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Sample records for lipid layer determined

  1. Stationary phase thickness determines the quality of thin-layer chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization mass spectra of lipids.

    PubMed

    Griesinger, Hans; Fuchs, Beate; Süß, Rosmarie; Matheis, Katerina; Schulz, Michael; Schiller, Jürgen

    2014-04-15

    Normal phase thin-layer chromatography (NP TLC) is an established method of (phospho)lipid analysis. The determination of the fatty acyl composition is, however, a more challenging task by NP TLC. The direct coupling of TLC separation with mass spectrometric detection (e.g., matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, MALDI MS), however, enables a detailed characterization of complex lipid mixtures. Here we show that the thickness of the silica gel layer has a considerable effect on the quality of the mass spectra recorded directly from the TLC plate. In particular, the intensity of the matrix background signals can be reduced if "thinner" TLC layers are used. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Composite S-layer lipid structures

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2010-01-01

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state of the art survey how S-layer proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas for application of composite S-layer membrane systems concern sensor systems involving specific membrane functions. PMID:19303933

  3. QUALITY ASSURANCE STUDY OF MARINE LIPID CLASS DETERMINATION USING CHROMAROD/IATROSCAN( REG. TRADEMARK) THIN-LAYER CHROMATOGRAPHY-FLAME IONIZATION DETECTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Iatroscan thin-layer chromatorgraphy-flame ionization detector has been utilized to quantify lipid classes in marine samples. This method was evaluated relative to established quality assurance (QA) procedures used for the gas chromatographic analysis of PCBs. A method for ext...

  4. Control of the morphology of lipid layers by substrate surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Granqvist, Niko; Yliperttula, Marjo; Välimäki, Salla; Pulkkinen, Petri; Tenhu, Heikki; Viitala, Tapani

    2014-03-18

    In this study, surface coatings were used to control the morphology of the deposited lipid layers during vesicle spreading, i.e., to control if liposomes self-assemble on a surface into a supported lipid bilayer or a supported vesicular layer. The influence of the properties of the surface coating on formation of the deposited lipid layer was studied with quartz crystal microbalance and two-wavelength multiparametric surface plasmon resonance techniques. Control of lipid self-assembly on the surface was achieved by two different types of soft substrate materials, i.e., dextran and thiolated polyethylene glycol, functionalized with hydrophobic linkers for capturing the lipid layer. The low-molecular-weight dextran-based surface promoted formation of supported lipid bilayers, while the thiolated polyethylene glycol-based surface promoted supported vesicular layer formation. A silicon dioxide surface was used as a reference surface in both measurement techniques. In addition to promoting supported lipid bilayer formation of known lipid mixtures, the dextran surface also promoted supported lipid bilayer formation of vesicles containing the cell membrane extract of human hepatoblastoma cells. The new dextran-based surface was also capable of protecting the supported lipid bilayer against dehydration when exposed to a constant flow of air. The well-established quartz crystal microbalance technique was effective in determining the morphology of the formed lipid layer, while the two-wavelength surface plasmon resonance analysis enabled further complementary characterization of the adsorbed supported lipid bilayers and supported vesicular layers.

  5. Evaluation of the lipid-rich layer of reamer aspirate.

    PubMed

    Kay Sinclair, Sarina S; Jeray, Kyle J; Tanner, Stephanie L; Burg, Karen J L

    2010-08-01

    The fatty layer of aspirate obtained by reaming the femoral shaft using a reamer/irrigator/aspirator (RIA) device was characterized for fatty acid content and the presence of adult stem cells. Gas chromatography analysis was performed on samples taken from multiple patients to determine and compare the fatty acid contents of aspirate lipid samples. All four patients had the same four fatty acids present in the highest percentages: oleic, palmitic, linoleic and stearic. After successful isolation from bulk material, cells isolated from this lipid-rich layer were studied to determine their osteogenic and growth potential on a clinically available ceramic bone graft substitute. The results of metabolic activity and intracellular protein assays indicated that the ceramics supported growth of the cells isolated from the aspirate fat layer, although levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression were low for cells grown on the ceramics. Cells will not transition along the osteogenic pathway when they are actively dividing, and active growth may have contributed to the lack of ALP expression in this study. Isolated cells grown on tissue culture plastic expressed significant levels of the bone marker ALP. The results of this study suggest that cells isolated from the fat layer of RIA aspirate proliferate on ceramic bone void filler and have the potential to differentiate along an osteogenic pathway. Previously considered waste, the lipid-rich fat layer of aspirate may be a source of mesenchymal stem cells that, either alone or in conjunction with currently available synthetic bone graft material, could be used to stimulate new bone growth.

  6. Combined urea-thin layer chromatography and silver nitrate-thin layer chromatography for micro separation and determination of hard-to-detect branched chain fatty acids in natural lipids.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xingguo; Liu, Yijun; Xiang, Jingying; Wang, Xiaosan; Zhang, Huijun; Yao, Yunping; Liu, Ruijie; Zou, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Jianhua; Jin, Qingzhe

    2015-12-18

    A simple, fast and efficient procedure was developed for micro separation and enrichment of branched chain fatty acids (BCFA) from natural products using successive thin layer chromatography (TLC) technique coupling novel urea-TLC with AgNO3-TLC, which rely on the formation of urea adduction and AgNO3 bonding in methanol. These natural lipids contain a significant amount of straight chain fatty acids (FA). Fresh and fast urea-TLC and AgNO3-TLC plate making techniques were developed with more even coating and less coating material contamination before being utilized for separation. Goat milk fat was used as a model. Various experimental parameters that affect urea-TLC and AgNO3-TLC separation of BCFA were investigated and optimized, including coating of urea, concentration of original oil sample, mobile phase and sample application format. High efficiency of removal of straight chain FA was achieved with a low amount of sample in an easy and fast way. A total BCFA mix with much higher purity than previous studies was successfully achieved. The developed method has also been applied for the concentration and analysis of BCFA in cow milk fat and Anchovy oil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of neutral lipids in tear fluid lipid layer: coarse-grained simulation study.

    PubMed

    Telenius, Jelena; Koivuniemi, Artturi; Kulovesi, Pipsa; Holopainen, Juha M; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2012-12-11

    Tear fluid lipid layer (TFLL) residing at the air-water interface of tears has been recognized to play an important role in the development of dry eye syndrome. Yet, the composition, structure, and mechanical properties of TFLL are only partly known. Here, we report results of coarse-grained simulations of a lipid layer comprising phospholipids, free fatty acids, cholesteryl esters, and triglycerides at the air-water interface to shed light on the properties of TFLL. We consider structural as well as dynamical properties of the lipid layer as a function of surface pressure. Simulations revealed that neutral lipids reside heterogeneously between phospholipids at relatively low pressures but form a separate hydrophobic phase with increasing surface pressure, transforming the initial lipid monolayer to a two-layered structure. When the model of TFLL was compared to a one-component phospholipid monolayer system, we found drastic differences in both structural and dynamical properties that explain the prominent role of neutral lipids as stabilizers of the TFLL. Based on our results, we suggest that neutral lipids are able to increase the stability of the TFLL by modulating its dynamical and structural behavior, which is important for the proper function of tear film.

  8. Lipid Layers on Polyelectrolyte Multilayers: Understanding Lipid-Polyelectrolyte Interactions and Applications on the Surface Engineering of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Diamanti, Eleftheria; Gregurec, Danijela; Gabriela, Romero; Cuellar, J L; Donath, E; Moya, S E

    2016-06-01

    In this manuscript we review work of our group on the assembly of lipid layers on top of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). The assembly of lipid layers with zwitterionic and charged lipids on PEMs is studied as a function of lipid and polyelectrolyte composition by the Quartz Crystal Microbalance. Polyelectrolyte lipid interactions are studied by means of Atomic Force Spectroscopy. We also show the coating of lipid layers for engineering different nanomaterials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) nanoparticles and how these can be used to decrease in vitro toxicity and to direct the intracellular localization of nanomaterials.

  9. Effect of meibomian lipid layer on evaporation of tears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miano, F.; Calcara, M.; Giuliano, F.; Millar, T. J.; Enea, V.

    2004-07-01

    The outer interface of a tear film was studied with the aid of a model system able to investigate the interfacial phenomena derived from the spreading of an insoluble lipid multilayer onto a tear-like aqueous fluid. The interactions of such a layer with proteins dissolved in the aqueous phase beneath were also investigated. Emphasis was given to evaporation phenomena because the increased rate of tear evaporation in humans is often related to a number of ocular dysfunctions. The model tear was studied as a pendant drop that permitted a functional evaluation of the effect of lipids and proteins upon the evaporation of water from the tear film.

  10. Tear film lipid layer: A molecular level view.

    PubMed

    Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2016-10-01

    Human cornea is covered by an aqueous tear film, and the outermost layer of the tear film is coated by lipids. This so-called tear film lipid layer (TFLL) reduces surface tension of the tear film and helps with the film re-spreading after blinks. Alterations of tear lipids composition and properties are related to dry eye syndrome. Therefore, unveiling structural and functional properties of TFLL is necessary for understanding tear film function under both normal and pathological conditions. Key properties of TFLL, such as resistance against high lateral pressures and ability to spread at the tear film surface, are directly related to the chemical identity of TFLL lipids. Hence, a molecular-level description is required to get better insight into TFLL properties. Molecular dynamics simulations are particularly well suited for this task and they were recently used for investigating TFLL. The present review discusses molecular level organization and properties of TFLL as seen by these simulation studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg.

  11. Lipid and protein maps defining arterial layers in atherosclerotic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Balluff, Benjamin; Maroto, Aroa S.; Carreira, Ricardo J.; van Zeijl, Rene J.M.; Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Padial, Luis R; McDonnell, Liam A.; Vivanco, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Subclinical atherosclerosis cannot be predicted and novel therapeutic targets are needed. The molecular anatomy of healthy and atherosclerotic tissue is pursued to identify ongoing molecular changes in atherosclerosis development. Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) accounts with the unique advantage of analyzing proteins and metabolites (lipids) while preserving their original localization; thus two dimensional maps can be obtained. Main molecular alterations were investigated in a rabbit model in response to early development of atherosclerosis. Aortic arterial layers (intima and media) and calcified regions were investigated in detail by MALDI-MSI and proteins and lipids specifically defining those areas of interest were identified. These data further complement main findings previously published in J Proteomics (M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics. (In press); M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics 108 (2014) 465–468.) [1,2]. PMID:26217810

  12. Non-lamellar lipid assembly at interfaces: controlling layer structure by responsive nanogel particles.

    PubMed

    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P; Valldeperas, Maria; Hirst, Christopher; Montis, Costanza; Pálsson, Gunnar K; Wang, Meina; Nöjd, Sofi; Gentile, Luigi; Barauskas, Justas; Steinke, Nina-Juliane; Schroeder-Turk, Gerd E; George, Sebastian; Skoda, Maximilian W A; Nylander, Tommy

    2017-08-06

    Biological membranes do not only occur as planar bilayer structures, but depending on the lipid composition, can also curve into intriguing three-dimensional structures. In order to fully understand the biological implications as well as to reveal the full potential for applications, e.g. for drug delivery and other biomedical devices, of such structures, well-defined model systems are required. Here, we discuss the formation of lipid non-lamellar liquid crystalline (LC) surface layers spin-coated from the constituting lipids followed by hydration of the lipid layer. We demonstrate that hybrid lipid polymer films can be formed with different properties compared with the neat lipid LC layers. The nanostructure and morphologies of the lipid films formed reflect those in the bulk. Most notably, mixed lipid layers, which are composed of glycerol monooleate and diglycerol monooleate with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanogels, can form films of reverse cubic phases that are capable of responding to temperature stimulus. Owing to the presence of the nanogel particles, changing the temperature not only regulates the hydration of the cubic phase lipid films, but also the lateral organization of the lipid domains within the lipid self-assembled film. This opens up the possibility for new nanostructured materials based on lipid-polymer responsive layers.

  13. Profiling the triacylglyceride contents in bat integumentary lipids by preparative thin layer chromatography and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Risch, Thomas S; Savary, Brett J

    2013-09-05

    The mammalian integument includes sebaceous glands that secrete an oily material onto the skin surface. Sebum production is part of the innate immune system that is protective against pathogenic microbes. Abnormal sebum production and chemical composition are also a clinical symptom of specific skin diseases. Sebum contains a complex mixture of lipids, including triacylglycerides, which is species-specific. The broad chemical properties exhibited by diverse lipid classes hinder the specific determination of sebum composition. Analytical techniques for lipids typically require chemical derivatizations that are labor-intensive and increase sample preparation costs. This paper describes how to extract lipids from mammalian integument, separate broad lipid classes by thin-layer chromatography, and profile the triacylglyceride contents using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This robust method enables a direct determination of the triacylglyceride profiles among species and individuals, and it can be readily applied to any taxonomic group of mammals.

  14. Profiling the Triacylglyceride Contents in Bat Integumentary Lipids by Preparative Thin Layer Chromatography and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pannkuk, Evan L.; Risch, Thomas S.; Savary, Brett J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian integument includes sebaceous glands that secrete an oily material onto the skin surface. Sebum production is part of the innate immune system that is protective against pathogenic microbes. Abnormal sebum production and chemical composition are also a clinical symptom of specific skin diseases. Sebum contains a complex mixture of lipids, including triacylglycerides, which is species-specific. The broad chemical properties exhibited by diverse lipid classes hinder the specific determination of sebum composition. Analytical techniques for lipids typically require chemical derivatizations that are labor-intensive and increase sample preparation costs. This paper describes how to extract lipids from mammalian integument, separate broad lipid classes by thin-layer chromatography, and profile the triacylglyceride contents using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This robust method enables a direct determination of the triacylglyceride profiles among species and individuals, and it can be readily applied to any taxonomic group of mammals. PMID:24056580

  15. Lipids from the nacreous and prismatic layers of two Pteriomorpha mollusc shells.

    PubMed

    Farre, B; Dauphin, Y

    2009-02-01

    Mollusc shells are acellular biominerals, in which macromolecular structures are intimately associated with mineral phases. Most studies are devoted to proteins, despite sugars have been described. Lipids were extracted from the calcite prismatic and aragonite nacreous layer of two mollusc shells. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry shows that lipids are present in both samples, but they are not similar. Thin layer chromatography confirms that lipids are different in the two studied layers, so that it may be suggested they are species-dependant. Although not yet deciphered, their role in biomineralization and fossilisation processes is probably important.

  16. Debye-Hückel theory of mixed charged-zwitterionic lipid layers.

    PubMed

    Mengistu, D H; May, S

    2008-07-01

    Modeling electrostatic properties of macroions such as charged lipid membranes is especially simple within linear Debye-Hückel theory where analytical solutions are often available. Charged lipid layers typically also contain zwitterionic lipids that possess a large headgroup dipole. We incorporate the presence of zwitterionic lipids into the Debye-Hückel description and derive analytical expressions for the free energies of isolated and interacting lipid layers. Our approach accounts for two major characteristic features of zwitterionic lipids, the firm linkage of the dipole's negatively charged phosphate end to the lipid chain and the comparatively large conformational freedom of the opposite, positively charged, dipole end. This leads to differences in structural properties of mixed anionic and cationic lipid layers that are known from experiment and that the Debye-Hückel description qualitatively recovers. Most notably, this includes the different dependencies of the average cross-sectional area per lipid on the composition of mixed anionic and cationic membranes. In addition, we study the predictions of Debye-Hückel theory regarding the electrostatic influence of zwitterionic lipids on the stability of non-ideally mixed membranes as well as on the adsorption energy of oppositely charged macroions.

  17. Debye-Hückel theory of mixed charged-zwitterionic lipid layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengistu, D. H.; May, S.

    2008-07-01

    Modeling electrostatic properties of macroions such as charged lipid membranes is especially simple within linear Debye-Hückel theory where analytical solutions are often available. Charged lipid layers typically also contain zwitterionic lipids that possess a large headgroup dipole. We incorporate the presence of zwitterionic lipids into the Debye-Hückel description and derive analytical expressions for the free energies of isolated and interacting lipid layers. Our approach accounts for two major characteristic features of zwitterionic lipids, the firm linkage of the dipole's negatively charged phosphate end to the lipid chain and the comparatively large conformational freedom of the opposite, positively charged, dipole end. This leads to differences in structural properties of mixed anionic and cationic lipid layers that are known from experiment and that the Debye-Hückel description qualitatively recovers. Most notably, this includes the different dependencies of the average cross-sectional area per lipid on the composition of mixed anionic and cationic membranes. In addition, we study the predictions of Debye-Hückel theory regarding the electrostatic influence of zwitterionic lipids on the stability of non-ideally mixed membranes as well as on the adsorption energy of oppositely charged macroions.

  18. Biophysical investigations of the structure and function of the tear fluid lipid layer and the effect of ectoine. Part A: natural meibomian lipid films.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Mridula; Backers, Hannes; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-01

    The tear fluid lipid layer is the outermost part of the tear film on the ocular surface which protects the eye from inflammations and injuries. We investigated the influence of ectoine on the structural organization of natural meibomian lipid films using surface activity analysis and topographical studies. These films exhibit a continuous pressure-area isotherm without any phase transition. With the addition of ectoine, the isotherm is expanded towards higher area per molecule values suggesting an increased area occupied by the interfacial lipid molecules. The AFM topology scans of natural meibomian lipid films reveal a presence of fiber-like structures. The addition of ectoine causes an appearance of droplet-like structures which are hypothesized to be tri-acyl-glycerols and other hydrophobic components excluded from the lipid film. Further the material properties of the droplet-like structure with respect to the surrounding were determined by using the quantitative imaging mode of the AFM technique. The droplet-like structures were found to be comparatively softer than the surrounding. Based on the observations a preliminary hypothesis is proposed explaining the mechanism of action of ectoine leading to the fluidization of meibomian lipid films. This suggests the possibility of ectoine as a treatment for the dry eye syndrome.

  19. Effect of Lipid Head Groups on Double-Layered Two-Dimensional Crystals Formed by Aquaporin-0

    PubMed Central

    Hite, Richard Kevin; Chiu, Po-Lin; Schuller, Jan Michael; Walz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-0 (AQP0) is a lens-specific water channel that also forms membrane junctions. Reconstitution of AQP0 with dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and E. coli polar lipids (EPL) yielded well-ordered, double-layered two-dimensional (2D) crystals that allowed electron crystallographic structure determination of the AQP0-mediated membrane junction. The interacting tetramers in the two crystalline layers are exactly in register, resulting in crystals with p422 symmetry. The high-resolution density maps also allowed modeling of the annular lipids surrounding the tetramers. Comparison of the DMPC and EPL bilayers suggested that the lipid head groups do not play an important role in the interaction of annular lipids with AQP0. We now reconstituted AQP0 with the anionic lipid dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG), which yielded a mixture of 2D crystals with different symmetries. The different crystal symmetries result from shifts between the two crystalline layers, suggesting that the negatively charged PG head group destabilizes the interaction between the extracellular AQP0 surfaces. Reconstitution of AQP0 with dimyristoyl phosphatidylserine (DMPS), another anionic lipid, yielded crystals that had the usual p422 symmetry, but the crystals showed a pH-dependent tendency to stack through their cytoplasmic surfaces. Finally, AQP0 failed to reconstitute into membranes that were composed of more than 40% dimyristoyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA). Hence, although DMPG, DMPS, and DMPA are all negatively charged lipids, they have very different effects on AQP0 2D crystals, illustrating the importance of the specific lipid head group chemistry beyond its mere charge. PMID:25635393

  20. Lipid vesicular nanocarrier: Quick encapsulation efficiency determination and transcutaneous application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yibang; Ng, Weibeng; Feng, Xue; Cao, Fangying; Xu, Huaxi

    2017-01-10

    Nanoscale delivery systems have been widely investigated to overcome the penetration barrier of stratum corneum for effective transcutaneous application. The aim of this study is the development of effective vesicular formulations of ovalbumin and saponin which are able to promote penetration through the skin layers. Three kinds of vesicular formulations have been investigated as carriers, including liposomes, transfersomes and ethosomes, in which cholesterol and/or cationic lipid stearylamine are incorporated. The impact of membrane composition variations on the protein entrapment has been evaluated for each vesicle type. Formulations were characterized for particle size, polydispersity and encapsulation efficiency. The best formulations for each type of vesicle were subjected to in vivo transdermal immunization in mice. Among the three kinds of vesicular carrier, ethosomal nano carrier not only showed the best stability over a two months' storage, but also enabled the highest increase in the titer of serum antibody. In this regard, cationic nano-ethosomes can be considered as a promising vesicular carrier for transdermal vaccines. Meanwhile, we have developed a simple method to determine encapsulation efficiency of vesicular systems, which has potential application as a high throughput screening for vesicular formulations.

  1. Normal and lateral forces between lipid covered solids in solution: correlation with layer packing and structure.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, L M; Tiberg, F

    2002-01-01

    We report on the normal and lateral forces between controlled-density mono- and bilayers of phospholipid co-adsorbed onto hydrophobic and hydrophilic solid supports, respectively. Interactions between 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine layers were measured using an atomic force microscope. Notable features of the normal force curves (barrier heights and widths) were found to correlate with the thickness and density of the supported lipid layers. The friction and normal force curves were also found interrelated. Thus, very low friction values were measured as long as the supported layer(s) resisted the normal pressure of the tip. However, as the applied load exceeded the critical value needed for puncturing the layers, the friction jumped to values close to those recorded between bare surfaces. The lipid layers were self-healing between measurements, but a significant hysteresis was observed in the force curves measured on approach and retraction, respectively. The study shows the potential of using atomic force microscopy for lipid layer characterization both with respect to structure and interactions. It further shows the strong lubricating effect of adsorbed lipid layers and how this varies with surface density of lipids. The findings may have important implications for the issue of joint lubrication. PMID:11867453

  2. Polar Lipid Profile of Nannochloropsis oculata Determined Using a Variety of Lipid Extraction Procedures.

    PubMed

    Servaes, K; Maesen, M; Prandi, B; Sforza, S; Elst, K

    2015-04-22

    Lipid compositions obtained from microalgae species are affected by both the cultivation conditions and the extraction method used. In this study, the extraction of lipids from Nannochloropsis oculata using traditional and modern extraction technologies with several solvents has been compared. Because important polyunsaturated fatty acids are bound to polar lipids, these polar lipids were the main focus of this study. The dominant compounds in the glycolipid fractions were monogalactosyldiglycerides and digalactosyldiglycerides bearing fatty acid chains containing at least one site of unsaturation. Phosphatidylcholine and trimethylhomoserines were detected in the phospholipid fractions. The fatty acid profile comprised large fractions of C16:0, C16:1, C20:5, and C18:3. Extraction of specific compounds was determined by extraction efficiency as well as differences in the selectivity of the method used. The composition derived from a glycolipid fraction was observed to be affected by the method used to a greater extent than the phospholipid fraction.

  3. Early determinants of development: a lipid perspective1234

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Susan E

    2009-01-01

    This article results from an International Life Sciences Institute workshop on early nutritional determinants of health and development. The presentation on lipids focused mainly on the longer-chain products of the essential fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n–3), and cognitive development as among the most studied lipids and outcomes, respectively, in early human nutrition. Because there have been several recent reviews on this topic, the present review takes a broader perspective with respect to both early development and lipids: an expanded research agenda is plausible on the basis of observations from some human studies and from animal studies. Other lipids known to be provided in variable amounts to infants through human milk are cholesterol and gangliosides. Short sections address the current state of knowledge and some questions that could be pursued. PMID:19321568

  4. Determining the pivotal plane of fluid lipid membranes in simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Deserno, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Each leaflet of a curved lipid membrane contains a surface at which the area strain vanishes, the so-called pivotal plane. Its distance z0 from the bilayer's midplane arises in numerous contexts, for instance the connection between monolayer and bilayer moduli, stress-profile moments, or area-difference elasticity theories. Here, we propose two precise methods for determining the location of the pivotal plane in computer simulations, both of which rely on monitoring the lipid imbalance across a curved bilayer. The first method considers the ratio of lipid number between the two leaflets of cylindrical or spherical vesicles; it hence requires lipid flip-flop for equilibration. The second method looks at the leaflet difference across local sections cut out from a buckled membrane; this observable equilibrates even in the absence of flip-flop. We apply our methods to two different coarse-grained lipid models, the generic three-bead solvent-free Cooke model and a ten-bead representation of dimyristoylphosphocholine with the explicit solvent MARTINI model. The Cooke model is amenable to both methods and gives results that agree at the percent level. Using it, we also show that the pivotal plane moves outward as lipid curvature becomes more positive. The MARTINI model can only be analyzed with the buckling method; the obtained value z0 = 0.850(11) nm lies about 0.4 nm inwards of the glycerol backbone and is hence unexpectedly small. We attribute this to limitations of the coarse-grained description, suggesting that the location of the pivotal plane might be a good indicator for how well lipid models capture the microscopic origins of curvature elasticity. Finally, we also show that the pivotal plane position itself moves as the membrane is bent. The leading correction is linear in curvature, dependent on the Poisson ratio, and can matter when analyzing experimental results obtained from highly curved inverse hexagonal phases.

  5. The contribution of lipid layer movement to tear film thinning and breakup.

    PubMed

    King-Smith, P Ewen; Fink, Barbara A; Nichols, Jason J; Nichols, Kelly K; Braun, Richard J; McFadden, Geoffrey B

    2009-06-01

    To investigate whether the tear film thinning between blinks is caused by evaporation or by tangential flow of the tear film along the surface of the cornea. Tangential flow was studied by measuring the movement of the lipid layer. Four video recordings of the lipid layer of the tear film were made from 16 normal subjects, with the subjects keeping their eyes open for up to 30 seconds after a blink. To assess vertical and horizontal stretching of the lipid layer and underlying aqueous layer, lipid movement was analyzed at five positions, a middle position 1 mm below the corneal center, and four positions respectively 1 mm above, below, nasal, and temporal to this middle position. In addition, in 13 subjects, the thinning of the tear film after a blink was measured. The total upward movement could be fitted by the sum of an exponential decay plus a slow steady drift; this drift was upward in 14 of 16 subjects (P = 0.002). Areas of thick lipid were seen to expand causing upward or downward drift or horizontal movement. The velocity of the initial rapid upward movement and the time constant of upward movement were found to correlate significantly with tear film thickness but not with tear-thinning rate. Analysis indicated that the observed movement of the lipid layer was too slow to explain the observed thinning rate of the tear film. In the Appendix, it is shown that flow under a stationary lipid layer cannot explain the observed thinning rate. It is concluded that most of the observed tear thinning between blinks is due to evaporation.

  6. A preliminary investigation into the relationship between ocular surface temperature and lipid layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Giraldez, Maria Jesus; Naroo, Shehzad A; Resua, Carlos Garcia

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between OST, tear film stability as assessed by NIBUT and subjective evaluation of the lipid layer thickness in a young, asymptomatic, sample group (N=29). Non-invasive tear break-up time (NIBUT) and tear lipid layer structure were evaluated through a slit-lamp mounted Tearscope Plus. A self-calibrating infrared thermography camera was used to record two OST values (one immediately post-blink and one immediately pre the subsequent blink). The most common lipid layer pattern observed was the amorphous pattern (48.3%). Differences between post- and pre-blink OST values were observed (paired t-test; p<0.001). Significant differences of pre-blink OST values were observed between the closed marmoreal group with that from the amorphous and flow groups (Tukey post hoc test, p<0.05). There were no differences of NIBUT values between each lipid layer thickness (Kruskal-Wallis test; p=0.152). A no significant tendency for higher OST in eyes with increased NIBUT was observed. This study suggests that higher OST values could be associated with thicker tear lipid layer in normal subjects. The lack of significant results in relation with tear film stability may be due to only normal subjects were included.

  7. Four Characteristics and a Model of an Effective Tear Film Lipid Layer (TFLL)

    PubMed Central

    King-Smith, P. Ewen; Bailey, Melissa D.; Braun, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that a normal, effective tear film lipid layer (TFLL) should have the following four characteristics: 1) high evaporation resistance to prevent water loss and consequent hyperosmolarity; 2) respreadability, so it will return to its original state after the compression-expansion cycle of the blink; 3) fluidity sufficient to avoid blocking secretion from meibomian glands; 4) gel-like and incompressible structure that can resist forces that may tend to disrupt it. These characteristics tend to be incompatible; for example, lipids that form good evaporation barriers tend to be disrupted by compression-expansion cycles. It is noted that clues about the function and organization of the TFLL can be obtained by comparison with other biological lipid layers, such as lung surfactant and the lipid evaporation barrier of the skin. In an attempt to satisfy the conflicting characteristics, a “multilamellar sandwich model” of the TFLL is proposed, having features in common with the skin evaporation barrier. PMID:24112227

  8. Releasable layer-by-layer assembly of stabilized lipid nanocapsules on microneedles for enhanced transcutaneous vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    DeMuth, Peter C; Moon, James J; Suh, Heikyung; Hammond, Paula T; Irvine, Darrell J

    2012-09-25

    Here we introduce a new approach for transcutaneous drug delivery, using microneedles coated with stabilized lipid nanocapsules, for delivery of a model vaccine formulation. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microneedle arrays were coated with multilayer films via layer-by-layer assembly of a biodegradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (PBAE) and negatively charged interbilayer-cross-linked multilamellar lipid vesicles (ICMVs). To test the potential of these nanocapsule-coated microneedles for vaccine delivery, we loaded ICMVs with a protein antigen and the molecular adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A. Following application of microneedle arrays to the skin of mice for 5 min, (PBAE/ICMV) films were rapidly transferred from microneedle surfaces into the cutaneous tissue and remained in the skin following removal of the microneedle arrays. Multilayer films implanted in the skin dispersed ICMV cargos in the treated tissue over the course of 24 h in vivo, allowing for uptake of the lipid nanocapsules by antigen presenting cells in the local tissue and triggering their activation in situ. Microneedle-mediated transcutaneous vaccination with ICMV-carrying multilayers promoted robust antigen-specific humoral immune responses with a balanced generation of multiple IgG isotypes, whereas bolus delivery of soluble or vesicle-loaded antigen via intradermal injection or transcutaneous vaccination with microneedles encapsulating soluble protein elicited weak, IgG(1)-biased humoral immune responses. These results highlight the potential of lipid nanocapsules delivered by microneedles as a promising platform for noninvasive vaccine delivery applications.

  9. Analysis and quantification of plant membrane lipids by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wewer, Vera; Dörmann, Peter; Hölzl, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Galactolipids represent the predominant membrane lipid class in plants. In general, galactolipids are restricted to plastids, but during phosphate deficiency, they also accumulate in extraplastidial membranes. Two groups of plants can be distinguished based on the presence of a specific fatty acid, hexadecatrienoic acid (16:3), in chloroplast lipids. Plants that contain galactolipids with 16:3 acids are designated "16:3-plants"; the other group of plants which lack 16:3 contain mostly 18:3 in their galactolipids ("18:3-plants"). The methods in this chapter describe the extraction of membrane lipids from whole leaves, or from subcellular fractions, and their analysis via thin-layer chromatography (TLC) with different staining methods. Furthermore, a protocol for membrane lipid quantification is presented starting with the separation via TLC, transmethylation of the isolated lipids to fatty acid methyl esters, and their quantitative analysis via gas chromatography (GC).

  10. Tear lipid layer thickness with eye drops in meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fogt, Jennifer S; Kowalski, Matthew J; King-Smith, P Ewen; Epitropolous, Alice T; Hendershot, Andrew J; Lembach, Carrie; Maszczak, John Paul; Jones-Jordan, Lisa A; Barr, Joseph T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a lipid containing emollient eye drop, Soothe XP, which was reformulated in 2014 with a more stable preservative and buffer system, compared to a control, non-emollient, eye drop (Systane Ultra) in improving lipid layer thickness (LLT) in subjects with dry eye due to meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). This prospective single-center, open-label, cross-over, examiner masked-study enrolled subjects aged 30-75 years with lipid-deficient dry eye and a clinical diagnosis of MGD as determined by a slit lamp examination, an evaluation of meibomian gland drop out with meibography, and a standard patient evaluation of eye dryness questionnaire of >5. Eligibility was then determined by a LLT of <75 nm at baseline and the inability to increase LLT ≥15 nm with three blinks, as determined by interferometric methods. Subjects were randomized to receive a single emollient or non-emollient eye drop at Visit 1 and were crossed over for the alternate treatment at Visit 2. At each visit, LLT was measured prior to and 15 minutes following the instillation of the assigned eye drop. The primary endpoint was the change in LLT from baseline. Subjects (n=40) were enrolled and 35 completed the two study arms. Mean (±SD) patient age was 55.7 years (10.9) and 69% were female. Mean (±SD) LLT at baseline was 49.5 nm (9.2). Instillation of Soothe XP resulted in an increase in LLT to 77.5 nm (29.3) 15 minutes following drop instillation, which is an increase of 28.0 nm (27.4) (P<0.001). In contrast, LLT 15 minutes after the instillation of Systane Ultra was 50.8 nm (14.1), which was not statistically significant when compared to the baseline LLT. In this study of subjects with MGD, the emollient, or lipid containing eye drop, increased the LLT of tears when measured 15 minutes after instilling a single eye drop.

  11. Tear lipid layer thickness with eye drops in meibomian gland dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fogt, Jennifer S; Kowalski, Matthew J; King-Smith, P Ewen; Epitropolous, Alice T; Hendershot, Andrew J; Lembach, Carrie; Maszczak, John Paul; Jones-Jordan, Lisa A; Barr, Joseph T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a lipid containing emollient eye drop, Soothe XP, which was reformulated in 2014 with a more stable preservative and buffer system, compared to a control, non-emollient, eye drop (Systane Ultra) in improving lipid layer thickness (LLT) in subjects with dry eye due to meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). Patients and methods This prospective single-center, open-label, cross-over, examiner masked-study enrolled subjects aged 30–75 years with lipid-deficient dry eye and a clinical diagnosis of MGD as determined by a slit lamp examination, an evaluation of meibomian gland drop out with meibography, and a standard patient evaluation of eye dryness questionnaire of >5. Eligibility was then determined by a LLT of <75 nm at baseline and the inability to increase LLT ≥15 nm with three blinks, as determined by interferometric methods. Subjects were randomized to receive a single emollient or non-emollient eye drop at Visit 1 and were crossed over for the alternate treatment at Visit 2. At each visit, LLT was measured prior to and 15 minutes following the instillation of the assigned eye drop. The primary endpoint was the change in LLT from baseline. Results Subjects (n=40) were enrolled and 35 completed the two study arms. Mean (±SD) patient age was 55.7 years (10.9) and 69% were female. Mean (±SD) LLT at baseline was 49.5 nm (9.2). Instillation of Soothe XP resulted in an increase in LLT to 77.5 nm (29.3) 15 minutes following drop instillation, which is an increase of 28.0 nm (27.4) (P<0.001). In contrast, LLT 15 minutes after the instillation of Systane Ultra was 50.8 nm (14.1), which was not statistically significant when compared to the baseline LLT. Conclusion In this study of subjects with MGD, the emollient, or lipid containing eye drop, increased the LLT of tears when measured 15 minutes after instilling a single eye drop. PMID:27853352

  12. Lipid Layer-based Corrosion Monitoring on Metal Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    phospholipid bilayer works with protein complexes to regulate material transport, as well as to send and receive information between cells. While...disrupting the bilayer (9). If metal oxides are capable of disrupting and causing degradation of a phospholipid layer, it may be possible to...Strittmatter, P. Formation and Properties of 1000-Å-Diameter, Singel- Bilayer Phospholipid Vesicles. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1979, 76, 145–149. 6

  13. Biomimetic interfaces based on S-layer proteins, lipid membranes and functional biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2014-07-06

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state-of-the-art survey of how S-layer proteins, lipids and polymers may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer-supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and, thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas in the (lab-on-a-) biochip technology are combining composite S-layer membrane systems involving specific membrane functions with the silicon world. Thus, it might become possible to create artificial noses or tongues, where many receptor proteins have to be exposed and read out simultaneously. Moreover, S-layer-coated liposomes and emulsomes copying virus envelopes constitute promising nanoformulations for the production of novel targeting, delivery, encapsulation and imaging systems.

  14. Biomimetic interfaces based on S-layer proteins, lipid membranes and functional biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2014-01-01

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state-of-the-art survey of how S-layer proteins, lipids and polymers may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer-supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and, thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas in the (lab-on-a-) biochip technology are combining composite S-layer membrane systems involving specific membrane functions with the silicon world. Thus, it might become possible to create artificial noses or tongues, where many receptor proteins have to be exposed and read out simultaneously. Moreover, S-layer-coated liposomes and emulsomes copying virus envelopes constitute promising nanoformulations for the production of novel targeting, delivery, encapsulation and imaging systems. PMID:24812051

  15. Binding of DNA to zwitterionic lipid layers mediated by divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Mengistu, Demmelash H; Bohinc, Klemen; May, Sylvio

    2009-09-10

    Divalent cations, i.e., calcium, magnesium, and others, are able to enhance the ability of DNA to interact with membranes that are composed of zwitterionic lipids such as phosphatidylcholine. The resulting condensed complexes offer potential applications as nontoxic gene delivery vehicles. The present study suggests a generic theoretical model to describe the energetics and structural features of a zwitterionic lipid-DNA complex in the presence of divalent cations. Specifically, we consider the adsorption of a single molecule of double-stranded DNA onto a planar zwitterionic lipid layer. Our theoretical model is based on the continuum Poisson-Boltzmann formalisms, which we modified so as to account for the two opposite charges and orientational freedom of the zwitterionic lipid headgroups. We find a substantially more favorable adsorption free energy of the DNA if divalent cations are present. In addition, our model predicts the divalent cations to preferentially interact with the phosphate groups of the zwitterionic lipids, given these lipids are located in close vicinity to the DNA. This is accompanied by a small but notable reorientation of the zwitterionic headgroups toward the DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of DNA onto a zwitterionic lipid layer is not driven by the release of counterions. Instead, the binding leads to a partial redistribution of the divalent cations, from the phosphate groups of the DNA (prior to the binding) to the phosphate groups of the zwitterionic lipids (after the binding). Our results thus suggest a general physical mechanism underlying complex formation between DNA and zwitterionic lipids in terms of mean-field electrostatics, i.e., neither involving correlations nor specific interactions of the divalent cations.

  16. Biophysical investigations of the structure and function of the tear fluid lipid layers and the effect of ectoine. Part B: artificial lipid films.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Mridula; Brinkkötter, Marc; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-01

    The tear fluid lipid layer is present at the outermost part of the tear film which lines the ocular surface and functions to maintain the corneal surface moist by retarding evaporation. Instability in the structure of the tear fluid lipid layer can cause an increased rate of evaporation and thus dry eye syndrome. Ectoine has been previously shown to fluidize lipid monolayers and alter the phase behavior. In the current study we have investigated the effect of ectoine on the artificial tear fluid lipid layer composed of binary and ternary lipid mixtures of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesteryl esters and tri-acyl-glycerols. The focus of our study was mainly the structural and the biophysical aspects of the artificial tear fluid lipid layer using surface activity studies and topology analysis. The presence of ectoine consistently causes an expansion of the pressure-area isotherm indicating increased intermolecular spacing. The topology studies showed the formation of droplet-like structures due to the addition of ectoine only when tri-acyl-glycerol is present in the mixture of DPPC and chol-palmitate, similar to the natural meibomian lipids. Consequently, the hypothesis of an exclusion of tri/di-acyl-glycerol from the meibomian lipid film in the presence of ectoine in the subphase is confirmed. A model describing the effect of ectoine on meibomian lipid films is further presented which may have an application for the use of ectoines in eye drops as a treatment for the dry eye syndrome.

  17. Thermal phase transition behavior of lipid layers on a single human corneocyte cell.

    PubMed

    Imai, Tomohiro; Nakazawa, Hiromitsu; Kato, Satoru

    2013-09-01

    We have improved the selected area electron diffraction method to analyze the dynamic structural change in a single corneocyte cell non-invasively stripped off from human skin surface. The improved method made it possible to obtain reliable diffraction images to trace the structural change in the intercellular lipid layers on a single corneocyte cell during heating from 24°C to 100°C. Comparison of the results with those of synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments on human stratum corneum sheets revealed that the intercellular lipid layers on a corneocyte cell exhibit essentially the same thermal phase transitions as those in a stratum corneum sheet. These results suggest that the structural features of the lipid layers are well preserved after the mechanical stripping of the corneocyte cell. Moreover, electron diffraction analyses of the thermal phase transition behaviors of the corneocyte cells that had the lipid layers with different distributions of orthorhombic and hexagonal domains at 24°C suggested that small orthorhombic domains interconnected with surrounding hexagonal domains transforms in a continuous manner into new hexagonal domains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Releasable Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Stabilized Lipid Nanocapsules on Microneedles for Enhanced Transcutaneous Vaccine Delivery

    PubMed Central

    DeMuth, Peter C.; Moon, James J.; Suh, Heikyung; Hammond, Paula T.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2012-01-01

    Here we introduce a new approach for transcutaneous drug delivery, using microneedles coated with stabilized lipid nanocapsules for delivery of a model vaccine formulation. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microneedle arrays were coated with multilayer films via layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of a biodegradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (PBAE) and negatively-charged interbilayer-crosslinked multilamellar lipid vesicles (ICMVs). To test the potential of these nanocapsule-coated microneedles for vaccine delivery, we loaded ICMVs with a protein antigen and the molecular adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA). Following application of microneedle arrays to the skin of mice for 5 minutes, (PBAE/ICMV) films were rapidly transferred from microneedle surfaces into the cutaneous tissue, and remained in the skin following removal of the microneedle arrays. Multilayer films implanted in the skin dispersed ICMV cargos in the treated tissue over the course of 24 hours in vivo, allowing for uptake of the lipid nanocapsules by antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the local tissue and triggering their activation in situ. Microneedle-mediated transcutaneous vaccination with ICMV-carrying multilayers promoted robust antigen-specific humoral immune responses with a balanced generation of multiple IgG isotypes, whereas bolus delivery of soluble or vesicle-loaded antigen via intradermal injection or transcutaneous vaccination with microneedles encapsulating soluble protein elicited weak, IgG1-biased humoral immune responses. These results highlight the potential of lipid nanocapsules delivered by microneedles as a promising platform for non-invasive vaccine delivery applications. PMID:22920601

  19. Lipids from the nacreous and prismatic layers of two Pteriomorpha Mollusc shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farre, B.; Dauphin, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Mollusc shells are the best-known Ca-carbonate biominerals. They are commonly described as a mineralized two layered structure: an outer layer composed of calcite prismatic units, and an internal layer composed of tablets of aragonite: the nacreous layer. An external organic layer (periostracum) is present in most taxa. However, the most common structure in the Mollusc shell is the aragonite crossed lamellar layer, but aragonite prisms, calcite foliated layers and homogeneous layers have been also described by Boggild (1930) in all the Mollusc orders. Since, more detailed descriptions of Bivalve shells have been done (Taylor et al., 1969, 1973). Despite the nacroprismatic arrangement is rare, calcite prismatic and aragonite nacreous layers are the best studied because of their simple 3D structure and large units. Among these Molluscs, some Bivalve species composed of these two layers are of commercial interest, such as the pearl oyster, Pinctada margaritifera, cultivated in French Polynesia to produce black pearls. It is well established that Mollusc shells are composite structures of organic and inorganic components (Hatchett, 1799; Grégoire et al., 1955; Beedham, 1958; Simkiss, 1965; Mutvei, 1969; Cuif et al., 1980; Berman et al., 1993; Kobayashi and Samata, 2006). Numerous studies are concerned with the organic matrix of the shell. Organic components are commonly obtained after a strong or mild decalcification process. They are said to consist of both a soluble and insoluble fraction. The main part of studies is dedicated to the soluble components, and among them, proteins (Grégoire et al., 1955; Grégoire, 1961; Krampitz et al., 1976; Samata et al., 1980, 2004; Weiner, 1983; Miyamoto et al., 2006). Despite the pioneering work of Wada (1980) sugars are usually neglected despite their role in biomineralization. The third component of the organic matrix of calcareous biominerals is lipids. To date, there is a paucity of information concerning the presence

  20. Lipid modification gives rise to two distinct Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein populations.

    PubMed

    Kandiba, Lina; Guan, Ziqiang; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-03-01

    The S-layer glycoprotein is the sole component of the protein shell surrounding Haloferax volcanii cells. The deduced amino acid sequence of the S-layer glycoprotein predicts the presence of a C-terminal membrane-spanning domain. However, several earlier observations, including the ability of EDTA to selectively solubilize the protein, are inconsistent with the presence of a trans-membrane sequence. In the present report, sequential solubilization of the S-layer glycoprotein by EDTA and then with detergent revealed the existence of two distinct populations of the S-layer glycoprotein. Whereas both S-layer glycoprotein populations underwent signal peptide cleavage and N-glycosylation, base hydrolysis followed by mass spectrometry revealed that a lipid, likely archaetidic acid, modified only the EDTA-solubilized version of the protein. These observations are consistent with the S-layer glycoprotein being initially synthesized as an integral membrane protein and subsequently undergoing a processing event in which the extracellular portion of the protein is separated from the membrane-spanning domain and transferred to a waiting lipid moiety.

  1. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of self-assembled layers of lipid molecules on nanostructured Au and Ag substrates.

    PubMed

    Slekiene, Nora; Ramanauskaite, Lina; Snitka, Valentinas

    2017-03-01

    In this work surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been used for the investigation of the self-assembled layers of lipid molecules (SALLMs) deposited on the nanostructured Au and Ag surfaces. The SALLMs were prepared from one part of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (DOPS) and four parts of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) lipids. The synthesis of Au and Ag SERS substrates was based on the direct gold and silver ions reduction onto HF etched silicon wafers. Au SERS substrates were not suitable for the formation of SALLMs because of the inappropriate contact angle of surface. It was found that the formation of the SALLM does not take place on Au SERS substrate. However, it has been shown that the modification of Au SERS substrate with 1-dodecanothiol layer allows building the SALLM on its surface. In the case of Ag SERS substrate, the SALLM was deposited directly on its surface. The SERS spectra of the SALLMs were recorded in the CH stretching (2800-3000cm(-1)) and the fingerprint (<1.800cm(-1)) regions. It has been demonstrated that the SERS spectra of the SALLM recorded on Au substrate differs from that one recorded on Ag SERS substrate. These spectral differences were found to be determined by the different interaction mechanisms of the lipid molecules with nanostructured surfaces.

  2. Development of "all natural" layer-by-layer redispersible solid lipid nanoparticles by nano spray drying technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Taoran; Hu, Qiaobin; Zhou, Mingyong; Xia, Yan; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-10-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have gained tremendous attraction as carriers for controlled drug delivery. Despite numerous advances in the field, one long-standing historical challenge for their practical applications remains unmet: redispersibility after drying. In this work, a novel design of SLNs using a layer-by-layer (LbL) technique was developed and the formulations were optimized by surface response methodology (Box-Behnken design). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the fabrication of SLNs from all natural ingredients in the absence of any synthetic surfactants or coatings. The SLNs were prepared by a combined solvent-diffusion and hot homogenization method, with soy lecithin as natural emulsifier (first layer), followed by the subsequent coating with sodium caseinate (second layer) and pectin (third layer), both of which are natural food biopolymers. The adsorption of pectin coating onto caseinate was reinforced by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions induced by a pH-driven process along with thermal treatment. The innovative nano spray drying technology was further explored to obtain ultra-fine powders of SLNs. Compared to uncoated or single-layer coated SLNs powders, which showed severe aggregation after spray drying, the well-separated particles with spherical shape and smooth surface were obtained for layer-by-layer (LbL) SLNs, which were redispersible into water without variation of dimension, shape and morphology. The SLNs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared and high-performance differential scanning calorimetry for their physical properties. The LbL-coated SLNs based on all natural ingredients have promising features for future applications as drug delivery systems, overcoming the major obstacles in conventional spray drying and redispersing SLNs-based formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Probing Peptide and Protein Insertion in a Biomimetic S-Layer Supported Lipid Membrane Platform

    PubMed Central

    Damiati, Samar; Schrems, Angelika; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The most important aspect of synthetic lipid membrane architectures is their ability to study functional membrane-active peptides and membrane proteins in an environment close to nature. Here, we report on the generation and performance of a biomimetic platform, the S-layer supported lipid membrane (SsLM), to investigate the structural and electrical characteristics of the membrane-active peptide gramicidin and the transmembrane protein α-hemolysin in real-time using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring in combination with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A shift in membrane resistance is caused by the interaction of α-hemolysin and gramicidin with SsLMs, even if only an attachment onto, or functional channels through the lipid membrane, respectively, are formed. Moreover, the obtained results did not indicate the formation of functional α-hemolysin pores, but evidence for functional incorporation of gramicidin into this biomimetic architecture is provided. PMID:25633104

  4. Tear-film lipid layer morphology and corneal sensation in the development of blinking in neonates and infants

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenson, John G; Birhah, Rosalind; Murphy, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of lipid layer thickness and corneal sensation in the development of blinking in neonates. The study group comprised sixty-four neonates and infants (mean age 27.5 ± 15 (sd) weeks, range 3.4–52) whose mothers were attending a general practice healthy baby clinic. Spontaneous eye-blink activity was determined from digital videographic recordings; tear film lipid layer morphology wasexamined using interference patterns produced by the Keeler Tearscope™ Plus over a five-point grading scale (higher grades are associated with thick and stable lipid films); corneal sensation threshold was assessed with the Non-Contact Corneal Aesthesiometer (NCCA), using the eye-blink response as an objective indication that the cooling stimulus had been felt; palpebral aperture dimensions were measured using calibrated digital still images of the eye in the primary position. The overall mean spontaneous blink-rate was found to be 3.6 (± 0.3) blinks min−1, and the mean interblink time was 21.6 (± 2.8) s. The lowest blink-rates were observed in the 0–17-week age group (average 2 blinks min−1). The blink-rate showed a highly significant correlation with age (r = 0.46, P < 0.01). The overall mean lipid layer grading was 3.6 (± 0.2 SE) arbitrary units. Higher grades were found in the newborn and the mean grading score reduced with age (P < 0.01). The mean sensation threshold to blink (TTB) was 0.69 (0.04 SE) mbar, which did not differ from a control group of older subjects (P > 0.05). There was a rapid increase in palpebral aperture length and width from birth to 1 year old, with surface area increasing by 50% over the same period. We concluded that the low rate of spontaneous eye blink activity in neonates is associated with a thick stable lipid layer that may be a function of a small palpebral aperture. Furthermore, neonates appear to have the capacity to detect ocular surface cooling, which is a major trigger for spontaneous

  5. WEFTA interlaboratory comparison on total lipid determination in fishery products using the Smedes method.

    PubMed

    Karl, Horst; Oehlenschläger, Jörg; Bekaert, Karen; Bergé, Jean-Pascal; Cadun, Asli; Duflos, Guillaume; Poli, Bianca Maria; Tejada, Margarita; Testi, Silvia; Timm-Heinrich, Maike

    2012-01-01

    Lipid determination by the Smedes method was tested in an interlaboratory trial performed by nine laboratories from seven countries belonging to the West European Fish Technologists Association Analytical Methods Working Group. Five samples of fish and fishery products with different lipid contents, including two blind duplicates, were distributed among the participants. All laboratories applied a slightly modified Smedes method, which included extraction of lipids by cyclohexane and isopropanol, transfer of lipids to the cyclohexane phase by addition of water, phase separation by centrifugation, and gravimetric lipid determination. The results indicate that the RSD for reproducibility (RSD(R)) was between 4.11 and 6.31% for samples with moderate (7%) and high (14%) lipid content, depending on the sample. Larger SDs among the laboratories were obtained for a cod sample with low lipid content of 0.5%. The method is judged to be suitable as a routine method for lipid determination in fish and fishery products.

  6. Lipid modification of proteins in Archaea: attachment of a mevalonic acid-based lipid moiety to the surface-layer glycoprotein of Haloferax volcanii follows protein translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Zvia; Eichler, Jerry

    2002-01-01

    Once the newly synthesized surface (S)-layer glycoprotein of the halophilic archaeaon Haloferax volcanii has traversed the plasma membrane, the protein undergoes a membrane-related, Mg(2+)-dependent maturation event, revealed as an increase in the apparent molecular mass and hydrophobicity of the protein. To test whether lipid modification of the S-layer glycoprotein could explain these observations, H. volcanii cells were incubated with a radiolabelled precursor of isoprene, [(3)H]mevalonic acid. In Archaea, isoprenoids serve as the major hydrophobic component of archaeal membrane lipids and have been shown to modify other haloarchaeal S-layer glycoproteins, although little is known of the mechanism, site or purpose of such modification. In the present study we report that the H. volcanii S-layer glycoprotein is modified by a derivative of mevalonic acid and that maturation of the protein was prevented upon treatment with mevinolin (lovastatin), an inhibitor of mevalonic acid biosynthesis. These findings suggest that lipid modification of S-layer glycoproteins is a general property of halophilic archaea and, like S-layer glycoprotein glycosylation, lipid-modification of the S-layer glycoproteins takes place on the external cell surface, i.e. following protein translocation across the membrane. PMID:12069685

  7. Structural organisation and lipid composition of the epicuticular accessory layer of infective larvae of Trichinella spiralis.

    PubMed

    Gounaris, K; Smith, V P; Selkirk, M E

    1996-05-22

    The epicuticle of infective larvae of Trichinella spiralis represents the interface between this intracellular nematode parasite and the cytosol of mammalian skeletal muscle. The macromolecular structures that make up the epicuticle were studied by freeze-fracture electron microscopy and compositional analysis. Three fracture planes were observed: one with a typical plasma membrane-type bilayer organisation which was overlaid by two extended layers of lipid in an inverted cylindrical configuration. This overall structure remained unchanged in response to variations in temperature between 20 degrees C and 45 degrees C. The lipid cylinders were on average 6.8 nm in diameter, with randomly-associated particles that were not dissociated by high-salt treatment, indicative of hydrophobically associated proteins. The majority of the lipids were non-polar, consisting of cholesterol, cholesterol esters, mono- and tri-glycerides, and free fatty acids. Three major classes of phospholipids were identified: phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine. Total lipid extracts did not adopt an inverted cylindrical or micellar configuration on isolation, but formed flat sheets of lamellae as did the purified polar and non-polar fractions of the lipids. Isolated lipids did not undergo thermally-induced polymorphism between 20 degrees C and 60 degrees C and there was no pH dependency of the structures adopted. The fatty acid saturation levels of the phospholipids were compatible with the observation that they did not form polymorphic structures on isolation. We suggest that this unusual configuration is probably stabilised by the associated (glyco)proteins and may be required for selective permeation of nutrients from the host cell cytosol and/or for maintaining the high curvature of the parasite within the cell.

  8. Thermal stability of ladderane lipids as determined by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaeschke, A.; Lewan, M.D.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe, Damste J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has been recognized as a major process resulting in loss of fixed inorganic nitrogen in the marine environment. Ladderane lipids, membrane lipids unique to anammox bacteria, have been used as markers for the detection of anammox in marine settings. However, the fate of ladderane lipids after sediment burial and maturation is unknown. In this study, anammox bacterial cell material was artificially matured by hydrous pyrolysis at constant temperatures ranging from 120 to 365 ??C for 72 h to study the stability of ladderane lipids during progressive dia- and catagenesis. HPLC-MS/MS analysis revealed that structural alterations of ladderane lipids already occurred at 120 ??C. At temperatures >140 ??C, ladderane lipids were absent and only more thermally stable products could be detected, i.e., ladderane derivatives in which some of the cyclobutane rings were opened. These diagenetic products of ladderane lipids were still detectable up to temperatures of 260 ??C using GC-MS. Thus, ladderane lipids are unlikely to occur in ancient sediments and sedimentary rocks, but specific diagenetic products of ladderane lipids will likely be present in sediments and sedimentary rocks of relatively low maturity (i.e., C31 hopane 22S/(22S + 22R) ratio 0.5). ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Lipid bilayer thickness determines cholesterol's location in model membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Marquardt, Drew; Heberle, Frederick A.; Greathouse, Denise V.; ...

    2016-10-11

    Cholesterol is an essential biomolecule of animal cell membranes, and an important precursor for the biosynthesis of certain hormones and vitamins. It is also thought to play a key role in cell signaling processes associated with functional plasma membrane microdomains (domains enriched in cholesterol), commonly referred to as rafts. In all of these diverse biological phenomena, the transverse location of cholesterol in the membrane is almost certainly an important structural feature. Using a combination of neutron scattering and solid-state 2H NMR, we have determined the location and orientation of cholesterol in phosphatidylcholine (PC) model membranes having fatty acids of differentmore » lengths and degrees of unsaturation. The data establish that cholesterol reorients rapidly about the bilayer normal in all the membranes studied, but is tilted and forced to span the bilayer midplane in the very thin bilayers. The possibility that cholesterol lies flat in the middle of bilayers, including those made from PC lipids containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), is ruled out. Finally, these results support the notion that hydrophobic thickness is the primary determinant of cholesterol's location in membranes.« less

  10. Lipid bilayer thickness determines cholesterol's location in model membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Marquardt, Drew; Heberle, Frederick A.; Greathouse, Denise V.; Koeppe, II, Roger E.; Standaert, Robert F.; Van Oosten, Brad J.; Harroun, Thad A.; Kinnun, Jacob J.; Williams, Justin A.; Wassall, Stephen R.; Katsaras, John

    2016-10-11

    Cholesterol is an essential biomolecule of animal cell membranes, and an important precursor for the biosynthesis of certain hormones and vitamins. It is also thought to play a key role in cell signaling processes associated with functional plasma membrane microdomains (domains enriched in cholesterol), commonly referred to as rafts. In all of these diverse biological phenomena, the transverse location of cholesterol in the membrane is almost certainly an important structural feature. Using a combination of neutron scattering and solid-state 2H NMR, we have determined the location and orientation of cholesterol in phosphatidylcholine (PC) model membranes having fatty acids of different lengths and degrees of unsaturation. The data establish that cholesterol reorients rapidly about the bilayer normal in all the membranes studied, but is tilted and forced to span the bilayer midplane in the very thin bilayers. The possibility that cholesterol lies flat in the middle of bilayers, including those made from PC lipids containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), is ruled out. Finally, these results support the notion that hydrophobic thickness is the primary determinant of cholesterol's location in membranes.

  11. What determines drug solubility in lipid vehicles: is it predictable?

    PubMed

    Rane, Sagar S; Anderson, Bradley D

    2008-03-17

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems are of increasing interest to the pharmaceutical scientist because of their potential to solubilize drug molecules that may be otherwise difficult to develop. The ability to predict lipid solubility is an important step in being able to identify the right excipients to solubilize and formulate drugs in lipid formulations. However, predicting lipid solubility is complicated by the fact that interfacial effects may play a dominant role in these mixtures and the solubility may be affected by the microstructure (microemulsions, emulsions, oily solutions, etc.), as well as by the physicochemical properties of the oil, surfactant, co-solvent, and the drug. This review illustrates the fundamental factors that govern solubility in lipid mixtures and discusses models built at varying levels of sophistication to estimate the solubility. Examples from the literature are presented that demonstrate the application of these models, how their choice is related to the drug/lipid employed, and the challenges involved in solubility prediction. New data on the role water plays in altering lipid solubility, not only through its interaction with the solute, but also by changing the structure of lipids by promoting lipid organization are highlighted. The available data demonstrate that a rational understanding of solubilization in lipids is a worthwhile pursuit and models to predict at least the relative solubility from chemical structure have potential. Prediction of absolute solubility is more difficult as it requires knowledge of the drug's escaping tendency from the crystalline state. In recent years, it has become amply clear that for polar solutes, specific interactions are a critical factor governing solubility. Methods that can better take into account the specific as well as non-specific interactions between the solute and solvent, and the lipid microstructure, hold considerable promise for the future.

  12. Spectroscopic study of 3-Hydroxyflavone - protein interaction in lipidic bi-layers immobilized on silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voicescu, Mariana; Ionescu, Sorana; Nistor, Cristina L.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of 3-Hydroxyflavone with serum proteins (BSA and HSA) in lecithin lipidic bi-layers (PC) immobilized on silver nanoparticles (SNPs), was studied by fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. BSA secondary structure was quantified with a deconvolution algorithm, showing a decrease in α-helix structure when lipids were added to the solution. The effect of temperature on the rate of the excited-state intra-molecular proton transfer and on the dual fluorescence emission of 3-HF in the HSA/PC/SNPs systems was discussed. Evaluation of the antioxidant activity of 3-HF in HSA/PC/SNPs systems was also studied. The antioxidant activity of 3-HF decreased in the presence of SNPs. The results are discussed with relevance to the secondary structure of proteins and of the 3-HF based nano-systems to a topical formulation useful in the oxidative stress process.

  13. Structure-function relationship of tear film lipid layer: A contemporary perspective.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Georgi As; Eftimov, Petar; Yokoi, Norihiko

    2017-10-01

    Tear film lipid layer (TFLL) stabilizes the air/tear surface of the human eye. Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) resulting in quantitative and qualitative modifications of TFLL major (>93%) component, the oily secretion of meibomian lipids (MGS), is the world leading cause of dry eye syndrome (DES) with up to 86% of all DES patients showing signs of MGD. Caused by intrinsic factors (aging, ocular and general diseases) and by extrinsic everyday influences like contact lens wear and extended periods in front of a computer screen, DES (resulting in TF instability, visual disturbances and chronic ocular discomfort) is the major ophthalmic public health disease of the present time affecting the quality of life of 10-30% of the human population worldwide. Therefore there is a pressing need to summarize the present knowledge, contradictions and open questions to be resolved in the field of TFLL composition/structure/functions relationship. The following major aspects are covered by the review: (i) Do we have a reliable mimic for TFLL: MGS vs contact lens lipid extracts (CLLE) vs lipid extracts from whole tears. Does TFLL truly consist of lipids only or it is important to keep in mind the TF proteins as well?; (ii) Structural properties of TFLL and of its mimics in health and disease in vitro and in vivo. How the TFLL uniformity and thickness ensures the functionality of the lipid layer (barrier to evaporation, surface properties, TF stability etc.); (iii) What are the main functions of the TFLL? In this aspect an effort is done to emphasize that there is no single main function of TFLL but instead it simultaneously fulfills plethora of functions: suppresses the evaporation (alone or probably in cooperation with other TF constituents) of the aqueous tears; stabilizes (due to its surface properties) the air/tear surface at eye opening and during the interblink interval; and even acts as a first line of defense against bacterial invasion due to its detergency action on the

  14. Senarmont compensation for determining fibril angles of cell wall layers

    Treesearch

    Floyd G. Manwiller

    1966-01-01

    A technique originated by Preston, is explained for determining fibril angles of the secondary wall layers of fibers. A polarizing microscope equipped with Senarmont compensator is used to measure birefringence of the wall layers in series of sections cut at various angles to the long axis of the cells. Enough measurements are taken on each section to give a...

  15. Automatic classification of the interferential tear film lipid layer using colour texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Remeseiro, B; Penas, M; Barreira, N; Mosquera, A; Novo, J; García-Resúa, C

    2013-07-01

    The tear film lipid layer is heterogeneous among the population. Its classification depends on its thickness and can be done using the interference pattern categories proposed by Guillon. This papers presents an exhaustive study about the characterisation of the interference phenomena as a texture pattern, using different feature extraction methods in different colour spaces. These methods are first analysed individually and then combined to achieve the best results possible. The principal component analysis (PCA) technique has also been tested to reduce the dimensionality of the feature vectors. The proposed methodologies have been tested on a dataset composed of 105 images from healthy subjects, with a classification rate of over 95% in some cases.

  16. A hydrated phospholipid polymer-grafted layer prevents lipid-related oxidative degradation of cross-linked polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Kyomoto, Masayuki; Moro, Toru; Yamane, Shihori; Takatori, Yoshio; Tanaka, Sakae; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    The surface and substrate of a cross-linked polyethylene (CLPE) liner are designed to achieve resistance against oxidative degradation in the construction of hip joint replacements. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the oxidative degradation caused by lipid absorption of a highly hydrophilic nanometer-scaled thickness layer prepared by grafting a poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) layer and a high-dose gamma-ray irradiated CLPE with vitamin E blending (HD-CLPE[VE]). The HD-CLPE(VE) and PMPC-grafted HD-CLPE(VE) exhibited extremely high oxidation resistance regardless of lipid absorption, even though residual-free radical levels were detectable. The water wettability of the PMPC-grafted CLPE and PMPC-grafted HD-CLPE(VE) surfaces was considerably greater than that of untreated surfaces. The hydrated PMPC-grafted layer also exhibited extremely low solubility for squalene. Lipids such as squalene and cholesterol esters diminished the oxidation resistance of CLPE despite the vitamin E improvement. Notably, the PMPC-grafted surface was resistant to lipid absorption and diffusion as well as subsequent lipid-related oxidative degradation, likely because of the presence of the hydrated PMPC-grafted layer. Together, these results provide preliminary evidence that the resistance against lipid absorption and diffusion of a hydrated PMPC-grafted layer might positively affect the extent of resistance to the in vivo oxidation of orthopedic implants.

  17. Layer-by-layer coated lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles designed for use in anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Thiruganesh; Tran, Tuan Hiep; Choi, Ju Yeon; Cho, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2014-02-15

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers created via sequential adsorption of complimentary materials may be useful in the delivery of small molecules such as anti-cancer drugs. In this study, layer-by-layer (LbL) nanoarchitectures were prepared by step-wise deposition of naturally derived chitosan and hyaluronic acid on negatively charged hybrid solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs). A doxorubicin/dextran sulfate complex was incorporated into the SLNs. This resulted in the production of spherical nanoparticles ∼ 265 nm in diameter, with a zeta potential of approximately -12 mV. The nanoparticles were physically stable and exhibited controlled doxorubicin (DOX) release kinetics. Further pharmacokinetic manipulations revealed that in comparison with both free DOX and uncoated DOX-loaded SLNs, LbL-functionalized SLNs remarkably enhanced the circulation half-life and decreased the elimination rate of the drug. Cumulatively, our results suggest that this novel LbL-coated system, with a pH-responsive shell and molecularly targeted entities, has the potential to act as a vehicle to deliver medication to targeted tumor regions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Measurements of conformational changes during adhesion of lipid and protein (polylysine and S-layer) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Leckband, D; Chen, Y L; Israelachvili, J; Wickman, H H; Fletcher, M; Zimmerman, R

    1993-06-20

    The adhesion forces between various surfaces were measured using the "surface forces apparatus" technique. This technique allows for the thickness of surface layers and the adhesion force between them to be directly measured in controlled vapor or liquid environments. Three types of biological surfaces were prepared by depositing various lipid-protein monolayers (with thicknesses ranging from 1 to 4 nm) on the inert, molecularly smooth mica surface: (i) hydrophobic lipid monolayers; (ii) amphiphilic polyelectrolyte surfaces of adsorbed polylysine; and (iii) deposited bacterial S-layer proteins. The adhesion, swelling, and wetting properties of these surfaces was measured as a function of relative humidity and time. Initial adhesion is due mainly to the van der Waals forces arising from nonpolar (hydrophobic) contacts. Following adhesive contact, significant molecular rearrangements can occur which alter their hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance and increase their adhesion with time. Increased adhesion is generally enhanced by (i) increased relative humidity (or degree of hydration); (ii) increased contact time; and (iii) increased rates of separation. The results are likely to be applicable to the adhesion of many other biosurfaces, and show that the hydrophobicity of a lipid or protein surface is not an intrinsic property of that surface but depends on its environment (e.g., on whether it is in aqueous solution or exposed to the atmosphere), and on the relative humidity of the atmosphere. It also depends on whether the surface is in adhesive contact with another surface and-when considering dynamic (nonequilibrium) conditions-on the time and previous history of its interaction with that surface.

  19. An Analysis of Unstirred Layers in Series with "Tight" and "Porous" Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Thomas E.; Troutman, Susan L.

