LA inhibited, while SA stimulated AgRP expression and secretion of N38 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, LA suppressed the protein expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), phosphorylation levels of JNK and IKKα/β, suggesting the inhibition of TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway. However, the above mentioned inhibitory effects of LA were eliminated by TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In contrast, SA promoted TLR4 protein expression and activated TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway, with elevated ratio of p-JNK/JNK. While TLR4 siRNA reversed the stimulatory effects of SA on AgRP expression and TLR4-dependent inflammation. Moreover, we found that TLR4 was also involved in LA-enhanced and SA-impaired leptin/insulin signal pathways in N38 cells. In conclusion, our findings indicated that LA elicited inhibitory while SA exerted stimulatory effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent inflammation and leptin/insulin pathways in N38 cells. These data provided a better understanding of the mechanism underlying fatty acids-regulated food intake and suggested the potential role of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids such as LA in reducing food intake and treating obesity.

  10. Metabolism in humans of cis-12,trans-15-octadecadienoic acid relative to palmitic, stearic, oleic and linoleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Emken, E.A.; Rohwedder, W.K.; Adlof, R.O.; Rakoff, H.; Gulley, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    Mixtures of triglycerides containing deuterium-labeled hexadecanoic acid (16:0), octadecanoic acid (18:0), cis-9-octadecenoic acid (9c-18:1), cis-9,cis-12-octadecadienoic acid (9c, 12c-18:2) and cis-12,trans-15-octadecadienoic acid (12c,15t-18:2) were fed to two young-adult males. Plasma lipid classes were isolated from samples collected periodically over 48 hr. Incorporation and turnover of the deuterium-labeled fats in plasma lipids were followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the methyl ester derivatives. Absorption of the deuterated fats was followed by GC-MS analysis of chylomicron triglycerides isolated by ultracentrifugation. Results were the following: (i) endogenous fat contributed about 40% of the total fat incorporated into chylomicron triglycerides; (ii) elongation, desaturation and chain-shortened products from the deuterated fats were not detected; (iii) the polyunsaturated isomer 12c,15t-18:2 was metabolically more similar to saturated and 9c-18:1 fatty acids than to 9c,12c-18:2; (iv) relative incorporation of 9c,12c-18:2 into phospholipids did not increase proportionally with an increase of 9c,12c-18:2 in the mixture of deuterated fats fed; (v) absorption of 16:0, 18:0, 9c-18:1, 9c,12c-18:2 and 12c,15t-18:2 were similar; and (vi) data for the 1- and 2-acyl positions of phosphatidylcholine and for cholesteryl ester fractions reflected the known high specificity of phosphatidylcholine acyltransferase and lecithin:cholesteryl acyltransferase for 9c,12c-18:2. These results illustrate that incorporation of dietary fatty acids into human plasma lipid classes is selectively controlled and that incorporation of dietary 9c,12c-18:2 is limited.

  11. Milk fatty acid composition, rumen microbial population, and animal performances in response to diets rich in linoleic acid supplemented with chestnut or quebracho tannins in dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Buccioni, A; Pauselli, M; Viti, C; Minieri, S; Pallara, G; Roscini, V; Rapaccini, S; Marinucci, M Trabalza; Lupi, P; Conte, G; Mele, M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate milk fatty acid (FA) profile, animal performance, and rumen microbial population in response to diets containing soybean oil supplemented or not with chestnut and quebracho tannins in dairy ewes. Eighteen Comisana ewes at 122±6 d in milking were allotted into 3 experimental groups. Diets were characterized by chopped grass hay administered ad libitum and by 800 g/head and day of 3 experimental concentrates containing 84.5 g of soybean oil/kg of dry matter (DM) and 52.8 g/kg of DM of bentonite (control diet), chestnut tannin extract (CHT diet), or quebracho tannin extract (QUE diet). The trial lasted 4 wk. Milk yield was recorded daily, and milk composition and blood parameters were analyzed weekly. At the end of the experiment, samples of rumen fluid were collected to analyze pH, volatile fatty acid profile, and the relative proportions of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus in the rumen microbial population. Hepatic functionality, milk yield, and gross composition were not affected by tannin extracts, whereas milk FA composition was characterized by significant changes in the concentration of linoleic acid (CHT +2.77% and QUE +9.23%), vaccenic acid (CHT +7.07% and QUE +13.88%), rumenic acid (CHT -1.88% and QUE +24.24%), stearic acid (CHT + 8.71% and QUE -11.45%), and saturated fatty acids (CHT -0.47% and QUE -3.38%). These differences were probably due to the ability of condensed versus hydrolyzable tannins to interfere with rumen microbial metabolism, as indirectly confirmed by changes in the relative proportions of B. fibrisolvens and B. proteoclasticus populations and by changes in the molar proportions of volatile fatty acids. The effect of the CHT diet on the milk FA profile and microbial species considered in this trial was intermediate between that of QUE and the control diet, suggesting a differential effect of condensed and hydrolyzable tannins on rumen microbes. Compared with control animals

  12. Dietary zinc deficiency affects blood linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio; a sensitive physiological marker of zinc status in vivo (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Reed, Spenser; Qin, Xia; Ran-Ressler, Rinat; Brenna, James Thomas; Glahn, Raymond P; Tako, Elad

    2014-03-20

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient used for over 300 enzymatic reactions and multiple biochemical and structural processes in the body. To date, sensitive and specific biological markers of zinc status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Gallus gallus as an in vivo model in the context of assessing the sensitivity of a previously unexplored potential zinc biomarker, the erythrocyte linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio. Diets identical in composition were formulated and two groups of birds (n = 12) were randomly separated upon hatching into two diets, Zn⁺ (zinc adequate control, 42.3 μg/g zinc), and Zn⁻ (zinc deficient, 2.5 μg/g zinc). Dietary zinc intake, body weight, serum zinc, and the erythrocyte fatty acid profile were measured weekly. At the conclusion of the study, tissues were collected for gene expression analysis. Body weight, feed consumption, zinc intake, and serum zinc were higher in the Zn⁺ control versus Zn⁻ group (p < 0.05). Hepatic TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 gene expression were higher in the Zn⁺ control group (p < 0.05), and hepatic Δ⁶ desaturase was significantly higher in the Zn⁺ group (p < 0.001). The LA:DGLA ratio was significantly elevated in the Zn⁻ group compared to the Zn⁺ group (22.6 ± 0.5 and 18.5 ± 0.5, % w/w, respectively, p < 0.001). This study suggests erythrocyte LA:DGLA is able to differentiate zinc status between zinc adequate and zinc deficient birds, and may be a sensitive biomarker to assess dietary zinc manipulation.

  13. Dietary linoleic acid requirements in the presence of α-linolenic acid are lower than the historical 2 % of energy intake value, study in rats.

    PubMed

    Choque, Benjamin; Catheline, Daniel; Delplanque, Bernadette; Guesnet, Philippe; Legrand, Philippe

    2015-04-14

    Previous studies on rats and human subjects have established that the linoleic acid (LA) requirement is 2 % of the total energy intake (en%), but is obtained in the absence of α-linolenic acid (ALA) and consequently appear to be overestimated. This raises questions since a recent study including ALA has suggested to divide the historical value by four. However, this recent study has remained inconclusive because the animals used were not totally LA-deficient animals. For the first time, the present study was especially designed using physiological and biochemical markers and performed in two steps: (1) to achieve a specific n-6 fatty acid deficiency model using growing male rats fed either a 0 en% from LA/0 en% from ALA (0LA/0ALA), 0LA/0·5ALA or 2LA/0·5ALA diet, born from female rats fed a 0LA/0·5ALA diet; and (2) to refine the required level of LA in the presence of ALA using rats fed either a 0LA/0ALA, 0·5LA/0·5ALA, 1LA/0·5ALA, 1·5LA/0·5ALA diet, born from female rats fed a 0LA/0·5ALA diet. The first step shows that the best LA deficiency model was obtained using rats fed the 0LA/0ALA diet, born from female rats fed the 0LA/0·5ALA diet. The second step demonstrates that in growing rats, LA deficiency was corrected with an intake of 1-1·5 en% from LA and 0·5 en% from ALA. These data suggest that the requirements in humans should be revisited, considering the presence of ALA to set up the recommendation for LA.

  14. Maternal Nutritional Imbalance between Linoleic Acid and Alpha-Linolenic Acid Increases Offspring's Anxious Behavior with a Sex-Dependent Manner in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sakayori, Nobuyuki; Tokuda, Hisanori; Yoshizaki, Kaichi; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Innis, Sheila M; Shibata, Hiroshi; Osumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Omega-6 (n-6) and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential nutrients for normal brain development. The principal dietary n-6 and n-3 PUFAs are linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA), respectively, We have previously shown that maternal dietary imbalance between these PUFAs, i.e., rich in LA and poor in ALA, affected brain development and increased anxiety-related behavior in the mouse offspring. Here we further addressed sex difference in anxiety-related behavior in the offspring exposed to maternal LA:ALA imbalance. We fed pregnant mice a LA excess/ALA deficient (LA(ex)/ALA(def)) diet, and raised their offspring on a well-balanced LA:ALA diet from an early lactation period. When the offspring were grown to adulthood, they were subjected to behavioral and biochemical analyses. We found that both male and female offspring exposed to the LA(ex)/ALA(def) diet showed increased anxiety-related behavior compared to those exposed to the control diet, which was differently observed between the sexes. The female offspring also exhibited hyperactivity by maternal intake of the LA(ex)/ALA(def) diet. On the other hand, abnormal depressive behavior was undetected in both sexes. We also found that the ratio of n-6 to n-3 PUFAs in the brain was unaffected regardless of maternal diet or offspring's sex. Since the n-6/n-3 ratio is known to influence emotional behavior, it is reasonable to assume that LA:ALA imbalance exposed during brain development is the key for causing enhanced anxiety in adulthood. The present study indicates that maternal dietary imbalance between LA and ALA increases offspring's anxiety-related behavior with a sex-dependent manner. PMID:27558477

  15. Dietary Zinc Deficiency Affects Blood Linoleic Acid: Dihomo-γ-linolenic Acid (LA:DGLA) Ratio; a Sensitive Physiological Marker of Zinc Status in Vivo (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Spenser; Qin, Xia; Ran-Ressler, Rinat; Brenna, James Thomas; Glahn, Raymond P.; Tako, Elad

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient used for over 300 enzymatic reactions and multiple biochemical and structural processes in the body. To date, sensitive and specific biological markers of zinc status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Gallus gallus as an in vivo model in the context of assessing the sensitivity of a previously unexplored potential zinc biomarker, the erythrocyte linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio. Diets identical in composition were formulated and two groups of birds (n = 12) were randomly separated upon hatching into two diets, Zn(+) (zinc adequate control, 42.3 μg/g zinc), and Zn(−) (zinc deficient, 2.5 μg/g zinc). Dietary zinc intake, body weight, serum zinc, and the erythrocyte fatty acid profile were measured weekly. At the conclusion of the study, tissues were collected for gene expression analysis. Body weight, feed consumption, zinc intake, and serum zinc were higher in the Zn(+) control versus Zn(−) group (p < 0.05). Hepatic TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 gene expression were higher in the Zn(+) control group (p < 0.05), and hepatic Δ6 desaturase was significantly higher in the Zn(+) group (p < 0.001). The LA:DGLA ratio was significantly elevated in the Zn(−) group compared to the Zn(+) group (22.6 ± 0.5 and 18.5 ± 0.5, % w/w, respectively, p < 0.001). This study suggests erythrocyte LA:DGLA is able to differentiate zinc status between zinc adequate and zinc deficient birds, and may be a sensitive biomarker to assess dietary zinc manipulation. PMID:24658588

  16. Utilization of extruded linseed to modify fatty composition of intensively-reared lamb meat: effect of associated cereals (wheat vs. corn) and linoleic acid content of the diet.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, V; Bas, P; Schmidely, P

    2010-01-01

    Sixty male lambs were used in two trials to study the efficiency of transfer and elongation of linolenic acid (ALA) in muscle and caudal adipose tissue and to assess factors affecting this process and related changes in fatty acid (FA) profile. In experiment 1, lambs were fed a control diet or extruded linseed (L) diet either with wheat (W, rapid starch) or corn (C, slow starch). In experiment 2, lambs were fed L with "normal" rapeseed, or high-oleic rapeseed, or soybean. In experiment 1, L increased ALA proportion and total n-3 PUFA in muscle and adipose tissue. In adipose tissue but not in muscle, LC lambs had higher proportion of ALA than LW lambs. In experiment 2, increasing linoleic acid (LA) intake increased LA proportion in muscle and adipose tissue but did not modify ALA proportion. Moreover, in muscle, it did not change the desaturation and elongation processes of ALA to long-chain n-3 PUFA.

  17. Self-aggregated nanoparticles of linoleic acid-modified glycol chitosan conjugate as delivery vehicles for paclitaxel: preparation, characterization and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingmou; Liu, Yonghua; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Jianguo; Ren, Jin; Zhang, Lifang; Jin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    A series of linoleic acid-modified glycol chitosan (LAGC) conjugates were synthesized and characterized by FTIR and (1)H NMR. The effect of the amount of linoleic acid (LA) on the physicochemical properties of LAGC conjugates was investigated. The mean diameters of three LAGC nanoparticles determined by dynamic light scattering ranged from 204 to 289 nm. The critical aggregation concentration values of LAGC conjugates in aqueous solution were 0.0148, 0.0348, and 0.0807 mg/ml, respectively. Paclitaxel (PTX) was physically loaded into the LAGC nanoparticles by a dialysis method. The drug loading content and encapsulation efficiency of PTX-loaded LAGC (PTX-LAGC) nanoparticles increased with an increasing ratio of the hydrophobic LA to hydrophilic glycol chitosan in the conjugates. PTX-LAGC nanoparticles were almost spherical in shape observed by transmission electron microscopy. In vitro release revealed that PTX release from the nanoparticles was reduced as the LA substitution degree of LAGC conjugates increased. Compared with the commercial formulation Taxol, PTX-LAGC-1 nanoparticles exhibited comparable cellular uptake and cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells in vitro. Importantly, PTX-LAGC-1 nanoparticles demonstrated the stronger antitumor efficacy against hepatic H22 tumor-bearing mice than Taxol (p < 0.05). Therefore, glycolipid-like LAGC nanoparticles had a potential as delivery vehicles for tumor therapy.

  18. Using linoleic acid embedded cellulose acetate membranes to in situ monitor polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in lakes and predict their bioavailability to submerged macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yuqiang; Xue, Bin; Yao, Shuchun

    2015-05-19

    To date no passive sampler has been used to predict bioavailability of contaminants to macrophytes. Here a novel passive sampler, linoleic acid embedded cellulose acetate membrane (LAECAM), was developed and used to in situ measure the freely dissolved concentrations of ten polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the sediment porewaters and the water columns of two lakes in both winter and summer and predict their bioavailability to the shoots of resident submerged macrophytes (Potamogeton malainus, Myriophyllum spicata, Najas minor All., and Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara). PAH sampling by LAECAMs could reach equilibrium within 21 days. The influence of temperature on LAECAM-water partition coefficients was 0.0008-0.0116 log units/°C. The method of LAECAM was comparable with the active sampling methods of liquid-liquid extraction combined with fDOC adjustment, centrifugation/solid-phase extraction (SPE), and filtration/SPE but had several advantages. After lipid normalization, concentrations of the PAHs in LAECAMs were not significantly different from those in the macrophytes. In contrast, concentrations of the PAHs in the triolein containing passive sampler (TECAM) deployed simultaneously with LAECAM were much higher. The results suggest that linoleic acid is more suitable than triolein as the model lipid for passive samplers to predict bioavailability of PAHs to submerged macrophytes.

