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Sample records for lipidic alpha-amino acids

  1. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W.

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceeding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 12 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  2. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W.

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the snythesis methods of the prior art.

  3. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W.

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 12 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  4. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J.W. Jr.

    1983-01-25

    A method is described for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceeding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(OSOCl)CN, R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(Cl)CN and [R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(CN)O][sub 2]SO wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art. No Drawings

  5. How to build optically active alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Calmes, M; Daunis, J

    1999-01-01

    Various methodologies published in the literature dealing with alpha-amino carboxylic acid asymmetric synthesis are presented in a digest form. In each case, only some recent or most typical works are mentioned.

  6. An efficient preparation of N-methyl-alpha-amino acids from N-nosyl-alpha-amino acid phenacyl esters.

    PubMed

    Leggio, Antonella; Belsito, Emilia Lucia; De Marco, Rosaria; Liguori, Angelo; Perri, Francesca; Viscomi, Maria Caterina

    2010-03-05

    In this paper we describe a simple and efficient solution-phase synthesis of N-methyl-N-nosyl-alpha-amino acids and N-Fmoc-N-methyl-alpha-amino acids. This represents a very important application in peptide synthesis to obtain N-methylated peptides in both solution and solid phase. The developed methodology involves the use of N-nosyl-alpha-amino acids with the carboxyl function protected as a phenacyl ester and the methylating reagent diazomethane. An important aspect of this synthetic strategy is the possibility to selectively deprotect the carboxyl function or alternatively both amino and carboxyl moieties by using the same reagent with a different molar excess and under mild conditions. Furthermore, the adopted procedure keeps unchanged the acid-sensitive side chain protecting groups used in Fmoc-based synthetic strategies.

  7. ANTIGENICITY OF POLYPEPTIDES (POLY ALPHA AMINO ACIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Pinchuck, Paul; Maurer, Paul H.

    1965-01-01

    The response of mice to synthetic linear polypeptides of known composition but random sequence has been studied. Neither Swiss mice nor a number of inbred strains could respond to copolymers of only 2 amino acids (G60L40, G60A40, G90T10). Upon introduction of as little as 4 mole per cent of a third amino acid, good immune responses were obtained, regardless of the nature of the third amino acid. The level of the immune response to a series of glu-lys-ala polymers increased with increasing alanine content of the polymer. PMID:5849232

  8. ANTIGENICITY OF POLYPEPTIDES (POLY ALPHA AMINO ACIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Paul H.; Gerulat, Bernard F.; Pinchuck, Paul

    1964-01-01

    A new group of synthetic random polymers of α-L-amino acids has been studied for immunogenicity. With the glutamic acid and alanine copolymers, those consisting of almost equimolar amounts of the two (G60A40 and G40A60) were effective antigens in rabbits whereas those with higher glutamic acid contents (G75A25, G90A10) were poor antigens. The substitution of alanine by valine or leucine (G75V25 and G80Leu20) produced copolymers which were poor antigens in rabbits but effective in guinea pigs. L70A30, although capable of "non-specifically" precipitating serum proteins, was shown not to be antigenic in either rabbits or guinea pigs. The introduction of alanine into glutamic acid and lysine polymers (GLA series) enhanced the immunogenicity of the terpolymers, i.e., GLA30 > GLA20 > GLA10 > GL. The mechanism by which this may be accomplished is discussed as possibly being related to the reduction of the interactions between glutamyl and lysyl residues which allows the carboxyl groups to act as strong immunogenic determinants. PMID:14176288

  9. Soluble polymer supported synthesis of alpha-amino acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sauvagnat, B; Kulig, K; Lamaty, F; Lazaro, R; Martinez, J

    2000-01-01

    A Schiff base activated glycine supported on a soluble polymer (poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)) was readily alkylated with a wide variety of electrophiles in the presence of a carbonate base in acetonitrile. The presence of the polymer provided a phase-transfer catalysis environment which accelerated the reaction. Effects of various carbonate bases and leaving groups have been also studied. Completion of the PEG-supported reaction was obtained without using a large excess of reagents or an extra phase-transfer catalyst, even in the case of unreactive or hindered electrophiles. After cleavage from the polymer, alpha-amino esters are obtained in good yields.

  10. N-carbamoyl-alpha-amino acids rather than free alpha-amino acids formation in the primitive hydrosphere: a novel proposal for the emergence of prebiotic peptides.

    PubMed

    Taillades, J; Beuzelin, I; Garrel, L; Tabacik, V; Bied, C; Commeyras, A

    1998-02-01

    Our previous kinetic and thermodynamic studies upon the reactional system HCHO/HCN/NH3 in aqueous solutions are completed. In the assumed prebiotic conditions of the primitive earth ([HCHO] and [HCN] near 1 g L-1, T = 25 degrees C, pH = 8, [NH3] very low), this system leads to 99.9% of alpha-hydroxyacetonitrile and 0.1% of alpha-aminoacetonitrile (precursor of the alpha-amino acid). The classical base-catalyzed hydration of nitriles, slow and not selective, can not modify significantly this proportion. On the contrary, we found two specific and efficient reactions of alpha-aminonitriles which shift the initial equilibrium in favor of the alpha-aminonitrile pathway. The first reaction catalyzed by formaldehyde generates alpha-aminoamides, precursors of alpha-aminoacids. The second reaction catalyzed by carbon dioxide affords hydantoins, precursors of N-carbamoyl-alpha-aminoacids. In the primitive hydrosphere, where the concentration in carbon dioxide was estimated to be higher than that of formaldehyde, the formation of hydantoins was consequently more efficient. The rates of hydrolysis of the alpha-aminoacetamide and of the hydantoin at pH 8 being very similar, the synthesis of the N-carbamoyl-alpha-amino acid seems then to be the fatal issue of the HCHO/HCN/NH3 system that nature used to perform its evolution. These N-protected alpha-amino acids offer new perspectives in prebiotic chemistry, in particular for the emergence of peptides on the prebiotic earth.

  11. An Ireland-Claisen approach to beta-alkoxy alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Tellam, James P; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Carbery, David R

    2008-11-20

    A diastereoselective Ireland-Claisen approach to beta-alkoxy alpha-amino acid esters is reported. Amino acid esters of enol ethereal allylic alcohols undergo facile syn-selective [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement via silyl ketene acetals. Substrate synthesis, rearrangement development, stereoselectivity, and product elaboration are discussed.

  12. Using enantioselective indicator displacement assays to determine the enantiomeric excess of alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Leung, Diana; Folmer-Andersen, J Frantz; Lynch, Vincent M; Anslyn, Eric V

    2008-09-17

    Enantioselective indicator displacement assays (eIDAs) were used for the determination of enantiomeric excess (ee) of alpha-amino acids as an alternative to the labor-intensive technique of chromatography. In this study, eIDAs were implemented by the use of two chiral receptors [(Cu(II)(1)](2+), [Cu(II)(2)](2+)) in conjunction with the indicator chrome azurol S. The two receptors were able to enantioselectively discriminate 13 of the 17 analyzed alpha-amino acids. Enantiomeric excess calibration curves were made using both receptors and then used to analyze true test samples to check the system's ability to determine ee accurately. The proposed method uses a conventional UV-vis spectrophotometer to monitor the colorimetric signal, which allows for a potential high-throughput screening (HTS) method for determining ee. The techniques created consistently produced results accurate enough for rapid preliminary determination of ee.

  13. An easy entry to optically active alpha-amino phosphonic acid derivatives using phase-transfer catalysis (PTC).

    PubMed

    Fini, Francesco; Micheletti, Gabriele; Bernardi, Luca; Pettersen, Daniel; Fochi, Mariafrancesca; Ricci, Alfredo

    2008-09-28

    The unprecedented use of phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) in an asymmetric hydrophosphonylation reaction allows the obtainment of a range of optically active alpha-amino phosphonic acid derivatives directly from alpha-amido sulfones.

  14. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. III - Seven carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, John R.; Pizzarello, Sandra

    1986-01-01

    All of the eighteen possible seven-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids have been positively identified in a hot-water extract of the Murchison meteorite by the combined use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase chromatography. None of these amino acids has previously been found in meteorites or in any other natural material. They range in concentration from less than or equal to 0.5 to 5.3 nmol/g. Configuration assignments were made for 2-amino-3,4-dimethylpentanoic acid and allo-2-amino-3,4-dimethylpentanoic acid and the diasteromer ratio was determined. Fifty-five amino acids have now been positively identified in the Murchison meteorite, 36 of which are unknown in terrestrial materials. This unique suite of amino acids is characterized by the occurrence of all structural isomers within the two major classes of amino acids represented, by the predominance of branched chain isomers, and by an exponential decline in amount with increasing carbon chain length within homologous series. These characteristics of the Murchison amino acids are suggestive of synthesis before incorporation into a parent body.

  15. Synthesis and transformations of a pyrazole containing alpha, beta-didehydro-alpha-amino acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Vranicar, L; Pozgan, F; Polanc, S; Kocevar, M

    2003-04-01

    2H-Pyran-2-ones 1 were transformed with various hydrazines into (E)- or (Z)-alpha, beta-didehydro-alpha-amino acid (DDAA) derivatives 4 (and 7) containing a highly substituted pyrazolyl moiety attached at the beta-position. With heterocyclic hydrazines, the products 4 were accompanied also by decarboxylated enamines E-6. In order to separate (E/Z)-mixtures of acids, they were transformed to the corresponding methyl esters 9 and 10 by the application of diazomethane. Catalytic hydrogenation under high pressures with Pd/C as a catalyst resulted in the formation of racemic alanine derivatives 11.

  16. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. I - Six carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Gandy, W. E.; Pizzarello, S.

    1981-01-01

    Six of the seven chain isomers of six-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids (leucine isomers) have been either identified or confirmed in hot-water extracts of the Murchison meteorite using combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion exchange chromatography. 2-Amino-2-ethylbutyric acid, 2-amino-2,3-dimethylbutyric acid, pseudoleucine, and 2-methylnorvaline were positively identified by GC-MS. These amino acids have not been previously reported to occur in natural materials and may be uniquely meteoritic in origin. The presence of leucine and isoleucine (including the diastereoisomer, alloisoleucine) was confirmed. Peaks corresponding to norleucine were seen by ion-exchange and gas chromatography but characteristic mass spectra were not obtained. The alpha-branched chain isomers in this series are quantitatively the most significant. These results are compared with literature data on amino acid synthesis by electrical discharge and Fischer-Tropsch-type catalysis. Neither model system produces an amino acid suite that is completely comparable to that found in the Murchison meteorite.

  17. Molecular Basis of Prodrug Activation by Human Valacyclovirase, an [alpha]-Amino Acid Ester Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Longsheng; Xu, Zhaohui; Zhou, Jiahai; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2008-07-08

    Chemical modification to improve biopharmaceutical properties, especially oral absorption and bioavailability, is a common strategy employed by pharmaceutical chemists. The approach often employs a simple structural modification and utilizes ubiquitous endogenous esterases as activation enzymes, although such enzymes are often unidentified. This report describes the crystal structure and specificity of a novel activating enzyme for valacyclovir and valganciclovir. Our structural insights show that human valacyclovirase has a unique binding mode and specificity for amino acid esters. Biochemical data demonstrate that the enzyme hydrolyzes esters of {alpha}-amino acids exclusively and displays a broad specificity spectrum for the aminoacyl moiety similar to tricorn-interacting aminopeptidase F1. Crystal structures of the enzyme, two mechanistic mutants, and a complex with a product analogue, when combined with biochemical analysis, reveal the key determinants for substrate recognition; that is, a flexible and mostly hydrophobic acyl pocket, a localized negative electrostatic potential, a large open leaving group-accommodating groove, and a pivotal acidic residue, Asp-123, after the nucleophile Ser-122. This is the first time that a residue immediately after the nucleophile has been found to have its side chain directed into the substrate binding pocket and play an essential role in substrate discrimination in serine hydrolases. These results as well as a phylogenetic analysis establish that the enzyme functions as a specific {alpha}-amino acid ester hydrolase. Valacyclovirase is a valuable target for amino acid ester prodrug-based oral drug delivery enhancement strategies.

  18. Kinetics and mechanisms of activation of alpha-amino acid ester prodrugs of camptothecins.

    PubMed

    Song, Lin; Bevins, Robert; Anderson, Bradley D

    2006-07-13

    The alpha-amino acid ester prodrugs of the antitumor agent camptothecin and a more potent, lipophilic silatecan analogue, DB-67, have been shown by NMR spectroscopy and quantitative kinetic analyses to undergo quantitative conversion to their pharmacologically active lactones via a nonenzymatic mechanism that at pH 7.4 is favored over direct hydrolysis. The alternate pathway involves the reversible intramolecular nucleophilic amine attack at the camptothecin E-ring carbonyl to generate a lactam (I) followed by a second intramolecular reaction to produce a bicyclic hemiortho ester (I'). The intermediates were isolated and shown to exist in an apparent equilibrium dominated by the hemiortho ester in DMSO using NMR spectroscopy. The conversion of prodrugs of camptothecin or DB-67 containing either alpha-NH(2) or alpha-NHCH(3) and their corresponding hemiortho esters were monitored versus time in aqueous buffer (pH 3.0 and 7.4) at 37 degrees C, and the kinetic data were fit to a model based on the proposed mechanism. The results indicated that while the prodrugs are relatively stable at pH 3, facile lactone release occurs from both the prodrugs and their corresponding hemiortho ester intermediates under physiological conditions (pH 7.4). The glycinate esters and their hemiortho esters were found to be more cytotoxic than the N-methylglycinates or their corresponding hemiortho ester intermediates in vitro using a human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-435S), consistent with their more rapid conversion to active lactone. The pH dependence of the nonenzymatic pathway for conversion of these alpha-amino acid ester prodrugs suggests that they may be useful for tumor-targeting via liposomes, as they can be stabilized in an acidic environment in the core of liposomes and readily convert to the active lactone following their intratumoral release.

  19. Saponification of esters of chiral alpha-amino acids anchored through their amine function on solid support.

    PubMed

    Cantel, Sonia; Desgranges, Stéphane; Martinez, Jean; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain

    2004-06-01

    Anchoring an alpha-amino acid residue by its amine function onto a solid support is an alternative to develop chemistry on its carboxylic function. This strategy can involve the use of amino-acid esters as precursors of the carboxylic function. A complete study on the Wang-resin was performed to determine the non racemizing saponification conditions of anchored alpha-amino esters. The use of LiOH, NaOH, NaOSi(Me)3, various solvents and temperatures were tested for this reaction. After saponification and cleavage from the support, samples were examined through their Marfey's derivatives by reversed phase HPLC to evaluate the percentage of racemization.

  20. Protein design with L- and D-alpha-amino acid structures as the alphabet.

    PubMed

    Durani, Susheel

    2008-10-01

    Summarizing the implications of homochiral structures in interpeptide interactions, not only in the topology but also possibly in the physics of protein folding, this Account provides an overview of the concept of shape-specific protein design using D- and L-(alpha)amino acid structures as the alphabet. The molecular shapes accessible in de novo protein design are stereochemically defined. Indeed, the defining consideration for shape specificity in proteins to be alpha-helix/beta-sheet composites is the L configuration of the alpha-amino acid structures. The stereospecificity in shapes implies that protein shapes may be diversifiable stereochemically, that is, designable de novo, using D and L structures as the alphabet. Indeed, augmented with D enantiomers, Nature's alphabet will expand greatly in the diversity of polypeptide stereoisomers, for example, from 1(30) to 2(30)--that is, from one to ca. one billion--for a modestly sized 30-residue polypeptide. Furthermore, with each isomer having conformers stereospecific to its structure, molecular folds of specific shapes may be approachable sequentially when D and L structures are used as the alphabet. Illustrating the promise, 14-20-residue bracelet-, boat-, canoe-, and cup-shaped molecular folds were designed stereochemically or implemented as specific sequence plans in the D- and L-alpha-amino acid alphabet. In practical terms, canonical poly-L peptide folds were modified to the desired shapes via stereochemical mutations invoking enantiomer symmetries in the Ramachandran phi,psi space as the logic. For example, in designing the boat-shaped fold, the canonical beta-hairpin was reengineered in its flat planar structure via multiple coordinated L-to-D mutations in its position specific cross-strand neighbor residues, upturning its ends enclosing six side chains in a molecular cleft. While affirming the generality of the approach, the 20-residue molecular canoe and the 14-residue molecular cup are also presented as

  1. Estrogen dissociates Tau and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor subunit in postischemic hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Gómez, Gloria Patricia; Arango-Davila, Cesar; Gallego-Gómez, Juan Carlos; Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Pimienta, Hernan; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel

    2006-08-21

    During cerebral ischemia, part of the damage associated with the hyperactivation of glutamate receptors results from the hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau. Previous studies have shown that estradiol treatment reduces neural damage after cerebral ischemia. Here, we show that transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery results in the hyperphosphorylation of Tau and in a significant increase in the association of Tau with glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid type glutamate receptor subunits 2/3 in the hippocampus. Estradiol treatment decreased hippocampal injury, inhibited glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and decreased the hyperphosphorylation of Tau and the interaction of Tau with glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor. These findings suggest that ischemia produces a strong association between Tau and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor, and estradiol can exert at least part of its neuroprotective activity through inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta.

  2. Surface active molecules: preparation and properties of long chain n-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Infante, R; Dominguez, J G; Erra, P; Julia, R; Prats, M

    1984-12-01

    Synopsis A new route for the synthesis of long chain N(alpha)-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guamdine alkyl acid derivatives, with cationic or amphoteric character has been established. The general formula of these compounds is shown below. A physico-chemical and antimicrobial study of these products as a function of the alkyl ester or sodium salt (R), the straight chain length of the fatty acid residue (x) and the number of carbons between the omega-guanidine and omega-carboxyl group (n) has been investigated. The water solubility, surface tension, critical micelle concentration (c.m.c.) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (including Pseudomonas) has been determined. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide has been used to condense fatty acids and alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acids. In these conditions protection of the omega-guanidine group is not necessary. The main characteristic of this synthetic procedure is the use of very mild experimental conditions (temperature, pH) to form the amide linkage which leads to pure optical compounds in high yield in the absence of electrolytes. The results show that some structural modifications, particularly the protection of the carboxyl group, promote variations of the surfactant and antimicrobial properties. Only those molecules with the blocked carboxyl group (cationic molecules, where R = Me, Et or Pr) showed a good surfactant and antimicrobial activity. When the carboxyl group was unprotected (amphoteric molecules, where R = Na(+)) the resulting compounds were inactive.

  3. Enantioseparation of N-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl alpha-amino acids on polysaccharide-derived chiral stationary phases by reverse mode liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Ah; Yeo, Sujeong; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Lee, Wonjae; Kang, Jong Seong

    2008-04-14

    The enantioseparation of N-protected fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (N-FMOC) alpha-amino acids was carried out on three polysaccharide-derived chiral stationary phases, such as cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) (Chiralcel OD), amylose tris(3,5-dimethyl-phenylcarbamate) (Chiralpak AD) and cellulose tris(4-methylbenzoate) (Chiralcel OJ), and the influence of acetonitrile composition and pH of the eluents on the enantioseparation in reverse mode chromatography was examined. The best separation of the enantiomers was achieved with 40% acetonitrile in 50mM phosphate buffer at pH 2. However, increasing the composition of acetonitrile to 50% on Chiralcel OD yielded a considerable decrease of retention time with minimum loss of resolution. The elution order of N-FMOC alpha-amino acid enantiomers on Chiralcel OD and OJ were quite different, indicating that both phases could be used in a complementary manner for the separation of the enantiomers of N-FMOC alpha-amino acids. The positive relationship between the capacity factor of N-FMOC alpha-amino acids and the hydrophobicity of amino acids indicated that hydrophobicity plays an important role on the retention of the N-FMOC alpha-amino acids in the reverse mode.

  4. alpha-Hydroxy and alpha-amino acids under possible Hadean, volcanic origin-of-life conditions.

    PubMed

    Huber, Claudia; Wächtershäuser, Günter

    2006-10-27

    To test the theory of a chemoautotrophic origin of life in a volcanic, hydrothermal setting, we explored mechanisms for the buildup of bio-organic compounds by carbon fixation on catalytic transition metal precipitates. We report the carbon monoxide-dependent formation of carbon-fixation products, including an ordered series of alpha-hydroxy and alpha-amino acids of the general formula R-CHA-COOH (where R is H, CH3,C2H5,orHOCH2 and A is OH or NH2) by carbon fixation at 80 degrees to 120 degrees C, catalyzed by nickel or nickel,iron precipitates with carbonyl, cyano, and methylthio ligands as carbon sources, with or without sulfido ligands. Calcium or magnesium hydroxide was added as a pH buffer. The results narrow the gap between biochemistry and volcanic geochemistry and open a new gateway for the exploration of a volcanic, hydrothermal origin of life.

  5. PfEMP1-DBL1alpha amino acid motifs in severe disease states of Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Normark, Johan; Nilsson, Daniel; Ribacke, Ulf; Winter, Gerhard; Moll, Kirsten; Wheelock, Craig E; Bayarugaba, Justus; Kironde, Fred; Egwang, Thomas G; Chen, Qijun; Andersson, Björn; Wahlgren, Mats

    2007-10-02

    An infection with Plasmodium falciparum may lead to severe malaria as a result of excessive binding of infected erythrocytes in the microvasculature. Vascular adhesion is mediated by P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein-1 (PfEMP1), which is encoded for by highly polymorphic members of the var-gene family. Here, we profile var gene transcription in fresh P. falciparum trophozoites from Ugandan children with malaria through var-specific DBL1alpha-PCR amplification and sequencing. A method for subsectioning region alignments into homology areas (MOTIFF) was developed to examine collected sequences. Specific PfEMP1-DBL1alpha amino acid motifs correlated with rosetting and severe malaria, with motif location corresponding to distinct regions of receptor interaction. The method is potentially applicable to other families of variant proteins and may be useful in identifying sequence-phenotype relationships. The results suggest that certain PfEMP1 sequences are predisposed to inducing severe malaria.

  6. Efficient synthesis of 1-azadienes derived from alpha-aminoesters. Regioselective preparation of alpha-dehydroamino acids, vinylglycines, and alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Francisco; Vicario, Javier; Aparicio, Domitila

    2006-09-29

    An efficient synthesis of 1-azadienes derived from alpha-aminoesters is achieved through an aza-Wittig reaction of phosphazenes with beta,gamma-unsaturated alpha-ketoesters. Regioselective 1,2-reduction of these functionalized 1-azadienes affords vinylglycine derivatives, while conjugative 1,4-reduction gives alpha-dehydroamino acid compounds. Reduction of both the carbon-carbon and the imine-carbon-nitrogen double bonds leads to the formation of alpha-amino acid derivatives.

  7. Cloning, sequence analysis, and expression in Escherichia coli of the gene encoding an alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase from Acetobacter turbidans.

    PubMed

    Polderman-Tijmes, Jolanda J; Jekel, Peter A; de Vries, Erik J; van Merode, Annet E J; Floris, René; van der Laan, Jan-Metske; Sonke, Theo; Janssen, Dick B

    2002-01-01

    The alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase from Acetobacter turbidans ATCC 9325 is capable of hydrolyzing and synthesizing beta-lactam antibiotics, such as cephalexin and ampicillin. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the purified alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase allowed cloning and genetic characterization of the corresponding gene from an A. turbidans genomic library. The gene, designated aehA, encodes a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 72,000. Comparison of the determined N-terminal sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence indicated the presence of an N-terminal leader sequence of 40 amino acids. The aehA gene was subcloned in the pET9 expression plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and found to be dimeric with subunits of 70 kDa. A sequence similarity search revealed 26% identity with a glutaryl 7-ACA acylase precursor from Bacillus laterosporus, but no homology was found with other known penicillin or cephalosporin acylases. There was some similarity to serine proteases, including the conservation of the active site motif, GXSYXG. Together with database searches, this suggested that the alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase is a beta-lactam antibiotic acylase that belongs to a class of hydrolases that is different from the Ntn hydrolase superfamily to which the well-characterized penicillin acylase from E. coli belongs. The alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase of A. turbidans represents a subclass of this new class of beta-lactam antibiotic acylases.

  8. Partial molar volumes of some alpha-amino acids in aqueous sodium acetate solutions at 308.15 K.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Yan, Z; Zhuo, K; Lu, J

    1999-08-30

    The apparent molar volumes V(2,phi) have been determined for glycine, DL-alpha-alanine, DL-alpha-amino-n-butyric acid, DL-valine and DL-leucine in aqueous solutions of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mol kg(-1) sodium acetate by density measurements at 308.15 K. These data have been used to derive the infinite dilution apparent molar volumes V(0)(2,phi) for the amino acids in aqueous sodium acetate solutions and the standard volumes of transfer, Delta(t)V(0), of the amino acids from water to aqueous sodium acetate solutions. It has been observed that both V(0)(2,phi) and Delta(t)V(0) vary linearly with increasing number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain of the amino acids. These linear correlations have been utilized to estimate the contributions of the charged end groups (NH(3)(+), COO(-)), CH(2) group and other alkyl chains of the amino acids to V(0)(2,phi) and Delta(t)V(0). The results show that V(0)(2,phi) values for (NH(3)(+), COO(-)) groups increase with sodium acetate concentration, and those for CH(2) are almost constant over the studied sodium acetate concentration range. The transfer volume increases and the hydration number of the amino acids decreases with increasing electrolyte concentrations. These facts indicate that strong interactions occur between the ions of sodium acetate and the charged centers of the amino acids. The volumetric interaction parameters of the amino acids with sodium acetate were calculated in water. The pair interaction parameters are found to be positive and decreased with increasing alkyl chain length of the amino acids, suggesting that sodium acetate has a stronger dehydration effect on amino acids which have longer hydrophobic alkyl chains. These phenomena are discussed by means of the co-sphere overlap model.

  9. Enantiomerically pure trans-beta-lactams from alpha-amino acids via compact fluorescent light (CFL) continuous-flow photolysis.

    PubMed

    Vaske, Yvette S Mimieux; Mahoney, Maximillian E; Konopelski, Joseph P; Rogow, David L; McDonald, William J

    2010-08-18

    Photolysis of alpha-diazo-N-methoxy-N-methyl (Weinreb) beta-ketoamides derived from enantiomerically pure (EP) alpha-amino acids affords the corresponding EP beta-lactams via an intramolecular Wolff rearrangement. The photochemistry is promoted with either standard UV irradiation or through the use of a 100 W compact fluorescent light; the latter affords a safe and environmentally friendly alternative to standard photolysis conditions. A continuous-flow photochemical reactor made from inexpensive laboratory equipment reduced reaction times and was amenable to scale-up. The diastereoselectivity (cis or trans) of the product beta-lactams has been shown to vary from modest to nearly complete. An extremely facile, atom-economical method for the epimerization of the product mixture to the trans isomer, which is generally highly crystalline, has been developed. Evidence for C3 epimerization of Weinreb amide structures via a nonbasic, purely thermal route is presented. Subsequent transformations of both the Weinreb amide at C3 (beta-lactam numbering) and the amino acid side chain at C4 are well-tolerated, allowing for a versatile approach to diverse beta-lactam structures. The technology is showcased in the synthesis of a common intermediate used toward several carbapenem-derived structures starting from unfunctionalized aspartic acid.

  10. Use of Sm(III)-{1,2-propanediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetra(alpha,alpha-dideuterioacetate)} complex for NMR determination of absolute configuration of each alpha-amino acid in peptide hydrolysate mixtures.

    PubMed

    Omata, Kenji; Fujioka, Mika; Kabuto, Kuninobu; Sasaki, Yoichi

    2008-10-28

    (1)H NMR analyses of individual alpha-amino acids in their mixture were simultaneously conducted in the presence of Sm-(pdta-d(8)) in water: high regularity, promising for direct simultaneous determination of absolute configurations of each alpha-amino acids in peptide hydrolysate mixtures, was observed between absolute configuration and the induced shifts.

  11. Polymerization on the rocks: negatively-charged alpha-amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. R. Jr; Bohler, C.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Oligomers of the negatively-charged amino acids, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and O-phospho-L-serine are adsorbed by hydroxylapatite and illite with affinities that increase with oligomer length. In the case of oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite, addition of an extra residue results in an approximately four-fold increase in the strength of adsorption. Oligomers much longer than the 7-mer are retained tenaciously by the mineral. Repeated incubation of short oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite or illite with activated monomer leads to the accumulation of oligomers at least 45 units long. The corresponding reactions of aspartic acid and O-phospho-L-serine on hydroxylapatite are less effective in generating long oligomers, while illite fails to accumulate substantial amounts of long oligomers of aspartic acid or of O-phospho-L-serine.

  12. Polymerization on the rocks: negatively-charged alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hill, A R; Böhler, C; Orgel, L E

    1998-06-01

    Oligomers of the negatively-charged amino acids, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and O-phospho-L-serine are adsorbed by hydroxylapatite and illite with affinities that increase with oligomer length. In the case of oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite, addition of an extra residue results in an approximately four-fold increase in the strength of adsorption. Oligomers much longer than the 7-mer are retained tenaciously by the mineral. Repeated incubation of short oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite or illite with activated monomer leads to the accumulation of oligomers at least 45 units long. The corresponding reactions of aspartic acid and O-phospho-L-serine on hydroxylapatite are less effective in generating long oligomers, while illite fails to accumulate substantial amounts of long oligomers of aspartic acid or of O-phospho-L-serine.

  13. Polymerization on the rocks: negatively-charged alpha-amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. R. Jr; Bohler, C.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Oligomers of the negatively-charged amino acids, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and O-phospho-L-serine are adsorbed by hydroxylapatite and illite with affinities that increase with oligomer length. In the case of oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite, addition of an extra residue results in an approximately four-fold increase in the strength of adsorption. Oligomers much longer than the 7-mer are retained tenaciously by the mineral. Repeated incubation of short oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite or illite with activated monomer leads to the accumulation of oligomers at least 45 units long. The corresponding reactions of aspartic acid and O-phospho-L-serine on hydroxylapatite are less effective in generating long oligomers, while illite fails to accumulate substantial amounts of long oligomers of aspartic acid or of O-phospho-L-serine.

  14. One pot, rapid and efficient synthesis of water dispersible gold nanoparticles using alpha-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangoo, Nishima; Kaur, Sarabjit; Bajaj, Manish; Jain, D. V. S.; Sharma, Rohit K.

    2014-10-01

    A detailed study on the synthesis of spherical and monodispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using all of the 20 naturally occurring α-amino acids has been reported. The synthesized nanoparticles have been further characterized using various techniques such as absorbance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance. Size control of the nanoparticles has been achieved by varying the ratio of the gold ion to the amino acid. These monodispersed water soluble AuNPs synthesized using non-toxic, naturally occurring α-amino acids as reducing and capping/stabilizing agents serve as a remarkable example of green chemistry.

  15. An NMR and ab initio quantum chemical study of acid-base equilibria for conformationally constrained acidic alpha-amino acids in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P A; Jaroszewski, J W; Norrby, P O; Liljefors, T

    2001-03-07

    The protonation states of a series of piperidinedicarboxylic acids (PDAs), which are conformationally constrained acidic alpha-amino acids, have been studied by (13)C NMR titration in water. The resulting data have been correlated with theoretical results obtained by HF/6-31+G calculations using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for the description of water. The PDAs are highly ionizable and contain one or two possible internal hydrogen bonds. In the present study, we show that the PCM model is able to reproduce the relative stabilities of the different protonation states of the PDAs. Furthermore, our results show that prediction of relative pK(a) values for two different types of ionizable functional groups covering a pK(a) range from 1.6 to 12.1 is possible with a high degree of accuracy.

  16. Novel solid-phase synthesis of thiol-terminated-poly(alpha-amino acid)-drug conjugate.

    PubMed

    Palacios, P; Bussat, P; Bichon, D

    1991-01-01

    A new method using a controlled pore glass solid support for the preparation of a thiol-terminated-polymerdrug, notably poly-L-glutamate-daunomycin having a terminal thiol group, is described. The method consists of first polymerizing an ester-protected glutamic acid onto an amino-disulfide functionalized controlled pore glass support. The ester protecting group is then removed, freeing the gamma-carboxyl groups of the grafted polymer which then allows it to react with daunomycin. Finally, the disulfide bond linking the conjugated polymer-drug to the solid support is broken by thiolysis, thus releasing the desired product. The final product consists of only polymer-drug conjugates with terminal thiol groups (global yield 26%). This novel method is much simpler and more elegant than more conventional preparation methods requiring solution phase techniques.

  17. Thyroid receptor ligands. Part 8: Thyromimetics derived from N-acylated-alpha-amino acid derivatives displaying modulated pharmacological selectivity compared with KB-141.

    PubMed

    Garg, Neeraj; Li, Yi-Lin; Garcia Collazo, Ana Maria; Litten, Chris; Ryono, Denis E; Zhang, Minsheng; Caringal, Yolanda; Brigance, Robert P; Meng, Wei; Washburn, William N; Agback, Peter; Mellström, Karin; Rehnmark, Stefan; Rahimi-Ghadim, Mahmoud; Norin, Thomas; Grynfarb, Marlena; Sandberg, Johnny; Grover, Gary; Malm, Johan

    2007-08-01

    Based on the scaffold of the pharmacologically selective thyromimetic 2b, structurally a close analog to KB-141 (2a), a number of novel N-acylated-alpha-amino acid derivatives were synthesized and tested in a TR radioligand binding assay as well as in a reporter cell assay. On the basis of TRbeta(1)-isoform selectivity and affinity, as well as affinity to the reporter cell assay, 3d was selected for further studies in the cholesterol-fed rat model. In this model 3d revealed an improved therapeutic window between cholesterol and TSH lowering but decreased margins versus tachycardia compared with 2a.

  18. Synthesis of various 3-substituted 1,2,4-oxadiazole-containing chiral beta 3- and alpha-amino acids from Fmoc-protected aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Hamzé, Abdallah; Hernandez, Jean-François; Fulcrand, Pierre; Martinez, Jean

    2003-09-19

    Various 3-substituted chiral 1,2,4-oxadiazole-containing Fmoc-beta(3)- and -alpha-amino acids were synthesized from Fmoc-(l or d)-Asp(OtBu)-OH and Fmoc-l-Asp-OtBu, respectively, in three steps (i.e., condensation of an aspartyl derivative with differentially substituted amidoximes, formation of the 1,2,4-oxadiazole, and cleavage of the tert-butyl ester). These compounds represent new series of nonnatural amino acids, which could be used in combinatorial synthesis. A simple protocol has been developed to generate the 1,2,4-oxadiazole ring. Indeed, common methods resulted in cleavage of the Fmoc group or required long reaction times. We found that sodium acetate in refluxing ethanol/water (86 degrees C) was a convenient and efficient catalyst to promote conversion of Fmoc-amino acyl amidoximes to 1,2,4-oxadiazoles, and this procedure proved to be compatible with Fmoc protection. It is shown that these compounds can be prepared without significant loss of enantiomerical purity. Furthermore, the alkaline conditions used to cleave the Fmoc protecting group from these compounds did not induce epimerization of their chiral center.

  19. ESR study of the radicals in X-irradiated L-alpha-amino-n-butyric acid HCl containing 1. 5% L-cysteine HCl

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, H.; Haven, Y.; Hamrick, P.J. Jr.; Ma, Y.

    1988-12-01

    After X-irradiation at room temperature, the radicals in L-alpha-amino-n-butyric acid HCl are CH/sub 3/CH/sub 2/CHCOOH. The beta- and alpha-hyperfine constants are typical of those found in amino acid radicals. On annealing at temperatures near 100 degrees C this carbon-centered radical in samples containing 1.5% cysteine converts to a perthiyl radical, RCH2S(1)S(2). The g-values for the perithiyl radical are 2.0024, 2.0257, and 2.0557. When the field is in the minimum g-value direction, the hyperfine splittings are 50 G for 33S(2) and 32 G for 33S(1).

  20. New insulinomimetic zinc(II) complexes of alpha-amino acids and their derivatives with Zn(N2O2) coordination mode.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Y; Ueda, E; Suzuki, Y; Yanagihara, N; Sakurai, H; Kojima, Y

    2001-05-01

    Zinc(II) complexes of alpha-amino acids and their derivatives with a Zn(N2O2) coordination mode were found to have in vitro insulinomimetic activity as estimated with the inhibition of free fatty acid release in isolated rat adipocytes treated with epinephrine. It was revealed that the insulinomimetic activities of zinc(II) complexes with over-all stability constants (log beta) less than 10.5 are higher than those of ZnSO4 and VOSO4. The high blood glucose level of KK-Ay mice with type 2 diabetes mellitus was lowered by daily intraperitoneal injections of a zinc(II) complex, cis-[Zn(L-Thr)2(H2O)2], for 14 d. The improvement of diabetes mellitus was confirmed with the oral glucose tolerance test.

  1. Quantum-chemical analysis of thermodynamics of two-dimensional cluster formation of alpha-amino acids at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Fomina, E S; Belyaeva, E A; Aksenenko, E V; Vollhardt, D; Miller, R

    2009-12-31

    The semiempirical quantum-chemical PM3 method is used to calculate the thermodynamic parameters of clusterization of the S-form of alpha-amino acids with the general composition C(n)H(2n+1)CHNH(2)COOH (n = 5-15) at 278 and 298 K. It is shown that six stable conformations of monomers exist, for which the thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy and Gibbs' energy) of the formation and absolute entropy are calculated. The correlation dependencies of the calculated parameters on the alkyl chain length are found to be linear. The structures of the monomers are used to build larger clusters (dimers, tetramers, hexamers). For all small clusters (comprised of two to six molecules), the thermodynamic parameters of formation and clusterization are calculated. It is shown that for tetramers and hexamers the enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs' energy of clusterization are linearly dependent on the alkyl chain length, whereas for the dimers these dependencies are stepwise. The thermodynamic characteristics of clusterization of associates tilted by angles of 9 and 30 degrees with respect to the normal to the interface are calculated. It is shown that the 30 degrees angle orientation is more energetically advantageous for this class of compounds. The geometric parameters of the unit cell characteristic for the infinite 2D film which corresponds to the most advantageous conformation of the monomer were calculated using the PM3 parametrization to be a = 4.57-4.71 A and b = 5.67-5.75 A, with the angle between the axes theta = 100-103 degrees . These values agree well with the available experimental data. Spontaneous clusterization of alpha-amino acids at the air/water interface at 278 K takes place if the alkyl chain length exceeds 11-12 carbon atoms, whereas for 298 K this clusterization threshold corresponds to 13-14 carbon atoms in the alkyl chain, also in agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Time-resolved FT EPR and optical spectroscopy study on photooxidation of aliphatic alpha-amino acids in aqueous solutions; electron transfer from amino vs carboxylate functional group.

    PubMed

    Tarabek, Peter; Bonifacić, Marija; Beckert, Dieter

    2006-06-08

    Using time-resolved Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance, FT EPR, and optical spectroscopy, the photooxidation of glycine, alpha-alanine, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, and model compounds beta-alanine, methylamine and sodium acetate, by excited triplets of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate dianion was studied in aqueous solutions in the pH range 5-13. Anthraquinone radical trianions showing strong emissive spin-polarization (CIDEP) were formed, indicating fast electron transfer from the quenchers to the spin-polarized quinone triplet as the primary reaction. None of the primary radicals formed upon one-electron oxidation of quenchers could be detected at the nanosecond time scale of FT EPR measurements because of their very fast transformation into secondary products. The latter were identified to be decarboxylated alpha-aminoalkyl radicals for alpha-amino acids anions and zwitterions, beta-aminoalkyl radicals for beta-alanine zwitterions, and methyl radicals for acetate anions; corresponding aminyl radicals were the first EPR detectable products from beta-alanine anions and methylamine. Thus, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate triplet can take an electron from both NH(2)- and -CO(2)(-) functional groups forming aminium ((+*)NH(2)-) and acyloxyl (-CO(2)(*)) radicals, respectively. Aminium radicals derived from beta-alanine anions and CH(3)-NH(2) stabilize by deprotonation into aminyl radicals, whereas these derived from alpha-amino acids anions are known to suffer ultrafast decarboxylation (tau approximately 10 ps). Analysis of the polarization patterns revealed that decarboxylation from acyloxyl radicals are considerably slower (ns < tau < 0.1 micros). Therefore, in the case of alpha-amino acids, the isoelectronic structures NH(2)-CR(2)-CO(2)(*) and (+*)NH(2)-CR(2)-CO(2)(-) probably do not constitute resonance mesomeric forms of one and the same species and the decarboxylation of aminium radicals is not preceded by the intramolecular carboxylate to amino group

  3. Purification and biochemical characterization of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/kainate-sensitive L-glutamate receptors of pig brain.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y C; Wu, T Y; Li, B F; Gao, L H; Liu, C I; Wu, C L

    1996-01-01

    Two preparations of glutamate receptors were purified from the synaptic junctions of pig brain by a combination of detergent solubilization, anion-exchange chromatography, wheat-germ agglutinin affinity chromatography and sedimentation through sucrose gradients. These preparations were enriched in specific L-[3H]glutamate binding activity (> 5000 pmol of glutamate binding sites/mg of protein), and the rank order of ligand affinity for binding to these preparations was: quisqualate > 6-cyano-7- nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione > alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4- isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) > L-glutamate > kainate > > N-methyl-D-aspartate approximately L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate. SDS/PAGE analysis revealed that more than 80% of the protein in either of these preparations appeared as a single protein band of 106 kDa. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis further revealed that these 106 kDa proteins consisted of a series of acidic proteins which were recognized by antibodies against rat AMPA receptor subunits. These 106 kDa proteins were also recognized by wheatgerm agglutinin and concanavalin A; in addition, peptide N-glycosidase F treatment of these preparations decreased their size to 99 kDa. Our results suggest that the putative glutamate receptors isolated here are likely to belong to the AMPA subtype of glutamate receptors in pig brain. Using the purification procedure reported here, 5 micrograms of AMPA receptor proteins can be isolated from 250 g of pig brain tissue. PMID:8870648

  4. Modulation of DL-. alpha. -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/quisqualate receptors by phospholipase A sub 2 : A necessary step in long-term potentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Massicotte, G.; Baudry, M. ); Vanderklish, P.; Lynch, G. )

    1991-03-01

    The effects of kainate (KA)-induced epileptic seizures on the binding properites of hippocampal glutamate receptors, on the modulation of DL-{alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/quisqualate receptor by phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}), and on the formation of long-term potentiation (LTP) were studied in hippocampal membranes and hippocampal slices. Systemic administration of KA produced specific changes in the binding properties of the AMPA/quisqualate receptors and its regulation. Whereas the binding of various ligands to the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors was not modified by KA treatment, there was a singificant decrease in the maximal number of binding sites for ({sup 3}H)AMPA. The loss of LTP was not due to changes in postsynaptic responses elicited by the bursts that trigger the potentiation effect, thus suggesting that KA treatment disrupts processes that follow N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. Systemic administration of KA was associated with calpain activation as the amount of spectrin breakdown products was increased severalfold in hippocampus but not in cerebellum. Pretreatment of telencephalic membranes with calpain greatly reduced the PLA{sub 2}-induced increase in ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding. The results provide evidence in favor of an essential role of PLA{sub 2} in the development of LTP and suggest that the order of activation of different calcium-dependent processes is critical for producing the final changes underlying LTP.

  5. DNA cleavage in red light promoted by copper(II) complexes of alpha-amino acids and photoactive phenanthroline bases.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ashis K; Bhowmick, Tuhin; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2008-12-28

    Ternary copper(II) complexes [Cu(L-trp)(B)(H(2)O)](NO(3)) (1-3) and [Cu(L-phe)(B)(H(2)O)](NO(3)) (4-6) of L-tryptophan (L-trp) and L-phenylalanine (L-phe) having phenanthroline bases (B), viz. 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 1 and 4), dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, 2 and 5) and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz, 3 and 6), were prepared and characterized by physico-chemical techniques. Complexes 3 and 6 were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography and show the presence of a square pyramidal (4 + 1) CuN(3)O(2) coordination geometry in which the N,O-donor amino acid (L-trp or L-phe) and N,N-donor phenanthroline base bind at the equatorial plane with an aqua ligand coordinated at the elongated axial site. Complex 3 shows significant distortion from the square pyramidal geometry and a strong intramolecular pi-pi stacking interaction between the pendant indole ring of L-trp and the planar dppz aromatic moiety. All the complexes display good binding propensity to the calf thymus DNA giving an order: 3,6 (dppz) > 2,5 (dpq) > 1,4 (phen). The binding constant (K(b)) values are in the range of 2.1 x 10(4)-1.1 x 10(6) mol(-1) with the binding site size (s) values of 0.17-0.63. The phen and dpq complexes are minor groove binders while the dppz analogues bind at the DNA major groove. Theoretical DNA docking studies on 2 and 3 show the close proximity of two photosensitizers, viz. the indole moiety of L-trp and the quinoxaline/phenazine of the dpq/dppz bases, to the complementary DNA strands. Complexes 2 and 3 show oxidative DNA double strand breaks (dsb) of supercoiled (SC) DNA forming a significant quantity of linear DNA along with the nicked circular (NC) form on photoexposure to UV-A light of 365 nm and red light of 647.1 nm (Ar-Kr laser). Complexes 1,5 and 6 show only single strand breaks (ssb) forming NC DNA. The red light induced DNA cleavage involves metal-assisted photosensitization of L-trp and dpq/dppz base resulting in the formation of a reactive

  6. New chiral didehydroamino acid derivatives from a cyclic glycine template with 3,6-dihydro-2H-1,4-oxazin-2-one structure: applications to the asymmetric synthesis of nonproteinogenic alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, R; Falvello, L R; Galindo, N; Nájera, C

    2000-05-19

    New chiral (Z)-alpha,beta-didehydroamino acid (DDAA) derivatives with 3,5-dihydro-2H-1,4-oxazin-2-one structure 11a-f have been stereoselectively prepared after condensation of chiral glycine equivalent 7 with aldehydes in the presence of K(2)CO(3) under mild solid-liquid phase-transfer catalysis reaction conditions. These new systems have been used in diastereoselective cyclopropanation reactions using Corey's ylide for the asymmetric synthesis of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acids (ACCs) such as allo-corononamic and allo-norcoronamic acids. The hydrogenation reaction of these systems at ambient pressure in the presence of formaldehyde affords saturated oxazinones and N-methylated oxazinones which have been transformed into the N-methyl-alpha-amino acids (N-MAAs) (S)-2-(methylamino)butanoic acid and (S)-N-methylleucine. In addition, the parent alpha, beta-didehydroalanine derivative 11g has been prepared by a direct aminomethylation-elimination sequence from 7 and Eschenmoser's salt and has been used in Diels-Alder cycloaddition with endo selectivity for the synthesis of the enantiomerically pure bicyclic alpha-amino acids (-)-2-aminobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic and (-)-2-aminobicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2-carboxylic acids.

  7. Glutamate regulates intracellular calcium and gene expression in oligodendrocyte progenitors through the activation of DL-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Pende, M; Holtzclaw, L A; Curtis, J L; Russell, J T; Gallo, V

    1994-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes and their progenitors (O-2A) express functional kainate- and DL-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-preferring glutamate receptors. The physiological consequences of activation of these receptors were studied in purified rat cortical O-2A progenitors and in the primary oligodendrocyte cell line CG-4. Changes in the mRNA levels of a set of immediate early genes were studied and were correlated to intracellular Ca2+ concentration, as measured by fura-2 Ca2+ imaging. Both in CG-4 and in cortical O-2A progenitors, basal mRNA levels of NGFI-A were much higher than c-fos, c-jun, or jun-b. Glutamate, kainate, and AMPA greatly increased NGFI-A mRNA and protein by activation of membrane receptors in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion. Agonists at non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors promoted transmembrane Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent channels as well as kainate and/or AMPA channels. The influx of Ca2+ ions occurring through glutamate-gated channels was sufficient by itself to increase the expression of NGFI-A mRNA. AMPA receptors were found to be directly involved in intracellular Ca2+ and NGFI-A mRNA regulation, because the effects of kainate were greatly enhanced by cyclothiazide, an allosteric modulator that selectively suppresses desensitization of AMPA but not kainate receptors. Our results indicate that glutamate acting at AMPA receptors regulates immediate early gene expression in cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage by increasing intracellular calcium. Consequently, modulation of these receptor channels may have immediate effects at the genomic level and regulate oligodendrocyte development at critical stages. Images PMID:8159727

  8. Positive alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor modulators have different impact on synaptic transmission in the thalamus and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan-Fang; Kessler, Markus; Arai, Amy C

    2005-04-01

    Earlier studies showed that positive modulators of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors enhance synaptic responses and facilitate synaptic plasticity. Those studies focused mainly on hippocampal functions. However, AMPA receptors have regionally distinct subunit compositions and thus potencies and efficacies of modulators may vary across the brain. The present study compared the effects of CX546 [1-(1,4-benzodioxan-6-ylcarbonyl) piperidine], a benzamide-type modulator, on synaptic transmission in neurons of the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN), which regulates the firing mode of relay cells in other thalamic nuclei, and on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. CX546 greatly prolonged synaptic responses in CA1 pyramidal cells, but at the same concentration it had only weak modulatory effects in RTN neurons. Effects on miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were similar to those on EPSCs in both regions, suggesting that variations in neuronal morphology and transmitter release kinetics do not account for the differences. Relay cells in the ventrobasal thalamus also exhibited weak modulatory effects that were comparable with those in RTN neurons. Regionally different effects on response duration were also observed with CX516 [BDP-12, 1-(quinoxalin-6-ylcarbonyl)piperidine], a second benzamide drug. In contrast, 100 microM cyclothiazide produced comparable synaptic enhancements in hippocampus and RTN. The regional selectivity of benzamide drugs (ampakines) may be explained, at least in part, by a lower potency at thalamic AMPA receptors, perhaps due to the prevalence of the subunits GluR3 and 4. Although regional preferences of the ampakines were modest in their extent, they may be sufficient to be of relevance when considering future therapeutic applications of such compounds.

  9. Differential effect of beta-N-oxalylamino-L-alanine, the Lathyrus sativus neurotoxin, and (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate on the excitatory amino acid and taurine levels in the brain of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    La Bella, V; Piccoli, F

    2000-05-01

    We studied the effect of beta-oxalylamino-L-alanine, a glutamate analog present in Lathyrus sativus seeds and implicated in the etiopathogenesis of neurolathyrism, and (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate on the extracellular levels of aspartate, glutamate and taurine in the primary motor cortex of freely moving rats. We found that while both neurotoxins increase the level of aspartate and glutamate, only (+/-)-alpha(-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate is able to modulate the level of taurine. GYKI-52466, a non-competitive non-NMDA antagonist, inhibited beta-oxalylamino-L-alanine-induced increase of aspartate, but not that of glutamate. Conversely, this antagonist proved to be very efficient in blocking the stimulating effect of (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate on all three amino acids. We suggest that beta-oxalylamino-L-alanine increases the level of glutamate in vivo by a mechanism not connected to its effect on the non-NMDA receptors, which might involve the inhibition of glutamate transport. This would allow the excitatory neurotransmitter to reach a concentration sufficient to stimulate the non-NMDA receptors, which in their turn mediate the specific release of aspartate. Although the role of aspartate as a neurotransmitter is still under discussion, it might indeed amplify the excitotoxic cascade through its action on NMDA receptors. We speculate that this sequence of events might represent an important step in the molecular cascade leading to the appearance of the selective motoneuron degeneration in neurolathyrism.

  10. Sensory-guided identification of N-(1-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidin-2-ylidene)-alpha-amino acids as contributors to the thick-sour and mouth-drying orosensation of stewed beef juice.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, Tessa; Kunert, Christof; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2010-05-26

    Sensory-guided fractionation of stewed beef juice using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, PFPP-HPLC, and HILIC combined with analytical sensory techniques led to the identification of the dipeptides beta-alanyl-N-methyl-L-histidine and beta-alanyl-L-histidine, as well as the creatinine derivatives N-(1-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidin-2-ylidene)aminopropionic acid, N-(1-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidin-2-ylidene)aminoacetic acid, and N-(1-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidin-2-ylidene)amino-4,5,6-trihydroxyhexanoic acid as taste modulators in stewed beef juice. Model experiments demonstrated for the first time that the latter three N-(1-methyl-4-oxoimidazolidin-2-ylidene)-alpha-amino acids are formed by Maillard-type reactions from creatinine and reducing hexoses. Quantitative analysis, followed by taste recombination and omission experiments, revealed that subthreshold concentrations of these taste modulators enhance the typical thick-sour and mouth-drying orosensation and the mouthfulness imparted by stewed beef juice, although none of these compounds exhibited any significant intrinsic taste when tasted individually in water.

  11. Neutral penta- and hexacoordinate silicon(IV) complexes containing two bidentate ligands derived from the alpha-amino acids (S)-alanine, (S)-phenylalanine, and (S)-tert-leucine.

    PubMed

    Cota, Smaranda; Beyer, Matthias; Bertermann, Rüdiger; Burschka, Christian; Götz, Kathrin; Kaupp, Martin; Tacke, Reinhold

    2010-06-11

    The neutral hexacoordinate silicon(IV) complex 6 (SiO(2)N(4) skeleton) and the neutral pentacoordinate silicon(IV) complexes 7-11 (SiO(2)N(2)C skeletons) were synthesized from Si(NCO)(4) and RSi(NCO)(3) (R = Me, Ph), respectively. The compounds were structurally characterized by solid-state NMR spectroscopy (6-11), solution NMR spectroscopy (6 and 10), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (8 and 11 were studied as the solvates 8 x CH(3)CN and 11 x C(5)H(12) x 0.5 CH(3)CN, respectively). The silicon(IV) complexes 6 (octahedral Si-coordination polyhedron) and 7-11 (trigonal-bipyramidal Si-coordination polyhedra) each contain two bidentate ligands derived from an alpha-amino acid: (S)-alanine, (S)-phenylalanine, or (S)-tert-leucine. The deprotonated amino acids act as monoanionic (6) or as mono- and dianionic ligands (7-11). The experimental investigations were complemented by computational studies of the stereoisomers of 6 and 7.

  12. The stress hormone corticosterone increases synaptic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors via serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (SGK) regulation of the GDI-Rab4 complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenhua; Yuen, Eunice Y; Yan, Zhen

    2010-02-26

    Corticosterone, the major stress hormone, plays an important role in regulating neuronal functions of the limbic system, although the cellular targets and molecular mechanisms of corticosteroid signaling are largely unknown. Here we show that a short treatment of corticosterone significantly increases alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR)-mediated synaptic transmission and AMPAR membrane trafficking in pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortex, a key region involved in cognition and emotion. This enhancing effect of corticosterone is through a mechanism dependent on Rab4, the small GTPase-controlling receptor recycling between early endosome and plasma membrane. Guanosine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI), which regulates the cycle of Rab proteins between membrane and cytosol, forms an increased complex with Rab4 after corticosterone treatment. Corticosterone also triggers an increased GDI phosphorylation at Ser-213 by the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (SGK). Moreover, AMPAR synaptic currents and surface expression and their regulation by corticosterone are altered by mutating Ser-213 on GDI. These results suggest that corticosterone, via SGK phosphorylation of GDI at Ser-213, increases the formation of GDI-Rab4 complex, facilitating the functional cycle of Rab4 and Rab4-mediated recycling of AMPARs to the synaptic membrane. It provides a potential mechanism underlying the role of corticosteroid stress hormone in up-regulating excitatory synaptic efficacy in cortical neurons.

  13. Helix formation in preorganized beta/gamma-peptide foldamers: hydrogen-bond analogy to the alpha-helix without alpha-amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Almeida, Aaron M; Zhang, Weicheng; Reidenbach, Andrew G; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Guzei, Ilia A; Gellman, Samuel H

    2010-06-16

    We report the first high-resolution structural data for the beta/gamma-peptide 13-helix (i,i+3 C=O...H-N H-bonds), a secondary structure that is formed by oligomers with a 1:1 alternation of beta- and gamma-amino acid residues. Our characterization includes both crystallographic and 2D NMR data. Previous studies suggested that beta/gamma-peptides constructed from conformationally flexible residues adopt a different helical secondary structure in solution. Our design features preorganized beta- and gamma-residues, which strongly promote 13-helical folding by the 1:1 beta/gamma backbone.

  14. Imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazine-3,6-diones derived from alpha-amino acids: a theoretical mechanistic study of their formation via pyrolysis and silica-catalyzed process.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Torres, Flavio F; Basiuk, Vladimir A

    2006-06-15

    Imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazine-3,6-diones are unusual compounds composed of three alpha-amino acid fragments. These bicyclic amidines (BCAs) form under high temperatures or with the use of strong dehydrating reagents. We gave insight into the mechanisms of BCA formation via gas-phase pyrolytic and silica-catalyzed reactions of glycine (Gly) and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) with related diketopiperazines (DKPs), using quantum chemical calculations. The entire process requires four steps: (1) O-acylation of DKP with free or silica-bonded amino acid, (2) acyl transfer from the oxygen to the nitrogen atom, (3) intramolecular condensation of the N-acyl DKP into a cyclol, and (4) elimination of water. To study step (1) at silica surface (modeled by H7Si8O12-OH cluster), we employed two-level ONIOM calculations (AM1:UFF, B3LYP/3-21G:UFF and B3LYP/6-31G(d):UFF); all gas-phase reactions were studied at the AM1, B3LYP/3-21G and B3LYP/6-31G(d) levels. The catalytic effect of silica was observed for both Gly and AIB: the activation energy in the O-acylation at the surface was lower by more than 9 kcal mol(-1) as compared to the gas-phase process. Contrary to the exothermic O-acylation, the gas-phase transfer reaction (step 2) was exothermic in both cases, but more favorable for Gly. The cyclocondensation of N-acylated DKPs into BCAs (steps 3 and 4) is endothermic for Gly and exothermic for AIB.

  15. Insights into the mechanisms of ifosfamide encephalopathy: drug metabolites have agonistic effects on alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptors and induce cellular acidification in mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Chatton, J Y; Idle, J R; Vågbø, C B; Magistretti, P J

    2001-12-01

    Therapeutic value of the alkylating agent ifosfamide has been limited by major side effects including encephalopathy. Although the underlying biochemical processes of the neurotoxic side effects are still unclear, they could be attributed to metabolites rather than to ifosfamide itself. In the present study, the effects of selected ifosfamide metabolites on indices of neuronal activity have been investigated, in particular for S-carboxymethylcysteine (SCMC) and thiodiglycolic acid (TDGA). Because of structural similarities of SCMC with glutamate, the Ca(2+)(i) response of single mouse cortical neurons to SCMC and TDGA was investigated. SCMC, but not TDGA, evoked a robust increase in Ca(2+)(i) concentration that could be abolished by the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), but only partly diminished by the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist 10,11-dihydro-5-methyl-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK=801). Cyclothiazide (CYZ), used to prevent AMPA/kainate receptor desensitization, potentiated the response to SCMC. Because activation of AMPA/kainate receptors is known to induce proton influx, the intracellular pH (pH(i)) response to SCMC was investigated. SCMC caused a concentration-dependent acidification that was amplified by CYZ. Since H(+)/monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) activity leads to similar cellular acidification, we tested its potential involvement in the pH(i) response. Application of the lactate transport inhibitor quercetin diminished the pH(i) response to SCMC and TDGA by 43 and 51%, respectively, indicating that these compounds may be substrates of MCTs. Taken together, this study indicates that hitherto apparently inert ifosfamide metabolites, in particular SCMC, activate AMPA/kainate receptors and induce cellular acidification. Both processes could provide the biochemical basis of the observed ifosfamide-associated encephalopathy.

  16. Dual role of hydrophobic racemic thioesters of alpha-amino acids in the generation of isotactic peptides and co-peptides in water; implications for the origin of homochirality.

    PubMed

    Illos, Roni A; Clodic, Gilles; Bolbach, Gerard; Weissbuch, Isabelle; Lahav, Meir

    2010-02-01

    Thioesters of alpha-amino acids are considered as plausible monomers for the generation of the primeval peptides. DL-Leucine-thioethyl esters (LeuSEt), where the L-enantiomer was tagged with deuterium atoms, undergo polycondensation in water or in bicarbonate or imidazole buffer solutions to yield mainly heterochiral (atactic) peptides and diketopiperazine, as analyzed by MALDI-TOF and ESI mass-spectrometry. In variance, when polymerization of DL(d(10))-Leu, first activated with N,N'-carbonyldiimidazole, then initiated with ethanethiol or with DL(d(3))-LeuSEt yielded a library of peptides up to 30 detectable residues where those of homochiral sequence (isotactic) are the dominant diastereoisomers. At these conditions, racemic beta-sheets are formed and operate as stereoselective templates in the process of chain-elongation. Isotopic L:L(d(10))-Leu co-peptides were obtained in the polymerization of L(d(10))-Leu with L-LeuSEt. By contrast, mixtures of oligo-D-Leu and oligo-L(d(10))-Leu were obtained in the polymerization of mixtures of D-LeuSEt with activated L(d(10))-Leu. Isotactic co-peptides containing Leu and Val residues were formed in the polymerization of mixtures of activated DL(d(8))-Val with DL(d(3))-LeuSEt in water, implying that the racemic beta-sheets exert regio-enantio-selection but not chemo-selection. A reaction pathway is suggested, where LeuSEt operates both as initiator of the reaction as well as a multimer.

  17. A study of the oligomeric state of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-preferring glutamate receptors in the synaptic junctions of porcine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T Y; Liu, C I; Chang, Y C

    1996-01-01

    The number of the subunits in an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-preferring L-glutamate receptor in the synaptic junctions of porcine brain was investigated in this study. Upon incubation of the synaptic junctions with three cross-linking regents, dimethyl adipimidate (DMA), dimethyl suberimidate (DMS) and N-succinimidyl-(4-azidophenyl)-1,3'-dithiopropionate (SADP), AMPA receptor subunits in higher-molecular-mass aggregates were detected by immunoblotting. These aggregates migrated as proteins of approx. 200, 300 and 400 kDa. The number and identity of the subunits in a solubilized AMPA receptor were also investigated here. Two samples, W1 and W2, enriched in AMPA receptors were prepared from synaptic junctions by a combination of detergent-solubilization, anion-exchange chromatography and wheatgerm agglutinin affinity chromatography. Hydrodynamic behaviour analyses revealed that the majority of the AMPA receptors in either one of these samples were asymmetrical detergent-surrounded particles with a protein mass around 350 kDa. SDS/PAGE analysis revealed that the majority of AMPA receptors in the W1 sample were comprised of dimers of 106 kDa subunits which were covalently linked by disulphide bonds. Cross-linking these receptors with SADP yielded a new band of approx. 400 kDa. The results obtained here, either from the studies of AMPA receptors embedding in synaptic junctions or from those of detergent-solubilized and partially purified receptors, suggest that AMPA receptors contain a basic core structure comprising of four 106 kDa subunits. PMID:8920974

  18. Linking supply to demand: the neuronal monocarboxylate transporter MCT2 and the alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptor GluR2/3 subunit are associated in a common trafficking process.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Karin; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Parent, Annabelle; Repond, Cendrine; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Di Luca, Monica; Pellerin, Luc

    2009-05-01

    MCT2 is the major neuronal monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) that allows the supply of alternative energy substrates such as lactate to neurons. Recent evidence obtained by electron microscopy has demonstrated that MCT2, like alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors, is localized in dendritic spines of glutamatergic synapses. Using immunofluorescence, we show in this study that MCT2 colocalizes extensively with GluR2/3 subunits of AMPA receptors in neurons from various mouse brain regions as well as in cultured neurons. It also colocalizes with GluR2/3-interacting proteins, such as C-kinase-interacting protein 1, glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 and clathrin adaptor protein. Coimmunoprecipitation of MCT2 with GluR2/3 and C-kinase-interacting protein 1 suggests their close interaction within spines. Parallel changes in the localization of both MCT2 and GluR2/3 subunits at and beneath the plasma membrane upon various stimulation paradigms were unraveled using an original immunocytochemical and transfection approach combined with three-dimensional image reconstruction. Cell culture incubation with AMPA or insulin triggered a marked intracellular accumulation of both MCT2 and GluR2/3, whereas both tumor necrosis factor alpha and glycine (with glutamate) increased their cell surface immunolabeling. Similar results were obtained using Western blots performed on membrane or cytoplasm-enriched cell fractions. Finally, an enhanced lactate flux into neurons was demonstrated after MCT2 translocation on the cell surface. These observations provide unequivocal evidence that MCT2 is linked to AMPA receptor GluR2/3 subunits and undergoes a similar translocation process in neurons upon activation. MCT2 emerges as a novel component of the synaptic machinery putatively linking neuroenergetics to synaptic transmission.

  19. Synthesis of chiral alpha-amino aldehydes linked by their amine function to solid support.

    PubMed

    Cantel, Sonia; Heitz, Annie; Martinez, Jean; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain

    2004-09-01

    The anchoring of an alpha-amino-acid derivative by its amine function on to a solid support allows some chemical reactions starting from the carboxylic acid function. This paper describes the preparation of alpha-amino aldehydes linked to the support by their amine function. This was performed by reduction with LiAlH4 of the corresponding Weinreb amide linked to the resin. The aldehydes obtained were then involved in Wittig or reductive amination reactions. In addition, the linked Weinreb amide was reacted with methylmagnesium bromide to yield the corresponding ketone. After cleavage from the support, the compounds were obtained in good to excellent yields and characterized.

  20. Peptide backbone folding induced by the C(alpha)-tetrasubstituted cyclic alpha-amino acids 4-amino-1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid (Adt) and 1-aminocyclopentane-1-carboxylic acid (Ac5c). A joint computational and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Aschi, Massimiliano; Lucente, Gino; Mazza, Fernando; Mollica, Adriano; Morera, Enrico; Nalli, Marianna; Paglialunga Paradisi, Mario

    2003-06-07

    The conformational study of a new group of synthetic peptides containing 4-amino-1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid (Adt), a cysteine-related achiral residue, has been carried out through a joint application of computational and experimental methodologies. Molecular Dynamics simulations clearly suggest the tendency of this molecule to adopt a gamma-turn conformation in vacuum and help in analyzing the complex and crucial conformational behaviour of the dithiolane ring which appears to preferentially adopt a C(S)-like structure. Electronic structure calculations carried out in solution using the Density Functional Theory also indicate the preservation of the gamma-like folding in apolar solvents and the helix-like one in more polar solvents. A comparison with the achiral 1-aminocycloalkane-1-carboxylic acid (Ac5c) has been carried out using the same computational tools. NMR and IR data on dipeptide derivatives containing the Adt or Ac5c residue show that in chloroform solution all the models prefer a gamma-turn structure, centered at the cyclic residue, stabilized by an intramolecular H-bond, whereas in a more polar solvent, i.e. dimethyl sulfoxide, this folding is not maintained. The experimental conformational studies, extended to N-Boc protected tripeptides, clearly indicate the remarkable tendency of both the five-membered C(alpha)-tetrasubstituted cyclic amino acids Adt and Ac5c to induce the gamma-turn structure also in models able to adopt the beta-bend conformation.

  1. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of {alpha}-amino phosphonates using lanthanoid-potassium-BINOL complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sasai, Hiroaki; Arai, Shigeru; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    1995-10-20

    {alpha}-Amino phosphonic acids 3 are interesting compounds in the design of enzyme inhibitors. The concept of mimicking tetrahedral transition states of enzyme-medicated peptide bond hydrolysis previously led to the successful design and synthesis of phosphonamide-containing peptides as a promising new class of proteinase inhibitors. It is not surprising that the absolute configuration of the {alpha}-carbon strongly influences the biological properties of 3. Several methods for the synthesis of optically active {alpha}-aminophosphonic acids have been published. The authors report here the first example of a catalytic asymmetric hydrophosphonylation to imines using lanthanoid-potassium-BINOL heterobimetallic complexes (LnPB, Ln = lanthanoid metal), which gives optically active {alpha}-amino phosphonates in modest to high enantiometric excess. 17 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Ovine prolactin and human growth hormone derivatives. Specific modification of their alpha-amino groups.

    PubMed

    Caridad, J J; Nowicki, C; Santomé, J A; Wolfenstein-Todel, C

    1988-06-01

    The alpha-amino group of ovine prolactin (oPRL) and human growth hormone (hGH) was selectively modified by transamination with glyoxylic acid. No difference was found in the binding capacity of transaminated oPRL to rat liver lactogenic receptors with respect to its control, although both samples showed a decrease in its binding capacity with reference to the native hormone. This decrease was due to conformational changes caused by the reaction conditions and not by the transamination itself, as shown by the circular dichroism spectra. Transaminated hGH retained the full binding capacity of the hormone. These results suggest that the alpha-amino group is not relevant for the binding to lactogenic liver receptors in both lactogenic hormones.