    1971-01-01

    The present experiments were designed to evaluate the effective thickness of the unstirred layers in series with native and porous (i.e., in the presence of amphotericin B) lipid bilayer membranes and, concomitantly, the respective contributions of membranes and unstirred layers to the observed resistances to the diffusion of water and nonelectrolytes between aqueous phases. The method depended on measuring the tracer permeability coefficients for the diffusion of water and nonelectrolytes (PDDi, cm sec-1) when the aqueous phase viscosity (η) was increased with solutes having a unity reflection coefficient, such as sucrose or dextran. The effective thickness of the unstirred layers (αt, cm) and the true, or membrane, permeability coefficients for diffusion of water and nonelectrolytes (Pmmi, cm sec-1) were computed from, respectively, the slope and intercept of the linear regression of 1/PDDi on η. In both the native and porous membranes, αt was approximately 110 x 10-4 cm. The ratio of Pf, the osmotic water permeability coefficient (cm sec-1) to PmmH2O was 1.22 in the native membranes and 3.75 in the porous membranes. For the latter, the effective pore radius, computed from Poiseuille's law, was approximately 5.6 A. A comparison of Pmmi and PDDi, indicated that the porous membranes accounted for 16, 25, and 66% of the total resistance to the diffusion of, respectively, H2O, urea, and glycerol, while the remainder was referable to the unstirred layers. PMID:5549099

  20. Determination of HEat Capacity of Yucca Mountain Strtigraphic Layers

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hadgu; C. Lum; J.E. Bean

    2006-06-20

    The heat generated from the radioactive waste to be placed in the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will affect the thermal-hydrology of the Yucca Mountain stratigraphic layers. In order to assess the effect of the movement of repository heat into the fractured rocks accurate determination of thermodynamic and hydraulic properties is important. Heat capacity is one of the properties that are required to evaluate energy storage in the fractured rock. Rock-grain heat capacity, the subject of this study, is the heat capacity of the solid part of the rock. Yucca Mountain consists of alternating lithostratigraphic units of welded and non-welded ash-flow tuff, mainly rhyolitic in composition and displaying varying degrees of vitrification and alteration. A number of methods exist that can be used to evaluate heat capacity of the stratigraphic layers that consist of different compositions. In this study, the mineral summation method has been used to quantify the heat capacity of the stratigraphic layers based on Kopp's rule. The mineral summation method is an addition of the weighted heat capacity of each mineral found in a specific layer. For this study the weighting was done based on the mass percentage of each mineral in the layer. The method utilized a mineralogic map of the rocks at the Yucca Mountain repository site. The Calico Hills formation and adjacent bedded tuff layers display a bimodal mineral distribution of vitric and zeolitic zones with differing mineralogies. Based on this bimodal distribution in zeolite abundance, the boundary between the vitric and zeolitic zones was selected to be 15% zeolitic abundance. Thus, based on the zeolite abundance, subdivisions have been introduced to these layers into ''vitric'' and ''zeolitic'' zones. Heat capacity values have been calculated for these layers both as ''layer average'' and ''zone average''. The heat capacity determination method presented in this report did not account for spatial

  1. Structural regions of MD-2 that determine the agonist-antagonist activity of lipid IVa.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Masashi; Tanamoto, Ken-ichi

    2006-03-03

    A cell surface receptor complex consisting of CD14, Toll-like receptor (TLR4), and MD-2 recognizes lipid A, the active moiety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Escherichia coli-type lipid A, a typical lipid A molecule, potently activates both human and mouse macrophage cells, whereas the lipid A precursor, lipid IVa, activates mouse macrophages but is inactive and acts as an LPS antagonist in human macrophages. This animal species-specific activity of lipid IVa involves the species differences in MD-2 structure. We explored the structural region of MD-2 that determines the agonistic and antagonistic activities of lipid IVa to induce nuclear factor-kappaB activation. By expressing human/mouse chimeric MD-2 together with mouse CD14 and TLR4 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, we found that amino acid regions 57-79 and 108-135 of MD-2 determine the species-specific activity of lipid IVa. We also showed that the replacement of Thr(57), Val(61), and Glu(122) of mouse MD-2 with corresponding human MD-2 sequence or alanines impaired the agonistic activity of lipid IVa, and antagonistic activity became evident. These mutations did not affect the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB, TLR4 oligomerization, and inducible phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha in response to E. coli-type lipid A. These results indicate that amino acid residues 57, 61, and 122 of mouse MD-2 are critical to determine the agonist-antagonist activity of lipid IVa and suggest that these amino acid residues may be involved in the discrimination of lipid A structure.

  2. Engineering and validation of a novel lipid thin film for biomembrane modeling in lipophilicity determination of drugs and xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Idowu, Sunday Olakunle; Adeyemo, Morenikeji Ambali; Ogbonna, Udochi Ihechiluru

    2009-01-01

    Background Determination of lipophilicity as a tool for predicting pharmacokinetic molecular behavior is limited by the predictive power of available experimental models of the biomembrane. There is current interest, therefore, in models that accurately simulate the biomembrane structure and function. A novel bio-device; a lipid thin film, was engineered as an alternative approach to the previous use of hydrocarbon thin films in biomembrane modeling. Results Retention behavior of four structurally diverse model compounds; 4-amino-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid (ADBA), naproxen (NPX), nabumetone (NBT) and halofantrine (HF), representing 4 broad classes of varying molecular polarities and aqueous solubility behavior, was investigated on the lipid film, liquid paraffin, and octadecylsilane layers. Computational, thermodynamic and image analysis confirms the peculiar amphiphilic configuration of the lipid film. Effect of solute-type, layer-type and variables interactions on retention behavior was delineated by 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and quantitative structure property relationships (QSPR). Validation of the lipid film was implemented by statistical correlation of a unique chromatographic metric with Log P (octanol/water) and several calculated molecular descriptors of bulk and solubility properties. Conclusion The lipid film signifies a biomimetic artificial biological interface capable of both hydrophobic and specific electrostatic interactions. It captures the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) in the determination of lipophilicity of molecules unlike the pure hydrocarbon film of the prior art. The potentials and performance of the bio-device gives the promise of its utility as a predictive analytic tool for early-stage drug discovery science. PMID:19735551

  3. Carbon and nitrogen abundances determined from transition layer lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Mena-Werth, Jose

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of determining relative carbon, nitrogen, and silicon abundances from the emission-line fluxes in the lower transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae is explored. Observations for main-sequence and luminosity class IV stars with presumably solar element abundances show that for the lower transition layers Em = BT sup -gamma. For a given carbon abundance the constants gamma and B in this relation can be determined from the C II and C IV emission-line fluxes. From the N V and S IV lines, the abundances of these elements relative to carbon can be determined from their surface emission-line fluxes. Ratios of N/C abundances determined in this way for some giants and supergiants agree within the limits of errors with those determined from molecular bands. For giants, an increase in the ratio of N/C at B-V of about 0.8 is found, as expected theoretically.

  4. Determining Membrane Protein-Lipid Binding Thermodynamics Using Native Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wen; Liang, Xiaowen; Russell, David H; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-04-06

    Membrane proteins are embedded in the biological membrane where the chemically diverse lipid environment can modulate their structure and function. However, the thermodynamics governing the molecular recognition and interaction of lipids with membrane proteins is poorly understood. Here, we report a method using native mass spectrometry (MS), to determine thermodynamics of individual ligand binding events to proteins. Unlike conventional methods, native MS can resolve individual ligand binding events and, coupled with an apparatus to control the temperature, determine binding thermodynamic parameters, such as for protein-lipid interactions. We validated our approach using three soluble protein-ligand systems (maltose binding protein, lysozyme, and nitrogen regulatory protein) and obtained similar results to those using isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance. We also determined for the first time the thermodynamics of individual lipid binding to the ammonia channel (AmtB), an integral membrane protein from Escherichia coli. Remarkably, we observed distinct thermodynamic signatures for the binding of different lipids and entropy-enthalpy compensation for binding lipids of variable chain length. Additionally, using a mutant form of AmtB that abolishes a specific phosphatidylglycerol (PG) binding site, we observed distinct changes in the thermodynamic signatures for binding PG, implying these signatures can identify key residues involved in specific lipid binding and potentially differentiate between specific lipid binding sites.

  5. Combined thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography with mass spectrometric analysis of lipid classes and fatty acids in malnourished polar bears (Ursus maritimus) which swam to Iceland.

    PubMed

    Eibler, Dorothee; Krüger, Sabine; Skírnisson, Karl; Vetter, Walter

    2017-03-01

    Between 2008 and 2011, four polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from the Greenland population swam and/or drifted on ice to Iceland where they arrived in very poor body condition. Body fat resources in these animals were only between 0% and 10% of the body weight (usually 25%). Here we studied the lipid composition in different tissues (adipose tissue if available, liver, kidney and muscle). Lipid classes were determined by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and on-column gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The fatty acid pattern of total lipids and free fatty acids was analyzed by GC/MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Additionally, cholesteryl esters and native fatty acid methyl esters, initially detected as zones in thin layer chromatograms, were enriched by solid phase extraction and quantified by GC/MS. The ratio of free fatty acids to native fatty acid methyl esters could be correlated with the remained body lipids in the polar bears and thus may also serve as a marker for other starving animals or even for humans.

  6. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins for Structure Determination using Lipidic Mesophases

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Martin; Porter, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    A detailed protocol for crystallizing membrane proteins by using lipidic mesophases is described. This method has variously been referred to as the lipidic cubic phase or in meso method. The method has been shown to be quite versatile in that it has been used to solve X-ray crystallographic structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins, proteins that are monomeric, homo- and hetero-multimeric, chromophore-containing and chromophore-free, and alpha-helical and beta-barrel proteins. Recent successes using in meso crystallization are the human engineered beta2-adrenergic and adenosine A2a G protein-coupled receptors. Protocols are presented for reconstituting the membrane protein into the monoolein-based mesophase, and for setting up crystallizations in the manual mode. Additional steps in the overall process, such as crystal harvesting, are to be addressed in future video articles. The time required to prepare the protein-loaded mesophase and to set up a crystallization plate manually is about one hour. PMID:21113125

  7. Tear film breakup and structure studied by simultaneous video recording of fluorescence and tear film lipid layer images.

    PubMed

    King-Smith, P Ewen; Reuter, Kathleen S; Braun, Richard J; Nichols, Jason J; Nichols, Kelly K

    2013-07-22

    The thinning of the precorneal tear film between blinks and tear film breakup can be logically analyzed into contributions from three components: evaporation, flow into the cornea, and tangential flow along the corneal surface. Whereas divergent tangential flow contributes to certain types of breakup, it has been argued that evaporation is the main cause of tear thinning and breakup. Because evaporation is controlled by the tear film lipid layer (TFLL) it should therefore be expected that patterns of breakup should match patterns in the TFLL, and this hypothesis is tested in this study. An optical system is described for simultaneous video imaging of fluorescein tear film breakup and the TFLL. Recordings were made from 85 subjects, including both with healthy and dry eyes. After instillation of 5 μL2% fluorescein, subjects were asked to blink 1 second after the start of the recording and try to maintain their eyes open for the recording length of 30 or 60 seconds. Areas of tear film thinning and breakup usually matched corresponding features in the TFLL. Whereas thinning and breakup were often matched to thin lipid, surprisingly, the corresponding lipid region was not always thinner than the surrounding lipid. Occasionally, a thin lipid region caused a corresponding region of greater fluorescence (thicker aqueous layer), due to convergent tangential flow. Areas of tear thinning and breakup can generally be matched to corresponding regions of the TFLL as would be expected if breakup is largely due to evaporation. Surprisingly, in some examples, the corresponding lipid area was not thinner and possibly thicker than the surrounding lipid. This indicates that the lipid was a poor barrier to evaporation, perhaps because of deficiency in composition and/or structure. For example, bacterial lipases may have broken down esters into component acids and alcohols, causing a defective TFLL structure with increased evaporation.

  8. Fabrication of fracture-free nanoglassified substrates by layer-by-layer deposition with a paint gun technique for real-time monitoring of protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Linman, Matthew J; Culver, Sean P; Cheng, Quan

    2009-03-03

    New sensing materials that are robust, biocompatible, and amenable to array fabrication are vital to the development of novel bioassays. Herein we report the fabrication of ultrathin (ca. 5-8 nm) glass (silicate) layers on top of a gold surface for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing applications. The nanoglass layers are fabricated by layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAH) and sodium silicate (SiO(x)), followed by calcination at high temperature. To deposit these layers in a uniform and reproducible manner, we employed a high-volume, low-pressure (HVLP) paint gun technique that offers high precision and better control through pressurized nitrogen gas. The new substrates are stable in solution for a long period of time, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images confirm that these films are nearly fracture-free. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicates that the surface roughness of the silicate layers is low (rms = 2 to 3 nm), similar to that of bare glass slides. By tuning the experimental parameters such as HVLP gun pressure and layers deposited, different surface morphology could be obtained as revealed by fluorescence microscopy and SEM images. To demonstrate the utility of these ultrathin, fracture-free substrates, lipid bilayer membranes composed of phosphorylated derivatives of phosphoinositides (PIs) were deposited on the new substrates for biosensing applications. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) data indicated that these lipid components in the membranes were highly mobile. Furthermore, interactions of PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(4)P lipids with their respective binding proteins were detected with high sensitivity by using SPR spectroscopy. This method of glass deposition can be combined with already well-developed surface chemistry for a range of planar glass assay applications, and the process is amenable to automation for mass production of nanometer thick silicate chips in a highly

  9. The design of naproxen solid lipid nanoparticles to target skin layers.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Jafar; Saeedi, Majid; Morteza-Semnani, Katayoun; Rostamkalaei, Seyyed Sohrab; Asadi, Masoumeh; Asare-Addo, Kofi; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the current investigation was to produce naproxen solid lipid nanoparticles (Nap-SLNs) by the ultrasonication method to improve its skin permeation and also to investigate the influence of Hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) changes on nanoparticles properties. The properties of obtained SLNs loaded with naproxen were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). FT-IR was also used to investigate any interaction between naproxen and the excipients used at the molecular level during the preparation of the SLNs. The performance of the formulations was investigated in terms of skin permeation and also the retention of the drug by the skin. It was found that generally, with increasing the lipid concentration, the average particle size and polydispersity index (PDI) of SLNs increased from 94.257±4.852nm to 143.90±2.685nm and from 0.293±0.037 to 0.525±0.038 respectively. The results also showed that a reduction in the HLB resulted in an increase in the PDI, particle size, zeta potential and entrapment efficiency (EE%). DSC showed that the naproxen encapsulated in the SLNs was in its amorphous form. The peaks of prominent functional groups of naproxen were found in the FT-IR spectra of naproxen-SLN, which confirmed the entrapment of naproxen in the lipid matrix. FT-IR results also ruled out any chemical interaction between drug and the chemicals used in the preparation of SLNs. The amount of naproxen detected in the receptor chamber at all the sampling times for the reference formulation (naproxen solution containing all surfactants at pH 7.4) was higher than that of the Nap-SLN8 formulation. Nap-SLN8 showed an increase in the concentration of naproxen in the skin layer with less systemic absorption. This indicates that most of the drug in Nap-SLN8 remains in the skin which can reduce the side effect of systemic absorption of the drug and increases the

  10. Determination of lipid asymmetry in human red cells by resonance energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J.; Schroit, A.J.

    1987-08-11

    This report describes the application of a resonance energy transfer assay to determine the transbilayer distribution of /sup 125/I-labelled 7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl (NBD)-labelled lipid analogues. The validity of this technique was established by determining the relationship between the distance of separation of lissamine rhodamine B labeled phosphatidylethanolamine (N-Rho-PE) acceptor lipid and NBD-labeled donor lipid and energy transfer efficiency. By determination of the distance between probes at 50% transfer efficiency (R/sub 0/), the distance between fluorophores distributed symmetrically (outer leaflet label) and asymmetrically in artificially generated vesicles was determined. Calculation of the average distance between probes revealed a 14-A difference between NBD-lipid and N-Rho-PE localized in the same leaflet and in opposing leaflets, respectively. Application of this technique to the study of the transbilayer distribution of NBD-lipid in human red blood cells (RBC) showed that exogenously supplied NBD-phosphatidylserine (NBD-PS) was selectively transported to the inner leaflet, whereas NBD-phosphatidylcholine remained in outer leaflet. In contrast, pretreatment of the RBC with diamide (a SH cross-linking reagent) blocked the transport of NBD-PS. The absence or presence of NBD-PS in the outer leaflet was independently verified by employing back-exchange, trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid derivatization, and decarboxylation with PS decarboxylase experiments. These control experiments yielded results which confirmed the lipid distributions determined by the resonance energy transfer assay.

  11. Implementation of a methodology for determining elastic properties of lipid assemblies from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Johner, Niklaus; Harries, Daniel; Khelashvili, George

    2016-04-12

    The importance of the material properties of membranes for diverse cellular processes is well established. Notably, the elastic properties of the membrane, which depend on its composition, can directly influence membrane reshaping and fusion processes as well as the organisation and function of membrane proteins. Determining these properties is therefore key for a mechanistic understanding of how the cell functions. We have developed a method to determine the bending rigidity and tilt modulus, for lipidic assemblies of arbitrary lipid composition and shape, from molecular dynamics simulations. The method extracts the elastic moduli from the distributions of microscopic tilts and splays of the lipid components. We present here an open source implementation of the method as a set of Python modules using the computational framework OpenStructure. These modules offer diverse algorithms typically used in the calculatation the elastic moduli, including routines to align MD trajectories of complex lipidic systems, to determine the water/lipid interface, to calculate lipid tilts and splays, as well as to fit the corresponding distributions to extract the elastic properties. We detail the implementation of the method and give several examples of how to use the modules in specific cases. The method presented here is, to our knowledge, the only available computational approach allowing to quantify the elastic properties of lipidic assemblies of arbitrary shape and composition (including lipid mixtures). The implementation as python modules offers flexibility, which has already allowed the method to be applied to diverse lipid assembly types, ranging from bilayers in the liquid ordered and disordered phases to a study of the inverted-hexagonal phase, and with different force-fields (both all-atom and coarse grained representations). The modules are freely available through GitHub at https://github.com/njohner/ost_pymodules/ while OpenStructure can be obtained at http://www.openstructure.org .

  12. Lidar determination of mixing layer height with high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci, Giovanni; Matthey, Renaud; Mitev, Valentin; Richner, Hans

    2005-10-01

    Ecological monitoring and analysis of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics require determination of the mixing layer height (MLH) on a continuous basis. In a number of cases it is necessary to determine the MLH with sufficiently high resolution - both altitude and temporal. The backscatter lidar provides a convenient tool for such determination, using the aerosol as tracer and determining its vertical profile and its time-evolution, with the capability for continuous measurements. Although methods already exist, based on the altitude derivative of the backscatter lidar signal (altitude Gradient method) and its time-variance (Variance method), the application of these methods with high resolution is limited by the background noise presence. We report here a further development of backscatter lidar gradient and variance methods for MLH determination, allowing higher resolutions. In it, the MLH determination from the gradient and the variance of the lidar signal is supported by a convenient filter technique. Time scale of increased temporal resolution allows the investigation of the fine atmospheric dynamic structures like convective motion. A number of examples in MLH retrieval are presented. The examples are based on backscatter lidar measurements performed in the PBL above Neuchatel, Switzerland (47.00°N, 6.95°S, 485m asl). The examples show the applicability and the usefulness of the reported technique in measurements of the daily cycle of the MLH dynamics.

  13. Lipids that determine detergent resistance of MDCK cell membrane fractions.

    PubMed

    Manni, Marco M; Cano, Ainara; Alonso, Cristina; Goñi, Félix M

    2015-10-01

    A comparative lipidomic study has been performed of whole Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells and of the detergent-resistant membrane fraction (DRM) obtained after treating the cells with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100. The DRM were isolated following a standard procedure that is extensively used in cell biology studies. Significant differences were found in the lipid composition of the whole cells and of DRM. The latter were enriched in all the analyzed sphingolipid classes: sphingomyelins, ceramides and hexosylceramides. Diacylglycerols were also preferentially found in DRM. The detergent-resistant fraction was also enriched in saturated over unsaturated fatty acyl chains, and in sn-1 acyl chains containing 16 carbon atoms, over the longer and shorter ones. The glycerophospholipid species phosphatidylethanolamines and phosphatidylinositols, that were mainly unsaturated, did not show a preference for DRM. Phosphatidylcholines were an intermediate case: the saturated, but not the unsaturated species were found preferentially in DRM. The question remains on whether these DRM, recovered from detergent-membrane mixtures by floatation over a sucrose gradient, really correspond to membrane domains existing in the cell membrane prior to detergent treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chill-coma recovery time, age and sex determine lipid profiles in Ceratitis capitata tissues.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Lereis, Luciana Mercedes; Fagali, Natalia Soledad; Rabossi, Alejandro; Catalá, Ángel; Quesada-Allué, Luis Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The remodeling of membrane composition by changes in phospholipid head groups and fatty acids (FA) degree of unsaturation has been associated with the maintenance of membrane homeostasis under stress conditions. Overall lipid levels and the composition of cuticle lipids also influence insect stress resistance and tissue protection. In a previous study, we demonstrated differences in survival, behavior and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene expression between subgroups of Ceratitis capitata flies that had a reversible recovery from chill-coma and those that developed chilling-injury. Here, we analyzed lipid profiles from comparable subgroups of 15 and 30-day-old flies separated according to their recovery time after a chill-coma treatment. Neutral and polar lipid classes of chill-coma subgroups were separated by thin layer chromatography and quantified by densitometry. FA composition of polar lipids of chill-coma subgroups and non-stressed flies was evaluated using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Higher amounts of neutral lipids such as triglycerides, diacylglycerol, wax esters, sterol esters and free esters were found in male flies that recovered faster from chill-coma compared to slower flies. A multivariate analysis revealed changes in patterns of storage and cuticle lipids among subgroups both in males and females. FA unsaturation increased after cold exposure, and was higher in thorax of slower subgroups compared to faster subgroups. The changes in neutral lipid patterns and FA composition depended on recovery time, sex, age and body-part, and were not specifically associated with the development of chilling-injury. An analysis of phospholipid classes showed that the phosphatidylcholine to lysophosphatidylcholine ratio (PC/LPC) was significantly higher, or showed a tendency, in subgroups that may have developed chilling-injury compared to those with a reversible recovery from coma.

  15. Biomimetic biosensor based on lipidic layers containing tyrosinase and lutetium bisphthalocyanine for the detection of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Apetrei, C; Alessio, P; Constantino, C J L; de Saja, J A; Rodriguez-Mendez, M L; Pavinatto, F J; Ramos Fernandes, E Giuliani; Zucolotto, V; Oliveira, O N

    2011-01-15

    This paper describes the preparation of a biomimetic Langmuir-Blodgett film of tyrosinase incorporated in a lipidic layer and the use of lutetium bisphthalocyanine as an electron mediator for the voltammetric detection of phenol derivatives, which include one monophenol (vanillic acid), two diphenols (catechol and caffeic acid) and two triphenols (gallic acid and pyrogallol). The first redox process of the voltammetric responses is associated with the reduction of the enzymatically formed o-quinone and is favoured by the lutetium bisphthalocyanine because significant signal amplification is observed, while the second is associated with the electrochemical oxidation of the antioxidant and occurs at lower potentials in the presence of an electron mediator. The biosensor shows low detection limit (1.98×10(-6)-27.49×10(-6) M), good reproducibility, and high affinity to antioxidants (K(M) in the range of 62.31-144.87 μM). The excellent functionality of the enzyme obtained using a biomimetic immobilisation method, the selectivity afforded by enzyme catalysis, the signal enhancement caused by the lutetium bisphthalocyanine mediator and the increased selectivity of the curves due to the occurrence of two redox processes make these sensors exceptionally suitable for the detection of phenolic compounds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Statistical Comparison of Classifiers Applied to the Interferential Tear Film Lipid Layer Automatic Classification

    PubMed Central

    Remeseiro, B.; Penas, M.; Mosquera, A.; Novo, J.; Penedo, M. G.; Yebra-Pimentel, E.

    2012-01-01

    The tear film lipid layer is heterogeneous among the population. Its classification depends on its thickness and can be done using the interference pattern categories proposed by Guillon. The interference phenomena can be characterised as a colour texture pattern, which can be automatically classified into one of these categories. From a photography of the eye, a region of interest is detected and its low-level features are extracted, generating a feature vector that describes it, to be finally classified in one of the target categories. This paper presents an exhaustive study about the problem at hand using different texture analysis methods in three colour spaces and different machine learning algorithms. All these methods and classifiers have been tested on a dataset composed of 105 images from healthy subjects and the results have been statistically analysed. As a result, the manual process done by experts can be automated with the benefits of being faster and unaffected by subjective factors, with maximum accuracy over 95%. PMID:22567040

  17. Preparation of Oriented, Fully Hydrated Lipid Samples for Structure Determination Using X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This chapter describes a method of sample preparation called “the rock and roll method,” which is basically a solvent evaporation technique with controlled manual sample movement during evaporation of solvent from lipid/solvent mixtures that produces well-oriented thick stacks of about 2000 lipid bilayers. Many lipid types have been oriented using different solvent mixtures that balance solubilization of the lipid with uniform deposition of the lipid solution onto solid substrates. These well-oriented thick stacks are then ideal samples for collection of both X-ray diffraction data in the gel phase and X-ray diffuse scattering data in the fluid phase of lipids. The degree of orientation is determined using visual inspection, polarizing microscopy, and a mosaic spread X-ray experiment. Atomic force microscopy is used to compare samples prepared using the rock and roll method with those prepared by spin-coating, which produces well-oriented but less homogeneous lipid stacks. These samples can be fully hydrated through the vapor provided that the hydration chamber has excellent temperature and humidity control. PMID:17951727

  18. Preparation of oriented, fully hydrated lipid samples for structure determination using X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie A

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes a method of sample preparation called "the rock and roll method," which is basically a solvent evaporation technique with controlled manual sample movement during evaporation of solvent from lipid/solvent mixtures that produces well-oriented thick stacks of about 2000 lipid bilayers. Many lipid types have been oriented using different solvent mixtures that balance solubilization of the lipid with uniform deposition of the lipid solution onto solid substrates. These well-oriented thick stacks are then ideal samples for collection of both X-ray diffraction data in the gel phase and X-ray diffuse scattering data in the fluid phase of lipids. The degree of orientation is determined using visual inspection, polarizing microscopy, and a mosaic spread X-ray experiment. Atomic force microscopy is used to compare samples prepared using the rock and roll method with those prepared by spin-coating, which produces well-oriented but less homogeneous lipid stacks. These samples can be fully hydrated through the vapor provided that the hydration chamber has excellent temperature and humidity control.

  19. Improvement in the Iatroscan thin-layer chromatographic-flame ionisation detection analysis of marine lipids. Separation and quantitation of monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols in standards and natural samples.

    PubMed

    Striby, L; Lafont, R; Goutx, M

    1999-07-23

    Mono- and diacylglycerols are important intermediates in glycerolipid biodegradation and intracellular signalling pathways. A method for mass determination of these lipid classes in marine particles was developed using the Iatroscan, which combines thin layer chromatography (TLC) and flame ionisation detection (FID) techniques. We improved existing protocols by adding two elution steps: hexane-diethyl-ether-formic acid (70:30:0.2, v/v/v) after triacylglycerol and free fatty acid scan, and acetone 100% followed by chloroform-acetone-formic acid (99:1:0.2, v/v/v) after 1,2 diacylglycerols. Diacylglycerol isomers 1,2 and 1,3 were separated from each other, as well as from free sterols in standards and marine lipids from sediment trap particles. Monoacylglycerols were separated from pigments and galactosyl-lipids in the same trap samples and in a rich pigment phytoplankton extract of Dunaliella viridis. Quantitation of each class in samples was performed after calibration with 0.5 to 2 micrograms of standards. As many as 17 lipid classes can be identified and quantified in samples using this proposed six-step development.

  20. Promoting the selection and maintenance of fetal liver stem/progenitor cell colonies by layer-by-layer polypeptide tethered supported lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-Chi; Liu, Yung-Chiang; Tsai, Hsuan-Ang; Shen, Chia-Ning; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2014-12-10

    In this study, we designed and constructed a series of layer-by-layer polypeptide adsorbed supported lipid bilayer (SLB) films as a novel and label-free platform for the isolation and maintenance of rare populated stem cells. In particular, four alternative layers of anionic poly-l-glutamic acid and cationic poly-l-lysine were sequentially deposited on an anionic SLB. We found that the fetal liver stem/progenitor cells from the primary culture were selected and formed colonies on all layer-by-layer polypeptide adsorbed SLB surfaces, regardless of the number of alternative layers and the net charges on those layers. Interestingly, these isolated stem/progenitor cells formed colonies which were maintained for an 8 day observation period. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation measurements showed that all SLB-polypeptide films were protein resistant with serum levels significantly lower than those on the polypeptide multilayer films without an underlying SLB. We suggest the fluidic SLB promotes selective binding while minimizing the cell-surface interaction due to its nonfouling nature, thus limiting stem cell colonies from spreading.

  1. Structural determinants of protein partitioning into ordered membrane domains and lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Lorent, Joseph Helmuth; Levental, Ilya

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the existence of lateral nanoscopic lipid domains in plasma membranes, known as lipid rafts. These domains preferentially recruit membrane proteins and lipids to facilitate their interactions and thereby regulate transmembrane signaling and cellular homeostasis. The functionality of raft domains is intrinsically dependent on their selectivity for specific membrane components; however, while the physicochemical determinants of raft association for lipids are known, very few systematic studies have focused on the structural aspects that guide raft partitioning of proteins. In this review, we describe biophysical and thermodynamic aspects of raft-mimetic liquid ordered phases, focusing on those most relevant for protein partitioning. Further, we detail the variety of experimental models used to study protein-raft interactions. Finally, we review the existing literature on mechanisms for raft targeting, including lipid post-translational modifications, lipid binding, and transmembrane domain features. We conclude that while protein palmitoylation is a clear raft-targeting signal, few other general structural determinants for raft partitioning have been revealed, suggesting that many discoveries lie ahead in this burgeoning field.

  2. Organic matter in sediment layers of an acidic mining lake as assessed by lipid analysis. Part II: Neutral lipids.

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, Juergen; Koschorreck, Matthias; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2017-02-01

    Natural neutralization of acidic mining lakes is often limited by organic matter. The knowledge of the sources and degradability of organic matter is crucial for understanding alkalinity generation in these lakes. Sediments collected at different depths (surface sediment layer from 0 to 1 cm and deep sediment layer from 4 to 5cm) from an acidic mining lake were studied in order to characterize sedimentary organic matter based on neutral signature markers. Samples were exhaustively extracted, subjected to pre-chromatographic derivatizations and analyzed by GC/MS. Herein, molecular distributions of diagnostic alkanes/alkenes, terpenes/terpenoids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic alcohols and ketones, sterols, and hopanes/hopanoids were addressed. Characterization of the contribution of natural vs. anthropogenic sources to the sedimentary organic matter in these extreme environments was then possible based on these distributions. With the exception of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, combined concentrations across all marker classes proved higher in the surface sediment layer as compared to those in the deep sediment layer. Alkane and aliphatic alcohol distributions pointed to predominantly allochthonous over autochthonous contribution to sedimentary organic matter. Sterol patterns were dominated by phytosterols of terrestrial plants including stigmasterol and β-sitosterol. Hopanoid markers with the ββ-biohopanoid "biological" configuration were more abundant in the surface sediment layer, which pointed to higher bacterial activity. The pattern of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons pointed to prevailing anthropogenic input. Pyrolytic makers were likely to due to atmospheric deposition from a nearby former coal combustion facility. The combined analysis of the array of biomarkers provided new insights into the sources and transformations of organic matter in lake sediments.

  3. Solid lipid nanoparticles coated with cross-linked polymeric double layer for oral delivery of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Taoran; Ma, Xiaoyu; Lei, Yu; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-12-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are regarded as promising carriers to improve the safety and effectiveness of delivery for drugs and nutrients, however, the clinic applications for oral administration are limited by their poor stability in gastrointestinal conditions. In this study, surface modification was explored to confer new physicochemical properties to SLNs and thus achieve enhanced functionalities. Novel SLNs with biopolymeric double layer (DL) coating using two natural biopolymers, i.e. caseinate (NaCas) and pectin, were prepared to encapsulate and deliver curcumin, a lipophilic bioactive compound studied as a model drug/nutrient. The DL coating was chemically cross-linked by creating covalent bonds between NaCas and pectin, using two different cross-linkers, i.e. glutaraldehyde (GA) and 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-Hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS). Prior to cross-linking, the mean particle size, polydispersity index and zeta potential of DL-SLNs were 300-330nm, 0.25-0.30, -45-40mV, respectively. It was found that cross-linking with GA had a more prominent effect on particle size and polydispersity index than EDC/NHS. The cross-linking process significantly improved physicochemical properties of DL-SLNs, resulting in higher encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity, better stability and slower release profile in simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Particularly, an optimal zero-order release kinetic was observed for EDC/NHS crosslinked DL-SLNs. The electron microscopy revealed that both cross-linked DL-SLNs exhibited spherical shape with homogeneous size and smooth surface. Encapsulation of curcumin in SLNs dramatically enhanced its antioxidant activity in aqueous condition. The cross-linking process further helped spray drying of SLNs by forming homogenous powder particles. These results indicated that coating with cross-linked polymers could significantly improve the physicochemical properties of SLNs and expand their potentials as

  4. Compression-triggered instabilities of multi-layer systems: From thin elastic membranes to lipid bilayers on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Howard A.

    2013-03-01

    Instabilities are triggered when elastic materials are subjected to compression. We explore new features of two distinct systems of this type. First, we describe a two-layer polymeric system under biaxial compressive stress, which exhibits a repetitive wrinkle-to-fold transition that subsequently generates a hierarchical network of folds during reorganization of the stress field. The folds delineate individual domains, and each domain subdivides into smaller ones over multiple generations. By modifying the boundary conditions and geometry, we demonstrate control over the final network morphology. Some analogies to the venation pattern of leaves are indicated. Second, motivated by the confined configurations common to cells, which are wrapped in lipid bilayer membranes, we study a lipid bilayer, coupled to an elastic sheet, and demonstrate that, upon straining, the confined lipid membrane is able to passively regulate its area. In particular, by stretching the elastic support, the bilayer laterally expands without rupture by fusing adhered lipid vesicles; upon compression, lipid tubes grow out of the membrane plane, thus reducing its area. These transformations are reversible, as we show using cycles of expansion and compression, and closely reproduce membrane processes found in cells during area regulation. The two distinct systems illustrate the influence of the substrate on finite amplitude shape changes, for which we describe the time-dependent shape evolution as the stress relaxes. This talk describes joint research with Manouk Abkarian, Marino Arroyo, Pilnam Kim, Mohammad Rahimi and Margarita Staykova.

  5. Beneath the minerals, a layer of round lipid particles was identified to mediate collagen calcification in compact bone formation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shaohua; Yu, Jianqing J

    2006-12-01

    Astronauts lose 1-2% of their bone minerals per month during space flights. A systematic search for a countermeasure relies on a good understanding of the mechanism of bone formation at the molecular level. How collagen fibers, the dominant matrix protein in bones, are mineralized remains mysterious. Atomic force microscopy was carried out, in combination with immunostaining and Western blotting, on bovine tibia to identify unrecognized building blocks involved in bone formation and for an elucidation of the process of collagen calcification in bone formation. Before demineralization, tiles of hydroxyapatite crystals were found stacked along bundles of collagen fibers. These tiles were homogeneous in size and shape with dimensions 0.69 x 0.77 x 0.2 micro m(3). Demineralization dissolved these tiles and revealed small spheres with an apparent diameter around 145 nm. These spheres appeared to be lipid particles since organic solvents dissolved them. The parallel collagen bundles had widths mostly <2 micro m. Composition analysis of compact bones indicated a high content of apolar lipids, including triglycerides and cholesterol esters. Apolar lipids are known to form lipid droplets or lipoproteins, and these spheres are unlikely to be matrix vesicles as reported for collagen calcification in epiphyseal cartilages. Results from this study suggest that the layer of round lipid particles on collagen fibers mediates the mineral deposition onto the fibers. The homogeneous size of these lipid particles and the presence of apolipoprotein in demineralized bone tissue suggest the possibility that these particles might be of lipoprotein origin. More studies are needed to verify the last claim and to exclude the possibility that they are secreted lipid droplets.

  6. Beneath the Minerals, a Layer of Round Lipid Particles Was Identified to Mediate Collagen Calcification in Compact Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaohua; Yu, Jianqing J.

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts lose 1–2% of their bone minerals per month during space flights. A systematic search for a countermeasure relies on a good understanding of the mechanism of bone formation at the molecular level. How collagen fibers, the dominant matrix protein in bones, are mineralized remains mysterious. Atomic force microscopy was carried out, in combination with immunostaining and Western blotting, on bovine tibia to identify unrecognized building blocks involved in bone formation and for an elucidation of the process of collagen calcification in bone formation. Before demineralization, tiles of hydroxyapatite crystals were found stacked along bundles of collagen fibers. These tiles were homogeneous in size and shape with dimensions 0.69 × 0.77 × 0.2 μm3. Demineralization dissolved these tiles and revealed small spheres with an apparent diameter around 145 nm. These spheres appeared to be lipid particles since organic solvents dissolved them. The parallel collagen bundles had widths mostly <2 μm. Composition analysis of compact bones indicated a high content of apolar lipids, including triglycerides and cholesterol esters. Apolar lipids are known to form lipid droplets or lipoproteins, and these spheres are unlikely to be matrix vesicles as reported for collagen calcification in epiphyseal cartilages. Results from this study suggest that the layer of round lipid particles on collagen fibers mediates the mineral deposition onto the fibers. The homogeneous size of these lipid particles and the presence of apolipoprotein in demineralized bone tissue suggest the possibility that these particles might be of lipoprotein origin. More studies are needed to verify the last claim and to exclude the possibility that they are secreted lipid droplets. PMID:16980361

  7. Direct comparison of fatty acid ratios in single cellular lipid droplets as determined by Raman spectroscopy and gas chromatography

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cellular lipid droplets are the least studied and least understood cellular organelles in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Despite a broad research trying to understand lipid droplets it has not been possible to determine the composition of individual cellular lipid droplets. In this paper we prese...

  8. Air motion determination by tracking humidity patterns in isentropic layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancuso, R. L.; Hall, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Determining air motions by tracking humidity patterns in isentropic layers was investigated. Upper-air rawinsonde data from the NSSL network and from the AVE-II pilot experiment were used to simulate temperature and humidity profile data that will eventually be available from geosynchronous satellites. Polynomial surfaces that move with time were fitted to the mixing-ratio values of the different isentropic layers. The velocity components of the polynomial surfaces are part of the coefficients that are determined in order to give an optimum fitting of the data. In the mid-troposphere, the derived humidity motions were in good agreement with the winds measured by rawinsondes so long as there were few or no clouds and the lapse rate was relatively stable. In the lower troposphere, the humidity motions were unreliable primarily because of nonadiabatic processes and unstable lapse rates. In the upper troposphere, the humidity amounts were too low to be measured with sufficient accuracy to give reliable results. However, it appears that humidity motions could be used to provide mid-tropospheric wind data over large regions of the globe.

  9. Comparison of histological, genetic, metabolomics, and lipid-based methods for sex determination in marine mussels.

    PubMed

    Hines, Adam; Yeung, Wai Ho; Craft, John; Brown, Margaret; Kennedy, Jill; Bignell, John; Stentiford, Grant D; Viant, Mark R

    2007-10-15

    Omics technologies are increasingly being used to monitor organismal responses to environmental stressors. Previous studies have shown that species identification, an appreciation of life history traits, and organism phenotype (e.g., gender) are essential for the accurate interpretation of omics data from field samples. As marine mussels are increasingly being used in ecotoxicogenomics and monitoring, a technique to determine mussel gender throughout their annual reproductive cycle is urgently needed. This study examines four methods for sex determination in the two mussel species found in the United Kingdom, Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis, and their hybrid. Each of these methods-histology, a lipid-based assay, a new reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics-initially was evaluated using sexually mature ("ripe") mussels whose gender was clearly distinguishable using histology. The methods subsequently were tested on spawned ("spent") mussels. For ripe animals, all techniques yielded high classification accuracies: histology, 100%; RT-PCR, 94.6%; lipid analysis, 90.6%; and metabolomics, 89.5%. The gender of spent animals, however, could not be determined by histology (0%) or lipid analysis (55.6%), but RT-PCR (100%) and metabolomics (88.9%) both proved to be successful. In addition, the RT-PCR, metabolomics, and lipid-based methods identified animals of mixed sex. Our findings highlight the application of a novel RT-PCR method as a robust technique for gender determination of ripe and spent mussels.

  10. Fabrication of Massive Sheets of Single Layer Patterned Arrays Using Lipid Directed Reengineered Phi29 Motor Dodecamer

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The bottom-up assembly of patterned arrays is an exciting and important area in current nanotechnology. Arrays can be engineered to serve as components in chips for a virtually inexhaustible list of applications ranging from disease diagnosis to ultra-high-density data storage. Phi29 motor dodecamer has been reported to form elegant multilayer tetragonal arrays. However, multilayer protein arrays are of limited use for nanotechnological applications which demand nanoreplica or coating technologies. The ability to produce a single layer array of biological structures with high replication fidelity represents a significant advance in the area of nanomimetics. In this paper, we report on the assembly of single layer sheets of reengineered phi29 motor dodecamer. A thin lipid monolayer was used to direct the assembly of massive sheets of single layer patterned arrays of the reengineered motor dodecamer. Uniform, clean and highly ordered arrays were constructed as shown by both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy imaging. PMID:19206255

  11. Disposition of ceramide in model lipid membranes determined by neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Groen, D; Gooris, G S; Barlow, D J; Lawrence, M J; van Mechelen, J B; Demé, B; Bouwstra, J A

    2011-03-16

    The lipid matrix present in the uppermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, plays a crucial role in the skin barrier function. The lipids are organized into two lamellar phases. To gain more insight into the molecular organization of one of these lamellar phases, we performed neutron diffraction studies. In the diffraction pattern, five diffraction orders were observed attributed to a lamellar phase with a repeat distance of 5.4 nm. Using contrast variation, the scattering length density profile could be calculated showing a typical bilayer arrangement. To obtain information on the arrangement of ceramides in the unit cell, a mixture that included a partly deuterated ceramide was also examined. The scattering length density profile of the 5.4-nm phase containing this deuterated ceramide demonstrated a symmetric arrangement of the ceramides with interdigitating acyl chains in the center of the unit cell.

  12. Disposition of Ceramide in Model Lipid Membranes Determined by Neutron Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Groen, D.; Gooris, G.S.; Barlow, D.J.; Lawrence, M.J.; van Mechelen, J.B.; Demé, B.; Bouwstra, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The lipid matrix present in the uppermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, plays a crucial role in the skin barrier function. The lipids are organized into two lamellar phases. To gain more insight into the molecular organization of one of these lamellar phases, we performed neutron diffraction studies. In the diffraction pattern, five diffraction orders were observed attributed to a lamellar phase with a repeat distance of 5.4 nm. Using contrast variation, the scattering length density profile could be calculated showing a typical bilayer arrangement. To obtain information on the arrangement of ceramides in the unit cell, a mixture that included a partly deuterated ceramide was also examined. The scattering length density profile of the 5.4-nm phase containing this deuterated ceramide demonstrated a symmetric arrangement of the ceramides with interdigitating acyl chains in the center of the unit cell. PMID:21402030

  13. Milk fat content and DGAT1 genotype determine lipid composition of the milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Argov-Argaman, Nurit; Mida, Kfir; Cohen, Bat-Chen; Visker, Marleen; Hettinga, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    During secretion of milk fat globules, triacylglycerol (TAG) droplets are enveloped by a phospholipid (PL) trilayer. Globule size has been found to be related to polar lipid composition and fat content, and milk fat content and fatty acid composition have been associated with the diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) K232A polymorphism; however, the association between the DGAT1 polymorphism and fat globule size and polar lipid composition has not been studied. The ratio between polar and neutral lipids as well as the composition of the polar lipids in milk has industrial as well as nutritional and health implications. Understanding phenotypic and genotypic factors influencing these parameters could contribute to improving milk lipid composition for dairy products. The focus of the present study was to determine the effect of both fat content and DGAT1 polymorphism on PL/TAG ratio, as a marker for milk fat globule size, and detailed PL composition. Milk samples were selected from 200 cows such that there were equal numbers of samples for the different fat contents as well as per DGAT1 genotype. Samples were analyzed for neutral and polar lipid concentration and composition. PL/TAG ratio was significantly associated with both fat content and DGAT1 genotype. Phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine concentrations were associated with fat content*DGAT1 genotype with a stronger association for the AA than the KK genotype. Sphingomyelin concentration tended to interact with fat content*DGAT1 genotype. Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) concentration showed a biphasic response to fat content, suggesting that multiple biological processes influence its concentration. These results provide a new direction for controlling polar lipid concentration and composition in milk through selective breeding of cows.

  14. Lipid profiling of rat peritoneal surface layers by online normal- and reversed-phase 2D LC QToF-MS[S

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Honggang; Liu, Ranran; Yang, Youyou; Bai, Yu; Guan, Yafeng; Qian, Daqing; Wang, Tao; Liu, Huwei

    2010-01-01

    An online, two-dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography (LC) quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QToF-MS) method was developed for lipid profiling of rat peritoneal surface layers, in which the lipid classes and species could be simultaneously separated in one injection with a significantly increased sensitivity. Different lipid classes were separated on a normal-phase column in the first dimension and lipid molecular species were separated on a reversed-phase column in the second dimension, so that the ion suppression effects were reduced while the detection sensitivity was improved. Identified were 721 endogenous lipid species from 12 lipid classes, in which 415 structures were confirmed using tandem mass spectra, and the other 306 lipid molecular species were identified by accurate masses. The linearity, limit of detection, and repeatability were all satisfactory. The method was applied to the investigation of the lipid changes in rat peritoneal surface layer after peritoneal dialysis, and 32 potential lipid biomarkers were identified, as their concentrations in the dosed group were 2.2–12.5 times of those in the control group. The results revealed that this 2D LC-MS system was a promising tool for lipid profiling of complex biological samples. PMID:20526000

  15. Improved pharmacokinetics and enhanced tumor growth inhibition using a nanostructured lipid carrier loaded with doxorubicin and modified with a layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte coating

    PubMed Central

    Mussi, Samuel V.; Parekh, Gaurav; Pattekari, Pravin; Levchenko, Tatyana; Lvov, Yuri; Ferreira, Lucas A.M.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    A nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) has been shown to be cytotoxic against the human cancer cell lines A549 and MCF-7/Adr. In attempts to improve formulation characteristics, enhance pharmacokinetics and antitumor effects, we modified the surface of these NLC with an alternating layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of polycation and polyanion polyelectrolytes and an additional coating with PEG using a simple method of core shell attachment. The formulation had a narrow size distribution, longer residence in the blood, lower accumulation in the liver, higher accumulation in tumors and a significant tumor growth inhibition effect. Thus, NLC-DOX nanopreparations complexes modified by LbL coating have the potential to enhance the anticancer effects of DOX against tumors. PMID:26325314

  16. Determination of molecular order in supported lipid membranes by internal reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Citra, M J; Axelsen, P H

    1996-01-01

    When polarized internal reflection infrared spectroscopy is used to determine molecular order in supported lipid membranes, the results are critically dependent on the accuracy of assumptions made about the evanescent electric field amplitudes in the membrane. In this work, we examine several expressions used for calculating evanescent electric field amplitudes in supported lipid monolayers and bilayers, and test their validity by measuring the infrared dichroism of poly-gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate and poly-beta-benzyl-L-aspartate under conditions in which their molecular order is known. Our results indicate that treating such systems as a simple single interface between two semi-infinite bulk phases is more accurate than the commonly employed thin-film approximation. This implies that earlier conclusions about molecular order in supported lipid membranes may require substantial revision. PMID:8889156

  17. Determination of layer-charge characteristics of smectites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christidis, G.E.; Eberl, D.D.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for calculation of layer charge and charge distribution of smectites is proposed. The method is based on comparisons between X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of K-saturated, ethylene glycol-solvated, oriented samples and calculated XRD patterns for three-component, mixed-layer systems. For the calculated patterns it is assumed that the measured patterns can be modeled as random interstratifications of fully expanding 17.1 A?? layers, partially expanding 13.5 A?? layers and non-expanding 9.98 A?? layers. The technique was tested using 29 well characterized smectites. According to their XRD patterns, smectites were classified as group 1 (low-charge smectites) and group 2 (high-charge smectites). The boundary between the two groups is at a layer charge of -0.46 equivalents per half unit-cell. Low-charge smectites are dominated by 17.1 A?? layers, whereas high-charge smectites contain only 20% fully expandable layers on average. Smectite properties and industrial applications may be dictated by the proportion of 17.1 A?? layers present. Non-expanding layers may control the behavior of smectites during weathering, facilitating the formation of illite layers after subsequent cycles of wetting and drying. The precision of the method is better than 3.5% at a layer charge of -0.50; therefore the method should be useful for basic research and for industrial purposes.

  18. Development of the layer-by-layer biosensor using graphene films: application for cholesterol determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh Nguyen, Hai; Chuc Nguyen, Van; Nguyen, Van Tu; Doan Le, Huu; Quynh Nguyen, Van; Thanh Tam Ngo, Thi; Phuc Do, Quan; Nghia Nguyen, Xuan; Phan, Ngoc Minh; Tran, Dai Lam

    2013-03-01

    The preparation and characterization of graphene films for cholesterol determination are described. The graphene films were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Methane gas (CH4) and copper tape were used as carbon source and catalyst in the graphene growth process, respectively. The intergrated array was fabricated by using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology in which Fe3O4-doped polyaniline (PANi) film was electropolymerized on Pt/Gr electrodes. The properties of the Pt/Gr/PANi/Fe3O4 films were investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) has been immobilized onto the working electrode with glutaraldehyde agent. The cholesterol electrochemical biosensor shows high sensitivity (74 μA mM-1 cm-2) and fast response time (<5 s). A linear calibration plot was obtained in the wide cholesterol concentration range from 2 to 20 mM and correlation coefficient square (R2) of 0.9986. This new layer-by-layer biosensor based on graphene films promises many practical applications.

  19. Depth Profile Determination of Stratified Layers Using Internal Reflection Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shick, Robert Adam

    It is the purpose of this project to develop a method to quantitatively determine depth profile information using internal reflection spectroscopy. The theory allowing depth profile information to be recovered from variable angle attenuated total reflection (VA-ATR) spectroscopy is shown for both perpendicular and parallel polarization. The major approximation is that the extinction coefficient must be small, so that the field decay due to distance and absorption are comparable. The errors invoked by these approximations are evaluated by comparison with exact optical simulations using dispersion theory. Having shown that the newly developed method is theoretically feasible, it is important to show that it is a viable technique with current instrumentation. It is shown that VA-ATR Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is a valuable technique to recover depth profile information on the molecular level. A number of known step profiles are measured to determine the limits of applicability for this method. Thickness results obtained using the internal reflection technique are compared with thickness determination using a stylus profilometer. It is shown that the results using p-polarization are somewhat more realistic than s -polarization. The VA-ATR infrared technique was used to investigate the interaction and diffusion of poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4 -phenylene oxide), PPO, and polystyrene, PS. Optical theory was employed to clarify the effect of the local interactions on the infrared spectra. Optical theory was also used to determine composition profiles at various times of inter -diffusion. It was observed that migration occurred between the PPO and the PS layer, even below the glass transition of the PPO. This migration proceeded linearly with time ^{1/2} which is an indication of Fickian diffusion, although the profiles had some additional non-Fickian characteristics.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of lipid and aqueous layers of tear film using optical coherence tomography and statistical decision theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinxin; Clarkson, Eric; Kupinski, Matthew; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of Dry Eye Disease (DED) in the USA is approximately 40 million in aging adults with about $3.8 billion economic burden. However, a comprehensive understanding of tear film dynamics, which is the prerequisite to advance the management of DED, is yet to be realized. To extend our understanding of tear film dynamics, we investigate the simultaneous estimation of the lipid and aqueous layers thicknesses with the combination of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and statistical decision theory. In specific, we develop a mathematical model for Fourier-domain OCT where we take into account the different statistical processes associated with the imaging chain. We formulate the first-order and second-order statistical quantities of the output of the OCT system, which can generate some simulated OCT spectra. A tear film model, which includes a lipid and aqueous layer on top of a rough corneal surface, is the object being imaged. Then we further implement a Maximum-likelihood (ML) estimator to interpret the simulated OCT data to estimate the thicknesses of both layers of the tear film. Results show that an axial resolution of 1 μm allows estimates down to nanometers scale. We use the root mean square error of the estimates as a metric to evaluate the system parameters, such as the tradeoff between the imaging speed and the precision of estimation. This framework further provides the theoretical basics to optimize the imaging setup for a specific thickness estimation task.

  1. Intracellular lipid content is a key intrinsic determinant for hepatocyte viability and metabolic and inflammatory states in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Liang; Jiang, Bijie

    2013-01-01

    The liver is an essential metabolic organ. In addition to metabolizing glucose and lipids, hepatocytes also secrete various cytokines that modulate both hepatocyte metabolism and liver inflammation. Hepatocyte injury and death and liver inflammation are the major contributors to liver diseases, including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Anatomic locations have a profound effect on hepatocyte metabolism, and liver zonation describes the metabolic heterogeneity of hepatocytes along the portovenous axis. However, it is unclear whether hepatocyte heterogeneity is affected by intrinsic factors and whether dietary fat, a risk factor for NASH, has distinct detrimental effects on different hepatocyte subpopulations. Here, we showed that mouse livers contained both high-lipid and low-lipid subpopulations of hepatocytes. The high-lipid subpopulation was more susceptible to injury and apoptosis and produced more proinflamatrory cytokines after treatment with endotoxin and saturated fatty acids. Dietary fat consumption further increased fatty acid uptake, intracellular lipid levels, hepatocyte injury and death, and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the high-lipid subpopulation. In contrast, dietary fat slightly increased lipid levels, cell death, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the low-lipid subpopulation. The low-lipid subpopulation produced more glucose. Fat consumption further activated the gluconeogenic program in the low-lipid, but not the high-lipid, subpopulations. These data suggest that intracellular lipid content is a key intrinsic determinant for hepatocyte heterogeneity of metabolic, inflammatory, and survival states. PMID:23982157

  2. Thin layer chromatographic determination of deoxynivalenol in processed grain products.

    PubMed

    Trucksess, M W; Flood, M T; Page, S W

    1986-01-01

    The thin layer chromatographic (TLC) method of Trucksess et al. (J. Assoc. Off. Anal. Chem. (1984) 67, 40-43) was modified for the determination of deoxynivalenol (DON) in high-sugar breakfast cereals, corn syrup, and beer. Celite was added to the substrate before extraction with acetonitrile-water (84 + 16). After filtration through an alumina-charcoal-Celite (0.5 + 0.7 + 0.3) column, the filtrate was evaporated to dryness and redissolved in water, which was passed through an octylsilyl reverse phase column. DON was eluted with anhydrous ethyl ether. The residue remaining after the eluate was evaporated to dryness was dissolved in CHCl3-acetonitrile (4 + 1) and chromatographed on AlCl3-impregnated silica gel TLC plates. The blue fluorescent DON spot was quantitated fluorodensitometrically after the TLC plate was heated at 120 degrees C for 7 min. Recoveries of DON added to breakfast cereals at 100, 200, and 400 ng/g levels and to syrup and beer at 50, 100, and 200 ng/g levels averaged 86%. The limit of determination in these products was about 50 ng/g.

  3. Experimental determination of wave function spread in Si inversion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Amlan

    2010-08-01

    We have experimentally determined the extent of wave function spread TQM in Si inversion layers on (100)-oriented surface in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) using the back gate bias sensitivity of front gate threshold voltage of planar fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MOSFETs. We show that the sum of TQM for large positive and negative F is an electrically determined value of the SOI thickness TSI. We find that the electric field dependence of TQM for electrons and holes is given by TQM˜F-0.4 and F-0.6, respectively, at high electric fields with TQM being larger for holes at a given F. Larger TQM for holes can be explained by the fact that holes have a smaller effective mass along the confinement direction than electrons in (100) Si. The field dependences of TQM are, however, not consistent with the results of variational calculations that assume single-subband occupancy and predict TQM˜F-1/3. The discrepancy likely indicates that the effects of multiple-subband occupation are significant at room temperature, especially for holes.

  4. Change in Tear Film Lipid Layer Thickness, Corneal Thickness, Volume and Topography after Superficial Cauterization for Conjunctivochalasis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tommy C Y; Ye, Cong; Ng, Paul K F; Li, Emmy Y M; Yuen, Hunter K L; Jhanji, Vishal

    2015-07-17

    We evaluated the change in tear film lipid layer thickness, corneal thickness, volume and topography after superficial cauterization of symptomatic conjunctivochalasis. Bilateral superficial conjunctival cauterization was performed in 36 eyes of 18 patients with symptomatic conjunctivochalasis. The mean age of patients (12 males, 6 females) was 68.6 ± 10.9 years (range: 44-83 years). Preoperatively, 28 eyes (77.8%) had grade 1 conjunctivochalasis, and 8 eyes (22.2%) had grade 2 conjunctivochalasis. At 1 month postoperatively, the severity of conjunctivochalasis decreased significantly (p < 0.001) and 29 eyes (80.6%) had grade 0 conjunctivochalasis whereas 7 eyes (19.4%) had grade 1 conjunctivochalasis. The mean Ocular Surface Disease Index score decreased from 31.5 ± 15.2 preoperatively to 21.5 ± 14.2 at the end of 1 month postoperatively (p = 0.001). There was a statistically significant increase in mean tear film lipid layer thickness 1 month after the surgery (49.6 ± 16.1 nm vs 62.6 ± 21.6 nm; p < 0.001). The central corneal thickness, thinnest corneal thickness and corneal volume decreased significantly postoperatively (p < 0.001). Our study showed that superficial conjunctival cauterization is an effective technique for management of conjunctivochalasis in the short term. An increase in tear film lipid layer thickness along with a decrease in corneal thickness and volume were observed after surgical correction of conjunctivochalasis.

  5. Direct comparison of fatty acid ratios in single cellular lipid droplets as determined by comparative Raman spectroscopy and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schie, Iwan W; Nolte, Lena; Pedersen, Theresa L; Smith, Zach; Wu, Jian; Yahiatène, Idir; Newman, John W; Huser, Thomas

    2013-11-07

    Cellular lipid droplets are the least studied and least understood cellular organelles in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Despite a significant body of research studying the physiology of lipid droplets it has not yet been possible to fully determine the composition of individual cellular lipid droplets. In this paper we use Raman spectroscopy on single cellular lipid droplets and least-squares fitting of pure fatty acid spectra to determine the composition of individual lipid droplets in cells after treatment with different ratios of oleic and palmitic acid. We validate the results of the Raman spectroscopy-based single lipid droplet analysis with results obtained by gas chromatography analysis of millions of cells, and find that our approach can accurately predict the relative amount of a specific fatty acid in the lipid droplet. Based on these results we show that the fatty acid composition in individual lipid droplets is on average similar to that of all lipid droplets found in the sample. Furthermore, we expand this approach to the investigation of the lipid composition in single cellular peroxisomes. We determine the location of cellular peroxisomes based on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of peroxisomes labeled with the green fluorescent protein, and successive Raman spectroscopy of peroxisomes. We find that in some cases peroxisomes can produce a detectable CARS signal, and that the peroxisomal Raman spectra exhibit an oleic acid-like signature.

  6. A systematic method for the sensitive and specific determination of hair lipids in combination with chromatography.

    PubMed

    Masukawa, Yoshinori; Tsujimura, Hisashi; Imokawa, Genji

    2005-09-05

    A systematic method for the sensitive, precise and accurate determination of hair lipids, including trace amounts of intrinsic endogenous cholesterol (CH), ceramide/N-palmitoyl-DL-dihydrosphingosine (CER/PDS), cholesterol sulfate (CS) and chemically bound 18-methyl eicosanoic acid (18-MEA), has been developed in combination with TLC/FID (flame ionization detection), LC/MS and GC/MS. TLC/FID was used for the simultaneous determination of squalene (SQ), wax esters (WEs), triglycerides (TGs) and free fatty acids (FFAs). Optimal conditions for LC/MS to determine CS and 18-MEA were developed using selected ion monitoring (SIM) under the negative ion mode of electrospray ionization. An alternative procedure for the determination of 18-MEA was also established using commercially available heneicosanoic acid (HEA). In GC/MS, the optimal selection of ions for SIM of trimethylsilylated CH and CER/PDS, and the use of on-column injection has enabled their simultaneous detection. This newly developed method has been used to characterize the hair lipid composition from the proximal root end to the distal tip of chemically untreated hair fibers from two different females, and specific changes of hair lipids probably due to its origin and individuals have been demonstrated for the first time. This method may be useful for clarifying the important roles of intrinsic endogenous 18-MEA, CS, CH and CERs in the function of the cell membrane complex of hair fibers.

  7. Determination of lipid content of oleaginous microalgal biomass by NMR spectroscopic and GC-MS techniques.

    PubMed

    Sarpal, Amarijt S; Teixeira, Claudia M L L; Silva, Paulo R M; Lima, Gustavo M; Silva, Samantha R; Monteiro, Thays V; Cunha, Valnei S; Daroda, Romeu J

    2015-05-01

    Direct methods based on (1)H NMR spectroscopic techniques have been developed for the determination of neutral lipids (triglycerides and free fatty acids) and polar lipids (glyceroglycolipids/phospholipids) in the solvent extracts of oleaginous microalgal biomasses cultivated on a laboratory scale with two species in different media. The chemical shift assignments observed in the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra corresponding to unsaturated (C18:N, N = 1-3, C20:3, C20:5, C22:6, epoxy) and saturated (C14-C18) fatty acid ester components in a complex matrix involving overlapped resonances have been unambiguously confirmed by the application of 2D NMR spectroscopy (total correlation spectroscopy and heteronuclear single quantum coherence-total correlation spectroscopy). The study of the effect of a polar lipid matrix on the determination of neutral lipids by an internal reference blending process by a systematic designed experimental protocol has provided absolute quantification. The fatty acid composition of algal extracts was found to be similar to that of vegetable oils containing saturated (C16-C18:0) and unsaturated (C18:N, N = 1-3, C20:N, N = 3-4, C22:6) fatty acids as confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. The NMR methods developed offer great potential for rapid screening of algal strains for generation of algal biomass with the desired lipid content, quality, and potential for biodiesel and value-added polyunsaturated fatty acids in view of the cost economics of the overall cost of generation of the biomass.

  8. Nile red fluorescence screening facilitating neutral lipid phenotype determination in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Rostron, Kerry A; Rolph, Carole E; Lawrence, Clare L

    2015-07-01

    Investigation of yeast neutral lipid accumulation is important for biotechnology and also for modelling aberrant lipid metabolism in human disease. The Nile red (NR) method has been extensively utilised to determine lipid phenotypes of yeast cells via microscopic means. NR assays have been used to differentiate lipid accumulation and relative amounts of lipid in oleaginous species but have not been thoroughly validated for phenotype determination arising from genetic modification. A modified NR assay, first described by Sitepu et al. (J Microbiol Methods 91:321-328, 2012), was able to detect neutral lipid changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion mutants with sensitivity similar to more advanced methodology. We have also be able to, for the first time, successfully apply the NR assay to the well characterised fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an increasingly important organism in biotechnology. The described NR fluorescence assay is suitable for increased throughput and rapid screening of genetically modified strains in both the biotechnology industry and for modelling ectopic lipid production for a variety of human diseases. This ultimately negates the need for labour intensive and time consuming lipid analyses of samples that may not yield a desirable lipid phenotype, whilst genetic modifications impacting significantly on the cellular lipid phenotype can be further promoted for more in depth analyses.

  9. Determination of PCBs and total lipids in edible fish and crab tissue using supercritical fluid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gavlor, M.; Hale, R.; Smith, C.; Thames, J.; Mothershead, R.

    1995-12-31

    An offline supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method has been developed to determine PCB congeners and total tissue lipid content in edible fish and crab tissues collected from several river systems in Virginia. The method is rapid and safe, requiring only 40 minutes per sample and uses nonorganic solvents for total lipid extraction and only 1.5 mL isooctane for PCB extraction. The SFE approach compares favorably with soxhlet extraction, ASE and column elution. Over 800 fish and crab tissue samples were analyzed successfully, thus demonstrating the robustness of the method. Total lipid values obtained using SFE showed considerable spatial and interspecies variability ranging from 1.8% in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) to 36.4% in striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Total PCB concentrations also varied greatly by site and species. These ranged from below the quantitation limit (1.0 {micro}1 g/kg) to 9,910 {micro}g/kg on a dry weight basis using GCELCD. Dominant PCB congeners detected were in good agreement with those reported by other researchers. Mean total PCB concentrations did not correlate well with total tissue lipid content.

  10. Intramuscular adipose tissue determined by T1-weighted MRI at 3T primarily reflects extramyocellular lipids.

    PubMed

    Akima, Hiroshi; Hioki, Maya; Yoshiko, Akito; Koike, Teruhiko; Sakakibara, Hisataka; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Oshida, Yoshiharu

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess relationships between intramuscular adipose tissue (IntraMAT) content determined by MRI and intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) and extramyocellular lipids (EMCL) determined by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) or echo intensity determined by B-mode ultrasonography of human skeletal muscles. Thirty young and elderly men and women were included. T1-weighted MRI was taken from the right mid-thigh to measure IntraMAT content of the vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF) using a histogram shape-based thresholding technique. IMCL and EMCL were measured from the VL and BF at the right mid-thigh using (1)H MRS. Ultrasonographic images were taken from the VL and BF of the right mid-thigh to measure echo intensity based on gray-scale level for quantitative analysis. There was a significant correlation between IntraMAT content by MRI and EMCL of the VL and BF (VL, r=0.506, P<0.01; BF, r=0.591, P<0.001) and between echo intensity and EMCL of the VL and BF (VL, r=0.485, P<0.05; BF, r=0.648, P<0.01). IntraMAT content was also significantly correlated with echo intensity of the VL and BF (VL, r=0.404, P<0.05; BF, r=0.493, P<0.01). Our study suggests that IntraMAT content determined by T1-weighted MRI at 3T primarily reflects extramyocellular lipids, not intramyocellular lipids, in human skeletal muscles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of supplementing layer diets with shark cartilage or chitosan on egg components and yolk lipids.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, C M; Zapata, J F F; Fuentes, M F F; Freitas, E R; Craveiro, A A; Aguiar, C M

    2003-05-01

    1. An experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of the addition of shark cartilage (SC) or chitosan (CH) to layer diets on egg component weights, yolk lipids and hen plasma lipids. 2. Hy-Line laying hens (80) were used during a 56 d feeding trial. Treatments were: basal diet (BD), BD + 20 g/kg SC, BD + 30 g/kg SC, BD + 20 g/kg CH and BD + 30 g/kg CH. Eggs were analysed on d 14, 28, 42 and 56. 3. Egg weight and egg component weights were not affected by these treatments throughout the experimental period. 4. After 14d of experimental feeding, cholesterol levels were higher in eggs from birds given BD + 20 g/kg CH and BD + 30 g/kg CH than in those from birds given BD. 5. Furthermore, eggs from hens given BD + 20 g/kg SC or BD + 20 g/kg CH were higher in palmitic and stearic acids and lower in oleic acid than those from birds fed on BD. After 56 d feeding, however, palmitic and stearic acid contents in eggs from hens given any of the supplemented diets were lower than in those from hens given BD, and oleic acid in eggs from hens given BD + 20 g/kg SC, BD + 30 g/kg SC and BD + 30 g/kg CH was higher than in those from birds fed on BD. 6. Plasma cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were not significantly affected by dietary treatment. 7. Shark cartilage or chitosan at up to 30 g/kg in layer diets did not affect egg component weights (yolk, white and shell) and total lipid contents. During the period from 42 to 56d of experimental feeding, diets containing up to 30 g/kg chitosan reduced egg yolk contents of cholesterol, palmitic and stearic acids and increased the content of oleic acid.

