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Sample records for lipid rafts reveals

  1. Proteomic analysis of BmN cell lipid rafts reveals roles in Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Min; Liang, Zi; Kumar, Dhiraj; Chen, Fei; Zhu, Liyuan; Kuang, Sulan; Xue, Renyu; Cao, Guangli; Gong, Chengliang

    2017-04-01

    The mechanism of how Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) enters cells is unknown. The primary components of membrane lipid rafts are proteins and cholesterol, and membrane lipid rafts are thought to be an active region for host-viral interactions. However, whether they contribute to the entry of BmNPV into silkworm cells remains unclear. In this study, we explored the membrane protein components of lipid rafts from BmN cells with mass spectrometry (MS). Proteins and cholesterol were investigated after establishing infection with BmNPV in BmN cells. In total, 222 proteins were identified in the lipid rafts, and Gene Ontology (GO) annotation analysis showed that more than 10% of these proteins had binding and catalytic functions. We then identified proteins that potentially interact between lipid rafts and BmNPV virions using the Virus Overlay Protein Blot Assay (VOPBA). A total of 65 proteins were analyzed with MS, and 7 were predicted to be binding proteins involved in BmNPV cellular invasion, including actin, kinesin light chain-like isoform X2, annexin B13, heat-shock protein 90, barrier-to-autointegration factor B-like and serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 A-like. When the cholesterol of the lipid rafts from the membrane was depleted by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), BmNPV entry into BmN cells was blocked. However, supplying cholesterol into the medium rescued the BmNPV infection ability. These results show that membrane lipid rafts may be the active regions for the entry of BmNPV into cells, and the components of membrane lipid rafts may be candidate targets for improving the resistance of the silkworm to BmNPV.

  2. You Sank My Lipid Rafts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Tessa N.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane is the membrane that serves as a boundary between the interior of a cell and its extracellular environment. Lipid rafts are microdomains within a cellular membrane that possess decreased fluidity due to the presence of cholesterol, glycolipids, and phospholipids containing longer fatty acids. These domains are involved in many…

  3. Characterization of Lipid Rafts from Medicago truncatula Root Plasma Membranes: A Proteomic Study Reveals the Presence of a Raft-Associated Redox System1[W

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Benoit; Furt, Fabienne; Hartmann, Marie-Andrée; Michaelson, Louise V.; Carde, Jean-Pierre; Sargueil-Boiron, Françoise; Rossignol, Michel; Napier, Johnathan A.; Cullimore, Julie; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques; Mongrand, Sébastien

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have provided new insights into the role of sphingolipid/sterol-rich domains so-called lipid rafts of the plasma membrane (PM) from mammalian cells, and more recently from leaves, cell cultures, and seedlings of higher plants. Here we show that lipid raft domains, defined as Triton X-100-insoluble membranes, can also be prepared from Medicago truncatula root PMs. These domains have been extensively characterized by ultrastructural studies as well as by analysis of their content in lipids and proteins. M. truncatula lipid domains are shown to be enriched in sphingolipids and Δ7-sterols, with spinasterol as the major compound, but also in steryl glycosides and acyl-steryl glycosides. A large number of proteins (i.e. 270) have been identified. Among them, receptor kinases and proteins related to signaling, cellular trafficking, and cell wall functioning were well represented whereas those involved in transport and metabolism were poorly represented. Evidence is also given for the presence of a complete PM redox system in the lipid rafts. PMID:17337521

  4. Lipid rafts: heterogeneity on the high seas.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Linda J

    2004-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains that are enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. They have been implicated in processes as diverse as signal transduction, endocytosis and cholesterol trafficking. Recent evidence suggests that this diversity of function is accompanied by a diversity in the composition of lipid rafts. The rafts in cells appear to be heterogeneous both in terms of their protein and their lipid content, and can be localized to different regions of the cell. This review summarizes the data supporting the concept of heterogeneity among lipid rafts and outlines the evidence for cross-talk between raft components. Based on differences in the ways in which proteins interact with rafts, the Induced-Fit Model of Raft Heterogeneity is proposed to explain the establishment and maintenance of heterogeneity within raft populations. PMID:14662007

  5. Lipid alterations in lipid rafts from Alzheimer's disease human brain cortex.

    PubMed

    Martín, Virginia; Fabelo, Noemí; Santpere, Gabriel; Puig, Berta; Marín, Raquel; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains intimately associated with cell signaling. These biochemical microstructures are characterized by their high contents of sphingolipids, cholesterol and saturated fatty acids and a reduced content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Here, we have purified lipid rafts of human frontal brain cortex from normal and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and characterized their biochemical lipid composition. The results revealed that lipid rafts from AD brains exhibit aberrant lipid profiles compared to healthy brains. In particular, lipid rafts from AD brains displayed abnormally low levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA, mainly 22:6n-3, docosahexaenoic acid) and monoenes (mainly 18:1n-9, oleic acid), as well as reduced unsaturation and peroxidability indexes. Also, multiple relationships between phospholipids and fatty acids were altered in AD lipid rafts. Importantly, no changes were observed in the mole percentage of lipid classes and fatty acids in rafts from normal brains throughout the lifespan (24-85 years). These indications point to the existence of homeostatic mechanisms preserving lipid raft status in normal frontal cortex. The disruption of such mechanisms in AD brains leads to a considerable increase in lipid raft order and viscosity, which may explain the alterations in lipid raft signaling observed in AD.

  6. The nutritional significance of lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Parveen

    2009-01-01

    The structure, size, stability, and functionality of lipid rafts are still in debate, but recent techniques allowing direct visualization have characterized them in a wide range of cell types. Lipid rafts are potentially modifiable by diet, particularly (but not exclusively) by dietary fatty acids. However, it is not clear whether dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are incorporated into raft lipids or whether their low affinity to cholesterol disallows this and causes phase separation from rafts and displacement of raft proteins. This review examines the potential for dietary modification of raft structure and function in the immune system, brain and retinal tissue, the gut, and in cancer cells. Although there is increasing evidence to suggest that membrane microdomains, and their modulation, have an impact in health and disease, it is too early to judge whether modulation of lipid rafts is responsible for the immunomodulatory effects of n-3 PUFA. In addition to dietary fatty acids, gangliosides and cholesterol may also modulate microdomains in a number of tissues, and recent work has highlighted sphingolipids in membrane microdomains as potential targets for inhibition of tumor growth by n-3 PUFA. The roles of fatty acids and gangliosides in cognitive development, age-related cognitive decline, psychiatric disorders, and Alzheimer's disease are poorly understood and require clarification, particularly with respect to the contribution of lipid rafts. The roles of lipid rafts in cancer, in microbial pathogenesis, and in insulin resistance are only just emerging, but compelling evidence indicates the growing importance of membrane microdomains in health and disease.

  7. Anesthetics interacting with lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Bandeiras, Cátia; Serro, Ana Paula; Luzyanin, Konstantin; Fernandes, Anabela; Saramago, Benilde

    2013-01-23

    The exact mechanism by which anesthetics induce cell membrane-mediated modifications is still an open question. Although the fluidization effect of the anesthetic molecules on the cellular membrane is widely recognized, it is not known if anesthetics show any preference for specific membrane domains, namely the lipid rafts. The importance of these membrane micro-domains derives from the fact that they have been associated with cell signaling pathways, as well as with specific drug interactions. The objective of this work is to contribute for the elucidation of this question through the comparison of the anesthetic interactions with membranes of various lipid compositions. Liposomes prepared with an equimolar mixture of POPC, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, were chosen as models for lipid rafts. The interactions of these liposomes with two local anesthetics, tetracaine and lidocaine, and one general anesthetic, propofol, were studied. The effect of cholesterol was investigated by comparing anesthetic interactions with POPC/SM liposomes and POPC/SM/CHOL liposomes. The following experimental techniques were used: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, differential scanning calorimetry and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance. Although the liposomes investigated by the different techniques are not in the same conditions, it is possible to assemble the information obtained from all experimental techniques employed to reach a general conclusion. Tetracaine interacts more with raftlike domains, lidocaine induces stronger modifications on POPC/SM liposomes and the results for propofol are not fully conclusive but it seems to be the least prone to lipid interactions. The results were compared with those obtained with DMPC-containing liposomes, reported in a previous work.

  8. Localization of mature neprilysin in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimihiko; Tanabe, Chiaki; Yonemura, Yoji; Watahiki, Haruhiko; Zhao, Yimeng; Yagishita, Sosuke; Ebina, Maiko; Suo, Satoshi; Futai, Eugene; Murata, Masayuki; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2012-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by senile plaques caused by amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation. It has been reported that Aβ generation and accumulation occur in membrane microdomains, called lipid rafts, which are enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. Moreover, the ablation of cholesterol metabolism has been implicated in AD. Neprilysin (NEP), a neutral endopeptidase, is one of the major Aβ-degrading enzymes in the brain. Activation of NEP is a possible therapeutic target. However, it remains unknown whether the activity of NEP is regulated by its association with lipid rafts. Here we show that only the mature form of NEP, which has been glycosylated in the Golgi, exists in lipid rafts, where it is directly associated with phosphatidylserine. Moreover, the localization of NEP in lipid rafts is enhanced by its dimerization, as shown using the NEP E403C homodimerization mutant. However, the protease activities of the mature form of NEP, as assessed by in vitro peptide hydrolysis, did not differ between lipid rafts and nonlipid rafts. We conclude that cholesterol and other lipids regulate the localization of mature NEP to lipid rafts, where the substrate Aβ accumulates but does not modulate the protease activity of NEP.

  9. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    SONG, JIAN; PING, LING-YAN; DUONG, DUC M.; GAO, XIAO-YAN; HE, CHUN-YAN; WEI, LEI; WU, JUN-ZHU

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native-LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL-stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label-free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native-LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native-LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation. PMID:26781977

  10. Selective interaction of LAT (linker of activated T cells) with the open-active form of Lck in lipid rafts reveals a new mechanism for the regulation of Lck in T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kabouridis, Panagiotis S

    2003-01-01

    In T cells, the lipid raft-associated Lck is strongly tyrosine phosphorylated and has reduced enzymic activity in contrast with the detergent-soluble pool, which has substantial activity. Lck tagged at the C-terminus (Lck/V5-His) was efficiently captured by epitope-specific reagents from the detergent-soluble fraction but not from lipid rafts. Binding was restored following urea denaturation, suggesting that Lck/V5-His is in a 'closed' conformation in these domains. In agreement with this hypothesis, the Tyr(505) --> Phe/V5-His and Arg(154) --> Lys/V5-His mutants, which disrupt the SH2-Tyr(505) intramolecular interaction, were efficiently precipitated from lipid rafts. In contrast to Lck, Fyn/V5-His was precipitated equally well from both fractions. In the LAT(linker of activated T cells)-deficient J.CaM2 cells, Tyr(505) phosphorylation of raft-associated Lck was reduced whereas its enzymic activity was elevated. This correlated with decreased levels of raft-localized Csk (C-terminal Src kinase) kinase. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation of Lck was restored in LAT-reconstituted J.CaM2 cells suggesting that LAT negatively regulates Lck activity in lipid rafts. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments from Tyr(505) --> Phe/V5-His-expressing cells revealed that LAT preferentially interacts with the 'open' form of Lck in T cell raft domains. These results demonstrate that, unlike the non-raft pool, Lck in lipid rafts has a 'closed'-inactive structure, and that LAT plays a role in maintaining this conformation, possibly by facilitating critical associations within lipid rafts via its capacity to interact with the 'open' form of the kinase. PMID:12570875

  11. Analysis of Cd44-Containing Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Oliferenko, Snezhana; Paiha, Karin; Harder, Thomas; Gerke, Volker; Schwärzler, Christoph; Schwarz, Heinz; Beug, Hartmut; Günthert, Ursula; Huber, Lukas A.

    1999-01-01

    CD44, the major cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), was shown to localize to detergent-resistant cholesterol-rich microdomains, called lipid rafts, in fibroblasts and blood cells. Here, we have investigated the molecular environment of CD44 within the plane of the basolateral membrane of polarized mammary epithelial cells. We show that CD44 partitions into lipid rafts that contain annexin II at their cytoplasmic face. Both CD44 and annexin II were released from these lipid rafts by sequestration of plasma membrane cholesterol. Partition of annexin II and CD44 to the same type of lipid rafts was demonstrated by cross-linking experiments in living cells. First, when CD44 was clustered at the cell surface by anti-CD44 antibodies, annexin II was recruited into the cytoplasmic leaflet of CD44 clusters. Second, the formation of intracellular, submembranous annexin II–p11 aggregates caused by expression of a trans-dominant mutant of annexin II resulted in coclustering of CD44. Moreover, a frequent redirection of actin bundles to these clusters was observed. These basolateral CD44/annexin II–lipid raft complexes were stabilized by addition of GTPγS or phalloidin in a semipermeabilized and cholesterol-depleted cell system. The low lateral mobility of CD44 in the plasma membrane, as assessed with fluorescent recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), was dependent on the presence of plasma membrane cholesterol and an intact actin cytoskeleton. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton dramatically increased the fraction of CD44 which could be recovered from the light detergent-insoluble membrane fraction. Taken together, our data indicate that in mammary epithelial cells the vast majority of CD44 interacts with annexin II in lipid rafts in a cholesterol-dependent manner. These CD44-containing lipid microdomains interact with the underlying actin cytoskeleton. PMID:10459018

  12. Surface chemistry of lipid raft and amyloid Aβ (1-40) Langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Garima; Pao, Christine; Micic, Miodrag; Johnson, Sheba; Leblanc, Roger M

    2011-10-15

    Lipid rafts being rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids are considered to provide ordered lipid environment in the neuronal membranes, where it is hypothesized that the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) to Aβ (1-40) and Aβ (1-42) takes place. It is highly likely that the interaction of lipid raft components like cholesterol, sphingomylein or GM1 leads to nucleation of Aβ and results in aggregation or accumulation of amyloid plaques. One has investigated surface pressure-area isotherms of the lipid raft and Aβ (1-40) Langmuir monolayer. The compression-decompression cycles and the stability of the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer are crucial parameters for the investigation of interaction of Aβ (1-40) with the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer. It was revealed that GM1 provides instability to the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer. Adsorption of Aβ (1-40) onto the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing neutral (POPC) or negatively charged phospholipid (DPPG) was examined. The adsorption isotherms revealed that the concentration of cholesterol was important for adsorption of Aβ (1-40) onto the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing POPC whereas for the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing DPPG:cholesterol or GM1 did not play any role. In situ UV-vis absorption spectroscopy supported the interpretation of results for the adsorption isotherms.

  13. Lipid raft: A floating island of death or survival

    SciTech Connect

    George, Kimberly S.; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-03-15

    Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, and play an important role in the initiation of many pharmacological agent-induced signaling pathways and toxicological effects. The structure of lipid rafts is dynamic, resulting in an ever-changing content of both lipids and proteins. Cholesterol, as a major component of lipid rafts, is critical for the formation and configuration of lipid raft microdomains, which provide signaling platforms capable of activating both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. A change of cholesterol level can result in lipid raft disruption and activate or deactivate raft-associated proteins, such as death receptor proteins, protein kinases, and calcium channels. Several anti-cancer drugs are able to suppress growth and induce apoptosis of tumor cells through alteration of lipid raft contents via disrupting lipid raft integrity. -- Highlights: ► The role of lipid rafts in apoptosis ► The pro- and anti-apoptotic effects of lipid raft disruption ► Cancer treatments targeting lipid rafts.

  14. Using NK Cell Lipid Raft Fractionation to Understand the Role of Lipid Rafts in NK Cell Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pertierra, Esther; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts were first defined as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) due to their relative insolubility in non-ionic detergents. Although they should not be confused with lipid rafts, DRMs are a valuable starting point for the study of these membrane domains and the interactions of proteins with rafts.Here we describe the isolation of DRMs by ultracentrifugation on a sucrose gradient, a method we have used to study the role of lipid rafts in NKG2D-mediated signaling. We also describe raft fractionation of NK cells involving the selective solubility of β-octylglucoside (β-OG). OG is a non-ionic detergent that efficiently dissolves DRMs but does not disrupt protein associations with the cytoskeleton. Using these two techniques may yield useful information about the proteins involved in receptor recruitment into lipid rafts and the interactions of the actin cytoskeleton with lipid rafts.

  15. The Continuing Mystery of Lipid Rafts.

    PubMed

    Levental, Ilya; Veatch, Sarah L

    2016-12-04

    Since its initial formalization nearly 20 years ago, the concept of lipid rafts has generated a tremendous amount of attention and interest and nearly as much controversy. The controversy is perhaps surprising because the notion itself is intuitive: compartmentalization in time and space is a ubiquitous theme at all scales of biology, and therefore, the partitioning of cellular membranes into lateral subdivision should be expected. Nevertheless, the physicochemical principles responsible for compartmentalization and the molecular mechanisms by which they are functionalized remain nearly as mysterious today as they were two decades ago. Herein, we review recent literature on this topic with a specific focus on the major open questions in the field including: (1) what are the best tools to assay raft behavior in living membranes? (2) what is the function of the complex lipidome of mammalian cells with respect to membrane organization? (3) what are the mechanisms that drive raft formation and determine their properties? (4) how can rafts be modulated? (5) how is membrane compartmentalization integrated into cellular signaling? Despite decades of intensive research, this compelling field remains full of fundamental questions.

  16. Structural determinants of protein partitioning into ordered membrane domains and lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Lorent, Joseph Helmuth; Levental, Ilya

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the existence of lateral nanoscopic lipid domains in plasma membranes, known as lipid rafts. These domains preferentially recruit membrane proteins and lipids to facilitate their interactions and thereby regulate transmembrane signaling and cellular homeostasis. The functionality of raft domains is intrinsically dependent on their selectivity for specific membrane components; however, while the physicochemical determinants of raft association for lipids are known, very few systematic studies have focused on the structural aspects that guide raft partitioning of proteins. In this review, we describe biophysical and thermodynamic aspects of raft-mimetic liquid ordered phases, focusing on those most relevant for protein partitioning. Further, we detail the variety of experimental models used to study protein-raft interactions. Finally, we review the existing literature on mechanisms for raft targeting, including lipid post-translational modifications, lipid binding, and transmembrane domain features. We conclude that while protein palmitoylation is a clear raft-targeting signal, few other general structural determinants for raft partitioning have been revealed, suggesting that many discoveries lie ahead in this burgeoning field.

  17. Lipid Rafts in Mast Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Silveira e Souza, Adriana Maria Mariano; Mazucato, Vivian Marino; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells have long been recognized to have a direct and critical role in allergic and inflammatory reactions. In allergic diseases, these cells exert both local and systemic responses, including allergic rhinitis and anaphylaxis. Mast cell mediators are also related to many chronic inflammatory conditions. Besides the roles in pathological conditions, the biological functions of mast cells include roles in innate immunity, involvement in host defense mechanisms against parasites, immunomodulation of the immune system, tissue repair, and angiogenesis. Despite their growing significance in physiological and pathological conditions, much still remains to be learned about mast cell biology. This paper presents evidence that lipid rafts or raft components modulate many of the biological processes in mast cells, such as degranulation and endocytosis, play a role in mast cell development and recruitment, and contribute to the overall preservation of mast cell structure and organization. PMID:21490812

  18. Cholesterol lipids and cholesterol-containing lipid rafts in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; London, Erwin

    2016-09-01

    Sterols are important components of eukaryotic membranes, but rare in bacteria. Some bacteria obtain sterols from their host or environment. In some cases, these sterols form membrane domains analogous the lipid rafts proposed to exist in eukaryotic membranes. This review describes the properties and roles of sterols in Borrelia and Helicobacter.

  19. Lipid rafts are disrupted in mildly inflamed intestinal microenvironments without overt disruption of the epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Rachel V; Donatello, Simona; Lyes, Clíona; Owens, Mark B; Babina, Irina S; Hudson, Lance; Walsh, Shaun V; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid P; Amu, Sylvie; Barry, Sean P; Fallon, Padraic G; Hopkins, Ann M

    2012-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial barrier disruption is a feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but whether barrier disruption precedes or merely accompanies inflammation remains controversial. Tight junction (TJ) adhesion complexes control epithelial barrier integrity. Since some TJ proteins reside in cholesterol-enriched regions of the cell membrane termed lipid rafts, we sought to elucidate the relationship between rafts and intestinal epithelial barrier function. Lipid rafts were isolated from Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells primed with the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or treated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin as a positive control for raft disruption. Rafts were also isolated from the ilea of mice in which colitis had been induced in conjunction with in vivo intestinal permeability measurements, and lastly from intestinal biopsies of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with predominantly mild or quiescent disease. Raft distribution was analyzed by measuring activity of the raft-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase and by performing Western blot analysis for flotillin-1. Epithelial barrier integrity was estimated by measuring transepithelial resistance in cytokine-treated cells or in vivo permeability to fluorescent dextran in colitic mice. Raft and nonraft fractions were analyzed by Western blotting for the TJ proteins occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Our results revealed that lipid rafts were disrupted in IFN-γ-treated cells, in the ilea of mice with subclinical colitis, and in UC patients with quiescent inflammation. This was not associated with a clear pattern of occludin or ZO-1 relocalization from raft to nonraft fractions. Significantly, a time-course study in colitic mice revealed that disruption of lipid rafts preceded the onset of increased intestinal permeability. Our data suggest for the first time that lipid raft disruption occurs early in the inflammatory cascade in murine and human colitis and, we speculate, may contribute to

  20. Do local anesthetics interact preferentially with membrane lipid rafts? Comparative interactivities with raft-like membranes.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Ueno, Takahiro; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2010-08-01

    Membranous lipid bilayers have been reconsidered as the site of action of local anesthetics (LAs). Recent understanding of biomembranes indicates the existence of lipid raft microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids as potential platforms for channels and receptors. Based on the hypothesis that LAs may interact preferentially with lipid rafts over non-raft membranes, we compared their effects on raft model membranes and cardiolipin-containing biomimetic membranes. Liposomes were prepared with phospholipids, sphingomyelin, cerebroside, and cholesterol to have compositions corresponding to lipid rafts and cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membranes. After reacting LAs (50-200 microM) with the membrane preparations, their interactivities were determined by measuring fluorescence polarization with 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Although bupivacaine and lidocaine acted on different raft-like liquid-ordered membranes to reduce polarization values, their effects on biomimetic less ordered membranes were much greater. LAs interacted with biomimetic membranes with the potency being R(+)-bupivacaine > racemic bupivacaine > S(-)-bupivacaine > ropivacaine > lidocaine > prilocaine, which is consistent with the rank order of pharmacotoxicological potency. However, raft model membranes showed neither structure-dependence nor stereoselectivity. The relevance of membrane lipid rafts to LAs is questionable at least in their effects on raft-like liquid-ordered membranes.

  1. Role of lipid rafts in neuronal differentiation of dental pulp-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Vincenzo; Santacroce, Costantino; Tasciotti, Vincenzo; Martellucci, Stefano; Santilli, Francesca; Manganelli, Valeria; Piccoli, Luca; Misasi, Roberta; Sorice, Maurizio; Garofalo, Tina

    2015-12-10

    Human dental pulp-derived stem cells (hDPSCs) are characterized by a typical fibroblast-like morphology. They express specific markers for mesenchymal stem cells and are capable of differentiation into osteoblasts, adipoblasts and neurons in vitro. Previous studies showed that gangliosides are involved in the induction of early neuronal differentiation of hDPSCs. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of lipid rafts in this process. Lipid rafts are signaling microdomains enriched in glycosphingolipids, cholesterol, tyrosine kinase receptors, mono- or heterotrimeric G proteins and GPI-anchored proteins. We preliminary showed that established cells expressed multipotent mesenchymal stromal-specific surface antigens. Then, we analyzed the distribution of lipid rafts, revealing plasma membrane microdomains with GM2 and EGF-R enrichment. Following stimulation with EGF/bFGF, neuronal differentiation was observed. To analyze the functional role of lipid rafts in EGF/bFGF-induced hDPSCs differentiation, cells were preincubated with lipid raft affecting agents, i.e. [D]-PDMP or methyl-β-cyclodextrin. These compounds significantly prevented neuronal-specific antigen expression, as well as Akt and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation, induced by EGF/bFGF, indicating that lipid raft integrity is essential for EGF/bFGF-induced hDPSCs differentiation. These results suggest that lipid rafts may represent specific chambers, where multimolecular signaling complexes, including lipids (gangliosides, cholesterol) and proteins (EGF-R), play a role in hDPSCs differentiation.

  2. Lipid rafts and detergent-resistant membranes in epithelial keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    McGuinn, Kathleen P; Mahoney, Mỹ G

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the plasma membrane has markedly increased since Singer and Nicolson proposed the fluid mosaic model in 1972. While their revolutionary theory of the lipid bilayer remains largely valid, it is now known that lipids and proteins are not randomly dispersed throughout the plasma membrane but instead may be organized within membrane microdomains, commonly referred to as lipid rafts. Lipid rafts are highly dynamic, detergent resistant, and enriched with both cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. The two main types are flotillin-rich planar lipid rafts and caveolin-rich caveolae. It is proposed that flotillin and caveolin proteins regulate cell communication by compartmentalizing and interacting with signal transduction proteins within their respective lipid microdomains. Consequently, membrane rafts play an important role in vital cellular functions including migration, invasion, and signaling; thus, alterations in their microenvironment can initiate signaling pathways that affect cellular function and behavior. Therefore, the identification of lipid rafts and their associated proteins is integral to the study of transmembrane signaling. Here, we review the current standard protocols and biochemical approaches used to isolate and define raft proteins from epithelial cells and tissues. Furthermore, in Section 3 of this chapter, detailed protocols are offered for isolating lipid rafts by subjection to detergent and sucrose density centrifugation, as well as an approach for selectively isolating caveolae. Methods to manipulate rafts with treatments such as methyl-β-cyclodextrin and flotillin III are also described.

  3. Lipid Rafts Disruption Increases Ochratoxin A Cytotoxicity to Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Qi, Xiaozhe; Zheng, Juanjuan; Luo, Yunbo; Zhao, Changhui; Hao, Junran; Li, Xiaohong; Huang, Kunlun; Xu, Wentao

    2016-02-01

    Lipid rafts are microdomains in plasma membrane and can mediate cytotoxicity. In this study, the role of lipid rafts in ochratoxin A-induced toxicity was investigated using Hepatoblastoma Cell Line HepG-2 cells. Disruption of cholesterol-containing lipid rafts enhanced Ochratoxin A (OTA) toxicity, as shown by increased lactate dehydrogenase leakage, increased reactive oxygen species level and reduction of superoxide dismutase activity in a time-dependent manner. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation-based proteomics of the cell membranes showed that nearly 85.5% proteins were downregulated by OTA, indicating that OTA inhibited the membrane protein synthesis. Most of altered proteins were involved in Gene Ontology "transport", "cell adhesion" and "vesicle-mediated transport". In conclusion, lipid rafts play a key role in OTA-induced cytotoxicity. This study provides insight into how OTA toxicity is regulated by the plasma membrane, especially the lipid rafts.

  4. Lipid rafts in immune signalling: current progress and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Pallavi; Yadav, Vikas; Saini, Neeru

    2016-09-01

    Lipid rafts are dynamic assemblies of proteins and lipids that harbour many receptors and regulatory molecules and so act as a platform for signal transduction. They float freely within the liquid-disordered bilayer of cellular membranes and can cluster to form larger ordered domains. Alterations in lipid rafts are commonly found to be associated with the pathogenesis of several human diseases and recent reports have shown that the raft domains can also be perturbed by targeting raft proteins through microRNAs. Over the last few years, the importance of lipid rafts in modulating both innate and acquired immune responses has been elucidated. Various receptors present on immune cells like B cells, T cells, basophils and mast cells associate with lipid rafts on ligand binding and initiate signalling cascades leading to inflammation. Furthermore, disrupting lipid raft integrity alters lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine secretion, IgE signalling, and B-cell and T-cell activation. The objective of this review is to summarize the recent progress in understanding the role of lipid rafts in the modulation of immune signalling and its related therapeutic potential for autoimmune diseases and inflammatory disorders.

  5. Localization and signaling of GPCRs in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Villar, Van Anthony M; Cuevas, Santiago; Zheng, Xiaoxu; Jose, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of how biological membranes are organized and how they function has evolved. Instead of just serving as a medium in which certain proteins are found, portions of the lipid bilayer have been demonstrated to form specialized platforms that foster the assembly of signaling complexes by providing a microenvironment that is conducive for effective protein-protein interactions. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and relevant signaling molecules, including the heterotrimeric G proteins, key enzymes such as kinases and phosphatases, trafficking proteins, and secondary messengers, preferentially partition to these highly organized cell membrane microdomains, called lipid rafts. As such, lipid rafts are crucial for the trafficking and signaling of GPCRs. The study of GPCR biology in the context of lipid rafts involves the localization of the GPCR of interest in lipid rafts, at the basal state and upon receptor agonism, and the evaluation of the biological functions of the GPCR in appropriate cell lines. The lack of standardized methodology to study lipid rafts, in general, and of the workings of GPCRs in lipid rafts, in particular, and the inherent drawbacks of current methods have hampered the complete understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Newer methodologies that allow the study of GPCRs in their native form are needed. The use of complementary approaches that produce mutually supportive results appear to be the best way for drawing conclusions with regards to the distribution and activity of GPCRs in lipid rafts.

  6. Down-regulation of Connexin43 expression reveals the involvement of caveolin-1 containing lipid rafts in human U251 glioblastoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Strale, Pierre-Olivier; Clarhaut, Jonathan; Lamiche, Coralie; Cronier, Laurent; Mesnil, Marc; Defamie, Norah

    2012-11-01

    Glioblastoma cells are characterized by high proliferation and invasive capacities. Tumor development has been associated with a decrease of gap-junctional intercellular communication, but the concrete involvement of gap junction proteins, connexins, remains elusive since they are also suspected to promote cell invasion. In order to better understand how connexins control the glioma cell phenotype, we studied the consequences of inhibiting the intrinsic expression of the major astrocytic connexin, Connexin43, in human U251 glioblastoma cells by the shRNA strategy. The induced down-regulation of Cx43 expression has various effects on the U251 cells such as increased clonogenicity, angiogenesis and decreased adhesion on specific extracellular matrix proteins. We demonstrate that the invasion capacity measured in vitro and ex vivo correlates with Cx43 expression level. For the first time in a cancer cell context, our work demonstrates that Cx43 cofractionates, colocalizes and coimmunoprecipitates with a lipid raft marker, caveolin-1 and that this interaction is inversely correlated to the level of Cx43. This localization of Cx43 in these lipid raft microdomains regulates both homo- and heterocellular gap junctional communications (respectively between U251 cells, or between U251 cells and astrocytes). Moreover, the adhesive and invasive capacities are not dependent, in our model, on Cav-1 expression level. Our results tend to show that heterocellular gap junctional communication between cancer and stroma cells may affect the behavior of the tumor cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate that Cx43 controls the tumor phenotype of glioblastoma U251 cells and in particular, invasion capacity, through its localization in lipid rafts containing Cav-1.

  7. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+, and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23087902

  8. Lipid rafts as major platforms for signaling regulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mollinedo, Faustino; Gajate, Consuelo

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling does not apparently occur randomly over the cell surface, but it seems to be integrated very often into cholesterol-rich membrane domains, termed lipid rafts. Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains that are enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides, and behave as major modulators of membrane geometry, lateral movement of molecules, traffic and signal transduction. Because the lipid and protein composition of membrane rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, they provide an additional level of compartmentalization, serving as sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction proteins. A wide number of signal transduction processes related to cell adhesion, migration, as well as to cell survival and proliferation, which play major roles in cancer development and progression, are dependent on lipid rafts. Despite lipid rafts harbor mainly critical survival signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling, recent evidence suggests that these membrane domains can also house death receptor-mediated apoptotic signaling. Recruitment of this death receptor signaling pathway in membrane rafts can be pharmacologically modulated, thus opening up the possibility to regulate cell demise with a therapeutic use. The synthetic ether phospholipid edelfosine shows a high affinity for cholesterol and accumulates in lipid rafts in a number of malignant hematological cells, leading to an efficient in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity by inducing translocation of death receptors and downstream signaling molecules to these membrane domains. Additional antitumor drugs have also been shown to act, at least in part, by recruiting death receptors in lipid rafts. The partition of death receptors together with downstream apoptotic signaling molecules in membrane rafts has led us to postulate the concept of a special liquid-ordered membrane platform coined as

  9. DJ-1 associates with lipid rafts by palmitoylation and regulates lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Soo; Kim, Jin Soo; Park, Ji-Young; Suh, Young Ho; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-Hye; Park, Sang Myun

    2013-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common progressive neurodegenerative disease. Several genes have been associated with familial type PD, providing tremendous insights into the pathogenesis of PD. Gathering evidence supports the view that these gene products may operate through common molecular pathways. Recent reports suggest that many PD-associated gene products, such as α-synuclein, LRRK2, parkin and PINK1, associate with lipid rafts and lipid rafts may be associated with neurodegeneration. Here, we observed that DJ-1 protein also associated with lipid rafts. Palmitoylation of three cysteine residues (C46/53/106) and C-terminal region of DJ-1 were required for this association. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced the localization of DJ-1 into lipid rafts in astrocytes. The LPS-TLR4 signaling was more augmented in DJ-1 knock-out astrocytes by the impairment of TLR4 endocytosis. Furthermore, lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis including the endocytosis of CD14, which play a major role in regulating TLR4 endocytosis was also impaired, but clathrin-dependent endocytosis was not. This study provides a novel function of DJ-1 in lipid rafts, which may contribute the pathogenesis of PD. Moreover, it also provides the possibility that many PD-related proteins may operate through common molecular pathways in lipid rafts.

  10. Lipid rafts prepared by different methods contain different connexin channels, but gap junctions are not lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Locke, Darren; Liu, Jade; Harris, Andrew L

    2005-10-04

    Cell extraction with cold nonionic detergents or alkaline carbonate prepares an insoluble membrane fraction whose buoyant density permits its flotation in discontinuous sucrose gradients. These lipid "rafts" are implicated in protein sorting and are attractive candidates as platforms that coordinate signal transduction pathways with intracellular substrates. Gap junctions form a direct molecular signaling pathway by end-to-end apposition of hemichannels containing one (homomeric) or more (heteromeric) connexin isoforms. Residency of channels composed of Cx26 and/or Cx32 in lipid rafts was assessed by membrane insolubility in alkaline carbonate or different concentrations of Triton X100, Nonidet P40 and Brij-58 nonionic detergents. Using Triton X100, insoluble raft membranes contained homomeric Cx32 channels, but Cx26-containing channels only when low detergent concentrations were used. Results were similar using Nonidet P40, except that Cx26-containing channels were excluded from raft membranes at all detergent concentrations. In contrast, homomeric Cx26 channels were enriched within Brij-58-insoluble rafts, whereas Cx32-containing channels partitioned between raft and nonraft membranes. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed prominent colocalization only of nonjunctional connexin channels with raft plasma membrane; junctional plaques were not lipid rafts. Rafts prepared by different extraction methods had considerable quantitative and qualitative differences in their lipid compositions. That functionally different nonjunctional connexin channels partition among rafts with distinct lipid compositions suggests that unpaired Cx26 and/or Cx32 channels exist in membrane domains of slightly different physicochemical character. Rafts may be involved in trafficking of plasma membrane connexin channels to gap junctions.

  11. Structure of Cholesterol in Lipid Rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppozini, Laura; Meinhardt, Sebastian; Armstrong, Clare L.; Yamani, Zahra; Kučerka, Norbert; Schmid, Friederike; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2014-11-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano-or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking, and lipid or protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules, we observe raftlike structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to ordering of the cholesterol molecules in the raftlike structures were observed and indexed by two different structures: a monoclinic structure of ordered cholesterol pairs of alternating direction in equilibrium with cholesterol plaques, i.e., triclinic cholesterol bilayers.

  12. Proving lipid rafts exist: membrane domains in the prokaryote Borrelia burgdorferi have the same properties as eukaryotic lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    LaRocca, Timothy J; Pathak, Priyadarshini; Chiantia, Salvatore; Toledo, Alvaro; Silvius, John R; Benach, Jorge L; London, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Lipid rafts in eukaryotic cells are sphingolipid and cholesterol-rich, ordered membrane regions that have been postulated to play roles in many membrane functions, including infection. We previously demonstrated the existence of cholesterol-lipid-rich domains in membranes of the prokaryote, B. burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease [LaRocca et al. (2010) Cell Host & Microbe 8, 331-342]. Here, we show that these prokaryote membrane domains have the hallmarks of eukaryotic lipid rafts, despite lacking sphingolipids. Substitution experiments replacing cholesterol lipids with a set of sterols, ranging from strongly raft-promoting to raft-inhibiting when mixed with eukaryotic sphingolipids, showed that sterols that can support ordered domain formation are both necessary and sufficient for formation of B. burgdorferi membrane domains that can be detected by transmission electron microscopy or in living organisms by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Raft-supporting sterols were also necessary and sufficient for formation of high amounts of detergent resistant membranes from B. burgdorferi. Furthermore, having saturated acyl chains was required for a biotinylated lipid to associate with the cholesterol-lipid-rich domains in B. burgdorferi, another characteristic identical to that of eukaryotic lipid rafts. Sterols supporting ordered domain formation were also necessary and sufficient to maintain B. burgdorferi membrane integrity, and thus critical to the life of the organism. These findings provide compelling evidence for the existence of lipid rafts and show that the same principles of lipid raft formation apply to prokaryotes and eukaryotes despite marked differences in their lipid compositions.

  13. Lipid Rafts: Keys to Sperm Maturation, Fertilization, and Early Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Natsuko; Yoshida, Kaoru; Miyado, Kenji; Yoshida, Manabu

    2011-01-01

    Cell membranes are composed of many different lipids and protein receptors, which are important for regulating intracellular functions and cell signaling. To orchestrate these activities, the cell membrane is compartmentalized into microdomains that are stably or transiently formed. These compartments are called “lipid rafts”. In gamete cells that lack gene transcription, distribution of lipids and proteins on these lipid rafts is focused during changes in their structure and functions such as starting flagella movement and membrane fusion. In this paper, we describe the role of lipid rafts in gamete maturation, fertilization, and early embryogenesis. PMID:21490798

  14. Proteomic Profiling of Detergent Resistant Membranes (Lipid Rafts) of Prostasomes.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Louise; Ronquist, Karl K Göran; Ek, Bo; Ronquist, Gunnar; Larsson, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Prostasomes are exosomes derived from prostate epithelial cells through exocytosis by multivesicular bodies. Prostasomes have a bilayered membrane and readily interact with sperm. The membrane lipid composition is unusual with a high contribution of sphingomyelin at the expense of phosphatidylcholine and saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids are dominant. Lipid rafts are liquid-ordered domains that are more tightly packed than the surrounding nonraft phase of the bilayer. Lipid rafts are proposed to be highly dynamic, submicroscopic assemblies that float freely within the liquid disordered membrane bilayer and some proteins preferentially partition into the ordered raft domains. We asked the question whether lipid rafts do exist in prostasomes and, if so, which proteins might be associated with them. Prostasomes of density range 1.13-1.19g/ml were subjected to density gradient ultracentrifugation in sucrose fabricated by phosphate buffered saline (PBS) containing 1% Triton X-100 with capacity for banding at 1.10 g/ml, i.e. the classical density of lipid rafts. Prepared prostasomal lipid rafts (by gradient ultracentrifugation) were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The clearly visible band on top of 1.10g/ml sucrose in the Triton X-100 containing gradient was subjected to liquid chromatography-tandem MS and more than 370 lipid raft associated proteins were identified. Several of them were involved in intraluminal vesicle formation, e.g. tetraspanins, ESCRTs, and Ras-related proteins. This is the first comprehensive liquid chromatography-tandem MS profiling of proteins in lipid rafts derived from exosomes. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002163.

  15. Lipid rafts, ceramide and molecular transcytosis.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fang; Xiong, Bin; Yang, Xiaoyan; Jin, Si

    2016-01-01

    Transcytosis, a widely described process concerning transport of macromolecules between the apical and basolateral sides in various cell types, is extremely important for multicellular organisms to selectively exchange materials in different microenvironments while maintaining cellular and body homeostasis. Uncontrolled transcytosis is involved in a wide range of pathophysiological processes. Lipid rafts (LRs), the sphingolipid and cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains, enable to form different functional membrane macrodomains or platforms upon stimulations. In particular, ceramide-enriched membrane microdomains play extremely critical roles in LRs clustering or platform formations. Notably, various transcytosis-related molecules are tightly correlated with LRs and ceramide. We attempt to summarize the basic and advanced information about the roles of different types of transcytosis in human health and diseases, and the types and functions of LRs involved in transcytosis, as well as multiple transcytosis-related molecules associated with LRs and ceramide. It is hoped that all information and discussions could provide much more comprehensive insights into the understanding of the association of LRs with transcytosis, as well as shed some new light on the translational significance in this area.

  16. Isolation and analysis of membrane lipids and lipid rafts in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Brogden, Graham; Propsting, Marcus; Adamek, Mikolaj; Naim, Hassan Y; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2014-03-01

    Cell membranes act as an interface between the interior of the cell and the exterior environment and facilitate a range of essential functions including cell signalling, cell structure, nutrient uptake and protection. It is composed of a lipid bilayer with integrated proteins, and the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer comprises of liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains. Lo microdomains, also named as lipid rafts are enriched in cholesterol, sphingomyelin and certain types of proteins, which facilitate cell signalling and nutrient uptake. Lipid rafts have been extensively researched in mammals and the presence of functional lipid rafts was recently demonstrated in goldfish, but there is currently very little knowledge about their composition and function in fish. Therefore a protocol was established for the analysis of lipid rafts and membranous lipids in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) tissues. Twelve lipids were identified and analysed in the Ld domain of the membrane with the most predominant lipids found in all tissues being; triglycerides, cholesterol, phosphoethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Four lipids were identified in lipid rafts in all tissues analysed, triglycerides (33-62%) always found in the highest concentration followed by cholesterol (24-32%), phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Isolation of lipid rafts was confirmed by identifying the presence of the lipid raft associated protein flotillin, present at higher concentrations in the detergent resistant fraction. The data provided here build a lipid library of important carp tissues as a baseline for further studies into virus entry, protein trafficking or environmental stress analysis.

  17. Antidepressants Accumulate in Lipid Rafts Independent of Monoamine Transporters to Modulate Redistribution of the G Protein, Gαs.

    PubMed

    Erb, Samuel J; Schappi, Jeffrey M; Rasenick, Mark M

    2016-09-16

    Depression is a significant public health problem for which currently available medications, if effective, require weeks to months of treatment before patients respond. Previous studies have shown that the G protein responsible for increasing cAMP (Gαs) is increasingly localized to lipid rafts in depressed subjects and that chronic antidepressant treatment translocates Gαs from lipid rafts. Translocation of Gαs, which shows delayed onset after chronic antidepressant treatment of rats or of C6 glioma cells, tracks with the delayed onset of therapeutic action of antidepressants. Because antidepressants appear to specifically modify Gαs localized to lipid rafts, we sought to determine whether structurally diverse antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts. Sustained treatment of C6 glioma cells, which lack 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters, showed marked concentration of several antidepressants in raft fractions, as revealed by increased absorbance and by mass fingerprint. Closely related molecules without antidepressant activity did not concentrate in raft fractions. Thus, at least two classes of antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts and effect translocation of Gαs to the non-raft membrane fraction, where it activates the cAMP-signaling cascade. Analysis of the structural determinants of raft localization may both help to explain the hysteresis of antidepressant action and lead to design and development of novel substrates for depression therapeutics.

  18. Association between tetrodotoxin resistant channels and lipid rafts regulates sensory neuron excitability.

    PubMed

    Pristerà, Alessandro; Baker, Mark D; Okuse, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a key role in the initiation and propagation of action potentials in neurons. Na(V)1.8 is a tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant VGSC expressed in nociceptors, peripheral small-diameter neurons able to detect noxious stimuli. Na(V)1.8 underlies the vast majority of sodium currents during action potentials. Many studies have highlighted a key role for Na(V)1.8 in inflammatory and chronic pain models. Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane highly enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts tune the spatial and temporal organisation of proteins and lipids on the plasma membrane. They are thought to act as platforms on the membrane where proteins and lipids can be trafficked, compartmentalised and functionally clustered. In the present study we investigated Na(V)1.8 sub-cellular localisation and explored the idea that it is associated with lipid rafts in nociceptors. We found that Na(V)1.8 is distributed in clusters along the axons of DRG neurons in vitro and ex vivo. We also demonstrated, by biochemical and imaging studies, that Na(V)1.8 is associated with lipid rafts along the sciatic nerve ex vivo and in DRG neurons in vitro. Moreover, treatments with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) led to the dissociation between rafts and Na(V)1.8. By calcium imaging we demonstrated that the lack of association between rafts and Na(V)1.8 correlated with impaired neuronal excitability, highlighted by a reduction in the number of neurons able to conduct mechanically- and chemically-evoked depolarisations. These findings reveal the sub-cellular localisation of Na(V)1.8 in nociceptors and highlight the importance of the association between Na(V)1.8 and lipid rafts in the control of nociceptor excitability.

  19. Association between Tetrodotoxin Resistant Channels and Lipid Rafts Regulates Sensory Neuron Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Pristerà, Alessandro; Baker, Mark D.; Okuse, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a key role in the initiation and propagation of action potentials in neurons. NaV1.8 is a tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant VGSC expressed in nociceptors, peripheral small-diameter neurons able to detect noxious stimuli. NaV1.8 underlies the vast majority of sodium currents during action potentials. Many studies have highlighted a key role for NaV1.8 in inflammatory and chronic pain models. Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane highly enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts tune the spatial and temporal organisation of proteins and lipids on the plasma membrane. They are thought to act as platforms on the membrane where proteins and lipids can be trafficked, compartmentalised and functionally clustered. In the present study we investigated NaV1.8 sub-cellular localisation and explored the idea that it is associated with lipid rafts in nociceptors. We found that NaV1.8 is distributed in clusters along the axons of DRG neurons in vitro and ex vivo. We also demonstrated, by biochemical and imaging studies, that NaV1.8 is associated with lipid rafts along the sciatic nerve ex vivo and in DRG neurons in vitro. Moreover, treatments with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) led to the dissociation between rafts and NaV1.8. By calcium imaging we demonstrated that the lack of association between rafts and NaV1.8 correlated with impaired neuronal excitability, highlighted by a reduction in the number of neurons able to conduct mechanically- and chemically-evoked depolarisations. These findings reveal the sub-cellular localisation of NaV1.8 in nociceptors and highlight the importance of the association between NaV1.8 and lipid rafts in the control of nociceptor excitability. PMID:22870192

  20. Effect of sterol carrier protein-2 expression on sphingolipid distribution in plasma membrane lipid rafts/caveolae.

    PubMed

    Atshaves, Barbara P; Jefferson, John R; McIntosh, Avery L; Gallegos, Adalberto; McCann, Bonnie M; Landrock, Kerstin K; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2007-10-01

    Although sphingolipids are highly important signaling molecules enriched in lipid rafts/caveolae, relatively little is known regarding factors such as sphingolipid binding proteins that may regulate the distribution of sphingolipids to lipid rafts/caveolae of living cells. Since early work demonstrated that sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) enhanced glycosphingolipid transfer from membranes in vitro, the effect of SCP-2 expression on sphingolipid distribution to lipid rafts/caveolae in living cells was examined. Using a non-detergent affinity chromatography method to isolate lipid rafts/caveolae and non-rafts from purified L-cell plasma membranes, it was shown that lipid rafts/caveolae were highly enriched in multiple sphingolipid species including ceramides, acidic glycosphingolipids (ganglioside GM1); neutral glycosphingolipids (monohexosides, dihexosides, globosides), and sphingomyelin as compared to non-raft domains. SCP-2 overexpression further enriched the content of total sphingolipids and select sphingolipid species in the lipid rafts/caveolae domains. Analysis of fluorescence binding and displacement data revealed that purified human recombinant SCP-2 exhibited high binding affinity (nanomolar range) for all sphingolipid classes tested. The binding affinity decreased in the following order: ceramides > acidic glycosphingolipid (ganglioside GM1) > neutral glycosphingolipid (monohexosides, hexosides, globosides) > sphingomyelin. Enrichment of individual sphingolipid classes to lipid rafts/caveolae versus non-rafts in SCP-2 expressing plasma membranes followed closely with those classes most strongly bound to SCP-2 (ceramides, GM1 > the neutral glycosphingolipids (monohexosides, dihexosides, and globosides) > sphingomyelin). Taken together these data suggested that SCP-2 acts to selectively regulate sphingolipid distribution to lipid rafts/caveolae in living cells.

  1. Involvement of glycosphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts in inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are membrane components consisting of hydrophobic ceramide and hydrophilic sugar moieties. GSLs cluster with cholesterol in cell membranes to form GSL-enriched lipid rafts. Biochemical analyses have demonstrated that GSL-enriched lipid rafts contain several kinds of transducer molecules, including Src family kinases. Among the GSLs, lactosylceramide (LacCer, CDw17) can bind to various microorganisms, is highly expressed on the plasma membranes of human phagocytes, and forms lipid rafts containing the Src family tyrosine kinase Lyn. LacCer-enriched lipid rafts mediate immunological and inflammatory reactions, including superoxide generation, chemotaxis, and non-opsonic phagocytosis. Therefore, LacCer-enriched membrane microdomains are thought to function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed on microorganisms. LacCer also serves as a signal transduction molecule for functions mediated by CD11b/CD18-integrin (αM/β2-integrin, CR3, Mac-1), as well as being associated with several key cellular processes. LacCer recruits PCKα/ε and phospholipase A2 to stimulate PECAM-1 expression in human monocytes and their adhesion to endothelial cells, as well as regulating β1-integrin clustering and endocytosis on cell surfaces. This review describes the organizational and inflammation-related functions of LacCer-enriched lipid rafts.

  2. Lipid Rafts and Alzheimer’s Disease: Protein-Lipid Interactions and Perturbation of Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, David A.; Nalivaeva, Natalia N.; Turner, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane domains, more ordered than the bulk membrane and enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. They represent a platform for protein-lipid and protein–protein interactions and for cellular signaling events. In addition to their normal functions, including membrane trafficking, ligand binding (including viruses), axonal development and maintenance of synaptic integrity, rafts have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Lipid rafts promote interaction of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) with the secretase (BACE-1) responsible for generation of the amyloid β peptide, Aβ. Rafts also regulate cholinergic signaling as well as acetylcholinesterase and Aβ interaction. In addition, such major lipid raft components as cholesterol and GM1 ganglioside have been directly implicated in pathogenesis of the disease. Perturbation of lipid raft integrity can also affect various signaling pathways leading to cellular death and AD. In this review, we discuss modulation of APP cleavage by lipid rafts and their components, while also looking at more recent findings on the role of lipid rafts in signaling events. PMID:22737128

  3. Lipid Raft Redox Signaling: Molecular Mechanisms in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fan; Katirai, Foad

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Lipid rafts, the sphingolipid and cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains, are able to form different membrane macrodomains or platforms upon stimulations, including redox signaling platforms, which serve as a critical signaling mechanism to mediate or regulate cellular activities or functions. In particular, this raft platform formation provides an important driving force for the assembling of NADPH oxidase subunits and the recruitment of other related receptors, effectors, and regulatory components, resulting, in turn, in the activation of NADPH oxidase and downstream redox regulation of cell functions. This comprehensive review attempts to summarize all basic and advanced information about the formation, regulation, and functions of lipid raft redox signaling platforms as well as their physiological and pathophysiological relevance. Several molecular mechanisms involving the formation of lipid raft redox signaling platforms and the related therapeutic strategies targeting them are discussed. It is hoped that all information and thoughts included in this review could provide more comprehensive insights into the understanding of lipid raft redox signaling, in particular, of their molecular mechanisms, spatial-temporal regulations, and physiological, pathophysiological relevances to human health and diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1043–1083. PMID:21294649

  4. Lipid rafts/caveolae as microdomains of calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Biswaranjan; Singh, Brij B

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ca2+ is a major signaling molecule in both excitable and non-excitable cells, where it serves critical functions ranging from cell growth to differentiation to cell death. The physiological functions of these cells are tightly regulated in response to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ that is achieved by the activation of several plasma membrane (PM) Ca2+ channels as well as release of Ca2+ from the internal stores. One such channel is referred to as store-operated Ca2+ channel that is activated by the release of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ which initiates store operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). Recent advances in the field suggest that some members of TRPCs and Orai channels function as SOCE channels. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate channel activity and the exact nature of where these channels are assembled and regulated remain elusive. Research from several laboratories has demonstrated that key proteins involved in Ca2+ signaling are localized in discrete PM lipid rafts/caveolar microdomains. Lipid rafts are cholesterol and sphingolipid enriched microdomains that function as unique signal transduction platforms. In addition lipid rafts are dynamic in nature which tends to scaffold certain signaling molecules while excluding others. By such spatial segregation, lipid rafts not only provide a favorable environment for intra-molecular cross talk but also aid to expedite the signal relay. Importantly, Ca2+ signaling is shown to initiate from these lipid raft microdomains. Clustering of Ca2+ channels and their regulators in such microdomains can provide an exquisite spatiotemporal regulation of Ca2+ mediated cellular function. Thus in this review we discuss PM lipid rafts and caveolae as Ca2+ signaling microdomains and highlight their importance in organizing and regulating SOCE channels. PMID:19324409

  5. Lipid composition of membrane rafts, isolated with and without detergent, from the spleen of a mouse model of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Hattersley, Kathryn J; Hein, Leanne K; Fuller, Maria

    2013-12-06

    Biological membranes are composed of functionally relevant liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains that coexist. Within the liquid-ordered domains are low-density microdomains known as rafts with a unique lipid composition that is crucial for their structure and function. Lipid raft composition is altered in sphingolipid storage disorders, and here we determined the lipid composition using a detergent and detergent-free method in spleen tissue, the primary site of pathology, in a mouse model of the sphingolipid storage disorder, Gaucher disease. The accumulating lipid, glucosylceramide, was 30- and 50-fold elevated in the rafts with the detergent and detergent-free method, respectively. Secondary accumulation of di- and trihexosylceramide resided primarily in the rafts with both methods. The phospholipids distributed differently with more than half residing in the rafts with the detergent-free method and less than 10% with the detergent method, with the exception of the fully saturated species that were primarily in the rafts. Individual isoforms of sphingomyelin correlated with detergent-free extraction and more than half resided in the raft fractions. However, this correlation was not seen with the detergent extraction method as sphingomyelin species were spread across both the raft and non-raft domains. Therefore caution must be exercised when interpreting phospholipid distribution in raft domains as it differs considerably depending on the method of isolation. Importantly, both methods revealed the same lipid alterations in the raft domains in the spleen of the Gaucher disease mouse model highlighting that either method is appropriate to determine membrane lipid changes in the diseased state.

  6. Activation of integrin α5 mediated by flow requires its translocation to membrane lipid rafts in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Fu, Yi; Gu, Mingxia; Zhang, Lu; Li, Dan; Li, Hongliang; Chien, Shu; Shyy, John Y-J; Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-19

    Local flow patterns determine the uneven distribution of atherosclerotic lesions. Membrane lipid rafts and integrins are crucial for shear stress-regulated endothelial function. In this study, we investigate the role of lipid rafts and integrin α5 in regulating the inflammatory response in endothelial cells (ECs) under atheroprone versus atheroprotective flow. Lipid raft proteins were isolated from ECs exposed to oscillatory shear stress (OS) or pulsatile shear stress, and then analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Among 396 proteins redistributed in lipid rafts, integrin α5 was the most significantly elevated in lipid rafts under OS. In addition, OS increased the level of activated integrin α5 in lipid rafts through the regulation of membrane cholesterol and fluidity. Disruption of F-actin-based cytoskeleton and knockdown of caveolin-1 prevented the OS-induced integrin α5 translocation and activation. In vivo, integrin α5 activation and EC dysfunction were observed in the atheroprone areas of low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice, and knockdown of integrin α5 markedly attenuated EC dysfunction in partially ligated carotid arteries. Consistent with these findings, mice with haploinsufficency of integrin α5 exhibited a reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in the regions under atheroprone flow. The present study has revealed an integrin- and membrane lipid raft-dependent mechanotransduction mechanism by which atheroprone flow causes endothelial dysfunction.

  7. Anomalies occurring in lipid profiles and protein distribution in frontal cortex lipid rafts in dementia with Lewy bodies disclose neurochemical traits partially shared by Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Marin, Raquel; Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Ferrer, Isidre; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Lipid rafts are highly dynamic membrane microdomains intimately associated with cell signaling. Compelling evidence has demonstrated that alterations in lipid rafts are associated with neurodegenerative diseases such Alzheimer's disease, but at present, whether alterations in lipid raft microdomains occur in other types of dementia such dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) remains unknown. Our analyses reveal that lipid rafts from DLB exhibit aberrant lipid profiles including low levels of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (mainly docosahexaenoic acid), plasmalogens and cholesterol, and reduced unsaturation and peroxidability indexes. As a consequence, lipid raft resident proteins holding principal factors of the β-amyloidogenic pathway, including β-amyloid precursor protein, presenilin 1, β-secretase, and PrP, are redistributed between lipid rafts and nonraft domains in DLB frontal cortex. Meta-analysis discloses certain similarities in the altered composition of lipid rafts between DLB and Parkinson's disease which are in line with the spectrum of Lewy body diseases. In addition, redistribution of proteins linked to the β-amyloidogenic pathway in DLB can facilitate generation of β-amyloid, thus providing mechanistic clues to the intriguing convergence of Alzheimer's disease pathology, particularly β-amyloid deposition, in DLB.

  8. Ethanol Enhances TGF-β Activity by Recruiting TGF-β Receptors From Intracellular Vesicles/Lipid Rafts/Caveolae to Non-Lipid Raft Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Franklin W; Johnson, Frank E; Huang, Jung San

    2016-04-01

    Regular consumption of moderate amounts of ethanol has important health benefits on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Overindulgence can cause many diseases, particularly alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The mechanisms by which ethanol causes both beneficial and harmful effects on human health are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ethanol enhances TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity with a maximum of 0.5-1% (v/v) in Mv1Lu cells stably expressing a luciferase reporter gene containing Smad2-dependent elements. In Mv1Lu cells, 0.5% ethanol increases the level of P-Smad2, a canonical TGF-β signaling sensor, by ∼ 2-3-fold. Ethanol (0.5%) increases cell-surface expression of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβR-II) by ∼ 2-3-fold from its intracellular pool, as determined by I(125) -TGF-β-cross-linking/Western blot analysis. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and indirect immunofluorescence staining analyses reveal that ethanol (0.5% and 1%) also displaces cell-surface TβR-I and TβR-II from lipid rafts/caveolae and facilitates translocation of these receptors to non-lipid raft microdomains where canonical signaling occurs. These results suggest that ethanol enhances canonical TGF-β signaling by increasing non-lipid raft microdomain localization of the TGF-β receptors. Since TGF-β plays a protective role in ASCVD but can also cause ALD, the TGF-β enhancer activity of ethanol at low and high doses appears to be responsible for both beneficial and harmful effects. Ethanol also disrupts the location of lipid raft/caveolae of other membrane proteins (e.g., neurotransmitter, growth factor/cytokine, and G protein-coupled receptors) which utilize lipid rafts/caveolae as signaling platforms. Displacement of these membrane proteins induced by ethanol may result in a variety of pathologies in nerve, heart and other tissues.

  9. High-polarity Mycobacterium avium-derived lipids interact with murine macrophage lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-García, G; Chico-Ortiz, M; Lopez-Marin, L M; Sánchez-García, F J

    2004-11-01

    Cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) are widely recognized as portals for pathogenic micro-organisms. A growing body of evidence demonstrates mobilization of host plasma cell membrane lipid rafts towards the site of contact with several pathogens as well as a strict dependence on cholesterol for appropriate internalization. The fate of lipid rafts once the pathogen has been internalized and the nature of the pathogen components that interact with them is however less understood. To address both these issues, infection of the J774 murine cell line with Mycobacterium avium was used as a model. After demonstrating that M. avium induces lipid raft mobilization and that M. avium infects J774 by a cholesterol-dependent mechanism, it is shown here that mycobacterial phagosomes harbour lipid rafts, which are, at least in part, of plasma cell membrane origin. On the other hand, by using latex microbeads coated with any of the three fractions of M. avium-derived lipids of different polarity, we provide evidence that high-polarity, in contrast to low-polarity and intermediate-polarity, mycobacterial lipids or uncoated latex beads have a strong capacity to induce lipid raft mobilization. These results suggest that high-polarity mycobacterial lipid(s) interact with host cell cholesterol-enriched microdomains which may in turn influence the course of infection.

  10. Isolation of Lipid Rafts Through Discontinuous Sucrose Gradient Centrifugation and Fas/CD95 Death Receptor Localization in Raft Fractions.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2017-01-01

    Lipid raft domains, enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, serve as sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction proteins, and show resistance to detergent solubilization. Despite rafts have been involved in survival processes, these membrane domains have also been shown to play a major role in the modulation of death receptor signaling. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for isolating lipid rafts from whole cells by taking advantage of the lipid raft resistance to Triton X-100 solubilization at 4 °C, followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, with subsequent analysis of Fas/CD95 death receptor localization in the raft fractions by immunoblotting. This method is also useful to localize additional proteins in membrane rafts.

  11. Aspirin inhibits formation of cholesterol rafts in fluid lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Richard J; Toppozini, Laura; Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Harroun, Thad A; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-03-01

    Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a high affinity for phospholipid membranes, altering their structure and biophysical properties. Aspirin has been shown to partition into the lipid head groups, thereby increasing membrane fluidity. Cholesterol is another well known mediator of membrane fluidity, in turn increasing membrane stiffness. As well, cholesterol is believed to distribute unevenly within lipid membranes leading to the formation of lipid rafts or plaques. In many studies, aspirin has increased positive outcomes for patients with high cholesterol. We are interested if these effects may be, at least partially, the result of a non-specific interaction between aspirin and cholesterol in lipid membranes. We have studied the effect of aspirin on the organization of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) membranes containing cholesterol. Through Langmuir-Blodgett experiments we show that aspirin increases the area per lipid and decreases compressibility at 32.5 mol% cholesterol, leading to a significant increase of fluidity of the membranes. Differential scanning calorimetry provides evidence for the formation of meta-stable structures in the presence of aspirin. The molecular organization of lipids, cholesterol and aspirin was studied using neutron diffraction. While the formation of rafts has been reported in binary DPPC/cholesterol membranes, aspirin was found to locally disrupt membrane organization and lead to the frustration of raft formation. Our results suggest that aspirin is able to directly oppose the formation of cholesterol structures through non-specific interactions with lipid membranes.

  12. Lipid rafts of mouse liver contain nonextended and extended acetylcholinesterase variants along with M3 muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, María Fernanda; Cabezas-Herrera, Juan; Campoy, F Javier; Muñoz-Delgado, Encarnación; Vidal, Cecilio J

    2017-02-01

    The observation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) type H (AChEH), which is the predominant AChE variant in visceral organs and immune cells, in lipid rafts of muscle supports functional reasons for the raft targeting of glypiated AChEH The search for these reasons revealed that liver AChE activity is mostly confined to rafts and that the liver is able to make N-extended AChE variants and target them to rafts. These results prompted us to test whether AChE and muscarinic receptors existed in the same raft. Isolation of flotillin-2-rich raft fractions by their buoyancy in sucrose gradients, followed by immunoadsorption and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry application, gave the following results: 1) most hepatic AChE activity emanates from AChE-H mRNA, and its product, glypiated AChEH, accumulates in rafts; 2) N-extended N-AChE readthrough variant, nonglypiated N-AChEH, and N-AChE tailed variant were all identified in liver rafts; and 3) M3 AChRs were observed in rafts, and coprecipitation of raft-confined N-AChE and M3 receptors by using anti-M3 antibodies showed that enzyme and receptor reside in the same raft unit. A raft domain that harbors tightly packed muscarinic receptor and AChE may represent a molecular device that, by means of which, the intensity and duration of cholinergic inputs are regulated.-Montenegro, M. F., Cabezas-Herrera, J., Campoy, F. J., Muñoz-Delgado, E., Vidal, C. J. Lipid rafts of mouse liver contain nonextended and extended acetylcholinesterase variants along with M3 muscarinic receptors.

  13. Quantitative profiling of brain lipid raft proteome in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska, Magdalena; Castillo, Catherine; Francesconi, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome, a leading cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism, arises from transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene encoding an RNA-binding protein, Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). FMRP can regulate the expression of approximately 4% of brain transcripts through its role in regulation of mRNA transport, stability and translation, thus providing a molecular rationale for its potential pleiotropic effects on neuronal and brain circuitry function. Several intracellular signaling pathways are dysregulated in the absence of FMRP suggesting that cellular deficits may be broad and could result in homeostatic changes. Lipid rafts are specialized regions of the plasma membrane, enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids, involved in regulation of intracellular signaling. Among transcripts targeted by FMRP, a subset encodes proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis and homeostasis, dysregulation of which could affect the integrity and function of lipid rafts. Using a quantitative mass spectrometry-based approach we analyzed the lipid raft proteome of Fmr1 knockout mice, an animal model of Fragile X syndrome, and identified candidate proteins that are differentially represented in Fmr1 knockout mice lipid rafts. Furthermore, network analysis of these candidate proteins reveals connectivity between them and predicts functional connectivity with genes encoding components of myelin sheath, axonal processes and growth cones. Our findings provide insight to aid identification of molecular and cellular dysfunctions arising from Fmr1 silencing and for uncovering shared pathologies between Fragile X syndrome and other autism spectrum disorders.

  14. Lipid rafts both in cellular membrane and viral envelope are critical for PRRSV efficient infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Zhang, Qiong; Tang, Jun; Feng, Wen-Hai

    2015-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) represents a significantly economical challenge to the swine industry worldwide. In this study, we investigated the importance of cellular and viral lipid rafts in PRRSV infection. First, we demonstrated that PRRSV glycoproteins, Gp3 and Gp4, were associated with lipid rafts during viral entry, and disruption of cellular lipid rafts inhibited PRRSV entry. We also showed the raft-location of CD163, which might contribute to the glycoproteins-raft association. Subsequently, raft disruption caused a significant reduction of viral RNA production. Moreover, Nsp9 was shown to be distributed in rafts, suggesting that rafts probably serve as a platform for PRRSV replication. Finally, we confirmed that disassembly of rafts on the virus envelope may affect the integrity of PRRSV particles and cause the leakage of viral proteins, which impaired PRRSV infectivity. These findings might provide insights on our understanding of the mechanism of PRRSV infection.