  3. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis.

  4. Synthesis and utilization of chiral alpha-methylated alpha-amino acids with a carboxyalkyl side chain in the design of novel Grb2-SH2 peptide inhibitors free of phosphotyrosine.

    PubMed

    Long, Ya-Qiu; Xue, Ting; Song, Yan-Li; Liu, Zu-Long; Huang, Shao-Xu; Yu, Qiang

    2008-10-23

    The growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) is an SH2 domain-containing docking module that represents an attractive target for anticancer therapeutic intervention. To improve the potency and bioavailability of the Grb2-SH2 inhibitors, the chiral alpha-methyl-alpha-carboxyalkyl amino acid [(alpha-Me)Aa] was designed to cover dual structural and functional features separately contributed by 1-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid (Ac6c) and alpha-aminoadipic acid (Adi) in position Y + 1. The enantiopure l(or D)-(alpha-Me)Aa bearing various chain length carboxylalkyl side chain was conveniently synthesized by an optimized oxazolidinone methodology. The incorporation of (S)-(alpha-Me)Aa into the non-pTyr-containing peptide framework with a 5-amino acid sequence binding motif of X (-2)-Leu-(3'-substituted-Tyr) (0)-X (+1)-Asn really improved the inhibitory activity, affording potent (R)-sulfoxide-bridged cyclic and an open-chain series of pentapeptide inhibitors of Grb2-SH2 domain (IC 50 = 1.1-5.8 microM). More significantly, these (alpha-Me)Aa incorporated peptide inhibitors showed excellent activities in inhibiting the growth of erbB2-dependent MDA-MB-453 tumor cell lines with low micromolar IC 50 values, owing to the reduced peptidic nature and absence of pTyr or pTyr mimetics.

  5. Introduction to fatty acids and lipids.

    PubMed

    Burdge, Graham C; Calder, Philip C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the structure, function and metabolism of fatty acids and lipids that are of particular importance in the context of parenteral nutrition. Lipids are a heterogeneous group of molecules that share the common property of hydrophobicity. Lipids range in structure from simple short hydrocarbon chains to more complex molecules, including triacylglycerols, phospholipids and sterols and their esters. Lipids within each class may differ structurally. Fatty acids are common components of complex lipids, and these differ according to chain length and the presence, number and position of double bonds in the hydrocarbon chain. Structural variation among complex lipids and among fatty acids gives rise to functional differences that result in different impacts upon metabolism and upon cell and tissue responses. Fatty acids and complex lipids exhibit a variety of structural variations that influence their metabolism and their functional effects.

  6. Lipids, fatty acids, and more

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Energy is the most expensive component in livestock diets. Lipids are concentrated energy sources and are known to affect growth, feed efficiency, feed dust, and diet palatability. A large majority of research evaluating lipids in livestock has utilized lipids of high quality, dealt mainly with anim...

  7. Novel alpha-hydroxyethyl-polystyrene, alpha-chloroethyl-polystyrene and alpha-amino-oxyethyl-polystyrene linkers on the Multipin solid support for solid-phase organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bui, C T; Maeji, N J; Bray, A M

    A simple method for the generation of three novel linkers, alpha-hydroxyethyl-polystyrene, alpha-chloroethyl-polystyrene and alpha-amino-oxyethyl-polystyrene on Multipin supports (SynPhase Crowns) has been developed. Applications of these linkers have been successfully demonstrated for solid-phase synthesis of dipeptide, oxime, and hydroxamic acid compounds in good yields and purities.

  8. Methyl 2-((succinimidooxy)carbonyl)benzoate (MSB): a new, efficient reagent for N-phthaloylation of amino acid and peptide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Casimir, J Richard; Guichard, Gilles; Briand, Jean-Paul

    2002-05-31

    A new, efficient, and readily available reagent, methyl 2-((succinimidooxy)carbonyl)benzoate (MSB), for N-phthaloylation of amino acids and amino acid derivatives is described. The phthaloylation procedure is simple and racemization-free and gives excellent results with alpha-amino acids, alpha-amino alcohols, dipeptides, alpha-amino carboxamides, and alpha-amino esters.

  9. Perfluorooctanoic acid rigidifies a model lipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüning, B.; Farago, B.

    2014-04-01

    We report a combined dynamic light scattering and neutron spin-echo (NSE) study on vesicles composed of the phospholipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine under the influence of varying amounts of perfluorooctanoic acid. We study local lipid bilayer undulations using NSE on time scales up to 200 ns. Similar to the effect evoked by cholesterol, we attribute the observed lipid bilayer stiffening to a condensing effect of the perfluorinated compound on the membrane.

  10. Lipid and Fatty Acid Requirements of Tilapia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dietary lipids are an important source of highly digestible energy and are the only source of essential fatty acids required for normal growth and development. They are also carriers and assist in the absorption of fat-soluble nutrients, such as sterols and fat-soluble vitamins, serve as a source of...

  11. Lipid encapsulated docosahexaenoic acid methyl ester

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Encapsulation of structurally sensitive compounds within a solid lipid matrix provides a barrier to prooxidant compounds and effectively limits the extent of oxidative degradation. Encapsulated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) methyl ester was examined as a model compound for functional foods and feeds. S...

  12. Stability of lipid encapsulated ferulic acid particles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Encapsulation of bioactive compounds by a solid lipid matrix provides stability and a mechanism for controlled release in formulated products. Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and have applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a common pheno...

  13. Phytic acid inhibits lipid peroxidation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Alicja; Wilczok, Adam; Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10-20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products.

  14. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10–20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products. PMID:24260736

  15. The effect of N-substituted alkyl groups on the anticonvulsant activities ofN-Cbz-alpha-amino-N-alkylsuccinimides.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Son, K; Jung, K; Choi, J; Park, M

    1997-02-01

    For the purpose of defining the effects of theN-substituted alkyl groups on the anticonvulsant activities ofN-Cbz-alpha-aminosuccinimides, various (R)-and(S)-N-alkyl substitutedN-Cbz-alpha-aminosuccinimides (1 and2) were prepared from the corresponding (R)-and(S)-N-Cbz-aspartic acid by using known reaction and were evaluated the anticonvulsant activies in the MES and PTZ tests, including their neurotoxicities. The most active compound in the MES test was(R)-N-Cbz-alpha-amino-N-methylsuccinimide (1b) (ED(50)=52.5 mg/kg, Pl-3.2). And in case of the PTZ test,(R)-N-Cbz-alpha-amino-N-ethylsuccinimide (1c) was the most active compound (ED(50)=32.5 mg/kg, Pl=3.1). The order of anticonvulsant activities of these compounds against the MES test, as judged from the ED(50) values for theR series (1), wasN-methyl >N-isobutyl > non-substituted >N-ethyl,N-allyl >N-benzyl compound; for theS series (2)N-methyl >N-allyl > non-substituted >N-isobutyl >N-ethyl >N-benzyl compound. The anticonvulsant activities in the PTZ tests of these compounds exhibited somewhat different pattern; for theR series (1)N-ethyl >N-methyl >N-isobutyl> non-substituted >N-allyl >N-benzyl compound in order of decreasing activity; forS series (2)N-ethyl >N-allyl, non-substituted >N-isobutyl >N-methyl >N-benzyl compound in order of decreasing activity.

  16. Effect of brown seaweed lipids on fatty acid composition and lipid hydroperoxide levels of mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Airanthi, M K Widjaja-Adhi; Sasaki, Naoya; Iwasaki, Sayaka; Baba, Nobuko; Abe, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2011-04-27

    Brown seaweed lipids from Undaria pinnatifida (Wakame), Sargassum horneri (Akamoku), and Cystoseira hakodatensis (Uganomoku) contained several bioactive compounds, namely, fucoxanthin, polyphenols, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Fucoxanthin and polyphenol contents of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids were higher than those of Wakame lipids, while Wakame lipids showed higher total omega-3 PUFA content than Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) in liver lipids of KK-A(y) mouse significantly increased by Akamoku and Uganomoku lipid feeding as compared with the control, but not by Wakame lipid feeding. Fucoxanthin has been reported to accelerate the bioconversion of omega-3 PUFA and omega-6 PUFA to DHA and AA, respectively. The higher hepatic DHA and AA level of mice fed Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids would be attributed to the higher content of fucoxanthin of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The lipid hydroperoxide levels of the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids were significantly lower than those of control mice, even though total PUFA content was higher in the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids. This would be, at least in part, due to the antioxidant activity of fucoxanthin metabolites in the liver.

  17. Perfluorodecanoic Acid and Lipid Metabolism in the Rat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-25

    2. To develop analogous methodologies for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a shorter-chain perfluorinated fatty acid similar to PFDA. 3. To validate...A5 TITLE (Includ Secuiq Oauahcatio0) Perfluorodecanoic Acid and Lipid Metabolism in the Rat 2 PERSONAL AUT)4O0(S) Ma’-c J. Van Rafelsehe. John P...fatty acid from those secondary to hypophagia. Carcass content of lipid phosphorus and free cholesterol decreased in dose-dependent fashion in both PFDA

  18. Fatty acid profile of 25 alternative lipid feedstocks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study reports the fatty acid profiles of 25 alternative lipid feedstocks for the production of bio-based fuels and chemicals. Lipids were extracted using hexane from oil-bearing seeds using a standard Soxhlet apparatus. Fatty acid profiles were measured using gas chromatography-flame ionization...

  19. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Lipid Bilayers and Tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Linda S.; Yuan, Jing; Pramudya, Yohannes; Nguyen, Lam T.

    2007-03-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are found in a variety of biological membranes and have been implicated with lipid raft formation and possible function, typical molecules include DHA (Docosahexanoic Acid) and AA (Alphalinoleic Acid) which have been the focus of considerable attention in recent years. We are interested in the phase behavior of these molecules in the lipid bilayer. The addition of lipid molecules with polyunsaturated chains has a clear effect on the fluidity and curvature of the membrane and we investigate the effects the addition of polyunsaturated lipids on bilayer structure and tubule formation. Self-assembled cylindrical lipid tubules have attracted considerable attention because of their interesting structures and potential technological applications. Using x-ray diffraction techniques, Atomic Force Microscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging, both symmetric and mixed chain lipids were incorporated into model membranes and the effects on bilayer structure and tubule formation investigated.

  20. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, A R; Thampi, P; Yadav, S; Rawal, U M

    1993-12-01

    The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  1. Fatty Acids from Membrane Lipids Become Incorporated into Lipid Bodies during Myxococcus xanthus Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Swapna; Boynton, Tye O.; Pham, Dan; Shimkets, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus responds to amino acid limitation by producing fruiting bodies containing dormant spores. During development, cells produce triacylglycerides in lipid bodies that become consumed during spore maturation. As the cells are starved to induce development, the production of triglycerides represents a counterintuitive metabolic switch. In this paper, lipid bodies were quantified in wild-type strain DK1622 and 33 developmental mutants at the cellular level by measuring the cross sectional area of the cell stained with the lipophilic dye Nile red. We provide five lines of evidence that triacylglycerides are derived from membrane phospholipids as cells shorten in length and then differentiate into myxospores. First, in wild type cells, lipid bodies appear early in development and their size increases concurrent with an 87% decline in membrane surface area. Second, developmental mutants blocked at different stages of shortening and differentiation accumulated lipid bodies proportionate with their cell length with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.76. Third, peripheral rods, developing cells that do not produce lipid bodies, fail to shorten. Fourth, genes for fatty acid synthesis are down-regulated while genes for fatty acid degradation are up regulated. Finally, direct movement of fatty acids from membrane lipids in growing cells to lipid bodies in developing cells was observed by pulse labeling cells with palmitate. Recycling of lipids released by Programmed Cell Death appears not to be necessary for lipid body production as a fadL mutant was defective in fatty acid uptake but proficient in lipid body production. The lipid body regulon involves many developmental genes that are not specifically involved in fatty acid synthesis or degradation. MazF RNA interferase and its target, enhancer-binding protein Nla6, appear to negatively regulate cell shortening and TAG accumulation whereas most cell-cell signals activate these processes. PMID:24906161

  2. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation.

  3. Acid test: lipid antigens get into the groove.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Mitchell; Sullivan, Barbara A

    2008-06-01

    How do CD1 molecules load lipid antigens? In this issue of Immunity, Relloso et al. (2008) uncover how lysosomal pH targets amino acids in CD1b, causing it to open and attain a conformation more receptive to lipid antigens.

  4. Nucleic acid-lipid membrane interactions studied by DSC.

    PubMed

    Giatrellis, Sarantis; Nounesis, George

    2011-01-01

    The interactions of nucleic acids with lipid membranes are of great importance for biological mechanisms as well as for biotechnological applications in gene delivery and drug carriers. The optimization of liposomal vectors for clinical use is absolutely dependent upon the formation mechanisms, the morphology, and the molecular organization of the lipoplexes, that is, the complexes of lipid membranes with DNA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has emerged as an efficient and relatively easy-to-operate experimental technique that can straightforwardly provide data related to the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the DNA-lipid complexation and especially to the lipid organization and phase transitions within the membrane. In this review, we summarize DSC studies considering nucleic acid-membrane systems, accentuating DSC capabilities, and data analysis. Published work involving cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic lipids as well as lipid mixtures interacting with RNA and DNA of different sizes and conformations are included. It is shown that despite limitations, issues such as DNA- or RNA-induced phase separation and microdomain lipid segregation, liposomal aggregation and fusion, alterations of the lipid long-range molecular order, as well as membrane-induced structural changes of the nucleic acids can be efficiently treated by systematic high-sensitivity DSC studies.

  5. Fatty acid methyl ester profiles of bat wing surface lipids.

    PubMed

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Fuller, Nathan W; Moore, Patrick R; Gilmore, David F; Savary, Brett J; Risch, Thomas S

    2014-11-01

    Sebocytes are specialized epithelial cells that rupture to secrete sebaceous lipids (sebum) across the mammalian integument. Sebum protects the integument from UV radiation, and maintains host microbial communities among other functions. Native glandular sebum is composed primarily of triacylglycerides (TAG) and wax esters (WE). Upon secretion (mature sebum), these lipids combine with minor cellular membrane components comprising total surface lipids. TAG and WE are further cleaved to smaller molecules through oxidation or host enzymatic digestion, resulting in a complex mixture of glycerolipids (e.g., TAG), sterols, unesterified fatty acids (FFA), WE, cholesteryl esters, and squalene comprising surface lipid. We are interested if fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling of bat surface lipid could predict species specificity to the cutaneous fungal disease, white nose syndrome (WNS). We collected sebaceous secretions from 13 bat spp. using Sebutape(®) and converted them to FAME with an acid catalyzed transesterification. We found that Sebutape(®) adhesive patches removed ~6× more total lipid than Sebutape(®) indicator strips. Juvenile eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis) had significantly higher 18:1 than adults, but 14:0, 16:1, and 20:0 were higher in adults. FAME profiles among several bat species were similar. We concluded that bat surface lipid FAME profiling does not provide a robust model predicting species susceptibility to WNS. However, these results provide baseline data that can be used for lipid roles in future ecological studies, such as life history, diet, or migration.

  6. Enhanced lipid extraction from algae using free nitrous acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Naghdi, Forough Ghasemi; Ye, Liu; Lant, Paul; Pratt, Steven

    2014-05-01

    Lipid extraction has been identified as a major bottleneck for large-scale algal biodiesel production. In this work free nitrous acid (FNA) is presented as an effective and low cost pretreatment to enhance lipid recovery from algae. Two batch tests, with a range of FNA additions, were conducted to disrupt algal cells prior to lipid extraction by organic solvents. Total accessible lipid content was quantified by the Bligh and Dyer method, and was found to increase with pretreatment time (up to 48 h) and FNA concentration (up to 2.19 mg HNO2-N/L). Hexane extraction was used to study industrially accessible lipids. The mass transfer coefficient (k) for lipid extraction using hexane from algae treated with 2.19 mg HNO2-N/L FNA was found to be dramatically higher than for extraction from untreated algae. Consistent with extraction results, cell disruption analysis indicated the disruption of the cell membrane barrier.

  7. An easy stereoselective access to beta,gamma-aziridino alpha-amino ester derivatives via mannich reaction of benzophenone imines of glycine esters with N-sulfonyl alpha-chloroaldimines.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Loránd; Mangelinckx, Sven; Sillanpää, Reijo; Fülöp, Ferenc; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2007-09-14

    Mannich-type addition of benzophenone imine glycinates across newly synthesized N-(p-toluenesulfonyl) alpha-chloroaldimines afforded gamma-chloro-alpha,beta-diamino ester derivatives with moderate diastereoselectivity as separable mixtures of anti and syn diastereomers. The gamma-chloro-alpha,beta-diamino esters were efficiently cyclized under basic conditions to the corresponding beta,gamma-aziridino alpha-amino ester derivatives, representing a new class of conformationally constrained heterocyclic alpha,beta-diamino acid derivatives. The relative configuration of the aziridines was determined via X-ray diffraction analysis. Mechanisms and intermediate transition states to explain the stereochemical outcome of the Mannich reaction with different substrates or under different conditions are proposed. The synthetic importance of the beta,gamma-aziridino alpha-amino ester derivatives is demonstrated by their conversion into the corresponding Boc-protected derivatives and ring opening reactions to alpha,beta-diamino esters and a gamma-amino alpha,beta-unsaturated amino ester.

  8. Acid Base Equilibrium in a Lipid/Water Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streb, Kristina K.; Ilich, Predrag-Peter

    2003-12-01

    A new and original experiment in which partition of bromophenol blue dye between water and lipid/water gel causes a shift in the acid base equilibrium of the dye is described. The dye-absorbing material is a monoglyceride food additive of plant origin that mixes freely with water to form a stable cubic phase gel; the nascent gel absorbs the dye from aqueous solution and converts it to the acidic form. There are three concurrent processes taking place in the experiment: (a) formation of the lipid/water gel, (b) absorption of the dye by the gel, and (c) protonation of the dye in the lipid/water gel environment. As the aqueous solution of the dye is a deep purple-blue color at neutral pH and yellow at acidic pH the result of these processes is visually striking: the strongly green-yellow particles of lipid/water gel are suspended in purple-blue aqueous solution. The local acidity of the lipid/water gel is estimated by UV vis spectrophotometry. This experiment is an example of host-guest (lipid/water gel dye) interaction and is suitable for project-type biophysics, physical chemistry, or biochemistry labs. The experiment requires three, 3-hour lab sessions, two of which must not be separated by more than two days.

  9. [Linoleic acid and the immune system. Controversies about lipid emulsions].

    PubMed

    García de Lorenzo, A; Culebras, J M

    1992-01-01

    The selection of a given lipidic function for nutritional backup requires not only knowledge of the metabolism of the different existing lipidic emulsions and of their specific therapeutic indications, but also of their contraindications and controversies because, apart from their calorific value, the contribution of liposoluble vitamins and their function in preventing essential fatty acid deficiencies, we know that they are powerful metabolic modulators. This in associated with the fact that manipulation of dietary lipids (enteral or parenteral) can affect and modulate the response to the disease, attack or infection by improving or impairing the different immune functions. This review is focused on the scientific publications which have examined the varying effects of lipidic emulsions, in quantity and in quality (particularly linoleic acid) on the immune system, on the fatty acid composition of the cellular membranes and on the production of and prostaglandins and leukotrienes. An update is given of the known interrelation between lipids and immunity, with appraisal of triglycerides and long-medium -- and short-chain fatty acids, mixtures of medium -- and long-chain triglycerides, the proportions between infinity-3/infinity-6, and structured lipids.

  10. Novel interference in thiobarbituric acid assay for lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, W A; Baker, N; Hill, V A; Wright, E T

    1975-05-01

    The thiobarbituric acid test for lipid peroxidation, when applied to a mixture of acetaldehyde and sucrose, produces a 532 nm aborbing chromogen which is indistinguishable from that formed by malonaldehyde and thiobarbituric acid. Unless special procedures are adopted to correct for this effect, the combined action of acetaldehyde and sucrose interferes seriously with the assay of lipid peroxidation reactions, notably those implicated in alcohol-induced liver injuries. However, this unusual thiobarbituric acid effect also can be used as a sensitive method for the detection of acetaldehyde.

  11. Simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification of wet microalgal lipid using acid.

    PubMed

    Takisawa, Kenji; Kanemoto, Kazuyo; Kartikawati, Muliasari; Kitamura, Yutaka

    2013-12-01

    This research demonstrated hydrolysis of wet microalgal lipid and esterification of free fatty acid (FFA) using acid in one-step process. The investigation of simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification (SHE) of wet microalgal lipid was conducted by using L27 orthogonal design and the effects of water content, volume of sulphuric acid, volume of methanol, temperature and time on SHE were examined. As a result, water content was found to be the most effective factor. The effects of various parameters on fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) content and equilibrium relation between FAME and FFA were also examined under water content 80%. Equimolar amounts of sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid showed similar results. This method has great potential in terms of biodiesel production from microalgae since no organic solvents are used.

  12. Lipid and polymeric carrier-mediated nucleic acid delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Mahato, Ram I

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Nucleic acids such as plasmid DNA, antisense oligonucleotide, and RNA interference (RNAi) molecules, have a great potential to be used as therapeutics for the treatment of various genetic and acquired diseases. To design a successful nucleic acid delivery system, the pharmacological effect of nucleic acids, the physiological condition of the subjects or sites, and the physicochemical properties of nucleic acid and carriers have to be thoroughly examined. Areas covered in this review The commonly used lipids, polymers and corresponding delivery systems are reviewed in terms of their characteristics, applications, advantages and limitations. What the reader will gain This article aims to provide an overview of biological barriers and strategies to overcome these barriers by properly designing effective synthetic carriers for nucleic acid delivery. Take home message A thorough understanding of biological barriers and the structure–activity relationship of lipid and polymeric carriers is the key for effective nucleic acid therapy. PMID:20836625

  13. Solubilization of lipids and lipid phases by the styrene-maleic acid copolymer.

    PubMed

    Dominguez Pardo, Juan J; Dörr, Jonas M; Iyer, Aditya; Cox, Ruud C; Scheidelaar, Stefan; Koorengevel, Martijn C; Subramaniam, Vinod; Killian, J Antoinette

    2017-01-01

    A promising tool in membrane research is the use of the styrene-maleic acid (SMA) copolymer to solubilize membranes in the form of nanodiscs. Since membranes are heterogeneous in composition, it is important to know whether SMA thereby has a preference for solubilization of either specific types of lipids or specific bilayer phases. Here, we investigated this by performing partial solubilization of model membranes and analyzing the lipid composition of the solubilized fraction. We found that SMA displays no significant lipid preference in homogeneous binary lipid mixtures in the fluid phase, even when using lipids that by themselves show very different solubilization kinetics. By contrast, in heterogeneous phase-separated bilayers, SMA was found to have a strong preference for solubilization of lipids in the fluid phase as compared to those in either a gel phase or a liquid-ordered phase. Together the results suggest that (1) SMA is a reliable tool to characterize native interactions between membrane constituents, (2) any solubilization preference of SMA is not due to properties of individual lipids but rather due to properties of the membrane or membrane domains in which these lipids reside and (3) exploiting SMA resistance rather than detergent resistance may be an attractive approach for the isolation of ordered domains from biological membranes.

  14. Lipid and fatty acid analysis of the Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus (PiGV) envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri-Bhalla, K.; Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Virus envelope was isolated from Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus, produced in early fourth-instar larvae. Both polar and neutral lipids were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Fatty acid composition of various individual neutral and polar lipids was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. The major components of envelope neutral lipid were diacylglycerols. Palmitic acid and stearic acid were the major saturated fatty acids in both polar and neutral lipids. Whereas palmitoleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acids in neutral lipids, oleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acid in the polar lipids.

  15. Fatty Acids and Bioactive Lipids of Potato Cultivars: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy; Oraby, Hesahm Farouk

    2016-01-01

    Potato tuber is a highly nutritious, wherein genotype and environmental differences are known to exist in the shape, size and nutritional value of potatoes. Owing to its high consumption, potato could be an ideal carrier of health-promoting phytochemicals. Potato cultivars contain many bioactive lipidic compounds such as fatty acids, glycolipids, phospholipids, sterols, tocols and carotenoids, which are highly desirable in diet because of their health-promoting effects. In the scientific literature, information on the content and profile of bioactive lipidic compounds in potato cultivars are few. The concentration and stability of bioactive lipids are affected by many factors such as genotype, agronomic factors, postharvest storage, cooking and processing conditions. In this review levels and composition of bioactive lipids in terms of lipid classes, fatty acids, phytosterols, tocopherols, and caroteinoids distribution in different potato cultivars including genetically modified potato (GMP) were highlighted and discussed. In addition, factors affecting bioactive lipids levels, stability and health benefits are reviewed. In consideration of potential nutritional value, detailed knowledge on lipids of potato cultivars is of major importance.

  16. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPAL2): a potent enzyme for the synthesis of non-canonical aromatic alpha-amino acids: Part I: Comparative characterization to the enzymes from Petroselinum crispum (PcPAL1) and Rhodosporidium toruloides (RtPAL).

    PubMed

    Dreßen, Alana; Hilberath, Thomas; Mackfeld, Ursula; Billmeier, Arne; Rudat, Jens; Pohl, Martina

    2017-04-06

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPAL2) was comparatively characterized to the well-studied enzyme from parsley (PcPAL1) and Rhodosporidium toruloides (RtPAL) with respect to kinetic parameters for the deamination and the amination reaction, pH- and temperature optima and the substrate range of the amination reaction. Whereas both plant enzymes are specific for phenylalanine, the bifunctional enzyme from Rhodosporidium toruloides shows KM-values for L-Phe and L-Tyr in the same order of magnitude and, compared to both plant enzymes, a 10-15-fold higher activity. At 30°C all enzymes were sufficiently stable with half-lives of 3.4days (PcPAL1), 4.6days (AtPAL2) and 9.7days (RtPAL/TAL). Very good results for the amination of various trans-cinnamic acid derivatives were obtained using E. coli cells as whole cell biocatalysts in ammonium carbonate buffer. Investigation of the substrate ranges gave interesting results for the newly tested enzymes from A. thaliana and R. toruloides. Only the latter accepts besides 4-hydroxy-CA also 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-CA as a substrate, which is an interesting intermediate for the formation of pharmaceutically relevant L-Dopa. AtPAL2 is a very good catalyst for the formation of (S)-3-F-Phe, (S)-4-F-Phe and (S)-2-Cl-Phe. Such non-canonical amino acids are valuable building blocks for the formation of various drug molecules.

  17. Linoleic acid stimulates neutral lipid accumulation in lipid droplets of maturing bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Carro, M; Buschiazzo, J; Ríos, G L; Oresti, G M; Alberio, R H

    2013-03-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in high concentrations in bovine follicular fluid; when added to maturation culture media, it affects oocyte competence (depending on the type and concentration of LA used). To date, little is known about the effective level of incorporation of LA and there is apparently no information regarding its esterification into various lipid fractions of the oocyte and its effect on neutral lipid storage. Therefore, the objective was to assess the uptake and subcellular lipid distribution of LA by analyzing incorporation of radiolabeled LA into oocyte polar and neutral lipid classes. The effects of various concentrations of LA on the nuclear status and cytoplasmic lipid content of bovine oocytes matured in vitro was also analyzed, with particular emphasis on intermediate concentrations of LA. Neutral lipids stored in lipid droplets were quantified with a fluorescence approach. Linoleic acid at 9 and 43 μM did not affect the nuclear status of oocytes matured in vitro, and 100 μM LA inhibited germinal vesicle breakdown, resulting in a higher percentage of oocytes arrested at the germinal state (43.5 vs. 3.0 in controls; P < 0.05). Bovine oocytes actively incorporated LA from the maturation medium (83.4 pmol LA per 100 oocytes at 22 hours of incubation; P < 0.05) and metabolized it mainly into major lipid classes, e.g., triacylglycerols and phospholipids (61.1% and 29.3%, respectively). Supplementation of the maturation medium with LA increased triacylglycerol accumulation in cytoplasmic lipid droplets at all concentrations assayed (P < 0.05). In conclusion, LA added to a defined maturation medium at concentrations that did not alter the nuclear status of bovine oocytes matured in vitro (9 and 43 μM) improved their quality by increasing the content of neutral lipids stored in lipid droplets. By directing the free fatty acid (LA) to triacylglycerol synthesis pathways and increasing the degree of unsaturation of

  18. A straightforward three-component synthesis of alpha-amino esters containing a phenylalanine or a phenylglycine scaffold.

    PubMed

    Haurena, Caroline; Le Gall, Erwan; Sengmany, Stéphane; Martens, Thierry; Troupel, Michel

    2010-04-16

    A range of alpha-amino esters has been synthesized in good to high yields using a straightforward three-component reaction among preformed or in situ generated aromatic or benzylic organozinc reagents, primary or secondary amines, and ethyl glyoxylate. The procedure, which is characterized by its simplicity, allows the concise synthesis of esters bearing a phenylglycine or a phenylalanine scaffold.

  19. New fluorescent octadecapentaenoic acids as probes of lipid membranes and protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, C R; Souto, A A; Amat-Guerri, F; Acuña, A U

    1996-01-01

    The chemical and spectroscopic properties of the new fluorescent acids all(E)-8, 10, 12, 14, 16-octadecapentaenoic acid (t-COPA) and its (8Z)-isomer (c-COPA) have been characterized in solvents of different polarity, synthetic lipid bilayers, and lipid/protein systems. These compounds are reasonably photostable in solution, present an intense UV absorption band (epsilon(350 nm) approximately 10(5) M(-1) cm(-1)) strongly overlapped by tryptophan fluorescence and their emission, centered at 470 nm, is strongly polarized (r(O) = 0.385 +/- 0.005) and decays with a major component (85%) of lifetime 23 ns and a faster minor one of lifetime 2 ns (D,L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), 15 degrees C). Both COPA isomers incorporate readily into vesicles and membranes (K(p) approximately 10(6)) and align parallel to the lipids. t-COPA distributes homogeneously between gel and fluid lipid domains and the changes in polarization accurately reflect the lipid T(m) values. From the decay of the fluorescence anisotropy in spherical bilayers of DMPC and POPC it is shown that t-COPA also correctly reflects the lipid order parameters, determined by 2H NMR techniques. Resonance energy transfer from tryptophan to the bound pentaenoic acid in serum albumin in solution, and from the tryptophan residues of gramicidin in lipid bilayers also containing the pentaenoic acid, show that this probe is a useful acceptor of protein tryptophan excitation, with R(O) values of 30-34 A. Images FIGURE 10 PMID:8889194

  20. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPAL2): A potent MIO-enzyme for the synthesis of non-canonical aromatic alpha-amino acids.: Part II: Application in different reactor concepts for the production of (S)-2-chloro-phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Dreßen, Alana; Hilberath, Thomas; Mackfeld, Ursula; Rudat, Jens; Pohl, Martina

    2017-09-20

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPAL2) is in general a very good catalyst for the amination of fluoro- and chloro-cinnamic acid derivatives yielding halogenated (S)-phenylalanine derivatives with ≥85% conversion and excellent ee values >99%. We have studied the application of this enzyme as whole cell biocatalyst and immobilized on the cellulose carrier Avicel(®) for the production of the hypertension drug precursor (S)-2-chloro-phenylalanine using batch, fed-batch, as well as continuous membrane reactor and plug-flow reactor. For immobilization, a C-terminal fusion of the enzyme with a carbohydrate binding module (CBM) was produced, which selectively binds to Avicel(®) directly from crude cell extracts, thus enabling a fast and cheap immobilization, stabilization and recycling of the enzyme. 1g Avicel was loaded with 10mg enzyme. Best results were obtained with whole cells using the continuous membrane reactor (47gproduct/gDryCellWeight) and using the immobilized enzyme in a repetitive fed-batch (274gproduct/gimmobilized enzyme) or in a continuous plug-flow reactor (288gproduct/gimmobilize enzyme). Therewith the productivity of AtPAL2 outperforms the established fed-batch process at DSM using PAL from Rhodotorula glutinis in E. coli as whole cell biocatalyst with a productivity of 0.14gproduct/gWetCellWeight (ca. 0.7gproduct/gDryCellWeight) (de Lange et al., 2011; doi:10.1002/cctc.201000435). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Abscisic acid-lipid interactions: a phospholipid monolayer study.

    PubMed

    Bürner, H; Benz, R; Gimmler, H; Hartung, W; Stillwell, W

    1993-08-15

    Lipid monolayer studies were performed on a Langmuir trough in the absence and in the presence of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA). The ABA-induced effects on the lipid monolayers can be summarized as follows: (i) ABA as the free acid (pH below 5.3) increased the molecular area and slightly decreased the surface pressure in the collapse points of monolayers made of saturated, unsaturated and of mixed lipids; ABA as the anion showed only minor effects. (ii) The ABA-induced area increase of the lipid monolayers decreased when the surface pressure increased, but some ABA remained in the monolayers made of unsaturated phospholipids even at collapse pressure. (iii) The incorporation of ABA into the monolayers could be inhibited by adding the plant sterol beta-sitosterol to the monolayer forming phospholipids. (iv) There was no substantial difference of ABA action on plant phospholipids as compared with other phospholipids. (v) ABA had a much stronger influence on unsaturated phospholipids than on saturated ones. (vi) ABA decreased the phase-transition temperature of saturated phospholipids. These results, which agree with those obtained from phospholipid vesicle studies, indicate that the physical state of the lipid is important for the ability of ABA penetrating into the lipid monolayer. Finally, a possible relevance of these results is discussed in terms of the action of ABA on guard cell membranes of plants.

  2. Amino Acid Degradations Produced by Lipid Oxidation Products.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-06-10

    Differently to amino acid degradations produced by carbohydrate-derived reactive carbonyls, amino acid degradations produced by lipid oxidation products are lesser known in spite of being lipid oxidation a major source of reactive carbonyls in food. This article analyzes the conversion of amino acids into Strecker aldehydes, α-keto acids, and amines produced by lipid-derived free radicals and carbonyl compounds, as well as the role of lipid oxidation products on the reactions suffered by these compounds: the formation of Strecker aldehydes and other aldehydes from α-keto acids; the formation of Strecker aldehydes and olefins from amines; the formation of shorter aldehydes from Strecker aldehydes; and the addition reactions suffered by the olefins produced from the amines. The relationships among all these reactions and the effect of reaction conditions on them are discussed. This knowledge should contribute to better control food processing in order to favor the formation of desirable beneficial compounds and to inhibit the production of compounds with deleterious properties.

  3. Lipid interaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A. Acid-triggered permeabilization and aggregation of lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Menestrina, G; Pederzolli, C; Forti, S; Gambale, F

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of Pseudomonas exotoxin A with small unilamellar vesicles comprised of different phospholipids as a function of pH, toxin, and lipid concentration. We have found that this toxin induces vesicle permeabilization, as measured by the release of a fluorescent dye. Permeabilization is due to the formation of ion-conductive channels which we have directly observed in planar lipid bilayers. The toxin also produces vesicle aggregation, as indicated by an increase of the turbidity. Aggregation and permeabilization have completely different time course and extent upon toxin dose and lipid composition, thus suggesting that they are two independent events. Both time constants decrease by lowering the pH of the bulk phase or by introducing a negative lipid into the vesicles. Our results indicate that at least three steps are involved in the interaction of Pseudomonas exotoxin A with lipid vesicles. After protonation of one charged group the toxin becomes competent to bind to the surface of the vesicles. Binding is probably initiated by an electrostatic interaction because it is absolutely dependent on the presence of acidic phospholipids. Binding is a prerequisite for the subsequent insertion of the toxin into the lipid bilayer, with a special preference for phosphatidylglycerol-containing membranes, to form ionic channels. At high toxin and vesicle concentrations, bound toxin may also induce aggregation of the vesicles, particularly when phosphatidic acid is present in the lipid mixture. A quenching of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the protein, which is induced by lowering the pH of the solution, becomes more drastic in the presence of lipid vesicles. However, this further quenching takes so long that it cannot be a prerequisite to either vesicle permeabilization or aggregation. Pseudomonas exotoxin A shares many of these properties with other bacterial toxins like diphtheria and tetanus toxin. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 12

  4. Dietary lipid level influences fatty acid profiles, tissue composition, and lipid peroxidation of soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen-Huei; Lin, Way-Yee; Chu, Jen-Hong

    2005-11-01

    Dietary lipids containing equal portions of soybean oil and fish oil were fed to juvenile Chinese soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis, at supplementation level of 0 to 15% for 8 weeks. Tissue fat contents of turtles increased when dietary lipid concentration increased. Fatty acid profiles for turtles fed diets supplemented with 6% or higher levels of lipids were similar to those in dietary lipids. On absolute value basis, fatty acids of 14-, 16-, and 18-carbons in muscle of turtles fed diet without lipid supplementation were higher than those in the initial turtle muscle. Among them, C16:1 and C18:1 was approximately 4 and 2 fold higher, respectively, than that of the initial turtles. By contrast, absolute amounts of C20:5 and C22:6 in muscle of turtles fed diet without lipid supplementation were slightly less than those in the initial turtles. For turtles fed lipid supplemented diets, tissue C20:5 and C22:6, however, increased when dietary lipid level increased. These results suggest that soft-shelled turtles are capable of synthesizing fatty acids up to 18 carbons from other nutrients and that they may have limited or no ability to synthesize highly unsaturated fatty acids. Lipid peroxidation measured by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in tissues of turtles fed 12% and 15% lipids was greater (p<0.05) than that in turtles fed 3% to 9% lipids. This could be due to high lipid and unsaturated fatty acid content in these tissues. On lipid basis, lipid peroxidation in turtles fed diet without lipid supplementation was the highest among all groups suggesting the existence of antioxidant factors in the dietary lipids.

  5. Multiscale structures of lipids in foods as parameters affecting fatty acid bioavailability and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Michalski, M C; Genot, C; Gayet, C; Lopez, C; Fine, F; Joffre, F; Vendeuvre, J L; Bouvier, J; Chardigny, J M; Raynal-Ljutovac, K

    2013-10-01

    On a nutritional standpoint, lipids are now being studied beyond their energy content and fatty acid (FA) profiles. Dietary FA are building blocks of a huge diversity of more complex molecules such as triacylglycerols (TAG) and phospholipids (PL), themselves organised in supramolecular structures presenting different thermal behaviours. They are generally embedded in complex food matrixes. Recent reports have revealed that molecular and supramolecular structures of lipids and their liquid or solid state at the body temperature influence both the digestibility and metabolism of dietary FA. The aim of the present review is to highlight recent knowledge on the impact on FA digestion, absorption and metabolism of: (i) the intramolecular structure of TAG; (ii) the nature of the lipid molecules carrying FA; (iii) the supramolecular organization and physical state of lipids in native and formulated food products and (iv) the food matrix. Further work should be accomplished now to obtain a more reliable body of evidence and integrate these data in future dietary recommendations. Additionally, innovative lipid formulations in which the health beneficial effects of either native or recomposed structures of lipids will be taken into account can be foreseen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) derivatives with dithiocarbamates derived from alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K; Pandey, Om P

    2006-06-01

    Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with dithiocarbamates have been synthesized by the reactions of lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) chloride with barium dithiocarbamate and complexes of type [LnCl(L)H2O]n have been obtained (where Ln=La(III) or Pr(III); L=barium salt of dithiocarbamate derived from glycine, L-leucine, L-valine, DL-alanine). The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H NMR spectral studies. The presence of coordinated water molecule is inferred from thermogravimetric analysis which indicates the loss of one water molecule at 150-170 degrees C. The oscillator strength, Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter, stimulated emission cross-section, etc. have been obtained for different transitions of Pr3+.

  7. Fatty Acids, Lipid Mediators, and T-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Anja J.; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Toes, René E. M.; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Research toward the mechanisms underlying obesity-linked complications has intensified during the last years. As a consequence, it has become clear that metabolism and immunity are intimately linked. Free fatty acids and other lipids acquired in excess by current feeding patterns have been proposed to mediate this link due to their immune modulatory capacity. The functional differences between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, in combination with their dietary intake are believed to modulate the outcome of immune responses. Moreover, unsaturated fatty acids can be oxidized in a tightly regulated and specific manner to generate either potent pro-inflammatory or pro-resolving lipid mediators. These oxidative derivatives of fatty acids have received detailed attention during the last years, as they have proven to have strong immune modulatory capacity, even in pM ranges. Both fatty acids and oxidized fatty acids have been studied especially in relation to macrophage and T-cells functions. In this review, we propose to focus on the effect of fatty acids and their oxidative derivatives on T-cells, as it is an active area of research during the past 5 years. The effect of fatty acids and their derivatives on activation and proliferation of T-cells, as well as the delicate balance between stimulation and lipotoxicity will be discussed. Moreover, the receptors involved in the interaction between free fatty acids and their derivatives with T-cells will be summarized. Finally, the mechanisms involved in modulation of T-cells by fatty acids will be addressed, including cellular signaling and metabolism of T-cells. The in vitro results will be placed in context of in vivo studies both in humans and mice. In this review, we summarize the latest findings on the immune modulatory function of lipids on T-cells and will point out novel directions for future research. PMID:25352844

  8. Controlling Styrene Maleic acid lipid particles through RAFT.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anton A A; Autzen, Henriette Elisabeth; Laursen, Tomas; Wu, Vincent; Yen, Max; Hall, Aaron; Hansen, Scott D; Cheng, Yifan; Xu, Ting

    2017-09-21

    The ability of styrene maleic acid copolymers to dissolve lipid membranes into nanosized lipid particles is a facile method of obtaining membrane proteins in solubilized lipid discs while conserving part of its native lipid environment. While the currently used copolymers can readily extract membrane proteins in native nanodiscs, their highly disperse composition is likely to influence the dispersity of the discs as well as the extraction efficiency. In this study, reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer was used to control the polymer architecture and dispersity of molecular weights with a high-precision. Based on Monte Carlo simulations of the polymerizations, the monomer composition was predicted and allowed a structure-function analysis of the polymer architecture in relation to their ability to assemble into lipid nanoparticles. We show that a higher degree of control of the polymer architecture may lead to homogeneous samples. We hypothesize that low dispersity copolymers with control of polymer architecture are an ideal frame-work for the rational design of polymers for customized isolation and characterization of integral membrane proteins in native lipid bilayer systems.

  9. Enzymic synthesis of L-lysine from DL-alpha-amino-epsilon-caprolactam by new microbial strains.

    PubMed

    Plhácková, K; Vojtísek, V; Plachý, J

    1982-01-01

    The production of L-lysine from DL-alpha-amino-epsilon-caprolactam (DL-ACL) by new strains producing L-alpha-amino-epsilon-caprolactamase and aminocaprolactam racemase is described. Optimal conditions for hydrolysis of L-ACL by Cryptococcus sp. and for racemization of ACL by cells of a strain isolated in nature and identified as Pseudomonas sp. were determined. Synthesis of L-alpha-amino-epsilon-caprolactamase is induced by DL-ACL or L-lysine with the same effectivity. A positive effect of phosphates (potassium salts) on reduction of the induction lag was detected, the synthesis of this enzyme was found to be repressed by glucose and some possibilities of the reversion of this repressive effect were demonstrated. Under conditions optimal for the production of both enzymes a quantitative theoretical conversion of 10% aqueous DL-ACL to L-lysine by a mixture of native cells in a mass ratio of 1 : 2 (producer of ACL-hydrolase to producer of ACL-racemase) occurred in 8 h at 40 degrees C and pH 8.0.

  10. Omega-3 fatty acids, lipid rafts, and T cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-08-15

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been shown in many clinical studies to attenuate inflammatory responses. Although inflammatory responses are orchestrated by a wide spectrum of cells, CD4(+) T cells play an important role in the etiology of many chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. In light of recent concerns over the safety profiles of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), alternatives such as bioactive nutraceuticals are becoming more attractive. In order for these agents to be accepted into mainstream medicine, however, the mechanisms by which nutraceuticals such as n-3 PUFA exert their anti-inflammatory effects must be fully elucidated. Lipid rafts are nanoscale, dynamic domains in the plasma membrane that are formed through favorable lipid-lipid (cholesterol, sphingolipids, and saturated fatty acids) and lipid-protein (membrane-actin cytoskeleton) interactions. These domains optimize the clustering of signaling proteins at the membrane to facilitate efficient cell signaling which is required for CD4(+) T cell activation and differentiation. This review summarizes novel emerging data documenting the ability of n-3 PUFA to perturb membrane-cytoskeletal structure and function in CD4(+) T cells. An understanding of these underlying mechanisms will provide a rationale for the use of n-3 PUFA in the treatment of chronic inflammation.

  11. Effects of different biomass drying and lipid extraction methods on algal lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and biodiesel quality.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Javid; Liu, Yan; Lopes, Wilson A; Druzian, Janice I; Souza, Carolina O; Carvalho, Gilson C; Nascimento, Iracema A; Liao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Three lipid extraction methods of hexane Soxhlet (Sox-Hex), Halim (HIP), and Bligh and Dyer (BD) were applied on freeze-dried (FD) and oven-dried (OD) Chlorella vulgaris biomass to evaluate their effects on lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and algal biodiesel quality. Among these three methods, HIP was the preferred one for C. vulgaris lipid recovery considering both extraction efficiency and solvent toxicity. It had the highest lipid yields of 20.0 and 22.0% on FD and OD biomass, respectively, with corresponding neutral lipid yields of 14.8 and 12.7%. The lipid profiling analysis showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic, and α-linolenic acids were the major fatty acids in the algal lipids, and there were no significant differences on the amount of these acids between different drying and extraction methods. Correlative models applied to the fatty acid profiles concluded that high contents of palmitic and oleic acids in algal lipids contributed to balancing the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and led to a high-quality algal biodiesel.

  12. Fatty acid composition and lipid peroxidation of soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis, fed different dietary lipid sources.

    PubMed

    Lin, Way-Yee; Huang, Chen-Huei

    2007-01-01

    Juvenile soft-shelled turtles (Pelodiscus sinensis) were fed 7 diets containing 8% of lard, soybean oil, olive oil, menhaden fish oil, or mixtures of 1 to 1 ratio of fish oil and lard, soybean oil, olive oil for 10 weeks. Growth and muscle proximate compositions of the turtles were not affected by different dietary treatments (p>0.05). Fatty acid profiles in muscle polar lipids, muscle non-polar lipids, and liver polar lipids reflected the fatty acid composition of dietary lipid source. Turtles fed diets containing fish oil generally contained significantly higher (p<0.05) proportion of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) in both polar and non-polar lipids of muscle and polar fraction of liver lipids than those fed other oils. Non-polar fraction of liver lipids from all groups of turtles contained less than 1% of HUFA. All turtles contained relatively high proportions of oleic acid in their lipids regardless of the dietary lipid source. Further, lipid peroxidation in both muscle tissue and liver microsomes of turtles fed fish oil as the sole lipid source was greater (p<0.05) than those fed fish oil-free diets. Turtles fed olive oil as the sole lipid source had the lowest lipid peroxidation rate among all dietary groups. The results indicate that dietary n-3 HUFA may not be crucial for optimal growth of soft-shelled turtles although they may be used for metabolic purpose. Further, high level of dietary HUFA not only increases the HUFA content in turtle tissues, but also enhances the susceptibility of these tissues to lipid peroxidation.

  13. Oleic Acid enhances all-trans retinoic Acid loading in nano-lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Chinsriwongkul, Akhayachatra; Opanasopit, Praneet; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Sila-On, Warisada; Ruktanonchai, Uracha

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the enhancement of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) loading in nano-lipid emulsions and stability by using oleic acid. The effect of formulation factors including initial ATRA concentration and the type of oil on the physicochemical properties, that is, percentage yield, percentage drug release, and photostability of formulations, was determined. The solubility of ATRA was increased in the order of oleic acid > MCT > soybean oil > water. The physicochemical properties of ATRA-loaded lipid emulsion, including mean particle diameter and zeta potential, were modulated by changing an initial ATRA concentration as well as the type and mixing ratio of oil and oleic acid as an oil phase. The particles of lipid emulsions had average sizes of less than 250 nm and negative zeta potential. The addition of oleic acid in lipid emulsions resulted in high loading capacity. The photodegradation rate was found to be dependent on the initial drug concentration but independent of the type of oily phase used in this study. The release rates were not affected by initial ATRA concentration but were affected by the type of oil, where oleic acid showed the highest release rate of ATRA from lipid emulsions.

  14. Evidence that oleic acid exists in a separate phase within stratum corneum lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Ongpipattanakul, B.; Burnette, R.R.; Potts, R.O.; Francoeur, M.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Oleic acid is known to be a penetration enhancer for polar to moderately polar molecules. A mechanism related to lipid phase separation has been previously proposed by this laboratory to explain the increases in skin transport. In the studies presented here, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was utilized to investigate whether or not oleic acid exists in a separate phase within stratum corneum (SC) lipids. Per-deuterated oleic acid was employed allowing the conformational phase behavior of the exogenously added fatty acid and the endogenous SC lipids to be monitored independently of each other. The results indicated that oleic acid exerts a significant effect on the SC lipids, lowering the lipid transition temperature (Tm) in addition to increasing the conformational freedom or flexibility of the endogenous lipid alkyl chains above their Tm. At temperatures lower than Tm, however, oleic acid did not significantly change the chain disorder of the SC lipids. Similar results were obtained with lipids isolated from the SC by chloroform:methanol extraction. Oleic acid, itself, was almost fully disordered at temperatures both above and below the endogenous lipid Tm in the intact SC and extracted lipid samples. This finding suggested that oleic acid does exist as a liquid within the SC lipids. The coexistence of fluid oleic acid and ordered SC lipids, at physiological temperatures, is consistent with the previously proposed phase-separation transport mechanism for enhanced diffusion.

  15. A comparative study of the fatty acid composition of prochloron lipids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenrick, J. R.; Deane, E. M.; Bishop, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The chemical analysis of lipids of Prochloron isolated from several hosts is discussed. The object was to determine whether differences in lipid composition could be used to characterize organisms from different sources. Major lipid components are given. An analysis of fatty acid composition of individual lipids slowed a distinctive disstribution of fatty acids. While present results do not justify the use of fatty acid content in the taxonomy of Prochlon, the variations found in the lipids of cells from the same host harvested from different areas, or at different times in the same area, suggest that a study of the effects of temperature and light intensity on lipid composition would be rewarding.

  16. Cannabinoids influence lipid-arachidonic acid pathways in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Smesny, Stefan; Rosburg, Timm; Baur, Kati; Rudolph, Nicole; Sauer, Heinrich

    2007-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests modulating effects of cannabinoids on time of onset, severity, and outcome of schizophrenia. Efforts to discover the underlying pathomechanism have led to the assumption of gene x environment interactions, including premorbid genetical vulnerability and worsening effects of continuing cannabis use. The objective of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the relationship between delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol intake and niacin sensitivity in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. Intensity of niacin skin flushing, indicating disturbed prostaglandin-mediated processes, was used as peripheral marker of lipid-arachidonic acid pathways and investigated in cannabis-consuming and nonconsuming schizophrenia patients and in healthy controls. Methylnicotinate was applied in three concentrations onto the forearm skin. Flush response was assessed in 3-min intervals over 15 min using optical reflection spectroscopy. In controls, skin flushing was significantly decreased in cannabis-consuming as compared to nonconsuming individuals. When comparing the nonconsuming subgroups, patients showed significantly decreased flush response. The populations as a whole (patients and controls) showed an inverse association between skin flushing and sum scores of Symptom Check List 90-R. Results demonstrate an impact of long-term cannabis use on lipid-arachidonic acid pathways. Considering pre-existing vulnerability of lipid metabolism in schizophrenia, observed effects of cannabis use support the notion of a gene x environment interaction.

  17. Permeability of lipid bilayers to amino acids and phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Permeability coefficients for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, were measured and compared with values for other ionic solutes such as phosphate. The rates of efflux of glycine, lysine, phenylalanine, serine and tryptophan were determined after they were passively entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) composed of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). The following permeability coefficients were obtained for: glycine, 5.7 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 2.0 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); serine, 5.5 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 1.6 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); lysine, 5.1 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 1.9 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); tryptophan, 4.1 x 10(-10) cm s-1 (EPC); and phenylalanine, 2.5 x 10(-10) cm s-1 (EPC). Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly, while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested. Phosphate permeability was in the range of 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1 depending on the pH of the medium. The values for the polar and charged amino acids were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium, which are in the range of 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1, depending on conditions and the lipid species used. This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. The results are relevant to the permeation of certain peptides into lipid bilayers during protein translocation and membrane biogenesis.

  18. Permeability of lipid bilayers to amino acids and phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Permeability coefficients for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, were measured and compared with values for other ionic solutes such as phosphate. The rates of efflux of glycine, lysine, phenylalanine, serine and tryptophan were determined after they were passively entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) composed of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). The following permeability coefficients were obtained for: glycine, 5.7 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 2.0 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); serine, 5.5 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 1.6 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); lysine, 5.1 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 1.9 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); tryptophan, 4.1 x 10(-10) cm s-1 (EPC); and phenylalanine, 2.5 x 10(-10) cm s-1 (EPC). Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly, while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested. Phosphate permeability was in the range of 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1 depending on the pH of the medium. The values for the polar and charged amino acids were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium, which are in the range of 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1, depending on conditions and the lipid species used. This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. The results are relevant to the permeation of certain peptides into lipid bilayers during protein translocation and membrane biogenesis.

  19. Fish Lipids as a Valuable Source of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merdzhanova, Albena; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Dobreva, Diana A.; Makedonski, Lyubomir

    2017-03-01

    This article presents information about omega-3 (h-3) and omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) contents in a broad range of commercially important fish species available on Bulgarian fish markets. The aim is to raise consumers' awareness and encourage them to eat fish. Fish species from the Black Sea coast have relatively high proportion of n-3 PUFAs, of which more than 80% is by EPf (eicosapentaenoic acid, C 20:5 n-3) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, C 22:6 n-3). Extensive epidemiological studies show that fish consumption is inversely associated with the incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), stroke and the functioning of the brain. About 0.5 g of omega-3 (EPA+DHA) a day or two savings of oily fish a week are required to reduce the risk of death from CVD. PUFAs needs should be satisfied not only with food additives but with fish lipids containing food.

  20. Fatty acids, lipid emulsions and the immune and inflammatory systems.

    PubMed

    Miles, Elizabeth A; Calder, Philip C

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids modulate the responses of cells of the immune system. Inflammatory and immune responses in patients receiving parenteral nutrition may be modulated by the type of lipid used, which may influence clinical outcomes. Lipid emulsions based solely upon soybean oil may not be optimal because of the role of n-6 fatty acids in promoting inflammation and suppressing immune responses. Lipid emulsions with soybean oil in various combinations with medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), olive oil and fish oil are available. Some early studies have suggested better immune function with MCT-soybean oil than with soybean oil alone, but the differences were small, and more recent studies suggested little difference between soybean oil, MCT-soybean oil and soybean oil-olive oil regarding markers of inflammation and immunity. The inclusion of fish oil in combination with one or more other oils (i.e. soybean, MCT, olive) in the parenteral regimen administered to patients following major gastrointestinal surgery reduces the post-surgery rise in inflammatory markers and the fall in cell-mediated immune markers. These changes are associated with improvements in clinical outcomes. Whether similar effects of intravenous fish oil occur in critically ill patients is not clear at present because of the small number, small size and variable findings of existing studies. The lipid component of parenteral nutrition may modify inflammatory and immune processes in ways that influence patient outcome. The inclusion of fish oil in parenteral nutrition for post-surgical patients is associated with benefits. The situation regarding critically ill patients is not clear. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. The phytanic acid content of the lipids of bovine tissues and milk.

    PubMed

    Lough, A K

    1977-01-01

    In three steers which were given grass silage for six months, the content of phytanic acid (i.e. 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-hexadecanoic acid) in plasma lipid increased to about 8% of the total fatty acids, whereas after this time the proportion in the total fatty acids of liver and heart lipids was about 1%, and only 0.1% in those of kidney lipids; the acid was present in trace amounts in adipose-tissue triglycerides and was apparently absent from brain lipids. In eight lactating cows which were given grass silage for about 3 months, the content of phytanic acid in the total long chain fatty acids of milk and of plasma was 0.7% and 13%, respectively. In the plasma lipids of both steers and lactating cows, phytanic acid constituted a substantial proportion of the total fatty acids of the triglycerides and phospholipids; the acid was present in lowest proportion in the cholesteryl esters.

  2. Interaction of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Matthew A; Zheng, Songbo; Roshankar, Golnaz; Alsop, Richard J; Belanger, Randy K R; Huynh, Chris; Kučerka, Norbert; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2012-01-01

    We studied the interaction of Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) with lipid membranes using x-ray diffraction for bilayers containing up to 50 mol% of aspirin. From 2D x-ray intensity maps that cover large areas of reciprocal space we determined the position of the ASA molecules in the phospholipid bilayers and the molecular arrangement of the molecules in the plane of the membranes. We present direct experimental evidence that ASA molecules participate in saturated lipid bilayers of DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and preferably reside in the head group region of the membrane. Up to 50 mol% ASA molecules can be dissolved in this type of bilayer before the lateral membrane organization is disturbed and the membranes are found to form an ordered, 2D crystal-like structure. Furthermore, ASA and cholesterol were found to co-exist in saturated lipid bilayers, with the ASA molecules residing in the head group region and the cholesterol molecules participating in the hydrophobic membrane core.

  3. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Loaded with Retinoic Acid and Lauric Acid as an Alternative for Topical Treatment of Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elton Luiz; Carneiro, Guilherme; De Araújo, Lidiane Advíncula; Trindade, Mariana de Jesus Vaz; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Oréfice, Rodrigo Lambert; Farias, Luis de Macêdo; De Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Dos Santos, Simone Gonçalves; Goulart, Gisele Assis Castro; Alves, Ricardo José; Ferreira, Lucas Antônio Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapy is the first choice for the treatment of mild to moderate acne and all-trans retinoic acid is one of the most used drugs. The combination of retinoids and antimicrobials is an innovative approach for acne therapy. Recently, lauric acid, a saturated fatty acid, has shown strong antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes. However, topical application of retinoic acid is followed by high incidence of side-effects, including erythema and irritation. Solid lipid nanoparticles represent an alternative to overcome these side-effects. This work aims to develop solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with retinoic acid and lauric acid and evaluate their antibacterial activity. The influence of lipophilic stearylamine on the characteristics of solid lipid nanoparticles was investigated. Solid lipid nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The in vitro inhibitory activity of retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles was evaluated against Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. High encapsulation efficiency was obtained at initial time (94 ± 7% and 100 ± 4% for retinoic acid and lauric acid, respectively) and it was demonstrated that lauric acid-loaded-solid lipid nanoparticles provided the incorporation of retinoic acid. However, the presence of stearylamine is necessary to ensure stability of encapsulation. Moreover, retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles showed growth inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus, representing an interesting alternative for the topical therapy of acne vulgaris.

  4. Lipid profiling of the Arabidopsis hypersensitive response reveals specific lipid peroxidation and fragmentation processes: biogenesis of pimelic and azelaic acid.

    PubMed

    Zoeller, Maria; Stingl, Nadja; Krischke, Markus; Fekete, Agnes; Waller, Frank; Berger, Susanne; Mueller, Martin J

    2012-09-01

    Lipid peroxidation (LPO) is induced by a variety of abiotic and biotic stresses. Although LPO is involved in diverse signaling processes, little is known about the oxidation mechanisms and major lipid targets. A systematic lipidomics analysis of LPO in the interaction of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) with Pseudomonas syringae revealed that LPO is predominantly confined to plastid lipids comprising galactolipid and triacylglyceride species and precedes programmed cell death. Singlet oxygen was identified as the major cause of lipid oxidation under basal conditions, while a 13-lipoxygenase (LOX2) and free radical-catalyzed lipid oxidation substantially contribute to the increase upon pathogen infection. Analysis of lox2 mutants revealed that LOX2 is essential for enzymatic membrane peroxidation but not for the pathogen-induced free jasmonate production. Despite massive oxidative modification of plastid lipids, levels of nonoxidized lipids dramatically increased after infection. Pathogen infection also induced an accumulation of fragmented lipids. Analysis of mutants defective in 9-lipoxygenases and LOX2 showed that galactolipid fragmentation is independent of LOXs. We provide strong in vivo evidence for a free radical-catalyzed galactolipid fragmentation mechanism responsible for the formation of the essential biotin precursor pimelic acid as well as of azelaic acid, which was previously postulated to prime the immune response of Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that azelaic acid is a general marker for LPO rather than a general immune signal. The proposed fragmentation mechanism rationalizes the pathogen-induced radical amplification and formation of electrophile signals such as phytoprostanes, malondialdehyde, and hexenal in plastids.

  5. Lipid growth requirement and influence of lipid supplement on fatty acid and aldehyde composition of Syntrophococcus sucromutans.

    PubMed Central

    Doré, J; Bryant, M P

    1989-01-01

    Results concerning the ruminal fluid growth requirement of the ruminal acetogen, Syntrophococcus sucromutans, indicate that octadecenoic acid isomers satisfy this essential requirement. Complex lipids, such as triglycerides and phospholipids, can also support growth. The cellular fatty acid and aldehyde composition closely reflects that of the lipid supplement provided to the cells. Up to 98% of the fatty acids and 80% of the fatty aldehydes are identical in chain length and degree of unsaturation to the octadecenoic acid supplement provided in the medium. S. sucromutans shows a tendency to have a greater proportion of the aldehyde form among its 18 carbon chains than it does with the shorter-chain simple lipids, which may be interpreted as a strategy to maintain membrane fluidity. 14C labeling showed that most of the oleic acid taken up from the medium was incorporated into the membrane fraction of the cells. PMID:2729991

  6. Lipid and fatty acid compositions of cod ( Gadus morhua), haddock ( Melanogrammus aeglefinus) and halibut ( Hippoglossus hippoglossus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Duan; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui; Milley, Joyce E.; Lall, Santosh P.

    2010-12-01

    This study was conducted to compare lipid and fatty acid composition of cod, haddock and halibut. Three groups of cod (276 g ± 61 g), haddock (538 g ± 83 g) and halibut (3704 g ± 221 g) were maintained with commercial feeds mainly based on fish meal and marine fish oil for 12 weeks prior to sampling. The fatty acid compositions of muscle and liver were determined by GC/FID after derivatization of extracted lipids into fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). Lipids were also fractionated into neutral and polar lipids using Waters silica Sep-Pak?. The phospholipid fraction was further separated by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and the FAME profile was obtained. Results of the present study showed that cod and haddock were lean fish and their total muscle lipid contents were 0.8% and 0.7%, respectively, with phospholipid constituting 83.6% and 87.5% of the total muscle lipid, respectively. Halibut was a medium-fat fish and its muscle lipid content was 8%, with 84% of the total muscle lipid being neutral lipid. Total liver lipid contents of cod, haddock and halibut were 36.9%, 67.2% and 30.7%, respectively, of which the neutral lipids accounted for the major fraction (88.1%-97.1%). Polyunsaturated fatty acids were the most abundant in cod and haddock muscle neutral lipid. Monounsaturated fatty acid level was the highest in halibut muscle neutral lipid. Fatty acid compositions of phospholipid were relatively constant. In summary, the liver of cod and haddock as lean fish was the main lipid reserve organ, and structural phospholipid is the major lipid form in flesh. However, as a medium-fat fish, halibut stored lipid in both their liver and muscle.

  7. Peripheral serotonin enhances lipid metabolism by accelerating bile acid turnover.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Akasaka, Daisuke; Ogasawara, Hideki; Sato, Kan; Miyake, Masato; Saito, Kazuki; Takahashi, Yu; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Hondo, Tetsuya; Chao, Guozheng; Rose, Michael T; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Aso, Hisashi

    2010-10-01

    Serotonin is synthesized by two distinct tryptophan hydroxylases, one in the brain and one in the periphery. The latter is known to be unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. These two serotonin systems have apparently independent functions, although the functions of peripheral serotonin have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, we have investigated the physiological effect of peripheral serotonin on the concentrations of metabolites in the circulation and in the liver. After fasting, mice were ip injected with 1 mg serotonin. The plasma glucose concentration was significantly elevated between 60 and 270 min after the injection. In contrast, plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and nonesterified fatty acid concentrations were decreased. The hepatic glycogen synthesis and concentrations were significantly higher at 240 min. At the same time, the hepatic triglyceride content was significantly lower than the basal levels noted before the serotonin injection, whereas the hepatic cholesterol content was significantly higher by 60 min after the injection. Furthermore, serotonin stimulated the contraction of the gallbladder and the excretion of bile. After the serotonin injection, there was a significant induction of apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter expression, resulting in a decrease in the concentration of bile acids in the feces. Additionally, data are presented to show that the functions of serotonin are mediated through diverse serotonin receptor subtypes. These data indicate that peripheral serotonin accelerates the metabolism of lipid by increasing the concentration of bile acids in circulation.

  8. [Fatty acid composition of structural lipids of normal and abnormal wool fibres].

    PubMed

    Havryliak, V V; Tkachuk, V M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the fatty acid composition of structural lipids, isolated from normal and abnormal wool fibers. The results of these studies show that regardless of the type of wool fibers defect there are quantitative changes in their fatty acid composition. It was shown that the main fatty acid of the covalently bound lipids, isolated from the wool fibers, is 18-methyleicosanoic acid (18-MEA), comprising 40% of the total fatty acid, while its amount in free lipids in norm is less than 4%. The decrease of 18-MEA content in the covalently bound lipid both in pathological thin and entangled wool fibers was established, which is associated with damage of the cuticle layer surface. Increasing of 18-MEA content in the free lipids in the entangled wool fibers may indicate a rupture of tioester links between lipids and proteins of cuticle layer lamellar structures.

  9. [The action of week inorganic acids and lower carboxylic acids on the conductivity of bilayer lipid membranes].

    PubMed

    Kilivnik, K E; Khmarskaia, L A; Ksenzhek, O S

    2009-01-01

    The ability of weak inorganic acids (H2S, HCN) and lower carboxylic acids to interact with bilayer lipid membranes, change their conductivity, and act as protonophores has been investigated. The mechanism of changes in BLM conductivity was studied. Factors influencing the interaction of acids with model lipid membranes were determined. Maximum changes in conductivity were observed at pH values equal to the dissociation constants of weak acids and depend on the coefficients of distribution "octanol-water".

  10. Impact of iron, chelators, and free fatty acids on lipid oxidation in low-moisture crackers.

    PubMed

    Barden, Leann; Vollmer, Daniel; Johnson, David; Decker, Eric

    2015-02-18

    This research strove to understand the relationship between physical structure and oxidative stability in crackers since mechanisms of lipid oxidation are poorly understood in low-moisture foods. Confocal microscopy showed that lipids formed a continuous matrix surrounding starch granules, and starch-lipid, lipid-air, and protein-lipid interfaces were observed. Unlike bulk oils, meats, and emulsions, lipid hydroperoxides exhibited greater stability in low-moisture crackers as hexanal formation was delayed >20 d. Iron, added at 10 times the concentrations normally found in enriched flour, did not increase oxidation rates compared to the control. EDTA may reduce endogenous iron activity but not as greatly as in other matrices. Addition of fatty acids up to 1.0% of total lipid weight did not statistically affect lipid oxidation lag phases. The unique structure of low-moisture foods clearly affects their resistance to metal-promoted lipid oxidation.

  11. Access to enantioenriched alpha-amino esters via rhodium-catalyzed 1,4-addition/enantioselective protonation.

    PubMed

    Navarre, Laure; Martinez, Rémi; Genet, Jean-Pierre; Darses, Sylvain

    2008-05-14

    Conjugate addition of potassium trifluoro(organo)borates 2 to dehydroalanine derivatives 1, mediated by a chiral rhodium catalyst and in situ enantioselective protonation, afforded straightforward access to a variety of protected alpha-amino esters 3 with high yields and enantiomeric excesses up to 95%. Among the tested chiral ligands and proton sources, Binap, in combination with guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), an inexpensive and nontoxic phenol, afforded the highest asymmetric inductions. Organostannanes have also shown to participate in this reaction. By a fine-tuning of the ester moiety, and using Difluorophos as chiral ligand, increased levels of enantioselectivity, generally close to 95%, were achieved. Deuterium labeling experiments revealed, and DFT calculation supported, an unusual mechanism involving a hydride transfer from the amido substituent to the alpha carbon explaining the high levels of enantioselectivity attained in controlling this alpha chiral center.