  19. Probiotic administration modifies the milk fatty acid profile, intestinal morphology, and intestinal fatty acid profile of goats.

    PubMed

    Apás, A L; Arena, M E; Colombo, S; González, S N

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a mixture of potentially probiotic bacteria (MPPB; Lactobacillus reuteri DDL 19, Lactobacillus alimentarius DDL 48, Enterococcus faecium DDE 39, and Bifidobacterium bifidum strains) on the milk fatty acid (FA) profile, with emphasis on cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in the middle stage of goat lactation, was determined. In addition, the effects of MPPB feeding on the FA profile in intestinal content and intestinal morphology in weaned goats were analyzed. The probiotic supplement was able to modify FA composition of milk and intestinal content. The unsaturated FA concentrations in milk (g of FA/L of milk) increased from 4.49 to 7.86 for oleic (18:1), from 0.70 to 1.39 for linoleic (18:2), from 0.063 to 0.187 for linolenic (18:3) acid, and from 0.093 to 0.232 for CLA. The atherogenicity index diminished 2-fold after MPPB ingestion. In the intestinal content of the weaned goats, no significant difference in saturated FA concentration compared with the control was observed. However, oleic acid, linolenic acid, CLA, and docosahexaenoic acid concentrations increased by 81, 23, 344, and 74%, respectively, after probiotic consumption. The ruminal production of CLA was increased by the MPPB. However, bacterial strains of MPPB were unable to produce CLA in culture media. By histological techniques, it was observed that the treated group had intestinally more conserved morphological structures than the control group. The results obtained in this study indicate that the MPPB administration in lactating and weaned goats allows for the production of milk with improved concentrations of beneficial compounds, and also produces a protective effect in the goat intestine. The results obtained in this study reinforce the strategy of probiotics application to enhance goat health with the production of milk with higher concentrations of polyunsaturated FA.

  20. Determination of the dissociation constants for recombinant c-Myc, Max, and DNA complexes: The inhibitory effect of linoleic acid on the DNA-binding step

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Kyung Chae; Rhee, Ho Sung; Park, Chi Hoon; Yang, Chul-Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-08-19

    c-Myc, the protein product of protooncogene c-myc, functions in cell proliferation, differentiation, and neoplastic disease. In this study, recombinant c-Myc and Max proteins, encompassing DNA binding (basic region) and dimerization (helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper) domain of human origin, were expressed in bacteria as Myc87 and Max85. Myc87 was purified under denatured conditions and was renatured again. The dissociation constant for the protein dimers and for dimer/DNA complexes were not detectable by isothermal titration calorimetry because of the low degree of solubility of Myc87 and Max85. Therefore, we set up equations which were used to determine the dissociation constants from the proportion of protein-DNA complexes. The dimer dissociation constants in TBS were 5.90({+-}0.54) x 10{sup -7} M for Max85/Max85 homodimer, 6.85({+-}0.25) x 10{sup -3} M for Myc87/Myc87 homodimer, and 2.55({+-}0.29) x 10{sup -8} M for Myc87/Max85 heterodimer, and the DNA-binding dissociation constants in TBS were 1.33({+-}0.21) x 10{sup -9} M for Max85/Max85/DNA, 2.27({+-}0.08) x 10{sup -12} M for Myc87/Myc87/DNA, and 4.43({+-}0.37) x 10{sup -10} M for Myc87/Max85/DNA. In addition, we revealed that linoleic acid which is known as an inhibitor for the formation of Max/Max/DNA complex reduced the affinity of Max homodimer for DNA. This result indicates that linoleic acid may bind to the DNA-binding region of Max homodimer.

  1. CLaMS: Classifier for Metagenomic Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita

    2010-12-01

    CLaMS-"Classifer for Metagenonic Sequences" is a Java application for binning assembled metagenomes wings user-specified training sequence sets and other user-specified initial parameters. Since ClAmS analyzes and matches sequence composition-based genomic signatures, it is much faster than binning tools that rely on alignments to homologs; CLaMS can bin ~20,000 sequences in 3 minutes on a laptop with a 2.4 Ghz. Intel Core 2 Duo processor and 2 GB Ram. CLaMS is meant to be desktop application for biologist and can be run on any machine under any operating system on which the Java Runtime Environment is enabled. CLaMS is freely available in both GVI-based and command-line based forms.

  2. CLaMS: Classifier for Metagenomic Sequences

    2010-12-01

    CLaMS-"Classifer for Metagenonic Sequences" is a Java application for binning assembled metagenomes wings user-specified training sequence sets and other user-specified initial parameters. Since ClAmS analyzes and matches sequence composition-based genomic signatures, it is much faster than binning tools that rely on alignments to homologs; CLaMS can bin ~20,000 sequences in 3 minutes on a laptop with a 2.4 Ghz. Intel Core 2 Duo processor and 2 GB Ram. CLaMS is meant to be desktop applicationmore » for biologist and can be run on any machine under any operating system on which the Java Runtime Environment is enabled. CLaMS is freely available in both GVI-based and command-line based forms.« less

  3. Starch and oil in the donor cow diet and starch in substrate differently affect the in vitro ruminal biohydrogenation of linoleic and linolenic acids.

    PubMed

    Zened, A; Troegeler-Meynadier, A; Nicot, M C; Combes, S; Cauquil, L; Farizon, Y; Enjalbert, F

    2011-11-01

    Trans isomers of fatty acids exhibit different health properties. Among them, trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid has negative effects on milk fat production and can affect human health. A shift from the trans-11 to the trans-10 pathway of biohydrogenation (BH) can occur in the rumen of dairy cows receiving high-concentrate diets, especially when the diet is supplemented with highly unsaturated fat sources. The differences of BH patterns between linoleic acid (LeA) and linolenic acid (LnA) in such ruminal conditions remain unknown; thus, the aim of this work was to investigate in vitro the effects of starch and sunflower oil in the diet of the donor cows and starch level in the incubates on the BH patterns and efficiencies of LeA and LnA. The design was a 4 × 4 Latin square design with 4 cows, 4 periods, and 4 diets with combinations of 21 or 34% starch and 0 or 5% sunflower oil. The rumen content of each cow during each period was incubated with 4 substrates, combining 2 starch levels and either LeA or LnA addition. Capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism of incubates showed that dietary starch decreased the diversity of the bacterial community and the high-starch plus oil diet modified its structure. High-starch diets poorly affected isomerization and first reduction of LeA and LnA, but decreased the efficiencies of trans-11,cis-15-C18:2 and trans C18:1 reduction. Dietary sunflower oil increased the efficiency of LeA isomerization but decreased the efficiency of trans C18:1 reduction. An interaction between dietary starch and dietary oil resulted in the highest trans-10 isomers production in incubates when the donor cow received the high-starch plus oil diet. The partition between trans-10 and trans-11 isomers was also affected by an interaction between starch level and the fatty acid added to the incubates, showing that the trans-10 shift only occurred with LeA, whereas LnA was mainly hydrogenated via the more usual trans-11

  4. Whole Blood Levels of the n-6 Essential Fatty Acid Linoleic Acid Are Inversely Associated with Stunting in 2-to-6 Year Old Tanzanian Children: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Jumbe, Theresia; Comstock, Sarah S.; Hahn, Samantha L.; Harris, William S.; Kinabo, Joyce; Fenton, Jenifer I.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Tanzania, 35% of all children below five years of age are stunted. Dietary fatty acids (FA) are critical for growth and development. However, whole blood FA levels in Tanzanian children are poorly described. Objective The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to assess 1) whole blood levels of essential fatty acids and 2) the association between whole blood FA levels and growth parameters in Tanzanian children 2–6 years of age. Methods A drop of blood was collected on an antioxidant treated card and analyzed for FA composition. Weight and height were measured and z-scores calculated. Relationships between FAs and growth parameters were analyzed by linear regression. Results Of the 334 children that participated, 30.3% were stunted. The average whole blood level of Mead acid was 0.15%. The anthropometric z-score height-for-age (HAZ) was inversely associated with Mead acid, the Mead acid to arachidonic acid (T/T) ratio, and total n-9 FA. Additionally, HAZ was positively associated with linoleic acid and total n-6 FA. BMI-for-age was positively associated with oleic acid, total n-9 FA and T/T ratio but inversely associated with arachidonic acid and total n-6 FA. Weight-for-height was inversely associated with arachidonic acid and total n-6 FAs and positively associated with oleic acid and total n-9 FA. Weight-for-age was not associated with any FA tested. Total n-3 FAs were not associated with any growth parameters measured. Conclusions The EFA linoleic acid and the markers of FA deficiency were associated with HAZ, an indicator for stunting in 2–6 year old Tanzanian children. Total n-6, total n-9, and a number of individual FAs were associated with growth. Increasing dietary intake of EFA and n-6 FAs may be a strategy to combat stunting in this population. PMID:27137223

  5. Lipids in the diet and the fatty acid profile in beef: a review and recent patents on the topic.

    PubMed

    Ladeira, Marcio M; Machado Neto, Otavio R; Chizzotti, Mario L; Oliveira, Dalton M; Chalfun Junior, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this review is to report how the use of lipid sources in diets for ruminants can affect the fatty acid profile of beef. In addition, recent patents that can be utilized to alter the fatty acid profile in the meat, or which concern the synthesis of conjugated fatty acids will be reviewed. The industrial production of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has already started and the commercial products present isomers cis-9, trans-11; trans-9, cis-11; and trans-10, cis-12. Patents on the biological synthesis of isomer C18:2 cis-9, trans-11 from the linoleic acid have also been published. However, the economic production of CLA in industrial scale is a difficult process. Most of the patents published for CLA production utilize bacteria of the genera Bifidobacterium sp. and Propionibacterium sp. Lipid supplementation, with the objective to improve the fatty acid profile of beef, can be done through the use of patented products, such as genetically modified oilseeds and calcium soaps of fatty acids.

  6. Sources and Bioactive Properties of Conjugated Dietary Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Alan A; Ross, Paul R; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Stanton, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The group of conjugated fatty acids known as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers have been extensively studied with regard to their bioactive potential in treating some of the most prominent human health malignancies. However, CLA isomers are not the only group of potentially bioactive conjugated fatty acids currently undergoing study. In this regard, isomers of conjugated α-linolenic acid, conjugated nonadecadienoic acid and conjugated eicosapentaenoic acid, to name but a few, have undergone experimental assessment. These studies have indicated many of these conjugated fatty acid isomers commonly possess anti-carcinogenic, anti-adipogenic, anti-inflammatory and immune modulating properties, a number of which will be discussed in this review. The mechanisms through which these bioactivities are mediated have not yet been fully elucidated. However, existing evidence indicates that these fatty acids may play a role in modulating the expression of several oncogenes, cell cycle regulators, and genes associated with energy metabolism. Despite such bioactive potential, interest in these conjugated fatty acids has remained low relative to the CLA isomers. This may be partly attributed to the relatively recent emergence of these fatty acids as bioactives, but also due to a lack of awareness regarding sources from which they can be produced. In this review, we will also highlight the common sources of these conjugated fatty acids, including plants, algae, microbes and chemosynthesis. PMID:26968402

  7. Linoleic acid suppresses cholesterol efflux and ATP-binding cassette transporters in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly associated with elevated plasma free fatty acid concentrations. Paradoxically, evidence suggests that unsaturated, compared to saturated fatty acids, suppress macrophage chole...

  8. Elevated Linoleic Acid (A Pro-Inflammatory PUFA) and Liver Injury in a Treatment Naive HIV-HCV Co-Infected Alcohol Dependent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Vatsalya, Vatsalya; Barve, Shirish S.; McClain, Craig J.; Ramchandani, Vijay A.

    2016-01-01

    HIV and HCV co-infection is a unique disease condition, and medical management of such condition is difficult due to severity and systemic complications. Added with heavy alcohol drinking, risk of liver injury increases due to several pro-inflammatory responses that subsequently get involved with alcohol metabolism. Elevated levels of fatty acids have been reported both in viral infections as well as alcoholic liver disease though such investigations have not addressed the adverse events with dual viral infection of HIV and HCV along with heavy drinking. This case report is of a patient with excessive alcohol drinking and first time diagnosis of HIV and HCV dual infection, elaborating concurrent alteration in Linoleic Acid (LA) levels and pro-inflammatory shift in ω-6/ω-3 ratio along with the elevations in liver injury markers. Elevated LA has been recently studied extensively for its role in alcoholic liver disease; and in the present case, we also found it to be clinically relevant to liver injury. PMID:27489857

  9. Linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA protects neurons from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-3/-9 activation.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Takahiro; Fujikawa, Hirokazu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2010-05-01

    The present study aimed at understanding the effect of the linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) on oxidative stress-induced neuronal death. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 1 mM) reduced viability of cultured rat cerebral cortical neurons to 50% of basal levels, but DCP-LA significantly prevented the SNP effect in a concentration (1-100 nM)-dependent manner. In addition, DCP-LA (100 nM) rescued neurons from SNP-induced degradation. SNP (1 mM) activated caspase-3 and -9 in cultured rat cerebral cortical neurons, but DCP-LA (100 nM) abolished the caspase activation. For a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion, oral administration with DCP-LA (1 mg/kg) significantly diminished degraded area due to cerebral infarction. The results of the present study, thus, demonstrate that DCP-LA protects neurons at least in part from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by inhibiting activation of caspase-3/-9.

  10. Effect of Increasing Doses of Linoleic and α-Linolenic Acids on High-Fructose and High-Fat Diet Induced Metabolic Syndrome in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianan; Wang, Ou; Guo, Yingjian; Wang, Tuo; Wang, Siyi; Li, Guopeng; Ji, Baoping; Deng, Qianchun

    2016-02-01

    Doses and ratio of linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA) preventing metabolic syndrome (MS) were investigated. SD rats were fed (i) basal diet, (ii) high-fructose and high-fat diet (HFFD), (iii) HFFD with increasing-dose LA (0.75 energy-% ALA + 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 30 energy-% LA), and (iv) HFFD with increasing-dose ALA (6 energy-% LA + 0.3, 0.5, 0.75, 1.5, 2.25, and 3.75 energy-% ALA) for 18 weeks. Results showed 6, 12, 15, and 30 energy-% LA significantly ameliorated central obesity, hyperlipidemia, glucose homeostasis, and leptin status; 0.5 and 0.75 energy-% ALA significantly improved insulin sensitivity, adiponectin, and anti-inflammatory status. Moreover, high intakes of ALA (1.5, 2.25, and 3.75 energy-%) presented a pro-oxidant activity. In conclusion, dose instead of ratio determines the prevention of MS. The optimal doses are 6 energy-% LA and 0.75 energy-% ALA; high intakes of ALA may have side effects.