  12. Enhanced electrochemical sensing of leukemia cells using drug/lipid co-immobilized on the conducting polymer layer.

    PubMed

    Gurudatt, N G; Naveen, M Halappa; Ban, Changill; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2016-12-15

    Electrochemical biosensors using five anticancer drug and lipid molecules attached on the conducting polymer layer to obtain the orientation of drug molecules toward cancer cells, were evaluated as sensing materials and their performances were compared. Conjugation of the drug molecules with a lipid, phosphatidylcholine (PC) has enhanced the sensitivity towards leukemia cells and differentiates cancer cells from normal cells. The composition of each layer of sensor probe was confirmed by electrochemical and surface characterization experiments. Both impedance spectroscopy and voltammetry show the enhanced interaction of leukemia cells using the drug/lipid modified sensor probe. As the number of leukemia cells increased, the charge transfer resistance (Rct) in impedance spectra increased and the amine oxidation peak current of drug molecules in voltammograms decreased at around 0.7-1.0V. Of test drug molecules, raltitrexed (Rtx) showed the best performance for the cancer cells detection. Cancer and normal cell lines from different origins were examined to evaluate the degree of expression of folate receptors (FR) on cells surface, where cervical HeLa cell line was found to be shown the highest expression of the receptor. Impedance and chronoamperometric experiments for leukemia cell line (Jurkat E6-1) showed linear dynamic ranges of 1.0×10(3)-2.5×10(5) cells/mL and 1.0×10(3)-8.0×10(3) cells/mL with detection limits of 68±5 cells/mL and 21±3 cells/mL, respectively.

  13. Energy of hydrogen bonds probed by the adhesion of functionalized lipid layers.

    PubMed Central

    Tareste, David; Pincet, Frédéric; Perez, Eric; Rickling, Stéphane; Mioskowski, Charles; Lebeau, Luc

    2002-01-01

    It is now well admitted that hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds are the main forces driving protein folding and stability. However, because of the complex structure of a protein, it is still difficult to separate the different energetic contributions and have a reliable estimate of the hydrogen bond part. This energy can be quantified on simpler systems such as surfaces bearing hydrogen-bonding groups. Using the surface force apparatus, we have directly measured the interaction energy between monolayers of lipids whose headgroups can establish hydrogen bonds in water: nitrilotriacetate, adenosine, thymidine, and methylated thymidine lipids. From the adhesion energy between the surfaces, we have deduced the energy of a single hydrogen bond in water. We found in each case an energy of 0.5 kcal/mol. This result is in good agreement with recent experimental and theoretical studies made on protein systems showing that intramolecular hydrogen bonds make a positive contribution to protein stabilization. PMID:12496134

  14. Lipid absorption triggers drug supersaturation at the intestinal unstirred water layer and promotes drug absorption from mixed micelles.

    PubMed

    Yeap, Yan Yan; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Porter, Christopher J H

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the potential for the acidic intestinal unstirred water layer (UWL) to induce drug supersaturation and enhance drug absorption from intestinal mixed micelles, via the promotion of fatty acid absorption. Using a single-pass rat jejunal perfusion model, the absorptive-flux of cinnarizine and (3)H-oleic acid from oleic acid-containing intestinal mixed micelles was assessed under normal acidic microclimate conditions and conditions where the acidic microclimate was attenuated via the co-administration of amiloride. As a control, the absorptive-flux of cinnarizine from micelles of Brij® 97 (a non-ionizable, non-absorbable surfactant) was assessed in the absence and presence of amiloride. Cinnarizine solubility was evaluated under conditions of decreasing pH and decreasing micellar lipid content to assess likely changes in solubilization and thermodynamic activity during micellar passage across the UWL. In the presence of amiloride, the absorptive-flux of cinnarizine and (3)H-oleic acid from mixed micelles decreased 6.5-fold and 3.0-fold, respectively. In contrast, the absorptive-flux of cinnarizine from Brij® 97 micelles remained unchanged by amiloride, and was significantly lower than from the long-chain micelles. Cinnarizine solubility in long-chain micelles decreased under conditions where pH and micellar lipid content decreased simultaneously. The acidic microclimate of the intestinal UWL promotes drug absorption from intestinal mixed micelles via the promotion of fatty acid absorption which subsequently stimulates drug supersaturation. The observations suggest that formulations (or food) containing absorbable lipids (or their digestive precursors) may outperform formulations that lack absorbable components since the latter do not benefit from lipid absorption-induced drug supersaturation.

  15. Core lipid structure is a major determinant of the oxidative resistance of low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, B; Prassl, R; Nigon, F; Chapman, M J; Laggner, P

    1995-01-01

    The influence of thermally induced changes in the lipid core structure on the oxidative resistance of discrete, homogeneous low density lipoprotein (LDL) subspecies (d, 1.0297-1.0327 and 1.0327-1.0358 g/ml) has been evaluated. The thermotropic transition of the LDL lipid core at temperatures between 15 degrees C and 37 degrees C, determined by differential scanning calorimetry, exerted significant effects on the kinetics of copper-mediated LDL oxidation expressed in terms of intrinsic antioxidant efficiency (lag time) and diene production rate. Thus, the temperature coefficients of oxidative resistance and maximum oxidation rate showed break points at the core transition temperature. Temperature-induced changes in copper binding were excluded as the molecular basis of such effects, as the saturation of LDL with copper was identical below and above the core transition. At temperatures below the transition, the elevation in lag time indicated a greater resistance to oxidation, reflecting a higher degree of antioxidant protection. This effect can be explained by higher motional constraints and local antioxidant concentrations, the latter resulting from the freezing out of antioxidants from crystalline domains of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Below the transition temperature, the conjugated diene production rate was decreased, a finding that correlated positively with the average size of the cooperative units of neutral lipids estimated from the calorimetric transition width. The reduced accessibility and structural hindrance in the cluster organization of the core lipids therefore inhibits peroxidation. Our findings provide evidence for a distinct effect of the dynamic state of the core lipids on the oxidative susceptibility of LDL and are therefore relevant to the atherogenicity of these cholesterol-rich particles. PMID:7708675

  16. Application of solid/liquid extraction for the gravimetric determination of lipids in royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Antinelli, Jean-François; Davico, Renée; Rognone, Catherine; Faucon, Jean-Paul; Lizzani-Cuvelier, Louisette

    2002-04-10

    Gravimetric lipid determination is a major parameter for the characterization and the authentication of royal jelly quality. A solid/liquid extraction was compared to the reference method, which is based on liquid/liquid extraction. The amount of royal jelly and the time of the extraction were optimized in comparison to the reference method. Boiling/rinsing ratio and spread of royal jelly onto the extraction thimble were identified as critical parameters, resulting in good accuracy and precision for the alternative method. Comparison of reproducibility and repeatability of both methods associated with gas chromatographic analysis of the composition of the extracted lipids showed no differences between the two methods. As the intra-laboratory validation tests were comparable to the reference method, while offering rapidity and a decrease in amount of solvent used, it was concluded that the proposed method should be used with no modification of quality criteria and norms established for royal jelly characterization.

  17. Altered lipid metabolism in the aging kidney identified by three layered omic analysis.

    PubMed

    Braun, Fabian; Rinschen, Markus M; Bartels, Valerie; Frommolt, Peter; Habermann, Bianca; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Schumacher, Björn; Dollé, Martijn E T; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Kurschat, Christine E

    2016-03-01

    Aging-associated diseases and their comorbidities affect the life of a constantly growing proportion of the population in developed countries. At the center of these comorbidities are changes of kidney structure and function as age-related chronic kidney disease predisposes to the development of cardiovascular diseases such as stroke, myocardial infarction or heart failure. To detect molecular mechanisms involved in kidney aging, we analyzed gene expression profiles of kidneys from adult and aged wild-type mice by transcriptomic, proteomic and targeted lipidomic methodologies. Interestingly, transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed differential expression of genes primarily involved in lipid metabolism and immune response. Additional lipidomic analyses uncovered significant age-related differences in the total amount of phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins as well as in subspecies of phosphatidylserines and ceramides with age. By integration of these datasets we identified Aldh1a1, a key enzyme in vitamin A metabolism specifically expressed in the medullary ascending limb, as one of the most prominent upregulated proteins in old kidneys. Moreover, ceramidase Asah1 was highly expressed in aged kidneys, consistent with a decrease in ceramide C16. In summary, our data suggest that changes in lipid metabolism are involved in the process of kidney aging and in the development of chronic kidney disease.

  18. Altered lipid metabolism in the aging kidney identified by three layered omic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Fabian; Rinschen, Markus M.; Bartels, Valerie; Frommolt, Peter; Habermann, Bianca; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Schumacher, Björn; Dollé, Martijn E.T.; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Kurschat, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Aging-associated diseases and their comorbidities affect the life of a constantly growing proportion of the population in developed countries. At the center of these comorbidities are changes of kidney structure and function as age-related chronic kidney disease predisposes to the development of cardiovascular diseases such as stroke, myocardial infarction or heart failure. To detect molecular mechanisms involved in kidney aging, we analyzed gene expression profiles of kidneys from adult and aged wild-type mice by transcriptomic, proteomic and targeted lipidomic methodologies. Interestingly, transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed differential expression of genes primarily involved in lipid metabolism and immune response. Additional lipidomic analyses uncovered significant age-related differences in the total amount of phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins as well as in subspecies of phosphatidylserines and ceramides with age. By integration of these datasets we identified Aldh1a1, a key enzyme in vitamin A metabolism specifically expressed in the medullary ascending limb, as one of the most prominent upregulated proteins in old kidneys. Moreover, ceramidase Asah1 was highly expressed in aged kidneys, consistent with a decrease in ceramide C16. In summary, our data suggest that changes in lipid metabolism are involved in the process of kidney aging and in the development of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26886165

  19. Determination of mixing layer heights from ceilometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Klaus; Emeis, Stefan M.; Rauch, Andreas; Munkel, Christoph; Vogt, Siegfried

    2004-11-01

    The Vaisala ceilometer LD40 is an eye-safe commercial lidar. It is designed originally to detect cloud base heights and vertical visibility for aviation safety purposes. The instrument was operated continuously at different measurement campaigns to detect mixing layer height from aerosol backscatter profiles. First results with the CT25K ceilometer were presented last year in the paper SPIE 5235-64 from the environmental measuring campaign in the frame of the BMBF-funded project VALIUM in Hanover, Germany, investigating the air pollution in a street canyon and the surrounding with various sensors. A software for routine retrieval of mixing layer height (MLH) from ceilometer data was developed. A comparison with mixing layer height retrievals from a SODAR and a wind-temperature-radar (WTR) operated in the urban region of Munich will be shown. The three instruments give information that partly agree and partly complement each other. The ceilometer gives information on the aerosol content of the air and the WTR provides a direct measurement of the vertical temperature distribution in the boundary layer. The WTR and the ceilometer add information on the moisture structure of the boundary layer that is not detected by the SODAR which gives information on the thermal structure. On the other hand this comparison validates known techniques by which the MLH is derived from SODAR data. In the absence of low clouds and precipitation ceilometers can estimate the mixing-layer-height fairly well. The potential of the ceilometer, being the smallest instrument among the used ones as LIDAR, SODAR and WTR, will be discussed to be used in future MLH studies.

  20. Heparin inhibits membrane interactions and lipid-induced fibrillation of a prion amyloidogenic determinant.

    PubMed

    Bazar, Ehud; Sheynis, Tania; Dorosz, Jerzy; Jelinek, Raz

    2011-03-21

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), particularly heparin, are known to reduce the toxicities of various amyloidogenic proteins. The molecular factors underlying the antitoxic effects of GAGs, however, are still not fully understood. Because interactions of amyloidogenic proteins and their aggregates with membranes are believed to play major roles in affecting amyloid pathogenesis, our objective in this study was to elucidate the effect of heparin on membrane interactions of the 21-residue amyloidogenic determinant of the prion protein [PrP(106-126)]. Indeed, the experimental results indicate that heparin significantly interferes in membrane interactions of the prion peptide. Specifically, we show that there is direct competition for binding of PrP(106-126) between heparin on the one hand and negatively charged phospholipids on the other hand. The data reveal that heparin, even in very low molar concentrations, exhibited high affinity towards PrP(106-126) and consequently suppressed interactions of the peptide with lipid vesicles. Interestingly, whereas heparin significantly inhibited lipid-induced PrP(106-126) fibrillation, it still promoted fibril formation in aqueous solutions independently of the lipid vesicles present. Our results strongly suggest that the primary effects of GAGs in attenuating amyloid toxicities are due to blocking of membrane interactions of the amyloidogenic proteins rather than modulation of their fibrillation properties. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Interplay of electrostatics and lipid packing determines the binding of charged polymer coated nanoparticles to model membranes.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Nupur; Bhattacharya, Rupak; Saha, Arindam; Jana, Nikhil R; Basu, Jaydeep K

    2015-10-07

    Understanding of nanoparticle-membrane interactions is useful for various applications of nanoparticles like drug delivery and imaging. Here we report on the studies of interaction between hydrophilic charged polymer coated semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles with model lipid membranes. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity measurements suggest that cationic nanoparticles bind and penetrate bilayers of zwitterionic lipids. Penetration and binding depend on the extent of lipid packing and result in the disruption of the lipid bilayer accompanied by enhanced lipid diffusion. On the other hand, anionic nanoparticles show minimal membrane binding although, curiously, their interaction leads to reduction in lipid diffusivity. It is suggested that the enhanced binding of cationic QDs at higher lipid packing can be understood in terms of the effective surface potential of the bilayers which is tunable through membrane lipid packing. Our results bring forth the subtle interplay of membrane lipid packing and electrostatics which determine nanoparticle binding and penetration of model membranes with further implications for real cell membranes.

  2. Determination of Stability and Translation in a Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crepeau, John; Tobak, Murray

    1996-01-01

    Reducing the infinite degrees of freedom inherent in fluid motion into a manageable number of modes to analyze fluid motion is presented. The concepts behind the center manifold technique are used. Study of the Blasius boundary layer and a precise description of stability within the flow field are discussed.

  3. Super-resolved thickness maps of thin film phantoms and in vivo visualization of tear film lipid layer using OCT

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Valentin Aranha; Schmetterer, Leopold; Triggs, Graham J.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Gröschl, Martin; Messner, Alina; Schmidl, Doreen; Garhofer, Gerhard; Aschinger, Gerold; Werkmeister, René M.

    2016-01-01

    In optical coherence tomography (OCT), the axial resolution is directly linked to the coherence length of the employed light source. It is currently unclear if OCT allows measuring thicknesses below its axial resolution value. To investigate spectral-domain OCT imaging in the super-resolution regime, we derived a signal model and compared it with the experiment. Several island thin film samples of known refractive indices and thicknesses in the range 46 – 163 nm were fabricated and imaged. Reference thickness measurements were performed using a commercial atomic force microscope. In vivo measurements of the tear film were performed in 4 healthy subjects. Our results show that quantitative super-resolved thickness measurement can be performed using OCT. In addition, we report repeatable tear film lipid layer visualization. Our results provide a novel interpretation of the OCT axial resolution limit and open a perspective to deeper extraction of the information hidden in the coherence volume. PMID:27446696

  4. Virosome engineering of colloidal particles and surfaces: bioinspired fusion to supported lipid layers.

    PubMed

    Fleddermann, J; Diamanti, E; Azinas, S; Košutić, M; Dähne, L; Estrela-Lopis, I; Amacker, M; Donath, E; Moya, S E

    2016-04-21

    Immunostimulating reconstituted influenza virosomes (IRIVs) are liposomes with functional viral envelope glycoproteins: influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase intercalated in the phospholipid bilayer. Here we address the fusion of IRIVs to artificial supported lipid membranes assembled on polyelectrolyte multilayers on both colloidal particles and planar substrates. The R18 assay is used to prove the IRIV fusion in dependence of pH, temperature and HA concentration. IRIVs display a pH-dependent fusion mechanism, fusing at low pH in analogy to the influenza virus. The pH dependence is confirmed by the Quartz Crystal Microbalance technique. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging shows that at low pH virosomes are integrated in the supported membrane displaying flattened features and a reduced vertical thickness. Virosome fusion offers a new strategy for transferring biological functions on artificial supported membranes with potential applications in targeted delivery and sensing.

  5. Virosome engineering of colloidal particles and surfaces: bioinspired fusion to supported lipid layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleddermann, J.; Diamanti, E.; Azinas, S.; Košutić, M.; Dähne, L.; Estrela-Lopis, I.; Amacker, M.; Donath, E.; Moya, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    Immunostimulating reconstituted influenza virosomes (IRIVs) are liposomes with functional viral envelope glycoproteins: influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase intercalated in the phospholipid bilayer. Here we address the fusion of IRIVs to artificial supported lipid membranes assembled on polyelectrolyte multilayers on both colloidal particles and planar substrates. The R18 assay is used to prove the IRIV fusion in dependence of pH, temperature and HA concentration. IRIVs display a pH-dependent fusion mechanism, fusing at low pH in analogy to the influenza virus. The pH dependence is confirmed by the Quartz Crystal Microbalance technique. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging shows that at low pH virosomes are integrated in the supported membrane displaying flattened features and a reduced vertical thickness. Virosome fusion offers a new strategy for transferring biological functions on artificial supported membranes with potential applications in targeted delivery and sensing.Immunostimulating reconstituted influenza virosomes (IRIVs) are liposomes with functional viral envelope glycoproteins: influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase intercalated in the phospholipid bilayer. Here we address the fusion of IRIVs to artificial supported lipid membranes assembled on polyelectrolyte multilayers on both colloidal particles and planar substrates. The R18 assay is used to prove the IRIV fusion in dependence of pH, temperature and HA concentration. IRIVs display a pH-dependent fusion mechanism, fusing at low pH in analogy to the influenza virus. The pH dependence is confirmed by the Quartz Crystal Microbalance technique. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging shows that at low pH virosomes are integrated in the supported membrane displaying flattened features and a reduced vertical thickness. Virosome fusion offers a new strategy for transferring biological functions on artificial supported membranes with potential applications in targeted delivery and sensing

  6. Determination of layer moduli from falling weight deflectometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruotoistenmaeki, A.

    Back calculation programs are used for evaluation of pavement layer moduli from falling weight deflectometer (FWD) measurements. A comparison of two programs with different calculation methods, Modulus and Elmod, is made using deflection data derived from 43 SHRP-LTPP (Strategic Highway Research Program, Long-Term Pavement Performance) test sections. Critical strains were calculated using the linear program (BISAR) with layer moduli from the Modulus program as input and with the Elmod program. It was found that calculated strains from the two programs agree very well, even though the calculated moduli are quite different. Calculated strains from FWD loading were compared with measured strains under moving wheel load at Virttaa test site. The differences between the two are most likely due to differences in the loading conditions and in the method of analysis.

  7. PROGRAM HTVOL: The Determination of Tree Crown Volume by Layers

    Treesearch

    Joseph C. Mawson; Jack Ward Thomas; Richard M. DeGraaf

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program calculates, from a few field measurements, the volume of tree crowns. This volume is in layers of a specified thickness of trees or large shrubs. Each tree is assigned one of 15 solid forms, formed by using one of five side shapes (a circle, an ellipse, a neiloid, a triangle, or a parabolalike shape), and one of three bottom shapes (a...

  8. Micro-porous layer stochastic reconstruction and transport parameter determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hannach, Mohamed; Singh, Randhir; Djilali, Ned; Kjeang, Erik

    2015-05-01

    The Micro-Porous Layer (MPL) is a porous, thin layer commonly used in fuel cells at the interfaces between the catalyst layers and gas diffusion media. It is generally made from spherical carbon nanoparticles and PTFE acting as hydrophobic agent. The scale and brittle nature of the MPL structure makes it challenging to study experimentally. In the present work, a 3D stochastic model is developed to virtually reconstruct the MPL structure. The carbon nanoparticle and PTFE phases are fully distinguished by the algorithm. The model is shown to capture the actual structural morphology of the MPL and is validated by comparing the results to available experimental data. The model shows a good capability in generating a realistic MPL successfully using a set of parameters introduced to capture specific morphological features of the MPL. A numerical model that resolves diffusive transport at the pore scale is used to compute the effective transport properties of the reconstructed MPLs. A parametric study is conducted to illustrate the capability of the model as an MPL design tool that can be used to guide and optimize the functionality of the material.

  9. The Effect of Particle Size on the Deposition of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles in Different Skin Layers: A Histological Study

    PubMed Central

    Mardhiah Adib, Zahra; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Yari Khosroshahi, Ahmad; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study the effect of particle size, as a substantial parameters in skin penetration, on the deposition depth and rate of SLNs in different layers of skin was explored. Methods: SLNs in different particle size ranges (80, 333 and 971 nm) made of Precirol as solid lipid were prepared using hot melt homogenization technique and pigmented by Rhodamine B to be able to be tracked in the skin under inspection of fluorescent microscopy. After 0.5 h, 3 h, 6 h and 24 h of SLNs administration on rat skin, animals were sacrificed and exercised skins were sliced by a freeze microtome. SLNs were monitored in the skin structure under fluorescence microscope. Results: The size of SLNs played a crucial role in the penetration to deep skin layers. The sub100 nm size range of SLNs showed the most promising skin penetration rate and depth mainly via hair follicles. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated that the selection of an appropriate size of particles may be a valuable factor impacting the therapeutic outcomes of dermal drug administration. PMID:27123415

  10. Refractive index and thickness determination in Langmuir monolayers of myelin lipids.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Julio M; Malfatti-Gasperini, Antonio A; Puentes-Martinez, Ximena E; Cavalcanti, Leide P; Oliveira, Rafael G

    2017-05-01

    Langmuir monolayers at the air/water interface are widely used as biomembrane models and for amphiphilic molecules studies in general. Under controlled intermolecular organization (lateral molecular area), surface pressure, surface potential, reflectivity (R) and other magnitudes can be precisely determined on these planar monomolecular films. However, some physical parameters such as the refractive index of the monolayer (n) still remain elusive. The refractive index is very relevant because (in combination with R) it allows for the determination of the thickness of the film. The uncertainties of n determine important errors that propagate non-linearly into the calculation of monolayers thickness. Here we present an analytical method for the determination of n in monolayers based on refractive index matching. By using a Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) setup and monolayers spread over subphases with variable refractive index (n2), a minimum in R is search as a function of n2. In these conditions, n equals n2. The results shown correspond to monolayers of myelin lipids. The n values remain constant at 1.46 upon compression and equals the obtained value for myelin lipid bilayers in suspension. The values for n and R allow for the determination of thickness. We establish comparisons between these thicknesses for the monolayer and those obtained from two X-ray scattering techniques: 1) GIXOS for monolayers at the air/water interface and 2) SAXS for bilayers in bulk suspension. This allows us to conclude that the thickness that we measure by BAM includes the apolar and polar headgroup regions of the monolayer.

  11. [Thin-layer chromatographic determination of coumarin derivatives].

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, Ts M

    1977-01-01

    Described is a thin-layer chromatography method for the demonstration and identification of the cumarin derivatives cumaphos and warfarin. Tested were five solvents and six developers. Best results were obtained by means of Silica gel plates, the toluol-aceton solvent (85:15), and the developer of a diazosalt 0.4% in an alcohol 20% sodiumhydroxide. Warfarin and cumaphos are demonstrated with the appearance of yellow, resp. orange spots on a white background, the RF values being 0.37 and 0.85, and sensitivity as regards warfarin 0.5 microgram and cumaphos 0.2 microgram.

  12. Square Wave Voltammetry: An Alternative Technique to Determinate Piroxicam Release Profiles from Nanostructured Lipid Carriers.

    PubMed

    Otarola, Jessica; Garrido, Mariano; Correa, N Mariano; Molina, Patricia G

    2016-08-04

    A new, simple, and fast electrochemical (EC) method has been developed to determine the release profile of piroxicam, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, loaded in a drug delivery system based on nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs). For the first time, the samples were analyzed by using square wave voltammetry, a sensitive EC technique. The piroxicam EC responses allow us to propose a model that explains the experimental results and to subsequently determine the amount of drug loaded into the NLCs formulation as a function of time. In vitro drug release studies showed prolonged drug release (up to 5 days), releasing 60 % of the incorporated drug. The proposed method is a promising and stable alternative for the study of different drug delivery systems. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Ab initio determination of kinetics for atomic layer deposition modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmers, Elizabeth M.

    A first principles model is developed to describe the kinetics of atomic layer deposition (ALD) systems. This model requires no fitting parameters, as it is based on the reaction pathways, structures, and energetics obtained from quantum-chemical studies. Using transition state theory and partition functions from statistical mechanics, equilibrium constants and reaction rates can be calculated. Several tools were created in Python to aid in the calculation of these quantities, and this procedure was applied to two systems- zinc oxide deposition from diethyl zinc (DEZ) and water, and alumina deposition from trimethyl aluminum (TMA) and water. A Gauss-Jordan factorization is used to decompose the system dynamics, and the resulting systems of equations are solved numerically to obtain the temporal concentration profiles of these two deposition systems.

  14. Determination of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height from Radiosonde and Lidar Backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennemuth, Barbara; Lammert, Andrea

    2006-07-01

    The height of the atmospheric boundary layer is derived with the help of two different measuring systems and methods. From radiosoundings the boundary layer height is determined by the parcel method and by temperature and humidity gradients. From lidar backscatter measurements a combination of the averaging variance method and the high-resolution gradient method is used to determine boundary layer heights. In this paper lidar-derived boundary layer heights on a 10 min basis are presented. Datasets from four experiments two over land and two over the sea are used to compare boundary layer heights from both methods. Only the daytime boundary layer is investigated because the height of the nighttime stable boundary layer is below the range of the lidar. In many situations the boundary layer heights from both systems coincide within ±200 m. This corresponds to the standard deviation of lidar-derived 10-min values within a 1-h interval and is due to the time and space variability of the boundary layer height. Deviations appear for certain situations and depend on which radiosonde method is applied. The parcel method fails over land surfaces in the afternoon when the boundary layer stabilizes and over the ocean when the boundary layer is slightly stable. An automatic radiosonde gradient method sometimes fails when multiple layers are present, e.g. a residual layer above the growing convective boundary layer. The lidar method has the advantage of continuous tracing and thus avoids confusion with elevated layers. On the other hand, it mostly fails in situations with boundary layer clouds

  15. Determination of Components in Beverages by Thin-Layer Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Yinfa; Yeung, Edward S.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a simple and interesting chromatography experiment using three different fluorescence detection principles for the determination of caffeine, saccharin and sodium benzoate in beverages. Experimental procedures and an analysis and discussion of the results are included. (CW)

  16. Determination of Components in Beverages by Thin-Layer Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Yinfa; Yeung, Edward S.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a simple and interesting chromatography experiment using three different fluorescence detection principles for the determination of caffeine, saccharin and sodium benzoate in beverages. Experimental procedures and an analysis and discussion of the results are included. (CW)

  17. Postprandial lipid responses to standard carbohydrates used to determine glycaemic index values.

    PubMed

    Vega-López, Sonia; Ausman, Lynne M; Matthan, Nirupa R; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2013-11-01

    Prior studies assessing the metabolic effects of different types of carbohydrates have focused on their glycaemic response. However, the response of postprandial cardiometabolic risk indicators has not been considered in these studies. The present study assessed postprandial lipid responses to two forms of carbohydrates used as reference foods for glycaemic index determinations, white bread (50 g available carbohydrate) and glucose (50 g), under controlled conditions and with intra-individual replicate determinations. A total of twenty adults (20–70 years) underwent two cycles of challenges with each pair of reference foods (four challenges/person), administered in a random order on separate days under standard conditions. Serum lipids (total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, TAG and NEFA), glucose and insulin were monitored for 5 h post-ingestion. Oral glucose resulted in greater glycaemic and insulinaemic responses than white bread for the first 90 min and a greater subsequent decline after 120 min (P =0·0001). The initial decline in serum NEFA concentrations was greater after the oral glucose than after the white bread challenge, as was the rebound after 150 min (P = 0·001). Nevertheless, the type of carbohydrate had no significant effect on postprandial total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol concentrations. Following an initial modest rise in TAG concentrations in response to both challenges, the values dropped below the fasting values for oral glucose but not for the white bread challenge. These data suggest that the type of carbohydrate used to determine the glycaemic index, bread or glucose, has little or modest effects on postprandial plasma cholesterol concentrations. Differences in TAG and NEFA concentrations over the 5 h time period were modest, and their clinical relevance is unclear.

  18. Postprandial lipid responses to standard carbohydrates used to determine glycaemic index values

    PubMed Central

    Vega-López, Sonia; Ausman, Lynne M.; Matthan, Nirupa R.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies assessing the metabolic effects of different types of carbohydrates have focused on their glycaemic response. However, the response of postprandial cardiometabolic risk indicators has not been considered in these studies. The present study assessed postprandial lipid responses to two forms of carbohydrates used as reference foods for glycaemic index determinations, white bread (50 g available carbohydrate) and glucose (50 g), under controlled conditions and with intra-individual replicate determinations. A total of twenty adults (20–70 years) underwent two cycles of challenges with each pair of reference foods (four challenges/person), administered in a random order on separate days under standard conditions. Serum lipids (total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, TAG and NEFA), glucose and insulin were monitored for 5 h post-ingestion. Oral glucose resulted in greater glycaemic and insulinaemic responses than white bread for the first 90 min and a greater subsequent decline after 120 min (P = 0.0001). The initial decline in serum NEFA concentrations was greater after the oral glucose than after the white bread challenge, as was the rebound after 150 min (P = 0.001). Nevertheless, the type of carbohydrate had no significant effect on postprandial total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol concentrations. Following an initial modest rise in TAG concentrations in response to both challenges, the values dropped below the fasting values for oral glucose but not for the white bread challenge. These data suggest that the type of carbohydrate used to determine the glycaemic index, bread or glucose, has little or modest effects on postprandial plasma cholesterol concentrations. Differences in TAG and NEFA concentrations over the 5 h time period were modest, and their clinical relevance is unclear. PMID:23656707

  19. Kinetic Evaluation of Lipid Oils Conversion to Biofuel Using Layered Double Hydroxide Doped with Triazabicyclodece Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nato Lopez, Frank D.

    Worldwide, there is an ever increasing need for sustainable, renewable fuels that will accommodate the rapidly increasing energy demand and provide independence from fossil fuels. The search for a sustainable alternative to petroleum based fuels has been a great challenge to the scientific community; therefore, great efforts are being made to overcome the fossil fuels dependence by exploring the prominent field of biofuels (bioethanol and biodiesel). Traditional biodiesel is produced from feedstocks such as vegetable oils and animal fats by converting the triglycerides with methanol in the presence of a homogeneous catalyst to produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). However, drawbacks of this process are the undesired glycerol byproduct and post reaction processing, including separation from reaction mixture, that results in high costs factors. In the present work, the reaction kinetics of a glycerol-free biodiesel method is studied. This method consists of the transesterification of a vegetable oil (i.e. canola oil) using dimethyl carbonate (DMC) as an alternative methylating agent in presence of layered double hydroxides doped with triazabicyclodecene catalyst (a basic organocatalyst). Furthermore, is theorized that this heterogeneous catalyst (TBD/LDH) simultaneously converts both FFAs and triglycerides due to acid sites formed by Al3+ active sites of the LDH structure. Additionally, the versatility of the Raman in situ technique was used as quantitative analysis tool to monitor the reaction kinetics and collect real time data.

  20. Using optical diagnostics to determine the melt temperature field in layer-by-layer laser alloying of metal powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavalov, Yu. N.; Dubrov, A. V.; Mirzade, F. Kh.; Dubrovin, N. G.; Makarova, E. S.; Dubrov, V. D.

    2017-07-01

    The results of application of optical diagnostics in the estimation of the temperature field at the melt surface in layer-by-layer laser alloying of metal powder are presented. It is demonstrated that surface concavity induced by the thermocapillary effect upon nonuniform heating may distort pyrometry data considerably. The use of external illumination provides an opportunity to determine the shape of the melt surface. The obtained minimum estimate of the temperature gradient in the metal region affected by laser radiation is 2.8 × 104 K/cm.

  1. Determination of the fatty acid profile of neutral lipids, free fatty acids and phospholipids in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Firl, Nina; Kienberger, Hermine; Hauser, Teresa; Rychlik, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge of the fatty acid composition of lipid classes in human plasma is an important factor in the investigation of human metabolism. Therefore, a method for the analysis of neutral lipid (NL), phospholipid (PL) and free fatty acids (FFA) in human plasma has been developed and validated. Separation of lipid classes was carried out by solid phase extraction of the lipid extract. The fractions were transesterified and the resulting fatty acid methyl esters were determined by GC/FID. For the method to be validated, precision, detection and quantification limits, as well as recovery, were determined for combined lipid extraction, solid phase extraction and GC analysis. The lipid extraction was miniaturized and simplified by application of an ultrasound ‘Sonotrode’. The resolution of lipid classes was optimized with appropriate standards added to a representative plasma sample. In addition, a rapid derivatization procedure using trimethylsulfoniumhydroxide was established. Low determination limits (1.5, 0.2 and 1.3 μg/g plasma for NL, PL and FFA, respectively) indicate that the method’s sensitivity is sufficient to quantify even minor components. Furthermore, recovery for NL and PL fatty acids was found to range from 80% to 110%. The results were similar for FFA apart from more polar free fatty acids due to their higher solubility in water. Repetitive measurements showed very good precision apart from the long chain PUFA for which the coefficients of variation were significantly higher. The present method is applicable to the quantitation of fatty acids in lipid classes of human plasma including several minor components.

  2. Determination of the primary structure of two lipid transfer proteins from apricot (Prunus armeniaca).

    PubMed

    Conti, A; Fortunato, D; Ortolani, C; Giuffrida, M G; Pravettoni, V; Napolitano, L; Farioli, L; Perono Garoffo, L; Trambaioli, C; Pastorello, E A

    2001-05-25

    It has been recently demonstrated that the major allergen of apricot is a protein of molecular mass (Mr) 9000 belonging to the family of Lipid Transfer Protein. The aim of this study was the determination of the primary structure of apricot LTP by micro-sequencing and mass spectrometric analyses. Apricot LTP is a 91 amino acids protein like peach and almond LTPs with a sequence identity of 91% and 94%, respectively. Like for the peach LTP, out of the 25 amino acids forming the inner surface of the tunnel-like hydrophobic cavity in maize ns-LTP, 16 are identical and 7 similar in the apricot LTP, supporting the hypothesis of a similar function.

  3. Experimental Determination of Shock Structures in Hetrogeneous Layered Material Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-19

    2004). The failure and ultimate strength of the composites were both reported to increase with strain rate. Haque et al. (2003) used SHPB technique...Sierakowski and Chaturvedi, 1997). These material systems can be engineered to have the same strength and stiffness as high- strength steels , yet they...Hugoniot curve of GRP were determined. The spall strength of GRP was also studied by conducting a series of both normal-impact and combined pressure

  4. Maternal Lipids as Strong Determinants of Fetal Environment and Growth in Pregnancies With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer-Graf, Ute M.; Graf, Kristof; Kulbacka, Irina; Kjos, Siri L.; Dudenhausen, Joachim; Vetter, Klaus; Herrera, Emilio

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the contribution of maternal glucose and lipids to intrauterine metabolic environment and fetal growth in pregnancies with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—In 150 pregnancies, serum triglycerides (TGs), cholesterol, free fatty acids (FFAs), glycerol, insulin, and glucose were determined in maternal serum and cord blood during the 3rd trimester. Maternal glucose values came from oral glucose tolerance testing and glucose profiles. Measurements of fetal abdominal circumference (AC) were performed simultaneously with maternal blood sampling and birth weight, and BMI and neonatal fat mass were obtained following delivery. RESULTS—Maternal TGs and FFAs correlated with fetal AC size (at 28 weeks: triglycerides, P = 0.001; FFAs, P = 0.02), and at delivery they correlated with all neonatal anthropometric measures (FFA: birth weight, P = 0.002; BMI, P = 0.001; fat mass, P = 0.01). After adjustment for confounding variables, maternal FFAs and TGs at delivery remained the only parameters independently related to newborns large for gestational age (LGA) (P = 0.008 and P = 0.04, respectively). Maternal FFA levels were higher in mothers with LGA newborns than in those with appropriate for gestational age (AGA) newborns (362.8 ± 101.7 vs. 252.4 ± 10.1, P = 0.002). Maternal levels of TGs, FFAs, and glycerol at delivery correlated with those in cord blood (P = 0.003, P = 0.004, and P = 0.005, respectively). Fetal triglyceride and cholesterol levels were negatively correlated with newborn birth weight (P = 0.001), BMI (P = 0.004), and fat mass (P = 0.001). TGs were significantly higher in small for gestational age (SGA) newborns compared with AGA or LGA newborns, while insulin-to-glucose ratio and FFAs were the highest in LGA newborns. CONCLUSIONS—In well-controlled GDM pregnancies, maternal lipids are strong predictors for fetal lipids and fetal growth. Infants with abnormal growth seem to be exposed to a distinct

  5. Primary aminophospholipids in the external layer of liposomes protect their component polyunsaturated fatty acids from 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)- dihydrochloride-mediated lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Kazuhiro; Sekine, Seiji; Saito, Morio

    2005-02-09

    We showed in our previous study that docosahexaenoic acid-rich phosphatidylethanolamine in the external layer of small-size liposomes, as a model for biomembranes, protected its docosahexaenoic acid from 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride- (AAPH-) mediated lipid peroxidation in vitro. Besides phosphatidylethanolamine, both phosphatidylserine and an alkenyl-acyl analogue of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogen, are reported to possess characteristic antioxidant activities. However, there are few reports about the relationship between the protective activity of phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogen and/or phosphatidylserine against lipid peroxidation and their distribution in a phospholipid bilayer. Furthermore, it is unclear whether phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogen and/or phosphatidylserine protect their component polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from lipid peroxidation. In the present study, we examined the relationship between the transbilayer distribution of aminophospholipids, such as phosphatidylethanolamine rich in arachidonic acid, phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogen, and phosphatidylserine, and the oxidative stability of their component PUFAs. The transbilayer distribution of these aminophospholipids in liposomes was modulated by coexisting phosphatidylcholine bearing two types of acyl chain: dipalmitoyl or dioleoyl. The amounts of these primary aminophospholipids in the external layer became significantly higher in liposomes containing dioleoylphosphatidylcholine than in those containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. Phosphatidylethanolamine rich in arachidonic acid, phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogen or phosphatidylserine in the external layer of liposomes, as well as external docosahexaenoic acid-rich phosphatidylethanolamine, were able to protect their component PUFAs from AAPH-mediated lipid peroxidation.

  6. Effective application of freezing lipid precipitation and SCX-SPE for determination of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in high lipid foodstuffs by LC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soo Hwan; Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Sang Hoon; Park, Hyun Mee; Pyo, Heesoo; Lee, Yong Moon; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Hong, Jongki

    2015-06-15

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are naturally occurring plant toxins associated with serious hepatic disease in humans and animals. In this study, rapid and sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of 9 toxic PAs in popularly high lipid foodstuffs by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). PAs in lipid foodstuff were effectively purified by freezing lipid precipitation (FLP) and strong cation exchange (SCX)-solid-phase extraction (SPE). Especially, FLP could easily remove the large amounts of triacylglycerols in the lipid sample extract and effectively combine with SPE cleanup. During the FLP procedure, over 77% of the lipids in the foodstuff extracts were rapidly eliminated without any significant loss of the PAs with over 81% recovery. The elimination efficiency of lipids by FLP was tested with LC-atmospheric chemical ionization (APCI)-MS. For further purification, SCX-SPE cartridge could successfully purify PAs from the remaining interfering substances by the variation pH with 5% NH4OH in methanol. For precise quantification and confirmation of PAs in complicate sample matrices, appropriate transition ions in LC-MS/MS-multiple-ion reaction monitoring (MRM) mode were selected on the basis of MS/MS fragmentation pathways of PAs. The established analytical method was validated in terms of the linearity, limits of detection (LOD), and quantification (LOQ), precision, and accuracy. The method was deemed satisfactory by inter- and intra-day validation and exhibited both high accuracy and precision (relative standard deviation<11.06%). Overall limits of detection and quantitation of PAs were approximately 0.06-0.60ng/mL at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 and were about 0.20-1.99ng/mL at a S/N of 10 for all foodstuffs. The established method was successfully applied for the monitoring of toxic PAs in several types of high lipid foodstuffs such as soybeans, seed oil, milk, and margarine.

  7. Determination of elastic properties of surface layers and coatings by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Růžek, M.; Sedlák, P.; Seiner, H.; Landa, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with determination of in-plane elastic constants of thin layers deposited on substrates. Modified resonant ultrasound spectroscopy is used to measure resonant spectra before and after layer deposition . These two spectra are compared and changes in the position of the resonant peaks are associated with layer properties. It is shown that for thin layers either the elastic moduli or the surface mass density can be determined, providing the complementary information (the surface mass density for the determination of the moduli, the elastic moduli for the determination of the surface mass density) is known. As an experimental demonstration of this approach, the elastic moduli of diamond-like-carbon film deposited on a silicon substrate and the surface mass density of a thin spray paint on a silicon substrate are determined.

  8. A validated HPLC method for the determination of octocrylene in solid lipid nanoparticle systems.

    PubMed

    Berkman, M S; Yazan, Y

    2011-02-01

    UV filters are traditionally classified as chemical absorbers and physical blockers depending on their mechanism of action. In this study, one of the most important chemical UVB absorber, octocrylene, was incorporated into Solid Lipid Nanoparticle (SLN) systems which themselves have UV blocking potential similar to physical blockers. Determination of octocrylene in the formulations was performed by HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) using a new validated method based on ICH harmonised tripartite guideline "validation of analytical procedures Q2(R1)". Determination and validation studies were carried out on a 4.6 x 250 mm, 5 microm C18 ACE column using an optimized mobile phase of acetonitrile:water (75:25, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.5 mL x min(-1). UV detection was performed at 210 nm and the column temperature was adjusted to 50 degrees C. Cyclosporine A was used as an internal standard (IS). The specified working range was derived from linearity studies and kept in the concentration range of 2.5 x -5.5 x 10(-5) M. Good correlation and accuracy were obtained. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) values were determined to be 1.64 x 10(-6) M and 4.97 x 10-6 M, respectively. Octocrylene recovery % results of the SLN formulations stored at 25 degrees C, 4 degrees C and 40 degrees C for 360 days were investigated and compared to the freshly prepared samples.

  9. Lipid quantification and structure determination of nuclear envelope precursor membranes in the sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Garnier-Lhomme, Marie; Dufourc, Erick J; Larijani, Banafshé; Poccia, Dominic

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear envelope assembly is a fundamental cellular process normally taking place once in every cell cycle in eukaryotes. The timing of fusion of nuclear membrane precursors to form the complete double membrane surrounding the chromosomes is tightly controlled, but much remains unclear concerning its regulation. Small amounts of material available and the high background of irrelevant cellular membranes have limited detailed analysis. We have employed several sensitive and high-resolution techniques to analyze the nuclear membrane structure, composition, and dynamics using purified membrane fractions and a cell-free system that results in nuclear envelope formation. We discuss the application of cholesterol and phospholipid colorimetric assays, fluorescent filipin labeling, electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry coupled to HPLC (HPLC-ESI/MS/MS), electron microscopy (EM), and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Colorimetric assays determine the amounts of inorganic phosphates from phospholipids and cholesterol/ cholesteryl esters present in membrane-containing fractions. Filipin staining of natural membranes allows the localization and relative quantification of cholesterol. HPLC-ESI/MS/MS determines the quantitative composition of membrane phospholipid species from small amounts of membranes. Cryosectioning of cryoprotected sperm cells facilitates EM verification of membrane domains existing in vivo. Deuterium solid-state NMR provides information about membrane rigidity and lipid-phase behavior. The sensitivity, quantification, and structural determinations provided by these techniques should prove useful in studying membrane dynamics in a variety of systems exhibiting membrane fusion.

  10. Variability of the Intestinal Uptake of Lipids Is Genetically Determined in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Keelan, M.; Hui, D.Y.; Wild, G.; Clandinin, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    The response of the plasma cholesterol concentration to changes in dietary lipids varies widely in humans and animals. There are variations in the in vivo absorption of cholesterol between different strains of mice. This study was undertaken in three strains of inbred mice to test the hypotheses that: (i) there are strain differences in the in vitro uptake of fatty acids and cholesterol and (ii) the adaptability of the intestine to respond to variations in dietary lipids is genetically determined. An in vitro intestinal ring technique was used to assess the uptake of medium- and long-chain fatty acids and cholesterol into jejunum and ileum of adult DBA/2, C57BL6, and C57L/J mice. The jejunal uptake of cholesterol was similar in C57L/J, DBA/2, or C57BL6 fed ad libitum a low-fat (5.7% fat, no cholesterol) chow diet. This is in contrast to a previous demonstration that in vivo cholesterol absorption was lower in C57L/J than in the other murine strains. The jejunal uptake of several long-chain fatty acids was greater in DBA/2 fed for 4 wk the high-fat (15.8% fat and 1.25% cholesterol) as compared with the low-fat diet. Furthermore, on the high-fat diet, the uptake of many long-chain fatty acids was higher in DBA/2 than in C57BL6 or C57L/J. The differences in cholesterol and fatty acid uptake were not explained by variations in food uptake, body weight gain, or the weight of the intestine. In summary: (i) there are strain differences in the in vitro intestinal uptake of fatty acids but not of cholesterol; (ii) a high-fat diet enhances the uptake of long-chain fatty acids in only one of the three strains examined in this study; and (iii) the pattern of strain- and diet-associated alterations in the in vivo absorption of cholesterol differs from the pattern of changes observed in vitro. We speculate that genetic differences in cholesterol and fatty acid uptake are explained by variations in the expression of protein-mediated components of lipid uptake. PMID:10984106

  11. Determination of lipid hydroperoxides in serum iodometry and high performance liquid chromatography compared.

    PubMed

    Wieland, E; Schettler, V; Diedrich, F; Schuff-Werner, P; Oellerich, M

    1992-06-01

    It is postulated that lipid peroxidation plays a role in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases. Efforts have therefore been made to develop reliable and practicable procedures for quantifying lipid peroxidation products such as lipid hydroperoxides in biological specimens. An iodometric cholesterol colour reagent (Merck, Darmstadt, Germany) can be used to measure lipid hydroperoxides in isolated low density lipoproteins without lipid extraction. This method has been validated with respect to its analytical performance and suitability for serum samples by comparing it with a high performance liquid chromatography technique. The method was found to have acceptable performance characteristics with aqueous fatty acid hydroperoxide solutions (linoleic acid) and isolated low density lipoproteins, but it cannot be applied to native serum samples without extraction of lipids.

  12. Lipid polyunsaturation determines the extent of membrane structural changes induced by Amphotericin B in Pichia pastoris yeast.

    PubMed

    de Ghellinck, Alexis; Fragneto, Giovanna; Laux, Valerie; Haertlein, Michael; Jouhet, Juliette; Sferrazza, Michele; Wacklin, Hanna

    2015-10-01

    The activity of the potent but highly toxic antifungal drug Amphotericin B (AmB), used intravenously to treat systemic fungal and parasitic infections, is widely accepted to result from its specific interaction with the fungal sterol ergosterol. While the effect of sterols on AmB activity has been intensely investigated, the role of membrane phospholipid composition has largely been ignored, and structural studies of native membranes have been hampered by their complex and disordered nature. We show for the first time that the structure of fungal membranes derived from Pichia pastoris yeast depends on the degree of lipid polyunsaturation, which has an impact on the structural consequences of AmB activity. AmB inserts in yeast membranes even in the absence of ergosterol, and forms an extra-membraneous layer whose thickness is resolved to be 4-5 nm. In ergosterol-containing membranes, AmB insertion is accompanied by ergosterol extraction into this layer. The AmB-sponge mediated depletion of ergosterol from P. pastoris membranes gives rise to a significant membrane thinning effect that depends on the degree of lipid polyunsaturation. The resulting hydrophobic mismatch is likely to interfere with a much broader range of membrane protein functions than those directly involving ergosterol, and suggests that polyunsaturated lipids could boost the efficiency of AmB. Furthermore, a low degree of lipid polyunsaturation leads to least AmB insertion and may protect host cells against the toxic effects of AmB. These results provide a new framework based on lipid composition and membrane structure through which we can understand its antifungal action and develop better treatments.

  13. Characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles containing caffeic acid and determination of its effects on MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Dikmen, Gokhan; Guney, Gamze; Genc, Lutfi

    2015-01-01

    Many anticancer drugs that are currently used in cancer treatment are natural products or their analogues by structural modification. Caffeic acid (3, 4-dihydroxycinnamic acid; CA) is classified as hydroxycinnamic acid and has a variety of potential pharmacological effects, including antioxidant, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities. As a drug carrier, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) introduced to improve stability, provide controlled drug release, avoid organic solvents and are obtained in small sizes. In this study, we developed solid lipid nanoparticles incorporating with caffeic acid using hot homogenization method. Caffeic acid loaded solid lipid nanoparticles were characterized regarding particle size, zeta potential, drug entrapment efficiency, drug release, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and FT-IR. The effects of caffeic acid loaded solid lipid nanoparticles on MCF-7 cells were determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-dimethyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) test and Annexin V-PI analysis. As a result, solid lipid nanoparticles could potentially be used for the delivery of caffeic acid and solid lipid nanoparticles formulation enhanced the effects of caffeic acid on MCF-7 cells. Some relevant patents are also referred in this article.

  14. Application of FTIR-ATR Spectroscopy to Determine the Extent of Lipid Peroxidation in Plasma during Haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Oleszko, Adam; Olsztyńska-Janus, Sylwia; Grzeszczuk-Kuć, Karolina; Bujok, Jolanta; Gałecka, Katarzyna; Czerski, Albert; Witkiewicz, Wojciech; Komorowska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    During a haemodialysis (HD), because of the contact of blood with the surface of the dialyser, the immune system becomes activated and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are released into plasma. Particularly exposed to the ROS are lipids and proteins contained in plasma, which undergo peroxidation. The main breakdown product of oxidized lipids is the malondialdehyde (MDA). A common method for measuring the concentration of MDA is a thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) method. Despite the formation of MDA in plasma during HD, its concentration decreases because it is removed from the blood in the dialyser. Therefore, this research proposes the Fourier Transform Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy, which enables determination of primary peroxidation products. We examined the influence of the amount of hydrogen peroxide added to lipid suspension that was earlier extracted from plasma specimen on lipid peroxidation with use of TBARS and FTIR-ATR methods. Linear correlation between these methods was shown. The proposed method was effective during the evaluation of changes in the extent of lipid peroxidation in plasma during a haemodialysis in sheep. A measurement using the FTIR-ATR showed an increase in plasma lipid peroxidation after 15 and 240 minutes of treatment, while the TBARS concentration was respectively lower. PMID:25961007

  15. Comparison of Methods for Determining Boundary Layer Edge Conditions for Transition Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Berry, Scott A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Data previously obtained for the X-33 in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel have been reanalyzed to compare methods for determining boundary layer edge conditions for use in transition correlations. The experimental results were previously obtained utilizing the phosphor thermography technique to monitor the status of the boundary layer downstream of discrete roughness elements via global heat transfer images of the X-33 windward surface. A boundary layer transition correlation was previously developed for this data set using boundary layer edge conditions calculated using an inviscid/integral boundary layer approach. An algorithm was written in the present study to extract boundary layer edge quantities from higher fidelity viscous computational fluid dynamic solutions to develop transition correlations that account for viscous effects on vehicles of arbitrary complexity. The boundary layer transition correlation developed for the X-33 from the viscous solutions are compared to the previous boundary layer transition correlations. It is shown that the boundary layer edge conditions calculated using an inviscid/integral boundary layer approach are significantly different than those extracted from viscous computational fluid dynamic solutions. The present results demonstrate the differences obtained in correlating transition data using different computational methods.

  16. Distribution of Lipids in the Grain of Wheat (cv. Hereward) Determined by Lipidomic Analysis of Milling and Pearling Fractions.

    PubMed

    González-Thuillier, Irene; Salt, Louise; Chope, Gemma; Penson, Simon; Skeggs, Peter; Tosi, Paola; Powers, Stephen J; Ward, Jane L; Wilde, Peter; Shewry, Peter R; Haslam, Richard P

    2015-12-16

    Lipidomic analyses of milling and pearling fractions from wheat grain were carried out to determine differences in composition that could relate to the spatial distribution of lipids in the grain. Free fatty acids and triacylglycerols were major components in all fractions, but the relative contents of polar lipids varied, particularly those of lysophosphatidylcholine and digalactosyldiglyceride, which were enriched in flour fractions. By contrast, minor phospholipids were enriched in bran and offal fractions. The most abundant fatty acids in the analyzed acyl lipids were C16:0 and C18:2 and their combinations, including C36:4 and C34:2. Phospholipids and galactolipids have been reported to have beneficial properties for breadmaking, whereas free fatty acids and triacylglycerols are considered detrimental. The subtle differences in the compositions of fractions determined in the present study could therefore underpin the production of flour fractions with optimized compositions for different end uses.

  17. Optimization of a Nile Red method for rapid lipid determination in autotrophic, marine microalgae is species dependent.

    PubMed

    Balduyck, Lieselot; Veryser, Cedrick; Goiris, Koen; Bruneel, Charlotte; Muylaert, Koenraad; Foubert, Imogen

    2015-11-01

    Several studies have been conducted to develop rapid methods for quantification of lipid content in microalgae, as an alternative for time consuming gravimetric methods. Different studies showed that lipid staining with Nile Red in whole cell suspensions and subsequently quantification by the use of a spectrofluorometric device is a promising method, but a profound optimization and validation is rare. It has already been proven that the correlation curve for quantification is species dependent, but it has not yet been investigated whether this is also the case for the optimization of the Nile Red assay protocol. Therefore, two autotrophic, marine microalgae, Nannochloropsis oculata and T-Isochrysis lutea, strongly differing in e.g. cell wall structure, were selected in this study to investigate whether optimization of the Nile Red assay is species dependent. Besides this, it was checked for one of these species, Nannochloropsis, whether the lipid content, determined by the Nile Red assay, could indeed be correlated with the neutral and/or total lipid content determined by gravimetric methods. It was found that optimization of the Nile Red assay was strongly species dependent. Consequently, optimization has to be done for each species before using the assay. For Nannochloropsis, a good correlation was found between total and neutral lipid content obtained by the Nile Red assay and by gravimetric methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Simultaneous determination of dopamine and uric acid using layer-by-layer graphene and chitosan assembled multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xuexiang; Cao, Qingxue; Liang, Lixin; Chen, Jianrong; You, Chunping; Ruan, Yongmin; Lin, Hongjun; Wu, Lanju

    2013-12-15

    Multilayer films containing graphene (Gr) and chitosan (CS) were prepared on glassy carbon electrodes with layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technique. After being characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the electrochemical sensor based on the resulted films was developed to simultaneously determine dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). The LBL assembled electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of DA and UA. In addition, the self-assembly electrode possessed an excellent sensing performance for detection of DA and UA with a linear range from 0.1 μM to 140 µM and from 1.0 µM to 125 µM with the detection limit as low as 0.05 µM and 0.1 µM based on S/N=3, respectively.

  19. Structure determination of a partially ordered layered silicate material with an NMR crystallography approach.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Darren Henry; Cadars, Sylvian; Hotke, Kathryn; Van Huizen, Jared; Van Huizen, Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    Structure determination of layered materials can present challenges for conventional diffraction methods due to the fact that such materials often lack full three-dimensional periodicity since adjacent layers may not stack in an orderly and regular fashion. In such cases, NMR crystallography strategies involving a combination of solid-state NMR spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and computational chemistry methods can often reveal structural details that cannot be acquired from diffraction alone. We present here the structure determination of a surfactant-templated layered silicate material that lacks full three-dimensional crystallinity using such an NMR crystallography approach. Through a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and advanced (29)Si solid-state NMR spectroscopy, it is revealed that the structure of the silicate layer of this layered silicate material templated with cetyltrimethylammonium surfactant cations is isostructural with the silicate layer of a previously reported material referred to as ilerite, octosilicate, or RUB-18. High-field (1)H NMR spectroscopy reveals differences between the materials in terms of the ordering of silanol groups on the surfaces of the layers, as well as the contents of the inter-layer space.

  20. Using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry to determine reactive oxygen species formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in viable boar spermatozoa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry analyses were developed for determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in live spermatozoa loaded with, respectively, hydroethidine (HE) or the lipophilic probe 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-d...

  1. Evaluation of micro-colorimetric lipid determination method with samples prepared using sonication and accelerated solvent extraction methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two common laboratory extraction techniques were evaluated for routine use with the micro-colorimetric lipid determination method developed by Van Handel (1985) [E. Van Handel, J. Am. Mosq. Control Assoc. 1(1985) 302] and recently validated for small samples by Inouye and Lotufo ...

  2. Evaluation of micro-colorimetric lipid determination method with samples prepared using sonication and accelerated solvent extraction methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two common laboratory extraction techniques were evaluated for routine use with the micro-colorimetric lipid determination method developed by Van Handel (1985) [E. Van Handel, J. Am. Mosq. Control Assoc. 1(1985) 302] and recently validated for small samples by Inouye and Lotufo ...

  3. The modified fluorescence based vesicle fluctuation spectroscopy technique for determination of lipid bilayer bending properties.

    PubMed

    Drabik, Dominik; Przybyło, Magda; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Iglič, Aleš; Langner, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Lipid bilayer is the main constitutive element of biological membrane, which confines intracellular space. The mechanical properties of biological membranes may be characterized by various parameters including membrane stiffness or membrane bending rigidity, which can be measured using flicker noise spectroscopy. The flicker noise spectroscopy exploits the spontaneous thermal undulations of the membrane. The method is based on the quantitative analysis of a series of microscopic images captured during thermal membrane fluctuations. Thus, measured bending rigidity coefficient depends on the image quality as well as the selection of computational tools for image processing and mathematical model used. In this work scanning and spinning disc confocal microscopies were used to visualize fluctuating membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles. The bending rigidity coefficient was calculated for different acquisition modes, using different fluorescent probes and different image processing methods. It was shown that both imaging approaches gave similar bending coefficient values regardless of acquisition time. Using the developed methodology the effect of fluorescent probe type and aqueous phase composition on the value of the membrane bending rigidity coefficient was measured. Specifically it was found that the bending rigidity coefficient of DOPC bilayer in water is smaller than that determined for POPC membrane. It has been found that the POPC and DOPC bending rigidities coefficient in sucrose solution was lower than that in water. Fluorescence imaging makes possible the quantitative analysis of membrane mechanical properties of inhomogeneous membrane.

  4. Surface potential determination in planar lipid bilayers: a simplification of the conductance-ratio method.

    PubMed

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Curi, Rui; Procopio, Joaquim

    2007-04-10

    One of the methods available for the measurement of surface potentials of planar lipid bilayers uses the conductance ratio between a charged and a neutral bilayer doped with ionophores to calculate the surface potential of the charged bilayer. We have devised a simplification of that method which does not require the use of an electrically neutral bilayer as control. The conductance of the charged bilayer is measured before and after the addition of divalent cations (Ba(2+)) to the bathing solution. Ba(2+) ions screen fixed surface charges, decreasing the surface potential. If the membrane is negatively charged the screening has the effect of decreasing the membrane conductance to cations. The resulting conductance ratio is used to calculate the surface potential change, which is fed into an iterative computer program. The program generates pairs of surface potential values and calculates the surface charge density for the two conditions. Since the surface charge density remains constant during this procedure, there is only one pair of surface potentials that satisfies the condition of constant charge density. Applying this method to experimental data from McLaughlin et al. [McLaughlin, S.G.A., Szabo, G. and Eisenman, G., Divalent ions and the surface potential of charged phospholipid membranes, J. Gen. Physiol., 58 (1971) 667-687.] we have found very similar results. We have also successfully used this method to determine the effect of palmitic acid on the surface potential of asolectin membranes.

  5. Direct determination of the thickness of stratospheric layers from single-channel satellite radiance measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.; Gelman, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    The direct use of measured radiances for determining the thickness of stratospheric layers is investigated. Layers based at 100-10 mb, with upper boundaries at 10-0.5 mb, are investigated using a carefully selected family of stratospheric temperature profiles and computed radiances. On the basis of physical reasoning, a high correlation of thickness with radiance is anticipated for deep layers, such as the 100- to 2-mb layer (from about 15 to 43 km), that emit a substantial part of the infrared energy reaching a satellite radiometer in a particular channel. Empirical regression curves relating thickness and radiance are developed and are compared with blackbody curves obtained by substituting the blackbody temperature in the hydrostatic equation. Maximum thickness-radiance correlation is found, for each infrared channel, for the layer having the best agreement of empirical and blackbody curves.

  6. Direct determination of the thickness of stratospheric layers from single-channel satellite radiance measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.; Gelman, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    The direct use of measured radiances for determining the thickness of stratospheric layers is investigated. Layers based at 100-10 mb, with upper boundaries at 10-0.5 mb, are investigated using a carefully selected family of stratospheric temperature profiles and computed radiances. On the basis of physical reasoning, a high correlation of thickness with radiance is anticipated for deep layers, such as the 100- to 2-mb layer (from about 15 to 43 km), that emit a substantial part of the infrared energy reaching a satellite radiometer in a particular channel. Empirical regression curves relating thickness and radiance are developed and are compared with blackbody curves obtained by substituting the blackbody temperature in the hydrostatic equation. Maximum thickness-radiance correlation is found, for each infrared channel, for the layer having the best agreement of empirical and blackbody curves.

  7. Determination of cloud and aerosol layers using CALIPSO and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alias, A. N.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.; Saleh, N. Mohd.

    2008-10-01

    The height of cloud and aerosol layers in the atmosphere is believed to affect climate change and air pollution because both of them have important direct effects on the radiation balance of the earth. In this paper, we study the ability of Cloud Aerosol LIDAR and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data to detect, locate and distinguish between cloud and aerosol layers in the atmosphere over Peninsula Malaysia. We also used image processing technique to differentiate between cloud and aerosol layers from the CALIPSO images. The cloud and aerosol layers mostly are seen at troposphere (>10 km) and lower stratosphere (>15km). The results shows that CALIPSO can be used to determine cloud and aerosol layers and image processing technique has successfully distinguished them in the atmosphere.

  8. Selective Determination of Lipid Hydroperoxides in Natural Waters Using a Fluorescent Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunday, M. O.; Sakugawa, H.

    2016-12-01

    The presence of various lipids in natural waters and the availability of conditions needed for their oxidation to lipid hydroperoxides (LHPs) suggest that LHPs may be part of the hydroperoxide mix in natural waters. While other hydroperoxides, including H2O2, methyl hydroperoxide (MHP) and ethyl hydroperoxide (EHP) etc. have been investigated, there is no information on LHPs in natural waters. In this study, we report the presence of LHPs in natural waters. Firstly, a method selective to LHPs determination was developed using 2-(4-diphenylphosphanyl-phenyl)-9-(3,6,9,12-tetraoxatridecyl)-anthra[2,1,9-def:6,5,10-d'e'f']diisoquinoline-1,3,8,10-tetraone, Liperfluo, as a fluorescent probe. A flow injector analysis equipped with fluorescence detector was used for fluorescence measurement of Liperfluo-Ox formed from the reaction between Liperfluo and LHP. Under the optimized conditions, the reaction of Liperfluo with LHP in MilliQ and river water had a linear range of 0-500 nM LHP. The method detection limit was 10.1 nM and 7.3 nM in riverwater and MilliQ respectively. The coefficient of variation for five replicate measurements each for 100 nM and 500 nM LHP was ≤ 3.8%. The probe and the conditions used in this study showed high selectivity for LHP over other natural water hydroperoxides, including H2O2, MHP and EHP. The method was applied in the quantification of LHPs in water from the Kurose River (Japan). The concentration ranged from below detection limit to 98 nM (ave. 37.2 nM; n=12). Increase in H2O2 formation upon irradiation of LHP-spiked riverwater in a solar simulator suggests H2O2 formation as one of the possible sinks of LHPs in natural waters. For the first time, this study reveals that LHPs are part of the hydroperoxide mix in natural waters and provides insight on its fate in natural waters.

  9. Membrane Protein Structure Determination Using Crystallography and Lipidic Mesophases - Recent Advances and Successes

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Martin; Li, Dianfan; Dukkipati, Abhiram

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of the β2-adrenergic receptor in complex with an agonist and its cognate G protein has just recently been solved. It is now possible to explore in molecular detail the means by which this paradigmatic transmembrane receptor binds agonist, communicates the impulse or signalling event across the membrane and sets in motion a series of G protein-directed intracellular responses. The structure was determined using crystals of the ternary complex grown in a rationally designed lipidic mesophase by the so-called in meso method. The method is proving to be particularly useful in the G protein-coupled receptor field where the structures of thirteen distinct receptor types have been solved in the past five years. In addition to receptors, the method has proven useful with a wide variety of integral membrane protein classes that include bacterial and eukaryotic rhodopsins, a light harvesting complex II (LHII), photosynthetic reaction centers, cytochrome oxidases, β-barrels, an exchanger, and an integral membrane peptide. This attests to the versatility and range of the method and supports the view that the in meso method should be included in the arsenal of the serious membrane structural biologist. For this to happen however, the reluctance in adopting it attributable, in part, to the anticipated difficulties associated with handling the sticky, viscous cubic mesophase in which crystals grow must be overcome. Harvesting and collecting diffraction data with the mesophase-grown crystals is also viewed with some trepidation. It is acknowledged that there are challenges associated with the method. Over the years, we have endeavored to establish how the method works at a molecular level and to make it user-friendly. To these ends, tools for handling the mesophase in the pico- to nano-liter volume range have been developed for highly efficient crystallization screening in manual and robotic modes. Methods have been implemented for evaluating the functional

  10. Evaluation of micro-colorimetric lipid determination method with samples prepared using sonication and accelerated solvent extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Billa, Nanditha; Hubin-Barrows, Dylan; Lahren, Tylor; Burkhard, Lawrence P

    2014-02-01

    Two common laboratory extraction techniques were evaluated for routine use with the micro-colorimetric lipid determination method developed by Van Handel (1985) [2] and recently validated for small samples by Inouye and Lotufo (2006) [1]. With the accelerated solvent extraction method using chloroform:methanol solvent and the colorimetric lipid determination method, 28 of 30 samples had significant proportional bias (α=1%, determined using standard additions) and 1 of 30 samples had significant constant bias (α=1%, determined using Youden Blank measurements). With sonic extraction, 0 of 6 samples had significant proportional bias (α=1%) and 1 of 6 samples had significant constant bias (α=1%). These demonstrate that the accelerated solvent extraction method with chloroform:methanol solvent system creates an interference with the colorimetric assay method, and without accounting for the bias in the analysis, inaccurate measurements would be obtained.

  11. Development of novel fluorescent probe 3-perylene diphenylphosphine for determination of lipid hydroperoxide with fluorescent image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chotimarkorn, Chatchawan; Nagasaka, Reiko; Ushio, Hideki . E-mail: hushio@s.kaiyodai.ac.jp; Ohshima, Toshiaki; Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2005-12-16

    A novel fluorescent probe 3-perylene diphenylphosphine (3-PeDPP) was synthesized for the direct analysis of lipid hydroperoxides. The structure of 3-PeDPP was identified by the spectroscopic data, FAB-MS, {sup 1}H NMR, and {sup 13}C NMR. The reactivities of 3-PeDPP with lipid hydroperoxides were investigated in chloroform/MeOH homogeneous solutions and PC liposome model systems oxidized by either 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride and photosensitized oxidation. The fluorescence intensity derived from 3-perylene diphenylphosphineoxide (3-PeDPPO) increased proportionally with amount of hydroperoxides produced in homogeneous solutions and liposome model systems. 3-PeDPP was easily incorporated into mouse myeloma SP2 cells and thin tissue section for dynamic membrane lipid peroxidation studies. Linear correlations between fluorescence intensity and amount of hydroperoxides in the cell membrane and tissue sections were obtained. The fluorescence intensity from 2-dimensional image analysis was also well correlated with lipid hydroperoxide level in these models. Thus, the novel probe 3-PeDPP is useful for the direct determination of lipid hydroperoxides in biological materials.