  12. Process strategies to maximize lipid accumulations of novel yeast in acid and base treated hydrolyzates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oleaginous yeasts can accumulate up to 70% of cell biomass as lipids, predominantly as triacylglycerols. Yeast lipid fatty acid profiles have been reported to be similar to that of vegetable oils and consist primarily of oleic, palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acids. This capability provides the oppo...

  13. THP-1 macrophage lipid accumulation unaffected by fatty acid double bond geometric or positional configuration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dietary fatty acid type alters atherosclerotic lesion progression and macrophage lipid accumulation. Incompletely elucidated are the mechanisms by which fatty acids differing in double-bond geometric or positional configuration alter arterial lipid accumulation. The objective of this study was to ev...

  14. LIPID CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF HIGHLY UNSATURATED LONG CHAIN FATTY ACIDS IN MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The very long chain highly unsaturated C28 fatty acids, octacosaheptaenoic [28:7(n-6)] and octacosaoctaenoic acid [28:8(n-3)], were found to be associated with phospholipids, obtained by fractionation of total lipid extracts into distinct lipid classes, in 4 and 6, respectively, ...

  15. The effect of dietary fat and omega-3 fatty acids on whole body lipid oxidation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids yields several electrophilic, reactive carbonyl metabolites. We hypothesized that an increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3) would lead to increased lipid peroxidation metabolites compared to a diet low in n-3. As part of a randomized crossov...

  16. LIPID CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF HIGHLY UNSATURATED LONG CHAIN FATTY ACIDS IN MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The very long chain highly unsaturated C28 fatty acids, octacosaheptaenoic [28:7(n-6)] and octacosaoctaenoic acid [28:8(n-3)], were found to be associated with phospholipids, obtained by fractionation of total lipid extracts into distinct lipid classes, in 4 and 6, respectively, ...

  17. Investigation of heat induced reactions between lipid oxidation products and amino acids in lipid rich model systems and hazelnuts.

    PubMed

    Karademir, Yeşim; Göncüoğlu, Neslihan; Gökmen, Vural

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of lipid oxidation to non-enzymatic browning reactions in lipid rich model and actual food systems. Hazelnut oil and model reaction mixtures consisting of different amino acids were heated under certain conditions to determine possible lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reaction products. In model systems, the Schiff base of 2,4-decadienal, its decarboxylated form, and reaction products formed after hydrolytic cleavage of the Schiff base or decarboxylated form were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. No furosine was detected in hazelnuts after roasting at 160 °C while the concentration of free amino acids significantly decreased. 2,4-Decadienal reacted effectively with all amino acids studied through a Maillard type carbonyl-amine condensation pathway. (2E,4E)-Deca-2,4-dien-1-amine was identified as a typical reaction product in model systems and roasted hazelnuts. In lipid-rich foods like hazelnuts, lipid-derived carbonyls might be responsible for potential modifications of free and protein bound amino acids during heating.

  18. Effect of Growth on Fatty Acid Composition of Total Intramuscular Lipid and Phospholipids in Ira Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingzhi; Li, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    The changes in fatty acid composition of total intramuscular lipid and phospholipids were investigated in the longissimus dorsi, left-hind leg muscle, and abdominal muscle of male Ira rabbits. Changes were monitored at 35, 45, 60, 75, and 90 d. Analysis using gas chromatography identified 21 types of fatty acids. Results showed that the intramuscular lipid increased and the intramuscular phospholipids (total intramuscular lipid %) decreased in all muscles with increasing age (p<0.05). An abundant amount of unsaturated fatty acids, especially polyunsaturated fatty acids, was distributed in male Ira rabbits at different ages and muscles. Palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), and arachidonic acid (C20:4) were the major fatty acids, which account to the dynamic changes of the n-6/n-3 value in Ira rabbit meat. PMID:26761795

  19. Effect of Growth on Fatty Acid Composition of Total Intramuscular Lipid and Phospholipids in Ira Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shan; He, Zhifei; Lu, Jingzhi; Tao, Xiaoqi; Zheng, Li; Xie, Yuejie; Xiao, Xia; Peng, Rong; Li, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    The changes in fatty acid composition of total intramuscular lipid and phospholipids were investigated in the longissimus dorsi, left-hind leg muscle, and abdominal muscle of male Ira rabbits. Changes were monitored at 35, 45, 60, 75, and 90 d. Analysis using gas chromatography identified 21 types of fatty acids. Results showed that the intramuscular lipid increased and the intramuscular phospholipids (total intramuscular lipid %) decreased in all muscles with increasing age (p<0.05). An abundant amount of unsaturated fatty acids, especially polyunsaturated fatty acids, was distributed in male Ira rabbits at different ages and muscles. Palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), and arachidonic acid (C20:4) were the major fatty acids, which account to the dynamic changes of the n-6/n-3 value in Ira rabbit meat.

  20. Dietary lipid-dependent regulation of de novo lipogenesis and lipid partitioning by ketogenic essential amino acids in mice.

    PubMed

    Nishikata, N; Shikata, N; Kimura, Y; Noguchi, Y

    2011-03-28

    We have previously reported that dietary ketogenic amino acids (KAAs) modulate hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and prevent hepatic steatosis in mice. However, the dependence of the metabolic phenotypes generated by KAA on the type of dietary lipid source remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of KAA combined with different dietary lipid sources on hepatic DNL and tissue lipid partitioning in mice. We compared three different KAA-supplemented diets, in which a portion of the dietary protein was replaced by five major essential amino acids (Leu, Ile, Val, Lys and Thr) in high-fat diets based on palm oil (PO), high-oleic safflower oil (FO) or soy oil (SO). To compare the effects of these diets in C57B6 mice, the differential regulation of DNL and dietary lipid partitioning due to KAA was assessed using stable isotopic flux analysis. The different dietary oils showed strikingly different patterns of lipid partitioning and accumulation in tissues. High-PO diets increased both hepatic and adipose triglycerides (TG), whereas high-FO and high-SO diets increased hepatic and adipose TG, respectively. Stable isotopic flux analysis revealed high rates of hepatic DNL in high-PO and high-FO diets, whereas it was reduced in the high-SO diet. KAA supplementation in high-PO and high-FO diets reduced hepatic TG by reducing the DNL of palmitate and the accumulation of dietary oleate. However, KAA supplementation in the high-SO diet failed to reduce hepatic DNL and TG. Interestingly, KAA reduced SO-induced accumulation of hepatic linoleate and enhanced SO-induced accumulation of dietary oleate. Overall, the reduction of hepatic TG by KAA is dependent on dietary lipid sources and occurs through the modulation of DNL and altered partitioning of dietary lipids. The current results provide further insight into the underlying mechanisms of hepatic lipid reduction by amino acids.

  1. Non-acidic activation of pain-related Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3 by lipids.

    PubMed

    Marra, Sébastien; Ferru-Clément, Romain; Breuil, Véronique; Delaunay, Anne; Christin, Marine; Friend, Valérie; Sebille, Stéphane; Cognard, Christian; Ferreira, Thierry; Roux, Christian; Euller-Ziegler, Liana; Noel, Jacques; Lingueglia, Eric; Deval, Emmanuel

    2016-02-15

    Extracellular pH variations are seen as the principal endogenous signal that triggers activation of Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs), which are basically considered as proton sensors, and are involved in various processes associated with tissue acidification. Here, we show that human painful inflammatory exudates, displaying non-acidic pH, induce a slow constitutive activation of human ASIC3 channels. This effect is largely driven by lipids, and we identify lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and arachidonic acid (AA) as endogenous activators of ASIC3 in the absence of any extracellular acidification. The combination of LPC and AA evokes robust depolarizing current in DRG neurons at physiological pH 7.4, increases nociceptive C-fiber firing, and induces pain behavior in rats, effects that are all prevented by ASIC3 blockers. Lipid-induced pain is also significantly reduced in ASIC3 knockout mice. These findings open new perspectives on the roles of ASIC3 in the absence of tissue pH variation, as well as on the contribution of those channels to lipid-mediated signaling.

  2. Implication of acidic lipids in 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.; Ishitani, R.

    1985-02-04

    To establish the possible involvement of acidic lipids in 5-HT receptor mechanisms, the authors subjected whole rat brain synaptic plasma membranes to treatment with several kinds of lipid-modifying reagents and examined the (/sup 3/H)5-HT and (/sup 3/H)spiperone binding properties of the membranes. (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding was decreased by treatment with Azure A, while (/sup 3/H)spiperone binding was not altered. Similarly, prior treatment with arylsulphatase reduced the former binding, but had no effect on the latter binding. On the other hand, neither (/sup 3/H)ligand binding was sensitive to phospholipases C and D. In contrast, prior treatment with phospholipase A/sub 2/ (unheated) drastically decreased the (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding and also affected the (/sup 3/H)spiperone binding to some extent. Chelation of Ca/sup 2 +/ by EGTA (5 mM) prior to incubation of membranes with the unheated phospholipase A/sub 2/ did not completely prevent the inhibitory effect of this enzyme on (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding, while in the heated enzyme (at 100/sup 0/C for 10 min) EGTA exhibited this preventive effect perfectly. Furthermore, it was an interesting find that at least a low concentration of the heated phospholipase A/sub 2/ (0.01 U) had no effect on the (/sup 3/H)spiperone binding, as contrasted with the case of (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding. In addition, the reduction of (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding capacity in membranes treated with phospholipase A/sub 2/ (heated and unheated) was restored only slightly by treatment with BSA (1%). 17 references, 4 tables.

  3. Bicyclic glutamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Udo; Bisel, Philippe; Weckert, Edgar; Frahm, August Wilhelm

    2006-05-15

    For the second-generation asymmetric synthesis of the trans-tris(homoglutamic) acids via Strecker reaction of chiral ketimines, the cyanide addition as the key stereodifferentiating step produces mixtures of diastereomeric alpha-amino nitrile esters the composition of which is independent of the reaction temperature and the type of the solvent, respectively. The subsequent hydrolysis is exclusively achieved with concentrated H(2)SO(4) yielding diastereomeric mixtures of three secondary alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters and two diastereomeric cis-fused angular alpha-carbamoyl gamma-lactams as bicyclic glutamic acid derivatives, gained from in situ stereomer differentiating cyclisation of the secondary cis-alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters. Separation was achieved by CC. The pure secondary trans-alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters cyclise on heating and treatment with concentrated H(2)SO(4), respectively, to diastereomeric cis-fused angular secondary alpha-amino imides. Their hydrogenolysis led to the enantiomeric cis-fused angular primary alpha-amino imides. The configuration of all compounds was completely established by NMR methods, CD-spectra, and by X-ray analyses of the (alphaR,1R,5R)-1-carbamoyl-2-(1-phenylethyl)-2-azabicyclo[3.3.0]octan-3-one and of the trans-alphaS,1S,2R-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-1-(1-phenylethylamino)cyclopentanecarboxamide.

  4. Amino acid- and lipid-induced insulin resistance in rat heart: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Terruzzi, Ileana; Allibardi, Sonia; Bendinelli, Paola; Maroni, Paola; Piccoletti, Roberta; Vesco, Flavio; Samaja, Michele; Luzi, Livio

    2002-04-25

    Lipids compete with glucose for utilization by the myocardium. Amino acids are an important energetic substrate in the heart but it is unknown whether they reduce glucose disposal. The molecular mechanisms by which lipids and amino acids impair insulin-mediated glucose disposal in the myocardium are unknown. We evaluated the effect of lipids and amino acids on the insulin stimulated glucose uptake in the isolated rat heart and explored the involved target proteins. The hearts were perfused with 16 mM glucose alone or with 6% lipid or 10% amino acid solutions at the rate of 15 ml/min. After 1 h of perfusion (basal period), insulin (240 nmol/l) was added and maintained for an additional hour. Both lipids and amino acids blocked the insulin effect on glucose uptake (P<0.01) and reduced the activity of the IRSs/PI 3-kinase/Akt/GSK3 axis leading to the activation of glucose transport and glycogen synthesis. Amino acids, but not lipids, increased the activity of the p70 S6 kinase leading to the stimulation of protein synthesis. Amino acids induce myocardial insulin resistance recruiting the same molecular mechanisms as lipids. Amino acids retain an insulin-like stimulatory effect on p70 S6 kinase, which is independent from the PI 3-Kinase downstream effectors.

  5. Changes of lipid and fatty acid absorption induced by high dose of citric acid ester and lecithin emulsifiers.

    PubMed

    Sadouki, Mohamed; Bouchoucha, Michel

    2014-09-01

    To describe the effect of two food emulsifiers, lecithin (E322) and citric acid esters of mono-and diglycerides of fatty acids (E472c), on the intestinal absorption of lipids. The experiment was conducted on 24 male Wistar rats randomly assigned in three groups. For two groups of six rats, 30% of the lipid intake was replaced with lecithin (L) or citric acid ester of mono and diglycerides, (E); the remaining 12 rats were the control group (C). Diet and fecal fat analysis was used to determine the apparent lipid absorption (ALA) and fatty acids. ALA was significantly lower in the group E than in the groups C and L (p < 0.001). ALA of long saturated chain fatty acids decreased while the length of the carbon chains increased, and this decrease was higher in the group E. E472c emulsifier decreased the intestinal absorption of lipids.

  6. Impact of Association Colloids on Lipid Oxidation in Triacylglycerols and Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters.

    PubMed

    Homma, Rika; Suzuki, Karin; Cui, Leqi; McClements, David Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2015-11-25

    The impact of association colloids on lipid oxidation in triacylglycerols and fatty acid ethyl esters was investigated. Association colloids did not affect lipid oxidation of high oleic safflower and high linoleic safflower triacylglycerols, but were prooxidative in fish triacylglycerols. Association colloids retarded aldehyde formation in stripped ethyl oleate, linoleate, and fish oil ethyl esters. Interfacial tension revealed that lipid hydroperoxides were surface active in the presence of the surfactants found in association colloids. The lipid hydroperoxides from ethyl esters were less surface active than triacylglycerol hydroperoxides. Stripping decreased iron and copper concentrations in all oils, but more so in fatty acid ethyl esters. The combination of lower hydroperoxide surface activity and low metal concentrations could explain why association colloids inhibited lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters. This research suggests that association colloids could be used as an antioxidant technology in fatty acid ethyl esters.

  7. Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid and carcinoembryonic antigen in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dnistrian, A M; Schwartz, M K

    1981-10-01

    We evaluated lipid-bound sialic acid as a "marker" in cancer patients and assessed the individual and combined value of lipid-bound sialic acid and carcinoembryonic antigen determinations in these patients. Plasma was sampled from 62 normal subjects and 125 cancer patients. Lipid-bound sialic acid was determined by the resorcinol method after total lipid extraction and isolation of the sialolipid fraction from plasma. Neither marker was increased in many breast cancer patients. Carcinoembryonic antigen was increased more commonly and to a greater degree in colon cancer patients and seems to be the preferred marker. Both markers were increased in lung cancer patients and their combined evaluation improved the rate of detection. Lipid-bound sialic acid was increased in more patients with leukemias, lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and melanomas, suggesting that it may be a useful biochemical marker in these types of cancer.

  8. Improved Butanol-Methanol (BUME) Method by Replacing Acetic Acid for Lipid Extraction of Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Mutya; Wang, Miao; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica; Han, Xianlin

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of lipids from biological samples is a critical step in lipidomics, especially for shotgun lipidomics where lipid extracts are directly infused into a mass spectrometer. The butanol-methanol (BUME) extraction method was originally developed to extract lipids from plasma samples with 1 % acetic acid. Considering some lipids are sensitive to acidic environments, we modified this protocol by replacing acetic acid with lithium chloride solution and extended the modified extraction to tissue samples. Although no significant reduction of plasmalogen levels in the acidic BUME extracts of rat heart samples was found, the modified method was established to extract various tissue samples, including rat liver, heart, and plasma. Essentially identical profiles of the majority of lipid classes were obtained from the extracts of the modified BUME and traditional Bligh-Dyer methods. However, it was found that neither the original, nor the modified BUME method was suitable for 4-hydroxyalkenal species measurement in biological samples.

  9. Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid alterations in neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, C; Dixit, M; Hardy, R E

    1990-01-15

    Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid (LSA) was assayed in normal volunteers, patients with non-malignant diseases, and a variety of cancer patients. Mean plasma LSA in 50 normal volunteers, 16 patients with non-malignant diseases, 54 breast cancer, 17 lung cancer, 15 colon cancer, 7 ovarian cancer, 5 prostate cancer, 4 leukemia, 4 gastrointestinal, 3 thyroid cancer, 3 pancreas cancer and 2 adrenal cancer patients were 17.7, 23.2, 58, 85, 56.7, 46.2, 56.7, 53.3, 31.1, 33.2 and 119.5 mg/dl, respectively. None of the normal volunteers had elevated plasma LSA values. Plasma LSA level was not significantly different in male and female volunteers. Two out of 114 different cancer patients had plasma LSA levels within normal range exhibiting 98.2% sensitivity of the assay. Plasma LSA, which is relatively simple to assay, may be used as a tumor marker in wide variety of neoplastic diseases.

  10. Hydrothermal nitric acid treatment for effectual lipid extraction from wet microalgae biomass.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ilgyu; Park, Ji-Yeon; Choi, Sun-A; Oh, You-Kwan; Han, Jong-In

    2014-11-01

    Hydrothermal acid (combined with autoclaving and nitric acid) pretreatment was applied to Nannochloropsis salina as a cost-effective yet efficient way of lipid extraction from wet biomass. The optimal conditions for this pretreatment were determined using a statistical approach, and the roles of nitric acid were also determined. The maximum lipid yield (predicted: 24.6%; experimental: 24.4%) was obtained using 0.57% nitric acid at 120°C for 30min through response surface methodology. A relatively lower lipid yield (18.4%) was obtained using 2% nitric acid; however, chlorophyll and unsaturated fatty acids, both of which adversely affect the refinery and oxidative stability of biodiesel, were found to be not co-extracted. Considering its comparable extractability even from wet biomass and ability to reduce chlorophyll and unsaturated fatty acids, the hydrothermal nitric acid pretreatment can serve as one direct and promising route of extracting microalgae oil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Insights into the complex association of bovine factor Va with acidic-lipid-containing synthetic membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Cutsforth, G A; Koppaka, V; Krishnaswamy, S; Wu, J R; Mann, K G; Lentz, B R

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of blood coagulation cofactor factor Va to acidic-lipid-containing membranes has been addressed. Binding isotherms were generated at room temperature using the change in fluorescence anisotropy of pyrene-labeled bovine factor Va to detect binding to sonicated membrane vesicles containing either bovine brain phosphatidylserine (PS) or 1,2-dioleoyl-3-sn-phosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) in combination with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-sn-phosphatidylcholine (POPC). The composition of the membranes was varied from 0 to 40 mol% for PS/POPC and from 0 to 65 mol % for DOPG/POPC membranes. Fitting the data to a classical Langmuir adsorption model yielded estimates of the dissociation constant (Kd) and the stoichiometry of binding. The values of Kd defined in this way displayed a maximum at low acidic lipid content but were nearly constant at intermediate to high fractions of acidic lipid. Fitting the binding isotherms to a two-process binding model (nonspecific adsorption in addition to binding of acidic lipids to sites on the protein) suggested a significant acidic-lipid-independent binding affinity in addition to occupancy of three protein sites that bind PS in preference to DOPG. Both analyses indicated that interaction of factor Va with an acidic-lipid-containing membrane is much more complex than those of factor Xa or prothrombin. Furthermore, a change in the conformation of bound pyrene-labeled factor Va with surface concentration of acidic lipid was implied by variation of both the saturating fluorescence anisotropy and the binding parameters with the acidic lipid content of the membrane. Finally, the results cannot support the contention that binding occurs through nonspecific adsorption to a patch or domain of acidic lipids in the membrane. Factor Va is suggested to associate with membranes by a complex process that includes both acidic-lipid-specific and acidic-lipid-independent sites and a protein structure change induced by occupancy of acidic-lipid

  12. Chronic administration of ursodeoxycholic and tauroursodeoxycholic acid changes microsomal membrane lipid content and fatty acid compositions in rats.

    PubMed

    Bellentani, S; Chao, Y C; Ferretti, I; Panini, R; Tiribelli, C

    1996-03-27

    We studied the effect of oral supplementation with ursodeoxycholate (UDCA) or tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA) on the lipid content and fatty acid composition of rat hepatic microsomes. UDCA and TUDCA significantly increased the total amount of lipids with the exception of cholesteryl-esters. UDCA significantly increased the triglycerides and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) microsomal content, and decreased the cholesterol/phospholipids and the phosphatidylcholine (PC)/PE ratio. Both treatments increased the percentage oleic acid and of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in each class of lipids. UDCA and TUDCA had a different action on PUFA microsomal molar percentage of phospholipids: UDCA increased the relative percentage of PUFA in the PE fraction, while TUDCA increased the relative percentage of PUFA in the PC fraction. These changes in the hepatic lipid content and composition might in part explain both cytoprotective action of these hydrophillic bile acids and their effect on membrane fluidity.

  13. Chlorogenic acid from honeysuckle improves hepatic lipid dysregulation and modulates hepatic fatty acid composition in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Ruan, Zheng; Wen, Yanmei; Yang, Yuhui; Mi, Shumei; Zhou, Lili; Wu, Xin; Ding, Sheng; Deng, Zeyuan; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-01

    Chlorogenic acid as a natural hydroxycinnamic acid has protective effect for liver. Endotoxin induced metabolic disorder, such as lipid dysregulation and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we investigated the effect of chlorogenic acid in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion. The Sprague-Dawley rats with lipid metabolic disorder (LD group) were intraperitoneally injected endotoxin. And the rats of chlorogenic acid-LD group were daily received chlorogenic acid by intragastric administration. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, the area of visceral adipocyte was decreased and liver injury was ameliorated, as compared to LD group. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, serum triglycerides, free fatty acids, hepatic triglycerides and cholesterol were decreased, the proportion of C20:1, C24:1 and C18:3n-6, Δ9-18 and Δ6-desaturase activity index in the liver were decreased, and the proportion of C18:3n-3 acid was increased, compared to the LD group. Moreover, levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I, and fatty acid β-oxidation were increased in chlorogenic acid-LD group compared to LD rats, whereas levels of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase were decreased. These findings demonstrate that chlorogenic acid effectively improves hepatic lipid dysregulation in rats by regulating fatty acid metabolism enzymes, stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase activation, and modulating levels of hepatic fatty acids.

  14. Malonic acid based cationic lipids - The way to highly efficient DNA-carriers.

    PubMed

    Wölk, Christian; Janich, Christopher; Bakowsky, Udo; Langner, Andreas; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2017-10-01

    Cationic lipids play an important role as non-viral nucleic acid carriers in gene therapy since 3 decades. This review will introduce malonic acid derived cationic lipids as nucleic acid carriers which appeared in the literature dealing with lipofection 10years ago. The family of amino-functionalized branched fatty acid amides will be presented as well as different generations of malonic acid diamides. Both groups of cationic lipids yield lipid mixtures with highly efficient nucleic acid transfer activities in in-vitro cell culture models. The DNA transfer screening of lipid libraries with directed structural variations in the lipophilic as well as in the hydrophilic part of the amphiphiles yields structure/activity relationships. Furthermore, the detailed characterizations of selected lipid composites at the air/water interface and in bulk systems are summarized with regard to transfection determining physical-chemical properties. The findings are also discussed in comparison to results obtained with other families of cationic lipids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Thiopeptide synthesis. {alpha}-amino thionoacid derivatives of nitrobenzotriazole as thioacylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Shalaby, M.A.; Grote, C.W.; Rapoport, H.

    1996-12-13

    There has been considerable interest recently in the synthesis and properties of thiopeptides in which the -CSNH- group replaces one or more peptide bonds. These modified peptides have demonstrated increased activity in vivo as biological response modifiers, neuro-effectors, and immunomodulators due to the stability of their thioamide bonds toward enzymatic degradation as compared to that of their oxygenated counterpart. Synthetic routes employed to prepare these thiopeptides included replacement of oxygen by sulfur using P{sub 4}S{sub 10} or Lawesson`s phosphetane disulfide reagent, and thioesters or dithioesters of N-protected amino acids. Several procedures also have been reported for monothionation of peptides using N-protected amino monothioacids and benzotriazolyloxytris(pyrrolidino) phosphonium hexafluorophosphate (PYBOP) and some of its derivatives. Unfortunately, these methods displayed lack of reaction site specificity, low yields and purity because of side reactions, and loss of enantiomeric integrity in the final product, apparently because of racemization induced by the thioacylating agents. Recently, major improvement was described for the site specific incorporation of thioamide linkages into a growing peptide under mild conditions using thioacylbenzimidazolinones of amino acid derivatives as thioacylating agents. This method proceeds with about 2% loss of enantiomeric purity, as demonstrated by HPLC analysis of the reaction product 10a, formed in reaction with {alpha}-methylbenzylamine. This procedure, although superior to previous methods, still suffers from the formation of benzimidazole 2 as a significant byproduct, and the overall yield for the four-step process was only about 20%. Furthermore, recent attempt to use this procedure failed due to the limited reactivity of the benzimidazolinone 4 as a thioacylating agent. To overcome these limitations, the authors have developed a new method for thiopeptide synthesis. 12 refs.

  16. Dietary linoleic acid-induced alterations in pro- and anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Amit; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon F; Yang, Jun; Blanchard, Helene; Zamora, Daisy; Loewke, James D; Rapoport, Stanley I; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M; Hammock, Bruce D; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic idiopathic pain syndromes are major causes of personal suffering, disability, and societal expense. Dietary n-6 linoleic acid has increased markedly in modern industrialized populations over the past century. These high amounts of linoleic acid could hypothetically predispose to physical pain by increasing the production of pro-nociceptive linoleic acid-derived lipid autacoids and by interfering with the production of anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids derived from n-3 fatty acids. Here, we used a rat model to determine the effect of increasing dietary linoleic acid as a controlled variable for 15 weeks on nociceptive lipid autacoids and their precursor n-6 and n-3 fatty acids in tissues associated with idiopathic pain syndromes. Results Increasing dietary linoleic acid markedly increased the abundance of linoleic acid and its pro-nociceptive derivatives and reduced the abundance of n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their anti-nociceptive monoepoxide derivatives. Diet-induced changes occurred in a tissue-specific manner, with marked alterations of nociceptive lipid autacoids in both peripheral and central tissues, and the most pronounced changes in their fatty acid precursors in peripheral tissues. Conclusions The present findings provide biochemical support for the hypothesis that the high linoleic acid content of modern industrialized diets may create a biochemical susceptibility to develop chronic pain. Dietary linoleic acid lowering should be further investigated as part of an integrative strategy for the prevention and management of idiopathic pain syndromes. PMID:27030719

  17. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 + 0.7% and 8.8 + 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 + 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 + 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 + 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  18. L-2-hydroxytetradecanoic acid as a constituent of Salmonella lipopolysaccharides (lipid A).

    PubMed

    Bryn, K; Rietschel, E T

    1978-05-16

    L-2-Hydroxytetradecanoic acid was recognized as a characteristic, although minor, constituent of the lipid A component of Salmonella lipopolysaccharides. The 2-hydroxy fatty acid was present in lipid A as an ester, probably bound to the hydroxyl group of some D-3-hydroxytetradecanoic acid residues. A survey of enterobacterial lipopolysaccharides showed that L-2-hydroxytetradecanoid acid was also present in Klebsiella and Serratia strains. It was absent, however, from lipopolysaccharides of other genera of the family including Escherichia, Shigella, Proteus, Enterobacter and Yersinia. This restricted distribution of the 2-hydroxy acid may be of significance for taxonomic studies of bacterial genera.

  19. Phospholipid lateral phase separation and the partition of cis-parinaric acid and trans-parinaric acid among aqueous, solid lipid, and fluid lipid phases.

    PubMed

    Sklar, L A; Miljanich, G P; Dratz, E A

    1979-05-01

    The partition of cis-parinaric acid (9,11,13,15-cis, trans, trans,cis-octadecatetraenoic acid, cis-PnA) and trans-parinaric acid (9,11,13,15-all-trans-octadecatetraenoic acid, trans-PnA) among aqueous, solid lipid, and fluid lipid phases has been measured by three spectroscopic parameters: absorption spectral shifts, fluorescence quantum yield, and fluorescence polarization. The solid lipid was dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC); the fluid lipid was palmitoyldocosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PDPC). Mole fraction partition coefficients between lipid and water were determined by absorption spectroscopy to be for ci--PnA, 5.3 X 10(5) with a solid lipid and 9 X 10(5) with fluid lipid and, for trans-PnA, 5 X 10(6) with solid lipid and 1.7 X 10(6) with fluid lipid. Ratios of the solid to the fluid partition coefficients (Kps/f) are 0.6 +/- 0.2 for cis-PnA and 3 +/- 1 for trans-PnA. A phase diagram for codispersions of DPPC and PDPC has been constructed from the measurements of the temperature dependence of the fluorescence quantum yield and polarization of cis-PnA and trans-PnA and their methyl ester derivatives. A simple analysis based on the phase diagram and fluorescence data allows additional calculations of Kps/f's which are determined to be 0.7 +/- 0.2 for the cis probes and 4 +/- 1 for the trans probes. The relative preference of trans-PnA for solid phase lipids and its enhanced quantum yield in solid phase lipids make it sensitive to a few percent solid. The trans probes provide evidence that structural order may persist in dispersions of these phospholipids 10 degrees C or more above their transition temperature. It is concluded that measurements of PnA fluorescence polarization vs. temperature are better suited than measurements of quantum yield vs. temperature for determining phospholipid phase separation.

  20. LIPID CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF HIGHLY UNSATURATED LONG-CHAIN FATTY ACIDS IN MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Very-long-chain highly unsaturated C28 fatty acids (HUFAs), found in a number of dinoflagellates, are released as methyl esters from phospholipids obtained by fractionation of lipid extracts. By contrast, the highly unsaturated C18 fatty acid octadecapentaenoic acid (18:5n-3), co...

  1. LIPID CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF HIGHLY UNSATURATED LONG-CHAIN FATTY ACIDS IN MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Very-long-chain highly unsaturated C28 fatty acids (HUFAs), found in a number of dinoflagellates, are released as methyl esters from phospholipids obtained by fractionation of lipid extracts. By contrast, the highly unsaturated C18 fatty acid octadecapentaenoic acid (18:5n-3), co...

  2. Analysis of the lipid moiety of lipopolysaccharide from Rhizobium tropici CIAT899: identification of 29-hydroxytriacontanoic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Serrano, A M; González-Jiménez, I; Tejero-Mateo, P; Megías, M; Romero-Vazquez, M J

    1994-01-01

    The lipid moieties of two lipid A's isolated from the phenolic and aqueous fractions of lipopolysaccharide from Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 have been studied. Several 3-hydroxy fatty acids and two long-chain hydroxy fatty acids, 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid, and 29-hydroxytriacontanoic acid were identified; the ratios of these acids are the same in both lipid A's. These results can be used for chemotaxonomic purposes. PMID:8157617

  3. Fatty acids from VLDL lipolysis products induce lipid droplet accumulation in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    den Hartigh, Laura J; Connolly-Rohrbach, Jaime E; Fore, Samantha; Huser, Thomas R; Rutledge, John C

    2010-01-01

    One mechanism by which monocytes become activated postprandially is by exposure to triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins such as very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). VLDL are hydrolyzed by lipoprotein lipase (LpL) at the blood-endothelial cell interface, releasing free fatty acids. In this study, we examined postprandial monocyte activation in more detail, and found that lipolysis products generated from postprandial VLDL induce the formation of lipid-filled droplets within cultured THP-1 monocytes, characterized by coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy. Organelle-specific stains revealed an association of lipid droplets with the endoplasmic reticulum, confirmed by electron microscopy. Lipid droplet formation was reduced when LpL-released fatty acids were bound by bovine serum albumin, which also reduced cellular inflammation. Furthermore, saturated fatty acids induced more lipid droplet formation in monocytes compared to mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Monocytes treated with postprandial VLDL lipolysis products contained lipid droplets with more intense saturated Raman spectroscopic signals than monocytes treated with fasting VLDL lipolysis products. In addition, we found that human monocytes isolated during the peak postprandial period contain more lipid droplets compared to those from the fasting state, signifying that their development is not limited to cultured cells but also occurs in vivo. In summary, circulating free fatty acids can mediate lipid droplet formation in monocytes and potentially be used as a biomarker to assess an individual’s risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:20208007

  4. Archaeal Lipid Genes: Clues to Life in Acid and the Evolution of Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macalady, J. L.; Croft, L.; Vestling, M. M.; Harms, A. C.; Zheng, L.; Baumler, D. J.; Kaspar, C. W.; Banfield, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    Microorganisms living in acid mine drainage environments face extraordinary challenges. Acid-loving archaea such as Ferroplasma acidarmanus maintain pH gradients of 4 to 5 pH units across their membranes and thrive in hot, extremely low pH (0-1), metal-rich, solutions. New lipid analyses for two extremely acidophilic archaea, F. acidarmanus and F. acidiphilum, reveal that all known archaeal acidophiles have cell membranes composed primarily of tetraether-linked lipids. Because tetraether lipids assemble in rigid monolayers that exclude protons and metals, we suggest that tetraether synthesis genes are essential for archaeal survival in acid. Fusion of two diether-linked lipids to form a tetraether-linked lipid is a distinctive biochemical reaction with no analogy in bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition to archaeal acidophiles, tetraethers are present in members of every archaeal lineage except halophiles. Genes responsible for tetraether synthesis and subsequent biochemical steps which "tune" membrane lipid properties in response to environmental changes have not been identified to date. Comparative genomic analyses using the newly completed genome of F. acidarmanus and available genomes from Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya have generated candidate tetraether synthase genes found only in archaea. Because tetraether-linked lipids are advantageous for acid-loving and possibly also for heat-loving archaea, the phylogeny of these genes has the potential to shed new light on role of hot, acid environments in early evolution.

  5. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, B. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  6. Enhancement effect of ethanol on lipid and fatty acid accumulation and composition of Scenedesmus sp.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengchen; Wang, Wei; Yue, Long; Yang, Zhen; Fu, Qiuguo; Ye, Qingfu

    2013-07-01

    The effects of ethanol concentration gradients along with varied cultivation times on lipid and fatty acid accumulation and composition of Scenedesmus sp. were studied. The maximum increment of algal density, lipid productivity, lipid content and fatty acid content were 6.61, 11.75, 1.34 and 3.14 times higher than the control group under 12h photoperiod. Algal light deprivation inhibited ethanol positive effects on algal growth and lipid biomass. The cumulative quantity of C16:0 and C18:0 decreased correspondingly with the increase of ethanol concentrations and cultivation times. Besides, unsaturated fatty acids appeared early in algal cells and increased 57.02% in maximum. However, only 2.27% (14)C was transferred from ethanol to fatty acids. The results indicated that adding proper amount of ethanol in algal culture medium was beneficial to biodiesel feedstock production and biodiesel properties.

  7. Pinolenic Acid Downregulates Lipid Anabolic Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah Ron; Han, Sung Nim

    2016-07-01

    Pine nut oil (PNO) was reported to reduce lipid accumulation in the liver. However, the specific effect of pinolenic acid (18:3, all-cis-Δ5,9,12), a unique component of PNO, on lipid metabolism has not been studied. We hypothesized that pinolenic acid downregulates the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells. HepG2 cells were incubated in serum-free medium supplemented with 50 μM bovine serum albumin (BSA), palmitic acid, oleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, pinolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or α-linolenic acid for 24 h. Lipid accumulation was determined by Oil Red O (ORO) staining. The mRNA levels of genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis (SREBP1c, FAS, SCD1, and ACC1), fatty acid oxidation (ACC2, PPARα, CPT1A, and ACADL), cholesterol synthesis (SREBP2 and HMGCR), and lipoprotein uptake (LDLr) and of genes that may be involved in the downregulation of the lipogenic pathway (ACSL3, ACSL4, and ACSL5) were determined by qPCR. LDLR protein levels were measured by Western blot analysis. The mRNA levels of SREBP1c, FAS, and SCD1 were significantly downregulated by pinolenic acid treatment compared to BSA control (53, 54, and 38 % lower, respectively). In addition, the mRNA levels of HMGCR, ACSL3, and LDLr were significantly lower (30, 30, and 43 % lower, respectively), and ACSL4 tended to be lower in the pinolenic acid group (20 % lower, P = 0.082) relative to the control group. In conclusion, pinolenic acid downregulated the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells by reducing expression of genes related to lipid synthesis, lipoprotein uptake, and the regulation of the lipogenic pathway.

  8. Stabilization of polymer lipid complexes prepared with lipids of lactic acid bacteria upon preservation and internalization into eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Alves, P; Hugo, A A; Szymanowski, F; Tymczyszyn, E E; Pérez, P F; Coelho, J F J; Simões, P N; Gómez-Zavaglia, A

    2014-11-01

    The physicochemical characterization of polymer liposome complexes (PLCs) prepared with lipids of lactic acid bacteria and poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) covalently bound to cholesterol (CHO-PDMAEMA) was carried out in an integrated approach, including their stability upon preservation and incorporation into eukaryotic cells. PLCs were prepared with different polymer:lipid molar ratios (0, 0.05 and 0.10). Zeta potential, particle size distribution and polydispersity index were determined. The optimal polymer:lipid ratio and the stability of both bare liposomes and PLCs were evaluated at 37 °C and at different pHs, as well as after storage at 4 °C, -80 °C and freeze-drying in the presence or absence of trehalose 250 mM. Internalization of PLCs by eukaryotic cells was assessed to give a complete picture of the system. Incorporation of CHO-PDMAEMA onto bacterial lipids (ratio 0.05 and 0.10) led to stabilization at 37 °C and pH 7. A slight decrease of pH led to their strong destabilization. Bacteria PLCs showed to be more stable than lecithin (LEC) PLCs (used for comparison) upon preservation at 4 and -80 °C. The harmful nature of the preservation processes led to a strong decrease in the stability of PLCs, bacterial formulations being more stable than LEC PLCs. The addition of trehalose to the suspension of liposomes stabilized LEC PLC and did not have effect on bacterial PLCs. In vitro studies on Raw 264.7 and Caco-2/TC7 cells demonstrated an efficient incorporation of PLCs into the cells. Preparations with higher stability were the ones that showed a better cell-uptake. The nature of the lipid composition is determinant for the stability of PLCs. Lipids from lactic acid bacteria are composed of glycolipids and phospholipids like cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol. The presence of negatively charged lipids strongly improves the interaction with the positively charged CHO-PDMAEMA, thus stabilizing liposomes. In addition, glycolipids and

  9. Fatty Acid and Lipid Profiles with Emphasis on n-3 Fatty Acids and Phospholipids from Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yadong; Wang, Miao; Lindström, Mikael E; Li, Jiebing

    2015-10-01

    In order to establish Ciona intestinalis as a new bioresource for n-3 fatty acids-rich marine lipids, the animal was fractionated into tunic and inner body tissues prior to lipid extraction. The lipids obtained were further classified into neutral lipids (NL), glycolipids (GL) and phospholipids (PL) followed by qualitative and quantitative analysis using GC-FID, GC-MS, (1)H NMR, 2D NMR, MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-ESI-MS methods. It was found that the tunic and inner body tissues contained 3.42-4.08% and 15.9-23.4% of lipids respectively. PL was the dominant lipid class (42-60%) irrespective of the anatomic fractions. From all lipid fractions and classes, the major fatty acids were 16:0, 18:1n-9, C20:1n-9, C20:5n-3 (EPA) and C22:6n-3 (DHA). The highest amounts of long chain n-3 fatty acids, mainly EPA and DHA, were located in PL from both body fractions. Cholestanol and cholesterol were the dominant sterols together with noticeable amounts of stellasterol, 22 (Z)-dehydrocholesterol and lathosterol. Several other identified and two yet unidentified sterols were observed for the first time from C. intestinalis. Different molecular species of phosphatidylcholine (34 species), sphingomyelin (2 species), phosphatidylethanolamine (2 species), phosphatidylserine (10 species), phosphatidylglycerol (9 species), ceramide (38 species) and lysophospholipid (5 species) were identified, representing the most systematic PL profiling knowledge so far for the animal. It could be concluded that C. intestinalis lipids should be a good alternative for fish oil with high contents of n-3 fatty acids. The lipids would be more bioavailable due to the presence of the fatty acids being mainly in the form of PL.

  10. Total and "free" lipids in commercial infant formulas: fatty acid composition and their stability to oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zunin, Paola; Boggia, Raffaella; Turrini, Federica; Leardi, Riccardo

    2015-04-15

    The aim of this paper was to study the fatty acid composition of total and "free" lipids in powdered infant milks and to evaluate the fatty acid oxidation after package opening. In its first step the application of Principal Component Analysis and Design of Experiments has allowed to take a comprehensive picture of powdered infant formulas on sale in Italy on the basis of their labelled composition and to select a limited number of representative samples. Both total and "non encapsulated" or "free" lipids were considered and analysed and no significant differences were found between their fatty acids contents. The possible modification of the fatty acid composition in the "free" lipids caused by oxidation was also studied, simulating the domestic habits after opening. No significant changes were observed up to 30 days even when formulas had an high content of unsaturated fatty acids and valuable Long Chain Polyunsaturated fatty acids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Lipid Classes and Fatty Acids in Ophryotrocha cyclops, a Dorvilleid from Newfoundland Aquaculture Sites.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Flora; Dufour, Suzanne C; Hamoutene, Dounia; Parrish, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    A new opportunistic annelid (Ophryotrocha cyclops) discovered on benthic substrates underneath finfish aquaculture sites in Newfoundland (NL) may be involved in the remediation of organic wastes. At those aquaculture sites, bacterial mats and O. cyclops often coexist and are used as indicators of organic enrichment. Little is known on the trophic strategies used by these annelids, including whether they might consume bacteria or other aquaculture-derived wastes. We studied the lipid and fatty acid composition of the annelids and their potential food sources (degraded flocculent organic matter, fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats) to investigate feeding relationships in these habitats and compared the lipid and fatty acid composition of annelids before and after starvation. Fish pellets were rich in lipids, mainly terrestrially derived C18 fatty acids (18:1ω9, 18:2ω6, 18:3ω3), while bacterial samples were mainly composed of ω7 fatty acids, and flocculent matter appeared to be a mixture of fresh and degrading fish pellets, feces and bacteria. Ophryotrocha cyclops did not appear to store excessive amounts of lipids (13%) but showed a high concentration of ω3 and ω6 fatty acids, as well as a high proportion of the main fatty acids contained in fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats. The dorvilleids and all potential food sources differed significantly in their lipid and fatty acid composition. Interestingly, while all food sources contained low proportions of 20:5ω3 and 20:2ω6, the annelids showed high concentrations of these two fatty acids, along with 20:4ω6. A starvation period of 13 days did not result in a major decrease in total lipid content; however, microscopic observations revealed that very few visible lipid droplets remained in the gut epithelium after three months of starvation. Ophryotrocha cyclops appears well adapted to extreme environments and may rely on lipid-rich organic matter for survival and dispersal in cold environments.

  12. Lipid Classes and Fatty Acids in Ophryotrocha cyclops, a Dorvilleid from Newfoundland Aquaculture Sites

    PubMed Central

    Salvo, Flora; Dufour, Suzanne C.; Hamoutene, Dounia; Parrish, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    A new opportunistic annelid (Ophryotrocha cyclops) discovered on benthic substrates underneath finfish aquaculture sites in Newfoundland (NL) may be involved in the remediation of organic wastes. At those aquaculture sites, bacterial mats and O. cyclops often coexist and are used as indicators of organic enrichment. Little is known on the trophic strategies used by these annelids, including whether they might consume bacteria or other aquaculture-derived wastes. We studied the lipid and fatty acid composition of the annelids and their potential food sources (degraded flocculent organic matter, fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats) to investigate feeding relationships in these habitats and compared the lipid and fatty acid composition of annelids before and after starvation. Fish pellets were rich in lipids, mainly terrestrially derived C18 fatty acids (18:1ω9, 18:2ω6, 18:3ω3), while bacterial samples were mainly composed of ω7 fatty acids, and flocculent matter appeared to be a mixture of fresh and degrading fish pellets, feces and bacteria. Ophryotrocha cyclops did not appear to store excessive amounts of lipids (13%) but showed a high concentration of ω3 and ω6 fatty acids, as well as a high proportion of the main fatty acids contained in fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats. The dorvilleids and all potential food sources differed significantly in their lipid and fatty acid composition. Interestingly, while all food sources contained low proportions of 20:5ω3 and 20:2ω6, the annelids showed high concentrations of these two fatty acids, along with 20:4ω6. A starvation period of 13 days did not result in a major decrease in total lipid content; however, microscopic observations revealed that very few visible lipid droplets remained in the gut epithelium after three months of starvation. Ophryotrocha cyclops appears well adapted to extreme environments and may rely on lipid-rich organic matter for survival and dispersal in cold environments. PMID:26308719

  13. Reversible Nuclear-Lipid-Droplet Morphology Induced by Oleic Acid: A Link to Cellular-Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lagrutta, Lucía C; Montero-Villegas, Sandra; Layerenza, Juan P; Sisti, Martín S; García de Bravo, Margarita M; Ves-Losada, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Neutral lipids-involved in many cellular processes-are stored as lipid droplets (LD), those mainly cytosolic (cLD) along with a small nuclear population (nLD). nLD could be involved in nuclear-lipid homeostasis serving as an endonuclear buffering system that would provide or incorporate lipids and proteins involved in signalling pathways as transcription factors and as enzymes of lipid metabolism and nuclear processes. Our aim was to determine if nLD constituted a dynamic domain. Oleic-acid (OA) added to rat hepatocytes or HepG2 cells in culture produced cellular-phenotypic LD modifications: increases in TAG, CE, C, and PL content and in cLD and nLD numbers and sizes. LD increments were reversed on exclusion of OA and were prevented by inhibition of acyl-CoA synthetase (with Triacsin C) and thus lipid biosynthesis. Under all conditions, nLD corresponded to a small population (2-10%) of total cellular LD. The anabolism triggered by OA, involving morphologic and size changes within the cLD and nLD populations, was reversed by a net balance of catabolism, upon eliminating OA. These catabolic processes included lipolysis and the mobilization of hydrolyzed FA from the LD to cytosolic-oxidation sites. These results would imply that nLD are actively involved in nuclear processes that include lipids. In conclusion, nLD are a dynamic nuclear domain since they are modified by OA through a reversible mechanism in combination with cLD; this process involves acyl-CoA-synthetase activity; ongoing TAG, CE, and PL biosynthesis. Thus, liver nLD and cLD are both dynamic cellular organelles.

  14. Metabolism of fatty acids and lipid hydroperoxides in human body monitoring with Fourier transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Satoshi; Zhang, Qin-Zeng; Sakuyama, Shu; Matsushima, Satoshi

    2009-07-24

    The metabolism of dietary fatty acids in human has been measured so far using human blood cells and stable-isotope labeled fatty acids, however, no direct data was available for human peripheral tissues and other major organs. To realize the role of dietary fatty acids in human health and diseases, it would be eager to develop convenient and suitable method to monitor fatty acid metabolism in human. We have developed the measurement system in situ for human lip surface lipids using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) - attenuated total reflection (ATR) detection system with special adaptor to monitor metabolic changes of lipids in human body. As human lip surface lipids may not be much affected by skin sebum constituents and may be affected directly by the lipid constituents of diet, we could detect changes of FTIR-ATR spectra, especially at 3005 to approximately 3015 cm(-1), of lip surface polyunsaturated fatty acids in a duration time-dependent manner after intake of the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-containing triglyceride diet. The ingested DHA appeared on the lip surface and was detected by FTIR-ATR directly and non-invasively. It was found that the metabolic rates of DHA for male volunteer subjects with age 60s were much lower than those with age 20s. Lipid hydroperoxides were found in lip lipids which were extracted from the lip surface using a mixture of ethanol/ethylpropionate/iso-octane solvents, and were the highest in the content just before noon. The changes of lipid hydroperoxides were detected also in situ with FTIR-ATR at 968 cm(-1). The measurements of lip surface lipids with FTIR-ATR technique may advance the investigation of human lipid metabolism in situ non-invasively.

  15. Metabolism of fatty acids and lipid hydroperoxides in human body monitoring with Fourier transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Satoshi; Zhang, Qin-Zeng; Sakuyama, Shu; Matsushima, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Background The metabolism of dietary fatty acids in human has been measured so far using human blood cells and stable-isotope labeled fatty acids, however, no direct data was available for human peripheral tissues and other major organs. To realize the role of dietary fatty acids in human health and diseases, it would be eager to develop convenient and suitable method to monitor fatty acid metabolism in human. Results We have developed the measurement system in situ for human lip surface lipids using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) – attenuated total reflection (ATR) detection system with special adaptor to monitor metabolic changes of lipids in human body. As human lip surface lipids may not be much affected by skin sebum constituents and may be affected directly by the lipid constituents of diet, we could detect changes of FTIR-ATR spectra, especially at 3005~3015 cm-1, of lip surface polyunsaturated fatty acids in a duration time-dependent manner after intake of the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-containing triglyceride diet. The ingested DHA appeared on the lip surface and was detected by FTIR-ATR directly and non-invasively. It was found that the metabolic rates of DHA for male volunteer subjects with age 60s were much lower than those with age 20s. Lipid hydroperoxides were found in lip lipids which were extracted from the lip surface using a mixture of ethanol/ethylpropionate/iso-octane solvents, and were the highest in the content just before noon. The changes of lipid hydroperoxides were detected also in situ with FTIR-ATR at 968 cm-1. Conclusion The measurements of lip surface lipids with FTIR-ATR technique may advance the investigation of human lipid metabolism in situ non-invasively. PMID:19627618

  16. Determination of the fatty acid profile of neutral lipids, free fatty acids and phospholipids in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Firl, Nina; Kienberger, Hermine; Hauser, Teresa; Rychlik, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge of the fatty acid composition of lipid classes in human plasma is an important factor in the investigation of human metabolism. Therefore, a method for the analysis of neutral lipid (NL), phospholipid (PL) and free fatty acids (FFA) in human plasma has been developed and validated. Separation of lipid classes was carried out by solid phase extraction of the lipid extract. The fractions were transesterified and the resulting fatty acid methyl esters were determined by GC/FID. For the method to be validated, precision, detection and quantification limits, as well as recovery, were determined for combined lipid extraction, solid phase extraction and GC analysis. The lipid extraction was miniaturized and simplified by application of an ultrasound ‘Sonotrode’. The resolution of lipid classes was optimized with appropriate standards added to a representative plasma sample. In addition, a rapid derivatization procedure using trimethylsulfoniumhydroxide was established. Low determination limits (1.5, 0.2 and 1.3 μg/g plasma for NL, PL and FFA, respectively) indicate that the method’s sensitivity is sufficient to quantify even minor components. Furthermore, recovery for NL and PL fatty acids was found to range from 80% to 110%. The results were similar for FFA apart from more polar free fatty acids due to their higher solubility in water. Repetitive measurements showed very good precision apart from the long chain PUFA for which the coefficients of variation were significantly higher. The present method is applicable to the quantitation of fatty acids in lipid classes of human plasma including several minor components.

  17. Maternal omega-3 fatty acids and micronutrients modulate fetal lipid metabolism: A review.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita A; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that alterations in the mother's diet or metabolism during pregnancy has long-term adverse effects on the lipid metabolism in the offspring. There is growing interest in the role of specific nutrients especially omega-3 fatty acids in the pathophysiology of lipid disorders. A series of studies carried out in humans and rodents in our department have consistently suggested a link between omega-3 fatty acids especially docosahexaenoic acid and micronutrients (vitamin B12 and folic acid) in the one carbon metabolic cycle and its effect on the fatty acid metabolism, hepatic transcription factors and DNA methylation patterns. However the association of maternal intake or metabolism of these nutrients with fetal lipid metabolism is relatively less explored. In this review, we provide insights into the role of maternal omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12 and their influence on fetal lipid metabolism through various mechanisms which influence phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase activity, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, adiponectin signaling pathway and epigenetic process like chromatin methylation. This will help understand the possible mechanisms involved in fetal lipid metabolism and may provide important clues for the prevention of lipid disorders in the offspring.

  18. Lipid production on free fatty acids by oleaginous yeasts under non-growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaobing; Jin, Guojie; Wang, Yandan; Shen, Hongwei; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2015-10-01

    Microbial lipids produced by oleaginous yeasts serve as promising alternatives to traditional oils and fats for the production of biodiesel and oleochemicals. To improve its techno-economics, it is pivotal to use wastes and produce high quality lipids of special fatty acid composition. In the present study, four oleaginous yeasts were tested to use free fatty acids for lipid production under non-growth conditions. Microbial lipids of exceptionally high fatty acid relative contents, e.g. those contained over 70% myristic acid or 80% oleic acid, were produced that may be otherwise inaccessible by growing cells on various carbon sources. It was found that Cryptococcus curvatus is a robust strain that can efficiently use oleic acid as well as even-numbered saturated fatty acids with carbon atoms ranging from 10 to 20. Our results provided new opportunity for the production of functional lipids and for the exploitation of organic wastes rich in free fatty acids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lipid and fatty acid composition of Gluconobacter oxydans before and after intracytoplasmic membrane formation.

    PubMed Central

    Heefner, D L; Claus, G W

    1978-01-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans differentiates by forming quantities of intracytoplasmic membranes at the end of exponential growth, and this formation occurs concurrently with a 60% increase in cellular lipid. The present study was initiated to determine whether this newly synthesized lipid differed from that extracted before intracytoplasmic membrane synthesis. Undifferentiated exponential-phase cells were found to contain 30% phosphatidylcholine, 27.1% caridolipin, 25% phosphatidylethanolamine, 12.5% phosphatidylglycerol, 0.4% phosphatidic acid, 0.2% phosphatidylserine, and four additional unidentified lipids totaling less than 5%. The only change detected after formation of intracytoplasmic membranes was a slight decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine and a corresponding increase in phosphatidylcholine. An examination of lipid hydrolysates revealed 11 different fatty acids in the lipids from each cell type. Hexadecanoic acid and monounsaturated octadecenoic accounted for more than 75% of the total fatty acids for both cell types. Proportional changes were noted in all fatty acids except octadecenoate. Anteiso-pentadecanoate comprised less than 1% of the fatty acids from undifferentiated cells but more than 13% of the total fatty acids from cells containing intracytoplasmic membranes. These results suggest that anteiso-pentadecanoate formation closely parallels the formation of intracytoplasmic membranes. Increased concentrations of this fatty acid may contribute to the fluidity necessary for plasma membrane convolution during intracytoplasmic membrane development. PMID:649571

  20. Identification of furan fatty acids in the lipids of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Chvalová, Daniela; Špička, Jiří

    2016-06-01

    Fatty acid (FA) composition was analyzed in muscle and gonad tissues of marketed common carp (Cyprinus carpio). The extracted lipids were separated into four fractions: polar lipids (PL), diacylglycerols, free fatty acids and triacylglycerols (TAG) using thin layer chromatography. FA content within the lipid fractions was determined by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC/FID). The muscle lipids consisted primarily of TAG (96.9% of total FA), while PL were the major component of both male (67.6%) and female gonad (58.6%) lipids. Polyunsaturated fatty acids predominated in PL of all tissues (52.2-55.8% of total FA); monounsaturated fatty acids were the most abundant FA group in TAG of muscle (51.8%) and female gonads (47.8%) whereas high proportion of furan fatty acids (F-acids) (38.2%) was detected in TAG of male gonads. Eight F-acids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in male gonad samples, including less common 12,15-epoxy-13,14-dimethylnonadeca-12,14-dienoic acid with even-numbered alkyl moiety.

  1. Bioconversion of volatile fatty acids derived from waste activated sludge into lipids by Cryptococcus curvatus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Jia-Nan; Yuan, Ming; Shen, Zi-Heng; Peng, Kai-Ming; Lu, Li-Jun; Huang, Xiang-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Pure volatile fatty acid (VFA) solution derived from waste activated sludge (WAS) was used to produce microbial lipids as culture medium in this study, which aimed to realize the resource recovery of WAS and provide low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production simultaneously. Cryptococcus curvatus was selected among three oleaginous yeast to produce lipids with VFAs derived from WAS. In batch cultivation, lipid contents increased from 10.2% to 16.8% when carbon to nitrogen ratio increased from about 3.5 to 165 after removal of ammonia nitrogen by struvite precipitation. The lipid content further increased to 39.6% and the biomass increased from 1.56g/L to 4.53g/L after cultivation for five cycles using sequencing batch culture (SBC) strategy. The lipids produced from WAS-derived VFA solution contained nearly 50% of monounsaturated fatty acids, including palmitic acid, heptadecanoic acid, ginkgolic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid, which showed the adequacy of biodiesel production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lipid and fatty acid profile of the edible fungus Laetiporus sulphurous. Antifungal and antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Sinanoglou, Vassilia J; Zoumpoulakis, Panagiotis; Heropoulos, George; Proestos, Charalampos; Ćirić, Ana; Petrovic, Jovana; Glamoclija, Jasmina; Sokovic, Marina

    2015-06-01

    Laetiporus sulphureus is a saprophyte belonging to a specific group of wood-decomposing Basidiomycetes growing on deciduous trees. This fungus has been characterized as a herbal medicine and is also known for its antimicrobial properties. In the present study, high energy extraction techniques using different solvents were compared to obtain maximum yield of the edible fungus Laetiporus sulphureus total lipids. The lipid classes and fatty acid composition of the fruiting bodies' total lipids has been studied using GC-FID and Iatroscan TLC-FID analysis. Among the lipids, the neutral lipids predominated followed by phospholipids and glycolipids. Triglycerides were the most abundant in the neutral lipid fraction, whereas phosphatidylcholine in phospholipids. The existence of relatively high amount of sterols may be correlated to fungus pharmaceutical properties. Total lipids were found to contain high unsaturated degree fatty acids (UFA/SFA>3.4) and dominated of C18:2ω-6, C18:1ω-9 and C16:0 fatty acids. Antibacterial and antifungal properties of mushrooms' lipid extracts from two different solvents were also examined. Results indicated that hexane extracts possessed better antifungal and slightly better antibacterial activity compared to chloroform extracts though both were less active than the commercial antimicrobial agents.

  3. Effect of 2 ppm ozone exposure on rat lung lipid fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, J.L.; Bassett, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Based on in vitro studies, the initial damage to lung cells by ozone exposure is believed to result in part from the breakdown of lipid polyunsaturated fatty acids to aldehydes, ozonides, and peroxides. The present study measured lipid breakdown products in lungs isolated from rats pretreated with (1-/sup 14/C)acetate 12 h before exposure for 4 h to either air or 2 ppm ozone. Lipid fatty acid breakdown was indicated by a 112% increase in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances on ozone exposure and by changes in chemical and radioactive measurements of mono- and dicarboxylic acids formed by treatment of lipid fractions with hydrogen peroxide. Ozone exposure resulted in a 63% increase in recovery of short-chain fatty acids accounted for by increased recoveries of malonic acid by 37%, hexanoic acid by 47%, nonanoic acid by 118%, and azelaic acid by 107%. Recovery of glutaric acid was enhanced 15-fold by ozone exposure. Although decreases in tissue arachidonic acid could not be detected, oleic acid was significantly decreased by 36%. Recovery of radiolabel as short-chain fatty acids was increased by 65% on ozone exposure and was mainly accounted for by enhanced labeling of nonanoic and glutaric acid fractions. The failure to observe significant increases in /sup 14/C recovery in the other fractions suggested ozone-induced breakdown of unlabeled fatty acids. These results demonstrate the cleavage of unsaturated fatty acid double bonds following in vivo exposure of lungs to ozone. Breakdown of arachidonic and oleic acids was specifically identified by increased recoveries of glutaric and nonanoic acids, respectively.

  4. Yeast fermentation of carboxylic acids obtained from pyrolytic aqueous phases for lipid production.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jieni; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Coates, Ralph; Wu, Hongwei; Chen, Shulin

    2012-08-01

    The presence of very reactive C1-C4 molecules adversely affects the quality bio-oils produced from the pyrolysis of lignocellulosic materials. In this paper a scheme to produce lipids with Cryptococcus curvatus from the carboxylic acids in the pyrolytic aqueous phase collected in fractional condensers is proposed. The capacities of three oleaginous yeasts C. curvatus, Rhodotorula glutinis, Lipomyces starkeyi to ferment acetate, formate, hydroxylacat-aldehyde, phenol and acetol were investigated. While acetate could be a good carbon source for lipid production, formate provides additional energy and contributes to yeast growth and lipid production as auxiliary energy resource. Acetol could slightly support yeast growth, but it inhibits lipid accumulation. Hydroxyacetaldehyde and phenols showed high yeast growth and lipid accumulation inhibition. A pyrolytic aqueous phase with 20 g/L acetate was fermented with C. curvatus, after neutralization and detoxification to produce 6.9 g/L dry biomass and 2.2 g/L lipid.

  5. Regulation of acid phosphatase in reverse micellar system by lipids additives: structural aspects.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, E V; Bronza, V L; Vinogradov, A A; Kamyshny, A; Magdassi, S; Levashov, A V

    2011-01-15

    Reverse micelles system is suggested as a direct tool to study the influence of membrane matrix composition on the activity and structure of membrane-associated enzymes with the use of acid phosphatase (AP) as an example. In reverse micelles the functioning of the monomeric and dimeric forms of AP could be separately observed by variation of the size of the micelles. We found that including the lipids into the micellar system can dramatically affect the enzyme functioning even at low lipid content (2% w/w), and this effect depends on the lipid nature. Structural studies using CD spectroscopy and DLS methods have shown that the influence of lipid composition on the enzyme properties might be caused by the interaction of lipids with the enzyme as well as by the influence of lipids on structure and properties of the micellar matrix. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Short-term circadian disruption impairs bile acid and lipid homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Jessica M; Chiang, John Y L

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids are physiological detergents that also activate nuclear receptors to regulate glucose and lipid homeostasis. Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), the rate-limiting enzyme that converts cholesterol to bile acids, is transcriptionally regulated by bile acids and circadian rhythms. Fasting, nutrients and the circadian clock critically control hepatic bile acid and lipid homeostasis, while circadian misalignment is associated with metabolic syndrome in humans. To delineate these interactions, we employed a sleep disruption model to induce circadian disruption and examined hepatic metabolism with respect to bile acids, lipids and clock gene expression. B6xC57 mice were maintained on chow or Western diet and were sleep disrupted for 6 hr/day for 5 days. Mice were sacrificed at 4 hr intervals over 24 hr. Hepatic metabolic genes were examined, and bile acid pool and lipid profiles were measured over 24 hr. Sleep disruption significantly suppressed circadian expression of core clock genes, genes involved in lipid metabolism, and key regulators of Cyp7a1 as well as Cyp7a1 expression itself. Sleep disruption abolished the peak in serum cholesterol and increased liver and serum free fatty acids. Bile acid pool size was increased while liver bile acids were decreased. ChIP assay revealed HNF4α and Dbp occupancies were suppressed at the Cyp7a1 promoter in sleep-disrupted mice. When coupled with Western diet, sleep disruption abolished liver clock rhythms and elevated free fatty acids. This study suggests that even short-term circadian disruption dramatically alters hepatic clock gene expression, bile acid metabolism and lipid homeostasis to contribute to dyslipidemia.

  7. Parenteral lipid fatty acid composition directly determines the fatty acid composition of red blood cell and brain lipids in preterm pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies in enterally-fed infants have shown a positive effect of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) supplementatin on neurodevelopment. The effect of n-3 LCPUFA in fish oil-based parenteral (PN) lipid emulsions on neuronal tissues of PN-fed preterm infants is unknown. The objective ...

  8. ω-Alkynyl lipid surrogates for polyunsaturated fatty acids: free radical and enzymatic oxidations.

    PubMed

    Beavers, William N; Serwa, Remigiusz; Shimozu, Yuki; Tallman, Keri A; Vaught, Melissa; Dalvie, Esha D; Marnett, Lawrence J; Porter, Ned A

    2014-08-13

    Lipid and lipid metabolite profiling are important parameters in understanding the pathogenesis of many diseases. Alkynylated polyunsaturated fatty acids are potentially useful probes for tracking the fate of fatty acid metabolites. The nonenzymatic and enzymatic oxidations of ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid were compared to that of linoleic and arachidonic acid. There was no detectable difference in the primary products of nonenzymatic oxidation, which comprised cis,trans-hydroxy fatty acids. Similar hydroxy fatty acid products were formed when ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid were reacted with lipoxygenase enzymes that introduce oxygen at different positions in the carbon chains. The rates of oxidation of ω-alkynylated fatty acids were reduced compared to those of the natural fatty acids. Cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 did not oxidize alkynyl linoleic but efficiently oxidized alkynyl arachidonic acid. The products were identified as alkynyl 11-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid, alkynyl 11-hydroxy-8,9-epoxy-eicosatrienoic acid, and alkynyl prostaglandins. This deviation from the metabolic profile of arachidonic acid may limit the utility of alkynyl arachidonic acid in the tracking of cyclooxygenase-based lipid oxidation. The formation of alkynyl 11-hydroxy-8,9-epoxy-eicosatrienoic acid compared to alkynyl prostaglandins suggests that the ω-alkyne group causes a conformational change in the fatty acid bound to the enzyme, which reduces the efficiency of cyclization of dioxalanyl intermediates to endoperoxide intermediates. Overall, ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid appear to be metabolically competent surrogates for tracking the fate of polyunsaturated fatty acids when looking at models involving autoxidation and oxidation by lipoxygenases.

  9. Alterations of the lipid content and fatty acid profile of Chlorella protothecoides under different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Izabela; Piasecka, Agata; Nosalewicz, Artur; Simionato, Diana; Wawrzykowski, Jacek

    2015-11-01

    Chlorella protothecoides is a valuable source of lipids that may be used for biodiesel production. The present work shows analysis of the potential of photoheterotrophic cultivation of C. protothecoides under various light intensities aiming to identify the conditions with maximal biomass and lipid content. An increase in light intensity was associated with an increased specific growth rate and a shortened doubling time. Also, the relative total lipid content increased from 24.8% to 37.5% with increase of light intensity. The composition of fatty acid methyl esters was affected by light intensity with the C16-18 fatty acids increased from 76.97% to 90.24% of total fatty acids. However, the content of linolenic acids decreased with the increase of the culture irradiance. These studies indicate that cultures irradiated with high light intensities achieve the minimal specifications for biodiesel quality on linolenic acids and thus are suitable for biodiesel production.

