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Sample records for lipid rafts reveals

  1. Proteomic analysis of BmN cell lipid rafts reveals roles in Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Min; Liang, Zi; Kumar, Dhiraj; Chen, Fei; Zhu, Liyuan; Kuang, Sulan; Xue, Renyu; Cao, Guangli; Gong, Chengliang

    2017-04-01

    The mechanism of how Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) enters cells is unknown. The primary components of membrane lipid rafts are proteins and cholesterol, and membrane lipid rafts are thought to be an active region for host-viral interactions. However, whether they contribute to the entry of BmNPV into silkworm cells remains unclear. In this study, we explored the membrane protein components of lipid rafts from BmN cells with mass spectrometry (MS). Proteins and cholesterol were investigated after establishing infection with BmNPV in BmN cells. In total, 222 proteins were identified in the lipid rafts, and Gene Ontology (GO) annotation analysis showed that more than 10% of these proteins had binding and catalytic functions. We then identified proteins that potentially interact between lipid rafts and BmNPV virions using the Virus Overlay Protein Blot Assay (VOPBA). A total of 65 proteins were analyzed with MS, and 7 were predicted to be binding proteins involved in BmNPV cellular invasion, including actin, kinesin light chain-like isoform X2, annexin B13, heat-shock protein 90, barrier-to-autointegration factor B-like and serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 A-like. When the cholesterol of the lipid rafts from the membrane was depleted by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), BmNPV entry into BmN cells was blocked. However, supplying cholesterol into the medium rescued the BmNPV infection ability. These results show that membrane lipid rafts may be the active regions for the entry of BmNPV into cells, and the components of membrane lipid rafts may be candidate targets for improving the resistance of the silkworm to BmNPV.

  2. Sterol targeting drugs reveal life cycle stage-specific differences in trypanosome lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aabha I; Olson, Cheryl L; Mamede, João I; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Epting, Conrad L; Almeida, Igor C; Engman, David M

    2017-08-22

    Cilia play important roles in cell signaling, facilitated by the unique lipid environment of a ciliary membrane containing high concentrations of sterol-rich lipid rafts. The African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei is a single-celled eukaryote with a single cilium/flagellum. We tested whether flagellar sterol enrichment results from selective flagellar partitioning of specific sterol species or from general enrichment of all sterols. While all sterols are enriched in the flagellum, cholesterol is especially enriched. T. brucei cycles between its mammalian host (bloodstream cell), in which it scavenges cholesterol, and its tsetse fly host (procyclic cell), in which it both scavenges cholesterol and synthesizes ergosterol. We wondered whether the insect and mammalian life cycle stages possess chemically different lipid rafts due to different sterol utilization. Treatment of bloodstream parasites with cholesterol-specific methyl-β-cyclodextrin disrupts both membrane liquid order and localization of a raft-associated ciliary membrane calcium sensor. Treatment with ergosterol-specific amphotericin B does not. The opposite results were observed with ergosterol-rich procyclic cells. Further, these agents have opposite effects on flagellar sterol enrichment and cell metabolism in the two life cycle stages. These findings illuminate differences in the lipid rafts of an organism employing life cycle-specific sterols and have implications for treatment.

  3. Bacterial invasion via lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Lafont, Frank; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2005-05-01

    Accumulating reports document the use by pathogens of cholesterol-enriched lipid microdomains, often called lipid rafts, as cell surface platforms to interact, bind and possibly enter into host cells. The challenge is now to understand what could be the functional role of these domains during pathogen invasion. Are they hijacked as general clustering devices for cellular binding sites and/or do they have other roles? In particular, is their cell signalling capacity activated and used by pathogens? In reverse, could lipid rafts activate bacterial mechanisms required for invasion? These issues will be discussed after an introduction on the current view on lipid rafts.

  4. Bacterial subversion of lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Lafont, Frank; Abrami, Laurence; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2004-02-01

    Bacteria rely on numerous basic cellular functions of their target cells to reach successful infection. The recent discovery that the plasma membrane contains specialized microdomains, called lipid rafts, with many specific functions but in particular with the ability to concentrate signaling molecules, has therefore attracted the attention of cellular microbiologists. Since then an increasing number of bacteria and their products have been shown to interact with lipid rafts to promote infection or intoxication. Here we review why certain bacteria and/or their products are attracted toward these lipid microdomains.

  5. You Sank My Lipid Rafts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Tessa N.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane is the membrane that serves as a boundary between the interior of a cell and its extracellular environment. Lipid rafts are microdomains within a cellular membrane that possess decreased fluidity due to the presence of cholesterol, glycolipids, and phospholipids containing longer fatty acids. These domains are involved in many…

  6. You Sank My Lipid Rafts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Tessa N.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane is the membrane that serves as a boundary between the interior of a cell and its extracellular environment. Lipid rafts are microdomains within a cellular membrane that possess decreased fluidity due to the presence of cholesterol, glycolipids, and phospholipids containing longer fatty acids. These domains are involved in many…

  7. Characterization of Lipid Rafts from Medicago truncatula Root Plasma Membranes: A Proteomic Study Reveals the Presence of a Raft-Associated Redox System1[W

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Benoit; Furt, Fabienne; Hartmann, Marie-Andrée; Michaelson, Louise V.; Carde, Jean-Pierre; Sargueil-Boiron, Françoise; Rossignol, Michel; Napier, Johnathan A.; Cullimore, Julie; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques; Mongrand, Sébastien

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have provided new insights into the role of sphingolipid/sterol-rich domains so-called lipid rafts of the plasma membrane (PM) from mammalian cells, and more recently from leaves, cell cultures, and seedlings of higher plants. Here we show that lipid raft domains, defined as Triton X-100-insoluble membranes, can also be prepared from Medicago truncatula root PMs. These domains have been extensively characterized by ultrastructural studies as well as by analysis of their content in lipids and proteins. M. truncatula lipid domains are shown to be enriched in sphingolipids and Δ7-sterols, with spinasterol as the major compound, but also in steryl glycosides and acyl-steryl glycosides. A large number of proteins (i.e. 270) have been identified. Among them, receptor kinases and proteins related to signaling, cellular trafficking, and cell wall functioning were well represented whereas those involved in transport and metabolism were poorly represented. Evidence is also given for the presence of a complete PM redox system in the lipid rafts. PMID:17337521

  8. Membrane Organization and Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Kai; Sampaio, Julio L.

    2011-01-01

    Cell membranes are composed of a lipid bilayer, containing proteins that span the bilayer and/or interact with the lipids on either side of the two leaflets. Although recent advances in lipid analytics show that membranes in eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of different lipid species, the function of this lipid diversity remains enigmatic. The basic structure of cell membranes is the lipid bilayer, composed of two apposing leaflets, forming a two-dimensional liquid with fascinating properties designed to perform the functions cells require. To coordinate these functions, the bilayer has evolved the propensity to segregate its constituents laterally. This capability is based on dynamic liquid–liquid immiscibility and underlies the raft concept of membrane subcompartmentalization. This principle combines the potential for sphingolipid-cholesterol self-assembly with protein specificity to focus and regulate membrane bioactivity. Here we will review the emerging principles of membrane architecture with special emphasis on lipid organization and domain formation. PMID:21628426

  9. Lipid rafts: heterogeneity on the high seas.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Linda J

    2004-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains that are enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. They have been implicated in processes as diverse as signal transduction, endocytosis and cholesterol trafficking. Recent evidence suggests that this diversity of function is accompanied by a diversity in the composition of lipid rafts. The rafts in cells appear to be heterogeneous both in terms of their protein and their lipid content, and can be localized to different regions of the cell. This review summarizes the data supporting the concept of heterogeneity among lipid rafts and outlines the evidence for cross-talk between raft components. Based on differences in the ways in which proteins interact with rafts, the Induced-Fit Model of Raft Heterogeneity is proposed to explain the establishment and maintenance of heterogeneity within raft populations. PMID:14662007

  10. Exploring the Existence of Lipid Rafts in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY An interesting concept in the organization of cellular membranes is the proposed existence of lipid rafts. Membranes of eukaryotic cells organize signal transduction proteins into membrane rafts or lipid rafts that are enriched in particular lipids such as cholesterol and are important for the correct functionality of diverse cellular processes. The assembly of lipid rafts in eukaryotes has been considered a fundamental step during the evolution of cellular complexity, suggesting that bacteria and archaea were organisms too simple to require such a sophisticated organization of their cellular membranes. However, it was recently discovered that bacteria organize many signal transduction, protein secretion, and transport processes in functional membrane microdomains, which are equivalent to the lipid rafts of eukaryotic cells. This review contains the most significant advances during the last 4 years in understanding the structural and biological role of lipid rafts in bacteria. Furthermore, this review shows a detailed description of a number of molecular and genetic approaches related to the discovery of bacterial lipid rafts as well as an overview of the group of tentative lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions that give consistency to these sophisticated signaling platforms. Additional data suggesting that lipid rafts are widely distributed in bacteria are presented in this review. Therefore, we discuss the available techniques and optimized protocols for the purification and analysis of raft-associated proteins in various bacterial species to aid in the study of bacterial lipid rafts in other laboratories that could be interested in this topic. Overall, the discovery of lipid rafts in bacteria reveals a new level of sophistication in signal transduction and membrane organization that was unexpected for bacteria and shows that bacteria are more complex than previously appreciated. PMID:25652542

  11. The nutritional significance of lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Parveen

    2009-01-01

    The structure, size, stability, and functionality of lipid rafts are still in debate, but recent techniques allowing direct visualization have characterized them in a wide range of cell types. Lipid rafts are potentially modifiable by diet, particularly (but not exclusively) by dietary fatty acids. However, it is not clear whether dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are incorporated into raft lipids or whether their low affinity to cholesterol disallows this and causes phase separation from rafts and displacement of raft proteins. This review examines the potential for dietary modification of raft structure and function in the immune system, brain and retinal tissue, the gut, and in cancer cells. Although there is increasing evidence to suggest that membrane microdomains, and their modulation, have an impact in health and disease, it is too early to judge whether modulation of lipid rafts is responsible for the immunomodulatory effects of n-3 PUFA. In addition to dietary fatty acids, gangliosides and cholesterol may also modulate microdomains in a number of tissues, and recent work has highlighted sphingolipids in membrane microdomains as potential targets for inhibition of tumor growth by n-3 PUFA. The roles of fatty acids and gangliosides in cognitive development, age-related cognitive decline, psychiatric disorders, and Alzheimer's disease are poorly understood and require clarification, particularly with respect to the contribution of lipid rafts. The roles of lipid rafts in cancer, in microbial pathogenesis, and in insulin resistance are only just emerging, but compelling evidence indicates the growing importance of membrane microdomains in health and disease.

  12. Lipid alterations in lipid rafts from Alzheimer's disease human brain cortex.

    PubMed

    Martín, Virginia; Fabelo, Noemí; Santpere, Gabriel; Puig, Berta; Marín, Raquel; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains intimately associated with cell signaling. These biochemical microstructures are characterized by their high contents of sphingolipids, cholesterol and saturated fatty acids and a reduced content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Here, we have purified lipid rafts of human frontal brain cortex from normal and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and characterized their biochemical lipid composition. The results revealed that lipid rafts from AD brains exhibit aberrant lipid profiles compared to healthy brains. In particular, lipid rafts from AD brains displayed abnormally low levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA, mainly 22:6n-3, docosahexaenoic acid) and monoenes (mainly 18:1n-9, oleic acid), as well as reduced unsaturation and peroxidability indexes. Also, multiple relationships between phospholipids and fatty acids were altered in AD lipid rafts. Importantly, no changes were observed in the mole percentage of lipid classes and fatty acids in rafts from normal brains throughout the lifespan (24-85 years). These indications point to the existence of homeostatic mechanisms preserving lipid raft status in normal frontal cortex. The disruption of such mechanisms in AD brains leads to a considerable increase in lipid raft order and viscosity, which may explain the alterations in lipid raft signaling observed in AD.

  13. Anesthetics interacting with lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Bandeiras, Cátia; Serro, Ana Paula; Luzyanin, Konstantin; Fernandes, Anabela; Saramago, Benilde

    2013-01-23

    The exact mechanism by which anesthetics induce cell membrane-mediated modifications is still an open question. Although the fluidization effect of the anesthetic molecules on the cellular membrane is widely recognized, it is not known if anesthetics show any preference for specific membrane domains, namely the lipid rafts. The importance of these membrane micro-domains derives from the fact that they have been associated with cell signaling pathways, as well as with specific drug interactions. The objective of this work is to contribute for the elucidation of this question through the comparison of the anesthetic interactions with membranes of various lipid compositions. Liposomes prepared with an equimolar mixture of POPC, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, were chosen as models for lipid rafts. The interactions of these liposomes with two local anesthetics, tetracaine and lidocaine, and one general anesthetic, propofol, were studied. The effect of cholesterol was investigated by comparing anesthetic interactions with POPC/SM liposomes and POPC/SM/CHOL liposomes. The following experimental techniques were used: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, differential scanning calorimetry and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance. Although the liposomes investigated by the different techniques are not in the same conditions, it is possible to assemble the information obtained from all experimental techniques employed to reach a general conclusion. Tetracaine interacts more with raftlike domains, lidocaine induces stronger modifications on POPC/SM liposomes and the results for propofol are not fully conclusive but it seems to be the least prone to lipid interactions. The results were compared with those obtained with DMPC-containing liposomes, reported in a previous work.

  14. Localization of mature neprilysin in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimihiko; Tanabe, Chiaki; Yonemura, Yoji; Watahiki, Haruhiko; Zhao, Yimeng; Yagishita, Sosuke; Ebina, Maiko; Suo, Satoshi; Futai, Eugene; Murata, Masayuki; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2012-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by senile plaques caused by amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation. It has been reported that Aβ generation and accumulation occur in membrane microdomains, called lipid rafts, which are enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. Moreover, the ablation of cholesterol metabolism has been implicated in AD. Neprilysin (NEP), a neutral endopeptidase, is one of the major Aβ-degrading enzymes in the brain. Activation of NEP is a possible therapeutic target. However, it remains unknown whether the activity of NEP is regulated by its association with lipid rafts. Here we show that only the mature form of NEP, which has been glycosylated in the Golgi, exists in lipid rafts, where it is directly associated with phosphatidylserine. Moreover, the localization of NEP in lipid rafts is enhanced by its dimerization, as shown using the NEP E403C homodimerization mutant. However, the protease activities of the mature form of NEP, as assessed by in vitro peptide hydrolysis, did not differ between lipid rafts and nonlipid rafts. We conclude that cholesterol and other lipids regulate the localization of mature NEP to lipid rafts, where the substrate Aβ accumulates but does not modulate the protease activity of NEP.

  15. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    SONG, JIAN; PING, LING-YAN; DUONG, DUC M.; GAO, XIAO-YAN; HE, CHUN-YAN; WEI, LEI; WU, JUN-ZHU

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native-LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL-stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label-free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native-LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native-LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation. PMID:26781977

  16. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Ping, Ling-Yan; Duong, Duc M; Gao, Xiao-Yan; He, Chun-Yan; Wei, Lei; Wu, Jun-Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell‑mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native‑LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl‑β‑cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL‑stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label‑free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native‑LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native‑LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation.

  17. Selective interaction of LAT (linker of activated T cells) with the open-active form of Lck in lipid rafts reveals a new mechanism for the regulation of Lck in T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kabouridis, Panagiotis S

    2003-01-01

    In T cells, the lipid raft-associated Lck is strongly tyrosine phosphorylated and has reduced enzymic activity in contrast with the detergent-soluble pool, which has substantial activity. Lck tagged at the C-terminus (Lck/V5-His) was efficiently captured by epitope-specific reagents from the detergent-soluble fraction but not from lipid rafts. Binding was restored following urea denaturation, suggesting that Lck/V5-His is in a 'closed' conformation in these domains. In agreement with this hypothesis, the Tyr(505) --> Phe/V5-His and Arg(154) --> Lys/V5-His mutants, which disrupt the SH2-Tyr(505) intramolecular interaction, were efficiently precipitated from lipid rafts. In contrast to Lck, Fyn/V5-His was precipitated equally well from both fractions. In the LAT(linker of activated T cells)-deficient J.CaM2 cells, Tyr(505) phosphorylation of raft-associated Lck was reduced whereas its enzymic activity was elevated. This correlated with decreased levels of raft-localized Csk (C-terminal Src kinase) kinase. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation of Lck was restored in LAT-reconstituted J.CaM2 cells suggesting that LAT negatively regulates Lck activity in lipid rafts. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments from Tyr(505) --> Phe/V5-His-expressing cells revealed that LAT preferentially interacts with the 'open' form of Lck in T cell raft domains. These results demonstrate that, unlike the non-raft pool, Lck in lipid rafts has a 'closed'-inactive structure, and that LAT plays a role in maintaining this conformation, possibly by facilitating critical associations within lipid rafts via its capacity to interact with the 'open' form of the kinase. PMID:12570875

  18. Membrane domains and the "lipid raft" concept.

    PubMed

    Sonnino, S; Prinetti, A

    2013-01-01

    The bulk structure of biological membranes consists of a bilayer of amphipathic lipids. According to the fluid mosaic model proposed by Singer and Nicholson, the glycerophospholipid bilayer is a two-dimensional fluid construct that allows the lateral movement of membrane components. Different types of lateral interactions among membrane components can take place, giving rise to multiple levels of lateral order that lead to highly organized structures. Early observations suggested that some of the lipid components of biological membranes may play active roles in the creation of these levels of order. In the late 1980s, a diverse series of experimental findings collectively gave rise to the lipid raft hypothesis. Lipid rafts were originally defined as membrane domains, i.e., ordered structures created as a consequence of the lateral segregation of sphingolipids and differing from the surrounding membrane in their molecular composition and properties. This definition was subsequently modified to introduce the notion that lipid rafts correspond to membrane areas stabilized by the presence of cholesterol within a liquid-ordered phase. During the past two decades, the concept of lipid rafts has become extremely popular among cell biologists, and these structures have been suggested to be involved in a great variety of cellular functions and biological events. During the same period, however, some groups presented experimental evidence that appeared to contradict the basic tenets that underlie the lipid raft concept. The concept is currently being re-defined, with greater consistency regarding the true nature and role of lipid rafts. In this article we will review the concepts, criticisms, and the novel confirmatory findings relating to the lipid raft hypothesis.

  19. Analysis of Cd44-Containing Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Oliferenko, Snezhana; Paiha, Karin; Harder, Thomas; Gerke, Volker; Schwärzler, Christoph; Schwarz, Heinz; Beug, Hartmut; Günthert, Ursula; Huber, Lukas A.

    1999-01-01

    CD44, the major cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), was shown to localize to detergent-resistant cholesterol-rich microdomains, called lipid rafts, in fibroblasts and blood cells. Here, we have investigated the molecular environment of CD44 within the plane of the basolateral membrane of polarized mammary epithelial cells. We show that CD44 partitions into lipid rafts that contain annexin II at their cytoplasmic face. Both CD44 and annexin II were released from these lipid rafts by sequestration of plasma membrane cholesterol. Partition of annexin II and CD44 to the same type of lipid rafts was demonstrated by cross-linking experiments in living cells. First, when CD44 was clustered at the cell surface by anti-CD44 antibodies, annexin II was recruited into the cytoplasmic leaflet of CD44 clusters. Second, the formation of intracellular, submembranous annexin II–p11 aggregates caused by expression of a trans-dominant mutant of annexin II resulted in coclustering of CD44. Moreover, a frequent redirection of actin bundles to these clusters was observed. These basolateral CD44/annexin II–lipid raft complexes were stabilized by addition of GTPγS or phalloidin in a semipermeabilized and cholesterol-depleted cell system. The low lateral mobility of CD44 in the plasma membrane, as assessed with fluorescent recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), was dependent on the presence of plasma membrane cholesterol and an intact actin cytoskeleton. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton dramatically increased the fraction of CD44 which could be recovered from the light detergent-insoluble membrane fraction. Taken together, our data indicate that in mammary epithelial cells the vast majority of CD44 interacts with annexin II in lipid rafts in a cholesterol-dependent manner. These CD44-containing lipid microdomains interact with the underlying actin cytoskeleton. PMID:10459018

  20. Surface chemistry of lipid raft and amyloid Aβ (1-40) Langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Garima; Pao, Christine; Micic, Miodrag; Johnson, Sheba; Leblanc, Roger M

    2011-10-15

    Lipid rafts being rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids are considered to provide ordered lipid environment in the neuronal membranes, where it is hypothesized that the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) to Aβ (1-40) and Aβ (1-42) takes place. It is highly likely that the interaction of lipid raft components like cholesterol, sphingomylein or GM1 leads to nucleation of Aβ and results in aggregation or accumulation of amyloid plaques. One has investigated surface pressure-area isotherms of the lipid raft and Aβ (1-40) Langmuir monolayer. The compression-decompression cycles and the stability of the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer are crucial parameters for the investigation of interaction of Aβ (1-40) with the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer. It was revealed that GM1 provides instability to the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer. Adsorption of Aβ (1-40) onto the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing neutral (POPC) or negatively charged phospholipid (DPPG) was examined. The adsorption isotherms revealed that the concentration of cholesterol was important for adsorption of Aβ (1-40) onto the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing POPC whereas for the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing DPPG:cholesterol or GM1 did not play any role. In situ UV-vis absorption spectroscopy supported the interpretation of results for the adsorption isotherms.

  1. Lipid raft: A floating island of death or survival

    SciTech Connect

    George, Kimberly S.; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-03-15

    Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, and play an important role in the initiation of many pharmacological agent-induced signaling pathways and toxicological effects. The structure of lipid rafts is dynamic, resulting in an ever-changing content of both lipids and proteins. Cholesterol, as a major component of lipid rafts, is critical for the formation and configuration of lipid raft microdomains, which provide signaling platforms capable of activating both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. A change of cholesterol level can result in lipid raft disruption and activate or deactivate raft-associated proteins, such as death receptor proteins, protein kinases, and calcium channels. Several anti-cancer drugs are able to suppress growth and induce apoptosis of tumor cells through alteration of lipid raft contents via disrupting lipid raft integrity. -- Highlights: ► The role of lipid rafts in apoptosis ► The pro- and anti-apoptotic effects of lipid raft disruption ► Cancer treatments targeting lipid rafts.

  2. The inner side of T cell lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Gri, Giorgia; Molon, Barbara; Manes, Santos; Pozzan, Tullio; Viola, Antonella

    2004-07-15

    A key question in understanding the functional role of lipid rafts is whether lipid microdomains at the plasma membrane outer leaflet are coupled to lipid microdomains at the inner leaflet. By using a cyan-fluorescent protein (CFP) targeted to inner plasma membrane rafts of Jurkat T cells, we found that raft domains at the outer and inner leaflets are physically coupled and that this coupling requires cholesterol. Interestingly, TCR/CD3 cross-linking induces co-capping of the raft bilayer independently of cholesterol or signaling events, indicating that cholesterol-extracting drugs are unable to destroy TCR-lipid rafts interaction.

  3. Mitochondria do not contain lipid rafts, and lipid rafts do not contain mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu Zi; Berg, Kyra B; Foster, Leonard J

    2009-05-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains involved in many cellular functions, including transduction of cellular signals and cell entry by pathogens. Lipid rafts can be enriched biochemically by extraction in a nonionic detergent at low temperature, followed by floatation on a sucrose density gradient. Previous proteomic studies of such detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) are in disagreement about the presence of mitochondrial proteins in raft components. Here, we approach the status of mitochondrial proteins in DRM preparations by employing stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to evaluate the composition of differentially purified subcellular fractions as well as high-resolution linear density gradients. Our data demonstrate that F(1)/F(0) ATPase subunits, voltage-dependent anion selective channels, and other mitochondrial proteins are at best partially copurifying contaminants of raft preparations.

  4. Cytoplasmic remodeling of erythrocyte raft lipids during infection by the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sean C.; Fernandez-Pol, Sebastian; Chung, Paul H.; Prasanna Murthy, S. N.; Milne, Stephen B.; Salomao, Marcela; Brown, H. Alex; Lomasney, Jon W.; Mohandas, Narla

    2007-01-01

    Studies of detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) rafts in mature erythrocytes have facilitated identification of proteins that regulate formation of endovacuolar structures such as the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM) induced by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. However, analyses of raft lipids have remained elusive because detergents interfere with lipid detection. Here, we use primaquine to perturb the erythrocyte membrane and induce detergent-free buoyant vesicles, which are enriched in cholesterol and major raft proteins flotillin and stomatin and contain low levels of cytoskeleton, all characteristics of raft microdomains. Lipid mass spectrometry revealed that phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol are depleted in endovesicles while phosphoinositides are highly enriched, suggesting raft-based endovesiculation can be achieved by simple (non–receptor-mediated) mechanical perturbation of the erythrocyte plasma membrane and results in sorting of inner leaflet phospholipids. Live-cell imaging of lipid-specific protein probes showed that phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate (PIP2) is highly concentrated in primaquine-induced vesicles, confirming that it is an erythrocyte raft lipid. However, the malarial PVM lacks PIP2, although another raft lipid, phosphatidylserine, is readily detected. Thus, different remodeling/sorting of cytoplasmic raft phospholipids may occur in distinct endovacuoles. Importantly, erythrocyte raft lipids recruited to the invasion junction by mechanical stimulation may be remodeled by the malaria parasite to establish blood-stage infection. PMID:17526861

  5. The Continuing Mystery of Lipid Rafts.

    PubMed

    Levental, Ilya; Veatch, Sarah L

    2016-12-04

    Since its initial formalization nearly 20 years ago, the concept of lipid rafts has generated a tremendous amount of attention and interest and nearly as much controversy. The controversy is perhaps surprising because the notion itself is intuitive: compartmentalization in time and space is a ubiquitous theme at all scales of biology, and therefore, the partitioning of cellular membranes into lateral subdivision should be expected. Nevertheless, the physicochemical principles responsible for compartmentalization and the molecular mechanisms by which they are functionalized remain nearly as mysterious today as they were two decades ago. Herein, we review recent literature on this topic with a specific focus on the major open questions in the field including: (1) what are the best tools to assay raft behavior in living membranes? (2) what is the function of the complex lipidome of mammalian cells with respect to membrane organization? (3) what are the mechanisms that drive raft formation and determine their properties? (4) how can rafts be modulated? (5) how is membrane compartmentalization integrated into cellular signaling? Despite decades of intensive research, this compelling field remains full of fundamental questions.

  6. Using NK Cell Lipid Raft Fractionation to Understand the Role of Lipid Rafts in NK Cell Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pertierra, Esther; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts were first defined as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) due to their relative insolubility in non-ionic detergents. Although they should not be confused with lipid rafts, DRMs are a valuable starting point for the study of these membrane domains and the interactions of proteins with rafts.Here we describe the isolation of DRMs by ultracentrifugation on a sucrose gradient, a method we have used to study the role of lipid rafts in NKG2D-mediated signaling. We also describe raft fractionation of NK cells involving the selective solubility of β-octylglucoside (β-OG). OG is a non-ionic detergent that efficiently dissolves DRMs but does not disrupt protein associations with the cytoskeleton. Using these two techniques may yield useful information about the proteins involved in receptor recruitment into lipid rafts and the interactions of the actin cytoskeleton with lipid rafts.

  7. Structural determinants of protein partitioning into ordered membrane domains and lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Lorent, Joseph Helmuth; Levental, Ilya

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the existence of lateral nanoscopic lipid domains in plasma membranes, known as lipid rafts. These domains preferentially recruit membrane proteins and lipids to facilitate their interactions and thereby regulate transmembrane signaling and cellular homeostasis. The functionality of raft domains is intrinsically dependent on their selectivity for specific membrane components; however, while the physicochemical determinants of raft association for lipids are known, very few systematic studies have focused on the structural aspects that guide raft partitioning of proteins. In this review, we describe biophysical and thermodynamic aspects of raft-mimetic liquid ordered phases, focusing on those most relevant for protein partitioning. Further, we detail the variety of experimental models used to study protein-raft interactions. Finally, we review the existing literature on mechanisms for raft targeting, including lipid post-translational modifications, lipid binding, and transmembrane domain features. We conclude that while protein palmitoylation is a clear raft-targeting signal, few other general structural determinants for raft partitioning have been revealed, suggesting that many discoveries lie ahead in this burgeoning field.

  8. Lipid Rafts in Mast Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Silveira e Souza, Adriana Maria Mariano; Mazucato, Vivian Marino; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells have long been recognized to have a direct and critical role in allergic and inflammatory reactions. In allergic diseases, these cells exert both local and systemic responses, including allergic rhinitis and anaphylaxis. Mast cell mediators are also related to many chronic inflammatory conditions. Besides the roles in pathological conditions, the biological functions of mast cells include roles in innate immunity, involvement in host defense mechanisms against parasites, immunomodulation of the immune system, tissue repair, and angiogenesis. Despite their growing significance in physiological and pathological conditions, much still remains to be learned about mast cell biology. This paper presents evidence that lipid rafts or raft components modulate many of the biological processes in mast cells, such as degranulation and endocytosis, play a role in mast cell development and recruitment, and contribute to the overall preservation of mast cell structure and organization. PMID:21490812

  9. Cholesterol lipids and cholesterol-containing lipid rafts in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; London, Erwin

    2016-09-01

    Sterols are important components of eukaryotic membranes, but rare in bacteria. Some bacteria obtain sterols from their host or environment. In some cases, these sterols form membrane domains analogous the lipid rafts proposed to exist in eukaryotic membranes. This review describes the properties and roles of sterols in Borrelia and Helicobacter.

  10. Lipid rafts are disrupted in mildly inflamed intestinal microenvironments without overt disruption of the epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Rachel V; Donatello, Simona; Lyes, Clíona; Owens, Mark B; Babina, Irina S; Hudson, Lance; Walsh, Shaun V; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid P; Amu, Sylvie; Barry, Sean P; Fallon, Padraic G; Hopkins, Ann M

    2012-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial barrier disruption is a feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but whether barrier disruption precedes or merely accompanies inflammation remains controversial. Tight junction (TJ) adhesion complexes control epithelial barrier integrity. Since some TJ proteins reside in cholesterol-enriched regions of the cell membrane termed lipid rafts, we sought to elucidate the relationship between rafts and intestinal epithelial barrier function. Lipid rafts were isolated from Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells primed with the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or treated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin as a positive control for raft disruption. Rafts were also isolated from the ilea of mice in which colitis had been induced in conjunction with in vivo intestinal permeability measurements, and lastly from intestinal biopsies of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with predominantly mild or quiescent disease. Raft distribution was analyzed by measuring activity of the raft-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase and by performing Western blot analysis for flotillin-1. Epithelial barrier integrity was estimated by measuring transepithelial resistance in cytokine-treated cells or in vivo permeability to fluorescent dextran in colitic mice. Raft and nonraft fractions were analyzed by Western blotting for the TJ proteins occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Our results revealed that lipid rafts were disrupted in IFN-γ-treated cells, in the ilea of mice with subclinical colitis, and in UC patients with quiescent inflammation. This was not associated with a clear pattern of occludin or ZO-1 relocalization from raft to nonraft fractions. Significantly, a time-course study in colitic mice revealed that disruption of lipid rafts preceded the onset of increased intestinal permeability. Our data suggest for the first time that lipid raft disruption occurs early in the inflammatory cascade in murine and human colitis and, we speculate, may contribute to

  11. Do local anesthetics interact preferentially with membrane lipid rafts? Comparative interactivities with raft-like membranes.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Ueno, Takahiro; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2010-08-01

    Membranous lipid bilayers have been reconsidered as the site of action of local anesthetics (LAs). Recent understanding of biomembranes indicates the existence of lipid raft microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids as potential platforms for channels and receptors. Based on the hypothesis that LAs may interact preferentially with lipid rafts over non-raft membranes, we compared their effects on raft model membranes and cardiolipin-containing biomimetic membranes. Liposomes were prepared with phospholipids, sphingomyelin, cerebroside, and cholesterol to have compositions corresponding to lipid rafts and cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membranes. After reacting LAs (50-200 microM) with the membrane preparations, their interactivities were determined by measuring fluorescence polarization with 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Although bupivacaine and lidocaine acted on different raft-like liquid-ordered membranes to reduce polarization values, their effects on biomimetic less ordered membranes were much greater. LAs interacted with biomimetic membranes with the potency being R(+)-bupivacaine > racemic bupivacaine > S(-)-bupivacaine > ropivacaine > lidocaine > prilocaine, which is consistent with the rank order of pharmacotoxicological potency. However, raft model membranes showed neither structure-dependence nor stereoselectivity. The relevance of membrane lipid rafts to LAs is questionable at least in their effects on raft-like liquid-ordered membranes.

  12. Role of lipid rafts in neuronal differentiation of dental pulp-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Vincenzo; Santacroce, Costantino; Tasciotti, Vincenzo; Martellucci, Stefano; Santilli, Francesca; Manganelli, Valeria; Piccoli, Luca; Misasi, Roberta; Sorice, Maurizio; Garofalo, Tina

    2015-12-10

    Human dental pulp-derived stem cells (hDPSCs) are characterized by a typical fibroblast-like morphology. They express specific markers for mesenchymal stem cells and are capable of differentiation into osteoblasts, adipoblasts and neurons in vitro. Previous studies showed that gangliosides are involved in the induction of early neuronal differentiation of hDPSCs. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of lipid rafts in this process. Lipid rafts are signaling microdomains enriched in glycosphingolipids, cholesterol, tyrosine kinase receptors, mono- or heterotrimeric G proteins and GPI-anchored proteins. We preliminary showed that established cells expressed multipotent mesenchymal stromal-specific surface antigens. Then, we analyzed the distribution of lipid rafts, revealing plasma membrane microdomains with GM2 and EGF-R enrichment. Following stimulation with EGF/bFGF, neuronal differentiation was observed. To analyze the functional role of lipid rafts in EGF/bFGF-induced hDPSCs differentiation, cells were preincubated with lipid raft affecting agents, i.e. [D]-PDMP or methyl-β-cyclodextrin. These compounds significantly prevented neuronal-specific antigen expression, as well as Akt and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation, induced by EGF/bFGF, indicating that lipid raft integrity is essential for EGF/bFGF-induced hDPSCs differentiation. These results suggest that lipid rafts may represent specific chambers, where multimolecular signaling complexes, including lipids (gangliosides, cholesterol) and proteins (EGF-R), play a role in hDPSCs differentiation.

  13. Lipid rafts and detergent-resistant membranes in epithelial keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    McGuinn, Kathleen P; Mahoney, Mỹ G

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the plasma membrane has markedly increased since Singer and Nicolson proposed the fluid mosaic model in 1972. While their revolutionary theory of the lipid bilayer remains largely valid, it is now known that lipids and proteins are not randomly dispersed throughout the plasma membrane but instead may be organized within membrane microdomains, commonly referred to as lipid rafts. Lipid rafts are highly dynamic, detergent resistant, and enriched with both cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. The two main types are flotillin-rich planar lipid rafts and caveolin-rich caveolae. It is proposed that flotillin and caveolin proteins regulate cell communication by compartmentalizing and interacting with signal transduction proteins within their respective lipid microdomains. Consequently, membrane rafts play an important role in vital cellular functions including migration, invasion, and signaling; thus, alterations in their microenvironment can initiate signaling pathways that affect cellular function and behavior. Therefore, the identification of lipid rafts and their associated proteins is integral to the study of transmembrane signaling. Here, we review the current standard protocols and biochemical approaches used to isolate and define raft proteins from epithelial cells and tissues. Furthermore, in Section 3 of this chapter, detailed protocols are offered for isolating lipid rafts by subjection to detergent and sucrose density centrifugation, as well as an approach for selectively isolating caveolae. Methods to manipulate rafts with treatments such as methyl-β-cyclodextrin and flotillin III are also described.

  14. Lipid Rafts Disruption Increases Ochratoxin A Cytotoxicity to Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Qi, Xiaozhe; Zheng, Juanjuan; Luo, Yunbo; Zhao, Changhui; Hao, Junran; Li, Xiaohong; Huang, Kunlun; Xu, Wentao

    2016-02-01

    Lipid rafts are microdomains in plasma membrane and can mediate cytotoxicity. In this study, the role of lipid rafts in ochratoxin A-induced toxicity was investigated using Hepatoblastoma Cell Line HepG-2 cells. Disruption of cholesterol-containing lipid rafts enhanced Ochratoxin A (OTA) toxicity, as shown by increased lactate dehydrogenase leakage, increased reactive oxygen species level and reduction of superoxide dismutase activity in a time-dependent manner. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation-based proteomics of the cell membranes showed that nearly 85.5% proteins were downregulated by OTA, indicating that OTA inhibited the membrane protein synthesis. Most of altered proteins were involved in Gene Ontology "transport", "cell adhesion" and "vesicle-mediated transport". In conclusion, lipid rafts play a key role in OTA-induced cytotoxicity. This study provides insight into how OTA toxicity is regulated by the plasma membrane, especially the lipid rafts.

  15. Lipid rafts in immune signalling: current progress and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Pallavi; Yadav, Vikas; Saini, Neeru

    2016-09-01

    Lipid rafts are dynamic assemblies of proteins and lipids that harbour many receptors and regulatory molecules and so act as a platform for signal transduction. They float freely within the liquid-disordered bilayer of cellular membranes and can cluster to form larger ordered domains. Alterations in lipid rafts are commonly found to be associated with the pathogenesis of several human diseases and recent reports have shown that the raft domains can also be perturbed by targeting raft proteins through microRNAs. Over the last few years, the importance of lipid rafts in modulating both innate and acquired immune responses has been elucidated. Various receptors present on immune cells like B cells, T cells, basophils and mast cells associate with lipid rafts on ligand binding and initiate signalling cascades leading to inflammation. Furthermore, disrupting lipid raft integrity alters lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine secretion, IgE signalling, and B-cell and T-cell activation. The objective of this review is to summarize the recent progress in understanding the role of lipid rafts in the modulation of immune signalling and its related therapeutic potential for autoimmune diseases and inflammatory disorders.

  16. Localization and signaling of GPCRs in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Villar, Van Anthony M; Cuevas, Santiago; Zheng, Xiaoxu; Jose, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of how biological membranes are organized and how they function has evolved. Instead of just serving as a medium in which certain proteins are found, portions of the lipid bilayer have been demonstrated to form specialized platforms that foster the assembly of signaling complexes by providing a microenvironment that is conducive for effective protein-protein interactions. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and relevant signaling molecules, including the heterotrimeric G proteins, key enzymes such as kinases and phosphatases, trafficking proteins, and secondary messengers, preferentially partition to these highly organized cell membrane microdomains, called lipid rafts. As such, lipid rafts are crucial for the trafficking and signaling of GPCRs. The study of GPCR biology in the context of lipid rafts involves the localization of the GPCR of interest in lipid rafts, at the basal state and upon receptor agonism, and the evaluation of the biological functions of the GPCR in appropriate cell lines. The lack of standardized methodology to study lipid rafts, in general, and of the workings of GPCRs in lipid rafts, in particular, and the inherent drawbacks of current methods have hampered the complete understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Newer methodologies that allow the study of GPCRs in their native form are needed. The use of complementary approaches that produce mutually supportive results appear to be the best way for drawing conclusions with regards to the distribution and activity of GPCRs in lipid rafts.

  17. Down-regulation of Connexin43 expression reveals the involvement of caveolin-1 containing lipid rafts in human U251 glioblastoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Strale, Pierre-Olivier; Clarhaut, Jonathan; Lamiche, Coralie; Cronier, Laurent; Mesnil, Marc; Defamie, Norah

    2012-11-01

    Glioblastoma cells are characterized by high proliferation and invasive capacities. Tumor development has been associated with a decrease of gap-junctional intercellular communication, but the concrete involvement of gap junction proteins, connexins, remains elusive since they are also suspected to promote cell invasion. In order to better understand how connexins control the glioma cell phenotype, we studied the consequences of inhibiting the intrinsic expression of the major astrocytic connexin, Connexin43, in human U251 glioblastoma cells by the shRNA strategy. The induced down-regulation of Cx43 expression has various effects on the U251 cells such as increased clonogenicity, angiogenesis and decreased adhesion on specific extracellular matrix proteins. We demonstrate that the invasion capacity measured in vitro and ex vivo correlates with Cx43 expression level. For the first time in a cancer cell context, our work demonstrates that Cx43 cofractionates, colocalizes and coimmunoprecipitates with a lipid raft marker, caveolin-1 and that this interaction is inversely correlated to the level of Cx43. This localization of Cx43 in these lipid raft microdomains regulates both homo- and heterocellular gap junctional communications (respectively between U251 cells, or between U251 cells and astrocytes). Moreover, the adhesive and invasive capacities are not dependent, in our model, on Cav-1 expression level. Our results tend to show that heterocellular gap junctional communication between cancer and stroma cells may affect the behavior of the tumor cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate that Cx43 controls the tumor phenotype of glioblastoma U251 cells and in particular, invasion capacity, through its localization in lipid rafts containing Cav-1.

  18. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+, and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23087902

  19. Lipid rafts as major platforms for signaling regulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mollinedo, Faustino; Gajate, Consuelo

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling does not apparently occur randomly over the cell surface, but it seems to be integrated very often into cholesterol-rich membrane domains, termed lipid rafts. Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains that are enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides, and behave as major modulators of membrane geometry, lateral movement of molecules, traffic and signal transduction. Because the lipid and protein composition of membrane rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, they provide an additional level of compartmentalization, serving as sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction proteins. A wide number of signal transduction processes related to cell adhesion, migration, as well as to cell survival and proliferation, which play major roles in cancer development and progression, are dependent on lipid rafts. Despite lipid rafts harbor mainly critical survival signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling, recent evidence suggests that these membrane domains can also house death receptor-mediated apoptotic signaling. Recruitment of this death receptor signaling pathway in membrane rafts can be pharmacologically modulated, thus opening up the possibility to regulate cell demise with a therapeutic use. The synthetic ether phospholipid edelfosine shows a high affinity for cholesterol and accumulates in lipid rafts in a number of malignant hematological cells, leading to an efficient in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity by inducing translocation of death receptors and downstream signaling molecules to these membrane domains. Additional antitumor drugs have also been shown to act, at least in part, by recruiting death receptors in lipid rafts. The partition of death receptors together with downstream apoptotic signaling molecules in membrane rafts has led us to postulate the concept of a special liquid-ordered membrane platform coined as

  20. Plasma membrane organization and function: moving past lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Mary L

    2013-09-01

    "Lipid raft" is the name given to the tiny, dynamic, and ordered domains of cholesterol and sphingolipids that are hypothesized to exist in the plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells. According to the lipid raft hypothesis, these cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched domains modulate the protein-protein interactions that are essential for cellular function. Indeed, many studies have shown that cellular levels of cholesterol and sphingolipids influence plasma membrane organization, cell signaling, and other important biological processes. Despite 15 years of research and the application of highly advanced imaging techniques, data that unambiguously demonstrate the existence of lipid rafts in mammalian cells are still lacking. This Perspective summarizes the results that challenge the lipid raft hypothesis and discusses alternative hypothetical models of plasma membrane organization and lipid-mediated cellular function.

  1. DJ-1 associates with lipid rafts by palmitoylation and regulates lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Soo; Kim, Jin Soo; Park, Ji-Young; Suh, Young Ho; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-Hye; Park, Sang Myun

    2013-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common progressive neurodegenerative disease. Several genes have been associated with familial type PD, providing tremendous insights into the pathogenesis of PD. Gathering evidence supports the view that these gene products may operate through common molecular pathways. Recent reports suggest that many PD-associated gene products, such as α-synuclein, LRRK2, parkin and PINK1, associate with lipid rafts and lipid rafts may be associated with neurodegeneration. Here, we observed that DJ-1 protein also associated with lipid rafts. Palmitoylation of three cysteine residues (C46/53/106) and C-terminal region of DJ-1 were required for this association. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced the localization of DJ-1 into lipid rafts in astrocytes. The LPS-TLR4 signaling was more augmented in DJ-1 knock-out astrocytes by the impairment of TLR4 endocytosis. Furthermore, lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis including the endocytosis of CD14, which play a major role in regulating TLR4 endocytosis was also impaired, but clathrin-dependent endocytosis was not. This study provides a novel function of DJ-1 in lipid rafts, which may contribute the pathogenesis of PD. Moreover, it also provides the possibility that many PD-related proteins may operate through common molecular pathways in lipid rafts.

  2. Lipid rafts prepared by different methods contain different connexin channels, but gap junctions are not lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Locke, Darren; Liu, Jade; Harris, Andrew L

    2005-10-04

    Cell extraction with cold nonionic detergents or alkaline carbonate prepares an insoluble membrane fraction whose buoyant density permits its flotation in discontinuous sucrose gradients. These lipid "rafts" are implicated in protein sorting and are attractive candidates as platforms that coordinate signal transduction pathways with intracellular substrates. Gap junctions form a direct molecular signaling pathway by end-to-end apposition of hemichannels containing one (homomeric) or more (heteromeric) connexin isoforms. Residency of channels composed of Cx26 and/or Cx32 in lipid rafts was assessed by membrane insolubility in alkaline carbonate or different concentrations of Triton X100, Nonidet P40 and Brij-58 nonionic detergents. Using Triton X100, insoluble raft membranes contained homomeric Cx32 channels, but Cx26-containing channels only when low detergent concentrations were used. Results were similar using Nonidet P40, except that Cx26-containing channels were excluded from raft membranes at all detergent concentrations. In contrast, homomeric Cx26 channels were enriched within Brij-58-insoluble rafts, whereas Cx32-containing channels partitioned between raft and nonraft membranes. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed prominent colocalization only of nonjunctional connexin channels with raft plasma membrane; junctional plaques were not lipid rafts. Rafts prepared by different extraction methods had considerable quantitative and qualitative differences in their lipid compositions. That functionally different nonjunctional connexin channels partition among rafts with distinct lipid compositions suggests that unpaired Cx26 and/or Cx32 channels exist in membrane domains of slightly different physicochemical character. Rafts may be involved in trafficking of plasma membrane connexin channels to gap junctions.

  3. Structure of Cholesterol in Lipid Rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppozini, Laura; Meinhardt, Sebastian; Armstrong, Clare L.; Yamani, Zahra; Kučerka, Norbert; Schmid, Friederike; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2014-11-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano-or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking, and lipid or protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules, we observe raftlike structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to ordering of the cholesterol molecules in the raftlike structures were observed and indexed by two different structures: a monoclinic structure of ordered cholesterol pairs of alternating direction in equilibrium with cholesterol plaques, i.e., triclinic cholesterol bilayers.

  4. Lipid rafts: at a crossroad between cell biology and physics.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Ken; Mouritsen, Ole G; Anderson, Richard G W

    2007-01-01

    Membrane lateral heterogeneity is accepted as a requirement for the function of biological membranes and the notion of lipid rafts gives specificity to this broad concept. However, the lipid raft field is now at a technical impasse because the physical tools to study biological membranes as a liquid that is ordered in space and time are still being developed. This has lead to a disconnection between the concept of lipid rafts as derived from biochemical and biophysical assays and their existence in the cell. Here, we compare the concept of lipid rafts as it has emerged from the study of synthetic membranes with the reality of lateral heterogeneity in biological membranes. Further application of existing tools and the development of new tools are needed to understand the dynamic heterogeneity of biological membranes.

  5. Proving lipid rafts exist: membrane domains in the prokaryote Borrelia burgdorferi have the same properties as eukaryotic lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    LaRocca, Timothy J; Pathak, Priyadarshini; Chiantia, Salvatore; Toledo, Alvaro; Silvius, John R; Benach, Jorge L; London, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Lipid rafts in eukaryotic cells are sphingolipid and cholesterol-rich, ordered membrane regions that have been postulated to play roles in many membrane functions, including infection. We previously demonstrated the existence of cholesterol-lipid-rich domains in membranes of the prokaryote, B. burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease [LaRocca et al. (2010) Cell Host & Microbe 8, 331-342]. Here, we show that these prokaryote membrane domains have the hallmarks of eukaryotic lipid rafts, despite lacking sphingolipids. Substitution experiments replacing cholesterol lipids with a set of sterols, ranging from strongly raft-promoting to raft-inhibiting when mixed with eukaryotic sphingolipids, showed that sterols that can support ordered domain formation are both necessary and sufficient for formation of B. burgdorferi membrane domains that can be detected by transmission electron microscopy or in living organisms by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Raft-supporting sterols were also necessary and sufficient for formation of high amounts of detergent resistant membranes from B. burgdorferi. Furthermore, having saturated acyl chains was required for a biotinylated lipid to associate with the cholesterol-lipid-rich domains in B. burgdorferi, another characteristic identical to that of eukaryotic lipid rafts. Sterols supporting ordered domain formation were also necessary and sufficient to maintain B. burgdorferi membrane integrity, and thus critical to the life of the organism. These findings provide compelling evidence for the existence of lipid rafts and show that the same principles of lipid raft formation apply to prokaryotes and eukaryotes despite marked differences in their lipid compositions.

  6. Lipid Rafts: Keys to Sperm Maturation, Fertilization, and Early Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Natsuko; Yoshida, Kaoru; Miyado, Kenji; Yoshida, Manabu

    2011-01-01

    Cell membranes are composed of many different lipids and protein receptors, which are important for regulating intracellular functions and cell signaling. To orchestrate these activities, the cell membrane is compartmentalized into microdomains that are stably or transiently formed. These compartments are called “lipid rafts”. In gamete cells that lack gene transcription, distribution of lipids and proteins on these lipid rafts is focused during changes in their structure and functions such as starting flagella movement and membrane fusion. In this paper, we describe the role of lipid rafts in gamete maturation, fertilization, and early embryogenesis. PMID:21490798

  7. Proteomic Profiling of Detergent Resistant Membranes (Lipid Rafts) of Prostasomes.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Louise; Ronquist, Karl K Göran; Ek, Bo; Ronquist, Gunnar; Larsson, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Prostasomes are exosomes derived from prostate epithelial cells through exocytosis by multivesicular bodies. Prostasomes have a bilayered membrane and readily interact with sperm. The membrane lipid composition is unusual with a high contribution of sphingomyelin at the expense of phosphatidylcholine and saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids are dominant. Lipid rafts are liquid-ordered domains that are more tightly packed than the surrounding nonraft phase of the bilayer. Lipid rafts are proposed to be highly dynamic, submicroscopic assemblies that float freely within the liquid disordered membrane bilayer and some proteins preferentially partition into the ordered raft domains. We asked the question whether lipid rafts do exist in prostasomes and, if so, which proteins might be associated with them. Prostasomes of density range 1.13-1.19g/ml were subjected to density gradient ultracentrifugation in sucrose fabricated by phosphate buffered saline (PBS) containing 1% Triton X-100 with capacity for banding at 1.10 g/ml, i.e. the classical density of lipid rafts. Prepared prostasomal lipid rafts (by gradient ultracentrifugation) were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The clearly visible band on top of 1.10g/ml sucrose in the Triton X-100 containing gradient was subjected to liquid chromatography-tandem MS and more than 370 lipid raft associated proteins were identified. Several of them were involved in intraluminal vesicle formation, e.g. tetraspanins, ESCRTs, and Ras-related proteins. This is the first comprehensive liquid chromatography-tandem MS profiling of proteins in lipid rafts derived from exosomes. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002163.

  8. Lipid rafts, ceramide and molecular transcytosis.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fang; Xiong, Bin; Yang, Xiaoyan; Jin, Si

    2016-01-01

    Transcytosis, a widely described process concerning transport of macromolecules between the apical and basolateral sides in various cell types, is extremely important for multicellular organisms to selectively exchange materials in different microenvironments while maintaining cellular and body homeostasis. Uncontrolled transcytosis is involved in a wide range of pathophysiological processes. Lipid rafts (LRs), the sphingolipid and cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains, enable to form different functional membrane macrodomains or platforms upon stimulations. In particular, ceramide-enriched membrane microdomains play extremely critical roles in LRs clustering or platform formations. Notably, various transcytosis-related molecules are tightly correlated with LRs and ceramide. We attempt to summarize the basic and advanced information about the roles of different types of transcytosis in human health and diseases, and the types and functions of LRs involved in transcytosis, as well as multiple transcytosis-related molecules associated with LRs and ceramide. It is hoped that all information and discussions could provide much more comprehensive insights into the understanding of the association of LRs with transcytosis, as well as shed some new light on the translational significance in this area.

  9. Isolation and analysis of membrane lipids and lipid rafts in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Brogden, Graham; Propsting, Marcus; Adamek, Mikolaj; Naim, Hassan Y; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2014-03-01

    Cell membranes act as an interface between the interior of the cell and the exterior environment and facilitate a range of essential functions including cell signalling, cell structure, nutrient uptake and protection. It is composed of a lipid bilayer with integrated proteins, and the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer comprises of liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains. Lo microdomains, also named as lipid rafts are enriched in cholesterol, sphingomyelin and certain types of proteins, which facilitate cell signalling and nutrient uptake. Lipid rafts have been extensively researched in mammals and the presence of functional lipid rafts was recently demonstrated in goldfish, but there is currently very little knowledge about their composition and function in fish. Therefore a protocol was established for the analysis of lipid rafts and membranous lipids in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) tissues. Twelve lipids were identified and analysed in the Ld domain of the membrane with the most predominant lipids found in all tissues being; triglycerides, cholesterol, phosphoethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Four lipids were identified in lipid rafts in all tissues analysed, triglycerides (33-62%) always found in the highest concentration followed by cholesterol (24-32%), phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Isolation of lipid rafts was confirmed by identifying the presence of the lipid raft associated protein flotillin, present at higher concentrations in the detergent resistant fraction. The data provided here build a lipid library of important carp tissues as a baseline for further studies into virus entry, protein trafficking or environmental stress analysis.

  10. Functional Proteomic Analysis of Lipid Raft Kinase Complexes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    NADPH -- cytochrome P450 reductase Non-raft 6 95/677 + 3.0 1.5 2.0 3 1 3.0 3 2 1.5 584 + IPI00015018 PPA1 Inorganic pyrophosphatase Non-raft 2 38/289...Freeman M.R. Proteome-scale characterization of human S-acylated proteins in lipid raft-enriched and non-raft membrane domains. Molecular & Cellular...IPI00013847 UQCRC1 Ubiquinol- cytochrome -c reductase complex core protein I,mitochondrial precursor Non-raft 2 24/480 – 0.5 1.0 0.5 1 2 0.5 0 0 0.0 891

  11. Antidepressants Accumulate in Lipid Rafts Independent of Monoamine Transporters to Modulate Redistribution of the G Protein, Gαs.

    PubMed

    Erb, Samuel J; Schappi, Jeffrey M; Rasenick, Mark M

    2016-09-16

    Depression is a significant public health problem for which currently available medications, if effective, require weeks to months of treatment before patients respond. Previous studies have shown that the G protein responsible for increasing cAMP (Gαs) is increasingly localized to lipid rafts in depressed subjects and that chronic antidepressant treatment translocates Gαs from lipid rafts. Translocation of Gαs, which shows delayed onset after chronic antidepressant treatment of rats or of C6 glioma cells, tracks with the delayed onset of therapeutic action of antidepressants. Because antidepressants appear to specifically modify Gαs localized to lipid rafts, we sought to determine whether structurally diverse antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts. Sustained treatment of C6 glioma cells, which lack 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters, showed marked concentration of several antidepressants in raft fractions, as revealed by increased absorbance and by mass fingerprint. Closely related molecules without antidepressant activity did not concentrate in raft fractions. Thus, at least two classes of antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts and effect translocation of Gαs to the non-raft membrane fraction, where it activates the cAMP-signaling cascade. Analysis of the structural determinants of raft localization may both help to explain the hysteresis of antidepressant action and lead to design and development of novel substrates for depression therapeutics.

  12. Association between Tetrodotoxin Resistant Channels and Lipid Rafts Regulates Sensory Neuron Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Pristerà, Alessandro; Baker, Mark D.; Okuse, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a key role in the initiation and propagation of action potentials in neurons. NaV1.8 is a tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant VGSC expressed in nociceptors, peripheral small-diameter neurons able to detect noxious stimuli. NaV1.8 underlies the vast majority of sodium currents during action potentials. Many studies have highlighted a key role for NaV1.8 in inflammatory and chronic pain models. Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane highly enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts tune the spatial and temporal organisation of proteins and lipids on the plasma membrane. They are thought to act as platforms on the membrane where proteins and lipids can be trafficked, compartmentalised and functionally clustered. In the present study we investigated NaV1.8 sub-cellular localisation and explored the idea that it is associated with lipid rafts in nociceptors. We found that NaV1.8 is distributed in clusters along the axons of DRG neurons in vitro and ex vivo. We also demonstrated, by biochemical and imaging studies, that NaV1.8 is associated with lipid rafts along the sciatic nerve ex vivo and in DRG neurons in vitro. Moreover, treatments with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) led to the dissociation between rafts and NaV1.8. By calcium imaging we demonstrated that the lack of association between rafts and NaV1.8 correlated with impaired neuronal excitability, highlighted by a reduction in the number of neurons able to conduct mechanically- and chemically-evoked depolarisations. These findings reveal the sub-cellular localisation of NaV1.8 in nociceptors and highlight the importance of the association between NaV1.8 and lipid rafts in the control of nociceptor excitability. PMID:22870192

  13. Association between tetrodotoxin resistant channels and lipid rafts regulates sensory neuron excitability.

    PubMed

    Pristerà, Alessandro; Baker, Mark D; Okuse, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a key role in the initiation and propagation of action potentials in neurons. Na(V)1.8 is a tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant VGSC expressed in nociceptors, peripheral small-diameter neurons able to detect noxious stimuli. Na(V)1.8 underlies the vast majority of sodium currents during action potentials. Many studies have highlighted a key role for Na(V)1.8 in inflammatory and chronic pain models. Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane highly enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts tune the spatial and temporal organisation of proteins and lipids on the plasma membrane. They are thought to act as platforms on the membrane where proteins and lipids can be trafficked, compartmentalised and functionally clustered. In the present study we investigated Na(V)1.8 sub-cellular localisation and explored the idea that it is associated with lipid rafts in nociceptors. We found that Na(V)1.8 is distributed in clusters along the axons of DRG neurons in vitro and ex vivo. We also demonstrated, by biochemical and imaging studies, that Na(V)1.8 is associated with lipid rafts along the sciatic nerve ex vivo and in DRG neurons in vitro. Moreover, treatments with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) led to the dissociation between rafts and Na(V)1.8. By calcium imaging we demonstrated that the lack of association between rafts and Na(V)1.8 correlated with impaired neuronal excitability, highlighted by a reduction in the number of neurons able to conduct mechanically- and chemically-evoked depolarisations. These findings reveal the sub-cellular localisation of Na(V)1.8 in nociceptors and highlight the importance of the association between Na(V)1.8 and lipid rafts in the control of nociceptor excitability.

  14. Effect of sterol carrier protein-2 expression on sphingolipid distribution in plasma membrane lipid rafts/caveolae.

    PubMed

    Atshaves, Barbara P; Jefferson, John R; McIntosh, Avery L; Gallegos, Adalberto; McCann, Bonnie M; Landrock, Kerstin K; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2007-10-01

    Although sphingolipids are highly important signaling molecules enriched in lipid rafts/caveolae, relatively little is known regarding factors such as sphingolipid binding proteins that may regulate the distribution of sphingolipids to lipid rafts/caveolae of living cells. Since early work demonstrated that sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) enhanced glycosphingolipid transfer from membranes in vitro, the effect of SCP-2 expression on sphingolipid distribution to lipid rafts/caveolae in living cells was examined. Using a non-detergent affinity chromatography method to isolate lipid rafts/caveolae and non-rafts from purified L-cell plasma membranes, it was shown that lipid rafts/caveolae were highly enriched in multiple sphingolipid species including ceramides, acidic glycosphingolipids (ganglioside GM1); neutral glycosphingolipids (monohexosides, dihexosides, globosides), and sphingomyelin as compared to non-raft domains. SCP-2 overexpression further enriched the content of total sphingolipids and select sphingolipid species in the lipid rafts/caveolae domains. Analysis of fluorescence binding and displacement data revealed that purified human recombinant SCP-2 exhibited high binding affinity (nanomolar range) for all sphingolipid classes tested. The binding affinity decreased in the following order: ceramides > acidic glycosphingolipid (ganglioside GM1) > neutral glycosphingolipid (monohexosides, hexosides, globosides) > sphingomyelin. Enrichment of individual sphingolipid classes to lipid rafts/caveolae versus non-rafts in SCP-2 expressing plasma membranes followed closely with those classes most strongly bound to SCP-2 (ceramides, GM1 > the neutral glycosphingolipids (monohexosides, dihexosides, and globosides) > sphingomyelin). Taken together these data suggested that SCP-2 acts to selectively regulate sphingolipid distribution to lipid rafts/caveolae in living cells.

  15. Involvement of glycosphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts in inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are membrane components consisting of hydrophobic ceramide and hydrophilic sugar moieties. GSLs cluster with cholesterol in cell membranes to form GSL-enriched lipid rafts. Biochemical analyses have demonstrated that GSL-enriched lipid rafts contain several kinds of transducer molecules, including Src family kinases. Among the GSLs, lactosylceramide (LacCer, CDw17) can bind to various microorganisms, is highly expressed on the plasma membranes of human phagocytes, and forms lipid rafts containing the Src family tyrosine kinase Lyn. LacCer-enriched lipid rafts mediate immunological and inflammatory reactions, including superoxide generation, chemotaxis, and non-opsonic phagocytosis. Therefore, LacCer-enriched membrane microdomains are thought to function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed on microorganisms. LacCer also serves as a signal transduction molecule for functions mediated by CD11b/CD18-integrin (αM/β2-integrin, CR3, Mac-1), as well as being associated with several key cellular processes. LacCer recruits PCKα/ε and phospholipase A2 to stimulate PECAM-1 expression in human monocytes and their adhesion to endothelial cells, as well as regulating β1-integrin clustering and endocytosis on cell surfaces. This review describes the organizational and inflammation-related functions of LacCer-enriched lipid rafts.

  16. Lipid Raft Redox Signaling: Molecular Mechanisms in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fan; Katirai, Foad

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Lipid rafts, the sphingolipid and cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains, are able to form different membrane macrodomains or platforms upon stimulations, including redox signaling platforms, which serve as a critical signaling mechanism to mediate or regulate cellular activities or functions. In particular, this raft platform formation provides an important driving force for the assembling of NADPH oxidase subunits and the recruitment of other related receptors, effectors, and regulatory components, resulting, in turn, in the activation of NADPH oxidase and downstream redox regulation of cell functions. This comprehensive review attempts to summarize all basic and advanced information about the formation, regulation, and functions of lipid raft redox signaling platforms as well as their physiological and pathophysiological relevance. Several molecular mechanisms involving the formation of lipid raft redox signaling platforms and the related therapeutic strategies targeting them are discussed. It is hoped that all information and thoughts included in this review could provide more comprehensive insights into the understanding of lipid raft redox signaling, in particular, of their molecular mechanisms, spatial-temporal regulations, and physiological, pathophysiological relevances to human health and diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1043–1083. PMID:21294649

  17. Lipid Rafts and Alzheimer’s Disease: Protein-Lipid Interactions and Perturbation of Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, David A.; Nalivaeva, Natalia N.; Turner, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane domains, more ordered than the bulk membrane and enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. They represent a platform for protein-lipid and protein–protein interactions and for cellular signaling events. In addition to their normal functions, including membrane trafficking, ligand binding (including viruses), axonal development and maintenance of synaptic integrity, rafts have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Lipid rafts promote interaction of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) with the secretase (BACE-1) responsible for generation of the amyloid β peptide, Aβ. Rafts also regulate cholinergic signaling as well as acetylcholinesterase and Aβ interaction. In addition, such major lipid raft components as cholesterol and GM1 ganglioside have been directly implicated in pathogenesis of the disease. Perturbation of lipid raft integrity can also affect various signaling pathways leading to cellular death and AD. In this review, we discuss modulation of APP cleavage by lipid rafts and their components, while also looking at more recent findings on the role of lipid rafts in signaling events. PMID:22737128

  18. Lipid rafts/caveolae as microdomains of calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Biswaranjan; Singh, Brij B

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ca2+ is a major signaling molecule in both excitable and non-excitable cells, where it serves critical functions ranging from cell growth to differentiation to cell death. The physiological functions of these cells are tightly regulated in response to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ that is achieved by the activation of several plasma membrane (PM) Ca2+ channels as well as release of Ca2+ from the internal stores. One such channel is referred to as store-operated Ca2+ channel that is activated by the release of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ which initiates store operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). Recent advances in the field suggest that some members of TRPCs and Orai channels function as SOCE channels. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate channel activity and the exact nature of where these channels are assembled and regulated remain elusive. Research from several laboratories has demonstrated that key proteins involved in Ca2+ signaling are localized in discrete PM lipid rafts/caveolar microdomains. Lipid rafts are cholesterol and sphingolipid enriched microdomains that function as unique signal transduction platforms. In addition lipid rafts are dynamic in nature which tends to scaffold certain signaling molecules while excluding others. By such spatial segregation, lipid rafts not only provide a favorable environment for intra-molecular cross talk but also aid to expedite the signal relay. Importantly, Ca2+ signaling is shown to initiate from these lipid raft microdomains. Clustering of Ca2+ channels and their regulators in such microdomains can provide an exquisite spatiotemporal regulation of Ca2+ mediated cellular function. Thus in this review we discuss PM lipid rafts and caveolae as Ca2+ signaling microdomains and highlight their importance in organizing and regulating SOCE channels. PMID:19324409

  19. Lipid composition of membrane rafts, isolated with and without detergent, from the spleen of a mouse model of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Hattersley, Kathryn J; Hein, Leanne K; Fuller, Maria

    2013-12-06

    Biological membranes are composed of functionally relevant liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains that coexist. Within the liquid-ordered domains are low-density microdomains known as rafts with a unique lipid composition that is crucial for their structure and function. Lipid raft composition is altered in sphingolipid storage disorders, and here we determined the lipid composition using a detergent and detergent-free method in spleen tissue, the primary site of pathology, in a mouse model of the sphingolipid storage disorder, Gaucher disease. The accumulating lipid, glucosylceramide, was 30- and 50-fold elevated in the rafts with the detergent and detergent-free method, respectively. Secondary accumulation of di- and trihexosylceramide resided primarily in the rafts with both methods. The phospholipids distributed differently with more than half residing in the rafts with the detergent-free method and less than 10% with the detergent method, with the exception of the fully saturated species that were primarily in the rafts. Individual isoforms of sphingomyelin correlated with detergent-free extraction and more than half resided in the raft fractions. However, this correlation was not seen with the detergent extraction method as sphingomyelin species were spread across both the raft and non-raft domains. Therefore caution must be exercised when interpreting phospholipid distribution in raft domains as it differs considerably depending on the method of isolation. Importantly, both methods revealed the same lipid alterations in the raft domains in the spleen of the Gaucher disease mouse model highlighting that either method is appropriate to determine membrane lipid changes in the diseased state. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Activation of integrin α5 mediated by flow requires its translocation to membrane lipid rafts in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Fu, Yi; Gu, Mingxia; Zhang, Lu; Li, Dan; Li, Hongliang; Chien, Shu; Shyy, John Y-J; Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-19

    Local flow patterns determine the uneven distribution of atherosclerotic lesions. Membrane lipid rafts and integrins are crucial for shear stress-regulated endothelial function. In this study, we investigate the role of lipid rafts and integrin α5 in regulating the inflammatory response in endothelial cells (ECs) under atheroprone versus atheroprotective flow. Lipid raft proteins were isolated from ECs exposed to oscillatory shear stress (OS) or pulsatile shear stress, and then analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Among 396 proteins redistributed in lipid rafts, integrin α5 was the most significantly elevated in lipid rafts under OS. In addition, OS increased the level of activated integrin α5 in lipid rafts through the regulation of membrane cholesterol and fluidity. Disruption of F-actin-based cytoskeleton and knockdown of caveolin-1 prevented the OS-induced integrin α5 translocation and activation. In vivo, integrin α5 activation and EC dysfunction were observed in the atheroprone areas of low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice, and knockdown of integrin α5 markedly attenuated EC dysfunction in partially ligated carotid arteries. Consistent with these findings, mice with haploinsufficency of integrin α5 exhibited a reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in the regions under atheroprone flow. The present study has revealed an integrin- and membrane lipid raft-dependent mechanotransduction mechanism by which atheroprone flow causes endothelial dysfunction.