  11. Conversion of linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), with a focus on pregnancy, lactation and the first 2 years of life.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Robert A; Muhlhausler, Bev; Makrides, Maria

    2011-04-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been a marked shift in the fatty acid composition of the diets of industrialized nations towards increased intake of the n-6 fatty acid linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6), largely as a result of the replacement of saturated fats with plant-based polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). While health agencies internationally continue to advocate for high n-6 PUFA intake combined with increased intakes of preformed n-3 long-chain PUFAs (LCPUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), there are questions as to whether this is the best approach. LA competes with alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) for endogenous conversion to the LC derivatives EPA and DHA, and LA also inhibits incorporation of DHA and EPA into tissues. Thus, high-LA levels in the diet generally result in low n-3 LCPUFA status. Pregnancy and infancy are developmental periods during which the fatty acid supply is particularly critical. The importance of an adequate supply of n-3 LCPUFA for ensuring optimal development of infant brain and visual systems is well established, and there is now evidence that the supply of n-3 LCPUFA also influences a range of growth, metabolic and immune outcomes in childhood. This review will re-evaluate the health benefits of modern Western diets and pose the question of whether the introduction of similar diets to nations with emerging economies is the most prudent public health strategy for improving health in these populations.

  12. Pelleting in Associated with Sodium Monensin Increases the Conjugated Linoleic Acids Concentration in the Milk of Dairy Cows Fed Canola Seeds

    PubMed Central

    De Marchi, Francilaine Eloise; Romero, Jakeline Vieira; Damasceno, Julio Cesar; Grande, Paula Adriana; Zeoula, Lúcia Maria; dos Santos, Geraldo Tadeu

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the pelleting and the addition of sodium monensin on production, the chemical and lipid composition of milk and butter physical characteristics, 4 Holstein dairy cows (135 days of lactation) with an average milk production of 14.7 kg/d, were supplemented with a concentrate containing ground canola seeds. The cows were assigned to a 4×4 Latin square design with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments: i) ground maize, soybean meal, mineral and vitamin supplements, and ground canola seeds (CG); ii) CG concentrate with 31.5 mg of monensin added per kg of dry matter (DM); iii) CG pelleted concentrate; iv) CG concentrate with monensin addition pelleted. There was no difference in milk production and composition. The addition of monensin increased milk concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), the PUFA/saturated fatty acids (SFA) ratio, and omega 6. The pelleting increased the concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids, the PUFA/SFA ratio, and the omega 6/omega 3 ratio, but decreased the concentration of SFA. The association between pelleting and the addition of monensin increased the concentration of conjugated linoleic acids by 46.9%. The physical characteristics of butter were not affected by the evaluated diets. We concluded that the concentrate with 31.5 mg of monensin added per kg DM basis combined with the pelleting improves the lipid composition of milk from Holstein cows that are on pasture and supplemented with ground canola seeds, without changing the production, milk composition, and spreadability of butter. PMID:26104517

  13. Lipid complex effect on fatty acid profile and chemical composition of cow milk and cheese.

    PubMed

    Bodkowski, R; Czyż, K; Kupczyński, R; Patkowska-Sokoła, B; Nowakowski, P; Wiliczkiewicz, A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of administration of lipid complex (LC) on cow milk and cheese characteristics was studied. Lipid complex was elaborated based on grapeseed oil with synthesized conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and Atlantic mackerel oil enriched in n-3 fatty acids. The 4-wk experiment was conducted on 30 Polish Holstein Friesian cows. The experimental group cow diet was supplemented with 400 g/d of LC (containing 38% CLA, and eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid in a relative amount of 36.5%) on a humic-mineral carrier. The chemical composition and fatty acid profile of milk and rennet cheese from raw fresh milk were analyzed. Lipid complex supplementation of the total mixed ration had no effect on milk yield and milk composition, except fat content, which decreased from 4.6 to 4.1%, a 10.9% decrease. Milk from cows treated with LC had greater relative amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly polyunsaturated fatty acids, and lesser relative amounts of saturated fatty acids. Lipid complex addition changed milk fat fatty acid profile: C18:2 cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 isomer (CLA) contents increased by 278 and 233%, respectively, as did eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6) contents. Milk fat fatty acid profile changes were correlated with the modifications in rennet cheese fatty acid profile. Lipid complex supplementation of dairy cows produced considerable changes in the biological value of milk and cheese fat.

  14. Lipid complex effect on fatty acid profile and chemical composition of cow milk and cheese.

    PubMed

    Bodkowski, R; Czyż, K; Kupczyński, R; Patkowska-Sokoła, B; Nowakowski, P; Wiliczkiewicz, A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of administration of lipid complex (LC) on cow milk and cheese characteristics was studied. Lipid complex was elaborated based on grapeseed oil with synthesized conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and Atlantic mackerel oil enriched in n-3 fatty acids. The 4-wk experiment was conducted on 30 Polish Holstein Friesian cows. The experimental group cow diet was supplemented with 400 g/d of LC (containing 38% CLA, and eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid in a relative amount of 36.5%) on a humic-mineral carrier. The chemical composition and fatty acid profile of milk and rennet cheese from raw fresh milk were analyzed. Lipid complex supplementation of the total mixed ration had no effect on milk yield and milk composition, except fat content, which decreased from 4.6 to 4.1%, a 10.9% decrease. Milk from cows treated with LC had greater relative amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly polyunsaturated fatty acids, and lesser relative amounts of saturated fatty acids. Lipid complex addition changed milk fat fatty acid profile: C18:2 cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 isomer (CLA) contents increased by 278 and 233%, respectively, as did eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6) contents. Milk fat fatty acid profile changes were correlated with the modifications in rennet cheese fatty acid profile. Lipid complex supplementation of dairy cows produced considerable changes in the biological value of milk and cheese fat. PMID:26506539

  15. Fatty acids in serum and diet--a canonical correlation analysis among toddlers.

    PubMed

    Uusitalo, Liisa; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Salminen, Irma; Ovaskainen, Marja-Leena; Kronberg-Kippilä, Carina; Ahonen, Suvi; Niinistö, Sari; Alfthan, Georg; Simell, Olli; Ilonen, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Knip, Mikael; Virtanen, Suvi M

    2013-07-01

    Fatty acid concentrations in blood are potential biomarkers of dietary fat intake, but methodological studies among children are scarce. The large number of fatty acids and their complex interrelationships pose a special challenge in research on fatty acids. Our target was to assess the interrelationships between the total fatty acid profiles in diet and serum of young children. The study subjects were healthy control children from the birth cohort of the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Study. A 3-day food record and a frozen serum sample were available from 135 children at the age of 1 year, from 133 at 2 years, and from 92 at 3 years. The relationship between dietary and serum fatty acid profiles was analysed using canonical correlation analysis. The consumption of fatty milk correlated positively with serum fatty acids, pentadecanoic acid, palmitic acid and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) at all ages. Correlations between dietary and serum eicosapentaenoic and/or docosahexaenoic acid were observed at 2 and 3 years of age. Serum linoleic acid was positively associated with the consumption of infant formula at the age of 1 year, and with the consumption of vegetable margarine at 2 and 3 years. The results indicate a high quality of the 3-day food records kept by parents and other caretakers of the children, and suitability of non-fasting, un-fractioned serum samples for total fatty acid analyses. The correlation between intake of milk fat and serum proportion of CLA is a novel finding. PMID:22066932

  16. VITRIFICATION OF THAI NATIVE CATTLE OOCYTES: EFFECTS OF ETHYLENE GLYCOL CONCENTRATIONS AND EXPOSURE TIME, LINOLEIC ACID ALBUMIN AND CHOLESTEROL-LOADED METHYL-B-CYCLODEXTRIN.

    PubMed

    Chasombat, Jakkhaphan; Vongpralub, Thevin; Sirisathien, Saksiri; Phasuk, Yupin; Sonseeda, Pronjit

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to improve the oocyte vitrification procedure for preservation of Thai native cattle genetic resources. In Experiment I, oocytes were exposed to various doses (2%, 4% and 6%) of ethylene glycol (EG) in vitrification solution I (VS-I) for different equilibration times (10 or 20 min) before being exposed to VS-II and then subjected to vitrification. Experiment II was divided into two parts: (a) oocytes were matured in medium supplemented with linoleic acid albumin (LAA) (1% or 2%) and then vitrified; (b) matured oocytes were preincubated with cholesterol-loaded methyl-β-cyclodextrin (CLC) (1% or 2%) and then vitrified. Equilibration of oocytes by exposure to 6% EG in VS-I for 10 min (Experiment I), and in vitro maturation of immature oocytes in medium supplementation with 2% LAA (Experiment II) were the most effective methods; vitrified/thawed oocytes showed higher rates of survival and subsequent embryonic development compared with the other experimental groups. PMID:26510334

  17. Ethanol and dietary unsaturated fat (corn oil/linoleic acid enriched) cause intestinal inflammation and impaired intestinal barrier defense in mice chronically fed alcohol.

    PubMed

    Kirpich, Irina A; Feng, Wenke; Wang, Yuhua; Liu, Yanlong; Beier, Juliane I; Arteel, Gavin E; Falkner, K Cameron; Barve, Shirish S; McClain, Craig J

    2013-05-01

    Alcohol and dietary fat both play an important role in alcohol-mediated multi-organ pathology, including gut and liver. In the present study we hypothesized that the combination of alcohol and dietary unsaturated fat (USF) would result in intestinal inflammatory stress and mucus layer alterations, thus contributing to disruption of intestinal barrier integrity. C57BL/6N mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli liquid diets containing EtOH and enriched in USF (corn oil/linoleic acid) or SF (medium chain triglycerides: beef tallow) for 8 weeks. Intestinal histology, morphometry, markers of inflammation, as well as levels of mucus protective factors were evaluated. Alcohol and dietary USF triggered an intestinal pro-inflammatory response, characterized by increase in Tnf-α, MCP1, and MPO activity. Further, alcohol and dietary USF, but not SF, resulted in alterations of the intestinal mucus layer, characterized by decreased expression of Muc2 in the ileum. A strong correlation was observed between down-regulation of the antimicrobial factor Cramp and increased Tnf-α mRNA. Therefore, dietary unsaturated fat (corn oil/LA enriched) is a significant contributing factor to EtOH-mediated intestinal inflammatory response and mucus layer alterations in rodents.

  18. Singlet Oxygen Induced Products of Linoleates, 10- and 12-(Z,E)-Hydroxyoctadecadienoic Acids (HODE), Can Be Potential Biomarkers for Early Detection of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Umeno, Aya; Shichiri, Mototada; Ishida, Noriko; Hashimoto, Yoshiko; Abe, Kaori; Kataoka, Masatoshi; Yoshino, Kohzoh; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Aki, Nanako; Funaki, Makoto; Asada, Yasuhiko; Yoshida, Yasukazu

    2013-01-01

    Current diagnostic tests such as glycemic indicators have limitations for early detection of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), which leads to diabetes. Oxidative stress induced by various oxidants in a random and destructive manner is considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of a number of human disorders and diseases such as impaired glucose tolerance. We have developed an improved method for the measurement of in vivo lipid peroxidation, where the presence of 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α), hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids (HODEs), hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and 7-hydroxycholesterol (7-OHCh), as well as their parent molecules, linoleic acid (LA) and cholesterol (Ch), was determined by performing LC-MS/MS (for 8-iso-PGF2α, HODE, and HETE) and GC-MS (for 7-OHCh, LA, and Ch) after reduction with triphenyl phosphine and saponification by potassium hydroxide. We then applied this method to volunteers (n = 57), including normal type (n = 43), “high-normal” (fasting plasma glucose, 100–109 mg/dL, n = 7), pre-diabetic type (IGT, n = 5), and diabetic type (n = 2) subjects who are diagnosed by performing oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs). Several biomarkers in plasma, such as insulin, leptin, adiponectin, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, high sensitivity-C-reactive protein, HbA1c, and glucose levels were measured during OGTT. We found that the fasting levels of (10- and 12-(Z,E)- HODE)/LA increased significantly with increasing levels of HbA1c and glucose during OGTT and with insulin secretion and resistance index. In conclusion, 10- and 12-(Z,E)-HODE may be prominent biomarkers for the early detection of IGT and “high-normal” type without OGTT. PMID:23691063

  19. A comparison of methods used to determine the oleic/linoleic acid ratio in cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanuts are a cheap source of protein compared to cheese and red meat and a good source of essential vitamins and minerals and are thus a common component of many oil and food products. The fatty acid composition of peanuts has become increasingly important with the realization that the onset of ra...

  20. Steric analysis of epoxyalcohol and trihydroxy derivatives of 9-hydroperoxy-linoleic acid from hematin and enzymatic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Christopher P.; Boeglin, William E.; Garcia-Diaz, Yoel; O’Donnell, Valerie B.; Brash, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    We characterize the allylic epoxyalcohols and their trihydroxy hydrolysis products generated from 9R- and 9S-hydroperoxy-octadecenoic acid (HPODE) under non-enzymatic conditions, reaction with hematin and subsequent acid hydrolysis, and enzymatic conditions, incubation with Beta vulgaris containing a hydroperoxide isomerase and epoxide hydrolase. The products were resolved by HPLC and the regio and stereo-chemistry of the transformations were determined through a combination of 1H NMR and GC-MS analysis of dimethoxypropane derivatives. Four trihydroxy isomers were identified upon mild acid hydrolysis of 9S,10S-trans-epoxy-11E-13S-hydroxyoctadecenoate: 9S,10R,13S, 9S,12R,13S, 9S,10S,13S and 9S,12S,13S-trihydroxy-octadecenoic acids, in the ratio 40:26:22:12. We also identified a prominent -ketol rearrangement product from the hydrolysis as mainly the 9-hydroxy-10E-13-oxo isomer. Short incubation (5 min) of 9R- and 9S-HPODE with Beta vulgaris extract yielded the 9R- and 9S-hydroxy-10E-12R,13S-cis-epoxy products respectively. Longer incubation (60 min) gave one specific hydrolysis product via epoxide hydrolase, the 9R/S,12S,13S-trihydroxyoctadecenoate. These studies provide a practical approach for the isolation and characterization of allylic epoxy alcohol and trihydroxy products using a combination of HPLC, GC-MS and 1H NMR. PMID:23352713

  1. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in rat pancreatic beta-cells by linoleic acid through both intracellular metabolites and membrane receptor signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu-Feng; Pei, Jianming; Chen, Chen

    2008-09-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP) channels) determine the excitability of pancreatic beta-cells and importantly regulate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Long-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) decrease GSIS after long-term exposure to beta-cells, but the effects of exogenous FFAs on K(ATP) channels are not yet well clarified. In this study, the effects of linoleic acid (LA) on membrane potential (MP) and K(ATP) channels were observed in primary cultured rat pancreatic beta-cells. LA (20 microM) induced hyperpolarization of MP and opening of K(ATP) channels, which was totally reversed and inhibited by tolbutamide, a K(ATP) channel blocker. Inhibition of LA metabolism by acyl-CoA synthetase inhibitor, triacsin C (10 microM), partially inhibited LA-induced opening of K(ATP) channels by 64%. The non-FFA G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 agonist, GW9508 (40 microM), induced an opening of K(ATP) channels, which was similar to that induced by LA under triacsin C treatment. Blockade of protein kinases A and C did not influence the opening of K(ATP) channels induced by LA and GW9508, indicating that these two protein kinase pathways are not involved in the action of LA on K(ATP) channels. The present study demonstrates that LA induces hyperpolarization of MP by activating K(ATP) channels via both intracellular metabolites and activation of GPR40. It indicates that not only intracellular metabolites of FFAs but also GPR40-mediated pathways take part in the inhibition of GSIS and beta-cell dysfunction induced by FFAs.