  10. Lipid complex effect on fatty acid profile and chemical composition of cow milk and cheese.

    PubMed

    Bodkowski, R; Czyż, K; Kupczyński, R; Patkowska-Sokoła, B; Nowakowski, P; Wiliczkiewicz, A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of administration of lipid complex (LC) on cow milk and cheese characteristics was studied. Lipid complex was elaborated based on grapeseed oil with synthesized conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and Atlantic mackerel oil enriched in n-3 fatty acids. The 4-wk experiment was conducted on 30 Polish Holstein Friesian cows. The experimental group cow diet was supplemented with 400 g/d of LC (containing 38% CLA, and eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid in a relative amount of 36.5%) on a humic-mineral carrier. The chemical composition and fatty acid profile of milk and rennet cheese from raw fresh milk were analyzed. Lipid complex supplementation of the total mixed ration had no effect on milk yield and milk composition, except fat content, which decreased from 4.6 to 4.1%, a 10.9% decrease. Milk from cows treated with LC had greater relative amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly polyunsaturated fatty acids, and lesser relative amounts of saturated fatty acids. Lipid complex addition changed milk fat fatty acid profile: C18:2 cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 isomer (CLA) contents increased by 278 and 233%, respectively, as did eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6) contents. Milk fat fatty acid profile changes were correlated with the modifications in rennet cheese fatty acid profile. Lipid complex supplementation of dairy cows produced considerable changes in the biological value of milk and cheese fat. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Reversible Nuclear-Lipid-Droplet Morphology Induced by Oleic Acid: A Link to Cellular-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lagrutta, Lucía C.; Montero-Villegas, Sandra; Layerenza, Juan P.; Sisti, Martín S.; García de Bravo, Margarita M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutral lipids—involved in many cellular processes—are stored as lipid droplets (LD), those mainly cytosolic (cLD) along with a small nuclear population (nLD). nLD could be involved in nuclear-lipid homeostasis serving as an endonuclear buffering system that would provide or incorporate lipids and proteins involved in signalling pathways as transcription factors and as enzymes of lipid metabolism and nuclear processes. Our aim was to determine if nLD constituted a dynamic domain. Oleic-acid (OA) added to rat hepatocytes or HepG2 cells in culture produced cellular-phenotypic LD modifications: increases in TAG, CE, C, and PL content and in cLD and nLD numbers and sizes. LD increments were reversed on exclusion of OA and were prevented by inhibition of acyl-CoA synthetase (with Triacsin C) and thus lipid biosynthesis. Under all conditions, nLD corresponded to a small population (2–10%) of total cellular LD. The anabolism triggered by OA, involving morphologic and size changes within the cLD and nLD populations, was reversed by a net balance of catabolism, upon eliminating OA. These catabolic processes included lipolysis and the mobilization of hydrolyzed FA from the LD to cytosolic-oxidation sites. These results would imply that nLD are actively involved in nuclear processes that include lipids. In conclusion, nLD are a dynamic nuclear domain since they are modified by OA through a reversible mechanism in combination with cLD; this process involves acyl-CoA-synthetase activity; ongoing TAG, CE, and PL biosynthesis. Thus, liver nLD and cLD are both dynamic cellular organelles. PMID:28125673

  12. Higher docosahexaenoic acid, lower arachidonic acid and reduced lipid tolerance with high doses of a lipid emulsion containing 15% fish oil: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    D'Ascenzo, Rita; Savini, Sara; Biagetti, Chiara; Bellagamba, Maria P; Marchionni, Paolo; Pompilio, Adriana; Cogo, Paola E; Carnielli, Virgilio P

    2014-12-01

    Lipid emulsions containing fish oil, as source of long chain omega 3 fatty acids, have recently became available for parenteral nutrition in infants, but scanty data exist in extremely low birth weight preterms. The objective of this study was to compare plasma fatty acids and lipid tolerance in preterm infants receiving different doses of a 15% fish oil vs. a soybean oil based lipid emulsion. Preterm infants (birth weight 500-1249 g) were randomized to receive parenteral nutrition with MOSF (30% Medium-chain triglycerides, 25% Olive oil, 30% Soybean oil, 15% Fish oil) or S (S, 100% Soybean oil) both at two levels of fat intake: 2.5 or 3.5 g kg(-1) d(-1), named 2.5Fat and 3.5Fat respectively. Plasma lipid classes and their fatty acid composition were determined on postnatal day 7 and 14 by gas chromatography together with routine biochemistry. We studied 80 infants. MOSF infants had significantly higher plasma phospholipid Docosahexaenoic acid and Eicosapentaenoic and lower Arachidonic acid. Plasma phospholipids, triglycerides and free cholesterol were all significantly higher in the MOSF-3.5Fat group, while cholesterol esters were lower with MOSF than with S. The area under the curve of total bilirubin was significantly lower with MOSF than with S. The use of a lipid emulsion with 15% FO resulted in marked changes of plasma long-chain fatty acids. Whether the benefits of increasing Docosahexaenoic acid outweigh the potential negative effect of reduced Arachidonic acid should be further studied. MOSF patients exhibited reduced lipid tolerance at 3.5 g kg(-1) d(-1) fat intake. The trial was conducted between January 2008 and December 2012 so we had not registered it in a public trials registry as it is now required for trials that started after July 2008. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  13. Evening primrose oil in rheumatoid arthritis: changes in serum lipids and fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Jäntti, J; Nikkari, T; Solakivi, T; Vapaatalo, H; Isomäki, H

    1989-01-01

    The serum concentration of lipids and composition of fatty acids after overnight fasting were studied in 18 patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated for 12 weeks with either 20 ml of evening primrose oil containing 9% of gamma-linolenic acid or olive oil. The serum concentrations of oleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and apolipoprotein B decreased and those of linoleic acid, gamma-linolenic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid increased during treatment with evening primrose oil. During olive oil treatment the serum concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid decreased and those of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I increased slightly. The decrease in serum eicosapentaenoic acid and the increase in arachidonic acid concentrations induced by evening primrose oil may not be favourable effects in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the light of the roles of these fatty acids as precursors of eicosanoids. PMID:2649022

  14. A conditional mutant of the fatty acid synthase unveils unexpected cross talks in mycobacterial lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cabruja, Matías; Mondino, Sonia; Tsai, Yi Ting; Lara, Julia; Gramajo, Hugo; Gago, Gabriela

    2017-02-01

    Unlike most bacteria, mycobacteria rely on the multi-domain enzyme eukaryote-like fatty acid synthase I (FAS I) to make fatty acids de novo. These metabolites are precursors of the biosynthesis of most of the lipids present both in the complex mycobacteria cell wall and in the storage lipids inside the cell. In order to study the role of the type I FAS system in Mycobacterium lipid metabolism in vivo, we constructed a conditional mutant in the fas-acpS operon of Mycobacterium smegmatis and analysed in detail the impact of reduced de novo fatty acid biosynthesis on the global architecture of the cell envelope. As expected, the mutant exhibited growth defect in the non-permissive condition that correlated well with the lower expression of fas-acpS and the concomitant reduction of FAS I, confirming that FAS I is essential for survival. The reduction observed in FAS I provoked an accumulation of its substrates, acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA, and a strong reduction of C12 to C18 acyl-CoAs, but not of long-chain acyl-CoAs (C19 to C24). The most intriguing result was the ability of the mutant to keep synthesizing mycolic acids when fatty acid biosynthesis was impaired. A detailed comparative lipidomic analysis showed that although reduced FAS I levels had a strong impact on fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis, mycolic acids were still being synthesized in the mutant, although with a different relative species distribution. However, when triacylglycerol degradation was inhibited, mycolic acid biosynthesis was significantly reduced, suggesting that storage lipids could be an intracellular reservoir of fatty acids for the biosynthesis of complex lipids in mycobacteria. Understanding the interaction between FAS I and the metabolic pathways that rely on FAS I products is a key step to better understand how lipid homeostasis is regulated in this microorganism and how this regulation could play a role during infection in pathogenic mycobacteria.

  15. Impact on lipid membrane organization by free branched-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Fredrick; Thurnhofer, Saskia; Vetter, Walter; Gröbner, Gerhard

    2006-11-07

    Here, we exploit the non-invasive techniques of solid-state NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to study the effect of free iso and ante-iso branched chain fatty acids (BCFAs) on the physicochemical properties of lipid membranes. Free fatty acids are present in biological membranes at low abundance, but can influence the cellular function by modulating the membrane organization. Solid state NMR spectra of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipid membranes containing either free 12-methyltetradecanoic acid (a15:0) or free 13-methyltetradecanoic acid (i15:0), show significant differences in their impact on the lipid bilayer. Chain order profiles obtained by deuterium NMR on fully deuterated DMPC-d(67) bilayers revealed an ordering effect induced by both fatty acids on the hydrophobic membrane core. This behavior was also visible in the corresponding DSC thermograms where the main phase transition of DMPC bilayers-indicative of the hydrophobic membrane region-was shifted to higher temperatures, with the iso isomer triggering more pronounced changes as compared to the ante-iso isomer. This is probably due to a higher packing density in the core of the lipid bilayer, which causes reduced diffusion across membranes. By utilizing the naturally occurring spin reporters nitrogen-14 and phosphorus-31 present in the hydrophilic DMPC headgroup region, even fatty acid induced changes at the membrane interface could be detected, an observation reflecting changes in the lipid headgroup dynamics.

  16. Conjugated linoleic acid alters growth performance, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli).

    PubMed

    Dong, Gui-Fang; Liu, Wen-Zuo; Wu, Lin-Zhou; Yu, Deng-Hang; Huang, Feng; Li, Peng-Cheng; Yang, Yan-Ou

    2015-02-01

    Fatty liver syndrome is a prevalent problem of farmed fish. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has received increased attention recently as a fat-reducing fatty acid to control fat deposition in mammals. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether dietary CLA can reduce tissue lipid content of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli) and whether decreased lipid content is partially due to alterations in lipid metabolism enzyme activities and fatty acid profiles. A 76-day feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary CLA on the growth, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish. Five diets containing 0 % (control), 0.5 % (CLA0.5), 1 % (CLA1), 2 % (CLA2), and 3 % (CLA3) CLA levels were evaluated. Results showed that fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed a significantly lower specific growth rate and feed conversion efficiency than those fed with the control diet. Dietary CLA decreased the lipid contents in the liver and intraperitoneal fat with the CLA levels from 1 to 3 %. Fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed significantly higher lipoprotein lipase and hepatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control, and fish fed with 1-3 % CLA diets had significantly higher pancreatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control. Dietary CLA was incorporated into liver, intraperitoneal fat, and muscle lipids, with higher percentages observed in liver compared with other tissues. Liver CLA deposition was at the expense of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). In contrast, CLA deposition appeared to be primarily at the expense of MUFA and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the intraperitoneal fat, whereas in muscle it was at the expense of n-3 PUFA. Our results suggested that CLA at a 1 % dose can reduce liver lipid content without eliciting any negative effect on growth rate in darkbarbel catfish. This lipid-lowering effect could

  17. Changes in amino acids and lipids during embryogenesis of European lobster, Homarus gammarus (Crustacea: Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Rosa, R; Calado, R; Andrade, A M; Narciso, L; Nunes, M L

    2005-02-01

    We studied the amino acid and lipid dynamics during embryogenesis of Homarus gammarus. Major essential amino acids (EAA) in the last stage of embryonic development were arginine, lysine and leucine; major nonessential amino acids (NEAA) were glutamic acid, aspartic acid, valine and glycine. The highest percent of utilization occurred in respect to EAA (27.8%), mainly due to a significant decrease (p<0.05) of methionine (38.3%) and threonine (36.0%). NEAA also decreased significantly (p<0.05, 11.4%), namely serine (38.1%), tyrosine (26.4%) and glutamic acid (25.7%). In contrast, the free amino acid content increased significantly (p<0.05) during embryonic development, especially the free nonessential amino acids (FNEAA). In the last stage, the most abundant FNEAA were glycine, proline, alanine and taurine, and the major free essential amino acids (FEAA) were arginine, lysine and leucine. Lipid content decreased significantly (p<0.05) during embryonic development. A substantial decrease in all neutral lipid classes was observed (>80% of utilization). Major fatty acids were 16:0, 18:0, 18:1n-9, 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3. Unsaturated (UFA) and saturated fatty acids (SFA) were used up at similar rates (76.5% and 76.3%, respectively). Within UFA, monounsaturates (MUFA) were consumed more than polyunsaturates (PUFA) (82.9% and 67.5%, respectively).

  18. Reductions in Serum Lipids with a 4-year Decline in Serum Perfluorooctanoic Acid and Perfluorooctanesulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Fitz-Simon, Nicola; Fletcher, Tony; Luster, Michael I.; Steenland, Kyle; Calafat, Antonia M.; Kato, Kayoko; Armstrong, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Background Several epidemiological cross-sectional studies have found positive associations between serum concentrations of lipids and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, or C8). A longitudinal study should be less susceptible to biases from uncontrolled confounding or reverse causality. Methods We investigated the association between within-individual changes in serum PFOA and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and changes in serum lipid levels (low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglycerides) over a 4.4-year period. The study population consisted of 560 adults living in parts of Ohio and West Virginia where public drinking water had been contaminated with PFOA. They had participated in a cross-sectional study in 2005–2006, and were followed up in 2010, by which time exposure to PFOA had been substantially reduced. Results Overall serum concentrations of PFOA and PFOS fell by half from initial geometric means of 74.8 and 18.5 ng/mL, respectively, with little corresponding change in LDL cholesterol (mean increase 1.8%, standard deviation 26.6%). However, there was a tendency for people with greater declines in serum PFOA or PFOS to have greater LDL decrease. For a person whose serum PFOA fell by half, the predicted fall in LDL cholesterol was 3.6% (95% confidence interval = 1.5–5.7%). The association with a decline in PFOS was even stronger, with a 5% decrease in LDL (2.5–7.4%). Conclusions Our findings from this longitudinal study support previous evidence from cross-sectional studies of positive associations between PFOA and PFOS in serum and LDL cholesterol. PMID:23685825

  19. Reductions in serum lipids with a 4-year decline in serum perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Fitz-Simon, Nicola; Fletcher, Tony; Luster, Michael I; Steenland, Kyle; Calafat, Antonia M; Kato, Kayoko; Armstrong, Ben

    2013-07-01

    Several epidemiological cross-sectional studies have found positive associations between serum concentrations of lipids and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, or C8). A longitudinal study should be less susceptible to biases from uncontrolled confounding or reverse causality. We investigated the association between within-individual changes in serum PFOA and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and changes in serum lipid levels (low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglycerides) over a 4.4-year period. The study population consisted of 560 adults living in parts of Ohio and West Virginia where public drinking water had been contaminated with PFOA. They had participated in a cross-sectional study in 2005-2006, and were followed up in 2010, by which time exposure to PFOA had been substantially reduced. Overall serum concentrations of PFOA and PFOS fell by half from initial geometric means of 74.8 and 18.5 ng/mL, respectively, with little corresponding change in LDL cholesterol (mean increase 1.8%, standard deviation 26.6%). However, there was a tendency for people with greater declines in serum PFOA or PFOS to have greater LDL decrease. For a person whose serum PFOA fell by half, the predicted fall in LDL cholesterol was 3.6% (95% confidence interval = 1.5-5.7%). The association with a decline in PFOS was even stronger, with a 5% decrease in LDL (2.5-7.4%). Our findings from this longitudinal study support previous evidence from cross-sectional studies of positive associations between PFOA and PFOS in serum and LDL cholesterol.

  20. Variation in amino acid and lipid composition of latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Croxton, Ruth S; Baron, Mark G; Butler, David; Kent, Terry; Sears, Vaughn G

    2010-06-15

    The enhancement of latent fingerprints, both at the crime scene and in the laboratory using an array of chemical, physical and optical techniques, permits their use for identification. Despite the plethora of techniques available, there are occasions when latent fingerprints are not successfully enhanced. An understanding of latent fingerprint chemistry and behaviour will aid the improvement of current techniques and the development of novel ones. In this study the amino acid and fatty acid content of 'real' latent fingerprints collected on a non-porous surface was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Squalene was also quantified in addition. Hexadecanoic acid, octadecanoic acid and cis-9-octadecenoic acid were the most abundant fatty acids in all samples. There was, however, wide variation in the relative amounts of each fatty acid in each sample. It was clearly demonstrated that touching sebum-rich areas of the face immediately prior to fingerprint deposition resulted in a significant increase in the amount of fatty acids and squalene deposited in the resulting 'groomed' fingerprints. Serine was the most abundant amino acid identified followed by glycine, alanine and aspartic acid. The significant quantitative differences between the 'natural' and 'groomed' fingerprint samples seen for fatty acids were not observed in the case of the amino acids. This study demonstrates the variation in latent fingerprint composition between individuals and the impact of the sampling protocol on the quantitative analysis of fingerprints.

  1. Rat liver microsomal lipid peroxidation produced during the oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Masubuchi, Y; Narimatsu, S; Kobayashi, S; Horie, T

    2001-04-01

    Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were produced in rat liver microsomal suspension incubated with ethacrynic acid (loop diuretic drug) and NADPH. Two oxidative metabolites of ethacrynic acid with dicarboxylic acid and hydroxylated ethyl group, respectively, were formed in the reaction mixture. The oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid was inhibited by cytochrome P450 inhibitors. The formation of TBARS was remarkably depressed by inhibitors like diethyldithiocarbamate and disulfiram. These results indicate that lipid peroxidation occurred in rat liver microsomes through the oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid.

  2. Effects of Fatty Acid Treatments on the Dexamethasone-Induced Intramuscular Lipid Accumulation in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao juan; Wei, Dai lin; Song, Zhi gang; Jiao, Hong chao; Lin, Hai

    2012-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoid has an important effect on lipid metabolism in muscles, and the type of fatty acid likely affects mitochondrial utilization. Therefore, we hypothesize that the different fatty acid types treatment may affect the glucocorticoid induction of intramuscular lipid accumulation. Methodology/Principal Findings The effect of dexamethasone (DEX) on fatty acid metabolism and storage in skeletal muscle of broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) was investigated with and without fatty acid treatments. Male Arbor Acres chickens (31 d old) were treated with either palmitic acid (PA) or oleic acid (OA) for 7 days, followed by DEX administration for 3 days (35–37 d old). The DEX-induced lipid uptake and oxidation imbalance, which was estimated by increased fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1) expression and decreased carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 activity, contributed to skeletal muscle lipid accumulation. More sensitive than glycolytic muscle, the oxidative muscle in DEX-treated chickens showed a decrease in the AMP to ATP ratio, a decrease in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) alpha phosphorylation and its activity, as well as an increase in the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ribosomal p70S6 kinase, without Akt activation. DEX-stimulated lipid deposition was augmented by PA, but alleviated by OA, in response to pathways that were regulated differently, including AMPK, mTOR and FATP1. Conclusions DEX-induced intramuscular lipid accumulation was aggravated by SFA but alleviated by unsaturated fatty acid. The suppressed AMPK and augmented mTOR signaling pathways were involved in glucocortcoid-mediated enhanced intramuscular fat accumulation. PMID:22623960

  3. Prebiotic oligomerization of amino acids inside lipid vesicles of unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, E.; Furuuchi, R.; Nemoto, A.; Hatori, K.; Honda, H.; Matsuno, K.

    We have already attempted an experimental model simulating seawater circulation in the vicinity of hydrothermal vents in the primitive ocean. We used a flow reactor that was constructed for simulating the pressure and temperature conditions of the hydrothermal vents. In the flow reactor, a high-temperature high-pressure fluid at 125˜ 250°C and at 20MPa was injected into a low temperature (0˜ 40°C ) chamber that was maintained at about the same high pressure as the fluid. We then experimentally examined a possibility of oligomerizing amino acids on or inside lipid vesicles. We compared three different kinds of lipid vesicles made of unsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid), saturated fatty acids (decanoic acid) and phospholipids (DPPC). Identification of the oligomeric products was made with the aid of an HPLC analysis. The oligomeric yields from glycine increased significantly in the presence of lipid vesicles compared to the case of their absence. On the other hand, there was found no significant difference in the yields of oligomers between in the presence of lipid vesicles dissolved by surfactant and in their absence. The possibility of lipid molecules serving as catalysts for oligomerization may be dismissed. The diameters of those lipid vesicles observed under a phase contrast microscope were about 10 micrometer or less. The total volume shared by oleic acid vesicles was about 5 % of the total volume of the suspension. Oligomerization of glycine inside oleic acid vesicles was enhanced more than 15 times compared to that proceeding in their outside. Enhancement of oligomerization of glycine in the presence of lipid vesicles was repeated as the reactants revisited the interface zone between the hot and cold regions. Even those lipid vesicles made of saturated fatty acid such as decanoic acid could have been functional in enhancing the oligomerization of monomers in their inside in the primitive ocean. References E. Imai, et al. (1999) Science 283, 831-833. H

  4. Sasa quelpaertensis and p-coumaric acid attenuate oleic acid-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kang, Seong-Il; Shin, Hye-Sun; Yoon, Seon-A; Kang, Seung-Woo; Ko, Hee-Chul; Kim, Se-Jae

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of Jeju dwarf bamboo (Sasa quelpaertensis Nakai) extract (JBE) and p-coumaric acid (CA) on oleic acid (OA)-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. JBE and CA increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1a (CPT1a) in OA-treated HepG2 cells. Additionally, these compounds decreased sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and OA-induced lipid accumulation, suggesting that JBE and CA modulate lipid metabolism in HepG2 cells via the AMPK activation pathway.

  5. Regulation of catalytic activity of acid phosphatase by lipids in a reverse micellar system.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, E V; Bronza, V L; Levashov, A V

    2009-03-01

    The influence of biomembrane lipids on the catalytic activity of a peripheral membrane enzyme, acid phosphatase (AP), was studied in a reverse micellar system. It was found that the interaction of AP with lipids led to a number of kinetic effects depending on lipid nature on enzyme function. The observed effects might be caused by the formation of lipoprotein complexes as well as by the influence of lipids on structure and properties of the micellar matrix. The results are important for clear understanding of molecular mechanisms of regulation of the catalytic activity of the membrane-associated enzyme in vivo. These data can also be used as a physicochemical basis for application of AP in medical fields as a diagnostic tool for diseases caused by changes in lipid metabolism, e.g. urinary, orthopedic, and allergic diseases.

  6. A special acyl carrier protein for transferring long hydroxylated fatty acids to lipid A in Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Brozek, K A; Carlson, R W; Raetz, C R

    1996-12-13

    Lipid A, the hydrophobic anchor of lipopolysaccharides in the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, varies in structure among different Rhizobiaceae. The Rhizobium meliloti lipid A backbone, like that of Escherichia coli, is a beta1'-6-linked glucosamine disaccharide that is phosphorylated at positions 1 and 4'. Rhizobium leguminosarum lipid A lacks both phosphates, but contains aminogluconate in place of the proximal glucosamine 1-phosphate, and galacturonic acid instead of the 4'-phosphate. A peculiar feature of the lipid As of all Rhizobiaceae is acylation with 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid, a long hydroxylated fatty acid not found in E. coli. We now describe an in vitro system, consisting of a membrane enzyme and a cytosolic acyl donor from R. leguminosarum, that transfers 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid to (Kdo)2-lipid IVA, a key lipid A precursor common to both E. coli and R. leguminosarum. The 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid moiety was detected in the lipid product by mass spectrometry. The membrane enzyme required the presence of Kdo residues in the acceptor substrate for activity. The cytosolic acyl donor was purified from wild-type R. leguminosarum using the acylation of (Kdo)2-[4'-32P]-lipid IVA as the assay. Amino-terminal sequencing of the purified acyl donor revealed an exact 19-amino acid match with a partially sequenced gene (orf*) of R. leguminosarum. Orf* contains the consensus sequence, DSLD, for attachment of 4'-phosphopantetheine. When the entire orf* gene was sequenced, it was found to encode a protein of 92 amino acids. Orf* is a new kind of acyl carrier protein because it is only approximately 25% identical both to the constitutive acyl carrier protein (AcpP) and to the inducible acyl carrier protein (NodF) of R. leguminosarum. Mass spectrometry of purified active Orf* confirmed the presence of 4'-phosphopantetheine and 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid in the major species. Smaller mass peaks indicative of Orf* acylation with hydroxylated 20, 22, 24

  7. Dietary effects on lipid and fatty acid composition of Clistoronia magnifica (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, B.J.; Cummins, K.W.; Cargill, A.S. II; Lowry, R.R.

    1983-02-01

    Dietary influences on growth and biochemical composition of the caddisfly Clistoronia magnifica were examined with a variety of diets including wheat, microbially conditioned alder, and wheat plus alder. Larvae receiving wheat were able to override direct temperature effects, while those on alder could not. Based on larval growth rates, and pupal weights and lipid contents, the authors concluded that alder alone was a poor quality food for late instar C. magnifica. A diet of alder plus wheat allowed the most growth, and produced the largest pupae, however pupae from larvae given just wheat had the largest lipid stores. Among-treatment differences in protein and lipid content, and fatty acid composition verified the importance of fatty acids synthesized from dietary carbohydrate. It appears that a carbohydrate source for the metabolism of storage lipid is a major requirement for late instar C. magnifica.

  8. Culture strategies for lipid production using acetic acid as sole carbon source by Rhodosporidium toruloides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Jia-Nan; Lu, Li-Jun; Peng, Kai-Ming; Yang, Gao-Xiang; Liu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides AS 2.1389 was tested using different concentrations of acetic acid as a low-cost carbon source for the production of microbial lipids, which are good raw materials for biodiesel production. It grew and had higher lipid contents in media containing 4-20 g/L acetic acid as the sole carbon source, compared with that in glucose-containing media under the same culture conditions. At acetic acid concentrations as high as 20 g/L and the optimal carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (C/N) of 200 in a batch culture, the highest biomass production was 4.35 g/L, with a lipid content of 48.2%. At acetic acid concentrations as low as 4 g/L, a sequencing batch culture (SBC) with a C/N of 100 increased biomass production to 4.21 g/L, with a lipid content of 38.6%. These results provide usable culture strategies for lipid production by R. toruloides AS 2.1389 when using diverse waste-derived volatile fatty acids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Lipid Class Specific Quantitative Analysis of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Food Supplements.

    PubMed

    Kutzner, Laura; Ostermann, Annika I; Konrad, Thade; Riegel, Dieter; Hellhake, Stefan; Schuchardt, Jan Philipp; Schebb, Nils Helge

    2017-01-11

    Supplementation products containing n-3 PUFA from marine sources serve a large market. Although the amount of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in the products is provided by the manufacturer, no or little information is available on their lipid pattern. Therefore, we quantitatively analyzed the fatty acid pattern in the lipid fractions triglycerides, phospholipids, ethyl esters, and free fatty acids in supplementation products by means of solid phase extraction and gas chromatography. Twelve products from the European and U.S. markets containing fish, krill, algal, or plant oil were analyzed. Total n-3 PUFA content ranged from 68 g/100 g fat (fish oil) to 42 g/100 g fat (algal oil) to 17 g/100 g fat (krill oil). On the basis of the n-3 PUFA containing lipid class, the supplements can be separated dominantly in ethyl ester, re-esterified triglyceride, triglyceride, and phospholipid containing products. Algae-based products contained natural triglycerides, krill oils a complex mixture of phospholipids, triglycerides, and free fatty acids, and fish oil products either ethyl esters, re-esterified triglycerides, or triglycerides. Even products of the same class and source showed distinct differences in their lipid pattern. A specification of the lipid composition of n-3 PUFA products would allow distinguishing the different (qualities of) supplements.

  10. Lipids and Fatty Acids of Nudibranch Mollusks: Potential Sources of Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhukova, Natalia V.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular diversity of chemical compounds found in marine animals offers a good chance for the discovery of novel bioactive compounds of unique structures and diverse biological activities. Nudibranch mollusks, which are not protected by a shell and produce chemicals for various ecological uses, including defense against predators, have attracted great interest for their lipid composition. Lipid analysis of eight nudibranch species revealed dominant phospholipids, sterols and monoalkyldiacylglycerols. Among polar lipids, 1-alkenyl-2-acyl glycerophospholipids (plasmalogens) and ceramide-aminoethyl phosphonates were found in the mollusks. The fatty acid compositions of the nudibranchs differed greatly from those of other marine gastropods and exhibited a wide diversity: very long chain fatty acids known as demospongic acids, a series of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids, including unusual 21:2∆7,13, and an abundance of various odd and branched fatty acids typical of bacteria. Symbiotic bacteria revealed in some species of nudibranchs participate presumably in the production of some compounds serving as a chemical defense for the mollusks. The unique fatty acid composition of the nudibranchs is determined by food supply, inherent biosynthetic activities and intracellular symbiotic microorganisms. The potential of nudibranchs as a source of biologically active lipids and fatty acids is also discussed. PMID:25196731

  11. Lipid and fatty acid analysis of uninfected and granulosis virus-infected Plodia interpunctella larvae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri-Bhalla, K.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A comparative study on the lipid and fatty acid composition of the uninfected and GV-infected Plodia interpunctella larvae was performed. Higher levels of free fatty acids were found in GV-infected larvae compared to those of the uninfected larvae, while the latter had more triacylglycerol compared to the former. The known identified phospholipids were fewer in the GV-infected larvae compared to those in the uninfected larvae. However, an unidentified phospholipid was found to be approximately two times higher in GV-infected larvae. The total lipid of both larvae had palmitic, oleic, and linoleic as the major fatty acids. The fatty acid composition of the GV-infected larval phospholipid differed considerably compared to that of the uninfected larvae, in that the ratio of unsaturated fatty acid to saturated fatty acid was 3.5 times less in the GV-infected larvae.

  12. [Effect of cultivation conditions on fatty acid content of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis lipids].

    PubMed

    Moroz, S M; Hvozdiak, R I; Chernenko, Ie P; Ostapchuk, A M

    2010-01-01

    The fatty acid content of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis cellular lipids in different culture conditions was investigated. It was established, that it lies in a narrow range C14-C18 and belongs to isoanteiso type. The species character is constant, independent of temperature, duration of cultivation and medium content dominance of saturated branched-chain fatty acids, among which the anteiso-acids dominate, generally a-C15. A response to the temperature modification of bacteria cultivation, medium and age of culture is expressed by relations between separate fatty acids. Thus the modifications of fatty acid content, connected with age of culture and temperature of cultivation, depend on a strain. The cultivation of bacteria on a rich medium in comparison with poor one enlarges the content of nonbranched-chain and anteiso-acids in lipids.

  13. Lipid and fatty acid analysis of uninfected and granulosis virus-infected Plodia interpunctella larvae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri-Bhalla, K.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A comparative study on the lipid and fatty acid composition of the uninfected and GV-infected Plodia interpunctella larvae was performed. Higher levels of free fatty acids were found in GV-infected larvae compared to those of the uninfected larvae, while the latter had more triacylglycerol compared to the former. The known identified phospholipids were fewer in the GV-infected larvae compared to those in the uninfected larvae. However, an unidentified phospholipid was found to be approximately two times higher in GV-infected larvae. The total lipid of both larvae had palmitic, oleic, and linoleic as the major fatty acids. The fatty acid composition of the GV-infected larval phospholipid differed considerably compared to that of the uninfected larvae, in that the ratio of unsaturated fatty acid to saturated fatty acid was 3.5 times less in the GV-infected larvae.

  14. Lipoprotein lipase expression, serum lipid and tissue lipid deposition in orally-administered glycyrrhizic acid-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Wai Yen Alfred; Chia, Yoke Yin; Liong, Shih Yeen; Ton, So Ha; Kadir, Khalid Abdul; Syed Husain, Sharifah Noor Akmal

    2009-01-01

    Background The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities comprising visceral obesity, dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance (IR). With the onset of IR, the expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), a key regulator of lipoprotein metabolism, is reduced. Increased activation of glucocorticoid receptors results in MetS symptoms and is thus speculated to have a role in the pathophysiology of the MetS. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), the bioactive constituent of licorice roots (Glycyrrhiza glabra) inhibits 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 that catalyzes the activation of glucocorticoids. Thus, oral administration of GA is postulated to ameliorate the MetS. Results In this study, daily oral administration of 50 mg/kg of GA for one week led to significant increase in LPL expression in the quadriceps femoris (p < 0.05) but non-significant increase in the abdominal muscle, kidney, liver, heart and the subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues (p > 0.05) of the GA-treated rats compared to the control. Decrease in adipocyte size (p > 0.05) in both the visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue depots accompanies such selective induction of LPL expression. Consistent improvement in serum lipid parameters was also observed, with decrease in serum free fatty acid, triacylglycerol, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol but elevated HDL-cholesterol (p > 0.05). Histological analysis using tissue lipid staining with Oil Red O showed significant decrease in lipid deposition in the abdominal muscle and quadriceps femoris (p < 0.05) but non-significant decrease in the heart, kidney and liver (p > 0.05). Conclusion Results from this study may imply that GA could counteract the development of visceral obesity and improve dyslipidaemia via selective induction of tissue LPL expression and a positive shift in serum lipid parameters respectively, and retard the development of IR associated with tissue steatosis. PMID:19638239

  15. Improved methods for the fatty acid analysis of blood lipid classes.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Ken'ichi; Yoneda, Kumiko; Takahashi, Ayuko; Hoshino, Noriko; Matsuda, Motoyoshi

    2011-03-01

    Two improved methods have been developed for preparation of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from major O-ester lipid classes in blood, i.e., cholesterol ester, triacylglycerol, and glycerophospholipids. The methods involve simple operations, and use neither harmful solvents such as chloroform or benzene nor highly reactive volatile reagents such as acetyl chloride. The FAME synthesis reaction proceeds under mild temperature conditions. The methods include (1) extraction of lipids from 0.2 ml of blood with 0.2 ml of tert-butyl methyl ether and 0.1 ml of methanol, (2) separation of the total lipids into lipid classes using a solid-phase extraction column or thin-layer chromatography, and (3) methanolysis of each lipid class at room temperature or at 45 °C. In all the operations, solvent concentration is performed only once prior to gas-liquid chromatography (GC). No noticeable differences in composition determined by GC have been found between FAME prepared by the present methods and those prepared by a conventional method involving lipid extraction with chloroform/methanol. The mild reaction and simplified procedures of the present methods enabled safe and reproducible analysis of the fatty acid compositions of the major ester-lipid classes in blood.

  16. Evidence for a Dual Role of an Active Site Histidine in [alpha]-Amino-[beta]-carboxymuconate-[epsilon]-semialdehyde Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Lu; Fielding, Andrew J.; Chen, Yan; Li, Tingfeng; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hosler, Jonathan P.; Chen, Lirong; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Que, Jr., Lawrence; Liu, Aimin

    2012-10-09

    The previously reported crystal structures of {alpha}-amino-{beta}-carboxymuconate-{epsilon}-semialdehyde decarboxylase (ACMSD) show a five-coordinate Zn(II)(His){sub 3}(Asp)(OH{sub 2}) active site. The water ligand is H-bonded to a conserved His228 residue adjacent to the metal center in ACMSD from Pseudomonas fluorescens (PfACMSD). Site-directed mutagenesis of His228 to tyrosine and glycine in this study results in a complete or significant loss of activity. Metal analysis shows that H228Y and H228G contain iron rather than zinc, indicating that this residue plays a role in the metal selectivity of the protein. As-isolated H228Y displays a blue color, which is not seen in wild-type ACMSD. Quinone staining and resonance Raman analyses indicate that the blue color originates from Fe(III)-tyrosinate ligand-to-metal charge transfer. Co(II)-substituted H228Y ACMSD is brown in color and exhibits an electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum showing a high-spin Co(II) center with a well-resolved {sup 59}Co (I = 7/2) eight-line hyperfine splitting pattern. The X-ray crystal structures of as-isolated Fe-H228Y (2.8 {angstrom}) and Co-substituted (2.4 {angstrom}) and Zn-substituted H228Y (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) support the spectroscopic assignment of metal ligation of the Tyr228 residue. The crystal structure of Zn-H228G (2.6 {angstrom}) was also determined. These four structures show that the water ligand present in WT Zn-ACMSD is either missing (Fe-H228Y, Co-H228Y, and Zn-H228G) or disrupted (Zn-H228Y) in response to the His228 mutation. Together, these results highlight the importance of His228 for PfACMSD's metal specificity as well as maintaining a water molecule as a ligand of the metal center. His228 is thus proposed to play a role in activating the metal-bound water ligand for subsequent nucleophilic attack on the substrate.

  17. Release of 11-cis-retinal from cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein by acidic lipids.

    PubMed

    Saari, John C; Nawrot, Maria; Stenkamp, Ronald E; Teller, David C; Garwin, Gregory G

    2009-01-01

    To determine molecular mechanisms for the release of 11-cis-retinal from the binding pocket of cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP). Binding of CRALBP to lipid surfaces was assessed with a lipid-immunoblot assay. Lipids were presented to CRALBP as small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) consisting of phosphatidylcholine (PC) plus other lipids. Release of 9-cis-retinal or 11-cis-retinal from CRALBP was measured with spectral and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assays based on the protection of the protein-bound retinal carbonyl group from reaction with NH(2)OH. The electrostatic surface potential of CRALBP was calculated from a model of its structure using the program CCP4mg. Incubation of CRALBP.11-cis-retinal with lipids absorbed on nitrocellulose revealed binding to the acidic lipids, phosphatidic acid (PA)>phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P(3)]>phosphatidylserine (PS)> PI(4,5)P(2) and little or no binding to PC, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), or PI(4)P. 11-cis-retinal was released during incubation of CRALBP with SUVs consisting of PC plus 50 mol% PA but not during incubation with those composed of 100 mol% PC. The efficacy of release of 9-cis-retinal or 11-cis-retinal from CRALBP by phospholipid-containing SUVs generally paralleled that of the binding of CRALBP to the lipids (PA>PS>PI>PC). Examination of the electrostatic surface potential of the protein structure revealed a basic recess on one face of the protein, which may bind acidic lipids. Our results identify the first physiologic substances that release 11-cis-retinal from CRALBP. PA and PS are relatively minor membrane lipids that can be generated in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane in response to various signal transduction pathways, where they could interact with cytosolic CRALBP. The mechanism for release of retinal from CRALBP by acidic lipids remains to be determined but could involve binding of the acidic lipid in the 11-cis-retinal binding site

  18. Release of 11-cis-retinal from cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein by acidic lipids

    PubMed Central

    Nawrot, Maria; Stenkamp, Ronald E.; Teller, David C.; Garwin, Gregory G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine molecular mechanisms for the release of 11-cis-retinal from the binding pocket of cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP). Methods Binding of CRALBP to lipid surfaces was assessed with a lipid-immunoblot assay. Lipids were presented to CRALBP as small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) consisting of phosphatidylcholine (PC) plus other lipids. Release of 9-cis-retinal or 11-cis-retinal from CRALBP was measured with spectral and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assays based on the protection of the protein-bound retinal carbonyl group from reaction with NH2OH. The electrostatic surface potential of CRALBP was calculated from a model of its structure using the program CCP4mg. Results Incubation of CRALBP·11-cis-retinal with lipids absorbed on nitrocellulose revealed binding to the acidic lipids, phosphatidic acid (PA)>phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3]>phosphatidylserine (PS)> PI(4,5)P2 and little or no binding to PC, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), or PI(4)P. 11-cis-retinal was released during incubation of CRALBP with SUVs consisting of PC plus 50 mol% PA but not during incubation with those composed of 100 mol% PC. The efficacy of release of 9-cis-retinal or 11-cis-retinal from CRALBP by phospholipid-containing SUVs generally paralleled that of the binding of CRALBP to the lipids (PA>PS>PI>>PC). Examination of the electrostatic surface potential of the protein structure revealed a basic recess on one face of the protein, which may bind acidic lipids. Conclusions Our results identify the first physiologic substances that release 11-cis-retinal from CRALBP. PA and PS are relatively minor membrane lipids that can be generated in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane in response to various signal transduction pathways, where they could interact with cytosolic CRALBP. The mechanism for release of retinal from CRALBP by acidic lipids remains to be determined but could involve binding of the acidic lipid in

  19. Lipid oxidation stability of omega-3- and conjugated linoleic acid-enriched sous vide chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Narciso-Gaytán, C; Shin, D; Sams, A R; Keeton, J T; Miller, R K; Smith, S B; Sánchez-Plata, M X

    2011-02-01

    Lipid oxidation is known to occur rather rapidly in cooked chicken meat containing relatively high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids. To assess the lipid oxidation stability of sous vide chicken meat enriched with n-3 and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fatty acids, 624 Cobb × Ross broilers were raised during a 6-wk feeding period. The birds were fed diets containing CLA (50% cis-9, trans-11 and 50% trans-10, cis-12 isomers), flaxseed oil (FSO), or menhaden fish oil (MFO), each supplemented with 42 or 200 mg/kg of vitamin E (dl-α-tocopheryl acetate). Breast or thigh meat was vacuum-packed, cooked (74°C), cooled in ice water, and stored at 4.4°C for 0, 5, 10, 15, and 30 d. The lipid oxidation development of the meat was estimated by quantification of malonaldehyde (MDA) values, using the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances analysis. Fatty acid, nonheme iron, moisture, and fat analyses were performed as well. Results showed that dietary CLA induced deposition of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers, increased the proportion of saturated fatty acids, and decreased the proportions of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Flaxseed oil induced higher deposition of C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, and C20:4 fatty acids, whereas MFO induced higher deposition of n-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5), and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6; P < 0.05). Meat lipid oxidation stability was affected by the interaction of either dietary oil or vitamin E with storage day. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were found in the CLA treatment than in the MFO and FSO treatments. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were detected in meat samples from the 200 mg/kg of vitamin E than in meat samples from the 42 mg/kg of vitamin E. Nonheme iron values did not affect (P > 0.05) lipid oxidation development. In conclusion, dietary CLA, FSO, and MFO influenced the fatty acid composition of chicken muscle and the lipid oxidation stability of meat over the storage time. Supranutritional

  20. Enhancement of lipid production and fatty acid profiling in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CC1010 for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Karpagam, R; Preeti, R; Ashokkumar, B; Varalakshmi, P

    2015-11-01

    Lipid from microalgae is one of the putative oil resources to facilitate the biodiesel production during this era of energy dissipation and environmental pollution. In this study, the key parameters such as biomass productivity, lipid productivity and lipid content were evaluated at the early stationary phase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CC1010 cultivated in nutrient starved (nitrogen, phosphorous), glucose (0.05%, 0.1%, 0.15% and 0.2%) and vitamin B12 supplementation (0.001%, 0.002% and 0.003%) in Tris-Acetate-Phosphate (TAP) medium. The lipid content in nitrogen starved media was 61% which is 2.34 folds higher than nutrient sufficient TAP medium. Glucose supplementation has lead to proportional increase in biomass productivity with the increasing concentration of glucose whereas vitamin B12 supplementations had not shown any influence in lipid and biomass production. Further, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling of C. reinhardtii, CC 1010 has revealed more than 80% of total SFA (saturated fatty acid) and MUFA (mono unsaturated fatty acid) content. Quality checking parameters of biodiesel like cetane number, saponification value, iodine number and degree of unsaturation were analyzed and the biodiesel fuel properties were found to be appropriate as per the international standards, EN 14214 and ASTM D6751. Conclusively, among all the treatments, nitrogen starvation with 0.1% glucose supplementation had yielded high lipid content in C. reinhardtii, CC 1010. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Regulation of Lipid Fraction Migration and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in Schizochytrium sp.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lujing; Hu, Xuechao; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Chen, Shenglan; Wu, Yi; Li, Dan; Yu, Yadong; Geng, Lingjun; Ji, Xiaojun; Huang, He

    2017-06-15

    Schizochytrium sp. is the main source of docosahexaenoic acid-rich oil, which is widely used in food additive and pharmaceutical industry. In this study, using RNA-seq, comparative transcriptomic analyses were performed at four stages of DHA fermentation by Schizochytrium sp to get potential genes related to cell transition from cell growth to lipid accumulation and then to lipid turnover. 1406, 385, 1384 differently expressed genes were identified by comparisons in pairs of S2 vs S1, S3 vs S2 and S4 vs S3. Functional analysis revealed that binding and single-organism process might be involve in the cell transition from cell growth to lipid accumulation while oxidation-reduction process played an important role in the transition from lipid accumulation to lipid turnover. pfaC in the PKS pathway showed higher sensitivity to the environmental change, which might be the key regulator for enhancing PUFA biosynthesis in the future. Some other genes in signal transduction and cell transport were revealed to be related to lipid turnover, which would enrich the current knowledge regarding lipid metabolism and help to enhance the DHA production and enrich different lipid fractions by Schizochytrium in the future.

  2. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid isomers change the unsaturation degree of hepatic fatty acids in neutral lipids but not in polar lipids.

    PubMed

    Martins, Susana V; Lopes, Paula A; Alves, Susana P; Alfaia, Cristina M; Nascimento, Mafalda; Castro, Matilde F; Bessa, Rui J B; Prates, José António Mestre

    2011-03-01

    The fatty acid composition of phospholipids plays a key role in the structural and functional properties of cellular membrane. In this study, it was hypothesized that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomer supplementation changes the unsaturation degree of the fatty acids of neutral lipids (NLs) but not those of polar lipids (PLs). Thus, the main goal was to determine the pattern of fatty acid incorporation into hepatic PL and NL fractions. Wistar male rats were fed cis(c)9,trans(t)11 and t10,c12 CLA isomers, separately or as a mixture. Whereas the t10,c12 isomer incorporation in the PL fraction was similar when supplemented either individually or as a mixture, the c9,t11 isomer reached the highest values of incorporation when combined with t10,c12. In the PL fraction, the linoleic acid did not change; but the arachidonic acid decreased, especially in the rats given the mixture. Also in this fraction, the t10,c12 isomer, either separately or as a mixture, decreased the amounts of n-6 long-chain (LC) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and increased those of the n-3 LC PUFA relative to the control. In the NL fraction, linoleic acid incorporation followed the diet composition, whereas the arachidonic acid was similar among treatments. Facing CLA isomer supplementation, the present study suggests that fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids, through the balance between n-6 and n-3 LC PUFA, is dependent upon maintaining the unsaturation degree of cellular membrane. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Protective effect of phytic acid hydrolysis products on iron-induced lipid peroxidation of liposomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, S; Kuwata, G; Imai, M; Nagao, A; Terao, J

    2000-12-01

    Beneficial effects of dietary phytic acid (myo-inositol hexaphosphate; IP6) have often been explained by its strong iron ion-chelating ability, which possibly suppresses iron ion-induced oxidative damage in the gastrointestinal tract. Because phytic acid is hydrolyzed during digestion, this work aimed to know whether its hydrolysis products (IP2, IP3, IP4, and IP5) could still prevent iron ion-induced lipid peroxidation. Studies using liposomal membranes demonstrated that hydrolysis products containing three or more phosphate groups are able to inhibit iron ion-induced lipid peroxidation although their effectiveness decreased with dephosphorylation. Similarly, they also prevented iron ion-induced decomposition of phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide. These results demonstrate that intermediate products of phytic acid hydrolysis still possess iron ion-chelating ability, and thus they can probably prevent iron ion-induced lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  4. In vitro evaluation of α-lipoic acid-loaded lipid nanocapsules for topical delivery.

    PubMed

    Xia, Nan; Liu, Tian; Wang, Qiang; Xia, Qiang; Bian, Xiaoli

    2017-09-03

    This study aimed at in vitro evaluation of α-lipoic acid-loaded lipid nanocapsules for topical delivery, which was prepared by hot high-pressure homogenisation. Stable particles could be formed and particle size was 148.54 ± 2.31 nm with polydispersity index below 0.15. Encapsulation efficiency and drug loading of α-lipoic acid were 95.23 ± 0.45% and 2.81 ± 0.37%. Antioxidant study showed α-lipoic acid could be protected by lipid nanocapsules without loss of antioxidant activity. Sustained release of α-lipoic acid from lipid nanocapsules was obtained and cumulative release was 62.18 ± 1.51%. In vitro percutaneous study showed the amount of α-lipoic acid distributed in skin was 1.7-fold than permeated. Cytotoxicity assay and antioxidant activity on L929 cells indicated this formulation had low cytotoxicity and ability of protecting cells from oxidative damage within specific concentration. These studies suggested α-lipoic acid-loaded lipid nanocapsules could be potential formulation for topical delivery.

  5. How Bacterial Pathogens Eat Host Lipids: Implications for the Development of Fatty Acid Synthesis Therapeutics*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) is a target for the development of novel therapeutics. Bacteria incorporate extracellular fatty acids into membrane lipids, raising the question of whether pathogens use host fatty acids to bypass FASII and defeat FASII therapeutics. Some pathogens suppress FASII when exogenous fatty acids are present to bypass FASII therapeutics. FASII inhibition cannot be bypassed in many bacteria because essential fatty acids cannot be obtained from the host. FASII antibiotics may not be effective against all bacteria, but a broad spectrum of Gram-negative and -positive pathogens can be effectively treated with FASII inhibitors. PMID:25648887

  6. Ontogenetic change in the lipid and fatty acid composition of scleractinian coral larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, J.; Baird, A. H.; Cohen, M. F.; Flot, J.-F.; Kamiki, T.; Meziane, T.; Tsuchiya, M.; Yamasaki, H.

    2012-06-01

    Some scleractinian coral larvae have an extraordinary capacity to delay metamorphosis, and this is reflected in the large geographic range of many species. Coral eggs typically contain a high proportion of wax esters, which have been hypothesized to provide a source of energy for long-distance dispersal. To better understand the role of lipids in the dispersal of broadcast spawning coral larvae, ontogenetic changes in the lipid and fatty acid composition of Goniastrea retiformis were measured from the eggs until larvae were 30 days old. Egg biomass was 78.8 ± 0.5% lipids, 86.3 ± 0.2% of which were wax esters, 9.3 ± 0.0% polar lipids, 4.1 ± 0.2% sterols, and 0.3 ± 0.1% triacylglycerols. The biomass of wax esters declined significantly through time, while polar lipids, sterols and triacylglycerols remained relatively constant, suggesting that wax esters are the prime source of energy for development. The most prevalent fatty acid in the eggs was palmitic acid, a marker of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium, highlighting the importance of symbiosis in coral reproductive ecology. The proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids declined through time, suggesting that they are essential for larval development. Interestingly, triacylglycerols are only abundant in the propagules that contain Symbiodinium, suggesting important differences in the energetic of dispersal among species with vertical and horizontal transmission of symbionts.

  7. Lipid Rafts Promote trans Fatty Acid-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yao; Liu, Benxin; Deng, Zeyuan; Fan, Yawei; Li, Jing; Li, Hongyan

    2017-01-01

    The effects of two fatty acids, oleic acid (OLA) and elaidic acid (ELA) on normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and non-rafts HUVEC were investigated in this study. The expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and IL-6) were analyzed. Western blot was used to analyze the expression levels of inflammation-related proteins (NF-κB, ERK1/2) and toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The results showed that the levels of nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 were significantly decreased only in non-lipid rafts cells pretreated with trans fatty acid (TFA). The expression of TLR4 in the ELA-treated normal cells was higher than that in non-lipid rafts HUVEC. When the lipid rafts was destroyed by methyl-β-cyclodextrin, the levels of nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and TLR4 were decreased significantly. Therefore, lipid rafts may be involved in TFA induced-inflammation in HUVEC through blocking the inflammatory signal pathway. Lipid rafts might be a platform for specific receptors such as TLR4 for TFA to activate the pro-inflammation on cell membranes.

  8. Excess lipid availability increases mitochondrial fatty acid oxidative capacity in muscle: evidence against a role for reduced fatty acid oxidation in lipid-induced insulin resistance in rodents.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nigel; Bruce, Clinton R; Beale, Susan M; Hoehn, Kyle L; So, Trina; Rolph, Michael S; Cooney, Gregory J

    2007-08-01

    A reduced capacity for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle has been proposed as a major factor leading to the accumulation of intramuscular lipids and their subsequent deleterious effects on insulin action. Here, we examine markers of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidative capacity in rodent models of insulin resistance associated with an oversupply of lipids. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet for either 5 or 20 weeks. Several markers of muscle mitochondrial fatty acid oxidative capacity were measured, including (14)C-palmitate oxidation, palmitoyl-CoA oxidation in isolated mitochondria, oxidative enzyme activity (citrate synthase, beta-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1), and expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial metabolism. Enzyme activity and mitochondrial protein expression were also examined in muscle from other rodent models of insulin resistance. Compared with standard diet-fed controls, muscle from fat-fed mice displayed elevated palmitate oxidation rate (5 weeks +23%, P < 0.05, and 20 weeks +29%, P < 0.05) and increased palmitoyl-CoA oxidation in isolated mitochondria (20 weeks +49%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, oxidative enzyme activity and protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)-1alpha, uncoupling protein (UCP) 3, and mitochondrial respiratory chain subunits were significantly elevated in fat-fed animals. A similar pattern was present in muscle of fat-fed rats, obese Zucker rats, and db/db mice, with increases observed for oxidative enzyme activity and expression of PGC-1alpha, UCP3, and subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. These findings suggest that high lipid availability does not lead to intramuscular lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in rodents by decreasing muscle mitochondrial fatty acid oxidative capacity.

  9. Folate administration increases n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in rat plasma and tissue lipids.

    PubMed

    Pita, M L; Delgado, M J

    2000-09-01

    It has been shown that folic acid deficiency can modify polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolism and thus could contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases. We have studied the effect of folate administration on fatty acid composition of plasma, platelet, erythrocyte, intestinal and liver lipids. Two groups of rats were daily injected with either saline solution (control group) or 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolate (MTHF) solution (MTHF group) for 15 days. Changes induced by folate treatment on n-6 PUFA were not very significant. Linoleic acid only decreased in liver and intestinal phospholipids of MTHF rats whereas arachidonic acid was unaffected by folate administration. However, n-3 PUFA significantly increased in plasma lipid fractions and in platelet, erythrocyte and intestinal phospholipids. It is well known that n-3 PUFA show antithrombotic properties. Thus, the increase of n-3 PUFA observed after MTHF administration might contribute to the prevention of vascular disorders.

  10. Bile acid signaling in lipid metabolism: metabolomic and lipidomic analysis of lipid and bile acid markers linked to anti-obesity and anti-diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yunpeng; Jiang, Changtao; Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W; Li, Tiangang; Ferrell, Jessica M; Gonzalez, Frank J; Chiang, John Y L

    2015-01-01

    Bile acid synthesis is the major pathway for catabolism of cholesterol. Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway in the liver and plays an important role in regulating lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Transgenic mice overexpressing CYP7A1 (CYP7A1-tg mice) were resistant to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, fatty liver, and diabetes. However the mechanism of resistance to HFD-induced obesity of CYP7A1-tg mice has not been determined. In this study, metabolomic and lipidomic profiles of CYP7A1-tg mice were analyzed to explore the metabolic alterations in CYP7A1-tg mice that govern the protection against obesity and insulin resistance by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with multivariate analyses. Lipidomics analysis identified seven lipid markers including lysophosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and ceramides that were significantly decreased in serum of HFD-fed CYP7A1-tg mice. Metabolomics analysis identified 13 metabolites in bile acid synthesis including taurochenodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, taurocholic acid, and tauro-β-muricholic acid (T-β-MCA) that differed between CYP7A1-tg and wild-type mice. Notably, T-β-MCA, an antagonist of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) was significantly increased in intestine of CYP7A1-tg mice. This study suggests that reducing 12α-hydroxylated bile acids and increasing intestinal T-β-MCA may reduce high fat diet-induced increase of phospholipids, sphingomyelins and ceramides, and ameliorate diabetes and obesity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics.

  11. Bile acid signaling in lipid metabolism: Metabolomic and lipidomic analysis of lipid and bile acid markers linked to anti-obesity and anti-diabetes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yunpeng; Jiang, Changtao; Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Li, Tiangang; Ferrell, Jessica M.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Chiang, John Y.L.

    2014-01-01

    Bile acid synthesis is the major pathway for catabolism of cholesterol. Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway in the liver and plays an important role in regulating lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Transgenic mice overexpressing CYP7A1 (CYP7A1-tg mice) were resistant to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, fatty liver, and diabetes. However the mechanism of resistance to HFD-induced obesity of CYP7A1-tg mice has not been determined. In this study, metabolomic and lipidomic profiles of CYP7A1-tg mice were analyzed to explore the metabolic alterations in CYP7A1-tg mice that govern the protection against obesity and insulin resistance by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with multivariate analyses. Lipidomics analysis identified seven lipid markers including lysophosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and ceramides that were significantly decreased in serum of HFD-fed CYP7A1-tg mice. Metabolomics analysis identified 13 metabolites in bile acid synthesis including taurochenodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, taurocholic acid, and tauro-β-muricholic acid (T-β-MCA) that differed between CYP7A1-tg and wild-type mice. Notably, T-β-MCA, an antagonist of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) was significantly increased in intestine of CYP7A1-tg mice. This study suggests that reducing 12α-hydroxylated bile acids and increasing intestinal T-β-MCA may reduce high fat diet-induced increase of phospholipids, sphingomyelins and ceramides, and ameliorate diabetes and obesity. PMID:24796972

  12. Tight binding of NAP-22 with acidic membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Shohei; Kobayashi, Yuumi; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Suzaki, Toshinobu

    2015-07-23

    Recovery of various signal transduction molecules in the detergent-resistant membrane microdomain (DRM) fraction suggests the importance of this region in cellular functions. Insolubility of the outer leaflet of DRM to the non-ionic detergent is ascribed to the tight association of cholesterol and sphingolipid. Since, poor localization of sphingolipid is observed in the inner leaflet, the physicochemical background of the insolubility of the inner leaflet is hence still an enigma. NAP-22 (also called BASP1 or CAP-23) is a neuron-enriched calmodulin-binding protein and one of the major proteins in the DRM of the neuronal cell membrane. A previous study showed the presence of several lipids in a NAP-22 fraction after the process of extraction and column chromatography. In this study, the effect of lipid extraction on NAP-22 was studied through native-gel electrophoresis, ultracentrifugation, and electron microscopic observation. The mobility of NAP-22 in native-PAGE was shifted from low to high after delipidation. Delipidated NAP-22 bound phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylinosotol, and ganglioside. Some part of the mixture of PS and NAP-22 was recovered in the insoluble fraction after Triton X-100 treatment and the addition of cholesterol enhanced the amount of NAP-22 in the insoluble fraction.

  13. Rutin inhibits oleic acid induced lipid accumulation via reducing lipogenesis and oxidative stress in hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Hsueh-Chun; Yang, Mon-Yuan; Jou, Ming-Jia; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2011-03-01

    Excessive lipid accumulation within liver has been proposed to cause obesity, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and fatty liver disease. Rutin, a common dietary flavonoid that is consumed in fruits, vegetables, and plant-derived beverages, has various biological functions, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. However, a hypolipidemic effect of rutin on fatty liver disease has not been reported. In this study, we examined the effect of rutin on reducing lipid accumulation in hepatic cells. Hepatocytes were treated with oleic acid (OA) containing with or without rutin to observe the lipid accumulation by Nile red stain. The result showed rutin suppressed OA-induced lipid accumulation and increased adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in hepatocytes. The expression of critical molecule involved in lipid synthesis, sterol regulatory element binding proteins-1 (SREBP-1), was attenuated in rutin-treated cells. Moreover, long-term incubation of rutin inhibited the transcriptions of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (HMGCR), glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-coenzyme carboxylase (ACC). Besides, we also found out the antioxidative effect of rutin by increasing the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α and antioxidative enzymes. Taken together, our findings suggest rutin could attenuate lipid accumulation by decreasing lipogenesis and oxidative stress in hepatocyte.

  14. Cationic Amino Acid Based Lipids as Effective Nonviral Gene Delivery Vectors for Primary Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of specific genes into neurons offers a potent approach for treatment of diseases as well as for the study of neuronal cell biology. Here we investigated the capabilities of cationic amino acid based lipid assemblies to act as nonviral gene delivery vectors in primary cultured neurons. An arginine-based lipid, Arg-C3-Glu2C14, and a lysine-based lipid, Lys-C3-Glu2C14, with two different types of counterion, chloride ion (Cl–) and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA–), were shown to successfully mediate transfection of primary cultured neurons with plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein. Among four types of lipids, we optimized their conditions such as the lipid-to-DNA ratio and the amount of pDNA and conducted a cytotoxicity assay at the same time. Overall, Arg-C3-Glu2C14 with TFA– induced a rate of transfection in primary cultured neurons higher than that of Lys-C3-Glu2C14 using an optimal weight ratio of lipid-to-plasmid DNA of 1. Moreover, it was suggested that Arg-C3-Glu2C14 with TFA– showed the optimized value higher than that of Lipofectamine2000 in experimental conditions. Thus, Arg-C3-Glu2C14 with TFA– is a promising candidate as a reliable transfection reagent for primary cultured neurons with a relatively low cytotoxicity. PMID:24087930

  15. Entry of Bluetongue Virus Capsid Requires the Late Endosome-specific Lipid Lysobisphosphatidic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Avnish; Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2016-01-01

    The entry of viruses into host cells is one of the key processes of infection. The mechanisms of cellular entry for enveloped virus have been well studied. The fusion proteins as well as the facilitating cellular lipid factors involved in the viral fusion entry process have been well characterized. The process of non-enveloped virus cell entry, in comparison, remains poorly defined, particularly for large complex capsid viruses of the family Reoviridae, which comprises a range of mammalian pathogens. These viruses enter cells without the aid of a limiting membrane and thus cannot fuse with host cell membranes to enter cells. Instead, these viruses are believed to penetrate membranes of the host cell during endocytosis. However, the molecular mechanism of this process is largely undefined. Here we show, utilizing an in vitro liposome penetration assay and cell biology, that bluetongue virus (BTV), an archetypal member of the Reoviridae, utilizes the late endosome-specific lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid for productive membrane penetration and viral entry. Further, we provide preliminary evidence that lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid facilitates pore expansion during membrane penetration, suggesting a mechanism for lipid factor requirement of BTV. This finding indicates that despite the lack of a membrane envelope, the entry process of BTV is similar in specific lipid requirements to enveloped viruses that enter cells through the late endosome. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that a large non-enveloped virus of the Reoviridae has specific lipid requirements for membrane penetration and host cell entry. PMID:27036941

  16. Perfluorononanoic acid disturbed the metabolism of lipid in the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xuemei; Gao, Guizhen; Zhang, Xingtao; Wang, Haichao

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on the liver toxicity of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are focused on healthy individuals, whereas the effects of PFCs on individuals with diabetes mellitus have not been fully characterized. This study aimed to investigate the acute exposure of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) on the metabolism of lipid in the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Male diabetic rats were orally dosed by gavage for 7 days with 0, 0.2, 1 and 5 mg/kg/day PFNA. The contents of lipid, the activities of enzyme, the expressions of protein in the liver and the serum parameters were detected. The results indicate that dose-dependent accumulation of triglyceride and total cholesterol occurred in the livers of diabetic rats after PFNA treatment. PFNA increased the activities of lipid synthetase, fatty acid synthease, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and decreased the activity of lipolytic enzyme, hepatic lipase, in the liver of diabetic rats. The changes of the isocitrate dehydrogenase, malicenzyme and lipoprotein lipase were not obvious. The expressions of protein related to lipid homeostasis, liver X receptor α and apolipoprotein E, were decreased after PFNA administration. Exposure to PFNA also increased the activity of serum alanine aminotransferase in diabetic rats. In conclusion, this study discloses that exposure to PFNA impacts on enzymes and proteins related to liver lipid metabolism and lead to obvious accumulation of lipid in the liver of diabetic rats, which may be responsible for hepatotoxicity of this compound in individuals with diabetes mellitus.

  17. Lipid dynamics in yeast under haem-induced unsaturated fatty acid and/or sterol depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Thierry; Régnacq, Matthieu; Alimardani, Parissa; Moreau-Vauzelle, Carole; Bergès, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, UFA (unsaturated fatty acids) and ergosterol syntheses are aerobic processes that require haem. We took advantage of a strain affected in haem synthesis ( hem1 Delta) to starve specifically for one or the other of these essential lipids in order to examine the consequences on the overall lipid composition. Our results demonstrate that reserve lipids (i.e. triacylglycerols and steryl esters) are depleted independently of haem availability and that their UFA and sterol content is not crucial to sustain residual growth under lipid depletion. In parallel to UFA starvation, a net accumulation of SFA (saturated fatty acids) is observed as a consequence of haem biosynthesis preclusion. Interestingly, the excess SFA are not mainly stored within triacylglycerols and steryl esters but rather within specific phospholipid species, with a marked preference for PtdIns. This results in an increase in the cellular PtdIns content. However, neutral lipid homoeostasis is perturbed under haem starvation. The contribution of two lipid particle-associated proteins (namely Tgl1p and Dga1p) to this process is described. PMID:14640980

  18. Thermodynamic and structural characterization of amino acid-linked dialkyl lipids

    PubMed Central

    Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Lewis, Ruthven N.A.H.; Blickenstaff, Joseph W.; DiPrima, Michael; Marques, Bruno F.; McElhaney, Ronald N.; Nagle, John F.; Schneider, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), we determined some thermodynamic and structural parameters for a series of amino acid-linked dialkyl lipids containing a glutamic acid-succinate headgroup and di-alkyl chains: C12, C14, C16 and C18 in CHES buffer, pH 10. Upon heating, DSC shows that the C12, C14 and annealed C16 lipids undergo a single transition which XRD shows is from a lamellar, chain ordered subgel phase to a fluid phase. This single transition splits into two transitions for C18, and FTIR shows that the upper main transition is predominantly the melting of the hydrocarbon chains whereas the lower transition involves changes in the headgroup ordering as well as changes in the lateral packing of the chains. For short incubation times at low temperature, the C16 lipid appears to behave like the C18 lipid, but appropriate annealing at low temperatures indicates that its true equilibrium behavior is like the shorter chain lipids. XRD shows that the C12 lipid readily converts into a highly ordered subgel phase upon cooling and suggests a model with untilted, interdigitated chains and an area of 77.2 Å2/4 chains, with a distorted orthorhombic unit subcell, a = 9.0 Å, b = 4.3 Å and β = 92.7°. As the chain length n increases, subgel formation is slowed, but untilted, interdigitated chains prevail. PMID:15752461

  19. Studies in lipid histochemistry. XIII. The OPA (osmiumtetroxide-periodic acid-alpha-naphthylamine) method for the detection of apolar lipids.

    PubMed

    Elleder, M

    1975-09-29

    A new procedure for the detection of apolar lipids is described. It is a modification of the OTAN method (Adams, 1959) using periodic acid which oxidatively removes lower osmium derivatives from polar sites only, leaving those in apolar lipids intact and demonstrable with alpha-naphthylamine. Control steps for the exclusion of the possible interference of some less polar complex lipids and of lipopigments are described. The described technic is superior to the conventionally used sudan dyes due partly to the fact that only aqueous solutions are employed thus excluding any extraction of lipids, partly to the more distinct coloration.

  20. Fatty acid metabolism in L1210 murine leukemia cells: differences in modification of fatty acids incorporated into various lipids.

    PubMed

    Burns, C P; Wei, S P; Spector, A A

    1978-10-01

    L1210 leukemia cells can utilize all of the main fatty acids that normally are present in the ascites fluid in which they grow. This finding is consistent with the view that L1210 cells derive most of their fatty acids from the ascites fluid. From 80--90% of each fatty acid was incorporated into cell lipids without structural modification, suggesting that the lipid composition of these cells can be altered by changing the type of fatty acids to which they are exposed. Most importantly, the palmitate that was subsequently incorporated into total cell phospholipids was elongated and desaturated somewhat more than that incorporated into triglycerides. This difference was due primarily to more extensive modification of the palmitate incorporated into the ethanolamine phosphoglycerides fraction. Although there was no difference between total phospholipids and triglycerides with linoleate, more of the linoleate incorporated into ethanolamine phosphoglycerides was elongated and further desaturated than that incorporated into choline phosphoglycerides and triglycerides. These findings indicate fatty acids incorporated into various cell lipid fractions are not structurally modified to the same extent. There appears to be greater modification of fatty acid used for ethanolamine phosphoglyceride synthesis as compared with triglyceride and choline phosphoglyceride synthesis.

  1. Characteristic of lipids and fatty acid compositions of the neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    The lipids and fatty acids of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) were an-alyzed to clarify its lipid physiology and health benefit as marine food. Triacylglycerols were the only major component in the digestive gland (liver). In all other organs (mantle, arm, integument, and ovary), sterols and phospholipids were the major components with noticeable levels of ceramide aminoethyl phosphonate and sphingomyelin. The significant levels of sphingolipids suggest the O. bartramii lipids is a useful source for cosmetics. Although the lipid content between the liver and all other tissues markedly differed from each other, the same nine dominant fatty acids in the triacylglycerols were found in all organs; 14:0, 16:0, 18:0, 18:1n-9, 20:1n-9, 20:1n-11, 22:1n-11, 20:5n-3 (icosapentaenoic acid, EPA), and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA). Unusually high 20:1n-11 levels in the O. bartramii triacylglycerols were probably characteristic for western Pacific animal depot lipids, compared with non-detectable levels of 20:1n-11 reported in other marine animals. O. bartramii concurrently has high levels of DHA in their triacylglycerols. The major fatty acids in the phospholipids were 16:0, 18:0, 20:1n-9, EPA, and DHA without 20:1n-11. Markedly high levels of both EPA and DHA were observed in phosphatidylethanolamine, while only DHA was found as the major one in phosphatidylcholine. In particular, high levels of DHA were found both in its depot triacylglycerols and tissue phospholipids in all organs of O. bartramii, similar to that in highly migratory fishes. The high DHA levels in all its organs suggest that O. bartramii lipids is a healthy marine source for DHA supplements.

