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Sample records for linseed oil

  1. 40 CFR 180.1056 - Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Boiled linseed oil; exemption from... From Tolerances § 180.1056 Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance. Boiled linseed... “boiled linseed oil.” This exemption is limited to use on rice before edible parts form....

  2. 40 CFR 180.1056 - Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boiled linseed oil; exemption from... From Tolerances § 180.1056 Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance. Boiled linseed... “boiled linseed oil.” This exemption is limited to use on rice before edible parts form....

  3. 40 CFR 180.1056 - Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boiled linseed oil; exemption from... From Tolerances § 180.1056 Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance. Boiled linseed... “boiled linseed oil.” This exemption is limited to use on rice before edible parts form....

  4. 40 CFR 180.1056 - Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Boiled linseed oil; exemption from... From Tolerances § 180.1056 Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance. Boiled linseed... “boiled linseed oil.” This exemption is limited to use on rice before edible parts form....

  5. 40 CFR 180.1056 - Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Boiled linseed oil; exemption from... From Tolerances § 180.1056 Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance. Boiled linseed... “boiled linseed oil.” This exemption is limited to use on rice before edible parts form....

  6. Methane output and diet digestibility in response to feeding dairy cows crude linseed, extruded linseed, or linseed oil.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Rouel, J; Jouany, J P; Doreau, M; Chilliard, Y

    2008-10-01

    This experiment studied the effect of 3 forms of presentation of linseed fatty acids (FA) on methane output using the sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique, total tract digestibility, and performance of dairy cows. Eight multiparous lactating Holstein cows (initial milk yield 23.4 +/- 2.2 kg/d) were assigned to 4 dietary treatments in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design: a control diet (C) consisting of corn silage (59%), grass hay (6%), and concentrate (35%) and the same diet with crude linseed (CLS), extruded linseed (ELS), or linseed oil (LSO) at the same FA level (5.7% of dietary DM). Each experimental period lasted 4 wk. All the forms of linseed FA significantly decreased daily CH(4) emissions (P < 0.001) but to different extents (-12% with CLS, -38% with ELS, -64% with LSO) compared with C. The same ranking among diets was observed for CH(4) output expressed as a percentage of energy intake (P < 0.001) or in grams per kilogram of OM intake (P < 0.001). Methane production per unit of digested NDF was similar for C, CLS, and ELS but was less for LSO (138 vs. 68 g/kg of digested NDF, respectively; P < 0.001). Measured as grams per kilogram of milk or fat-corrected milk yield, methane emission was similar for C and CLS and was less for ELS and LSO (P < 0.001), LSO being less than ELS (P < 0.01). Total tract NDF digestibility was significantly less (P < 0.001) for the 3 supplemented diets than for C (-6.8% on average; P < 0.001). Starch digestibility was similar for all diets (mean 93.5%). Compared with C, DMI was not modified with CLS (P > 0.05) but was decreased with ELS and LSO (-3.1 and -5.1 kg/d, respectively; P < 0.001). Milk yield and milk fat content were similar for LSO and ELS but less than for C and CLS (19.9 vs. 22.3 kg/d and 33.8 vs. 43.2 g/kg, on average, respectively; P < 0.01 and P < 0.001). Linseed FA offer a promising dietary means to depress ruminal methanogenesis. The form of presentation of linseed FA greatly influences methane output from

  7. Development of karanja oil based offset printing ink in comparison with linseed oil.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Moumita; Roy, Ananda Sankar; Ghosh, Santinath; Dey, Munmun

    2011-01-01

    The conventional offset lithographic printing ink is mainly based on linseed oil. But in recent years, due to stiff competition from synthetic substitutes mainly from petroleum products, the crop production shrinks down to an unsustainable level, which increases the price of linseed oil. Though soyabean oil has replaced a major portion of linseed oil, it is also necessary to develop alternate cost effective vegetable oils for printing ink industry. The present study aims to evaluate the performance of karanja oil (Pongamia glabra) as an alternative of linseed oil in the formulation of offset printing ink because karanja oil is easily available in rural India. Physical properties of raw karanja oil are measured and compared with that of alkali refined linseed oil. Rosin modified phenolic resin based varnishes were made with linseed oil as well as with karanja oil and their properties are compared. Sheetfed offset inks of process colour yellow and cyan is chosen to evaluate the effect of karanja oil in ink properties. In conclusion, karanja oil can be accepted as an alternate vegetable oil source with its noticeable effect on print and post print properties with slower drying time on paper. However, the colour and odour of the oil will restrict its usage on offset inks.

  8. Effects of chemically or technologically treated linseed products and docosahexaenoic acid addition to linseed oil on biohydrogenation of C18:3n-3 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sterk, A; Hovenier, R; Vlaeminck, B; van Vuuren, A M; Hendriks, W H; Dijkstra, J

    2010-11-01

    Rumen biohydrogenation kinetics of C18:3n-3 from several chemically or technologically treated linseed products and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3) addition to linseed oil were evaluated in vitro. Linseed products evaluated were linseed oil, crushed linseed, formaldehyde treated crushed linseed, sodium hydroxide/formaldehyde treated crushed linseed, extruded whole linseed (2 processing variants), extruded crushed linseed (2 processing variants), micronized crushed linseed, commercially available extruded linseed, lipid encapsulated linseed oil, and DHA addition to linseed oil. Each product was incubated with rumen liquid using equal amounts of supplemented C18:3n-3 and fermentable substrate (freeze-dried total mixed ration) for 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24h using a batch culture technique. Disappearance of C18:3n-3 was measured to estimate the fractional biohydrogenation rate and lag time according to an exponential model and to calculate effective biohydrogenation of C18:3n-3, assuming a fractional passage rate of 0.060/h. Treatments showed no differences in rumen fermentation parameters, including gas production rate and volatile fatty acid concentration. Technological pretreatment (crushing) followed by chemical treatment applied as formaldehyde of linseed resulted in effective protection of C18:3n-3 against biohydrogenation. Additional chemical pretreatment (sodium hydroxide) before applying formaldehyde treatment did not further improve the effectiveness of protection. Extrusion of whole linseed compared with extrusion of crushed linseed was effective in reducing C18:3n-3 biohydrogenation, whereas the processing variants were not different in C18:3n-3 biohydrogenation. Crushed linseed, micronized crushed linseed, lipid encapsulated linseed oil, and DHA addition to linseed oil did not reduce C18:3n-3 biohydrogenation. Compared with the other treatments, docosahexaenoic acid addition to linseed oil resulted in a comparable trans11,cis15-C18

  9. Effects of linseed oil and palm oil on growth performance, tibia fatty acid and biomarkers of bone metabolism in broilers.

    PubMed

    Zhong, X; Gao, S; Wang, J J; Dong, L; Huang, J; Zhang, L L; Wang, T

    2014-01-01

    1. This study was conducted to determine the effects of different dietary fat sources on growth performance, tibia fatty acids and biomarkers of bone metabolism in broilers. 2. One-d-old commercial Arbor Acres broilers were fed with a maize-soya bean basal diet for 42 d, supplemented with oils according to the following 5 treatments: lard (lard group); linseed oil (linseed oil group); palm oil (palm oil group); linseed oil + palm oil (60:40 or 40:60 w/w, LP-1 group and LP-2 group, respectively). 3. No significant differences in weight gain, feed intake and gain/feed ratio were observed between the lard and linseed oil groups. Birds fed on palm oil had significantly greater weight gain and feed intake than those fed on lard or linseed oil. Growth performance in LP-1 and LP-2 was significantly greater than that of single-oil groups. 4. Tibia growth and bone characteristics were not influenced by supplementation with lard, linseed oil, or palm oil alone, but broilers fed on a mixture of fats had significantly greater tibia weight and length compared to broilers fed on linseed oil. Bone mineral density in tibia was significantly increased in LP-1 and LP-2 groups. 5. Supplementation of linseed oil alone or in combination with palm oil enhanced apparent digestibility of calcium, reduced serum calcium and increased tibia calcium concentrations. Moreover, supplementation with linseed oil alone or in combination with palm oil had a positive effect on biomarkers of bone growth. 6. The combination of linseed and palm oils was beneficial for growth performance, tibia growth and biomarkers of bone metabolism.

  10. Additive effect of linseed oil supplementation on the lipid profiles of older adults.

    PubMed

    Avelino, Ana Paula A; Oliveira, Gláucia M M; Ferreira, Célia C D; Luiz, Ronir R; Rosa, Glorimar

    2015-01-01

    Linseed oil has been investigated as a rich source of n-3 series polyunsaturated fatty acids, which mainly produce a non-atherogenic lipid profile. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of linseed oil supplementation associated with nutritional guidelines on the lipid profiles of older adults, according to the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with 110 older adults randomized in two groups: placebo and linseed oil. The linseed oil group received supplementation with 3 g of linseed oil. Both groups received nutritional guidance and were supplemented for 90 days with monthly blood collection for biochemical analysis. The dietary intake of saturated fat was subdivided into low (<7% SFA/day of the total energy value) and high consumption groups (>7% SFA/day of the total energy value). Low SFA (<7% SFA/day of total energy value) consumption was associated with lower total cholesterol concentrations. However, we observed that the linseed oil group, including older adults who consumed >7% SFA/day, had a greater reduction in total cholesterol than the placebo group (P=0.020). The same was observed for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P<0.050), suggesting an additive effect of linseed oil and diet. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations were increased significantly in only the linseed group, suggesting that the nutritional intervention alone did not improve HDL cholesterol. The results suggest that the nutritional intervention was effective, but linseed oil showed notable effects by increasing the HDL cholesterol concentration. In addition, consumption of <7% SFA/day of the total energy value increased the effect of linseed oil, demonstrating the importance of reducing the consumption of saturated fat.

  11. Additive effect of linseed oil supplementation on the lipid profiles of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Avelino, Ana Paula A; Oliveira, Gláucia MM; Ferreira, Célia CD; Luiz, Ronir R; Rosa, Glorimar

    2015-01-01

    Background Linseed oil has been investigated as a rich source of n-3 series polyunsaturated fatty acids, which mainly produce a non-atherogenic lipid profile. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of linseed oil supplementation associated with nutritional guidelines on the lipid profiles of older adults, according to the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Methods We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with 110 older adults randomized in two groups: placebo and linseed oil. The linseed oil group received supplementation with 3 g of linseed oil. Both groups received nutritional guidance and were supplemented for 90 days with monthly blood collection for biochemical analysis. The dietary intake of saturated fat was subdivided into low (<7% SFA/day of the total energy value) and high consumption groups (>7% SFA/day of the total energy value). Results Low SFA (<7% SFA/day of total energy value) consumption was associated with lower total cholesterol concentrations. However, we observed that the linseed oil group, including older adults who consumed >7% SFA/day, had a greater reduction in total cholesterol than the placebo group (P=0.020). The same was observed for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P<0.050), suggesting an additive effect of linseed oil and diet. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations were increased significantly in only the linseed group, suggesting that the nutritional intervention alone did not improve HDL cholesterol. Conclusion The results suggest that the nutritional intervention was effective, but linseed oil showed notable effects by increasing the HDL cholesterol concentration. In addition, consumption of <7% SFA/day of the total energy value increased the effect of linseed oil, demonstrating the importance of reducing the consumption of saturated fat. PMID:26543357

  12. [Inhibition of Linseed Oil Autooxidation by Essential Oils and Extracts from Spice Plants].

    PubMed

    Misharina, T A; Alinkina, E S; Terenina, M B; Krikunova, N I; Kiseleva, V I; Medvedeva, I B; Semenova, M G

    2015-01-01

    Clove bud essential oil, extracts from ginger, pimento and black pepper, or ascorbyl palmytate were studied as natural antioxidants for the inhibition of autooxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in linseed oil. Different methods were used to estimate antioxidant efficiency. These methods are based on the following parameters: peroxide values; peroxide concentration; content of degradation products of unsaturated fatty acid peroxides, which acted with thiobarbituric acid; diene conjugate content; the content of volatile compounds that formed as products of unsaturated fatty acid peroxide degradation; and the composition of methyl esters of fatty acids in samples of oxidized linseed oil.

  13. Rate Capability of Doped Linseed Oil coated Bakelite RPCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Zarah

    2009-10-01

    Bakelite Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are used as muon trigger detectors for the PHENIX experiment at RHIC and the CMS and ATLAS experiments at LHC. These muon trigger RPCs are gas detectors in which high voltage is applied across two Bakelite plates spaced 2 mm apart. The detector gas is 95% R134-a, 4.5% isobutene and 0.5 % SF6 The rate capability of Bakelite RPCs is limited by the time it takes to re-store the initial charge distribution on the dielectric plates after the ionization charge from an avalanche has been collected on the plates. The rate capability depends on the bulk and surface resistivity of the Bakelite plates and its coating. We have doped the linseed oil coating used in the PHENIX RPCs to lower the surface resistivity of the coated Bakelite plate. The rate capability of the modified RPCs was studied using measurements of the RPC detection efficiencies for cosmic rays in presence of high rate backgrounds from two Fe55 radioactive sources. We will present methods for the production of doped linseed oil coats and discuss status and results from rate capability measurements.

  14. Synthesis of urethane acrylates modified by linseed oil and study on EBC coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuecheng, Ju; Hongfei, Ha; Bo, Jiang; Yong, Zhou

    1999-11-01

    In this paper, five different structural urethane acrylates modified by linseed oil were synthesized and then properties of their electron beam cured (EBC) coatings, i.e., adhesion, gloss, flexibility, impact resistance, hardness, tensile strength and elongation were studied. It was shown that these synthesizing conditions of urethane acrylates modified by linseed oil were temperate. Effect of structure of urethane acrylates modified by linseed oil on these properties of their EBC coatings was obvious, except gloss. According to synthetical properties of EBC coatings, the optimum oligomer among these was No. A, whose main chains were formed by hexane diacid, average functionality was 2, and oil content was 25.5%. With increasing of absorbed doses, these properties of EBC coatings, except gloss, changed correspondingly. It was advisable that absorbed dose wasn't greater than 180 kGy. At higher absorbed doses, cobaltous naphthenate had obvious effect on these properties of EBC coatings, whose oil content of linseed oil was rather high.

  15. Lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of linseed oil: optimization using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Sun, Shangde; Liang, Shaohua; Peng, Le; Wang, Yadong; Shen, Mi

    2014-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of linseed oil was investigated. Four commercially available microbial lipases of Lipase AY, Lipozyme RMIM, Lipozyme TLIM, and Novozym 435 were used. Among these tested lipases, Lipase AY exhibited the best hydrolysis effeciency to linseed oil. The effect of reaction variables was also evaluated and optimized using response surface methodology. A second-order regression for the Box-Behken design was used to study the effect of five independent variables, such as, temperature, pH, oil-aqueous phase ratio, enzyme load, and reaction time, on the hydrolysis of linseed oil. The optimal conditions were as follows: temperature 33°C, pH 5.80, oil-aqueous phase ratio 0.90 (w/w), enzyme load 1.20% (relative to the weight of total substrates), and reaction time 3.33 h. Under these conditions, the hydrolysis ratio of linseed oil was 93.92±0.54%.

  16. Effects of Maternal Linseed Oil Supplementation on Metabolic Parameters in Cafeteria Diet-induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Benaissa, Nawel; Merzouk, Hafida; Merzouk, Sid Ahmed; Narce, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Because linseed oil may influence maternal and fetal metabolisms, we investigated its role in the modulation of lipid metabolism in cafeteria diet-induced obese rats and their offspring. Female Wistar rats were fed control or cafeteria food, which were either supplemented or not supplemented with linseed oil (5%) for 1 month before and during gestation. At parturition, serum and tissue lipids and enzyme activities were analyzed. Cafeteria diet induced adverse metabolic alterations in both mothers and offspring. Linseed oil improved metabolic status. In conclusion, linseed oil displayed health benefits by modulating tissue enzyme activities in both obese mothers and their newborns. Copyright © 2015 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of linseed oil or whole linseed supplementation on performance and milk Fatty Acid composition of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Suksombat, Wisitiporn; Thanh, Lam Phuoc; Meeprom, Chayapol; Mirattanaphrai, Rattakorn

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of linseed oil or whole linseed supplementation on performance and milk fatty acid composition of lactating dairy cows. Thirty six Holstein Friesian crossbred lactating dairy cows were blocked by milking days first and then stratified random balanced for milk yields and body weight into three groups of 12 cows each. The treatments consisted of basal ration (53:47; forage:concentrate ratio, on a dry matter [DM] basis, respectively) supplemented with 300 g/d of palm oil as a positive control diet (PO), or supplemented with 300 g/d of linseed oil (LSO), or supplemented with 688 g/d of top-dressed whole linseed (WLS). All cows were received ad libitum grass silage and individually fed according to the treatments. The experiment lasted for 10 weeks including the first 2 weeks as the adjustment period, followed by 8 weeks of measurement period. The results showed that LSO and WLS supplementation had no effects on total dry matter intake, milk yield, milk composition, and live weight change; however, the animals fed WLS had higher crude protein (CP) intake than those fed PO and LSO (p<0.05). To compare with the control diet, dairy cow's diets supplemented with LSO and WLS significantly increased milk concentrations of cis-9, trans-11-conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (p<0.05) and n-3 fatty acids (FA) (p<0.01), particularly, cis-9,12,15-C18:3, C20:5n-3 and C22:6n-3. Supplementing LSO and WLS induced a reduction of medium chain FA, especially, C12:0-C16:0 FA (p<0.05) while increasing the concentration of milk unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) (p<0.05). Milk FA proportions of n-3 FA remarkably increased whereas the ratio of n-6 to n-3 decreased in the cows supplemented with WLS as compared with those fed the control diet and LSO (p<0.01). In conclusion, supplementing dairy cows' diet based on grass silage with WLS had no effect on milk yield and milk composition; however, trans-9- C18:1, cis-9, trans-11-CLA, n-3 FA and UFA

  18. Analysis of the electrical characteristic of linseed oil films exposed to humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palummo, Lucrezia; Bearzotti, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    Linseed oil is a material widely used in various applications as a protecting layer for surfaces in industry, in scientific research, for medical use, and finally for artistic purpose. This natural origins substance has a particular application as a protective and smoothing layer on phenolic-melaminic laminate electrodes on Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detectors used in various particle physic experiments. In such electronic applications where linseed oil could be exposed to water vapours, an electrical characterization should result useful for having an overall control of the process involving the oil. In this paper, we studied the electrical behaviour towards relative humidity variations of linseed oil films deposited on interdigitated metal electrodes. Moreover, I/V characterisation both in air and vacuum, current vs. temperature and relative humidity was performed.

  19. Milk fatty acids in dairy cows fed whole crude linseed, extruded linseed, or linseed oil, and their relationship with methane output.

    PubMed

    Chilliard, Y; Martin, C; Rouel, J; Doreau, M

    2009-10-01

    This experiment studied the effect of 3 different physical forms of linseed fatty acids (FA) on cow dairy performance, milk FA secretion and composition, and their relationship with methane output. Eight multiparous, lactating Holstein cows were assigned to 1 of 4 dietary treatments in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design: a control diet (C) based on corn silage (59%) and concentrate (35%), and the same diet supplemented with whole crude linseed (CLS), extruded linseed (ELS), or linseed oil (LSO) at the same FA level (5% of dietary dry matter). Each experimental period lasted 4 wk. Dry matter intake was not modified with CLS but was lowered with both ELS and LSO (-3.1 and -5.1 kg/d, respectively) compared with C. Milk yield and milk fat content were similar for LSO and ELS but lower than for C and CLS (19.9 vs. 22.3 kg/d and 33.8 vs. 43.2 g/kg, on average, respectively). Compared with diet C, CLS changed the concentrations of a small number of FA; the main effects were decreases in 8:0 to 16:0 and increases in 18:0 and cis-9 18:1. Compared with diet C (and CLS in most cases), LSO appreciably changed the concentrations of almost all the FA measured; the main effects were decreases in FA from 4:0 to 16:0 and increases in 18:0, trans-11 16:1, all cis and trans 18:1 (except trans-11 18:1), and nonconjugated trans 18:2 isomers. The effect of ELS was either intermediate between those of CLS and LSO or similar to LSO with a few significant exceptions: increases in 17:0 iso; 18:3n-3; trans-11 18:1; cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid; and trans-11, trans-13 conjugated linoleic acid and a smaller increase in cis-9 18:1. The most positive correlations (r = 0.87 to 0.91) between milk FA concentrations and methane output were observed for saturated FA from 6:0 to 16:0 and for 10:1, and the most negative correlations (r = -0.86 to -0.90) were observed for trans-16+cis-14 18:1; cis-9, trans-13 18:2; trans-11 16:1; and trans-12 18:1. Thus, milk FA profile can be considered

  20. Additive methane-mitigating effect between linseed oil and nitrate fed to cattle.

    PubMed

    Guyader, J; Eugène, M; Meunier, B; Doreau, M; Morgavi, D P; Silberberg, M; Rochette, Y; Gerard, C; Loncke, C; Martin, C

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effect of linseed oil and nitrate fed alone or in combination on methane (CH4) emissions and diet digestibility in cows. The experiment was conducted as a 2 × 2 factorial design using 4 multiparous nonlactating Holstein cows (initial BW 656 ± 31 kg). Each experimental period lasted 5 wk, with measures performed in the final 3 wk (wk 3 to 5). Diets given on a DM basis were 1) control (CON; 50% natural grassland hay and 50% concentrate), 2) CON with 4% linseed oil (LIN), 3) CON with 3% calcium nitrate (NIT), and 4) CON with 4% linseed oil plus 3% calcium nitrate (LIN+NIT). Diets were offered twice daily and were formulated to deliver similar amounts (DM basis) of CP (12.2%), starch (25.5%), and NDF (39.5%). Feed offer was restricted to 90% of voluntary intake (12.4 kg DMI/d). Total tract digestibility and N balance were determined from total feces and urine collected separately for 6 d during wk 4. Daily CH4 emissions were quantified using open chambers for 4 d during wk 5. Rumen fermentation and microbial parameters were analyzed from samples taken before and 3 h after the morning feeding. Rumen concentrations of dissolved hydrogen (H2) were measured continuously up to 6 h after feeding using a H2 sensor. Compared with the CON diet linseed oil and nitrate decreased (P < 0.01) CH4 emissions (g/kg DMI) by 17 and 22%, respectively, when fed alone and by 32% when combined. The LIN diet reduced CH4 production throughout the day, increased (P = 0.02) propionate proportion, and decreased (P = 0.03) ruminal protozoa concentration compared with CON diet. The NIT diet strongly reduced CH4 production 3 h after feeding, with a simultaneous increase in rumen dissolved H2 concentration, suggesting that nitrate does not act only as an electron acceptor. As a combined effect, linseed plus nitrate also increased H2 concentrations in the rumen. Diets had no effect (P > 0.05) on total tract digestibility of nutrients, except linseed oil

  1. Study of the Thermal Polymerization of Linseed and Passion Fruit Oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R. V. V.; Loureiro, N. P. D.; Fonseca, P. S.; Macedo, J. L.; Santos, M. L.; Sales, M. J.

    2008-08-01

    Researches involving ecofriendliness materials are growing up, as well as, a current interest in developing materials from inexpensive and renewable resources. Vegetable oils show a number of excellent properties, which could be utilized to produce valuable polymeric materials. In this work is described the synthesis of polymeric materials from linseed oil (Linum usitatissimum L.) and passion fruit oil (Passiflora edulis) and their characterization by thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Raman spectroscopy. The TG curve shows that those polymeric materials present two stages of decomposition. DSC plots of the vegetable oils showed some endothermic and exothermic transitions which are not present in the DSC curves corresponding to oil-based polymers. The Raman spectra of the polymers indicate declining of absorbance in the region of C = C stretching (˜1600 cm-1). This absorption was used to estimate the degree of polymerization (79% and 67.5% for linseed and passion fruit oils, respectively)

  2. Synthesis and application of novel EB curable polyester urethane acrylate modified by linseed oil fatty acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Li; Xuecheng, Ju; Min, Yi; Jinshan, Wei; Hongfei, Ha

    1999-06-01

    A novel polyester urethane acrylate resin modified by linseed oil fatty acid (LFA) was synthesized and EB curing coating was formulated in this work. When the coating cured by EB radiation on the timber, the cured coating was possessed of good performances.

  3. Effect of dietary linseed oil and α-tocopherol on pork tenderloin (Psoas major) muscle.

    PubMed

    Hoz, L; Lopez-Bote, C J; Cambero, M I; D'Arrigo, M; Pin, C; Santos, C; Ordóñez, J A

    2003-11-01

    The effect of linseed oil and α-tocopheryl acetate on the fatty acid composition and the susceptibility to oxidation of lipid fraction from pork tenderloin (Psoas major) muscle has been studied. Muscles were obtained from animals fed on diets with the same ingredients excepting the oil source [sunflower (C), linseed (L) and linseed and olive (1/1, w/w) (LO)] and α-tocopherol [20 (C, L and LO) or 200 (LOE and LE) mg/kg diet]. The n-6/n-3 ratio in pork tenderloin was markedly modified by dietary linseed oil administration, which was due to the increase in the C18:3n-3 (and total n-3 fatty acids) and the decrease in the C18:2n-6 (and total n-6 fatty acids) contents (P<0.05). The α-tocopherol content of tenderloin from batches LE and LOE was about 2.8 mg/kg of muscle, significantly greater (P<0.05) than about 0.7 mg/kg muscle found in tenderloin from pigs receiving C, L and LO. Dietary supplementation with α-tocopheryl acetate markedly reduced tenderloin lipid oxidation from animals fed diets enriched in n-3 fatty acids (L or LO vs LE or LOE).

  4. Linseed oil presents different patterns of oxidation in real-time and accelerated aging assays.

    PubMed

    Douny, Caroline; Razanakolona, Rina; Ribonnet, Laurence; Milet, Jérôme; Baeten, Vincent; Rogez, Hervé; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Larondelle, Yvan

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at verifying if the hypothesis that one day at 60°C is equivalent to one month at 20°C could be confirmed during linseed oil aging for 6months at 20°C and 6days at 60°C using the "Schaal oven stability test". Tests were conducted with linseed oil supplemented or not with myricetin or butyl-hydroxytoluene as antioxidants. Oxidation was evaluated with the peroxide and p-anisidine values, as well as the content in conjugated dienes and aldehydes. All four indicators of oxidation showed very different kinetic behaviors at 20 and 60°C. The hypothesis is thus not verified for linseed oil, supplemented or not with antioxidant. In the control oil, the conjugated dienes and the peroxide value observed were respectively of 41.8±0.8 Absorbance Unit (AU)/g oil and 254.3±5.8meq.O2/kg oil after 6months at 20°C. These values were of 18.2±1.3AU/g oil and 65.2±20.3meq.O2/kg after 6days at 60°C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Infrared spectral investigation of the linseed oil polymerization in a corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groza, A.; Surmeian, A.; Ganciu, M.; Popescu, I. I.

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we have demonstrated that the negative and positive corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure is a convenient physical method for the initiation of the high-reaction-rate polymerization process of the linseed oil. The different stages of the polymerization process were investigated by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and the formation of the linseed oil polymer was evaluated by the presence of the C-O-C bands.

  6. Comparison of the oxidative stability of linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) oil by pressure differential scanning calorimetry and Rancimat measurements.

    PubMed

    Symoniuk, Edyta; Ratusz, Katarzyna; Krygier, Krzysztof

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the oxidative stability of linseed oil using the pressure differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) and Rancimat methods, and to determine the kinetic parameters of linseed oil oxidation. Five cold pressed linseed oils were oxidized at different temperatures under PDSC (90-140 °C) and Rancimat (70-140 °C) test conditions. The oxidative stability of the linseed oils was calculated based on induction times (PDSCτmax, Rancimat τon), the Arrhenius equation and activated complex theory, frequency factors (Z), the reaction rate coefficient (k) for all temperatures, activation energies (Ea), Q10 numbers, activation enthalpies (∆H(++)), and activation entropies (∆S(++)). The PDSC method was more convenient for the determination of the induction time of linseed oils than the Rancimat method. During oxidation measurement by Rancimat method, the linseed oil polymerized, which affected the measurements. The reaction rate coefficient increased with rising temperature during measurement by both methods. The activation energy values of linseed oil oxidation using the PDSC and Rancimat methods ranged from 93.14 to 94.53 and 74.03 to 77.76 kJ mol(-1), respectively. The Q10 , ∆H(++), and ∆S(++) values for the analyzed linseed oils were between 2.11-2.13, 90.54-91.30 kJ mol(-1), -33.20 to -30.90 J mol K(-1) calculated by PDSC measurements, and 2.23-2.32, 71.03-74.76, -59.42 to -49.08 J mol K(-1) by Rancimat measurements, respectively.

  7. Oxidative stabilization of mixed mayonnaises made with linseed oil and saturated medium-chain triglyceride oil.

    PubMed

    Raudsepp, Piret; Brüggemann, Dagmar A; Lenferink, Aufried; Otto, Cees; Andersen, Mogens L

    2014-01-01

    Mayonnaises, made with either saturated medium chain triglyceride (MCT) oil or unsaturated purified linseed oil (LSO), were mixed. Raman confocal microspectrometry demonstrated that lipid droplets in mixed mayonnaise remained intact containing either MCT oil or LSO. Peroxide formation during storage was lower in mixed mayonnaise compared to LSO mayonnaise, while in mixed oil mayonnaise the level of peroxides was constantly low. Mixed oil mayonnaise had a lower rate of oxygen consumption than mixed mayonnaise, LSO mayonnaise having the highest rate. The decay of water-soluble nitroxyl radicals showed radicals are formed in the aqueous phase with the same rate independent of the lipids. This was also reflected in decay of α-tocopherol during storage being similar in MCT and LSO mayonnaises, but being stable in mixed oil mayonnaise and mixed mayonnaise. Results suggest that other effects than simply diluting unsaturated triglycerides with saturated triglycerides is causing the oxidative stabilization observed for mixed mayonnaise and mixed oil mayonnaise. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of the drying process of linseed oil using FTIR and ToF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grehk, T. M.; Berger, R.; Bexell, U.

    2008-03-01

    The drying process of linseed oil, oxidized at 80 oC, has been investigated with rheology measurements, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The drying process can be divided into three main steps: initiation, propagation and termination. ToF-SIMS spectra show that the oxidation is initiated at the linolenic (three double bonds) and linoleic fatty acids (two double bonds). ToF-SIMS spectra reveal peaks that can be assigned to ketones, alcohols and hydroperoxides. In this article it is shown that FTIR in combination with ToF-SIMS are well suited tools for investigations of various fatty acid components and reaction products of linseed oil.

  9. Effect of the linseed oil surface treatment on the performance of resistive plate chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Arena, V.; Bonomi, G.; Braj, A.; Gianini, G.; Liguori, G.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Viola, L.; Vitulo, P.

    1997-02-01

    Results on the behaviour of several bakelite Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) without the linseed oil treatment of the internal electrodes will be presented. Efficiency, collected charge and cluster size distributions will be compared to the ones of a standard oiled RPC. Currents and single rate are the quantities most affected by the surface treatment of the electrodes beyond the optical/mechanical properties. A factor 4 less in currents and at least a factor 10 less in single rate is achieved using standard oiled RPCs operated in streamer mode.

  10. Echium oil and linseed oil as alternatives for fish oil in the maternal diet: Blood fatty acid profiles and oxidative status of sows and piglets.

    PubMed

    Tanghe, S; Millet, S; De Smet, S

    2013-07-01

    Echium oil (source of stearidonic acid) and linseed oil (source of α-linolenic acid) were evaluated as alternatives for fish oil in the diet of sows to increase the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status of the offspring. The hypothesis was that echium oil would be more efficient than linseed oil to increase the DHA concentration, as it bypasses the enzyme Δ6-desaturase. In addition, it was determined whether adding PUFA to the diet affected the plasma oxidative status. Sows were fed either a palm oil diet or a diet containing 1% linseed oil, echium oil, or fish oil from d 73 of gestation and during lactation (n = 16 per dietary treatment). Total oil concentrations in the diets were similar among dietary treatments. Blood samples were taken for fatty acid analysis and oxidative status of sows on d 73 and 93 of gestation and at parturition and the lightest and heaviest piglet per litter at birth and weaning. Colostrum was also sampled. No effect of diet was observed on total number of piglets born (13.7 ± 0.4), number of weaned piglets (10.8 ± 0.4), and gestation length (114.8 ± 0.2 d). Piglets from sows fed fish oil had lighter birth weights (1.41 ± 0.03 kg) than piglets from the linseed oil diet (1.54 ± 0.03 kg; P = 0.006), with no difference between the palm oil (1.45 ± 0.03 kg) and echium oil diet (1.49 ± 0.03 kg). Daily BW gain until weaning was less for piglets from sows fed the fish oil diet (214 ± 5 g) compared with piglets from sows fed the echium oil (240 ± 5 g; P < 0.001) or linseed oil diet (234 ± 5 g; P = 0.02). Compared with the palm oil diet, echium and linseed oil in the maternal diet increased the DHA concentration in the colostrum and the sow and piglet plasma to the same extent (1.1 to 1.4-fold; P < 0.001). On the fish oil diet, 20.7-fold, 10-fold, and 2.4-fold increases in DHA in colostrum, sow, and piglet plasma, respectively, were observed (P < 0.001). At 1% in the maternal diet, echium oil had, thus, no benefit over linseed oil and

  11. Quality of ω-3 fatty acid enriched low-fat chicken meat patties incorporated with selected levels of linseed flour/oil and canola flour/oil.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ripudaman; Chatli, Manish K; Biswas, Ashim K; Sahoo, Jhari

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the nutritional, processing and sensory characteristics of low-fat ω-3 enriched fatty acids chicken meat patties (CMP) prepared with the incorporation of 4% linseed flour (T1), 2% canola flour (T2), 3% linseed oil (T3), and 4% canola oil (T4) and to estimate their cost of production. The total fat and crude fiber content was increased (P < 0.05) with the incorporation of linseed flour. The emulsion stability and cooking yield was greater (P < 0.05) in T4 among all the treatments. The percent shrinkage was lower (P < 0.05) in linseed/canola oil incorporated CMP than their respective flours. The colour and appearance and flavour scores were lower (P < 0.05) in canola flour than canola oil incorporated CMP. The texture scores were not influenced (P < 0.05) in linseed-and canola-treated products. The overall acceptability was greatest (P < 0.05) in T4 whereas, lowest (P < 0.05) in T2 among all treated products. The cost of production was increased by 3-5% with the incorporation of linseed and canola oil whereas it was almost same for control and linseed flour.

  12. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities of Linum usitatissimum L. (flaxseed/linseed) fixed oil.

    PubMed

    Kaithwas, Gaurav; Mukherjee, Alok; Chaurasia, A K; Majumdar, Dipak K

    2011-12-01

    The fixed oil of L. usitatissimum (flaxseed/linseed) inhibited PGE2-, leukotriene-, histamine- and bradykinin-induced inflammation. The oil also inhibited arachidonic acid-induced inflammation, suggesting its capacity to inhibit both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways of arachidonate metabolism. In tail immersion model, the oil raised the pain threshold to a lesser extent than morphine but showed excellent peripherally acting, analgesic activity comparable to aspirin, against acetic acid-induced writhing in mouse. In typhoid paratyphoid A/B vaccine-induced pyrexia, the oil showed antipyretic activity comparable to aspirin. The oil contains 57.38% alpha-linolenic acid. Dual inhibition of arachidonic acid metabolism, antihistaminic and antibradykinin activities of the oil could account for the biological activity and the active principle could be alpha-linolenic acid an omega-3 (18:3, n-3) fatty acid.

  13. The evaluation of the healing proprieties of pumpkin and linseed oils on deep second-degree burns in rats.

    PubMed

    Bardaa, Sana; Moalla, Dorsaf; Ben Khedir, Sameh; Rebai, Tarek; Sahnoun, Zouheir

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants have been recognized as useful remedies for primary health care. Accordingly, Cucurbita pepo L. (Cucurbitaceae) (pumpkin) and Linum usitatissimum (L.) Griesb. (Linaceae) (linseed) which have extracted oil with prominent pharmacological properties are investigated as possible burn healing treatments. The present study assesses the healing potential of pumpkin and linseed extracted oils on rats. Uniform deep second-degree burns were induced on the dorsum of 24 rats, randomly divided into four groups. The burns were measured, photographed, and topically treated with saline solution, "Cytol Centella®", pumpkin, and linseed-extracted oils (0.52 µl/mm(2) of oil) each 2 d (up until day 33). Post-burning of the 33rd day, biopsies were histologically assessed. At the end of the experiment, the rat groups treated with linseed, pumpkin oils, and "Cytol Centella®" had higher percentage of wound contraction (98.68, 96.71, and 92.54%, respectively) than the control group (58.38%). Wound biopsies from rats treated with extracted oils showed the best tissue regeneration proprieties as compared with the other groups. The histomorphometric analysis of biopsies revealed that linseed oil could significantly stimulate angiogenesis (55.6% ± 7.25). The pumpkin oil, and Cytol Centella® could significantly increase the collagen production 64.9% ± 5.94, and 61.2% ± 7.36, respectively. Overall, our study has given for the first time scientific evidence of the healing efficiency of pumpkin and linseed oils on burn-wounds.

  14. Microbial degradation of linseed oil-based elastomer and subsequent accumulation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) copolymer.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Nilkamal; Das, Rakesh; Rath, Tanmoy; Kundu, P P

    2014-10-01

    The microbial synthesis of environment-friendly poly(3-hydroxybutyrate--co-3-hydroxyvalerate), PHBV, has been performed by using an alkaliphilic microorganism, Alkaliphilus oremlandii OhILAs strain (GenBank Accession number NR_043674.1), at pH 8 and at a temperature of 30-32 °C through the biodegradation of linseed oil-based elastomer. The yield of the copolymer on dry cell weight basis is 90 %. The elastomers used for the biodegradation have been synthesized by cationic polymerization technique. The yield of the PHBV copolymer also varies with the variation of linseed oil content (30-60 %) in the elastomer. Spectroscopic characterization ((1)H NMR and FTIR) of the accumulated product through biodegradation of linseed oil-based elastomers indicates that the accumulated product is a PHBV copolymer consisting of 13.85 mol% of 3-hydroxyvalerate unit. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results indicate a decrease in the melting (T m) and glass transition temperature (T g) of PHBV copolymer with an increase in the content of linseed oil in the elastomer, which is used for the biodegradation. The gel permeation chromatography (GPC) results indicate that the weight average molecular weight (M w) of PHBV copolymer decreases with an increasing concentration of linseed oil in the elastomer. The surface morphology of the elastomer before and after biodegradation is observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM); these results indicate about porous morphology of the biodegraded elastomer.

  15. Enrichment of eggs in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids by feeding hens with different amount of linseed oil in diet.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Marinko; Gačić, Milica; Karačić, Veseljko; Gottstein, Zeljko; Mazija, Hrvoje; Medić, Helga

    2012-12-01

    The production of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid enriched eggs by addition of linseed oil to the laying hens' diet has been evaluated in terms of production parameters and n-6/n-3 ratio. A total of 150 18weeks old Lohmann Brown laying hens were housed in cages and fed with basal diet and four experimental diets containing 1%, 2%, 3% or 4% of linseed oil added to the basal diet. The effect of the altered level of linseed oil on hens laying performance, fatty acid content and composition and cholesterol content in egg yolk has been evaluated during 13weeks of experiment. Egg weight, yolk fat content, yolk weight, yolk percentage and shape index were not influenced by dietary treatment. The ratio between n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in eggs decreased in first 5weeks and then remained stable until the end of the experiment for all experimental groups. Different contents of linseed oil in feed highly influenced the n-6/n-3 ratio (P<0.0001). Addition of linseed oil did not influence the cholesterol content in yolks (P=0.5200) while the only factor affecting the cholesterol content was the hens age (P<0.0001). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of linseed oil supplementation on performance and milk fatty acid composition in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Suksombat, Wisitiporn; Thanh, Lam Phuoc; Meeprom, Chayapol; Mirattanaphrai, Rattakorn

    2016-12-01

    Thirty-six Holstein-Friesian crossbred lactating dairy cows were used to determine the effects of linseed oil supplementation on performance and milk fatty acid (FA) profile. Three treatments were as follows: basal diet (56:44 Roughage:concentrate [R:C] ratio, dry matter basis) supplemented with 500 g of palm oil as control (PO), 500 g mixture (1:1, w/w) of palm oil and linseed oil (POLSO) and 500 g of linseed oil (LSO). The LSO supplementation had no effects on total dry matter intake (DMI), milk yield and milk composition. Compared to control cows, cows supplemented with LSO increased milk concentrations of cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and n-3 FA (P < 0.05), particularly C18:3n-3, C20:5n-3 and C22:6n-3. Feeding LSO reduced concentrations of milk short- and medium-chain saturated fatty acids (P < 0.05) while it increased concentration of milk unsaturated fatty acids (P < 0.05). Milk proportions of n-3 FA increased, whereas n-6/n-3 ratio decreased in the LSO as compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, supplementing dairy cows' diet based on corn silage with LSO at 500 g/day could improve the nutritional value of milk with potential health-beneficial FA without detrimental effect on milk composition or cow's performance. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. [Determination of epoxidized soybean oil and linseed oil in wrapping film and cap sealing].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Shinji; Kawamura, Yoko; Mutsuga, Motoh; Tanamoto, Kenichi

    2006-06-01

    A determination method was developed for epoxidized soybean oil (ESBO) and epoxidized linseed oil (ELO), which are used as plasticizers and/or stabilizers, in wrapping film and cap sealings. The ESBO method reported by Castle et al. was improved. Samples were extracted with acetone-hexane (3: 7), transmethylated under alkaline conditions, then derivatized to the 1,3-dioxolanes and analyzed by GC/MS. The recoveries of spiked ESBO and ELO were between 92.6% and 104.4%. The determination limits were 0.01 mg/g for ESBO and 0.02 mg/g for ELO in the wrapping film, and 0.04 mg/g and 0.08 mg/g in the cap sealing. ESBO and ELO were surveyed in 10 samples each of wrapping film and cap sealings currently available on the Japanese market. ESBO was found at 34.7-82.8 mg/g in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) wrapping films and at 5.47-399 mg/g in cap sealings. ELO was detected at 8.6-11.4 mg/g in polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) wrapping films, and at 46.4 mg/g in a PVC wrapping film.

  18. Tissue fatty acid composition and estimated ∆ desaturase activity after castration in chicken broilers fed with linseed or sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Mašek, T; Starčević, K; Filipović, N; Stojević, Z; Brozić, D; Gottstein, Z; Severin, K

    2014-04-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the influence of the short-term addition of sunflower and linseed oil and castration on fatty acid composition and desaturation indexes in chicken broilers. Forty-eight male Ross 308 chicken broilers were supplemented with 5% of sunflower or linseed oil. The four experimental groups were linseed oil supplementation and castration (LC), linseed oil without castration (LN), sunflower oil and castration (SC) and sunflower oil without castration (SN). There was no significant influence of castration or oil supplement on live weights, weight gain, feed intake or feed conversion. Castration resulted in an increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), total n3, n6, measured desaturation indexes and a decrease in the saturated fatty acid (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) content of abdominal fat. In breast muscle, castration increased PUFA and 18:3n3 values, while in the liver tissue, castration did not influence the parameters measured. Linseed oil supplementation significantly increased 18:3n3, n3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC PUFA), total n3 and decreased total n6, n6/n3 ratio, and 20:4n6 content. Values for 20:4n6 were the highest in SC and the lowest in the LC group. Linseed oil also significantly decreased ∆5 and ∆4 desaturation indexes in the thighs and ∆5 and ∆5, 6 in abdominal fat and the liver. These results suggest that short-term supplementation of basal diet with 5% of linseed oil could significantly increase n3 LC PUFA and decrease n6/n3 ratio content in the edible tissues of chicken broilers, without adverse effects on growth performance. Meanwhile, castration only improved fatty acid profile in abdominal fat, which is not nutritionally important. The interactions observed between basal diet, supplemented oil, sex hormones and other non-nutritional factors must be elucidated in future trials in order to correctly predict the nutritional value of linseed-fed poultry. Journal of Animal

  19. Effects of ammonia stress, dietary linseed oil and Edwardsiella ictaluri challenge on juvenile darkbarbel catfish Pelteobagrus vachelli.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Yu, Na; Qin, Jian G; Li, Erchao; Du, Zhenyu; Chen, Liqiao

    2014-05-01

    A two-stage study was carried out to test the response of juvenile darkbarbel catfish Pelteobagrus vachelli to ammonia stress, dietary lipid and bacterial challenge. At stage 1, the catfish (0.99 ± 0.01 g) fed a commercial diet were exposed to 0.01 and 5.70 mg L(-1) total ammonia nitrogen in nine replicates for 14 days. At stage 2, all fish previously exposed to either low or high ammonia were separately transferred into low ammonia (<0.01 mg L(-1)), and divided into three feeding groups. Fish were then fed three levels of linseed oil (0, 2 and 4%) in triplicate for 46 days. Fish growth performance and immune response were low in high ammonia at stage 1. At stage 2, fish growth and immune response were not significantly different between fish previously exposed to low and high ammonia in all diets. Fish fed 4% linseed oil showed the greatest weight gain, feed efficiency ratio, red blood cells, hemoglobin and hematocrit, and achieved higher lysozyme activity, phagocytic index, respiratory burst and total immunoglobulin than fish fed 0% linseed oil, but did not differ from fish fed 2% linseed oil regardless of previous ammonia exposure. After 14-day infection of Edwardsiella ictaluri, cumulative mortality of fish previously exposed to low ammonia was lower than that of fish exposed to high ammonia in all diets. Cumulative mortality of fish fed 0% linseed oil was highest, but the antibody titer of fish fed 4% linseed oil was highest regardless of previous ammonia treatments. This study indicates that ammonia stress has a lasting effect even after ammonia is lowed, but the adverse effect on fish can be mitigated through manipulation of dietary oil inclusion, especially under the challenge of pathogenic bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Linum usitatissimum (linseed/flaxseed) fixed oil: antimicrobial activity and efficacy in bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Kaithwas, Gaurav; Mukerjee, Alok; Kumar, P; Majumdar, Dipak K

    2011-02-01

    In vitro antimicrobial activity and in vivo therapeutic efficacy of L. usitatissimum (linseed/flaxseed) fixed oil in bovine mastitis were investigated. In vitro antimicrobial activity of L. usitatissimum fixed oil was evaluated against a number of microorganisms by disc diffusion method and MIC determination. The in vivo efficacy of the oil was evaluated in nine mastitis-affected cows divided into three groups (three in each group), following once-a-day intramammary infusion of oil, cefoperazone or an oil-cefoperazone combination for 7 days and by monitoring the California mastitis test score, somatic cell count and microbial count in milk samples. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the oil against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae and Escherichia coli was comparable to that of cefoperazone while the antimicrobial activity against Enterococcus faecalis, Micrococcus luteus and Candida albicans, was greater than that of cefoperazone. In the in vivo study, the oil exhibited significant reduction in the California mastitis test score and somatic cell count in milk samples from infected udders following 7 days of intramammary administration suggesting its anti-inflammatory effect. The microbial count in milk samples was also reduced significantly following oil treatment. The effects were comparable to the treatment by cefoperazone (Mastiwock) alone or in combination with the oil. Apparently, the anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties of the oil contribute to its therapeutic efficacy in mastitis; the oil could be used as an alternative treatment for bovine mastitis The results suggest possible therapeutic potential of L. usitatissimum fixed oil in bovine mastitis.

  1. Dietary linseed oil increases trans-10,cis-15 18:2 in caprine milk fat.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cortés, P; Cívico, A; de la Fuente, M A; Juárez, M; Sánchez, N Núñez; Blanco, F Peña; Marín, A L Martínez

    2017-06-01

    Trans-10,cis-15 18:2 has been recently detected and characterized in digestive contents and meat and adipose tissue of ruminants, but its presence in milk and dairy products is hardly known. The aim of this study was to quantify trans-10,cis-15 18:2 in milk fat, better understand its metabolic origin, and help to elucidate the mechanisms of rumen biohydrogenation when the diet composition might affect ruminal environment. To address these objectives, 16 dairy goats were allocated to 2 simultaneous experiments (2 groups of goats and 2 treatments in each experiment). Experimental treatments consisted of basal diets with the same forage-to-concentrate ratio (33/67) and 2 starch-to-nonforage neutral detergent fiber (NDF) ratios (0.8 and 3.1), which were supplemented or not with 30 g/d of linseed oil for 25 d in a crossover design. Trans-10,cis-15 18:2 contents in milk fat were determined by gas chromatography fitted with an extremely polar capillary column (SLB-IL111). Levels of trans-10,cis-15 18:2 in individual milk fat samples ranged from 0 to 0.2% of total fatty acids, and its content in milk fat increased 8 fold due to linseed oil supplementation, substantiating the predominant role of α-linolenic acid in its formation. The trans-10,cis-15 18:2 levels in milk fat were similar in both experiments, despite the fact starch-to-nonforage NDF ratio of their respective basal diets greatly differed. In conclusion, trans-10,cis-15 18:2 was clearly related to linseed oil supplementation, and its increase in milk fat was comparable when the basal diets were rich in either nonforage NDF or starch. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chicken meat nutritional value when feeding red palm oil, palm oil or rendered animal fat in combinations with linseed oil, rapeseed oil and two levels of selenium.

    PubMed

    Nyquist, Nicole F; Rødbotten, Rune; Thomassen, Magny; Haug, Anna

    2013-05-09

    Chicken meat nutritional value with regard to fatty acid composition and selenium content depends on the choice of dietary oil and selenium level used in the chickens' feed. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of replacing commonly used rendered animal fat as a dietary source of saturated fatty acids and soybean oil as a source of unsaturated fatty acids, with palm oil and red palm oil in combinations with rapeseed oil, linseed oil and two levels of selenium enriched yeast on chicken breast meat nutritional value. The study also wished to see whether red palm oil had a cholesterol lowering effect on chicken plasma.204 male, newly hatched broiler chickens were randomly divided into twelve dietary treatment groups, and individually fed one out of six dietary fat combinations combined with either low (0.1 mg Se /kg feed) or high (1 mg Se/kg feed) dietary selenium levels. Linseed oil, independent of accompanying dietary fat source, lead to increased levels of the n-3 EPA, DPA and DHA and reduced levels of the n-6 arachidonic acid (AA). The ratio between AA/EPA was reduced from 19/1 in the soybean oil dietary groups to 1.7/1 in the linseed oil dietary groups. Dietary red palm oil reduced total chicken plasma cholesterol levels. There were no differences between the dietary groups with regard to measured meat antioxidant capacity or sensory evaluation. Chicken meat selenium levels were clearly influenced by dietary selenium levels, but were not influenced by feed fatty acid composition. High dietary selenium level lead to marginally increased n-3 EPA and higher meat fat % in breast muscle but did not influence the other LC PUFA levels. Chicken breast meat nutritional value from the soybean oil and low selenium dietary groups may be regarded as less beneficial compared to the breast meat from the linseed oil and high selenium dietary groups. Replacing rendered animal fat with palm oil and red palm oil had no negative effects on chicken muscle

  3. Chicken meat nutritional value when feeding red palm oil, palm oil or rendered animal fat in combinations with linseed oil, rapeseed oil and two levels of selenium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chicken meat nutritional value with regard to fatty acid composition and selenium content depends on the choice of dietary oil and selenium level used in the chickens’ feed. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of replacing commonly used rendered animal fat as a dietary source of saturated fatty acids and soybean oil as a source of unsaturated fatty acids, with palm oil and red palm oil in combinations with rapeseed oil, linseed oil and two levels of selenium enriched yeast on chicken breast meat nutritional value. The study also wished to see whether red palm oil had a cholesterol lowering effect on chicken plasma. 204 male, newly hatched broiler chickens were randomly divided into twelve dietary treatment groups, and individually fed one out of six dietary fat combinations combined with either low (0.1 mg Se /kg feed) or high (1 mg Se/kg feed) dietary selenium levels. Linseed oil, independent of accompanying dietary fat source, lead to increased levels of the n-3 EPA, DPA and DHA and reduced levels of the n-6 arachidonic acid (AA). The ratio between AA/EPA was reduced from 19/1 in the soybean oil dietary groups to 1.7/1 in the linseed oil dietary groups. Dietary red palm oil reduced total chicken plasma cholesterol levels. There were no differences between the dietary groups with regard to measured meat antioxidant capacity or sensory evaluation. Chicken meat selenium levels were clearly influenced by dietary selenium levels, but were not influenced by feed fatty acid composition. High dietary selenium level lead to marginally increased n-3 EPA and higher meat fat % in breast muscle but did not influence the other LC PUFA levels. Chicken breast meat nutritional value from the soybean oil and low selenium dietary groups may be regarded as less beneficial compared to the breast meat from the linseed oil and high selenium dietary groups. Replacing rendered animal fat with palm oil and red palm oil had no negative effects on chicken muscle

  4. Comparison of 1% cyclosporine eye drops in olive oil and in linseed oil to treat experimentally-induced keratoconjunctivitis sicca in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Parrilha, Leticia Rodrigues; Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; Giuffrida, Rogério; Barbero, Rafael Cabral; Padovani, Leticia Dias Fabris; Pereira, Ricardo Henrique Zaquir; Silva, Danielle Alves; Silva, Mariele Catherine Alves; Diniz, Miriely Stein; Andrade, Silvia Franco

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of topical 1% cyclosporine eye drops diluted in either of the two vehicles-olive and linseed oil-and that of the oils themselves in treating experimentally-induced keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) in rabbits. KCS was induced in 25 New Zealand rabbits using 1% atropine sulfate eye drops for 7 days before treatment and throughout the treatment period (12 weeks). The rabbits were divided into five groups: one control (C) group without KCS induction and four treatment groups in which KCS was induced and treated topically with olive oil (O), linseed oil (L), cyclosporine in olive oil (CO), and cyclosporine in linseed oil (CL). The animals were evaluated using Schirmer tear test 1 (STT), the fluorescein test (FT), tear-film break-up time (TBUT), the rose bengal test (RBT), and histopathological analysis. Values of STT and TBUT significantly decreased 1 week post-induction (p<0.05) and were similar to initial values after the 4th week of treatment, in all groups. After KCS induction, there was significantly less corneal damage in group L than in group CL, as assessed FT and RBT. Histopathology demonstrated that Groups L and CL presented less edema and corneal congestion. There was no significant difference in the goblet cell density (cells/mm2) between the groups (p=0.147). Cyclosporine diluted in olive oil or linseed oil was effective in the treatment of KCS, although it had better efficacy when diluted in linseed oil. Linseed oil presented better effectiveness, whether associated or not, than olive oil. These results may contribute to the creation of novel topical ophthalmic formulations for KCS treatment in future.

  5. Use of thermal desorption gas chromatography-olfactometry/mass spectrometry for the comparison of identified and unidentified odor active compounds emitted from building products containing linseed oil.

    PubMed

    Clausen, P A; Knudsen, H N; Larsen, K; Kofoed-Sørensen, V; Wolkoff, P; Wilkins, C K

    2008-11-14

    The emission of odor active volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a floor oil based on linseed oil, the linseed oil itself and a low-odor linseed oil was investigated by thermal desorption gas chromatography combined with olfactometry and mass spectrometry (TD-GC-O/MS). The oils were applied to filters and conditioned in the micro emission cell, FLEC, for 1-3days at ambient temperature, an air exchange rate of 26.9h(-1) and a 30% relative humidity. These conditions resulted in dynamic headspace concentrations and composition of the odor active VOCs that may be similar to real indoor setting. Emission samples for TD-GC-O/MS analysis from the FLEC were on Tenax TA. Although many volatile VOCs were detected by MS, only the odor active VOCs are reported here. In total, 142 odor active VOCs were detected in the emissions from the oils. About 50 of the odor active VOCs were identified or tentatively identified by GC-MS. While 92 VOCs were detected from the oil used in the floor oil, only 13 were detected in the low-odor linseed oil. The major odor active VOCs were aldehydes and carboxylic acids. Spearmen rank correlation of the GC-O profiles showed that the odor profile of the linseed oil likely influenced the odor profile of the floor oil based on this linseed oil.

  6. MWCNTs-Reinforced Epoxidized Linseed Oil Plasticized Polylactic Acid Nanocomposite and Its Electroactive Shape Memory Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Javed; Alam, Manawwer; Raja, Mohan; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy

    2014-01-01

    A novel electroactive shape memory polymer nanocomposite of epoxidized linseed oil plasticized polylactic acid and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was prepared by a combination of solution blending, solvent cast technique, and hydraulic hot press moulding. In this study, polylactic acid (PLA) was first plasticized by epoxidized linseed oil (ELO) in order to overcome the major limitations of PLA, such as high brittleness, low toughness, and low tensile elongation. Then, MWCNTs were incorporated into the ELO plasticized PLA matrix at three different loadings (2, 3 and 5 wt. %), with the aim of making the resulting nanocomposites electrically conductive. The addition of ELO decreased glass transition temperature, and increased the elongation and thermal degradability of PLA, as shown in the results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile test, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to observe surface morphology, topography, and the dispersion of MWCNTs in the nanocomposite. Finally, the electroactive-shape memory effect (electroactive-SME) in the resulting nanocomposite was investigated by a fold-deploy “U”-shape bending test. As per the results, the addition of both ELO and MWCNTs to PLA matrix seemed to enhance its overall properties with a great deal of potential in improved shape memory. The 3 wt. % MWCNTs-reinforced nanocomposite system, which showed 95% shape recovery within 45 s at 40 DC voltage, is expected to be used as a preferential polymeric nanocomposite material in various actuators, sensors and deployable devices. PMID:25365179

  7. MWCNTs-reinforced epoxidized linseed oil plasticized polylactic acid nanocomposite and its electroactive shape memory behaviour.

    PubMed

    Alam, Javed; Alam, Manawwer; Raja, Mohan; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy

    2014-10-31

    A novel electroactive shape memory polymer nanocomposite of epoxidized linseed oil plasticized polylactic acid and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was prepared by a combination of solution blending, solvent cast technique, and hydraulic hot press moulding. In this study, polylactic acid (PLA) was first plasticized by epoxidized linseed oil (ELO) in order to overcome the major limitations of PLA, such as high brittleness, low toughness, and low tensile elongation. Then, MWCNTs were incorporated into the ELO plasticized PLA matrix at three different loadings (2, 3 and 5 wt. %), with the aim of making the resulting nanocomposites electrically conductive. The addition of ELO decreased glass transition temperature, and increased the elongation and thermal degradability of PLA, as shown in the results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile test, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to observe surface morphology, topography, and the dispersion of MWCNTs in the nanocomposite. Finally, the electroactive-shape memory effect (electroactive-SME) in the resulting nanocomposite was investigated by a fold-deploy "U"-shape bending test. As per the results, the addition of both ELO and MWCNTs to PLA matrix seemed to enhance its overall properties with a great deal of potential in improved shape memory. The 3 wt. % MWCNTs-reinforced nanocomposite system, which showed 95% shape recovery within 45 s at 40 DC voltage, is expected to be used as a preferential polymeric nanocomposite material in various actuators, sensors and deployable devices.

  8. Effect of linseed fed as rolled seeds, extruded seeds or oil on fatty acid rumen metabolism and intestinal digestibility in cows.

    PubMed

    Doreau, Michel; Laverroux, Sophie; Normand, Jérôme; Chesneau, Guillaume; Glasser, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    Linseed, a source of linolenic acid, is used in ruminant diets to increase polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA) in animal products. Seed processing is known to have an impact on FA rumen metabolism, but few data are available for linseed. We studied the effect of linseed lipid on ruminal metabolism and intestinal digestibility in cows. Three modes of linseed processing: rolled linseed (RL), extruded linseed (EL) and linseed oil plus linseed meal (LO), supplemented at 7.5% of DM intake, were compared to a control diet (C). Duodenal flows, intestinal digestibility and plasma composition were determined. The duodenal flow of linolenic acid was similar among diets. The sum of t10 and t11-18:1, which were coeluted, was increased with lipid-supplemented diets and represented more than 60% of trans 18:1 for EL and LO diets. The main 18:2 isomers were c9, c12 and t11, c15 among the non-conjugated isomers, and t11, t13 among CLA. Linseed supplementation increased the duodenal flow of unsaturated intermediates of biohydrogenation, and this effect was more pronounced for extruded seeds and oil than for rolled seeds. For most 18-carbon FA, intestinal digestibility was slightly higher for C and LO diets than for RL and EL. Plasma concentrations of non-conjugated 18:2 and linolenic acid were similar among the lipid-supplemented diets. Within diet, profiles of 18:1 isomers (except c9) remained very similar between duodenal and plasma FA.

  9. Spelt, an ancient cereal and first pressure linseed oil as ingredients of compound feedstuffs for modern horse feeding.

    PubMed

    Fayt, J; Dotreppe, O; Hornick, J L; Istasse, L

    2008-06-01

    Spelt is a covered cereal with large glumellas. In experiment 1, it has been compared in terms of chemical composition with barley, oat and maize. Spelt is characterized by rather low protein and ether extract (EE) contents. The neutral detergent fibre (NDF) content of spelt was slightly higher than that of oat but the acid detergent fibre (ADF) content was lower. Two compound feedstuffs were fed along with hay to six horses used in a cross-over design. Both diets were well appreciated by the horses and there were no significant differences in the apparent digestibility coefficients, except for EE which was significantly higher, when oat was included in the compound feedstuff. In experiment 2, first pressure linseed oil was incorporated at a rate of 8% in a control compound feedstuff, where the barley was partly substituted by the oil. The fat content was 9.6% dry matter (DM) in the linseed oil compound feedstuff and 5.4% in the hay-concentrate ration. The inclusion of linseed oil increased the digestibility of DM, EE and NDF of the diet. There were no effects on the post-prandial concentrations of glucose, triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) but the insulin concentration was significantly reduced with the linseed oil inclusion. There were significant increases in the plasma concentrations of the total fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), saturated fatty acids (SFA), C18:3 n-3 and C18:2 n-6 and significant reductions in the contents of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), C18:1 n-7 + n-9 and C20:4 n-6. It is concluded that the inclusions of spelt and first pressure linseed oil in compound feed stuff for horse are of interest for modern horse feeding.

  10. A Comparative Study of Engine Performance and Exhaust Emissions Characteristics of Linseed Oil Biodiesel Blends with Diesel Fuel in a Direct Injection Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, B. L.; Jindal, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is aimed at study of the performance and emissions characteristics of direct injection diesel engine fueled with linseed oil biodiesel blends and diesel fuel. The comparison was done with base fuel as diesel and linseed oil biodiesel blends. The experiments were conducted with various blends of linseed biodiesel at different engine loads. It was found that comparable mass fraction burnt, better rate of pressure rise and BMEP, improved indicated thermal efficiency (8-11 %) and lower specific fuel consumption (3.5-6 %) were obtained with LB10 blend at full load. The emissions of CO, un-burnt hydrocarbon and smoke were less as compared to base fuel, but with slight increase in the emission of NOx. Since, linseed biodiesel is renewable in nature, so practically negligible CO2 is added to the environment. The linseed biodiesel can be one of the renewable alternative fuels for transportation vehicles and blend LB10 is preferable for better efficiency.