  15. Isolation and biochemical characterisation of lipid rafts from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) intestinal enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Gylfason, Gudjón Andri; Knútsdóttir, Erna; Asgeirsson, Bjarni

    2010-01-01

    Lipid rafts are glycosphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains that have been extensively studied during the past two decades. Our aim was to isolate and perform biochemical characterization of lipid rafts from the intestinal brush border membrane (BBM) of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) to confirm their existence in a cold-water species and compare their characteristics with lipid rafts from other species in terms of lipid and protein content. To validate the isolation process, we assayed marker enzymes for subcellular organelles, including alkaline phosphatase (AP) and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), both well-known marker enzymes for BBM and lipid rafts. All biochemical methods showed enrichment of AP in both the BBM and lipid raft fractions. Proteomic studies were performed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry using trypsin digested SDS-PAGE samples. Various proteins were associated with the cod intestinal lipid raft preparation such as aminopeptidase-N, prohibitin, and beta-actin. Lipid analysis with (31)P NMR and thin layer chromatography on BBMs and lipid rafts samples gave higher content of sphingomyelin than previously reported in the BBM and lower content of phosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, sphingomyelin was highly dominant in the lipid rafts together with cholesterol. The existence of lipid rafts containing previously reported lipid raft characteristics from the cod intestine has, therefore, been confirmed in a ray-finned fish for the first time to the best of our knowledge.

  16. Lipid rafts and raft-mediated supramolecular entities in the regulation of CD95 death receptor apoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2015-05-01

    Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides that have the property to segregate and concentrate proteins. Lipid and protein composition of lipid rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, thus providing sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction molecules, including CD95 death receptor-mediated signaling. CD95 can be recruited to rafts in a reversible way through S-palmitoylation following activation of cells with its physiological cognate ligand as well as with a wide variety of inducers, including several antitumor drugs through ligand-independent intracellular mechanisms. CD95 translocation to rafts can be modulated pharmacologically, thus becoming a target for the treatment of apoptosis-defective diseases, such as cancer. CD95-mediated signaling largely depends on protein-protein interactions, and the recruitment and concentration of CD95 and distinct downstream apoptotic molecules in membrane raft domains, forming raft-based supramolecular entities that act as hubs for apoptotic signaling molecules, favors the generation and amplification of apoptotic signals. Efficient CD95-mediated apoptosis involves CD95 and raft internalization, as well as the involvement of different subcellular organelles. In this review, we briefly summarize and discuss the involvement of lipid rafts in the regulation of CD95-mediated apoptosis that may provide a new avenue for cancer therapy.

  17. Triton promotes domain formation in lipid raft mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Heerklotz, H

    2002-01-01

    Biological membranes are supposed to contain functional domains (lipid rafts) made up in particular of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, glycolipids, and certain proteins. It is often assumed that the application of the detergent Triton at 4 degrees C allows the isolation of these rafts as a detergent-resistant membrane fraction. The current study aims to clarify whether and how Triton changes the domain properties. To this end, temperature-dependent transitions in vesicles of an equimolar mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, egg sphingomyelin, and cholesterol were monitored at different Triton concentrations by differential scanning calorimetry and pressure perturbation calorimetry. Transitions initiated by the addition of Triton to the lipid mixture were studied by isothermal titration calorimetry, and the structure was investigated by (31)P-NMR. The results are discussed in terms of liquid-disordered (ld) and -ordered (lo) bilayer and micellar (mic) phases, and the typical sequence encountered with increasing Triton content or decreasing temperature is ld, ld + lo, ld + lo + mic, and lo + mic. That means that addition of Triton may create ordered domains in a homogeneous fluid membrane, which are, in turn, Triton resistant upon subsequent membrane solubilization. Hence, detergent-resistant membranes should not be assumed to resemble biological rafts in size, structure, composition, or even existence. Functional rafts may not be steady phenomena; they might form, grow, cluster or break up, shrink, and vanish according to functional requirements, regulated by rather subtle changes in the activity of membrane disordering or ordering compounds. PMID:12414701

  18. Evidence that the respiratory syncytial virus polymerase complex associates with lipid rafts in virus-infected cells: a proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Terence P.; Pitt, Andrew R.; Brown, Gaie; Rixon, Helen W. McL.; Sugrue, Richard J. . E-mail: r.sugrue@vir.gla.ac.uk

    2004-12-05

    The interaction between the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) polymerase complex and lipid rafts was examined in HEp2 cells. Lipid-raft membranes were prepared from virus-infected cells and their protein content was analysed by Western blotting and mass spectrometry. This analysis revealed the presence of the N, P, L, M2-1 and M proteins. However, these proteins appeared to differ from one another in their association with these structures, with the M2-1 protein showing a greater partitioning into raft membranes compared to that of the N, P or M proteins. Determination of the polymerase activity profile of the gradient fractions revealed that 95% of the detectable viral enzyme activity was associated with lipid-raft membranes. Furthermore, analysis of virus-infected cells by confocal microscopy suggested an association between these proteins and the raft-lipid, GM1. Together, these results provide evidence that the RSV polymerase complex is able to associate with lipid rafts in virus-infected cells.

  19. Extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity or lipid raft localization and efflux function of the ABC transporter MRP1

    PubMed Central

    Klappe, Karin; Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Hummel, Ina; vanDam, Annie; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Milne, Stephen B.; Myers, David S.; Brown, H. Alex; Permentier, Hjalmar; Kok, Jan W.

    2013-01-01

    We show that highly efficient depletion of sphingolipids in two different cell lines does not abrogate the ability to isolate Lubrol-based DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes) or detergent-free lipid rafts from these cells. Compared with control, DRM/detergent-free lipid raft fractions contain equal amounts of protein, cholesterol and phospholipid, whereas the classical DRM/lipid raft markers Src, caveolin-1 and flotillin display the same gradient distribution. DRMs/detergent-free lipid rafts themselves are severely depleted of sphingolipids. The fatty acid profile of the remaining sphingolipids as well as that of the glycerophospholipids shows several differences compared with control, most prominently an increase in highly saturated C16 species. The glycerophospholipid headgroup composition is unchanged in sphingolipid-depleted cells and cell-derived detergent-free lipid rafts. Sphingolipid depletion does not alter the localization of MRP1 (multidrug-resistance-related protein 1) in DRMs/detergent-free lipid rafts or MRP1-mediated efflux of carboxyfluorescein. We conclude that extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity in two cell lines and does not affect the function of the lipid-raft-associated protein MRP1. PMID:20604746

  20. Complexity of Lipid Domains and Rafts in Giant Unilamellar Vesicles Revealed by Combining Imaging and Microscopic and Macroscopic Time-Resolved Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Rodrigo F. M.; Borst, JanWillem; Fedorov, Alexander; Prieto, Manuel; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.

    2007-01-01

    The application of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study gel/fluid and raftlike lipid domains in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) is demonstrated here. Different regions of the ternary dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol phase diagram were studied. The head-labeled phospholipid Rhodamine-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (Rhod-DOPE) was used as a fluorescent probe. Gel/fluid and liquid-ordered (lo)/liquid-disordered (ld) phase separation were clearly visualized upon two-photon excitation. Fluorescence intensity decays in different regions of a GUV were also obtained with the microscope in fixed laser-beam configuration. The ensemble behavior of the system was studied by obtaining fluorescence intensity decays of Rhod-DOPE in nongiant vesicle suspensions. The fingerprints for gel/fluid coexistence and for the presence of lo raftlike phase, based on fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy histograms and images, and on the fluorescence intensity decay parameters of Rhod-DOPE, are presented. The presence of three lipid phases in one single GUV is detected unequivocally. From the comparison of lifetime parameters, it can be concluded that the lo phase is formed in the binary dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol but not in the dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol mixture. The domains apparent in fluorescence intensity images have a more complex substructure revealed by analysis of the lifetime data. The potential applications of this combined imaging/microscopic/macroscopic methodology are discussed. PMID:17449668

  1. Amyloid beta-protein and lipid rafts: focused on biogenesis and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Araki, Wataru; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is thought to play a key role in the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three secretases (β-, γ-, and α-secretase) are proteases that control the production of Aβ from amyloid precursor protein. Increasing evidence suggests that cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains termed 'lipid rafts' are involved in the biogenesis and accumulation of Aβ as well as Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity. γ-Secretase is enriched in lipid rafts, which are considered an important site for Aβ generation. Additionally, Aβ-degrading peptidases located in lipid rafts, such as neprilysin, appear to play a role in Aβ catabolism. This mini-review focuses on the roles of lipid rafts in the biogenesis and catabolism of Aβ, covering recent research on the relationship between lipid rafts and the three secretases or Aβ-degrading peptidases. Furthermore, the significance of lipid rafts in Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity is briefly summarized.

  2. Direct evidence of lipid rafts by in situ atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mingjun; Zhao, Weidong; Shang, Xin; Jiang, Junguang; Ji, Hongbin; Tang, Zhiyong; Wang, Hongda

    2012-04-23

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains enriched with cholesterol, glycosphingolipids, and proteins. Although they are broadly presumed to play a pivotal role in various cellular functions, there are still fierce debates about the composition, functions, and even existence of lipid rafts. Here high-resolution and time-lapse in situ atomic force microscopy is used to directly confirm the existence of lipid rafts in native erythrocyte membranes. The results indicate some important aspects of lipid rafts: most of the lipid rafts are in the size range of 100-300 nm and have irregular shape; the detergent-resistant membranes consist of cholesterol microdomains and are not likely the same as the lipid rafts; cholesterol contributes significantly to the formation and stability of the protein domains; and Band III is an important protein of lipid rafts in the inner leaflet of erythrocyte membranes, indicating that lipid rafts are exactly the functional domains in plasma membrane. This work provides direct evidence of the presence, size, and main constitutive protein of lipid rafts at a resolution of a few nanometers, which will pave the way for studying their structure and functions in detail.

  3. Severe alterations in lipid composition of frontal cortex lipid rafts from Parkinson's disease and incidental Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Santpere, Gabriel; Marín, Raquel; Torrent, Laia; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains that provide a highly saturated and viscous physicochemical microenvironment to promote protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. We purified lipid rafts from human frontal cortex from normal, early motor stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) and incidental Parkinson's disease (iPD) subjects and analyzed their lipid composition. We observed that lipid rafts from PD and iPD cortices exhibit dramatic reductions in their contents of n-3 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (22:6-n3) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Also, saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) were significantly higher than in control brains. Paralleling these findings, unsaturation and peroxidability indices were considerably reduced in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Lipid classes were also affected in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Thus, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were increased in PD and iPD, whereas cerebrosides and sulfatides and plasmalogen levels were considerably diminished. Our data pinpoint a dramatic increase in lipid raft order due to the aberrant biochemical structure in PD and iPD and indicate that these abnormalities of lipid rafts in the frontal cortex occur at early stages of PD pathology. The findings correlate with abnormal lipid raft signaling and cognitive decline observed during the development of these neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Studying the role of lipid rafts on protein receptor bindings with cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Haack, Fiete; Burrage, Kevin; Redmer, Ronald; Uhrmacher, Adelinde M

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that lipid rafts promote receptor clustering and thereby facilitate signaling transduction. The role of lipid rafts in inducing and promoting receptor accumulation within the cell membrane has been explored by several computational and experimental studies. However, it remains unclear whether lipid rafts influence the recruitment and binding of proteins from the cytosol as well. To provide an answer to this question a spatial membrane model has been developed based on cellular automata. Our results indicate that lipid rafts indeed influence protein receptor bindings. In particular processes with slow dissociation and binding kinetics are promoted by lipid rafts, whereas fast binding processes are slightly hampered. However, the impact depends on a variety of parameters, such as the size and mobility of the lipid rafts, the induced slow down of receptors within rafts, and also the dissociation and binding kinetics of the cytosolic proteins. Thus, for any individual signaling pathway the influence of lipid rafts on protein binding might be different. To facilitate analyzing this influence given a specific pathway, our approach has been generalized into LiRaM, a modeling and simulation tool for lipid rafts models.

  5. Edelfosine and miltefosine effects on lipid raft properties: membrane biophysics in cell death by antitumor lipids.

    PubMed

    Castro, Bruno M; Fedorov, Aleksander; Hornillos, Valentin; Delgado, Javier; Acuña, A Ulises; Mollinedo, Faustino; Prieto, Manuel

    2013-07-03

    Edelfosine (1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine) and miltefosine (hexadecylphosphocholine) are synthetic alkylphospholipids (ALPs) that are reported to selectively accumulate in tumor cell membranes, inducing Fas clustering and activation on lipid rafts, triggering apoptosis. However, the exact mechanism by which these lipids elicit these events is still not fully understood. Recent studies propose that their mode of action might be related with alterations of lipid rafts biophysical properties caused by these lipid drugs. To achieve a clear understanding of this mechanism, we studied the effects of pharmacologically relevant amounts of edelfosine and miltefosine in the properties of model and cellular membranes. The influence of these molecules on membrane order, lateral organization, and lipid rafts molar fraction and size were studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), confocal and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We found that the global membrane and lipid rafts biophysical properties of both model and cellular membranes were not significantly affected by both the ALPs. Nonetheless, in model membranes, a mild increase in membrane fluidity induced by both alkyl lipids was detected, although this effect was more noticeable for edelfosine than miltefosine. This absence of drastic alterations shows for the first time that ALPs mode of action is unlikely to be directly linked to alterations of lipid rafts biophysical properties caused by these drugs. The biological implications of this result are discussed in the context of ALPs effects on lipid metabolism, mitochondria homeostasis modulation, and their relationship with tumor cell death.

  6. Lipid raft disruption protects mature neurons against amyloid oligomer toxicity.

    PubMed

    Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Contrusciere, Valentina; Raggi, Carla; Fecchi, Katia; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Paradisi, Silvia; Matteucci, Andrea; Santini, Maria Teresa; Sargiacomo, Massimo; Frank, Claudio; Gaudiano, Maria Cristina; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2010-04-01

    A specific neuronal vulnerability to amyloid protein toxicity may account for brain susceptibility to protein misfolding diseases. To investigate this issue, we compared the effects induced by oligomers from salmon calcitonin (sCTOs), a neurotoxic amyloid protein, on cells of different histogenesis: mature and immature primary hippocampal neurons, primary astrocytes, MG63 osteoblasts and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. In mature neurons, sCTOs increased apoptosis and induced neuritic and synaptic damages similar to those caused by amyloid beta oligomers. Immature neurons and the other cell types showed no cytotoxicity. sCTOs caused cytosolic Ca(2+) rise in mature, but not in immature neurons and the other cell types. Comparison of plasma membrane lipid composition showed that mature neurons had the highest content in lipid rafts, suggesting a key role for them in neuronal vulnerability to sCTOs. Consistently, depletion in gangliosides protected against sCTO toxicity. We hypothesize that the high content in lipid rafts makes mature neurons especially vulnerable to amyloid proteins, as compared to other cell types; this may help explain why the brain is a target organ for amyloid-related diseases.

  7. Lipidomics of Candida albicans biofilms reveals phase-dependent production of phospholipid molecular classes and role for lipid rafts in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Lattif, Ali Abdul; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Chandra, Jyotsna; Roth, Mary R; Welti, Ruth; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2011-11-01

    Candida albicans-associated bloodstream infections are linked to the ability of this yeast to form biofilms. In this study, we used lipidomics to compare the lipid profiles of C. albicans biofilms and planktonic cells, in early and mature developmental phases. Our results showed that significant differences exist in lipid composition in both developmental phases. Biofilms contained higher levels of phospholipid and sphingolipids than planktonic cells (nmol per g biomass, P<0.05 for all comparisons). In the early phase, levels of lipid in most classes were significantly higher in biofilms compared to planktonic cells (P≤0.05). The ratio of phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylethanolamine was lower in biofilms compared to planktonic cells in both early (1.17 vs 2.52, P≤0.001) and late (2.34 vs 3.81, P≤0.001) developmental phases. The unsaturation index of phospholipids decreased with time, with this effect being particularly strong for biofilms. Inhibition of the biosynthetic pathway for sphingolipid [mannosyl diinositolphosphoryl ceramide, M(IP)₂C] by myriocin or aureobasidin A, and disruption of the gene encoding inositolphosphotransferase (Ipt1p), abrogated the ability of C. albicans to form biofilms. The differences in lipid profiles between biofilms and planktonic Candida cells may have important implications for the biology and antifungal resistance of biofilms.

  8. Lipid rafts mediate ultraviolet light-induced Fas aggregation in M624 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Elyassaki, Walid; Wu, Shiyong

    2006-01-01

    Ultraviolet light (UV) induces aggregation of Fas-receptor through a Fas-ligand-independent pathway. However, the mechanism of ultraviolet light-induced Fas-receptor aggregation is not known. In this report, we show that lipid rafts mediate ultraviolet light-induced aggregation of Fas. Our data show that UV induces a redistribution of Fas-receptor in a 25-5% Optiprep continuous gradient. The amount of Fas-receptorS is significantly increased in a gradient fraction that contain lipid rafts and is associated with an increase of FADD and caspase-8. Our data also show that the active dimeric form of caspase-8 (p44/p41) is increased in the lipid raft fraction. In addition, our data show that cholesterol, a major component of lipid rafts, is significantly reduced in only the lipid raft fractions after UV-irradiation. However, ceramide, another major lipid raft component, is increased evenly in all gradient fractions after UV-irradiation. These results suggest that UV alters the composition of major lipid raft components, which leads to the recruitment of Fas-receptor and FADD, with subsequent activation of caspase-8. Based on our results, we propose a novel mechanism by which UV induces apoptosis through a membrane lipid raft-mediated signaling pathway.

  9. Dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to fusion competence of myogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Atsushi; Kurisaki, Tomohiro; Sato, Satoshi B.; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kondoh, Gen; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2009-10-15

    Recent research indicates that the leading edge of lamellipodia of myogenic cells (myoblasts and myotubes) contains presumptive fusion sites, yet the mechanisms that render the plasma membrane fusion-competent remain largely unknown. Here we show that dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to both cell adhesion and plasma membrane union during myogenic cell fusion. Adhesion-complex proteins including M-cadherin, {beta}-catenin, and p120-catenin accumulated at the leading edge of lamellipodia, which contains the presumptive fusion sites of the plasma membrane, in a lipid raft-dependent fashion prior to cell contact. In addition, disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depletion directly prevented the membrane union of myogenic cell fusion. Time-lapse recording showed that lipid rafts were laterally dispersed from the center of the lamellipodia prior to membrane fusion. Adhesion proteins that had accumulated at lipid rafts were also removed from the presumptive fusion sites when lipid rafts were laterally dispersed. The resultant lipid raft- and adhesion complex-free area at the leading edge fused with the opposing plasma membrane. These results demonstrate a key role for dynamic clustering/dispersion of lipid rafts in establishing fusion-competent sites of the myogenic cell membrane, providing a novel mechanistic insight into the regulation of myogenic cell fusion.

  10. Lipid raft association restricts CD44-ezrin interaction and promotion of breast cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Donatello, Simona; Babina, Irina S; Hazelwood, Lee D; Hill, Arnold D K; Nabi, Ivan R; Hopkins, Ann M

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration.

  11. NCAM-140 Translocation into Lipid Rafts Mediates the Neuroprotective Effects of GDNF.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Huizhen; Wang, Meng; Chen, Fangfang; Gao, Jin; Sun, Shen; Li, Yunqing; Gao, Dianshuai

    2016-03-22

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor for substantia nigra dopaminergic (DA) neuronal cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that neural cell adhesion molecule functions as a signal transduction receptor for GDNF. The purpose of this study is to reveal whether neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mediates the protective effects of GDNF on DA neuronal cells and further explore the mechanisms involved. We utilized SH-SY5Y cell line to establish a model of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-injured DA neuronal cells. Lentiviral vectors were constructed to knockdown or overexpress NCAM-140, and a density gradient centrifugation method was employed to separate membrane lipid rafts. 3-(4,5-Dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), flow cytometric analysis, and western blotting were used to evaluate the protective effects of GDNF. The results showed that GDNF could protect 6-OHDA-injured SH-SY5Y cells via improving cell viability and decreasing the cell death rate and cleaved caspase-3 expression. NCAM-140 knockdown decreased cell viability and increased the cell death rate and cleaved caspase-3 expression, while its overexpression had the opposite effects. Notably, the amount of NCAM-140 located in lipid rafts increased after GDNF treatment. Pretreatment with 2-bromopalmitate, a specific inhibitor of protein palmitoylation, suppressed NCAM-140 translocation to lipid rafts and reduced the NCAM-mediated protective effects of GDNF on injured DA neuronal cells. Our results suggest that GDNF have the protective effects on injured DA cells by influencing NCAM-140 translocation into lipid rafts.

  12. Tumor exosomes induce tunneling nanotubes in lipid raft-enriched regions of human mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Babatunde, Victor; Dickson, Elizabeth L.; Wong, Phillip; Oh, Sanghoon; Ke, Xu; Barlas, Afsar; Fujisawa, Sho; Romin, Yevgeniy; Moreira, André L.; Downey, Robert J.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Lou, Emil

    2014-04-15

    Tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) are long, non-adherent, actin-based cellular extensions that act as conduits for transport of cellular cargo between connected cells. The mechanisms of nanotube formation and the effects of the tumor microenvironment and cellular signals on TnT formation are unknown. In the present study, we explored exosomes as potential mediators of TnT formation in mesothelioma and the potential relationship of lipid rafts to TnT formation. Mesothelioma cells co-cultured with exogenous mesothelioma-derived exosomes formed more TnTs than cells cultured without exosomes within 24–48 h; and this effect was most prominent in media conditions (low-serum, hyperglycemic medium) that support TnT formation (1.3–1.9-fold difference). Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed the purity of isolated exosomes and revealed that they localized predominantly at the base of and within TnTs, in addition to the extracellular environment. Time-lapse microscopic imaging demonstrated uptake of tumor exosomes by TnTs, which facilitated intercellular transfer of these exosomes between connected cells. Mesothelioma cells connected via TnTs were also significantly enriched for lipid rafts at nearly a 2-fold higher number compared with cells not connected by TnTs. Our findings provide supportive evidence of exosomes as potential chemotactic stimuli for TnT formation, and also lipid raft formation as a potential biomarker for TnT-forming cells. - Highlights: • Exosomes derived from malignant cells can stimulate an increased rate in the formation of tunneling nanotubes. • Tunneling nanotubes can serve as conduits for intercellular transfer of these exosomes. • Most notably, exosomes derived from benign mesothelial cells had no effect on nanotube formation. • Cells forming nanotubes were enriched in lipid rafts at a greater number compared with cells not forming nanotubes. • Our findings suggest causal and potentially synergistic association of exosomes and

  13. The Important Role of Lipid Raft-Mediated Attachment in the Infection of Cultured Cells by Coronavirus Infectious Bronchitis Virus Beaudette Strain

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huichen; Huang, Mei; Yuan, Quan; Wei, Yanquan; Gao, Yuan; Mao, Lejiao; Gu, Lingjun; Tan, Yong Wah; Zhong, Yanxin; Liu, Dingxiang; Sun, Shiqi

    2017-01-01

    Lipid raft is an important element for the cellular entry of some viruses, including coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). However, the exact role of lipid rafts in the cellular membrane during the entry of IBV into host cells is still unknown. In this study, we biochemically fractionated IBV-infected cells via sucrose density gradient centrifugation after depleting plasma membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or Mevastatin. Our results demonstrated that unlike IBV non-structural proteins, IBV structural proteins co-localized with lipid raft marker caveolin-1. Infectivity assay results of Vero cells illustrated that the drug-induced disruption of lipid rafts significantly suppressed IBV infection. Further studies revealed that lipid rafts were not required for IBV genome replication or virion release at later stages. However, the drug-mediated depletion of lipid rafts in Vero cells before IBV attachment significantly reduced the expression of viral structural proteins, suggesting that drug treatment impaired the attachment of IBV to the cell surface. Our results indicated that lipid rafts serve as attachment factors during the early stages of IBV infection, especially during the attachment stage. PMID:28081264

  14. Prion protein accumulation in lipid rafts of mouse aging brain.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrP(C). In old mice, this change favors PrP(C) accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrP(C) translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrP(C) compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrP(C) in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases.

  15. Prion Protein Accumulation in Lipid Rafts of Mouse Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G.; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrPC. In old mice, this change favors PrPC accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrPC translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrPC compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrPC in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases. PMID:24040215

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Lipid Raft-Like Detergent-Resistant Membranes of Lens Fiber Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Plasma membranes of lens fiber cells have high levels of long-chain saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and sphingolipids—key components of lipid rafts. Thus, lipid rafts are expected to constitute a significant portion of fiber cell membranes and play important roles in lens biology. The purpose of this study was to characterize the lens lipid raft proteome. Methods Quantitative proteomics, both label-free and iTRAQ methods, were used to characterize lens fiber cell lipid raft proteins. Detergent-resistant, lipid raft membrane (DRM) fractions were isolated by sucrose gradient centrifugation. To confirm protein localization to lipid rafts, protein sensitivity to cholesterol removal by methyl-β-cyclodextrin was quantified by iTRAQ analysis. Results A total of 506 proteins were identified in raft-like detergent-resistant membranes. Proteins identified support important functions of raft domains in fiber cells, including trafficking, signal transduction, and cytoskeletal organization. In cholesterol-sensitivity studies, 200 proteins were quantified and 71 proteins were strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Lipid raft markers flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 and a significant fraction of AQP0, MP20, and AQP5 were found in the DRM fraction and were highly sensitive to cholesterol removal. Connexins 46 and 50 were more abundant in nonraft fractions, but a small fraction of each was found in the DRM fraction and was strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Quantification of modified AQP0 confirmed that fatty acylation targeted this protein to membrane raft domains. Conclusions These data represent the first comprehensive profile of the lipid raft proteome of lens fiber cells and provide information on membrane protein organization in these cells. PMID:26747763

  17. Lipid rafts regulate cellular CD40 receptor localization in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Min; Wang Qing; Zhu Huilian; Ma Jing; Hou Mengjun; Tang Zhihong; Li Juanjuan; Ling Wenhua

    2007-09-28

    Cholesterol enriched lipid rafts are considered to function as platforms involved in the regulation of membrane receptor signaling complex through the clustering of signaling molecules. In this study, we tested whether these specialized membrane microdomains affect CD40 localization in vitro and in vivo. Here, we provide evidence that upon CD40 ligand stimulation, endogenous and exogenous CD40 receptor is rapidly mobilized into lipid rafts compared with unstimulated HAECs. Efficient binding between CD40L and CD40 receptor also increases amounts of CD40 protein levels in lipid rafts. Deficiency of intracellular conserved C terminus of the CD40 cytoplasmic tail impairs CD40 partitioning in raft. Raft disorganization after methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin treatment diminishes CD40 localization into rafts. In vivo studies show that elevation of circulating cholesterol in high-cholesterol fed rabbits increases the cholesterol content and CD40 receptor localization in lipid rafts. These findings identify a physiological role for membrane lipid rafts as a critical regulator of CD40-mediated signal transduction and raise the possibility that certain pathologic conditions may be treated by altering CD40 signaling with drugs affecting its raft localization.

  18. Monte Carlo study of receptor-lipid raft formation on a cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-Yang, Paul; Srinivas Reddy, A.; Raychaudhuri, Subhadip

    2012-02-01

    Receptors are cell surface molecules that bind with extracellular ligand molecules leading to propagation of downstream signals and cellular activation. Even though ligand binding-induced formation of receptor-lipid rafts has been implicated in such a process, the formation mechanism of such large stable rafts is not understood. We present findings from our Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving (i) receptor interaction with the membrane lipids and (ii) lipid-lipid interactions between raft forming lipids. We have developed a hybrid MC simulation method that combines a probabilistic MC simulation with an explicit free energy-based MC scheme. Some of the lipid-mediated interactions, such as the cholesterol-lipid interactions, are simulated in an implicit way. We examine the effect of varying attractive interactions between raft forming lipids and ligand-bound receptors and show that strong coupling between receptor-receptor and receptor-sphingolipid molecules generate raft formation similar to that observed in recent biological experiments. We study the effect of variation of receptor affinity for ligands (as happens in adaptive immune cells) on raft formation. Such affinity dependence in receptor-lipid raft formation provides insight into important problems in B cell biology.

  19. Modulation of lipid rafts by Omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and cancer: implications for use of lipids during nutrition support.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Rafat A; Harvey, Kevin A; Zaloga, Gary P; Stillwell, William

    2007-02-01

    Current understanding of biologic membrane structure and function is largely based on the concept of lipid rafts. Lipid rafts are composed primarily of tightly packed, liquid-ordered sphingolipids/cholesterol/saturated phospholipids that float in a sea of more unsaturated and loosely packed, liquid-disordered lipids. Lipid rafts have important clinical implications because many important membrane-signaling proteins are located within the raft regions of the membrane, and alterations in raft structure can alter activity of these signaling proteins. Because rafts are lipid-based, their composition, structure, and function are susceptible to manipulation by dietary components such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and by cholesterol depletion. We review how alteration of raft lipids affects the raft/nonraft localization and hence the function of several proteins involved in cell signaling. We focus our discussion of raft-signaling proteins on inflammation and cancer.

  20. Extracellular Signals induce Glycoprotein M6a Clustering of Lipid-rafts and associated Signaling Molecules.

    PubMed

    Honda, Atsuko; Ito, Yasuyuki; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Matsushita, Natsuki; Nozumi, Motohiro; Tabata, Hidenori; Takeuchi, Kosei; Igarashi, Michihiro

    2017-03-08

    Lipid-raft domains, where sphingolipids and cholesterol are enriched, concentrate signaling molecules. To examine how signaling protein complexes are clustered in rafts, we focused on the functions of glycoprotein M6a (GPM6a), which is expressed at a high concentration in developing mouse neurons. Using imaging of lipid-rafts, we found that GPM6a congregated in rafts in a GPM6a palmitoylation-dependent manner, thereby contributing to lipid-raft clustering. Additionally, we found that signaling proteins downstream of GPM6a, i.e., Rufy3, Rap2, and Tiam2/STEF, accumulated in lipid-rafts in a GPM6a-dependent manner, and that they were essential for laminin-dependent polarity during neurite formation in neuronal development. In utero RNAi targeting of GPM6a resulted in abnormally polarized neurons with multiple neurites. These results demonstrate that GPM6a induces the clustering of lipid-rafts, which supports the raft aggregation of its associated downstream molecules for acceleration of neuronal polarity determination. Thus, GPM6a acts as a signal transducer that responds to extracellular signals.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTLipid-raft domains, where sphingolipids and cholesterol are enriched, concentrate signaling molecules. We focused on glycoprotein M6a (GPM6a), which is expressed at a high concentration in developing neurons. Using imaging of lipid-rafts, we found that GPM6a congregated in rafts in a palmitoylation-dependent manner, thereby contributing to lipid-raft clustering. Additionally, we found that signaling proteins downstream of GPM6a accumulated in lipid-rafts in a GPM6a-dependent manner, and that they were essential for laminin-dependent polarity during neurite formation. In utero RNAi targeting of GPM6a resulted in abnormally polarized neurons with multiple neurites. These results demonstrate that GPM6a induces the clustering of lipid-rafts, which supports the raft aggregation of its associated downstream molecules for acceleration of polarity determination

  1. Lipid raft detecting in membranes of live erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mikhalyov, Ilya; Samsonov, Andrey

    2011-07-01

    The fluorescent probe N-(BODIPY(®)-FL-propionyl)-neuraminosyl-GM(1) (BODIPY-GM(1)) was used to detect lipid rafts in living red blood cells (RBCs) membranes. The probe was detected with fluorescence video microscopy and was found to be uniformly distributed along plasma membrane at room temperature (23°C). At 4°C some probe clearly phase-separated to yield detectable bright spots that were smaller than spatial resolution. As measured by spectrofluorometry, in addition to a major fluorescence peak caused by emissions from monomers, the probe exhibited a red-shifted peak that is characteristic of a BODIPY fluorophore at high local concentrations, indicating that some probe had clustered. Red-shifted fluorescence was the greatest at 4°C, intermediate at 23°C, and the smallest at 37°C. Treating the RBCs with methyl-β-cyclodextrin to remove cholesterol eliminated the red-shifted peak. This strongly indicates that the presence of cholesterol was essential for phase separation of the probe. Fluorometry experiments indicate that rafts exist at 23°C and at 37°C, even though the membrane appears to be uniform at the resolution of microscope. The distinct GM(1) patches distributed over entire membrane of the erythrocytes were observed at both 23°C and at 37°C in RBCs stained with Alexa FL 647 cholera toxin subunit B conjugate (CTB-A647 ). Based on both fluorometry and fluorescence microscopy, some rafts clearly exist at 37°C.

  2. Omega-3 fatty acids, lipid rafts, and T cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-08-15

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been shown in many clinical studies to attenuate inflammatory responses. Although inflammatory responses are orchestrated by a wide spectrum of cells, CD4(+) T cells play an important role in the etiology of many chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. In light of recent concerns over the safety profiles of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), alternatives such as bioactive nutraceuticals are becoming more attractive. In order for these agents to be accepted into mainstream medicine, however, the mechanisms by which nutraceuticals such as n-3 PUFA exert their anti-inflammatory effects must be fully elucidated. Lipid rafts are nanoscale, dynamic domains in the plasma membrane that are formed through favorable lipid-lipid (cholesterol, sphingolipids, and saturated fatty acids) and lipid-protein (membrane-actin cytoskeleton) interactions. These domains optimize the clustering of signaling proteins at the membrane to facilitate efficient cell signaling which is required for CD4(+) T cell activation and differentiation. This review summarizes novel emerging data documenting the ability of n-3 PUFA to perturb membrane-cytoskeletal structure and function in CD4(+) T cells. An understanding of these underlying mechanisms will provide a rationale for the use of n-3 PUFA in the treatment of chronic inflammation.

  3. Interaction of hyperlipidemia and reactive oxygen species: Insights from the lipid-raft platform

    PubMed Central

    Amiya, Eisuke

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress are closely associated with the development of atherosclerosis, and the most important regulator of ROS production in endothelial cells is NADPH oxidase. Activation of NADPH oxidase requires the assembly of multiple subunits into lipid rafts, which include specific lipid components, including free cholesterol and specific proteins. Disorders of lipid metabolism such as hyperlipidemia affect the cellular lipid components included in rafts, resulting in modification of cellular reactions that produce ROS. In the similar manner, several pathways associating ROS production are affected by the presence of lipid disorder through raft compartments. In this manuscript, we review the pathophysiological implications of hyperlipidemia and lipid rafts in the production of ROS. PMID:28070236

  4. Role of lipid rafts and GM1 in the segregation and processing of prion protein.

    PubMed

    Botto, Laura; Cunati, Diana; Coco, Silvia; Sesana, Silvia; Bulbarelli, Alessandra; Biasini, Emiliano; Colombo, Laura; Negro, Alessandro; Chiesa, Roberto; Masserini, Massimo; Palestini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrPC) is highly expressed within the nervous system. Similar to other GPI-anchored proteins, PrPC is found in lipid rafts, membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. PrPC raft association, together with raft lipid composition, appears essential for the conversion of PrPC into the scrapie isoform PrPSc, and the development of prion disease. Controversial findings were reported on the nature of PrPC-containing rafts, as well as on the distribution of PrPC between rafts and non-raft membranes. We investigated PrPC/ganglioside relationships and their influence on PrPC localization in a neuronal cellular model, cerebellar granule cells. Our findings argue that in these cells at least two PrPC conformations coexist: in lipid rafts PrPC is present in the native folding (α-helical), stabilized by chemico-physical condition, while it is mainly present in other membrane compartments in a PrPSc-like conformation. We verified, by means of antibody reactivity and circular dichroism spectroscopy, that changes in lipid raft-ganglioside content alters PrPC conformation and interaction with lipid bilayers, without modifying PrPC distribution or cleavage. Our data provide new insights into the cellular mechanism of prion conversion and suggest that GM1-prion protein interaction at the cell surface could play a significant role in the mechanism predisposing to pathology.

  5. Lipid raft-dependent uptake, signaling, and intracellular fate of Porphyromonas gingivalis in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Hajishengallis, George

    2009-01-01

    Summary Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enriched microdomains involved in cellular trafficking and implicated as portals for certain pathogens. We sought to determine whether the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis enters macrophages via lipid rafts, and if so, to examine the impact of raft entry on its intracellular fate. Using J774A.1 mouse macrophages, we found that P. gingivalis colocalizes with lipid rafts in a cholesterol-dependent way. Depletion of cellular cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin resulted in about 50% inhibition of P. gingivalis uptake, although this effect was reversed by cholesterol reconstitution. The intracellular survival of P. gingivalis was dramatically inhibited in cholesterol-depleted cells relative to untreated or cholesterol-reconstituted cells, even when infections were adjusted to allow equilibration of the initial intracellular bacterial load. P. gingivalis thus appeared to exploit raft-mediated uptake for promoting its survival. Consistent with this, lipid raft disruption enhanced the colocalization of internalized P. gingivalis with lysosomes. In contrast, raft disruption did not affect the expression of host receptors interacting with P. gingivalis, although it significantly inhibited signal transduction. In summary, P. gingivalis uses macrophage lipid rafts as signaling and entry platforms, which determine its intracellular fate to the pathogen’s own advantage. PMID:18547335

  6. Procyanidins can interact with Caco-2 cell membrane lipid rafts: involvement of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Sandra V; Jaggers, Grayson K; Fraga, Cesar G; Oteiza, Patricia I

    2013-11-01

    Large procyanidins (more than three subunits) are not absorbed at the gastrointestinal tract but could exert local effects through their interactions with membranes. We previously showed that hexameric procyanidins (Hex), although not entering cells, interact with membranes modulating cell signaling and fate. This paper investigated if Hex, as an example of large procyanidins, can selectively interact with lipid rafts which could in part explain its biological actions. This mechanism was studied in both synthetic membranes (liposomes) and Caco-2 cells. Hex promoted Caco-2 cell membrane rigidification and dehydration, effects that were abolished upon cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD). Hex prevented lipid raft structure disruption induced by cholesterol depletion/redistribution by MCD or sodium deoxycholate. Supporting the involvement of cholesterol-Hex bonding in Hex interaction with lipid rafts, the absence of cholesterol markedly decreased the capacity of Hex to prevent deoxycholate- and Triton X-100-mediated disruption of lipid raft-like liposomes. Stressing the functional relevance of this interaction, Hex mitigated lipid raft-associated activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2. Results support the capacity of a large procyanidin (Hex) to interact with membrane lipid rafts mainly through Hex-cholesterol bondings. Procyanidin-lipid raft interactions can in part explain the capacity of large procyanidins to modulate cell physiology.

  7. Detergent and detergent-free methods to define lipid rafts and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Liu, Xiaoqiu

    2007-01-01

    Lipid rafts and their related membrane vesicular structures, caveolae, are cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich microdomains of the plasma membrane that have attracted considerable interest because of their ability to concentrate numerous signaling proteins. Efforts to define the proteins that reside in lipid rafts and caveolae as well as investigations into the functional role of these microdomains in signaling, endocytosis, and other cellular processes have led to the hypothesis that they compartmentalize or prearrange molecules involved in regulating these pathways. This chapter describes biochemical approaches for defining lipid rafts and caveolae. Included are detergent- and nondetergent-based fractionations on sucrose-density gradients that isolate buoyant lipid rafts and caveolae as well as caveolin antibody-based immunoisolation of detergent-insoluble membranes that selectively isolates caveolae and not lipid rafts. Also, a general method to disrupt lipid rafts and caveolae using beta-cyclodextrin that is useful for probing the role of these microdomains in cellular processes is described. The advantages and disadvantages of the respective approaches are discussed. Taken together, these methods are useful for defining the role of lipid rafts and caveolae in cell signaling.

  8. Raft Formation in Lipid Bilayers Coupled to Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Sina; Müller, Marcus; Vink, Richard L.C.

    2014-01-01

    We present computer simulations of a membrane in which the local composition is coupled to the local membrane curvature. At high temperatures (i.e., above the temperature of macroscopic phase separation), finite-sized transient domains are observed, reminiscent of lipid rafts. The domain size is in the range of hundred nanometers, and set by the membrane elastic properties. These findings are in line with the notion of the membrane as a curvature-induced microemulsion. At low temperature, the membrane phase separates. The transition to the phase-separated regime is continuous and belongs to the two-dimensional Ising universality class when the coupling to curvature is weak, but becomes first-order for strong curvature-composition coupling. PMID:25296311

  9. Evidence for the involvement of lipid rafts localized at the ER-mitochondria associated membranes in autophagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Tina; Matarrese, Paola; Manganelli, Valeria; Marconi, Matteo; Tinari, Antonella; Gambardella, Lucrezia; Faggioni, Alberto; Misasi, Roberta; Sorice, Maurizio; Malorni, Walter

    2016-06-02

    Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) are subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that interact with mitochondria. This membrane scrambling between ER and mitochondria appears to play a critical role in the earliest steps of autophagy. Recently, lipid microdomains, i.e. lipid rafts, have been identified as further actors of the autophagic process. In the present work, a series of biochemical and molecular analyses has been carried out in human fibroblasts with the specific aim of characterizing lipid rafts in MAMs and to decipher their possible implication in the autophagosome formation. In fact, the presence of lipid microdomains in MAMs has been detected and, in these structures, a molecular interaction of the ganglioside GD3, a paradigmatic "brick" of lipid rafts, with core-initiator proteins of autophagy, such as AMBRA1 and WIPI1, was revealed. This association seems thus to take place in the early phases of autophagic process in which MAMs have been hypothesized to play a key role. The functional activity of GD3 was suggested by the experiments carried out by knocking down ST8SIA1 gene expression, i.e., the synthase that leads to the ganglioside formation. This experimental condition results in fact in the impairment of the ER-mitochondria crosstalk and the subsequent hindering of autophagosome nucleation. We thus hypothesize that MAM raft-like microdomains could be pivotal in the initial organelle scrambling activity that finally leads to the formation of autophagosome.

  10. Pentobarbital modifies the lipid raft-protein interaction: A first clue about the anesthesia mechanism on NMDA and GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Valdez, Francisco Javier; Ruiz-Suárez, J C; Delint-Ramirez, Ilse

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that anesthetic agents alter the physical properties of lipid rafts on model membranes. However, if this destabilization occurs in brain membranes, altering the lipid raft-protein interaction, remains unknown. We analyzed the effects produced by pentobarbital (PB) on brain plasma membranes and lipid rafts in vivo. We characterized for the first time the thermotropic behavior of plasma membranes, synaptosomes, and lipid rafts from rat brain. We found that the transition temperature from the ordered gel to disordered liquid phase of lipids is close to physiological temperature. We then studied the effect of PB on protein composition of lipid rafts. Our results show a reduction of the total protein associated to rafts, with a higher reduction of the NMDAR compared to the GABAA receptor. Both receptors are considered the main targets of PB. In general, our results suggest that lipid rafts could be plausible mediators in anesthetic action.

  11. Ginsenoside Rh2 induces ligand-independent Fas activation via lipid raft disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Jae-Sung; Choo, Hyo-Jung; Cho, Bong-Rae; Kim, Hwan-Myung; Kim, Yong-Nyun; Ham, Young-Mi; Ko, Young-Gyu

    2009-07-24

    Lipid rafts are plasma membrane platforms mediating signal transduction pathways for cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Here, we show that membrane fluidity was increased in HeLa cells following treatment with ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2), as determined by cell staining with carboxy-laurdan (C-laurdan), a two-photon dye designed for measuring membrane hydrophobicity. In the presence of Rh2, caveolin-1 appeared in non-raft fractions after sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. In addition, caveolin-1 and GM1, lipid raft landmarkers, were internalized within cells after exposure to Rh2, indicating that Rh2 might disrupt lipid rafts. Since cholesterol overloading, which fortifies lipid rafts, prevented an increase in Rh2-induced membrane fluidity, caveolin-1 internalization and apoptosis, lipid rafts appear to be essential for Rh2-induced apoptosis. Moreover, Rh2-induced Fas oligomerization was abolished following cholesterol overloading, and Rh2-induced apoptosis was inhibited following treatment with siRNA for Fas. This result suggests that Rh2 is a novel lipid raft disruptor leading to Fas oligomerization and apoptosis.

  12. Comparative lipidomics and proteomics analysis of platelet lipid rafts using different detergents.

    PubMed

    Rabani, Vahideh; Davani, Siamak; Gambert-Nicot, Ségolène; Meneveau, Nicolas; Montange, Damien

    2016-11-01

    Lipid rafts play a pivotal role in physiological functions of platelets. Their isolation using nonionic mild detergents is considered as the gold standard method, but there is no consensual detergent for lipid raft studies. We aimed to investigate which detergent is the most suitable for lipid raft isolation from platelet membrane, based on lipidomics and proteomics analysis. Platelets were obtained from healthy donors. Twelve sucrose fractions were extracted by three different detergents, namely Brij 35, Lubrol WX, and Triton X100, at 0.05% and 1%. After lipidomics analysis and determination of fractions enriched in cholesterol (Ch) and sphingomyelin (SM), proteomics analysis was performed. Lipid rafts were mainly observed in 1-4 fractions, and non-rafts were distributed on 5-12 fractions. Considering the concentration of Ch and SM, Lubrol WX 1% and Triton X100 1% were more suitable detergents as they were able to isolate lipid raft fractions that were more enriched than non-raft fractions. By proteomics analysis, overall, 822 proteins were identified in platelet membrane. Lipid raft fractions isolated with Lubrol WX 0.05% and Triton X100 1% contained mainly plasma membrane proteins. However, only Lubrol WX 0.05 and 1% and Triton X100 1% were able to extract non-denaturing proteins with more than 10 transmembrane domains. Our results suggest that Triton X100 1% is the most suitable detergent for global lipid and protein studies on platelet plasma membrane. However, the detergent should be adapted if investigation of an association between specific proteins and lipid rafts is planned.

  13. Selective association of outer surface lipoproteins with the lipid rafts of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Alvaro; Crowley, Jameson T; Coleman, James L; LaRocca, Timothy J; Chiantia, Salvatore; London, Erwin; Benach, Jorge L

    2014-03-11

    Borrelia burgdorferi contains unique cholesterol-glycolipid-rich lipid rafts that are associated with lipoproteins. These complexes suggest the existence of macromolecular structures that have not been reported for prokaryotes. Outer surface lipoproteins OspA, OspB, and OspC were studied for their participation in the formation of lipid rafts. Single-gene deletion mutants with deletions of ospA, ospB, and ospC and a spontaneous gene mutant, strain B313, which does not express OspA and OspB, were used to establish their structural roles in the lipid rafts. All mutant strains used in this study produced detergent-resistant membranes, a common characteristic of lipid rafts, and had similar lipid and protein slot blot profiles. Lipoproteins OspA and OspB but not OspC were shown to be associated with lipid rafts by transmission electron microscopy. When the ability to form lipid rafts in live B. burgdorferi spirochetes was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), strain B313 showed a statistically significant lower level of segregation into ordered and disordered membrane domains than did the wild-type and the other single-deletion mutants. The transformation of a B313 strain with a shuttle plasmid containing ospA restored the phenotype shared by the wild type and the single-deletion mutants, demonstrating that OspA and OspB have redundant functions. In contrast, a transformed B313 overexpressing OspC neither rescued the FRET nor colocalized with the lipid rafts. Because these lipoproteins are expressed at different stages of the life cycle of B. burgdorferi, their selective association is likely to have an important role in the structure of prokaryotic lipid rafts and in the organism's adaptation to changing environments. IMPORTANCE Lipid rafts are cholesterol-rich clusters within the membranes of cells. Lipid rafts contain proteins that have functions in sensing the cell environment and transmitting signals. Although selective proteins are present in

  14. Myo1c regulates lipid raft recycling to control cell spreading, migration and Salmonella invasion.

    PubMed

    Brandstaetter, Hemma; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2012-04-15

    A balance between endocytosis and membrane recycling regulates the composition and dynamics of the plasma membrane. Internalization and recycling of cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts is an actin-dependent process that is mediated by a specialized Arf6-dependent recycling pathway. Here, we identify myosin1c (Myo1c) as the first motor protein that drives the formation of recycling tubules emanating from the perinuclear recycling compartment. We demonstrate that the single-headed Myo1c is a lipid-raft-associated motor protein that is specifically involved in recycling of lipid-raft-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked cargo proteins and their delivery to the cell surface. Whereas Myo1c overexpression increases the levels of these raft proteins at the cell surface, in cells depleted of Myo1c function through RNA interference or overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant, these tubular transport carriers of the recycling pathway are lost and GPI-linked raft markers are trapped in the perinuclear recycling compartment. Intriguingly, Myo1c only selectively promotes delivery of lipid raft membranes back to the cell surface and is not required for recycling of cargo, such as the transferrin receptor, which is mediated by parallel pathways. The profound defect in lipid raft trafficking in Myo1c-knockdown cells has a dramatic impact on cell spreading, cell migration and cholesterol-dependent Salmonella invasion; processes that require lipid raft transport to the cell surface to deliver signaling components and the extra membrane essential for cell surface expansion and remodeling. Thus, Myo1c plays a crucial role in the recycling of lipid raft membrane and proteins that regulate plasma membrane plasticity, cell motility and pathogen entry.

  15. Regulation of the high-affinity choline transporter activity and trafficking by its association with cholesterol-rich lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, Leah K; Winick-Ng, Warren; Rylett, Rebecca Jane

    2014-03-01

    The sodium-coupled, hemicholinium-3-sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is responsible for transport of choline into cholinergic nerve terminals from the synaptic cleft following acetylcholine release and hydrolysis. In this study, we address regulation of CHT function by plasma membrane cholesterol. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in both SH-SY5Y cells and nerve terminals from mouse forebrain. Treatment of SH-SY5Y cells expressing rat CHT with filipin, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβC) or cholesterol oxidase significantly decreased choline uptake. In contrast, CHT activity was increased by addition of cholesterol to membranes using cholesterol-saturated MβC. Kinetic analysis of binding of [(3)H]hemicholinium-3 to CHT revealed that reducing membrane cholesterol with MβC decreased both the apparent binding affinity (KD) and maximum number of binding sites (Bmax ); this was confirmed by decreased plasma membrane CHT protein in lipid rafts in cell surface protein biotinylation assays. Finally, the loss of cell surface CHT associated with lipid raft disruption was not because of changes in CHT internalization. In summary, we provide evidence that CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for transporter function and localization. Alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol cholinergic nerve terminals could diminish cholinergic transmission by reducing choline availability for acetylcholine synthesis. The sodium-coupled choline transporter CHT moves choline into cholinergic nerve terminals to serve as substrate for acetylcholine synthesis. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts, and decreasing membrane cholesterol significantly reduces both choline uptake activity and cell surface CHT protein levels. CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for its function, and alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol could diminish cholinergic

  16. Membrane lipid rafts disturbance in the response of rat skeletal muscle to short-term disuse.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Alexey M; Kravtsova, Violetta V; Matchkov, Vladimir V; Vasiliev, Alexander N; Zefirov, Andrey L; Chibalin, Alexander V; Heiny, Judith A; Krivoi, Igor I

    2017-03-08

    Marked loss of skeletal muscle mass occurs under various conditions of disuse, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to atrophy are not completely understood. We investigate early molecular events which might play a role in skeletal muscle remodeling during mechanical unloading (disuse). The effects of acute (6 - 12 h) hindlimb suspension on the soleus muscles from adult rats were examined. The integrity of plasma membrane lipid rafts was tested utilizing cholera toxin B subunit, or fluorescent sterols. In addition, resting intracellular Ca(2+) level was analyzed. Acute disuse disturbed the plasma membrane lipid-ordered phase throughout the sarcolemma and was more pronounced in junctional membrane regions. Ouabain (1 µM), which specifically inhibits the Na,K-ATPase α2 isozyme in rodent skeletal muscles, produced similar lipid rafts changes in control muscles, but was ineffective in suspended muscles, which show an initial loss of α2 Na,K-ATPase activity. Lipid rafts were able to recover with cholesterol supplementation, suggesting that disturbance results from cholesterol loss. Repetitive nerve stimulation also restores lipid rafts, specifically in junctional sarcolemma region. Disuse locally lowered the resting intracellular Ca(2+) concentration only near the neuromuscular junction of muscle fibers. Our results provide the evidence to suggest that the ordering of lipid rafts strongly depends on motor nerve input and may involve interactions with the α2 Na,K-ATPase. Lipid rafts disturbance, accompanied by intracellular Ca(2+) dysregulation are among the earliest remodeling events induced by skeletal muscle disuse.

  17. The modulation of gap-junctional intercellular communication by lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Defamie, Norah; Mesnil, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Lipid rafts are specific microdomains of plasma membrane which are enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. These domains seem to favour the interactions of particular proteins and the regulation of signalling pathways in the cells. Recent data have shown that among the proteins, which are preferentially localized in lipid rafts, are connexins that are the structural proteins of gap junctions. Since gap junctional intercellular communication is involved in various cellular processes and pathologies such as cancer, we were interested to review the various observations concerning this specific localization of connexins in lipid rafts and its consequences on gap junctional intercellular communication capacity. In particular, we will focus our discussion on the role of the lipid raft-connexin connection in cancer progression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Communicating junctions, composition, structure and characteristics.

  18. Lipid Raft Association Restricts CD44-Ezrin Interaction and Promotion of Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Donatello, Simona; Babina, Irina S.; Hazelwood, Lee D.; Hill, Arnold D.K.; Nabi, Ivan R.; Hopkins, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration. PMID:23031255

  19. Lipid rafts, caveolae, caveolin-1, and entry by Chlamydiae into host cells.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Elizabeth S; Webley, Wilmore C; Norkin, Leonard C

    2003-07-01

    Obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens of the genus Chlamydia are reported to enter host cells by both clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent processes. C. trachomatis serovar K recently was shown to enter cells via caveolae-like lipid raft domains. We asked here how widespread raft-mediated entry might be among the Chlamydia. We show that C. pneumoniae, an important cause of respiratory infections in humans that additionally is associated with cardiovascular disease, and C. psittaci, an important pathogen in domestic mammals and birds that also infects humans, each enter host cells via cholesterol-rich lipid raft microdomains. Further, we show that C. trachomatis serovars E and F also use these domains to enter host cells. The involvement of these membrane domains in the entry of these organisms was indicated by the sensitivity of their entry to the raft-disrupting agents Nystatin and filipin, and by their intracellular association with caveolin-1, a 22-kDa protein associated with the formation of caveolae in rafts. In contrast, caveolin-marked lipid raft domains do not mediate entry of C. trachomatis serovars A, 36B, and C, nor of LGV serovar L2 and MoPn. Finally, we show that entry of each of these chlamydial strains is independent of cellular expression of caveolin-1. Thus, entry via the Nystatin and filipin-sensitive pathway is dependent on lipid rafts containing cholesterol, rather than invaginated caveolae per se.

  20. The shedding activity of ADAM17 is sequestered in lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Tellier, Edwige; Canault, Matthias; Rebsomen, Laure; Bonardo, Bernadette; Juhan-Vague, Irene; Nalbone, Gilles; Peiretti, Franck . E-mail: Franck.Peiretti@medecine.univ-mrs.fr

    2006-12-10

    The tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) converting enzyme (ADAM17) is a metalloprotease-disintegrin responsible for the cleavage of several biologically active transmembrane proteins. However, the substrate specificity of ADAM17 and the regulation of its shedding activity are still poorly understood. Here, we report that during its transport through the Golgi apparatus, ADAM17 is included in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) where its prodomain is cleaved by furin. Consequently, ADAM17 shedding activity is sequestered in lipid rafts, which is confirmed by the fact that metalloproteinase inhibition increases the proportion of ADAM17 substrates (TNF and its receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2) in lipid rafts. Membrane cholesterol depletion increases the ADAM17-dependent shedding of these substrates demonstrating the importance of lipid rafts in the control of this process. Furthermore, ADAM17 substrates are present in different proportions in lipid rafts, suggesting that the entry of each of these substrates in these particular membrane microdomains is specifically regulated. Our data support the idea that one of the mechanisms regulating ADAM17 substrate cleavage involves protein partitioning in lipid rafts.

  1. Involvement of lipid rafts in the budding-like exit of Orientia tsutsugamushi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Mee-Kyung; Kang, Jae-Seung

    2013-10-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi is an intracellular parasite that causes scrub typhus. After entering the cytoplasm by induced phagocytosis, O. tsutsugamushi escapes from the primary phagosome into the host cytosol, where it replicates slowly. Subsequently, it is released from the host cells by a process resembling viral budding with a remaining bacterial aggregate near the nucleus. Lipid rafts have been implicated in the life cycle of a wide variety of pathogenic microorganisms. We have observed that proteins of O. tsutsugamushi were co-fractionated with the lipid rafts over a sucrose density gradient, suggesting the possible involvement of lipid rafts during the intracellular life cycle of O. tsutsugamushi. The entry of O. tsutsugamushi into the host cells was shown to be independent on lipid rafts as judged by the inability of lipid raft-disrupting agents to inhibit bacterial entry and no co-localization of bacterial proteins with caveolin. To our interest, a 47-kDa protein (HtrA) was observed to be co-localized with caveolin at the cell membrane at 72 h after infection, when bacterial particles move to the cell membrane and initiate the exit into the extracellular environment. Our results suggest that O. tsutsugamushi involves lipid rafts of the host cells in the budding-like process to exit from host cells.

  2. Simvastatin Attenuates Astrogliosis after Traumatic Brain Injury through the Modulation of EGFR in Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongtao; Mahmood, Asim; Lu, Dunyue; Jiang, Hao; Xiong, Ye; Zhou, Dong; Chopp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective Our previous studies demonstrated that simvastatin treatment promotes neuronal survival and reduces inflammatory cytokine release from astrocytes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. Since reactive astrocytes produce inflammation mediators, in the current study we investigated the effect of simvastatin on astrocyte activation after TBI and its underlying signaling mechanisms. Methods Saline or simvastatin (1 mg/kg) was orally administered to rats starting at Day 1 after TBI and then daily for 14 days. Rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 7, 14 days after treatment. Brain sections and tissues were prepared for immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis, respectively. Cultured astrocytes were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and followed by immunocytochemical staining with GFAP/caveolin-1 and Western blot analysis. Lipid rafts were isolated from the cell lysate and Western blot was carried out to detect the changes in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and phosphorylation in the lipid rafts. Results Simvastatin significantly promoted neuronal survival after TBI and attenuated activation of astrocytes. Simvastatin modified the caveolin-1 expression in lipid rafts in astrocyte cell membrane, suppressed the phosphorylation of EGFR in lipid rafts of astrocytes after OGD, and inhibited the OGD-induced interleukin-1 (IL-1) production. Conclusions These data suggest that simvastatin reduces reactive astrogliosis and rescues neuronal cells after TBI. These beneficial effects of simvastatin may be mediated by inhibiting astrocyte activation after TBI through modifying the caveolin-1 expression in lipid rafts and the subsequent modulation of EGFR phosphorylation in lipid rafts. PMID:19895202

  3. On ripples and rafts: Curvature induced nanoscale structures in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Friederike; Dolezel, Stefan; Lenz, Olaf; Meinhardt, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    We develop an elastic theory that predicts the spontaneous formation of nanoscale structures in lipid bilayers which locally phase separate between two phases with different spontaneous monolayer curvature. The theory rationalizes in a unified manner the observation of a variety of nanoscale structures in lipid membranes: Rippled states in one-component membranes, lipid rafts in multicomponent membranes. Furthermore, we report on recent observations of rippled states and rafts in simulations of a simple coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers, which are compatible with experimental observations and with our elastic model.

  4. Lipid Rafts Promote trans Fatty Acid-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yao; Liu, Benxin; Deng, Zeyuan; Fan, Yawei; Li, Jing; Li, Hongyan

    2017-01-01

    The effects of two fatty acids, oleic acid (OLA) and elaidic acid (ELA) on normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and non-rafts HUVEC were investigated in this study. The expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and IL-6) were analyzed. Western blot was used to analyze the expression levels of inflammation-related proteins (NF-κB, ERK1/2) and toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The results showed that the levels of nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 were significantly decreased only in non-lipid rafts cells pretreated with trans fatty acid (TFA). The expression of TLR4 in the ELA-treated normal cells was higher than that in non-lipid rafts HUVEC. When the lipid rafts was destroyed by methyl-β-cyclodextrin, the levels of nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and TLR4 were decreased significantly. Therefore, lipid rafts may be involved in TFA induced-inflammation in HUVEC through blocking the inflammatory signal pathway. Lipid rafts might be a platform for specific receptors such as TLR4 for TFA to activate the pro-inflammation on cell membranes.

  5. Sphingomyelin distribution in lipid rafts of artificial monolayer membranes visualized by Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ando, Jun; Kinoshita, Masanao; Cui, Jin; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Fujita, Katsumasa; Murata, Michio; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-04-14

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (chol)-rich domains in cell membranes, called lipid rafts, are thought to have important biological functions related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking. To visualize the distribution of SM in lipid rafts by means of Raman microscopy, we designed and synthesized an SM analog tagged with a Raman-active diyne moiety (diyne-SM). Diyne-SM showed a strong peak in a Raman silent region that is free of interference from intrinsic vibrational modes of lipids and did not appear to alter the properties of SM-containing monolayers. Therefore, we used Raman microscopy to directly visualize the distribution of diyne-SM in raft-mimicking domains formed in SM/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/chol ternary monolayers. Raman images visualized a heterogeneous distribution of diyne-SM, which showed marked variation, even within a single ordered domain. Specifically, diyne-SM was enriched in the central area of raft domains compared with the peripheral area. These results seem incompatible with the generally accepted raft model, in which the raft and nonraft phases show a clear biphasic separation. One of the possible reasons is that gradual changes of SM concentration occur between SM-rich and -poor regions to minimize hydrophobic mismatch. We believe that our technique of hyperspectral Raman imaging of a single lipid monolayer opens the door to quantitative analysis of lipid membranes by providing both chemical information and spatial distribution with high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution.

  6. Sphingomyelin distribution in lipid rafts of artificial monolayer membranes visualized by Raman microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Jun; Kinoshita, Masanao; Cui, Jin; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Fujita, Katsumasa; Murata, Michio; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (chol)-rich domains in cell membranes, called lipid rafts, are thought to have important biological functions related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking. To visualize the distribution of SM in lipid rafts by means of Raman microscopy, we designed and synthesized an SM analog tagged with a Raman-active diyne moiety (diyne-SM). Diyne-SM showed a strong peak in a Raman silent region that is free of interference from intrinsic vibrational modes of lipids and did not appear to alter the properties of SM-containing monolayers. Therefore, we used Raman microscopy to directly visualize the distribution of diyne-SM in raft-mimicking domains formed in SM/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/chol ternary monolayers. Raman images visualized a heterogeneous distribution of diyne-SM, which showed marked variation, even within a single ordered domain. Specifically, diyne-SM was enriched in the central area of raft domains compared with the peripheral area. These results seem incompatible with the generally accepted raft model, in which the raft and nonraft phases show a clear biphasic separation. One of the possible reasons is that gradual changes of SM concentration occur between SM-rich and -poor regions to minimize hydrophobic mismatch. We believe that our technique of hyperspectral Raman imaging of a single lipid monolayer opens the door to quantitative analysis of lipid membranes by providing both chemical information and spatial distribution with high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution. PMID:25825736

  7. Amyloid Oligomer Neurotoxicity, Calcium Dysregulation, and Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Paradisi, Silvia; Matteucci, Andrea; Frank, Claudio; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid proteins constitute a chemically heterogeneous group of proteins, which share some biophysical and biological characteristics, the principal of which are the high propensity to acquire an incorrect folding and the tendency to aggregate. A number of diseases are associated with misfolding and aggregation of proteins, although only in some of them—most notably Alzheimer's disease (AD) and transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs)—a pathogenetic link with misfolded proteins is now widely recognized. Lipid rafts (LRs) have been involved in the pathophysiology of diseases associated with protein misfolding at several levels, including aggregation of misfolded proteins, amyloidogenic processing, and neurotoxicity. Among the pathogenic misfolded proteins, the AD-related protein amyloid β (Aβ) is by far the most studied protein, and a large body of evidence has been gathered on the role played by LRs in Aβ pathogenicity. However, significant amount of data has also been collected for several other amyloid proteins, so that their ability to interact with LRs can be considered an additional, shared feature characterizing the amyloid protein family. In this paper, we will review the evidence on the role of LRs in the neurotoxicity of huntingtin, α-synuclein, prion protein, and calcitonin. PMID:21331330

  8. Lipid rafts in epithelial brush borders: atypical membrane microdomains with specialized functions.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2003-10-31

    Epithelial cells that fulfil high-throughput digestive/absorptive functions, such as small intestinal enterocytes and kidney proximal tubule cells, are endowed with a dense apical brush border. It has long been recognized that the microvillar surface of the brush border is organized in cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains commonly known as lipid rafts. More recent studies indicate that microvillar rafts, in particular those of enterocytes, have some unusual properties in comparison with rafts present on the surface of other cell types. Thus, microvillar rafts are stable rather than transient/dynamic, and their core components include glycolipids and the divalent lectin galectin-4, which together can be isolated as "superrafts", i.e., membrane microdomains resisting solubilization with Triton X-100 at physiological temperature. These glycolipid/lectin-based rafts serve as platforms for recruitment of GPI-linked and transmembrane digestive enzymes, most likely as an economizing effort to secure and prolong their digestive capability at the microvillar surface. However, in addition to microvilli, the brush border surface also consists of membrane invaginations between adjacent microvilli, which are the only part of the apical surface sterically accessible for membrane fusion/budding events. Many of these invaginations appear as pleiomorphic, deep apical tubules that extend up to 0.5-1 microm into the underlying terminal web region. Their sensitivity to methyl-beta-cyclodextrin suggests them to contain cholesterol-dependent lipid rafts of a different type from the glycolipid-based rafts at the microvillar surface. The brush border is thus an example of a complex membrane system that harbours at least two different types of lipid raft microdomains, each suited to fulfil specialized functions. This conclusion is in line with an emerging, more varied view of lipid rafts being pluripotent microdomains capable of adapting in size, shape, and content to

  9. Atomic force microscopy imaging of lipid rafts of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Orsini, F; Cremona, A; Arosio, P; Corsetto, P A; Montorfano, G; Lascialfari, A; Rizzo, A M

    2012-12-01

    Several studies suggest that the plasma membrane is composed of micro-domains of saturated lipids that segregate together to form lipid rafts. Lipid rafts have been operationally defined as cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched membrane micro-domains resistant to solubilization by non-ionic detergents at low temperatures. Here we report a biophysical approach aimed at investigating lipid rafts of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells by coupling an atomic force microscopy (AFM) study to biochemical assays namely Western blotting and high performance thin layer chromatography. Lipid rafts were purified by ultracentrifugation on discontinuous sucrose gradient using extraction with Triton X-100. Biochemical analyses proved that the fractions isolated at the 5% and 30% sucrose interface (fractions 5 and 6) have a higher content of cholesterol, sphingomyelin and flotillin-1 with respect to the other purified fractions. Tapping mode AFM imaging of fraction 5 showed membrane patches whose height corresponds to the one awaited for a single lipid bilayer as well as the presence of micro-domains with lateral dimensions in the order of a few hundreds of nanometers. In addition, an AFM study using specific antibodies suggests the presence, in these micro-domains, of a characteristic marker of lipid rafts, the protein flotillin-1.