  2. Enantioselective analysis of chiral anteiso fatty acids in the polar and neutral lipids of food.

    PubMed

    Hauff, Simone; Hottinger, Georg; Vetter, Walter

    2010-04-01

    Anteiso fatty acids (aFA) are substituted with a methyl group on the antepenultimate carbon of the straight acyl chain. This feature leads to a stereogenic center. The 12-methyltetradecanoic acid (a15:0) and the 14-methylhexadecanoic acid (a17:0) are the most common aFA found in food, although they occur only in very small quantities. In this study we used gas chromatography in combination with a chiral stationary phase to determine the enantiomeric distribution of both a15:0 and a17:0 in the neutral and polar lipids of aquatic food samples and cheese. The best suited column was selected out of four custom-made combinations of heptakis(6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (beta-TBDM) with different amount and polarity of an achiral polysiloxane. After separation of polar and neutral lipids of the food samples by solid phase extraction, fatty acid methyl esters were prepared and the fatty acid methyl esters were fractionated by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. Measurements of fractions high in aFA by enantioselective GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring mode verified the dominance of the (S)-enantiomers of a15:0 and a17:0 in both lipid fractions. However (R)-enantiomers were detectable in all samples. The relative proportion of the (R)-enantiomers was up to fivefold higher in the polar lipids than in the neutral lipids. The higher proportions in the polar lipids indicate that microorganisms might be involved in the formation of (R)-aFA.

  3. Dietary lipids modify the fatty acid composition of cartilage, isolated chondrocytes and matrix vesicles.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Watkins, B A; Adkisson, H D

    1994-09-01

    The effects of dietary lipids on the fatty acid composition of hyaline cartilage, epiphyseal chondrocytes (EC) and matrix vesicles (MV) were evaluated in chicks. A basal semipurified diet was fed to chicks containing one of the following lipid sources at 70 g/kg: soybean oil, butter+corn oil, margarine+corn oil or menhaden oil+corn oil (MEC). Articular and epiphyseal growth cartilage were isolated from the proximal tibiotarsus; EC and MV were subsequently released by trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) and collagenase (EC 3.4.24.3) digestion followed by ultracentrifugation. The fatty acid composition of polar lipids in chick epiphyseal cartilage at three and six weeks, as well as articular cartilage, EC and MV at eight weeks of age revealed the presence of high levels of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (up to 85.5%) but low levels of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (2.6-10.2%). Mead acid (20:3n-9, > 3%) was also present in cartilage, EC and MV lipids, and was unaffected by the dietary lipid treatments. Total n-3 PUFA concentrations were the highest in cartilage, EC and MV of chicks consuming MEC. Feeding MEC lowered the levels of 20:4n-6 in cartilage, but increased 20:5n-3 levels. The data are consistent with those reported previously which showed that cartilage tissues are low in n-6 PUFA and that they contain 20:3n-9. We furthermore demonstrated that the PUFA composition of cartilage can be modified by dietary lipids.

  4. Fatty acid analysis tool (FAAT): An FT-ICR MS lipid analysis algorithm.

    PubMed

    Leavell, Michael D; Leary, Julie A

    2006-08-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is becoming an established tool for the investigation of lipids. As the methods for lipid analysis become more mature and their throughput increases, computer algorithms for the interpretation of such data will become a necessity. Toward this end, an algorithm dedicated to the analysis of Fourier transform mass spectral data from lipid extracts has been developed. The algorithm, Fatty Acid Analysis Tool, termed FAAT, has been successfully used to investigate complex lipid extracts containing thousands of components, from various species of mycobacteria including M. tuberculosis and M. abscessus. FAAT is rapid, generally taking tens of seconds to interpret multiple spectra, and accessible to most users as it is implemented in Microsoft Excel Visual Basic Software. In the reduction of data, FAAT begins by scaling spectra (i.e., to account for dilution factors), identifying monoisotopic ions, and assigning isotope packets. Unique features of FAAT include the following: (1) overlapping saturated and unsaturated lipid species can be distinguished, (2) known ions are assigned from a user-defined library including species that possess methylene heterogeneity, (3) and isotopic shifts from stable isotope labeling experiments are identified and assigned (up to a user-defined maximum). In addition, abundance differences between samples grown under normal and stressed conditions can be determined. In the analysis of mycobacterial lipid extracts, FAAT has successfully identified isotopic shifts from incorporation of 15N in M. abscessus. Additionally, FAAT has been used to successfully determine differences in lipid abundances between M. tuberculosis wild-type and mutant strains.

  5. Comparison of free fatty acids composition of cuticular lipids of Calliphora vicina larvae and pupae.

    PubMed

    Gołębiowski, Marek

    2012-10-01

    The chemical characterization of the free fatty acid (FFA) fractions of the cuticular lipids of Calliphora vicina larvae and pupae was performed by separating the FFA fraction using high-performance liquid chromatography with laser light scattering detection (HPLC-LLSD) and quantitatively analyzing the FFA using gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Thirty-two saturated and unsaturated FFA were identified and quantified in the insect lipids. Cuticular FFA profiles of C. vicina larvae and pupae were compared. Cuticular FFA of larvae and pupae accounted for 70.8 and 77.8 % of the total lipids, respectively. The cuticular lipids of C. vicina larvae contained 24 FFA ranging from 8:0 to 24:0, whereas the cuticular lipids of pupae contained 32 FFA ranging from 6:0 to 26:0. The cuticular lipids of the larvae contained 16 saturated, five monounsaturated, one diunsaturated, and two polyunsaturated FFA. The cuticular lipids of the pupae contained 18 saturated, nine monounsaturated, two diunsaturated, and three polyunsaturated FFA. The major cuticular FFA in C. vicina larvae and pupae was 18:1 (47.6 and 41.7 %, respectively). The highest amounts of total cuticular FFA were detected in larvae of C. vicina (1.7 mg/g of the insect body). The quantities of total cuticular FFA in pupae were smaller (1.4 mg/g of the insect body).

  6. New Poly(amino acid methacrylate) Brush Supports the Formation of Well-Defined Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A novel poly(amino acid methacrylate) brush comprising zwitterionic cysteine groups (PCysMA) was utilized as a support for lipid bilayers. The polymer brush provides a 12-nm-thick cushion between the underlying hard support and the aqueous phase. At neutral pH, the zeta potential of the PCysMA brush was ∼−10 mV. Cationic vesicles containing >25% DOTAP were found to form a homogeneous lipid bilayer, as determined by a combination of surface analytical techniques. The lipid mobility as measured by FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching) gave diffusion coefficients of ∼1.5 μm2 s–1, which are comparable to those observed for lipid bilayers on glass substrates. PMID:25746444

  7. Roles of Chlorogenic Acid on Regulating Glucose and Lipids Metabolism: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shengxi; Cao, Jianmei; Feng, Qin; Peng, Jinghua; Hu, Yiyang

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular glucose and lipid metabolic homeostasis is vital for maintaining basic life activities of a cell or an organism. Glucose and lipid metabolic disorders are closely related with the occurrence and progression of diabetes, obesity, hepatic steatosis, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), one of the most abundant polyphenol compounds in the human diet, is a group of phenolic secondary metabolites produced by certain plant species and is an important component of coffee. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that CGA exerts many biological properties, including antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic activities. Recently, the roles and applications of CGA, particularly in relation to glucose and lipid metabolism, have been highlighted. This review addresses current studies investigating the roles of CGA in glucose and lipid metabolism. PMID:24062792

  8. Age-Specific Lipid and Fatty Acid Profiles of Atlantic Salmon Juveniles in the Varzuga River

    PubMed Central

    Murzina, Svetlana A.; Nefedova, Zinaida A.; Pekkoeva, Svetlana N.; Veselov, Alexey E.; Efremov, Denis A.; Nemova, Nina N.

    2016-01-01

    The age-specific lipid and fatty acid profiles of juvenile Atlantic salmon at different ages (0+, 1+, and 2+ years) after hatching from nests located in the mainstream of a large Arctic River, the Varzuga River, and resettling to the favorable Sobachji shoal in autumn before overwinter are herein presented. The contemporary methods of the lipid analysis were used: thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The results show that the stability of the regulation of important functions in developing organisms is maintained through structural alterations in lipids. These alterations can be considered as a sequence of the modifications and changes in the ratios of certain lipid classes and fatty acids constituents. In general, changes in the lipids and fatty acids (FAs) maintained the physiological limits and controls through the adaptive systems of the organism. The mechanisms of juvenile fish biochemical adaptation to the environmental conditions in the studied biotope include the modification of the energy metabolism and anabolism, and here belongs to the energy characteristics of metabolic processes. PMID:27376274

  9. Lipids and fatty acids in Calanus sinicus during over-summering in the southern Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqing; Li, Chaolun; Liu, Mengtan; Jin, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Over-summering is a crucial period for Calanus sinicus in the southern Yellow Sea, where it is a key member of the zooplankton community. Lipids play an important role in copepod diapause, which is part of their over-summering strategy. We investigated how different fatty acids and lipid classes, including wax esters, changed during over-summering of C. sinicus during three cruises in June and August 2011 and November 2010, corresponding to the pre-, during and post- diapause periods, respectively. Large amounts of lipids were accumulated, mainly wax esters as previously found in C. finmarchicus during its diapause, and most of the storage lipids were used during over-summering. Wax ester polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) showed the most variation of the fatty acids (FAs), while the percentage composition of FAs in polar lipids was relatively stable. Selective use of wax ester PUFAs has already been shown to play important roles in the winter diapause of Calanus species in other regions, and our FA results show that this is the case for the YSCBW population that diapauses in summer.

  10. Stimuli responsive charge-switchable lipids: Capture and release of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Hersey, Joseph S; LaManna, Caroline M; Lusic, Hrvoje; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-03-01

    Stimuli responsive lipids, which enable control over the formation, transformation, and disruption of supramolecular assemblies, are of interest for biosensing, diagnostics, drug delivery, and basic transmembrane protein studies. In particular, spatiotemporal control over a supramolecular structure can be achieved using light activated compounds to induce significant supramolecular rearrangements. As such, a family of cationic lipids are described which undergo a permanent switch in charge upon exposure to 365 nm ultraviolet (UV) light to enable the capture of negatively charged nucleic acids within the self-assembled supramolecular structure of the lipids and subsequent release of these macromolecules upon exposure to UV light and disruption of the assemblies. The lipids are composed of either two different tripeptide head groups, Lysine-Glycine-Glycine (KGG) and Glycine-Glycine-Glycine (GGG) and three different hydrocarbon chain lengths (C6, C10, or C14) terminated by a UV light responsive 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethanol (NPE) protected carboxylic acid. The photolysis of the NPE protected lipid is measured as a function of time, and the resulting changes in net molecular charge are observed using zeta potential analysis for each head group and chain length combination. A proof of concept study for the capture and release of both linear DNA (calf thymus) and siRNA is presented using an ethidium bromide quenching assay where a balance between binding affinity and supramolecular stability are found to be the key to optimal nucleic acid capture and release.

  11. Age-Specific Lipid and Fatty Acid Profiles of Atlantic Salmon Juveniles in the Varzuga River.

    PubMed

    Murzina, Svetlana A; Nefedova, Zinaida A; Pekkoeva, Svetlana N; Veselov, Alexey E; Efremov, Denis A; Nemova, Nina N

    2016-06-30

    The age-specific lipid and fatty acid profiles of juvenile Atlantic salmon at different ages (0+, 1+, and 2+ years) after hatching from nests located in the mainstream of a large Arctic River, the Varzuga River, and resettling to the favorable Sobachji shoal in autumn before overwinter are herein presented. The contemporary methods of the lipid analysis were used: thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The results show that the stability of the regulation of important functions in developing organisms is maintained through structural alterations in lipids. These alterations can be considered as a sequence of the modifications and changes in the ratios of certain lipid classes and fatty acids constituents. In general, changes in the lipids and fatty acids (FAs) maintained the physiological limits and controls through the adaptive systems of the organism. The mechanisms of juvenile fish biochemical adaptation to the environmental conditions in the studied biotope include the modification of the energy metabolism and anabolism, and here belongs to the energy characteristics of metabolic processes.

  12. Lipids and fatty acids in Calanus sinicus during oversummering in the southern Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqing; Li, Chaolun; Liu, Mengtan; Jin, Xin

    2017-07-01

    Over-summering is a crucial period for Calanus sinicus in the southern Yellow Sea, where it is a key member of the zooplankton community. Lipids play an important role in copepod diapause, which is part of their over-summering strategy. We investigated how different fatty acids and lipid classes, including wax esters, changed during over-summering of C. sinicus during three cruises in June and August 2011 and November 2010, corresponding to the pre-, during and post-diapause periods, respectively. Large amounts of lipids were accumulated, mainly wax esters as previously found in C. finmarchicus during its diapause, and most of the storage lipids were used during over-summering. Wax ester polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) showed the most variation of the fatty acids (FAs), while the percentage composition of FAs in polar lipids was relatively stable. Selective use of wax ester PUFAs has already been shown to play important roles in the winter diapause of Calanus species in other regions, and our FA results show that this is the case for the Yellow Sea Cold Bottom Water (YSCBW) population that diapauses in summer.

  13. Lipid Profiling of the Arabidopsis Hypersensitive Response Reveals Specific Lipid Peroxidation and Fragmentation Processes: Biogenesis of Pimelic and Azelaic Acid1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zoeller, Maria; Stingl, Nadja; Krischke, Markus; Fekete, Agnes; Waller, Frank; Berger, Susanne; Mueller, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation (LPO) is induced by a variety of abiotic and biotic stresses. Although LPO is involved in diverse signaling processes, little is known about the oxidation mechanisms and major lipid targets. A systematic lipidomics analysis of LPO in the interaction of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) with Pseudomonas syringae revealed that LPO is predominantly confined to plastid lipids comprising galactolipid and triacylglyceride species and precedes programmed cell death. Singlet oxygen was identified as the major cause of lipid oxidation under basal conditions, while a 13-lipoxygenase (LOX2) and free radical-catalyzed lipid oxidation substantially contribute to the increase upon pathogen infection. Analysis of lox2 mutants revealed that LOX2 is essential for enzymatic membrane peroxidation but not for the pathogen-induced free jasmonate production. Despite massive oxidative modification of plastid lipids, levels of nonoxidized lipids dramatically increased after infection. Pathogen infection also induced an accumulation of fragmented lipids. Analysis of mutants defective in 9-lipoxygenases and LOX2 showed that galactolipid fragmentation is independent of LOXs. We provide strong in vivo evidence for a free radical-catalyzed galactolipid fragmentation mechanism responsible for the formation of the essential biotin precursor pimelic acid as well as of azelaic acid, which was previously postulated to prime the immune response of Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that azelaic acid is a general marker for LPO rather than a general immune signal. The proposed fragmentation mechanism rationalizes the pathogen-induced radical amplification and formation of electrophile signals such as phytoprostanes, malondialdehyde, and hexenal in plastids. PMID:22822212

  14. A mutant of Arabidopsis deficient in desaturation of palmitic acid in leaf lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Kunst, L.; Somerville, C. ); Browse, J. )

    1989-07-01

    The overall fatty acid composition of leaf lipids in a mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana was characterized by elevated amounts of palmitic acid and a decreased amount of unsaturated 16-carbon fatty acids as a consequence of a single nuclear mutation. Quantitative analysis of the fatty acid composition of individual lipids suggested that the mutant is deficient in the activity of a chloroplast {omega}9 fatty acid desaturase which normally introduces a double bond in 16-carbon acyl chains esterified to monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGD). The mutant exhibited an increased ratio of 18- to 16-carbon fatty acids in MGD due to a change in the relative contribution of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways of lipid biosynthesis. This appears to be a regulated response to the loss of chloroplast {omega}9 desaturase and presumably reflects a requirement for polyunsaturated fatty acids for the normal assembly of chloroplast membranes. The reduction in mass of prokaryotic MGD species involved both a reduction in synthesis of MGD by the prokaryotic pathway and increased turnover of MGD molecular species which contain 16:0.

  15. Enhancement of extracellular lipid production by oleaginous yeast through preculture and sequencing batch culture strategy with acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Shen, Yi; Luo, Hui-Juan; Liu, Jia-Nan; Liu, Jia

    2017-09-19

    Oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus curvatus MUCL 29819, an acid-tolerant lipid producer, was tested to spill lipids extracellularly using different concentrations of acetic acid as carbon source. Extracellular lipids were released when the yeast was cultured with acetic acid exceeding 20g/L. The highest production of lipid (5.01g/L) was obtained when the yeast was cultured with 40g/L acetic acid. When the yeast was cultivated with moderate concentration (20g/L) of acetic acid, lipid production was further increased by 49.6% through preculture with 40g/L acetic acid as stimulant. When applying high concentration (40g/L) of acetic acid as carbon source in sequencing batch cultivation, extracellular lipids accounted up to 50.5% in the last cycle and the extracellular lipids reached 5.43g/L through the whole process. This study provides an effective strategy to enhance extracellular lipid production and facilitate the recovery of microbial lipids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of lipid bilayer properties on nanodisc formation mediated by styrene/maleic acid copolymers.

    PubMed

    Cuevas Arenas, Rodrigo; Klingler, Johannes; Vargas, Carolyn; Keller, Sandro

    2016-08-11

    Copolymers of styrene and maleic acid (SMA) have gained great attention as alternatives to conventional detergents, as they offer decisive advantages for studying membrane proteins and lipids in vitro. These polymers self-insert into artificial and biological membranes and, at sufficiently high concentrations, solubilise them into disc-shaped nanostructures containing a lipid bilayer core surrounded by a polymer belt. We have used (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering to systematically study the solubilisation of vesicles composed of saturated or unsaturated phospholipids by an SMA copolymer with a 3 : 1 styrene/maleic acid molar ratio at different temperatures. Solubilisation was thermodynamically rationalised in terms of a three-stage model that treats various lipid/polymer aggregates as pseudophases. The solubilising capacity of SMA(3 : 1) towards a saturated lipid is higher in the gel than in the liquid-crystalline state of the membrane even though solubilisation is slower. Although the solubilisation of mixed fluid membranes is non-selective, the presence of a non-bilayer phospholipid lowers the threshold at which the membrane becomes saturated with SMA(3 : 1) but raises the polymer concentration required for complete solubilisation. Both of these trends can be explained by considering the vesicle-to-nanodisc transfer free energies of the lipid and the polymer. On the basis of the phase diagrams thus obtained, re-association of polymer-solubilised lipids with vesicles is possible under mild conditions, which has implications for the reconstitution of proteins and lipids from nanodiscs into vesicular membranes. Finally, the phase diagrams provide evidence for the absence of free SMA(3 : 1) in vesicular lipid suspensions.

  17. Rapid lipid enrichment in omega3 fatty acids: liver data.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Yvon A; Peltier, Sebastien; Portois, Laurence; Sener, Abdullah; Malaisse, Willy J

    2008-03-01

    The bolus intravenous injection of a novel medium-chain triglyceride:fish oil emulsion to normal subjects was recently reported to enrich within 60 min the phospholipid content of leucocytes and platelets in long-chain polyunsaturated omega3 fatty acids. The present study, conducted in second generation omega3-depleted rats, aims at investigating whether such a procedure may also increase within 60 min the phospholipid content of omega3 fatty acids in cells located outwards of the bloodstream, in this case liver cells, and whether this coincides with correction of the perturbation in the liver triglyceride fatty acid content and profile otherwise prevailing in these rats. The results indicate that such is indeed the case and further suggest a cause-to-effect relationship between the two events.

  18. Modulation of lipid rafts by Omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and cancer: implications for use of lipids during nutrition support.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Rafat A; Harvey, Kevin A; Zaloga, Gary P; Stillwell, William

    2007-02-01

    Current understanding of biologic membrane structure and function is largely based on the concept of lipid rafts. Lipid rafts are composed primarily of tightly packed, liquid-ordered sphingolipids/cholesterol/saturated phospholipids that float in a sea of more unsaturated and loosely packed, liquid-disordered lipids. Lipid rafts have important clinical implications because many important membrane-signaling proteins are located within the raft regions of the membrane, and alterations in raft structure can alter activity of these signaling proteins. Because rafts are lipid-based, their composition, structure, and function are susceptible to manipulation by dietary components such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and by cholesterol depletion. We review how alteration of raft lipids affects the raft/nonraft localization and hence the function of several proteins involved in cell signaling. We focus our discussion of raft-signaling proteins on inflammation and cancer.

  19. Rapid lipid enrichment in omega3 fatty acids: cause-to-effect relationships.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Yvon A; Peltier, Sebastien; Portois, Laurence; Sener, Abdullah; Malaisse, Willy J

    2008-03-01

    The bolus intravenous administration of a novel medium-chain triglyceride:fish oil emulsion to second generation rats depleted in long-chain polyunsaturated omega3 fatty acids was recently found to enrich within 60 min the content of both plasma and liver lipids in such omega3 fatty acids, this coinciding with correction of the perturbation in liver triglyceride fatty acid content and profile otherwise prevailing in these rats. The present report draws attention to cause-to-effect relationships between changes in liver phospholipid and triglyceride fatty acid content and/or pattern operative under these experimental conditions.

  20. Accumulation of Oxygenated Fatty Acids in Oat Lipids During Storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oxygenated fatty acids were identified in oat grain by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. We hypothesized that most of these were the results of lipoxygenase activity. This hypothesis was tested by measuring concentrations of these compounds after hydrothermal treatments and storage of oat groa...

  1. Acetylsalicylic acid improves lipid-induced insulin resistance in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Möhlig, Matthias; Freudenberg, Madlen; Bobbert, Thomas; Ristow, Michael; Rochlitz, Helmut; Weickert, Martin O; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Spranger, Joachim

    2006-03-01

    Insulin resistance is a central feature of type 2 diabetes. Salicylates prevent lipid-induced insulin resistance in rodents by interrupting inflammatory pathways. We therefore investigated whether salicylates reduce lipid-induced insulin resistance in humans by affecting inflammatory pathways as reflected by serum adipocytokines. Ten healthy men were included in a crossover intervention study. Four euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps were performed, one without pretreatment, one with prior 2-h lipid infusion, one after pretreatment with 4 g acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), and one with ASA pretreatment and prior lipid infusion. Lipid-induced insulin resistance was quantified by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique running at least 2 h. Repeated-measures ANOVA on two factors was used for comparison, and results were Bonferroni adjusted for multiple measurements. ASA effects on serum adipocytokines were addressed by comparing the areas under the curves. Glucose infusion rate (M value) of the control clamp without pretreatment was 6.3 (+/- 0.6) mg/kg.min. ASA pretreatment did not change glucose infusion rates (P = 0.6). Lipid infusion significantly decreased the M value to 4.1 (+/- 0.6) mg/kg.min (P = 0.008). After ASA pretreatment and lipid infusion, the M value was 4.8 (+/- 0.7) mg/kg.min and was significantly improved, compared with the lipid-only clamp (P = 0.036 after Bonferroni's adjustment). General biomarkers of inflammatory processes (IL-6, C-reactive protein), the insulin-sensitizing mediator adiponectin, and circulating adiponectin oligomers were unchanged by ASA pretreatment. ASA pretreatment attenuated lipid-induced insulin resistance in healthy humans. This acute insulin-sensitizing effect of ASA was unrelated to changes of circulating inflammatory markers.

  2. Direct comparison of fatty acid ratios in single cellular lipid droplets as determined by comparative Raman spectroscopy and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schie, Iwan W; Nolte, Lena; Pedersen, Theresa L; Smith, Zach; Wu, Jian; Yahiatène, Idir; Newman, John W; Huser, Thomas

    2013-11-07

    Cellular lipid droplets are the least studied and least understood cellular organelles in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Despite a significant body of research studying the physiology of lipid droplets it has not yet been possible to fully determine the composition of individual cellular lipid droplets. In this paper we use Raman spectroscopy on single cellular lipid droplets and least-squares fitting of pure fatty acid spectra to determine the composition of individual lipid droplets in cells after treatment with different ratios of oleic and palmitic acid. We validate the results of the Raman spectroscopy-based single lipid droplet analysis with results obtained by gas chromatography analysis of millions of cells, and find that our approach can accurately predict the relative amount of a specific fatty acid in the lipid droplet. Based on these results we show that the fatty acid composition in individual lipid droplets is on average similar to that of all lipid droplets found in the sample. Furthermore, we expand this approach to the investigation of the lipid composition in single cellular peroxisomes. We determine the location of cellular peroxisomes based on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of peroxisomes labeled with the green fluorescent protein, and successive Raman spectroscopy of peroxisomes. We find that in some cases peroxisomes can produce a detectable CARS signal, and that the peroxisomal Raman spectra exhibit an oleic acid-like signature.

  3. Fatty acid composition of lipids in pot marigold (Calendula officinalis L.) seed genotypes.

    PubMed

    Dulf, Francisc V; Pamfil, Doru; Baciu, Adriana D; Pintea, Adela

    2013-01-17

    Calendula officinalis L. (pot marigold) is an annual aromatic herb with yellow or golden-orange flowers, native to the Mediterranean climate areas. Their seeds contain significant amounts of oil (around 20%), of which about 60% is calendic acid. For these reasons, in Europe concentrated research efforts have been directed towards the development of pot marigold as an oilseed crop for industrial purposes. The oil content and fatty acid composition of major lipid fractions in seeds from eleven genotypes of pot marigold (Calendula officinalis L.) were determined. The lipid content of seeds varied between 13.6 and 21.7 g oil/100 g seeds. The calendic and linoleic acids were the two dominant fatty acids in total lipid (51.4 to 57.6% and 28.5 to 31.9%) and triacylglycerol (45.7 to 54.7% and 22.6 to 29.2%) fractions. Polar lipids were also characterised by higher unsaturation ratios (with the PUFAs content between 60.4 and 66.4%), while saturates (consisted mainly of palmitic and very long-chain saturated fatty acids) were found in higher amounts in sterol esters (ranging between 49.3 and 55.7% of total fatty acids). All the pot marigold seed oils investigated contain high levels of calendic acid (more than 50% of total fatty acids), making them favorable for industrial use. The compositional differences between the genotypes should be considered when breeding and exploiting the pot marigold seeds for nutraceutical and pharmacological purposes.

  4. Fatty acid composition of lipids in pot marigold (Calendula officinalis L.) seed genotypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Calendula officinalis L. (pot marigold) is an annual aromatic herb with yellow or golden-orange flowers, native to the Mediterranean climate areas. Their seeds contain significant amounts of oil (around 20%), of which about 60% is calendic acid. For these reasons, in Europe concentrated research efforts have been directed towards the development of pot marigold as an oilseed crop for industrial purposes. Results The oil content and fatty acid composition of major lipid fractions in seeds from eleven genotypes of pot marigold (Calendula officinalis L.) were determined. The lipid content of seeds varied between 13.6 and 21.7 g oil/100 g seeds. The calendic and linoleic acids were the two dominant fatty acids in total lipid (51.4 to 57.6% and 28.5 to 31.9%) and triacylglycerol (45.7 to 54.7% and 22.6 to 29.2%) fractions. Polar lipids were also characterised by higher unsaturation ratios (with the PUFAs content between 60.4 and 66.4%), while saturates (consisted mainly of palmitic and very long-chain saturated fatty acids) were found in higher amounts in sterol esters (ranging between 49.3 and 55.7% of total fatty acids). Conclusions All the pot marigold seed oils investigated contain high levels of calendic acid (more than 50% of total fatty acids), making them favorable for industrial use. The compositional differences between the genotypes should be considered when breeding and exploiting the pot marigold seeds for nutraceutical and pharmacological purposes. PMID:23327299

  5. Effects of dietary fats on plasma lipids and lipoproteins: an hypothesis for the lipid-lowering effect of unsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Spritz, Norton; Mishkel, Maurice A.

    1969-01-01

    Several aspects of the effects of dietary fat on plasma lipids and lipoproteins were investigated in 12 subjects during the long-term feeding of formulas containing 40% of their calories as either saturated or unsaturated fats. The changes in fatty acid composition of plasma lipids, shown previously to occur after prolonged feedings of a dietary fat, required 10-14 days to be complete and were synchronous with the effect of the fat on plasma lipid concentrations. The change in lipid concentration occurred in low but not in high density lipoproteins. The effects on lipid levels of the low density lipoproteins were found to occur with little or no effect on the concentration of the protein moiety of these lipoproteins; as a result, cholesterol- and phospholipid to protein ratios in low density lipoproteins fell during unsaturated fat feeding. The effects of dietary fat on plasma phospholipids were studied in detail: the relative amounts of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, and lysophosphatidylcholine were unaffected by the type of dietary fat. However, the molecular species of phosphatidylcholine were markedly affected. More than 90% of the fatty acids at the α-position were saturated during both saturated and unsaturated feedings. In contrast, during unsaturated feedings, linoleate at the β-position outnumbered oleate by approximately 4:1, whereas during saturated feedings these two types of fatty acids were present in nearly equal amounts. This paper also presents the following hypothesis for the lipid-lowering effect of unsaturated dietary fat: since unsaturated fatty acids occupy a greater area than saturated acids, they alter the spatial configuration of the lipids into which they are incorporated; as a result, fewer lipid molecules can be accommodated by the apoprotein of the low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and thus the lipid content of the lipoprotein is lowered. The experimental findings of this study, while not proving this

  6. Long-term melatonin administration increases polyunsaturated fatty acid percentage in plasma lipids of hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Pita, Maria L; Hoyos, Marta; Martin-Lacave, Inés; Osuna, Carmen; Fernández-Santos, Jose M; Guerrero, Juan M

    2002-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of melatonin on the fatty acid composition of plasma and tissue lipids. Melatonin administration to rats fed with a standard diet only increased long-chain n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in total plasma lipids and liver phospholipids but induced significant changes in hypercholesterolemic rats. In plasma, palmitoleic and oleic acids increased and n-6 and n-3 PUFA decreased in hypercholesterolemic rats; theses changes were reversed by melatonin administration. The analysis of lipid fractions revealed that only the cholesteryl ester fraction was affected by melatonin. Histological studies of the carotid artery intima revealed the appearance, in hypercholesterolemic rats, of fatty streaks produced by a mass of foam cells covered by the endothelium and by a thin layer of mononucleated cells. These changes were prevented by melatonin. We conclude that long-term melatonin administration modifies the fatty acid composition of rat plasma and liver lipids and ameliorates the arterial fatty infiltration induced by cholesterol.

  7. Acid sphingomyelinase activity is regulated by membrane lipids and facilitates cholesterol transfer by NPC2[S

    PubMed Central

    Oninla, Vincent O.; Breiden, Bernadette; Babalola, Jonathan O.; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    During endocytosis, membrane components move to intraluminal vesicles of the endolysosomal compartment for digestion. At the late endosomes, cholesterol is sorted out mainly by two sterol-binding proteins, Niemann-Pick protein type C (NPC)1 and NPC2. To study the NPC2-mediated intervesicular cholesterol transfer, we developed a liposomal assay system. (Abdul-Hammed, M., B. Breiden, M. A. Adebayo, J. O. Babalola, G. Schwarzmann, and K. Sandhoff. 2010. Role of endosomal membrane lipids and NPC2 in cholesterol transfer and membrane fusion. J. Lipid Res. 51: 1747–1760.) Anionic lipids stimulate cholesterol transfer between liposomes while SM inhibits it, even in the presence of anionic bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP). Preincubation of vesicles containing SM with acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) (SM phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12) results in hydrolysis of SM to ceramide (Cer), which enhances cholesterol transfer. Besides SM, ASM also cleaves liposomal phosphatidylcholine. Anionic phospholipids derived from the plasma membrane (phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid) stimulate SM and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by ASM more effectively than BMP, which is generated during endocytosis. ASM-mediated hydrolysis of liposomal SM was also stimulated by incorporation of diacylglycerol (DAG), Cer, and free fatty acids into the liposomal membranes. Conversely, phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol, Cer, DAG, monoacylglycerol, and fatty acids. Our data suggest that SM degradation by ASM is required for physiological secretion of cholesterol from the late endosomal compartment, and is a key regulator of endolysosomal lipid digestion. PMID:25339683

  8. Lipids and lipoteichoic acid of autolysis-defective Streptococcus faecium strains.

    PubMed

    Shungu, D L; Cornett, J B; Shockman, G D

    1980-06-01

    Two of four previously isolated autolysis-defective mutants of Streptococcus faecium (Streptococcus faecalis ATCC 9790) incorporated substantially more [14C]glycerol into lipids and lipoteichoic acid than did the parent strain. Consistent with increased accumulation of lipids and lipoteichoic acid, significantly higher levels of phosphorus were found in the corresponding fractions of the two mutant strains than in the wild type. Although the autolysis-defective mutant strains contained the same assortment of lipids as the wild type, the relative amount of [14C]glycerol incorporated into diphosphatidylglycerol increased, accompanied by a decreased fraction of phosphatidylglycerol. These results suggested that increased cellular content of two types of substances, acylated lipoteichoic acid and lipids (notably diphosphatidylglycerol), which previously had been shown to be potent inhibitors of the N-acetylmuramoylhydrolase of this species, contributed to the autolysis-defective phenotype of these mutants. Consistent with this interpretation are observations that (i) cerulenin inhibition of fatty acid synthesis increased the rates of benzylpenicillin-induced cellular lysis and that (ii) Triton X-100 or Zwittergent 3-14 treatment could reveal the presence of otherwise cryptic but substantial levels of the active form of the autolysin in cells of three of four mutants and of the proteinase-activable latent form in all four mutants.

  9. Changes in the Total Lipid, Neutral Lipid, Phospholipid and Fatty Acid Composition of Phospholipid Fractions during Pastırma Processing, a Dry-Cured Meat Product

    PubMed Central

    Aksu, Muhammet Irfan; Dogan, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Pastırma is a dry-cured meat product, produced from whole beef or water buffalo muscles. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of production stages (raw meat, after curing, after 2nd drying and pastırma) on the total lipid, neutral lipid, phospholipid and fatty acid composition of phospholipid fraction of pastırma produced from beef M. Longissimus dorsi muscles. The pH and colour (L*, a* and b*) analyses were also performed in raw meat and pastırma. It was found that pastırma production stages had significant effects (p<0.01) on the total amounts of lipid, neutral lipid and phospholipid, and the highest amounts of lipid, neutral lipid and phospholipid were detected in pastırma. In pastırma, neutral lipid ratio was determined as 79.33±2.06% and phospholipid ratio as 20.67±2.06%. Phospholipids was proportionately lower in pastırma than raw meat. Pastırma production stages affected pentadecanoic acid (15:1) (p<0.01), linoleic acid (18:2n-6) (p<0.05), γ-linoleic acid (18:3n-6) (p<0.05), erucic acid (22:1n-9) (p<0.05), docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6) (p<0.05), total unsaturated fatty acid (ΣUSFA) (p<0.05) and total saturated fatty acid (ΣSFA) (p<0.05) ratios of phospholipid fraction and also the moisture content (p<0.01). Pastırma process also affected pH and colour (L*, a* and b*) values (p<0.01), and these values were higher in pastırma than raw meat. PMID:28316467

  10. A conditional mutant of the fatty acid synthase unveils unexpected cross talks in mycobacterial lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cabruja, Matías; Mondino, Sonia; Tsai, Yi Ting; Lara, Julia; Gramajo, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Unlike most bacteria, mycobacteria rely on the multi-domain enzyme eukaryote-like fatty acid synthase I (FAS I) to make fatty acids de novo. These metabolites are precursors of the biosynthesis of most of the lipids present both in the complex mycobacteria cell wall and in the storage lipids inside the cell. In order to study the role of the type I FAS system in Mycobacterium lipid metabolism in vivo, we constructed a conditional mutant in the fas-acpS operon of Mycobacterium smegmatis and analysed in detail the impact of reduced de novo fatty acid biosynthesis on the global architecture of the cell envelope. As expected, the mutant exhibited growth defect in the non-permissive condition that correlated well with the lower expression of fas-acpS and the concomitant reduction of FAS I, confirming that FAS I is essential for survival. The reduction observed in FAS I provoked an accumulation of its substrates, acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA, and a strong reduction of C12 to C18 acyl-CoAs, but not of long-chain acyl-CoAs (C19 to C24). The most intriguing result was the ability of the mutant to keep synthesizing mycolic acids when fatty acid biosynthesis was impaired. A detailed comparative lipidomic analysis showed that although reduced FAS I levels had a strong impact on fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis, mycolic acids were still being synthesized in the mutant, although with a different relative species distribution. However, when triacylglycerol degradation was inhibited, mycolic acid biosynthesis was significantly reduced, suggesting that storage lipids could be an intracellular reservoir of fatty acids for the biosynthesis of complex lipids in mycobacteria. Understanding the interaction between FAS I and the metabolic pathways that rely on FAS I products is a key step to better understand how lipid homeostasis is regulated in this microorganism and how this regulation could play a role during infection in pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:28228470

  11. Probing lipid peroxidation by using linoleic acid and benzophenone.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Inmaculada; Neshchadin, Dmytro; Rico, Enrique; Griesser, Markus; Samadi, Abdelouahid; Morera, Isabel M; Gescheidt, Georg; Miranda, Miguel A

    2011-08-29

    A thorough mechanistic study has been performed on the reaction between benzophenone (BZP) and a series of 1,4-dienes, including 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD), 1,4-dihydro-2-methylbenzoic acid (MBA), 1,4-dihydro-1,2-dimethylbenzoic acid (DMBA) and linoleic acid (LA). A combination of steady-state photolysis, laser flash photolysis (LFP), and photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) have been used. Irradiation of BZP and CHD led to a cross-coupled sensitizer-diene product, together with 6, 7, and 8. With MBA and DMBA as hydrogen donors, photoproducts arising from cross-coupling of sensitizer and diene radicals were found; compound 7 was also obtained, but 6 and o-toluic acid were only isolated in the irradiation of BZP with MBA. Triplet lifetimes were determined in the absence and in the presence of several diene concentrations. All three model compounds showed similar reactivity (k(q) ≈10(8)  M(-1)  s(-1)) towards triplet excited BZP. Partly reversible hydrogen abstraction of the allylic hydrogen atoms of CHD, MBA, and DMBA was also detected by photo-CIDNP on different timescales. Polarizations of the diamagnetic products were in full agreement with the results derived from LFP. Finally, LA also underwent partly reversible hydrogen abstraction during photoreaction with BZP. Subsequent hydrogen transfer between primary radicals led to conjugated derivatives of LA. The unpaired electron spin population in linoleyl radical (LA(.)) was predominantly found on H(1-5) protons. To date, LA-related radicals were only reported upon hydrogen transfer from highly substituted model compounds by steady-state EPR spectroscopy. Herein, we have experimentally established the formation of LA(.) and shown that it converts into two dominating conjugated isomers on the millisecond timescale. Such processes are at the basis of alterations of membrane structures caused by oxidative stress.

  12. The fusogenic lipid phosphatidic acid promotes the biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane protein Ugo1

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael; Taskin, Asli A.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Guan, Xue Li; Prinz, Claudia; Opalińska, Magdalena; Zorzin, Carina; van der Laan, Martin; Wenk, Markus R.; Schubert, Rolf; Wiedemann, Nils; Holzer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Import and assembly of mitochondrial proteins depend on a complex interplay of proteinaceous translocation machineries. The role of lipids in this process has been studied only marginally and so far no direct role for a specific lipid in mitochondrial protein biogenesis has been shown. Here we analyzed a potential role of phosphatidic acid (PA) in biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vivo remodeling of the mitochondrial lipid composition by lithocholic acid treatment or by ablation of the lipid transport protein Ups1, both leading to an increase of mitochondrial PA levels, specifically stimulated the biogenesis of the outer membrane protein Ugo1, a component of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. We reconstituted the import and assembly pathway of Ugo1 in protein-free liposomes, mimicking the outer membrane phospholipid composition, and found a direct dependency of Ugo1 biogenesis on PA. Thus, PA represents the first lipid that is directly involved in the biogenesis pathway of a mitochondrial membrane protein. PMID:26347140

  13. The Lipid domain Phase diagram in a Dipalmitoyl-PC/Docosahaexnoic Acid-PE/Cholesterol System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda

    2011-03-01

    Lipid domains in bilayer membrane and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are thought to play an important role in cellular activities. In particular, lipids containing docosahaexnoic acid are an interesting class of PUFAs due to their health benefits. In this project, we perform oxidation measurements of DHA-PE to determine the rate of oxidation in combination with antioxidants. A ternary diagram of DPPC/DHA-PE/cholesterol is mapped out to identify phase separation phenomena using atomic force microscope (AFM). Fluorescence microscopy is also used to image lipid domains in a flat bilayer with fluorescent labels. As expected, we observe the phase, shape, and size of lipid domains changes with varying composition. Moreover, we find that the roughness of the domains changes possibly due to overpacking of cholesterol in domains. This model study provides further understanding of the role of cholesterol in the bilayer membrane leading towards a better understanding of cell membranes. NSF award # DMR 0852791, ``CAREER: Self-Assembly of Polyunsaturated Lipids and Cholesterol In The Cell Membrane.''

  14. Waste lipids to energy: how to optimize methane production from long‐chain fatty acids (LCFA)

    PubMed Central

    Alves, M. Madalena; Pereira, M. Alcina; Sousa, Diana Z.; Cavaleiro, Ana J.; Picavet, Merijn; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The position of high‐rate anaerobic technology (HR‐AnWT) in the wastewater treatment and bioenergy market can be enhanced if the range of suitable substrates is expanded. Analyzing existing technologies, applications and problems, it is clear that, until now, wastewaters with high lipids content are not effectively treated by HR‐AnWT. Nevertheless, waste lipids are ideal potential substrates for biogas production, since theoretically more methane can be produced, when compared with proteins or carbohydrates. In this minireview, the classical problems of lipids methanization in anaerobic processes are discussed and new concepts to enhance lipids degradation are presented. Reactors operation, feeding strategies and prospects of technological developments for wastewater treatment are discussed. Long‐chain fatty acids (LCFA) degradation is accomplished by syntrophic communities of anaerobic bacteria and methanogenic archaea. For optimal performance these syntrophic communities need to be clustered in compact aggregates, which is often difficult to achieve with wastewaters that contain fats and lipids. Driving the methane production from lipids/LCFA at industrial scale without risk of overloading and inhibition is still a challenge that has the potential for filling a gap in the existing processes and technologies for biological methane production associated to waste and wastewater treatment. PMID:21255287

  15. Identification of hydrophobic amino acids required for lipid activation of C. elegans CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Braker, Jay D; Hodel, Kevin J.; Mullins, David R.; Friesen, Jon A.

    2009-01-01

    CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT), critical for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis, is activated by translocation to the membrane surface. The lipid activation region of Caenorhabditis elegans CCT is between residues 246 and 266 of the 347 amino acid polypeptide, a region proposed to form an amphipathic alpha helix. When leucine 246, tryptophan 249, isoleucine 256, isoleucine 257, or phenylalanine 260, on the hydrophobic face of the helix, were changed individually to serine low activity was observed in the absence of lipid vesicles, similar to wild-type CCT, while lipid stimulated activity was reduced compared to wild-type CCT. Mutational analysis of phenylalanine 260 implicated this residue as a contributor to auto-inhibition of CCT while mutation of L246, W249, I256, and I257 simultaneously to serine resulted in significantly higher activity in the absence of lipid vesicles and an enzyme that was not lipid activated. These results support a concerted mechanism of lipid activation that requires multiple residues on the hydrophobic face of the putative amphipathic alpha helix. PMID:19836342

  16. Microbial conversion of synthetic and food waste-derived volatile fatty acids to lipids.

    PubMed

    Vajpeyi, Shashwat; Chandran, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    Lipid accumulation in the oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus albidus was evaluated using mixtures of volatile fatty acids (VFA) as substrates. In general, batch growth under nitrogen limitation led to higher lipid accumulation using synthetic VFA. During batch growth, an initial COD:N ratio of 25:1mg COD:mg N led to maximum intracellular lipid accumulation (28.3 ± 0.7% g/g dry cell weight), which is the maximum reported for C. albidus using VFA as the carbon source, without compromising growth kinetics. At this feed COD:N ratio, chemostat cultures fed with synthetic VFA yielded statistically similar intracellular lipid content as batch cultures (29.9 ± 1.9%, g/g). However, batch cultures fed with VFA produced from the fermentation of food waste, yielded a lower lipid content (14.9 ± 0.1%, g/g). The lipid composition obtained with synthetic and food-waste-derived VFA was similar to commercial biodiesel feedstock. We therefore demonstrate the feasibility of linking biochemical waste treatment and biofuel production using VFA as key intermediates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of hydrophobic amino acids required for lipid activation of C. elegans CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Braker, Jay D; Hodel, Kevin J; Mullins, David R; Friesen, Jon A

    2009-12-01

    CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT), critical for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis, is activated by translocation to the membrane surface. The lipid activation region of Caenorhabditis elegans CCT is between residues 246 and 266 of the 347 amino acid polypeptide, a region proposed to form an amphipathic alpha helix. When leucine 246, tryptophan 249, isoleucine 256, isoleucine 257, or phenylalanine 260, on the hydrophobic face of the helix, were changed individually to serine low activity was observed in the absence of lipid vesicles, similar to wild-type CCT, while lipid stimulated activity was reduced compared to wild-type CCT. Mutational analysis of phenylalanine 260 implicated this residue as a contributor to auto-inhibition of CCT while mutation of L246, W249, I256, and I257 simultaneously to serine resulted in significantly higher activity in the absence of lipid vesicles and an enzyme that was not lipid activated. These results support a concerted mechanism of lipid activation that requires multiple residues on the hydrophobic face of the putative amphipathic alpha helix.

  18. Waste lipids to energy: how to optimize methane production from long-chain fatty acids (LCFA).

    PubMed

    Alves, M Madalena; Pereira, M Alcina; Sousa, Diana Z; Cavaleiro, Ana J; Picavet, Merijn; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, Alfons J M

    2009-09-01

    The position of high-rate anaerobic technology (HR-AnWT) in the wastewater treatment and bioenergy market can be enhanced if the range of suitable substrates is expanded. Analyzing existing technologies, applications and problems, it is clear that, until now, wastewaters with high lipids content are not effectively treated by HR-AnWT. Nevertheless, waste lipids are ideal potential substrates for biogas production, since theoretically more methane can be produced, when compared with proteins or carbohydrates. In this minireview, the classical problems of lipids methanization in anaerobic processes are discussed and new concepts to enhance lipids degradation are presented. Reactors operation, feeding strategies and prospects of technological developments for wastewater treatment are discussed. Long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) degradation is accomplished by syntrophic communities of anaerobic bacteria and methanogenic archaea. For optimal performance these syntrophic communities need to be clustered in compact aggregates, which is often difficult to achieve with wastewaters that contain fats and lipids. Driving the methane production from lipids/LCFA at industrial scale without risk of overloading and inhibition is still a challenge that has the potential for filling a gap in the existing processes and technologies for biological methane production associated to waste and wastewater treatment.

  19. Mice do not accumulate muscle lipid in response to dietary conjugated linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Kanosky, K M; Ippagunta, S; Barnes, K M

    2013-10-01

    Dietary CLA decreases body fat in several species and in pigs this is accompanied by increased muscle lipid. Our objective was to determine if mice could be used as a model for CLA-induced increased marbling in pigs. We used our model of enhanced CLA response, where mice fed coconut oil (CO) lose more body fat than mice fed soy oil (SO). Mice (21 d old; Imprinting Control Region [ICR]) were fed SO or CO diets for 6 wk followed by 12 d of 0 or 0.5% mixed isomer CLA. Ether extraction determined that thigh muscle lipid content was reduced by both CLA and CO (P = 0.007 and P = 0.006, respectively). Conjugated linoleic acid also caused a reduction (P = 0.016) in carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) enzyme activity, so less fatty acid oxidation appeared to be occurring. Lumbar muscle, which is more similar to the longissimus dorsi tested in pigs, did not differ in lipid content between mice (56 d old; ICR) fed SO or SO+CLA for 14 d. Therefore, CLA-fed mice do not appear to be accumulating excess lipid in their muscle. However, CLA addition to CO diets increased (P = 0.007) the mRNA expression of PPAR-γ in the thigh muscle to the level of SO-fed mice, indicating that intramuscular adipocyte differentiation may be increasing. On the other hand, liver lipid was increased (P < 0.0001) by CO and tended to be increased (P = 0.099) by CLA. Liver CPT activity was decreased (P = 0.018) in SO+CLA-fed mice but not CO+CLA. It appears that mice may accumulate lipid in their livers preferentially over muscle when fed CLA and therefore are not a good model for CLA-induced muscle lipid accumulation.

  20. Expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) GluR2/3 receptors in the developing rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Kaur, C; Sivakumar, V; Ling, E A

    2005-10-01

    The expression of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) type glutamate (GluR2/3) receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subtype 1 (NMDAR1) was carried out by immunohistochemistry, double immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR analysis in the pineal glands of 1-day to 6-wk-old rats in the present study. GluR2/3 immunopositive cells were distributed throughout the pineal gland and showed branching processes in all age groups. The NMDAR1 immunoreactivity, however, was observed in fewer branched cells. A constitutive mRNA expression of NMDAR1, GluR2 and GluR3 was detected in the pineal glands of various ages and showed no significant difference between the age groups studied. Immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescence results showed that the GluR2/3 were mainly expressed and co-localized with OX-42-positive microglia/macrophages and the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes. Co-localization of NMDAR1 with OX-42- and GFAP-positive cells was much less. The expression of these receptors on the glial cells suggests that they may be involved in the development and growth of the pineal gland in the early postnatal period (1 day to 3 wk) and subsequently in the regulation of melatonin synthesis.

  1. Modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate and (R,S)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) responses of spinal nociceptive neurons by a N-terminal fragment of substance P.

    PubMed

    Budai, D; Wilcox, G L; Larson, A A

    1992-06-17

    The effects of an N-terminal fragment of substance P, substance P-(1-7) [SP-(1-7)], on the responses of dorsal horn nociceptive neurons to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and (R,S)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) were tested by combined single-unit extracellular recordings/microiontophoresis. While SP-(1-7) had no effects when applied by itself, it was a potent and long-lasting modulator of both NMDA- and AMPA-mediated excitation of spinal dorsal horn nociceptive neurons. NMDA responses were transiently decreased (by an average of 36% of control at minimum) by SP-(1-7) followed by a more sustained increase (by 76% at maximum). In contrast, AMP responses were only increased by SP-(1-7) (by 81% at maximum). It is hypothesized that the actions of SP-(1-7) on excitatory amino acid (EAA) responses of dorsal horn nociceptive neurons reflect a novel mechanism by which SP and EAAs interact to modulate pain transmission.

  2. pH, cholesterol sulfate, and fatty acids affect the stratum corneum lipid organization.

    PubMed

    Bouwstra, J A; Gooris, G S; Dubbelaar, F E; Weerheim, A M; Ponec, M

    1998-08-01

    Lipid mixtures prepared from cholesterol (CHOL), isolated ceramides (CER), and free fatty acids can serve as attractive tools to study the role various stratum corneum (SC) lipids or microenvironmental conditions play in the SC lipid organization, as the phase behavior in these mixtures and in SC are similar: two lamellar phases with periodicities of approximately 6 and 13 nm are present. Because pH and cholesterol sulfate (CSO4) gradients exist in SC and may affect the local SC lipid organization, the effects of pH and CSO4 on lipid phase behavior was examined. X-ray diffraction studies with CHOL:CER mixtures revealed that the lamellar ordering at pH 5 and 7.4 were similar: both the short and the long periodicity phases were present. Upon addition of free fatty acids the phase behavior became pH dependent; the long periodicity phase being more dominant at pH 7.4 than at pH 5. Similar observations have been made upon addition of CSO4. Furthermore, only in the presence of CSO4 did phase-separated CHOL disappear, indicating that CHOL completely dissolves in the lamellar phases. A major phase change from an hexagonal to an orthorhombic lateral packing has been observed in the presence of free fatty acids. Furthermore, in the presence of CSO4 next to orthorhombic also liquid lateral packing could be detected. In contrast to lamellar ordering, changes in pH did not affect the lateral packing in any of the lipid mixtures studied.

  3. Effects of Fatty Acids on the Interfacial and Solution Behavior of Mixed Lipidic Aggregates Called Solid Lipid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Gourab; Nahak, Prasant; Guha, Pritam; Roy, Biplab; Chettri, Priyam; Sapkota, Manish; Koirala, Suraj; Misono, Takeshi; Torigoe, Kanjiro; Ghosh, Shilpi; Panda, Amiya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Mutual miscibility of soylecithin, tristearin, fatty acids (FAs), and curcumin was assessed by means of surface pressure-area isotherms at the air-solution interface in order to formulate modified solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). Appearance of minima in the excess area (Aex) and changes in free energy of mixing (∆G(0)ex) were recorded for systems with 20 mole% FAs. Modified SLNs, promising as topical drug delivery systems, were formulated using the lipids in combination with curcumin, stabilized by an aqueous Tween 60 solution. Optimal formulations were assessed by judiciously varying the FA chain length and composition. Physicochemical properties of SLNs were studied such as the size, zeta potential (by dynamic light scattering), morphology (by freeze fracture transmission electron microscopy), and thermal behavior (by differential scanning calorimetry). The size and zeta potential of the formulations were in the range 300-500 nm and -10 to -20 mV, respectively. Absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses supported the dynamic light scattering and differential scanning calorimetry data and confirmed localization of curcumin to the palisade layer of SLNs. These nanoparticles showed a sustained release of incorporated curcumin. Curcumin-loaded SLNs were effective against a gram-positive bacterial species, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Our results on the physicochemical properties of curcumin-loaded SLNs, the sustained release, and on antibacterial activity suggest that SLNs are promising delivery agents for topical drugs.

  4. Lipid mobilization and acid phosphatase activity in lytic compartments during conidium dormancy and appressorium formation of Colletotrichum graminicola.

    PubMed

    Schadeck, R J; Leite, B; de Freitas Buchi, D

    1998-12-01

    Colletotrichum graminicola, a pathogen of sorghum and corn, was investigated prior and during germination as to certain aspects of acid phosphatase activity and lipid mobilization. Ungerminated conidia cytoplasm was filled with lipid deposits, which were mobilized during the germination process. Cytochemical ultrastructural examination showed that conidia vacuoles exhibit acid phosphatase activity, which is suggestive of lytic activity. Lipid bodies, stored in the ungerminated conidia cytoplasm, were internalized by vacuoles in a process analogous to microautophagy and were apparently digested inside them. The lipid bodies disappeared and vacuoles became enlarged in conidial cells during germination. Appressoria also showed acid phosphatase activity in multiple heterogeneous vesicles which were, in most cases, juxtaposed with lipid bodies. These results suggest that the vacuolar system plays an important role during C. graminicola germination and that the initial stages of lipid metabolization are taking place inside the vacuoles.

  5. Ursodeoxycholic acid exerts farnesoid X receptor-antagonistic effects on bile acid and lipid metabolism in morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Michaela; Thorell, Anders; Claudel, Thierry; Jha, Pooja; Koefeler, Harald; Lackner, Carolin; Hoesel, Bastian; Fauler, Guenter; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Einarsson, Curt; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Trauner, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are major regulators of hepatic BA and lipid metabolism but their mechanisms of action in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are still poorly understood. Here we aimed to explore the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in modulating the cross-talk between liver and visceral white adipose tissue (vWAT) regarding BA and cholesterol metabolism and fatty acid/lipid partitioning in morbidly obese NAFLD patients. In this randomized controlled pharmacodynamic study, we analyzed serum, liver and vWAT samples from 40 well-matched morbidly obese patients receiving UDCA (20 mg/kg/day) or no treatment three weeks prior to bariatric surgery. Short term UDCA administration stimulated BA synthesis by reducing circulating fibroblast growth factor 19 and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation, resulting in cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase induction mirrored by elevated C4 and 7α-hydroxycholesterol. Enhanced BA formation depleted hepatic and LDL-cholesterol with subsequent activation of the key enzyme of cholesterol synthesis 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. Blunted FXR anti-lipogenic effects induced lipogenic stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in the liver, thereby increasing hepatic triglyceride content. In addition, induced SCD activity in vWAT shifted vWAT lipid metabolism towards generation of less toxic and more lipogenic monounsaturated fatty acids such as oleic acid. These data demonstrate that by exerting FXR-antagonistic effects, UDCA treatment in NAFLD patients strongly impacts on cholesterol and BA synthesis and induces neutral lipid accumulation in both liver and vWAT. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Permeation of Aromatic Carboxylic Acids across Lipid Bilayers: The pH-Partition Hypothesis Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Thomae, Anita V.; Wunderli-Allenspach, Heidi; Krämer, Stefanie D.

    2005-01-01

    According to the pH-partition hypothesis the charged species of organic compounds do not contribute to lipid bilayer permeation as they generally show negligible partitioning into n-octanol. With this assumption, membrane permeation is related to the molar fraction of the neutral species at a particular pH. A recently developed permeation assay permits us to directly determine pH-dependent permeation of aromatic carboxylic acids. Tb3+-loaded liposomes are incubated with aromatic carboxylic acids and upon excitation at the absorption wavelength of the acid, permeation kinetics can be measured as an increase in Tb3+ luminescence. The anions of the tested acids permeated egg phosphatidylcholine membranes only 12 (2-hydroxynicotinic acid), 66 (salicylic acid), and 155 (dipicolinic acid) times slower than the net neutral species. The anions, therefore, controlled the total permeation already at 1–2 pH units above their pKa. These results indicate that in contrast to the expectations of the pH-partition hypothesis, lipid bilayer permeation of an acidic compound can be completely controlled by the anion at physiological pH. PMID:15951388

  7. Lipid composition and acid hydrolase content of lamellar granules of fetal rat epidermis.

    PubMed

    Freinkel, R K; Traczyk, T N

    1985-10-01

    Lipids and acid hydrolases have been characterized in a subcellular fraction, enriched with lamellar granules (LG), derived from fetal rat epidermis. This fraction contains 23% glycosyl ceramides and ceramides, 15% free sterols, and 34% phospholipids. The lipid/protein ratio is 2.0. The sterols and sphingolipids were present in proportions similar to those previously reported in stratum corneum. These findings provide direct biochemical evidence for the widely accepted hypothesis that stratum corneum lipids are derived from exocytosis of lamellar granules into the intercellular space. The LG fraction was enriched in certain acid hydrolases including glucosidase, acid phosphatase, phospholipases A, and sphingomyelinase; other acid hydrolases, i.e., amino-glycosidases, glactosidase and aryl sulfatase (pH 5.5), and steroid sulfatase were not preferentially localized in this fraction. By modulation of phospholipids, glycolipids, and proteins in the membrane regions of stratum corneum, the acid hydrolases of LG may play a role relevant to the function and desquamation of stratum corneum.

  8. [Effect of phytic acid and its derivatives on blood lipid peroxidation state in vitro].

    PubMed

    Martusevich, A K; Sidorova, M V; Mel'nikova, N B; Solov'eva, A G; Peretiagin, S P

    2014-01-01

    We have studied specific features of lipid peroxidation in whole human blood under the action of aqueous solutions of xymedone (19.6 microM), phytic acid (117.9 microM) and its complex (237.6 microM) synthesized in distilled water and isotonic (0.9%) solution of sodium chloride. The estimated parameters included lipid peroxidation (LPO) rate, total antioxidant potential, superoxide dismutase (SOD) level, and malonic dialdehyde (MDA) level in blood plasma and erythrocytes. It was established that the effect of phytic acid on blood samples includes moderate stimulation of total antioxidant activity and SOD activity with predominant prooxidant effect. The phytic acid--xymedone complex synthesized in distilled water exhibits an antioxidant action, while its synthesis in saline solution yields a prooxidant.

  9. Lipid oxidation and fatty acid composition in salt-dried yellow croaker ( Pseudosciaena polyactis) during processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qiuxing; Wu, Yanyan; Li, Laihao; Wang, Yueqi; Yang, Xianqing; Zhao, Yongqiang

    2017-10-01

    Lipid oxidation in salt-dried yellow croaker ( Pseudosciaena polyactis) was evaluated during processing with commonly used analytical indices, such as the peroxide value (POV), the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) value, and oxidative-relative lipoxygenase (LOX) activity. Additionally, fatty acids were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Both POV and TBARS increased significantly ( P < 0.05) at the rinsing stage. POV reached its peak value of 3.63 meq O2 per kg sample at the drying stage, whereas TBARS constantly increased from 0.05 to 0.20 mg MDA per kg sample. Processing of salt-dried yellow croaker had an extremely significant ( P < 0.01) effect on LOX activity. Twenty-six fatty acids were identified. Combined eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; C20:5n3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n3) content varied between (19.20 ± 0.37) mg g-1 and (23.45 ± 1.05) mg g-1. The polyunsaturated fatty acid/saturated fatty acid (PUFA/SFA) ratio in yellow croaker was 0.73-1.10, and the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio was approximately 0.13-0.20. The contents of most fatty acids varied significantly ( P < 0.05) during the different processing stages, and these differences were caused by lipid oxidation. C18:0, C16:1n7, C19:0, and C22:6n3 showed clear changes in principle component one of a principle components analysis. These fatty acids are potential markers for evaluating lipid oxidation in fish muscle because there was a significant correlation between these markers and TBARS and LOX activity ( P < 0.05) with Pearson's coefficients > 0.931.

  10. Wine lees modulate lipid metabolism and induce fatty acid remodelling in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Caro, M; Sansone, A; Amezaga, J; Navarro, V; Ferreri, C; Tueros, I

    2017-03-21

    This study investigates the ability of a polyphenolic extract obtained from a wine lees by-product to modulate zebrafish lipid metabolism. Lees from a Spanish winery were collected and the polyphenolic extract was chemically characterised in terms of antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content and the individual main phenolic compounds. The effects of the extract on lipid metabolism were evaluated using a zebrafish animal model. Lees are rich in polyphenols (42.33 mg gallic acid equivalent per g dry matter) with high antioxidant capacity (56.04 mg Trolox equivalent per g dry matter), rutin and quercetin being their main identified polyphenols. The biological effects of lees extract included (i) a reduction in zebrafish embryos' fat reserve (40%), (ii) changes in the expression of lipid metabolism key genes, (iii) remodelling of the fatty acid content in phospholipid and triglyceride fractions of zebrafish embryos and (iv) reduction in the trans fatty acid content. On the whole, wine lees polyphenolic extract was effective at modulating zebrafish lipid metabolism evidencing remodelling effects and antioxidant properties that can be further developed for food innovation.

  11. Lipids and Fatty Acids in Algae: Extraction, Fractionation into Lipid Classes, and Analysis by Gas Chromatography Coupled with Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID).

    PubMed

    Guihéneuf, Freddy; Schmid, Matthias; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the number of biochemical studies exploring algal lipids and fatty acid biosynthesis pathways and profiles, analytical methods used by phycologists for this purpose are often diverse and incompletely described. Potential confusion and potential variability of the results between studies can therefore occur due to change of protocols for lipid extraction and fractionation, as well as fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) preparation before gas chromatography (GC) analyses. Here, we describe a step-by-step procedure for the profiling of neutral and polar lipids using techniques such as solid-liquid extraction (SLE), thin-layer chromatography (TLC), and gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). As an example, in this protocol chapter, analyses of neutral and polar lipids from the marine microalga Pavlova lutheri (an EPA/DHA-rich haptophyte) will be outlined to describe the distribution of fatty acid residues within its major lipid classes. This method has been proven to be a reliable technique to assess changes in lipid and fatty acid profiles in several other microalgal species and seaweeds.

  12. [Effect of acetylsalicylic acid in complex with lipid nanostructures of various compositions on human platelet aggregation].

    PubMed

    Suslina, Z A; Prokhorov, D I; Shilova, A G; Kaplun, A P; Ionova, V G; Seĭfulla, R D

    2011-01-01

    The effect of lipid nanocomplexes loaded with acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) on platelet aggregation in vitro was investigated. The antithrombotic effect of aspirin in complex with liposomes prepared from pig brain glycosphingolipids is not only significantly higher compared to control, but also accompanied by leveling of the development of proaggregant effects. It was shown that ADP-induced platelet aggregation is reduced by the introduction of electrostatic charge in the structure of lipid bilayer of liposomes. The effect achieved for the liposomes possessing a negative charge was more pronounced in comparison to the effect of positively charged liposomes.

  13. Co-oxidation of the sulfur-containing amino acids in an autoxidizing lipid system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, G.A.; Dollar, A.M.

    1963-01-01

    Oxidation of the sulfur amino acids by autoxidizing lipids was studied in a model system consisting of an amino acid dispersed in cold-pressed, molecularly distilled menhaden oil (20–80% w/w). Under all conditions investigated, cysteine was oxidized completely to cystine. Preliminary results suggest that at 110°C the oxidation follows first-order kinetics for at least the first 8 hr. A specific reaction rate constant of 0.25 per hour was calculated. When fatty acids were added to the system, cystine was oxidized to its thiosulfinate ester. When the fatty acid-cystine ratio was 1:2, oxidation of cystine was a maximum. No oxidation of cystine occurred unless either a fatty acid, volatile organic acid, or ethanol was added. Under the conditions investigated, methionine was not oxidized to either its sulfoxide or its sulfone.

  14. Saturated and unsaturated anteiso-C19 acids in the seed lipids from Hesperopeuce mertensiana (Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Destaillats, Frédéric; Wolff, Robert L; Angers, Paul

    2002-03-01

    Minor uncommon FA from Hesperopeuce mertensiana (a gymnosperm species of the Pinaceae family) seed oil were characterized through a combination of silver ion TLC of their FAME, and GLC coupled with MS of their picolinyl derivatives. These uncommon components have the structures 16-methyloctadecanoic (anteiso-19:0), 16-methyl-cis-9-octadecenoic (anteiso-19:1), and 1 6-methyl-cis-9,cis-12-octadecadienoic (anteiso-19:2) acids. These branched C19 acids were identified earlier in the wood of Picea abies, which would indicate that such acids could be widespread, though minor, components of Pinaceae lipids.

  15. High-performance liquid chromatography of fatty acid isopropylidene hydrazides and its application in lipid analysis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, V P; Schulte, E

    1983-06-01

    Fatty acid isopropylidene hydrazides, prepared by stepwise treatment of acyl lipids with hydrazine and acetone, were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography on a reversed-phase column. These derivatives could be easily eluted with 15% water in methanol and monitored by measuring absorbance at 229 nm with a uv detector. Their elution behavior, in general, was similar to that of methyl esters and some commonly used ultraviolet-absorbing derivatives of fatty acids. The new method has been used for fatty acid analysis of some oils.

  16. The Role of Tetraether Lipid Composition in the Adaptation of Thermophilic Archaea to Acidity

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Wang, Jinxiang; He, Liu; Zhang, Chuanlun L.

    2013-01-01

    Diether and tetraether lipids are fundamental components of the archaeal cell membrane. Archaea adjust the degree of tetraether lipid cyclization in order to maintain functional membranes and cellular homeostasis when confronted with pH and/or thermal stress. Thus, the ability to adjust tetraether lipid composition likely represents a critical phenotypic trait that enabled archaeal diversification into environments characterized by extremes in pH and/or temperature. Here we assess the relationship between geochemical variation, core- and polar-isoprenoid glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT, respectively) lipid composition, and archaeal 16S rRNA gene diversity and abundance in 27 geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The composition and abundance of C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal ecosystems were distinct from surrounding soils, indicating that they are synthesized endogenously. With the exception of GDGT-0 (no cyclopentyl rings), the abundances of individual C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids were significantly correlated. The abundance of a number of individual tetraether lipids varied positively with the relative abundance of individual 16S rRNA gene sequences, most notably crenarchaeol in both the core and polar GDGT fraction and sequences closely affiliated with Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. This finding supports the proposal that crenarchaeol is a biomarker for nitrifying archaea. Variation in the degree of cyclization of C- and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal mats and sediments could best be explained by variation in spring pH, with lipids from acidic environments tending to have, on average, more internal cyclic rings than those from higher pH ecosystems. Likewise, variation in the phylogenetic composition of archaeal 16S rRNA genes could best be explained by spring pH. In turn, the phylogenetic similarity of archaeal 16S rRNA genes was significantly correlated with the similarity

  17. The role of tetraether lipid composition in the adaptation of thermophilic archaea to acidity.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Hamilton, Trinity L; Wang, Jinxiang; He, Liu; Zhang, Chuanlun L

    2013-01-01

    Diether and tetraether lipids are fundamental components of the archaeal cell membrane. Archaea adjust the degree of tetraether lipid cyclization in order to maintain functional membranes and cellular homeostasis when confronted with pH and/or thermal stress. Thus, the ability to adjust tetraether lipid composition likely represents a critical phenotypic trait that enabled archaeal diversification into environments characterized by extremes in pH and/or temperature. Here we assess the relationship between geochemical variation, core- and polar-isoprenoid glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT, respectively) lipid composition, and archaeal 16S rRNA gene diversity and abundance in 27 geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The composition and abundance of C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal ecosystems were distinct from surrounding soils, indicating that they are synthesized endogenously. With the exception of GDGT-0 (no cyclopentyl rings), the abundances of individual C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids were significantly correlated. The abundance of a number of individual tetraether lipids varied positively with the relative abundance of individual 16S rRNA gene sequences, most notably crenarchaeol in both the core and polar GDGT fraction and sequences closely affiliated with Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. This finding supports the proposal that crenarchaeol is a biomarker for nitrifying archaea. Variation in the degree of cyclization of C- and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal mats and sediments could best be explained by variation in spring pH, with lipids from acidic environments tending to have, on average, more internal cyclic rings than those from higher pH ecosystems. Likewise, variation in the phylogenetic composition of archaeal 16S rRNA genes could best be explained by spring pH. In turn, the phylogenetic similarity of archaeal 16S rRNA genes was significantly correlated with the similarity

  18. Some of the amino acid chemistry going on in the Laboratory of Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bouifraden, S; Drouot, C; el Hadrami, M; Guenoun, F; Lecointe, L; Mai, N; Paris, M; Pothion, C; Sadoune, M; Sauvagnat, B; Amblard, M; Aubagnac, J L; Calmes, M; Chevallet, P; Daunis, J; Enjalbal, C; Fehrentz, J A; Lamaty, F; Lavergne, J P; Lazaro, R; Rolland, V; Roumestant, M L; Viallefont, P; Vidal, Y; Martinez, J

    1999-01-01

    Some of the chemistry of amino acids going on in our laboratory (Laboratoire des Amino acides Peptides et Protéines) is described as well as some mass spectrometry methodology for their characterization particularly on solid supports. Several aspects are presented including: (i) the stereoselective synthesis of natural and unnatural amino acids using 2-hydroxypinan-3-one as chiral auxiliary; (ii) the stereoselective synthesis of natural and unnatural amino acids by deracemization of alpha-amino acids via their ketene derivatives; (iii) the synthesis of alpha-aryl-alpha-amino acids via reaction of organometallics with a glycine cation; (iv) the diastereoselective synthesis of glycosyl-alpha-amino acids; (v) the synthesis of beta-amino acids using alpha-aminopyrrolidinopiperazinediones as chiral templates; (vi) the reactivity of urethane-N-protected N-carboxyanhydrides. To characterize natural and non natural amino acids through their immonium ions by mass spectrometry, some methodology is also described.