  2. Reduced linoleic acid intake in early postnatal life improves metabolic outcomes in adult rodents following a Western-style diet challenge.

    PubMed

    Oosting, Annemarie; Kegler, Diane; van de Heijning, Bert J M; Verkade, Henkjan J; van der Beek, Eline M

    2015-09-01

    The global increase in dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake has been suggested to contribute to the rise in obesity incidence. We hypothesized that reduced n-6 PUFA intake during early postnatal life improves adult body composition and metabolic phenotype upon a Western diet challenge. Male offspring of C57Bl/6j mice and Wistar rats were subjected to a control diet (CTRL; 3.16 En% linoleic acid [LA]) or a low n-6 PUFA diet (low LA; 1.36 En% LA) from postnatal days (PNs) 2 to 42. Subsequently, all animals were switched to a Western-style diet (2.54 En% LA) until PN98. We monitored body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and glucose homeostasis by an intravenous glucose and insulin tolerance test in rats and by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in mice. At PN98, plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, and adipokines were measured and adipocyte number and size were analyzed. In mice, the postnatal low-LA diet decreased fat accumulation during the adult Western-style diet challenge (-27% compared with CTRL, P < .001). Simultaneously, it reduced fasting triglyceride levels and lowered fasting resistin and leptin levels. In rats, the low-LA diet did not affect adult body composition, but decreased the number of retroperitoneal adipocytes and increased the number of large adipocytes. In conclusion, lowering dietary n-6 PUFA intake in early life protected against detrimental effects of an obesogenic diet in adulthood on metabolic homeostasis and fat mass accumulation. PMID:26239950

  3. The linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a protein 4.1N-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2013-03-01

    In yeast two-hybrid screening, protein 4.1N, a scaffolding protein, was identified as a binding partner of the α7 ACh (acetylcholine) receptor. For rat hippocampal slices, the linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA {8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid} increased the association of the α7 ACh receptor with 4.1N, and the effect was inhibited by GF109203X, an inhibitor of PKC (protein kinase C), although DCP-LA did not induce PKC phosphorylation of 4.1N. For PC-12 cells, the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction was significantly suppressed by knocking down 4.1N. DCP-LA increased the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction, and the effect was still inhibited by knocking down 4.1N. In the monitoring of α7 ACh receptor mobilization, DCP-LA enhanced signal intensities for the α7 ACh receptor at the membrane surface in PC-12 cells, which was clearly prevented by knocking down 4.1N. Taken together, the results of the present study show that 4.1N interacts with the α7 ACh receptor and participates in the receptor tethering to the plasma membrane. The results also indicate that DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a 4.1N-dependent manner under the control of PKC, but without phosphorylating 4.1N.

  4. Generation of novel metabolites of dietary linoleic acid (18:2n6) by guinea pig epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Chapkin, R.S.; Ziboh, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    Although the authors have demonstrated the inability of rat and guinea pig (GP) skin enzyme preparations to desaturate 18:2n6 into gammalinolenic acid (18:3n6) using an in vitro microsomal system, the fate of this dietary essential fatty acid in the GP epidermis is unknown. To explore the fate of 18:2n6, intact tissue slices from GP epidermis were incubated with (1-/sup 14/C)18:2n6. After incubation, the extracted lipids were transesterified using methanolic-HCL. The fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed using a combination of (i) argentation TLC, scanned using a proportional TLC radioscanner, and (ii) reverse phase HPLC, equipped with a flow through radioscanner. The results indicate that the intact epidermis metabolized /sup 14/C-18:2n6 to a group of novel products more polar than 18:2n6. In subsequent experiments, /sup 14/C-18:2n6 was either incubated with the 800 xg supernatant, the 105,000 xg pellet or supernatant from GP epidermis. Metabolism of 18:2n6 by the high speed supernatant resulted in the generation of polar products with chromatographic properties of not greater than 2 double bonds. These results indicate that although the GP epidermis lacks the capacity to desaturate 18:2n6 to 18:3n6, it can convert dietary 18:2n6 into a group of novel polar metabolites via a cytosolic mediated process. The function of these metabolites in the GP integumentary system remains to be determined.

  5. Topical application of a linoleic acid-ceramide containing moisturizer exhibit therapeutic and preventive benefits for psoriasis vulgaris: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Li, Xia; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Xue, Feng; Zheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin inflammatory disorder with frequent relapse. Ceramides and their key enzymes are deficient in the lesions, resulting in impaired epidermal permeability barrier, which correlates with disease severity. We evaluated the efficacy of linoleic acid-ceramide moisturizer (LA-Cer) as an adjunctive and preventive therapy for psoriasis vulgaris. 106 patients were randomized into two groups. The control group (C1 ) received Mometasone Furoate 0.1% Cream (MF) while the treatment group (T1 ) was given 0.1% MF in combination with LA-Cer moisturizer. Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), pruritus, capacitance (CAP), and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) of normal skin and lesion were evaluated at Week 0, 2, 4, 8. Subsequently, T1 patients were randomized for another 1 year. LA-Cer-group (T2 ) maintained the use of moisturizer while control group (C2 ) discontinued. CAPs, TEWLs, PASI were assessed after 1 year. Primary endpoints (PASI-50 at Week 8) revealed superiority of LA-Cer-MF versus MF, less relapse, and rebound in LA-Cer-group than control (C2 ) at Year 1. There were time-by-therapy interaction effect on CAPs, lesional TEWL, and PASI. LA-Cer-MF induced higher CAP, an earlier reduction of lesional TEWL and PASI than control (C1 ). CAPs, lesional TEWL, and PASI remained stable in LA-Cer-group. CAPs, lesional TEWL, and PASI were comparable to the baseline levels in control group (C2 ). Topical LA-Cer moisturizer can alleviate psoriasis, and could be a valuable approach for the treatment and prevention of psoriasis.

  6. Topical application of a linoleic acid-ceramide containing moisturizer exhibit therapeutic and preventive benefits for psoriasis vulgaris: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Li, Xia; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Xue, Feng; Zheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin inflammatory disorder with frequent relapse. Ceramides and their key enzymes are deficient in the lesions, resulting in impaired epidermal permeability barrier, which correlates with disease severity. We evaluated the efficacy of linoleic acid-ceramide moisturizer (LA-Cer) as an adjunctive and preventive therapy for psoriasis vulgaris. 106 patients were randomized into two groups. The control group (C1 ) received Mometasone Furoate 0.1% Cream (MF) while the treatment group (T1 ) was given 0.1% MF in combination with LA-Cer moisturizer. Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), pruritus, capacitance (CAP), and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) of normal skin and lesion were evaluated at Week 0, 2, 4, 8. Subsequently, T1 patients were randomized for another 1 year. LA-Cer-group (T2 ) maintained the use of moisturizer while control group (C2 ) discontinued. CAPs, TEWLs, PASI were assessed after 1 year. Primary endpoints (PASI-50 at Week 8) revealed superiority of LA-Cer-MF versus MF, less relapse, and rebound in LA-Cer-group than control (C2 ) at Year 1. There were time-by-therapy interaction effect on CAPs, lesional TEWL, and PASI. LA-Cer-MF induced higher CAP, an earlier reduction of lesional TEWL and PASI than control (C1 ). CAPs, lesional TEWL, and PASI remained stable in LA-Cer-group. CAPs, lesional TEWL, and PASI were comparable to the baseline levels in control group (C2 ). Topical LA-Cer moisturizer can alleviate psoriasis, and could be a valuable approach for the treatment and prevention of psoriasis. PMID:26286610

  7. Linoleic acid permeabilizes gastric epithelial cells by increasing connexin 43 levels in the cell membrane via a GPR40- and Akt-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Puebla, Carlos; Cisterna, Bruno A; Salas, Daniela P; Delgado-López, Fernando; Lampe, Paul D; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-05-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is known to activate G-protein coupled receptors and connexin hemichannels (Cx HCs) but possible interlinks between these two responses remain unexplored. Here, we evaluated the mechanism of action of LA on the membrane permeability mediated by Cx HCs in MKN28 cells. These cells were found to express connexins, GPR40, GPR120, and CD36 receptors. The Cx HC activity of these cells increased after 5 min of treatment with LA or GW9508, an agonist of GPR40/GPR120; or exposure to extracellular divalent cation-free solution (DCFS), known to increase the open probability of Cx HCs, yields an immediate increase in Cx HC activity of similar intensity and additive with LA-induced change. Treatment with a CD36 blocker or transfection with siRNA-GPR120 maintains the LA-induced Cx HC activity. However, cells transfected with siRNA-GPR40 did not show LA-induced Cx HC activity but activity was increased upon exposure to DCFS, confirming the presence of activatable Cx HCs in the cell membrane. Treatment with AKTi (Akt inhibitor) abrogated the LA-induced Cx HC activity. In HeLa cells transfected with Cx43 (HeLa-Cx43), LA induced phosphorylation of surface Cx43 at serine 373 (S373), site for Akt phosphorylation. HeLa-Cx43 but not HeLa-Cx43 cells with a S373A mutation showed a LA-induced Cx HC activity directly related to an increase in cell surface Cx43 levels. Thus, the increase in membrane permeability induced by LA is mediated by an intracellular signaling pathway activated by GPR40 that leads to an increase in membrane levels of Cx43 phosphorylated at serine 373 via Akt.

  8. Jejunal linoleic acid infusions require GLP-1 receptor signaling to inhibit food intake: implications for the effectiveness of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Alexander A.; Moran, Timothy H.

    2011-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery results in sustained decreases in food intake and weight loss. A key component is likely the direct delivery of nutrients to the jejunum and resulting changes in levels of gut peptide secretion. Prior work modeling this aspect of the surgery has shown that small-volume, prolonged jejunal infusions of linoleic acid (LA) produce sustained decreases in food intake and weight loss. LA infusions also significantly elevate plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels. To assess a role for the increased circulating GLP-1 in the feeding suppression, we examined the effect of prolonged peripheral minipump administration of the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9–39 (Ex 9) on the feeding suppression produced by jejunal LA. Using a 2 × 2 design, we infused either saline or LA in the jejunum (7 h/day, 11.4 kcal) for 5 days with a subset of animals from each group receiving either saline or Ex 9 (25 pmol·kg−1·min−1) continuously via a minipump. The antagonist alone had no effect on food intake. LA reduced daily food intake greatly in excess of the kilocalories infused. Ex 9 completely blocked the feeding suppression produced by the jejunal LA infusion. Ex 9 also attenuated the increase in plasma GLP-1 induced by jejunal LA infusions. These data demonstrate that endogenous GLP-1 receptor signaling is necessary for the reduction in food intake produced by jejunal LA infusions. Whether increased secretion of additional gut peptides is also necessary for such suppressions remains to be determined. PMID:21917638

  9. Dual response surface-optimized synthesis of L-menthyl conjugated linoleate in solvent-free system by Candida rugosa lipase.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Wang, Yulun; Li, Jia; Wang, Ping; Wei, Wei; Gao, Yang; Fu, Chenyin; Dong, Wenqi

    2010-02-01

    Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of L-menthyl conjugated linoleate in solvent-free system was studied in this paper. Duel response surface methodology was employed to explore the factors which would influence the reaction conversion by a range of independent experiments. The conditions of reaction temperature, reaction time, enzyme amount, substrate molar ratio and water content were symmetrically investigated. When the substrates were 1 mmol CLA and 1 mmol L-menthol, the maximum conversion (79.1+/-0.8%) was obtained at 30 degrees C, Candida rugosa lipase of 33.7% (w/w by weight of L-menthol), water content of 32% (w/w by weight of L-menthol), reaction time of 43 h. The product isomers (9Z,11E-/10E,12Z-=63/37) were analyzed by GC/MS. The similarity between the oleic acid and 9Z,11E-CLA conformations which were obtained by molecular modeling could account for the specific catalyzed by C. rugosa lipase. PMID:19833506

  10. Fatty acid profile differs between organic and conventionally produced cow milk independent of season or milking time.

    PubMed

    Schwendel, B H; Morel, P C H; Wester, T J; Tavendale, M H; Deadman, C; Fong, B; Shadbolt, N M; Thatcher, A; Otter, D E

    2015-03-01

    Differing amounts of fresh forage and concentrates fed, and level of input contributes to the differences reported in fatty acid (FA) composition of organic and conventionally produced cow milk. In many previous studies designed to investigate this phenomenon, comparisons were made between grazed organic cows and housed conventional cows. In the present study, we have investigated differences between organic and conventional milk produced using year-round pasture grazing, as practiced in New Zealand. The FA composition was determined in milk sampled at morning and evening milking in both spring and autumn. Samples were taken from 45 cows from the Massey University organic herd and compared with 50 cows from the corresponding conventional herd grazed and managed similarly at the same location. Forty-three out of 51 analyzed FA were influenced by season, whereas 28 were different between production systems. In addition, one-half were also different due to time of milking. Levels of linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid were higher in organic milk, whereas conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and vaccenic acid were higher in conventional milk. The first 3 FA (linoleic acid, α-linolenic acid, and CLA) were more abundant in milk harvested during autumn, and the CLA concentration was also significantly influenced by time of milking. Our results confirm reports that the FA profile is affected by season and time of milking, and we also showed an effect due to the production system, when both sets of cows were kept continuously on pasture, even after taking milking time and seasonal effect into account.

  11. AMPKα, C/EBPβ, CPT1β, GPR43, PPARγ, and SCD Gene Expression in Single- and Co-cultured Bovine Satellite Cells and Intramuscular Preadipocytes Treated with Palmitic, Stearic, Oleic, and Linoleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Choi, S H; Park, S K; Johnson, B J; Chung, K Y; Choi, C W; Kim, K H; Kim, W Y; Smith, B

    2015-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that bovine subcutaneous preadipocytes promote adipogenic gene expression in muscle satellite cells in a co-culture system. Herein we hypothesize that saturated fatty acids would promote adipogenic/lipogenic gene expression, whereas mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids would have the opposite effect. Bovine semimembranosus satellite cells (BSC) and intramuscular preadipocytes (IPA) were isolated from crossbred steers and cultured with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS)/Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) and 1% antibiotics during the 3-d proliferation period. After proliferation, cells were treated for 3 d with 3% horse serum/DMEM (BSC) or 5% FBS/DMEM (IPA) with antibiotics. Media also contained 10 μg/mL insulin and 10 μg/mL pioglitazone. Subsequently, differentiating BSC and IPA were cultured in their respective media with 40 μM palmitic, stearic, oleic, or linoleic acid for 4 d. Finally, BSC and IPA were single- or co-cultured for an additional 2 h. All fatty acid treatments increased (p = 0.001) carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 beta (CPT1β) gene expression, but the increase in CPT1β gene expression was especially pronounced in IPA incubated with palmitic and stearic acid (6- to 17- fold increases). Oleic and linoleic acid decreased (p = 0.001) stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) gene expression over 80% in both BSC and IPA. Conversely, palmitic and stearic acid increased SCD gene expression three fold in co-cultured in IPA, and stearic acid increased AMPKα gene expression in single- and co-cultured BSC and IPA. Consistent with our hypothesis, saturated fatty acids, especially stearic acid, promoted adipogenic and lipogenic gene expression, whereas unsaturated fatty acids decreased expression of those genes associated with fatty acid metabolism.