  10. Toward atomic force microscopy and mass spectrometry to visualize and identify lipid rafts in plasmodesmata

    PubMed Central

    Naulin, Pamela A.; Alveal, Natalia A.; Barrera, Nelson P.

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell-to-cell communication is mediated by nanopores called plasmodesmata (PDs) which are complex structures comprising plasma membrane (PM), highly packed endoplasmic reticulum and numerous membrane proteins. Although recent advances on proteomics have led to insights into mechanisms of transport, there is still an inadequate characterization of the lipidic composition of the PM where membrane proteins are inserted. It has been postulated that PDs could be formed by lipid rafts, however no structural evidence has shown to visualize and analyse their lipid components. In this perspective article, we discuss proposed experiments to characterize lipid rafts and proteins in the PDs. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and mass spectrometry (MS) of purified PD vesicles it is possible to determine the presence of lipid rafts, specific bound proteins and the lipidomic profile of the PD under physiological conditions and after changing transport permeability. In addition, MS can determine the stoichiometry of intact membrane proteins inserted in lipid rafts. This will give novel insights into the role of membrane proteins and lipid rafts on the PD structure. PMID:24910637

  11. Sphingolipids, Lipid Rafts, and Giardial Encystation: The Show Must Go On.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Tavis L; De Chatterjee, Atasi; Duarte, Trevor; De Leon, Joaquin; Robles-Martinez, Leobarda; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-09-01

    Sphingolipids are sphingosine-based phospholipids, which are present in the plasma and endomembranes of many eukaryotic cells. These lipids are involved in various cellular functions, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, sphingolipid and cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains (also called "lipid rafts") contain a set of proteins and lipids, which take part in the signaling process in response to intra- or extracellular stimuli. Recent findings suggest that sphingolipids, especially glucosylceramide, play a critical role in inducing encystation and maintaining the cyst viability in Giardia. Similarly, the assembly/disassembly of lipid rafts modulates the encystation and cyst production of this ubiquitous enteric parasite. In this review article, we discuss the overall progress in the field and examine whether sphingolipids and lipid rafts can be used as novel targets for designing therapies to control infection by Giardia, which is rampant in developing countries, where children are especially vulnerable.

  12. Arf6 and microtubules in adhesion-dependent trafficking of lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Scott, David W.; Castle, J. David; Casanova, James E.; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Integrin-mediated adhesion regulates Rac1 membrane binding sites within lipid rafts. Detachment of cells from the substratum triggers clearance of rafts from the plasma membrane through caveolin-dependent internalization. The small GTPase Arf6 and microtubules also regulate Rac-dependent cell spreading and migration but the mechanisms are poorly understood. We now show that endocytosis of rafts after detachment requires F-actin, followed by microtubule-dependent trafficking to recycling endosomes (RE). When cells are replated on fibronectin, rafts exit from RE in an Arf6-dependent manner and return to the plasma membrane along microtubules. Both of these steps are required for plasma membrane targeting and activation of Rac1. These data therefore define a novel membrane raft trafficking pathway that is crucial for anchorage-dependent signaling. PMID:18026091

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptors are localized to lipid rafts that contain a balance of inner and outer leaflet lipids: a shotgun lipidomics study.

    PubMed

    Pike, Linda J; Han, Xianlin; Gross, Richard W

    2005-07-22

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor partitions into lipid rafts made using a detergent-free method, but is extracted from low density fractions by Triton X-100. By screening several detergents, we identified Brij 98 as a detergent in which the EGF receptor is retained in detergent-resistant membrane fractions. To identify the difference in lipid composition between those rafts that harbored the EGF receptor (detergent-free and Brij 98-resistant) and those that did not (Triton X-100-resistant), we used multidimensional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to perform a lipidomics study on these three raft preparations. Although all three raft preparations were similarly enriched in cholesterol, the EGF receptor-containing rafts contained more ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and less sphingomyelin than did the non-EGF receptor-containing Triton X-100 rafts. As a result, the detergent-free and Brij 98-resistant rafts exhibited a balance of inner and outer leaflet lipids, whereas the Triton X-100 rafts contained a preponderance of outer leaflet lipids. Furthermore, in all raft preparations, the outer leaflet phospholipid species were significantly different from those in the bulk membrane, whereas the inner leaflet lipids were quite similar to those found in the bulk membrane. These findings indicate that the EGF receptor is retained only in rafts that exhibit a lipid distribution compatible with a bilayer structure and that the selection of phospholipids for inclusion into rafts occurs mainly on the outer leaflet lipids.

  14. Sigma-1 receptors bind cholesterol and remodel lipid rafts in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christopher P; Mahen, Robert; Schnell, Eva; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A; Aydar, Ebru

    2007-12-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane platforms that spatially organize molecules for specific signaling pathways that regulate various cellular functions. Cholesterol is critical for liquid-ordered raft formation by serving as a spacer between the hydrocarbon chains of sphingolipids, and alterations in the cholesterol contents of the plasma membrane causes disruption of rafts. The role that sigma receptors play in cancer is not clear, although it is frequently up-regulated in human cancer cells and tissues and sigma receptors inhibit proliferation in carcinoma and melanoma cell lines, induce apoptosis in colon and mammary carcinoma cell lines, and reduce cellular adhesion in mammary carcinoma cell lines. In this study, we provide molecular and functional evidence for the involvement of the enigmatic sigma 1 receptors in lipid raft modeling by sigma 1 receptor-mediated cholesterol alteration of lipid rafts in breast cancer cell lines. Cholesterol binds to cholesterol recognition domains in the COOH terminus of the sigma 1 receptor. This binding is blocked by sigma receptor drugs because the cholesterol-binding domains form part of the sigma receptor drug-binding site, mutations of which abolish cholesterol binding. Furthermore, we outline a hypothetical functional model to explain the myriad of biological processes, including cancer, in which these mysterious receptors are involved. The findings of this study provide a biological basis for the potential therapeutic applications of lipid raft cholesterol regulation in cancer therapy using sigma receptor drugs.

  15. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V.

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease. PMID:27014089

  16. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease.

  17. Generation of antisera to purified prions in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert; Serban, Ana V; Carlson, George; Prusiner, Stanley B; Stanker, Larry H

    2010-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by prion proteins (PrP). Infectious prions accumulate in the brain through a template-mediated conformational conversion of endogenous PrP(C) into alternately folded PrP(Sc). Immunoassays toward pre-clinical detection of infectious PrP(Sc) have been confounded by low-level prion accumulation in non-neuronal tissue and the lack of PrP(Sc) selective antibodies. We report a method to purify infectious PrP(Sc) from biological tissues for use as an immunogen and sample enrichment for increased immunoassay sensitivity. Significant prion enrichment is accomplished by sucrose gradient centrifugation of infected tissue and isolation with detergent resistant membranes from lipid rafts (DRMs). At equivalent protein concentration a 50-fold increase in detectable PrP(Sc) was observed in DRM fractions relative to crude brain by direct ELISA. Sequential purification steps result in increased specific infectivity (DRM <20-fold and purified DRM immunogen <40-fold) relative to 1% crude brain homogenate. Purification of PrP(Sc) from DRM was accomplished using phosphotungstic acid protein precipitation after proteinase-K (PK) digestion followed by size exclusion chromatography to separate PK and residual protein fragments from larger prion aggregates. Immunization with purified PrP(Sc) antigen was performed using wild-type (wt) and Prnp(0/0) mice, both on Balb/cJ background. A robust immune response against PrP(Sc) was observed in all inoculated Prnp(0/0) mice resulting in antisera containing high-titer antibodies against prion protein. Antisera from these mice recognized both PrP(C) and PrP(Sc), while binding to other brain-derived protein was not observed. In contrast, the PrP(Sc) inoculum was non-immunogenic in wt mice and antisera showed no reactivity with PrP or any other protein.

  18. Generation of antisera to purified prions in lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Hnasko, Robert; Serban, Ana V; Carlson, George; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2010-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by prion proteins (PrP). Infectious prions accumulate in the brain through a template-mediated conformational conversion of endogenous PrPC into alternately folded PrPSc. Immunoassays toward pre-clinical detection of infectious PrPSc have been confounded by low-level prion accumulation in non-neuronal tissue and the lack of PrPSc selective antibodies. We report a method to purify infectious PrPSc from biological tissues for use as an immunogen and sample enrichment for increased immunoassay sensitivity. Significant prion enrichment is accomplished by sucrose gradient centrifugation of infected tissue and isolation with detergent resistant membranes from lipid rafts (DRMs). At equivalent protein concentration a 50-fold increase in detectable PrPSc was observed in DRM fractions relative to crude brain by direct ELISA. Sequential purification steps result in increased specific infectivity (DRM >20-fold and purified DRM immunogen >40-fold) relative to 1% crude brain homogenate. Purification of PrPSc from DRM was accomplished using phosphotungstic acid protein precipitation after proteinase-K (PK) digestion followed by size exclusion chromatography to separate PK and residual protein fragments from larger prion aggregates. Immunization with purified PrPSc antigen was performed using wild-type (wt) and Prnp0/0 mice, both on Balb/cJ background. A robust immune response against PrPSc was observed in all inoculated Prnp0/0 mice resulting in antisera containing high-titer antibodies against prion protein. Antisera from these mice recognized both PrPC and PrPSc, while binding to other brain-derived protein was not observed. In contrast, the PrPSc inoculum was non-immunogenic in wt mice and antisera showed no reactivity with PrP or any other protein. PMID:20647769

  19. Interactive protein network of FXIII-A1 in lipid rafts of activated and non-activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Rabani, Vahideh; Montange, Damien; Davani, Siamak

    2016-09-01

    Lipid-rafts are defined as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids within platelet plasma membrane. Lipid raft-mediated clot retraction requires factor XIII and other interacting proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the proteins that interact with factor XIII in raft and non-raft domains of activated and non-activated platelet plasma membrane. By lipidomics analysis, we identified cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched areas as lipid rafts. Platelets were activated by thrombin. Proteomics analysis provided an overview of the pathways in which proteins of rafts and non-rafts participated in the interaction network of FXIII-A1, a catalytic subunit of FXIII. "Platelet activation" was the principal pathway among KEGG pathways for proteins of rafts, both before and after activation. Network analysis showed four types of interactions (activation, binding, reaction, and catalysis) in raft and non-raft domains in interactive network of FXIII-A1. FXIII-A1 interactions with other proteins in raft domains and their role in homeostasis highlight the specialization of the raft domain in clot retraction via the Factor XIII protein network.

  20. Clathrin to Lipid Raft-Endocytosis via Controlled Surface Chemistry and Efficient Perinuclear Targeting of Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Atanu; Jana, Nikhil R

    2015-09-17

    Nanoparticle interacts with live cells depending on their surface chemistry, enters into cell via endocytosis, and is commonly trafficked to an endosome/lysozome that restricts subcellular targeting options. Here we show that nanoparticle surface chemistry can be tuned to alter their cell uptake mechanism and subcellular trafficking. Quantum dot based nanoprobes of 20-30 nm hydrodynamic diameters have been synthesized with tunable surface charge (between +15 mV to -25 mV) and lipophilicity to influence their cellular uptake processes and subcellular trafficking. It is observed that cationic nanoprobe electrostatically interacts with cell membrane and enters into cell via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. At lower surface charge (between +10 mV to -10 mV), the electrostatic interaction with cell membrane becomes weaker, and additional lipid raft endocytosis is initiated. If a lipophilic functional group is introduced on a weakly anionic nanoparticle surface, the uptake mechanism shifts to predominant lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. In particular, the zwitterionic-lipophilic nanoprobe has the unique advantage as it weakly interacts with anionic cell membrane, migrates toward lipid rafts for interaction through lipophilic functional group, and induces lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. While predominate or partial clathrin-mediated entry traffics most of the nanoprobes to lysozome, predominate lipid raft-mediated entry traffics them to perinuclear region, particularly to the Golgi apparatus. This finding would guide in designing appropriate nanoprobe for subcellular targeting and delivery.

  1. Methods for the study of signaling molecules in membrane lipid rafts and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Insel, Paul A

    2006-01-01

    Lipid rafts and caveolae are cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich microdomains of the plasma membrane that concentrate components of certain signal transduction pathways. Interest in and exploration of these microdomains has grown in recent years, especially after the discovery of the biochemical marker of caveolae, caveolin, and the recognition that caveolin interacts with many different signaling molecules via its scaffolding domain. There are three major types of caveolins (1, 2, and 3), with some selectivity in their expression in different tissues. Results assessing lipid raft/caveolae co-localization of molecules in signal transduction pathways have provided support for the idea that signaling components are compartmentalized or preassembled together. This chapter describes nondetergent- and detergent-based methods for isolating lipid rafts and caveolae for biochemical studies. We also describe a method for immunoisolation (using antibodies to caveolins) of detergent-insoluble membranes that selectively isolates caveolae vs lipid rafts. Together, these methods are useful for assessment of the role of lipid rafts and caveolae in transmembrane signaling.

  2. A novel biotinylated lipid raft reporter for electron microscopic imaging of plasma membrane microdomains[S

    PubMed Central

    Krager, Kimberly J.; Sarkar, Mitul; Twait, Erik C.; Lill, Nancy L.; Koland, John G.

    2012-01-01

    The submicroscopic spatial organization of cell surface receptors and plasma membrane signaling molecules is readily characterized by electron microscopy (EM) via immunogold labeling of plasma membrane sheets. Although various signaling molecules have been seen to segregate within plasma membrane microdomains, the biochemical identity of these microdomains and the factors affecting their formation are largely unknown. Lipid rafts are envisioned as submicron membrane subdomains of liquid ordered structure with differing lipid and protein constituents that define their specific varieties. To facilitate EM investigation of inner leaflet lipid rafts and the localization of membrane proteins therein, a unique genetically encoded reporter with the dually acylated raft-targeting motif of the Lck kinase was developed. This reporter, designated Lck-BAP-GFP, incorporates green fluorescent protein (GFP) and biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) modules, with the latter allowing its single-step labeling with streptavidin-gold. Lck-BAP-GFP was metabolically biotinylated in mammalian cells, distributed into low-density detergent-resistant membrane fractions, and was readily detected with avidin-based reagents. In EM images of plasma membrane sheets, the streptavidin-gold-labeled reporter was clustered in 20–50 nm microdomains, presumably representative of inner leaflet lipid rafts. The utility of the reporter was demonstrated in an investigation of the potential lipid raft localization of the epidermal growth factor receptor. PMID:22822037

  3. A novel biotinylated lipid raft reporter for electron microscopic imaging of plasma membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Krager, Kimberly J; Sarkar, Mitul; Twait, Erik C; Lill, Nancy L; Koland, John G

    2012-10-01

    The submicroscopic spatial organization of cell surface receptors and plasma membrane signaling molecules is readily characterized by electron microscopy (EM) via immunogold labeling of plasma membrane sheets. Although various signaling molecules have been seen to segregate within plasma membrane microdomains, the biochemical identity of these microdomains and the factors affecting their formation are largely unknown. Lipid rafts are envisioned as submicron membrane subdomains of liquid ordered structure with differing lipid and protein constituents that define their specific varieties. To facilitate EM investigation of inner leaflet lipid rafts and the localization of membrane proteins therein, a unique genetically encoded reporter with the dually acylated raft-targeting motif of the Lck kinase was developed. This reporter, designated Lck-BAP-GFP, incorporates green fluorescent protein (GFP) and biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) modules, with the latter allowing its single-step labeling with streptavidin-gold. Lck-BAP-GFP was metabolically biotinylated in mammalian cells, distributed into low-density detergent-resistant membrane fractions, and was readily detected with avidin-based reagents. In EM images of plasma membrane sheets, the streptavidin-gold-labeled reporter was clustered in 20-50 nm microdomains, presumably representative of inner leaflet lipid rafts. The utility of the reporter was demonstrated in an investigation of the potential lipid raft localization of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

  4. Uncoupling Neogenin association with lipid rafts promotes neuronal survival and functional recovery after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shabanzadeh, A P; Tassew, N G; Szydlowska, K; Tymianski, M; Banerjee, P; Vigouroux, R J; Eubanks, J H; Huang, L; Geraerts, M; Koeberle, P D; Mueller, B K; Monnier, P P

    2015-01-01

    The dependence receptor Neogenin and its ligand, the repulsive guidance molecule a (RGMa), regulate apoptosis and axonal growth in the developing and the adult central nervous system (CNS). Here, we show that this pathway has also a critical role in neuronal death following stroke, and that providing RGMa to neurons blocks Neogenin-induced death. Interestingly, the Neogenin pro-death function following ischemic insult depends on Neogenin association with lipid rafts. Thus, a peptide that prevents Neogenin association with lipid rafts increased neuronal survival in several in vitro stroke models. In rats, a pro-survival effect was also observed in a model of ocular ischemia, as well as after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Treatments that prevented Neogenin association with lipid rafts improved neuronal survival and the complexity of the neuronal network following occlusion of the middle artery. Toward the development of a treatment for stroke, we developed a human anti-RGMa antibody that also prevents Neogenin association with lipid rafts. We show that this antibody also protected CNS tissue from ischemic damage and that its application resulted in a significant functional improvement even when administrated 6 h after artery occlusion. Thus, our results draw attention to the role of Neogenin and lipid rafts as potential targets following stroke. PMID:25950474

  5. Effects of acrylonitrile on lymphocyte lipid rafts and RAS/RAF/MAPK/ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, X J; Li, B; Huang, J S; Shi, J M; Wang, P; Fan, W; Zhou, Y L

    2014-09-26

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a widely used chemical in the production of plastics, resins, nitriles, acrylic fibers, and synthetic rubber. Previous epidemiological investigations and animal studies have confirmed that ACN affects the lymphocytes and spleen. However, the immune toxicity mechanism is unknown. Lipid rafts are cell membrane structures that are rich in cholesterol and involved in cell signal transduction. The B cell lymophoma-10 (Bcl10) protein is a joint protein that is important in lymphocyte development and signal pathways. This study was conducted to examine the in vitro effects of ACN. We separated lipid rafts, and analyzed Bcl10 protein and caveolin. Western blotting was used to detect mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphorylated MAPK levels. The results indicated that with increasing ACN concentration, the total amount of Bcl10 remained stable, but was concentrated mainly in part 4 to part 11 in electrophoretic band district which is high density in gradient centrifugation. Caveolin-1 was evaluated as a lipid raft marker protein; caveolin-1 content and position were relatively unchanged. Western blotting showed that in a certain range, MAPK protein was secreted at a higher level. At some ACN exposure levels, MAPK protein secretion was significantly decreased compared to the control group (P < 0.05). These results indicate that ACN can cause immune toxicity by damaging lipid raft structures, causing Bcl10 protein and lipid raft separation and restraining Ras-Raf-MAPK-extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways.

  6. Effect of the structure of lipids favoring disordered domain formation on the stability of cholesterol-containing ordered domains (lipid rafts): identification of multiple raft-stabilization mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bakht, Omar; Pathak, Priyadarshini; London, Erwin

    2007-12-15

    Despite the importance of lipid rafts, commonly defined as liquid-ordered domains rich in cholesterol and in lipids with high gel-to-fluid melting temperatures (T(m)), the rules for raft formation in membranes are not completely understood. Here, a fluorescence-quenching strategy was used to define how lipids with low T(m), which tend to form disordered fluid domains at physiological temperatures, can stabilize ordered domain formation by cholesterol and high-T(m) lipids (either sphingomyelin or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine). In bilayers containing mixtures of low-T(m) phosphatidylcholines, cholesterol, and high-T(m) lipid, the thermal stability of ordered domains decreased with the acyl-chain structure of low-T(m) lipids in the following order: diarachadonyl > diphytanoyl > 1-palmitoyl 2-docosahexenoyl = 1,2 dioleoyl = dimyristoleoyl = 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl (PO). This shows that low-T(m) lipids with two acyl chains having very poor tight-packing propensities can stabilize ordered domain formation by high-T(m) lipids and cholesterol. The effect of headgroup structure was also studied. We found that even in the absence of high-T(m) lipids, mixtures of cholesterol with PO phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) and PO phosphatidylserine (POPS) or with brain PE and brain PS showed a (borderline) tendency to form ordered domains. Because these lipids are abundant in the inner (cytofacial) leaflet of mammalian membranes, this raises the possibility that PE and PS could participate in inner-leaflet raft formation or stabilization. In bilayers containing ternary mixtures of PO lipids, cholesterol, and high-T(m) lipids, the thermal stability of ordered domains decreased with the polar headgroup structure of PO lipids in the order PE > PS > phosphatidylcholine (PC). Analogous experiments using diphytanoyl acyl chain lipids in place of PO acyl chain lipids showed that the stabilization of ordered lipid domains by acyl chain and headgroup structure was not additive. This implies

  7. Lipid rafts, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in the antitumor action of the alkylphospholipid analog edelfosine.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2014-05-01

    The so-called alkylphospholipid analogs (APLs) constitute a family of synthetic antitumor compounds that target cell membranes. The ether phospholipid edelfosine has been considered the long-standing prototype of these antitumor agents and promotes apoptosis in tumor cells by a rather selective way, while sparing normal cells. Increasing evidence suggests that edelfosine-induced apoptosis involves a number of subcellular structures in tumor cells, including plasma membrane lipid rafts, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. Edelfosine has been shown to accumulate in plasma membrane lipid rafts, ER and mitochondria in different tumor cells in a cell type-dependent way. Edelfosine induces apoptosis in several hematopoietic cancer cells by recruiting death receptor and downstream apoptotic signaling molecules into lipid rafts and displacing survival signaling molecules from these membrane domains. However, in vitro and in vivo evidences suggest that edelfosine-induced apoptosis in solid tumor cells is mediated through an ER stress response. Both raft- and ER-mediated proapoptotic responses require a mitochondrial-related step to eventually promote cell death, and overexpression of Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL prevents edelfosine-induced apoptosis. Edelfosine can also interact with mitochondria leading to an increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Edelfosine treatment also induced a redistribution of lipid rafts from the plasma membrane to mitochondria, suggesting a raft-mediated link between plasma membrane and mitochondria. The involvement of lipid rafts, ER and mitochondria in the apoptotic response induced by edelfosine may provide new avenues for targeting cancer cells as well as new opportunities for cancer therapy.

  8. [Cholesterol and lipid rafts in the biological membranes. Role in the release, reception and ion channel functions].

    PubMed

    Petrov, A M; Zefirov, A L

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, membrane protein molecules that form ion channels, transporters, pumps, signaling complexes, machine of exo- and endocytosis is assigned as the main players of the cellular processes. Recently, the findings that indicate the importance of lipids in regulating of cell physiology are accumulated. Attention is attracting to cholesterol molecule because it can directly interact with different proteins and together with sphingolipids to form membrane microdomains (lipid rafts). Many receptors (for neurotransmitters, hormones, growth factors), signaling proteins and proteins involved in vesicular and ion transport are concentrated in the lipid rafts. Changes in stability and structure of rafts cause dramatic cellular dysfunction. In the review the current views on lipid variants that make up the biological membrane, the distribution of cholesterol, the organization and the formation of lipid rafts and caveolae are described. Accent is made on researches that focus on the significance of lipid rafts in the extra- and intracellular signaling, neurotransmitters release, receptor and ion channels function at the excitable cells.

  9. Severe Alterations in Lipid Composition of Frontal Cortex Lipid Rafts from Parkinson’s Disease and Incidental Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Santpere, Gabriel; Marín, Raquel; Torrent, Laia; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains that provide a highly saturated and viscous physicochemical microenvironment to promote protein–lipid and protein–protein interactions. We purified lipid rafts from human frontal cortex from normal, early motor stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and incidental Parkinson’s disease (iPD) subjects and analyzed their lipid composition. We observed that lipid rafts from PD and iPD cortices exhibit dramatic reductions in their contents of n-3 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (22:6-n3) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Also, saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) were significantly higher than in control brains. Paralleling these findings, unsaturation and peroxidability indices were considerably reduced in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Lipid classes were also affected in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Thus, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were increased in PD and iPD, whereas cerebrosides and sulfatides and plasmalogen levels were considerably diminished. Our data pinpoint a dramatic increase in lipid raft order due to the aberrant biochemical structure in PD and iPD and indicate that these abnormalities of lipid rafts in the frontal cortex occur at early stages of PD pathology. The findings correlate with abnormal lipid raft signaling and cognitive decline observed during the development of these neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:21717034

  10. Cold induces micro- and nano-scale reorganization of lipid raft markers at mounds of T-cell membrane fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Qin, Jie; Cai, Jiye; Chen, Zheng W

    2009-01-01

    Whether and how cold causes changes in cell-membrane or lipid rafts remain poorly characterized. Using the NSOM/QD and confocal imaging systems, we found that cold caused microscale redistribution of lipid raft markers, GM1 for lipid and CD59 for protein, from the peripheral part of microdomains to the central part on Jurkat T cells, and that cold also induced the nanoscale size-enlargement (1/3- to 2/3-fold) of the nanoclusters of lipid raft markers and even the colocalization of GM1 and CD59 nanoclusters. These findings indicate cold-induced lateral rearrangement/coalescence of raft-related membrane heterogeneity. The cold-induced re-distribution of lipid raft markers under a nearly-natural condition provide clues for their alternations, and help to propose a model in which raft lipids associate themselves or interact with protein components to generate functional membrane heterogeneity in response to stimulus. The data also underscore the possible cold-induced artifacts in early-described cold-related experiments and the detergent-resistance-based analyses of lipid rafts at 4 degrees C, and provide a biophysical explanation for recently-reported cold-induced activation of signaling pathways in T cells. Importantly, our fluorescence-topographic NSOM imaging demonstrated that GM1/CD59 raft markers distributed and re-distributed at mounds but not depressions of T-cell membrane fluctuations. Such mound-top distribution of lipid raft markers or lipid rafts provides spatial advantage for lipid rafts or contact molecules interacting readily with neighboring cells or free molecules.

  11. Signalling of the BCR is regulated by a lipid rafts-localised transcription factor, Bright

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Christian; Kim, Dongkyoon; Ippolito, Gregory C; Naqvi, Hassan R; Probst, Loren; Mathur, Shawn; Rosas-Acosta, German; Wilson, Van G; Oldham, Athenia L; Poenie, Martin; Webb, Carol F; Tucker, Philip W

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of BCR signalling strength is crucial for B-cell development and function. Bright is a B-cell-restricted factor that complexes with Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) and its substrate, transcription initiation factor-I (TFII-I), to activate immunoglobulin heavy chain gene transcription in the nucleus. Here we show that a palmitoylated pool of Bright is diverted to lipid rafts of resting B cells where it associates with signalosome components. After BCR ligation, Bright transiently interacts with sumoylation enzymes, blocks calcium flux and phosphorylation of Btk and TFII-I and is then discharged from lipid rafts as a Sumo-I-modified form. The resulting lipid raft concentration of Bright contributes to the signalling threshold of B cells, as their sensitivity to BCR stimulation decreases as the levels of Bright increase. Bright regulates signalling independent of its role in IgH transcription, as shown by specific dominant-negative titration of rafts-specific forms. This study identifies a BCR tuning mechanism in lipid rafts that is regulated by differential post-translational modification of a transcription factor with implications for B-cell tolerance and autoimmunity. PMID:19214191

  12. Lipid Raft-Mediated Regulation of Hyaluronan–CD44 Interactions in Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a major component of the extracellular matrix and plays pivotal roles in inflammation and cancer. Hyaluronan oligomers are frequently found in these pathological conditions, in which they exert their effects via association with the transmembrane receptor CD44. Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains that may regulate membrane receptors while serving as platforms for transmembrane signaling at the cell surface. This article focuses on the recent discovery that lipid rafts regulate the interaction between CD44 and hyaluronan, which depends largely on hyaluronan’s size. Lipid rafts regulate CD44’s ability to bind hyaluronan in T cells, control the rolling adhesion of lymphocytes on vascular endothelial cells, and regulate hyaluronan- and CD44-mediated cancer cell migration. The implications of these findings for preventing inflammatory disorders and cancer are also discussed. PMID:26347743

  13. Association of γ-Secretase with Lipid Rafts in Post-Golgi and Endosome Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Vetrivel, Kulandaivelu S.; Cheng, Haipeng; Lin, William; Sakurai, Takashi; Li, Tong; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Wong, Philip C.; Xu, Huaxi; Thinakaran, Gopal

    2005-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease-associated β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) are generated by the sequential proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. There is growing evidence that cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich membrane microdomains are involved in regulating trafficking and processing of APP. BACE1, the major γ-secretase in neurons is a palmi-toylated transmembrane protein that resides in lipid rafts. A subset of APP is subject to amyloidogenic processing by BACE1 in lipid rafts, and this process depends on the integrity of lipid rafts. Here we describe the association of all four components of the γ-secretase complex, namely presenilin 1 (PS1)-derived fragments, mature nicastrin, APH-1, and PEN-2, with cholesterol-rich detergent insoluble membrane (DIM) domains of non-neuronal cells and neurons that fulfill the criteria of lipid rafts. In PS1−/−/PS2−/− and NCT−/− fibroblasts, γ-secretase components that still remain fail to become detergent-resistant, suggesting that raft association requires γ-secretase complex assembly. Biochemical evidence shows that subunits of the γ-secretase complex and three TGN/endosome-resident SNAREs cofractionate in sucrose density gradients, and show similar solubility or insolubility characteristics in distinct non-ionic and zwitterionic detergents, indicative of their co-residence in membrane microdomains with similar protein-lipid composition. This notion is confirmed using magnetic immunoisolation of PS1- or syntaxin 6-positive membrane patches from a mixture of membranes with similar buoyant densities following Lubrol WX extraction or sonication, and gradient centrifugation. These findings are consistent with the localization of γ-secretase in lipid raft microdomains of post-Golgi and endosomes, organelles previously implicated in amyloidogenic processing of APP. PMID:15322084

  14. A role for lipid rafts in the protection afforded by docosahexaenoic acid against ethanol toxicity in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Aliche-Djoudi, Fatiha; Podechard, Normand; Collin, Aurore; Chevanne, Martine; Provost, Emilie; Poul, Martine; Le Hégarat, Ludovic; Catheline, Daniel; Legrand, Philippe; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Sergent, Odile

    2013-10-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid enhanced ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death in primary rat hepatocytes via an increase in membrane fluidity and lipid raft clustering. In this context, another n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), was tested with a special emphasis on physical and chemical alteration of lipid rafts. Pretreatment of hepatocytes with DHA reduced significantly ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death. DHA protection could be related to an alteration of lipid rafts. Indeed, rafts exhibited a marked increase in membrane fluidity and packing defects leading to the exclusion of a raft protein marker, flotillin. Furthermore, DHA strongly inhibited disulfide bridge formation, even in control cells, thus suggesting a disruption of protein-protein interactions inside lipid rafts. This particular spatial organization of lipid rafts due to DHA subsequently prevented the ethanol-induced lipid raft clustering. Such a prevention was then responsible for the inhibition of phospholipase C-γ translocation into rafts, and consequently of both lysosome accumulation and elevation in cellular low-molecular-weight iron content, a prooxidant factor. In total, the present study suggests that DHA supplementation could represent a new preventive approach for patients with alcoholic liver disease based upon modulation of the membrane structures.

  15. Functional Proteomic Analysis of Lipid Raft Kinase Complexes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    IPI00329352 NOMO1 Nodal modulator 1 precursor Non-raft 4 49/1222 – 1.0 1.5 0.7 2 3 0.7 0 0 0.0 519 + + + IPI00304596 NONO Non-POU domain-containing...octamer-binding protein Non-raft 3 43/471 + + + 1.5 0.0 5.0 3 0 10.0 0 0 0.0 IPI00304596 NONO Non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein Raft 8...interacting protein 1 4.7 : 0.7 + + + IPI00012048 NME1 Nucleoside diphosphate kinase A + + + IPI00304596 NONO Non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding

  16. Altered lipid composition in cortical lipid rafts occurs at early stages of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and facilitates APP/BACE1 interactions.

    PubMed

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Marín, Raquel; Moreno, Dolores; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2014-08-01

    The presence of lipid alterations in lipid rafts from the frontal cortex in late stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been recently demonstrated. Here, we have isolated and analyzed the lipid composition of lipid rafts from different brain areas from control and AD subjects at initial neuropathologic stages. We have observed that frontal cortex lipid rafts are profoundly altered in AD brains from the earliest stages of AD, namely AD I/II. These changes in the lipid matrix of lipid rafts affected both lipid classes and fatty acids and were also detected in the entorhinal cortex, but not in the cerebellum from the same subjects. Paralleling these changes, lipid rafts from AD frontal and entorhinal cortices displayed higher anisotropy for environment-sensitive probes, indicating that lipid changes in AD lipid rafts increased membrane order and viscosity in these domains. The pathophysiological consequences of these alterations in the development and progression of AD were strengthened by the significant, and specific, accumulation of β-secretase within the lipid rafts of AD subjects even at the earliest stages. Our results provide a mechanistic connection between lipid alterations in these microdomains and amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein.

  17. Dynamical Clustering and a Mechanism for Raft-like Structures in a Model Lipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Francis W.; Hartmann, Benedikt; Douglas, Jack F.

    2014-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the dynamical heterogeneity of a model single-component lipid membrane using a coarse-grained representation of lipid molecules. This model qualitatively reproduces the known phase transitions between disordered, ordered, and gel membrane phases, and the phase transitions are accompanied by significant changes in the nature of the lipid dynamics. In particular, lipid diffusion in the liquid-ordered phase is hindered by the transient trapping of molecules by their neighbors, similar to the dynamics of a liquid approaching its glass transition. This transient molecular caging gives rise to two distinct mobility groups within a single-component membrane: lipids that are transiently trapped, and lipids with displacements on the scale of the intermolecular spacing. Most significantly, lipids within these distinct mobility states spatially segregate, creating transient “islands” of enhanced mobility having a size and time scale compatible with lipidrafts,” dynamical structures thought to be important for cell membrane function. Although the dynamic lipid clusters that we observe do not themselves correspond to rafts (which are more complex, multicomponent structures), we hypothesize that such rafts may develop from the same universal mechanism, explaining why raft-like regions should arise, regardless of lipid structural or compositional details. These clusters are strikingly similar to the dynamical clusters found in glass-forming fluids, and distinct from phase-separation clusters. Further examination shows that mobile lipid clusters can be dissected into smaller clusters of cooperatively rearranging molecules. The geometry of these clusters can be understood in the context of branched equilibrium polymers, related to the statistics percolation theory. We discuss how these dynamical structures relate to a range observations on the dynamics of lipid membranes. PMID:24695573

  18. Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface upon lipid raft fluidization.

    PubMed

    Orihashi, Kaoru; Tojo, Hiromasa; Okawa, Katsuya; Tashima, Yuko; Morita, Takashi; Kondoh, Gen

    2012-03-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) is well known as a biotransformation enzyme for prodrugs and xenobiotics. Here, we purified CES as a GPI-anchored protein (GPI-AP)-releasing factor (GPIase) that releases such protein from the cell surface. All five isoforms of CES showed this activity to various degrees. When the serine residue of the catalytic triad for esterase was replaced by alanine, esterase activity was completely disrupted, while full GPIase activity remained, suggesting that these two activities are exhibited via different mechanisms. CES6, a new class of mammalian CES, exhibited the highest GPIase activity and released specific GPI-APs from the cell surface after lipid raft fluidization. The released product contained a GPI component, indicating that GPI-AP was released by cleavage in GPI. These results revealed for the first time that CES recognizes and catalyzes macromolecule GPI-AP as well as small molecules.

  19. Lipid rafts are required for signal transduction by angiotensin II receptor type 1 in neonatal glomerular mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adebiyi, Adebowale Soni, Hitesh; John, Theresa A.; Yang, Fen

    2014-05-15

    Angiotensin II (ANG-II) receptors (AGTRs) contribute to renal physiology and pathophysiology, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate AGTR function in glomerular mesangium are poorly understood. Here, we show that AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal pig glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Cyclodextrin (CDX)-mediated cholesterol depletion attenuated cell surface AGTR1 protein expression and ANG-II-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) elevation in the cells. The COOH-terminus of porcine AGTR1 contains a caveolin (CAV)-binding motif. However, neonatal GMCs express CAV-1, but not CAV-2 and CAV-3. Colocalization and in situ proximity ligation assay detected an association between endogenous AGTR1 and CAV-1 in the cells. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CAV-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) sequence also reduced ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in the cells. Real-time imaging of cell growth revealed that ANG-II stimulates neonatal GMC proliferation. ANG-II-induced GMC growth was attenuated by EMD 66684, an AGTR1 antagonist; BAPTA, a [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} chelator; KN-93, a Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor; CDX; and a CSD peptide, but not PD 123319, a selective AGTR2 antagonist. Collectively, our data demonstrate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent proliferative effect of ANG-II and highlight a critical role for lipid raft microdomains in AGTR1-mediated signal transduction in neonatal GMCs. - Highlights: • AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal mesangial cells. • Endogenous AGTR1 associates with CAV-1 in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption attenuates cell surface AGTR1 protein expression. • Lipid raft disruption reduces ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption inhibits ANG-II-induced neonatal mesangial cell growth.

  20. Functional characterization of the Aspergillus nidulans glucosylceramide pathway reveals that LCB Δ8-desaturation and C9-methylation are relevant to filamentous growth, lipid raft localization and Psd1 defensin activity.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, C M; de Castro, P A; Singh, A; Fonseca, F L; Pereira, M D; Vila, T V M; Atella, G C; Rozental, S; Savoldi, M; Del Poeta, M; Goldman, G H; Kurtenbach, E

    2016-11-01

    C8-desaturated and C9-methylated glucosylceramide (GlcCer) is a fungal-specific sphingolipid that plays an important role in the growth and virulence of many species. In this work, we investigated the contribution of Aspergillus nidulans sphingolipid Δ8-desaturase (SdeA), sphingolipid C9-methyltransferases (SmtA/SmtB) and glucosylceramide synthase (GcsA) to fungal phenotypes, sensitivity to Psd1 defensin and Galleria mellonella virulence. We showed that ΔsdeA accumulated C8-saturated and unmethylated GlcCer, while gcsA deletion impaired GlcCer synthesis. Although increased levels of unmethylated GlcCer were observed in smtA and smtB mutants, ΔsmtA and wild-type cells showed a similar 9,Me-GlcCer content, reduced by 50% in the smtB disruptant. The compromised 9,Me-GlcCer production in the ΔsmtB strain was not accompanied by reduced filamentation or defects in cell polarity. When combined with the smtA deletion, smtB repression significantly increased unmethylated GlcCer levels and compromised filamentous growth. Furthermore, sdeA and gcsA mutants displayed growth defects and raft mislocalization, which were accompanied by reduced neutral lipids levels and attenuated G. mellonella virulence in the ΔgcsA strain. Finally, ΔsdeA and ΔgcsA showed increased resistance to Psd1, suggesting that GlcCer synthesis and fungal sphingoid base structure specificities are relevant not only to differentiation but also to proper recognition by this antifungal defensin.

  1. Dynamical Clustering and the Origin of Raft-like Structures in a Model Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Francis

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the dynamical heterogeneity of a model single-component lipid membrane using simulations of a coarse-grained representation of lipid molecules. In the liquid-ordered (LO) phase, lipid diffusion is hindered by the transient trapping of molecules by their neighbors, giving rise to two distinct mobility groups: low-mobility lipids which are temporarily ``caged'', and lipids with displacements on the scale of the intermolecular spacing. The lipid molecules within these distinct mobility states cluster, giving rise to transient ``islands'' of enhanced mobility having the size and time scale expected for lipid ``rafts''. These clusters are strikingly similar to the dynamical clusters found in glass-forming fluids, and distinct from phase-separation clusters. Such dynamic heterogeneity is ubiquitous in disordered condensed-phase systems. Thus, we hypothesize that rafts may originate from this universal mechanism, explaining why raft-like regions should arise, regardless of lipid structural or compositional details. This perspective provides a new approach to understand membrane transport.

  2. Epigenetic DNA-methylation regulation of genes coding for lipid raft-associated components: a role for raft proteins in cell transformation and cancer progression (review).

    PubMed

    Patra, Samir K; Bettuzzi, Saverio

    2007-06-01

    Metastatic progression is the cause of most cancer deaths. Host tumour cell separation (fission) is accompanied by simultaneous acquisition of migrating capability of cancer cells, remodeling of cellular architecture and effective 'homing' in body host environment. Cell remodeling involves cytoskeletal protein-protein and lipid-protein interaction together with altered signaling. Alteration of signaling in tumour cells may affect expression of many genes also by DNA-methylation/demethylation. This would alter the steady-state intracellular level of structural proteins or metabolic enzymes, and notably enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of lipids, affecting the composition of membranes. Lipid rafts are small, heterogeneous, highly dynamic, sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched domains that compartmentalize cellular processes. Small rafts can be stabilized to form larger platforms through protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. Lipid rafts play an important role in intracellular protein transport, membrane fusion and trans-cytosis, also being platforms for cell surface antigens and adhesion molecules which are crucial for cell activation, polarization and signaling. Detachment of individual tumour cells from the host tumour lump requires lipid-protein-lipid raft (LPLR) reordering. Lipid rafts are also involved in angiogenesis and local invasion, which occurs within the host tumour vicinity by exchange of enzymes, cytokines and motility factors that modify the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). Many cell surface adhesion, ECM, and signaling proteins (such as E-cadherin, catenin, CD44, MMP-9 and caveolin-1) are known to be absent or reduced following gene promoter-CpG-island hypermethylation in mid-stage growing tumours, but re-expressed (by gene promoter-mCpG-DNA demethylation) in carcinomas such as metastasized lung, prostate and sarcomas. The recent research acquisitions on lipid rafts have tremendous implications in understanding the genetic and

  3. Ethanol alters cellular activation and CD14 partitioning in lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Qun; Zhang Jun; Pruett, Stephen B. . E-mail: spruet@lsuhsc.edu

    2005-06-24

    Alcohol consumption interferes with innate immunity. In vivo EtOH administration suppresses cytokine responses induced through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and inhibits TLR4 signaling. Actually, EtOH exhibits a generalized suppressive effect on signaling and cytokine responses induced by through most TLRs. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. RAW264.7 cells were treated with LPS or co-treated with EtOH or with lipid raft-disrupting drugs. TNF-{alpha} production, IRAK-1 activation, and CD14 partition were evaluated. EtOH or nystatin, a lipid raft-disrupting drug, suppressed LPS-induced production of TNF-{alpha}. The suppressive effect of EtOH on LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} production was additive with that of methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (MCD), another lipid raft-disrupting drug. EtOH interfered with IRAK-1 activation, an early TLR4 intracellular signaling event. Cell fractionation analyses show that acute EtOH altered LPS-related partition of CD14, a critical component of the LPS receptor complex. These results suggest a novel mechanism of EtOH action that involves interference with lipid raft clustering induced by LPS. This membrane action of EtOH might be one of the mechanisms by which EtOH acts as a generalized suppressor for TLR signaling.

  4. Probing Lipid Membrane Rafts (Microdomains) with Fluorescent Phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Mitchel, Drake

    2011-10-01

    Membrane rafts are enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, they exist in a more ordered state (the liquid-ordered phase; lo) than the bulk membrane (the liquid-disordered phase; ld). Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form membrane rafts over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes, NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions into the lo phase, and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions into the ld phase, to detect these two phases. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the size and stability of POPC/SPM/Chol membrane rafts. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of two fluorescent probes. Data were acquired via frequency-domain measurements from 5 to 250 MHz.

  5. Juvenile-onset loss of lipid-raft domains in attractin-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Azouz, Abdallah; Gunn, Teresa M.; Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S. . E-mail: Jonathan_Duke-Cohan@dfci.harvard.edu

    2007-02-15

    Mutations at the attractin (Atrn) locus in mice result in altered pigmentation on an agouti background, higher basal metabolic rate and juvenile-onset hypomyelination leading to neurodegeneration, while studies on human immune cells indicate a chemotaxis regulatory function. The underlying biochemical defect remains elusive. In this report we identify a role for attractin in plasma membrane maintenance. In attractin's absence there is a decline in plasma membrane glycolipid-enriched rafts from normal levels at 8 weeks to a complete absence by 24 weeks. The structural integrity of lipid rafts depends upon cholesterol and sphingomyelin, and can be identified by partitioning within of ganglioside GM{sub 1}. Despite a significant fall in cellular cholesterol with maturity, and a lesser fall in both membrane and total cellular GM{sub 1}, these parameters lag behind raft loss, and are normal when hypomyelination/neurodegeneration has already begun thus supporting consequence rather than cause. These findings can be recapitulated in Atrn-deficient cell lines propagated in vitro. Further, signal transduction through complex membrane receptor assemblies is not grossly disturbed despite the complete absence of lipid rafts. We find these results compatible with a role for attractin in plasma membrane maintenance and consistent with the proposal that the juvenile-onset hypomyelination and neurodegeneration represent a defect in attractin-mediated raft-dependent myelin biogenesis.

  6. Kinetic disruption of lipid rafts is a mechanosensor for phospholipase D

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, E. Nicholas; Chung, Hae-Won; Nayebosadri, Arman; Hansen, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    The sensing of physical force, mechanosensation, underlies two of five human senses—touch and hearing. How transduction of force in a membrane occurs remains unclear. We asked if a biological membrane could employ kinetic energy to transduce a signal absent tension. Here we show that lipid rafts are dynamic compartments that inactivate the signalling enzyme phospholipase D2 (PLD2) by sequestering the enzyme from its substrate. Mechanical disruption of the lipid rafts activates PLD2 by mixing the enzyme with its substrate to produce the signalling lipid phosphatidic acid (PA). We calculate a latency time of <650 μs for PLD activation by mixing. Our results establish a fast, non-tension mechanism for mechanotransduction where disruption of ordered lipids initiates a mechanosensitive signal for cell growth through mechanical mixing. PMID:27976674

  7. Formation and aggregation of lipid rafts in γδ T cells following stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

    PubMed

    Lü, He-Zuo; Zhu, An-You; Chen, Yong; Tang, Jie; Li, Bai-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are plasma membrane microdomains that are implicated in diverse signaling pathways in immune cells. Based on the distinct types of T-cell receptors, two T-cell subpopulations have been identified: αβ and γδ T cells. In humans, γδ T cells represent a relatively rare T lymphocyte population but play a critical role in the immune response to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It has been demonstrated that Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens (Mtb-Ag) preferentially activate γδ T cells. Thus, we investigated whether lipid rafts are involved in the Mtb-Ag-mediated activation of γδ T cells. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with Mtb-Ag, and expression of a lipid raft marker ganglioside GM1 (GM1) was determined by flow cytometry. The aggregation of lipid rafts was evaluated by laser confocal microscopy. Non-stimulated fresh PBMCs minimally expressed GM1 (6.55 ± 2.01%) and had no aggregated rafts in γδ T cells. Mtb-Ag stimulation gradually increased the expression of GM1 in a time-dependent manner. At 72 h, the majority of γδ T cells expressed GM1 (88.69 ± 7.55%). Furthermore, accompanied with the increased expression of GM1, aggregation of lipid rafts became gradually visible in γδ T cells. The aggregated rafts, however, were not evenly distributed and only occurred over a small portion of GM1-positive cells. Pretreatment with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, a cholesterol-depleting reagent, completely inhibited the Mtb-Ag-mediated aggregation of lipid rafts. These results demonstrate that lipid raft aggregation occurs in Mtb-Ag-activated γδ T cells, suggesting that lipid rafts are involved in activation of γδ T cells.

  8. The synaptic recruitment of lipid rafts is dependent on CD19-PI3K module and cytoskeleton remodeling molecules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liling; Auzins, Arturs; Sun, Xiaolin; Xu, Yinsheng; Harnischfeger, Fiona; Lu, Yun; Li, Zhanguo; Chen, Ying-Hua; Zheng, Wenjie; Liu, Wanli

    2015-08-01

    Sphingolipid- and cholesterol-rich lipid raft microdomains are important in the initiation of BCR signaling. Although it is known that lipid rafts promote the coclustering of BCR and Lyn kinase microclusters within the B cell IS, the molecular mechanism of the recruitment of lipid rafts into the B cell IS is not understood completely. Here, we report that the synaptic recruitment of lipid rafts is dependent on the cytoskeleton-remodeling proteins, RhoA and Vav. Such an event is also efficiently regulated by motor proteins, myosin IIA and dynein. Further evidence suggests the synaptic recruitment of lipid rafts is, by principle, an event triggered by BCR signaling molecules and second messenger molecules. BCR-activating coreceptor CD19 potently enhances such an event depending on its cytoplasmic Tyr421 and Tyr482 residues. The enhancing function of the CD19-PI3K module in synaptic recruitment of lipid rafts is also confirmed in human peripheral blood B cells. Thus, these results improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of the recruitment of lipid raft microdomains in B cell IS.

  9. Evidence for the presence of functional lipid rafts in immune cells of ectothermic organisms.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, Erick; Grayfer, Leon; Stafford, James L; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2012-06-01

    The role of lipid rafts in non-mammalian leukocytes has been scarcely investigated. We performed biochemical and functional analysis of lipid rafts in fish leukocytes. Fish Flotillin-1 and a fish GM1-like molecule (fGM1-L) were found in low density detergent-resistant membranes (LD-DRM) in goldfish macrophages and catfish B lymphocytes, similarly to mammals. The presence of flotillin-1 and fGM1-L in LD-DRM was sensitive to increased detergent concentrations, and cholesterol extraction. Confocal microscopy analysis of flotillin-1 and fGM1-L in fish leukocytes showed a distinctive punctuated staining pattern, suggestive of pre-existing rafts. Confocal microscopy analysis of macrophages showed that the membrane of phagosomes containing serum-opsonized zymosan was enriched in fGM1-L, and zymosan phagocytosis was reduced after cholesterol extraction. The presence of flotillin-1 and fGM1-L in LD-DRM, the microscopic evidence of flotillin-1 and fGM1-L on fish macrophages and B-cells, and the sensitivity of phagocytosis to cholesterol extraction, indicate that lipid rafts are biochemically and functionally similar in leukocytes from fish and mammals.

  10. Cholesterol accumulation in Niemann Pick type C (NPC) model cells causes a shift in APP localization to lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Kosicek, Marko; Malnar, Martina; Goate, Alison; Hecimovic, Silva

    2010-03-12

    It has been suggested that cholesterol may modulate amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) formation, a causative factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), by regulating distribution of the three key proteins in the pathogenesis of AD ({beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP), {beta}-secretase (BACE1) and/or presenilin 1 (PS1)) within lipid rafts. In this work we tested whether cholesterol accumulation upon NPC1 dysfunction, which causes Niemann Pick type C disease (NPC), causes increased partitioning of APP into lipid rafts leading to increased CTF/A{beta} formation in these cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. To test this we used CHO NPC1{sup -/-} cells (NPC cells) and parental CHOwt cells. By sucrose density gradient centrifugation we observed a shift in fl-APP/CTF compartmentalization into lipid raft fractions upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC vs. wt cells. Furthermore, {gamma}-secretase inhibitor treatment significantly increased fl-APP/CTF distribution in raft fractions in NPC vs. wt cells, suggesting that upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC1-null cells increased formation of APP-CTF and its increased processing towards A{beta} occurs in lipid rafts. Our results support that cholesterol overload, such as in NPC disease, leads to increased partitioning of APP/CTF into lipid rafts resulting in increased amyloidogenic processing of APP in these cholesterol-rich membranes. This work adds to the mechanism of the cholesterol-effect on APP processing and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and supports the role of lipid rafts in these processes.

  11. Transport mechanisms in Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes: lipid rafts and a tubovesicular network.

    PubMed

    Haldar, K; Samuel, B U; Mohandas, N; Harrison, T; Hiller, N L

    2001-10-01

    The mature human erythrocyte is a simple cell that is devoid of intracellular organelles and does not show endocytic or phagocytic activity at the plasma membrane. However, following infection by Plasmodium, the erythrocyte undergoes several morphological and functional changes. Parasite-derived proteins are exported into the erythrocyte cytoplasm and to the membrane, while several proteins are localised to the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane and to the tubovesicular membranous network structures surrounding the parasite. Recent evidence indicates that multiple host proteins, independent of the type of their membrane anchor, that exist in detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) rafts or microdomains enter this apicomplexan vacuole. The internalised host components along with the parasite-encoded transmembrane protein PfEXP1 can be detected as DRM rafts in the vacuole. It appears that in Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes lipid rafts may play a role in endovacuolation and macromolecular transport.

  12. Hypoxia reduces the efficiency of elisidepsin by inhibiting hydroxylation and altering the structure of lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Király, Anna; Váradi, Tímea; Hajdu, Tímea; Rühl, Ralph; Galmarini, Carlos M; Szöllősi, János; Nagy, Peter

    2013-12-02

    The mechanism of action of elisidepsin (PM02734, Irvalec®) is assumed to involve membrane permeabilization via attacking lipid rafts and hydroxylated lipids. Here we investigate the role of hypoxia in the mechanism of action of elisidepsin. Culturing under hypoxic conditions increased the half-maximal inhibitory concentration and decreased the drug's binding to almost all cell lines which was reversed by incubation of cells with 2-hydroxy palmitic acid. The expression of fatty acid 2-hydroxylase was strongly correlated with the efficiency of the drug and inversely correlated with the effect of hypoxia. Number and brightness analysis and fluorescence anisotropy experiments showed that hypoxia decreased the clustering of lipid rafts and altered the structure of the plasma membrane. Although the binding of elisidepsin to the membrane is non-cooperative, its membrane permeabilizing effect is characterized by a Hill coefficient of ~3.3. The latter finding is in agreement with elisidepsin-induced clusters of lipid raft-anchored GFP visualized by confocal microscopy. We propose that the concentration of elisidepsin needs to reach a critical level in the membrane above which elisidepsin induces the disruption of the cell membrane. Testing for tumor hypoxia or the density of hydroxylated lipids could be an interesting strategy to increase the efficiency of elisidepsin.

  13. Drug uptake, lipid rafts, and vesicle trafficking modulate resistance to an anticancer lysophosphatidylcholine analogue in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Marbán, Álvaro; Botet, Javier; Czyz, Ola; Cacharro, Luis M; Gajate, Consuelo; Hornillos, Valentín; Delgado, Javier; Zhang, Hui; Amat-Guerri, Francisco; Acuña, A Ulises; McMaster, Christopher R; Revuelta, José Luis; Zaremberg, Vanina; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2013-03-22

    The ether-phospholipid edelfosine, a prototype antitumor lipid (ATL), kills yeast cells and selectively kills several cancer cell types. To gain insight into its mechanism of action, we performed chemogenomic screens in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene-deletion strain collection, identifying edelfosine-resistant mutants. LEM3, AGP2, and DOC1 genes were required for drug uptake. Edelfosine displaced the essential proton pump Pma1p from rafts, inducing its internalization into the vacuole. Additional ATLs, including miltefosine and perifosine, also displaced Pma1p from rafts to the vacuole, suggesting that this process is a major hallmark of ATL cytotoxicity in yeast. Radioactive and synthetic fluorescent edelfosine analogues accumulated in yeast plasma membrane rafts and subsequently the endoplasmic reticulum. Although both edelfosine and Pma1p were initially located at membrane rafts, internalization of the drug toward endoplasmic reticulum and Pma1p to the vacuole followed different routes. Drug internalization was not dependent on endocytosis and was not critical for yeast cytotoxicity. However, mutants affecting endocytosis, vesicle sorting, or trafficking to the vacuole, including the retromer and ESCRT complexes, prevented Pma1p internalization and were edelfosine-resistant. Our data suggest that edelfosine-induced cytotoxicity involves raft reorganization and retromer- and ESCRT-mediated vesicular transport and degradation of essential raft proteins leading to cell death. Cytotoxicity of ATLs is mainly dependent on the changes they induce in plasma membrane raft-located proteins that lead to their internalization and subsequent degradation. Edelfosine toxicity can be circumvented by inactivating genes that then result in the recycling of internalized cell-surface proteins back to the plasma membrane.

  14. Structures and dynamics of glycosphingolipid-containing lipid mixtures as raft models of plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, M.; Koizumi, M.; Hirai, H.; Hayakawa, T.; Yuyama, K.; Suzuki, N.; Kasahara, K.

    2005-08-01

    The structure and function of mammalian plasma membrane microdomains, so-called rafts, are among the hot topics in cell biology, since it is suggested that these domains are involved in important membrane-associated events, especially ones such as signal transduction, which were frequently seen in physiological and immunological studies. In spite of the accumulation of large amounts of evidence, results on physical properties of the structure and dynamics of membranes such as those in intact cells are less abundant. In this report we treat the structure and dynamics of glycosphingolipid (ganglioside)-cholesterol and glycosphingolipid (ganglioside)-cholesterol-phospholipid mixtures used as models of rafts and plasma membranes. The present results clearly show that the incorporation of cholesterol with ganglioside aggregates is limited to a maximum miscibility of the molar ratio between the ganglioside and cholesterol ranging from ~1/1 to 1/3 and that small vesicles with diameters of about 250-300 Å form. These molar ratios and sizes agree well with the reported constituent ratio and minimum size for the rafts. In the vesicle systems containing ganglioside, cholesterol, and phospholipid (PC, DSPC, DOPC, POPC), the bending modulus tends to take the smallest value at the molar ratio of [gang]/[chol]/[phospholipid] = 0.1/0.1/1. The present results would strongly support a functional physical property of the raft model: sphingolipids and cholesterol clustering to form rafts that move within the fluid lipid bilayer.

  15. Role of the lipid rafts in the life cycle of canine coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Annamaria; Colao, Valeriana

    2015-02-01

    Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that have evolved complex relationships with their host cells, and modulate their lipid composition, lipid synthesis and signalling. Lipid rafts, enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol and associated proteins, are special plasma membrane microdomains involved in several processes in viral infections. The extraction of cholesterol leads to disorganization of lipid microdomains and to dissociation of proteins bound to lipid rafts. Because cholesterol-rich microdomains appear to be a general feature of the entry mechanism of non-eneveloped viruses and of several coronaviruses, the purpose of this study was to analyse the contribution of lipids to the infectivity of canine coronavirus (CCoV). The CCoV life cycle is closely connected to plasma membrane cholesterol, from cell entry to viral particle production. The methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) was employed to remove cholesterol and to disrupt the lipid rafts. Cholesterol depletion from the cell membrane resulted in a dose-dependent reduction, but not abolishment, of virus infectivity, and at a concentration of 15 mM, the reduction in the infection rate was about 68 %. MβCD treatment was used to verify if cholesterol in the envelope was required for CCoV infection. This resulted in a dose-dependent inhibitory effect, and at a concentration of 9 mM MβCD, infectivity was reduced by about 73 %. Since viral entry would constitute a target for antiviral strategies, inhibitory molecules interacting with viral and/or cell membranes, or interfering with lipid metabolism, may have strong antiviral potential. It will be interesting in the future to analyse the membrane microdomains in the CCoV envelope.

  16. GM1 improves neurofascin155 association with lipid rafts and prevents rat brain myelin injury after hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y P; Huang, Q L; Zhao, C M; Tang, J L; Wang, Y L

    2011-06-01

    White matter injury characterized by damage to myelin is an important process in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). Because the oligodendrocyte-specific isoform of neurofascin, neurofascin 155 (NF155), and its association with lipid rafts are essential for the establishment and stabilization of the paranodal junction, which is required for tight interaction between myelin and axons, we analyzed the effect of monosialotetrahexosyl ganglioside (GM1) on NF155 expression and its association with lipid rafts after HIBD in Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 12-15 g, on day 7 post-partum (P7; N = 20 per group). HIBD was induced on P7 and the rats were divided into two groups: one group received an intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg GM1 three times and the other group an injection of saline. There was also a group of 20 sham-operated rats. After sacrifice, the brains of the rats were removed on P30 and studied by immunochemistry, SDS-PAGE, Western blot analysis, and electron microscopy. Staining showed that the saline group had definite rarefaction and fragmentation of brain myelin sheaths, whereas the GM1 group had no obvious structural changes. The GM1 group had 1.9-2.9-fold more GM1 in lipid rafts than the saline group (fraction 3-6; all P < 0.05) and 0.5-2.4-fold higher expression of NF155 in lipid rafts (fraction 3-5; all P < 0.05). Injection of GM1 increased the content of GM1 in lipid rafts as well as NF155 expression and its lipid raft association in HIBD rat brains. GM1 may repair the structure of lipid rafts, promote the association of NF155 (or other important proteins) with lipid rafts, stabilize the structure of paranodes, and eventually prevent myelin sheath damage, suggesting a novel mechanism for its neuroprotective properties.

  17. Compartmentalization of endocannabinoids into lipid rafts in a microglial cell line devoid of caveorrlin-1

    PubMed Central

    Rimmerman, Neta; Bradshaw, Heather B; Kozela, Ewa; Levy, Rivka; Juknat, Ana; Vogel, Zvi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE N-acyl ethanolamines (NAEs) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) are endogenous cannabinoids and along with related lipids are synthesized on demand from membrane phospholipids. Here, we have studied the compartmentalization of NAEs and 2-AG into lipid raft fractions isolated from the caveolin-1-lacking microglial cell line BV-2, following vehicle or cannabidiol (CBD) treatment. Results were compared with those from the caveolin-1-positive F-11 cell line. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH BV-2 cells were incubated with CBD or vehicle. Cells were fractionated using a detergent-free continuous OptiPrep density gradient. Lipids in fractions were quantified using HPLC/MS/MS. Proteins were measured using Western blot. KEY RESULTS BV-2 cells were devoid of caveolin-1. Lipid rafts were isolated from BV-2 cells as confirmed by co-localization with flotillin-1 and sphingomyelin. Small amounts of cannabinoid CB1 receptors were found in lipid raft fractions. After incubation with CBD, levels and distribution in lipid rafts of 2-AG, N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (AEA), and N-oleoyl ethanolamine (OEA) were not changed. Conversely, the levels of the saturated N-stearoyl ethanolamine (SEA) and N-palmitoyl ethanolamine (PEA) were elevated in lipid raft fractions. In whole cells with growth medium, CBD treatment increased AEA and OEA time-dependently, while levels of 2-AG, PEA and SEA did not change. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Whereas levels of 2-AG were not affected by CBD treatment, the distribution and levels of NAEs showed significant changes. Among the NAEs, the degree of acyl chain saturation predicted the compartmentalization after CBD treatment suggesting a shift in cell signalling activity. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-8. To view Part I of Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine visit http://dx.doi.org/10

  18. Complex and Multidimensional Lipid Raft Alterations in a Murine Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Wayne; Brenneman, Randall; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Various animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been created to assist our appreciation of AD pathophysiology, as well as aid development of novel therapeutic strategies. Despite the discovery of mutated proteins that predict the development of AD, there are likely to be many other proteins also involved in this disorder. Complex physiological processes are mediated by coherent interactions of clusters of functionally related proteins. Synaptic dysfunction is one of the hallmarks of AD. Synaptic proteins are organized into multiprotein complexes in high-density membrane structures, known as lipid rafts. These microdomains enable coherent clustering of synergistic signaling proteins. We have used mass analytical techniques and multiple bioinformatic approaches to better appreciate the intricate interactions of these multifunctional proteins in the 3xTgAD murine model of AD. Our results show that there are significant alterations in numerous receptor/cell signaling proteins in cortical lipid rafts isolated from 3xTgAD mice. PMID:21151659

  19. Disruption of Lipid Rafts Interferes with the Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Karla Dias; Cruz, Thayana Araújo; Veras de Moraes, Gabriela; Paredes-Santos, Tatiana Christina; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii can penetrate any warm-blooded animal cell. Conserved molecular assemblies of host cell plasma membranes should be involved in the parasite-host cell recognition. Lipid rafts are well-conserved membrane microdomains that contain high concentrations of cholesterol, sphingolipids, glycosylphosphatidylinositol, GPI-anchored proteins, and dually acylated proteins such as members of the Src family of tyrosine kinases. Disturbing lipid rafts of mouse peritoneal macrophages and epithelial cells of the lineage LLC-MK2 with methyl-beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) and filipin, which interfere with cholesterol or lidocaine, significantly inhibited internalization of T. gondii in both cell types, although adhesion remained unaffected in macrophages and decreased only in LLC-MK2 cells. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed these observations. Results are discussed in terms of the original role of macrophages as professional phagocytes versus the LLC-MK2 cell lineage originated from kidney epithelial cells. PMID:24734239

  20. CD45 phosphatase is crucial for human and murine acute myeloid leukemia maintenance through its localization in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Saint-Paul, Laetitia; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Buffière, Anne; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Hammann, Arlette; Landras-Guetta, Corinne; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; Johnson, Pauline; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent; Quéré, Ronan

    2016-10-04

    CD45 is a pan-leukocyte protein with tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the regulation of signal transduction in hematopoiesis. Exploiting CD45 KO mice and lentiviral shRNA, we prove the crucial role that CD45 plays in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and maintenance. We discovered that CD45 does not colocalize with lipid rafts on murine and human non-transformed hematopoietic cells. Using a mouse model, we proved that CD45 positioning within lipid rafts is modified during their oncogenic transformation to AML. CD45 colocalized with lipid rafts on AML cells, which contributes to elevated GM-CSF signal intensity involved in proliferation of leukemic cells. We furthermore proved that the GM-CSF/Lyn/Stat3 pathway that contributes to growth of leukemic cells could be profoundly affected, by using a new plasma membrane disrupting agent, which rapidly delocalized CD45 away from lipid rafts. We provide evidence that this mechanism is also effective on human primary AML samples and xenograft transplantation. In conclusion, this study highlights the emerging evidence of the involvement of lipid rafts in oncogenic development of AML and the targeting of CD45 positioning among lipid rafts as a new strategy in the treatment of AML.