  19. The crystal structure of human alpha-amino-beta-carboxymuconate-epsilon-semialdehyde decarboxylase in complex with 1,3-dihydroxyacetonephosphate suggests a regulatory link between NAD synthesis and glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Silvia; Perozzi, Silvia; Galeazzi, Luca; Raffaelli, Nadia; Rizzi, Menico

    2009-11-01

    The enzyme alpha-amino-beta-carboxymuconate-epsilon-semialdehyde decarboxylase (ACMSD) is a zinc-dependent amidohydrolase that participates in picolinic acid (PA), quinolinic acid (QA) and NAD homeostasis. Indeed, the enzyme stands at a branch point of the tryptophan to NAD pathway, and determines the final fate of the amino acid, i.e. transformation into PA, complete oxidation through the citric acid cycle, or conversion into NAD through QA synthesis. Both PA and QA are key players in a number of physiological and pathological conditions, mainly affecting the central nervous system. As their relative concentrations must be tightly controlled, modulation of ACMSD activity appears to be a promising prospect for the treatment of neurological disorders, including cerebral malaria. Here we report the 2.0 A resolution crystal structure of human ACMSD in complex with the glycolytic intermediate 1,3-dihydroxyacetonephosphate (DHAP), refined to an R-factor of 0.19. DHAP, which we discovered to be a potent enzyme inhibitor, resides in the ligand binding pocket with its phosphate moiety contacting the catalytically essential zinc ion through mediation of a solvent molecule. Arg47, Asp291 and Trp191 appear to be the key residues for DHAP recognition in human ACMSD. Ligand binding induces a significant conformational change affecting a strictly conserved Trp-Met couple, and we propose that these residues are involved in controlling ligand admission into ACMSD. Our data may be used for the design of inhibitors with potential medical interest, and suggest a regulatory link between de novo NAD biosynthesis and glycolysis.

  20. Effect of gamma 60Co irradiation on the lipid content and fatty acid composition of Nannochloropsis sp. microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermavitalini, Dini; Sari, Ika Puspita; Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Abdulgani, Nurlita; Saputro, Triono Bagus

    2017-06-01

    Nannochloropsissp. has been identified as a promising feed stock for biodiesel production in recent years. Nannochloropsis sp. have high lipid content between 31-68 % of dry biomass weight. Mutagenesis induced by Gamma 60Co irradiation can be utilized to alter Nannochloropsis sp. characteristic to get microalgae mutant strain that can produce a higher lipid content than the wild strain. The aim of this research was to know the effect of gamma 60Co irradiation to the biomass, lipid content and fatty acid compotition of Nannochloropsis sp. microalgae. In this research, irradiation was done in different doses there were 0, 2, 4, 6 and 10 Gray (Gy). Measuring microalgae biomass and lipid content were done in late exponential phase at the end of each treatment. Research design used is random complete with 95 % confident level for quantitative analysis based on biomass and lipid content. Fatty acid compotition was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Results showed that gamma irradiated gave an effect on lipid content and fatty acid profile of Nannochloropsis sp. Tukey test showed total lipid content of control micoalgae (0 Gy) was significat different with 10 Gy irradiated microalgae, but no significant different with 2,4 and 6 Gy irradiated microalgae. The highest lipid content were found in 10 Gy irradiated microalgae equal to 62.65 %. Fatty acid profile of 10 Gy irradiated Nannochloropsis sp. had 9 fatty acids while control Nannochloropsis sp. had 6 fatty acids.

  1. Lipid classes and fatty acids composition of the roe of wild Silurus glanis from subalpine freshwater.

    PubMed

    Saliu, Francesco; Leoni, Barbara; Della Pergola, Roberto

    2017-10-01

    The fat content and the fatty acid composition of the roe of European catfish (Silurus glanis) wild specimens captured in the Lambro river basin (Como, Northern Italy) were investigated in order to assess their nutritional value. Total extracted lipid values on roe weight were 5.8-6.3%. Phospholipids (40.2-43.6%) and triacylglycerols (31.8-34.7%) were the most represented lipid classes. Relevant amount of cholesteryl esters (14.3-15.6%) were also detected. The main fatty acids were palmitic, oleic and cis-4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Total saturated fatty acids were 28.1-30.9%, monounsaturated fatty acids were 28.2-30.6%, and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) were 26.7-29.1%. The good found content of phospholipids and ω3-polyunsaturated fatty acids encourage further investigation for the exploitation of Silurus glanis roe in food products and/or supplements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of ascorbic acid and antioxidants on color, lipid oxidation and volatiles of irradiated ground beef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, D. U.; Nam, K. C.

    2004-09-01

    Beef loins with 3 different aging times after slaughter were ground, added with none, 0.1% ascorbic acid, 0.01% sesamol+0.01% α-tocopherol, or 0.1% ascorbic acid+0.01% sesamol+0.01% tocopherol. The meats were packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, irradiated at 2.5 kGy, and color, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), lipid oxidation and volatile profiles were determined. Irradiation decreased the redness of ground beef, and visible color of beef changed from a bright red to a green/brown depending on the age of meat. Addition of ascorbic acid prevented color changes in irradiated beef, and the effect of ascorbic acid became greater as the age of meat or storage time after irradiation increased. The ground beef added with ascorbic acid had lower ORP than control, and the low ORP of meat helped maintaining the heme pigments in reduced form. During aerobic storage, S-volatiles disappeared while volatile aldehydes significantly increased in irradiated beef. Addition of ascorbic acid at 0.1% or sesamol+α-tocopherol at each 0.01% level to ground beef prior to irradiation were effective in reducing lipid oxidation and S-volatiles. As storage time increased, however, the antioxidant effect of sesamol+tocopherol in irradiated ground beef was superior to that of ascorbic acid.

  3. Five Decades with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Chemical Synthesis, Enzymatic Formation, Lipid Peroxidation and Its Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Catalá, Angel

    2013-01-01

    I have been involved in research on polyunsaturated fatty acids since 1964 and this review is intended to cover some of the most important aspects of this work. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have followed me during my whole scientific career and I have published a number of studies concerned with different aspects of them such as chemical synthesis, enzymatic formation, metabolism, transport, physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of a reconstructed desaturase system in liposomes, lipid peroxidation, and their effects. The first project I became involved in was the organic synthesis of [1-14C] eicosa-11,14-dienoic acid, with the aim of demonstrating the participation of that compound as a possible intermediary in the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid “in vivo.” From 1966 to 1982, I was involved in several projects that study the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the eighties, we studied fatty acid binding protein. From 1990 up to now, our laboratory has been interested in the lipid peroxidation of biological membranes from various tissues and different species as well as liposomes prepared with phospholipids rich in PUFAs. We tested the effect of many antioxidants such as alpha tocopherol, vitamin A, melatonin and its structural analogues, and conjugated linoleic acid, among others. PMID:24490074

  4. Effects of sewage discharges on lipid and fatty acid composition of the Patagonian bivalve Diplodon chilensis.

    PubMed

    Rocchetta, Iara; Pasquevich, María Y; Heras, Horacio; Ríos de Molina, María del Carmen; Luquet, Carlos M

    2014-02-15

    Lipid and fatty acid (FA) composition and selected oxidative stress parameters of freshwater clams (Dipolodon chilensis), from a sewage-polluted (SMA) and a clean site, were compared. Trophic markers FA were analyzed in clams and sediment. Saturated FA (SAFA), and bacteria and sewage markers were abundant in SMA sediments, while diatom markers were 50% lower. Proportions of SAFA, branched FA, 20:5n-3 (EPA) and 22:6n-3 (DHA) were higher in SMA clams. Chronic exposure of D. chilensis to increasing eutrophication affected its lipid and FA composition. The increase in EPA and DHA proportions could be an adaptive response, which increases stress resistance but could also lead to higher susceptibility to lipid peroxidation TBARS, lipofuscins (20-fold) and GSH concentrations were higher in SMA clams. FA markers indicated terrestrial plant detritus and bacteria are important items in D. chilensis diet. Anthropogenic input in their food could be traced using specific FA as trophic markers.

  5. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) increases the solubility of cholesterol when incorporated in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Richard J; Barrett, Matthew A; Zheng, Songbo; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2014-06-28

    Cholesterol has been well established as a mediator of cell membrane fluidity. By interacting with lipid tails, cholesterol causes the membrane tails to be constrained thereby reducing membrane fluidity, well known as the condensation effect. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), the main ingredient in aspirin, has recently been shown to increase fluidity in lipid bilayers by primarily interacting with lipid head groups. We used high-resolution X-ray diffraction to study both ASA and cholesterol coexisting in model membranes of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). While a high cholesterol concentration of 40 mol% cholesterol leads to the formation of immiscible cholesterol bilayers, as was reported previously, increasing the amount of ASA in the membranes between 0 to 12.5 mol% was found to significantly increase the fluidity of the bilayers and dissolve the cholesterol plaques. We, therefore, present experimental evidence for an interaction between cholesterol and ASA on the level of the cell membrane at elevated levels of cholesterol and ASA.

  6. The effect of interesterification on the bioavailability of fatty acids in structured lipids.

    PubMed

    Farfán, M; Villalón, M J; Ortíz, M E; Nieto, S; Bouchon, P

    2013-08-15

    Fatty acid (FA) profile is a critical factor in the nutritional properties of fats, but, stereochemistry may also play a fundamental role in the rate and extent to which FAs are absorbed and become available. To better understand this phenomenon, we evaluated the bioavailability of FAs in linseed-oil and palm-stearin blends compared to their interesterified mix, using a sn-1,3 stereospecific lipase, to determine if there was any difference in terms of FA availability when using this technology. Test meals were fed through an intragastric feeding tube on Sprague-Dawley male rats after 18 h fasting. Postprandial blood samples were collected after meal or physiological serum (control) administration and the FA profile of plasma lipids was determined. Results showed that modification of the melting profile through interesterification, without altering the bioavailability determined by sn-2 stereochemistry, could delay lipid absorption at the beginning, but had no effect on total lipid absorption.

  7. Lipids of heliobacteria are characterised by a high proportion of monoenoic fatty acids with variable double bond positions.

    PubMed

    Aase, B; Jantzen, E; Bryn, K; Ormerod, J

    1994-07-01

    The fatty acid composition and lipid pattern of six strains of heliobacteria have been analysed. The results were fairly uniform for all strains. Phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl glycerol were the dominating lipids found, with the former as the major one. No glycolipids were detected. The general fatty acid pattern was dominated by acids of chain length C16 to C18. An unusually large proportion of monoenoic acids was seen, with up to four positional isomers for each chain length. Methyl branched (iso) fatty acids were present, but not cyclopropyl or hydroxy fatty acids nor fatty alcohols.

  8. Regulation of lipid metabolism by obeticholic acid in hyperlipidemic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bin; Young, Mark; Liu, Xueqing; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2017-02-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays critical roles in plasma cholesterol metabolism, in particular HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) homeostasis. Obeticholic acid (OCA) is a FXR agonist being developed for treating various chronic liver diseases. Previous studies reported inconsistent effects of OCA on regulating plasma cholesterol levels in different animal models and in different patient populations. The mechanisms underlying its divergent effects have not yet been thoroughly investigated. The scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) is a FXR-modulated gene and the major receptor for HDL-C. We investigated the effects of OCA on hepatic SR-BI expression and correlated such effects with plasma HDL-C levels and hepatic cholesterol efflux in hyperlipidemic hamsters. We demonstrated that OCA induced a time-dependent reduction in serum HDL-C levels after 14 days of treatment, which was accompanied by a significant reduction of liver cholesterol content and increases in fecal cholesterol in OCA-treated hamsters. Importantly, hepatic SR-BI mRNA and protein levels in hamsters were increased to 1.9- and 1.8-fold of control by OCA treatment. Further investigations in normolipidemic hamsters did not reveal OCA-induced changes in serum HDL-C levels or hepatic SR-BI expression. We conclude that OCA reduces plasma HDL-C levels and promotes transhepatic cholesterol efflux in hyperlipidemic hamsters via a mechanism involving upregulation of hepatic SR-BI.

  9. Effect of a rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid mixture on hepatic lipid metabolism in heifers.

    PubMed

    Shibani, M; Schlegel, G; Most, E; Schwarz, F J; Ringseis, R; Eder, K

    2012-06-01

    This study was performed to assess the effects of rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on hepatic lipid metabolism in heifers. In particular, it was of interest whether feeding CLA causes development of fatty liver as observed recently in mice. Thirty-six growing heifers with an initial body weight of 185 kg were allotted to three treatment groups and fed daily 250 g of different rumen-protected fats for 16 weeks: The control group received 250 g of a CLA-free control fat, the CLA100 group received 100 g of a CLA fat containing 2.4% of cis-9, trans-11 CLA and 2.1% of trans-10, cis-12 CLA and 150 g control fat and the CLA250 group received 250 g of the CLA fat. CLA supplementation had no effect on animal performance parameters, liver weight and hepatic triglyceride concentration. Moreover, mRNA expression of hepatic genes involved in lipogenesis, β-oxidation and fatty acid transport was not influenced by dietary CLA. The fatty acid composition of hepatic total lipids, with particular consideration of ratios of fatty acids indicative of Δ9-, Δ6- and Δ5-desaturation, was also less influenced by dietary CLA. In conclusion, the study shows that dietary rumen-protected CLA has less effect on hepatic lipid metabolism in young heifers and does not induce the development of a fatty liver such as in mice. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Ontogeny of Sex-Related Differences in Foetal Developmental Features, Lipid Availability and Fatty Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Contreras, Consolacion; Vazquez-Gomez, Marta; Astiz, Susana; Torres-Rovira, Laura; Sanchez-Sanchez, Raul; Gomez-Fidalgo, Ernesto; Gonzalez, Jorge; Isabel, Beatriz; Rey, Ana; Ovilo, Cristina; Gonzalez-Bulnes, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Sex-related differences in lipid availability and fatty acid composition during swine foetal development were investigated. Plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in the mother were strongly related to the adequacy or inadequacy of foetal development and concomitant activation of protective growth in some organs (brain, heart, liver and spleen). Cholesterol and triglyceride availability was similar in male and female offspring, but female foetuses showed evidence of higher placental transfer of essential fatty acids and synthesis of non-essential fatty acids in muscle and liver. These sex-related differences affected primarily the neutral lipid fraction (triglycerides), which may lead to sex-related postnatal differences in energy partitioning. These results illustrate the strong influence of the maternal lipid profile on foetal development and homeorhesis, and they confirm and extend previous reports that female offspring show better adaptive responses to maternal malnutrition than male offspring. These findings may help guide dietary interventions to ensure adequate fatty acid availability for postnatal development. PMID:28561768

  11. Immunomodulatory lipids in plants: plant fatty acid amides and the human endocannabinoid system.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, Jürg

    2008-05-01

    Since the discovery that endogenous lipid mediators show similar cannabimimetic effects as phytocannabinoids from CANNABIS SATIVA, our knowledge about the endocannabinoid system has rapidly expanded. Today, endocannabinoid action is known to be involved in various diseases, including inflammation and pain. As a consequence, the G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoid transport, as well as endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes represent targets to block or enhance cannabinoid receptor-mediated signalling for therapeutic intervention. Based on the finding that certain endocannabinoid-like fatty acid N-alkylamides from purple coneflower ( ECHINACEA spp.) potently activate CB2 cannabinoid receptors we have focused our interest on plant fatty acid amides (FAAs) and their overall cannabinomodulatory effects. Certain FAAs are also able to partially inhibit the action of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which controls the breakdown of endocannabinoids. Intriguingly, plants lack CB receptors and do not synthesize endocannabinoids, but express FAAH homologues capable of metabolizing plant endogenous N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). While the site of action of these NAEs in plants is unknown, endogenous NAEs and arachidonic acid glycerols in animals interact with distinct physiological lipid receptors, including cannabinoid receptors. There is increasing evidence that also plant FAAs other than NAEs can pharmacologically modulate the action of these endogenous lipid signals. The interference of plant FAAs with the animal endocannabinoid system could thus be a fortunate evolutionary cross point with yet unexplored therapeutic potential.

  12. Effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acids on lipid metabolism and antioxidant capacity in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaolong; Wu, Shugeng; Zhang, Haijun; Yue, Hongyuan; Xu, Shaohui; Ji, Feng; Qi, Guanghai

    2011-10-01

    To examine the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) on lipid metabolism and antioxidant capacity in laying hens, Hy-Line Brown layers (n = 384, 52 weeks old) were randomly allocated to one of four dietary treatments. Each treatment had six replicates of 16 hens each. All birds were assigned to a corn-soybean meal-based diet containing a mixture of CLA at 0%, 1%, 2% or 4% for six weeks. With increasing dietary CLA, egg weight and feed intake decreased, and yolk colour was darkened. Feed efficiency was improved at 1% and 2% dietary CLA. Serum triglyceride concentration was significantly reduced by CLA in a dose dependent manner. A linear decrease in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were observed after CLA supplementation. With increasing dietary CLA, the deposition of two major isomers of CLA (c9, t11; t10, c12) in yolk lipids increased linearly, the proportion of saturated fatty acids increased and monounsaturated fatty acids decreased significantly. The proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids was highest at 1% CLA. Compared to the control, CLA supplementation significantly increased the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, inhibited hydroxyl radicals and superoxide anion production, and decreased the malonaldehyde concentrations in both serum and liver. The results demonstrated that dietary CLA meliorated serum lipid profiles and enhanced the antioxidant capacity of laying hens.

  13. The Immunosuppressant Mycophenolic Acid Alters Nucleotide and Lipid Metabolism in an Intestinal Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Heischmann, Svenja; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk; Leibfritz, Dieter; Christians, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    The study objective was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the negative effects of mycophenolic acid (MPA) on human intestinal cells. Effects of MPA exposure and guanosine supplementation on nucleotide concentrations in LS180 cells were assessed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proteomics analysis was carried out using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture combined with gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and lipidome analysis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Despite supplementation, depletion of guanosine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 and 72 h; 5, 100, and 250 μM MPA) and upregulation of uridine and cytidine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 h; 5 μM MPA) occurred after exposure to MPA. MPA significantly altered 35 proteins mainly related to nucleotide-dependent processes and lipid metabolism. Cross-reference with previous studies of MPA-associated protein changes widely corroborated these results, but showed differences that may be model- and/or method-dependent. MPA exposure increased intracellular concentrations of fatty acids, cholesterol, and phosphatidylcholine (p < 0.01 at 72 h; 100 μM MPA) which corresponded to the changes in lipid-metabolizing proteins. MPA affected intracellular nucleotide levels, nucleotide-dependent processes, expression of structural proteins, fatty acid and lipid metabolism in LS180 cells. These changes may compromise intestinal membrane integrity and contribute to gastrointestinal toxicity. PMID:28327659

  14. Tumor growth suppression by alpha-eleostearic acid, a linolenic acid isomer with a conjugated triene system, via lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Tsuyoshi; Tokuyama, Yoshiko; Igarashi, Miki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2004-08-01

    We have previously shown that conjugated linolenic acids (CLnA) prepared by alkaline isomerization have a stronger antitumor effect than conjugated linoleic acids (CLA). In this study we have compared the suppressive effect on tumor growth of alpha-eleostearic acid (alpha-ESA, 9Z11E13E-18:3) with those of the CLA isomers 9Z11E-CLA and 10E12Z-CLA, using nude mice into which DLD-1 human colon cancer cells were transplanted. The results showed that alpha-ESA, which is a CLnA that can be prepared from natural sources in bulk, had a stronger antitumor effect than CLA. DNA fragmentation was enhanced and lipid peroxidation was increased in tumor tissues of the alpha-ESA-fed mice, which suggested that alpha-ESA induced apoptosis via lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, treatment of DLD-1 cells with alpha-ESA, 9Z11E-CLA and 10E12Z-CLA confirmed that alpha-ESA had a stronger antitumor effect than CLA in cultured cell lines. The induction of apoptosis by alpha-ESA was consistent with enhanced DNA fragmentation, increased caspase activity and increased expression of caspase mRNA following alpha-ESA treatment. Addition of alpha-tocopherol, an antioxidant, suppressed oxidative stress and apoptosis, suggesting that these effects were associated with lipid peroxidation.

  15. Serum fatty acid, lipid profile and dietary intake of Hong Kong Chinese omnivores and vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Lee, H Y; Woo, J; Chen, Z Y; Leung, S F; Peng, X H

    2000-10-01

    To examine the serum fatty acid and lipid profiles and dietary intake of Hong Kong Chinese omnivores and vegetarians with respect to cardiovascular health. Random population survey stratified by age and sex. One-hundred and ninety-four omnivore subjects (81 men, 113 women) age 25-70 y, and 60 ovo-lacto-vegetarian adults (15 men, 45 women) age 30-55 y. Nutrient quantitation was by a food frequency method. Serum fatty acids were analysed by gas chromatography, and serum lipid by standard laboratory methods. Compared with omnivores, vegetarians had higher serum concentrations of polyunsaturated (PUFA) and monosaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and lower saturated fatty acids (SFA), long chain omega-3 and trans fatty acids (TFA). They also had lower serum cholesterol and higher apoA-1 concentrations, but the LDL/HDL ratio was not different. The ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids intake was higher in vegetarians. Compared with results from populations with higher incidences of coronary heart disease, while lower myristic and palmitic acid concentrations and higher eicosapentaneoic (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) may partly account for the difference in incidence, linoleic acid concentration was higher. Although the Chinese vegetarian diet may be beneficial for heart health in that antioxidant and fibre intakes are higher and saturated fat lower, the low EPA and DHA due to omission from dietary source and suppressed formation by high linoleic acid level, and the presence of TFA in the diet, may exert an opposite effect. There are some favourable features in the serum fatty acid profile in the Hong Kong Chinese population with respect to cardiovascular health, but the consumption of TFA is of concern. The Chinese vegetarian diet also contains some adverse features.

  16. Aluminum contamination of parenteral nutrition additives, amino acid solutions, and lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Popińska, K; Kierkuś, J; Lyszkowska, M; Socha, J; Pietraszek, E; Kmiotek, W; Ksiazyk, J

    1999-09-01

    Contamination of parenteral nutrition solutions with aluminum may result in accumulation of this element in bones and, in premature infants, may inhibit bone calcium uptake and induce cholestasis. We measured the aluminum concentration of small-volume parenterals, amino acid solutions, lipid emulsions, and special solutions containing glucose, amino acids, electrolytes, and trace elements (standard I for children with a body weight of 3-5 kg, standard II for children with a body weight of 5-10 kg). The method used was graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry GTA-AAS (SpectrAA-400 Plus, Varian, PtY Ltd., Mulgrave, Australia). Quality control was run with the use of control serum (Seronorm, Nycomed, Oslo, Norway). The aluminum contents of parenterally administered solutions were: pediatric trace elements, 130 micrograms/L, and pediatric trace elements, 3000 micrograms/L; phosphorus salts: K-phosphates, 9800 micrograms/L, and Na/K phosphates, 13,000 micrograms/L; 10% calcium gluconate, 4400 micrograms/L; 6.5% amino acids, 30 micrograms/L; 10% amino acids, 120 micrograms/L; 12.5% amino acids, 121 micrograms/L; 20% lipid emulsion, 30 micrograms/L; 20% lipid emulsion, 180 micrograms/L; water-soluble vitamins, 12 micrograms/L; lipid soluble vitamins, 360 micrograms/L; standard I, 55 micrograms/L; standard II, 90 micrograms/L; The aluminum intake from parenteral nutrition was 6.6-10.8 micrograms.kg-1.d-1--a dose exceeding the safety limit of 2 micrograms.kg-1.d-1. The possible association of aluminum not only with metabolic bone disease, but also with encephalopathy, dictates caution when dealing with the pediatric population on long-term parenteral nutrition. In the absence of reliable label information, it seems proper to monitor the aluminum concentration in parenteral nutrition products and to report it in professional journals.

  17. Culture media optimization of Porphyridium purpureum: production potential of biomass, total lipids, arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Mysore Doddaiah; Kathiresan, Shanmugam; Bhattacharya, Sila; Sarada, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    Porphyridium purpureum a red marine microalga is known for phycobiliproteins (PB), polyunsaturated fatty acids and sulphated exopolysaccharides. In the present study, effects of media constituents for the production of different polyunsaturated fatty acids from P. purpureum were considered using a response surface methodology (RSM). A second order polynomial was used to predict the response functions in terms of the independent variables such as the concentrations of sodium chloride, magnesium sulphate, sodium nitrate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The response functions were production of biomass yield, total lipid and polyunsaturated fatty acids like arachidonic acid (AA 20:4) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA 20:5). Results corroborated that maximum Biomass (0.95 gL(-1)) yield was at the concentrations of sodium chloride (14.89 gL(-1)), magnesium sulfate (3.93 gL(-1)) and sodium nitrate (0.96 gL(-1)) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (0.09 gL(-1)). Optimum total lipid (17.9 % w/w) and EPA (34.6 % w/w) content was at the concentrations of sodium chloride (29.98 gL(-1)), magnesium sulfate (9.34 gL(-1)) and sodium nitrate (1.86 gL(-1)). Variation in concentration of potassium dihydrogen phosphate for both lipid (0.01gL(-1)) and EPA content (0.20 gL(-1)) was observed. The optimum conditions for biomass, total lipid, AA and EPA varied indicating their batch mode of growth and interaction effect of the salt.

  18. Trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid decreases de novo lipid synthesis in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Obsen, Thomas; Faergeman, Nils J; Chung, Soonkyu; Martinez, Kristina; Gobern, Semone; Loreau, Olivier; Wabitsch, Martin; Mandrup, Susanne; McIntosh, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduces adiposity in vivo. However, mechanisms mediating these changes are unclear. Therefore, we treated cultures of human adipocytes with trans-10, cis-12 (10,12) CLA, cis-9, trans-11 (9,11) CLA or other trans fatty acids (FA), and measured indices of lipid metabolism. The lipid-lowering effects of 10,12 CLA were unique, as other trans FA did not reduce TG content to the same extent. Using low levels of [(14)C]-CLA isomers, it was shown that both isomers were readily incorporated into acylglycerols and phospholipids, albeit at lower levels than [(14)C]-oleic or [(14)C]-linoleic acids. When using [(14)C]-acetic acid and [(14)C]-pyruvic acid as substrates, 30 μM 10,12 CLA, but not 9,11 CLA, decreased de novo synthesis of triglyceride, free FA, diacylglycerol, cholesterol esters, cardiolipin, phospholipids and ceramides within 3-24 h. Treatment with 30 μM 10,12 CLA, but not 9,11 CLA, decreased total cellular lipids within 3 days and the ratio of monounsaturated FA (MUFA) to saturated FA, and increased C18:0 acyl-CoA levels within 24 h. Consistent with these data, stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD)-1 mRNA and protein levels were down-regulated by 10,12 CLA within 7-12 h, respectively. The mRNA levels of liver X receptor (LXR)α and sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1c, transcription factors that regulate SCD-1, were decreased by 10,12 CLA within 5 h. These data suggest that the isomer-specific decrease in de novo lipid synthesis by 10,12 CLA is due, in part, to the rapid repression of lipogenic transcription factors that regulate MUFA synthesis, suggesting an anti-obesity mechanism unique to this trans FA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes in lipid class and fatty acid composition during development in white seabream (Diplodus sargus) eggs and larvae.

    PubMed

    Cejas, Juana Rosa; Almansa, Eduardo; Jérez, Salvador; Bolaños, Ana; Felipe, Beatriz; Lorenzo, Antonio

    2004-10-01

    To establish the changes which occur during embryogenesis and early larvae development, eggs, yolk-sac larvae (one day old larvae) and absorbed yolk-sac larvae (three day old larvae) of white sea bream were examined for lipid class and fatty acid composition. The development was characterized by a decrease in all lipid classes with the exception of phosphatidylserine (PS) and fatty free acids (FFA) which increased, and sphingomyelin (SM) which remained unchanged. The changes observed in lipid class content and the decrease in fatty acids in total lipid (TL) reflect the utilization and mobilization of lipids during both embryogenesis and early larvae development. Fluctuations in the relative composition of fatty acids in phosphatidylcholine (PC) during development suggest a selective bulk uptake and catabolism of fatty acids in this lipid class. Unlike PC, catabolism of triacylglycerol (TG) fatty acid appears to be non-selective. During development, the decrease in levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) eicosapentaenoic (20:5n-3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic (22:6n-3, DHA) in total lipid denotes their utilization as energy substrate by Diplodus sargus larvae.

  20. Plasma lipoprotein lipid and Lp[a] changes with substitution of elaidic acid for oleic acid in the diet.

    PubMed

    Nestel, P; Noakes, M; Belling, B; McArthur, R; Clifton, P; Janus, E; Abbey, M

    1992-07-01

    The effect of additional dietary trans fatty acids (7% energy) on plasma lipids was assessed in a double-blind comparison of four separate diets: 1, enriched with butter fat (lauric-myristic-palmitic); 2, oleic acid-rich; 3, elaidic acid-rich; 4, palmitic acid-rich. The total dietary period was 11 weeks and comprised normal foods plus specific fat supplements. In 27 mildly hypercholesterolemic men, total and LDL cholesterol were significantly lower during the 3-week oleic acid-rich diet, and were similar during the other three diets. For the four diets LDL cholesterol levels were in mg/dl: 1, 163; 2, 151; 3, 165; 4, 161. HDL cholesterol was significantly higher with the palmitic acid-rich diet, 42 mg/dl, compared with elaidic acid, 38 mg/dl, which in turn was not lower than with oleic acid, 38 mg/dl. Plasma elaidic acid concentration rose seven-fold with the trans fatty acid diet but did not increase the vulnerability of LDL to oxidative change. The elaidic acid-rich diet led to significant elevations in the level of Lp[a] compared to all the other test diets. The Lp[a] level increased to 296 +/- 220 U/l in the elaidic acid-rich period from 235 +/- 182 (mean +/- SD) in the first ("butter") period (P less than 0.001) compared with 249 +/- 204 in the palmitic acid period (P less than 0.001) and 236 +/- 201 in the oleic acid period (NS).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Lipids rich in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from microalgae.

    PubMed

    Santos-Sánchez, N F; Valadez-Blanco, R; Hernández-Carlos, B; Torres-Ariño, A; Guadarrama-Mendoza, P C; Salas-Coronado, R

    2016-10-01

    Despite microalgae recently receiving enormous attention as a potential source of biodiesel, their use is still not feasible as an alternative to fossil fuels. Recently, interest in microalgae has focused on the production of bioactive compounds such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which provide microalgae a high added value. Several considerations need to be assessed for optimizing PUFA production from microalgae. Firstly, a microalgae species that produces high PUFA concentrations should be selected, such as Nannochloropsis gaditana, Isochrysis galbana, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and Crypthecodinium cohnii, with marine species gaining more attention than do freshwater species. Closed cultivation processes, e.g., photobioreactors, are the most appropriate since temperature, pH, and nutrients can be controlled. An airlift column with LEDs or optical fibers to distribute photons into the culture media can be used at small scale to produce inoculum, while tubular and flat panels are used at commercial scale. Depending on the microalgae, a temperature range from 15 to 28 °C and a pH from 7 to 8 can be employed. Relevant conditions for PUFA production are medium light irradiances (50-300 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)), air enriched with (0-1 % (v/v) CO2, as well as nitrogen and phosphorous limitation. For research purposes, the most appropriate medium for PUFA production is Bold's Basal, whereas mixotrophic cultivation using sucrose or glucose as the carbon source has been reported for industrial processes. For cell harvesting, the use of tangential flow membrane filtration or disk stack centrifugation is advisable at commercial scale. Current researches on PUFA extraction have focused on the use of organic solvents assisted with ultrasound or microwaves, supercritical fluids, and electroporation or are enzyme assisted. Commercial-scale extraction involves mainly physical methods such as bead mills and expeller presses. All these factors should be taken into

  2. Heat exposure increases circulating fatty acids but not lipid oxidation at rest and during exercise.

    PubMed

    O'Hearn, Katharine; Tingelstad, Hans Christian; Blondin, Denis; Tang, Vera; Filion, Lionel G; Haman, François

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in lipid oxidation during exercise have been well studied, but limited data exists on the effects of passive heat exposure and exercise in the heat on changes in lipid oxidation. This study was designed to examine: (1) the effects of heat exposure on lipid metabolism during passive heating and subsequent exercise in the heat by focusing on changes in whole-body lipid oxidation and plasma lipid concentrations, and (2) the effects of extended passive pre-heating on exercise performance in the heat. Male participants (n=8) were passively heated for 120 min at 42 °C, then exercised on a treadmill in the same temperature at 50% V̇O2 max for 30 min (HEAT). This same procedure was followed on a separate occasion at 23 °C (CON). Results showed that lipid oxidation rates were not different between HEAT and CON during passive heating or exercise. However, non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were significantly higher following passive heating (618 µM, 95% CI: 479-757) compared to CON (391 µM, 95% CI: 270-511). The same trend was observed following exercise (2036 µM, 95% CI: 1604-2469 for HEAT and 1351 µM, 95% CI: 1002-1699). Triacylglycerol, phospholipid and cholesterol levels were not different between HEAT and CON at any point. Four of 8 participants could not complete 30 min of exercise in HEAT, resulting in a 14% decline in total external work. Rate of perceived exertion over the final 5 min of exercise was higher in HEAT (9.5) than CON (5). We conclude that: (1) heat exposure results in increased circulating NEFA at rest and during exercise without changes in whole-body lipid utilization, and (2) passive pre-heating reduces work capacity during exercise in the heat and increases the perceived intensity of a given workload. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipid Body Organelles within the Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi: A Role for Intracellular Arachidonic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Daniel A. M.; Roque, Natália R.; Teixeira, Lívia; Milán-Garcés, Erix A.; Carneiro, Alan B.; Almeida, Mariana R.; Andrade, Gustavo F. S.; Martins, Jefferson S.; Pinho, Roberto R.; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; D’Avila, Heloisa

    2016-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells contain varying amounts of cytosolic lipidic inclusions termed lipid bodies (LBs) or lipid droplets (LDs). In mammalian cells, such as macrophages, these lipid-rich organelles are formed in response to host-pathogen interaction during infectious diseases and are sites for biosynthesis of arachidonic acid (AA)-derived inflammatory mediators (eicosanoids). Less clear are the functions of LBs in pathogenic lower eukaryotes. In this study, we demonstrated that LBs, visualized by light microscopy with different probes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), are produced in trypomastigote forms of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas’ disease, after both host interaction and exogenous AA stimulation. Quantitative TEM revealed that LBs from amastigotes, the intracellular forms of the parasite, growing in vivo have increased size and electron-density compared to LBs from amastigotes living in vitro. AA-stimulated trypomastigotes released high amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and showed PGE2 synthase expression. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated increased unsaturated lipid content and AA incorporation in stimulated parasites. Moreover, both Raman and MALDI mass spectroscopy revealed increased AA content in LBs purified from AA-stimulated parasites compared to LBs from unstimulated group. By using a specific technique for eicosanoid detection, we immunolocalized PGE2 within LBs from AA-stimulated trypomastigotes. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that LBs from the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi are not just lipid storage inclusions but dynamic organelles, able to respond to host interaction and inflammatory events and involved in the AA metabolism. Acting as sources of PGE2, a potent immunomodulatory lipid mediator that inhibits many aspects of innate and adaptive immunity, newly-formed parasite LBs may be implicated with the pathogen survival in its host. PMID:27490663

  4. Fatty Acid Profiles of Stipe and Blade from the Norwegian Brown Macroalgae Laminaria hyperborea with Special Reference to Acyl Glycerides, Polar Lipids, and Free Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Foseid, Lena; Devle, Hanne; Stenstrøm, Yngve; Naess-Andresen, Carl Fredrik; Ekeberg, Dag

    2017-01-01

    A thorough analysis of the fatty acid profiles of stipe and blade from the kelp species Laminaria hyperborea is presented. Lipid extracts were fractionated into neutral lipids, free fatty acids, and polar lipids, prior to derivatization and GC-MS analysis. A total of 42 fatty acids were identified and quantified, including the n-3 fatty acids α-linolenic acid, stearidonic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid. The fatty acid amounts are higher in blade than in stipe (7.42 mg/g dry weight and 2.57 mg/g dry weight, resp.). The highest amounts of n-3 fatty acids are found within the neutral lipid fractions with 590.6 ug/g dry weight and 100.9 ug/g dry weight for blade and stipe, respectively. The amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids are 3.4 times higher in blade than stipe. The blade had the highest PUFA/SFA ratio compared to stipe (1.02 versus 0.76) and the lowest n-6/n-3 ratio (0.8 versus 3.5). This study highlights the compositional differences between the lipid fractions of stipe and blade from L. hyperborea. The amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids compared to saturated- and monounsaturated fatty acids is known to influence human health. In the pharmaceutical, food, and feed industries, this can be of importance for production of different health products.

  5. Fatty Acid Profiles of Stipe and Blade from the Norwegian Brown Macroalgae Laminaria hyperborea with Special Reference to Acyl Glycerides, Polar Lipids, and Free Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Foseid, Lena; Stenstrøm, Yngve; Naess-Andresen, Carl Fredrik; Ekeberg, Dag

    2017-01-01

    A thorough analysis of the fatty acid profiles of stipe and blade from the kelp species Laminaria hyperborea is presented. Lipid extracts were fractionated into neutral lipids, free fatty acids, and polar lipids, prior to derivatization and GC-MS analysis. A total of 42 fatty acids were identified and quantified, including the n-3 fatty acids α-linolenic acid, stearidonic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid. The fatty acid amounts are higher in blade than in stipe (7.42 mg/g dry weight and 2.57 mg/g dry weight, resp.). The highest amounts of n-3 fatty acids are found within the neutral lipid fractions with 590.6 ug/g dry weight and 100.9 ug/g dry weight for blade and stipe, respectively. The amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids are 3.4 times higher in blade than stipe. The blade had the highest PUFA/SFA ratio compared to stipe (1.02 versus 0.76) and the lowest n-6/n-3 ratio (0.8 versus 3.5). This study highlights the compositional differences between the lipid fractions of stipe and blade from L. hyperborea. The amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids compared to saturated- and monounsaturated fatty acids is known to influence human health. In the pharmaceutical, food, and feed industries, this can be of importance for production of different health products. PMID:28713595

  6. Radiotherapy improves serum fatty acids and lipid profile in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Sana; Channa, Naseem Aslam; Talpur, Farha Naz; Younis, Muhammad; Tabassum, Naila

    2017-05-18

    Breast cancer is a disease with diverse clinical symptoms, molecular profiles, and its nature to response its therapeutic treatments. Radiotherapy (RT), along with surgery and chemotherapy is a part of treatment in breast cancer. The aim of present study was to investigate pre and post treatment effects of radiotherapy in serum fatty acids and its lipids profile in patients with breast cancer. In this comparative as well as follow up study, Serum fatty acids were performed by gas chromatography to investigate fatty acids and Microlab for analysis of lipid profile. Among serum free and total fatty acids the major saturated fatty acids (SFAs) in serum lipids of breast cancer patients (pre and post treated) were stearic acid (18:0) and palmitic acid (16:0). These fatty acids contributed about 35-50% of total fatty acids. The decreased concentrations of linoleic acid (C18:2) and arachidonic acid (C20:4) with a lower ratio of C18:2/C18:1 was found in pretreated breast cancer patients as compared to controls. The n-3/n-6 ratio of breast cancer patients was decreased before treatment but it was 35% increased after treatment. In addition, plasma activity of D6 desaturase was increased in the breast cancer patients, while the activity of D5 desaturase was decreased. Increased levels of SFAs, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and decreased polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) levels in breast cancer patients (pre and post treated) as compared to controls. Serum total cholesterol (TC) (224.4 mg/dL) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (142.9 mg/dL) were significantly increased in pretreated breast cancer patients but after the radiotherapy treatment, the TC (150.2 mg/dL) and LDL-C (89.8 mg/dL) were decreased. It seems that RT would have played a potential role in the treatment of BC. After RT the serum levels of PUFAs, TC, and LDL-C are improved. Our study reinforces the important role of RT in the management of BC. The level of PUFAs, TC, and LDL-C can be

  7. Heterotrophy of filamentous oleaginous microalgae Tribonema minus for potential production of lipid and palmitoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjun; Wang, Hui; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Wentao; Liu, Tianzhong

    2017-09-01

    Heterotrophic fermentation and high valuable co-product producing are thought to be effective ways to improve the economic viability and feasibility of commercial production of microalgae biofuels. This work reported the heterotrophic cultivation of Tribonema minus for lipid and palmitoleic acid (a novel functional fatty acid) production. Firstly, the heterotrophic ability of T. minus was identified for the first time with significant promotion in biomass and lipid productivity, and glucose and urea were then selected as the optimal carbon and nitrogen sources. Moreover, nutrient concentrations and culture conditions were optimized. Highest biomass and lipid productivity of 30.8gL(-1) and 730mgL(-1)d(-1) were obtained respectively by adding 80gL(-1) glucose at once. In addition, 2gL(-1) urea, 0.8gL(-1) K2HPO4, 24mgL(-1) ammonium ferric citrate, initial pH of 6, and temperature of 27°C were determined as the appropriate conditions for heterotrophic growth and lipid production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Lipid and protein oxidation in hepatic homogenates and cell membranes exposed to bile acids.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Martínez-Ballarín, Enrique; Miana-Mena, Javier; Berzosa, Cesar; Piedrafita, Eduardo; Cebrián, Igor; Reiter, Russel J; García, Joaquín J

    2009-01-01

    Cholestasis occurs in a variety of hepatic diseases and causes damage due to accumulation of bile acids in the liver. The aim was to investigate the effect of several bile acids, i.e. chenodeoxycholic, taurochenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic, taurodeoxycholic, ursodeoxycholic, lithocholic and taurolithocholic (TLC), in inducing oxidative damage. Hepatic tissue of male Sprague-Dawley rats was incubated with or without 1 mM of each bile acid, with or without 0.1 mM FeCl(3) and 0.1 mM ascorbic acid for the purpose of generating free radicals. Several bile acids increased lipid and protein oxidation, with TLC being the most pro-oxidative (657% and 175% in homogenates and 350% and 311% in membranes, respectively). TLC also enhanced iron-induced oxidative stress to lipids (21% in homogenates and 29% in membranes) and to proteins (74% in membranes). This enhancement was dose- and time-dependent and was reduced by melatonin. These results suggest that bile acids differentially mediate hepatic oxidative stress and may be involved in the physiopathology of cholestasis.

  9. Pectin-Lipid Self-Assembly: Influence on the Formation of Polyhydroxy Fatty Acids Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Puyol, Susana; Benítez, José Jesús; Domínguez, Eva; Bayer, Ilker Sefik; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Heredia, Antonio; Heredia-Guerrero, José Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles, named cutinsomes, have been prepared from aleuritic (9,10,16-trihidroxipalmitic) acid and tomato fruit cutin monomers (a mixture of mainly 9(10),16-dihydroxypalmitic acid (85%, w/w) and 16-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid (7.5%, w/w)) with pectin in aqueous solution. The process of formation of the nanoparticles of aleuritic acid plus pectin has been monitored by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, while their chemical and morphological characterization was analyzed by ATR-FTIR, TEM, and non-contact AFM. The structure of these nanoparticles can be described as a lipid core with a pectin shell. Pectin facilitated the formation of nanoparticles, by inducing their aggregation in branched chains and favoring the condensation between lipid monomers. Also, pectin determined the self-assembly of cutinsomes on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces, causing their opening and forming interconnected structures. In the case of cutin monomers, the nanoparticles are fused, and the condensation of the hydroxy fatty acids is strongly affected by the presence of the polysaccharide. The interaction of pectin with polyhydroxylated fatty acids could be related to an initial step in the formation of the plant biopolyester cutin. PMID:25915490

  10. Lipid metabolism in ethanol-treated rat pups and adults: effects of folic Acid.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Ma Luisa; Delgado-Villa, Ma Jesús; Llopis, Ruth; Murillo, Ma Luisa; Carreras, Olimpia

    2008-01-01

    In this study we determined whether a folic acid-supplemented diet could change hyperlipaemia provoked by chronic ethanol intake in adult and pup rats. Animals were randomized into eight groups (four adults and four pups): control groups, water and basic diet; alcohol groups, 20% ethanol and basic diet; alcohol folic acid groups, 20% ethanol and diet supplemented with folic acid; control folic acid groups, water and folic acid-supplemented diet. We determined serum and liver total cholesterol (Chol), HDL, triglycerides (TG), phospholipids (PL) and bile acids (BA) levels in all of the groups. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase activity was also measured in the livers. Ethanol-fed rats have higher serum HDL and PL levels in pups and higher serum LDL, TG and PL levels in adults than controls and supplemented animals with or without alcohol ingestion. Ethanol provokes an increase in hepatic Chol and BA, and a decrease in hepatic TG and PL in pups; in adults it also provokes an increase in hepatic Chol and BA and a significant increase in HMG-CoA reductase activity. Alcohol intake plus folic acid supplementation has no effects on these values except BA levels that were significantly higher, in both pups and adult rats, than in the control group. Despite the fact that alcohol intake provokes different lipid alterations in adults and in pups whose mothers drank ethanol, folic acid contributes to the alleviation of these adverse effects reducing HMG-CoA reductase activity in adult rats and, except BA levels, to normalizing lipids values due to the fact that folic acid acts as a choleretic compound. We can therefore assume that folic acid supplementation reduces alcohol-induced hypercholesterolaemia by decreasing synthesis and increasing catabolism.

  11. Effects of a lipid-based nutrient supplement during pregnancy and lactation on maternal plasma fatty acid status and lipid profile: Results of two randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Oaks, Brietta M; Young, Rebecca R; Adu-Afarwuah, Seth; Ashorn, Ulla; Jackson, Kristina H; Lartey, Anna; Maleta, Kenneth; Okronipa, Harriet; Sadalaki, John; Baldiviez, Lacey M; Shahab-Ferdows, Setti; Ashorn, Per; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2017-02-01

    It is unknown whether a novel small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplement (SQ-LNS) containing alpha-linolenic (ALA) and linoleic acids impacts maternal plasma lipids and fatty acid status. We measured plasma fatty acids (wt%) and lipid concentrations at 36 wk gestation and breast milk fatty acids (wt%) at 6 months postpartum in a subsample of women enrolled in a randomized controlled trial studying the effects of SQ-LNS on birth outcomes and child growth. Women≤20 wk gestation in Ghana (n=1,320) and Malawi (n=1,391) were assigned to receive daily either: 1) iron-folic acid (pregnancy); 2) multiple micronutrients (pregnancy and lactation); or 3) SQ-LNS (pregnancy and lactation). At 36 wk, plasma ALA levels were higher in those receiving SQ-LNS. SQ-LNS increased breast milk ALA in Ghana but not Malawi. There was no effect on plasma lipids or other selected fatty acids. SQ-LNS may impact plasma and breast milk ALA levels depending on the population. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Very long chain fatty acid and lipid signaling in the response of plants to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Leger, Amandine

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that lipid signaling is essential for plant resistance to pathogens. Besides oxylipins and unsaturated fatty acids known to play important signaling functions during plant-pathogen interactions, the very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) biosynthesis pathway has been recently associated to plant defense through different aspects. VLCFAs are indeed required for the biosynthesis of the plant cuticle and the generation of sphingolipids. Elucidation of the roles of these lipids in biotic stress responses is the result of the use of genetic approaches together with the identification of the genes/proteins involved in their biosynthesis. This review focuses on recent observations which revealed the complex function of the cuticle and cuticle-derived signals, and the key role of sphingolipids as bioactive molecules involved in signal transduction and cell death regulation during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:19649180

  13. Urea application promotes amino acid metabolism and membrane lipid peroxidation in Azolla.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiana; Huang, Min; Cao, Fangbo; Pardha-Saradhi, P; Zou, Yingbin

    2017-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of urea on nitrogen metabolism and membrane lipid peroxidation in Azolla pinnata. Compared to controls, the application of urea to A. pinnata resulted in a 44% decrease in nitrogenase activity, no significant change in glutamine synthetase activity, 660% higher glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, 39% increase in free amino acid levels, 22% increase in malondialdehyde levels, 21% increase in Na+/K+- levels, 16% increase in Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase levels, and 11% decrease in superoxide dismutase activity. In terms of H2O2 detoxifying enzymes, peroxidase activity did not change and catalase activity increased by 64% in urea-treated A. pinnata. These findings suggest that urea application promotes amino acid metabolism and membrane lipid peroxidation in A. pinnata.

  14. Heart and liver lipid fatty acid and behavior changes in mice after a diet change.

    PubMed

    Kitchell, B B

    1984-04-23

    270-Day old, male Ham/ICR mice were subjected to a diet change from high protein and carbohydrate and low fat to a diet higher in fat and lower in carbohydrate and protein. Age matched mice were maintained on laboratory rodent chow as controls. The diet change was not defined so the observed differences could not necessarily be ascribed to altered protein, carbohydrate, or fat intake. Comparison of the controls with the experimental mice revealed the " junk food" mice differed in lipid fatty acid profiles of the heart and liver and in percentage of lipid palmitic and oleic acids in these organs and also in plasma. Appearance was altered in the experimental mice which had dull, greasy coats. In addition, the experimental animals were less active, slept singly, and were slower in negotiating a three-choice maze than their comparably housed counterparts, indicating altered activity/curiosity behavior.

  15. Characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles containing caffeic acid and determination of its effects on MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Dikmen, Gokhan; Guney, Gamze; Genc, Lutfi

    2015-01-01

    Many anticancer drugs that are currently used in cancer treatment are natural products or their analogues by structural modification. Caffeic acid (3, 4-dihydroxycinnamic acid; CA) is classified as hydroxycinnamic acid and has a variety of potential pharmacological effects, including antioxidant, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities. As a drug carrier, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) introduced to improve stability, provide controlled drug release, avoid organic solvents and are obtained in small sizes. In this study, we developed solid lipid nanoparticles incorporating with caffeic acid using hot homogenization method. Caffeic acid loaded solid lipid nanoparticles were characterized regarding particle size, zeta potential, drug entrapment efficiency, drug release, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and FT-IR. The effects of caffeic acid loaded solid lipid nanoparticles on MCF-7 cells were determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-dimethyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) test and Annexin V-PI analysis. As a result, solid lipid nanoparticles could potentially be used for the delivery of caffeic acid and solid lipid nanoparticles formulation enhanced the effects of caffeic acid on MCF-7 cells. Some relevant patents are also referred in this article.

  16. Lipids of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa IIPL32 with biodiesel potential: Oil yield, fatty acid profile, fuel properties.

    PubMed

    Khot, Mahesh; Ghosh, Debashish

    2017-04-01

    This study analyzes the single cell oil (SCO), fatty acid profile, and biodiesel fuel properties of the yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa IIPL32 grown on the pentose fraction of acid pre-treated sugarcane bagasse as a carbon source. The yeast biomass from nitrogen limiting culture conditions (15.3 g L(-1) ) was able to give the SCO yield of 0.17 g g(-1) of xylose consumed. Acid digestion, cryo-pulverization, direct in situ transesterification, and microwave assisted techniques were evaluated in comparison to the Soxhlet extraction for the total intracellular yeast lipid recovery. The significant differences were observed among the SCO yield of different methods and the in situ transesterification stood out most for effective yeast lipid recovery generating 97.23 mg lipid as FAME per gram dry biomass. The method was fast and consumed lesser solvent with greater FAME yield while accessing most cellular fatty acids present. The yeast lipids showed the major presence of monounsaturated fatty esters (35-55%; 18:1, 16:1) suitable for better ignition quality, oxidative stability, and cold-flow properties of the biodiesel. Analyzed fuel properties (density, kinematic viscosity, cetane number) of the yeast oil were in good agreement with international biodiesel standards. The sugarcane bagasse-derived xylose and the consolidated comparative assessment of lab scale SCO recovery methods highlight the necessity for careful substrate choice and validation of analytical method in yeast oil research. The use of less toxic co-solvents together with solvent recovery and recycling would help improve process economics for sustainable production of biodiesel from the hemicellulosic fraction of cheap renewable sources. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Effects of Diet High in Palmitoleic Acid on Serum Lipid Levels and Metabolism.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    Macadamia nuts are among the natural foods known to contain a high proportion of the monounsaturated fat, palmitoleic acid. A pilot study was...GL, Dobbs J, Abbott RD, Huang B: Comparison of lipid levels in humans on a macadamia nut based high monounsaturated fat diet to their levels on a...continue. This subject was included in the high dose group for statistical analysis even though he ate no nuts . For the remainder of the subjects, side

  18. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of (lyso)phosphatidic acids, (lyso)phosphatidylserines and other lipid classes.

    PubMed

    Cífková, Eva; Hájek, Roman; Lísa, Miroslav; Holčapek, Michal

    2016-03-25

    The goal of this work is a systematic optimization of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) separation of acidic lipid classes (namely phosphatidic acids-PA, lysophosphatidic acids-LPA, phosphatidylserines-PS and lysophosphatidylserines-LPS) and other lipid classes under mass spectrometry (MS) compatible conditions. The main parameters included in this optimization are the type of stationary phases used in HILIC, pH of the mobile phase, the type and concentration of mobile phase additives. Nine HILIC columns with different chemistries (unmodified silica, modified silica using diol, 2-picolylamine, diethylamine and 1-aminoanthracene and hydride silica) are compared with the emphasis on peak shapes of acidic lipid classes. The optimization of pH is correlated with the theoretical calculation of acidobasic equilibria of studied lipid classes. The final method using the hydride column, pH 4 adjusted by formic acid and the gradient of acetonitrile and 40 mmol/L of aqueous ammonium formate provides good peak shapes for all analyzed lipid classes including acidic lipids. This method is applied for the identification of lipids in real samples of porcine brain and kidney extracts.

  19. Changes in fatty acid composition and lipid profile during koji fermentation and their relationships with soy sauce flavour.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yunzi; Chen, Zhiyao; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Haifeng; Cui, Chun; Zhao, Mouming

    2014-09-01

    Evolution of lipids during koji fermentation and the effect of lipase supplementation on the sensory properties of soy sauce were investigated. Results showed that total lipids of the koji samples were in the range of 16-21%. The extracted lipid of initial koji consisted mainly of triacylglycerols (TAGs, >98%), followed by phospholipids (PLs), diglycerides (DAGs), monoacylglycerols (MAGs) and free fatty acids (FFAs). As the fermentation proceeded, peroxide value of the lipids decreased while carbonyl value increased (p<0.05). Linoleic acid was utilised fastest according to the fatty acid composition of total lipids, and preferential degradation of PLs to liberate FFAs was also observed. Moreover, phospholipase supplementation had significant influence on the sensory characteristics of soy sauce, especially enhanced (p<0.05) scores for the umami and kokumi taste attributes. All these results indicated that the control of PLs utilisation during fermentation was a potential method to improve soy sauce's characteristic taste. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Differential lipid and fatty acid profiles of photoautotrophic and heterotrophic Chlorella zofingiensis: assessment of algal oils for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Junchao; Sun, Zheng; Zhong, Yujuan; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document and compare the lipid class and fatty acid composition of the green microalga Chlorella zofingiensis cultivated under photoautotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, a 900% increase in lipid yield was achieved in heterotrophic cells fed with 30 g L(-1) of glucose. Furthermore heterotrophic cells accumulated predominantly neutral lipids (NL) that accounted for 79.5% of total lipids with 88.7% being triacylglycerol (TAG); whereas photoautotrophic cells contained mainly the membrane lipids glycolipids (GL) and phospholipids (PL). Together with the much higher content of oleic acid (C18:1) (35.2% of total fatty acids), oils from heterotrophic C. zofingiensis appear to be more feasible for biodiesel production. Our study highlights the possibility of using heterotrophic algae for producing high quality biodiesel.

  1. Lipid metabolism in pigs fed supplemental conjugated linoleic acid and/or dietary arginine.

    PubMed

    Go, Gwangwoong; Wu, Guoyao; Silvey, David T; Choi, Seongho; Li, Xilong; Smith, Stephen B

    2012-10-01

    We proposed that the combination of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and arginine would decrease adiposity by depressing lipid synthesis in liver and adipose tissues of growing pigs. Pigs were allotted to treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial design with two lipids (CLA or canola oil) and two amino acids [L-arginine or L-alanine (isonitrogenous control)]; supplements were provided from 80 to 110 kg body weight (approximately 4 weeks). Treatment groups (n = 4) were: control (2.05% L-alanine plus 1% canola oil); CLA (2.05% L-alanine plus 1% CLA); arginine (1.0% L-arginine plus 1.0% canola oil); arginine plus CLA (1.0% arginine plus 1.0% CLA). Arginine increased backfat thickness (P = 0.07) in the absence or presence of CLA, and arginine supplementation increased subcutaneous and retroperitoneal adipocyte volume, especially in combination with dietary CLA (interaction P = 0.001). Arginine increased palmitate incorporation into total lipids by over 60% in liver (P = 0.07). Dietary CLA increased palmitate incorporation into lipids in longissimus muscle by over 100% (P = 0.01), and CLA increased longissimus muscle lipid by nearly 20%. CLA increased glucose oxidation to CO(2) by over 80% in retroperitoneal and subcutaneous adipose tissues (P = 0.04), and doubled palmitate oxidation to CO(2) in intestinal duodenal mucosal cells (P = 0.07). Arginine supplementation decreased muscle pH at 45 min postmortem (P = 0.001), indicating elevated early postmortem glycolysis, and CLA and arginine independently increased PGC-1α gene expression in longissimus muscle. CLA but not arginine depressed mTOR gene expression in intestinal duodenal mucosal cells. CLA decreased serum insulin by 50% (P = 0.02) but increased serum triacylglycerols by over 40%. CLA supplementation increased (P ≤ 0.01) total saturated fatty acids in liver and adipose tissue. In conclusion, neither CLA nor arginine depressed tissue lipid synthesis in growing/finishing pigs, and in fact dietary CLA promoted elevated

  2. Fatty acid composition of plasma lipids and erythrocyte membranes during simulated extravehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skedina, M. A.; Katuntsev, V. P.; Buravkova, L. B.; Naidina, V. P.

    Ten subjects (from 27 to 41 years) have been participated in 32 experiments. They were decompressed from ground level to 40-35 kPa in altitude chamber when breathed 100% oxygen by mask and performed repeated cycles of exercises (3.0 Kcal/min). The intervals between decompressions were 3-5 days. Plasma lipid and erythrocyte membrane fatty acid composition was evaluated in the fasting venous blood before and immediately after hypobaric exposure. There were 7 cases decompression sickness (DCS). Venous gas bubbles (GB) were detected in 27 cases (84.4%). Any significant changes in the fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes and plasma didn't practically induce after the first decompression. However, by the beginning of the second decompression the total lipid level in erythrocyte membranes decreased from 54.6 mg% to 40.4 mg% in group with DCS symptoms and from 51.2 mg% to 35.2 mg% (p < 0.05) without DCS symptoms. In group with DCS symptoms a tendency to increased level of saturated fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes (16:0, 18:0), the level of the polyunsaturated linoleic fatty acid (18:2) and arachidonic acid (20:4) tended to be decreased by the beginning of the second decompression. Insignificant changes in blood plasma fatty acid composition was observed in both groups. The obtained biochemical data that indicated the simulated extravehicular activity (EVA) condition is accompanied by the certain changes in the blood lipid metabolism, structural and functional state of erythrocyte membranes, which are reversible. The most pronounced changes are found in subjects with DCS symptoms.

  3. Fatty acid composition of plasma lipids and erythrocyte membranes during simulated extravehicular activity.

    PubMed

    Skedina, M A; Katuntsev, V P; Buravkova, L B; Naidina, V P

    1998-01-01

    Ten subjects (from 27 to 41 years) have been participated in 32 experiments. They were decompressed from ground level to 40-35 kPa in altitude chamber when breathed 100% oxygen by mask and performed repeated cycles of exercises (3.0 Kcal/min). The intervals between decompressions were 3-5 days. Plasma lipid and erythrocyte membrane fatty acid composition was evaluated in the fasting venous blood before and immediately after hypobaric exposure. There were 7 cases decompression sickness (DCS). Venous gas bubbles (GB) were detected in 27 cases (84.4%). Any significant changes in the fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes and plasma didn't practically induce after the first decompression. However, by the beginning of the second decompression the total lipid level in erythrocyte membranes decreased from 54.6 mg% to 40.4 mg% in group with DCS symptoms and from 51.2 mg% to 35.2 mg% (p<0.05) without DCS symptoms. In group with DCS symptoms a tendency to increased level of saturated fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes (16:0, 18:0), the level of the polyunsaturated linoleic fatty acid (18:2) and arachidonic acid (20:4) tended to be decreased by the beginning of the second decompression. Insignificant changes in blood plasma fatty acid composition was observed in both groups. The obtained biochemical data that indicated the simulated extravehicular activity (EVA) condition is accompanied by the certain changes in the blood lipid metabolism, structural and functional state of erythrocyte membranes, which are reversible. The most pronounced changes are found in subjects with DCS symptoms.

  4. Lipid and fatty acid profiles in rats consuming different high-fat ketogenic diets.

    PubMed

    Dell, C A; Likhodii, S S; Musa, K; Ryan, M A; Burnham, W M; Cunnane, S C

    2001-04-01

    High-fat ketogenic diets are used to treat intractable seizures in children, but little is known of the mechanism by which these diets work or whether fats rich in n-3 polyunsaturates might be beneficial. Tissue lipid and fatty acid profiles were determined in rats consuming very high fat (80 weight%), low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets containing either medium-chain triglyceride, flaxseed oil, butter, or an equal combination of these three fat sources. Ketogenic diets containing butter markedly raised liver triglyceride but had no effect on plasma cholesterol. Unlike the other fats, flaxseed oil in the ketogenic diet did not raise brain cholesterol. Brain total and free fatty acid profiles remained similar in all groups, but there was an increase in the proportion of arachidonate in brain total lipids in the medium-chain triglyceride group, while the two groups consuming flaxseed oil had significantly lower arachidonate in brain, liver, and plasma. The very high dietary intake of alpha-linolenate in the flaxseed group did not change docosahexaenoate levels in the brain. Our previous report based on these diets showed that although ketosis is higher in rats consuming a ketogenic diet based on medium-chain triglyceride oil, seizure resistance in the pentylenetetrazol model is not clearly related to the degree of ketosis achieved. In combination with our present data from the same seizure study, it appears that ketogenic diets with widely differing effects on tissue lipids and fatty acid profiles can confer a similar amount of seizure protection.

  5. Critical amino acid residues of maurocalcine involved in pharmacology, lipid interaction and cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Kamel; Ram, Narendra; Boisseau, Sylvie; Strappazzon, Flavie; Rehaim, Amel; Sadoul, Rémy; Darbon, Hervé; Ronjat, Michel; De Waard, Michel

    2007-10-01

    Maurocalcine (MCa) is a 33-amino acid residue peptide that was initially identified in the Tunisian scorpion Scorpio maurus palmatus. This peptide triggers interest for three main reasons. First, it helps unravelling the mechanistic basis of Ca(2+) mobilization from the sarcoplasmic reticulum because of its sequence homology with a calcium channel domain involved in excitation-contraction coupling. Second, it shows potent pharmacological properties because of its ability to activate the ryanodine receptor. Finally, it is of technological value because of its ability to carry cell-impermeable compounds across the plasma membrane. Herein, we characterized the molecular determinants that underlie the pharmacological and cell-penetrating properties of maurocalcine. We identify several key amino acid residues of the peptide that will help the design of cell-penetrating analogues devoid of pharmacological activity and cell toxicity. Close examination of the determinants underlying cell penetration of maurocalcine reveals that basic amino acid residues are required for an interaction with negatively charged lipids of the plasma membrane. Maurocalcine analogues that penetrate better have also stronger interaction with negatively charged lipids. Conversely, less effective analogues present a diminished ability to interact with these lipids. These findings will also help the design of still more potent cell penetrating analogues of maurocalcine.

  6. Depot-specific effects of fatty acids on lipid accumulation in children's adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Sabin, Matthew A; Crowne, Elizabeth C; Stewart, Claire E; Hunt, Linda P; Turner, Stephen J; Welsh, Gavin I; Grohmann, Malcolm J; Holly, Jeff M; Shield, Julian P

    2007-09-21

    Circulating concentrations of fatty acids are elevated in obesity, although their effect on regional fat deposition is relatively unexplored. With the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, we aimed to investigate whether saturated and unsaturated fatty acids lead to differential lipid accumulation (LA) in children's subcutaneous and visceral adipocytes. To examine this, subcutaneous and peri-nephric pre-adipocytes, isolated from fat biopsies from 6 pre-pubertal children, were differentiated in vitro before being exposed to palmitate and/or oleate for 24 h. Lipid accumulation was then quantified by nile red staining. Palmitate significantly increased LA in visceral adipocytes at all doses > or =188 microM (e.g. Palmitate 750 microM: +30.0%[8.2]; p<0.01), whilst only a dose of 375 microM led to a significant, but smaller, increase in LA in subcutaneous adipocytes (Palmitate 375 micro: +13.0%[4.3]; p=0.02). In contrast, oleate significantly increased LA in subcutaneous (Oleate 1000 microM: +36.3%[14.0]; p=0.01), but not visceral (Oleate 1000 microM: +16.2%[9.6]; p=0.25) adipocytes. These data suggest that saturated and unsaturated fatty acids may exert depot-specific effects on lipid accumulation.

  7. Control analysis of lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from oil crops shows that flux control is shared between fatty acid synthesis and lipid assembly.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Umi S; Baker, Darren S; Quant, Patti A; Harwood, John L

    2002-06-01

    Top-Down (Metabolic) Control Analysis (TDCA) was used to examine, quantitatively, lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from two commercially important oil crops, olive (Olea europaea L.) and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.). A conceptually simplified system was defined comprising two blocks of reactions: fatty acid synthesis (Block A) and lipid assembly (Block B), which produced and consumed, respectively, a common and unique system intermediate, cytosolic acyl-CoA. We manipulated the steady-state levels of the system intermediate by adding exogenous oleic acid and, using two independent assays, measured the effect of the addition on the system fluxes (J(A) and J(B)). These were the rate of incorporation of radioactivity: (i) through Block A from [1-(14)C]acetate into fatty acids and (ii) via Block B from [U-(14)C]glycerol into complex lipids respectively. The data showed that fatty acid formation (Block A) exerted higher control than lipid assembly (Block B) in both tissues with the following group flux control coefficients (C):(i) Oil palm: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.64+/-0.05 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.36+/-0.05(ii) Olive: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.57+/-0.10 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.43+/-0.10where *C indicates the group flux control coefficient over the lipid biosynthesis flux (J(TL)) and the subscripts BlkA and BlkB refer to defined blocks of the system, Block A and Block B. Nevertheless, because both parts of the lipid biosynthetic pathway exert significant flux control, we suggest strongly that manipulation of single enzyme steps will not affect product yield appreciably. The present study represents the first use of TDCA to examine the overall lipid biosynthetic pathway in any tissue, and its findings are of immediate academic and economic relevance to the yield and nutritional quality of oil crops.