  12. Macroscopic and Nanoscopic Heterogeneous Structures in a Three-Component Lipid Bilayer Mixtures Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Nawal K; Ho, Chian Sing; Pan, Jianjun

    2015-11-17

    Much of lipid raft properties can be inferred from phase behavior of multicomponent lipid membranes. We use liquid compatible atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study a three-component system composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), egg sphingomyelin (eSM), and cholesterol. Specifically, we obtain macroscopic and nanoscopic heterogeneous structures in a broad compositional space of DOPC/eSM/cholesterol (23 °C). In the macroscopic liquid coexisting region, we quantify area fraction of the coexisting phases and determine a set of thermodynamic tie-lines. When lipid compositions are near the critical point, we obtain fluctuation-like nanoscopic structures. We also use AFM height images to explore the hypothetical three-phase coexisting region. Finally, we use fluorescence microscopy to compare the phase behavior from our AFM measurements to that in free-floating giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Our results highlight the role of lipid composition in mediating lipid domain formation and stability.

  13. Evaluation of FT-IR and Nile Red methods for microalgal lipid characterization and biomass composition determination.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Fang; Cheng, Li-Hua; Xu, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Huan-Lin

    2013-01-01

    To characterize lipid content of microalgal cells rapidly and accurately, the gravimetric determination, FT-IR and Nile Red (NR) staining were investigated on six typical eukaryotic and prokaryotic algae species. FT-IR and Nile Red were relative quantification methods and a standard curve was required in contrast to the gravimetric method. The FT-IR method determined the lipid, carbohydrate and protein contents simultaneously assuming that the algal cells only consisted of those three components. The Nile Red method was a relatively rapid method for neutral lipid content characterization by spectrofluorometry and could locate lipid body of the algal cell by fluorescence microscopy. According to sample sources and processing purposes, the gravimetric determination was preferable for large-scale cultivation with low-frequency monitoring, while FT-IR and Nile Red were suitable for general laboratory cultivation with medium-frequency monitoring, in particularly Nile Red was appropriate for small samples when high-frequency screening was required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. New Method to Determine the Schottky Barrier in Few-Layer Black Phosphorus Metal Contacts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Yeong; Yun, Won Seok; Lee, J D

    2017-03-01

    Schottky barrier height and carrier polarity are seminal concepts for a practical device application of the interface between semiconductor and metal electrode. Investigation of those concepts is usually made by a conventional method such as the Schottky-Mott rule, incorporating the metal work function and semiconductor electron affinity, or the Fermi level pinning effect, resulting from the metal-induced gap states. Both manners are, however, basically applied to the bulk semiconductor metal contacts. To explore few-layer black phosphorus metal contacts far from the realm of bulk, we propose a new method to determine the Schottky barrier by scrutinizing the layer-by-layer phosphorus electronic structure from the first-principles calculation combined with the state-of-the-art band unfolding technique. In this study, using the new method, we calculate the Schottky barrier height and determine the contact polarity of Ti, Sc, and Al metal contacts to few-layer (mono-, bi-, tri-, and quadlayer) black phosphorus. This gives a significant physical insight toward the utmost layer-by-layer manipulation of electronic properties of few-layer semiconductor metal contacts.

  15. Layering

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-01

    At the bottom of this image from NASA Mars Odyssey is the cliff-face that is the sidewall of Ophir Chasma. Layering is easily visible in the upper cliff wall, with the thickness of the surface clearly visible.

  16. Genetically Determined Plasma Lipid Levels and Risk of Diabetic Retinopathy: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

    PubMed

    Sobrin, Lucia; Chong, Yong He; Fan, Qiao; Gan, Alfred; Stanwyck, Lynn K; Kaidonis, Georgia; Craig, Jamie E; Kim, Jihye; Liao, Wen-Ling; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Lee, Wen-Jane; Hung, Yi-Jen; Guo, Xiuqing; Hai, Yang; Ipp, Eli; Pollack, Samuela; Hancock, Heather; Price, Alkes; Penman, Alan; Mitchell, Paul; Liew, Gerald; Smith, Albert V; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tan, Gavin; Klein, Barbara E K; Kuo, Jane; Li, Xiaohui; Christiansen, Mark W; Psaty, Bruce M; Sandow, Kevin; Jensen, Richard A; Klein, Ronald; Cotch, Mary Frances; Wang, Jie Jin; Jia, Yucheng; Chen, Ching J; Ida Chen, Yii-Der; Rotter, Jerome I; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Hanis, Craig L; Burdon, Kathryn P; Wong, Tien Yin; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2017-09-26

    Results from observational studies examining dyslipidemia as a risk factor for diabetic retinopathy (DR) have been inconsistent. We evaluated the causal relationship between plasma lipids and DR using a Mendelian randomization (MR) approach. We pooled genome-wide association studies summary statistics from 18 studies for 2 DR phenotypes: any DR (N=2,969 case; 4,096 controls) and severe DR, (N=1,277 cases; 3,980 controls). Previously identified lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) served as instrumental variables. Meta-analysis to combine the MR estimates from different cohorts was conducted. There was no statistically significant change in odds ratios (OR) of having any DR or severe DR for any of lipid fractions in the primary analysis which used SNPs that did not have a pleiotropic effect on another lipid fraction. Similarly, there was no significant association in the Caucasian and Chinese subgroup analyses. This study did not show evidence of a causal role of the four lipid fractions on DR. However, the study had limited power to detect OR less than 1.23 per standard deviation (SD) in genetically-induced increase in plasma lipid levels, thus we cannot exclude that causal relationships with more modest effect sizes exist. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  17. Layer-by-layer assembled carbon nanotubes for selective determination of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meining; Gong, Kuanping; Zhang, Hongwu; Mao, Lanqun

    2005-01-15

    Multilayer films of shortened multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are homogeneously and stably assembled on glassy carbon (GC) electrodes using layer-by-layer (LBL) method based on electrostatic interaction of positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and negatively charged shortened MWNTs. The assembled MWNT multilayer films were studied with respect to the electrocatalytic activity toward ascorbic acid (AA) and dopamine (DA) and were further applied for selective determination of DA in the presence of AA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) used for characterization of MWNT films indicates that the assembled MWNTs are almost in a form of small bundles or single nanotubes on the electrodes. Cyclic voltammetric results with assembled MWNT electrode indicate that the strategy based on the LBL method for assembling the MWNT multilayer films on substrate well retains the electrochemical catalytic activity of the MWNTs toward AA and DA, offering some advantages particularly attractive for analytical applications, such as the form of MWNTs assembled on the substrate, i.e., small bundles or single tubes, homogeneity and stability of the as-assembled MWNT films. These features make the assembled MWNTs relatively potential for selective and sensitive determination of DA in the presence of AA.

  18. Microfluidic Synthesis of Hybrid Nanoparticles with Controlled Lipid Layers: Understanding Flexibility-Regulated Cell-Nanoparticle Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Feng, Qiang; Wang, Jiuling; Zhang, Shuai; Ding, Baoquan; Wei, Yujie; Dong, Mingdong; Ryu, Ji-Young; Yoon, Tae-Young; Shi, Xinghua; Sun, Jiashu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-10-27

    The functionalized lipid shell of hybrid nanoparticles plays an important role for improving their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Yet few efforts have been made to critically examine the shell structure of nanoparticles and its effect on cell-particle interaction. Here we develop a microfluidic chip allowing for the synthesis of structurally well-defined lipid-polymer nanoparticles of the same sizes, but covered with either lipid-monolayer-shell (MPs, monolayer nanoparticles) or lipid-bilayer-shell (BPs, bilayer nanoparticles). Atomic force microscope and atomistic simulations reveal that MPs have a lower flexibility than BPs, resulting in a more efficient cellular uptake and thus anticancer effect than BPs do. This flexibility-regulated cell-particle interaction may have important implications for designing drug nanocarriers.

  19. Determination of the Mixing Layer Height Over two Sites, Using Pilot Balloons During the MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohrnschimmel, H.; Alonso, A. L.; Ángeles, F.; Sosa, G.; Varela, J.; Cárdenas, B.

    2007-12-01

    Among the mechanisms that affect air quality there is a variety of meteorological processes. An important process in this context are the changes in the mixing layer height during a day and over the year. The mixing layer height is the portion of the atmosphere close to the surface layer where air pollutants get diluted, without leaving this layer. Therefore, it is important to describe the variations in the height of the mixing layer, i.e. the vertical dilution of air pollution, since this is a process mitigating naturally the impact of emissions. There exist different methods to obtain information on the mixing layer height, among them radio soundings, the application of vertical wind profilers, and launching pilot balloons. In this study, pilot balloons have been used simultaneously over two sites of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MILAGRO campaign in March 2006. The objective was to determine the vertical wind profiles and derive information on the mixing layer height. Daily, four pilot balloons were launched, at 9:00, 12:00, 15:00, and 18:00 hours, over Tenango del Aire (a rural area in the Southeast of Mexico City), and over Ciudad Universitaria, in the Southern metropolitan area. At some occasions, night time measurements have been carried out at 21:00 and 24:00. A variability of the diurnal evolution of the mixing layer was observed along March, which could be related to surface temperature. The diurnal evolution showed a sudden growth of the mixing layer between 9:00 and 12:00 hours. Data intercomparisons were carried out for pilot balloons versus radio soundings during a few days at a third site, Tula, in the North of Mexico City. Both intercomparisons showed that pilot balloons are an effective method to obtain information about the development of the mixing layer.

  20. Determination of thermal stability of specific biomarker lipids of the freshwater fern Azolla through hydrous pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sap, Merel; Speelman, Eveline N.; Lewan, Michael D.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Reichart, Gert-Jan

    2010-05-01

    Enormous blooms of the free-floating freshwater fern Azolla occurred within the Arctic Basin during an extended period of ~1.2 Ma during the middle Eocene (Brinkhuis et al. 2006; Speelman et al., GB, 2009). The sustained growth of Azolla, currently ranking among the fastest growing plants on Earth, in a major anoxic basin may have substantially contributed to decreasing atmospheric CO2 levels by burial of Azolla-derived organic matter. Speelman et al. (OG, 2009) reported biomarkers for Azolla (1,w20 C32 - C36 diols, structurally related C29 ω20,ω21 diols, C29 1,20,21 triols, C29 dihydroxy fatty acids as well as a series of wax esters containing these mono- and dihydroxy lipids), which can be used to reconstruct palaeo-environmental conditions. Here we assess the thermal stability of these compounds, to extend their biomarker potential. We specifically focused on the thermal stability of the Azolla biomarkers using hydrous pyrolysis in order to determine which burial conditions allow reconstruction of past occurrences of Azolla. In addition, hydrous pyrolysis was also performed on samples from the Eocene Arctic Ocean (ACEX core), to test if and how the biomarkers change under higher temperatures and pressures in situ. During hydrous pyrolysis, the biomass was heated under high pressure at temperatures ranging between 220 and 365°C for 72 hours. Four experiments were also run using different durations to explore the kinetics of biomarker degradation at specific temperatures. First results indicate that the Azolla specific diols are still present at 220°C, while the corresponding wax esters are already absent. At 300°C all Azolla specific biomarkers are destroyed. More specific determination of the different biomarkers' stability and kinetics would potentially allow the reconstruction of the temperature and pressure history of Azolla deposits. Literature: • Brinkhuis, H., Schouten, S., Collinson, M. E., Sluijs, A., Sinninghe Damste, J. S., Dickens, G. R., Huber

  1. Dynamics and Molecular Determinants of Cytoplasmic Lipid Droplet Clustering and Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Stefanski, Adrianne L.; McManaman, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Perilipin-1 (Plin1), a prominent cytoplasmic lipid droplet (CLD) binding phosphoprotein and key physiological regulator of triglyceride storage and lipolysis in adipocytes, is thought to regulate the fragmentation and dispersion of CLD that occurs in response to β-adrenergic activation of adenylate cyclase. Here we investigate the dynamics and molecular determinants of these processes using cell lines stably expressing recombinant forms of Plin1 and/or other members of the perilipin family. Plin1 and a C-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1 (Plin1CT) induced formation of single dense CLD clusters near the microtubule organizing center, whereas neither an N-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1, nor Plin2 or Plin3 induced clustering. Clustered CLD coated by Plin1, or Plin1CT, dispersed in response to isoproterenol, or other agents that activate adenylate cyclase, in a process inhibited by the protein kinase A inhibitor, H89, and blocked by microtubule disruption. Isoproterenol-stimulated phosphorylation of CLD-associated Plin1 on serine 492 preceded their dispersion, and live cell imaging showed that cluster dispersion involved initial fragmentation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, which then fragmented into well-dispersed individual CLD. siRNA knockdown of the cortical actin binding protein, moesin, induced disaggregation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, and inhibited the reaggregation of dispersed CLD into tight clusters. Together these data suggest that the clustering and dispersion processes involve a complex orchestration of phosphorylation-dependent, microtubule-dependent and independent, and microfilament dependent steps. PMID:23825572

  2. NMR techniques for determination of lipid content in microalgal biomass and their use in monitoring the cultivation with biodiesel potential.

    PubMed

    Sarpal, Amarjit S; Teixeira, Cláudia M L L; Silva, Paulo Roque Martins; da Costa Monteiro, Thays Vieira; da Silva, Júlia Itacolomy; da Cunha, Valnei Smarcaro; Daroda, Romeu José

    2016-03-01

    In the present investigation, the application of NMR spectroscopic techniques was extensively used with an objective to explore the biodiesel potential of biomass cultivated on a lab scale using strains of Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus ecornis. The effect of variation in the composition of culturing medium on the neutral and polar lipids productivity, and fatty acid profile of solvent extracts of microalgae biomass was studied. Determination of unsaturated fatty acid composition (C18:N = 1-3, ω3 C20:5, ω3 C22:6), polyunsaturated fatty esters (PUFEs), saturated fatty acids (SFAs), unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), free fatty acids (FFAs), and iodine value were achieved from a single (1)H NMR spectral analysis. The results were validated by (13)C NMR and GC-MS analyses. It was demonstrated that newly developed methods based on (1)H and (13)C NMR techniques are direct, rapid, and convenient for monitoring the microalgae cultivation process for enhancement of lipid productivity and their quality aspects in the solvent extracts of microalgal biomasses without any sample treatment and prior separation compared to other methods. The fatty acid composition of algae extracts was found to be similar to vegetable and fish oils, mostly rich in C16:0, C18:N (N = 0 to 3), and n-3 omega polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). The lipid content, particularly neutral lipids, as well as most of the quality parameters were found to be medium specific by both the strains. The newly developed methods based on NMR and ultrasonic procedure developed for efficient extraction of neutral lipids are cost economic and can be an effective aid for rapid screening of algae strains for modulation of lipid productivity with desired biodiesel quality and value-added products including fatty acid profile.

  3. Back-calculation of temperature parameters for determination of asphalt layer modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qinxi; Matsui, Kunihito; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Higashi, Shigeo

    2000-05-01

    The pavement elastic modulus of each layer was usually assumed not to be dependent on the environmental factors when the backcalculation of asphalt pavement was conducted from the measured surface deflections of FWD. However, it is well known that the elastic modulus of asphalt layer changes with the variation of temperature. Considering the influence of atmospheric temperature and radiant heat, the temperature distribution is nonlinear along the asphalt layer thickness, and has always been changed. Therefore, the distribution of elastic modulus in the asphalt layer has been considered to change as well. In this paper, we assume the elastic modulus distribution of the asphalt layer to vary with its temperature in terms of the exponential form. Based on the finite element method forward analysis, we propose a method to estimate a standard elastic modulus and temperature coefficient at 20 degrees Celsius for the asphalt layer from the backcalculation analysis. The corresponding FEM backcalculation program using Gauss-Newton method was developed to determine the pavement layer moduli and temperature dependent coefficient, in which the singular value decomposition (SVD) was used for the inverse analysis with scaling of unknown parameters. This method results in a smaller condition number that contributes to improvement of numerical stability. Both numerical simulation and measured data from FWD testing are used to demonstrate the potential applications of this method. As a result, the backcalculation procedure is less dependent on the user's initial values, fast in convergence rate and effective in the pavement engineering.

  4. Determinants of the tumor suppressor INPP4B protein and lipid phosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Sandra M; Hodgson, Myles C; Packianathan, Charles; Bingol-Ozakpinar, Ozlem; Uras, Fikriye; Rosen, Barry P; Agoulnik, Irina U

    2013-10-18

    The tumor suppressor INPP4B is an important regulator of phosphatidyl-inositol signaling in the cell. Reduced INPP4B expression is associated with poor outcomes for breast, prostate, and ovarian cancer patients. INPP4B contains a CX5R catalytic motif characteristic of dual-specificity phosphatases, such as PTEN. Lipid phosphatase activity of INPP4B has previously been described. In this report we show that INPP4B can dephosphorylate para-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) and 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl (DiFMUP), synthetic phosphotyrosine analogs, suggesting that INPP4B has protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Using mutagenesis, we examined the functional role of specific amino acids within the INPP4B C842KSAKDR catalytic site. The K843M mutant displayed increased pNPP hydrolysis, the K846M mutant lost lipid phosphatase activity with no effect on PTP activity, and the D847E substitution ablated PTP activity and significantly reduced lipid phosphatase activity. Further, we show that INPP4B but not PTEN is able to reduce tyrosine phosphorylation of Akt1 and both the lipid and PTP activity of INPP4B likely contribute to the reduction of Akt1 phosphorylation. Taken together our data identified key residues in the INPP4B catalytic domain associated with lipid and protein phosphatase activities and found a robust downstream target regulated by INPP4B but not PTEN.

  5. Examining the Role of Membrane Lipid Composition in Determining the Ethanol Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Clark M.

    2014-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) has an innate ability to withstand high levels of ethanol that would prove lethal to or severely impair the physiology of other organisms. Significant efforts have been undertaken to elucidate the biochemical and biophysical mechanisms of how ethanol interacts with lipid bilayers and cellular membranes. This research has implicated the yeast cellular membrane as the primary target of the toxic effects of ethanol. Analysis of model membrane systems exposed to ethanol has demonstrated ethanol's perturbing effect on lipid bilayers, and altering the lipid composition of these model bilayers can mitigate the effect of ethanol. In addition, cell membrane composition has been correlated with the ethanol tolerance of yeast cells. However, the physical phenomena behind this correlation are likely to be complex. Previous work based on often divergent experimental conditions and time-consuming low-resolution methodologies that limit large-scale analysis of yeast fermentations has fallen short of revealing shared mechanisms of alcohol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Lipidomics, a modern mass spectrometry-based approach to analyze the complex physiological regulation of lipid composition in yeast and other organisms, has helped to uncover potential mechanisms for alcohol tolerance in yeast. Recent experimental work utilizing lipidomics methodologies has provided a more detailed molecular picture of the relationship between lipid composition and ethanol tolerance. While it has become clear that the yeast cell membrane composition affects its ability to tolerate ethanol, the molecular mechanisms of yeast alcohol tolerance remain to be elucidated. PMID:24610851

  6. Examining the role of membrane lipid composition in determining the ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Clark M; Block, David E

    2014-05-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) has an innate ability to withstand high levels of ethanol that would prove lethal to or severely impair the physiology of other organisms. Significant efforts have been undertaken to elucidate the biochemical and biophysical mechanisms of how ethanol interacts with lipid bilayers and cellular membranes. This research has implicated the yeast cellular membrane as the primary target of the toxic effects of ethanol. Analysis of model membrane systems exposed to ethanol has demonstrated ethanol's perturbing effect on lipid bilayers, and altering the lipid composition of these model bilayers can mitigate the effect of ethanol. In addition, cell membrane composition has been correlated with the ethanol tolerance of yeast cells. However, the physical phenomena behind this correlation are likely to be complex. Previous work based on often divergent experimental conditions and time-consuming low-resolution methodologies that limit large-scale analysis of yeast fermentations has fallen short of revealing shared mechanisms of alcohol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Lipidomics, a modern mass spectrometry-based approach to analyze the complex physiological regulation of lipid composition in yeast and other organisms, has helped to uncover potential mechanisms for alcohol tolerance in yeast. Recent experimental work utilizing lipidomics methodologies has provided a more detailed molecular picture of the relationship between lipid composition and ethanol tolerance. While it has become clear that the yeast cell membrane composition affects its ability to tolerate ethanol, the molecular mechanisms of yeast alcohol tolerance remain to be elucidated.

  7. Effect of monomer diffusion on photoinduced shrinkage in photopolymer layers determined by electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moothanchery, Mohesh; Pramanik, Manojit; Toal, Vincent; Naydenova, Izabela

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of monomer diffusion on the photoinduced shrinkage profile in acrylamide based photopolymer layers during holographic recording. Using phase shifting electronic speckle pattern interferometry the displacement at each pixel in the image of the layer is measured. The complete displacement profile of the layer was obtained using phase shifting technique. We observed a reduction in shrinkage as a result of monomer diffusion from unexposed regions of holographic exposure. As a result of diffusion the maximum shrinkage was reduced by 26 % from 7.18μm to 5.28μm in a photopolymer layer of thickness160 +/- 3 μm after 84 seconds of recording.

  8. Determining mean thickness of the oxide layer by mapping the surface of a silicon sphere.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jitao; Li, Yan; Wu, Xuejian; Luo, Zhiyong; Wei, Haoyun

    2010-03-29

    To determine Avogadro constant with a relative uncertainty of better than 2 x 10(-8), the mean thickness of the oxide layer grown non-uniformly on the silicon sphere should be determined with about 0.1 nm uncertainty. An effective and flexible mapping strategy is proposed, which is insensitive to the angle resolution of the sphere-rotating mechanism. In this method, a sphere-rotating mechanism is associated with spectroscopic ellipsometer to determine the distribution of the layer, and a weighted mean method based on equal-area projection theory is applied to estimate the mean thickness. The spectroscopic ellipsometer is calibrated by X-ray reflectivity method. Within 12 hours, eight hundred positions on the silicon sphere are measured twice. The mean thickness is determined to be 4.23 nm with an uncertainty of 0.13 nm, which is in the acceptable level for the Avogadro project.

  9. Comparison of macro-gravimetric and micro-colorimetric lipid determination methods.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Laura S; Lotufo, Guiherme R

    2006-10-15

    In order to validate a method for lipid analysis of small tissue samples, the standard macro-gravimetric method of Bligh-Dyer (1959) [E.G. Bligh, W.J. Dyer, Can. J. Biochem. Physiol. 37 (1959) 911] and a modification of the micro-colorimetric assay developed by Van Handel (1985) [E. Van Handel, J. Am. Mosq. Control Assoc. 1 (1985) 302] were compared. No significant differences were observed for wet tissues of two species of fish. However, limited analysis of wet tissue of the amphipod, Leptocheirusplumulosus, indicated that the Bligh-Dyer gravimetric method generated higher lipid values, most likely due to the inclusion of non-lipid materials. Additionally, significant differences between the methods were observed with dry tissues, with the micro-colorimetric method consistently reporting calculated lipid values greater than as reported by the gravimetric method. This was most likely due to poor extraction of dry tissue in the standard Bligh-Dyer method, as no significant differences were found when analyzing a single composite extract. The data presented supports the conclusion that the micro-colorimetric method described in this paper is accurate, rapid, and minimizes time and solvent use.

  10. Postprandial lipid responses to standard carbohydrate challenges used to determine glycemic index values

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prior studies assessing metabolic effects of different types of carbohydrate have focused on their glycemic response. Not considered has been the response of postprandial cardiometabolic risk indicators. This study assessed the postprandial lipid responses to two forms of carbohydrates used as ref...

  11. A method for determining the thickness of tribological performing thin layers formed by selective transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Filip; Chisiu, Georgiana; Ipate, George

    2017-02-01

    A new stage in the research of the unconventional friction couples (alloys or pseudo-alloys in thin layers) to implement them in the designing and execution of machines is represented by the modern friction couples which are based on selective transfer (transfer of a material from one element of the friction couple to the other in the presence of a lubricant forming a superficial layer, antifriction, very thin, the order of several microns, which behaves very well to friction and wear). A selective transfer can be achieved with certainty in a friction couple, lubricated with glycerine or with a special lubricant, if in the friction area there is a material from alloys on based copper. The thin superficial layer formed through selective transfer in the friction process of a friction couple is made of the elements of the alloy based on copper, where the copper is predominant. Hence results the practical necessity to determine the thickness of superficial thin layers (0.1 - 4 μm) obtained in the friction couples, by selective transfer (mass selective transfer through diffusion from one element of the friction couple to another, in conditions of local energies favourable to the transfer process and in the presence of relative motion). The aim of this paper is presenting and explaining a methodology for determining the thickness of layers formed by selective transfer, in the friction process, on the surfaces of elements friction couples.

  12. Parametric studies to determine the effect of compliant layers on metal matrix composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.; Brown, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    Computational simulation studies are conducted to identify compliant layers to reduce matrix stresses which result from the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and the large temperature range over which the current metal matrix composites will be used. The present study includes variations of compliant layers and their properties to determine their influence on unidirectional composite and constituent response. Two simulation methods are used for these studies. The first approach is based on a three-dimensional linear finite element analysis of a 9 fiber unidirectional composite system. The second approach is a micromechanics based nonlinear computer code developed to determine the behavior of metal matrix composite system for thermal and mechanical loads. The results show that an effective compliant layer for the SCS 6 (SiC)/Ti-24Al-11Nb (Ti3Al + Nb) and SCS 6 (SiC)/Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al (Ti-15-3) composite systems should have modulus 15 percent that of the matrix and a coefficient of thermal expansion of the compliant layer roughly equal to that of the composite system without the CL. The matrix stress in the longitudinal and the transverse tangent (loop) direction are tensile for the Ti3Al + Nb and Ti-15-3 composite systems upon cool down from fabrication. The fiber longitudinal stress is compressive from fabrication cool down. Addition of a recommended compliant layer will result in a reduction in the composite modulus.

  13. Determining the imaging plane of a retinal capillary layer in adaptive optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Le-Bao; Hu, Li-Fa; Li, Da-Yu; Cao, Zhao-Liang; Mu, Quan-Quan; Ma, Ji; Xuan, Li

    2016-09-01

    Even in the early stage, endocrine metabolism disease may lead to micro aneurysms in retinal capillaries whose diameters are less than 10 μm. However, the fundus cameras used in clinic diagnosis can only obtain images of vessels larger than 20 μm in diameter. The human retina is a thin and multiple layer tissue, and the layer of capillaries less than 10 μm in diameter only exists in the inner nuclear layer. The layer thickness of capillaries less than 10 μm in diameter is about 40 μm and the distance range to rod&cone cell surface is tens of micrometers, which varies from person to person. Therefore, determining reasonable capillary layer (CL) position in different human eyes is very difficult. In this paper, we propose a method to determine the position of retinal CL based on the rod&cone cell layer. The public positions of CL are recognized with 15 subjects from 40 to 59 years old, and the imaging planes of CL are calculated by the effective focal length of the human eye. High resolution retinal capillary imaging results obtained from 17 subjects with a liquid crystal adaptive optics system (LCAOS) validate our method. All of the subjects’ CLs have public positions from 127 μm to 147 μm from the rod&cone cell layer, which is influenced by the depth of focus. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174274, 11174279, 61205021, 11204299, 61475152, and 61405194).

  14. Determination of the Mechanical Properties of the Different Layers of Blood Vessels in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.; Liu, S. Q.

    1995-03-01

    The structure and materials of the blood vessel wall are layered. This article presents the principle of a method to determine the mechanical properties of the different layers in vivo. In vivo measurement begets in vivo data and avoids pitfalls of in vitro tests of dissected specimens. With the proposed method, we can measure vessels of diameters 100 μm and up and obtain data on vascular smooth muscles and adventitia. To derive the full constitutive equations, one must first determine the zero-stress state, obtain the morphometric data on the thicknesses of the layers, and make mechanical measurements in the neighborhood of the zero-stress state. Then eight small perturbation experiments are done on each blood vessel in vivo to determine eight incremental elastic moduli of the two layers of the blood vessel wall. The calculation requires the morphometric data and the location of the neutral axis. The experiments are simple, the interpretation is definitive, but the analysis is somewhat sophisticated. The method will yield results that are needed to assess the stress and strain in the tissues of the blood vessel. The subject is important because blood vessels remodel themselves significantly and rapidly when their stress and strain deviate from their homeostatic values, and because cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, contraction, and locomotion depend on stress and strain in the tissue.

  15. Comparison of techniques for determination of boundary layer transition in shock wave induced flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Three methods of determining transition times in shock wave-induced boundary layers are compared. Experimental transition data for these comparisons were obtained in two different shock tube facilities for shock wave Mach numbers from 3.0 to 5.5. Bias in determining transition times by the conventional thin-film temperature history and difficulty in reading schlieren photographs suggest the use of a new heat-flux technique for determining transition. It is suggested that the heat-flux technique be used when possible, because of better sensitivity and a view of the entire transition process and because it reveals important information concerning departures from theoretical laminar boundary-layer development. Transition results presented extend the range of data available in the literature and are in good agreement with existing data through transition Reynolds numbers of 1,000,000.

  16. Analytical method for determining the location of ionospheric and atmospheric layers from radio occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelyev, A. G.; Zhang, K.; Wang, C. S.; Liou, Y. A.; Kuleshov, Yu.

    2012-08-01

    We generalize the fundamental principle of the radio-occultation method for studying the atmospheres and ionospheres of planets and the Earth. The criterion containing the necessary and sufficient condition under which the tangential point, at which the refractive-index gradient is normal to the ray trajectory coincides with the radio-ray perigee, is obtained. The method for determining the location and parameters of ionospheric and ionospheric layers, which is based on the relationship between the amplitudes and phases of the analytic functions determined from variations in the phase path (eikonal) and intensity of the radio-occultation signal, is proposed. This method yields qualitative and quantitative estimations of the value of the spatial displacement of the ionospheric or ionospheric layer with respect to the radio-ray perigee and allows one to determine the altitude and inclination of the ionospheric layer. The developed method is, in particular, required for determining the location and inclination of the wind-shear region and the direction of propagation of internal waves in the ionosphere and the atmosphere. This method is simpler and more accurate than the back-propagation, radio-holographic method which was previously used for determining the location of the ionospheric irregularities.

  17. The direct determination of double bond positions in lipid mixtures by liquid chromatography/in-line ozonolysis/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chenxing; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Curtis, Jonathan M

    2013-01-31

    The direct determination of double bond positions in unsaturated lipids using in-line ozonolysis-mass spectrometry (O(3)-MS) is described. In this experiment, ozone penetrates through the semi-permeable Teflon AF-2400 tubing containing a flow of a solution of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). Unsaturated FAME are thus oxidized by the ozone and cleaved at the double bond positions. The ozonolysis products then flow directly into the atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source of a mass spectrometer for analysis. Aldehyde products retaining the methyl ester group are indicative of the double bond positions in unsaturated FAME. For the first time, O(3)-MS is able to couple directly to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), making the double bond localization in lipid mixtures possible. The application of LC/O(3)-MS has been demonstrated for a fat sample from bovine adipose tissue. A total of 9 unsaturated FAME including 6 positional isomers were identified unambiguously, without comparison to standards. The in-line ozonolysis reaction apparatus is applicable to most mass spectrometers without instrumental modification; it is also directly compatible with various LC columns. The LC/O(3)-MS method described here is thus a practical, versatile and easy to use new approach to the direct determination of double bond positions in lipids, even in complex mixtures.

  18. Determination of the cathode layer thickness in the normal glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xinyu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Hao; Zou, Xiaobing; Luo, Haiyun; Wang, Xinxin

    2017-08-01

    Two methods for the determination of the cathode layer thickness dn in the normal glow discharge were developed. The first one is the computational method based on the iteration with a differently assumed value of dn. The second one is the experimental method with a Langmuir probe. The computational results showed that the reduced cathode layer thickness p.dn monotonically decreases and finally saturates with the increase in the cathode fall. It was found with these two methods that p.dn is a constant for the given cathode fall and secondary electron emission coefficient. This implies that the cathode layer will automatically adjust its thickness to keep p.dn a constant when the gas pressure changes. The results obtained with these two developed methods were compared with the results obtained with the numerical simulation of the normal glow discharge, which shows a good agreement.

  19. Determination of mixing-layer height by ground-based remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emeis, S.; Schäfer, K.; Münkel, C.

    2009-09-01

    Different ground-based remote sensing methods are today available to profile the boundary-layer and to derive such information as vertical layering and mixing-layer height (MLH). A SODAR detects the vertical profile of temperature fluctuations and gradients. By an algorithm which uses the acoustic backscatter intensity and the variance of the vertical velocity component estimates of the MLH can be made. A ceilometer detects the vertical distribution of aerosol particles and water droplets. By an algorithm which uses the vertical gradient of the optical backscatter intensity estimates of the MLH can be made. A RASS directly detects the vertical temperature profile and therefore allows for a direct measurement of MLH by analysing the vertical temperature gradient. In this presentation MLH determination from all three instruments will be compared and a few applications in the fields of air quality and wind energy will be presented. Limitations and restrictions of the different methods will be discussed.

  20. Determination of mixing layer heights by ceilometer and influences upon air quality at Mexico City airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Klaus; Flores-Jardines, Edgar; Emeis, Stefan; Grutter, Michel; Kurtenbach, Ralf; Wiesen, Peter; Münkel, Christoph

    2009-09-01

    Monitoring of mixing layer height (MLH) was performed during different measurement campaigns in urban and suburban area (Hannover, Munich, Budapest, Zürich, Augsburg) by the Vaisala ceilometer LD40. It is an eye-safe commercial lidar and designed originally to detect cloud base heights and vertical visibility for aviation safety purposes. Software for routine retrieval of mixing layer height from ceilometer data was developed and improved continuously. MLH was determined during a one-week-campaign at the airport Mexico City. Air pollutants like NO, NOx, CO and O3 as well as meteorological parameters like wind, temperature and irradiance are measured at the airport in addition to the air quality monitoring network RAMA in Mexico City. The influence of MLH together with wind, temperature and cloudiness upon air pollution is investigated. These continuous MLH and meteorological data are correlated with simultaneous measured air pollutants. The influence of mixing layer height upon air quality is shown.

  1. Separation and determination of polyether carboxylic antibiotics from Streptomyces hygroscopicus NRRL B 1865 by thin-layer chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Auboiron, S; Bauchart, D; David, L

    1991-06-28

    Thin-layer chromatography coupled with flame ionization detection was used to develop a method to separate and to determine simultaneously three polyether carboxylic ionophore antibiotics (abierixin, nigericin and grisorixin) produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus NRRL B 1865. Various proportions of chloroform, methanol and formic acid (or acetic acid as a substitute for formic acid) were used in the developing solvent to determine changes in RF values of the antibiotics and to allow conditions for maximum resolution to be obtained. Development on Chromarods SII with chloroform-methanol-formic acid (97:4:0.6, v/v/v) gave satisfactory and reliable separations of the three polyether antibiotics. Under these conditions, the internal standard methyl desoxycholate was found to be suitable for their simultaneous determination in the lipid extracts of Streptomyces hygroscopicus NRRL B 1865.

  2. Interaction of bacterial surface layer proteins with lipid membranes: synergysm between surface charge density and chain packing.

    PubMed

    Hollmann, Axel; Delfederico, Lucrecia; De Antoni, Graciela; Semorile, Liliana; Disalvo, Edgardo Aníbal

    2010-08-01

    S-layer proteins from Lactobacillus kefir and Lactobacillus brevis are able to adsorb on the surface of positively charged liposomes composed by Soybean lecithin, cholesterol and stearylamine. The different K values for S-layer proteins isolated from L. kefir and L. brevis (4.22 x 10(-3) and 2.45 x 10(2) microM(-1) respectively) indicates that the affinity of the glycosylated protein isolated from L. kefir is higher than the non-glycosylated one. The attachment of S-layer proteins counteracts the electrostatic charge repulsion between stearylamine molecules in the membrane surface, producing an increase in the rigidity in the acyl chains as measured by DPH anisotropy. Laurdan generalized polarization (GP) shows that glycosylated causes a GP increase, attributed to a lowering in water penetration into the head groups of membrane phospholipids, with charge density reduction, while the non-glycosylated does not affect it. The octadecyl-rhodamine results indicate that S-layer coated liposomes do not show spontaneous dequenching in comparison with control liposomes without S-layer proteins, suggesting that S-layer protein avoid spontaneous liposomal fusion. It is concluded that the increase in stability of liposomes coated with S-layers proteins is due to the higher rigidity induced by the S-layer attachment by electrostatic forces. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of lipid oxidation products in vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, Bente Lise; Blomhoff, Rune

    2011-01-01

    There is convincing evidence that replacing dietary saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats (PUFA) decreases risk of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, PUFA rich foods such as vegetable oils, fatty fish, and marine omega-3 supplements are recommended. However, PUFA are easily oxidizable and there is concern about possible negative health effects from intake of oxidized lipids. Little is known about the degree of lipid oxidation in such products. To assess the content of lipid oxidation products in a large selection of vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements available in Norway. Both fresh and heated vegetable oils were studied. A large selection of commercially available vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements was purchased from grocery stores, pharmacies, and health food stores in Norway. The content of lipid oxidation products were measured as peroxide value and alkenal concentration. Twelve different vegetable oils were heated for a temperature (225°C) and time (25 minutes) resembling conditions typically used during cooking. The peroxide values were in the range 1.04-10.38 meq/kg for omega-3 supplements and in the range 0.60-5.33 meq/kg for fresh vegetable oils. The concentration range of alkenals was 158.23-932.19 nmol/mL for omega-3 supplements and 33.24-119.04 nmol/mL for vegetable oils. After heating, a 2.9-11.2 fold increase in alkenal concentration was observed for vegetable oils. The contents of hydroperoxides and alkenals in omega-3 supplements are higher than in vegetable oils. After heating vegetable oils, a large increase in alkenal concentration was observed.

  4. Determination of lipid oxidation products in vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Bente Lise; Blomhoff, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Background There is convincing evidence that replacing dietary saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats (PUFA) decreases risk of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, PUFA rich foods such as vegetable oils, fatty fish, and marine omega-3 supplements are recommended. However, PUFA are easily oxidizable and there is concern about possible negative health effects from intake of oxidized lipids. Little is known about the degree of lipid oxidation in such products. Objective To assess the content of lipid oxidation products in a large selection of vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements available in Norway. Both fresh and heated vegetable oils were studied. Design A large selection of commercially available vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements was purchased from grocery stores, pharmacies, and health food stores in Norway. The content of lipid oxidation products were measured as peroxide value and alkenal concentration. Twelve different vegetable oils were heated for a temperature (225°C) and time (25 minutes) resembling conditions typically used during cooking. Results The peroxide values were in the range 1.04–10.38 meq/kg for omega-3 supplements and in the range 0.60–5.33 meq/kg for fresh vegetable oils. The concentration range of alkenals was 158.23–932.19 nmol/mL for omega-3 supplements and 33.24–119.04 nmol/mL for vegetable oils. After heating, a 2.9–11.2 fold increase in alkenal concentration was observed for vegetable oils. Conclusions The contents of hydroperoxides and alkenals in omega-3 supplements are higher than in vegetable oils. After heating vegetable oils, a large increase in alkenal concentration was observed. PMID:21691461

  5. Herbivore impacts to the moss layer determine tundra ecosystem response to grazing and warming.

    PubMed

    Gornall, Jemma L; Woodin, Sarah J; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg S; Van der Wal, Rene

    2009-10-01

    Herbivory and climate are key environmental drivers, shaping ecosystems at high latitudes. Here, we focus on how these two drivers act in concert, influencing the high arctic tundra. We aim to investigate mechanisms through which herbivory by geese influences vegetation and soil processes in tundra ecosystems under ambient and warmed conditions. To achieve this, two grazing treatments, clipping plus faecal additions and moss removal, were implemented in conjunction with passive warming. Our key finding was that, in many cases, the tundra ecosystem response was determined by treatment impacts on the moss layer. Moss removal reduced the remaining moss layer depth by 30% and increased peak grass biomass by 27%. These impacts were probably due to observed higher soil temperatures and decomposition rates associated with moss removal. The positive impact of moss removal on grass biomass was even greater with warming, further supporting this conclusion. In contrast, moss removal reduced dwarf shrub biomass possibly resulting from increased exposure to desiccating winds. An intact moss layer buffered the soil to increased air temperature and as a result there was no response of vascular plant productivity to warming over the course of this study. In fact, moss removal impacts on soil temperature were nearly double those of warming, suggesting that the moss layer is a key component in controlling soil conditions. The moss layer also absorbed nutrients from faeces, promoting moss growth. We conclude that both herbivory and warming influence this high arctic ecosystem but that herbivory is the stronger driver of the two. Disturbance to the moss layer resulted in a shift towards a more grass-dominated system with less abundant mosses and shrubs, a trend that was further enhanced by warming. Thus herbivore impacts to the moss layer are key to understanding arctic ecosystem response to grazing and warming.

  6. Anionic Lipids: Determinants of Binding Cytotoxins from Snake Venom on the Surface of Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Boldyrev, I.A.; Omelkov, A.V.; Utkin, Yu.N.; Efremov, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxic properties of cytotoxins (CTs) from snake venom are mediated by their interaction with the cell membrane. The hydrophobic pattern containing the tips of loops I–III and flanked by polar residues is known to be a membrane–binding motif of CTs. However, this is not enough to explain the difference in activity among various CTs which are similar in sequence and in 3D structure. The mechanism of further CT–membrane interaction leading to pore formation and cell death still remains unknown. Published experimental data on the specific interaction between CT and low molecular weight anionic components (sulphatide) of the bilayer point to the existence of corresponding ligand binding sites on the surface of toxin molecules. In this work we study the membrane–lytic properties of CT I, CT II (Naja oxiana), and Ct 4 (Naja kaouthia), which belong to different structural and functional types (P– and S–type) of CTs, by measuring the intensity of a fluorescent dye, calcein released from liposomes containing a phosphatidylserine (PS) lipid as an anionic component. Using molecular docking simulations, we find and characterize three sites in CT molecules that can potentially bind the PS polar head. Based on the data obtained, we suggest a hypothesis that CTs can specifically interact with one or more of the anionic lipids (in particular, with PS) contained in the membrane, thus facilitating the interaction between CTs and the lipid bilayer of a cell membrane. PMID:22649646

  7. Dual role of outer epicuticular lipids in determining the wettability of dragonfly wings.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Song Ha T; Webb, Hayden K; Hasan, Jafar; Tobin, Mark J; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2013-06-01

    Numerous natural surfaces possess superhydrophobicity and self-cleaning properties that would be extremely beneficial when applied in industry. Dragonfly wings are one example of such surfaces, and while their general surface structure is known, their precise chemical composition is not. Here, the epicuticular lipids of dragonfly wing membranes were characterized to investigate their significance in contributing to self-cleaning and superhydrophobic properties. After just 10s of lipid extraction using chloroform, the water contact angles exhibited by the wings decreased below the accepted threshold for superhydrophobicity (150°). Infrared spectra collected at the Australian Synchrotron contained characteristic absorption bands of amide, ester and aliphatic hydrocarbons moieties on the wing surfaces, the latter of which was decreased post-extraction with chloroform. GC-MS data analysis revealed that the epicuticular wax components were dominated by n-alkanes with even-numbered carbons, especially n-hexacosane, and palmitic acid. SEM and AFM data analysis conducted on the untreated and chloroform-extracted wing surfaces demonstrated that surface topography changed after extraction; the surface nanostructure was progressively lost with extended extraction times. The data presented here indicate that epicuticular lipids contribute not only to self-cleaning and superhydrophobic properties through their inherent hydrophobic nature, but also by forming the physical structure of the wing surface. This knowledge will be extremely valuable for reconstruction of dragonfly wing structures as a biomimetic template.

  8. Neutron scattering determination of the binding of prothrombin to lipid vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Torbet, J.

    1987-12-01

    Low-angle neutron scattering is used to study the binding of human prothrombin to small single-bilayer vesicles consisting of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine (1/1 w/w). The radius of gyration of prothrombin indicates that it is an elongated molecule. The vesicles alone were not observed to coalesce, and their molecular weight, outer radius, and average surface area per lipid were respectively (1.6 +/- 0.32) x 10/sup 6/, 114 +/- 4 A, and 110 +/- 18 A/sup 2/. These values were independent of the presence of calcium and were not altered significantly by prothrombin, which binds reversibly to the vesicle outer surface with its long axis projecting approximately radially forming a 90-A thick protein shell. From the titration of the protein-vesicle interaction, the apparent dissociation constant of the binding of prothrombin to these vesicles is estimated to be 0.8 +/- 0.4 ..mu..M. At saturation, 57 +/- 7 prothrombin molecules bind, giving 25 +/- 6 lipid residues and an area of 2900 +/- 400 A/sup 2/ per prothrombin molecule on the vesicle outer surface. This area is about twice that calculated from a prolate ellipsoid model for prothrombin. However, it is close to the maximum cross-sectional area of fragment 1, the lipid binding region of prothrombin, which is coin-shaped in the high-resolution X-ray structure. This similarity suggests that prothrombin binding could be sterically limited.

  9. Oceanic upper mixed layer depth determination by the use of satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Xiao-Hai; Schubel, J. R.; Pritchard, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed to determine the oceanic daily mean mixed layer depth from satellite observations and a mixed layer thermal inertia (MLTI) model. The algorithms were developed to use remotely-sensed values of sea surface temperature, albedo, and surface wind speeds to calculate the thermal inertia and to predict changes in subsurface diurnal mixed layer depth. The MLTI model, based on a mixed layer model of the upper ocean, has been used to simulate the diurnal mixing process and thermal inertia distribution in the Sargasso Sea around 34 deg N, 70 deg W. Sea surface temperature and albedo have been obtained from the NOAA7-AVHRR images. Surface wind speeds have been derived from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) aboard Nimbus 7. Image processing was performed for images gathered between June and July 1982. The daily mean mixed layer depths predicted by the MLTI model agree well with data gathered at the LOTUS mooring located in the Sargasso Sea. This suggests that vertical mixing is the dominant physical process that controls the thermal inertia distribution in the midocean, far from major current systems, and that remote sensing is a promising tool to study such upper ocean processes.

  10. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, Ricardo; Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    In the present work we analyze three methods used to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. (Fluid Dyn. Res. 41:021401, 2009) and the one by Nickels (J. Fluid Mech. 521:217-239, 2004), and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. (Phys. Fluids 23:041702, 2011). The boundary layer developing over the suction side of a NACA4412 wing profile, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at Rec = 400,000, is used as the test case. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, but stronger pressure gradients (with β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity, and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Therefore, the technique based on the diagnostic plot is a robust method to determine the boundary layer thickness (equivalent to δ99) and edge velocity in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers.

  11. The determinants of cost-effectiveness potential: an historical perspective on lipid-lowering therapies.

    PubMed

    Refoios Camejo, Rodrigo; McGrath, Clare; Miraldo, Marisa; Rutten, Frans

    2013-05-01

    The concept of cost effectiveness emerged in an attempt to link the prices of new healthcare technologies to the immediate value they provide, with payers defining the acceptable cost per unit of incremental effect over the alternatives available. It has been suggested that such measures allow developers to assess potential market profitability in an early stage of development, but may result in discouraging investment in efficient research if not used appropriately. The objective of this study is to identify the pattern of the factors determining cost effectiveness and assess the evolution of cost-effectiveness potential for drugs in development using lipid-lowering therapy as a case study. The study is based on observational clinical and market data covering a 20-year period (from 1990 to 2010) in the UK. Real-life clinical data including total cholesterol laboratory test results were extracted from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) and are used to illustrate how the clinical effectiveness of existing standard care changed over time in patients managed in clinical practice. Prescription Cost Analysis (PCA) data were extracted and the average price of the drug mix used was computed throughout the study period. Using this information, the maximum clinical benefit and cost savings to be had were estimated for each year of the analysis using a cost-effectiveness model. Subsequently, the highest price a new technology providing the maximum clinical effectiveness possible (i.e. eliminating cardiovascular risk from high cholesterol levels) could achieve under current cost-effectiveness rules was calculated and used as a measure of the potential cost effectiveness of drugs in development. The results in this study show that the total cholesterol values of patients managed in clinical practice moved steadily towards recommended clinical targets. Overall, the absolute potential for incremental health-related quality of life decreased by approximately 78

  12. pH- and thermosensitive thin lipid layer coated mesoporous magnetic nanoassemblies as a dual drug delivery system towards thermochemotherapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Lina; Srivastava, R; Bahadur, D

    2014-07-01

    A new pH-sensitive and thermosensitive dual drug delivery system consisting of thin lipid layer encapsulated mesoporous magnetite nanoassemblies (MMNA) has been developed which can deliver two anticancer drugs simultaneously. The formulation of lipid layer used is 5:2:2:2 w/w, DPPC:cholesterol:DSPE-PEG2000:MMNA. The structure, morphology and magnetic properties of MMNA and lipid coated MMNA (LMMNA) were thoroughly characterized. This hybrid system was investigated for its ability to carry two anticancer drugs as well as its ability to provide heat under an alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). A very high loading efficiency of up to ∼81% of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) with an ∼0.02 mg mg(-1) loading capacity and ∼60% of paclitaxel (TXL) with an ∼0.03 mg mg(-1) loading capacity are obtained with LMMNA. A sustained release of drug is observed over a period of 172 h, with better release, of ∼88:53% (DOX:TXL), at pH 4.3 compared to the ∼28:26% (DOX:TXL) in physiological conditions (pH 7.4). An enhanced release of ∼72 and ∼68% is recorded for DOX and TXL, respectively, during the first hour with the application of an ACMF (∼43°C). A greater in vitro cytotoxic effect is observed with the two drugs compared to them individually in HeLa, MCF-7 and HepG2 cancer cells. With the application of an ACMF for 10 min, the cell killing efficiency is improved substantially due to simultaneous thermo- and chemotherapy. Confocal microscopy confirms the internalization of drug loaded MMNA and LMMNA by cells and their morphological changes during thermochemotherapy.

  13. Determining the number of hidden units in multi-layer perceptrons using F-ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Ben H.; Desai, Pratish R.

    1993-01-01

    The hidden units in multi-layer perceptrons are believed to act as feature extractors. In other words, the outputs of the hidden units represent the features in a more traditional statistical classification paradigm. This viewpoint offers a statistical, objective approach to determining the optimal number of hidden units required. This approach is based on an F-ratio test, and proceeds in an iterative fashion. The method and its application to simulated time-series data are presented.

  14. Computer model of unstirred layer and intracellular pH changes. Determinants of unstirred layer pH.

    PubMed

    Marrannes, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Transmembrane acid-base fluxes affect the intracellular pH and unstirred layer pH around a superfused biological preparation. In this paper the factors influencing the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are studied. An analytical expression of the unstirred layer pH gradient in steady state is derived as a function of simultaneous transmembrane fluxes of (weak) acids and bases with the dehydration reaction of carbonic acid in equilibrium. Also a multicompartment computer model is described consisting of the extracellular bulk compartment, different unstirred layer compartments and the intracellular compartment. With this model also transient changes and the influence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) can be studied. The analytical expression and simulations with the multicompartment model demonstrate that in steady state the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are influenced by the size and type of transmembrane flux of acids and bases, their dissociation constant and diffusion coefficient, the concentration, diffusion coefficient and type of mobile buffers and the activity and location of CA. Similar principles contribute to the amplitude of the unstirred layer pH transients. According to these models an immobile buffer does not influence the steady-state pH, but reduces the amplitude of pH transients especially when these are fast. The unstirred layer pH provides useful information about transmembrane acid-base fluxes. This paper gives more insight how the unstirred layer pH and its transients can be interpreted. Methodological issues are discussed.

  15. Lipids in blood-brain barrier models in vitro I: Thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of lipid classes and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Stefanie D; Hurley, Johannah A; Abbott, N Joan; Begley, David J

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to optimize a sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for fatty acid (FA) analysis for the quantification of polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) in cell lipid extracts and to analyze the lipid and FA patterns of three cell lines used in blood-brain barrier (BBB) models: RBE4, ECV304, and C6. Thin-layer chromatographic analysis revealed differences in the phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidylethanolamine (PC:PE) ratios and the triglyceride (TG) content. The PC:PE ratio was <1 for RBE4 cells but >1 for ECV304 and C6 cells. ECV304 cells displayed up to 9% TG depending on culture time, whereas the other cell lines contained about 1% TG. The percentages of docosahexaenoic acid were 9.4 +/- 1.7% of the unsaturated FAs in RBE4 cells (n = 5; 4 d in culture; 9.9% after 10 d), 8.1 +/- 2.0% in ECV304 cells (n = 11; 10 to 14 d), and 6.7 +/- 0.6% in C6 cells (n = 6; 10 to 14 d) and were close to the published values for rat brain microvascular endothelium. The percentage of arachidonic acid (C20:4) was about half that in vivo. ECV304 cells contained the highest fraction of C20:4, 17.8 +/- 2.2%; RBE4 cells contained 11.6 +/- 2.4%; and C6 cells 15.8 +/- 1.9%. It is concluded that a sensitive HPLC method for FAs is now optimized for the analysis of long-chain PUFAs. The results provide a useful framework for studies on the effects of lipid modulation and give reference information for the development of further BBB models.

  16. Lipid composition determines the effects of arbutin on the stability of membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Hincha, D K; Oliver, A E; Crowe, J H

    1999-01-01

    Arbutin (hydroquinone-beta-D-glucopyranoside) is an abundant solute in the leaves of many freezing- or desiccation-tolerant plants. Its physiological role in plants, however, is not known. Here we show that arbutin protects isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) thylakoid membranes from freeze-thaw damage. During freezing of liposomes, the presence of only 20 mM arbutin led to complete leakage of a soluble marker from egg PC (EPC) liposomes. When the nonbilayer-forming chloroplast lipid monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) was included in the membranes, this leakage was prevented. Inclusion of more than 15% MGDG into the membranes led to a strong destabilization of liposomes during freezing. Under these conditions arbutin became a cryoprotectant, as only 5 mM arbutin reduced leakage from 75% to 20%. The nonbilayer lipid egg phosphatidylethanolamine (EPE) had an effect similar to that of MGDG, but was much less effective, even at concentrations up to 80% in EPC membranes. Arbutin-induced leakage during freezing was accompanied by massive bilayer fusion in EPC and EPC/EPE membranes. Twenty percent MGDG in EPC bilayers completely inhibited the fusogenic effect of arbutin. The membrane surface probes merocyanine 540 and 2-(6-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazol-4-yl)amino)hexanoyl-1-hexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosph ocholi ne (NBD-C(6)-HPC) revealed that arbutin reduced the ability of both probes to partition into the membranes. Steady-state anisotropy measurements with probes that localize at different positions in the membranes showed that headgroup mobility was increased in the presence of arbutin, whereas the mobility of the fatty acyl chains close to the glycerol backbone was reduced. This reduction, however, was not seen in membranes containing 20% MGDG. The effect of arbutin on lipid order was limited to the interfacial region of the membranes and was not evident in the hydrophobic core region. From these data we were able to derive a physical model of the perturbing

  17. Density determination of nano-layers depending to the thickness by non-destructive method

    SciTech Connect

    Gacem, A.; Doghmane, A.; Hadjoub, Z.

    2013-12-16

    Non-destructive tests used to characterize and observe the state of the solids near the surface or at depth, without damaging them or damaging them. Density is frequently used to follow the variations of the physical structure of the samples, as well as in the calculation of quantity of material required to fill a given volume, and it is also used to determine the homogeneity of a sample. However, the measurement of the acoustic properties (density, elastic constants,…) of a thin film whose thickness is smaller than several atomic layers is not easy to perform. For that reason, we expose in this work the effects of the thicknesses of thin films on the evolution of the density, where several samples are analyzed. The samples selected structures are thin films deposited on substrates, these coatings have thicknesses varying from a few atomic layers to ten or so micrometers and can change the properties of the substrate on which they are deposited. To do so, we considered a great number of layers (Cr, Al, SiO{sub 2}, ZnO, Cu, AlN, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, SiC) deposited on different substrates (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu and Quartz). It is first shown that the density exhibits a dispersive behaviour. Such a behaviour is characterized by an initial increase (or decrease) followed by a saturated region. Further investigations of these dependences led to the determination of a semi-empirical universal relations, ρ=f(h/λ{sub T}), for all the investigated layer/substrate combination. Such expression could be of great importance in the density prediction of even layers thicknesses.

  18. Effect of Dietary Marine Microalgae (Schizochytrium) Powder on Egg Production, Blood Lipid Profiles, Egg Quality, and Fatty Acid Composition of Egg Yolk in Layers

    PubMed Central

    Park, J. H.; Upadhaya, S. D.; Kim, I. H.

    2015-01-01

    Two hundred and sixteen Institut de Sélection Animale (ISA) brown layers (40 wks of age) were studied for 6 wks to examine the effect of microalgae powder (MAP) on egg production, egg quality, blood lipid profile, and fatty acid concentration of egg yolk. Dietary treatments were as follows: i) CON (basal diet), ii) 0.5% MAP (CON+0.5% Schizochytrium powder), and iii) 1.0% MAP (CON+1.0% Schizochytrium powder). From 44 to 46 wks, egg production was higher in 1.0% MAP treatment than in control treatment (linear, p = 0.034); however, there was no difference on the egg production from 40 to 43 wks (p>0.05). Serum triglyceride and total cholesterol were significantly reduced in the groups fed with MAP, compared to those in groups fed with control diets (Quadratic, p = 0.034 and p = 0.039, respectively). Inclusion of 0.5% MAP in the diet of layers improved egg yolk color, compared with hens fed with basal diet at 46 wks (quadratic, p = 0.044). Eggshell thickness was linearly increased in MAP-fed treatments at 46th wk (p<0.05). Concentration of yolk docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3) was increased in treatment groups fed with MAP (linear, p<0.05). The n-6 fatty acids, n-6/n-3 fatty acid, and unsaturated fatty acid/saturated fatty acid were decreased in treatment groups fed with MAP (linear, p<0.05). These results suggest that MAP improved the egg production and egg quality, and may affect serum lipid metabolites in the layers. In addition, MAP increases yolk DHA levels, and deceases n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio. PMID:25656210

  19. Determination of the Schottky barrier height of ferromagnetic contacts to few-layer phosphorene

    SciTech Connect

    Anugrah, Yoska; Robbins, Matthew C.; Koester, Steven J.; Crowell, Paul A.

    2015-03-09

    Phosphorene, the 2D analogue of black phosphorus, is a promising material for studying spin transport due to its low spin-orbit coupling and its ½ nuclear spin, which could allow the study of hyperfine effects. In this work, the properties of permalloy (Py) and cobalt (Co) contacts to few-layer phosphorene are presented. The Schottky barrier height was extracted and determined as a function of gate bias. Flat-band barrier heights, relative to the valence band edge, of 110 meV and 200 meV were determined for Py and Co, respectively. These results are important for future studies of spin transport in phosphorene.

  20. Role of blooming in determining the storage stability of lipid-based dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nurzalina; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2004-12-01

    Gelucire 50/13 alone and solid dispersions in this material containing two model drugs (10% w/w caffeine and paracetamol) have been studied with a view to establishing the mechanism underpinning changes in drug-release characteristics as a function of storage time and temperature. The lipid systems were fabricated into tablets and stored for up to 180 days at temperatures of 20 and 37 degrees C. The dispersions were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy, and dissolution testing. DSC studies indicated that the Gelucire 50/13 exists in two principal melting forms (melting points 38 and 43 degrees C) that undergo transformation to the higher melting form on storage at 37 degrees C. Scanning electron microscopy studies indicated that the systems exhibit "blooming," with crystal formation on the surface being apparent on storage at both temperatures. The dissolution rate increased on storage, with the effect being particularly marked at higher storage temperatures and for the paracetamol systems. However, whereas these changes corresponded well to those seen for the morphology, the correlation between the changes in dissolution and those of the DSC profiles was poor. The study has suggested a novel explanation for the storage instability of Gelucire 50/13 whereby the change in dissolution is associated not with molecular rearrangement as such but with the gross distribution of the constituent components, this in turn altering the physical integrity of the lipid bases.

  1. Note: Non-invasive optical method for rapid determination of alignment degree of oriented nanofibrous layers

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, M.; Rebicek, J.; Klemes, J.; Kotzianova, A.; Velebny, V.

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a rapid non-destructive method that provides information on the anisotropic internal structure of nanofibrous layers. A laser beam of a wavelength of 632.8 nm is directed at and passes through a nanofibrous layer prepared by electrostatic spinning. Information about the structural arrangement of nanofibers in the layer is directly visible in the form of a diffraction image formed on a projection screen or obtained from measured intensities of the laser beam passing through the sample which are determined by the dependency of the angle of the main direction of polarization of the laser beam on the axis of alignment of nanofibers in the sample. Both optical methods were verified on Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibrous layers (fiber diameter of 470 nm) with random, single-axis aligned and crossed structures. The obtained results match the results of commonly used methods which apply the analysis of electron microscope images. The presented simple method not only allows samples to be analysed much more rapidly and without damaging them but it also makes possible the analysis of much larger areas, up to several square millimetres, at the same time.

  2. Permuting the PGF Signature Motif Blocks both Archaeosortase-Dependent C-Terminal Cleavage and Prenyl Lipid Attachment for the Haloferax volcanii S-Layer Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Halim, Mohd Farid; Karch, Kelly R.; Zhou, Yitian; Haft, Daniel H.; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT For years, the S-layer glycoprotein (SLG), the sole component of many archaeal cell walls, was thought to be anchored to the cell surface by a C-terminal transmembrane segment. Recently, however, we demonstrated that the Haloferax volcanii SLG C terminus is removed by an archaeosortase (ArtA), a novel peptidase. SLG, which was previously shown to be lipid modified, contains a C-terminal tripartite structure, including a highly conserved proline-glycine-phenylalanine (PGF) motif. Here, we demonstrate that ArtA does not process an SLG variant where the PGF motif is replaced with a PFG motif (slgG796F,F797G). Furthermore, using radiolabeling, we show that SLG lipid modification requires the PGF motif and is ArtA dependent, lending confirmation to the use of a novel C-terminal lipid-mediated protein-anchoring mechanism by prokaryotes. Similar to the case for the ΔartA strain, the growth, cellular morphology, and cell wall of the slgG796F,F797G strain, in which modifications of additional H. volcanii ArtA substrates should not be altered, are adversely affected, demonstrating the importance of these posttranslational SLG modifications. Our data suggest that ArtA is either directly or indirectly involved in a novel proteolysis-coupled, covalent lipid-mediated anchoring mechanism. Given that archaeosortase homologs are encoded by a broad range of prokaryotes, it is likely that this anchoring mechanism is widely conserved. IMPORTANCE Prokaryotic proteins bound to cell surfaces through intercalation, covalent attachment, or protein-protein interactions play critical roles in essential cellular processes. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms that anchor proteins to archaeal cell surfaces remain poorly characterized. Here, using the archaeon H. volcanii as a model system, we report the first in vivo studies of a novel protein-anchoring pathway involving lipid modification of a peptidase-processed C terminus. Our findings not only yield important insights into

  3. Determination of band offsets at GaN/single-layer MoS{sub 2} heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Tangi, Malleswararao; Mishra, Pawan; Ng, Tien Khee; Janjua, Bilal; Alias, Mohd Sharizal; Ooi, Boon S.; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Tseng, Chien-Chih; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Joyce, Hannah J.

    2016-07-18

    We report the band alignment parameters of the GaN/single-layer (SL) MoS{sub 2} heterostructure where the GaN thin layer is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on CVD deposited SL-MoS{sub 2}/c-sapphire. We confirm that the MoS{sub 2} is an SL by measuring the separation and position of room temperature micro-Raman E{sup 1}{sub 2g} and A{sup 1}{sub g} modes, absorbance, and micro-photoluminescence bandgap studies. This is in good agreement with HRTEM cross-sectional analysis. The determination of band offset parameters at the GaN/SL-MoS{sub 2} heterojunction is carried out by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy accompanying with electronic bandgap values of SL-MoS{sub 2} and GaN. The valence band and conduction band offset values are, respectively, measured to be 1.86 ± 0.08 and 0.56 ± 0.1 eV with type II band alignment. The determination of these unprecedented band offset parameters opens up a way to integrate 3D group III nitride materials with 2D transition metal dichalcogenide layers for designing and modeling of their heterojunction based electronic and photonic devices.

  4. Density of states determination in organic donor-acceptor blend layers enabled by molecular doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Janine; Ray, Debdutta; Kleemann, Hans; Pahner, Paul; Schwarze, Martin; Koerner, Christian; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl

    2015-06-01

    Charge carrier transport is a key parameter determining the efficiency of organic solar cells, and is closely related to the density of free and trapped states. For trap characterization, impedance spectroscopy is a suitable, non-invasive method, applicable to complete organic semiconductor devices. In order to contribute to the capacitive signal, the traps must be filled with charge carriers. Typically, trap filling is achieved by illuminating the device or by injecting charge carriers through application of a forward bias voltage. However, in both cases, the exact number of charge carriers in the device is not known and depends strongly on the measurement conditions. Here, hole trap states of the model blend layer ZnPc:C60 are filled by weak p-doping, enabling trap characterization in a blend layer at a controlled hole density. We evaluate impedance spectra at different temperatures in order to determine the density of occupied states (DOOS) directly from the capacitance-frequency spectra by assuming a simple energy diagram. The reconstructed DOOS distribution is analyzed at different doping concentrations and device thicknesses and compared to thermally stimulated current measurements performed on the same devices. In both methods, a pronounced Gaussian peak at about 0.4 eV below the transport level is found as well as deep, exponential tail states, providing a deeper insight into the density of states distribution of this donor-acceptor blend layer. Additionally, the effect of doping-induced trap filling on the solar cell characteristics is studied in these devices.

  5. Long- and Short-Range Constraints for the Structure Determination of Layered Silicates with Stacking Disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Cadars, Sylvian; Allix, mathieu; Brouwer, Darren H.; Shayib, Ramzy; Suchomel, Matthew; Garaga, Mounesha N.; Rakhmatullin, Aydar; Burton, Allen W.; Zones, Stacy I.; Massiot, Dominique; Chmelka, Bradley F.

    2014-12-23

    Layered silicates have important applications as host materials, supports for catalysis, and zeolite precursors. However, their local structures are often challenging to establish due to disorder of the sheet assemblies. We present a new protocol that combines long- and short-range structural constraints from diffraction and solid-state NMR techniques, respectively, to determine the molecular structure of layered silicates in the presence of various extents of stacking disorder. Solid-state 29Si NMR data are largely insensitive to the incomplete extent of three-dimensional (3D) crystallinity that limits the interpretation of diffraction data alone to the identification of possible unit cells and space groups. State-of-the-art NMR crystallography techniques consequently provide a simplified view of materials from which candidate framework structures can be built and evaluated based on local structural constraints, including interatomic distances, Si site numbers and multiplicities, and Si–O–Si connectivities, and refined using density functional theory. This protocol was applied to a new layered silicate material named CLS-1, of composition [Si5O11H][C9N2H15]·1.9(H2O), synthesized by using a fluoride-based protocol and cationic alkylaminopyridinium as a structure-directing agent (SDA). Despite the intrinsic complexity and partial ordering of the intersheet arrangements and organic–inorganic interactions, this led to the identification of a single space group that is compatible with both NMR and diffraction data, from which the silicate framework structure could be established,. The remarkable similarities between the layered framework structures of CLS-1, HUS-2 (Tsunoji et al. J. Mater. Chem.2012, 22, 13682), and another layered silicate material with a radically different morphology and extent of stacking order and interlayer dynamics, established by using a similar approach (Brouwer et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2013, 135, 5641), point to the remarkable

  6. Lipid and fatty acid analysis of the Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus (PiGV) envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri-Bhalla, K.; Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Virus envelope was isolated from Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus, produced in early fourth-instar larvae. Both polar and neutral lipids were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Fatty acid composition of various individual neutral and polar lipids was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. The major components of envelope neutral lipid were diacylglycerols. Palmitic acid and stearic acid were the major saturated fatty acids in both polar and neutral lipids. Whereas palmitoleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acids in neutral lipids, oleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acid in the polar lipids.

  7. Determination of isotropic layer parameters from spatiotemporal signals of an ultrasonic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, S. A.; Maev, R. G.

    2013-09-01

    The paper discusses a method for measuring the velocities and attenuation of longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic waves and the density and thickness of the isotropic layer with an array placed in an immersion liquid parallel to the sample. The method is based on the recording of the total spatiotemporal signal of the array and its expansion into a spatial spectrum of pulse plane wave response. The ultrasonic velocity and sample thickness depend on the response delay of the plane wave in the layer from the transverse projection of the slowness vector. The density and attenuation are determined from the behavior of the amplitudes of spectral responses. To confirm this method in experiment, the parameters of a polystyrene plate have been measured using a linear 32-element array with a central frequency of 17 MHz.