  11. Prolongation of life span in hypertensive rats by dietary interventions. Effects of garlic and linseed oil.

    PubMed

    Brändle, M; al Makdessi, S; Weber, R K; Dietz, K; Jacob, R

    1997-08-01

    The effects of long-term dietary application of garlic (dried powder, 0.5% in weight of standard chow; G group) or linseed oil (2.5%; L group) as well as a combination of both interventions (L + G group) on the life span of hypertensive rats (SHR SP) was investigated. A further group fed with standard chow served as control (C). The dietary interventions were started at the age of three weeks. Besides regular measurements of the systolic arterial blood pressure (oscillometrically at the tail artery) as well as of heart rate and body weight, autopsy and histological investigations were performed. Both diets, and particularly their combination, prolonged life span significantly (mean values (days) C: 434.5 +/- 23.5; G: 453.2 +/- 16.2; L: 470.0 +/- 26.2; L + G: 494.8 +/- 39.2). There was no significant interaction of the factors garlic and linseed oil. Systolic blood pressure as measured during the compensatory stage (data used until the 39th week of life) was significantly lowered by both garlic (mean -5.8 mm Hg), linseed oil (mean -6.3 mm Hg), and their combination (mean -11.3 mm Hg). The animals died as a consequence of congestive left and right ventricular failure with ventricular hypertrophy, dilatation, myocardial fibrosis and cellular infiltration, left ventricular atrial thrombosis (in most cases), and terminal pneumonia. On the other hand, arteriosclerotic plaques and signs of cerebral stroke could not be detected. Except for the degree of hypertrophy, which was lower in the treated groups, no differences were obvious regarding the morphological findings at the time of death. There was a significant positive correlation between mean blood pressure and the degree of left ventricular hypertrophy. Furthermore, a significant negative correlation between mean blood pressure and ventricular hypertrophy on the one hand and survival on the other hand was obvious provided the total number of animals was considered, however, not within the individual groups. The same

  12. Influence of dietary grape pomace combined with linseed oil on fatty acid profile and milk composition.

    PubMed

    Manso, T; Gallardo, B; Salvá, A; Guerra-Rivas, C; Mantecón, A R; Lavín, P; de la Fuente, M A

    2016-02-01

    Grape pomace is a by-product resulting from the winery industry that is rich in phenolic compounds. It could play a role as an antioxidant and, owing to its high fiber concentration, it would be an alternative ingredient to partially replace forage in the diet of small ruminants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary supplementation of vitamin E or different doses of grape pomace associated with linseed oil on milk fatty acid profile, composition, and yield. Forty-eight Churra ewes were fed with experimental diets consisting of a total mixed ration (TMR) containing 2.7% [on a dry matter (DM) basis] of linseed oil, forage, and concentrate at a 40:60 ratio. Ewes were assigned to 1 of 4 treatments: control (without grape pomace), vitamin E (with 500 mg/kg of TMR of vitamin E), grape pomace-5 (5 g/100 g of TMR of DM of grape pomace), and grape pomace-10 (10 g/100 g of TMR of DM of grape pomace). Experimental diets did not affect DM intake and milk yield and composition. The vitamin E supplementation had only a moderate effect on milk concentration of fatty acids (increase in α-linolenic acid and 16:0 and decrease in cis-9 18:1). Grape pomace supplementation did not affect the percentages of total saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Levels of α-linolenic acid reached about 1% of total fatty acids as a consequence of the presence of linseed oil in the diets, were not modified with vitamin E, and remained unaltered in grape pomace-5 and -10 treatments. Linoleic acid was increased by the highest dose of grape pomace, but this ingredient did not modify the cis-9,trans-11 18:2 milk fat content. The concentration of total odd- and branched-chain fatty acids did not diminish in grape pomace-5 and pomace-10 treatments. The presence of grape residue did not modified the trans-11 18:1 and trans-10 18:1 contents, which might indicate that, under the conditions assayed, this winery by-product would not alter the pathways of

  13. Rapid Estimation of Tocopherol Content in Linseed and Sunflower Oils-Reactivity and Assay.

    PubMed

    Prevc, Tjaša; Levart, Alenka; Cigić, Irena Kralj; Salobir, Janez; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Cigić, Blaž

    2015-08-13

    The reactivity of tocopherols with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) was studied in model systems in order to establish a method for quantifying vitamin E in plant oils. The method was optimized with respect to solvent composition of the assay medium, which has a large influence on the course of reaction of tocopherols with DPPH. The rate of reaction of α-tocopherol with DPPH is higher than that of γ-tocopherol in both protic and aprotic solvents. In ethyl acetate, routinely applied for the analysis of antioxidant potential (AOP) of plant oils, reactions of tocopherols with DPPH are slower and concentration of tocopherols in the assay has a large influence on their molar reactivity. In 2-propanol, however, two electrons are exchanged for both α- and γ-tocopherols, independent of their concentration. 2-propanol is not toxic and is fully compatible with polypropylene labware. The chromatographically determined content of tocopherols and their molar reactivity in the DPPH assay reveal that only tocopherols contribute to the AOP of sunflower oil, whereas the contribution of tocopherols to the AOP of linseed oil is 75%. The DPPH assay in 2-propanol can be applied for rapid and cheap estimation of vitamin E content in plant oils where tocopherols are major antioxidants.

  14. From epoxidized linseed oil to bioresin: an overall approach of epoxy/anhydride cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Pin, Jean-Mathieu; Sbirrazzuoli, Nicolas; Mija, Alice

    2015-04-13

    Biorenewable resources can be used as green monomers to design tailored structures for formulations that can play an important role as functional materials. The choice of optimal structures depends on the targeted properties and applications. This work focuses on the elaboration of biobased materials with toughened mechanical properties based on epoxidized linseed oil. This result was obtained by an overall approach of cross-linking process, that is, starting with the optimal choice of hardeners and finally favoring the side reactions of polymerization. Therefore, the anionic alternating copolymerization of epoxide with mono- and dianhydrides was investigated to tailor the parameters that led to maximal conversions and properties. The obtained highly cross-linked networks perform well, as demonstrated by good impact strengths, high glass transition temperatures, and excellent thermal stability, which opens up the possibility of using these emergent materials for industrial applications.

  15. Development of Polymer Network of Phenolic and Epoxies Resins Mixed with Linseed Oil: Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Cardona, F.; Rogers, D.; Munoz, J.-C.

    2010-08-01

    Epoxy resin was mixed with phenolic resins in different percentages by weight. Composite 40/60 means the proportion by weight of epoxy resin is 40%. It was found that only composites 50/50 and 40/60 could be cured in ambient conditions. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that only these two composites form interpenetrating polymer network. The addition of linseed oil to the two resins results also in the formation of interpenetrating network irrespective of proportion by weight of the resins; the mechanical properties will only be better when the percentage by weight of epoxy resin is higher; the aim of reducing cost and at the same time maintaining the mechanical properties cannot be fully achieved because epoxy resin is much more expensive than its counterpart.

  16. Measuring Rate Capability of a Bakelite-Trigger RPC Coated with Linseed Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Leah

    2008-10-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory intends to study proton spin structure through the detection of high pT muons produced from W-Boson decay. Such measurements will require an upgrade of the first level muon trigger using Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). RPCs are gas detectors in which high voltage is applied across two resistive electrodes (bakelite plates) spaced 2 mm apart. The resistivity of the electrodes and possible coatings on the surface of the electrodes determine the rate capability of RPCs. We tested the performance of a double gap RPC in avalanche mode under gamma radiation from an Fe55 source. In this paper we present the rate capability of a bakelite RPC with a coating of linseed oil applied to the bakelite electrode surfaces.

  17. Drying of linseed oil paints: the effects of substrate on the emission of aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Fjällström, P; Andersson, B; Nilsson, C

    2003-09-01

    The effect of substrate on the emission of aldehydes from linseed oil paint was investigated. Plates of glass, fiberboard, gypsum board, lime mortar and wood lath were painted, and then placed into emission chambers. Samples were collected every eighth hour over 10 days with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazin samplers. Analysis was performed with liquid chromatography/UV-detection and mass spectrometry. Paint applied on gypsum board gave the highest total amount of emitted carbonyls, and that on wood lath gave the least. Painted glass had the highest contribution of unsaturated species, and lime mortar, the lowest. Lime mortar also had the highest momentary levels of a single species, 443 nmol/h/m2 of propanal, while fiberboard peaked at only 123 nmol/h/m2 of propanal. In turn, the emission from the painted fiberboard had the slowest decline, and thus at the end of the experiment the highest levels. All substrates gave an emission that peaked within 16 h.

  18. Milk fatty acid composition of grazing dairy cows when supplemented with linseed oil.

    PubMed

    Flowers, G; Ibrahim, S A; AbuGhazaleh, A A

    2008-02-01

    The effects of varying amounts of linseed oil (LSO) in grazing dairy cows' diet on milk conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 CLA) were investigated in this study. Twelve Holstein cows in midlactation (150 +/- 19 DIM) were placed on alfalfa-based pasture and assigned to 4 treatments using a 4 x 4 Latin square design with 3-wk periods. Treatments were: 1) control grain supplement; 2) control grain supplement containing 170 g of LSO (LSO1); 3) control grain supplement containing 340 g of LSO (LSO2); and 4) control grain supplement containing 510 g of LSO (LSO3). Grain supplements were offered at 7 kg/d. Additional 100 g/d of algae, divided evenly between the 2 feeding times, were added to every treatment diet. Milk samples were collected during the last 3 d of each period and analyzed for chemical and fatty acid composition. Treatments had no effect on milk production (18.9, 18.5, 19.6, and 19.1 kg/d for treatments 1 to 4, respectively). Linseed oil supplementation caused a quadratic increase in milk fat (3.23, 3.44, 3.35, and 3.27% for treatments 1 to 4, respectively) and protein (3.03, 3.19, 3.12, and 3.08%) contents. Concentrations (g/100 g of fatty acids) of milk cis-9, trans-11 CLA (1.12, 1.18, 1.39, and 1.65 for treatments 1 to 4, respectively) and VA (3.39, 3.62, 4.25, and 4.89) linearly increased with LSO supplementations. Results from this trial suggest that the increase in milk cis-9, trans-11 CLA was proportional to the amounts of LSO fed. In conclusion, adding LSO to grazing dairy cow diets can improve the nutritional value of milk without compromising milk composition or cow performance.

  19. Linseed Oil Supplementation of Lambs' Diet in Early Life Leads to Persistent Changes in Rumen Microbiome Structure.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Tamsin; Boland, Tommy; Storey, Sean; Doyle, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a significant impact on microbial community composition in the rumen and could potentially be used to manipulate rumen microbiome structure to achieve specific outcomes. There is some evidence that a window may exist in early life, while the microbiome is being established, where manipulation through diet could lead to long-lasting results. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that dietary supplementation in early life will have an effect on rumen microbial composition that will persist even once supplementation is ceased. Twenty-seven new-born lambs were allocated to one of three dietary treatments; a control group receiving standard lamb meal, a group receiving lamb meal supplemented with 40 g kg(-1) DM of linseed oil and a group receiving the supplement pre-weaning and standard lamb meal post-weaning. The supplement had no effect on average daily feed intake or average daily weight gain of lambs. Bacterial and archaeal community composition was significantly (p = 0.033 and 0.005, respectively) different in lambs fed linseed oil throughout the study compared to lambs on the control diet. Succinivibrionaceae, succinate producers, and Veillonellaceae, propionate producers, were in a higher relative abundance in the lambs fed linseed oil while Ruminococcaceae, a family linked with high CH4 emitters, were in a higher relative abundance in the control group. The relative abundance of Methanobrevibacter was reduced in the lambs receiving linseed compared to those that didn't. In contrast, the relative abundance of Methanosphaera was significantly higher in the animals receiving the supplement compared to animals receiving no supplement (40.82 and 26.67%, respectively). Furthermore, lambs fed linseed oil only in the pre-weaning period had a bacterial community composition significantly (p = 0.015) different to that of the control group, though archaeal diversity and community structure did not differ. Again, Succinivibrionaceae

  20. Linseed Oil Supplementation of Lambs’ Diet in Early Life Leads to Persistent Changes in Rumen Microbiome Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Tamsin; Boland, Tommy; Storey, Sean; Doyle, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a significant impact on microbial community composition in the rumen and could potentially be used to manipulate rumen microbiome structure to achieve specific outcomes. There is some evidence that a window may exist in early life, while the microbiome is being established, where manipulation through diet could lead to long-lasting results. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that dietary supplementation in early life will have an effect on rumen microbial composition that will persist even once supplementation is ceased. Twenty-seven new-born lambs were allocated to one of three dietary treatments; a control group receiving standard lamb meal, a group receiving lamb meal supplemented with 40 g kg-1 DM of linseed oil and a group receiving the supplement pre-weaning and standard lamb meal post-weaning. The supplement had no effect on average daily feed intake or average daily weight gain of lambs. Bacterial and archaeal community composition was significantly (p = 0.033 and 0.005, respectively) different in lambs fed linseed oil throughout the study compared to lambs on the control diet. Succinivibrionaceae, succinate producers, and Veillonellaceae, propionate producers, were in a higher relative abundance in the lambs fed linseed oil while Ruminococcaceae, a family linked with high CH4 emitters, were in a higher relative abundance in the control group. The relative abundance of Methanobrevibacter was reduced in the lambs receiving linseed compared to those that didn’t. In contrast, the relative abundance of Methanosphaera was significantly higher in the animals receiving the supplement compared to animals receiving no supplement (40.82 and 26.67%, respectively). Furthermore, lambs fed linseed oil only in the pre-weaning period had a bacterial community composition significantly (p = 0.015) different to that of the control group, though archaeal diversity and community structure did not differ. Again, Succinivibrionaceae

  1. Influence of dietary linseed oil and sunflower seed oil on some mechanical and metabolic parameters of isolated working rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Demaison, L; Grynberg, A

    1991-01-01

    The role played by membrane lipid environment on cardiac function remains poorly defined. The polyunsaturated fatty acid profile of myocardial phospholipids could be of utmost importance in the regulation of key-enzyme activities. This study was undertaken to determine whether selective incorporation of n-6 or n-3 fatty acids in membrane phospholipids might influence cardiac mechanical performances and metabolism. For 8 wk, male weaning Wistar rats were fed a semi-purified diet containing either 10% sunflower seed oil (72% C18:2 n-6) or 10% linseed oil (54% C18:3 n-3) as the sole source of lipids. The hearts were then removed and perfused according to working mode with a Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing glucose (11 mM) and insulin (10 Ul/l). Cardiac rate, coronary and aortic flows and ejection fraction were monitored after 30 min of perfusion. Myocardial metabolism was estimated by evaluating the intracellular fate of 1-14C palmitate. Sunflower seed oil and linseed oil feeding did not modify either coronary or aortic flow, which suggests that cardiac mechanical work was not affected by the diets. Conversely, cardiac rate was significantly decreased (-18%; P less than 0.01) when rats were fed the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid rich diet. Radioanalysis of the myocardial metabolism suggested that replacing n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: i) did not alter palmitate uptake; ii) prolonged palmitate incorporation into cardiac triglycerides; iii) reduced beta-oxidation of palmitic acid. These results support the assumption that dietary fatty acids, particularly n-6 and n-3 fatty acids, play an important role in the regulation of cardiac mechanical and metabolic activity.

  2. New insights into the ageing of linseed oil paint binder: a qualitative and quantitative analytical study.

    PubMed

    Bonaduce, Ilaria; Carlyle, Leslie; Colombini, Maria Perla; Duce, Celia; Ferrari, Carlo; Ribechini, Erika; Selleri, Paola; Tiné, Maria Rosaria

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical investigation of paint reconstructions prepared with linseed oil that have undergone typical 19th century treatments in preparation for painting. The oil was mechanically extracted from the same seed lot, which was then processed by various methods: water washing, heat treatments, and the addition of driers, with and without heat. A modern process lead white (Dutch source, Schoonhoven) and a commercially available vine black were used as pigments. The reconstructions were prepared in 1999, and naturally aged from then onwards. We compared thermogravimetric analysis (TG), which yields macromolecular information, with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and direct exposure mass spectrometry (DEMS), which both provide molecular information. The study enabled us to quantitatively demonstrate, for the first time, that the parameters used to identify drying oils are deeply influenced by the history of the paint. In particular, here we show that the ratio between the relative amounts of palmitic and stearic acid (P/S), which is used as an index for differentiating between drying oils, is extremely dependent on the pigments present and the age of the paint. Moreover the study revealed that neither the P/S parameter nor the ratios between the relative amounts of the various dicarboxylic acids (azelaic over suberic and azelaic over sebacic) can be used to trace the sorts of pre-treatment undergone by the oil investigated in this study. The final results represent an important milestone for the scientific community working in the field, highlighting that further research is still necessary to solve the identification of drying oils in works of art.

  3. New Insights into the Ageing of Linseed Oil Paint Binder: A Qualitative and Quantitative Analytical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bonaduce, Ilaria; Carlyle, Leslie; Colombini, Maria Perla; Duce, Celia; Ferrari, Carlo; Ribechini, Erika; Selleri, Paola; Tiné, Maria Rosaria

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical investigation of paint reconstructions prepared with linseed oil that have undergone typical 19th century treatments in preparation for painting. The oil was mechanically extracted from the same seed lot, which was then processed by various methods: water washing, heat treatments, and the addition of driers, with and without heat. A modern process lead white (Dutch source, Schoonhoven) and a commercially available vine black were used as pigments. The reconstructions were prepared in 1999, and naturally aged from then onwards. We compared thermogravimetric analysis (TG), which yields macromolecular information, with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and direct exposure mass spectrometry (DEMS), which both provide molecular information. The study enabled us to quantitatively demonstrate, for the first time, that the parameters used to identify drying oils are deeply influenced by the history of the paint. In particular, here we show that the ratio between the relative amounts of palmitic and stearic acid (P/S), which is used as an index for differentiating between drying oils, is extremely dependent on the pigments present and the age of the paint. Moreover the study revealed that neither the P/S parameter nor the ratios between the relative amounts of the various dicarboxylic acids (azelaic over suberic and azelaic over sebacic) can be used to trace the sorts of pre-treatment undergone by the oil investigated in this study. The final results represent an important milestone for the scientific community working in the field, highlighting that further research is still necessary to solve the identification of drying oils in works of art. PMID:23166642

  4. When balanced for precursor fatty acid supply echium oil is not superior to linseed oil in enriching lamb tissues with long-chain n-3 PUFA.

    PubMed

    Kitessa, Soressa M; Young, Paul; Nattrass, Greg; Gardner, Graham; Pearce, Kelly; Pethick, David W

    2012-07-14

    Vegetable oils containing stearidonic acid (SDA, 18 : 4n-3) are considered better precursors of long-chain n-3 PUFA (LC n-3 PUFA) than those with only α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18 : 3n-3). The present study re-examined this premise using treatments where added ALA from linseed oil was matched with ALA plus SDA from echium oil. Lambs (n 6) were abomasally infused with saline (control (C), 25 ml), echium oil low (EL, 25 ml), echium oil high (EH, 50 ml), linseed oil low (LL, 25 ml) or linseed oil high (LH, 50 ml) for 4 weeks. The basal ration used was identical across all treatments. EPA (20 : 5n-3) in meat increased from 6·5 mg in the C lambs to 16·8, 17·7, 13·5 and 11·7 (SEM 0·86) mg/100 g muscle in the EL, EH, LL and LH lambs, respectively. For muscle DPA (docosapentaenoic acid; 22 : 5n-3), the corresponding values were 14·3, 22·2, 18·6 18·2 and 19·4 (SEM 0·57) mg/100 g muscle. The DHA (22 : 6n-3) content of meat was 5·8 mg/100 g in the C lambs and ranged from 4·53 to 5·46 (SEM 0·27) mg/100 g muscle in the oil-infused groups. Total n-3 PUFA content of meat (including ALA and SDA) increased from 39 mg to 119, 129, 121 and 150 (SEM 12·3) mg/100 g muscle. We conclude that both oil types were effective in enhancing the EPA and DPA, but not DHA, content of meat. Furthermore, we conclude that, when balanced for precursor n-3 fatty acid supply, differences between linseed oil and echium oil in enriching meat with LC n-3 PUFA were of little, if any, nutritional significance.

  5. Altered gene expression of epigenetic modifying enzymes in response to dietary supplementation with linseed oil.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M

    2017-05-01

    Recently we showed that 5% linseed oil (LSO) and 5% safflower oil (SFO) supplementation of cow's diets reduced milk fat yield by 30·38 and 32·42% respectively, accompanied by differential expression of genes and regulation by microRNAs (miRNA). This research communication addresses the hypothesis that epigenetic regulation could be involved in the observed milk fat reduction. Thus, this study investigated the gene expression pattern of major epigenetic modifying enzymes in response to dietary supplementation with LSO or SFO. Twenty-six Canadian Holstein cows in mid lactation were randomly assigned to two groups (13/group) and fed a control diet for 28 d (day -28 to -1) (control period- CP) followed by a treatment period (TP) (control diet supplemented with 5% LSO (LSO treatment) or 5% SFO (SFO treatment) of 28 d (day +1 to +28). After treatment, cows in the two groups were returned to the control diet for another 28 d (day +29 to +56) (post treatment period-PTP). Milk samples were collected on day -1 (CP), +7, +28 (TP) and +56 (PTP) for RNA isolation and measurement of the expression of thirteen epigenetic modifying genes including two DNA methytrasferases (DNMT1, DNMT3A), four histone acetylases (HAT1, KAT2A, KAT5 and CREBBP), five histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, SIRT1 and SIRT2) and two histone methytransferases (EHMT2 and PRMT1) by qPCR. Linseed oil supplementation significantly repressed the expression of EHMT2, HDAC2 and HDAC3 on day +7 (P < 0·05) and KAT2A and SIRT2 on day +28 (P < 0·05) as compared with the control period (day -1) while SFO had no effect. When LSO was withdrawn, the expression of some of the genes increased slightly but did not reach control (day -1) levels at the end of the PTP. Our study demonstrated a significant role of LSO in the epigenetic regulation of fatty acid synthesis as compared to SFO. The effect of LSO may be related to its higher degree of unsaturation and might represent a different regulatory mechanism which

  6. Effect of a Semisolid Formulation of Linum usitatissimum L. (Linseed) Oil on the Repair of Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Eryvelton de Souza; de Aquino, Camilla Maria Ferreira; de Medeiros, Paloma Lys; Evêncio, Liriane Baratella; Góes, Alexandre José da Silva; Maia, Maria Bernadete de Souza

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a semisolid formulation of linseed oil, SSFLO (1%, 5%, or 10%) or in natura linseed oil on skin wounds of rats. We used wound models, incisional and excisional, to evaluate, respectively, the contraction/reepithelialization of the wound and resistance to mechanical traction. The groups (n = 6) treated with SSFLO (1% or 5%) began the process of reepithelialization, to a significant extent (P < .05), on the sixth day, when compared to the petroleum jelly control group. On 14th day for the groups treated with SSFLO (1% or 5%), 100% reepithelialization was found, while in the petroleum jelly control group, this was only 33.33%. Our study showed that topical administration of SSFLO (1% or 5%) in excisional wounds allowed reepithelialization in 100% of treated animals. Therefore, a therapeutic potential of linseed oil, when used at low concentrations in the solid pharmaceutical formulations, is suggested for the process of dermal repair. PMID:21747895

  7. Lipid and colour stability of M. longissimus muscle from lambs fed camelina or linseed as oil or seeds.

    PubMed

    Moloney, A P; Kennedy, C; Noci, F; Monahan, F J; Kerry, J P

    2012-09-01

    Colour and lipid stability of M. longissimus dorsi (LD) from sheep fed diets containing different lipid sources (Megalac (MG), camelina oil (CO), linseed oil (LO), NaOH-treated camelina seed (CS), NaOH-treated linseed (LS) or CO treated with ethanolamine (CA)) were examined. After 100 days on-feed, samples of LD were collected, fatty acid profile determined and colour and lipid oxidation (2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; TBARS) measured during retail display in high oxygen packaging. The LS ration was most effective in increasing the 18:3n-3 and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) concentration in muscle. Within camelina, CA resulted in the highest 18:3n-3 and lowest CLA concentration in muscle. There was no difference in colour stability. Oil (seed) supplementation increased TBARS compared to MG in the early part of display while linseed-based rations tended to cause higher TBARS than camelina-based rations. Higher muscle 18:3n-3 concentration was associated with higher oxidation during early retail display but this was not reflected in a loss of colour stability.

  8. Haematological parameters, serum lipid profile, liver function and fatty acid profile of broiler chickens fed on diets supplemented with pomegranate seed oil and linseed oil.

    PubMed

    Manterys, A; Franczyk-Zarow, M; Czyzynska-Cichon, I; Drahun, A; Kus, E; Szymczyk, B; Kostogrys, R B

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine effect of pomegranate seed oil (PSO) and linseed oil (LO) on haematological parameters, serum lipid profile and liver enzymes as well as fatty acids profile of adipose tissue in broilers. Broilers (n = 400) were fed on diets containing graded PSO levels (0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%) with or without 2% LO. After 6 weeks of feeding, 6 male broilers from each group were slaughtered and abdominal fat, liver and blood samples were collected. Mixtures of pomegranate seed oil (0.5%, 1%) with linseed oil increased white blood cell level in broilers. Total cholesterol was elevated after LO supplementation whereas administration of PSO (1.5%) significantly decreased this parameter. PSO administration caused c9,t11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) concentration-dependent deposition in adipose tissue. By LO addition α-linolenic acid (ALA) content was enhanced, decreasing the n-6/n-3 ratio. PSO and ALA also affected oleic acid proportion in adipose tissue. Neither pomegranate seed oil nor linseed oil had any effect on liver parameters. Pomegranate seed oil had no negative effects on broiler health status and can be considered as a functional poultry meat component.

  9. Effect of linseed oil and macadamia oil on metabolic changes induced by high-fat diet in mice.

    PubMed

    Barrena, Helenton C; Schiavon, Fabiana P M; Cararra, Marcia A; Marques, Any de Castro R; Schamber, Christiano R; Curi, Rui; Bazotte, Roberto B

    2014-06-01

    The effects of linseed oil (LO) and macadamia oil (MO) on the metabolic changes induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) rich in saturated fatty acid were investigated. For the purpose of this study, the vegetable oil present in the HFD, i.e. soybean oil (SO) was replaced with LO (HFD-LO) or MO (HFD-MO). For comparative purposes, a group was included, which received a normal fat diet (NFD). Male Swiss mice (6-week old) were used. After 14 days under the dietary conditions, the mice were fasted for 18 h, and experiments were then performed. The HFD-SO, HFD-LO and HFD-MO groups showed higher glycaemia (p < 0.05 versus NFD). However, no significant effect was observed on glycaemia, liver gluconeogenesis and liver ketogenesis when SO was replaced by either LO or MO. The body weight and the sum of epididymal, mesenteric, retroperitoneal and inguinal fat weights were higher (p < 0.05) in the HFD-SO and HFD-MO groups as compared with the NFD group. However, there was no significant difference in these parameters between the NFD and HFD-LO groups. Thus, the protective role of LO on lipid accumulation induced by an HFD rich in saturated fatty acid is potentially mediated by the high content of ɷ-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid in LO. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Cheek cell fatty acids reflect n-3 PUFA in blood fractions during linseed oil supplementation: a controlled human intervention study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adequate biomarkers for the dietary supply of fatty acids (FA) are FA of adipose tissue and blood fractions. In human studies, invasive sample collection is unpleasant for subjects. In contrast, cheek cell sampling can be considered as a non-invasive alternative to investigate FA status. The aim of this study was to analyze whether cheek cell FA composition reflect the supplementation of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) using a linseed oil mixture compared to olive oil supplementation. Additionally, it was investigated if cheek cell FA composition correlates with the FA composition of plasma, red blood cells (RBC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) before and during both interventions. Methods During a 10-week randomized, controlled, double-blind human intervention study, 38 subjects provided cheek cell and blood samples. After a two-week run-in period, the test group (n = 23) received 17 g/d of an ALA-rich linseed oil mixture, while the control group (n = 15) received 17 g/d of an omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated FA (PUFA)-free olive oil. Cheek cells and blood were collected on days 0, 7 and 56 of the 8-week intervention period. Results Compared to olive oil, the linseed oil intervention increased ALA and also the endogenously converted long-chain n-3 metabolites eicosatetraenoic-, eicosapentaenoic- and docosapentaenoic acid in cheek cells (P ≤ 0.05). Docosahexaenoic acid remained unchanged. Reflecting the treatment, the n-6/n-3 ratio decreased in the test group. In general, cheek cell FA reflected the changes of FA in blood fractions. Independent of treatment, significant correlations (P ≤ 0.05) of n-6 PUFA and n-3 PUFA between cheek cells and plasma, RBC and PBMC were found, except for linoleic acid and ALA. Conclusions The changes in FA composition of cheek cells confirmed that ALA from linseed oil increased endogenously derived n-3 PUFA in cheek cell lipids. These changes in cheek cells and their correlation to the respective

  11. Cheek cell fatty acids reflect n-3 PUFA in blood fractions during linseed oil supplementation: a controlled human intervention study.

    PubMed

    Grindel, Annemarie; Staps, Frank; Kuhnt, Katrin

    2013-11-14

    Adequate biomarkers for the dietary supply of fatty acids (FA) are FA of adipose tissue and blood fractions. In human studies, invasive sample collection is unpleasant for subjects. In contrast, cheek cell sampling can be considered as a non-invasive alternative to investigate FA status.The aim of this study was to analyze whether cheek cell FA composition reflect the supplementation of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) using a linseed oil mixture compared to olive oil supplementation. Additionally, it was investigated if cheek cell FA composition correlates with the FA composition of plasma, red blood cells (RBC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) before and during both interventions. During a 10-week randomized, controlled, double-blind human intervention study, 38 subjects provided cheek cell and blood samples. After a two-week run-in period, the test group (n = 23) received 17 g/d of an ALA-rich linseed oil mixture, while the control group (n = 15) received 17 g/d of an omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated FA (PUFA)-free olive oil. Cheek cells and blood were collected on days 0, 7 and 56 of the 8-week intervention period. Compared to olive oil, the linseed oil intervention increased ALA and also the endogenously converted long-chain n-3 metabolites eicosatetraenoic-, eicosapentaenoic- and docosapentaenoic acid in cheek cells (P ≤ 0.05). Docosahexaenoic acid remained unchanged. Reflecting the treatment, the n-6/n-3 ratio decreased in the test group. In general, cheek cell FA reflected the changes of FA in blood fractions. Independent of treatment, significant correlations (P ≤ 0.05) of n-6 PUFA and n-3 PUFA between cheek cells and plasma, RBC and PBMC were found, except for linoleic acid and ALA. The changes in FA composition of cheek cells confirmed that ALA from linseed oil increased endogenously derived n-3 PUFA in cheek cell lipids. These changes in cheek cells and their correlation to the respective FA in blood fractions indicate the cheek

  12. Conjugated fatty acids and methane production by rumen microbes when incubated with linseed oil alone or mixed with fish oil and/or malate.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang Z; Gao, Qing S; Yan, Chang G; Choi, Seong H; Shin, Jong S; Song, Man K

    2015-08-01

    We hypothesized that manipulating metabolism with fish oil and malate as a hydrogen acceptor would affect the biohydrogenation process of α-linolenic acid by rumen microbes. This study was to examine the effect of fish oil and/or malate on the production of conjugated fatty acids and methane (CH4 ) by rumen microbes when incubated with linseed oil. Linseed oil (LO), LO with fish oil (LO-FO), LO with malate (LO-MA), or LO with fish oil and malate (LO-FO-MA) was added to diluted rumen fluid, respectively. The LO-MA and LO-FO-MA increased pH and propionate concentration compared to the other treatments. LO-MA and LO-FO-MA reduced CH4 production compared to LO. LO-MA and LO-FO-MA increased the contents of c9,t11-conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and c9,t11,c15-conjugated linolenic acid (CLnA) compared to LO. The content of malate was rapidly reduced while that of lactate was reduced in LO-MA and LO-FO-MA from 3 h incubation time. The fold change of the quantity of methanogen related to total bacteria was decreased at both 3 h and 6 h incubation times in all treatments compared to the control. Overall data indicate that supplementation of combined malate and/or fish oil when incubated with linseed oil, could depress methane generation and increase production of propionate, CLA and CLnA under the conditions of the current in vitro study.

  13. Enhancement of the nutritional status and quality of fresh pork sausages following the addition of linseed oil, fish oil and natural antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Valencia, I; O'Grady, M N; Ansorena, D; Astiasarán, I; Kerry, J P

    2008-12-01

    Fresh pork sausages (pork shoulder, pork back fat, water, rusk and seasoning) were manufactured where 15% of the pork back fat was substituted with linseed oil (LO) or fish oil (FO). Green tea catechins (GTC) and green coffee antioxidant (GCA) were added to both LO (LGTC 200 and LGCA 200) and FO (FGTC 200 and FGCA 200) substituted sausages at a level of 200mg/kg. Raw and cooked pork sausages were either over-wrapped with oxygen permeable film (aerobic storage) or stored in modified atmosphere packages (MAP) containing 80% O(2):20% CO(2) or 70% N(2):30% CO(2), respectively for 7 days at 4°C. Effects on fatty acid profiles, lipid oxidation, colour and sensorial properties were investigated. α-Linolenic acid increased from 1.34% (control) to 8.91% (LO) and up to 11.2% (LGTC 200 and LGCA 200). Addition of fish oil increased levels of EPA from 0.05% (control) to 2.83% (FO), 3.02% (FGTC 200) and 2.87% (FGCA 200) and DHA levels increased from 0.04% (control) to a maximum of 1.93% (FGTC 200). Lipid oxidation was low in raw and cooked linseed oil containing sausages. GTC (200mg/kg) significantly (P<0.05) reduced lipid oxidation in raw fish oil containing sausages after 7 days of storage. Colour parameters in raw pork sausages were unaffected by the packaging atmosphere. L(∗) lightness values were lower (P<0.05) in LGTC 200 and a(∗) redness values lower (P<0.05) in LGTC 200 and FGTC 200 after 7 days of storage. Sensory scores of cooked pork sausages were unaffected by linseed oil addition. Flavour and overall acceptability scores in cooked fish oil containing sausages were improved by GTC addition. Results obtained demonstrate potential for the production of nutritionally enhanced fresh pork sausages.

  14. Consumption of echium oil increases EPA and DPA in blood fractions more efficiently compared to linseed oil in humans.

    PubMed

    Kuhnt, Katrin; Weiß, Stefanie; Kiehntopf, Michael; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2016-02-18

    A plant-based strategy to improve long-chain (LC) omega (n)-3 PUFA supply in humans involves dietary supplementation with oils containing α-linolenic acid (ALA) alone or in combination with stearidonic acid (SDA). The study aimed to compare the effects of echium oil (EO) and linseed oil (LO) on LC n-3 PUFA accumulation in blood and on clinical markers. In two double-blind, parallel-arm, randomized controlled studies, all volunteers started with 17 g/d run-in oil (2 weeks). Thereafter, subjects received diets enriched in study 1 with EO (5 g ALA + 2 g SDA; n = 59) or in study 2 with LO (5 g ALA; n =  9) daily for 8 weeks. The smaller control groups received fish oil (FO; n = 19) or olive oil (OO; n = 18). Participants were instructed to restrict their dietary n-3 PUFA intake throughout the studies (e.g., no fish). To investigate the influence of age and BMI on the conversion of ALA and SDA as well as clinical markers, the subjects recruited for EO and LO treatment were divided into three subgroups (two age groups 20-35 y; 49-69 y with BMI 18-25 kg/m(2) and one group with older, overweight subjects (age 49-69 y; BMI >25 kg/m(2)). In plasma, red blood cells (RBC), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), EPA and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) were ~25 % higher following EO compared to LO. Comparing all treatments, the effectiveness of increasing EPA and DPA in plasma, RBC, and PBMC was on average 100:25:10:0 and 100:50:25:0 for FO:EO:LO:OO, respectively. EO led to a lower arachidonic acid/EPA-ratio compared to LO in plasma, RBC, and PBMC. Following EO, final DHA was not greater compared to LO. Higher BMI correlated negatively with increases in plasma EPA and DPA after EO supplementation, but not after LO supplementation. Decreasing effect on plasma LDL-C and serum insulin was greater with EO than with LO. Daily intake of SDA-containing EO is a better supplement than LO for increasing EPA and DPA in blood. However, neither EO nor LO maintained blood DHA status in

  15. Short communication: Feeding linseed oil to dairy goats with competent reticular groove reflex greatly increases n-3 fatty acids in milk fat.

    PubMed

    Martínez Marín, A L; Gómez-Cortés, P; Carrión Pardo, D; Núñez Sánchez, N; Gómez Castro, G; Juárez, M; Pérez Alba, L; Pérez Hernández, M; de la Fuente, M A

    2013-01-01

    A crossover experiment was designed to compare the effects of 2 ways of feeding linseed oil on milk fat fatty acid (FA) composition. Ten lactating goats, trained to keep competent their inborn reticular groove reflex, received a daily dose of linseed oil (38 g/d) either with their solid (concentrate) feed (CON) or emulsified in skim milk and bottle-fed (BOT). Two groups of 5 goats received alternative and successively each of the treatments in two 15-d periods. α-Linolenic acid in milk fat rose up to 13.7% in the BOT versus 1.34% in the CON treatment. The n-6 to n-3 FA ratio was significantly reduced in goats receiving bottle-fed linseed oil (1.49 vs. 0.49). Contents of rumen biohydrogenation intermediates of dietary unsaturated FA were high in milk fat of goats under the CON treatment but low in those in the BOT treatment. These results point to a clear rumen bypass of the bottle-fed linseed oil. This strategy allows obtaining milk fat naturally very rich in n-3 FA and very low in trans FA. Translating this approach into practical farm conditions could enable farmers to produce milk enriched in specific FA. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanical and morphological characterization of novel vinyl plastisols with epoxidized linseed oil as natural-based plasticizer

    SciTech Connect

    Fenollar, O.; Balart, R.; Sanchez-Nacher, L.; Garcia-Sanoguera, D.; Boronat, T.

    2010-06-02

    Poly(vinyl chloride)(PVC) is one of the most commonly used plastics in the current market due to its low cost and versatility in processing, combined with its satisfactory physical and chemical properties. However, there is an important problem associated to the use of plasticized PVC. This problem is regarding to the toxicity of the most common plasticized used like DOP, DEHP, DINP, due to its possible migration. This problem limits the use of the plasticized PVC in the industry. In this work we have used epoxidized linseed oil (ELO) as a non toxic plasticizer for PVC. This type of natural oil is characterized by acting as both plasticizer and stabilizer of PVC. With this purpose, ELO have been added to PVC. The processing conditions (temperature and time of curing) are vital to determine the final properties of the material. A study of the processing conditions shows the adequate temperature and time to achieve the optimum properties.

  17. Mechanical and morphological characterization of novel vinyl plastisols with epoxidized linseed oil as natural-based plasticizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenollar, O.; Balart, R.; Sánchez-Nácher, L.; García-Sanoguera, D.; Boronat, T.

    2010-06-01

    Poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) is one of the most commonly used plastics in the current market due to its low cost and versatility in processing, combined with its satisfactory physical and chemical properties. However, there is an important problem associated to the use of plasticized PVC. This problem is regarding to the toxicity of the most common plasticized used like DOP, DEHP, DINP, due to its possible migration. This problem limits the use of the plasticized PVC in the industry. In this work we have used epoxidized linseed oil (ELO) as a non toxic plasticizer for PVC. This type of natural oil is characterized by acting as both plasticizer and stabilizer of PVC. With this purpose, ELO have been added to PVC. The processing conditions (temperature and time of curing) are vital to determine the final properties of the material. A study of the processing conditions shows the adequate temperature and time to achieve the optimum properties.

  18. Effect of Linum usitatissimum L. (linseed) oil on mild and moderate carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is known as the most common entrapment neuropathy. Conservative treatments cannot reduce the symptomatic severity satisfactorily; therefore, effectiveness of Linum usitatissimum L. (linseed) oil on carpal tunnel syndrome, as a complementary treatment, was evaluated in the current study. Linseed oil is a well-known preparation in Iranian traditional medicine and its analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects have been shown in previous studies. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted. One hundred patients (155 hands) with idiopathic mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome aged between 18 and 65 years old were randomized in two parallel groups. These two groups were treated during 4 weeks with topical placebo and linseed oil. In addition, a night wrist splint was prescribed for both groups. Symptomatic severity and functional status were measured using Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. In addition, median sensory nerve conduction velocity, motor distal latency, sensory distal latency and compound latency as electrodiagnostic parameters were measured at baseline and after the intervention period. Results After the intervention, significant improvement was observed regarding Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire symptomatic severity and functional status mean differences (p <0.001) in the linseed oil group compared with those in the placebo group. Also, regarding the mean differences of both groups, significant improvement of nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve was seen in the linseed oil group by a value of 2.38 m/sec (p < 0.05). However, motor distal latency and sensory distal latency of the median nerve showed no between-group significant changes (p = 0.14 for both items). Finally, compound latency was improved slightly in the case group, comparing mean differences between the groups (p <0.05). No significant adverse events were reported from using linseed

  19. Effect of Linum usitatissimum L. (linseed) oil on mild and moderate carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Homayouni, Kaynoosh; Ashraf, Alireza; Salehi, Alireza; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Heydari, Mojtaba

    2014-05-21

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is known as the most common entrapment neuropathy. Conservative treatments cannot reduce the symptomatic severity satisfactorily; therefore, effectiveness of Linum usitatissimum L. (linseed) oil on carpal tunnel syndrome, as a complementary treatment, was evaluated in the current study. Linseed oil is a well-known preparation in Iranian traditional medicine and its analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects have been shown in previous studies. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted. One hundred patients (155 hands) with idiopathic mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome aged between 18 and 65 years old were randomized in two parallel groups. These two groups were treated during 4 weeks with topical placebo and linseed oil. In addition, a night wrist splint was prescribed for both groups. Symptomatic severity and functional status were measured using Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. In addition, median sensory nerve conduction velocity, motor distal latency, sensory distal latency and compound latency as electrodiagnostic parameters were measured at baseline and after the intervention period. After the intervention, significant improvement was observed regarding Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire symptomatic severity and functional status mean differences (p <0.001) in the linseed oil group compared with those in the placebo group. Also, regarding the mean differences of both groups, significant improvement of nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve was seen in the linseed oil group by a value of 2.38 m/sec (p < 0.05). However, motor distal latency and sensory distal latency of the median nerve showed no between-group significant changes (p = 0.14 for both items). Finally, compound latency was improved slightly in the case group, comparing mean differences between the groups (p <0.05). No significant adverse events were reported from using linseed oil. It seems that linseed

  20. Structurally modified pectin for targeted lipid antioxidant capacity in linseed/sunflower oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Celus, Miete; Salvia-Trujillo, Laura; Kyomugasho, Clare; Maes, Ine; Van Loey, Ann M; Grauwet, Tara; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2018-02-15

    The present work explored the lipid antioxidant capacity of citrus pectin addition to 5%(w/v) linseed/sunflower oil emulsions stabilized with 0.5%(w/v) Tween 80, as affected by pectin molecular characteristics. The peroxide formation in the emulsions, containing tailored pectin structures, was studied during two weeks of storage at 35°C. Low demethylesterified pectin (≤33%) exhibited a higher antioxidant capacity than high demethylesterified pectin (≥58%), probably due to its higher chelating capacity of pro-oxidative metal ions (Fe(2+)), whereas the distribution pattern of methylesters along the pectin chain only slightly affected the antioxidant capacity. Nevertheless, pectin addition to the emulsions caused emulsion destabilization probably due to depletion or bridging effect, independent of the pectin structural characteristics. These results evidence the potential of structurally modified citrus pectin as a natural antioxidant in emulsions. However, optimal conditions for emulsion stability should be carefully selected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In situ surface treatment of nanocrystalline MFe2O4 (M = Co, Mg, Mn, Ni) spinel ferrites using linseed oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherca, Daniel; Cornei, Nicoleta; Mentré, Olivier; Kabbour, Houria; Daviero-Minaud, Sylvie; Pui, Aurel

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports the synthesis by coprecipitation method of MFe2O4 nanoparticles using linseed oil as the in-situ surfactant. The decomposition process of the precursors and the formation process of MFe2O4 were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). The crystal structure and surface morphology were examined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The results demonstrate that the surface of MFe2O4 with a diameter in the range 5-13 nm, is activated with hydrophilic groups of the surfactant which coat them and enhance the stability. Magnetic properties are discussed.

  2. [Oral toxicity at 60-days of sacha inchi oil (Plukenetia volubilis L.) and linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.), and determination of lethal dose 50 in rodents].

    PubMed

    Gorriti, Arilmi; Arroyo, Jorge; Quispe, Fredy; Cisneros, Braulio; Condorhuamán, Martín; Almora, Yuan; Chumpitaz, Víctor

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the oral toxicity at 60 days and to determine the lethal dose 50 (LD 50) of raw sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L.) and linseed (Linum ussitatisimum) oils in Holtzman rats and mice of the strain Balb C57 respectively. For the evaluation of the oral toxicity of repeated doses for 60 days, 24 male Holtzman rats were used, divided in three groups of 8 each, the groups were: physiologic saline solution 4 mL/kg (FSS), sacha inchi oil 0.5 mL/kg (SI05) and linseed oil 0.5 mL/kg (L05), during the experiment the body weight was controlled weekly, and signs of toxicity in the research groups, as well as total cholesterol, HDL, glucose, triglycerides and alkaline phosphatase at days 30 and 60 after initiating the experiment. For the evaluation of the LD50 male mice of the Balb C57 strain were used in groups of 10 animals, and they were administered increasing oral doses of raw oils until reaching 1 mL/kg (37 g/kg). The serum parameters in the rats indicated there is no toxicity at 60 days and that the administration of the oils lowered the levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and increased the HDL in comparison with the control group. The LD50 shows that the raw sacha inchi and linseed oils have doses above 37 g/kg of body weight. Sacha inchi and linseed oils are harmless at 60 days and present a LD50 above the 37 g/kg of animal.

  3. Incorporation of sunflower oil or linseed oil in equine compound feedstuff: 1 Effects on haematology and on fatty acids profiles in the red blood cells membranes.

    PubMed

    Patoux, S; Istasse, L

    2016-10-01

    Eight trained horses (6 mares - 2 geldings, 6 Selle Français, 2 Trotteur Français, 12 ± 5.8 years old, 538 ± 72.5 kg) were offered three diets to potentially affect haematology and the fatty acids (FA) profiles in red blood cells (RBC) membranes. The control diet was composed of 50% hay and 50% concentrate containing mainly rolled barley (48%) and whole spelt (48%). In the case of sunflower oil diet, sunflower oil (62.0% of α-linoleic acid, LA) was incorporated at a rate of 8% and substituted by an equal proportion of barley. In the linseed oil diet, first cold-pressed linseed oil (56.0% of α-linolenic acid, ALA) was utilised at a similar incorporation rate of 8%. The experimental design consisted of three 3 × 3 latin squares with one being incomplete. Each period lasted 8 weeks. On average, the total feed intake (straw excluded) was 6.2 kg/day and the oil intake 0.278 kg/day. The oils significantly increased the concentrations of RBC, haemoglobin and haematocrit. The oils had no significant impact on the haematology profiles except that platelets tended to decrease in both oil-based diets. The most abundant FA in the RBC membranes of the control diet samples were in the decreasing order LA, C18:1n9-7, C18:0, C16:0 and the arachidonic acid (ARA) respectively. The sunflower oil supplementation slightly increased the amount of LA (36.23 vs. 34.72 mg/dl, p = 0.55) and C22:4n-6 (0.21 vs. 0.09 mg/dl, p = 0.22), while the decrease was observed in case of other FA (C16:1n-7, 1.08 vs. 1.42 mg/dl, p = 0.03), C20:3n-6 (0.22 vs. 0.31 mg/dl, p = 0.02), and ARA (1.17 vs. 1.63 mg/dl, p = 0.08). Linseed oil induced similar effects in the n-6 series FA profiles. In the context of practical applications, our results show that linseed oil incorporation in the diet could improve the haematology and the n-3 FA profiles potentially leading to an increased performance. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Performance, Carcass Quality and Fatty Acid Profile of Crossbred Wagyu Beef Steers Receiving Palm and/or Linseed Oil.

    PubMed

    Suksombat, Wisitiporn; Meeprom, Chayapol; Mirattanaphrai, Rattakorn

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of palm and/or linseed oil (LSO) supplementation on carcass quality, sensory evaluation and fatty acid profile of beef from crossbred Wagyu beef steers. Twenty four fattening Wagyu crossbred beef steers (50% Wagyu), averaging 640±18 kg live weight (LW) and approximately 30 mo old, were stratified and randomly assigned in completely randomized design into 3 treatment groups. All steers were fed approximately 7 kg/d of 14% crude protein concentrate with ad libitum rice straw and had free access to clean water and were individually housed in a free-stall unit. The treatments were i) control concentrate plus 200 g/d of palm oil; ii) control concentrate plus 100 g/d of palm oil and 100 g/d of LSO, iii) control concentrate plus 200 g/d of LSO. This present study demonstrated that supplementation of LSO rich in C18:3n-3 did not influence feed intakes, LW changes, carcass and muscle characteristics, sensory and physical properties. LSO increased C18:3n-3, C22:6n-3, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), however, it decreased C18:1t-11, C18:2n-6, cis-9, trans-11, and trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acids, n-6 PUFA and n-6:n-3 ratio in Longissimus dorsi and Semimembranosus muscles.

  5. Performance, Carcass Quality and Fatty Acid Profile of Crossbred Wagyu Beef Steers Receiving Palm and/or Linseed Oil

    PubMed Central

    Suksombat, Wisitiporn; Meeprom, Chayapol; Mirattanaphrai, Rattakorn

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of palm and/or linseed oil (LSO) supplementation on carcass quality, sensory evaluation and fatty acid profile of beef from crossbred Wagyu beef steers. Twenty four fattening Wagyu crossbred beef steers (50% Wagyu), averaging 640±18 kg live weight (LW) and approximately 30 mo old, were stratified and randomly assigned in completely randomized design into 3 treatment groups. All steers were fed approximately 7 kg/d of 14% crude protein concentrate with ad libitum rice straw and had free access to clean water and were individually housed in a free-stall unit. The treatments were i) control concentrate plus 200 g/d of palm oil; ii) control concentrate plus 100 g/d of palm oil and 100 g/d of LSO, iii) control concentrate plus 200 g/d of LSO. This present study demonstrated that supplementation of LSO rich in C18:3n-3 did not influence feed intakes, LW changes, carcass and muscle characteristics, sensory and physical properties. LSO increased C18:3n-3, C22:6n-3, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), however, it decreased C18:1t-11, C18:2n-6, cis-9, trans-11, and trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acids, n-6 PUFA and n-6:n-3 ratio in Longissimus dorsi and Semimembranosus muscles. PMID:26954221

  6. Effects of linseed oil and natural or synthetic vitamin E supplementation in lactating ewes' diets on meat fatty acid profile and lipid oxidation from their milk fed lambs.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, B; Manca, M G; Mantecón, A R; Nudda, A; Manso, T

    2015-04-01

    Forty-eight Churra ewes with their new-born lambs were separated into four dietary treatments: Control (without added fat), LO (with 3% linseed oil), LO-Syn E (LO plus 400 mg/kg TMR of synthetic vitamin E) and LO-Nat E (LO plus 400 g/kg TMR of natural vitamin E). Linseed oil caused an increase in trans-11 C18:1 (VA), trans-10 C18:1, cis-9, trans-11 C18:2 (RA), trans-10, cis-12 C18:2 and C18:3 n-3 (ALA) in milk fat compared to the Control. The addition of vitamin E to the LO diets did not influence significantly the majority of milk fatty acids compared with the LO diet alone. Trans-10 C18:1, VA, RA, trans-10, cis-12 C18:2 and LA levels were higher in intramuscular lamb fat from treatments with linseed oil. No statistically significant differences were observed in these FA due to vitamin E supplementation or the type of vitamin E (synthetic vs. natural). Vitamin supplementation resulted in lipid oxidation levels below the threshold values for detection of rancidity in lamb meat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of dietary linseed oil on innate immune system of Eurasian perch and disease resistance after exposure to Aeromonas salmonicida achromogen.

    PubMed

    Geay, F; Mellery, J; Tinti, E; Douxfils, J; Larondelle, Y; Mandiki, S N M; Kestemont, P

    2015-12-01

    This study was designated to investigate the effects of dietary fish oil (FO diet) replacement by linseed oil (LO diet) on regulation of immune response and disease resistance in Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis). A control diet containing fish oil (FO = cod liver oil) and characterized by high levels of n-3 high LC-PUFA (6% EPA, 7.5% of total fatty acids (FAs)) was compared to linseed oil diet (LO diet) composed of low LC-PUFA contents (1% EPA, 2.3% DHA of total FAs) but high C18 fatty acids levels. The experiment was conducted in quadruplicate groups of 80 fish each. After 10 weeks of feeding, the innate immune status was evaluated in various organs (liver, spleen, and head-kidney) (feeding condition). Two days later, a bacterial challenge was performed on fish from 2 rearing conditions: fish infected with Aeromonas salmonicida (bacteria condition) and fish injected with sterile medium but maintained in the same flow system that fish challenged with bacteria (sentinel condition). Three days after injection of bacteria, a significant decrease of lymphocyte, thrombocyte and basophil populations was observed while neutrophils were not affected. In addition, plasma lysozyme activity and reactive oxygen species production in kidney significantly increased in fish challenged with A. salmonicida while the plasma alternative complement pathway activity was not affected. Increase of plasma lysozyme activity as well as reactive oxygen species production in spleen and kidney of sentinel fish suggest that these immune defenses can also be activated, but at lower bacteria concentration than infected fish. No differences in leucocyte populations, plasma lysozyme and alternative complement pathway activities were observed between dietary treatments. Similarly, expression of genes related to eicosanoid synthesis in liver were not affected by the dietary oil source but were strongly stimulated in fish challenged with A. salmonicida. These findings demonstrated that the use of

  8. Replacement of dietary fish oil with increasing levels of linseed oil: modification of flesh fatty acid compositions in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) using a fish oil finishing diet.

    PubMed

    Bell, J Gordon; Henderson, R James; Tocher, Douglas R; Sargent, John R

    2004-03-01

    Five groups of salmon, of initial mean weight 127 +/- 3 g, were fed increasing levels of dietary linseed oil (LO) in a regression design. The control diet contained capelin oil (FO) only, and the same oil was blended with LO to provide the experimental diets. After an initial period of 40 wk, all groups were switched to a finishing diet containing only FO for a further 24 wk. Growth and flesh lipid contents were not affected by dietary treatment. The FA compositions of flesh total lipids were linearly correlated with dietary FA compositions (r2 = 0.88-1.00, P < 0.0001). LO included at 50% of added dietary lipids reduced flesh DHA and EPA (20:5n-3) concentrations to 65 and 58%, respectively, of the concentrations in fish fed FO. Feeding 100% LO reduced flesh DHA and EPA concentrations to 38 and 30%, respectively, of the values in fish fed FO. Differences between diet and flesh FA concentrations showed that 16:0, 18:1n-9, and especially DHA were preferentially retained in flesh, whereas 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, and 22:1n-11 were selected against and presumably utilized for energy. In fish previously fed 50 and 100% LO, feeding a finishing diet containing FO for 16 wk restored flesh DHA and EPA concentrations, to approximately 80% of the values in fish fed FO throughout. Flesh DHA and EPA concentrations in fish fed up to 50% LO were above recommended intake values for humans for these EFA. This study suggests that LO can be used as a substitute for FO in seawater salmon feeds and that any reductions in DHA and EPA can be largely overcome with a finishing diet high in FO before harvest.

  9. Effect of Linseed Oil Dietary Supplementation on Fatty Acid Composition and Gene Expression in Adipose Tissue of Growing Goats

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, M.; Rajion, M. A.; Goh, Y. M.; Sazili, A. Q.; Schonewille, J. T.

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of feeding oil palm frond silage based diets with added linseed oil (LO) containing high α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3), namely, high LO (HLO), low LO (LLO), and without LO as the control group (CON) on the fatty acid (FA) composition of subcutaneous adipose tissue and the gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α, PPAR-γ, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in Boer goats. The proportion of C18:3n-3 in subcutaneous adipose tissue was increased (P < 0.01) by increasing the LO in the diet, suggesting that the FA from HLO might have escaped ruminal biohydrogenation. Animals fed HLO diets had lower proportions of C18:1 trans-11, C18:2n-6, CLA cis-9 trans-11, and C20:4n-6 and higher proportions of C18:3n-3, C22:5n-3, and C22:6n-3 in the subcutaneous adipose tissue than animals fed the CON diets, resulting in a decreased n-6:n-3 fatty acid ratio (FAR) in the tissue. In addition, feeding the HLO diet upregulated the expression of PPAR-γ (P < 0.05) but downregulated the expression of SCD (P < 0.05) in the adipose tissue. The results of the present study show that LO can be safely incorporated in the diets of goats to enrich goat meat with potential health beneficial FA (i.e., n-3 FA). PMID:23484090

  10. A ToF-SIMS study of linseed oil bonded to mercapto silane treated aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bexell, U.; Olsson, M.; Sundell, P.-E.; Johansson, M.; Carlsson, P.; Hellsing, M.

    2004-06-01

    ToF-SIMS has been used to analyse an aluminium surface treated with a vegetable oil using a mercapto silane as a coupling agent between the aluminium substrate and the vegetable oil. The coupling between the vegetable oil and the mercapto silane was obtained through a photoinduced thiol-ene reaction using UV-radiation. The ToF-SIMS results show that the desired thiol-ene reaction has taken place between the unsaturated parts of the vegetable oil and the thiol groups of the mercapto silane via the thiol-ene reaction forming a surface film.

  11. Effect of supplementation of cows diet with linseed and fish oil and different variants of β-lactoglobulin on fatty acid composition and antioxidant capacity of milk.

    PubMed

    Puppel, Kamila; Kuczyńska, Beata; Nałęcz-Tarwacka, Teresa; Gołębiewski, Marcin; Sakowski, Tomasz; Kapusta, Aleksandra; Budziński, Arkadiusz; Balcerak, Marek

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of polymorphic variants of β-lactoglobulin in cows supplemented with linseed and fish oil on the fatty acid composition and antioxidant capacity of milk. From the herd of 320 Polish Holstein Friesian cows three groups of cows were selected according to the variants of β-LG (β-LGAA, β-LGBB, β-LGAB). During the first 7 days (the initial period) all the cows were fed the same total mixed ration (TMR) diet. From day 8 to 28,150 g fish oil and 250 g linseed (FOL) was added to the TMR diet of each cow. The results showed that the diet supplemented with FOL was effective in reducing atherogenic and thrombogenic indices. Introducing supplementation improved the antioxidant capacity: higher concentration of C18:2cis-9 trans-11, C20:5 n-3, C22:6 n-3, bioactive whey proteins and vitamin soluble in fat has been recorded. The results showed that β-LGAA was associated with lower levels of atherogenic and thrombogenic indices and higher concentration of C22:5 n-6, phospholipids and β-carotene. β-LGBB favours a higher content of C18:1trans-11, C18:2cis-9 trans-11 and lactoferrin. β-LGAB was associated with higher concentrations of C20:5 n-3, Lysozyme, α-retinol, α-tocopherol and total antioxidant status. Modification of the diet of cows with fish oil and linseed significantly influenced fatty acid composition and antioxidant properties of milk. The effect of β-LG phenotype on the fatty acid composition and antioxidant capacity of milk is variable, which could partly be the result of a β-LG phenotype × diet interaction. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Deep sequencing shows microRNA involvement in bovine mammary gland adaptation to diets supplemented with linseed oil or safflower oil.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Beaudoin, Frédéric; Ammah, Adolf A; Bissonnette, Nathalie; Benchaar, Chaouki; Zhao, Xin; Lei, Chuzhao; Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M

    2015-10-30

    Bovine milk fat composition is responsive to dietary manipulation providing an avenue to modify the content of fatty acids and especially some specific unsaturated fatty acid (USFA) isomers of benefit to human health. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression but their specific roles in bovine mammary gland lipogenesis are unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the expression pattern of miRNAs following mammary gland adaptation to dietary supplementation with 5 % linseed or safflower oil using next generation RNA-sequencing. Twenty-four Canadian Holstein dairy cows (twelve per treatment) in mid lactation were fed a control diet (total mixed ration of corn:grass silages) for 28 days followed by a treatment period (control diet supplemented with 5 % linseed or safflower oil) of 28 days. Milk samples were collected weekly for fat and individual fatty acid determination. RNA from mammary gland biopsies harvested on day-14 (control period) and on days +7 and +28 (treatment period) from six randomly selected cows per treatment was subjected to small RNA sequencing. Milk fat percentage decreased significantly (P < 0.001) during treatment with the two diets as compared to the control period. The individual saturated fatty acids C4:0, C6:0, C8:0, C14:0 and C16:0 decreased significantly (P < 0.05) while five USFAs (C14:1, C18:1n11t, C20:3n3, C20:5n3 and CLA:t10c12) increased remarkably (P < 0.05) in response to both treatments. Analysis of 361 million sequence reads generated 321 known bovine miRNAs and 176 novel miRNAs. The expression of fourteen and twenty-two miRNAs was affected (P < 0.05) by linseed and safflower oil treatments, respectively. Seven miRNAs including six up-regulated (bta-miR-199c, miR-199a-3p, miR-98, miR-378, miR-148b and miR-21-5p) and one down-regulated (bta-miR-200a) were found to be regulated (P < 0.05) by both treatments, and thus considered core differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs. The gene targets of core DE miRNAs have functions

  13. The effect of maleinized linseed oil (MLO) on mechanical performance of poly(lactic acid)-thermoplastic starch (PLA-TPS) blends.

    PubMed

    Ferri, J M; Garcia-Garcia, D; Sánchez-Nacher, L; Fenollar, O; Balart, R

    2016-08-20

    In this work, poly(lactic acid), PLA and thermoplastic starch, TPS blends (with a fixed content of 30wt.% TPS) were prepared by melt extrusion process to increase the low ductile properties of PLA. The TPS used contains an aliphatic/aromatic biodegradable polyester (AAPE) that provides good resistance to aging and moisture. This blend provides slightly improved ductile properties with an increase in elongation at break of 21.5% but phase separation is observed due to the lack of strong interactions between the two polymers. Small amounts of maleinized linseed oil (MLO) can positively contribute to improve the ductile properties of these blends by a combined plasticizing-compatibilizing effect. The elongation at break increases over 160% with the only addition of 6phr MLO. One of the evidence of the plasticizing-compatibilizing effect provided by MLO is the change in the glass transition temperature (Tg) with a decrease of about 10°C. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) of PLA-TPS blends with varying amounts of maleinized linseed oil also suggests an increase in compatibility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The age of cows as a factor shaping the antioxidant level during a nutritional experiment with fish oil and linseed supplementation for increasing the antioxidant value of milk.

    PubMed

    Puppel, Kamila; Nałecz-Tarwacka, Teresa; Kuczyńska, Beata; Gołebiewski, Marcin; Kordyasz, Marta; Grodzki, Henryk

    2012-09-01

    So far, in research studies, the age of cows has not been considered as a factor that may influence the changes in the content of milk ingredients with antioxidant properties modified by the feed supplementation. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of supplementation on the content of ingredients having antioxidant properties and to determine the influence of the age of cows taking part in the experiment on these changes. The experiment was conducted using 20 Polish Holstein Friesian cows, 10 primiparous and 10 multiparous. The combined supplementation of fish oil and linseed constituted the experimental factor. The milk of primiparous cows after 21 days of supplementation was characterised by a higher content of C18:1 trans-11, C18:2 cis-9, trans-11, α-retinol, α-tocopherol and β-lactoglobulin compared to the milk of multiparous cows, in which a higher level of lactoferrin, C20:5 and β-carotene was recorded. In both groups an increase in the total antioxidant status was noted (a higher level in the milk of primiparous cows). Modification of the diet of cows with fish oil and linseed significantly influenced antioxidant properties of their milk; however, the response of multiparous and primaparous cows was noticeably different to the supplement introduced. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Effect of fish oil and linseed supplementation on the protein composition of milk from cows with different β-lactoglobulin phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Puppel, Kamila; Kuczyńska, Beata; Nałęcz-Tarwacka, Teresa; Sakowski, Tomasz; Gołębiewski, Marcin; Kunowska-Slósarz, Małgorzata; Budziński, Arkadiusz; Grodzki, Henryk

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of fish oil and linseed (FOL) supplements on the protein fraction levels of milk from cows with different phenotypes of β-lactoglobulin. After 21 days of supplementation the study showed significantly higher concentrations of whey proteins, especially lysozyme (144% increase) and lactoferrin (45.5% increase), compared with milk from control cows (total mixed ration with no supplemented FOL). A reverse trend was demonstrated for casein, casein index and casein number (lower level). The most favourable change (higher level), in terms of lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin and bovine serum albumin contents in milk, was recorded in cows with the BB variant of β-lactoglobulin. The highest level of lysozyme was recorded in the milk of cows with the AB variant of β-lactoglobulin. The combined supplementation of fish oil and linseed had a positive impact on whey proteins in cow's milk. In addition, the phenotype of β-lactoglobulin also played a role in milk protein composition. There is therefore a clear indication that nutritional experiments should take into account not only food supplements but also the genetic variants of β-lactoglobulin. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Novel characterisation of minor α-linolenic acid isomers in linseed oil by gas chromatography and covalent adduct chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cortés, P; Brenna, J T; Lawrence, P; de la Fuente, M A

    2016-06-01

    Discrimination between polyunsaturated fatty acid isomers with three double bonds is a great challenge, due to structural similarities and similar polarities. In this study, we report the identification of four minor geometrical isomers of α-linolenic acid (ALA) present in linseed oil samples: (9E,12Z,15E)-, (9Z,12Z,15E)-, (9Z,12E,15Z)- and (9E,12Z,15Z)-octadeca-9,12,15-trienoic acids, chromatographically resolved by gas chromatography (GC) using a new and highly polar ionic phase column (SLB-IL111). Gas chromatography-electron ionisation mass spectrometry (GC-EIMS) determined that the four unknown compounds were C18:3 n-3 isomers. The positional 9-12-15 C18:3 configuration was achieved by covalent adduct chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (CACI-MS/MS) while geometrical configuration was established with analytical standards based on relative retention. We hypothesised that these isomers are formed during linseed oil deodorisation and postulate preferred and unfavoured isomerisation pathways of ALA.