  8. Control analysis of lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from oil crops shows that flux control is shared between fatty acid synthesis and lipid assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Umi S; Baker, Darren S; Quant, Patti A; Harwood, John L

    2002-01-01

    Top-Down (Metabolic) Control Analysis (TDCA) was used to examine, quantitatively, lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from two commercially important oil crops, olive (Olea europaea L.) and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.). A conceptually simplified system was defined comprising two blocks of reactions: fatty acid synthesis (Block A) and lipid assembly (Block B), which produced and consumed, respectively, a common and unique system intermediate, cytosolic acyl-CoA. We manipulated the steady-state levels of the system intermediate by adding exogenous oleic acid and, using two independent assays, measured the effect of the addition on the system fluxes (J(A) and J(B)). These were the rate of incorporation of radioactivity: (i) through Block A from [1-(14)C]acetate into fatty acids and (ii) via Block B from [U-(14)C]glycerol into complex lipids respectively. The data showed that fatty acid formation (Block A) exerted higher control than lipid assembly (Block B) in both tissues with the following group flux control coefficients (C):(i) Oil palm: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.64+/-0.05 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.36+/-0.05(ii) Olive: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.57+/-0.10 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.43+/-0.10where *C indicates the group flux control coefficient over the lipid biosynthesis flux (J(TL)) and the subscripts BlkA and BlkB refer to defined blocks of the system, Block A and Block B. Nevertheless, because both parts of the lipid biosynthetic pathway exert significant flux control, we suggest strongly that manipulation of single enzyme steps will not affect product yield appreciably. The present study represents the first use of TDCA to examine the overall lipid biosynthetic pathway in any tissue, and its findings are of immediate academic and economic relevance to the yield and nutritional quality of oil crops. PMID:12023882

  9. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures caused by alpha amino adipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency: the first polish case with confirmed biochemical and molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Kaczorowska, Magdalena; Kmiec, Tomasz; Jakobs, Cornelis; Kacinski, Marek; Kroczka, Slawomir; Salomons, Gajja S; Struys, Eduard A; Jozwiak, Sergiusz

    2008-12-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent seizures are a rare condition recognized when numerous seizures respond to pyridoxine treatment and recur on pyridoxine withdrawal. For decades the diagnosis was confirmed only with pyridoxine treatment withdrawal trial. Recently described biochemical and molecular pathology improved the diagnostic process for those cases in which seizures are caused by alpha amino adipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency. This article presents a girl with recurrent status epilepticus episodes resistant to phenobarbital and phenytoin and partly responding to midazolam. Eventually the seizures were completely controlled with pyridoxine; however, due to the severe condition of this child when seizing, no trial of withdrawal has been performed. The diagnosis of pyridoxine-dependent seizures was confirmed with biochemical and molecular testing revealing elevated alpha-AASA excretion and the presence of 2 different mutations in the antiquitin ( ALDH7A1) gene. Due to the availability of reliable laboratory testing, confirmation of the diagnosis was made without the life-threatening trial of pyridoxine withdrawal.

  10. Preferential labeling of alpha-amino N-terminal groups in peptides by biotin: application to the detection of specific anti-peptide antibodies by enzyme immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Sélo, I; Négroni, L; Créminon, C; Grassi, J; Wal, J M

    1996-12-15

    Experimental conditions (pH 6.5, 24 h reaction, peptide:biotin ratio 1:5) were defined for preferential incorporation of the biotin molecule in the N-terminal alpha-amino group of peptides. This strategy could be helpful in numerous applications when an entire peptide chain must remain accessible for antibody or receptor binding. We illustrate this advantage in a solid-phase enzyme immunoassay designed to detect antibodies specific for bovine beta-lactoglobulin present in rabbit or human sera. This test involves synthetic peptides biotinylated in different positions and immobilized on a solid phase. The use of biotin/streptavidin interactions permitted more efficient detection of specific anti-peptide antibodies than solid phases prepared using conventional passive-adsorption techniques. The highest levels of antibody binding were measured when biotinylation occurred at the N-terminal extremity of immobilized peptides.

  11. Branched short-chain fatty acids modulate glucose and lipid metabolism in primary adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, Emilia; Nyman, Margareta; Pålbrink, Ann-Ki; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin; Degerman, Eva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), e.g. acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid, generated through colonic fermentation of dietary fibers, have been shown to reach the systemic circulation at micromolar concentrations. Moreover, SCFAs have been conferred anti-obesity properties in both animal models and human subjects. Branched SCFAs (BSCFAs), e.g., isobutyric and isovaleric acid, are generated by fermentation of branched amino acids, generated from undigested protein reaching colon. However, BSCFAs have been sparsely investigated when referring to effects on energy metabolism. Here we primarily investigate the effects of isobutyric acid and isovaleric acid on glucose and lipid metabolism in primary rat and human adipocytes. BSCFAs inhibited both cAMP-mediated lipolysis and insulin-stimulated de novo lipogenesis at 10 mM, whereas isobutyric acid potentiated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by all concentrations (1, 3 and 10 mM) in rat adipocytes. For human adipocytes, only SCFAs inhibited lipolysis at 10 mM. In both in vitro models, BSCFAs and SCFAs reduced phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase, a rate limiting enzyme in lipolysis. In addition, BSCFAs and SCFAs, in contrast to insulin, inhibited lipolysis in the presence of wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase inhibitor and OPC3911, a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor in rat adipocytes. Furthermore, BSCFAs and SCFAs reduced insulin-mediated phosphorylation of protein kinase B. To conclude, BSCFAs have effects on adipocyte lipid and glucose metabolism that can contribute to improved insulin sensitivity in individuals with disturbed metabolism. PMID:27994949

  12. Vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together regulate lipid metabolism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita; Rathod, Richa; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Our recent study indicates that maternal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status influence plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid profile in dams. The present study examines the effects of prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status on lipid metabolism in the offspring. Pregnant dams were divided into five groups: Control; Vitamin B12 deficient (BD); Vitamin B12 supplemented (BS); Vitamin B12 deficient group supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids (BDO); Vitamin B12 supplemented group with omega-3 fatty acids (BSO). The offspring were continued on the same diets till 3 month of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency increased cholesterol levels (p<0.01) but reduced docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (p<0.05), liver mRNA levels of acetyl CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC-1) (p<0.05) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) (p<0.01) in the offspring. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation to this group normalized cholesterol but not mRNA levels of ACC-1 and CPT-1. Vitamin B12 supplementation normalized the levels cholesterol to that of control but increased plasma triglyceride (p<0.01) and reduced liver mRNA levels of adiponectin, ACC-1, and CPT-1 (p<0.01 for all). Supplementation of both vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid normalized triglyceride and mRNA levels of all the above genes. Prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together play a crucial role in regulating the genes involved in lipid metabolism in adult offspring.

  13. Patterns and dynamics of neutral lipid fatty acids in ants - implications for ecological studies.

    PubMed

    Rosumek, Félix B; Brückner, Adrian; Blüthgen, Nico; Menzel, Florian; Heethoff, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Trophic interactions are a fundamental aspect of ecosystem functioning, but often difficult to observe directly. Several indirect techniques, such as fatty acid analysis, were developed to assess these interactions. Fatty acid profiles may indicate dietary differences, while individual fatty acids can be used as biomarkers. Ants are among the most important terrestrial animal groups, but little is known about their lipid metabolism, and no study so far used fatty acids to study their trophic ecology. We set up a feeding experiment with high- and low-fat food to elucidate patterns and dynamics of neutral lipid fatty acids (NLFAs) assimilation in ants. We asked whether dietary fatty acids are assimilated through direct trophic transfer, how diet influences NLFA total amounts and patterns over time, and whether these assimilation processes are similar across species and life stages. Ants fed with high-fat food quickly accumulated specific dietary fatty acids (C18:2n6, C18:3n3 and C18:3n6), compared to ants fed with low-fat food. Dietary fat content did not affect total body fat of workers or amounts of fatty acids extensively biosynthesized by animals (C16:0, C18:0, C18:1n9). Larval development had a strong effect on the composition and amounts of C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1n9. NLFA compositions reflected dietary differences, which became more pronounced over time. Assimilation of specific dietary NLFAs was similar regardless of species or life stage, but these factors affected dynamics of other NLFAs, composition and total fat. We showed that ants accumulated certain dietary fatty acids via direct trophic transfer. Fat content of the diet had no effect on lipids stored by ants, which were able to synthesize high amounts of NLFAs from a sugar-based diet. Nevertheless, dietary NLFAs had a strong effect on metabolic dynamics and profiles. Fatty acids are a useful tool to study trophic biology of ants, and could be applied in an ecological context, although factors that

  14. Dynamics of lipid and fatty acid composition of shallow-water corals under thermal stress: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbs, A. B.; Yakovleva, I. M.

    2012-03-01

    Coral bleaching induces changes in lipid and fatty acid composition that result in low lipid content, reducing the likelihood of coral survival. Species-specific differences in the metabolism of lipid reserves may contribute to the differential resistance of corals under acute heat exposures. Here, we examined the dynamics of lipids and fatty acid abundance in corals subjected to short-term heat stress. The stony corals Acropora intermedia, Montipora digitata, and the soft coral Sinularia capitalis all showed a 60-75% decline in both storage and structural lipids. However, S. capitalis and M. digitata exhibited no significant change in the percentages of structural lipids (i.e., polar lipids and sterols) until they had lost 90-95% of their endosymbionts, whereas A. intermedia showed a rapid decline in structural lipids after a 50% loss of symbionts. After a 90-95% loss of symbionts under heat stress, all three corals showed a relative depletion of polyunsaturated fatty acids that had symbiont biomarkers, suggesting that polyunsaturated fatty acids were translocated from the symbiont to the coral host tissue.

  15. Determination of Total Lipids as Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAME) by in situ Transesterification: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wychen, S.; Laurens, L. M. L.

    2013-12-01

    This procedure is based on a whole biomass transesterification of lipids to fatty acid methyl esters to represent an accurate reflection of the potential of microalgal biofuels. Lipids are present in many forms and play various roles within an algal cell, from cell membrane phospholipids to energy stored as triacylglycerols.

  16. Nicotinic acid: the broad-spectrum lipid drug. A 50th anniversary review.

    PubMed

    Carlson, L A

    2005-08-01

    Nicotinic acid has, like the Roman God Janus, two faces. One is the vitamin. The other is the broad-spectrum lipid drug. The Canadian pathologist Rudolf Altschul discovered 50 years ago that nicotinic acid in gram doses lowered plasma levels of cholesterol. From the point of view of treatment of the dyslipidaemias that are risk factors for clinical atherosclerosis nicotinic acid is a miracle drug. It lowers the levels of all atherogenic lipoproteins--VLDL and LDL with subclasses as well as Lp(a)--and in addition it raises more than any other drug the levels of the protective HDL lipoproteins. Trials have shown that treatment with nicotinic acid reduces progression of atherosclerosis, and clinical events and mortality from coronary heart disease. The new combination treatment with statin-lowering LDL and nicotinic acid-raising HDL is reviewed. A basic effect of nicotinic acid is the inhibition of fat-mobilizing lipolysis in adipose tissue leading to a lowering of plasma free fatty acids, which has many metabolic implications which are reviewed. The very recent discovery of a nicotinic acid receptor and the finding that the drug stimulates the expression of the ABCA 1 membrane cholesterol transporter have paved the way for exciting and promising new 50 years in the history of nicotinic acid.

  17. High fatty acid availability after exercise alters the regulation of muscle lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Newsom, Sean A; Schenk, Simon; Li, Minghua; Everett, Allison C; Horowitz, Jeffrey F

    2011-06-01

    We previously reported that a single exercise session protects against fatty acid (FA)-induced insulin resistance, perhaps in part through augmented intramyocellular triacylglycerol (IMTG) synthesis. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of elevated FA availability after exercise on factors regulating IMTG metabolism. After exercise (90 minutes, 65% peak oxygen uptake), 7 healthy women (body mass index, 23 ± 1 kg/m(2)) were infused overnight (16 hours) with either a lipid and heparin solution (LIPID, 0.11 g fat per kilogram per hour) or saline (SALINE). We measured resting FA oxidation (indirect calorimetry) and obtained a skeletal muscle biopsy sample the next morning. The 4-fold increase in overnight plasma FA concentration during LIPID increased IMTG by approximately 30% during LIPID vs SALINE. This was accompanied by an approximately 25% greater membrane-associated abundance of the FA transporter FAT/CD36 (P < .01) and an approximately 8% increase in the activity of the IMTG synthesis enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, P < .01). In contrast, resting FA oxidation was not affected. We also found no difference in the protein abundance of GPAT1 and diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1, diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity, or the abundance of the lipid droplet coat proteins (perilipins 2, 3, 4, and 5) between treatments. Our findings suggest that augmented capacity for FA flux into muscle (ie, via membrane-associated FAT/CD36), perhaps together with a slight yet significant increase in activity of a key IMTG synthesis enzyme (GPAT), may enhance IMTG storage when FA availability is high after exercise. The importance of the absence of a change in perilipin protein abundance despite increased muscle lipid storage remains to be determined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The incretin effect in cats: comparison between oral glucose, lipids, and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Gilor, C; Graves, T K; Gilor, S; Ridge, T K; Weng, H-Y; Dossin, O

    2011-05-01

    Incretin hormones are secreted from the intestines in response to specific nutrients. They potentiate insulin secretion and have other beneficial effects in glucose homeostasis. We aimed to study the incretin effect in cats and to compare the effect of oral glucose, lipids, or amino acids on serum concentrations of insulin, total glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and total glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Ten healthy cats were used in a repeated measures design. Glucose, lipid, or amino acids were administered through nasoesophageal tubes on separate days. Blood glucose (BG) concentrations were matched between experiments by measuring BG every 5 min and infusing glucose intravenously at a changing rate. Intravenous glucose infusion with no prior treatment served as control. The incretin effect was estimated as the difference in insulin area under the curve (AUC) after oral compared with intravenous glucose. Temporal changes and total amount of hormone secretions were compared between treatment groups with the use of mixed models. Total glucose infused (TGI) at a mean dose of 0.49 g/kg resulted in slightly higher BG compared with 1 g/kg oral glucose (P = 0.038), but insulin concentrations were not significantly different (P = 0.367). BG and the TGI were not significantly different after the 3 oral challenges. Total GIP AUC was larger after lipids compared with amino acids (P = 0.0012) but GIP concentrations did not increase after oral glucose. Insulin and GIP concentrations were positively correlated after lipid (P < 0.001) and amino acids (P < 0.001) stimulations, respectively, but not after oral glucose stimulation. Total GLP-1 AUC was similar after all three oral stimulations. Insulin and GLP-1 concentrations were positively correlated after glucose (P = 0.001), amino acids (P < 0.001), or lipids (P = 0.001) stimulations. Our data indirectly support an insulinotropic effect of GIP and GLP-1. Potentiation of insulin secretion after oral glucose is

  19. Longitudinal Metabolomic Profiling of Amino Acids and Lipids across Healthy Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Karen L.; Hellmuth, Christian; Uhl, Olaf; Buss, Claudia; Wadhwa, Pathik D.; Koletzko, Berthold; Entringer, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by a complexity of metabolic processes that may impact fetal development and ultimately, infant health outcomes. However, our understanding of whole body maternal and fetal metabolism during this critical life stage remains incomplete. The objective of this study is to utilize metabolomics to profile longitudinal patterns of fasting maternal metabolites among a cohort of non-diabetic, healthy pregnant women in order to advance our understanding of changes in protein and lipid concentrations across gestation, the biochemical pathways by which they are metabolized and to describe variation in maternal metabolites between ethnic groups. Among 160 pregnant women, amino acids, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, keto-bodies and non-esterified fatty acids were detected by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, while polar lipids were detected through flow-injected mass spectrometry. The maternal plasma concentration of several essential and non-essential amino acids, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, free carnitine, acetylcarnitine, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins significantly decreased across pregnancy. Concentrations of several TCA intermediates increase as pregnancy progresses, as well as the keto-body β-hydroxybutyrate. Ratios of specific acylcarnitines used as indicators of metabolic pathways suggest a decreased beta-oxidation rate and increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 enzyme activity with advancing gestation. Decreasing amino acid concentrations likely reflects placental uptake and tissue biosynthesis. The absence of any increase in plasma non-esterified fatty acids is unexpected in the catabolic phase of later pregnancy and may reflect enhanced placental fatty acid uptake and utilization for fetal tissue growth. While it appears that energy production through the TCA cycle increases as pregnancy progresses, decreasing patterns of free carnitine and acetylcarnitine as well as increased

  20. Lipid content and fatty acid composition of green algae Scenedesmus obliquus grown in a constant cell density apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, K. J.; Nakhost, Z.; Barzana, E.; Karel, M.

    1987-01-01

    The lipids of alga Scenedesmus obliquus grown under controlled conditions were separated and fractionated by column and thin-layer chromatography, and fatty acid composition of each lipid component was studied by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). Total lipids were 11.17%, and neutral lipid, glycolipid and phospholipid fractions were 7.24%, 2.45% and 1.48% on a dry weight basis, respectively. The major neutral lipids were diglycerides, triglycerides, free sterols, hydrocarbons and sterol esters. The glycolipids were: monogalactosyl diglyceride, digalactosyl diglyceride, esterified sterol glycoside, and sterol glycoside. The phospholipids included: phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl glycerol and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. Fourteen fatty acids were identified in the four lipid fractions by GLC. The main fatty acids were C18:2, C16:0, C18:3(alpha), C18:1, C16:3, C16:1, and C16:4. Total unsaturated fatty acid and essential fatty acid compositions of the total algal lipids were 80% and 38%, respectively.

  1. A moderate change in temperature induces changes in fatty acid composition of storage and membrane lipids in a soil arthropod.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Ellers, Jacintha

    2010-02-01

    A moderate change in ambient temperature can lead to vital physiological and biochemical adjustments in ectotherms, one of which is a change in fatty acid composition. When temperature decreases, the composition of membrane lipids (phospholipid fatty acids) is expected to become more unsaturated to be able to maintain homeoviscosity. Although different in function, storage lipids (triacylglycerol fatty acids) are expected to respond to temperature changes in a similar way. Age-specific differences, however, could influence this temperature response between different life stages. Here, we investigate if fatty acid composition of membrane and storage lipids responds similarly to temperature changes for two different life stages of Orchesella cincta. Juveniles and adults were cold acclimated (15 degrees C-->5 degrees C) for 28 days and then re-acclimated (5 degrees C-->15 degrees C) for another 28 days. We found adult membranes had a more unsaturated fatty acid composition than juveniles. Membrane lipids became more unsaturated during cold acclimation, and a reversed response occurred during warm acclimation. Membrane lipids, however, showed no warm acclimation, possibly due to the moderate temperature change. The ability to adjust storage lipid composition to moderate changes in ambient temperature may be an underestimated fitness component of temperature adaptation because fluidity of storage lipids permits accessibility of enzymes to energy reserves.

  2. Lipid content and fatty acid composition of green algae Scenedesmus obliquus grown in a constant cell density apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, K. J.; Nakhost, Z.; Barzana, E.; Karel, M.

    1987-01-01

    The lipids of alga Scenedesmus obliquus grown under controlled conditions were separated and fractionated by column and thin-layer chromatography, and fatty acid composition of each lipid component was studied by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). Total lipids were 11.17%, and neutral lipid, glycolipid and phospholipid fractions were 7.24%, 2.45% and 1.48% on a dry weight basis, respectively. The major neutral lipids were diglycerides, triglycerides, free sterols, hydrocarbons and sterol esters. The glycolipids were: monogalactosyl diglyceride, digalactosyl diglyceride, esterified sterol glycoside, and sterol glycoside. The phospholipids included: phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl glycerol and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. Fourteen fatty acids were identified in the four lipid fractions by GLC. The main fatty acids were C18:2, C16:0, C18:3(alpha), C18:1, C16:3, C16:1, and C16:4. Total unsaturated fatty acid and essential fatty acid compositions of the total algal lipids were 80% and 38%, respectively.

  3. Effect of Nerolidol and/or Levulinic Acid on the Thermotropic Behavior of Lipid Lamellar Structures in the Stratum Corneum.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Shunichi; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Obata, Yasuko; Ohta, Noboru; Takayama, Kozo

    2016-01-01

    Permeation enhancers are required to deliver drugs through the skin efficiently and maintain effective blood concentrations. Studies of the barrier function of the stratum corneum using l-menthol, a monocyclic monoterpene widely used in medicines and foods, have revealed an interaction between characteristic intercellular lipid structures in the stratum corneum and permeation enhancers. The variety of permeation enhancers that can be used to contribute to transdermal delivery systems beyond l-menthol is increasing. In this study, we focused on nerolidol and levulinic acid and investigated their influence on stratum corneum lipid structures. Nerolidol, a sesquiterpene, has been reported to enhance the permeation of various drugs. Levulinic acid is reported to enhance the permeability of buprenorphine and is used as a component of the buprenorphine(®) patch. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform IR spectroscopy measurements revealed that nerolidol disturbs the rigidly arranged lipid structure and increases lipid fluidity. Levulinic acid had a smaller effect on stratum corneum lipid structures, but did increase lipid fluidity when co-administered with nerolidol or heat. We found that nerolidol has an effect on stratum corneum lipids similar to that of l-menthol, and levulinic acid had an effect similar to that of oleic acid.

  4. Short term exposure to perluoroalkyl acids causes increase of hepatic lipid and triglyceride in conjunction with liver hypertrophy

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Persistent presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the environment is due to extensive use of industrial and consumer products. These chemicals activate peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor-alpha (PPARa) in liver and after lipid metabolism. The current stu...

  5. A Central Role for Triacylglycerol in Membrane Lipid Breakdown, Fatty Acid β -Oxidation, and Plant Survival under Extended Darkness

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Jilian; Yu, Linhui; Xu, Changcheng

    2017-06-01

    Triacylglycerol is a key intermediate in membrane lipid breakdown and fatty acid β-oxidation, and blocking triacylglycerol hydrolysis reduces oxidative stress and enhances plant survival under extended darkness.

  6. Australian Acid Brine Lake as a Mars Analog: An Analysis of Preserved Lipids in Shore and Lake Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, H. V.; Stern, J. C.; Baldridge, A. M.; Thomsen, B. J.

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates organic molecules preserved in sediment cores from an acid brine lake. We explore the distribution and stable isotopic composition of lipids in order to understand preservation potential in similar martian environments.

  7. Short term exposure to perluoroalkyl acids causes increase of hepatic lipid and triglyceride in conjunction with liver hypertrophy

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Persistent presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the environment is due to extensive use of industrial and consumer products. These chemicals activate peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor-alpha (PPARa) in liver and after lipid metabolism. The current stu...

  8. Chlorogenic acid stabilized nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) of atorvastatin: formulation, design and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saba; Baboota, Sanjula; Ali, Javed; Narang, R S; Narang, Jasjeet K

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at developing an optimized oral nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) formulation of poorly soluble atorvastatin Ca (AT Ca) and assessing its in vitro release, oral bioavailability and pharmacodynamic activity. In this study, chlorogenic acid, a novel excipient having synergistic cholesterol lowering activity was utilized and explored in NLC formulation development. The drug-loaded NLC formulations were prepared using a high pressure homogenization technique and optimized by the Box-Behnken statistical design using the Design-Expert software. The optimized NLC formulation was composed of oleic acid and stearic acid as lipid phase (0.9% w/v), poloxamer 188 as surfactant (1% w/v) and chlorogenic acid (0.05% w/v). The mean particle size, polydispersity index (PDI) and % drug entrapment efficiency of optimized NLC were 203.56 ± 8.57 nm, 0.27 ± 0.028 and 83.66 ± 5.69, respectively. In vitro release studies showed that the release of drug from optimized NLC formulations were markedly enhanced as compared to solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and drug suspension. The plasma concentration time profile of AT Ca in rats showed 3.08- and 4.89-fold increase in relative bioavailability of developed NLC with respect to marketed preparation (ATORVA® tablet) and drug suspension, respectively. Pharmacodynamic study suggested highly significant (**p < 0.01) reduction in the cholesterol and triglyceride values by NLC in comparison with ATORVA® tablet. Therefore, the results of in vivo studies demonstrated promising prospects for successful oral delivery of AT Ca by means of its chlorogenic acid integrated NLC.

  9. Succinic acid monoethyl ester, a novel insulinotropic agent: effect on lipid composition and lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin-nicotin-amide induced type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Ramalingam; Pari, Leelavinothan

    2007-02-01

    Succinic acid monoethyl ester (EMS) is recently proposed as an insulinotropic agent for the treatment of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress has been suggested to be a contributory factor in the development and complications of diabetes. In the present study the effect of EMS and Metformin on plasma glucose, insulin, serum and tissue lipid profile, lipoproteins and lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin-nicotinamide induced type 2 diabetic model was investigated. The carboxylic nutrient EMS was administered intraperitonially (8 micromol/g body weight) to streptozotocin diabetic rats for 30 days. The levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and hydroperoxides in liver and kidney and serum and tissue lipids [cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids and free fatty acids] and very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), were significantly increased in diabetic rats, whereas the levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and antiatherogenic index (AAI) (ratio of HDL to total cholesterol) were significantly decreased. The effect of EMS was compared with metformin, a reference drug. Treatment with EMS and metformin resulted in a significant reduction of plasma glucose with increase plasma insulin in diabetic rats. EMS also resulted in a significant decrease in serum and tissue lipids and lipid peroxidation products. These biochemical observations were supplemented by histopathological examination of liver and kidney section. Our results suggest the possible antihyperlipidemic and antiperoxidative effect of EMS apart from its antidiabetic effect.

  10. Ferulic acid improves lipid and glucose homeostasis in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Naowaboot, Jarinyaporn; Piyabhan, Pritsana; Munkong, Narongsuk; Parklak, Wason; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan

    2016-02-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is a plant phenolic acid that has several pharmacological effects including antihyperglycaemic activity. Thus, the objective of this study is to investigate the effect of FA on glucose and lipid metabolism in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice were fed a HFD (45 kcal% fat) for 16 weeks. At the ninth week of induction, the obese mice were orally administered with daily FA doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg for the next eight weeks. The results show that FA significantly reduced the elevated blood glucose and serum leptin levels, lowered the insulin resistance, and increased the serum adiponectin level. Moreover, serum lipid level, and liver cholesterol and triglyceride accumulations were also reduced. The histological examination showed clear evidence of a decrease in the lipid droplets in liver tissues and smaller size of fat cells in the adipose tissue in the obese mice treated with FA. Interestingly, FA reduced the expression of hepatic lipogenic genes such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). It could also up-regulate hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) gene and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) proteins. The FA treatment was also found to suppress the protein expressions of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). In conclusion, the findings of this study demonstrate that FA improves the glucose and lipid homeostasis in HFD-induced obese mice probably via modulating the expression of lipogenic and gluconeogenic genes in liver tissues.

  11. Effect of acidic phospholipids on apolipoprotein binding by artificial lipid particles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tong, M F; Kuksis, A

    1986-08-01

    Soybean triacylglycerol particles stabilized with soybean phosphatidylinositol (PI), bovine brain phosphatidylserine (PS), egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (PC) or mixtures of these acidic and neutral phospholipids were prepared with diameters ranging from 250 to 520 nm. Binding of apoproteins to the lipid particles was studied using the strategy of Connelly and Kuksis. The recoveries of the injected particles, which had undergone minimal changes in lipid composition, ranged rom 57% for the PC-stabilized emulsions to 21% for the emulsions stabilized with PS and 8% for the emulsions stabilized with PI. The apoprotein (apo) composition of the recovered particles showed characteristic qualitative and quantitative differences. The particles stabilized with PI and PS or PI-phosphatidylethanolamine contained an unknown protein of molecular weight 117,000 (43-48%) and albumin (9-13%) as major components. The apoC-II, apoC-III, apoA-I, apoE, and apoA-IV were present as minor components in ratios that were the reverse of those seen for the PC-stabilized particles, which contained these proteins as major components. The relative strength of the binding of the proteins, which was determined by washing the particles with saline under standard conditions, also showed variations among the different particles and different apoproteins. The lipid particles stabilized with the acidic phospholipids had less total apoprotein and held it less tightly than the particles stabilized with PC. It is concluded that the binding of apoproteins by lipid particles stabilized with acidic phospholipids involves hydrophobic and ionic interactions, both of which may be physiologically important.

  12. Effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid connecting phospholipids on the lipid peroxidation of the brain in mice.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Seiichi; Ishihara, Kenji; Kitagawa, Tomoko; Wada, Shun; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2008-12-01

    The effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) with two lipid types on lipid peroxidation of the brain was investigated in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Each group of female Balb/c mice was fed a diet containing DHA-connecting phospholipids (DHA-PL) or DHA-connecting triacylglycerols (DHA-TG) for 5 wk. Safflower oil was fed as the control. The lipid peroxide level of the brain was significantly lower in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet when compared to those fed the DHA-TG and safflower oil diets, while the alpha-tocopherol level was significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the DHA-TG and safflower oil diets. The DHA level of phosphatidylethanolamine in the brain was significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the safflower oil diet. The dimethylacetal levels were significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the safflower oil and DHA-TG diets. These results suggest that the dietary DHA-connecting phospholipids have an antioxidant activity on the brain lipids in mice, and the effect may be related to the brain plasmalogen.

  13. Variation in Fatty Acid Distribution of Different Acyl Lipids in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Brans

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Tanigawa, Takaaki; Kuriyama, Isoko; Yoshida, Naoko; Tomiyama, Yuka; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    The lipids extracted from rice brans were classified by thin-layer chromatography into eight fractions, and their fatty acid (FA) compositions were investigated among five different Japanese cultivars. The lipids of these rice brans comprised mainly triacylglycerols (TAG; 84.9-86.0 wt%), free FA (4.2-4.6 wt%), and phospholipids (PL; 6.5-6.7 wt%), whilst other components were also detected in minor proportions (0.2-2.1 wt%). The PL components included phosphatidyl choline (43.3-46.8 wt%) phosphatidyl ethanolamine (25.0-27.3 wt%) and phosphatidyl inositol (20.2-23.2 wt%). Comparison of the different cultivars showed, with a few exceptions, no substantial difference (P > 0.05) in FA distribution. FA distribution of TAG among the five cultivars was characterized as: unsaturated FA predominantly concentrated at the sn-2 position and saturated FA primarily occupying the sn-1 or sn-3 position in these lipids. These results suggest that the rice bran lipids may be well incorporated into our daily diet to improve nutritional value of the Japanese diet. PMID:22254108

  14. Niaspan, the prolonged release preparation of nicotinic acid (niacin), the broad-spectrum lipid drug.

    PubMed

    Carlson, L A

    2004-07-01

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) is the broad-spectrum lipid drug, which lowers the concentration of all atherogenic plasma lipids/lipoproteins and at the same time raises the levels of the protective HDL (high-density lipoprotein). Niaspan is a prolonged release (PR) formulation of niacin, which has considerable advantages over both immediate release (IR) and slow release (SR) formulations of this drug. The major early side effect of IR niacin, the flush, is reduced with Niaspan. The hepatotoxic effects with SR niacin are not present with Niaspan. It is suitable for once daily prescription at bedtime. Niaspan is effective as monotherapy and in combination with other lipid-lowering drugs such as statins and fibrates. It is particularly useful for treatment of the dyslipidaemia of type 2 diabetes, where IR but not PR niacin may deteriorate the diabetic condition. Overall, niacin, now available as the well-tolerable drug formulation Niaspan, is the unique broad-spectrum lipid drug for the prevention and treatment of clinical atherosclerosis.

  15. A central role for phosphatidic acid as a lipid mediator of regulated exocytosis in apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Bullen, Hayley E; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    Lipids are commonly known for the structural roles they play, however, the specific contribution of different lipid classes to wide-ranging signalling pathways is progressively being unravelled. Signalling lipids and their associated effector proteins are emerging as significant contributors to a vast array of effector functions within cells, including essential processes such as membrane fusion and vesicle exocytosis. Many phospholipids have signalling capacity, however, this review will focus on phosphatidic acid (PA) and the enzymes implicated in its production from diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidylcholine (PC): DGK and PLD respectively. PA is a negatively charged, cone-shaped lipid identified as a key mediator in specific membrane fusion and vesicle exocytosis events in a variety of mammalian cells, and has recently been implicated in specialised secretory organelle exocytosis in apicomplexan parasites. This review summarises the recent work implicating a role for PA regulation in exocytosis in various cell types. We will discuss how these signalling events are linked to pathogenesis in the phylum Apicomplexa. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Monthly changes of glycogen, lipid and free amino acid of oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhicui, Zhang; Changhu, Xue; Xin, Gao; Zhaojie, Li; Qi, Wang

    2006-07-01

    Monthly difference of the chemical composition of oyster cultured along the eastern coast of Shandong Province was analyzed. The components analyzed included glycogen, fatty acid and free amino acid (FAA). The content of glycogen was high in January and March (2.89 and 2.82 g(100g)-1 on average, respectively) and low in October (2.07 g(100g)-1 on avarage). The low content of neutral lipids in October reflected a relatively poor nutritional value of oyster (1.42 g(100 g)-1 on average). The main fatty acids of oyster were palmitic acid (16:0), oleic acid (18:1), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20: 5ω-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6ω-3). The major FAAs of oyster were Taurine, Glutamicacid, Glycin, Alanine, Arginine and Proline. Taurine was the most abundant FAA with its content ranging from 603 mg (100g)-1 to 1139 mg(100g)-1. The high contents of glycogen, polyunsaturated fatty acid and FAA showed that oyster cultured along the eastern coast of Shandong Province was nutritionally good in January and March.

  17. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  18. Polar lipid fatty acids, LPS-hydroxy fatty acids, and respiratory quinones of three Geobacter strains, and variation with electron acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron; Lovley, Derek; Woodard, Trevor L.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Long, Philip E.; White, David C.

    2009-02-01

    The polar lipid fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide hydroxy-fatty acids, and respiratory quinones of Geobacter metallireducens str. GS-15, Geobacter sulfurreducens str. PCA, and Geobacter bemidjiensis str. Bem are reported. Also, the lipids of G. metallireducens were compared when grown with Fe3+ or nitrate as electron acceptors and G. sulfurreducens with Fe3+ or fumarate. In all experiments, the most abundant polar lipid fatty acids were 14:0, i15:0, 16:1*7c, 16:1*5c, and 16:0; lipopolysaccharide hydroxyfatty acids were dominated by 3oh16:0, 3oh14:0, 9oh16:0, and 10oh16:0; and menaquinone-8 was the most abundant respiratory quinone. Some variation in lipid proWles with strain were observed, but not with electron acceptor.

  19. Fatty acid rich effluent from acidogenic biohydrogen reactor as substrate for lipid accumulation in heterotrophic microalgae with simultaneous treatment.

    PubMed

    Venkata Mohan, S; Prathima Devi, M

    2012-11-01

    Acid-rich effluent generated from acidogenic biohydrogen production process was evaluated as substrate for lipid synthesis by integrating with heterotrophic cultivation of mixed microalgae. Experiments were performed both with synthetic volatile fatty acids (SVFA) and fermented fatty acids (FFA) from biohydrogen producing reactor. Fatty acid based platform evidenced significant influence on algal growth as well as lipid accumulation by the formation of triglycerides through fatty acid synthesis. Comparatively FFA documented higher biomass and lipid productivity (1.42mg/ml (wet weight); 26.4%) than SVFAs ((HAc+HBu+HPr), 0.60mg/ml; 23.1%). Lipid profiles varied with substrates and depicted 18 types of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with wide fuel and food characteristics. The observed higher concentrations of Chl b over Chl a supports the biosynthesis of triacylglycerides. Microalgae diversity visualized the presence of lipid accumulating species viz., Scenedesmus sp. and Chlorella sp. Integration of microalgae cultivation with biohydrogen production showed lipid productivity for biodiesel production along with additional treatment.

  20. The environmental light influences the circulatory levels of retinoic acid and associates with hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wenqiang; Li, Chunying; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Shiming; Dong, Wei; Jiang, Pengjiu; Zhang, Jianfa

    2008-12-01

    Environmental light is involved in the regulation of photochemical reaction in mouse retina. It remains unclear whether light-mediated increase in all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) synthesis in retina will result in altering the circulatory levels of ATRA and regulating downstream gene expression and physiological function. Here we showed circulatory levels of ATRA decreased in mice under constant darkness and elevated by light exposure. Fat gene pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (mPlrp2) and its partner procolipase (mClps), but not hepatic lipase (mHl), activated in livers for responding to lack of light illuminating. Light-triggered alterations in circulatory ATRA levels regulated ecto-5'-nucleotidase gene expression by retinoic acid receptor retinoic acid receptor-alpha and modulated 5'-AMP levels in blood and were associated with mPlrp2 and mClps expression in the livers. Mice deficient in adenosine receptors displayed mPlrp2 and mClps expression in livers under 12-h light, 12-h dark cycles. Caffeine blocked adenosine receptors and induced hepatic mPlrp2 and mClps expression in wild-type mice. Mice activated in hepatic mPlrp2 and mClps expression lowered hepatic and serum lipid levels and markedly elevated circulatory levels of all-trans retinol. Our results suggest environmental light influence hepatic lipid homeostasis by light-modulated retinoic acid signaling associated with mPlrp2 and mClps gene expression in livers.

  1. Localization of cholesterol and fatty acid in a model lipid membrane: a neutron diffraction approach.

    PubMed

    Mojumdar, E H; Groen, D; Gooris, G S; Barlow, D J; Lawrence, M J; Deme, B; Bouwstra, J A

    2013-08-20

    The intercellular lipid matrix of the skin's stratum corneum serves to protect the body against desiccation and simultaneously limits the passage of drugs and other xenobiotics into the body. The matrix is made up of ceramides, free fatty acids, and cholesterol, which are organized as two coexisting crystalline lamellar phases. In studies reported here, we sought to use the technique of neutron diffraction, together with the device of isotopic (H/D) substitution, to determine the molecular architecture of the lamellar phase having a repeat distance of 53.9 ± 0.3 Å. Using hydrogenous samples as well as samples incorporating perdeuterated (C24:0) fatty acids and selectively deuterated cholesterol, the diffraction data obtained were used to construct neutron scattering length density profiles. By this means, the locations within the unit cell were determined for the cholesterol and fatty acids. The cholesterol headgroup was found to lie slightly inward from the unit cell boundary and the tail of the molecule located 6.2 ± 0.2 Å from the unit cell center. The fatty acid headgroups were located at the unit cell boundary with their acyl chains straddling the unit cell center. Based on these results, a molecular model is proposed for the arrangement of the lipids within the unit cell.

  2. Solid lipid nanoparticles as nucleic acid delivery system: properties and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Marcelo B; Zuhorn, Inge S

    2015-03-10

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have been proposed in the 1990s as appropriate drug delivery systems, and ever since they have been applied in a wide variety of cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications. In addition, SLNs are considered suitable alternatives as carriers in gene delivery. Although important advances have been made in this particular field, fundamental knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of SLN-mediated gene delivery is conspicuously lacking, an imperative requirement in efforts aimed at further improving their efficiency. Here, we address recent advances in the use of SLNs as platform for delivery of nucleic acids as therapeutic agents. In addition, we will discuss available technology for conveniently producing SLNs. In particular, we will focus on underlying molecular mechanisms by which SLNs and nucleic acids assemble into complexes and how the nucleic acid cargo may be released intracellularly. In discussing underlying mechanisms, we will, when appropriate, refer to analogous studies carried out with systems based on cationic lipids and polymers, that have proven useful in the assessment of structure-function relationships. Finally, we will give suggestions for improving SLN-based gene delivery systems, by pointing to alternative methods for SLNplex assembly, focusing on the realization of a sustained nucleic acid release.

  3. Dietary Fatty Acids and Changes in Blood Lipids during Adolescence: The Role of Substituting Nutrient Intakes.

    PubMed

    Harris, Carla; Buyken, Anette; Koletzko, Sibylle; von Berg, Andrea; Berdel, Dietrich; Schikowski, Tamara; Koletzko, Berthold; Heinrich, Joachim; Standl, Marie

    2017-02-11

    The relevance of dietary fatty acids (FA) for blood lipids should be assessed in the context of substituting nutrients. Such evidence is lacking for adolescents. This study describes prospective associations of dietary FA with changes in serum lipids during adolescence, and considers the theoretical isocaloric replacements of saturated FA (SFA) with other FA or carbohydrates (CHO). Children from the GINIplus and LISAplus birth cohorts, with data on FA intakes (at age 10 years) and serum lipids (at age 10 and 15 years), were included (n = 1398). Associations of SFA, monounsaturated FA (MUFA), n-3 polyunsaturated FA (n-3 PUFA) and n-6 PUFA, with changes in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TAG), and total cholesterol to HDL ratio (TOTAL:HDL), were assessed by linear regression. Substitution models assessed isocaloric replacements of SFA with MUFA, n-3 PUFA, n-6 PUFA or CHO. Higher SFA intakes were associated with decreasing TAG. No associations were observed for fatty acid intakes with LDL, HDL or TOTAL:HDL. In females, replacing SFA with CHO was associated with increasing LDL, TAG and TOTAL:HDL. Our findings confirm observations in adults, although sex-specific determinants seem relevant in our adolescent population. Overlooking the nutrient context when limiting SFA intakes might have detrimental consequences appreciable as early as adolescence.

  4. Dietary Fatty Acids and Changes in Blood Lipids during Adolescence: The Role of Substituting Nutrient Intakes

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Carla; Buyken, Anette; Koletzko, Sibylle; von Berg, Andrea; Berdel, Dietrich; Schikowski, Tamara; Koletzko, Berthold; Heinrich, Joachim; Standl, Marie

    2017-01-01

    The relevance of dietary fatty acids (FA) for blood lipids should be assessed in the context of substituting nutrients. Such evidence is lacking for adolescents. This study describes prospective associations of dietary FA with changes in serum lipids during adolescence, and considers the theoretical isocaloric replacements of saturated FA (SFA) with other FA or carbohydrates (CHO). Children from the GINIplus and LISAplus birth cohorts, with data on FA intakes (at age 10 years) and serum lipids (at age 10 and 15 years), were included (n = 1398). Associations of SFA, monounsaturated FA (MUFA), n-3 polyunsaturated FA (n-3 PUFA) and n-6 PUFA, with changes in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TAG), and total cholesterol to HDL ratio (TOTAL:HDL), were assessed by linear regression. Substitution models assessed isocaloric replacements of SFA with MUFA, n-3 PUFA, n-6 PUFA or CHO. Higher SFA intakes were associated with decreasing TAG. No associations were observed for fatty acid intakes with LDL, HDL or TOTAL:HDL. In females, replacing SFA with CHO was associated with increasing LDL, TAG and TOTAL:HDL. Our findings confirm observations in adults, although sex-specific determinants seem relevant in our adolescent population. Overlooking the nutrient context when limiting SFA intakes might have detrimental consequences appreciable as early as adolescence. PMID:28208667

  5. Roles of Fatty Acid Oversupply and Impaired Oxidation in Lipid Accumulation in Tissues of Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Nicholas D.; Kjellstedt, Ann; Thalén, Pia; Ljung, Bengt; Turner, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    To test the roles of lipid oversupply versus oxidation in causing tissue lipid accumulation associated with insulin resistance/obesity, we studied in vivo fatty acid (FA) metabolism in obese (Obese) and lean (Lean) Zucker rats. Indices of local FA utilization and storage were calculated using the partially metabolizable [9,10-3H]-(R)-2-bromopalmitate (3H-R-BrP) and [U-14C]-palmitate (14C-P) FA tracers, respectively. Whole-body FA appearance (R a) was estimated from plasma 14C-P kinetics. Whole-body FA oxidation rate (R ox) was assessed using 3H2O production from 3H-palmitate infusion, and tissue FA oxidative capacity was evaluated ex vivo. In the basal fasting state Obese had markedly elevated FA levels and R a, associated with elevated FA utilization and storage in most tissues. Estimated rates of muscle FA oxidation were not lower in obese rats and were similarly enhanced by contraction in both lean and obese groups. At comparable levels of FA availability, achieved by nicotinic acid, R ox was lower in Obese than Lean. In Obese rats, FA oxidative capacity was 35% higher than that in Lean in skeletal muscle, 67% lower in brown fat and comparable in other organs. In conclusion, lipid accumulation in non-adipose tissues of obese Zucker rats appears to result largely from systemic FA oversupply. PMID:23762564

  6. Roles of Fatty Acid oversupply and impaired oxidation in lipid accumulation in tissues of obese rats.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Nicholas D; Kjellstedt, Ann; Thalén, Pia; Ljung, Bengt; Turner, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    To test the roles of lipid oversupply versus oxidation in causing tissue lipid accumulation associated with insulin resistance/obesity, we studied in vivo fatty acid (FA) metabolism in obese (Obese) and lean (Lean) Zucker rats. Indices of local FA utilization and storage were calculated using the partially metabolizable [9,10-(3)H]-(R)-2-bromopalmitate ((3)H-R-BrP) and [U-(14)C]-palmitate ((14)C-P) FA tracers, respectively. Whole-body FA appearance (R a ) was estimated from plasma (14)C-P kinetics. Whole-body FA oxidation rate (R ox) was assessed using (3)H2O production from (3)H-palmitate infusion, and tissue FA oxidative capacity was evaluated ex vivo. In the basal fasting state Obese had markedly elevated FA levels and R a , associated with elevated FA utilization and storage in most tissues. Estimated rates of muscle FA oxidation were not lower in obese rats and were similarly enhanced by contraction in both lean and obese groups. At comparable levels of FA availability, achieved by nicotinic acid, R ox was lower in Obese than Lean. In Obese rats, FA oxidative capacity was 35% higher than that in Lean in skeletal muscle, 67% lower in brown fat and comparable in other organs. In conclusion, lipid accumulation in non-adipose tissues of obese Zucker rats appears to result largely from systemic FA oversupply.

  7. Nitrooleic Acid Attenuates Lipid Metabolic Disorders and Liver Steatosis in DOCA-Salt Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Jia, Zhanjun; Yang, Tianxin; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Bing; Yu, Kezhou; Wang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Nitrooleic acid (OA-NO2) is endogenous ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. The present study was aimed at investigating the beneficial effects of OA-NO2 on the lipid metabolism and liver steatosis in deoxycorticosterone acetate- (DOCA-) salt induced hypertensive mice model. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided to receive DOCA-salt plus OA-NO2 or DOCA-salt plus vehicle and another group received neither DOCA-salt nor OA-NO2 (control group). After 3-week treatment with DOCA-salt plus 1% sodium chloride in drinking fluid, the hypertension was noted; however, OA-NO2 had no effect on the hypertension. In DOCA-salt treated mice, the plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were significantly increased compared to control mice, and pretreatment with OA-NO2 significantly reduced these parameters. Further, the histopathology of liver exhibited more lipid distribution together with more serious micro- and macrovesicular steatosis after DOCA-salt treatment and that was consistent with liver tissue triglyceride and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) content. The mice pretreated with OA-NO2 showed reduced liver damage accompanied with low liver lipid content. Moreover, the liver TBARS, together with the expressions of gp91phox and p47phox, were parallelly decreased. These findings indicated that OA-NO2 had the protective effect on liver injury against DOCA-salt administration and the beneficial effect could be attributed to its antihyperlipidemic activities. PMID:25861250

  8. Ethanol and fatty acids impair lipid homeostasis in an in vitro model of hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Vecchione, Giulia; Grasselli, Elena; Compalati, Andrea D; Ragazzoni, Milena; Cortese, Katia; Gallo, Gabriella; Voci, Adriana; Vergani, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Excess ethanol consumption and fatty acid intake lead to a cumulative effect on liver steatosis through still unclear mechanisms. This study aimed to characterize the lipid homoeostasis alterations under the exposure of hepatocytes to ethanol alone or combined with fatty acids. FaO hepatoma cells were incubated in the absence (C) or in the presence of 100 mM ethanol (EtOH) or 0.35 mM oleate/palmitate (FFA) alone or in the combination (FFA/EtOH). Content of intra- and extra-cellular triglycerides (TAGs) and of lipid droplets (LDs), expression of lipogenic and lipolytic genes, and oxidative stress-related parameters were evaluated. Exposure to either FFAs or EtOH given separately led to steatosis which was augmented when they were combined. Our results show that FFA/EtOH: (i) increased the LD number, but reduced their size compared to separate treatments; (ii) up-regulated PPARγ and SREBP-1c and down-regulated sirtuin-1 (SIRT1); (iii) impaired FFA oxidation; (iv) did not change lipid secretion and oxidative stress. Our findings indicate that one of the major mechanisms of the metabolic interference between ethanol and fat excess is the impairment of FFA oxidation, in addition to lipogenic pathway stimulation. Interestingly, ethanol combined with FFAs led to a shift from macrovesicular to microvesicular steatosis that represents a more dangerous condition.

  9. Nitrooleic Acid Attenuates Lipid Metabolic Disorders and Liver Steatosis in DOCA-Salt Hypertensive Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiping; Sun, Jing; Jia, Zhanjun; Yang, Tianxin; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Bing; Yu, Kezhou; Wang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Nitrooleic acid (OA-NO2) is endogenous ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. The present study was aimed at investigating the beneficial effects of OA-NO2 on the lipid metabolism and liver steatosis in deoxycorticosterone acetate- (DOCA-) salt induced hypertensive mice model. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided to receive DOCA-salt plus OA-NO2 or DOCA-salt plus vehicle and another group received neither DOCA-salt nor OA-NO2 (control group). After 3-week treatment with DOCA-salt plus 1% sodium chloride in drinking fluid, the hypertension was noted; however, OA-NO2 had no effect on the hypertension. In DOCA-salt treated mice, the plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were significantly increased compared to control mice, and pretreatment with OA-NO2 significantly reduced these parameters. Further, the histopathology of liver exhibited more lipid distribution together with more serious micro- and macrovesicular steatosis after DOCA-salt treatment and that was consistent with liver tissue triglyceride and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) content. The mice pretreated with OA-NO2 showed reduced liver damage accompanied with low liver lipid content. Moreover, the liver TBARS, together with the expressions of gp91phox and p47phox, were parallelly decreased. These findings indicated that OA-NO2 had the protective effect on liver injury against DOCA-salt administration and the beneficial effect could be attributed to its antihyperlipidemic activities.

  10. Perfluoroalkyl acids-induced liver steatosis: Effects on genes controlling lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Das, Kaberi P; Wood, Carmen R; Lin, Mimi T; Starkov, Anatoly A; Lau, Christopher; Wallace, Kendall B; Corton, J Christopher; Abbott, Barbara D

    2017-03-01

    Persistent presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the environment is due to their extensive use in industrial and consumer products, and their slow decay. Biochemical tests in rodent demonstrated that these chemicals are potent modifiers of lipid metabolism and cause hepatocellular steatosis. However, the molecular mechanism of PFAAs interference with lipid metabolism remains to be elucidated. Currently, two major hypotheses are that PFAAs interfere with mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids and/or they affect the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in liver. To determine the ability of structurally-diverse PFAAs to cause steatosis, as well as to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, wild-type (WT) and PPARα-null mice were treated with perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), or perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), by oral gavage for 7days, and their effects were compared to that of PPARα agonist WY-14643 (WY), which does not cause steatosis. Increases in liver weight and cell size, and decreases in DNA content per mg of liver, were observed for all compounds in WT mice, and were also seen in PPARα-null mice for PFOA, PFNA, and PFHxS, but not for WY. In Oil Red O stained sections, WT liver showed increased lipid accumulation in all treatment groups, whereas in PPARα-null livers, accumulation was observed after PFNA and PFHxS treatment, adding to the burden of steatosis observed in control (untreated) PPARα-null mice. Liver triglyceride (TG) levels were elevated in WT mice by all PFAAs and in PPARα-null mice only by PFNA. In vitro β-oxidation of palmitoyl carnitine by isolated rat liver mitochondria was not inhibited by any of the 7 PFAAs tested. Likewise, neither PFOA nor PFOS inhibited palmitate oxidation by HepG2/C3A human liver cell cultures. Microarray analysis of livers from PFAAs-treated mice indicated that the PFAAs induce the expression of the lipid catabolism

  11. Reaction conditions affecting the relationship between thiobarbituric acid reactivity and lipid peroxides in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Lapenna, D; Ciofani, G; Pierdomenico, S D; Giamberardino, M A; Cuccurullo, F

    2001-08-01

    The thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reactivity of human plasma was studied to evaluate its adequacy in quantifying lipid peroxidation as an index of systemic oxidative stress. Two spectrophotometric TBA tests based on the use of either phosphoric acid (pH 2.0, method A) or trichloroacetic plus hydrochloric acid (pH 0.9, method B) were employed with and without sodium sulfate (SS) to inhibit sialic acid (SA) reactivity with TBA. To correct for background absorption, the absorbance values at 572 nm were subtracted from those at 532 nm, which represent the absorption maximum of the TBA:MDA adduct. Method B gave values of TBA-reactive substances (TBARS) 2-fold higher than those detected with method A. SS lowered TBARS by about 50% with both methods, indicating a significant involvement of SA in plasma TBA reactivity. Standard SA, at a physiologically relevant concentration of 1.5 mM, reacted with TBA, creating interference problems, which were substantially eliminated by SS plus correction for background absorbance. When method B was carried out in the lipid and protein fraction of plasma, SS inhibited by 65% TBARS formation only in the latter. Protein TBARS may be largely ascribed to SA-containing glycoproteins and, to a minor extent, protein-bound MDA. Indeed, EDTA did not affect protein TBARS assessed in the presence of SS. TBA reactivity of whole plasma and of its lipid fraction was instead inhibited by EDTA, suggesting that lipoperoxides (and possibly monofunctional lipoperoxidation aldehydes) are involved as MDA precursors in the TBA test. Pretreatment of plasma with KI, a specific reductant of hydroperoxides, decreased TBARS by about 27%. Moreover, aspirin administration to humans to inhibit prostaglandin endoperoxide generation reduced plasma TBARS by 40%. In conclusion, reaction conditions affect the relationship between TBA reactivity and lipid peroxidation in human plasma. After correction for the interfering effects of SA in the TBA test, 40% of plasma TBARS

  12. Responses in growth, lipid accumulation, and fatty acid composition of four oleaginous microalgae to different nitrogen sources and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Wan, Linglin; Li, Aifen; Zhang, Chengwu

    2013-11-01

    Nitrogen deficiency is an effective strategy for enhancing lipid production in microalgae. Close relationships exist among lipid production, microalgal species, and nitrogen sources. We report growth, lipid accumulation, and fatty acid composition in four microalgae ( Chlorococcum ellipsoideum UTEX972, Chlorococcum nivale LB2225, Chlorococcum tatrense UTEX2227, and Scenedesmus deserticola JNU19) under nitrate- and urea-nitrogen deficiencies. We found three patterns of response to nitrogen deficiency: Type-A (decrease in biomass and increase in lipid content), Type-B (reduction in both biomass and lipid content), and Type-C (enhancement of both biomass and lipid content). Type-C microalgae are potential candidates for large-scale oil production. Chlorococcum ellipsoideum, for example, exhibited a neutral lipid production of up to 239.6 mg/(L·d) under urea-nitrogen deficiency. In addition, nitrogen deficiency showed only a slight influence on lipid fractions and fatty acid composition. Our study provides useful information for further screening hyper-lipid microalgal strains for biofuel production.

  13. Differential molecular regulation of bile acid homeostasis by soy lipid induced phytosterolemia and fish oil lipid emulsions in TPN-fed preterm pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prolonged total parenteral nutrition (PN) may lead to cholestasis and liver disease (PNALD). The soybean oil-based lipid emulsion (Intralipid) and its constituent phytosterols have been implicated in PNALD. Phytosterols may induce cholestasis by antagonism of the nuclear bile-acid receptor, FXR, lea...

  14. Effect of lipid supplementation on milk odd- and branched-chain fatty acids in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Baumann, E; Chouinard, P Y; Lebeuf, Y; Rico, D E; Gervais, R

    2016-08-01

    Eight ruminally fistulated, multiparous Holstein cows were arranged in a double 4×4 Latin square with 14-d periods to investigate the effects of lipid supplementation on performance, rumen parameters, the milk odd- and branched-chain fatty acid (OBCFA) profile, and the relationships between milk OBCFA and rumen parameters. Lipid supplementation is known to inhibit microbial growth in the rumen, decrease de novo microbial fatty acid synthesis, and increase the uptake of circulating fatty acids by the mammary gland; treatments were selected to isolate these effects on the milk OBCFA profile. The 4 treatments were (1) a lipid-free emulsion medium infused in the rumen (CTL), (2) soybean oil as a source of polyunsaturated fatty acids infused in the rumen (RSO), (3) saturated fatty acids (38% 16:0, 40% 18:0) infused in the rumen (RSF), and (4) saturated fatty acids infused in the abomasum (ASF). Fat supplements were provided continuously as emulsions at a rate of 450g/d. Preplanned contrasts compared CTL to RSO, RSO to RSF, and RSF to ASF. Infusing RSO slightly decreased ruminal pH, but did not affect volatile fatty acids profile and milk fat concentration as compared with CTL. The yields of energy-corrected milk, fat, and protein were greater with RSF compared with RSO. The concentration of odd-chain fatty acids was decreased by RSO, whereas even-chain iso fatty acids were not affected. Milk fat concentration of 17:0 + cis-9 17:1 was higher for RSF than for RSO, due to the saturated fatty acids supplement containing 2% 17:0 + cis-9 17:1. Limited differences were observed in the milk OBCFA profile between RSF and ASF. A multiple regression analysis yielded the following equation for predicting rumen pH based on milk fatty acids: pH=6.24 - (0.56×4:0) + (1.67 × iso 14:0) + (4.22 × iso 15:0) + (9.41×22:0). Rumen propionate concentration was negatively correlated with milk fat concentration of iso 14:0 and positively correlated with milk 15:0, whereas the acetate

  15. Structure-activity relationship of reversibly lipidized peptides: studies of fatty acid-desmopressin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jeff; Wu, Daphne; Shen, Wei-Chiang

    2002-05-01

    To synthesize a series of reversible fatty acid-desmopressin (DDAVP) conjugates and to study their structure-activity relationship as anti-diuretic drugs. Seven fatty acid conjugates of DDAVP were prepared using various reversible lipidization reagents as described in our previous reports. All products were purified by acid precipitation and/or size-exclusion chromatography. Reversed-phase HPLC was used to evaluate their purity and lipophilicity. The anti-diuretic efficacy of these fatty acid conjugates was assessed in vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rats. Four selected conjugates, i.e., DPA, DPH, DPD and DPP (acetic, hexanoic. decanoic, and palmitic acid conjugate, respectively), along with DDAVP itself were used in Caco-2 cell uptake studies and their degradation and the regeneration of active DDAVP were investigated using an in vitro liver slice metabolic system coupled with a HPLC assay. All fatty acid-DDAVP conjugates were more lipophilic than DDAVP as examined by HPLC analyses. When cysteine was used as the linker, the capacity index (k', a measure of lipophilicity) of the conjugates was linearly correlated with the number of carbons in the fatty acid chain. The anti-diuretic activity of the conjugates was correlated with the length of the fatty acid chain, with C10 as the minimal requirement for possessing the enhanced anti-diuretic activity. Among the seven fatty acid conjugates, palmitic acid conjugate was the most potent DDAVP derivative. Removal of carboxyl group from the cysteine linker completely abolished the enhancement of the activity. The extent of cellular uptake also positively correlated with the lipophilicity of the conjugates. The metabolism of DDAVP, DPH, DPD, and DPP by liver slices all followed first order kinetics with half-life of 0.30, 0.01, 0.06 and 3.44 hr, respectively. The degradation rates of DPH and DPD in the liver slice incubation were much faster than that of DDAVP and therefore an accumulation of regenerated DDAVP in the

  16. Exploitable Lipids and Fatty Acids in the Invasive Oyster Crassostrea gigas on the French Atlantic Coast

    PubMed Central

    Dagorn, Flore; Couzinet-Mossion, Aurélie; Kendel, Melha; Beninger, Peter G.; Rabesaotra, Vony; Barnathan, Gilles; Wielgosz-Collin, Gaëtane

    2016-01-01

    Economic exploitation is one means to offset the cost of controlling invasive species, such as the introduced Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg) on the French Atlantic coast. Total lipid and phospholipid (PL) fatty acids (FAs) and sterols were examined in an invasive population of C. gigas in Bourgneuf Bay, France, over four successive seasons, with a view to identify possible sources of exploitable substances. The total lipid level (% dry weight) varied from 7.1% (winter) to 8.6% (spring). Of this, PLs accounted for 28.1% (spring) to 50.4% (winter). Phosphatidylcholine was the dominant PL throughout the year (up to 74% of total PLs in winter). Plasmalogens were identified throughout the year as a series of eleven dimethylacetals (DMAs) with chain lengths between C16 and C20 (up to 14.5% of PL FAs + DMAs in winter). Thirty-seven FAs were identified in the PL FAs. Eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3 EPA/7.53% to 14.5%) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3 DHA/5.51% to 9.5%) were the dominant polyunsaturated FAs in all seasons. Two non-methylene-interrupted dienoic (NMID) FAs were identified in all seasons: 7,13-docosadienoic and 7,15-docosadienoic acids, the latter being present at relatively high levels (up to 9.6% in winter). Twenty free sterols were identified, including cholesterol at 29.9% of the sterol mixture and about 33% of phytosterols. C. gigas tissues thus contained exploitable lipids for health benefits or as a potential source of high-quality commercial lecithin. PMID:27231919

  17. Dietary ɛ-Polylysine Decreased Serum and Liver Lipid Contents by Enhancing Fecal Lipid Excretion Irrespective of Increased Hepatic Fatty Acid Biosynthesis-Related Enzymes Activities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosomi, Ryota; Yamamoto, Daiki; Otsuka, Ren; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro; Fukunaga, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    ɛ-Polylysine (EPL) is used as a natural preservative in food. However, few studies have been conducted to assess the beneficial functions of dietary EPL. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying the inhibition of neutral and acidic sterol absorption and hepatic enzyme activity-related fatty acid biosynthesis following EPL intake. EPL digest prepared using an in vitro digestion model had lower lipase activity and micellar lipid solubility and higher bile acid binding capacity than casein digest. Male Wistar rats were fed an AIN-93G diet containing 1% (wt/wt) EPL or l-lysine. After 4 weeks of feeding these diets, the marked decrease in serum and liver triacylglycerol contents by the EPL diet was partly attributed to increased fecal fatty acid excretion. The activities of hepatic acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, which are key enzymes of fatty acid biosynthesis, were enhanced in rats fed EPL diet. The increased fatty acid biosynthesis activity due to dietary EPL may be prevented by the enhancement of fecal fatty acid excretion. The hypocholesterolemic effect of EPL was mediated by increased fecal neutral and acidic sterol excretions due to the EPL digest suppressing micellar lipid solubility and high bile acid binding capacity. These results show that dietary EPL has beneficial effects that could help prevent lifestyle-related diseases such as hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:25866749

  18. Lipid and fatty acid content in wild white seabream (Diplodus sargus) broodstock at different stages of the reproductive cycle.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M J; Rodríguez, C; Cejas, J R; Martín, M V; Jerez, S; Lorenzo, A

    2007-02-01

    The lipid and fatty acid content of the gonads, liver and muscle of wild white seabream males and females was studied at different stages of the reproductive cycle. Samples were taken from mature white seabream at pre-spawning (November), mid-spawning (March) and post-spawning (June) stages. The results showed that lipid accumulates in gonads and muscle from November to March. The gonadosomatic index (GSI) was also increased during this period. Male gonads showed a greater increase in polar lipid (PL) than neutral (NL), while female gonads displayed the reverse. The increase in both neutral and polar lipid was higher in the muscle of males than in females. In the same period, male livers showed no changes either in lipid content or the hepatosomatic index (HSI), while female livers registered an increase in both lipid content and HSI. Between March and June, in both males and females, total, neutral and polar lipid decreased sharply in the gonads and muscle. Muscular lipid content reduction was more pronounced in males than females. On the other hand, the lipid content of the liver in males and females remained relatively constant. In general terms, the amounts of major fatty acids (16:0, 18:1n-9, 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3) in gonadal and muscular polar and neutral lipid in both males and females increased from November to March and declined thereafter. Variations of the liver fatty acid content were less extreme. In the period from mid-spawning to post-spawning, the presence of 20:4n-6 in polar and neutral lipid increased to a notable extent in all organs studied.

  19. Lipid Sources with Different Fatty Acid Profile Alters the Fatty Acid Profile and Quality of Beef from Confined Nellore Steers

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentini, Giovani; Lage, Josiane F.; Carvalho, Isabela P. C.; Messana, Juliana D.; Canesin, Roberta. C.; Reis, Ricardo A.; Berchielli, Telma T.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of lipid sources with different fatty acids profile on meat fatty acids profile and beef quality traits of Nellore. A total of 45 Nellore animals with an average initial body weight of 419±11 kg (at 15±2 mo) were distributed in a completely randomized design consisting of 5 treatments and 9 replicates. The roughage feed was maize silage (600 g/kg on a dry matter [DM] basis) plus concentrate (400 g/kg on a DM basis). The dietary treatments were as follows: without fat (WF), palm oil (PO), linseed oil (LO), protected fat (PF), and soybean grains (SG). No effects of lipid sources were observed (p>0.05) on beef color, pH, water-holding capacity, and sarcomere length. Beef from cattle fed PO had greater shear-force values (p<0.05) compared to beef from cattle fed WF. Deposition of main unsaturated fatty acids (oleic, linoleic, and linolenic) was greater in treatments WF, SG, and LO, respectively, while the values of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) were greater when animals were fed LO. The inclusion of LO in the diet enhances the concentration of CLA in longissimus muscle and subcutaneous fat besides improving the atherogenicity index and elongase activity. As such, LO can be used with the aim to improve the quality of beef from confined Nellore cattle. Conversely, the use of PO is not recommended since it may increase the concentration of undesirable unsaturated fatty acids in muscle and subcutaneous fat, shear-force and the atherogenicity index. PMID:26104402

  20. SMA-SH: Modified Styrene-Maleic Acid Copolymer for Functionalization of Lipid Nanodiscs.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; Carvalho, Vanessa; Pronk, Joachim W; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve

    2016-04-11

    Challenges in purification and subsequent functionalization of membrane proteins often complicate their biochemical and biophysical characterization. Purification of membrane proteins generally involves replacing the lipids surrounding the protein with detergent molecules, which can affect protein structure and function. Recently, it was shown that styrene-maleic acid copolymers (SMA) can dissolve integral membrane proteins from biological membranes into nanosized discs. Within these nanoparticles, proteins are embedded in a patch of their native lipid bilayer that is stabilized in solution by the amphipathic polymer that wraps the disc like a bracelet. This approach for detergent-free purification of membrane proteins has the potential to greatly simplify purification but does not facilitate conjugation of functional compounds to the membrane proteins. Often, such functionalization involves laborious preparation of protein variants and optimization of labeling procedures to ensure only minimal perturbation of the protein. Here, we present a strategy that circumvents several of these complications through modifying SMA by grafting the polymer with cysteamine. The reaction results in SMA that has solvent-exposed sulfhydrils (SMA-SH) and allows tuning of the coverage with SH groups. Size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy demonstrate that SMA-SH dissolves lipid bilayer membranes into lipid nanodiscs, just like SMA. In addition, we demonstrate that, just like SMA, SMA-SH solubilizes proteoliposomes into protein-loaded nanodiscs. We covalently modify SMA-SH-lipid nanodiscs using thiol-reactive derivatives of Alexa Fluor 488 and biotin. Thus, SMA-SH promises to simultaneously tackle challenges in purification and functionalization of membrane proteins.