  8. Lipid peroxidation induced by cercosporin as a possible determinant of its toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, L; Bindoli, A; Macrì, F; Vianello, A

    1979-12-01

    The photodynamic action of cercosporin was assayed in various kinds of natural and artificial membranes. Cerosporin induces lipoperoxidation of liposomes, rat liver and pea internode mitochondria and microsomes, estimated both as malondialdehyde (MDA) formation and O2 consumption. Cercosporin-induced lipoperoxidation is inhibited by either singlet oxygen quenchers, free radical trapping agents or EDTA. Superoxide anion (O2-), hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals (.OH) are not involved in the activity of cercosporin. In addition cercosporin, by chelating iron, lowers the lipoperoxidation induced by such a metal. Therefore cercosporin stimulates, through singlet oxygen production, the hydroperoxide formation but, at the same time, it inhibits the continuation of the iron-mediated free radical chain. The present results suggest that cellular lipid peroxidation has a certain relevance to toxic activity of cercosporin.

  9. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, R.; Bobke, A.; Örlü, R.; Schlatter, P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, we analyze three commonly used methods to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. ["Criteria for assessing experiments in zero pressure gradient boundary layers," Fluid Dyn. Res. 41, 021404 (2009)] and the one by Nickels ["Inner scaling for wall-bounded flows subject to large pressure gradients," J. Fluid Mech. 521, 217-239 (2004)], and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. ["A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the `outer' peak," Phys. Fluids 23, 041702 (2011)]. The boundary layers developing over the suction and pressure sides of a NACA4412 wing section, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at chord Reynolds number Rec = 400 000, are used as the test case, besides other numerical and experimental data from favorable, zero, and adverse pressure-gradient flat-plate turbulent boundary layers. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, although the composite-profile techniques require data preparation, including initial estimations of fitting parameters and data truncation. Stronger pressure gradients (with a Rotta-Clauser pressure-gradient parameter β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Collapse of intermittency factors obtained from a wide range of pressure-gradient and Re conditions on the wing further highlights the robustness of the diagnostic plot method to determine the

  10. A Biochemical GC-MS Application for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory: Determination of Fatty Acid Composition of Arabidopsis thaliana Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Jared D.; Catino, Arthur J., III.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Lassman, Michael E.; Leber, Phyllis A.; Reinard, Michael D.; Strotman, Neil A.; Pike, Carl S.

    2000-11-01

    A biochemical application of GC-MS in which students determine the qualitative and quantitative lipid composition of plant leaf samples is described. There are four facets of this project: (i) synthesis and characterization of individual fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) as standards for GC-MS analysis, (ii) isolation of the fatty acids of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, both wild type and mutants, as FAMEs, (iii) GC-MS analysis of the Arabidopsis leaf extracts for fatty acid composition, and (iv) comparison of the class results with the literature data for both wild type and the four mutants and with a biochemical model of two pathways for lipid synthesis in Arabidopsis leaves. Because this experimental paradigm links organic synthesis and spectral characterization by IR and NMR, both 1H and 13C, with separation and identification via GC-MS analysis, all of the key areas of laboratory procedure are encompassed in this single project. The experimental design permits a myriad of hypothesis-testing variations. Plants can be grown at different temperatures and for different lengths of time to determine if and how fatty acid composition varies. Different types of plant leaves can be examined to ascertain if each has a unique fatty acid fingerprint.

  11. To determine ice layer thickness of Europa by high energy neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, D.; Kurita, K.; Tanaka, H. K.

    2010-12-01

    Europa, the second closest Galilean satellite is one of the targets which are suspected to have an internal ocean. Detection and characterization of the internal ocean is one of the main subjects for Europa orbiter exploration. Although the gravitational data has shown the thickness of the surface H2O layer of 80-170km[1], it can not determine the phase of H2O. The variations in the magnetic field associated with the induced current in the internal ocean can determine the thickness of the layer of ice if satellite's orbits satisfy the required conditions. Observations of tidal amplitude forced by Jupiter can also resolve the thickness of the surface lithosphere[2]. At moment because of the lack of observational constraints there exist two contrasting models:thick ice layer model and thin model. Here we propose new method to detect the ocean directly based on the radiation by high energy neutrino interacted with matter. Schaefer et al[3] have proposed a similar method to determine ice layer thickness. We will focus on the detection of internal ocean for Europa and present the method is suitable for actual situations of Europa exploration by numerical simulations. Neutrino is famous for its traveling at long distance without any interaction with matter. When high energy neutrinos traverse in Europa hadronic showers are produced by the weak interaction with the nucleons that makes the body of Europa. These hadronic showers induces excess electrons. Because of these excess electrons, Cherenkov photons are emitted. When this radiation occurs in the ice layer, radiations whose wave length is over 10cm should be coherent because the scale of the shower becomes small (a few cm) in the ice, which is called as Askaryan effect[3]. Thus, the intensity of the radiation whose frequency is a few GHz should be enhanced. Since ice has a much longer attenuation length than water, the radiations which occur in the surface ice layer could be detected by the antenna outside Europa but

  12. Lipids of Sarcina lutea III. Composition of the Complex Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Charles K.; Albro, Phillip W.; Grindey, Gerald B.

    1965-01-01

    Huston, Charles K. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.), Phillip W. Albro, and Gerald B. Grindey. Lipids of Sarcina lutea. III. Composition of the complex lipids. J. Bacteriol. 89:768–775. 1965.—The complex lipids from a strain of Sarcina lutea were isolated and separated into fractions on diethylaminoethyl cellulose acetate and silicic acid columns. These fractions were monitored in several thin-layer chromatography systems. The various lipid types were characterized by their behavior in thin-layer systems and by an analysis of their hydrolysis products. The fatty acid composition of the column fractions was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. A number of components (13) were separated by thin-layer chromatography and characterized. The major components were polyglycerol phosphatide (17.0%), lipoamino acids (15.1%), phosphatidyl glycerol (13.8%), and an incompletely characterized substance (15.0%). Minor constituents included phosphatidyl inositol (5.5%), phosphatidic acid (4.2%), phosphatidyl serine (2.0%), and phosphatidyl choline (1.0%). No phosphatidyl ethanolamine was observed. PMID:14273659

  13. Maximum Angle Method for Determining Mixed Layer Depth from Seaglider Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    exchange with the atmosphere, and in turn affects 47  the climate . 48  Objective and accurate identification of HT and HD is important for the...determination of 49  barrier layer occurrence and its climate impact. Three types of criteria (difference, gradient, and 50  curvature) are available for...0.2oC (de Boyer Montegut et al., 2004). The reference level changes from near surface (Wyrtki, 58  1964) to 10 m depth (de Boyer Montegut et al., 2004

  14. Echinococcus granulosus: DNA extraction from germinal layers allows strain determination in fertile and nonfertile hydatid cysts.

    PubMed

    Kamenetzky, L; Canova, S G; Guarnera, E A; Rosenzvit, M C

    2000-06-01

    A method for the isolation of Echinococcus granulosus DNA from germinal layers of hydatid cysts is described. The method includes a hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide/chloroform extraction and an adsorption to diatomaceous earth suspension. DNA suitable for polymerase chain reaction was obtained and used for parasite strain determination by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene sequencing. Fertile and nonfertile cyst isolates from sheep, cattle, pigs, and humans were characterized. Hitherto, no direct parasite strain characterization has been made on nonfertile hydatid cysts, whereas here we report that nonfertile hydatid cysts were produced by sheep strain (G1 genotype) in sheep, cattle, and humans and by pig strain (G7 genotype) in pigs.

  15. Determination of lawsone in henna powders by high performance thin layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    El-Shaer, Nagwa S; Badr, Jihan M; Aboul-Ela, Maha A; Gohar, Yousry M

    2007-12-01

    The lawsone content has been evaluated quantitatively in eight commercial henna powders and two collected henna leaves. The phenolic, chloroform-soluble fraction of the majority of the examined samples showed the presence of lawsone and two other pigments. Here we aimed to optimize high performance thin layer chromatography for the determination of lawsone. Upon using the optimized method the examined samples showed considerable variation in lawsone concentration ranging from 0.004 up to 0.608 wt%, indicating that some samples were almost devoid of lawsone. Some of these products were subjected to preliminary in vivo toxicity studies.

  16. Giant aeolian dune size determined by the average depth of the atmospheric boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Bruno; Fourrière, Antoine; Ould-Kaddour, Fouzia; Murray, Brad; Claudin, Philippe

    2009-02-26

    Depending on the wind regime, sand dunes exhibit linear, crescent-shaped or star-like forms resulting from the interaction between dune morphology and sand transport. Small-scale dunes form by destabilization of the sand bed with a wavelength (a few tens of metres) determined by the sand transport saturation length. The mechanisms controlling the formation of giant dunes, and in particular accounting for their typical time and length scales, have remained unknown. Using a combination of field measurements and aerodynamic calculations, we show here that the growth of aeolian giant dunes, ascribed to the nonlinear interaction between small-scale superimposed dunes, is limited by the confinement of the flow within the atmospheric boundary layer. Aeolian giant dunes and river dunes form by similar processes, with the thermal inversion layer that caps the convective boundary layer in the atmosphere acting analogously to the water surface in rivers. In both cases, the bed topography excites surface waves on the interface that in turn modify the near-bed flow velocity. This mechanism is a stabilizing process that prevents the scale of the pattern from coarsening beyond the resonant condition. Our results can explain the mean spacing of aeolian giant dunes ranging from 300 m in coastal terrestrial deserts to 3.5 km. We propose that our findings could serve as a starting point for the modelling of long-term evolution of desert landscapes under specific wind regimes.

  17. Giant aeolian dune size determined by the average depth of the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudin, P.; Fourrière, A.; Andreotti, B.; Murray, A. B.

    2009-12-01

    Depending on the wind regime, sand dunes exhibit linear, crescent-shaped or star-like forms resulting from the interaction between dune morphology and sand transport. Small-scale dunes form by destabilization of the sand bed with a wavelength (a few tens of metres) determined by the sand transport saturation length. The mechanisms controlling the formation of giant dunes, and in particular accounting for their typical time and length scales, have remained unknown. Using a combination of field measurements and aerodynamic calculations, we show here that the growth of aeolian giant dunes, ascribed to the nonlinear interaction between small-scale superimposed dunes, is limited by the confinement of the flow within the atmospheric boundary layer. Aeolian giant dunes and river dunes form by similar processes, with the thermal inversion layer that caps the convective boundary layer in the atmosphere acting analogously to the water surface in rivers. In both cases, the bed topography excites surface waves on the interface that in turn modify the near-bed flow velocity. This mechanism is a stabilizing process that prevents the scale of the pattern from coarsening beyond the resonant condition. Our results can explain the mean spacing of aeolian giant dunes ranging from 300 m in coastal terrestrial deserts to 3.5 km. We propose that our findings could serve as a starting point for the modelling of long-term evolution of desert landscapes under specific wind regimes.

  18. Factorial experiment to determine influence of fish protein and fish oil on serum and liver lipids in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, N; Deshaies, Y; Jacques, H

    1992-01-01

    Rabbits were fed purified diets consisting of casein (CA), fish protein (FP), and soy protein (SP) combined with MaxEpa oil (ME) or corn oil (CN) to determine the effects of dietary protein and lipid sources on serum total, lipoprotein, and hepatic lipid levels. Dietary proteins and lipids exerted significant (p < 0.05) separate effects on serum total cholesterol (TC) (p < 0.005), very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) (p < 0.001), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (p < 0.001), whereas only dietary proteins significantly affected low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (p < 0.001) and the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio (p < 0.05). Hence, FP induced serum TC (233 mg/dl), VLDL-C (22 mg/dl), and LDL-C (151 mg/dl) intermediary to hypercholesterolemic CA (TC, 319 mg/dl; VLDL-C, 57 mg/dl; LDL-C, 204 mg/dl) and cholesterol-lowering SP (TC, 129 mg/dl; VLDL-C 19 mg/dl; LDL-C, 84 mg/dl). The twofold rise in HDL-C on feeding FP (35 mg/dl), compared with CA (20 mg/dl) and SP (16 mg/dl), resulted in a drop in LDL-C/HDL-C to a level similar to that of SP groups. The cholesterol-lowering action of ME (188 mg/dl), in contrast to CN (266 mg/dl), was reflected mainly in VLDL (ME, 15 mg/dl; CN, 50 mg/dl) but also in HDL (ME, 16 mg/dl; CN, 31 mg/dl) fractions. Compared with CN, the significant (p < 0.05) ME-induced rise in serum and VLDL triglycerides was accompanied by a significant (p < 0.001) drop in lipoprotein lipase activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Experimental phasing for structure determination using membrane-protein crystals grown by the lipid cubic phase method

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dianfan; Pye, Valerie E.; Caffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Very little information is available in the literature concerning the experimental heavy-atom phasing of membrane-protein structures where the crystals have been grown using the lipid cubic phase (in meso) method. In this paper, pre-labelling, co-crystallization, soaking, site-specific mercury binding to genetically engineered single-cysteine mutants and selenomethionine labelling as applied to an integral membrane kinase crystallized in meso are described. An assay to assess cysteine accessibility for mercury labelling of membrane proteins is introduced. Despite the marked increase in the number of membrane-protein structures solved using crystals grown by the lipid cubic phase or in meso method, only ten have been determined by SAD/MAD. This is likely to be a consequence of the technical difficulties associated with handling proteins and crystals in the sticky and viscous hosting mesophase that is usually incubated in glass sandwich plates for the purposes of crystallization. Here, a four-year campaign aimed at phasing the in meso structure of the integral membrane diacylglycerol kinase (DgkA) from Escherichia coli is reported. Heavy-atom labelling of this small hydrophobic enzyme was attempted by pre-labelling, co-crystallization, soaking, site-specific mercury binding to genetically engineered single-cysteine mutants and selenomethionine incorporation. Strategies and techniques for special handling are reported, as well as the typical results and the lessons learned for each of these approaches. In addition, an assay to assess the accessibility of cysteine residues in membrane proteins for mercury labelling is introduced. The various techniques and strategies described will provide a valuable reference for future experimental phasing of membrane proteins where crystals are grown by the lipid cubic phase method.

  20. Lipid A structure of Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125: use of electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of fatty acid distribution.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Maria Michela; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo

    2002-05-01

    The use of electrospray Ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the structural determination of the lipid A components of the psychrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125 is reported. The lipid A contains the classical bisphosphorylated beta-(1' --> 6)-linked D-glucosamine disaccharide with 3-hydroxydodecanoyl residues (12 : 0 (3-OH)) linked both as esters and amides to 2', 3' (distal glucosamine) and 2, 3 positions (proximal glucosamine) of the sugar backbone. The hydroxyl of 12 : 0 (3-OH) fatty acid linked at the 3' position is esterified by a dodecanoyl residue (12 : 0). In addition to the pentaacyl component, a minor tetraacyl lipid A, lacking the acyl residue at position 3, was also found in the lipid A fraction. The advantage of this MS technique for the investigation of the intra-ring fragmentation, which is useful for the determination of fatty acyl residue distribution on each glucosamine unit, is emphasized.

  1. Lipid droplets hypertrophy: a crucial determining factor in insulin regulation by adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sanjabi, Bahram; Dashty, Monireh; Özcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Rahimi, Mehran; Vinciguerra, Manlio; van Rooij, Felix; Al-Lahham, Saad; Sheedfar, Fareeba; van Kooten, Theo G.; Spek, C. Arnold; Rowshani, Ajda T.; van der Want, Johannes; Klaassen, Rene; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) hypertrophy in adipocytes is the main cause of energy metabolic system dysfunction, obesity and its afflictions such as T2D. However, the role of adipocytes in linking energy metabolic disorders with insulin regulation is unknown in humans. Human adipocytes constitutively synthesize and secrete insulin, which is biologically functional. Insulin concentrations and release are fat mass- and LDs-dependent respectively. Fat reduction mediated by bariatric surgery repairs obesity-associated T2D. The expression of genes, like PCSK1 (proinsulin conversion enzyme), GCG (Glucagon), GPLD1, CD38 and NNAT, involved in insulin regulation/release were differentially expressed in pancreas and adipose tissue (AT). INS (insulin) and GCG expression reduced in human AT-T2D as compared to AT-control, but remained unchanged in pancreas in either state. Insulin levels (mRNA/protein) were higher in AT derived from prediabetes BB rats with destructed pancreatic β-cells and controls than pancreas derived from the same rats respectively. Insulin expression in 10 human primary cell types including adipocytes and macrophages is an evidence for extrapancreatic insulin-producing cells. The data suggest a crosstalk between AT and pancreas to fine-tune energy metabolic system or may minimize the metabolic damage during diabetes. This study opens new avenues towards T2D therapy with a great impact on public health. PMID:25743104

  2. Analytical performance and comparability of the determination of cholesterol by 12 Lipid-Research Clinics.

    PubMed

    Lippel, K; Ahmed, S; Albers, J J; Bachorik, P; Cooper, G; Helms, R; Williams, J

    1977-09-01

    Twelve Lipid-Research Clinic laboratories performed automated cholesterol analyses on four control-serum pools of known cholesterol concentration, using the Liebermann-Burchard reaction. The analyses were done during a two-year period, with the same standards, methodology, and quality-control procedures. Estimates of analytical bias, variability, and short- and long-term trends for each instrument and for the entire group of LRC instruments are presented. High accuracy, precision, and interlaboratory comparability were achieved through the rigorous standardization and control of the entire analytical procedure. The significance of these results for long-term collaborative studies is discussed. Individual laboratory biases averaged from 0.5 to 2.0% below Abell-Kendall reference values. Between-run variability was about equal to within-run variability and inter-laboratory variation was substantially less than intra-laboratory variation. The total standard deviation for all instruments was about 0.04 g/liter. Only 8-15% of this variation was due to differences between instruments. The between-instrument standard deviation ranged from 0.011 to 0.015 g/liter; the between-run, within-instrument standard deviation ranged from 0.023 to 0.030 g/liter; and within-run standard deviation ranged from 0.023 to 0.028 g/liter. The significance of the achieved results for long-term collaborative studies is discussed.

  3. Determination of Lipid-Protein Interactions in Lung Surfactants Using Computer Simulations and Structural Bioinformatics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaznessis, Yiannis

    2001-06-01

    Proteins are the primary components of the networks that conduct the flows of mass, energy and information in living organisms. The discovery of the principles of protein structure and function allows the development of design rules for biological activities. The microscopic nature of the operating mechanisms of protein activity, and the vast complexity of the networks of interaction call for the employment of powerful computational methodologies that can decipher the physicochemical and evolutionary principles underlying protein structure and function. An example will be presented that reflects the strength of computational approaches. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and structural bioinformatics tools are employed to investigate the interactions between the first 25 N-terminal residues of surfactant protein B (SP-B 1-25) and the lipid components of the lung surfactant (LS). An understanding of the molecular level interactions between the LS components is essential for the establishment of design rules for the development of synthetic LS and the treatment of the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, which results from deficiency or inactivation of LS.

  4. Lipid droplets hypertrophy: a crucial determining factor in insulin regulation by adipocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjabi, Bahram; Dashty, Monireh; Özcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Rahimi, Mehran; Vinciguerra, Manlio; van Rooij, Felix; Al-Lahham, Saad; Sheedfar, Fareeba; van Kooten, Theo G.; Spek, C. Arnold; Rowshani, Ajda T.; van der Want, Johannes; Klaassen, Rene; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-03-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) hypertrophy in adipocytes is the main cause of energy metabolic system dysfunction, obesity and its afflictions such as T2D. However, the role of adipocytes in linking energy metabolic disorders with insulin regulation is unknown in humans. Human adipocytes constitutively synthesize and secrete insulin, which is biologically functional. Insulin concentrations and release are fat mass- and LDs-dependent respectively. Fat reduction mediated by bariatric surgery repairs obesity-associated T2D. The expression of genes, like PCSK1 (proinsulin conversion enzyme), GCG (Glucagon), GPLD1, CD38 and NNAT, involved in insulin regulation/release were differentially expressed in pancreas and adipose tissue (AT). INS (insulin) and GCG expression reduced in human AT-T2D as compared to AT-control, but remained unchanged in pancreas in either state. Insulin levels (mRNA/protein) were higher in AT derived from prediabetes BB rats with destructed pancreatic β-cells and controls than pancreas derived from the same rats respectively. Insulin expression in 10 human primary cell types including adipocytes and macrophages is an evidence for extrapancreatic insulin-producing cells. The data suggest a crosstalk between AT and pancreas to fine-tune energy metabolic system or may minimize the metabolic damage during diabetes. This study opens new avenues towards T2D therapy with a great impact on public health.

  5. Lipid droplets hypertrophy: a crucial determining factor in insulin regulation by adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Sanjabi, Bahram; Dashty, Monireh; Özcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Rahimi, Mehran; Vinciguerra, Manlio; van Rooij, Felix; Al-Lahham, Saad; Sheedfar, Fareeba; van Kooten, Theo G; Spek, C Arnold; Rowshani, Ajda T; van der Want, Johannes; Klaassen, Rene; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-03-06

    Lipid droplets (LDs) hypertrophy in adipocytes is the main cause of energy metabolic system dysfunction, obesity and its afflictions such as T2D. However, the role of adipocytes in linking energy metabolic disorders with insulin regulation is unknown in humans. Human adipocytes constitutively synthesize and secrete insulin, which is biologically functional. Insulin concentrations and release are fat mass- and LDs-dependent respectively. Fat reduction mediated by bariatric surgery repairs obesity-associated T2D. The expression of genes, like PCSK1 (proinsulin conversion enzyme), GCG (Glucagon), GPLD1, CD38 and NNAT, involved in insulin regulation/release were differentially expressed in pancreas and adipose tissue (AT). INS (insulin) and GCG expression reduced in human AT-T2D as compared to AT-control, but remained unchanged in pancreas in either state. Insulin levels (mRNA/protein) were higher in AT derived from prediabetes BB rats with destructed pancreatic β-cells and controls than pancreas derived from the same rats respectively. Insulin expression in 10 human primary cell types including adipocytes and macrophages is an evidence for extrapancreatic insulin-producing cells. The data suggest a crosstalk between AT and pancreas to fine-tune energy metabolic system or may minimize the metabolic damage during diabetes. This study opens new avenues towards T2D therapy with a great impact on public health.

  6. Determining the Gaussian Modulus and Edge Properties of 2D Materials: From Graphene to Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelisko, Matthew; Ahmadpoor, Fatemeh; Gao, Huajian; Sharma, Pradeep

    2017-08-01

    The dominant deformation behavior of two-dimensional materials (bending) is primarily governed by just two parameters: bending rigidity and the Gaussian modulus. These properties also set the energy scale for various important physical and biological processes such as pore formation, cell fission and generally, any event accompanied by a topological change. Unlike the bending rigidity, the Gaussian modulus is, however, notoriously difficult to evaluate via either experiments or atomistic simulations. In this Letter, recognizing that the Gaussian modulus and edge tension play a nontrivial role in the fluctuations of a 2D material edge, we derive closed-form expressions for edge fluctuations. Combined with atomistic simulations, we use the developed approach to extract the Gaussian modulus and edge tension at finite temperatures for both graphene and various types of lipid bilayers. Our results possibly provide the first reliable estimate of this elusive property at finite temperatures and appear to suggest that earlier estimates must be revised. In particular, we show that, if previously estimated properties are employed, the graphene-free edge will exhibit unstable behavior at room temperature. Remarkably, in the case of graphene, we show that the Gaussian modulus and edge tension even change sign at finite temperatures.

  7. Determining the Effect of Growth Rate on Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation of Algal Lipids in Two North Pacific Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfshorndl, M.; Sachs, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Tropical hydrologic changes have a large effect on global climate, but there does not yet exist a good indicator of rainfall variation in the tropics. Understanding past natural variability of such features as the Intertropical Convergence Zone and El Niño Southern Oscillation provides information about the extent of anthropogenic climate change today. The hydrogen isotopic composition (D/H ratio) of algal lipids has been shown to track the isotopic composition of source water in which the organism grew, providing information about precipitation variability over time. However, culture work has revealed that environmental factors such as salinity, temperature, growth rate, and irradiance also influence algal lipid D/H ratios. Here I present work determining the effect of growth rate and irradiance on the hydrogen isotope composition of alkenone-producing algae in the water column in two North Pacific locations, off the coast of Oregon and near the Hawaii Ocean Time Series site. This work corroborates empirical relationships observed in culture studies and indicates that the effects of growth rate and irradiance should be taken into account when applying the D/H isotope ratio rainfall proxy to reconstruct past climates.

  8. Experimental phasing for structure determination using membrane-protein crystals grown by the lipid cubic phase method

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dianfan; Pye, Valerie E.; Caffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Despite the marked increase in the number of membrane-protein structures solved using crystals grown by the lipid cubic phase or in meso method, only ten have been determined by SAD/MAD. This is likely to be a consequence of the technical difficulties associated with handling proteins and crystals in the sticky and viscous hosting mesophase that is usually incubated in glass sandwich plates for the purposes of crystallization. Here, a four-year campaign aimed at phasing the in meso structure of the integral membrane diacylglycerol kinase (DgkA) from Escherichia coli is reported. Heavy-atom labelling of this small hydrophobic enzyme was attempted by pre-labelling, co-crystallization, soaking, site-specific mercury binding to genetically engineered single-cysteine mutants and selenomethionine incorporation. Strategies and techniques for special handling are reported, as well as the typical results and the lessons learned for each of these approaches. In addition, an assay to assess the accessibility of cysteine residues in membrane proteins for mercury labelling is introduced. The various techniques and strategies described will provide a valuable reference for future experimental phasing of membrane proteins where crystals are grown by the lipid cubic phase method. PMID:25615865

  9. Determining the Effect of Growth Rate on Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation of Algal Lipids in Two North Pacific Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfshorndl, M.; Sachs, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical hydrologic changes have a large effect on global climate, but there does not yet exist a good indicator of rainfall variation in the tropics. Understanding past natural variability of such features as the Intertropical Convergence Zone and El Niño Southern Oscillation provides information about the extent of anthropogenic climate change today. The hydrogen isotopic composition (D/H ratio) of algal lipids has been shown to track the isotopic composition of source water in which the organism grew, providing information about precipitation variability over time. However, culture work has revealed that environmental factors such as salinity, temperature, growth rate, and irradiance also influence algal lipid D/H ratios. Here I present work determining the effect of growth rate and irradiance on the hydrogen isotope composition of alkenone-producing algae in the water column in two North Pacific locations, off the coast of Oregon and near the Hawaii Ocean Time Series site. This work corroborates empirical relationships observed in culture studies and indicates that the effects of growth rate and irradiance should be taken into account when applying the D/H isotope ratio rainfall proxy to reconstruct past climates.

  10. A validated high performance thin layer chromatography method for determination of yohimbine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparations

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Jihan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Yohimbine is an indole alkaloid used as a promising therapy for erectile dysfunction. A number of methods were reported for the analysis of yohimbine in the bark or in pharmaceutical preparations. Materials and Method: In the present work, a simple and sensitive high performance thin layer chromatographic method is developed for determination of yohimbine (occurring as yohimbine hydrochloride) in pharmaceutical preparations and validated according to International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) guidelines. The method employed thin layer chromatography aluminum sheets precoated with silica gel as the stationary phase and the mobile phase consisted of chloroform:methanol:ammonia (97:3:0.2), which gave compact bands of yohimbine hydrochloride. Results: Linear regression data for the calibration curves of standard yohimbine hydrochloride showed a good linear relationship over a concentration range of 80–1000 ng/spot with respect to the area and correlation coefficient (R2) was 0.9965. The method was evaluated regarding accuracy, precision, selectivity, and robustness. Limits of detection and quantitation were recorded as 5 and 40 ng/spot, respectively. The proposed method efficiently separated yohimbine hydrochloride from other components even in complex mixture containing powdered plants. The amount of yohimbine hydrochloride ranged from 2.3 to 5.2 mg/tablet or capsule in preparations containing the pure alkaloid, while it varied from zero (0) to 1.5–1.8 mg/capsule in dietary supplements containing powdered yohimbe bark. Conclusion: We concluded that this method employing high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) in quantitative determination of yohimbine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparations is efficient, simple, accurate, and validated. PMID:23661986

  11. Shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    Perturbation theory formulas were derived and applied to determine changes in neutron and gamma-ray doses due to changes in various radiation shield layers for fixed sources. For a given source and detector position, the perturbation method enables dose derivatives with respect to density, or equivalently thickness, for every layer to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. A direct determination without the perturbation approach would require two forward calculations to evaluate the dose derivative due to a change in a single layer. Hence, the perturbation method for obtaining dose derivatives requires fewer computations for design studies of multilayer shields. For an illustrative problem, a comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in the thickness of each shield layer in a two-layer spherical configuration as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  12. Optimum growth temperature determination for GaInSb/InAs strained layer superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.L.; Wagner, R.J.; Waterman, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    To determine the optimum growth temperature for GaInSb/InAs strained layer superlattices (SLS) a series of SLS was grown over the temperature range 357-433 {degrees}C. Temperatures were estimated by determining the absorption spectrum of the GaAs substrate, hence its band gap, and thus its temperature. SLS were evaluated by single crystal x-ray diffraction and interband magnetoabsorption (IMA) measurements. X-ray spectra showed as many as eight peaks due to the superlattice. The quality of the superlattices as indicated by the x-ray data had a well defined maximum between 390 and 410 {degrees}C. IMA measurements indicated band gaps from 85 to 154 meV. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Annual layers in the Roosevelt Island (coastal Antarctica) ice core determined from conductivity and calcium measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Marius; Vallelonga, Paul; Kjær, Helle; Neff, Peter; Bertler, Nancy; Svensson, Anders; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Riis, Marie

    2015-04-01

    The Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) Project aims to determine the stability of the Ross Ice Shelf and thus the West Antarctic Ice Sheet in a warming world. A 764 m ice core (79.36° S, 161.71° W) was drilled in 2011-13 at the summit of the Roosevelt Island ice dome, a location surrounded by the Ross Ice Shelf. The site has high accumulation (0.26 m ice equivalent) and a mean annual temperature of -23 °C. From 2012 to 2014, continuous flow analysis (CFA) of the ice core enabled continuous measurements of conductivity, acidity, calcium and insoluble dust particle concentrations along the core. The RICE ice core features high background levels of sulphate and marine salts, due to the low altitude of the site (550 m asl) and its proximity to open ocean. At Roosevelt Island, calcium is influenced by both dust and marine salt inputs. By investigating the residual offset between conductivity and calcium, it has been possible to calculate non-sea salt conductivity and hence determine impurity layers deriving from volcanic eruptions. We present a preliminary chronology for the last 2000 years of deposition in the RICE ice core, composed of counted impurity layers and constrained by a limited number of large, well-dated volcanic eruptions.

  14. Nondestructive and in situ determination of graphene layers using optical fiber Fabry-Perot interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Peng, Xiaobin; Liu, Qianwen; Gan, Xin; Lv, Ruitao; Fan, Shangchun

    2017-02-01

    Thickness measurement plays an important role for characterizing optomechanical behaviors of graphene. From the view of graphene-based Fabry-Perot (F-P) sensors, a simple, nondestructive and in situ method of determining the thickness of nanothick graphene membranes was demonstrated by using optical fiber F-P interference. Few-layer/multilayer graphene sheets were suspendedly adhered onto the endface of a ferrule with a 125 µm inner diameter by van der Waals interactions to construct micro F-P cavities. Along with the Fresnel’s law and complex index of refraction of the membrane working as a light reflector of an F-P interferometer, the optical reflectivity of graphene was modeled to investigate the effects of light wavelength and temperature. Then the average thickness of graphene membranes were extracted by F-P interference demodulation, and yielded a very strong cross-correlation coefficient of 99.95% with the experimental results observed by Raman spectrum and atomic force microscope. The method could be further extended for determining the number of layers of other 2D materials.

  15. Menopausal Status and Abdominal Obesity Are Significant Determinants of Hepatic Lipid Metabolism in Women.

    PubMed

    Hodson, Leanne; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Rial, Belén; Arlt, Wiebke; Adiels, Martin; Boren, Jan; Marinou, Kyriakoula; Fisher, Ciaran; Mostad, Ingrid L; Stratton, Irene M; Barrett, P Hugh R; Chan, Dick C; Watts, Gerald F; Harnden, Karin; Karpe, Fredrik; Fielding, Barbara A

    2015-10-02

    Android fat distribution (abdominal obesity) is associated with insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, and greater secretion of large very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles in men. Since abdominal obesity is becoming increasingly prevalent in women, we aimed to investigate the relationship between android fat and hepatic lipid metabolism in pre- and postmenopausal women. We used a combination of stable isotope tracer techniques to investigate intrahepatic fatty acid synthesis and partitioning in 29 lean and 29 abdominally obese women (android fat/total fat 0.065 [0.02 to 0.08] and 0.095 [0.08 to 0.11], respectively). Thirty women were premenopausal aged 35 to 45 and they were matched for abdominal obesity with 28 postmenopausal women aged 55 to 65. As anticipated, abdominal obese women were more insulin resistant with enhanced hepatic secretion of large (404±30 versus 268±26 mg/kg lean mass, P<0.001) but not small VLDL (160±11 versus 142±13). However, postmenopausal status had a pronounced effect on the characteristics of small VLDL particles, which were considerably triglyceride-enriched (production ratio of VLDL2- triglyceride:apolipoprotein B 30±5.3 versus 19±1.6, P<0.05). In contrast to postmenopausal women, there was a tight control of hepatic fatty acid metabolism and triglyceride production in premenopausal women, whereby oxidation (rs=-0.49, P=0.006), de novo lipogenesis (rs=0.55, P=0.003), and desaturation (rs=0.48, P=0.012) were closely correlated with abdominal obesity-driven large VLDL-triglyceride secretion rate. In women, abdominal obesity is a major driver of hepatic large VLDL particle secretion, whereas postmenopausal status was characterized by increased small VLDL particle size. These data provide a mechanistic basis for the hyperlipidemia observed in postmenopausal obesity. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  16. Hexa-acylation and KDO(2)-glycosylation determine the specific immunostimulatory activity of Neisseria meningitidis lipid A for human monocyte derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Zughaier, Susu; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Stephens, David S; Pulendran, Bali

    2006-02-27

    To better understand immune modulation by endotoxin and facilitate the development of novel vaccine adjuvants, the structural requirements of Neisseria meningitidis lipopoly(oligo)saccharide (LOS) for activation of human monocyte derived dendritic cell (MDDC) was determined. Highly purified LOS from wild type and genetically-defined mutants of N. meningitidis serogroup B were used. Unglycosylated or penta-acylated meningococcal KDO(2)-lipid A failed to induce human MDDC maturation and activation. However, both wild type meningococcal LOS and KDO(2)-lipid A, significantly up-regulated CD80, CD83 and CD86 and released significantly higher amounts of IL-12p70, IL-6, IL-10, TNFalpha, MCP-1, IP-10 and RANTES. Further, DCs stimulated with wild type or KDO(2)-lipid A but not meningococcal lipid A or penta-acylated KDO(2)-lipid A stimulated naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells to secrete enhanced levels of IFN-gamma, relative to T cells primed with immature DCs. In contrast to Escherichia coli LPS, IL-5 production was enhanced or maintained in CD4+ T-cells stimulated with MDDC exposed to wild-type meningococcal LOS and KDO(2)-lipid A. These data suggest that KDO linked to a fully acylated meningococcal lipid A is required for meningococcal endotoxin's immunostimulatory activity of human MDDC via TLR4/MD-2 and that different endotoxin structures influence Th responses mediated by MDDC.

  17. Parenteral lipid fatty acid composition directly determines the fatty acid composition of red blood cell and brain lipids in preterm pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies in enterally-fed infants have shown a positive effect of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) supplementatin on neurodevelopment. The effect of n-3 LCPUFA in fish oil-based parenteral (PN) lipid emulsions on neuronal tissues of PN-fed preterm infants is unknown. The objective ...

  18. Determination of nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer emission lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    We have finished studying the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios for stars with different effective temperatures T(sub eff) and luminosities using transition layer emission lines and using spectra available in the IUE archives. The N/C abundance ratio determinations using transition layer emission lines are as accurate as the photospheric abundance determinations as found by comparison of results obtained by both methods for the same stars. Our measurements confirm photospheric abundance determinations in regions of the HR diagram where they can be obtained. Our studies have extended the temperature range to higher temperatures. They have shown the exact positions in the HR diagram where the mixing due to the outer convection zones reaches deep enough to bring nuclear processed material to the surface. This occurs at effective temperatures which are higher by delta log T(sub eff) approximately 0.04 or roughly 400 K than expected theoretically. Since the depth of the convection zone increases rapidly with decreasing T(sub eff) this may indicate considerable overshoot beyond the lower boundary of the convection zone. Our N/C abundance ratio determinations from transition layer emission lines have confirmed that the actual enrichment observed for some cool giants is larger than expected theoretically, again indicating a larger degree of mixing in several stars either from below or from above. For the supergiants it probably indicates overshoot above the convective core in the progenitor main sequence stars. For the more massive giants this may also be the case, though we did not find a correlation between delta log N/C and the absolute magnitudes, but these are rather uncertain. As byproducts of these studies we also found anomalies in Si/C and N/C abundance ratios for F giants which can be understood as the relict of surface abundance changes for their main sequence progenitors due to diffusion. This anomaly disappears for G giants, for which the depths of the

  19. Novel therapeutic mechanisms determine the effectiveness of lipid-core nanocapsules on melanoma models

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Carine C; Fiel, Luana A; Bexiga, Celina G; Asbahr, Ana Carolina C; Uchiyama, Mayara K; Cogliati, Bruno; Araki, Koiti; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Farsky, Sandra P

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a severe metastatic skin cancer with poor prognosis and no effective treatment. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches using nanotechnology have been proposed to improve therapeutic effectiveness. Lipid-core nanocapsules (LNCs), prepared with poly(ε-caprolactone), capric/caprylic triglyceride, and sorbitan monostearate and stabilized by polysorbate 80, are efficient as drug delivery systems. Here, we investigated the effects of acetyleugenol-loaded LNC (AcE-LNC) on human SK-Mel-28 melanoma cells and its therapeutic efficacies on melanoma induced by B16F10 in C57B6 mice. LNC and AcE-LNC had z-average diameters and zeta potential close to 210 nm and -10.0 mV, respectively. CytoViva® microscopy images showed that LNC and AcE-LNC penetrated into SK-Mel-28 cells, and remained in the cytoplasm. AcE-LNC in vitro treatment (18–90×109 particles/mL; 1 hour) induced late apoptosis and necrosis; LNC and AcE-LNC (3–18×109 particles/mL; 48 hours) treatments reduced cell proliferation and delayed the cell cycle. Elevated levels of nitric oxide were found in supernatant of LNC and AcE-LNC, which were not dependent on nitric oxide synthase expressions. Daily intraperitoneal or oral treatment (days 3–10 after tumor injection) with LNC or AcE-LNC (1×1012 particles/day), but not with AcE (50 mg/kg/day, same dose as AcE-LNC), reduced the volume of the tumor; nevertheless, intraperitoneal treatment caused toxicity. Oral LNC treatment was more efficient than AcE-LNC treatment. Moreover, oral treatment with nonencapsulated capric/caprylic triglyceride did not inhibit tumor development, implying that nanocapsule supramolecular structure is important to the therapeutic effects. Together, data herein presented highlight the relevance of the supramolecular structure of LNCs to toxicity on SK-Mel-28 cells and to the therapeutic efficacy on melanoma development in mice, conferring novel therapeutic mechanisms to LNC further than a drug delivery system. PMID:27099491

  20. Novel therapeutic mechanisms determine the effectiveness of lipid-core nanocapsules on melanoma models.

    PubMed

    Drewes, Carine C; Fiel, Luana A; Bexiga, Celina G; Asbahr, Ana Carolina C; Uchiyama, Mayara K; Cogliati, Bruno; Araki, Koiti; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Farsky, Sandra P

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a severe metastatic skin cancer with poor prognosis and no effective treatment. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches using nanotechnology have been proposed to improve therapeutic effectiveness. Lipid-core nanocapsules (LNCs), prepared with poly(ε-caprolactone), capric/caprylic triglyceride, and sorbitan monostearate and stabilized by polysorbate 80, are efficient as drug delivery systems. Here, we investigated the effects of acetyleugenol-loaded LNC (AcE-LNC) on human SK-Mel-28 melanoma cells and its therapeutic efficacies on melanoma induced by B16F10 in C57B6 mice. LNC and AcE-LNC had z-average diameters and zeta potential close to 210 nm and -10.0 mV, respectively. CytoViva(®) microscopy images showed that LNC and AcE-LNC penetrated into SK-Mel-28 cells, and remained in the cytoplasm. AcE-LNC in vitro treatment (18-90×10(9) particles/mL; 1 hour) induced late apoptosis and necrosis; LNC and AcE-LNC (3-18×10(9) particles/mL; 48 hours) treatments reduced cell proliferation and delayed the cell cycle. Elevated levels of nitric oxide were found in supernatant of LNC and AcE-LNC, which were not dependent on nitric oxide synthase expressions. Daily intraperitoneal or oral treatment (days 3-10 after tumor injection) with LNC or AcE-LNC (1×10(12) particles/day), but not with AcE (50 mg/kg/day, same dose as AcE-LNC), reduced the volume of the tumor; nevertheless, intraperitoneal treatment caused toxicity. Oral LNC treatment was more efficient than AcE-LNC treatment. Moreover, oral treatment with nonencapsulated capric/caprylic triglyceride did not inhibit tumor development, implying that nanocapsule supramolecular structure is important to the therapeutic effects. Together, data herein presented highlight the relevance of the supramolecular structure of LNCs to toxicity on SK-Mel-28 cells and to the therapeutic efficacy on melanoma development in mice, conferring novel therapeutic mechanisms to LNC further than a drug delivery system.

  1. Quantification of brain lipids by FTIR spectroscopy and partial least squares regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreissig, Isabell; Machill, Susanne; Salzer, Reiner; Krafft, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Brain tissue is characterized by high lipid content. Its content decreases and the lipid composition changes during transformation from normal brain tissue to tumors. Therefore, the analysis of brain lipids might complement the existing diagnostic tools to determine the tumor type and tumor grade. Objective of this work is to extract lipids from gray matter and white matter of porcine brain tissue, record infrared (IR) spectra of these extracts and develop a quantification model for the main lipids based on partial least squares (PLS) regression. IR spectra of the pure lipids cholesterol, cholesterol ester, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, galactocerebroside and sulfatide were used as references. Two lipid mixtures were prepared for training and validation of the quantification model. The composition of lipid extracts that were predicted by the PLS regression of IR spectra was compared with lipid quantification by thin layer chromatography.

  2. Molecular driving forces defining lipid positions around aquaporin-0

    PubMed Central

    Aponte-Santamaría, Camilo; Briones, Rodolfo; Schenk, Andreas D.; Walz, Thomas; de Groot, Bert L.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid–protein interactions play pivotal roles in biological membranes. Electron crystallographic studies of the lens-specific water channel aquaporin-0 (AQP0) revealed atomistic views of such interactions, by providing high-resolution structures of annular lipids surrounding AQP0. It remained unclear, however, whether these lipid structures are representative of the positions of unconstrained lipids surrounding an individual protein, and what molecular determinants define the lipid positions around AQP0. We addressed these questions by using molecular dynamics simulations and crystallographic refinement, and calculated time-averaged densities of dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine lipids around AQP0. Our simulations demonstrate that, although the experimentally determined crystallographic lipid positions are constrained by the crystal packing, they appropriately describe the behavior of unconstrained lipids around an individual AQP0 tetramer, and thus likely represent physiologically relevant lipid positions.While the acyl chains were well localized, the lipid head groups were not. Furthermore, in silico mutations showed that electrostatic interactions do not play a major role attracting these phospholipids towards AQP0. Instead, the mobility of the protein crucially modulates the lipid localization and explains the difference in lipid density between extracellular and cytoplasmic leaflets. Moreover, our simulations support a general mechanism in which membrane proteins laterally diffuse accompanied by several layers of localized lipids, with the positions of the annular lipids being influenced the most by the protein surface. We conclude that the acyl chains rather than the head groups define the positions of dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine lipids around AQP0. Lipid localization is largely determined by the mobility of the protein surface, whereas hydrogen bonds play an important but secondary role. PMID:22679286

  3. The dynamics of the plasmasphere boundary layer as determined by ground magnetometers, satellite observations, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zesta, E.; Boudouridis, A.; Yizengaw, E.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Carranza-fulmer, T. L.; Moldwin, M.; Mann, I. R.; Chi, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    The plasmasphere boundary layer (PBL) separates the cold and dense plasmaspheric plasma from the more tenuous and hot plasma sheet plasma and organizes the spatial distribution of ULF and VLF waves that can contribute to acceleration or loss processes of radiation belt particles through wave-particle interactions. The PBL has been traditionally determined by in situ observations and can be given by empirical models. Recent work has shown that a mid-latitude chain of well-spaced ground magnetometers can also determine the PBL location. Spectral properties, like the cross-phase reversal in the standard field-line resonance (FLR) determination between two stations closely aligned in latitude, have been shown to indicate the presence of a sharp PBL. We merge data from many ground magnetometer pairs from the SAMBA (South American Meridional B-field Array), McMAC (Mid continent Magnetoseismic Chain), and CARISMA (Canadian Array for Realtime Investigations of Magnetic Activity) chains to provide the best available spatial coverage in L values spanning the plasmasphere and PBL, for a range of dynamic states (L=1.6 to greater than 5). The PBL location is identified as the L value of the station pair for which a reverse phase difference is observed in the standard FLR determination. We compare the FLR determined PBL with the trough boundary determined by GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) analysis and with model PBL. Initial results demonstrate that the PBL as identified by the reverse phase differences is in general agreement with TEC identifications and reasonable agreement with models. Reverse Phase Differences are regularly observed at the L range of 2.7 to 3.7 and are highly correlated with Dst and Kp, as determined by daily correlations. We further examine the more detailed time sequence of the PBL dynamics by focusing on key periods around storms preceded by quiet periods, and by using the full L range of the ground magnetometer pairs.

  4. Application of pressure-modulated differential scanning calorimetry to the determination of relaxation kinetics of multilamellar lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Kristian; Guddorf, Jessica; Hinz, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-03-01

    We report an extension of the recently published PMDSC method that permitted synchronous determination of heat capacity and expansibility when using slow, defined pressure formats in a DSC scan. Here we applied continuously opposing pressure changes that are fast compared to the time constants of the DSC instrument to study relaxation kinetics of phospholipids. Investigations of multilamellar vesicles of DPPC or DSPC in water revealed for both lipids relaxation times of about 30 s at the maximum of the main transition peak and about 15 s at the maximum of the pretransition. The relaxation times in the transition range are proportional to heat capacity of main- and pretransition. The molecular origin of the relaxation processes appears to stem from pressure-induced water fluxes between the interbilayer region and the bulk water phase.

  5. Determination of the degree of oxidation in highly-oxidised lipids using profile changes of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Soo; Yeo, JuDong; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Mi-Ja; Lee, JaeHwan

    2013-06-01

    The degree of highly oxidised lipids was determined by a modified method using profile changes of fatty acids in lard and soybean oil heated at 180°C. The usefulness of the modified method was compared through conjugated dienoic acid (CDA) and/or p-anisidine value (p-AV) methods. Absolute values, which were expressed as equivalent to an internal standard (C11:0), of both unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) decreased significantly during thermal oxidation (p<0.05) while relative percentage of SFA increased and those of UFA decreased significantly (p<0.05). The content of caprylic acid (C8:0) increased significantly (p<0.05) as thermal oxidation time increased. The ratio of total saturated over total unsaturated fatty acids (SFAs/UFAs) or caprylic acid (C8:0) over UFAs could be useful markers to determine the degree of oxidation. Antioxidant capacity of sesamol, a free radical scavenger, was determined using the ratio of fatty acids. The modified method can be applied to determine the quality control of fried foods containing highly oxidised and abused oils, which may not be measured correctly using CDA and p-AV.

  6. Simultaneous determination of anabolic steroids and synthetic hormones in meat by freezing-lipid filtration, solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jungju; Kim, Hye-Young; Chung, Bong Chul; Hong, Jongki

    2005-03-04

    Estradiol, testosterone, progesterone, zeranol and diethylstilbestrol including estradiol metabolites were determined simultaneously in meat. Extraction of growth hormones was carried out by ultasonication using a methanol-water mixture. The growth hormones in the meat extract can be effectively separated from lipids by freezing-lipid filtration, followed by C8-solid phase extraction (SPE). During freezing-lipid filtration, about 90% of lipids are removed without any significant loss of growth hormones. For further clean-up, silica- and aminopropyl-SPE were used. To enhance detection sensitivity, the growth hormones are derivatized with trimethylsilyl reagents. Quantitation using isotope-labelled internal standards was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode. The method detection limits were 0.1-0.4 microg/kg for all growth hormones. Overall recoveries of synthetic and natural growth hormones were 68-106% with coefficients of variation of 5-16% for the complete procedure.

  7. Mixing layer height measurements determines influence of meteorology on air pollutant concentrations in urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Klaus; Blumenstock, Thomas; Bonn, Boris; Gerwig, Holger; Hase, Frank; Münkel, Christoph; Nothard, Rainer; von Schneidemesser, Erika

    2015-10-01

    Mixing layer height (MLH) is a key parameter to determine the influence of meteorological parameters upon air pollutants such as trace gas species and particulate concentrations near the surface. Meteorology, and MLH as a key parameter, affect the budget of emission source strengths, deposition, and accumulation. However, greater possibilities for the application of MLH data have been identified in recent years. Here, the results of measurements in Berlin in 2014 are shown and discussed. The concentrations of NO, NO2, O3, CO, PM1, PM2.5, PM10 and about 70 volatile organic compounds (anthropogenic and biogenic of origin) as well as particle size distributions and contributions of SOA and soot species to PM were measured at the urban background station of the Berlin air quality network (BLUME) in Nansenstr./Framstr., Berlin-Neukölln. A Vaisala ceilometer CL51, which is a commercial mini-lidar system, was applied at that site to detect the layers of the lower atmosphere in real time. Special software for these ceilometers with MATLAB provided routine retrievals of MLH from vertical profiles of laser backscatter data. Five portable Bruker EM27/SUN FTIR spectrometers were set up around Berlin to detect column averaged abundances of CO2 and CH4 by solar absorption spectrometry. Correlation analyses were used to show the coupling of temporal variations of trace gas compounds and PM with MLH. Significant influences of MLH upon NO, NO2, PM10, PM2.5, PM1 and toluene (marker for traffic emissions) concentrations as well as particle number concentrations in the size modes 70 - 100 nm, 100 - 200 nm and 200 - 500 nm on the basis of averaged diurnal courses were found. Further, MLH was taken as important auxiliary information about the development of the boundary layer during each day of observations, which was required for the proper estimation of CO2 and CH4 source strengths from Berlin on the basis of atmospheric column density measurements.

  8. Three-dimensional structure of the surface layer protein of Aquaspirillum serpens VHA determined by electron crystallography.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, M R; Downing, K H; Wu, W H; Glaeser, R M

    1986-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the protein which forms the S layer of Aquaspirillum serpens strain VHA has been determined by electron microscopy. Structures have been reconstructed to a resolution of about 1.6 nm for single-layered specimens and about 4 nm for two-layered specimens. The structure, which has hexagonal symmetry, consists of a core in the shape of a cup, with six projections arising from the rim of the cup to join adjacent subunits at the threefold symmetry axes. The model is consistent with edge views of the S layer which have been obtained in this and other work. It is now clear from this work and from three-dimensional reconstructions of other bacterial S layers that a wide diversity exists in the morphology of surface layers. Images PMID:3745114

  9. Age determination in manatees using growth-layer-group counts in bone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marmontel, M.; O'Shea, T.J.; Kochman, H.I.; Humphrey, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    Growth layers were observed in histological preparations of bones of known-age, known minimum-age, and tetracycline-marked free-ranging and captive Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris), substantiating earlier preliminary findings of other studies. Detailed analysis of 17 new case histories showed that growth-layer group (GLG) counts in the periotic bone were consistent with known age, or time since tetracycline administration, but were less reliable in other bones. GLG counts were also made in periotic bones of 1,196 Florida manatees of unknown age found dead from 1974 through 1991. These counts were conducted in order to assess variability and to determine relationships among estimated age, size, sex, and degree of bone resorption. Resorption can interfere with accuracy of GLG counts. This effect does not occur until ages greater than about 15 yr and body lengths greater than 300 cm are attained. GLGs were also observed in periotic bones of Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) but were not validated against known-age specimens. Use of GLG counts in the periotic bone is suitable for application to studies of population dynamics and other age-related aspects of manatee biology.

  10. Determining the Effective Density and Stabilizer Layer Thickness of Sterically Stabilized Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A series of model sterically stabilized diblock copolymer nanoparticles has been designed to aid the development of analytical protocols in order to determine two key parameters: the effective particle density and the steric stabilizer layer thickness. The former parameter is essential for high resolution particle size analysis based on analytical (ultra)centrifugation techniques (e.g., disk centrifuge photosedimentometry, DCP), whereas the latter parameter is of fundamental importance in determining the effectiveness of steric stabilization as a colloid stability mechanism. The diblock copolymer nanoparticles were prepared via polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) using RAFT aqueous emulsion polymerization: this approach affords relatively narrow particle size distributions and enables the mean particle diameter and the stabilizer layer thickness to be adjusted independently via systematic variation of the mean degree of polymerization of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic blocks, respectively. The hydrophobic core-forming block was poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate) [PTFEMA], which was selected for its relatively high density. The hydrophilic stabilizer block was poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) [PGMA], which is a well-known non-ionic polymer that remains water-soluble over a wide range of temperatures. Four series of PGMAx–PTFEMAy nanoparticles were prepared (x = 28, 43, 63, and 98, y = 100–1400) and characterized via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). It was found that the degree of polymerization of both the PGMA stabilizer and core-forming PTFEMA had a strong influence on the mean particle diameter, which ranged from 20 to 250 nm. Furthermore, SAXS was used to determine radii of gyration of 1.46 to 2.69 nm for the solvated PGMA stabilizer blocks. Thus, the mean effective density of these sterically stabilized particles was calculated and determined to lie between 1.19 g

  11. Thin-layer immunoassay for determination of antibodies to herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Jeansson, S; Elwing, H; Nilsson, L A

    1979-01-01

    Thin-layer immunoassay (TIA) is a simple serological technique suitable for analysis of large numbers of samples. In this study, TIA was evaluated for determination of antibodies to herpes simplex virus. Herpes simplex virus antigen used in TIA was purified from material released from virus-infected cells. The results obtained by TIA were compared with those obtained by neutralization and complement fixation tests. TIA was found to be as sensitive as the neutralization test for demonstration of herpes simplex virus antibodies. No false-negative or -positive reactions were observed. In primary herpes simplex virus-1 infections, an antibody response was demonstrated by TIA, whereas antibodies could not be demonstrated in patients with primary herpes simplex virus-2 infections. Images PMID:222798

  12. Determination of heavy metals by thin-layer chromatography-square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry

    SciTech Connect

    Aldstadt, J.H.; Dewald, H.D. )

    1992-12-15

    A square-wave anodic stripping voltammetric method is described for low parts per million determination of heavy metals separated by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Heavy metal samples are separated on carboxymethyl cellulose TLC plates and detected by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) using a cellulose dialysis membrane-covered mercury film electrode (CM-MFE) placed directly on the TLC plate surface in a thin film of supporting electrolyte solution. The fast scan rates possible in square-wave voltammetry during the stripping step eliminate the need to deoxygenate the sample. Results are presented for a mixture of Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II). Calibration curves for Pb(II) were linear over the range 10-500 ng, with a relative standard deviation of the peak current over a set of eight separate 100-ng Pb(II) samples of 16%. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Lidar determination of winds by aerosol inhomogeneities: motion velocity in the planetary boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Kolev, I; Parvanov, O; Kaprielov, B

    1988-06-15

    The paper presents results from lidar measurements of wind velocity in the planetary boundary layer using correlation data processing. Two lidars are used in our experiments: a ruby lidar operating along slant paths and a YAG:Nd lidar operating for near vertical sounding used by us for the first time. On the basis of our experience the optimal sizes of aerosol inhomogeneities (30-300 m), the duration of the experiments (2-10 min), and the repetition rate of laser shots (fractions of hertz to several hertz) are determined. The results are compared to independent data obtained from anemometer measurements, theodolite- and radar-tracked pilot balloons. The range of differences is ~1-2 m/s in speed and 10-15 degrees in direction. Preliminary results from the use of lidar data to remotely sound the wind speed for various atmospheric stratifications and synoptic situations are described as well.

  14. Optical methods for determining thicknesses of few-layer graphene flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wengen; Liu, Xin-Z.; Li, Qunyang; Zhang, Yingying; Yang, Jiarui; Zheng, Quan-shui

    2013-12-01

    Optical microscopy (OM) methods have been commonly used as a convenient means for locating and identifying few-layer graphene (FLG) on SiO2/Si substrates. However, it is less clear how reliably optical images of FLG could be used to determine the sample thickness. In this work, various OM methods based on color differences and color contrasts are presented and their reliabilities are evaluated. Our analysis shows that these color-based OM methods depend sensitively on certain parameters of the measuring system, particularly the light source and the reference substrate. These parameters have usually been overlooked and less controlled in routine experiments. From evaluating the performance of these OM methods with both virtual and real FLG samples, we propose some practical guidelines for minimizing the impact of these less-controlled experimental parameters and provide a user-friendly MATLAB script for facilitating the implementation.

  15. Determination of the Vertical Extinction Coefficient Profile in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and the Free Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, M.; Pahlow, M.; Kovalev, V.; Ondov, J.; Balin, I.; Simeonov, V.; van den Bergh, H.; Parlange, M.

    2003-04-01

    Elastic lidars were deployed in Baltimore (USA) and Jungfraujoch (Switzerland) with the goal of determining aerosol vertical extinction coefficient profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and free troposphere, respectively. This talk focuses on a comparision of methods to obtain the vertical extinction coefficient, specifically, 1) One Angle Method (OAM), 2) Optical Depth Method (ODM) and 3) Klett Method. The reference extinction coefficient values for the near point in the first method were obtained using Mie theory with particle size distribution and estimates of the refractive index from supporting ground measurements. For the ODM we use the optical depth measurements using a sun photometer. The reference far field value for the Klett method was obtained using standard atmospheric profiles.

  16. Low-density lipoprotein is the major carrier of lipid hydroperoxides in plasma. Relevance to determination of total plasma lipid hydroperoxide concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Nourooz-Zadeh, J; Tajaddini-Sarmadi, J; Ling, K L; Wolff, S P

    1996-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) has been proposed as the principal carrier of hydroperoxides in plasma, based upon data gathered with an HPLC-chemiluminescence technique. To test this hypothesis we have measured total lipid hydroperoxides in native plasma using the ferrous oxidation in Xylenol Orange (FOX) assay and then fractionated plasma into very-low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and HDL fractions. Hydroperoxides were found to accumulate principally (more than 65%) in LDL, as judged by hydroperoxide content per amount of protein or cholesterol, or expressed as a proportion of total hydroperoxide in plasma. Plasma was also incubated at 37 degrees C in the presence and absence of 2,2'-azo-bis-(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH), an azo-initiator of lipid peroxidation. The majority of hydroperoxides generated in plasma were recovered in the LDL fraction. Furthermore, when isolated lipoproteins were subject to oxidation initiated by AAPH, very-low-density lipoprotein and LDL showed the greatest propensity for hydroperoxide accumulation, whereas HDL seemed relatively resistant. Estimates for plasma and LDL peroxidation based upon techniques which measure total lipid hydroperoxides suggest that levels of hydroperoxides in plasma and LDL are far higher than that those estimates generated by ostensibly more selective techniques. Higher levels of hydroperoxides in LDL than those reported by HPLC-chemiluminescence also seem in greater accordance with other available data concerning LDL oxidation. PMID:8611155

  17. Determination of lipid and phenolic fraction in two hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) cultivars grown in Poland.

    PubMed

    Ciemniewska-Żytkiewicz, Hanna; Verardo, Vito; Pasini, Federica; Bryś, Joanna; Koczoń, Piotr; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza

    2015-02-01

    The fatty acid, tocopherol, sterol, phospholipid and phenolic compositions of Polish hazelnuts (Kataloński and Webba Cenny) were examined. Particularly, free+esterified and bound tocopherol, sterol and phenolic compounds were determined. The major fatty acids found in hazelnuts were oleic and linoleic acids. α-Tocopherol was the most abundant tocopherol accounting for 90-92% of the total content. Bound tocopherols represented 45.5% and 21.7% of total tocopherols in Kataloński and Webba Cenny cultivar, respectively. Total free+esterified sterols were between 62.0% and 75.7% of total sterols and β-sitosterol was the first sterol in the two samples. Phosphatidylcholine was the most common phospholipid, accounting for 72.2% for Kataloński and 67.5% Webba Cenny, respectively. The most abundant fatty acids in the phospholipid fraction were oleic equally with palmitic acids. Twelve free and six bound phenolic compounds were identified and quantified in hazelnut kernel, instead nine free and six bound phenolic compounds were determined in hard shell.

  18. Bioelectronic tongue based on lipidic nanostructured layers containing phenol oxidases and lutetium bisphthalocyanine for the analysis of grapes.

    PubMed

    Medina-Plaza, C; de Saja, J A; Rodriguez-Mendez, M L

    2014-07-15

    In this work, a multisensor system formed by nanostructured voltammetric biosensors based on phenol oxidases (tyrosinase and laccase) has been developed. The enzymes have been incorporated into a biomimetic environment provided by a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film of arachidic acid (AA). Lutetium bisphthalocyanine (LuPc2) has also been introduced in the films to act as electron mediator. The incorporation of the enzymes to the floating layers to form Tyr/AA/LuPc2 and Lac/AA/LuPc2 films has been confirmed by the expansion in the surface pressure isotherms and by the AFM images. The voltammetric response towards six phenolic compounds demonstrates the enhanced performance of the biosensors that resulted from a preserved activity of the tyrosinase and laccase combined with the electron transfer activity of LuPc2. Biosensors show improved detection limits in the range of 10(-7)-10(-8) mol L(-1). An array formed by three sensors AA/LuPc2, Tyr/AA/LuPc2 and Lac/AA/LuPc2 has been employed to discriminate phenolic antioxidants of interest in the food industry. The Principal Component Analysis scores plot has demonstrated that the multisensor system is able to discriminate phenols according to the number of phenolic groups attached to the structure. The system has also been able to discriminate grapes of different varieties according to their phenolic content. This good performance is due to the combination of four factors: the high functionality of the enzyme obtained using a biomimetic immobilization, the signal enhancement caused by the LuPc2 mediator, the improvement in the selectivity induced by the enzymes and the complementary activity of the enzymatic sensors demonstrated in the loading plots. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimal Linear Fitting for Objective Determination of Ocean Mixed Layer Depth from Glider Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-06

    profile is around 1 m . All the profiles are deeper than 700 m and clearly show the existence of layered structure: mixed layer, thermocline, and deep...controlled profiles observed by the two Seagliders. With high vertical resolution (1 m ), we chose n 5 4. The value of Hmix was calculated for each...compared to the fluctuations in the mixed layer depth observed after this date. The mixed layer depth oscillates between 50 and 90 m before 25 November 2007

  20. Surface layer determination for the Si spheres of the Avogadro project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, I.; Azuma, Y.; Bettin, H.; Cibik, L.; Fuchs, P.; Fujii, K.; Krumrey, M.; Kuetgens, U.; Kuramoto, N.; Mizushima, S.

    2011-04-01

    For the accurate determination of the Avogadro constant, two 28Si spheres were produced, whose macroscopic density, in addition to other values, must be determined. To make a contribution to the new definition of the kilogram, a relative standard uncertainty of less than 2 × 10-8 has to be achieved. Each silicon surface is covered by a surface layer (SL). Consequently, correction parameters for the SL are determined to be applied to the mass and volume determination of the enriched spheres. With the use of a large set of surface analysing techniques, the structure of the SL is investigated. An unexpected metallic contamination existing on the sphere surface enlarges the uncertainty contribution of the correction parameters above the originally targeted value of 1 × 10-8. In the framework of this investigation this new obstacle is resolved in two ways. A new combination of analytical methods is applied to measure the SL mass mSL and the thickness dSL, including this new contamination, with an uncertainty of u(mSL) = 14.5 µg and 14.4 µg, respectively, and u(dSL) = 0.33 nm and 0.32 nm for the 28Si spheres AVO28-S5 and AVO28-S8, respectively. In the second part of the work, the chemical composition of these metallic contaminations is found to be Cu, Ni and Zn silicide compounds. For the removal of this contamination, a special procedure is developed, tested and applied to the spheres to produce the originally expected surface structure on the spheres. After the application of this new procedure the use of x-ray reflectometry directly at the spheres will be possible. It is expected to reduce the uncertainty contribution due to the SL down to 1 × 10-8.

  1. Simultaneous determination of cyclodol and diprazin by thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Makharadze, R; Adeishvili, L; Chelidze, T; Imnadze, N; Nizharadze, N

    2009-11-01

    Ciklodol (trihexyphenidil)--the central and peripheral m-cholinoblocker is currently used with other antipsychotic drugs such as phenotiazines and tricycle antidepressants. For the purpose of simultaneous determination of ciklodol and diprazine, were selected two methods of analysis: Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). During development of TLC method was studied the 10 visualizing system and 24 mobile systems. For individual or simultaneous determination of ciklodol and diprazine were recommended the following solvents' systems: 1. Toluene-acetone-ethanole-25%NH(4)OH (45:45: 7.5:2.5), 2. Hexane-ethyl acetate (15:5), 3. Chloroform-heptene-25%NH(4)OH (16:3:3), 4. Ethylacetate-hexane (10:10), 5. Acetonitrile-metanol (10:10) and 6.Heptene-chloroform-ethanol-25% NH(4)OH (5:10:3:1). As visualizing systems were chosen: Iodine vapors, blacklight (UV254) and reagent of FNP. Reagent of FNP gives colored spot just with diprazine and it is also could be used for separation of both objects in simultaneous analysis. Developed HPLC method of simultaneous determination of ciklodol and diprazine: like mobile phase is recommended: Acetonitril- 0.05M KH(2)PO4 (55:45) (v/v) +H(3)PO(4) (pH3.5), column EC250 x 4.6mm, with solid phase Nucleosil, flow rate 1ml/min, sample volume 40 microl. In given conditions, the retention time of ciklodol is 6.005min and diprazine 7.227min. Developed method of simultaneous determination and separation of ciklodol and diprazine in respective mixtures could be successfully applied as in the pharmaceutical, as well in the chemical-toxicological laboratories.

  2. Determination of the optimized single-layer ionospheric height for electron content measurements over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Yuan, Yunbin; Zhang, Baocheng; Wang, Ningbo; Li, Zishen; Liu, Xifeng; Zhang, Xiao

    2017-08-01

    The ionosphere effective height (IEH) is a very important parameter in total electron content (TEC) measurements under the widely used single-layer model assumption. To overcome the requirement of a large amount of simultaneous vertical and slant ionospheric observations or dense "coinciding" pierce points data, a new approach comparing the converted vertical TEC (VTEC) value using mapping function based on a given IEH with the "ground truth" VTEC value provided by the combined International GNSS Service Global Ionospheric Maps is proposed for the determination of the optimal IEH. The optimal IEH in the Chinese region is determined using three different methods based on GNSS data. Based on the ionosonde data from three different locations in China, the altitude variation of the peak electron density (hmF2) is found to have clear diurnal, seasonal and latitudinal dependences, and the diurnal variation of hmF2 varies from approximately 210 to 520 km in Hainan. The determination of the optimal IEH employing the inverse method suggested by Birch et al. (Radio Sci 37, 2002. doi: 10.1029/2000rs002601) did not yield a consistent altitude in the Chinese region. Tests of the method minimizing the mapping function errors suggested by Nava et al. (Adv Space Res 39:1292-1297, 2007) indicate that the optimal IEH ranges from 400 to 600 km, and the height of 450 km is the most frequent IEH at both high and low solar activities. It is also confirmed that the IEH of 450-550 km is preferred for the Chinese region instead of the commonly adopted 350-450 km using the determination method of the optimal IEH proposed in this paper.