  1. HIV-1 Vpu's lipid raft association is dispensable for counteraction of the particle release restriction imposed by CD317/Tetherin

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Joeelle V. Tibroni, Nadine Keppler, Oliver T. Fackler, Oliver T.

    2012-03-01

    HIV-1 Vpu antagonizes the block to particle release mediated by CD317 (BST-2/HM1.24/Tetherin) via incompletely understood mechanisms. Vpu and CD317 partially reside in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts where HIV-1 budding preferentially occurs. Here we find that lipid raft association of ectopically expressed or endogenous CD317 was unaltered upon co-expression with Vpu or following HIV-1 infection. Similarly, Vpu's lipid raft association remained unchanged upon expression of CD317. We identify amino acids V25 and Y29 of Vpu as crucial for microdomain partitioning and single substitution of these amino acids resulted in Vpu variants with markedly reduced or undetectable lipid raft association. These mutations did not affect Vpu's subcellular distribution and binding capacity to CD317, nor its ability to downmodulate cell surface CD317 and promote HIV-1 release from CD317-positive cells. We conclude that (i) lipid raft incorporation is dispensable for Vpu-mediated CD317 antagonism and (ii) Vpu does not antagonize CD317 by extraction from lipid rafts.

  2. The stromal cell-surface protease fibroblast activation protein-α localizes to lipid rafts and is recruited to invadopodia.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Julia D; Tholen, Stefan; Koczorowska, Maria M; De Wever, Olivier; Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAPα) is a cell surface protease expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts in the microenvironment of most solid tumors. As there is increasing evidence for proteases having non-catalytic functions, we determined the FAPα interactome in cancer-associated fibroblasts using the quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown (QUICK) method. Complex formation with adenosin deaminase, erlin-2, stomatin, prohibitin, Thy-1 membrane glycoprotein, and caveolin-1 was further validated by immunoblotting. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of the known stoichiometric FAPα binding partner dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV) corroborated the proteomic strategy. Reverse co-IPs validated the FAPα interaction with caveolin-1, erlin-2, and stomatin while co-IP upon RNA-interference mediated knock-down of DPPIV excluded adenosin deaminase as a direct FAPα interaction partner. Many newly identified FAPα interaction partners localize to lipid rafts, including caveolin-1, a widely-used marker for lipid raft localization. We hypothesized that this indicates a recruitment of FAPα to lipid raft structures. In density gradient centrifugation, FAPα co-fractionates with caveolin-1. Immunofluorescence optical sectioning microscopy of FAPα and lipid raft markers further corroborates recruitment of FAPα to lipid rafts and invadopodia. FAPα is therefore an integral component of stromal lipid rafts in solid tumors. In essence, we provide one of the first interactome analyses of a cell surface protease and translate these results into novel biological aspects of a marker protein for cancer-associated fibroblasts.

  3. Alterations in cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Ke; Tan, Liang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Cao, Yun-Peng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the protein, cholesterol, and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), and identify potential blood biomarkers of the disease. A total of 31 Chinese patients with AD and 31 aged-matched control subjects were selected. Lipid rafts were isolated from platelets using Optiprep gradient centrifugation. The protein content of lipid rafts was evaluated using Micro BCA assay, the cholesterol content using molecular probes, ganglioside GM1 content using colorimetry and dot-blotting analysis. The results showed that the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from platelets was significantly higher in patients with AD than aged-matched control subjects, whereas the protein content of lipid rafts did not show any differences between the 2 groups. These results indicate that the increases in the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from the platelets of patients with AD might serve as a biochemical adjunct to the clinical diagnosis of AD.

  4. CD45 phosphatase is crucial for human and murine acute myeloid leukemia maintenance through its localization in lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Paul, Laetitia; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Buffière, Anne; de Barros, Jean-Paul Pais; Hammann, Arlette; Landras-Guetta, Corinne; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; Johnson, Pauline; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent; Quéré, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    CD45 is a pan-leukocyte protein with tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the regulation of signal transduction in hematopoiesis. Exploiting CD45 KO mice and lentiviral shRNA, we prove the crucial role that CD45 plays in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and maintenance. We discovered that CD45 does not colocalize with lipid rafts on murine and human non-transformed hematopoietic cells. Using a mouse model, we proved that CD45 positioning within lipid rafts is modified during their oncogenic transformation to AML. CD45 colocalized with lipid rafts on AML cells, which contributes to elevated GM-CSF signal intensity involved in proliferation of leukemic cells. We furthermore proved that the GM-CSF/Lyn/Stat3 pathway that contributes to growth of leukemic cells could be profoundly affected, by using a new plasma membrane disrupting agent, which rapidly delocalized CD45 away from lipid rafts. We provide evidence that this mechanism is also effective on human primary AML samples and xenograft transplantation. In conclusion, this study highlights the emerging evidence of the involvement of lipid rafts in oncogenic development of AML and the targeting of CD45 positioning among lipid rafts as a new strategy in the treatment of AML. PMID:27579617

  5. Lipid rafts mediate the interaction between myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) on myelin and MAG-receptors on neurons.

    PubMed

    Vinson, Mary; Rausch, Oliver; Maycox, Peter R; Prinjha, Rab K; Chapman, Debra; Morrow, Rachel; Harper, Alex J; Dingwall, Colin; Walsh, Frank S; Burbidge, Stephen A; Riddell, David R

    2003-03-01

    The interaction between myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), expressed at the periaxonal membrane of myelin, and receptors on neurons initiates a bidirectional signalling system that results in inhibition of neurite outgrowth and maintenance of myelin integrity. We show that this involves a lipid-raft to lipid-raft interaction on opposing cell membranes. MAG is exclusively located in low buoyancy Lubrol WX-insoluble membrane fractions isolated from whole brain, primary oligodendrocytes, or MAG-expressing CHO cells. Localisation within these domains is dependent on cellular cholesterol and occurs following terminal glycosylation in the trans-Golgi network, characteristics of association with lipid rafts. Furthermore, a recombinant form of MAG interacts specifically with lipid-raft fractions from whole brain and cultured cerebellar granule cells, containing functional MAG receptors GT1b and Nogo-66 receptor and molecules required for transduction of signal from MAG into neurons. The localisation of both MAG and MAG receptors within lipid rafts on the surface of opposing cells may create discrete areas of high avidity multivalent interaction, known to be critical for signalling into both cell types. Localisation within lipid rafts may provide a molecular environment that facilitates the interaction between MAG and multiple receptors and also between MAG ligands and molecules involved in signal transduction.

  6. Two-Phase Contiguous Supported Lipid Bilayer Model for Membrane Rafts via Polymer Blotting and Stenciling.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark J; Daniel, Susan

    2017-02-07

    The supported lipid bilayer has been portrayed as a useful model of the cell membrane compatible with many biophysical tools and techniques that demonstrate its appeal in learning about the basic features of the plasma membrane. However, some of its potential has yet to be realized, particularly in the area of bilayer patterning and phase/composition heterogeneity. In this work, we generate contiguous bilayer patterns as a model system that captures the general features of membrane domains and lipid rafts. Micropatterned polymer templates of two types are investigated for generating patterned bilayer formation: polymer blotting and polymer lift-off stenciling. While these approaches have been used previously to create bilayer arrays by corralling bilayers patches with various types of boundaries impenetrable to bilayer diffusion, unique to the methods presented here, there are no physical barriers to diffusion. In this work, interfaces between contiguous lipid phases define the pattern shapes, with continuity between them allowing transfer of membrane-bound biomolecules between the phases. We examine effectors of membrane domain stability including temperature and cholesterol content to investigate domain dynamics. Contiguous patterning of supported bilayers as a model of lipid rafts expands the application of the SLB to an area with current appeal and brings with it a useful toolset for characterization and analysis. These combined tools should be helpful to researchers investigating lipid raft dynamics and function and biomolecule partitioning studies. Additionally, this patterning technique may be useful for applications such as bioseparations that exploit differences in lipid phase partitioning or creation of membranes that bind species like viruses preferentially at lipid phase boundaries, to name a few.

  7. Lipid rafts are required for GLUT4 internalization in adipose cells

    PubMed Central

    Ros-Baró, Anna; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Peiró, Sandra; Bellido, David; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; Camps, Marta

    2001-01-01

    It has been recently reported that insulin recruits a novel signaling machinery to lipid rafts required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation [Baumann, A., Ribon, V., Kanzaki, M., Thurmond, D. C., Mora, S., Shigematsu, S., Bickel, P. E., Pessin, J. E. & Saltiel, A. R. (2001) Nature 407, 202–207, 2000; Chiang, S. H., Baumann, C. A., Kanzaki, M., Thurmond, D. C., Watson, R. T., Neudauer, C. L., Macara, I. G., Pessin, J. E. & Saltiel, A. R. (2001) Nature 410, 944–948]. We have assessed the role of lipid rafts on GLUT4 traffic in adipose cells. High GLUT4 levels were detected in caveolae from adipocytes by two approaches, the mechanical isolation of purified caveolae from plasma membrane lawns and the immunogold analysis of plasma membrane lawns followed by freeze-drying. The role of lipid rafts in GLUT4 trafficking was studied by adding nystatin or filipin at concentrations that specifically disrupt caveolae morphology and inhibit caveolae function without altering clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These caveolae inhibitors did not affect the insulin-stimulated glucose transport. However, they blocked both the GLUT4 internalization and the down-regulation of glucose transport triggered by insulin removal in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Our data indicate that lipid rafts are crucial for GLUT4 internalization after insulin removal. Given that high levels of GLUT4 were detected in caveolae from insulin-treated adipose cells, this transporter may be internalized from caveolae or caveolae may operate as an obligatory transition station before internalization. PMID:11593015

  8. Enhancement of Lytic Activity by Leptin Is Independent From Lipid Rafts in Murine Primary Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Collin, Aurore; Noacco, Audrey; Talvas, Jérémie; Caldefie-Chézet, Florence; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Farges, Marie-Chantal

    2017-01-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic adipokine, is known as a regulator of food intake, but it is also involved in inflammation, immunity, cell proliferation, and survival. Leptin receptor is integrated inside cholesterol-rich microdomains called lipid rafts, which, if disrupted or destroyed, could lead to a perturbation of lytic mechanism. Previous studies also reported that leptin could induce membrane remodeling. In this context, we studied the effect of membrane remodeling in lytic activity modulation induced by leptin. Thus, primary mouse splenocytes were incubated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (β-MCD), a lipid rafts disrupting agent, cholesterol, a major component of cell membranes, or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a membrane stabilizer agent for 1 h. These treatments were followed by splenocyte incubation with leptin (absence, 10 and 100 ng/ml). Unlike β-MCD or cholesterol, UDCA was able to block leptin lytic induction. This result suggests that leptin increased the lytic activity of primary spleen cells against syngenic EO771 mammary cancer cells independently from lipid rafts but may involve membrane fluidity. Furthermore, natural killer cells were shown to be involved in the splenocyte lytic activity. To our knowledge it is the first publication in primary culture that provides the link between leptin lytic modulation and membrane remodeling. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 101-109, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Alteration of endoplasmic reticulum lipid rafts contributes to lipotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Boslem, Ebru; Weir, Jacquelyn M; MacIntosh, Gemma; Sue, Nancy; Cantley, James; Meikle, Peter J; Biden, Trevor J

    2013-09-13

    Chronic saturated fatty acid exposure causes β-cell apoptosis and, thus, contributes to type 2 diabetes. Although endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and reduced ER-to-Golgi protein trafficking have been implicated, the exact mechanisms whereby saturated fatty acids trigger β-cell death remain elusive. Using mass spectroscopic lipidomics and subcellular fractionation, we demonstrate that palmitate pretreatment of MIN6 β-cells promoted ER remodeling of both phospholipids and sphingolipids, but only the latter was causally linked to lipotoxic ER stress. Thus, overexpression of glucosylceramide synthase, previously shown to protect against defective protein trafficking and ER stress, partially reversed lipotoxic reductions in ER sphingomyelin (SM) content and aggregation of ER lipid rafts, as visualized using Erlin1-GFP. Using both lipidomics and a sterol response element reporter assay, we confirmed that free cholesterol in the ER was also reciprocally modulated by chronic palmitate and glucosylceramide synthase overexpression. This is consistent with the known coregulation and association of SM and free cholesterol in lipid rafts. Inhibition of SM hydrolysis partially protected against ATF4/C/EBP homology protein induction because of palmitate. Our results suggest that loss of SM in the ER is a key event for initiating β-cell lipotoxicity, which leads to disruption of ER lipid rafts, perturbation of protein trafficking, and initiation of ER stress.

  10. HTLV-1 Tax deregulates autophagy by recruiting autophagic molecules into lipid raft microdomains.

    PubMed

    Ren, T; Takahashi, Y; Liu, X; Loughran, T P; Sun, S-C; Wang, H-G; Cheng, H

    2015-01-15

    The retroviral oncoprotein Tax from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological factor that causes adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma, has a crucial role in initiating T-lymphocyte transformation by inducing oncogenic signaling activation. We here report that Tax is a determining factor for dysregulation of autophagy in HTLV-1-transformed T cells and Tax-immortalized CD4 memory T cells. Tax facilitated autophagic process by activating inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase (IKK) complex, which subsequently recruited an autophagy molecular complex containing Beclin1 and Bif-1 to the lipid raft microdomains. Tax engaged a crosstalk between IKK complex and autophagic molecule complex by directly interacting with both complexes, promoting assembly of LC3+ autophagosomes. Moreover, expression of lipid raft-targeted Bif-1 or Beclin1 was sufficient to induce formation of LC3+ autophagosomes, suggesting that Tax recruitment of autophagic molecules to lipid rafts is a dominant strategy to deregulate autophagy in the context of HTLV-1 transformation of T cells. Furthermore, depletion of autophagy molecules such as Beclin1 and PI3 kinase class III resulted in impaired growth of HTLV-1-transformed T cells, indicating a critical role of Tax-deregulated autophagy in promoting survival and transformation of virally infected T cells.

  11. Recent progress on lipid lateral heterogeneity in plasma membranes: From rafts to submicrometric domains.

    PubMed

    Carquin, Mélanie; D'Auria, Ludovic; Pollet, Hélène; Bongarzone, Ernesto R; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2016-04-01

    The concept of transient nanometric domains known as lipid rafts has brought interest to reassess the validity of the Singer-Nicolson model of a fluid bilayer for cell membranes. However, this new view is still insufficient to explain the cellular control of surface lipid diversity or membrane deformability. During the past decades, the hypothesis that some lipids form large (submicrometric/mesoscale vs nanometric rafts) and stable (>min vs s) membrane domains has emerged, largely based on indirect methods. Morphological evidence for stable submicrometric lipid domains, well-accepted for artificial and highly specialized biological membranes, was further reported for a variety of living cells from prokaryot es to yeast and mammalian cells. However, results remained questioned based on limitations of available fluorescent tools, use of poor lipid fixatives, and imaging artifacts due to non-resolved membrane projections. In this review, we will discuss recent evidence generated using powerful and innovative approaches such as lipid-specific toxin fragments that support the existence of submicrometric domains. We will integrate documented mechanisms involved in the formation and maintenance of these domains, and provide a perspective on their relevance on membrane deformability and regulation of membrane protein distribution.

  12. Hybrid and Nonhybrid Lipids Exert Common Effects on Membrane Raft Size and Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A; Doktorova, Milka; Goh, Shih Lin; Standaert, Robert F; Katsaras, John; Feigenson, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Nanometer-scale domains in cholesterolrich model membranes emulate lipid rafts in cell plasma membranes (PMs). The physicochemical mechanisms that maintain a finite, small domain size are, however, not well understood. A special role has been postulated for chainasymmetric or hybrid lipids having a saturated sn-1 chain and an unsaturated sn-2 chain. Hybrid lipids generate nanodomains in some model membranes and are also abundant in the PM. It was proposed that they align in a preferred orientation at the boundary of ordered and disordered phases, lowering the interfacial energy and thus reducing domain size. We used small-angle neutron scattering and fluorescence techniques to detect nanoscopic and modulated liquid phase domains in a mixture composed entirely of nonhybrid lipids and cholesterol. Our results are indistinguishable from those obtained previously for mixtures containing hybrid lipids, conclusively showing that hybrid lipids are not required for the formation of nanoscopic liquid domains and strongly implying a common mechanism for the overall control of raft size and morphology. We discuss implications of these findings for theoretical descriptions of nanodomains.

  13. Recent progress on lipid lateral heterogeneity in plasma membranes: from rafts to submicrometric domains

    PubMed Central

    Carquin, Mélanie; D'Auria, Ludovic; Pollet, Hélène; Bongarzone, Ernesto R.; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2016-01-01

    The concept of transient nanometric domains known as lipid rafts has brought interest to reassess the validity of the Singer-Nicholson model of a fluid bilayer for cell membranes. However, this new view is still insufficient to explain the cellular control of surface lipid diversity or membrane deformability. During the past decade, the hypothesis that some lipids form large (submicrometric/mesoscale vs nanometric rafts) and stable (> min vs sec) membrane domains has emerged, largely based on indirect methods. Morphological evidence for stable submicrometric lipid domains, well-accepted for artificial and highly specialized biological membranes, was further reported for a variety of living cells from prokaryotes to yeast and mammalian cells. However, results remained questioned based on limitations of available fluorescent tools, use of poor lipid fixatives, and imaging artifacts due to non-resolved membrane projections. In this review, we will discuss recent evidence generated using powerful and innovative approaches such as lipid-specific toxin fragments that support the existence of submicrometric domains. We will integrate documented mechanisms involved in the formation and maintenance of these domains, and provide a perspective on their relevance on membrane deformability and regulation of membrane protein distribution. PMID:26738447

  14. Analysis of the interaction between respiratory syncytial virus and lipid-rafts in Hep2 cells during infection

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Gaie; Jeffree, Chris E.; McDonald, Terence; McL Rixon, Helen W.; Aitken, James D.; Sugrue, Richard J. . E-mail: r.sugrue@vir.gla.ac.uk

    2004-10-01

    The assembly of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in lipid-rafts was examined in Hep2 cells. Confocal and electron microscopy showed that during RSV assembly, the cellular distribution of the complement regulatory proteins, decay accelerating factor (CD55) and CD59, changes and high levels of these cellular proteins are incorporated into mature virus filaments. The detergent-solubility properties of CD55, CD59, and the RSV fusion (F) protein were found to be consistent with each protein being located predominantly within lipid-raft structures. The levels of these proteins in cell-released virus were examined by immunoelectronmicroscopy and found to account for between 5% and 15% of the virus attachment (G) glycoprotein levels. Collectively, our findings suggest that an intimate association exists between RSV and lipid-raft membranes and that significant levels of these host-derived raft proteins, such as those regulating complement activation, are subsequently incorporated into the envelope of mature virus particles.

  15. Endogenous Galectin-3 Is Localized in Membrane Lipid Rafts and Regulates Migration of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Daniel K.; Chernyavsky, Alexander I.; Chen, Huan-Yuan; Yu, Lan; Grando, Sergei A.; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2008-01-01

    This study reveals a function of endogenous galectin-3, an animal lectin recognizing β-galactosides, in regulating dendritic cell motility both in vitroand in vivo,which to our knowledge is unreported. First, galectin-3-deficient (gal3−/−) bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exhibited defective chemotaxis compared to gal3+/+ cells. Second, cutaneous dendritic cells in gal3−/− mice displayed reduced migration to draining lymph nodes upon hapten stimulation compared to gal3+/+ mice. Moreover, gal3−/− mice were impaired in the development of contact hypersensitivity relative to gal3+/+ mice in response to a hapten, a process in which dendritic cell trafficking to lymph nodes is critical. In addition, defective signaling was detected in gal3−/− cells upon chemokine receptor activation. By immunofluorescence microscopy, we observed that galectin-3 is localized in membrane ruffles and lamellipodia in stimulated dendritic cells and macrophages. Furthermore, galectin-3 was enriched in lipid raft domains under these conditions. Finally, we determined that ruffles on gal3−/− cells contained structures with lower complexity compared to gal3+/+ cells. In view of the participation of membrane ruffles in signal transduction and cell motility, we conclude that galectin-3 regulates cell migration by functioning at these structures. PMID:18843294

  16. Lipid Raft- and Src Family Kinase-Dependent Entry of Coxsackievirus B into Human Placental Trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Delorme-Axford, Elizabeth; Sadovsky, Yoel

    2013-01-01

    Maternal-fetal transmission of group B coxsackieviruses (CVB) during pregnancy has been associated with a number of diverse pathological outcomes, including hydrops fetalis, fetal myocarditis, meningoencephalitis, neurodevelopmental delays, congenital skin lesions, miscarriage, and/or stillbirth. Throughout pregnancy, the placenta forms a critical antimicrobial protective barrier at the maternal-fetal interface. Despite the severity of diseases accompanying fetal CVB infections, little is known regarding the strategies used by CVB to gain entry into placental trophoblasts. Here we used both a trophoblast cell line and primary human trophoblasts to demonstrate the mechanism by which CVB gains entry into polarized placental trophoblasts. Our studies revealed that the kinetics of CVB entry into placental trophoblasts are similar to those previously described for polarized intestinal epithelial cells. Likewise, CVB entry into placental trophoblasts requires decay-accelerating factor (DAF) binding and involves relocalization of the virus from the apical surface to intercellular tight junctions. In contrast, we have identified a divergent mechanism for CVB entry into polarized trophoblasts that is clathrin, caveolin-1, and dynamin II independent but requires intact lipid rafts. In addition, we found that members of the Src family of tyrosine kinases were required for CVB entry. Our studies highlight the complexity of viral entry into human placental trophoblasts and may serve as a model for mechanisms used by diverse pathogens to penetrate the placental barrier. PMID:23720726

  17. Lipid rafts, KCa/ClCa/Ca2+ channel complexes and EGFR signaling: Novel targets to reduce tumor development by lipids?

    PubMed

    Guéguinou, Maxime; Gambade, Audrey; Félix, Romain; Chantôme, Aurélie; Fourbon, Yann; Bougnoux, Philippe; Weber, Günther; Potier-Cartereau, Marie; Vandier, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    Membrane lipid rafts are distinct plasma membrane nanodomains that are enriched with cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides, with occasional presence of saturated fatty acids and phospholipids containing saturated acyl chains. It is well known that they organize receptors (such as Epithelial Growth Factor Receptor), ion channels and their downstream acting molecules to regulate intracellular signaling pathways. Among them are Ca2+ signaling pathways, which are modified in tumor cells and inhibited upon membrane raft disruption. In addition to protein components, lipids from rafts also contribute to the organization and function of Ca2+ signaling microdomains. This article aims to focus on the lipid raft KCa/ClCa/Ca2+ channel complexes that regulate Ca2+ and EGFR signaling in cancer cells, and discusses the potential modification of these complexes by lipids as a novel therapeutic approach in tumor development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  18. Pravastatin reverses the membrane cholesterol reorganization induced by myocardial infarction within lipid rafts in CD14(+)/CD16(-) circulating monocytes.

    PubMed

    Salvary, Thomas; Gambert-Nicot, Ségolène; Brindisi, Marie-Claude; Meneveau, Nicolas; Schiele, François; Séronde, Marie-France; Lorgis, Luc; Zeller, Marianne; Cottin, Yves; Kantelip, Jean-Pierre; Gambert, Philippe; Davani, Siamak

    2012-09-01

    Large numbers of monocytes are recruited in the infarcted myocardium. Their cell membranes contain cholesterol-rich microdomains called lipids rafts, which participate in numerous signaling cascades. In addition to its cholesterol-lowering effect, pravastatin has several pleiotropic effects and is widely used as secondary prevention treatment after myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pravastatin on the organization of cholesterol within monocyte membrane rafts from patients who had suffered myocardial infarction. Monocytes from healthy donors and acute MI patients were cultured with or without 4μM pravastatin. Lipid rafts were extracted by Lubrol WX, caveolae and flat rafts were separated using a modified sucrose gradient. Cholesterol level and caveolin-1 expression in lipid rafts were determined. In healthy donors, cholesterol was concentrated in flat rafts (63±3 vs 13±1%, p<0.001). While monocytes from MI patients presented similar cholesterol distribution in both caveolae and flat rafts. Cholesterol distribution was higher in flat rafts in healthy donors, compared to MI patients (63±3 vs 41±2%, p<0.001), with less distribution in caveolae (13±1 vs 34±2%, p<0.001). Pravastatin reversed the cholesterol distribution in MI patients cells between flat rafts (41±2 vs 66±3%, p<0.001) and caveolae (34±2 vs 18±1%, p<0.001). In conclusion, MI redistributes cholesterol from flat rafts to caveolae indicating monocyte membrane reorganization. In vitro pravastatin treatment restored basal conditions in MI monocytes, suggesting another effect of statins.

  19. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-02-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes.

  20. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes. PMID:26861908

  1. Association of Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct hemolysin with lipid rafts is essential for cytotoxicity but not hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shigeaki; Kodama, Toshio; Okada, Natsumi; Okayama, Kanna; Honda, Takeshi; Iida, Tetsuya

    2010-02-01

    Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), a major virulence factor of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, induces cytotoxicity in cultured cells. However, the mechanism of TDH's cytotoxic effect including its target molecules on the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells remains unclear. In this study, we identified the role of lipid rafts, cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched microdomains, in TDH cytotoxicity. Treatment of cells with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD), a raft-disrupting agent, inhibited TDH cytotoxicity. TDH was associated with detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), and MbetaCD eliminated this association. In contrast, there was no such association between a nontoxic TDH mutant and DRMs. The disruption of lipid rafts neither affected hemolysis nor inhibited Ca(2+) influx into HeLa cells induced by TDH. These findings indicate that the cytotoxicity but not the hemolytic activity of TDH is dependent on lipid rafts. The exogenous and endogenous depletion of cellular sphingomyelin also prevented TDH cytotoxicity, but a direct interaction between TDH and sphingomyelin was not detected with either a lipid overlay assay or a liposome absorption test. Treatment with sphingomyelinase (SMase) at 100 mU/ml disrupted the association of TDH with DRMs but did not affect the localization of lipid raft marker proteins (caveolin-1 and flotillin-1) with DRMs. These results suggest that sphingomyelin is important for the association of TDH with lipid rafts but is not a molecular target of TDH. We hypothesize that TDH may target a certain group of rafts that are sensitive to SMase at a certain concentration, which does not affect other types of rafts.

  2. Cellular prion protein in blood platelets associates with both lipid rafts and the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Brouckova, Adela; Holada, Karel

    2009-11-01

    The recently shown transmissibility of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) by blood transfusion emphasises the need for better understanding of the cellular prion protein (PrPc) in blood. A substantial amount of cell-associated PrPc in blood resides in platelets. Platelet activation leads to up-regulation of PrPc on the platelet surface and its release on exosomes and microparticles. The sub-cellular localisation and function of platelet PrPc, however, is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the association of PrPc with platelet lipid rafts and the platelet cytoskeleton. Immuno-fluorescence microscopy showed that the signals of PrPc and P-selectin, both of which occupy intracellular alpha granules, were separated on the membrane, suggesting organisation in different membrane domains. A flotation assay of platelet lysates demonstrated that a relatively small portion of platelet PrPc floats with lipid rafts, regardless of platelet activation status. This was reversed by depolymerisation of the platelet cytoskeleton, which led to flotation of most platelet PrPc, suggesting that interactions with the cytoskeleton prevent flotation of PrPc rafts. This association of PrPc with the platelet cytoskeleton was confirmed by its presence in both the isolated membrane skeleton and actin cytoskeleton. Platelet activation significantly increased the amount of PrPc associated with the cytoskeleton. Our results indicate that the localisation of PrPc in platelets is complex, with the majority of PrPc present within platelet lipid rafts linked to the platelet cytoskeleton. This localisation places PrPc in a position where it can interact with proteins involved in platelet signalling and eventually with vCJD prions.

  3. Sterol carrier protein 2 regulates proximal tubule size in the Xenopus pronephric kidney by modulating lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Débora M; Tran, Uyen; Romaker, Daniel; Abreu, José G; Wessely, Oliver

    2014-10-01

    The kidney is a homeostatic organ required for waste excretion and reabsorption of water, salts and other macromolecules. To this end, a complex series of developmental steps ensures the formation of a correctly patterned and properly proportioned organ. While previous studies have mainly focused on the individual signaling pathways, the formation of higher order receptor complexes in lipid rafts is an equally important aspect. These membrane platforms are characterized by differences in local lipid and protein compositions. Indeed, the cells in the Xenopus pronephric kidney were positive for the lipid raft markers ganglioside GM1 and Caveolin-1. To specifically interfere with lipid raft function in vivo, we focused on the Sterol Carrier Protein 2 (scp2), a multifunctional protein that is an important player in remodeling lipid raft composition. In Xenopus, scp2 mRNA was strongly expressed in differentiated epithelial structures of the pronephric kidney. Knockdown of scp2 did not interfere with the patterning of the kidney along its proximo-distal axis, but dramatically decreased the size of the kidney, in particular the proximal tubules. This phenotype was accompanied by a reduction of lipid rafts, but was independent of the peroxisomal or transcriptional activities of scp2. Finally, disrupting lipid micro-domains by inhibiting cholesterol synthesis using Mevinolin phenocopied the defects seen in scp2 morphants. Together these data underscore the importance for localized signaling platforms in the proper formation of the Xenopus kidney.

  4. Accumulation of raft lipids in T-cell plasma membrane domains engaged in TCR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zech, Tobias; Ejsing, Christer S; Gaus, Katharina; de Wet, Ben; Shevchenko, Andrej; Simons, Kai; Harder, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Activating stimuli for T lymphocytes are transmitted through plasma membrane domains that form at T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signalling foci. Here, we determined the molecular lipid composition of immunoisolated TCR activation domains. We observed that they accumulate cholesterol, sphingomyelin and saturated phosphatidylcholine species as compared with control plasma membrane fragments. This provides, for the first time, direct evidence that TCR activation domains comprise a distinct molecular lipid composition reminiscent of liquid-ordered raft phases in model membranes. Interestingly, TCR activation domains were also enriched in plasmenyl phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine. Modulating the T-cell lipidome with polyunsaturated fatty acids impaired the plasma membrane condensation at TCR signalling foci and resulted in a perturbed molecular lipid composition. These results correlate the accumulation of specific molecular lipid species with the specific plasma membrane condensation at sites of TCR activation and with early TCR activation responses. PMID:19177148

  5. Involvement of lipid rafts in the localization and dysfunction effect of the antitumor ether phospholipid edelfosine in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, F; Fernández, M; Hornillos, V; Delgado, J; Amat-Guerri, F; Acuña, A U; Nieto-Miguel, T; Villa-Pulgarín, J A; González-García, C; Ceña, V; Gajate, C

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts and mitochondria are promising targets in cancer therapy. The synthetic antitumor alkyl-lysophospholipid analog edelfosine (1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine) has been reported to target lipid rafts. Here, we have found that edelfosine induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, both responses being abrogated by Bcl-xL overexpression. We synthesized a number of new fluorescent edelfosine analogs, which preserved the proapoptotic activity of the parent drug, and colocalized with mitochondria in HeLa cells. Edelfosine induced swelling in isolated mitochondria, indicating an increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability. This mitochondrial swelling was independent of reactive oxygen species generation. A structurally related inactive analog was unable to promote mitochondrial swelling, highlighting the importance of edelfosine molecular structure in its effect on mitochondria. Raft disruption inhibited mitochondrial localization of the drug in cells and edelfosine-induced swelling in isolated mitochondria. Edelfosine promoted a redistribution of lipid rafts from the plasma membrane to mitochondria, suggesting a raft-mediated link between plasma membrane and mitochondria. Our data suggest that direct interaction of edelfosine with mitochondria eventually leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. These observations unveil a new framework in cancer chemotherapy that involves a link between lipid rafts and mitochondria in the mechanism of action of an antitumor drug, thus opening new avenues for cancer treatment. PMID:21593790

  6. The Bordetella type III secretion system effector BteA contains a conserved N-terminal motif that guides bacterial virulence factors to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    French, Christopher T; Panina, Ekaterina M; Yeh, Sylvia H; Griffith, Natasha; Arambula, Diego G; Miller, Jeff F

    2009-12-01

    The Bordetella type III secretion system (T3SS) effector protein BteA is necessary and sufficient for rapid cytotoxicity in a wide range of mammalian cells. We show that BteA is highly conserved and functionally interchangeable between Bordetella bronchiseptica, Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis. The identification of BteA sequences required for cytotoxicity allowed the construction of non-cytotoxic mutants for localization studies. BteA derivatives were targeted to lipid rafts and showed clear colocalization with cortical actin, ezrin and the lipid raft marker GM1. We hypothesized that BteA associates with the cytoplasmic face of lipid rafts to locally modulate host cell responses to Bordetella attachment. B. bronchiseptica adhered to host cells almost exclusively to GM1-enriched lipid raft microdomains and BteA colocalized to these same sites following T3SS-mediated translocation. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin protected cells from T3SS-induced cytotoxicity. Localization to lipid rafts was mediated by a 130-amino-acid lipid raft targeting domain at the N-terminus of BteA, and homologous domains were identified in virulence factors from other bacterial species. Lipid raft targeting sequences from a T3SS effector (Plu4750) and an RTX-type toxin (Plu3217) from Photorhabdus luminescens directed fusion proteins to lipid rafts in a manner identical to the N-terminus of BteA.

  7. The C1 and C2 domains target human type 6 adenylyl cyclase to lipid rafts and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Thangavel, Muthusamy; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2009-02-01

    Previous data has shown that adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) is expressed principally in lipid rafts or caveolae of cardiac myocytes and other cell types while certain other isoforms of AC are excluded from these microdomains. The mechanism by which AC6 is localized to lipid rafts or caveolae is unknown. In this study, we show AC6 is localized in lipid rafts of COS-7 cells (expressing caveolin-1) and in HEK-293 cells or cardiac fibroblasts isolated from caveolin-1 knock-out mice (both of which lack prototypical caveolins). To determine the region of AC6 that confers raft localization, we independently expressed each of the major intracellular domains, the N-terminus, C1 and C2 domains, and examined their localization with various approaches. The N-terminus did not associate with lipid rafts or caveolae of either COS-7 or HEK-293 cells nor did it immunoprecipitate with caveolin-1 when expressed in COS-7 cells. By contrast, the C1 and C2 domains each associated with lipid rafts to varying degrees and were present in caveolin-1 immunoprecipitates. There were no differences in the pattern of localization of either the C1 or C2 domains between COS-7 and HEK-293 cells. Further dissection of the C1 domain into four individual proteins indicated that the N-terminal half of this domain is responsible for its raft localization. To probe for a role of a putative palmitoylation motif in the C-terminal portion of the C2 domain, we expressed various truncated forms of AC6 lacking most or all of the C-terminal 41 amino acids. These truncated AC6 proteins were not altered in terms of their localization in lipid rafts or their catalytic activity, implying that this C-terminal region is not required for lipid raft targeting of AC6. We conclude that while the C1 domain may be most important, both the C1 and C2 domains of AC6 play a role in targeting AC6 to lipid rafts.

  8. The involvement of P2Y12 receptors, NADPH oxidase, and lipid rafts in the action of extracellular ATP on synaptic transmission at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Giniatullin, A; Petrov, A; Giniatullin, R

    2015-01-29

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is the main co-transmitter accompanying the release of acetylcholine from motor nerve terminals. Previously, we revealed the direct inhibitory action of extracellular ATP on transmitter release via redox-dependent mechanism. However, the receptor mechanism of ATP action and ATP-induced sources of reactive oxygen sources (ROS) remained not fully understood. In the current study, using microelectrode recordings of synaptic currents from the frog neuromuscular junction, we analyzed the receptor subtype involved in synaptic action of ATP, receptor coupling to NADPH oxidase and potential location of ATP receptors within the lipid rafts. Using subtype-specific antagonists, we found that the P2Y13 blocker 2-[(2-chloro-5-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]-4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde did not prevent the depressant action of ATP. In contrast, the P2Y12 antagonist 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate abolished the inhibitory action of ATP, suggesting the key role of P2Y12 receptors in ATP action. As the action of ATP is redox-dependent, we also tested potential involvement of the NADPH oxidase, known as a common inducer of ROS. The depressant action of extracellular ATP was significantly reduced by diphenyleneiodonium chloride and 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride, two structurally different inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, indicating that this enzyme indeed mediates the action of ATP. Since the location and activity of various receptors are often associated with lipid rafts, we next tested whether ATP-driven inhibition depends on lipid rafts. We found that the disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin reduced and largely delayed the action of ATP. Taken together, these data revealed key steps in the purinergic control of synaptic transmission via P2Y12 receptors associated with lipid rafts, and identified NADPH oxidase as the main source of ATP-induced inhibitory ROS at the neuromuscular

  9. The structural role of cholesterol in cell membranes: from condensed bilayers to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin R; Regen, Steven L

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Defining the two-dimensional structure of cell membranes represents one of the most daunting challenges currently facing chemists, biochemists, and biophysicists. In particular, the time-averaged lateral organization of the lipids and proteins that make up these natural enclosures has yet to be established. As the classic Singer-Nicolson model of cell membranes has evolved over the past 40 years, special attention has focused on the structural role played by cholesterol, a key component that represents ca. 30% of the total lipids that are present. Despite extensive studies with model membranes, two fundamental issues have remained a mystery: (i) the mechanism by which cholesterol condenses low-melting lipids by uncoiling their acyl chains and (ii) the thermodynamics of the interaction between cholesterol and high- and low-melting lipids. The latter bears directly on one of the most popular notions in modern cell biology, that is, the lipid raft hypothesis, whereby cholesterol is thought to combine with high-melting lipids to form "lipid rafts" that float in a "sea" of low-melting lipids. In this Account, we first describe a chemical approach that we have developed in our laboratories that has allowed us to quantify the interactions between exchangeable mimics of cholesterol and low- and high-melting lipids in model membranes. In essence, this "nearest-neighbor recognition" (NNR) method involves the synthesis of dimeric forms of these lipids that contain a disulfide moiety as a linker. By means of thiolate-disulfide interchange reactions, equilibrium mixtures of dimers are then formed. These exchange reactions are initiated either by adding dithiothreitol to a liposomal dispersion to generate a small amount of thiol monomer or by including a small amount of thiol monomer in the liposomes at pH 5.0 and then raising the pH to 7.4. We then show how such NNR measurements have allowed us to distinguish between two very different mechanisms that have been

  10. High-density lipoprotein affects antigen presentation by interfering with lipid raft: a promising anti-atherogenic strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-H; Yuan, S-G; Peng, D-Q; Zhao, S-P

    2010-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease. Immunomodulation of atherosclerosis emerges as a promising approach to prevention and treatment of this widely prevalent disease. The function of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to promote reverse cholesterol transport may explain the ability of its protection against atherosclerosis. Findings that HDL and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) inhibited the ability of antigen presenting cells (APCs) to stimulate T cells might be attributed to lipid raft, a cholesterol-rich microdomain exhibiting functional properties depending largely upon its lipid composition. Thus, modulating cholesterol in lipid raft may provide a promising anti-atherogenic strategy.

  11. Compartmentalisation of cAMP-dependent signalling in blood platelets: The role of lipid rafts and actin polymerisation.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Zaher; Naseem, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) inhibits blood platelets through the activation of membrane adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated signalling. However, the molecular mechanism controlling cAMP signalling in blood platelet remains unclear, and in particular how individual isoforms of AC and protein kinase A (PKA) are coordinated to target distinct substrates in order to modulate platelet activation. In this study, we demonstrate that lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton may play a key role in regulating platelet responses to cAMP downstream of PGI2. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD) increased platelet sensitivity to PGI2 and forskolin, a direct AC cyclase activator, resulting in greater inhibition of collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation. In contrast, platelet inhibition by the direct activator of PKA, 8-CPT-6-Phe-cAMP was unaffected by MβCD treatment. Consistent with the functional data, lipid raft disruption increased PGI2-stimulated cAMP formation and proximal PKA-mediated signalling events. Platelet inhibition, cAMP formation and phosphorylation of PKA substrates in response to PGI2 were also increased in the presence of cytochalasin D, indicating a role for actin cytoskeleton in signalling in response to PGI2. A potential role for lipid rafts in cAMP signalling is strengthened by our finding that a pool of ACV/VI and PKA was partitioned into lipid rafts. Our data demonstrate partial compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling machinery in platelets, where lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton regulate the inhibitory effects induced by PGI2. The increased platelet sensitivity to cAMP-elevating agents signalling upon raft and cytoskeleton disruption suggests that these compartments act to restrain basal cAMP signalling.

  12. Ceramide displaces cholesterol from lipid rafts and decreases the association of the cholesterol binding protein caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cuijuan; Alterman, Michail; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2005-08-01

    Addition of exogenous ceramide causes a significant displacement of cholesterol in lipid raft model membranes. However, whether ceramide-induced cholesterol displacement is sufficient to alter the protein composition of caveolin-enriched lipid raft membranes is unknown. Therefore, we examined whether increasing endogenous ceramide levels with bacterial sphingomyelinase (bSMase) depleted cholesterol and changed the protein composition of caveolin-enriched membranes (CEMs) isolated from immortalized Schwann cells. bSMase increased ceramide levels severalfold and decreased the cholesterol content of detergent-insoluble CEMs by 25-50% within 2 h. To examine the effect of ceramide on the protein composition of the CEMs, we performed a quantitative proteomic analysis using stable isotope labeling of cells in culture and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Although ceramide rapidly depleted lipid raft cholesterol, the levels of the cholesterol binding protein caveolin-1 (Cav-1) decreased by 25% only after 8 h. Importantly, replenishing the cells with cholesterol rapidly reversed the loss of Cav-1 from the CEMs. Ceramide-induced cholesterol depletion increased the association of 5'-nucleotidase and ATP synthase beta-subunit with the CEMs but had a minimal effect on changing the abundance of other lipid raft proteins, such as flotillin-1 and G-proteins. These results suggest that the ceramide-induced loss of cholesterol from CEMs may contribute to altering the lipid raft proteome.

  13. Significance of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Protein Enrichment in Lipid Rafts for the Control of Autoimmunity*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yetao; Murakami, Yoshiko; Yasui, Teruhito; Wakana, Shigeharu; Kikutani, Hitoshi; Kinoshita, Taroh; Maeda, Yusuke

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPI) are complex glycolipids that are covalently linked to the C terminus of proteins as a post-translational modification and tether proteins to the plasma membrane. One of the most striking features of GPI-anchored proteins (APs) is their enrichment in lipid rafts. The biosynthesis of GPI and its attachment to proteins occur in the endoplasmic reticulum. In the Golgi, GPI-APs are subjected to fatty acid remodeling, which replaces an unsaturated fatty acid at the sn-2 position of the phosphatidylinositol moiety with a saturated fatty acid. We previously reported that fatty acid remodeling is critical for the enrichment of GPI-APs in lipid rafts. To investigate the biological significance of GPI-AP enrichment in lipid rafts, we generated a PGAP3 knock-out mouse (PGAP3−/−) in which fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs does not occur. We report here that a significant number of aged PGAP3−/− mice developed autoimmune-like symptoms, such as increased anti-DNA antibodies, spontaneous germinal center formation, and enlarged renal glomeruli with deposition of immune complexes and matrix expansion. A possible cause for this was the impaired engulfment of apoptotic cells by resident peritoneal macrophages in PGAP3−/− mice. Mice with conditional targeting of PGAP3 in either B or T cells did not develop such autoimmune-like symptoms. In addition, PGAP3−/− mice exhibited the tendency of Th2 polarization. These data demonstrate that PGAP3-dependent fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs has a significant role in the control of autoimmunity, possibly by the regulation of apoptotic cell clearance and Th1/Th2 balance. PMID:23864655

  14. Critical role of CFTR-dependent lipid rafts in cigarette smoke-induced lung epithelial injury

    PubMed Central

    Bodas, Manish; Min, Taehong

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis of lung epithelial and endothelial cells by exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) severely damages the lung tissue, leading to the pathogenesis of emphysema, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We have recently established a direct correlation between decreased lipid raft CFTR expression and emphysema progression through increased ceramide accumulation. In the present work, we investigated the role of membrane CFTR in regulating apoptosis and autophagy responses to CS exposure. We report a constitutive and CS-induced increase in the number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells in Cftr−/− murine lungs compared with Cftr+/+ murine lungs that also correlated with a concurrent increase in the expression of ceramide, NF-κB, CD95/Fas, lipid raft proteins, and zonula occludens (ZO)-1/2 (P < 0.001). We also verified that stable wild-type CFTR expression in CFBE41o− cells controls constitutively elevated caspase-3/7 activity (−1.6-fold, P < 0.001). Our data suggest that membrane CFTR regulates ceramide-enriched lipid raft signaling platforms required for the induction of Fas-mediated apoptotic signaling. In addition, lack of membrane CFTR also modulates autophagy, as demonstrated by the significant increase in constitutive (P < 0.001) and CSE-induced (P < 0.005) perinuclear accumulation of green fluorescent protein-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3 (LC3) in the absence of membrane CFTR (CFBE41o− cells). The significant constitutive and CS-induced increase (P < 0.05) in p62 and LC3β expression in CFTR-deficient cells and mice corroborates these findings and suggest a defective autophagy response in the absence of membrane CFTR. Our data demonstrate the critical role of membrane-localized CFTR in regulating apoptotic and autophagic responses in CS-induced lung injury that may be involved in the pathogenesis of severe emphysema. PMID:21378025

  15. Critical role of CFTR-dependent lipid rafts in cigarette smoke-induced lung epithelial injury.

    PubMed

    Bodas, Manish; Min, Taehong; Vij, Neeraj

    2011-06-01

    Apoptosis of lung epithelial and endothelial cells by exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) severely damages the lung tissue, leading to the pathogenesis of emphysema, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We have recently established a direct correlation between decreased lipid raft CFTR expression and emphysema progression through increased ceramide accumulation. In the present work, we investigated the role of membrane CFTR in regulating apoptosis and autophagy responses to CS exposure. We report a constitutive and CS-induced increase in the number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells in Cftr(-/-) murine lungs compared with Cftr(+/+) murine lungs that also correlated with a concurrent increase in the expression of ceramide, NF-κB, CD95/Fas, lipid raft proteins, and zonula occludens (ZO)-1/2 (P < 0.001). We also verified that stable wild-type CFTR expression in CFBE41o(-) cells controls constitutively elevated caspase-3/7 activity (-1.6-fold, P < 0.001). Our data suggest that membrane CFTR regulates ceramide-enriched lipid raft signaling platforms required for the induction of Fas-mediated apoptotic signaling. In addition, lack of membrane CFTR also modulates autophagy, as demonstrated by the significant increase in constitutive (P < 0.001) and CSE-induced (P < 0.005) perinuclear accumulation of green fluorescent protein-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3 (LC3) in the absence of membrane CFTR (CFBE41o(-) cells). The significant constitutive and CS-induced increase (P < 0.05) in p62 and LC3β expression in CFTR-deficient cells and mice corroborates these findings and suggest a defective autophagy response in the absence of membrane CFTR. Our data demonstrate the critical role of membrane-localized CFTR in regulating apoptotic and autophagic responses in CS-induced lung injury that may be involved in the pathogenesis of severe emphysema.

  16. Clustering and Lateral Concentration of Raft Lipids by the MAL Protein

    PubMed Central

    Magal, Lee Goldstein; Yaffe, Yakey; Shepshelovich, Jeanne; Aranda, Juan Francisco; del Carmen de Marco, Maria; Gaus, Katharina; Alonso, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01

    MAL, a compact hydrophobic, four-transmembrane-domain apical protein that copurifies with detergent-resistant membranes is obligatory for the machinery that sorts glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins and others to the apical membrane in epithelia. The mechanism of MAL function in lipid-raft–mediated apical sorting is unknown. We report that MAL clusters formed by two independent procedures—spontaneous clustering of MAL tagged with the tandem dimer DiHcRED (DiHcRED-MAL) in the plasma membrane of COS7 cells and antibody-mediated cross-linking of FLAG-tagged MAL—laterally concentrate markers of sphingolipid rafts and exclude a fluorescent analogue of phosphatidylethanolamine. Site-directed mutagenesis and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis demonstrate that MAL forms oligomers via ϕxxϕ intramembrane protein–protein binding motifs. Furthermore, results from membrane modulation by using exogenously added cholesterol or ceramides support the hypothesis that MAL-mediated association with raft lipids is driven at least in part by positive hydrophobic mismatch between the lengths of the transmembrane helices of MAL and membrane lipids. These data place MAL as a key component in the organization of membrane domains that could potentially serve as membrane sorting platforms. PMID:19553470

  17. Lipid raft-regulated IGF-1R activation antagonizes TRAIL-induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ling; Qu, Xiujuan; Hu, Xuejun; Zhu, Zhitu; Li, Ce; Li, Enze; Ma, Yanju; Song, Na; Liu, Yunpeng

    2013-11-29

    Gastric cancer cells are resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and the resistance mechanism is not fully understood. In human gastric cancer MGC803 and BGC823 cells, TRAIL induces insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) pathway activation. Treatment with IGF-1R inhibitor OSI-906 or small interfering RNAs against IGF-1R, prevents IGF-1R pathway activation and increases TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The TRAIL-induced IGF-1R pathway activation is promoted by IGF-1R translocation into lipid rafts. Moreover, the translocation of IGF-1R into lipid rafts is regulated by Casitas B-lineage lymphoma b (Cbl-b). Taken together, TRAIL-induced IGF-1R activation antagonizes TRAIL-induced apoptosis by Cbl-b-regulated distribution of IGF-1R in lipid rafts.

  18. Recombinant VSV G proteins reveal a novel raft-dependent endocytic pathway in resorbing osteoclasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mulari, Mika T.K. Nars, Martin; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Kaisto, Tuula; Metsikkoe, Kalervo; Sun Yi; Vaeaenaenen, H. Kalervo

    2008-05-01

    Transcytotic membrane flow delivers degraded bone fragments from the ruffled border to the functional secretory domain, FSD, in bone resorbing osteoclasts. Here we show that there is also a FSD-to-ruffled border trafficking pathway that compensates for the membrane loss during the matrix uptake process and that rafts are essential for this ruffled border-targeted endosomal pathway. Replacing the cytoplasmic tail of the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein with that of CD4 resulted in partial insolubility in Triton X-100 and retargeting from the peripheral non-bone facing plasma membrane to the FSD. Recombinant G proteins were subsequently endosytosed and delivered from the FSD to the peripheral fusion zone of the ruffled border, which were both rich in lipid rafts as suggested by viral protein transport analysis and visualizing the rafts with fluorescent recombinant cholera toxin. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin impaired the ruffled border-targeted vesicle trafficking pathway and inhibited bone resorption dose-dependently as quantified by measuring the CTX and TRACP 5b secreted to the culture medium and by measuring the resorbed area visualized with a bi-phasic labeling method using sulpho-NHS-biotin and WGA-lectin. Thus, rafts are vital for membrane recycling from the FSD to the late endosomal/lysosomal ruffled border and bone resorption.

  19. Aβ promotes VDAC1 channel dephosphorylation in neuronal lipid rafts. Relevance to the mechanisms of neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Echevarria, C; Díaz, M; Ferrer, I; Canerina-Amaro, A; Marin, R

    2014-10-10

    Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is a mitochondrial protein abundantly found in neuronal lipid rafts. In these membrane domains, VDAC is associated with a complex of signaling proteins that trigger neuroprotective responses. Loss of lipid raft integrity may result in disruption of multicomplex association and alteration of signaling responses that may ultimately promote VDAC activation. Some data have demonstrated that VDAC at the neuronal membrane may be involved in the mechanisms of amyloid beta (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity, through yet unknown mechanisms. Aβ is generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP), and is released to the extracellular space where it may undergo self-aggregation. Aβ aggregate deposition in the form of senile plaques may lead to Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, although other pathological hallmarks (such as hyper-phosphorylated Tau deposition) also participate in this neurodegenerative process. The present study demonstrates that VDAC1 associates with APP and Aβ in lipid rafts of neurons. Interaction of VDAC1 with APP was observed in lipid rafts from the frontal and entorhinal cortex of human brains affected by AD at early stages (I-IV/0-B of Braak and Braak). Furthermore, Aβ exposure enhanced the dephosphorylation of VDAC1 that correlated with cell death. Both effects were reverted in the presence of tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors. VDAC1 dephosphorylation was corroborated in lipid rafts of AD brains. These results demonstrate that Aβ is involved in alterations of the phosphorylation state of VDAC in neuronal lipid rafts. Modulation of this channel may contribute to the development and progression of AD pathology.

  20. Caveolin-1 in Lipid Rafts Interacts with Dengue Virus NS3 during Polyprotein Processing and Replication in HMEC-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    García Cordero, Julio; León Juárez, Moisés; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A.; Cedillo Barrón, Leticia; Gutiérrez Castañeda, Benito

    2014-01-01

    Lipid rafts are ordered microdomains within cellular membranes that are rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Caveolin (Cav-1) and flotillin (Flt-1) are markers of lipid rafts, which serve as an organizing center for biological phenomena and cellular signaling. Lipid rafts involvement in dengue virus (DENV) processing, replication, and assembly remains poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the role of lipid rafts after DENV endocytosis in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). The non-structural viral proteins NS3 and NS2B, but not NS5, were associated with detergent-resistant membranes. In sucrose gradients, both NS3 and NS2B proteins appeared in Cav-1 and Flt-1 rich fractions. Additionally, double immunofluorescence staining of DENV-infected HMEC-1 cells showed that NS3 and NS2B, but not NS5, colocalized with Cav-1 and Flt-1. Furthermore, in HMEC-1cells transfected with NS3 protease, shown a strong overlap between NS3 and Cav-1, similar to that in DENV-infected cells. In contrast, double-stranded viral RNA (dsRNA) overlapped weakly with Cav-1 and Flt-1. Given these results, we investigated whether Cav-1 directly interacted with NS3. Cav-1 and NS3 co-immunoprecipitated, indicating that they resided within the same complex. Furthermore, when cellular cholesterol was depleted by methyl-beta cyclodextrin treatment after DENV entrance, lipid rafts were disrupted, NS3 protein level was reduced, besides Cav-1 and NS3 were displaced to fractions 9 and 10 in sucrose gradient analysis, and we observed a dramatically reduction of DENV particles release. These data demonstrate the essential role of caveolar cholesterol-rich lipid raft microdomains in DENV polyprotein processing and replication during the late stages of the DENV life cycle. PMID:24643062

  1. Nitric oxide inhibition of adenylyl cyclase type 6 activity is dependent upon lipid rafts and caveolin signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Bundey, Richard A; Insel, Paul A

    2004-05-07

    Several cell types, including cardiac myocytes and vascular endothelial cells, produce nitric oxide (NO) via both constitutive and inducible isoforms of NO synthase. NO attenuates cardiac contractility and contributes to contractile dysfunction in heart failure, although the precise molecular mechanisms for these effects are poorly defined. Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms type 5 and 6, which are preferentially expressed in cardiac myocytes, may be inhibited via a direct nitrosylation by NO. Because endothelial NO synthase (eNOS and NOS3), beta-adrenergic (betaAR) receptors, and AC6 all can localize in lipid raft/caveolin-rich microdomains, we sought to understand the role of lipid rafts in organizing components of betaAR-G(s)-AC signal transduction together with eNOS. Using neonatal rat cardiac myocytes, we found that disruption of lipid rafts with beta-cyclodextrin inhibited forskolin-stimulated AC activity and cAMP production, eliminated caveolin-3-eNOS interaction, and increased NO production. betaAR- and G(s)-mediated activation of AC activity were inhibited by beta-cyclodextrin treatment, but prostanoid receptor-stimulated AC activity, which appears to occur outside caveolin-rich microdomains, was unaffected unless eNOS was overexpressed and lipid rafts were disrupted. An NO donor, SNAP, inhibited basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production in both native cardiac myocytes and cardiac myocytes and pulmonary artery endothelial cells engineered to overexpress AC6. These effects of SNAP were independent of guanylyl cyclase activity and were mimicked by overexpression of eNOS. The juxtaposition of eNOS with betaAR and AC types 5 and 6 results in selective regulation of betaAR by eNOS activity in lipid raft domains over other G(s)-coupled receptors localized in nonraft domains. Thus co-localization of multiple signaling components in lipid rafts provides key spatial regulation of AC activity.

  2. TRAIL-activated EGFR by Cbl-b-regulated EGFR redistribution in lipid rafts antagonises TRAIL-induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ling; Zhang, Ye; Liu, Jing; Qu, Jinglei; Hu, Xuejun; Zhang, Fan; Zheng, Huachuan; Qu, Xiujuan; Liu, Yunpeng

    2012-11-01

    Most gastric cancer cells are resistant to tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Since TRAIL resistance is associated with lipid rafts, in which both death receptors and epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) are enriched, our aim is to identify how lipid raft-regulated receptor redistribution influences the sensitivity of TRAIL in gastric cancer cells. In TRAIL-resistant gastric cancer cells, TRAIL did not induce effective death-inducing signalling complex (DISC) formation in lipid rafts, accompanied with EGFR translocation into lipid rafts, and activation of EGFR pathway. Knockdown of casitas B-lineage lymphoma-b (Cbl-b) enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by promoting DISC formation in lipid rafts. However, knockdown of Cbl-b also enhanced EGFR translocation into lipid rafts and EGFR pathway activation induced by TRAIL. Either using inhibitors of EGFR or depletion of EGFR with small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented EGFR pathway activation, and thus increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis, especially in Cbl-b knockdown clones. Taken together, TRAIL-induced EGFR activation through Cbl-b-regulated EGFR redistribution in lipid rafts antagonised TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The contribution of DISC formation and the inhibition of EGFR signal triggered in lipid rafts are both essential for increasing the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to TRAIL.

  3. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  4. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; Lee, Sang -Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang -Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin -Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.

  5. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; ...

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed betweenmore » the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.« less

  6. Saltatory conduction in unmyelinated axons: clustering of Na+ channels on lipid rafts enables micro-saltatory conduction in C-fibers

    PubMed Central

    Neishabouri, Ali; Faisal, A. Aldo

    2014-01-01

    The action potential (AP), the fundamental signal of the nervous system, is carried by two types of axons: unmyelinated and myelinated fibers. In the former the action potential propagates continuously along the axon as established in large-diameter fibers. In the latter axons the AP jumps along the nodes of Ranvier—discrete, anatomically specialized regions which contain very high densities of sodium ion (Na+) channels. Therefore, saltatory conduction is thought as the hallmark of myelinated axons, which enables faster and more reliable propagation of signals than in unmyelinated axons of same outer diameter. Recent molecular anatomy showed that in C-fibers, the very thin (0.1 μm diameter) axons of the peripheral nervous system, Nav1.8 channels are clustered together on lipid rafts that float in the cell membrane. This localized concentration of Na+ channels resembles in structure the ion channel organization at the nodes of Ranvier, yet it is currently unknown whether this translates into an equivalent phenomenon of saltatory conduction or related-functional benefits and efficiencies. Therefore, we modeled biophysically realistic unmyelinated axons with both conventional and lipid-raft based organization of Na+ channels. We find that APs are reliably conducted in a micro-saltatory fashion along lipid rafts. Comparing APs in unmyelinated fibers with and without lipid rafts did not reveal any significant difference in either the metabolic cost or AP propagation velocity. By investigating the efficiency of AP propagation over Nav1.8 channels, we find however that the specific inactivation properties of these channels significantly increase the metabolic cost of signaling in C-fibers. PMID:25352785

  7. Regulating the Size and Stabilization of Lipid Raft-Like Domains and Using Calcium Ions as Their Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raviv, Uri; Szekely, Or

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we apply means to probe, stabilize and control the size of lipid raft-like domains in vitro. In biomembranes the size of lipid rafts is ca. 10 - 30 nm. In vitro, mixing saturated and unsaturated lipids results in micro-domains, which are unstable and coalesce. Using solution X-ray scattering, we studied the structure of binary and ternary lipid mixtures in the presence of calcium ions. Three lipids were used: saturated, unsaturated and a hybrid (1-saturated-2-unsaturated) lipid that is predominant in the phospholipids of cellular membranes. Only membranes composed of the saturated lipid can adsorb calcium ions, become charged and therefore considerably swell. The selective calcium affinity was used to show that binary mixtures, containing the saturated lipid, phase separated into large-scale domains. Our data suggests that by introducing the hybrid lipid to a mixture of the saturated and unsaturated lipids, the size of the domains decreased with the concentration of the hybrid lipid, until the three lipids could completely mix. We attribute this behavior to the tendency of the hybrid lipid to act as a line-active co-surfactant that can easily reside at the interface between the saturated and the unsaturated lipids and reduce the line-tension between them.

  8. Caveolins, caveolae, and lipid rafts in cellular transport, signaling, and disease.

    PubMed

    Quest, Andrew F G; Leyton, Lisette; Párraga, Mario

    2004-02-01

    Caveolae were initially described some 50 years ago. For many decades, they remained predominantly of interest to structural biologists. The identification of a molecular marker for these domains, caveolin, combined with the possibility to isolate such cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich regions as detergent-insoluble membrane complexes paved the way to more rigorous characterization of composition, regulation, and function. Experiments with knock-out mice for the caveolin genes clearly demonstrate the importance of caveolin-1 and -3 in formation of caveolae. Nonetheless, detergent-insoluble domains are also found in cells lacking caveolin expression and are referred to here as lipid rafts. Caveolae and lipid rafts were shown to represent membrane compartments enriched in a large number of signaling molecules whose structural integrity is essential for many signaling processes. Caveolin-1 is an essential structural component of cell surface caveolae, important for regulating trafficking and mobility of these vesicles. In addition, caveolin-1 is found at many other intracellular locations. Variations in subcellular localization are paralleled by a plethora of ascribed functions for this protein. Here, more recent data addressing the role of caveolin-1 in cellular signaling and the development of diseases like cancer will be preferentially discussed.

  9. Lipid Rafts Act as Specialized Domains for Tetanus Toxin Binding and Internalization into Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Herreros, Judit; Ng, Tony; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2001-01-01

    Tetanus (TeNT) is a zinc protease that blocks neurotransmission by cleaving the synaptic protein vesicle-associated membrane protein/synaptobrevin. Although its intracellular catalytic activity is well established, the mechanism by which this neurotoxin interacts with the neuronal surface is not known. In this study, we characterize p15s, the first plasma membrane TeNT binding proteins and we show that they are glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoproteins in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells, spinal cord cells, and purified motor neurons. We identify p15 as neuronal Thy-1 in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy measurements confirm the close association of the binding domain of TeNT and Thy-1 at the plasma membrane. We find that TeNT is recruited to detergent-insoluble lipid microdomains on the surface of neuronal cells. Finally, we show that cholesterol depletion affects a raft subpool and blocks the internalization and intracellular activity of the toxin. Our results indicate that TeNT interacts with target cells by binding to lipid rafts and that cholesterol is required for TeNT internalization and/or trafficking in neurons. PMID:11598183

  10. Motility and stem cell properties induced by the epithelial-mesenchymal transition require destabilization of lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Prijic, Sara; Chen, Xiaoling; Levental, Ilya; Chang, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    The Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a developmental program that provides cancer cells with the characteristics necessary for metastasis, including increased motility and stem cell properties. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are not yet fully understood, hampering efforts to develop therapeutics. In recent years, it has become apparent that EMT is accompanied by wholesale changes in diverse signaling pathways that are initiated by proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). The PM contains thousands of lipid and protein species that are dynamically and spatially organized into lateral membrane domains, an example of which are lipid rafts. Since one of the major functions of rafts is modulation of signaling originating at the PM, we hypothesized that the signaling changes occurring during an EMT are associated with alterations in PM organization. To test this hypothesis, we used Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles (GPMVs) to study the organization of intact plasma membranes isolated from live cells. We observed that induction of EMT significantly destabilized lipid raft domains. Further, this reduction in stability was crucial for the maintenance of the stem cell phenotype and EMT-induced remodeling of PM-orchestrated pathways. Exogenously increasing raft stability by feeding cells with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) repressed these phenotypes without altering EMT markers, and inhibited the metastatic capacity of breast cancer cells. Hence, modulating raft properties regulates cell phenotype, suggesting a novel approach for targeting the impact of EMT in cancer. PMID:27303921

  11. Rafting trips into the cell.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Knorr, Ruth

    2009-09-01

    Lipid rafts are small, heterogeneous and short-lived assemblies of cholesterol, sphingolipids and few proteins in biological membranes. They can be converted to larger and more permanent membrane domains by coalescence. Cells appear to be able to modulate the size and the longevity of lipid rafts and thus exploit the local enrichment of membrane components for processes ranging from signaling to intracellular sorting and transport. In a recent paper, we provided evidence for the internalization of MHC I and MHC II along two distinct endocytosis pathways in mouse B-lymphocytes. Both pathways were much more dependent on membrane cholesterol than the clathrin-mediated uptake of transferrin receptor, which implicated lipid rafts in the internalization of MHC molecules. Indeed, MHC I and MHC II prefer distinct raft-like membrane environments as revealed by a co-clustering analysis with the sphingolipids G(M)1 and G(M)2. Moreover, MHC I and MHC II distributed to different types of detergent resistant membranes (DRMs) prepared by a novel detergent extraction procedure. In this article addendum we discuss the relationship between DRMs, small lipid rafts and stabilized rafts/membrane domains and propose a role for membrane domains in the endocytosis of MHC proteins.