  1. Volatile fatty acids derived from waste organics provide an economical carbon source for microbial lipids/biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Park, Gwon Woo; Fei, Qiang; Jung, Kwonsu; Chang, Ho Nam; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Kim, Nag-jong; Choi, Jin-dal-rae; Kim, Sangyong; Cho, Jaehoon

    2014-12-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) derived from organic waste, were used as a low cost carbon source for high bioreactor productivity and titer. A multi-stage continuous high cell density culture (MSC-HCDC) process was employed for economic assessment of microbial lipids for biodiesel production. In a simulation study we used a lipid yield of 0.3 g/g-VFAs, cell mass yield of 0.5 g/g-glucose or wood hydrolyzates, and employed process variables including lipid contents from 10-90% of cell mass, bioreactor productivity of 0.5-48 g/L/h, and plant capacity of 20000-1000000 metric ton (MT)/year. A production cost of USD 1.048/kg-lipid was predicted with raw material costs of USD 0.2/kg for wood hydrolyzates and USD 0.15/kg for VFAs; 9 g/L/h bioreactor productivity; 100, 000 MT/year production capacity; and 75% lipids content. The variables having the highest impact on microbial lipid production costs were the cost of VFAs and lipid yield, followed by lipid content, fermenter cost, and lipid productivity. The cost of raw materials accounted for 66.25% of total operating costs. This study shows that biodiesel from microbial lipids has the potential to become competitive with diesels from other sources.

  2. Fatty Acid Desaturase 1 (FADS1) Gene Polymorphisms Control Human Hepatic Lipid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Libo; Athinarayanan, Shaminie; Jiang, Guanglong; Chalasani, Naga; Zhang, Min; Liu, Wanqing

    2014-01-01

    Fatty Acid Desaturase (FADS) genes and their variants have been associated with multiple metabolic phenotypes including liver enzymes and hepatic fat accumulation but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. We aimed to delineate the role of FADSs in modulating lipid composition in human liver. We performed a targeted lipidomic analysis of a variety of phospholipids, sphingolipids and ceramides among 154 human liver tissue samples. The associations between previously Genome-wide Association Studies (GWAS)-identified six FADS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and these lipid levels as well as total hepatic fat content (HFC) were tested. The potential function of these SNPs in regulating transcription of 3 FADS genes (FADS1, FADS2 and FADS3) in the locus was also investigated. We found that while these SNPs were in high linkage disequilibrium (r2 >0.8), the rare alleles of these SNPs were consistently and significantly associated with the accumulation of multiple very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), with C47H85O13P (C36:4), a phosphatidylinositol (PI) and C43H80O8PN (C38:3), a phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) reached the Bonferroni corrected significance (p<3×10−4). Meanwhile, these SNPs were significantly associated with increased ratios between the more saturated and relatively less saturated forms of VLCFAs, especially between PEs, PIs and phosphatidylcholines (PCs) (p≤3.5×10−6). These alleles were also associated with increased total HFC (p<0.05). Further analyses revealed that these alleles were associated with decreased hepatic expression of FADS1 (p=0.0018 for rs174556), but not FADS2 or FADS3 (p>0.05). Conclusion Our findings revealed critical insight into the mechanism underlying FADS1 and its polymorphisms in modulating hepatic lipid deposition by altering gene transcription and controlling lipid composition in human livers. PMID:25123259

  3. Trans isomeric octadecenoic acids are related inversely to arachidonic acid and DHA and positively related to mead acid in umbilical vessel wall lipids.

    PubMed

    Decsi, Tamás; Boehm, Günther; Tjoonk, H M Ria; Molnár, Szilárd; Dijck-Brouwer, D A Janneke; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Martini, Ingrid A; Muskiet, Frits A J; Boersma, E Rudy

    2002-10-01

    Long-chain PUFA play an important role in early human neurodevelopment. Significant inverse correlations were reported between values of trans isomeric and long-chain PUFA in plasma lipids of preterm infants and children aged 1-15 yr as well as in venous cord blood lipids of full-term infants. Here we report FA compositional data of cord blood vessel wall lipids in 308 healthy, full-term infants (gestational age: 39.7 +/- 1.2 wk, birth weight: 3528 +/- 429 g, mean +/- SD). The median (interquartile range) of the sum of 18-carbon trans FA was 0.22 (0.13) % w/w in umbilical artery and 0.16 (0.10) % w/w in umbilical vein lipids. Nonparametric correlation analysis showed significant inverse correlations between the sum of 18-carbon trans FA and both arachidonic acid and DHA in artery (r = -0.38, P < 0.01, and r = -0.20, P < 0.01) and vein (r = -0.36, P < 0.01, and -0.17, P < 0.01) wall lipids. In addition, the sum of 18-carbon trans FA was significantly positively correlated to Mead acid, a general indicator of EFA deficiency, in both artery (r = +0.35, P < 0.01) and vein (r = +0.31, P< 0.01) wall lipids. The present results obtained in a large group of full-term infants suggest that maternal trans FA intake is inversely associated with long-chain PUFA status of the infant at birth.

  4. Conserved valproic-acid-induced lipid droplet formation in Dictyostelium and human hepatocytes identifies structurally active compounds.

    PubMed

    Elphick, Lucy M; Pawolleck, Nadine; Guschina, Irina A; Chaieb, Leila; Eikel, Daniel; Nau, Heinz; Harwood, John L; Plant, Nick J; Williams, Robin S B

    2012-03-01

    Lipid droplet formation and subsequent steatosis (the abnormal retention of lipids within a cell) has been reported to contribute to hepatotoxicity and is an adverse effect of many pharmacological agents including the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). In this study, we have developed a simple model system (Dictyostelium discoideum) to investigate the effects of VPA and related compounds in lipid droplet formation. In mammalian hepatocytes, VPA increases lipid droplet accumulation over a 24-hour period, giving rise to liver cell damage, and we show a similar effect in Dictyostelium following 30 minutes of VPA treatment. Using (3)H-labelled polyunsaturated (arachidonic) or saturated (palmitic) fatty acids, we shown that VPA treatment of Dictyostelium gives rise to an increased accumulation of both types of fatty acids in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and non-polar lipids in this time period, with a similar trend observed in human hepatocytes (Huh7 cells) labelled with [(3)H]arachidonic acid. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of β-oxidation in Dictyostelium phenocopies fatty acid accumulation, in agreement with data reported in mammalian systems. Using Dictyostelium, we then screened a range of VPA-related compounds to identify those with high and low lipid-accumulation potential, and validated these activities for effects on lipid droplet formation by using human hepatocytes. Structure-activity relationships for these VPA-related compounds suggest that lipid accumulation is independent of VPA-catalysed teratogenicity and inositol depletion. These results suggest that Dictyostelium could provide both a novel model system for the analysis of lipid droplet formation in human hepatocytes and a rapid method for identifying VPA-related compounds that show liver toxicology.

  5. Conserved valproic-acid-induced lipid droplet formation in Dictyostelium and human hepatocytes identifies structurally active compounds

    PubMed Central

    Elphick, Lucy M.; Pawolleck, Nadine; Guschina, Irina A.; Chaieb, Leila; Eikel, Daniel; Nau, Heinz; Harwood, John L.; Plant, Nick J.; Williams, Robin S. B.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Lipid droplet formation and subsequent steatosis (the abnormal retention of lipids within a cell) has been reported to contribute to hepatotoxicity and is an adverse effect of many pharmacological agents including the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). In this study, we have developed a simple model system (Dictyostelium discoideum) to investigate the effects of VPA and related compounds in lipid droplet formation. In mammalian hepatocytes, VPA increases lipid droplet accumulation over a 24-hour period, giving rise to liver cell damage, and we show a similar effect in Dictyostelium following 30 minutes of VPA treatment. Using 3H-labelled polyunsaturated (arachidonic) or saturated (palmitic) fatty acids, we shown that VPA treatment of Dictyostelium gives rise to an increased accumulation of both types of fatty acids in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and non-polar lipids in this time period, with a similar trend observed in human hepatocytes (Huh7 cells) labelled with [3H]arachidonic acid. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of β-oxidation in Dictyostelium phenocopies fatty acid accumulation, in agreement with data reported in mammalian systems. Using Dictyostelium, we then screened a range of VPA-related compounds to identify those with high and low lipid-accumulation potential, and validated these activities for effects on lipid droplet formation by using human hepatocytes. Structure-activity relationships for these VPA-related compounds suggest that lipid accumulation is independent of VPA-catalysed teratogenicity and inositol depletion. These results suggest that Dictyostelium could provide both a novel model system for the analysis of lipid droplet formation in human hepatocytes and a rapid method for identifying VPA-related compounds that show liver toxicology. PMID:22003123

  6. Lipotoxicity of the Pancreatic β-Cell Is Associated With Glucose-Dependent Esterification of Fatty Acids Into Neutral Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Briaud, Isabelle; Harmon, Jamie S.; Kelpe, Cynthia L.; Segu, Venkatesh Babu G.; Poitout, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of isolated islets to supraphysiologic concentrations of palmitate decreases insulin gene expression in the presence of elevated glucose levels. This study was designed to determine whether or not this phenomenon is associated with a glucose-dependent increase in esterification of fatty acids into neutral lipids. Gene expression of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), three key enzymes of lipid metabolism, was detected in isolated rat islets. Their levels of expression were not affected after a 72-h exposure to elevated glucose and palmitate. To determine the effects of glucose on palmitate-induced neutral lipid synthesis, isolated rat islets were cultured for 72 h with trace amounts of [14C]palmitate with or without 0.5 mmol/l unlabeled palmitate, at 2.8 or 16.7 mmol/l glucose. Glucose increased incorporation of [14C]palmitate into complex lipids. Addition of exogenous palmitate directed lipid metabolism toward neutral lipid synthesis. As a result, neutral lipid mass was increased upon prolonged incubation with elevated palmitate only in the presence of high glucose. The ability of palmitate to increase neutral lipid synthesis in the presence of high glucose was concentration-dependent in HIT cells and was inversely correlated to insulin mRNA levels. 2-Bromopalmitate, an inhibitor of fatty acid mitochondrial β-oxidation, reproduced the inhibitory effect of palmitate on insulin mRNA levels. In contrast, palmitate methyl ester, which is not metabolized, and the medium-chain fatty acid octanoate, which is readily oxidized, did not affect insulin gene expression, suggesting that fatty-acid inhibition of insulin gene expression requires activation of the esterification pathway. These results demonstrate that inhibition of insulin gene expression upon prolonged exposure of islets to palmitate is associated with a glucose-dependent increase in esterification of fatty

  7. Occurrence of lipid A variants with 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid in lipopolysaccharides from members of the family Rhizobiaceae

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, U.R.; Carlson, R.W. ); Mayer, H. ); Yokota, A. ); Hollingsworth, R.I. )

    1991-04-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) isolated from several strains of Rhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Agrobacterium, and Azorhizobium were screened for the presence of 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid. The LPSs from all strains, with the exception of Azorhizobium caulinodans, contained various amounts of this long-chain hydroxy fatty acid in the lipid A fractions. Analysis of the lipid A sugars revealed three types of backbones: those containing glucosamine (as found in Rhizobium meliloti and Thizobium fredii), those containing glucosamine and galacturonic acid (as found in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli, trifolii, and viciae), and those containing clucosamine and galacturonic acid (as found in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli, trifolii, and viciae), and those containing 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxyglucose either alone or in combination with glucosamine (as found in Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) strain DSM 30140). The distribution of 27-hydroxyoctacosamoic acid as well as analysis of lipid A backbone sugars revealed the taxonomic relatedness of various strains of the Rhizobiaceae.

  8. 13,16-Dimethyl Octacosanedioic Acid (iso-Diabolic Acid), a Common Membrane-Spanning Lipid of Acidobacteria Subdivisions 1 and 3 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Weijers, Johan W. H.; Foesel, Bärbel U.; Overmann, Jörg; Dedysh, Svetlana N.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of membrane lipids of 17 different strains representing 13 species of subdivisions 1 and 3 of the phylum Acidobacteria, a highly diverse phylum of the Bacteria, were examined by hydrolysis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS) and by high-performance liquid chromatography-MS of intact polar lipids. Upon both acid and base hydrolyses of total cell material, the uncommon membrane-spanning lipid 13,16-dimethyl octacosanedioic acid (iso-diabolic acid) was released in substantial amounts (22 to 43% of the total fatty acids) from all of the acidobacteria studied. This lipid has previously been encountered only in thermophilic Thermoanaerobacter species but bears a structural resemblance to the alkyl chains of bacterial glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) that occur ubiquitously in peat and soil and are suspected to be produced by acidobacteria. As reported previously, most species also contained iso-C15 and C16:1ω7C as major fatty acids but the presence of iso-diabolic acid was unnoticed in previous studies, most probably because the complex lipid that contained this moiety was not extractable from the cells; it could only be released by hydrolysis. Direct analysis of intact polar lipids in the Bligh-Dyer extract of three acidobacterial strains, indeed, did not reveal any membrane-spanning lipids containing iso-diabolic acid. In 3 of the 17 strains, ether-bound iso-diabolic acid was detected after hydrolysis of the cells, including one branched GDGT containing iso-diabolic acid-derived alkyl chains. Since the GDGT distribution in soils is much more complex, branched GDGTs in soil likely also originate from other (acido)bacteria capable of biosynthesizing these components. PMID:21515715

  9. New and Uncommon Fatty Acids in Lipids of Deep-Sea Foraminifera.

    PubMed

    Kharlamenko, Vladimir I; Svetashev, Vasily I; Tarasova, Tatyana S

    2017-04-01

    Fatty acids (FA) of agglutinating foraminifera of two genera, Bathysiphon and Rhabdammina, collected from a depth of 3307-3377 m in the Kuril Basin, Sea of Okhotsk, and adjacent deep-sea waters of the Pacific Ocean, were analyzed. In lipids of two Bathysiphon species, in addition to common FA typical for marine organisms, the uncommon ∆4 and ∆7 monoenoic acids and ∆4,7-dienoic acid were found in noticeable amounts. FA of two Rhabdammina species included also such uncommon acids as ∆5,8,11,14-21:4, ∆5,8,11,14-22:4, and ∆5,8,11,14-23:4, which are homologues to arachidonic acid. High levels of cis-vaccenic and arachidonic acids were typical for lipids of all the studied species. At the same time, we observed a substantial difference in FA composition between members of these two genera. Using GC and GC-MS of FAME, pyrrolidide and DMOX derivatives, the structures of 10 new FA were confirmed: ∆4-i-16:1 (1.1-0.6%), ∆7-i-21:1 (0.4%), ∆7-ai-21:1 (0.3-0.8%), ∆4,11-18:2 (0.3-0.9%), ∆4,7-20:2 (8.8%), ∆7,12-20:2 (0.4-0.6%), ∆4,7-21:2 (0.6%), ∆7,12-22:2 (6.4-2.1%); ∆5,8,11,14-22:4 (1.2-2.0%), and ∆5,8,11,14-23:4 (1.7-2.3%). The origin of the new FA and the role of foraminifera FA in deep-sea communities are discussed.

  10. Conjugated eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibits transplanted tumor growth via membrane lipid peroxidation in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Tsuyoshi; Igarashi, Miki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2004-05-01

    Both conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have an antitumor effect. Hence, we hypothesized that a combination of conjugated double bonds and an (n-3) highly unsaturated fatty acid would produce stronger bioactivity. To verify the antitumor effect of conjugated EPA (CEPA), we transplanted DLD-1 human colon tumor cells into nude mice, and compared the tumor growth between CEPA-fed mice and CLA- and EPA-fed mice. After tumor cell inoculation, mice were assigned to 1 of 4 groups (control, CLA, EPA, and CEPA) consisting of 10 mice each. The control group received only safflower oil fatty acids, whereas the remaining groups received a mixture of safflower oil fatty acids and 20 g/100 g of total fatty acids as CLA, EPA, or CEPA. Mice were fed once every 2 d for 4 wk at a dose of 50 mg/mouse at each feeding. After 4 wk, tumor growth in CEPA-fed mice was significantly suppressed, compared with that in CLA- (P < 0.005) and EPA-fed mice (P < 0.001). DNA fragmentation in the tumor tissues of the CEPA-fed mice occurred more frequently than in the CLA- (P < 0.001) and EPA-fed mice (P < 0.001), suggesting that CEPA induced apoptosis in the tumor tissues. To further investigate the mechanism, the level of oxidative stress in the tumor tissues was determined. The CEPA-fed mice showed significant lipid peroxidation, compared with the CLA- (P < 0.001) and EPA-fed mice (P < 0.001). Therefore, we verified that CEPA has a stronger in vivo antitumor effect than EPA and CLA, and that CEPA acts through induction of apoptosis via lipid peroxidation.

  11. Lipid oxidation in fish oil enriched mayonnaise: calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate, but not gallic acid, strongly inhibited oxidative deterioration.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, C; Hartvigsen, K; Thomsen, M K; Hansen, L F; Lund, P; Skibsted, L H; Hølmer, G; Adler-Nissen, J; Meyer, A S

    2001-02-01

    The antioxidative effects of gallic acid, EDTA, and extra emulsifier Panodan DATEM TR in mayonnaise enriched with 16% fish oil were investigated. EDTA reduced the formation of free radicals, lipid hydroperoxides, volatiles, and fishy and rancid off-flavors. The antioxidative effect of EDTA was attributed to its ability to chelate free metal ions and iron from egg yolk located at the oil-water interface. Gallic acid reduced the levels of both free radicals and lipid hydroperoxides but promoted slightly the oxidative flavor deterioration in mayonnaise and influenced the profile of volatiles. Gallic acid may therefore promote the decomposition of lipid hydroperoxides to volatile oxidation products. Addition of extra emulsifier reduced the lipid hydroperoxide levels but did not influence the level of free radicals or the oxidative flavor deterioration in mayonnaisse; however, it appeared to alter the profile of volatiles. The effect of the emulsifier on the physical structure and rheological properties depended on the presence of antioxidants.

  12. Fatty acid composition of chylomicron remnant-like particles influences their uptake and induction of lipid accumulation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Pascale, Clara; Avella, Michael; Perona, Javier S; Ruiz-Gutierrez, Valentina; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P D; Botham, Kathleen M

    2006-12-01

    The influence of the fatty acid composition of chylomicron remnant-like particles (CRLPs) on their uptake and induction of lipid accumulation in macrophages was studied. CRLPs containing triacylglycerol enriched in saturated, monounsaturated, n-6 or n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from palm, olive, corn or fish oil, respectively, and macrophages derived from the human monocyte cell line THP-1 were used. Lipid accumulation (triacylglycerol and cholesterol) in the cells was measured after incubation with CRLPs for 5, 24 and 48 h, and uptake over 24 h was determined using CRLPs radiolabelled with [3H]triolein. Total lipid accumulation in the macrophages was significantly greater with palm CRLPs than with the other three types of particle. This was mainly due to increased triacylglycerol concentrations, whereas changes in cholesterol concentrations did not reach significance. There were no significant differences in lipid accumulation after incubation with olive, corn or fish CRLPs. Palm and olive CRLPs were taken up by the cells at a similar rate, which was considerably faster than that observed with corn and fish CRLPs. These findings demonstrate that CRLPs enriched in saturated or monounsaturated fatty acids are taken up more rapidly by macrophages than those enriched in n-6 or n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and that the faster uptake rate results in greater lipid accumulation in the case of saturated fatty acid-rich particles, but not monounsaturated fatty acid-rich particles. Thus, dietary saturated fatty acids carried in chylomicron remnants may enhance their propensity to induce macrophage foam cell formation.

  13. Ethyl oleate-containing nanostructured lipid carriers improve oral bioavailability of trans-ferulic acid ascompared with conventional solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongtai; Li, Zhe; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Gang; Wang, Zhi; Zhao, Jihui; Hu, Rongfeng; Feng, Nianping

    2016-09-10

    trans-Ferulic acid (TFA) has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and cardioprotective effects, but its poor solubility in water results in unsatisfactory oral bioavailability when administered conventionally at a standard dosage. However, the limited bioavailability of TFA can be overcome by delivering it in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs). In this study, a microemulsion (ME)-based method was used to prepare NLCs with ethyl oleate as the liquid lipid component and glyceryl behenate as the solid lipid component. These NLCs and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were then used as vehicles for TFA. Their entrapment efficiencies (EE), stability during storage, in vitro release profiles, and in vivo pharmacokinetics were compared. The NLC formulation afforded a drug entrapment efficiency that was significantly greater than that of the SLN formulation, which was made using a single solid lipid. Furthermore, the TFA that was dispersed in the disordered binary lipid matrix of the NLC formulation was more stable than that in the SLN formulation, and thus showed less expulsion from the vehicle during storage. In in vivo pharmacokinetic studies, the NLC TFA formulation yielded a greater Cmax and AUC than that produced by the SLN formulation and an aqueous TFA suspension. This showed that the oral bioavailability of TFA was markedly improved by packaging in NLCs. NLCs are thus a promising vehicle for oral TFA administration, with significant advantages over SLNs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prenatal exposures to perfluoroalkyl acids and serum lipids at ages 7 and 15 in females.

    PubMed

    Maisonet, Mildred; Näyhä, Simo; Lawlor, Debbie A; Marcus, Michele

    2015-09-01

    In some cross-sectional epidemiologic studies the shape of the association between serum concentrations of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and lipids suggests departures from linearity. We used statistical approaches allowing for non-linearity to determine associations of prenatal exposures of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) with lipid concentrations. PFAAs were measured in serum from pregnant women collected in 1991-1992 at enrollment in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children and lipids in serum from their daughters at ages 7 (n=111) and 15 (n=88). The associations of PFAAs with lipids were first explored by cubic splines, followed by piecewise linear regressions by tertiles to obtain regression coefficients (β) and their 95% confidence limits (95% CL) (in mg/dL per 1ng/mL). At age 7, total cholesterol was positively associated with prenatal PFOA concentrations in the lower tertile (β=15.01; 95% CL=2.34, 27.69) but not with PFOA concentrations in the middle (β=-3.63; 95% CL=-17.43, 10.16) and upper (β=-1.58; 95% CL=-4.58, 1.42) tertiles. At age 15, a similar pattern was noted as well. Positive associations between LDL-C and prenatal PFOA concentration in the lower tertile were observed in daughters at ages 7 (β=14.91; 95% CL=3.53, 28.12) and 15 (β=13.93; 95% CL=0.60, 27.26). LDL-C was not associated with PFOA concentrations in the middle or upper tertile at any age. Neither HDL-C nor triglycerides was associated with prenatal PFOA exposure. Non-linear patterns of association of total cholesterol and LDL-C with prenatal PFOS were less consistently noted. Exposure to low levels of PFOA during prenatal development may alter lipid metabolism later in life. Given the small sample size further replication of the association in large independent cohorts is important. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Drosophila TRF2 and TAF9 regulate lipid droplet size and phospholipid fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wei; Lam, Sin Man; Xin, Jingxue; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Shui, Guanghou

    2017-01-01

    The general transcription factor TBP (TATA-box binding protein) and its associated factors (TAFs) together form the TFIID complex, which directs transcription initiation. Through RNAi and mutant analysis, we identified a specific TBP family protein, TRF2, and a set of TAFs that regulate lipid droplet (LD) size in the Drosophila larval fat body. Among the three Drosophila TBP genes, trf2, tbp and trf1, only loss of function of trf2 results in increased LD size. Moreover, TRF2 and TAF9 regulate fatty acid composition of several classes of phospholipids. Through RNA profiling, we found that TRF2 and TAF9 affects the transcription of a common set of genes, including peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes that affect phospholipid fatty acid composition. We also found that knockdown of several TRF2 and TAF9 target genes results in large LDs, a phenotype which is similar to that of trf2 mutants. Together, these findings provide new insights into the specific role of the general transcription machinery in lipid homeostasis. PMID:28273089

  16. Expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin enhances production of arachidonic acid and lipids in Mortierella alpina.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huidan; Feng, Yingang; Cui, Qiu; Song, Xiaojin

    2017-08-30

    Arachidonic acid (ARA, C20:4, n-6), which belongs to the omega-6 series of polyunsaturated fatty acids and has a variety of biological activities, is commercially produced in Mortierella alpina. Dissolved oxygen or oxygen utilization efficiency is a critical factor for Mortierella alpina growth and arachidonic acid production in large-scale fermentation. Overexpression of the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene is thought to significantly increase the oxygen utilization efficiency of the cells. An optimized Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) gene was introduced into Mortierella alpina via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Compared with the parent strain, the VHb-expressing strain, termed VHb-20, grew faster under both limiting and non-limiting oxygen conditions and exhibited dramatic changes in cell morphology. Furthermore, VHb-20 produced 4- and 8-fold higher total lipid and ARA yields than those of the wild-type strain under a microaerobic environment. Furthermore, ARA production of VHb-20 was also 1.6-fold higher than that of the wild type under normal conditions. The results demonstrated that DO utilization was significantly increased by expressing the VHb gene in Mortierella alpina. The expression of VHb enhances ARA and lipid production under both lower and normal dissolved oxygen conditions. This study provides a novel strategy and an engineered strain for the cost-efficient production of ARA.

  17. Glucose regulates fatty acid binding protein interaction with lipids and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, Heather A.; Balanarasimha, Madhumitha; Huang, Huan; Kelzer, Matthew S.; Kaliappan, Alagammai; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of diabetes is characterized by elevated levels of glucose and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), nuclear mechanisms linking glucose and LCFA metabolism are poorly understood. As the liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) shuttles LCFA to the nucleus, where L-FABP directly interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα), the effect of glucose on these processes was examined. In vitro studies showed that L-FABP strongly bound glucose and glucose-1-phosphate (Kd = 103 ± 19 nM and Kd = 20 ± 3 nM, respectively), resulting in altered L-FABP conformation, increased affinity for lipid ligands, and enhanced interaction with PPARα. In living cells, glucose stimulated cellular uptake and nuclear localization of a nonmetabolizable fluorescent fatty acid analog (BODIPY C-16), particularly in the presence of L-FABP. These data suggest for the first time a direct role of glucose in facilitating L-FABP-mediated uptake and distribution of lipidic ligands to the nucleus for regulation of PPARα transcriptional activity. PMID:20628144

  18. Drosophila TRF2 and TAF9 regulate lipid droplet size and phospholipid fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Lam, Sin Man; Xin, Jingxue; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Shui, Guanghou; Huang, Xun

    2017-03-01

    The general transcription factor TBP (TATA-box binding protein) and its associated factors (TAFs) together form the TFIID complex, which directs transcription initiation. Through RNAi and mutant analysis, we identified a specific TBP family protein, TRF2, and a set of TAFs that regulate lipid droplet (LD) size in the Drosophila larval fat body. Among the three Drosophila TBP genes, trf2, tbp and trf1, only loss of function of trf2 results in increased LD size. Moreover, TRF2 and TAF9 regulate fatty acid composition of several classes of phospholipids. Through RNA profiling, we found that TRF2 and TAF9 affects the transcription of a common set of genes, including peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes that affect phospholipid fatty acid composition. We also found that knockdown of several TRF2 and TAF9 target genes results in large LDs, a phenotype which is similar to that of trf2 mutants. Together, these findings provide new insights into the specific role of the general transcription machinery in lipid homeostasis.

  19. Lipid and fatty acid metabolism in Ralstonia eutropha: relevance for the biotechnological production of value-added products.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Sebastian L; Lu, Jingnan; Stahl, Ulf; Brigham, Christopher J

    2014-02-01

    Lipid and fatty acid metabolism has been well studied in model microbial organisms like Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The major precursor of fatty acid biosynthesis is also the major product of fatty acid degradation (β-oxidation), acetyl-CoA, which is a key metabolite for all organisms. Controlling carbon flux to fatty acid biosynthesis and from β-oxidation allows for the biosynthesis of natural products of biotechnological importance. Ralstonia eutropha can utilize acetyl-CoA from fatty acid metabolism to produce intracellular polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). R. eutropha can also be engineered to utilize fatty acid metabolism intermediates to produce different PHA precursors. Metabolism of lipids and fatty acids can be rerouted to convert carbon into other value-added compounds like biofuels. This review discusses the lipid and fatty acid metabolic pathways in R. eutropha and how they can be used to construct reagents for the biosynthesis of products of industrial importance. Specifically, how the use of lipids or fatty acids as the sole carbon source in R. eutropha cultures adds value to these biotechnological products will be discussed here.

  20. Lipid metabolic dose response to dietary alpha-linolenic acid in monk parrot (Myiopsitta monachus).

    PubMed

    Petzinger, Christina; Heatley, J J; Bailey, Christopher A; Bauer, John E

    2014-03-01

    Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus) are susceptible to atherosclerosis, a progressive disease characterized by the formation of plaques in the arteries accompanied by underlying chronic inflammation. The family of n-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA), have consistently been shown to reduce atherosclerotic risk factors in humans and other mammals. Some avian species have been observed to convert α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3, ALA) to EPA and DHA (Htin et al. in Arch Geflugelk 71:258-266, 2007; Petzinger et al. in J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr, 2013). Therefore, the metabolic effects of including flaxseed oil, as a source of ALA, in the diet at three different levels (low, medium, and high) on the lipid metabolism of Monk parrots was evaluated through measuring plasma total cholesterol (TC), free cholesterol (FC), triacylglycerols (TAG), and phospholipid fatty acids. Feed intake, body weight, and body condition score were also assessed. Thus the dose and possible saturation response of increasing dietary ALA at constant linoleic acid (18:2n-6, LNA) concentration on lipid metabolism in Monk parrots (M. monachus) was evaluated. Calculated esterified cholesterol in addition to plasma TC, FC, and TAG were unaltered by increasing dietary ALA. The high ALA group had elevated levels of plasma phospholipid ALA, EPA, and docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-3, 22:5n-3). The medium and high ALA groups had suppressed plasma phospholipid 20:2n-6 and adrenic acid (22:4n-6, ADA) compared to the low ALA group. When the present data were combined with data from a previous study (Petzinger et al. in J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr, 2013) a dose response to dietary ALA was observed when LNA was constant. Plasma phospholipid ALA, EPA, DPAn-3, DHA, and total n-3 were positively correlated while 20:2n-6, di-homo-gamma-linoleic acid (20:3n-6Δ7), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), ADA, and total n-6 were inversely correlated with dietary en% ALA.

  1. Lipid modification of proteins in Archaea: attachment of a mevalonic acid-based lipid moiety to the surface-layer glycoprotein of Haloferax volcanii follows protein translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Zvia; Eichler, Jerry

    2002-01-01

    Once the newly synthesized surface (S)-layer glycoprotein of the halophilic archaeaon Haloferax volcanii has traversed the plasma membrane, the protein undergoes a membrane-related, Mg(2+)-dependent maturation event, revealed as an increase in the apparent molecular mass and hydrophobicity of the protein. To test whether lipid modification of the S-layer glycoprotein could explain these observations, H. volcanii cells were incubated with a radiolabelled precursor of isoprene, [(3)H]mevalonic acid. In Archaea, isoprenoids serve as the major hydrophobic component of archaeal membrane lipids and have been shown to modify other haloarchaeal S-layer glycoproteins, although little is known of the mechanism, site or purpose of such modification. In the present study we report that the H. volcanii S-layer glycoprotein is modified by a derivative of mevalonic acid and that maturation of the protein was prevented upon treatment with mevinolin (lovastatin), an inhibitor of mevalonic acid biosynthesis. These findings suggest that lipid modification of S-layer glycoproteins is a general property of halophilic archaea and, like S-layer glycoprotein glycosylation, lipid-modification of the S-layer glycoproteins takes place on the external cell surface, i.e. following protein translocation across the membrane. PMID:12069685

  2. Improved Experimental Techniques for Analyzing Nucleic Acid Transport Through Protein Nanopores in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Justin A.

    The translocation of nucleic acid polymers across cell membranes is a fundamental requirement for complex life and has greatly contributed to genomic molecular evolution. The diversity of pathways that have evolved to transport DNA and RNA across membranes include protein receptors, active and passive transporters, endocytic and pinocytic processes, and various types of nucleic acid conducting channels known as nanopores. We have developed a series of experimental techniques, collectively known as "Wicking", that greatly improves the biophysical analysis of nucleic acid transport through protein nanopores in planar lipid bilayers. We have verified the Wicking method using numerous types of classical ion channels including the well-studied chloride selective channel, CLIC1. We used the Wicking technique to reconstitute α-hemolysin and found that DNA translocation events of types A and B could be routinely observed using this method. Furthermore, measurable differences were observed in the duration of blockade events as DNA length and composition was varied, consistent with previous reports. Finally, we tested the ability of the Wicking technology to reconstitute the dsRNA transporter Sid-1. Exposure to dsRNAs of increasing length and complexity showed measurable differences in the current transitions suggesting that the charge carrier was dsRNA. However, the translocation events occurred so infrequently that a meaningful electrophysiological analysis was not possible. Alterations in the lipid composition of the bilayer had a minor effect on the frequency of translocation events but not to such a degree as to permit rigorous statistical analysis. We conclude that in many instances the Wicking method is a significant improvement to the lipid bilayer technique, but is not an optimal method for analyzing transport through Sid-1. Further refinements to the Wicking method might have future applications in high throughput DNA sequencing, DNA computation, and

  3. Variable recoveries of fatty acids following the separation of lipids on commercial silica gel TLC plates Selective loss of unsaturated fatty acids on certain brands of plates.

    PubMed

    Sowa, Jennifer M; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2004-12-25

    Since we recently noticed poor recoveries of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) when the parent lipids were first separated on TLC plates, we investigated the source of this error by examining several variables, including the brand of TLC plate, nature of the lipid, and conditions of methylation. Of the five commercial brands of plates used, two (Baker and Whatman) showed loss of UFA, and three (Alltech Hardlayer, Alltech Softlayer, and Merck) did not. This loss occurred in both neutral and phospholipids, did not affect saturated acids, and was independent of the methylation reagent used. No loss occurred, however, if the lipids were eluted from the silica gel before methylation, indicating that the loss is due to oxidation of UFA in presence of certain brands of silica gel. These results show that some brands of TLC plates may be unsuitable for lipid analysis, if the aim is to determine the fatty acid composition by GC using direct methylation.

  4. Lipogenesis and lipid peroxidation in rat testes after long-term treatment with sucrose and tannic acid in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Mašek, T; Starčević, K

    2017-05-01

    We studied the influence of long-term treatment with sucrose and tannic acid in drinking water on the fatty acid profile and lipid peroxidation in rat testes. Male Wistar rats were supplemented with sucrose (30% w/v) or with sucrose and tannic acid (sucrose 30% w/v, tannic acid 0.1% w/v) in drinking water. The treatment with sucrose elevated blood glucose levels in the plasma (p < .05) and decreased the testis weight (p < .05) and testis index (p < .05) of the rats. Sucrose treatment increased monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and C22:6n3, and decreased n6 fatty acids in testis tissue. Lipid peroxidation was significantly increased after sucrose administration in plasma (p < .05) and testis tissue (p < .01). The addition of tannic acid led to the decrease in lipid peroxidation in the plasma (p < .05) and testis (p < .05), a further increase in MUFA and decrease in n6 fatty acids. In conclusion, sucrose significantly altered the testis fatty acid profile with an increase in MUFA and C22:6n3, and a decrease in n6 fatty acids. Tannic acid attenuated oxidative stress and hyperglycaemia, but it did not improve pathological changes in the fatty acid composition of the testis. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Lipid mixtures containing a very high proportion of saturated fatty acids only modestly impair insulin signaling in cultured muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Newsom, Sean A; Everett, Allison C; Park, Sanghee; Van Pelt, Douglas W; Hinko, Alexander; Horowitz, Jeffrey F

    2015-01-01

    In vitro examinations of the effect of saturated fatty acids on skeletal muscle insulin action often use only one or two different fatty acid species, which does not resemble the human plasma fatty acid profile. We compared graded concentrations (0.1-0.8 mM) of 3 different lipid mixtures: 1) a physiologic fatty acid mixture (NORM; 40% saturated fatty acids), 2) a physiologic mixture high in saturated fatty acids (HSFA; 60% saturated fatty acids), and 3) 100% palmitate (PALM) on insulin signaling and fatty acid partitioning into triacylglycerol (TAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) in cultured muscle cells. As expected, PALM readily impaired insulin-stimulated pAktThr308/Akt and markedly increased intracellular DAG content. In contrast, the fatty acid mixtures only modestly impaired insulin-stimulated pAktThr308M/Akt, and we found no differences between NORM and HSFA. Importantly, NORM and HSFA did not increase DAG content, but instead dose-dependently increased TAG accumulation. Therefore, the robust impairment in insulin signaling found with palmitate exposure was attenuated with physiologic mixtures of fatty acids, even with a very high proportion of saturated fatty acids. This may be explained in part by selective partitioning of fatty acids into neutral lipid (i.e., TAG) when muscle cells were exposed to physiologic lipid mixtures.

  6. Do conjugated eicosapentaenoic acid and conjugated docosahexaenoic acid induce apoptosis via lipid peroxidation in cultured human tumor cells?

    PubMed

    Igarashi, M; Miyazawa, T

    2000-04-13

    Conjugated eicosapentaenoic acid (CEPA) and conjugated docosahexaenoic acid (CDHA) with triene structure, isomerized by alkaline treatment, showed intensive cytotoxicity with LD(50) at 12 and 16 microM, respectively, in DLD-1 cells (colorectal adenocarcinoma), while they had no effect on normal human fibroblast cell lines such as MRC-5, TIG-103, and KMS-6 cells. Cytotoxic action of CEPA and CDHA was also demonstrated in other tumor cell lines including HepG2, A549, MCF-7, and MKN-7 cells. alpha-Tocopherol suppressed cytotoxicity of CEPA and CDHA in tumor cells, and the cytotoxicity involved membrane phospholipid peroxidation. CEPA and CDHA induced DNA condensation and fragmentation in DLD-1 cells, indicating the involvement of apoptosis in this cytotoxic mechanism. Furthermore, previous reports have shown that lipid peroxidation product induces cell death, including apoptotic cell death in different cell lines. CEPA and CDHA have been demonstrated in cultured cells to cause cell death via lipid peroxidation and apoptosis in the absence of alpha-tocopherol. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  7. Fatty acids in berry lipids of six sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L., subspecies carpatica) cultivars grown in Romania

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A systematic mapping of the phytochemical composition of different sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) fruit subspecies is still lacking. No data relating to the fatty acid composition of main lipid fractions from the berries of ssp. carpatica (Romania) have been previously reported. Results The fatty acid composition of the total lipids (oils) and the major lipid fractions (PL, polar lipids; FFA, free fatty acids; TAG, triacylglycerols and SE, sterol esters) of the oils extracted from different parts of six sea buckthorn berry subspecies (ssp. carpatica) cultivated in Romania were investigated using the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The dominating fatty acids in pulp/peel and whole berry oils were palmitic (23-40%), oleic (20-53%) and palmitoleic (11-27%). In contrast to the pulp oils, seed oils had higher amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) (65-72%). The fatty acid compositions of TAGs were very close to the compositions of corresponding seed and pulp oils. The major fatty acids in PLs of berry pulp/peel oils were oleic (20-40%), palmitic (17-27%), palmitoleic (10-22%) and linoleic (10%-20%) acids, whereas in seeds PLs, PUFAs prevailed. Comparing with the other lipid fractions the SEs had the highest contents of saturated fatty acids (SFAs). The fatty acid profiles of the FFA fractions were relatively similar to those of TAGs. Conclusions All parts of the analyzed sea buckthorn berry cultivars (ssp. carpatica) exhibited higher oil content then the other European or Asiatic sea buckthorn subspecies. Moreover, the pulp/peel oils of ssp. carpatica were found to contain high levels of oleic acid and slightly lower amounts of linoleic and α-linolenic acids. The studied cultivars of sea buckthorn from Romania have proven to be potential sources of valuable oils. PMID:22995716

  8. Crystal Structure of Autotaxin, a Lysophospholipase D that Produces Lipid Mediator Lysophosphatidic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Takagi, Junichi; Aoki, Junken; Nureki, Osamu

    Autotaxin (ATX), also known as Enpp2, is a secreted lysophospholipase D that hydrolyzes lysophosphatidylcholine to generate lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a lipid mediator that activates G-protein coupled receptors to evoke various cellular responses. We solved the crystal structures of mouse ATX alone and in complex with LPAs with different acyl-chain lengths and saturations. The structures reveal a multidomain architecture that may maintain the structure of the hydrophobic pocket, in which the respective LPA molecules are accommodated in distinct conformations. Moreover, our data suggest that the produced LPAs are transferred from the catalytic pocket to cognate receptors through a hydrophobic channel.

  9. Amino acid sequences of two nonspecific lipid-transfer proteins from germinated castor bean.

    PubMed

    Takishima, K; Watanabe, S; Yamada, M; Suga, T; Mamiya, G

    1988-11-01

    The amino acid sequence of two nonspecific lipid-transfer proteins (nsLTP) B and C from germinated castor bean seeds have been determined. Both the proteins consist of 92 residues, as for nsLTP previously reported, and their calculated Mr values are 9847 and 9593 for nsLTP-B and nsLTP-C, respectively. The sequences of nsLTP-B and nsLTP-C, compared to the known sequence of nsLTP-A from the same source, are 68% and 35% similar, respectively. No variation was found at the positions of the cysteine residues, indicating that they might be involved in disulfide bridges.

  10. Brain uptake and utilization of fatty acids, lipids & lipoproteins: recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Katz, Robert; Hamilton, James A; Pownall, Henry J; Deckelbaum, Richard J; Hillard, Cecilia J; Leboeuf, Renee C; Watkins, Paul A

    2007-09-01

    A major goal of the second International Workshop on "Brain Uptake and Utilization of Fatty Acids, Lipids and Lipoproteins: Application to Neurological Disorders" was the identification of important future research areas that would lead to accelerated and systematic progress in the field. Major themes identified for future research include the following: (1) Rigorous research protocols for fatty acid (FA) studies should be established to overcome errors introduced by small differences in chain length and degree of unsaturation. (2) Using cellular integration models consisting of endothelial cells, astrocytes, and neurons, investigation of functional lipidomics, cell-specific signaling by lipids, and nutritional considerations should be undertaken. (3) Educational programs should be undertaken for women of childbearing age on the health benefits of omega3 long chain (LC) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) from fish consumption vs risks of mercury in fish. (4) Studies of the "flip-flop" model of passive diffusion should be extended to include other quantitative measures, such as the sizes of different fatty acid pools. (5) Investigations to establish physiologic roles and concentrations of omega3 LC-PUFA in various compartments of the brain should be undertaken. (6) Further studies should be carried out to illuminate the role and behavior of tight junctions in the microvascular endothelium of the blood-brain barrier and astrocytes, with emphasis on developing new LC-PUFA and lipid-based carriers of biomolecules across this barrier. (7) Roles and localization of very low density lipoproteins, low density lipoprotein (LDL), and the LDL receptor in the brain and their interactions with omega3 LC-PUFA, cholesterol, apolipoprotein E1-4, and their derivatives in Alzheimer's disease (AD) should be assessed. (8) Investigation of intraneuronal synthesis of DHA and its effects on signal transduction, apoptosis, and neurite growth stimulation should be undertaken. (9) Nutrition

  11. Effects of brefeldin A and nordihydroguaiaretic acid on endomembrane dynamics and lipid synthesis in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Mérigout, Patricia; Képès, François; Perret, Anne-Marie; Satiat-Jeunemaitre, Béatrice; Moreau, Patrick

    2002-05-08

    Effects of brefeldin A (BFA) and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) on endomembrane structures and lipid synthesis were compared in maize root cells and tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cells. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy studies showed that NDGA altered the structure and distribution of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) within 1 h but not of the Golgi apparatus whereas, as shown previously, BFA altered that organization of the Golgi apparatus and, only subsequently, of the ER. Biochemical studies revealed that both drugs and especially BFA led to a strong inhibition of the phytosterol biosynthetic pathway: BFA led to accumulation of sterol precursors. The importance of phytosterols in membrane architecture and membrane trafficking is discussed.

  12. Cytosolic phospholipase A2-driven PGE2 synthesis within unsaturated fatty acids-induced lipid bodies of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Luciana S; Piva, Bruno; Gentile, Luciana B; Mesquita-Santos, Fabio P; D'Avila, Heloisa; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Bozza, Patricia T; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; Diaz, Bruno L

    2009-03-01

    Cytoplasmic lipid bodies (also known as lipid droplets) are intracellular deposits of arachidonic acid (AA), which can be metabolized for eicosanoid generation. PGE2 is a major AA metabolite produced by epithelial cells and can modulate restoration of epithelium homeostasis after injury. We studied lipid body biogenesis and their role in AA metabolic pathway in an epithelial cell line derived from normal rat intestinal epithelium, IEC-6 cells. Lipid bodies were virtually absent in confluent IEC-6 cells. Stimulation of confluent IEC-6 cells with unsaturated fatty acids, including AA or oleic acid (OA), induced rapid lipid body assembly that was independent on its metabolism to PGE(2), but dependent on G-coupled receptor-driven signaling through p38, PKC, and PI3 K. Newly formed lipid bodies compartmentalized cytosolic phospholipase (cPL)A(2)-alpha, while facilitated AA mobilization and synthesis of PGE(2) within epithelial cells. Thus, both lipid body-related events, including highly regulated biogenesis and functional assembly of cPLA (2)-alpha-driven enhanced AA mobilization and PGE(2)production, may have key roles in epithelial cell-driven inflammatory functions, and may represent relevant therapeutic targets of epithelial pathologies.

  13. Distinctive lipid composition of the copepod Limnocalanus macrurus with a high abundance of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Hiltunen, Minna; Strandberg, Ursula; Keinänen, Markku; Taipale, Sami; Kankaala, Paula

    2014-09-01

    We studied the copepod Limnocalanus macrurus for seasonal variation in the composition of fatty acids, wax esters and sterols in large boreal lakes, where it occurs as a glacial-relict. Vast wax ester reserves of Limnocalanus were accumulated in a period of only two months, and comprised mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and saturated fatty alcohols. In winter, the mobilization of wax esters was selective, and the proportion of long-chain polyunsaturated wax esters declined first. PUFA accounted for >50% of all fatty acids throughout the year reaching up to ca. 65% during late summer and fall. Long-chain PUFA 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 together comprised 17-40% of all fatty acids. The rarely reported C24 and C26 very-long-chain PUFA (VLC-PUFA) comprised 6.2 ± 3.4 % of all fatty acids in August and 2.1 ± 1.7% in September. The VLC-PUFA are presumably synthesized by Limnocalanus from shorter chain-length precursors because they were not found in the potential food sources. We hypothesize that these VLC-PUFA help Limnocalanus to maximize lipid reserves when food is abundant. Sterol content of Limnocalanus, consisting ca. 90% of cholesterol, did not show great seasonal variation. As a lipid-rich copepod with high abundance of PUFA, Limnocalanus is excellent quality food for fish. The VLC-PUFA were also detected in planktivorous fish, suggesting that these compounds can be used as a trophic marker indicating feeding on Limnocalanus.

  14. Lipid composition of the human eye: are red blood cells a good mirror of retinal and optic nerve fatty acids?

    PubMed

    Acar, Niyazi; Berdeaux, Olivier; Grégoire, Stéphane; Cabaret, Stéphanie; Martine, Lucy; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P; Bron, Alain M; Bretillon, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of blood lipids is very frequent in clinical research as it is assumed to reflect the lipid composition of peripheral tissues. Even well accepted such relationships have never been clearly established. This is particularly true in ophthalmology where the use of blood lipids has become very common following recent data linking lipid intake to ocular health and disease. In the present study, we wanted to determine in humans whether a lipidomic approach based on red blood cells could reveal associations between circulating and tissue lipid profiles. To check if the analytical sensitivity may be of importance in such analyses, we have used a double approach for lipidomics. Red blood cells, retinas and optic nerves were collected from 9 human donors. The lipidomic analyses on tissues consisted in gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ionization source-mass spectrometer (LC-ESI-MS). Gas chromatography did not reveal any relevant association between circulating and ocular fatty acids except for arachidonic acid whose circulating amounts were positively associated with its levels in the retina and in the optic nerve. In contrast, several significant associations emerged from LC-ESI-MS analyses. Particularly, lipid entities in red blood cells were positively or negatively associated with representative pools of retinal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), retinal very-long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFA) or optic nerve plasmalogens. LC-ESI-MS is more appropriate than gas chromatography for lipidomics on red blood cells, and further extrapolation to ocular lipids. The several individual lipid species we have identified are good candidates to represent circulating biomarkers of ocular lipids. However, further investigation is needed before considering them as indexes of disease risk and before using them in clinical studies on optic nerve neuropathies or retinal diseases displaying photoreceptors degeneration.

  15. Anthocyanins and phenolic acids from a wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) powder counteract lipid accumulation in THP-1-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Del Bo', Cristian; Cao, Yi; Roursgaard, Martin; Riso, Patrizia; Porrini, Marisa; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Blueberries are a rich source of anthocyanins (ACNs) and phenolic acids (PA), which are hypothesized to protect against development of atherosclerosis. The present study examined the effect of an ACN- and PA-rich fractions, obtained from a wild blueberry powder, on the capacity to counteract lipid accumulation in macrophages derived from monocytic THP-1 cells. In addition, we tested the capacity of pure ACNs and their metabolites to alter lipid accumulation. THP-1-derived macrophages were incubated with fatty acids (500 μM oleic/palmitic acid, 2:1 ratio) and different concentrations (from 0.05 to 10 μg mL(-1)) of ACN- and PA-rich fractions, pure ACN standards (malvidin, delphinidin and cyanidin 3-glucoside), and metabolites (syringic, gallic and protocatechuic acids). Lipid accumulation was quantified with the fluorescent dye Nile red. Lipid accumulation was reduced at all concentrations of the ACN-rich fraction tested with a maximum reduction at 10 μg mL(-1) (-27.4%; p < 0.0001). The PA-rich fraction significantly reduced the lipid accumulation only at the low concentrations from 0.05 µg mL(-1) to 0.3 µg mL(-1), with respect to the control with fatty acids. Supplementation with pure ACN compounds (malvidin and delphinidin-3-glucoside and its metabolic products (syringic and gallic acid)) reduced lipid accumulation especially at the low concentrations, while no significant effect was observed after cyanidin-3-glucoside and protocatechuic acid supplementation. The results demonstrated a potential role of both the ACN- and PA-rich fractions and single compounds in the lipid accumulation also at concentrations close to that achievable in vivo.

  16. Light-Induced Changes in Fatty Acid Profiles of Specific Lipid Classes in Several Freshwater Phytoplankton Species

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Alexander; Piepho, Maike; Harwood, John L.; Guschina, Irina A.; Arts, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the influence of two light intensities [40 and 300 μmol PAR / (m2s)] on the fatty acid composition of three distinct lipid classes in four freshwater phytoplankton species. We chose species of different taxonomic classes in order to detect potentially similar reaction characteristics that might also be present in natural phytoplankton communities. From samples of the bacillariophyte Asterionella formosa, the chrysophyte Chromulina sp., the cryptophyte Cryptomonas ovata and the zygnematophyte Cosmarium botrytis we first separated glycolipids (monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, digalactosyldiacylglycerol, and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol), phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylserine) as well as non-polar lipids (triacylglycerols), before analyzing the fatty acid composition of each lipid class. High variation in the fatty acid composition existed among different species. Individual fatty acid compositions differed in their reaction to changing light intensities in the four species. Although no generalizations could be made for species across taxonomic classes, individual species showed clear but small responses in their ecologically-relevant omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in terms of proportions and of per tissue carbon quotas. Knowledge on how lipids like fatty acids change with environmental or culture conditions is of great interest in ecological food web studies, aquaculture, and biotechnology, since algal lipids are the most important sources of omega-3 long-chain PUFA for aquatic and terrestrial consumers, including humans. PMID:27014290

  17. High levels of icosapentaenoic acid in the lipids of oyster Crassostrea gigas ranging over both Japan and France.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroaki; Marty, Yanic

    2010-01-01

    The lipid and fatty acids of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, collected both in Japan and France, were analyzed. Triacylglycerols and sterols were the major classes in the neutral lipids of both populations of C. gigas between the two countries, and they had significant levels of phospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine) with ceramideaminoethylphosphonate in their polar tissue lipids. The differences of 18:3n-3 and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid; DHA) levels in the depot triacylglycerols suggest the influence of dietary phytoplankton in different environments of the two countries. Although the levels of the fatty acids slightly differed, that of 20:5n-3 (icosapentaenoic acid; EPA, 20.5-24.8%) in the triacylglycerols was specifically the highest fatty acid in all the samples. The major polyunsaturated fatty acids in the polar lipids of all samples were EPA (13.2-17.8% for phosphatidylethanolamine and 13.4-22.7% for phosphatidylcholine) and DHA (18.9-26.8% for phosphatidylethanolamine and 13.1-22.5% for phosphatidylcholine). The fluctuation of total PUFA levels in the polar lipids between samples of both countries suggests the influence of diet. In addition, the consistently high EPA levels in the phospholipids may compensate for the variation in DHA levels.

  18. Betaine affects muscle lipid metabolism via regulating the fatty acid uptake and oxidation in finishing pig.

    PubMed

    Li, Sisi; Wang, Haichao; Wang, Xinxia; Wang, Yizhen; Feng, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Betaine affects fat metabolism in animals, but the specific mechanism is still not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible mechanisms of betaine in altering lipid metabolism in muscle tissue in finishing pigs. A total of 120 crossbred gilts (Landrace × Yorkshire × Duroc) with an average initial body weight of 70.1 kg were randomly allotted to three dietary treatments. The treatments included a corn-soybean meal basal diet supplemented with 0, 1250 or 2500 mg/kg betaine. The feeding experiment lasted 42 d. Betaine addition to the diet significantly increased the concentration of free fatty acids (FFA) in muscle (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the levels of serum cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were decreased (P < 0.05) and total cholesterol content was increased in muscle (P < 0.05) of betaine fed pigs. Experiments on genes involved in fatty acid transport showed that betaine increased expression of lipoprotein lipase(LPL), fatty acid translocase/cluster of differentiation (FAT/CD36), fatty acid binding protein (FABP3) and fatty acid transport protein (FATP1) (P < 0.05). The abundance of fatty acid transport protein and fatty acid binding protein were also increased by betaine (P < 0.05). As for the key factors involved in fatty acid oxidation, although betaine supplementation didn't affect the level of carnitine and malonyl-CoA, betaine increased mRNA and protein abundance of carnitine palmitransferase-1(CPT1) and phosphorylated-AMPK (P < 0.05). The results suggested that betaine may promoted muscle fatty acid uptake via up-regulating the genes related to fatty acid transporter including FAT/CD36, FATP1 and FABP3. On the other hand, betaine activated AMPK and up-regulated genes related to fatty acid oxidation including PPARα and CPT1. The underlying mechanism regulating fatty acid metabolism in pigs supplemented with betaine is associated with the up-regulation of genes involved in fatty acid transport and fatty

  19. Mechanism of rapid elimination of lysophosphatidic acid and related lipids from the circulation of mice

    PubMed Central

    Salous, Abdel K.; Panchatcharam, Manikandan; Sunkara, Manjula; Mueller, Paul; Dong, Anping; Wang, Yuhuan; Graf, Gregory A.; Smyth, Susan S.; Morris, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator. Concentrations of the major LPA species in mouse plasma decreased uniformly following administration of a potent selective inhibitor of the LPA-generating lysophospholipase D autotaxin, identifying an active mechanism for removal of LPA from the circulation. LPA, akylglycerol phosphate (AGP), sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), and a variety of structural mimetics of these lipids, including phosphatase-resistant phosphonate analogs of LPA, were rapidly eliminated (t1/2 < 30 s) from the circulation of mice following intravenous administration of a single bolus dose without significant metabolism in situ in the blood. These lipids accumulated in the liver. Elimination of intravenously administered LPA was blunted by ligation of the hepatic circulation, and ∼90% of LPA administered through the portal vein was accumulated by the isolated perfused mouse liver at first pass. At early times following intravenous administration, more LPA was associated with a nonparenchymal liver cell fraction than with hepatocytes. Primary cultures of nonparenchymal liver cells rapidly assimilated exogenously provided LPA. Our results identify hepatic uptake as an important determinant of the bioavailability of LPA and bioactive lysophospholipid mimetics and suggest a mechanism to explain changes in circulating LPA levels that have been associated with liver dysfunction in humans. PMID:23948545

  20. Acid-Catalyzed Algal Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Lipid and Carbohydrate-Based Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, L. M. L.; Nagle, N.; Davis, R.; Sweeney, N.; Van Wychen, S.; Lowell, A.; Pienkos, P. T.

    2014-11-12

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. We studied the effect of harvest timing on the conversion yields, using two algal strains; Chlorella and Scenedesmus, generating biomass with distinctive compositional ratios of protein, carbohydrate, and lipids. We found that the late harvest Scenedesmus biomass had the maximum theoretical biofuel potential at 143 gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) combined fuel yield per dry ton biomass, followed by late harvest Chlorella at 128 GGE per ton. Our experimental data show a clear difference between the two strains, as Scenedesmus was more successfully converted in this process with a demonstrated 97 GGE per ton. Our measurements indicated a release of >90% of the available glucose in the hydrolysate liquors and an extraction and recovery of up to 97% of the fatty acids from wet biomass. Techno-economic analysis for the combined product yields indicates that this process exhibits the potential to improve per-gallon fuel costs by up to 33% compared to a lipids-only process for one strain, Scenedesmus, grown to the mid-point harvest condition.

  1. Proximate, amino acid and lipid compositions in Sinonovacula constricta (Lamarck) reared at different salinities.

    PubMed

    Ran, Zhaoshou; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Runtao; Xu, Jilin; Liao, Kai; Yu, Xuejun; Zhong, Yingying; Ye, Mengwei; Yu, Shanshan; Ran, Yun; Huang, Wei; Yan, Xiaojun

    2017-10-01

    Sinonovacula constricta is an economically and nutritionally important bivalve native to the estuaries and mudflats of China, Japan and Korea. In the present study, S. constricta, cultured either under experimental conditions or collected directly from natural coastal areas with different seawater salinities, was investigated for changes in proximates, amino acids and lipids. When culture salinity was increased, levels of moisture, carbohydrate, crude protein and crude lipid were significantly decreased, whereas the level of ash was significantly increased. The level of Ala was increased by 1.5- to 2-fold, whereas the contents of most lipids were significantly decreased, and the proportion of phosphatidylethanolamine was significantly increased. Notably, a high proportion of ceramide aminoethylphosphonates was detected in S. constricta reared at all salinities. The energy content appears to be higher in S. constricta reared at higher salinity. In experimental S. constricta, when the salinity was enhanced, the changes of compositions were very close to those reared at constant high salinity. Sinonovacula constricta reared at higher salinities possesses a superior quality. A short period of exposure to a higher salinity for farmed S. constricta reared at a lower salinity before harvest would be useful with respect to improving its nutritive value. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Photolysis and membrane lipid peroxidation of human erythrocytes by m-chloroperbenzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Abou-Seif, M A; Elgendy, E M

    1998-09-14

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the biological hazard of photooxidation products of m-chloroperbenzoic acid (mCPBA), as a novel photo-sensitizer, on lysis and membrane lipid peroxidation of human red blood cells (RBC). The photohemolysis activity of mCPBA oxidative products was concentration- and exposure time-dependent. Ten minutes photoexposure time and 100 micromol/L of mCPBA concentration were optimum to study the effect of generated superoxide (O2.-) and hydroxyl (.OH) radicals on RBC. The hemolytic effect of mCPBA was highly significantly inhibited by formate (as an .OH radical scavenger) compared with the partial inhibition effect of SOD-like Cu(II) complex (as O2.- radical Scavenger). The MDA value (an end product of membrane lipid peroxidation of RBC) induced by mCPBA was highly significantly decreased by formate. The generation of O2.- radicals by mCPBA was also confirmed by the partial hemolytic effect of phenazine methosulfate (PMS., O2.- radical generation). The data suggest the molecular mechanism of the oxygen radical species (O2.- and .OH through the photosensitization reaction of mCPBA and explain that hydroxyl radicals (.OH) play an active role in the photohemolysis process and peroxidation of membrane lipids of human erythrocytes.

  3. Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid Attenuates Lipid Accumulation in Endoplasmic Reticulum-Stressed Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yinan; Kandadi, Machender R.; Zhu, Meijun; Ren, Jun; Sreejayan, Nair

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim Recent evidence suggests that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress provoked under diabetic conditions augments the expression of scavenger receptors on macrophages, promoting the uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) uptake and atherogenesis. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) attenuates lipid accumulation in macrophages subjected to ER stress. Methods Cultured human macrophages were subjected to ER-stress by treating them with tunicamycin. Lipid-uptake by macrophages subjected to ER-stress in the presence or absence of TUDCA was assessed by oil red O staining and by assessing the cellular uptake of Dil-ox-LDL by fluorescence measurement. Protein levels and phosphorylation status of ER stress markers, insulin-signalling molecules and scavenger receptor were assessed by Western blotting. Results Treatment of cultured human macrophages with the ER-stressor tunicamycin caused an increase in the protein levels of CD-36, and augmentation of lipid-uptake both of which were inhibited by TUDCA. TUDCA-treatment inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER-stress as evidenced by the attenuation of phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2α and glucose reactive protein-78. In addition, TUDCA improved insulin signaling in macrophages by augmenting Akt-phosphorylation and blunting c-Jun N-terminal kinase activity. Conclusion Inhibition of macrophage ER-stress may represent a potential strategy in preventing atherogenesis under diabetic conditions. PMID:19834331

  4. Comparative evaluation and selection of a method for lipid and fatty acid extraction from macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Puja; Reddy, C R K; Jha, Bhavanath

    2011-08-15

    A comparative evaluation of Bligh and Dyer, Folch, and Cequier-Sánchez methods for quantitative determination of total lipids (TLs) and fatty acids (FAs) was accomplished in selective green (Ulva fasciata), red (Gracilaria corticata), and brown algae (Sargassum tenerrimum) using a full factorial categorical design. Applications of sonication and buffer individually on lipid extraction solvent systems were also evaluated. The FA recoveries obtained from the aforementioned methods were compared with those of direct transesterification (DT) methods to identify the best extraction methods. The experimental design showed that macroalgal matrix, extraction method, and buffer were key determinants for TL and FA recoveries (P≤0.05), exhibiting significant interactions. But sonication gave erratic results with no interaction with any of the factors investigated. The buffered solvent system of Folch rendered the highest TL yield in U. fasciata and G. corticata while the buffered system of Bligh and Dyer gave the highest yield in S. tenerrimum. DT methods were more convenient and accurate for FA quantification and rendered 1.5-2 times higher yields when compared with the best conventional method, minimizing the use of chlorinated solvents, their cost of analysis, and disposal. The buffered solvent system was found to be the most appropriate for lipid research in macroalgae.

  5. Quantitative intracellular localization of cationic lipid-nucleic acid nanoparticles with fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Majzoub, Ramsey N.; Ewert, Kai K.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Current activity in developing synthetic carriers of nucleic acids (NA) and small molecule drugs for therapeutic applications is unprecedented. One promising class of synthetic vectors for the delivery of therapeutic NA is PEGylated cationic lipid (CL)-NA nanoparticles (NPs). Chemically-modified PEG-lipids can be used to surface-functionalize lipid-NA nanoparticles, allowing researchers to design active nanoparticles that can overcome the various intracellular and extracellular barriers to efficient delivery. Optimization of these functionalized vectors requires a comprehensive understanding of their intracellular pathways. In this chapter we present 2 distinct methods for investigating the intracellular activity of PEGylated CL-NA NPs using quantitative analysis of fluorescence microscopy. The first method, spatial localization, will describe how to prepare fluorescently-labeled CL-NA NPs, perform fluorescence microscopy and properly analyze the data to measure the intracellular distribution of nanoparticles and fluorescent signal. We provide software which allows data from multiple cells to be averaged together and yield statistically significant results. The second method, fluorescence colocalization, will describe how to label endocytic organelle via Rab-GFPs and generate micrographs for software-assisted NP-endocytic marker colocalization measurements. These tools will allow researchers to study the endosomal trafficking of CL-NA NPs which can guide their design and improve their efficiency. PMID:27436314

  6. Lipid, fatty acid and protein content of late larval to early juvenile stages of the western rock lobster, Panulirus cygnus.

    PubMed

    Limbourn, Andrew J; Nichols, Peter D

    2009-03-01

    Lipid, fatty acid and protein content were determined individually on 7 phyllosomata, 69 clear pueruli, 286 pre-moult pueruli, and 86 juvenile western rock lobster (WRL) collected from four locations between the settlement seasons 2000 to 2006 to evaluate compositional changes during the non-feeding puerulus stage. Only the lipid content, particularly the phospholipids, decreased significantly with development. Protein declined sharply following moult to the juvenile. PL comprised between 86-94% of total lipid in all animals, and declined most between phyllosomata and clear pueruli (238.5 to 121.4 mg g(-1) DW) (p<0.001). Triacylglycerols were the only lipid to increase in absolute amounts with development, but declined 53% on average following moult to juvenile. This increase in TAG is likely due to the conversion of phospholipids to triacylglycerols. Monounsaturated fatty acids were the main energy form utilised during benthic development while polyunsaturated fatty acids showed a high degree of sparing. The n-3:n-6 fatty acid ratio of juveniles indicates that they may be approaching critically low levels of stored lipid energy reserves. Both protein, and lipid, declined sharply from the final puerulus phase to the juvenile confirming that a high energetic demand is required to fuel the moulting process.

  7. Lipidomic Profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii Reveals Critical Changes in Lipid Composition in Response to Acetic Acid Stress

    PubMed Central

    Riezman, Howard; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555) cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L−1, while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L−1 acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS) showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP)2C 2.2×) and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP)2C 2.7×), when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to generate large

  8. Lipidomic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii reveals critical changes in lipid composition in response to acetic acid stress.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Lina; Santos, Aline Xs; Riezman, Howard; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555) cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L(-1), while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L(-1) acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS) showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP)2C 2.2×) and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP)2C 2.7×), when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to generate large

  9. Lipid content and fatty acid distribution in tissues from Portuguese dogfish, leafscale gulper shark and black dogfish.

    PubMed

    Remme, Jannicke Fugledal; Larssen, Wenche Emblem; Bruheim, Inge; Saebø, Per Christian; Saebø, Asgeir; Stoknes, Iren S

    2006-04-01

    The lipid characterization in tissues from the three deep-sea sharks leafscale gulper shark (Centrophorus squamosus), Portuguese dogfish (Centroscymnus coelolepis) and black dogfish (Centrocyllium fabricii) captured at Hatton Bank in the North Atlantic were examined. The objective was to determine the lipid content and the fatty acid composition in different tissues. In addition, the fatty acid composition in tissues and species was compared. The tissues examined were pancreas, heart, kidney, stomach, spleen and liver. The lipid content was high in liver (40-50%) and ranged from 1% to 5% in the other tissues. The dominant fatty acids were C16:0, C18:1 (n-9), C18:1 (n-7) and C22:6 (n-3) in all tissues. All tissues had a high content of unsaturated fatty acids.

  10. Lipids, lipoproteins and fatty acid composition in obese adolescents undergoing a very low calorie diet.

    PubMed

    Widhalm, K M; Zwiauer, K F

    1984-12-01

    Sixteen obese adolescents (mean +/- SD age: group I 12.5 +/- 2.1 and group II 12.0 +/- 2.5 years) were treated at least 3 weeks with two different very low calorie diet (VLCD) regimens. The VLCD in group I contained 33g proteins, 25.5g carbohydrates and 0.7g fat (240 kcal, 1004KJ) and in group II 44g protein, 33g carbohydrates and 0.9g fat (320 kcal, 1339KJ). After the 3 weeks treatment total serum cholesterol decreased from 180 +/- 34 mg/dl in group I and 184 +/- 34 mg/dl in group II respectively, to 125 + 16 mg/dl and 120 + 22 mg/dl. This fall was mainly due to the highly significant decrease of LDL-cholesterol. VLDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides in group I remained almost unchanged. In group II triglycerides increased significantly from 81 +/- 19 mg/dl to 104 +/- 19 mg/dl and HDL-cholesterol decreased slightly. The LDL-C HDL-C- ratio in both groups improved considerably. Fatty acid composition of the serum lipids changed only slightly: In total serum linoleic acid levels declined slightly in group I and remained constant in group II. Linoleic acid content in cholesterylesters declined moderately in group I from 37.5 +/- 5.6% to 34.8 +/- 5.6% whereas arachidonic acid increased slightly in both groups. In phospholipids, oleic acid declined in both groups significantly, linoleic acid declined significantly in group I and arachidonic acid increased in group I significantly. Similar changes occurred in triglycerides. After 3 weeks treatment with a practically fat free alimentation no biochemical signs of essential fatty acid deficiency could be detected.