  3. Results of retrospective chart review to determine improvement in lipid goal attainment in patients treated by high-volume prescribers of lipid-modifying drugs.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Thomas A; Egger, Allison

    2006-01-01

    There is a primary focus in cholesterol management on the elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) component of dyslipidemia and a secondary focus on the other components of dyslipidemia, such as low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), high triglycerides (TGs), and high non-HDL-C. This was a physician practice analysis to examine the real-world therapeutic management of patients diagnosed with hyperlipidemia and/or hypercholesterolemia according to the guidelines of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel Third Report (ATP III) and the American Heart Association (AHA). Additionally, the number of patients who should be diagnosed with mixed hyperlipidemia instead of hyperlipidemia or hypercholesterolemia was estimated. A total of 600 high-volume prescribers of lipid-modifying drugs were identified in 6 metropolitan areas using the IMS Health prescription database. A total of 101 physician prescribers (about 17%) agreed to participate in the study and had the necessary medical records available. The participating prescribers were asked to identify all patients aged between 18 and 79 years who were seen in their practice in the last 2 years having a diagnosis of hyperlipidemia (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] code 272.4) and/or hypercholesterolemia (ICD-9-CM code 272.0). ICD-9-CM code 272.2 (mixed hyperlipidemia) was purposely excluded from the criteria for patient chart selection in order to estimate the prevalence of mixed hyperlipidemia in patients previously diagnosed with hyperlipidemia and/or hypercholesterolemia. A random number generator was used to select 25 patient medical records from each office. A common instrument was used to collect data on patient demographics; clinical history; comorbid disease states; laboratory test results, including liver function; and 4 values for serum cholesterol (total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, TG). Total

  4. Epidermal lipids.

    PubMed

    Wertz, P W

    1992-06-01

    Epidermal lipids play important roles in cell structure, in control of growth and differentiation, in determining cohesion and desquamation, and in formation and function of a permeability barrier. Knowledge of the structures and composition of the epidermal lipids is important for understanding these functions. The lipids present in epidermis include phospholipids, monohexosylceramides, ceramides, cholesterol, cholesterol esters, cholesterol sulfate, triglycerides, and fatty acids. The phospholipids are major structural components of the plasma membranes and membranous organelles in the viable and differentiating keratinocytes. In addition, phospholipids serve in several transmembranal signaling processes and as a reservoir for arachidonic acid, the precursor of the eicosanoids. Monohexosylceramides are thought to function in the assembly of lamellar bodies, and in the final stage of differentiation are converted to a structurally heterogenous mixture of ceramides in the intercellular space of the stratum corneum and to a unique ceramide covalently attached to the corneocyte surface. The mixture of lipids in the stratum corneum, composed principally of ceramides, cholesterol, cholesterol esters, and fatty acids, prevents desiccation and limits the penetration of a variety of noxious environmental agents. The stratum corneum lipids represent a major product of epidermal differentiation, and free sphingosine liberated from ceramides in this terminally differentiated compartment may provide a feedback mechanism for the regulation of the differentiation process.

  5. Predicting the release profile of small molecules from within the ordered nanostructured lipidic bicontinuous cubic phase using translational diffusion coefficients determined by PFG-NMR.

    PubMed

    Meikle, Thomas G; Yao, Shenggen; Zabara, Alexandru; Conn, Charlotte E; Drummond, Calum J; Separovic, Frances

    2017-02-16

    The ordered nanostructured lipidic bicontinuous cubic phase has demonstrated potential as a drug release material, due to its ability to encapsulate a wide variety of compounds, which may undergo sustained, diffusion controlled release over time. Control of drug release has been shown to depend on the nanostructural parameters of the lipid mesophase. Herein, the diffusion and release of two amino acids, encapsulated within a range of different lipidic cubic mesophases are investigated. Pulsed-field gradient NMR was used to determine the diffusion coefficient of the encapsulated amino acid, which was found to be correlated with the nanoscale diameter of the water channels within the cubic mesophase. This information was used to predict the release profiles of encapsulated compounds from within the cubic mesophase, which was verified by directly measuring the release of each amino acid in vitro. Predicted release profiles tracked reasonably close to the measured release profiles, indicating that NMR determined diffusion measurements can be used to predict release profiles.

  6. Determination of half value layers of X-ray equipment using computed radiography imaging plates.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Eiji; Ito, Shigeki; Deji, Shizuhiko; Saze, Takuya; Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2012-01-01

    A method for determining half value layers (HVLs) of inverter-type X-ray equipment using a computed radiography (CR) systems was developed. This method is similar to the traditional method, where the air kerma (K) is measured using an ionization based dosimeter and increasing aluminum (Al) absorber thickness, but utilized an imaging plate (IP) and the sensitivity index (S number) of the CR system as the dosimeter and the dosimeter reading, respectively. The IP and the S number were calibrated using an ionization chamber having traceability to the National Standard Ionization Chamber. A modified version of the S number definition equation K=a × S(-b) was used to translate the S number to K values for X-ray beams produced using tube voltages ranging from 50 to 120 kV and additional Al filtration up to 2.5mm. The coefficient 'a' varied depending on the beam quality, while the coefficient 'b' showed a constant value of 0.991. The HVLs in the range from 1.8 to 5.5mm Al that were obtained with this method were in good agreement with those obtained with the traditional method, as uncertainties were between -7 and 4%. This method can be used to determine the HVLs of inverter-type X-ray equipment within an acceptable accuracy. Copyright © 2011 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High-performance thin-layer chromatographic determination of lamotrigine in serum.

    PubMed

    Patil, Kuldeep M; Bodhankar, Subhash L

    2005-09-05

    A simple and rapid high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) determination of lamotrigine (LTG) in serum is reported. The method involves extraction of the drug by ethyl acetate followed by separation on TLC silica plates using a mixture of toluene-acetone-ammonia (7:3:0.5), as eluting solvent. Densitometric analysis was carried out at 312 nm with lamotrigine being detected at Rf of 0.54. The analytical method has excellent linearity (r=0.998) in the range of 20-300 ng/spot. This assay range is adequate for analyzing human serum, as it corresponds to lamotrigine concentrations measured in human serum from epileptic patients. The method was validated for sensitivity, selectivity, extraction efficiency, accuracy and intra and inter-day reproducibility. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were found to be 6.4 and 10.2 ng, respectively. Good accuracy is reported in the range of 92.06-97.12% and high precision with %CV in range of 0.53-2.59. The method was applied for determination of serum lamotrigine levels in epileptic patients and in pharmacokinetic study of lamotrigine administered orally to rabbits.

  8. Lipid nutritional value of legumes: Evaluation of different extraction methods and determination of fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Caprioli, Giovanni; Giusti, Federica; Ballini, Roberto; Sagratini, Gianni; Vila-Donat, Pilar; Vittori, Sauro; Fiorini, Dennis

    2016-02-01

    This study sought to contribute to the assessment of the nutritional properties of legumes by determining the fatty acid (FA) composition of 29 legume samples after the evaluation of nine extraction methods. The Folch method and liquid-solid extraction with hexane/isopropanol or with hexane/acetone were investigated, as was the effect of previous hydration of samples. Soxhlet extractions were also evaluated with different solvent mixtures. Results on FA composition using the hexane/isopropanol extraction method were the same in terms of FA composition of the Folch method, but the extraction yield was only around 20-40% of that of the Folch method preceded by hydration. Some types of legumes showed particularly interesting values for the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) n-6/n-3, such as lentils, with the value of 4.0, and Azuki beans, at 3.2. In lentils, the PUFAs% ranged from 42.0% to 57.4%, while in Azuki beans it was 57.5%.

  9. Limitations of Electronic Energy Transfer in the Determination of Lipid Nanodomain Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Šachl, Radek; Humpolíčková, Jana; Štefl, Martin; Johansson, Lennart B.-Å.; Hof, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Even though superresolution microscopy indicates that size of plasma membrane rafts is <20 nm, those structures have never been observed. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is therefore still the most powerful optical method for characterization of such domains. In this letter we investigate relation between nanodomain affinity of a donor-acceptor (D/A) pair and the detectable nanodomain size/area. We show that probes with high affinity to the liquid-ordered (Lo) phase are required for detecting domain sizes of a few nanometers, and/or domains that occupy a few percent of the bilayer area. A combination of donors and acceptors that prefer different phases is the more favorable approach. For instance, a D/A pair with the distribution constant of donors KD = 5 and acceptors KA = 0.01 can resolve a broad spectrum of nanodomain sizes. On the other hand, currently available donors and acceptors that prefer the same phase, either the liquid-disordered (Ld) or Lo phase, are not so convenient for determining domain sizes <20 nm. Here the detection limits of FRET experiments employing several commonly used D/A pairs have been investigated. PMID:22261076

  10. Paper-based thin-layer coulometric sensor for halide determination.

    PubMed

    Cuartero, Maria; Crespo, Gastón A; Bakker, Eric

    2015-02-03

    We report on a paper-based analytical device (PAD) for the exhaustive, and therefore absolute, determination of halides in a range of diverse water samples and food supplements. A mixture of chloride, bromide, and iodide ions is assessed in a wide range of concentrations, specifically, from 10(-4.8) to 0.1 M for bromide and iodide and from 10(-4.5) to 0.6 M for chloride, with a limit of detection of 10(-5) M. As a result of a careful optimization of the electrochemical cell, a thin layer made of cellulose paper (75-μm thickness), a cation-exchange Donnan exclusion membrane (FKL), and a silver-foil working electrode were selected as optimum materials. Cyclic voltammetry (from 0 to 0.8 V) was chosen as the interrogation technique to impose the exhaustive oxidative plating and re-reduction of halides on the silver element, accompanied by outward and inward counterion fluxes. The scan rate plays an important role in the ability of the technique to resolve mixtures of ions. Moderate scan rates (10 mV s(-1)) provide a suitable compromise between sensitivity, limit of detection, and resolution. This paper-based microfluidic device is extremely simple in terms of manipulation, cost, and contamination risk. Paper is an excellent basis for the establishment of a confined thin aqueous layer, the construction of disposable halide sensors, and portability for measuring outside the controlled laboratory environment. A discussion of the relevant analytical characteristics is presented herein, followed by a demonstration of halide assessment in water samples (sea, tap, river, and mineral waters) and food supplements enriched with iodide and chloride as early examples.

  11. Dual-Layered Nanogel-Coated Hollow Lipid/Polypeptide Conjugate Assemblies for Potential pH-Triggered Intracellular Drug Release

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Wen-Hsuan; Huang, Wen-Chia; Shen, Ming-Yin; Wang, Che-Hsu; Huang, Yi-Fong; Lin, Sung-Chyr; Chern, Chorng-Shyan; Chiu, Hsin-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    To achieve effective intracellular anticancer drug delivery, the polymeric vesicles supplemented with the pH-responsive outlayered gels as a delivery system of doxorubicin (DOX) were developed from self-assembly of the lipid/polypeptide adduct, distearin grafted poly(γ-glutamic acid) (poly(γ-GA)), followed by sequential deposition of chitosan and poly(γ-GA-co-γ-glutamyl oxysuccinimide)-g-monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol) in combination with in situ covalent cross-linking on assembly surfaces. The resultant gel-caged polymeric vesicles (GCPVs) showed superior performance in regulating drug release in response to the external pH change. Under typical physiological conditions (pH 7.4 and 37°C) at which the γ-GA/DOX ionic pairings remained mostly undisturbed, the dense outlayered gels of GCPVs significantly reduced the premature leakage of the uncomplexed payload. With the environmental pH being reduced from pH 7.4 to 4.7, the drug liberation was appreciably promoted by the massive disruption of the ionic γ-GA/DOX complexes along with the significant swelling of nanogel layers upon the increased protonation of chitosan chain segments. After being internalized by HeLa cells via endocytosis, GCPVs exhibited cytotoxic effect comparable to free DOX achieved by rapidly releasing the payload in intracellular acidic endosomes and lysosomes. This strongly implies the great promise of such unique GCPVs as an intracellular drug delivery carrier for potential anticancer treatment. PMID:24651156

  12. Lipid packing determines protein-membrane interactions: challenges for apolipoprotein A–I and High Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Susana A.; Tricerri, M. Alejandra; Ossato, Giulia; Gratton, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Summary Protein and protein-lipid interactions, with and within specific areas in the cell membrane, are critical in order to modulate the cell signaling events required to maintain cell functions and viability. Biological bilayers are complex, dynamic platforms, and thus in vivo observations usually need to be preceded by studies on model systems that simplify and discriminate the different factors involved in lipid-protein interactions. Fluorescence microscopy studies using giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) as membrane model systems provide a unique methodology to quantify protein binding, interaction and lipid solubilization in artificial bilayers. The large size of lipid domains obtainable on GUVs, together with fluorescence microscopy techniques, provides the possibility to localize and quantify molecular interactions. FCS (Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy) can be performed using the GUV model to extract information on mobility and concentration. Two-photon Laurdan GP (Generalized Polarization) reports on local changes in membrane water content (related to membrane fluidity) due to protein binding or lipid removal from a given lipid domain. In this review, we summarize the experimental microscopy methods used to study the interaction of human apolipoprotein A–I (apoA-I) in lipid-free and lipid-bound conformations with bilayers and natural membranes. Results described here help us to understand cholesterol homeostasis, and offer a methodological design suited to different biological systems. PMID:20347719

  13. Determination of Total Lipids as Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAME) by in situ Transesterification: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wychen, S.; Laurens, L. M. L.

    2013-12-01

    This procedure is based on a whole biomass transesterification of lipids to fatty acid methyl esters to represent an accurate reflection of the potential of microalgal biofuels. Lipids are present in many forms and play various roles within an algal cell, from cell membrane phospholipids to energy stored as triacylglycerols.

  14. Quantitative Determination of Photosynthetic Pigments in Green Beans Using Thin-Layer Chromatography and a Flatbed Scanner as Densitometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valverde, Juan; This, Herve; Vignolle, Marc

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for the quantitative determination of photosynthetic pigments extracted from green beans using thin-layer chromatography is proposed. Various extraction methods are compared, and it is shown how a simple flatbed scanner and free software for image processing can give a quantitative determination of pigments. (Contains 5 figures.)

  15. Quantitative Determination of Photosynthetic Pigments in Green Beans Using Thin-Layer Chromatography and a Flatbed Scanner as Densitometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valverde, Juan; This, Herve; Vignolle, Marc

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for the quantitative determination of photosynthetic pigments extracted from green beans using thin-layer chromatography is proposed. Various extraction methods are compared, and it is shown how a simple flatbed scanner and free software for image processing can give a quantitative determination of pigments. (Contains 5 figures.)

  16. Competing Lipid-Protein and Protein-Protein Interactions Determine Clustering and Gating Patterns in the Potassium Channel from Streptomyces lividans (KcsA)*

    PubMed Central

    Molina, M. Luisa; Giudici, A. Marcela; Poveda, José A.; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; Montoya, Estefanía; Renart, M. Lourdes; Fernández, Asia M.; Encinar, José A.; Riquelme, Gloria; Morales, Andrés; González-Ros, José M.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence to support the notion that membrane proteins, instead of being isolated components floating in a fluid lipid environment, can be assembled into supramolecular complexes that take part in a variety of cooperative cellular functions. The interplay between lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions is expected to be a determinant factor in the assembly and dynamics of such membrane complexes. Here we report on a role of anionic phospholipids in determining the extent of clustering of KcsA, a model potassium channel. Assembly/disassembly of channel clusters occurs, at least partly, as a consequence of competing lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions at nonannular lipid binding sites on the channel surface and brings about profound changes in the gating properties of the channel. Our results suggest that these latter effects of anionic lipids are mediated via the Trp67–Glu71–Asp80 inactivation triad within the channel structure and its bearing on the selectivity filter. PMID:26336105

  17. A shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    The perturbation theory for fixed sources was applied to radiation shielding problems to determine changes in neutron and gamma ray doses due to changes in various shield layers. For a given source and detector position the perturbation method enables dose derivatives due to all layer changes to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. The direct approach requires two forward calculations for the derivative due to a single layer change. Hence, the perturbation method for obtaining dose derivatives permits an appreciable savings in computation for a multilayered shield. For an illustrative problem, a comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in the thickness of each shield layer as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  18. Determination of effective mechanical properties of a double-layer beam by means of a nano-electromechanical transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Hocke, Fredrik; Pernpeintner, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Kippenberg, Tobias J.; Schliesser, Albert; Huebl, Hans

    2014-09-29

    We investigate the mechanical properties of a doubly clamped, double-layer nanobeam embedded into an electromechanical system. The nanobeam consists of a highly pre-stressed silicon nitride and a superconducting niobium layer. By measuring the mechanical displacement spectral density both in the linear and the nonlinear Duffing regime, we determine the pre-stress and the effective Young's modulus of the nanobeam. An analytical double-layer model quantitatively corroborates the measured values. This suggests that this model can be used to design mechanical multilayer systems for electro- and optomechanical devices, including materials controllable by external parameters such as piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, or in more general multiferroic materials.

  19. Large Eddy Simulations to determine the role of dispersive stresses in the urban canopy layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, Andreas; Giometto, Marco; Parlange, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Urban-scale weather and air pollution forecasting models need to realistically predict conditions in the urban canopy layer (UCL) - the atmosphere in-between buildings where people live and most activities take place. Nevertheless, for performance reasons, forecasting models cannot resolve every detail of the flow field around individual buildings and obstacles in a city. In common urban canopy parameterizations (UCPs), exchange processes between the UCL and the overlying atmosphere - including momentum transfer - are simplified to one-dimensional bulk flow representations, where the time-averaged flow field is also horizontally averaged over a larger spatial subset of the urban canopy. In the spatial averaging process of RANS equations, additional covariance terms arise in the time-averaged momentum balance, called 'dispersive stresses'. Physically, a dispersive stress can be explained as spatial correlation between the mean horizontal flow and mean vertical flow around buildings at a given height layer. Due to lack of knowledge on the role of dispersive fluxes, they are neglected in all current UCPs and transfer formulations. Only limited CFD studies for idealized cubical arrays show that dispersive fluxes are relevant and important to properly describe the overall momentum transfer in those specific rigid canopies. The current contribution determines the role of dispersive stresses to the overall momentum transfer for a more realistic urban canopy by means of large eddy simulation (LES). LES takes into account the unsteadiness that characterizes canopy layer flows, offering indisputably superior performances in predicting momentum exchange with respect to traditional methods, in particular when the effects of canopy elements play a major role. LES also showed to be able to properly represent the flow in areas of strong separation and in wakes, features that are strongly present in urban canopies, where most RANS and URANS models fail due to their under

  20. Experimental determination of the three-dimensional vorticity field in the boundary-layer transition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. R.; Fasel, H.; Hama, F. R.

    1984-12-01

    Hot film anemometers have been used to measure all three velocity components at numerous grid points in a measuring volume that is centered on the location at which the vortex loop appears in flow visualization studies of boundary layer transition. The instantaneous vorticity field has been computed from the velocity field, and the vortex loop is revealed in the longitudinal component of vorticity. The fluid in the outer part of the boundary layer travels faster, and flows into the loop, forming the inflectional high shear layer that breaks down into the hairpin vortices. The magnitude of the high shear layer vorticity is about three times greater than that in the loop.

  1. Genetic determinants of serum lipid levels in Chinese subjects: A population-based study in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Andreotti, Gabriella; Menashe, Idan; Chen, Jinbo; Chang, Shih-Chen; Rashid, Asif; Gao, Yu-Tang; Han, Tian-Quan; Sakoda, Lori C.; Chanock, Stephen; Rosenberg, Philip S.; Hsing, Ann W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We examined the associations between 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of eight lipid metabolism genes and lipid levels in a Chinese population. Methods This study was conducted as part of a population-based study in China with 799 randomly selected healthy residents who provided fasting blood and an in-person interview. Associations between variants and mean lipid levels were examined using a test of trend and least squares mean test in a general linear model. Results Four SNPs were associated with lipid levels: LDLR rs1003723 was associated with total cholesterol (p-trend=0.002) and LDL (p-trend=0.01), LDLR rs6413503 was associated with total cholesterol (p-trend=0.05), APOB rs1367117 was associated with apoB (p-trend=0.02), and ABCB11 rs49550 was associated with total cholesterol (p-trend=0.01), triglycerides (p-trend=0.01), and apoA (p-trend=0.01). We found statistically significant effects on lipid levels for LDLR rs6413503 among those with high dairy intake, LPL rs263 among those with high allium vegetable intake, and APOE rs440446 among those with high red meat intake. Conclusion We identified new associations between SNPs and lipid levels in Chinese previously found in Caucasians. These findings provide insight into the role of lipid metabolism genes, as well as the mechanisms by which these genes may be linked with disease. PMID:19888660

  2. FCS diffusion laws in two-phase lipid membranes: determination of domain mean size by experiments and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Favard, Cyril; Wenger, Jérôme; Lenne, Pierre-François; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-03-02

    Many efforts have been undertaken over the last few decades to characterize the diffusion process in model and cellular lipid membranes. One of the techniques developed for this purpose, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), has proved to be a very efficient approach, especially if the analysis is extended to measurements on different spatial scales (referred to as FCS diffusion laws). In this work, we examine the relevance of FCS diffusion laws for probing the behavior of a pure lipid and a lipid mixture at temperatures below, within and above the phase transitions, both experimentally and numerically. The accuracy of the microscopic description of the lipid mixtures found here extends previous work to a more complex model in which the geometry is unknown and the molecular motion is driven only by the thermodynamic parameters of the system itself. For multilamellar vesicles of both pure lipid and lipid mixtures, the FCS diffusion laws recorded at different temperatures exhibit large deviations from pure Brownian motion and reveal the existence of nanodomains. The variation of the mean size of these domains with temperature is in perfect correlation with the enthalpy fluctuation. This study highlights the advantages of using FCS diffusion laws in complex lipid systems to describe their temporal and spatial structure. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reconstitution baking tests with defatted wheat flour are suitable for determining the functional effects of lipase-treated wheat lipids.

    PubMed

    Schaffarczyk, Monika; Østdal, Henrik; Matheis, Olivia; Jekle, Mario; Koehler, Peter

    2016-06-01

    A microscale reconstitution baking test, using wheat flour defatted with 2-propanol at 20 °C, was established to determine the functional effects of lipids isolated from lipase-treated wheat dough. Proper selection of solvent and extraction temperature was of major importance to maintain the functionality of defatted flour. Dough and gluten from flour defatted with water-saturated 1-butanol (WSB; extracted at 20 °C) and 2-propanol (extracted at 75 °C) had inferior extensibility and loaf volume compared to control flour extracted with 2-propanol at 20 °C. Quantitation of gluten proteins showed that defatting with WSB (20 °C) or 2-propanol (75 °C) decreased the gliadin and increased the glutenin content. Possible reasons were thiol-disulfide interchange reactions, caused either by heat (2-propanol, 75 °C) or by the solvent WSB, which affected gluten proteins. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that regular, interconnected gluten structures were only present in dough from flour defatted with 2-propanol at 20 °C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Determination of free fatty acids in pharmaceutical lipids by ¹H NMR and comparison with the classical acid value.

    PubMed

    Skiera, Christina; Steliopoulos, Panagiotis; Kuballa, Thomas; Diehl, Bernd; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2014-05-01

    Indices like acid value, peroxide value, and saponification value play an important role in quality control and identification of lipids. Requirements on these parameters are given by the monographs of the European pharmacopeia. (1)H NMR spectroscopy provides a fast and simple alternative to these classical approaches. In the present work a new (1)H NMR approach to determine the acid value is described. The method was validated using a statistical approach based on a variance components model. The performance under repeatability and in-house reproducibility conditions was assessed. We applied this (1)H NMR assay to a wide range of different fatty oils. A total of 305 oil and fat samples were examined by both the classical and the NMR method. Except for hard fat, the data obtained by the two methods were in good agreement. The (1)H NMR method was adapted to analyse waxes and oleyloleat. Furthermore, the effect of solvent and in the case of castor oil the effect of the oil matrix on line broadening and chemical shift of the carboxyl group signal are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Statistical Modeling and Removal of Lipid Membrane Projections for Cryo-EM Structure Determination of Reconstituted Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Brandt, Sami Sebastian; Shigematsu, Hideki; Sigworth, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes steps in the single-particle cryo-EM 3D structure determination of membrane proteins in their membrane environment. Using images of the Kv1.2 potassium-channel complex reconstituted into lipid vesicles, we describe procedures for the merging of focal-pairs of exposures and the removal of the vesicle-membrane signal from the micrographs. These steps allow 3D reconstruction to be performed from the protein particle images. We construct a 2D statistical model of the vesicle structure based on higher-order singular value decomposition (HOSVD), by taking into account the structural symmetries of the vesicles in polar coordinates. Non-roundness in the vesicle structure is handled with a non-linear shape alignment to a reference, which ensures a compact model representation. The results show that the learned model is an accurate representation of the imaged vesicle structures. Precise removal of the strong membrane signals allows better alignment and classification of images of small membrane-protein particles, and allows higher-resolution 3D reconstruction. PMID:26835990

  6. Phylogenetic relationship and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy-derived lipid determinants of lifespan parameters in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast.

    PubMed

    Molon, Mateusz; Zebrowski, Jacek

    2017-06-01

    Yeast ageing has been gaining much attention in gerontology research, yet the process itself is still not entirely clear. One of the constraints related to the use of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast in studies is the ambiguity of the results concerning ageing determinants for different genetic backgrounds. In this paper, we compare reproductive potentials and lifespans of seven widely used haploid laboratory strains differing in daughter cells production capabilities and highlight the importance of choosing an appropriate genotype for the studies on ageing. Moreover, we show here links between post-reproductive lifespan and lipid metabolism, as well as between reproductive potential, reproductive lifespan and phylogenetic relationship. Using FTIR spectroscopy that generated a biochemical fingerprint of cells, coupled with chemometrics, we found that the band of carbonyl (C = O) stretching vibration discriminates the strains according to post-reproductive lifespan. The results indicated that prolonged post-reproductive lifespan was associated with relatively lower amount of fatty acids esterified to phospholipids compared to a free acid pool, thus implying phospholipid metabolism for the post-reproductive lifespan of yeast. In addition, phylogenetic analysis showed a correlation between nucleotide similarity and the reproductive potential or reproductive lifespan, but not to the longevity expressed in time units. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Different determinants of soil carbon decomposition between active and permafrost layers: evidence from alpine permafrost on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Chen, L.; Qin, S.; Ding, J.; Yang, G.; Li, F.

    2015-12-01

    The fate of permafrost carbon is of great concern among global change community due to its potential positive feedback to climate warming. However, the determinants of soil carbon decomposition between active layer and permafrost layers remain poorly understood. This incubation study was designed to test the following two hypotheses: 1) low carbon quantity and microbial abundances in permafrost soils limit decomposition rates compared with active layer soils; 2) carbon losses from active layer are more controlled by environmental factors, whereas those from permafrost depth are primarily determined by the microbial condition. We collected five active layer and permafrost soils from alpine grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau and compared the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at -5 and 5 °C in a 80-days aerobic incubation. The availability of organic carbon and microbial abundances (fungi, bacteria, and actinomycete) within permafrost soils were significantly lower than active layer soils, which, together with the environmental data supports the reduced cumulative CO2 emissions in permafrost depth. However, the decomposability of SOC from permafrost was similar or even higher than surface soils. The carbon loss not only depended on SOC quantity and microbial abundance, but also nitrogen availability and soil pH. Nevertheless, the controls on carbon emissions between active and permafrost layers were significantly different. Cumulative CO2 emission from active layers was best predicted by soil moisture, and carbon emission from permafrost depths was highly associated with fungal-PLFAs. Taken together, these results demonstrate that different controls on carbon emission between active layer and permafrost soils. These differences highlight the importance of distinguishing permafrost depth in Earth System Models when predicting the responses of deep soil carbon to environmental change.

  8. Estimation of thickness of concentration boundary layers by osmotic volume flux determination.

    PubMed

    Jasik-Ślęzak, Jolanta S; Olszówka, Kornelia M; Slęzak, Andrzej

    2011-06-01

    The estimation method of the concentration boundary layers thicknesses (δ) in a single-membrane system containing non-electrolytic binary or ternary solutions was devised using the Kedem-Katchalsky formalism. A square equation used in this method contains membrane transport (L(p), σ, ω) and solution (D, C) parameters as well as a volume osmotic flux (J(v)). These values can be determined in a series of independent experiments. Calculated values δ are nonlinearly dependent on the concentrations of investigated solutions and the membrane system configuration. These nonlinearities are the effect of a competition between spontaneously occurring diffusion and natural convection. The mathematical model based on Kedem-Katchalsky equations and a concentration Rayleigh number (R(C)) was presented. On the basis of this model we introduce the dimensionless parameter, called by us a Katchalsky number (Ka), modifies R(C) of membrane transport. The critical value of this number well describes a moment of transition from the state of diffusion into convective diffusion membrane transport.

  9. Birth order dependent growth cone segregation determines synaptic layer identity in the Drosophila visual system.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Abhishek; Ertekin, Deniz; Lee, Chi-Hon; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-03-17

    The precise recognition of appropriate synaptic partner neurons is a critical step during neural circuit assembly. However, little is known about the developmental context in which recognition specificity is important to establish synaptic contacts. We show that in the Drosophila visual system, sequential segregation of photoreceptor afferents, reflecting their birth order, lead to differential positioning of their growth cones in the early target region. By combining loss- and gain-of-function analyses we demonstrate that relative differences in the expression of the transcription factor Sequoia regulate R cell growth cone segregation. This initial growth cone positioning is consolidated via cell-adhesion molecule Capricious in R8 axons. Further, we show that the initial growth cone positioning determines synaptic layer selection through proximity-based axon-target interactions. Taken together, we demonstrate that birth order dependent pre-patterning of afferent growth cones is an essential pre-requisite for the identification of synaptic partner neurons during visual map formation in Drosophila.

  10. Urban boundary-layer height determination from lidar measurements over the paris area.

    PubMed

    Menut, L; Flamant, C; Pelon, J; Flamant, P H

    1999-02-20

    The Paris area is strongly urbanized and is exposed to atmospheric pollution events. To understand the chemical and physical processes that are taking place in this area it is necessary to describe correctly the atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) dynamics and the ABL height evolution. During the winter of 1994-1995, within the framework of the Etude de la Couche Limite Atmosphérique en Agglomération Parisienne (ECLAP) experiment, the vertical structure of the ABL over Paris and its immediate suburbs was extensively documented by means of lidar measurements. We present methods suited for precise determination of the ABL structure's temporal evolution in a dynamic environment as complex as the Paris area. The purpose is to identify a method that can be used on a large set of lidar data. We compare commonly used methods that permit ABL height retrievals from backscatter lidar signals under different meteorological conditions. Incorrect tracking of the ABL depth's diurnal cycle caused by limitations in the methods is analyzed. The study uses four days of the ECLAP experiment characterized by different meteorological and synoptic conditions.

  11. Birth order dependent growth cone segregation determines synaptic layer identity in the Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Abhishek; Ertekin, Deniz; Lee, Chi-Hon; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The precise recognition of appropriate synaptic partner neurons is a critical step during neural circuit assembly. However, little is known about the developmental context in which recognition specificity is important to establish synaptic contacts. We show that in the Drosophila visual system, sequential segregation of photoreceptor afferents, reflecting their birth order, lead to differential positioning of their growth cones in the early target region. By combining loss- and gain-of-function analyses we demonstrate that relative differences in the expression of the transcription factor Sequoia regulate R cell growth cone segregation. This initial growth cone positioning is consolidated via cell-adhesion molecule Capricious in R8 axons. Further, we show that the initial growth cone positioning determines synaptic layer selection through proximity-based axon-target interactions. Taken together, we demonstrate that birth order dependent pre-patterning of afferent growth cones is an essential pre-requisite for the identification of synaptic partner neurons during visual map formation in Drosophila. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13715.001 PMID:26987017

  12. [Comparative thin-layer chromatographic studies for determining phorate and fenthion].

    PubMed

    Ignatov, M

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to use thin-layer chromatography to determine pure substances of the organic phosphorous insecticides forat and phenothion. Three sorbents were employed to establish the most appropriate conditions for the application of a fast, readily applicably and highly sensitive method--silica gel G, DG and Kiselgur "Merk", as well as 14 mobile phases--monocompound (n-hexane, n-heptane, acetone benzol and toluol), double combinations (hexane-acetone 4:1, hexane-acetone 9:1, hexane-benzol 1:1, hexane-benzol 4:1, heptane-acetone 7:1, benzol-hexane 4:1, benzol-acetone 9:1, and petrolium ether-tetrachlormethane) and triple combinations (acetone-toluol-hexane 1:15 and 5 developers (a diazosalt, bromine vapours + diazosalt, palladium bichloride, bromphenol blue, and silver nitrate, sodium hydroxide, ammonia gas). Established was the fact that the best results are obtained with the use of silica gel G, the mobile phase heptan-acetone 7:1, and the developer of 0.2% solution of palladium bichloride in 0.5 per cent solution of hydrochloric acid. In chromatogrammes the forat compound appears as a tile red portion with a darker peripheral part and Rf = 0.61, and phenothion--in yellow, with a brownish halo and Rf = 0.41. The method is highly sensitive--for forat 0.5 microgram, and for phenothion 0.5 microgram. In determining these insecticides it is possible to use as a sorbent silica gel "Merk" 1:1 with the same degree of sensitivity, but with higher Rf values.

  13. The determination of the thickness of the layers deposited on the electronic circuit boards through tribological methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrescu, A. M.; Tudor, A.; Chişiu, G.; Stoica, N. A.; Cihak Bayr, U.

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the paper is to determinate the thickness of the copper layer deposit on the electronic circuit boards, the thickness of the soldering alloy SAC 307 (96.5%Sn/3.0%Ag/0.7%Cu) deposit on the copper-PCB assembly used in electronic industry and also to determinate the sliding length of the sphere on those materials. Slurry composed of water and SiC was used to reduce the testing time. For the experiment a CSEM Calowear equipment was used and the tested materials were the layer of FR4(flame retardant 4) with copper deposit and the soldering alloy SAC 307.

  14. A Novel Method to Determine the Thermal Conductivity of Interfacial Layers Surrounding the Nanoparticles of a Nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rajinder

    2014-10-13

    Nanofluids are becoming increasingly popular as heat transfer fluids in a variety of industrial applications, due to their enhanced heat transfer characteristics. The thermal conductivity of nanofluids is usually found to be much larger than that predicted from the classical models, such as the Maxwell model. The key mechanism of enhancement of thermal conductivity of dilute nanofluids is the solvation of nanoparticles with a layer of matrix liquid. As of now, little is known quantitatively about the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layers surrounding the nanoparticles. In this article, a novel method is presented to determine the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layers of the nanoparticles. The proposed method allows the estimation of the thermal conductivity of interfacial layers based on the combined measurements of the intrinsic viscosity and intrinsic thermal conductivity of a bulk nanofluid. From the measured intrinsic viscosity of the nanofluid, the thickness of the interfacial layer is estimated. Using the known interfacial layer thickness along with the measured intrinsic thermal conductivity of the nanofluid, the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layer is estimated. The proposed method is validated by simulation and experimental results.

  15. A Novel Method to Determine the Thermal Conductivity of Interfacial Layers Surrounding the Nanoparticles of a Nanofluid

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Rajinder

    2014-01-01

    Nanofluids are becoming increasingly popular as heat transfer fluids in a variety of industrial applications, due to their enhanced heat transfer characteristics. The thermal conductivity of nanofluids is usually found to be much larger than that predicted from the classical models, such as the Maxwell model. The key mechanism of enhancement of thermal conductivity of dilute nanofluids is the solvation of nanoparticles with a layer of matrix liquid. As of now, little is known quantitatively about the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layers surrounding the nanoparticles. In this article, a novel method is presented to determine the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layers of the nanoparticles. The proposed method allows the estimation of the thermal conductivity of interfacial layers based on the combined measurements of the intrinsic viscosity and intrinsic thermal conductivity of a bulk nanofluid. From the measured intrinsic viscosity of the nanofluid, the thickness of the interfacial layer is estimated. Using the known interfacial layer thickness along with the measured intrinsic thermal conductivity of the nanofluid, the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layer is estimated. The proposed method is validated by simulation and experimental results.

  16. Accuracy of Young's Modulus of Thermal Barrier Coating Layer Determined by Bending Resonance of a Multilayered Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waki, Hiroyuki; Takizawa, Kensuke; Kato, Masahiko; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-04-01

    The Young's modulus of individual layer in thermal barrier coating (TBC) system is an important mechanical property because it allows determining the parameters of materials mechanics in the TBC system. In this study, we investigated the accuracy of the evaluation method for the Young's modulus of a TBC layer according to the first bending resonance of a multilayered specimen comprising a substrate, bond coating, and TBC. First, we derived a closed-form solution for the Young's modulus of the TBC layer using the equation of motion for the bending vibration of a composite beam. The solution for the three-layered model provided the Young's modulus of the TBC layer according to the measured resonance frequency and the known values for the dimensions, mass, and Young's moduli of all the other layers. Next, we analyzed the sensitivity of these input errors to the evaluated Young's modulus and revealed the important inputs for accurate evaluation. Finally, we experimentally confirmed that the Young's modulus of the TBC layer was obtained accurately by the developed method.

  17. Determining Fuzzy Membership for Sentiment Classification: A Three-Layer Sentiment Propagation Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chuanjun; Wang, Suge; Li, Deyu

    2016-01-01

    Enormous quantities of review documents exist in forums, blogs, twitter accounts, and shopping web sites. Analysis of the sentiment information hidden in these review documents is very useful for consumers and manufacturers. The sentiment orientation and sentiment intensity of a review can be described in more detail by using a sentiment score than by using bipolar sentiment polarity. Existing methods for calculating review sentiment scores frequently use a sentiment lexicon or the locations of features in a sentence, a paragraph, and a document. In order to achieve more accurate sentiment scores of review documents, a three-layer sentiment propagation model (TLSPM) is proposed that uses three kinds of interrelations, those among documents, topics, and words. First, we use nine relationship pairwise matrices between documents, topics, and words. In TLSPM, we suppose that sentiment neighbors tend to have the same sentiment polarity and similar sentiment intensity in the sentiment propagation network. Then, we implement the sentiment propagation processes among the documents, topics, and words in turn. Finally, we can obtain the steady sentiment scores of documents by a continuous iteration process. Intuition might suggest that documents with strong sentiment intensity make larger contributions to classification than those with weak sentiment intensity. Therefore, we use the fuzzy membership of documents obtained by TLSPM as the weight of the text to train a fuzzy support vector machine model (FSVM). As compared with a support vector machine (SVM) and four other fuzzy membership determination methods, the results show that FSVM trained with TLSPM can enhance the effectiveness of sentiment classification. In addition, FSVM trained with TLSPM can reduce the mean square error (MSE) on seven sentiment rating prediction data sets. PMID:27846225

  18. Chromatographic method for clobetasol propionate determination in hair follicles and in different skin layers.

    PubMed

    Ângelo, Tamara; Cunha-Filho, Marcílio S S; Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Gratieri, Tais

    2017-02-01

    Clobetasol propionate (CLO) is a potent steroid used for the treatment of several dermatological diseases. Recent studies suggest its additional use in alopecia topical treatment, generating a demand for novel formulations with specific delivery into hair follicles. Hence, a selective analytical method for drug quantification in follicular structures and skin layers is required. For this, a simple HPLC-UV method was developed. Quantification was performed using a RP-C18 column (4.6 mm × 15 cm, 5 μm), with a mixture of methanol-acetonitrile-water (50:15:35 v/v) as mobile phase, a flow rate of 1.2 mL/min, oven temperature of 30°C, injection volume of 50 μL and detection at 240 nm. The optimized conditions enabled a 12 min running with CLO elution at 10.1 min and resolution of 2.424 from skin matrix interferences. Validation was performed in accordance with International Conference on Harmonization guidelines and fulfilled the criteria of selectivity, linearity (0.5-15.0 μg/mL), robustness, precision, accuracy and limits of detection and quantification (0.02 and 0.07 μg/mL, respectively). The validated method was successfully applied for CLO quantification following in vitro skin permeation experiments and differential tape-stripping for hair follicle deposition determination, demonstrating its suitability. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Determination of Mean Thickness of an Oxide Layer on a Silicon Sphere by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji-Tao; Li, Yan; Luo, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Xue-Jian

    2010-05-01

    One of the biggest obstacles to reduce the uncertainty of the Avogadro constant NA is such that there will be an oxide layers on the surface of a silicon sphere. The thickness of this layer is measured by a modified spectroscopic ellipsometer, which can eliminate the influence of the curved surface, and the results are calibrated by x-ray reflectivity. Fifty positions distributed nearly uniformly on the surface of the silicon sphere are measured twice. The results show that the mean thickness of the overall oxide layer is 3.75 nm with the standard uncertainty of 0.21 nm, which means that the relative uncertainty component of NA owing to this layer can be reduced to 1.2 × 10-8.

  20. Epidermal surface lipids.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Apostolos

    2009-03-01

    A layer of lipids, which are of both sebaceous and keratinocyte origin, covers the surface of the skin. The apparent composition of surface lipids varies depending on the selected method of sampling. Lipids produced by the epidermal cells are an insignificant fraction of the total extractable surface lipid on areas rich in sebaceous glands. Due to the holocrine activity of the sebaceous gland, its product of secretion (sebum) is eventually released to the surface of the skin and coats the fur as well. Lipids of epidermal origin fill the spaces between the cells, like mortar or cement. The sebaceous lipids are primarily non polar lipids as triglycerides, wax esters and squalene, while epidermal lipids are a mixture of ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol. The composition of the sebaceous lipids is unique and intriguing and elevated sebum excretion is a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of acne. Recent studies have elucidated the roles that epidermal surface lipids have on normal skin functions and acne.

  1. Epidermal surface lipids

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A layer of lipids, which are of both sebaceous and keratinocyte origin, covers the surface of the skin. The apparent composition of surface lipids varies depending on the selected method of sampling. Lipids produced by the epidermal cells are an insignificant fraction of the total extractable surface lipid on areas rich in sebaceous glands. Due to the holocrine activity of the sebaceous gland, its product of secretion (sebum) is eventually released to the surface of the skin and coats the fur as well. Lipids of epidermal origin fill the spaces between the cells, like mortar or cement. The sebaceous lipids are primarily non polar lipids as triglycerides, wax esters and squalene, while epidermal lipids are a mixture of ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol. The composition of the sebaceous lipids is unique and intriguing and elevated sebum excretion is a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of acne. Recent studies have elucidated the roles that epidermal surface lipids have on normal skin functions and acne. PMID:20224687

  2. Ferritin-stimulated lipid peroxidation, lysosomal leak, and macroautophagy promote lysosomal "metastability" in primary hepatocytes determining in vitro cell survival.

    PubMed

    Krenn, Margit A; Schürz, Melanie; Teufl, Bernhard; Uchida, Koji; Eckl, Peter M; Bresgen, Nikolaus

    2015-03-01

    Several pathologies are associated with elevated levels of serum ferritin, for which growth inhibitory properties have been reported; however, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly defined. Previously we have described cytotoxic properties of isoferritins released from primary hepatocytes in vitro, which induce apoptosis in an iron and oxidative stress-dependent mode. Here we show that this ferritin species stimulates endosome clustering and giant endosome formation in primary hepatocytes accompanied by enhanced lysosomal membrane permeability (LMP). In parallel, protein modification by lipid peroxidation-derived 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) is strongly promoted by ferritin, the HNE-modified proteins (HNE-P) showing remarkable aggregation. Emphasizing the prooxidant context, GSH is rapidly depleted and the GSH/GSSG ratio is substantially declining in ferritin-treated cells. Furthermore, ferritin triggers a transient upregulation of macroautophagy which is abolished by iron chelation and apparently supports HNE-P clearance. Macroautophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine strongly amplifies ferritin cytotoxicity in a time- and concentration-dependent mode, suggesting an important role of macroautophagy on cellular responses to ferritin endocytosis. Moreover, pointing at an involvement of lysosomal proteolysis, ferritin cytotoxicity and lysosome fragility are aggravated by the protease inhibitor leupeptin. In contrast, EGF which suppresses ferritin-induced cell death attenuates ferritin-mediated LMP. In conclusion, we propose that HNE-P accumulation, lysosome dysfunction, and macroautophagy stimulated by ferritin endocytosis provoke lysosomal "metastability" in primary hepatocytes which permits cell survival as long as in- and extrinsic determinants (e.g., antioxidant availability, damage repair, EGF signaling) keep the degree of lysosomal destabilization below cell death-inducing thresholds.

  3. [Fatty acid composition of structural lipids of normal and abnormal wool fibres].

    PubMed

    Havryliak, V V; Tkachuk, V M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the fatty acid composition of structural lipids, isolated from normal and abnormal wool fibers. The results of these studies show that regardless of the type of wool fibers defect there are quantitative changes in their fatty acid composition. It was shown that the main fatty acid of the covalently bound lipids, isolated from the wool fibers, is 18-methyleicosanoic acid (18-MEA), comprising 40% of the total fatty acid, while its amount in free lipids in norm is less than 4%. The decrease of 18-MEA content in the covalently bound lipid both in pathological thin and entangled wool fibers was established, which is associated with damage of the cuticle layer surface. Increasing of 18-MEA content in the free lipids in the entangled wool fibers may indicate a rupture of tioester links between lipids and proteins of cuticle layer lamellar structures.

  4. Effects of anacetrapib on plasma lipids in specific patient subgroups in the DEFINE (Determining the Efficacy and Tolerability of CETP INhibition with AnacEtrapib) trial.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Eliot A; Kher, Uma; Shah, Sukrut; Cannon, Christopher P; Davidson, Michael; Gotto, Antonio M; Ashraf, Tanya B; McCrary Sisk, Christine; Dansky, Hayes; Mitchel, Yale; Barter, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In the Determining the Efficacy and Tolerability of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) INhibition with AnacEtrapib (DEFINE) trial, anacetrapib added to statin produced robust low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)-raising vs placebo in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Predictors of the degree of LDL-C and HDL-C responses to anacetrapib, however, are poorly understood. Lipid effects of anacetrapib in patient subgroups within the DEFINE trial (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00685776) are reported. The percent of placebo-corrected changes from baseline for LDL-C (estimated by Friedewald calculation [Fc-LDL-C]) and HDL-C after 24 weeks of anacetrapib 100 mg/day were compared among patients by age, gender, race, diabetes status, type of concomitant statin with or without other lipid therapies, and baseline HDL-C, Fc-LDL-C, and triglyceride (TG) levels. Percent decreases in Fc-LDL-C and increases in HDL-C with anacetrapib were similar (magnitude of difference generally <1/5 of the overall treatment effect) across subgroups by age, gender, diabetes status, lipid-modifying regimen, and baseline Fc-LDL-C, HDL-C, or TG. On the other hand, anacetrapib effects on Fc-LDL-C (-24% vs -41%) and HDL-C (+75% vs +139%) appeared to be less in black vs white patients, respectively. Effects of anacetrapib on Fc-LDL-C and HDL-C were generally comparable across subgroups, including being relatively independent of baseline Fc-LDL-C, HDL-C, or TG levels. The clinical impact of the lipid-modifying effects of anacetrapib is being evaluated in the cardiovascular disease outcomes trial, Randomized EValuation of the Effects of Anacetrapib though Lipid-modification (REVEAL). Copyright © 2015 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. INAA determination of major and trace elements in loess, paleosol and precipitation layers in a pleistocene Loess Section, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tian, J.; Chou, C.-L.; Ehmann, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used for the determination of 31 major and trace elements in 32 samples from the Xinji Loess Section, Shaanxi Province, China. Interferences, including those from uranium fission products, were evaluated and corrections applied where necessary. The 39.7-meter deep section comprises of Lishi Loess of the middle Pleistocene (Q2) and Malan Loess of the late Pleistocene (Q3). The section is characterized by the presence of 5 layers of paleosol, and each paleosol is underlain by a precipitation layer. When the elemental abundances are converted to a carbonate-free basis, there is little compositional difference among the carbonate-free fractions of loess, paleosol and precipitation layers. This indicates that dissolution of carbonate minerals by downward-moving surface water was an important process in paleosol formation while other minerals were not severely weathered and elemental fractionation was minimal. The parent materials of the paleosol and precipitation layers closely resemble the loess layers in their elemental abundances, which suggests that all layers in the section have a compositionally similar source. ?? 1987 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  6. Rapid determination of lipid peroxidation using a novel pyridoxamine-participating ferrous oxidation-sulfosalicylic acid spectrophotometric method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingnan; Cai, Danqian; Zhang, Yu

    2016-11-15

    A novel method is developed to rapidly analyze lipid peroxidation in edible oils and fatty foods at room temperature, which is called the pyridoxamine-participating ferrous oxidation-sulfosalicylic acid (PFOS) method. The PFOS method evaluates the lipid peroxide value colorimetrically via detecting the pyridoxamine-mediated pigment produced by 5-sulfosalicylic acid and Fe(3+) at 500nm, while the latter is converted from Fe(2+) in the presence of lipid peroxides. The optimized formulation was ethanol (70%, v/v), Fe(2+) (4mmol/L), 5-sulfosalicylic acid (40mmol/L) and pyridoxamine (18mmol/L). The limit of quantitation is 0.087mmol Fe(3+)/L with acceptable reproducibility. In addition, current method has a significant linear correlation with both conventional thiobarbituric acid (R(2)=0.9999) and ferric thiocyanate assays (R(2)=0.9675). This method offers a rapid technique for evaluating lipid peroxidation without heating and sophisticated instrumental procedures. Besides, current method provides a new option to evaluate the lipid peroxidation state and improve the reproducibility of ferrous-oxidation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. S-layer protein gene of Lactobacillus brevis: cloning by polymerase chain reaction and determination of the nucleotide sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Vidgrén, G; Palva, I; Pakkanen, R; Lounatmaa, K; Palva, A

    1992-01-01

    The surface (S)-layer protein of Lactobacillus brevis was isolated, purified, and characterized. The S-layer protein is the major protein of the cell, with an apparent molecular mass of 46 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunogold electron microscopy with polyclonal antiserum against the isolated 46-kDa protein was used to confirm the surface location of this protein. N-terminal amino acid sequences of the intact 46-kDa protein and its tryptic peptides were determined. The gene of the S-layer protein was amplified from the genome of L. brevis by polymerase chain reaction with oligonucleotides, synthesized according to the N-terminal amino acid sequences, as primers. The polymerase chain reaction fragments containing the entire S-layer gene and its regulatory regions were sequenced. Nucleic acid sequence analysis revealed one open reading frame with a capacity to encode a protein of 48,159 Da. From the regulatory region of the gene, two subsequent promoters and a ribosome binding site, showing typical features of prokaryotic consensus sequences, were found. The coding region contained a characteristic gram-positive-type signal peptide of 30 amino acids. Removal of the signal peptide results in a polypeptide of 435 amino acids, which is in excellent agreement with the size of the S-layer protein determined by SDS-PAGE. The size and the 5' end analyses of the S-layer transcripts confirmed the monocistronic nature of the S-layer operon and the functionality of the two promoters found. Images PMID:1429463

  8. Conformation Transformation Determined by Different Self-Assembled Phases in a DNA Complex with Cationic Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Lipid

    SciTech Connect

    Cui,L.; Chen, D.; Zhu, L.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a novel cube-shaped cationic lipid based on the imidazolium salt of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was complexed with double-stranded DNA. Because of the negative spontaneous curvature of the cationic POSS imidazolium lipid, an inverted hexagonal phase resulted above the melting point of POSS crystals. Depending on the competition between the crystallization of POSS molecules and the negative spontaneous curvature of cationic POSS imidazolium lipids, different self-assembled phase morphologies were obtained. A lamellar phase was obtained when the POSS crystallization was relatively slow. When the POSS crystallization was fast, an inverted hexagonal phase was obtained with POSS lamellar crystals grown in the interstitials of DNA cylinders. On the basis of a circular dichroism study, double-stranded DNA adopted the B-form helical conformation in the inverted hexagonal phase, whereas the helical conformation was largely destroyed in the lamellar phase.

  9. Lipid Profile

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Lipid Profile Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... as: Lipid Panel; Coronary Risk Panel Formal name: Lipid Profile Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; ...

  10. Note: Accurate determination of thickness of multiple layers of thin film deposited on a piezoelectric quartz crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajid, Abdul

    2013-10-01

    Modern day piezoelectric quartz crystal microbalances for thin film deposition control are based on Z-match equation, which is mathematically valid for deposition of a single material on a given quartz crystal. When multiple layers are deposited, thickness and deposition rate errors accumulate due to mismatch of acoustic impedance of different materials. Here we present a novel method, based on the acoustic transfer matrix formalism, for accurate determination of thickness of an arbitrary number of layers of dissimilar materials deposited on a quartz crystal. Laboratory data show excellent accuracy of the method compared to conventional Z-match equation.

  11. Approach for simultaneous determination of thickness and sound velocity in layered structures based on sound field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnicke, Elfgard; Wolf, Mario; Kümmritz, Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive, nondestructive method for the simultaneous determination of sound velocity and thickness of the different layers of a layered structure by means of ultrasound. It will be demonstrated how further information about the reflected sound field, in addition to the time of flight, is acquired by using annular arrays. Because of this supplementary information, reflectors or other probes at known distances are not necessary and the specimen does not have to be placed in a medium with known sound velocity. Two different evaluation methods combined with a geometric model are explained. To improve the accuracy, measured signals are also evaluated by a wave propagation model.

  12. Note: Accurate determination of thickness of multiple layers of thin film deposited on a piezoelectric quartz crystal.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Abdul

    2013-10-01

    Modern day piezoelectric quartz crystal microbalances for thin film deposition control are based on Z-match equation, which is mathematically valid for deposition of a single material on a given quartz crystal. When multiple layers are deposited, thickness and deposition rate errors accumulate due to mismatch of acoustic impedance of different materials. Here we present a novel method, based on the acoustic transfer matrix formalism, for accurate determination of thickness of an arbitrary number of layers of dissimilar materials deposited on a quartz crystal. Laboratory data show excellent accuracy of the method compared to conventional Z-match equation.

  13. Layer-by-Layer Thin Film of Iron Phthalocyanine as a Simple and Fast Sensor for Polyphenol Determination in Tea Samples.

    PubMed

    Maximino, Mateus Dassie; Martin, Cibely Silva; Paulovich, Fernando Vieira; Alessio, Priscila

    2016-10-01

    Polyphenols have attracted attention due to their antioxidant capacity and beneficial effects to health. Therefore, fast, inexpensive, and efficient methods to discriminate and to quantify polyphenols are of interest for food industry. In this paper, Layer-by-Layer films of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and iron tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine were employed as sensor for determination of polyphenols in green tea (camellia sinensis), and green and roasted mate teas (ilex paraguariensis). The polyphenol sensor was tested in catechol standard solution by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), reaching a limit of detection of 1.76 × 10(-7) mol/L. The determination of polyphenols in the tea samples was obtained by analytical curve and catechol standard addition using electrochemical techniques. Projection techniques (information visualization) were applied to the DPV results of the tea samples and a pattern of separation following the phenolic content was obtained. The results support the application of the sensor in fast classification of beverages according to their polyphenol content. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. Determination of General Relations for the Behavior of Turbulent Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-07-01

    c’.osou ’.hi jkr.e.’J ;o the isnontu» Ihe variables that con- le.-.t bound-iry layer ar-par- ptidi uer.si tnal prossure he...all. The purpose of the preaent investigation ic to deter- mine the inportnr.t variables thrt control the behavtcr of turbulent boundary layers and...experimentally contained only end variable T); whoroae, in the präsent analysis, the arbitrary function contains two variables , — .-* . and E

  15. In Vitro Amphotericin B Susceptibility of Malassezia pachydermatis Determined by the CLSI Broth Microdilution Method and Etest Using Lipid-Enriched Media

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Peláez, Teresa; Cutuli, Maite; García, Marta E.

    2014-01-01

    We determined the in vitro amphotericin B susceptibility of 60 Malassezia pachydermatis isolates by the CLSI broth microdilution method and the Etest using lipid-enriched media. All isolates were susceptible at MICs of ≤1 μg/ml, confirming the high activity of amphotericin B against this yeast species. Overall, the essential agreement between the tested methods was high (80% and 96.7% after 48 h and 72 h, respectively), and all discrepancies were regarded as nonsubstantial. PMID:24752258

  16. Determination of solid state characteristics of spray-congealed Ibuprofen solid lipid microparticles and their impact on sustaining drug release.

    PubMed

    Wong, Priscilla Chui Hong; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah

    2015-05-04

    This study was used to find solid state characteristics of ibuprofen loaded spray-congealed solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) by employing simple lipids as matrices, with or without polymeric additives, and the impact of solid drug-matrix miscibility on sustaining drug release. Solid miscibility of ibuprofen with two lipids, cetyl alcohol (CA) and stearic acid (SA), were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SLMs containing 20% w/w ibuprofen with or without polymeric additives, PVP/VA and EC, were produced by spray congealing, and the resultant microparticles were subjected to visual examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal analysis using DSC, and hot-stage microscopy. Intermolecular interactions between lipids and drug as well as additives were investigated by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). X-ray diffractometry (XRD) was utilized to study polymorphic changes of drug and matrix over the course of a year. Ibuprofen was found to depress the melting points of CA and SA in a colligative manner, reaching maximum solubility at 10% w/w and 30% w/w for CA and SA, respectively. Drug encapsulation efficiencies and yields of spray-congealed SLMs containing 20% w/w ibuprofen were consistently high for both lipid matrices. CA and SA were found to adopt their stable γ- and β-polymorphs, respectively, immediately after spray congealing. The spray congealing process resulted in ibuprofen adopting an amorphous or poorly crystalline state, with no further changes over the course of a year. SEM, DSC, and hot stage microscope studies on the SLMs confirmed the formation of a solid dispersion between ibuprofen and CA and a solid solution between ibuprofen and SA. SA was found to sustain the release of ibuprofen significantly better than CA. PVP/VA and EC showed some interactions with CA, which led to an expansion of unit cell dimensions of CA upon spray congealing, whereas they

  17. Changes of crop rotation in Iowa determined from the USDA-NASS cropland data layer product

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop rotation is one of the important decisions made independently by numerous farm managers, and is a critical variable in models of crop growth and soil carbon. By combining multiple years (2001-2009) of the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) cropland data layer (CDL), it is pos...

  18. The S-layer protein from Campylobacter rectus: sequence determination and function of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, M; Maeda, H; Kitanaka, M; Kokeguchi, S; Takashiba, S; Murayama, Y

    1998-09-15

    The gene encoding the crystalline surface layer (S-layer) protein from Campylobacter rectus, designated slp, was sequenced and the recombinant gene product was expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene consisted of 4086 nucleotides encoding a protein with 1361 amino acids. The N-terminal amino acid sequence revealed that Slp did not contain a signal sequence, but that the initial methionine residue was processed. The deduced amino acid sequence displayed some common characteristic features of S-layer proteins previously reported. A homology search showed a high similarity to the Campylobacter fetus S-layer proteins, especially in their N-terminus. The C-terminal third of Slp exhibited homology with the RTX toxins from Gram-negative bacteria via the region including the glycine-rich repeats. The Slp protein had the same N-terminal sequence as a 104-kDa cytotoxin isolated from the culture supernatants of C. rectus. However, neither native nor recombinant Slp showed cytotoxicity against HL-60 cells or human peripheral white blood cells. These data support the idea that the N-terminus acts as an anchor to the cell surface components and that the C-terminus is involved in the assembly and/or transport of the protein.

  19. Lateral mobility of lipid analogues and GPI-anchored proteins in supported bilayers determined by fluorescent bead tracking.

    PubMed

    Fein, M; Unkeless, J; Chuang, F Y; Sassaroli, M; da Costa, R; Väänänen, H; Eisinger, J

    1993-07-01

    Lipid analogues and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins incorporated in glass-supported phospholipid bilayers (SBL) were coupled to small (30 nm diameter) fluorescent beads whose motion in the liquid phase was tracked by intensified fluorescence video microscopy. Streptavidin (St), covalently attached to the carboxyl modified surface of the polystyrene bead, bound either the biotinylated membrane component, or a biotinylated monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against a specific membrane constituent. The positions of the beads tethered to randomly diffusing membrane molecules were recorded at 0.2 sec intervals for about 1 min. The mean square displacement (rho) of the beads was found to be a linear function of diffusion time t, and the diffusion coefficient, D, was derived from the relation, rho(t) = 4Dt. The values of D for biotinylated phosphatidylethanolamine (Bi-PE) dispersed in an egg lecithin:cholesterol (80:20%) bilayer obtained by this methodology range from 0.05 to 0.6 micron 2/sec with an average of mean value of D = 0.26 micron 2/sec, similar to the value of mean value of D = 0.24 micron 2/sec for fluorescein-conjugated phosphatidylethanolamine (Fl-PE) linked to St-coupled beads by the anti-fluorescein mAb 4-4-20 or its Fab fragment. These values of D are comparable to those reported for Fl-PE linked to 30 nm gold particles but are several times lower than that of Fl-PE in the same planar bilayer as measured by fluorescence photobleaching recovery, D = 1.3 microns 2/sec. The mobilities of two GPI-anchored proteins in similar SBL were also determined by use of the appropriate biotinylated mAb and were found to be mean value of D = 0.25 and 0.56 micron 2/sec for the decay accelerating factor (DAF, CD55) and the human Fc gamma RIIIB (CD16) receptors, respectively. The methodology described here is suitable for tracking any accessible membrane component.

  20. Summary of experimentally determined facts concerning the behavior of the boundary layer and performance of boundary layer measurements. [considering sailing flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanness, W.

    1978-01-01

    A summary report of boundary layer studies is presented. Preliminary results of experimental measurements show that: (1) A very thin layer (approximately 0.4 mm) of the boundary layer seems to be accelerated; (2) the static pressure of the outer flow does not remain exactly constant through the boundary layer; and (3) an oncoming boundary layer which is already turbulent at the suction point can again become laminar behind this point without being completely sucked off.

  1. Comparison of X-ray diffraction methods for determination of the critical layer thickness for dislocation multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. G.; Li, P.; Parent, D. W.; Zhao, G.; Ayers, J. E.; Jain, F. C.

    1999-05-01

    We present a comparison of x-ray diffraction methods for the determination of the critical layer thickness for dislocation multiplication in mismatched heteroepitaxy. The conventional x-ray diffraction method for determination of the critical layer thickness is based on the direct observation of the lattice relaxation in measurements of strain (the “strain method”). An indirect method is based on the observation of the x-ray rocking curve broadening by the threading dislocations, which are introduced concurrently with misfit dislocations (the “full width at half maximum (FWHM) method”). For this study, we have applied both methods to ZnSe grown on GaAs (001) by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). We have compared the resolution of the two x-ray diffraction methods both theoretically and experimentally for the case of 004 reflections using Cukα1 radiation. Theoretically, we have shown that in this case the FWHM method is 2.6 times more sensitive to relaxation than the strain method. This conclusion is supported by our experiments, in which we determined a critical layer thickness value of 140 nm by the FWHM method, compared to 210 nm as determined by the strain method.

  2. The internal meristem layer (L3) determines floral meristem size and carpel number in tomato periclinal chimeras.

    PubMed Central

    Szymkowiak, E J; Sussex, I M

    1992-01-01

    Cell-cell interactions are important during plant development. We have generated periclinal chimeras between plants that differ in the number of carpels per flower to determine the roles of cells occupying specific positions in the floral meristem in determining the number of carpels initiated. Intraspecific chimeras were generated between tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) expressing the mutation fasciated, which causes an increased number of floral organs per whorl, and tomato wild type for fasciated. Interspecific chimeras were generated between tomato and L. peruvianum, which differ in number of carpels per flower. In both sets of chimeras, carpel number as well as the size of the floral meristem during carpel initiation were not determined by the genotype of cells in the outer two layers of the meristem (L1 and L2) but were determined by the genotype of cells occupying the inner layer (L3) of the meristem. We concluded from these experiments that during floral organ initiation, cells in certain layers of the meristem respond to information supplied to them from other cells in the meristem. PMID:1392610

  3. Stacking sequence determines Raman intensities of observed interlayer shear modes in 2D layered materials - A general bond polarizability model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Lu, Xin; Cong, Chunxiao; Yu, Ting; Xiong, Qihua; Ying Quek, Su

    2015-10-01

    2D layered materials have recently attracted tremendous interest due to their fascinating properties and potential applications. The interlayer interactions are much weaker than the intralayer bonds, allowing the as-synthesized materials to exhibit different stacking sequences, leading to different physical properties. Here, we show that regardless of the space group of the 2D materials, the Raman frequencies of the interlayer shear modes observed under the typical configuration blue shift for AB stacked materials, and red shift for ABC stacked materials, as the number of layers increases. Our predictions are made using an intuitive bond polarizability model which shows that stacking sequence plays a key role in determining which interlayer shear modes lead to the largest change in polarizability (Raman intensity); the modes with the largest Raman intensity determining the frequency trends. We present direct evidence for these conclusions by studying the Raman modes in few layer graphene, MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and Bi2Se3, using both first principles calculations and Raman spectroscopy. This study sheds light on the influence of stacking sequence on the Raman intensities of intrinsic interlayer modes in 2D layered materials in general, and leads to a practical way of identifying the stacking sequence in these materials.

  4. Lipid profile characterization of wastewaters from different origins.

    PubMed

    Efimova, E; Marjakangas, J M; Lakaniemi, A-M; Koskinen, P E P; Puhakka, J A

    2013-01-01

    Lipids in wastewaters are potential raw material for renewable diesel, but may complicate biological treatment of wastewaters. The lipid composition of palm oil mill effluent (POME), chemithermomechanical pulp mill (CTMP) wastewater and municipal wastewater (MWW) was studied with a combination of thin-layer chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Gravimetrically determined content of extracted lipids from the solids of POME and CTMP wastewater were 8.4 ± 1.2 g/L (19.6 ± 0.8% of dry weight) and 0.17-0.23 g/L (12.4-18.5%), respectively, while MWW contained 0.021 ± 0.002 g/L (9.3 ± 1.4%) of lipids. All lipid extracts contained mono-, di- and triacylglycerols (TAGs) and free fatty acids (FFAs). In POME, lipids were mostly TAGs (11.5 ± 0.2 μmol/10 mg of lipid extract). In CTMP and MWW lipid composition was more diverse than in POME containing also sterol derivatives and fatty acid methyl esters and the main lipids were FFAs.

  5. Determination of the scale at which land-surface heterogeneity affects the convective boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Tatyana Vadim

    1997-06-01

    The effects on the Convective Boundary Layer (CBL) of surface heterogeneities produced by sensible heat waves with different means, amplitudes, and wavelengths, were investigated here. The major objective of this study was to evaluate at which scale and under which atmospheric conditions (background wind and relative humidity) surface heterogeneity starts to affect the heat and momentum fluxes in the CBL. The Large Eddy Simulation (LES) option of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System developed at Colorado State University was used for that purpose. It is found that the impact of amplitude and wavelength of a heat wave is nonlinearly dependent upon the mean heating rate. The circulations resulting from surface heterogeneity are relatively strong when the amplitude and the wavelength of the heat wave are relatively large (especially at low mean heating rate). In that case the profiles of horizontally-averaged variables are quite strongly modified in the CBL. The potential temperature is not constant with elevation, and the sensible heat flux considerably departs from the linear variation with height obtained in a homogeneous domain. The turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) profile shows two maxima, one near the ground surface and one near the top of the CBL, in agreement with the strong horizontal flow that develops near the ground surface and the return flow at the top of the CBL. A relatively weak background wind of 2.5 m/ s-1 is strong enough to considerably reduce the impact of ground surface heterogeneity on the CBL. A moderate background wind of 5 m/ s-1 virtually eliminates all impacts that could potentially be produced in realistic landscapes. Moisture does not significantly change the CBL. However, the formation of rolls (circulations) at preferential locations within the domain causes regions of relatively high moisture concentration, which can easily result in the formation of clouds. It is important to emphasize that such clouds may not form in the CBL over

  6. Multilayer Films Electrodes Consisted of Cashew Gum and Polyaniline Assembled by the Layer-by-Layer Technique: Electrochemical Characterization and Its Use for Dopamine Determination.