  17. Some studies on the composition and surface properties of oil bodies from the seed cotyledons of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) and linseed (Linum ustatissimum).

    PubMed

    Slack, C R; Bertaud, W S; Shaw, B D; Holland, R; Browse, J; Wright, H

    1980-09-15

    1. The average oil-body diameter in intact cells of developing linseed (Linum usitatissimum) and safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) cotyledons was similar (about 1.4 micrometer), and there was little change in size after oil bodies were isolated and repeatedly washed. 2. The glycerolipid composition of washed oil bodies from both developing and mature cotyledons of the two species was similar; oil bodies from ten different batches of cotyledons contained 4.3 +/- 0.16 mumol of 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine and 25.2 +/- 1.7 mumol of diacylglycerol per 1000 mumol of triacylglycerol. During four successive washings of a once-washed oil-body preparation, the proportion of diacylglycerol to triacylglycerol remained constant and that of 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine to triacylglycerol decreased by only 20%. 3. The protein content of thrice-washed oil bodies from the two species was similar, about 2.4% of the weight of glycerolipids, and appeared to be independent of the stage of cotyledon maturity. Sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis indicated that the protein of purified oil bodies from the two species consisted mainly of only four polypeptides and that two of the polypeptides from each species had apparent mol.wts. of 17500 and 15500. Similar patterns of polypeptides were obtained after the hydrolysis of the 15500-mol.wt. polypeptides from linseed and safflower oil bodies by Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, whereas the proteolysis of the 17500-mol.wt. polypeptides from the two species produced different patterns of polypeptides. 4. The 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine in oil-body preparations was hydrolysed about 85% by bee-venom phospholipase A2 without any apparent coalescence of the oil bodies. Incubation with lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus caused rapid coalescence of the oil bodies, and this lipase appeared to initially hydrolyse diacylglycerols in preference to triacylglycerol. 5. Oil bodies from both species were almost completely dispersed in suspensions of

  18. Some studies on the composition and surface properties of oil bodies from the seed cotyledons of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) and linseed (Linum ustatissimum).

    PubMed Central

    Slack, C R; Bertaud, W S; Shaw, B D; Holland, R; Browse, J; Wright, H

    1980-01-01

    1. The average oil-body diameter in intact cells of developing linseed (Linum usitatissimum) and safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) cotyledons was similar (about 1.4 micrometer), and there was little change in size after oil bodies were isolated and repeatedly washed. 2. The glycerolipid composition of washed oil bodies from both developing and mature cotyledons of the two species was similar; oil bodies from ten different batches of cotyledons contained 4.3 +/- 0.16 mumol of 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine and 25.2 +/- 1.7 mumol of diacylglycerol per 1000 mumol of triacylglycerol. During four successive washings of a once-washed oil-body preparation, the proportion of diacylglycerol to triacylglycerol remained constant and that of 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine to triacylglycerol decreased by only 20%. 3. The protein content of thrice-washed oil bodies from the two species was similar, about 2.4% of the weight of glycerolipids, and appeared to be independent of the stage of cotyledon maturity. Sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis indicated that the protein of purified oil bodies from the two species consisted mainly of only four polypeptides and that two of the polypeptides from each species had apparent mol.wts. of 17500 and 15500. Similar patterns of polypeptides were obtained after the hydrolysis of the 15500-mol.wt. polypeptides from linseed and safflower oil bodies by Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, whereas the proteolysis of the 17500-mol.wt. polypeptides from the two species produced different patterns of polypeptides. 4. The 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine in oil-body preparations was hydrolysed about 85% by bee-venom phospholipase A2 without any apparent coalescence of the oil bodies. Incubation with lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus caused rapid coalescence of the oil bodies, and this lipase appeared to initially hydrolyse diacylglycerols in preference to triacylglycerol. 5. Oil bodies from both species were almost completely dispersed in suspensions of

  19. Linseed oil: an investigation of its antiarthritic activity in experimental models.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surender; Nair, Vinod; Gupta, Y K

    2012-02-01

    Food sources rich in omega-3 fatty acids have been valued for their beneficial effect in the management of inflammatory disorders. The present study evaluates the antiarthritic and immunomodulatory activity of Linum usitatissimum fixed oil (LUFO) in experimental models. The LUFO produced a dose-dependent reduction in joint swelling and circulating TNF-α levels in both preventive and curative protocols of arthritis induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Expression of TNF-R1 and Interleukin (IL) 6 proteins in the arthritic paw was also significantly reduced in the LUFO-treated animals. In the cotton pellet induced granuloma model, LUFO treatment significantly reduced the dry granuloma weight as compared with the control group. Results of our present study thus demonstrate the antiarthritic and disease modifying activity of LUFO. We believe that dietary incorporation of LUFO may be beneficial in the prevention and management of rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic inflammatory disorders. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The effect of different concentrations of linseed oil or fish oil in the maternal diet on the fatty acid composition and oxidative status of sows and piglets.

    PubMed

    Tanghe, S; Missotten, J; Raes, K; De Smet, S

    2015-10-01

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are essential for foetal development. Hence, including n-3 PUFA in the sow diet can be beneficial for reproduction. Both the amount and form (precursor fatty acids vs. long chain PUFA) of supplementation are important in this respect. Furthermore, including n-3 PUFA in the diet can have negative effects, such as decreased arachidonic acid (ARA) concentration and increased oxidative stress. This study aimed to compare the efficacy to increase eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) concentrations in the piglet, when different concentrations of linseed oil (LO, source of precursor α-linolenic acid) or fish oil (FO, source of EPA and DHA) were included in the maternal diet. Sows were fed a palm oil diet or a diet including 0.5% or 2% LO or FO from day 45 of gestation until weaning. Linoleic acid (LA) was kept constant in the diets to prevent a decrease in ARA, and all diets were supplemented with α-tocopherol acetate (150 mg/kg) and organic selenium (0.4 mg/kg) to prevent oxidative stress. Feeding 0.5% LO or 0.5% FO to the sows resulted in comparable EPA concentrations in the 5-day old piglet liver, but both diets resulted in lower EPA concentrations than when 2% LO was fed. The highest EPA concentration was obtained when 2% FO was fed. The DHA level in the piglet liver could only be increased when FO, but not LO, was fed to the sows. The 2% FO diet had no advantage over the 0.5% FO diet to increase DHA in the piglet. Despite the constant LA concentration in the sow diet, a decrease in ARA could not be avoided when LO or FO were included in the diet. Feeding 2% FO to the sows increased the malondialdehyde concentration (marker for lipid peroxidation) in sow plasma, but not in piglets.

  1. Effects of different sources of fat (calcium soap of palm oil vs. extruded linseed) in lactating ewes' diet on the fatty acid profile of their suckling lambs.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cortés, P; Gallardo, B; Mantecón, A R; Juárez, M; de la Fuente, M A; Manso, T

    2014-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplementing lactating ewe diets with extruded linseed on the fatty acid (FA) composition of intramuscular and subcutaneous fat depots of suckling lambs. Twenty-four pregnant Churra ewes were divided into two groups based on the milk production, age, body weight and parity, and assigned to one of two treatments. Each ewe of the Control treatment was supplemented with 70 g/day of FAs from a calcium soap of palm oil, while the other treatment group (Lin) was supplemented with 128 g/day of extruded linseed. All lambs were reared exclusively on milk and were slaughtered when they reached 11 kg live weight. FA profiles of ewe milk, lamb meat and subcutaneous adipose tissue were determined by GC. Lamb performance was not affected by the treatments. Muscle fat and adipose tissue from the Lin treatment showed higher proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The percentages of α-linolenic (C18:3 n-3), docosahexaenoic (C22:6 n-3), vaccenic (trans-11 C18:1) and rumenic (cis-9, trans-11 C18:2) acids in both fat depots were higher in Lin than in Control suckling lambs. Furthermore, meat fat from Lin carcasses displayed a lower n-6/n-3 ratio than Control samples. Intramuscular depots clearly showed a greater content of PUFA, including cis-9, trans-11 C18:2, and a lower n-6/n-3 ratio than subcutaneous fat. The results from this study demonstrate that dietary extruded linseed supplementation of lactating ewes enhances the nutritional quality of suckling lamb fat depots such as intramuscular and subcutaneous fats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dietary fish oil replacement by linseed oil: Effect on growth, nutrient utilization, tissue fatty acid composition and desaturase gene expression in silver barb (Puntius gonionotus) fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Madhusmita; Saha, Ashis; Pradhan, Avinash; Samanta, Mrinal; Giri, Shiba Shankar

    2017-03-01

    Silver barb (Puntius gonionotus) is considered a promising medium carp species for freshwater aquaculture in Asia. This study in silver barb was carried out to evaluate the effects of total or partial substitution of dietary fish oil (FO) with linseed oil (LO) on growth, nutrient utilization, whole-body composition, muscle and liver fatty acid composition. Fish (12.1±0.4g of initial body weight) were fed for 60days with five experimental iso-proteinous, iso-lipidic and iso-caloric diets in which FO (control diet) was replaced by 33.3%, 50%, 66.7% and 100% LO. Final weight, weight gain, percent weight gain, SGR decreased linearly (p<0.001) with increasing LO levels in the diets. Dietary LO substitution levels did not significantly (p>0.05) affect the feed conversion ratio (FCR), protein efficiency ratio (PER) and whole body proximate composition. Furthermore, enhanced level of LO increased α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n3) and linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n6) and decreased eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n3) in muscle and liver. To understand the molecular mechanism of long chain-polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) biosynthesis, we cloned and characterized the fatty acyl Δ6 desaturase (Δ6 fad) cDNA and investigated its expression in various organs/tissues following replacement of FO with LO in the diet. The full-length Δ6 fad cDNA was 2056bp encoding 444 amino acids and was widely expressed in various organs/tissues. Replacement of FO with LO increased the expression of Δ6 fad mRNA in liver, muscle and intestine but no significant difference was found in the brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Copolymerization as a Strategy to Combine Epoxidized Linseed Oil and Furfuryl Alcohol: The Design of a Fully Bio-Based Thermoset.

    PubMed

    Pin, Jean-Mathieu; Guigo, Nathanaël; Vincent, Luc; Sbirrazzuoli, Nicolas; Mija, Alice

    2015-12-21

    Epoxidized linseed oil and furfuryl alcohol are bio-sourced monomers known for their high-potential applications in materials science. In this work, we propose the association of these monomers through copolymerization reactions with the target to design fully bio-based thermosets. Herein, investigations on cationic polymerization reactivity have been explored using differential scanning calorimetry. The obtained structures have been confirmed by IR spectroscopy and 2 D NMR spectroscopy, which revealed the principal chain connections. In spite of the multiple capabilities of chemical connections, which include copolymerization and cross-linking, the obtained networks are homogeneous as confirmed by dynamic mechanical analysis and SEM. Furthermore, the copolymer demonstrates a semiductile behavior if subjected to tensile measurements (tensile strain at break ≈40 %), which is a significant advance in terms of its applications as a furanic bio-based thermoset material.

  4. Curcumin and linseed oil co-delivered in phospholipid nanoemulsions enhances the levels of docosahexaenoic acid in serum and tissue lipids of rats.

    PubMed

    Sugasini, D; Lokesh, B R

    2017-04-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an important long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) primarily found in marine fishes. The diets of vegetarian population do not contain preformed DHA, but they can derive it from shorter chain α-linolenic acid (ALA) found in plant oils. However, the conversion efficiency of ALA to DHA is minimal in human adults. This may cause insufficiency of DHA in the vegetarian population. Curcumin, diferuloyl methane found in the spice turmeric, has the potential to increase the formation of DHA from ALA by activating the enzymes FADS2 and elongase 2. The present study was designed to prepare curcumin nanoemulsion using phospholipid core material (Lipoid™) and exploring the possibility of enhancing its bioavailability and its impact on DHA levels in rats. Curcumin was dissolved in coconut oil (CNO, MCFA rich), Sunflower oil (SNO, n-6 PUFA rich) or Linseed oil (LSO, n-3 PUFA rich) and nanoemulsions were prepared after mixing with Lipoid™ using high pressure homogenizer. The nanoemulsions were fed to weaning rats for 60 days along with AIN-93 diets. Rats fed nanoemulsion containing curcumin in LSO showed high levels of curcumin in serum liver, heart and brain. Significant increase in DHA levels of serum and tissue lipids were observed in rats given LSO with curcumin in nanoemulsions. Therefore, supplementation of diets with ALA rich LSO and curcumin could increase DHA concentrations in serum, liver, heart and brain lipids which have implications for meeting the DHA requirements of vegetarian populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fatty acid profile and oxidative stability of pork as influenced by duration and time of dietary linseed or fish oil supplementation.

    PubMed

    Haak, L; De Smet, S; Fremaut, D; Van Walleghem, K; Raes, K

    2008-06-01

    In this experiment, the effect of duration and time of feeding n-3 PUFA sources on the fatty acid composition and oxidative stability of the longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle was investigated. Linseed (L) and fish oil (F), rich in alpha-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA and DHA), respectively, were supplied equivalent to a level of 1.2% oil (as fed), either during the whole fattening period or only during the first (P1; 8 wk) or second (P2; 6 to 9 wk until slaughter) fattening phase. All diets were based on barley, wheat, and soybean meal and were fed ad libitum. Crossbred pigs (n = 154; Topigs 40 x Piétrain) were randomly allotted to the 7 feeding groups. In the basal diet (B), only animal fat was used as the supplementary fat source. Three dietary groups were supplied the same fatty acid source during both fattening phases (i.e., group BB, LL, and FF). For the other 4 dietary groups, the fatty acid source was switched after the first phase (groups BL, BF, LF, and FL; the first and second letter indicating the diet in P1 and P2, respectively). Twelve animals per feeding group were selected based on average live BW. The LT was analyzed for fatty acid composition; lipid stability (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) and color stability (a* value, % of myoglobin pigments) were determined on the LT after illuminated chill storage for up to 8 d. The alpha-linolenic acid, EPA, and docosapentaenoic acid incorporation was independent of the duration of linseed feeding (1.24, 0.54, and 0.75% of total fatty acids, respectively, for group LL). Supplying fish oil during both phases resulted in the greatest EPA and DHA proportions (1.37 and 1.02% of total fatty acids; P < 0.05), but the content of docosapentaenoic acid was not affected. The proportion of DHA was greater when fish oil was administered during P2 compared with P1 (P < 0.05). There was no effect of diet on meat ultimate pH and drip loss or on lipid or color oxidation.

  6. Diet-induced thermogenesis is lower in rats fed a lard diet than in those fed a high oleic acid safflower oil diet, a safflower oil diet or a linseed oil diet.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, H; Matsuo, T; Tokuyama, K; Shimomura, Y; Suzuki, M

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of the present study were to examine the effects of dietary fats differing in fatty acid composition on diet-induced thermogenesis, sympathetic activity in brown adipose tissue and body fat accumulation in rats. Rats were meal-fed for 12 wk an isoenergetic diet based on lard, high oleic acid safflower oil, safflower oil or linseed oil, and norepinephrine turnover rates in brown adipose tissue were then estimated. Whole-body oxygen consumption after the meal indicated that diet-induced thermogenesis was significantly lower in rats fed the lard diet than in those fed the other diets. The norepinephrine turnover rate in the interscapular brown adipose tissue was also significantly lower in the lard diet group than in the other diet groups. The carcass fat content was significantly higher in the lard diet group than in the other diet groups, whereas the abdominal adipose tissue weights were the same in all diet groups. These results suggest that the intake of animal fats rich in saturated fatty acids, compared with the intake of vegetable oils rich in monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids, decreases diet-induced thermogenesis by a decline of sympathetic activity in brown adipose tissue, resulting in the promotion of body fat accumulation.

  7. Effect of a dietary supplementation with linseed oil and selenium to growing rabbits on their productive performances, carcass traits and fresh and cooked meat quality.

    PubMed

    Matics, Zs; Cullere, M; Szín, M; Gerencsér, Zs; Szabó, A; Fébel, H; Odermatt, M; Radnai, I; Dalle Zotte, A; Szendrő, Zs

    2016-08-23

    The present experiment tested a dietary supplementation with linseed oil and selenium to growing rabbits. The basal diet (B) contained 3% sunflower oil, while it was substituted with 3% linseed oil in the experimental feed (S). The selenium (Se) content of the two diets was 0.10 vs. 0.46 mg/kg. Rabbits were fed with B diet from the age of 18 days. One group was fed with the B diet until 11 weeks of age (group B), whereas the experimental groups were fed with S diet for 1, 2, 3 or 4 weeks (groups S1, S2, S3 and S4, respectively), before slaughtering (11 weeks of age). Live performance and carcass traits of rabbits, fatty acid (FA) profile and selenium content of their hind leg (HL) and Longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) meat were considered in this study. In addition, the effect of two different cooking methods on the nutritional value of the enriched HL meat was also assessed. The tested dietary supplementation only minimally affected the live performance and carcass traits of rabbits. The S supplementation significantly reduced the Σ n-6 FA and increased the Σ n-3 FA of the HL meat and LTL meat, compared to the B diet (p < 0.001); thus, n-6/n-3 ratio was improved (p < 0.001). In addition, HL meat and LTL meat of S fed rabbits were significantly enriched in Se reaching a twofold increase in both meat cuts (p < 0.01). Therefore, the S supplementation improved the functional value of the rabbit meat. The heat treatment affected cooking loss, Se and vitamin E contents as well as the oxidative status of the HL meat (p < 0.001), with the different cooking methods providing different results. In addition, even if the beneficial C20:5 n-3 and C22:6 n-3 decreased with cooking, the n-6/n-3 ratio remained unaffected.

  8. Dietary linseed oil in the maternal diet affects immunoglobulins, tissue fatty acid composition and expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets.

    PubMed

    Chen, X L; Wang, N; Tian, M L; Wang, L; Liu, T; Zhang, X W; Shi, B M; Shan, A S

    2016-11-21

    This experiment investigated the effects of supplementing the maternal diet with linseed oil (LSO) and soya bean oil (SBO) on immunoglobulins, the fatty acid composition and hepatic expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets. Multiparous sows (twenty-four per diet) were fed on diets containing a supplement of either SBO or LSO during last week of gestation and lactation. The results indicated that supplementation of maternal diet with LSO could improve the weaning weight of piglets and average daily gain (ADG) (p < 0.05). The concentration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) was enhanced in sow plasma, colostrum and milk by the addition of LSO (p < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of 18: 3n-3 fatty acids was higher in the milk of LSO sows. Meanwhile, maternal supplementation with LSO increased the levels of plasma IgG, IgA and the tissues n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in piglets (p < 0.05). Correspondingly, the mRNA expression levels of hepatic ∆5-desaturase (D5D) and ∆6-desaturase (D6D) were higher, and fatty acid synthase (FAS) was lower in piglets from LSO-fed sows when compared with that in the SBO group. In conclusion, LSO supplementation of the maternal diet increases immunoglobulins, modifies the fatty acid composition and affects the gene of D5D and D6D expression of piglets.

  9. Temperature Increase Negatively Affects the Fatty Acid Bioconversion Capacity of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Fed a Linseed Oil-Based Diet

    PubMed Central

    Mellery, Julie; Geay, Florian; Tocher, Douglas R.; Kestemont, Patrick; Debier, Cathy; Rollin, Xavier; Larondelle, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Aquaculture is meant to provide fish rich in omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA). This objective must be reached despite (1) the necessity to replace the finite and limited fish oil in feed production and (2) the increased temperature of the supply water induced by the global warming. The objective of the present paper was to determine to what extent increased water temperature influences the fatty acid bioconversion capacity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a plant-derived diet. Fish were fed two diets formulated with fish oil (FO) or linseed oil (LO) as only added lipid source at the optimal water temperature of 15°C or at the increased water temperature of 19°C for 60 days. We observed that a temperature increase close to the upper limit of the species temperature tolerance range negatively affected the feed efficiency of rainbow trout fed LO despite a higher feed intake. The negative impact of increased water temperature on fatty acid bioconversion capacity appeared also to be quite clear considering the reduced expression of fatty acid desaturase 2 in liver and intestine and the reduced Δ6 desaturase enzymatic activity in intestinal microsomes. The present results also highlighted a negative impact of increased temperature on the apparent in vivo enzymatic activity of Δ5 and Δ6 desaturases of fish fed LO. Interestingly, this last parameter appeared less affected than those mentioned above. This study highlights that the increased temperature that rainbow trout may face due to global warming could reduce their fatty acid bioconversion capacity. The unavoidable replacement of finite fish oil by more sustainable, readily available and economically viable alternative lipid sources in aquaculture feeds should take this undeniable environmental issue on aquaculture productivity into account. PMID:27736913

  10. Temperature Increase Negatively Affects the Fatty Acid Bioconversion Capacity of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Fed a Linseed Oil-Based Diet.

    PubMed

    Mellery, Julie; Geay, Florian; Tocher, Douglas R; Kestemont, Patrick; Debier, Cathy; Rollin, Xavier; Larondelle, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Aquaculture is meant to provide fish rich in omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA). This objective must be reached despite (1) the necessity to replace the finite and limited fish oil in feed production and (2) the increased temperature of the supply water induced by the global warming. The objective of the present paper was to determine to what extent increased water temperature influences the fatty acid bioconversion capacity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a plant-derived diet. Fish were fed two diets formulated with fish oil (FO) or linseed oil (LO) as only added lipid source at the optimal water temperature of 15°C or at the increased water temperature of 19°C for 60 days. We observed that a temperature increase close to the upper limit of the species temperature tolerance range negatively affected the feed efficiency of rainbow trout fed LO despite a higher feed intake. The negative impact of increased water temperature on fatty acid bioconversion capacity appeared also to be quite clear considering the reduced expression of fatty acid desaturase 2 in liver and intestine and the reduced Δ6 desaturase enzymatic activity in intestinal microsomes. The present results also highlighted a negative impact of increased temperature on the apparent in vivo enzymatic activity of Δ5 and Δ6 desaturases of fish fed LO. Interestingly, this last parameter appeared less affected than those mentioned above. This study highlights that the increased temperature that rainbow trout may face due to global warming could reduce their fatty acid bioconversion capacity. The unavoidable replacement of finite fish oil by more sustainable, readily available and economically viable alternative lipid sources in aquaculture feeds should take this undeniable environmental issue on aquaculture productivity into account.

  11. Relative humidity effects on the surface electrical properties of resistive plate chamber melaminic laminates uncoated and coated with polymerized linseed oil film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bearzotti, Andrea; Palummo, Lucrezia

    2007-09-01

    Relative humidity is an important quantity to control in many manufacturing environments such as semiconductor industry. Humidity and moisture can affect many electronic devices, generally rendering their operation worse. In this study we present results showing that in some specific applications, humidity can improve the performance of an electronic device. Resistive plate chambers are used as trigger detectors of the muon system in LHC (large hadron collider) experiments ATLAS (a toroidal LHC apparatus), CMS (compact muon solenoid) and ALICE (a large ion collider experiment) and as detector in cosmic rays experiment ARGO (astrophysical radiation with ground-based observatory). These detectors are made of phenolic-melaminic laminate electrodes, coated with a polymerized linseed oil film delimiting the gaseous sensitive volume. The loss of some of the detector capability can be progressive in time and due to the intrinsic limits of the detector materials. One of these effects is due to an increase of the total plate resistance, that is correlated to ion migration and relativity humidity phenomena. Our purpose is to understand the relative humidity (RH) influence on the conduction mechanisms on the electrodes surface. Results of amperometric measurements on laminate samples kept at a fixed temperature of 22°C, cycling RH between 10% and 90% are here presented.

  12. Relative humidity effects on the surface electrical properties of resistive plate chamber melaminic laminates uncoated and coated with polymerized linseed oil film

    SciTech Connect

    Bearzotti, Andrea; Palummo, Lucrezia

    2007-09-15

    Relative humidity is an important quantity to control in many manufacturing environments such as semiconductor industry. Humidity and moisture can affect many electronic devices, generally rendering their operation worse. In this study we present results showing that in some specific applications, humidity can improve the performance of an electronic device. Resistive plate chambers are used as trigger detectors of the muon system in LHC (large hadron collider) experiments ATLAS (a toroidal LHC apparatus), CMS (compact muon solenoid) and ALICE (a large ion collider experiment) and as detector in cosmic rays experiment ARGO (astrophysical radiation with ground-based observatory). These detectors are made of phenolic-melaminic laminate electrodes, coated with a polymerized linseed oil film delimiting the gaseous sensitive volume. The loss of some of the detector capability can be progressive in time and due to the intrinsic limits of the detector materials. One of these effects is due to an increase of the total plate resistance, that is correlated to ion migration and relativity humidity phenomena. Our purpose is to understand the relative humidity (RH) influence on the conduction mechanisms on the electrodes surface. Results of amperometric measurements on laminate samples kept at a fixed temperature of 22 deg. C, cycling RH between 10% and 90% are here presented.

  13. Therapeutic effect of Linum usitatissimum (flaxseed/linseed) fixed oil on acute and chronic arthritic models in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Kaithwas, Gaurav; Majumdar, Dipak K

    2010-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the activity/anti-inflammatory potential of Linum usitatissimum fixed oil against castor oil-induced diarrhoea, turpentine oil-induced joint oedema, formaldehyde and Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis in Wistar albino rats. The oil intraperitoneally, significantly inhibited the castor oil-induced diarrhoea and turpentine oil-induced exudative joint oedema in a dose-dependent manner. Significant inhibitory effect of L. usitatissimum fixed oil was observed in formaldehyde-induced proliferative global oedematous arthritis when given intraperitoneally, with significant checking of the serum glutamic oxaloacetic acid transaminase and serum glutamic pyruvic acid transaminase. Further, L. usitatissimum fixed oil showed a significant dose-dependent protective effect against CFA-induced arthritis as well. Secondary lesions produced by CFA due to a delayed hypersensitivity reaction were also reduced in a significant manner. Anti-inflammatory activity of L. usitatissimum fixed oil can be attributed to the presence of alpha linolenic acid (57.38%, an omega-3 fatty acid, 18:3, n-3) having dual inhibitory effect on arachidonate metabolism resulting in suppressed production of proinflammatory n-6 eicosanoids (PGE(2), LTB(4)) and diminished vascular permeability. These observations suggest possible therapeutic potential of L. usitatissimum fixed oil in inflammatory disorders like rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Interactive effect of supplemental ultraviolet B and elevated ozone on seed yield and oil quality of two cultivars of linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) carried out in open top chambers.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ruchika; Agrawal, Shashi B

    2013-03-30

    Current scenarios of global climate change predict a significant increase in ultraviolet B (UV-B) and tropospheric ozone (O₃) in the near future. Both UV-B and O₃ can have detrimental effects on the productivity and yield quality of important agricultural crops. The present study was conducted to investigate the individual and interactive effects of supplemental UV-B (sUV-B) (ambient + 7.2 kJ m⁻² day⁻¹) and O₃ (ambient + 10 ppb) on the yield and oil quality of two cultivars of linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.). The mean monthly ambient O₃ concentration varied from 27.7 to 59.0 ppb during the experimental period. O₃ affected fruit formation, while sUV-B was mainly responsible for ovule abortion. Seed sugar and protein contents showed maximum reduction in O₃-treated plants, while mineral nutrient levels were most affected by sUV-B + O₃ treatment. Rancid oil of low nutritional quality and containing long-chain fatty acids was favoured along with a decrease in oil content. sUV-B and O₃ individually as well as in combination caused deterioration of the yield and quality of oil and seeds of linseed. However, the individual effect of O₃ was more damaging than the effect of sUV-B or sUV-B + O₃, and cultivar T-397 performed better than Padmini. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Rats given linseed oil in microemulsion forms enriches the brain synaptic membrane with docosahexaenoic acid and enhances the neurotransmitter levels in the brain.

    PubMed

    Sugasini, Dhavamani; Lokesh, Belur R

    2015-02-01

    Long chain n-3 fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are essential for the normal functioning of the brain. The vegetarian sections of the population get only alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) through their diet as a source of n-3 fatty acids. Hence, in this group of the population, the ALAs need to be converted to DHA through the action of the desaturase and the elongase enzymes. However, the conversion of the ALA to the DHA is very minimal (<2%) in mammals. Our recent studies have shown that the conversion of the ALA to the DHA can be enhanced significantly when given in the microemulsion forms. This work was undertaken to study the feasibility of enriching the synaptic membranes of rat brain with the DHA by providing the microemulsions of linseed oil (LSO) containing ALA. The rats were fed LSO as microemulsions in whey protein or in lipoid for 60 days through gavage. The rats given LSO microemulsions in lipoid showed higher levels of the DHA in the brain synaptic membrane when compared to rats given LSO without emulsion formation. This decreased the n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio of the brain synaptic membrane. This also increased the membrane fluidity, Na⁺-K⁺ ATPase activity, and acetylcholine esterase activity in the synaptic membranes. Furthermore, Ca²⁺-Mg²⁺ ATPase activity, monoamine oxidase A and monoamine oxidase B activity was lowered in the rats given LSO in the microemulsion form. The dopamine and the serotonin levels in the brain were increased in the rats given LSO in the microemulsion form with lipoid as compared to those given LSO without the preemulsion formation. This study indicates that the LSO microemulsions in the lipoid can enhance the synaptic membrane DHA levels and influence the functions associated with the brain in a beneficial manner.

  16. Cardioprotective effect of linseed oil against isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in Wistar rats: a biochemical and electrocardiographic study.

    PubMed

    Derbali, Amal; Mnafgui, Kais; Affes, Marwa; Derbali, Fatma; Hajji, Raouf; Gharsallah, Neji; Allouche, Noureddine; El Feki, Abdelfattah

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the cardioprotective effect of Tunisian flaxseed oil (Linum usitatissimum) against isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in rats by studying hypertensive and cardiac damage markers especially electrocardiographic changes and troponin T serum level. In vitro, the extracted oil showed an important inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) with an IC50 = 85.96 μg/ml. According to chemical analysis, this extract is composed essentially of alpha linolenic acid (ALA), an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (58.59 %). Male rats were randomly divided into three groups, namely control (C), isoproterenol (ISO), and isoproterenol-treated group with flaxseed oil (FO + ISO). Isoproterenol injection showed changes in ECG pattern, including ST-segment elevation (diagnostic of myocardial infarction), increase in the serum levels of Troponin T and cardiac injury markers (creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transaminase (AST), and alanine transaminase (ALT)). However, Linum oil pre-co-treatment prevented almost all the parameters isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in rats. Results of the present study proved that flaxseed oil has a significant effect by heart protection against isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction through beneficial effect of the important fraction of ALA.

  17. Effects of dietary linseed, evening primrose or fish oils on fatty acid and prostaglandin E2 contents in the rat livers and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced tumours.

    PubMed

    Jelińska, Małgorzata; Tokarz, Andrzej; Oledzka, Regina; Czorniuk-Sliwa, Alicja

    2003-04-17

    We examined the influence of diets supplemented with fish and vegetable oils on fatty acid and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contents in livers of non-7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)- and DMBA-treated rats, and in DMBA-induced tumours. Decreased concentrations of saturated fatty acids and increased unsaturated fatty acid levels were observed in liver phospholipids of rats fed these oils. There was a marked difference in the concentrations of fatty acids found in the tumours and those present in liver lipids. Oleic acid was the main unsaturated fatty acid found in the tumour tissue. Both liver and tumour PGE2 contents were clearly correlated to the diet. The PGE2 concentrations were decreased in livers and tumours of rats fed fish (FO) and linseed oils (LO).

  18. Echium oil increased the expression of a Δ4 Fads2 fatty acyl desaturase and the deposition of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid in comparison with linseed oil in striped snakehead (Channa striata) muscle.

    PubMed

    Jaya-Ram, Annette; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong; Kuah, Meng-Kiat

    2016-08-01

    Despite the potential of vegetable oils as aquafeed ingredients, a major drawback associated with their utilization is the inferior level of beneficial n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA). Echium oil (EO), which is rich in stearidonic acid (SDA, 18:4n-3), could potentially improve the deposition of n-3 LC-PUFA as the biosynthesis of LC-PUFA is enhanced through bypassing the rate-limiting ∆6 desaturation step. We report for the first time an attempt to investigate whether the presence of a desaturase (Fads2) capable of ∆4 desaturation activities and an elongase (Elovl5) will leverage the provision of dietary SDA to produce a higher rate of LC-PUFA bioconversion. Experimental diets were designed containing fish oil (FO), EO or linseed oil (LO) (100FO, 100EO, 100LO), and diets which comprised equal mixtures of the designated oils (50EOFO and 50EOLO) were evaluated in a 12-week feeding trial involving striped snakeheads (Channa striata). There was no significant difference in growth and feed conversion efficiency. The hepatic fatty acid composition and higher expression of fads2 and elovl5 genes in fish fed EO-based diets indicate the utilization of dietary SDA for LC-PUFA biosynthesis. Collectively, this resulted in a higher deposition of muscle eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) compared to LO-based diets. Dietary EO improved the ratio of n-3 LC-PUFA to n-6 LC-PUFA in fish muscle, which is desirable for human populations with excessive consumption of n-6 PUFA. This study validates the contribution of SDA in improving the content of n-3 LC-PUFA and the ratio of EPA to arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4n-6) in a freshwater carnivorous species.

  19. Linseed oil and DGAT1 K232A polymorphism: Effects on methane emission, energy and nitrogen metabolism, lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, and rumen microbial composition of Holstein-Friesian cows.

    PubMed

    van Gastelen, S; Visker, M H P W; Edwards, J E; Antunes-Fernandes, E C; Hettinga, K A; Alferink, S J J; Hendriks, W H; Bovenhuis, H; Smidt, H; Dijkstra, J

    2017-09-13

    Complex interactions between rumen microbiota, cow genetics, and diet composition may exist. Therefore, the effect of linseed oil, DGAT1 K232A polymorphism (DGAT1), and the interaction between linseed oil and DGAT1 on CH4 and H2 emission, energy and N metabolism, lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, and rumen bacterial and archaeal composition was investigated. Twenty-four lactating Holstein-Friesian cows (i.e., 12 with DGAT1 KK genotype and 12 with DGAT1 AA genotype) were fed 2 diets in a crossover design: a control diet and a linseed oil diet (LSO) with a difference of 22 g/kg of dry matter (DM) in fat content between the 2 diets. Both diets consisted of 40% corn silage, 30% grass silage, and 30% concentrates (DM basis). Apparent digestibility, lactation performance, N and energy balance, and CH4 emission were measured in climate respiration chambers, and rumen fluid samples were collected using the oral stomach tube technique. No linseed oil by DGAT1 interactions were observed for digestibility, milk production and composition, energy and N balance, CH4 and H2 emissions, and rumen volatile fatty acid concentrations. The DGAT1 KK genotype was associated with a lower proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk fat, and with a higher milk fat and protein content, and proportion of saturated fatty acids in milk fat compared with the DGAT1 AA genotype, whereas the fat- and protein-corrected milk yield was unaffected by DGAT1. Also, DGAT1 did not affect nutrient digestibility, CH4 or H2 emission, ruminal fermentation or ruminal archaeal and bacterial concentrations. Rumen bacterial and archaeal composition was also unaffected in terms of the whole community, whereas at the genus level the relative abundances of some bacterial genera were found to be affected by DGAT1. The DGAT1 KK genotype was associated with a lower metabolizability (i.e., ratio of metabolizable to gross energy intake), and with a tendency for a lower milk N efficiency compared with the

  20. Dietary linseed oil with or without malate increases conjugated linoleic acid and oleic acid in milk fat and and gene expression in mammary gland and milk somatic cells of lactating goats.

    PubMed

    Li, X Z; Choi, S H; Yan, C G; Shin, J S; Smith, S B

    2016-08-01

    Supplementary dietary plant oils have the potential to alter milk fatty acid composition in ruminants as a result of changes in the amount and kind of fatty acid precursors. We hypothesized that linseed oil in combination with malate (a key propionate precursor in the rumen) would increase ∆9 unsaturated fatty acids and specific gene expression in somatic cells and mammary glands of lactating goats. Twelve lactating goats were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. Treatments included the basal diet (CON), the CON plus 4% linseed oil (LO), and the CON plus 4% linseed oil and 2% -malate (LOM). Relative to CON, the LO and LOM supplements increased the daily intake of palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), oleic (18:1-9), linoleic (18:2-6), α-linolenic (18:3-3), and γ-linolenic acids (18:2-6); α-linolenic acid intake was increased over 9-fold, from 6.77 to over 51 g/d ( < 0.02). The LO and LOM supplements increased daily milk yield, milk fat yield, and milk fat percentage ( < 0.05). The LOM supplement also increased milk lactose percentage and daily yield ( = 0.03). Both the LO and LOM supplements increased plasma glucose and total cholesterol and decreased plasma β-hydroxbutyrate concentrations ( = 0.03). The LO and LOM supplements increased concentrations of stearic acid; -vaccenic acid (TVA; 18:1-11); -9, -11 CLA; -10 -12 CLA; and α-linolenic acid in rumen fluid and increased the concentrations of oleic acid; TVA; -9, -11 CLA; -10, -12 CLA; and α-linolenic acid in plasma lipids and milk fat ( < 0.05). Conversely, the LO and LOM supplements decreased short- and medium-chain SFA, including lauric (12:0), myristic (14:0), and palmitic acids, in plasma and milk fat ( < 0.05). Relative mRNA levels for and () gene expression were increased in somatic cells and mammary gland tissue by LO and LOM ( < 0.05). We conclude that the higher intake and ruminal production of stearic acid promoted SCD gene expression in somatic cells and mammary tissue. Furthermore, milk somatic

  1. Effect of extruded linseeds alone or in combination with fish oil on intake, milk production, plasma metabolite concentrations and milk fatty acid composition in lactating goats.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L; Leroux, C; Rouel, J; Delavaud, C; Shingfield, K J; Chilliard, Y

    2015-05-01

    Based on the potential benefits for long-term human health, there is interest in developing sustainable nutritional strategies for lowering medium-chain saturated fatty acids (FA) and increasing specific unsaturated FA in ruminant milk. Dietary supplements of extruded linseeds (EL), fish oil (FO) or a mixture of EL and FO increase cis-9,trans-11 CLA and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated FA in bovine milk. Supplements of FO cause milk fat depression in lactating cows, but information for dairy goats is limited. A total of 14 Alpine goats were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square with 28-days experimental periods to examine the effects of EL alone or in combination with FO on animal performance, milk fat synthesis and milk FA composition. Treatments comprised diets based on natural grassland hay supplemented with no additional oil (control), 530 of EL or 340 g/day of EL and 39 g/day of FO (ELFO). Compared with the control, ELFO tended (P=0.08) to lower milk fat yield, whereas EL increased (P<0.01) milk fat content and yield (15% and 10%, respectively). Relative to EL, ELFO decreased (P<0.01) milk fat content and yield (19% and 17%, respectively). Relative to the control and ELFO, EL decreased (P<0.05) milk 10:0 to 16:0 and odd- and branched-chain FA content and increased 18:0, cis-18:1, trans-13 18:1 (and their corresponding ∆-9 (desaturase products), trans-12,cis-14 CLA, cis-13,trans-15 CLA, cis-12,trans-14 CLA and trans-11,cis-13 CLA and 18:3n-3 concentrations. ELFO was more effective for enriching (P<0.05) milk cis-9, trans-11 CLA and trans-11 18:1 concentrations (up to 5.4- and 7.1-fold compared with the control) than EL (up to 1.7- and 2.5-fold increases). Furthermore, ELFO resulted in a substantial increase in milk trans-10 18:1 concentration (5.4% total FA), with considerable variation between individual animals. Relative to the control and EL, milk fat responses to ELFO were characterized by increases (P<0.05) in milk trans-16:1 (Δ9 to 11), trans-18:1 (Δ6

  2. Supplementation of increasing amounts of linseed oil to dairy cows fed total mixed rations: effects on digestion, ruminal fermentation characteristics, protozoal populations, and milk fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Benchaar, C; Romero-Pérez, G A; Chouinard, P Y; Hassanat, F; Eugene, M; Petit, H V; Côrtes, C

    2012-08-01

    The effect of linseed oil (LO) supplementation on nutrient digestibility, forage (i.e., timothy hay) in sacco ruminal degradation, ruminal fermentation characteristics, protozoal populations, milk production, and milk fatty acid (FA) profile in dairy cows was investigated. Four ruminally cannulated, primiparous lactating cows were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design (28-d periods). They were fed a total mixed ration (50:50 forage:concentrate (F:C) ratio [dry matter (DM) basis] without supplementation (control, CTL), or supplemented (wt/wt; DM basis) with LO at 2, 3, or 4%. Supplementation with LO had no effect on DM intake (19 kg/d) and apparent total-tract digestibility of nutrients (organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, starch, and gross energy). Ruminal pH, ammonia, and total volatile FA concentrations were not changed by LO supplementation to diets. Extent of changes in volatile FA pattern and effective ruminal degradability of DM of timothy hay were minor. Neither the total numbers nor the genera distribution of protozoa was changed by the addition of increasing amounts of LO to the diet. Milk yield increased linearly (26.1, 27.3, 27.4, and 28.4 kg/d for CTL to LO4, respectively) as the amount of LO added to the diet increased. Milk fat content was not affected by LO supplementation, whereas milk protein content decreased linearly with increasing amounts of LO in the diet. Milk fat proportions of several intermediates of ruminal biohydrogenation of polyunsaturated FA (i.e., trans-10 18:1, trans-11 18:1, cis-9,trans-11 18:2, trans-11,cis-15 18:2, and cis-9,trans-11,cis-15 18:3) increased linearly with LO addition to the diet. The proportion of cis-9,cis-12 18:2 decreased linearly (2.06, 1.99, 1.91, and 1.83% for CTL to LO4, respectively) as the amount of LO in the diet increased. Milk fat content of cis-9,cis-12,cis-15 18:3 increased as the level of LO in the diet increased up to 3% but no further increase was observed when 4% of LO

  3. Effect of lyophilized water extracts of Melissa officinalis on the stability of algae and linseed oil-in-water emulsion to be used as a functional ingredient in meat products.

    PubMed

    de Ciriano, Mikel García-Iñiguez; Rehecho, Sheyla; Calvo, Maria Isabel; Cavero, Rita Yolanda; Navarro, Iñigo; Astiasarán, Iciar; Ansorena, Diana

    2010-06-01

    Previous work pointed out the possibility to enhance the nutritional value of meat products using long chain omega-3 PUFA enriched emulsions. Oil-in-water emulsions elaborated with a mixture of algae and linseed oils (15:10) in order to be used as functional ingredient were stabilized with BHA (butylhydroxyanisol) or with a lyophilized water extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Lemon balm). The lipid profile of the oil mixture showed a high amount of DHA (31.7%), oleic (25.4%) and alpha-linolenic acid (12.7%) resulting in a very low omega-6/omega-3 ratio (0.12). The lyophilized extract of M. officinalis showed a high antioxidant activity (being 62ppm of the lyophilized water extract of Melissa equivalent to 200ppm of BHA, using the DPPH assay as reference), and high total phenolic content. Studying the oxidation process in the emulsions during 15days at room temperature, it could be concluded that this extract was as efficient as BHA in order to control the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcriptome adaptation of the bovine mammary gland to diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids shows greater impact of linseed oil over safflower oil on gene expression and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M; Li, Ran; Ammah, Adolf A; Dudemaine, Pier-Luc; Bissonnette, Nathalie; Benchaar, Chaouki; Zhao, Xin

    2016-02-09

    Nutritional strategies can decrease saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and increase health beneficial fatty acids (FAs) in bovine milk. The pathways/genes involved in these processes are not properly defined. Next-generation RNA-sequencing was used to investigate the bovine mammary gland transcriptome following supplemental feeding with 5% linseed oil (LSO) or 5% safflower oil (SFO). Holstein cows in mid-lactation were fed a control diet for 28 days (control period) followed by supplementation with 5% LSO (12 cows) or 5% SFO (12 cows) for 28 days (treatment period). Milk and mammary gland biopsies were sampled on days-14 (control period), +7 and +28 (treatment period). Milk was used to measure fat(FP)/protein(PP) percentages and individual FAs while RNA was subjected to sequencing. Milk FP was decreased by 30.38% (LSO) or 32.42% (SFO) while PP was unaffected (LSO) or increased (SFO). Several beneficial FAs were increased by LSO (C18:1n11t, CLA:10t12c, CLA:9c11t, C20:3n3, C20:5n3, C22:5n3) and SFO (C18:1n11t, CLA:10t12c, C20:1c11, C20:2, C20:3n3) while several SFAs (C4:0, C6:0, C8:0, C14:0, C16:0, C17:0, C24:0) were decreased by both treatments (P < 0.05). 1006 (460 up- and 546 down-regulated) and 199 (127 up- and 72 down-regulated) genes were significantly differentially regulated (DE) by LSO and SFO, respectively. Top regulated genes (≥ 2 fold change) by both treatments (FBP2, UCP2, TIEG2, ANGPTL4, ALDH1L2) are potential candidate genes for milk fat traits. Involvement of SCP2, PDK4, NQO1, F2RL1, DBI, CPT1A, CNTFR, CALB1, ACADVL, SPTLC3, PIK3CG, PIGZ, ADORA2B, TRIB3, HPGD, IGFBP2 and TXN in FA/lipid metabolism in dairy cows is being reported for the first time. Functional analysis indicated similar and different top enriched functions for DE genes. DE genes were predicted to significantly decrease synthesis of FA/lipid by both treatments and FA metabolism by LSO. Top canonical pathways associated with DE genes of both treatments might be involved in lipid

  5. Down-regulation of NF-κB expression by n-3 fatty acid-rich linseed oil is modulated by PPARγ activation, eicosanoid cascade and secretion of cytokines by macrophages in rats fed partially hydrogenated vegetable fat.

    PubMed

    Rao, Y Poorna Chandra; Lokesh, B R

    2017-04-01

    The industrially produced partially hydrogenated vegetable fat (PHVF) contains trans fatty acid mostly comprising of elaidic acid (18:1 ∆9t). PHVF is used as a cooking medium in Southeast Asian countries. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of dietary PHVF on inflammatory mediators and possible ameliorative effects of n-3 fatty acid (α-linolenic acid, ALA)-rich linseed oil (LSO) on the inflammatory mediators. Male Wistar weaning rats were fed AIN-93-purified diet supplemented with one of the following lipids for 60 days, groundnut oil (GNO, 10 wt%), PHVF (10 wt%), LSO (10 wt%), PHVF blended with LSO at 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 wt% levels. The final fat level in the diet was maintained at 10 wt%. The macrophages from rats fed PHVF showed higher levels of total cholesterol and free cholesterol as compared to those from rats fed GNO and LSO. Macrophages from rats fed PHVF down-regulated the expression of PPARγ and up-regulated the expressions of cytosolic phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase and nuclear factor-kappa B p65. The macrophages from rats fed PHVF secreted higher levels of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and cytokines. The rats fed PHVF blended with LSO at incremental amounts showed a significant reduction in the expressions of pro-inflammatory markers in dose-dependent manner. Detrimental effects of dietary PHVF in enhancing pro-inflammatory agents in rats could be significantly reduced by providing ALA (n-3 PUFA)-rich LSO.

  6. Linseed oil supplementation to dairy cows fed diets based on red clover silage or corn silage: Effects on methane production, rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility, N balance, and milk production.

    PubMed

    Benchaar, C; Hassanat, F; Martineau, R; Gervais, R

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of linseed oil (LO) supplementation to red clover silage (RCS)- or corn silage (CS)-based diets on enteric CH4 emissions, ruminal fermentation characteristics, nutrient digestibility, N balance, and milk production. Twelve rumen-cannulated lactating cows were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design (35-d periods) with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Cows were fed (ad libitum) RCS- or CS-based diets [forage:concentrate ratio 60:40; dry matter (DM) basis] without or with LO (4% of DM). Supplementation of LO to the RCS-based diet reduced enteric CH4 production (-9%) and CH4 energy losses (-11%) with no adverse effects on DM intake, digestion, ruminal fermentation characteristics, protozoa numbers, or milk production. The addition of LO to the CS-based diet caused a greater decrease in CH4 production (-26%) and CH4 energy losses (-23%) but was associated with a reduction in DM intake, total-tract fiber digestibility, protozoa numbers, acetate:propionate ratio, and energy-corrected milk yield. Urinary N excretion (g/d) decreased with LO supplementation to RCS- and CS-based diets, suggesting reduced potential of N2O emissions. Results from this study show that the depressive effect of LO supplementation on enteric CH4 production is more pronounced with the CS- than with the RCS-based diet. However, because of reduced digestibility with the CS-based diet, the reduction in enteric CH4 production may be offset by higher CH4 emissions from manure storage. Thus, the type of forage of the basal diet should be taken into consideration when using fat supplementation as a dietary strategy to reduce enteric CH4 production from dairy cows. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization and quantification of the aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction during linseed development ( Linum usitatissimum L.).

    PubMed

    Herchi, Wahid; Harrabi, Saoussem; Rochut, Sophie; Boukhchina, Sadok; Kallel, Habib; Pepe, Claude

    2009-07-08

    Changes in hydrocarbon composition were investigated during maturation of three varieties of linseed (H52, O116, and P129) cultivated in Tunisia. The hydrocarbon fraction of the three linseed oil samples was found to contain mainly n-alkanes and squalene. The greatest decrease of these components occurred between 7 and 21 days after flowering (DAF); thereafter, the changes were slight. At 7 DAF, P129 had a significantly higher level of squalene (27.24 mg/100 g of oil) than H52 (3.36 mg/100 g of oil), but from this date until 21 DAF squalene decreased much more actively in P129, resulting in similar levels in H52 (0.57 mg/100 g of oil) and P129 (0.52 mg/100 g of oil) at full maturity. In three varieties of linseed, 13 n-alkanes were detected ranging from C(22) to C(34) carbon atoms. The n-alkane composition of linseed oil was influenced by the ripening stage of seeds. At 7 DAF, C29 was the most predominant hydrocarbon (19.84 mg/100 g of total oil), followed by C(27) (11.82 mg/100 g) and C(25) (11.28 mg/100 g). C(29) exhibited the most significant decrease from 7 to 21 DAF, as a result C(27) being the most significant n-alkane component for the remainder of the period. At full maturity, the content of total n-alkanes in three varieties of linseed ranged from 4.0 to 4.26 mg/100 g of oil.

  8. [Resorption of hydrocyanic acid from linseed].

    PubMed

    Schulz, V; Löffler, A; Gheorghiu, T

    1983-01-01

    Resorption of hydrocyanic acid after ingestion of linseed was investigated in 20 healthy volunteers and 5 patients. The persons investigated took a single dose of 30 g or of 100 g of linseed or they received throughout several weeks 15 g. t.i.d. One volunteer also took for purposes of comparison bitter almonds or potassium cyanide. Before, during and after the periods of ingestion plasma levels of hydrocyanic acid and of thiocyanate were normal. During long-term trials urinary excretion of thiocyanate was monitored regularly. Intake of linseed even in extremely high dosages never caused significant rises of plasma thiocyanate levels; this, however, was the case after intake of bitter almonds or potassium cyanide. Thus, it can be excluded, that intoxication by hydrocyanic acid can be caused by linseed. Long-term intake of linseed however, raised plasma levels of thiocyanate significantly; at the same time urinary excretion of thiocyanate increased.

  9. Effect of water stress on growth of three linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) varieties.

    PubMed

    Kariuki, Lilian Wambui; Masinde, Peter; Githiri, Stephen; Onyango, Arnold N

    2016-01-01

    Linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an annual oil crop that accounts for approximately 1 % of the world's oilseed supplies. It produces seeds that are rich in the health-promoting ω-3 fatty acid, α-linolenic. In Kenya, linseed is grown in the Rift Valley and Western regions, places which often experience drought. This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of water stress on growth of three linseed cultivars and to establish the extent of drought tolerance in the three cultivars. A greenhouse pot experiment in a completely randomized design was conducted at Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya. The pots were well watered until the fourth week when watering was completely withheld to a half of the pots (stressed) while the other half (well watered control) was maintained at 90 % field capacity. Destructive harvesting was done when the stressed pots were at 90, 70, 60, 50, 40 % field capacities and at permanent wilting point. The experiment was replicated thrice and was repeated twice (February-May and August-November 2014). There were no significant differences in production of leaves, plant height, number of tillers and biomass between the three varieties in both seasons. Subjecting the linseed varieties to permanent wilting resulted in reduced production of leaves, growth in height, production of tillers and dry weight by 20-40 %. Decline in all growth parameters begun when 30-80 % of available soil water had been used up. There existed linear relationships between the various evaluated growth parameters. These relationships were not influenced either by the water status of soil or the varieties. Relative water content for the three linseed varieties declined after 25-67 % of available soil water had been used up.

  10. 21 CFR 181.26 - Drying oils as components of finished resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) shall include: Chinawood oil (tung oil). Dehydrated castor oil. Linseed oil. Tall oil. ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drying oils as components of finished resins. 181... Prior-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.26 Drying oils as components of finished resins....

  11. 21 CFR 181.26 - Drying oils as components of finished resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) shall include: Chinawood oil (tung oil). Dehydrated castor oil. Linseed oil. Tall oil. ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drying oils as components of finished resins. 181... Prior-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.26 Drying oils as components of finished resins....

  12. 21 CFR 181.26 - Drying oils as components of finished resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) shall include: Chinawood oil (tung oil). Dehydrated castor oil. Linseed oil. Tall oil. ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Drying oils as components of finished resins. 181... Prior-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.26 Drying oils as components of finished resins....

  13. 21 CFR 181.26 - Drying oils as components of finished resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) shall include: Chinawood oil (tung oil). Dehydrated castor oil. Linseed oil. Tall oil. ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drying oils as components of finished resins. 181... Prior-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.26 Drying oils as components of finished resins....

  14. QTL for fatty acid composition and yield in linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; You, Frank M; Duguid, Scott; Booker, Helen; Rowland, Gordon; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2015-05-01

    The combined SSR-SNP map and 20 QTL for agronomic and quality traits will assist in marker assisted breeding as well as map-based cloning of key genes in linseed. Flax is an important nutraceutical crop mostly because it is a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidant compounds. Canada is the largest producer and exporter of oilseed flax (or linseed), creating a growing need to improve crop productivity and quality. In this study, a genetic map was constructed based on selected 329 single nucleotide polymorphic markers and 362 simple sequence repeat markers using a recombinant inbred line population of 243 individuals from a cross between the Canadian varieties CDC Bethune and Macbeth. The genetic map consisted of 15 linkage groups comprising 691 markers with an average marker density of one marker every 1.9 cM. A total of 20 quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified corresponding to 14 traits. Three QTL each for oleic acid and stearic acid, two QTL each for linoleic acid and iodine value and one each for palmitic acid, linolenic acid, oil content, seed protein, cell wall, straw weight, thousand seed weight, seeds per boll, yield and days to maturity were identified. The QTL for cell wall, straw weight, seeds per boll, yield and days to maturity all co-located on linkage group 4. Analysis of the candidate gene regions underlying the QTL identified proteins involved in cell wall and fibre synthesis, fatty acid biosynthesis as well as their metabolism and yield component traits. This study provides the foundation for assisting in map-based cloning of the QTL and marker assisted selection of a wide range of quality and agronomic traits in linseed and potentially fibre flax.

  15. Effects of linseed and quercetin added to the diet of fattening lambs on the fatty acid profile and lipid antioxidant status of meat samples.

    PubMed

    Andrés, S; Morán, L; Aldai, N; Tejido, M L; Prieto, N; Bodas, R; Giráldez, F J

    2014-06-01

    Thirty-two Merino lambs fed barley straw and a concentrate formulated either with palm oil (CTRL group) or with linseed (+LS group), both alone or supplemented with quercetin (+QCT group or +LS+QCT group) were used to assess the effects of these dietary supplements on meat quality attributes. After being slaughtered, the longissimus thoracis muscles were used to study the fatty acid (FA) profile in detail, whilst longissimus lumborum slices were stored under refrigerated conditions to determine the lipid stability. Linseed increased the content of highly unsaturated n-3 long-chain fatty acid (20:5n-3; 22:5n-3; 22:6n-3). Interestingly, a significant increment of rumenic acid content (9c,11t-18:2) was observed when this seed was administered together with dietary quercetin. Moreover, the feeding of quercetin resulted in a reduction in the proportion of saturated FA and a decrease in lipid peroxidation of meat when the lambs were fed linseed. In conclusion, from both a nutritional and a commercial (shelf-life) point of view, it may be useful to include a source of quercetin when lambs are fed linseed diets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 21 CFR 181.26 - Drying oils as components of finished resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...). Dehydrated castor oil. Linseed oil. Tall oil. ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drying oils as components of finished resins. 181... Drying oils as components of finished resins. Substances classified as drying oils, when migrating...

  17. Cholesterol lowering benefits of soy and linseed enriched foods.

    PubMed

    Ridges, L; Sunderland, R; Moerman, K; Meyer, B; Astheimer, L; Howe, P

    2001-01-01

    Foods such as breads and breakfast cereals enriched with a combination of soy protein (soy grits and/or soy flour) and whole linseed are gaining popularity. Regular consumption of either whole grains or soy protein can lower risk factors for coronary heart disease. Furthermore, linseed is a rich source of the omega-3 fatty acid. alpha-linolenic acid (LNA), with purported cardiovascular benefits. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of daily consumption of soy and linseed containing foods and Canola (as an added source of LNA) on plasma lipid concentrations in 20 mildly hypercholesterolaemic postmenopausal women. Fasted blood samples were taken initially and after 3 and 8 weeks to assay plasma lipids and both plasma and erythrocyte membrane fatty acids. Urinary isoflavones were also measured. Data from 18 subjects were used for analysis. Plasma total, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations fell significantly (10, 12.5 and 12%, respectively) within 3 weeks. Although attenuated, there were still significant reductions in total and non-HDL cholesterol (5 and 6.5%, respectively) after 8 weeks of intervention. These reductions were associated with increases in urinary isoflavone excretion. This pilot study indicates that regular inclusion of foods containing soy and linseed in the diet may improve plasma lipids in subjects with hypercholesterolaemia.

  18. Development of linseed oil-free bakelite resistive plate chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bose, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Saha, S.; Viyogi, Y. P.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper we would like to present a few characteristics of the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) made of a particular grade of bakelite paper laminates (P-120, NEMA LI-1989 Grade XXX), produced and commercially available in India. This particular grade is used for high voltage insulation in humid conditions. The chambers are tested with cosmic rays in the streamer mode using argon, tetrafluroethane and isobutane in 34:59:7 mixing ratio. In the first set of detectors made with such grade, a thin coating of silicone fluid on the inner surfaces of the bakelite was found to be necessary for operation of the detector. Those silicone coated RPCs were found to give satisfactory performance with stable efficiency of >90% continuously for a long period as reported earlier. Results of the crosstalk measurement of these silicone coated RPC will be presented in this paper. Very recently RPCs made with the same grade of bakelite but having better surface finish are found to give equivalent performance even without any coating inside. Preliminary results of this type of RPCs are also being presented.

  19. Growth Impairment Caused by Raw Linseed Consumption: Can Trypsin Inhibitors Be Harmful for Health?

    PubMed

    Anaya, Katya; Cruz, Ana C B; Cunha, Dayse C S; Monteiro, Sandra M N; Dos Santos, Elizeu A

    2015-09-01

    Linseed (Linun usitatissimum L.) is an important oilseed whose nutritional value can be impaired due to presence of antinutritional factors and low protein digestibility. Protein fractions from raw linseed meal were extracted, isolated and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Globulins, the major protein fraction of linseed, showed low in vitro susceptibility to trypsin and chymotrypsin, but its in vivo digestibility was 93.2 %. Albumin fraction had high trypsin inhibition activity (5250 Inhibition Units g(-1)) and presented low molecular mass protein bands, similar to known trypsin inhibitors. Raw linseed consumption caused negative effects on rat growth and reduction of intestinal villi. Results indicate that raw linseed meal must not be used as an exclusive source of protein regardless of the major proteins have high digestibility; digestive enzymes inhibitors in raw linseed probably reduces the protein utilization.

  20. Effect of inclusion level of linseed on the nutrient utilisation of diets for growing broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M L; Alzueta, C; Rebolé, A; Ortiz, L T; Centeno, C; Treviño, J

    2001-07-01

    1. Diets containing linseed at inclusions of 0, 80, 120 and 160 g/kg were evaluated for digestibility of nutrients and AMEn content with male broiler chickens. 2. Increasing the concentration of linseed decreased the retention of nitrogen and the digestibility of amino acids, crude fat and fatty acids of diets. 3. Dietary AMEn (MJ/kg) was also affected by the rate of inclusion of linseed, values decreasing from 14.39 to 12.49. 4. In general, a linear regression model explained the relationship between dietary linseed content and nutritive parameters. However, the quadratic response found for the digestibility of several amino acids and fatty acids indicated a non-additive change in their digestibility. 5. Viscosity ofjejunal digesta was markedly increased by each increment of linseed in the diets. This is attributable to the presence of mucilage in linseed and it might explain many of the results obtained in this study.

  1. [The prececal digestibility of corn, sunflower, cottonseed, linseed and soybean extract meal in swine with ileocecal anastomoses].

    PubMed

    Hennig, U; Wünsche, J; Souffrant, W B; Peters, G; Kreienbring, F

    1993-01-01

    Five pigs were each surgically prepared with end-to-side (E.t.S.) and end-to-end (E.t.E.) ileorectal anastomoses (IRA). The ileo-caecal valve was preserved in both modifications. The animals were fed diets with maize or solvent extracted oil seed meals from sunflower, cottonseed, linseed or soybean and maize in combination with one of these oil seed meals. The aim of the experiment was to estimate the influence of both IRA-techniques on the precaecal nutrient digestibility and amino acid (AA) absorption. The crude carbohydrate digestibility in two of the five single protein diets and in three of the four blends were significantly higher in the E.t.S.--than in the E.t.E.--IRA group. There were no significant differences between the two IRA-modifications in crude protein (CP) and crude fat digestibility. No differences were observed in AA absorption for the single components maize, sunflower- and cottonseed meal. The absorption values of isoleucine, leucine and valine from linseed meal were significantly more than 5%-units higher in the E.t.S.-group than in E.t.E.-animals. There were similar results in soybean meal for four essential AA but with differences below 5%-units. Accordingly the two IRA-modifications did not influence the AA absorption to a practically important extent.

  2. Supercritical fluid extraction of lipids from linseed with on-line evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Victor; Rodriguez-Meizoso, Irene; Turner, Charlotta

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a green alternative method of extraction for neutral lipids in seeds compared to conventional methods utilizing organic solvents. In this work, a novel method where SFE is hyphenated with an evaporative light scattering detector is presented. The method was subsequently applied to determine lipid content in crushed linseed. The new method enables rapid quantification of extracted lipids as well as be ability to continuously monitor the extraction rate in real-time, thus being able to determine the time point of completed extraction. Both the detector and the method was validated. The results show that any of several tested oils can be used to calibrate the detection method for the determination of lipids extraction from linseed. The overall method repeatability and intermediate precision was 2.6% relative standard deviations. The extracted amount was significantly less than that obtained using the standard method of Soxhlet with petroleum ether, 26.0±0.4% (95% CI, n=9) compared to 32.3±1.3% (95% CI, n=3) of extracted amounts. It was found that channeling effects were present, and by either performing sequential repeated extractions with decompression in-between or by using a relatively large vessel a more complete extraction could be obtained. Interestingly, a substantially higher extracted amount (approximately 50%) was obtained compared to both a single extraction by SFE and the Soxhlet method. Therefore, it is recommended that an additional extraction including a rapid decompression in-between should be included in the validation of a method using supercritical fluid extraction, in order to either rule out channeling effects or to acquire a full recovery.