  1. Ethanol Enhances TGF-β Activity by Recruiting TGF-β Receptors From Intracellular Vesicles/Lipid Rafts/Caveolae to Non-Lipid Raft Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Franklin W; Johnson, Frank E; Huang, Jung San

    2016-04-01

    Regular consumption of moderate amounts of ethanol has important health benefits on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Overindulgence can cause many diseases, particularly alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The mechanisms by which ethanol causes both beneficial and harmful effects on human health are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ethanol enhances TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity with a maximum of 0.5-1% (v/v) in Mv1Lu cells stably expressing a luciferase reporter gene containing Smad2-dependent elements. In Mv1Lu cells, 0.5% ethanol increases the level of P-Smad2, a canonical TGF-β signaling sensor, by ∼ 2-3-fold. Ethanol (0.5%) increases cell-surface expression of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβR-II) by ∼ 2-3-fold from its intracellular pool, as determined by I(125) -TGF-β-cross-linking/Western blot analysis. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and indirect immunofluorescence staining analyses reveal that ethanol (0.5% and 1%) also displaces cell-surface TβR-I and TβR-II from lipid rafts/caveolae and facilitates translocation of these receptors to non-lipid raft microdomains where canonical signaling occurs. These results suggest that ethanol enhances canonical TGF-β signaling by increasing non-lipid raft microdomain localization of the TGF-β receptors. Since TGF-β plays a protective role in ASCVD but can also cause ALD, the TGF-β enhancer activity of ethanol at low and high doses appears to be responsible for both beneficial and harmful effects. Ethanol also disrupts the location of lipid raft/caveolae of other membrane proteins (e.g., neurotransmitter, growth factor/cytokine, and G protein-coupled receptors) which utilize lipid rafts/caveolae as signaling platforms. Displacement of these membrane proteins induced by ethanol may result in a variety of pathologies in nerve, heart and other tissues.

  2. Isolation of Lipid Rafts Through Discontinuous Sucrose Gradient Centrifugation and Fas/CD95 Death Receptor Localization in Raft Fractions.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2017-01-01

    Lipid raft domains, enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, serve as sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction proteins, and show resistance to detergent solubilization. Despite rafts have been involved in survival processes, these membrane domains have also been shown to play a major role in the modulation of death receptor signaling. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for isolating lipid rafts from whole cells by taking advantage of the lipid raft resistance to Triton X-100 solubilization at 4 °C, followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, with subsequent analysis of Fas/CD95 death receptor localization in the raft fractions by immunoblotting. This method is also useful to localize additional proteins in membrane rafts.

  3. Anomalies occurring in lipid profiles and protein distribution in frontal cortex lipid rafts in dementia with Lewy bodies disclose neurochemical traits partially shared by Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Marin, Raquel; Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Ferrer, Isidre; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Lipid rafts are highly dynamic membrane microdomains intimately associated with cell signaling. Compelling evidence has demonstrated that alterations in lipid rafts are associated with neurodegenerative diseases such Alzheimer's disease, but at present, whether alterations in lipid raft microdomains occur in other types of dementia such dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) remains unknown. Our analyses reveal that lipid rafts from DLB exhibit aberrant lipid profiles including low levels of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (mainly docosahexaenoic acid), plasmalogens and cholesterol, and reduced unsaturation and peroxidability indexes. As a consequence, lipid raft resident proteins holding principal factors of the β-amyloidogenic pathway, including β-amyloid precursor protein, presenilin 1, β-secretase, and PrP, are redistributed between lipid rafts and nonraft domains in DLB frontal cortex. Meta-analysis discloses certain similarities in the altered composition of lipid rafts between DLB and Parkinson's disease which are in line with the spectrum of Lewy body diseases. In addition, redistribution of proteins linked to the β-amyloidogenic pathway in DLB can facilitate generation of β-amyloid, thus providing mechanistic clues to the intriguing convergence of Alzheimer's disease pathology, particularly β-amyloid deposition, in DLB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. High-polarity Mycobacterium avium-derived lipids interact with murine macrophage lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-García, G; Chico-Ortiz, M; Lopez-Marin, L M; Sánchez-García, F J

    2004-11-01

    Cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) are widely recognized as portals for pathogenic micro-organisms. A growing body of evidence demonstrates mobilization of host plasma cell membrane lipid rafts towards the site of contact with several pathogens as well as a strict dependence on cholesterol for appropriate internalization. The fate of lipid rafts once the pathogen has been internalized and the nature of the pathogen components that interact with them is however less understood. To address both these issues, infection of the J774 murine cell line with Mycobacterium avium was used as a model. After demonstrating that M. avium induces lipid raft mobilization and that M. avium infects J774 by a cholesterol-dependent mechanism, it is shown here that mycobacterial phagosomes harbour lipid rafts, which are, at least in part, of plasma cell membrane origin. On the other hand, by using latex microbeads coated with any of the three fractions of M. avium-derived lipids of different polarity, we provide evidence that high-polarity, in contrast to low-polarity and intermediate-polarity, mycobacterial lipids or uncoated latex beads have a strong capacity to induce lipid raft mobilization. These results suggest that high-polarity mycobacterial lipid(s) interact with host cell cholesterol-enriched microdomains which may in turn influence the course of infection.

  5. Aspirin inhibits formation of cholesterol rafts in fluid lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Richard J; Toppozini, Laura; Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Harroun, Thad A; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-03-01

    Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a high affinity for phospholipid membranes, altering their structure and biophysical properties. Aspirin has been shown to partition into the lipid head groups, thereby increasing membrane fluidity. Cholesterol is another well known mediator of membrane fluidity, in turn increasing membrane stiffness. As well, cholesterol is believed to distribute unevenly within lipid membranes leading to the formation of lipid rafts or plaques. In many studies, aspirin has increased positive outcomes for patients with high cholesterol. We are interested if these effects may be, at least partially, the result of a non-specific interaction between aspirin and cholesterol in lipid membranes. We have studied the effect of aspirin on the organization of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) membranes containing cholesterol. Through Langmuir-Blodgett experiments we show that aspirin increases the area per lipid and decreases compressibility at 32.5 mol% cholesterol, leading to a significant increase of fluidity of the membranes. Differential scanning calorimetry provides evidence for the formation of meta-stable structures in the presence of aspirin. The molecular organization of lipids, cholesterol and aspirin was studied using neutron diffraction. While the formation of rafts has been reported in binary DPPC/cholesterol membranes, aspirin was found to locally disrupt membrane organization and lead to the frustration of raft formation. Our results suggest that aspirin is able to directly oppose the formation of cholesterol structures through non-specific interactions with lipid membranes.

  6. Lipid rafts of mouse liver contain nonextended and extended acetylcholinesterase variants along with M3 muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, María Fernanda; Cabezas-Herrera, Juan; Campoy, F Javier; Muñoz-Delgado, Encarnación; Vidal, Cecilio J

    2017-02-01

    The observation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) type H (AChEH), which is the predominant AChE variant in visceral organs and immune cells, in lipid rafts of muscle supports functional reasons for the raft targeting of glypiated AChEH The search for these reasons revealed that liver AChE activity is mostly confined to rafts and that the liver is able to make N-extended AChE variants and target them to rafts. These results prompted us to test whether AChE and muscarinic receptors existed in the same raft. Isolation of flotillin-2-rich raft fractions by their buoyancy in sucrose gradients, followed by immunoadsorption and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry application, gave the following results: 1) most hepatic AChE activity emanates from AChE-H mRNA, and its product, glypiated AChEH, accumulates in rafts; 2) N-extended N-AChE readthrough variant, nonglypiated N-AChEH, and N-AChE tailed variant were all identified in liver rafts; and 3) M3 AChRs were observed in rafts, and coprecipitation of raft-confined N-AChE and M3 receptors by using anti-M3 antibodies showed that enzyme and receptor reside in the same raft unit. A raft domain that harbors tightly packed muscarinic receptor and AChE may represent a molecular device that, by means of which, the intensity and duration of cholinergic inputs are regulated.-Montenegro, M. F., Cabezas-Herrera, J., Campoy, F. J., Muñoz-Delgado, E., Vidal, C. J. Lipid rafts of mouse liver contain nonextended and extended acetylcholinesterase variants along with M3 muscarinic receptors.

  7. Quantitative profiling of brain lipid raft proteome in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska, Magdalena; Castillo, Catherine; Francesconi, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome, a leading cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism, arises from transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene encoding an RNA-binding protein, Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). FMRP can regulate the expression of approximately 4% of brain transcripts through its role in regulation of mRNA transport, stability and translation, thus providing a molecular rationale for its potential pleiotropic effects on neuronal and brain circuitry function. Several intracellular signaling pathways are dysregulated in the absence of FMRP suggesting that cellular deficits may be broad and could result in homeostatic changes. Lipid rafts are specialized regions of the plasma membrane, enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids, involved in regulation of intracellular signaling. Among transcripts targeted by FMRP, a subset encodes proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis and homeostasis, dysregulation of which could affect the integrity and function of lipid rafts. Using a quantitative mass spectrometry-based approach we analyzed the lipid raft proteome of Fmr1 knockout mice, an animal model of Fragile X syndrome, and identified candidate proteins that are differentially represented in Fmr1 knockout mice lipid rafts. Furthermore, network analysis of these candidate proteins reveals connectivity between them and predicts functional connectivity with genes encoding components of myelin sheath, axonal processes and growth cones. Our findings provide insight to aid identification of molecular and cellular dysfunctions arising from Fmr1 silencing and for uncovering shared pathologies between Fragile X syndrome and other autism spectrum disorders.

  8. Lipid rafts both in cellular membrane and viral envelope are critical for PRRSV efficient infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Zhang, Qiong; Tang, Jun; Feng, Wen-Hai

    2015-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) represents a significantly economical challenge to the swine industry worldwide. In this study, we investigated the importance of cellular and viral lipid rafts in PRRSV infection. First, we demonstrated that PRRSV glycoproteins, Gp3 and Gp4, were associated with lipid rafts during viral entry, and disruption of cellular lipid rafts inhibited PRRSV entry. We also showed the raft-location of CD163, which might contribute to the glycoproteins-raft association. Subsequently, raft disruption caused a significant reduction of viral RNA production. Moreover, Nsp9 was shown to be distributed in rafts, suggesting that rafts probably serve as a platform for PRRSV replication. Finally, we confirmed that disassembly of rafts on the virus envelope may affect the integrity of PRRSV particles and cause the leakage of viral proteins, which impaired PRRSV infectivity. These findings might provide insights on our understanding of the mechanism of PRRSV infection.

  9. Isolation and biochemical characterisation of lipid rafts from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) intestinal enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Gylfason, Gudjón Andri; Knútsdóttir, Erna; Asgeirsson, Bjarni

    2010-01-01

    Lipid rafts are glycosphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains that have been extensively studied during the past two decades. Our aim was to isolate and perform biochemical characterization of lipid rafts from the intestinal brush border membrane (BBM) of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) to confirm their existence in a cold-water species and compare their characteristics with lipid rafts from other species in terms of lipid and protein content. To validate the isolation process, we assayed marker enzymes for subcellular organelles, including alkaline phosphatase (AP) and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), both well-known marker enzymes for BBM and lipid rafts. All biochemical methods showed enrichment of AP in both the BBM and lipid raft fractions. Proteomic studies were performed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry using trypsin digested SDS-PAGE samples. Various proteins were associated with the cod intestinal lipid raft preparation such as aminopeptidase-N, prohibitin, and beta-actin. Lipid analysis with (31)P NMR and thin layer chromatography on BBMs and lipid rafts samples gave higher content of sphingomyelin than previously reported in the BBM and lower content of phosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, sphingomyelin was highly dominant in the lipid rafts together with cholesterol. The existence of lipid rafts containing previously reported lipid raft characteristics from the cod intestine has, therefore, been confirmed in a ray-finned fish for the first time to the best of our knowledge.

  10. Lipid rafts and raft-mediated supramolecular entities in the regulation of CD95 death receptor apoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2015-05-01

    Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides that have the property to segregate and concentrate proteins. Lipid and protein composition of lipid rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, thus providing sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction molecules, including CD95 death receptor-mediated signaling. CD95 can be recruited to rafts in a reversible way through S-palmitoylation following activation of cells with its physiological cognate ligand as well as with a wide variety of inducers, including several antitumor drugs through ligand-independent intracellular mechanisms. CD95 translocation to rafts can be modulated pharmacologically, thus becoming a target for the treatment of apoptosis-defective diseases, such as cancer. CD95-mediated signaling largely depends on protein-protein interactions, and the recruitment and concentration of CD95 and distinct downstream apoptotic molecules in membrane raft domains, forming raft-based supramolecular entities that act as hubs for apoptotic signaling molecules, favors the generation and amplification of apoptotic signals. Efficient CD95-mediated apoptosis involves CD95 and raft internalization, as well as the involvement of different subcellular organelles. In this review, we briefly summarize and discuss the involvement of lipid rafts in the regulation of CD95-mediated apoptosis that may provide a new avenue for cancer therapy.

  11. Triton promotes domain formation in lipid raft mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Heerklotz, H

    2002-01-01

    Biological membranes are supposed to contain functional domains (lipid rafts) made up in particular of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, glycolipids, and certain proteins. It is often assumed that the application of the detergent Triton at 4 degrees C allows the isolation of these rafts as a detergent-resistant membrane fraction. The current study aims to clarify whether and how Triton changes the domain properties. To this end, temperature-dependent transitions in vesicles of an equimolar mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, egg sphingomyelin, and cholesterol were monitored at different Triton concentrations by differential scanning calorimetry and pressure perturbation calorimetry. Transitions initiated by the addition of Triton to the lipid mixture were studied by isothermal titration calorimetry, and the structure was investigated by (31)P-NMR. The results are discussed in terms of liquid-disordered (ld) and -ordered (lo) bilayer and micellar (mic) phases, and the typical sequence encountered with increasing Triton content or decreasing temperature is ld, ld + lo, ld + lo + mic, and lo + mic. That means that addition of Triton may create ordered domains in a homogeneous fluid membrane, which are, in turn, Triton resistant upon subsequent membrane solubilization. Hence, detergent-resistant membranes should not be assumed to resemble biological rafts in size, structure, composition, or even existence. Functional rafts may not be steady phenomena; they might form, grow, cluster or break up, shrink, and vanish according to functional requirements, regulated by rather subtle changes in the activity of membrane disordering or ordering compounds. PMID:12414701

  12. Lipid rafts function in Ca2+ signaling responsible for activation of sperm motility and chemotaxis in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lihong; Inaba, Kazuo

    2011-12-01

    Lipid rafts are specialized membrane microdomains that function as signaling platforms across plasma membranes of many animal and plant cells. Although there are several studies implicating the role of lipid rafts in capacitation of mammalian sperm, the function of these structures in sperm motility activation and chemotaxis remains unknown. In the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, egg-derived sperm activating- and attracting-factor (SAAF) induces both activation of sperm motility and sperm chemotaxis to the egg. Here we found that a lipid raft disrupter, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD), inhibited both SAAF-induced sperm motility activation and chemotaxis. MCD inhibited both SAAF-promoted synthesis of intracellular cyclic AMP and sperm motility induced by ionophore-mediated Ca(2+) entry, but not that induced by valinomycin-mediated hyperpolarization. Ca(2+)-imaging revealed that lipid raft disruption inhibited Ca(2+) influx upon activation of sperm motility. The Ca(2+)-activated adenylyl cyclase was clearly inhibited by MCD in isolated lipid rafts. The results suggest that sperm lipid rafts function in signaling upstream of cAMP synthesis, most likely in SAAF-induced Ca(2+) influx, and are required for Ca(2+)-dependent pathways underlying activation and chemotaxis in Ciona sperm. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Evidence that the respiratory syncytial virus polymerase complex associates with lipid rafts in virus-infected cells: a proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Terence P.; Pitt, Andrew R.; Brown, Gaie; Rixon, Helen W. McL.; Sugrue, Richard J. . E-mail: r.sugrue@vir.gla.ac.uk

    2004-12-05

    The interaction between the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) polymerase complex and lipid rafts was examined in HEp2 cells. Lipid-raft membranes were prepared from virus-infected cells and their protein content was analysed by Western blotting and mass spectrometry. This analysis revealed the presence of the N, P, L, M2-1 and M proteins. However, these proteins appeared to differ from one another in their association with these structures, with the M2-1 protein showing a greater partitioning into raft membranes compared to that of the N, P or M proteins. Determination of the polymerase activity profile of the gradient fractions revealed that 95% of the detectable viral enzyme activity was associated with lipid-raft membranes. Furthermore, analysis of virus-infected cells by confocal microscopy suggested an association between these proteins and the raft-lipid, GM1. Together, these results provide evidence that the RSV polymerase complex is able to associate with lipid rafts in virus-infected cells.

  14. Extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity or lipid raft localization and efflux function of the ABC transporter MRP1

    PubMed Central

    Klappe, Karin; Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Hummel, Ina; vanDam, Annie; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Milne, Stephen B.; Myers, David S.; Brown, H. Alex; Permentier, Hjalmar; Kok, Jan W.

    2013-01-01

    We show that highly efficient depletion of sphingolipids in two different cell lines does not abrogate the ability to isolate Lubrol-based DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes) or detergent-free lipid rafts from these cells. Compared with control, DRM/detergent-free lipid raft fractions contain equal amounts of protein, cholesterol and phospholipid, whereas the classical DRM/lipid raft markers Src, caveolin-1 and flotillin display the same gradient distribution. DRMs/detergent-free lipid rafts themselves are severely depleted of sphingolipids. The fatty acid profile of the remaining sphingolipids as well as that of the glycerophospholipids shows several differences compared with control, most prominently an increase in highly saturated C16 species. The glycerophospholipid headgroup composition is unchanged in sphingolipid-depleted cells and cell-derived detergent-free lipid rafts. Sphingolipid depletion does not alter the localization of MRP1 (multidrug-resistance-related protein 1) in DRMs/detergent-free lipid rafts or MRP1-mediated efflux of carboxyfluorescein. We conclude that extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity in two cell lines and does not affect the function of the lipid-raft-associated protein MRP1. PMID:20604746

  15. Complexity of Lipid Domains and Rafts in Giant Unilamellar Vesicles Revealed by Combining Imaging and Microscopic and Macroscopic Time-Resolved Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Rodrigo F. M.; Borst, JanWillem; Fedorov, Alexander; Prieto, Manuel; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.

    2007-01-01

    The application of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study gel/fluid and raftlike lipid domains in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) is demonstrated here. Different regions of the ternary dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol phase diagram were studied. The head-labeled phospholipid Rhodamine-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (Rhod-DOPE) was used as a fluorescent probe. Gel/fluid and liquid-ordered (lo)/liquid-disordered (ld) phase separation were clearly visualized upon two-photon excitation. Fluorescence intensity decays in different regions of a GUV were also obtained with the microscope in fixed laser-beam configuration. The ensemble behavior of the system was studied by obtaining fluorescence intensity decays of Rhod-DOPE in nongiant vesicle suspensions. The fingerprints for gel/fluid coexistence and for the presence of lo raftlike phase, based on fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy histograms and images, and on the fluorescence intensity decay parameters of Rhod-DOPE, are presented. The presence of three lipid phases in one single GUV is detected unequivocally. From the comparison of lifetime parameters, it can be concluded that the lo phase is formed in the binary dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol but not in the dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol mixture. The domains apparent in fluorescence intensity images have a more complex substructure revealed by analysis of the lifetime data. The potential applications of this combined imaging/microscopic/macroscopic methodology are discussed. PMID:17449668

  16. Amyloid beta-protein and lipid rafts: focused on biogenesis and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Araki, Wataru; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is thought to play a key role in the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three secretases (β-, γ-, and α-secretase) are proteases that control the production of Aβ from amyloid precursor protein. Increasing evidence suggests that cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains termed 'lipid rafts' are involved in the biogenesis and accumulation of Aβ as well as Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity. γ-Secretase is enriched in lipid rafts, which are considered an important site for Aβ generation. Additionally, Aβ-degrading peptidases located in lipid rafts, such as neprilysin, appear to play a role in Aβ catabolism. This mini-review focuses on the roles of lipid rafts in the biogenesis and catabolism of Aβ, covering recent research on the relationship between lipid rafts and the three secretases or Aβ-degrading peptidases. Furthermore, the significance of lipid rafts in Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity is briefly summarized.

  17. Direct evidence of lipid rafts by in situ atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mingjun; Zhao, Weidong; Shang, Xin; Jiang, Junguang; Ji, Hongbin; Tang, Zhiyong; Wang, Hongda

    2012-04-23

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains enriched with cholesterol, glycosphingolipids, and proteins. Although they are broadly presumed to play a pivotal role in various cellular functions, there are still fierce debates about the composition, functions, and even existence of lipid rafts. Here high-resolution and time-lapse in situ atomic force microscopy is used to directly confirm the existence of lipid rafts in native erythrocyte membranes. The results indicate some important aspects of lipid rafts: most of the lipid rafts are in the size range of 100-300 nm and have irregular shape; the detergent-resistant membranes consist of cholesterol microdomains and are not likely the same as the lipid rafts; cholesterol contributes significantly to the formation and stability of the protein domains; and Band III is an important protein of lipid rafts in the inner leaflet of erythrocyte membranes, indicating that lipid rafts are exactly the functional domains in plasma membrane. This work provides direct evidence of the presence, size, and main constitutive protein of lipid rafts at a resolution of a few nanometers, which will pave the way for studying their structure and functions in detail.

  18. Studying the role of lipid rafts on protein receptor bindings with cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Haack, Fiete; Burrage, Kevin; Redmer, Ronald; Uhrmacher, Adelinde M

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that lipid rafts promote receptor clustering and thereby facilitate signaling transduction. The role of lipid rafts in inducing and promoting receptor accumulation within the cell membrane has been explored by several computational and experimental studies. However, it remains unclear whether lipid rafts influence the recruitment and binding of proteins from the cytosol as well. To provide an answer to this question a spatial membrane model has been developed based on cellular automata. Our results indicate that lipid rafts indeed influence protein receptor bindings. In particular processes with slow dissociation and binding kinetics are promoted by lipid rafts, whereas fast binding processes are slightly hampered. However, the impact depends on a variety of parameters, such as the size and mobility of the lipid rafts, the induced slow down of receptors within rafts, and also the dissociation and binding kinetics of the cytosolic proteins. Thus, for any individual signaling pathway the influence of lipid rafts on protein binding might be different. To facilitate analyzing this influence given a specific pathway, our approach has been generalized into LiRaM, a modeling and simulation tool for lipid rafts models.

  19. Severe alterations in lipid composition of frontal cortex lipid rafts from Parkinson's disease and incidental Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Santpere, Gabriel; Marín, Raquel; Torrent, Laia; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains that provide a highly saturated and viscous physicochemical microenvironment to promote protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. We purified lipid rafts from human frontal cortex from normal, early motor stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) and incidental Parkinson's disease (iPD) subjects and analyzed their lipid composition. We observed that lipid rafts from PD and iPD cortices exhibit dramatic reductions in their contents of n-3 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (22:6-n3) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Also, saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) were significantly higher than in control brains. Paralleling these findings, unsaturation and peroxidability indices were considerably reduced in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Lipid classes were also affected in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Thus, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were increased in PD and iPD, whereas cerebrosides and sulfatides and plasmalogen levels were considerably diminished. Our data pinpoint a dramatic increase in lipid raft order due to the aberrant biochemical structure in PD and iPD and indicate that these abnormalities of lipid rafts in the frontal cortex occur at early stages of PD pathology. The findings correlate with abnormal lipid raft signaling and cognitive decline observed during the development of these neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Edelfosine and miltefosine effects on lipid raft properties: membrane biophysics in cell death by antitumor lipids.

    PubMed

    Castro, Bruno M; Fedorov, Aleksander; Hornillos, Valentin; Delgado, Javier; Acuña, A Ulises; Mollinedo, Faustino; Prieto, Manuel

    2013-07-03

    Edelfosine (1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine) and miltefosine (hexadecylphosphocholine) are synthetic alkylphospholipids (ALPs) that are reported to selectively accumulate in tumor cell membranes, inducing Fas clustering and activation on lipid rafts, triggering apoptosis. However, the exact mechanism by which these lipids elicit these events is still not fully understood. Recent studies propose that their mode of action might be related with alterations of lipid rafts biophysical properties caused by these lipid drugs. To achieve a clear understanding of this mechanism, we studied the effects of pharmacologically relevant amounts of edelfosine and miltefosine in the properties of model and cellular membranes. The influence of these molecules on membrane order, lateral organization, and lipid rafts molar fraction and size were studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), confocal and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We found that the global membrane and lipid rafts biophysical properties of both model and cellular membranes were not significantly affected by both the ALPs. Nonetheless, in model membranes, a mild increase in membrane fluidity induced by both alkyl lipids was detected, although this effect was more noticeable for edelfosine than miltefosine. This absence of drastic alterations shows for the first time that ALPs mode of action is unlikely to be directly linked to alterations of lipid rafts biophysical properties caused by these drugs. The biological implications of this result are discussed in the context of ALPs effects on lipid metabolism, mitochondria homeostasis modulation, and their relationship with tumor cell death.

  1. Lipid raft disruption protects mature neurons against amyloid oligomer toxicity.

    PubMed

    Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Contrusciere, Valentina; Raggi, Carla; Fecchi, Katia; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Paradisi, Silvia; Matteucci, Andrea; Santini, Maria Teresa; Sargiacomo, Massimo; Frank, Claudio; Gaudiano, Maria Cristina; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2010-04-01

    A specific neuronal vulnerability to amyloid protein toxicity may account for brain susceptibility to protein misfolding diseases. To investigate this issue, we compared the effects induced by oligomers from salmon calcitonin (sCTOs), a neurotoxic amyloid protein, on cells of different histogenesis: mature and immature primary hippocampal neurons, primary astrocytes, MG63 osteoblasts and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. In mature neurons, sCTOs increased apoptosis and induced neuritic and synaptic damages similar to those caused by amyloid beta oligomers. Immature neurons and the other cell types showed no cytotoxicity. sCTOs caused cytosolic Ca(2+) rise in mature, but not in immature neurons and the other cell types. Comparison of plasma membrane lipid composition showed that mature neurons had the highest content in lipid rafts, suggesting a key role for them in neuronal vulnerability to sCTOs. Consistently, depletion in gangliosides protected against sCTO toxicity. We hypothesize that the high content in lipid rafts makes mature neurons especially vulnerable to amyloid proteins, as compared to other cell types; this may help explain why the brain is a target organ for amyloid-related diseases.

  2. Lipidomics of Candida albicans biofilms reveals phase-dependent production of phospholipid molecular classes and role for lipid rafts in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Lattif, Ali Abdul; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Chandra, Jyotsna; Roth, Mary R; Welti, Ruth; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2011-11-01

    Candida albicans-associated bloodstream infections are linked to the ability of this yeast to form biofilms. In this study, we used lipidomics to compare the lipid profiles of C. albicans biofilms and planktonic cells, in early and mature developmental phases. Our results showed that significant differences exist in lipid composition in both developmental phases. Biofilms contained higher levels of phospholipid and sphingolipids than planktonic cells (nmol per g biomass, P<0.05 for all comparisons). In the early phase, levels of lipid in most classes were significantly higher in biofilms compared to planktonic cells (P≤0.05). The ratio of phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylethanolamine was lower in biofilms compared to planktonic cells in both early (1.17 vs 2.52, P≤0.001) and late (2.34 vs 3.81, P≤0.001) developmental phases. The unsaturation index of phospholipids decreased with time, with this effect being particularly strong for biofilms. Inhibition of the biosynthetic pathway for sphingolipid [mannosyl diinositolphosphoryl ceramide, M(IP)₂C] by myriocin or aureobasidin A, and disruption of the gene encoding inositolphosphotransferase (Ipt1p), abrogated the ability of C. albicans to form biofilms. The differences in lipid profiles between biofilms and planktonic Candida cells may have important implications for the biology and antifungal resistance of biofilms.

  3. Lipid rafts mediate ultraviolet light-induced Fas aggregation in M624 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Elyassaki, Walid; Wu, Shiyong

    2006-01-01

    Ultraviolet light (UV) induces aggregation of Fas-receptor through a Fas-ligand-independent pathway. However, the mechanism of ultraviolet light-induced Fas-receptor aggregation is not known. In this report, we show that lipid rafts mediate ultraviolet light-induced aggregation of Fas. Our data show that UV induces a redistribution of Fas-receptor in a 25-5% Optiprep continuous gradient. The amount of Fas-receptorS is significantly increased in a gradient fraction that contain lipid rafts and is associated with an increase of FADD and caspase-8. Our data also show that the active dimeric form of caspase-8 (p44/p41) is increased in the lipid raft fraction. In addition, our data show that cholesterol, a major component of lipid rafts, is significantly reduced in only the lipid raft fractions after UV-irradiation. However, ceramide, another major lipid raft component, is increased evenly in all gradient fractions after UV-irradiation. These results suggest that UV alters the composition of major lipid raft components, which leads to the recruitment of Fas-receptor and FADD, with subsequent activation of caspase-8. Based on our results, we propose a novel mechanism by which UV induces apoptosis through a membrane lipid raft-mediated signaling pathway.

  4. Dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to fusion competence of myogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Atsushi; Kurisaki, Tomohiro; Sato, Satoshi B.; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kondoh, Gen; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2009-10-15

    Recent research indicates that the leading edge of lamellipodia of myogenic cells (myoblasts and myotubes) contains presumptive fusion sites, yet the mechanisms that render the plasma membrane fusion-competent remain largely unknown. Here we show that dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to both cell adhesion and plasma membrane union during myogenic cell fusion. Adhesion-complex proteins including M-cadherin, {beta}-catenin, and p120-catenin accumulated at the leading edge of lamellipodia, which contains the presumptive fusion sites of the plasma membrane, in a lipid raft-dependent fashion prior to cell contact. In addition, disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depletion directly prevented the membrane union of myogenic cell fusion. Time-lapse recording showed that lipid rafts were laterally dispersed from the center of the lamellipodia prior to membrane fusion. Adhesion proteins that had accumulated at lipid rafts were also removed from the presumptive fusion sites when lipid rafts were laterally dispersed. The resultant lipid raft- and adhesion complex-free area at the leading edge fused with the opposing plasma membrane. These results demonstrate a key role for dynamic clustering/dispersion of lipid rafts in establishing fusion-competent sites of the myogenic cell membrane, providing a novel mechanistic insight into the regulation of myogenic cell fusion.

  5. Lipid raft association restricts CD44-ezrin interaction and promotion of breast cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Donatello, Simona; Babina, Irina S; Hazelwood, Lee D; Hill, Arnold D K; Nabi, Ivan R; Hopkins, Ann M

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration.

  6. Lipid rafts are essential for peroxisome biogenesis in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Woudenberg, Jannes; Rembacz, Krzysztof P; Hoekstra, Mark; Pellicoro, Antonella; van den Heuvel, Fiona A J; Heegsma, Janette; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C D; Holzinger, Andreas; Imanaka, Tsuneo; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2010-08-01

    Peroxisomes are particularly abundant in the liver and are involved in bile salt synthesis and fatty acid metabolism. Peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) are required for peroxisome biogenesis [e.g., the interacting peroxisomal biogenesis factors Pex13p and Pex14p] and its metabolic function [e.g., the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) and PMP70]. Impaired function of PMPs is the underlying cause of Zellweger syndrome and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we studied for the first time the putative association of PMPs with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts and their function in peroxisome biogenesis. Lipid rafts were isolated from Triton X-100-lysed or Lubrol WX-lysed HepG2 cells and analyzed for the presence of various PMPs by western blotting. Lovastatin and methyl-beta-cyclodextrin were used to deplete cholesterol and disrupt lipid rafts in HepG2 cells, and this was followed by immunofluorescence microscopy to determine the subcellular location of catalase and PMPs. Cycloheximide was used to inhibit protein synthesis. Green fluorescent protein-tagged fragments of PMP70 and ALDP were analyzed for their lipid raft association. PMP70 and Pex14p were associated with Triton X-100-resistant rafts, ALDP was associated with Lubrol WX-resistant rafts, and Pex13p was not lipid raft-associated in HepG2 cells. The minimal peroxisomal targeting signals in ALDP and PMP70 were not sufficient for lipid raft association. Cholesterol depletion led to dissociation of PMPs from lipid rafts and impaired sorting of newly synthesized catalase and ALDP but not Pex14p and PMP70. Repletion of cholesterol to these cells efficiently reestablished the peroxisomal sorting of catalase but not ALDP. Human PMPs are differentially associated with lipid rafts independently of the protein homology and/or their functional interaction. Cholesterol is required for peroxisomal lipid raft assembly and peroxisome biogenesis.

  7. Tumor exosomes induce tunneling nanotubes in lipid raft-enriched regions of human mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Babatunde, Victor; Dickson, Elizabeth L.; Wong, Phillip; Oh, Sanghoon; Ke, Xu; Barlas, Afsar; Fujisawa, Sho; Romin, Yevgeniy; Moreira, André L.; Downey, Robert J.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Lou, Emil

    2014-04-15

    Tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) are long, non-adherent, actin-based cellular extensions that act as conduits for transport of cellular cargo between connected cells. The mechanisms of nanotube formation and the effects of the tumor microenvironment and cellular signals on TnT formation are unknown. In the present study, we explored exosomes as potential mediators of TnT formation in mesothelioma and the potential relationship of lipid rafts to TnT formation. Mesothelioma cells co-cultured with exogenous mesothelioma-derived exosomes formed more TnTs than cells cultured without exosomes within 24–48 h; and this effect was most prominent in media conditions (low-serum, hyperglycemic medium) that support TnT formation (1.3–1.9-fold difference). Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed the purity of isolated exosomes and revealed that they localized predominantly at the base of and within TnTs, in addition to the extracellular environment. Time-lapse microscopic imaging demonstrated uptake of tumor exosomes by TnTs, which facilitated intercellular transfer of these exosomes between connected cells. Mesothelioma cells connected via TnTs were also significantly enriched for lipid rafts at nearly a 2-fold higher number compared with cells not connected by TnTs. Our findings provide supportive evidence of exosomes as potential chemotactic stimuli for TnT formation, and also lipid raft formation as a potential biomarker for TnT-forming cells. - Highlights: • Exosomes derived from malignant cells can stimulate an increased rate in the formation of tunneling nanotubes. • Tunneling nanotubes can serve as conduits for intercellular transfer of these exosomes. • Most notably, exosomes derived from benign mesothelial cells had no effect on nanotube formation. • Cells forming nanotubes were enriched in lipid rafts at a greater number compared with cells not forming nanotubes. • Our findings suggest causal and potentially synergistic association of exosomes and

  8. NCAM-140 Translocation into Lipid Rafts Mediates the Neuroprotective Effects of GDNF.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Huizhen; Wang, Meng; Chen, Fangfang; Gao, Jin; Sun, Shen; Li, Yunqing; Gao, Dianshuai

    2017-05-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor for substantia nigra dopaminergic (DA) neuronal cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that neural cell adhesion molecule functions as a signal transduction receptor for GDNF. The purpose of this study is to reveal whether neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mediates the protective effects of GDNF on DA neuronal cells and further explore the mechanisms involved. We utilized SH-SY5Y cell line to establish a model of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-injured DA neuronal cells. Lentiviral vectors were constructed to knockdown or overexpress NCAM-140, and a density gradient centrifugation method was employed to separate membrane lipid rafts. 3-(4,5-Dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), flow cytometric analysis, and western blotting were used to evaluate the protective effects of GDNF. The results showed that GDNF could protect 6-OHDA-injured SH-SY5Y cells via improving cell viability and decreasing the cell death rate and cleaved caspase-3 expression. NCAM-140 knockdown decreased cell viability and increased the cell death rate and cleaved caspase-3 expression, while its overexpression had the opposite effects. Notably, the amount of NCAM-140 located in lipid rafts increased after GDNF treatment. Pretreatment with 2-bromopalmitate, a specific inhibitor of protein palmitoylation, suppressed NCAM-140 translocation to lipid rafts and reduced the NCAM-mediated protective effects of GDNF on injured DA neuronal cells. Our results suggest that GDNF have the protective effects on injured DA cells by influencing NCAM-140 translocation into lipid rafts.

  9. Prion protein accumulation in lipid rafts of mouse aging brain.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrP(C). In old mice, this change favors PrP(C) accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrP(C) translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrP(C) compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrP(C) in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases.

  10. Prion Protein Accumulation in Lipid Rafts of Mouse Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G.; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrPC. In old mice, this change favors PrPC accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrPC translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrPC compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrPC in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases. PMID:24040215

  11. The Important Role of Lipid Raft-Mediated Attachment in the Infection of Cultured Cells by Coronavirus Infectious Bronchitis Virus Beaudette Strain

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huichen; Huang, Mei; Yuan, Quan; Wei, Yanquan; Gao, Yuan; Mao, Lejiao; Gu, Lingjun; Tan, Yong Wah; Zhong, Yanxin; Liu, Dingxiang; Sun, Shiqi

    2017-01-01

    Lipid raft is an important element for the cellular entry of some viruses, including coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). However, the exact role of lipid rafts in the cellular membrane during the entry of IBV into host cells is still unknown. In this study, we biochemically fractionated IBV-infected cells via sucrose density gradient centrifugation after depleting plasma membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or Mevastatin. Our results demonstrated that unlike IBV non-structural proteins, IBV structural proteins co-localized with lipid raft marker caveolin-1. Infectivity assay results of Vero cells illustrated that the drug-induced disruption of lipid rafts significantly suppressed IBV infection. Further studies revealed that lipid rafts were not required for IBV genome replication or virion release at later stages. However, the drug-mediated depletion of lipid rafts in Vero cells before IBV attachment significantly reduced the expression of viral structural proteins, suggesting that drug treatment impaired the attachment of IBV to the cell surface. Our results indicated that lipid rafts serve as attachment factors during the early stages of IBV infection, especially during the attachment stage. PMID:28081264

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Lipid Raft-Like Detergent-Resistant Membranes of Lens Fiber Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Plasma membranes of lens fiber cells have high levels of long-chain saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and sphingolipids—key components of lipid rafts. Thus, lipid rafts are expected to constitute a significant portion of fiber cell membranes and play important roles in lens biology. The purpose of this study was to characterize the lens lipid raft proteome. Methods Quantitative proteomics, both label-free and iTRAQ methods, were used to characterize lens fiber cell lipid raft proteins. Detergent-resistant, lipid raft membrane (DRM) fractions were isolated by sucrose gradient centrifugation. To confirm protein localization to lipid rafts, protein sensitivity to cholesterol removal by methyl-β-cyclodextrin was quantified by iTRAQ analysis. Results A total of 506 proteins were identified in raft-like detergent-resistant membranes. Proteins identified support important functions of raft domains in fiber cells, including trafficking, signal transduction, and cytoskeletal organization. In cholesterol-sensitivity studies, 200 proteins were quantified and 71 proteins were strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Lipid raft markers flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 and a significant fraction of AQP0, MP20, and AQP5 were found in the DRM fraction and were highly sensitive to cholesterol removal. Connexins 46 and 50 were more abundant in nonraft fractions, but a small fraction of each was found in the DRM fraction and was strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Quantification of modified AQP0 confirmed that fatty acylation targeted this protein to membrane raft domains. Conclusions These data represent the first comprehensive profile of the lipid raft proteome of lens fiber cells and provide information on membrane protein organization in these cells. PMID:26747763

  13. Lipid rafts regulate cellular CD40 receptor localization in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Min; Wang Qing; Zhu Huilian; Ma Jing; Hou Mengjun; Tang Zhihong; Li Juanjuan; Ling Wenhua

    2007-09-28

    Cholesterol enriched lipid rafts are considered to function as platforms involved in the regulation of membrane receptor signaling complex through the clustering of signaling molecules. In this study, we tested whether these specialized membrane microdomains affect CD40 localization in vitro and in vivo. Here, we provide evidence that upon CD40 ligand stimulation, endogenous and exogenous CD40 receptor is rapidly mobilized into lipid rafts compared with unstimulated HAECs. Efficient binding between CD40L and CD40 receptor also increases amounts of CD40 protein levels in lipid rafts. Deficiency of intracellular conserved C terminus of the CD40 cytoplasmic tail impairs CD40 partitioning in raft. Raft disorganization after methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin treatment diminishes CD40 localization into rafts. In vivo studies show that elevation of circulating cholesterol in high-cholesterol fed rabbits increases the cholesterol content and CD40 receptor localization in lipid rafts. These findings identify a physiological role for membrane lipid rafts as a critical regulator of CD40-mediated signal transduction and raise the possibility that certain pathologic conditions may be treated by altering CD40 signaling with drugs affecting its raft localization.

  14. Monte Carlo study of receptor-lipid raft formation on a cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-Yang, Paul; Srinivas Reddy, A.; Raychaudhuri, Subhadip

    2012-02-01

    Receptors are cell surface molecules that bind with extracellular ligand molecules leading to propagation of downstream signals and cellular activation. Even though ligand binding-induced formation of receptor-lipid rafts has been implicated in such a process, the formation mechanism of such large stable rafts is not understood. We present findings from our Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving (i) receptor interaction with the membrane lipids and (ii) lipid-lipid interactions between raft forming lipids. We have developed a hybrid MC simulation method that combines a probabilistic MC simulation with an explicit free energy-based MC scheme. Some of the lipid-mediated interactions, such as the cholesterol-lipid interactions, are simulated in an implicit way. We examine the effect of varying attractive interactions between raft forming lipids and ligand-bound receptors and show that strong coupling between receptor-receptor and receptor-sphingolipid molecules generate raft formation similar to that observed in recent biological experiments. We study the effect of variation of receptor affinity for ligands (as happens in adaptive immune cells) on raft formation. Such affinity dependence in receptor-lipid raft formation provides insight into important problems in B cell biology.

  15. Modulation of lipid rafts by Omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and cancer: implications for use of lipids during nutrition support.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Rafat A; Harvey, Kevin A; Zaloga, Gary P; Stillwell, William

    2007-02-01

    Current understanding of biologic membrane structure and function is largely based on the concept of lipid rafts. Lipid rafts are composed primarily of tightly packed, liquid-ordered sphingolipids/cholesterol/saturated phospholipids that float in a sea of more unsaturated and loosely packed, liquid-disordered lipids. Lipid rafts have important clinical implications because many important membrane-signaling proteins are located within the raft regions of the membrane, and alterations in raft structure can alter activity of these signaling proteins. Because rafts are lipid-based, their composition, structure, and function are susceptible to manipulation by dietary components such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and by cholesterol depletion. We review how alteration of raft lipids affects the raft/nonraft localization and hence the function of several proteins involved in cell signaling. We focus our discussion of raft-signaling proteins on inflammation and cancer.

  16. Lipid raft detecting in membranes of live erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mikhalyov, Ilya; Samsonov, Andrey

    2011-07-01

    The fluorescent probe N-(BODIPY(®)-FL-propionyl)-neuraminosyl-GM(1) (BODIPY-GM(1)) was used to detect lipid rafts in living red blood cells (RBCs) membranes. The probe was detected with fluorescence video microscopy and was found to be uniformly distributed along plasma membrane at room temperature (23°C). At 4°C some probe clearly phase-separated to yield detectable bright spots that were smaller than spatial resolution. As measured by spectrofluorometry, in addition to a major fluorescence peak caused by emissions from monomers, the probe exhibited a red-shifted peak that is characteristic of a BODIPY fluorophore at high local concentrations, indicating that some probe had clustered. Red-shifted fluorescence was the greatest at 4°C, intermediate at 23°C, and the smallest at 37°C. Treating the RBCs with methyl-β-cyclodextrin to remove cholesterol eliminated the red-shifted peak. This strongly indicates that the presence of cholesterol was essential for phase separation of the probe. Fluorometry experiments indicate that rafts exist at 23°C and at 37°C, even though the membrane appears to be uniform at the resolution of microscope. The distinct GM(1) patches distributed over entire membrane of the erythrocytes were observed at both 23°C and at 37°C in RBCs stained with Alexa FL 647 cholera toxin subunit B conjugate (CTB-A647 ). Based on both fluorometry and fluorescence microscopy, some rafts clearly exist at 37°C.

  17. Extracellular Signals induce Glycoprotein M6a Clustering of Lipid-rafts and associated Signaling Molecules.

    PubMed

    Honda, Atsuko; Ito, Yasuyuki; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Matsushita, Natsuki; Nozumi, Motohiro; Tabata, Hidenori; Takeuchi, Kosei; Igarashi, Michihiro

    2017-03-08

    Lipid-raft domains, where sphingolipids and cholesterol are enriched, concentrate signaling molecules. To examine how signaling protein complexes are clustered in rafts, we focused on the functions of glycoprotein M6a (GPM6a), which is expressed at a high concentration in developing mouse neurons. Using imaging of lipid-rafts, we found that GPM6a congregated in rafts in a GPM6a palmitoylation-dependent manner, thereby contributing to lipid-raft clustering. Additionally, we found that signaling proteins downstream of GPM6a, i.e., Rufy3, Rap2, and Tiam2/STEF, accumulated in lipid-rafts in a GPM6a-dependent manner, and that they were essential for laminin-dependent polarity during neurite formation in neuronal development. In utero RNAi targeting of GPM6a resulted in abnormally polarized neurons with multiple neurites. These results demonstrate that GPM6a induces the clustering of lipid-rafts, which supports the raft aggregation of its associated downstream molecules for acceleration of neuronal polarity determination. Thus, GPM6a acts as a signal transducer that responds to extracellular signals.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTLipid-raft domains, where sphingolipids and cholesterol are enriched, concentrate signaling molecules. We focused on glycoprotein M6a (GPM6a), which is expressed at a high concentration in developing neurons. Using imaging of lipid-rafts, we found that GPM6a congregated in rafts in a palmitoylation-dependent manner, thereby contributing to lipid-raft clustering. Additionally, we found that signaling proteins downstream of GPM6a accumulated in lipid-rafts in a GPM6a-dependent manner, and that they were essential for laminin-dependent polarity during neurite formation. In utero RNAi targeting of GPM6a resulted in abnormally polarized neurons with multiple neurites. These results demonstrate that GPM6a induces the clustering of lipid-rafts, which supports the raft aggregation of its associated downstream molecules for acceleration of polarity determination

  18. Omega-3 fatty acids, lipid rafts, and T cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-08-15

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been shown in many clinical studies to attenuate inflammatory responses. Although inflammatory responses are orchestrated by a wide spectrum of cells, CD4(+) T cells play an important role in the etiology of many chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. In light of recent concerns over the safety profiles of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), alternatives such as bioactive nutraceuticals are becoming more attractive. In order for these agents to be accepted into mainstream medicine, however, the mechanisms by which nutraceuticals such as n-3 PUFA exert their anti-inflammatory effects must be fully elucidated. Lipid rafts are nanoscale, dynamic domains in the plasma membrane that are formed through favorable lipid-lipid (cholesterol, sphingolipids, and saturated fatty acids) and lipid-protein (membrane-actin cytoskeleton) interactions. These domains optimize the clustering of signaling proteins at the membrane to facilitate efficient cell signaling which is required for CD4(+) T cell activation and differentiation. This review summarizes novel emerging data documenting the ability of n-3 PUFA to perturb membrane-cytoskeletal structure and function in CD4(+) T cells. An understanding of these underlying mechanisms will provide a rationale for the use of n-3 PUFA in the treatment of chronic inflammation.

  19. Interaction of hyperlipidemia and reactive oxygen species: Insights from the lipid-raft platform

    PubMed Central

    Amiya, Eisuke

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress are closely associated with the development of atherosclerosis, and the most important regulator of ROS production in endothelial cells is NADPH oxidase. Activation of NADPH oxidase requires the assembly of multiple subunits into lipid rafts, which include specific lipid components, including free cholesterol and specific proteins. Disorders of lipid metabolism such as hyperlipidemia affect the cellular lipid components included in rafts, resulting in modification of cellular reactions that produce ROS. In the similar manner, several pathways associating ROS production are affected by the presence of lipid disorder through raft compartments. In this manuscript, we review the pathophysiological implications of hyperlipidemia and lipid rafts in the production of ROS. PMID:28070236

  20. Role of lipid rafts and GM1 in the segregation and processing of prion protein.

    PubMed

    Botto, Laura; Cunati, Diana; Coco, Silvia; Sesana, Silvia; Bulbarelli, Alessandra; Biasini, Emiliano; Colombo, Laura; Negro, Alessandro; Chiesa, Roberto; Masserini, Massimo; Palestini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrPC) is highly expressed within the nervous system. Similar to other GPI-anchored proteins, PrPC is found in lipid rafts, membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. PrPC raft association, together with raft lipid composition, appears essential for the conversion of PrPC into the scrapie isoform PrPSc, and the development of prion disease. Controversial findings were reported on the nature of PrPC-containing rafts, as well as on the distribution of PrPC between rafts and non-raft membranes. We investigated PrPC/ganglioside relationships and their influence on PrPC localization in a neuronal cellular model, cerebellar granule cells. Our findings argue that in these cells at least two PrPC conformations coexist: in lipid rafts PrPC is present in the native folding (α-helical), stabilized by chemico-physical condition, while it is mainly present in other membrane compartments in a PrPSc-like conformation. We verified, by means of antibody reactivity and circular dichroism spectroscopy, that changes in lipid raft-ganglioside content alters PrPC conformation and interaction with lipid bilayers, without modifying PrPC distribution or cleavage. Our data provide new insights into the cellular mechanism of prion conversion and suggest that GM1-prion protein interaction at the cell surface could play a significant role in the mechanism predisposing to pathology.

  1. Detergent and detergent-free methods to define lipid rafts and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Liu, Xiaoqiu

    2007-01-01

    Lipid rafts and their related membrane vesicular structures, caveolae, are cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich microdomains of the plasma membrane that have attracted considerable interest because of their ability to concentrate numerous signaling proteins. Efforts to define the proteins that reside in lipid rafts and caveolae as well as investigations into the functional role of these microdomains in signaling, endocytosis, and other cellular processes have led to the hypothesis that they compartmentalize or prearrange molecules involved in regulating these pathways. This chapter describes biochemical approaches for defining lipid rafts and caveolae. Included are detergent- and nondetergent-based fractionations on sucrose-density gradients that isolate buoyant lipid rafts and caveolae as well as caveolin antibody-based immunoisolation of detergent-insoluble membranes that selectively isolates caveolae and not lipid rafts. Also, a general method to disrupt lipid rafts and caveolae using beta-cyclodextrin that is useful for probing the role of these microdomains in cellular processes is described. The advantages and disadvantages of the respective approaches are discussed. Taken together, these methods are useful for defining the role of lipid rafts and caveolae in cell signaling.

  2. Procyanidins can interact with Caco-2 cell membrane lipid rafts: involvement of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Sandra V; Jaggers, Grayson K; Fraga, Cesar G; Oteiza, Patricia I

    2013-11-01

    Large procyanidins (more than three subunits) are not absorbed at the gastrointestinal tract but could exert local effects through their interactions with membranes. We previously showed that hexameric procyanidins (Hex), although not entering cells, interact with membranes modulating cell signaling and fate. This paper investigated if Hex, as an example of large procyanidins, can selectively interact with lipid rafts which could in part explain its biological actions. This mechanism was studied in both synthetic membranes (liposomes) and Caco-2 cells. Hex promoted Caco-2 cell membrane rigidification and dehydration, effects that were abolished upon cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD). Hex prevented lipid raft structure disruption induced by cholesterol depletion/redistribution by MCD or sodium deoxycholate. Supporting the involvement of cholesterol-Hex bonding in Hex interaction with lipid rafts, the absence of cholesterol markedly decreased the capacity of Hex to prevent deoxycholate- and Triton X-100-mediated disruption of lipid raft-like liposomes. Stressing the functional relevance of this interaction, Hex mitigated lipid raft-associated activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2. Results support the capacity of a large procyanidin (Hex) to interact with membrane lipid rafts mainly through Hex-cholesterol bondings. Procyanidin-lipid raft interactions can in part explain the capacity of large procyanidins to modulate cell physiology.

  3. Raft Formation in Lipid Bilayers Coupled to Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Sina; Müller, Marcus; Vink, Richard L.C.

    2014-01-01

    We present computer simulations of a membrane in which the local composition is coupled to the local membrane curvature. At high temperatures (i.e., above the temperature of macroscopic phase separation), finite-sized transient domains are observed, reminiscent of lipid rafts. The domain size is in the range of hundred nanometers, and set by the membrane elastic properties. These findings are in line with the notion of the membrane as a curvature-induced microemulsion. At low temperature, the membrane phase separates. The transition to the phase-separated regime is continuous and belongs to the two-dimensional Ising universality class when the coupling to curvature is weak, but becomes first-order for strong curvature-composition coupling. PMID:25296311

  4. Evidence for the involvement of lipid rafts localized at the ER-mitochondria associated membranes in autophagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Tina; Matarrese, Paola; Manganelli, Valeria; Marconi, Matteo; Tinari, Antonella; Gambardella, Lucrezia; Faggioni, Alberto; Misasi, Roberta; Sorice, Maurizio; Malorni, Walter

    2016-06-02

    Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) are subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that interact with mitochondria. This membrane scrambling between ER and mitochondria appears to play a critical role in the earliest steps of autophagy. Recently, lipid microdomains, i.e. lipid rafts, have been identified as further actors of the autophagic process. In the present work, a series of biochemical and molecular analyses has been carried out in human fibroblasts with the specific aim of characterizing lipid rafts in MAMs and to decipher their possible implication in the autophagosome formation. In fact, the presence of lipid microdomains in MAMs has been detected and, in these structures, a molecular interaction of the ganglioside GD3, a paradigmatic "brick" of lipid rafts, with core-initiator proteins of autophagy, such as AMBRA1 and WIPI1, was revealed. This association seems thus to take place in the early phases of autophagic process in which MAMs have been hypothesized to play a key role. The functional activity of GD3 was suggested by the experiments carried out by knocking down ST8SIA1 gene expression, i.e., the synthase that leads to the ganglioside formation. This experimental condition results in fact in the impairment of the ER-mitochondria crosstalk and the subsequent hindering of autophagosome nucleation. We thus hypothesize that MAM raft-like microdomains could be pivotal in the initial organelle scrambling activity that finally leads to the formation of autophagosome.

  5. Pentobarbital modifies the lipid raft-protein interaction: A first clue about the anesthesia mechanism on NMDA and GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Valdez, Francisco Javier; Ruiz-Suárez, J C; Delint-Ramirez, Ilse

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that anesthetic agents alter the physical properties of lipid rafts on model membranes. However, if this destabilization occurs in brain membranes, altering the lipid raft-protein interaction, remains unknown. We analyzed the effects produced by pentobarbital (PB) on brain plasma membranes and lipid rafts in vivo. We characterized for the first time the thermotropic behavior of plasma membranes, synaptosomes, and lipid rafts from rat brain. We found that the transition temperature from the ordered gel to disordered liquid phase of lipids is close to physiological temperature. We then studied the effect of PB on protein composition of lipid rafts. Our results show a reduction of the total protein associated to rafts, with a higher reduction of the NMDAR compared to the GABAA receptor. Both receptors are considered the main targets of PB. In general, our results suggest that lipid rafts could be plausible mediators in anesthetic action.

  6. Ginsenoside Rh2 induces ligand-independent Fas activation via lipid raft disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Jae-Sung; Choo, Hyo-Jung; Cho, Bong-Rae; Kim, Hwan-Myung; Kim, Yong-Nyun; Ham, Young-Mi; Ko, Young-Gyu

    2009-07-24

    Lipid rafts are plasma membrane platforms mediating signal transduction pathways for cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Here, we show that membrane fluidity was increased in HeLa cells following treatment with ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2), as determined by cell staining with carboxy-laurdan (C-laurdan), a two-photon dye designed for measuring membrane hydrophobicity. In the presence of Rh2, caveolin-1 appeared in non-raft fractions after sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. In addition, caveolin-1 and GM1, lipid raft landmarkers, were internalized within cells after exposure to Rh2, indicating that Rh2 might disrupt lipid rafts. Since cholesterol overloading, which fortifies lipid rafts, prevented an increase in Rh2-induced membrane fluidity, caveolin-1 internalization and apoptosis, lipid rafts appear to be essential for Rh2-induced apoptosis. Moreover, Rh2-induced Fas oligomerization was abolished following cholesterol overloading, and Rh2-induced apoptosis was inhibited following treatment with siRNA for Fas. This result suggests that Rh2 is a novel lipid raft disruptor leading to Fas oligomerization and apoptosis.

  7. Lipid raft-mediated Akt signaling as a therapeutic target in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Reis-Sobreiro, M; Roué, G; Moros, A; Gajate, C; de la Iglesia-Vicente, J; Colomer, D; Mollinedo, F

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that lipid raft membrane domains modulate both cell survival and death. Here, we have found that the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway is present in the lipid rafts of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells, and this location seems to be critical for full activation and MCL cell survival. The antitumor lipids (ATLs) edelfosine and perifosine target rafts, and we found that ATLs exerted in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity against MCL cells by displacing Akt as well as key regulatory kinases p-PDK1 (phosphatidylinositol-dependent protein kinase 1), PI3K and mTOR (mammalian TOR) from lipid rafts. This raft reorganization led to Akt dephosphorylation, while proapoptotic Fas/CD95 death receptor was recruited into rafts. Raft integrity was critical for Ser473 Akt phosphorylation. ATL-induced apoptosis appeared to correlate with the basal Akt phosphorylation status in MCL cell lines and primary cultures, and could be potentiated by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin, or inhibited by the Akt activator pervanadate. Classical Akt inhibitors induced apoptosis in MCL cells. Microenvironmental stimuli, such as CD40 ligation or stromal cell contact, did not prevent ATL-induced apoptosis in MCL cell lines and patient-derived cells. These results highlight the role of raft-mediated PI3K/Akt signaling in MCL cell survival and chemotherapy, thus becoming a new target for MCL treatment. PMID:23727661

  8. Comparative lipidomics and proteomics analysis of platelet lipid rafts using different detergents.

    PubMed

    Rabani, Vahideh; Davani, Siamak; Gambert-Nicot, Ségolène; Meneveau, Nicolas; Montange, Damien

    2016-11-01

    Lipid rafts play a pivotal role in physiological functions of platelets. Their isolation using nonionic mild detergents is considered as the gold standard method, but there is no consensual detergent for lipid raft studies. We aimed to investigate which detergent is the most suitable for lipid raft isolation from platelet membrane, based on lipidomics and proteomics analysis. Platelets were obtained from healthy donors. Twelve sucrose fractions were extracted by three different detergents, namely Brij 35, Lubrol WX, and Triton X100, at 0.05% and 1%. After lipidomics analysis and determination of fractions enriched in cholesterol (Ch) and sphingomyelin (SM), proteomics analysis was performed. Lipid rafts were mainly observed in 1-4 fractions, and non-rafts were distributed on 5-12 fractions. Considering the concentration of Ch and SM, Lubrol WX 1% and Triton X100 1% were more suitable detergents as they were able to isolate lipid raft fractions that were more enriched than non-raft fractions. By proteomics analysis, overall, 822 proteins were identified in platelet membrane. Lipid raft fractions isolated with Lubrol WX 0.05% and Triton X100 1% contained mainly plasma membrane proteins. However, only Lubrol WX 0.05 and 1% and Triton X100 1% were able to extract non-denaturing proteins with more than 10 transmembrane domains. Our results suggest that Triton X100 1% is the most suitable detergent for global lipid and protein studies on platelet plasma membrane. However, the detergent should be adapted if investigation of an association between specific proteins and lipid rafts is planned.

  9. Perfringolysin O association with ordered lipid domains: implications for transmembrane protein raft affinity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Lindsay D; Chiantia, Salvatore; London, Erwin

    2010-11-17

    Upon interaction with cholesterol, perfringolysin O (PFO) inserts into membranes and forms a rigid transmembrane (TM) β-barrel. PFO is believed to interact with liquid ordered lipid domains (lipid rafts). Because the origin of TM protein affinity for rafts is poorly understood, we investigated PFO raft affinity in vesicles having coexisting ordered and disordered lipid domains. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PFO Trp to domain-localized acceptors indicated that PFO generally has a raft affinity between that of LW peptide (low raft affinity) and cholera toxin B (high raft affinity) in vesicles containing ordered domains rich in brain sphingomyelin or distearoylphosphatidylcholine. FRET also showed that ceramide, which increases exposure of cholesterol to water and thus displaces it from rafts, does not displace PFO from ordered domains. This can be explained by shielding of PFO-bound cholesterol from water. Finally, FRET showed that PFO affinity for ordered domains was higher in its non-TM (prepore) form than in its TM form, demonstrating that the TM portion of PFO interacts unfavorably with rafts. Microscopy studies in giant unilamellar vesicles confirmed that PFO exhibits intermediate raft affinity, and showed that TM PFO (but not non-TM PFO) concentrated at the edges of liquid ordered domains. These studies suggest that a combination of binding to raft-associating molecules and having a rigid TM structure that is unable to pack well in a highly ordered lipid environment can control TM protein domain localization. To accommodate these constraints, raft-associated TM proteins in cells may tend to locate within liquid disordered shells encapsulated within ordered domains. Copyright © 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Selective association of outer surface lipoproteins with the lipid rafts of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Alvaro; Crowley, Jameson T; Coleman, James L; LaRocca, Timothy J; Chiantia, Salvatore; London, Erwin; Benach, Jorge L

    2014-03-11

    Borrelia burgdorferi contains unique cholesterol-glycolipid-rich lipid rafts that are associated with lipoproteins. These complexes suggest the existence of macromolecular structures that have not been reported for prokaryotes. Outer surface lipoproteins OspA, OspB, and OspC were studied for their participation in the formation of lipid rafts. Single-gene deletion mutants with deletions of ospA, ospB, and ospC and a spontaneous gene mutant, strain B313, which does not express OspA and OspB, were used to establish their structural roles in the lipid rafts. All mutant strains used in this study produced detergent-resistant membranes, a common characteristic of lipid rafts, and had similar lipid and protein slot blot profiles. Lipoproteins OspA and OspB but not OspC were shown to be associated with lipid rafts by transmission electron microscopy. When the ability to form lipid rafts in live B. burgdorferi spirochetes was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), strain B313 showed a statistically significant lower level of segregation into ordered and disordered membrane domains than did the wild-type and the other single-deletion mutants. The transformation of a B313 strain with a shuttle plasmid containing ospA restored the phenotype shared by the wild type and the single-deletion mutants, demonstrating that OspA and OspB have redundant functions. In contrast, a transformed B313 overexpressing OspC neither rescued the FRET nor colocalized with the lipid rafts. Because these lipoproteins are expressed at different stages of the life cycle of B. burgdorferi, their selective association is likely to have an important role in the structure of prokaryotic lipid rafts and in the organism's adaptation to changing environments. IMPORTANCE Lipid rafts are cholesterol-rich clusters within the membranes of cells. Lipid rafts contain proteins that have functions in sensing the cell environment and transmitting signals. Although selective proteins are present in

  11. SNARE proteins and 'membrane rafts'.

    PubMed

    Lang, Thorsten

    2007-12-15

    The original 'lipid raft' hypothesis proposed that lipid-platforms/rafts form in the exoplasmic plasmalemmal leaflet by tight clustering of sphingolipids and cholesterol. Their physical state, presumably similar to liquid-ordered phases in model membranes, would confer detergent resistance to rafts and enriched proteins therein. Based on this concept, detergent resistant membranes (DRMs) from solubilized cells were considered to reflect pre-existing 'lipid rafts' in live cells. To date, more than 200 proteins were found in DRMs including also members of the SNARE superfamily, which are small membrane proteins involved in intracellular fusion steps. Their raft association indicates that they are not uniformly distributed, and, indeed, microscopic studies revealed that SNAREs concentrate in submicrometre-sized, cholesterol-dependent clusters at which vesicles fuse. However, the idea that SNARE clusters are 'lipid rafts' was challenged, as they do not colocalize with raft markers, and SNAREs are excluded from liquid-ordered phases in model membranes. Independent from this disagreement, in recent years the solubilization criterion has been criticized for several reasons, calling for a more exact definition of rafts. At a recent consensus on a revised raft model, the term 'lipid rafts' was replaced by 'membrane rafts' that were defined as 'small (10-200 nm), heterogeneous, highly dynamic, sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched domains that compartmentalize cellular processes'. As a result, after dismissing the terms 'detergent resistant' and 'liquid-ordered', it now appears that SNARE clusters are bona fide 'membrane rafts'.

  12. Myo1c regulates lipid raft recycling to control cell spreading, migration and Salmonella invasion.

    PubMed

    Brandstaetter, Hemma; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2012-04-15

    A balance between endocytosis and membrane recycling regulates the composition and dynamics of the plasma membrane. Internalization and recycling of cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts is an actin-dependent process that is mediated by a specialized Arf6-dependent recycling pathway. Here, we identify myosin1c (Myo1c) as the first motor protein that drives the formation of recycling tubules emanating from the perinuclear recycling compartment. We demonstrate that the single-headed Myo1c is a lipid-raft-associated motor protein that is specifically involved in recycling of lipid-raft-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked cargo proteins and their delivery to the cell surface. Whereas Myo1c overexpression increases the levels of these raft proteins at the cell surface, in cells depleted of Myo1c function through RNA interference or overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant, these tubular transport carriers of the recycling pathway are lost and GPI-linked raft markers are trapped in the perinuclear recycling compartment. Intriguingly, Myo1c only selectively promotes delivery of lipid raft membranes back to the cell surface and is not required for recycling of cargo, such as the transferrin receptor, which is mediated by parallel pathways. The profound defect in lipid raft trafficking in Myo1c-knockdown cells has a dramatic impact on cell spreading, cell migration and cholesterol-dependent Salmonella invasion; processes that require lipid raft transport to the cell surface to deliver signaling components and the extra membrane essential for cell surface expansion and remodeling. Thus, Myo1c plays a crucial role in the recycling of lipid raft membrane and proteins that regulate plasma membrane plasticity, cell motility and pathogen entry.

  13. Aggregation of Lipid Rafts Accompanies Signaling via the T Cell Antigen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Peter W.; Ley, Steven C.; Magee, Anthony I.