    PubMed

    Barros, Sergio Bitencourt Araújo; Leite, Cleide Maria da Silva; de Brito, Ana Cristina Facundo; Dos Santos Júnior, José Ribeiro; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Eiras, Carla

    2012-01-01

    We take advantage of polyelectrolyte feature exhibited by natural cashew gum (Anacardium occidentale L.) (CG), found in northeast Brazil, to employ it in the formation of electroactive nanocomposites prepared by layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. We used polyaniline unmodified (PANI) or modified with phosphonic acid (PA), PANI-PA as cationic polyelectrolyte. On the other hand, the CG or polyvinyl sulfonic (PVS) acids were used as anionic polyelectrolytes. The films were prepared with PANI or PANI-PA intercalated with CG or with PVS alternately resulting in four films with different sequences: PANI/CG PANI-PA/CG, PANI/PVS and PANI-PA/PVS, respectively. Analysis by cyclic voltammetry (CV) of the films showed that the presence of gum increases the stability of the films in acidic medium. The performance of the modified electrode of PANI-PA/CG was evaluated in electro analytical determination of dopamine (DA). The tests showed great sensitivity of the film for this analyte that was detected at 10(-5) mol L(-1).

  7. Multilayer Films Electrodes Consisted of Cashew Gum and Polyaniline Assembled by the Layer-by-Layer Technique: Electrochemical Characterization and Its Use for Dopamine Determination

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Sergio Bitencourt Araújo; Leite, Cleide Maria da Silva; de Brito, Ana Cristina Facundo; Dos Santos Júnior, José Ribeiro; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Eiras, Carla

    2012-01-01

    We take advantage of polyelectrolyte feature exhibited by natural cashew gum (Anacardium occidentale L.) (CG), found in northeast Brazil, to employ it in the formation of electroactive nanocomposites prepared by layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. We used polyaniline unmodified (PANI) or modified with phosphonic acid (PA), PANI-PA as cationic polyelectrolyte. On the other hand, the CG or polyvinyl sulfonic (PVS) acids were used as anionic polyelectrolytes. The films were prepared with PANI or PANI-PA intercalated with CG or with PVS alternately resulting in four films with different sequences: PANI/CG PANI-PA/CG, PANI/PVS and PANI-PA/PVS, respectively. Analysis by cyclic voltammetry (CV) of the films showed that the presence of gum increases the stability of the films in acidic medium. The performance of the modified electrode of PANI-PA/CG was evaluated in electro analytical determination of dopamine (DA). The tests showed great sensitivity of the film for this analyte that was detected at 10−5 mol L−1. PMID:22505924

  8. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-10-01

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2-C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2-C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2-C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment.

  9. Experimental determination of layer cloud edge charging from cosmic ray ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, K. A.; Harrison, R. G.

    2010-07-01

    The cloud-air transition zone at stratiform cloud edges is an electrically active region where droplet charging has been predicted. Cloud edge droplet charging is expected from vertical flow of cosmic ray generated atmospheric ions in the global electric circuit. Experimental confirmation of stratiform cloud edge electrification is presented here, through charge and droplet measurements made within an extensive layer of supercooled stratiform cloud, using a specially designed electrostatic sensor. Negative space charge up to 35 pC m-3 was found in a thin (<100 m) layer at the lower cloud boundary associated with the clear air-cloud conductivity gradient, agreeing closely with space charge predicted from the measured droplet concentration using ion-aerosol theory. Such charge levels carried by droplets are sufficient to influence collision processes between cloud droplets.

  10. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-10-05

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2-C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2-C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2-C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment.

  11. Nonlinear physical segmentation algorithm for determining the layer boundary from lidar signal.

    PubMed

    Mao, Feiyue; Li, Jun; Li, Chen; Gong, Wei; Min, Qilong; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-30

    Layer boundary (base and top) detection is a basic problem in lidar data processing, the results of which are used as inputs of optical properties retrieval. However, traditional algorithms not only require manual intervention but also rely heavily on the signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we propose a robust and automatic algorithm for layer detection based on a novel algorithm for lidar signal segmentation and representation. Our algorithm is based on the lidar equation and avoids most of the limitations of the traditional algorithms. Testing of the simulated and real signals shows that the algorithm is able to position the base and top accurately even with a low signal to noise ratio. Furthermore, the results of the classification are accurate and satisfactory. The experimental results confirm that our algorithm can be used for automatic detection, retrieval, and analysis of lidar data sets.

  12. Using dissolved oxygen concentrations to determine mixed layer depths in the Bellingshausen Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Morales, K.; Kaiser, J.

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of oxygen (O2) and other dissolved gases in the oceanic mixed layer are often used to calculate air-sea gas exchange fluxes. The mixed layer depth (zmix) may be defined using criteria based on temperature or density differences to a reference depth near the ocean surface. However, temperature criteria fail in regions with strong haloclines such as the Southern Ocean where heat, freshwater and momentum fluxes interact to establish mixed layers. Moreover, the time scales of air-sea exchange differ for gases and heat, so that zmix defined using oxygen may be different than zmix defined using temperature or density. Here, we propose to define an O2-based mixed layer depth, zmix(O2), as the depth where the relative difference between the O2 concentration and a reference value at a depth equivalent to 10 dbar equals 0.5 %. This definition was established by analysis of O2 profiles from the Bellingshausen Sea (west of the Antarctic Peninsula) and corroborated by visual inspection. Comparisons of zmix(O2) with zmix based on potential temperature differences, i.e., zmix(0.2 °C) and zmix(0.5 °C), and potential density differences, i.e., zmix(0.03 kg m-3) and zmix(0.125 kg m-3), showed that zmix(O2) closely follows zmix(0.03 kg m-3). Further comparisons with published zmix climatologies and zmix derived from World Ocean Atlas 2005 data were also performed. To establish zmix for use with biological production estimates in the absence of O2 profiles, we suggest using zmix(0.03 kg m-3), which is also the basis for the climatology by de Boyer Montégut et al. (2004).

  13. Further results determining permeability and thickness for a multi-layer five spot tracer test

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.L.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-02-01

    This report presents further results obtained using a computer algorithm developed by Dexter Yuen, which gives an indication of the heterogeneity among the layers of a reservoir. Yuen, Brigham and Cinco-Ley presented a match obtained by this program with field data reported by Brigham and Smith. To find a more accurate fit for these data, the program was modified to allow the selection of up to ten peaks. Results of this more detailed analysis are presented.

  14. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces. PMID:23867843

  15. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-09-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces.

  16. Structure of Yeast OSBP-Related Protein Osh1 Reveals Key Determinants for Lipid Transport and Protein Targeting at the Nucleus-Vacuole Junction.

    PubMed

    Manik, Mohammad Kawsar; Yang, Huiseon; Tong, Junsen; Im, Young Jun

    2017-03-10

    Yeast Osh1 belongs to the oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) family of proteins and contains multiple targeting modules optimized for lipid transport at the nucleus-vacuole junction (NVJ). The key determinants for NVJ targeting and the role of Osh1 at NVJs have remained elusive because of unknown lipid specificities. In this study, we determined the structures of the ankyrin repeat domain (ANK), and OSBP-related domain (ORD) of Osh1, in complex with Nvj1 and ergosterol, respectively. The Osh1 ANK forms a unique bi-lobed structure that recognizes a cytosolic helical segment of Nvj1. We discovered that Osh1 ORD binds ergosterol and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate PI(4)P in a competitive manner, suggesting counter-transport function of the two lipids. Ergosterol is bound to the hydrophobic pocket in a head-down orientation, and the structure of the PI(4)P-binding site in Osh1 is well conserved. Our results suggest that Osh1 performs non-vesicular transport of ergosterol and PI(4)P at the NVJ.

  17. Alteration of interleaflet coupling due to compounds displaying rapid translocation in lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Reigada, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The spatial coincidence of lipid domains at both layers of the cell membrane is expected to play an important role in many cellular functions. Competition between the surface interleaflet tension and a line hydrophobic mismatch penalty are conjectured to determine the transversal behavior of laterally heterogeneous lipid membranes. Here, by a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, a continuum field theory and kinetic equations, I demonstrate that the presence of small, rapidly translocating molecules residing in the lipid bilayer may alter its transversal behavior by favoring the spatial coincidence of similar lipid phases. PMID:27596355

  18. Determination of monomethylmercury and dimethylmercury in the Arctic marine boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Baya, Pascale A; Gosselin, Michel; Lehnherr, Igor; St Louis, Vincent L; Hintelmann, Holger

    2015-01-06

    Our understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of monomethylmercury (MMHg) in the Arctic is incomplete because atmospheric sources and sinks of MMHg are still unclear. We sampled air in the Canadian Arctic marine boundary layer to quantify, for the first time, atmospheric concentrations of methylated Hg species (both MMHg and dimethylmercury (DMHg)), and, estimate the importance of atmospheric deposition as a source of MMHg to Arctic land- and sea-scapes. Overall atmospheric MMHg and DMHg concentrations (mean ± SD) were 2.9 ± 3.6 and 3.8 ± 3.1 (n = 37) pg m(-3), respectively. Concentrations of methylated Hg species in the marine boundary layer varied significantly among our sites, with a predominance of MMHg over Hudson Bay (HB), and DMHg over Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) waters. We concluded that DMHg is of marine origin and that primary production rate and sea-ice cover are major drivers of its concentration in the Canadian Arctic marine boundary layer. Summer wet deposition rates of atmospheric MMHg, likely to be the product of DMHg degradation in the atmosphere, were estimated at 188 ± 117.5 ng m(-2) and 37 ± 21.7 ng m(-2) for HB and CAA, respectively, sustaining MMHg concentrations available for biomagnification in the pelagic food web.

  19. Use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to determine double-layer capacitance in doped nonpolar liquids.

    PubMed

    Yezer, Benjamin A; Khair, Aditya S; Sides, Paul J; Prieve, Dennis C

    2015-07-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in a thin cell (10 μm) was used to infer conductivity, permittivity and the differential double-layer capacitance of solutions of dodecane doped with OLOA 11000 [poly(isobutylene) succinimide] for concentrations of dopant between 0.1% and 10% by weight. All spectra (frequencies between 1 Hz and 100 kHz) were well fit by an equivalent circuit having four elements including a constant-phase element representing the double-layer capacitance. Using Gouy-Chapman theory for small zeta potentials and assuming univalent charge carriers, the double-layer capacitances were converted into charge carrier concentration which was found to be directly proportional to the weight percent of dopant with a 1 wt% solution having 87 carriers/μm(3) (the concentration of either positive or negative charges). This is only 17 ppm of the total monomer concentration calculated from the average molecule weight of the dopant. Dividing the measured conductivities by the charge carrier concentration, we inferred the mobility and hydrodynamic diameters for the charged micelles. The hydrodynamic diameters of carriers were significantly larger than the average diameter of all micelles measured independently by dynamic light scattering. This suggests that only large micelles become charged.

  20. Surface free energy and wettability of silyl layers on silicon determined from contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Chibowski, Emil J

    2005-05-30

    Using the literature data of the advancing and receding contact angles for water, diiodomethane and hexadecane measured on various hydrophobic silyl layers (mostly monolayers) produced on silicon wafers the apparent surface free energies gamma(s)(tot) were calculated by applying new model of the contact angle hysteresis interpretation. It was found that, for the same silyl layer, the calculated gamma(s)(tot) values to some degree depended on the probe liquid used. Therefore, thus calculated the surface free energies should be considered as apparent ones. Moreover, also the values of the dispersion component gamma(s)(d) of these layers depend on the probe liquid used, but to a less degree. This must be due to the strength of the force field originating from the probe liquid and the spacing between the interacting molecules. The relationships between gamma(s)(tot) and gamma(s)(d) are discussed on the basis of the equations derived. It may be postulated that applying proposed model of the contact angle hysteresis and calculating the apparent total surface free energies and the dispersion contributions better insight into wetting properties of the silyled silicon surface can be achieved.

  1. Development and validation of a simple high-performance liquid chromatography analytical method for simultaneous determination of phytosterols, cholesterol and squalene in parenteral lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Novak, Ana; Gutiérrez-Zamora, Mercè; Domenech, Lluís; Suñé-Negre, Josep M; Miñarro, Montserrat; García-Montoya, Encarna; Llop, Josep M; Ticó, Josep R; Pérez-Lozano, Pilar

    2017-08-30

    A simple analytical method for simultaneous determination of phytosterols, cholesterol and squalene in lipid emulsions was developed owing to increased interest in their clinical effects. Method development was based on commonly used stationary (C18 , C8 and phenyl) and mobile phases (mixtures of acetonitrile, methanol and water) under isocratic conditions. Differences in stationary phases resulted in peak overlapping or coelution of different peaks. The best separation of all analyzed compounds was achieved on Zorbax Eclipse XDB C8 (150 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm; Agilent) and ACN-H2 O-MeOH, 80:19.5:0.5 (v/v/v). In order to achieve a shorter time of analysis, the method was further optimized and gradient separation was established. The optimized analytical method was validated and tested for routine use in lipid emulsion analyses. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Comparison of the Mixing Layer Height determined by ceilometer and Optical Particle Counter and simulated by MM5 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, F.; Barnaba, F.; Bolzacchini, E.; Caporaso, L.; Curci, G.; Ferrero, L.; Ferretti, R.; Gobbi, G. P.; Landi, T. C.; Stocchi, P.

    2009-09-01

    The atmospheric aerosol is often used as a proxy for the determination of the Mixing Layer Height (MLH). The ceilometer, measuring the aerosol backscattering cross section, is a powerful instrument for determining the MLH, thanks to its high spatial-temporal resolution and the possibility of continuous unattended operation. An automated algorithm for MLH determination has been developed and tested under different conditions. MLH retrieval through the analysis of the aerosol numerical concentration is possible by Balloon Borne Optical Particle Counter (BBOPC) installed aboard a tethered balloon. During summer 2007 and winter 2008, ceilometer and BBOPC data were collected in the Milan urban area (Milano Bicocca), within the framework of the Quitsat project (www.quitsat.it). Observations are compared with the planetary boundary layer height as predicted by the PSU/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5, v3 r3-6) with four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA), using two different schemes for the boundary layer parameterization: the Gayno-Seaman (GS) and non-local Medium Range Forecast (MRF).

  3. Separation of Intra- and Extramyocellular Lipid Signals in Proton MR Spectra by Determination of Their Magnetic Field Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steidle, G.; Machann, J.; Claussen, C. D.; Schick, F.

    2002-02-01

    In skeletal musculature intramyocellular (IMCL) and extramyocellular lipids (EMCL) are stored in compartments of different geometry and experience different magnetic field strengths due to geometrical susceptibility effects. The effect is strong enough to-at least partly-separate IMCL and EMCL contributions in 1H MR spectroscopy, despite IMCL and EMCL consisting of the same substances. The assessment of intramyocellular lipid stores in skeletal musculature by 1H MR spectroscopy plays an important role for studying physiological and pathological aspects of lipid metabolism. Therefore, a method using mathematical tools of Fourier analysis is developed to obtain the magnetic field distribution (MFD) from the measured spectra by deconvolution. A reference lipid spectrum is required which was recorded in tibial yellow bone marrow. It is shown that the separation of IMCL contributions can be performed more precisely-compared to other methods-based on the MFD. Examples of deconvolution in model systems elucidate the principle. Applications of the proposed approach on in vivo examinations in m. soleus and m. tibialis anterior are presented. Fitting the IMCL part of the MFD by a Gaussian lineshape with a linewidth kept fixed with respect to the linewidth of creatine and with the assumption of a smooth but not necessarily symmetrical shape for the EMCL part, the only free fit parameter, the amplitude of the IMCL part, is definite and subtraction leads to the EMCL part in the MFD. This procedure is especially justified for the soleus muscle showing a severely asymmetrical distribution which might lead to a marked overestimation of IMCL using common line fitting procedures.

  4. A bulk similarity approach in the atmospheric boundary layer using radiometric skin temperature to determine regional surface fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brutsaert, Wilfried; Sugita, Michiaki

    1991-01-01

    Profiles of wind velocity and temperature in the outer region of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) were used together with surface temperature measurements, to determine regional shear stress and sensible heat flux by means of transfer parameterizations on the basis of bulk similarity. The profiles were measured by means of radiosondes and the surface temperatures by infrared radiation thermometry over hilly prairie terrain in northeastern Kansas during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). In the analysis, the needed similarity functions were determined and tested.

  5. A bulk similarity approach in the atmospheric boundary layer using radiometric skin temperature to determine regional surface fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brutsaert, Wilfried; Sugita, Michiaki

    1991-01-01

    Profiles of wind velocity and temperature in the outer region of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) were used together with surface temperature measurements, to determine regional shear stress and sensible heat flux by means of transfer parameterizations on the basis of bulk similarity. The profiles were measured by means of radiosondes and the surface temperatures by infrared radiation thermometry over hilly prairie terrain in northeastern Kansas during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). In the analysis, the needed similarity functions were determined and tested.

  6. Buried layer tungsten deposits in porous silicon: Metal penetration depth and film purity determinants

    SciTech Connect

    Blewer, R.S.; Tsao, S.S.; Gutierrez, G.M.

    1987-01-01

    Infiltration of anodically prepared porous silicon with tungsten hexafluoride gas has been investigated as a function of silicon porosity, source gas pressure and carrier gas type and flow rate. The depth of tungsten metallization in the silicon has been shown to depend most sensitively on the WF/sub 6/ partial pressure, and less on the flow rate and carrier gas type. Penetration depths of >30 ..mu..m have been attained. Structural integrity of the tungsten layer is dependent on the porosity of the starting material and the degree of internal oxidation of the porous silicon surface area. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Measurements and determination of the marine coarse aerosol fluxes in near marine boundary layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuszewski, Piotr; Petelski, Tomasz; Zielinski, Tymon; Strzalkowska, Agata; Pakszys, Paulina; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Kowalczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    Studies of production and transport of aerosol over the sea are very important for many areas of knowledge. Marine aerosols emitted from the sea surface help to clean the boundary layer from other aerosol particles. The emitted droplets do not dry out in the highly humid surface layer air and because of their sizes most of them are deposited quickly at the sea surface. Therefore, marine aerosols have many features of rain i.e. the deposition in the marine boundary layer in high wind events is controlled not only by the "dry" processes but also by the "wet" scavenging. During a number of cruises conducted on board of r/v Oceania between 2008 and 2012 we collected much data which were further used to calculate sea salt source function over the Baltic Sea. Measurements were carried out using a gradient method. For this method we used a Laser Particle Counter (PMS model CSASP-100_HV) placed on one of the masts of the boat. Measurements were performed at five different levels above the sea level: 8, 11, 14, 17 and 20 meters. The vertical aerosol concentration gradient was obtained from a minimum of 4 measurement series. Thus each result consists of a 1 hour series with the average sampling time at each elevation equaling to 8 minutes. Based on the averaged vertical concentration, and using the Monin Obukhov theory, profiles of vertical sea spray fluxes in the near water layer were calculated. Using the results from those experiments the sea spray emission fluxes have been calculated for all particles of sizes at ranges from 0.5 μm to 8 μm, as well as for particles of sizes from fifteen channels of 0.5 μm width. Using these fluxes we calculated the Sea Salt Generation Function (SSGF) over the Baltic Sea. This function provides information on the emission of particles of different sizes, depending on environmental parameters. The emission of sea spray depends on the magnitude of energy lost by the wind waves in the process of their collapse. The support for this study

  8. Using dissolved oxygen concentrations to determine mixed layer depths in the Bellingshausen Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Morales, K.; Kaiser, J.

    2011-06-01

    Concentrations of oxygen (O2) and other dissolved gases in the oceanic mixed layer are often used to calculate air-sea gas exchange fluxes; for example, in the context of net and gross biological production estimates. The mixed layer depth (zmix) may be defined using criteria based on temperature or density differences to a reference depth near the ocean surface. However, temperature criteria fail in regions with strong haloclines such as the Southern Ocean where heat, freshwater and momentum fluxes interact to establish mixed layers. Moreover, the time scales of air-sea exchange differ for gases and heat, so that zmix defined using O2 may be different to zmix defined using temperature or density. Here, we propose to define an O2-based mixed layer depth, zmix(O2), as the depth where the relative difference between the O2 concentration and a reference value at a depth equivalent to 10 dbar equals 0.5 %. This definition was established by numerical analysis of O2 profiles in coastal areas of the Southern Ocean and corroborated by visual inspection. Comparisons of zmix(O2) with zmix based on potential temperature differences, i.e. zmix(Δθ = 0.2 °C) and zmix(Δθ = 0.5 °C), and potential density differences, i.e. zmix(Δσθ = 0.03 kg m-3) and zmix(Δσθ = 0.125 kg m-3), showed that zmix(O2) closely follows zmix(Δσθ = 0.03 kg m-3). Further comparisons with published zmix climatologies and zmix derived from World Ocean Atlas 2005 data were also performed. To establish zmix for use with biological production estimates in the absence of O2 profiles, we suggest using zmix(Δσθ = 0.03 kg m-3), which is also the basis for the climatology by de Boyer Montégut et al. (2004).

  9. Employment of Mixed Layer Models and Large Eddy Simulations to Determine the Factors Controlling Stratocumulus Cloud Lifetime over the Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghonima, M. S.; Heus, T.; Norris, J. R.; Kleissl, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Summertime marine boundary layer stratocumulus (Sc) clouds have a strong impact on ecology and infrastructure over the coast of California. Modeling the lifetime of such clouds in global climate models (GCM) or numerical weather prediction models (NWP) is difficult and significant errors are typically observed. For instance, stratocumulus clouds over the coast of southern California in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were found to dissipate, on average, 1.9 hours earlier than observed via satellite. In order to determine the factors controlling the Sc lifetime, we have employed large eddy simulations (LES) and a mixed layer model (MLM). Enhancements to previous MLMs include a temperature dependent radiation scheme, a land surface model, and a novel entrainment parameterization scheme for stratocumulus clouds over land in which the entrainment velocity is derived as a function of the surface buoyancy flux and the buoyancy flux integrated over the cloud layer. The advantage of using the MLM is that different mechanisms and feedbacks controlling stratocumulus cloud thickness can be examined rapidly through sensitivity studies. We find that during the night cloud lifetime is modulated by longwave cooling of the boundary layer and entrainment flux warming and drying. During the day, surface shortwave radiative heating drives surface flux therefore increasing the turbulence within the boundary layer and increasing entrainment flux. For wet surface conditions, the increase in latent heat flux moistens the boundary layer and offsets the increase in entrainment flux warming and drying of the boundary layer and clouds persist throughout the day. For dry surface conditions, the combination of increased surface sensible heat flux warming the boundary layer and increased entrainment flux act to dissipate the cloud within a couple of hours after sunrise. For both cases, the sea breeze advects cool ocean air that acts to thicken and prolong the cloud lifetime

  10. Complementarity of RBS, PIGE and PIXE for the determination of surface layers of thicknesses up to 30 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demortier, Guy; Mathot, Serge; Van Oystaeyen, Bruno

    1990-04-01

    The ratios of intensities of K X-rays of medium elements and L X-rays of heavy elements (whose energies lie from 5 to 25 keV) are particularly sensitive to changes in the geometrical parameters (direction of the incident beam and of the detector with respect to the sample surface), and may be used (possibly by comparison of results at different incident energies) to determine the composition of surface layers thicker than 10 μm. We will call this procedure thick layer PIXE (TL-PIXE). Proton backscattering is mainly used to appreciate the uniformity of the surface layer in the first 2-10 μm and is used here for the thickness calibration of samples studied by TL-PIXE. Resonant nuclear reactions giving rise to emission of characteristic γ-rays of light elements present in the backing are also used if the surface layer is too thick to allow the transmission of characteristics X-rays of elements in the substrate. We illustrate the potentiality of the method to measure thicknesses of gold on copper, zinc on iron, nickel on copper and aluminium-copper alloys.

  11. Conformation of ceramide 6 molecules and chain-flip transitions in the lipid matrix of the outermost layer of mammalian skin, the stratum corneum

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, M. A.

    2007-05-15

    Neutron diffraction from oriented multilamellar model stratum corneum (SC) membranes provides information on the internal nanostructure and hydration of the lipid bilayer. The main distinguishing feature of model SC membranes based on ceramide 6 is the extremely small intermembrane space (1 A). The role of the fully extended (FE) conformation of ceramide 6 molecules in the organization of the nanostructure of the lipid matrix is discussed. The FE conformation gives rise to extremely strong intermembrane attractions (armature reinforcement), which tighten the adjacent bilayers to form steric contacts. Chain-flip transitions in the conformation of ceramide molecules account for structural alterations in native and model SC membranes upon their hydration.

  12. Conformation of ceramide 6 molecules and chain-flip transitions in the lipid matrix of the outermost layer of mammalian skin, the stratum corneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, M. A.

    2007-05-01

    Neutron diffraction from oriented multilamellar model stratum corneum (SC) membranes provides information on the internal nanostructure and hydration of the lipid bilayer. The main distinguishing feature of model SC membranes based on ceramide 6 is the extremely small intermembrane space (1 Å). The role of the fully extended (FE) conformation of ceramide 6 molecules in the organization of the nanostructure of the lipid matrix is discussed. The FE conformation gives rise to extremely strong intermembrane attractions (armature reinforcement), which tighten the adjacent bilayers to form steric contacts. Chain-flip transitions in the conformation of ceramide molecules account for structural alterations in native and model SC membranes upon their hydration.

  13. Conduction band offset determination between strained CdSe and ZnSe layers using DLTS

    SciTech Connect

    Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio

    2013-12-04

    The conduction band offset between strained CdSe layers embedded in unintentionally n-type doped ZnSe is measured and reported. Two samples, consisting of thirty Ultra Thin Quantum Wells (UTQWs) of CdSe embedded in ZnSe, grown by Atomic Layer Epitaxy, are used for this study. The thicknesses of the UTQWs are one and three monolayers (MLs) in each sample, respectively. As expected, the sample with one ML UTQWs does not show any energy level in the UTQWs due to the small thickness of the UTQWs, while the thickness of the sample with 3 ML UTQWs is large enough to form an energy level inside the UTQWs. This energy level appears as a majority trap with an activation energy of 223.58 ± 9.54 meV. This corresponds to UTQWs with barrier heights (the conduction band offset) between 742 meV and 784 meV. These values suggest that the band gap misfit between strained CdSe and ZnSe is around 70.5 to 74 % in the conduction band.

  14. THz - ToF Optical Layer Analysis (OLA) to determine optical properties of dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spranger, Holger; Beckmann, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic waves with frequencies between 0.1 and 10 THz are described as THz-radiation (T-ray). The ability to penetrate dielectric materials makes T-rays attractive to reveal discontinuities in polymer and ceramic materials. THz-Time Domain Spectroscopy Systems (THz-TDS) are available on the market today which operates with THz-pulses transmitted and received by optically pumped semiconductor antennas. In THz-TDS the travelling time (ToF) and shape of the pulse is changed if it interacts with the dielectric material and its inherent discontinuities. A tomogram of the object under the test can be reconstructed from time of flight diffraction (ToFD) scans if a synthetic focusing aperture (SAFT) algorithm is applied. The knowledge of the base materials shape and optical properties is essential for a proper reconstruction result. To obtain these properties a model is assumed which describes the device under the test as multilayer structure composed of thin layers with different dielectric characteristics. The Optical Layer Analysis (OLA) is able to fulfill these requirements. A short description why the optical properties are crucial for meaningful SAFT reconstruction results will be given first. Afterwards the OLA will be derived and applied on representative samples to discuss and evaluate its benefits and limits.

  15. Conduction band offset determination between strained CdSe and ZnSe layers using DLTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio

    2013-12-01

    The conduction band offset between strained CdSe layers embedded in unintentionally n-type doped ZnSe is measured and reported. Two samples, consisting of thirty Ultra Thin Quantum Wells (UTQWs) of CdSe embedded in ZnSe, grown by Atomic Layer Epitaxy, are used for this study. The thicknesses of the UTQWs are one and three monolayers (MLs) in each sample, respectively. As expected, the sample with one ML UTQWs does not show any energy level in the UTQWs due to the small thickness of the UTQWs, while the thickness of the sample with 3 ML UTQWs is large enough to form an energy level inside the UTQWs. This energy level appears as a majority trap with an activation energy of 223.58 ± 9.54 meV. This corresponds to UTQWs with barrier heights (the conduction band offset) between 742 meV and 784 meV. These values suggest that the band gap misfit between strained CdSe and ZnSe is around 70.5 to 74 % in the conduction band.

  16. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-01-01

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2–C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2–C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2–C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment. PMID:27703168

  17. Exchange stiffness in ultrathin perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB layers determined using the spectroscopy of electrically excited spin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devolder, T.; Kim, J.-V.; Nistor, L.; Sousa, R.; Rodmacq, B.; Diény, B.

    2016-11-01

    We measure the frequencies of spin waves in nm-thick perpendicularly magnetized FeCoB systems, and model the frequencies to deduce the exchange stiffness of this material in the ultrathin limit. For this, we embody the layers in magnetic tunnel junctions patterned into circular nanopillars of diameters ranging from 100 to 300 nm, and we use magneto-resistance to determine which rf-current frequencies are efficient in populating the spin wave modes. Micromagnetic calculations indicate that the ultrathin nature of the layer and the large wave vectors used ensure that the spin wave frequencies are predominantly determined by the exchange stiffness, such that the number of modes in a given frequency window can be used to estimate the exchange stiffness. For 1 nm layers, the experimental data are consistent with an exchange stiffness A = 20 ± 2 pJ/m, which is slightly lower than its bulk counterpart. The thickness dependence of the exchange stiffness has strong implications for the numerous situations that involve ultrathin films hosting strong magnetization gradients, and the micromagnetic description thereof.

  18. Determinants of molecular specificity in phosphoinositide regulation. Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) is the endogenous lipid regulating TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Klein, Rebecca M; Ufret-Vincenty, Carmen A; Hua, Li; Gordon, Sharona E

    2008-09-19

    Once thought of as simply an oily barrier that maintains cellular integrity, lipids are now known to play an active role in a large variety of cellular processes. Phosphoinositides are of particular interest because of their remarkable ability to affect many signaling pathways. Ion channels and transporters are an important target of phosphoinositide signaling, but identification of the specific phosphoinositides involved has proven elusive. TRPV1 is a good example; although phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) can potently regulate its activation, we show that phosphatidylinositol (4)-phosphate (PI(4)P) and phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P(3)) can as well. To determine the identity of the endogenous phosphoinositide regulating TRPV1, we applied recombinant pleckstrin homology domains to inside-out excised patches. Although a PI(4,5)P(2)-specific pleckstrin homology domain inhibited TRPV1, a PI(3,4,5)P(3)-specific pleckstrin homology domain had no effect. Simultaneous confocal imaging and electrophysiological recording of whole cells expressing a rapamycin-inducible lipid phosphatase also demonstrates that depletion of PI(4,5)P(2) inhibits capsaicin-activated TRPV1 current; the PI(4)P generated by the phosphatases was not sufficient to support TRPV1 function. We conclude that PI(4,5)P(2), and not other phosphoinositides or other lipids, is the endogenous phosphoinositide regulating TRPV1 channels.

  19. Genetic determinants of lipid traits in diverse populations from the population architecture using genomics and epidemiology (PAGE) study.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, Logan; Carty, Cara L; Taylor, Kira; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Hindorff, Lucia A; Ambite, José L; Anderson, Garnet; Best, Lyle G; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Bůžková, Petra; Carlson, Christopher S; Cochran, Barbara; Cole, Shelley A; Devereux, Richard B; Duggan, Dave; Eaton, Charles B; Fornage, Myriam; Franceschini, Nora; Haessler, Jeff; Howard, Barbara V; Johnson, Karen C; Laston, Sandra; Kolonel, Laurence N; Lee, Elisa T; MacCluer, Jean W; Manolio, Teri A; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Quibrera, Miguel; Shohet, Ralph V; Wilkens, Lynne R; Haiman, Christopher A; Le Marchand, Loïc; Buyske, Steven; Kooperberg, Charles; North, Kari E; Crawford, Dana C

    2011-06-01

    For the past five years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of common variants associated with human diseases and traits, including high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglyceride (TG) levels. Approximately 95 loci associated with lipid levels have been identified primarily among populations of European ancestry. The Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study was established in 2008 to characterize GWAS-identified variants in diverse population-based studies. We genotyped 49 GWAS-identified SNPs associated with one or more lipid traits in at least two PAGE studies and across six racial/ethnic groups. We performed a meta-analysis testing for SNP associations with fasting HDL-C, LDL-C, and ln(TG) levels in self-identified European American (~20,000), African American (~9,000), American Indian (~6,000), Mexican American/Hispanic (~2,500), Japanese/East Asian (~690), and Pacific Islander/Native Hawaiian (~175) adults, regardless of lipid-lowering medication use. We replicated 55 of 60 (92%) SNP associations tested in European Americans at p<0.05. Despite sufficient power, we were unable to replicate ABCA1 rs4149268 and rs1883025, CETP rs1864163, and TTC39B rs471364 previously associated with HDL-C and MAFB rs6102059 previously associated with LDL-C. Based on significance (p<0.05) and consistent direction of effect, a majority of replicated genotype-phentoype associations for HDL-C, LDL-C, and ln(TG) in European Americans generalized to African Americans (48%, 61%, and 57%), American Indians (45%, 64%, and 77%), and Mexican Americans/Hispanics (57%, 56%, and 86%). Overall, 16 associations generalized across all three populations. For the associations that did not generalize, differences in effect sizes, allele frequencies, and linkage disequilibrium offer clues to the next generation of association studies for these traits.

  20. Porphyrin Depth in Lipid Bilayers as Determined by Iodide and Parallax Fluorescence Quenching Methods and Its Effect on Photosensitizing Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bronshtein, Irena; Afri, Michal; Weitman, Hana; Frimer, Aryeh A.; Smith, Kevin M.; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    Photosensitization by porphyrins and other tetrapyrrole chromophores is used in biology and medicine to kill cells. This light-triggered generation of singlet oxygen is used to eradicate cancer cells in a process dubbed “photodynamic therapy,” or PDT. Most photosensitizers are of amphiphilic character and they partition into cellular lipid membranes. The photodamage that they inflict to the host cell is mainly localized in membrane proteins. This photosensitized damage must occur in competition with the rapid diffusion of singlet oxygen through the lipid phase and its escape into the aqueous phase. In this article we show that the extent of damage can be modulated by employing modified hemato- and protoporphyrins, which have alkyl spacers of varying lengths between the tetrapyrrole ring and the carboxylate groups that are anchored at the lipid/water interface. The chromophore part of the molecule, and the point of generation of singlet oxygen, is thus located at a deeper position in the bilayer. The photosensitization efficiency was measured with 9,10-dimethylanthracene, a fluorescent chemical target for singlet oxygen. The vertical insertion of the sensitizers was assessed by two fluorescence-quenching techniques: by iodide ions that come from the aqueous phase; and by spin-probe-labeled phospholipids, that are incorporated into the bilayer, using the parallax method. These methods also show that temperature has a small effect on the depth when the membrane is in the liquid phase. However, when the bilayer undergoes a phase transition to the solid gel phase, the porphyrins are extruded toward the water interface as the temperature is lowered. These results, together with a previous publication in this journal, represent a unique and precedental case where the vertical location of a small molecule in a membrane has an effect on its membranal activity. PMID:15298918

  1. Lanolin-derived lipid mixtures mimic closely the lipid composition and organization of vernix caseosa lipids.

    PubMed

    Rissmann, Robert; Oudshoorn, Marion H M; Kocks, Elise; Hennink, Wim E; Ponec, Maria; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to use semi-synthetic lipid mixtures to mimic the complex lipid composition, organization and thermotropic behaviour of vernix caseosa (VC) lipids. As VC shows multiple protecting and barrier supporting properties before and after birth, it is suggested that a VC substitute could be an innovative barrier cream for barrier deficient skin. Lanolin was selected as the source of the branched chain sterol esters and wax esters--the main lipid classes of VC. Different lipid fractions were isolated from lanolin and subsequently mixed with squalene, triglycerides, cholesterol, ceramides and fatty acids to generate semi-synthetic lipid mixtures that mimic the lipid composition of VC, as established by high-performance thin-layer chromatography. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy investigations revealed that triglycerides play an important role in the (lateral) lipid organization and thermotropic behaviour of the synthetic lipid mixtures. Excellent resemblance of VC lipids was obtained when adding unsaturated triglycerides. Moreover, these lipid mixtures showed similar long range ordering as VC. The optimal lipid mixture was evaluated on tape-stripped hairless mouse skin in vivo. The rate of barrier recovery was increased and comparable to VC lipid treatment.

  2. Technical note: Boundary layer height determination from lidar for improving air pollution episode modeling: development of new algorithm and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ting; Wang, Zifa; Zhang, Wei; Gbaguidi, Alex; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Wang, Xiquan; Matsui, Ichiro; Sun, Yele

    2017-05-01

    Predicting air pollution events in the low atmosphere over megacities requires a thorough understanding of the tropospheric dynamics and chemical processes, involving, notably, continuous and accurate determination of the boundary layer height (BLH). Through intensive observations experimented over Beijing (China) and an exhaustive evaluation of existing algorithms applied to the BLH determination, persistent critical limitations are noticed, in particular during polluted episodes. Basically, under weak thermal convection with high aerosol loading, none of the retrieval algorithms is able to fully capture the diurnal cycle of the BLH due to insufficient vertical mixing of pollutants in the boundary layer associated with the impact of gravity waves on the tropospheric structure. Consequently, a new approach based on gravity wave theory (the cubic root gradient method: CRGM) is developed to overcome such weakness and accurately reproduce the fluctuations of the BLH under various atmospheric pollution conditions. Comprehensive evaluation of CRGM highlights its high performance in determining BLH from lidar. In comparison with the existing retrieval algorithms, CRGM potentially reduces related computational uncertainties and errors from BLH determination (strong increase of correlation coefficient from 0.44 to 0.91 and significant decreases of the root mean square error from 643 to 142 m). Such a newly developed technique is undoubtedly expected to contribute to improving the accuracy of air quality modeling and forecasting systems.

  3. Genetic determinants of long-term changes in blood lipid concentrations: 10-year follow-up of the GLACIER study.

    PubMed

    Varga, Tibor V; Sonestedt, Emily; Shungin, Dmitry; Koivula, Robert W; Hallmans, Göran; Escher, Stefan A; Barroso, Inês; Nilsson, Peter; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Renström, Frida; Franks, Paul W

    2014-06-01

    Recent genome-wide meta-analyses identified 157 loci associated with cross-sectional lipid traits. Here we tested whether these loci associate (singly and in trait-specific genetic risk scores [GRS]) with longitudinal changes in total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) levels in a population-based prospective cohort from Northern Sweden (the GLACIER Study). We sought replication in a southern Swedish cohort (the MDC Study; N = 2,943). GLACIER Study participants (N = 6,064) were genotyped with the MetaboChip array. Up to 3,495 participants had 10-yr follow-up data available in the GLACIER Study. The TC- and TG-specific GRSs were strongly associated with change in lipid levels (β = 0.02 mmol/l per effect allele per decade follow-up, P = 2.0 × 10(-11) for TC; β = 0.02 mmol/l per effect allele per decade follow-up, P = 5.0 × 10(-5) for TG). In individual SNP analysis, one TC locus, apolipoprotein E (APOE) rs4420638 (β = 0.12 mmol/l per effect allele per decade follow-up, P = 2.0 × 10(-5)), and two TG loci, tribbles pseudokinase 1 (TRIB1) rs2954029 (β = 0.09 mmol/l per effect allele per decade follow-up, P = 5.1 × 10(-4)) and apolipoprotein A-I (APOA1) rs6589564 (β = 0.31 mmol/l per effect allele per decade follow-up, P = 1.4 × 10(-8)), remained significantly associated with longitudinal changes for the respective traits after correction for multiple testing. An additional 12 loci were nominally associated with TC or TG changes. In replication analyses, the APOE rs4420638, TRIB1 rs2954029, and APOA1 rs6589564 associations were confirmed (P ≤ 0.001). In summary, trait-specific GRSs are robustly associated with 10-yr changes in lipid levels and three individual SNPs were strongly associated with 10-yr changes in lipid levels.

  4. Genetic Determinants of Long-Term Changes in Blood Lipid Concentrations: 10-Year Follow-Up of the GLACIER Study

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Tibor V.; Sonestedt, Emily; Shungin, Dmitry; Koivula, Robert W.; Hallmans, Göran; Escher, Stefan A.; Barroso, Inês; Nilsson, Peter; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Renström, Frida; Franks, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide meta-analyses identified 157 loci associated with cross-sectional lipid traits. Here we tested whether these loci associate (singly and in trait-specific genetic risk scores [GRS]) with longitudinal changes in total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) levels in a population-based prospective cohort from Northern Sweden (the GLACIER Study). We sought replication in a southern Swedish cohort (the MDC Study; N = 2,943). GLACIER Study participants (N = 6,064) were genotyped with the MetaboChip array. Up to 3,495 participants had 10-yr follow-up data available in the GLACIER Study. The TC- and TG-specific GRSs were strongly associated with change in lipid levels (β = 0.02 mmol/l per effect allele per decade follow-up, P = 2.0×10−11 for TC; β = 0.02 mmol/l per effect allele per decade follow-up, P = 5.0×10−5 for TG). In individual SNP analysis, one TC locus, apolipoprotein E (APOE) rs4420638 (β = 0.12 mmol/l per effect allele per decade follow-up, P = 2.0×10−5), and two TG loci, tribbles pseudokinase 1 (TRIB1) rs2954029 (β = 0.09 mmol/l per effect allele per decade follow-up, P = 5.1×10−4) and apolipoprotein A-I (APOA1) rs6589564 (β = 0.31 mmol/l per effect allele per decade follow-up, P = 1.4×10−8), remained significantly associated with longitudinal changes for the respective traits after correction for multiple testing. An additional 12 loci were nominally associated with TC or TG changes. In replication analyses, the APOE rs4420638, TRIB1 rs2954029, and APOA1 rs6589564 associations were confirmed (P≤0.001). In summary, trait-specific GRSs are robustly associated with 10-yr changes in lipid levels and three individual SNPs were strongly associated with 10-yr changes in lipid levels. PMID:24922540

  5. Evaluating quality and its determinants in lipid control for secondary prevention of heart disease and stroke in primary care: a study in an inner London Borough.

    PubMed

    Dodhia, Hiten; Kun, Liu; Logan Ellis, Hugh; Crompton, James; Wierzbicki, Anthony S; Williams, Helen; Hodgkinson, Anna; Balazs, John

    2015-12-09

    To assess quality of management and determinants in lipid control for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) using multilevel regression models. Cross-sectional study. Inner London borough, with a primary care registered population of 378,000 (2013). 48/49 participating general practices with 7869 patients on heart disease/stroke registers were included. (1) Recording of current total cholesterol levels and lipid control according to national evidence-based standards. (2) Assessment of quality by age, sex, ethnicity, deprivation, presence of other risks or comorbidity in meeting both lipid measurement and control standards. Some process standards were not met. Patients with a current cholesterol measurement >5 mmol/L were less likely to have a current statin prescription (adjusted OR=3.10; 95% CI 2.70 to 3.56). They were more likely to have clustering of other CVD risk factors. Women were significantly more likely to have raised cholesterol after adjustment for other factors (adjusted OR=1.74; 95% CI 1.53 to 1.98). In this study, the key factor that explained poor lipid control in people with CVD was having no current prescription record of a statin. Women were more likely to have poorly controlled cholesterol (independent of comorbid risk factors and after adjusting for age, ethnicity, deprivation index and practice-level variation). Women with CVD should be offered statin prescription and may require higher statin dosage for improved control. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Determination of the altitude of the nitric acid layer from very high resolution ground-based IR solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Locker, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    A ground-based solar spectrum at a spectral resolution of about 0.002/cm is used to determine the altitude of the HNO3 layer. The 870/cm spectral region, which is essentially free from absorptions from other species, is employed. The data were obtained with the University of Denver 2.5-m maximum path difference Fourier Transform interferometer spectrometer system. A set of 13 HNO3 vertical profiles were used in the analysis. The best fit obtained for the 'starting' profile (which is centered at 24 km), and the best fit for the profile centered at 26 km are shown. For displacements of greater than 2 km, the discrepancy between the synthetic and observed spectra becomes readily discernible by inspection of the spectra. It is shown that the 'best fit' rms residuals are quite sensitive to the assumed altitude of the HNO3 layer.

  7. Determining the efficiency of subjecting finely dispersed emulsions to physical coagulation in a packed layer under turbulent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. G.; Basharov, M. M.; Farakhova, A. I.

    2013-09-01

    The process through which small droplets contained in emulsions are physically coagulated on the surface of random packing elements is considered. The theory of turbulent migration of a finely dispersed phase is used for determining the coagulation efficiency. Expressions for calculating coagulation efficiency and turbulent transfer rate are obtained by applying models of a turbulent boundary layer. An example of calculating the enlargement of water droplets in hydrocarbon medium represented by a wide fraction of light hydrocarbons (also known as natural gas liquid) is given. The process flowchart of a system for removing petroleum products from effluent waters discharged from the Kazan TETs-1 cogeneration station is considered. Replacement of the mechanical filter by a thin-layer settler with a coagulator is proposed.

  8. Two-wavelengths laser-speckle technique for thickness determination of transparent layers on rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettner, J.; Zagar, B. G.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, a non-contacting laser-speckle technique and two different implementations thereof for measuring the thickness of thin transparent liquid layers on optically rough surfaces are presented. The optical system allows large stand-off distances and can be used in harsh environments and industrial applications. The thickness of the (oil) coating can be measured down into the μm range, which is below that of the surface roughness. The distribution of the coating depends on adhesive and cohesive forces, the temperature and primarily on the surface topography itself. The thickness of transparent coatings can be evaluated statistically considering wavelengths and roughness. We describe the two measurement principles and the data processing, present measurement results and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of both methods. For a better understanding, the theoretical considerations of the diffraction of sinusoidal phase gratings in the Fraunhofer region will be given.

  9. Modified shape of the Eiffel Tower determined for an atmospheric boundary-layer wind profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P. D.

    2009-06-01

    The design and construction of the Eiffel Tower was based, in part, on a uniform horizontal wind model giving 300 kg m-2 kinematic pressure acting on the surface of the tower. Eiffel received a patent for his method of construction that eliminates the need for diagonal trellis bars used to resist the moment of an oncoming wind. At the end of the 19th century boundary-layer theory, laminar or turbulent, was nonexistent. Now, however, models for atmospheric flow over rough landscapes are available, the simplest being a power-law distribution of velocity with height. In this paper we deduce the shape of the tower had Eiffel incorporated this information into the design and construction of his world famous tower. Moreover, we prove Eiffel's observation that the tower profile conforms to the moment distribution wrought by the wind.

  10. A trough for improved SFG spectroscopy of lipid monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Johannes; van Zadel, Marc-Jan; Weidner, Tobias

    2017-05-01

    Lipid monolayers are indispensable model systems for biological membranes. The main advantage over bilayer model systems is that the surface pressure within the layer can be directly and reliably controlled. The sensitive interplay between surface pressure and temperature determines the molecular order within a model membrane and consequently determines the membrane phase behavior. The lipid phase is of crucial importance for a range of membrane functions such as protein interactions and membrane permeability. A very reliable method to probe the structure of lipid monolayers is sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. Not only is SFG extremely surface sensitive but it can also directly access critical parameters such as lipid order and orientation, and it can provide valuable information about protein interactions along with interfacial hydration. However, recent studies have shown that temperature gradients caused by high power laser beams perturb the lipid layers and potentially obscure the spectroscopic results. Here we demonstrate how the local heating problem can be effectively reduced by spatially distributing the laser pulses on the sample surface using a translating Langmuir trough for SFG experiments at lipid monolayers. The efficiency of the trough is illustrated by the detection of enhanced molecular order due to reduced heat load.

  11. On determination of formaldehyde content in atmospheric boundary layer for overcast using DOAS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postylyakov, Oleg; Borovski, Alexander; Ivanov, Victor

    2015-11-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is involved in a lot of chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Taking into account that HCHO basically undergo by photolysis and reaction with hydroxyl radical within a few hours, short-lived VOCs and direct HCHO emissions can cause local HCHO enhancement over certain areas, and, hence, exceeding background level of HCHO can be examined as a local pollution of the atmosphere by VOCs or existence of a local HCHO source. Several retrieval algorithms applicable for DOAS measurements in cloudless were previously developed. A new algorithm applicable for overcast and cloudless sky and its error analysis is briefly introduced by this paper. Analysis of our HCHO VCD retrieval for overcast shows that when one know the cloud base height, but doesn't know cloud optical depth, the typical errors of HCHO total content retrieval are less than 10% for snow season, less than 5% for snow-free seasons, and reaches 40-45% for season with non-stable snow cover. In case one knows both the cloud base height and the cloud optical depth, the typical errors are about 5% for snow season, less than 2.5% for snow-free seasons, and are within about 10-30% for season with non-stable snow cover. Given above error estimations are valid if the HCHO layer is below the cloud base. The errors dramatically increase when HCHO layer penetrates into clouds in both cases. The first preliminary results of HCHO VCD retrieval for overcast are shown. The average difference of the HCHO VCDs for wind from Moscow megapolis and wind from few urbanized areas is about 0.8×1016 mol×cm-2 and approximately corresponds to estimates of influence of Moscow megapolis observed in clear-sky conditions.

  12. Lipid and fatty acid compositions of cod ( Gadus morhua), haddock ( Melanogrammus aeglefinus) and halibut ( Hippoglossus hippoglossus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Duan; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui; Milley, Joyce E.; Lall, Santosh P.

    2010-12-01

    This study was conducted to compare lipid and fatty acid composition of cod, haddock and halibut. Three groups of cod (276 g ± 61 g), haddock (538 g ± 83 g) and halibut (3704 g ± 221 g) were maintained with commercial feeds mainly based on fish meal and marine fish oil for 12 weeks prior to sampling. The fatty acid compositions of muscle and liver were determined by GC/FID after derivatization of extracted lipids into fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). Lipids were also fractionated into neutral and polar lipids using Waters silica Sep-Pak?. The phospholipid fraction was further separated by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and the FAME profile was obtained. Results of the present study showed that cod and haddock were lean fish and their total muscle lipid contents were 0.8% and 0.7%, respectively, with phospholipid constituting 83.6% and 87.5% of the total muscle lipid, respectively. Halibut was a medium-fat fish and its muscle lipid content was 8%, with 84% of the total muscle lipid being neutral lipid. Total liver lipid contents of cod, haddock and halibut were 36.9%, 67.2% and 30.7%, respectively, of which the neutral lipids accounted for the major fraction (88.1%-97.1%). Polyunsaturated fatty acids were the most abundant in cod and haddock muscle neutral lipid. Monounsaturated fatty acid level was the highest in halibut muscle neutral lipid. Fatty acid compositions of phospholipid were relatively constant. In summary, the liver of cod and haddock as lean fish was the main lipid reserve organ, and structural phospholipid is the major lipid form in flesh. However, as a medium-fat fish, halibut stored lipid in both their liver and muscle.

  13. Model-based Approaches for the Determination of Lipid Bilayer Structure from Small-Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A; Pan, Jianjun; Standaert, Robert F; Drazba, Paul; Kucerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John

    2012-01-01

    Some of our recent work has resulted in the detailed structures of fully hydrated, fluid phase phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) bilayers. These structures were obtained from the joint refinement of small-angle neutron and X-ray data using the scattering density profile (SDP) models developed by Ku erka et al. (Ku erka et al. 2012; Ku erka et al. 2008). In this review, we first discuss models for the standalone analysis of neutron or X-ray scattering data from bilayers, and assess the strengths and weaknesses inherent in these models. In particular, it is recognized that standalone data do not contain enough information to fully resolve the structure of inherently disordered fluid bilayers, and therefore may not provide a robust determination of bilayer structural parameters, including the much sought after area per lipid. We then discuss the development of matter density-based models (including the SDP model) that allow for the joint refinement of different contrast neutron and X-ray data sets, as well as the implementation of local volume conservation in the unit cell (i.e., ideal packing). Such models provide natural definitions of bilayer thicknesses (most importantly the hydrophobic and Luzzati thicknesses) in terms of Gibbs dividing surfaces, and thus allow for the robust determination of lipid areas through equivalent slab relationships between bilayer thickness and lipid volume. In the final section of this review, we discuss some of the significant findings/features pertaining to structures of PC and PG bilayers as determined from SDP model analyses.

  14. Membrane location of apocytochrome c and cytochrome c determined from lipid-protein spin exchange interactions by continuous wave saturation electron spin resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Snel, M M; Marsh, D

    1994-01-01

    Apocytochrome c derived from horse heart cytochrome c was spin-labeled on the cysteine residue at position 14 or 17 in the N-terminal region of the primary sequence, and cytochrome c from yeast was spin-labeled on the single cysteine residue at sequence position 102 in the C-terminal region. The spin-labeled apocytochrome c and cytochrome c were bound to fluid bilayers composed of different negatively charged phospholipids that also contained phospholipid probes that were spin-labeled either in the headgroup or at different positions in the sn-2 acyl chain. The location of the spin-labeled cysteine residues on the lipid-bound proteins was determined relative to the spin-label positions in the different spin-labeled phospholipids by the influence of spin-spin interactions on the microwave saturation properties of the spin-label electron spin resonance spectra. The enhanced spin relaxation observed in the doubly labeled systems arises from Heisenberg spin exchange, which is determined by the accessibility of the spin-label group on the protein to that on the lipid. It is found that the labeled cysteine groups in horse heart apocytochrome c are located closest to the 14-C atom of the lipid acyl chain when the protein is bound to dimyristoyl- or dioleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol, and to that of the 5-C atom when the protein is bound to a dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (15:85 mol/mol mixture. On binding to dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol, the labeled cysteine residue in yeast cytochrome c is located closest to the phospholipid headgroups but possibly between the polar group region and the 5-C atom of the acyl chains. These data determine the extent to which the different regions of the proteins are able to penetrate negatively charged phospholipid bilayers. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7948687

  15. Contribution of various lipid profile parameters in determining creatine kinase-MB levels in unstable angina patients.

    PubMed

    Bagale, Kiran R; Ingle, Avinash S; Choudhary, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    In India, the correlation of severity of minor myocardial damage with dyslipidemia has rarely been studied in patients of unstable angina (UA). Dyslipidemia is proven to be a major risk factor for developing acute coronary syndrome (ACS) but still there is doubt about the type of lipoproteins involved in causing minor myocardial damage occurring in UA patients of ACS. The aim of our study was to find out the contribution of various types of lipoproteins to predict the severity of minor myocardial damage occurring in the patients of UA. Correlation design was used for the study. A single group of individuals was selected. Data were collected on dependent variable creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) and independent variables (lipid profile parameters). The study comprised fifty patients admitted in cardiac care unit with typical history of UA with electrocardiogram showing no ST-segment elevation. The severity of myocardial damage was assessed from on admission CK-MB levels. The lipid profile was estimated from fasting blood samples of all the patients. For the purpose of the study, Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression analysis methods were applied. The triacylglycerol (TAG), very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (TC/HDL) showed significant positive correlation whereas HDL was negatively correlating with CK-MB levels. The TAG, VLDL, and TC/HDL were found to be significantly affecting the severity of myocardial damage in the patients of UA.

  16. Structural and mechanical properties of cardiolipin lipid bilayers determined using neutron spin echo, small angle neutron and X-ray scattering, and molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Sharp, Melissa; ...

    2014-10-29

    We report that the detailed structural and mechanical properties of a tetraoleoyl cardiolipin (TOCL) bilayer were determined using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, small angle neutron and X-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS, respectively), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We used MD simulations to develop a scattering density profile (SDP) model, which was then utilized to jointly refine SANS and SAXS data. In addition to commonly reported lipid bilayer structural parameters, component distributions were obtained, including the volume probability, electron density and neutron scattering length density.

  17. Structural and mechanical properties of cardiolipin lipid bilayers determined using neutron spin echo, small angle neutron and X-ray scattering, and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Sharp, Melissa; Ho, Chian-Sing; Khadka, Nawal; Katsaras, John

    2014-10-29

    We report that the detailed structural and mechanical properties of a tetraoleoyl cardiolipin (TOCL) bilayer were determined using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, small angle neutron and X-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS, respectively), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We used MD simulations to develop a scattering density profile (SDP) model, which was then utilized to jointly refine SANS and SAXS data. In addition to commonly reported lipid bilayer structural parameters, component distributions were obtained, including the volume probability, electron density and neutron scattering length density.

  18. Determination of pigments in colour layers on walls of some selected historical buildings using optical and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Skapin, A. Sever Ropret, P. Bukovec, P.

    2007-11-15

    For successful restoration of painted walls and painted coloured finishing coats it is necessary to determine the composition of the original colour layers. Identification of the pigments used in The Cistercian Abbey of Sticna and The Manor of Novo Celje was carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Selected samples of wall paintings were inspected by the combined application of an optical microscope and a low-vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope to determine their colour and structural features and to identify the position of individual pigment grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to determine the elemental distribution on selected surfaces and elemental composition of individual pigments. It was found that the most abundantly used pigments were iron oxide red, cinnabar, green earth, umber, calcium carbonate white, ultramarine, yellow ochre and carbon black. These identifications have allowed us to compare the use of various pigments in buildings from different historical periods.

  19. Determination of sucralose in soft drinks by high-performance thin-layer chromatography: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Joerg; Doncheva, Ivanka; Spangenberg, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    An interlaboratory comparison was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of a method based on HPTLC in which reagent-free derivatization is followed by UV/fluorescence detection. The method was tested for the determination of sucralose (C12H19C13O8; (2R,3R,4R,5S,6R)-2-[(2R,3S,4S,5S)-2,5-bis(chloromethyl)-3,4-dihydroxyoxolan-2-yl]oxy-5-chloro-6-hydroxymethyl)oxane-3, 4-diol; CAS Registry No. 56038-13-2) in carbonated and still beverages at the proposed European regulatory limits. For still beverages, a portion of the sample was diluted with methanol-water. For carbonated beverages, a portion of the sample was degassed in an ultrasonic bath before dilution. Turbid beverages were filtered after dilution through an HPLC syringe filter. The separation of sucralose was performed by direct application on amino-bonded (NH2) silica gel HPTLC plates (no cleanup needed) with the mobile phase acetonitrile-water. Sucralose was determined after reagent-free derivatization at 190 degrees C; it was quantified by measurements of both UV absorption and fluorescence. The samples, both spiked and containing sucralose, were sent to 14 laboratories in five different countries. Test portions of a sample found to contain no sucralose were spiked at levels of 30.5, 100.7, and 299 mg/L. Recoveries ranged from 104.3 to 124.6% and averaged 112% for determination by UV detection; recoveries ranged from 98.4 to 101.3% and averaged 99.9% for determination by fluorescence detection. On the basis of the results for spiked samples (blind duplicates at three levels), as well as sucralose-containing samples (blind duplicates at three levels and one split level), the values for the RSDr ranged from 10.3 to 31.4% for determinations by UV detection and from 8.9 to 15.9% for determinations by fluorescence detection. The values for the RSDR values ranged from 13.5 to 31.4% for determinations by UV detection and from 8.9 to 20.7% for determinations by fluorescence detection.

  20. Reduced-Basis Determination of Planetary Boundary-Layer Flow Statistics for a Novel Turbulence Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skitka, Joseph; Marston, Brad; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty in climate modeling and weather forecasting can largely be attributed to the omission or inaccurate representation of oceanic and atmospheric subgrid processes. Existing subgrid turbulence models are built on assumptions of isotropy, homogeneity, and the locality of correlations. Direct statistical simulation (DSS) using expansion in equal-time cumulants is a novel approach to subgrid modeling that does not make these assumptions. In prior work, a second-order closure, CE2, was shown to capture important vertical turbulent transports in Langmuir turbulence and Rayleigh-Bénard convection, but to run efficiently, this approach to turbulence modeling requires a drastic reduction in dimensionality. The present work addresses how accurately these systems can be represented with a truncated principal orthogonal decomposition (POD). The representation of turbulent transports by truncated POD bases are studied by static projection of fully resolved statistics and dynamical evolution of a reduced model. Results indicate the projected truncated turbulent statistics in these flows are less sensitive to flow details, like mixed-layer depth, than the truncated basis itself. The question of whether POD is an optimal truncation technique for these purposes is considered. NSF DMR 1306806, NSF GCE 1350795, The Institute at Brown for Environment and Society Graduate Student Fellowship.

  1. The role of oxidoreductases in determining the function of the neisserial lipid A phosphoethanolamine transferase required for resistance to polymyxin.

    PubMed

    Piek, Susannah; Wang, Zhirui; Ganguly, Jhuma; Lakey, Adam M; Bartley, Stephanie N; Mowlaboccus, Shakeel; Anandan, Anandhi; Stubbs, Keith A; Scanlon, Martin J; Vrielink, Alice; Azadi, Parastoo; Carlson, Russell W; Kahler, Charlene M

    2014-01-01

    The decoration of the lipid A headgroups of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) by the LOS phosphoethanolamine (PEA) transferase (LptA) in Neisseria spp. is central for resistance to polymyxin. The structure of the globular domain of LptA shows that the protein has five disulphide bonds, indicating that it is a potential substrate of the protein oxidation pathway in the bacterial periplasm. When neisserial LptA was expressed in Escherichia coli in the presence of the oxidoreductase, EcDsbA, polymyxin resistance increased 30-fold. LptA decorated one position of the E. coli lipid A headgroups with PEA. In the absence of the EcDsbA, LptA was degraded in E. coli. Neisseria spp. express three oxidoreductases, DsbA1, DsbA2 and DsbA3, each of which appear to donate disulphide bonds to different targets. Inactivation of each oxidoreductase in N. meningitidis enhanced sensitivity to polymyxin with combinatorial mutants displaying an additive increase in sensitivity to polymyxin, indicating that the oxidoreductases were required for multiple pathways leading to polymyxin resistance. Correlates were sought between polymyxin sensitivity, LptA stability or activity and the presence of each of the neisserial oxidoreductases. Only meningococcal mutants lacking DsbA3 had a measurable decrease in the amount of PEA decoration on lipid A headgroups implying that LptA stability was supported by the presence of DsbA3 but did not require DsbA1/2 even though these oxidoreductases could oxidise the protein. This is the first indication that DsbA3 acts as an oxidoreductase in vivo and that multiple oxidoreductases may be involved in oxidising the one target in N. meningitidis. In conclusion, LptA is stabilised by disulphide bonds within the protein. This effect was more pronounced when neisserial LptA was expressed in E. coli than in N. meningitidis and may reflect that other factors in the neisserial periplasm have a role in LptA stability.

  2. Genetic Determinants of Lipid Traits in Diverse Populations from the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Logan; Carty, Cara L.; Taylor, Kira; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Ambite, José L.; Anderson, Garnet; Best, Lyle G.; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Bůžková, Petra; Carlson, Christopher S.; Cochran, Barbara; Cole, Shelley A.; Devereux, Richard B.; Duggan, Dave; Eaton, Charles B.; Fornage, Myriam; Franceschini, Nora; Haessler, Jeff; Howard, Barbara V.; Johnson, Karen C.; Laston, Sandra; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lee, Elisa T.; MacCluer, Jean W.; Manolio, Teri A.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Quibrera, Miguel; Shohet, Ralph V.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Buyske, Steven; Kooperberg, Charles; North, Kari E.; Crawford, Dana C.

    2011-01-01

    For the past five years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of common variants associated with human diseases and traits, including high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglyceride (TG) levels. Approximately 95 loci associated with lipid levels have been identified primarily among populations of European ancestry. The Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study was established in 2008 to characterize GWAS–identified variants in diverse population-based studies. We genotyped 49 GWAS–identified SNPs associated with one or more lipid traits in at least two PAGE studies and across six racial/ethnic groups. We performed a meta-analysis testing for SNP associations with fasting HDL-C, LDL-C, and ln(TG) levels in self-identified European American (∼20,000), African American (∼9,000), American Indian (∼6,000), Mexican American/Hispanic (∼2,500), Japanese/East Asian (∼690), and Pacific Islander/Native Hawaiian (∼175) adults, regardless of lipid-lowering medication use. We replicated 55 of 60 (92%) SNP associations tested in European Americans at p<0.05. Despite sufficient power, we were unable to replicate ABCA1 rs4149268 and rs1883025, CETP rs1864163, and TTC39B rs471364 previously associated with HDL-C and MAFB rs6102059 previously associated with LDL-C. Based on significance (p<0.05) and consistent direction of effect, a majority of replicated genotype-phentoype associations for HDL-C, LDL-C, and ln(TG) in European Americans generalized to African Americans (48%, 61%, and 57%), American Indians (45%, 64%, and 77%), and Mexican Americans/Hispanics (57%, 56%, and 86%). Overall, 16 associations generalized across all three populations. For the associations that did not generalize, differences in effect sizes, allele frequencies, and linkage disequilibrium offer clues to the next generation of association studies for these traits. PMID:21738485

  3. The Role of Oxidoreductases in Determining the Function of the Neisserial Lipid A Phosphoethanolamine Transferase Required for Resistance to Polymyxin

    PubMed Central

    Piek, Susannah; Wang, Zhirui; Ganguly, Jhuma; Lakey, Adam M.; Bartley, Stephanie N.; Mowlaboccus, Shakeel; Anandan, Anandhi; Stubbs, Keith A.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Vrielink, Alice; Azadi, Parastoo; Carlson, Russell W.; Kahler, Charlene M.

    2014-01-01

    The decoration of the lipid A headgroups of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) by the LOS phosphoethanolamine (PEA) transferase (LptA) in Neisseria spp. is central for resistance to polymyxin. The structure of the globular domain of LptA shows that the protein has five disulphide bonds, indicating that it is a potential substrate of the protein oxidation pathway in the bacterial periplasm. When neisserial LptA was expressed in Escherichia coli in the presence of the oxidoreductase, EcDsbA, polymyxin resistance increased 30-fold. LptA decorated one position of the E. coli lipid A headgroups with PEA. In the absence of the EcDsbA, LptA was degraded in E. coli. Neisseria spp. express three oxidoreductases, DsbA1, DsbA2 and DsbA3, each of which appear to donate disulphide bonds to different targets. Inactivation of each oxidoreductase in N. meningitidis enhanced sensitivity to polymyxin with combinatorial mutants displaying an additive increase in sensitivity to polymyxin, indicating that the oxidoreductases were required for multiple pathways leading to polymyxin resistance. Correlates were sought between polymyxin sensitivity, LptA stability or activity and the presence of each of the neisserial oxidoreductases. Only meningococcal mutants lacking DsbA3 had a measurable decrease in the amount of PEA decoration on lipid A headgroups implying that LptA stability was supported by the presence of DsbA3 but did not require DsbA1/2 even though these oxidoreductases could oxidise the protein. This is the first indication that DsbA3 acts as an oxidoreductase in vivo and that multiple oxidoreductases may be involved in oxidising the one target in N. meningitidis. In conclusion, LptA is stabilised by disulphide bonds within the protein. This effect was more pronounced when neisserial LptA was expressed in E. coli than in N. meningitidis and may reflect that other factors in the neisserial periplasm have a role in LptA stability. PMID:25215579

  4. Harvesting and cryo-cooling crystals of membrane proteins grown in lipidic mesophases for structure determination by macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Li, Dianfan; Boland, Coilín; Aragao, David; Walsh, Kilian; Caffrey, Martin

    2012-09-02

    An important route to understanding how proteins function at a mechanistic level is to have the structure of the target protein available, ideally at atomic resolution. Presently, there is only one way to capture such information as applied to integral membrane proteins (Figure 1), and the complexes they form, and that method is macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX). To do MX diffraction quality crystals are needed which, in the case of membrane proteins, do not form readily. A method for crystallizing membrane proteins that involves the use of lipidic mesophases, specifically the cubic and sponge phases(1-5), has gained considerable attention of late due to the successes it has had in the G protein-coupled receptor field(6-21) (www.mpdb.tcd.ie). However, the method, henceforth referred to as the in meso or lipidic cubic phase method, comes with its own technical challenges. These arise, in part, due to the generally viscous and sticky nature of the lipidic mesophase in which the crystals, which are often micro-crystals, grow. Manipulating crystals becomes difficult as a result and particularly so during harvesting(22,23). Problems arise too at the step that precedes harvesting which requires that the glass sandwich plates in which the crystals grow (Figure 2)(24,25) are opened to expose the mesophase bolus, and the crystals therein, for harvesting, cryo-cooling and eventual X-ray diffraction data collection. The cubic and sponge mesophase variants (Figure 3) from which crystals must be harvested have profoundly different rheologies(4,26). The cubic phase is viscous and sticky akin to a thick toothpaste. By contrast, the sponge phase is more fluid with a distinct tendency to flow. Accordingly, different approaches for opening crystallization wells containing crystals growing in the cubic and the sponge phase are called for as indeed different methods are required for harvesting crystals from the two mesophase types. Protocols for doing just that have been

  5. Microalgae lipid characterization.

    PubMed

    Yao, Linxing; Gerde, Jose A; Lee, Show-Ling; Wang, Tong; Harrata, Kamel A

    2015-02-18

    To meet the growing interest of utilizing microalgae biomass in the production of biofuels and nutraceutical and pharmaceutical lipids, we need suitable analytical methods and a comprehensive database for their lipid components. The objective of the present work was to demonstrate methodology and provide data on fatty acid composition, lipid class content and composition, characteristics of the unsaponifiables, and type of chlorophylls of five microalgae. Microalgae lipids were fractionated into TAG, FFA, and polar lipids using TLC, and the composition of fatty acids in total lipids and in each lipid class, hydrocarbons, and sterols were determined by GC-MS. Glyco- and phospholipids were profiled by LC/ESI-MS. Chlorophylls and their related metabolites were qualified by LC/APCI-MS. The melting and crystallization profiles of microalgae total lipids and their esters were analyzed by DSC to evaluate their potential biofuel applications. Significant differences and complexities of lipid composition among the algae tested were observed. The compositional information is valuable for strain selection, downstream biomass fractionation, and utilization.