  12. AMPKα, C/EBPβ, CPT1β, GPR43, PPARγ, and SCD Gene Expression in Single- and Co-cultured Bovine Satellite Cells and Intramuscular Preadipocytes Treated with Palmitic, Stearic, Oleic, and Linoleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Choi, S. H.; Park, S. K.; Johnson, B. J.; Chung, K. Y.; Choi, C. W.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, W. Y.; Smith, B.

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that bovine subcutaneous preadipocytes promote adipogenic gene expression in muscle satellite cells in a co-culture system. Herein we hypothesize that saturated fatty acids would promote adipogenic/lipogenic gene expression, whereas mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids would have the opposite effect. Bovine semimembranosus satellite cells (BSC) and intramuscular preadipocytes (IPA) were isolated from crossbred steers and cultured with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS)/Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) and 1% antibiotics during the 3-d proliferation period. After proliferation, cells were treated for 3 d with 3% horse serum/DMEM (BSC) or 5% FBS/DMEM (IPA) with antibiotics. Media also contained 10 μg/mL insulin and 10 μg/mL pioglitazone. Subsequently, differentiating BSC and IPA were cultured in their respective media with 40 μM palmitic, stearic, oleic, or linoleic acid for 4 d. Finally, BSC and IPA were single- or co-cultured for an additional 2 h. All fatty acid treatments increased (p = 0.001) carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 beta (CPT1β) gene expression, but the increase in CPT1β gene expression was especially pronounced in IPA incubated with palmitic and stearic acid (6- to 17- fold increases). Oleic and linoleic acid decreased (p = 0.001) stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) gene expression over 80% in both BSC and IPA. Conversely, palmitic and stearic acid increased SCD gene expression three fold in co-cultured in IPA, and stearic acid increased AMPKα gene expression in single- and co-cultured BSC and IPA. Consistent with our hypothesis, saturated fatty acids, especially stearic acid, promoted adipogenic and lipogenic gene expression, whereas unsaturated fatty acids decreased expression of those genes associated with fatty acid metabolism. PMID:25656188

  13. Effects of the heating process of soybean oil and seeds on fatty acid biohydrogenation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Troegeler-Meynadier, A; Puaut, S; Farizon, Y; Enjalbert, F

    2014-09-01

    Heating fat is an efficient way to alter ruminal biohydrogenation (BH) and milk fat quality. Nevertheless, results are variable among studies and this could be due to various heating conditions differently affecting BH. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of type and duration of heating of soybean oil or seeds on BH in vitro. Ruminal content cultures were incubated to first investigate the effects of roasting duration (no heating, and 0.5- and 6-h roasting) at 125°C and its interaction with fat source (soybean seeds vs. soybean oil), focusing on linoleic acid BH and its intermediates: conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and trans-C18:1. Additionally, we compared the effects of seed extrusion with the 6 combinations of unheated and roasted oils and seeds. None of the treatments was efficient to protect linoleic acid from BH. Soybean oil resulted in higher trans-11 isomer production than seeds: 5.7 and 1.2 times higher for cis-9,trans-11 CLA and trans-11 C18:1, respectively. A 125°C, 0.5-h roasting increased trans-11 isomer production by 11% compared with no heating and 6-h roasted fat. Extrusion of seeds was more efficient to increase trans-11 C18:1 production than seed roasting, leading to values similar to oils. For other fatty acids, including cis-9,trans-11 CLA, extrusion resulted in similar balances to seeds (mainly 0.5-h-roasted seeds). Extruded oilseeds would be more efficient than roasted seeds to produce trans-11 C18:1; nevertheless, effects of conditions of extrusion need to be explored.

  14. Stability of fatty acid composition after thermal, high pressure, and microwave processing of cow milk as affected by polyunsaturated fatty acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Alcalá, L M; Alonso, L; Fontecha, J

    2014-12-01

    Interest has been increasing to enhance the contents of healthy polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in milk. However, trans fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) can be altered after thermal processing and high pressures disrupt the milk fat globule membrane, exposing the lipid core and helping its oxidation. The objective of the present research was to study whether processing can alter the fatty acid composition of milk and if these changes are affected by PUFA concentration as previous studies suggest. Two cow milk batches (500 L each), one naturally enriched in PUFA, were processed to obtain pasteurized; high temperature, short time; UHT; high pressure; and microwave pasteurized samples. The detailed fatty acid composition was analyzed with special attention to trans fatty acids and CLA isomers. Results showed that after high temperature, short time processing, total CLA content increased in both milk batches, whereas sterilization resulted in a sigmatropic rearrangement of C18:2 cis-9,trans-11 to C18:2 trans-9,trans-11. The extent of these effects was greater in milks naturally enriched in PUFA.

  15. Active Site Dynamical Effects in the Hydrogen Transfer Rate-limiting Step in the Catalysis of Linoleic Acid by Soybean Lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1): Primary and Secondary Isotope Contributions.

    PubMed

    Phatak, Prasad; Venderley, Jordan; Debrota, John; Li, Junjie; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2015-07-30

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations that facilitate the treatment of rare events, we probe the active site participation in the rate-determining hydrogen transfer step in the catalytic oxidation of linoleic acid by soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1). The role of two different active site components is probed. (a) On the hydrogen atom acceptor side of the active site, the hydrogen bonding propensity between the acceptor side hydroxyl group, which is bound to the iron cofactor, and the backbone carboxyl group of isoleucine (residue number 839) is studied toward its role in promoting the hydrogen transfer event. Primary and secondary (H/D) isotope effects are also probed and a definite correlation with subtle secondary H/D isotope effects is found. With increasing average nuclear kinetic energy, the increase in transfer probability is enhanced due to the presence of the hydrogen bond between the backbone carbonyl of I839 and the acceptor oxygen. Further increase in average nuclear kinetic energy reduces the strength of this secondary hydrogen bond which leads to a deterioration in hydrogen transfer rates and finally embrances an Arrhenius-like behavior. (b) On the hydrogen atom donor side, the coupling between vibrational modes predominantly localized on the donor-side linoleic acid group and the reactive mode is probed. There appears to be a qualitative difference in the coupling between modes that belong to linoleic acid and the hydrogen transfer mode, for hydrogen and deuterium transfer. For example, the donor side secondary hydrogen atom is much more labile (by nearly a factor of 5) during deuterium transfer as compared to the case for hydrogen transfer. This appears to indicate a greater coupling between the modes belonging to the linoleic acid scaffold and the deuterium transfer mode and also provides a new rationalization for the abnormal (nonclassical) secondary isotope effect results obtained by Knapp, Rickert, and Klinman in J. Am. Chem. Soc

  16. Abnormal essential fatty acid composition of tissue lipids in genetically diabetic mice is partially corrected by dietary linoleic and gamma-linolenic acids.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, S C; Manku, M S; Horrobin, D F

    1985-05-01

    Genetically diabetic mice (db/db) and their non-diabetic litter-mates were maintained for 15 weeks on diets supplemented with safflower oil or evening primrose (Oenothera bienis) oil, both essential fatty acid (EFA)-rich sources, or hydrogenated coconut oil (devoid of EFA). Plasma glucose was higher in the diabetic mice supplemented with the oils than in the unsupplemented diabetic mice. In the oil-supplemented non-diabetic mice, plasma glucose did not differ compared with the unsupplemented non-diabetic mice. The proportional content of arachidonic acid in the phospholipids of the pancreas was significantly decreased in diabetic mice, an effect which was completely prevented by supplementation with safflower or evening primrose oil but not hydrogenated coconut oil. In the liver phospholipids of the diabetic mice, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid was proportionally increased, an effect reduced by supplementation with safflower oil but not evening primrose or hydrogenated coconut oils. In the liver triglycerides of the diabetic mice, gamma-linolenic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid were all proportionally decreased, effects which were also prevented by safflower or evening primrose oil but not hydrogenated coconut oil. Alopecia and dry scaly skin were prominent in the diabetic mice but less extensive in the diabetic mice supplemented with EFA.

  17. Catalyst for Change: The CIC/CLA Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, David C.

    2011-01-01

    From the fall of 2008 through the spring of 2011, 47 colleges and universities, organized and supported by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC), administered the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) to their students. The CLA is a test of critical thinking, analytic reasoning, problem solving, and written communication developed by the…

  18. Effective stabilization of CLA by microencapsulation in pea protein.

    PubMed

    Costa, A M M; Nunes, J C; Lima, B N B; Pedrosa, C; Calado, V; Torres, A G; Pierucci, A P T R

    2015-02-01

    CLA was microencapsulated by spray drying in ten varied wall systems (WS) consisting of pea protein isolate or pea protein concentrate (PPC) alone at varied core:WS ratios (1:2; 1:3 and 1:4), or blended with maltodextrin (M) and carboxymethylcellulose at a pea protein:carbohydrate ratio of 3:1. The physical-chemical properties of the CLA microparticles were characterised by core retention, microencapsulation efficiency (ME), particle size and moisture. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) showed the most promising results, thus we evaluated the effect of M addition in the WS on other physical-chemical characteristics and oxidative stability (CLA isomer profile, quantification of CLA and volatile compounds by SPME coupled with CG-MS) during two months of storage at room temperature, CLA:PPC (1:4) was selected for comparisons. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) microparticles demonstrated better morphology, solubility, dispersibility and higher glass-transition temperature values. M addition did not influence the oxidative stability of CLA, however its presence improved physical-chemical characteristics necessary for food applications.

  19. Incremental amounts of ground flaxseed decreases milk production but increases n-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acids in dairy cows fed high-forage diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of incremental amounts of ground flaxseed (GFLAX) on milk yield and fatty acids (FA) profile, ruminal metabolism, and nutrient digestibility in dairy cows fed high-forage diets. Twelve multiparous Jersey cows averaging (mean ± SD) 112 ± 68 da...

  20. Association of novel SNPs in the candidate genes affecting caprine milk fatty acids related to human health

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, S.P.; Sivalingam, Jayakumar; Tyagi, A.K.; Saroha, V.; Sharma, A.; Nagda, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, 618 milk samples of Sirohi breed of goat were collected, and analyzed for conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, C18:2) and other fatty acids. The CLA in studied goat milk samples was 4.87 mg/g of milk fat and C18:2 cis-9, trans-11 contributes 2.9 mg/g of milk fat and trans10 cis12 contributes 0.82 mg/g of milk fat. The saturated fatty acids in the milk accounted for 69.55% and unsaturated fatty acid accounted for 28.50%. The unsaturated fatty acid was constituted by monounsaturated fatty acid (24.57%) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (3.96%.). The major contribution (45.56%) in total fatty acid was of C12:0, C14:0 and C16:0. C18:0 and short chain ones (C4:0, C6:0, C8:0, and C10:0) have a neutral or cholesterol-decreasing effect. The DNA sequence analysis of the genes (DGAT1, SCAP, PPARG, OLR, FABP3 and PRL) in a random panel of 8 Sirohi goats revealed 38 SNPs across the targeted regions. Out of the studied SNPs (38) across these genes, 22 SNPs had significant effect on one or a group of fatty acids including CLA. The genotypes at these loci showed significant differences in the least square means of a particular fatty acid or a group of fatty acids including CLA and its isomers. PMID:25853060

  1. Higher PUFA and n-3 PUFA, conjugated linoleic acid, α-tocopherol and iron, but lower iodine and selenium concentrations in organic milk: a systematic literature review and meta- and redundancy analyses.

    PubMed

    Średnicka-Tober, Dominika; Barański, Marcin; Seal, Chris J; Sanderson, Roy; Benbrook, Charles; Steinshamn, Håvard; Gromadzka-Ostrowska, Joanna; Rembiałkowska, Ewa; Skwarło-Sońta, Krystyna; Eyre, Mick; Cozzi, Giulio; Larsen, Mette Krogh; Jordon, Teresa; Niggli, Urs; Sakowski, Tomasz; Calder, Philip C; Burdge, Graham C; Sotiraki, Smaragda; Stefanakis, Alexandros; Stergiadis, Sokratis; Yolcu, Halil; Chatzidimitriou, Eleni; Butler, Gillian; Stewart, Gavin; Leifert, Carlo

    2016-03-28

    Demand for organic milk is partially driven by consumer perceptions that it is more nutritious. However, there is still considerable uncertainty over whether the use of organic production standards affects milk quality. Here we report results of meta-analyses based on 170 published studies comparing the nutrient content of organic and conventional bovine milk. There were no significant differences in total SFA and MUFA concentrations between organic and conventional milk. However, concentrations of total PUFA and n-3 PUFA were significantly higher in organic milk, by an estimated 7 (95 % CI -1, 15) % and 56 (95 % CI 38, 74) %, respectively. Concentrations of α-linolenic acid (ALA), very long-chain n-3 fatty acids (EPA+DPA+DHA) and conjugated linoleic acid were also significantly higher in organic milk, by an 69 (95 % CI 53, 84) %, 57 (95 % CI 27, 87) % and 41 (95 % CI 14, 68) %, respectively. As there were no significant differences in total n-6 PUFA and linoleic acid (LA) concentrations, the n-6:n-3 and LA:ALA ratios were lower in organic milk, by an estimated 71 (95 % CI -122, -20) % and 93 (95 % CI -116, -70) %. It is concluded that organic bovine milk has a more desirable fatty acid composition than conventional milk. Meta-analyses also showed that organic milk has significantly higher α-tocopherol and Fe, but lower I and Se concentrations. Redundancy analysis of data from a large cross-European milk quality survey indicates that the higher grazing/conserved forage intakes in organic systems were the main reason for milk composition differences.

  2. Higher PUFA and n-3 PUFA, conjugated linoleic acid, α-tocopherol and iron, but lower iodine and selenium concentrations in organic milk: a systematic literature review and meta- and redundancy analyses.