  12. Deep-apical tubules: dynamic lipid-raft microdomains in the brush-border region of enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gert H; Pedersen, Jens; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte; Immerdal, Lissi; Danielsen, E Michael

    2003-07-01

    The brush border of small intestinal enterocytes is highly enriched in cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-containing membrane microdomains, commonly termed as lipid 'rafts'. Functionally, transcytosis of IgA and exocytosis of newly made brush-border proteins in enterocytes occur through apical lipid raft-containing compartments, but little is otherwise known about these raft microdomains. We therefore studied in closer detail apical lipid-raft compartments in enterocytes by immunogold electron microscopy and biochemical analyses. Novel membrane structures, deep-apical tubules, were visualized by the non-permeable surface marker Ruthenium Red in the brush-border region of the cells. The surface-connected tubules were labelled by antibodies to caveolin-1 and the glycolipid asialo G(M1), and they were sensitive to cholesterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, indicating the presence of raft microdomains. Deep-apical tubules were positioned close to the actin rootlets of adjacent microvilli in the terminal web region, which had a diameter of 50-100 nm, and penetrated up to 1 microm into the cytoplasm. Markers for transcytosis, IgA and the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, as well as the resident brush-border enzyme aminopeptidase N, were present in these deep-apical tubules. We propose that deep-apical tubules are a specialized lipid-raft microdomain in the brush-border region functioning as a hub in membrane trafficking at the brush border. In addition, the sensitivity to cholesterol depletion suggests that deep-apical tubules function as a cell-surface membrane reservoir for cholesterol and for rapid adaptive changes in the size of microvilli at the brush border.

  13. Ceramide modulates HERG potassium channel gating by translocation into lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Sindura B.; Fox, Todd E.; Elmslie, Keith S.

    2010-01-01

    Human ether-à-go-go-related gene (HERG) potassium channels play an important role in cardiac action potential repolarization, and HERG dysfunction can cause cardiac arrhythmias. However, recent evidence suggests a role for HERG in the proliferation and progression of multiple types of cancers, making it an attractive target for cancer therapy. Ceramide is an important second messenger of the sphingolipid family, which due to its proapoptotic properties has shown promising results in animal models as an anticancer agent. Yet the acute effects of ceramide on HERG potassium channels are not known. In the present study we examined the effects of cell-permeable C6-ceramide on HERG potassium channels stably expressed in HEK-293 cells. C6-ceramide (10 μM) reversibly inhibited HERG channel current (IHERG) by 36 ± 5%. Kinetically, ceramide induced a significant hyperpolarizing shift in the current-voltage relationship (ΔV1/2 = −8 ± 0.5 mV) and increased the deactivation rate (43 ± 3% for τfast and 51 ± 3% for τslow). Mechanistically, ceramide recruited HERG channels within caveolin-enriched lipid rafts. Cholesterol depletion and repletion experiments and mathematical modeling studies confirmed that inhibition and gating effects are mediated by separate mechanisms. The ceramide-induced hyperpolarizing gating shift (raft mediated) could offset the impact of inhibition (raft independent) during cardiac action potential repolarization, so together they may nullify any negative impact on cardiac rhythm. Our results provide new insights into the effects of C6-ceramide on HERG channels and suggest that C6-ceramide can be a promising therapeutic for cancers that overexpress HERG. PMID:20375276

  14. Cholesterol drives aβ(1-42) interaction with lipid rafts in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Seghezza, Silvia; Diaspro, Alberto; Canale, Claudio; Dante, Silvia

    2014-11-25

    The molecular mechanism at the basis of the neurodegenerative process related to Alzheimer's disease (AD) is triggered by the local composition of the neural plasma membrane. The role of cholesterol is controversial. In this investigation the interaction of the AD peptide amyloid-beta (1-42) with model membranes containing lipid rafts has been investigated by atomic force microscopy techniques. Supported lipid membranes made of phospholipids/sphingomyelin/cholesterol have been investigated as a function of the molar content of cholesterol, in a range spanning the phase diagram of the lipid system. The administration of amyloid-beta induced a phase reorganization of the lipid domains, when the cholesterol molar fraction was below 5%. At the same time, a mechanical destabilization and an appreciable thinning of the membrane induced by the peptide were detected. The major interaction was observed in the presence of the gel phase Lβ, and was enhanced by a low cholesterol amount. With the appearance of the liquid ordered phase Lo, the effect was hindered. At high cholesterol content (20% mol), no detectable effects in the bilayer morphology or in its mechanical stability were recorded. These findings give new insights on the molecular mechanism of the amyloid/membrane interaction, highlighting the peculiar role of cholesterol.

  15. Lipid Raft Integrity Is Required for Survival of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Badana, Anil; Chintala, Madhuri; Varikuti, Gayathri; Pudi, Nagaseshu; Kumari, Seema; Kappala, Vijaya Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lipid rafts are cholesterol enriched microdomains that colocalize signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis. We examined the effect of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD)-mediated cholesterol extraction on the proliferation, adhesion, invasion, and angiogenesis of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Methods We measured cholesterol and estimated cell toxicity. Detergent resistant membrane (DRM) and non-DRM fractions were separated using the OptiPrep gradient method. Cell cycles stages were analyzed by flow cytometry, apoptosis was assessed using the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay, and metastasis was determined using a Matrigel invasion assay. Neo-vessel pattern and levels of angiogenic modulators were determined using an in vitro angiogenesis assay and an angiogenesis array, respectively. Results The present study found that the cholesterol-depleting agent MβCD, efficiently depleted membrane cholesterol and caused concentration dependent (0.1–0.5 mM) cytotoxicity compared to nystatin and filipin III in TNBC cell lines, MDA-MB 231 and MDA-MB 468. A reduced proportion of caveolin-1 found in DRM fractions indicated a cholesterol extraction-induced disruption of lipid raft integrity. MβCD inhibited 52% of MDA-MB 231 cell adhesion on fibronectin and 56% of MDA-MB 468 cell adhesion on vitronectin, while invasiveness of these cells was decreased by 48% and 52% respectively, following MβCD treatment (48 hours). MβCD also caused cell cycle arrest at the G2M phase and apoptosis in MDA-MB 231 cells (25% and 58% cells, respectively) and in MDA-MB 468 cells (30% and 38% cells, respectively). We found that MβCD treated cells caused a 52% and 58% depletion of neovessel formation in both MDA-MB 231 and MDA-MB 468 cell lines, respectively. This study also demonstrated that MβCD treatment caused a respective 2.6- and 2.5-fold depletion of tyrosine protein kinase receptor (TEK) receptor tyrosine kinase levels in both

  16. Segregation of gangliosides GM1 and GD3 on cell membranes, isolated membrane rafts, and defined supported lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Vyas, K A; Patel, H V; Vyas, A A; Schnaar, R L

    2001-02-01

    Lateral assemblies of sphingolipids, glycosphingolipids and cholesterol, termed rafts, are postulated to be present in biological membranes and to function in important cellular phenomena. We probed whether rafts are heterogeneous by determining the relative distribution of two gangliosides, GM1 and GD3, in artificial supported monolayers, in intact rat primary cerebellar granule neurones, and in membrane rafts isolated from rat cerebellum. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using fluorophore-labelled cholera toxin B subunit (which binds GM1) and mAb R24 (which binds GD3) revealed that GM1 spontaneously self-associates but does not co-cluster with GD3 in supported monolayers and on intact neurones. Cholera toxin and immunocytochemical labelling of isolated membrane rafts from rat cerebellum further demonstrated that GM1 does not co-localise with GD3. Furthermore, whereas the membrane raft resident proteins Lyn and caveolin both co-localise with GD3 in isolated membrane rafts, GM1 appears in separate and distinct aggregates. These data support prior reports that membrane rafts are heterogeneous, although the mechanisms for establishing and maintaining such heterogeneity remain to be determined.

  17. Supramolecular Nanofibers Enhance Growth Factor Signaling by Increasing Lipid Raft Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, Christina J.; Sur, Shantanu; Lee, Sungsoo S.; Yu, Jeong Min; Zhou, Yan; Snead, Malcolm L.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2016-04-12

    The nanostructures of self-assembling biomaterials have been previously designed to tune the release of growth factors in order to optimize biological repair and regeneration. We report here on the discovery that weakly cohesive peptide nanostructures in terms of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, when combined with low concentrations of osteogenic growth factor, enhance both BMP-2 and Wnt mediated signaling in myoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells, respectively. Conversely, analogous nanostructures with enhanced levels of internal hydrogen bonding and cohesion lead to an overall reduction in BMP-2 signaling. We propose that the mechanism for enhanced growth factor signaling by the nanostructures is related to their ability to increase diffusion within membrane lipid rafts. The phenomenon reported here could lead to new nanomedicine strategies to mediate growth factor signaling for translational targets.

  18. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets — protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores

    PubMed Central

    Arbor, Sage C.; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  19. Fas/CD95 prevents autoimmunity independently of lipid raft localization and efficient apoptosis induction

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Anthony C.; Ramaswamy, Madhu; Ouyang, Claudia; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Meylan, Françoise; Thomas, Stacy K.; Richoz, Nathan; Eil, Robert; Price, Susan; Casellas, Rafael; Rao, V. Koneti; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Siegel, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affecting the apoptosis-inducing function of the Fas/CD95 TNF-family receptor result in autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disease. However, Fas can also costimulate T-cell activation and promote tumour cell growth and metastasis. Palmitoylation at a membrane proximal cysteine residue enables Fas to localize to lipid raft microdomains and induce apoptosis in cell lines. Here, we show that a palmitoylation-defective Fas C194V mutant is defective in inducing apoptosis in primary mouse T cells, B cells and dendritic cells, while retaining the ability to enhance naive T-cell differentiation. Despite inability to efficiently induce cell death, the Fas C194V receptor prevents the lymphoaccumulation and autoimmunity that develops in Fas-deficient mice. These findings indicate that induction of apoptosis through Fas is dependent on receptor palmitoylation in primary immune cells, and Fas may prevent autoimmunity by mechanisms other than inducing apoptosis. PMID:28008916

  20. Thiolated pyrimidine nucleotides may interfere thiol groups concentrated at lipid rafts of HIV-1 infected cells.

    PubMed

    Kanizsai, Szilvia; Ongrádi, Joseph; Aradi, János; Nagy, Károly

    2014-12-01

    Upon HIV infection, cells become activated and cell surface thiols are present in increased number. Earlier we demonstrated in vitro anti-HIV effect of thiolated pyrimidine nucleotide UD29, which interferes thiol function. To further analyse the redox processes required for HIV-1 entry and infection, toxicity assays were performed using HIV-1 infected monolayer HeLaCD4-LTR/ β-gal cells and suspension H9 T cells treated with several thiolated nucleotide derivatives of UD29. Selective cytotoxicity of thiolated pyrimidines on HIV-1 infected cells were observed. Results indicate that thiolated pyrimidine derivates may interfere with -SH (thiol) groups concentrated in lipid rafts of cell membrane and interacts HIV-1 infected (activated) cells resulting in a selective cytotoxicity of HIV-1 infected cells, and reducing HIV-1 entry.

  1. Persistence of psychosine in brain lipid rafts is a limiting factor in the therapeutic recovery of a mouse model for Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    White, AB; Galbiati, F; Givogri, MI; Lopez Rosas, A; Qiu, X; van Breemen, R; Bongarzone, ER

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids are intrinsic components of membrane lipid rafts. The abnormal accumulation of these molecules may introduce architectural and functional changes in these domains, leading to cellular dysfunction. Galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) is a pathogenic lipid-raft associated molecule whose accumulation leads to brain deterioration and irreversible neurological handicap in the incurable leukodystrophy Krabbe disease (KD). The relevance of clearing excessive levels of pathogenic psychosine from lipid rafts in therapy for KD has not been investigated. The work presented here demonstrates that psychosine inhibits raft-mediated endocytosis in neural cells. In addition, while in vitro enzyme reconstitution is sufficient for the reversal of related endocytic defects in affected neural cells, traditional in vivo enzyme therapies in the mouse model of KD appear insufficient for complete removal of pathogenic levels of raft-associated psychosine. This work describes a mechanism that may contribute to limit the in vivo efficacy of traditional therapies for KD. PMID:21259322

  2. Lipid rafts association and anti-apoptotic function of prohibitin in ultraviolet B light-irradiated HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-08-01

    Upon UVB irradiation, an alternation of major lipid raft components can lead to the recruitment/activation of rafts-associated proteins and initiation of downstream apoptotic signalling pathways. We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to identify potential regulators of UVB-induced apoptosis and mass spectrometry fingerprint analysis to identify proteins that are altered in the rafts after UVB irradiation. Our data show that levels of several proteins, including prohibitin (PHB), were changed in lipid rafts after UVB irradiation. We also demonstrate that while total PHB expression was not changed, the protein was enriched in lipid rafts after UVB irradiation. Reduced expression of PHB using siRNA knockdown resulted in an increase in cellular apoptosis after UVB irradiation. Based on these results, we propose that PHB protects keratinocytes from UVB-induced apoptosis.

  3. A novel mechanism of regulating breast cancer cell migration via palmitoylation-dependent alterations in the lipid raft affiliation of CD44

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Most breast cancer-related deaths result from metastasis, a process involving dynamic regulation of tumour cell adhesion and migration. The adhesion protein CD44, a key regulator of cell migration, is enriched in cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains termed lipid rafts. We recently reported that raft affiliation of CD44 negatively regulates interactions with its migratory binding partner ezrin. Since raft affiliation is regulated by post-translational modifications including palmitoylation, we sought to establish the contribution of CD44 palmitoylation and lipid raft affiliation to cell migration. Methods Recovery of CD44 and its binding partners from raft versus non-raft membrane microdomains was profiled in non-migrating and migrating breast cancer cell lines. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to introduce single or double point mutations into both CD44 palmitoylation sites (Cys286 and Cys295), whereupon the implications for lipid raft recovery, phenotype, ezrin co-precipitation and migratory behaviour was assessed. Finally CD44 palmitoylation status and lipid raft affiliation was assessed in primary cultures from a small panel of breast cancer patients. Results CD44 raft affiliation was increased during migration of non-invasive breast cell lines, but decreased during migration of highly-invasive breast cells. The latter was paralleled by increased CD44 recovery in non-raft fractions, and exclusive non-raft recovery of its binding partners. Point mutation of CD44 palmitoylation sites reduced CD44 raft affiliation in invasive MDA-MB-231 cells, increased CD44-ezrin co-precipitation and accordingly enhanced cell migration. Expression of palmitoylation-impaired (raft-excluded) CD44 mutants in non-invasive MCF-10a cells was sufficient to reversibly induce the phenotypic appearance of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and to increase cell motility. Interestingly, cell migration was associated with temporal reductions in CD44 palmitoylation in

  4. Sustained Epigenetic Drug Delivery Depletes Cholesterol-Sphingomyelin Rafts from Resistant Breast Cancer Cells, Influencing Biophysical Characteristics of Membrane Lipids.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Vijay; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Yamada, Masayoshi; Morisada, Megan; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2015-10-27

    Cell-membrane lipid composition can greatly influence biophysical properties of cell membranes, affecting various cellular functions. We previously showed that lipid synthesis becomes altered in the membranes of resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR); they form a more rigid, hydrophobic lipid monolayer than do sensitive cell membranes (MCF-7). These changes in membrane lipids of resistant cells, attributed to epigenetic aberration, significantly affected drug transport and endocytic function, thus impacting the efficacy of anticancer drugs. The present study's objective was to determine the effects of the epigenetic drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC), delivered in sustained-release nanogels (DAC-NGs), on the composition and biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells. Resistant and sensitive cells were treated with DAC in solution (DAC-sol) or DAC-NGs, and cell-membrane lipids were isolated and analyzed for lipid composition and biophysical properties. In resistant cells, we found increased formation of cholesterol-sphingomyelin (CHOL-SM) rafts with culturing time, whereas DAC treatment reduced their formation. In general, the effect of DAC-NGs was greater in changing the lipid composition than with DAC-sol. DAC treatment also caused a rise in levels of certain phospholipids and neutral lipids known to increase membrane fluidity, while reducing the levels of certain lipids known to increase membrane rigidity. Isotherm data showed increased lipid membrane fluidity following DAC treatment, attributed to decrease levels of CHOL-SM rafts (lamellar beta [Lβ] structures or ordered gel) and a corresponding increase in lipids that form lamellar alpha-structures (Lα, liquid crystalline phase). Sensitive cells showed marginal or insignificant changes in lipid profile following DAC-treatment, suggesting that epigenetic changes affecting lipid biosynthesis are more specific to resistant cells. Since membrane fluidity plays a major role in drug transport

  5. Ethanol effects on binary and ternary supported lipid bilayers with gel/fluid domains and lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Marquês, Joaquim T; Viana, Ana S; De Almeida, Rodrigo F M

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol-lipid bilayer interactions have been a recurrent theme in membrane biophysics, due to their contribution to the understanding of membrane structure and dynamics. The main purpose of this study was to assess the interplay between membrane lateral heterogeneity and ethanol effects. This was achieved by in situ atomic force microscopy, following the changes induced by sequential ethanol additions on supported lipid bilayers formed in the absence of alcohol. Binary phospholipid mixtures with a single gel phase, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/cholesterol, gel/fluid phase coexistence DPPC/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and ternary lipid mixtures containing cholesterol, mimicking lipid rafts (DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol and DOPC/sphingomyelin/cholesterol), i.e., with liquid ordered/liquid disordered (ld/lo) phase separation, were investigated. For all compositions studied, and in two different solid supports, mica and silicon, domain formation or rearrangement accompanied by lipid bilayer thinning and expansion was observed. In the case of gel/fluid coexistence, low ethanol concentrations lead to a marked thinning of the fluid but not of the gel domains. In the case of ld/lo all the bilayer thins simultaneously by a similar extent. In both cases, only the more disordered phase expanded significantly, indicating that ethanol increases the proportion of disordered domains. Water/bilayer interfacial tension variation and freezing point depression, inducing acyl chain disordering (including opening and looping), tilting, and interdigitation, are probably the main cause for the observed changes. The results presented herein demonstrate that ethanol influences the bilayer properties according to membrane lateral organization.

  6. Key Molecular Requirements for Raft Formation in Lipid/Cholesterol Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Hakobyan, Davit; Heuer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The lipid mixture of DPPC (saturated lipid)/DUPC (unsaturated lipid)/CHOL (cholesterol) is studied with respect to its ability to form liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. We employ coarse-grained simulations with MARTINI force field. All three components are systematically modified in order to explore the relevant molecular properties, leading to phase separation. Specifically, we show that the DPPC/DUPC/CHOL system unmixes due to enthalpic DPPC-DPPC and DPPC-CHOL interactions. The phase separation remains unchanged, except for the formation of a gel phase at long times after decreasing the conformational degrees of freedom of the unsaturated DUPC. In contrast, the phase separation can be suppressed by softening the DPPC chains. In an attempt to mimic the ordering and unmixing effect of CHOL the latter is replaced by a stiff and shortened DPPC-like lipid. One still observes phase separation, suggesting that it is mainly the rigid and planar structure of CHOL which is important for raft formation. Addition of an extra bead to the head of CHOL has no notable impact on the phase separation of the system, supporting the irrelevance of the Umbrella model for the phase separation. Reduction of the conformational entropy of CHOL by stiffening its last bead results in a significant increase of the order of the DPPC/CHOL domain. This suggests that the conformational entropy of CHOL is important to prohibit the gelation process. The interleaflet interactions as mediated by the terminal molecular groups seem to have a strong impact on the possibility of a subsequent gelation process after phase separation. PMID:24498317

  7. Sigma-1 receptors (sigma(1) binding sites) form raft-like microdomains and target lipid droplets on the endoplasmic reticulum: roles in endoplasmic reticulum lipid compartmentalization and export.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2003-08-01

    The brain sigma-1 receptors can bind neurosteroids and psychotropic drugs, including neuroleptics and cocaine and are implicated in schizophrenia, depression, and drug dependence. In this study, we found that sigma-1 receptors specifically target lipid storage sites (lipid droplets) on the endoplasmic reticulum by forming a distinct class of lipid microdomains. Both endogenously expressing sigma-1 receptors and transfected C-terminally enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP)-tagged sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1R-EYFP) target unique "ring-like" structures associated with endoplasmic reticulum reticular networks in NG108-15 cells. The ring-like structures contain neutral lipids and are enlarged by the oleate treatment, indicating that they are endoplasmic reticulum-associated lipid droplets (ER-LDs). sigma-1 receptors colocalize with caveolin-2, a cholesterol-binding protein in lipid rafts on the ER-LDs, but not with adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP), a cytosolic lipid droplet (c-LD)-specific protein. When the double-arginine ER retention signal on the N terminus of sigma-1 receptors is truncated, sigma-1 receptors no longer exist on ER-LDs, but predominantly target c-LDs, which contain ADRP. sigma-1 receptors on ER-LDs form detergent-resistant raft-like lipid microdomains, the buoyancy of which is different from that of plasma membrane lipid rafts. (+)-Pentazocine causes sigma-1 receptors to disappear from the microdomains. N-Terminally EYFP-tagged sigma-1 receptors (EYFP-Sig-1R) failed to target ER-LDs. EYFP-Sig-1R-transfected cells showed an unrestricted distribution of neutral lipids all over the endoplasmic reticulum network, decreases in c-LDs and cholesterol in plasma membranes, and the bulbous aggregation of endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, sigma-1 receptors are unique endoplasmic reticulum proteins that regulate the compartmentalization of lipids on the endoplasmic reticulum and their export from the endoplasmic reticulum to plasma membrane and c-LDs.

  8. Freely turning over palmitate in erythrocyte membrane proteins is not responsible for the anchoring of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton: a study with bio-orthogonal chemical probes.

    PubMed

    Ciana, Annarita; Achilli, Cesare; Hannoush, Rami N; Risso, Angela; Balduini, Cesare; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2013-03-01

    Erythrocyte lipid rafts are anchored to the underlying spectrin membrane skeleton [A. Ciana, C. Achilli, C. Balduini, G. Minetti, On the association of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton in human erythrocytes, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1808 (2011) 183-190]. The nature of this linkage and the molecules involved are poorly understood. The interaction is sensitive to the increase in pH and ionic strength induced by carbonate. Given the role of palmitoylation in modulating the partitioning of certain proteins between various sub-cellular compartments and the plasma membrane, we asked whether palmitoylation of p55, a peripheral protein located at the junctional complex between spectrin-actin-protein 4.1 that anchors the membrane skeleton to the lipid bilayer via the transmembrane protein glycophorin C, could contribute to the anchoring of lipid rafts to the membrane skeleton. We adopted a new, non-radioactive method for studying protein palmitoylation, based on bio-orthogonal chemical analogues of fatty acids, containing an omega-alkynyl group, to metabolically label cell proteins, which are then revealed by a "click chemistry" reaction of the alkynyl moiety with an azide-containing reporter tag. We show that the membrane localization and palmitoylation levels of p55 did not change after carbonate treatment. 2-bromopalmitate and cerulenin, two known palmitoylation inhibitors, completely inhibited p55 palmitoylation, and protein palmitoyl thioesterase-1 (PPT1) reduced it, without affecting the association between lipid rafts and membrane-skeleton, indicating, on the one hand, that p55 palmitoylation is enzymatic, and, on the other, that it is not involved in the modulation of the linkage of lipid rafts to the membrane-skeleton.

  9. Bilayer Asymmetry Influences Integrin Sequestering in Raft-Mimicking Lipid Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Noor F.; Siegel, Amanda P.; Ge, Yifan; Jordan, Rainer; Naumann, Christoph A.

    2013-01-01

    There is growing recognition that lipid heterogeneities in cellular membranes play an important role in the distribution and functionality of membrane proteins. However, the detection and characterization of such heterogeneities at the cellular level remains challenging. Here we report on the poorly understood relationship between lipid bilayer asymmetry and membrane protein sequestering in raft-mimicking model membrane mixtures using a powerful experimental platform comprised of confocal spectroscopy XY-scan and photon-counting histogram analyses. This experimental approach is utilized to probe the domain-specific sequestering and oligomerization state of αvβ3 and α5β1 integrins in bilayers, which contain coexisting liquid-disordered/liquid-ordered (ld/lo) phase regions exclusively in the top leaflet of the bilayer (bottom leaflet contains ld phase). Comparison with previously reported integrin sequestering data in bilayer-spanning lo-ld phase separations demonstrates that bilayer asymmetry has a profound influence on αvβ3 and α5β1 sequestering behavior. For example, both integrins sequester preferentially to the lo phase in asymmetric bilayers, but to the ld phase in their symmetric counterparts. Furthermore, our data show that bilayer asymmetry significantly influences the role of native ligands in integrin sequestering. PMID:23708361

  10. Interaction of membrane/lipid rafts with the cytoskeleton: impact on signaling and function

    PubMed Central

    Head, Brian P.; Patel, Hemal H.; Insel, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The plasma membrane in eukaryotic cells contains microdomains that are enriched in certain glycosphingolipids, gangliosides, and sterols (such as cholesterol) to form membrane/lipid rafts (MLR). These regions exist as caveolae, morphologically observable flask-like invaginations, or as a less easily detectable planar form. MLR are scaffolds for many molecular entities, including signaling receptors and ion channels that communicate extracellular stimuli to the intracellular milieu. Much evidence indicates that this organization and/or the clustering of MLR into more active signaling platforms depends upon interactions with and dynamic rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. Several cytoskeletal components and binding partners, as well as enzymes that regulate the cytoskeleton, localize to MLR and help regulate lateral diffusion of membrane proteins and lipids in response to extracellular events (e.g., receptor activation, shear stress, electrical conductance, and nutrient demand). MLR regulate cellular polarity, adherence to the extracellular matrix, signaling events (including ones that affect growth and migration), and are sites of cellular entry of certain pathogens, toxins and nanoparticles. The dynamic interaction between MLR and the underlying cytoskeleton thus regulates many facets of the function of eukaryotic cells and their adaptation to changing environments. Here, we review general features of MLR and caveolae and their role in several aspects of cellular function, including polarity of endothelial and epithelial cells, cell migration, mechanotransduction, lymphocyte activation, neuronal growth and signaling, and a variety of disease settings. PMID:23899502

  11. Lipid raft localization of epidermal growth factor receptor alters matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in SiHa cells via the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zongfeng; Wang, Lina; Du, Juan; Li, Yuanbo; Yang, Huilun; Li, Chenxi; Li, Hui; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) has been identified as an important participant in tumor invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) localization to lipid rafts on signaling pathways involved in the regulation of MMP-1 expression in SiHa cells, a cervical cancer cell line. EGFR activation by EGF specifically induced MMP-1 expression at both the messenger RNA and protein levels. Additionally, it was observed that EGFR localized to lipid rafts, and that the redistribution of EGFR induced by lipid raft disruption strengthened EGF-induced MMP-1 expression. MMP-1 induction was blocked by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase inhibitors PD98059 and U0126. Our results suggested that lipid rafts provide a platform to inhibit EGFR regulation of MMP-1 in SiHa cells through the MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. PMID:28101233

  12. Membrane lipid rafts and neurobiology: age-related changes in membrane lipids and loss of neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Junji; Pearn, Matthew L; Lemkuil, Brian P; Patel, Piyush M; Head, Brian P

    2016-08-15

    A better understanding of the cellular physiological role that plasma membrane lipids, fatty acids and sterols play in various cellular systems may yield more insight into how cellular and whole organ function is altered during the ageing process. Membrane lipid rafts (MLRs) within the plasma membrane of most cells serve as key organizers of intracellular signalling and tethering points of cytoskeletal components. MLRs are plasmalemmal microdomains enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol and scaffolding proteins; they serve as a platform for signal transduction, cytoskeletal organization and vesicular trafficking. Within MLRs are the scaffolding and cholesterol binding proteins named caveolin (Cav). Cavs not only organize a multitude of receptors including neurotransmitter receptors (NMDA and AMPA receptors), signalling proteins that regulate the production of cAMP (G protein-coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, phosphodiesterases (PDEs)), and receptor tyrosine kinases involved in growth (Trk), but also interact with components that modulate actin and tubulin cytoskeletal dynamics (e.g. RhoGTPases and actin binding proteins). MLRs are essential for the regulation of the physiology of organs such as the brain, and age-related loss of cholesterol from the plasma membrane leads to loss of MLRs, decreased presynaptic vesicle fusion, and changes in neurotransmitter release, all of which contribute to different forms of neurodegeneration. Thus, MLRs provide an active membrane domain that tethers and reorganizes the cytoskeletal machinery necessary for membrane and cellular repair, and genetic interventions that restore MLRs to normal cellular levels may be exploited as potential therapeutic means to reverse the ageing and neurodegenerative processes.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of ABCA1-Null Macrophages Reveals a Role for Stomatin-Like Protein-2 in Raft Composition and Toll-Like Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Zhu, Xuewei; Aloor, Jim J.; Azzam, Kathleen M.; Gabor, Kristin A.; Ge, William; Addo, Kezia A.; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Parks, John S.; Fessler, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid raft membrane microdomains organize signaling by many prototypical receptors, including the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) of the innate immune system. Raft-localization of proteins is widely thought to be regulated by raft cholesterol levels, but this is largely on the basis of studies that have manipulated cell cholesterol using crude and poorly specific chemical tools, such as β-cyclodextrins. To date, there has been no proteome-scale investigation of whether endogenous regulators of intracellular cholesterol trafficking, such as the ATP binding cassette (ABC)A1 lipid efflux transporter, regulate targeting of proteins to rafts. Abca1−/− macrophages have cholesterol-laden rafts that have been reported to contain increased levels of select proteins, including TLR4, the lipopolysaccharide receptor. Here, using quantitative proteomic profiling, we identified 383 proteins in raft isolates from Abca1+/+ and Abca1−/− macrophages. ABCA1 deletion induced wide-ranging changes to the raft proteome. Remarkably, many of these changes were similar to those seen in Abca1+/+ macrophages after lipopolysaccharide exposure. Stomatin-like protein (SLP)-2, a member of the stomatin-prohibitin-flotillin-HflK/C family of membrane scaffolding proteins, was robustly and specifically increased in Abca1−/− rafts. Pursuing SLP-2 function, we found that rafts of SLP-2-silenced macrophages had markedly abnormal composition. SLP-2 silencing did not compromise ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux but reduced macrophage responsiveness to multiple TLR ligands. This was associated with reduced raft levels of the TLR co-receptor, CD14, and defective lipopolysaccharide-induced recruitment of the common TLR adaptor, MyD88, to rafts. Taken together, we show that the lipid transporter ABCA1 regulates the protein repertoire of rafts and identify SLP-2 as an ABCA1-dependent regulator of raft composition and of the innate immune response. PMID:25910759

  14. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Eum, Sung Yong Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. - Highlights: • PCB153 disturbed human brain endothelial barrier through disruption of occludin. • Lipid raft-associated PP

  15. Surfactant lipids regulate LPS-induced interleukin-8 production in A549 lung epithelial cells by inhibiting translocation of TLR4 into lipid raft domains

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Wondwossen; Alghaithy, Abdulaziz A.; Parton, Joan; Jones, Kenneth P.; Jackson, Simon K.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to providing mechanical stability, growing evidence suggests that surfactant lipid components can modulate inflammatory responses in the lung. However, little is known of the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory action of surfactant lipids. This study investigates the effect of the lipid-rich surfactant preparations Survanta®, Curosurf®, and the major surfactant phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene and protein expression in human A549 lung epithelial cells using immunoassay and PCR techniques. To examine potential mechanisms of the surfactant lipid effects, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, and membrane lipid raft domains were separated by density gradient ultracentrifugation and analyzed by immunoblotting with anti-TLR4 antibody. The lipid-rich surfactant preparations Survanta®, Curosurf®, and DPPC, at physiological concentrations, significantly downregulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced IL-8 expression in A549 cells both at the mRNA and protein levels. The surfactant preparations did not affect the cell surface expression of TLR4 or the binding of LPS to the cells. However, LPS treatment induced translocation of TLR4 into membrane lipid raft microdomains, and this translocation was inhibited by incubation of the cells with the surfactant lipid. This study provides important mechanistic details of the immune-modulating action of pulmonary surfactant lipids. PMID:19648651

  16. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Eum, Sung Yong; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs.

  17. Disruption of Lipid Raft Function Increases Expression and Secretion of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Lu, Chia-Yun; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Yeh, Chia-Shan

    2016-01-01

    The adipocyte is unique in its capacity to store lipids. In addition to triglycerides, the adipocyte stores a significant amount of cholesterol. Moreover, obese adipocytes are characterized by a redistribution of cholesterol with depleted cholesterol in the plasma membrane, suggesting that cholesterol perturbation may play a role in adipocyte dysfunction. We used methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), a molecule with high affinity for cholesterol, to rapidly deplete cholesterol level in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We tested whether this perturbation altered adipocyte secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a chemokine that is elevated in obesity and is linked to obesity-associated chronic diseases. Depletion of cholesterol by MβCD increased MCP-1 secretion as well as the mRNA and protein levels, suggesting perturbation at biosynthesis and secretion. Pharmacological inhibition revealed that NF-κB, but not MEK, p38 and JNK, was involved in MβCD-stimulated MCP-1 biosynthesis and secretion in adipocytes. Finally, another cholesterol-binding drug, filipin, also induced MCP-1 secretion without altering membrane cholesterol level. Interestingly, both MβCD and filipin disturbed the integrity of lipid rafts, the membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol. Thus, the depletion of membrane cholesterol in obese adipocytes may result in dysfunction of lipid rafts, leading to the elevation of proinflammatory signaling and MCP-1 secretion in adipocytes. PMID:28030645

  18. LINGO-1 regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation by inhibiting ErbB2 translocation and activation in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Xinhua; Shao, Zhaohui; Sheng, Guoqing; Pepinsky, Blake; Mi, Sha

    2014-05-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation is negatively regulated by LINGO-1 and positively regulated by the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase. In wild-type oligodendrocytes, inhibition of ErbB2 blocks differentiation, whereas activation of ErbB2 promotes differentiation. In LINGO-1(-/-) oligodendrocytes, inhibition of ErbB2 blocks oligodendrocyte differentiation; whereas activation of ErbB2 does not enhance differentiation. Biological and biochemical evidence showing that LINGO-1 can directly bind to ErbB2, block ErbB2 translocation into lipid rafts, and inhibit its phosphorylation for activation. The study demonstrates a novel regulatory mechanism of ErbB2 function whereby LINGO-1 suppresses oligodendrocyte differentiation by inhibiting ErbB2 translocation and activation in lipid rafts.

  19. Lipid rafts promote liver cancer cell proliferation and migration by up-regulation of TLR7 expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Guo, Xiaodong; Wu, Liyuan; Yang, Mei; Li, Zhiwei; Gao, Yinjie; Liu, Shuhong; Zhou, Guangde; Zhao, Jingmin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) occurs predominantly in patients with underlying chronic liver disease and cirrhosis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in innate immune responses and TLR signaling has been associated with various chronic liver diseases. Lipid rafts provide the necessary microenvironment for certain specialized signaling events to take place, such as the innate immune recognition. The purpose of this study was to determine the pattern of TLR7 expression in HCC, how to recruit TLR7 into lipid rafts responded to ligands and whether targeting TLR7 might have beneficial effects. The study group was comprised of 130 human liver tissues: 23 chronic hepatitis B (CHB), 18 liver cirrhosis (LC), 68 HCC and 21 normal livers. The expression of TLR7 was evaluated using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and flow cytometry. Proliferation and migration of human HepG2 cells were studied following stimulation of TLR7 using the agonist gardiquimod and inhibition with a specific antagonist 20S-protopanaxadiol (aPPD). The activation of lipid raft-associated TLR7 signaling was measured using western blotting, double immunohistochemistry and immunoprecipitation in liver tissues and HepG2 cells. TLR7 expression was up-regulated in human HCC tissues and hepatoma cell line. Proliferation and migration of HepG2 cells in vitro increased significantly in response to stimulation of TLR7. TLR7 inhibition using aPPD significantly reduced HepG2 cell migration in vitro. The lipid raft protein caveolin-1 and flotillin-1 were involved with enhanced TLR7 signaling in HCC. Conclusions The data suggest that inhibiting TLR7 with antagonists, like aPPD, could potentially be used as a novel therapeutic approach for HCC. PMID:27588480

  20. Biophysical alterations in lipid rafts from human cerebral cortex associate with increased BACE1/AβPP interaction in early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Mario; Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Ferrer, Isidre; Gómez, Tomás; Marín, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have assessed the biophysical properties of lipid rafts from different brain areas in subjects exhibiting early neuropathological stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). By means of steady-state fluorescence polarization analyses using two environment-sensitive fluorescent probes, we demonstrate that lipid rafts from cerebellum, and frontal and entorhinal cortices, exhibit different biophysical behaviors depending on the stage of the disease. Thus, while membrane anisotropies were similar in the cerebellum along stages, lipid rafts from frontal and entorhinal cortices at AD stages I/II and AD III were significantly more liquid-ordered than in control subjects, both at the aqueous interface and hydrophobic core of the raft membrane. Thermotropic analyses demonstrated the presence of Arrhenius breakpoints between 28.3-32.0 °C, which were not influenced by the disease stage. However, analyses of membrane microviscosity (ηapp) demonstrate that frontal and entorhinal lipid rafts are notably more viscous and liquid-ordered all across the membrane from early stages of the disease. These physicochemical alterations in lipid rafts do not correlate with changes in cholesterol or sphingomyelin levels, but to reduced unsaturation index and increased saturate/polyunsaturated ratios in phospholipid acyl chains. Moreover, we demonstrate that β-secretase/AβPP (amyloid-β protein precursor) interaction and lipid raft microviscosity are strongly, and positively, correlated in AD frontal and entorhinal cortices. These observations strengthens the hypothesis that physical properties of these microdomains modulate the convergence of amyloidogenic machinery toward lipid rafts, and also points to a critical role of polyunsaturated fatty acids in amyloidogenic processing of AβPP.

  1. Localization of lipid raft proteins to the plasma membrane is a major function of the phospholipid transfer protein Sec14.

    PubMed

    Curwin, Amy J; Leblanc, Marissa A; Fairn, Gregory D; McMaster, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    The Sec14 protein domain is a conserved tertiary structure that binds hydrophobic ligands. The Sec14 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is essential with studies of S. cerevisiae Sec14 cellular function facilitated by a sole temperature sensitive allele, sec14(ts). The sec14(ts) allele encodes a protein with a point mutation resulting in a single amino acid change, Sec14(G266D). In this study results from a genome-wide genetic screen, and pharmacological data, provide evidence that the Sec14(G266D) protein is present at a reduced level compared to wild type Sec14 due to its being targeted to the proteosome. Increased expression of the sec14(ts) allele ameliorated growth arrest, but did not restore the defects in membrane accumulation or vesicular transport known to be defective in sec14(ts) cells. We determined that trafficking and localization of two well characterized lipid raft resident proteins, Pma1 and Fus-Mid-GFP, were aberrant in sec14(ts) cells. Localization of both lipid raft proteins was restored upon increased expression of the sec14(ts) allele. We suggest that a major function provided by Sec14 is trafficking and localization of lipid raft proteins.

  2. Evidence for the role of lipid rafts and sphingomyelin in Ca2+-gating of Transient Receptor Potential channels in trigeminal sensory neurons and peripheral nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Sághy, Éva; Szőke, Éva; Payrits, Maja; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Börzsei, Rita; Erostyák, János; Jánosi, Tibor Zoltán; Sétáló, György; Szolcsányi, János

    2015-10-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) cation channels, such as TRP Vanilloid 1 and TRP Ankyrin repeat domain 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1) are nocisensors playing important role to signal pain. Two "melastatin" TRP receptors, like TRPM8 and TRPM3 are also expressed in a subgroup of primary sensory neurons. These channels serve as thermosensors with unique thermal sensitivity ranges and are activated also by several exogenous and endogenous chemical ligands inducing conformational changes from various allosteric ("multisteric") sites. We analysed the role of plasma membrane microdomains of lipid rafts on isolated trigeminal (TRG) neurons and TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line by measuring agonist-induced Ca2+ transients with ratiometric technique. Stimulation-evoked calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release from sensory nerve endings of the isolated rat trachea by radioimmunoassay was also measured. Lipid rafts were disrupted by cleaving sphingomyelin (SM) with sphingomyelinase (SMase), cholesterol depletion with methyl β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and ganglioside breakdown with myriocin. It has been revealed that intracellular Ca2+ increase responses evoked by the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, the TRPA1 agonsits allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and formaldehyde as well as the TRPM8 activator icilin were inhibited after SMase, MCD and myriocin incubation but the response to the TRPM3 agonist pregnenolon sulphate was not altered. Extracellular SMase treatment did not influence the thapsigargin-evoked Ca2+-release from intracellular stores. Besides the cell bodies, SMase also inhibited capsaicin- or AITC-evoked CGRP release from peripheral sensory nerve terminals, this provides the first evidence for the importance of lipid raft integrity in TRPV1 and TRPA1 gating on capsaicin-sensitive nerve terminals. SM metabolites, ceramide and sphingosine, did not influence TRPA1 and TRPV1 activation on TRG neurons, TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line, and nerve terminals. We suggest, that the hydrophobic

  3. The role of lipid raft translocation of prohibitin in regulation of Akt and Raf-protected apoptosis of HaCaT cells upon ultraviolet B irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Wu, Shiyong

    2017-02-20

    Prohibitin (PHB) plays a role in regulation of ultraviolet B light (UVB)-induced apoptosis of human keratinocytes, HaCaT cells. The regulatory function of PHB appears to be associated with its lipid raft translocation. However, the detailed mechanism for PHB-mediated apoptosis of these keratinocytes upon UVB irradiation is not clear. In this report, we determined the role of lipid raft translocation of PHB in regulation of UVB-induced apoptosis. Our data show that upon UVB irradiation PHB is translocated from the non-raft membrane to the lipid rafts, which is correlated with a release of both Akt and Raf from membrane. Overexpression of Akt and/or Raf impedes UVB-induced lipid raft translocation of PHB. Immunoprecipitation analysis indicates that UVB alters the interactions among PHB, Akt, and Raf. Reduced expression of PHB leads to a decreased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, as well as a decreased activity of Akt, and increased apoptosis of the cells upon UVB irradiation. These results suggest that PHB regulates UVB-induced apoptosis of keratinocytes via a mechanism that involves detachment from Akt and Raf on the plasma membrane, and sequential lipid raft translocation.

  4. Lipid rafts: linking prion protein to zinc transport and amyloid-β toxicity in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Nicole T.; Griffiths, Heledd H.; Hooper, Nigel M.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of neuronal zinc homeostasis plays a major role in many processes related to brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Yet, despite the critical role of zinc in neuronal function, the cellular mechanisms underpinning its homeostatic control are far from clear. We reported that the cellular prion protein (PrPC) is involved in the uptake of zinc into neurons. This PrPC-mediated zinc influx required the metal-binding octapeptide repeats in PrPC and the presence of the zinc permeable AMPA channel with which PrPC directly interacted. Together with the observation that PrPC is evolutionarily related to the ZIP family of zinc transporters, these studies indicate that PrPC plays a key role in neuronal zinc homeostasis. Therefore, PrPC could contribute to cognitive health and protect against age-related zinc dyshomeostasis but PrPC has also been identified as a receptor for amyloid-β oligomers which accumulate in the brains of those with AD. We propose that the different roles that PrPC has are due to its interaction with different ligands and/or co-receptors in lipid raft-based signaling/transport complexes. PMID:25364748

  5. Docosahexaenoic acid modifies the clustering and size of lipid rafts and the lateral organization and surface expression of MHC class I of EL4 cells.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Salameh, Muhammad; Carraway, Kristen

    2009-09-01

    An emerging molecular mechanism by which docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts its effects is modification of lipid raft organization. The biophysical model, based on studies with liposomes, shows that DHA avoids lipid rafts because of steric incompatibility between DHA and cholesterol. The model predicts that DHA does not directly modify rafts; rather, it incorporates into nonrafts to modify the lateral organization and/or conformation of membrane proteins, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. Here, we tested predictions of the model at a cellular level by incorporating oleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and DHA, compared with a bovine serum albumin (BSA) control, into the membranes of EL4 cells. Quantitative microscopy showed that DHA, but not EPA, treatment, relative to the BSA control diminished lipid raft clustering and increased their size. Approximately 30% of DHA was incorporated directly into rafts without changing the distribution of cholesterol between rafts and nonrafts. Quantification of fluorescence colocalization images showed that DHA selectively altered MHC class I lateral organization by increasing the fraction of the nonraft protein into rafts compared with BSA. Both DHA and EPA treatments increased antibody binding to MHC class I compared with BSA. Antibody titration showed that DHA and EPA did not change MHC I conformation but increased total surface levels relative to BSA. Taken together, our findings are not in agreement with the biophysical model. Therefore, we propose a model that reconciles contradictory viewpoints from biophysical and cellular studies to explain how DHA modifies lipid rafts on several length scales. Our study supports the notion that rafts are an important target of DHA's mode of action.

  6. Measuring the Strength of Interaction between the Ebola Fusion Peptide and Lipid Rafts: Implications for Membrane Fusion and Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Mônica S.; Follmer, Cristian; Costa, Lilian T.; Vilani, Cecília; Bianconi, M. Lucia; Achete, Carlos Alberto; Silva, Jerson L.

    2011-01-01

    The Ebola fusion peptide (EBO16) is a hydrophobic domain that belongs to the GP2 membrane fusion protein of the Ebola virus. It adopts a helical structure in the presence of mimetic membranes that is stabilized by the presence of an aromatic-aromatic interaction established by Trp8 and Phe12. In spite of its infectious cycle becoming better understood recently, several steps still remain unclear, a lacuna that makes it difficult to develop strategies to block infection. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of membrane fusion, we probed the structure, function and energetics of EBO16 and its mutant W8A, in the absence or presence of different lipid membranes, including isolated domain-resistant membranes (DRM), a good experimental model for lipid rafts. The depletion of cholesterol from living mammalian cells reduced the ability of EBO16 to induce lipid mixing. On the other hand, EBO16 was structurally sensitive to interaction with lipid rafts (DRMs), but the same was not observed for W8A mutant. In agreement with these data, W8A showed a poor ability to promote membrane aggregation in comparison to EBO16. Single molecule AFM experiments showed a high affinity force pattern for the interaction of EBO16 and DRM, which seems to be a complex energetic event as observed by the calorimetric profile. Our study is the first to show a strong correlation between the initial step of Ebola virus infection and cholesterol, thus providing a rationale for Ebola virus proteins being co-localized with lipid-raft domains. In all, the results show how small fusion peptide sequences have evolved to adopt highly specific and strong interactions with membrane domains. Such features suggest these processes are excellent targets for therapeutic and vaccine approaches to viral diseases. PMID:21249196

  7. The β-subunit of cholera toxin has a high affinity for ganglioside GM1 embedded into solid supported lipid membranes with a lipid raft-like composition.

    PubMed

    Margheri, G; D'Agostino, R; Trigari, S; Sottini, S; Del Rosso, M

    2014-02-01

    In this communication, we report on the fabrication of GM1-rich solid-supported bilayer lipid membranes (ssBLM) made of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, the main components of lipid rafts,which are the physiological hosting microenvironment of GM1 on the cell membrane. The functionality of the ganglioside has been checked by measuring the apparent dissociation constant K(D) of the complex formed by the β-subunit of the cholera toxin and GM1. The value found deviates less than one order of magnitude from that measured for in vivo cells, indicating the potential of these ssBLM as optimized in vitro biomimetic platforms.

  8. Targeting of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel α2δ-1 Subunit to Lipid Rafts Is Independent from a GPI-Anchoring Motif

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Philip; Etheridge, Sarah; Song, Lele; Shah, Riddhi; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth M.; Jones, Owen T.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav) exist as heteromultimers comprising a pore-forming α1 with accessory β and α2δ subunits which modify channel trafficking and function. We previously showed that α2δ-1 (and likely the other mammalian α2δ isoforms - α2δ-2, 3 and 4) is required for targeting Cavs to lipid rafts, although the mechanism remains unclear. Whilst originally understood to have a classical type I transmembrane (TM) topology, recent evidence suggests the α2δ subunit contains a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor that mediates its association with lipid rafts. To test this notion, we have used a strategy based on the expression of chimera, where the reported GPI-anchoring sequences in the gabapentinoid-sensitive α2δ-1 subunit have been substituted with those of a functionally inert Type I TM-spanning protein – PIN-G. Using imaging, electrophysiology and biochemistry, we find that lipid raft association of PIN-α2δ is unaffected by substitution of the GPI motif with the TM domain of PIN-G. Moreover, the presence of the GPI motif alone is not sufficient for raft localisation, suggesting that upstream residues are required. GPI-anchoring is susceptible to phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) cleavage. However, whilst raft localisation of PIN-α2δ is disrupted by PI-PLC treatment, this is assay-dependent and non-specific effects of PI-PLC are observed on the distribution of the endogenous raft marker, caveolin, but not flotillin. Taken together, these data are most consistent with a model where α2δ-1 retains its type I transmembrane topology and its targeting to lipid rafts is governed by sequences upstream of the putative GPI anchor, that promote protein-protein, rather than lipid-lipid interactions. PMID:21695204

  9. Adenylyl cyclase type 6 overexpression selectively enhances beta-adrenergic and prostacyclin receptor-mediated inhibition of cardiac fibroblast function because of colocalization in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Thangavel, Muthusamy; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Mahautmr, Penden; Stitham, Jeremiah; Hwa, John; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2008-06-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts produce and degrade extracellular matrix and are critical in regulating cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Fibroblasts are activated by factors such as transforming growth factor beta and inhibited by agents that elevate 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. cAMP signal generation and response is known to be compartmentalized in many cell types in part through the colocalization of receptors and specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms in lipid rafts and caveolae. The present study sought to define the localization of key G protein-coupled receptors with adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) in lipid rafts of rat cardiac fibroblasts and to determine if this colocalization was functionally relevant. We found that cardiac fibroblasts produce cAMP in response to agonists for beta-adrenergic (isoproterenol), prostaglandin EP2 (butaprost), adenosine (adenosine-5'-N-ethylcarboxamide, NECA), and prostacyclin (beraprost) receptors. Overexpression of AC6 increased cAMP production stimulated by isoproterenol and beraprost but not by butaprost or NECA. A key function of fibroblasts is the production of collagen. Isoproterenol- and beraprostmediated inhibition of collagen synthesis was also enhanced by AC6 overexpression, while inhibition by butaprost and NECA were unaltered. Lipid raft fractions from cardiac fibroblasts contain the preponderance of beta-adrenergic receptors and AC6 but exclude EP2 receptors. While we could not determine the localization of native prostacyclin receptors, we were able to determine that epitope-tagged prostanoid IP receptors (IPR) expressed in COS7 cells did localize, in part, in lipid raft fractions. These findings indicate that IP receptors are expressed in lipid rafts and can activate raft-localized AC isoforms. AC6 is completely compartmentized in lipid raft domains where it is activated solely by coresident G protein-coupled receptors to regulate cardiac fibroblast function.

  10. Oral PEG 15-20 protects the intestine against radiation : role of lipid rafts.

    SciTech Connect

    Valuckaite, V.; Zaborina, O.; Long, J.; Hauer-Jensen, M.; Wang, J.; Holbrook, C.; Zaborin, A.; Drabik, K.; Katdare, M.; Mauceri, H.; Weichselbaum, R.; Firestone, M. A.; Lee, K. Y.; Chang, E. B.; Matthews, J.; Alverdy, J. C.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Arkansas

    2009-12-01

    Intestinal injury following abdominal radiation therapy or accidental exposure remains a significant clinical problem that can result in varying degrees of mucosal destruction such as ulceration, vascular sclerosis, intestinal wall fibrosis, loss of barrier function, and even lethal gut-derived sepsis. We determined the ability of a high-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol-based copolymer, PEG 15-20, to protect the intestine against the early and late effects of radiation in mice and rats and to determine its mechanism of action by examining cultured rat intestinal epithelia. Rats were exposed to fractionated radiation in an established model of intestinal injury, whereby an intestinal segment is surgically placed into the scrotum and radiated daily. Radiation injury score was decreased in a dose-dependent manner in rats gavaged with 0.5 or 2.0 g/kg per day of PEG 15-20 (n = 9-13/group, P < 0.005). Complementary studies were performed in a novel mouse model of abdominal radiation followed by intestinal inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), a common pathogen that causes lethal gut-derived sepsis following radiation. Mice mortality was decreased by 40% in mice drinking 1% PEG 15-20 (n = 10/group, P < 0.001). Parallel studies were performed in cultured rat intestinal epithelial cells treated with PEG 15-20 before radiation. Results demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented radiation-induced intestinal injury in rats, prevented apoptosis and lethal sepsis attributable to P. aeruginosa in mice, and protected cultured intestinal epithelial cells from apoptosis and microbial adherence and possible invasion. PEG 15-20 appeared to exert its protective effect via its binding to lipid rafts by preventing their coalescence, a hallmark feature in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to radiation.

  11. Probing lipid-cholesterol interactions in DOPC/eSM/Chol and DOPC/DPPC/Chol model lipid rafts with DSC and (13)C solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Kim, Jihyun; Holland, Gregory P

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between cholesterol (Chol) and phospholipids in bilayers was investigated for the ternary model lipid rafts, DOPC/eSM/Chol and DOPC/DPPC/Chol, with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) solid-state NMR. The enthalpy and transition temperature (Tm) of the Lα liquid crystalline phase transition from DSC was used to probe the thermodynamics of the different lipids in the two systems as a function of Chol content. The main chain (13)C (CH2)n resonance is resolved in the (13)C CP-MAS NMR spectra for the unsaturated (DOPC) and saturated (eSM or DPPC) chain lipid in the ternary lipid raft mixtures. The (13)C chemical shift of this resonance can be used to detect differences in chain ordering and overall interactions with Chol for the different lipid constituents in the ternary systems. The combination of DSC and (13)C CP-MAS NMR results indicate that there is a preferential interaction between SM and Chol below Tm for the DOPC/eSM/Chol system when the Chol content is ≤20mol%. In contrast, no preferential interaction between Chol and DPPC is observed in the DOPC/DPPC/Chol system above or below Tm. Finally, (13)C CP-MAS NMR resolves two Chol environments in the DOPC/eSM/Chol system below Tm at Chol contents >20mol% while, a single Chol environment is observed for DOPC/DPPC/Chol at all compositions.

  12. Lipid Rafts Are Physiologic Membrane Microdomains Necessary for the Morphogenic and Developmental Functions of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Cynthia C; Gabreski, Nicole A; Hein, Sarah J; Pierchala, Brian A

    2015-09-23

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes PNS development and kidney morphogenesis via a receptor complex consisting of the glycerophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored, ligand binding receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Although Ret signal transduction in vitro is augmented by translocation into lipid rafts via GFRα1, the existence and importance of lipid rafts in GDNF-Ret signaling under physiologic conditions is unresolved. A knock-in mouse was produced that replaced GFRα1 with GFRα1-TM, which contains a transmembrane (TM) domain instead of the GPI anchor. GFRα1-TM still binds GDNF and promotes Ret activation but does not translocate into rafts. In Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice, GFRα1-TM is expressed, trafficked, and processed at levels identical to GFRα1. Although Gfrα1(+/TM) mice are viable, Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice display bilateral renal agenesis, lack enteric neurons in the intestines, and have motor axon guidance deficits, similar to Gfrα1(-/-) mice. Therefore, the recruitment of Ret into lipid rafts by GFRα1 is required for the physiologic functions of GDNF in vertebrates. Significance statement: Membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts have been proposed to be unique subdomains in the plasma membrane that are critical for the signaling functions of multiple receptor complexes. Their existence and physiologic relevance has been debated. Based on in vitro studies, lipid rafts have been reported to be necessary for the function of the Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of neurotrophic factors. The receptor for GDNF comprises the lipid raft-resident, glycerophosphatidylinositol-anchored receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Here we demonstrate, using a knock-in mouse model in which GFRα1 is no longer located in lipid rafts, that the developmental functions of GDNF in the periphery require the translocation of the GDNF receptor complex

  13. By activating Fas/ceramide synthase 6/p38 kinase in lipid rafts, stichoposide D inhibits growth of leukemia xenografts.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Park, Eun-Seon; Shin, Sung-Won; Ju, Mi-Ha; Han, Jin-Yeong; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Stonik, Valentin A; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2015-09-29

    Stichoposide D (STD) is a marine triterpene glycoside isolated from sea cucumbers. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor activity of STD in human leukemia cells. The role of Fas (CD95), ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) and p38 kinase during STD-induced apoptosis was examined in human leukemia cells. In addition, the antitumor effects of STD in K562 and HL-60 leukemia xenograft models were investigated. We found that STD induces Fas translocation to lipid rafts, and thus mediates cell apoptosis. We also observed the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase during STD-induced apoptosis. The use of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and nystatin to disrupt lipid rafts prevents the clustering of Fas and the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase, and also inhibits STD-induced apoptosis. Specific inhibition by Fas, CerS6, and p38 kinase siRNA transfection partially blocked STD-induced apoptosis. In addition, STD has antitumor activity through the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase without displaying any toxicity in HL-60 and K562 xenograft models. We observed that the anti-tumor effect of STD is partially prevented in CerS6 shRNA-silenced xenograft models. We first report that Fas/CerS6/p38 kinase activation in lipid rafts by STD is involved in its anti-leukemic activity. We also established that STD is able to enhance the chemosensitivity of K562 cells to etoposide or Ara-C. These data suggest that STD may be used alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents to treat leukemia.

  14. By activating Fas/ceramide synthase 6/p38 kinase in lipid rafts, Stichoposide D inhibits growth of leukemia xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Park, Eun-Seon; Shin, Sung-Won; Ju, Mi-Ha; Han, Jin-Yeong; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Stonik, Valentin A.; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2015-01-01

    Stichoposide D (STD) is a marine triterpene glycoside isolated from sea cucumbers. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor activity of STD in human leukemia cells. The role of Fas (CD95), ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) and p38 kinase during STD-induced apoptosis was examined in human leukemia cells. In addition, the antitumor effects of STD in K562 and HL-60 leukemia xenograft models were investigated. We found that STD induces Fas translocation to lipid rafts, and thus mediates cell apoptosis. We also observed the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase during STD-induced apoptosis. The use of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and nystatin to disrupt lipid rafts prevents the clustering of Fas and the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase, and also inhibits STD-induced apoptosis. Specific inhibition by Fas, CerS6, and p38 kinase siRNA transfection partially blocked STD-induced apoptosis. In addition, STD has antitumor activity through the activation of CerS6 and p38 kinase without displaying any toxicity in HL-60 and K562 xenograft models. We observed that the anti-tumor effect of STD is partially prevented in CerS6 shRNA-silenced xenograft models. We first report that Fas/CerS6/p38 kinase activation in lipid rafts by STD is involved in its anti-leukemic activity. We also established that STD is able to enhance the chemosensitivity of K562 cells to etoposide or Ara-C. These data suggest that STD may be used alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents to treat leukemia. PMID:26318294

  15. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis.

  16. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis. PMID:25313007

  17. P2X1 receptors localized in lipid rafts mediate ATP motor responses in the human vas deferens longitudinal muscles.

    PubMed

    Donoso, María Verónica; Norambuena, Andrés; Navarrete, Camilo; Poblete, Inés; Velasco, Alfredo; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2014-02-01

    To assess the role of the P2X1 receptors (P2X1R) in the longitudinal and circular layers of the human vas deferens, ex vivo-isolated strips or rings were prepared from tissue biopsies to record isometric contractions. To ascertain its membrane distribution, tissue extracts were analyzed by immunoblotting following sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. ATP, alpha,beta-methylene ATP, or electrical field stimulation elicited robust contractions of the longitudinal layer but not of the circular layer which demonstrated inconsistent responses. Alpha,beta-methylene ATP generated stronger and more robust contractions than ATP. In parallel, prostatic segments of the rat vas deferens were examined. The motor responses in both species were not sustained but decayed within the first minute, showing desensitization to additional applications. Cross-desensitization was established between alpha,beta-methylene ATP or ATP-evoked contractions and electrical field stimulation-induced contractions. Full recovery of the desensitized motor responses required more than 30 min and showed a similar pattern in human and rat tissues. Immunoblot analysis of the human vas deferens extracts revealed a P2X1R oligomer of approximately 200 kDa under nonreducing conditions, whereas dithiothreitol-treated extracts showed a single band of approximately 70 kDa. The P2X1R was identified in ultracentrifugation fractions containing 15%-29% sucrose; the receptor localized in the same fractions as flotillin-1, indicating that it regionalized into smooth muscle lipid rafts. In conclusion, ATP plays a key role in human vas deferens contractile responses of the longitudinal smooth muscle layer, an effect mediated through P2X1Rs.

  18. Saikosaponin a inhibits lipopolysaccharide-oxidative stress and inflammation in Human umbilical vein endothelial cells via preventing TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yunhe; Hu, Xiaoyu; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Zecai; Zhang, Naisheng

    2015-12-01

    Saikosaponin a (SSa), the major triterpenoid saponin derivatives from Radix bupleuri (RB), has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of SSa on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory response in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of SSa. The levels of TNF-α and IL-8 were detected by ELISA. The expression of COX-2 and iNOS, NF-κB and IκB protein were determined by Western blotting. To investigate the protective mechanisms of SSa, TLR4 expression was detected by Western blotting and membrane lipid rafts were separated by density gradient ultracentrifugation and analyzed by immunoblotting with anti-TLR4 antibody. The results showed that SSa dose-dependently inhibited the production of ROS, TNF-α, IL-8, COX-2 and iNOS in LPS-stimulated HUVECs. Western blot analysis showed that SSa suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation. SSa did not affect the expression of TLR4 induced by LPS. However, translocation of TLR4 into lipid rafts and oligomerization of TLR4 induce by LPS was inhibited by SSa. Furthermore, SSa disrupted the formation of lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol. Moreover, SSa activated LXRα-ABCA1 signaling pathway, which could induce cholesterol efflux from lipid rafts. Knockdown of LXRα abrogated the anti-inflammatory effects of SSa. In conclusion, the effects of SSa is associated with activating LXRα-ABCA1 signaling pathway which results in disrupting lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol and reducing translocation of TLR4 to lipid rafts and oligomerization of TLR4, thereby attenuating LPS mediated oxidative and inflammatory responses.

  19. The evolving role of lipid rafts and caveolae in G protein-coupled receptor signaling: implications for molecular pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Insel, Paul A

    2004-09-01

    The many components of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signal transduction provide cells with numerous combinations with which to customize their responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and pharmacologic agonists. GPCRs function as guanine nucleotide exchange factors for heterotrimeric (alpha, beta, gamma) G proteins, thereby promoting exchange of GTP for GDP and, in turn, the activation of 'downstream' signaling components. Recent data indicate that individual cells express mRNA for perhaps over 100 different GPCRs (out of a total of nearly a thousand GPCR genes), several different combinations of G-protein subunits, multiple regulators of G-protein signaling proteins (which function as GTPase activating proteins), and various isoforms of downstream effector molecules. The differential expression of such protein combinations allows for modulation of signals that are customized for a specific cell type, perhaps at different states of maturation or differentiation. In addition, in the linear arrangement of molecular interactions involved in a given GPCR-G-protein-effector pathway, one needs to consider the localization of receptors and post-receptor components in subcellular compartments, microdomains, and molecular complexes, and to understand the movement of proteins between these compartments. Co-localization of signaling components, many of which are expressed at low overall concentrations, allows cells to tailor their responses by arranging, or spatially organizing in unique and kinetically favorable ways, the molecules involved in GPCR signal transduction. This review focuses on the role of lipid rafts and a subpopulation of such rafts, caveolae, as a key spatial compartment enriched in components of GPCR signal transduction. Recent data suggest cell-specific patterns for expression of those components in lipid rafts and caveolae. Such domains likely define functionally important, cell-specific regions of signaling by GPCRs and drugs active at those GPCRs.

  20. Specific localization of the annexin II heterotetramer in brain lipid raft fractions and its changes in spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Qin; Waisman, David M; Grimaldi, Maurizio

    2004-08-01

    Annexin-II (AII) is a Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipid-binding protein that is present in both intracellular and extracellular compartments. In the present study AII immunoreactivity was found in a subpopulation of neurons in specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and the surface of hippocampal pyramidal neurons from adult rats. AII from synaptic membranes was detected by immunoblotting as multiple species containing the monomer (AII36) and heterotetramer (AIIt). AIIt was resistant to beta-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but was completely reduced to monomers (36 kDa) by two-dimensional electrophoresis. AIIt resided exclusively in the detergent-resistant lipid rafts concentrated in neuronal dendrites, and its recruitment to those structures was enhanced by antibody cross-link. AII abundantly distributed on the outer leaflet of neuronal membranes and between spaces of neurons appeared to be neuronal adhesive. The formation of AIIt required synthesis of sphingolipids and cholesterol, and its stability depended on Ca2+. Increases in neuronal activities such as depolarization and learning were shown to promote formation of AIIt. Our results suggest that, via a dynamic association with dendritic lipid rafts, AII may play a role in synaptic signal transduction and remodeling. This probably involves focal adhesion and interactions with actin that are associated with brain development and memory consolidation.