  3. Effects of whole linseed and rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid enriched diets on beef quality.

    PubMed

    Barahona, M; Olleta, J L; Sañudo, C; Albertí, P; Panea, B; Pérez-Juan, M; Realini, C E; Campo, M M

    2016-04-01

    Instrumental assessments and sensory tests were performed to evaluate the effects of diet and postmortem ageing time (1, 7 and 21 days) on beef quality. A total of 48 Friesian calves were randomly allocated to four dietary treatments: control, whole linseed (10% linseed), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (2% protected CLA), and whole linseed+CLA (10% linseed and 2% protected CLA). Animals were slaughtered at 458±16.6 kg live weight and 11 months of age. Ageing was more significant than diet on most instrumental parameters. Meat from linseed enriched diets had greater drip loss (P⩽0.001) and intramuscular fat (P⩽0.01) than meat from animals fed CLA. Beef aged for 7 and 21 days had lower cooking losses (P⩽0.01) and shear force (P⩽0.001) than beef aged for 1 day. Lightness was affected only by display time. The addition of CLA in the diet increased hue and yellowness, whereas the inclusion of linseed decreased these values, as well as increased redness. Linseed in the diet decreased fat odour (P⩽0.05), but increased beef (P⩽0.01) and liver (P⩽0.05) flavours. Meat aged for 21 days was significantly more rancid (P⩽0.001), even under vacuum storage. Several organoleptic properties were improved with the inclusion of linseed in the diet, whereas they remained unaffected by the inclusion of CLA.

  4. Effects of feeding different linseed sources on omasal fatty acid flows and fatty acid profiles of plasma and milk fat in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Sterk, A; Vlaeminck, B; van Vuuren, A M; Hendriks, W H; Dijkstra, J

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this experiment was to study the effects of feeding different linseed sources on omasal fatty acid (FA) flows, and plasma and milk FA profiles in dairy cows. Four ruminally cannulated lactating Holstein-Friesian cows were assigned to 4 dietary treatments in a 4×4 Latin square design. Dietary treatments consisted of supplementing crushed linseed (CL), extruded whole linseed (EL), formaldehyde-treated linseed oil (FL) and linseed oil in combination with marine algae rich in docosahexaenoic acid (DL). Each period in the Latin square design lasted 21 d, with the first 16 d for adaptation. Omasal flow was estimated by the omasal sampling technique using Cr-EDTA, Yb-acetate, and acid detergent lignin as digesta flow markers. The average DM intake was 20.6 ± 2.5 kg/d, C18:3n-3 intake was 341 ± 51 g/d, and milk yield was 32.0 ± 4.6 kg/d. Milk fat yield was lower for the DL treatment (0.96 kg/d) compared with the other linseed treatments (CL, 1.36 kg/d; EL, 1.49 kg/d; FL, 1.54 kg/d). Omasal flow of C18:3n-3 was higher and C18:3n-3 biohydrogenation was lower for the EL treatment (33.8 g/d; 90.9%) compared with the CL (21.8 g/d; 94.0%), FL (15.5 g/d; 95.4%), and DL (4.6 g/d; 98.5%) treatments, whereas whole-tract digestibility of crude fat was lower for the EL treatment (64.8%) compared with the CL (71.3%), FL (78.5%), and DL (80.4%) treatments. The proportion of C18:3n-3 (g/100 g of FA) was higher for the FL treatment compared with the other treatments in plasma triacylglycerols (FL, 3.60; CL, 1.22; EL, 1.35; DL, 1.12) and milk fat (FL, 3.19; CL, 0.87; EL, 0.83; DL, 0.46). Omasal flow and proportion of C18:0 in plasma and milk fat were lower, whereas omasal flow and proportions of biohydrogenation intermediates in plasma and milk fat were higher for the DL treatment compared with the other linseed treatments. The results demonstrate that feeding EL did not result in a higher C18:3n-3 proportion in plasma and milk fat despite the higher omasal C18:3n-3 flow

  5. Diversity analysis in Indian genotypes of linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) using AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Chandrawati; Maurya, Ramanuj; Singh, P K; Ranade, S A; Yadav, Hemant Kumar

    2014-10-01

    AFLP fingerprinting of 45 Indian genotypes of linseed was carried out to determine the genetic relationship among them. Sixteen primer combinations produced 1142 fragments with 1129 as polymorphic and 13 as monomorphic fragments. Polymorphic fragments varied from 44 (E-ACA/M-CTA) to 94 (E-AGC/M-CAC) with an average of 70.6 fragments per primer combination. The frequency of polymorphism varied from 93.7% to 100% with an average of 98.8% across all the genotypes. The PIC value ranged from 0.19 to 0.31 with an average of 0.23 per primer combination. The primer pair E-AGC/M-CAC showed the maximum PIC value (0.31) followed by E-AGC/M-CAG (0.29), E-AAC/M-CAG (0.26) and E-AGC/M-CTA (0.25). Resolving power (RP) and marker index (MI) varied from 13.73 to 43.50 and 8.81 to 28.91 respectively. The Jaccard's similarity coefficient varied from 0.16 to 0.57 with an average of 0.26 ± 0.05. The maximum genetic similarities (57%) were detected between genotypes Him Alsi-1 and Him Alsi-2, followed by Him Alsi-1 and GS41 and GS41 and LC-54. The genotypes R-552, Himani, RKY-14, Meera, Indira Alsi-32 and Suyog were found to be more divergent genotypes. The NJ clustering grouped all the 45 genotypes into three major clusters. In general the genotypes of cluster III had high oil content and those of cluster I had low oil content. At the population level, within population variance was much higher than between populations variance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapeseed or linseed supplements in grass-based diets: effects on dairy performance of Holstein cows over 2 consecutive lactations.

    PubMed

    Lerch, S; Ferlay, A; Pomiès, D; Martin, B; Pires, J A A; Chilliard, Y

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term supplementation with different oilseeds rich in 18:1 cis-9 or 18:3n-3 fatty acids on dairy cow performance over 2 consecutive lactations. This trial involved 58 Holstein cows during the first year and 35 during the second year. During the first 5 wk of the first year, all of the cows were fed the same diet; after a 4-wk transition period, the cows received 1 of 5 treatments for 2 consecutive lactations, including the dry period. Their basal diet was supplemented or not with extruded linseeds or with different forms of rapeseeds: extruded seeds, cold-pressed fat-rich meal, or whole unprocessed seeds. Oilseed amount was calculated to provide 2.5 to 3.0% additional oil in ration dry matter. Cows were fed a grass-based diet (75% grass silage and 25% hay) during indoor periods and grazed during outdoor periods. For the first year of experimentation, oilseed supplementation had no effect on milk, fat, protein, and lactose yields, body weight, or body condition score compared with the control treatment (no oilseed supplementation). During the indoor period, extruded linseed tended to decrease dry matter intake (-1.5 kg/d), whereas all of the oilseed treatments decreased milk protein content without changing protein yield. Cold-pressed fat-rich rapeseed meal decreased milk protein content independently of the period (-0.29 and -0.19 g/100 g for indoor and outdoor periods, respectively), and whole unprocessed rapeseed increased milk fat content during the outdoor period (+0.53 g/100 g compared with the control treatment). During the second year of experimentation, the effects of oilseed supplementation during the outdoor period were similar to those observed during the first outdoor period, but the effects of oilseed supplementation differed between the 2 indoor periods. This was likely due to changes in forage quality and composition and percentage in the ration of the concentrate mixtures. Thus, the effects of

  7. Aceclofenac oil drops: characterization and evaluation against ocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Katara, Rajesh; Sachdeva, Sameer; Majumdar, Dipak K

    2017-06-19

    Ocular inflammatory diseases, such as uveitis, scleritis, episcleritis and dry eye syndrome are commonly treated with eye drop formulations. In the present study, attempts were made to prepare aceclofenac oil formulations to evaluate its transcorneal permeation and anti-inflammatory effect. Ophthalmic solutions of aceclofenac with or without (0.5% v/v) benzyl alcohol were formulated in different vegetable oils and permeation studies were carried out. Aceclofenac ophthalmic solution in linseed oil containing benzyl alcohol exhibited maximum permeation (4.42% in goat, 4.26% in sheep and 3.94% in buffalo) through corneas under study. The partition characteristics of aceclofenac in linseed oil reinforced the results of permeation studies. The optimized formulation (linseed oil containing benzyl alcohol) showed better stability profile. Linseed oil aceclofenac formulation showed significant inhibitory effect on ocular inflammation induced by arachidonic acid in rabbit eyes (p < .05) and hence it can be considered as a potential approach for treatment of ocular inflammatory conditions.

  8. Effect of linseed feeding on blood metabolites, incidence of cystic follicles, and productive and reproductive performance in fresh Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Jahani-Moghadam, M; Mahjoubi, E; Dirandeh, E

    2015-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the effect of feeding linseed on blood metabolites, incidence of cystic follicles, resumption of postpartum ovarian cyclicity, pregnancy rate, milk production, and composition in fresh Holstein dairy cows. A total of 399 dairy cows were assigned randomly to 2 diets. Diets contained either protected palm oil (CON) or extruded linseed (LIN) and were fed from calving to d 40 postpartum. Ovaries of each cow were examined on d 10, 20, 30, and 40 after parturition (parturition=d 0) by transrectal ultrasonography to determine follicular development, ovarian disorders, and cyclicity. Blood samples were collected at 14-d intervals for 6 wk starting on the day of parturition to determine plasma concentrations of glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and blood urea N (BUN). Results showed plasma glucose concentration was affected by the diets and was greater in the LIN treatment, but BHBA, NEFA, and BUN concentrations were similar among treatments. Dietary treatments had no significant effect on milk production and composition except milk fat percentage that significantly decreased in cows fed LIN (3.55%) compared with those fed with CON (4.17%). Plasma progesterone concentrations were greater in LIN treatment than CON treatment (1.31±0.09 vs. 0.87±0.09) at early postpartum. The resumption of cyclicity and onset of estrus were influenced by treatments and reduced by 7 d in LIN treatment compared with CON treatment. Cows fed diets enriched in LIN fatty acids had a lesser incidence of cystic follicles. Treatments did not differ significantly in terms of the number of days open, number of services per pregnancy, and pregnancy rate. In conclusion, feeding linseed immediately after parturition decreased milk fat and incidence of cystic follicles, increased progesterone concentrations early postpartum, and caused earlier resumption of cyclicity but did not affect pregnancy rate.

  9. Total antioxidant activity of selected vegetable oils and their influence on total antioxidant values in vivo: a photochemiluminescence based analysis.

    PubMed

    Dhavamani, Sugasini; Poorna Chandra Rao, Yalagala; Lokesh, Belur R

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the antioxidant activity of vegetable oils using photochemiluminescence based assay. The following oils were selected for the study - palm oil (PO); olive oil (OLO); sunflower oil (SNO); rice bran oil (RBO); sesame oil (SESO) and linseed oil (LSO). The antioxidant activity of oils was reduced significantly when unsaponifiable matter was removed from the oils. The rats fed unsaponifiable matter removed vegetable oils showed significantly reduced antioxidant activity but no change in overall fatty acid composition in serum lipids. Therefore the minor constituents in unsaponifiable matter influences antioxidant activity exhibited by vegetable oils.

  10. Characterisation of fatty acids in drying oils used in paintings on canvas by GC and GC-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Cartoni, G; Russo, M V; Spinelli, F; Talarico, F

    2001-01-01

    Of the various binding media used in paintings, this work examines drying oils. During the initial phase of polymerisation and the progressive ageing process, the fraction of unsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids undergoes various changes (reticulation, oxidation, etc.), that give rise to characteristic compounds. Within a broader research project, aimed at the characterisation of binding media, a preliminary study was made of the ageing process of linseed oil. In this regard, linseed oil was spread on a glass or canvas support and then dried in the open air. The ageing of the spread linseed oil was monitored by taking samples of the material at regular intervals. After the fatty acids had changed into methylesters, the samples were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results obtained have been reported as a ratio between the areas of the chromatographic peaks of the different fatty acids found.

  11. Vegetable Oil Derived Fuels for Civil Works Diesel Engine Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    linseed, peanut, canola (low-eruec rapeseed), safflower , sesame, soybean, and sunflower. 4 Extensive research has been done to determine which...substitutes for conventional petroleum derived diesel fuels. Soybean, sunflower, safflower , and peanut oils were among the potential alternatives. Jn general

  12. Biobased polyurethanes prepared from different vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaoqun; Madbouly, Samy A; Kessler, Michael R

    2015-01-21

    In this study, a series of biobased polyols were prepared from olive, canola, grape seed, linseed, and castor oil using a novel, solvent/catalyst-free synthetic method. The biobased triglyceride oils were first oxidized into epoxidized vegetable oils with formic acid and hydrogen peroxide, followed by ring-opening reaction with castor oil fatty acid. The molecular structures of the polyols and the resulting polyurethane were characterized. The effects of cross-linking density and the structures of polyols on the thermal, mechanical, and shape memory properties of the polyurethanes were also investigated.

  13. Effect of feeding flax or linseed meal on progesterone clearance rate in ovariectomized ewes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ovariectomized ewes (n = 22; 68.76 ± 2.34 kg initial body weight; 2.9 ± 0.1 initial body condition score) were individually fed one of three diets: 1) Control (phytoestrogen-free; n = 7), 2) Flax containing diet (n = 8), or 3) linseed meal (LSM) containing diet (n =7) to investigate the rate of prog...

  14. Linseed Dietary Fibers Reduce Apparent Digestibility of Energy and Fat and Weight Gain in Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Mette; Bach Knudsen, Knud Erik; Jørgensen, Henry; Oomah, David; Bügel, Susanne; Toubro, Søren; Tetens, Inge; Astrup, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fibers (DF) may affect energy balance, an effect often ascribed to the viscous nature of some water soluble DF, which affect luminal viscosity and thus multiple physiological processes. We have tested the hypothesis that viscous linseed DF reduce apparent nutrient digestibility, and limit weight gain, in a randomized feeding trial where 60 male, growing, Wistar rats, with an initial weight of ~200 g, were fed different diets (n = 10 per group): low DF control (C), 5% DF from cellulose (5-CEL), CEL + 5% DF from whole (5-WL) or ground linseed (5-GL), CEL + 5% DF from linseed DF extract (5-LDF), and CEL + 10% DF from linseed DF extract (10-LDF). Diets were provided ad libitum for 21 days. Feed intake and faecal output were measured during days 17–21. Faecal fat excretion increased with increasing DF content and was highest in the 10-LDF group. Apparent fat digestibility was highest with the C diet (94.9% ± 0.8%) and lowest (74.3% ± 0.6%) with the 10-LDF diet, and decreased in a non-linear manner with increasing DF (p < 0.001). Apparent fat digestibility also decreased with increased accessibility of DF (5-WL vs. 5-GL) and when the proportion of viscous DF increased (5-GL vs. 5-LDF). The 10-LDF resulted in a lower final body weight (258 ± 6.2 g) compared to C (282 ± 5.9 g), 5-CEL (281 ± 5.9 g), and 5-WL (285 ± 5.9 g) (p < 0.05). The 10-LDF diet reduced body fat compared to 5-CEL (p < 0.01). In conclusion, DF extracted from linseed reduced apparent energy and fat digestibility and resulted in restriction of body weight gain in growing rats. PMID:23966109

  15. Effects of supplementation with different edible oils on cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Otranto, Marcela; Do Nascimento, Adriana Paulino; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acids are bioactive molecules, but their effects on cutaneous wound healing are not well understood. Our aim was to investigate the effects of supplementation with edible oils on cutaneous healing. Thirty days before wounding, rats were started on daily supplements of sunflower oil, linseed oil, fish oil, or water. Supplementation lasted until euthanasia. On day 0, an excisional wound was made on the back of each animal. Fourteen days later, the animals were euthanized, and the wound and adjacent skin were collected. Wound closure was higher in the control group compared with the other groups at days 7 and 14. Inflammatory cells were abundant in the control, linseed, and fish groups, but scarce in the sunflower group. Large numbers of myofibroblasts were observed in the control and sunflower groups. The linseed and fish groups presented a high density of dilated blood vessels. The control and sunflower groups showed a moderate density of collagen fibers; a high density of fibers was observed in the linseed and fish groups. Hydroxyproline levels were lowest in the control and sunflower groups. Supplementation with different types of edible oils delayed wound closure and affected the inflammatory infiltrate and collagen deposition.

  16. Effect of traditional Chinese cooking methods on fatty acid profiles of vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yamin; Hao, Pengfei; Liu, Bingjie; Meng, Xianghong

    2017-10-15

    The effect of four frying processes (vegetable salad, stir frying, pan frying, and deep frying) on fatty acid composition of ten vegetable oils (peanut oil, soybean oil, rapeseed oil, corn oil, sunflower seed oil, rice bran oil, olive oil, sesame oil, linseed oil, and peony seed oil) was investigated using GC-MS. The result showed that trans-fatty acid (TFA) was produced during all processes. Rapeseed oil had the highest TFA content in vegetable salad oil with 2.88% of total fatty acid. The TFA content of sunflower seed oil was 0.00% in vegetable salad oil, however, after stir frying and pan frying, it increased to 1.53% and 1.29%, respectively. Peanut oil had the lowest TFA content after deep frying for 12h with 0.74mg/g. It was concluded that a healthy cooking process could be acquired by a scientific collocation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of forage type and extruded linseed supplementation on methane production and milk fatty acid composition of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, K M; Humphries, D J; Kirton, P; Kliem, K E; Givens, D I; Reynolds, C K

    2015-06-01

    Replacing dietary grass silage (GS) with maize silage (MS) and dietary fat supplements may reduce milk concentration of specific saturated fatty acids (SFA) and can reduce methane production by dairy cows. The present study investigated the effect of feeding an extruded linseed supplement on milk fatty acid (FA) composition and methane production of lactating dairy cows, and whether basal forage type, in diets formulated for similar neutral detergent fiber and starch, altered the response to the extruded linseed supplement. Four mid-lactation Holstein-Friesian cows were fed diets as total mixed rations, containing either high proportions of MS or GS, both with or without extruded linseed supplement, in a 4×4 Latin square design experiment with 28-d periods. Diets contained 500 g of forage/kg of dry matter (DM) containing MS and GS in proportions (DM basis) of either 75:25 or 25:75 for high MS or high GS diets, respectively. Extruded linseed supplement (275 g/kg ether extract, DM basis) was included in treatment diets at 50 g/kg of DM. Milk yields, DM intake, milk composition, and methane production were measured at the end of each experimental period when cows were housed in respiration chambers. Whereas DM intake was higher for the MS-based diet, forage type and extruded linseed had no significant effect on milk yield, milk fat, protein, or lactose concentration, methane production, or methane per kilogram of DM intake or milk yield. Total milk fat SFA concentrations were lower with MS compared with GS-based diets (65.4 vs. 68.4 g/100 g of FA, respectively) and with extruded linseed compared with no extruded linseed (65.2 vs. 68.6 g/100 g of FA, respectively), and these effects were additive. Concentrations of total trans FA were higher with MS compared with GS-based diets (7.0 vs. 5.4 g/100 g of FA, respectively) and when extruded linseed was fed (6.8 vs. 5. 6g/100 g of FA, respectively). Total n-3 FA were higher when extruded linseed was fed compared with no

  18. Oil Content, Fatty Acid Composition and Distributions of Vitamin-E-Active Compounds of Some Fruit Seed Oils

    PubMed Central

    Matthäus, Bertrand; Özcan, Mehmet Musa

    2015-01-01

    Oil content, fatty acid composition and the distribution of vitamin-E-active compounds of selected Turkish seeds that are typically by-products of the food processing industries (linseed, apricot, pear, fennel, peanut, apple, cotton, quince and chufa), were determined. The oil content of the samples ranged from 16.9 to 53.4 g/100 g. The dominating fatty acids were oleic acid (apricot seed oil, peanut oil, and chufa seed oil) in the range of 52.5 to 68.4 g/100 g and linoleic acid (pear seed oil, apple seed oil, cottonseed oil and quince seed oil) with 48.1 to 56.3 g/100 g, while in linseed oil mainly α-linolenic acid (53.2 g/100 g) and in fennel seed oil mainly 18:1 fatty acids (80.5 g/100 g) with petroselinic acid predominating. The total content of vitamin-E-active compounds ranged from 20.1 (fennel seed oil) to 96 mg/100 g (apple seed oil). The predominant isomers were established as α- and γ-tocopherol. PMID:26785341

  19. Genetic characterization of a core collection of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) suitable for association mapping studies and evidence of divergent selection between fiber and linseed types.

    PubMed

    Soto-Cerda, Braulio J; Diederichsen, Axel; Ragupathy, Raja; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2013-05-06

    Flax is valued for its fiber, seed oil and nutraceuticals. Recently, the fiber industry has invested in the development of products made from linseed stems, making it a dual purpose crop. Simultaneous targeting of genomic regions controlling stem fiber and seed quality traits could enable the development of dual purpose cultivars. However, the genetic diversity, population structure and linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns necessary for association mapping (AM) have not yet been assessed in flax because genomic resources have only recently been developed. We characterized 407 globally distributed flax accessions using 448 microsatellite markers. The data was analyzed to assess the suitability of this core collection for AM. Genomic scans to identify candidate genes selected during the divergent breeding process of fiber flax and linseed were conducted using the whole genome shotgun sequence of flax. Combined genetic structure analysis assigned all accessions to two major groups with six sub-groups. Population differentiation was weak between the major groups (F(ST) = 0.094) and for most of the pairwise comparisons among sub-groups. The molecular coancestry analysis indicated weak relatedness (mean = 0.287) for most individual pairs. Abundant genetic diversity was observed in the total panel (5.32 alleles per locus), and some sub-groups showed a high proportion of private alleles. The average genome-wide LD (r²) was 0.036, with a relatively fast decay of 1.5 cM. Genomic scans between fiber flax and linseed identified candidate genes involved in cell-wall biogenesis/modification, xylem identity and fatty acid biosynthesis congruent with genes previously identified in flax and other plant species. Based on the abundant genetic diversity, weak population structure and relatedness and relatively fast LD decay, we concluded that this core collection is suitable for AM studies targeting multiple agronomic and quality traits aiming at the improvement of flax as a

  20. Genetic characterization of a core collection of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) suitable for association mapping studies and evidence of divergent selection between fiber and linseed types

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Flax is valued for its fiber, seed oil and nutraceuticals. Recently, the fiber industry has invested in the development of products made from linseed stems, making it a dual purpose crop. Simultaneous targeting of genomic regions controlling stem fiber and seed quality traits could enable the development of dual purpose cultivars. However, the genetic diversity, population structure and linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns necessary for association mapping (AM) have not yet been assessed in flax because genomic resources have only recently been developed. We characterized 407 globally distributed flax accessions using 448 microsatellite markers. The data was analyzed to assess the suitability of this core collection for AM. Genomic scans to identify candidate genes selected during the divergent breeding process of fiber flax and linseed were conducted using the whole genome shotgun sequence of flax. Results Combined genetic structure analysis assigned all accessions to two major groups with six sub-groups. Population differentiation was weak between the major groups (FST = 0.094) and for most of the pairwise comparisons among sub-groups. The molecular coancestry analysis indicated weak relatedness (mean = 0.287) for most individual pairs. Abundant genetic diversity was observed in the total panel (5.32 alleles per locus), and some sub-groups showed a high proportion of private alleles. The average genome-wide LD (r2) was 0.036, with a relatively fast decay of 1.5 cM. Genomic scans between fiber flax and linseed identified candidate genes involved in cell-wall biogenesis/modification, xylem identity and fatty acid biosynthesis congruent with genes previously identified in flax and other plant species. Conclusions Based on the abundant genetic diversity, weak population structure and relatedness and relatively fast LD decay, we concluded that this core collection is suitable for AM studies targeting multiple agronomic and quality traits aiming at

  1. Synthesis and applications of vegetable oil-based fluorocarbon water repellent agents on cotton fabrics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tao; Zheng, Junzhi; Sun, Gang

    2012-06-05

    Vegetable oil-based fluorocarbon water repellent agents were prepared by chemical modifications of different vegetable oils - soybean and linseed oils through several reactions, including saponification, acidification, acylation of vegetable oil and trans-esterification with 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol and 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropanol. The resulted fluorocarbon agents were then copolymerized with styrene. The structures of the vegetable oil based agents were characterized by FT-IR and NMR. By evaluating water contact angle and time of water disappearance on cotton fabrics, as well as whiteness and breaking strength of cotton fabrics that were treated by these agents, optimum fabric finishing conditions were explored. The cotton fabrics finished with the vegetable oil-based fluorocarbon agents showed excellent water repellency, while other properties of the cotton fabrics declined to certain level. The linseed oil-based tetrafluoropropanol water repellent agent displayed the highest water repellency among all modified oils. All the treated fabrics exhibited good durability of water repellency. The linseed oil-based tetrafluoropropanol water repellent agent demonstrated the best durability among all repellent agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Volatiles in raw and cooked meat from lambs fed olive cake and linseed.

    PubMed

    Gravador, R S; Serra, A; Luciano, G; Pennisi, P; Vasta, V; Mele, M; Pauselli, M; Priolo, A

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of feeding olive cake and linseed to lambs on the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in raw and cooked meat. Four groups of eight male Appenninica lambs each were fed: conventional cereal-based concentrates (diet C), concentrates containing 20% on a dry matter (DM) basis of rolled linseed (diet L), concentrates containing 35% DM of stoned olive cake (diet OC), or concentrates containing both rolled linseed (10% DM) and stoned olive cake (17% DM; diet OCL). The longissimus dorsi muscle of each lamb was sampled at slaughter and was subjected to VOC profiling through the use of SPME-GC-MS. In the raw meat, the concentration of 3-methylpentanoic acid was higher in treatment C as compared with treatments L, OC and OCL (P<0.01). Moreover the level of nonanoic acid was greater in treatments C and OC than in treatment L (P<0.05). With respect to alcohols, in raw meat the amount of 2-phenoxyethanol in treatment OCL was lower than in treatments C (P<0.01) and OC (P<0.05), while in cooked meat the amount of 1-pentanol was higher in treatment C than in treatment OC (P<0.05). Apart from these compounds, none of the lipid oxidation-derived volatiles was significantly affected by the dietary treatment. Therefore, the results suggest that the replacement of cereal concentrates with linseed and/or olive cake did not cause appreciable changes in the production of volatile organic compounds in lamb meat.

  3. Effect of dietary extruded linseed, verbascoside and vitamin E supplements on yield and quality of milk in Lacaune ewes.

    PubMed

    Casamassima, Donato; Nardoia, Maria; Palazzo, Marisa; Vizzarri, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Angela Gabriella; Corino, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    Milk yield and milk qualitative parameters were evaluated in Lacaune ewes on a diet supplemented with extruded linseed, verbascoside and vitamin E. A 98 d-trial was conducted on 44 ewes and started 40±2 d post partum. The animals were divided into four homogeneous groups of eleven animals each; one control group (CON) without extruded linseed and dietary supplements, and the diet of the other three experimental groups was enhanced with extruded linseed (L group), extruded linseed-verbascoside (LVB group), and extruded linseed-verbascoside-vitamin E (LVBE group). All animals individually received an isoenergetic diet, consisting of 700 g concentrated feed and meadow hay ad libitum. Body weight, body condition score, milk yield and milk qualitative parameters were assessed. LVB and LVBE groups resulted in a significant improvement (P<0·05) in milk yield due to the verbascoside supplementation. The extruded linseed supplementation L, LVB and LVBE groups produced a milk fat increase and a better milk fatty acid profile in terms of a higher monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content and a reduced saturated fatty acid (SFA) content, a lower n-6/n-3 ratio and atherogenic and thrombogenic index. The dietary verbascoside supplementation in the LVB and LVBE group resulted in a better milk quality due to the low cholesterol level and higher vitamin A and E contents, in addition to an increased oxidative stability highlighted by the lower thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level. Thus, the addition of extruded linseed and verbascoside supplements improved milk yield and quality both from a chemical and nutritive point of view.

  4. The crystallization of metal soaps and fatty acids in oil paint model systems.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Joen J; Keune, Katrien; van Loon, Annelies; Iedema, Piet D

    2016-04-28

    The formation and crystallization of metal soaps in oil paint layers is an important issue in the conservation of oil paintings. The chemical reactions and physical processes that are involved in releasing metal ions from pigments and fatty acids from the oil binder to form crystalline metal soap deposits have so far remained poorly understood. We have used a combination of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) on model mixtures of palmitic acid, lead palmitate or zinc palmitate and linseed oil to study the transition from amorphous material to crystalline fatty acid or metal soap. This transition forms the final stage in the cascade of processes leading to metal soap-related oil paint degradation. Palmitic acid as well as the metal soaps showed nearly ideal solubility behavior. However, it was found that, near room temperature, both lead and zinc palmitate are practically insoluble in both liquid and partially polymerized linseed oil. Interestingly, the rate of metal soap and fatty acid crystallization decreased rapidly with the degree of linseed oil polymerization, possibly leading to systems where metal soaps are kinetically trapped in a semi-crystalline state. To explain the various morphologies of metal soap aggregates observed in oil paint layers, it is proposed that factors affecting the probability of crystal nucleation and the rate of crystal growth play a crucial role, like exposure to heat or cleaning solvents and the presence of microcracks.

  5. Effect of a linseed diet on lipogenesis, fatty acid composition and stearoyl-CoA-desaturase in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Benatmane, F; Kouba, M; Youyou, A; Mourot, J

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of a linseed diet on meat quality and on lipogenesis in rabbits. Twelve rabbits were fed a control or a linseed diet. There was no diet effect on growth, food consumption, carcass characteristics and meat ultimate pH and colour. Feeding the linseed diet increased the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) levels in perirenal and interscapular fats, in the Longissimus dorsi muscle and in the liver. The linseed diet produced lower linoleic acid/α-linolenic acid ratios in adipose tissues and in the Longissimus dorsi muscle, but not in the liver. Diet did not affect lipogenic enzyme activities in the Longissimus dorsi muscle, whereas the linseed diet decreased the lipogenic potential in perirenal and interscapular fats, and in the liver. Feeding rabbits with a high n-3 PUFA diet led to a decrease in the oxidative stability of perirenal fat and the Longissimus dorsi muscle, and to an inhibition of stearoyl-CoA-desaturase activity in liver and in adipose tissues, but not in muscle.

  6. Biodiesel from plant seed oils as an alternate fuel for compression ignition engines-a review.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, C; Ramesh, M; Murugesan, A; Panneerselvam, N; Subramaniam, D; Bharathiraja, M

    2016-12-01

    The modern scenario reveals that the world is facing energy crisis due to the dwindling sources of fossil fuels. Environment protection agencies are more concerned about the atmospheric pollution due to the burning of fossil fuels. Alternative fuel research is getting augmented because of the above reasons. Plant seed oils (vegetable oils) are cleaner, sustainable, and renewable. So, it can be the most suitable alternative fuel for compression ignition (CI) engines. This paper reviews the availability of different types of plant seed oils, several methods for production of biodiesel from vegetable oils, and its properties. The different types of oils considered in this review are cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) oil, ginger oil, eucalyptus oil, rice bran oil, Calophyllum inophyllum, hazelnut oil, sesame oil, clove stem oil, sardine oil, honge oil, polanga oil, mahua oil, rubber seed oil, cotton seed oil, neem oil, jatropha oil, egunsi melon oil, shea butter, linseed oil, Mohr oil, sea lemon oil, pumpkin oil, tobacco seed oil, jojoba oil, and mustard oil. Several methods for production of biodiesel are transesterification, pre-treatment, pyrolysis, and water emulsion are discussed. The various fuel properties considered for review such as specific gravity, viscosity, calorific value, flash point, and fire point are presented. The review also portrays advantages, limitations, performance, and emission characteristics of engine using plant seed oil biodiesel are discussed. Finally, the modeling and optimization of engine for various biofuels with different input and output parameters using artificial neural network, response surface methodology, and Taguchi are included.

  7. A facile and efficient strategy for the fabrication of porous linseed gum/cellulose superabsorbent hydrogels for water conservation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Luan, Qian; Huang, Qingde; Tang, Hu; Huang, Fenghong; Li, Wenlin; Wan, Chuyun; Liu, Changsheng; Xu, Jiqu; Guo, Pingmei; Zhou, Qi

    2017-02-10

    The linseed gum/cellulose composite hydrogels were successfully fabricated by mixing cellulose and linseed gum solutions dissolved in the NaOH/urea aqueous system and cross-linked with epichlorohydrin. The morphology and structure of the composite hydrogels were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The swelling ratio and water retention properties were investigated. The results revealed that linseed gum mainly contributed to water adsorption, whereas the cellulose acted as a backbone to strengthen the porous structure. This work provided a simple way to prepare cellulose-based superabsorbent hydrogels, which could be potentially applied as an effective water conservation material in agriculture.

  8. Characterization of the total free radical scavenger capacity of vegetable oils and oil fractions using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical.

    PubMed

    Espín, J C; Soler-Rivas, C; Wichers, H J

    2000-03-01

    The total free radical scavenger capacity (RSC) of 57 edible oils from different sources was studied: olive (24 brands of oils), sunflower (6), safflower (2), rapeseed (3), soybean (3), linseed (2), corn (3), hazelnut (2), walnut (2), sesame (2), almond (2), mixture of oils for salad (2), "dietetic" oil (2), and peanut (2). Olive oils were also studied according to their geographical origins (France, Greece, Italy, Morocco, Spain, and Turkey). RSC was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring the disappearance of the radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(*)) at 515 nm. The disappearance of the radical followed a double-exponential equation in the presence of oils and oil fractions, which suggested the presence of two (fast and slow) groups of antioxidants. RSC was studied for the methanol-soluble phase ("methanolic fraction", MF) of the oil, the fraction nonsoluble in methanol ("lipidic fraction", LF), and the nonfractionated oil ("total oil"; TF = MF + LF). Only olive, linseed, rapeseed, safflower, sesame, and walnut oils showed significant RSC in the MF due to the presence of phenolic compounds. No significant differences were found in the RSC of olive oils from different geographical origins. Upon heating at 180 degrees C the apparent constant for the disappearance of RSC (k(T)) and the half-life (t1/2) of RSC for MF, LF, and TF were calculated. The second-order rate constants (k2) for the antiradical activity of some phenolic compounds present in oils are also reported.

  9. Performances of linseed oil-free bakelite RPC prototypes with cosmic ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bose, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Saha, S.; Sharan, M. K.; Viyogi, Y. P.

    2009-05-01

    A comparative study has been performed on Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) made of two different grades of bakelite paper laminates, produced and commercially available in India. The chambers, operated in the streamer mode using argon, tetrafluroethane and isobutane in 34:59:7 mixing ratio, are tested for the efficiency and the stability with cosmic rays. A particular grade of bakelite (P-120, NEMA LI-1989 Grade XXX), used for high voltage insulation in humid conditions, was found to give satisfactory performance with stable efficiency of >96% continuously for more than 130 days. A thin coating of silicone fluid on the inner surfaces of the bakelite RPC is found to be necessary for the operation of the detector.

  10. Linseed oil gelled emulsion: A successful fat replacer in dry fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Alejandre, Marta; Poyato, Candelaria; Ansorena, Diana; Astiasarán, Iciar

    2016-11-01

    Different levels of animal fat replacement by a high omega-3 content carrageenan gelled emulsion in dry fermented sausages were studied in order to improve their fatty acid composition. Percentages of fat replacement were 26.3% (SUB1), 32.8% (SUB2) and 39.5% (SUB3). α-linolenic acid (ALA) content increased up to 1.81, 2.19 and 2.39g/100g (SUB1, SUB2, and SUB3 products) as compared to the Control (0.35g/100g), implying an increment in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) supply (up to 10.3%) and reductions in omega-6/ omega-3 ratio (75, 82 and 84%, respectively). Peroxides and TBARs values were not affected (P>0.05) by the fat modification and a slight low formation of volatile aldehydes derived from lipid oxidation was detected. Fat replacement did not cause relevant modifications on the instrumental color properties and no sensory differences (P>0.05) were found between Control and SUB2 products (32.8%) for taste and juiciness, pointing out the viability of this formulation for human consumption.

  11. The effects of dietary oils on the fatty acid composition and osmotic fragility of rat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kirchgessner, M; Stangl, G I; Reichlmayr-Lais, A M; Eder, K

    1994-06-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of different dietary oils representing special fatty acids which varied in chain length, position and number of double bonds on fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes and on the osmotic fragility of rat erythrocytes after incubation in NaCl solutions of different concentrations. For this purpose all animals were initially fed a control diet (CO) containing 10% coconut oil and 0.4% safflower oil for 28 days. After that 10 groups of 10 animals each were switched to test diets for another 20 days in which 50% or 100% of the coconut oil was exchanged for one of the following oils: olive oil (OO 5, OO 10), safflower oil (SFO 5, SFO 10), evening primrose oil (EPO 5, EPO 10), linseed oil (LO 5, LO 10) or salmon oil (SLO 5, SLO 10). The results show that the fatty acid composition of rat erythrocyte membranes was affected by the fatty acid composition of the dietary fats. Rats fed OO 10, EPO 10, LO 5 and LO 10 had a slightly lower concentration of saturated fatty acids (SFA) in erythrocyte membranes than control rats. Groups fed olive oil showed the highest level of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in the erythrocyte membrane. This increase in MUFA at the expense of SFA and (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was most pronounced with respect to 18:1 and occurred in a dose-dependent fashion. Rats fed SFO, EPO or LO had higher linoleic acid levels in the erythrocyte membrane than control rats. This increase in 18:2 (n-6) was mainly at the expense of 18:1 and occurred in a dose-dependent fashion. The proportion of 20:4 (n-6) did not remarkably change feeding diets with (n-6) PUFA-rich oils. The (n-3) PUFA concentration in the erythrocyte membranes considerably increased, whereas (n-6) PUFA decreased feeding linseed oil or salmon oil rich in (n-3) PUFA. Linseed oil and salmon oil caused similar changes in the membrane, which were more pronounced in rats fed salmon oil than in rats fed linseed oil. The

  12. Desulfurization of Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils and alkali, Quarterly report, March 1 - May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, R.; Cheng, J.; Shi, F.; Wang, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Organic sulfur is removed from coals by treatment with aqueous base, air, and vegetable oils with minimal loss of BTU. Such results were revealed during exploratory experiments on an ICCI funded project to remove organic sulfur from Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. In fact, prewashing IBC-108 coal with dilute alkali prior to treating with linseed oil and air results in 26% removal of sulfur. This new method is being investigated by treating coals with alkali, impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. During the first quarter the selection of base fro pretreatment and extraction was completed. NaOH is better than NH{sub 4}OH for the pretreatment and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is better than NaOH for the oil extraction. During the second quarter the effectiveness of linseed oil and NaOH for sulfur removal from IBC-108 coal was further tested by pretreating the coal with two base concentrations at four different times followed by treatment with linseed oil at 125{degrees}C for three different times and finally washing with 5% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and methanol. During this third quarter more experimental parameters were systematically varied in order to study the effectiveness of linseed oil and NaOH for sulfur removal from IBC- 108 coal.

  13. Discrimination of n-3 rich oils by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Pedro; Zeng, Yingxu; Du, Zhen-Yu; Nguyen, Thu-Thao; Frøyland, Livar; Grung, Bjørn

    2010-12-01

    Exploring the capabilities of instrumental techniques for discriminating n-3 rich oils derived from animals is a very important though much neglected area that was emphasized more than 100 years ago. In this study the potential of gas chromatography (GC) for discriminating full fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles from fish (cod liver and salmon) and marine mammal (seal and whale) oils is evaluated by means of principal component analysis (PCA). The FAME profiles from plant oils such as rapeseed, linseed and soy oils and seven different brands of n-3 supplements are also used in the discrimination process. The results from the PCA plots can reliably distinguish between plant, n-3 supplements, fish and marine mammal oils. By removing the contribution of the n-3 supplements and plant oils it is possible to discriminate between types of fish and marine animal oils. GC offers a rapid, simple and convenient means of discriminating oils from different species, brands and grades.

  14. Linear relationship between increasing amounts of extruded linseed in dairy cow diet and milk fatty acid composition and butter properties.

    PubMed

    Hurtaud, C; Faucon, F; Couvreur, S; Peyraud, J-L

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this experiment was to compare the effects of increasing amounts of extruded linseed in dairy cow diet on milk fat yield, milk fatty acid (FA) composition, milk fat globule size, and butter properties. Thirty-six Prim'Holstein cows at 104 d in milk were sorted into 3 groups by milk production and milk fat globule size. Three diets were assigned: a total mixed ration (control) consisting of corn silage (70%) and concentrate (30%), or a supplemented ration based on the control ration but where part of the concentrate energy was replaced on a dry matter basis by 2.1% (LIN1) or 4.3% (LIN2) extruded linseed. The increased amounts of extruded linseed linearly decreased milk fat content and milk fat globule size and linearly increased the percentage of milk unsaturated FA, specifically alpha-linolenic acid and trans FA. Extruded linseed had no significant effect on butter color or on the sensory properties of butters, with only butter texture in the mouth improved. The LIN2 treatment induced a net improvement of milk nutritional properties but also created problems with transforming the cream into butter. The butters obtained were highly spreadable and melt-in-the-mouth, with no pronounced deficiency in taste. The LIN1 treatment appeared to offer a good tradeoff of improved milk FA profile and little effect on butter-making while still offering butters with improved functional properties.

  15. Effects of forage source and extruded linseed supplementation on methane emissions from growing dairy cattle of differing body weights.

    PubMed

    Hammond, K J; Humphries, D J; Crompton, L A; Kirton, P; Reynolds, C K

    2015-11-01

    Changes in diet carbohydrate amount and type (i.e., starch vs. fiber) and dietary oil supplements can affect ruminant methane emissions. Our objectives were to measure methane emissions, whole-tract digestibility, and energy and nitrogen utilization from growing dairy cattle at 2 body weight (BW) ranges, fed diets containing either high maize silage (MS) or high grass silage (GS), without or with supplemental oil from extruded linseed (ELS). Four Holstein-Friesian heifers aged 13 mo (BW range from start to finish of 382 to 526 kg) were used in experiment 1, whereas 4 lighter heifers aged 12 mo (BW range from start to finish of 292 to 419 kg) were used in experiment 2. Diets were fed as total mixed rations with forage dry matter (DM) containing high MS or high GS and concentrates in proportions (forage:concentrate, DM basis) of either 75:25 (experiment 1) or 60:40 (experiment 2), respectively. Diets were supplemented without or with ELS (Lintec, BOCM Pauls Ltd., Wherstead, UK; 260 g of oil/kg of DM) at 6% of ration DM. Each experiment was a 4 × 4 Latin square design with 33-d periods, with measurements during d 29 to 33 while animals were housed in respiration chambers. Heifers fed MS at a heavier BW (experiment 1) emitted 20% less methane per unit of DM intake (yield) compared with GS (21.4 vs. 26.6, respectively). However, when repeated with heifers of a lower BW (experiment 2), methane yield did not differ between the 2 diets (26.6g/kg of DM intake). Differences in heifer BW had no overall effect on methane emissions, except when expressed as grams per kilogram of digestible organic matter (OMD) intake (32.4 vs. 36.6, heavy vs. light heifers). Heavier heifers fed MS in experiment 1 had a greater DM intake (9.4kg/d) and lower OMD (755 g/kg), but no difference in N utilization (31% of N intake) compared with heifers fed GS (7.9 kg/d and 799 g/kg, respectively). Tissue energy retention was nearly double for heifers fed MS compared with GS in experiment 1 (15 vs. 8

  16. Fourier transform infrared spectra of drying oils treated by irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Qin; Artz, William E; Padua, Graciela W

    2008-05-14

    Drying oils, such as linseed oil and tung oil, have the potential as coating materials to improve barrier properties of biobased packaging films. Oil drying is a chemical reaction in which polyunsaturated fatty acids undergo autoxidation. During drying, oils polymerize and form water-resistant films. However, drying rates tend to be too slow for practical applications. Metal driers are used in the paint industry to accelerate drying, but often driers are not safe for food contact. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on the oxidation or drying rate of drying oils. The effect of irradiation dose on the drying rate of linseed and tung oils was monitored by FTIR spectroscopy. The peak at 3010 cm (-1) was found to be a useful index of oxidation rate. The decrease in peak intensity with time was fitted with exponential functions of the form Abs = Abs 0 exp (- t/ k), where Abs 0 is the initial absorbance and 1/ k is the rate constant for the oxidation process. Values for k were 9.91 ( R (2) = 0.98), 6.59 ( R (2) = 0.95)n and 6.44 ( R (2) = 0.97) for radiation levels of 0, 50, and 100 kGy, respectively. The k values suggested that the oxidation rate increased as the radiation dose increased from 0 to 50 kGy. A further increase to 100 kGy had only a limited effect.

  17. Grape seed and linseed, alone and in combination, enhance unsaturated fatty acids in the milk of Sarda dairy sheep.

    PubMed

    Correddu, F; Gaspa, G; Pulina, G; Nudda, A

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dietary inclusion of grape seed and linseed, alone or in combination, on sheep milk fatty acids (FA) profile using 24 Sarda dairy ewes allocated to 4 isoproductive groups. Groups were randomly assigned to 4 dietary treatments consisting of a control diet (CON), a diet including 300 g/d per animal of grape seed (GS), a diet including 220 g/d per animal of extruded linseed (LIN), and a diet including a mix of 300 g/d per animal of grape seed and 220 g/d per animal of extruded linseed (MIX). The study lasted 10 wk, with a 2-wk adaptation period and an 8-wk experimental period. Milk FA composition was analyzed in milk samples collected in the last 4 wk of the trial. The milk concentration of saturated fatty acids (SFA) decreased and that of unsaturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids (UFA, MUFA, and PUFA, respectively) increased in GS, LIN, and MIX groups compared with CON. The MIX group showed the lowest values of SFA and the highest of UFA, MUFA, and PUFA. Milk from ewes fed linseed (LIN and MIX) showed an enrichment of vaccenic acid (VA), oleic acid (OA), α-linolenic acid (LNA), and cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) compared with milk from the CON group. The GS group showed a greater content of milk oleic acid (OA) and linoleic acid (LA) and tended to show a greater content of VA and cis-9,trans-11 CLA than the CON group. The inclusion of grape seed and linseed, alone and in combination, decreased the milk concentration of de novo synthesized FA C10:0, C12:0, and C14:0, with the MIX group showing the lowest values. In conclusion, grape seed and linseed could be useful to increase the concentration of FA with potential health benefits, especially when these ingredients are included in combination in the diet. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhanced solubilization and desorption of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) from soil by oil-swollen micelles formed with a nonionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guanyu; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2012-11-06

    The effect of oil-swollen micelles formed with nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80), cosurfactant 1-pentanol, and linseed oil on the solubilization and desorption of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) including DDT and γ-HCH from both loam soil and clay soil were investigated. Results showed that the solubilizing capacities of oil-swollen micelles were dependent on the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of Tween 80. Once the concentrations of oil-swollen micelles exceeded the CMC of Tween 80, the oil-swollen micelles exhibited much higher solubilizing capacity than empty Tween 80 micelles for the two OCPs. Desorption tests revealed that oil-swollen micelles could successfully enhance desorption of OCPs from both loam soil and clay soil. However, compared with the efficiencies achieved by empty Tween 80 micelles, oil-swollen micelles exhibited their superiority to desorb OCPs only in loam soil-water system while was less effective in clay soil-water system. Distribution of Tween 80, 1-pentanol and linseed oil in soil-water system revealed that the difference in the sorption behavior of linseed oil onto the two soils is responsible for the different effects of oil-swollen micelles on the desorption of OCPs in loam soil and clay soil systems. Therefore, oil-swollen micelles formed with nonionic surfactant Tween 80 are better candidates over empty micelle counterparts to desorb OCPs from soil with relatively lower sorption capacity for oil fraction, which may consequently enhance the availability of OCPs in soil environment during remediation processes of contaminated soil.

  19. Combination of Analytical and Chemometric Methods as a Useful Tool for the Characterization of Extra Virgin Argan Oil and Other Edible Virgin Oils. Role of Polyphenols and Tocopherols.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Ascensión; Samaniego-Sánchez, Cristina; Olalla, Manuel; Giménez, Rafael; Cabrera-Vique, Carmen; Seiquer, Isabel; Lara, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of phenolic profile and tocopherol fractions in conjunction with chemometrics techniques were used for the accurate characterization of extra virgin argan oil and eight other edible vegetable virgin oils (olive, soybean, wheat germ, walnut, almond, sesame, avocado, and linseed) and to establish similarities among them. Phenolic profile and tocopherols were determined by HPLC coupled with diode-array and fluorescence detectors, respectively. Multivariate factor analysis (MFA) and linear correlations were applied. Significant negative correlations were found between tocopherols and some of the polyphenols identified, but more intensely (P < 0.001) between the γ-tocopherol and oleuropein, pinoresinol, and luteolin. MFA revealed that tocopherols, especially γ-fraction, most strongly influenced the oil characterization. Among the phenolic compounds, syringic acid, dihydroxybenzoic acid, oleuropein, pinoresinol, and luteolin also contributed to the discrimination of the oils. According to the variables analyzed in the present study, argan oil presented the greatest similarity with walnut oil, followed by sesame and linseed oils. Olive, avocado, and almond oils showed close similarities.

  20. Linseed plus nitrate in the diet for fattening bulls: effects on methane emission, animal health and residues in offal.

    PubMed

    Doreau, M; Arbre, M; Popova, M; Rochette, Y; Martin, C

    2017-08-15

    The combination of linseed and nitrate is known to decrease enteric methane emission in dairy cows but few studies have been carried out in fattening cattle for animal liveweight gain, enteric methane emission, animal health and presence of residues in beef products. To address this gap, 16 young bulls received a control (C) diet between weaning at 9 months and 14 months, then were split into two groups of eight balanced on feed intake, BW gain and methane emission to receive either the C diet or a diet moderately supplemented with extruded linseed and calcium nitrate (LN) for 2 months before being slaughtered. On a dry matter (DM) basis, the C diet contained 70% baled grass silage and 30% concentrate mainly made of maize, wheat and rapeseed meal. In the LN diet, rapeseed meal and a fraction of cereals were replaced by 35% extruded linseed and 6% calcium nitrate; linseed fatty acids and nitrate supply in the LN diet were 1.9% and 1.0%, respectively. Methane emission was measured continuously using the GreenFeed system. Methaemoglobin was determined every week in peripheral blood from bulls receiving the LN diet. Nitrate and nitrite concentrations were determined in rumen, liver and tongue sampled at slaughter. Dry matter intake tended to be lower for LN diet (P=0.10). Body weight gain was lower for LN diet (P=0.01; 1.60 and 1.26 kg/day for C and LN diet, respectively). Daily methane emission was 9% lower (P<0.001) for LN than C diet (249 and 271 g/day, respectively) but methane yield did not differ between diets (24.1 and 23.2 g/kg DM intake for C and LN diet, respectively, P=0.34). Methaemoglobin was under the limit of detection (<2% of total haemoglobin) for most animals and was always lower than 5.6%, suggesting an absence of risk to animal health. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations in offal did not differ between C and LN diets. In conclusion, a moderate supply of linseed and nitrate in bull feed failed to decrease enteric methane yield and impaired bull

  1. Crystallization behavior of milk fat obtained from linseed-fed cows.

    PubMed

    Smet, K; Coudijzer, K; Fredrick, E; De Campeneere, S; De Block, J; Wouters, J; Raes, K; Dewettinck, K

    2010-02-01

    Milk with an increased content of unsaturated fatty acids was obtained by incorporating 60% of extruded linseed into the concentrate of cows. Two groups of Holstein cows (3 animals/group) were fed a concentrate (control or linseed enriched) together with the same roughage diet (ad libitum). After an adaptation period of 3 wk, evening and morning milk samples were collected every 7 d for 3 wk. Milk was decreamed and anhydrous milk fat (AMF) was isolated from the fat fraction by using the Bureau of Dairy Industries method. The objective of this study was to investigate if the crystallization mechanism of milk fat changed when the content of unsaturated fatty acids was increased. Therefore, the crystallization behavior of a milk fat enriched with unsaturated fatty acids was compared with that of a control milk fat. Nonisothermal crystallization was investigated with differential scanning calorimetry, and 1-step and 2-step isothermal crystallization behaviors were investigated using pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance, differential scanning calorimetry, and x-ray diffraction. A higher content of unsaturated fatty acids in AMF resulted in an increased proportion of low melting triglycerides. These triglycerides lowered the solid fat content profile, particularly at refrigerator temperatures. Furthermore, they induced some changes in the crystallization and melting behaviors of milk fat compared with a control AMF, although no fundamental changes in the crystallization mechanism could be revealed. Even though a lower melting point could be observed for milk fat with a higher content of unsaturated fatty acids, a similar degree of supercooling was needed to initiate crystallization, resulting in a shift in onset temperature of crystallization toward lower temperatures. In addition, slower crystallization kinetics were measured, such as a lower nucleation rate and longer induction times, although crystallization occurred in a similar polymorphic crystal lattice. During

  2. Epoxy thermoset networks derived from vegetable oils and their blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Chang; Ravalli, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Epoxidized vegetable oils (EVOs), such as epoxidized soybean oil and linseed oils were prepared by the partial oxidation of the unsaturated double bonds in vegetable oils and used as monomers for preparing epoxy thermoset materials based on the cationic polymerization. These EVOs have been used to prepare epoxy thermosets of different network densities by cationic polymerization using onium salt catalyst. The crosslinked epoxy thermosets provide an ideal platform to study the structure-property-relationships of networked polymers. In particular, rheological studies on the epoxidized vegetable oil thermosets have been performed to measure the molecular weights between crosslinks (Mx) in the epoxy thermosets and to ultimately elucidate the role of functionality of epoxy groups in EVO on the mechanical and thermophysical properties of the epoxy thermoset materials. NSF DMR POLYMERS 1308617.

  3. Mineral and Anti-Nutritional Contents of Niger Seed (Guizotia abyssinica (L.f.) Cass., Linseed (Linumusitatissimum L.) and Sesame (Sesamumindicum L.) Varieties Grown in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Deme, Tesfaye; Haki, Gulelat D.; Retta, Nigussie; Woldegiorgis, Ashagrie; Geleta, Mulatu

    2017-01-01

    Oilseeds are rich sources of micronutrients and contribute to combating malnutrition caused by micronutrient deficiency. The objective of this study was to investigate the mineral and anti-nutritional contents of different varieties of niger seed, linseed and sesame. Five niger seed, eight linseed and ten sesame varieties were used. Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used for mineral analysis and the standard method was adopted to estimate tannin and phytate. Twelve mineral elements; Ca, K, Mg, Na, P, B, Cu, Fe, Mn, S, Se and Zn were analyzed for each oilseed variety. In niger seed, phosphorous was the most abundant mineral element ranging from 661 to 867 mg/100 g and selenium was the least, ranging from 0.1 to 0.33 mg/100 g. Potassium was recorded in the range of 502 to 732 mg/100 g for linseed varieties. Calcium was the most common mineral element in sesame (1112 to 1787 mg/100 g). The average phytate contents of niger seed, linseed and sesame varieties were353 mg/100 g, 104 mg/100 g and 285 mg/100 g, respectively. Tannin ranged from 91 to 201 mg/100 g, 96 to 695 mg/100 g and 85 to 660 mg/100 g in niger seed, linseed and sesame, respectively. In conclusion, there is a significant variation among the varieties within each crop species as well as among the different oilseeds in terms of their mineral and anti-nutritional contents. PMID:28368326

  4. Potential of oil-based formulations of Beauveria bassiana to control Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Luz, C; Batagin, I

    2005-08-01

    The in vitro development of Beauveria bassiana conidia was monitored when immersed in six concentrations of seven non-ionic (MP 6400, MP 600, Renex 60, Renex 95, Span 80, Tween 20 and Tween 80) and three anionic (DOS 75, Hostapaval BVQ 9 and Surfax 220) surfactants and 11 vegetable oils (linseed, soybean, groundnut, rapeseed, thistle, sunflower, olive, sesame, corn, castor, and babassu). The influence of the oils on the settling behavior of Triatoma infestans nymphs and the activity of an oil-water formulation of the fungus against this vector under laboratory and simulated field conditions were also determined. With exception of DOS 75 and Surfax 220 germination of conidia on complete medium was >98% at 24 h after exposure to surfactants up to 10%. Elevated rates of germination (>25%) were observed in 10% corn, thistle and linseed oil 8 days after incubation. Pure oils had a significant repellent effect to T. infestans. Repellency decreased generally at 10% of the oil and some oils showed some attractiveness for nymphs when tested at 1%. Nymphs were highly susceptible to oil-water formulated conidia, even at unfavorable moisture for extra-tegumental development of the fungus on the insect cuticle.

  5. Linseed hydrogel-mediated green synthesis of silver nanoparticles for antimicrobial and wound-dressing applications.

    PubMed

    Haseeb, Muhammad Tahir; Hussain, Muhammad Ajaz; Abbas, Khawar; Youssif, Bahaa Gm; Bashir, Sajid; Yuk, Soon Hong; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2017-01-01

    Polysaccharides are being extensively employed for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) having diverse morphology and applications. Herein, we present a novel and green synthesis of Ag NPs without using any physical reaction conditions. Linseed hydrogel (LSH) was used as a template to reduce Ag(+) to Ag(0). AgNO3 (10, 20, and 30 mmol) solutions were mixed with LSH suspension in deionized water and exposed to diffused sunlight. Reaction was monitored by noting the change in the color of reaction mixture up to 10 h. Ag NPs showed characteristic ultraviolet-visible (UV/Vis) absorptions from 410 to 437 nm in the case of sunlight and 397-410 nm in the case of temperature study. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed the formation of spherical Ag NPs in the range of 10-35 nm. Face-centered cubic array of Ag NPs was confirmed by characteristic diffraction peaks in powder X-ray diffraction spectrum. Ag NPs were stored in LSH thin films, and UV/Vis spectra recorded after 6 months indicated that Ag NPs retained their texture over the storage period. Significant antimicrobial activity was observed when microbial cultures (bacteria and fungi) were exposed to the synthesized Ag NPs. Wound-healing studies revealed that Ag NP-impregnated LSH thin films could have potential applications as an antimicrobial dressing in wound management procedures.

  6. Natural oil nanoemulsions as cores for layer-by-layer encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Adamczak, M; Para, G; Simon, C; Warszyński, P

    2013-01-01

    In this study, emulsions of three different natural oils were prepared using spontaneous emulsification technique. The effect of three emulsifiers, AOT, lecithin and cholesterol on emulsion properties was studied. Their influence on interfacial tension at oil/water interface was evaluated by the pendant drop shape analysis method. Then, the mean droplet size, zeta potential and stability of emulsions were investigated in relation with the type of oil, surfactant, oil-to-ethanol ratio and surfactant concentration. We found that in the case of linseed oil, fine emulsion droplets are formed without any surfactant due to its low oil/water interfacial tension. A hydrophobic dye (Coumarin 6) was encapsulated within oil cores and its presence was confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. The obtained emulsions can be used alone or as the cores for layer-by-layer encapsulation, which was demonstrated by enclosing droplets within first layer of synthetic polycation poly(allyamine hydrochloride) (PAH).

  7. Dietary effects of linseed on fatty acid composition of milk and on liver, adipose and mammary gland metabolism of periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Mach, N; Zom, R L G; Widjaja, H C A; van Wikselaar, P G; Weurding, R E; Goselink, R M A; van Baal, J; Smits, M A; van Vuuren, A M

    2013-05-01

    During the transition period in dairy cows, drastic adaptations within and between key tissues and cell types occur in a coordinated manner to support late gestation, the synthesis of large quantities of milk and metabolic homoeostasis. The start of lactation coincides with an increase of triacylglycerols in the liver, which has been associated with several economically important diseases in dairy cows (i.e. hepatic lipidiosis, mastitis). The polyunsaturated fatty acids have been used to improve liver metabolism and immune function in the mammary gland. Therefore, the effects of dietary linseed supplementation on milk quality and liver, adipose and mammary gland metabolism of periparturient dairy cows were studied in 14 cows that were randomly assigned to control or linseed supplementation. Animals were treated from 3 weeks antepartum until 6 weeks post-partum. Linseed did not modify dry matter intake, but increased milk yield and lactose yield, and decreased milk fat concentration, which coincided with lower proportion of C16 and higher proportions of stearic acid, conjugated linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid in milk fat. Linseed supplementation did not significantly change the expression of key lipid metabolism genes in liver and adipose tissues, except of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) in liver, which was increased in cows supplemented with linseed, suggesting that more glucose was secreted and probably available for lactose synthesis compared with cows fed control diet. Large adaptations of transcription occurred in the mammary gland when dairy cows were supplemented with linseed. The main affected functional modules were related to energy metabolism, cell proliferation and remodelling, as well as the immune system response.

  8. Desulfurization of coal with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. [Quarterly progress report], December 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, Ruozhi; Cheng, Jianjun; Shi, Feng; Gholson, K.L.; Ho, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    This project proposes a new method for removing organic sulfur from Illinois coals using readily available farm products. It proposes to use air and vegetable oils to disrupt the coal matrix, oxidize sulfur forms, increase volatiles, and desulfurize coal. This will be accomplished by impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover, the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of the solid products. Preliminary experiments showed that IBC 104 coal catalyzes the formation of hydroperoxides in safflower oil and that more sulfur is extracted from the treated than untreated coal. During the first quarter the requirement of an added photosensitizer was eliminated, the catalytic effect of coal was confirmed, and the existence of a complex set of reactions was revealed. During this second quarter working with IBC-108 coal (2.3% organic S. 0.4% pyrite S), the effects of different ratios of oil:coal, different extraction solvents, and different temperatures were examined. A new pretreatment which combines alkali with linseed oil was discovered. Best organic sulfur removal is approximately 26% using alkali pretreatment combined with linseed oil at 1OO{degree}C. BTU loses can be kept to a minimum of 3% with proper use of solvents.

  9. Desulfurization of Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils and alkali. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, R.; Cheng, J.; Shi, F.; Wang, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Organic sulfur is removed from coals by treatment with aqueous base, air, and vegetable oils with minimal loss of BTU. Such results were revealed during exploratory experiments on an ICCI funded project to remove organic sulfur from Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. In fact, prewashing IBC-108 coal with dilute alkali prior to treating with linseed oil and air results in 26% removal of sulfur. This new method will be investigated by treating coals with alkali, impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of the solid products. During this first quarter the selection of base for pretreatment and extraction (Task 1) has been completed. NaOH is better than NH{sub 4}OH for the pretreatment and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is better than NaOH for the oil extraction. About 40% of sulfur is removed from IBC-108 coal using 5% NaOH for pretreatment followed by linseed oil oxidation in air and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} extraction.

  10. Comparison of the effect of the linseed extract Salinum and a methyl cellulose preparation on the symptoms of dry mouth.

    PubMed

    Andersson, G; Johansson, G; Attström, R; Edwardsson, S; Glantz, P O; Larsson, K

    1995-07-01

    The effect of a linseed extract Salinum and a sodium carboxymethyl cellulose preparation called MAS-84 was compared with regard to its effect on the symptoms of dry mouth. Twenty patients with xerostomia, who had been treated for cancer in the head and neck by radiation were recruited from the clinic for maxillofacial surgery, Malmo University Hospital. Following radiation treatment the salivation was severely reduced. The symptoms of a general feeling of a dry mouth, difficulties in chewing and swallowing, taste disturbances, problems with speech and mouth burning were registered on a subjective verbal rating scale. In addition plaque index and gingival bleeding were determined. The study design was crossover and performed single blind. The experimental period was 7 weeks. The patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. One group used Salinum and the other MAS-84 for 3 weeks. The fourth week was a wash out period and for the next three weeks the patients shifted preparation. Each of the preparations was used ad libitum. Registrations of the various parameters were undertaken on days 0, 7 and 21 of the respective period. At the initial examination all patients reported considerable disturbances from mouth-dryness. These symptoms were reduced in 15 patients during the Salinum period and in 9 during the MAS-84 period. The relief was significantly more pronounced during the use of Salinum compared to that during the use of the methyl cellulose preparation. On day 21 plaque and gingival bleeding were significantly reduced during the Salinum period but not during the MAS-84 period. The results of the present study confirm those of a previous pilot study and indicate that the linseed mucilage significantly reduced the symptoms of dry mouth. This effect increased with increasing time of saliva substitute use. The linseed mucilage Salinum appeared to be a suitable saliva replacement in mouth dry patients.