    PubMed

    Średnicka-Tober, Dominika; Barański, Marcin; Seal, Chris J; Sanderson, Roy; Benbrook, Charles; Steinshamn, Håvard; Gromadzka-Ostrowska, Joanna; Rembiałkowska, Ewa; Skwarło-Sońta, Krystyna; Eyre, Mick; Cozzi, Giulio; Larsen, Mette Krogh; Jordon, Teresa; Niggli, Urs; Sakowski, Tomasz; Calder, Philip C; Burdge, Graham C; Sotiraki, Smaragda; Stefanakis, Alexandros; Stergiadis, Sokratis; Yolcu, Halil; Chatzidimitriou, Eleni; Butler, Gillian; Stewart, Gavin; Leifert, Carlo

    2016-03-28

    Demand for organic milk is partially driven by consumer perceptions that it is more nutritious. However, there is still considerable uncertainty over whether the use of organic production standards affects milk quality. Here we report results of meta-analyses based on 170 published studies comparing the nutrient content of organic and conventional bovine milk. There were no significant differences in total SFA and MUFA concentrations between organic and conventional milk. However, concentrations of total PUFA and n-3 PUFA were significantly higher in organic milk, by an estimated 7 (95 % CI -1, 15) % and 56 (95 % CI 38, 74) %, respectively. Concentrations of α-linolenic acid (ALA), very long-chain n-3 fatty acids (EPA+DPA+DHA) and conjugated linoleic acid were also significantly higher in organic milk, by an 69 (95 % CI 53, 84) %, 57 (95 % CI 27, 87) % and 41 (95 % CI 14, 68) %, respectively. As there were no significant differences in total n-6 PUFA and linoleic acid (LA) concentrations, the n-6:n-3 and LA:ALA ratios were lower in organic milk, by an estimated 71 (95 % CI -122, -20) % and 93 (95 % CI -116, -70) %. It is concluded that organic bovine milk has a more desirable fatty acid composition than conventional milk. Meta-analyses also showed that organic milk has significantly higher α-tocopherol and Fe, but lower I and Se concentrations. Redundancy analysis of data from a large cross-European milk quality survey indicates that the higher grazing/conserved forage intakes in organic systems were the main reason for milk composition differences. PMID:26878105

  3. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5), and its expression in response to the ratio of linolenic acid to linoleic acid in diets of large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianjiao; Zuo, Rantao; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Ai, Qinghui

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to clone and functionally characterize a full-length cDNA encoding arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5) from large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea) and investigate its gene expression in response to graded dietary ratio of linolenic acid (ALA) to linoleic acid (LNA) (0.03, 0.06, 0.45, 0.90 and 1.51). An isolated 2372bp cDNA clone of Alox5 contained an open reading frame spanning 2025bp encoding a protein with the ability to modify arachidonate acid (AA) to 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic (5-HETE). In the liver, the Alox5 mRNA expression levels significantly increased to the maximum when the dietary ALA/LNA increased from 0.03 to 0.06, and then significantly decreased with dietary ALA/LNA increased to 1.51 (P<0.05). In the kidney, the expression levels of Alox5 of fish fed diets with low dietary ALA/LNA (0.03-0.06) were significantly higher than those of fish fed diets with high dietary ALA/LNA (0.45-1.51) (P<0.05). The dual-luciferase reporter assays showed that the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) could act on cognate cis-acting elements in the promoter of Alox5 and increased the transcription of Alox5. Results of the present study suggested that the expression of Alox5 is higher in croakers fed high concentrations of LNA compared to those fed high concentrations of ALA, which might be regulated by NF-κB and contribute to the inflammation process by catalyzing the dioxygenation of AA. PMID:27378407

  4. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5), and its expression in response to the ratio of linolenic acid to linoleic acid in diets of large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianjiao; Zuo, Rantao; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Ai, Qinghui

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to clone and functionally characterize a full-length cDNA encoding arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5) from large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea) and investigate its gene expression in response to graded dietary ratio of linolenic acid (ALA) to linoleic acid (LNA) (0.03, 0.06, 0.45, 0.90 and 1.51). An isolated 2372bp cDNA clone of Alox5 contained an open reading frame spanning 2025bp encoding a protein with the ability to modify arachidonate acid (AA) to 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic (5-HETE). In the liver, the Alox5 mRNA expression levels significantly increased to the maximum when the dietary ALA/LNA increased from 0.03 to 0.06, and then significantly decreased with dietary ALA/LNA increased to 1.51 (P<0.05). In the kidney, the expression levels of Alox5 of fish fed diets with low dietary ALA/LNA (0.03-0.06) were significantly higher than those of fish fed diets with high dietary ALA/LNA (0.45-1.51) (P<0.05). The dual-luciferase reporter assays showed that the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) could act on cognate cis-acting elements in the promoter of Alox5 and increased the transcription of Alox5. Results of the present study suggested that the expression of Alox5 is higher in croakers fed high concentrations of LNA compared to those fed high concentrations of ALA, which might be regulated by NF-κB and contribute to the inflammation process by catalyzing the dioxygenation of AA.

  5. Palmitic acid (16:0) competes with omega-6 linoleic and omega-3 ɑ-linolenic acids for FADS2 mediated Δ6-desaturation.

    PubMed

    Park, Hui Gyu; Kothapalli, Kumar S D; Park, Woo Jung; DeAllie, Christian; Liu, Lei; Liang, Allison; Lawrence, Peter; Brenna, J Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Sapienic acid, 16:1n-10 is the most abundant unsaturated fatty acid on human skin where its synthesis is mediated by FADS2 in the sebaceous glands. The FADS2 product introduces a double bond at the Δ6, Δ4 and Δ8 positions by acting on at least ten substrates, including 16:0, 18:2n-6, and 18:3n-3. Our aim was to characterize the competition for accessing FADS2 mediated Δ6 desaturation between 16:0 and the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the human diet, 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3, to evaluate whether competition may be relevant in other tissues and thus linked to metabolic abnormalities associated with FADS2 or fatty acid levels. MCF7 cells stably transformed with FADS2 biosynthesize 16:1n-10 from exogenous 16:0 in preference to 16:1n-7, the immediate product of SCD highly expressed in cancer cell lines, and 16:1n-9 via partial β-oxidation of 18:1n-9. Increasing availability of 18:2n-6 or 18:3n-3 resulted in decreased bioconversion of 16:0 to 16:1n-10, simultaneously increasing the levels of highly unsaturated products. FADS2 cells accumulate the desaturation-elongation products 20:3n-6 and 20:4n-3 in preference to the immediate desaturation products 18:3n-6 and 18:4n-3 implying prompt/coupled elongation of the nascent desaturation products. MCF7 cells incorporate newly synthesized 16:1n-10 into phospholipids. These data suggest that excess 16:0 due to, for instance, de novo lipogenesis from high carbohydrate or alcohol consumption, inhibits synthesis of highly unsaturated fatty acids, and may in part explain why supplemental preformed EPA and DHA in some studies improves insulin resistance and other factors related to diabetes and metabolic syndrome aggravated by excess calorie consumption.

  6. Incremental amounts of ground flaxseed decrease milk yield but increase n-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acids in dairy cows fed high-forage diets(1).

    PubMed

    Resende, T L; Kraft, J; Soder, K J; Pereira, A B D; Woitschach, D E; Reis, R B; Brito, A F

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of incremental amounts of ground flaxseed (GFX) on milk yield and concentrations and yields of milk components, milk fatty acids (FA) profile, ruminal metabolism, and nutrient digestibility in dairy cows fed high-forage diets. Twelve multiparous Jersey cows averaging (mean ± SD) 112±68d in milk and 441±21kg of body weight and 8 primiparous Jersey cows averaging 98±43d in milk and 401±43kg of body weight were randomly assigned to treatment sequences in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design. Each period lasted 21d with 14d for diet adaptation and 7d for data and sample collection. Treatments were fed as a total mixed ration (63:37 forage-to-concentrate ratio) with corn meal and soybean meal replaced by incremental levels (i.e., 0, 5, 10, or 15% diet dry matter) of GFX. The ruminal molar proportions of acetate and butyrate decreased linearly with GFX supplementation, whereas the ruminal molar proportion of propionate increased linearly resulting in decreased acetate-to-propionate ratio. Apparent total-tract digestibilities of nutrients either decreased (dry matter) or tended to decrease (organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber) linearly in cows fed GFX. Milk yield decreased linearly in cows fed increasing amounts of GFX, which is explained by the linear reduction in dry matter intake. Except for the concentrations of milk protein and urea N, which decreased linearly with GFX supplementation, no other changes in the concentration of milk components were observed. However, yields of milk protein and fat decreased linearly with GFX supplementation. The linear decrease in the yields of milk fat and protein are explained by reduced milk yield, whereas that in milk urea N is explained by decreased crude protein intake. No treatment effects were observed for plasma urea N and nonesterified fatty acids, serum cortisol, and body weight change. Milk odd- and branched-chain FA and saturated FA

  7. Incremental amounts of ground flaxseed decrease milk yield but increase n-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acids in dairy cows fed high-forage diets(1).

    PubMed

    Resende, T L; Kraft, J; Soder, K J; Pereira, A B D; Woitschach, D E; Reis, R B; Brito, A F

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of incremental amounts of ground flaxseed (GFX) on milk yield and concentrations and yields of milk components, milk fatty acids (FA) profile, ruminal metabolism, and nutrient digestibility in dairy cows fed high-forage diets. Twelve multiparous Jersey cows averaging (mean ± SD) 112±68d in milk and 441±21kg of body weight and 8 primiparous Jersey cows averaging 98±43d in milk and 401±43kg of body weight were randomly assigned to treatment sequences in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design. Each period lasted 21d with 14d for diet adaptation and 7d for data and sample collection. Treatments were fed as a total mixed ration (63:37 forage-to-concentrate ratio) with corn meal and soybean meal replaced by incremental levels (i.e., 0, 5, 10, or 15% diet dry matter) of GFX. The ruminal molar proportions of acetate and butyrate decreased linearly with GFX supplementation, whereas the ruminal molar proportion of propionate increased linearly resulting in decreased acetate-to-propionate ratio. Apparent total-tract digestibilities of nutrients either decreased (dry matter) or tended to decrease (organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber) linearly in cows fed GFX. Milk yield decreased linearly in cows fed increasing amounts of GFX, which is explained by the linear reduction in dry matter intake. Except for the concentrations of milk protein and urea N, which decreased linearly with GFX supplementation, no other changes in the concentration of milk components were observed. However, yields of milk protein and fat decreased linearly with GFX supplementation. The linear decrease in the yields of milk fat and protein are explained by reduced milk yield, whereas that in milk urea N is explained by decreased crude protein intake. No treatment effects were observed for plasma urea N and nonesterified fatty acids, serum cortisol, and body weight change. Milk odd- and branched-chain FA and saturated FA

  8. Effects of previous diet and duration of soybean oil supplementation on light lambs carcass composition, meat quality and fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Bessa, R J B; Lourenço, M; Portugal, P V; Santos-Silva, J

    2008-12-01

    Forty Merino Branco ram lambs were used to study the effects of initial diet and duration of supplementation with a conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) promoting diet, on carcass composition, meat quality and fatty acid composition of intramuscular fat. The experimental period was 6 weeks. The experimental design involved 2 initial diets (commercial concentrate (C); dehydrated lucerne (L)), and 2 finishing periods (2 and 4 weeks) on dehydrated lucerne plus 10% soybean oil (O). Data were analysed as a 2×2 factorial arrangement with initial diet and time on finishing (CLA promoting) diet as the main factors. The lambs were randomly assigned to four groups: CCO; COO; LLO; LOO according to the lamb's diet fed in each period. Lambs initially fed with concentrate showed higher hot carcass weights (11.2 vs 9.6kg) than lambs fed initially with lucerne. The increase of the duration of finishing period reduced the carcass muscle percentage (57.4% vs 55.5%) and increased the subcutaneous fat percentage (5.67% vs 7.03%). Meat colour was affected by initial diet. Lambs initially fed with concentrate showed a lower proportion of CLA (18:2cis-9, trans-11 isomer) (0.98% vs 1.38% of total fatty acids) and most of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids than lambs initially fed with lucerne. Initial diet did not compromise the response to the CLA-promoting diet and the proportion of 18:2cis-9, trans-11 in intramuscular fat increased with the duration of time on the CLA-promoting diet (1.02% vs 1.34% of total fatty acids).

  9. Effect of the feeding system on the fatty acid composition, expression of the Δ9-desaturase, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha, Gamma, and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 genes in the semitendinous muscle of light lambs of the Rasa Aragonesa breed

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) are receiving increasing attention because of their beneficial effects on human health, with milk and meat products derived from ruminants as important sources of CLA in the human diet. SCD gene is responsible for some of the variation in CLA concentration in adipose tissues, and PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 genes are regulator of SCD gene. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the feeding system on fatty acid composition, CLA content and relative gene expression of Δ9-desaturase (SCD), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha, (PPARα) and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (SREBP1) in Rasa Aragonesa light lambs in semitendinous muscle. Forty-four single-born male lambs were used to evaluate the effect of the feeding system, varying on an intensity gradient according to the use of concentrates: 1. grazing alfalfa, 2. grazing alfalfa with a supplement for lambs, 3. indoor lambs with grazing ewes and 4. drylot. Results Both grazing systems resulted in a higher concentration of vaccenic acid (VA), CLA, CLA/VA acid ratio, and a lower oleic content, oleic acid (C18:1)/stearic acid (C18:0) ratio, PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio and SCD expression compared to other diets. In addition feeding system affected the fatty acid composition and SCD expression, possibly due to CLA concentration or the PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio. Both expression of the SCD gene and the feeding system were important factors affecting CLA concentration in the animal's semitendinous muscle. PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 expression seemed to be unaffected by the feeding system. Although no significant results were found, PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 showed similar expression pattern as SCD. Moreover, the correlation results between SCD expression and PPARγ (p < 0.01), as well as SREBP1 (p < 0.01) expression, may suggest that these genes were affecting SCD expression in a different way. Conclusions

  10. Antioxidant activity of olive phenols and other dietary phenols in model gastric conditions: Scavenging of the free radical DPPH and inhibition of the haem-induced peroxidation of linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Achat, Sabiha; Rakotomanomana, Njara; Madani, Khodir; Dangles, Olivier

    2016-12-15

    The antioxidant activity of dietary phenols in humans (direct reduction of radicals and other highly oxidizing species) could be largely restricted to fighting postprandial oxidative stress in the gastric compartment. Hence, the development of chemical tests simply modelling this situation is pertinent. In this work, the antioxidant properties of the olive phenols hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein are investigated in pH 5-6 micellar solutions through the reduction of the DPPH radical and the inhibition of the metmyoglobin-induced peroxidation of linoleic acid. In the first test, hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein proved as efficient as common polyphenols and their reactivity was only moderately affected by β-cyclodextrin and bovine serum albumin, taken as models of food macromolecules. In the second test, hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein by themselves came up as relatively weak inhibitors, despite their efficiency at reducing hypervalent haem iron. However, hydroxytyrosol was able to act in synergy with the typical chain-breaking antioxidant α-tocopherol. PMID:27451164

  11. The Effect of Unsaturated Fatty Acids on Molecular Markers of Cholesterol Homeostasis in THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zavar Reza, Javad; Nahangi, Hossein; Mansouri, Reza; Dehghani, Ali; Mojarrad, Majid; Fathi, Mohammad; Nikzamir, Abdolrahim; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background Macrophages derived foam cells are key factors in the maladaptive immune and inflammatory response. Objectives The study of the cholesterol homeostasis and the molecular factor involved in these cells is very important in understanding the process of atherosclerosis and the mechanisms that prevent its occurrence. Materials and Methods This experimental study investigated the effects of c9, t11-Conjugated Linoleic Acid (c9, t11-CLA). Alpha Linolenic Acid (LA), and Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) on the PPARα and ACAT1 mRNA expression by Real time PCR and cholesterol homeostasis in THP-1 macrophages derived foam cells. Results Incubation of CLA, LA, EPA, and synthetic ligands did not prevent increasing the cellular total cholesterol (TC). Free cholesterol (FC) is increased by Sandoz58-035 (P = 0.024) and decreased by fatty acids and Wy14643 (Pirinixic acid) (P = 0.035). The pattern of distribution of %EC is similar to the EC pattern distribution. The ACAT1 mRNA expression was significantly increased by EPA (P = 0.009), but c9, t11- CLA, LA, Wy14643, and Sandoz58-035 had no significant effect on the mRNA level of ACAT1 expression compared to DMSO(Dimethyl sulfoxide). Discussions In comparison to the control of Wy14643, Sandoz58-035, c9 and t11-CLA, EPA increased the PPARα mRNA levels (P = 0.024, P = 0.041, P = 0.043, and P = 0.004, respectively), even though, LA had no significant effect on the PPARα mRNA expression (P = 0.489). Conclusions Variations in the chemical structure of fatty acids can affect their physiological function. PMID:24396573