    1999-01-01

    The role of lipid rafts in T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling was investigated using fluorescence microscopy. Lipid rafts labeled with cholera toxin B subunit (CT-B) and cross-linked into patches displayed characteristics of rafts isolated biochemically, including detergent resistance and colocalization with raft-associated proteins. LCK, LAT, and the TCR all colocalized with lipid patches, although TCR association was sensitive to nonionic detergent. Aggregation of the TCR by anti-CD3 mAb cross-linking also caused coaggregation of raft-associated proteins. However, the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 did not colocalize to either CT-B or CD3 patches. Cross-linking of either CD3 or CT-B strongly induced tyrosine phosphorylation and recruitment of a ZAP-70(SH2)2–green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein to the lipid patches. Also, CT-B patching induced signaling events analagous to TCR stimulation, with the same dependence on expression of key TCR signaling molecules. Targeting of LCK to rafts was necessary for these events, as a nonraft- associated transmembrane LCK chimera, which did not colocalize with TCR patches, could not reconstitute CT-B–induced signaling. Thus, our results indicate a mechanism whereby TCR engagement promotes aggregation of lipid rafts, which facilitates colocalization of LCK, LAT, and the TCR whilst excluding CD45, thereby triggering protein tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:10525547

  14. Regulation of the high-affinity choline transporter activity and trafficking by its association with cholesterol-rich lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, Leah K; Winick-Ng, Warren; Rylett, Rebecca Jane

    2014-03-01

    The sodium-coupled, hemicholinium-3-sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is responsible for transport of choline into cholinergic nerve terminals from the synaptic cleft following acetylcholine release and hydrolysis. In this study, we address regulation of CHT function by plasma membrane cholesterol. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in both SH-SY5Y cells and nerve terminals from mouse forebrain. Treatment of SH-SY5Y cells expressing rat CHT with filipin, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβC) or cholesterol oxidase significantly decreased choline uptake. In contrast, CHT activity was increased by addition of cholesterol to membranes using cholesterol-saturated MβC. Kinetic analysis of binding of [(3)H]hemicholinium-3 to CHT revealed that reducing membrane cholesterol with MβC decreased both the apparent binding affinity (KD) and maximum number of binding sites (Bmax ); this was confirmed by decreased plasma membrane CHT protein in lipid rafts in cell surface protein biotinylation assays. Finally, the loss of cell surface CHT associated with lipid raft disruption was not because of changes in CHT internalization. In summary, we provide evidence that CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for transporter function and localization. Alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol cholinergic nerve terminals could diminish cholinergic transmission by reducing choline availability for acetylcholine synthesis. The sodium-coupled choline transporter CHT moves choline into cholinergic nerve terminals to serve as substrate for acetylcholine synthesis. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts, and decreasing membrane cholesterol significantly reduces both choline uptake activity and cell surface CHT protein levels. CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for its function, and alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol could diminish cholinergic

  15. Selective Association of Outer Surface Lipoproteins with the Lipid Rafts of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Alvaro; Crowley, Jameson T.; Coleman, James L.; LaRocca, Timothy J.; Chiantia, Salvatore; London, Erwin; Benach, Jorge L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Borrelia burgdorferi contains unique cholesterol-glycolipid-rich lipid rafts that are associated with lipoproteins. These complexes suggest the existence of macromolecular structures that have not been reported for prokaryotes. Outer surface lipoproteins OspA, OspB, and OspC were studied for their participation in the formation of lipid rafts. Single-gene deletion mutants with deletions of ∆ospA, ∆ospB, and ∆ospC and a spontaneous gene mutant, strain B313, which does not express OspA and OspB, were used to establish their structural roles in the lipid rafts. All mutant strains used in this study produced detergent-resistant membranes, a common characteristic of lipid rafts, and had similar lipid and protein slot blot profiles. Lipoproteins OspA and OspB but not OspC were shown to be associated with lipid rafts by transmission electron microscopy. When the ability to form lipid rafts in live B. burgdorferi spirochetes was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), strain B313 showed a statistically significant lower level of segregation into ordered and disordered membrane domains than did the wild-type and the other single-deletion mutants. The transformation of a B313 strain with a shuttle plasmid containing ospA restored the phenotype shared by the wild type and the single-deletion mutants, demonstrating that OspA and OspB have redundant functions. In contrast, a transformed B313 overexpressing OspC neither rescued the FRET nor colocalized with the lipid rafts. Because these lipoproteins are expressed at different stages of the life cycle of B. burgdorferi, their selective association is likely to have an important role in the structure of prokaryotic lipid rafts and in the organism’s adaptation to changing environments. PMID:24618252

  16. Membrane lipid rafts disturbance in the response of rat skeletal muscle to short-term disuse.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Alexey M; Kravtsova, Violetta V; Matchkov, Vladimir V; Vasiliev, Alexander N; Zefirov, Andrey L; Chibalin, Alexander V; Heiny, Judith A; Krivoi, Igor I

    2017-03-08

    Marked loss of skeletal muscle mass occurs under various conditions of disuse, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to atrophy are not completely understood. We investigate early molecular events which might play a role in skeletal muscle remodeling during mechanical unloading (disuse). The effects of acute (6 - 12 h) hindlimb suspension on the soleus muscles from adult rats were examined. The integrity of plasma membrane lipid rafts was tested utilizing cholera toxin B subunit, or fluorescent sterols. In addition, resting intracellular Ca(2+) level was analyzed. Acute disuse disturbed the plasma membrane lipid-ordered phase throughout the sarcolemma and was more pronounced in junctional membrane regions. Ouabain (1 µM), which specifically inhibits the Na,K-ATPase α2 isozyme in rodent skeletal muscles, produced similar lipid rafts changes in control muscles, but was ineffective in suspended muscles, which show an initial loss of α2 Na,K-ATPase activity. Lipid rafts were able to recover with cholesterol supplementation, suggesting that disturbance results from cholesterol loss. Repetitive nerve stimulation also restores lipid rafts, specifically in junctional sarcolemma region. Disuse locally lowered the resting intracellular Ca(2+) concentration only near the neuromuscular junction of muscle fibers. Our results provide the evidence to suggest that the ordering of lipid rafts strongly depends on motor nerve input and may involve interactions with the α2 Na,K-ATPase. Lipid rafts disturbance, accompanied by intracellular Ca(2+) dysregulation are among the earliest remodeling events induced by skeletal muscle disuse.

  17. The modulation of gap-junctional intercellular communication by lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Defamie, Norah; Mesnil, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Lipid rafts are specific microdomains of plasma membrane which are enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. These domains seem to favour the interactions of particular proteins and the regulation of signalling pathways in the cells. Recent data have shown that among the proteins, which are preferentially localized in lipid rafts, are connexins that are the structural proteins of gap junctions. Since gap junctional intercellular communication is involved in various cellular processes and pathologies such as cancer, we were interested to review the various observations concerning this specific localization of connexins in lipid rafts and its consequences on gap junctional intercellular communication capacity. In particular, we will focus our discussion on the role of the lipid raft-connexin connection in cancer progression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Communicating junctions, composition, structure and characteristics.

  18. Membrane lipid domains distinct from cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich rafts are involved in the ABCA1-mediated lipid secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Mendez, A J; Lin, G; Wade, D P; Lawn, R M; Oram, J F

    2001-02-02

    Efflux of excess cellular cholesterol mediated by lipid-poor apolipoproteins occurs by an active mechanism distinct from passive diffusion and is controlled by the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1. Here we examined whether ABCA1-mediated lipid efflux involves the selective removal of lipids associated with membrane rafts, plasma membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingomyelin. ABCA1 was not associated with cholesterol and sphingolipid-rich membrane raft domains based on detergent solubility and lack of colocalization with marker proteins associated with raft domains. Lipid efflux to apoA-I was accounted for by decreases in cellular lipids not associated with cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membranes. Treating cells with filipin, to disrupt raft structure, or with sphingomyelinase, to digest plasma membrane sphingomyelin, did not impair apoA-I-mediated cholesterol or phosphatidylcholine efflux. In contrast, efflux of cholesterol to high density lipoproteins (HDL) or plasma was partially accounted for by depletion of cholesterol from membrane rafts. Additionally, HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was partially inhibited by filipin and sphingomyelinase treatment. Apo-A-I-mediated cholesterol efflux was absent from fibroblasts with nonfunctional ABCA1 (Tangier disease cells), despite near normal amounts of cholesterol associated with raft domains and normal abilities of plasma and HDL to deplete cholesterol from these domains. Thus, the involvement of membrane rafts in cholesterol efflux applies to lipidated HDL particles but not to lipid-free apoA-I. We conclude that cholesterol and sphingomyelin-rich membrane rafts do not provide lipid for efflux promoted by apolipoproteins through the ABCA1-mediated lipid secretory pathway and that ABCA1 is not associated with these domains.

  19. Lipid Raft Association Restricts CD44-Ezrin Interaction and Promotion of Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Donatello, Simona; Babina, Irina S.; Hazelwood, Lee D.; Hill, Arnold D.K.; Nabi, Ivan R.; Hopkins, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration. PMID:23031255

  20. Lipid rafts, caveolae, caveolin-1, and entry by Chlamydiae into host cells.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Elizabeth S; Webley, Wilmore C; Norkin, Leonard C

    2003-07-01

    Obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens of the genus Chlamydia are reported to enter host cells by both clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent processes. C. trachomatis serovar K recently was shown to enter cells via caveolae-like lipid raft domains. We asked here how widespread raft-mediated entry might be among the Chlamydia. We show that C. pneumoniae, an important cause of respiratory infections in humans that additionally is associated with cardiovascular disease, and C. psittaci, an important pathogen in domestic mammals and birds that also infects humans, each enter host cells via cholesterol-rich lipid raft microdomains. Further, we show that C. trachomatis serovars E and F also use these domains to enter host cells. The involvement of these membrane domains in the entry of these organisms was indicated by the sensitivity of their entry to the raft-disrupting agents Nystatin and filipin, and by their intracellular association with caveolin-1, a 22-kDa protein associated with the formation of caveolae in rafts. In contrast, caveolin-marked lipid raft domains do not mediate entry of C. trachomatis serovars A, 36B, and C, nor of LGV serovar L2 and MoPn. Finally, we show that entry of each of these chlamydial strains is independent of cellular expression of caveolin-1. Thus, entry via the Nystatin and filipin-sensitive pathway is dependent on lipid rafts containing cholesterol, rather than invaginated caveolae per se.

  1. The shedding activity of ADAM17 is sequestered in lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Tellier, Edwige; Canault, Matthias; Rebsomen, Laure; Bonardo, Bernadette; Juhan-Vague, Irene; Nalbone, Gilles; Peiretti, Franck . E-mail: Franck.Peiretti@medecine.univ-mrs.fr

    2006-12-10

    The tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) converting enzyme (ADAM17) is a metalloprotease-disintegrin responsible for the cleavage of several biologically active transmembrane proteins. However, the substrate specificity of ADAM17 and the regulation of its shedding activity are still poorly understood. Here, we report that during its transport through the Golgi apparatus, ADAM17 is included in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) where its prodomain is cleaved by furin. Consequently, ADAM17 shedding activity is sequestered in lipid rafts, which is confirmed by the fact that metalloproteinase inhibition increases the proportion of ADAM17 substrates (TNF and its receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2) in lipid rafts. Membrane cholesterol depletion increases the ADAM17-dependent shedding of these substrates demonstrating the importance of lipid rafts in the control of this process. Furthermore, ADAM17 substrates are present in different proportions in lipid rafts, suggesting that the entry of each of these substrates in these particular membrane microdomains is specifically regulated. Our data support the idea that one of the mechanisms regulating ADAM17 substrate cleavage involves protein partitioning in lipid rafts.

  2. Simvastatin Attenuates Astrogliosis after Traumatic Brain Injury through the Modulation of EGFR in Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongtao; Mahmood, Asim; Lu, Dunyue; Jiang, Hao; Xiong, Ye; Zhou, Dong; Chopp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective Our previous studies demonstrated that simvastatin treatment promotes neuronal survival and reduces inflammatory cytokine release from astrocytes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. Since reactive astrocytes produce inflammation mediators, in the current study we investigated the effect of simvastatin on astrocyte activation after TBI and its underlying signaling mechanisms. Methods Saline or simvastatin (1 mg/kg) was orally administered to rats starting at Day 1 after TBI and then daily for 14 days. Rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 7, 14 days after treatment. Brain sections and tissues were prepared for immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis, respectively. Cultured astrocytes were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and followed by immunocytochemical staining with GFAP/caveolin-1 and Western blot analysis. Lipid rafts were isolated from the cell lysate and Western blot was carried out to detect the changes in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and phosphorylation in the lipid rafts. Results Simvastatin significantly promoted neuronal survival after TBI and attenuated activation of astrocytes. Simvastatin modified the caveolin-1 expression in lipid rafts in astrocyte cell membrane, suppressed the phosphorylation of EGFR in lipid rafts of astrocytes after OGD, and inhibited the OGD-induced interleukin-1 (IL-1) production. Conclusions These data suggest that simvastatin reduces reactive astrogliosis and rescues neuronal cells after TBI. These beneficial effects of simvastatin may be mediated by inhibiting astrocyte activation after TBI through modifying the caveolin-1 expression in lipid rafts and the subsequent modulation of EGFR phosphorylation in lipid rafts. PMID:19895202

  3. Involvement of lipid rafts in the budding-like exit of Orientia tsutsugamushi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Mee-Kyung; Kang, Jae-Seung

    2013-10-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi is an intracellular parasite that causes scrub typhus. After entering the cytoplasm by induced phagocytosis, O. tsutsugamushi escapes from the primary phagosome into the host cytosol, where it replicates slowly. Subsequently, it is released from the host cells by a process resembling viral budding with a remaining bacterial aggregate near the nucleus. Lipid rafts have been implicated in the life cycle of a wide variety of pathogenic microorganisms. We have observed that proteins of O. tsutsugamushi were co-fractionated with the lipid rafts over a sucrose density gradient, suggesting the possible involvement of lipid rafts during the intracellular life cycle of O. tsutsugamushi. The entry of O. tsutsugamushi into the host cells was shown to be independent on lipid rafts as judged by the inability of lipid raft-disrupting agents to inhibit bacterial entry and no co-localization of bacterial proteins with caveolin. To our interest, a 47-kDa protein (HtrA) was observed to be co-localized with caveolin at the cell membrane at 72 h after infection, when bacterial particles move to the cell membrane and initiate the exit into the extracellular environment. Our results suggest that O. tsutsugamushi involves lipid rafts of the host cells in the budding-like process to exit from host cells.

  4. Visualizing lipid structure and raft domains in living cells with two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gaus, Katharina; Gratton, Enrico; Kable, Eleanor P. W.; Jones, Allan S.; Gelissen, Ingrid; Kritharides, Leonard; Jessup, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    The lateral organization of cellular membranes is formed by the clustering of specific lipids, such as cholesterol and sphingolipids, into highly condensed domains (termed lipid rafts). Hence such domains are distinct from the remaining membrane by their lipid structure (liquid-ordered vs. -disordered domains). Here, we directly visualize membrane lipid structure of living cells by using two-photon microscopy. In macrophages, liquid-ordered domains are particularly enriched on membrane protrusions (filopodia), adhesion points and cell–cell contacts and cover 10–15% of the cell surface at 37°C. By deconvoluting the images, we demonstrate the existence of phase separation in vivo. We compare the properties of microscopically visible domains (<1 μm2), with those of isolated detergent-resistant membranes and provide evidence that membrane coverage by lipid rafts and their fluidity are principally governed by cholesterol content, thereby providing strong support for the lipid raft hypothesis. PMID:14673117

  5. Amyloid Oligomer Neurotoxicity, Calcium Dysregulation, and Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Paradisi, Silvia; Matteucci, Andrea; Frank, Claudio; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid proteins constitute a chemically heterogeneous group of proteins, which share some biophysical and biological characteristics, the principal of which are the high propensity to acquire an incorrect folding and the tendency to aggregate. A number of diseases are associated with misfolding and aggregation of proteins, although only in some of them—most notably Alzheimer's disease (AD) and transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs)—a pathogenetic link with misfolded proteins is now widely recognized. Lipid rafts (LRs) have been involved in the pathophysiology of diseases associated with protein misfolding at several levels, including aggregation of misfolded proteins, amyloidogenic processing, and neurotoxicity. Among the pathogenic misfolded proteins, the AD-related protein amyloid β (Aβ) is by far the most studied protein, and a large body of evidence has been gathered on the role played by LRs in Aβ pathogenicity. However, significant amount of data has also been collected for several other amyloid proteins, so that their ability to interact with LRs can be considered an additional, shared feature characterizing the amyloid protein family. In this paper, we will review the evidence on the role of LRs in the neurotoxicity of huntingtin, α-synuclein, prion protein, and calcitonin. PMID:21331330

  6. Lipid Rafts Promote trans Fatty Acid-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yao; Liu, Benxin; Deng, Zeyuan; Fan, Yawei; Li, Jing; Li, Hongyan

    2017-01-01

    The effects of two fatty acids, oleic acid (OLA) and elaidic acid (ELA) on normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and non-rafts HUVEC were investigated in this study. The expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and IL-6) were analyzed. Western blot was used to analyze the expression levels of inflammation-related proteins (NF-κB, ERK1/2) and toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The results showed that the levels of nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 were significantly decreased only in non-lipid rafts cells pretreated with trans fatty acid (TFA). The expression of TLR4 in the ELA-treated normal cells was higher than that in non-lipid rafts HUVEC. When the lipid rafts was destroyed by methyl-β-cyclodextrin, the levels of nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and TLR4 were decreased significantly. Therefore, lipid rafts may be involved in TFA induced-inflammation in HUVEC through blocking the inflammatory signal pathway. Lipid rafts might be a platform for specific receptors such as TLR4 for TFA to activate the pro-inflammation on cell membranes.

  7. Sphingomyelin distribution in lipid rafts of artificial monolayer membranes visualized by Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ando, Jun; Kinoshita, Masanao; Cui, Jin; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Fujita, Katsumasa; Murata, Michio; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-04-14

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (chol)-rich domains in cell membranes, called lipid rafts, are thought to have important biological functions related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking. To visualize the distribution of SM in lipid rafts by means of Raman microscopy, we designed and synthesized an SM analog tagged with a Raman-active diyne moiety (diyne-SM). Diyne-SM showed a strong peak in a Raman silent region that is free of interference from intrinsic vibrational modes of lipids and did not appear to alter the properties of SM-containing monolayers. Therefore, we used Raman microscopy to directly visualize the distribution of diyne-SM in raft-mimicking domains formed in SM/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/chol ternary monolayers. Raman images visualized a heterogeneous distribution of diyne-SM, which showed marked variation, even within a single ordered domain. Specifically, diyne-SM was enriched in the central area of raft domains compared with the peripheral area. These results seem incompatible with the generally accepted raft model, in which the raft and nonraft phases show a clear biphasic separation. One of the possible reasons is that gradual changes of SM concentration occur between SM-rich and -poor regions to minimize hydrophobic mismatch. We believe that our technique of hyperspectral Raman imaging of a single lipid monolayer opens the door to quantitative analysis of lipid membranes by providing both chemical information and spatial distribution with high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution.

  8. Sphingomyelin distribution in lipid rafts of artificial monolayer membranes visualized by Raman microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Jun; Kinoshita, Masanao; Cui, Jin; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Fujita, Katsumasa; Murata, Michio; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (chol)-rich domains in cell membranes, called lipid rafts, are thought to have important biological functions related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking. To visualize the distribution of SM in lipid rafts by means of Raman microscopy, we designed and synthesized an SM analog tagged with a Raman-active diyne moiety (diyne-SM). Diyne-SM showed a strong peak in a Raman silent region that is free of interference from intrinsic vibrational modes of lipids and did not appear to alter the properties of SM-containing monolayers. Therefore, we used Raman microscopy to directly visualize the distribution of diyne-SM in raft-mimicking domains formed in SM/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/chol ternary monolayers. Raman images visualized a heterogeneous distribution of diyne-SM, which showed marked variation, even within a single ordered domain. Specifically, diyne-SM was enriched in the central area of raft domains compared with the peripheral area. These results seem incompatible with the generally accepted raft model, in which the raft and nonraft phases show a clear biphasic separation. One of the possible reasons is that gradual changes of SM concentration occur between SM-rich and -poor regions to minimize hydrophobic mismatch. We believe that our technique of hyperspectral Raman imaging of a single lipid monolayer opens the door to quantitative analysis of lipid membranes by providing both chemical information and spatial distribution with high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution. PMID:25825736

  9. On ripples and rafts: Curvature induced nanoscale structures in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Friederike; Dolezel, Stefan; Lenz, Olaf; Meinhardt, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    We develop an elastic theory that predicts the spontaneous formation of nanoscale structures in lipid bilayers which locally phase separate between two phases with different spontaneous monolayer curvature. The theory rationalizes in a unified manner the observation of a variety of nanoscale structures in lipid membranes: Rippled states in one-component membranes, lipid rafts in multicomponent membranes. Furthermore, we report on recent observations of rippled states and rafts in simulations of a simple coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers, which are compatible with experimental observations and with our elastic model.

  10. Atomic force microscopy imaging of lipid rafts of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Orsini, F; Cremona, A; Arosio, P; Corsetto, P A; Montorfano, G; Lascialfari, A; Rizzo, A M

    2012-12-01

    Several studies suggest that the plasma membrane is composed of micro-domains of saturated lipids that segregate together to form lipid rafts. Lipid rafts have been operationally defined as cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched membrane micro-domains resistant to solubilization by non-ionic detergents at low temperatures. Here we report a biophysical approach aimed at investigating lipid rafts of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells by coupling an atomic force microscopy (AFM) study to biochemical assays namely Western blotting and high performance thin layer chromatography. Lipid rafts were purified by ultracentrifugation on discontinuous sucrose gradient using extraction with Triton X-100. Biochemical analyses proved that the fractions isolated at the 5% and 30% sucrose interface (fractions 5 and 6) have a higher content of cholesterol, sphingomyelin and flotillin-1 with respect to the other purified fractions. Tapping mode AFM imaging of fraction 5 showed membrane patches whose height corresponds to the one awaited for a single lipid bilayer as well as the presence of micro-domains with lateral dimensions in the order of a few hundreds of nanometers. In addition, an AFM study using specific antibodies suggests the presence, in these micro-domains, of a characteristic marker of lipid rafts, the protein flotillin-1.

  11. Toward atomic force microscopy and mass spectrometry to visualize and identify lipid rafts in plasmodesmata

    PubMed Central

    Naulin, Pamela A.; Alveal, Natalia A.; Barrera, Nelson P.

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell-to-cell communication is mediated by nanopores called plasmodesmata (PDs) which are complex structures comprising plasma membrane (PM), highly packed endoplasmic reticulum and numerous membrane proteins. Although recent advances on proteomics have led to insights into mechanisms of transport, there is still an inadequate characterization of the lipidic composition of the PM where membrane proteins are inserted. It has been postulated that PDs could be formed by lipid rafts, however no structural evidence has shown to visualize and analyse their lipid components. In this perspective article, we discuss proposed experiments to characterize lipid rafts and proteins in the PDs. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and mass spectrometry (MS) of purified PD vesicles it is possible to determine the presence of lipid rafts, specific bound proteins and the lipidomic profile of the PD under physiological conditions and after changing transport permeability. In addition, MS can determine the stoichiometry of intact membrane proteins inserted in lipid rafts. This will give novel insights into the role of membrane proteins and lipid rafts on the PD structure. PMID:24910637

  12. Sphingolipids, Lipid Rafts, and Giardial Encystation: The Show Must Go On.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Tavis L; De Chatterjee, Atasi; Duarte, Trevor; De Leon, Joaquin; Robles-Martinez, Leobarda; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-09-01

    Sphingolipids are sphingosine-based phospholipids, which are present in the plasma and endomembranes of many eukaryotic cells. These lipids are involved in various cellular functions, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, sphingolipid and cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains (also called "lipid rafts") contain a set of proteins and lipids, which take part in the signaling process in response to intra- or extracellular stimuli. Recent findings suggest that sphingolipids, especially glucosylceramide, play a critical role in inducing encystation and maintaining the cyst viability in Giardia. Similarly, the assembly/disassembly of lipid rafts modulates the encystation and cyst production of this ubiquitous enteric parasite. In this review article, we discuss the overall progress in the field and examine whether sphingolipids and lipid rafts can be used as novel targets for designing therapies to control infection by Giardia, which is rampant in developing countries, where children are especially vulnerable.

  13. Arf6 and microtubules in adhesion-dependent trafficking of lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Scott, David W.; Castle, J. David; Casanova, James E.; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Integrin-mediated adhesion regulates Rac1 membrane binding sites within lipid rafts. Detachment of cells from the substratum triggers clearance of rafts from the plasma membrane through caveolin-dependent internalization. The small GTPase Arf6 and microtubules also regulate Rac-dependent cell spreading and migration but the mechanisms are poorly understood. We now show that endocytosis of rafts after detachment requires F-actin, followed by microtubule-dependent trafficking to recycling endosomes (RE). When cells are replated on fibronectin, rafts exit from RE in an Arf6-dependent manner and return to the plasma membrane along microtubules. Both of these steps are required for plasma membrane targeting and activation of Rac1. These data therefore define a novel membrane raft trafficking pathway that is crucial for anchorage-dependent signaling. PMID:18026091

  14. Proteome Scale Characterization of Human S-Acylated Proteins in Lipid Raft-enriched and Non-raft Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Di Vizio, Dolores; Kirchner, Marc; Steen, Hanno; Freeman, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Protein S-acylation (palmitoylation), a reversible post-translational modification, is critically involved in regulating protein subcellular localization, activity, stability, and multimeric complex assembly. However, proteome scale characterization of S-acylation has lagged far behind that of phosphorylation, and global analysis of the localization of S-acylated proteins within different membrane domains has not been reported. Here we describe a novel proteomics approach, designated palmitoyl protein identification and site characterization (PalmPISC), for proteome scale enrichment and characterization of S-acylated proteins extracted from lipid raft-enriched and non-raft membranes. In combination with label-free spectral counting quantitation, PalmPISC led to the identification of 67 known and 331 novel candidate S-acylated proteins as well as the localization of 25 known and 143 novel candidate S-acylation sites. Palmitoyl acyltransferases DHHC5, DHHC6, and DHHC8 appear to be S-acylated on three cysteine residues within a novel CCX7–13C(S/T) motif downstream of a conserved Asp-His-His-Cys cysteine-rich domain, which may be a potential mechanism for regulating acyltransferase specificity and/or activity. S-Acylation may tether cytoplasmic acyl-protein thioesterase-1 to membranes, thus facilitating its interaction with and deacylation of membrane-associated S-acylated proteins. Our findings also suggest that certain ribosomal proteins may be targeted to lipid rafts via S-acylation, possibly to facilitate regulation of ribosomal protein activity and/or dynamic synthesis of lipid raft proteins in situ. In addition, bioinformatics analysis suggested that S-acylated proteins are highly enriched within core complexes of caveolae and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, both cholesterol-rich membrane structures. The PalmPISC approach and the large scale human S-acylated protein data set are expected to provide powerful tools to facilitate our understanding of the

  15. Sigma-1 receptors bind cholesterol and remodel lipid rafts in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christopher P; Mahen, Robert; Schnell, Eva; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A; Aydar, Ebru

    2007-12-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane platforms that spatially organize molecules for specific signaling pathways that regulate various cellular functions. Cholesterol is critical for liquid-ordered raft formation by serving as a spacer between the hydrocarbon chains of sphingolipids, and alterations in the cholesterol contents of the plasma membrane causes disruption of rafts. The role that sigma receptors play in cancer is not clear, although it is frequently up-regulated in human cancer cells and tissues and sigma receptors inhibit proliferation in carcinoma and melanoma cell lines, induce apoptosis in colon and mammary carcinoma cell lines, and reduce cellular adhesion in mammary carcinoma cell lines. In this study, we provide molecular and functional evidence for the involvement of the enigmatic sigma 1 receptors in lipid raft modeling by sigma 1 receptor-mediated cholesterol alteration of lipid rafts in breast cancer cell lines. Cholesterol binds to cholesterol recognition domains in the COOH terminus of the sigma 1 receptor. This binding is blocked by sigma receptor drugs because the cholesterol-binding domains form part of the sigma receptor drug-binding site, mutations of which abolish cholesterol binding. Furthermore, we outline a hypothetical functional model to explain the myriad of biological processes, including cancer, in which these mysterious receptors are involved. The findings of this study provide a biological basis for the potential therapeutic applications of lipid raft cholesterol regulation in cancer therapy using sigma receptor drugs.

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptors are localized to lipid rafts that contain a balance of inner and outer leaflet lipids: a shotgun lipidomics study.

    PubMed

    Pike, Linda J; Han, Xianlin; Gross, Richard W

    2005-07-22

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor partitions into lipid rafts made using a detergent-free method, but is extracted from low density fractions by Triton X-100. By screening several detergents, we identified Brij 98 as a detergent in which the EGF receptor is retained in detergent-resistant membrane fractions. To identify the difference in lipid composition between those rafts that harbored the EGF receptor (detergent-free and Brij 98-resistant) and those that did not (Triton X-100-resistant), we used multidimensional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to perform a lipidomics study on these three raft preparations. Although all three raft preparations were similarly enriched in cholesterol, the EGF receptor-containing rafts contained more ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and less sphingomyelin than did the non-EGF receptor-containing Triton X-100 rafts. As a result, the detergent-free and Brij 98-resistant rafts exhibited a balance of inner and outer leaflet lipids, whereas the Triton X-100 rafts contained a preponderance of outer leaflet lipids. Furthermore, in all raft preparations, the outer leaflet phospholipid species were significantly different from those in the bulk membrane, whereas the inner leaflet lipids were quite similar to those found in the bulk membrane. These findings indicate that the EGF receptor is retained only in rafts that exhibit a lipid distribution compatible with a bilayer structure and that the selection of phospholipids for inclusion into rafts occurs mainly on the outer leaflet lipids.

  17. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease.

  18. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V.

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease. PMID:27014089

  19. Generation of antisera to purified prions in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert; Serban, Ana V; Carlson, George; Prusiner, Stanley B; Stanker, Larry H

    2010-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by prion proteins (PrP). Infectious prions accumulate in the brain through a template-mediated conformational conversion of endogenous PrP(C) into alternately folded PrP(Sc). Immunoassays toward pre-clinical detection of infectious PrP(Sc) have been confounded by low-level prion accumulation in non-neuronal tissue and the lack of PrP(Sc) selective antibodies. We report a method to purify infectious PrP(Sc) from biological tissues for use as an immunogen and sample enrichment for increased immunoassay sensitivity. Significant prion enrichment is accomplished by sucrose gradient centrifugation of infected tissue and isolation with detergent resistant membranes from lipid rafts (DRMs). At equivalent protein concentration a 50-fold increase in detectable PrP(Sc) was observed in DRM fractions relative to crude brain by direct ELISA. Sequential purification steps result in increased specific infectivity (DRM <20-fold and purified DRM immunogen <40-fold) relative to 1% crude brain homogenate. Purification of PrP(Sc) from DRM was accomplished using phosphotungstic acid protein precipitation after proteinase-K (PK) digestion followed by size exclusion chromatography to separate PK and residual protein fragments from larger prion aggregates. Immunization with purified PrP(Sc) antigen was performed using wild-type (wt) and Prnp(0/0) mice, both on Balb/cJ background. A robust immune response against PrP(Sc) was observed in all inoculated Prnp(0/0) mice resulting in antisera containing high-titer antibodies against prion protein. Antisera from these mice recognized both PrP(C) and PrP(Sc), while binding to other brain-derived protein was not observed. In contrast, the PrP(Sc) inoculum was non-immunogenic in wt mice and antisera showed no reactivity with PrP or any other protein.

  20. Generation of antisera to purified prions in lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Hnasko, Robert; Serban, Ana V; Carlson, George; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2010-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by prion proteins (PrP). Infectious prions accumulate in the brain through a template-mediated conformational conversion of endogenous PrPC into alternately folded PrPSc. Immunoassays toward pre-clinical detection of infectious PrPSc have been confounded by low-level prion accumulation in non-neuronal tissue and the lack of PrPSc selective antibodies. We report a method to purify infectious PrPSc from biological tissues for use as an immunogen and sample enrichment for increased immunoassay sensitivity. Significant prion enrichment is accomplished by sucrose gradient centrifugation of infected tissue and isolation with detergent resistant membranes from lipid rafts (DRMs). At equivalent protein concentration a 50-fold increase in detectable PrPSc was observed in DRM fractions relative to crude brain by direct ELISA. Sequential purification steps result in increased specific infectivity (DRM >20-fold and purified DRM immunogen >40-fold) relative to 1% crude brain homogenate. Purification of PrPSc from DRM was accomplished using phosphotungstic acid protein precipitation after proteinase-K (PK) digestion followed by size exclusion chromatography to separate PK and residual protein fragments from larger prion aggregates. Immunization with purified PrPSc antigen was performed using wild-type (wt) and Prnp0/0 mice, both on Balb/cJ background. A robust immune response against PrPSc was observed in all inoculated Prnp0/0 mice resulting in antisera containing high-titer antibodies against prion protein. Antisera from these mice recognized both PrPC and PrPSc, while binding to other brain-derived protein was not observed. In contrast, the PrPSc inoculum was non-immunogenic in wt mice and antisera showed no reactivity with PrP or any other protein. PMID:20647769

  1. Interactive protein network of FXIII-A1 in lipid rafts of activated and non-activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Rabani, Vahideh; Montange, Damien; Davani, Siamak

    2016-09-01

    Lipid-rafts are defined as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids within platelet plasma membrane. Lipid raft-mediated clot retraction requires factor XIII and other interacting proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the proteins that interact with factor XIII in raft and non-raft domains of activated and non-activated platelet plasma membrane. By lipidomics analysis, we identified cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched areas as lipid rafts. Platelets were activated by thrombin. Proteomics analysis provided an overview of the pathways in which proteins of rafts and non-rafts participated in the interaction network of FXIII-A1, a catalytic subunit of FXIII. "Platelet activation" was the principal pathway among KEGG pathways for proteins of rafts, both before and after activation. Network analysis showed four types of interactions (activation, binding, reaction, and catalysis) in raft and non-raft domains in interactive network of FXIII-A1. FXIII-A1 interactions with other proteins in raft domains and their role in homeostasis highlight the specialization of the raft domain in clot retraction via the Factor XIII protein network.

  2. Uncoupling Neogenin association with lipid rafts promotes neuronal survival and functional recovery after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shabanzadeh, A P; Tassew, N G; Szydlowska, K; Tymianski, M; Banerjee, P; Vigouroux, R J; Eubanks, J H; Huang, L; Geraerts, M; Koeberle, P D; Mueller, B K; Monnier, P P

    2015-01-01

    The dependence receptor Neogenin and its ligand, the repulsive guidance molecule a (RGMa), regulate apoptosis and axonal growth in the developing and the adult central nervous system (CNS). Here, we show that this pathway has also a critical role in neuronal death following stroke, and that providing RGMa to neurons blocks Neogenin-induced death. Interestingly, the Neogenin pro-death function following ischemic insult depends on Neogenin association with lipid rafts. Thus, a peptide that prevents Neogenin association with lipid rafts increased neuronal survival in several in vitro stroke models. In rats, a pro-survival effect was also observed in a model of ocular ischemia, as well as after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Treatments that prevented Neogenin association with lipid rafts improved neuronal survival and the complexity of the neuronal network following occlusion of the middle artery. Toward the development of a treatment for stroke, we developed a human anti-RGMa antibody that also prevents Neogenin association with lipid rafts. We show that this antibody also protected CNS tissue from ischemic damage and that its application resulted in a significant functional improvement even when administrated 6 h after artery occlusion. Thus, our results draw attention to the role of Neogenin and lipid rafts as potential targets following stroke. PMID:25950474

  3. Effects of acrylonitrile on lymphocyte lipid rafts and RAS/RAF/MAPK/ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, X J; Li, B; Huang, J S; Shi, J M; Wang, P; Fan, W; Zhou, Y L

    2014-09-26

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a widely used chemical in the production of plastics, resins, nitriles, acrylic fibers, and synthetic rubber. Previous epidemiological investigations and animal studies have confirmed that ACN affects the lymphocytes and spleen. However, the immune toxicity mechanism is unknown. Lipid rafts are cell membrane structures that are rich in cholesterol and involved in cell signal transduction. The B cell lymophoma-10 (Bcl10) protein is a joint protein that is important in lymphocyte development and signal pathways. This study was conducted to examine the in vitro effects of ACN. We separated lipid rafts, and analyzed Bcl10 protein and caveolin. Western blotting was used to detect mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphorylated MAPK levels. The results indicated that with increasing ACN concentration, the total amount of Bcl10 remained stable, but was concentrated mainly in part 4 to part 11 in electrophoretic band district which is high density in gradient centrifugation. Caveolin-1 was evaluated as a lipid raft marker protein; caveolin-1 content and position were relatively unchanged. Western blotting showed that in a certain range, MAPK protein was secreted at a higher level. At some ACN exposure levels, MAPK protein secretion was significantly decreased compared to the control group (P < 0.05). These results indicate that ACN can cause immune toxicity by damaging lipid raft structures, causing Bcl10 protein and lipid raft separation and restraining Ras-Raf-MAPK-extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways.

  4. A novel biotinylated lipid raft reporter for electron microscopic imaging of plasma membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Krager, Kimberly J; Sarkar, Mitul; Twait, Erik C; Lill, Nancy L; Koland, John G

    2012-10-01

    The submicroscopic spatial organization of cell surface receptors and plasma membrane signaling molecules is readily characterized by electron microscopy (EM) via immunogold labeling of plasma membrane sheets. Although various signaling molecules have been seen to segregate within plasma membrane microdomains, the biochemical identity of these microdomains and the factors affecting their formation are largely unknown. Lipid rafts are envisioned as submicron membrane subdomains of liquid ordered structure with differing lipid and protein constituents that define their specific varieties. To facilitate EM investigation of inner leaflet lipid rafts and the localization of membrane proteins therein, a unique genetically encoded reporter with the dually acylated raft-targeting motif of the Lck kinase was developed. This reporter, designated Lck-BAP-GFP, incorporates green fluorescent protein (GFP) and biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) modules, with the latter allowing its single-step labeling with streptavidin-gold. Lck-BAP-GFP was metabolically biotinylated in mammalian cells, distributed into low-density detergent-resistant membrane fractions, and was readily detected with avidin-based reagents. In EM images of plasma membrane sheets, the streptavidin-gold-labeled reporter was clustered in 20-50 nm microdomains, presumably representative of inner leaflet lipid rafts. The utility of the reporter was demonstrated in an investigation of the potential lipid raft localization of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

  5. Methods for the study of signaling molecules in membrane lipid rafts and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Insel, Paul A

    2006-01-01

    Lipid rafts and caveolae are cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich microdomains of the plasma membrane that concentrate components of certain signal transduction pathways. Interest in and exploration of these microdomains has grown in recent years, especially after the discovery of the biochemical marker of caveolae, caveolin, and the recognition that caveolin interacts with many different signaling molecules via its scaffolding domain. There are three major types of caveolins (1, 2, and 3), with some selectivity in their expression in different tissues. Results assessing lipid raft/caveolae co-localization of molecules in signal transduction pathways have provided support for the idea that signaling components are compartmentalized or preassembled together. This chapter describes nondetergent- and detergent-based methods for isolating lipid rafts and caveolae for biochemical studies. We also describe a method for immunoisolation (using antibodies to caveolins) of detergent-insoluble membranes that selectively isolates caveolae vs lipid rafts. Together, these methods are useful for assessment of the role of lipid rafts and caveolae in transmembrane signaling.

  6. A novel biotinylated lipid raft reporter for electron microscopic imaging of plasma membrane microdomains[S

    PubMed Central

    Krager, Kimberly J.; Sarkar, Mitul; Twait, Erik C.; Lill, Nancy L.; Koland, John G.

    2012-01-01

    The submicroscopic spatial organization of cell surface receptors and plasma membrane signaling molecules is readily characterized by electron microscopy (EM) via immunogold labeling of plasma membrane sheets. Although various signaling molecules have been seen to segregate within plasma membrane microdomains, the biochemical identity of these microdomains and the factors affecting their formation are largely unknown. Lipid rafts are envisioned as submicron membrane subdomains of liquid ordered structure with differing lipid and protein constituents that define their specific varieties. To facilitate EM investigation of inner leaflet lipid rafts and the localization of membrane proteins therein, a unique genetically encoded reporter with the dually acylated raft-targeting motif of the Lck kinase was developed. This reporter, designated Lck-BAP-GFP, incorporates green fluorescent protein (GFP) and biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) modules, with the latter allowing its single-step labeling with streptavidin-gold. Lck-BAP-GFP was metabolically biotinylated in mammalian cells, distributed into low-density detergent-resistant membrane fractions, and was readily detected with avidin-based reagents. In EM images of plasma membrane sheets, the streptavidin-gold-labeled reporter was clustered in 20–50 nm microdomains, presumably representative of inner leaflet lipid rafts. The utility of the reporter was demonstrated in an investigation of the potential lipid raft localization of the epidermal growth factor receptor. PMID:22822037

  7. Clathrin to Lipid Raft-Endocytosis via Controlled Surface Chemistry and Efficient Perinuclear Targeting of Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Atanu; Jana, Nikhil R

    2015-09-17

    Nanoparticle interacts with live cells depending on their surface chemistry, enters into cell via endocytosis, and is commonly trafficked to an endosome/lysozome that restricts subcellular targeting options. Here we show that nanoparticle surface chemistry can be tuned to alter their cell uptake mechanism and subcellular trafficking. Quantum dot based nanoprobes of 20-30 nm hydrodynamic diameters have been synthesized with tunable surface charge (between +15 mV to -25 mV) and lipophilicity to influence their cellular uptake processes and subcellular trafficking. It is observed that cationic nanoprobe electrostatically interacts with cell membrane and enters into cell via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. At lower surface charge (between +10 mV to -10 mV), the electrostatic interaction with cell membrane becomes weaker, and additional lipid raft endocytosis is initiated. If a lipophilic functional group is introduced on a weakly anionic nanoparticle surface, the uptake mechanism shifts to predominant lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. In particular, the zwitterionic-lipophilic nanoprobe has the unique advantage as it weakly interacts with anionic cell membrane, migrates toward lipid rafts for interaction through lipophilic functional group, and induces lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. While predominate or partial clathrin-mediated entry traffics most of the nanoprobes to lysozome, predominate lipid raft-mediated entry traffics them to perinuclear region, particularly to the Golgi apparatus. This finding would guide in designing appropriate nanoprobe for subcellular targeting and delivery.

  8. Glypican-1 mediates both prion protein lipid raft association and disease isoform formation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David R; Whitehouse, Isobel J; Hooper, Nigel M

    2009-11-01

    In prion diseases, the cellular form of the prion protein, PrP(C), undergoes a conformational conversion to the infectious isoform, PrP(Sc). PrP(C) associates with lipid rafts through its glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor and a region in its N-terminal domain which also binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). We show that heparin displaces PrP(C) from rafts and promotes its endocytosis, suggesting that heparin competes with an endogenous raft-resident HSPG for binding to PrP(C). We then utilised a transmembrane-anchored form of PrP (PrP-TM), which is targeted to rafts solely by its N-terminal domain, to show that both heparin and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C can inhibit its association with detergent-resistant rafts, implying that a GPI-anchored HSPG targets PrP(C) to rafts. Depletion of the major neuronal GPI-anchored HSPG, glypican-1, significantly reduced the raft association of PrP-TM and displaced PrP(C) from rafts, promoting its endocytosis. Glypican-1 and PrP(C) colocalised on the cell surface and both PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) co-immunoprecipitated with glypican-1. Critically, treatment of scrapie-infected N2a cells with glypican-1 siRNA significantly reduced PrP(Sc) formation. In contrast, depletion of glypican-1 did not alter the inhibitory effect of PrP(C) on the beta-secretase cleavage of the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein. These data indicate that glypican-1 is a novel cellular cofactor for prion conversion and we propose that it acts as a scaffold facilitating the interaction of PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) in lipid rafts.

  9. Effect of the structure of lipids favoring disordered domain formation on the stability of cholesterol-containing ordered domains (lipid rafts): identification of multiple raft-stabilization mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bakht, Omar; Pathak, Priyadarshini; London, Erwin

    2007-12-15

    Despite the importance of lipid rafts, commonly defined as liquid-ordered domains rich in cholesterol and in lipids with high gel-to-fluid melting temperatures (T(m)), the rules for raft formation in membranes are not completely understood. Here, a fluorescence-quenching strategy was used to define how lipids with low T(m), which tend to form disordered fluid domains at physiological temperatures, can stabilize ordered domain formation by cholesterol and high-T(m) lipids (either sphingomyelin or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine). In bilayers containing mixtures of low-T(m) phosphatidylcholines, cholesterol, and high-T(m) lipid, the thermal stability of ordered domains decreased with the acyl-chain structure of low-T(m) lipids in the following order: diarachadonyl > diphytanoyl > 1-palmitoyl 2-docosahexenoyl = 1,2 dioleoyl = dimyristoleoyl = 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl (PO). This shows that low-T(m) lipids with two acyl chains having very poor tight-packing propensities can stabilize ordered domain formation by high-T(m) lipids and cholesterol. The effect of headgroup structure was also studied. We found that even in the absence of high-T(m) lipids, mixtures of cholesterol with PO phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) and PO phosphatidylserine (POPS) or with brain PE and brain PS showed a (borderline) tendency to form ordered domains. Because these lipids are abundant in the inner (cytofacial) leaflet of mammalian membranes, this raises the possibility that PE and PS could participate in inner-leaflet raft formation or stabilization. In bilayers containing ternary mixtures of PO lipids, cholesterol, and high-T(m) lipids, the thermal stability of ordered domains decreased with the polar headgroup structure of PO lipids in the order PE > PS > phosphatidylcholine (PC). Analogous experiments using diphytanoyl acyl chain lipids in place of PO acyl chain lipids showed that the stabilization of ordered lipid domains by acyl chain and headgroup structure was not additive. This implies

  10. Lipid rafts, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in the antitumor action of the alkylphospholipid analog edelfosine.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2014-05-01

    The so-called alkylphospholipid analogs (APLs) constitute a family of synthetic antitumor compounds that target cell membranes. The ether phospholipid edelfosine has been considered the long-standing prototype of these antitumor agents and promotes apoptosis in tumor cells by a rather selective way, while sparing normal cells. Increasing evidence suggests that edelfosine-induced apoptosis involves a number of subcellular structures in tumor cells, including plasma membrane lipid rafts, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. Edelfosine has been shown to accumulate in plasma membrane lipid rafts, ER and mitochondria in different tumor cells in a cell type-dependent way. Edelfosine induces apoptosis in several hematopoietic cancer cells by recruiting death receptor and downstream apoptotic signaling molecules into lipid rafts and displacing survival signaling molecules from these membrane domains. However, in vitro and in vivo evidences suggest that edelfosine-induced apoptosis in solid tumor cells is mediated through an ER stress response. Both raft- and ER-mediated proapoptotic responses require a mitochondrial-related step to eventually promote cell death, and overexpression of Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL prevents edelfosine-induced apoptosis. Edelfosine can also interact with mitochondria leading to an increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Edelfosine treatment also induced a redistribution of lipid rafts from the plasma membrane to mitochondria, suggesting a raft-mediated link between plasma membrane and mitochondria. The involvement of lipid rafts, ER and mitochondria in the apoptotic response induced by edelfosine may provide new avenues for targeting cancer cells as well as new opportunities for cancer therapy.

  11. [Cholesterol and lipid rafts in the biological membranes. Role in the release, reception and ion channel functions].

    PubMed

    Petrov, A M; Zefirov, A L

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, membrane protein molecules that form ion channels, transporters, pumps, signaling complexes, machine of exo- and endocytosis is assigned as the main players of the cellular processes. Recently, the findings that indicate the importance of lipids in regulating of cell physiology are accumulated. Attention is attracting to cholesterol molecule because it can directly interact with different proteins and together with sphingolipids to form membrane microdomains (lipid rafts). Many receptors (for neurotransmitters, hormones, growth factors), signaling proteins and proteins involved in vesicular and ion transport are concentrated in the lipid rafts. Changes in stability and structure of rafts cause dramatic cellular dysfunction. In the review the current views on lipid variants that make up the biological membrane, the distribution of cholesterol, the organization and the formation of lipid rafts and caveolae are described. Accent is made on researches that focus on the significance of lipid rafts in the extra- and intracellular signaling, neurotransmitters release, receptor and ion channels function at the excitable cells.

  12. Signalling of the BCR is regulated by a lipid rafts-localised transcription factor, Bright

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Christian; Kim, Dongkyoon; Ippolito, Gregory C; Naqvi, Hassan R; Probst, Loren; Mathur, Shawn; Rosas-Acosta, German; Wilson, Van G; Oldham, Athenia L; Poenie, Martin; Webb, Carol F; Tucker, Philip W

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of BCR signalling strength is crucial for B-cell development and function. Bright is a B-cell-restricted factor that complexes with Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) and its substrate, transcription initiation factor-I (TFII-I), to activate immunoglobulin heavy chain gene transcription in the nucleus. Here we show that a palmitoylated pool of Bright is diverted to lipid rafts of resting B cells where it associates with signalosome components. After BCR ligation, Bright transiently interacts with sumoylation enzymes, blocks calcium flux and phosphorylation of Btk and TFII-I and is then discharged from lipid rafts as a Sumo-I-modified form. The resulting lipid raft concentration of Bright contributes to the signalling threshold of B cells, as their sensitivity to BCR stimulation decreases as the levels of Bright increase. Bright regulates signalling independent of its role in IgH transcription, as shown by specific dominant-negative titration of rafts-specific forms. This study identifies a BCR tuning mechanism in lipid rafts that is regulated by differential post-translational modification of a transcription factor with implications for B-cell tolerance and autoimmunity. PMID:19214191

  13. Cold induces micro- and nano-scale reorganization of lipid raft markers at mounds of T-cell membrane fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Qin, Jie; Cai, Jiye; Chen, Zheng W

    2009-01-01

    Whether and how cold causes changes in cell-membrane or lipid rafts remain poorly characterized. Using the NSOM/QD and confocal imaging systems, we found that cold caused microscale redistribution of lipid raft markers, GM1 for lipid and CD59 for protein, from the peripheral part of microdomains to the central part on Jurkat T cells, and that cold also induced the nanoscale size-enlargement (1/3- to 2/3-fold) of the nanoclusters of lipid raft markers and even the colocalization of GM1 and CD59 nanoclusters. These findings indicate cold-induced lateral rearrangement/coalescence of raft-related membrane heterogeneity. The cold-induced re-distribution of lipid raft markers under a nearly-natural condition provide clues for their alternations, and help to propose a model in which raft lipids associate themselves or interact with protein components to generate functional membrane heterogeneity in response to stimulus. The data also underscore the possible cold-induced artifacts in early-described cold-related experiments and the detergent-resistance-based analyses of lipid rafts at 4 degrees C, and provide a biophysical explanation for recently-reported cold-induced activation of signaling pathways in T cells. Importantly, our fluorescence-topographic NSOM imaging demonstrated that GM1/CD59 raft markers distributed and re-distributed at mounds but not depressions of T-cell membrane fluctuations. Such mound-top distribution of lipid raft markers or lipid rafts provides spatial advantage for lipid rafts or contact molecules interacting readily with neighboring cells or free molecules.

  14. Lipid Raft-Mediated Regulation of Hyaluronan–CD44 Interactions in Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a major component of the extracellular matrix and plays pivotal roles in inflammation and cancer. Hyaluronan oligomers are frequently found in these pathological conditions, in which they exert their effects via association with the transmembrane receptor CD44. Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains that may regulate membrane receptors while serving as platforms for transmembrane signaling at the cell surface. This article focuses on the recent discovery that lipid rafts regulate the interaction between CD44 and hyaluronan, which depends largely on hyaluronan’s size. Lipid rafts regulate CD44’s ability to bind hyaluronan in T cells, control the rolling adhesion of lymphocytes on vascular endothelial cells, and regulate hyaluronan- and CD44-mediated cancer cell migration. The implications of these findings for preventing inflammatory disorders and cancer are also discussed. PMID:26347743

  15. T-lymphocyte signalling in systemic lupus erythematosus: a lipid raft perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jury, EC; Kabouridis, PS

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years it has become clear that in cells of the immune system, specialized microdomains present in the plasma membrane, called lipid rafts, have been found to play a central role in regulating signalling by immune receptors. Recent studies have looked at whether lipid rafts may be connected to the abnormalities in signalling seen in T lymphocytes isolated from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). These early findings show that in SLE T cells, the expression and protein composition of lipid rafts is different when compared with normal T cells. These results also demonstrate changes in the function and localization of critical signalling molecules such as the LCK tyrosine kinase and the CD45 tyrosine phosphatase. PMID:15303567

  16. Severe Alterations in Lipid Composition of Frontal Cortex Lipid Rafts from Parkinson’s Disease and Incidental Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Santpere, Gabriel; Marín, Raquel; Torrent, Laia; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains that provide a highly saturated and viscous physicochemical microenvironment to promote protein–lipid and protein–protein interactions. We purified lipid rafts from human frontal cortex from normal, early motor stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and incidental Parkinson’s disease (iPD) subjects and analyzed their lipid composition. We observed that lipid rafts from PD and iPD cortices exhibit dramatic reductions in their contents of n-3 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (22:6-n3) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Also, saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) were significantly higher than in control brains. Paralleling these findings, unsaturation and peroxidability indices were considerably reduced in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Lipid classes were also affected in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Thus, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were increased in PD and iPD, whereas cerebrosides and sulfatides and plasmalogen levels were considerably diminished. Our data pinpoint a dramatic increase in lipid raft order due to the aberrant biochemical structure in PD and iPD and indicate that these abnormalities of lipid rafts in the frontal cortex occur at early stages of PD pathology. The findings correlate with abnormal lipid raft signaling and cognitive decline observed during the development of these neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:21717034

  17. Altered dynamics of a lipid raft associated protein in a kidney model of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Labilloy, Anatália; Youker, Robert T; Bruns, Jennifer R; Kukic, Ira; Kiselyov, Kirill; Halfter, Willi; Finegold, David; do Monte, Semiramis Jamil Hadad; Weisz, Ora A

    2014-02-01

    Accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and other neutral glycosphingolipids with galactosyl residues is the hallmark of Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (α-gal A). These lipids are incorporated into the plasma membrane and intracellular membranes, with a preference for lipid rafts. Disruption of raft mediated cell processes is implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, but little is known about the effects of the accumulation of glycosphingolipids on raft dynamics in the context of Fabry disease. Using siRNA technology, we have generated a polarized renal epithelial cell model of Fabry disease in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. These cells present increased levels of Gb3 and enlarged lysosomes, and progressively accumulate zebra bodies. The polarized delivery of both raft-associated and raft-independent proteins was unaffected by α-gal A knockdown, suggesting that accumulation of Gb3 does not disrupt biosynthetic trafficking pathways. To assess the effect of α-gal A silencing on lipid raft dynamics, we employed number and brightness (N&B) analysis to measure the oligomeric status and mobility of the model glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein GFP-GPI. We observed a significant increase in the oligomeric size of antibody-induced clusters of GFP-GPI at the plasma membrane of α-gal A silenced cells compared with control cells. Our results suggest that the interaction of GFP-GPI with lipid rafts may be altered in the presence of accumulated Gb3. The implications of our results with respect to the pathogenesis of Fabry disease are discussed. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Association of γ-Secretase with Lipid Rafts in Post-Golgi and Endosome Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Vetrivel, Kulandaivelu S.; Cheng, Haipeng; Lin, William; Sakurai, Takashi; Li, Tong; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Wong, Philip C.; Xu, Huaxi; Thinakaran, Gopal

    2005-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease-associated β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) are generated by the sequential proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. There is growing evidence that cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich membrane microdomains are involved in regulating trafficking and processing of APP. BACE1, the major γ-secretase in neurons is a palmi-toylated transmembrane protein that resides in lipid rafts. A subset of APP is subject to amyloidogenic processing by BACE1 in lipid rafts, and this process depends on the integrity of lipid rafts. Here we describe the association of all four components of the γ-secretase complex, namely presenilin 1 (PS1)-derived fragments, mature nicastrin, APH-1, and PEN-2, with cholesterol-rich detergent insoluble membrane (DIM) domains of non-neuronal cells and neurons that fulfill the criteria of lipid rafts. In PS1−/−/PS2−/− and NCT−/− fibroblasts, γ-secretase components that still remain fail to become detergent-resistant, suggesting that raft association requires γ-secretase complex assembly. Biochemical evidence shows that subunits of the γ-secretase complex and three TGN/endosome-resident SNAREs cofractionate in sucrose density gradients, and show similar solubility or insolubility characteristics in distinct non-ionic and zwitterionic detergents, indicative of their co-residence in membrane microdomains with similar protein-lipid composition. This notion is confirmed using magnetic immunoisolation of PS1- or syntaxin 6-positive membrane patches from a mixture of membranes with similar buoyant densities following Lubrol WX extraction or sonication, and gradient centrifugation. These findings are consistent with the localization of γ-secretase in lipid raft microdomains of post-Golgi and endosomes, organelles previously implicated in amyloidogenic processing of APP. PMID:15322084

  19. A role for lipid rafts in the protection afforded by docosahexaenoic acid against ethanol toxicity in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Aliche-Djoudi, Fatiha; Podechard, Normand; Collin, Aurore; Chevanne, Martine; Provost, Emilie; Poul, Martine; Le Hégarat, Ludovic; Catheline, Daniel; Legrand, Philippe; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Sergent, Odile

    2013-10-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid enhanced ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death in primary rat hepatocytes via an increase in membrane fluidity and lipid raft clustering. In this context, another n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), was tested with a special emphasis on physical and chemical alteration of lipid rafts. Pretreatment of hepatocytes with DHA reduced significantly ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death. DHA protection could be related to an alteration of lipid rafts. Indeed, rafts exhibited a marked increase in membrane fluidity and packing defects leading to the exclusion of a raft protein marker, flotillin. Furthermore, DHA strongly inhibited disulfide bridge formation, even in control cells, thus suggesting a disruption of protein-protein interactions inside lipid rafts. This particular spatial organization of lipid rafts due to DHA subsequently prevented the ethanol-induced lipid raft clustering. Such a prevention was then responsible for the inhibition of phospholipase C-γ translocation into rafts, and consequently of both lysosome accumulation and elevation in cellular low-molecular-weight iron content, a prooxidant factor. In total, the present study suggests that DHA supplementation could represent a new preventive approach for patients with alcoholic liver disease based upon modulation of the membrane structures.

  20. Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface upon lipid raft fluidization.

    PubMed

    Orihashi, Kaoru; Tojo, Hiromasa; Okawa, Katsuya; Tashima, Yuko; Morita, Takashi; Kondoh, Gen

    2012-03-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) is well known as a biotransformation enzyme for prodrugs and xenobiotics. Here, we purified CES as a GPI-anchored protein (GPI-AP)-releasing factor (GPIase) that releases such protein from the cell surface. All five isoforms of CES showed this activity to various degrees. When the serine residue of the catalytic triad for esterase was replaced by alanine, esterase activity was completely disrupted, while full GPIase activity remained, suggesting that these two activities are exhibited via different mechanisms. CES6, a new class of mammalian CES, exhibited the highest GPIase activity and released specific GPI-APs from the cell surface after lipid raft fluidization. The released product contained a GPI component, indicating that GPI-AP was released by cleavage in GPI. These results revealed for the first time that CES recognizes and catalyzes macromolecule GPI-AP as well as small molecules.

  1. Dynamical Clustering and a Mechanism for Raft-like Structures in a Model Lipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Francis W.; Hartmann, Benedikt; Douglas, Jack F.

    2014-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the dynamical heterogeneity of a model single-component lipid membrane using a coarse-grained representation of lipid molecules. This model qualitatively reproduces the known phase transitions between disordered, ordered, and gel membrane phases, and the phase transitions are accompanied by significant changes in the nature of the lipid dynamics. In particular, lipid diffusion in the liquid-ordered phase is hindered by the transient trapping of molecules by their neighbors, similar to the dynamics of a liquid approaching its glass transition. This transient molecular caging gives rise to two distinct mobility groups within a single-component membrane: lipids that are transiently trapped, and lipids with displacements on the scale of the intermolecular spacing. Most significantly, lipids within these distinct mobility states spatially segregate, creating transient “islands” of enhanced mobility having a size and time scale compatible with lipidrafts,” dynamical structures thought to be important for cell membrane function. Although the dynamic lipid clusters that we observe do not themselves correspond to rafts (which are more complex, multicomponent structures), we hypothesize that such rafts may develop from the same universal mechanism, explaining why raft-like regions should arise, regardless of lipid structural or compositional details. These clusters are strikingly similar to the dynamical clusters found in glass-forming fluids, and distinct from phase-separation clusters. Further examination shows that mobile lipid clusters can be dissected into smaller clusters of cooperatively rearranging molecules. The geometry of these clusters can be understood in the context of branched equilibrium polymers, related to the statistics percolation theory. We discuss how these dynamical structures relate to a range observations on the dynamics of lipid membranes. PMID:24695573

  2. Isolation and characterization of lipid rafts with different properties from RBL-2H3 (rat basophilic leukaemia) cells.

    PubMed Central

    Radeva, Galina; Sharom, Frances J

    2004-01-01

    Lipid rafts are plasma-membrane microdomains that are enriched in certain lipids (sphingolipids, glycosphingolipids and cholesterol), as well as in lipid-modified proteins. Rafts appear to exist in the liquid-ordered phase, which contributes to their partitioning from the surrounding liquid-disordered glycerophospholipid environment. DRM (detergent-resistant membrane) fractions isolated from cells are believed to represent coalesced lipid rafts. We have employed extraction using two different non-ionic detergents, Brij-96 and Triton X-100, to isolate detergent-resistant lipid rafts from rat basophilic leukaemia cell line RBL-2H3, and compared their properties with each other and with plasma-membrane vesicles. DRM fractions were isolated as sealed unilamellar vesicles of similar size (135-170 nm diameter), using either sucrose-density-gradient sedimentation or gel-filtration chromatography. Lipid rafts isolated using Brij-96 and Triton X-100 differed in density, protein content and the distribution between high- and low-density fractions of the known raft constituents, Thy-1, and the non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases, Yes and Lyn. Lyn was found in the raft microdomains in predominantly phosphorylated form. The level of enrichment of the protein constituents of the isolated lipid rafts seemed to depend on the ratio of cell lipid/protein to detergent. As indicated by reactivity with anti-Thy-1 antibodies, lipid rafts prepared using Brij-96 appeared to consist of vesicles with primarily right-side-out orientation. Both Brij-96 and Triton X-100 appear to isolate detergent-insoluble raft microdomains from the rat basophilic leukaemia cell line RBL-2H3, but the observed differences suggest that either the detergents themselves play a role in determining the physicochemical characteristics of the resulting DRM fractions, or different subsets of rafts are isolated by the two detergents. PMID:14769131

  3. Altered lipid composition in cortical lipid rafts occurs at early stages of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and facilitates APP/BACE1 interactions.

    PubMed

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Marín, Raquel; Moreno, Dolores; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2014-08-01

    The presence of lipid alterations in lipid rafts from the frontal cortex in late stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been recently demonstrated. Here, we have isolated and analyzed the lipid composition of lipid rafts from different brain areas from control and AD subjects at initial neuropathologic stages. We have observed that frontal cortex lipid rafts are profoundly altered in AD brains from the earliest stages of AD, namely AD I/II. These changes in the lipid matrix of lipid rafts affected both lipid classes and fatty acids and were also detected in the entorhinal cortex, but not in the cerebellum from the same subjects. Paralleling these changes, lipid rafts from AD frontal and entorhinal cortices displayed higher anisotropy for environment-sensitive probes, indicating that lipid changes in AD lipid rafts increased membrane order and viscosity in these domains. The pathophysiological consequences of these alterations in the development and progression of AD were strengthened by the significant, and specific, accumulation of β-secretase within the lipid rafts of AD subjects even at the earliest stages. Our results provide a mechanistic connection between lipid alterations in these microdomains and amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein.

  4. Lipid rafts are required for signal transduction by angiotensin II receptor type 1 in neonatal glomerular mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adebiyi, Adebowale Soni, Hitesh; John, Theresa A.; Yang, Fen

    2014-05-15

    Angiotensin II (ANG-II) receptors (AGTRs) contribute to renal physiology and pathophysiology, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate AGTR function in glomerular mesangium are poorly understood. Here, we show that AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal pig glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Cyclodextrin (CDX)-mediated cholesterol depletion attenuated cell surface AGTR1 protein expression and ANG-II-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) elevation in the cells. The COOH-terminus of porcine AGTR1 contains a caveolin (CAV)-binding motif. However, neonatal GMCs express CAV-1, but not CAV-2 and CAV-3. Colocalization and in situ proximity ligation assay detected an association between endogenous AGTR1 and CAV-1 in the cells. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CAV-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) sequence also reduced ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in the cells. Real-time imaging of cell growth revealed that ANG-II stimulates neonatal GMC proliferation. ANG-II-induced GMC growth was attenuated by EMD 66684, an AGTR1 antagonist; BAPTA, a [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} chelator; KN-93, a Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor; CDX; and a CSD peptide, but not PD 123319, a selective AGTR2 antagonist. Collectively, our data demonstrate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent proliferative effect of ANG-II and highlight a critical role for lipid raft microdomains in AGTR1-mediated signal transduction in neonatal GMCs. - Highlights: • AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal mesangial cells. • Endogenous AGTR1 associates with CAV-1 in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption attenuates cell surface AGTR1 protein expression. • Lipid raft disruption reduces ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption inhibits ANG-II-induced neonatal mesangial cell growth.

  5. Functional characterization of the Aspergillus nidulans glucosylceramide pathway reveals that LCB Δ8-desaturation and C9-methylation are relevant to filamentous growth, lipid raft localization and Psd1 defensin activity.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, C M; de Castro, P A; Singh, A; Fonseca, F L; Pereira, M D; Vila, T V M; Atella, G C; Rozental, S; Savoldi, M; Del Poeta, M; Goldman, G H; Kurtenbach, E

    2016-11-01

    C8-desaturated and C9-methylated glucosylceramide (GlcCer) is a fungal-specific sphingolipid that plays an important role in the growth and virulence of many species. In this work, we investigated the contribution of Aspergillus nidulans sphingolipid Δ8-desaturase (SdeA), sphingolipid C9-methyltransferases (SmtA/SmtB) and glucosylceramide synthase (GcsA) to fungal phenotypes, sensitivity to Psd1 defensin and Galleria mellonella virulence. We showed that ΔsdeA accumulated C8-saturated and unmethylated GlcCer, while gcsA deletion impaired GlcCer synthesis. Although increased levels of unmethylated GlcCer were observed in smtA and smtB mutants, ΔsmtA and wild-type cells showed a similar 9,Me-GlcCer content, reduced by 50% in the smtB disruptant. The compromised 9,Me-GlcCer production in the ΔsmtB strain was not accompanied by reduced filamentation or defects in cell polarity. When combined with the smtA deletion, smtB repression significantly increased unmethylated GlcCer levels and compromised filamentous growth. Furthermore, sdeA and gcsA mutants displayed growth defects and raft mislocalization, which were accompanied by reduced neutral lipids levels and attenuated G. mellonella virulence in the ΔgcsA strain. Finally, ΔsdeA and ΔgcsA showed increased resistance to Psd1, suggesting that GlcCer synthesis and fungal sphingoid base structure specificities are relevant not only to differentiation but also to proper recognition by this antifungal defensin. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Dynamical Clustering and the Origin of Raft-like Structures in a Model Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Francis

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the dynamical heterogeneity of a model single-component lipid membrane using simulations of a coarse-grained representation of lipid molecules. In the liquid-ordered (LO) phase, lipid diffusion is hindered by the transient trapping of molecules by their neighbors, giving rise to two distinct mobility groups: low-mobility lipids which are temporarily ``caged'', and lipids with displacements on the scale of the intermolecular spacing. The lipid molecules within these distinct mobility states cluster, giving rise to transient ``islands'' of enhanced mobility having the size and time scale expected for lipid ``rafts''. These clusters are strikingly similar to the dynamical clusters found in glass-forming fluids, and distinct from phase-separation clusters. Such dynamic heterogeneity is ubiquitous in disordered condensed-phase systems. Thus, we hypothesize that rafts may originate from this universal mechanism, explaining why raft-like regions should arise, regardless of lipid structural or compositional details. This perspective provides a new approach to understand membrane transport.

  7. Epigenetic DNA-methylation regulation of genes coding for lipid raft-associated components: a role for raft proteins in cell transformation and cancer progression (review).

    PubMed

    Patra, Samir K; Bettuzzi, Saverio

    2007-06-01

    Metastatic progression is the cause of most cancer deaths. Host tumour cell separation (fission) is accompanied by simultaneous acquisition of migrating capability of cancer cells, remodeling of cellular architecture and effective 'homing' in body host environment. Cell remodeling involves cytoskeletal protein-protein and lipid-protein interaction together with altered signaling. Alteration of signaling in tumour cells may affect expression of many genes also by DNA-methylation/demethylation. This would alter the steady-state intracellular level of structural proteins or metabolic enzymes, and notably enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of lipids, affecting the composition of membranes. Lipid rafts are small, heterogeneous, highly dynamic, sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched domains that compartmentalize cellular processes. Small rafts can be stabilized to form larger platforms through protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. Lipid rafts play an important role in intracellular protein transport, membrane fusion and trans-cytosis, also being platforms for cell surface antigens and adhesion molecules which are crucial for cell activation, polarization and signaling. Detachment of individual tumour cells from the host tumour lump requires lipid-protein-lipid raft (LPLR) reordering. Lipid rafts are also involved in angiogenesis and local invasion, which occurs within the host tumour vicinity by exchange of enzymes, cytokines and motility factors that modify the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). Many cell surface adhesion, ECM, and signaling proteins (such as E-cadherin, catenin, CD44, MMP-9 and caveolin-1) are known to be absent or reduced following gene promoter-CpG-island hypermethylation in mid-stage growing tumours, but re-expressed (by gene promoter-mCpG-DNA demethylation) in carcinomas such as metastasized lung, prostate and sarcomas. The recent research acquisitions on lipid rafts have tremendous implications in understanding the genetic and

  8. The Lipid Raft-Associated Protein CD98 Is Required for Vaccinia Virus Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Nina; Chung, Che-Sheng; Chen, Chein-Hung; Liao, Chung-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Mature vaccinia virus (vaccinia MV) infects a broad range of animals in vivo and cell cultures in vitro; however, the cellular receptors that determine vaccinia MV tropism and entry pathways are poorly characterized. Here, we performed quantitative proteomic analyses of lipid raft-associated proteins upon vaccinia MV entry into HeLa cells. We found that a type II membrane glycoprotein, CD98, is enriched in lipid rafts upon vaccinia MV infection compared to mock-infected HeLa cells. The knockdown of CD98 expression in HeLa cells significantly reduced vaccinia MV entry. Furthermore, CD98 knockout (KO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) also exhibited reduced vaccinia MV infectivity without affecting MV attachment to cells, suggesting a role for CD98 in the postbinding step of virus entry. Further characterization with inhibitors and dominant negative proteins that block different endocytic pathways revealed that vaccinia MV entry into MEFs occurs through a clathrin-independent, caveolin-independent, dynamin-dependent, fluid-phase endocytic pathway, implying that CD98 plays a specific role in the vaccinia MV endocytic pathway. Infections of wild-type and CD98 KO MEF cells with different strains of vaccinia MV provided further evidence that CD98 plays a specific role in MV endocytosis but not in plasma membrane fusion. Finally, different CD98-C69 chimeric proteins were expressed in CD98 KO MEFs, but none were able to reconstitute MV infectivity, suggesting that the overall structure of the CD98 protein is required for vaccinia MV endocytosis. PMID:22345471

  9. A quantitative proteomic analysis of growth factor-induced compositional changes in lipid rafts of human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    MacLellan, Dawn L; Steen, Hanno; Adam, Rosalyn M; Garlick, Monica; Zurakowski, David; Gygi, Steven P; Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2005-12-01

    Signals that promote proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells (SMC) have been implicated in pathologic growth of hollow organs. Members of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) family, potent mitogens and motility factors for SMC, have been shown to signal through cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts. We recently demonstrated that PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis in urinary tract SMC was dependent on the integrity of lipid rafts. Despite its known ability to rapidly alter discrete proteins within rafts, the effect of PDGF on overall raft protein composition is unknown. In this study, we employed isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) analysis to evaluate PDGF-induced protein changes in lipid rafts of primary culture human SMC. Following acute (i.e., 15 min) exposure of SMC to PDGF, 23 proteins increased in rafts >20%. In contrast, raft localization of only three proteins increased after 12 h of PDGF treatment. Among the proteins that increased at 15 min were the glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins Thy-1, 5'-nucleotidase, and CD55, the cytoskeletal proteins actin, actinin, tropomyosin-3 and -4, and the endocytosis-related proteins clathrin and beta-adaptin. In addition, eight Rho family members were localized to rafts by ICAT analysis. Collectively, these observations suggest a role for lipid rafts in regulation of PDGF-stimulated changes in the cytoskeleton.

  10. Probing Lipid Membrane Rafts (Microdomains) with Fluorescent Phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Mitchel, Drake

    2011-10-01

    Membrane rafts are enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, they exist in a more ordered state (the liquid-ordered phase; lo) than the bulk membrane (the liquid-disordered phase; ld). Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form membrane rafts over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes, NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions into the lo phase, and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions into the ld phase, to detect these two phases. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the size and stability of POPC/SPM/Chol membrane rafts. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of two fluorescent probes. Data were acquired via frequency-domain measurements from 5 to 250 MHz.

  11. Ethanol alters cellular activation and CD14 partitioning in lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Qun; Zhang Jun; Pruett, Stephen B. . E-mail: spruet@lsuhsc.edu

    2005-06-24

    Alcohol consumption interferes with innate immunity. In vivo EtOH administration suppresses cytokine responses induced through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and inhibits TLR4 signaling. Actually, EtOH exhibits a generalized suppressive effect on signaling and cytokine responses induced by through most TLRs. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. RAW264.7 cells were treated with LPS or co-treated with EtOH or with lipid raft-disrupting drugs. TNF-{alpha} production, IRAK-1 activation, and CD14 partition were evaluated. EtOH or nystatin, a lipid raft-disrupting drug, suppressed LPS-induced production of TNF-{alpha}. The suppressive effect of EtOH on LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} production was additive with that of methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (MCD), another lipid raft-disrupting drug. EtOH interfered with IRAK-1 activation, an early TLR4 intracellular signaling event. Cell fractionation analyses show that acute EtOH altered LPS-related partition of CD14, a critical component of the LPS receptor complex. These results suggest a novel mechanism of EtOH action that involves interference with lipid raft clustering induced by LPS. This membrane action of EtOH might be one of the mechanisms by which EtOH acts as a generalized suppressor for TLR signaling.

  12. BK Channels Are Linked to Inositol 1,4,5-Triphosphate Receptors via Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Amy K.; Olsen, Michelle L.; McFerrin, Michael B.; Sontheimer, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Glioma cells prominently express a unique splice variant of a large conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel (BK channel). These channels transduce changes in intracellular calcium to changes of K+ conductance in the cells and have been implicated in growth control of normal and malignant cells. The Ca2+ increase that facilitates channel activation is thought to occur via activation of intracellular calcium release pathways or influx of calcium through Ca2+-permeable ion channels. We show here that BK channel activation involves the activation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3R), which localize near BK channels in specialized membrane domains called lipid rafts. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-β-cyclodextrin disrupts the functional association of BK channel and calcium source resulting in a >50% reduction in K+ conductance mediated by BK channels. The reduction of BK current by lipid raft disruption was overcome by the global elevation of intracellular calcium through inclusion of 750 nm Ca2+ in the pipette solution, indicating that neither the calcium sensitivity of the channel nor their overall number was altered. Additionally, pretreatment of glioma cells with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate to inhibit IP3Rs negated the effect of methyl-β-cyclodextrin, providing further support that IP3Rs are the calcium source for BK channels. Taken together, these data suggest a privileged association of BK channels in lipid raft domains and provide evidence for a novel coupling of these Ca2+-sensitive channels to their second messenger source. PMID:17711864

  13. Lipid raft organization and function in the small intestinal brush border.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, E M; Hansen, G H

    2008-12-01

    The enterocyte brush border of the small intestine is a highly specialized membrane designed to function both as a high capacity digestive/absorptive surface of dietary nutrients and a permeability barrier towards lumenal pathogens. It is characterized by an unusually high content of glycolipids (approximately 30% of the total microvillar membrane lipid), enabling the formation of liquid ordered microdomains, better known as lipid rafts. The glycolipid rafts are stabilized by galectin-4, a 36 kDa divalent lectin that cross-links galactosyl (and other carbohydrate) residues present on membrane lipids and several brush border proteins, including some of the major hydrolases. These supramolecular complexes are further stabilized by intelectin, a 35 kDa trimeric lectin that also functions as an intestinal lactoferrin receptor. As a result, brush border hydrolases, otherwise sensitive to pancreatic proteinases, are protected from untimely release into the gut lumen. Finally, anti-glycosyl antibodies, synthesized by plasma cells locally in the gut, are deposited on the brush border glycolipid rafts, protecting the epithelium from lumenal pathogens that exploit lipid rafts as portals for entry to the organism.

  14. Differential requirement of lipid rafts for FcγRIIA mediated effector activities

    PubMed Central

    Vieth, Joshua A.; Kim, Moo-kyung; Pan, Xiao Qing; Schreiber, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) dependent activities are important in host defense and autoimmune diseases. Various cell types including macrophages and neutrophils contribute to pathogen destruction and tissue damage through binding of IgG to Fcγ receptors (FcγR). One member of this family, FcγRIIA, is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to mediate binding and internalization of IgG-containing targets. FcγRIIA has been observed to translocate into lipids rafts upon binding IgG-containing targets. We hypothesize that lipid rafts participate to different extents in binding and internalizing targets of different sizes. We demonstrate that disruption of lipid rafts with 8mM methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) nearly abolishes binding (91% reduction) and phagocytosis (60% reduction) of large IgG-coated targets. Conversely, binding and internalization of small IgG-complexes is less dependent on lipid rafts (49% and 17% inhibition at 8mM MβCD respectively). These observations suggest that differences between phagocytosis and endocytosis may arise as early as the initial stages of ligand recognition. PMID:20728077

  15. Juvenile-onset loss of lipid-raft domains in attractin-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Azouz, Abdallah; Gunn, Teresa M.; Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S. . E-mail: Jonathan_Duke-Cohan@dfci.harvard.edu

    2007-02-15

    Mutations at the attractin (Atrn) locus in mice result in altered pigmentation on an agouti background, higher basal metabolic rate and juvenile-onset hypomyelination leading to neurodegeneration, while studies on human immune cells indicate a chemotaxis regulatory function. The underlying biochemical defect remains elusive. In this report we identify a role for attractin in plasma membrane maintenance. In attractin's absence there is a decline in plasma membrane glycolipid-enriched rafts from normal levels at 8 weeks to a complete absence by 24 weeks. The structural integrity of lipid rafts depends upon cholesterol and sphingomyelin, and can be identified by partitioning within of ganglioside GM{sub 1}. Despite a significant fall in cellular cholesterol with maturity, and a lesser fall in both membrane and total cellular GM{sub 1}, these parameters lag behind raft loss, and are normal when hypomyelination/neurodegeneration has already begun thus supporting consequence rather than cause. These findings can be recapitulated in Atrn-deficient cell lines propagated in vitro. Further, signal transduction through complex membrane receptor assemblies is not grossly disturbed despite the complete absence of lipid rafts. We find these results compatible with a role for attractin in plasma membrane maintenance and consistent with the proposal that the juvenile-onset hypomyelination and neurodegeneration represent a defect in attractin-mediated raft-dependent myelin biogenesis.

  16. Formation and aggregation of lipid rafts in γδ T cells following stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

    PubMed

    Lü, He-Zuo; Zhu, An-You; Chen, Yong; Tang, Jie; Li, Bai-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are plasma membrane microdomains that are implicated in diverse signaling pathways in immune cells. Based on the distinct types of T-cell receptors, two T-cell subpopulations have been identified: αβ and γδ T cells. In humans, γδ T cells represent a relatively rare T lymphocyte population but play a critical role in the immune response to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It has been demonstrated that Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens (Mtb-Ag) preferentially activate γδ T cells. Thus, we investigated whether lipid rafts are involved in the Mtb-Ag-mediated activation of γδ T cells. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with Mtb-Ag, and expression of a lipid raft marker ganglioside GM1 (GM1) was determined by flow cytometry. The aggregation of lipid rafts was evaluated by laser confocal microscopy. Non-stimulated fresh PBMCs minimally expressed GM1 (6.55 ± 2.01%) and had no aggregated rafts in γδ T cells. Mtb-Ag stimulation gradually increased the expression of GM1 in a time-dependent manner. At 72 h, the majority of γδ T cells expressed GM1 (88.69 ± 7.55%). Furthermore, accompanied with the increased expression of GM1, aggregation of lipid rafts became gradually visible in γδ T cells. The aggregated rafts, however, were not evenly distributed and only occurred over a small portion of GM1-positive cells. Pretreatment with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, a cholesterol-depleting reagent, completely inhibited the Mtb-Ag-mediated aggregation of lipid rafts. These results demonstrate that lipid raft aggregation occurs in Mtb-Ag-activated γδ T cells, suggesting that lipid rafts are involved in activation of γδ T cells.

  17. Hepatitis C Virus Induces the Localization of Lipid Rafts to Autophagosomes for Its RNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ja Yeon; Wang, Linya; Lee, Jiyoung; Ou, Jing-Hsiung James

    2017-10-15

    Autophagy plays important roles in maintaining cellular homeostasis. It uses double- or multiple-membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes to remove protein aggregates and damaged organelles from the cytoplasm for recycling. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been shown to induce autophagy to enhance its own replication. Here we describe a procedure that combines membrane flotation and affinity chromatography for the purification of autophagosomes from cells that harbor an HCV subgenomic RNA replicon. The purified autophagosomes had double- or multiple-membrane structures with a diameter ranging from 200 nm to 600 nm. The analysis of proteins associated with HCV-induced autophagosomes by proteomics led to the identification of HCV nonstructural proteins as well as proteins involved in membrane trafficking. Notably, caveolin-1, caveolin-2, and annexin A2, which are proteins associated with lipid rafts, were also identified. The association of lipid rafts with HCV-induced autophagosomes was confirmed by Western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy. Their association with autophagosomes was also confirmed in HCV-infected cells. The association of lipid rafts with autophagosomes was specific to HCV, as it was not detected in autophagosomes induced by nutrient starvation. Further analysis indicated that the autophagosomes purified from HCV replicon cells could mediate HCV RNA replication in a lipid raft-dependent manner, as the depletion of cholesterol, a major component of lipid rafts, from autophagosomes abolished HCV RNA replication. Our studies thus demonstrated that HCV could specifically induce the association of lipid rafts with autophagosomes for its RNA replication.IMPORTANCE HCV can cause severe liver diseases, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and is one of the most important human pathogens. Infection with HCV can lead to the reorganization of membrane structures in its host cells, including the induction of

  18. Kinetic disruption of lipid rafts is a mechanosensor for phospholipase D

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, E. Nicholas; Chung, Hae-Won; Nayebosadri, Arman; Hansen, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    The sensing of physical force, mechanosensation, underlies two of five human senses—touch and hearing. How transduction of force in a membrane occurs remains unclear. We asked if a biological membrane could employ kinetic energy to transduce a signal absent tension. Here we show that lipid rafts are dynamic compartments that inactivate the signalling enzyme phospholipase D2 (PLD2) by sequestering the enzyme from its substrate. Mechanical disruption of the lipid rafts activates PLD2 by mixing the enzyme with its substrate to produce the signalling lipid phosphatidic acid (PA). We calculate a latency time of <650 μs for PLD activation by mixing. Our results establish a fast, non-tension mechanism for mechanotransduction where disruption of ordered lipids initiates a mechanosensitive signal for cell growth through mechanical mixing. PMID:27976674

  19. Microtubules and actin microfilaments regulate lipid raft/caveolae localization of adenylyl cyclase signaling components.

    PubMed

    Head, Brian P; Patel, Hemal H; Roth, David M; Murray, Fiona; Swaney, James S; Niesman, Ingrid R; Farquhar, Marilyn G; Insel, Paul A

    2006-09-08

    Microtubules and actin filaments regulate plasma membrane topography, but their role in compartmentation of caveolae-resident signaling components, in particular G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and their stimulation of cAMP production, has not been defined. We hypothesized that the microtubular and actin cytoskeletons influence the expression and function of lipid rafts/caveolae, thereby regulating the distribution of GPCR signaling components that promote cAMP formation. Depolymerization of microtubules with colchicine (Colch) or actin microfilaments with cytochalasin D (CD) dramatically reduced the amount of caveolin-3 in buoyant (sucrose density) fractions of adult rat cardiac myocytes. Colch or CD treatment led to the exclusion of caveolin-1, caveolin-2, beta1-adrenergic receptors (beta1-AR), beta2-AR, Galpha(s), and adenylyl cyclase (AC)5/6 from buoyant fractions, decreasing AC5/6 and tyrosine-phosphorylated caveolin-1 in caveolin-1 immunoprecipitates but in parallel increased isoproterenol (beta-AR agonist)-stimulated cAMP production. Incubation with Colch decreased co-localization (by immunofluorescence microscopy) of caveolin-3 and alpha-tubulin; both Colch and CD decreased co-localization of caveolin-3 and filamin (an F-actin cross-linking protein), decreased phosphorylation of caveolin-1, Src, and p38 MAPK, and reduced the number of caveolae/mum of sarcolemma (determined by electron microscopy). Treatment of S49 T-lymphoma cells (which possess lipid rafts but lack caveolae) with CD or Colch redistributed a lipid raft marker (linker for activation of T cells (LAT)) and Galpha(s) from lipid raft domains. We conclude that microtubules and actin filaments restrict cAMP formation by regulating the localization and interaction of GPCR-G(s)-AC in lipid rafts/caveolae.

  20. The synaptic recruitment of lipid rafts is dependent on CD19-PI3K module and cytoskeleton remodeling molecules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liling; Auzins, Arturs; Sun, Xiaolin; Xu, Yinsheng; Harnischfeger, Fiona; Lu, Yun; Li, Zhanguo; Chen, Ying-Hua; Zheng, Wenjie; Liu, Wanli

    2015-08-01

    Sphingolipid- and cholesterol-rich lipid raft microdomains are important in the initiation of BCR signaling. Although it is known that lipid rafts promote the coclustering of BCR and Lyn kinase microclusters within the B cell IS, the molecular mechanism of the recruitment of lipid rafts into the B cell IS is not understood completely. Here, we report that the synaptic recruitment of lipid rafts is dependent on the cytoskeleton-remodeling proteins, RhoA and Vav. Such an event is also efficiently regulated by motor proteins, myosin IIA and dynein. Further evidence suggests the synaptic recruitment of lipid rafts is, by principle, an event triggered by BCR signaling molecules and second messenger molecules. BCR-activating coreceptor CD19 potently enhances such an event depending on its cytoplasmic Tyr421 and Tyr482 residues. The enhancing function of the CD19-PI3K module in synaptic recruitment of lipid rafts is also confirmed in human peripheral blood B cells. Thus, these results improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of the recruitment of lipid raft microdomains in B cell IS.

  1. Evidence for the presence of functional lipid rafts in immune cells of ectothermic organisms.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, Erick; Grayfer, Leon; Stafford, James L; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2012-06-01

    The role of lipid rafts in non-mammalian leukocytes has been scarcely investigated. We performed biochemical and functional analysis of lipid rafts in fish leukocytes. Fish Flotillin-1 and a fish GM1-like molecule (fGM1-L) were found in low density detergent-resistant membranes (LD-DRM) in goldfish macrophages and catfish B lymphocytes, similarly to mammals. The presence of flotillin-1 and fGM1-L in LD-DRM was sensitive to increased detergent concentrations, and cholesterol extraction. Confocal microscopy analysis of flotillin-1 and fGM1-L in fish leukocytes showed a distinctive punctuated staining pattern, suggestive of pre-existing rafts. Confocal microscopy analysis of macrophages showed that the membrane of phagosomes containing serum-opsonized zymosan was enriched in fGM1-L, and zymosan phagocytosis was reduced after cholesterol extraction. The presence of flotillin-1 and fGM1-L in LD-DRM, the microscopic evidence of flotillin-1 and fGM1-L on fish macrophages and B-cells, and the sensitivity of phagocytosis to cholesterol extraction, indicate that lipid rafts are biochemically and functionally similar in leukocytes from fish and mammals.

  2. Transport mechanisms in Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes: lipid rafts and a tubovesicular network.

    PubMed

    Haldar, K; Samuel, B U; Mohandas, N; Harrison, T; Hiller, N L

    2001-10-01

    The mature human erythrocyte is a simple cell that is devoid of intracellular organelles and does not show endocytic or phagocytic activity at the plasma membrane. However, following infection by Plasmodium, the erythrocyte undergoes several morphological and functional changes. Parasite-derived proteins are exported into the erythrocyte cytoplasm and to the membrane, while several proteins are localised to the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane and to the tubovesicular membranous network structures surrounding the parasite. Recent evidence indicates that multiple host proteins, independent of the type of their membrane anchor, that exist in detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) rafts or microdomains enter this apicomplexan vacuole. The internalised host components along with the parasite-encoded transmembrane protein PfEXP1 can be detected as DRM rafts in the vacuole. It appears that in Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes lipid rafts may play a role in endovacuolation and macromolecular transport.

  3. Drug uptake, lipid rafts, and vesicle trafficking modulate resistance to an anticancer lysophosphatidylcholine analogue in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Marbán, Álvaro; Botet, Javier; Czyz, Ola; Cacharro, Luis M; Gajate, Consuelo; Hornillos, Valentín; Delgado, Javier; Zhang, Hui; Amat-Guerri, Francisco; Acuña, A Ulises; McMaster, Christopher R; Revuelta, José Luis; Zaremberg, Vanina; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2013-03-22

    The ether-phospholipid edelfosine, a prototype antitumor lipid (ATL), kills yeast cells and selectively kills several cancer cell types. To gain insight into its mechanism of action, we performed chemogenomic screens in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene-deletion strain collection, identifying edelfosine-resistant mutants. LEM3, AGP2, and DOC1 genes were required for drug uptake. Edelfosine displaced the essential proton pump Pma1p from rafts, inducing its internalization into the vacuole. Additional ATLs, including miltefosine and perifosine, also displaced Pma1p from rafts to the vacuole, suggesting that this process is a major hallmark of ATL cytotoxicity in yeast. Radioactive and synthetic fluorescent edelfosine analogues accumulated in yeast plasma membrane rafts and subsequently the endoplasmic reticulum. Although both edelfosine and Pma1p were initially located at membrane rafts, internalization of the drug toward endoplasmic reticulum and Pma1p to the vacuole followed different routes. Drug internalization was not dependent on endocytosis and was not critical for yeast cytotoxicity. However, mutants affecting endocytosis, vesicle sorting, or trafficking to the vacuole, including the retromer and ESCRT complexes, prevented Pma1p internalization and were edelfosine-resistant. Our data suggest that edelfosine-induced cytotoxicity involves raft reorganization and retromer- and ESCRT-mediated vesicular transport and degradation of essential raft proteins leading to cell death. Cytotoxicity of ATLs is mainly dependent on the changes they induce in plasma membrane raft-located proteins that lead to their internalization and subsequent degradation. Edelfosine toxicity can be circumvented by inactivating genes that then result in the recycling of internalized cell-surface proteins back to the plasma membrane.

  4. Cholesterol accumulation in Niemann Pick type C (NPC) model cells causes a shift in APP localization to lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Kosicek, Marko; Malnar, Martina; Goate, Alison; Hecimovic, Silva

    2010-03-12

    It has been suggested that cholesterol may modulate amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) formation, a causative factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), by regulating distribution of the three key proteins in the pathogenesis of AD ({beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP), {beta}-secretase (BACE1) and/or presenilin 1 (PS1)) within lipid rafts. In this work we tested whether cholesterol accumulation upon NPC1 dysfunction, which causes Niemann Pick type C disease (NPC), causes increased partitioning of APP into lipid rafts leading to increased CTF/A{beta} formation in these cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. To test this we used CHO NPC1{sup -/-} cells (NPC cells) and parental CHOwt cells. By sucrose density gradient centrifugation we observed a shift in fl-APP/CTF compartmentalization into lipid raft fractions upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC vs. wt cells. Furthermore, {gamma}-secretase inhibitor treatment significantly increased fl-APP/CTF distribution in raft fractions in NPC vs. wt cells, suggesting that upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC1-null cells increased formation of APP-CTF and its increased processing towards A{beta} occurs in lipid rafts. Our results support that cholesterol overload, such as in NPC disease, leads to increased partitioning of APP/CTF into lipid rafts resulting in increased amyloidogenic processing of APP in these cholesterol-rich membranes. This work adds to the mechanism of the cholesterol-effect on APP processing and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and supports the role of lipid rafts in these processes.

  5. Rafts can trigger contact-mediated secretion of bacterial effectors via a lipid-based mechanism.

    PubMed

    van der Goot, Françoise G; Tran van Nhieu, Guy; Allaoui, Abdelmounaaïm; Sansonetti, Phillipe; Lafont, Frank

    2004-11-12

    Infection by the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Shigella flexneri depends on its ability to invade host cells. Bacterial engulfment requires a functional type III secretion system (TTSS) allowing the translocation into host cells of bacterial effectors that activate cell-signaling cascades. We demonstrated previously that specialized lipid membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids (rafts) are involved during early steps of invasion, namely in binding and host cell entry. In this study, we addressed the issue of contact-mediated secretion by the TTSS. We show that contact-mediated and TTSS-induced hemolysis depend on the presence of cholesterol on the host cell surface. We found that purified detergent resistant membranes were able to activate TTSS. Finally, we found that artificial liposomes, devoid of proteins, were able to activate the TTSS but only when their composition mimicked that of lipid rafts. Altogether, these data indicate that specific lipid packing can trigger contact-mediated secretion by S. flexneri.

  6. Hypoxia Reduces the Efficiency of Elisidepsin by Inhibiting Hydroxylation and Altering the Structure of Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Király, Anna; Váradi, Tímea; Hajdu, Tímea; Rühl, Ralph; Galmarini, Carlos M.; Szöllősi, János; Nagy, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of action of elisidepsin (PM02734, Irvalec®) is assumed to involve membrane permeabilization via attacking lipid rafts and hydroxylated lipids. Here we investigate the role of hypoxia in the mechanism of action of elisidepsin. Culturing under hypoxic conditions increased the half-maximal inhibitory concentration and decreased the drug’s binding to almost all cell lines which was reversed by incubation of cells with 2-hydroxy palmitic acid. The expression of fatty acid 2-hydroxylase was strongly correlated with the efficiency of the drug and inversely correlated with the effect of hypoxia. Number and brightness analysis and fluorescence anisotropy experiments showed that hypoxia decreased the clustering of lipid rafts and altered the structure of the plasma membrane. Although the binding of elisidepsin to the membrane is non-cooperative, its membrane permeabilizing effect is characterized by a Hill coefficient of ~3.3. The latter finding is in agreement with elisidepsin-induced clusters of lipid raft-anchored GFP visualized by confocal microscopy. We propose that the concentration of elisidepsin needs to reach a critical level in the membrane above which elisidepsin induces the disruption of the cell membrane. Testing for tumor hypoxia or the density of hydroxylated lipids could be an interesting strategy to increase the efficiency of elisidepsin. PMID:24317474

  7. Hypoxia reduces the efficiency of elisidepsin by inhibiting hydroxylation and altering the structure of lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Király, Anna; Váradi, Tímea; Hajdu, Tímea; Rühl, Ralph; Galmarini, Carlos M; Szöllősi, János; Nagy, Peter

    2013-12-02

    The mechanism of action of elisidepsin (PM02734, Irvalec®) is assumed to involve membrane permeabilization via attacking lipid rafts and hydroxylated lipids. Here we investigate the role of hypoxia in the mechanism of action of elisidepsin. Culturing under hypoxic conditions increased the half-maximal inhibitory concentration and decreased the drug's binding to almost all cell lines which was reversed by incubation of cells with 2-hydroxy palmitic acid. The expression of fatty acid 2-hydroxylase was strongly correlated with the efficiency of the drug and inversely correlated with the effect of hypoxia. Number and brightness analysis and fluorescence anisotropy experiments showed that hypoxia decreased the clustering of lipid rafts and altered the structure of the plasma membrane. Although the binding of elisidepsin to the membrane is non-cooperative, its membrane permeabilizing effect is characterized by a Hill coefficient of ~3.3. The latter finding is in agreement with elisidepsin-induced clusters of lipid raft-anchored GFP visualized by confocal microscopy. We propose that the concentration of elisidepsin needs to reach a critical level in the membrane above which elisidepsin induces the disruption of the cell membrane. Testing for tumor hypoxia or the density of hydroxylated lipids could be an interesting strategy to increase the efficiency of elisidepsin.

  8. Structures and dynamics of glycosphingolipid-containing lipid mixtures as raft models of plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, M.; Koizumi, M.; Hirai, H.; Hayakawa, T.; Yuyama, K.; Suzuki, N.; Kasahara, K.

    2005-08-01

    The structure and function of mammalian plasma membrane microdomains, so-called rafts, are among the hot topics in cell biology, since it is suggested that these domains are involved in important membrane-associated events, especially ones such as signal transduction, which were frequently seen in physiological and immunological studies. In spite of the accumulation of large amounts of evidence, results on physical properties of the structure and dynamics of membranes such as those in intact cells are less abundant. In this report we treat the structure and dynamics of glycosphingolipid (ganglioside)-cholesterol and glycosphingolipid (ganglioside)-cholesterol-phospholipid mixtures used as models of rafts and plasma membranes. The present results clearly show that the incorporation of cholesterol with ganglioside aggregates is limited to a maximum miscibility of the molar ratio between the ganglioside and cholesterol ranging from ~1/1 to 1/3 and that small vesicles with diameters of about 250-300 Å form. These molar ratios and sizes agree well with the reported constituent ratio and minimum size for the rafts. In the vesicle systems containing ganglioside, cholesterol, and phospholipid (PC, DSPC, DOPC, POPC), the bending modulus tends to take the smallest value at the molar ratio of [gang]/[chol]/[phospholipid] = 0.1/0.1/1. The present results would strongly support a functional physical property of the raft model: sphingolipids and cholesterol clustering to form rafts that move within the fluid lipid bilayer.

  9. Role of the lipid rafts in the life cycle of canine coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Annamaria; Colao, Valeriana

    2015-02-01

    Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that have evolved complex relationships with their host cells, and modulate their lipid composition, lipid synthesis and signalling. Lipid rafts, enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol and associated proteins, are special plasma membrane microdomains involved in several processes in viral infections. The extraction of cholesterol leads to disorganization of lipid microdomains and to dissociation of proteins bound to lipid rafts. Because cholesterol-rich microdomains appear to be a general feature of the entry mechanism of non-eneveloped viruses and of several coronaviruses, the purpose of this study was to analyse the contribution of lipids to the infectivity of canine coronavirus (CCoV). The CCoV life cycle is closely connected to plasma membrane cholesterol, from cell entry to viral particle production. The methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) was employed to remove cholesterol and to disrupt the lipid rafts. Cholesterol depletion from the cell membrane resulted in a dose-dependent reduction, but not abolishment, of virus infectivity, and at a concentration of 15 mM, the reduction in the infection rate was about 68 %. MβCD treatment was used to verify if cholesterol in the envelope was required for CCoV infection. This resulted in a dose-dependent inhibitory effect, and at a concentration of 9 mM MβCD, infectivity was reduced by about 73 %. Since viral entry would constitute a target for antiviral strategies, inhibitory molecules interacting with viral and/or cell membranes, or interfering with lipid metabolism, may have strong antiviral potential. It will be interesting in the future to analyse the membrane microdomains in the CCoV envelope.

  10. GM1 improves neurofascin155 association with lipid rafts and prevents rat brain myelin injury after hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y P; Huang, Q L; Zhao, C M; Tang, J L; Wang, Y L

    2011-06-01

    White matter injury characterized by damage to myelin is an important process in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). Because the oligodendrocyte-specific isoform of neurofascin, neurofascin 155 (NF155), and its association with lipid rafts are essential for the establishment and stabilization of the paranodal junction, which is required for tight interaction between myelin and axons, we analyzed the effect of monosialotetrahexosyl ganglioside (GM1) on NF155 expression and its association with lipid rafts after HIBD in Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 12-15 g, on day 7 post-partum (P7; N = 20 per group). HIBD was induced on P7 and the rats were divided into two groups: one group received an intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg GM1 three times and the other group an injection of saline. There was also a group of 20 sham-operated rats. After sacrifice, the brains of the rats were removed on P30 and studied by immunochemistry, SDS-PAGE, Western blot analysis, and electron microscopy. Staining showed that the saline group had definite rarefaction and fragmentation of brain myelin sheaths, whereas the GM1 group had no obvious structural changes. The GM1 group had 1.9-2.9-fold more GM1 in lipid rafts than the saline group (fraction 3-6; all P < 0.05) and 0.5-2.4-fold higher expression of NF155 in lipid rafts (fraction 3-5; all P < 0.05). Injection of GM1 increased the content of GM1 in lipid rafts as well as NF155 expression and its lipid raft association in HIBD rat brains. GM1 may repair the structure of lipid rafts, promote the association of NF155 (or other important proteins) with lipid rafts, stabilize the structure of paranodes, and eventually prevent myelin sheath damage, suggesting a novel mechanism for its neuroprotective properties.

  11. Disruption of Lipid Rafts Interferes with the Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Karla Dias; Cruz, Thayana Araújo; Veras de Moraes, Gabriela; Paredes-Santos, Tatiana Christina; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii can penetrate any warm-blooded animal cell. Conserved molecular assemblies of host cell plasma membranes should be involved in the parasite-host cell recognition. Lipid rafts are well-conserved membrane microdomains that contain high concentrations of cholesterol, sphingolipids, glycosylphosphatidylinositol, GPI-anchored proteins, and dually acylated proteins such as members of the Src family of tyrosine kinases. Disturbing lipid rafts of mouse peritoneal macrophages and epithelial cells of the lineage LLC-MK2 with methyl-beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) and filipin, which interfere with cholesterol or lidocaine, significantly inhibited internalization of T. gondii in both cell types, although adhesion remained unaffected in macrophages and decreased only in LLC-MK2 cells. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed these observations. Results are discussed in terms of the original role of macrophages as professional phagocytes versus the LLC-MK2 cell lineage originated from kidney epithelial cells. PMID:24734239

  12. Complex and Multidimensional Lipid Raft Alterations in a Murine Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Wayne; Brenneman, Randall; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Various animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been created to assist our appreciation of AD pathophysiology, as well as aid development of novel therapeutic strategies. Despite the discovery of mutated proteins that predict the development of AD, there are likely to be many other proteins also involved in this disorder. Complex physiological processes are mediated by coherent interactions of clusters of functionally related proteins. Synaptic dysfunction is one of the hallmarks of AD. Synaptic proteins are organized into multiprotein complexes in high-density membrane structures, known as lipid rafts. These microdomains enable coherent clustering of synergistic signaling proteins. We have used mass analytical techniques and multiple bioinformatic approaches to better appreciate the intricate interactions of these multifunctional proteins in the 3xTgAD murine model of AD. Our results show that there are significant alterations in numerous receptor/cell signaling proteins in cortical lipid rafts isolated from 3xTgAD mice. PMID:21151659

  13. Compartmentalization of endocannabinoids into lipid rafts in a microglial cell line devoid of caveorrlin-1

    PubMed Central

    Rimmerman, Neta; Bradshaw, Heather B; Kozela, Ewa; Levy, Rivka; Juknat, Ana; Vogel, Zvi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE N-acyl ethanolamines (NAEs) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) are endogenous cannabinoids and along with related lipids are synthesized on demand from membrane phospholipids. Here, we have studied the compartmentalization of NAEs and 2-AG into lipid raft fractions isolated from the caveolin-1-lacking microglial cell line BV-2, following vehicle or cannabidiol (CBD) treatment. Results were compared with those from the caveolin-1-positive F-11 cell line. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH BV-2 cells were incubated with CBD or vehicle. Cells were fractionated using a detergent-free continuous OptiPrep density gradient. Lipids in fractions were quantified using HPLC/MS/MS. Proteins were measured using Western blot. KEY RESULTS BV-2 cells were devoid of caveolin-1. Lipid rafts were isolated from BV-2 cells as confirmed by co-localization with flotillin-1 and sphingomyelin. Small amounts of cannabinoid CB1 receptors were found in lipid raft fractions. After incubation with CBD, levels and distribution in lipid rafts of 2-AG, N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (AEA), and N-oleoyl ethanolamine (OEA) were not changed. Conversely, the levels of the saturated N-stearoyl ethanolamine (SEA) and N-palmitoyl ethanolamine (PEA) were elevated in lipid raft fractions. In whole cells with growth medium, CBD treatment increased AEA and OEA time-dependently, while levels of 2-AG, PEA and SEA did not change. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Whereas levels of 2-AG were not affected by CBD treatment, the distribution and levels of NAEs showed significant changes. Among the NAEs, the degree of acyl chain saturation predicted the compartmentalization after CBD treatment suggesting a shift in cell signalling activity. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-8. To view Part I of Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine visit http://dx.doi.org/10

  14. Controlling Styrene Maleic acid lipid particles through RAFT.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anton A A; Autzen, Henriette Elisabeth; Laursen, Tomas; Wu, Vincent; Yen, Max; Hall, Aaron; Hansen, Scott D; Cheng, Yifan; Xu, Ting

    2017-09-21

    The ability of styrene maleic acid copolymers to dissolve lipid membranes into nanosized lipid particles is a facile method of obtaining membrane proteins in solubilized lipid discs while conserving part of its native lipid environment. While the currently used copolymers can readily extract membrane proteins in native nanodiscs, their highly disperse composition is likely to influence the dispersity of the discs as well as the extraction efficiency. In this study, reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer was used to control the polymer architecture and dispersity of molecular weights with a high-precision. Based on Monte Carlo simulations of the polymerizations, the monomer composition was predicted and allowed a structure-function analysis of the polymer architecture in relation to their ability to assemble into lipid nanoparticles. We show that a higher degree of control of the polymer architecture may lead to homogeneous samples. We hypothesize that low dispersity copolymers with control of polymer architecture are an ideal frame-work for the rational design of polymers for customized isolation and characterization of integral membrane proteins in native lipid bilayer systems.

  15. CD45 phosphatase is crucial for human and murine acute myeloid leukemia maintenance through its localization in lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Paul, Laetitia; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Buffière, Anne; de Barros, Jean-Paul Pais; Hammann, Arlette; Landras-Guetta, Corinne; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; Johnson, Pauline; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent; Quéré, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    CD45 is a pan-leukocyte protein with tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the regulation of signal transduction in hematopoiesis. Exploiting CD45 KO mice and lentiviral shRNA, we prove the crucial role that CD45 plays in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and maintenance. We discovered that CD45 does not colocalize with lipid rafts on murine and human non-transformed hematopoietic cells. Using a mouse model, we proved that CD45 positioning within lipid rafts is modified during their oncogenic transformation to AML. CD45 colocalized with lipid rafts on AML cells, which contributes to elevated GM-CSF signal intensity involved in proliferation of leukemic cells. We furthermore proved that the GM-CSF/Lyn/Stat3 pathway that contributes to growth of leukemic cells could be profoundly affected, by using a new plasma membrane disrupting agent, which rapidly delocalized CD45 away from lipid rafts. We provide evidence that this mechanism is also effective on human primary AML samples and xenograft transplantation. In conclusion, this study highlights the emerging evidence of the involvement of lipid rafts in oncogenic development of AML and the targeting of CD45 positioning among lipid rafts as a new strategy in the treatment of AML. PMID:27579617

  16. CD45 phosphatase is crucial for human and murine acute myeloid leukemia maintenance through its localization in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Saint-Paul, Laetitia; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Buffière, Anne; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Hammann, Arlette; Landras-Guetta, Corinne; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; Johnson, Pauline; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent; Quéré, Ronan

    2016-10-04

    CD45 is a pan-leukocyte protein with tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the regulation of signal transduction in hematopoiesis. Exploiting CD45 KO mice and lentiviral shRNA, we prove the crucial role that CD45 plays in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and maintenance. We discovered that CD45 does not colocalize with lipid rafts on murine and human non-transformed hematopoietic cells. Using a mouse model, we proved that CD45 positioning within lipid rafts is modified during their oncogenic transformation to AML. CD45 colocalized with lipid rafts on AML cells, which contributes to elevated GM-CSF signal intensity involved in proliferation of leukemic cells. We furthermore proved that the GM-CSF/Lyn/Stat3 pathway that contributes to growth of leukemic cells could be profoundly affected, by using a new plasma membrane disrupting agent, which rapidly delocalized CD45 away from lipid rafts. We provide evidence that this mechanism is also effective on human primary AML samples and xenograft transplantation. In conclusion, this study highlights the emerging evidence of the involvement of lipid rafts in oncogenic development of AML and the targeting of CD45 positioning among lipid rafts as a new strategy in the treatment of AML.

  17. HIV-1 Vpu's lipid raft association is dispensable for counteraction of the particle release restriction imposed by CD317/Tetherin

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Joeelle V. Tibroni, Nadine Keppler, Oliver T. Fackler, Oliver T.

    2012-03-01

    HIV-1 Vpu antagonizes the block to particle release mediated by CD317 (BST-2/HM1.24/Tetherin) via incompletely understood mechanisms. Vpu and CD317 partially reside in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts where HIV-1 budding preferentially occurs. Here we find that lipid raft association of ectopically expressed or endogenous CD317 was unaltered upon co-expression with Vpu or following HIV-1 infection. Similarly, Vpu's lipid raft association remained unchanged upon expression of CD317. We identify amino acids V25 and Y29 of Vpu as crucial for microdomain partitioning and single substitution of these amino acids resulted in Vpu variants with markedly reduced or undetectable lipid raft association. These mutations did not affect Vpu's subcellular distribution and binding capacity to CD317, nor its ability to downmodulate cell surface CD317 and promote HIV-1 release from CD317-positive cells. We conclude that (i) lipid raft incorporation is dispensable for Vpu-mediated CD317 antagonism and (ii) Vpu does not antagonize CD317 by extraction from lipid rafts.

  18. The stromal cell-surface protease fibroblast activation protein-α localizes to lipid rafts and is recruited to invadopodia.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Julia D; Tholen, Stefan; Koczorowska, Maria M; De Wever, Olivier; Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAPα) is a cell surface protease expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts in the microenvironment of most solid tumors. As there is increasing evidence for proteases having non-catalytic functions, we determined the FAPα interactome in cancer-associated fibroblasts using the quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown (QUICK) method. Complex formation with adenosin deaminase, erlin-2, stomatin, prohibitin, Thy-1 membrane glycoprotein, and caveolin-1 was further validated by immunoblotting. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of the known stoichiometric FAPα binding partner dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV) corroborated the proteomic strategy. Reverse co-IPs validated the FAPα interaction with caveolin-1, erlin-2, and stomatin while co-IP upon RNA-interference mediated knock-down of DPPIV excluded adenosin deaminase as a direct FAPα interaction partner. Many newly identified FAPα interaction partners localize to lipid rafts, including caveolin-1, a widely-used marker for lipid raft localization. We hypothesized that this indicates a recruitment of FAPα to lipid raft structures. In density gradient centrifugation, FAPα co-fractionates with caveolin-1. Immunofluorescence optical sectioning microscopy of FAPα and lipid raft markers further corroborates recruitment of FAPα to lipid rafts and invadopodia. FAPα is therefore an integral component of stromal lipid rafts in solid tumors. In essence, we provide one of the first interactome analyses of a cell surface protease and translate these results into novel biological aspects of a marker protein for cancer-associated fibroblasts.

  19. Alterations in cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Ke; Tan, Liang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Cao, Yun-Peng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the protein, cholesterol, and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), and identify potential blood biomarkers of the disease. A total of 31 Chinese patients with AD and 31 aged-matched control subjects were selected. Lipid rafts were isolated from platelets using Optiprep gradient centrifugation. The protein content of lipid rafts was evaluated using Micro BCA assay, the cholesterol content using molecular probes, ganglioside GM1 content using colorimetry and dot-blotting analysis. The results showed that the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from platelets was significantly higher in patients with AD than aged-matched control subjects, whereas the protein content of lipid rafts did not show any differences between the 2 groups. These results indicate that the increases in the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from the platelets of patients with AD might serve as a biochemical adjunct to the clinical diagnosis of AD.

  20. Lipid rafts mediate the interaction between myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) on myelin and MAG-receptors on neurons.

    PubMed

    Vinson, Mary; Rausch, Oliver; Maycox, Peter R; Prinjha, Rab K; Chapman, Debra; Morrow, Rachel; Harper, Alex J; Dingwall, Colin; Walsh, Frank S; Burbidge, Stephen A; Riddell, David R

    2003-03-01

    The interaction between myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), expressed at the periaxonal membrane of myelin, and receptors on neurons initiates a bidirectional signalling system that results in inhibition of neurite outgrowth and maintenance of myelin integrity. We show that this involves a lipid-raft to lipid-raft interaction on opposing cell membranes. MAG is exclusively located in low buoyancy Lubrol WX-insoluble membrane fractions isolated from whole brain, primary oligodendrocytes, or MAG-expressing CHO cells. Localisation within these domains is dependent on cellular cholesterol and occurs following terminal glycosylation in the trans-Golgi network, characteristics of association with lipid rafts. Furthermore, a recombinant form of MAG interacts specifically with lipid-raft fractions from whole brain and cultured cerebellar granule cells, containing functional MAG receptors GT1b and Nogo-66 receptor and molecules required for transduction of signal from MAG into neurons. The localisation of both MAG and MAG receptors within lipid rafts on the surface of opposing cells may create discrete areas of high avidity multivalent interaction, known to be critical for signalling into both cell types. Localisation within lipid rafts may provide a molecular environment that facilitates the interaction between MAG and multiple receptors and also between MAG ligands and molecules involved in signal transduction.

  1. Transmembrane Form Agrin-induced Process Formation Requires Lipid Rafts and the Activation of Fyn and MAPK*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ramseger, Rene; White, Robin; Kröger, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression or clustering of the transmembrane form of the extracellular matrix heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin (TM-agrin) induces the formation of highly dynamic filopodia-like processes on axons and dendrites from central and peripheral nervous system-derived neurons. Here we show that the formation of these processes is paralleled by a partitioning of TM-agrin into lipid rafts, that lipid rafts and transmembrane-agrin colocalize on the processes, that extraction of lipid rafts with methyl-β-cyclodextrin leads to a dose-dependent reduction of process formation, that inhibition of lipid raft synthesis prevents process formation, and that the continuous presence of lipid rafts is required for the maintenance of the processes. Association of TM-agrin with lipid rafts results in the phosphorylation and activation of the Src family kinase Fyn and subsequently in the phosphorylation and activation of MAPK. Inhibition of Fyn or MAPK activation inhibits process formation. These results demonstrate that the formation of filopodia-like processes by TM-agrin is the result of the activation of a complex intracellular signaling cascade, supporting the hypothesis that TM-agrin is a receptor or coreceptor on neurons. PMID:19139104

  2. Two-Phase Contiguous Supported Lipid Bilayer Model for Membrane Rafts via Polymer Blotting and Stenciling.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark J; Daniel, Susan

    2017-02-07

    The supported lipid bilayer has been portrayed as a useful model of the cell membrane compatible with many biophysical tools and techniques that demonstrate its appeal in learning about the basic features of the plasma membrane. However, some of its potential has yet to be realized, particularly in the area of bilayer patterning and phase/composition heterogeneity. In this work, we generate contiguous bilayer patterns as a model system that captures the general features of membrane domains and lipid rafts. Micropatterned polymer templates of two types are investigated for generating patterned bilayer formation: polymer blotting and polymer lift-off stenciling. While these approaches have been used previously to create bilayer arrays by corralling bilayers patches with various types of boundaries impenetrable to bilayer diffusion, unique to the methods presented here, there are no physical barriers to diffusion. In this work, interfaces between contiguous lipid phases define the pattern shapes, with continuity between them allowing transfer of membrane-bound biomolecules between the phases. We examine effectors of membrane domain stability including temperature and cholesterol content to investigate domain dynamics. Contiguous patterning of supported bilayers as a model of lipid rafts expands the application of the SLB to an area with current appeal and brings with it a useful toolset for characterization and analysis. These combined tools should be helpful to researchers investigating lipid raft dynamics and function and biomolecule partitioning studies. Additionally, this patterning technique may be useful for applications such as bioseparations that exploit differences in lipid phase partitioning or creation of membranes that bind species like viruses preferentially at lipid phase boundaries, to name a few.

  3. Lipid rafts are required for GLUT4 internalization in adipose cells

    PubMed Central

    Ros-Baró, Anna; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Peiró, Sandra; Bellido, David; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; Camps, Marta

    2001-01-01

    It has been recently reported that insulin recruits a novel signaling machinery to lipid rafts required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation [Baumann, A., Ribon, V., Kanzaki, M., Thurmond, D. C., Mora, S., Shigematsu, S., Bickel, P. E., Pessin, J. E. & Saltiel, A. R. (2001) Nature 407, 202–207, 2000; Chiang, S. H., Baumann, C. A., Kanzaki, M., Thurmond, D. C., Watson, R. T., Neudauer, C. L., Macara, I. G., Pessin, J. E. & Saltiel, A. R. (2001) Nature 410, 944–948]. We have assessed the role of lipid rafts on GLUT4 traffic in adipose cells. High GLUT4 levels were detected in caveolae from adipocytes by two approaches, the mechanical isolation of purified caveolae from plasma membrane lawns and the immunogold analysis of plasma membrane lawns followed by freeze-drying. The role of lipid rafts in GLUT4 trafficking was studied by adding nystatin or filipin at concentrations that specifically disrupt caveolae morphology and inhibit caveolae function without altering clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These caveolae inhibitors did not affect the insulin-stimulated glucose transport. However, they blocked both the GLUT4 internalization and the down-regulation of glucose transport triggered by insulin removal in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Our data indicate that lipid rafts are crucial for GLUT4 internalization after insulin removal. Given that high levels of GLUT4 were detected in caveolae from insulin-treated adipose cells, this transporter may be internalized from caveolae or caveolae may operate as an obligatory transition station before internalization. PMID:11593015

  4. Enhancement of Lytic Activity by Leptin Is Independent From Lipid Rafts in Murine Primary Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Collin, Aurore; Noacco, Audrey; Talvas, Jérémie; Caldefie-Chézet, Florence; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Farges, Marie-Chantal

    2017-01-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic adipokine, is known as a regulator of food intake, but it is also involved in inflammation, immunity, cell proliferation, and survival. Leptin receptor is integrated inside cholesterol-rich microdomains called lipid rafts, which, if disrupted or destroyed, could lead to a perturbation of lytic mechanism. Previous studies also reported that leptin could induce membrane remodeling. In this context, we studied the effect of membrane remodeling in lytic activity modulation induced by leptin. Thus, primary mouse splenocytes were incubated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (β-MCD), a lipid rafts disrupting agent, cholesterol, a major component of cell membranes, or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a membrane stabilizer agent for 1 h. These treatments were followed by splenocyte incubation with leptin (absence, 10 and 100 ng/ml). Unlike β-MCD or cholesterol, UDCA was able to block leptin lytic induction. This result suggests that leptin increased the lytic activity of primary spleen cells against syngenic EO771 mammary cancer cells independently from lipid rafts but may involve membrane fluidity. Furthermore, natural killer cells were shown to be involved in the splenocyte lytic activity. To our knowledge it is the first publication in primary culture that provides the link between leptin lytic modulation and membrane remodeling. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 101-109, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. HTLV-1 Tax deregulates autophagy by recruiting autophagic molecules into lipid raft microdomains.

    PubMed

    Ren, T; Takahashi, Y; Liu, X; Loughran, T P; Sun, S-C; Wang, H-G; Cheng, H

    2015-01-15

    The retroviral oncoprotein Tax from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological factor that causes adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma, has a crucial role in initiating T-lymphocyte transformation by inducing oncogenic signaling activation. We here report that Tax is a determining factor for dysregulation of autophagy in HTLV-1-transformed T cells and Tax-immortalized CD4 memory T cells. Tax facilitated autophagic process by activating inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase (IKK) complex, which subsequently recruited an autophagy molecular complex containing Beclin1 and Bif-1 to the lipid raft microdomains. Tax engaged a crosstalk between IKK complex and autophagic molecule complex by directly interacting with both complexes, promoting assembly of LC3+ autophagosomes. Moreover, expression of lipid raft-targeted Bif-1 or Beclin1 was sufficient to induce formation of LC3+ autophagosomes, suggesting that Tax recruitment of autophagic molecules to lipid rafts is a dominant strategy to deregulate autophagy in the context of HTLV-1 transformation of T cells. Furthermore, depletion of autophagy molecules such as Beclin1 and PI3 kinase class III resulted in impaired growth of HTLV-1-transformed T cells, indicating a critical role of Tax-deregulated autophagy in promoting survival and transformation of virally infected T cells.

  6. Alteration of endoplasmic reticulum lipid rafts contributes to lipotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Boslem, Ebru; Weir, Jacquelyn M; MacIntosh, Gemma; Sue, Nancy; Cantley, James; Meikle, Peter J; Biden, Trevor J

    2013-09-13

    Chronic saturated fatty acid exposure causes β-cell apoptosis and, thus, contributes to type 2 diabetes. Although endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and reduced ER-to-Golgi protein trafficking have been implicated, the exact mechanisms whereby saturated fatty acids trigger β-cell death remain elusive. Using mass spectroscopic lipidomics and subcellular fractionation, we demonstrate that palmitate pretreatment of MIN6 β-cells promoted ER remodeling of both phospholipids and sphingolipids, but only the latter was causally linked to lipotoxic ER stress. Thus, overexpression of glucosylceramide synthase, previously shown to protect against defective protein trafficking and ER stress, partially reversed lipotoxic reductions in ER sphingomyelin (SM) content and aggregation of ER lipid rafts, as visualized using Erlin1-GFP. Using both lipidomics and a sterol response element reporter assay, we confirmed that free cholesterol in the ER was also reciprocally modulated by chronic palmitate and glucosylceramide synthase overexpression. This is consistent with the known coregulation and association of SM and free cholesterol in lipid rafts. Inhibition of SM hydrolysis partially protected against ATF4/C/EBP homology protein induction because of palmitate. Our results suggest that loss of SM in the ER is a key event for initiating β-cell lipotoxicity, which leads to disruption of ER lipid rafts, perturbation of protein trafficking, and initiation of ER stress.

  7. Isolation of Lipid Rafts from Human Neutrophils by Density Gradient Centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Carl; Fülöp, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are present within minutes to the site of aggression in the body making them one of the first cells of the immune system to be in contact with incoming threats. The cell functions of neutrophils are elicited through the engagement of surface receptors, some of which are located in a specific region of the membrane called lipid rafts, a functionally segregated region of the membrane enriched with cholesterol and distinct species of sphingomyelin and glycerophospholipids. Lipid rafts are relatively resistant to detergent extraction and this can be taken advantage of to isolate them from the rest of the cell membrane. This chapter will describe a reliable method to obtain lipid rafts from detergent-resistant membrane fractions of human neutrophils. Cells are lysed in an HEPES solution containing 0.5% Triton X-100, supernatants are mixed with a 42% sucrose solution, which is then overlaid with a 35% and 5% sucrose solution. The gradient is centrifuged for 16 h and the resulting fractions can be further analyzed by immunoblotting or subjected to immunoprecipitation.

  8. HTLV-1 Tax deregulates autophagy by recruiting autophagic molecules into lipid raft microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tong; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Liu, Xin; Loughran, Thomas P.; Sun, Shao-Cong; Wang, Hong-Gang; Cheng, Hua

    2014-01-01

    The retroviral oncoprotein Tax from Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological factor that causes adult T cell leukemia and lymphoma, plays a crucial role in initiating T lymphocyte transformation by inducing oncogenic signaling activation. We here report that Tax is a determining factor for dysregulation of autophagy in HTLV-1-transformed T cells and Tax-immortalized CD4 memory T cells. Tax facilitated autophagic process by activating IκB kinase complex, which subsequently recruited an autophagy molecular complex containing Beclin1 and Bif-1 to the lipid raft microdomains. Tax engaged a crosstalk between IκB kinase complex and autophagic molecule complex by directly interacting with both complexes, promoting assembly of LC3+ autophagosomes. Moreover, expression of lipid raft-targeted Bif-1 or Beclin1 was sufficient to induce formation of LC3+ autophagosomes, suggesting that Tax recruitment of autophagic molecules to lipid rafts is a dominant strategy to deregulate autophagy in the context of HTLV-1 transformation of T cells. Furthermore, depletion of autophagy molecules such as Beclin1 and PI3 kinase class III resulted in impaired growth of HTLV-1-transformed T cells, indicating a critical role of Tax-deregulated autophagy in promoting survival and transformation of virally infected T cells. PMID:24362528

  9. Recent progress on lipid lateral heterogeneity in plasma membranes: From rafts to submicrometric domains.

    PubMed

    Carquin, Mélanie; D'Auria, Ludovic; Pollet, Hélène; Bongarzone, Ernesto R; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2016-04-01

    The concept of transient nanometric domains known as lipid rafts has brought interest to reassess the validity of the Singer-Nicolson model of a fluid bilayer for cell membranes. However, this new view is still insufficient to explain the cellular control of surface lipid diversity or membrane deformability. During the past decades, the hypothesis that some lipids form large (submicrometric/mesoscale vs nanometric rafts) and stable (>min vs s) membrane domains has emerged, largely based on indirect methods. Morphological evidence for stable submicrometric lipid domains, well-accepted for artificial and highly specialized biological membranes, was further reported for a variety of living cells from prokaryot es to yeast and mammalian cells. However, results remained questioned based on limitations of available fluorescent tools, use of poor lipid fixatives, and imaging artifacts due to non-resolved membrane projections. In this review, we will discuss recent evidence generated using powerful and innovative approaches such as lipid-specific toxin fragments that support the existence of submicrometric domains. We will integrate documented mechanisms involved in the formation and maintenance of these domains, and provide a perspective on their relevance on membrane deformability and regulation of membrane protein distribution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Recent progress on lipid lateral heterogeneity in plasma membranes: from rafts to submicrometric domains

    PubMed Central

    Carquin, Mélanie; D'Auria, Ludovic; Pollet, Hélène; Bongarzone, Ernesto R.; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2016-01-01

    The concept of transient nanometric domains known as lipid rafts has brought interest to reassess the validity of the Singer-Nicholson model of a fluid bilayer for cell membranes. However, this new view is still insufficient to explain the cellular control of surface lipid diversity or membrane deformability. During the past decade, the hypothesis that some lipids form large (submicrometric/mesoscale vs nanometric rafts) and stable (> min vs sec) membrane domains has emerged, largely based on indirect methods. Morphological evidence for stable submicrometric lipid domains, well-accepted for artificial and highly specialized biological membranes, was further reported for a variety of living cells from prokaryotes to yeast and mammalian cells. However, results remained questioned based on limitations of available fluorescent tools, use of poor lipid fixatives, and imaging artifacts due to non-resolved membrane projections. In this review, we will discuss recent evidence generated using powerful and innovative approaches such as lipid-specific toxin fragments that support the existence of submicrometric domains. We will integrate documented mechanisms involved in the formation and maintenance of these domains, and provide a perspective on their relevance on membrane deformability and regulation of membrane protein distribution. PMID:26738447

  11. Hybrid and Nonhybrid Lipids Exert Common Effects on Membrane Raft Size and Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A; Doktorova, Milka; Goh, Shih Lin; Standaert, Robert F; Katsaras, John; Feigenson, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Nanometer-scale domains in cholesterolrich model membranes emulate lipid rafts in cell plasma membranes (PMs). The physicochemical mechanisms that maintain a finite, small domain size are, however, not well understood. A special role has been postulated for chainasymmetric or hybrid lipids having a saturated sn-1 chain and an unsaturated sn-2 chain. Hybrid lipids generate nanodomains in some model membranes and are also abundant in the PM. It was proposed that they align in a preferred orientation at the boundary of ordered and disordered phases, lowering the interfacial energy and thus reducing domain size. We used small-angle neutron scattering and fluorescence techniques to detect nanoscopic and modulated liquid phase domains in a mixture composed entirely of nonhybrid lipids and cholesterol. Our results are indistinguishable from those obtained previously for mixtures containing hybrid lipids, conclusively showing that hybrid lipids are not required for the formation of nanoscopic liquid domains and strongly implying a common mechanism for the overall control of raft size and morphology. We discuss implications of these findings for theoretical descriptions of nanodomains.

  12. Analysis of the interaction between respiratory syncytial virus and lipid-rafts in Hep2 cells during infection

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Gaie; Jeffree, Chris E.; McDonald, Terence; McL Rixon, Helen W.; Aitken, James D.; Sugrue, Richard J. . E-mail: r.sugrue@vir.gla.ac.uk

    2004-10-01

    The assembly of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in lipid-rafts was examined in Hep2 cells. Confocal and electron microscopy showed that during RSV assembly, the cellular distribution of the complement regulatory proteins, decay accelerating factor (CD55) and CD59, changes and high levels of these cellular proteins are incorporated into mature virus filaments. The detergent-solubility properties of CD55, CD59, and the RSV fusion (F) protein were found to be consistent with each protein being located predominantly within lipid-raft structures. The levels of these proteins in cell-released virus were examined by immunoelectronmicroscopy and found to account for between 5% and 15% of the virus attachment (G) glycoprotein levels. Collectively, our findings suggest that an intimate association exists between RSV and lipid-raft membranes and that significant levels of these host-derived raft proteins, such as those regulating complement activation, are subsequently incorporated into the envelope of mature virus particles.

  13. Endogenous Galectin-3 Is Localized in Membrane Lipid Rafts and Regulates Migration of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Daniel K.; Chernyavsky, Alexander I.; Chen, Huan-Yuan; Yu, Lan; Grando, Sergei A.; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2008-01-01

    This study reveals a function of endogenous galectin-3, an animal lectin recognizing β-galactosides, in regulating dendritic cell motility both in vitroand in vivo,which to our knowledge is unreported. First, galectin-3-deficient (gal3−/−) bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exhibited defective chemotaxis compared to gal3+/+ cells. Second, cutaneous dendritic cells in gal3−/− mice displayed reduced migration to draining lymph nodes upon hapten stimulation compared to gal3+/+ mice. Moreover, gal3−/− mice were impaired in the development of contact hypersensitivity relative to gal3+/+ mice in response to a hapten, a process in which dendritic cell trafficking to lymph nodes is critical. In addition, defective signaling was detected in gal3−/− cells upon chemokine receptor activation. By immunofluorescence microscopy, we observed that galectin-3 is localized in membrane ruffles and lamellipodia in stimulated dendritic cells and macrophages. Furthermore, galectin-3 was enriched in lipid raft domains under these conditions. Finally, we determined that ruffles on gal3−/− cells contained structures with lower complexity compared to gal3+/+ cells. In view of the participation of membrane ruffles in signal transduction and cell motility, we conclude that galectin-3 regulates cell migration by functioning at these structures. PMID:18843294

  14. Lipid Raft- and Src Family Kinase-Dependent Entry of Coxsackievirus B into Human Placental Trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Delorme-Axford, Elizabeth; Sadovsky, Yoel

    2013-01-01

    Maternal-fetal transmission of group B coxsackieviruses (CVB) during pregnancy has been associated with a number of diverse pathological outcomes, including hydrops fetalis, fetal myocarditis, meningoencephalitis, neurodevelopmental delays, congenital skin lesions, miscarriage, and/or stillbirth. Throughout pregnancy, the placenta forms a critical antimicrobial protective barrier at the maternal-fetal interface. Despite the severity of diseases accompanying fetal CVB infections, little is known regarding the strategies used by CVB to gain entry into placental trophoblasts. Here we used both a trophoblast cell line and primary human trophoblasts to demonstrate the mechanism by which CVB gains entry into polarized placental trophoblasts. Our studies revealed that the kinetics of CVB entry into placental trophoblasts are similar to those previously described for polarized intestinal epithelial cells. Likewise, CVB entry into placental trophoblasts requires decay-accelerating factor (DAF) binding and involves relocalization of the virus from the apical surface to intercellular tight junctions. In contrast, we have identified a divergent mechanism for CVB entry into polarized trophoblasts that is clathrin, caveolin-1, and dynamin II independent but requires intact lipid rafts. In addition, we found that members of the Src family of tyrosine kinases were required for CVB entry. Our studies highlight the complexity of viral entry into human placental trophoblasts and may serve as a model for mechanisms used by diverse pathogens to penetrate the placental barrier. PMID:23720726

  15. Pravastatin reverses the membrane cholesterol reorganization induced by myocardial infarction within lipid rafts in CD14(+)/CD16(-) circulating monocytes.

    PubMed

    Salvary, Thomas; Gambert-Nicot, Ségolène; Brindisi, Marie-Claude; Meneveau, Nicolas; Schiele, François; Séronde, Marie-France; Lorgis, Luc; Zeller, Marianne; Cottin, Yves; Kantelip, Jean-Pierre; Gambert, Philippe; Davani, Siamak

    2012-09-01

    Large numbers of monocytes are recruited in the infarcted myocardium. Their cell membranes contain cholesterol-rich microdomains called lipids rafts, which participate in numerous signaling cascades. In addition to its cholesterol-lowering effect, pravastatin has several pleiotropic effects and is widely used as secondary prevention treatment after myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pravastatin on the organization of cholesterol within monocyte membrane rafts from patients who had suffered myocardial infarction. Monocytes from healthy donors and acute MI patients were cultured with or without 4μM pravastatin. Lipid rafts were extracted by Lubrol WX, caveolae and flat rafts were separated using a modified sucrose gradient. Cholesterol level and caveolin-1 expression in lipid rafts were determined. In healthy donors, cholesterol was concentrated in flat rafts (63±3 vs 13±1%, p<0.001). While monocytes from MI patients presented similar cholesterol distribution in both caveolae and flat rafts. Cholesterol distribution was higher in flat rafts in healthy donors, compared to MI patients (63±3 vs 41±2%, p<0.001), with less distribution in caveolae (13±1 vs 34±2%, p<0.001). Pravastatin reversed the cholesterol distribution in MI patients cells between flat rafts (41±2 vs 66±3%, p<0.001) and caveolae (34±2 vs 18±1%, p<0.001). In conclusion, MI redistributes cholesterol from flat rafts to caveolae indicating monocyte membrane reorganization. In vitro pravastatin treatment restored basal conditions in MI monocytes, suggesting another effect of statins.

  16. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-02-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes.

  17. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes. PMID:26861908

  18. Lipid rafts, KCa/ClCa/Ca2+ channel complexes and EGFR signaling: Novel targets to reduce tumor development by lipids?

    PubMed

    Guéguinou, Maxime; Gambade, Audrey; Félix, Romain; Chantôme, Aurélie; Fourbon, Yann; Bougnoux, Philippe; Weber, Günther; Potier-Cartereau, Marie; Vandier, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    Membrane lipid rafts are distinct plasma membrane nanodomains that are enriched with cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides, with occasional presence of saturated fatty acids and phospholipids containing saturated acyl chains. It is well known that they organize receptors (such as Epithelial Growth Factor Receptor), ion channels and their downstream acting molecules to regulate intracellular signaling pathways. Among them are Ca2+ signaling pathways, which are modified in tumor cells and inhibited upon membrane raft disruption. In addition to protein components, lipids from rafts also contribute to the organization and function of Ca2+ signaling microdomains. This article aims to focus on the lipid raft KCa/ClCa/Ca2+ channel complexes that regulate Ca2+ and EGFR signaling in cancer cells, and discusses the potential modification of these complexes by lipids as a novel therapeutic approach in tumor development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  19. On scattered waves and lipid domains: detecting membrane rafts with X-rays and neutrons

    DOE PAGES

    Marquardt, Drew; Heberle, Frederick A.; Nickels, Jonathan D.; ...

    2015-09-21

    In order to understand the biological role of lipids in cell membranes, it is necessary to determine the mesoscopic structure of well-defined model membrane systems. Neutron and X-ray scattering are non-invasive, probe-free techniques that have been used extensively in such systems to probe length scales ranging from angstroms to microns, and dynamics occurring over picosecond to millisecond time scales. Finally, recent developments in the area of phase separated lipid systems mimicking membrane rafts will be presented, and the underlying concepts of the different scattering techniques used to study them will be discussed in detail.

  20. Cellular prion protein in blood platelets associates with both lipid rafts and the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Brouckova, Adela; Holada, Karel

    2009-11-01

    The recently shown transmissibility of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) by blood transfusion emphasises the need for better understanding of the cellular prion protein (PrPc) in blood. A substantial amount of cell-associated PrPc in blood resides in platelets. Platelet activation leads to up-regulation of PrPc on the platelet surface and its release on exosomes and microparticles. The sub-cellular localisation and function of platelet PrPc, however, is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the association of PrPc with platelet lipid rafts and the platelet cytoskeleton. Immuno-fluorescence microscopy showed that the signals of PrPc and P-selectin, both of which occupy intracellular alpha granules, were separated on the membrane, suggesting organisation in different membrane domains. A flotation assay of platelet lysates demonstrated that a relatively small portion of platelet PrPc floats with lipid rafts, regardless of platelet activation status. This was reversed by depolymerisation of the platelet cytoskeleton, which led to flotation of most platelet PrPc, suggesting that interactions with the cytoskeleton prevent flotation of PrPc rafts. This association of PrPc with the platelet cytoskeleton was confirmed by its presence in both the isolated membrane skeleton and actin cytoskeleton. Platelet activation significantly increased the amount of PrPc associated with the cytoskeleton. Our results indicate that the localisation of PrPc in platelets is complex, with the majority of PrPc present within platelet lipid rafts linked to the platelet cytoskeleton. This localisation places PrPc in a position where it can interact with proteins involved in platelet signalling and eventually with vCJD prions.

  1. Association of Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct hemolysin with lipid rafts is essential for cytotoxicity but not hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shigeaki; Kodama, Toshio; Okada, Natsumi; Okayama, Kanna; Honda, Takeshi; Iida, Tetsuya

    2010-02-01

    Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), a major virulence factor of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, induces cytotoxicity in cultured cells. However, the mechanism of TDH's cytotoxic effect including its target molecules on the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells remains unclear. In this study, we identified the role of lipid rafts, cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched microdomains, in TDH cytotoxicity. Treatment of cells with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD), a raft-disrupting agent, inhibited TDH cytotoxicity. TDH was associated with detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), and MbetaCD eliminated this association. In contrast, there was no such association between a nontoxic TDH mutant and DRMs. The disruption of lipid rafts neither affected hemolysis nor inhibited Ca(2+) influx into HeLa cells induced by TDH. These findings indicate that the cytotoxicity but not the hemolytic activity of TDH is dependent on lipid rafts. The exogenous and endogenous depletion of cellular sphingomyelin also prevented TDH cytotoxicity, but a direct interaction between TDH and sphingomyelin was not detected with either a lipid overlay assay or a liposome absorption test. Treatment with sphingomyelinase (SMase) at 100 mU/ml disrupted the association of TDH with DRMs but did not affect the localization of lipid raft marker proteins (caveolin-1 and flotillin-1) with DRMs. These results suggest that sphingomyelin is important for the association of TDH with lipid rafts but is not a molecular target of TDH. We hypothesize that TDH may target a certain group of rafts that are sensitive to SMase at a certain concentration, which does not affect other types of rafts.

  2. Sterol carrier protein 2 regulates proximal tubule size in the Xenopus pronephric kidney by modulating lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Débora M; Tran, Uyen; Romaker, Daniel; Abreu, José G; Wessely, Oliver

    2014-10-01

    The kidney is a homeostatic organ required for waste excretion and reabsorption of water, salts and other macromolecules. To this end, a complex series of developmental steps ensures the formation of a correctly patterned and properly proportioned organ. While previous studies have mainly focused on the individual signaling pathways, the formation of higher order receptor complexes in lipid rafts is an equally important aspect. These membrane platforms are characterized by differences in local lipid and protein compositions. Indeed, the cells in the Xenopus pronephric kidney were positive for the lipid raft markers ganglioside GM1 and Caveolin-1. To specifically interfere with lipid raft function in vivo, we focused on the Sterol Carrier Protein 2 (scp2), a multifunctional protein that is an important player in remodeling lipid raft composition. In Xenopus, scp2 mRNA was strongly expressed in differentiated epithelial structures of the pronephric kidney. Knockdown of scp2 did not interfere with the patterning of the kidney along its proximo-distal axis, but dramatically decreased the size of the kidney, in particular the proximal tubules. This phenotype was accompanied by a reduction of lipid rafts, but was independent of the peroxisomal or transcriptional activities of scp2. Finally, disrupting lipid micro-domains by inhibiting cholesterol synthesis using Mevinolin phenocopied the defects seen in scp2 morphants. Together these data underscore the importance for localized signaling platforms in the proper formation of the Xenopus kidney.

  3. [Effect of acupuncture on transmembrane signal pathway in AD mice: an analysis based on lipid-raft proteomics].

    PubMed

    Nie, Kun; Zhang, Xue-Zhu; Zhao, Lan; Jia, Yu-Jie; Han, Jing-Xian

    2014-08-01

    To reveal the transmembrane signal pathway participating in regulating neuron functions of treating Alzheimer's disease (AD) by acupuncture. SAMP8 mice was used for AD animal model. The effect of acupuncture method for qi benefiting, blood regulating, health supporting, and root strengthening on the amount and varieties of transmembrane signal proteins from hippocampal lipid rafts in SAMP8 mice was detected using HPLC MS/MS proteomics method. Compared with the control group, acupuncture increased 39 transmembrane signal proteins from hippocampal lipid rafts in SAMP8 mice, of them, 14 belonged to ionophorous protein, 8 to G protein, 8 to transmembrane signal receptor, and 9 to kinase protein. Totally 3 main cell signal pathways were involved, including G-protein-coupled receptors signal, enzyme linked receptor signal, and ion-channel mediated signal. Compared with the sham-acupuncture group, acupuncture resulted in significant increase of kinase signal protein amount. From the aspect of functions, they were dominant in regulating synapse functions relevant to cytoskeleton and secreting neurotransmitters. The cell biological mechanism for treating AD by acupuncture might be achieved by improving synapse functions and promoting the secretion of neurotransmitters through transmembrane signal transduction, thus improving cognitive function of AD patients.

  4. CFTR in a lipid raft-TNFR1 complex modulates gap junctional intercellular communication and IL-8 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Dudez, Tecla; Borot, Florence; Huang, Song; Kwak, Brenda R.; Bacchetta, Marc; Ollero, Mario; Stanton, Bruce A.; Chanson, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cause a chronic inflammatory response in the lung of patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). We have showed that TNF-α signaling through the Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) was defective as determined by an inability of TNF-α to regulate gap junctional communication (GJIC) in CF cells. Here, we sought to elucidate the mechanisms linking TNF-α signaling to the functions of CFTR at the molecular level. In a MDCKI epithelial cell model expressing wild-type (WtCFTR) or mutant CFTR lacking its PDZ-interacting motif (CFTR-ΔTRL), TNF-α increased the amount of WtCFTR but not CFTR-ΔTRL in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs). This recruitment was modulated by SFK activity and associated with DRM localization of TNFR1 and c-Src. Activation of TNFR1 signaling also decreased GJIC and markedly stimulated IL-8 production in WtCFTR cells. In contrast, the absence of CFTR in DRMs was associated with abnormal TNFR1 signaling as revealed by no recruitment of TNFR1 and c-Src to lipid rafts in CFTR-ΔTRL cells and loss of regulation of GJIC and IL-8 secretion. These results suggest that localization of CFTR in lipid rafts in association with c-Src and TNFR1 provides a responsive signaling complex to regulate GJIC and cytokine signaling. PMID:18255040

  5. Involvement of lipid rafts in the localization and dysfunction effect of the antitumor ether phospholipid edelfosine in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, F; Fernández, M; Hornillos, V; Delgado, J; Amat-Guerri, F; Acuña, A U; Nieto-Miguel, T; Villa-Pulgarín, J A; González-García, C; Ceña, V; Gajate, C

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts and mitochondria are promising targets in cancer therapy. The synthetic antitumor alkyl-lysophospholipid analog edelfosine (1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine) has been reported to target lipid rafts. Here, we have found that edelfosine induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, both responses being abrogated by Bcl-xL overexpression. We synthesized a number of new fluorescent edelfosine analogs, which preserved the proapoptotic activity of the parent drug, and colocalized with mitochondria in HeLa cells. Edelfosine induced swelling in isolated mitochondria, indicating an increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability. This mitochondrial swelling was independent of reactive oxygen species generation. A structurally related inactive analog was unable to promote mitochondrial swelling, highlighting the importance of edelfosine molecular structure in its effect on mitochondria. Raft disruption inhibited mitochondrial localization of the drug in cells and edelfosine-induced swelling in isolated mitochondria. Edelfosine promoted a redistribution of lipid rafts from the plasma membrane to mitochondria, suggesting a raft-mediated link between plasma membrane and mitochondria. Our data suggest that direct interaction of edelfosine with mitochondria eventually leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. These observations unveil a new framework in cancer chemotherapy that involves a link between lipid rafts and mitochondria in the mechanism of action of an antitumor drug, thus opening new avenues for cancer treatment. PMID:21593790

  6. Accumulation of raft lipids in T-cell plasma membrane domains engaged in TCR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zech, Tobias; Ejsing, Christer S; Gaus, Katharina; de Wet, Ben; Shevchenko, Andrej; Simons, Kai; Harder, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Activating stimuli for T lymphocytes are transmitted through plasma membrane domains that form at T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signalling foci. Here, we determined the molecular lipid composition of immunoisolated TCR activation domains. We observed that they accumulate cholesterol, sphingomyelin and saturated phosphatidylcholine species as compared with control plasma membrane fragments. This provides, for the first time, direct evidence that TCR activation domains comprise a distinct molecular lipid composition reminiscent of liquid-ordered raft phases in model membranes. Interestingly, TCR activation domains were also enriched in plasmenyl phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine. Modulating the T-cell lipidome with polyunsaturated fatty acids impaired the plasma membrane condensation at TCR signalling foci and resulted in a perturbed molecular lipid composition. These results correlate the accumulation of specific molecular lipid species with the specific plasma membrane condensation at sites of TCR activation and with early TCR activation responses. PMID:19177148

  7. The Bordetella type III secretion system effector BteA contains a conserved N-terminal motif that guides bacterial virulence factors to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    French, Christopher T; Panina, Ekaterina M; Yeh, Sylvia H; Griffith, Natasha; Arambula, Diego G; Miller, Jeff F

    2009-12-01

    The Bordetella type III secretion system (T3SS) effector protein BteA is necessary and sufficient for rapid cytotoxicity in a wide range of mammalian cells. We show that BteA is highly conserved and functionally interchangeable between Bordetella bronchiseptica, Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis. The identification of BteA sequences required for cytotoxicity allowed the construction of non-cytotoxic mutants for localization studies. BteA derivatives were targeted to lipid rafts and showed clear colocalization with cortical actin, ezrin and the lipid raft marker GM1. We hypothesized that BteA associates with the cytoplasmic face of lipid rafts to locally modulate host cell responses to Bordetella attachment. B. bronchiseptica adhered to host cells almost exclusively to GM1-enriched lipid raft microdomains and BteA colocalized to these same sites following T3SS-mediated translocation. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin protected cells from T3SS-induced cytotoxicity. Localization to lipid rafts was mediated by a 130-amino-acid lipid raft targeting domain at the N-terminus of BteA, and homologous domains were identified in virulence factors from other bacterial species. Lipid raft targeting sequences from a T3SS effector (Plu4750) and an RTX-type toxin (Plu3217) from Photorhabdus luminescens directed fusion proteins to lipid rafts in a manner identical to the N-terminus of BteA.

  8. The C1 and C2 domains target human type 6 adenylyl cyclase to lipid rafts and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Thangavel, Muthusamy; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2009-02-01

    Previous data has shown that adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) is expressed principally in lipid rafts or caveolae of cardiac myocytes and other cell types while certain other isoforms of AC are excluded from these microdomains. The mechanism by which AC6 is localized to lipid rafts or caveolae is unknown. In this study, we show AC6 is localized in lipid rafts of COS-7 cells (expressing caveolin-1) and in HEK-293 cells or cardiac fibroblasts isolated from caveolin-1 knock-out mice (both of which lack prototypical caveolins). To determine the region of AC6 that confers raft localization, we independently expressed each of the major intracellular domains, the N-terminus, C1 and C2 domains, and examined their localization with various approaches. The N-terminus did not associate with lipid rafts or caveolae of either COS-7 or HEK-293 cells nor did it immunoprecipitate with caveolin-1 when expressed in COS-7 cells. By contrast, the C1 and C2 domains each associated with lipid rafts to varying degrees and were present in caveolin-1 immunoprecipitates. There were no differences in the pattern of localization of either the C1 or C2 domains between COS-7 and HEK-293 cells. Further dissection of the C1 domain into four individual proteins indicated that the N-terminal half of this domain is responsible for its raft localization. To probe for a role of a putative palmitoylation motif in the C-terminal portion of the C2 domain, we expressed various truncated forms of AC6 lacking most or all of the C-terminal 41 amino acids. These truncated AC6 proteins were not altered in terms of their localization in lipid rafts or their catalytic activity, implying that this C-terminal region is not required for lipid raft targeting of AC6. We conclude that while the C1 domain may be most important, both the C1 and C2 domains of AC6 play a role in targeting AC6 to lipid rafts.

  9. The involvement of P2Y12 receptors, NADPH oxidase, and lipid rafts in the action of extracellular ATP on synaptic transmission at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Giniatullin, A; Petrov, A; Giniatullin, R

    2015-01-29

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is the main co-transmitter accompanying the release of acetylcholine from motor nerve terminals. Previously, we revealed the direct inhibitory action of extracellular ATP on transmitter release via redox-dependent mechanism. However, the receptor mechanism of ATP action and ATP-induced sources of reactive oxygen sources (ROS) remained not fully understood. In the current study, using microelectrode recordings of synaptic currents from the frog neuromuscular junction, we analyzed the receptor subtype involved in synaptic action of ATP, receptor coupling to NADPH oxidase and potential location of ATP receptors within the lipid rafts. Using subtype-specific antagonists, we found that the P2Y13 blocker 2-[(2-chloro-5-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]-4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde did not prevent the depressant action of ATP. In contrast, the P2Y12 antagonist 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate abolished the inhibitory action of ATP, suggesting the key role of P2Y12 receptors in ATP action. As the action of ATP is redox-dependent, we also tested potential involvement of the NADPH oxidase, known as a common inducer of ROS. The depressant action of extracellular ATP was significantly reduced by diphenyleneiodonium chloride and 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride, two structurally different inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, indicating that this enzyme indeed mediates the action of ATP. Since the location and activity of various receptors are often associated with lipid rafts, we next tested whether ATP-driven inhibition depends on lipid rafts. We found that the disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin reduced and largely delayed the action of ATP. Taken together, these data revealed key steps in the purinergic control of synaptic transmission via P2Y12 receptors associated with lipid rafts, and identified NADPH oxidase as the main source of ATP-induced inhibitory ROS at the neuromuscular

  10. The structural role of cholesterol in cell membranes: from condensed bilayers to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin R; Regen, Steven L

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Defining the two-dimensional structure of cell membranes represents one of the most daunting challenges currently facing chemists, biochemists, and biophysicists. In particular, the time-averaged lateral organization of the lipids and proteins that make up these natural enclosures has yet to be established. As the classic Singer-Nicolson model of cell membranes has evolved over the past 40 years, special attention has focused on the structural role played by cholesterol, a key component that represents ca. 30% of the total lipids that are present. Despite extensive studies with model membranes, two fundamental issues have remained a mystery: (i) the mechanism by which cholesterol condenses low-melting lipids by uncoiling their acyl chains and (ii) the thermodynamics of the interaction between cholesterol and high- and low-melting lipids. The latter bears directly on one of the most popular notions in modern cell biology, that is, the lipid raft hypothesis, whereby cholesterol is thought to combine with high-melting lipids to form "lipid rafts" that float in a "sea" of low-melting lipids. In this Account, we first describe a chemical approach that we have developed in our laboratories that has allowed us to quantify the interactions between exchangeable mimics of cholesterol and low- and high-melting lipids in model membranes. In essence, this "nearest-neighbor recognition" (NNR) method involves the synthesis of dimeric forms of these lipids that contain a disulfide moiety as a linker. By means of thiolate-disulfide interchange reactions, equilibrium mixtures of dimers are then formed. These exchange reactions are initiated either by adding dithiothreitol to a liposomal dispersion to generate a small amount of thiol monomer or by including a small amount of thiol monomer in the liposomes at pH 5.0 and then raising the pH to 7.4. We then show how such NNR measurements have allowed us to distinguish between two very different mechanisms that have been

  11. Compartmentalisation of cAMP-dependent signalling in blood platelets: The role of lipid rafts and actin polymerisation.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Zaher; Naseem, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) inhibits blood platelets through the activation of membrane adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated signalling. However, the molecular mechanism controlling cAMP signalling in blood platelet remains unclear, and in particular how individual isoforms of AC and protein kinase A (PKA) are coordinated to target distinct substrates in order to modulate platelet activation. In this study, we demonstrate that lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton may play a key role in regulating platelet responses to cAMP downstream of PGI2. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD) increased platelet sensitivity to PGI2 and forskolin, a direct AC cyclase activator, resulting in greater inhibition of collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation. In contrast, platelet inhibition by the direct activator of PKA, 8-CPT-6-Phe-cAMP was unaffected by MβCD treatment. Consistent with the functional data, lipid raft disruption increased PGI2-stimulated cAMP formation and proximal PKA-mediated signalling events. Platelet inhibition, cAMP formation and phosphorylation of PKA substrates in response to PGI2 were also increased in the presence of cytochalasin D, indicating a role for actin cytoskeleton in signalling in response to PGI2. A potential role for lipid rafts in cAMP signalling is strengthened by our finding that a pool of ACV/VI and PKA was partitioned into lipid rafts. Our data demonstrate partial compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling machinery in platelets, where lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton regulate the inhibitory effects induced by PGI2. The increased platelet sensitivity to cAMP-elevating agents signalling upon raft and cytoskeleton disruption suggests that these compartments act to restrain basal cAMP signalling.

  12. High-density lipoprotein affects antigen presentation by interfering with lipid raft: a promising anti-atherogenic strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-H; Yuan, S-G; Peng, D-Q; Zhao, S-P

    2010-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease. Immunomodulation of atherosclerosis emerges as a promising approach to prevention and treatment of this widely prevalent disease. The function of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to promote reverse cholesterol transport may explain the ability of its protection against atherosclerosis. Findings that HDL and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) inhibited the ability of antigen presenting cells (APCs) to stimulate T cells might be attributed to lipid raft, a cholesterol-rich microdomain exhibiting functional properties depending largely upon its lipid composition. Thus, modulating cholesterol in lipid raft may provide a promising anti-atherogenic strategy.

  13. Ceramide displaces cholesterol from lipid rafts and decreases the association of the cholesterol binding protein caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cuijuan; Alterman, Michail; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2005-08-01

    Addition of exogenous ceramide causes a significant displacement of cholesterol in lipid raft model membranes. However, whether ceramide-induced cholesterol displacement is sufficient to alter the protein composition of caveolin-enriched lipid raft membranes is unknown. Therefore, we examined whether increasing endogenous ceramide levels with bacterial sphingomyelinase (bSMase) depleted cholesterol and changed the protein composition of caveolin-enriched membranes (CEMs) isolated from immortalized Schwann cells. bSMase increased ceramide levels severalfold and decreased the cholesterol content of detergent-insoluble CEMs by 25-50% within 2 h. To examine the effect of ceramide on the protein composition of the CEMs, we performed a quantitative proteomic analysis using stable isotope labeling of cells in culture and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Although ceramide rapidly depleted lipid raft cholesterol, the levels of the cholesterol binding protein caveolin-1 (Cav-1) decreased by 25% only after 8 h. Importantly, replenishing the cells with cholesterol rapidly reversed the loss of Cav-1 from the CEMs. Ceramide-induced cholesterol depletion increased the association of 5'-nucleotidase and ATP synthase beta-subunit with the CEMs but had a minimal effect on changing the abundance of other lipid raft proteins, such as flotillin-1 and G-proteins. These results suggest that the ceramide-induced loss of cholesterol from CEMs may contribute to altering the lipid raft proteome.

  14. CD28 and lipid rafts coordinate recruitment of Lck to the immunological synapse of human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tavano, Regina; Gri, Giorgia; Molon, Barbara; Marinari, Barbara; Rudd, Christopher E; Tuosto, Loretta; Viola, Antonella

    2004-11-01

    In T lymphocytes, the Src family kinase Lck associates lipid rafts and accumulates at the immunological synapse (IS) during T cell stimulation by APCs. Using CD4- or CD28-deficient murine T cells, it was suggested that recruitment of Lck to the IS depends on CD4, whereas CD28 sustains Lck activation. However, in human resting T cells, CD28 is responsible for promoting recruitment of lipid rafts to the IS by an unknown mechanism. Thus, we performed a series of experiments to determine 1) whether Lck is recruited to the IS through lipid rafts; and 2) whether Lck recruitment to the IS of human resting T cells depends on CD4 or on CD28 engagement. We found that CD28, but not CD4, stimulation induced recruitment of Lck into detergent-resistant domains as well as its accumulation at the IS. We also found that Lck recruitment to the IS depends on the CD28 COOH-terminal PxxPP motif. Thus, the CD28-3A mutant, generated by substituting the prolines in positions 208, 211, and 212 with alanines, failed to induce Lck and lipid raft accumulation at the synapse. These results indicate that CD28 signaling orchestrates both Lck and lipid raft recruitment to the IS to amplify T cell activation.

  15. Membrane lipid domains and rafts: current applications of fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rodrigo F M; Loura, Luís M S; Prieto, Manuel

    2009-02-01

    Membrane microdomains and their involvement in cellular processes are part of the current paradigm of biomembranes. However, a better characterization of domains, namely lipid rafts, is needed. In this review, it is shown how the use of time-resolved fluorescence, with the adequate parameters and probes, helps elucidating the type, number, fraction, composition and size of lipid phases and domains in multicomponent model systems. The determination of phase diagrams for lipid mixtures containing sphingolipids and/or cholesterol is exemplified. The use of fluorescence quenching and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) are also illustrated. Strategies for studying protein-induced domains are presented. The advantages of using single point microscopic decays and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in systems with three-phase coexistence are explained. Finally, the introduction of FLIM allows studies in live cell membranes, and the nature of the microdomains observed is readily elucidated due to the information retrieved from fluorescence lifetimes.

  16. Expressed Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Horseradish Peroxidase Identifies Co-Clustering Molecules in Individual Lipid Raft Domains

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa-Yamaguchi, Arisa; Kotani, Norihiro; Honke, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Lipid rafts that are enriched in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins serve as a platform for important biological events. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these events, identification of co-clustering molecules in individual raft domains is required. Here we describe an approach to this issue using the recently developed method termed enzyme-mediated activation of radical source (EMARS), by which molecules in the vicinity within 300 nm from horseradish peroxidase (HRP) set on the probed molecule are labeled. GPI-anchored HRP fusion proteins (HRP-GPIs), in which the GPI attachment signals derived from human decay accelerating factor and Thy-1 were separately connected to the C-terminus of HRP, were expressed in HeLa S3 cells, and the EMARS reaction was catalyzed by these expressed HRP-GPIs under a living condition. As a result, these different HRP-GPIs had differences in glycosylation and localization and formed distinct clusters. This novel approach distinguished molecular clusters associated with individual GPI-anchored proteins, suggesting that it can identify co-clustering molecules in individual raft domains. PMID:24671047

  17. Significance of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Protein Enrichment in Lipid Rafts for the Control of Autoimmunity*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yetao; Murakami, Yoshiko; Yasui, Teruhito; Wakana, Shigeharu; Kikutani, Hitoshi; Kinoshita, Taroh; Maeda, Yusuke

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPI) are complex glycolipids that are covalently linked to the C terminus of proteins as a post-translational modification and tether proteins to the plasma membrane. One of the most striking features of GPI-anchored proteins (APs) is their enrichment in lipid rafts. The biosynthesis of GPI and its attachment to proteins occur in the endoplasmic reticulum. In the Golgi, GPI-APs are subjected to fatty acid remodeling, which replaces an unsaturated fatty acid at the sn-2 position of the phosphatidylinositol moiety with a saturated fatty acid. We previously reported that fatty acid remodeling is critical for the enrichment of GPI-APs in lipid rafts. To investigate the biological significance of GPI-AP enrichment in lipid rafts, we generated a PGAP3 knock-out mouse (PGAP3−/−) in which fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs does not occur. We report here that a significant number of aged PGAP3−/− mice developed autoimmune-like symptoms, such as increased anti-DNA antibodies, spontaneous germinal center formation, and enlarged renal glomeruli with deposition of immune complexes and matrix expansion. A possible cause for this was the impaired engulfment of apoptotic cells by resident peritoneal macrophages in PGAP3−/− mice. Mice with conditional targeting of PGAP3 in either B or T cells did not develop such autoimmune-like symptoms. In addition, PGAP3−/− mice exhibited the tendency of Th2 polarization. These data demonstrate that PGAP3-dependent fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs has a significant role in the control of autoimmunity, possibly by the regulation of apoptotic cell clearance and Th1/Th2 balance. PMID:23864655

  18. Critical role of CFTR-dependent lipid rafts in cigarette smoke-induced lung epithelial injury.

    PubMed

    Bodas, Manish; Min, Taehong; Vij, Neeraj

    2011-06-01

    Apoptosis of lung epithelial and endothelial cells by exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) severely damages the lung tissue, leading to the pathogenesis of emphysema, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We have recently established a direct correlation between decreased lipid raft CFTR expression and emphysema progression through increased ceramide accumulation. In the present work, we investigated the role of membrane CFTR in regulating apoptosis and autophagy responses to CS exposure. We report a constitutive and CS-induced increase in the number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells in Cftr(-/-) murine lungs compared with Cftr(+/+) murine lungs that also correlated with a concurrent increase in the expression of ceramide, NF-κB, CD95/Fas, lipid raft proteins, and zonula occludens (ZO)-1/2 (P < 0.001). We also verified that stable wild-type CFTR expression in CFBE41o(-) cells controls constitutively elevated caspase-3/7 activity (-1.6-fold, P < 0.001). Our data suggest that membrane CFTR regulates ceramide-enriched lipid raft signaling platforms required for the induction of Fas-mediated apoptotic signaling. In addition, lack of membrane CFTR also modulates autophagy, as demonstrated by the significant increase in constitutive (P < 0.001) and CSE-induced (P < 0.005) perinuclear accumulation of green fluorescent protein-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3 (LC3) in the absence of membrane CFTR (CFBE41o(-) cells). The significant constitutive and CS-induced increase (P < 0.05) in p62 and LC3β expression in CFTR-deficient cells and mice corroborates these findings and suggest a defective autophagy response in the absence of membrane CFTR. Our data demonstrate the critical role of membrane-localized CFTR in regulating apoptotic and autophagic responses in CS-induced lung injury that may be involved in the pathogenesis of severe emphysema.

  19. Critical role of CFTR-dependent lipid rafts in cigarette smoke-induced lung epithelial injury

    PubMed Central

    Bodas, Manish; Min, Taehong

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis of lung epithelial and endothelial cells by exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) severely damages the lung tissue, leading to the pathogenesis of emphysema, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We have recently established a direct correlation between decreased lipid raft CFTR expression and emphysema progression through increased ceramide accumulation. In the present work, we investigated the role of membrane CFTR in regulating apoptosis and autophagy responses to CS exposure. We report a constitutive and CS-induced increase in the number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells in Cftr−/− murine lungs compared with Cftr+/+ murine lungs that also correlated with a concurrent increase in the expression of ceramide, NF-κB, CD95/Fas, lipid raft proteins, and zonula occludens (ZO)-1/2 (P < 0.001). We also verified that stable wild-type CFTR expression in CFBE41o− cells controls constitutively elevated caspase-3/7 activity (−1.6-fold, P < 0.001). Our data suggest that membrane CFTR regulates ceramide-enriched lipid raft signaling platforms required for the induction of Fas-mediated apoptotic signaling. In addition, lack of membrane CFTR also modulates autophagy, as demonstrated by the significant increase in constitutive (P < 0.001) and CSE-induced (P < 0.005) perinuclear accumulation of green fluorescent protein-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3 (LC3) in the absence of membrane CFTR (CFBE41o− cells). The significant constitutive and CS-induced increase (P < 0.05) in p62 and LC3β expression in CFTR-deficient cells and mice corroborates these findings and suggest a defective autophagy response in the absence of membrane CFTR. Our data demonstrate the critical role of membrane-localized CFTR in regulating apoptotic and autophagic responses in CS-induced lung injury that may be involved in the pathogenesis of severe emphysema. PMID:21378025

  20. Clustering and Lateral Concentration of Raft Lipids by the MAL Protein

    PubMed Central

    Magal, Lee Goldstein; Yaffe, Yakey; Shepshelovich, Jeanne; Aranda, Juan Francisco; del Carmen de Marco, Maria; Gaus, Katharina; Alonso, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01

    MAL, a compact hydrophobic, four-transmembrane-domain apical protein that copurifies with detergent-resistant membranes is obligatory for the machinery that sorts glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins and others to the apical membrane in epithelia. The mechanism of MAL function in lipid-raft–mediated apical sorting is unknown. We report that MAL clusters formed by two independent procedures—spontaneous clustering of MAL tagged with the tandem dimer DiHcRED (DiHcRED-MAL) in the plasma membrane of COS7 cells and antibody-mediated cross-linking of FLAG-tagged MAL—laterally concentrate markers of sphingolipid rafts and exclude a fluorescent analogue of phosphatidylethanolamine. Site-directed mutagenesis and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis demonstrate that MAL forms oligomers via ϕxxϕ intramembrane protein–protein binding motifs. Furthermore, results from membrane modulation by using exogenously added cholesterol or ceramides support the hypothesis that MAL-mediated association with raft lipids is driven at least in part by positive hydrophobic mismatch between the lengths of the transmembrane helices of MAL and membrane lipids. These data place MAL as a key component in the organization of membrane domains that could potentially serve as membrane sorting platforms. PMID:19553470

  1. Recombinant VSV G proteins reveal a novel raft-dependent endocytic pathway in resorbing osteoclasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mulari, Mika T.K. Nars, Martin; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Kaisto, Tuula; Metsikkoe, Kalervo; Sun Yi; Vaeaenaenen, H. Kalervo

    2008-05-01

    Transcytotic membrane flow delivers degraded bone fragments from the ruffled border to the functional secretory domain, FSD, in bone resorbing osteoclasts. Here we show that there is also a FSD-to-ruffled border trafficking pathway that compensates for the membrane loss during the matrix uptake process and that rafts are essential for this ruffled border-targeted endosomal pathway. Replacing the cytoplasmic tail of the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein with that of CD4 resulted in partial insolubility in Triton X-100 and retargeting from the peripheral non-bone facing plasma membrane to the FSD. Recombinant G proteins were subsequently endosytosed and delivered from the FSD to the peripheral fusion zone of the ruffled border, which were both rich in lipid rafts as suggested by viral protein transport analysis and visualizing the rafts with fluorescent recombinant cholera toxin. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin impaired the ruffled border-targeted vesicle trafficking pathway and inhibited bone resorption dose-dependently as quantified by measuring the CTX and TRACP 5b secreted to the culture medium and by measuring the resorbed area visualized with a bi-phasic labeling method using sulpho-NHS-biotin and WGA-lectin. Thus, rafts are vital for membrane recycling from the FSD to the late endosomal/lysosomal ruffled border and bone resorption.

  2. P-glycoprotein and 'lipid rafts': some ambiguous mutual relationships (floating on them, building them or meeting them by chance?).

    PubMed

    Orlowski, S; Martin, S; Escargueil, A

    2006-05-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an active membrane transporter responsible for cell detoxification against numerous amphiphilic compounds, leading to multidrug resistance in tumor cells. It displays entangled connections with its membrane environment since it recognizes its substrates within the cytosolic leaflet and it also translocates some endogenous lipids to the exoplasmic leaflet. Regarding its relationships with membrane microdomains, 'lipid rafts', a literature analysis concludes that (i) P-gp also exists in rafts and non-raft membrane domains, depending on the cell considered, the experimental conditions and the method used to test it; (ii) cholesterol has a positive influence on P-gp function, and this may be a direct effect of the free cholesterol present in membrane or an indirect effect mediated by the cholesterol-enriched microdomains; (iii) when present in rafts, P-gp interacts with protein partners regulating its activity; (iv) P-gp is a lipid translocase that handles the raft-constituting lipids with particular efficiency, and it also influences membrane trafficking in the cell.

  3. Lipid raft-regulated IGF-1R activation antagonizes TRAIL-induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ling; Qu, Xiujuan; Hu, Xuejun; Zhu, Zhitu; Li, Ce; Li, Enze; Ma, Yanju; Song, Na; Liu, Yunpeng

    2013-11-29

    Gastric cancer cells are resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and the resistance mechanism is not fully understood. In human gastric cancer MGC803 and BGC823 cells, TRAIL induces insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) pathway activation. Treatment with IGF-1R inhibitor OSI-906 or small interfering RNAs against IGF-1R, prevents IGF-1R pathway activation and increases TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The TRAIL-induced IGF-1R pathway activation is promoted by IGF-1R translocation into lipid rafts. Moreover, the translocation of IGF-1R into lipid rafts is regulated by Casitas B-lineage lymphoma b (Cbl-b). Taken together, TRAIL-induced IGF-1R activation antagonizes TRAIL-induced apoptosis by Cbl-b-regulated distribution of IGF-1R in lipid rafts.

  4. Atomic Force Microscopy and Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy of Nanoscale Rafts in Biomimetic Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Jeeseong, Hwang; Jin, Albert; Arie, Takayuki; Smith, Paul; Feigenson, Gerald; Goldner, Lori; Dvorak, James

    2002-03-01

    We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) and near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to image nanoscale domains in biomimetic lipid membranes composed of bilayers of binary or tertiary mixtures of 1, 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1, 2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC), and cholesterol. At phase transition temperature, the AFM images of membranes composed of binary mixture displayed evolution of phase domains that are thought to have relevance to functional cell-surface rafts. For tertiary mixture we labeled the lipids with fluorescent lipid analogs, Bodipy-PC and DiI-C20:0 to identify the distribution of specific membrane components. Simultaneous multicolor imaging at the wavelengths of the emission maxima of the fluorescent analogs revealed a non-correlated patchy distribution of Bodipy-PC and DiI-C20:0 indicative of a domain separation of the lipid bilayer. The nanoscale size distribution of membrane patches is consistent with parameters in a thermodynamic model system. NSOM studies were performed either on a homebuilt wet cell NSOM or on a prototype NSOM/AFM we are developing for biomedical research. Our NSOM uses aperture probes fabricated with pulled single mode fiber. A probe scans topography of the sample within the distance less than 10nm resulting in the sub-diffraction limit resolution.

  5. Caveolin-1 in Lipid Rafts Interacts with Dengue Virus NS3 during Polyprotein Processing and Replication in HMEC-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    García Cordero, Julio; León Juárez, Moisés; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A.; Cedillo Barrón, Leticia; Gutiérrez Castañeda, Benito

    2014-01-01

    Lipid rafts are ordered microdomains within cellular membranes that are rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Caveolin (Cav-1) and flotillin (Flt-1) are markers of lipid rafts, which serve as an organizing center for biological phenomena and cellular signaling. Lipid rafts involvement in dengue virus (DENV) processing, replication, and assembly remains poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the role of lipid rafts after DENV endocytosis in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). The non-structural viral proteins NS3 and NS2B, but not NS5, were associated with detergent-resistant membranes. In sucrose gradients, both NS3 and NS2B proteins appeared in Cav-1 and Flt-1 rich fractions. Additionally, double immunofluorescence staining of DENV-infected HMEC-1 cells showed that NS3 and NS2B, but not NS5, colocalized with Cav-1 and Flt-1. Furthermore, in HMEC-1cells transfected with NS3 protease, shown a strong overlap between NS3 and Cav-1, similar to that in DENV-infected cells. In contrast, double-stranded viral RNA (dsRNA) overlapped weakly with Cav-1 and Flt-1. Given these results, we investigated whether Cav-1 directly interacted with NS3. Cav-1 and NS3 co-immunoprecipitated, indicating that they resided within the same complex. Furthermore, when cellular cholesterol was depleted by methyl-beta cyclodextrin treatment after DENV entrance, lipid rafts were disrupted, NS3 protein level was reduced, besides Cav-1 and NS3 were displaced to fractions 9 and 10 in sucrose gradient analysis, and we observed a dramatically reduction of DENV particles release. These data demonstrate the essential role of caveolar cholesterol-rich lipid raft microdomains in DENV polyprotein processing and replication during the late stages of the DENV life cycle. PMID:24643062

  6. Nitric oxide inhibition of adenylyl cyclase type 6 activity is dependent upon lipid rafts and caveolin signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Bundey, Richard A; Insel, Paul A

    2004-05-07

    Several cell types, including cardiac myocytes and vascular endothelial cells, produce nitric oxide (NO) via both constitutive and inducible isoforms of NO synthase. NO attenuates cardiac contractility and contributes to contractile dysfunction in heart failure, although the precise molecular mechanisms for these effects are poorly defined. Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms type 5 and 6, which are preferentially expressed in cardiac myocytes, may be inhibited via a direct nitrosylation by NO. Because endothelial NO synthase (eNOS and NOS3), beta-adrenergic (betaAR) receptors, and AC6 all can localize in lipid raft/caveolin-rich microdomains, we sought to understand the role of lipid rafts in organizing components of betaAR-G(s)-AC signal transduction together with eNOS. Using neonatal rat cardiac myocytes, we found that disruption of lipid rafts with beta-cyclodextrin inhibited forskolin-stimulated AC activity and cAMP production, eliminated caveolin-3-eNOS interaction, and increased NO production. betaAR- and G(s)-mediated activation of AC activity were inhibited by beta-cyclodextrin treatment, but prostanoid receptor-stimulated AC activity, which appears to occur outside caveolin-rich microdomains, was unaffected unless eNOS was overexpressed and lipid rafts were disrupted. An NO donor, SNAP, inhibited basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production in both native cardiac myocytes and cardiac myocytes and pulmonary artery endothelial cells engineered to overexpress AC6. These effects of SNAP were independent of guanylyl cyclase activity and were mimicked by overexpression of eNOS. The juxtaposition of eNOS with betaAR and AC types 5 and 6 results in selective regulation of betaAR by eNOS activity in lipid raft domains over other G(s)-coupled receptors localized in nonraft domains. Thus co-localization of multiple signaling components in lipid rafts provides key spatial regulation of AC activity.

  7. Aβ promotes VDAC1 channel dephosphorylation in neuronal lipid rafts. Relevance to the mechanisms of neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Echevarria, C; Díaz, M; Ferrer, I; Canerina-Amaro, A; Marin, R

    2014-10-10

    Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is a mitochondrial protein abundantly found in neuronal lipid rafts. In these membrane domains, VDAC is associated with a complex of signaling proteins that trigger neuroprotective responses. Loss of lipid raft integrity may result in disruption of multicomplex association and alteration of signaling responses that may ultimately promote VDAC activation. Some data have demonstrated that VDAC at the neuronal membrane may be involved in the mechanisms of amyloid beta (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity, through yet unknown mechanisms. Aβ is generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP), and is released to the extracellular space where it may undergo self-aggregation. Aβ aggregate deposition in the form of senile plaques may lead to Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, although other pathological hallmarks (such as hyper-phosphorylated Tau deposition) also participate in this neurodegenerative process. The present study demonstrates that VDAC1 associates with APP and Aβ in lipid rafts of neurons. Interaction of VDAC1 with APP was observed in lipid rafts from the frontal and entorhinal cortex of human brains affected by AD at early stages (I-IV/0-B of Braak and Braak). Furthermore, Aβ exposure enhanced the dephosphorylation of VDAC1 that correlated with cell death. Both effects were reverted in the presence of tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors. VDAC1 dephosphorylation was corroborated in lipid rafts of AD brains. These results demonstrate that Aβ is involved in alterations of the phosphorylation state of VDAC in neuronal lipid rafts. Modulation of this channel may contribute to the development and progression of AD pathology.

  8. Caveolin-1 in lipid rafts interacts with dengue virus NS3 during polyprotein processing and replication in HMEC-1 cells.

    PubMed

    García Cordero, Julio; León Juárez, Moisés; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A; Cedillo Barrón, Leticia; Gutiérrez Castañeda, Benito

    2014-01-01

    Lipid rafts are ordered microdomains within cellular membranes that are rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Caveolin (Cav-1) and flotillin (Flt-1) are markers of lipid rafts, which serve as an organizing center for biological phenomena and cellular signaling. Lipid rafts involvement in dengue virus (DENV) processing, replication, and assembly remains poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the role of lipid rafts after DENV endocytosis in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). The non-structural viral proteins NS3 and NS2B, but not NS5, were associated with detergent-resistant membranes. In sucrose gradients, both NS3 and NS2B proteins appeared in Cav-1 and Flt-1 rich fractions. Additionally, double immunofluorescence staining of DENV-infected HMEC-1 cells showed that NS3 and NS2B, but not NS5, colocalized with Cav-1 and Flt-1. Furthermore, in HMEC-1cells transfected with NS3 protease, shown a strong overlap between NS3 and Cav-1, similar to that in DENV-infected cells. In contrast, double-stranded viral RNA (dsRNA) overlapped weakly with Cav-1 and Flt-1. Given these results, we investigated whether Cav-1 directly interacted with NS3. Cav-1 and NS3 co-immunoprecipitated, indicating that they resided within the same complex. Furthermore, when cellular cholesterol was depleted by methyl-beta cyclodextrin treatment after DENV entrance, lipid rafts were disrupted, NS3 protein level was reduced, besides Cav-1 and NS3 were displaced to fractions 9 and 10 in sucrose gradient analysis, and we observed a dramatically reduction of DENV particles release. These data demonstrate the essential role of caveolar cholesterol-rich lipid raft microdomains in DENV polyprotein processing and replication during the late stages of the DENV life cycle.

  9. Gangliosides are essential in the protection of inflammation and neurodegeneration via maintenance of lipid rafts: elucidation by a series of ganglioside-deficient mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Tajima, Orie; Ohkawa, Yuki; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Sugiura, Yasuo; Furukawa, Keiko; Furukawa, Koichi

    2011-03-01

    Gangliosides are considered to be involved in the maintenance and repair of nervous tissues. Recently, novel roles of gangliosides in the regulation of complement system were reported by us. In this study, we compared complement activation, inflammatory reaction and disruption of glycolipid-enriched microdomain (GEM)/rafts among various mutant mice of ganglioside synthases, i.e. GM2/GD2 synthase knockout (KO), GD3 synthase KO, double KO (DKO) of these two enzymes and wild type. Up-regulation of complement-related genes, deposits of C1q, proliferation of astrocytes and infiltration of microglia also showed similar gradual severity depending on the defects in ganglioside compositions. In the expression of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor α, only DKO showed definite up-regulation. Immunoblotting of fractions from sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation revealed that lipid raft markers such as caveolin-1 and flotillin-1 tended to disperse from the raft fractions with intensities of DKO > GM2/GD2 synthase KO > GD3 synthase KO > wild type. Decay-accelerating factor and neural cell adhesion molecule tended to disappear from the raft fraction. Phospholipids and cholesterol also tended to decrease in GEM/rafts in GM2/GD2 synthase KO and DKO, although total amounts were almost equivalent. These results indicate that destruction of GEM/rafts is caused by ganglioside deficiency with gradual intensity depending on the degree of defects of their compositions. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. TRAIL-activated EGFR by Cbl-b-regulated EGFR redistribution in lipid rafts antagonises TRAIL-induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ling; Zhang, Ye; Liu, Jing; Qu, Jinglei; Hu, Xuejun; Zhang, Fan; Zheng, Huachuan; Qu, Xiujuan; Liu, Yunpeng

    2012-11-01

    Most gastric cancer cells are resistant to tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Since TRAIL resistance is associated with lipid rafts, in which both death receptors and epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) are enriched, our aim is to identify how lipid raft-regulated receptor redistribution influences the sensitivity of TRAIL in gastric cancer cells. In TRAIL-resistant gastric cancer cells, TRAIL did not induce effective death-inducing signalling complex (DISC) formation in lipid rafts, accompanied with EGFR translocation into lipid rafts, and activation of EGFR pathway. Knockdown of casitas B-lineage lymphoma-b (Cbl-b) enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by promoting DISC formation in lipid rafts. However, knockdown of Cbl-b also enhanced EGFR translocation into lipid rafts and EGFR pathway activation induced by TRAIL. Either using inhibitors of EGFR or depletion of EGFR with small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented EGFR pathway activation, and thus increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis, especially in Cbl-b knockdown clones. Taken together, TRAIL-induced EGFR activation through Cbl-b-regulated EGFR redistribution in lipid rafts antagonised TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The contribution of DISC formation and the inhibition of EGFR signal triggered in lipid rafts are both essential for increasing the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to TRAIL.

  11. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  12. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; ...

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed betweenmore » the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.« less

  13. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; Lee, Sang -Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang -Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin -Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.

  14. Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinase β Controls Recruitment of Lipid Rafts into the Immunological Synapse.

    PubMed

    Kallikourdis, Marinos; Trovato, Anna Elisa; Roselli, Giuliana; Muscolini, Michela; Porciello, Nicla; Tuosto, Loretta; Viola, Antonella

    2016-02-15

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) is critical for T lymphocyte activation serving as a substrate for the generation of second messengers and the remodeling of actin cytoskeleton necessary for the clustering of lipid rafts, TCR, and costimulatory receptors toward the T:APC interface. Spatiotemporal analysis of PIP2 synthesis in T lymphocytes suggested that distinct isoforms of the main PIP2-generating enzyme, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K), play a differential role on the basis of their distinct localization. In this study, we analyze the contribution of PIP5Kβ to T cell activation and show that CD28 induces the recruitment of PIP5Kβ to the immunological synapse, where it regulates filamin A and lipid raft accumulation, as well as T cell activation, in a nonredundant manner. Finally, we found that Vav1 and the C-terminal 83 aa of PIP5Kβ are pivotal for the PIP5Kβ regulatory functions in response to CD28 stimulation. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Caveolins, caveolae, and lipid rafts in cellular transport, signaling, and disease.

    PubMed

    Quest, Andrew F G; Leyton, Lisette; Párraga, Mario

    2004-02-01

    Caveolae were initially described some 50 years ago. For many decades, they remained predominantly of interest to structural biologists. The identification of a molecular marker for these domains, caveolin, combined with the possibility to isolate such cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich regions as detergent-insoluble membrane complexes paved the way to more rigorous characterization of composition, regulation, and function. Experiments with knock-out mice for the caveolin genes clearly demonstrate the importance of caveolin-1 and -3 in formation of caveolae. Nonetheless, detergent-insoluble domains are also found in cells lacking caveolin expression and are referred to here as lipid rafts. Caveolae and lipid rafts were shown to represent membrane compartments enriched in a large number of signaling molecules whose structural integrity is essential for many signaling processes. Caveolin-1 is an essential structural component of cell surface caveolae, important for regulating trafficking and mobility of these vesicles. In addition, caveolin-1 is found at many other intracellular locations. Variations in subcellular localization are paralleled by a plethora of ascribed functions for this protein. Here, more recent data addressing the role of caveolin-1 in cellular signaling and the development of diseases like cancer will be preferentially discussed.

  16. Lipid Rafts Act as Specialized Domains for Tetanus Toxin Binding and Internalization into Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Herreros, Judit; Ng, Tony; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2001-01-01

    Tetanus (TeNT) is a zinc protease that blocks neurotransmission by cleaving the synaptic protein vesicle-associated membrane protein/synaptobrevin. Although its intracellular catalytic activity is well established, the mechanism by which this neurotoxin interacts with the neuronal surface is not known. In this study, we characterize p15s, the first plasma membrane TeNT binding proteins and we show that they are glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoproteins in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells, spinal cord cells, and purified motor neurons. We identify p15 as neuronal Thy-1 in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy measurements confirm the close association of the binding domain of TeNT and Thy-1 at the plasma membrane. We find that TeNT is recruited to detergent-insoluble lipid microdomains on the surface of neuronal cells. Finally, we show that cholesterol depletion affects a raft subpool and blocks the internalization and intracellular activity of the toxin. Our results indicate that TeNT interacts with target cells by binding to lipid rafts and that cholesterol is required for TeNT internalization and/or trafficking in neurons. PMID:11598183

  17. Prion Protein-mediated Toxicity of Amyloid-β Oligomers Requires Lipid Rafts and the Transmembrane LRP1*

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, Jo V.; Griffiths, Heledd H.; Watt, Nicole T.; Hooper, Nigel M.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble oligomers of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide cause neurotoxicity, synaptic dysfunction, and memory impairments that underlie Alzheimer disease (AD). The cellular prion protein (PrPC) was recently identified as a high affinity neuronal receptor for Aβ oligomers. We report that fibrillar Aβ oligomers recognized by the OC antibody, which have been shown to correlate with the onset and severity of AD, bind preferentially to cells and neurons expressing PrPC. The binding of Aβ oligomers to cell surface PrPC, as well as their downstream activation of Fyn kinase, was dependent on the integrity of cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. In SH-SY5Y cells, fluorescence microscopy and co-localization with subcellular markers revealed that the Aβ oligomers co-internalized with PrPC, accumulated in endosomes, and subsequently trafficked to lysosomes. The cell surface binding, internalization, and downstream toxicity of Aβ oligomers was dependent on the transmembrane low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1). The binding of Aβ oligomers to cell surface PrPC impaired its ability to inhibit the activity of the β-secretase BACE1, which cleaves the amyloid precursor protein to produce Aβ. The green tea polyphenol (−)-epigallocatechin gallate and the red wine extract resveratrol both remodeled the fibrillar conformation of Aβ oligomers. The resulting nonfibrillar oligomers displayed significantly reduced binding to PrPC-expressing cells and were no longer cytotoxic. These data indicate that soluble, fibrillar Aβ oligomers bind to PrPC in a conformation-dependent manner and require the integrity of lipid rafts and the transmembrane LRP1 for their cytotoxicity, thus revealing potential targets to alleviate the neurotoxic properties of Aβ oligomers in AD. PMID:23386614

  18. Saltatory conduction in unmyelinated axons: clustering of Na+ channels on lipid rafts enables micro-saltatory conduction in C-fibers

    PubMed Central

    Neishabouri, Ali; Faisal, A. Aldo

    2014-01-01

    The action potential (AP), the fundamental signal of the nervous system, is carried by two types of axons: unmyelinated and myelinated fibers. In the former the action potential propagates continuously along the axon as established in large-diameter fibers. In the latter axons the AP jumps along the nodes of Ranvier—discrete, anatomically specialized regions which contain very high densities of sodium ion (Na+) channels. Therefore, saltatory conduction is thought as the hallmark of myelinated axons, which enables faster and more reliable propagation of signals than in unmyelinated axons of same outer diameter. Recent molecular anatomy showed that in C-fibers, the very thin (0.1 μm diameter) axons of the peripheral nervous system, Nav1.8 channels are clustered together on lipid rafts that float in the cell membrane. This localized concentration of Na+ channels resembles in structure the ion channel organization at the nodes of Ranvier, yet it is currently unknown whether this translates into an equivalent phenomenon of saltatory conduction or related-functional benefits and efficiencies. Therefore, we modeled biophysically realistic unmyelinated axons with both conventional and lipid-raft based organization of Na+ channels. We find that APs are reliably conducted in a micro-saltatory fashion along lipid rafts. Comparing APs in unmyelinated fibers with and without lipid rafts did not reveal any significant difference in either the metabolic cost or AP propagation velocity. By investigating the efficiency of AP propagation over Nav1.8 channels, we find however that the specific inactivation properties of these channels significantly increase the metabolic cost of signaling in C-fibers. PMID:25352785

  19. Cutting Edge: Localization of linker for activation of T cells to lipid rafts is not essential in T cell activation and development.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minghua; Shen, Shudan; Liu, Yan; Granillo, Olivia; Zhang, Weiguo

    2005-01-01

    It has been proposed that upon T cell activation, linker for activation of T cells (LAT), a transmembrane adaptor protein localized to lipid rafts, orchestrates formation of multiprotein complexes and activates signaling cascades in lipid rafts. However, whether lipid rafts really exist or function remains controversial. To address the importance of lipid rafts in LAT function, we generated a fusion protein to target LAT to nonraft fractions using the transmembrane domain from a nonraft protein, linker for activation of X cells (LAX). Surprisingly, this fusion protein functioned well in TCR signaling. It restored MAPK activation, calcium flux, and NFAT activation in LAT-deficient cells. To further study the function of this fusion protein in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that express this protein. Analysis of these mice indicated that it was fully capable of replacing LAT in thymocyte development and T cell function. Our results demonstrate that LAT localization to lipid rafts is not essential during normal T cell activation and development.

  20. Regulating the Size and Stabilization of Lipid Raft-Like Domains and Using Calcium Ions as Their Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raviv, Uri; Szekely, Or

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we apply means to probe, stabilize and control the size of lipid raft-like domains in vitro. In biomembranes the size of lipid rafts is ca. 10 - 30 nm. In vitro, mixing saturated and unsaturated lipids results in micro-domains, which are unstable and coalesce. Using solution X-ray scattering, we studied the structure of binary and ternary lipid mixtures in the presence of calcium ions. Three lipids were used: saturated, unsaturated and a hybrid (1-saturated-2-unsaturated) lipid that is predominant in the phospholipids of cellular membranes. Only membranes composed of the saturated lipid can adsorb calcium ions, become charged and therefore considerably swell. The selective calcium affinity was used to show that binary mixtures, containing the saturated lipid, phase separated into large-scale domains. Our data suggests that by introducing the hybrid lipid to a mixture of the saturated and unsaturated lipids, the size of the domains decreased with the concentration of the hybrid lipid, until the three lipids could completely mix. We attribute this behavior to the tendency of the hybrid lipid to act as a line-active co-surfactant that can easily reside at the interface between the saturated and the unsaturated lipids and reduce the line-tension between them.

  1. Motility and stem cell properties induced by the epithelial-mesenchymal transition require destabilization of lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Prijic, Sara; Chen, Xiaoling; Levental, Ilya; Chang, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    The Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a developmental program that provides cancer cells with the characteristics necessary for metastasis, including increased motility and stem cell properties. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are not yet fully understood, hampering efforts to develop therapeutics. In recent years, it has become apparent that EMT is accompanied by wholesale changes in diverse signaling pathways that are initiated by proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). The PM contains thousands of lipid and protein species that are dynamically and spatially organized into lateral membrane domains, an example of which are lipid rafts. Since one of the major functions of rafts is modulation of signaling originating at the PM, we hypothesized that the signaling changes occurring during an EMT are associated with alterations in PM organization. To test this hypothesis, we used Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles (GPMVs) to study the organization of intact plasma membranes isolated from live cells. We observed that induction of EMT significantly destabilized lipid raft domains. Further, this reduction in stability was crucial for the maintenance of the stem cell phenotype and EMT-induced remodeling of PM-orchestrated pathways. Exogenously increasing raft stability by feeding cells with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) repressed these phenotypes without altering EMT markers, and inhibited the metastatic capacity of breast cancer cells. Hence, modulating raft properties regulates cell phenotype, suggesting a novel approach for targeting the impact of EMT in cancer. PMID:27303921

  2. Biophysical and biochemical mechanisms by which dietary N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from fish oil disrupt membrane lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2012-02-01

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from fish oil exert their functional effects by targeting multiple mechanisms. One mechanism to emerge in the past decade is the ability of n-3 PUFA acyl chains to perturb the molecular organization of plasma membrane sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched lipid raft domains. These domains are nanometer-scale assemblies that coalesce to compartmentalize select proteins for optimal function. Here we review recent evidence on how n-3 PUFAs modify lipid rafts from biophysical and biochemical experiments from several different model systems. A central theme emerges from these studies. N-3 PUFA acyl chains display tremendous conformational flexibility and a low affinity for cholesterol and saturated acyl chains. This unique flexibility of n-3 PUFA acyl chains impacts the organization of inner and outer leaflet lipid rafts by disrupting acyl chain packing and molecular order within rafts. Ultimately, the disruption in raft organization has consequences for protein clustering and thereby signaling. Overall, elucidating the complex mechanisms by which n-3 PUFA acyl chains reorganize membrane architecture will enhance the translation of these fatty acids into the clinic for treating several diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipid-Mediated Clusters of Guest Molecules in Model Membranes and Their Dissolving in the Presence of Lipid Rafts.

    PubMed

    Kardash, Maria E; Dzuba, Sergei A

    2017-05-25

    The clustering of molecules is an important feature of plasma membrane organization. It is challenging to develop methods for quantifying membrane heterogeneities because of their transient nature and small size. Here, we obtained evidence that transient membrane heterogeneities can be frozen at cryogenic temperatures which allows the application of solid-state experimental techniques sensitive to the nanoscale distance range. We employed the pulsed version of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the electron spin echo (ESE) technique, for spin-labeled molecules in multilamellar lipid bilayers. ESE decays were refined for pure contribution of spin-spin magnetic dipole-dipolar interaction between the labels; these interactions manifest themselves at a nanometer distance range. The bilayers were prepared from different types of saturated and unsaturated lipids and cholesterol (Chol); in all cases, a small amount of guest spin-labeled substances 5-doxyl-stearic-acid (5-DSA) or 3β-doxyl-5α-cholestane (DChl) was added. The local concentration found of 5-DSA and DChl molecules was remarkably higher than the mean concentration in the bilayer, evidencing the formation of lipid-mediated clusters of these molecules. To our knowledge, formation of nanoscale clusters of guest amphiphilic molecules in biological membranes is a new phenomenon suggested only recently. Two-dimensional 5-DSA molecular clusters were found, whereas flat DChl molecules were found to be clustered into stacked one-dimensional structures. These clusters disappear when the Chol content is varied between the boundaries known for lipid raft formation at room temperatures. The room temperature EPR evidenced entrapping of DChl molecules in the rafts.

  4. Rafting trips into the cell.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Knorr, Ruth

    2009-09-01

    Lipid rafts are small, heterogeneous and short-lived assemblies of cholesterol, sphingolipids and few proteins in biological membranes. They can be converted to larger and more permanent membrane domains by coalescence. Cells appear to be able to modulate the size and the longevity of lipid rafts and thus exploit the local enrichment of membrane components for processes ranging from signaling to intracellular sorting and transport. In a recent paper, we provided evidence for the internalization of MHC I and MHC II along two distinct endocytosis pathways in mouse B-lymphocytes. Both pathways were much more dependent on membrane cholesterol than the clathrin-mediated uptake of transferrin receptor, which implicated lipid rafts in the internalization of MHC molecules. Indeed, MHC I and MHC II prefer distinct raft-like membrane environments as revealed by a co-clustering analysis with the sphingolipids G(M)1 and G(M)2. Moreover, MHC I and MHC II distributed to different types of detergent resistant membranes (DRMs) prepared by a novel detergent extraction procedure. In this article addendum we discuss the relationship between DRMs, small lipid rafts and stabilized rafts/membrane domains and propose a role for membrane domains in the endocytosis of MHC proteins.

  5. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) traffics to apical membrane in lipid rafts in mouse cortical collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Hill, Warren G; Butterworth, Michael B; Wang, Huamin; Edinger, Robert S; Lebowitz, Jonathan; Peters, Kathryn W; Frizzell, Raymond A; Johnson, John P

    2007-12-28

    We previously showed that ENaC is present in lipid rafts in A6 cells, a Xenopus kidney cell line. We now demonstrate that ENaC can be detected in lipid rafts in mouse cortical collecting duct ((MPK)CCD(14)) cells by detergent insolubility, buoyancy on density gradients using two distinct approaches, and colocalization with caveolin 1. Less than 30% of ENaC subunits were found in raft fractions. The channel subunits also colocalized on sucrose gradients with known vesicle targeting and fusion proteins syntaxin 1A, Vamp 2, and SNAP23. Hormonal stimulation of ENaC activity by either forskolin or aldosterone, short or long term, did not alter the lipid raft distribution of ENaC. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin added apically to (MPK)CCD(14) cells resulted in a slow decline in amiloride-sensitive sodium transport with short circuit current reductions of 38.1 +/- 9.6% after 60 min. The slow decline in ENaC activity in response to apical cyclodextrin was identical to the rate of decline seen when protein synthesis was inhibited by cycloheximide. Apical biotinylation of (MPK)CCD(14) cells confirmed the loss of ENaC at the cell surface following cyclodextrin treatment. Acute stimulation of the recycling pool of ENaC was unaffected by apical cyclodextrin application. Expression of dominant negative caveolin isoforms (CAV1-eGFP and CAV3-DGV) which disrupt caveolae, reduced basal ENaC currents by 72.3 and 78.2%, respectively; but, as with cyclodextrin, the acute response to forskolin was unaffected. We conclude that ENaC is present in and regulated by lipid rafts. The data are consistent with a model in which rafts mediate the constitutive apical delivery of ENaC.

  6. Ceramide modulates HERG potassium channel gating by translocation into lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Sindura B.; Fox, Todd E.; Elmslie, Keith S.

    2010-01-01

    Human ether-à-go-go-related gene (HERG) potassium channels play an important role in cardiac action potential repolarization, and HERG dysfunction can cause cardiac arrhythmias. However, recent evidence suggests a role for HERG in the proliferation and progression of multiple types of cancers, making it an attractive target for cancer therapy. Ceramide is an important second messenger of the sphingolipid family, which due to its proapoptotic properties has shown promising results in animal models as an anticancer agent. Yet the acute effects of ceramide on HERG potassium channels are not known. In the present study we examined the effects of cell-permeable C6-ceramide on HERG potassium channels stably expressed in HEK-293 cells. C6-ceramide (10 μM) reversibly inhibited HERG channel current (IHERG) by 36 ± 5%. Kinetically, ceramide induced a significant hyperpolarizing shift in the current-voltage relationship (ΔV1/2 = −8 ± 0.5 mV) and increased the deactivation rate (43 ± 3% for τfast and 51 ± 3% for τslow). Mechanistically, ceramide recruited HERG channels within caveolin-enriched lipid rafts. Cholesterol depletion and repletion experiments and mathematical modeling studies confirmed that inhibition and gating effects are mediated by separate mechanisms. The ceramide-induced hyperpolarizing gating shift (raft mediated) could offset the impact of inhibition (raft independent) during cardiac action potential repolarization, so together they may nullify any negative impact on cardiac rhythm. Our results provide new insights into the effects of C6-ceramide on HERG channels and suggest that C6-ceramide can be a promising therapeutic for cancers that overexpress HERG. PMID:20375276

  7. Interaction of membrane/lipid rafts with the cytoskeleton: impact on signaling and function: membrane/lipid rafts, mediators of cytoskeletal arrangement and cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Head, Brian P; Patel, Hemal H; Insel, Paul A

    2014-02-01

    The plasma membrane in eukaryotic cells contains microdomains that are enriched in certain glycosphingolipids, gangliosides, and sterols (such as cholesterol) to form membrane/lipid rafts (MLR). These regions exist as caveolae, morphologically observable flask-like invaginations, or as a less easily detectable planar form. MLR are scaffolds for many molecular entities, including signaling receptors and ion channels that communicate extracellular stimuli to the intracellular milieu. Much evidence indicates that this organization and/or the clustering of MLR into more active signaling platforms depends upon interactions with and dynamic rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. Several cytoskeletal components and binding partners, as well as enzymes that regulate the cytoskeleton, localize to MLR and help regulate lateral diffusion of membrane proteins and lipids in response to extracellular events (e.g., receptor activation, shear stress, electrical conductance, and nutrient demand). MLR regulate cellular polarity, adherence to the extracellular matrix, signaling events (including ones that affect growth and migration), and are sites of cellular entry of certain pathogens, toxins and nanoparticles. The dynamic interaction between MLR and the underlying cytoskeleton thus regulates many facets of the function of eukaryotic cells and their adaptation to changing environments. Here, we review general features of MLR and caveolae and their role in several aspects of cellular function, including polarity of endothelial and epithelial cells, cell migration, mechanotransduction, lymphocyte activation, neuronal growth and signaling, and a variety of disease settings. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters. Guest Editor: Jean Claude Hervé. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. The Role of Lipid Raft Aggregation in the Infection of Type II Pneumocytes by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fine-Coulson, Kari; Reaves, Barbara J.; Karls, Russell K.; Quinn, Frederick D.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic, cholesterol-dense regions of the plasma membrane, known as lipid rafts (LR), have been observed to develop during and may be directly involved in infection of host cells by various pathogens. This study focuses on LR aggregation induced in alveolar epithelial cells during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacilli. We report dose- and time-dependent increases in LR aggregation after infection with three different strains at multiplicities of infection of 1, 10 and 100 from 2–24 hr post infection (hpi). Specific strain-dependent variations were noted among H37Rv, HN878 and CDC1551 with H37Rv producing the most significant increase from 15 aggregates per cell (APC) to 27 APC at MOI 100 during the 24 hour infection period. Treatment of epithelial cells with Culture Filtrate Protein, Total Lipids and gamma-irradiated whole cells from each strain failed to induce the level of LR aggregation observed during infection with any of the live strains. However, filtered supernatants from infected epithelial cells did produce comparable LR aggregation, suggesting a secreted mycobacterial product produced during infection of host cells is responsible for LR aggregation. Disruption of lipid raft formation prior to infection indicates that Mtb bacilli utilize LR aggregates for internalization and survival in epithelial cells. Treatment of host cells with the LR-disruption agent Filipin III produced a nearly 22% reduction in viable bacteria for strains H37Rv and HN878, and a 7% reduction for strain CDC1551 after 6 hpi. This study provides evidence for significant mycobacterial-induced changes in the plasma membrane of alveolar epithelial cells and that Mtb strains vary in their ability to facilitate aggregation and utilization of LR. PMID:23024786

  9. Segregation of gangliosides GM1 and GD3 on cell membranes, isolated membrane rafts, and defined supported lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Vyas, K A; Patel, H V; Vyas, A A; Schnaar, R L

    2001-02-01

    Lateral assemblies of sphingolipids, glycosphingolipids and cholesterol, termed rafts, are postulated to be present in biological membranes and to function in important cellular phenomena. We probed whether rafts are heterogeneous by determining the relative distribution of two gangliosides, GM1 and GD3, in artificial supported monolayers, in intact rat primary cerebellar granule neurones, and in membrane rafts isolated from rat cerebellum. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using fluorophore-labelled cholera toxin B subunit (which binds GM1) and mAb R24 (which binds GD3) revealed that GM1 spontaneously self-associates but does not co-cluster with GD3 in supported monolayers and on intact neurones. Cholera toxin and immunocytochemical labelling of isolated membrane rafts from rat cerebellum further demonstrated that GM1 does not co-localise with GD3. Furthermore, whereas the membrane raft resident proteins Lyn and caveolin both co-localise with GD3 in isolated membrane rafts, GM1 appears in separate and distinct aggregates. These data support prior reports that membrane rafts are heterogeneous, although the mechanisms for establishing and maintaining such heterogeneity remain to be determined.

  10. Lipid Raft Integrity Is Required for Survival of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Badana, Anil; Chintala, Madhuri; Varikuti, Gayathri; Pudi, Nagaseshu; Kumari, Seema; Kappala, Vijaya Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lipid rafts are cholesterol enriched microdomains that colocalize signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis. We examined the effect of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD)-mediated cholesterol extraction on the proliferation, adhesion, invasion, and angiogenesis of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Methods We measured cholesterol and estimated cell toxicity. Detergent resistant membrane (DRM) and non-DRM fractions were separated using the OptiPrep gradient method. Cell cycles stages were analyzed by flow cytometry, apoptosis was assessed using the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay, and metastasis was determined using a Matrigel invasion assay. Neo-vessel pattern and levels of angiogenic modulators were determined using an in vitro angiogenesis assay and an angiogenesis array, respectively. Results The present study found that the cholesterol-depleting agent MβCD, efficiently depleted membrane cholesterol and caused concentration dependent (0.1–0.5 mM) cytotoxicity compared to nystatin and filipin III in TNBC cell lines, MDA-MB 231 and MDA-MB 468. A reduced proportion of caveolin-1 found in DRM fractions indicated a cholesterol extraction-induced disruption of lipid raft integrity. MβCD inhibited 52% of MDA-MB 231 cell adhesion on fibronectin and 56% of MDA-MB 468 cell adhesion on vitronectin, while invasiveness of these cells was decreased by 48% and 52% respectively, following MβCD treatment (48 hours). MβCD also caused cell cycle arrest at the G2M phase and apoptosis in MDA-MB 231 cells (25% and 58% cells, respectively) and in MDA-MB 468 cells (30% and 38% cells, respectively). We found that MβCD treated cells caused a 52% and 58% depletion of neovessel formation in both MDA-MB 231 and MDA-MB 468 cell lines, respectively. This study also demonstrated that MβCD treatment caused a respective 2.6- and 2.5-fold depletion of tyrosine protein kinase receptor (TEK) receptor tyrosine kinase levels in both

  11. Cholesterol drives aβ(1-42) interaction with lipid rafts in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Seghezza, Silvia; Diaspro, Alberto; Canale, Claudio; Dante, Silvia

    2014-11-25

    The molecular mechanism at the basis of the neurodegenerative process related to Alzheimer's disease (AD) is triggered by the local composition of the neural plasma membrane. The role of cholesterol is controversial. In this investigation the interaction of the AD peptide amyloid-beta (1-42) with model membranes containing lipid rafts has been investigated by atomic force microscopy techniques. Supported lipid membranes made of phospholipids/sphingomyelin/cholesterol have been investigated as a function of the molar content of cholesterol, in a range spanning the phase diagram of the lipid system. The administration of amyloid-beta induced a phase reorganization of the lipid domains, when the cholesterol molar fraction was below 5%. At the same time, a mechanical destabilization and an appreciable thinning of the membrane induced by the peptide were detected. The major interaction was observed in the presence of the gel phase Lβ, and was enhanced by a low cholesterol amount. With the appearance of the liquid ordered phase Lo, the effect was hindered. At high cholesterol content (20% mol), no detectable effects in the bilayer morphology or in its mechanical stability were recorded. These findings give new insights on the molecular mechanism of the amyloid/membrane interaction, highlighting the peculiar role of cholesterol.

  12. Supramolecular Nanofibers Enhance Growth Factor Signaling by Increasing Lipid Raft Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, Christina J.; Sur, Shantanu; Lee, Sungsoo S.; Yu, Jeong Min; Zhou, Yan; Snead, Malcolm L.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2016-04-12

    The nanostructures of self-assembling biomaterials have been previously designed to tune the release of growth factors in order to optimize biological repair and regeneration. We report here on the discovery that weakly cohesive peptide nanostructures in terms of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, when combined with low concentrations of osteogenic growth factor, enhance both BMP-2 and Wnt mediated signaling in myoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells, respectively. Conversely, analogous nanostructures with enhanced levels of internal hydrogen bonding and cohesion lead to an overall reduction in BMP-2 signaling. We propose that the mechanism for enhanced growth factor signaling by the nanostructures is related to their ability to increase diffusion within membrane lipid rafts. The phenomenon reported here could lead to new nanomedicine strategies to mediate growth factor signaling for translational targets.

  13. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets — protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores

    PubMed Central

    Arbor, Sage C.; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  14. Fas/CD95 prevents autoimmunity independently of lipid raft localization and efficient apoptosis induction

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Anthony C.; Ramaswamy, Madhu; Ouyang, Claudia; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Meylan, Françoise; Thomas, Stacy K.; Richoz, Nathan; Eil, Robert; Price, Susan; Casellas, Rafael; Rao, V. Koneti; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Siegel, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affecting the apoptosis-inducing function of the Fas/CD95 TNF-family receptor result in autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disease. However, Fas can also costimulate T-cell activation and promote tumour cell growth and metastasis. Palmitoylation at a membrane proximal cysteine residue enables Fas to localize to lipid raft microdomains and induce apoptosis in cell lines. Here, we show that a palmitoylation-defective Fas C194V mutant is defective in inducing apoptosis in primary mouse T cells, B cells and dendritic cells, while retaining the ability to enhance naive T-cell differentiation. Despite inability to efficiently induce cell death, the Fas C194V receptor prevents the lymphoaccumulation and autoimmunity that develops in Fas-deficient mice. These findings indicate that induction of apoptosis through Fas is dependent on receptor palmitoylation in primary immune cells, and Fas may prevent autoimmunity by mechanisms other than inducing apoptosis. PMID:28008916

  15. Thiolated pyrimidine nucleotides may interfere thiol groups concentrated at lipid rafts of HIV-1 infected cells.

    PubMed

    Kanizsai, Szilvia; Ongrádi, Joseph; Aradi, János; Nagy, Károly

    2014-12-01

    Upon HIV infection, cells become activated and cell surface thiols are present in increased number. Earlier we demonstrated in vitro anti-HIV effect of thiolated pyrimidine nucleotide UD29, which interferes thiol function. To further analyse the redox processes required for HIV-1 entry and infection, toxicity assays were performed using HIV-1 infected monolayer HeLaCD4-LTR/ β-gal cells and suspension H9 T cells treated with several thiolated nucleotide derivatives of UD29. Selective cytotoxicity of thiolated pyrimidines on HIV-1 infected cells were observed. Results indicate that thiolated pyrimidine derivates may interfere with -SH (thiol) groups concentrated in lipid rafts of cell membrane and interacts HIV-1 infected (activated) cells resulting in a selective cytotoxicity of HIV-1 infected cells, and reducing HIV-1 entry.

  16. Pathologic prion protein infects cells by lipid-raft dependent macropinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wadia, Jehangir S; Schaller, Monica; Williamson, R Anthony; Dowdy, Steven F

    2008-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, including variant-Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans and bovine spongiform encephalopathies in cattle, are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by protein misfolding of the host cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to the infectious scrapie form (PrP(Sc)). However, the mechanism that exogenous PrP(Sc) infects cells and where pathologic conversion of PrP(C) to the PrP(Sc) form occurs remains uncertain. Here we report that similar to the mechanism of HIV-1 TAT-mediated peptide transduction, processed mature, full length PrP contains a conserved N-terminal cationic domain that stimulates cellular uptake by lipid raft-dependent, macropinocytosis. Inhibition of macropinocytosis by three independent means prevented cellular uptake of recombinant PrP; however, it did not affect recombinant PrP cell surface association. In addition, fusion of the cationic N-terminal PrP domain to a Cre recombinase reporter protein was sufficient to promote both cellular uptake and escape from the macropinosomes into the cytoplasm. Inhibition of macropinocytosis was sufficient to prevent conversion of PrP(C) to the pathologic PrP(Sc) form in N2a cells exposed to strain RML PrP(Sc) infected brain homogenates, suggesting that a critical determinant of PrP(C) conversion occurs following macropinocytotic internalization and not through mere membrane association. Taken together, these observations provide a cellular mechanism that exogenous pathological PrP(Sc) infects cells by lipid raft dependent, macropinocytosis.

  17. Persistence of psychosine in brain lipid rafts is a limiting factor in the therapeutic recovery of a mouse model for Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    White, AB; Galbiati, F; Givogri, MI; Lopez Rosas, A; Qiu, X; van Breemen, R; Bongarzone, ER

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids are intrinsic components of membrane lipid rafts. The abnormal accumulation of these molecules may introduce architectural and functional changes in these domains, leading to cellular dysfunction. Galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) is a pathogenic lipid-raft associated molecule whose accumulation leads to brain deterioration and irreversible neurological handicap in the incurable leukodystrophy Krabbe disease (KD). The relevance of clearing excessive levels of pathogenic psychosine from lipid rafts in therapy for KD has not been investigated. The work presented here demonstrates that psychosine inhibits raft-mediated endocytosis in neural cells. In addition, while in vitro enzyme reconstitution is sufficient for the reversal of related endocytic defects in affected neural cells, traditional in vivo enzyme therapies in the mouse model of KD appear insufficient for complete removal of pathogenic levels of raft-associated psychosine. This work describes a mechanism that may contribute to limit the in vivo efficacy of traditional therapies for KD. PMID:21259322

  18. Lipid rafts association and anti-apoptotic function of prohibitin in ultraviolet B light-irradiated HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-08-01

    Upon UVB irradiation, an alternation of major lipid raft components can lead to the recruitment/activation of rafts-associated proteins and initiation of downstream apoptotic signalling pathways. We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to identify potential regulators of UVB-induced apoptosis and mass spectrometry fingerprint analysis to identify proteins that are altered in the rafts after UVB irradiation. Our data show that levels of several proteins, including prohibitin (PHB), were changed in lipid rafts after UVB irradiation. We also demonstrate that while total PHB expression was not changed, the protein was enriched in lipid rafts after UVB irradiation. Reduced expression of PHB using siRNA knockdown resulted in an increase in cellular apoptosis after UVB irradiation. Based on these results, we propose that PHB protects keratinocytes from UVB-induced apoptosis.

  19. A novel mechanism of regulating breast cancer cell migration via palmitoylation-dependent alterations in the lipid raft affiliation of CD44

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Most breast cancer-related deaths result from metastasis, a process involving dynamic regulation of tumour cell adhesion and migration. The adhesion protein CD44, a key regulator of cell migration, is enriched in cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains termed lipid rafts. We recently reported that raft affiliation of CD44 negatively regulates interactions with its migratory binding partner ezrin. Since raft affiliation is regulated by post-translational modifications including palmitoylation, we sought to establish the contribution of CD44 palmitoylation and lipid raft affiliation to cell migration. Methods Recovery of CD44 and its binding partners from raft versus non-raft membrane microdomains was profiled in non-migrating and migrating breast cancer cell lines. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to introduce single or double point mutations into both CD44 palmitoylation sites (Cys286 and Cys295), whereupon the implications for lipid raft recovery, phenotype, ezrin co-precipitation and migratory behaviour was assessed. Finally CD44 palmitoylation status and lipid raft affiliation was assessed in primary cultures from a small panel of breast cancer patients. Results CD44 raft affiliation was increased during migration of non-invasive breast cell lines, but decreased during migration of highly-invasive breast cells. The latter was paralleled by increased CD44 recovery in non-raft fractions, and exclusive non-raft recovery of its binding partners. Point mutation of CD44 palmitoylation sites reduced CD44 raft affiliation in invasive MDA-MB-231 cells, increased CD44-ezrin co-precipitation and accordingly enhanced cell migration. Expression of palmitoylation-impaired (raft-excluded) CD44 mutants in non-invasive MCF-10a cells was sufficient to reversibly induce the phenotypic appearance of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and to increase cell motility. Interestingly, cell migration was associated with temporal reductions in CD44 palmitoylation in

  20. Lipid raft components cholesterol and sphingomyelin increase H+/OH− permeability of phosphatidylcholine membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gensure, Rebekah H.; Zeidel, Mark L.; Hill, Warren G.

    2006-01-01

    H+/OH− permeation through lipid bilayers occurs at anomalously high rates and the determinants of proton flux through membranes are poorly understood. Since all life depends on proton gradients, it is important to develop a greater understanding of proton leak phenomena. We have used stopped-flow fluorimetry to probe the influence of two lipid raft components, chol (cholesterol) and SM (sphingomyelin), on H+/OH− and water permeability. Increasing the concentrations of both lipids in POPC (palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine) liposomes decreased water permeability in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect that correlated with increased lipid order. Surprisingly, proton flux was increased by increasing the concentration of chol and SM. The chol effect was complex with molar concentrations of 17.9, 33 and 45.7% giving 2.8-fold (P<0.01), 2.2-fold (P<0.001) and 5.1-fold (P<0.001) increases in H+/OH− permeability from a baseline of 2.4×10−2 cm/s. SM at 10 mole% effected a 2.8-fold increase (P<0.01), whereas 20 and 30 mole% enhanced permeability by 3.6-fold (P<0.05) and 4.1-fold respectively (P<0.05). Supplementing membranes containing chol with SM did not enhance H+/OH− permeability. Of interest was the finding that chol addition to soya-bean lipids decreased H+/OH− permeability, consistent with an earlier report [Ira and Krishnamoorthy (2001) J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 1484–1488]. We speculate that the presence of proton carriers in crude lipid extracts might contribute to this result. We conclude that (i) chol and SM specifically and independently increase rates of proton permeation in POPC bilayers, (ii) domains enriched in these lipids or domain interfaces may represent regions with high H+/OH− conductivity, (iii) H+/OH− fluxes are not governed by lipid order and (iv) chol can inhibit or promote H+/OH− permeability depending on the total lipid environment. Theories of proton permeation are discussed in the light of these results. PMID

  1. Sustained Epigenetic Drug Delivery Depletes Cholesterol-Sphingomyelin Rafts from Resistant Breast Cancer Cells, Influencing Biophysical Characteristics of Membrane Lipids.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Vijay; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Yamada, Masayoshi; Morisada, Megan; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2015-10-27

    Cell-membrane lipid composition can greatly influence biophysical properties of cell membranes, affecting various cellular functions. We previously showed that lipid synthesis becomes altered in the membranes of resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR); they form a more rigid, hydrophobic lipid monolayer than do sensitive cell membranes (MCF-7). These changes in membrane lipids of resistant cells, attributed to epigenetic aberration, significantly affected drug transport and endocytic function, thus impacting the efficacy of anticancer drugs. The present study's objective was to determine the effects of the epigenetic drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC), delivered in sustained-release nanogels (DAC-NGs), on the composition and biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells. Resistant and sensitive cells were treated with DAC in solution (DAC-sol) or DAC-NGs, and cell-membrane lipids were isolated and analyzed for lipid composition and biophysical properties. In resistant cells, we found increased formation of cholesterol-sphingomyelin (CHOL-SM) rafts with culturing time, whereas DAC treatment reduced their formation. In general, the effect of DAC-NGs was greater in changing the lipid composition than with DAC-sol. DAC treatment also caused a rise in levels of certain phospholipids and neutral lipids known to increase membrane fluidity, while reducing the levels of certain lipids known to increase membrane rigidity. Isotherm data showed increased lipid membrane fluidity following DAC treatment, attributed to decrease levels of CHOL-SM rafts (lamellar beta [Lβ] structures or ordered gel) and a corresponding increase in lipids that form lamellar alpha-structures (Lα, liquid crystalline phase). Sensitive cells showed marginal or insignificant changes in lipid profile following DAC-treatment, suggesting that epigenetic changes affecting lipid biosynthesis are more specific to resistant cells. Since membrane fluidity plays a major role in drug transport

  2. Ethanol effects on binary and ternary supported lipid bilayers with gel/fluid domains and lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Marquês, Joaquim T; Viana, Ana S; De Almeida, Rodrigo F M

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol-lipid bilayer interactions have been a recurrent theme in membrane biophysics, due to their contribution to the understanding of membrane structure and dynamics. The main purpose of this study was to assess the interplay between membrane lateral heterogeneity and ethanol effects. This was achieved by in situ atomic force microscopy, following the changes induced by sequential ethanol additions on supported lipid bilayers formed in the absence of alcohol. Binary phospholipid mixtures with a single gel phase, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/cholesterol, gel/fluid phase coexistence DPPC/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and ternary lipid mixtures containing cholesterol, mimicking lipid rafts (DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol and DOPC/sphingomyelin/cholesterol), i.e., with liquid ordered/liquid disordered (ld/lo) phase separation, were investigated. For all compositions studied, and in two different solid supports, mica and silicon, domain formation or rearrangement accompanied by lipid bilayer thinning and expansion was observed. In the case of gel/fluid coexistence, low ethanol concentrations lead to a marked thinning of the fluid but not of the gel domains. In the case of ld/lo all the bilayer thins simultaneously by a similar extent. In both cases, only the more disordered phase expanded significantly, indicating that ethanol increases the proportion of disordered domains. Water/bilayer interfacial tension variation and freezing point depression, inducing acyl chain disordering (including opening and looping), tilting, and interdigitation, are probably the main cause for the observed changes. The results presented herein demonstrate that ethanol influences the bilayer properties according to membrane lateral organization.

  3. Key Molecular Requirements for Raft Formation in Lipid/Cholesterol Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Hakobyan, Davit; Heuer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The lipid mixture of DPPC (saturated lipid)/DUPC (unsaturated lipid)/CHOL (cholesterol) is studied with respect to its ability to form liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. We employ coarse-grained simulations with MARTINI force field. All three components are systematically modified in order to explore the relevant molecular properties, leading to phase separation. Specifically, we show that the DPPC/DUPC/CHOL system unmixes due to enthalpic DPPC-DPPC and DPPC-CHOL interactions. The phase separation remains unchanged, except for the formation of a gel phase at long times after decreasing the conformational degrees of freedom of the unsaturated DUPC. In contrast, the phase separation can be suppressed by softening the DPPC chains. In an attempt to mimic the ordering and unmixing effect of CHOL the latter is replaced by a stiff and shortened DPPC-like lipid. One still observes phase separation, suggesting that it is mainly the rigid and planar structure of CHOL which is important for raft formation. Addition of an extra bead to the head of CHOL has no notable impact on the phase separation of the system, supporting the irrelevance of the Umbrella model for the phase separation. Reduction of the conformational entropy of CHOL by stiffening its last bead results in a significant increase of the order of the DPPC/CHOL domain. This suggests that the conformational entropy of CHOL is important to prohibit the gelation process. The interleaflet interactions as mediated by the terminal molecular groups seem to have a strong impact on the possibility of a subsequent gelation process after phase separation. PMID:24498317

  4. Interaction of membrane/lipid rafts with the cytoskeleton: impact on signaling and function

    PubMed Central

    Head, Brian P.; Patel, Hemal H.; Insel, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The plasma membrane in eukaryotic cells contains microdomains that are enriched in certain glycosphingolipids, gangliosides, and sterols (such as cholesterol) to form membrane/lipid rafts (MLR). These regions exist as caveolae, morphologically observable flask-like invaginations, or as a less easily detectable planar form. MLR are scaffolds for many molecular entities, including signaling receptors and ion channels that communicate extracellular stimuli to the intracellular milieu. Much evidence indicates that this organization and/or the clustering of MLR into more active signaling platforms depends upon interactions with and dynamic rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. Several cytoskeletal components and binding partners, as well as enzymes that regulate the cytoskeleton, localize to MLR and help regulate lateral diffusion of membrane proteins and lipids in response to extracellular events (e.g., receptor activation, shear stress, electrical conductance, and nutrient demand). MLR regulate cellular polarity, adherence to the extracellular matrix, signaling events (including ones that affect growth and migration), and are sites of cellular entry of certain pathogens, toxins and nanoparticles. The dynamic interaction between MLR and the underlying cytoskeleton thus regulates many facets of the function of eukaryotic cells and their adaptation to changing environments. Here, we review general features of MLR and caveolae and their role in several aspects of cellular function, including polarity of endothelial and epithelial cells, cell migration, mechanotransduction, lymphocyte activation, neuronal growth and signaling, and a variety of disease settings. PMID:23899502

  5. Bilayer Asymmetry Influences Integrin Sequestering in Raft-Mimicking Lipid Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Noor F.; Siegel, Amanda P.; Ge, Yifan; Jordan, Rainer; Naumann, Christoph A.

    2013-01-01

    There is growing recognition that lipid heterogeneities in cellular membranes play an important role in the distribution and functionality of membrane proteins. However, the detection and characterization of such heterogeneities at the cellular level remains challenging. Here we report on the poorly understood relationship between lipid bilayer asymmetry and membrane protein sequestering in raft-mimicking model membrane mixtures using a powerful experimental platform comprised of confocal spectroscopy XY-scan and photon-counting histogram analyses. This experimental approach is utilized to probe the domain-specific sequestering and oligomerization state of αvβ3 and α5β1 integrins in bilayers, which contain coexisting liquid-disordered/liquid-ordered (ld/lo) phase regions exclusively in the top leaflet of the bilayer (bottom leaflet contains ld phase). Comparison with previously reported integrin sequestering data in bilayer-spanning lo-ld phase separations demonstrates that bilayer asymmetry has a profound influence on αvβ3 and α5β1 sequestering behavior. For example, both integrins sequester preferentially to the lo phase in asymmetric bilayers, but to the ld phase in their symmetric counterparts. Furthermore, our data show that bilayer asymmetry significantly influences the role of native ligands in integrin sequestering. PMID:23708361

  6. Proteomic Analysis of ABCA1-Null Macrophages Reveals a Role for Stomatin-Like Protein-2 in Raft Composition and Toll-Like Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Zhu, Xuewei; Aloor, Jim J.; Azzam, Kathleen M.; Gabor, Kristin A.; Ge, William; Addo, Kezia A.; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Parks, John S.; Fessler, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid raft membrane microdomains organize signaling by many prototypical receptors, including the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) of the innate immune system. Raft-localization of proteins is widely thought to be regulated by raft cholesterol levels, but this is largely on the basis of studies that have manipulated cell cholesterol using crude and poorly specific chemical tools, such as β-cyclodextrins. To date, there has been no proteome-scale investigation of whether endogenous regulators of intracellular cholesterol trafficking, such as the ATP binding cassette (ABC)A1 lipid efflux transporter, regulate targeting of proteins to rafts. Abca1−/− macrophages have cholesterol-laden rafts that have been reported to contain increased levels of select proteins, including TLR4, the lipopolysaccharide receptor. Here, using quantitative proteomic profiling, we identified 383 proteins in raft isolates from Abca1+/+ and Abca1−/− macrophages. ABCA1 deletion induced wide-ranging changes to the raft proteome. Remarkably, many of these changes were similar to those seen in Abca1+/+ macrophages after lipopolysaccharide exposure. Stomatin-like protein (SLP)-2, a member of the stomatin-prohibitin-flotillin-HflK/C family of membrane scaffolding proteins, was robustly and specifically increased in Abca1−/− rafts. Pursuing SLP-2 function, we found that rafts of SLP-2-silenced macrophages had markedly abnormal composition. SLP-2 silencing did not compromise ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux but reduced macrophage responsiveness to multiple TLR ligands. This was associated with reduced raft levels of the TLR co-receptor, CD14, and defective lipopolysaccharide-induced recruitment of the common TLR adaptor, MyD88, to rafts. Taken together, we show that the lipid transporter ABCA1 regulates the protein repertoire of rafts and identify SLP-2 as an ABCA1-dependent regulator of raft composition and of the innate immune response. PMID:25910759

  7. Lipid raft localization of epidermal growth factor receptor alters matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in SiHa cells via the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zongfeng; Wang, Lina; Du, Juan; Li, Yuanbo; Yang, Huilun; Li, Chenxi; Li, Hui; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) has been identified as an important participant in tumor invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) localization to lipid rafts on signaling pathways involved in the regulation of MMP-1 expression in SiHa cells, a cervical cancer cell line. EGFR activation by EGF specifically induced MMP-1 expression at both the messenger RNA and protein levels. Additionally, it was observed that EGFR localized to lipid rafts, and that the redistribution of EGFR induced by lipid raft disruption strengthened EGF-induced MMP-1 expression. MMP-1 induction was blocked by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase inhibitors PD98059 and U0126. Our results suggested that lipid rafts provide a platform to inhibit EGFR regulation of MMP-1 in SiHa cells through the MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. PMID:28101233

  8. Freely turning over palmitate in erythrocyte membrane proteins is not responsible for the anchoring of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton: a study with bio-orthogonal chemical probes.

    PubMed

    Ciana, Annarita; Achilli, Cesare; Hannoush, Rami N; Risso, Angela; Balduini, Cesare; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2013-03-01

    Erythrocyte lipid rafts are anchored to the underlying spectrin membrane skeleton [A. Ciana, C. Achilli, C. Balduini, G. Minetti, On the association of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton in human erythrocytes, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1808 (2011) 183-190]. The nature of this linkage and the molecules involved are poorly understood. The interaction is sensitive to the increase in pH and ionic strength induced by carbonate. Given the role of palmitoylation in modulating the partitioning of certain proteins between various sub-cellular compartments and the plasma membrane, we asked whether palmitoylation of p55, a peripheral protein located at the junctional complex between spectrin-actin-protein 4.1 that anchors the membrane skeleton to the lipid bilayer via the transmembrane protein glycophorin C, could contribute to the anchoring of lipid rafts to the membrane skeleton. We adopted a new, non-radioactive method for studying protein palmitoylation, based on bio-orthogonal chemical analogues of fatty acids, containing an omega-alkynyl group, to metabolically label cell proteins, which are then revealed by a "click chemistry" reaction of the alkynyl moiety with an azide-containing reporter tag. We show that the membrane localization and palmitoylation levels of p55 did not change after carbonate treatment. 2-bromopalmitate and cerulenin, two known palmitoylation inhibitors, completely inhibited p55 palmitoylation, and protein palmitoyl thioesterase-1 (PPT1) reduced it, without affecting the association between lipid rafts and membrane-skeleton, indicating, on the one hand, that p55 palmitoylation is enzymatic, and, on the other, that it is not involved in the modulation of the linkage of lipid rafts to the membrane-skeleton.

  9. Sigma-1 receptors (sigma(1) binding sites) form raft-like microdomains and target lipid droplets on the endoplasmic reticulum: roles in endoplasmic reticulum lipid compartmentalization and export.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2003-08-01

    The brain sigma-1 receptors can bind neurosteroids and psychotropic drugs, including neuroleptics and cocaine and are implicated in schizophrenia, depression, and drug dependence. In this study, we found that sigma-1 receptors specifically target lipid storage sites (lipid droplets) on the endoplasmic reticulum by forming a distinct class of lipid microdomains. Both endogenously expressing sigma-1 receptors and transfected C-terminally enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP)-tagged sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1R-EYFP) target unique "ring-like" structures associated with endoplasmic reticulum reticular networks in NG108-15 cells. The ring-like structures contain neutral lipids and are enlarged by the oleate treatment, indicating that they are endoplasmic reticulum-associated lipid droplets (ER-LDs). sigma-1 receptors colocalize with caveolin-2, a cholesterol-binding protein in lipid rafts on the ER-LDs, but not with adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP), a cytosolic lipid droplet (c-LD)-specific protein. When the double-arginine ER retention signal on the N terminus of sigma-1 receptors is truncated, sigma-1 receptors no longer exist on ER-LDs, but predominantly target c-LDs, which contain ADRP. sigma-1 receptors on ER-LDs form detergent-resistant raft-like lipid microdomains, the buoyancy of which is different from that of plasma membrane lipid rafts. (+)-Pentazocine causes sigma-1 receptors to disappear from the microdomains. N-Terminally EYFP-tagged sigma-1 receptors (EYFP-Sig-1R) failed to target ER-LDs. EYFP-Sig-1R-transfected cells showed an unrestricted distribution of neutral lipids all over the endoplasmic reticulum network, decreases in c-LDs and cholesterol in plasma membranes, and the bulbous aggregation of endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, sigma-1 receptors are unique endoplasmic reticulum proteins that regulate the compartmentalization of lipids on the endoplasmic reticulum and their export from the endoplasmic reticulum to plasma membrane and c-LDs.

  10. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Eum, Sung Yong Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. - Highlights: • PCB153 disturbed human brain endothelial barrier through disruption of occludin. • Lipid raft-associated PP

  11. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Eum, Sung Yong; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs.

  12. Disruption of Lipid Raft Function Increases Expression and Secretion of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Lu, Chia-Yun; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Yeh, Chia-Shan

    2016-01-01

    The adipocyte is unique in its capacity to store lipids. In addition to triglycerides, the adipocyte stores a significant amount of cholesterol. Moreover, obese adipocytes are characterized by a redistribution of cholesterol with depleted cholesterol in the plasma membrane, suggesting that cholesterol perturbation may play a role in adipocyte dysfunction. We used methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), a molecule with high affinity for cholesterol, to rapidly deplete cholesterol level in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We tested whether this perturbation altered adipocyte secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a chemokine that is elevated in obesity and is linked to obesity-associated chronic diseases. Depletion of cholesterol by MβCD increased MCP-1 secretion as well as the mRNA and protein levels, suggesting perturbation at biosynthesis and secretion. Pharmacological inhibition revealed that NF-κB, but not MEK, p38 and JNK, was involved in MβCD-stimulated MCP-1 biosynthesis and secretion in adipocytes. Finally, another cholesterol-binding drug, filipin, also induced MCP-1 secretion without altering membrane cholesterol level. Interestingly, both MβCD and filipin disturbed the integrity of lipid rafts, the membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol. Thus, the depletion of membrane cholesterol in obese adipocytes may result in dysfunction of lipid rafts, leading to the elevation of proinflammatory signaling and MCP-1 secretion in adipocytes. PMID:28030645

  13. LINGO-1 regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation by inhibiting ErbB2 translocation and activation in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Xinhua; Shao, Zhaohui; Sheng, Guoqing; Pepinsky, Blake; Mi, Sha

    2014-05-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation is negatively regulated by LINGO-1 and positively regulated by the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase. In wild-type oligodendrocytes, inhibition of ErbB2 blocks differentiation, whereas activation of ErbB2 promotes differentiation. In LINGO-1(-/-) oligodendrocytes, inhibition of ErbB2 blocks oligodendrocyte differentiation; whereas activation of ErbB2 does not enhance differentiation. Biological and biochemical evidence showing that LINGO-1 can directly bind to ErbB2, block ErbB2 translocation into lipid rafts, and inhibit its phosphorylation for activation. The study demonstrates a novel regulatory mechanism of ErbB2 function whereby LINGO-1 suppresses oligodendrocyte differentiation by inhibiting ErbB2 translocation and activation in lipid rafts.

  14. Cholesterol lipids of Borrelia burgdorferi form lipid rafts and are required for the bactericidal mechanism of a complement-independent antibody

    PubMed Central

    LaRocca, Timothy J; Crowley, Jameson T; Cusack, Brian J; Pathak, Priyadarshini; Benach, Jordi; London, Erwin; Garcia-Monco, Juan C; Benach, Jorge L

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Borrelia burgdorferi (the agent of Lyme disease) is unusual in that it contains free cholesterol and cholesterol glycolipids. It is also susceptible to complement-independent bactericidal antibodies, such as CB2, a monoclonal IgG1 against outer surface protein B (OspB). The bactericidal action of CB2 requires the presence of cholesterol glycolipids and cholesterol. Through ultrastructural, biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that these cholesterol glycolipids exist as lipid raft-like microdomains in the outer membrane of cultured and mouse-derived B. burgdorferi, and in model membranes from B. burgdorferi lipids. The order and size of the microdomains of intact cells and model membranes are temperature sensitive and correlate with the bactericidal activity of CB2. Here we demonstrate the existence of cholesterol-containing lipid raft-like microdomains in a prokaryote. PMID:20951967

  15. Surfactant lipids regulate LPS-induced interleukin-8 production in A549 lung epithelial cells by inhibiting translocation of TLR4 into lipid raft domains

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Wondwossen; Alghaithy, Abdulaziz A.; Parton, Joan; Jones, Kenneth P.; Jackson, Simon K.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to providing mechanical stability, growing evidence suggests that surfactant lipid components can modulate inflammatory responses in the lung. However, little is known of the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory action of surfactant lipids. This study investigates the effect of the lipid-rich surfactant preparations Survanta®, Curosurf®, and the major surfactant phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene and protein expression in human A549 lung epithelial cells using immunoassay and PCR techniques. To examine potential mechanisms of the surfactant lipid effects, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, and membrane lipid raft domains were separated by density gradient ultracentrifugation and analyzed by immunoblotting with anti-TLR4 antibody. The lipid-rich surfactant preparations Survanta®, Curosurf®, and DPPC, at physiological concentrations, significantly downregulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced IL-8 expression in A549 cells both at the mRNA and protein levels. The surfactant preparations did not affect the cell surface expression of TLR4 or the binding of LPS to the cells. However, LPS treatment induced translocation of TLR4 into membrane lipid raft microdomains, and this translocation was inhibited by incubation of the cells with the surfactant lipid. This study provides important mechanistic details of the immune-modulating action of pulmonary surfactant lipids. PMID:19648651

  16. Regulation of lipid raft proteins by glimepiride- and insulin-induced glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C in rat adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Müller, Günter; Schulz, Andrea; Wied, Susanne; Frick, Wendelin

    2005-03-01

    The insulin receptor-independent insulin-mimetic signalling provoked by the antidiabetic sulfonylurea drug, glimepiride, is accompanied by the redistribution and concomitant activation of lipid raft-associated signalling components, such as the acylated tyrosine kinase, pp59(Lyn), and some glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-proteins). We now found that impairment of glimepiride-induced lipolytic cleavage of GPI-proteins in rat adipocytes by the novel inhibitor of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC), GPI-2350, caused almost complete blockade of (i) dissociation from caveolin-1 of pp59(Lyn) and GPI-proteins, (ii) their redistribution from high cholesterol- (hcDIGs) to low cholesterol-containing (lcDIGs) lipid rafts, (iii) tyrosine phosphorylation of pp59(Lyn) and insulin receptor substrate-1 protein (IRS-1) and (iv) stimulation of glucose transport as well as (v) inhibition of isoproterenol-induced lipolysis in response to glimepiride. In contrast, blockade of the moderate insulin activation of the GPI-PLC and of lipid raft protein redistribution by GPI-2350 slightly reduced insulin signalling and metabolic action, only. Importantly, in response to both insulin and glimepiride, lipolytically cleaved hydrophilic GPI-proteins remain associated with hcDIGs rather than redistribute to lcDIGs as do their uncleaved amphiphilic versions. In conclusion, GPI-PLC controls the localization within lipid rafts and thereby the activity of certain GPI-anchored and acylated signalling proteins. Its stimulation is required and may even be sufficient for insulin-mimetic cross-talking to IRS-1 in response to glimepiride via redistributed and activated pp59(Lyn).

  17. Lipid rafts promote liver cancer cell proliferation and migration by up-regulation of TLR7 expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Guo, Xiaodong; Wu, Liyuan; Yang, Mei; Li, Zhiwei; Gao, Yinjie; Liu, Shuhong; Zhou, Guangde; Zhao, Jingmin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) occurs predominantly in patients with underlying chronic liver disease and cirrhosis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in innate immune responses and TLR signaling has been associated with various chronic liver diseases. Lipid rafts provide the necessary microenvironment for certain specialized signaling events to take place, such as the innate immune recognition. The purpose of this study was to determine the pattern of TLR7 expression in HCC, how to recruit TLR7 into lipid rafts responded to ligands and whether targeting TLR7 might have beneficial effects. The study group was comprised of 130 human liver tissues: 23 chronic hepatitis B (CHB), 18 liver cirrhosis (LC), 68 HCC and 21 normal livers. The expression of TLR7 was evaluated using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and flow cytometry. Proliferation and migration of human HepG2 cells were studied following stimulation of TLR7 using the agonist gardiquimod and inhibition with a specific antagonist 20S-protopanaxadiol (aPPD). The activation of lipid raft-associated TLR7 signaling was measured using western blotting, double immunohistochemistry and immunoprecipitation in liver tissues and HepG2 cells. TLR7 expression was up-regulated in human HCC tissues and hepatoma cell line. Proliferation and migration of HepG2 cells in vitro increased significantly in response to stimulation of TLR7. TLR7 inhibition using aPPD significantly reduced HepG2 cell migration in vitro. The lipid raft protein caveolin-1 and flotillin-1 were involved with enhanced TLR7 signaling in HCC. Conclusions The data suggest that inhibiting TLR7 with antagonists, like aPPD, could potentially be used as a novel therapeutic approach for HCC. PMID:27588480

  18. Lipid rafts are essential for the regulation of SOCE by plasma membrane resident STIM1 in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Dionisio, Natalia; Galán, Carmen; Jardín, Isaac; Salido, Ginés M; Rosado, Juan A

    2011-03-01

    STIM1 is a transmembrane protein essential for the activation of store-operated Ca²+ entry (SOCE), a major Ca²+ influx mechanism. STIM1 is either located in the endoplasmic reticulum, communicating the Ca²+ concentration in the stores to plasma membrane channels or in the plasma membrane, where it might sense the extracellular Ca²+ concentration. Plasma membrane-located STIM1 has been reported to mediate the SOCE sensitivity to extracellular Ca²+ through its interaction with Orai1. Here we show that plasma membrane lipid raft domains are essential for the regulation of SOCE by extracellular Ca²+. Treatment of platelets with the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) induced Mn²+ entry, which was inhibited by increasing concentrations of extracellular Ca²+. Platelet treatment with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which removes cholesterol and disrupts the lipid raft domains, impaired the inactivation of Ca²+ entry induced by extracellular Ca²+. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin also abolished translocation of STIM1 to the plasma membrane stimulated by treatment with TG and prevented TG-evoked co-immunoprecipitation between plasma membrane-located STIM1 and the Ca²+ permeable channel Orai1. These findings suggest that lipid raft domains are essential for the inactivation of SOCE by extracellular Ca²+ mediated by the interaction between plasma membrane-located STIM1 and Orai1. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Localization of lipid raft proteins to the plasma membrane is a major function of the phospholipid transfer protein Sec14.

    PubMed

    Curwin, Amy J; Leblanc, Marissa A; Fairn, Gregory D; McMaster, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    The Sec14 protein domain is a conserved tertiary structure that binds hydrophobic ligands. The Sec14 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is essential with studies of S. cerevisiae Sec14 cellular function facilitated by a sole temperature sensitive allele, sec14(ts). The sec14(ts) allele encodes a protein with a point mutation resulting in a single amino acid change, Sec14(G266D). In this study results from a genome-wide genetic screen, and pharmacological data, provide evidence that the Sec14(G266D) protein is present at a reduced level compared to wild type Sec14 due to its being targeted to the proteosome. Increased expression of the sec14(ts) allele ameliorated growth arrest, but did not restore the defects in membrane accumulation or vesicular transport known to be defective in sec14(ts) cells. We determined that trafficking and localization of two well characterized lipid raft resident proteins, Pma1 and Fus-Mid-GFP, were aberrant in sec14(ts) cells. Localization of both lipid raft proteins was restored upon increased expression of the sec14(ts) allele. We suggest that a major function provided by Sec14 is trafficking and localization of lipid raft proteins.

  20. C2-Phytoceramide Perturbs Lipid Rafts and Cell Integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a Sterol-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Andreia; Santos, Júlia; Chaves, Susana R.; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Sousa, Maria João

    2013-01-01

    Specific ceramides are key regulators of cell fate, and extensive studies aimed to develop therapies based on ceramide-induced cell death. However, the mechanisms regulating ceramide cytotoxicity are not yet fully elucidated. Since ceramides also regulate growth and stress responses in yeast, we studied how different exogenous ceramides affect yeast cells. C2-phytoceramide, a soluble form of phytoceramides, the yeast counterparts of mammalian ceramides, greatly reduced clonogenic survival, particularly in the G2/M phase, but did not induce autophagy nor increase apoptotic markers. Rather, the loss of clonogenic survival was associated with PI positive staining, disorganization of lipid rafts and cell wall weakening. Sensitivity to C2-phytoceramide was exacerbated in mutants lacking Hog1p, the MAP kinase homolog of human p38 kinase. Decreasing sterol membrane content reduced sensitivity to C2-phytoceramide, suggesting sterols are the targets of this compound. This study identified a new function of C2-phytoceramide through disorganization of lipid rafts and induction of a necrotic cell death under hypo-osmotic conditions. Since lipid rafts are important in mammalian cell signaling and adhesion, our findings further support pursuing the exploitation of yeast to understand the basis of synthetic ceramides’ cytotoxicity to provide novel strategies for therapeutic intervention in cancer and other diseases. PMID:24040213

  1. Biophysical alterations in lipid rafts from human cerebral cortex associate with increased BACE1/AβPP interaction in early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Mario; Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Ferrer, Isidre; Gómez, Tomás; Marín, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have assessed the biophysical properties of lipid rafts from different brain areas in subjects exhibiting early neuropathological stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). By means of steady-state fluorescence polarization analyses using two environment-sensitive fluorescent probes, we demonstrate that lipid rafts from cerebellum, and frontal and entorhinal cortices, exhibit different biophysical behaviors depending on the stage of the disease. Thus, while membrane anisotropies were similar in the cerebellum along stages, lipid rafts from frontal and entorhinal cortices at AD stages I/II and AD III were significantly more liquid-ordered than in control subjects, both at the aqueous interface and hydrophobic core of the raft membrane. Thermotropic analyses demonstrated the presence of Arrhenius breakpoints between 28.3-32.0 °C, which were not influenced by the disease stage. However, analyses of membrane microviscosity (ηapp) demonstrate that frontal and entorhinal lipid rafts are notably more viscous and liquid-ordered all across the membrane from early stages of the disease. These physicochemical alterations in lipid rafts do not correlate with changes in cholesterol or sphingomyelin levels, but to reduced unsaturation index and increased saturate/polyunsaturated ratios in phospholipid acyl chains. Moreover, we demonstrate that β-secretase/AβPP (amyloid-β protein precursor) interaction and lipid raft microviscosity are strongly, and positively, correlated in AD frontal and entorhinal cortices. These observations strengthens the hypothesis that physical properties of these microdomains modulate the convergence of amyloidogenic machinery toward lipid rafts, and also points to a critical role of polyunsaturated fatty acids in amyloidogenic processing of AβPP.

  2. Evidence for the role of lipid rafts and sphingomyelin in Ca2+-gating of Transient Receptor Potential channels in trigeminal sensory neurons and peripheral nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Sághy, Éva; Szőke, Éva; Payrits, Maja; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Börzsei, Rita; Erostyák, János; Jánosi, Tibor Zoltán; Sétáló, György; Szolcsányi, János

    2015-10-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) cation channels, such as TRP Vanilloid 1 and TRP Ankyrin repeat domain 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1) are nocisensors playing important role to signal pain. Two "melastatin" TRP receptors, like TRPM8 and TRPM3 are also expressed in a subgroup of primary sensory neurons. These channels serve as thermosensors with unique thermal sensitivity ranges and are activated also by several exogenous and endogenous chemical ligands inducing conformational changes from various allosteric ("multisteric") sites. We analysed the role of plasma membrane microdomains of lipid rafts on isolated trigeminal (TRG) neurons and TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line by measuring agonist-induced Ca2+ transients with ratiometric technique. Stimulation-evoked calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release from sensory nerve endings of the isolated rat trachea by radioimmunoassay was also measured. Lipid rafts were disrupted by cleaving sphingomyelin (SM) with sphingomyelinase (SMase), cholesterol depletion with methyl β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and ganglioside breakdown with myriocin. It has been revealed that intracellular Ca2+ increase responses evoked by the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, the TRPA1 agonsits allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and formaldehyde as well as the TRPM8 activator icilin were inhibited after SMase, MCD and myriocin incubation but the response to the TRPM3 agonist pregnenolon sulphate was not altered. Extracellular SMase treatment did not influence the thapsigargin-evoked Ca2+-release from intracellular stores. Besides the cell bodies, SMase also inhibited capsaicin- or AITC-evoked CGRP release from peripheral sensory nerve terminals, this provides the first evidence for the importance of lipid raft integrity in TRPV1 and TRPA1 gating on capsaicin-sensitive nerve terminals. SM metabolites, ceramide and sphingosine, did not influence TRPA1 and TRPV1 activation on TRG neurons, TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line, and nerve terminals. We suggest, that the hydrophobic

  3. Lipid rafts are required for signal transduction by angiotensin II receptor type 1 in neonatal glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Adebiyi, Adebowale; Soni, Hitesh; John, Theresa A; Yang, Fen

    2014-05-15

    Angiotensin II (ANG-II) receptors (AGTRs) contribute to renal physiology and pathophysiology, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate AGTR function in glomerular mesangium are poorly understood. Here, we show that AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal pig glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Cyclodextrin (CDX)-mediated cholesterol depletion attenuated cell surface AGTR1 protein expression and ANG-II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) elevation in the cells. The COOH-terminus of porcine AGTR1 contains a caveolin (CAV)-binding motif. However, neonatal GMCs express CAV-1, but not CAV-2 and CAV-3. Colocalization and in situ proximity ligation assay detected an association between endogenous AGTR1 and CAV-1 in the cells. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CAV-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) sequence also reduced ANG-II-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation in the cells. Real-time imaging of cell growth revealed that ANG-II stimulates neonatal GMC proliferation. ANG-II-induced GMC growth was attenuated by EMD 66684, an AGTR1 antagonist; BAPTA, a [Ca(2+)]i chelator; KN-93, a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor; CDX; and a CSD peptide, but not PD 123319, a selective AGTR2 antagonist. Collectively, our data demonstrate [Ca(2+)]i-dependent proliferative effect of ANG-II and highlight a critical role for lipid raft microdomains in AGTR1-mediated signal transduction in neonatal GMCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lipid rafts: linking prion protein to zinc transport and amyloid-β toxicity in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Nicole T.; Griffiths, Heledd H.; Hooper, Nigel M.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of neuronal zinc homeostasis plays a major role in many processes related to brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Yet, despite the critical role of zinc in neuronal function, the cellular mechanisms underpinning its homeostatic control are far from clear. We reported that the cellular prion protein (PrPC) is involved in the uptake of zinc into neurons. This PrPC-mediated zinc influx required the metal-binding octapeptide repeats in PrPC and the presence of the zinc permeable AMPA channel with which PrPC directly interacted. Together with the observation that PrPC is evolutionarily related to the ZIP family of zinc transporters, these studies indicate that PrPC plays a key role in neuronal zinc homeostasis. Therefore, PrPC could contribute to cognitive health and protect against age-related zinc dyshomeostasis but PrPC has also been identified as a receptor for amyloid-β oligomers which accumulate in the brains of those with AD. We propose that the different roles that PrPC has are due to its interaction with different ligands and/or co-receptors in lipid raft-based signaling/transport complexes. PMID:25364748

  5. Intelectin: a novel lipid raft-associated protein in the enterocyte brush border.

    PubMed

    Wrackmeyer, Uta; Hansen, Gert H; Seya, Tsukasa; Danielsen, E Michael

    2006-08-01

    Intelectin is a mammalian Ca2+-dependent, D-galactosyl-specific lectin expressed in Paneth and goblet cells of the small intestine and proposed to serve a protective role in the innate immune response to parasite infection. In addition, it is structurally identical to the intestinal lactoferrin receptor known to reside in the enterocyte brush border. To clarify this apparent discrepancy with regard to localization, the aim of this work was to study the cellular and subcellular distribution of small intestinal intelectin by immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy. Secretory granules of lysozyme-positive Paneth cells in the bottom of the crypts as well as goblet cells along the crypt-villus axis were intensively labeled with intelectin antibodies, but quantitatively, the major site of intelectin deposition was the enterocyte brush border. This membrane is organized in stable glycolipid-based lipid raft microdomains, and like the divalent lectin galectin-4, intelectin was enriched in microvillar "superrafts", i.e., membranes that resist solubilization with Triton X-100 at 37 degrees C. This strategic localization suggests that the trimeric intelectin, like galectin-4, serves as an organizer and stabilizer of the brush border membrane, preventing loss of digestive enzymes to the gut lumen and protecting the glycolipid microdomains from pathogens.

  6. Heterodimerization with the prostacyclin receptor triggers thromboxane receptor relocation to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Salam; McCartney, Ann; Markosyan, Nune; Smyth, Emer M

    2013-01-01

    Prostacyclin and thromboxane mediate opposing cardiovascular actions through receptors termed IP and TP, respectively. When dimerized with IP, the TP shifts to IP-like function. IP localizes to cholesterol-enriched membrane rafts, but TP and IPTP heterodimer localization is not defined. We examined these receptors' membrane localization and the role of rafts in receptor function. Microdomain distribution of IP, TP, and IPTP heterodimers was examined in COS-7 cells by measuring energy transfer from renilla luciferase-fused receptors to fluorescently labeled rafts. IP raft association was confirmed. TP was raft excluded, but redistributed to rafts upon dimerization with IP. Signaling of the IP and IPTP heterodimer, but not TP alone, was suppressed after raft disruption by cholesterol depletion. Cholesterol enrichment also selectively suppressed IP and IPTP function. Native IP and IPTP signaling in smooth muscle cells and macrophages were similarly sensitive to cholesterol manipulation, whereas macrophages from hypercholesterolemic mice displayed suppressed IP and IPTP function. IP and TP function within distinct microdomains. Raft incorporation of TP in the IPTP heterodimer likely facilitates its signaling shift. We speculate that changes in IP and IPTP signaling after perturbation of membrane cholesterol may contribute to cardiovascular disease associated with hypercholesterolemia.

  7. The role of lipid raft translocation of prohibitin in regulation of Akt and Raf-protected apoptosis of HaCaT cells upon ultraviolet B irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Wu, Shiyong

    2017-02-20

    Prohibitin (PHB) plays a role in regulation of ultraviolet B light (UVB)-induced apoptosis of human keratinocytes, HaCaT cells. The regulatory function of PHB appears to be associated with its lipid raft translocation. However, the detailed mechanism for PHB-mediated apoptosis of these keratinocytes upon UVB irradiation is not clear. In this report, we determined the role of lipid raft translocation of PHB in regulation of UVB-induced apoptosis. Our data show that upon UVB irradiation PHB is translocated from the non-raft membrane to the lipid rafts, which is correlated with a release of both Akt and Raf from membrane. Overexpression of Akt and/or Raf impedes UVB-induced lipid raft translocation of PHB. Immunoprecipitation analysis indicates that UVB alters the interactions among PHB, Akt, and Raf. Reduced expression of PHB leads to a decreased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, as well as a decreased activity of Akt, and increased apoptosis of the cells upon UVB irradiation. These results suggest that PHB regulates UVB-induced apoptosis of keratinocytes via a mechanism that involves detachment from Akt and Raf on the plasma membrane, and sequential lipid raft translocation.

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid modifies the clustering and size of lipid rafts and the lateral organization and surface expression of MHC class I of EL4 cells.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Salameh, Muhammad; Carraway, Kristen

    2009-09-01

    An emerging molecular mechanism by which docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts its effects is modification of lipid raft organization. The biophysical model, based on studies with liposomes, shows that DHA avoids lipid rafts because of steric incompatibility between DHA and cholesterol. The model predicts that DHA does not directly modify rafts; rather, it incorporates into nonrafts to modify the lateral organization and/or conformation of membrane proteins, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. Here, we tested predictions of the model at a cellular level by incorporating oleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and DHA, compared with a bovine serum albumin (BSA) control, into the membranes of EL4 cells. Quantitative microscopy showed that DHA, but not EPA, treatment, relative to the BSA control diminished lipid raft clustering and increased their size. Approximately 30% of DHA was incorporated directly into rafts without changing the distribution of cholesterol between rafts and nonrafts. Quantification of fluorescence colocalization images showed that DHA selectively altered MHC class I lateral organization by increasing the fraction of the nonraft protein into rafts compared with BSA. Both DHA and EPA treatments increased antibody binding to MHC class I compared with BSA. Antibody titration showed that DHA and EPA did not change MHC I conformation but increased total surface levels relative to BSA. Taken together, our findings are not in agreement with the biophysical model. Therefore, we propose a model that reconciles contradictory viewpoints from biophysical and cellular studies to explain how DHA modifies lipid rafts on several length scales. Our study supports the notion that rafts are an important target of DHA's mode of action.

  9. Membrane lipid rafts and neurobiology: age-related changes in membrane lipids and loss of neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Junji; Pearn, Matthew L; Lemkuil, Brian P; Patel, Piyush M; Head, Brian P

    2016-08-15

    A better understanding of the cellular physiological role that plasma membrane lipids, fatty acids and sterols play in various cellular systems may yield more insight into how cellular and whole organ function is altered during the ageing process. Membrane lipid rafts (MLRs) within the plasma membrane of most cells serve as key organizers of intracellular signalling and tethering points of cytoskeletal components. MLRs are plasmalemmal microdomains enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol and scaffolding proteins; they serve as a platform for signal transduction, cytoskeletal organization and vesicular trafficking. Within MLRs are the scaffolding and cholesterol binding proteins named caveolin (Cav). Cavs not only organize a multitude of receptors including neurotransmitter receptors (NMDA and AMPA receptors), signalling proteins that regulate the production of cAMP (G protein-coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, phosphodiesterases (PDEs)), and receptor tyrosine kinases involved in growth (Trk), but also interact with components that modulate actin and tubulin cytoskeletal dynamics (e.g. RhoGTPases and actin binding proteins). MLRs are essential for the regulation of the physiology of organs such as the brain, and age-related loss of cholesterol from the plasma membrane leads to loss of MLRs, decreased presynaptic vesicle fusion, and changes in neurotransmitter release, all of which contribute to different forms of neurodegeneration. Thus, MLRs provide an active membrane domain that tethers and reorganizes the cytoskeletal machinery necessary for membrane and cellular repair, and genetic interventions that restore MLRs to normal cellular levels may be exploited as potential therapeutic means to reverse the ageing and neurodegenerative processes. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Measuring the Strength of Interaction between the Ebola Fusion Peptide and Lipid Rafts: Implications for Membrane Fusion and Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Mônica S.; Follmer, Cristian; Costa, Lilian T.; Vilani, Cecília; Bianconi, M. Lucia; Achete, Carlos Alberto; Silva, Jerson L.

    2011-01-01

    The Ebola fusion peptide (EBO16) is a hydrophobic domain that belongs to the GP2 membrane fusion protein of the Ebola virus. It adopts a helical structure in the presence of mimetic membranes that is stabilized by the presence of an aromatic-aromatic interaction established by Trp8 and Phe12. In spite of its infectious cycle becoming better understood recently, several steps still remain unclear, a lacuna that makes it difficult to develop strategies to block infection. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of membrane fusion, we probed the structure, function and energetics of EBO16 and its mutant W8A, in the absence or presence of different lipid membranes, including isolated domain-resistant membranes (DRM), a good experimental model for lipid rafts. The depletion of cholesterol from living mammalian cells reduced the ability of EBO16 to induce lipid mixing. On the other hand, EBO16 was structurally sensitive to interaction with lipid rafts (DRMs), but the same was not observed for W8A mutant. In agreement with these data, W8A showed a poor ability to promote membrane aggregation in comparison to EBO16. Single molecule AFM experiments showed a high affinity force pattern for the interaction of EBO16 and DRM, which seems to be a complex energetic event as observed by the calorimetric profile. Our study is the first to show a strong correlation between the initial step of Ebola virus infection and cholesterol, thus providing a rationale for Ebola virus proteins being co-localized with lipid-raft domains. In all, the results show how small fusion peptide sequences have evolved to adopt highly specific and strong interactions with membrane domains. Such features suggest these processes are excellent targets for therapeutic and vaccine approaches to viral diseases. PMID:21249196

  11. Sustained Epigenetic Drug Delivery Depletes Cholesterol-Sphingomyelin Rafts from Resistant Breast Cancer Cells, Influencing Biophysical Characteristics of Membrane Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Vijay; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Yamada, Masayoshi; Morisada, Megan; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Cell-membrane lipid composition can greatly influence biophysical properties of cell membranes, affecting various cellular functions. We previously showed that lipid synthesis becomes altered in the membranes of resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR); they form a more rigid, hydrophobic lipid monolayer than do sensitive cell membranes (MCF-7). These changes in membrane lipids of resistant cells, attributed to epigenetic aberration, significantly affected drug transport and endocytic function, thus impacting the efficacy of anticancer drugs. The present study’s objective was to determine the effects of the epigenetic drug 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC), delivered in sustained-release nanogels (DAC-NGs), on the composition and biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells. Resistant and sensitive cells were treated with DAC in solution (DAC-sol) or DAC-NGs, and cell-membrane lipids were isolated and analyzed for lipid composition and biophysical properties. In resistant cells, we found increased formation of Cholesterol-Sphingomyelin (CHOL-SM) rafts with culturing time, whereas DAC treatment reduced their formation. In general, the effect of DAC-NGs was greater in changing the lipid composition than with DAC-sol. DAC treatment also caused a rise in levels of certain phospholipids and neutral lipids known to increase membrane fluidity while reducing the levels of certain lipids known to increase membrane rigidity. Isotherm data showed increased lipid membrane fluidity following DAC treatment, attributed to decrease levels of CHOL-SM rafts (lamellar beta [Lβ] structures or ordered gel) and a corresponding increase in lipids that form lamellar alpha structures (Lα, liquid crystalline phase). Sensitive cells showed marginal or insignificant changes in lipid profile following DAC-treatment, suggesting that epigenetic changes affecting lipid biosynthesis are more specific to resistant cells. Since membrane fluidity plays a major role in drug transport

  12. Oral PEG 15-20 protects the intestine against radiation : role of lipid rafts.

    SciTech Connect

    Valuckaite, V.; Zaborina, O.; Long, J.; Hauer-Jensen, M.; Wang, J.; Holbrook, C.; Zaborin, A.; Drabik, K.; Katdare, M.; Mauceri, H.; Weichselbaum, R.; Firestone, M. A.; Lee, K. Y.; Chang, E. B.; Matthews, J.; Alverdy, J. C.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Arkansas

    2009-12-01

    Intestinal injury following abdominal radiation therapy or accidental exposure remains a significant clinical problem that can result in varying degrees of mucosal destruction such as ulceration, vascular sclerosis, intestinal wall fibrosis, loss of barrier function, and even lethal gut-derived sepsis. We determined the ability of a high-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol-based copolymer, PEG 15-20, to protect the intestine against the early and late effects of radiation in mice and rats and to determine its mechanism of action by examining cultured rat intestinal epithelia. Rats were exposed to fractionated radiation in an established model of intestinal injury, whereby an intestinal segment is surgically placed into the scrotum and radiated daily. Radiation injury score was decreased in a dose-dependent manner in rats gavaged with 0.5 or 2.0 g/kg per day of PEG 15-20 (n = 9-13/group, P < 0.005). Complementary studies were performed in a novel mouse model of abdominal radiation followed by intestinal inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), a common pathogen that causes lethal gut-derived sepsis following radiation. Mice mortality was decreased by 40% in mice drinking 1% PEG 15-20 (n = 10/group, P < 0.001). Parallel studies were performed in cultured rat intestinal epithelial cells treated with PEG 15-20 before radiation. Results demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented radiation-induced intestinal injury in rats, prevented apoptosis and lethal sepsis attributable to P. aeruginosa in mice, and protected cultured intestinal epithelial cells from apoptosis and microbial adherence and possible invasion. PEG 15-20 appeared to exert its protective effect via its binding to lipid rafts by preventing their coalescence, a hallmark feature in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to radiation.

  13. Localization of uPAR and MMP-9 in lipid rafts is critical for migration, invasion and angiogenesis in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background uPAR and MMP-9, which play critical roles in tumor cell invasion, migration and angiogenesis, have been shown to be associated with lipid rafts. Methods To investigate whether cholesterol could regulate uPAR and MMP-9 in breast carcinoma, we used MβCD (methyl beta cyclodextrin, which extracts cholesterol from lipid rafts) to disrupt lipid rafts and studied its effect on breast cancer cell migration, invasion, angiogenesis and signaling. Results Morphological evidence showed the association of uPAR with lipid rafts in breast carcinoma cells. MβCD treatment significantly reduced the colocalization of uPAR and MMP-9 with lipid raft markers and also significantly reduced uPAR and MMP-9 at both the protein and mRNA levels. Spheroid migration and invasion assays showed inhibition of breast carcinoma cell migration and invasion after MβCD treatment. In vitro angiogenesis studies showed a significant decrease in the angiogenic potential of cells pretreated with MβCD. MβCD treatment significantly reduced the levels of MMP-9 and uPAR in raft fractions of MDA-MB-231 and ZR 751 cells. Phosphorylated forms of Src, FAK, Cav, Akt and ERK were significantly inhibited upon MβCD treatment. Increased levels of soluble uPAR were observed upon MβCD treatment. Cholesterol supplementation restored uPAR expression to basal levels in breast carcinoma cell lines. Increased colocalization of uPAR with the lysosomal marker LAMP1 was observed in MβCD-treated cells when compared with untreated cells. Conclusion Taken together, our results suggest that cholesterol levels in lipid rafts are critical for the migration, invasion, and angiogenesis of breast carcinoma cells and could be a critical regulatory factor in these cancer cell processes mediated by uPAR and MMP-9. PMID:21106094

  14. Targeting of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel α2δ-1 Subunit to Lipid Rafts Is Independent from a GPI-Anchoring Motif

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Philip; Etheridge, Sarah; Song, Lele; Shah, Riddhi; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth M.; Jones, Owen T.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav) exist as heteromultimers comprising a pore-forming α1 with accessory β and α2δ subunits which modify channel trafficking and function. We previously showed that α2δ-1 (and likely the other mammalian α2δ isoforms - α2δ-2, 3 and 4) is required for targeting Cavs to lipid rafts, although the mechanism remains unclear. Whilst originally understood to have a classical type I transmembrane (TM) topology, recent evidence suggests the α2δ subunit contains a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor that mediates its association with lipid rafts. To test this notion, we have used a strategy based on the expression of chimera, where the reported GPI-anchoring sequences in the gabapentinoid-sensitive α2δ-1 subunit have been substituted with those of a functionally inert Type I TM-spanning protein – PIN-G. Using imaging, electrophysiology and biochemistry, we find that lipid raft association of PIN-α2δ is unaffected by substitution of the GPI motif with the TM domain of PIN-G. Moreover, the presence of the GPI motif alone is not sufficient for raft localisation, suggesting that upstream residues are required. GPI-anchoring is susceptible to phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) cleavage. However, whilst raft localisation of PIN-α2δ is disrupted by PI-PLC treatment, this is assay-dependent and non-specific effects of PI-PLC are observed on the distribution of the endogenous raft marker, caveolin, but not flotillin. Taken together, these data are most consistent with a model where α2δ-1 retains its type I transmembrane topology and its targeting to lipid rafts is governed by sequences upstream of the putative GPI anchor, that promote protein-protein, rather than lipid-lipid interactions. PMID:21695204

  15. Adenylyl cyclase type 6 overexpression selectively enhances beta-adrenergic and prostacyclin receptor-mediated inhibition of cardiac fibroblast function because of colocalization in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Thangavel, Muthusamy; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Mahautmr, Penden; Stitham, Jeremiah; Hwa, John; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2008-06-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts produce and degrade extracellular matrix and are critical in regulating cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Fibroblasts are activated by factors such as transforming growth factor beta and inhibited by agents that elevate 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. cAMP signal generation and response is known to be compartmentalized in many cell types in part through the colocalization of receptors and specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms in lipid rafts and caveolae. The present study sought to define the localization of key G protein-coupled receptors with adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) in lipid rafts of rat cardiac fibroblasts and to determine if this colocalization was functionally relevant. We found that cardiac fibroblasts produce cAMP in response to agonists for beta-adrenergic (isoproterenol), prostaglandin EP2 (butaprost), adenosine (adenosine-5'-N-ethylcarboxamide, NECA), and prostacyclin (beraprost) receptors. Overexpression of AC6 increased cAMP production stimulated by isoproterenol and beraprost but not by butaprost or NECA. A key function of fibroblasts is the production of collagen. Isoproterenol- and beraprostmediated inhibition of collagen synthesis was also enhanced by AC6 overexpression, while inhibition by butaprost and NECA were unaltered. Lipid raft fractions from cardiac fibroblasts contain the preponderance of beta-adrenergic receptors and AC6 but exclude EP2 receptors. While we could not determine the localization of native prostacyclin receptors, we were able to determine that epitope-tagged prostanoid IP receptors (IPR) expressed in COS7 cells did localize, in part, in lipid raft fractions. These findings indicate that IP receptors are expressed in lipid rafts and can activate raft-localized AC isoforms. AC6 is completely compartmentized in lipid raft domains where it is activated solely by coresident G protein-coupled receptors to regulate cardiac fibroblast function.

  16. Probing lipid-cholesterol interactions in DOPC/eSM/Chol and DOPC/DPPC/Chol model lipid rafts with DSC and (13)C solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Kim, Jihyun; Holland, Gregory P

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between cholesterol (Chol) and phospholipids in bilayers was investigated for the ternary model lipid rafts, DOPC/eSM/Chol and DOPC/DPPC/Chol, with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) solid-state NMR. The enthalpy and transition temperature (Tm) of the Lα liquid crystalline phase transition from DSC was used to probe the thermodynamics of the different lipids in the two systems as a function of Chol content. The main chain (13)C (CH2)n resonance is resolved in the (13)C CP-MAS NMR spectra for the unsaturated (DOPC) and saturated (eSM or DPPC) chain lipid in the ternary lipid raft mixtures. The (13)C chemical shift of this resonance can be used to detect differences in chain ordering and overall interactions with Chol for the different lipid constituents in the ternary systems. The combination of DSC and (13)C CP-MAS NMR results indicate that there is a preferential interaction between SM and Chol below Tm for the DOPC/eSM/Chol system when the Chol content is ≤20mol%. In contrast, no preferential interaction between Chol and DPPC is observed in the DOPC/DPPC/Chol system above or below Tm. Finally, (13)C CP-MAS NMR resolves two Chol environments in the DOPC/eSM/Chol system below Tm at Chol contents >20mol% while, a single Chol environment is observed for DOPC/DPPC/Chol at all compositions.

  17. Lipid Rafts Are Physiologic Membrane Microdomains Necessary for the Morphogenic and Developmental Functions of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Cynthia C; Gabreski, Nicole A; Hein, Sarah J; Pierchala, Brian A

    2015-09-23

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes PNS development and kidney morphogenesis via a receptor complex consisting of the glycerophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored, ligand binding receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Although Ret signal transduction in vitro is augmented by translocation into lipid rafts via GFRα1, the existence and importance of lipid rafts in GDNF-Ret signaling under physiologic conditions is unresolved. A knock-in mouse was produced that replaced GFRα1 with GFRα1-TM, which contains a transmembrane (TM) domain instead of the GPI anchor. GFRα1-TM still binds GDNF and promotes Ret activation but does not translocate into rafts. In Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice, GFRα1-TM is expressed, trafficked, and processed at levels identical to GFRα1. Although Gfrα1(+/TM) mice are viable, Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice display bilateral renal agenesis, lack enteric neurons in the intestines, and have motor axon guidance deficits, similar to Gfrα1(-/-) mice. Therefore, the recruitment of Ret into lipid rafts by GFRα1 is required for the physiologic functions of GDNF in vertebrates. Significance statement: Membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts have been proposed to be unique subdomains in the plasma membrane that are critical for the signaling functions of multiple receptor complexes. Their existence and physiologic relevance has been debated. Based on in vitro studies, lipid rafts have been reported to be necessary for the function of the Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of neurotrophic factors. The receptor for GDNF comprises the lipid raft-resident, glycerophosphatidylinositol-anchored receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Here we demonstrate, using a knock-in mouse model in which GFRα1 is no longer located in lipid rafts, that the developmental functions of GDNF in the periphery require the translocation of the GDNF receptor complex

  18. Seladin-1/DHCR24 Is Neuroprotective by Associating EAAT2 Glutamate Transporter to Lipid Rafts in Experimental Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Jiménez, Macarena; Martínez-López, Diego; Gabandé-Rodríguez, Enrique; Martín-Segura, Adrian; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Ledesma, María D; Dotti, Carlos G; Moro, María A

    2016-01-01

    3β-Hydroxysteroid-Δ24 reductase (DHCR24) or selective alzheimer disease indicator 1 (seladin-1), an enzyme of cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, has been implicated in neuroprotection, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, its role in ischemic stroke remains unexplored. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of seladin-1/DHCR24 using an experimental stroke model in mice. Dhcr24(+/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. In another set of experiments, WT mice were treated intraperitoneally either with vehicle or U18666A (seladin-1/DHCR24 inhibitor, 10 mg/kg) 30 minutes after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Brains were removed 48 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion for infarct volume determination. For protein expression determination, peri-infarct region was obtained 24 h after ischemia, and Western blot or cytometric bead array was performed. Dhcr24(+/-) mice displayed larger infarct volumes after middle cerebral artery occlusion than their WT littermates. Treatment of WT mice with the seladin-1/DHCR24 inhibitor U18666A also increased ischemic lesion. Inflammation-related mediators were increased after ischemia in Dhcr24(+/-) mice compared with WT counterparts. Consistent with a role of cholesterol in proper function of glutamate transporter EAAT2 in membrane lipid rafts, we found a decreased association of EAAT2 with lipid rafts after ischemia when DHCR24 is genetically deleted or pharmacologically inhibited. Accordingly, treatment with U18666A decreases [(3)H]-glutamate uptake in cultured astrocytes. These results support the idea that lipid raft integrity, ensured by seladin-1/DHCR24, plays a crucial protective role in the ischemic brain by guaranteeing EAAT2-mediated uptake of glutamate excess. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. By activating Fas/ceramide synthase 6/p38 kinase in lipid rafts, stichoposide D inhibits growth of leukemia xenografts.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Park, Eun-Seon; Shin, Sung-Won; Ju, Mi-Ha; Han, Jin-Yeong; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Stonik, Valentin A; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2015-09-29

    Stichoposide D (STD) is a marine triterpene glycoside isolated from sea cucumbers. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor activity of STD in human leukemia cells. The role of Fas (CD95), ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) and p38 kinase during STD-induced apoptosis was examined in human leukemia cells. In addition, the antitumor effects of STD in K562 and HL-60 leukemia xenograft models were investigated. We found that STD induces Fas translocation to lipid rafts, and thus mediates cell apoptosis. We also observed the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase during STD-induced apoptosis. The use of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and nystatin to disrupt lipid rafts prevents the clustering of Fas and the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase, and also inhibits STD-induced apoptosis. Specific inhibition by Fas, CerS6, and p38 kinase siRNA transfection partially blocked STD-induced apoptosis. In addition, STD has antitumor activity through the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase without displaying any toxicity in HL-60 and K562 xenograft models. We observed that the anti-tumor effect of STD is partially prevented in CerS6 shRNA-silenced xenograft models. We first report that Fas/CerS6/p38 kinase activation in lipid rafts by STD is involved in its anti-leukemic activity. We also established that STD is able to enhance the chemosensitivity of K562 cells to etoposide or Ara-C. These data suggest that STD may be used alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents to treat leukemia.

  20. By activating Fas/ceramide synthase 6/p38 kinase in lipid rafts, Stichoposide D inhibits growth of leukemia xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Park, Eun-Seon; Shin, Sung-Won; Ju, Mi-Ha; Han, Jin-Yeong; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Stonik, Valentin A.; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2015-01-01

    Stichoposide D (STD) is a marine triterpene glycoside isolated from sea cucumbers. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor activity of STD in human leukemia cells. The role of Fas (CD95), ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) and p38 kinase during STD-induced apoptosis was examined in human leukemia cells. In addition, the antitumor effects of STD in K562 and HL-60 leukemia xenograft models were investigated. We found that STD induces Fas translocation to lipid rafts, and thus mediates cell apoptosis. We also observed the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase during STD-induced apoptosis. The use of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and nystatin to disrupt lipid rafts prevents the clustering of Fas and the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase, and also inhibits STD-induced apoptosis. Specific inhibition by Fas, CerS6, and p38 kinase siRNA transfection partially blocked STD-induced apoptosis. In addition, STD has antitumor activity through the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase without displaying any toxicity in HL-60 and K562 xenograft models. We observed that the anti-tumor effect of STD is partially prevented in CerS6 shRNA-silenced xenograft models. We first report that Fas/CerS6/p38 kinase activation in lipid rafts by STD is involved in its anti-leukemic activity. We also established that STD is able to enhance the chemosensitivity of K562 cells to etoposide or Ara-C. These data suggest that STD may be used alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents to treat leukemia. PMID:26318294

  1. Membranes are not just rafts.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Edidin, Michael A

    2006-10-01

    A new definition for lipid rafts was coined at the Keystone Symposium of Lipid Rafts and Cell Function based on recent advances in the field. The revised definition lumps all membrane heterogeneities that are not rafts into a single class of "non-raft". In this commentary, we suggest that "non-raft" domains encompass a variety of membrane heterogeneities and are quite diverse in composition and origin. A good starting point for the study of this diversity would be phospholipids with unsaturated acyl chains, which display little affinity for cholesterol; these lipids are abundant in membranes such as the endoplasmic reticulum and that may form their own macro- or microdomains.

  2. 7-Dehydrocholesterol Enhances Ultraviolet A-Induced Oxidative Stress in Keratinocytes: Roles of Nadph Oxidase, Mitochondria and Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Antonio; Rajadurai, Anpuchchelvi; Carle, A. Bjorn; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2006-01-01

    Long wavelength solar UVA radiation stimulates formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which are involved in skin photosensitivity and tumor promotion. High levels of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC), the precursor to cholesterol, cause exaggerated photosensitivity to UVA in patients with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS). Partially replacing cholesterol with 7-DHC in keratinocytes rapidly (<5 min) increased UVA-induced ROS, intracellular calcium, phospholipase A2 activity, PGE2, and NADPH oxidase activity. UVA-induced ROS and PGE2 production were inhibited in these cells by depleting the Nox1 subunit of NADPH oxidase using siRNA or using a mitochondrial radical quencher, MitoQ. Partial replacement of cholesterol with 7-DHC also disrupted membrane lipid raft domains, although depletion of cholesterol, which also disrupts lipid rafts, did not affect UVA-induced increases in ROS and PGE2. Phospholipid liposomes containing 7-DHC were more rapidly oxidized by a free radical mechanism than those containing cholesterol. These results indicate that 7-DHC enhances rapid UVA-induced ROS and PGE2 formation by enhancing free radical-mediated membrane lipid oxidation and suggests that this mechanism might underlie the UVA-photosensitivity in SLOS. PMID:17145559

  3. 7-Dehydrocholesterol enhances ultraviolet A-induced oxidative stress in keratinocytes: roles of NADPH oxidase, mitochondria, and lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Antonio; Rajadurai, Anpuchchelvi; Carle, A Bjorn; Kochevar, Irene E

    2006-12-01

    Long wavelength solar UVA radiation stimulates formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), which are involved in skin photosensitivity and tumor promotion. High levels of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC), the precursor to cholesterol, cause exaggerated photosensitivity to UVA in patients with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS). Partially replacing cholesterol with 7-DHC in keratinocytes rapidly (<5 min) increased UVA-induced ROS, intracellular calcium, phospholipase A(2) activity, PGE(2), and NADPH oxidase activity. UVA-induced ROS and PGE(2) production were inhibited in these cells by depleting the Nox1 subunit of NADPH oxidase using siRNA or using a mitochondrial radical quencher, MitoQ. Partial replacement of cholesterol with 7-DHC also disrupted membrane lipid raft domains, although depletion of cholesterol, which also disrupts lipid rafts, did not affect UVA-induced increases in ROS and PGE(2). Phospholipid liposomes containing 7-DHC were more rapidly oxidized by a free radical mechanism than those containing cholesterol. These results indicate that 7-DHC enhances rapid UVA-induced ROS and PGE(2) formation by enhancing free radical-mediated membrane lipid oxidation and suggests that this mechanism might underlie the UVA photosensitivity in SLOS.

  4. Tuning the size of styrene-maleic acid copolymer-lipid nanoparticles (SMALPs) using RAFT polymerization for biophysical studies.

    PubMed

    Craig, Andrew F; Clark, Emily E; Sahu, Indra D; Zhang, Rongfu; Frantz, Nick D; Al-Abdul-Wahid, M Sameer; Dabney-Smith, Carole; Konkolewicz, Dominik; Lorigan, Gary A

    2016-11-01

    Characterization of membrane proteins is challenging due to the difficulty in mimicking the native lipid bilayer with properly folded and functional membrane proteins. Recently, styrene-maleic acid (StMA) copolymers have been shown to facilitate the formation of disc-like lipid bilayer mimetics that maintain the structural and dynamic integrity of membrane proteins. Here we report the controlled synthesis and characterization of StMA containing block copolymers. StMA polymers with different compositions and molecular weights were synthesized and characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). These polymers act as macromolecular surfactants for 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol (POPG) lipids, forming disc like structures of the lipids with the polymer wrapping around the hydrophobic lipid edge. A combination of dynamic light scattering (DLS), solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize the size of the nanoparticles created using these StMA polymers. At a weight ratio of 1.25:1 StMA to lipid, the nanoparticle size created is 28+1nm for a 2:1 ratio, 10+1nm for a 3:1 StMA ratio and 32+1nm for a 4:1 StMA ratio independent of the molecular weight of the polymer. Due to the polymer acting as a surfactant that forms disc like nanoparticles, we term these StMA based block copolymers "RAFT SMALPs". RAFT SMALPs show promise as a new membrane mimetic with different nanoscale sizes, which can be used for a wide variety of biophysical studies of membrane proteins. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis. PMID:25313007

  6. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis.

  7. P2X1 receptors localized in lipid rafts mediate ATP motor responses in the human vas deferens longitudinal muscles.

    PubMed

    Donoso, María Verónica; Norambuena, Andrés; Navarrete, Camilo; Poblete, Inés; Velasco, Alfredo; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2014-02-01

    To assess the role of the P2X1 receptors (P2X1R) in the longitudinal and circular layers of the human vas deferens, ex vivo-isolated strips or rings were prepared from tissue biopsies to record isometric contractions. To ascertain its membrane distribution, tissue extracts were analyzed by immunoblotting following sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. ATP, alpha,beta-methylene ATP, or electrical field stimulation elicited robust contractions of the longitudinal layer but not of the circular layer which demonstrated inconsistent responses. Alpha,beta-methylene ATP generated stronger and more robust contractions than ATP. In parallel, prostatic segments of the rat vas deferens were examined. The motor responses in both species were not sustained but decayed within the first minute, showing desensitization to additional applications. Cross-desensitization was established between alpha,beta-methylene ATP or ATP-evoked contractions and electrical field stimulation-induced contractions. Full recovery of the desensitized motor responses required more than 30 min and showed a similar pattern in human and rat tissues. Immunoblot analysis of the human vas deferens extracts revealed a P2X1R oligomer of approximately 200 kDa under nonreducing conditions, whereas dithiothreitol-treated extracts showed a single band of approximately 70 kDa. The P2X1R was identified in ultracentrifugation fractions containing 15%-29% sucrose; the receptor localized in the same fractions as flotillin-1, indicating that it regionalized into smooth muscle lipid rafts. In conclusion, ATP plays a key role in human vas deferens contractile responses of the longitudinal smooth muscle layer, an effect mediated through P2X1Rs.

  8. Anti-Tetherin Activities of HIV-1 Vpu and Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Do Not Involve Removal of Tetherin from Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Lisa A.; Yang, Su Jung; Exline, Colin M.; Rengarajan, Srinivas; Haworth, Kevin G.

    2012-01-01

    BST-2/tetherin is an interferon-inducible host restriction factor that blocks the release of newly formed enveloped viruses. It is enriched in lipid raft membrane microdomains, which are also the sites of assembly of several enveloped viruses. Viral anti-tetherin factors, such as the HIV-1 Vpu protein, typically act by removing tetherin from the cell surface. In contrast, the Ebola virus glycoprotein (GP) is unusual in that it blocks tetherin restriction without apparently altering its cell surface localization. We explored the possibility that GP acts to exclude tetherin from the specific sites of virus assembly without overtly removing it from the cell surface and that lipid raft exclusion is the mechanism involved. However, we found that neither GP nor Vpu had any effect on tetherin's distribution within lipid raft domains. Furthermore, GP did not prevent the colocalization of tetherin and budding viral particles. Contrary to previous reports, we also found no evidence that GP is itself a raft protein. Together, our data indicate that the exclusion of tetherin from lipid rafts is not the mechanism used by either HIV-1 Vpu or Ebola virus GP to counteract tetherin restriction. PMID:22398279

  9. Saikosaponin a inhibits lipopolysaccharide-oxidative stress and inflammation in Human umbilical vein endothelial cells via preventing TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yunhe; Hu, Xiaoyu; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Zecai; Zhang, Naisheng

    2015-12-01

    Saikosaponin a (SSa), the major triterpenoid saponin derivatives from Radix bupleuri (RB), has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of SSa on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory response in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of SSa. The levels of TNF-α and IL-8 were detected by ELISA. The expression of COX-2 and iNOS, NF-κB and IκB protein were determined by Western blotting. To investigate the protective mechanisms of SSa, TLR4 expression was detected by Western blotting and membrane lipid rafts were separated by density gradient ultracentrifugation and analyzed by immunoblotting with anti-TLR4 antibody. The results showed that SSa dose-dependently inhibited the production of ROS, TNF-α, IL-8, COX-2 and iNOS in LPS-stimulated HUVECs. Western blot analysis showed that SSa suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation. SSa did not affect the expression of TLR4 induced by LPS. However, translocation of TLR4 into lipid rafts and oligomerization of TLR4 induce by LPS was inhibited by SSa. Furthermore, SSa disrupted the formation of lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol. Moreover, SSa activated LXRα-ABCA1 signaling pathway, which could induce cholesterol efflux from lipid rafts. Knockdown of LXRα abrogated the anti-inflammatory effects of SSa. In conclusion, the effects of SSa is associated with activating LXRα-ABCA1 signaling pathway which results in disrupting lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol and reducing translocation of TLR4 to lipid rafts and oligomerization of TLR4, thereby attenuating LPS mediated oxidative and inflammatory responses.

  10. The evolving role of lipid rafts and caveolae in G protein-coupled receptor signaling: implications for molecular pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Insel, Paul A

    2004-09-01

    The many components of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signal transduction provide cells with numerous combinations with which to customize their responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and pharmacologic agonists. GPCRs function as guanine nucleotide exchange factors for heterotrimeric (alpha, beta, gamma) G proteins, thereby promoting exchange of GTP for GDP and, in turn, the activation of 'downstream' signaling components. Recent data indicate that individual cells express mRNA for perhaps over 100 different GPCRs (out of a total of nearly a thousand GPCR genes), several different combinations of G-protein subunits, multiple regulators of G-protein signaling proteins (which function as GTPase activating proteins), and various isoforms of downstream effector molecules. The differential expression of such protein combinations allows for modulation of signals that are customized for a specific cell type, perhaps at different states of maturation or differentiation. In addition, in the linear arrangement of molecular interactions involved in a given GPCR-G-protein-effector pathway, one needs to consider the localization of receptors and post-receptor components in subcellular compartments, microdomains, and molecular complexes, and to understand the movement of proteins between these compartments. Co-localization of signaling components, many of which are expressed at low overall concentrations, allows cells to tailor their responses by arranging, or spatially organizing in unique and kinetically favorable ways, the molecules involved in GPCR signal transduction. This review focuses on the role of lipid rafts and a subpopulation of such rafts, caveolae, as a key spatial compartment enriched in components of GPCR signal transduction. Recent data suggest cell-specific patterns for expression of those components in lipid rafts and caveolae. Such domains likely define functionally important, cell-specific regions of signaling by GPCRs and drugs active at those GPCRs.

  11. Oxidized LDL lipids increase β-amyloid production by SH-SY5Y cells through glutathione depletion and lipid raft formation.

    PubMed

    Dias, Irundika H K; Mistry, Jayna; Fell, Shaun; Reis, Ana; Spickett, Corinne M; Polidori, Maria C; Lip, Gregory Y H; Griffiths, Helen R

    2014-10-01

    Elevated total cholesterol in midlife has been associated with increased risk of dementia in later life. We have previously shown that low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is more oxidized in the plasma of dementia patients, although total cholesterol levels are not different from those of age-matched controls. β-Amyloid (Aβ) peptide, which accumulates in Alzheimer disease (AD), arises from the initial cleavage of amyloid precursor protein by β-secretase-1 (BACE1). BACE1 activity is regulated by membrane lipids and raft formation. Given the evidence for altered lipid metabolism in AD, we have investigated a mechanism for enhanced Aβ production by SH-SY5Y neuronal-like cells exposed to oxidized LDL (oxLDL). The viability of SH-SY5Y cells exposed to 4μg oxLDL and 25µM 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OH-C) was decreased significantly. Lipids, but not proteins, extracted from oxLDL were more cytotoxic than oxLDL. In parallel, the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione was decreased at sublethal concentrations of lipids extracted from native and oxLDL. GSH loss was associated with an increase in acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) activity and lipid raft formation, which could be inhibited by the ASMase inhibitor desipramine. 27OH-C and total lipids from LDL and oxLDL independently increased Aβ production by SH-SY5Y cells, and Aβ accumulation could be inhibited by desipramine and by N-acetylcysteine. These data suggest a mechanism whereby oxLDL lipids and 27OH-C can drive Aβ production by GSH depletion, ASMase-driven membrane remodeling, and BACE1 activation in neuronal cells. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Novel Mechanism of Sequestering Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 by Glypican in Lipid Rafts, Allowing Skeletal Muscle Differentiation▿

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Jaime; Brandan, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are critical modulators of growth factor activities. Skeletal muscle differentiation is strongly inhibited by fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). We have shown that HSPGs present at the plasma membrane are expressed in myoblasts and are downregulated during muscle differentiation. An exception is glypican-1, which is present throughout the myogenic process. Myoblasts that do not express glypican-1 exhibit defective differentiation, with an increase in the receptor binding of FGF-2, concomitant with increased signaling. Glypican-1-deficient myoblasts show decreased expression of myogenin, the master gene that controls myogenesis, myosin, and the myoblast fusion index. Reversion of these defects was induced by expression of rat glypican-1. Glypican-1 is the only HSPG localized in lipid raft domains in myoblasts, resulting in the sequestration of FGF-2 away from FGF-2 receptors (FGFRs) located in nonraft domains. A chimeric glypican-1, containing syndecan-1 transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, is located in nonraft domains interacting with FGFR-IV- and enhanced FGF-2-dependent signaling. Thus, glypican-1 acts as a positive regulator of muscle differentiation by sequestering FGF-2 in lipid rafts and preventing its binding and dependent signaling. PMID:20100867

  13. Decreased human leukocyte antigen-DR expression in the lipid raft by peritoneal macrophages from women with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yorito; Maeda, Nagamasa; Izumiya, Chiaki; Kusume, Tomoaki; Oguri, Hiroyoshi; Kawashima, Masaaki; Hayashi, Kazutoshi; Nomura, Aki; Yamashita, Chika; Fukaya, Takao

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the macrophage response in endometriosis by determining the expression and localization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-ABC and HLA-DR by the peritoneal fluid (PF) macrophages and PF concentrations of interferon (IFN)-gamma that regulate HLA expression. Case-control study. University hospital. 64 Japanese endometriosis patients, and 65 women with other laparoscopic diagnoses. Venipuncture and laparoscopic peritoneal fluid collection. Expression and localization of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR in PF macrophages were determined by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The concentration of IFN-gamma in PF was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In women with endometriosis, expression of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR by PF macrophages, and the IFN-gamma concentrations in PF were statistically significantly lower than in controls. Women with endometriosis showed a statistically significant positive correlation between HLA expression and IFN-gamma concentration. By confocal microscopy, HLA-ABC was distributed homogenously on the macrophage surface whereas HLA-DR expression on these cells corresponded to the lipid raft. In women with endometriosis, low HLA expression and particularly reduced HLA-DR in the lipid raft may be influenced by low IFN-gamma and may compromise antigen presentation, limiting the immune response to peritoneal cavity antigens such as implanted or metaplastic endometrial tissue.

  14. Specific localization of the annexin II heterotetramer in brain lipid raft fractions and its changes in spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Qin; Waisman, David M; Grimaldi, Maurizio

    2004-08-01

    Annexin-II (AII) is a Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipid-binding protein that is present in both intracellular and extracellular compartments. In the present study AII immunoreactivity was found in a subpopulation of neurons in specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and the surface of hippocampal pyramidal neurons from adult rats. AII from synaptic membranes was detected by immunoblotting as multiple species containing the monomer (AII36) and heterotetramer (AIIt). AIIt was resistant to beta-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but was completely reduced to monomers (36 kDa) by two-dimensional electrophoresis. AIIt resided exclusively in the detergent-resistant lipid rafts concentrated in neuronal dendrites, and its recruitment to those structures was enhanced by antibody cross-link. AII abundantly distributed on the outer leaflet of neuronal membranes and between spaces of neurons appeared to be neuronal adhesive. The formation of AIIt required synthesis of sphingolipids and cholesterol, and its stability depended on Ca2+. Increases in neuronal activities such as depolarization and learning were shown to promote formation of AIIt. Our results suggest that, via a dynamic association with dendritic lipid rafts, AII may play a role in synaptic signal transduction and remodeling. This probably involves focal adhesion and interactions with actin that are associated with brain development and memory consolidation.

  15. HSL-knockout mouse testis exhibits class B scavenger receptor upregulation and disrupted lipid raft microdomains[S

    PubMed Central

    Casado, María Emilia; Huerta, Lydia; Ortiz, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Crespo, Mirian; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Kraemer, Fredric B.; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    There is a tight relationship between fertility and changes in cholesterol metabolism during spermatogenesis. In the testis, class B scavenger receptors (SR-B) SR-BI, SR-BII, and LIMP II mediate the selective uptake of cholesterol esters from HDL, which are hydrolyzed to unesterified cholesterol by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). HSL is critical because HSL knockout (KO) male mice are sterile. The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of the lack of HSL in testis on the expression of SR-B, lipid raft composition, and related cell signaling pathways. HSL-KO mouse testis presented altered spermatogenesis associated with decreased sperm counts, sperm motility, and infertility. In wild-type (WT) testis, HSL is expressed in elongated spermatids; SR-BI, in Leydig cells and spermatids; SR-BII, in spermatocytes and spermatids but not in Leydig cells; and LIMP II, in Sertoli and Leydig cells. HSL knockout male mice have increased expression of class B scavenger receptors, disrupted caveolin-1 localization in lipid raft plasma membrane microdomains, and activated phospho-ERK, phospho-AKT, and phospho-SRC in the testis, suggesting that class B scavenger receptors are involved in cholesterol ester uptake for steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis. PMID:22988039

  16. Distribution of C16:0, C18:0, C24:1, and C24:0 sulfatides in central nervous system lipid rafts by quantitative ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Ana Lis; Li, Guannan; Lopez-Rosas, Aurora; Månsson, Jan-Eric; van Breemen, Richard B; Givogri, Maria Irene

    2014-12-15

    Sulfated galactosylceramides (sulfatides) are glycosphingolipids associated with cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) and are highly expressed in brain tissue. Although it is known that sulfatide species show heterogeneity in their fatty acid acyl group composition throughout brain development, their lipid raft distribution and biological relevance is poorly understood. We validated a fast and sensitive ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method to measure developmentally regulated sulfatide species (C16:0, C18:0, C24:1, and C24:0) in central nervous system (CNS) lipid rafts isolated without using detergent. Our UHPLC-MS/MS assay showed good accuracy and precision with a linear range of 5 to 1,000 nM for C18:0 and C24:1 sulfatides and 10 to 1,000 nM for C16:0 and C24:0 sulfatides. We applied this quantitative analysis to detergent-free lipid rafts isolated from wild-type mice and arylsulfatase A-deficient (ASA knockout) mice that accumulate sulfatides. All four sulfatide species were more abundant in raft membranes than in non-raft membranes, with a significant increase in lipid rafts isolated from ASA knockout mice. This is the first description of an analytical method to study these sulfatide species in raft and non-raft membranes and has the potential to be applied to preparations from other tissues.

  17. Rafts, Nanoparticles and Neural Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Vishal; Wallace, Ron

    2012-01-01

    This review examines the role of membrane rafts in neural disease as a rationale for drug targeting utilizing lipid-based nanoparticles. The article begins with an overview of methodological issues involving the existence, sizes, and lifetimes of rafts, and then examines raft function in the etiologies of three major neural diseases—epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease—selected as promising candidates for raft-based therapeutics. Raft-targeting drug delivery systems involving liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles are then examined in detail.

  18. Impact of lipid rafts on the T -cell-receptor and peptide-major-histocompatibility-complex interactions under different measurement conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Xu, Guang-Kui; Song, Fan

    2017-01-01

    The interactions between T-cell receptor (TCR) and peptide-major-histocompatibility complex (pMHC), which enable T-cell development and initiate adaptive immune responses, have been intensively studied. However, a central issue of how lipid rafts affect the TCR-pMHC interactions remains unclear. Here, by using a statistical-mechanical membrane model, we show that the binding affinity of TCR and pMHC anchored on two apposing cell membranes is significantly enhanced because of the lipid raft-induced signaling protein aggregation. This finding may provide an alternative insight into the mechanism of T-cell activation triggered by very low densities of pMHC. In the case of cell-substrate adhesion, our results indicate that the loss of lateral mobility of the proteins on the solid substrate leads to the inhibitory effect of lipid rafts on TCR-pMHC interactions. Our findings help to understand why different experimental methods for measuring the impact of lipid rafts on the receptor-ligand interactions have led to contradictory conclusions.

  19. GM1 and GD1a gangliosides modulate toxic and inflammatory effects of E. coli lipopolysaccharide by preventing TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Bayunova, Lubov; Sokolova, Tatyana; Vlasova, Yulia; Bachteeva, Vera; Avrova, Natalia; Parnova, Rimma

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous gangliosides are known to inhibit the effects of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in different cells exhibiting anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities. The mechanisms underlying ganglioside action are not fully understood. Because LPS recognition and receptor complex formation occur in lipid rafts, and gangliosides play a key role in their maintenance, we hypothesize that protective effects of exogenous gangliosides would depend on inhibition of LPS signaling via prevention of TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts. The effect of GM1 and GD1a gangliosides on LPS-induced toxic and inflammatory reactions in PC12 cells, and in epithelial cells isolated from the frog urinary bladder, was studied. In PC12 cells, GD1a and GM1 significantly reduced the effect of LPS on the decrease of cell survival and on stimulation of reactive oxygen species production. In epithelial cells, gangliosides decreased LPS-stimulated iNOS expression, NO, and PGE2 production. Subcellular fractionation, in combination with immunoblotting, showed that pretreatment of cells with GM1, GD1a, or methyl-β-cyclodextrin, completely eliminated the effect of LPS on translocation of TLR4 into lipid rafts. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that ganglioside-induced prevention of TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts could be a mechanism of protection against LPS in various cells.

  20. Impact of lipid rafts on the T-cell-receptor and peptide-major-histocompatibility-complex interactions under different measurement conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Xu, Guang-Kui; Song, Fan

    2017-01-01

    The interactions between T-cell receptor (TCR) and peptide-major-histocompatibility complex (pMHC), which enable T-cell development and initiate adaptive immune responses, have been intensively studied. However, a central issue of how lipid rafts affect the TCR-pMHC interactions remains unclear. Here, by using a statistical-mechanical membrane model, we show that the binding affinity of TCR and pMHC anchored on two apposing cell membranes is significantly enhanced because of the lipid raft-induced signaling protein aggregation. This finding may provide an alternative insight into the mechanism of T-cell activation triggered by very low densities of pMHC. In the case of cell-substrate adhesion, our results indicate that the loss of lateral mobility of the proteins on the solid substrate leads to the inhibitory effect of lipid rafts on TCR-pMHC interactions. Our findings help to understand why different experimental methods for measuring the impact of lipid rafts on the receptor-ligand interactions have led to contradictory conclusions.

  1. HIF-1 is induced via EGFR activation and mediates resistance to anoikis-like cell death under lipid rafts/caveolae-disrupting stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong-Hee; Koo, Kyung Hee; Park, Jong-Wan; Kim, Hee-Jung; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Park, Jong Bae; Park, Byung-Kiu; Kim, Yong-Nyun

    2009-12-01

    The plasma membrane microdomains, lipid rafts, are involved in regulation of cellular functions such as cell survival and adhesion. Cholesterol is a critical component of lipid rafts in terms of their integrity and functions and rafts disruption by cholesterol depletion can induce detachment-induced cell death. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) alpha is stabilized in hypoxia and transactivates numerous genes required for cellular adaptation to hypoxia. It is also induced by non-hypoxic stimuli and contributes to cell survival. Because hypoxia inhibits cholesterol synthesis and HIF-1alpha plays a role in this process, we here explored a possible connection between lipid rafts and HIF-1alpha. We investigated whether HIF-1alpha is regulated during cholesterol depletion/rafts disruption in A431 cells in normoxic conditions. Methyl-beta cyclodextrin (MbetaCD), which induces cholesterol depletion, upregulated HIF-1alpha even under normoxic conditions and this upregulation required epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 activation, but not Akt activation. MbetaCD treatment induced HIF-1alpha upregulation at both the transcriptional and translational levels but not at the posttranslational levels. In addition, MbetaCD robustly induced vascular endothelial growth factor production and stimulated an hypoxia response element-driven luciferase reporter activity under normoxic conditions, indicating that MbetaCD-induced HIF-1alpha is functionally activated. Both EGFR activity and HIF-1alpha expression were higher in the attached cells than in the detached cells after MbetaCD treatment. Furthermore, inhibition of HIF-1alpha by RNA interference accelerated cell detachment, thus increasing cell death, indicating that HIF-1alpha expression attenuates MbetaCD-induced anoikis-like cell death. These data suggest that, depending on cholesterol levels, lipid rafts or membrane fluidity are probably to regulate HIF-1alpha expression in

  2. Possible protective effect of membrane lipid rafts against interleukin-1β-mediated anti-proliferative effect in INS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Chentouf, Myriam; Guzman, Caroline; Hamze, Moustafa; Gross, René; Lajoix, Anne Dominique; Peraldi-Roux, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that pancreatic islets from pre-diabetic rats undergo an inflammatory process in which IL-1β takes part and controls β-cell function. In the present study, using the INS-1 rat pancreatic β-cell line, we investigated the potential involvement of membrane-associated cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts in IL-1β signaling and biological effects on insulin secretion, β-cell proliferation and apoptosis. We show that, INS-1 cells exposure to increasing concentrations of IL-1β leads to a progressive inhibition of insulin release, an increase in the number of apoptotic cells and a dose-dependent decrease in pancreatic β-cell proliferation. Disruption of membrane lipid rafts markedly reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion but did not affect either cell apoptosis or proliferation rate, demonstrating that membrane lipid raft integrity is essential for β-cell secretory function. In the same conditions, IL-1β treatment of INS-1 cells led to a slight further decrease in insulin secretion for low concentrations of the cytokine, and a more marked one, similar to that observed in normal cells for higher concentrations. These effects occurred together with an increase in iNOS expression and surprisingly with an upregulation of tryptophane hydroxylase and protein Kinase C in membrane lipid rafts suggesting that compensatory mechanisms develop to counteract IL-1β inhibitory effects. We also demonstrate that disruption of membrane lipid rafts did not prevent cytokine-induced cell death recorded after exposure to high IL-1β concentrations. Finally, concerning cell proliferation, we bring strong evidence that membrane lipid rafts exert a protective effect against IL-1β anti-proliferative effect, possibly mediated at least partly by modifications in ERK and PKB expression/activities. Our results 1) demonstrate that IL-1β deleterious effects do not require a cholesterol-dependent plasma membrane compartmentalization of IL-1R1 signaling and 2) confer to

  3. Expression of HIV-1 Vpu leads to loss of the viral restriction factor CD317/Tetherin from lipid rafts and its enhanced lysosomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Rollason, Ruth; Dunstan, Katie; Billcliff, Peter G; Bishop, Paul; Gleeson, Paul; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Banting, George

    2013-01-01

    CD317/tetherin (aka BST2 or HM1.24 antigen) is an interferon inducible membrane protein present in regions of the lipid bilayer enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol (often termed lipid rafts). It has been implicated in an eclectic mix of cellular processes including, most notably, the retention of fully formed viral particles at the surface of cells infected with HIV and other enveloped viruses. Expression of the HIV viral accessory protein Vpu has been shown to lead to intracellular sequestration and degradation of tetherin, thereby counteracting the inhibition of viral release. There is evidence that tetherin interacts directly with Vpu, but it remains unclear where in the cell this interaction occurs or if Vpu expression affects the lipid raft localisation of tetherin. We have addressed these points using biochemical and cell imaging approaches focused on endogenous rather than ectopically over-expressed tetherin. We find i) no evidence for an interaction between Vpu and endogenous tetherin at the cell surface, ii) the vast majority of endogenous tetherin that is at the cell surface in control cells is in lipid rafts, iii) internalised tetherin is present in non-raft fractions, iv) expression of Vpu in cells expressing endogenous tetherin leads to the loss of tetherin from lipid rafts, v) internalised tetherin enters early endosomes, and late endosomes, in both control cells and cells expressing Vpu, but the proportion of tetherin molecules destined for degradation rather than recycling is increased in cells expressing Vpu vi) lysosomes are the primary site for degradation of endogenous tetherin in cells expressing Vpu. Our studies underlie the importance of studying endogenous tetherin and let us propose a model in which Vpu intercepts newly internalised tetherin and diverts it for lysosomal destruction rather than recycling to the cell surface.

  4. A-type ECG and EGCG dimers inhibit 3T3-L1 differentiation by binding to cholesterol in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Deng, Xiangyi; Peng, Jinming; Zou, Bo; Li, Chunmei

    2017-06-24

    The present study aimed to explore the underlying mechanisms of epicatechin-3-gallate-(4β→8, 2β→O→7)-epicatechin-3-gallate (A-type ECG dimer) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate-(4β→8, 2β→O→7)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (A-type EGCG dimer) involved in their strong inhibitory effects on 3T3-L1 preadipocytes differentiation. In the synthetic "lipid raft-like" liposome, A-type ECG and EGCG dimers incorporated into the liposome with high affinity and decreased the fluidity of the liposome. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, A-type ECG and EGCG dimers possibly bonded to lipid rafts cholesterol and disrupted the integrity of lipid rafts, thus exerting their notable inhibitory effects on 3T3-L1 preadipocytes differentiation by suppressing mitotic clonal expansion process and mRNA levels of PPARγ, C/EBPα and SREBP1C. A highly positive correlation between the cholesterol binding capacity of the two dimers and their inhibitory effect on 3T3-L1 preadipocytes differentiation (R(2)=0.9328) was observed. Molecular dynamics simulation further verified that A-type ECG and EGCG dimers could bond to cholesterol via hydrogen bonding. The results of this study suggested that the disruption of A-type ECG and EGCG dimers on membrane lipid rafts by targeting cholesterol in the lipid rafts was involved in the underlying mechanisms of their strong inhibitory effects on 3T3-L1 preadipocytes differentiation. This broadens the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of polyphenols on modulating and controlling of metabolic dysregulation, particularly adipocyte differentiation, which is a significant risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Peptidoglycan-mediated IL-8 expression in human alveolar type II epithelial cells requires lipid raft formation and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Cheon, In Su; Woo, Sang Su; Kang, Seok-Seong; Im, Jintaek; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Chung, Dae Kyun; Park, Dong Ki; Han, Seung Hyun

    2008-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a major sepsis-causing Gram-positive bacterium, invades pulmonary epithelial cells and causes lung diseases. In the lung, alveolar type II epithelial cells play an important role in innate immunity by secreting chemokines and antimicrobial peptides upon bacterial infection whereas type I cells mainly function in gas-exchange. In this study, we investigated the ability of S. aureus peptidoglycan (PGN) to induce expression of a chemokine, IL-8, in a human alveolar type II epithelial cell line, A549. PGN induces IL-8 mRNA and protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Supplementation of soluble CD14 further enhanced the PGN-induced IL-8 expression. Interestingly, PGN-induced IL-8 expression was inhibited by nystatin, a specific inhibitor for lipid rafts, but not by chlorpromazine, a specific inhibitor for clathrin-coated pits. Furthermore, PGN-induced IL-8 expression was attenuated by inhibitors for MAP kinases such as ERK, p38 kinase, and JNK/SAPK, whereas no inhibitory effect was observed by inhibitors for reactive oxygen species or protein kinase C. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrates that PGN increased the DNA binding of the transcription factors, AP-1 and NF-kappaB while minimally, NF-IL6, all of which are involved in the transcription of IL-8. Taken together, these results suggest that PGN induces IL-8 expression in a CD14-enhanced manner in human alveolar type II epithelial cells, through the formation of lipid rafts and the activation of MAP kinases, which ultimately leads to activation of AP-1, NF-kappaB, and NF-IL6.

  6. Caveolae/lipid rafts in fibroblast-like synoviocytes: ectopeptidase-rich membrane microdomains.

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, D; Hansen, G H; Niels-Christiansen, L; Thorsen, E; Immerdal, L; Santos, A N; Kehlen, A; Langner, J; Danielsen, E M

    2001-01-01

    Membrane peptidases play important roles in cell activation, proliferation and communication. Human fibroblast-like synoviocytes express considerable amounts of aminopeptidase N/CD13, dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26, and neprilysin/CD10, transmembrane proteins previously proposed to be involved in the regulation of intra-articular levels of neuropeptides and chemotactic mediators as well as in adhesion and cell-cell interactions. Here, we report these peptidases in synoviocytes to be localized predominantly in glycolipid- and cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains known as 'rafts'. At the ultrastructural level, aminopeptidase N/CD13 and dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26 were found in caveolae, in particular in intracellular yet surface-connected vesicle-like structures and 'rosettes' made up of several caveolae. In addition, clusters of peptidases were seen at the cell surface in flat patches ranging in size from about 60 to 160 nm. Cholesterol depletion of synoviocytes by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin disrupted >90% of the caveolae and reduced the raft localization of aminopeptidase N/CD13 without affecting Ala-p-nitroanilide-cleaving activity of confluent cell cultures. In co-culture experiments with T-lymphocytes, cholesterol depletion of synoviocytes greatly reduced their capability to induce an early lymphocytic expression of aminopeptidase N/CD13. We propose caveolae/rafts to be peptidase-rich 'hot-spot' regions of the synoviocyte plasma membrane required for functional cell-cell interactions with lymphocytes. The peptidases may act in concert with other types of proteins such as receptors and signal transducers localized in these specialized membrane domains. PMID:11171078

  7. The Ia.2 Epitope Defines a Subset of Lipid Raft Resident MHC Class II Molecules Crucial to Effective Antigen Presentation1

    PubMed Central

    Busman-Sahay, Kathleen; Sargent, Elizabeth; Harton, Jonathan A.; Drake, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has established that binding of the 11-5.2 anti-I-Ak mAb, which recognizes the Ia.2 epitope on I-Ak class II molecules, elicits MHC class II signaling, whereas binding of two other anti-I-Ak mAb that recognize the Ia.17 epitope fail to elicit signaling. Using a biochemical approach, we establish that the Ia.2 epitope recognized by the widely used 11-5.2 mAb defines a subset of cell surface I-Ak molecules predominantly found within membrane lipid rafts. Functional studies demonstrate that the Ia.2 bearing subset of I-Ak class II molecules is critically necessary for effective B cell–T cell interactions especially at low antigen doses, a finding consistent with published studies on the role of raft-resident class II molecules in CD4 T cell activation. Interestingly, B cells expressing recombinant I-Ak class II molecules possessing a β chain-tethered HEL peptide lack the Ia.2 epitope and fail to partition into lipid rafts. Moreover, cells expressing Ia.2 negative tethered peptide-class II molecules are severely impaired in their ability to present both tethered peptide or peptide derived from exogenous antigen to CD4 T cells. These results establish the Ia.2 epitope as defining a lipid raft-resident MHC class II confomer vital to the initiation of MHC class II restricted B cell–T cell interactions. PMID:21543648

  8. Mitochondria and lipid raft-located FOF1-ATP synthase as major therapeutic targets in the antileishmanial and anticancer activities of ether lipid edelfosine.

    PubMed

    Villa-Pulgarín, Janny A; Gajate, Consuelo; Botet, Javier; Jimenez, Alberto; Justies, Nicole; Varela-M, Rubén E; Cuesta-Marbán, Álvaro; Müller, Ingrid; Modolell, Manuel; Revuelta, José L; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2017-08-01

    Leishmaniasis is the world's second deadliest parasitic disease after malaria, and current treatment of the different forms of this disease is far from satisfactory. Alkylphospholipid analogs (APLs) are a family of anticancer drugs that show antileishmanial activity, including the first oral drug (miltefosine) for leishmaniasis and drugs in preclinical/clinical oncology trials, but their precise mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. Here we show that the tumor cell apoptosis-inducer edelfosine was the most effective APL, as compared to miltefosine, perifosine and erucylphosphocholine, in killing Leishmania spp. promastigotes and amastigotes as well as tumor cells, as assessed by DNA breakdown determined by flow cytometry. In studies using animal models, we found that orally-administered edelfosine showed a potent in vivo antileishmanial activity and diminished macrophage pro-inflammatory responses. Edelfosine was also able to kill Leishmania axenic amastigotes. Edelfosine was taken up by host macrophages and killed intracellular Leishmania amastigotes in infected macrophages. Edelfosine accumulated in tumor cell mitochondria and Leishmania kinetoplast-mitochondrion, and led to mitochondrial transmembrane potential disruption, and to the successive breakdown of parasite mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. Ectopic expression of Bcl-XL inhibited edelfosine-induced cell death in both Leishmania parasites and tumor cells. We found that the cytotoxic activity of edelfosine against Leishmania parasites and tumor cells was associated with a dramatic recruitment of FOF1-ATP synthase into lipid rafts following edelfosine treatment in both parasites and cancer cells. Raft disruption and specific FOF1-ATP synthase inhibition hindered edelfosine-induced cell death in both Leishmania parasites and tumor cells. Genetic deletion of FOF1-ATP synthase led to edelfosine drug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast. The present study shows that the antileishmanial and

  9. Glypican-1 regulates myoblast response to HGF via Met in a lipid raft-dependent mechanism: effect on migration of skeletal muscle precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Via the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (Met), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exerts key roles involving skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are critical modulators of HGF activity, but the role of specific HSPGs in HGF regulation is poorly understood. Glypican-1 is the only HSPG expressed in myoblasts that localize in lipid raft membrane domains, controlling cell responses to extracellular stimuli. We determined if glypican-1 in these domains is necessary to stabilize the HGF-Met signaling complex and myoblast response to HGF. Methods C2C12 myoblasts and a derived clone (C6) with low glypican-1 expression were used as an experimental model. The activation of Met, ERK1/2 and AKT in response to HGF was evaluated. The distribution of Met and its activated form in lipid raft domains, as well as its dependence on glypican-1, were characterized by sucrose density gradient fractionation in both cell types. Rescue experiments reexpressing glypican-1 or a chimeric glypican-1 fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of mouse syndecan-1 or myoblast pretreatment with MβCD were conducted. In vitro and in vivo myoblast migration assays in response to HGF were also performed. Results Glypican-1 localization in membrane raft domains was required for a maximum cell response to HGF. It stabilized Met and HGF in lipid raft domains, forming a signaling complex where the active phospho-Met receptor was concentrated. Glypican-1 also stabilized CD44 in a HGF-dependent manner. In addition, glypican-1 was required for in vitro and in vivo HGF-dependent myoblast migration. Conclusions Glypican-1 is a regulator of HGF-dependent signaling via Met in lipid raft domains. PMID:24517345

  10. Glypican-1 regulates myoblast response to HGF via Met in a lipid raft-dependent mechanism: effect on migration of skeletal muscle precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Jaime; Cabrera, Daniel; Brandan, Enrique

    2014-02-12

    Via the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (Met), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exerts key roles involving skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are critical modulators of HGF activity, but the role of specific HSPGs in HGF regulation is poorly understood. Glypican-1 is the only HSPG expressed in myoblasts that localize in lipid raft membrane domains, controlling cell responses to extracellular stimuli. We determined if glypican-1 in these domains is necessary to stabilize the HGF-Met signaling complex and myoblast response to HGF. C2C12 myoblasts and a derived clone (C6) with low glypican-1 expression were used as an experimental model. The activation of Met, ERK1/2 and AKT in response to HGF was evaluated. The distribution of Met and its activated form in lipid raft domains, as well as its dependence on glypican-1, were characterized by sucrose density gradient fractionation in both cell types. Rescue experiments reexpressing glypican-1 or a chimeric glypican-1 fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of mouse syndecan-1 or myoblast pretreatment with MβCD were conducted. In vitro and in vivo myoblast migration assays in response to HGF were also performed. Glypican-1 localization in membrane raft domains was required for a maximum cell response to HGF. It stabilized Met and HGF in lipid raft domains, forming a signaling complex where the active phospho-Met receptor was concentrated. Glypican-1 also stabilized CD44 in a HGF-dependent manner. In addition, glypican-1 was required for in vitro and in vivo HGF-dependent myoblast migration. Glypican-1 is a regulator of HGF-dependent signaling via Met in lipid raft domains.

  11. Modulation of cell surface transport and lipid raft localization by the cytoplasmic tail of the influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Silvia; Imkeller, Katharina; Jolmes, Fabian; Veit, Michael; Herrmann, Andreas; Schwarzer, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Viral glycoproteins are highly variable in their primary structure, but on the other hand feature a high functional conservation to fulfil their versatile tasks during the pathogenic life cycle. Typically, all protein domains are optimized in that indispensable functions can be assigned to small conserved motifs or even individual amino acids. The cytoplasmic tail of many viral spike proteins, although of particular relevance for the virus biology, is often only insufficiently characterized. Hemagglutinin (HA), the receptor-binding protein of the influenza virus comprises a short cytoplasmic tail of 13 amino acids that exhibits three highly conserved palmitoylation sites. However, the particular importance of these modifications and the tail in general for intracellular trafficking and lateral membrane organization remains elusive. In this study, we generated HA core proteins consisting of transmembrane domain, cytoplasmic tail and a minor part of the ectodomain, tagged with a yellow fluorescent protein. Different mutation and truncation variants of these chimeric proteins were investigated using confocal microscopy, to characterize the role of cytoplasmic tail and palmitoylation for the intracellular trafficking to plasma membrane and Golgi apparatus. In addition, we assessed raft partitioning of the variants by Foerster resonance energy transfer with an established raft marker. We revealed a substantial influence of the cytoplasmic tail length on the intracellular distribution and surface exposure of the proteins. A complete removal of the tail hampers a physiological trafficking of the protein, whereas a partial truncation can be compensated by cytoplasmic palmitoylations. Plasma membrane raft partitioning on the other hand was found to imperatively require palmitoylations, and the cysteine at position 551 turned out to be of most relevance. Our data shed further light on the tight interconnection between cytoplasmic elements and intracellular trafficking and

  12. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine promotes the differentiation of resident Sca-1 positive cardiac stem cells to cardiomyocytes through lipid raft/JNK/STAT3 and β-catenin signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjing; Liu, Honghong; Liu, Pingping; Yin, Deling; Zhang, Shangli; Zhao, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Resident cardiac Sca-1-positive (+) stem cells may differentiate into cardiomyocytes to improve the function of damaged hearts. However, little is known about the inducers and molecular mechanisms underlying the myogenic conversion of Sca-1(+) stem cells. Here we report that sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), a naturally occurring bioactive lipid, induces the myogenic conversion of Sca-1(+) stem cells, as evidenced by the increased expression of cardiac transcription factors (Nkx2.5 and GATA4), structural proteins (cardiac Troponin T), transcriptional enhancer (Mef2c) and GATA4 nucleus translocation. First, SPC activated JNK and STAT3, and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 or STAT3 inhibitor stattic impaired the SPC-induced expression of cardiac transcription factors and GATA4 nucleus translocation, which suggests that JNK and STAT3 participated in SPC-promoted cardiac differentiation. Moreover, STAT3 activation was inhibited by SP600125, whereas JNK was inhibited by β-cyclodextrin as a lipid raft breaker, which indicates a lipid raft/JNK/STAT3 pathway involved in SPC-induced myogenic transition. β-Catenin, degraded by activated GSK3β, was inhibited by SPC. Furthermore, GSK3β inhibitors weakened but the β-catenin inhibitor promoted SPC-induced differentiation. We found no crosstalk between the lipid raft/JNK/STAT3 and β-catenin pathway. Our study describes a lipid, SPC, as an endogenic inducer of myogenic conversion in Sca-1(+) stem cells with low toxicity and high efficiency for uptake.

  13. The Productive Entry Pathway of HIV-1 in Macrophages Is Dependent on Endocytosis through Lipid Rafts Containing CD4

    PubMed Central

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Moore, Michael D.; James, William S.; Cowley, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages constitute an important reservoir of HIV-1 infection, yet HIV-1 entry into these cells is poorly understood due to the difficulty in genetically manipulating primary macrophages. We developed an effective genetic approach to manipulate the sub-cellular distribution of CD4 in macrophages, and investigated how this affects the HIV-1 entry pathway. Pluripotent Stem Cells (PSC) were transduced with lentiviral vectors designed to manipulate CD4 location and were then differentiated into genetically modified macrophages. HIV-1 infection of these cells was assessed by performing assays that measure critical steps of the HIV-1 lifecycle (fusion, reverse transcription, and expression from HIV-1 integrants). Expression of LCK (which tethers CD4 to the surface of T cells, but is not normally expressed in macrophages) in PSC-macrophages effectively tethered CD4 at the cell surface, reducing its normal endocytic recycling route, and increasing surface CD4 expression 3-fold. This led to a significant increase in HIV-1 fusion and reverse transcription, but productive HIV-1 infection efficiency (as determined by reporter expression from DNA integrants) was unaffected. This implies that surface-tethering of CD4 sequesters HIV-1 into a pathway that is unproductive in macrophages. Secondly, to investigate the importance of lipid rafts (as detergent resistant membranes - DRM) in HIV-1 infection, we generated genetically modified PSC-macrophages that express CD4 mutants known to be excluded from DRM. These macrophages were significantly less able to support HIV-1 fusion, reverse-transcription and integration than engineered controls. Overall, these results support a model in which productive infection by HIV-1 in macrophages occurs via a CD4-raft-dependent endocytic uptake pathway. PMID:24465876

  14. Fatty Acid 2-Hydroxylase Mediates Diffusional Mobility of Raft-associated Lipids, GLUT4 Level, and Lipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lin; Zhou, Dequan; Pryse, Kenneth M.; Okunade, Adewole L.; Su, Xiong

    2010-01-01

    Straight chain fatty acid α-oxidation increases during differentiation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes, leading to a marked accumulation of odd chain length fatty acyl moieties. Potential roles of this pathway in adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis are unknown. Mammalian fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) was recently identified and suggested to catalyze the initial step of straight chain fatty acid α-oxidation. Accordingly, we examined whether FA2H modulates adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis in mature adipocytes. FA2H level markedly increases during differentiation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and small interfering RNAs against FA2H inhibit the differentiation process. In mature adipocytes, depletion of FA2H inhibits basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and lipogenesis, which are partially rescued by the enzymatic product of FA2H, 2-hydroxy palmitic acid. Expression of fatty-acid synthase and SCD1 was decreased in FA2H-depleted cells, and levels of GLUT4 and insulin receptor proteins were reduced. 2-Hydroxy fatty acids are enriched in cellular sphingolipids, which are components of membrane rafts. Accelerated diffusional mobility of raft-associated lipids was shown to enhance degradation of GLUT4 and insulin receptor in adipocytes. Consistent with this, depletion of FA2H appeared to increase raft lipid mobility as it significantly accelerated the rates of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measurements of lipid rafts labeled with Alexa 488-conjugated cholera toxin subunit B. Moreover, the enhanced recovery rates were partially reversed by treatment with 2-hydroxy palmitic acid. In conclusion, our findings document the novel role of FA2H in adipocyte lipogenesis possibly by modulation of raft fluidity and level of GLUT4. PMID:20519515

  15. Sizes of lipid domains: What do we know from artificial lipid membranes? What are the possible shared features with membrane rafts in cells?

    PubMed

    Rosetti, Carla M; Mangiarotti, Agustín; Wilke, Natalia

    2017-01-28

    In model lipid membranes with phase coexistence, domain sizes distribute in a very wide range, from the nanometer (reported in vesicles and supported films) to the micrometer (observed in many model membranes). Domain growth by coalescence and Ostwald ripening is slow (minutes to hours), the domain size being correlated with the size of the capture region. Domain sizes thus strongly depend on the number of domains which, in the case of a nucleation process, depends on the oversaturation of the system, on line tension and on the perturbation rate in relation to the membrane dynamics. Here, an overview is given of the factors that affect nucleation or spinodal decomposition and domain growth, and their influence on the distribution of domain sizes in different model membranes is discussed. The parameters analyzed respond to very general physical rules, and we therefore propose a similar behavior for the rafts in the plasma membrane of cells, but with obstructed mobility and with a continuously changing environment.

  16. Thymineless Death in F10-Treated AML Cells Occurs via Lipid Raft Depletion and Fas/FasL co-Localization in the Plasma Membrane with Activation of the Extrinsic Apoptotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gmeiner, William H.; Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Stuart, Christopher H.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    The polymeric fluoropyrimidine F10 displays excellent anti-leukemia activity in pre-clinical models of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) through dual targeting of thymidylate synthase and DNA topoisomerase 1. Here we report that F10 activates the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in AML cells by enhancing localization of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) at the plasma membrane and while reducing overall lipid raft levels promotes Fas/FasL co-localization in remaining lipid rafts. The HMG-CoA synthase inhibitor simvastatin was synergistic with F10 and induced cell death via similar apoptotic processes. Our results are consistent with diverse processes activating a common apoptotic pathway characterized by reduced overall levels of lipid rafts and Fas/FasL co-localization in the plasma membrane, including in remaining lipid rafts which may play a role in both cell-survival and cell death signaling. PMID:25510486

  17. Thymineless death in F10-treated AML cells occurs via lipid raft depletion and Fas/FasL co-localization in the plasma membrane with activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Gmeiner, William H; Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Stuart, Christopher H; Pardee, Timothy S

    2015-02-01

    The polymeric fluoropyrimidine F10 displays excellent anti-leukemia activity in pre-clinical models of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) through dual targeting of thymidylate synthase and DNA topoisomerase 1. Here we report that F10 activates the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in AML cells by enhancing localization of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) at the plasma membrane and while reducing overall lipid raft levels promotes Fas/FasL co-localization in remaining lipid rafts. The HMG-CoA synthase inhibitor simvastatin was synergistic with F10 and induced cell death via similar apoptotic processes. Our results are consistent with diverse processes activating a common apoptotic pathway characterized by reduced overall levels of lipid rafts and Fas/FasL co-localization in the plasma membrane, including in remaining lipid rafts which may play a role in both cell-survival and cell death signaling.

  18. Lipid raft facilitated ligation of K-{alpha}1-tubulin by specific antibodies on epithelial cells: Role in pathogenesis of chronic rejection following human lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Angaswamy, Nataraju; Weber, Joseph; Mohanakumar, T.

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Addition of KAT Abs (+) sera to NHBE culture causes upregulation of growth factors. {yields} Cholesterol depletion causes down regulation of growth factor expression. {yields} Cholesterol depletion is accompanied by loss of membrane bound caveolin. {yields} Thus, we demonstrate lipid raft are critical for efficient ligation of the KAT Abs. -- Abstract: Long term function of human lung allografts is hindered by development of chronic rejection manifested as Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS). We have previously identified the development of antibodies (Abs) following lung transplantation to K-{alpha}1-tubulin (KAT), an epithelial surface gap junction cytoskeletal protein, in patients who develop BOS. However, the biochemical and molecular basis of the interactions and signaling cascades mediated by KAT Abs are yet to be defined. In this report, we investigated the biophysical basis of the epithelial cell membrane surface interaction between KAT and its specific Abs. Towards this, we analyzed the role of the lipid raft-domains in the membrane interactions which lead to cell signaling and ultimately increased growth factor expression. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, upon specific ligation with Abs to KAT obtained either from the serum of BOS(+) patients or monoclonal KAT Abs, resulted in upregulation of growth factors VEGF, PDGF, and bFGF (6.4 {+-} 1.1-, 3.2 {+-} 0.9-, and 3.4 {+-} 1.1-fold increase, respectively) all of which are important in the pathogenesis of BOS. To define the role for lipid raft in augmenting surface interactions, we analyzed the changes in the growth factor expression pattern upon depletion and enrichment with lipid raft following the ligation of the epithelial cell membranes with Abs specific for KAT. NHBE cells cultured in the presence of {beta}-methyl cyclodextran ({beta}MCD) had significantly reduced growth factor expression (1.3 {+-} 0.3, vs {beta}MCD untreated being 6.4 {+-} 1.1-fold

  19. Neuropeptide FF-sensitive confinement of mu opioid receptor does not involve lipid rafts in SH-SY5Y cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mouledous, Lionel

    2008-08-15

    *: Mu opioid (MOP) receptor activation can be functionally modulated by stimulation of Neuropeptide FF 2 (NPFF{sub 2}) G protein-coupled receptors. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments have shown that activation of the NPFF{sub 2} receptor dramatically reduces the fraction of MOP receptors confined in microdomains of the plasma membrane of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The aim of the present work was to assess if the direct observation of receptor compartmentation by fluorescence techniques in living cells could be related to indirect estimation of receptor partitioning in lipid rafts after biochemical fractionation of the cell. Our results show that MOP receptor distribution in lipid rafts is highly dependent upon the method of purification, questioning the interpretation of previous data regarding MOP receptor compartmentation. Moreover, the NPFF analogue 1DMe does not modify the distribution profile of MOP receptors, clearly demonstrating that membrane fractionation data do not correlate with direct measurement of receptor compartmentation in living cells.

  20. N-glycan-dependent cell-surface expression of the P2Y2 receptor and N-glycan-independent distribution to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tetsuto; Takahashi, Chihiro; Matsuzaki, Hitomi; Takeyama, Shohei; Sato, Shinpei; Sato, Ayaka; Kuroda, Yoshiyuki; Higashi, Hideyoshi

    2017-04-01

    P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that couples with Gαq/11 and is stimulated by ATP and UTP. P2Y2R is involved in pain, proinflammatory changes, and blood pressure control. Some GPCRs are localized in lipid rafts for interaction with other signaling molecules. In this study, we prepared N-glycan-deficient mutants by mutating the two consensus Asn residues for N-glycosylation to Gln to examine intracellular localization and association with lipid rafts. Western blotting of the wild type (WT) protein and mutants (N9Q, N13Q, N9Q/N13Q) in COS-7 cells showed that both Asn residues were glycosylated in the WT. Fluorescent microscopy analysis showed that WT, N9Q and N13Q were expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi body, and cell membrane, but N9Q/N13Q was only found in the ER. WT, N9Q and N13Q moved from the cell surface to endosomes within 15 min after UTP stimulation. WT and the N9Q/N13Q glycosylation-deficient mutant appeared in the detergent insoluble membrane fraction, lipid raft. These findings suggest that P2Y2R is localized in lipid rafts in the ER during biosynthesis, and that N-glycosylation is required for subsequent expression in the cell membrane. In the presence of epoxomicin, a proteasome inhibitor, there was a significant increase in the level of N9Q/N13Q, which suggests that N-glycan-deficient P2Y2R undergoes proteasomal degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) in lipid rafts mediates hepatic metastasis of pancreatic cancer by regulating IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haojun; Fang, Winston; Liu, Minda; Fu, Deliang

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a remarkable predilection for hepatic metastasis. Complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) can mediate growth factor-induced cancer cell chemotaxis and distant metastasis by activation of receptor tyrosine kinases. Coincidentally, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) derived from the liver and cancer cells itself has been recognized as a critical inducer of hepatic metastasis. However, the mechanism underlying IGF-1-dependent hepatic metastasis of pancreatic cancer, in which C1QBP may be involved, remains unknown. In the study, we demonstrated a significant association between C1QBP expression and hepatic metastasis in patients with pancreatic cancer. IGF-1 induced the translocation of C1QBP from cytoplasm to lipid rafts and further drove the formation of CD44 variant 6 (CD44v6)/C1QBP complex in pancreatic cancer cells. C1QBP interacting with CD44v6 in lipid rafts promoted phosphorylation of IGF-1R and thus activated downstream PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways which mediated metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer cells including proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, adhesion and energy metabolism. Furthermore, C1QBP knockdown suppressed hepatic metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells in nude mice. We therefore conclude that C1QBP in lipid rafts serves a key regulator of IGF-1/IGF-1R-induced hepatic metastasis from pancreatic cancer. Our findings about C1QBP in lipid rafts provide a novel strategy to block IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling in pancreatic cancer and a reliable premise for more efficient combined modality therapies. © 2017 UICC.

  2. Membrane-Associated Effects of Glucocorticoid on BACE1 Upregulation and Aβ Generation: Involvement of Lipid Raft-Mediated CREB Activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gee Euhn; Lee, Sei-Jung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Ko, So Hee; Chae, Chang Woo; Han, Ho Jae

    2017-08-30

    Glucocorticoid has been widely accepted to induce Alzheimer's disease, but the nongenomic effect of glucocorticoid on amyloid β (Aβ) generation has yet to be studied. Here, we investigated the effect of the nongenomic pathway induced by glucocorticoid on amyloid precursor protein processing enzymes as well as Aβ production using male ICR mice and human neuroblastoma SK-N-MC cells. Mice groups exposed to restraint stress or intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ showed impaired cognition, decreased intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR) level, but elevated level of membrane GR (mGR). In this respect, we identified the mGR-dependent pathway evoked by glucocorticoid using impermeable cortisol conjugated to BSA (cortisol-BSA) on SK-N-MC cells. Cortisol-BSA augmented the expression of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), the level of C-terminal fragment β of amyloid precursor protein (C99) and Aβ production, which were maintained even after blocking intracellular GR. We also found that cortisol-BSA enhanced the interaction between mGR and Gαs, which colocalized in the lipid raft. The subsequently activated CREB by cortisol-BSA bound to the CRE site of the BACE1 promoter increasing its expression, which was downregulated by inhibiting CBP. Consistently, blocking CBP attenuated cognitive impairment and Aβ production induced by corticosterone treatment or intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ more efficiently than inhibiting intracellular GR in mice. In conclusion, glucocorticoid couples mGR with Gαs and triggers cAMP-PKA-CREB axis dependent on the lipid raft to stimulate BACE1 upregulation and Aβ generation.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been growing sharply and stress is considered as the major environment factor of AD. Glucocorticoid is the primarily responsive factor to stress and is widely known to induce AD. However, most AD patients usually have impaired genomic pathway of glucocorticoid

  3. Poly-lactic acid nanoparticles (PLA-NP) promote physiological modifications in lung epithelial cells and are internalized by clathrin-coated pits and lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Camila Macedo; Boyles, Matthew Samuel Powys; Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Pereira, Mariana Rodrigues; Tutumi, Henrique Rudolf; de Oliveira Santos, Eidy; Martins, Nathalia Balthazar; Himly, Martin; Sommer, Aniela; Foissner, Ilse; Duschl, Albert; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Leite, Paulo Emílio Corrêa

    2017-01-31

    Poly-lactic acid nanoparticles (PLA-NP) are a type of polymeric NP, frequently used as nanomedicines, which have advantages over metallic NP such as the ability to maintain therapeutic drug levels for sustained periods of time. Despite PLA-NP being considered biocompatible, data concerning alterations in cellular physiology are scarce. We conducted an extensive evaluation of PLA-NP biocompatibility in human lung epithelial A549 cells using high throughput screening and more complex methodologies. These included measurements of cytotoxicity, cell viability, immunomodulatory potential, and effects upon the cells' proteome. We used non- and green-fluorescent PLA-NP with 63 and 66 nm diameters, respectively. Cells were exposed with concentrations of 2, 20, 100 and 200 µg/mL, for 24, 48 and 72 h, in most experiments. Moreover, possible endocytic mechanisms of internalization of PLA-NP were investigated, such as those involving caveolae, lipid rafts, macropinocytosis and clathrin-coated pits. Cell viability and proliferation were not altered in response to PLA-NP. Multiplex analysis of secreted mediators revealed a low-level reduction of IL-12p70 and vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF) in response to PLA-NP, while all other mediators assessed were unaffected. However, changes to the cells' proteome were observed in response to PLA-NP, and, additionally, the cellular stress marker miR155 was found to reduce. In dual exposures of staurosporine (STS) with PLA-NP, PLA-NP enhanced susceptibility to STS-induced cell death. Finally, PLA-NP were rapidly internalized in association with clathrin-coated pits, and, to a lesser extent, with lipid rafts. These data demonstrate that PLA-NP are internalized and, in general, tolerated by A549 cells, with no cytotoxicity and no secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators. However, PLA-NP exposure may induce modification of biological functions of A549 cells, which should be considered when designing drug delivery systems. Moreover

  4. Placental protein 13 (PP13/galectin-13) undergoes lipid raft-associated subcellular redistribution in the syncytiotrophoblast in preterm preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Balogh, Andrea; Pozsgay, Judit; Matkó, János; Dong, Zhong; Kim, Chong Jai; Várkonyi, Tibor; Sammar, Marei; Rigó, Jánow; Meiri, Hamutal; Romero, Roberto; Papp, Zoltán; Than, Nandor Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate placental protein 13 (PP13) localization in relation to cytoskeleton and lipid rafts in preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. Study Design Placental cryosections from patients with preeclampsia and HELLP, and controls were stained for PP13, actin, PLAP (lipid raft marker), and CD71 (nonraft marker). BeWo cells exposed to stress conditions were stained for PP13 and actin. Protein localization were investigated by confocal microscopy, PP13 concentrations by ELISA. Results PP13-actin colocalization was increased in syncytiotrophoblast juxtamembrane regions in term/preterm preeclampsia and HELLP. PP13-CD71 colocalization was decreased and PP13-PLAP proximity was increased in preterm but not term preeclampsia and HELLP. PP13-release from BeWo cells was inhibited by cytoskeleton disruption, and augmented by Ca2+-influx and ischemic stress. Conclusion The actin cytoskeleton, probably in connection with lipid rafts, controls trophoblastic “nonclassical” PP13 export. PP13 is released from the syncytiotrophoblast in preterm preeclampsia and HELLP, mimicked in BeWo cells by ischemic stress, suggesting PP13 is a placental alarmin. PMID:21596368

  5. The Reorientation of T-Cell Polarity and Inhibition of Immunological Synapse Formation by CD46 Involves Its Recruitment to Lipid Rafts.