  6. Determination of Optimal Parameters for Dual-Layer Cathode of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Using Computational Intelligence-Aided Design

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Huang, Weina; Peng, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Because of the demands for sustainable and renewable energy, fuel cells have become increasingly popular, particularly the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Among the various components, the cathode plays a key role in the operation of a PEFC. In this study, a quantitative dual-layer cathode model was proposed for determining the optimal parameters that minimize the over-potential difference and improve the efficiency using a newly developed bat swarm algorithm with a variable population embedded in the computational intelligence-aided design. The simulation results were in agreement with previously reported results, suggesting that the proposed technique has potential applications for automating and optimizing the design of PEFCs. PMID:25490761

  7. Determination of optimal parameters for dual-layer cathode of polymer electrolyte fuel cell using computational intelligence-aided design.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Huang, Weina; Peng, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Because of the demands for sustainable and renewable energy, fuel cells have become increasingly popular, particularly the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Among the various components, the cathode plays a key role in the operation of a PEFC. In this study, a quantitative dual-layer cathode model was proposed for determining the optimal parameters that minimize the over-potential difference η and improve the efficiency using a newly developed bat swarm algorithm with a variable population embedded in the computational intelligence-aided design. The simulation results were in agreement with previously reported results, suggesting that the proposed technique has potential applications for automating and optimizing the design of PEFCs.

  8. On the determination of the position of laminar-turbulent transition in boundary layer by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bountin, D. A.; Gromyko, Yu. V.; Maslov, A. A.; Polivanov, P. A.; Sidorenko, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    As a rule, aerodynamic studies at hypersonic flow velocities are carried out in short-duration wind-tunnel facilities. For such facilities, optical diagnostic methods are most preferable. In the present study, we give for the first time a comparison of two methods for determining the end of laminar-turbulent transition: from the distribution of heat fluxes and from schlieren visualization data for the boundary-layer flow. Parametric data on the position of the transition are obtained. These data can be used in the future as reference ones while calibrating semi-empirical calculation models for the transition.

  9. Ozone-induced dissociation on a traveling wave high-resolution mass spectrometer for determination of double-bond position in lipids.

    PubMed

    Vu, Ngoc; Brown, Jeffery; Giles, Kevin; Zhang, Qibin

    2017-09-15

    The position of C=C within fatty acyl chains affects the biological function of lipids. Ozone-induced dissociation mass spectrometry (OzID-MS) has great potential in determination of lipid double-bond position, but has generally been implemented on low-resolution ion trap mass spectrometers. In addition, most of the OzID-MS experiments carried out so far were focused on the sodiated adducts of lipids; fragmentation of the most commonly observed protonated ions generated in LC/MS-based lipidomics workflow has been less explored. Ozone generated in line from an ozone generator was connected to the trap and transfer gas supply line of a Synapt G2 high-resolution mass spectrometer. Protonated ions of different phosphatidylcholines (PC) were generated by electrospray ionization through direct infusion. Different parameters, including traveling wave height and velocity, trap entrance and DC potential, were adjusted to maximize the OzID efficiency. sn-positional isomers and cis/trans isomers of lipids were compared for their reactivity with ozone. Traveling wave height and velocity were tuned to prolong the encounter time between lipid ions and ozone, and resulted in improved OzID efficiency, as did increasing trapping region DC and entrance potential. Under optimized settings, at least 1000 times enhancement in OzID efficiency was achieved compared to that under default settings for monounsaturated PC standards. Monounsaturated C=C in the sn-2 PC isomer reacted faster with ozone than the sn-1 isomer. Similarly, the C=C in trans PC reacted faster than in cis PC. This is the first implementation of OzID in the trap and transfer region of a traveling wave enabled high-resolution mass spectrometer. The OzID reaction efficiency is significantly improved by slowing down ions in the trap region for their prolonged interaction with ozone. This will facilitate application of high-resolution OzID-MS in lipidomics. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Optimization of total vaporization solid-phase microextraction (TV-SPME) for the determination of lipid profiles of Phormia regina, a forensically important blow fly species.

    PubMed

    Kranz, William; Carroll, Clinton; Dixon, Darren; Picard, Christine; Goodpaster, John

    2017-08-29

    A new method has been developed for the determination of fatty acids, sterols, and other lipids which naturally occur within pupae of the blow fly Phormia regina. The method relies upon liquid extraction in non-polar solvent, followed by derivatization using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) w/ 1% trimethylchlorsilane (TMCS) carried out inside the sample vial. The analysis is facilitated by total vaporization solid-phase microextraction (TV-SPME), with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) serving as the instrumentation for analysis. The TV-SPME delivery technique is approximately a factor of five more sensitive than traditional liquid injection, which may alleviate the need for rotary evaporation, reconstitution, collection of high performance liquid chromatography fractions, and many of the other pre-concentration steps that are commonplace in the current literature. Furthermore, the ability to derivatize the liquid extract in a single easy step while increasing sensitivity represents an improvement over current derivatization methods. The most common lipids identified in fly pupae were various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids ranging from lauric acid (12:0) to arachinoic acid (20:4), as well as cholesterol. The concentrations of myristic acid (14:0), palmitelaidic acid (16:2), and palmitoleic acid (16:1) were the most reliable indicators of the age of the pupae. Graphical abstract Blow fly pupae were extracted prior to emerging as adults. The extracts were analyzed via total vaporization solid-phase microextraction (TV-SPME), revealing a complex mixture of lipids that could be associated with the age of the insect. This information may assist in determining a post-mortum interval (PMI) in a death investigation.

  11. TRPV1 structures in nanodiscs reveal mechanisms of ligand and lipid action.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Cao, Erhu; Julius, David; Cheng, Yifan

    2016-06-16

    When integral membrane proteins are visualized in detergents or other artificial systems, an important layer of information is lost regarding lipid interactions and their effects on protein structure. This is especially relevant to proteins for which lipids have both structural and regulatory roles. Here we demonstrate the power of combining electron cryo-microscopy with lipid nanodisc technology to ascertain the structure of the rat TRPV1 ion channel in a native bilayer environment. Using this approach, we determined the locations of annular and regulatory lipids and showed that specific phospholipid interactions enhance binding of a spider toxin to TRPV1 through formation of a tripartite complex. Furthermore, phosphatidylinositol lipids occupy the binding site for capsaicin and other vanilloid ligands, suggesting a mechanism whereby chemical or thermal stimuli elicit channel activation by promoting the release of bioactive lipids from a critical allosteric regulatory site.

  12. TRPV1 structures in nanodiscs reveal mechanisms of ligand and lipid action

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan; Cao, Erhu; Julius, David; Cheng, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    When integral membrane proteins are visualized in detergents or other artificial systems, an important layer of information is lost regarding lipid interactions and their effects on protein structure. This is especially relevant to proteins for which lipids play both structural and regulatory roles. Here, we demonstrate the power of combining electron cryo-microscopy with lipid nanodisc technology to ascertain the structure of the TRPV1 ion channel in a native bilayer environment. Using this approach, we determined the locations of annular and regulatory lipids and showed that specific phospholipid interactions enhance binding of a spider toxin to TRPV1 through formation of a tripartite complex. Furthermore, phosphatidylinositol lipids occupy the binding site for capsaicin and other vanilloid ligands, suggesting a mechanism whereby chemical or thermal stimuli elicit channel activation by promoting release of bioactive lipids from a critical allosteric regulatory site. PMID:27281200

  13. Structure and Dynamics of the Myristoyl Lipid Modification of Src Peptides Determined by 2H Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, Holger A.; Huster, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Lipid modifications of proteins are widespread in nature and play an important role in numerous biological processes. The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src is equipped with an N-terminal myristoyl chain and a cluster of basic amino acids for the stable membrane association of the protein. We used 2H NMR spectroscopy to investigate the structure and dynamics of the myristoyl chain of myr-Src(2–19), and compare them with the hydrocarbon chains of the surrounding phospholipids in bilayers of varying surface potentials and chain lengths. The myristoyl chain of Src was well inserted in all bilayers investigated. In zwitterionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine membranes, the myristoyl chain of Src was significantly longer and appears “stiffer” than the phospholipid chains. This can be explained by an equilibrium between the attraction attributable to the insertion of the myristoyl chain and the Born repulsion. In a 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-L-serine] membrane, where attractive electrostatic interactions come into play, the differences between the peptide and the phospholipid chain lengths were attenuated, and the molecular dynamics of all lipid chains were similar. In a much thicker 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-L-serine]/cholesterol membrane, the length of the myristoyl chain of Src was elongated nearly to its maximum, and the order parameters of the Src chain were comparable to those of the surrounding membrane. PMID:19413971

  14. Determination of anesthetic molecule environments by infrared spectroscopy. II. Multiple sites for nitrous oxide in proteins, lipids, and brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Hazzard, J H; Gorga, J C; Caughey, W S

    1985-08-01

    The presence of molecules of the general anesthetic nitrous oxide (N2O) in oils, esters, proteins, red cells, cream, lipid vesicles, and brain tissue upon exposure to the gas was observed by infrared spectroscopy. Analysis of the N-N-O antisymmetric stretch band reveals a distribution of N2O molecules among several sites of differing polarity in these solutions and tissues. The sensitivity of the band intensity and frequency to the number and strength of the dipoles in the solvating molecules is demonstrated by the resolution of N2O-ester and N2O-alkane interactions in acetic acid ethyl ester and oleic acid methyl ester. In all aqueous solutions and in all tissues a population of N2O molecules in water is observed. At least two sites of N2O-protein interaction are observed in purified hemoglobin A and packed red cells; multiple N2O sites may also be present in bovine serum albumin. Two sites of N2O-lipid interaction are observed in whipping cream and in an aqueous suspension of phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The sites providing the least polar immediate environment to N2O in hemoglobin, cream, and vesicles give similar band frequencies to those found in pure alkane solvents. Infrared spectra of bovine brain tissue, upon exposure to N2O, show N2O molecules present in water and in two less-polar environments. Analysis of spectra of N2O in cerebellum tissue removed from a dog under halothane-N2O anesthesia reveals, in addition to N2O in water, a single population of N2O molecules in an alkane-like environment. Infrared spectroscopy provides a unique means of probing the structure of the environment of N2O and should prove useful in correlating anesthetic potency with anesthetic environment under physiological conditions.

  15. Comparison of Methods to Determine Tropical Tropopause Layer Cirrus Formation Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Liang, Calvin; Massie, Steven T.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Toth, Travis D.

    2012-03-30

    A new method of estimating Tropical Tropopause Layer Cirrus (TTLC) formation mechanism (object method) is compared to interpretations of formation from previous studies using back trajectory calculations matched to convection identified from satellites and statistical relationships of TTLC with temperature and water vapor. The object method groups neighboring Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) TTLC cloud profiles into cloud objects and classifies them as convective (35% of TTLC) if they are directly attached to a convective cloud along the CALIPSO track. The percentage of back trajectory calculations that intersect convection (39-95% of TTLC within 5 days) depends strongly on the spatial and temporal resolution of the convection data set, and the manner in which deep convection is identified. Using minimum brightness temperature in 3 hourly, 1{sup o} resolution grid boxes to define convection, 46% of non-convective TTLC (37% of all TTLC) did not trace back to convection within 24 h. Back trajectory calculations of thin cirrus identified by the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) gave similar results. Temperature is not a good proxy for formation mechanism as convective and non-convective TTLC frequencies both increase monotonically with decreasing temperature at approximately the same rate. Non-convective TTLC frequencies have a stronger relationship with relative humidity than convective TTLC frequencies, though are not sufficiently different to distinguish object method categories. A decrease in TTL cirrus frequency found at low temperatures in previous studies is caused by insufficient variability in reanalysis temperature data and is not indicative of TTLC formation mechanism.

  16. Comparison of methods to determine Tropical Tropopause Layer cirrus formation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Liang, Calvin; Massie, Steven T.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Toth, Travis D.

    2012-03-01

    A new method of estimating Tropical Tropopause Layer Cirrus (TTLC) formation mechanism (object method) is compared to interpretations of formation from previous studies using back trajectory calculations matched to convection identified from satellites and statistical relationships of TTLC with temperature and water vapor. The object method groups neighboring Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) TTLC cloud profiles into cloud objects and classifies them as convective (35% of TTLC) if they are directly attached to a convective cloud along the CALIPSO track. The percentage of back trajectory calculations that intersect convection (39-95% of TTLC within 5 days) depends strongly on the spatial and temporal resolution of the convection data set, and the manner in which deep convection is identified. Using minimum brightness temperature in 3 hourly, 1° resolution grid boxes to define convection, 46% of non-convective TTLC (37% of all TTLC) did not trace back to convection within 24 h. Back trajectory calculations of thin cirrus identified by the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) gave similar results. Temperature is not a good proxy for formation mechanism as convective and non-convective TTLC frequencies both increase monotonically with decreasing temperature at approximately the same rate. Non-convective TTLC frequencies have a stronger relationship with relative humidity than convective TTLC frequencies, though are not sufficiently different to distinguish object method categories. A decrease in TTL cirrus frequency found at low temperatures in previous studies is caused by insufficient variability in reanalysis temperature data and is not indicative of TTLC formation mechanism.

  17. Evaporation and Hydrocarbon Chain Conformation of Surface Lipid Films

    PubMed Central

    Sledge, Samiyyah M.; Khimji, Hussain; Borchman, Douglas; Oliver, Alexandria; Michael, Heidi; Dennis, Emily K.; Gerlach, Dylan; Bhola, Rahul; Stephen, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The inhibition of the rate of evaporation (Revap) by surface lipids is relevant to reservoirs and dry eye. Our aim was to test the idea that lipid surface films inhibit Revap. Methods Revap were determined gravimetrically. Hydrocarbon chain conformation and structure were measured using a Raman microscope. Six 1-hydroxyl hydrocarbons (11–24 carbons in length) and human meibum were studied. Reflex tears were obtained from a 62-year-old male. Results The Raman scattering intensity of the lipid film deviated by about 7 % for hydroxyl lipids and varied by 21 % for meibum films across the entire film at a resolution of 5 µm2. All of the surface lipids were ordered. Revap of the shorter chain hydroxyl lipids were slightly (7%) but significantly lower compared with the longer chain hydroxyl lipids. Revap of both groups was essentially similar to that of buffer. A hydroxyl lipid film did not influence Revap over an estimated average thickness range of 0.69 to >6.9 µm. Revap of human tears and buffer with and without human meibum (34.4 µm thick) was not significantly different. Revap of human tears was not significantly different from buffer. Conclusions Human meibum and hydroxyl lipids, regardless of their fluidity, chain length, or thickness did not inhibit Revap of buffer or tears even though they completely covered the surface. It is unlikely that hydroxyl lipids can be used to inhibit Revap of reservoirs. Our data do not support the widely accepted (yet unconfirmed) idea that the tear film lipid layer inhibits Revap of tears. PMID:27395776

  18. High Performance Thin layer Chromatography: Densitometry Method for Determination of Rubraxanthone in the Stem Bark Extract of Garcinia cowa Roxb.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Dachriyanus; Aulia, Hilyatul; Susanti, Meri

    2017-01-01

    Garcinia cowa is a medicinal plant widely grown in Southeast Asia and tropical countries. Various parts of this plant have been used in traditional folk medicine. The bark, latex, and root have been used as an antipyretic agent, while fruit and leaves have been used as an expectorant, for indigestion and improvement of blood circulation. This study aims to determine the concentration of rubraxanthone found in ethyl acetate extract of the stem bark of G. cowa by the high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC). HPTLC method was performed on precoated silica gel G 60 F254 plates using an HPTLC system with a developed mobile-phase system of chloroform: ethyl acetate: methanol: formic acid (86:6:3:5). A volume of 5 μL of standard and sample solutions was applied to the chromatographic plates. The plates were developed in saturated mode of twin trough chamber at room temperature. The method was validated based on linearity, accuracy, precision, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), and specificity. The spots were observed at ultraviolet 243 nm. The linearity of rubraxanthone was obtained between 52.5 and 157.5 ppm/spot. The LOD and LOQ were found to be 4.03 and 13.42 ppm/spot, respectively. The proposed method showed good linearity, precision, accuracy, and high sensitivity. Therefore, it may be applied for the quantification of rubraxanthone in ethyl acetate extract of the stem bark of G. cowa. High performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) method provides rapid qualitative and quantitative estimation of rubraxanthone as a marker com¬pound in G. cowa extract used for commercial productRubraxanthone found in ethyl acetate extracts of G. cowa was successfully quantified using HPTLC method. Abbreviations Used: TLC: Thin-layer chromatography, HPTLC: High-performance thin-layer chromatography, LOD: Limit of detection, LOQ: Limit of quantification, ICH: International Conference on Harmonization.

  19. Determination of the layer-specific distributed collagen fibre orientations in human thoracic and abdominal aortas and common iliac arteries

    PubMed Central

    Schriefl, Andreas J.; Zeindlinger, Georg; Pierce, David M.; Regitnig, Peter; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2012-01-01

    The established method of polarized microscopy in combination with a universal stage is used to determine the layer-specific distributed collagen fibre orientations in 11 human non-atherosclerotic thoracic and abdominal aortas and common iliac arteries (63 ± 15.3 years, mean ± s.d.). A dispersion model is used to quantify over 37 000 recorded fibre angles from tissue samples. The study resulted in distinct fibre families, fibre directions, dispersion and thickness data for each layer and all vessels investigated. Two fibre families were present for the intima, media and adventitia in the aortas, with often a third and sometimes a fourth family in the intima in the respective axial and circumferential directions. In all aortas, the two families were almost symmetrically arranged with respect to the cylinder axis, closer to the axial direction in the adventitia, closer to the circumferential direction in the media and in between in the intima. The same trend was found for the intima and adventitia of the common iliac arteries; however, there was only one preferred fibre alignment present in the media. In all locations and layers, the observed fibre orientations were always in the tangential plane of the walls, with no radial components and very small dispersion through the wall thickness. A wider range of in-plane fibre orientations was present in the intima than in the media and adventitia. The mean total wall thickness for the aortas and the common iliac artery was 1.39 and 1.05 mm, respectively. For the aortas, a slight thickening of the intima and a thinning of the media in increasingly distal regions were observed. A clear intimal thickening was present distal to the branching of the celiac arteries. All data, except for the media of the common iliac arteries, showed two prominent collagen fibre families for all layers so that two-fibre family models seem most appropriate. PMID:22171063

  20. Introduction to membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes are composed largely of lipids and proteins. The most common arrangement of lipids in biological membranes is as a bilayer. This arrangement spontaneously forms a barrier for the passage of polar materials. The bilayer is thin but can have a large area in the dimension perpendicular to its thickness. The physical nature of the bilayer membrane will vary according to the conditions of the environment as well as the chemical structure of the lipid constituents of the bilayer. These physical properties determine the function of the membrane together with specific structural features of the lipids that allow them to have signaling properties. The lipids of the membrane are not uniformly distributed. There is an intrinsic asymmetry between the two monolayers that constitute the bilayer. In addition, some lipids tend to be enriched in particular regions of the membrane, termed domains. There is evidence that certain domains recruit specific proteins into that domain. This has been suggested to be important for allowing interaction among different proteins involved in certain signal transduction pathways. Membrane lipids have important roles in determining the physical properties of the membrane, in modulating the activity of membrane-bound proteins and in certain cases being specific secondary messengers that can interact with specific proteins. A large variety of lipids present in biological membranes result in them possessing many functions.

  1. Semiquantitative determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in tissue samples by thin layer chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulhern, B.M.; Cromartie, E.; Reichel, W.L.; Belisle, A.A.

    1971-01-01

    A method is described for the analysis of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds in tissue samples. Cleanup by hexane-aceto-nitrile partitioning and Florisil column chromatography are performed on samples before oxidative treatment to convert DDE to DCBP. PCB components are then determined semi-quantitatively by TLC. No prior separation of PCB from chlorinated pesticides is required. The lower limit of sensitivity is 0.2 ?g.

  2. T(2) determination of the J-coupled methyl protons of lipids: In vivo ilustration with tibial bone marrow at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Atiyah; Fallone, B Gino

    2010-06-01

    To demonstrate how J-coupling modulations of the CH(3) lipid resonance can be minimized enabling a representative T(2) to be measured. Experiments were conducted on canola oil and in vivo on tibial bone marrow of four volunteers at 3 T. The T(2) of the CH(2) protons was measured with a standard point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence, whereas the T(2) of the CH(3) protons was determined with a PRESS sequence composed of narrow bandwidth refocusing pulses designed to exploit the chemical shift displacement effect and rewind the J-coupling evolution of the CH(3) protons in the desired voxel. Spectra were acquired at five echo times. The narrow bandwidth PRESS sequence rewound the J-evolution of the CH(3) protons resulting in a T(2) curve that was well described by a monoexponential function. The mean T(2) of the bone marrow CH(3) protons was calculated to be 132.6 msec. The mean T(2) of the bone marrow CH(2) protons was estimated with a regular PRESS sequence to be 88.0 msec. The mean CH(2):CH(3) tibial bone marrow composition was estimated to be 12.0:1. The presented technique permits the T(2) of the methyl protons of lipids to be determined with more accuracy by minimizing contributions from J-coupling.

  3. Determining the Polar Cosmic Ray Effect on Cloud Microphysics and the Earth's Ozone Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckie, Charlene Radons

    Earth’s changing climate is an important topic where atmospheric ozone plays a critical role. Ozone has a direct influence on the amount and type of solar radiation received by the Earth. This study addresses how cosmic rays may influence the ozone layer by ionizing Earth’s atmosphere and enhancing the growth of cloud condensation nuclei and rate of chemical reactions on polar ice cloud surfaces. This theory was largely based on the lifetime work by Lu [2010]. The region of interest was centered over the Thule, Greenland neutron monitor station. Using cosmic ray, satellite-based ISCCP and ICARE project cloud data along with TOMS-OMI-SBUV and TEMIS total column ozone data, data comparisons were done. Plots of cosmic rays versus Antarctic atmospheric ozone from Lu [2009] were reproduced using regional Arctic data and extended to include years from 1983 to 2011. Comparisons to the research by Harris et al. [2010] were made by substituting ice cloud optical thickness for the cloud parameter and seasonal total column ozone for winter stratospheric ozone loss. The results of these data evaluations showed that the regional Arctic view matched very closely to Lu’s work from the Antarctic. The ozone 3-point moving average case demonstrated a statistically significant correlation of -0.508. Extending the data duration exposed a cosmic ray data peak that was 14 percent larger than the two previous 11-year cycles. Ice cloud tau / ozone data comparisons did not produce the strong correlations from Harris et al. [2010]. Five years of low stratospheric temperatures and increased volumes of polar stratospheric clouds, identified by Rex et al. [2006], matched significant years of total column ozone minimums. Polar atmospheric CO2 trended along with ice cloud tau and oppositely to total column ozone, suggesting that lower stratospheric temperatures are instrumental in ozone reduction. Future work would involve using more extensive datasets, focusing on parameters such as ice

  4. Swelling and pillaring of the layered precursor IPC-1P: tiny details determine everything.

    PubMed

    Shamzhy, Mariya; Mazur, Michal; Opanasenko, Maksym; Roth, Wieslaw J; Čejka, Jiří

    2014-07-21

    The influence of swelling (i.e. the size of tetraalkylammonium surfactant molecule, the presence of tetrapropylammonium hydroxide (TPAOH), pH) and pillaring (i.e. the ratio between the swollen precursor IPC-1P and tetraethyl orthosilicate) conditions on the structure and textural properties of the resulting materials was studied in detail for IPC-1P, which is the layered precursor of zeolite PCR. The swelling of IPC-1P proceeds efficiently under basic conditions both in mixed C(n)H(2n+1)N(CH3)3Cl/TPAOH systems and in C(n)H(2n+1)N(CH3)3OH (n = 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18) solutions at pH = 13-14. The intercalation of C(n)H(2n+1)N(+)(CH3)3 in IPC-1P resulted in the formation of expanded materials with interlayer distances growing with increasing length of the alkyl chain in C(n)H(2n+1)N(CH3)3(+): 1.59-1.86 (n = 8) < 1.89-2.11 (10) < 2.05-2.26 (12) = 2.08-2.26 (14) < 2.37-2.43 (16) < 2.57-2.71 (18) Å. IPC-2 zeolite was formed during calcination of IPC-1P samples swollen in C(n)H(2n+1)N(CH3)3OH solution, while PCR zeolite can be obtained by calcination of IPC-1P treated with either C(n)H(2n+1)N(CH3)3Cl/TPAOH or C(n)H(2n+1)N(CH3)3Cl. The pillaring of IPC-1P samples swollen with C(n)H(2n+1)N(CH3)3OH provided mesoporous materials with narrow pore size distribution in the range 2.5-3.5 nm. Pillared materials derived from the samples swollen in the presence of TPAOH were characterized by a broader pore size distribution. The optimal TEOS/IPC-1PSW ratio being sufficient for the formation of well-ordered pillared derivatives characterized by improved textural properties (S(BET) = 878 m(2) g(-1), V(total) = 0.599 cm(3) g(-1)) was found to be 1 : 1.5.

  5. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE C ISOTOPIC VALUE OF MICROBIAL LIPIDS APPLIED TO DETERMINE C USAGE IN MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The combination of compound specific stable isotopic analysis with phospholipid fatty acid (PLFAS) analysis is useful in determining the source of organic carbon used by groups of a microbial community. Determination of the effect of certain environmental parameters is important ...

  6. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE C ISOTOPIC VALUE OF MICROBIAL LIPIDS APPLIED TO DETERMINE C USAGE IN MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The combination of compound specific stable isotopic analysis with phospholipid fatty acid (PLFAS) analysis is useful in determining the source of organic carbon used by groups of a microbial community. Determination of the effect of certain environmental parameters is important ...

  7. Contact-free sheet resistance determination of large area graphene layers by an open dielectric loaded microwave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaforost, O.; Wang, K.; Goniszewski, S.; Adabi, M.; Guo, Z.; Hanham, S.; Gallop, J.; Hao, L.; Klein, N.

    2015-01-01

    A method for contact-free determination of the sheet resistance of large-area and arbitrary shaped wafers or sheets coated with graphene and other (semi) conducting ultrathin layers is described, which is based on an open dielectric loaded microwave cavity. The sample under test is exposed to the evanescent resonant field outside the cavity. A comparison with a closed cavity configuration revealed that radiation losses have no significant influence of the experimental results. Moreover, the microwave sheet resistance results show good agreement with the dc conductivity determined by four-probe van der Pauw measurements on a set of CVD samples transferred on quartz. As an example of a practical application, correlations between the sheet resistance and deposition conditions for CVD graphene transferred on quartz wafers are described. Our method has a high potential as measurement standard for contact-free sheet resistance measurement and mapping of large area graphene samples.

  8. Contact-free sheet resistance determination of large area graphene layers by an open dielectric loaded microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Shaforost, O.; Wang, K.; Adabi, M.; Guo, Z.; Hanham, S.; Klein, N.; Goniszewski, S.; Gallop, J.; Hao, L.

    2015-01-14

    A method for contact-free determination of the sheet resistance of large-area and arbitrary shaped wafers or sheets coated with graphene and other (semi) conducting ultrathin layers is described, which is based on an open dielectric loaded microwave cavity. The sample under test is exposed to the evanescent resonant field outside the cavity. A comparison with a closed cavity configuration revealed that radiation losses have no significant influence of the experimental results. Moreover, the microwave sheet resistance results show good agreement with the dc conductivity determined by four-probe van der Pauw measurements on a set of CVD samples transferred on quartz. As an example of a practical application, correlations between the sheet resistance and deposition conditions for CVD graphene transferred on quartz wafers are described. Our method has a high potential as measurement standard for contact-free sheet resistance measurement and mapping of large area graphene samples.

  9. Sexually dimorphic genome-wide binding of retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα) determines male-female differences in the expression of hepatic lipid processing genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Kosters, Astrid; Sun, Deqiang; Wu, Hao; Tian, Feng; Felix, Julio C; Li, Wei; Karpen, Saul J

    2013-01-01

    Many hepatic functions including lipid metabolism, drug metabolism, and inflammatory responses are regulated in a sex-specific manner due to distinct patterns of hepatic gene expression between males and females. Regulation for the majority of these genes is under control of Nuclear Receptors (NRs). Retinoid X Receptor alpha (RXRα) is an obligate partner for multiple NRs and considered a master regulator of hepatic gene expression, yet the full extent of RXRα chromatin binding in male and female livers is unclear. ChIP-Seq analysis of RXRα and RNA Polymerase2 (Pol2) binding was performed livers of both genders and combined with microarray analysis. Mice were gavage-fed with the RXR ligand LG268 for 5 days (30 mg/kg/day) and RXRα-binding and RNA levels were determined by ChIP-qPCR and qPCR, respectively. ChIP-Seq revealed 47,845 (male) and 46,877 (female) RXRα binding sites (BS), associated with ∼12,700 unique genes in livers of both genders, with 91% shared between sexes. RXRα-binding showed significant enrichment for 2227 and 1498 unique genes in male and female livers, respectively. Correlating RXRα binding strength with Pol2-binding revealed 44 genes being male-dominant and 43 female-dominant, many previously unknown to be sexually-dimorphic. Surprisingly, genes fundamental to lipid metabolism, including Scd1, Fasn, Elovl6, and Pnpla3-implicated in Fatty Liver Disease pathogenesis, were predominant in females. RXRα activation using LG268 confirmed RXRα-binding was 2-3 fold increased in female livers at multiple newly identified RXRα BS including for Pnpla3 and Elovl6, with corresponding ∼10-fold and ∼2-fold increases in Pnpla3 and Elovl6 RNA respectively in LG268-treated female livers, supporting a role for RXRα regulation of sexually-dimorphic responses for these genes. RXRα appears to be one of the most widely distributed transcriptional regulators in mouse liver and is engaged in determining sexually-dimorphic expression of key lipid

  10. Sexually Dimorphic Genome-Wide Binding of Retinoid X Receptor alpha (RXRα) Determines Male-Female Differences in the Expression of Hepatic Lipid Processing Genes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Tian, Feng; Felix, Julio C.; Li, Wei; Karpen, Saul J.

    2013-01-01

    Many hepatic functions including lipid metabolism, drug metabolism, and inflammatory responses are regulated in a sex-specific manner due to distinct patterns of hepatic gene expression between males and females. Regulation for the majority of these genes is under control of Nuclear Receptors (NRs). Retinoid X Receptor alpha (RXRα) is an obligate partner for multiple NRs and considered a master regulator of hepatic gene expression, yet the full extent of RXRα chromatin binding in male and female livers is unclear. ChIP-Seq analysis of RXRα and RNA Polymerase2 (Pol2) binding was performed livers of both genders and combined with microarray analysis. Mice were gavage-fed with the RXR ligand LG268 for 5 days (30 mg/kg/day) and RXRα-binding and RNA levels were determined by ChIP-qPCR and qPCR, respectively. ChIP-Seq revealed 47,845 (male) and 46,877 (female) RXRα binding sites (BS), associated with ∼12,700 unique genes in livers of both genders, with 91% shared between sexes. RXRα-binding showed significant enrichment for 2227 and 1498 unique genes in male and female livers, respectively. Correlating RXRα binding strength with Pol2-binding revealed 44 genes being male-dominant and 43 female-dominant, many previously unknown to be sexually-dimorphic. Surprisingly, genes fundamental to lipid metabolism, including Scd1, Fasn, Elovl6, and Pnpla3-implicated in Fatty Liver Disease pathogenesis, were predominant in females. RXRα activation using LG268 confirmed RXRα-binding was 2–3 fold increased in female livers at multiple newly identified RXRα BS including for Pnpla3 and Elovl6, with corresponding ∼10-fold and ∼2-fold increases in Pnpla3 and Elovl6 RNA respectively in LG268-treated female livers, supporting a role for RXRα regulation of sexually-dimorphic responses for these genes. RXRα appears to be one of the most widely distributed transcriptional regulators in mouse liver and is engaged in determining sexually-dimorphic expression of key lipid

  11. Immersion transmission ellipsometry (ITE) for the determination of orientation gradients in photoalignment layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C. C.; Stumpe, J.

    2014-09-01

    The capability of the method of immersion transmission ellipsometry (ITE) (Jung et al. Int Patent WO, 2004/109260) to not only determine three-dimensional refractive indices in anisotropic thin films (which was already possible in the past), but even their gradients along the z-direction (perpendicular to the film plane) is investigated in this paper. It is shown that the determination of orientation gradients in deep-sub-μm films becomes possible by applying ITE in combination with reflection ellipsometry. The technique is supplemented by atomic force microscopy for measuring the film thickness. For a photo-oriented thin film, no gradient was found, as expected. For a photo-oriented film, which was subsequently annealed in a nematic liquid crystalline phase, an order was found similar to the one applied in vertically aligned nematic displays, with a tilt angle varying along the z-direction. For fresh films, gradients were only detected for the refractive index perpendicular to the film plane, as expected.

  12. Determination of the oxide layer thickness in core-shell zerovalent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Martin, John E; Herzing, Andrew A; Yan, Weile; Li, Xiao-qin; Koel, Bruce E; Kiely, Christopher J; Zhang, Wei-xian

    2008-04-15

    Zerovalent iron (nZVI) nanoparticles have long been used in the electronic and chemical industries due to their magnetic and catalytic properties. Increasingly, applications of nZVI have also been reported in environmental engineering because of their ability to degrade a wide variety of toxic pollutants in soil and water. It is generally assumed that nZVI has a core-shell morphology with zerovalent iron as the core and iron oxide/hydroxide in the shell. This study presents a detailed characterization of the nZVI shell thickness using three independent methods. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis provides direct evidence of the core-shell structure and indicates that the shell thickness of fresh nZVI was predominantly in the range of 2-4 nm. The shell thickness was also determined from high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS) analysis through comparison of the relative integrated intensities of metallic and oxidized iron with a geometric correction applied to account for the curved overlayer. The XPS analysis yielded an average shell thickness in the range of 2.3-2.8 nm. Finally, complete oxidation reaction of the nZVI particles by Cu(II) was used as an indication of the zerovalent iron content of the particles, and these observations further correlate the chemical reactivity of the particles and their shell thicknesses. The three methods yielded remarkably similar results, providing a reliable determination of the shell thickness, which fills an essential gap in our knowledge about the nZVI structure. The methods presented in this work can also be applied to the study of the aging process of nZVI and may also prove useful for the measurement and characterization of other metallic nanoparticles.

  13. Prevalence, Specificity and Determinants of Lipid-Interacting PDZ Domains from an In-Cell Screen and In Vitro Binding Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Rudra; Polanowska, Jolanta; Betzi, Stéphane; Lembo, Frédérique; Vermeiren, Elke; Chiheb, Driss; Lenfant, Nicolas; Morelli, Xavier; Borg, Jean-Paul; Reboul, Jérôme; Zimmermann, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Background PDZ domains are highly abundant protein-protein interaction modules involved in the wiring of protein networks. Emerging evidence indicates that some PDZ domains also interact with phosphoinositides (PtdInsPs), important regulators of cell polarization and signaling. Yet our knowledge on the prevalence, specificity, affinity, and molecular determinants of PDZ-PtdInsPs interactions and on their impact on PDZ-protein interactions is very limited. Methodology/Principal Findings We screened the human proteome for PtdInsPs interacting PDZ domains by a combination of in vivo cell-localization studies and in vitro dot blot and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) experiments using synthetic lipids and recombinant proteins. We found that PtdInsPs interactions contribute to the cellular distribution of some PDZ domains, intriguingly also in nuclear organelles, and that a significant subgroup of PDZ domains interacts with PtdInsPs with affinities in the low-to-mid micromolar range. In vitro specificity for the head group is low, but with a trend of higher affinities for more phosphorylated PtdInsPs species. Other membrane lipids can assist PtdInsPs-interactions. PtdInsPs-interacting PDZ domains have generally high pI values and contain characteristic clusters of basic residues, hallmarks that may be used to predict additional PtdInsPs interacting PDZ domains. In tripartite binding experiments we established that peptide binding can either compete or cooperate with PtdInsPs binding depending on the combination of ligands. Conclusions/Significance Our screen substantially expands the set of PtdInsPs interacting PDZ domains, and shows that a full understanding of the biology of PDZ proteins will require a comprehensive insight into the intricate relationships between PDZ domains and their peptide and lipid ligands. PMID:23390500

  14. Spectral imaging toolbox: segmentation, hyperstack reconstruction, and batch processing of spectral images for the determination of cell and model membrane lipid order.

    PubMed

    Aron, Miles; Browning, Richard; Carugo, Dario; Sezgin, Erdinc; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Eggeling, Christian; Stride, Eleanor

    2017-05-12

    Spectral imaging with polarity-sensitive fluorescent probes enables the quantification of cell and model membrane physical properties, including local hydration, fluidity, and lateral lipid packing, usually characterized by the generalized polarization (GP) parameter. With the development of commercial microscopes equipped with spectral detectors, spectral imaging has become a convenient and powerful technique for measuring GP and other membrane properties. The existing tools for spectral image processing, however, are insufficient for processing the large data sets afforded by this technological advancement, and are unsuitable for processing images acquired with rapidly internalized fluorescent probes. Here we present a MATLAB spectral imaging toolbox with the aim of overcoming these limitations. In addition to common operations, such as the calculation of distributions of GP values, generation of pseudo-colored GP maps, and spectral analysis, a key highlight of this tool is reliable membrane segmentation for probes that are rapidly internalized. Furthermore, handling for hyperstacks, 3D reconstruction and batch processing facilitates analysis of data sets generated by time series, z-stack, and area scan microscope operations. Finally, the object size distribution is determined, which can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying changes in membrane properties and is desirable for e.g. studies involving model membranes and surfactant coated particles. Analysis is demonstrated for cell membranes, cell-derived vesicles, model membranes, and microbubbles with environmentally-sensitive probes Laurdan, carboxyl-modified Laurdan (C-Laurdan), Di-4-ANEPPDHQ, and Di-4-AN(F)EPPTEA (FE), for quantification of the local lateral density of lipids or lipid packing. The Spectral Imaging Toolbox is a powerful tool for the segmentation and processing of large spectral imaging datasets with a reliable method for membrane segmentation and no ability in programming required. The

  15. A simple and rapid method to characterize lipid fate in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Massart, Julie; Zierath, Juleen R; Chibalin, Alexander V

    2014-06-24

    Elevated fatty acids contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes and affect skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity. Since elevated intramuscular lipids and insulin resistance is strongly correlated, aberrant lipid storage or lipid intermediates may be involved in diabetes pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to develop a method to determine the dynamic metabolic fate of lipids in primary human skeletal muscle cells and in intact mouse skeletal muscle. We report a simple and fast method to characterize lipid profiles in skeletal muscle using thin layer chromatography. The described method was specifically developed to assess lipid utilization in cultured and intact skeletal muscle. We determined the effect of a pan-diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) class I inhibitor (R59949) on lipid metabolism to validate the method. In human skeletal muscle cells, DGK inhibition impaired diacylglycerol (DAG) conversion to phosphatidic acid and increased triglyceride synthesis. In intact glycolytic mouse skeletal muscle, DGK inhibition triggered the accumulation of DAG species. Conversely, the DGK inhibitor did not affect DAG content in oxidative muscle. This simple assay detects rapid changes in the lipid species composition of skeletal muscle with high sensitivity and specificity. Determination of lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle may further elucidate the mechanisms contributing to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes or obesity.

  16. A simple and rapid method to characterize lipid fate in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated fatty acids contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes and affect skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity. Since elevated intramuscular lipids and insulin resistance is strongly correlated, aberrant lipid storage or lipid intermediates may be involved in diabetes pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to develop a method to determine the dynamic metabolic fate of lipids in primary human skeletal muscle cells and in intact mouse skeletal muscle. We report a simple and fast method to characterize lipid profiles in skeletal muscle using thin layer chromatography. Findings The described method was specifically developed to assess lipid utilization in cultured and intact skeletal muscle. We determined the effect of a pan-diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) class I inhibitor (R59949) on lipid metabolism to validate the method. In human skeletal muscle cells, DGK inhibition impaired diacylglycerol (DAG) conversion to phosphatidic acid and increased triglyceride synthesis. In intact glycolytic mouse skeletal muscle, DGK inhibition triggered the accumulation of DAG species. Conversely, the DGK inhibitor did not affect DAG content in oxidative muscle. Conclusion This simple assay detects rapid changes in the lipid species composition of skeletal muscle with high sensitivity and specificity. Determination of lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle may further elucidate the mechanisms contributing to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes or obesity. PMID:24962347

  17. Determination of neutral lipid hydroperoxides by size exclusion HPLC with fluorometric detection. Application to fish oil enriched mayonnaises during storage.

    PubMed

    Hartvigsen, K; Hansen, L F; Lund, P; Bukhave, K; Hølmer, G

    2000-12-01

    A fast (12 min) high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) method for the separation of neutral lipid class hydroperoxides in the oil phases from fish oil enriched mayonnaises was developed. Detection and quantification were performed using the postcolumn fluorometric (FL) diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine oxidation principle. The reproducibilities judged by intra- and inter-assay variations were 0.64 and 7.2%, respectively. The HPSEC-FL method was applied to assess the effect of supplementations with emulsifier, gallic acid, and EDTA on the oxidative processes in the mayonnaises during storage. Substantial amounts of hydroperoxy triacylglycerols (TAGOOH) and cholesterol esters (CEOOH), together with traces of TAGOOH-dimers, were detected. All supplementations significantly decreased the levels of TAGOOH and to a lesser degree CEOOH. Supplementations with EDTA and gallic acid resulted in constant and slightly increasing levels of TAGOOH, respectively, thus affecting the oxidation mechanisms seen in reference mayonnaise. The emulsifier Panodan TR DATEM reduced the levels of TAGOOH as compared to the appropriate controls.

  18. Cuticular lipids of insects as potential biofungicides: methods of lipid composition analysis.

    PubMed

    Gołębiowski, Marek; Boguś, Mieczysława I; Paszkiewicz, Monika; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2011-03-01

    The main function of cuticular lipids in insects is the restriction of water transpiration through the surface. Lipids are involved in various types of chemical communication between species and reduce the penetration of insecticides, chemicals, and toxins and they also provide protection from attack by microorganisms, parasitic insects, and predators. Hydrocarbons, which include straight-chain saturated, unsaturated, and methyl-branched hydrocarbons, predominate in the cuticular lipids of most insect species; fatty acids, alcohols, esters, ketones, aldehydes, as well as trace amounts of epoxides, ethers, oxoaldehydes, diols, and triacylglycerols have also been identified. Analyses of cuticular lipids are chemically relatively straightforward, and methods for their extraction should be simple. Classically, extraction has relied mainly on application of apolar solvents to the entire insect body. Recently, several alternative methods have been employed to overcome some of the shortcomings of solvent extraction. These include the use of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers to extract hydrocarbons from the headspace of heated samples, SPME to sample live individuals, and a less expensive method (utilized for social wasps), which consists of the collection of cuticular lipids by means of small pieces of cotton rubbed on the body of the insect. Both classical and recently developed extraction methods are reviewed in this work. The separation and analysis of the insect cuticular lipids were performed by column chromatography, thin-layer chromatography (TLC), high performance liquid chromatography with a laser light scattering detector (HPLC-LLSD), gas chromatography (GC), and GC-mass spectrometry (MS). The strategy of lipid analysis with the use of chromatographic techniques was as follows: extraction of analytes from biological material, lipid class separation by TLC, column chromatography, HPLC-LLSD, derivatization, and final determination by GC, GC-MS, matrix

  19. Systematic determination of the thickness of a thin oxide layer on a multilayered structure by using an X-ray reflectivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jisung; Park, Sungkyun

    2016-09-01

    X-ray reflectometry was used to determine the chemical structure of oxidized Permalloy films grown at different oxidation times. The oxidation time-dependent thickness, roughness and chemical density of each layer were examined simultaneously using the Parratt formalism. With increasing oxidation time, the Permalloy thickness decreased while forming a new oxide layer. After oxidation for 40 sec, the Permalloy film's thickness remained the same for further oxidation, indicating the formation of an oxidation barrier with a scattering length density much lower than that of the Permalloy. The interfacial roughness between the interface layer and the top protective layer remained the same regardless of the oxidation time.

  20. Determining concentration fields of tracer plumes for layered porous media in flow-tank experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Schwartz, Franklin W.

    In the laboratory, computer-assisted image analysis provides an accurate and efficient way to monitor tracer experiments. This paper describes the determination of detailed temporal concentration distributions of tracers in a flow-tank experiment by analyzing photographs of plumes of Rhodamine dye through the glass wall of the tank. The methodology developed for this purpose consists of four steps: (1) digitally scanning black and white negatives obtained from photographs of the flow-tank experiment; (2) calibrating and normalizing each digitized image to a standard optical-density scale by determining the relation between the optical density and pixel value for each image; (3) constructing standard curves relating the concentration in an optical density from five experimental runs with predetermined concentrations (2-97mg/L) and (4) converting the optical density to concentration. The spatial distribution of concentration for two photographs was determined by applying these calibration and conversion procedures to all pixels of the digitized images. This approach provides an efficient way to study patterns of plume evolution and transport mechanisms. Résumé Au laboratoire, l'analyse d'images assistée par ordinateur est un moyen précis et efficace pour suivre certaines expériences de traçage. Ce papier présente comment sont déterminées dans le détail les distributions temporelles de la concentration en traceur au cours d'une expérience d'écoulement en réservoir au moyen de l'analyse de photographies de panaches de rhodamine à travers la paroi de verre du réservoir. La méthodologie développée dans cette expérience suit quatre étapes: (1) digitalisation par balayage des négatifs noir et blanc des prises de vue de l'expérience d'écoulement en réservoir (2) calibration et normalisation de chaque image digitalisée par rapport à une échelle étalon de densité optique en déterminant la relation entre la densité optique et la valeur des pixels

  1. Mechanical properties of the superficial biofilm layer determine the architecture of biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; Liang, Yang; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-06-29

    Cells in biofilms sense and interact with their environment through the extracellular matrix. The physicochemical properties of the matrix, particularly at the biofilm-environment interface, determine how cells respond to changing conditions. In this study we describe the application of atomic force microscopy and confocal imaging to probe in situ the mechanical properties of these interfacial regions and to elucidate how key matrix components can contribute to the physical sensing by the cells. We describe how the Young's modulus of microcolonies differs according to the size and morphology of microcolonies, as well as the flow rate. The Young's modulus increased as a function of microcolony diameter, which was correlated with the production of the polysaccharide Psl at later stages of maturation for hemispherical or mushroom shaped microcolonies. The Young's modulus of the periphery of the biofilm colony was however independent of the hydrodynamic shear. The morphology of the microcolonies also influenced interfacial or peripheral stiffness. Microcolonies with a diffuse morphology had a lower Young's modulus than isolated, circular ones and this phenomenon was due to a deficiency of Psl. In this way, changes in the specific polysaccharide components imbue the biofilm with distinct physical properties that may modulate the way in which bacteria perceive or respond to their environment. Further, the physical properties of the polysaccharides are closely linked to the specific architectures formed by the developing biofilm.

  2. Comparisons of protein, lipid, phenolics, γ-oryzanol, vitamin E, and mineral contents in bran layer of sodium azide-induced red rice mutants.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Toong Long; Ho, Pei Tzu; Shih, Yi Ju; Lai, Chia Chi; Wu, Min Tze; Sung, Jih Min

    2011-06-01

    The bran part of red rice grain is concentrated with many phytochemicals, including proanthocyanidins, oryzanol and vitamin E, that exert beneficial effects on human health, but it contains low levels of essential minerals such as Fe and Zn. In the present study, the protein, lipid, phytochemicals and mineral contents in bran samples were compared among red rice SA-586 and its NaN₃-induced mutants. The plant heights of NaN₃-induced mutants were decreased. The contents of protein, lipid, total phenolics, total flavonoids, total anthocyanins, total proanthocyanidins, total γ-oryzanol, total tocopherols and total tocotrienols also varied among the tested mutants. The brans of mutants M-18, M-56 and M-50 contained more proanthocyanidins, γ-oryzanol, vitamin E than that of SA-586, respectively. M-54 accumulated more Fe content (588.7 mg kg⁻¹ bran dry weight) than SA-586 (100.1 mg kg⁻¹ bran dry weight). The brans of M-18, M-50 and M-56 are good sources of proanthocyanidins, vitamin E and γ-oryzanol, respectively, while the bran of M-54 is rich in Fe. Thus these mutants could be used to produce high-value phytochemicals or Fe byproducts from bran during rice grain milling or as genetic resources for rice improvement programs. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Determination of permeability coefficients of ophthalmic drugs through different layers of porcine, rabbit and bovine eyes.

    PubMed

    Loch, Christian; Zakelj, Simon; Kristl, Albin; Nagel, Stefan; Guthoff, Rudolf; Weitschies, Werner; Seidlitz, Anne

    2012-08-30

    To treat ophthalmic diseases like glaucoma or inflammatory disorders topically applied ophthalmic formulations such as eye drops are usually used. In addition, novel ophthalmic implants releasing drug substances locally into different parts of the eye are available today. In the work presented here, the permeability coefficients of selected drugs (ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, lidocaine hydrochloride, timolol maleate) for ophthalmic tissues were determined using side-by-side diffusion chambers (so-called Ussing chambers). Sclera, conjunctiva, cornea, choroidea-retina-complex and a complex of conjunctiva-sclera-choroidea-retina were excised from fresh porcine, rabbit and bovine eyes. In the porcine eye tissues the highest P(app) values were obtained for conjunctiva with the exception of lidocaine. Therefore, it can be estimated that a certain amount of drug diffuses or is transported through conjunctiva after application. The P(app) values for sclera were also higher than those for cornea and even more, the surface area of sclera which is available for drug absorption is much larger than that of cornea when applying an implant. The obtained permeability coefficients for sclera and conjunctiva indicate that the administration of periocular implants can be an alternative to topically applied formulations. The complexes of the tissues were a significantly (p<0.01) stronger barrier to the investigated substances than the separated tissues. Distinct differences in permeability coefficients between the investigated animal tissues were observed. Overall the highest P(app) values for all mounted tissues were obtained with the rabbit, followed by porcine and bovine eyes. Because of these distinct interspecies differences one must be very careful when selecting the proper animal model for the permeability experiments.

  4. Comparison of lipid deposition at coronary bifurcations versus at nonbifurcation portions of coronary arteries as determined by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Jacob C; Steinberg, Daniel H; Nielsen, Christopher D; Todoran, Thomas M; Patel, Chetan P; Leonardi, Robert A; Wolf, Bethany J; Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Shunk, Kendrick A; Goldstein, James A; Kern, Morton J; Powers, Eric R

    2013-08-01

    Atherosclerosis has been shown to develop preferentially at sites of coronary bifurcation, yet culprit lesions resulting in ST-elevation myocardial infarction do not occur more frequently at these sites. We hypothesized that these findings can be explained by similarities in intracoronary lipid and that lipid and lipid core plaque would be found with similar frequency in coronary bifurcation and nonbifurcation segments. One hundred seventy bifurcations were identified, 156 of which had comparative nonbifurcation segments proximal and/or distal to the bifurcation. We compared lipid deposition at bifurcation and nonbifurcation segments in coronary arteries using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), a novel method for the in vivo detection of coronary lipid. Any NIRS signal for the presence of lipid was found with similar frequency in bifurcation and nonbifurcation segments (79% vs 74%, p = NS). Lipid core burden index, a measure of total lipid quantity indexed to segment length, was similar across bifurcation segments as well as their proximal and distal controls (lipid core burden index 66.3 ± 106, 67.1 ± 116, and 66.6 ± 104, p = NS). Lipid core plaque, identified as a high-intensity focal NIRS signal, was found in 21% of bifurcation segments, and 20% of distal nonbifurcation segments (p = NS). In conclusion, coronary bifurcations do not appear to have higher levels of intracoronary lipid or lipid core plaque than their comparative nonbifurcation regions.

  5. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  6. Lipids in preventive dentistry.

    PubMed

    Kensche, A; Reich, M; Kümmerer, K; Hannig, M; Hannig, C

    2013-04-01

    There is still a great demand for the improvement of oral prophylaxis methods. One repeatedly described approach is rinsing with edible oils. The aim of the present review paper was to analyze the role of lipids in bioadhesion and preventive dentistry. Despite limited sound scientific data, extensive literature search was performed to illustrate possible effects of lipids in the oral cavity. It is to be assumed that lipophilic components modulate the process of bioadhesion to the oral hard tissues as well as the composition and ultrastructure of the initial oral biofilm or the pellicle, respectively. Thereby, lipids could add hydrophobic characteristics to the tooth surface hampering bacterial colonization and eventually decreasing caries susceptibility. Also, a lipid-enriched pellicle might be more resistant in case of acid exposure and could therefore reduce the erosive mineral loss. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory effects on the oral soft tissues were described. However, there is only limited evidence for these beneficial impacts. Neither the lipid composition of saliva and pellicle nor the interactions of lipids with the initial oral biofilm and the pellicle layer have been investigated adequately until now. Edible oils might qualify as mild supplements to conventional strategies for the prevention of caries, erosion, and periodontal diseases but further research is necessary. Against the background of current scientific and empirical knowledge, edible oils might be used as oral hygiene supplements but a decisive benefit for the oral health status is questionable.

  7. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  8. Piezoelectric layer embedded-microdiaphragm sensors for the determination of blood viscosity and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Jinsik; Zandieh, Omid; Chae, Myung-Sic; Kim, Tae Song; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Seonghwan; Hwang, Kyo Seon

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a lead zirconate titanate [PZT; Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3] microdiaphragm resonating sensor packaged in a polydimethylsiloxane chip. The proposed sensor can measure the density and viscosity of a liquid that is within the density and viscosity regime of blood (1.060 × 103 kg/m3, 3-4 cP). To verify the basic characteristics of the sensor, viscous solutions were prepared from glycerol and deionized water with a density in the range from 0.998 to 1.263 × 103 kg/m3 and a viscosity in the range from 1 to 1414 cP. We measured the frequency responses of the sensor before and after injecting the viscosity- and density-controlled liquid under the bottom of the microdiaphragm. The resonant frequencies in the (1,1) and (2,2) modes decreased linearly as a function of the liquid density in the range from 0.998 to 1.146 × 103 kg/m3 with a sensitivity of 28.03 Hz/kg.m-3 and 81.85 Hz/kg.m-3, respectively. The full width at half maximum had a logarithmic relationship with the liquid viscosity in the viscosity range from 1 to 8.4 cP. The quality factor (Q-factor) for the 50% glycerol/water mixture was determined to be greater than 20 for both the (1,1) and the (2,2) modes, indicating that the microdiaphragm resonating sensor is suitable for measuring the density and viscosity of a liquid within a density range from 0.998 to 1.1466 × 103 kg/m3 and a viscosity range from 1 to 8.4 cP. These density and viscosity ranges span the regime of possible changes of blood characteristics. The microdiaphragm resonating sensors were also tested with a real human serum to verify that the sensor is suitable for measuring the viscosity and density of blood. Therefore, the PZT microdiaphragm resonating sensor could be utilized for early diagnosis of diseases associated with changes in the physical properties of blood.

  9. Orientation of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa in lipid membranes determined from 19F-NMR dipolar couplings of 4-CF3-phenylglycine labels.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Ralf W; Sachse, Carsten; Dürr, Ulrich H N; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2004-05-01

    A highly sensitive solid state (19)F-NMR strategy is described to determine the orientation and dynamics of membrane-associated peptides from specific fluorine labels. Several analogues of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa were synthesized with the non-natural amino acid 4-trifluoromethyl-phenylglycine (CF(3)-Phg) at different positions throughout the alpha-helical peptide chain. A simple 1-pulse (19)F experiment allows the simultaneous measurement of both the anisotropic chemical shift and the homonuclear dipolar coupling within the rotating CF(3)-group in a macroscopically oriented membrane sample. The value and sign of the dipolar splitting determines the tilt of the CF(3)-rotational axis, which is rigidly attached to the peptide backbone, with respect to the external magnetic field direction. Using four CF(3)-labeled peptide analogues (with L-CF(3)-Phg at Ile9, Ala10, Ile13, and Ala14) we confirmed that PGLa is aligned at the surface of lipid membranes with its helix axis perpendicular to the bilayer normal at a peptide:lipid ratio of 1:200. We also determined the azimuthal rotation angle of the helix, which agrees well with the orientation expected from its amphiphilic character. Peptide analogues with a D-CF(3)-Phg label resulting from racemization of the amino acid during synthesis were separately collected by HPLC. Their spectra provide additional information about the PGLa structure and orientation but allow only to discriminate qualitatively between multiple solutions. The structural and functional characterization of the individual CF(3)-labeled peptides by circular dichroism and antimicrobial assays showed only small effects for our four substitutions on the hydrophobic face of the helix, but a significant disturbance was observed in a fifth analogue where Ala8 on the hydrophilic face had been replaced. Even though the hydrophobic CF(3)-Phg side chain cannot be utilized in all positions, it allows highly sensitive NMR measurements over a wide range of

  10. Preliminary evidence of genetic determinants of adiponectin response to fenofibrate in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network.

    PubMed

    Aslibekyan, S; An, P; Frazier-Wood, A C; Kabagambe, E K; Irvin, M R; Straka, R J; Tiwari, H K; Tsai, M Y; Hopkins, P N; Borecki, I B; Ordovas, J M; Arnett, D K

    2013-10-01

    Adiponectin is an adipose-secreted protein that has been linked to changes in insulin sensitivity, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and inflammatory patterns. Although fenofibrate therapy can raise adiponectin levels, treatment response is heterogeneous and heritable, suggesting a role for genetic mediators. This is the first genome-wide association study of fenofibrate effects on circulating adiponectin. Plasma adiponectin was measured in participants of the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (n = 793) before and after a 3-week daily treatment with 160 mg of fenofibrate. Associations between variants on the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 and adiponectin were assessed using mixed linear models, adjusted for age, sex, site, and family. We observed a statistically significant (P = 5 × 10⁻⁸) association between rs2384207 in 12q24, a region previously linked to several metabolic traits, and the fenofibrate-induced change in circulating adiponectin. Additionally, our genome-wide analysis of baseline adiponectin levels replicated the previously reported association with CDH13 and suggested novel associations with markers near the PCK1, ZBP1, TMEM18, and SCUBE1 genes. The findings from the single marker tests were corroborated in gene-based analyses. Biological pathway analyses suggested a borderline significant association between the EGF receptor signaling pathway and baseline adiponectin levels. We present preliminary evidence linking several biologically relevant genetic variants to adiponectin levels at baseline and in response to fenofibrate therapy. Our findings provide support for fine-mapping of the 12q24 region to investigate the shared biological mechanisms underlying levels of circulating adiponectin and susceptibility to metabolic disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dietary Fat Supply to Failing Hearts Determines Dynamic Lipid Signaling for Nuclear Receptor Activation and Oxidation of Stored Triglyceride

    PubMed Central

    Lahey, Ryan; Wang, Xuerong; Carley, Andrew N.; Lewandowski, E. Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Background Intramyocardial triglyceride (TG) turnover is reduced in pressure overloaded, failing hearts, limiting availability of this rich source of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) for mitochondrial β-oxidation and nuclear receptor activation. This study explored two major dietary fats, palmitate and oleate, in supporting endogenous TG dynamics and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) activation in sham-operated (SHAM) and hypertrophied (transverse aortic constriction, TAC) rat hearts. Methods and Results Isolated SHAM and TAC hearts were provided media containing carbohydrate with either 13C-palmitate or 13C-oleate for dynamic 13C NMR spectroscopy and endpoint LC/MS of TG dynamics. With palmitate, TAC hearts contained 48% less TG versus SHAM (P=0.0003), while oleate maintained elevated TG in TAC, similar to SHAM. TG turnover in TAC was greatly reduced with palmitate (TAC: 46.7±12.2 nmol/g dw/min; SHAM: 84.3±4.9; P=0.0212), as was β-oxidation of TG. Oleate elevated TG turnover in both TAC (140.4±11.2) and SHAM (143.9±15.6), restoring TG oxidation in TAC. PPAR-α target gene transcripts were reduced by 70% in TAC with palmitate, while oleate induced normal transcript levels. Additionally, mRNA levels for PGC-1α and PGC-1β in TAC hearts were maintained by oleate. With these metabolic effects, oleate also supported a 25% improvement in contractility over palmitate with TAC (P=0.0202). Conclusions The findings link reduced intracellular lipid storage dynamics to impaired PPAR-α signaling and contractility in diseased hearts, consistent with a rate-dependent lipolytic activation of PPAR-α. In decompensated hearts, oleate may serve as a beneficial energy substrate versus palmitate by upregulating TG dynamics and nuclear receptor signaling. PMID:25266948

  12. Iron silicide formation at different layers of (Fe/Si)3 multilayered structures determined by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badía-Romano, L.; Rubín, J.; Magén, C.; Bürgler, D. E.; Bartolomé, J.

    2014-07-01

    The morphology and the quantitative composition of the Fe-Si interface layer forming at each Fe layer of a (Fe/Si)3 multilayer have been determined by means of conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). For the CEMS measurements, each layer was selected by depositing the Mössbauer active 57Fe isotope with 95% enrichment. Samples with Fe layers of nominal thickness dFe = 2.6 nm and Si spacers of dSi = 1.5 nm were prepared by thermal evaporation onto a GaAs(001) substrate with an intermediate Ag(001) buffer layer. HRTEM images showed that Si layers grow amorphous and the epitaxial growth of the Fe is good only for the first deposited layer. The CEMS spectra show that at all Fe/Si and Si/Fe interfaces a paramagnetic c-Fe1-xSi phase is formed, which contains 16% of the nominal Fe deposited in the Fe layer. The bottom Fe layer, which is in contact with the Ag buffer, also contains α-Fe and an Fe1-xSix alloy that cannot be attributed to a single phase. In contrast, the other two layers only comprise an Fe1-xSix alloy with a Si concentration of ≃0.15, but no α-Fe.

  13. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic-impedance measurements. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-06-10

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are presented. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  14. Estimation of thermophysical properties by an inverse method with experimentally determined heating region of a thin-layer heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmywaczyk, J.; Madura, H.; Koniorczyk, P.; Dąbrowski, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of estimation of thermophysical parameters by an inverse method. The thermal conductivity in radial and axial direction of a cylindrical sample and the heat capacity were simultaneously estimated using the Levenberg-Marquardt method of minimizing a mean square functional. As heat sources the thin-layer heater KHR 2/10 of diameter ϕ = 50 mm and thickness 0.20 mm made by OMEGA as well as the Kanthal resistance wire of diameter ϕ = 0.1 mm in a form of semicircle were simultaneously used. The main aim of using these two heaters simultaneously, both placed at one of the sample interfaces, was to generate heat fluxes in axial and additionally in radial direction. However, measurements of temperature distribution on the main surface of the thin-layer heater by using the FLIR Systems (ThermaCAM SC 3000 infrared camera) revealed a spatial heterogeneity of its temperature field, and therefore it was necessary to determine the effective heating region of that heater indispensable for solving of the coefficient inverse problem of heat conduction.

  15. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOEpatents

    Langlois, Gary N.

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  16. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOEpatents

    Langlois, G.N.

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are disclosed. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. 6 figs.

  17. Utilizing SO2/CO2 Mixing Ratios to Determine SO2 Uptake by a Regional Cloud Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. R.; Bililign, S.; Fiddler, M. N.; Jaegle, L.; Thornton, J. A.; Brown, S. S.; Shah, V.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Lee, B. H.; Haskins, J.; Fibiger, D. L.; McDuffie, E. E.; Sparks, T.; Ebben, C. J.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Cohen, R. C.; Veres, P. R.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Schroder, J. C.; Day, D. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Sullivan, A.; Guo, H.; Weber, R. J.; Campos, T. L.; Leen, J. B.; DiGangi, J. P.; Wolfe, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    The cloud uptake of SO2 during wintertime conditions over the Eastern United States is presented. In wintertime conditions in the Eastern United States there are fewer reactant sinks for gaseous SO2, as a result the atmospheric lifetime is measurably longer. An examination of the SO2/CO2 mixing ratio above and below the cloud layer in comparison to the internal concentration of gaseous CO2 inside the cloud layer will determine uptake of SO2 due to aqueous reactivity SO2/CO2. The performance of this will allow for a numerical estimate of the CO2-H2O complexes compared to the SO2-H2O complexes formed at the cloud droplet surface. The data obtained originates from a series of survey night and day flights on a C-130 aircraft that occurred from Feb 3 to Mar 13, 2015 over the Eastern coastal region of the United States ranging from New York to Florida. The following instruments were utilized in obtaining gaseous measurements; for water droplet size distribution a Condensation Nucleus Counter (CN Counter) (NCAR) and a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe, Model 100 (FSSP-100) (NCAR), for SO2 measurements the TECO 43C SO2 analyzer (NOAA—ESRL/NCAT) and a CO/CO2 analyzer (NCAR). An estimate and transport gaseous SO2 due to of cloud uptake in surveyed regions in the WINTER 2015 campaign will be presented.

  18. Analysis of multi-layered films. [determining dye densities by applying a regression analysis to the spectral response of the composite transparency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F. L.; Voss, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    Dye densities of multi-layered films are determined by applying a regression analysis to the spectral response of the composite transparency. The amount of dye in each layer is determined by fitting the sum of the individual dye layer densities to the measured dye densities. From this, dye content constants are calculated. Methods of calculating equivalent exposures are discussed. Equivalent exposures are a constant amount of energy over a limited band-width that will give the same dye content constants as the real incident energy. Methods of using these equivalent exposures for analysis of photographic data are presented.

  19. Employing X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Determining Layer Homogeneity in Mixed Polar Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing embedded dipolar groups offer the particular advantage of changing the electronic properties of a surface without affecting the SAM–ambient interface. Here we show that such systems can also be used for continuously tuning metal work functions by growing mixed monolayers consisting of molecules with different orientations of the embedded dipolar groups. To avoid injection hot-spots when using the SAM-modified electrodes in devices, a homogeneous mixing of the two components is crucial. We show that a combination of high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with state-of-the-art simulations is an ideal tool for probing the electrostatic homogeneity of the layers and thus for determining phase separation processes in polar adsorbate assemblies down to inhomogeneities at the molecular level. PMID:27429041