  12. The Pathway-Specific Regulator ClaR of Streptomyces clavuligerus Has a Global Effect on the Expression of Genes for Secondary Metabolism and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Burgo, Yolanda; Álvarez-Álvarez, Rubén; Rodríguez-García, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus claR::aph is a claR-defective mutant, but in addition to its claR defect it also carries fewer copies of the resident linear plasmids pSCL2 and pSCL4 (on the order of 4 × 105-fold lower than the wild-type strain), as shown by qPCR. To determine the function of ClaR without potential interference due to plasmid copy number, a new strain, S. clavuligerus ΔclaR::aac, with claR deleted and carrying the wild-type level of plasmids, was constructed. Transcriptomic analyses were performed in S. clavuligerus ΔclaR::aac and S. clavuligerus ATCC 27064 as the control strain. The new ΔclaR mutant did not produce clavulanic acid (CA) and showed a partial expression of genes for the early steps of the CA biosynthesis pathway and a very poor expression (1 to 8%) of the genes for the late steps of the CA pathway. Genes for cephamycin C biosynthesis were weakly upregulated (1.7-fold at 22.5 h of culture) in the ΔclaR mutant, but genes for holomycin biosynthesis were expressed at levels from 3- to 572-fold higher than in the wild-type strain, supporting the observed overproduction of holomycin by S. clavuligerus ΔclaR::aac. Interestingly, three secondary metabolites produced by gene clusters SMCp20, SMCp22, and SMCp24, encoding still-cryptic compounds, had partially or totally downregulated their genes in the mutant, suggesting a regulatory role for ClaR wider than previously reported. In addition, the amfR gene was downregulated, and consequently, the mutant did not produce aerial mycelium. Expression levels of about 100 genes in the genome were partially up- or downregulated in the ΔclaR mutant, many of them related to the upregulation of the sigma factor-encoding rpoE gene. PMID:26187955

  13. Vaccenic acid suppresses intestinal inflammation by increasing anandamide and related N-acylethanolamines in the JCR:LA-cp rat.

    PubMed

    Jacome-Sosa, Miriam; Vacca, Claudia; Mangat, Rabban; Diane, Abdoulaye; Nelson, Randy C; Reaney, Martin J; Shen, Jianheng; Curtis, Jonathan M; Vine, Donna F; Field, Catherine J; Igarashi, Miki; Piomelli, Daniele; Banni, Sebastiano; Proctor, Spencer D

    2016-04-01

    Vaccenic acid (VA), the predominant ruminant-derivedtransfat in the food chain, ameliorates hyperlipidemia, yet mechanisms remain elusive. We investigated whether VA could influence tissue endocannabinoids (ECs) by altering the availability of their biosynthetic precursor, arachidonic acid (AA), in membrane phospholipids (PLs). JCR:LA-cprats were assigned to a control diet with or without VA (1% w/w),cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (1% w/w) or VA+CLA (1% + 0.5% w/w) for 8 weeks. VA reduced the EC, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), in the liver and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) relative to control diet (P< 0.001), but did not change AA in tissue PLs. There was no additive effect of combining VA+CLA on 2-AG relative to VA alone (P> 0.05). Interestingly, VA increased jejunal concentrations of anandamide and those of the noncannabinoid signaling molecules, oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide, relative to control diet (P< 0.05). This was consistent with a lower jejunal protein abundance (but not activity) of their degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase, as well as the mRNA expression of TNFα and interleukin 1β (P< 0.05). The ability of VA to reduce 2-AG in the liver and VAT provides a potential mechanistic explanation to alleviate ectopic lipid accumulation. The opposing regulation of ECs and other noncannabinoid lipid signaling molecules by VA suggests an activation of benefit via the EC system in the intestine.

  14. Dietary influence on the m. longissimus dorsi fatty acid composition of lambs in relation to protein source.

    PubMed

    Turner, T D; Karlsson, L; Mapiye, C; Rolland, D C; Martinsson, K; Dugan, M E R

    2012-08-01

    Dietary lipid effect, as a consequence of protein supplement, on lamb m. longissimus dorsi fatty acid composition was investigated, with emphasis on biohydrogenation intermediates. Crossbred lambs (White Swedish Landrace × Texel) were fed a barley-based diet without (CON) or with protein supplements including peas (PEA), rapeseed cake (RC) or hempseed cake (HC). The HC diet resulted in the highest muscle 22:6n-3 proportion, with the RC diet being similar (P<0.05). Protein supplement did not affect the c9,t11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) proportion, however the HC diet increased some minor CLA isomers, including t10,c12 CLA (P<0.05). The t10-18:1 and total trans-18:1 were lowest for the RC diet (P<0.05), likely relating to rumen conditions and precursor availability. The saturated, monounsaturated and branched-chain fatty acids were largely unaffected by protein supplement. In conclusion, feeding the RC diet lowered the t10-18:1 and total trans-18:1 in meat, and modestly increased 22:6n-3 content. The direction of these changes would be beneficial, making the RC diet the preferred protein supplement; however the magnitude of the changes in the present experiment may not be sufficient to have an impact on human health.

  15. Dietary influence on the m. longissimus dorsi fatty acid composition of lambs in relation to protein source.

    PubMed

    Turner, T D; Karlsson, L; Mapiye, C; Rolland, D C; Martinsson, K; Dugan, M E R

    2012-08-01

    Dietary lipid effect, as a consequence of protein supplement, on lamb m. longissimus dorsi fatty acid composition was investigated, with emphasis on biohydrogenation intermediates. Crossbred lambs (White Swedish Landrace × Texel) were fed a barley-based diet without (CON) or with protein supplements including peas (PEA), rapeseed cake (RC) or hempseed cake (HC). The HC diet resulted in the highest muscle 22:6n-3 proportion, with the RC diet being similar (P<0.05). Protein supplement did not affect the c9,t11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) proportion, however the HC diet increased some minor CLA isomers, including t10,c12 CLA (P<0.05). The t10-18:1 and total trans-18:1 were lowest for the RC diet (P<0.05), likely relating to rumen conditions and precursor availability. The saturated, monounsaturated and branched-chain fatty acids were largely unaffected by protein supplement. In conclusion, feeding the RC diet lowered the t10-18:1 and total trans-18:1 in meat, and modestly increased 22:6n-3 content. The direction of these changes would be beneficial, making the RC diet the preferred protein supplement; however the magnitude of the changes in the present experiment may not be sufficient to have an impact on human health. PMID:22459498

  16. Linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA ameliorates stress-induced depression-related behavior by promoting cell surface 5-HT1A receptor translocation, stimulating serotonin release, and inactivating GSK-3β.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Impairment of serotonergic neurotransmission is the major factor responsible for depression and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) participates in serotonergic transmission-mediated signaling networks relevant to mental illnesses. In the forced-swim test to assess depression-like behavior, the immobility time for mice with restraint stress was significantly longer than that for nonstressed control mice. Postsynaptic cell surface localization of 5-HT1A receptor, but not 5-HT2A receptor, in the hypothalamus for mice with restraint stress was significantly reduced as compared with that for control mice, which highly correlated to prolonged immobility time, i.e., depression-like behavior. The linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) restored restraint stress-induced reduction of cell surface 5-HT1A receptor and improved depression-like behavior in mice with restraint stress. Moreover, DCP-LA stimulated serotonin release from hypothalamic slices and cancelled restraint stress-induced reduction of GSK-3β phosphorylation at Ser9. Taken together, the results of the present study indicate that DCP-LA could ameliorate depression-like behavior by promoting translocation of 5-HT1A receptor to the plasma membrane on postsynaptic cells, stimulating serotonin release, and inactivating GSK-3β.

  17. Effect of dietary inclusion of triticale dried distillers' grain and oilseeds on quality and fatty acid profile of meat from feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    He, M L; McAllister, T A; Hernandez-Calva, L M; Aalhus, J L; Dugan, M E R; McKinnon, J J

    2014-05-01

    This study compared carcass, meat quality and fatty acid profiles of longissimus thoracis (LT) from feedlot cattle fed barley grain with or without oilseed (OS). Six diets containing no oilseed (No-OS), 10% ground flaxseed (FS), 10% high oleate sunflower seeds (SS) with or without 30% triticale dried distiller's grain (DDGS) were prepared. Feeding DDGS increased chroma at 24 and 144 h post mortem. Feeding FS increased weight% of LT PUFA (P<0.05) compared to No-OS or SS. An OS by DDGS interaction occurred for 18:3n-3 (P<0.05) where FS increased weight% of 18:3n-3 (P<0.05), a response accentuated (P<0.05) by DDGS. Feeding DDGS increased weight% of LT 18:2n-6 (P<0.05), but neither OS nor DDGS affected conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, t7,c9 &c9,t11-18:2). Feeding FS increased weight% of n-3 FA, and both FS and SS increased t10-18:1 with no effect on CLA or t11-18:1. Combination feeding of DDGS and FS further increased weight% of n-3 FA and tempered increases in t10-18:1 with no effect on CLA or t11-18:1. The findings suggest a new strategy to increase beef omega-3 fatty acids efficiently through inclusion of a combination of DDGS and FS in feedlot diet.

  18. Effect of dietary inclusion of triticale dried distillers' grain and oilseeds on quality and fatty acid profile of meat from feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    He, M L; McAllister, T A; Hernandez-Calva, L M; Aalhus, J L; Dugan, M E R; McKinnon, J J

    2014-05-01

    This study compared carcass, meat quality and fatty acid profiles of longissimus thoracis (LT) from feedlot cattle fed barley grain with or without oilseed (OS). Six diets containing no oilseed (No-OS), 10% ground flaxseed (FS), 10% high oleate sunflower seeds (SS) with or without 30% triticale dried distiller's grain (DDGS) were prepared. Feeding DDGS increased chroma at 24 and 144 h post mortem. Feeding FS increased weight% of LT PUFA (P<0.05) compared to No-OS or SS. An OS by DDGS interaction occurred for 18:3n-3 (P<0.05) where FS increased weight% of 18:3n-3 (P<0.05), a response accentuated (P<0.05) by DDGS. Feeding DDGS increased weight% of LT 18:2n-6 (P<0.05), but neither OS nor DDGS affected conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, t7,c9 &c9,t11-18:2). Feeding FS increased weight% of n-3 FA, and both FS and SS increased t10-18:1 with no effect on CLA or t11-18:1. Combination feeding of DDGS and FS further increased weight% of n-3 FA and tempered increases in t10-18:1 with no effect on CLA or t11-18:1. The findings suggest a new strategy to increase beef omega-3 fatty acids efficiently through inclusion of a combination of DDGS and FS in feedlot diet. PMID:24530992

  19. Effect of plant oils in the diet on performance and milk fatty acid composition in goats fed diets based on grass hay or maize silage.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Laurence; Shingfield, Kevin J; Rouel, Jacques; Ferlay, Anne; Chilliard, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Based on the potential benefits to long-term human health there is interest in developing sustainable nutritional strategies for reducing saturated and increasing specific unsaturated fatty acids in ruminant milk. The impact of plant oil supplements to diets containing different forages on caprine milk fatty acid composition was examined in two experiments using twenty-seven Alpine goats in replicated 3 x 3 Latin squares with 28 d experimental periods. Treatments comprised of no oil (control) or 130 g/d of sunflower-seed oil (SO) or linseed oil (LO) supplements added to diets based on grass hay (H; experiment 1) or maize silage (M; experiment 2). Milk fat content was enhanced (P<0.01) on HSO, HLO and MLO compared with the corresponding H or M control diets, resulting in 17, 15 and 14% increases in milk fat secretion, respectively. For both experiments, plant oils decreased (P<0.05) milk 10:0-16:0 and odd- and branched-chain fatty acid content and increased 18:0, trans-Delta(6-9,11-14,16)-18:1 (and their corresponding Delta-9 desaturase products), trans-7, trans-9-conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), trans-9, trans-11-CLA and trans-8, cis-10-CLA concentrations. Alterations in the distribution of cis-18:1, trans-18:1, -18:2 and CLA isomers in milk fat were related to plant oil composition and forage in the diet. In conclusion, plant oils represent an effective strategy for altering the fatty acid composition of caprine milk, with evidence that the basal diet is an important determinant of ruminal unsaturated fatty acid metabolism in the goat.

  20. A Rapid Method for Determination of the Main Conjugated Linoleic Acid Precursors (C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3) in Forage by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis with Ultraviolet Detection Using Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detection as a Comparative Method.

    PubMed

    de Jesus Coelho Castro, Renata; Sobrinho, Fausto Souza; Sundfeld da Gama, Marco Antônio; Takabayashi Sato, Renata; Lavorato Lima, Larissa; Leal de Oliveira, Marcone Augusto

    2015-01-01

    A rapid method has been proposed for determination of the main conjugated linoleic acid precursors such as linoleic (C18:2 n-6) and linolenic (C18:3 n-3) acids in forages by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with direct UV detection at 200 nm. Among the fatty acids found in forages, C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 have received particular attention due to their roles as precursors for the synthesis of conjugated linoleic acid, a class of health-enhancing compounds that is predominantly found in dairy products. The electrolyte background consisted of 12.0 mmol/L tetraborate buffer (pH 9.2) added to 12.0 mmol/L Brij 35®, 17% acetonitrile, and 33% methanol. Under the optimized conditions, the baseline separation of C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 was achieved within 4 min. The CZE-UV method was compared to GC with a flame ionization detector, which is the American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS 996.06) official method for fatty acid analysis. The methods did not show any evidence of significant differences within 95% confidence interval (P>0.05). The CZE-UV method was successfully applied to the analysis of 80 genotypes of Brachiaria ruzizienses clones submitted to a genetic improvement program in agricultural research. PMID:26651572

  1. Effect of functional buffalo cheese on fatty acid profile and oxidative status of liver and intestine of mice.

    PubMed

    Van Nieuwenhove, Carina P; Cano, Paola Gauffin; Pérez-Chaia, Adriana B; González, Silvia N

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of administration of buffalo dairy products on lipid content and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) incorporation on liver and intestine of mice. Buffalo cheeses were selected according to nutritional properties and CLA content. Cheeses were previously manufactured using as adjunct culture bacteria with probiotic or technological properties. BALB/c mice were fed for 28 days, and then a single dose of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) as oxidant agent was administered before the influence of diet and DMH on antioxidant status in tissues was evaluated. Mice fed buffalo cheese showed the highest body weight gain (P < .05). Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content in foods was very different, but total PUFA incorporation was similar in mouse tissues. CLA was only detected in fat tissues of mice fed dairy products, with cis-9, trans-11 being the major isomer. A higher linolenic (C(18:3)) acid content was found in tissues of mice fed commercial diet (control group), and it was partially replaced by CLA in groups receiving buffalo milk or cheese. Lipoperoxides (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) were higher in tissues of the control group with or without DMH administration, and DMH had a cytotoxic effect on colon cells (P < .05). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities in liver and intestine were similar among animals, with a slight increase of SOD detected after DMH treatment. Consumption of buffalo dairy products did not affect the oxidative status of mice tissues even after DMH application. In the present study, a protective effect of buffalo cheese and milk on intestine cells was determined. PMID:21370968

  2. Linoleate impairs collagen synthesis in primary cultures of avian chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Watkins, B A; Xu, H; Turek, J J

    1996-06-01

    The effects of supplemental fatty acids, vitamin E (VIT E), and iron-induced oxidative stress on collagen synthesis, cellular injury, and lipid peroxidation were evaluated in primary cultures of avian epiphyseal chondrocytes. The treatments included oleic and linoleic acids (O or 50 microM) complexed with BSA and dl-alpha-tocopheryl acetate (VIT E at 0 or 100 microM). After 14 days of preculture, the chondrocytes were enriched with fatty acids for 8 days then cultured with VIT E for 2 days. The chondrocytes were then treated with ferrous sulfate (O or 20 microM) for 24 hr to induce oxidative stress. Collagen synthesis was the lowest and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was the highest in chondrocyte cultures treated with 50 microM linoleic acid and 0 VIT E. In contrast, VIT E supplemented at 100 microM partially restored collagen synthesis in the chondrocytes enriched with linoleic acid and lowered LDH activity in the media. The iron oxidative inducer significantly increased the values of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) in the culture medium. The data showed that linoleic acid impaired chondrocyte cell function and caused cellular injury but that VIT E reversed these effects. Results from a previous study demonstrated that VIT E stimulated bone formation in chicks fed unsaturated fat, and the present findings in cultures of epiphyseal chondrocytes suggest that VIT E is important for chondrocyte function in the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids. VIT E appears to be beneficial for growth cartilage biology and in optimizing bone growth.

  3. The fatty acid composition of muscle and adipose tissue of steers offered unwilted or wilted grass silage supplemented with sunflower oil and fishoil.

    PubMed

    Noci, F; Monahan, F J; Scollan, N D; Moloney, A P

    2007-03-01

    The effects of the type of grass silage and dietary inclusion of fish oil (FO) on the fatty acid profile of bovine intramuscular and subcutaneous adipose tissue were investigated. Eighty Friesian steers were assigned (n 10) to unwilted or wilted silage, and to one of four rations which contained, per kg, 80 g of sunflower oil and either 0, 10, 20 or 40 g of FO replacing lard. Animals were slaughtered after 108 d and the fatty acid profile of the neutral, polar and total lipid fractions of the M. longissimus dorsi, and the total lipid fraction of the subcutaneous adipose tissue were determined. Wilting of grass prior to ensiling increased the concentration of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in intramuscular total lipid (P<0 x 01), but did not affect the n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio. Increasing FO supply linearly increased (P<0 x 05) the concentration of the cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 isomers of CLA and trans-11 18 : 1 predominantly in the neutral lipid fraction of intramuscular total lipid, and linearly decreased the n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio. Wilting of grass prior to ensiling increased the concentration of CLA in subcutaneous adipose tissue (P<0 x 001), while increasing FO supply linearly increased the concentration of cis-9, trans-11 CLA. From a human nutrition perspective, increasing the level of FO in the ration or wilting of grass prior to ensiling appear to modify the fatty acid composition of beef muscle favourably. However, the health implications of associated increases in trans fatty acids remain to be elucidated.

  4. Influence of in vitro supplementation with lipids from conventional and Alpine milk on fatty acid distribution and cell growth of HT-29 cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To date, the influence of milk and dairy products on carcinogenesis remains controversial. However, lipids of ruminant origin such as conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are known to exhibit beneficial effects in vitro and in vivo. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of milk lipids of different origin and varying quality presenting as free fatty acid (FFA) solutions on cellular fatty acid distribution, cellular viability, and growth of human colon adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29). Methods FAME of conventional and Alpine milk lipids (MLcon, MLalp) and cells treated with FFA derivatives of milk lipids were analyzed by means of GC-FID and Ag+-HPLC. Cellular viability and growth of the cells were determined by means of CellTiter-Blue®-assay and DAPI-assay (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride), respectively. Results Supplementation with milk lipids significantly decreased viability and growth of HT-29 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MLalp showed a lower SFA/MUFA ratio, a 8 fold increased CLA content, and different CLA profile compared to MLcon but did not demonstrate additional growth-inhibitory effects. In addition, total concentration and fatty acid distribution of cellular lipids were altered. In particular, treatment of the cells yielded highest amounts of two types of milk specific major fatty acids (μg FA/mg cellular protein) after 8 h of incubation compared to 24 h; 200 μM of MLcon (C16:0, 206 ± 43), 200 μM of MLalp (C18:1 c9, (223 ± 19). Vaccenic acid (C18:1 t11) contained in milk lipids was converted to c9,t11-CLA in HT-29 cells. Notably, the ratio of t11,c13-CLA/t7,c9-CLA, a criterion for pasture feeding of the cows, was significantly changed after incubation for 8 h with lipids from MLalp (3.6 - 4.8), compared to lipids from MLcon (0.3 - 0.6). Conclusions Natural lipids from conventional and Alpine milk showed similar growth inhibitory effects. However, different changes in cellular lipid composition

  5. Effects of acerola fruit extract on sensory and shelf-life of salted beef patties from grinds differing in fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Realini, C E; Guàrdia, M D; Díaz, I; García-Regueiro, J A; Arnau, J

    2015-01-01

    The effects of added acerola fruit extract on sensory and shelf-life of beef patties were evaluated. Ground beef was obtained from young bulls fed one of four diets (CON: control, LIN: linseed, CLA: conjugated linoleic acid, LINCLA: LIN plus CLA). Pre-salted (1.8% w/w) beef patties (7.7% fat) with (0.15% w/w) or without acerola were packed in modified atmosphere (80%O2:20%CO2) and displayed in a retail case for 8days. There were no interactions between diet and antioxidant treatments. LIN and/or CLA had no effect on color and lipid stability during display. However, LIN increased n-3 fatty acids in beef and tended to increase intensity of rancid flavor. Addition of acerola extended shelf-life by at least 3 days by improving color and lipid stability and a decreased trend in intensity of rancid flavor of patties without affecting microbial counts. Thus, the use of acerola as a natural antioxidant can be considered an effective method to retard color and lipid oxidation in beef patties.

  6. Minor iridoids from Scutellaria albida ssp. albida. Inhibitory potencies on lipoxygenase, linoleic acid lipid peroxidation and antioxidant activity of iridoids from Scutellaria sp.

    PubMed

    Gousiadou, Chrysoula; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H; Matsa, Marina; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra; Skaltsa, Helen

    2013-08-01

    A new iridoid glycoside, 6'-O-E-caffeoyl-mussaenosidic acid , in addition to one known aglycon, four known triterpenes and one known flavonoid, were isolated from the aerial parts of Scutellaria albida subsp. albida. Furthermore, 12 iridoids with similar structures isolated from Scutellaria sp., were examined for their inhibitory potency on lipoxygenase and lipid peroxidation, as well as their antioxidant activity, in comparison to known antioxidants e.g. caffeic acid, nordihydroguaretic acid (NDGA) and trolox. AAPH, DPPH and soybean lipoxygenase (LOX) assays were used for the tests. This investigation led to interesting observations considering the Structure-Activity Relationship. According to our results, the presence of a p-coumaroyl group optimized and even dramatically changed the biological responses of the investigated iridoids.

  7. Changes in fatty acid composition of various full fat crushed oilseeds and their free oils when incubated with rumen liquor in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Achim; Steingass, Herbert; Schollenberger, Margit; Jara, Helga Terry; Hartung, Karin; Weiss, Eva; Mosenthin, Rainer

    2013-02-01

    The fatty acid pattern of dietary lipids can be modified during rumen biohydrogenation (BH). The objective of the present study was to assess changes in the FA pattern of different oilseed products supplied either as crushed full fat oilseed or as free oil after in vitro incubation with buffered rumen liquor. The FA patterns were determined at the beginning and compared with those measured after 24 h of incubation. The contents of fatty acids (FA) < C18 increased (p < 0.05) in nearly all treatments, eventually due to microbial de novo synthesis and fermentation of carbohydrates and proteins during incubation. In contrast, the contents of the dominating C18 FA, (oleic acid - C18:1c9, linoleic acid - C18:2c9,12, linolenic acid - C18:3c9,12,15) were reduced due to BH, resulting in the accumulation of characteristic BH intermediates, such as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomer C18:2c9t11 (rumenic acid). However, both for crushed full fat oilseeds and their free oils the process of BH was not completed at the end of incubation. The disappearance was highest for C18:3c9,12,15, followed by C18:2c9,12 and C18:1c9. The rate of BH of unsaturated FA was higher in the crushed form compared to the oil form. Higher amounts of BH intermediates accumulated in the crushed form. Obviously, the physical form affects the degree of BH in vitro. The current results suggest that feeding crushed full fat seeds instead of their free oils to dairy cows might stimulate the formation of beneficial BH intermediates such as CLA in the rumen.

  8. Fatty Acid Profiles and Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase Gene Expression in Longissimus dorsi Muscle of Growing Lambs Influenced by Addition of Tea Saponins and Soybean Oil

    PubMed Central

    Mao, H. L.; Wang, J. K.; Lin, J.; Liu, J. X.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary addition of tea saponins (TS) and soybean oil (SO) on fatty acid profile and gene expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of growing lambs. Thirty-two Huzhou lambs were assigned to four dietary treatments in a 2×2 factorial arrangement with main effects of TS (0 or 3 g/d) and SO (0 or 30 g/kg of diet DM). The diet without additives was considered as NTNS (no TS or SO). After a feeding trial for 60 d, four lambs of each treatment were slaughtered to collect the samples of LD muscle. Percentage of trans-11 vaccenic acid was enhanced (p<0.05) in muscle of lambs fed TS and SO. The proportion of total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was increased (p<0.05) by SO, but decreased (p<0.05) by TS in LD muscle. The percentage of total saturated fatty acids in muscle was decreased (p<0.05) by addition of TS and SO, while addition of SO increased (p<0.05) the percentage of total polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ratio of cis-9, trans-11 CLA to tran-11 vaccenic acid was decreased (p<0.05) by TS, but increased (p<0.05) by SO. The same effects were observed in SCD mRNA expression. From these results it is indicated that including TS and SO in the diet of growing lambs affect the fatty acid profiles of LD muscle and that the proportion of cis-9, trans-11 CLA in the muscle influenced by TS and SO may be related to the SCD gene expression. PMID:25049609

  9. Effects of rapeseed and soybean oil dietary supplementation on bovine fat metabolism, fatty acid composition and cholesterol levels in milk.

    PubMed

    Altenhofer, Christian; Spornraft, Melanie; Kienberger, Hermine; Rychlik, Michael; Herrmann, Julia; Meyer, Heinrich H D; Viturro, Enrique

    2014-02-01

    The main goal of this experiment was to study the effect of milk fat depression, induced by supplementing diet with plant oils, on the bovine fat metabolism, with special interest in cholesterol levels. For this purpose 39 cows were divided in three groups and fed different rations: a control group (C) without any oil supplementation and two groups with soybean oil (SO) or rapeseed oil (RO) added to the partial mixed ration (PMR). A decrease in milk fat percentage was observed in both oil feedings with a higher decrease of -1·14 % with SO than RO with -0·98 % compared with the physiological (-0·15 %) decline in the C group. There was no significant change in protein and lactose yield. The daily milk cholesterol yield was lower in both oil rations than in control ration, while the blood cholesterol level showed an opposite variation. The milk fatty acid pattern showed a highly significant decrease of over 10 % in the amount of saturated fatty acids (SFA) in both oil feedings and a highly significant increase in mono (MUFA) and poly (PUFA) unsaturated fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) included. The results of this experiment suggest that the feeding of oil supplements has a high impact on milk fat composition and its significance for human health, by decreasing fats with a potentially negative effect (SFA and cholesterol) while simultaneously increasing others with positive (MUFA, PUFA, CLA).

  10. Supplementation with CLA: isomer incorporation into serum lipids and effect on body fat of women.

    PubMed

    Petridou, Anatoli; Mougios, Vassilis; Sagredos, Angelos

    2003-08-01

    Animal studies have suggested that CLA, a natural component of meat and dairy products, may confer beneficial effects on health. However, human studies using supplementation with CLA have produced contradictory results. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the effect of CLA supplementation on human body fat, serum leptin, and serum lipids, as well as the incorporation of CLA isomers into serum lipids classes. Sixteen young healthy nonobese sedentary women received 2.1 g of CLA (divided equally between the cis,trans-9,11 and trans,cis-10,12 isomers) daily for 45 d and placebo for 45 d in a randomized double-blind crossover design. Body fat was estimated (by measurement of skinfold thickness at 10 sites), and blood was sampled at the beginning, middle, and end of the entire intervention period; an additional blood sample was obtained 2 wk thereafter. No significant differences in energy, carbohydrate, lipid, or protein intake existed between the CLA and placebo intake periods. No significant differences were found in body fat or serum leptin, TAG, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and alanine aminotransferase between CLA and placebo. The CLA isomer content of serum TAG, phospholipids, and total lipids increased 2-5 times with CLA supplementation (P < 0.05). In contrast, the CLA content of cholesteryl esters did not change significantly. The period of 2 wk after the end of CLA supplementation was sufficient for its washout from serum lipids. These data indicate that supplementation with 2.1 g of CLA daily for 45 d increased its levels in blood but had no effect on body composition or the lipidemic profile of nonobese women.

  11. Characterization of Linoleate 10-Hydratase of Lactobacillus plantarum and Novel Antifungal Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan Y.; Liang, Nuan Y.; Curtis, Jonathan M.; Gänzle, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli convert linoleic acid to the antifungal compound 10-hydroxy-12-octadecenoic acid (10-HOE) by linoleate 10-hydratase (10-LAH). However, the effect of this conversion on cellular membrane physiology and properties of the cell surface have not been demonstrated. Moreover, Lactobacillus plantarum produces 13-hydroxy-9-octadecenoic acid (13-HOE) in addition to 10-HOE, but the antifungal activity of 13-HOE was unknown. Phylogenetic analyses conducted in this study did not differentiate between 10-LAH and linoleate 13-hydratase (13-LAH). Thus, linoleate hydratases (LAHs) must be characterized through their differences in their activities of linoleate conversion. Four genes encoding putative LAHs from lactobacilli were cloned, heterologous expressed, purified and identified as FAD-dependent 10-LAH. The unsaturated fatty acid substrates stimulated the growth of lactobacilli. We also investigated the role of 10-LAH in ethanol tolerance, membrane fluidity and hydrophobicity of cell surfaces in lactobacilli by disruption of lah. Compared with the L. plantarum lah deficient strain, 10-LAH in wild-type strain did not exert effect on cell surviv