    PubMed

    Ludford-Menting, Mandy J; Crimeen-Irwin, Blessing; Oliaro, Jane; Pasam, Anupama; Williamson, David; Pedersen, Natalie; Guillaumot, Patricia; Christansen, Dale; Manie, Serge; Gaus, Katharina; Russell, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    Many infectious agents utilize CD46 for infection of human cells, and therapeutic applications of CD46-binding viruses are now being explored. Besides mediating internalization to enable infection, binding to CD46 can directly alter immune function. In particular, ligation of CD46 by antibodies or by measles virus can prevent activation of T cells by altering T-cell polarity and consequently preventing the formation of an immunological synapse. Here, we define a mechanism by which CD46 reorients T-cell polarity to prevent T-cell receptor signaling in response to antigen presentation. We show that CD46 associates with lipid rafts upon ligation, and that this reduces recruitment of both lipid rafts and the microtubule organizing centre to the site of receptor cross-linking. These data combined indicate that polarization of T cells towards the site of CD46 ligation prevents formation of an immunological synapse, and this is associated with the ability of CD46 to recruit lipid rafts away from the site of TCR ligation.

  6. Lipid rafts enriched in monosialylGb5Cer carrying the stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 epitope are involved in development of mouse preimplantation embryos at cleavage stage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lipid rafts enriched in glycosphingolipids (GSLs), cholesterol and signaling molecules play an essential role not only for signal transduction started by ligand binding, but for intracellular events such as organization of actin, intracellular traffic and cell polarity, but their functions in cleavage division of preimplantation embryos are not well known. Results Here we show that monosialylGb5Cer (MSGb5Cer)-enriched raft domains are involved in development during the cleavage stage of mouse preimplantation embryos. MSGb5Cer preferentially localizes at the interfaces between blastomeres in mouse preimplantation embryos. Live-imaging analysis revealed that MSGb5Cer localizes in cleavage furrows during cytokinesis, and that by accumulating at the interfaces, it thickens them. Depletion of cholesterol from the cell membrane with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbCD) reduced the expression of MSGb5Cer and stopped cleavage. Extensive accumulation of MSGb5Cer at the interfaces by cross-linking with anti-MSGb5Cer Mab (6E2) caused F-actin to aggregate at the interfaces and suppressed the localization of E-cadherin at the interfaces, which resulted in the cessation of cleavage. In addition, suppression of actin polymerization with cytochalasin D (CCD) decreased the accumulation of MSGb5Cer at the interfaces. In E-cadherin-targeted embryos, the MSGb5Cer-enriched raft membrane domains accumulated heterotopically. Conclusions These results indicate that MSGb5Cer-enriched raft membrane domains participate in cytokinesis in a close cooperation with the cortical actin network and the distribution of E-cadherin. PMID:21489308

  7. Mitochondria and lipid raft-located FOF1-ATP synthase as major therapeutic targets in the antileishmanial and anticancer activities of ether lipid edelfosine

    PubMed Central

    Botet, Javier; Jimenez, Alberto; Justies, Nicole; Varela-M, Rubén E.; Cuesta-Marbán, Álvaro; Modolell, Manuel; Revuelta, José L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is the world’s second deadliest parasitic disease after malaria, and current treatment of the different forms of this disease is far from satisfactory. Alkylphospholipid analogs (APLs) are a family of anticancer drugs that show antileishmanial activity, including the first oral drug (miltefosine) for leishmaniasis and drugs in preclinical/clinical oncology trials, but their precise mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. Methodology/Principal findings Here we show that the tumor cell apoptosis-inducer edelfosine was the most effective APL, as compared to miltefosine, perifosine and erucylphosphocholine, in killing Leishmania spp. promastigotes and amastigotes as well as tumor cells, as assessed by DNA breakdown determined by flow cytometry. In studies using animal models, we found that orally-administered edelfosine showed a potent in vivo antileishmanial activity and diminished macrophage pro-inflammatory responses. Edelfosine was also able to kill Leishmania axenic amastigotes. Edelfosine was taken up by host macrophages and killed intracellular Leishmania amastigotes in infected macrophages. Edelfosine accumulated in tumor cell mitochondria and Leishmania kinetoplast-mitochondrion, and led to mitochondrial transmembrane potential disruption, and to the successive breakdown of parasite mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. Ectopic expression of Bcl-XL inhibited edelfosine-induced cell death in both Leishmania parasites and tumor cells. We found that the cytotoxic activity of edelfosine against Leishmania parasites and tumor cells was associated with a dramatic recruitment of FOF1-ATP synthase into lipid rafts following edelfosine treatment in both parasites and cancer cells. Raft disruption and specific FOF1-ATP synthase inhibition hindered edelfosine-induced cell death in both Leishmania parasites and tumor cells. Genetic deletion of FOF1-ATP synthase led to edelfosine drug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast. Conclusions

  8. Docosahexaenoic Acid Enhances Segregation of Lipids between Raft and Nonraft Domains: 2H-NMR Study

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Smita P.; LoCascio, Daniel S.; Liu, Yidong; Williams, Justin A.; Bittman, Robert; Stillwell, William; Wassall, Stephen R.

    2008-01-01

    Solid-state 2H-NMR of [2H31]-N-palmitoylsphingomyelin ([2H31]16:0SM, PSM*), supplemented by differential scanning calorimetry, was used for the first time, to our knowledge, to investigate the molecular organization of the sphingolipid in 1:1:1 mol mixtures with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (16:0–18:1PE, POPE) or 1-palmitoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (16:0–22:6PE, PDPE) and cholesterol. When compared with 2H-NMR data for analogous mixtures of [2H31]16:0–18:1PE (POPE*) or [2H31]16:0-22:6PE (PDPE*) with egg SM and cholesterol, molecular interactions of oleic acid (OA) versus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are distinguished, and details of membrane architecture emerge. SM-rich, characterized by higher-order, and PE-rich, characterized by lower-order, domains <20 nm in size are formed in the absence and presence of cholesterol in both OA- and DHA-containing membranes. Although acyl chain order within both domains increases on the addition of sterol to the two systems, the resultant differential in order between SM- and PE-rich domains is almost a factor of 3 greater with DHA than with OA. Our interpretation is that the aversion that cholesterol has for DHA—but not for OA—excludes the sterol from DHA-containing, PE-rich (nonraft) domains and excludes DHA from SM-rich/cholesterol-rich (raft) domains. We attribute, in part, the diverse health benefits associated with dietary consumption of DHA to an alteration in membrane domains. PMID:18339742

  9. Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates angiotensin II-induced lipid raft clustering in mesenteric endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei-Qing; Chen, Wen-Dong; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Jian-Jun; Wu, Yong-Jie; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that intracellular Ca2+ is involved in lysosome fusion and membrane repair in skeletal cells. Given that angiotensin II (Ang II) elicits an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and that lysosome fusion is a crucial mediator of lipid raft (LR) clustering, we hypothesized that Ang II induces lysosome fusion and activates LR formation in rat mesenteric endothelial cells (MECs). We found that Ang II acutely increased intracellular Ca2+ content, an effect that was inhibited by the extracellular Ca2+ chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca2+ release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Further study showed that EGTA almost completely blocked Ang II-induced lysosome fusion, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to LR clusters, ASMase activation and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase activation. In contrast, 2-APB had a slight inhibitory effect. Functionally, both the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and the ASMase inhibitor amitriptyline reversed Ang II-induced impairment of vasodilation. We conclude that Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates the Ang II-induced regulation of the LR-redox signaling pathway and mesenteric endothelial dysfunction.

  10. Quercetin enhances TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in colon cancer cells by inducing the accumulation of death receptors in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Psahoulia, Faiy H; Drosopoulos, Konstantinos G; Doubravska, Lenka; Andera, Ladislav; Pintzas, Alexander

    2007-09-01

    Cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) can induce apoptosis in colon cancer cells through engagement of death receptors. Nevertheless, evading apoptosis induced by anticancer drugs characterizes many types of cancers. This results in the need for combination therapy. In this study, we have investigated whether the flavonoid quercetin could sensitize human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We report that quercetin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by causing the redistribution of DR4 and DR5 into lipid rafts. Nystatin, a cholesterol-sequestering agent, prevented quercetin-induced clustering of death receptors and sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in colon adenocarcinoma cells. In addition, our experiments show that quercetin, in combination with TRAIL, triggered the mitochondrial-dependent death pathway, as shown by Bid cleavage and the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol. Together, our findings propose that quercetin, through its ability to redistribute death receptors at the cell surface, facilitates death-inducing signaling complex formation and activation of caspases in response to death receptor stimulation. Based on these results, this study provides a challenging approach to enhance the efficiency of TRAIL-based therapies.

  11. Reduced levels of folate transporters (PCFT and RFC) in membrane lipid rafts result in colonic folate malabsorption in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Wani, Nissar Ahmad; Kaur, Jyotdeep

    2011-03-01

    We studied the effect of chronic ethanol ingestion on folate transport across the colonic apical membranes (CAM) in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed 1 g/kg body weight/day ethanol (20%) solution orally for 3 months and folate transport was studied in the isolated colon apical membrane vesicles. The folate transport was found to be carrier mediated, saturable, with pH optima at 5.0. Chronic ethanol ingestion reduced the folate transport across the CAM by decreasing the affinity of transporters (high Km) for the substrate and by decreasing the number of transporter molecules (low Vmax) on the colon luminal surface. The decreased transport activity at the CAM was associated with down-regulation of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) and the reduced folate carrier (RFC) which resulted in decreased PCFT and RFC protein levels in the colon of rats fed alcohol chronically. Moreover, the PCFT and the RFC were found to be distributed in detergent insoluble fraction of the CAM in rats. Floatation experiments on Optiprep density gradients demonstrated the association of the PCFT and the RFC protein with lipid rafts (LR). Chronic alcoholism decreased the PCFT and the RFC protein levels in the CAM LR in accordance with the decreased synthesis. Hence, we propose that downregulation in the expression of the PCFT and the RFC in colon results in reduced levels of these transporters in colon apical membrane LR as a mechanism of folate malabsorption during chronic alcoholism.

  12. Cross-correlation analysis of inner-leaflet-anchored green fluorescent protein co-redistributed with IgE receptors and outer leaflet lipid raft components.

    PubMed Central

    Pyenta, P S; Holowka, D; Baird, B

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the structural basis for membrane interactions that occur between Lyn tyrosine kinase and IgE-Fc(epsilon)RI or other components of lipid rafts, we prepared a green fluorescent protein analog of Lyn (PM-EGFP) and used cross-correlation analysis to quantify co-redistributions of aggregates that occur after IgE-Fc(epsilon)RI is cross-linked on the cell surface. PM-EGFP, which contains minimally the palmitoylation and myristoylation sites on Lyn, was compared with another inner leaflet probe, EGFP-GG, which contains a prenylation site and a polybasic sequence similar to K-ras. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to examine co-redistributions of these inner leaflet components with IgE-Fc(epsilon)RI and outer leaflet raft components, ganglioside GD1b and glycosylphosphotidylinositol-linked Thy-1, under conditions where the latter were cross-linked externally to form large patches at the cell surface. The cross-correlation analysis was developed and characterized with simulations representing cell surface distributions, and parameters from the cross-correlation curves, rho(o) (peak height) and A (peak area), were shown to be reliable measures of the extent of co-redistributed aggregates and their size. Cross-correlation analysis was then applied to quantify co-redistributions of the fluorescently labeled inner and outer leaflet components on RBL-2H3 cells. As visually observed and parameterized in this manner, PM-EGFP was found to co-redistribute with lipid rafts significantly more than EGFP-GG or an endogenous prenylated protein, Cdc42. These quantitative results are consistent with previous analyses of Lyn co-redistributions and support the hypothesis that the functionally important interaction of Lyn with cross-linked IgE- Fc(epsilon)RI is due to their mutual co-association with lipid rafts. PMID:11325715

  13. Genetic obesity alters recruitment of TANK-binding kinase 1 and AKT into hypothalamic lipid rafts domains.

    PubMed

    Delint-Ramirez, Ilse; Maldonado Ruiz, Roger; Torre-Villalvazo, Ivan; Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth; Garza Ocañas, Lourdes; Tovar, Armando; Camacho, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts (LRs) are membrane subdomains enriched in cholesterol, glycosphingolipids and sphingolipids containing saturated fatty acid. Signaling proteins become concentrated in these microdomains mainly by saturated fatty acid modification, thus facilitating formation of protein complexes and activation of specific signaling pathways. High intake of saturated fatty acids promotes inflammation and insulin resistance, in part by disrupting insulin signaling pathway. Here we investigate whether lipid-induced toxicity in obesity correlates with altered composition of insulin signaling proteins in LRs in the brain. Our results showed that insulin receptor (IR) is highly concentrated in LRs fraction in comparison with soluble or postsynaptic density (PSD) fractions. Analysis of LRs domains from hippocampus of obese mouse showed a significant decrease of IR and its downstream signaling protein AKT, while in the PSD fraction we detected partial decrease of AKT and no changes in the IR concentration. No changes were shown in the soluble extract. In hypothalamus, genetic obesity also decreases interaction of AKT, but we did not detect changes in the IR distribution. However, in this structure genetic obesity increases recruitment of the IR negative regulator TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) into LRs and PSD fraction. No changes of AKT, IR and TBK1 were found in soluble fractions of obese in comparison with lean mice. In vitro studies showed that incubation with saturated palmitic acid but not with unsaturated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or palmitoleic acid decreases association of IR and AKT and increases TBK1 recruitment into LRs and PSD domains, emulating what happens in the obese mice. TBK1 recruitment to insoluble domains correlates with decreases of IR tyrosine phosphorylation and ser473 AKT phosphorylation, markers of insulin resistance. These data support the hypothesis that hyperlipidemia associated with genetic obesity alters targeting of TBK1 and insulin signaling

  14. Revealing model dependencies in "Assessing the RAFT equilibrium constant via model systems: an EPR study".

    PubMed

    Junkers, Thomas; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Coote, Michelle L

    2011-12-01

    In a recent article (W. Meiser, M. Buback, Assessing the RAFT Equilibrium Constant via Model Systems: An EPR Study, Macromol. Rapid Commun. 2011, 18, 1490-1494), it is claimed that evidence is found that unequivocally proves that quantum mechanical calculations assessing the equilibrium constant and fragmentation rate coefficients in dithiobenzoate-mediated reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) systems are beset with a considerable uncertainty. In the present work, we show that these claims made by Meiser and Buback are beset with a model dependency, as a critical key parameter in their data analysis - the addition rate coefficient of the radicals attacking the C=S double bond in the dithiobenzoate - induces a model insensitivity into the data analysis. Contrary to the claims made by Meiser and Buback, their experimental results can be brought into agreement with the quantum chemical calculations if a lower addition rate coefficient of cyanoisopropyl radicals (CIP) to the CIP dithiobenzoate (CPDB) is assumed. To resolve the model dependency, the addition rate coefficient of CIP radicals to CPDB needs to be determined as a matter of priority.

  15. Lateral Diffusion of Gαs in the Plasma Membrane Is Decreased after Chronic but not Acute Antidepressant Treatment: Role of Lipid Raft and Non-Raft Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Czysz, Andrew H; Schappi, Jeffrey M; Rasenick, Mark M

    2015-01-01

    GPCR signaling is modified both in major depressive disorder and by chronic antidepressant treatment. Endogenous Gαs redistributes from raft- to nonraft-membrane fractions after chronic antidepressant treatment. Modification of G protein anchoring may participate in this process. Regulation of Gαs signaling by antidepressants was studied using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of GFP-Gαs. Here we find that extended antidepressant treatment both increases the half-time of maximum recovery of GFP-Gαs and decreases the extent of recovery. Furthermore, this effect parallels the movement of Gαs out of lipid rafts as determined by cold detergent membrane extraction with respect to both dose and duration of drug treatment. This effect was observed for several classes of compounds with antidepressant activity, whereas closely related molecules lacking antidepressant activity (eg, R-citalopram) did not produce the effect. These results are consistent with previously observed antidepressant-induced translocation of Gαs, but also suggest an alternate membrane attachment site for this G protein. Furthermore, FRAP analysis provides the possibility of a relatively high-throughput screening tool for compounds with putative antidepressant activity. PMID:25249058

  16. SDF-1α/CXCR4 Signaling in Lipid Rafts Induces Platelet Aggregation via PI3 Kinase-Dependent Akt Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Hiroko; Iguchi, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Moyuru; Kaneda, Mizuho; Iida, Kazuko; Shimonaka, Motoyuki; Hara, Takahiko; Arai, Morio; Koike, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Naomasa; Kasahara, Kohji

    2017-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α)-induced platelet aggregation is mediated through its G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K). Here, we demonstrate that SDF-1α induces phosphorylation of Akt at Thr308 and Ser473 in human platelets. SDF-1α-induced platelet aggregation and Akt phosphorylation are inhibited by pretreatment with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 or the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. SDF-1α also induces the phosphorylation of PDK1 at Ser241 (an upstream activator of Akt), GSK3β at Ser9 (a downstream substrate of Akt), and myosin light chain at Ser19 (a downstream element of the Akt signaling pathway). SDF-1α-induced platelet aggregation is inhibited by pretreatment with the Akt inhibitor MK-2206 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, SDF-1α-induced platelet aggregation and Akt phosphorylation are inhibited by pretreatment with the raft-disrupting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Sucrose density gradient analysis shows that 35% of CXCR4, 93% of the heterotrimeric G proteins Gαi-1, 91% of Gαi-2, 50% of Gβ and 4.0% of PI3Kβ, and 4.5% of Akt2 are localized in the detergent-resistant membrane raft fraction. These findings suggest that SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling in lipid rafts induces platelet aggregation via PI3K-dependent Akt phosphorylation.

  17. SDF-1α/CXCR4 Signaling in Lipid Rafts Induces Platelet Aggregation via PI3 Kinase-Dependent Akt Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Moyuru; Kaneda, Mizuho; Iida, Kazuko; Shimonaka, Motoyuki; Hara, Takahiko; Arai, Morio; Koike, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Naomasa; Kasahara, Kohji

    2017-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α)-induced platelet aggregation is mediated through its G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K). Here, we demonstrate that SDF-1α induces phosphorylation of Akt at Thr308 and Ser473 in human platelets. SDF-1α-induced platelet aggregation and Akt phosphorylation are inhibited by pretreatment with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 or the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. SDF-1α also induces the phosphorylation of PDK1 at Ser241 (an upstream activator of Akt), GSK3β at Ser9 (a downstream substrate of Akt), and myosin light chain at Ser19 (a downstream element of the Akt signaling pathway). SDF-1α-induced platelet aggregation is inhibited by pretreatment with the Akt inhibitor MK-2206 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, SDF-1α-induced platelet aggregation and Akt phosphorylation are inhibited by pretreatment with the raft-disrupting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Sucrose density gradient analysis shows that 35% of CXCR4, 93% of the heterotrimeric G proteins Gαi-1, 91% of Gαi-2, 50% of Gβ and 4.0% of PI3Kβ, and 4.5% of Akt2 are localized in the detergent-resistant membrane raft fraction. These findings suggest that SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling in lipid rafts induces platelet aggregation via PI3K-dependent Akt phosphorylation. PMID:28072855

  18. Pantethine Alters Lipid Composition and Cholesterol Content of Membrane Rafts, With Down-Regulation of CXCL12-Induced T Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    van Gijsel-Bonnello, Manuel; Acar, Niyazi; Molino, Yves; Bretillon, Lionel; Khrestchatisky, Michel; de Reggi, Max; Gharib, Bouchra

    2015-10-01

    Pantethine, a natural low-molecular-weight thiol, shows a broad activity in a large range of essential cellular pathways. It has been long known as a hypolipidemic and hypocholesterolemic agent. We have recently shown that it exerts a neuroprotective action in mouse models of cerebral malaria and Parkinson's disease through multiple mechanisms. In the present study, we looked at its effects on membrane lipid rafts that serve as platforms for molecules engaged in cell activity, therefore providing a target against inappropriate cell response leading to a chronic inflammation. We found that pantethine-treated cells showed a significant change in raft fatty acid composition and cholesterol content, with ultimate downregulation of cell adhesion, CXCL12-driven chemotaxis, and transendothelial migration of various T cell types, including human Jurkat cell line and circulating effector T cells. The mechanisms involved include the alteration of the following: (i) CXCL12 binding to its target cells; (ii) membrane dynamics of CXCR4 and CXCR7, the two CXCL12 receptors; and (iii) cell redox status, a crucial determinant in the regulation of the chemokine system. In addition, we considered the linker for activation of T cells molecule to show that pantethine effects were associated with the displacement from the rafts of the acylated signaling molecules which had their palmitoylation level reduced.. In conclusion, the results presented here, together with previously published findings, indicate that due to its pleiotropic action, pantethine can downregulate the multifaceted process leading to pathogenic T cell activation and migration.

  19. Amphiphilic brush polymers produced using the RAFT polymerisation method stabilise and reduce the cell cytotoxicity of lipid lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jiali; Suryadinata, Randy; Luan, Bao; Tran, Nhiem; Hinton, Tracey M; Ratcliffe, Julian; Hao, Xiaojuan; Drummond, Calum J

    2016-10-06

    Self-assembled lipid lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles such as hexosomes and cubosomes contain internal anisotropic and isotropic nanostructures, respectively. Despite the remarkable potential of such nanoparticles in various biomedical applications, the stabilisers used in formulating the nanoparticles are often limited to commercially available polymers such as the Pluronic block copolymers. This study explored the potential of using Reversible Addition-Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) technology to design amphiphilic brush-type polymers for the purpose of stabilising phytantriol and monoolein-based lipid dispersions. The synthesised brush-type polymers consisted of a hydrophobic C12 short chain and a hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether acrylate (PEGA) long chain with multiple 9-unit poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) brushes with various molecular weights. It was observed that increasing the PEO brush density and thus the length of the hydrophilic component improved the stabilisation effectiveness for phytantriol and monoolein-based cubosomes. Synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments confirmed that the RAFT polymer-stabilised cubosomes had an internal double-diamond cubic phase with tunable water channel sizes. These properties were dependent on the molecular weight of the polymers, which were considered in some cases to be anisotropically distributed within the cubosomes. The in vitro toxicity of the cubosomes was assessed by cell viability of two human adenocarcinoma cell lines and haemolytic activities to mouse erythrocytes. The results showed that phytantriol cubosomes stabilised by the RAFT polymers were less toxic compared to their Pluronic F127-stabilised analogues. This study provides valuable insight into designing non-linear amphiphilic polymers for the effective stabilisation and cellular toxicity improvement of self-assembled lipid lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles.

  20. Dynamin2, Clathrin, and Lipid Rafts Mediate Endocytosis of the Apical Na/K/2Cl Cotransporter NKCC2 in Thick Ascending Limbs*

    PubMed Central

    Ares, Gustavo R.; Ortiz, Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    Steady-state surface levels of the apical Na/K/2Cl cotransporter NKCC2 regulate NaCl reabsorption by epithelial cells of the renal thick ascending limb (THAL). We reported that constitutive endocytosis of NKCC2 controls NaCl absorption in native THALs; however, the pathways involved in NKCC2 endocytosis are unknown. We hypothesized that NKCC2 endocytosis at the apical surface depends on dynamin-2 and clathrin. Measurements of steady-state surface NKCC2 and the rate of NKCC2 endocytosis in freshly isolated rat THALs showed that inhibition of endogenous dynamin-2 with dynasore blunted NKCC2 endocytosis by 56 ± 11% and increased steady-state surface NKCC2 by 67 ± 27% (p < 0.05). Expression of the dominant negative Dyn2K44A in THALs slowed the rate of NKCC2 endocytosis by 38 ± 8% and increased steady-state surface NKCC2 by 37 ± 8%, without changing total NKCC2 expression. Inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis with chlorpromazine blunted NKCC2 endocytosis by 54 ± 6%, while preventing clathrin from interacting with synaptojanin also blunted NKCC2 endocytosis by 52 ± 5%. Disruption of lipid rafts blunted NKCC2 endocytosis by 39 ± 4% and silencing caveolin-1 by 29 ± 4%. Simultaneous inhibition of clathrin- and lipid raft-mediated endocytosis completely blocked NKCC2 internalization. We concluded that dynamin-2, clathrin, and lipid rafts mediate NKCC2 endocytosis and maintain steady-state apical surface NKCC2 in native THALs. These are the first data identifying the endocytic pathway for apical NKCC2 endocytosis. PMID:22977238

  1. Role of lipid rafts and flagellin in invasion of colonic epithelial cells by Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli O113:H21.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Trisha J; Thorpe, Cheleste M; Paton, Adrienne W; Paton, James C

    2012-08-01

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) O113:H21 strains that lack the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) efficiently invade eukaryotic cells in vitro, unlike LEE-positive O157:H7 strains. We used a fliC deletion mutant of the O113:H21 STEC strain 98NK2 (98NK2ΔfliC) to show that invasion of colonic epithelial (HCT-8) cells is heavily dependent on production of flagellin, even though adherence to the cells was actually enhanced in the mutant. Flagellin binds and signals through Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), but there was no evidence that either TLR5, the adaptor protein myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), or the serine kinase interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) were required for invasion of HCT-8 cells by strain 98NK2, as judged by transfection, RNA knockdown, or inhibitor studies. However, pretreatment of cells with anti-asialo-GM1 significantly decreased 98NK2 invasion (by 40.8%), while neuraminidase treatment (which cleaves terminal sialic acid residues, thus converting GM1 into asialo-GM1) significantly increased invasion (by 70.7%). Pretreatment of HCT-8 cells with either the cholesterol-depleting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein significantly decreased invasion by 98NK2, indicating a potential role for lipid rafts in the invasion mechanism. Confocal microscopy also showed invading 98NK2 colocalized with lipid raft markers caveolin-1 and GM1. Interestingly, anti-asialo-GM1, neuraminidase, MβCD, and genistein have similar effects on the vestigial level of STEC invasion seen for STEC strain 98NK2ΔfliC, indicating that lipid rafts mediate a common step in flagellin-dependent and flagellin-independent cellular invasion.

  2. Altering Hydrophobic Sequence Lengths Shows That Hydrophobic Mismatch Controls Affinity for Ordered Lipid Domains (Rafts) in the Multitransmembrane Strand Protein Perfringolysin O*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that mismatch between transmembrane (TM) length and bilayer width controls TM protein affinity for ordered lipid domains (rafts) was tested using perfringolysin O (PFO), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin. PFO forms a multimeric barrel with many TM segments. The properties of PFO mutants with lengthened or shortened TM segments were compared with that of PFO with wild type TM sequences. Both mutant and wild type length PFO exhibited cholesterol-dependent membrane insertion. Maximal PFO-induced pore formation occurred in vesicles with wider bilayers for lengthened TM segments and in thinner bilayers for shortened TM segments. In diC18:0 phosphatidylcholine (PC)/diC14:1 PC/cholesterol vesicles, which form ordered domains with a relatively thick bilayer and disordered domains with a relatively thin bilayer, affinity for ordered domains was greatest with lengthened TM segments and least with shortened TM segments as judged by FRET. Similar results were observed by microscopy in giant vesicles containing sphingomyelin in place of diC18:0 PC. In contrast, in diC16:0 PC/diC14:0 PC/diC20:1 PC/cholesterol vesicles, which should form ordered domains with a relatively thin bilayer and disordered domains with a relatively thick bilayer, relative affinity for ordered domains was greatest with shortened TM segments and least with lengthened TM segments. The inability of multi-TM segment proteins (unlike single TM segment proteins) to adapt to mismatch by tilting may explain the sensitivity of raft affinity to mismatch. The difference in width sensitivity for single and multi-TM helix proteins may link raft affinity to multimeric state and thus control the assembly of multimeric TM complexes in rafts. PMID:23150664

  3. Solvatochromic Nile Red probes with FRET quencher reveal lipid order heterogeneity in living and apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Kreder, Rémy; Pyrshev, Kyrylo A; Darwich, Zeinab; Kucherak, Oleksandr A; Mély, Yves; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2015-06-19

    Detecting and imaging lipid microdomains (rafts) in cell membranes remain a challenge despite intensive research in the field. Two types of fluorescent probes are used for this purpose: one specifically labels a given phase (liquid ordered, Lo, or liquid disordered, Ld), while the other, being environment-sensitive (solvatochromic), stains the two phases in different emission colors. Here, we combined the two approaches by designing a phase-sensitive probe of the Ld phase and a quencher of the Ld phase. The former is an analogue of the recently developed Nile Red-based probe NR12S, bearing a bulky hydrophobic chain (bNR10S), while the latter is based on Black Hole Quencher-2 designed as bNR10S (bQ10S). Fluorescence spectroscopy of large unilamellar vesicles and microscopy of giant vesicles showed that the bNR10S probe can partition specifically into the Ld phase, while bQ10S can specifically quench the NR12S probe in the Ld phase so that only its fraction in the Lo phase remains fluorescent. Thus, the toolkit of two probes with quencher can specifically target Ld and Lo phases and identify their lipid order from the emission color. Application of this toolkit in living cells (HeLa, CHO, and 293T cell lines) revealed heterogeneity in the cell plasma membranes, observed as distinct probe environments close to the Lo and Ld phases of model membranes. In HeLa cells undergoing apoptosis, our toolkit showed the formation of separate domains of the Ld-like phase in the form of blebs. The developed tools open new possibilities in lipid raft research.

  4. Lipid raft-mediated miR-3908 inhibition of migration of breast cancer cell line MCF-7 by regulating the interactions between AdipoR1 and Flotillin-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Shan, Fei; Chen, Jinglong

    2017-03-21

    The mechanisms of lipid raft regulation by microRNAs in breast cancer are not fully understood. This work focused on the evaluation and identification of miR-3908, which may be a potential biomarker related to the migration of breast cancer cells, and elucidates lipid-raft-regulating cell migration in breast cancer. To confirm the prediction that miR-3908 is matched with AdipoR1, we used 3'-UTR luciferase activity of AdipoR1 to assess this. Then, human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was cultured in the absence or presence of the mimics or inhibitors of miR-3908, after which the biological functions of MCF-7 cells were analyzed. The protein expression of AdipoR1, AMPK, and SIRT-1 were examined. The interaction between AdipoR1 and Flotillin-1, or its effects on lipid rafts on regulating cell migration of MCF-7, was also investigated. AdipoR1 is a direct target of miR-3908. miR-3908 suppresses the expression of AdipoR1 and its downstream pathway genes, including AMPK, p-AMPK, and SIRT-1. miR-3908 enhances the process of breast cancer cell clonogenicity. miR-3908 exerts its effects on the proliferation and migration of MCF-7 cells, which are mediated by lipid rafts regulating AdipoR1's ability to bind Flotillin-1. miR-3908 is a crucial mediator of the migration process in breast cancer cells. Lipid rafts regulate the interactions between AdipoR1 and Flotillin-1 and then the migration process associated with miR-3908 in MCF-7 cells. Our findings suggest that targeting miR-3908 and the lipid raft, may be a promising strategy for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer.

  5. CD44 interaction with ankyrin and IP3 receptor in lipid rafts promotes hyaluronan-mediated Ca2+ signaling leading to nitric oxide production and endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Patrick A; Bourguignon, Lilly Y W

    2004-04-15

    In this study, we have showed that aortic endothelial cells (GM7372A cell line) express CD44v10 [a hyaluronan (HA) receptor], which is significantly enriched in cholesterol-containing lipid rafts (characterized as caveolin-rich plasma membrane microdomains). HA binding to CD44v10 promotes recruitment of the cytoskeletal protein, ankyrin and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor into cholesterol-containing lipid rafts. The ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of ankyrin is responsible for binding IP3 receptor to CD44v10 at lipid rafts and subsequently triggering HA/CD44v10-mediated intracellular calcium (Ca2+) mobilization leading to a variety of endothelial cell functions such as nitric oxide (NO) production, cell adhesion and proliferation. Further analyses indicate (i) disruption of lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol from the membranes of GM7372A cells (using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin treatment) or (ii) interference of endogenous ankyrin binding to CD44 and IP3 receptor using overexpression of ARD fragments (by transfecting cells with ARDcDNA) not only abolishes ankyrin/IP3 receptor accumulation into CD44v10/cholesterol-containing lipid rafts, but also blocks HA-mediated Ca2+ signaling and endothelial cell functions. Taken together, our findings suggest that CD44v10 interaction with ankyrin and IP3 receptor in cholesterol-containing lipid rafts plays an important role in regulating HA-mediated Ca2+ signaling and endothelial cell functions such as NO production, cell adhesion and proliferation.

  6. Lateral Diffusion, Function, and Expression of the Slow Channel Congenital Myasthenia Syndrome αC418W Nicotinic Receptor Mutation with Changes in Lipid Raft Components*

    PubMed Central

    Oyola-Cintrón, Jessica; Caballero-Rivera, Daniel; Ballester, Leomar; Baéz-Pagán, Carlos A.; Martínez, Hernán L.; Vélez-Arroyo, Karla P.; Quesada, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts, specialized membrane microdomains in the plasma membrane rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, are hot spots for a number of important cellular processes. The novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) mutation αC418W, the first lipid-exposed mutation identified in a patient that causes slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome was shown to be cholesterol-sensitive and to accumulate in microdomains rich in the membrane raft marker protein caveolin-1. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the mechanism by which lateral segregation into specialized raft membrane microdomains regulates the activable pool of nAChRs. We performed fluorescent recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), quantitative RT-PCR, and whole cell patch clamp recordings of GFP-encoding Mus musculus nAChRs transfected into HEK 293 cells to assess the role of cholesterol and caveolin-1 (CAV-1) in the diffusion, expression, and functionality of the nAChR (WT and αC418W). Our findings support the hypothesis that a cholesterol-sensitive nAChR might reside in specialized membrane microdomains that upon cholesterol depletion become disrupted and release the cholesterol-sensitive nAChRs to the pool of activable receptors. In addition, our results in HEK 293 cells show an interdependence between CAV-1 and αC418W that could confer end plates rich in αC418W nAChRs to a susceptibility to changes in cholesterol levels that could cause adverse drug reactions to cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins. The current work suggests that the interplay between cholesterol and CAV-1 provides the molecular basis for modulating the function and dynamics of the cholesterol-sensitive αC418W nAChR. PMID:26354438

  7. Rafting in the membrane. A lesson learnt from lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Svec, A

    2008-10-01

    Lipid rafts are chemically distinct compartments of the plasma membrane. Their integrity is a prerequisite for vital cellular functions particularly for signalling and trafficking. Their perturbation is associated with development of a broad spectrum of diseases. Lipid rafts are also important for therapeutic effects of some drugs. Moreover, some of the raft associated molecules are useful immunohistochemical markers in routine histopathology.

  8. Taraxasterol inhibits cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting reactive oxygen species-induced TLR4 trafficking to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Xueshibojie, Liu; Duo, Yu; Tiejun, Wang

    2016-10-15

    Taraxasterol, a pentacyclic-triterpene isolated from Taraxacum officinale, has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, the protective effects of taraxasterol against cigarette smoke (CS)-induced lung inflammation have not been reported. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects and mechanism of taraxasterol on CS-induced lung inflammation in mice. CS-induced mouse lung inflammation model was used to investigate the protective effects of taraxasterol in vivo. Human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) were used to investigate the protective mechanism of taraxasterol in vitro. The results showed that taraxasterol attenuated CS-induced lung pathological changes, inflammatory cells infiltration, inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production. Taraxasterol also up-regulated CS-induced glutathione (GSH) production. In vitro, taraxasterol was found to inhibit CS-induced reactive oxygen species production, recruitment of TLR4 into lipid rafts, NF-κB activation, and IL-8 production. Furthermore, our results showed that antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited CS-induced recruitment of TLR4 into lipid rafts as well as IL-8 production. In conclusion, our results suggested that taraxasterol had protective effects of CS-induced lung inflammation.

  9. Vibrio vulnificus VvpE inhibits mucin 2 expression by hypermethylation via lipid raft-mediated ROS signaling in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-J; Jung, Y H; Oh, S Y; Jang, K K; Lee, H S; Choi, S H; Han, H J

    2015-06-18

    Mucin is an important physical barrier against enteric pathogens. VvpE is an elastase encoded by Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio vulnificus; however, the functional role of VvpE in intestinal mucin (Muc) production is yet to be elucidated. The recombinant protein (r) VvpE significantly reduced the level of Muc2 in human mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cells. The repression of Muc2 induced by rVvpE was highly susceptible to the knockdown of intelectin-1b (ITLN) and sequestration of cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin. We found that rVvpE induces the recruitment of NADPH oxidase 2 and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1 into the membrane lipid rafts coupled with ITLN to facilitate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The bacterial signaling of rVvpE through ROS production is uniquely mediated by the phosphorylation of ERK, which was downregulated by the silencing of the PKCδ. Moreover, rVvpE induced region-specific methylation in the Muc2 promoter to promote the transcriptional repression of Muc2. In two mouse models of V. vulnificus infection, the mutation of the vvpE gene from V. vulnificus exhibited an increased survival rate and maintained the level of Muc2 expression in intestine. These results demonstrate that VvpE inhibits Muc2 expression by hypermethylation via lipid raft-mediated ROS signaling in the intestinal epithelial cells.

  10. Vibrio vulnificus VvpE inhibits mucin 2 expression by hypermethylation via lipid raft-mediated ROS signaling in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S-J; Jung, Y H; Oh, S Y; Jang, K K; Lee, H S; Choi, S H; Han, H J

    2015-01-01

    Mucin is an important physical barrier against enteric pathogens. VvpE is an elastase encoded by Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio vulnificus; however, the functional role of VvpE in intestinal mucin (Muc) production is yet to be elucidated. The recombinant protein (r) VvpE significantly reduced the level of Muc2 in human mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cells. The repression of Muc2 induced by rVvpE was highly susceptible to the knockdown of intelectin-1b (ITLN) and sequestration of cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin. We found that rVvpE induces the recruitment of NADPH oxidase 2 and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1 into the membrane lipid rafts coupled with ITLN to facilitate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The bacterial signaling of rVvpE through ROS production is uniquely mediated by the phosphorylation of ERK, which was downregulated by the silencing of the PKCδ. Moreover, rVvpE induced region-specific methylation in the Muc2 promoter to promote the transcriptional repression of Muc2. In two mouse models of V. vulnificus infection, the mutation of the vvpE gene from V. vulnificus exhibited an increased survival rate and maintained the level of Muc2 expression in intestine. These results demonstrate that VvpE inhibits Muc2 expression by hypermethylation via lipid raft-mediated ROS signaling in the intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26086960

  11. NADPH oxidase and lipid raft-associated redox signaling are required for PCB153-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules in human brain endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eum, Sung Yong Andras, Ibolya; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), can lead to chronic inflammation and the development of vascular diseases. Because cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the cerebrovascular endothelium regulate infiltration of inflammatory cells into the brain, we have explored the molecular mechanisms by which ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), such as PCB153, can upregulate CAMs in brain endothelial cells. Exposure to PCB153 increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as well as elevated adhesion of leukocytes to brain endothelial cells. These effects were impeded by inhibitors of EGFR, JAKs, or Src activity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase or disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depleting agents blocked PCB153-induced phosphorylation of JAK and Src kinases and upregulation of CAMs. In contrast, silencing of caveolin-1 by siRNA interference did not affect upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells stimulated by PCB153. Results of the present study indicate that lipid raft-dependent NADPH oxidase/JAK/EGFR signaling mechanisms regulate the expression of CAMs in brain endothelial cells and adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial monolayers. Due to its role in leukocyte infiltration, induction of CAMs may contribute to PCB-induced cerebrovascular disorders and neurotoxic effects in the CNS.

  12. Regulation of Cell Migration by Sphingomyelin Synthases: Sphingomyelin in Lipid Rafts Decreases Responsiveness to Signaling by the CXCL12/CXCR4 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Satoshi; Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Makoto; Hashimoto, Mayumi; Zama, Kota; Mitsutake, Susumu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Takeya, Hiroyuki; Kigawa, Junzo; Hayashi, Akira; Umehara, Hisanori

    2012-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) catalyzes the formation of sphingomyelin, a major component of the plasma membrane and lipid rafts. To investigate the role of SMS in cell signaling and migration induced by binding of the chemokine CXCL12 to CXCR4, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in SMS1 and/or SMS2 and examined the effects of SMS deficiency on cell migration. SMS deficiency promoted cell migration through a CXCL12/CXCR4-dependent signaling pathway involving extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. In addition, SMS1/SMS2 double-knockout cells had heightened sensitivity to CXCL12, which was significantly suppressed upon transfection with the SMS1 or SMS2 gene or when they were treated with exogenous sphingomyelin but not when they were treated with the SMS substrate ceramide. Notably, SMS deficiency facilitated relocalization of CXCR4 to lipid rafts, which form platforms for the regulation and transduction of receptor-mediated signaling. Furthermore, we found that SMS deficiency potentiated CXCR4 dimerization, which is required for signal transduction. This dimerization was significantly repressed by sphingomyelin treatment. Collectively, our data indicate that SMS-derived sphingomyelin lowers responsiveness to CXCL12, thereby reducing migration induced by this chemokine. Our findings provide the first direct evidence for an involvement of SMS-generated sphingomyelin in the regulation of cell migration. PMID:22688512

  13. Lovastatin enhances adenovirus-mediated TRAIL induced apoptosis by depleting cholesterol of lipid rafts and affecting CAR and death receptor expression of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youhong; Chen, Lin; Gong, Zhicheng; Shen, Liangfang; Kao, Chinghai; Hock, Janet M; Sun, Lunquan; Li, Xiong

    2015-02-20

    Oncolytic adenovirus and apoptosis inducer TRAIL are promising cancer therapies. Their antitumor efficacy, when used as single agents, is limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have low infection activity, and cancer cells develop resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we explored combining prostate-restricted replication competent adenovirus-mediated TRAIL (PRRA-TRAIL) with lovastatin, a commonly used cholesterol-lowering drug, as a potential therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Lovastatin significantly enhanced the efficacy of PRRA-TRAIL by promoting the in vivo tumor suppression, and the in vitro cell killing and apoptosis induction, via integration of multiple molecular mechanisms. Lovastatin enhanced PRRA replication and virus-delivered transgene expression by increasing the expression levels of CAR and integrins, which are critical for adenovirus 5 binding and internalization. Lovastatin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing death receptor DR4 expression. These multiple effects of lovastatin on CAR, integrins and DR4 expression were closely associated with cholesterol-depletion in lipid rafts. These studies, for the first time, show correlations between cholesterol/lipid rafts, oncolytic adenovirus infection efficiency and the antitumor efficacy of TRAIL at the cellular level. This work enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that support use of lovastatin, in combination with PRRA-TRAIL, as a candidate strategy to treat human refractory prostate cancer in the future.

  14. Lovastatin enhances adenovirus-mediated TRAIL induced apoptosis by depleting cholesterol of lipid rafts and affecting CAR and death receptor expression of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhicheng; Shen, Liangfang; Kao, Chinghai; Hock, Janet M.; Sun, Lunquan; Li, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic adenovirus and apoptosis inducer TRAIL are promising cancer therapies. Their antitumor efficacy, when used as single agents, is limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have low infection activity, and cancer cells develop resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we explored combining prostate-restricted replication competent adenovirus-mediated TRAIL (PRRA-TRAIL) with lovastatin, a commonly used cholesterol-lowering drug, as a potential therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Lovastatin significantly enhanced the efficacy of PRRA-TRAIL by promoting the in vivo tumor suppression, and the in vitro cell killing and apoptosis induction, via integration of multiple molecular mechanisms. Lovastatin enhanced PRRA replication and virus-delivered transgene expression by increasing the expression levels of CAR and integrins, which are critical for adenovirus 5 binding and internalization. Lovastatin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing death receptor DR4 expression. These multiple effects of lovastatin on CAR, integrins and DR4 expression were closely associated with cholesterol-depletion in lipid rafts. These studies, for the first time, show correlations between cholesterol/lipid rafts, oncolytic adenovirus infection efficiency and the antitumor efficacy of TRAIL at the cellular level. This work enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that support use of lovastatin, in combination with PRRA-TRAIL, as a candidate strategy to treat human refractory prostate cancer in the future. PMID:25605010

  15. Inhibition of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis by the anti-CD82 monoclonal antibody 4F9 through regulation of lipid raft microdomains

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Sayaka; Iwata, Satoshi; Hatano, Ryo; Komiya, Eriko; Dang, Nam H.; Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2016-05-20

    CD82 (also known as KAI1) belongs to the tetraspanin superfamily of type III transmembrane proteins, and is involved in regulating cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In contrast to these well-established roles of CD82 in tumor biology, its function in endothelial cell (EC) activity and tumor angiogenesis is yet to be determined. In this study, we show that suppression of CD82 negatively regulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate that the anti-CD82 mAb 4F9 effectively inhibits phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), which is the principal mediator of the VEGF-induced angiogenic signaling process in tumor angiogenesis, by regulating the organization of the lipid raft microdomain signaling platform in human EC. Our present work therefore suggests that CD82 on EC is a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy in VEGFR2-dependent tumor angiogenesis. -- Highlights: •Knockdown of CD82 decreases EC migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. •Anti-CD82 mAb 4F9 inhibits EC migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. •4F9 inhibits VEGFR2 phosphorylation via control of CD82 distribution in lipid rafts.

  16. Soluble Glucan Is Internalized and Trafficked to the Golgi Apparatus in Macrophages via a Clathrin-Mediated, Lipid Raft-Regulated Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Matthew P.; Kalbfleisch, John H.; Williams, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Glucans are natural product carbohydrates that stimulate immunity. Glucans are internalized by the pattern recognition receptor, Dectin-1. Glucans were thought to be trafficked to phagolysosomes, but this is unproven. We examined the internalization and trafficking of soluble glucans in macrophages. Incubation of macrophages with glucan resulted in internalization of Dectin-1 and glucan. Inhibition of clathrin blocked internalization of the Dectin-1/glucan complex. Lipid raft depletion resulted in decreased Dectin levels and glucan uptake. Once internalized, glucans colocalized with early endosomes at 0 to 15 min, with the Golgi apparatus at 15 min to 24 h, and with Dectin-1 immediately (0 h) and again later (15 min-24 h). Glucans did not colocalize with lysosomes at any time interval examined. We conclude that the internalization of Dectin-1/glucan complexes in macrophages is mediated by clathrin and negatively regulated by lipid rafts and/or caveolin-1. Upon internalization, soluble glucans are trafficked via endosomes to the Golgi apparatus, not lysosomes. PMID:22700434

  17. Isolation and use of rafts.

    PubMed

    Brown, Deborah A

    2002-11-01

    This unit describes methods for isolating and analyzing rafts by detergent insolubility. To distinguish these rafts from raft-like membranes isolated by other methods, they are referred to here as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs). DRMs can be isolated by flotation on sucrose density gradients or by pelleting after detergent extraction. DRM proteins can be analyzed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. Additionally, radiolabeled DRM proteins can be analyzed, and lipids can be quantitated by high-performance thin layer chromatography. Support protocols needed for the lipid analysis are also provided. Finally, protocols for raft disruption by cholesterol removal and measuring the kinetics of such removal are included together with a method that reverses the cholesterol removal (cholesterol repletion).

  18. Activated FcgammaRII and signalling molecules revealed in rafts by ultra-structural observations of plasma-membrane sheets.

    PubMed

    Strzelecka-Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Korzeniowski, Marek; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Mrozińska, Kazimiera; Sobota, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    To reveal topography of FcgammaRII components of the receptor-signalling complex, large plasma-membrane sheets were obtained by cell cleavage and analysed by immuno-electron microscopy. Non-activated FcgammaRII was dispersed in the plane of the plasma membrane and only rarely was localized in the proximity of Lyn, an Src family tyrosine kinase, and CD55, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein. After FcgammaRII activation by cross-linking with antibodies, clusters of an electron-dense material acquiring about 86% of FcgammaRII and reaching up to 300 nm in diameter were formed within 5 min. These structures also accommodated about 85% of Lyn and 63% of CD55 labels that were located in close vicinity of gold particles attributed to the cross-linked FcgammaRII . The electron-dense structures were also abundant in tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. At their margins PIP2 was preferentially located. Based on a concentration of Lyn, CD55 and activated FcgammaRII , the electron-dense structures seem to reflect coalescent membrane rafts.

  19. ApoER2 expression increases Aβ production while decreasing Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) endocytosis: Possible role in the partitioning of APP into lipid rafts and in the regulation of γ-secretase activity

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Rodrigo A; Barría, Maria Ines; Lee, Jiyeon; Cam, Judy; Araya, Claudia; Escudero, Claudia A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Bronfman, Francisca C; Bu, Guojun; Marzolo, Maria-Paz

    2007-01-01

    Background The generation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) through the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a central event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies highlight APP endocytosis and localization to lipid rafts as important events favoring amyloidogenic processing. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these events are poorly understood. ApoER2 is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) family exhibiting slow endocytosis rate and a significant association with lipid rafts. Despite the important neurophysiological roles described for ApoER2, little is known regarding how ApoER2 regulates APP trafficking and processing. Results Here, we demonstrate that ApoER2 physically interacts and co-localizes with APP. Remarkably, we found that ApoER2 increases cell surface APP levels and APP association with lipid rafts. The increase of cell surface APP requires the presence of ApoER2 cytoplasmic domain and is a result of decreased APP internalization rate. Unexpectedly, ApoER2 expression correlated with a significant increase in Aβ production and reduced levels of APP-CTFs. The increased Aβ production was dependent on the integrity of the NPxY endocytosis motif of ApoER2. We also found that expression of ApoER2 increased APP association with lipid rafts and increased γ-secretase activity, both of which might contribute to increased Aβ production. Conclusion These findings show that ApoER2 negatively affects APP internalization. However, ApoER2 expression stimulates Aβ production by shifting the proportion of APP from the non-rafts to the raft membrane domains, thereby promoting β-secretase and γ-secretase mediated amyloidogenic processing and also by incrementing the activity of γ-secretase. PMID:17620134

  20. ApoER2 expression increases Abeta production while decreasing Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) endocytosis: Possible role in the partitioning of APP into lipid rafts and in the regulation of gamma-secretase activity.

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, Rodrigo A; Barría, Maria Ines; Lee, Jiyeon; Cam, Judy; Araya, Claudia; Escudero, Claudia A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Bronfman, Francisca C; Bu, Guojun; Marzolo, Maria-Paz

    2007-07-09

    The generation of the amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) through the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a central event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies highlight APP endocytosis and localization to lipid rafts as important events favoring amyloidogenic processing. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these events are poorly understood. ApoER2 is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) family exhibiting slow endocytosis rate and a significant association with lipid rafts. Despite the important neurophysiological roles described for ApoER2, little is known regarding how ApoER2 regulates APP trafficking and processing. Here, we demonstrate that ApoER2 physically interacts and co-localizes with APP. Remarkably, we found that ApoER2 increases cell surface APP levels and APP association with lipid rafts. The increase of cell surface APP requires the presence of ApoER2 cytoplasmic domain and is a result of decreased APP internalization rate. Unexpectedly, ApoER2 expression correlated with a significant increase in Abeta production and reduced levels of APP-CTFs. The increased Abeta production was dependent on the integrity of the NPxY endocytosis motif of ApoER2. We also found that expression of ApoER2 increased APP association with lipid rafts and increased gamma-secretase activity, both of which might contribute to increased Abeta production. These findings show that ApoER2 negatively affects APP internalization. However, ApoER2 expression stimulates Abeta production by shifting the proportion of APP from the non-rafts to the raft membrane domains, thereby promoting beta-secretase and gamma-secretase mediated amyloidogenic processing and also by incrementing the activity of gamma-secretase.

  1. Cholesterol depletion blocks redistribution of lipid raft components and insulin-mimetic signaling by glimepiride and phosphoinositolglycans in rat adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gunter; Hanekop, Nils; Wied, Susanne; Frick, Wendelin

    2002-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored plasma membrane (GPI) proteins, such as Gce1, the dually acylated nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs), such as pp59(Lyn), and the membrane protein, caveolin, together with cholesterol are typical components of detergent/carbonate-insoluble glycolipid-enriched raft domains (DIGs) in the plasma membrane of most eucaryotes. Previous studies demonstrated the dissociation from caveolin and concomitant redistribution from DIGs of Gce1 and pp59(Lyn) in rat adipocytes in response to four different insulin-mimetic stimuli, glimepiride, phosphoinositolglycans, caveolin-binding domain peptide, and trypsin/NaCl-treatment. We now characterized the structural basis for this dynamic of DIG components. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Carbonate extracts from purified plasma membranes of basal and stimulated adipocytes were analyzed by high-resolution sucrose gradient centrifugation. RESULTS: This process revealed the existence of two distinct species of detergent/carbonate-insoluble complexes floating at higher buoyant density and harboring lower amounts of cholesterol, caveolin, GPI proteins, and NRTKs (lcDIGs) compared to typical DIGs of high cholesterol content (hcDIGs). The four insulin-mimetic stimuli decreased by 40-70% and increased by 2.5- to 5-fold the amounts of GPI proteins and NRTKs at hcDIGs and lcDIGs, respectively. Cholesterol depletion of adipocytes per se by incubation with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin or cholesterol oxidase also caused translocation of GPI proteins and NRTKs from hcDIGs to lcDIGs and their release from caveolin in reversible fashion without concomitant induction of insulin-mimetic signaling. Cholesterol depletion, however, reduced by 50-60% the stimulus-induced translocation as well as dissociation from hcDIGs-associated caveolin of GPI proteins and NRTKs, activation of NRTKs as well as insulin-mimetic signaling and metabolic action. In contrast, insulin-mimetic signaling induced by vanadium compounds was not

  2. The binding of Aβ1-42 to lipid rafts of RBC is enhanced by dietary docosahexaenoic acid in rats: Implicates to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio; Hossain, Shahdat; Katakura, Masanori; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Shido, Osamu

    2015-06-01

    Once amyloid β peptides (Aβs) of the Alzheimer's disease build up in blood circulation, they are capable of binding to red blood cell (RBC) and inducing hemolysis of RBC. The mechanisms of the interactions between RBC and Aβ are largely unknown; however, it is very important for the therapeutic target of Aβ-induced hemolysis. In the present study, we investigated whether Aβ1-42 interacts with caveolin-1-containing detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) of RBC and whether the interaction could be modulated by dietary pre-administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). DHA pre-administration to rats inhibited hemolysis by Aβ1-42. This activity was accompanied by increased DHA levels and membrane fluidity and decreased cholesterol level, lipid peroxidation, and reactive oxygen species in the RBCs of the DHA-pretreated rats, suggesting that the antioxidative property of DHA may rescue RBCs from oxidative damage by Aβ1-42. The level of caveolin-1 was augmented in the DRMs of DHA-pretreated rats. Binding between Aβ1-42 and DRMs of RBC significantly increased in DHA-rats. When fluorescently labeled Aβ1-42 (TAMRA-Aβ1-42) was directly infused into the bloodstream, it again occupied the caveolin-1-containing DRMs of the RBCs from the DHA-rats to a greater extent, indicating that circulating Aβs interact with the caveolin-1-rich lipid rafts of DRMs and the interaction is stronger in the DHA-enriched RBCs. The levels of TAMRA-Aβ1-42 also increased in liver DRMs, whereas it decreased in plasma of DHA-pretreated rats. DHA might help clearance of circulating Aβs by increased lipid raft-dependent degradation pathways and implicate to therapies in Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Membrane-lipid therapy in operation: the HSP co-inducer BGP-15 activates stress signal transduction pathways by remodeling plasma membrane rafts.

    PubMed

    Gombos, Imre; Crul, Tim; Piotto, Stefano; Güngör, Burcin; Török, Zsolt; Balogh, Gábor; Péter, Mária; Slotte, J Peter; Campana, Federica; Pilbat, Ana-Maria; Hunya, Akos; Tóth, Noémi; Literati-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Vígh, László; Glatz, Attila; Brameshuber, Mario; Schütz, Gerhard J; Hevener, Andrea; Febbraio, Mark A; Horváth, Ibolya; Vígh, László

    2011-01-01

    Aging and pathophysiological conditions are linked to membrane changes which modulate membrane-controlled molecular switches, causing dysregulated heat shock protein (HSP) expression. HSP co-inducer hydroxylamines such as BGP-15 provide advanced therapeutic candidates for many diseases since they preferentially affect stressed cells and are unlikely have major side effects. In the present study in vitro molecular dynamic simulation, experiments with lipid monolayers and in vivo ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy showed that BGP-15 alters the organization of cholesterol-rich membrane domains. Imaging of nanoscopic long-lived platforms using the raft marker glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric green fluorescent protein diffusing in the live Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell plasma membrane demonstrated that BGP-15 prevents the transient structural disintegration of rafts induced by fever-type heat stress. Moreover, BGP-15 was able to remodel cholesterol-enriched lipid platforms reminiscent of those observed earlier following non-lethal heat priming or membrane stress, and were shown to be obligate for the generation and transmission of stress signals. BGP-15 activation of HSP expression in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells involves the Rac1 signaling cascade in accordance with the previous observation that cholesterol affects the targeting of Rac1 to membranes. Finally, in a human embryonic kidney cell line we demonstrate that BGP-15 is able to inhibit the rapid heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) acetylation monitored during the early phase of heat stress, thereby promoting a prolonged duration of HSF1 binding to heat shock elements. Taken together, our results indicate that BGP-15 has the potential to become a new class of pharmaceuticals for use in 'membrane-lipid therapy' to combat many various protein-misfolding diseases associated with aging.

  4. Membrane-Lipid Therapy in Operation: The HSP Co-Inducer BGP-15 Activates Stress Signal Transduction Pathways by Remodeling Plasma Membrane Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Piotto, Stefano; Güngör, Burcin; Török, Zsolt; Balogh, Gábor; Péter, Mária; Slotte, J. Peter; Campana, Federica; Pilbat, Ana-Maria; Hunya, Ákos; Tóth, Noémi; Literati-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Vígh, László; Glatz, Attila; Brameshuber, Mario; Schütz, Gerhard J.; Hevener, Andrea; Febbraio, Mark A.; Horváth, Ibolya; Vígh, László

    2011-01-01

    Aging and pathophysiological conditions are linked to membrane changes which modulate membrane-controlled molecular switches, causing dysregulated heat shock protein (HSP) expression. HSP co-inducer hydroxylamines such as BGP-15 provide advanced therapeutic candidates for many diseases since they preferentially affect stressed cells and are unlikely have major side effects. In the present study in vitro molecular dynamic simulation, experiments with lipid monolayers and in vivo ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy showed that BGP-15 alters the organization of cholesterol-rich membrane domains. Imaging of nanoscopic long-lived platforms using the raft marker glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric green fluorescent protein diffusing in the live Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell plasma membrane demonstrated that BGP-15 prevents the transient structural disintegration of rafts induced by fever-type heat stress. Moreover, BGP-15 was able to remodel cholesterol-enriched lipid platforms reminiscent of those observed earlier following non-lethal heat priming or membrane stress, and were shown to be obligate for the generation and transmission of stress signals. BGP-15 activation of HSP expression in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells involves the Rac1 signaling cascade in accordance with the previous observation that cholesterol affects the targeting of Rac1 to membranes. Finally, in a human embryonic kidney cell line we demonstrate that BGP-15 is able to inhibit the rapid heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) acetylation monitored during the early phase of heat stress, thereby promoting a prolonged duration of HSF1 binding to heat shock elements. Taken together, our results indicate that BGP-15 has the potential to become a new class of pharmaceuticals for use in ‘membrane-lipid therapy’ to combat many various protein-misfolding diseases associated with aging. PMID:22174906

  5. Cisplatin-induced CD95 redistribution into membrane lipid rafts of HT29 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Sandrine; Hammann, Arlette; Grazide, Solène; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Athias, Anne; Sergent, Odile; Laurent, Guy; Gambert, Philippe; Solary, Eric; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse

    2004-05-15

    We have shown previously that the death receptor CD95 could contribute to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis of colon cancer cells. In addition, anticancer drugs cooperate with CD95 cognate ligand or agonistic antibodies to trigger cancer cell apoptosis. In the present study, we show that the anticancer drug cisplatin induces clustering of CD95 at the surface of the human colon cancer cell line HT29, an event inhibited by the inhibitor of acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) imipramine. The cholesterol sequestering agent nystatin also prevents cisplatin-induced CD95 clustering and decreases HT29 cell sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis and the synergy between cisplatin and anti-CD95 agonistic antibodies. CD95, together with the adaptor molecule Fas-associated death domain and procaspase-8, is redistributed into cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched cell fractions after cisplatin treatment, suggesting plasma membrane raft involvement. Interestingly, nystatin prevents the translocation of the aSMase to the extracellular surface of plasma membrane and the production of ceramide, suggesting that these early events require raft integrity. In addition, nystatin prevents cisplatin-induced transient increase in plasma membrane fluidity that could be required for CD95 translocation. Together, these results demonstrate that cisplatin activates aSMase and induces ceramide production, which triggers the redistribution of CD95 into the plasma membrane rafts. Such redistribution contributes to cell death and sensitizes tumor cells to CD95-mediated apoptosis.

  6. Prostaglandin EP3 receptor superactivates adenylyl cyclase via the Gq/PLC/Ca2+ pathway in a lipid raft-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Kumiko; Yano, Akiko; Kuroiwa, Kenji; Morimoto, Kazushi; Inazumi, Tomoaki; Hatae, Noriyuki; Tabata, Hiroyuki; Segi-Nishida, Eri; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Yukihiko

    2009-11-27

    We previously demonstrated that prostaglandin EP3 receptor augments EP2-elicited cAMP formation in COS-7 cells in a G(i/o)-insensitive manner. The purpose of our current study was to identify the signaling pathways involved in EP3-induced augmentation of receptor-stimulated cAMP formation. The enhancing effect of EP3 receptor was irrespective of the C-terminal structure of the EP3 isoform. This EP3 action was abolished by treatment with inhibitors for phospholipase C and intracellular Ca(2+)-related signaling molecules such as U73122, staurosporine, 2-APB and SK&F 96365. Indeed, an EP3 agonist stimulated IP(3) formation and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, which was blocked by U73122, but not by pertussis toxin. The enhancing effect by EP3 on cAMP formation was mimicked by both a Ca(2+) ionophore and the activation of a typical G(q)-coupled receptor. Moreover, EP3 was exclusively localized to the raft fraction in COS-7 cells and EP3-elicited augmentation of cAMP formation was abolished by cholesterol depletion and introduction of a dominant negative caveolin-1 mutant. These results suggest that EP3 elicits adenylyl cyclase superactivation via G(q)/phospholipase C activation and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in a lipid raft microdomain-dependent manner.

  7. Toll like receptor 2 and CC chemokine receptor 5 cluster in the lipid raft enhances the susceptibility of Leishmania donovani infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Suchandra Bhattacharyya; Bhattacharya, Parna; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Majumder, Saikat; Banerjee, Sayantan; Majumdar, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    In experimental visceral leishmaniasis the causative obligate protozoan parasite, L. donovani invades and multiplies inside of macrophages, one of the sentries of the mammalian immune system. The initial host-parasite interaction between the Leishmania promastigote and the macrophage takes place at the plasma membrane interface. To trace any possible interaction between Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) during early Leishmania-macrophage interactions, it was observed that the expression of both TLR2 and CCR5 were significantly increased, along with their recruitment to the lipid raft. TLR2 silencing attenuates CCR5 expression and restricts L. donovani infection, indicating a regulatory role of TLR2 and CCR5 during infection. Silencing of CCR5 and TLR2 markedly reduced the number of intracellular parasites in macrophages by host protective cytokine responses, while raft disruption using beta-MCD affected TLR2/CCR5 cross-talk and resulted in a significant reduction in parasite invasion. In vivo RNA interference of TLR2 and CCR5 using shRNA plasmids rendered protection in Leishmania donovani-infected mice. Thus, this study for the first time demonstrates the importance of TLR2/CCR5 crosstalk as a significant determinant of Leishmania donovani entry in host macrophages.

  8. Chronic treatment with escitalopram but not R-citalopram translocates Galpha(s) from lipid raft domains and potentiates adenylyl cyclase: a 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter-independent action of this antidepressant compound.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanqiu; Rasenick, Mark M

    2010-03-01

    Chronic antidepressant treatment has been shown to increase adenylyl cyclase activity, in part, due to translocation of Galpha(s) from lipid rafts to a nonraft fraction of the plasma membrane where they engage in a more facile stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. This effect holds for multiple classes of antidepressants, and for serotonin uptake inhibitors, it occurs in the absence of the serotonin transporter. In the present study, we examined the change in the amount of Galpha(s) in lipid raft and whole cell lysate after exposing C6 cells to escitalopram. The results showed that chronic (but not acute) escitalopram decreased the content of Galpha(s) in lipid rafts, whereas there was no change in overall Galpha(s) content. These effects were drug dose- and exposure time-dependent. Although R-citalopram has been reported to antagonize some effects of escitalopram, this compound was without effect on Galpha(s) localization in lipid rafts, and R-citalopram did not inhibit these actions of escitalopram. Escitalopram treatment increased cAMP accumulation, and this seemed due to increased coupling between Galpha(s) and adenylyl cyclase. Thus, escitalopram is potent, rapid and efficacious in translocating Galpha(s) from lipid rafts, and this effect seems to occur independently of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters. Our results suggest that, although antidepressants display distinct affinities for well identified targets (e.g., monoamine transporters), several presynaptic and postsynaptic molecules are probably modified during chronic antidepressant treatment, and these additional targets may be required for clinical efficacy of these drugs.

  9. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter ABCA7 Regulates NKT Cell Development and Function by Controlling CD1d Expression and Lipid Raft Content

    PubMed Central

    Nowyhed, Heba N.; Chandra, Shilpi; Kiosses, William; Marcovecchio, Paola; Andary, Farah; Zhao, Meng; Fitzgerald, Michael L.; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2017-01-01

    ABCA7 is an ABC transporter expressed on the plasma membrane, and actively exports phospholipid complexes from the cytoplasmic to the exocytoplasmic leaflet of membranes. Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are a subpopulation of T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens in the context of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. In this study, we demonstrate that ABCA7 regulates the development of NKT cells in a cell-extrinsic manner. We found that in Abca7−/− mice there is reduced expression of CD1d accompanied by an alteration in lipid raft content on the plasma membrane of thymocytes and antigen presenting cells. Together, these alterations caused by absence of ABCA7 negatively affect NKT cell development and function. PMID:28091533

  10. Two pools of Triton X-100-insoluble GABAA receptors are present in the brain, one associated to lipid rafts and another one to the postsynaptic GABAergic complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejing; Serwanski, David R.; Miralles, Celia P.; Bahr, Ben A.; De Blas, Angel L.

    2009-01-01

    Rat forebrain synaptosomes were extracted with Triton X-100 at 4°C and the insoluble material, which is enriched in postsynaptic densities (PSDs), was subjected to sedimentation on a continuous sucrose gradient. Two pools of Triton X-100-insoluble GABAA receptor