  1. A Novel Mechanism of Sequestering Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 by Glypican in Lipid Rafts, Allowing Skeletal Muscle Differentiation▿

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Jaime; Brandan, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are critical modulators of growth factor activities. Skeletal muscle differentiation is strongly inhibited by fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). We have shown that HSPGs present at the plasma membrane are expressed in myoblasts and are downregulated during muscle differentiation. An exception is glypican-1, which is present throughout the myogenic process. Myoblasts that do not express glypican-1 exhibit defective differentiation, with an increase in the receptor binding of FGF-2, concomitant with increased signaling. Glypican-1-deficient myoblasts show decreased expression of myogenin, the master gene that controls myogenesis, myosin, and the myoblast fusion index. Reversion of these defects was induced by expression of rat glypican-1. Glypican-1 is the only HSPG localized in lipid raft domains in myoblasts, resulting in the sequestration of FGF-2 away from FGF-2 receptors (FGFRs) located in nonraft domains. A chimeric glypican-1, containing syndecan-1 transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, is located in nonraft domains interacting with FGFR-IV- and enhanced FGF-2-dependent signaling. Thus, glypican-1 acts as a positive regulator of muscle differentiation by sequestering FGF-2 in lipid rafts and preventing its binding and dependent signaling. PMID:20100867

  2. HSL-knockout mouse testis exhibits class B scavenger receptor upregulation and disrupted lipid raft microdomains[S

    PubMed Central

    Casado, María Emilia; Huerta, Lydia; Ortiz, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Crespo, Mirian; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Kraemer, Fredric B.; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    There is a tight relationship between fertility and changes in cholesterol metabolism during spermatogenesis. In the testis, class B scavenger receptors (SR-B) SR-BI, SR-BII, and LIMP II mediate the selective uptake of cholesterol esters from HDL, which are hydrolyzed to unesterified cholesterol by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). HSL is critical because HSL knockout (KO) male mice are sterile. The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of the lack of HSL in testis on the expression of SR-B, lipid raft composition, and related cell signaling pathways. HSL-KO mouse testis presented altered spermatogenesis associated with decreased sperm counts, sperm motility, and infertility. In wild-type (WT) testis, HSL is expressed in elongated spermatids; SR-BI, in Leydig cells and spermatids; SR-BII, in spermatocytes and spermatids but not in Leydig cells; and LIMP II, in Sertoli and Leydig cells. HSL knockout male mice have increased expression of class B scavenger receptors, disrupted caveolin-1 localization in lipid raft plasma membrane microdomains, and activated phospho-ERK, phospho-AKT, and phospho-SRC in the testis, suggesting that class B scavenger receptors are involved in cholesterol ester uptake for steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis. PMID:22988039

  3. Distribution of C16:0, C18:0, C24:1, and C24:0 sulfatides in central nervous system lipid rafts by quantitative ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Ana Lis; Li, Guannan; Lopez-Rosas, Aurora; Månsson, Jan-Eric; van Breemen, Richard B; Givogri, Maria Irene

    2014-12-15

    Sulfated galactosylceramides (sulfatides) are glycosphingolipids associated with cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) and are highly expressed in brain tissue. Although it is known that sulfatide species show heterogeneity in their fatty acid acyl group composition throughout brain development, their lipid raft distribution and biological relevance is poorly understood. We validated a fast and sensitive ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method to measure developmentally regulated sulfatide species (C16:0, C18:0, C24:1, and C24:0) in central nervous system (CNS) lipid rafts isolated without using detergent. Our UHPLC-MS/MS assay showed good accuracy and precision with a linear range of 5 to 1,000 nM for C18:0 and C24:1 sulfatides and 10 to 1,000 nM for C16:0 and C24:0 sulfatides. We applied this quantitative analysis to detergent-free lipid rafts isolated from wild-type mice and arylsulfatase A-deficient (ASA knockout) mice that accumulate sulfatides. All four sulfatide species were more abundant in raft membranes than in non-raft membranes, with a significant increase in lipid rafts isolated from ASA knockout mice. This is the first description of an analytical method to study these sulfatide species in raft and non-raft membranes and has the potential to be applied to preparations from other tissues.

  4. Rafts, Nanoparticles and Neural Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Vishal; Wallace, Ron

    2012-01-01

    This review examines the role of membrane rafts in neural disease as a rationale for drug targeting utilizing lipid-based nanoparticles. The article begins with an overview of methodological issues involving the existence, sizes, and lifetimes of rafts, and then examines raft function in the etiologies of three major neural diseases—epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease—selected as promising candidates for raft-based therapeutics. Raft-targeting drug delivery systems involving liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles are then examined in detail.

  5. GM1 and GD1a gangliosides modulate toxic and inflammatory effects of E. coli lipopolysaccharide by preventing TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Bayunova, Lubov; Sokolova, Tatyana; Vlasova, Yulia; Bachteeva, Vera; Avrova, Natalia; Parnova, Rimma

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous gangliosides are known to inhibit the effects of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in different cells exhibiting anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities. The mechanisms underlying ganglioside action are not fully understood. Because LPS recognition and receptor complex formation occur in lipid rafts, and gangliosides play a key role in their maintenance, we hypothesize that protective effects of exogenous gangliosides would depend on inhibition of LPS signaling via prevention of TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts. The effect of GM1 and GD1a gangliosides on LPS-induced toxic and inflammatory reactions in PC12 cells, and in epithelial cells isolated from the frog urinary bladder, was studied. In PC12 cells, GD1a and GM1 significantly reduced the effect of LPS on the decrease of cell survival and on stimulation of reactive oxygen species production. In epithelial cells, gangliosides decreased LPS-stimulated iNOS expression, NO, and PGE2 production. Subcellular fractionation, in combination with immunoblotting, showed that pretreatment of cells with GM1, GD1a, or methyl-β-cyclodextrin, completely eliminated the effect of LPS on translocation of TLR4 into lipid rafts. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that ganglioside-induced prevention of TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts could be a mechanism of protection against LPS in various cells.

  6. Impact of lipid rafts on the T -cell-receptor and peptide-major-histocompatibility-complex interactions under different measurement conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Xu, Guang-Kui; Song, Fan

    2017-01-01

    The interactions between T-cell receptor (TCR) and peptide-major-histocompatibility complex (pMHC), which enable T-cell development and initiate adaptive immune responses, have been intensively studied. However, a central issue of how lipid rafts affect the TCR-pMHC interactions remains unclear. Here, by using a statistical-mechanical membrane model, we show that the binding affinity of TCR and pMHC anchored on two apposing cell membranes is significantly enhanced because of the lipid raft-induced signaling protein aggregation. This finding may provide an alternative insight into the mechanism of T-cell activation triggered by very low densities of pMHC. In the case of cell-substrate adhesion, our results indicate that the loss of lateral mobility of the proteins on the solid substrate leads to the inhibitory effect of lipid rafts on TCR-pMHC interactions. Our findings help to understand why different experimental methods for measuring the impact of lipid rafts on the receptor-ligand interactions have led to contradictory conclusions.

  7. Impact of lipid rafts on the T-cell-receptor and peptide-major-histocompatibility-complex interactions under different measurement conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Xu, Guang-Kui; Song, Fan

    2017-01-01

    The interactions between T-cell receptor (TCR) and peptide-major-histocompatibility complex (pMHC), which enable T-cell development and initiate adaptive immune responses, have been intensively studied. However, a central issue of how lipid rafts affect the TCR-pMHC interactions remains unclear. Here, by using a statistical-mechanical membrane model, we show that the binding affinity of TCR and pMHC anchored on two apposing cell membranes is significantly enhanced because of the lipid raft-induced signaling protein aggregation. This finding may provide an alternative insight into the mechanism of T-cell activation triggered by very low densities of pMHC. In the case of cell-substrate adhesion, our results indicate that the loss of lateral mobility of the proteins on the solid substrate leads to the inhibitory effect of lipid rafts on TCR-pMHC interactions. Our findings help to understand why different experimental methods for measuring the impact of lipid rafts on the receptor-ligand interactions have led to contradictory conclusions.

  8. HIF-1 is induced via EGFR activation and mediates resistance to anoikis-like cell death under lipid rafts/caveolae-disrupting stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong-Hee; Koo, Kyung Hee; Park, Jong-Wan; Kim, Hee-Jung; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Park, Jong Bae; Park, Byung-Kiu; Kim, Yong-Nyun

    2009-12-01

    The plasma membrane microdomains, lipid rafts, are involved in regulation of cellular functions such as cell survival and adhesion. Cholesterol is a critical component of lipid rafts in terms of their integrity and functions and rafts disruption by cholesterol depletion can induce detachment-induced cell death. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) alpha is stabilized in hypoxia and transactivates numerous genes required for cellular adaptation to hypoxia. It is also induced by non-hypoxic stimuli and contributes to cell survival. Because hypoxia inhibits cholesterol synthesis and HIF-1alpha plays a role in this process, we here explored a possible connection between lipid rafts and HIF-1alpha. We investigated whether HIF-1alpha is regulated during cholesterol depletion/rafts disruption in A431 cells in normoxic conditions. Methyl-beta cyclodextrin (MbetaCD), which induces cholesterol depletion, upregulated HIF-1alpha even under normoxic conditions and this upregulation required epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 activation, but not Akt activation. MbetaCD treatment induced HIF-1alpha upregulation at both the transcriptional and translational levels but not at the posttranslational levels. In addition, MbetaCD robustly induced vascular endothelial growth factor production and stimulated an hypoxia response element-driven luciferase reporter activity under normoxic conditions, indicating that MbetaCD-induced HIF-1alpha is functionally activated. Both EGFR activity and HIF-1alpha expression were higher in the attached cells than in the detached cells after MbetaCD treatment. Furthermore, inhibition of HIF-1alpha by RNA interference accelerated cell detachment, thus increasing cell death, indicating that HIF-1alpha expression attenuates MbetaCD-induced anoikis-like cell death. These data suggest that, depending on cholesterol levels, lipid rafts or membrane fluidity are probably to regulate HIF-1alpha expression in

  9. Possible protective effect of membrane lipid rafts against interleukin-1β-mediated anti-proliferative effect in INS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Chentouf, Myriam; Guzman, Caroline; Hamze, Moustafa; Gross, René; Lajoix, Anne Dominique; Peraldi-Roux, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that pancreatic islets from pre-diabetic rats undergo an inflammatory process in which IL-1β takes part and controls β-cell function. In the present study, using the INS-1 rat pancreatic β-cell line, we investigated the potential involvement of membrane-associated cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts in IL-1β signaling and biological effects on insulin secretion, β-cell proliferation and apoptosis. We show that, INS-1 cells exposure to increasing concentrations of IL-1β leads to a progressive inhibition of insulin release, an increase in the number of apoptotic cells and a dose-dependent decrease in pancreatic β-cell proliferation. Disruption of membrane lipid rafts markedly reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion but did not affect either cell apoptosis or proliferation rate, demonstrating that membrane lipid raft integrity is essential for β-cell secretory function. In the same conditions, IL-1β treatment of INS-1 cells led to a slight further decrease in insulin secretion for low concentrations of the cytokine, and a more marked one, similar to that observed in normal cells for higher concentrations. These effects occurred together with an increase in iNOS expression and surprisingly with an upregulation of tryptophane hydroxylase and protein Kinase C in membrane lipid rafts suggesting that compensatory mechanisms develop to counteract IL-1β inhibitory effects. We also demonstrate that disruption of membrane lipid rafts did not prevent cytokine-induced cell death recorded after exposure to high IL-1β concentrations. Finally, concerning cell proliferation, we bring strong evidence that membrane lipid rafts exert a protective effect against IL-1β anti-proliferative effect, possibly mediated at least partly by modifications in ERK and PKB expression/activities. Our results 1) demonstrate that IL-1β deleterious effects do not require a cholesterol-dependent plasma membrane compartmentalization of IL-1R1 signaling and 2) confer to

  10. Expression of HIV-1 Vpu leads to loss of the viral restriction factor CD317/Tetherin from lipid rafts and its enhanced lysosomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Rollason, Ruth; Dunstan, Katie; Billcliff, Peter G; Bishop, Paul; Gleeson, Paul; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Banting, George

    2013-01-01

    CD317/tetherin (aka BST2 or HM1.24 antigen) is an interferon inducible membrane protein present in regions of the lipid bilayer enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol (often termed lipid rafts). It has been implicated in an eclectic mix of cellular processes including, most notably, the retention of fully formed viral particles at the surface of cells infected with HIV and other enveloped viruses. Expression of the HIV viral accessory protein Vpu has been shown to lead to intracellular sequestration and degradation of tetherin, thereby counteracting the inhibition of viral release. There is evidence that tetherin interacts directly with Vpu, but it remains unclear where in the cell this interaction occurs or if Vpu expression affects the lipid raft localisation of tetherin. We have addressed these points using biochemical and cell imaging approaches focused on endogenous rather than ectopically over-expressed tetherin. We find i) no evidence for an interaction between Vpu and endogenous tetherin at the cell surface, ii) the vast majority of endogenous tetherin that is at the cell surface in control cells is in lipid rafts, iii) internalised tetherin is present in non-raft fractions, iv) expression of Vpu in cells expressing endogenous tetherin leads to the loss of tetherin from lipid rafts, v) internalised tetherin enters early endosomes, and late endosomes, in both control cells and cells expressing Vpu, but the proportion of tetherin molecules destined for degradation rather than recycling is increased in cells expressing Vpu vi) lysosomes are the primary site for degradation of endogenous tetherin in cells expressing Vpu. Our studies underlie the importance of studying endogenous tetherin and let us propose a model in which Vpu intercepts newly internalised tetherin and diverts it for lysosomal destruction rather than recycling to the cell surface.

  11. Peptidoglycan-mediated IL-8 expression in human alveolar type II epithelial cells requires lipid raft formation and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Cheon, In Su; Woo, Sang Su; Kang, Seok-Seong; Im, Jintaek; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Chung, Dae Kyun; Park, Dong Ki; Han, Seung Hyun

    2008-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a major sepsis-causing Gram-positive bacterium, invades pulmonary epithelial cells and causes lung diseases. In the lung, alveolar type II epithelial cells play an important role in innate immunity by secreting chemokines and antimicrobial peptides upon bacterial infection whereas type I cells mainly function in gas-exchange. In this study, we investigated the ability of S. aureus peptidoglycan (PGN) to induce expression of a chemokine, IL-8, in a human alveolar type II epithelial cell line, A549. PGN induces IL-8 mRNA and protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Supplementation of soluble CD14 further enhanced the PGN-induced IL-8 expression. Interestingly, PGN-induced IL-8 expression was inhibited by nystatin, a specific inhibitor for lipid rafts, but not by chlorpromazine, a specific inhibitor for clathrin-coated pits. Furthermore, PGN-induced IL-8 expression was attenuated by inhibitors for MAP kinases such as ERK, p38 kinase, and JNK/SAPK, whereas no inhibitory effect was observed by inhibitors for reactive oxygen species or protein kinase C. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrates that PGN increased the DNA binding of the transcription factors, AP-1 and NF-kappaB while minimally, NF-IL6, all of which are involved in the transcription of IL-8. Taken together, these results suggest that PGN induces IL-8 expression in a CD14-enhanced manner in human alveolar type II epithelial cells, through the formation of lipid rafts and the activation of MAP kinases, which ultimately leads to activation of AP-1, NF-kappaB, and NF-IL6.

  12. Caveolae/lipid rafts in fibroblast-like synoviocytes: ectopeptidase-rich membrane microdomains.

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, D; Hansen, G H; Niels-Christiansen, L; Thorsen, E; Immerdal, L; Santos, A N; Kehlen, A; Langner, J; Danielsen, E M

    2001-01-01

    Membrane peptidases play important roles in cell activation, proliferation and communication. Human fibroblast-like synoviocytes express considerable amounts of aminopeptidase N/CD13, dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26, and neprilysin/CD10, transmembrane proteins previously proposed to be involved in the regulation of intra-articular levels of neuropeptides and chemotactic mediators as well as in adhesion and cell-cell interactions. Here, we report these peptidases in synoviocytes to be localized predominantly in glycolipid- and cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains known as 'rafts'. At the ultrastructural level, aminopeptidase N/CD13 and dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26 were found in caveolae, in particular in intracellular yet surface-connected vesicle-like structures and 'rosettes' made up of several caveolae. In addition, clusters of peptidases were seen at the cell surface in flat patches ranging in size from about 60 to 160 nm. Cholesterol depletion of synoviocytes by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin disrupted >90% of the caveolae and reduced the raft localization of aminopeptidase N/CD13 without affecting Ala-p-nitroanilide-cleaving activity of confluent cell cultures. In co-culture experiments with T-lymphocytes, cholesterol depletion of synoviocytes greatly reduced their capability to induce an early lymphocytic expression of aminopeptidase N/CD13. We propose caveolae/rafts to be peptidase-rich 'hot-spot' regions of the synoviocyte plasma membrane required for functional cell-cell interactions with lymphocytes. The peptidases may act in concert with other types of proteins such as receptors and signal transducers localized in these specialized membrane domains. PMID:11171078

  13. Glypican-1 regulates myoblast response to HGF via Met in a lipid raft-dependent mechanism: effect on migration of skeletal muscle precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Via the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (Met), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exerts key roles involving skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are critical modulators of HGF activity, but the role of specific HSPGs in HGF regulation is poorly understood. Glypican-1 is the only HSPG expressed in myoblasts that localize in lipid raft membrane domains, controlling cell responses to extracellular stimuli. We determined if glypican-1 in these domains is necessary to stabilize the HGF-Met signaling complex and myoblast response to HGF. Methods C2C12 myoblasts and a derived clone (C6) with low glypican-1 expression were used as an experimental model. The activation of Met, ERK1/2 and AKT in response to HGF was evaluated. The distribution of Met and its activated form in lipid raft domains, as well as its dependence on glypican-1, were characterized by sucrose density gradient fractionation in both cell types. Rescue experiments reexpressing glypican-1 or a chimeric glypican-1 fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of mouse syndecan-1 or myoblast pretreatment with MβCD were conducted. In vitro and in vivo myoblast migration assays in response to HGF were also performed. Results Glypican-1 localization in membrane raft domains was required for a maximum cell response to HGF. It stabilized Met and HGF in lipid raft domains, forming a signaling complex where the active phospho-Met receptor was concentrated. Glypican-1 also stabilized CD44 in a HGF-dependent manner. In addition, glypican-1 was required for in vitro and in vivo HGF-dependent myoblast migration. Conclusions Glypican-1 is a regulator of HGF-dependent signaling via Met in lipid raft domains. PMID:24517345

  14. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine promotes the differentiation of resident Sca-1 positive cardiac stem cells to cardiomyocytes through lipid raft/JNK/STAT3 and β-catenin signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjing; Liu, Honghong; Liu, Pingping; Yin, Deling; Zhang, Shangli; Zhao, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Resident cardiac Sca-1-positive (+) stem cells may differentiate into cardiomyocytes to improve the function of damaged hearts. However, little is known about the inducers and molecular mechanisms underlying the myogenic conversion of Sca-1(+) stem cells. Here we report that sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), a naturally occurring bioactive lipid, induces the myogenic conversion of Sca-1(+) stem cells, as evidenced by the increased expression of cardiac transcription factors (Nkx2.5 and GATA4), structural proteins (cardiac Troponin T), transcriptional enhancer (Mef2c) and GATA4 nucleus translocation. First, SPC activated JNK and STAT3, and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 or STAT3 inhibitor stattic impaired the SPC-induced expression of cardiac transcription factors and GATA4 nucleus translocation, which suggests that JNK and STAT3 participated in SPC-promoted cardiac differentiation. Moreover, STAT3 activation was inhibited by SP600125, whereas JNK was inhibited by β-cyclodextrin as a lipid raft breaker, which indicates a lipid raft/JNK/STAT3 pathway involved in SPC-induced myogenic transition. β-Catenin, degraded by activated GSK3β, was inhibited by SPC. Furthermore, GSK3β inhibitors weakened but the β-catenin inhibitor promoted SPC-induced differentiation. We found no crosstalk between the lipid raft/JNK/STAT3 and β-catenin pathway. Our study describes a lipid, SPC, as an endogenic inducer of myogenic conversion in Sca-1(+) stem cells with low toxicity and high efficiency for uptake.

  15. Modulation of cell surface transport and lipid raft localization by the cytoplasmic tail of the influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Silvia; Imkeller, Katharina; Jolmes, Fabian; Veit, Michael; Herrmann, Andreas; Schwarzer, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Viral glycoproteins are highly variable in their primary structure, but on the other hand feature a high functional conservation to fulfil their versatile tasks during the pathogenic life cycle. Typically, all protein domains are optimized in that indispensable functions can be assigned to small conserved motifs or even individual amino acids. The cytoplasmic tail of many viral spike proteins, although of particular relevance for the virus biology, is often only insufficiently characterized. Hemagglutinin (HA), the receptor-binding protein of the influenza virus comprises a short cytoplasmic tail of 13 amino acids that exhibits three highly conserved palmitoylation sites. However, the particular importance of these modifications and the tail in general for intracellular trafficking and lateral membrane organization remains elusive. In this study, we generated HA core proteins consisting of transmembrane domain, cytoplasmic tail and a minor part of the ectodomain, tagged with a yellow fluorescent protein. Different mutation and truncation variants of these chimeric proteins were investigated using confocal microscopy, to characterize the role of cytoplasmic tail and palmitoylation for the intracellular trafficking to plasma membrane and Golgi apparatus. In addition, we assessed raft partitioning of the variants by Foerster resonance energy transfer with an established raft marker. We revealed a substantial influence of the cytoplasmic tail length on the intracellular distribution and surface exposure of the proteins. A complete removal of the tail hampers a physiological trafficking of the protein, whereas a partial truncation can be compensated by cytoplasmic palmitoylations. Plasma membrane raft partitioning on the other hand was found to imperatively require palmitoylations, and the cysteine at position 551 turned out to be of most relevance. Our data shed further light on the tight interconnection between cytoplasmic elements and intracellular trafficking and

  16. Sizes of lipid domains: What do we know from artificial lipid membranes? What are the possible shared features with membrane rafts in cells?

    PubMed

    Rosetti, Carla M; Mangiarotti, Agustín; Wilke, Natalia

    2017-01-28

    In model lipid membranes with phase coexistence, domain sizes distribute in a very wide range, from the nanometer (reported in vesicles and supported films) to the micrometer (observed in many model membranes). Domain growth by coalescence and Ostwald ripening is slow (minutes to hours), the domain size being correlated with the size of the capture region. Domain sizes thus strongly depend on the number of domains which, in the case of a nucleation process, depends on the oversaturation of the system, on line tension and on the perturbation rate in relation to the membrane dynamics. Here, an overview is given of the factors that affect nucleation or spinodal decomposition and domain growth, and their influence on the distribution of domain sizes in different model membranes is discussed. The parameters analyzed respond to very general physical rules, and we therefore propose a similar behavior for the rafts in the plasma membrane of cells, but with obstructed mobility and with a continuously changing environment.

  17. Thymineless Death in F10-Treated AML Cells Occurs via Lipid Raft Depletion and Fas/FasL co-Localization in the Plasma Membrane with Activation of the Extrinsic Apoptotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gmeiner, William H.; Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Stuart, Christopher H.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    The polymeric fluoropyrimidine F10 displays excellent anti-leukemia activity in pre-clinical models of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) through dual targeting of thymidylate synthase and DNA topoisomerase 1. Here we report that F10 activates the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in AML cells by enhancing localization of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) at the plasma membrane and while reducing overall lipid raft levels promotes Fas/FasL co-localization in remaining lipid rafts. The HMG-CoA synthase inhibitor simvastatin was synergistic with F10 and induced cell death via similar apoptotic processes. Our results are consistent with diverse processes activating a common apoptotic pathway characterized by reduced overall levels of lipid rafts and Fas/FasL co-localization in the plasma membrane, including in remaining lipid rafts which may play a role in both cell-survival and cell death signaling. PMID:25510486

  18. Thymineless death in F10-treated AML cells occurs via lipid raft depletion and Fas/FasL co-localization in the plasma membrane with activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Gmeiner, William H; Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Stuart, Christopher H; Pardee, Timothy S

    2015-02-01

    The polymeric fluoropyrimidine F10 displays excellent anti-leukemia activity in pre-clinical models of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) through dual targeting of thymidylate synthase and DNA topoisomerase 1. Here we report that F10 activates the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in AML cells by enhancing localization of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) at the plasma membrane and while reducing overall lipid raft levels promotes Fas/FasL co-localization in remaining lipid rafts. The HMG-CoA synthase inhibitor simvastatin was synergistic with F10 and induced cell death via similar apoptotic processes. Our results are consistent with diverse processes activating a common apoptotic pathway characterized by reduced overall levels of lipid rafts and Fas/FasL co-localization in the plasma membrane, including in remaining lipid rafts which may play a role in both cell-survival and cell death signaling.

  19. Lipid raft facilitated ligation of K-{alpha}1-tubulin by specific antibodies on epithelial cells: Role in pathogenesis of chronic rejection following human lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Angaswamy, Nataraju; Weber, Joseph; Mohanakumar, T.

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Addition of KAT Abs (+) sera to NHBE culture causes upregulation of growth factors. {yields} Cholesterol depletion causes down regulation of growth factor expression. {yields} Cholesterol depletion is accompanied by loss of membrane bound caveolin. {yields} Thus, we demonstrate lipid raft are critical for efficient ligation of the KAT Abs. -- Abstract: Long term function of human lung allografts is hindered by development of chronic rejection manifested as Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS). We have previously identified the development of antibodies (Abs) following lung transplantation to K-{alpha}1-tubulin (KAT), an epithelial surface gap junction cytoskeletal protein, in patients who develop BOS. However, the biochemical and molecular basis of the interactions and signaling cascades mediated by KAT Abs are yet to be defined. In this report, we investigated the biophysical basis of the epithelial cell membrane surface interaction between KAT and its specific Abs. Towards this, we analyzed the role of the lipid raft-domains in the membrane interactions which lead to cell signaling and ultimately increased growth factor expression. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, upon specific ligation with Abs to KAT obtained either from the serum of BOS(+) patients or monoclonal KAT Abs, resulted in upregulation of growth factors VEGF, PDGF, and bFGF (6.4 {+-} 1.1-, 3.2 {+-} 0.9-, and 3.4 {+-} 1.1-fold increase, respectively) all of which are important in the pathogenesis of BOS. To define the role for lipid raft in augmenting surface interactions, we analyzed the changes in the growth factor expression pattern upon depletion and enrichment with lipid raft following the ligation of the epithelial cell membranes with Abs specific for KAT. NHBE cells cultured in the presence of {beta}-methyl cyclodextran ({beta}MCD) had significantly reduced growth factor expression (1.3 {+-} 0.3, vs {beta}MCD untreated being 6.4 {+-} 1.1-fold

  20. Neuropeptide FF-sensitive confinement of mu opioid receptor does not involve lipid rafts in SH-SY5Y cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mouledous, Lionel

    2008-08-15

    *: Mu opioid (MOP) receptor activation can be functionally modulated by stimulation of Neuropeptide FF 2 (NPFF{sub 2}) G protein-coupled receptors. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments have shown that activation of the NPFF{sub 2} receptor dramatically reduces the fraction of MOP receptors confined in microdomains of the plasma membrane of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The aim of the present work was to assess if the direct observation of receptor compartmentation by fluorescence techniques in living cells could be related to indirect estimation of receptor partitioning in lipid rafts after biochemical fractionation of the cell. Our results show that MOP receptor distribution in lipid rafts is highly dependent upon the method of purification, questioning the interpretation of previous data regarding MOP receptor compartmentation. Moreover, the NPFF analogue 1DMe does not modify the distribution profile of MOP receptors, clearly demonstrating that membrane fractionation data do not correlate with direct measurement of receptor compartmentation in living cells.

  1. Placental protein 13 (PP13/galectin-13) undergoes lipid raft-associated subcellular redistribution in the syncytiotrophoblast in preterm preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Balogh, Andrea; Pozsgay, Judit; Matkó, János; Dong, Zhong; Kim, Chong Jai; Várkonyi, Tibor; Sammar, Marei; Rigó, Jánow; Meiri, Hamutal; Romero, Roberto; Papp, Zoltán; Than, Nandor Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate placental protein 13 (PP13) localization in relation to cytoskeleton and lipid rafts in preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. Study Design Placental cryosections from patients with preeclampsia and HELLP, and controls were stained for PP13, actin, PLAP (lipid raft marker), and CD71 (nonraft marker). BeWo cells exposed to stress conditions were stained for PP13 and actin. Protein localization were investigated by confocal microscopy, PP13 concentrations by ELISA. Results PP13-actin colocalization was increased in syncytiotrophoblast juxtamembrane regions in term/preterm preeclampsia and HELLP. PP13-CD71 colocalization was decreased and PP13-PLAP proximity was increased in preterm but not term preeclampsia and HELLP. PP13-release from BeWo cells was inhibited by cytoskeleton disruption, and augmented by Ca2+-influx and ischemic stress. Conclusion The actin cytoskeleton, probably in connection with lipid rafts, controls trophoblastic “nonclassical” PP13 export. PP13 is released from the syncytiotrophoblast in preterm preeclampsia and HELLP, mimicked in BeWo cells by ischemic stress, suggesting PP13 is a placental alarmin. PMID:21596368

  2. Reduced levels of folate transporters (PCFT and RFC) in membrane lipid rafts result in colonic folate malabsorption in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Wani, Nissar Ahmad; Kaur, Jyotdeep

    2011-03-01

    We studied the effect of chronic ethanol ingestion on folate transport across the colonic apical membranes (CAM) in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed 1 g/kg body weight/day ethanol (20%) solution orally for 3 months and folate transport was studied in the isolated colon apical membrane vesicles. The folate transport was found to be carrier mediated, saturable, with pH optima at 5.0. Chronic ethanol ingestion reduced the folate transport across the CAM by decreasing the affinity of transporters (high Km) for the substrate and by decreasing the number of transporter molecules (low Vmax) on the colon luminal surface. The decreased transport activity at the CAM was associated with down-regulation of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) and the reduced folate carrier (RFC) which resulted in decreased PCFT and RFC protein levels in the colon of rats fed alcohol chronically. Moreover, the PCFT and the RFC were found to be distributed in detergent insoluble fraction of the CAM in rats. Floatation experiments on Optiprep density gradients demonstrated the association of the PCFT and the RFC protein with lipid rafts (LR). Chronic alcoholism decreased the PCFT and the RFC protein levels in the CAM LR in accordance with the decreased synthesis. Hence, we propose that downregulation in the expression of the PCFT and the RFC in colon results in reduced levels of these transporters in colon apical membrane LR as a mechanism of folate malabsorption during chronic alcoholism.

  3. Cross-correlation analysis of inner-leaflet-anchored green fluorescent protein co-redistributed with IgE receptors and outer leaflet lipid raft components.

    PubMed Central

    Pyenta, P S; Holowka, D; Baird, B

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the structural basis for membrane interactions that occur between Lyn tyrosine kinase and IgE-Fc(epsilon)RI or other components of lipid rafts, we prepared a green fluorescent protein analog of Lyn (PM-EGFP) and used cross-correlation analysis to quantify co-redistributions of aggregates that occur after IgE-Fc(epsilon)RI is cross-linked on the cell surface. PM-EGFP, which contains minimally the palmitoylation and myristoylation sites on Lyn, was compared with another inner leaflet probe, EGFP-GG, which contains a prenylation site and a polybasic sequence similar to K-ras. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to examine co-redistributions of these inner leaflet components with IgE-Fc(epsilon)RI and outer leaflet raft components, ganglioside GD1b and glycosylphosphotidylinositol-linked Thy-1, under conditions where the latter were cross-linked externally to form large patches at the cell surface. The cross-correlation analysis was developed and characterized with simulations representing cell surface distributions, and parameters from the cross-correlation curves, rho(o) (peak height) and A (peak area), were shown to be reliable measures of the extent of co-redistributed aggregates and their size. Cross-correlation analysis was then applied to quantify co-redistributions of the fluorescently labeled inner and outer leaflet components on RBL-2H3 cells. As visually observed and parameterized in this manner, PM-EGFP was found to co-redistribute with lipid rafts significantly more than EGFP-GG or an endogenous prenylated protein, Cdc42. These quantitative results are consistent with previous analyses of Lyn co-redistributions and support the hypothesis that the functionally important interaction of Lyn with cross-linked IgE- Fc(epsilon)RI is due to their mutual co-association with lipid rafts. PMID:11325715

  4. Genetic obesity alters recruitment of TANK-binding kinase 1 and AKT into hypothalamic lipid rafts domains.

    PubMed

    Delint-Ramirez, Ilse; Maldonado Ruiz, Roger; Torre-Villalvazo, Ivan; Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth; Garza Ocañas, Lourdes; Tovar, Armando; Camacho, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts (LRs) are membrane subdomains enriched in cholesterol, glycosphingolipids and sphingolipids containing saturated fatty acid. Signaling proteins become concentrated in these microdomains mainly by saturated fatty acid modification, thus facilitating formation of protein complexes and activation of specific signaling pathways. High intake of saturated fatty acids promotes inflammation and insulin resistance, in part by disrupting insulin signaling pathway. Here we investigate whether lipid-induced toxicity in obesity correlates with altered composition of insulin signaling proteins in LRs in the brain. Our results showed that insulin receptor (IR) is highly concentrated in LRs fraction in comparison with soluble or postsynaptic density (PSD) fractions. Analysis of LRs domains from hippocampus of obese mouse showed a significant decrease of IR and its downstream signaling protein AKT, while in the PSD fraction we detected partial decrease of AKT and no changes in the IR concentration. No changes were shown in the soluble extract. In hypothalamus, genetic obesity also decreases interaction of AKT, but we did not detect changes in the IR distribution. However, in this structure genetic obesity increases recruitment of the IR negative regulator TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) into LRs and PSD fraction. No changes of AKT, IR and TBK1 were found in soluble fractions of obese in comparison with lean mice. In vitro studies showed that incubation with saturated palmitic acid but not with unsaturated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or palmitoleic acid decreases association of IR and AKT and increases TBK1 recruitment into LRs and PSD domains, emulating what happens in the obese mice. TBK1 recruitment to insoluble domains correlates with decreases of IR tyrosine phosphorylation and ser473 AKT phosphorylation, markers of insulin resistance. These data support the hypothesis that hyperlipidemia associated with genetic obesity alters targeting of TBK1 and insulin signaling

  5. Revealing model dependencies in "Assessing the RAFT equilibrium constant via model systems: an EPR study".

    PubMed

    Junkers, Thomas; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Coote, Michelle L

    2011-12-01

    In a recent article (W. Meiser, M. Buback, Assessing the RAFT Equilibrium Constant via Model Systems: An EPR Study, Macromol. Rapid Commun. 2011, 18, 1490-1494), it is claimed that evidence is found that unequivocally proves that quantum mechanical calculations assessing the equilibrium constant and fragmentation rate coefficients in dithiobenzoate-mediated reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) systems are beset with a considerable uncertainty. In the present work, we show that these claims made by Meiser and Buback are beset with a model dependency, as a critical key parameter in their data analysis - the addition rate coefficient of the radicals attacking the C=S double bond in the dithiobenzoate - induces a model insensitivity into the data analysis. Contrary to the claims made by Meiser and Buback, their experimental results can be brought into agreement with the quantum chemical calculations if a lower addition rate coefficient of cyanoisopropyl radicals (CIP) to the CIP dithiobenzoate (CPDB) is assumed. To resolve the model dependency, the addition rate coefficient of CIP radicals to CPDB needs to be determined as a matter of priority.

  6. Solvatochromic Nile Red probes with FRET quencher reveal lipid order heterogeneity in living and apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Kreder, Rémy; Pyrshev, Kyrylo A; Darwich, Zeinab; Kucherak, Oleksandr A; Mély, Yves; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2015-06-19

    Detecting and imaging lipid microdomains (rafts) in cell membranes remain a challenge despite intensive research in the field. Two types of fluorescent probes are used for this purpose: one specifically labels a given phase (liquid ordered, Lo, or liquid disordered, Ld), while the other, being environment-sensitive (solvatochromic), stains the two phases in different emission colors. Here, we combined the two approaches by designing a phase-sensitive probe of the Ld phase and a quencher of the Ld phase. The former is an analogue of the recently developed Nile Red-based probe NR12S, bearing a bulky hydrophobic chain (bNR10S), while the latter is based on Black Hole Quencher-2 designed as bNR10S (bQ10S). Fluorescence spectroscopy of large unilamellar vesicles and microscopy of giant vesicles showed that the bNR10S probe can partition specifically into the Ld phase, while bQ10S can specifically quench the NR12S probe in the Ld phase so that only its fraction in the Lo phase remains fluorescent. Thus, the toolkit of two probes with quencher can specifically target Ld and Lo phases and identify their lipid order from the emission color. Application of this toolkit in living cells (HeLa, CHO, and 293T cell lines) revealed heterogeneity in the cell plasma membranes, observed as distinct probe environments close to the Lo and Ld phases of model membranes. In HeLa cells undergoing apoptosis, our toolkit showed the formation of separate domains of the Ld-like phase in the form of blebs. The developed tools open new possibilities in lipid raft research.

  7. Lateral Diffusion of Gαs in the Plasma Membrane Is Decreased after Chronic but not Acute Antidepressant Treatment: Role of Lipid Raft and Non-Raft Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Czysz, Andrew H; Schappi, Jeffrey M; Rasenick, Mark M

    2015-01-01

    GPCR signaling is modified both in major depressive disorder and by chronic antidepressant treatment. Endogenous Gαs redistributes from raft- to nonraft-membrane fractions after chronic antidepressant treatment. Modification of G protein anchoring may participate in this process. Regulation of Gαs signaling by antidepressants was studied using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of GFP-Gαs. Here we find that extended antidepressant treatment both increases the half-time of maximum recovery of GFP-Gαs and decreases the extent of recovery. Furthermore, this effect parallels the movement of Gαs out of lipid rafts as determined by cold detergent membrane extraction with respect to both dose and duration of drug treatment. This effect was observed for several classes of compounds with antidepressant activity, whereas closely related molecules lacking antidepressant activity (eg, R-citalopram) did not produce the effect. These results are consistent with previously observed antidepressant-induced translocation of Gαs, but also suggest an alternate membrane attachment site for this G protein. Furthermore, FRAP analysis provides the possibility of a relatively high-throughput screening tool for compounds with putative antidepressant activity. PMID:25249058

  8. Amphiphilic brush polymers produced using the RAFT polymerisation method stabilise and reduce the cell cytotoxicity of lipid lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jiali; Suryadinata, Randy; Luan, Bao; Tran, Nhiem; Hinton, Tracey M; Ratcliffe, Julian; Hao, Xiaojuan; Drummond, Calum J

    2016-10-06

    Self-assembled lipid lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles such as hexosomes and cubosomes contain internal anisotropic and isotropic nanostructures, respectively. Despite the remarkable potential of such nanoparticles in various biomedical applications, the stabilisers used in formulating the nanoparticles are often limited to commercially available polymers such as the Pluronic block copolymers. This study explored the potential of using Reversible Addition-Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) technology to design amphiphilic brush-type polymers for the purpose of stabilising phytantriol and monoolein-based lipid dispersions. The synthesised brush-type polymers consisted of a hydrophobic C12 short chain and a hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether acrylate (PEGA) long chain with multiple 9-unit poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) brushes with various molecular weights. It was observed that increasing the PEO brush density and thus the length of the hydrophilic component improved the stabilisation effectiveness for phytantriol and monoolein-based cubosomes. Synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments confirmed that the RAFT polymer-stabilised cubosomes had an internal double-diamond cubic phase with tunable water channel sizes. These properties were dependent on the molecular weight of the polymers, which were considered in some cases to be anisotropically distributed within the cubosomes. The in vitro toxicity of the cubosomes was assessed by cell viability of two human adenocarcinoma cell lines and haemolytic activities to mouse erythrocytes. The results showed that phytantriol cubosomes stabilised by the RAFT polymers were less toxic compared to their Pluronic F127-stabilised analogues. This study provides valuable insight into designing non-linear amphiphilic polymers for the effective stabilisation and cellular toxicity improvement of self-assembled lipid lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles.

  9. Pantethine Alters Lipid Composition and Cholesterol Content of Membrane Rafts, With Down-Regulation of CXCL12-Induced T Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    van Gijsel-Bonnello, Manuel; Acar, Niyazi; Molino, Yves; Bretillon, Lionel; Khrestchatisky, Michel; de Reggi, Max; Gharib, Bouchra

    2015-10-01

    Pantethine, a natural low-molecular-weight thiol, shows a broad activity in a large range of essential cellular pathways. It has been long known as a hypolipidemic and hypocholesterolemic agent. We have recently shown that it exerts a neuroprotective action in mouse models of cerebral malaria and Parkinson's disease through multiple mechanisms. In the present study, we looked at its effects on membrane lipid rafts that serve as platforms for molecules engaged in cell activity, therefore providing a target against inappropriate cell response leading to a chronic inflammation. We found that pantethine-treated cells showed a significant change in raft fatty acid composition and cholesterol content, with ultimate downregulation of cell adhesion, CXCL12-driven chemotaxis, and transendothelial migration of various T cell types, including human Jurkat cell line and circulating effector T cells. The mechanisms involved include the alteration of the following: (i) CXCL12 binding to its target cells; (ii) membrane dynamics of CXCR4 and CXCR7, the two CXCL12 receptors; and (iii) cell redox status, a crucial determinant in the regulation of the chemokine system. In addition, we considered the linker for activation of T cells molecule to show that pantethine effects were associated with the displacement from the rafts of the acylated signaling molecules which had their palmitoylation level reduced.. In conclusion, the results presented here, together with previously published findings, indicate that due to its pleiotropic action, pantethine can downregulate the multifaceted process leading to pathogenic T cell activation and migration.

  10. SDF-1α/CXCR4 Signaling in Lipid Rafts Induces Platelet Aggregation via PI3 Kinase-Dependent Akt Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Moyuru; Kaneda, Mizuho; Iida, Kazuko; Shimonaka, Motoyuki; Hara, Takahiko; Arai, Morio; Koike, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Naomasa; Kasahara, Kohji

    2017-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α)-induced platelet aggregation is mediated through its G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K). Here, we demonstrate that SDF-1α induces phosphorylation of Akt at Thr308 and Ser473 in human platelets. SDF-1α-induced platelet aggregation and Akt phosphorylation are inhibited by pretreatment with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 or the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. SDF-1α also induces the phosphorylation of PDK1 at Ser241 (an upstream activator of Akt), GSK3β at Ser9 (a downstream substrate of Akt), and myosin light chain at Ser19 (a downstream element of the Akt signaling pathway). SDF-1α-induced platelet aggregation is inhibited by pretreatment with the Akt inhibitor MK-2206 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, SDF-1α-induced platelet aggregation and Akt phosphorylation are inhibited by pretreatment with the raft-disrupting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Sucrose density gradient analysis shows that 35% of CXCR4, 93% of the heterotrimeric G proteins Gαi-1, 91% of Gαi-2, 50% of Gβ and 4.0% of PI3Kβ, and 4.5% of Akt2 are localized in the detergent-resistant membrane raft fraction. These findings suggest that SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling in lipid rafts induces platelet aggregation via PI3K-dependent Akt phosphorylation. PMID:28072855

  11. SDF-1α/CXCR4 Signaling in Lipid Rafts Induces Platelet Aggregation via PI3 Kinase-Dependent Akt Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Hiroko; Iguchi, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Moyuru; Kaneda, Mizuho; Iida, Kazuko; Shimonaka, Motoyuki; Hara, Takahiko; Arai, Morio; Koike, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Naomasa; Kasahara, Kohji

    2017-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α)-induced platelet aggregation is mediated through its G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K). Here, we demonstrate that SDF-1α induces phosphorylation of Akt at Thr308 and Ser473 in human platelets. SDF-1α-induced platelet aggregation and Akt phosphorylation are inhibited by pretreatment with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 or the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. SDF-1α also induces the phosphorylation of PDK1 at Ser241 (an upstream activator of Akt), GSK3β at Ser9 (a downstream substrate of Akt), and myosin light chain at Ser19 (a downstream element of the Akt signaling pathway). SDF-1α-induced platelet aggregation is inhibited by pretreatment with the Akt inhibitor MK-2206 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, SDF-1α-induced platelet aggregation and Akt phosphorylation are inhibited by pretreatment with the raft-disrupting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Sucrose density gradient analysis shows that 35% of CXCR4, 93% of the heterotrimeric G proteins Gαi-1, 91% of Gαi-2, 50% of Gβ and 4.0% of PI3Kβ, and 4.5% of Akt2 are localized in the detergent-resistant membrane raft fraction. These findings suggest that SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling in lipid rafts induces platelet aggregation via PI3K-dependent Akt phosphorylation.

  12. CD44 interaction with ankyrin and IP3 receptor in lipid rafts promotes hyaluronan-mediated Ca2+ signaling leading to nitric oxide production and endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Patrick A; Bourguignon, Lilly Y W

    2004-04-15

    In this study, we have showed that aortic endothelial cells (GM7372A cell line) express CD44v10 [a hyaluronan (HA) receptor], which is significantly enriched in cholesterol-containing lipid rafts (characterized as caveolin-rich plasma membrane microdomains). HA binding to CD44v10 promotes recruitment of the cytoskeletal protein, ankyrin and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor into cholesterol-containing lipid rafts. The ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of ankyrin is responsible for binding IP3 receptor to CD44v10 at lipid rafts and subsequently triggering HA/CD44v10-mediated intracellular calcium (Ca2+) mobilization leading to a variety of endothelial cell functions such as nitric oxide (NO) production, cell adhesion and proliferation. Further analyses indicate (i) disruption of lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol from the membranes of GM7372A cells (using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin treatment) or (ii) interference of endogenous ankyrin binding to CD44 and IP3 receptor using overexpression of ARD fragments (by transfecting cells with ARDcDNA) not only abolishes ankyrin/IP3 receptor accumulation into CD44v10/cholesterol-containing lipid rafts, but also blocks HA-mediated Ca2+ signaling and endothelial cell functions. Taken together, our findings suggest that CD44v10 interaction with ankyrin and IP3 receptor in cholesterol-containing lipid rafts plays an important role in regulating HA-mediated Ca2+ signaling and endothelial cell functions such as NO production, cell adhesion and proliferation.

  13. Lateral Diffusion, Function, and Expression of the Slow Channel Congenital Myasthenia Syndrome αC418W Nicotinic Receptor Mutation with Changes in Lipid Raft Components*

    PubMed Central

    Oyola-Cintrón, Jessica; Caballero-Rivera, Daniel; Ballester, Leomar; Baéz-Pagán, Carlos A.; Martínez, Hernán L.; Vélez-Arroyo, Karla P.; Quesada, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts, specialized membrane microdomains in the plasma membrane rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, are hot spots for a number of important cellular processes. The novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) mutation αC418W, the first lipid-exposed mutation identified in a patient that causes slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome was shown to be cholesterol-sensitive and to accumulate in microdomains rich in the membrane raft marker protein caveolin-1. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the mechanism by which lateral segregation into specialized raft membrane microdomains regulates the activable pool of nAChRs. We performed fluorescent recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), quantitative RT-PCR, and whole cell patch clamp recordings of GFP-encoding Mus musculus nAChRs transfected into HEK 293 cells to assess the role of cholesterol and caveolin-1 (CAV-1) in the diffusion, expression, and functionality of the nAChR (WT and αC418W). Our findings support the hypothesis that a cholesterol-sensitive nAChR might reside in specialized membrane microdomains that upon cholesterol depletion become disrupted and release the cholesterol-sensitive nAChRs to the pool of activable receptors. In addition, our results in HEK 293 cells show an interdependence between CAV-1 and αC418W that could confer end plates rich in αC418W nAChRs to a susceptibility to changes in cholesterol levels that could cause adverse drug reactions to cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins. The current work suggests that the interplay between cholesterol and CAV-1 provides the molecular basis for modulating the function and dynamics of the cholesterol-sensitive αC418W nAChR. PMID:26354438

  14. NADPH oxidase and lipid raft-associated redox signaling are required for PCB153-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules in human brain endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eum, Sung Yong Andras, Ibolya; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), can lead to chronic inflammation and the development of vascular diseases. Because cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the cerebrovascular endothelium regulate infiltration of inflammatory cells into the brain, we have explored the molecular mechanisms by which ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), such as PCB153, can upregulate CAMs in brain endothelial cells. Exposure to PCB153 increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as well as elevated adhesion of leukocytes to brain endothelial cells. These effects were impeded by inhibitors of EGFR, JAKs, or Src activity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase or disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depleting agents blocked PCB153-induced phosphorylation of JAK and Src kinases and upregulation of CAMs. In contrast, silencing of caveolin-1 by siRNA interference did not affect upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells stimulated by PCB153. Results of the present study indicate that lipid raft-dependent NADPH oxidase/JAK/EGFR signaling mechanisms regulate the expression of CAMs in brain endothelial cells and adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial monolayers. Due to its role in leukocyte infiltration, induction of CAMs may contribute to PCB-induced cerebrovascular disorders and neurotoxic effects in the CNS.

  15. Vibrio vulnificus VvpE inhibits mucin 2 expression by hypermethylation via lipid raft-mediated ROS signaling in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S-J; Jung, Y H; Oh, S Y; Jang, K K; Lee, H S; Choi, S H; Han, H J

    2015-01-01

    Mucin is an important physical barrier against enteric pathogens. VvpE is an elastase encoded by Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio vulnificus; however, the functional role of VvpE in intestinal mucin (Muc) production is yet to be elucidated. The recombinant protein (r) VvpE significantly reduced the level of Muc2 in human mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cells. The repression of Muc2 induced by rVvpE was highly susceptible to the knockdown of intelectin-1b (ITLN) and sequestration of cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin. We found that rVvpE induces the recruitment of NADPH oxidase 2 and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1 into the membrane lipid rafts coupled with ITLN to facilitate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The bacterial signaling of rVvpE through ROS production is uniquely mediated by the phosphorylation of ERK, which was downregulated by the silencing of the PKCδ. Moreover, rVvpE induced region-specific methylation in the Muc2 promoter to promote the transcriptional repression of Muc2. In two mouse models of V. vulnificus infection, the mutation of the vvpE gene from V. vulnificus exhibited an increased survival rate and maintained the level of Muc2 expression in intestine. These results demonstrate that VvpE inhibits Muc2 expression by hypermethylation via lipid raft-mediated ROS signaling in the intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26086960

  16. Taraxasterol inhibits cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting reactive oxygen species-induced TLR4 trafficking to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Xueshibojie, Liu; Duo, Yu; Tiejun, Wang

    2016-10-15

    Taraxasterol, a pentacyclic-triterpene isolated from Taraxacum officinale, has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, the protective effects of taraxasterol against cigarette smoke (CS)-induced lung inflammation have not been reported. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects and mechanism of taraxasterol on CS-induced lung inflammation in mice. CS-induced mouse lung inflammation model was used to investigate the protective effects of taraxasterol in vivo. Human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) were used to investigate the protective mechanism of taraxasterol in vitro. The results showed that taraxasterol attenuated CS-induced lung pathological changes, inflammatory cells infiltration, inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production. Taraxasterol also up-regulated CS-induced glutathione (GSH) production. In vitro, taraxasterol was found to inhibit CS-induced reactive oxygen species production, recruitment of TLR4 into lipid rafts, NF-κB activation, and IL-8 production. Furthermore, our results showed that antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited CS-induced recruitment of TLR4 into lipid rafts as well as IL-8 production. In conclusion, our results suggested that taraxasterol had protective effects of CS-induced lung inflammation.

  17. Soluble Glucan Is Internalized and Trafficked to the Golgi Apparatus in Macrophages via a Clathrin-Mediated, Lipid Raft-Regulated Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Matthew P.; Kalbfleisch, John H.; Williams, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Glucans are natural product carbohydrates that stimulate immunity. Glucans are internalized by the pattern recognition receptor, Dectin-1. Glucans were thought to be trafficked to phagolysosomes, but this is unproven. We examined the internalization and trafficking of soluble glucans in macrophages. Incubation of macrophages with glucan resulted in internalization of Dectin-1 and glucan. Inhibition of clathrin blocked internalization of the Dectin-1/glucan complex. Lipid raft depletion resulted in decreased Dectin levels and glucan uptake. Once internalized, glucans colocalized with early endosomes at 0 to 15 min, with the Golgi apparatus at 15 min to 24 h, and with Dectin-1 immediately (0 h) and again later (15 min-24 h). Glucans did not colocalize with lysosomes at any time interval examined. We conclude that the internalization of Dectin-1/glucan complexes in macrophages is mediated by clathrin and negatively regulated by lipid rafts and/or caveolin-1. Upon internalization, soluble glucans are trafficked via endosomes to the Golgi apparatus, not lysosomes. PMID:22700434

  18. Rafting in the membrane. A lesson learnt from lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Svec, A

    2008-10-01

    Lipid rafts are chemically distinct compartments of the plasma membrane. Their integrity is a prerequisite for vital cellular functions particularly for signalling and trafficking. Their perturbation is associated with development of a broad spectrum of diseases. Lipid rafts are also important for therapeutic effects of some drugs. Moreover, some of the raft associated molecules are useful immunohistochemical markers in routine histopathology.

  19. ApoER2 expression increases Aβ production while decreasing Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) endocytosis: Possible role in the partitioning of APP into lipid rafts and in the regulation of γ-secretase activity

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Rodrigo A; Barría, Maria Ines; Lee, Jiyeon; Cam, Judy; Araya, Claudia; Escudero, Claudia A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Bronfman, Francisca C; Bu, Guojun; Marzolo, Maria-Paz

    2007-01-01

    Background The generation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) through the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a central event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies highlight APP endocytosis and localization to lipid rafts as important events favoring amyloidogenic processing. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these events are poorly understood. ApoER2 is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) family exhibiting slow endocytosis rate and a significant association with lipid rafts. Despite the important neurophysiological roles described for ApoER2, little is known regarding how ApoER2 regulates APP trafficking and processing. Results Here, we demonstrate that ApoER2 physically interacts and co-localizes with APP. Remarkably, we found that ApoER2 increases cell surface APP levels and APP association with lipid rafts. The increase of cell surface APP requires the presence of ApoER2 cytoplasmic domain and is a result of decreased APP internalization rate. Unexpectedly, ApoER2 expression correlated with a significant increase in Aβ production and reduced levels of APP-CTFs. The increased Aβ production was dependent on the integrity of the NPxY endocytosis motif of ApoER2. We also found that expression of ApoER2 increased APP association with lipid rafts and increased γ-secretase activity, both of which might contribute to increased Aβ production. Conclusion These findings show that ApoER2 negatively affects APP internalization. However, ApoER2 expression stimulates Aβ production by shifting the proportion of APP from the non-rafts to the raft membrane domains, thereby promoting β-secretase and γ-secretase mediated amyloidogenic processing and also by incrementing the activity of γ-secretase. PMID:17620134

  20. Activated FcgammaRII and signalling molecules revealed in rafts by ultra-structural observations of plasma-membrane sheets.

    PubMed

    Strzelecka-Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Korzeniowski, Marek; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Mrozińska, Kazimiera; Sobota, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    To reveal topography of FcgammaRII components of the receptor-signalling complex, large plasma-membrane sheets were obtained by cell cleavage and analysed by immuno-electron microscopy. Non-activated FcgammaRII was dispersed in the plane of the plasma membrane and only rarely was localized in the proximity of Lyn, an Src family tyrosine kinase, and CD55, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein. After FcgammaRII activation by cross-linking with antibodies, clusters of an electron-dense material acquiring about 86% of FcgammaRII and reaching up to 300 nm in diameter were formed within 5 min. These structures also accommodated about 85% of Lyn and 63% of CD55 labels that were located in close vicinity of gold particles attributed to the cross-linked FcgammaRII . The electron-dense structures were also abundant in tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. At their margins PIP2 was preferentially located. Based on a concentration of Lyn, CD55 and activated FcgammaRII , the electron-dense structures seem to reflect coalescent membrane rafts.

  1. Cholesterol depletion blocks redistribution of lipid raft components and insulin-mimetic signaling by glimepiride and phosphoinositolglycans in rat adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gunter; Hanekop, Nils; Wied, Susanne; Frick, Wendelin

    2002-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored plasma membrane (GPI) proteins, such as Gce1, the dually acylated nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs), such as pp59(Lyn), and the membrane protein, caveolin, together with cholesterol are typical components of detergent/carbonate-insoluble glycolipid-enriched raft domains (DIGs) in the plasma membrane of most eucaryotes. Previous studies demonstrated the dissociation from caveolin and concomitant redistribution from DIGs of Gce1 and pp59(Lyn) in rat adipocytes in response to four different insulin-mimetic stimuli, glimepiride, phosphoinositolglycans, caveolin-binding domain peptide, and trypsin/NaCl-treatment. We now characterized the structural basis for this dynamic of DIG components. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Carbonate extracts from purified plasma membranes of basal and stimulated adipocytes were analyzed by high-resolution sucrose gradient centrifugation. RESULTS: This process revealed the existence of two distinct species of detergent/carbonate-insoluble complexes floating at higher buoyant density and harboring lower amounts of cholesterol, caveolin, GPI proteins, and NRTKs (lcDIGs) compared to typical DIGs of high cholesterol content (hcDIGs). The four insulin-mimetic stimuli decreased by 40-70% and increased by 2.5- to 5-fold the amounts of GPI proteins and NRTKs at hcDIGs and lcDIGs, respectively. Cholesterol depletion of adipocytes per se by incubation with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin or cholesterol oxidase also caused translocation of GPI proteins and NRTKs from hcDIGs to lcDIGs and their release from caveolin in reversible fashion without concomitant induction of insulin-mimetic signaling. Cholesterol depletion, however, reduced by 50-60% the stimulus-induced translocation as well as dissociation from hcDIGs-associated caveolin of GPI proteins and NRTKs, activation of NRTKs as well as insulin-mimetic signaling and metabolic action. In contrast, insulin-mimetic signaling induced by vanadium compounds was not

  2. High-density lipoprotein and apolipoprotein A-I inhibit palmitate-induced translocation of toll-like receptor 4 into lipid rafts and inflammatory cytokines in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hodaka; Umemoto, Tomio; Kawano, Mikihiko; Kawakami, Masanobu; Kakei, Masafumi; Momomura, Shin-Ichi; Ishikawa, San-E; Hara, Kazuo

    2017-03-04

    Saturated fatty acids (SFAs) activate toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal transduction in macrophages and are involved in the chronic inflammation accompanying obesity. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) produce anti-inflammatory effects via reverse cholesterol transport. However, the underlying mechanisms by which HDL and apoA-I inhibit inflammatory responses in adipocytes remain to be determined. Here we examined whether palmitate increases the translocation of TLR4 into lipid rafts and whether HDL and apoA-I inhibit inflammation in adipocytes. Palmitate exposure (250 μM, 24 h) increased interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α gene expressions and translocation of TLR4 into lipid rafts in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Pretreatment with HDL and apoA-I (50 μg/mL, 6 h) suppressed palmitate-induced inflammatory cytokine expression and TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts. Moreover, HDL and apoA-I inhibited palmitate-induced phosphorylation of nuclear factor-kappa B. HDL showed an anti-inflammatory effect via ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 and scavenger receptor class B, member 1, whereas apoA-I showed an effect via ATP-binding cassette transporter A1. These results demonstrated that HDL and apoA-I reduced palmitate-potentiated TLR4 trafficking into lipid rafts and its related inflammation in adipocytes via these specific transporters.

  3. Prostaglandin EP3 receptor superactivates adenylyl cyclase via the Gq/PLC/Ca2+ pathway in a lipid raft-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Kumiko; Yano, Akiko; Kuroiwa, Kenji; Morimoto, Kazushi; Inazumi, Tomoaki; Hatae, Noriyuki; Tabata, Hiroyuki; Segi-Nishida, Eri; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Yukihiko

    2009-11-27

    We previously demonstrated that prostaglandin EP3 receptor augments EP2-elicited cAMP formation in COS-7 cells in a G(i/o)-insensitive manner. The purpose of our current study was to identify the signaling pathways involved in EP3-induced augmentation of receptor-stimulated cAMP formation. The enhancing effect of EP3 receptor was irrespective of the C-terminal structure of the EP3 isoform. This EP3 action was abolished by treatment with inhibitors for phospholipase C and intracellular Ca(2+)-related signaling molecules such as U73122, staurosporine, 2-APB and SK&F 96365. Indeed, an EP3 agonist stimulated IP(3) formation and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, which was blocked by U73122, but not by pertussis toxin. The enhancing effect by EP3 on cAMP formation was mimicked by both a Ca(2+) ionophore and the activation of a typical G(q)-coupled receptor. Moreover, EP3 was exclusively localized to the raft fraction in COS-7 cells and EP3-elicited augmentation of cAMP formation was abolished by cholesterol depletion and introduction of a dominant negative caveolin-1 mutant. These results suggest that EP3 elicits adenylyl cyclase superactivation via G(q)/phospholipase C activation and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in a lipid raft microdomain-dependent manner.

  4. Toll like receptor 2 and CC chemokine receptor 5 cluster in the lipid raft enhances the susceptibility of Leishmania donovani infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Suchandra Bhattacharyya; Bhattacharya, Parna; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Majumder, Saikat; Banerjee, Sayantan; Majumdar, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    In experimental visceral leishmaniasis the causative obligate protozoan parasite, L. donovani invades and multiplies inside of macrophages, one of the sentries of the mammalian immune system. The initial host-parasite interaction between the Leishmania promastigote and the macrophage takes place at the plasma membrane interface. To trace any possible interaction between Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) during early Leishmania-macrophage interactions, it was observed that the expression of both TLR2 and CCR5 were significantly increased, along with their recruitment to the lipid raft. TLR2 silencing attenuates CCR5 expression and restricts L. donovani infection, indicating a regulatory role of TLR2 and CCR5 during infection. Silencing of CCR5 and TLR2 markedly reduced the number of intracellular parasites in macrophages by host protective cytokine responses, while raft disruption using beta-MCD affected TLR2/CCR5 cross-talk and resulted in a significant reduction in parasite invasion. In vivo RNA interference of TLR2 and CCR5 using shRNA plasmids rendered protection in Leishmania donovani-infected mice. Thus, this study for the first time demonstrates the importance of TLR2/CCR5 crosstalk as a significant determinant of Leishmania donovani entry in host macrophages.

  5. Chronic treatment with escitalopram but not R-citalopram translocates Galpha(s) from lipid raft domains and potentiates adenylyl cyclase: a 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter-independent action of this antidepressant compound.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanqiu; Rasenick, Mark M

    2010-03-01

    Chronic antidepressant treatment has been shown to increase adenylyl cyclase activity, in part, due to translocation of Galpha(s) from lipid rafts to a nonraft fraction of the plasma membrane where they engage in a more facile stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. This effect holds for multiple classes of antidepressants, and for serotonin uptake inhibitors, it occurs in the absence of the serotonin transporter. In the present study, we examined the change in the amount of Galpha(s) in lipid raft and whole cell lysate after exposing C6 cells to escitalopram. The results showed that chronic (but not acute) escitalopram decreased the content of Galpha(s) in lipid rafts, whereas there was no change in overall Galpha(s) content. These effects were drug dose- and exposure time-dependent. Although R-citalopram has been reported to antagonize some effects of escitalopram, this compound was without effect on Galpha(s) localization in lipid rafts, and R-citalopram did not inhibit these actions of escitalopram. Escitalopram treatment increased cAMP accumulation, and this seemed due to increased coupling between Galpha(s) and adenylyl cyclase. Thus, escitalopram is potent, rapid and efficacious in translocating Galpha(s) from lipid rafts, and this effect seems to occur independently of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters. Our results suggest that, although antidepressants display distinct affinities for well identified targets (e.g., monoamine transporters), several presynaptic and postsynaptic molecules are probably modified during chronic antidepressant treatment, and these additional targets may be required for clinical efficacy of these drugs.