  11. Lipid content and fatty acid composition of the digital cushion of bulls offered different amounts of linseed.

    PubMed

    Baird, L G; Dawson, L E R; Young, I S; O'Connell, N E

    2010-07-01

    Previous research suggests that the digital cushion, a shock-absorbing structure in the claw, plays an important role in protecting cattle from lameness. This study aimed to assess the degree to which nutritional factors influence the composition of the digital cushion. This involved quantifying lipid content and fatty acid composition differences in digital cushion tissue from cattle offered diets with different amounts of linseed. Forty-six bulls were allocated to 1 of 4 treatments, which were applied for an average of 140 +/- 27 d during the finishing period. The treatments consisted of a linseed supplement offered once daily on top of the basal diet (grass silage:concentrate) at 0, 400, 800, or 1,200 g of supplement/animal per day. For each treatment, the concentrate offered was adjusted to ensure that total estimated ME intake was constant across treatments. Target BW at slaughter was 540 kg. Legs were collected in 3 batches after 120, 147 and 185 d on experiment. Six samples of the digital cushion were dissected from the right lateral hind claw of each animal. Lipids were extracted and expressed as a proportion of fresh tissue, and fatty acid composition of the digital cushion was determined by gas chromatography. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, with diet, location within the digital cushion, and their interactions as fixed effects and fat content (grams per 100 g of tissue) as a covariate. Linear or quadratic contrasts were examined. The lipid content of digital cushion tissue differed between sampling locations (P < 0.001) but did not vary by treatment. There were quadratic responses to increasing linseed supplementation for several fatty acids. Although the overall proportion of C18:3n-3 (the most abundant fatty acid in linseed) did not differ (P < 0.33) by treatment, there was a quadratic influence of diet on total PUFA concentration (P = 0.003) and a linear increase in C18:3n-3 as a proportion of total PUFA (P = 0.01) in the digital cushion. This work

  12. EVALUATION OF CRUDE FLAXSEED (Linum usitatissimum L) OIL IN BURN WOUND HEALING IN NEW ZEALAND RABBITS.

    PubMed

    Beroual, Katiba; Agabou, Amir; Abdeldjelil, Mohamed-Cherif; Boutaghane, Naima; Haouam, Saîd; Hamdi-Pacha, Youcef

    2017-01-01

    Burns are among the most prevalent injuries in humans with high cost in health care and heavy prolonged or permanent physical, psychological and social consequences. Commercial antimicrobial creams and dressing agents are unsuccessful in healing deep burn wounds. A study was conducted to assess the impact of crude linseed oil (LSO) topical application on burn wounds healing in rabbits in comparison with untreated wounds (NAT) and those treated with Vaseline gel (VAG) and Cicatryl-Bio ointment (CBO). By the 28(th) day post burning, skin biopsies were analyzed for histological and cytological lesions. The presence of various bioactive phytochemical groups in linseed was also screened. Phytochemical screening has resulted in high concentrations of flavonoids and terpenoids, low amounts of catechic tannins and total absence of alkaloids and saponosides. All along the trial, the rate of wounds contraction was found to be significantly higher in burns treated with LSO which had also a significant shorter healing period (26±5.89 days) as compared to the other treatments. LSO healed wounds included less inflammatory cells, complete epithelium regeneration with a reduced thickness of the new formed dermis, discreet fibrosis, enhanced neo-vascularization, increased number of collagen fibers, fibroblasts and many myofibroblasts. Additionally, no adverse effects of LSO on cicatrization process were recorded. These findings prove the safety and efficaciousness of linseed oil topical application in the therapy of burn wounds.

  13. EVALUATION OF CRUDE FLAXSEED (Linum usitatissimum L) OIL IN BURN WOUND HEALING IN NEW ZEALAND RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Beroual, Katiba; Agabou, Amir; Abdeldjelil, Mohamed-Cherif; Boutaghane, Naima; Haouam, Saîd; Hamdi-Pacha, Youcef

    2017-01-01

    Background: Burns are among the most prevalent injuries in humans with high cost in health care and heavy prolonged or permanent physical, psychological and social consequences. Commercial antimicrobial creams and dressing agents are unsuccessful in healing deep burn wounds. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted to assess the impact of crude linseed oil (LSO) topical application on burn wounds healing in rabbits in comparison with untreated wounds (NAT) and those treated with Vaseline gel (VAG) and Cicatryl-Bio ointment (CBO). By the 28th day post burning, skin biopsies were analyzed for histological and cytological lesions. The presence of various bioactive phytochemical groups in linseed was also screened. Results: Phytochemical screening has resulted in high concentrations of flavonoids and terpenoids, low amounts of catechic tannins and total absence of alkaloids and saponosides. All along the trial, the rate of wounds contraction was found to be significantly higher in burns treated with LSO which had also a significant shorter healing period (26±5.89 days) as compared to the other treatments. LSO healed wounds included less inflammatory cells, complete epithelium regeneration with a reduced thickness of the new formed dermis, discreet fibrosis, enhanced neo-vascularization, increased number of collagen fibers, fibroblasts and many myofibroblasts. Additionally, no adverse effects of LSO on cicatrization process were recorded. Conclusion: These findings prove the safety and efficaciousness of linseed oil topical application in the therapy of burn wounds. PMID:28480439

  14. Biopolymers from vegetable oils via catalyst- and solvent-free "click" chemistry: effects of cross-linking density.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jian; Luo, Qiang; Wan, Xianmei; Petrović, Zoran S; Shah, Bipin K

    2012-01-09

    New monomers were prepared by introducing the azide groups in castor, canola, corn, soybean, and linseed oils. Polymerization of the azidated oils with alkynated soybean oil under thermal "click" chemistry conditions (without using a solvent or a catalyst) yielded fully cross-linked elastomers (1-5) of almost the same density (1.05 × 10(-3) kg/m(3)). The degree of cross-linking gradually increased from the castor-derived polymer (220 mol/m(3)) to the linseed-derived polymer (683 mol/m(3)). A systematic correlation between the degree of cross-linking and the thermal and mechanical properties was observed in these biopolymers. Tensile strength (0.62-3.39 MPa) and glass transition temperature (-5 to 16 °C) increased and the linear thermal expansion coefficient decreased in the series from the canola-derived polymer (2) to the linseed-derived polymer (5). The castor-derived polymer (1) that possesses an additional hydroxyl group per fatty acid chain behaved differently.

  15. Immune and oxidative response to linseed in the diet of periparturient Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Đidara, M; Poljičak-Milas, N; Milinković-Tur, S; Mašek, T; Šuran, J; Pavić, M; Kardum, M; Šperanda, M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the influence of dietary replacement of n-6 with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on cellular immunity and oxidative stress in the transition period dairy cows. The experiment was conducted on 20 dairy Holstein cows from 3 ± 1 weeks before parturition until the 6th week of lactation. Both groups were fed an iso-energetic and iso-nitrogenous diet. Soybean meal from control (C) group was replaced with linseed in the experimental (LS) group. Cellular immunity and oxidative stress were measured on days -10, 1, 21 and 42 relative to parturition. During the entire experimental period, the proportion of CD45+ cells was lower (P<0.05) in LS group compared with the C group. The phagocytosis ability and phagocytosis index of cows fed with n-3 fatty acids were significantly reduced (P<0.05) compared with the group of cows fed with n-6 fatty acids. The most severe decrease in phagocytosis ability was on day -10 and 1 relative to parturition. The activity of superoxide dismutase (P<0.05) and plasma glutathione peroxidase (P<0.05) increased around calving, although activities were not influenced by dietary treatment. Increased malondialdehyde concentration (P<0.05) was influenced by dietary n-3 fatty acids and the time relative to parturition. The immune suppression was most pronounced during periparturient period. In that matter we can conclude that not only dietary n-3 fatty acids but also oxidative stress, which reached peak at time of parturition, contributed to the reduced cellular immunity during the periparturient period.

  16. Reduction of epoxidized vegetable oils: a novel method to prepare bio-based polyols for polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaoqun; Ding, Rui; Kessler, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    A novel method, epoxidation/reduction of vegetable oils, is developed to prepare bio-based polyols for the manufacture of polyurethanes (PUs). These polyols are synthesized from castor oil (CO), epoxidized soybean oil, and epoxidized linseed oil and their molecular structures are characterized. They are used to prepare a variety of PUs, and their thermomechanical properties are compared to those of PU made with petroleum-based polyol (P-450). It is shown that PUs made with polyols from soybean and linseed oil exhibit higher glass transition temperatures, tensile strength, and Young's modulus and PU made with polyol from CO exhibits higher elongation at break and toughness than PU made with P-450. However, PU made with P-450 displays better thermal resistance because of tri-ester structure and terminal functional groups. The method provides a versatile way to prepare bio-polyols from vegetable oils, and it is expected to partially or completely replace petroleum-based polyols in PUs manufacture.

  17. Benefits of foods supplemented with vegetable oils rich in α-linolenic, stearidonic or docosahexaenoic acid in hypertriglyceridemic subjects: a double-blind, randomized, controlled trail.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Manja; Jahreis, Gerhard; Bothor, Kristin; Drechsel, Carina; Kiehntopf, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Dawczynski, Christine

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of foods enriched with vegetable oils varying in their n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids profile on cardiovascular risk factors for hypertriglyceridemic subjects. Fifty-nine hypertriglyceridemic subjects (triglycerides ≥ 1.5 mmol/L) were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. The placebo group received sunflower oil [linoleic acid (LA) group; 10 g LA/day]. The intervention groups received linseed oil [α-linolenic acid (ALA) group; 7 g ALA/day], echium oil [stearidonic acid (SDA) group; 2 g SDA/day] or microalgae oil [docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) group; 2 g DHA/day] over 10 weeks. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at the end of each period. Total cholesterol (TC) and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol decreased significantly in the LA and ALA groups (LA: P ≤ 0.01, ALA: P ≤ 0.05). No changes in blood lipids were observed in the SDA group. Significant increases in TC and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol occurred in the DHA group (P ≤ 0.05). In the ALA and SDA groups, the content of eicosapentaenoic acid in erythrocyte lipids increased significantly (P ≤ 0.05) after 10 weeks (ALA group: 38 ± 37 %, SDA group: 73  ± 59 %). Foods enriched with different vegetable oils rich in ALA or SDA are able to increase the n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids content in erythrocyte lipids; echium oil is more potent in comparison with linseed oil. Blood lipids were beneficially modified through the consumption of food products enriched with sunflower, linseed and microalgae oils, whereas echium oil did not affect blood lipids. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01437930.

  18. Evaluation of superabsorbent linseed-polysaccharides as a novel stimuli-responsive oral sustained release drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Haseeb, Muhammad Tahir; Hussain, Muhammad Ajaz; Bashir, Sajid; Ashraf, Muhammad Umer; Ahmad, Naveed

    2017-03-01

    Advancement in technology has transformed the conventional dosage forms to intelligent drug delivery systems. Such systems are helpful for targeted and efficient drug delivery with minimum side effects. Drug release from these systems is governed and controlled by external stimuli (pH, enzymes, ions, glucose, etc.). Polymeric biomaterial having stimuli-responsive properties has opened a new area in drug delivery approach. Potential of a polysaccharide (rhamnogalacturonan)-based hydrogel from Linseeds (Linum usitatissimum L.) was investigated as an intelligent drug delivery material. Different concentrations of Linseed hydrogel (LSH) were used to prepare caffeine and diacerein tablets and further investigated for pH and salt solution-responsive swelling, pH-dependent drug release, and release kinetics. Morphology of tablets was observed using SEM. LSH tablets exhibited dynamic swelling-deswelling behavior with tendency to swell at pH 7.4 and in deionized water while deswell at pH 1.2, in normal saline and ethanol. Consequently, pH controlled release of the drugs was observed from tablets with lower release (<10%) at pH 1.2 and higher release at pH 6.8 and 7.4. SEM showed elongated channels in swollen then freeze-dried tablets. The drug release was greatly influenced by the amount of LSH in the tablets. Drug release from LSH tablets was governed by the non-Fickian diffusion. These finding indicates that LSH holds potential to be developed as sustained release material for tablet.

  19. The effect of vitamin E supplementation of cow diets containing rapeseed and linseed on the prevention of milk fat oxidation.

    PubMed

    Focant, M; Mignolet, E; Marique, M; Clabots, F; Breyne, T; Dalemans, D; Larondelle, Y

    1998-04-01

    Two experiments involving lactating Holstein cows were carried out to quantify the effect of a 550-g supplement of lipids from extruded rapeseed and linseed on milk fatty acid profiles and the susceptibility of milk fat to oxidation. The effect of a daily oral supplement containing 9616 IU of vitamin E (all-rac-alpha-tocopheryl acetate) on milk alpha-tocopherol and protection against oxidation was also evaluated. The intake of oilseeds decreased protein and fat contents in milk, and the proportion of all C18 fatty acids increased. The trans isomers were 2.7 and 10.76% of the milk fatty acids, respectively, for cows fed the control diet and the diet containing extruded rapeseed and linseed. The ratio of oleic to palmitic acid was doubled, and the resistance to oxidation was reduced by 30 to 40% in both experiments. The dietary vitamin E supplement increased the alpha-tocopherol concentration in milk by about 45% and was sufficient to prevent milk fat depression and oxidation. The diet containing oilseeds and supplemented with an adequate amount of vitamin E allowed cows to yield milk that could be used to manufacture butter with high oleic acid content, good spreadability, and resistance to oxidation.

  20. A comparison of Fibre Characteristics between Linseed Flax, Canadian Grown Linen Flax and European Linen Flax with Respect to Performance as a Composite Reinforcement

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper describes the fibre character differences that may influence the fibre’s potential as a composite reinforcement. Fourteen linseed samples were tested. Twelve of the sample groups were produced using hammer mill technology and straw from the years 2000, 2006 and 2007 with ranges in cleanli...

  1. Durbin-Watson partial least-squares regression applied to MIR data on adulteration with edible oils of different origins.

    PubMed

    Jović, Ozren

    2016-12-15

    A novel method for quantitative prediction and variable-selection on spectroscopic data, called Durbin-Watson partial least-squares regression (dwPLS), is proposed in this paper. The idea is to inspect serial correlation in infrared data that is known to consist of highly correlated neighbouring variables. The method selects only those variables whose intervals have a lower Durbin-Watson statistic (dw) than a certain optimal cutoff. For each interval, dw is calculated on a vector of regression coefficients. Adulteration of cold-pressed linseed oil (L), a well-known nutrient beneficial to health, is studied in this work by its being mixed with cheaper oils: rapeseed oil (R), sesame oil (Se) and sunflower oil (Su). The samples for each botanical origin of oil vary with respect to producer, content and geographic origin. The results obtained indicate that MIR-ATR, combined with dwPLS could be implemented to quantitative determination of edible-oil adulteration.

  2. Effect of supplementation with linseed or a blend of aromatic spices and time on feed on fatty acid composition, meat quality and consumer liking of meat from lambs fed dehydrated alfalfa or corn.

    PubMed

    Realini, C E; Bianchi, G; Bentancur, O; Garibotto, G

    2017-05-01

    Cross-bred lambs (n=72) were fed finishing diets using a factorial arrangement of treatments: BASAL DIET (alfalfa pellets or corn), SUPPLEMENT (none, linseed or aromatic spices), TIME ON FEED (41 or 83days). Carcass and meat quality traits, fatty acid composition, color stability and consumer liking were determined. Feeding alfalfa improved sensory ratings and fatty acid composition of lamb. However, corn or longer alfalfa feeding would be recommended if heavier and fatter carcasses are sought. Consumer liking and fatty acid composition of lamb were improved with addition of spices and linseed, respectively. But additional antioxidant strategies should be considered to delay meat color deterioration during storage if lambs are fed corn-linseed for 83days. Although alfalfa basal diet and linseed supplementation improved fatty acid composition, feeding the basal diets for at least 41days resulted in low n-3 fatty acid concentrations in muscle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Flaxseed and Flaxseed Oil

    MedlinePlus

    ... sheet provides basic information about flaxseed and flaxseed oil—common names, usefulness and safety, and resources for more information. Common Names: flaxseed, flax, linseed Latin Name: Linum usitatissimum Background Over the ...

  4. A new analytical method for quantification of olive and palm oil in blends with other vegetable edible oils based on the chromatographic fingerprints from the methyl-transesterified fraction.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Carvelo, Ana M; González-Casado, Antonio; Cuadros-Rodríguez, Luis

    2017-03-01

    A new analytical method for the quantification of olive oil and palm oil in blends with other vegetable edible oils (canola, safflower, corn, peanut, seeds, grapeseed, linseed, sesame and soybean) using normal phase liquid chromatography, and applying chemometric tools was developed. The procedure for obtaining of chromatographic fingerprint from the methyl-transesterified fraction from each blend is described. The multivariate quantification methods used were Partial Least Square-Regression (PLS-R) and Support Vector Regression (SVR). The quantification results were evaluated by several parameters as the Root Mean Square Error of Validation (RMSEV), Mean Absolute Error of Validation (MAEV) and Median Absolute Error of Validation (MdAEV). It has to be highlighted that the new proposed analytical method, the chromatographic analysis takes only eight minutes and the results obtained showed the potential of this method and allowed quantification of mixtures of olive oil and palm oil with other vegetable oils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Desulfurization of coal with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. Technical progress report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, R.; Cheng, J.; Shi, Feng; Gholson, K.L.

    1995-12-31

    This project proposes a new method for removing organic sulfur from Illinois coals using readily available farm products. It proposes to use air and vegetable oils to disrupt the coal matrix, oxidize sulfur forms, increase volatiles, and desulfurize coal. This will be accomplished by impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover, the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of solid products. Preliminary experiments showed that IBC 104 coal catalyzes the formation of hydroperoxides in safflower oil and that more sulfur is extracted from the treated than untreated coal. During the first quarter the requirement of an added photosensitizer was eliminated, the catalytic effect of coal was confirmed, and the existence of a complex set of reactions was revealed. During the second quarter, working with IBC-108 coal (2.3% organic S, 0.4% pyrite S), the effects of different extraction solvents were examined. A new pretreatment which combines alkali with linseed oil was discovered. Best organic sulfur removal is approximately 26% using alkali pretreatment combined with linseed oil at 100[degrees]C. BTU loses can be kept to a minimum of 3% with proper use of solvents. During this third quarter the effects of different ratios of oil:coal, different temperatures, and different reaction times were completely examined. The effects of alkali on sulfur removal were further investigated. Best organic sulfur removal reaches 34% using ammonia pretreatment, then oil and finally aqNA2CO3 extraction.

  6. Effect of low-to-moderate amounts of dietary fish oil on neutrophil lipid composition and function.

    PubMed

    Healy, D A; Wallace, F A; Miles, E A; Calder, P C; Newsholm, P

    2000-07-01

    Although essential to host defense, neutrophils are also involved in numerous inflammatory disorders including rheumatoid arthritis. Dietary supplementation with relatively large amounts of fish oil [containing >2.6 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus 1.4 g docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) per day] can attenuate neutrophil functions such as chemotaxis and superoxide radical production. In this study, the effects of more moderate supplementation with fish oil on neutrophil lipid composition and function were investigated. The rationale for using lower supplementary doses of fish oil was to avoid adverse gastrointestinal problems, which have been observed at high supplementary concentrations of fish oil. Healthy male volunteers aged <40 yr were randomly assigned to consume one of six dietary supplements daily for 12 wk (n = 8 per treatment group). The dietary supplements included four different concentrations of fish oil (the most concentrated fish oil provided 0.58 g EPA plus 1.67 g DHA per day), linseed oil, and a placebo oil. The percentages of EPA and DHA increased (both P < 0.05) in neutrophil phospholipids in a dose-dependent manner after 4 wk of supplementation with the three most concentrated fish oil supplements. No further increases in EPA or DHA levels were observed after 4 wk. The percentage of arachidonic acid in neutrophil phospholipids decreased (P < 0.05) after 12 wk supplementation with the linseed oil supplement or the two most concentrated fish oil supplements. There were no significant changes in N-formyl-met-leu-phe-induced chemotaxis and superoxide radical production following the dietary supplementations. In conclusion, low-to-moderate amounts of dietary fish oil can be used to manipulate neutrophil fatty acid composition. However, this may not be accompanied by modulation of neutrophil functions such as chemotaxis and superoxide radical production.

  7. Discrimination of n-3 Rich Oils by Gas Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yingxu; Du, Zhen-Yu; Nguyen, Thu-Thao; Frøyland, Livar; Grung, Bjørn

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the capabilities of instrumental techniques for discriminating n-3 rich oils derived from animals is a very important though much neglected area that was emphasized more than 100 years ago. In this study the potential of gas chromatography (GC) for discriminating full fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles from fish (cod liver and salmon) and marine mammal (seal and whale) oils is evaluated by means of principal component analysis (PCA). The FAME profiles from plant oils such as rapeseed, linseed and soy oils and seven different brands of n-3 supplements are also used in the discrimination process. The results from the PCA plots can reliably distinguish between plant, n-3 supplements, fish and marine mammal oils. By removing the contribution of the n-3 supplements and plant oils it is possible to discriminate between types of fish and marine animal oils. GC offers a rapid, simple and convenient means of discriminating oils from different species, brands and grades. PMID:20963508

  8. Antioxidant coating of micronsize droplets for prevention of lipid peroxidation in oil-in-water emulsion.

    PubMed

    Lomova, Maria V; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Antipina, Maria N

    2010-12-01

    Fast lipid peroxidation in emulsified oils results in carcinogens formation and product rancidity. Prevention of oxidative degradation in oil-in-water emulsion has been achieved by encapsulating of each droplet of dispersed phase in antioxidant multilayer coating shell. The fabrication comprised placing a surface-active ionic emulsifier at the oil/water interface followed by stepwise alternate adsorption a biocompatible polyelectrolyte and antioxidant layers. Uncoupled polyelectrolyte macromolecules and antioxidant were thoroughly removed from formulation, thus the protection was entirely attributed to the droplets' shell. The experiments were performed using linseed oil, the richest source of highly unstable omega-3 alpha linolenic essential fatty acid. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was exploited as an anionic emulsifier. The biodegradable coating shell was formed of poly-l-arginine (PARG) and dextran sulfate (DS) applied as a polycation and a polyanion respectively. Tannic acid (TA) known as a natural antioxidant and possessing antimicrobial properties was used as a protective remedy. Oil microdroplets coated with TA-containing shell displayed physical-chemical and mechanical stability in aqueous phase and over freeze-drying process as determined by ζ-potential measurements, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Oxidation of emulsified oil was monitored by formation of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the samples quantified by Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) assay. Coating shell with an incorporated layer of TA effectively suppressed oxidation in water-dispersed oil droplets and affected iron-catalyzed oxidation over 15 days of incubation at 37 °C in 0.3 mM FeBr2 solution. Antioxidant activity of TA-containing shell assembled around each oil droplet was found to be higher than that of mixed tocopherols (MT) added to linseed oil in concentration of 10000 ppm.

  9. Increasing linseed supply in dairy cow diets based on hay or corn silage: Effect on enteric methane emission, rumen microbial fermentation, and digestion.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Ferlay, A; Mosoni, P; Rochette, Y; Chilliard, Y; Doreau, M

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the effects of increasing extruded linseed supply in diets based on hay (H; experiment 1) or corn silage (CS; experiment 2) on enteric methane (CH4) emission, rumen microbial and fermentation parameters, and rumen and total-tract digestibility. In each experiment, 4 lactating Holstein cows fitted with cannulas at the rumen and proximal duodenum were used in a 4×4 Latin square design (28-d periods). Cows were fed ad libitum a diet [50:50 and 60:40 forage:concentrate on a dry matter (DM) basis for experiments 1 and 2, respectively] without supplementation (H0, CS0) or supplemented with extruded linseed at 5% (H5, CS5), 10% (H10, CS10), and 15% (H15, CS15) of dietary DM (i.e., 1.8, 3.6 and 5.4% total fatty acids added, respectively). All measurements were carried out during the last 8 d of each period. Linseed supply linearly decreased daily CH4 emission in cows fed H diets (from 486 to 289g/d for H0 to H15, on average) and CS diets (from 354 to 207g/d for CS0 to CS15, on average). The average decrease in CH4 per kilogram of DM intake was, respectively, -7, -15, and -38% for H5, H10, H15 compared with the H0 diet, and -4, -8, and -34% for CS5, CS10, and CS15 compared with the CS0 diet. The same dose-response effect was observed on CH4 emission in percent of gross energy intake, per kilogram of nutrient digested, and per kilogram of 4% fat- and 3.3% protein-corrected milk (FPCM) in both experiments. Changes in the composition of rumen volatile fatty acids in response to increasing linseed supply resulted in a moderate or marked linear decrease in acetate:propionate ratio for H or CS diets, respectively. The depressive effect of linseed on total protozoa concentration was linear for H diets (-15 to -40%, on average, for H5 to H15 compared with H0) and quadratic for CS diets (-17 to -83%, on average, for CS5 to CS15 compared with CS0). Concentration of methanogens was similar among H or CS diets. The energetic benefits from the decreased CH4 emission

  10. Effects of linseed consumption for a short period of time on lipid profile and atherosclerotic lesions in rabbits fed a hypercholesterolaemic diet.

    PubMed

    Prim, Camila Rodrigues; Baroncini, Liz Andréa Villela; Précoma, Leonardo Brandão; Caron, Pedro Henrique Lamach; Winter, Guilherme; Poletti, Mônica Olímpia Dall'Oglio; Précoma, Dalton Bertolim

    2012-03-01

    Linseed contains biologically active substances, such as lignans, fibres and linoleic acid, which are believed to provide cardioprotective effects. The objective of the present study was to assess the potential hypolipaemic, anti-atherogenic and anti-inflammatory effects of linseed consumption using an experimental animal model, with rabbits fed a hypercholesterolaemic diet (1 % cholesterol extracted from lyophilised egg). A total of twenty white male rabbits were selected and divided into two groups: group I (GI), control group, ten rabbits; group II (GII), ten rabbits. The animals were fed a hypercholesterolaemic diet for 56 d. For the GII diet, ground linseed was added from day 29 through to day 56. Animals underwent aortic arch and descending aorta dissection on day 56 for histological, morphometric and immunohistochemical analysis. At the end of the experiment, GII animals presented with lower levels of total cholesterol (TC, 10 068·3 v. 16 767·0 mg/l; P < 0·05) and lower levels of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C; 10 743·2 v. 15 961·2 mg/l; P < 0·05) when compared with the GI control group. There was no significant difference in serum HDL-cholesterol and TAG between the two groups. Almost all animals exhibited type III atherosclerotic lesions in the descending aorta. There was no statistically significant difference between the intima area and the intima:media layer area ratio in both groups. There was no difference between the positive areas for vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 molecules between the groups. Linseed consumption showed hypolipaemic action by reducing LDL-C and TC levels; however, this cholesterol-lowering effect did not reduce the atherosclerotic lesions induced by a hypercholesterolaemic diet (1 % cholesterol) for a short period of time.

  11. Effect of dietary linseed on the nutritional value and quality of pork and pork products: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Corino, Carlo; Rossi, Raffaella; Cannata, Susanna; Ratti, Sabrina

    2014-12-01

    Nutritional quality of pork is a significant factor for consumers' health. Feeding n-3 PUFA to pigs, using linseed, improves pork nutritional quality. A meta-analysis involving 1006 pigs reported in 24 publications was carried out to assess the effects of dietary linseed on alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) content in muscle and adipose tissue. Data showed positive effects of n-3 PUFA on muscle fatty acid composition: ALA+137%, EPA+188%, DPA+51% and DHA+12%. Same results were observed in adipose tissue: ALA+297%, EPA+149%, DPA+88% and DHA+18%. A positive correlation between dietary treatment and ALA and EPA content in muscle (P<0.001) and adipose tissue (P=0.036) was observed. A significant association between DPA (P=0.04) and DHA (P=0.011) and live weight in muscle was observed. Feeding linseed to pig improves the nutritional pork quality, raising the n-3 PUFA content in muscle and adipose tissue.

  12. Changes in fatty acid composition and distribution of N-3 fatty acids in goat tissues fed different levels of whole linseed.

    PubMed

    Abuelfatah, Kamaleldin; Zakaria, Md Zuki Abu Bakar; Meng, Goh Yong; Sazili, Awis Qurni

    2014-01-01

    The effects of feeding different levels of whole linseed on fatty acid (FA) composition of muscles and adipose tissues of goat were investigated. Twenty-four Crossed Boer bucks were assigned randomly into three treatment diets: L0, L10, or L20, containing 0%, 10%, or 20% whole linseed, respectively. The goats were slaughtered after 110 days of feeding. Samples from the longissimus dorsi, supraspinatus, semitendinosus, and subcutaneous fat (SF) and perirenal fat (PF) were taken for FA analyses. In muscles, the average increments in α-linolenic (ALA) and total n-3 PUFA were 6.48 and 3.4, and 11.48 and 4.78 for L10 and L20, respectively. In the adipose tissues, the increments in ALA and total n-3 PUFA were 3.07- and 6.92-fold and 3.00- and 7.54-fold in SF and PF for L10 and L20, respectively. The n-6 : n-3 ratio of the muscles was decreased from up to 8.86 in L0 to 2 or less in L10 and L20. The PUFA : SFA ratio was increased in all the tissues of L20 compared to L0. It is concluded that both inclusion levels (10% and 20%) of whole linseed in goat diets resulted in producing meat highly enriched with n-3 PUFA with desirable n-6 : n-3 ratio.

  13. n-3 PUFA fortification of high n-6 PUFA farmed tilapia with linseed could significantly increase dietary contribution and support nutritional expectations of fish.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Niva; Weill, Pierre; Sharon, Ossie; Loewenbach, Rachel; Berzak, Ofer

    2009-03-25

    Farmed fish high in n-6 PUFA may undermine fish nutritional expectations and intake recommendations for n-3 PUFA requirements and exacerbate rather than improve already high n-6/n-3 PUFA diets. Dietary contribution of fish fortification by linseed-based n-3 PUFA was evaluated. Mango tilapia (12 months old) with high n-6 PUFA (21.8 FA%, n-6/n-3 ratio 4.6:1) were fed standard/control (T(C)) or linseed-supplemented (5%, T(5%); 7%, T(7%)) feed for 61 days regular-growth and 120 days stock-growth (to 650 g). Compared to T(C), n-3 PUFA increased in T(5%) 46% and T(7%) 58%; ALA in T(5%) increased 100% and T(7%) 167%; EPA+DHA in T(5%) increased 14% and T(7%) 23% (p < 0.05); n-6 PUFA/LCPUFA were unchanged. T(7%) EPA+DHA 168 mg/100 g of raw fillet is comparable to current American intake and Dietary Reference Intakes; controlled cooking preserved approximately 90% EPA+DHA. n-6/n-3 ratios decreased 16-38% in total PUFA to 2.3:1 and in LCPUFA to 0.61:1. Linseed supplementation could improve tilapia n-3 PUFA/LCPUFA, ameliorating n-3 PUFA scarcity and unexpectedly high fish n-6 PUFA content, potentially making a significant nutritional contribution.

  14. Changes in Fatty Acid Composition and Distribution of N-3 Fatty Acids in Goat Tissues Fed Different Levels of Whole Linseed

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Md. Zuki Abu Bakar; Meng, Goh Yong; Sazili, Awis Qurni

    2014-01-01

    The effects of feeding different levels of whole linseed on fatty acid (FA) composition of muscles and adipose tissues of goat were investigated. Twenty-four Crossed Boer bucks were assigned randomly into three treatment diets: L0, L10, or L20, containing 0%, 10%, or 20% whole linseed, respectively. The goats were slaughtered after 110 days of feeding. Samples from the longissimus dorsi, supraspinatus, semitendinosus, and subcutaneous fat (SF) and perirenal fat (PF) were taken for FA analyses. In muscles, the average increments in α-linolenic (ALA) and total n-3 PUFA were 6.48 and 3.4, and 11.48 and 4.78 for L10 and L20, respectively. In the adipose tissues, the increments in ALA and total n-3 PUFA were 3.07- and 6.92-fold and 3.00- and 7.54-fold in SF and PF for L10 and L20, respectively. The n-6 : n-3 ratio of the muscles was decreased from up to 8.86 in L0 to 2 or less in L10 and L20. The PUFA : SFA ratio was increased in all the tissues of L20 compared to L0. It is concluded that both inclusion levels (10% and 20%) of whole linseed in goat diets resulted in producing meat highly enriched with n-3 PUFA with desirable n-6 : n-3 ratio. PMID:25478601

  15. Effect of fatty acids and oils on photodegradation of azadirachtin-A.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S; Patra, D; Dureja, P

    2000-07-01

    Azadirachtin-A on exposure to UV-light (254 nm) as a thin film on glass surface gave a isomerised (Z)-2-methylbut-2-enoate product. Half-life of azadirachtin-A as thin film under UV light was found to be 48 min. Azadirachtin-A was irradiated along with saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and fatty oils under ultra-violet light as thin film. Saturated fatty acid increased the rate of photodegradation of azadirachtin-A, whereas unsaturated fatty acids such as oleic, linoleic and elaidic acid reduced the rate of degradation. Castor, linseed and olive oil accelerated the rate of degradation, whereas neem oil showed no or little change in the rate of degradation of azadirachtin-A. None of these fatty acids and fatty oils were effective in controlling the rate of degradation of azadirachtin-A under UV-light as thin film.

  16. Total substitution of fish oil by vegetable oils in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) diets: effects on hepatic Mx expression and some immune parameters.

    PubMed

    Montero, D; Grasso, V; Izquierdo, M S; Ganga, R; Real, F; Tort, L; Caballero, M J; Acosta, F

    2008-02-01

    The use of vegetable oils in fish nutrition has been extensively studied; and recent work has focused attention on replacing fish oil with alternative fatty acid sources and their effect on the immune system. However, little is known about the effect of these oils on immune parameters such as the fish interferon system. In this study we evaluate the effect of two vegetable oils (linseed and soybean) on gilthead sea bream Mx expression and other innate immune parameters. Experimental diets were formulated where fish oil was totally replaced by vegetable oils or for a mixture of them (50% linseed and 50% soybean). Another diet prepared with pure fish oil was used as a control. Two experiments were carried out in order to evaluate growth, feed utilization, serum alternative complement pathway activity, serum lysozyme and phagocytic activity of head kidney leucocytes as well as Mx expression in the liver. In the first experiment fish were fed with experimental diets for 6 months and then, growth and feed utilization as well as immune parameters were analyzed. In the second experiment, fish from the previous feeding trial were injected with either a sub-lethal dose of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida (94/99) or a synthetic dsRNA (Poly I:C) in order to stimulate an Mx response. The results show that total substitution of fish oil by vegetable oils decreased the growth of gilthead sea bream juveniles. Furthermore, both phagocytic activity and serum alternative complement pathway activity were significantly reduced by the inclusion of either vegetable oil individually in the sea bream diets, but the diet with mixed vegetable oils had no significant effect. There was no effect on serum lysozyme levels but the basal constitutive levels of Mx transcript expression in the liver were elevated in the fish fed the vegetable oil diets. The time-course of the Mx response to injection of Poly I:C was shorter in the fish fed the fish oil diet and the fish fed the diet based

  17. Hydrolysis of vegetable oils in sub- and supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, R.L.; King, J.W.; List, G.R.

    1997-03-01

    Water, in its subcritical state, can be used as both a solvent and reactant for the hydrolysis of triglycerides. In this study, soybean, linseed, and coconut oils were successfully and reproducibly hydrolyzed to free fatty acids with water at a density of 0.7 g/mL and temperatures of 260--280 C. Under these conditions the reaction proceeds quickly, with conversion of greater than 97% after 15--20 min. Some geometric isomerization of the linolenic acids was observed at reaction temperatures as low as 250 C. Reactions carried out at higher temperatures and pressures, up to the critical point of water, produced either/or degradation, pyrolysis, and polymerization, of the oils and resultant fatty acids.

  18. Serum triglycerides and HDL cholesterol from SHR after evening primrose oil and other polyunsaturated fats.

    PubMed

    Singer, P; Hoffmann, P; Beitz, J; Förster, W; Wirth, M; Gödicke, W

    1986-05-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were fed diets enriched with evening primrose (EPO), sunflower (SO) and linseed oils (LO) as well as palm kernel fat (PKF), the latter being deficient in polyunsarated fatty acids (PUFA). In SHR fed EPO serum triglycerides were lowest and HDL1 cholesterol was highest as compared to the other groups of animals. Total cholesterol was not different. The data suggest that - as with blood pressure - serum lipids and lipoproteins might be influenced most effectively by EPO in comparison to other polyunsaturated fats.

  19. A 19th Century "Ideal" Oil Paint Medium: A Complex Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Gel.

    PubMed

    de Viguerie, Laurence; Jaber, Maguy; Pasco, Hélène; Lalevée, Jacques; Morlet-Savary, Fabrice; Ducouret, Guylaine; Rigaud, Baptiste; Pouget, Thierry; Sanchez, Clément; Walter, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    British 19th century painters such as J. M. W. Turner, commonly modified the properties of their paint by using gels called "gumtions". These gels allowed them to easily tune the paint handling and drying properties. The fascinating properties of these "gumtions" were obtained by adding lead acetate to a ternary system based on mastic resin, linseed oil and turpentine. Herein, we report and investigate in depth the rheological properties of these gels as well as their structure at a molecular and supra-molecular scale. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Effects of Addition of Linseed and Marine Algae to the Diet on Adipose Tissue Development, Fatty Acid Profile, Lipogenic Gene Expression, and Meat Quality in Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Urrutia, Olaia; Mendizabal, José Antonio; Insausti, Kizkitza; Soret, Beatriz; Purroy, Antonio; Arana, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effect of linseed and algae on growth and carcass parameters, adipocyte cellularity, fatty acid profile and meat quality and gene expression in subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues (AT) in lambs. After weaning, 33 lambs were fed three diets up to 26.7 ± 0.3 kg: Control diet (barley and soybean); L diet (barley, soybean and 10% linseed) and L-A diet (barley, soybean, 5% linseed and 3.89% algae). Lambs fed L-A diet showed lower average daily gain and greater slaughter age compared to Control and L (P < 0.001). Carcass traits were not affected by L and L-A diets, but a trend towards greater adipocyte diameter was observed in L and L-A in the subcutaneous AT (P = 0.057). Adding either linseed or linseed and algae increased α-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid contents in both AT (P < 0.001); however, docosahexaenoic acid was increased by L-A (P < 0.001). The n-6/n-3 ratio decreased in L and L-A (P < 0.001). Algae had adverse effects on meat quality, with greater lipid oxidation and reduced ratings for odor and flavor. The expression of lipogenic genes was downregulated in the subcutaneous AT (P < 0.05): acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACACA) in L and L-A and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in L-A. Fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1), fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) and fatty acid elongase 5 (ELOVL5) were unaffected. In the subcutaneous AT, supplementing either L or L-A increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) and CAAT-enhancer binding protein alpha (CEBPA) (P < 0.05), although it had no effect on sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1 (SREBF1). In the intramuscular AT, expression of ACACA, SCD, FADS1 and FADS2 decreased in L and L-A (P < 0.001) and LPL in L (P < 0.01), but PPARG, CEBPA and SREBF1 were unaffected. PMID:27253325

  1. Long-term effect of linseed plus nitrate fed to dairy cows on enteric methane emission and nitrate and nitrite residuals in milk.

    PubMed

    Guyader, J; Doreau, M; Morgavi, D P; Gérard, C; Loncke, C; Martin, C

    2016-07-01

    A previous study showed the additive methane (CH4)-mitigating effect of nitrate and linseed fed to non-lactating cows. Before practical application, the use of this new strategy in dairy cows requires further investigation in terms of persistency of methanogenesis reduction and absence of residuals in milk products. The objective of this experiment was to study the long-term effect of linseed plus nitrate on enteric CH4 emission and performance in dairy cows. We also assessed the effect of this feeding strategy on the presence of nitrate residuals in milk products, total tract digestibility, nitrogen (N) balance and rumen fermentation. A total of 16 lactating Holstein cows were allocated to two groups in a randomised design conducted in parallel for 17 weeks. Diets were on a dry matter (DM) basis: (1) control (54% maize silage, 6% hay and 40% concentrate; CON) or (2) control plus 3.5% added fat from linseed and 1.8% nitrate (LIN+NIT). Diets were equivalent in terms of CP (16%), starch (28%) and NDF (33%), and were offered twice daily. Cows were fed ad libitum, except during weeks 5, 16 and 17 in which feed was restricted to 95% of dry matter intake (DMI) to ensure complete consumption of meals during measurement periods. Milk production and DMI were measured weekly. Nitrate and nitrite concentrations in milk and milk products were determined monthly. Daily CH4 emission was quantified in open circuit respiration chambers (weeks 5 and 16). Total tract apparent digestibility, N balance and rumen fermentation parameters were determined in week 17. Daily DMI tended to be lower with LIN+NIT from week 4 to 16 (-5.1 kg/day on average). The LIN+NIT diet decreased milk production during 6 non-consecutive weeks (-2.5 kg/day on average). Nitrate or nitrite residuals were not detected in milk and associated products. The LIN+NIT diet reduced CH4 emission to a similar extent at the beginning and end of the trial (-47%, g/day; -30%, g/kg DMI; -33%, g/kg fat- and protein

  2. Effects of Addition of Linseed and Marine Algae to the Diet on Adipose Tissue Development, Fatty Acid Profile, Lipogenic Gene Expression, and Meat Quality in Lambs.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Olaia; Mendizabal, José Antonio; Insausti, Kizkitza; Soret, Beatriz; Purroy, Antonio; Arana, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effect of linseed and algae on growth and carcass parameters, adipocyte cellularity, fatty acid profile and meat quality and gene expression in subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues (AT) in lambs. After weaning, 33 lambs were fed three diets up to 26.7 ± 0.3 kg: Control diet (barley and soybean); L diet (barley, soybean and 10% linseed) and L-A diet (barley, soybean, 5% linseed and 3.89% algae). Lambs fed L-A diet showed lower average daily gain and greater slaughter age compared to Control and L (P < 0.001). Carcass traits were not affected by L and L-A diets, but a trend towards greater adipocyte diameter was observed in L and L-A in the subcutaneous AT (P = 0.057). Adding either linseed or linseed and algae increased α-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid contents in both AT (P < 0.001); however, docosahexaenoic acid was increased by L-A (P < 0.001). The n-6/n-3 ratio decreased in L and L-A (P < 0.001). Algae had adverse effects on meat quality, with greater lipid oxidation and reduced ratings for odor and flavor. The expression of lipogenic genes was downregulated in the subcutaneous AT (P < 0.05): acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACACA) in L and L-A and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in L-A. Fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1), fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) and fatty acid elongase 5 (ELOVL5) were unaffected. In the subcutaneous AT, supplementing either L or L-A increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) and CAAT-enhancer binding protein alpha (CEBPA) (P < 0.05), although it had no effect on sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1 (SREBF1). In the intramuscular AT, expression of ACACA, SCD, FADS1 and FADS2 decreased in L and L-A (P < 0.001) and LPL in L (P < 0.01), but PPARG, CEBPA and SREBF1 were unaffected.

  3. Total substitution of fish oil by vegetable oils in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) diets: effects on fish performance, biochemical composition, and expression of some glucocorticoid receptor-related genes.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Dorta, Vanessa; Caballero, María J; Izquierdo, Marisol; Manchado, Manuel; Infante, Carlos; Zamorano, María J; Montero, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    To study the substitution of fish oil by vegetable oils in fish diets, juveniles Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) were fed diets (56 % crude protein, 12 % crude lipid) containing either linseed (100LO) or soybean (100SO) oils in comparison with a 100 % fish oil-based diet (100FO) for 90 days. Samples of muscle, liver, and intestine were collected for biochemical analysis and for glucocorticoid receptor-related genes, including GR1 and GR2, and the associated heat shock proteins HSP70, HSP90AA, and HSP90AB. Besides, basal levels of plasma cortisol were also determined. After the feeding period, a stress test, consisting on 5 min of net chasing, was applied to a selected population of each dietary group. Total replacement of fish oil by vegetable oils did not induced changes in fish growth and performance, but affected fatty acid profile of muscle, liver, and intestine, reflecting those tissues the characteristic fatty acids of each type of dietary oil. A tendency to conserve the ARA/EPA ratio could be observed in the different tissues, despite of the level of these fatty acids in diet. Chasing stress induced an increase of muscle GR1 and a reduction in intestinal GR2 relative expressions at any of the experimental diets assayed. In liver, chasing stress induced an increase in both GR1 and GR2 gene expression in fish fed fish oil diets. Similarly, chasing stress induced an increase of muscle HSP70 and decrease of HSP90AB in liver at any of the experimental diet assayed. Besides, vegetable oils decreased the expression of HSP70 in intestine, being the relative expression of liver HSP90AA increased by the inclusion of linseed oil in the diet, at any of the experimental conditions assayed.

  4. [Fatty acids in 80 brands of edible vegetable oil and in 14 brands of mayonnaise (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Heckers, H; Henneking, K; Schmahl, F W; Huth, K

    1976-07-15

    The fatty acid patterns have been defined in 80 commonly used table oils chosen at random and of 14 brands of mayonnaise commercially available in West Germany. In addition, sterols of the various mayonnaises were analysed. The oils could be grouped into 8 different categories: 12 oliver oils, 8 maize oils, 14 soya oils, 5 linseed oils, 22 sunflower oils, 3 safflower oils, 5 groundnut oils, and 8 rapeseed oils. As a result of the analyses, it is in almost every case a question of a pure variety of non-animal oils. The range of the values obtained for the composition of the fatty acids for each variety, which can be considerable, represents a modern complement to previous analyses. The fatty acid pattern of 3 additional commerical table oils suggest an amalgamation with fats of other types, among which are 2 cases of mixture with rapeseed oils. For mayonnaise, soya oil is used almost exclusively as a fat component. The presence of sunflower oil was only confirmed in one brand of mayonnaise. The concentrations of cholesterol which were determined lie between 17.0 and 72.3 mg (average 53 mg) per 100 g mayonnaise, so that even in the case of persons which present an elevated risk of atherosclerosis there can be no objection to the consumption of mayonnaise. The nutritive-physiological significance of these various oils for human nutrition is thoroughly discussed. A possible health hazard is the sale of vegetable oils rich in erucic acid permitted in the West German Republic (proportion of erucic acid in the 8 samples examined: 223-53%). These vegetable oils, as is shown by the additionally indicated trade names with the corresponding supplementary specifications are overwhelmingly labelled as vegetable oil (Pflanzenöl) or table oil (Speiseöl). The purchase prices indicated and paid by us for the oils examined are subject to considerable fluctuations even for oils of the same quality.

  5. Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils

    SciTech Connect

    Henna, Phillip H.

    2008-01-01

    there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is

  6. Investigating the Photocatalytic Degradation of Oil Paint using ATR-IR and AFM-IR.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Suzanne; van Driel, Birgit A; van den Berg, Klaas Jan; Dik, Joris

    2017-03-22

    As linseed oil has a longstanding and continuing history of use as a binder in artistic paints, developing an understanding of its degradation mechanism is critical to conservation efforts. At present, little can be done to detect the early stages of oil paint deterioration due to the complex chemical composition of degrading paints. In this work, we use advanced infrared analysis techniques to investigate the UV-induced deterioration of model linseed oil paints in detail. Subdiffraction limit infrared analysis (AFM-IR) is applied to identify and map accelerated degradation in the presence of two different grades of titanium white pigment particles (rutile or anatase TiO2). Differentiation between the degradation of these two formulations demonstrates the sensitivity of this approach. The identification of characteristic peaks and transient species residing at the paint surface allows infrared absorbance peaks related to degradation deeper in the film to be extricated from conventional ATR-FTIR spectra, potentially opening up a new approach to degradation monitoring.

  7. Influence of Supplementation of Vegetable Oil Blends on Omega-3 Fatty Acid Production in Mortierella alpina CFR-GV15

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelan, Ganesan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives of this study were designed for improved production of mycelial omega-3 fatty acids with particular reference to EPA and DHA from the oleaginous fungus Mortierella alpina CFR-GV15 under submerged low temperatures fermentation supplemented with linseed oil and garden cress oil as an additional energy source. The fungus was grown at 20°C temperature for four days initially followed by 12°C temperature for next five days. The basal medium contained starch, yeast extract, and a blend of linseed oil (LSO) and garden cress oil (GCO) in the ratio 1 : 1. Results of the study revealed that, after nine days of total incubation period, the enhancement of biomass was up to 16.7 g/L dry weight with a total lipid content of 55.4% (v/w). Enrichment of omega-3 fatty acids indicated a significant increase in fatty acid bioconversion (ALA 32.2 ± 0.42%, EPA 7.9 ± 0.1%, and DHA 4.09 ± 0.2%) by 2.5-fold. The two-stage temperature cultivation alters the fatty acid profile due to activation of the desaturase enzyme in the cellular levels due to which arachidonic acid (AA) content reduced significantly. It can be concluded that Mortierella alpina CFR-GV15 is a fungal culture suitable for commercial production of PUFAs with enriched EPA and DHA. PMID:28466005

  8. Influence of Supplementation of Vegetable Oil Blends on Omega-3 Fatty Acid Production in Mortierella alpina CFR-GV15.

    PubMed

    Vadivelan, Ganesan; Rao, Pamidighantam Prabhakara; Venkateswaran, Govindarajulu

    2017-01-01

    Objectives of this study were designed for improved production of mycelial omega-3 fatty acids with particular reference to EPA and DHA from the oleaginous fungus Mortierella alpina CFR-GV15 under submerged low temperatures fermentation supplemented with linseed oil and garden cress oil as an additional energy source. The fungus was grown at 20°C temperature for four days initially followed by 12°C temperature for next five days. The basal medium contained starch, yeast extract, and a blend of linseed oil (LSO) and garden cress oil (GCO) in the ratio 1 : 1. Results of the study revealed that, after nine days of total incubation period, the enhancement of biomass was up to 16.7 g/L dry weight with a total lipid content of 55.4% (v/w). Enrichment of omega-3 fatty acids indicated a significant increase in fatty acid bioconversion (ALA 32.2 ± 0.42%, EPA 7.9 ± 0.1%, and DHA 4.09 ± 0.2%) by 2.5-fold. The two-stage temperature cultivation alters the fatty acid profile due to activation of the desaturase enzyme in the cellular levels due to which arachidonic acid (AA) content reduced significantly. It can be concluded that Mortierella alpina CFR-GV15 is a fungal culture suitable for commercial production of PUFAs with enriched EPA and DHA.

  9. DHA-Containing Oilseed: A Timely Solution for the Sustainability Issues Surrounding Fish Oil Sources of the Health-Benefitting Long-Chain Omega-3 Oils

    PubMed Central

    Kitessa, Soressa M.; Abeywardena, Mahinda; Wijesundera, Chakra; Nichols, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Benefits of long-chain (≥C20) omega-3 oils (LC omega-3 oils) for reduction of the risk of a range of disorders are well documented. The benefits result from eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); optimal intake levels of these bioactive fatty acids for maintenance of normal health and prevention of diseases have been developed and adopted by national and international health agencies and science bodies. These developments have led to increased consumer demand for LC omega-3 oils and, coupled with increasing global population, will impact on future sustainable supply of fish. Seafood supply from aquaculture has risen over the past decades and it relies on harvest of wild catch fisheries also for its fish oil needs. Alternate sources of LC omega-3 oils are being pursued, including genetically modified soybean rich in shorter-chain stearidonic acid (SDA, 18:4ω3). However, neither oils from traditional oilseeds such as linseed, nor the SDA soybean oil have shown efficient conversion to DHA. A recent breakthrough has seen the demonstration of a land plant-based oil enriched in DHA, and with omega-6 PUFA levels close to that occurring in marine sources of EPA and DHA. We review alternative sources of DHA supply with emphasis on the need for land plant oils containing EPA and DHA. PMID:24858407

  10. Desulfurization of coal with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. [Quarterly] report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, Ruozhi; Cheng, Jianjun

    1994-12-31

    This project proposes a new method for removing organic sulfur from Illinois coals using readily available farm products. It proposes to use air and vegetable oils to disrupt the coal matrix, oxidize sulfur forms, increase volatiles, and desulfurize coal. This will be accomplished by impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover, the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of the solid products. Preliminary experiments showed that EBC 104 coal catalyzes the formation of hydroperoxides in safflower oil and that more sulfur is extracted from the treated than untreated coal. During this first quarter the requirement of an added photosensitizer has been eliminated, the catalytic effect of coal has been confirmed, and the existence of a complex set of reactions revealed. These reactions between the oxygen, oil, hydroperoxides, and coal are hydroperoxide formation, which is catalyzed by the coal surface and by heat, an unknown coal-hydroperoxide reaction, and oil polymerization. Additionally, diffusion phenomena must be playing a role because oil polymerization occurs, but the importance of diffusion is difficult to assess because less polymerization occurs when coal is present. The first task has been completed and we are now ready to determine the ability of linseed oil hydroperoxides to oxidize organic sulfur in EBC 108 coal.

  11. World oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, J. L.

    1982-06-01

    Results obtained through the application of 10 prominent world oil or world energy models to 12 scenarios are reported. These scenarios were designed to bound the range of likely future world oil market outcomes. Conclusions relate to oil market trends, impacts of policies on oil prices, security of oil supplies, impacts of policies on oil security problems, use of the oil import premium in policymaking, the transition to oil substitutes, and the state of the art of world oil modeling.

  12. Manufacturing of vegetable oils-based epoxy and composites for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongpeng

    Epoxidized vegetable oil (EVO) is one of the largest industrial applications of vegetable oils (VOs) and is widely used as a plasticizer and as a synthetic intermediate for polyol or unsaturated polyester. However, the utility of EVO as monomer for high performance epoxy thermoset polymer is limited by its reactivity and by the resulting physical properties. Herein, VO-based epoxy monomers, i.e., glycidyl esters of epoxidized fatty acids derived from soybean oil (EGS) or linseed oil (EGL), have been synthesized and were benchmarked against commercial available diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and also epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) controls. EGS and EGL possessed higher oxirane content, more reactivity and lower viscosity than ESO or epoxidized linseed oil (ELO), provided better compatibility with DGEBA as a reactive diluent, and yielded thermally and mechanically stronger polymers than polymers obtained using ESO. Glass transition temperatures (T g) of the VO-based epoxy thermoset polymers were mostly a function of monomer oxirane content with some added structural influences of epoxy reactivity, and presence of a pendant chain. Organo-modified montmorillonite clay (OMMT) and long glass fiber reinforced composites (FRC) were efficiently manufactured using anhydride cured EGS as matrices. The OMMT nanocomposites showed higher mechanical and thermal strength than the neat polymers but were also dependent on the dispersion techniques and the clay concentration. Surprisingly, the neat EGS-anhydride matrix FRC showed comparable properties, such as flexural and impact strengths and slightly lower Tg, versus DGEBA based counterparts. These high performance monomers, polymers, and composites have potential to replace petroleum-based epoxy as value-added products from VOs compared to EVOs.

  13. Portable detection system of vegetable oils based on laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Chen, He; Guo, Pan; Mu, Taotao

    2015-11-01

    Food safety, especially edible oils, has attracted more and more attention recently. Many methods and instruments have emerged to detect the edible oils, which include oils classification and adulteration. It is well known than the adulteration is based on classification. Then, in this paper, a portable detection system, based on laser induced fluorescence, is proposed and designed to classify the various edible oils, including (olive, rapeseed, walnut, peanut, linseed, sunflower, corn oils). 532 nm laser modules are used in this equipment. Then, all the components are assembled into a module (100*100*25mm). A total of 700 sets of fluorescence data (100 sets of each type oil) are collected. In order to classify different edible oils, principle components analysis and support vector machine have been employed in the data analysis. The training set consisted of 560 sets of data (80 sets of each oil) and the test set consisted of 140 sets of data (20 sets of each oil). The recognition rate is up to 99%, which demonstrates the reliability of this potable system. With nonintrusive and no sample preparation characteristic, the potable system can be effectively applied for food detection.

  14. Volatile components of several virgin and refined oils differing in their botanical origin.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, Patricia S; Goicoechea, Encarnación; Guillen, María D

    2011-08-15

    The volatile components of virgin and refined oils whose compositions were very different in terms of oleic, linoleic and linolenic acyl groups were studied by solid phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and their composition of acyl groups was determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1) H NMR. The virgin oils studied were olive, linseed and walnut oils, while the refined oils were sunflower and rapeseed oils. Large differences were found among the headspace compositions of the virgin oils. These were due in part to compounds that could be considered as markers of different vegetable origins and manufacturing processes, but also to compounds resulting from degradative oxidation of the main acyl group components. By virtue of their being refined, fewer components were present in the refined oils, although differences in their headspaces were found owing to the presence of compounds resulting from oxidation of the determined acyl groups. The studied oils show specific characteristics regarding not only their main components, which are well known, but also their volatile components. The latter provide information on some of the processes to which oils have been submitted, on their oxidation level, on their botanical origin and on the compounds responsible for their odour. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. 21 CFR 176.210 - Defoaming agents used in the manufacture of paper and paperboard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... therefrom: Beef tallow. Castor oil. Coconut oil. Corn oil. Cottonseed oil. Fish oil. Lard oil. Linseed oil. Mustardseed oil. Palm oil. Peanut oil. Rapeseed oil. Ricebran oil. Soybean oil. Sperm oil. Tall oil. (2)...

  16. 21 CFR 176.210 - Defoaming agents used in the manufacture of paper and paperboard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... therefrom: Beef tallow. Castor oil. Coconut oil. Corn oil. Cottonseed oil. Fish oil. Lard oil. Linseed oil. Mustardseed oil. Palm oil. Peanut oil. Rapeseed oil. Ricebran oil. Soybean oil. Sperm oil. Tall oil. (2)...

  17. Supplementation of cottonseed, linseed, and noug seed cakes on feed intake, digestibility, body weight, and carcass parameters of Sidama goats.

    PubMed

    Alemu, Wondwosen; Melaku, Solomon; Tolera, Adugna

    2010-04-01

    A digestibility, feed intake, and carcass evaluation experiment using 20 yearling intact male Sidama goats weighing 16.4 +/- 0.63 kg (mean +/- SD) was conducted in Ethiopia with the objectives to determine feed intake, digestibility, body weight (BW) gain, and carcass parameters. The treatments included feeding natural pasture hay (T1, control) and supplementation with cottonseed cake (284 g-T2), linseed cake (250 g-T3), and noug seed cake (296 g-T4) on dry matter (DM) basis to supply 85 g crude protein (CP) per head per day. Randomized complete block design for feed intake and BW parameters and complete randomized design for digestibility and carcass parameters were used. Hay DM intake was higher (P < 0.01) for T1 than for the other treatments. T3 promoted higher (P < 0.01) DM (29.3 g/kg W(0.75)/day) and CP (14.1 g/kg W(0.75)/day) intake than T4 (8.9 g/kg W(0.75)/day DM and 4.1 g/kg W(0.75)/day CP). T3 showed better (P < 0.05) organic matter and CP digestibility than T2. Goats in T3 had higher nitrogen intake (P < 0.01) and retention (P < 0.05) than those in T1. Goats in T2 and T3 showed higher (P < 0.05) daily BW gain and final BW than those in T4 and T1. Goats in T2 and T3 had higher (P < 0.05) slaughter weight, empty BW, hot carcass weight, rib-eye muscle area, and dressing percentage on slaughter weight basis than those in T1. The results showed that T2 and T3 had similar effect on CP intake, daily BW gain, and carcass parameters for growing Sidama goats fed natural pasture hay.

  18. Do edible oils reduce bacterial colonization of enamel in situ?

    PubMed

    Hannig, Christian; Kirsch, Jasmin; Al-Ahmad, Ali; Kensche, Anna; Hannig, Matthias; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Edible oils are an empiric approach for the prevention of oral diseases. The present in situ study investigated the effect of edible oils on initial bacterial colonization of enamel surfaces. Initial biofilm formation was performed on enamel specimens mounted on maxillary splints and carried by eight subjects. After 1 min of pellicle formation, rinses with safflower oil, olive oil and linseed oil were performed for 10 min. Application of chlorhexidine for 1 min served as positive control. Afterwards, the slabs were carried for 8 h overnight. Samples carried for 8 h without any rinse served as negative controls. The amount of adherent bacteria was determined by DAPI staining (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) and live-dead staining (BacLight). Additionally, determination of colony forming units was performed after desorption of the bacteria. TEM evaluation was carried out after application of the rinses. The number of adherent bacteria on control samples was 6.1 ± 8.1 × 10(5)/cm(2) after 8 h (DAPI). Fluorescence microscopic data from DAPI staining and live-dead staining as well as from the determination of CFU revealed no significant effects of rinsing with oils on the amount of adherent bacteria compared to the non-rinsed control samples. However, with chlorhexidine a significant reduction in the number of bacteria by more than 85 % was achieved (DAPI, chlorhexidine: 8.2 ± 17.1 × 10(4)/cm(2)). The ratio of viable to dead bacteria was almost equal (1:1) irrespective of the rinse adopted as recorded with BacLight. TEM indicated accumulation of oil micelles at the pellicle's surface and modification of its ultrastructure. Rinses with edible oils have no significant impact on the initial pattern and amount of bacterial colonization on enamel over 8 h. Rinses with edible oils cannot be recommended for efficient reduction of oral biofilm formation.

  19. One input-class and two input-class classifications for differentiating olive oil from other edible vegetable oils by use of the normal-phase liquid chromatography fingerprint of the methyl-transesterified fraction.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Carvelo, Ana M; Pérez-Castaño, Estefanía; González-Casado, Antonio; Cuadros-Rodríguez, Luis

    2017-04-15

    A new method for differentiation of olive oil (independently of the quality category) from other vegetable oils (canola, safflower, corn, peanut, seeds, grapeseed, palm, linseed, sesame and soybean) has been developed. The analytical procedure for chromatographic fingerprinting of the methyl-transesterified fraction of each vegetable oil, using normal-phase liquid chromatography, is described and the chemometric strategies applied and discussed. Some chemometric methods, such as k-nearest neighbours (kNN), partial least squared-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), support vector machine classification analysis (SVM-C), and soft independent modelling of class analogies (SIMCA), were applied to build classification models. Performance of the classification was evaluated and ranked using several classification quality metrics. The discriminant analysis, based on the use of one input-class, (plus a dummy class) was applied for the first time in this study.

  20. Development of high oleic oil crop platform in flax through RNAi-mediated multiple FAD2 gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yurong; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Dribnenki, Paul; Singh, Surinder; Green, Allan

    2015-04-01

    Simultaneous gene silencing of both FAD2 genes in high linoleic acid flax leads to high level of oleic acid, which is stable across multiple generations. High oleic oil is one of the preferred traits in oil crop engineering due to its stability and multiple applications as an industrial feedstock. Flax possesses two isoforms of FAD2 enzymes that desaturate monounsaturated oleic acid to polyunsaturated linoleic acid. These two enzymes are encoded by two FAD2 genes. By simultaneous gene silencing both FAD2 genes in high linoleic acid flax, Linola, high level of oleic acid up to 80% was achieved in 69 silencing lines. The high oleic trait was stable across multiple generations with oleic acid reaching up to 77% in homozygote T3 progeny. The RNAi-mediated gene-silencing approach generated high oleic linseed oil, as well as a high oleic platform that can be exploited for further fatty acid engineering.

  1. Crystallization and melting properties of mixtures of milk fat stearin and omega-3 rich oils.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing-Zheng; Truong, Tuyen; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2017-03-01

    Solid milk fat stearin (S25) can be a promising oxidation retarder due to its capacity to entrap liquid oils, especially for incorporating omega-3 (ω-3) rich oils into dairy products. Thermal properties of S25/ω-3 rich oil mixtures are necessary for such application. The effects of S25 on the crystallization and melting behaviours of ω-3 rich oils, namely fish oil (FO), linseed oil (LO) and krill oil (KO), were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Thermograms showed that with S25 concentration increasing, transitions of FO and LO shifted to lower and largely to higher temperatures, respectively, while crystallization temperature of KO slightly decreased. Negative, positive and low values of interaction enthalpy (ΔHint) suggested the adverse, beneficial and limited effect of S25 on the crystallization of S25/FO, S25/LO and S25/KO mixtures, respectively. LO could have the best oxidative stability upon the addition of S25 since their interactions facilitated earlier and stronger crystallization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Peanut Oil

    MedlinePlus

    ... and baby care products. Sometimes the less expensive soya oil is added to peanut oil. ... are pregnant or breast-feeding. Allergy to peanuts, soybeans, and related plants: Peanut oil can cause serious ...

  3. Oil Spills

    MedlinePlus

    Oil spills often happen because of accidents, when people make mistakes or equipment breaks down. Other causes include natural disasters or deliberate acts. Oil spills have major environmental and economic effects. Oil spills ...

  4. Effects of diets containing grape seed, linseed, or both on milk production traits, liver and kidney activities, and immunity of lactating dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Nudda, A; Correddu, F; Marzano, A; Battacone, G; Nicolussi, P; Bonelli, P; Pulina, G

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the dietary inclusion of grape seed, alone or in combination with linseed, on milk production traits, immune response, and liver and kidney metabolic activity of lactating ewes. Twenty-four Sarda dairy ewes were randomly assigned to 4 dietary treatments consisting of a control diet (CON), a diet containing 300 g/d per head of grape seed (GS), a diet containing 220 g/d per head of extruded linseed (LIN), and a diet containing a mix of 300 g/d per head of grape seed and 220 g/d per head of extruded linseed (MIX). The study lasted 10 wk, with 2 wk of adaptation period and 8 wk of experimental period. Milk yield was measured and samples were collected weekly and analyzed for fat, protein, casein, lactose, pH, milk urea nitrogen, and somatic cell count. Blood samples were collected every 2 wk by jugular vein puncture and analyzed for hematological parameters, for albumin, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, creatinine, gamma glutamyltransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, protein, blood urea nitrogen, and for anti-albumin IgG, IL-6, and lymphocyte T-helper (CD4(+)) and lymphocyte T-cytotoxic (CD8(+)) cells. On d 0, 45, and 60 of the trial, lymphocyte response to phytohemagglutinin was determined in vivo on each animal by measuring skin-fold thickness (SFT) at the site of phytohemagglutinin injection. Humoral response to chicken egg albumin was stimulated by a subcutaneous injection with albumin. Dietary treatments did not affect milk yield and composition. Milk urea nitrogen and lactose were affected by diet × period. Diets did not influence hematological, kidney, and liver parameters, except for blood urea nitrogen, which decreased in LIN and increased in MIX compared with CON and GS. Dietary treatments did not alter CD4(+), CD8(+), and CD4(+)-to-CD8(+) ratio. The SFT was reduced in GS and MIX and increased in LIN compared with CON. The IgG and IL-6 were affected by diet × period. The reduction in Ig

  5. Effects of organic plant oils and role of oxidation on nutrient utilization in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Lund, I; Dalsgaard, J; Jacobsen, C; Hansen, J H; Holm, J; Jokumsen, A

    2013-03-01

    Producing organic fish diets requires that the use of both fishmeal and fish oil (FO) be minimized and replaced by sustainable, organic sources. The purpose of the present study was to replace FO with organic oils and evaluate the effects on feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR), daily specific growth rate (SGR) and nutrient digestibility in diets in which fishmeal protein was partly substituted by organic plant protein concentrates. It is prohibited to add antioxidants to organic oils, and therefore the effects of force-oxidizing the oils (including FO) on feed intake and nutrient digestibility was furthermore examined. Four organic oils with either a relatively high or low content of polyunsaturated fatty acids were considered: linseed oil, rapeseed oil, sunflower oil and grapeseed oil. Substituting FO with organic oils did not affect feed intake (P > 0.05), FCR or SGR (P > 0.05) despite very different dietary fatty acid profiles. All organic plant oils had a positive effect on apparent lipid digestibility compared with the FO diet (P < 0.05), whereas there were no effects on the apparent digestibility of other macronutrients when compared with the FO diet (P > 0.05). Organic vegetable oils did not undergo auto-oxidation as opposed to the FO, and the FO diet consequently had a significantly negative effect on the apparent lipid digestibility. Feed intake was not affected by oxidation of any oils. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that it is possible to fully substitute FO with plant-based organic oils without negatively affecting nutrient digestibility and growth performance. Furthermore, plant-based organic oils are less likely to oxidize than FOs, prolonging the shelf life of such organic diets.

  6. Light-induced lipid oxidation in sheep milk: effects of dietary grape seed and linseed, alone or in combination, on milk oxidative stability.

    PubMed

    Correddu, Fabio; Nudda, Anna; Manca, Maria G; Pulina, Giuseppe; Dalsgaard, Trine K

    2015-04-22

    The present work aimed to investigate the milk oxidative stability when the sheep diet includes a source of polyphenols (grape seed, (GS)) and a source of polyunsaturated fatty acids (linseed, (LIN)), alone or in combination (MIX) compared to a control group (CON). For this purpose light-induced oxidation in milk was studied. After 24 h of light exposure the lipid hydroperoxides increased in milk in the LIN and MIX groups. The calculated ratio between the level of lipid hydroperoxides and unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) in milk was lower in the GS and MIX than in the LIN group. At the same time the level of the ratio between hexanal/linoleic acid in milk was lower in the GS and MIX than in the CON group. Although the dietary inclusion of grape seed did not reduce the level of lipid oxidation products in sheep milk, it effectively reduced the extent of oxidation of UFA.

  7. Digestibility of amino acids in organically cultivated white-flowering faba bean and cake from cold-pressed rapeseed, linseed and hemp seed in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Presto, Magdalena Høøk; Lyberg, Karin; Lindberg, Jan Erik

    2011-02-01

    The study aimed at determining the ileal apparent (IAD) and standardised ileal (SID) digestibility of crude protein (CP) and amino acids (AA) in organically cultivated white-flowering faba beans (Vicia faba), and cakes from hemp seed (Cannabis sativa), linseed (Linum usitatissimum) and rapeseed (Brassica napus). The experiment was designed as a four period cross-over trial with six castrated male Yorkshire pigs fitted with post valve T-caecum (PVTC) cannulas. The IAD and SID of CP for the feed ingredients ranged from 79.2-85.9% and were affected by dietary treatment, with significantly lower values in rapeseed cake. The IAD and SID of most AA in the feed ingredients were also significantly affected by dietary treatment, but without any consistent trend. However, the overall digestibilities were in general comparable with conventional protein feed ingredients. Thus, these alternative protein feed ingredients have the potential to be used to a greater extent when formulating organic pig diets.

  8. Utilization of extruded linseed to modify fatty composition of intensively-reared lamb meat: effect of associated cereals (wheat vs. corn) and linoleic acid content of the diet.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, V; Bas, P; Schmidely, P

    2010-01-01

    Sixty male lambs were used in two trials to study the efficiency of transfer and elongation of linolenic acid (ALA) in muscle and caudal adipose tissue and to assess factors affecting this process and related changes in fatty acid (FA) profile. In experiment 1, lambs were fed a control diet or extruded linseed (L) diet either with wheat (W, rapid starch) or corn (C, slow starch). In experiment 2, lambs were fed L with "normal" rapeseed, or high-oleic rapeseed, or soybean. In experiment 1, L increased ALA proportion and total n-3 PUFA in muscle and adipose tissue. In adipose tissue but not in muscle, LC lambs had higher proportion of ALA than LW lambs. In experiment 2, increasing linoleic acid (LA) intake increased LA proportion in muscle and adipose tissue but did not modify ALA proportion. Moreover, in muscle, it did not change the desaturation and elongation processes of ALA to long-chain n-3 PUFA.

  9. Differential transcriptional activity of SAD, FAD2 and FAD3 desaturase genes in developing seeds of linseed contributes to varietal variation in α-linolenic acid content.

    PubMed

    Rajwade, Ashwini V; Kadoo, Narendra Y; Borikar, Sanjay P; Harsulkar, Abhay M; Ghorpade, Prakash B; Gupta, Vidya S

    2014-02-01

    Linseed or flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) varieties differ markedly in their seed α-linolenic acid (ALA) levels. Fatty acid desaturases play a key role in accumulating ALA in seed. We performed fatty acid (FA) profiling of various seed developmental stages of ten Indian linseed varieties including one mutant variety. Depending on their ALA contents, these varieties were grouped under high ALA and low ALA groups. Transcript profiling of six microsomal desaturase genes (SAD1, SAD2, FAD2, FAD2-2, FAD3A and FAD3B), which act sequentially in the fatty acid desaturation pathway, was performed using real-time PCR. We observed gene specific as well as temporal expression pattern for all the desaturases and their differential expression profiles corresponded well with the variation in FA accumulation in the two groups. Our study points to efficient conversion of intermediate FAs [stearic (SA), oleic (OA) and linoleic acids (LA)] to the final product, ALA, due to efficient action of all the desaturases in high ALA group. While in the low ALA group, even though the initial conversion up to OA was efficient, later conversions up to ALA seemed to be inefficient, leading to higher accumulation of OA and LA instead of ALA. We sequenced the six desaturase genes from the ten varieties and observed that variation in the amino acid (AA) sequences of desaturases was not responsible for differential ALA accumulation, except in the mutant variety TL23 with very low (<2%) ALA content. In TL23, a point mutation in the FAD3A gene resulted into a premature stop codon generating a truncated protein with 291 AA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in the milk and cheese fat composition of ewes fed commercial supplements containing linseed with special reference to the CLA content and isomer composition.

    PubMed

    Luna, Pilar; Fontecha, Javier; Juárez, Manuela; Angel de la Fuente, Miguel

    2005-05-01

    A study was carried out to increase the CLA contents in ewes' milk fat under field conditions by dietary means and to investigate the extent of the changes and consequences for milk processing and cheese quality. During a 3-mon period, ewes' bulk milk samples were collected every week from two different herds. For the first 4 wk the ewes were fed a conventional diet. Then the following 6 wk a supplement enriched in alpha-linolenate (whole linseed) was incorporated into the ovine diet. Finally, in the last 3 wk the feeding was the same as in the first 4 wk. The FA profile in milk fat was monitored by GC, and the distribution of CLA isomers was thoroughly tested by combining GC-MS of 4,4-dimethyloxazoline derivatives (DMOX) with silver ion-HPLC (Ag(+)-HPLC) of FAME. Reconstructed mass spectral profiles of CLA characteristic ions from DMOX were used to identify positional isomers, and Ag(+)-HPLC was used to quantify them. An increase in total CLA in milk fat was observed, and total CLA remained elevated during the weeks of enriched alpha-linolenate feeding. In our experimental conditions there was a linear relationship between trans-vaccenic acid (trans-11-octadecenoic acid; trans-11 18:1) and 9-cis,11-trans CLA in ewes' milk fat. Concerning the CLA isomer profile, increases in the 11,13- and 12,14-18:2 positional isomers were considerable when linseed was included in the diet. Organoleptic characteristics of cheeses made with CLA-enriched milk did not substantially differ from those made with nonsupplemented ewes' milk. CLA total content and isomer profile did not change during ripening.

  11. Lipid nanoparticles with different oil/fatty ester ratios as carriers of buprenorphine and its prodrugs for injection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jhi-Joung; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Sung, K C; Tsai, Chia-Yin; Fang, Jia-You

    2009-09-10

    Buprenorphine is a promising drug for the treatment of chronic pain and opioid dependence. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the feasibility of lipid nanoparticles with different oil/fatty ester ratios for injection of buprenorphine. To improve the release properties and analgesic duration of the drug, ester prodrugs were also incorporated into the nanoparticles for evaluation. Linseed oil and cetyl palmitate were respectively chosen as the liquid lipid and solid lipid in the inner phase of the nanoparticulate systems. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was performed, and the particle size, zeta potential, molecular environment, and lipid/water partitioning were determined to characterize the state of the drug/prodrug and lipid modification. The in vitro release kinetics were measured by a Franz assembly. DSC showed that systems without oil (solid lipid nanoparticles, SLNs) had a more ordered crystalline lattice in the inner matrix compared to those with oil (nanostructured lipid carriers, NLCs and lipid emulsion, LE). The mean diameter of the nanoparticles ranged between 180 and 200nm. The in vitro drug/prodrug release occurred in a delayed manner in decreasing order as follows: SLN>NLC>LE. It was found that the release rate was reduced following an increase in alkyl ester chains in the prodrugs. The in vivo antinociception was examined by a cold ethanol tail-flick test in rats. Compared to an aqueous solution, a prolonged analgesic duration was detected after an intravenous injection of buprenorphine-loaded SLNs and buprenorphine propionate (Bu-C3)-loaded NLCs (with 10% linseed oil in the lipid phase). The Bu-C3 in NLCs even showed a maximum antinociceptive activity for 10h. In vitro erythrocyte hemolysis and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from neutrophils demonstrated a negligible toxicity of these carriers. Our results indicate the feasibility of using lipid nanoparticles, especially SLNs and NLCs, as parenteral delivery systems for

  12. Microbial side-chain cleavage of phytosterols by mycobacteria in vegetable oil/aqueous two-phase system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang-Guang; Guan, Yi-Xin; Wang, Hai-Qing; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2014-09-01

    Microbial side-chain cleavage of natural sterols to 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD) and 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione (ADD) by Mycobacteria has received much attention in pharmaceutical industry, while low yield of the reaction owing to the strong hydrophobicity of sterols is a tough problem to be solved urgently. Eight kinds of vegetable oils, i.e., sunflower, peanut, corn, olive, linseed, walnut, grape seed, and rice oil, were used to construct oil/aqueous biphasic systems in the biotransformation of phytosterols by Mycobacterium sp. MB 3683 cells. The results indicated that vegetable oils are suitable for phytosterol biotransformation. Specially, the yield of AD carried out in sunflower biphasic system (phase ratio of 1:9, oil to aqueous) was greatly increased to 84.8 % with 10 g/L feeding concentration after 120-h transformation at 30 °C and 200 rpm. Distribution coefficients of AD in different oil/aqueous systems were also determined. Because vegetable oils are of low cost and because of their eco-friendly characters, there is a great potential for the application of oil/aqueous two-phase systems in bacteria whole cell biocatalysis.

  13. Oil Spill!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansberry, Karen Rohrich; Morgan, Emily

    2005-01-01

    An oil spill occurs somewhere in the world almost every day of the year, and the consequences can be devastating. In this month's column, students explore the effects of oil spills on plants, animals, and the environment and investigate oil spill clean-up methods through a simulated oil spill. The activities described in this article give students…

  14. Oil Spill!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansberry, Karen Rohrich; Morgan, Emily

    2005-01-01

    An oil spill occurs somewhere in the world almost every day of the year, and the consequences can be devastating. In this month's column, students explore the effects of oil spills on plants, animals, and the environment and investigate oil spill clean-up methods through a simulated oil spill. The activities described in this article give students…

  15. Milk Yield, Composition, and Fatty Acid Profile in Dairy Cows Fed a High-concentrate Diet Blended with Oil Mixtures Rich in Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Thanh, Lam Phuoc; Suksombat, Wisitiporn

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of feeding linseed oil or/and sunflower oil mixed with fish oil on milk yield, milk composition and fatty acid (FA) profiles of dairy cows fed a high-concentrate diet, 24 crossbred primiparous lactating dairy cows in early lactation were assigned to a completely randomized design experiment. All cows were fed a high-concentrate basal diet and 0.38 kg dry matter (DM) molasses per day. Treatments were composed of a basal diet without oil supplement (Control), or diets of (DM basis) 3% linseed and fish oils (1:1, w/w, LSO-FO), or 3% sunflower and fish oils (1:1, w/w, SFO-FO), or 3% mixture (1:1:1, w/w) of linseed, sunflower, and fish oils (MIX-O). The animals fed SFO-FO had a 13.12% decrease in total dry matter intake compared with the control diet (p<0.05). No significant change was detected for milk yield; however, the animals fed the diet supplemented with SFO-FO showed a depressed milk fat yield and concentration by 35.42% and 27.20%, respectively, compared to those fed the control diet (p<0.05). Milk c9, t11-conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) proportion increased by 198.11% in the LSO-FO group relative to the control group (p<0.01). Milk C18:3n-3 (ALA) proportion was enhanced by 227.27% supplementing with LSO-FO relative to the control group (p<0.01). The proportions of milk docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were significantly increased (p<0.01) in the cows fed LSO-FO (0.38%) and MIX-O (0.23%) compared to the control group (0.01%). Dietary inclusion of LSO-FO mainly increased milk c9, t11-CLA, ALA, DHA, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), whereas feeding MIX-O improved preformed FA and unsaturated fatty acids (UFA). While the lowest n-6/n-3 ratio was found in the LSO-FO, the decreased atherogenecity index (AI) and thrombogenicity index (TI) seemed to be more extent in the MIX-O. Therefore, to maximize milk c9, t11-CLA, ALA, DHA, and n-3 PUFA and to minimize milk n-6/n-3 ratio, AI and TI, an ideal supplement would appear to be either LSO-FO or

  16. Polyphenol Oxidase Containing Sidestreams as Emulsifiers of Rumen Bypass Linseed Oil Emulsions: Interfacial Characterization and Efficacy of Protection against in Vitro Ruminal Biohydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Gadeyne, Frederik; De Neve, Nympha; Vlaeminck, Bruno; Claeys, Erik; Van der Meeren, Paul; Fievez, Veerle

    2016-05-18

    The low transfer in ruminants of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids to the milk or peripheral tissues is largely due to ruminal biohydrogenation. Lipids emulsified by a polyphenol oxidase (PPO) rich protein extract of red clover were shown before to be protected against this breakdown after cross-linking with 4-methylcatechol. Protein extracts of 13 other vegetal resources were tested. Surprisingly, the effectiveness to protect emulsified lipids against in vitro ruminal biohydrogenation largely depended on the origin of the extract and its protein concentration but was not related to PPO activity. Moreover, PPO isoforms in vegetal sources, effectively protecting emulsified lipids, were diverse and their presence at the emulsion interface did not seem essential. Potato tuber peels were identified as an interesting biological source of emulsifying proteins and PPO, particularly since protein extracts of industrial potato sidestreams proved to be suitable for the current application.

  17. Identification of non-cross-linked compounds in methanolic extracts of cured and aged linseed oil-based paint films using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Jorrit D J; van den Berg, Klaas Jan; Boon, Jaap J

    2002-03-15

    Methanolic extracts of paint samples of different composition and age were qualitatively investigated by GC-MS using an on-column injector after off-line methylation or trimethylsilyl derivatisation, and on-line thermally assisted (trans)methylation with tetramethylammonium hydroxide using Curie-point pyrolysis-GC-MS. The combination of these three analytical strategies led to the identification of typical oxidation products of unsaturated fatty acids by interpretation of their mass spectrum. Some of the identified compounds have not been reported before. Both the off-line and on-line GC-MS strategy show series of short-chain fatty (di)acids and C16 and (oxidised) C18 fatty acids. The major advantage of the on-line pyrolysis-GC-MS approach is that chemical work-up is minimal and very quick. With this technique both the carboxylic acid functionalities, and hydroxyl groups are methylated. Young paint films are shown to contain relatively more oxidised C18 fatty acids and less diacids compared to older paints, which is indicative for the on-going oxidation processes within the paint. After trimethylsilylation, monoacylglycerols are detected indicative for hydrolytic processes, which reflect the relative distribution of the most prominent silylated fatty acids present. Relatively more C16 and C18 monoacylglycerols are found in young paints, whereas older paints contain higher amounts of monoacylglycerols of diacids.

  18. Effect of dietary supplementation with red wine extract or vitamin E, in combination with linseed and fish oil, on lamb meat quality.

    PubMed

    Muíño, Iria; Apeleo, Elizabeth; de la Fuente, Jesús; Pérez-Santaescolástica, Cristina; Rivas-Cañedo, Ana; Pérez, Concepción; Díaz, María Teresa; Cañeque, Vicente; Lauzurica, Sara

    2014-10-01

    Thirty lambs were assigned to the following treatments: control diet (C) rich in omega-3 fatty acids; C plus 900ppm red wine extract (RWE), or C plus 300ppm vitamin E (VE). Oxidative stability and sensory properties of chops stored in MAP (70% O2/30% CO2) during 12days were evaluated. Chops from the VE group showed lower lipid oxidation (p<0.001) and protein carbonylation (p<0.05), stable omega-3 fatty acids proportions and overall liking sensory scores (p<0.05). Dietary RWE supplementation did not influence oxidative stability of chops, however levels of C20:5n-3 were greater (p<0.05) and n-6/n-3 ratio (p<0.01) was lower, relative to controls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of including whole linseed and vitamin E in the diet of young bulls slaughtered at two fat covers on the sensory quality of beef packaged in two different packaging systems.

    PubMed

    Albertí, Pere; Campo, María M; Beriain, María J; Ripoll, Guillermo; Sañudo, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    Forty-six Pirenaica young bulls, slaughtered at two levels of fatness (3 and 4 mm), were used to evaluate the effect of the inclusion of 50 g kg(-1) linseed alone or with 200 IU vitamin E kg(-1) in the concentrate and of the meat packaging system (vacuum or modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)) on the beef sensory quality. The inclusion of linseed or supplementation with vitamin E in the concentrate induced no significant differences in the main meat sensory scores and overall appraisal except under MAP, where small differences due to concentrate ingredients were found in juiciness and metallic flavor intensity. Extending the display time up to 4 or 8 days in high-oxygen MAP had detrimental effects on sensory attributes. Meat from animals with 4 mm fat cover depth were rated more tender and juicy, less fibrous and with a higher intensity of beef flavor and rancid odor than meat from 3 mm fat cover bulls when both samples were vacuum packaged. The inclusion of 50 g kg(-1) linseed in the concentrate fed to bulls had no detrimental effect on the beef sensory quality. The vacuum-packaged meat of bulls slaughtered at 4 mm fat cover was rated higher on sensory analysis than that at 3 mm fat cover. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Prophylactic effect of flaxseed oil against radiation-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, A L; Sharma, Avadhesh; Patni, Shikha; Sharma, Antim Lata

    2007-09-01

    Flaxseed (linseed, Linum usitatissimum, Linaceae) is widely used for its edible oil in many parts of the world. The present study investigates the radioprotective and antioxidative potential of flaxseed oil (FO). Swiss albino mice were administered FO orally once daily for 15 consecutive days, then exposed to a single dose of 5 Gy of gamma radiation. Lipid peroxide, reduced glutathione and total protein were estimated in the liver. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), acid and alkaline phosphatase estimations in serum were also carried out. Radiation-induced increases in the levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO), AST, ALT and acid phosphatase were significantly ameliorated by flaxseed oil pretreatment, and radiation-induced depletion in the level of glutathione (GSH) and alkaline phosphatase activities was significantly inhibited by flaxseed oil administration. The lifespan was increased in the flaxseed oil treated irradiated mice in comparison with their respective control mice, with survival data showing an LD(50/30) (lethal dose for 50% of animals after 30 days) of 7.1 and 10 Gy for control and FO treated irradiated mice, respectively, and produced a dose reduction factor for flaxseed oil (DRF) of 1.40. Radiation-induced deficits in body and organ weight were significantly reduced or prevented in flaxseed oil pretreated mice. The protection afforded by flaxseed oil may be attributed to the constituents of the oil, which include omega-3 essential fatty acids and phytoestrogenic lignans, which appear to play an important role in free radical scavenging and singlet oxygen quenching. The study does not rule out the possibility of a prophylactic potential of flaxseed oil against radiation-induced degenerative changes in liver.

  1. Composition, in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of essential oil and oleoresins obtained from black cumin seeds (Nigella sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Singh, Sunita; Das, S S; Singh, G; Schuff, Carola; de Lampasona, Marina P; Catalán, César A N

    2014-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed the major components in black cumin essential oils which were thymoquinone (37.6%) followed by p-cymene (31.2%), α-thujene (5.6%), thymohydroquinone (3.4%), and longifolene (2.0%), whereas the oleoresins extracted in different solvents contain linoleic acid as a major component. The antioxidant activity of essential oil and oleoresins was evaluated against linseed oil system at 200 ppm concentration by peroxide value, thiobarbituric acid value, ferric thiocyanate, ferrous ion chelating activity, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging methods. The essential oil and ethyl acetate oleoresin were found to be better than synthetic antioxidants. The total phenol contents (gallic acid equivalents, mg GAE per g) in black cumin essential oil, ethyl acetate, ethanol, and n-hexane oleoresins were calculated as 11.47 ± 0.05, 10.88 ± 0.9, 9.68 ± 0.06, and 8.33 ± 0.01, respectively, by Folin-Ciocalteau method. The essential oil showed up to 90% zone inhibition against Fusarium moniliforme in inverted petri plate method. Using agar well diffusion method for evaluating antibacterial activity, the essential oil was found to be highly effective against Gram-positive bacteria.

  2. Composition, In Vitro Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Essential Oil and Oleoresins Obtained from Black Cumin Seeds (Nigella sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sunita; Das, S. S.; Singh, G.; Schuff, Carola; de Lampasona, Marina P.; Catalán, César A. N.

    2014-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed the major components in black cumin essential oils which were thymoquinone (37.6%) followed by p-cymene (31.2%), α-thujene (5.6%), thymohydroquinone (3.4%), and longifolene (2.0%), whereas the oleoresins extracted in different solvents contain linoleic acid as a major component. The antioxidant activity of essential oil and oleoresins was evaluated against linseed oil system at 200 ppm concentration by peroxide value, thiobarbituric acid value, ferric thiocyanate, ferrous ion chelating activity, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging methods. The essential oil and ethyl acetate oleoresin were found to be better than synthetic antioxidants. The total phenol contents (gallic acid equivalents, mg GAE per g) in black cumin essential oil, ethyl acetate, ethanol, and n-hexane oleoresins were calculated as 11.47 ± 0.05, 10.88 ± 0.9, 9.68 ± 0.06, and 8.33 ± 0.01, respectively, by Folin-Ciocalteau method. The essential oil showed up to 90% zone inhibition against Fusarium moniliforme in inverted petri plate method. Using agar well diffusion method for evaluating antibacterial activity, the essential oil was found to be highly effective against Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:24689064

  3. Peppermint Oil

    MedlinePlus

    ... irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), other digestive problems, the common cold, headaches, and other conditions. Peppermint oil is also ... whether peppermint oil is helpful for nausea, the common cold, or other conditions. There’s not enough evidence to ...

  4. Coconut Oil

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat eczema and a skin condition called psoriasis. Coconut oil is also used in hair products ... not affect weight or body mass index (BMI). Psoriasis. Applying coconut oil to the skin before treatment ...

  5. Petroleum Oils

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Different types of crude oil and refined product, of all different chemical compositions, have distinct physical properties. These properties affect the way oil spreads and breaks down, its hazard to marine and human life, and the likelihood of threat.

  6. SYNTHETIC OIL,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The patent concerns a dicarboxylate-base synthetic oil with antiwear and antioxidation additives. The oil is prepared from the esterification of 2- or 3-methylcyclohexanol and 2-ethylhexanol with adipic acid. (Author)

  7. Palm Oil

    MedlinePlus

    ... A deficiency, cancer, brain disease, aging; and treating malaria, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and cyanide poisoning. ... oils, such as soybean, canola, or sunflower oil. Malaria. Some research suggests that dietary consumption of palm ...

  8. Oil Shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, Justin E.

    2017-01-01

    Oil shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks formed in many different depositional environments (terrestrial, lacustrine, marine) containing large quantities of thermally immature organic matter in the forms of kerogen and bitumen. If defined from an economic standpoint, a rock containing a sufficient concentration of oil-prone kerogen to generate economic quantities of synthetic crude oil upon heating to high temperatures (350–600 °C) in the absence of oxygen (pyrolysis) can be considered an oil shale.

  9. Mineral oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furby, N. W.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of lubricants made from mineral oils are discussed. Types and compositions of base stocks are reviewed and the product demands and compositions of typical products are outlined. Processes for commercial production of mineral oils are examined. Tables of data are included to show examples of product types and requirements. A chemical analysis of three types of mineral oils is reported.

  10. Dietary inclusion of diallyl disulfide, yucca powder, calcium fumarate, an extruded linseed product, or medium-chain fatty acids does not affect methane production in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    van Zijderveld, S M; Dijkstra, J; Perdok, H B; Newbold, J R; Gerrits, W J J

    2011-06-01

    Two similar experiments were conducted to assess the effect of diallyl disulfide (DADS), yucca powder (YP), calcium fumarate (CAFU), an extruded linseed product (UNSAT), or a mixture of capric and caprylic acid (MCFA) on methane production, energy balance, and dairy cow performance. In experiment 1, a control diet (CON1) and diets supplemented with 56 mg of DADS/kg of dry matter (DM), 3g of YP/kg of DM, or 25 g of CAFU/kg of DM were evaluated. In experiment 2, an inert saturated fat source in the control diet (CON2) was exchanged isolipidically for an extruded linseed source (100g/kg of DM; UNSAT) or a mixture of C8:0 and C10:0 (MCFA; 20.3g/kg of DM). In experiment 2, a higher inclusion level of DADS (200mg/kg of DM) was also tested. Both experiments were conducted using 40 lactating Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. Cows were adapted to the diet for 12 d and were subsequently kept in respiration chambers for 5 d to evaluate methane production, diet digestibility, energy balance, and animal performance. Feed intake was restricted to avoid confounding effects of possible differences in ad libitum feed intake on methane production. Feed intake was, on average, 17.5 and 16.6 kg of DM/d in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. None of the additives reduced methane production in vivo. Methane production in experiment 1 was 450, 453, 446, and 423 g/d for CON1 and the diets supplemented with DADS, YP, and CAFU, respectively. In experiment 2, methane production was 371, 394, 388, and 386 g/d for CON2 and the diets supplemented with UNSAT, MCFA, and DADS, respectively. No effects of the additives on energy balance or neutral detergent fiber digestibility were observed. The addition of MCFA increased milk fat content (5.38% vs. 4.82% for control) and fat digestibility (78.5% vs. 59.8% for control), but did not affect milk yield or other milk components. The other products did not affect milk yield or composition. Results from these experiments emphasize the need to confirm methane

  11. Effects of two supplementation levels of linseed combined with CLA or tallow on meat quality traits and fatty acid profile of adipose and different muscle tissues in slaughter pigs.

    PubMed

    Bee, G; Jacot, S; Guex, G; Biolley, C

    2008-05-01

    Dietary linseed supply efficiently elevates the linolenic acid concentration of pork. The main problem of increasing the n-3 fatty acid tissue levels arises from a higher susceptibility to lipid oxidation. Increasing the saturation level of tissue lipids by the dietary inclusion of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) or tallow might prevent oxidation. Thus, the aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of dietary CLA or tallow supplementation combined with extruded linseed on the growth performance, carcass characteristics and fatty acid profile of muscles (longissimus, semimembranosus, biceps femoris) and subcutaneous fat (SF). The enzyme activity of the de novo lipogenesis and stearoyl-CoA desaturase in the SF was also assessed. From 18 to 104 kg BW, 32 Swiss Large White barrows were fed a diet supplemented with either: (1) 2% linseed (L2); (2) 3% linseed (L3); (3) 2% linseed + 1% CLA (L2-C) or (4) 2% linseed + 1% tallow (L2-T). The linolenic and eicosatrienoic acid concentrations were higher (P < 0.01) and the ∑n-6/∑n-3 ratio was lower (P < 0.01) in all tissues of L3 than L2 and L2-T barrows. Only in the SF the docosapentaenoic acid concentration was increased (P < 0.01) in L3 barrows. Compared with the other three diets, feeding the L2-C diets increased (P < 0.01) the amount of myristic, palmitic, stearic and palmitoleic acid at the expense of the oleic and eicosenoic acid content in the intramuscular and SF lipids. Except for the lower (P < 0.05) eicosadienoic acid concentration in the muscles, feeding the L2-C treatment resulted in similar polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations and ∑n-6/∑n-3 ratio than feeding L2 or L2-T diets. Both the c9,t11- and t10,c12-CLA isomers found in the CLA-supplemented diet were also detected in the tissues, but the c9,t11-isomer was more abundant than the t10,c12-isomer. De novo lipogenesis was not (P > 0.05) affected by the dietary fats, whereas Δ9-desaturase activity was depressed (P < 0.05) by CLA inclusion (L2-C

  12. Dietary whole and cracked linseed increases the proportion of oleic and α-linolenic acids in adipose tissues and decreases stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase, acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase gene expression in the longissimus thoracis muscle of Yanbian Yellow cattle.

    PubMed

    Li, X Z; Yan, C G; Yu, J; Gao, Q S; Choi, S H; Shin, J S; Smith, S B

    2017-02-01

    We hypothesized that supplementation of linseed in a beef cattle fattening diet would increase PUFA concentrations in intramuscular adipose tissue and depress (), (), and () gene expression by decreasing () expression. Conversely, supplemental linseed would upregulate expression of () and () in muscle of Yanbian Yellow steers. Thirty steers were assigned at random to 3 groups of 10 steers fed either the basal diet (corn grain and corn silage-based commercial concentrate [CON]), the CON diet plus 8% whole linseed (WLS; DM basis), or the CON diet plus 8% cracked linseed (CLS; DM basis) for 6 mo. The WLS and CLS supplements did not affect carcass weight, backfat thickness, or marbling scores ( > 0.10) but increased rib eye area and fat color (more yellow; < 0.05). The WLS and CLS diets decreased the proportions of 16:0 and 18:0 and increased the proportions of 18:1-9, 18:3-3, -9, -11 conjugated linoleic acid, total MUFA, and total PUFA in intramuscular, intermuscular, and subcutaneous adipose tissues. The WLS and CLS diets increased and gene expression whereas the supplements depressed , , , and gene expression in longissimus thoracis muscle, relative to CON muscle, consistent with our hypothesis. Because the WLS and CLS treatments did not affect any measure of carcass adiposity, these results indicated that linseed supplements promoted uptake of dietary lipids while concurrently depressing de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in adipose tissue.

  13. Effects of Fe(3+) and Antioxidants on Glycidyl Ester Formation in Plant Oil at High Temperature and Their Influencing Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weiwei; Liu, Guoqin; Liu, Xinqi

    2017-05-24

    This research investigated the effects of Fe(3+) and antioxidants on the formation of glycidyl esters (GEs) and the free radical mediated mechanisms involving the recognition of cyclic acyloxonium free radical intermediate (CAFRI) for GE formation in both the plant oil model (palm oil, camellia oil, soybean oil, and linseed oil) system and the chemical model (dipalmitin and methyl linoleate) system heated at 200 °C. Results show that Fe(3+) can promote the formation of GEs, which can be inhibited by antioxidants in plant oil during high-temperature exposure. Based on the monitoring of cyclic acyloxonium and ester carbonyl group by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the promotion of Fe(3+) and the inhibition of antioxidants (tert-butylhydroquinone and α-tocopherol) for GE formation occurred not only through lipid oxidation but also through directly affecting the formation of cyclic acyloxonium intermediate. Additionally, a quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry measurement was conducted to identify the presence of radical adduct captured by 5,5-dimethylpyrroline N-oxide, which provided strong evidence for the formation of CAFRI. Thus, one possible influencing mechanism can be that free radical generated in lipid oxidation may be transferred to dipalmitin and promote CAFRI formation. Fe(3+) can catalyze free radical generation while antioxidants can scavenge free radical, and therefore they also can directly affect CAFRI formation.

  14. Effects of rice bran oil enriched with n-3 PUFA on liver and serum lipids in rats.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Rajni; Sambaiah, Kari

    2009-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed interesterification was used to prepare different structured lipids (SL) from rice bran oil (RBO) by replacing some of the fatty acids with alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) from linseed oil (LSO) and n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) from cod liver oil (CLO). In one SL, the ALA content was 20% whereas in another the long chain n-3 PUFA content was 10%. Most of the n-3 PUFA were incorporated into the sn-1 and sn-3 positions of triacylglycerol. The influence of SL with RBO rich in ALA and EPA + DHA was studied on various lipid parameters in experimental animals. Rats fed RBO showed a decrease in total serum cholesterol by 10% when compared to groundnut oil (GNO). Similarly structured lipids with CLO and LSO significantly decreased total serum cholesterol by 19 and 22% respectively compared to rice bran oil. The serum TAGs level of rats fed SLs and blended oils were also significantly decreased by 14 and 17% respectively compared to RBO. Feeding of an n-3 PUFA rich diet resulted in the accumulation of long chain n-3 PUFA in various tissues and a reduction in the long chain n-6 PUFA. These studies indicate that the incorporation of ALA and EPA + DHA into RBO can offer health benefits.

  15. Influence of Maternal and Postweaning Linseed Dietary Supplementation on Growth Rate, Lipid Profile, and Meat Quality Traits of Light Sarda Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Mughetti, Laura; Ranucci, David; Acuti, Gabriele; Olivieri, Oliviero; Miraglia, Dino; Branciari, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    The effects of dietary extruded linseed (EL) on growth performance, meat quality, and lipid profile of Semimembranosus and Longissimus lumborum muscles of 81 Sarda lambs were studied in a 3 × 3 design: EL content (0%, 10%, and 20%) of maternal dietary concentrate fed from 20 d to parturition to 60 d of lactation and EL content (0%, 10%, 20%) of lamb concentrate fed after weaning for 30 d. The basal diet was composed of alfalfa and meadow hay during pregnancy and alfalfa hay during lactation. At slaughter, carcass and meat quality were evaluated. Sensory quality of Semimembranosus from 0% and 20% EL lambs was assessed. Both maternal and postweaning diets affected growth performance, with higher body weights recorded with the 10% EL concentrate. Carcass and meat quality were not affected by diet. Saturated and monounsaturated FA decreased and n-3 polyunsaturated FA increased with increasing EL content in lamb diet. An increase in vaccenic and rumenic acid was associated with the EL content of the maternal diet. Both diets increased the n-6/n-3 FA ratio. No differences in acceptability were detected by consumers among groups. It is concluded that EL supplementation and early life nutrition can influence performance and FA metabolism in growing lambs. PMID:27034972

  16. Replacement of dietary fish oil by vegetable oils affects humoral immunity and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines genes in gilthead sea bream Sparus aurata.

    PubMed

    Montero, D; Mathlouthi, F; Tort, L; Afonso, J M; Torrecillas, S; Fernández-Vaquero, A; Negrin, D; Izquierdo, M S

    2010-12-01

    Commercial gilthead sea bream feeds are highly energetic, fish oil traditionally being the main lipid source. But the decreased fish oil production together with the increased prices of this oil encourages its substitution by vegetable oils, imposing new nutritional habits to aquaculture species. Partial replacement of fish oil by vegetable oils in diets for marine species allows good feed utilization and growth but may affect fish health, since imbalances in dietary fatty acids may alter fish immunological status. The effect of dietary oils on different aspects of fish immune system has been reported for some species, but very little is known about the effect of dietary oils on immune-related genes expression in fish. Thus, the objective of this study was to elucidate the role of dietary oils on the expression of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) and Interleukine 1β (IL-1β) on intestine and head kidney after exposure to the bacterial pathogen Photobacterium damselae sp. piscicida. For that purpose, 5 iso-nitrogenous and iso-lipidic diets (45% crude protein, 22% crude lipid content) were formulated. Anchovy oil was the only lipid source used in the control diet (FO), but in the other diets, fish oil was totally (100%) or partially (70%) substituted by linseed (rich in n-3 fatty acids) or soybean (rich in n-6 fatty acids) (100L, 100S, 70L, 70S). Fish were fed experimental diets during 80 days and after this period were exposed to an experimental intestinal infection with the pathogen. Serum and tissue samples were obtained at pre-infection and after 1, 3 and 7 days of infection. RNA was extracted and cDNA was synthesized by reverse transcription from intestine and head kidney and the level expression of TNF-α and IL-1β were assayed by using quantitative real time PCR. The expression level of genes analysed was represented as relative value, using the comparative Ct method (2(-ΔΔCt)). Serum anti-bacterial activity was measured as

  17. Ozonated oils as functional dermatological matrices: effects on the wound healing process using SKH1 mice.

    PubMed

    Valacchi, G; Zanardi, I; Lim, Y; Belmonte, G; Miracco, C; Sticozzi, C; Bocci, V; Travagli, V

    2013-12-15

    Wound tissue repair is a complex and dynamic process of restoring cellular structures and tissue layers. Improvement of this process is crucial for several pathologies characterized by chronic delayed wound closure such as diabetes, and the investigation of new approaches aimed to ameliorate the wound healing process is under continuous evolution. Recently, the usage of vegetable matrices in the form of ozonated oils has been proposed and several researchers have shown a positive effect in the wound, based on their bactericidal, antiviral, and antifungal properties. The present study was undertaken to compare the effect that different ozonated oils (olive, sesame and linseed) with the same level of ozonation have on wound healing rate in SKH1 mice. Several histological parameters and the level of key proteins such as VEGF and PCNA have been analyzed. Only treatment with ozonated sesame oil shows a faster wound closure in the first 7 days. This effect paralleled with the increased VEGF and PCNA levels, NFκB nuclear translocation and 4-HNE formation. The present study shows that not only the ozonation grade is of importance for the improvement of wound healing process but also the typical composition of the oil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of free and protected oils on the digestion of dietary carbohydrates between the mouth and duodenum of sheep.

    PubMed

    McAllan, A B; Knight, R; Sutton, J D

    1983-05-01

    Sheep fitted with rumen and re-entrant duodenal cannulas were given diets of approximately 200 g hay and 400 g concentrate mixture alone, or supplemented daily with 40 g linseed or coconut oils free or protected with formaldehyde-casein in a 5 x 5 Latin-square arrangement. Chromic oxide paper was given as a marker at feeding time and passage to the duodenum of neutral-detergent fibre (NDF) and different sugars were estimated from the values for constituent:marker at the duodenum. Contributions of microbial carbohydrates to these flows were estimated from amounts of RNA present. The carbohydrate composition of mixed rumen bacteria from sheep rumen digesta were similar regardless of diet. Of the sugars entering the duodenum all the rhamnose and ribose and 0.51, 0.24 and 0.35 of the mannose, galactose and starch-glucose respectively, were contributed by the microbes. Virtually all the arabinose, xylose and cellulose-glucose were contributed by the diet. For sheep receiving the basal ration, coefficients of digestibility between mouth and duodenum, corrected where necessary for microbial contribution, were 0.95, 0.66, 0.67, 0.62, 0.45 and 0.51 for starch-glucose, mannose, arabinose, galactose, xylose and cellulose-glucose respectively. Corresponding values when free-oil-supplemented diets were given were 0.95, 0.55, 0.38, 0.55, 0.01 and -0.02 respectively. Values for diets supplemented with linseed oil or coconut oil did not differ significantly. Addition of protected oils to the basal feed also resulted in depressed digestibilities of dietary structural sugars but to a far lesser extent than those observed with the free oils. Apparent digestibility of NDF was altered in the same direction as those of the main structural sugars, averaging 0.50, 0.17 and 0.29 in animals receiving the basal, free-oil-supplemented or protected-oil-supplemented diets respectively. The reasons for the difference between NDF and discrete carbohydrate analytical totals are discussed.

  19. Relationships between the evolution of the percentage in weight of polar compounds and that of the molar percentage of acyl groups of edible oils submitted to frying temperature.

    PubMed

    Guillén, Maria D; Uriarte, Patricia S

    2013-06-01

    The evolution of the molar percentage of several kinds of acyl groups of extra virgin olive, sunflower and virgin linseed oils was monitored throughout heating at frying temperature by means of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance. Likewise, the evolution of the percentage in weight of the polar compounds of the same oils under the same heating conditions was also determined. Relationships between both sets of parameters, in each oil and in the oils as a group, were studied. An equation which is able to accurately predict the percentage in weight of the polar compounds, throughout the heating at frying temperature, of any one of these three oils, from the molar percentage of triunsaturated, diunsaturated and monounsaturated acyl groups, was obtained. In this way both molar percentage of acyl groups and percentage in weight of polar compounds can be obtained in a few minutes that registration of the (1)H NMR spectrum of the oil takes, in addition to the rest of information provided by this technique. The study reveals the close relationships between percentage in weight of polar compounds and the composition expressed in terms of molar percentages of acyl groups in edible oils heated at frying temperature.

  20. Oil gluts and oil tariffs

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, W.W.

    1982-01-01

    The free market does not provide the level of oil imports that is in the best interest of oil-importing nations. Common sense tells us that the best time to combat the economic power of a cartel is when it is weak, such as during a period of oil glut. The glut conditions still leave us with a large gap between the true cost of oil and the market price. The authors could justify an oil import tariff of 30-40% of the price of oil, or more. Nearly every other consideration, especially the positive effect on the federal budget, reinforces the recommendation for a large import tariff. An analysis in the appendix showing the otpimal tariff at 65-100% suggests that we should impose the largest tariff we can get through the political system. 9 references, 10 tables.

  1. Effects of partial substitution of dietary fish oil with blends of vegetable oils, on blood leucocyte fatty acid compositions, immune function and histology in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L).

    PubMed

    Mourente, Gabriel; Good, Joanne E; Thompson, Kim D; Bell, J Gordon

    2007-10-01

    Within a decade or so insufficient fish oil (FO) will be available to meet the requirements for aquaculture growth. Consequently, alternative sources are being investigated to reduce reliance on wild fish as a source of FO. Vegetable oils (VO) are a feasible alternative to FO. However, it is important to establish that alternative dietary lipids are not only supplied in the correct quantities and balance for optimal growth, but can maintain immune function and prevent infection, since it is known that the nutritional state of the fish can influence their immune function and disease resistance. A way of maintaining immune function, while replacing dietary FO, is by using a blend of VO rather than a single oil. In this study, juvenile European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) were fed diets with a 60 % substitution of FO with a blend of rapeseed, linseed and palm oils. Two oil blends were used to achieve a fatty acid composition similar to FO, in terms of energy content, and provide a similar balance of SFA, MUFA and PUFA. Fish were fed the diets for 64 weeks, after which time growth and fatty acid compositions of liver and blood leucocytes were monitored. The impact of the dietary blends on selected innate immune responses and histopathology were also assessed, together with levels of plasma prostaglandin E2. The results suggest that potential exists for replacing FO with a VO blend in farmed sea bass feeds without compromising growth, non-specific immune function or histology.

  2. Antidiabetic oils.

    PubMed

    Berraaouan, Ali; Abid, Sanae; Bnouham, Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    Many studies have demonstrated evidence of the health benefits of natural products. Plant extracts have been tested on a variety of physiological disorders, including diabetes mellitus. Studies have tested aqueous extracts, plant fractions extracts, families of active of compounds, and specific active compounds. In this review, we describe the antidiabetic effects of vegetable oils. Information was collected from ScienceDirect and PubMed databases using the following key words: Diabetes mellitus, Oils, Vegetable oils, Type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, antidiabetic effect, antihyperglycemic, antidiabetic oil. We have compiled approximately ten vegetable oils with including experimental studies that have demonstrated benefits on diabetes mellitus. There are soybean, argan, olive, palm, walnut, black cumin, safflower, Colocynth, Black seed, Rice bran, Cinnamom, and Rocket oils. For each vegetable oil, we investigated on the plant's traditional uses, their pharmacological activities and their antidiabetic effects. It seems that many vegetable oils are really interesting and can be used in the improvement of human health, particularly, to prevent or to treat diabetes mellitus complications.

  3. Lavender oil

    MedlinePlus

    Lavender oil is an oil made from the flowers of lavender plants. Lavender poisoning can occur when ... Seek medical help right away. Do NOT make the person throw up unless ... tells you to. If the chemical was swallowed, give the person ...

  4. Barley Oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is an ancient grain that has was domesticated for use as a food. Currently only about 2% is used for food, about two thirds is used for animal feed and one third for malting. Because the oil content of most barley cultivars is low (<2%), obtaining oil from whole barley gra...

  5. Separation of steroids using vegetable oils in microemulsion electrokinetic capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sirén, Heli; Vesanen, Sari; Suomi, Johanna

    2014-01-15

    The steroids, hydrocortisone, androstenedione, 17-α-hydroxyprogesterone, testosterone, 17-α-methyltestosterone, and progesterone were separated with microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) and detected with UV absorption. The microemulsion phases were prepared from both artificial and vegetable oils, from them the first was made of alkane and alcohol and the latter from colza, olive, linseed, and walnut oils. The electrolyte solutions were made to emulsions using sodium dodecyl sulfate and alkaline tetraborate. The solution mixtures made from ethyl acetate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, 1-butanol, acetonitrile, and sodium tetraborate were used as the reference solutions to evaluate the performance of the vegetable oil emulsions. Our study showed that the lipophilic organic phase in the microemulsion did provide resolution improvements but not selectivity changes. The results also correlate with real interactions of the steroids with the lipophilic organic microemulsion phase. The quality of the oils between the manufacturers did not have importance, which was noticed from the equal behavior of the steroids in the vegetable oil emulsions. Detection limits of the steroids in vegetable oil emulsions were at the level of 0.20-0.43μg/L. Thus, they were 2-10 times higher than the concentrations in the partial filling micellar electrokinetic chromatography (PF-MEKC), which we have obtained earlier. The repeatability (RSD%) of the electrophoretic mobilities of the steroids was between 0.50 and 3.70. The RSD% values between the inter-day separations were below 1%, but when walnut and olive oils were used the values exceeded even 10%.

  6. Supplementation with linseed (Linum usitatissimum) cake and/or wheat bran on feed utilization and carcass characteristics of Arsi-Bale sheep.

    PubMed

    Tafa, Abebe; Melaku, Solomon; Peters, Kurt J

    2010-04-01

    Thirty yearling male intact Arsi-Bale sheep with initial body weight (BW) of 15.5 +/- 0.21 kg (mean +/- SD) were used in 90 days feeding trial, 10 days digestibility trial followed by evaluation of carcass parameters at Bokoji, Ethiopia. The objectives were to evaluate effects of supplementation with linseed (Linum usitatissimum) cake (LSC), wheat bran (WB), and their mixtures at 2:1 and 1:2, respectively on feed intake, digestibility, daily BW gain, and carcass parameters. The five treatments included ad libitum feeding of natural pasture hay (control) and with daily supplementation of 300 g dry matter (DM) sole LSC, 2LSC:1WB mix, 1LSC:2WB mix, and sole WB. Six sheep were randomly assigned to each treatment using randomized complete-block design. Four sheep in each treatment were randomly selected and used for determination of digestibility and carcass characteristics using a completely randomized design. The intake of hay DM was higher (P < 0.001) for the non-supplemented sheep compared with the supplemented ones, but the contrary was true for total DM intake. Sheep in the control treatment lost BW (-1.5 g/day), while the supplemented ones gained 69.0-104.1 g BW/head/day. Digestibility of CP was higher (P < 0.001) for supplemented sheep as a result of higher (P < 0.001) CP intake. Slaughter weight, empty BW, and hot carcass weight were lower (P < 0.001) for sheep in the control treatment compared with the rest. Sheep supplemented with LSC and its mixtures with WB had better (P < 0.001) performance in daily BW gain than sole WB supplemented ones indicating the advantages of using supplements as mixed rations. Moreover, supplementation proved to be profitable, whereas feeding hay alone led to economic loss.

  7. Effects of addition of different vegetable oils to lactating dairy ewes' diet on meat quality characteristics of suckling lambs reared on the ewes' milk.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Ceferina; Fernández-Diez, Ana; Mateo, Javier; Bodas, Raul; Soto, Sergio; Manso, Teresa

    2012-07-01

    The effect of different vegetable oils used in the diet of lactating ewes on the meat quality of their suckling lambs has been evaluated. Lambs (males and females) were slaughtered at 11 kg. Fortyeight lactating Churra ewes (prolificacy 1.5) and their suckling lambs were assigned to four treatments according to the oil added (3% on weight basis) to the ewes' daily ration: palm oil as control (CON); olive oil (OLI); soybean oil (SOY); and linseed oil (LIN). Analyses of pH, colour, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), tocopherol levels, volatile compounds and a sensory evaluation were carried out on suckling lambs' meat. Results showed no substantial effect on pH, colour, TBARS and tocopherol levels. Volatiles typically derived from lipid oxidation were higher in SOY group. However, panellists were only able to correctly identify samples from LIN group. Furthermore, the meat from LIN group showed lower scores towards odour and flavour quality and overall liking than that from the rest of treatments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel bio-based thermoset resins based on epoxidized vegetable oils for structural adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivasubramanian, Shivshankar

    Conventional engineered wood composites are bonded for the most part through formaldehyde-based structural adhesives such as urea formaldehyde (UF), melamine formaldehyde (MF), phenol formaldehyde (PF) and resorcinol formaldehyde (RF). Formaldehyde is a known human carcinogen; the occupational exposure and emission after manufacturing of these binders is raising more and more concern. With increasing emphasis on environmental issues, there is clear incentive to replace these hazardous conventional formaldehyde-based binders with cco-friendly resins having similar properties but derived from renewable sources, bearing in mind the economics of the structural wood composite industry. In this thesis, the curing reaction of bio-derived epoxy thermosets with inexpensive, low-toxicity precursors, including polyimines and amino acids was investigated. Epoxidized linseed oil (ELO) and epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) were successfully crosslinked with both branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) and triethylenetetramine (fETA). Epoxidized castor oil (ECO) was crosslinked with polyethyleneimine (PEI), having different molecular weights. Curing conditions were optimized through solvent uptake and soluble fraction analysis. Finally, the mechanical properties of the optimized compositions of rigid bioepoxies were evaluated using dynamic mechanical rheological testing (DMRT). While not as stiff as conventional materials, optimized materials have sufficient room temperature moduli to show promise for coatings and as binders in engineered wood products.

  9. Oil-in-water microemulsions enhance the biodegradation of DDT by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guanyu; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2012-12-01

    A novel approach was developed using oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsions formed with non-ionic surfactant, cosurfactant (1-pentanol) and linseed oil, at the cosurfactant to surfactant ratio (C/S ratio, w/w) of 1:3 and oil to surfactant ratio (O/S ratio, w/w) of 1:10, to enhance the biodegradation of DDT by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Results showed that microemulsions formed with Tween 80 effectively enhanced the biodegradation of DDT by P. chrysosporium and the enhancement was about two times that of Tween 80 solution, while microemulsion formed with Triton X-100 exhibited negative effect. Further studies revealed that microemulsion formed with Tween 80 enhanced the biodegradation of DDT through transporting DDT from crystalline phase to mycelium as well as their positive effect on the growth of P. chrysosporium; of these, the former is likely the most important and pre-requisite for the biodegradation of DDT by P. chrysosporium.

  10. Purification process for MUFA- and PUFA-based monoacylglycerols from edible oils.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, M J; Ramos-Bueno, R P; Rodríguez-García, I; Guil-Guerrero, J L

    2017-08-01

    Important health benefits have been attributed to monoacylglycerols (MAGs) due to their various physiological functions, owing to which they become candidates for use as functional foods in order to prevent the onset of certain diseases such as colon cancer. In this work, six edible oils, namely: olive, linseed, sunflower, evening primrose, DHASCO(®) and ARASCO(®) have been processed to obtain different MUFA- and PUFA- based MAGs. First, the oils were hydrolyzed by means of an enzymatic process using porcine pancreatic lipase and then the reaction products were fractionated by using a liquid chromatography column containing silica gel as stationary phase in order to purify the MAGs-enriched fraction. A second chromatography process was performed using silver nitrate coated silica gel as stationary phase, in order to obtain the different MUFA- and PUFA-based MAGs from the corresponding oils. Overall, MAGs based on oleic, linoleic, α-linolenic, γ-linolenic, arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids have been isolated in high yields and purities (92.6, 97.4, 95.3, 90.9, 100 and 95.3% purity, respectively). Positional distribution was determined by means of (1)H NMR, which revealed a mix of 1(3) and 2-MAGs in variable proportions in the different MAGs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  11. Aureobasidium melanogenum: a native of dark biofinishes on oil treated wood.

    PubMed

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, Elke J; Houbraken, Jos A M P; Meijer, Martin; Adan, Olaf C G; Samson, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    The genus Aureobasidium, which is known as a wood staining mould, has been detected on oil treated woods in the specific stain formation called biofinish. This biofinish is used to develop a new protective, self-healing and decorative biotreatment for wood. In order to understand and control biofinish formation on oil treated wood, the occurrence of different Aureobasidium species on various wood surfaces was studied. Phenotypic variability within Aureobasidium strains presented limitations of morphological identification of Aureobasidium species. PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing of ITS and RPB2 were used to identify the culturable Aureobasidium species composition in mould stained wood surfaces with and without a biofinish. The analysed isolates showed that several Aureobasidium species were present and that Aureobasidium melanogenum was predominantly detected, regardless of the presence of a biofinish and the type of substrate. A. melanogenum was detected on wood samples exposed in the Netherlands, Cameroon, South Africa, Australia and Norway. ITS-specific PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing of DNA extracted from biofinish samples confirmed results of the culturing based method: A. melanogenum is predominant within the Aureobasidium population of biofinishes on pine sapwood treated with raw linseed oil and the outdoor placement in the Netherlands.

  12. Oil Spills

    MedlinePlus

    ... of response operations. In addition to spill response software and mapping tools , OR&R provides standard techniques ... communities for oil spills, OR&R develops several software and map tools for spill response and planning. ...

  13. OIL BOND®

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technical product bulletin: this miscellaneous oil spill control agent is a solidifier used in cleanups. It absorbs and solidifies hydrocarbon spills on freshwater and saltwater or land applications. Ring spill with booms or pillows before treatment.

  14. Diesel oil

    MedlinePlus

    Various hydrocarbons ... Empyema Many of the most dangerous effects of hydrocarbon (such as diesel oil) poisoning are due to ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 75. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  15. Multi-Hull Flow Visualization: An Investigation of Flow Visualization Techniques for Trimaran Hulls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    flow on the surface of the hulls is boiled linseed oil mixed with artist’s paint. Particle Image Velocimetry is the recommended method for...hulls is boiled linseed oil mixed with artist’s paint. Particle Image Velocimetry is the recommended method for visualizing flow around the hulls...3 Artists’ Paint and Linseed Oil Mixture

  16. Konjac-based oil bulking system for development of improved-lipid pork patties: technological, microbiological and sensory assessment.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Sandoval, Lorena; Cofrades, Susana; Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Carballo, José; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    Improved-lipid pork patties were manufactured following two different reformulation strategies: fat reduction by replacement of pork backfat with konjac gel (KG), and fat reduction/lipid improvement by replacement of pork backfat with an improved oil combination (olive, linseed and fish oils) bulking system based on konjac gel (O-KG). Technological, microbiological and sensory properties were analyzed as affected by the type of formulation and by chilled storage (9days, 2°C). Fat was reduced by between 30 and 86%. In the cases where O-KG was incorporated, 12 and 41% of total fat in patties came from the oil combination. There was no observable effect on color parameters in samples with O-K. Higher KG levels produced harder cooked patties. Animal fat replacement in patties promoted an increase in lipid oxidation, which was more pronounced in samples with an oil combination. In general, during chilled storage no major changes were observed in the studied properties as a result of the different treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of unsaponifiable matter of plant oils and isolation of eight phytosterols by means of high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Markus; Vetter, Walter

    2012-05-11

    Phytosterols are minor components of plant oils. Due to their beneficial effect on human serum cholesterol level, new products supplemented with phytosterols have been marketed. Commercial phytosterol standards are frequently of insufficient purity, very expensive, only available in (semi-) synthetic form or not available at all. For this reason we aimed to explore the unsaponifiable matter of three plant oils (rapeseed oil, linseed oil and olive oil) in order to study their compositions and to purify several phytosterols. We fractionated ∼ 100 mg of the unsaponifiable matter of the plant oils with high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) by the combination of an enrichment step and a purification step. In the first part (enrichment step) composition of phytosterols, alkanes, fatty alcohols from 14:0 to 30:0 including isomers, 15-nonacosanone and other ketones as well as further minor compounds in the different fractions was studied by GC/MS. By means of the solvent system n-hexane/methanol/aqueous silver nitrate solution (34/24/1, v/v/v) in normal phase mode (tail-to-head) β-sitosterol could be isolated (6.4 mg, purity ≥ 99%) and several phytosterols (e.g. citrostadienol, cycloeucalenol and erythrodiol) could be enriched. Moreover, the fast eluting hydrocarbons squalene and nonacosane as well as the later eluting phytol (pure, 7 mg) and geranyl geraniol could also be efficiently enriched. Suited HSCCC fractions from the three plant oils were merged and re-injected into the HSCCC system (purification step). The HSCCC purification step provided 6.9 mg campesterol (≥ 99%), 2.9 mg brassicasterol (≥ 99%), 0.3mg Δ5-avenasterol (≥ 90%), 9.5mg cycloartenol (≥ 90%), 3.7 mg 24-methylene-cycloartanol (≥ 99%), and ∼ 1mg of an unknown compound (∼ 80%) isolated from rapeseed and linseed oil. Furthermore, the combined HSCCC enrichment and purification of a hydrogenated sterol standard provided two pure phytostanols (campestanol ≥ 99% and sitostanol

  18. Tailoring of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) flesh lipid composition and sensory quality by replacing fish oil with a vegetable oil blend.

    PubMed

    Torstensen, Bente E; Bell, J Gordon; Rosenlund, Grethe; Henderson, R James; Graff, Ingvild E; Tocher, Douglas R; Lie, Øyvind; Sargent, John R

    2005-12-28

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) juveniles were fed either 100% fish oil (FO), 75% vegetable oil (VO), or 100% VO throughout their life cycle to harvest weight followed by a finishing diet period when all groups were fed 100% FO. The two experimental VO diets were tested at two different locations (Scotland and Norway) against the same control diet (100% FO). The VO blend was composed of rapeseed oil, palm oil, and linseed oil using capelin oil as a control for fatty acid class compositions. Flesh fatty acid profiles were measured regularly throughout the experiment, with the times of sampling determined by changes in pellet size/lipid content and fish life stage. Growth and mortality rates were not significantly affected by dietary fatty acid compositions throughout the life cycle, except during the seawater winter period in Norway when both growth and protein utilization were increased in salmon fed 100% VO compared to 100% FO. Flesh fatty acid composition was highly influenced by that of the diet, and after the finishing diet period the weekly intake recommendations of very long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (VLCn-3 PUFA) for human health were 80 and 56% satisfied by a 200 g meal of 75% VO and 100% VO flesh, respectively. No effect on flesh astaxanthin levels was observed in relation to changing dietary oil sources. Sensory evaluation showed only minor differences between salmon flesh from the dietary groups, although prior to the finishing diet period, flesh from 100% VO had less rancid and marine characteristics and was preferred over flesh from the other dietary groups by a trained taste panel. After the finishing diet period, the levels of typical vegetable oil fatty acids in flesh were reduced, whereas those of VLCn-3 PUFA increased to levels comparable with a 100% FO fed salmon. No differences in any of the sensory characteristics were observed between dietary groups. By blending VOs to provide balanced levels of dietary fatty acids, up to 100% of

  19. Combusting vegetable oils in diesel engines: the impact of unsaturated fatty acids on particle emissions and mutagenic effects of the exhaust.

    PubMed

    Bünger, Jürgen; Bünger, Jörn F; Krahl, Jürgen; Munack, Axel; Schröder, Olaf; Brüning, Thomas; Hallier, Ernst; Westphal, Götz A

    2016-06-01

    High particle emissions and strong mutagenic effects were observed after combustion of vegetable oil in diesel engines. This study tested the hypothesis that these results are affected by the amount of unsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids of vegetable oils. Four different vegetable oils (coconut oil, CO; linseed oil, LO; palm tree oil, PO; and rapeseed oil, RO) and common diesel fuel (DF) were combusted in a heavy-duty diesel engine. The exhausts were investigated for particle emissions and mutagenic effects in direct comparison with emissions of DF. The engine was operated using the European Stationary Cycle. Particle masses were measured gravimetrically while mutagenicity was determined using the bacterial reverse mutation assay with tester strains TA98 and TA100. Combustion of LO caused the largest amount of total particulate matter (TPM). In comparison with DF, it particularly raised the soluble organic fraction (SOF). RO presented second highest TPM and SOF, followed by CO and PO, which were scarcely above DF. RO revealed the highest number of mutations of the vegetable oils closely followed by LO. PO was less mutagenic, but still induced stronger effects than DF. While TPM and SOF were strongly correlated with the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the vegetable oils, mutagenicity had a significant correlation with the amount of total unsaturated fatty acids. This study supports the hypothesis that numbers of double bounds in unsaturated fatty acids of vegetable oils combusted in diesel engines influence the amount of emitted particles and the mutagenicity of the exhaust. Further investigations have to elucidate the causal relationship.

  20. Myristica oil poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Nutmeg oil; Myristicin ... Myristica oil ( Myristica fragrans ) can be harmful. It comes from the seed of a nutmeg. ... Myristica oil is found in: Aromatherapy products Mace Nutmeg Other products may also contain myristica oil.

  1. Effect of cooking method on the fatty acid content of reduced-fat and PUFA-enriched pork patties formulated with a konjac-based oil bulking system.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Sandoval, Lorena; Cofrades, Susana; Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    The effect of cooking methods (electric grilling and pan-frying in olive oil) on the composition of reduced-fat and reduced-fat/PUFA enriched pork patties was studied. Fat reduction was performed by replacing pork backfat (38% and 100%) with konjac gel and PUFA-enrichment by replacing pork backfat (49%) with a konjac-based oil bulking system stabilizing a healthier oil combination (olive, linseed and fish oils). Cooking losses (13%-27%) were affected (p<0.05) by formulation and cooking procedure. Compared with raw products, cooked samples had higher (p<0.05) concentrations of MUFAs and PUFAs (both n-3 and n-6); the difference was greater (p<0.05) in the pan-fried patties. Fatty acid retention was generally better in pan-fried than in grilled samples. When cooked, the PUFA levels in the medium-fat/improved sample containing the oil bulking system ranged between 1.4 and 1.6g/100g (0.47-0.51 from n-3 PUFAs), with EPA+DHA concentrations of around 75mg/100g. Konjac materials were successfully used to produce pork patties with a better lipid composition. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Growth performance, carcass and meat quality of lambs supplemented with increasing levels of a tanniferous bush (Cistus ladanifer L.) and vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Francisco, A; Dentinho, M T; Alves, S P; Portugal, P V; Fernandes, F; Sengo, S; Jerónimo, E; Oliveira, M A; Costa, P; Sequeira, A; Bessa, R J B; Santos-Silva, J

    2015-02-01

    The effects of dietary inclusion of Cistus ladanifer L. (CL) and a vegetable oil blend were evaluated on growth performance,carcass and meat quality of fifty four lambs that were assigned to 9 diets, corresponding to 3 levels of CL(50, 100 and 200 g/kg DM) and 3 levels of oil inclusion (0, 40 and 80 g/kg DM). Treatments had no effects on growth rate. Oil depressed dry matter intake (P = 0.017), carcass muscle (P = 0.041) and increased (P = 0.016) kidney knob channel fat. Chemical and physical meat quality traits were not affected by treatments. Off-flavour perception was higher for 8% of oil (P b 0.001). The level of 100 g/kg DM of CL inclusion improved meat stability after 7 days of storage. Supplementation with linseed and soybean oils (2:1) was a good approach to improve meat nutritional value from feedlot lambs, increasing total n-3 PUFA.

  3. Science: Oil Slick.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleave, Janice

    2000-01-01

    Presents a science experiment about oil spills and oil pollution for 7th- and 8th-grade science students. This variation on a method used by pollution control experts to clean up oil spills shows students how oil is collected after an oil spill, explaining that with this method, much of the damage from an oil spill can be averted. (SM)

  4. Science: Oil Slick.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleave, Janice

    2000-01-01

    Presents a science experiment about oil spills and oil pollution for 7th- and 8th-grade science students. This variation on a method used by pollution control experts to clean up oil spills shows students how oil is collected after an oil spill, explaining that with this method, much of the damage from an oil spill can be averted. (SM)

  5. Emissions from diesel engines using fatty acid methyl esters from different vegetable oils as blends and pure fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, O.; Munack, A.; Schaak, J.; Pabst, C.; Schmidt, L.; Bünger, J.; Krahl, J.

    2012-05-01

    Biodiesel is used as a neat fuel as well as in blends with mineral diesel fuel. Because of the limited availability of fossil resources, an increase of biogenic compounds in fuels is desired. To achieve this goal, next to rapeseed oil, other sustainably produced vegetable oils can be used as raw materials. These raw materials influence the fuel properties as well as the emissions. To investigate the environmental impact of the exhaust gas, it is necessary to determine regulated and non-regulated exhaust gas components. In detail, emissions of aldehydes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), as well as mutagenicity in the Ames test are of special interest. In this paper emission measurements on a Euro III engine OM 906 of Mercedes-Benz are presented. As fuel vegetable oil methyl esters from various sources and reference diesel fuel were used as well as blends of the vegetable oil methyl esters with diesel fuel. PAH were sampled according to VDI Guideline 3872. The sampling procedure of carbonyls was accomplished using DNPH cartridges coupled with potassium iodide cartridges. The carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions of the tested methyl esters show advantages over DF. The particle mass emissions of methyl esters were likewise lower than those of DF, only linseed oil methyl ester showed higher particle mass emissions. A disadvantage is the use of biodiesel with respect to emissions of nitrogen oxides. They increased depending on the type of methyl ester by 10% to 30%. Emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the results of mutagenicity tests correlate with those of the PM measurements, at which for palm oil methyl ester next to coconut oil methyl ester the lowest emissions were detected. From these results one can formulate a clear link between the iodine number of the ester and the emission behaviour. For blends of biodiesel and diesel fuel, emissions changed linearly with the proportion of biodiesel. However, especially in the non

  6. Vegetable oils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biodiesel is a technically competitive alternative to petroleum-derived diesel fuel. It can be obtained from commodity oils and fats such as soybean, sunflower, canola or tallow. However, the available amounts of these biodiesel feedstocks do not suffice to satisfy the long-term need for biodiesel...

  7. Gas chromatographic, mass spectrometric and stable carbon isotopic investigations of organic residues of plant oils and animal fats employed as illuminants in archaeological lamps from Egypt.

    PubMed

    Copley, M S; Bland, H A; Rose, P; Horton, M; Evershed, R P

    2005-06-01

    Man's use of illuminants in lamps or as torches to extend the working day and range of environments accessible to him would have been a major technological advance in human civilisation. The most obvious evidence for this in the archaeological record comes from pottery and stone vessels showing sooting due to the use of a wick in conjunction with a lipid-based fuel or illuminant. A wide range of potential fuels would have been exploited depending upon availability and burning requirements. Reported herein are the results of chemical investigations of a number of lamps recovered from excavations of the site of Qasr Ibrim, Egypt. Gas chromatographic, mass spectrometric and stable carbon isotopic analyses of both free (solvent extractable) and 'bound'(released from solvent extracted pottery by base treatment) lipids have revealed a wide range of saturated fatty acids, hydroxy fatty acids and alpha, omega-dicarboxylic acids. Examination of the distributions of compounds and comparisons with the fatty acid compositions of modern plant oils have allowed a range of fats and oils to be recognised. Specific illuminants identified include Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) seed oil (most likely radish oil, Raphanus sativus), castor oil (from Ricinus communis), animal fat, with less diagnostic distributions and delta(13)C values being consistent with low stearic acid plant oils, such as linseed (Linum usitatissimum) or sesame (Sesamum indicum) oils. The identifications of the various oils and fats are supported by parallel investigations of illuminant residues produced by burning various oils in replica pottery lamps. The findings are entirely consistent with the classical writers including Strabo, Pliny and Theophrastrus.

  8. Functional genomics reveals increases in cholesterol biosynthetic genes and highly unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis after dietary substitution of fish oil with vegetable oils in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Leaver, Michael J; Villeneuve, Laure AN; Obach, Alex; Jensen, Linda; Bron, James E; Tocher, Douglas R; Taggart, John B

    2008-01-01

    Background There is an increasing drive to replace fish oil (FO) in finfish aquaculture diets with vegetable oils (VO), driven by the short supply of FO derived from wild fish stocks. However, little is known of the consequences for fish health after such substitution. The effect of dietary VO on hepatic gene expression, lipid composition and growth was determined in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), using a combination of cDNA microarray, lipid, and biochemical analysis. FO was replaced with VO, added to diets as rapeseed (RO), soybean (SO) or linseed (LO) oils. Results Dietary VO had no major effect on growth of the fish, but increased the whole fish protein contents and tended to decrease whole fish lipid content, thus increasing the protein:lipid ratio. Expression levels of genes of the highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) and cholesterol biosynthetic pathways were increased in all vegetable oil diets as was SREBP2, a master transcriptional regulator of these pathways. Other genes whose expression was increased by feeding VO included those of NADPH generation, lipid transport, peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation, a marker of intracellular lipid accumulation, and protein and RNA processing. Consistent with these results, HUFA biosynthesis, hepatic β-oxidation activity and enzymic NADPH production were changed by VO, and there was a trend for increased hepatic lipid in LO and SO diets. Tissue cholesterol levels in VO fed fish were the same as animals fed FO, whereas fatty acid composition of the tissues largely reflected those of the diets and was marked by enrichment of 18 carbon fatty acids and reductions in 20 and 22 carbon HUFA. Conclusion This combined gene expression, compositional and metabolic study demonstrates that major lipid metabolic effects occur after replacing FO with VO in salmon diets. These effects are most likely mediated by SREBP2, which responds to reductions in dietary cholesterol. These changes are sufficient to maintain whole body cholesterol

  9. Oil Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-23

    particles are not to 0 be confused with polymer spheres or oxide spheres. The polymer spheres are thought to be the result of polymerization of oil...Contact Fatigue Spall Particles ...... 119 33 Ball Bearing Test Sequence BC (162 Million Revs.) " Friction Polymer ...translucent but often contains thousands of metal particles. Various contaminant polymers such as gasket material and plasticizers are the major sources of

  10. Oil damage

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, R.C.

    1995-03-31

    This book presents the results of a series of studies designed to determine the extent and magnitude of the effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on marine mammals, particularly sea otters. A third of the book focuses on studies that quantify population-level impacts, with much of the remainder focusing on behavioral, pathologic, or toxicologic studies designed to understand how petroleum hydrocarbons negatively affect free ranging marine animals.

  11. Vegetable-oil test

    SciTech Connect

    Suber, H.

    1983-01-01

    A diesel engine was tested using soy oil as fuel. Tests were run using 20%, 50% 75%, and 100% soy oil combined with diesel fuel. Performance dropped somewhat at 75 and 100% soy oil. After media coverage, used soy oil was difficult to obtain. Other problems mentioned are increased carbon buildup, changes in crankcase oil, and odor. (MHR)

  12. Metal stearate distributions in modern artists' oil paints: surface and cross-sectional investigation of reference paint films using conventional and synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Osmond, Gillian; Boon, Jaap J; Puskar, Ljiljana; Drennan, John

    2012-10-01

    Zinc oxide is a prevalent industrial-age pigment that readily reacts with fatty acids in oil-based paints to form zinc carboxylates. Zinc stearate aggregates are associated with deterioration in late nineteenth and twentieth century paintings. The current study uses both conventional and synchrotron Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) to investigate metal carboxylate composition in a range of naturally aged artists' oil paints and reference paint film draw-downs. The paints contain zinc oxide alone or in combination with lead white, titanium white, and aluminum stearate and are prepared with linseed and safflower oils. Attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-FT-IR using the conventional source identifies marked differences in carboxylate profiles between exposed and protected surfaces in a large number of samples. Synchrotron FT-IR microspectroscopy of thin paint cross-sections maps metal carboxylate distributions at high spatial resolution and resolves broad concentration gradients and micrometer-scale phase separation of carboxylate species. Aluminum stearate, a common paint additive, is found to influence the distribution of zinc carboxylates more strongly than pigment composition or oil type. The presence of aluminum stearate results in higher concentrations and more pronounced separation of saturated C16 and C18 chain zinc carboxylates in the margin of paint nearest the polyester substrate. The presence of aluminum stearate in association with zinc oxide has a clear influence on zinc carboxylate formation and distribution, with potential implications for long term stability of vulnerable paintings.

  13. All About Oils

    MedlinePlus

    ... that are liquid at room temperature, like the vegetable oils used in cooking. Oils come from many different ... many animal foods and can be made from vegetable oils through a process called hydrogenation. Some common fats ...

  14. Exploring Oil Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses damages of oil tanker spillage to the marine organisms and scientists' research in oil pollution removal techniques. Included is a list of learning activities concerning the causes and effects of oil pollution and methods of solving the problem. (CC)

  15. Turpentine oil poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Turpentine oil comes from a substance in pine trees. Turpentine oil poisoning occurs when someone swallows turpentine oil or breathes in the fumes. Breathing these fumes on purpose is sometimes called " ...

  16. Exploring Oil Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses damages of oil tanker spillage to the marine organisms and scientists' research in oil pollution removal techniques. Included is a list of learning activities concerning the causes and effects of oil pollution and methods of solving the problem. (CC)

  17. Rheology of Structured Oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelbaliev, G. I.; Rasulov, S. R.; Rzaev, A. G.; Mustafaeva, G. R.

    2017-07-01

    Rheological models of structured oils are proposed and compared with available experimental data on oils from different deposits. It is shown that structured oils can possess properties of Bingham and power-law non-Newtonian fluids.

  18. 21 CFR 176.210 - Defoaming agents used in the manufacture of paper and paperboard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... therefrom: Beef tallow. Castor oil. Coconut oil. Corn oil. Cottonseed oil. Fish oil. Lard oil. Linseed oil. Mustardseed oil. Palm oil. Peanut oil. Rapeseed oil. Ricebran oil. Soybean oil. Sperm oil. Tall oil. (2) Fatty triglycerides, and marine oils, and the fatty acids and......

  19. Effects of fish oil replacement by vegetable oil blend on digestive enzymes and tissue histomorphology of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) juveniles.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carolina; Couto, Ana; Pérez-Jiménez, Amalia; Serra, Cláudia R; Díaz-Rosales, Patricia; Fernandes, Rui; Corraze, Geneviève; Panserat, Stéphane; Oliva-Teles, Aires

    2016-02-01

    The impact of replacing circa 70% fish oil (FO) by a vegetable oil (VO) blend (rapeseed, linseed, palm oils; 20:50:30) in diets for European sea bass juveniles (IBW 96 ± 0.8 g) was evaluated in terms of activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, lipase, alkaline phosphatase, trypsin and total alkaline proteases) in the anterior (AI) and posterior (PI) intestine and tissue morphology (pyloric caeca-PC, AI, PI, distal intestine-DI and liver). For that purpose, fish were fed the experimental diets for 36 days and then liver and intestine were sampled at 2, 6 and 24 h after the last meal. Alkaline protease characterization was also done in AI and PI at 6 h post-feeding. Dietary VO promoted higher alkaline phosphatase activity at 2 h post-feeding in the AI and at all sampling points in the PI. Total alkaline protease activity was higher at 6 h post-feeding in the PI of fish fed the FO diet. Identical number of bands was observed in zymograms of alkaline proteases of fish fed both diets. No alterations in the histomorphology of PC, AI, PI or DI were noticed in fish fed the VO diets, while in the liver a tendency towards increased hepatocyte vacuolization due to lipid accumulation was observed. Overall, and with the exception of a higher intestine alkaline phosphatase activity, 70% FO replacement by a VO blend in diets for European sea bass resulted in no distinctive alterations on the postprandial pattern of digestive enzyme activities and intestine histomorphology.

  20. Desulfurization of Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils and alkali. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, Ruozhi

    1997-05-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an inexpensive method to remove organic sulfur from pyrite-free and mineral-free coal using base, air, and readily available farm products. This is accomplished by treating coals with impregnating coals with polyunsaturated offs, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover, the oils are environmentally safe; they produce no noxious products and improve burning qualities of the solid products. IBC-108 coal, (contains only 0.4% pyrite and 2.7% organic sulfur) was first treated with Na{sub 4}OH at two different concentrations and four different times, and with NH{sub 4}OH at two different concentrations and two different temperatures. Pretreating IBC-108 coal with bases removes 13% to 23% of the sulfur, and NaOH is a better treatment than NH{sub 4}OH in most of the experiments. Higher temperatures, higher base concentrations, and longer treatment times remove more sulfur. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is more effective than NaOH for oil extraction after the oil treatment. To test for effectiveness of sulfur removal, eight coal samples were treated with NaOH (two concentrations at four different times) were further treated with linseed oil at three temperatures, four different times, and two oil to coal ratios. The combination of NaOH pretreatment, then oil treatment, followed by Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} extraction, removes 23% to 50% of the sulfur. The best result is achieved by pretreating with 5% NaOH for 20 hr (23% sulfur removal) followed by oil treatment at 100{degrees}C for 5 hr with a 1:1 oil to coal ratio (50% sulfur removal in total). More sulfur is removed with a 1:1 oil to coal ratio than a 1:10 ratio under most conditions.

  1. Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

    1994-03-29

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

  2. Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

  3. Oil Fires and Oil Slick, Kuwait

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-05-06

    STS039-87-012 (28 April-6 May 1991) --- A handheld 70mm camera onboard the Space Shuttle Discovery exposed this infrared frame showing oil fires near the Kuwait coast as well as south-bound oil slicks in the Gulf. Pools of oil on the land are recognized as white objects near the burning wells.

  4. [MICROBIAL DESTRUCTION MINERAL (OIL) MOTOR OIL].

    PubMed

    Homenko, L A; Nogina, T M

    2015-01-01

    In a review information is presented about composition of mineral motor oils and their negative impact on the environment and the ability of microorganisms, in particular actinobacteria, to assimilate hydrocarbon oil components. The role of bacteria is described in the process of cleaning up polluted environments motor oils and the prospect of their use in biotechnology, environmental clean-up of these pollutants.

  5. Non-Petroleum Oils

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These include synthetics such as silicone fluids and tung oils, wood-derivative oils such as resin/rosin, animal fats/oil, and seed oils. Many have similar physical properties to petroleum-based, such as water insolubility and formation of slicks.

  6. Vegetable oil fuel standards

    SciTech Connect

    Pryde, E.H.

    1982-01-01

    Suggested standards for vegetable oils and ester fuels, as well as ASTM specifications for No. 2 diesel oil are given. The following physical properties were discussed: cetane number, cloud point, distillation temperatures, flash point, pour point, turbidity, viscosity, free fatty acids, iodine value, phosphorus, and wax. It was apparent that vegetable oils and their esters cannot meet ASTM specifications D975 for No. 2 diesel oil for use in the diesel engine. Vegetable oil modification or engine design modification may make it possible eventually for vegetable oils to become suitable alternative fuels. Vegetable oils must be recognized as experimental fuels until modifications have been tested thoroughly and generally accepted. 1 table. (DP)

  7. Direct use of sunflower oil as a heating oil

    SciTech Connect

    Karaosmanoglu, F.; Kurt, G.

    1998-11-01

    Vegetable oils in particular have exceptional importance since they can be used as a fuel oil (heating oil type) alternative. In this research evaluation, the possibilities of sunflower oil as a heating oil candidate have been investigated. The fuel oil property tests of sunflower oil were performed according to standard methods. An overall evaluation of data indicates that sunflower oil can be proposed as a possible substitute for heating oil.

  8. Growth performance, carcass traits, meat chemical composition and blood serum metabolites of broiler chicken fed on diets containing flaxseed oil.

    PubMed

    Lopes, D C N; Xavier, E G; Santos, V L; Gonçalves, F M; Anciuti, M A; Roll, V F B; Del Pino, F A B; Feijó, J O; Catalan, A A S

    2013-01-01

    1. This study evaluated the effects of diets with partial and total substitution of soya bean oil (SO) with flaxseed (linseed) oil (FO) on broiler chicken performance, carcass traits, meat chemical composition and blood serum metabolites. 2. A total of 448 one-d-old Cobb 500 broiler chicken were used. They were allotted among 4 treatments with 8 replications, using a completely randomised design, for 35 d. Four diets were compared: T1 = 100% SO (3%, 1-7 d; 4%, 8-21 d; and 5%, 22-35 d); T2 = 50% SO + 50% FO; T3 = 25% SO + 75% FO and T4 = 100% FO. 3. No significant differences were observed in body weight (BW), body weight gain (BWG), feed intake (FI), feed conversion ratio (FCR) and blood serum metabolites (total triglycerides, TRI; total cholesterol, CHO; high-density lipoprotein, HDL; low-density lipoprotein, LDL; glucose, GLU; albumin, ALB; globulin, GLO; and total proteins, TPs). Significant effects were observed for TRI, CHO, HDL, GLU, HDL, LDL, ALB and GLO with regard to the day of collection. 4. Carcass traits did not show significant differences for the treatments. No significant differences were observed for breast and drumstick chemical compositions, with the exception of drumstick fat concentration (quadratic effect). 5. In conclusion, the partial or total substitution of SO with FO did not affect growth performance, carcass traits, meat chemical composition or blood serum profile in broiler chicken. Therefore, FO can be an alternative to SO in the diet formulation for broiler chicken.

  9. Protection of polyunsaturated oils against ruminal biohydrogenation and oxidation during storage using a polyphenol oxidase containing extract from red clover.

    PubMed

    Gadeyne, F; Van Ranst, G; Vlaeminck, B; Vossen, E; Van der Meeren, P; Fievez, V

    2015-03-15

    Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) are to a large extent subject to biohydrogenation in a ruminal environment, which results to the healthy value of these PUFA being lost upon dietary addition to ruminants. PUFA are also prone to lipid oxidation upon storage. Therefore, it was tested whether emulsions could be protected against in vitro ruminal biohydrogenation and oxidation during storage by using protein extracts rich in polyphenol oxidase, an enzyme responsible for browning of plant tissues. PUFA rich emulsions were made with a protein extract from red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) before adding a synthetic diphenol (4-methylcatechol) to induce protection. Results after in vitro incubation confirmed the hypothesis and indicated the potential to prevent PUFA in linseed or fish oil from ruminal biohydrogenation and oxidation during storage through addition of 4-methylcatechol to the emulsions. Protection depended on the amount of oil present and protein concentrations in the emulsions. Protection efficiency increased with increasing the amounts of diphenol present in the emulsion per unit interfacial surface area. It is suggested that protection is caused by an effective encapsulation by cross-linking of the protein layer at the emulsion interface. For the first time, a method is described to protect PUFA using an enzyme abundantly available in nature, polyphenol oxidase, in combination with 4-methylcatechol.

  10. Sesamin modulation of lipid class and fatty acid profile in early juvenile teleost, Lates calcarifer, fed different dietary oils.

    PubMed

    Alhazzaa, Ramez; Bridle, Andrew R; Carter, Chris G; Nichols, Peter D

    2012-10-15

    Sesamin, a major sesame seed lignan, has diverse biological functions including the modulation of molecular actions in lipid metabolic pathways and reducing cholesterol levels. Vertebrates have different capacities to biosynthesize long-chain PUFA from dietary precursors and sesamin can enhance the biosynthesis of ALA to EPA and DHA in marine teleost. Early juvenile barramundi, Lates calcarifer, were fed for two weeks on diets rich in ALA or SDA derived from linseed or Echium plantagineum, respectively. Both diets contained phytosterols and less cholesterol compared with a standard fish oil-based diet. The growth rates were reduced in the animals receiving sesamin regardless of the dietary oil. However, the relative levels of n-3 LC-PUFA in total lipid, but not the phospholipid, increased in the whole body by up to 25% in animals fed on sesamin with ALA or SDA. Sesamin reduced the relative levels of triacylglycerols and increased polar lipid, and did not affect the relative composition of phospholipid subclasses or sterols. Sesamin is a potent modulator for LC-PUFA biosynthesis in animals, but probably will have more effective impact at advanced ages. By modulating certain lipid metabolic pathways, sesamin has probably disrupted the body growth and development of organs and tissues in early juvenile barramundi.

  11. Tea tree oil.

    PubMed

    Hartford, Orville; Zug, Kathryn A

    2005-09-01

    Tea tree oil is a popular ingredient in many over-the-counter healthcare and cosmetic products. With the explosion of the natural and alternative medicine industry, more and more people are using products containing tea tree oil. This article reviews basic information about tea tree oil and contact allergy, including sources of tea tree oil, chemical composition, potential cross reactions, reported cases of allergic contact dermatitis, allergenic compounds in tea tree oil, practical patch testing information, and preventive measures.

  12. Oil spill contingency planning

    SciTech Connect

    Kip, S.H. )

    1988-01-01

    Oil spill contingency planning is an essential feature required in present day activities involving oil and gas exploration, production and transportation. A well through out continency plan will not only eliminate or minimize the sense of panic, normally associated with oil spill emergency, but also can minimize damage and cost involved. Oil spill contingency planning is a process of predetermining a response to an oil spill emergency. The process of preparing a contingency plan is discussed in this paper.

  13. A novel method for the determination of some pesticides in vegetable oils based on dissociation extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zayats, Mikhail F; Leschev, Sergey M; Zayats, Marina A

    2016-08-01

    The distribution of 40 pesticides of basic nature in different extraction systems was studied at 20 ± 1°C. The distribution constants (P) and distribution ratios (D) between n-hexane and polar phases are calculated. It was found that the studied pesticides are most fully and selectively extracted from hexane and vegetable oils by solutions of perchloric acid in acetonitrile. In particular, the acidification of acetonitrile decreases the D-value of fenpropimorph by 29,000 times. This phenomenon was used for the development of an improved technique for the quantitative analysis of widely used pesticides of basic nature in rapeseed, linseed, sunflower and olive oils by GC-MS. The proposed approach allows obtaining much purer sample extracts, compared with the use of standard solvent extraction with further purification by the freezing-out technique. This approach expands the range of pesticides (flutriafol, fenpropidine, metazachlor, cyprodinil and others) that can be determined by GC-MS. The recovery values of the studied pesticides from vegetable oils were between 85% and 115% with RSD values below 10%. The obtained limits of detection ranged from 0.001 to 0.1 mg kg(-)(1), and are below or equal to the maximum residue levels (MRLs) set by the European Union for the corresponding pesticides.

  14. Theoretical and Kinetic Tools for Selecting Effective Antioxidants: Application to the Protection of Omega-3 Oils with Natural and Synthetic Phenols

    PubMed Central

    Guitard, Romain; Nardello-Rataj, Véronique; Aubry, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Radical-scavenging antioxidants play crucial roles in the protection of unsaturated oils against autoxidation and, especially, edible oils rich in omega-3 because of their high sensitivity to oxygen. Two complementary tools are employed to select, among a large set of natural and synthetic phenols, the most promising antioxidants. On the one hand, density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) of 70 natural (i.e., tocopherols, hydroxybenzoic and cinnamic acids, flavonoids, stilbenes, lignans, and coumarins) and synthetic (i.e., 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT), 3-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisol (BHA), and tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ)) phenols. These BDEs are discussed on the basis of structure–activity relationships with regard to their potential antioxidant activities. On the other hand, the kinetic rate constants and number of hydrogen atoms released per phenol molecule are measured by monitoring the reaction of phenols with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH•) radical. The comparison of the results obtained with these two complementary methods allows highlighting the most promising antioxidants. Finally, the antioxidant effectiveness of the best candidates is assessed by following the absorption of oxygen by methyl esters of linseed oil containing 0.5 mmol L−1 of antioxidant and warmed at 90 °C under oxygen atmosphere. Under these conditions, some natural phenols namely epigallocatechin gallate, myricetin, rosmarinic and carnosic acids were found to be more effective antioxidants than α-tocopherol. PMID:27483242

  15. Characterization of triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol composition of plant oils using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Holcapek, Michal; Jandera, Pavel; Zderadicka, Petr; Hrubá, Lucie

    2003-08-29

    Triacylglycerols (TGs) and diacylglycerols (DGs) in 16 plant oil samples (hazelnut, pistachio, poppy-seed, almond, palm, Brazil-nut, rapeseed, macadamia, soyabean, sunflower, linseed, Dracocephalum moldavica, evening primrose, corn, amaranth, Silybum arianum) were analyzed by HPLC-MS with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and UV detection at 205 nm on two Nova-Pak C18 chromatographic columns connected in series. A single chromatographic column and non-aqueous ethanol-acetonitrile gradient system was used as a compromise between the analysis time and the resolution for the characterization of TG composition of five plant oils. APCI mass spectra were applied for the identification of all TGs and other acylglycerols. The isobaric positional isomers can be distinguished on the basis of different relative abundances of the fragment ions formed by preferred losses of the fatty acid from sn-1(3) positions compared to the sn-2 position. Excellent chromatographic resolution and broad retention window together with APCI mass spectra enabled positive identification of TGs containing fatty acids with odd numbers of carbon atoms such as margaric (C17:0) and heptadecanoic (C17:1) acids. The general fragmentation patterns of TGs in both APCI and electrospray ionization mass spectra were proposed on the basis of MSn spectra measured with an ion trap analyzer. The relative concentrations of particular TGs in the analyzed plant oils were estimated on the basis of relative peak areas measured with UV detection at 205 nm.

  16. Theoretical and Kinetic Tools for Selecting Effective Antioxidants: Application to the Protection of Omega-3 Oils with Natural and Synthetic Phenols.

    PubMed

    Guitard, Romain; Nardello-Rataj, Véronique; Aubry, Jean-Marie

    2016-07-29

    Radical-scavenging antioxidants play crucial roles in the protection of unsaturated oils against autoxidation and, especially, edible oils rich in omega-3 because of their high sensitivity to oxygen. Two complementary tools are employed to select, among a large set of natural and synthetic phenols, the most promising antioxidants. On the one hand, density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) of 70 natural (i.e., tocopherols, hydroxybenzoic and cinnamic acids, flavonoids, stilbenes, lignans, and coumarins) and synthetic (i.e., 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT), 3-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisol (BHA), and tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ)) phenols. These BDEs are discussed on the basis of structure-activity relationships with regard to their potential antioxidant activities. On the other hand, the kinetic rate constants and number of hydrogen atoms released per phenol molecule are measured by monitoring the reaction of phenols with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(•)) radical. The comparison of the results obtained with these two complementary methods allows highlighting the most promising antioxidants. Finally, the antioxidant effectiveness of the best candidates is assessed by following the absorption of oxygen by methyl esters of linseed oil containing 0.5 mmol L(-1) of antioxidant and warmed at 90 °C under oxygen atmosphere. Under these conditions, some natural phenols namely epigallocatechin gallate, myricetin, rosmarinic and carnosic acids were found to be more effective antioxidants than α-tocopherol.

  17. Evaluation of changes in lipid peroxidation, ROS production, surface structures, secondary metabolites and yield of linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) under individual and combined stress of ultraviolet-B and ozone using open top chambers.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ruchika; Agrawal, S B

    2013-08-01

    The individual and interactive effects of supplemental UV-B (sUV-B) (ambient + 7.2 kJ m(-2) d(-1)) and elevated O3 (ambient + 10 ppb) were evaluated under field conditions using open top chambers on two cultivars, Padmini and T-397 of linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.). Mean monthly surface level of O3 concentrations varied from 27.7 ppb to 59.0 ppb during the experimental period. Both UV-B and O03 induced the production of ROS (H2O2 and O2*-), resulting in significant damage of membranes due to lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage. Synthesis of secondary metabolites (flavonoids, anthocyanin, lignin and wax) was also enhanced in all the treatments, whereas biomass and yield were reduced. Alterations in frequency of stomata and wax distribution were also observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cultivar Padmini was found to be more sensitive because of higher damage of membrane vis-a-vis reduction in biomass and seed yield. However, concentrations of flavonoids, anthocyanin, lignin and wax were higher in T-397, suggesting its relative resistance against applied stress. Combined exposure of sUV-B and O3 was less harmful, as compared to their individual treatment. Among the three treatments, O3 was found to be more detrimental for overall growth and sUV-B for economic yield.

  18. Marine oil seeps

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons of both biogenic and thermogenic origin are common constituents of the marine water column and sediment of the continental shelves. Approximately 0.25 million metric tons of oil per year, constituting about 8% of the oil input into the sea, is derived from natural seeps, the rest being anthropogenic. Seepage has occurred world-wide for millions of years and must have been many times greater in the past, when enormous oil deposits, such as the Orinoco Oil Belt, were first exposed to erosion. Although the amount varies from site to site with time, seepage is pervasive in polar and temperate seas. Marine-seep oil is intensely weathered and thus can be distinguished chemically from recent biogenic or undegraded crude oil. The degraded oil from seeps appears to have little deleterious effect on many marine organisms, which ingest and discharge the oil mostly unmetabolized. Chemical analyses suggest that a very large oil-rich layer in the Sargasso Sea originated from a large and as yet undetected seep. Oil seeps have long been used as guides for oil exploration onshore but have been underutilized for this purpose offshore because of oil-plume drift from the site of the seep and because natural oil slicks may be masked by spilled oil. At least one marine seep, in the Santa Barbara Channel, California, is producing oil and natural gas into two hollow steel pyramids from which the oil is collected by work boats and the natural gas is transported to shore by pipeline. This facility effectively reduces atmospheric pollution, controls marine oil pollution from the largest seep in the area, provides emission credits, and yields a modest economic benefit, but the seep is not known to have been used directly in oil exploration.

  19. Base Oils from Petroleum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, R. J.

    The source, composition and suitability of crude oils for base oil production are reviewed. The physical and chemical properties of alkanes, naphthenes and aromatics and their characteristics for lubricant applications are examined. Properties and applications of various base oils are defined and specified. Production of conventional mineral oils is described, including the various processes to remove wax and other deleterious substances, followed by increasingly severe hydrogenation to produce base oils of increased quality and performance. The API categorization of mineral base oils, either direct from the refinery or after hydrotreatment of increasing severity, is described, together with sub-categories.

  20. Bio-Friendly Alternatives for Xylene - Carrot oil, Olive oil, Pine oil, Rose oil.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Sugunakar Raju Godishala; Nandan, Surapaneni Rateesh Kumar; Kulkarni, Pavan G; Rao, Thokala Madhusudan; Palakurthy, Pavan

    2015-11-01

    Xylene is a flammable liquid with characteristic petroleum or aromatic odours, it is miscible with most of the organic solvents and paraffin wax. Xylene clears tissues rapidly and renders transparency, facilitating clearing endpoint determination, this made it to be used as a clearing agent in routine histopathological techniques. Even though it is a good clearing agent, it causes damage to the tissues by its hardening effect particularly those fixed in non-protein coagulant fixatives. Apart from these tissue effects, it has severe, long lasting ill effects on health of technicians and pathologists when exposed to longer duration. Hence in order to overcome these effects and replace xylene with a safe alternative agent, the present study was carried out to assess the clearing ability and bio-friendly nature of four different natural oils i.e., Carrot oil, Olive oil, Pine oil and Rose oil in comparison with that of Xylene. According to Bernoulli's principle of fluid dynamics, to decrease viscosity of these oils and increase penetration into tissues for rapid clearing hot-air oven technique was used. To assess:1) Clearing ability and bio-friendly nature of four different oils i.e., Carrot oil, Olive oil, Pine oil, Rose oil in comparison with that of xylene, 2) Application of Bernoulli's principle of fluid dynamics in rapid clearing of tissues by using hot-air oven. Forty different formalin fixed tissue samples were taken. Each sample of tissue was cut into 5 bits (40x5=200 total bits) which were subjected for dehydration in differential alcohol gradients. Later, each bit is kept in 4 different oils such as Carrot oil, Olive oil, Pine oil, Rose oil and xylene and transferred into hot-air oven. Further routine steps of processing, sectioning and staining were done. Individual sections cleared in four different oils were assessed for cellular architecture, staining quality and a comparison was done between them. Results showed that all the four oils had ability to clear

  1. Libyan oil industry

    SciTech Connect

    Waddams, F.C.

    1980-01-01

    Three aspects of the growth and progress of Libya's oil industry since the first crude oil discovery in 1961 are: (1) relations between the Libyan government and the concessionary oil companies; (2) the impact of Libyan oil and events in Libya on the petroleum markets of Europe and the world; and (3) the response of the Libyan economy to the development of its oil industry. The historical review begins with Libya's becoming a sovereign nation in 1951 and traces its subsequent development into a position as a leading world oil producer. 54 references, 10 figures, 55 tables.

  2. Butter, margarine, and cooking oils

    MedlinePlus

    ... margarine are not the best choices. Choose liquid vegetable oils or margarines made from these oils when possible. ... over harder stick forms. Choose margarines with liquid vegetable oil, such as olive oil, as the first ingredient. ...

  3. EPA OIL FIELD SOLUTION

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technical product bulletin: aka HYDRO-CLEAN, GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANER, AWAN PRA, this surface washing agent for oil spill cleanups is sprayed full strength on oiled rocky surfaces at shorelines, mangroves, and seagrasses. Allow at least 30 minute soak.

  4. Mineral oil overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Mineral oil is not very poisonous, and recovery is likely. How well someone does depends on the amount of mineral oil swallowed and how quickly treatment is received. The faster medical help is given, the ...

  5. South American oil

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    GAO reviewed the petroleum industries of the following eight South American Countries that produce petroleum but are not major exporters: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago. This report discusses the amount of crude oil the United States imports from the eight countries, expected crude oil production for these countries through the year 2010, and investment reforms that these countries have recently made in their petroleum industries. In general, although the United States imports some oil from these countries, as a group, the eight countries are currently net oil importers because combined domestic oil consumption exceeds oil production. Furthermore, the net oil imports are expected to continue to increase through the year 2010, making it unlikely that the United States will obtain increased oil shipments from these countries.

  6. Eucalyptus oil poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, S; Wiggins, J

    1980-01-01

    Accidental ingestion of eucalyptus oil by a 3-year-old boy caused profound central nervous system depression within 30 minutes, but he recovered rapidly after gastric lavage. The extreme toxicity of eucalyptus oil is emphasised. PMID:7436478

  7. Groundnut (Peanut) Oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut oil is valued worldwide, primarily as a cooking medium and food ingredient. This chapter provides timely summaries and discussions on the latest compositional, physical and nutritional data for peanut oil....

  8. Vegetable Oil-Biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Pudel, Frank; Wiesen, Sebastian

    2017-03-07

    Conventional vegetable oil mills are complex plants, processing oil, fruits, or seeds to vegetable fats and oils of high quality and predefined properties. Nearly all by-products are used. However, most of the high valuable plant substances occurring in oil fruits or seeds besides the oil are used only in low price applications (proteins as animal feeding material) or not at all (e.g., phenolics). This chapter describes the state-of-the-art of extraction and use of oilseed/oil fruit proteins and phyto-nutrients in order to move from a conventional vegetable oil processing plant to a proper vegetable oil-biorefinery producing a wide range of different high value bio-based products.

  9. Oil separator device

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, S.J.

    1982-03-02

    An oil separator device for use in a crankcase ventilation system of an internal combustion engine. The device comprises a cannister having an internal baffle member and partition means defining therewith an oil laden fume inlet chamber, an oil separating chamber and a fume outlet chamber. Oil laden fumes enter the fume inlet chamber where they are directed by the baffle member to a first 180* volute section of the oil separating chamber and then to a second 180* volute section having a smaller radius of curvature than the first section to thereby produce a vortex region adjacent to the center of the second volute section. Gaseous fluid with oil removed flows upwardly out of the oil separating chamber into the fume outlet chamber through a flue aperture in the partition at a location above the vortex region while separated oil is returned to the engine lubrication system through a drain aperture in the bottom of the cannister.

  10. OIL SOLUTIONS POWDER

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technical product bulletin: aka OIL SOLUTIONS POWDER, SPILL GREEN LS, this miscellaneous oil spill control agent used in cleanups initially behaves like a synthetic sorbent, then as a solidifier as the molecular microencapsulating process occurs.

  11. Oil fence arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, I.; Tatsuguchi, M.

    1984-01-10

    An oil fence arrangement for effectively preventing oil spills from spreading or diffusing over the surface of the sea. The arrangement is of a double wall construction and can fold into a small space.

  12. Manitoba oil activity review, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Annual review is presented of Manitoba Crown oil and gas dispositions, mineral owner leasing and revenue, geophysical and drilling activity, areas of activity, oil production and markets, oil prices, value of production, provincial revenue from oil production, surface owners, spills and reclamation, municipal taxes, the Manitoba Drilling Incentive Program, oil reserves, oil industry expenditures, and industry employment. Highlights of the current year are included.

  13. Automotive gear oil lubricant from soybean oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of lubricants that are based on renewable materials is rapidly increasing. Vegetable oils have good lubricity, wear protection and low volatility which are desired properties for automotive gear lubricant applications. Soybean oil is used widely in the lubricant industry due to its properti...

  14. Vegetable oils for tractors

    SciTech Connect

    Moroney, M.

    1981-11-14

    Preliminary tests by the Agricultural Institute, show that tractors can be run on a 50:50 rape oil-diesel mixture or on pure rape oil. In fact, engine power actually increased slightly with the 50:50 blend but decreased fractionally with pure rape oil. Research at the North Dakota State University on using sunflower oil as an alternative to diesel fuel is also noted.

  15. SRC Residual fuel oils

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, Krishna C.; Foster, Edward P.

    1985-01-01

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  16. Oil-futures markets

    SciTech Connect

    Prast, W.G.; Lax, H.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book on oil futures trading takes a look at a market and its various hedging strategies. Growing interest in trading of commodity futures has spread to petroleum, including crude oil, and key refined products such as gasoline and heating oil. This book describes how the international petroleum trade is structured, examines the working of oil futures markets in the United States and the United Kingdom, and assesses the possible courses of further developments.

  17. Crude oil desulfurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Hsu, G. C.; Ernest, J. B. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High sulfur crude oil is desulfurized by a low temperature (25-80 C.) chlorinolysis at ambient pressure in the absence of organic solvent or diluent but in the presence of water (water/oil=0.3) followed by a water and caustic wash to remove sulfur and chlorine containing reaction products. The process described can be practiced at a well site for the recovery of desulfurized oil used to generate steam for injection into the well for enhanced oil recovery.

  18. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1999-01-12

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

  19. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow S.

    1999-01-12

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

  20. Natural oils as lubricants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is currently an availability of vegetable oil lubricants, with the exception of engine oils. Vegetable oils are environmentally friendly, renewable, contribute to the reduction of our dependence on imported petroleum, and add value to the farmer. However, there are inherent weaknesses in veg...

  1. Oil Spill Cleanup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauble, Christena Ann

    2011-01-01

    Several classroom activities using a model of a seashore and an oil spill demonstrate the basic properties of oil spills in oceans. Students brainstorm about how to best clean up the mess. They work in teams, and after agreeing on how they will proceed, their method is tested by measuring the amount of oil removed and by rating the cleanliness of…

  2. Enhanced oil recovery update

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.V

    1989-03-01

    Technology continues to grow in the realm of enhanced oil recovery. Since 1950 several processes have proven economic for oil recovery. Others are still in their infancy and must be custom designed for each reservoir. This paper gives a general overview of these processes. The author focuses on the latest technology and the outlook for enhanced oil recovery operations.

  3. Secondary oil system

    SciTech Connect

    Borre, R.J. Jr.

    1991-09-10

    This patent describes a gas turbine engine. It comprises a source of compressed air, a rotor bearing in a bearing sump of the engine, and a primary oil system for lubricating the rotor bearing with oil at a primary oil system pressure when the engine is operating normally, a secondary oil system comprising: a reservoir in the bearing sump, means defining an oil inlet between the primary oil system and the reservoir for filling the reservoir with oil from the primary oil system, a mist tube in the reservoir having a first end connected to the compressed air source and a second end connected to a secondary oil system nozzle in the bearing sump, means defining a first orifice in the mist tube at a first elevation relative to the bottom of the reservoir and above the elevation of the secondary oil system nozzle relative to the bottom of the reservoir, means defining a pick-up tube for conducting oil from the reservoir near the bottom thereof to the first orifice, a shut-off valve means in the mist tube between the first orifice and the first end of the mist tube responsive to the primary system oil pressure to block the mist tube.

  4. Why Big Bad Oil?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olien, Diana Davids; Olien, Roger M.

    1996-01-01

    Investigates the negative and hostile public opinion towards the oil industry, in general, and Standard Oil, in particular. Discovers that those most responsible for criticizing Standard Oil had an economic interest in doing so. Defends the company's record and refutes its critics' charges. (MJP)

  5. On experimental oil spills

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, D.; Thornton, D. E.; Blackall, P. J.; Sergy, G. S.; Snow, N.; Hume, H.

    1980-09-01

    Experimental oil spills are an essential component of overall oil pollution research efforts. However, such experiments must be carefully designed and coordinated in order to cull the most information possible. Physical, biological, and ecological impacts must be examined simultaneously. Long-term monitoring of the multidisciplinary effects of experimental oil spills is recommended.

  6. Oil Spill Cleanup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauble, Christena Ann

    2011-01-01

    Several classroom activities using a model of a seashore and an oil spill demonstrate the basic properties of oil spills in oceans. Students brainstorm about how to best clean up the mess. They work in teams, and after agreeing on how they will proceed, their method is tested by measuring the amount of oil removed and by rating the cleanliness of…

  7. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  8. Oil-eating microbes control oil slicks

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, J. )

    1992-04-01

    Researchers with Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (LMSC) have demonstrated a new environmentally safe method that uses a naturally occurring seawater microbe, powdered clay, and fertilizer to contain and break down oil spills. The philosophy is to accelerate nature and use natural organisms to break down the oil. While the concept of using oil-eating microbes is not new, this process involves applying a powdered clay, called Petro-Lock, to the slick to coagulate the oil and prevent it from sinking. The microbe, Marine-D, is applied with a nitrogen-based fertilizer to begin digesting the oil. The fertilizer provides nutrients for the microbes, which secrete a fatty acid that can be eaten by plankton. When the microbes have digested all of the oil, they die, sink to the ocean floor, and decompose. Bench and large scale testing results indicate that the microbes digest about 75% of the oil after 36 days. Further testing will incorporate wave action and will simulate deep-water and beach conditions.

  9. Oil shale commercialization study

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, M.M.

    1981-09-01

    Ninety four possible oil shale sections in southern Idaho were located and chemically analyzed. Sixty-two of these shales show good promise of possible oil and probable gas potential. Sixty of the potential oil and gas shales represent the Succor Creek Formation of Miocene age in southwestern Idaho. Two of the shales represent Cretaceous formations in eastern Idaho, which should be further investigated to determine their realistic value and areal extent. Samples of the older Mesozonic and paleozoic sections show promise but have not been chemically analyzed and will need greater attention to determine their potential. Geothermal resources are of high potential in Idaho and are important to oil shale prospects. Geothermal conditions raise the geothermal gradient and act as maturing agents to oil shale. They also might be used in the retorting and refining processes. Oil shales at the surface, which appear to have good oil or gas potential should have much higher potential at depth where the geothermal gradient is high. Samples from deep petroleum exploration wells indicate that the succor Creek shales have undergone considerable maturation with depth of burial and should produce gas and possibly oil. Most of Idaho's shales that have been analyzed have a greater potential for gas than for oil but some oil potential is indicated. The Miocene shales of the Succor Creek Formation should be considered as gas and possibly oil source material for the future when technology has been perfectes. 11 refs.

  10. Political economy of oil

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    A nontechnical discussion of the political economy of the world oil market is intended to inform the beginning student as well as serve as a reference book. Beginning with definitions and an explanation of units, the text covers the world economy, oil supply, oil prices, oil consumption and non-oil energy materials supplies, oil companies, macroeconomics, and the market in an effort to relate both macro- and microeconomic phenomena. Professor Banks feels that population is the most crucial factor in economics today, followed by nonfuel minerals and energy; the technical problems pertaining to energy, however, can be managed if the first two are faced and dealt with. He thinks the outlook is good for replacing oil with other energy sources. 143 references, 23 figures, 26 tables. (DKC)

  11. Oil degradation in soil.

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, R L; Hudson, J O; Jamison, V W

    1976-01-01

    The environmental effects of adding certain selected petroleum products to field soils at widely separated geographical locations under optimum conditions for biodegradation were studied. The locations selected for study of soil biodegradation of six oils (used crankcase oil from cars, used crankcase oil from trucks, an Arabian Heavy crude oil, a Coastal Mix crude oil, a home heating oil no. 2, and a residual fuel oil no. 6) were Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania, Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Corpus Christi, Texas. The investigative process, covering a period of 1 year at each location, was conducted in 14 fields plots (1.7 by 3.0 m) to which the oils were added in a single application at a rate of 11.9 m3/4 X 10(3) m2. One-half of the plots at each location were fertilized, and the incorporation of the oils and fertilizers was accomplished with rototillers to a depth of 10 to 15 cm. Concentrations of all oils decreased significantly at all locations. The average reduction ranged from 48.5 to 90.0% depending upon the type of oil and location. Rates of degradation did not exceed 2.4 m3/4 X 10(3) m2 per month. Compositional changes in the oil with time were investigated using silica gel fractionation, gas chromatography, and ultraviolet absorbance. With the possible exception of the two fuel oils, the compositional changes were generally in the same direction for all of the oils. The silica gel fractionation and gravimetric data on residual oils show that all classes of compounds were degraded, but the more polar type degrade more slowly. Analysis of runoff water, leachate, and soils indicated that at the concentration applied no oil less was observed from these plots via water movement. No significant movement of lead compounds added to the soils in the used crankcase oils was observed. Significant increases in hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms were demonstrated in all treated plots using either the pure hydrocarbon, n-hexadecane, or the applied oils as the growth substrate

  12. Oil degradation in soil.

    PubMed

    Raymond, R L; Hudson, J O; Jamison, V W

    1976-04-01

    The environmental effects of adding certain selected petroleum products to field soils at widely separated geographical locations under optimum conditions for biodegradation were studied. The locations selected for study of soil biodegradation of six oils (used crankcase oil from cars, used crankcase oil from trucks, an Arabian Heavy crude oil, a Coastal Mix crude oil, a home heating oil no. 2, and a residual fuel oil no. 6) were Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania, Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Corpus Christi, Texas. The investigative process, covering a period of 1 year at each location, was conducted in 14 fields plots (1.7 by 3.0 m) to which the oils were added in a single application at a rate of 11.9 m3/4 X 10(3) m2. One-half of the plots at each location were fertilized, and the incorporation of the oils and fertilizers was accomplished with rototillers to a depth of 10 to 15 cm. Concentrations of all oils decreased significantly at all locations. The average reduction ranged from 48.5 to 90.0% depending upon the type of oil and location. Rates of degradation did not exceed 2.4 m3/4 X 10(3) m2 per month. Compositional changes in the oil with time were investigated using silica gel fractionation, gas chromatography, and ultraviolet absorbance. With the possible exception of the two fuel oils, the compositional changes were generally in the same direction for all of the oils. The silica gel fractionation and gravimetric data on residual oils show that all classes of compounds were degraded, but the more polar type degrade more slowly. Analysis of runoff water, leachate, and soils indicated that at the concentration applied no oil less was observed from these plots via water movement. No significant movement of lead compounds added to the soils in the used crankcase oils was observed. Significant increases in hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms were demonstrated in all treated plots using either the pure hydrocarbon, n-hexadecane, or the applied oils as the growth substrate

  13. Effect of fatty acid profile in vegetable oils and antioxidant supplementation on dairy cattle performance and milk fat depression.

    PubMed

    He, M; Armentano, L E

    2011-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary supplementation of unprotected vegetable oils differing in fatty acid profiles with or without a commercial antioxidant (Agrado Plus, Novus International, St. Charles, MO) on dairy cattle performance, milk fatty acid profiles, and milk fat depression. Twenty-four multiparous Holstein cows were blocked by production (high and low) and assigned to Agrado Plus or no Agrado Plus diets as the main plot in this experiment. The 6 cows in each of the fixed effect groups (high with and without Agrado, low with and without Agrado) were then assigned to a 6 × 6 Latin square as a split plot with 21-d periods. The 6 dietary treatments in the split-plot Latin square were no added oil (control), or 5% DM as oil from palm (PO), high-oleic safflower (OSAF), high-linoleic safflower (LSAF), linseed (LNSD), or corn (CO). Added oil replaced corn starch in the total mixed ration. Diets were formulated to have similar crude protein and neutral detergent fiber, and consisted of 41.2% alfalfa silage, 18.3% corn silage, and 40.5% concentrate mix (dry matter basis). Feeding Agrado Plus did not affect milk, milk fat, or milk protein production or milk fatty acid composition in this study. No significant differences were found between oil feeding versus control for dry matter intake, milk yield, and milk protein yield, but oils other than PO significantly decreased milk fat concentration and proportion and yield of milk short- and medium-chain fatty acids (C(<16)). Feeding PO effectively maintained milk fat yield (1.18 kg/d) and concentration (3.44%), whereas the oils rich in linoleic acid (CO and LSAF) significantly decreased milk fat yield (0.98 and 0.86 vs. 1.14 kg/d) and concentration (3.05 and 2.83 vs. 3.41%) compared with control. Similar lactation performance between OSAF and LNSD suggests that oleic and linolenic acids are roughly equal in potency of milk fat depression.

  14. Determination of carbamates in edible vegetable oils by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a new clean-up based on zirconia for QuEChERS methodology.

    PubMed

    Moreno-González, David; Huertas-Pérez, José F; García-Campaña, Ana M; Gámiz-Gracia, Laura

    2014-10-01

    In this study a fast, selective and sensitive multiresidue method based on QuEChERS methodology has been evaluated and validated for the determination of carbamate pesticides, in edible vegetable oils by UHPLC-MS/MS. A new clean-up sorbent, Supel(TM) QuE Z-Sep(+), has been successfully applied in vegetable oil extracts. Z-Sep(+) was compared with other sorbents (i.e. mixture of C18 and PSA) previously used for dispersive solid phase extraction of these matrices, reducing more effectively matrix effects without a significant decrease of analyte recoveries. Matrix effect was studied in different matrices (extra-virgin olive, sunflower, maize, linseed and sesame oil) being ≤│30│% for most of the studied pesticides. Under optimum conditions, recoveries ranged from 74% to 101%, with relative standard deviations lower than 10%. Limits of quantification ranged from 0.09 to 2.0 µg kg(-1), allowing their determination at the low concentration levels demanding by current legislation.

  15. 27 CFR 21.98 - Bone oil (Dipple's oil).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bone oil (Dipple's oil....98 Bone oil (Dipple's oil). (a) Color. The color shall be a deep brown. (b) Distillation range. When... below 90 °C. (c) Pyrrol reaction. Prepare a 1.0 percent solution of bone oil in 95 percent alcohol...

  16. 27 CFR 21.98 - Bone oil (Dipple's oil).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bone oil (Dipple's oil....98 Bone oil (Dipple's oil). (a) Color. The color shall be a deep brown. (b) Distillation range. When... below 90 °C. (c) Pyrrol reaction. Prepare a 1.0 percent solution of bone oil in 95 percent alcohol...

  17. 27 CFR 21.98 - Bone oil (Dipple's oil).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bone oil (Dipple's oil....98 Bone oil (Dipple's oil). (a) Color. The color shall be a deep brown. (b) Distillation range. When... below 90 °C. (c) Pyrrol reaction. Prepare a 1.0 percent solution of bone oil in 95 percent alcohol...

  18. MacOil--An Oil Exploration Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burger, H. Robert

    1989-01-01

    Described is a simulation program designed to teach the geology of oil exploration in a game format. Discussed are information and tools provided, information management, data sets, and availability of the program. (CW)

  19. Understanding oil spills and oil spill response

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The volume contains individual sections that outline what oil spills are, their potential effects on the environment, how they are cleaned up, and how various agencies prepare for spills before they happen.

  20. Biodegradation of crude oils.

    PubMed

    Bosecker, K; Teschner, M; Wehner, H

    1989-01-01

    Petroleum from well sites in the Gifhorn Trough (Lower Saxony, NW-Germany) and the Maracaibo Basin (Venezuela) contained various types of microorganisms capable of degrading crude oils. Genetically related oils were inoculated with the isolated microorganisms and the degradation of the oils was followed by chromatographic techniques. Parameters important for the reactions (pH, supply of oxygen, nitrogen and phosphorus, reaction medium) were monitored and optimized. The degradation of n-alkanes was followed closely. Microorganisms active in degradation (yeast, bacteria) easily survived a period of inactivity due to missing nutrients and were reactivated within hours to degrade newly added crude oil. Under substrate-limiting conditions selectivity of degradation was found, destroying medium-chain n-alkanes (C20, C21) at a faster rate than long-chain n-alkanes (C30, C31). During degradation the physical parameters of the crude oils (e.g. density, viscosity, average molecular weight) were altered and shifted into the direction of heavy oil. In vitro degraded oil is very similar to oil degraded in nature. Aromatic hydrocarbons and biomarker molecules (steranes and triterpanes) were not degraded under the conditions used. Pyrolysis-GC analysis of asphaltenes revealed no significant changes in the composition of pyrolyzates during biodegradation. There is sufficient evidence that heavy oils - besides some other effects - are generated by the in situ-biodegradation of conventional oils.

  1. Crude Oil Analysis Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shay, Johanna Y.

    The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

  2. On the study of oil paint adhesion on optically transparent glass: Conservation of reverse paintings on glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayle, M.; Waugh, D. G.; Colston, B. J.; Lawrence, J.

    2015-12-01

    Reverse painting on glass is a technique which consists of applying a cold paint layer on the reverse-side of glass. The main challenge facing these artworks is the fragile adhesion of the pictorial layer - a simple movement can modify the appearance of the painting. This paper details a study into the adhesion parameters of pigments on glass and the comparison between different pigments. The relationships between the binder (linseed oil) with pigments and the glass with or without the use of an adhesive are studied. Physical analyses by surface characterisation have been carried out to better understand the influence of the pigment. The use of a sessile drop device, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a surface 3D profiler and a pencil hardness scratch tester were necessary to establish a comparison of the pictorial layer adhesion. A comparison of the effect of two adhesives, namely ox gall and gum arabic, has shown that the adhesion is not only linked to the physical parameters but that possible chemical reactions can influence the results. Finally, a treatment based on humidity-extreme storage has shown the weakness of some pictorial layers.

  3. Comparison of the fatty acid profiles in cheeses from ewes fed diets supplemented with different plant oils.

    PubMed

    Bodas, Raúl; Manso, Teresa; Mantecón, Angel R; Juárez, Manuela; De la Fuente, Miguel Angel; Gómez-Cortés, Pilar

    2010-10-13

    The purpose of this work was to obtain a cheese from ewes milk with a healthier fatty acid (FA) profile. To achieve our aim, 48 ewes (12 per treatment) were fed diets supplemented with 3% of plant oils: palm (used as control), olive (OO), soybean (SO), and linseed (LO). Milk samples from each treatment were collected to manufacture cheeses. The cheesemaking process did not modify the dairy fat FA profile, but OO, SO, and LO did reduce the C12:0 + C14:0 + C16:0 content in dairy fat, thus decreasing the atherogenic index value in the cheeses. Percentages of cis-9 trans-11 C18:2 in cheeses ranged from the 0.43 control value to 0.92, 1.64, and 2.71 with OO, LO, and SO respectively, following the same pattern as trans-11 C18:1. In contrast, trans-10 C18:1 levels were always below 1%. The lowest n-6/n-3 ratio obtained with LO (1.43) suggests that such lipid supplementation would be the most effective nutritional strategy for improving cheese FA profiles.

  4. Spectroscopic study of Mentha oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, A. K.; Singh, A. K.

    The visible fluorescence and excitation spectra of Mentha oils (Japanese mint oil, peppermint oil and spearmint oil) have been recorded. Different physical constants which are characteristic of the fluorescent molecules have been calculated for all three oils. Results reveal that the same group of organic compounds dominate in the oils of peppermint and spearmint, whereas some different compound is present in Japanese mint oil. It is also found that the fluorescence intensity of these oils is comparable to that of Rhodamine 6G dye in methanol solution. Our studies suggest that Mentha oils may be a useful lasing material in the 450-600 nm wavelength range.

  5. Environmentally friendly lubricating oil candidate.

    PubMed

    Ozgülsün, A; Karaosmanoğlu, F

    1999-01-01

    Synthetic lubricating oils based on renewable sources, excluding petroleum, have a great importance among all of the lubricating oil alternatives that are included in the research field about clean and environmentally friendly lubricating oil technologies. One of the environmentally friendly lubricating oils is a vegetable oil-based product. In this study, the esterification product of oleic acid with a fraction of molasses fusel oil as a lubricating oil candidate was determined according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard tests. The results indicate that the ester product can be used as an environmental friendly lubricating oil or lubricating oil additive.

  6. Edible Oils, Microbial Modification Processes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    US produces huge amount of vegetable oils headed with soybean oil (20 billion pounds of soybean oil with 1 billion pound carry over annually). Finding new uses for the huge surplus of vegetable oil is important to US agriculture community. However, studies on oil biotechnology and bioprocesses are...

  7. Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This pamphlet describes Union Oil's shale oil project in the Parachute Creek area of Garfield County, Colorado. The oil shale is estimated to contain 1.6 billion barrels of recoverable oil in the high Mahogany zone alone. Primarily a public relations publication, the report presented contains general information on the history of the project and Union Oil's future plans. (JMT)

  8. Chemometric techniques in oil classification from oil spill fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Azimah; Toriman, Mohd Ekhwan; Juahir, Hafizan; Kassim, Azlina Md; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Ahmad, Wan Kamaruzaman Wan; Wong, Kok Fah; Retnam, Ananthy; Zali, Munirah Abdul; Mokhtar, Mazlin; Yusri, Mohd Ayub

    2016-10-15

    Extended use of GC-FID and GC-MS in oil spill fingerprinting and matching is significantly important for oil classification from the oil spill sources collected from various areas of Peninsular Malaysia and Sabah (East Malaysia). Oil spill fingerprinting from GC-FID and GC-MS coupled with chemometric techniques (discriminant analysis and principal component analysis) is used as a diagnostic tool to classify the types of oil polluting the water. Clustering and discrimination of oil spill compounds in the water from the actual site of oil spill events are divided into four groups viz. diesel, Heavy Fuel Oil (HFO), Mixture Oil containing Light Fuel Oil (MOLFO) and Waste Oil (WO) according to the similarity of their intrinsic chemical properties. Principal component analysis (PCA) demonstrates that diesel, HFO, MOLFO and WO are types of oil or oil products from complex oil mixtures with a total variance of 85.34% and are identified with various anthropogenic activities related to either intentional releasing of oil or accidental discharge of oil into the environment. Our results show that the use of chemometric techniques is significant in providing independent validation for classifying the types of spilled oil in the investigation of oil spill pollution in Malaysia. This, in consequence would result in cost and time saving in identification of the oil spill sources. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Tea tree oil.

    PubMed

    Larson, David; Jacob, Sharon E

    2012-01-01

    Tea tree oil is an increasingly popular ingredient in a variety of household and cosmetic products, including shampoos, massage oils, skin and nail creams, and laundry detergents. Known for its potential antiseptic properties, it has been shown to be active against a variety of bacteria, fungi, viruses, and mites. The oil is extracted from the leaves of the tea tree via steam distillation. This essential oil possesses a sharp camphoraceous odor followed by a menthol-like cooling sensation. Most commonly an ingredient in topical products, it is used at a concentration of 5% to 10%. Even at this concentration, it has been reported to induce contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis reactions. In 1999, tea tree oil was added to the North American Contact Dermatitis Group screening panel. The latest prevalence rates suggest that 1.4% of patients referred for patch testing had a positive reaction to tea tree oil.

  10. 19. LOWER OIL ROOM DIABLO POWERHOUSE: SHARPLES OIL CENTRIFUGE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. LOWER OIL ROOM DIABLO POWERHOUSE: SHARPLES OIL CENTRIFUGE AND OIL TANK, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Diablo Powerhouse, On Skagit River, 6.1 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  11. The Obtaining of Oil from an Oil Reservoir.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawe, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the mechanics of how an actual oil reservoir works and provides some technical background in physics. An experiment which simulates an oil reservoir and demonstrates quantitatively all the basic concepts of oil reservoir rock properties is also presented. (HM)

  12. The Obtaining of Oil from an Oil Reservoir.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawe, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the mechanics of how an actual oil reservoir works and provides some technical background in physics. An experiment which simulates an oil reservoir and demonstrates quantitatively all the basic concepts of oil reservoir rock properties is also presented. (HM)

  13. Vegetable oil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Fifty contributions (presentations) involving more than one hundred people worldwide were given at the International Conference on Plant and Vegetable Oils as Fuels. The proceedings were in Fargo, North Dakota, from August 2-4, 1982. The conference helped to promote renewable fuels, bio-oils, from plant and vegetable oils. Separate abstracts were prepared for 44 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  14. Kuwait Oil Fires, Kuwait

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-04-11

    Smoke from the burning oil fields to the north of Kuwait City, seen on the south shore of Kuwayt Bay, almost totally obscures the view of the tiny, but oil rich, nation of Kuwait (30.0N, 48.0E). During the brief war between Iraq and the Allied forces, many of the oil wells in Kuwait were destroyed and set afire. For several months, those fires burned out of control, spewing wind borne smoke and ash for hundreds of miles.

  15. Essentials of essential oils.

    PubMed

    Manion, Chelsea R; Widder, Rebecca M

    2017-05-01

    Information to guide clinicians in educating and advising patients using or intending to use essential oils for self-administered aromatherapy or other medicinal purposes is presented. The term essential oils refers to highly concentrated, aromatic oils extracted from plants by steam distillation, hydrodiffusion, or pressure. Market reports indicate strong growth in the use of essential oils in the United States in recent decades. Therapeutic claims made in the marketing of essential oils have led the Food and Drug Administration to caution a number of suppliers. Along with rapid growth in sales of essential oils to consumers there has been an increase in the amount of published evidence regarding aromatherapy and essential oils; the annual number of relevant articles indexed using Medical Subject Headings terminology has doubled since 2004. In order to help ensure proper application and safe use of essential oils as a self-care modality, healthcare professionals can benefit from a general knowledge of the terminology and foundational concepts of medicinal use of essential oils, as well as resources to facilitate evaluations of appropriateness of use. Because of the increasing popularity of essential oils and the prevalence of essential oil-based self-care practices targeting a wide variety of ailments in the United States, healthcare professionals must be prepared to address concerns about the agents' safety and efficacy. Proper literature evaluation requires the ability to discern the quality of an oil, the safety of administration, and the validity of its use. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Integrated palm oil processing

    SciTech Connect

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Googin, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Tree palms are a promising source of fuel extenders and substitutes. They are perennials which bear oil for a period of two to three decades after a roughly four year preliminary growth period. Tree palms are now one of the most efficient energy crops: the best modern varieties can provide up to 6 tonnes per hectare per year of mesocarp and kernal oils. Palms are particularly attractive in areas where more conventional farming would pose a significant threat of laterization of cause major ecological problems. Technology for palm oil production is can range between village level manual operations and highly industrialized mills. Process energy is often supplied by combustion of byproducts. Although palm oil is a good energy crop, its physical and combustion properties preclude most use in conventional diesel engines, although palm oil could be directly blended with residual fuel oils for use in some large engines. At present, two uses for palm oil as a diesel fuel extender or substitute appear attractive: microemulsion blends using palm soapstock and monoesters produced by exchanging small alcohols for the glycerol in triglycerides. The amount of alcohols required for conversion of a substantial fraction of palm oil or palm oil soapstock to fuel extenders or substitutes is proportionately small, and, to a major extent, can be supplied by palm processing waste materials. Fermentation and gasification produced alcohols in the one to four carbon range are suitable for use in formulating palm oil based fuels. On a stoichiometric basis, it appears that the value of the palm oil and alcohols are very close to their value as export items. Use of these palm oil fuels could help to decrease balance of payments problems for developing countries, as well as provide a secure market for agricultural products and improved rural employment.

  17. Kuwait Oil Fires, Kuwait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Smoke from the burning oil fields to the north of Kuwait City, seen on the south shore of Kuwayt Bay, almost totally obscures the view of the tiny, but oil rich, nation of Kuwait (30.0N, 48.0E). During the brief war between Iraq and the Allied forces, many of the oil wells in Kuwait were destroyed and set afire. For several months, those fires burned out of control, spewing wind borne smoke and ash for hundreds of miles.

  18. A healthier oil combination and konjac gel as functional ingredients in low-fat pork liver pâté.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Pando, G; Cofrades, S; Rodríguez-Salas, L; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2011-06-01

    Healthier lipid pâtés were formulated by reducing the fat content and/or replacing the pork backfat by a healthier oil combination (olive, linseed and fish oils) and konjac gel (0-15%). The reformulation results were evaluated by composition (proximate analysis and fatty acid profile), technological properties (emulsion stability, colour, and texture), microbiological and sensory parameters of the pâtés. Pâtés with partial or total replacement of pork backfat had lower levels of saturated fatty acids (SFA) (27.4% and 21.3%) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) (49.8% and 42.5%), and higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (22.4% and 35.6%) compared with control pâtés (32.2%, 58.2% and 9.04% respectively). The n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio was decreased from 6.78 (in control pâtés) to 0.79 and 0.48 when partial and total pork backfat respectively was replaced by a healthier oil combination. Although emulsion stability was affected by the formulation, in general all pâtés had good fat and water binding properties. The fat reduction produced a softer and more spreadable pâté, although no effect on penetration parameters was observed after by pork fat replacement by a healthier oil combination. The addition of 15% of konjac gel produced stiffer structures (as compared with 0 and 7%) which are very close to those of the control samples. No microbiological limitations were produced by the reformulation process, obtaining pâtés with acceptable sensory characteristics, similar to the control sample. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of vegetable oils

    SciTech Connect

    Bessler, T.R.

    1986-05-13

    A process is described for preparing an injectable vegetable oil selected from the group consisting of soybean oil and sunflower oil and mixtures thereof which comprise: (a) first treating the vegetable oil at a temperature of 80/sup 0/C to about 130/sup 0/C with an acid clay; (b) deodorizing the vegetable oil with steam at a temperature of 220/sup 0/C to about 280/sup 0/C and applying a vacuum to remove volatilized components; (c) treating the deodorized vegetable oil, at a temperature of from about 10/sup 0/C to about 60/sup 0/C, with an acid clay to reduce the content of a member selected from the group consisting of diglycerides, tocopherol components, and trilinolenin and mixtures thereof, wherein the acid clay is added in a weight ratio to the deoderized vegetable oil of from about 1:99 to about 1:1; and (d) thereafter conducting a particulate filtration to remove a substantial portion of the acid clay from the vegetable oil, wherein the filtration is accomplished with filters having a pore size of from about 0.1 to 0.45 microns, thereby obtaining the injectable oil.

  20. Melaleuca oil poisoning.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M R; Hornfeldt, C S

    1994-01-01

    A 23-month-old boy became confused and was unable to walk thirty minutes after ingesting less than 10 mL of T36-C7, a commercial product containing 100% melaleuca oil. The child was referred to a nearby hospital. His condition improved and he was asymptomatic within 5 hours of ingestion. He was discharged to home the following day. Melaleuca oil, extracted from the Melaleuca alternifolia, contains 50-60% terpenes and related alcohols. Clinical experience with products containing melaleuca oil is limited. This case report suggests that ingestion of a modest amount of a concentrated form of this oil may produce signs of toxicity.

  1. Waste oil reduction: GKN

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, G.

    1995-08-01

    This report details the steps required to establish a waste oil management program. Such a program can reduce operational costs, cut wastewater treatment costs and produce a better quality wastewater effluent through such means as: reducing the volume of oils used; segregating oils at the source of generation for recovery and reuse; and reducing the quality of oily wastewater generated. It discusses the metal-working fluid recovery options available for such a program, namely settling, filtration, hydrocyclone, and centrifugation. Included are source lists for vendors of oil skimmer equipment and coolant recovery systems.

  2. Pepper Oil Surprise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Astronauts Cady Coleman and Paolo Nespoli perform the Pepper Oil Surprise experiment from Potlatch Elementary School in Potlatch, Idaho. This research investigates the interaction of liquid pepper/...

  3. Oil in the Arctic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    density of North Slope crude oil Is 0.89. After aging two weeks In the Arctic suimer, this density rises to about 0.95 . Hence the oil can be...the Ice. In that case, puddles form at the high points of the ice- water Interface. A third feature is the fact that crude oils are sticky, and...this section Is to develop equations which describe the boiling point distribution of crude oil as it ages on ice or water. We assume, firstly, that

  4. Hot Oil Removes Wax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzstock, James J.

    1991-01-01

    Mineral oil heated to temperature of 250 degrees F (121 degrees C) found effective in removing wax from workpieces after fabrication. Depending upon size and shape of part to be cleaned of wax, part immersed in tank of hot oil, and/or interior of part flushed with hot oil. Pump, fittings, and ancillary tooling built easily for this purpose. After cleaning, innocuous oil residue washed off part by alkaline aqueous degreasing process. Serves as relatively safe alternative to carcinogenic and environmentally hazardous solvent perchloroethylene.

  5. Dietary vegetable oils: effects on the expression of immune-related genes in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) intestine.

    PubMed

    Montero, Daniel; Benitez-Dorta, Vanessa; Caballero, María José; Ponce, Marian; Torrecillas, Silvia; Izquierdo, Marisol; Zamorano, María Jesús; Manchado, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    The decreased availability of fish oil, traditionally used as oil source in marine aquafeeds, has lead to the search for alternatives oils. Vegetable oils (VO) are being extensively used as lipid sources in marine fish diets, inducing an imbalance on certain dietary fatty acids. Alteration on the dietary ratio of w-6/w-3 has been described to have detrimental effects on fish immunity. Senegalese sole has high susceptibility to stress and diseases, and little is known on the effects of dietary VO on its immunity. In this study, Senegalese sole juveniles were fed diets (56% crude protein, 12% crude lipid) containing linseed (100LO), soybean (100SO) or fish (100FO) oils as unique oil source. Growth, cortisol and intestinal fatty acid composition were determined after 90 days. Moreover, at the final of the experiment a stress test (5 min of net chasing) was carried out. To evaluate the effect of diets and stress on intestine immunology, expression profiles of a set of 53 immune-related genes using RT-qPCR was also performed. The use of VO did not induced changes in fish growth, but affected fatty acid profile of intestine and expression of immune-related genes. The use of SO (rich in n-6 fatty acids) induced an over-expression of those genes related to complement pathway, recognizing pathogen associated to molecular patterns, defensive response against bacteria, defensive response against viruses, antigen differentiation, cytokines and their receptors. This general over-expression could indicate an activation of inflammatory processes in fish gut. When a stress was applied, a decrease of mRNA levels of different immune-related genes with respect to the unstressed control could be observed in fish fed 100FO. However, fish fed 100LO, with a higher ALA/LA ratio, seemed to ameliorate the effects of combined effects of FO substitution plus stressful situation whereas fish fed 100SO did not show this type of response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mineral oil soluble borate compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Dulat, J.

    1981-09-15

    Alkali metal borates are reacted with fatty acids or oils in the presence of a low hlb value surfactant to give a stable mineral oil-soluble product. Mineral oil containing the borate can be used as a cutting fluid.

  7. Vegetable oil as fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    A review is presented of various experiments undertaken over the past few years in the U.S. to test the performance of vegetable oils in diesel engines, mainly with a view to on-farm energy self-sufficiency. The USDA Northern Regional Research Center in Peoria, Illinois, is screening native U.S. plant species as potential fuel oil sources.

  8. Tree nut oils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The major tree nuts include almonds, Brazil nuts, cashew nuts, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachio nuts, and walnuts. Tree nut oils are appreciated in food applications because of their flavors and are generally more expensive than other gourmet oils. Research during the last de...

  9. Kapok oil methyl esters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The increased need for biodiesel feedstocks has caused various vegetable oils to be examined for this purpose. In the present work, the methyl esters of kapok (Ceiba pentandra) oil were prepared. The essential fuel properties were comprehensively determined and evaluated in comparison to specificati...

  10. Fossil Energy: Oil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Detailed are the highlights of the history and technology of crude oil and its end products. Included also are some of the important programs that American industry and the Federal government are planning and undertaking in order to enhance the benefits of oil and make use of the limited available quantities as wisely as possible, both now and in…

  11. Fossil Energy: Oil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Detailed are the highlights of the history and technology of crude oil and its end products. Included also are some of the important programs that American industry and the Federal government are planning and undertaking in order to enhance the benefits of oil and make use of the limited available quantities as wisely as possible, both now and in…

  12. Exploring Oil Spills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerniak, Charlene M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities in which elementary and middle school students work together to gain environmental awareness about oil spills. Involves students experiencing a simulated oil spill and attempting to clean it up. Discusses the use of children's literature after the activity in evaluation of the activity. (JRH)

  13. Multi Tasking Engine Oils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-21

    Petroleum Institute has standards for engine and gear oils but none for multipurpose lubricants of the type described above. The concept of...Transmission Oils (UTTOs) to satisfy this consumer market. Unfortunately, there are no industry-wide standards for these UTTOs as the American

  14. Exploring Oil Spills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerniak, Charlene M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities in which elementary and middle school students work together to gain environmental awareness about oil spills. Involves students experiencing a simulated oil spill and attempting to clean it up. Discusses the use of children's literature after the activity in evaluation of the activity. (JRH)

  15. Cooking with Healthier Fats and Oils

    MedlinePlus

    ... use fats and oils, choose those with less saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol. Choose Less Often Choose More Often Percent of Saturated Fat Canola Oil Safflower Oil Sesame Oil Sunflower Oil ...

  16. Products from vegetable oils

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, M.O.

    1995-12-01

    Vegetable oils serve various industrial applications such as plasticizers, emulsifiers, surfactants, plastics and resins. Research and development approaches may take advantage of natural properties of the oils. More often it is advantageous to modify those properties for specific applications. One example is the preparation of ink vehicles using vegetable oils in the absence of petroleum. They are cost competitive with petroleum-based inks with similar quality factors. Vegetable oils have potential as renewable sources of fuels for the diesel engine. However, several characteristics can restrict their use. These include poor cold-engine startup, misfire and for selected fuels, high pour point and cloud point temperatures. Other characteristics include incomplete combustion causing carbon buildup, lube oil dilution and degradation, and elevated NO{sub x} emissions. Precombustion and fuel quality data are presented as a tool for understanding and solving these operational and durability problems.

  17. Closing the oil loop

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, K.

    1998-05-01

    If you live east of the Mississippi, chances are good that your oil ends up at Safety-Kleen`s (Elgin, Illinois) rerefining facility in East Chicago, Ind., about 10 miles west of the Windy City. The company bills itself as the world`s largest oil rerefiner. Its 180 service branches serve as the collection pickup points for more than 100,000 service stations, car dealerships, and generators of industrial oil, including hydraulic oil. Safety-Kleen`s other oil recovery facility is in Breslau, Ontario, about an hour west of Toronto. The East Chicago facility rerefines more than 100 million gallons per year, with Breslau rerefining 40 million gallons per year.

  18. Intraventricular Silicone Oil

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Stéphane; Boissonnot, Michèle; Tasu, Jean-Pierre; Simonet, Charles; Ciron, Jonathan; Neau, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intracranial silicone oil is a rare complication of intraocular endotamponade with silicone oil. We describe a case of intraventricular silicone oil fortuitously observed 38 months after an intraocular tamponade for a complicated retinal detachment in an 82 year-old woman admitted in the Department of Neurology for a stroke. We confirm the migration of silicone oil along the optic nerve. We discuss this rare entity with a review of the few other cases reported in the medical literature. Intraventricular migration of silicone oil after intraocular endotamponade is usually asymptomatic but have to be known of the neurologists and the radiologists because of its differential diagnosis that are intraventricular hemorrhage and tumor. PMID:26735537

  19. Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, James R; Bestor, Michael A; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

  20. Marine Oil Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Terry C; Prince, Roger C; Mahmoudi, Nagissa

    2016-03-01

    Crude oil has been part of the marine environment for millions of years, and microbes that use its rich source of energy and carbon are found in seawater, sediments, and shorelines from the tropics to the polar regions. Catastrophic oil spills stimulate these organisms to "bloom" in a reproducible fashion, and although oil does not provide bioavailable nitrogen, phosphorus or iron, there are enough of these nutrients in the sea that when dispersed oil droplets dilute to low concentrations these low levels are adequate for microbial growth. Most of the hydrocarbons in dispersed oil are degraded in aerobic marine waters with a half-life of days to months. In contrast, oil that reaches shorelines is likely to be too concentrated, have lower levels of nutrients, and have a far longer residence time in the environment. Oil that becomes entrained in anaerobic sediments is also likely to have a long residence time, although it too will eventually be biodegraded. Thus, data that encompass everything from the ecosystem to the molecular level are needed for understanding the complicated process of petroleum biodegradation in marine environments.

  1. Marine Oil Biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.; Prince, Roger; Mahmoudi, Nagissa

    2015-12-23

    Crude oil has been part of the marine environment for millions of years, and microbes that use its rich source of energy and carbon are found in seawater, sediments and shorelines from the tropics to the polar regions. Catastrophic oil spills stimulate these organisms to ‘bloom’ in a reproducible fashion, and although oil does not provide bioavailable nitrogen, phosphorus or iron, there are enough of these nutrients in the sea that when dispersed oil droplets dilute to low concentrations these low levels are adequate for microbial growth. Most of the hydrocarbons in dispersed oil are degraded in aerobic marine waters with a half-life of days to months. In contrast, oil that reaches shorelines is likely to be too concentrated, have lower levels of nutrients, and have a far longer residence time in the environment. Oil that becomes entrained in anaerobic sediments is also likely to have a long residence time, although it too will eventually be biodegraded. Thus, data that encompass everything from the ecosystem to the molecular level are needed for understanding the complicated process of petroleum biodegradation in marine environments.

  2. Marine Oil Biodegradation

    DOE PAGES

    Hazen, Terry C.; Prince, Roger; Mahmoudi, Nagissa

    2015-12-23

    Crude oil has been part of the marine environment for millions of years, and microbes that use its rich source of energy and carbon are found in seawater, sediments and shorelines from the tropics to the polar regions. Catastrophic oil spills stimulate these organisms to ‘bloom’ in a reproducible fashion, and although oil does not provide bioavailable nitrogen, phosphorus or iron, there are enough of these nutrients in the sea that when dispersed oil droplets dilute to low concentrations these low levels are adequate for microbial growth. Most of the hydrocarbons in dispersed oil are degraded in aerobic marine watersmore » with a half-life of days to months. In contrast, oil that reaches shorelines is likely to be too concentrated, have lower levels of nutrients, and have a far longer residence time in the environment. Oil that becomes entrained in anaerobic sediments is also likely to have a long residence time, although it too will eventually be biodegraded. Thus, data that encompass everything from the ecosystem to the molecular level are needed for understanding the complicated process of petroleum biodegradation in marine environments.« less

  3. 21 CFR 172.861 - Cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm... substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils. The food additive, cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils, may be safely used in food in accordance with the...

  4. 21 CFR 172.861 - Cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm... substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils. The food additive, cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils, may be safely used in food in accordance with the...

  5. 21 CFR 172.861 - Cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm... substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils. The food additive, cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils, may be safely used in food in accordance with the...

  6. 21 CFR 172.861 - Cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm... substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils. The food additive, cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils, may be safely used in food in accordance with the...

  7. Kuwait Oil Fires, Kuwait

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-04-11

    Smoke from the burning oil fields to the north and south of Kuwait City, seen on the south shore of Kuwayt Bay almost totally obscures the view of the tiny, but oil rich, nation of Kuwait (29.0N, 48.0E). During the brief war between Iraq and the Allied forces, many of the oil wells in Kuwait were destroyed and set afire. For several months, those fires burned out of control, spewing wind borne smoke and ash for hundreds of miles.

  8. Kuwait Oil Fires, Kuwait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Smoke from the burning oil fields to the north and south of Kuwait City, seen on the south shore of Kuwayt Bay almost totally obscures the view of the tiny, but oil rich, nation of Kuwait (29.0N, 48.0E). During the brief war between Iraq and the Allied forces, many of the oil wells in Kuwait were destroyed and set afire. For several months, those fires burned out of control, spewing wind borne smoke and ash for hundreds of miles.

  9. Kuwait Oil Fires, Kuwait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The number of oil well fires from the Kuwait Oil Fields (29.5N, 48.0E) set afire by the retreating Iraqi Army during the 1991 Persian Gulf War, has been measurably diminished since the last observation although the smoke plumes were still intact as far south as Qatar. Most of the remaining approximately 300 oil fires are in the two largest fields: Sibirayah, north of Kuwait Bay and the larger Magwas-Burgan-Al Ahmadi field south of Kuwait City.

  10. Feeding vegetable oils to lactating ewes modifies the fatty acid profile of suckling lambs.

    PubMed

    Manso, T; Bodas, R; Vieira, C; Mantecón, A R; Castro, T

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of vegetable oil supplementation of ewe diets on the performance and fatty acid (FA) composition of their suckling lambs. Forty-eight pregnant Churra ewes (mean BW 64.3±0.92 kg) with their 72 newborn lambs (prolificacy=1.5) were assigned to one of four experimental diets, supplemented with 3% of hydrogenated palm (PALM), olive (OLI), soya (SOY) or linseed (LIN) oil. Lambs were nourished exclusively by suckling from their respective mothers. Ewes were milked once daily, and milk samples were taken once a week. When lambs reached 11 kg, they were slaughtered and samples were taken from musculus longissimus dorsi (intramuscular fat) and subcutaneous fat tissue. No changes were observed in milk yield, proximal composition or lamb performance (P>0.10). Milk and lamb subcutaneous and intramuscular fat samples from the PALM diet had the highest saturated fatty acid concentration, whereas those of the OLI, SOY and LIN diets had the lowest (P<0.05). The greatest monounsaturated fatty acid concentration was observed in milk from ewes fed OLI, and the least in milk and in lamb subcutaneous and intramuscular fat samples from LIN and PALM diets. Milk and lamb fat from ewes fed PALM displayed the highest 16:0 proportion and the lowest 18:0 (P<0.05). There were higher concentrations of cis-9 18:1 in OLI samples (P<0.05), more 18:2n-6 in SOY lambs and milk fat (P<0.001) and the highest levels of 18:3n-3 and 20:5n-3 in LIN samples (P<0.01). Milk and lamb subcutaneous and intramuscular samples from SOY and LIN diets contained the most cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid, whereas PALM samples had the least (P<0.01). Sheep diet supplementation with different oils, constituting up to 3% of their diets, resulted in changes in the FA composition of milk and the subcutaneous and intramuscular fat of suckling lambs, but did not affect either milk production or lamb performance.

  11. Processing sunflower oil for fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Backer, L.F.; Jacobsen, L.; Olson, C.

    1982-05-01

    Research on processing of sunflower seed for oil was initiated to evaluate the equipment that might adapt best to on-farm or small factory production facilities. The first devices identified for evaluation were auger press expeller units, primary oil cleaning equipment, and final filters. A series of standard finishing filtration tests were carried out on sunflower oil and sunflower oil - diesel fuel blends using sunflower oil from four different sources.

  12. Fuel properties of cottonseed oil

    SciTech Connect

    Karaosmanoglu, F.; Tueter, M.; Goellue, E.; Yanmaz, S.; Altintig, E.

    1999-11-01

    The use of vegetable oils as fuel alternatives has an exceptional importance in the field of research. In this study, evaluation possibilities of cottonseed oil have been investigated as an alternative candidate for diesel fuel and fuel oil. The fuel property tests were performed according to standard analysis methods for oil and fuel. An overall evaluation of the results indicates that cottonseed oil can be proposed as a possible green substitute for fuel.

  13. Elastohydrodynamic properties of heat-bodied oils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat-bodied oils are biobased oils obtained via thermal treatment of vegetable oils under inert (N2) atmospheric conditions. Most heat-bodied oils are based on soybean oil, but other vegetable oils and blends of vegetable oils can also be utilized to obtain specific properties. Depending on the temp...

  14. Essential Oils, Part VI: Sandalwood Oil, Ylang-Ylang Oil, and Jasmine Absolute.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Anton C; Schmidt, Erich

    In this article, some aspects of sandalwood oil, ylang-ylang oil, and jasmine absolute are discussed including their botanical origin, uses of the plants and the oils and absolute, chemical composition, contact allergy to and allergic contact dermatitis from these essential oils and absolute, and their causative allergenic ingredients.

  15. Efficiency of apples, strawberries, and tomatoes for reduction of oxidative stress in pigs as a model for humans.

    PubMed

    Pajk, Tanja; Rezar, Vida; Levart, Alenka; Salobir, Janez

    2006-04-01

    The present study investigated the potency of apples, strawberries, and tomatoes in decreasing oxidative stress in pigs as a model for humans. Forty-eight growing pigs were individually penned in metabolic cages and divided into six groups. All groups received isocaloric daily rations composed of a basal diet supplemented with starch, linseed oil, linseed oil and apples, linseed oil and strawberries, linseed oil and tomatoes, or linseed oil, apples, strawberries and tomatoes. Oxidative stress was evaluated at the beginning and at the end of the 22-d experimental period by measuring the degree of DNA damage in mononuclear blood cells, the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) in plasma, the MDA excretion rate, the concentration of tocopherols in plasma, plasma total antioxidant status, and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase concentration. The results confirmed that the linseed oil diet significantly increased MDA formation in the body and DNA damage to mononuclear blood cells in comparison with the starch diet. Although the MDA concentration in plasma was significantly decreased in all fruit groups, urine MDA excretion rate was decreased only in the linseed oil/apple and linseed oil/apple/strawberry/tomato groups. Supplementation with fruit significantly decreased DNA damage, was more pronounced in the linseed oil/apple and linseed oil/apple/strawberry/tomato groups. Significantly lower glutathione peroxidase concentrations were observed only in the linseed oil/strawberry group. Our findings support the hypothesis that supplementation with apples, strawberries, or tomatoes effectively decreases oxidative stress by decreasing MDA formation in the body and by protecting mononuclear blood cells against increased DNA damage. This effect was particularly pronounced in the group supplemented with a fruit mixture; among the single fruit supplements, the most beneficial effect was obtained with apples.

  16. Cod Liver Oil

    MedlinePlus

    ... cod liver oil on their skin to speed wound healing. When taken in appropriate doses by mouth, cod ... young children. Heart disease. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Wound healing. Glaucoma. Other conditions. More evidence is needed to ...

  17. Synthetic Eelgrass Oil Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, T. G.

    2013-05-01

    Although surviving in situ micro-organisms eventually consume spilled oil, extensive inundation of shore biota by oil requires cleanup to enable ecological recovery within normal time scales. Although effective in calm seas and quiet waters, oil is advected over and under conventional curtain oil booms by wave actions and currents when seas are running. Most sorbent booms are not reusable, and are usually disposed of in landfills, creating excessive waste. A new concept is proposed for a floating oil barrier, to be positioned off vulnerable coasts, to interdict, contain, and sequester spilled oil, which can then be recovered and the barrier reused. While conventional oil boom designs rely principally on the immiscibility of oil in water and its relative buoyancy, the new concept barrier avoids the pitfalls of the former by taking advantage of the synergistic benefits of numerous fluid and material properties, including: density, buoyancy, elasticity, polarity, and surface area to volume ratio. Modeled after Zostera marina, commonly called eelgrass, the new barrier, referred to as synthetic eelgrass (SE), behaves analogously. Eelgrass has very long narrow, ribbon-like, leaves which support periphyton, a complex matrix of algae and heterotrophic microbes, which position themselves there to extract nutrients from the seawater flowing past them. In an analogous fashion, oil on, or in, seawater, which comes in contact with SE, is adsorbed on the surface and sequestered there. Secured to the bottom, in shoal waters, SE rises to the surface, and, if the tide is low enough, floats on the sea surface down wind, or down current to snare floating oil. The leaves of SE, called filaments, consist of intrinsically buoyant strips of ethylene methyl acrylate, aka EMA. EMA, made of long chain, saturated, hydrocarbon molecules with nearly homogeneous electron charge distributions, is a non-polar material which is oleophilic and hydrophobic. Oil must be in close proximity to the

  18. Economic Geology (Oil & Gas)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geotimes, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Briefly reviews the worldwide developments in petroleum geology in 1971, including exploration, new fields, and oil production. This report is condensed from the October Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. (PR)

  19. UAVSAR_Gulf_Oil

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's Gulfstream III research aircraft carrying the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s sophisticated UAVSAR synthetic aperture radar under its belly surveyed the spread of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill du...

  20. Eugenol oil overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Below are symptoms of a eugenol oil overdose in different parts of the body. AIRWAYS AND LUNGS Shallow breathing Rapid breathing Coughing up blood BLADDER AND KIDNEYS Blood in the urine No urine output Pain when you urinate EYES, EARS, ...

  1. Oil-shale program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, B. E.

    1981-10-01

    The principal activities of the Sandia National Laboratories in the Department of Energy Oil shale program during the period April 1 to June 30, 1981 are discussed. Currently, Sandia's activities are focused upon: the development and use of analytical and experimental modeling techniques to describe and predict the retort properties and retorting process parameters that are important to the preparation, operation, and stability of in situ retorts, and the development, deployment, and field use of instrumentation, data acquisition, and process monitoring systems to characterize and evaluate in site up shale oil recovery operations. In-house activities and field activities (at the Geokinetics Oil Shale Project and the Occidental Oil Shale Project) are described under the headings: bed preparation, bed characterization, retorting process, and structural stability.

  2. Fuel oil poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Substances called hydrocarbons are the harmful ingredients in fuel oil. ... Gummin DD. Hydrocarbons. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 152. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. ...

  3. Sassafras oil overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diarrhea Nausea Vomiting HEART AND BLOOD Low blood pressure Pounding heartbeat (palpitations) Rapid heartbeat LUNGS Rapid breathing Shallow breathing NERVOUS SYSTEM Dizziness Hallucinations Unconsciousness SKIN Burns (if the oil is on the skin)

  4. World oil shale deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, C.O.; Russell, P.L.

    1982-01-01

    The article estimates resources in-place and their oil equivalent. The major deposits are described in the U.S., Australia, USSR, Peoples Republic of China, Morocco, Israel, Jordan, Syria, Europe and South America. 2 refs.

  5. Peppermint oil overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 101. Murray MT. Mentha piperita (peppermint). In: Pizzorno JE, Murray MT, eds. ... B. Final report on the safety assessment of mentha piperita (peppermint) oil, mentha piperita (peppermint) leaf extract, ...

  6. Futures oil market outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Saucer, J.

    1995-06-01

    We expect the broader expansion of global economic activity in 1995 to more than offset the anticipated slowdown in the US economic growth. This should result in worldwide oil demand growth in excess of 1 million barrels per day and firmer oil prices. This comes on the heels of nearly identical growth in 1994 and should be followed by an even larger increase in 1996. This year`s demand growth comes against a backdrop of flat OPEC production and an increase in non-OPEC supplies that will fall short of the expected increase in consumption. Some degree of political upheaval in at least a half dozen important oil exporting nations could also have implication for crude supplies. One major wildcard that remains for global oil markets is the status of the United Nations` sanctions on Iraqi exports and the timing of when these sanctions are to be eased or lifted completely.

  7. Oil Spills Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA monitors impacts and mitigates the effects of spilled oil, which threatens public health and safety, contaminates drinking water, causes fire and explosion, diminishes air and water quality, harms ecosystems, and more.

  8. Economic Geology (Oil & Gas)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geotimes, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Briefly reviews the worldwide developments in petroleum geology in 1971, including exploration, new fields, and oil production. This report is condensed from the October Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. (PR)

  9. Oil Discharge Reporting Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    If a facility or vessel discharges oil to navigable waters or adjoining shorelines, the owner/operator is required to follow certain federal reporting requirements. This fact sheet outlines those reporting requirements.

  10. Colombian export oil pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, K. ); Enright, B. )

    1989-06-01

    The authors discuss how bringing crude oil to market often requires extraordinary determination and effort to overcome the obstacles of terrain and time. They describe a pipeline project on a 53-week suicide schedule to get oil across the Colombian Andes. After confronting setbacks, they completed a job that included 304 miles of pipeline, 497 miles of telecommunications and a major offshore terminal in only 47 weeks.

  11. Synthetic aircraft turbine oil

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard, R.R.; Yaffe, R.

    1980-10-07

    Synthetic lubricating oil composition having improved oxidation stability comprises a major portion of an aliphatic ester base oil having lubricating properties, formed by the reaction of pentaerythritol and an organic monocarboxylic acid and containing a phenylnaphthylamine, a dialkyldiphenylamine, a hydrocarbyl phosphate ester, a polyhydroxy anthraquninone, an alkylamine salt of 3-amino-triazole-dodecenylsuccinamic acid, 2-hydroxylpropyl-n, n-dibutyldithiocarbamate, and an alkyl amine salt of a methyl acid phosphate.

  12. Prospecting for oil.

    PubMed

    Shields, David S

    2010-01-01

    From the 1770s to the 1880s agriculturists and cooks sought to develop culinary oils from plants. Thomas Jefferson's attempts to introduce the olive into the agriculture of the United States, as a partial substitute for lard in cookery and as a cheap oleo for the consumption of slaves, met with limited success, even in the southeast, because periodic freezes and high humidity thwarted the development of groves. Southern slaves from West Africa supplied their own oil, derived from benne (Sesamum indicum). Benne oil was merely one feature of an elaborate African-American cuisine employing sesame that included benne soup, benne and greens, benne and hominy, benne candy, and benne wafers. Only the last item has survived as a feature of regional and ethnic cookery. In the first decades of the nineteenth century, planter experimentalists began the commercial scale production of benne oil, establishing it as the primary salad oil and the second favored frying medium in the southern United States. It enjoyed acceptance and moderate commercial success until the refinement of cottonseed oil in the 1870s and 1880s. Cotton seed, a waste product of the south's most vital industry, was turned into a revenue stream as David Wesson and other scientists created a salad oil and frying medium designedly tasteless and odorless, and a cooking fat, hydrogenated cottonseed oil (Cottonlene or Crisco) that could cheaply substitute for lard in baking. With the recent recovery of regional foodways, both the olive and sesame are being revived for use in the neo-southern cookery of the twenty-first century.

  13. New oils for oil mist lubrication to reduce fine oil droplets in stray mist

    SciTech Connect

    Shamim, A.; Kettleborough, C.F.

    1997-07-01

    In the widely used open loop oil mist lubrication system, the unused oil mist, called stray mist, is vented out into the atmosphere. The stray mist contains very little oil and applications can easily meet the OSHA requirement of maximum allowable 5 mg of oil per m{sup 3} of air. However, it has been found that for some widely used oils the stray mist contains large numbers of sub-micrometer oil particles. These particles are too small to lubricate bearings and are potentially harmful to the human respiratory system. Several new lubricating oils have been developed and tested to reduce fine oil droplets in the stray mist. The best blend of oil was able to reduce the sub-micrometer particles in the stray mist by about 75% as compared to the version of this oil currently being used. This has been accomplished without any significant change in the parameters influencing the lubrication of bearings.

  14. Shoreline oiling from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Zachary; Zengel, Scott; Baker, Mary; Steinhoff, Marla; Fricano, Gail; Rouhani, Shahrokh; Michel, Jacqueline

    2016-06-15

    We build on previous work to construct a comprehensive database of shoreline oiling exposure from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill by compiling field and remotely-sensed datasets to support oil exposure and injury quantification. We compiled a spatial database of shoreline segments with attributes summarizing habitat, oiling category and timeline. We present new simplified oil exposure classes for both beaches and coastal wetland habitats derived from this database integrating both intensity and persistence of oiling on the shoreline over time. We document oiling along 2113km out of 9545km of surveyed shoreline, an increase of 19% from previously published estimates and representing the largest marine oil spill in history by length of shoreline oiled. These data may be used to generate maps and calculate summary statistics to assist in quantifying and understanding the scope, extent, and spatial distribution of shoreline oil exposure as a result of the DWH incident. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks

    DOEpatents

    Henning, Carl D.

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas collector/separator for recovery of oil leaking, for example, from an offshore or underwater oil well. The separator is floated over the point of the leak and tethered in place so as to receive oil/gas floating, or forced under pressure, toward the water surface from either a broken or leaking oil well casing, line, or sunken ship. The separator is provided with a downwardly extending skirt to contain the oil/gas which floats or is forced upward into a dome wherein the gas is separated from the oil/water, with the gas being flared (burned) at the top of the dome, and the oil is separated from water and pumped to a point of use. Since the density of oil is less than that of water it can be easily separated from any water entering the dome.

  16. Autoxidation of Fish Oil Blended with Rice Bran Oil.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shigeo; Takai, Marie; Hayashi, Chieko; Tsuno, Takuo; Endo, Yasushi

    2017-06-01

    Effects of rice bran oil on the oxidative and flavor stability of fish oil were investigated by the gas liquid chromatography-head space method. When fish oil blending with different ratio of rice bran oils was oxidized at room temperature in the dark, volatile compounds produced during autoxidation was measured by gas liquid chromatography. The amounts of volatile compounds were decreased with increased the ratio of blended rice bran oil as well as peroxide value. The level of propanal and acrolein which gave unpleasant flavor was also decreased with increased the ratio of blended rice bran oil. Especially, the level of propanal and acrolein and peroxide value were remarkably decreased when blending more than 75% of rice bran oil. Blending of rice bran oil improved the oxidative and flavor stabilities of fish oil.

  17. Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an oil/gas collector/separator for recovery of oil leaking, for example, from an offshore or underwater oil well. The separator is floated over the point of the leak and tethered in place so as to receive oil/gas floating, or forced under pressure, toward the water surface from either a broken or leaking oil well casing, line, or sunken ship. The separator is provided with a downwardly extending skirt to contain the oil/gas which floats or is forced upward into a dome wherein the gas is separated from the oil/water, with the gas being flared (burned) at the top of the dome, and the oil is separated from water and pumped to a point of use. Since the density of oil is less than that of water it can be easily separated from any water entering the dome.

  18. Process for preparing lubricating oil from used waste lubricating oil

    DOEpatents

    Whisman, Marvin L.; Reynolds, James W.; Goetzinger, John W.; Cotton, Faye O.

    1978-01-01

    A re-refining process is described by which high-quality finished lubricating oils are prepared from used waste lubricating and crankcase oils. The used oils are stripped of water and low-boiling contaminants by vacuum distillation and then dissolved in a solvent of 1-butanol, 2-propanol and methylethyl ketone, which precipitates a sludge containing most of the solid and liquid contaminants, unspent additives, and oxidation products present in the used oil. After separating the purified oil-solvent mixture from the sludge and recovering the solvent for recycling, the purified oil is preferably fractional vacuum-distilled, forming lubricating oil distillate fractions which are then decolorized and deodorized to prepare blending stocks. The blending stocks are blended to obtain a lubricating oil base of appropriate viscosity before being mixed with an appropriate additive package to form the finished lubricating oil product.

  19. Environmental consequences of oil production from oil sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Lorenzo; Davis, Kyle F.; Rulli, Maria C.; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    Crude oil from oil sands will constitute a substantial share of future global oil demand. Oil sands deposits account for a third of globally proven oil reserves, underlie large natural forested areas, and have extraction methods requiring large volumes of freshwater. Yet little work has been done to quantify some of the main environmental impacts of oil sands operations. Here we examine forest loss and water use for the world's major oil sands deposits. We calculate actual and potential rates of water use and forest loss both in Canadian deposits, where oil sands extraction is already taking place, and in other major deposits worldwide. We estimated that their exploitation, given projected production trends, could result in 1.31 km3 yr-1 of freshwater demand and 8700 km2 of forest loss. The expected escalation in oil sands extraction thus portends extensive environmental impacts.

  20. Hydrotreat used lube oil

    SciTech Connect

    Bhan, O.K.; Tai, W.P.; Brinkman, D.W.

    1986-04-01

    Mild hydrotreating is the key to successful re-refining of used lubricating oils. Coupled with pre-distillation and metals removal, the process produces oil of superior color and clarity with acceptable viscosity and heteroatom content. Furthermore, the entire process provides operational simplicity, economic feasibility and environmental attractiveness. Re-refining preserves a valuable resource while solving a potential environmental problem. Increased sensitivity to disposal of hazardous material once again makes re-refining almost a necessity. Various technologies developed to re-refine used lubricating oils range from simple acid/clay contacting to complex solvent extraction. Most technologies require similar capital investment; however, operating costs vary substantially. Current technology seems to converge on a two-step procedure: distillation of dehydrated used oil in a thin-film evaporator, and subsequent hydrotreating of distilled stocks. Filtered used oil is first dehydrated in a flash tower, which also removes some light hydrocarbons. It is then distilled in a thin-film evaporator, which allows feed fractionation with minimal thermal degradation. Hydrotreating of distilled lubes is conducted in two trickle-bed reactors in series. The first reactor contains a guard-bed material (e.g., high-surface-area alumina) and the second contains hydrotreating catalyst. Hydrotreating improves product color and reduces the level of halogen-, sulfur-, oxygen-, and nitrogen-containing compounds. While distillation is a common, well-understood technology, application of hydrotreating to recycled lube oil raises many questions.

  1. Oil Saving Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Driven under difficult field conditions, the Army Jeep shown went more than 22,000 miles without an oil change in a test conducted by the U.S. Army Mobility Equipment Research and Development Command. Key to this exceptionally long oil life was a set of piston ring seals made of a new synthetic rubber formula called RC-34; the seal pictured, photographed after its arduous Army trial, shows no signs of deterioration. The seal and the RC-34 material, which may soon be available for use in the family auto, were developed by Ramsey Corporation, St. Louis, Missouri, a division of TRW Automotive Worldwide. The oil in an automobile engine must be I replaced every few thousand miles not because it wears out but because it becomes contaminated. The contamination sources are gasoline and combustion gases which blow by the piston rings to mix with the oil, reducing the oil's ability to lubricate properly. Seeking to prolong oil life by eliminating "blowby," Ramsey Corporation looked for a better way to seal piston rings and used NASA technology as a departure point. The parent company TRW, under contract to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, had developed seals and bladders from a type of material called elastomers which where designed to withstand the environmental extremes of interplanetary flight. That effort formed a knowledge base for research which culminated in Ramsey's RC-34 elastomer.

  2. Multi-photon excitation fluorescence and third-harmonic generation microscopy measurements combined with confocal Raman microscopy for the analysis of layered samples of varnished oil films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevin, A.; Comelli, D.; Osticioli, I.; Filippidis, G.; Melessanaki, K.; Valentini, G.; Cubeddu, R.; Fotakis, C.

    2010-09-01

    The non-destructive determination of layer structures in works of art remains a significant challenge. Non-linear microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) were employed for characterisation of varnish-media layers in model samples, providing important information regarding the thickness of materials and the identification of different media in depth. Commonly found triterpenoid varnishes mastic and dammar were applied over a single layer of films of linseed oil. Non-linear microscopy of samples was carried out using a 1028-nm femtosecond laser source; both third-harmonic generation signals (THG) and three-photon fluorescence signals (3PEF) of samples were collected in an effort to measure the thickness of mono- and bi-layers; in parallel scans of larger areas were undertaken to assess heterogeneities in samples with spatial resolution of ˜2 μm. Complementary spectroscopic information from CRM collected with both a 514.5-nm argon-ion and a 785-nm diode lasers coupled with a 100X objective and a motorised stage was carried out. Comparison of C-H stretching regions of Raman spectra allowed the differentiation between different molecular materials and the fingerprint region was employed for the depth profiling of the samples.

  3. Rapeseed or linseed in dairy cow diets over 2 consecutive lactations: effects on adipose fatty acid profile and carry-over effects on milk fat composition in subsequent early lactation.

    PubMed

    Lerch, S; Pires, J A A; Delavaud, C; Shingfield, K J; Pomiès, D; Martin, B; Chilliard, Y; Ferlay, A

    2015-02-01

    During early lactation, milk fatty acid (FA) composition is influenced by diet, animal genetics, and the high availability of preformed FA from body-fat mobilization. Long-term prepartum dietary oilseed supplementation could, therefore, modify milk FA composition postpartum in the subsequent lactation through changes in adipose tissue (AT) FA profile. To test this hypothesis, measurements were made in 19 Holstein cows fed grass-based diets containing no additional lipid (control, CTL; n=4) or supplemented with extruded linseeds (EL; n=4), cold-pressed fat-rich rapeseed meal (FRM; n=6), or whole unprocessed rapeseeds (WR; n=5) over 2 consecutive lactations (yr 1 and 2) and 2 dry periods. Oilseed supplements were withdrawn from the diets 23 d before the calving of yr 3, following the end of the previous experimental periods in yr 1 to 2. Thereafter, all cows received a total mixed ration composed of grass silage, grass hay, and concentrates (forage:concentrate ratio of 70:30 on a dry-matter basis). Cows previously fed EL and WR had a lower milk fat content (6.32% for CTL and FRM vs. 5.46% for EL and WR) and yield (1.90kg/d for CTL and FRM vs. 1.61kg/d for EL and WR) during the first week of lactation. Treatment effects on milk fat content and yield did not persist into lactation wk 3 and 7. Whatever the week, EL and WR increased concentration of FA in milk synthesized de novo (i.e., carbon number ≤15; 17.1g/100g of FA for CTL and FRM vs. 22.2g/100g of FA for EL and WR) and decreased concentration and secretion of preformed FA (i.e., carbon number ≥17; 56.1g/100g of FA for CTL and FRM vs. 49.9g/100g of FA for EL and WR). Alterations in milk FA composition may be explained by the lower availability of mobilized FA for uptake by the mammary gland, as indicated by the lower plasma nonesterified FA concentrations for EL and WR compared with CTL and FRM. Prepartum EL feeding increased AT and milk concentration of 18:3n-3 (0.96 vs. 0.79g/100g of milk FA for EL and the

  4. Oils and cancer.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, P E

    1997-05-01

    Epidemiologic evidence on the relationship between mineral oil exposure and cancer is reviewed. The review is restricted to occupations involving substantial dermal and inhalational exposure and for which an epidemiologic literature exists: metal machining, print press operating, and cotton and jute spinning. Mineral oils are complex mixtures of aliphatic hydrocarbons, naphthenics, and aromatics, the relative distribution of which depends on the source of the oil and the method of refinement. End-use products contain a variety of additives, and contamination by other agents generally occurs during use. Suspect agents include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (particularly benz[a]pyrene), nitrosamines, chlorinated paraffins, long-chain aliphatics, sulfur, N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine, and formaldehyde. The heterogeneity of this exposure makes epidemiologic study difficult and meta-analysis inappropriate. Nonetheless, several associations emerge from the literature with varying degrees of support. There is clear evidence that early formulations of mineral oils used in cotton and jute spinning and in metal machining were carcinogenic to the skin. Associations of mineral oil exposure with laryngeal and rectal cancer have received some support in the literature, particularly with respect to straight oils. Evidence is suggestive that grinding operations (which can entail either mineral oil-based or ethanolamine-based fluids) are associated with excess risk of cancer of the esophagus, stomach, and pancreas. A number of bladder cancer case-control studies have noted an association with work as a machinist. There is limited evidence of an association with cancer of the colon, prostate, and sinonasal region. Several studies of printers have yielded positive findings for lung cancer, whereas studies in metal machinists have been generally negative. The PAH and nitrosamine content of current formulations is lower than in the past and the implications of these changes in

  5. Oil and Gas Supply Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gass, S. I.

    1982-05-01

    The theoretical and applied state of the art of oil and gas supply models was discussed. The following areas were addressed: the realities of oil and gas supply, prediction of oil and gas production, problems in oil and gas modeling, resource appraisal procedures, forecasting field size and production, investment and production strategies, estimating cost and production schedules for undiscovered fields, production regulations, resource data, sensitivity analysis of forecasts, econometric analysis of resource depletion, oil and gas finding rates, and various models of oil and gas supply.

  6. Oil spill environmental forensics: the Hebei Spirit oil spill case.

    PubMed

    Yim, Un Hyuk; Kim, Moonkoo; Ha, Sung Yong; Kim, Sunghwan; Shim, Won Joon

    2012-06-19

    After the Hebei Spirit oil spill (HSOS) in December 2007, mixtures of three types of Middle East crude oil (total 12,547 kL) were stranded along 375 km of coastline in Western Korea. Emergency responses together with 1.3 million volunteers' activity rapidly removed ca. 20% of spilled oil but the lingering oils have been found along the heavily impacted shorelines for more than 4 years. The HSOS was the worst oil spill case in Republic of Korea, and there were many issues and lessons to be shared. In this study, we summarized some of the oil spill environmental forensic issues that were raised after the HSOS. Rapid screening using on-site measurement, long-term monitoring of multimedia, fingerprinting challenges and evaluation of the extent of the submerged oil were introduced, which supported decision making process of oil spill cleanup, mitigation of debates among stakeholders and provided scientific backgrounds for reasonable compensation.

  7. Process for producing lubricating oils and white oils

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, G.L.; Hu, W.C.

    1982-04-20

    The preparation of high quality, e.g., high viscosity index, base lubricating oils and white oils, particularly food grade white mineral oils, of suitable viscosity in high yield from a mineral oil distillate of suitable lubricating oil viscosity comprises contacting the distillate with hydrogen in four catalytic stages. The first reaction stage employs hydrocracking conditions. Subsequent reaction stages employ hydrogenation conditions. The second reaction stage, preferably employs a sulfur-resistant hydrogenation catalyst and produces a product suitable as a high quality lubricating oil base stock. The third reaction stage preferably employs a sulfur-resistant hydrogenation catalyst to obtain further aromatic saturation. The final stage employs a selective hydrogenation catalyst, optionally activated with a halogen, and produces a product suitable as a white oil, preferably a food grade white oil.

  8. 1985 oil spill conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-02-01

    This 1985 Oil Spill Conference, our ninth biennial meeting, presents another unique opportunity fo industry, government, and academic representatives to meet and exchange ideas to enhance our knowledge and understanding of the prevention, behavior, control, and cleanup of oil spills. Growing international and domestic participation, and the continued worldwide use of the Proceedings of past oil spill conferences as valuable reference sources affirms the importance and quality of these conferences. It is my firm belief, furthermore, that the conferences have contributed substantially to the reduction in the number of marine oil spills, and to our increased cleanup capabilities. The sponsoring organizations--the United States Coast Guard, the American Petroleum Institute, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency--have combined their efforts to provide a program of timely technical content which affords the opportunity to review the state-of-the-art accomplishments since our last conference in 1983. Finally, I hope that the knowledge and associations developed at this conference will influence your decision to participate in the 1987 Oil Spill Conference, to be held in Baltimore, Maryland.

  9. Abandoned Texas oil fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

  10. Pyrolysis Oil Biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Meier, Dietrich

    2017-03-14

    In biorefineries several conversion processes for biomasses may be applied to obtain maximum value from the feed materials. One viable option is the liquefaction of lignocellulosic feedstocks or residues by fast pyrolysis. The conversion technology requires rapid heating of the biomass particles along with rapid cooling of the hot vapors and aerosols. The main product, bio-oil, is obtained in yields of up to 75 wt% on a dry feed basis, together with by-product char and gas which are used within the process to provide the process heat requirements; there are no waste streams other than flue gas and ash. Bio-oils from fast pyrolysis have a great potential to be used as renewable fuel and/or a source for chemical feedstocks. Existing technical reactor designs are presented together with actual examples. Bio-oil characterization and various options for bio-oil upgrading are discussed based on the potential end-use. Existing and potential utilization alternatives for bio-oils are presented with respect to their use for heat and power generation as well as chemical and material use.

  11. 21 CFR 172.861 - Cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.861 Cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils. The food additive, cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil,...

  12. Engine wear and lubricating oil contamination from plant oil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Darcey, C.L.; LePori, W.A.; Yarbrough, C.M.

    1982-12-01

    Engine disassembly with wear measurements, and lubricating oil analysis were used to determine wear rates on a one cylinder diesel engine. Results are reported from short duration tests on the wear rates of various levels of processed sunflower oil, a 25% blend with diesel fuel, and processed cottonseed oil.

  13. 27. DIABLO POWERHOUSE UPPER OIL ROOM: OBSOLETE WESTINGHOUSE DIELECTRIC OIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. DIABLO POWERHOUSE UPPER OIL ROOM: OBSOLETE WESTINGHOUSE DIELECTRIC OIL TESTING SET. OIL IS USED AS AN INSULATOR IN TRANSFORMERS AND ITS CONDUCTIVITY USED TO BE TESTED USING EQUIPMENT SUCH AS THIS, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Diablo Powerhouse, On Skagit River, 6.1 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  14. Locomotive oil filter

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, D.

    1987-04-07

    This patent describes a locomotive lube oil filter comprised of means for filtering lube oil sufficient for locomotive engine use without filter swelling or plugging due to water in the lube oil. It includes a filter medium having a substantial portion of lignin-containing fiber pulp derived from the disc refining of wood chips having a ligning content of at least about 10 percent under steam pressures in the range of about 90 psig to about 120 psig, at temperatures in the range of from about 330/sup 0/F to about 350/sup 0/F, and using energy levels in the range of from about 8 to about 35 HPD/ADT.

  15. Seed storage oil mobilization.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ian A

    2008-01-01

    Storage oil mobilization starts with the onset of seed germination. Oil bodies packed with triacylglycerol (TAG) exist in close proximity with glyoxysomes, the single membrane-bound organelles that house most of the biochemical machinery required to convert fatty acids derived from TAG to 4-carbon compounds. The 4-carbon compounds in turn are converted to soluble sugars that are used to fuel seedling growth. Biochemical analysis over the last 50 years has identified the main pathways involved in this process, including beta-oxidation, the glyoxylate cycle, and gluconeogenesis. In the last few years molecular genetic dissection of the overall process in the model oilseed species Arabidopsis has provided new insight into its complexity, particularly with respect to the specific role played by individual enzymatic steps and the subcellular compartmentalization of the glyoxylate cycle. Both abscisic acid (ABA) and sugars inhibit storage oil mobilization and a substantial degree of the control appears to operate at the transcriptional level.

  16. Integrated palm oil processing

    SciTech Connect

    Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Griffith, W.L.

    1983-12-01

    Tree palms are a promising source of fuel extenders and substitutes. They are perennials which bear oil for a period of two to three decades after a roughly four year preliminary growth period. Because palms are an important crop in many areas of Asia, Africa, and South America, considerable attention has been given to palm genetic improvement, with the result that tree palms are one of the most efficient energy crops, providing much better solar energy capture than, for example, sugar cane and cassava. Tree palms are particularly attractive in areas where more conventional farming would pose a significant threat of laterization or cause major ecological problems. Technology for palm oil production, including harvest, tree management, and oil pressing are generally suited to village or plantation use, and, for the most part, have been directed toward supplying process energy through the combustion of process waste products, such as palm fruit residue and palm bunch fibers.

  17. Variations in the IR spectra of yellow ochre due to mixing with binding medium and drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakhnina, I. A.; Brandt, N. N.; Kimberg, Ya. S.; Rebrikova, N. L.; Chikishev, A. Yu.

    2011-05-01

    ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is used to analyze the interaction of yellow ochre with a binding medium (linseed oil) and other pigments (orpiment and azurite). Spectra of four different samples of ochre are compared. Variations in the IR spectra of ochre resulting from drying it on various substrates are detected. Changes in spectra of the linseed oil upon its drying are analyzed.

  18. Aromatherapy and Essential Oils (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of essential oils from plants (flowers, herbs , or trees) as therapy to improve physical, emotional, and spiritual ... found very few side effects . Lavender and tea tree essential oils have been found to have some ...

  19. Crude Oil Spills and Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Health Journal Articles on Oil Dispersants and Invertebrates, Seawater, Plants and Environment PubMed - Biomedical journal literature ... of Health Journal Articles on Oil Spills and Invertebrates, Seawater, Plants and Environment PubMed - Biomedical journal literature ...

  20. Vegetable Oils and Animal Fats

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    non-petroleum oils are also regulated under CFR 112. Like petroleum oils, they can cause devastating physical effects, be toxic, destroy food supplies and habitats, produce rancid odors, foul shorelines and treatment plants, be flammable, and linger.

  1. Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts in the Breast Mastitis Duct Ectasia Other Non-cancerous Breast Conditions Breast ... Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts in the Breast Mastitis Duct Ectasia Other Non-cancerous Breast Conditions Back ...

  2. Extracting Oil From Tar Sands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, L. B.; Daly, D.

    1984-01-01

    Recovery of oil from tar sands possible by batch process, using steam produced by solar heater. In extraction process, solar heater provides steam for heating solvent boiler. Boiling solvent removes oil from tar sands in Soxhlet extractor.

  3. Crude Oil Characterization Data Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A computer program has been written which allows rapid retrieval and selection of CONUS and OCONUS crude oil characterization data. The computer... crude oil characterization data, including geographic location, production rate, reserves quantity and physical properties.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL 1 CRUDE OIL CLEANER

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technical product bulletin: this surface washing agent is used in oil spill cleanups on solid surfaces including beaches, rocks, machines, buildings, and tools. The oil and cleaner form a loose emulsion that can be rinsed away.

  5. 7 CFR 985.4 - Spearmint oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 985.4 Spearmint oil. Spearmint oil, hereinafter referred to as oil, means essential oil extracted by distillation from... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spearmint oil. 985.4 Section 985.4 Agriculture...

  6. 7 CFR 985.4 - Spearmint oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 985.4 Spearmint oil. Spearmint oil, hereinafter referred to as oil, means essential oil extracted by distillation from... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Spearmint oil. 985.4 Section 985.4 Agriculture...

  7. 7 CFR 985.4 - Spearmint oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 985.4 Spearmint oil. Spearmint oil, hereinafter referred to as oil, means essential oil extracted by distillation from... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spearmint oil. 985.4 Section 985.4 Agriculture...

  8. 7 CFR 985.4 - Spearmint oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 985.4 Spearmint oil. Spearmint oil, hereinafter referred to as oil, means essential oil extracted by distillation from... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spearmint oil. 985.4 Section 985.4 Agriculture...

  9. 7 CFR 985.4 - Spearmint oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 985.4 Spearmint oil. Spearmint oil, hereinafter referred to as oil, means essential oil extracted by distillation from... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spearmint oil. 985.4 Section 985.4 Agriculture...

  10. Oil and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kipling, M D

    1974-08-01

    A relatively high incidence of cancer of the skin, especially of the scrotum, due to occupational contact with mineral oil has been observed among shale oil workers and cotton mule spinners and, since the Second World War, among machine operators in the Birmingham region. A study has been made of the factors causing this high incidence and evidence is given that the respiratory and digestive tracts as well as the skin may be affected. The preventive measures are described and the suggestion made that they appear at the present time to be effective.

  11. Refrigerating machine oil

    SciTech Connect

    Nozawa, K.

    1981-03-17

    Refrigerating machine oil to be filled in a sealed motorcompressor unit constituting a refrigerating cycle system including an electric refrigerator, an electric cold-storage box, a small-scaled electric refrigerating show-case, a small-scaled electric cold-storage show-case and the like, is arranged to have a specifically enhanced property, in which smaller initial driving power consumption of the sealed motor-compressor and easier supply of the predetermined amount of the refrigerating machine oil to the refrigerating system are both guaranteed even in a rather low environmental temperature condition.

  12. Oil Spill Cleanup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Petroleum Remediation Product (PRP) is a new way of cleaning up oil spills. It consists of thousands of microcapsules, tiny balls of beeswax with hollow centers, containing live microorganisms and nutrients to sustain them. As oil flows through the microcapsule's shell, it is consumed and digested by the microorganisms. Pressure buildup causes the PRP to explode and the enzymes, carbon dioxide and water are released into the BioBoom used in conjunction with PRP, preventing contaminated water from spreading. The system incorporates technology originally developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Marshall Space Flight Center.

  13. Dispersants displace hot oiling

    SciTech Connect

    Wash, R.

    1984-02-01

    Laboratory experiments and field testing of dispersants in producing wells have resulted in development of 2 inexpensive paraffin dispersant packages with a broad application range, potential for significant savings over hot oiling, and that can be applied effectively by both continuous and batch treating techniques. The 2 dispersants are soluble in the carrier solvent (one soluble in oil, one in water); are able to readily disperse the wax during a hot flask test conducted in a laboratory; and leave the producing interval water wet. Field data on the 2 dispersants are tabulated, demonstrating their efficacy.

  14. Oil and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kipling, M D

    1974-01-01

    A relatively high incidence of cancer of the skin, especially of the scrotum, due to occupational contact with mineral oil has been observed among shale oil workers and cotton mule spinners and, since the Second World War, among machine operators in the Birmingham region. A study has been made of the factors causing this high incidence and evidence is given that the respiratory and digestive tracts as well as the skin may be affected. The preventive measures are described and the suggestion made that they appear at the present time to be effective. PMID:4858528

  15. [Antioxidant activity of flaxseed oil].

    PubMed

    Prozorovskaia, N N; Rusina, I F; Lupinovich, V L; Beketova, N A; Sorokin, I V; Ipatova, O M; Levachev, M M

    2003-01-01

    Effective concentration of antioxidants and its reactivity toward peroxil radicals (constant k7) have been measured by the chemiluminescence technique for flaxseed oil. Effective concentration of antioxidants is shown to depend on the technology of producing flaxseed oil; period of seed storage before use; and storing duration of flaxseed oil also. Minor component content of flaxseed oil, which may be the members of antioxidant pool, has been quantitatively estimated.

  16. Oil recovery from tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Boesiger, D.D.; Siefkin, J.M.

    1983-01-11

    A process for recovering oil from oil wet and particularly from oil-wet, acidic tar sands is described in which these sands are subjected to vigorous fluidization in the presence of water, air and a surfactant but in the absence of an extraneous hydrocarbon solvent. This step produces a multiphase mixture including an oil containing froth enabling gravity separation, E.G. In hydrocyclone.

  17. Green bio-oil extraction for oil crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainab, H.; Nurfatirah, N.; Norfaezah, A.; Othman, H.

    2016-06-01

    The move towards a green bio-oil extraction technique is highlighted in this paper. The commonly practised organic solvent oil extraction technique could be replaced with a modified microwave extraction. Jatropha seeds (Jatropha curcas) were used to extract bio-oil. Clean samples were heated in an oven at 110 ° C for 24 hours to remove moisture content and ground to obtain particle size smaller than 500μm. Extraction was carried out at different extraction times 15 min, 30 min, 45 min, 60 min and 120 min to determine oil yield. The biooil yield obtained from microwave assisted extraction system at 90 minutes was 36% while that from soxhlet extraction for 6 hours was 42%. Bio-oil extracted using the microwave assisted extraction (MAE) system could enhance yield of bio-oil compared to soxhlet extraction. The MAE extraction system is rapid using only water as solvent which is a nonhazardous, environment-friendly technique compared to soxhlet extraction (SE) method using hexane as solvent. Thus, this is a green technique of bio-oil extraction using only water as extractant. Bio-oil extraction from the pyrolysis of empty fruit bunch (EFB), a biomass waste from oil palm crop, was enhanced using a biocatalyst derived from seashell waste. Oil yield for non-catalytic extraction was 43.8% while addition of seashell based biocatalyst was 44.6%. Oil yield for non-catalytic extraction was 43.8% while with addition of seashell-based biocatalyst was 44.6%. The pH of bio-oil increased from 3.5 to 4.3. The viscosity of bio-oil obtained by catalytic means increased from 20.5 to 37.8 cP. A rapid and environment friendly extraction technique is preferable to enhance bio-oil yield. The microwave assisted approach is a green, rapid and environmental friendly extraction technique for the production of bio-oil bearing crops.

  18. Oil from algae; salvation from peak oil?

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    A review is presented of the use of algae principally to produce biodiesel fuel, as a replacement for conventional fuel derived from petroleum. The imperative for such a strategy is that cheap supplies of crude oil will begin to wane within a decade and land-based crops cannot provide more than a small amount of the fuel the world currently uses, even if food production were allowed to be severely compromised. For comparison, if one tonne of biodiesel might be produced say, from rape-seed per hectare, that same area of land might ideally yield 100 tonnes of biodiesel grown from algae. Placed into perspective, the entire world annual petroleum demand which is now provided for by 31 billion barrels of crude oil might instead be met from algae grown on an area equivalent to 4% of that of the United States. As an additional benefit, in contrast to growing crops it is not necessary to use arable land, since pond-systems might be placed anywhere, even in deserts, and since algae grow well on saline water or wastewaters, no additional burden is imposed on freshwater-a significant advantage, as water shortages threaten. Algae offer the further promise that they might provide future food supplies, beyond what can be offered by land-based agriculture to a rising global population.

  19. Vegetable oil fuels: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Karaosmanoglu, F.

    1999-04-01

    Using vegetable oils as fuel alternatives has economic, environmental, and energy benefits for Turkey. The present work provides insight to the status of vegetable oil fuels in Turkey. A brief historical background of the issue, as well as an up to date review of the research carried out on vegetable oil fuels, is given and the future of their production and application is discussed.

  20. Burning crude oil without pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Crude oil can be burned at drilling sites by two-stage combustion process without producing pollution. Process allows easier conformance to strict federal or state clean air standards without installation of costly pollution removal equipment. Secondary oil recovery can be accomplished with injection of steam heating by burning oil.