  6. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter ABCA7 Regulates NKT Cell Development and Function by Controlling CD1d Expression and Lipid Raft Content

    PubMed Central

    Nowyhed, Heba N.; Chandra, Shilpi; Kiosses, William; Marcovecchio, Paola; Andary, Farah; Zhao, Meng; Fitzgerald, Michael L.; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2017-01-01

    ABCA7 is an ABC transporter expressed on the plasma membrane, and actively exports phospholipid complexes from the cytoplasmic to the exocytoplasmic leaflet of membranes. Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are a subpopulation of T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens in the context of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. In this study, we demonstrate that ABCA7 regulates the development of NKT cells in a cell-extrinsic manner. We found that in Abca7−/− mice there is reduced expression of CD1d accompanied by an alteration in lipid raft content on the plasma membrane of thymocytes and antigen presenting cells. Together, these alterations caused by absence of ABCA7 negatively affect NKT cell development and function. PMID:28091533

  7. Direct interaction, instrumental for signaling processes, between LacCer and Lyn in the lipid rafts of neutrophil-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiricozzi, Elena; Ciampa, Maria Grazia; Brasile, Giuseppina; Compostella, Federica; Prinetti, Alessandro; Nakayama, Hitoshi; Ekyalongo, Roudy C.; Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa; Sonnino, Sandro; Mauri, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Lactosylceramide [LacCer; β-Gal-(1-4)-β-Glc-(1-1)-Cer] has been shown to contain very long fatty acids that specifically modulate neutrophil properties. The interactions between LacCer and proteins and their role in cell signaling processes were assessed by synthesizing two molecular species of azide-photoactivable tritium-labeled LacCer having acyl chains of different lengths. The lengths of the two acyl chains corresponded to those of a short/medium and very long fatty acid, comparable to the lengths of stearic and lignoceric acids, respectively. These derivatives, designated C18-[3H]LacCer-(N3) and C24-[3H]LacCer-(N3), were incorporated into the lipid rafts of plasma membranes of neutrophilic differentiated HL-60 (D-HL-60) cells. C24-[3H]LacCer-(N3), but not C18-[3H]LacCer-(N3), induced the phosphorylation of Lyn and promoted phagocytosis. Incorporation of C24-[3H]LacCer-(N3) into plasma membranes, followed by illumination, resulted in the formation of several tritium-labeled LacCer-protein complexes, including the LacCer-Lyn complex, into plasma membrane lipid rafts. Administration of C18-[3H]LacCer-(N3) to cells, however, did not result in the formation of the LacCer-Lyn complex. These results suggest that LacCer derivatives mimic the biological properties of natural LacCer species and can be utilized as tools to study LacCer-protein interactions, and confirm a specific direct interaction between LacCer species containing very long fatty acids, and Lyn protein, associated with the cytoplasmic layer via myristic/palmitic chains. PMID:25418321

  8. Netrin-1-Induced Stem Cell Bioactivity Contributes to the Regeneration of Injured Tissues via the Lipid Raft-Dependent Integrin α6β4 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Sang; Lee, Sei-Jung; Lee, Sang Hun; Ryu, Jung Min; Lim, Hyeon Su; Kim, Jun Sung; Song, Eun Ju; Jung, Young Hyun; Lee, Hyun Jik; Kim, Chung Hun; Han, Ho Jae

    2016-01-01

    Netrin-1 (Ntn-1) is a multifunctional neuronal signaling molecule; however, its physiological significance, which improves the tissue-regeneration capacity of stem cells, has not been characterized. In the present study, we investigate the mechanism by which Ntn-1 promotes the proliferation of hUCB-MSCs with regard to the regeneration of injured tissues. We found that Ntn-1 induces the proliferation of hUCB-MSCs mainly via Inα6β4 coupled with c-Src. Ntn-1 induced the recruitment of NADPH oxidases and Rac1 into membrane lipid rafts to facilitate ROS production. The Inα6β4 signaling of Ntn-1 through ROS production is uniquely mediated by the activation of SP1 for cell cycle progression and the transcriptional occupancy of SP1 on the VEGF promoter. Moreover, Ntn-1 has the ability to induce the F-actin reorganization of hUCB-MSCs via the Inα6β4 signaling pathway. In an in vivo model, transplantation of hUCB-MSCs pre-treated with Ntn-1 enhanced the skin wound healing process, where relatively more angiogenesis was detected. The potential effect of Ntn-1 on angiogenesis is further verified by the mouse hindlimb ischemia model, where the pre-activation of hUCB-MSCs with Ntn-1 significantly improved vascular regeneration. These results demonstrate that Ntn-1 plays an important role in the tissue regeneration process of hUCB-MSC via the lipid raft-mediated Inα6β4 signaling pathway. PMID:27881869

  9. Expression of GM1, a marker of lipid rafts, defines two subsets of human monocytes with differential endocytic capacity and lipopolysaccharide responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Altamirano, M Maximina Bertha; Aguilar-Carmona, Israel; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2007-01-01

    Monocytes constitute 5–10% of total human peripheral blood leucocytes and remain in circulation for several days before replenishing the tissue macrophage populations. Monocytes display heterogeneity in size, granularity and nuclear morphology, and in the expression of cell membrane molecules, such as CD14, CD16, CD32, CD64, major histocompatibility complex class II, CCR2, CCR5, among others. This has led to the suggestion that individual monocyte/macrophage populations have specialized functions within their microenvironments. This study provides evidence for the occurrence of two peripheral blood monocyte subpopulations on the basis of their differential expression of GM1, a sphingolipid found mostly in lipid rafts, a CD14+ GM1low population and a CD14+ GM1high population comprising about 97·5% and 2·5% of total CD14+ cells, respectively. GM1 expression correlates with functional differences in terms of endocytic activity, susceptibility to mycobacterial infection, and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (modulation of Toll-like receptor-4 expression). CD14+ GM1low cells proved to be less endocytic and more responsive to LPS, whereas CD14+ GM1high cells are more endocytic and less responsive to LPS. In addition, during monocyte to macrophage differentiation in vitro, the percentage of CD14+ GM1high cells increases from about 2·5% at day 1 to more than 50% at day 7 of culture. These results suggest that GM1low and GM1high monocytes in peripheral blood, represent either different stages of maturation or different subsets with specialized activities. The expression of CD16 on GM1high favours the first possibility and, on the other hand that up-regulation of GM1 expression and probably lipid rafts function is involved in the monocyte to macrophage differentiation process. PMID:17250589

  10. Lipid Clustering Correlates with Membrane Curvature as Revealed by Molecular Simulations of Complex Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Koldsø, Heidi; Shorthouse, David; Hélie, Jean; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Cell membranes are complex multicomponent systems, which are highly heterogeneous in the lipid distribution and composition. To date, most molecular simulations have focussed on relatively simple lipid compositions, helping to inform our understanding of in vitro experimental studies. Here we describe on simulations of complex asymmetric plasma membrane model, which contains seven different lipids species including the glycolipid GM3 in the outer leaflet and the anionic lipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphophate (PIP2), in the inner leaflet. Plasma membrane models consisting of 1500 lipids and resembling the in vivo composition were constructed and simulations were run for 5 µs. In these simulations the most striking feature was the formation of nano-clusters of GM3 within the outer leaflet. In simulations of protein interactions within a plasma membrane model, GM3, PIP2, and cholesterol all formed favorable interactions with the model α-helical protein. A larger scale simulation of a model plasma membrane containing 6000 lipid molecules revealed correlations between curvature of the bilayer surface and clustering of lipid molecules. In particular, the concave (when viewed from the extracellular side) regions of the bilayer surface were locally enriched in GM3. In summary, these simulations explore the nanoscale dynamics of model bilayers which mimic the in vivo lipid composition of mammalian plasma membranes, revealing emergent nanoscale membrane organization which may be coupled both to fluctuations in local membrane geometry and to interactions with proteins. PMID:25340788

  11. Lipid clustering correlates with membrane curvature as revealed by molecular simulations of complex lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Koldsø, Heidi; Shorthouse, David; Hélie, Jean; Sansom, Mark S P

    2014-10-01

    Cell membranes are complex multicomponent systems, which are highly heterogeneous in the lipid distribution and composition. To date, most molecular simulations have focussed on relatively simple lipid compositions, helping to inform our understanding of in vitro experimental studies. Here we describe on simulations of complex asymmetric plasma membrane model, which contains seven different lipids species including the glycolipid GM3 in the outer leaflet and the anionic lipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphophate (PIP2), in the inner leaflet. Plasma membrane models consisting of 1500 lipids and resembling the in vivo composition were constructed and simulations were run for 5 µs. In these simulations the most striking feature was the formation of nano-clusters of GM3 within the outer leaflet. In simulations of protein interactions within a plasma membrane model, GM3, PIP2, and cholesterol all formed favorable interactions with the model α-helical protein. A larger scale simulation of a model plasma membrane containing 6000 lipid molecules revealed correlations between curvature of the bilayer surface and clustering of lipid molecules. In particular, the concave (when viewed from the extracellular side) regions of the bilayer surface were locally enriched in GM3. In summary, these simulations explore the nanoscale dynamics of model bilayers which mimic the in vivo lipid composition of mammalian plasma membranes, revealing emergent nanoscale membrane organization which may be coupled both to fluctuations in local membrane geometry and to interactions with proteins.

  12. ADP-Induced Ca(2+) Signaling and Proliferation of Rat Ventricular Myofibroblasts Depend on Phospholipase C-Linked TRP Channels Activation Within Lipid Rafts.

    PubMed

    Certal, Mariana; Vinhas, Adriana; Barros-Barbosa, Aurora; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Costa, Maria Adelina; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2017-06-01

    Nucleotides released during heart injury affect myocardium electrophysiology and remodeling through P2 purinoceptors activation in cardiac myofibroblasts. ATP and UTP endorse [Ca(2+) ]i accumulation and growth of DDR-2/α-SMA-expressing myofibroblasts from adult rat ventricles via P2Y4 and P2Y2 receptors activation, respectively. Ventricular myofibroblasts also express ADP-sensitive P2Y1 , P2Y12 , and P2Y13 receptors as demonstrated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and western blot analysis, but little information exists on ADP effects in these cells. ADP (0.003-3 mM) and its stable analogue, ADPßS (100 μM), caused fast [Ca(2+) ]i transients originated from thapsigargin-sensitive internal stores, which partially declined to a plateau sustained by capacitative Ca(2+) entry through transient receptor potential (TRP) channels inhibited by 2-APB (50 μM) and flufenamic acid (100 μM). Hydrophobic interactions between Gq/11 -coupled P2Y purinoceptors and TRP channels were suggested by prevention of the ADP-induced [Ca(2+) ]i plateau following PIP2 depletion with LiCl (10 mM) and cholesterol removal from lipid rafts with methyl-ß-cyclodextrin (2 mM). ADP [Ca(2+) ]i transients were insensitive to P2Y1 , P2Y12 , and P2Y13 receptor antagonists, MRS2179 (10μM), AR-C66096 (0.1 μM), and MRS2211 (10μM), respectively, but were attenuated by suramin and reactive blue-2 (100 μM) which also blocked P2Y4 receptors activation by UTP. Cardiac myofibroblasts growth and type I collagen production were favored upon activation of MRS2179-sensitive P2Y1 receptors with ADP or ADPßS (30 μM). In conclusion, ADP exerts a dual role on ventricular myofibroblasts: [Ca(2+) ]i transients are mediated by fast-desensitizing P2Y4 receptors, whereas the pro-fibrotic effect of ADP involves the P2Y1 receptor activation. Data also show that ADP-induced capacitative Ca(2+) influx depends on phospholipase C-linked TRP channels opening in lipid raft microdomains. J. Cell

  13. High glucose upregulates BACE1-mediated Aβ production through ROS-dependent HIF-1α and LXRα/ABCA1-regulated lipid raft reorganization in SK-N-MC cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jik; Ryu, Jung Min; Jung, Young Hyun; Lee, Sei-Jung; Kim, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Sang Hun; Hwang, In Koo; Seong, Je Kyung; Han, Ho Jae

    2016-01-01

    There is an accumulation of evidence indicating that the risk of Alzheimer’s disease is associated with diabetes mellitus, an indicator of high glucose concentrations in blood plasma. This study investigated the effect of high glucose on BACE1 expression and amyloidogenesis in vivo, and we present details of the mechanism associated with those effects. Our results, using ZLC and ZDF rat models, showed that ZDF rats have high levels of amyloid-beta (Aβ), phosphorylated tau, BACE1, and APP-C99. In vitro result with mouse hippocampal neuron and SK-N-MC, high glucose stimulated Aβ secretion and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, high glucose increased BACE1 and APP-C99 expressions, which were reversed by a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. Indeed, high glucose increased intracellular ROS levels and HIF-1α expression, associated with regulation of BACE1 and Liver X Receptor α (LXRα). In addition, high glucose induced ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) down-regulation, was associated with LXR-induced lipid raft reorganization and BACE1 localization on the lipid raft. Furthermore, silencing of BACE1 expression was shown to regulate Aβ secretion and apoptosis of SK-N-MC. In conclusion, high glucose upregulates BACE1 expression and activity through HIF-1α and LXRα/ABCA1-regulated lipid raft reorganization, leading to Aβ production and apoptosis of SK-N-MC. PMID:27829662

  14. High glucose upregulates BACE1-mediated Aβ production through ROS-dependent HIF-1α and LXRα/ABCA1-regulated lipid raft reorganization in SK-N-MC cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jik; Ryu, Jung Min; Jung, Young Hyun; Lee, Sei-Jung; Kim, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Sang Hun; Hwang, In Koo; Seong, Je Kyung; Han, Ho Jae

    2016-11-10

    There is an accumulation of evidence indicating that the risk of Alzheimer's disease is associated with diabetes mellitus, an indicator of high glucose concentrations in blood plasma. This study investigated the effect of high glucose on BACE1 expression and amyloidogenesis in vivo, and we present details of the mechanism associated with those effects. Our results, using ZLC and ZDF rat models, showed that ZDF rats have high levels of amyloid-beta (Aβ), phosphorylated tau, BACE1, and APP-C99. In vitro result with mouse hippocampal neuron and SK-N-MC, high glucose stimulated Aβ secretion and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, high glucose increased BACE1 and APP-C99 expressions, which were reversed by a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. Indeed, high glucose increased intracellular ROS levels and HIF-1α expression, associated with regulation of BACE1 and Liver X Receptor α (LXRα). In addition, high glucose induced ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) down-regulation, was associated with LXR-induced lipid raft reorganization and BACE1 localization on the lipid raft. Furthermore, silencing of BACE1 expression was shown to regulate Aβ secretion and apoptosis of SK-N-MC. In conclusion, high glucose upregulates BACE1 expression and activity through HIF-1α and LXRα/ABCA1-regulated lipid raft reorganization, leading to Aβ production and apoptosis of SK-N-MC.

  15. Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane association of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus GP4 glycoprotein and its co-localization with CD163 in lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yijun; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Song, Cheng; Yoo, Dongwan; Li, Gang

    2012-03-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) glycoprotein 4 (GP4) resembles a typical type I membrane protein in its structure but lacks a hydrophilic tail at the C-terminus, suggesting that GP4 may be a lipid-anchored membrane protein. Using the human decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55), a known glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) lipid-anchored protein, chimeric constructs were made to substitute the GPI-anchor domain of DAF with the putative lipid-anchor domain of GP4, and their membrane association and lipase cleavage were determined in cells. The DAF-GP4 fusion protein was transported to the plasma membrane and was cleaved by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), indicating that the C-terminal domain of GP4 functions as a GPI anchor. Mutational studies for residues adjacent to the GPI modification site and characterization of respective mutant viruses generated from infectious cDNA clones show that the ability of GP4 for membrane association corresponded to virus viability and growth characteristics. The residues T158 ({omega} - 2, where {omega} is the GPI moiety at E160), P159 ({omega} - 1), and M162 ({omega} + 2) of GP4 were determined to be important for virus replication, with M162 being of particular importance for virus infectivity. The complete removal of the peptide-anchor domain in GP4 resulted in a complete loss of virus infectivity. The depletion of cholesterol from the plasma membrane of cells reduced the virus production, suggesting a role of lipid rafts in PRRSV infection. Remarkably, GP4 was found to co-localize with CD163 in the lipid rafts on the plasma membrane. Since CD163 has been reported as a cellular receptor for PRRSV and GP4 has been shown to interact with this receptor, our data implicates an important role of lipid rafts during entry of the virus.

  16. Dynamin- and Lipid Raft-Dependent Entry of Decay-Accelerating Factor (DAF)-Binding and Non-DAF-Binding Coxsackieviruses into Nonpolarized Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunal P.; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Bergelson, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Group B coxsackieviruses (CVB) use the CVB and adenovirus receptor (CAR) to enter and infect cells. Some CVB also bind to decay-accelerating factor (DAF), but that interaction alone is insufficient for infection. We previously found that CVB3 entry into polarized human intestinal cells (Caco-2) occurs by a caveolin-dependent but dynamin-independent mechanism that requires DAF-mediated tyrosine kinase signals. In this study, we examined how CVB enter and infect nonpolarized HeLa cells and how DAF binding affects these processes. Using immunofluorescence microscopy and a combination of dominant-negative proteins, small interfering RNAs, and drugs targeting specific endocytic pathways, we found that both DAF-binding and non-DAF-binding virus isolates require dynamin and lipid rafts to enter and infect cells. Unlike what we observed in Caco-2 cells, CVB3 entered HeLa cells with CAR. We found no role for clathrin, endosomal acidification, or caveolin. Inhibition of tyrosine kinases blocked an early event in infection but did not prevent entry of virus into the cell. These results indicate that CVB3 entry into nonpolarized HeLa cells differs significantly from entry into polarized Caco-2 cells and is not influenced by virus binding to DAF. PMID:19710132

  17. Apical sorting of ADAMTS13 in vascular endothelial cells and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells depends on the CUB domains and their association with lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Dezhi; Zheng, X. Wu; Niiya, Masami; Zheng, X. Long

    2006-01-01

    ADAMTS13 biosynthesis appeared to occur mainly in hepatic stellate cells, but detection of ADAMTS13 mRNA in many other tissues suggests that vascular endothelium may also produce ADAMTS13. We showed that ADAMTS13 mRNA and protein were detectable in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, aortic endothelial cells, and endothelium-derived cell line (ECV304). ADAMTS13 in cell lysate or serum-free conditioned medium cleaved von Willebrand factor (VWF) specifically. ADAMTS13 and VWF were localized to the distinct compartments of endothelial cells. Moreover, ADAMTS13 was preferentially sorted into apical domain of ECV304 and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Apical sorting of ADAMTS13 depended on the CUB domains and their association with lipid rafts. A mutation in the second CUB domain of ADAMTS13 (4143-4144insA), naturally occurring in patients with inherited thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, resulted in a significant reduction of ADAMTS13 secretion and a reversal of its polarity in MDCK cells. These data demonstrated that ADAMTS13 is synthesized and secreted from endothelial cells; the apically secreted ADAMTS13 from endothelial cells may contribute significantly to plasma ADAMTS13 proteases. The data also suggest a critical role of the CUB domains and a novel cargo-selective mechanism for apical sorting of a soluble ADAMTS protease in polarized cells. PMID:16597588

  18. Fucose-containing fraction of Ling-Zhi enhances lipid rafts-dependent ubiquitination of TGFβ receptor degradation and attenuates breast cancer tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Shu-Ming; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh

    2016-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum exerts antitumor activity, but the mechanism of G. lucidum polysaccharides on cancer is unclear. Here, we demonstrated that a fucose-containing fraction of Ling-Zhi (FFLZ) reduced tumor size and suppressed metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, FFLZ inhibited breast cancer cell migration and altered the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. Transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGFR) pathways act as key mediators to promote tumor progression and metastasis. We found that FFLZ down-regulated TGFR and downstream signaling pathways, including the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and the expression of Smad4. In an investigation of the underlying mechanisms, we found that FFLZ enhanced the Smurf2-dependent ubiquitination of TGFR by disrupting the balance of the lipid rafts, promoted the “re-localization” of the TGFR to the caveolae, and facilitated the degradation of TGFR. Together, our data indicated that FFLZ is associated with the inhibition of EMT and the prevention of metastasis by promoting ubiquitination-dependent TGFR degradation and abolishing TGFR signaling pathways. Moreover, the combination of FFLZ and trastuzumab synergistically inhibited the viability of certain trastuzumab-resistant human breast cancer cells. In summary, our current findings indicate that FFLZ is a potential therapeutic or dietary supplemental agent for cancer patients and that it functions via the caveolin-1/Smad7/Smurf2-dependent ubiquitin-mediated degradation of TGFR. PMID:27830743

  19. Distribution of ganglioside GM1 in L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol monolayers: a model for lipid rafts.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, C; Johnston, L J

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of low concentrations of ganglioside GM1 in L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC/cholesterol monolayers supported on mica has been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The monolayers studied correspond to a pure gel phase and a mixture of liquid-expanded (LE) and liquid-condensed (LC) phases for DPPC and to a single homogeneous liquid-ordered phase for 2:1 DPPC/cholesterol. The addition of 2.5-5% GM1 to phase-separated DPPC monolayers resulted in small round ganglioside-rich microdomains in the center and at the edges of the LC domains. Higher amounts of GM1 (10%) give numerous filaments in the center of the LC domains and larger patches at the edges. A gel phase DPPC monolayer containing GM1 showed large domains containing a network of GM1-rich filaments. The addition of GM1 to a liquid-ordered 2:1 DPPC/cholesterol monolayer gives small, round domains that vary in size from 50 to 150 nm for a range of surface pressures. Larger amounts of GM1 lead to coalescence of the small, round domains to give longer filaments that cover 30-40% of the monolayer surface for 10 mol % GM1. The results indicate that biologically relevant GM1 concentrations lead to submicron-sized domains in a cholesterol-rich liquid-ordered phase that is analogous to that found in detergent-insoluble membrane fractions, and are thought to be important in membrane microdomains or rafts. This demonstrates that AFM studies of model monolayers and bilayers provide a powerful method for the direct detection of microdomains that are too small for study with most other techniques. PMID:11053150

  20. FATTY ACIDS MODULATE TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 4 ACTIVATION THROUGH REGULATION OF RECEPTOR DIMERIZATION AND RECRUITMENT INTO LIPID RAFTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The saturated fatty acids acylated on Lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or bacterial lipoproteins play critical roles in ligand recognition and receptor activation for Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2. The results from our previous studies (J Biol Chem 2003, 2004) demonstrated that saturated ...

  1. Live imaging of prions reveals nascent PrPSc in cell-surface, raft-associated amyloid strings and webs

    PubMed Central

    Rouvinski, Alexander; Karniely, Sharon; Kounin, Maria; Moussa, Sanaa; Goldberg, Miri D.; Warburg, Gabriela; Lyakhovetsky, Roman; Papy-Garcia, Dulce; Kutzsche, Janine; Korth, Carsten; Carlson, George A.; Godsave, Susan F.; Peters, Peter J.; Luhr, Katarina; Kristensson, Krister

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian prions refold host glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored PrPC into β-sheet–rich PrPSc. PrPSc is rapidly truncated into a C-terminal PrP27-30 core that is stable for days in endolysosomes. The nature of cell-associated prions, their attachment to membranes and rafts, and their subcellular locations are poorly understood; live prion visualization has not previously been achieved. A key obstacle has been the inaccessibility of PrP27-30 epitopes. We overcame this hurdle by focusing on nascent full-length PrPSc rather than on its truncated PrP27-30 product. We show that N-terminal PrPSc epitopes are exposed in their physiological context and visualize, for the first time, PrPSc in living cells. PrPSc resides for hours in unexpected cell-surface, slow moving strings and webs, sheltered from endocytosis. Prion strings observed by light and scanning electron microscopy were thin, micrometer-long structures. They were firmly cell associated, resisted phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, aligned with raft markers, fluoresced with thioflavin, and were rapidly abolished by anti-prion glycans. Prion strings and webs are the first demonstration of membrane-anchored PrPSc amyloids. PMID:24493590

  2. Insights on raft behavior from minimal phenomenological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbès Putzel, G.; Schick, M.

    2011-07-01

    We construct a simple phenomenological theory of phase separation in ternary mixtures of cholesterol and saturated and unsaturated lipids. Such separation is relevant to the formation of 'rafts' in the plasma membrane. We also show how simple cross-linking of proteins which prefer one form of lipid to the other can trigger raft-formation, the first step in a signaling pathway.

  3. A New Membrane Lipid Raft Gene SpFLT-1 Facilitating the Endocytosis of Vibrio alginolyticus in the Crab Scylla paramamosain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fangyi; Bo, Jun; Ma, Xiaowan; Dong, Lixia; Shan, Zhongguo; Cui, Qian; Chen, Huiyun; Wang, Kejian

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens can enter their host cells by way of endocytosis in which the membrane lipid raft gene flotillins are probably involved in the invasion process and this is an important way to cause infection. In this study, a new gene SpFLT-1 was identified in Scylla paramamosain, which shared high identity with the flotillin-1 of other species. The SpFLT-1 gene was widely distributed in tissues and showed the highest level of mRNA transcripts in the hemocytes. This gene might be a maternal gene based on the evident results that it was highly expressed in maternal ovaries and in the early developmental stages of the zygote and early embryo stage whereas it gradually decreased in zoea 1. SpFLT-1 positively responded to the challenge of Vibrio alginolyticus with a significantly increased level of mRNA expression in the hemocytes and gills at 3 hours post infection (hpi). The SpFLT-1 protein was detected densely in the same fraction layer where the Vibrio protein was most present in the hemocytes and gills at 3 hpi. Furthermore, it was found that the expression of SpFLT-1 decreased to the base level following disappearance of the Vibrio protein at 6 hpi in the gills. Silencing SpFLT-1 inhibited the endocytosis rate of V. alginolyticus but overexpression of the gene could facilitate bacterial entry into the epithelioma papulosum cyprinid cells. Our study indicated that SpFLT-1 may act as a key protein involved in the process of bacterial infection and this sheds light on clarifying the pathogenesis of pathogens infecting S. paramamosain. PMID:26186350

  4. Identification of Novel Raft Marker Protein, FlotP in Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Vikas K.; Aggarwal, Somya; Singh, Damini; Prasad, Tulika; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are dynamic, nanoscale assemblies of specific proteins and lipids, distributed heterogeneously on eukaryotic membrane. Flotillin-1, a conserved eukaryotic raft marker protein (RMP) harbor SPFH (Stomatin, Prohibitin, Flotillin, and HflK/C) and oligomerization domains to regulate various cellular processes through its interactions with other signaling or transport proteins. Rafts were thought to be absent in prokaryotes hitherto, but recent report of its presence and significance in physiology of Bacillus subtilis prompted us to investigate the same in pathogenic bacteria (PB) also. In prokaryotes, proteins of SPFH2a subfamily show highest identity to SPFH domain of Flotillin-1. Moreover, bacterial genome organization revealed that Flotillin homolog harboring SPFH2a domain exists in an operon with an upstream gene containing NFeD domain. Here, presence of RMP in PB was initially investigated in silico by analyzing the presence of SPFH2a, oligomerization domains in the concerned gene and NfeD domain in the adjacent upstream gene. After investigating 300 PB, four were found to harbor RMP. Among them, domains of Bas0525 (FlotP) of Bacillus anthracis (BA) showed highest identity with characteristic domains of RMP. Considering the global threat of BA as the bioterror agent, it was selected as a model for further in vitro characterization of rafts in PB. In silico and in vitro analysis showed significant similarity of FlotP with numerous attributes of Flotillin-1. Its punctate distribution on membrane with exclusive localization in detergent resistant membrane fraction; strongly favors presence of raft with RMP FlotP in BA. Furthermore, significant effect of Zaragozic acid (ZA), a raft associated lipid biosynthesis inhibitor, on several patho-physiological attributes of BA such as growth, morphology, membrane rigidity etc., were also observed. Specifically, a considerable decrease in membrane rigidity, strongly recommended presence of an unknown raft associated

  5. Localization of Kv4.2 and KChIP2 in lipid rafts and modulation of outward K+ currents by membrane cholesterol content in rat left ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Rudakova, Elena; Wagner, Michael; Frank, Magdalena; Volk, Tilmann

    2015-02-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enriched microdomains of the cell membrane. Here we investigate the localization of the pore forming K(+)-channel α-subunit Kv4.2 and the β-subunit KChIP2, underlying the transient outward K(+) current (I to), in lipid rafts in left ventricular myocytes. Furthermore, we explored the impact of membrane cholesterol depletion (using 20 mM methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD)) on K(+) outward currents. Cholesterol-saturated MBCD (20 mM) served as control. Myocytes were isolated from the left ventricular free wall of Wistar rats. The Triton X-100 (4 °C) insoluble fraction of whole cell protein was analyzed by sucrose density gradient centrifugation followed by Western blot. Kv4.2 and KChIP2 were partially detected in low-density fractions (lipid rafts). MBCD treatment (5 min) resulted in a shift of Kv4.2 and KChIP2 towards high-density fractions. K(+) currents were assessed by whole-cell patch-clamp. MBCD treatment resulted in a 29 ± 3 % decrease in I to (20.0 ± 1.6pApF(-1) vs. 28.5 ± 2.0pApF(-1), n = 15, p < 0.001, V Pip = 40 mV) within 5 min. Control solution resulted in a significantly smaller reduction in I to (17 ± 3 %, p < 0.001, p < 0.01 compared with MBCD). MBCD induced a 38 ± 9 % increase in the non-inactivating current component (I sus) (10.1 ± 0.6pApF(-1) vs. 7.6 ± 0.4pApF(-1), n = 15, p < 0.001). This effect was absent in control solution. The increase in I sus was not sensitive to 100 μM 4-aminopyridine or 20 mM tetraethylammonium, making a contribution of Kv1.5 or Kv2.1 unlikely. In conclusion, in rat ventricular cardiomyocytes, a fraction of Kv4.2 and KChIP2 is localized in lipid rafts. Membrane cholesterol depletion results in ~12 % net reduction of I to, a redistribution of the channel proteins Kv4.2 and KChIP2 and an increased delayed rectifier current.

  6. Flagellar membranes are rich in raft-forming phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Serricchio, Mauro; Schmid, Adrien W.; Steinmann, Michael E.; Sigel, Erwin; Rauch, Monika; Julkowska, Daria; Bonnefoy, Serge; Fort, Cécile; Bastin, Philippe; Bütikofer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The observation that the membranes of flagella are enriched in sterols and sphingolipids has led to the hypothesis that flagella might be enriched in raft-forming lipids. However, a detailed lipidomic analysis of flagellar membranes is not available. Novel protocols to detach and isolate intact flagella from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic forms in combination with reverse-phase liquid chromatography high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry allowed us to determine the phospholipid composition of flagellar membranes relative to whole cells. Our analyses revealed that phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, ceramide and the sphingolipids inositol phosphorylceramide and sphingomyelin are enriched in flagella relative to whole cells. In contrast, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol are strongly depleted in flagella. Within individual glycerophospholipid classes, we observed a preference for ether-type over diacyl-type molecular species in membranes of flagella. Our study provides direct evidence for a preferential presence of raft-forming phospholipids in flagellar membranes of T. brucei. PMID:26276100

  7. Phospholipid scramblase 1 is secreted by a lipid raft-dependent pathway and interacts with the extracellular matrix protein 1 in the dermal epidermal junction zone of human skin.

    PubMed

    Merregaert, Joseph; Van Langen, Johanna; Hansen, Uwe; Ponsaerts, Peter; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Steenackers, Ellen; Van Ostade, Xaveer; Sercu, Sandy

    2010-11-26

    We examined the interaction of ECM1 (extracellular matrix protein 1) using yeast two-hybrid screening and identified the type II transmembrane protein, PLSCR1 (phospholipid scramblase 1), as a binding partner. This interaction was then confirmed by in vitro and in vivo co-immunoprecipitation experiments, and additional pull-down experiments with GST-tagged ECM1a fragments localized this interaction to occur within the tandem repeat region of ECM1a. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining revealed a partial overlap of ECM1 and PLSCR1 in human skin at the basal epidermal cell layer. Moreover, in human skin equivalents, both proteins are expressed at the basal membrane in a dermal fibroblast-dependent manner. Next, immunogold electron microscopy of ultrathin human skin sections showed that ECM1 and PLSCR1 co-localize in the extracellular matrix, and using antibodies against ECM1 or PLSCR1 cross-linked to magnetic immunobeads, we were able to demonstrate PLSCR1-ECM1 interaction in human skin extracts. Furthermore, whereas ECM1 is secreted by the endoplasmic/Golgi-dependent pathway, PLSCR1 release from HaCaT keratinocytes occurs via a lipid raft-dependent mechanism, and is deposited in the extracellular matrix. In summary, we here demonstrate that PLSCR1 interacts with the tandem repeat region of ECM1a in the dermal epidermal junction zone of human skin and provide for the first time experimental evidence that PLSCR1 is secreted by an unconventional secretion pathway. These data suggest that PLSCR1 is a multifunctional protein that can function both inside and outside of the cell and together with ECM1 may play a regulatory role in human skin.

  8. Reticulated lipid probe fluorescence reveals MDCK cell apical membrane topography.

    PubMed

    Colarusso, Pina; Spring, Kenneth R

    2002-02-01

    High spatial resolution confocal microscopy of young MDCK cells stained with the lipophilic probe 1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'- tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiIC(16)) revealed a reticulated fluorescence pattern on the apical membrane. DiIC(16) was delivered as crystals to live cells to minimize possible solvent perturbations of the membrane lipids. The ratio of the integrated fluorescence intensities in the bright versus dim regions was 1.6 +/- 0.1 (n = 13). Deconvolved images of the cells were consistent with exclusive plasma membrane staining. Multi-spectral and fluorescence anisotropy microscopy did not reveal differences between bright and dim regions. Bright regions coincided with microvilli and microridges observed by differential interference contrast microscopy and were stable for several minutes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching yielded similar diffusion coefficients (pooled D = 1.5 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) cm(2)/s, n = 40) for both bright and dim regions. Line fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that the reticulated pattern was maintained as the fluorescence recovered in the bleached areas. Cytochalasin D did not affect the staining pattern, but the pattern was eliminated by cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. We conclude that the reticulated fluorescence pattern was caused by increased optical path lengths through the microvilli and microridges compared with the flat areas on the apical membrane.

  9. Reticulated lipid probe fluorescence reveals MDCK cell apical membrane topography.

    PubMed Central

    Colarusso, Pina; Spring, Kenneth R

    2002-01-01

    High spatial resolution confocal microscopy of young MDCK cells stained with the lipophilic probe 1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'- tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiIC(16)) revealed a reticulated fluorescence pattern on the apical membrane. DiIC(16) was delivered as crystals to live cells to minimize possible solvent perturbations of the membrane lipids. The ratio of the integrated fluorescence intensities in the bright versus dim regions was 1.6 +/- 0.1 (n = 13). Deconvolved images of the cells were consistent with exclusive plasma membrane staining. Multi-spectral and fluorescence anisotropy microscopy did not reveal differences between bright and dim regions. Bright regions coincided with microvilli and microridges observed by differential interference contrast microscopy and were stable for several minutes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching yielded similar diffusion coefficients (pooled D = 1.5 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) cm(2)/s, n = 40) for both bright and dim regions. Line fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that the reticulated pattern was maintained as the fluorescence recovered in the bleached areas. Cytochalasin D did not affect the staining pattern, but the pattern was eliminated by cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. We conclude that the reticulated fluorescence pattern was caused by increased optical path lengths through the microvilli and microridges compared with the flat areas on the apical membrane. PMID:11806917

  10. Solution Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Reveals Structural Details of Lipid Domains in Ternary Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, J.; Kiss, A; Pramudya, Y; Nguyen, L; Hirst, L

    2009-01-01

    The influence of cholesterol on lipid bilayer structure is significant and the effect of cholesterol on lipid sorting and phase separation in lipid-raft-forming model membrane systems has been well investigated by microscopy methods on giant vesicles. An important consideration however is the influence of fluorescence illumination on the phase state of these lipids and this effect must be carefully minimized. In this paper, we show that synchrotron x-ray scattering on solution lipid mixtures is an effective alternative technique for the identification and characterization of the l o (liquid ordered) and l d (liquid disordered) phases. The high intensity of synchrotron x rays allows the observation of up to 5 orders of diffraction from the l o phase, whereas only two are clearly visible when the l d phase alone is present. This data can be collected in approximately 1 min/sample, allowing rapid generation of phase data. In this paper, we measure the lamellar spacing in both the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases simultaneously, as a function of cholesterol concentration in two different ternary mixtures. We also observe evidence of a third gel-phaselike population at 10-12 mol % cholesterol and determine the thickness of the bilayer for this phase. Importantly we are able to look at phase coexistence in the membrane independent of photoeffects.

  11. Life raft stabilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radnofsky, M. I.; Barnett, J. H., Jr.; Harrison, F. L.; Marak, R. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An improved life raft stabilizer for reducing rocking and substantially precluding capsizing is discussed. The stabilizer may be removably attached to the raft and is defined by flexible side walls which extend a considerable depth downwardly to one another in the water. The side walls, in conjunction with the floor of the raft, form a ballast enclosure. A weight is placed in the bottom of the enclosure and water port means are provided in the walls. Placement of the stabilizer in the water allows the weighted bottom to sink, producing submerged deployment thereof and permitting water to enter the enclosure through the port means, thus forming a ballast for the raft.

  12. Feeding long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids to obese leptin receptor-deficient JCR:LA- cp rats modifies immune function and lipid-raft fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Ruth, Megan R; Proctor, Spencer D; Field, Catherine J

    2009-05-01

    Dietary EPA and DHA modulate immunity and thereby may improve the aberrant immune function in obese states. To determine the effects of feeding fish oil (FO) containing EPA and DHA on splenocyte phospholipid (PL) and lipid-raft fatty acid composition, phenotypes and cytokine production, 14-week-old obese, leptin receptor-deficient JCR:LA-cp rats (cp/cp; n 10) were randomised to one of three nutritionally adequate diets for 3 weeks: control (Ctl, 0 % EPA+DHA); low FO (LFO, 0.8 % (w/w) EPA+DHA); high FO (HFO, 1.4 % (w/w) EPA+DHA). Lean JCR:LA-cp (+/ - or +/+) rats (n 5) were fed the Ctl diet. Obese Ctl rats had a higher proportion of n-3 PUFA in splenocyte PL than lean rats fed the same diet (P < 0.05). The lower n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio of splenocyte PL was consistent with the lower mitogen-stimulated interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-1beta production by cells from obese rats (P < 0.05). Obese rats fed the FO diet had lower mitogen-stimulated Th1 (IFN-gamma) and Th2 (IL-4) cytokine responses, but IL-2 production (concanavalin A; ConA) did not differ (P < 0.05). The HFO diet was more effective in lowering IL-1beta and increasing IL-10 production (ConA, P < 0.05). This lower IL-1beta production was accompanied by a lower proportion of major histocompatability complex class II-positive cells and a higher incorporation of DHA into lipid rafts. This is the first study to demonstrate impaired responses to mitogen stimulation and altered fatty acid incorporation into the membrane PL of JCR:LA-cp rats. Feeding FO lowered the ex vivo inflammatory response, without altering IL-2 production from ConA-stimulated splenocytes which may occur independent of leptin signalling.

  13. Detergent-Based Isolation of Yeast Membrane Rafts: An Inquiry-Based Laboratory Series for the Undergraduate Cell Biology or Biochemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willhite, D. Grant; Wright, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts have been implicated in numerous cellular processes including cell signaling, endocytosis, and even viral infection. Isolation of these lipid rafts often involves detergent treatment of the membrane to dissolve nonraft components followed by separation of raft regions in a density gradient. We present here an inquiry-based lab series…

  14. Lights on: Dye dequenching reveals polymersome fusion with polymer, lipid and stealth lipid vesicles

    DOE PAGES

    Henderson, Ian M.; Collins, Aaron M.; Quintana, Hope A.; ...

    2015-12-13

    In this study, we develop a quantitative dye dequenching technique for the measurement of polymersome fusion, using it to characterize the salt mediated, mechanically-induced fusion of polymersomes with polymer, lipid, and so-called stealth lipid vesicles. While dye dequenching has been used to quantitatively explore liposome fusion in the past, this is the first use of dye dequenching to measure polymersome fusion of which we are aware. In addition to providing quantitative results, dye dequenching is ideal for detecting fusion in instances where DLS results would be ambiguous, such as low yield levels and size ranges outside the capabilities of DLS.more » The dye chosen for this study was a cyanine derivative, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide (DiR), which proved to provide excellent data on the extent of polymersome fusion. Using this technique, we have shown the limited fusion capabilities of polymersome/liposome heterofusion, notably DOPC vesicles fusing with polymersomes at half the efficiency of polymersome homofusion and DPPC vesicles showing virtually no fusion. In addition to these key heterofusion experiments, we determined the broad applicability of dye dequenching in measuring kinetic rates of polymersome fusion; and showed that even at elevated temperatures or over multiple weeks' time, no polymersome fusion occurred without agitation. Stealth liposomes formed from DPPC and PEO-functionalized lipid, however, fused with polymersomes and stealth liposomes with relatively high efficiency, lending support to our hypothesis that the response of the PEO corona to salt is a key factor in the fusion process. This last finding suggests that although the conjugation of PEO to lipids increases vesicle biocompatibility and enables their longer circulation times, it also renders the vesicles subject to destabilization under high salt and shear (e.g. in the circulatory system) that may lead to, in this case, fusion.« less

  15. Lights on: Dye dequenching reveals polymersome fusion with polymer, lipid and stealth lipid vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Ian M.; Collins, Aaron M.; Quintana, Hope A.; Montaño, Gabriel A.; Martinez, Julio A.; Paxton, Walter F.

    2015-12-13

    In this study, we develop a quantitative dye dequenching technique for the measurement of polymersome fusion, using it to characterize the salt mediated, mechanically-induced fusion of polymersomes with polymer, lipid, and so-called stealth lipid vesicles. While dye dequenching has been used to quantitatively explore liposome fusion in the past, this is the first use of dye dequenching to measure polymersome fusion of which we are aware. In addition to providing quantitative results, dye dequenching is ideal for detecting fusion in instances where DLS results would be ambiguous, such as low yield levels and size ranges outside the capabilities of DLS. The dye chosen for this study was a cyanine derivative, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide (DiR), which proved to provide excellent data on the extent of polymersome fusion. Using this technique, we have shown the limited fusion capabilities of polymersome/liposome heterofusion, notably DOPC vesicles fusing with polymersomes at half the efficiency of polymersome homofusion and DPPC vesicles showing virtually no fusion. In addition to these key heterofusion experiments, we determined the broad applicability of dye dequenching in measuring kinetic rates of polymersome fusion; and showed that even at elevated temperatures or over multiple weeks' time, no polymersome fusion occurred without agitation. Stealth liposomes formed from DPPC and PEO-functionalized lipid, however, fused with polymersomes and stealth liposomes with relatively high efficiency, lending support to our hypothesis that the response of the PEO corona to salt is a key factor in the fusion process. This last finding suggests that although the conjugation of PEO to lipids increases vesicle biocompatibility and enables their longer circulation times, it also renders the vesicles subject to destabilization under high salt and shear (e.g. in the circulatory system) that may lead to, in this case, fusion.

  16. Self Righting Life Raft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Givens Buoy Raft was designed and manufactured for inventor Jim Givens of Givens Marine Survival Co. Inc., by RPR Industries, Inc. The Raft consists of a canopied topside and an underwater hemispheric ballast chamber. It has a heavy ballast stabilization system, adopted from NASA technology, which negates the capsizing problem. A "flapper valve" admits large amounts of water to the hemisphere chamber providing ballast to keep the center of gravity constant; stabilization system compensates for changes in wave angle and weight shifting of raft occupants. Mr. Givens has an exclusive patent license for use of the NASA technology. Produced in various sizes, capacities range from six to 20 persons. Raft is housed in a canister, available in several configurations. A pull on a line triggers the automatic inflation process, which takes 12 seconds. The raft has been credited with saving 230 lives in the last five years. It has found wide acceptance with operators of fishing boats, pleasure craft and other vessels. The Coast Guard is purchasing the rafts for use on its rescue helicopters and the Navy has a development program to adapt the system. The Coast Guard last year announced a proposed amendment of its regulations that would require large ballast chambers on inflatable life rafts.

  17. Sinking a Granular Raft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protière, Suzie; Josserand, Christophe; Aristoff, Jeffrey M.; Stone, Howard A.; Abkarian, Manouk

    2017-03-01

    We report experiments that yield new insights on the behavior of granular rafts at an oil-water interface. We show that these particle aggregates can float or sink depending on dimensionless parameters taking into account the particle densities and size and the densities of the two fluids. We characterize the raft shape and stability and propose a model to predict its shape and maximum length to remain afloat. Finally we find that wrinkles and folds appear along the raft due to compression by its own weight, which can trigger destabilization. These features are characteristics of an elastic instability, which we discuss, including the limitations of our model.

  18. Raft-like membrane domains in pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Farnoud, Amir M; Toledo, Alvaro M; Konopka, James B; Del Poeta, Maurizio; London, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    The lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane is thought to be compartmentalized by the presence of lipid-protein microdomains. In eukaryotic cells, microdomains composed of sterols and sphingolipids, commonly known as lipid rafts, are believed to exist, and reports on the presence of sterol- or protein-mediated microdomains in bacterial cell membranes are also appearing. Despite increasing attention, little is known about microdomains in the plasma membrane of pathogenic microorganisms. This review attempts to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of lipid rafts in pathogenic fungi and bacteria. The current literature on characterization of microdomains in pathogens is reviewed, and their potential role in growth, pathogenesis, and drug resistance is discussed. Better insight into the structure and function of membrane microdomains in pathogenic microorganisms might lead to a better understanding of their pathogenesis and development of raft-mediated approaches for therapy.

  19. Rafting in superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N.

    1996-03-01

    The phenomenon of rafting in superalloys is described, with particular reference to modern superalloys with a high volume fraction of the particulate {gamma}{prime} phase. It is shown that in the elastic regime, the thermodynamic driving force for rafting is proportional to the applied stress, to the difference between the lattice parameters of the {gamma} matrix and the {gamma}{prime} particles, and to the difference of their elastic constants. A qualitative argument gives the sign of this driving force, which agrees with that determined by Pineau for a single isolated particle. Drawing on the work of Pollock and Argon and of Socrate and Parks, it is shown that after a plastic strain of the sample of order 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, the driving force is proportional to the product of the applied stress and the lattice misfit, in agreement with the results of the calculations of Socrate and Parks. The rate of rafting is controlled by the diffusion of alloying elements. Here, the tendency of large atoms to move from regions of high hydrostatic pressure to those of low may outweigh the influence of concentration gradients. The deformation of the sample directly produced by rafting is small, of order 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. The rafted structure is resistant to creep under low stresses at high temperatures. Under most experimental conditions at relatively high stresses, rafting accelerates creep; this effect may be less pronounced at the small strains acceptable under operational conditions.

  20. Quantitative analysis of proteome and lipidome dynamics reveals functional regulation of global lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Casanovas, Albert; Sprenger, Richard R; Tarasov, Kirill; Ruckerbauer, David E; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian; Zanghellini, Jürgen; Jensen, Ole N; Ejsing, Christer S

    2015-03-19

    Elucidating how and to what extent lipid metabolism is remodeled under changing conditions is essential for understanding cellular physiology. Here, we analyzed proteome and lipidome dynamics to investigate how regulation of lipid metabolism at the global scale supports remodeling of cellular architecture and processes during physiological adaptations in yeast. Our results reveal that activation of cardiolipin synthesis and remodeling supports mitochondrial biogenesis in the transition from fermentative to respiratory metabolism, that down-regulation of de novo sterol synthesis machinery prompts differential turnover of lipid droplet-associated triacylglycerols and sterol esters during respiratory growth, that sphingolipid metabolism is regulated in a previously unrecognized growth stage-specific manner, and that endogenous synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids constitutes an in vivo upstream activator of peroxisomal biogenesis, via the heterodimeric Oaf1/Pip2 transcription factor. Our work demonstrates the pivotal role of lipid metabolism in adaptive processes and provides a resource to investigate its regulation at the cellular level.

  1. Dynamics of putative raft-associated proteins at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Kenworthy, Anne K.; Nichols, Benjamin J.; Remmert, Catha L.; Hendrix, Glenn M.; Kumar, Mukesh; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Lipid rafts are conceptualized as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipid that serve as platforms for protein segregation and signaling. The properties of these domains in vivo are unclear. Here, we use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to test if raft association affects a protein's ability to laterally diffuse large distances across the cell surface. The diffusion coefficients (D) of several types of putative raft and nonraft proteins were systematically measured under steady-state conditions and in response to raft perturbations. Raft proteins diffused freely over large distances (>4 μm), exhibiting Ds that varied 10-fold. This finding indicates that raft proteins do not undergo long-range diffusion as part of discrete, stable raft domains. Perturbations reported to affect lipid rafts in model membrane systems or by biochemical fractionation (cholesterol depletion, decreased temperature, and cholesterol loading) had similar effects on the diffusional mobility of raft and nonraft proteins. Thus, raft association is not the dominant factor in determining long-range protein mobility at the cell surface. PMID:15173190

  2. Dynamics of putative raft-associated proteins at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Kenworthy, Anne K; Nichols, Benjamin J; Remmert, Catha L; Hendrix, Glenn M; Kumar, Mukesh; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2004-06-07

    Lipid rafts are conceptualized as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipid that serve as platforms for protein segregation and signaling. The properties of these domains in vivo are unclear. Here, we use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to test if raft association affects a protein's ability to laterally diffuse large distances across the cell surface. The diffusion coefficients (D) of several types of putative raft and nonraft proteins were systematically measured under steady-state conditions and in response to raft perturbations. Raft proteins diffused freely over large distances (> 4 microm), exhibiting Ds that varied 10-fold. This finding indicates that raft proteins do not undergo long-range diffusion as part of discrete, stable raft domains. Perturbations reported to affect lipid rafts in model membrane systems or by biochemical fractionation (cholesterol depletion, decreased temperature, and cholesterol loading) had similar effects on the diffusional mobility of raft and nonraft proteins. Thus, raft association is not the dominant factor in determining long-range protein mobility at the cell surface.

  3. Bordetella parapertussis Survives the Innate Interaction with Human Neutrophils by Impairing Bactericidal Trafficking inside the Cell through a Lipid Raft-Dependent Mechanism Mediated by the Lipopolysaccharide O Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Gorgojo, Juan; Lamberti, Yanina; Valdez, Hugo; Harvill, Eric T.

    2012-01-01

    Whooping cough is a reemerging disease caused by two closely related pathogens, Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis. The incidence of B. parapertussis in whooping cough cases has been increasing since the introduction of acellular pertussis vaccines containing purified antigens that are common to both strains. Recently published results demonstrated that these vaccines do not protect against B. parapertussis due to the presence of the O antigen on the bacterial surface that impairs antibody access to shared antigens. We have investigated the effect of the lack of opsonization of B. parapertussis on the outcome of its interaction with human neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]). In the absence of opsonic antibodies, PMN interaction with B. parapertussis resulted in nonbactericidal trafficking upon phagocytosis. A high percentage of nonopsonized B. parapertussis was found in nonacidic lysosome marker (lysosome-associated membrane protein [LAMP])-negative phagosomes with access to the host cell-recycling pathway of external nutrients, allowing bacterial survival as determined by intracellular CFU counts. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O antigen was found to be involved in directing B. parapertussis to PMN lipid rafts, eventually determining the nonbactericidal fate inside the PMN. IgG opsonization of B. parapertussis drastically changed this interaction by not only inducing efficient PMN phagocytosis but also promoting PMN bacterial killing. These data provide new insights into the immune mechanisms of hosts against B. parapertussis and document the crucial importance of opsonic antibodies in immunity to this pathogen. PMID:23027528

  4. Inflammation-related alterations of lipids after spinal cord injury revealed by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamosaityte, Sandra; Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Koch, Maria; Later, Robert; Schackert, Gabriele; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers several lipid alterations in nervous tissue. It is characterized by extensive demyelination and the inflammatory response leads to accumulation of activated microglia/macrophages, which often transform into foam cells by accumulation of lipid droplets after engulfment of the damaged myelin sheaths. Using an experimental rat model, Raman microspectroscopy was applied to retrieve the modifications of the lipid distribution following SCI. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and endogenous two-photon fluorescence (TPEF) microscopies were used for the detection of lipid-laden inflammatory cells. The Raman mapping of CH2 deformation mode intensity at 1440 cm-1 retrieved the lipid-depleted injury core. Preserved white matter and inflammatory regions with myelin fragmentation and foam cells were localized by specifically addressing the distribution of esterified lipids, i.e., by mapping the intensity of the carbonyl Raman band at 1743 cm-1, and were in agreement with CARS/TPEF microscopy. Principal component analysis revealed that the inflammatory regions are notably rich in saturated fatty acids. Therefore, Raman spectroscopy enabled to specifically detect inflammation after SCI and myelin degradation products.

  5. The Lipid-Droplet Proteome Reveals that Droplets Are a Protein-Storage Depot

    SciTech Connect

    Cermelli, Silvia; Guo, Yi; Gross, Steven P.; Welte, Michael

    2006-09-19

    Lipid droplets are ubiquitous organelles that are among the basic building blocks of eukaryotic cells. Despite central roles for cholesterol homeostasis and lipid metabolism, their function and protein composition are poorly understood. Results: We purified lipid droplets from Drosophila embryos and analyzed the associated proteins by capillary LC-MS-MS. Important functional groups include enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, signaling molecules, and proteins related to membrane trafficking. Unexpectedly, histones H2A, H2Av, and H2B were present. Using biochemistry, genetics, real-time imaging, and cell biology, we confirm that roughly 50% of certain embryonic histones are physically attached to lipid droplets, a localization conserved in other fly species. Histone association with droplets starts during oogenesis and is prominent in early embryos, but it is undetectable in later stages or in cultured cells. Histones on droplets are not irreversibly trapped; quantitation of droplet histone levels and transplantation experiments suggest that histones are transferred from droplets to nuclei as development proceeds. When this maternal store of histones is unavailable because lipid droplets are mislocalized, zygotic histone production starts prematurely. Conclusions: Because we uncover a striking proteomic similarity of Drosophila droplets to mammalian lipid droplets, Drosophila likely provides a good model for understanding droplet function in general. Our analysis also reveals a new function for these organelles; the massive nature of histone association with droplets and its developmental time-course suggest that droplets sequester maternally provided proteins until they are needed. We propose that lipid droplets can serve as transient storage depots for proteins that lack appropriate binding partners in the cell. Such sequestration may provide a general cellular strategy for handling excess proteins.

  6. A plus-end raft to control microtubule dynamics and function.

    PubMed

    Galjart, Niels; Perez, Franck

    2003-02-01

    Cells require a properly oriented and organised microtubule array to transmit positional information. Recent data have revealed a heterogeneous population of microtubule-binding proteins that accumulates mainly at distal ends of polymerising microtubules. Two mechanisms may account for this concentration: transient immobilisation, which involves association of proteins with growing ends, followed by release more proximally; and deposition at ends via a molecular motor. As with lipid rafts, protein concentration at distal ends may allow a cascade of interactions in the restricted area of a microtubule plus end. This may, in turn, control the dynamic behaviour of this cytoskeletal network and its anchoring to other structures.

  7. Raft-Like Membrane Domains in Pathogenic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Farnoud, Amir M.; Toledo, Alvaro M.; Konopka, James B.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; London, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane is thought to be compartmentalized by the presence of lipid-protein microdomains. In eukaryotic cells, microdomains composed of sterols and sphingolipids packed in a liquid-ordered state, commonly known as lipid rafts, are believed to exist. While less studied in bacterial cells, reports on the presence of sterol or protein-mediated microdomains in bacterial cell membranes are also appearing with increasing frequency. Recent efforts have been focused on addressing the biophysical and biochemical properties of lipid rafts. However, most studies have been focused on synthetic membranes, mammalian cells, and/or model, non-pathogenic microorganisms. Much less is known about microdomains in the plasma membrane of pathogenic microorganisms. This review attempts to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of lipid rafts in pathogenic fungi and the developing field of microdomains in pathogenic bacteria. The current literature on the structure and function and of microdomains is reviewed and the potential role of microdomains in growth, pathogenesis, and drug resistance of pathogens are discussed. Better insight into the structure and function of membrane microdomains in pathogenic microorganisms might lead to a better understanding of the process of pathogenesis and development of raft-mediated approaches for new methods of therapy. PMID:26015285

  8. Crystal structure of human CD1e reveals a groove suited for lipid-exchange processes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alles, Luis F; Giacometti, Gaelle; Versluis, Cees; Maveyraud, Laurent; de Paepe, Diane; Guiard, Julie; Tranier, Samuel; Gilleron, Martine; Prandi, Jacques; Hanau, Daniel; Heck, Albert J R; Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro; Puzo, Germain; Mourey, Lionel; de la Salle, Henri

    2011-08-09

    CD1e is the only human CD1 protein existing in soluble form in the late endosomes of dendritic cells, where it facilitates the processing of glycolipid antigens that are ultimately recognized by CD1b-restricted T cells. The precise function of CD1e remains undefined, thus impeding efforts to predict the participation of this protein in the presentation of other antigens. To gain insight into its function, we determined the crystal structure of recombinant CD1e expressed in human cells at 2.90-Å resolution. The structure revealed a groove less intricate than in other CD1 proteins, with a significantly wider portal characterized by a 2 Å-larger spacing between the α1 and α2 helices. No electron density corresponding to endogenous ligands was detected within the groove, despite the presence of ligands unequivocally established by native mass spectrometry in recombinant CD1e. Our structural data indicate that the water-exposed CD1e groove could ensure the establishment of loose contacts with lipids. In agreement with this possibility, lipid association and dissociation processes were found to be considerably faster with CD1e than with CD1b. Moreover, CD1e was found to mediate in vitro the transfer of lipids to CD1b and the displacement of lipids from stable CD1b-antigen complexes. Altogether, these data support that CD1e could have evolved to mediate lipid-exchange/editing processes with CD1b and point to a pathway whereby the repertoire of lipid antigens presented by human dendritic cells might be expanded.

  9. The Rafts of the Medusa: cholesterol targeting in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, M R; Di Vizio, D; Solomon, K R

    2010-07-01

    In this issue of Oncogene, Mollinedo and co-workers present promising evidence that cholesterol-sensitive signaling pathways involving lipid rafts can be therapeutically targeted in multiple myeloma. Because the pathways considered in their study are used by other types of tumor cells, one implication of this report is that cholesterol-targeting approaches may be applicable to other malignancies.

  10. Rafting along the axon on Unc104 motors.

    PubMed

    Scholey, Jonathan M

    2002-05-01

    Neurotransmission depends upon the fast axonal transport of synaptic vesicle precursors by the monomeric kinesin Unc104, a motor whose mechanism of action is a topic of debate. New work suggests that the formation of lipid raft domains triggers the assembly of vesicle-bound Unc104 dimers and the concomitant activation of processive movement, facilitating efficient long-range vesicle transport.

  11. Exome-wide association analysis reveals novel coding sequence variants associated with lipid traits in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Clara S.; Zhang, He; Cheung, Chloe Y. Y.; Xu, Ming; Ho, Jenny C. Y.; Zhou, Wei; Cherny, Stacey S.; Zhang, Yan; Holmen, Oddgeir; Au, Ka-Wing; Yu, Haiyi; Xu, Lin; Jia, Jia; Porsch, Robert M.; Sun, Lijie; Xu, Weixian; Zheng, Huiping; Wong, Lai-Yung; Mu, Yiming; Dou, Jingtao; Fong, Carol H. Y.; Wang, Shuyu; Hong, Xueyu; Dong, Liguang; Liao, Yanhua; Wang, Jiansong; Lam, Levina S. M.; Su, Xi; Yan, Hua; Yang, Min-Lee; Chen, Jin; Siu, Chung-Wah; Xie, Gaoqiang; Woo, Yu-Cho; Wu, Yangfeng; Tan, Kathryn C. B.; Hveem, Kristian; Cheung, Bernard M. Y.; Zöllner, Sebastian; Xu, Aimin; Eugene Chen, Y; Jiang, Chao Qiang; Zhang, Youyi; Lam, Tai-Hing; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Huo, Yong; Sham, Pak C.; Lam, Karen S. L.; Willer, Cristen J.; Tse, Hung-Fat; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Blood lipids are important risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD). Here we perform an exome-wide association study by genotyping 12,685 Chinese, using a custom Illumina HumanExome BeadChip, to identify additional loci influencing lipid levels. Single-variant association analysis on 65,671 single nucleotide polymorphisms reveals 19 loci associated with lipids at exome-wide significance (P<2.69 × 10−7), including three Asian-specific coding variants in known genes (CETP p.Asp459Gly, PCSK9 p.Arg93Cys and LDLR p.Arg257Trp). Furthermore, missense variants at two novel loci—PNPLA3 p.Ile148Met and PKD1L3 p.Thr429Ser—also influence levels of triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, respectively. Another novel gene, TEAD2, is found to be associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol through gene-based association analysis. Most of these newly identified coding variants show suggestive association (P<0.05) with CAD. These findings demonstrate that exome-wide genotyping on samples of non-European ancestry can identify additional population-specific possible causal variants, shedding light on novel lipid biology and CAD. PMID:26690388

  12. Lipidomics reveals dramatic lipid compositional changes in the maturing postnatal lung

    PubMed Central

    Dautel, Sydney E.; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Clair, Geremy; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weitz, Karl K.; Shukla, Anil K.; Nguyen, Son N.; Kim, Young-Mo; Zink, Erika M.; Luders, Teresa; Frevert, Charles W.; Gharib, Sina A.; Laskin, Julia; Carson, James P.; Metz, Thomas O.; Corley, Richard A.; Ansong, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Lung immaturity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving normal lung development could provide insights on how to ameliorate disrupted development. While transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of normal lung development have been previously reported, characterization of changes in the lipidome is lacking. Lipids play significant roles in the lung, such as dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine in pulmonary surfactant; however, many of the roles of specific lipid species in normal lung development, as well as in disease states, are not well defined. In this study, we used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to investigate the murine lipidome during normal postnatal lung development. Lipidomics analysis of lungs from post-natal day 7, day 14 and 6–8 week mice (adult) identified 924 unique lipids across 21 lipid subclasses, with dramatic alterations in the lipidome across developmental stages. Our data confirmed previously recognized aspects of post-natal lung development and revealed several insights, including in sphingolipid-mediated apoptosis, inflammation and energy storage/usage. Complementary proteomics, metabolomics and chemical imaging corroborated these observations. This multi-omic view provides a unique resource and deeper insight into normal pulmonary development. PMID:28145528

  13. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Regulation of Gene Expression for Lipid Catabolism in Young Broilers by Butyrate Glycerides

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Fugui; Yu, Hai; Lepp, Dion; Shi, Xuejiang; Yang, Xiaojian; Hu, Jielun; Leeson, Steve; Yang, Chengbo; Nie, Shaoping; Hou, Yongqing; Gong, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    indicated that dietary BG intervention induced 79 and 205 characterized DEGs in the jejunum and liver, respectively. In addition, 255 and 165 TSEGs were detected in the liver and jejunum of BG-fed group, while 162 and 211 TSEGs genes were observed in the liver and jejunum of BD-fed birds, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis with both IPA and DAVID-BR further revealed a significant enrichment of DEGs and TSEGs in the biological processes for reducing the synthesis, storage, transportation and secretion of lipids in the jejunum, while those in the liver were for enhancing the oxidation of ingested lipids and fatty acids. In particular, transcriptional regulators of THRSP and EGR-1 as well as several DEGs involved in the PPAR-α signaling pathway were significantly induced by dietary BG intervention for lipid catabolism. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that BG reduces body fat deposition via regulation of gene expression, which is involved in the biological events relating to the reduction of synthesis, storage, transportation and secretion, and improvement of oxidation of lipids and fatty acids. PMID:27508934

  14. Genetic Analysis of Arabidopsis Mutants Impaired in Plastid Lipid Import Reveals a Role of Membrane Lipids in Chloroplast Division

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, J.; Xu, C.

    2011-03-01

    The biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes in plants relies largely on lipid import from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and this lipid transport process is mediated by TGD proteins in Arabidopsis. Such a dependency of chloroplast biogenesis on ER-to-plastid lipid transport was recently exemplified by analyzing double mutants between tgd1-1 or tgd4-3 and fad6 mutants. The fad6 mutants are defective in the desaturation of membrane lipids in chloroplasts and therefore dependent on import of polyunsaturated lipid precursors from the ER for constructing a competent thylakoid membrane system. In support of a critical role of TGD proteins in ER-to-plastid lipid trafficking, we showed that the introduction of the tgd mutations into fad6 mutant backgrounds led to drastic reductions in relative amounts of thylakoid lipids. Moreover, the tgd1-1 fad6 and tgd4-3 fad6 double mutants were deficient in polyunsaturated fatty acids in chloroplast membrane lipids, and severely compromised in the biogenesis of photosynthetic membrane systems. Here we report that these double mutants are severely impaired in chloroplast division. The possible role of membrane lipids in chloroplast division is discussed.

  15. Structure and dynamics of nano-sized raft-like domains on the plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Fernando E.; Pantano, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes are constitutively composed of thousands of different lipidic species, whose specific organization leads to functional heterogeneities. In particular, sphingolipids, cholesterol and some proteins associate among them to form stable nanoscale domains involved in recognition, signaling, membrane trafficking, etc. Atomic-detail information in the nanometer/second scale is still elusive to experimental techniques. In this context, molecular simulations on membrane systems have provided useful insights contributing to bridge this gap. Here we present the results of a series of simulations of biomembranes representing non-raft and raft-like nano-sized domains in order to analyze the particular structural and dynamical properties of these domains. Our results indicate that the smallest (5 nm) raft domains are able to preserve their distinctive structural and dynamical features, such as an increased thickness, higher ordering, lower lateral diffusion, and specific lipid-ion interactions. The insertion of a transmembrane protein helix into non-raft, extended raft-like, and raft-like nanodomain environments result in markedly different protein orientations, highlighting the interplay between the lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions.

  16. Single-molecule peptide-lipid affinity assay reveals interplay between solution structure and partitioning.

    PubMed

    Matin, Tina R; Sigdel, Krishna P; Utjesanovic, Milica; Marsh, Brendan P; Gallazzi, Fabio; Smith, Virginia F; Kosztin, Ioan; King, Gavin M

    2017-03-27

    Interactions between short protein segments and phospholipid bilayers dictate fundamental aspects of cellular activity and have important applications in biotechnology. Yet, a lack of suitable methodology for directly probing these interactions has hindered mechanistic understanding. We developed a precision atomic force microscope (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy assay and probed partitioning into lipid bilayers by measuring the mechanical force experienced by a peptide. Protein segments were constructed from the peripheral membrane protein SecA, a key ATPase in bacterial secretion. We focused on the first 10 amino-terminal residues of SecA (SecA2-11) which are known to be lipophilic. In addition to the core SecA2-11 sequence, constructs with nearly identical chemical composition but with differing geometry were used: two copies of SecA2-11 linked in series, and two copies in parallel. Lipid bilayer partitioning interactions of peptides with differing structures were distinguished. To model the energetic landscape, a theory of diffusive barrier crossing was extended to incorporate a superposition of potential barriers with variable weights. Analysis revealed two dissociation pathways for the core SecA2-11 sequence with well-separated intrinsic dissociation rates. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that the three peptides had significant conformational differences in solution that correlated well with measured variations in the propensity to partition into the bilayer. The methodology is generalizable and can be applied to other peptide and lipid species.

  17. Diet-induced docosahexaenoic acid non-raft domains and lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Raza Shaikh, Saame

    2010-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) that generally suppresses the function of T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APCs). An emerging mechanism by which DHA modifies lymphocyte function is through changes in the organization of sphingolipid/cholesterol lipid raft membrane domains. Two contradictory models have been proposed to explain how DHA exerts its effects through changes in raft organization. The biophysical model, developed in model membranes, shows that DHA-containing phospholipids form unique non-raft membrane domains, that are organizationally distinct from lipid rafts, which serve to alter the conformation and/or lateral organization of lymphocyte proteins. In contrast, the cellular model on DHA and rafts shows that DHA suppresses lymphocyte function, in part, by directly incorporating into lipid rafts and altering protein activity. To reconcile opposing biophysical and cellular viewpoints, a major revision to existing models is presented herein. Based largely on quantitative microscopy data, it is proposed that DHA, consumed through the diet, modifies lymphocyte function, in part, through the formation of nanometer scale DHA-rich domains. These nano-scale domains disrupt the optimal raft-dependent clustering of proteins necessary for initial signaling. The data covered in this review highlights the importance of understanding how dietary n-3 PUFAs modify lymphocyte membranes, which is essential toward developing these fatty acids as therapeutic agents for treating inflammatory diseases.

  18. Lipids and Membrane Lateral Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sonnino, Sandro; Prinetti, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Shortly after the elucidation of the very basic structure and properties of cellular membranes, it became evident that cellular membranes are highly organized structures with multiple and multi-dimensional levels of order. Very early observations suggested that the lipid components of biological membranes might be active players in the creation of these levels of order. In the late 1980s, several different and diverse experimental pieces of evidence coalesced together giving rise to the lipid raft hypothesis. Lipid rafts became enormously (and, in the opinion of these authors, sometimes acritically) popular, surprisingly not just within the lipidologist community (who is supposed to be naturally sensitive to the fascination of lipid rafts). Today, a PubMed search using the key word “lipid rafts” returned a list of 3767 papers, including 690 reviews (as a term of comparison, searching over the same time span for a very hot lipid-related key word, “ceramide” returned 6187 hits with 799 reviews), and a tremendous number of different cellular functions have been described as “lipid raft-dependent.” However, a clear consensus definition of lipid raft has been proposed only in recent times, and the basic properties, the ruling forces, and even the existence of lipid rafts in living cells has been recently matter of intense debate. The scenario that is gradually emerging from the controversies elicited by the lipid raft hypothesis emphasizes multiple roles for membrane lipids in determining membrane order, that encompass their tendency to phase separation but are clearly not limited to this. In this review, we would like to re-focus the attention of the readers on the importance of lipids in organizing the fine structure of cellular membranes. PMID:21423393

  19. Phloem proteomics reveals new lipid-binding proteins with a putative role in lipid-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaglia, Allison M.; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2016-04-28

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all three

  20. Phloem proteomics reveals new lipid-binding proteins with a putative role in lipid-mediated signaling

    DOE PAGES

    Barbaglia, Allison M.; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; ...

    2016-04-28

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and thatmore » they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all

  1. Phloem Proteomics Reveals New Lipid-Binding Proteins with a Putative Role in Lipid-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Barbaglia, Allison M.; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all three

  2. Theoretical and simulation study of lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelashvili, George

    It has been established that a proper functioning of biological lipid membranes is in large part due to cholesterol's ability to regulate fluidity of a lipid bilayer. In particular, a growing body of evidence suggested that cholesterol participates in the formation of cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched phase-separated domains known as "rafts" in the plasma and other membranes of animal cells. Rafts have been identified as important membrane structural components in signal transduction, protein transport and sorting of membrane components. At a molecular level, the detailed, localized behavior of lipid-cholesterol bilayers is unclear. In order to better understand how cholesterols function in lipid membranes it is desirable to built theoretical models. The goal of the present research is to model lipid-cholesterol bilayers on the different length and timescales. In the first part of the work, mixtures of sphingomyelin (SM) lipid and cholesterol at different temperatures and cholesterol concentrations were investigated using Molecular Dynamics and Monte-Carlo simulation techniques. The objective was to study the properties of cholesterol- and SM-enriched raft-like domains at the atomic level. The simulations revealed that, addition of 31% cholesterol induced intermediate degree of organization in the model SM-cholesterol bilayers at temperatures below and above the main phase transition temperature of pure SM bilayer. This intermediate state of fluidity may be necessary for the binding of proteins and other molecules that associate with raft domains. In the second part of the work, dynamical self-consistent mean-field model based on atomistic simulations was developed to investigate phase properties of lipid-cholesterol bilayers on the length and timescales currently unreachable with traditional atomistic level simulation methods. This new technique allows studying systems consisting of 104 or more number of molecules, on microsecond timescales. The model was

  3. Interaction of chiral rafts in self-assembled colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Sheng; Hagan, Michael F.; Pelcovits, Robert A.

    2016-03-01

    Colloidal membranes are monolayer assemblies of rodlike particles that capture the long-wavelength properties of lipid bilayer membranes on the colloidal scale. Recent experiments on colloidal membranes formed by chiral rodlike viruses showed that introducing a second species of virus with different length and opposite chirality leads to the formation of rafts—micron-sized domains of one virus species floating in a background of the other viruses [Sharma et al., Nature (London) 513, 77 (2014), 10.1038/nature13694]. In this article we study the interaction of such rafts using liquid crystal elasticity theory. By numerically minimizing the director elastic free energy, we predict the tilt angle profile for both a single raft and two rafts in a background membrane, and the interaction between two rafts as a function of their separation. We find that the chiral penetration depth in the background membrane sets the scale for the range of the interaction. We compare our results with the experimental data and find good agreement for the strength and range of the interaction. Unlike the experiments, however, we do not observe a complete collapse of the data when rescaled by the tilt angle at the raft edge.

  4. Untargeted Metabolomics Reveals Predominant Alterations in Lipid Metabolism Following Light Exposure in Broccoli Sprouts

    PubMed Central

    Maldini, Mariateresa; Natella, Fausta; Baima, Simona; Morelli, Giorgio; Scaccini, Cristina; Langridge, James; Astarita, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of vegetables belonging to the family Brassicaceae (e.g., broccoli and cauliflower) is linked to a reduced incidence of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The molecular composition of such plants is strongly affected by growing conditions. Here we developed an unbiased metabolomics approach to investigate the effect of light and dark exposure on the metabolome of broccoli sprouts and we applied such an approach to provide a bird’s-eye view of the overall metabolic response after light exposure. Broccoli seeds were germinated and grown hydroponically for five days in total darkness or with a light/dark photoperiod (16 h light/8 h dark cycle). We used an ultra-performance liquid-chromatography system coupled to an ion-mobility, time-of-flight mass spectrometer to profile the large array of metabolites present in the sprouts. Differences at the metabolite level between groups were analyzed using multivariate statistical analyses, including principal component analysis and correlation analysis. Altered metabolites were identified by searching publicly available and in-house databases. Metabolite pathway analyses were used to support the identification of subtle but significant changes among groups of related metabolites that may have gone unnoticed with conventional approaches. Besides the chlorophyll pathway, light exposure activated the biosynthesis and metabolism of sterol lipids, prenol lipids, and polyunsaturated lipids, which are essential for the photosynthetic machinery. Our results also revealed that light exposure increased the levels of polyketides, including flavonoids, and oxylipins, which play essential roles in the plant’s developmental processes and defense mechanism against herbivores. This study highlights the significant contribution of light exposure to the ultimate metabolic phenotype, which might affect the cellular physiology and nutritional value of broccoli sprouts. Furthermore, this study highlights the potential of an

  5. Study of Raft Domains in Model Membrane of DPPC/PE/Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda

    2010-10-01

    Raft domains in bilayer membrane are thought to play an important role in many cell functions such as cell signaling or trans-membrane protein activation. Here we use a model membrane consisting of DPPC/PE/cholesterol to examine the structure of membrane rafts and phase interactions. In particular we are interested in lipids containing the highly polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA. We use both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy to obtain information on the structural properties of raft regions and track cholesterol. As expected, we find phase separation of raft regions between saturated and unsaturated lipids. Moreover, we find that the roughness of the domains change with varying cholesterol concentration possibly due to overpacking. This model study provides further understanding of the role of cholesterol in bilayer membrane leading towards a better knowledge of cell membranes.

  6. A Specific Structural Requirement for Ergosterol in Long-chain Fatty Acid Synthesis Mutants Important for Maintaining Raft Domains in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Eisenkolb, Marlis; Zenzmaier, Christoph; Leitner, Erich; Schneiter, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Fungal sphingolipids contain ceramide with a very-long-chain fatty acid (C26). To investigate the physiological significance of the C26-substitution on this lipid, we performed a screen for mutants that are synthetically lethal with ELO3. Elo3p is a component of the ER-associated fatty acid elongase and is required for the final elongation cycle to produce C26 from C22/C24 fatty acids. elo3Δ mutant cells thus contain C22/C24- instead of the natural C26-substituted ceramide. We now report that under these conditions, an otherwise nonessential, but also fungal-specific, structural modification of the major sterol of yeast, ergosterol, becomes essential, because mutations in ELO3 are synthetically lethal with mutations in ERG6. Erg6p catalyzes the methylation of carbon atom 24 in the aliphatic side chain of sterol. The lethality of an elo3Δ erg6Δ double mutant is rescued by supplementation with ergosterol but not with cholesterol, indicating a vital structural requirement for the ergosterol-specific methyl group. To characterize this structural requirement in more detail, we generated a strain that is temperature sensitive for the function of Erg6p in an elo3Δ mutant background. Examination of raft association of the GPI-anchored Gas1p and plasma membrane ATPase, Pma1p, in the conditional elo3Δ erg6ts double mutant, revealed a specific defect of the mutant to maintain raft association of preexisting Pma1p. Interestingly, in an elo3Δ mutant at 37°C, newly synthesized Pma1p failed to enter raft domains early in the biosynthetic pathway, and upon arrival at the plasma membrane was rerouted to the vacuole for degradation. These observations indicate that the C26 fatty acid substitution on lipids is important for establishing raft association of Pma1p and stabilizing the protein at the cell surface. Analysis of raft lipids in the conditional mutant strain revealed a selective enrichment of ergosterol in detergent-resistant membrane domains, indicating that specific

  7. Methyl Substitution of a Rexinoid Agonist Improves Potency and Reveals Site of Lipid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8E)-8-(3′,4′-Dihydro-1′(2′H)-naphthalen-1′-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid that displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity. 4-Methyl-UAB30, an analogue of 9cUAB30, is a potent RXR agonist but caused increased lipid biosynthesis unlike 9cUAB30. To evaluate how methyl substitution influenced potency and lipid biosynthesis, we synthesized four 9cUAB30 homologues with methyl substitutions at the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of these new analogues are reported here along with the X-ray crystal structures of each homologue bound to the ligand binding domain of hRXRα. We demonstrate that each homologue of 9cUAB30 is a more potent agonist, but only the 7-methyl-9cUAB30 caused severe hyperlipidemia in rats. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structures of these new rexinoids and bexarotene (Targretin) bound to hRXRα-LBD, we reveal that each rexinoid, which induced hyperlipidemia, had methyl groups that interacted with helix 7 residues of the LBD. PMID:24801499

  8. Canine epidermal lipid sampling by skin scrub revealed variations between different body sites and normal and atopic dogs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previously, we evaluated a minimally invasive epidermal lipid sampling method called skin scrub, which achieved reproducible and comparable results to skin scraping. The present study aimed at investigating regional variations in canine epidermal lipid composition using the skin scrub technique and its suitability for collecting skin lipids in dogs suffering from certain skin diseases. Eight different body sites (5 highly and 3 lowly predisposed for atopic lesions) were sampled by skin scrub in 8 control dogs with normal skin. Additionally, lesional and non-lesional skin was sampled from 12 atopic dogs and 4 dogs with other skin diseases by skin scrub. Lipid fractions were separated by high performance thin layer chromatography and analysed densitometrically. Results No significant differences in total lipid content were found among the body sites tested in the control dogs. However, the pinna, lip and caudal back contained significantly lower concentrations of ceramides, whereas the palmar metacarpus and the axillary region contained significantly higher amounts of ceramides and cholesterol than most other body sites. The amount of total lipids and ceramides including all ceramide classes were significantly lower in both lesional and non-lesional skin of atopic dogs compared to normal skin, with the reduction being more pronounced in lesional skin. The sampling by skin scrub was relatively painless and caused only slight erythema at the sampled areas but no oedema. Histological examinations of skin biopsies at 2 skin scrubbed areas revealed a potential lipid extraction from the transition zone between stratum corneum and granulosum. Conclusions The present study revealed regional variations in the epidermal lipid and ceramide composition in dogs without skin abnormalities but no connection between lipid composition and predilection sites for canine atopic dermatitis lesions. The skin scrub technique proved to be a practicable sampling method for canine

  9. Contribution of PIP-5 kinase I{alpha} to raft-based Fc{gamma}RIIA signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanska, Ewelina; Korzeniowski, Marek; Raynal, Patrick; Sobota, Andrzej; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2009-04-01

    Receptor Fc{gamma}IIA (Fc{gamma}RIIA) associates with plasma membrane rafts upon activation to trigger signaling cascades leading to actin polymerization. We examined whether compartmentalization of PI(4,5)P{sub 2} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2}-synthesizing PIP5-kinase I{alpha} to rafts contributes to Fc{gamma}RIIA signaling. A fraction of PIP5-kinase I{alpha} was detected in raft-originating detergent-resistant membranes (DRM) isolated from U937 monocytes and other cells. The DRM of U937 monocytes contained also a major fraction of PI(4,5)P{sub 2}. PIP5-kinase I{alpha} bound PI(4,5)P{sub 2}, and depletion of the lipid displaced PIP5-kinase I{alpha} from the DRM. Activation of Fc{gamma}RIIA in BHK transfectants led to recruitment of the kinase to the plasma membrane and enrichment of DRM in PI(4,5)P{sub 2}. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that in resting cells the kinase was associated with the plasma membrane, cytoplasmic vesicles and the nucleus. After Fc{gamma}RIIA activation, PIP5-kinase I{alpha} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2} co-localized transiently with the activated receptor at distinct cellular locations. Immunoelectron microscopy studies revealed that PIP5-kinase I{alpha} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2} were present at the edges of electron-dense assemblies containing activated Fc{gamma}RIIA in their core. The data suggest that activation of Fc{gamma}RIIA leads to membrane rafts coalescing into signaling platforms containing PIP5-kinase I{alpha} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2}.

  10. Quantitative lipidomics reveals age-dependent perturbations of whole-body lipid metabolism in ACBP deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Sandra F; Sprenger, Richard R; Neess, Ditte; Pauling, Josch K; Færgeman, Nils J; Ejsing, Christer S

    2017-02-01

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) plays a key role in chaperoning long-chain acyl-CoAs into lipid metabolic processes and acts as an important regulatory hub in mammalian physiology. This is highlighted by the recent finding that mice devoid of ACBP suffer from a compromised epidermal barrier and delayed weaning, the physiological process where newborns transit from a fat-based milk diet to a carbohydrate-rich diet. To gain insights into how ACBP impinges on weaning and the concomitant remodeling of whole-body lipid metabolism we performed a comparative lipidomics analysis charting the absolute abundance of 613 lipid molecules in liver, muscle and plasma from weaning and adult Acbp knockout and wild type mice. Our results reveal that ACBP deficiency affects primarily lipid metabolism of liver and plasma during weaning. Specifically, we show that ACBP deficient mice have elevated levels of hepatic cholesteryl esters, and that lipids featuring an 18:1 fatty acid moiety are increased in Acbp depleted mice across all tissues investigated. Our results also show that the perturbation of systemic lipid metabolism in Acbp knockout mice is transient and becomes normalized and similar to that of wild type as mice grow older. These findings demonstrate that ACBP serves crucial functions in maintaining lipid metabolic homeostasis in mice during weaning.

  11. TRPV1 structures in nanodiscs reveal mechanisms of ligand and lipid action.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Cao, Erhu; Julius, David; Cheng, Yifan

    2016-06-16

    When integral membrane proteins are visualized in detergents or other artificial systems, an important layer of information is lost regarding lipid interactions and their effects on protein structure. This is especially relevant to proteins for which lipids have both structural and regulatory roles. Here we demonstrate the power of combining electron cryo-microscopy with lipid nanodisc technology to ascertain the structure of the rat TRPV1 ion channel in a native bilayer environment. Using this approach, we determined the locations of annular and regulatory lipids and showed that specific phospholipid interactions enhance binding of a spider toxin to TRPV1 through formation of a tripartite complex. Furthermore, phosphatidylinositol lipids occupy the binding site for capsaicin and other vanilloid ligands, suggesting a mechanism whereby chemical or thermal stimuli elicit channel activation by promoting the release of bioactive lipids from a critical allosteric regulatory site.

  12. TRPV1 structures in nanodiscs reveal mechanisms of ligand and lipid action

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan; Cao, Erhu; Julius, David; Cheng, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    When integral membrane proteins are visualized in detergents or other artificial systems, an important layer of information is lost regarding lipid interactions and their effects on protein structure. This is especially relevant to proteins for which lipids play both structural and regulatory roles. Here, we demonstrate the power of combining electron cryo-microscopy with lipid nanodisc technology to ascertain the structure of the TRPV1 ion channel in a native bilayer environment. Using this approach, we determined the locations of annular and regulatory lipids and showed that specific phospholipid interactions enhance binding of a spider toxin to TRPV1 through formation of a tripartite complex. Furthermore, phosphatidylinositol lipids occupy the binding site for capsaicin and other vanilloid ligands, suggesting a mechanism whereby chemical or thermal stimuli elicit channel activation by promoting release of bioactive lipids from a critical allosteric regulatory site. PMID:27281200

  13. Liquid immiscibility in model bilayer lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veatch, Sarah L.

    There is growing evidence that cell plasma membranes are laterally organized into "raft" regions in which particular lipids and proteins are concentrated. These domains have sub-micron dimensions and have been implicated in vital cell functions. Similar liquid domains are observed in model bilayer membrane mixtures that mimick cellular lipid compositions. In model membranes, domains can be large (microns) and can readily form in the absence of proteins. This thesis presents studies of liquid immiscibility in model membrane systems using two experimental methods. By fluorescence microscopy, this thesis documents that miscibility transitions occur in a wide variety of ternary lipid mixtures containing high melting temperature (saturated) lipids, low melting temperature (usually unsaturated) lipids, and cholesterol. I have constructed detailed miscibility phase diagrams for three separate ternary lipid mixtures (DOPC/DPPC/Chol, DOPC/PSM/Chol, and POPC/PSM/Chol). Phase separation is also observed in membranes of lipids extracted from human erythrocytes. NMR experiments probe lipid order and verify the coexistence of a saturated lipid and cholesterol rich liquid ordered (Lo) phase with a more disordered, unsaturated lipid rich liquid crystalline (Lalpha) phase at low temperatures. These experiments also find multiple thermodynamic transitions and lipid organization on different length-scales. This complexity is revealed because fluorescence microscopy and NMR probe lipid order at different length-scales (>1mum vs. ˜100nm). NMR detects small domains (˜80nm) at temperatures just below the miscibility transition, even though micron-scale domains are observed by fluorescent microscopy. NMR does detect large-scale ("100nm) demixing, but at a lower temperature. In addition, it has long been known that >10nm length-scale structure is present in many lipid mixtures containing cholesterol and at least one additional lipid species, though it is shown here that only a subset of

  14. Hierarchical organization of chiral rafts in colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prerna; Ward, Andrew; Gibaud, T.; Hagan, Michael F.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2014-09-01

    Liquid-liquid phase separation is ubiquitous in suspensions of nanoparticles, proteins and colloids. It has an important role in gel formation, protein crystallization and perhaps even as an organizing principle in cellular biology. With a few notable exceptions, liquid-liquid phase separation in bulk proceeds through the continuous coalescence of droplets until the system undergoes complete phase separation. But when colloids, nanoparticles or proteins are confined to interfaces, surfaces or membranes, their interactions differ fundamentally from those mediated by isotropic solvents, and this results in significantly more complex phase behaviour. Here we show that liquid-liquid phase separation in monolayer membranes composed of two dissimilar chiral colloidal rods gives rise to thermodynamically stable rafts that constantly exchange monomeric rods with the background reservoir to maintain a self-limited size. We visualize and manipulate rafts to quantify their assembly kinetics and to show that membrane distortions arising from the rods' chirality lead to long-range repulsive raft-raft interactions. Rafts assemble into cluster crystals at high densities, but they can also form bonds to yield higher-order structures. Taken together, our observations demonstrate a robust membrane-based pathway for the assembly of monodisperse membrane clusters that is complementary to existing methods for colloid assembly in bulk suspensions. They also reveal that chiral inclusions in membranes can acquire long-range repulsive interactions, which might more generally have a role in stabilizing assemblages of finite size.

  15. Dysregulated signaling hubs of liver lipid metabolism reveal hepatocellular carcinoma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunjae; Mardinoglu, Adil; Zhang, Cheng; Lee, Doheon; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a high mortality rate and early detection of HCC is crucial for the application of effective treatment strategies. HCC is typically caused by either viral hepatitis infection or by fatty liver disease. To diagnose and treat HCC it is necessary to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. As a major cause for development of HCC is fatty liver disease, we here investigated anomalies in regulation of lipid metabolism in the liver. We applied a tailored network-based approach to identify signaling hubs associated with regulation of this part of metabolism. Using transcriptomics data of HCC patients, we identified significant dysregulated expressions of lipid-regulated genes, across many different lipid metabolic pathways. Our findings, however, show that viral hepatitis causes HCC by a distinct mechanism, less likely involving lipid anomalies. Based on our analysis we suggest signaling hub genes governing overall catabolic or anabolic pathways, as novel drug targets for treatment of HCC that involves lipid anomalies. PMID:27216817

  16. A semisynthetic Atg3 reveals that acetylation promotes Atg3 membrane binding and Atg8 lipidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi-Tong; Yi, Cong; Chen, Chen-Chen; Lan, Huan; Pan, Man; Zhang, Shao-Jin; Huang, Yi-Chao; Guan, Chao-Jian; Li, Yi-Ming; Yu, Li; Liu, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Acetylation of Atg3 regulates the lipidation of the protein Atg8 in autophagy. The molecular mechanism behind this important biochemical event remains to be elucidated. We describe the first semi-synthesis of homogeneous K19/K48-diacetylated Atg3 through sequential hydrazide-based native chemical ligation. In vitro reconstitution experiments with the semi-synthetic proteins confirm that Atg3 acetylation can promote the lipidation of Atg8. We find that acetylation of Atg3 enhances its binding to phosphatidylethanolamine-containing liposomes and to endoplasmic reticulum, through which it promotes the lipidation process.

  17. Metabolomic profiling reveals mitochondrial-derived lipid biomarkers that drive obesity-associated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sampey, Brante P; Freemerman, Alex J; Zhang, Jimmy; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Galanko, Joseph A; O'Connell, Thomas M; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Stevens, Robert D; Newgard, Christopher B; Brauer, Heather A; Troester, Melissa A; Makowski, Liza

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Several animal models of obesity exist, but studies are lacking that compare traditional lard-based high fat diets (HFD) to "Cafeteria diets" (CAF) consisting of nutrient poor human junk food. Our previous work demonstrated the rapid and severe obesogenic and inflammatory consequences of CAF compared to HFD including rapid weight gain, markers of Metabolic Syndrome, multi-tissue lipid accumulation, and dramatic inflammation. To identify potential mediators of CAF-induced obesity and Metabolic Syndrome, we used metabolomic analysis to profile serum, muscle, and white adipose from rats fed CAF, HFD, or standard control diets. Principle component analysis identified elevations in clusters of fatty acids and acylcarnitines. These increases in metabolites were associated with systemic mitochondrial dysfunction that paralleled weight gain, physiologic measures of Metabolic Syndrome, and tissue inflammation in CAF-fed rats. Spearman pairwise correlations between metabolites, physiologic, and histologic findings revealed strong correlations between elevated markers of inflammation in CAF-fed animals, measured as crown like structures in adipose, and specifically the pro-inflammatory saturated fatty acids and oxidation intermediates laurate and lauroyl carnitine. Treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages with lauroyl carnitine polarized macrophages towards the M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype through downregulation of AMPK and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Results presented herein demonstrate that compared to a traditional HFD model, the CAF diet provides a robust model for diet-induced human obesity, which models Metabolic Syndrome-related mitochondrial dysfunction in serum, muscle, and adipose, along with pro-inflammatory metabolite alterations. These data also suggest that modifying the availability or metabolism of saturated fatty acids may limit the inflammation associated with obesity leading to Metabolic

  18. Unique Lipid Chemistry of Synaptic Vesicle and Synaptosome Membrane Revealed Using Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kenneth T; Maddipati, Krishna R; Naik, Akshata R; Jena, Bhanu P

    2017-03-02

    Synaptic vesicles measuring 30-50 nm in diameter containing neurotransmitters either completely collapse at the presynaptic membrane or dock and transiently fuse at the base of specialized 15 nm cup-shaped lipoprotein structures called porosomes at the presynaptic membrane of synaptosomes to release neurotransmitters. Recent study reports the unique composition of major lipids associated with neuronal porosomes. Given that lipids greatly influence the association and functions of membrane proteins, differences in lipid composition of synaptic vesicle and the synaptosome membrane was hypothesized. To test this hypothesis, the lipidome of isolated synaptosome, synaptosome membrane, and synaptic vesicle preparation were determined by using mass spectrometry in the current study. Results from the study demonstrate the enriched presence of triacyl glycerols and sphingomyelins in synaptic vesicles, as opposed to the enriched presence of phospholipids in the synaptosome membrane fraction, reflecting on the tight regulation of nerve cells in compartmentalization of membrane lipids at the nerve terminal.

  19. MALDI mass spectrometry reveals that cumulus cells modulate the lipid profile of in vitro-matured bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Vireque, Alessandra A; Tata, Alessandra; Belaz, Katia Roberta A; Grázia, João Gabriel V; Santos, Fábio N; Arnold, Daniel R; Basso, Andrea C; Eberlin, Marcos N; Silva-de-Sá, Marcos Felipe; Ferriani, Rui A; Sá Rosa-E-Silva, Ana Carolina J

    2017-04-01

    The influence of cumulus cells (CC) on the lipid profile of bovine oocytes matured in two different lipid sources was investigated. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) or denuded oocytes (DO) were matured in tissue culture medium (TCM) supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS) or serum substitute supplement (SSS). Lipid profiles of TCM, serum supplements, immature CC and oocyte (IO), and in vitro-matured oocytes from COC and DO were then analyzed by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and submitted to partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The developmental competence of such oocytes was also assessed. Differences in lipid composition were observed between two types of sera and distinctly influenced the lipid profile of CC. As revealed by PLS-DA, the abundance of specific ions corresponding to triacylglycerols (TAG) or phospholipids (PL) were higher in COC compared to DO both supplemented with FBS or SSS and to some extent affected the subsequent DO in vitro embryo development. DO exposed to SSS had however a marked diminished ability to develop to the blastocyst stage. These results indicate a modulation by CC of the oocyte TAG and PL profiles associated with a specific cell response to the serum supplement used for in vitro maturation.

  20. Functions of cholera toxin B-subunit as a raft cross-linker.

    PubMed

    Day, Charles A; Kenworthy, Anne K

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts are putative complexes of lipids and proteins in cellular membranes that are proposed to function in trafficking and signalling events. CTxB (cholera toxin B-subunit) has emerged as one of the most studied examples of a raft-associated protein. Consisting of the membrane-binding domain of cholera toxin, CTxB binds up to five copies of its lipid receptor on the plasma membrane of the host cell. This multivalency of binding gives the toxin the ability to reorganize underlying membrane structure by cross-linking otherwise small and transient lipid rafts. CTxB thus serves as a useful model for understanding the properties and functions of protein-stabilized domains. In the present chapter, we summarize current evidence that CTxB associates with and cross-links lipid rafts, discuss how CTxB binding modulates the architecture and dynamics of membrane domains, and describe the functional consequences of this cross-linking behaviour on toxin uptake into cells via endocytosis.

  1. Lipid Composition of Multilamellar Bodies Secreted by Dictyostelium discoideum Reveals Their Amoebal Origin

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Valérie E.; Lessire, René; Domergue, Frédéric; Fouillen, Laetitia; Filion, Geneviève; Sedighi, Ahmadreza

    2013-01-01

    When they are fed with bacteria, Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae produce and secrete multilamellar bodies (MLBs), which are composed of membranous material. It has been proposed that MLBs are a waste disposal system that allows D. discoideum to eliminate undigested bacterial remains. However, the real function of MLBs remains unknown. Determination of the biochemical composition of MLBs, especially lipids, represents a way to gain information about the role of these structures. To allow these analyses, a protocol involving various centrifugation procedures has been developed to purify secreted MLBs from amoeba-bacterium cocultures. The purity of the MLB preparation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and by immunofluorescence using H36, an antibody that binds to MLBs. The lipid and fatty acid compositions of pure MLBs were then analyzed by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and gas chromatography (GC), respectively, and compared to those of amoebae as well as bacteria used as a food source. While the bacteria were devoid of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), these two polar lipid species were major classes of lipids in MLBs and amoebae. Similarly, the fatty acid composition of MLBs and amoebae was characterized by the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids, while cyclic fatty acids were found only in bacteria. These results strongly suggest that the lipids constituting the MLBs originate from the amoebal metabolism rather than from undigested bacterial membranes. This opens the possibility that MLBs, instead of being a waste disposal system, have unsuspected roles in D. discoideum physiology. PMID:23748431

  2. A model of lipid-free Apolipoprotein A-I revealed by iterative molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Lei, Dongsheng; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-03-20

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), the major protein component of high-density lipoprotein, has been proven inversely correlated to cardiovascular risk in past decades. The lipid-free state of apo A-I is the initial stage which binds to lipids forming high-density lipoprotein. Molecular models of lipid-free apo A-I have been reported by methods like X-ray crystallography and chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CCL/MS). Through structural analysis we found that those current models had limited consistency with other experimental results, such as those from hydrogen exchange with mass spectrometry. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we also found those models could not reach a stable equilibrium state. Therefore, by integrating various experimental results, we proposed a new structural model for lipidfree apo A-I, which contains a bundled four-helix N-terminal domain (1–192) that forms a variable hydrophobic groove and a mobile short hairpin C-terminal domain (193–243). This model exhibits an equilibrium state through molecular dynamics simulation and is consistent with most of the experimental results known from CCL/MS on lysine pairs, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and hydrogen exchange. This solution-state lipid-free apo A-I model may elucidate the possible conformational transitions of apo A-I binding with lipids in high-density lipoprotein formation.

  3. A model of lipid-free Apolipoprotein A-I revealed by iterative molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xing; Lei, Dongsheng; Zhang, Lei; ...

    2015-03-20

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), the major protein component of high-density lipoprotein, has been proven inversely correlated to cardiovascular risk in past decades. The lipid-free state of apo A-I is the initial stage which binds to lipids forming high-density lipoprotein. Molecular models of lipid-free apo A-I have been reported by methods like X-ray crystallography and chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CCL/MS). Through structural analysis we found that those current models had limited consistency with other experimental results, such as those from hydrogen exchange with mass spectrometry. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we also found those models could not reach a stable equilibrium state. Therefore,more » by integrating various experimental results, we proposed a new structural model for lipidfree apo A-I, which contains a bundled four-helix N-terminal domain (1–192) that forms a variable hydrophobic groove and a mobile short hairpin C-terminal domain (193–243). This model exhibits an equilibrium state through molecular dynamics simulation and is consistent with most of the experimental results known from CCL/MS on lysine pairs, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and hydrogen exchange. This solution-state lipid-free apo A-I model may elucidate the possible conformational transitions of apo A-I binding with lipids in high-density lipoprotein formation.« less

  4. Euphol from Euphorbia tirucalli Negatively Modulates TGF-β Responsiveness via TGF-β Receptor Segregation inside Membrane Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Lin; Chen, Ying-Pin; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Chang, Fang-Rong; Duh, Tsai-Hui; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Wu, Wei-Chiang; Kao, Yu-Chen; Yang, Pei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) responsiveness in cultured cells can be modulated by TGF-β partitioning between lipid raft/caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathways. Lipid rafts are plasma membrane microdomains with an important role in cell survival signaling, and cholesterol is necessary for the lipid rafts’ structure and function. Euphol is a euphane-type triterpene alcohol that is structurally similar to cholesterol and has a wide range of pharmacological properties, including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. In the present study, euphol suppressed TGF-β signaling by inducing TGF-β receptor movement into lipid-raft microdomains and degrading TGF-β receptors. PMID:26448474

  5. Secretory granule biogenesis: rafting to the SNARE.

    PubMed

    Tooze, S A; Martens, G J; Huttner, W B

    2001-03-01

    Regulated secretion of hormones occurs when a cell receives an external stimulus, triggering the secretory granules to undergo fusion with the plasma membrane and release their content into the extracellular milieu. The formation of a mature secretory granule (MSG) involves a series of discrete and unique events such as protein sorting, formation of immature secretory granules (ISGs), prohormone processing and vesicle fusion. Regulated secretory proteins (RSPs), the proteins stored and secreted from MSGs, contain signals or domains to direct them into the regulated secretory pathway. Recent data on the role of specific domains in RSPs involved in sorting and aggregation suggest that the cell-type-specific composition of RSPs in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) has an important role in determining how the RSPs get into ISGs. The realization that lipid rafts are implicated in sorting RSPs in the TGN and the identification of SNARE molecules represent further major advances in our understanding of how MSGs are formed. At the heart of these findings is the elucidation of molecular mechanisms driving protein--lipid and protein--protein interactions specific for secretory granule biogenesis.

  6. A combined clinical phenotype and lipidomic analysis reveals the impact of chronic kidney disease on lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Chen, Lin; Liu, Dan; Chen, Dan-Qian; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Yu, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Li; Su, Wei; Bai, Xu; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2017-03-13

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in significant dyslipidemia and profound changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The associated dyslipidemia, in turn, contributes to progression of CKD and its cardiovascular complications. To gain an in-depth insight into the disorders of lipid metabolism in advanced CKD, we applied UPLC-HDMS-based lipidomics to measure serum lipid metabolites in 180 patients with advanced CKD and 120 age-matched healthy controls. We found significant increases in the levels of total free fatty acids, glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids in patients with CKD. The levels of free fatty acids, glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids directly correlated with the level of serum triglyceride, and inversely correlated with the levels of total cholesterol and eGFR. A total of 126 lipid species were identified from positive and negative ion modes. 113 out of 126 identified lipid species were significantly altered in patients with CKD based on the adjusted FDR method. These results point to profound disturbance of fatty acid and triglyceride metabolisms in patients with CKD. Logistic regression analysis showed strong correlations between serum methyl hexadecanoic acid, LPC(24:1), 3-oxooctadecanoic acid and PC(20:2/24:1) levels with eGFR and serum creatinine levels (R>0.8758). In conclusion application of UPLC-HDMS-based lipidomic technique revealed profound changes in lipid metabolites in patients with CKD. The observed increases in serum total fatty acids, glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids levels directly correlated with increased serum triglyceride level, and inversely correlated with the eGFR and triglyceride levels.

  7. Lipid Profiling Reveals Arachidonate Deficiency in RAW264.7 Cells: Structural and Functional Implications†

    PubMed Central

    Rouzer, Carol A.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Byrne, Mark O.; Milne, Stephen B.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Brown, H. Alex

    2008-01-01

    Glycerophospholipids containing arachidonic acid (20:4) serve as the precursors for an array of biologically active lipid mediators, most of which are produced by macrophages. We have applied mass spectrometry-based lipid profiling technology to evaluate the glycerophospholipid structure and composition of two macrophage populations, resident peritoneal macrophages and RAW264.7 cells, with regard to their potential for 20:4-based lipid mediator biosynthesis. Fatty acid analysis indicated that RAW264.7 cells were deficient in 20:4 (10 ± 1 mole percent) as compared to peritoneal macrophages (26 ± 1 mole percent). Mass spectrometry of total glycerophospholipids demonstrated a marked difference in the distribution of lipid species, including reduced levels of 20:4-containing lipids, in RAW264.7 cells as compared to peritoneal macrophages. Enrichment of RAW264.7 cells with 20:4 increased the fatty acid to 20 ± 1 mole percent. However, the distribution of the incorporated 20:4 remained different from that of peritoneal macrophages. RAW264.7 cells pretreated with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor followed by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma mobilized similar quantities of 20:4 and produced similar amounts of prostaglandins as peritoneal macrophages treated with LPS alone. LPS treatment resulted in detectable changes in specific 20:4-containing glycerophospholipids in peritoneal cells, but not in RAW264.7 cells. 20:4-enriched RAW264.7 cells lost 88% of the incorporated fatty acid during the LPS incubation without additional prostaglandin synthesis. These results illustrate that large differences in glycerophospholipid composition may exist, even in closely related cell populations, and demonstrate the importance of interpreting the potential for lipid-mediator biosynthesis in the context of overall glycerophospholipid composition. PMID:17144673

  8. Depletion with Cyclodextrin Reveals Two Populations of Cholesterol in Model Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Litz, Jonathan P.; Thakkar, Niket; Portet, Thomas; Keller, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent results provide evidence that cholesterol is highly accessible for removal from both cell and model membranes above a threshold concentration that varies with membrane composition. Here we measured the rate at which methyl-β-cyclodextrin depletes cholesterol from a supported lipid bilayer as a function of cholesterol mole fraction. We formed supported bilayers from two-component mixtures of cholesterol and a PC (phosphatidylcholine) lipid, and we directly visualized the rate of decrease in area of the bilayers with fluorescence microscopy. Our technique yields the accessibility of cholesterol over a wide range of concentrations (30–66 mol %) for many individual bilayers, enabling fast acquisition of replicate data. We found that the bilayers contain two populations of cholesterol, one with low surface accessibility and the other with high accessibility. A larger fraction of the total membrane cholesterol appears in the more accessible population when the acyl chains of the PC-lipid tails are more unsaturated. Our findings are most consistent with the predictions of the condensed-complex and cholesterol bilayer domain models of cholesterol-phospholipid interactions in lipid membranes. PMID:26840728

  9. Integrating mass spectrometry with MD simulations reveals the role of lipids in Na+/H+ antiporters

    PubMed Central

    Landreh, Michael; Marklund, Erik G.; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Coincon, Mathieu; Gault, Joseph; Gupta, Kallol; Liko, Idlir; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Drew, David; Robinson, Carol V.

    2017-01-01

    Na+/H+ antiporters are found in all kingdoms of life and exhibit catalysis rates that are among the fastest of all known secondary-active transporters. Here we combine ion mobility mass spectrometry and molecular dynamics simulations to study the conformational stability and lipid-binding properties of the Na+/H+ exchanger NapA from Thermus thermophilus and compare this to the prototypical antiporter NhaA from Escherichia coli and the human homologue NHA2. We find that NapA and NHA2, but not NhaA, form stable dimers and do not selectively retain membrane lipids. By comparing wild-type NapA with engineered variants, we show that the unfolding of the protein in the gas phase involves the disruption of inter-domain contacts. Lipids around the domain interface protect the native fold in the gas phase by mediating contacts between the mobile protein segments. We speculate that elevator-type antiporters such as NapA, and likely NHA2, use a subset of annular lipids as structural support to facilitate large-scale conformational changes within the membrane. PMID:28071645

  10. Integrating mass spectrometry with MD simulations reveals the role of lipids in Na(+)/H(+) antiporters.

    PubMed

    Landreh, Michael; Marklund, Erik G; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Coincon, Mathieu; Gault, Joseph; Gupta, Kallol; Liko, Idlir; Benesch, Justin L P; Drew, David; Robinson, Carol V

    2017-01-10

    Na(+)/H(+) antiporters are found in all kingdoms of life and exhibit catalysis rates that are among the fastest of all known secondary-active transporters. Here we combine ion mobility mass spectrometry and molecular dynamics simulations to study the conformational stability and lipid-binding properties of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NapA from Thermus thermophilus and compare this to the prototypical antiporter NhaA from Escherichia coli and the human homologue NHA2. We find that NapA and NHA2, but not NhaA, form stable dimers and do not selectively retain membrane lipids. By comparing wild-type NapA with engineered variants, we show that the unfolding of the protein in the gas phase involves the disruption of inter-domain contacts. Lipids around the domain interface protect the native fold in the gas phase by mediating contacts between the mobile protein segments. We speculate that elevator-type antiporters such as NapA, and likely NHA2, use a subset of annular lipids as structural support to facilitate large-scale conformational changes within the membrane.

  11. Ancient lipids reveal continuity in culinary practices across the transition to agriculture in Northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Oliver E.; Steele, Val J.; Fischer, Anders; Hartz, Sönke; Andersen, Søren H.; Donohoe, Paul; Glykou, Aikaterini; Saul, Hayley; Jones, D. Martin; Koch, Eva; Heron, Carl P.

    2011-01-01

    Farming transformed societies globally. Yet, despite more than a century of research, there is little consensus on the speed or completeness of this fundamental change and, consequently, on its principal drivers. For Northern Europe, the debate has often centered on the rich archaeological record of the Western Baltic, but even here it is unclear how quickly or completely people abandoned wild terrestrial and marine resources after the introduction of domesticated plants and animals at ∼4000 calibrated years B.C. Ceramic containers are found ubiquitously on these sites and contain remarkably well-preserved lipids derived from the original use of the vessel. Reconstructing culinary practices from this ceramic record can contribute to longstanding debates concerning the origins of farming. Here we present data on the molecular and isotopic characteristics of lipids extracted from 133 ceramic vessels and 100 carbonized surface residues dating to immediately before and after the first evidence of domesticated animals and plants in the Western Baltic. The presence of specific lipid biomarkers, notably ω-(o-alkylphenyl)alkanoic acids, and the isotopic composition of individual n-alkanoic acids clearly show that a significant proportion (∼20%) of ceramic vessels with lipids preserved continued to be used for processing marine and freshwater resources across the transition to agriculture in this region. Although changes in pottery use are immediately evident, our data challenge the popular notions that economies were completely transformed with the arrival of farming and that Neolithic pottery was exclusively associated with produce from domesticated animals and plants. PMID:22025697

  12. Neutron Reflectometry reveals the interaction between functionalized SPIONs and the surface of lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Luchini, Alessandra; Gerelli, Yuri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Nylander, Tommy; Pálsson, Gunnar K; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Paduano, Luigi

    2017-03-01

    The safe application of nanotechnology devices in biomedicine requires fundamental understanding on how they interact with and affect the different components of biological systems. In this respect, the cellular membrane, the cell envelope, certainly represents an important target or barrier for nanosystems. Here we report on the interaction between functionalized SuperParamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs), promising contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and lipid bilayers that mimic the plasma membrane. Neutron Reflectometry, supported by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) experiments, was used to characterize this interaction by varying both SPION coating and lipid bilayer composition. In particular, the interaction of two different SPIONs, functionalized with a cationic surfactant and a zwitterionic phospholipid, and lipid bilayers, containing different amount of cholesterol, were compared. The obtained results were further validated by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) measurements and Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) images. None of the investigated functionalized SPIONs were found to disrupt the lipid membrane. However, in all case we observed the attachment of the functionalized SPIONs onto the surface of the bilayers, which was affected by the bilayer rigidity, i.e. the cholesterol concentration.

  13. Integrating mass spectrometry with MD simulations reveals the role of lipids in Na+/H+ antiporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landreh, Michael; Marklund, Erik G.; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Coincon, Mathieu; Gault, Joseph; Gupta, Kallol; Liko, Idlir; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Drew, David; Robinson, Carol V.

    2017-01-01

    Na+/H+ antiporters are found in all kingdoms of life and exhibit catalysis rates that are among the fastest of all known secondary-active transporters. Here we combine ion mobility mass spectrometry and molecular dynamics simulations to study the conformational stability and lipid-binding properties of the Na+/H+ exchanger NapA from Thermus thermophilus and compare this to the prototypical antiporter NhaA from Escherichia coli and the human homologue NHA2. We find that NapA and NHA2, but not NhaA, form stable dimers and do not selectively retain membrane lipids. By comparing wild-type NapA with engineered variants, we show that the unfolding of the protein in the gas phase involves the disruption of inter-domain contacts. Lipids around the domain interface protect the native fold in the gas phase by mediating contacts between the mobile protein segments. We speculate that elevator-type antiporters such as NapA, and likely NHA2, use a subset of annular lipids as structural support to facilitate large-scale conformational changes within the membrane.

  14. Ancient lipids reveal continuity in culinary practices across the transition to agriculture in Northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Craig, Oliver E; Steele, Val J; Fischer, Anders; Hartz, Sönke; Andersen, Søren H; Donohoe, Paul; Glykou, Aikaterini; Saul, Hayley; Jones, D Martin; Koch, Eva; Heron, Carl P

    2011-11-01

    Farming transformed societies globally. Yet, despite more than a century of research, there is little consensus on the speed or completeness of this fundamental change and, consequently, on its principal drivers. For Northern Europe, the debate has often centered on the rich archaeological record of the Western Baltic, but even here it is unclear how quickly or completely people abandoned wild terrestrial and marine resources after the introduction of domesticated plants and animals at ∼4000 calibrated years B.C. Ceramic containers are found ubiquitously on these sites and contain remarkably well-preserved lipids derived from the original use of the vessel. Reconstructing culinary practices from this ceramic record can contribute to longstanding debates concerning the origins of farming. Here we present data on the molecular and isotopic characteristics of lipids extracted from 133 ceramic vessels and 100 carbonized surface residues dating to immediately before and after the first evidence of domesticated animals and plants in the Western Baltic. The presence of specific lipid biomarkers, notably ω-(o-alkylphenyl)alkanoic acids, and the isotopic composition of individual n-alkanoic acids clearly show that a significant proportion (∼20%) of ceramic vessels with lipids preserved continued to be used for processing marine and freshwater resources across the transition to agriculture in this region. Although changes in pottery use are immediately evident, our data challenge the popular notions that economies were completely transformed with the arrival of farming and that Neolithic pottery was exclusively associated with produce from domesticated animals and plants.

  15. Mass spectrometry reveals synergistic effects of nucleotides, lipids, and drugs binding to a multidrug resistance efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, Julien; Wang, Sheila C; Politis, Argyris; Reading, Eamonn; Ma, Jerome; Biggin, Philip C; Zhou, Min; Tao, Houchao; Zhang, Qinghai; Chang, Geoffrey; Morgner, Nina; Robinson, Carol V

    2013-06-11

    Multidrug resistance is a serious barrier to successful treatment of many human diseases, including cancer, wherein chemotherapeutics are exported from target cells by membrane-embedded pumps. The most prevalent of these pumps, the ATP-Binding Cassette transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), consists of two homologous halves each comprising one nucleotide-binding domain and six transmembrane helices. The transmembrane region encapsulates a hydrophobic cavity, accessed by portals in the membrane, that binds cytotoxic compounds as well as lipids and peptides. Here we use mass spectrometry (MS) to probe the intact P-gp small molecule-bound complex in a detergent micelle. Activation in the gas phase leads to formation of ions, largely devoid of detergent, yet retaining drug molecules as well as charged or zwitterionic lipids. Measuring the rates of lipid binding and calculating apparent KD values shows that up to six negatively charged diacylglycerides bind more favorably than zwitterionic lipids. Similar experiments confirm binding of cardiolipins and show that prior binding of the immunosuppressant and antifungal antibiotic cyclosporin A enhances subsequent binding of cardiolipin. Ion mobility MS reveals that P-gp exists in an equilibrium between different states, readily interconverted by ligand binding. Overall these MS results show how concerted small molecule binding leads to synergistic effects on binding affinities and conformations of a multidrug efflux pump.

  16. Lipidomic Profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii Reveals Critical Changes in Lipid Composition in Response to Acetic Acid Stress

    PubMed Central

    Riezman, Howard; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555) cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L−1, while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L−1 acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS) showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP)2C 2.2×) and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP)2C 2.7×), when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to generate large

  17. Lipidomic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii reveals critical changes in lipid composition in response to acetic acid stress.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Lina; Santos, Aline Xs; Riezman, Howard; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555) cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L(-1), while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L(-1) acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS) showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP)2C 2.2×) and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP)2C 2.7×), when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to generate large

  18. Metabolomics of reef benthic interactions reveals a bioactive lipid involved in coral defence.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert A; Vermeij, Mark J A; Hartmann, Aaron C; Galtier d'Auriac, Ines; Benler, Sean; Haas, Andreas; Quistad, Steven D; Lim, Yan Wei; Little, Mark; Sandin, Stuart; Smith, Jennifer E; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-04-27

    Holobionts are assemblages of microbial symbionts and their macrobial host. As extant representatives of some of the oldest macro-organisms, corals and algae are important for understanding how holobionts develop and interact with one another. Using untargeted metabolomics, we show that non-self interactions altered the coral metabolome more than self-interactions (i.e. different or same genus, respectively). Platelet activating factor (PAF) and Lyso-PAF, central inflammatory modulators in mammals, were major lipid components of the coral holobionts. When corals were damaged during competitive interactions with algae, PAF increased along with expression of the gene encoding Lyso-PAF acetyltransferase; the protein responsible for converting Lyso-PAF to PAF. This shows that self and non-self recognition among some of the oldest extant holobionts involve bioactive lipids identical to those in highly derived taxa like humans. This further strengthens the hypothesis that major players of the immune response evolved during the pre-Cambrian.

  19. Mechanistic insights into EGFR membrane clustering revealed by super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Ye; Cai, Mingjun; Pan, Yangang; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Ji, Hongbin; Wang, Hongda

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of membrane receptors such as EGFR is critical for various biological processes, for example cell signaling and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism involved remains poorly understood. Here, we used a super resolution imaging technique, which has shattered the longstanding resolution barrier of light diffraction, to investigate the distribution of membrane EGFR on apical or basal surfaces of COS-7 cells and on the surface of suspended COS-7 cells. Our data show that more and larger EGFR clusters are detected on the apical surface in comparison with those on the basal surface and this difference is not affected by the EGFR activation state, whereas suspended COS-7 cells exhibit a moderate clustering state and a homogeneous distribution pattern, indicating that the external environment surrounding the cell membrane is the decisive factor in the EGFR clustering pattern. A dual-color dSTORM image reveals the significant colocalization of EGFR and lipid rafts; interestingly MβCD treatment leads to a dramatic decrease of the amount and size of EGFR clusters on both apical and basal surfaces, highlighting a key role of lipid rafts in EGFR cluster formation. Altogether, our results illustrate the distribution pattern of EGFR in polarized cells and uncover the essential role of lipid rafts in EGFR cluster maintenance.The clustering of membrane receptors such as EGFR is critical for various biological processes, for example cell signaling and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism involved remains poorly understood. Here, we used a super resolution imaging technique, which has shattered the longstanding resolution barrier of light diffraction, to investigate the distribution of membrane EGFR on apical or basal surfaces of COS-7 cells and on the surface of suspended COS-7 cells. Our data show that more and larger EGFR clusters are detected on the apical surface in comparison with those on the basal surface and this difference is not affected by the EGFR

  20. Raft River geoscience case study

    SciTech Connect

    Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (c) hydraulically connected to the shallow thermal fluid of the Crook and BLM wells based upon both geochemistry and pressure response; (d) controlled by a mixture of diluted meteoric water recharging from the northwest and a saline sodium chloride water entering from the southwest. Although the hydrogeologic environment of the Raft River geothermal area is very complex and unique, it is typical of many Basin and Range systems.

  1. Lipidomic profiling of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 knockout mice reveals novel lipid biomarkers associated with serotonin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Burton, Casey; Yang, Li; Nie, Honggang; Tian, Yonglu; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2016-04-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that regulates a wide range of physiological, neuropsychological, and behavioral processes. Consequently, serotonin deficiency is involved in a wide variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and depression. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying serotonin deficiency, particularly from a lipidomics perspective, remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel lipid biomarkers associated with serotonin deficiency by lipidomic profiling of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 knockout (Tph2-/-) mice. Using a high-throughput normal-/reversed-phase two-dimensional liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (NP/RP 2D LC-QToF-MS) method, 59 lipid biomarkers encompassing glycerophospholipids (glycerophosphocholines, lysoglycerophosphocholines, glycerophosphoethanolamines, lysoglycerophosphoethanolamines glycerophosphoinositols, and lysoglycerophosphoinositols), sphingolipids (sphingomyelins, ceramides, galactosylceramides, glucosylceramides, and lactosylceramides) and free fatty acids were identified. Systemic oxidative stress in the Tph2-/- mice was significantly elevated, and a corresponding mechanism that relates the lipidomic findings has been proposed. In summary, this work provides preliminary findings that lipid metabolism is implicated in serotonin deficiency.

  2. Rafting through traffic: Membrane domains in cellular logistics.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Rohrer, Blanca; Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya

    2014-12-01

    The intricate and tightly regulated organization of eukaryotic cells into spatially and functionally distinct membrane-bound compartments is a defining feature of complex organisms. These compartments are defined by their lipid and protein compositions, with their limiting membrane as the functional interface to the rest of the cell. Thus, proper segregation of membrane proteins and lipids is necessary for the maintenance of organelle identity, and this segregation must be maintained despite extensive, rapid membrane exchange between compartments. Sorting processes of high efficiency and fidelity are required to avoid potentially deleterious mis-targeting and maintain cellular function. Although much molecular machinery associated with membrane traffic (i.e. membrane budding/fusion/fission) has been characterized both structurally and biochemically, the mechanistic details underlying the tightly regulated distribution of membranes between subcellular locations remain to be elucidated. This review presents evidence for the role of ordered lateral membrane domains known as lipid rafts in both biosynthetic sorting in the late secretory pathway, as well as endocytosis and recycling to/from the plasma membrane. Although such evidence is extensive and the involvement of membrane domains in sorting is definitive, specific mechanistic details for raft-dependent sorting processes remain elusive.

  3. Equilibrium microphase separation in the two-leaflet model of lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigada, Ramon; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Because of the coupling between local lipid composition and the thickness of the membrane, microphase separation in two-component lipid membranes can take place; such effects may underlie the formation of equilibrium nanoscale rafts. Using a kinetic description, this phenomenon is analytically and numerically investigated. The phase diagram is constructed through the stability analysis for linearized kinetic equations, and conditions for microphase separation are discussed. Simulations of the full kinetic model reveal the development of equilibrium membrane nanostructures with various morphologies from the initial uniform state.

  4. White matter rafting--membrane microdomains in myelin.

    PubMed

    Debruin, Lillian S; Harauz, George

    2007-02-01

    The myelin membrane comprises a plethora of regions that are compositionally, ultrastructurally, and functionally distinct. Biochemical dissection of oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells, and central and peripheral nervous system myelin by means such as cold-detergent extraction and differential fractionation has led to the identification of a variety of detergent-resistant membrane assemblies, some of which represent putative signalling platforms. We review here the different microdomains that have hitherto been identified in the myelin membrane, particularly lipid rafts, caveolae, and cellular junctions such as the tight junctions that are found in the radial component of the CNS myelin sheath.

  5. Stabilization of concentration fluctuations in mixed membranes by hybrid lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Safran, Samuel

    2012-02-01

    Finite-size domains have been observed at the surface of cells. These lipids ``rafts'' are stable nanodomains enriched in saturated lipids and cholesterol. While line tension favors macrodomains, one explanation for raft stabilization suggests that the membrane composition is tuned close to a spinodal temperature. From this point of view, rafts are long-lived concentration fluctuations in the mixed phase. We propose a ternary mixture model for the cell membrane that includes hybrid lipids which have one saturated and one unsaturated hydrocarbon chain. Finite amount of hybrid lipids reduces the packing incompatibility at the saturated/unsaturated lipid interface and stabilizes the concentration fluctuations. Hybrid-Hybrid interactions are included in the model and further increase the life-time of the rafts and decrease their length-scales. Moreover, the hybrid has extra orientational degrees of freedom that may lead to modulated phases.

  6. Does distant homology with Evf reveal a lipid binding site in Bacillus thuringiensis cytolytic toxins?

    PubMed

    Rigden, Daniel J

    2009-05-19

    The Cry and Cyt classes of insecticidal toxins derived from the sporulating bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis are valuable substitutes for synthetic pesticides in agricultural contexts. Crystal structures and many biochemical data have provided insights into their molecular mechanisms, generally thought to involve oligomerization and pore formation, but have not localised the site on Cyt toxins responsible for selective binding of phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids. Here, distant homology between the structure of Cyt toxins and Erwinia virulence factor (Evf) is demonstrated which, along with sequence conservation analysis, allows a putative lipid binding site to be localised in the toxins.

  7. Lipid Profiling and Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals a Functional Interplay between Estradiol and Growth Hormone in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; Santana-Farré, Ruymán; de Mirecki-Garrido, Mercedes; García, Irma; Guerra, Borja; Mateo-Díaz, Carlos; Iglesias-Gato, Diego; Díaz-Chico, Juan Carlos; Flores-Morales, Amilcar; Díaz, Mario

    2014-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) may interfere with endocrine, metabolic, and gender-differentiated functions in liver in both females and males. Indirect mechanisms play a crucial role because of the E2 influence on the pituitary GH secretion and the GHR-JAK2-STAT5 signaling pathway in the target tissues. E2, through its interaction with the estrogen receptor, exerts direct effects on liver. Hypothyroidism also affects endocrine and metabolic functions of the liver, rendering a metabolic phenotype with features that mimic deficiencies in E2 or GH. In this work, we combined the lipid and transcriptomic analysis to obtain comprehensive information on the molecular mechanisms of E2 effects, alone and in combination with GH, to regulate liver functions in males. We used the adult hypothyroid-orchidectomized rat model to minimize the influence of internal hormones on E2 treatment and to explore its role in male-differentiated functions. E2 influenced genes involved in metabolism of lipids and endo-xenobiotics, and the GH-regulated endocrine, metabolic, immune, and male-specific responses. E2 induced a female-pattern of gene expression and inhibited GH-regulated STAT5b targeted genes. E2 did not prevent the inhibitory effects of GH on urea and amino acid metabolism-related genes. The combination of E2 and GH decreased transcriptional immune responses. E2 decreased the hepatic content of saturated fatty acids and induced a transcriptional program that seems to be mediated by the activation of PPARα. In contrast, GH inhibited fatty acid oxidation. Both E2 and GH replacements reduced hepatic CHO levels and increased the formation of cholesterol esters and triacylglycerols. Notably, the hepatic lipid profiles were endowed with singular fingerprints that may be used to segregate the effects of different hormonal replacements. In summary, we provide in vivo evidence that E2 has a significant impact on lipid content and transcriptome in male liver and that E2 exerts a marked influence on

  8. Reconstruction of the lipid metabolism for the microalga Monoraphidium neglectum from its genome sequence reveals characteristics suitable for biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microalgae are gaining importance as sustainable production hosts in the fields of biotechnology and bioenergy. A robust biomass accumulating strain of the genus Monoraphidium (SAG 48.87) was investigated in this work as a potential feedstock for biofuel production. The genome was sequenced, annotated, and key enzymes for triacylglycerol formation were elucidated. Results Monoraphidium neglectum was identified as an oleaginous species with favourable growth characteristics as well as a high potential for crude oil production, based on neutral lipid contents of approximately 21% (dry weight) under nitrogen starvation, composed of predominantly C18:1 and C16:0 fatty acids. Further characterization revealed growth in a relatively wide pH range and salt concentrations of up to 1.0% NaCl, in which the cells exhibited larger structures. This first full genome sequencing of a member of the Selenastraceae revealed a diploid, approximately 68 Mbp genome with a G + C content of 64.7%. The circular chloroplast genome was assembled to a 135,362 bp single contig, containing 67 protein-coding genes. The assembly of the mitochondrial genome resulted in two contigs with an approximate total size of 94 kb, the largest known mitochondrial genome within algae. 16,761 protein-coding genes were assigned to the nuclear genome. Comparison of gene sets with respect to functional categories revealed a higher gene number assigned to the category “carbohydrate metabolic process” and in “fatty acid biosynthetic process” in M. neglectum when compared to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Nannochloropsis gaditana, indicating a higher metabolic diversity for applications in carbohydrate conversions of biotechnological relevance. Conclusions The genome of M. neglectum, as well as the metabolic reconstruction of crucial lipid pathways, provides new insights into the diversity of the lipid metabolism in microalgae. The results of this work provide a platform to encourage the

  9. Integrated systems biology analysis of KSHV latent infection reveals viral induction and reliance on peroxisome mediated lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sychev, Zoi E; Hu, Alex; DiMaio, Terri A; Gitter, Anthony; Camp, Nathan D; Noble, William S; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Lagunoff, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma associated Herpesvirus (KSHV), an oncogenic, human gamma-herpesvirus, is the etiological agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma the most common tumor of AIDS patients world-wide. KSHV is predominantly latent in the main KS tumor cell, the spindle cell, a cell of endothelial origin. KSHV modulates numerous host cell-signaling pathways to activate endothelial cells including major metabolic pathways involved in lipid metabolism. To identify the underlying cellular mechanisms of KSHV alteration of host signaling and endothelial cell activation, we identified changes in the host proteome, phosphoproteome and transcriptome landscape following KSHV infection of endothelial cells. A Steiner forest algorithm was used to integrate the global data sets and, together with transcriptome based predicted transcription factor activity, cellular networks altered by latent KSHV were predicted. Several interesting pathways were identified, including peroxisome biogenesis. To validate the predictions, we showed that KSHV latent infection increases the number of peroxisomes per cell. Additionally, proteins involved in peroxisomal lipid metabolism of very long chain fatty acids, including ABCD3 and ACOX1, are required for the survival of latently infected cells. In summary, novel cellular pathways altered during herpesvirus latency that could not be predicted by a single systems biology platform, were identified by integrated proteomics and transcriptomics data analysis and when correlated with our metabolomics data revealed that peroxisome lipid metabolism is essential for KSHV latent infection of endothelial cells.

  10. Metabonomics Reveals Drastic Changes in Anti-Inflammatory/Pro-Resolving Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids-Derived Lipid Mediators in Leprosy Disease

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Julio J.; Antunes, Luis Caetano M.; de Macedo, Cristiana S.; Mattos, Katherine A.; Han, Jun; Pan, Jingxi; Candéa, André L. P.; Henriques, Maria das Graças M. O.; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Borchers, Christoph H.; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Finlay, B. Brett; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts over the last decades, our understanding of leprosy pathogenesis remains limited. The complex interplay between pathogens and hosts has profound effects on host metabolism. To explore the metabolic perturbations associated with leprosy, we analyzed the serum metabolome of leprosy patients. Samples collected from lepromatous and tuberculoid patients before and immediately after the conclusion of multidrug therapy (MDT) were subjected to high-throughput metabolic profiling. Our results show marked metabolic alterations during leprosy that subside at the conclusion of MDT. Pathways showing the highest modulation were related to polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolism, with emphasis on anti-inflammatory, pro-resolving omega-3 fatty acids. These results were confirmed by eicosanoid measurements through enzyme-linked immunoassays. Corroborating the repertoire of metabolites altered in sera, metabonomic analysis of skin specimens revealed alterations in the levels of lipids derived from lipase activity, including PUFAs, suggesting a high lipid turnover in highly-infected lesions. Our data suggest that omega-6 and omega-3, PUFA-derived, pro-resolving lipid mediators contribute to reduced tissue damage irrespectively of pathogen burden during leprosy disease. Our results demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive metabonomic approach for identifying potential contributors to disease pathology that may facilitate the development of more targeted treatments for leprosy and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:23967366

  11. 1H NMR-based metabolic profiling reveals the effects of fluoxetine on lipid and amino acid metabolism in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shunjie; Zhou, Chanjuan; Cheng, Pengfei; Fu, Yuying; Fang, Liang; Huang, Wen; Yu, Jia; Shao, Weihua; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Meiling; Zhou, Jingjing; Xie, Peng

    2015-04-15

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is a prescribed and effective antidepressant and generally used for the treatment of depression. Previous studies have revealed that the antidepressant mechanism of fluoxetine was related to astrocytes. However, the therapeutic mechanism underlying its mode of action in astrocytes remains largely unclear. In this study, primary astrocytes were exposed to 10 µM fluoxetine; 24 h post-treatment, a high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR)-based metabolomic approach coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was used to characterize the metabolic variations of intracellular metabolites. The orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) score plots of the spectra demonstrated that the fluoxetine-treated astrocytes were significantly distinguished from the untreated controls. In total, 17 differential metabolites were identified to discriminate the two groups. These key metabolites were mainly involved in lipids, lipid metabolism-related molecules and amino acids. This is the first study to indicate that fluoxetine may exert antidepressant action by regulating the astrocyte's lipid and amino acid metabolism. These findings should aid our understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying fluoxetine therapy.

  12. Integrated systems biology analysis of KSHV latent infection reveals viral induction and reliance on peroxisome mediated lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sychev, Zoi E.; Hu, Alex; Lagunoff, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi’s Sarcoma associated Herpesvirus (KSHV), an oncogenic, human gamma-herpesvirus, is the etiological agent of Kaposi’s Sarcoma the most common tumor of AIDS patients world-wide. KSHV is predominantly latent in the main KS tumor cell, the spindle cell, a cell of endothelial origin. KSHV modulates numerous host cell-signaling pathways to activate endothelial cells including major metabolic pathways involved in lipid metabolism. To identify the underlying cellular mechanisms of KSHV alteration of host signaling and endothelial cell activation, we identified changes in the host proteome, phosphoproteome and transcriptome landscape following KSHV infection of endothelial cells. A Steiner forest algorithm was used to integrate the global data sets and, together with transcriptome based predicted transcription factor activity, cellular networks altered by latent KSHV were predicted. Several interesting pathways were identified, including peroxisome biogenesis. To validate the predictions, we showed that KSHV latent infection increases the number of peroxisomes per cell. Additionally, proteins involved in peroxisomal lipid metabolism of very long chain fatty acids, including ABCD3 and ACOX1, are required for the survival of latently infected cells. In summary, novel cellular pathways altered during herpesvirus latency that could not be predicted by a single systems biology platform, were identified by integrated proteomics and transcriptomics data analysis and when correlated with our metabolomics data revealed that peroxisome lipid metabolism is essential for KSHV latent infection of endothelial cells. PMID:28257516

  13. Metabolomics of reef benthic interactions reveals a bioactive lipid involved in coral defence

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Hartmann, Aaron C.; Galtier d'Auriac, Ines; Benler, Sean; Haas, Andreas; Quistad, Steven D.; Lim, Yan Wei; Little, Mark; Sandin, Stuart; Smith, Jennifer E.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-01-01

    Holobionts are assemblages of microbial symbionts and their macrobial host. As extant representatives of some of the oldest macro-organisms, corals and algae are important for understanding how holobionts develop and interact with one another. Using untargeted metabolomics, we show that non-self interactions altered the coral metabolome more than self-interactions (i.e. different or same genus, respectively). Platelet activating factor (PAF) and Lyso-PAF, central inflammatory modulators in mammals, were major lipid components of the coral holobionts. When corals were damaged during competitive interactions with algae, PAF increased along with expression of the gene encoding Lyso-PAF acetyltransferase; the protein responsible for converting Lyso-PAF to PAF. This shows that self and non-self recognition among some of the oldest extant holobionts involve bioactive lipids identical to those in highly derived taxa like humans. This further strengthens the hypothesis that major players of the immune response evolved during the pre-Cambrian. PMID:27122568

  14. Organization and Dynamics of Fas Transmembrane Domain in Raft Membranes and Modulation by Ceramide

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Bruno M.; de Almeida, Rodrigo F.M.; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Fedorov, Aleksander; Prieto, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    To comprehend the molecular processes that lead to the Fas death receptor clustering in lipid rafts, a 21-mer peptide corresponding to its single transmembrane domain (TMD) was reconstituted into mammalian raft model membranes composed of an unsaturated glycerophospholipid, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol. The peptide membrane lateral organization and dynamics, and its influence on membrane properties, were studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques and by attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Our results show that Fas TMD is preferentially localized in liquid-disordered membrane regions and undergoes a strong reorganization as the membrane composition is changed toward the liquid-ordered phase. This results from the strong hydrophobic mismatch between the length of the peptide hydrophobic stretch and the hydrophobic thickness of liquid-ordered membranes. The stability of nonclustered Fas TMD in liquid-disordered domains suggests that its sequence may have a protective function against nonligand-induced Fas clustering in lipid rafts. It has been reported that ceramide induces Fas oligomerization in lipid rafts. Here, it is shown that neither Fas TMD membrane organization nor its conformation is affected by ceramide. These results are discussed within the framework of Fas membrane signaling events. PMID:21961589

  15. Colorado Outward Bound School Rafting Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Al

    River rafting trips at the Colorado Outward Bound School (COBS) present participants with an opportunity for developing self-confidence, self-awareness, and concern for others through challenging and adventuresome group effort, combined with a program of instruction in rafting skills, safety consciousness, and awareness of the natural environment.…

  16. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  17. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP b