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Sample records for lipiodol induced cerebral

  1. Cerebral Lipiodol Embolism after Lymphatic Embolization for Plastic Bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Dori, Yoav; Itkin, Maxim; Licht, Daniel J.; Ichord, Rebecca; Vossough, Arastoo

    2016-01-01

    An adolescent with plastic bronchitis due to congenital heart disease had altered mental status after an interventional lymphatic procedure in which lipiodol contrast was used. Neuroimaging revealed cerebral lipiodol embolization due to direct shunting between lymphatic channels and pulmonary veins. Cerebral lipiodol embolization is a potential neurologic morbidity associated with interventional lymphatic procedures. PMID:27297208

  2. Cerebral Lipiodol Embolism: A Complication of Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Koichi Nojiri, Junichi; Takase, Yukinori; Egashira, Yoshikazu; Azama, Shinichi; Kato, Akira; Kitahara, Kenji; Miyazaki, Koji; Kudo, Sho

    2007-06-15

    We report a case of cerebral lipiodol embolism following transcatheter chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma. A 70-year-old woman with a large unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma underwent TACE. Her level of consciousness deteriorated after the procedure, and magnetic resonance imaging and non-contrast computed tomography revealed a cerebral lipiodol embolism. Despite intensive care, the patient died 2 weeks later. The complication might have been due to systemic-pulmonary shunts caused by previous surgeries and/or direct invasion of the recurrent tumor.

  3. Management of Aortic Replacement-Induced Chylothorax by Lipiodol Lymphography

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Akihiro; Hachiya, Takashi; Inaba, Yu; Tamura, Kentaro; Yashiro, Hideki; Nakatsuka, Seiji; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Chylothorax is a rare but serious complication of thoracic aortic surgery, leading to malnutrition, respiratory insufficiency, and prolonged hospital stay. In this article, we describe the successful treatment of a case of intractable chylothorax by lipiodol lymphography. The patient was a 39-year-old man who underwent descending aortic replacement for a remaining dissected aneurysm after total arch replacement. Chylothorax developed postoperatively. After complete oral intake cessation, total parenteral nutrition, and plasmatic factor XIII administration, lipiodol lymphography detected the chyle leakage location and subsequently decreased pleural effusion. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged on postoperative day 30 without any complications. PMID:26131032

  4. Caffeine induced changes in cerebral circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1985-09-01

    While the caffeine induced cerebral vasoconstriction is well documented, the effects of oral ingestion of the drug in a dose range comparable to the quantities in which it is usually consumed and the intensity and duration of the associated reduction in cerebral circulation are unknown. Cerebral blood flow was measured via the TTXenon inhalation technique before and thirty and ninety minutes after the oral administration of 250 mg of caffeine or a placebo, under double-blind conditions. Caffeine ingestion was found to be associated with significant reductions in cerebral perfusion thirty and ninety minutes later. The placebo group showed no differences between the three sets of cerebral blood flow values.

  5. Targeting cancer chemotherapeutic agents by use of lipiodol contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, T. )

    1990-11-01

    Arterially administered Lipiodol Ultrafluid contrast medium selectively remained in various malignant solid tumors because of the difference in time required for the removal of Lipiodol contrast medium from normal capillaries and tumor neovasculature. Although blood flow was maintained in the tumor, even immediately after injection Lipiodol contrast medium remained in the neovasculature of the tumor. To target anti-cancer agents to tumors by using Lipiodol contrast medium as a carrier, the characteristics of the agents were examined. Anti-cancer agents had to be soluble in Lipiodol, be stable in it, and separate gradually from it so that the anti-cancer agents would selectively remain in the tumor. These conditions were found to be necessary on the basis of the measurement of radioactivity in VX2 tumors implanted in the liver of 16 rabbits that received arterial injections of 14C-labeled doxorubicin. Antitumor activities and side effects of arterial injections of two types of anti-cancer agents were compared in 76 rabbits with VX2 tumors. Oily anti-cancer agents that had characteristics essential for targeting were compared with simple mixtures of anti-cancer agents with Lipiodol contrast medium that did not have these essential characteristics. Groups of rabbits that received oily anti-cancer agents responded significantly better than groups that received simple mixtures, and side effects were observed more frequently in the groups that received the simple mixtures. These results suggest that targeting of the anti-cancer agent to the tumor is important for treatment of solid malignant tumors.

  6. Induced hypertension for the treatment of cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Direct effect on cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Muizelaar, J.P.; Becker, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    The best treatment for symptomatic cerebral ischemia from presumed vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage remains a matter of controversy. A direct effect of any treatment modality on regional cerebral blood flow has never been documented. In a series of 43 patients operated on for ruptured anterior circulation aneurysms, five patients (11.6%) developed clinical signs of cerebral ischemia postoperatively. In four of those patients, the diagnosis of vasospasm was made with measurements of cerebral blood flow (133Xe inhalation or intravenous injection, 10-16 detectors, cerebral blood flow infinity). Treatment with induced arterial hypertension with phenylephrine was instituted. Hemodilution was instituted in one patient; the other three patients already had hematocrits in the range of 33. Within 1 hour, the cerebral blood flow measurement was repeated to document the effect of treatment. The average pretreatment hemispherical blood flow on the operated side was 18.8 mL/100 g per minute, on the contralateral side 21.0 mL/100 g per minute. With treatment these flows increased to 30.8 and 35.8 mL/100 g per minute, respectively. There was also an immediate and obvious positive clinical effect in all patients. The role of measurement of cerebral blood flow in the clinical management of vasospasm is discussed. We stress the theoretical and practical advances of measurements of cerebral blood flow over cerebral angiography, especially in comatose patients.

  7. Carbon dioxide induced changes in cerebral blood flow and flow velocity: role of cerebrovascular resistance and effective cerebral perfusion pressure

    PubMed Central

    Grüne, Frank; Kazmaier, Stephan; Stolker, Robert J; Visser, Gerhard H; Weyland, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In addition to cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) zero flow pressure (ZFP), effective cerebral perfusion pressure (CPPe) and the resistance area product (RAP) are supplemental determinants of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Until now, the interrelationship of PaCO2-induced changes in CBF, CVR, CPPe, ZFP, and RAP is not fully understood. In a controlled crossover trial, we investigated 10 anesthetized patients aiming at PaCO2 levels of 30, 37, 43, and 50 mm Hg. Cerebral blood flow was measured with a modified Kety-Schmidt-technique. Zero flow pressure and RAP was estimated by linear regression analysis of pressure–flow velocity relationships of the middle cerebral artery. Effective cerebral perfusion pressure was calculated as the difference between mean arterial pressure and ZFP, CVR as the ratio CPPe/CBF. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way RM-ANOVA. When comparing hypocapnia with hypercapnia, CBF showed a significant exponential reduction by 55% and mean VMCA by 41%. Effective cerebral perfusion pressure linearly decreased by 17% while ZFP increased from 14 to 29 mm Hg. Cerebrovascular resistance increased by 96% and RAP by 39% despite these concordant changes in mean CVR and Doppler-derived RAP correlation between these variables was weak (r=0.43). In conclusion, under general anesthesia hypocapnia-induced reduction in CBF is caused by both an increase in CVR and a decrease in CPPe, as a consequence of an increase in ZFP. PMID:25873428

  8. Holmium-lipiodol-alginate microspheres for fluoroscopy-guided embolotherapy and multimodality imaging.

    PubMed

    Oerlemans, Chris; Seevinck, Peter R; Smits, Maarten L; Hennink, Wim E; Bakker, Chris J G; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Nijsen, J Frank W

    2015-03-30

    Embolotherapy is a minimally invasive transcatheter technique aiming at reduction or complete obstruction of the blood flow by infusion of micro-sized particles in order to induce tumor regression. A major drawback of the current commercially available and clinically used microspheres is that they cannot be detected in vivo with medical imaging techniques, impeding intra- and post-procedural feedback. It can be expected that real-time monitoring of microsphere infusion and post-procedural imaging will result in better predictability and higher efficacy of the treatment. In this study, a novel microsphere formulation has been developed that can be visualized with fluoroscopy, X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The microspheres were prepared with the JetCutter technique and consist of alginate (matrix-forming polymer), holmium (cross-linking and MRI contrast agent), lipiodol (radiopaque contrast agent) and Pluronic F-68 (surfactant). The mean size (±SEM) of the hydrated holmium-lipiodol-alginate microspheres (Ho-lip-ams) was 570±12 μm with a holmium content of 0.38±0.01% (w/w). Stability studies showed that the microspheres remained intact during incubation for two weeks in fetal calf serum (FCS) at 37 °C. The inclusion of lipiodol in the microspheres rendered excellent visualization capabilities for fluoroscopy and CT, whereas the holmium ions, which keep the alginate network together, also allow MR imaging. In this study it was shown that single sphere detection was possible by fluoroscopy, CT and MRI. The Ho-lip-ams were visualized in real-time, during infusion in a porcine kidney using fluoroscopy, and post-procedural, the deposition of the microspheres was examined with fluoroscopy, (cone beam rotational) CT and MRI. The different imaging modalities showed similar deposition patterns of the microspheres within the organ. The combination of intra-procedural visualization, multimodality imaging for patient follow-up and the

  9. An Unusual Presentation of Opioid Induced Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    Butt, Mujeeb-Ur-Rehman Abid; Nadir, Reeja

    2016-06-01

    Opioid induced cerebral infarction is one of the most dreadful complications encountered in clinical practice. A30-year known hypertensive male presented to the emergency department of Shalamar Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan, with altered state of consciousness. He had been in his usual state of health a day before the presentation. On examination he was afebrile, his GCS was 3/15 having pinpoint pupils with absent doll's eye movements. His blood pressure was 90/60 mmHg, pulse rate was 62/minute, and respiratory rate was 10/minute. His right plantar was upgoing. He was resuscitated in emergency and was placed on ventilator due to hypoxemia. Computed tomography (CT) of brain revealed bilateral internal capsule hypolucencies and bilateral frontal lobe infarction. His urinary toxicological screening revealed extremely high concentrations of opioids and benzodiazepine. Patient made an uneventful recovery with antidote and supportive care. PMID:27376233

  10. Arsenic-induced oxidative cerebral disorders: protection by taurine.

    PubMed

    Das, Joydeep; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Manna, Prasenjit; Sinha, Mahua; Sil, Parames C

    2009-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate whether the conditionally essential amino acid, taurine, could play any protective role against the potent neurotoxin arsenic (As)-induced oxidative impairment in the rat brain. Administration in the form of NaAsO(2) (at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight for 2 days, orally), As increased the intracellular accumulation of metallic As, reactive oxygen species, and super oxide radicals. The toxin also augmented the extent of lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, and the levels of glutathione disulphide. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes, membrane-bound enzymes, acetylcholinesterase, and the levels of reduced glutathione, as well as total thiols, have been significantly decreased due to As exposure. Oral administration of taurine (at a dose of 100 mg/kg/body weight for 5 days) was found to be very effective in the prevention of As-induced oxidative impairment in the brain tissue of the experimental rats. To validate the experimental results, a well-known water-soluble antioxidant, vitamin C, was used as the positive control in the study. Combining all, results suggest that taurine plays a beneficial role against As-induced cerebral oxidative stress.

  11. Aqueous extract of Cordyceps alleviates cerebral ischemia-induced short-term memory impairment in gerbils.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hak; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Hwang, Lakkyong; Jin, Jun-Jang; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral ischemia is caused by reduced cerebral blood flow due to a transient or permanent cerebral artery occlusion. Ischemic injury in the brain leads to neuronal cell death, and eventually causes neurological impairments. Cordyceps, the name given to the fungi on insects, has abundant useful natural products with various biological activities. Cordyceps is known to have nephroprotective, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antiapoptotic effects. We investigated the effects of Cordyceps on short-term memory, neuronal apoptosis, and cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus following transient global ischemia in gerbils. For this study, a step-down avoidance test, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay, immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and 5-bromo-2'-de-oxyuridine, and western blot for Bax, Bcl-2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and tyrosin kinase B were performed. In the present study, Cordyceps alleviated cerebral ischemia-induced short-term memory impairment. Cordyceps showed therapeutic effects through inhibiting cerebral ischemia-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus. Cordyceps suppressed cerebral ischemia-induced cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus due to the reduced apoptotic neuronal cell death. Cordyceps treatment also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the hippocampus of ischemic gerbils. It can be suggested that Cordyceps overcomes cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis, thus facilitates recovery following cerebral ischemia injury. PMID:27162767

  12. Aqueous extract of Cordyceps alleviates cerebral ischemia-induced short-term memory impairment in gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hak; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Hwang, Lakkyong; Jin, Jun-Jang; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is caused by reduced cerebral blood flow due to a transient or permanent cerebral artery occlusion. Ischemic injury in the brain leads to neuronal cell death, and eventually causes neurological impairments. Cordyceps, the name given to the fungi on insects, has abundant useful natural products with various biological activities. Cordyceps is known to have nephroprotective, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antiapoptotic effects. We investigated the effects of Cordyceps on short-term memory, neuronal apoptosis, and cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus following transient global ischemia in gerbils. For this study, a step-down avoidance test, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay, immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and 5-bromo-2′-de-oxyuridine, and western blot for Bax, Bcl-2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and tyrosin kinase B were performed. In the present study, Cordyceps alleviated cerebral ischemia-induced short-term memory impairment. Cordyceps showed therapeutic effects through inhibiting cerebral ischemia-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus. Cordyceps suppressed cerebral ischemia-induced cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus due to the reduced apoptotic neuronal cell death. Cordyceps treatment also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the hippocampus of ischemic gerbils. It can be suggested that Cordyceps overcomes cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis, thus facilitates recovery following cerebral ischemia injury. PMID:27162767

  13. Tenascin-C induces prolonged constriction of cerebral arteries in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Masashi; Suzuki, Hidenori; Shiba, Masato; Shimojo, Naoshi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Kanamaru, Kenji; Matsushima, Satoshi; Taki, Waro

    2013-07-01

    Tenascin-C (TNC), a matricellular protein, is induced in association with cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The aim of this study was to assess the vasoconstrictive effects of TNC and its mechanisms of action on cerebral arteries in vivo. Two dosages (1 and 10μg) of TNC were administered intracisternally to healthy rats, and the effects were evaluated by neurobehavioral tests and India-ink angiography at 24, 48, and 72h after the administration. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to explore the underlying mechanisms on constricted cerebral arteries after 24h. The effects of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonists (LPS-RS), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 inhibitors (SP600125 and SB203580) on TNC-induced vasoconstriction were evaluated at 24h. Higher dosages of TNC induced more severe cerebral arterial constriction, which continued for more than 72h. TNC administration also upregulated TLR4, and activated JNK and p38 in the smooth muscle cell layer of the constricted cerebral artery. LPS-RS blocked TNC-induced TLR4 upregulation, JNK and p38 activation, and vasoconstrictive effects. SP600125 and SB203580 abolished TNC-induced TLR4 upregulation and vasoconstrictive effects. TNC may cause prolonged cerebral arterial constriction via TLR4 and activation of JNK and p38, which may upregulate TLR4. These findings suggest that TNC causes cerebral vasospasm and provides a novel therapeutic approach against it.

  14. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Curtis R.; Hanna, Mina; Behnke, Bradley J.; Stabley, John N.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Davis, Robert T.; Ghosh, Payal; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Delp, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence indicates that cerebral blood flow is both increased and diminished in astronauts on return to Earth. Data from ground-based animal models simulating the effects of microgravity have shown that decrements in cerebral perfusion are associated with enhanced vasoconstriction and structural remodeling of cerebral arteries. Based on these results, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 13 d of spaceflight [Space Transportation System (STS)-135 shuttle mission] enhances myogenic vasoconstriction, increases medial wall thickness, and elicits no change in the mechanical properties of mouse cerebral arteries. Basilar and posterior communicating arteries (PCAs) were isolated from 9-wk-old female C57BL/6 mice for in vitro vascular and mechanical testing. Contrary to that hypothesized, myogenic vasoconstrictor responses were lower and vascular distensibility greater in arteries from spaceflight group (SF) mice (n=7) relative to ground-based control group (GC) mice (n=12). Basilar artery maximal diameter was greater in SF mice (SF: 236±9 μm and GC: 215±5 μm) with no difference in medial wall thickness (SF: 12.4±1.6 μm; GC: 12.2±1.2 μm). Stiffness of the PCA, as characterized via nanoindentation, was lower in SF mice (SF: 3.4±0.3 N/m; GC: 5.4±0.8 N/m). Collectively, spaceflight-induced reductions in myogenic vasoconstriction and stiffness and increases in maximal diameter of cerebral arteries signify that elevations in brain blood flow may occur during spaceflight. Such changes in cerebral vascular control of perfusion could contribute to increases in intracranial pressure and an associated impairment of visual acuity in astronauts during spaceflight.—Taylor, C. R., Hanna, M., Behnke, B. J., Stabley, J. N., McCullough, D. J., Davis III, R. T., Ghosh, P., Papadopoulos, A., Muller-Delp, J. M., Delp, M. D. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated

  15. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Curtis R; Hanna, Mina; Behnke, Bradley J; Stabley, John N; McCullough, Danielle J; Davis, Robert T; Ghosh, Payal; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Muller-Delp, Judy M; Delp, Michael D

    2013-06-01

    Evidence indicates that cerebral blood flow is both increased and diminished in astronauts on return to Earth. Data from ground-based animal models simulating the effects of microgravity have shown that decrements in cerebral perfusion are associated with enhanced vasoconstriction and structural remodeling of cerebral arteries. Based on these results, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 13 d of spaceflight [Space Transportation System (STS)-135 shuttle mission] enhances myogenic vasoconstriction, increases medial wall thickness, and elicits no change in the mechanical properties of mouse cerebral arteries. Basilar and posterior communicating arteries (PCAs) were isolated from 9-wk-old female C57BL/6 mice for in vitro vascular and mechanical testing. Contrary to that hypothesized, myogenic vasoconstrictor responses were lower and vascular distensibility greater in arteries from spaceflight group (SF) mice (n=7) relative to ground-based control group (GC) mice (n=12). Basilar artery maximal diameter was greater in SF mice (SF: 236±9 μm and GC: 215±5 μm) with no difference in medial wall thickness (SF: 12.4±1.6 μm; GC: 12.2±1.2 μm). Stiffness of the PCA, as characterized via nanoindentation, was lower in SF mice (SF: 3.4±0.3 N/m; GC: 5.4±0.8 N/m). Collectively, spaceflight-induced reductions in myogenic vasoconstriction and stiffness and increases in maximal diameter of cerebral arteries signify that elevations in brain blood flow may occur during spaceflight. Such changes in cerebral vascular control of perfusion could contribute to increases in intracranial pressure and an associated impairment of visual acuity in astronauts during spaceflight. PMID:23457215

  16. SU-D-BRB-07: Lipiodol Impact On Dose Distribution in Liver SBRT After TACE

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, D; Ozawa, S; Hioki, K; Suzuki, T; Lin, Y; Okumura, T; Ochi, Y; Nakashima, T; Ohno, Y; Kimura, T; Murakami, Y; Nagata, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) combining transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with Lipiodol is expected to improve local control. This study aims to evaluate the impact of Lipiodol on dose distribution by comparing the dosimetric performance of the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm, anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and Monte Carlo (MC) method using a virtual heterogeneous phantom and a treatment plan for liver SBRT after TACE. Methods: The dose distributions calculated using AAA and AXB algorithm, both in Eclipse (ver. 11; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), and EGSnrc-MC were compared. First, the inhomogeneity correction accuracy of the AXB algorithm and AAA was evaluated by comparing the percent depth dose (PDD) obtained from the algorithms with that from the MC calculations using a virtual inhomogeneity phantom, which included water and Lipiodol. Second, the dose distribution of a liver SBRT patient treatment plan was compared between the calculation algorithms. Results In the virtual phantom, compared with the MC calculations, AAA underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 5.1% and 9.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 6.0%. Furthermore, compared with the MC calculations, the AXB algorithm underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 4.5% and 10.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 4.2%. In the SBRT plan, the AAA and AXB algorithm underestimated the maximum doses in the Lipiodol region by 9.0% in comparison with the MC calculations. In clinical cases, the dose enhancement in the Lipiodol region can approximately 10% increases in tumor dose without increase of dose to normal tissue. Conclusion: The MC method demonstrated a larger increase in the dose in the Lipiodol region than the AAA and AXB algorithm. Notably, dose enhancement were observed in the tumor area; this may lead to a clinical benefit.

  17. Music-induced changes in functional cerebral asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Markus; Hodgetts, Sophie; Eerola, Tuomas

    2016-04-01

    After decades of research, it remains unclear whether emotion lateralization occurs because one hemisphere is dominant for processing the emotional content of the stimuli, or whether emotional stimuli activate lateralised networks associated with the subjective emotional experience. By using emotion-induction procedures, we investigated the effect of listening to happy and sad music on three well-established lateralization tasks. In a prestudy, Mozart's piano sonata (K. 448) and Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata were rated as the most happy and sad excerpts, respectively. Participants listened to either one emotional excerpt, or sat in silence before completing an emotional chimeric faces task (Experiment 1), visual line bisection task (Experiment 2) and a dichotic listening task (Experiment 3 and 4). Listening to happy music resulted in a reduced right hemispheric bias in facial emotion recognition (Experiment 1) and visuospatial attention (Experiment 2) and increased left hemispheric bias in language lateralization (Experiments 3 and 4). Although Experiments 1-3 revealed an increased positive emotional state after listening to happy music, mediation analyses revealed that the effect on hemispheric asymmetries was not mediated by music-induced emotional changes. The direct effect of music listening on lateralization was investigated in Experiment 4 in which tempo of the happy excerpt was manipulated by controlling for other acoustic features. However, the results of Experiment 4 made it rather unlikely that tempo is the critical cue accounting for the effects. We conclude that listening to music can affect functional cerebral asymmetries in well-established emotional and cognitive laterality tasks, independent of music-induced changes in the emotion state.

  18. A Comparison of Three Transarterial Lipiodol-Based Formulations for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: In Vivo Biodistribution Study in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Simon Chun Ho Leung, Thomas Wai Tong; Lau, Wan Yee; Lee, Nelson; Hui, Edwin Pun; Yeo, Winnie; Lai, Paul Bo San; Mok, Tony Shu Kam

    2008-03-15

    This study aimed to evaluate and compare the biodistribution properties of three transarterial Lipiodol-based therapeutic regimens in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this prospective study with 13 patients randomly allocated to one of three study groups, each of the patients received transcatheter intra-arterial administration into a solitary HCC with one of three different Lipiodol-based formulations: Lipiodol-ethanol mixture (LEM; Group A), Lipiodol alone (Group B), and Lipiodol and gelatin pledgets (Group C). With the use of radioactive iodine-131-labeled Lipiodol, each group was assessed for (1) pattern of Lipiodol accumulation in the lungs within the first 2 weeks as evaluated by single-photon emission computed tomography and (2) decomposition of Lipiodol formulation within the first 2 weeks as evaluated by radioactivity detected in peripheral blood and urine. The degree of Lipiodol retention in the tumor within the first 4 weeks was evaluated with CT. No statistically significant difference in Lipiodol accumulation in the lungs was detected among the three groups. However, the peak accumulation in the lungs was delayed 3 days for Group A compared to Groups B and C. The degree of Lipiodol retention within the tumor in Group A was significantly greater than that in Groups B and C on day 14 (p = 0.014) and day 28 (p = 0.013). This study showed that LEM is associated with a greater embolic effect in intrahepatic HCC at 4 weeks, and a comparable degree of lung shunting and decomposition rates, compared with ethanol-free Lipiodol formulations.

  19. Chronic nicotine exposure exacerbates transient focal cerebral ischemia-induced brain injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Sun, Hong; Arrick, Denise M; Mayhan, William G

    2016-02-01

    Tobacco smoking is a risk factor contributing to the development and progression of ischemic stroke. Among many chemicals in tobacco, nicotine may be a key contributor. We hypothesized that nicotine alters the balance between oxidant and antioxidant networks leading to an increase in brain injury following transient focal cerebral ischemia. Male Sprague-Dawley were treated with nicotine (2 or 4 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 4 wk via an implanted subcutaneous osmotic minipump and subjected to a 2-h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Infarct size and neurological deficits were evaluated at 24 h of reperfusion. Superoxide levels were determined by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence. Expression of oxidant and antioxidant proteins was measured using Western blot analysis. We found that chronic nicotine exposure significantly increased infarct size and worsened neurological deficits. In addition, nicotine significantly elevated superoxide levels of cerebral cortex under basal conditions. Transient focal cerebral ischemia produced an increase in superoxide levels of cerebral cortex in control group, but no further increase was found in the nicotine group. Furthermore, chronic nicotine exposure did not alter protein expression of NADPH oxidase but significantly decreased MnSOD and uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) in the cerebral cortex and cerebral arteries. Our findings suggest that nicotine-induced exacerbation in brain damage following transient focal cerebral ischemia may be related to a preexisting oxidative stress via decreasing of MnSOD and UCP-2.

  20. Effects of crocin on reperfusion-induced oxidative/nitrative injury to cerebral microvessels after global cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-Qiu; Liu, Jian-Xun; Wang, Jan-Nong; Xu, Li

    2007-03-23

    This paper studied the effects of crocin, a pharmacologically active component of Crocus sativus L., on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in mice cerebral microvessels. Transient global cerebral ischemia (20 min), followed by 24 h of reperfusion, significantly promoted the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in cortical microvascular homogenates, as well as markedly reduced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) and promoted the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOs). Reperfusion for 24 h led to serous edema with substantial microvilli loss, vacuolation, membrane damage and mitochondrial injuries in cortical microvascular endothelial cells (CMEC). Furthermore, enhanced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were detected in cortical microvessels after I (20 min)/R (24 h). Reperfusion for 24 h also induced membrane (functional) G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) expression, while it reduced cytosol GRK2 expression. Pretreatment with crocin markedly inhibited oxidizing reactions and modulated the ultrastructure of CMEC in mice with 20 min of bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) followed by 24 h of reperfusion in vivo. Furthermore, crocin inhibited GRK2 translocation from the cytosol to the membrane and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and MMP-9 expression in cortical microvessels. We propose that crocin protects the brain against excessive oxidative stress and constitutes a potential therapeutic candidate in transient global cerebral ischemia.

  1. PUMA is invovled in ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis of mouse cerebral astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Tian, M; Jin, L; Jia, H; Jin, Y

    2015-01-22

    PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis), a BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 protein family, is required for p53-dependent and p53-independent forms of apoptosis. PUMA has been invovled in the onset and progress of several diseases, including cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and ischemic brain disease. Although many studies have shown that ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) can induce the apoptosis of astrocytes, the role of PUMA in I/R-mediated apoptosis of cerebral astrocyte apoptosis remains unclear. To mimic in vivo I/R conditions, primary mouse cerebral astrocytes were incubated in a combinational cultural condition of oxygen, glucose, and serum deprivation (OSGD) for 1 h followed by reperfusion (OSGD/R). Cell death determination assays and cell viability assays indicated that OSGD and OSGD/R induce the apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. The expression of PUMA was significantly elevated in primary cerebral astrocytes during OSGD/R. Moreover, targeted down-regulation of PUMA by siRNA transfection significantly decreased the OSGD/R-induced apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. We also found that OSGD and OSGD/R triggered the release of cytochrome c in astrocytes, indicating the dependence on a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was extremely generated during OSGD and OSGD/R, and the elimination of ROS by treated with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) remarkably inhibited the expression of PUMA and the apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. The activation of Caspase 3 and Caspase 9 was extremely elevated in primary cerebral astrocytes during OSGD. In addition, we found that knockdown of PUMA led to the depressed expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-9 and caspase-3 during OSGD/R. These results indicate that PUMA is invovled in the apoptosis of cerebral astrocytes upon I/R injury.

  2. Lipiodol: A Potential Direct Surrogate for Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Image Guidance in Radiotherapy of Liver Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Yue Jinbo; Sun Xindong; Cai Jing; Yin Fangfang; Yin Yong; Zhu Jian; Lu Jie; Liu Tonghai; Yu Jinming; Shi Xuetao; Song Jinlong

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using lipiodol as a direct surrogate for target localization using cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance in radiotherapy (RT) of patients with unresectable liver tumors after transarterial chemoembolization. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with an unresectable solitary liver tumor were enrolled for RT using active breathing control (ABC) and CBCT image guidance after transarterial chemoembolization. Each patient had pre- and posttreatment CBCT in the first 10 fractions of treatment. Lipiodol retention was evaluated using daily CBCT scans, and volume of lipiodol retention in the liver was calculated and compared between planning CT and post-RT CT. Influence of lipiodol on dosimetry was evaluated by measuring doses using an ion chamber with and without the presence of lipiodol. Margin analysis was performed on the basis of both inter- and intrafractional target localization errors. Results: Twenty-eight patients successfully completed the study. The shape and size of lipiodol retention did not vary substantially during the course of treatment. The mean Dice similarity coefficient for the lipiodol volume in pretreatment CT and that in posttreatment CT was 0.836 (range, 0.817-0.885). The maximum change (ratio of the lipiodol volume in pretreatment CT to that in posttreatment CT) was 1.045. The mean dose changes with the presence of <10 mL lipiodol were -1.44% and 0.13% for 6 MV and 15 MV, respectively. With ABC and online CBCT image guidance, clinical target volume-planning target volume margins were determined to be 2.5 mm in the mediolateral direction, 2.9 mm in the anteroposterior direction, and 4.0 mm in the craniocaudal direction. Conclusions: Lipiodol could be used as a direct surrogate for CBCT image guidance to improve the localization accuracy for RT of liver tumors. Combination of ABC and CBCT image guidance with lipiodol can potentially reduce the clinical target volume-planning target volume margin.

  3. [Comparative evaluation of ultrasonography, computerized tomography, angiography and lipiodol CT in defining extent of hepatocarcinoma. A multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Dalla Palma, L; Pozzi Mucelli, R; Sponza, M; Bartolozzi, C; De Santis, M; Gandini, G; Mannella, P; Matricardi, L; Rossi, C; Simonetti, G

    1995-03-01

    The authors report the results of a multicentric trial on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, whose lesions were confirmed with biopsy or by high (> 400 ng/ml) alpha-fetoprotein levels. The series consisted of 149 patients examined in 8 different centers and submitted to ultrasonography (US), Computed Tomography (CT) before and after contrast agent administration, angiography and Lipiodol CT. According to lesion size and number, the patients were divided with each imaging modality into three groups: a) group 1: unifocal HCC < 5 cm diameter; b) group 2: multifocal HCC with 2-3 nodules and/or tumor mass < 80 ml; c) multifocal HCC with more than 3 nodules (with total tumor mass not exceeding 40% of liver volume) or with total tumor mass > 80 ml. In 77 patients all the examinations were available for comparison. US and CT diagnosed more patients as belonging to group 1 than angiography and Lipiodol CT, while more patients were classified as groups 2 and 3 with angiography and Lipiodol CT, meaning that US and CT may understage some HCC cases (about 15%) because they show a lower number of nodules. This observation was confirmed by the direct comparison between US and Lipiodol CT (in 114 patients), CT and Lipiodol CT (in 103 patients) and angiography and Lipiodol CT (in 116 patients). US and Lipiodol CT were in disagreement in 18 cases, CT and Lipiodol CT in 16 cases and angiography and Lipiodol CT in 13 cases. In most of these cases, Lipiodol CT showed more lesions than the other techniques. The size of the undetected lesions was small, ranging few mm to 2 cm in nearly all cases. To conclude, the results of this multicentric trial show that Lipiodol CT is a fundamental tool to evaluate HCC extent. In contrast, conventional CT appeared not to add any significant piece of information and can therefore be excluded from the diagnostic protocol of HCC.

  4. Aging Exacerbates Pressure-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Mouse Cerebral Arteries.

    PubMed

    Springo, Zsolt; Tarantini, Stefano; Toth, Peter; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Koller, Akos; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate that in addition to the increased prevalence of hypertension in old patients, the deleterious cerebrovascular effects of hypertension (including atherosclerosis, stroke, and vascular cognitive impairment) are also exacerbated in elderly individuals. The cellular mechanisms by which aging and hypertension interact to promote cerebrovascular pathologies are not well understood. To test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates high pressure-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress, we exposed isolated segments of the middle cerebral arteries of young (3 months) and aged (24 months) C57BL/6 mice to 60 or 140 mmHg intraluminal pressure and assessed changes in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production using a mitochondria-targeted redox-sensitive fluorescent indicator dye (MitoSox) by confocal microscopy. Perinuclear MitoSox fluorescence was significantly stronger in high pressure-exposed middle cerebral arteries compared with middle cerebral arteries of the same animals exposed to 60 mmHg, indicating that high pressure increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in the smooth muscle cells of cerebral arteries. Comparison of young and aged middle cerebral arteries showed that aging exacerbates high pressure-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in cerebral arteries. We propose that increased mechanosensitive mitochondrial oxidative stress may potentially exacerbate cerebrovascular injury and vascular inflammation in aging.

  5. Multiple cerebral infarctions in a young patient with heroin-induced hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bolz, Jan; Meves, Saskia H; Kara, Kaffer; Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Gold, Ralf; Krogias, Christos

    2015-09-15

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome represents a rare cause for cerebral infarctions and inflammatory neurological disorders. Various possible pathogenic mechanisms for cerebral infarctions have already been discussed. Complex mechanisms including a local hypercoagulability by eosinophilic granules as well as a direct damage to endothelial cells, leading to alterations of the microcirculation seem to be involved. The changing pattern of heroin use to inhalation/sniffing leading to an increasing abuse may cause a rise in the prevalence of Heroin induced eosinophilia, as it has been reported in a case of eosinophilic pneumonia associated with heroin inhalation. To our knowledge, the present case report displays the first description of stroke in the setting of heroin induced hypereosinophilia. Thus, besides usual vasoconstriction, HES should be considered in drug-induced cerebral infarctions.

  6. Ischemic Effects of Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate-Lipiodol on the Colon in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ikoma, Akira; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Takasaka, Isao; Nakata, Kouhei; Sahara, Shinya; Sawa, Naohisa; Shirai, Shintaro; Mori, Ichiro

    2010-10-15

    This study was designed to assess the safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with n-butyl cyanoacrylate-lipiodol (NBCA-Lp) for the large bowel and to investigate the vital response to NBCA-Lp in a swine model. In nine swine, nine arteries nourishing the colon were embolized with NBCA-Lp (1 ml of NBCA mixed with 4 ml of lipiodol): sigmoid-rectal branch artery in six swine, right colic branch artery in two, and middle colic branch artery in one. The amount of NBCA-Lp was 0.1-0.4 ml. Sacrifice was conducted 3 days after TAE to identify histological infarction. Classification was conducted retrospectively: group A, vasa recta without NBCA-Lp embolization despite TAE; group B, three or fewer vasa recta with NBCA-Lp embolization; and group C, five or more vasa recta with NBCA-Lp embolization. In one swine in group A, no necrotic focus was observed. In group B, three of four swine experienced no ischemic damage. The remaining one swine experienced necrosis of mucosal and submucosal layers in one-fourth of the circumference. In group C, all four swine with marginal artery and five vasa recta or more embolized experienced total necrosis of mucosa, submucosa, and smooth muscle layers of the whole colonic circumference. Significant difference on the extent of ischemic damage was observed between groups B and C (P < 0.05). Microscopically, NBCA-Lp induced acute vasculitis. Embolization of three or fewer vasa recta with NBCA-Lp induced no ischemic damage or limited necrosis, whereas embolization of five or more vasa recta with NBCA-Lp induced extensive necrosis.

  7. Acetylcholine- and sodium hydrosulfide-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation and hyperpolarization in cerebral vessels of global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion rat.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun; Chen, Zhi-Wu; He, Guo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) and the role of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) in the cerebral vasorelaxation induced by acetylcholine (ACh) in global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (CIR) rats. CIR was induced by occlusion of bilateral carotid and vertebral arteries. Isolated arterial segments from the cerebral basilar (CBA) and middle artery (MCA) of CIR rats were studied in a pressurized chamber. Transmembrane potential was recorded using glass microelectrodes to evaluate hyperpolarization. In the CIR CBAs and MCAs preconstricted by 30 mM KCl, ACh induced concentration-dependent vasorelaxation and hyperpolarization that were partially attenuated by NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 30 μM) and l-NAME plus indomethacin (10 μM). The residual responses were abolished by the H2S inhibitor dl-propargylglycine (PPG, 100 μM). The H2S donor NaHS and l-Cys, the substrate of endogenous H2S synthase, elicited similar responses to ACh and was inhibited by tetraethylamonine (1 mM) or PPG. ACh induces EDHF-mediated vasorelaxation and hyperpolarization in rat cerebral arteries. These responses are up-regulated by ischemia-reperfusion while NO-mediated responses are down-regulated. Further, the ACh-induced, EDHF-mediated relaxation, and hyperpolarization and the inhibition of these responses are similar to the H2S-induced responses, suggesting that H2S is a possible candidate for EDHF in rat cerebral vessels.

  8. Cyclophosphamide-induced agenesis of cerebral aqueduct resulting in hydrocephalus in mice.

    PubMed

    Prakash; Singh, Gajendra; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2007-07-01

    The present work was undertaken to reveal the mechanism of cerebral aqueduct agenesis found to result in hydrocephalus following intrauterine exposure to model teratogen, cyclophosphamide, in murine fetuses. A single dose of 10-mg/kg body weight cyclophosphamide was injected intaperitoneally to pregnant mice on day 10, 11 or 12 of gestation. Fetuses were collected through abdominal incision on day 18 and studied for various malformations of brain and cranium including hydrocephalus. Incomplete development and failure of canalization of the cerebral aqueduct were detected when serial sections of brain in coronal and transverse planes were studied under the microscope. Biotechnological investigations such as % DNA fragmentation, % viable cell count and cell proliferation assay were carried out on brain cells for further studies. Agenesis and non-canalization of the cerebral aqueduct resulted in increased pressure of CSF, which led to rupture of the aqueduct complicated by leakage and accumulation of CSF in brain substance forming a cavity containing CSF parallel and lateral to the unopened part of the cerebral aqueduct. Incomplete development along with non-canalization of the cerebral aqueduct resulted in blockage of CSF flow through the ventricles that manifest as internal hydrocephalus. External hydrocephalus on the other hand was detected where the CSF accumulated in the cavity formed inside the brain substance and established communication with the CSF in the subarachnoid space. Cyclophosphamide induced inhibition of mitosis and cell differentiation of ependymal cells reflecting a decreased % viable cell count and cell proliferation assay along with augmentation of apoptosis of brain cells quantified as increased % DNA fragmentation count, which were identified as the contributing factors underlying the agenesis and incomplete development of the cerebral aqueduct. The study also suggests that cell survival, proliferation, migration or differentiation of

  9. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  10. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  11. Cerebral blood flow changes during sodium-lactate-induced panic attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.S.; Devous, M.D. Sr.; Rush, A.J.; Lane, L.; Bonte, F.J.

    1988-04-01

    Dynamic single-photon emission computed axial tomography (CAT) with inhaled xenon-133 was used to measure regional cerebral blood flow in 10 drug-free patients with DSM-III-diagnosed panic disorder and in five normal control subjects. All subjects underwent regional cerebral blood flow studies while at rest or during normal saline infusion and during sodium lactate infusion. Six of the 10 patients and none of the control subjects experienced lactate-induced panic attacks. Lactate infusion markedly raised hemispheric blood flow levels in both control subjects and patients who did not panic. Patients who did panic experienced either a minimal increase or a decrease in hemispheric blood flow.

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury by a Closed Head Injury Device Induces Cerebral Blood Flow Changes and Microhemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Bandaru, Sharath; Zakaria, Nisrine; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zhang, Liying; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic brain injury is a poly-pathology characterized by changes in the cerebral blood flow, inflammation, diffuse axonal, cellular, and vascular injuries. However, studies related to understanding the temporal changes in the cerebral blood flow following traumatic brain injury extending to sub-acute periods are limited. In addition, knowledge related to microhemorrhages, such as their detection, localization, and temporal progression, is important in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods: Cerebral blood flow changes and microhemorrhages in male Sprague Dawley rats at 4 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were assessed following a closed head injury induced by the Marmarou impact acceleration device (2 m height, 450 g brass weight). Cerebral blood flow was measured by arterial spin labeling. Microhemorrhages were assessed by susceptibility-weighted imaging and Prussian blue histology. Results: Traumatic brain injury rats showed reduced regional and global cerebral blood flow at 4 h and 7 days post-injury. Injured rats showed hemorrhagic lesions in the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, and brainstem in susceptibility-weighted imaging. Injured rats also showed Prussian blue reaction products in both the white and gray matter regions up to 7 days after the injury. These lesions were observed in various areas of the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow and hemorrhagic lesions can persist for sub-acute periods after the initial traumatic insult in an animal model. In addition, microhemorrhages otherwise not seen by susceptibility-weighted imaging are present in diverse regions of the brain. The combination of altered cerebral blood flow and microhemorrhages can potentially be a source of secondary injury changes following traumatic brain injury and may need to be taken into consideration in the long-term care of these cases. PMID:26605126

  13. Cerebral venous thrombosis due to essential thrombocythemia and worsened by heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Richard, Sebastien; Perrin, Julien; Lavandier, Karine; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Ducrocq, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    This case describes the medical history of a 61-year-old woman treated for cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) leading to diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia (ET). During treatment with unfractionated heparin, after initial improvement of clinical state, signs of cerebral hypertension reappeared. Although the platelet count decreased, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) was only suspected 2 days later when it dropped below the standard 150 × 10(9) L(-1) threshold. HIT diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of anti-PF4/heparin IgG. This late finding was the cause of the extension of CVT with worsening of cerebral hypertension necessitating decompressive craniectomy. Elevated basal platelet count due to ET can delay diagnosis and treatment of HIT. In this case, physicians should be more attentive to platelet count variations rather than thrombocytopenia threshold. PMID:21142409

  14. Semaphorin3A elevates vascular permeability and contributes to cerebral ischemia-induced brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sheng Tao; Nilchi, Ladan; Li, Xuesheng; Gangaraju, Sandhya; Jiang, Susan X.; Aylsworth, Amy; Monette, Robert; Slinn, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) increased significantly in mouse brain following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of Sema3A in stroke brain remains unknown. Our aim was to determine wether Sema3A functions as a vascular permeability factor and contributes to ischemic brain damage. Recombinant Sema3A injected intradermally to mouse skin, or stereotactically into the cerebral cortex, caused dose- and time-dependent increases in vascular permeability, with a degree comparable to that caused by injection of a known vascular permeability factor vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGF). Application of Sema3A to cultured endothelial cells caused disorganization of F-actin stress fibre bundles and increased endothelial monolayer permeability, confirming Sema3A as a permeability factor. Sema3A-mediated F-actin changes in endothelial cells were through binding to the neuropilin2/VEGFR1 receptor complex, which in turn directly activates Mical2, a F-actin modulator. Down-regulation of Mical2, using specific siRNA, alleviated Sema3A-induced F-actin disorganization, cellular morphology changes and endothelial permeability. Importantly, ablation of Sema3A expression, cerebrovascular permeability and brain damage were significantly reduced in response to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia/haemorrhagic transformation. Together, these studies demonstrated that Sema3A is a key mediator of cerebrovascular permeability and contributes to brain damage caused by cerebral ischemia. PMID:25601765

  15. Semaphorin3A elevates vascular permeability and contributes to cerebral ischemia-induced brain damage.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sheng Tao; Nilchi, Ladan; Li, Xuesheng; Gangaraju, Sandhya; Jiang, Susan X; Aylsworth, Amy; Monette, Robert; Slinn, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) increased significantly in mouse brain following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of Sema3A in stroke brain remains unknown. Our aim was to determine wether Sema3A functions as a vascular permeability factor and contributes to ischemic brain damage. Recombinant Sema3A injected intradermally to mouse skin, or stereotactically into the cerebral cortex, caused dose- and time-dependent increases in vascular permeability, with a degree comparable to that caused by injection of a known vascular permeability factor vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGF). Application of Sema3A to cultured endothelial cells caused disorganization of F-actin stress fibre bundles and increased endothelial monolayer permeability, confirming Sema3A as a permeability factor. Sema3A-mediated F-actin changes in endothelial cells were through binding to the neuropilin2/VEGFR1 receptor complex, which in turn directly activates Mical2, a F-actin modulator. Down-regulation of Mical2, using specific siRNA, alleviated Sema3A-induced F-actin disorganization, cellular morphology changes and endothelial permeability. Importantly, ablation of Sema3A expression, cerebrovascular permeability and brain damage were significantly reduced in response to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia/haemorrhagic transformation. Together, these studies demonstrated that Sema3A is a key mediator of cerebrovascular permeability and contributes to brain damage caused by cerebral ischemia.

  16. Cerebral oxygenation and haemodynamic effects induced by nimodipine in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Canova, Daniela; Roatta, Silvestro; Micieli, Giuseppe; Bosone, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Summary The cerebrovascular effects of nimodipine are still poorly understood even in the healthy condition; in particular, its effects on tissue oxygenation have never been investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in cerebral oxygenation and blood volume upon oral administration of nimodipine (90 mg) in the healthy condition. In eight subjects, changes in cerebral tissue oxygenation and blood volume were determined simultaneously with changes in blood velocity of the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) by using, respectively, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD). The subjects also underwent non-invasive assessment of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and end-tidal CO2. TCD and NIRS CO2 reactivity indices were also extracted. Nimodipine significantly reduced ABP (11±13%) and increased heart rate, as well as NIRS oxygenation (6.0±4.8%) and blood volume indices (9.4±10.1%), while VMCA was not significantly decreased (2.0±3.5%). Nimodipine slightly but significantly reduced the VMCA response to changes in pCO2 whereas the CO2 reactivity of NIRS parameters was improved. The observed changes in cerebral tissue oxygenation and blood volume indicate nimodipine-induced cerebrovascular dilation and increased perfusion, while the effect on VMCA possibly results from dilation of the insonated artery. The present results cast doubt on the putative nimodipine-induced impairment of CO2 reactivity. PMID:23402678

  17. Ulinastatin inhibits cerebral ischemia-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus of gerbils

    PubMed Central

    CHO, YOUNG-SAM; SHIN, MAL-SOON; KO, IL-GYU; KIM, SUNG-EUN; KIM, CHANG-JU; SUNG, YUN-HEE; YOON, HYE-SUN; LEE, BONG-JAE

    2015-01-01

    Ulinastatin is a urinary trypsin inhibitor, originally extracted and purified from human urine. Ulinastatin has cytoprotective effects against ischemic injury in several organs. In the present study, the neuroprotective effects of ulinastatin following ischemic cerebral injury in the hippocampus of gerbils was investigated. To induce transient global ischemia in gerbils, the common carotid arteries were occluded using aneurysm clips for 5 min, and the clips were then removed. Ulinastatin was subcutaneously injected into the gerbils once a day for 7 days at doses of 50,000 or 100,000 U/kg. The gerbils were confronted with a step-down avoidance task, following which tissue samples from the gerbils were examined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, western blot analysis for B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and immunofluorescence for 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine. The numbers of TUNEL-positive and caspase-3-positive cells in the hippocampal CA1 region increased following cerebral ischemia. The expression of Bax in the hippocampus increased, while the expression of Bcl-2 in the hippocampus decreased following cerebral ischemia. These results confirmed that apoptosis in the hippocampus was enhanced following cerebral ischemia in gerbils. The levels of cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were also enhanced by ischemia, which is possibly an adaptive mechanism to compensate for excessive levels of apoptosis. Ulinastatin treatment inhibited ischemia-induced apoptosis by suppressing apoptosis-associated molecules, and thus ameliorated ischemia-induced short-term memory impairment. The cell proliferation in the hippocampus was also suppressed following ulinastatin treatment. These results suggested the use of ulinastatin as a therapeutic agent for patients with cerebral stroke. PMID:25891426

  18. Ulinastatin inhibits cerebral ischemia-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus of gerbils.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Sam; Shin, Mal-Soon; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang-Ju; Sung, Yun-Hee; Yoon, Hye-Sun; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2015-08-01

    Ulinastatin is a urinary trypsin inhibitor, originally extracted and purified from human urine. Ulinastatin has cytoprotective effects against ischemic injury in several organs. In the present study, the neuroprotective effects of ulinastatin following ischemic cerebral injury in the hippocampus of gerbils was investigated. To induce transient global ischemia in gerbils, the common carotid arteries were occluded using aneurysm clips for 5 min, and the clips were then removed. Ulinastatin was subcutaneously injected into the gerbils once a day for 7 days at doses of 50,000 or 100,000 U/kg. The gerbils were confronted with a step-down avoidance task, following which tissue samples from the gerbils were examined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, western blot analysis for B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and immunofluorescence for 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. The numbers of TUNEL-positive and caspase-3-positive cells in the hippocampal CA1 region increased following cerebral ischemia. The expression of Bax in the hippocampus increased, while the expression of Bcl-2 in the hippocampus decreased following cerebral ischemia. These results confirmed that apoptosis in the hippocampus was enhanced following cerebral ischemia in gerbils. The levels of cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were also enhanced by ischemia, which is possibly an adaptive mechanism to compensate for excessive levels of apoptosis. Ulinastatin treatment inhibited ischemia-induced apoptosis by suppressing apoptosis-associated molecules, and thus ameliorated ischemia-induced short-term memory impairment. The cell proliferation in the hippocampus was also suppressed following ulinastatin treatment. These results suggested the use of ulinastatin as a therapeutic agent for patients with cerebral stroke.

  19. Interaction between inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nogawa, S; Forster, C; Zhang, F; Nagayama, M; Ross, M E; Iadecola, C

    1998-09-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia is associated with expression of both inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), enzymes whose reaction products contribute to the evolution of ischemic brain injury. We tested the hypothesis that, after cerebral ischemia, nitric oxide (NO) produced by iNOS enhances COX-2 activity, thereby increasing the toxic potential of this enzyme. Cerebral ischemia was produced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats or mice. Twenty-four hours after ischemia in rats, iNOS-immunoreactive neutrophils were observed in close proximity (<20 micrometer) to COX-2-positive cells at the periphery of the infarct. In the olfactory bulb, only COX-2 positive cells were observed. Cerebral ischemia increased the concentration of the COX-2 reaction product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the ischemic area and in the ipsilateral olfactory bulb. The iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine reduced PGE2 concentration in the infarct, where both iNOS and COX-2 were expressed, but not in the olfactory bulb, where only COX-2 was expressed. Postischemic PGE2 accumulation was reduced significantly in iNOS null mice compared with wild-type controls (C57BL/6 or SV129). The data provide evidence that NO produced by iNOS influences COX-2 activity after focal cerebral ischemia. Pro-inflammatory prostanoids and reactive oxygen species produced by COX-2 may be a previously unrecognized factor by which NO contributes to ischemic brain injury. The pathogenic effect of the interaction between NO, or a derived specie, and COX-2 is likely to play a role also in other brain diseases associated with inflammation.

  20. Ethanol induces heterotopias in organotypic cultures of rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Sandra M; Siegenthaler, Julie A; Miller, Michael W

    2004-10-01

    Abnormalities in the migration of cortical neurons to ectopic sites can be caused by prenatal exposure to ethanol. In extreme cases, cells migrate past the pial surface and form suprapial heterotopias or 'warts'. We used organotypic slice cultures from 17-day-old rat fetuses to examine structural and molecular changes that accompany wart formation. Cultures were exposed to ethanol (0, 200, 400 or 800 mg/dl) and maintained for 2-32 h. Fixed slices were sectioned and immunolabeled with antibodies directed against calretinin, reelin, nestin, GFAP, doublecortin, MAP-2 and NeuN. Ethanol promoted the widespread infiltration of the marginal zone (MZ) with neurons and the focal formation of warts. The appearance of warts is time- and concentration-dependent. Heterotopias comprised migrating neurons and were not detected in control slices. Warts were associated with breaches in the array of Cajal-Retzius cells and with translocation of reelin-immunoexpression from the MZ to the outer limit of the wart. Ethanol also altered the morphology of the radial glia. Thus, damage to the integrity of superficial cortex allows neurons to infiltrate the MZ, and if the pial-subpial glial barrier is also compromised these ectopic neurons can move beyond the normal cerebral limit to form a wart.

  1. Prediction of recurrence after HCC resection. Faint oily deposits on preoperative Lipiodol-CT of remnant liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, M; Iimuro, Y; Mogaki, M; Kachi, K; Fujii, H; Matsumoto, Y

    1994-07-01

    In trying to clarify the high recurrence rate after removal of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we assessed the postoperative evolution of minute hepatic Lipiodol deposits which had been diagnosed as artifacts on the preoperative Lipiodol-CT. Of 27 patients with solitary HCC less than 5 cm in diameter, 14 had such Lipiodol deposits in the preoperative CT and 9 of them (64%) developed recurrent tumors. On the other hand, 6 of the 13 patients without deposits (46%) suffered recurrence, but in 5 of these 6 patients the HCC was metachronous multicentric. The cumulative survival rate of the non-deposit group was better than that of the deposit group (p < 0.1). The present study suggested that, even in patients with small HCC, minute concomitant tumors invisible by conventional imaging techniques may exist at the time of surgery. Some of these lesions without sufficient tumor vasculature showing a hypervascular blush on angiography appear to retain small, vague Lipiodol deposits.

  2. Influence of Lipiodol Agent on Proton Beam Range in Radiotherapy Planning Using Computed Tomography for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dongho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Sung Yong Kwak, Jungwon; Moon, Sung Ho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Soah; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho; Park, Joong-Won; Kim, Chang-Min

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of lipiodol on the proton beam range, which has not yet been determined. Methods and Materials: Two computed tomography (CT) data sets were obtained with a T25-flask containing lipiodol and water that was placed above a water phantom. The plan with the lipiodol CT images was performed, and then a verification plan was applied to the water CT images. The actual proton beam ranges in the lipiodol and water were measured under same conditions, and we compared the calculated proton beam range in the treatment planning system with measured values. Results: The calculated distal range in the treatment planning system was 12 cm in water, which was 3.87 cm longer than that in lipiodol (8.13 cm). In contrast, the measured distal range was 12 {+-} 0.01 cm in water, which was 0.21 {+-} 0.01 cm longer than that of lipiodol (11.78 {+-} 0.01 cm). A 3.65 {+-} 0.01-cm range shift was found in the calculated range compared with the measured range. For 10 hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the distal range in the verification plan with the corrected CT images in which the Hounsfield unit (HU) value of lipiodolized lesion was replaced with the average HU value of the surrounding tissue was 0.61 {+-} 0.26 cm (range, 0.26-0.99) longer than that in the plan with uncorrected CT images. Conclusions: It could be relevant for the purposes of range calculation of proton beams in the treatment planning system that the HU value of a lipiodolized lesion is replaced by the average HU value of the surrounding normal tiss0008.

  3. Effect of neurosteroid modulation on global ischaemia-reperfusion-induced cerebral injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Amarjot Kaur; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Rana, Avtar Chand; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-12-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the putative effect of neurosteroid modulation on global ischaemia-reperfusion-induced cerebral injury in mice. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by reperfusion, produced a significant rise in cerebral infarct size along with impairment of grip strength and motor coordination in Swiss albino mice. Administration of carbamazepine (16 mg/kg, i.p.) before global cerebral ischaemia significantly attenuated cerebral infarct size and improved the motor performance. However, administration of indomethacin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated the neuroprotective effect of carbamazepine. Mexiletine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) did not produce significant neuroprotective effect. It may be concluded that the neuroprotective effect of carbamazepine may be due to increase in synthesis of neurosteroids perhaps by activating enzyme (3α HSD) as indomethacin attenuated the neuroprotective effect of carbamazepine. The sodium channel blocking effect of carbamazepine may not be involved in neuroprotection as mexiletine, a sodium channel blocker, did not produce significant neuroprotective effect. PMID:24381496

  4. Manganese-induced effects on cerebral trace element and nitric oxide of Hyline cocks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofei; Zuo, Nan; Guan, Huanan; Han, Chunran; Xu, Shi Wen

    2013-08-01

    Exposure to Manganese (Mn) is a common phenomenon due to its environmental pervasiveness. To investigate the Mn-induced toxicity on cerebral trace element levels and crucial nitric oxide parameters on brain of birds, 50-day-old male Hyline cocks were fed either a commercial diet or a Mn-supplemented diet containing 600, 900, 1,800 mg kg(-1). After being treated with Mn for 30, 60, and 90 days, the following were determined: the changes in contents of copper (Cu), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), calcium (Ca), selenium (Se) in brain; inducible nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide (iNOS-NO) system activity in brain; and histopathology and ultrastructure changes of cerebral cortex. The results showed that Mn was accumulated in brain and the content of Cu and Fe increased. However, the levels of Zn and Se decreased and the Ca content presented no obvious regularity. Exposure to Mn significantly elevated the content of NO and the expression of iNOS mRNA. Activity of total NO synthase (T NOS) and iNOS appeared with an increased tendency. These findings suggested that Mn exposure resulted in the imbalance of cerebral trace elements and influenced iNOS in the molecular level, which are possible underlying nervous system injury mechanisms induced by Mn exposure. PMID:23813426

  5. Ganzfeld-induced hallucinatory experience, its phenomenology and cerebral electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Wackermann, Jirí; Pütz, Peter; Allefeld, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Ganzfeld, i.e., exposure to an unstructured, uniform stimulation field, elicits in most observers pseudo-hallucinatory percepts, and may even induce global functional state changes ('altered states of consciousness'). The present paper gives a comprehensive overview of the phenomenology of subjective experience in the ganzfeld and its electrophysiological correlates. Laboratory techniques for visual or multi-modal ganzfeld induction are explained. The spectrum of ganzfeld-induced phenomena, ranging from elementary percepts to complex, vivid, dream-like imagery is described, and the latter illustrated by transcripts of subjects' reports. Similarities and differences to related sensory/perceptual phenomena are also discussed. Earlier findings on electrophysiological correlates of the ganzfeld are reviewed. Our own studies of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in the ganzfeld are presented in some detail, and a re-analysis of data on EEG correlates of hallucinatory percepts in statu nascendi is reported. The results do not support the hypothesis of the hypnagogic origin of the percepts; the ganzfeld-induced steady-state is an activated state, and the spectral EEG dynamics in the alpha frequency range reveals processes of attention shifts and percept formation. The final section is devoted to the controversial topic of allegedly anomalous communication between human subjects ('ganzfeld telepathy'). It is shown that the use of ganzfeld in this research field relies partly on unsupported hypotheses concerning ganzfeld-induced states, partly on a weak conceptual background of the experimental procedure. The rôle of a particular belief system shared by the participants and experimenters is critically discussed.

  6. Protective effect of extract of Cordyceps sinensis in middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced focal cerebral ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ischemic hypoxic brain injury often causes irreversible brain damage. The lack of effective and widely applicable pharmacological treatments for ischemic stroke patients may explain a growing interest in traditional medicines. From the point of view of "self-medication" or "preventive medicine," Cordyceps sinensis was used in the prevention of cerebral ischemia in this paper. Methods The right middle cerebral artery occlusion model was used in the study. The effects of Cordyceps sinensis (Caterpillar fungus) extract on mortality rate, neurobehavior, grip strength, lactate dehydrogenase, glutathione content, Lipid Peroxidation, glutathione peroxidase activity, glutathione reductase activity, catalase activity, Na+K+ATPase activity and glutathione S transferase activity in a rat model were studied respectively. Results Cordyceps sinensis extract significantly improved the outcome in rats after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in terms of neurobehavioral function. At the same time, supplementation of Cordyceps sinensis extract significantly boosted the defense mechanism against cerebral ischemia by increasing antioxidants activity related to lesion pathogenesis. Restoration of the antioxidant homeostasis in the brain after reperfusion may have helped the brain recover from ischemic injury. Conclusions These experimental results suggest that complement Cordyceps sinensis extract is protective after cerebral ischemia in specific way. The administration of Cordyceps sinensis extract significantly reduced focal cerebral ischemic/reperfusion injury. The defense mechanism against cerebral ischemia was by increasing antioxidants activity related to lesion pathogenesis. PMID:20955613

  7. Analysis of purine- and pyrimidine-induced vascular responses in the isolated rat cerebral arteriole.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, T; Dietrich, H H; Tsugane, S; Dacey, R G

    2001-02-01

    Effects of extraluminal UTP were studied and compared with vascular responses to ATP and its analogs in rat cerebral-penetrating arterioles. UTP, UDP, 2-methylthio-ATP, and alpha,beta-methylene-ATP dilated arterioles at the lowest concentration and constricted them at high concentrations. Low concentrations of ATP dilated the vessels; high concentrations caused a biphasic response, with transient constriction followed by dilation. Endothelial impairment inhibited ATP- and UTP-mediated dilation and potentiated constriction to UTP but not to ATP. ATP- and 2-methylthio-ATP- but not UTP-mediated constrictions were inhibited by desensitization with 10(-6) M alpha,beta-methylene-ATP or 3 x 10(-6) M pyridoxal phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS). PPADS at 10(-4) M abolished the UTP-mediated constriction and induced vasodilation in a dose-dependent manner but did not affect the dilation to ATP. These results suggest that in rat cerebral microvessels 1) ATP and 2-methylthio-ATP induce transient constriction via smooth muscle P(2X1) receptors in the cerebral arteriole, 2) UTP stimulates two different classes of P(2Y) receptors, resulting in constriction (smooth muscle P(2Y4)) and dilation (possibly endothelial P(2Y2)), and 3) ATP and UTP produce dilation by stimulation of a single receptor (P(2Y2)).

  8. Protective effects of naringenin on iron-overload-induced cerebral cortex neurotoxicity correlated with oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chtourou, Yassine; Fetoui, Hamadi; Gdoura, Radhouane

    2014-06-01

    Iron is a component of several metalloproteins involved in crucial metabolic processes such as oxygen sensing and transport, energy metabolism, and DNA synthesis. This metal progressively accumulates in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases. Naringenin (NGEN), a natural flavonoid compound, has been reported to possess neuroprotective effect against PD-related pathology, however, the mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects are poorly defined. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate the potential mechanism involved in the cytoprotection of NGEN against iron-induced neurotoxicity in the cerebral cortex of Wistar rats. Animals that were given repetitive injections of iron dextran for a total of 4 weeks showed a significant increase in lipid and protein markers such as thiobarbituric reactive acid substances, protein carbonyl product content levels, and DNA apoptosis in the cerebral cortex. These changes were accompanied by a decrease of enzymatic antioxidants like superoxide dismutase and catalase and in the levels of nonenzymatic antioxidants like total thiols and ascorbic acid. The activity of glutathione peroxidase remained unchanged in rats. A significant decrease in acetylcholinesterase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities was also shown, with a substantial rise in the nitric oxide levels. Coadministration of NGEN to iron-treated rats significantly improved antioxidant enzyme activities and attenuated oxidative damages observed in the cerebral cortex. The potential effect of NGEN to prevent iron-induced neurotoxicity was also reflected by the microscopic study, indicative of its neuroprotective effects. PMID:24682942

  9. Soluble Aβ seeds are potent inducers of cerebral β-amyloid deposition

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Franziska; Eisele, Yvonne S.; Fritschi, Sarah K.; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Walker, Lary C.; Jucker, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral β-amyloidosis and associated pathologies can be exogenously induced by the intracerebral injection of small amounts of pathogenic Aβ-containing brain extract into young β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. The probable β-amyloid-inducing factor in the brain extract has been identified as a species of aggregated Aβ that is generated in its most effective conformation or composition in vivo. Here we report that Aβ in the brain extract is more proteinase K- (PK) resistant than is synthetic fibrillar Aβ, and that this PK-resistant fraction of the brain extract retains the capacity to induce β-amyloid deposition upon intracerebral injection in young, pre-depositing APP23 transgenic mice. After ultra-centrifugation of the brain extract, less than 0.05% of the Aβ remained in the supernatant fraction, and these soluble Aβ species were largely PK-sensitive. However, upon intracerebral injection, this soluble fraction accounted for up to 30% of the β-amyloid induction observed with the un-fractionated extract. Fragmentation of the Aβ seeds by extended sonication increased the seeding capacity of the brain extract. In summary, these results suggest that multiple Aβ assemblies, with various PK sensitivities, are capable of inducing β-amyloid aggregation in vivo. The finding that small and soluble Aβ seeds are potent inducers of cerebral β-amyloidosis raises the possibility that such seeds may mediate the spread of β-amyloidosis in the brain. If they can be identified in vivo, soluble Aβ seeds in bodily fluids also could serve as early biomarkers for cerebral β-amyloidogenesis and eventually Alzheimer´s disease. PMID:21994365

  10. Nicotine induces leukocyte rolling and adhesion in the cerebral microcirculation of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Yong, T; Zheng, M Q; Linthicum, D S

    1997-12-01

    Nicotine and several related metabolites were examined for their ability to induce leukocyte rolling and adhesion in the cerebral microcirculation of the mouse. A cranial window was surgically prepared for the visualization of the pial microcirculation using an intra-vital microscopy imaging system. Using this technique rhodamine-labeled leukocytes could be visualized and video-recorded as they traveled within the microvessels, and the quantitation of their rolling and adhesion along the pial venule walls was assessed during an off-line video playback analysis. Nicotine was found to produce significant dose-related increases in leukocyte rolling and adhesion. Cotinine, a major nicotine metabolite, did not induce the same degree of leukocyte rolling and adhesion. Mecamylamine, a nicotine antagonist, was found to inhibit the nicotine-induced leukocyte rolling and adhesion. Anti-P-selectin antibody blocked nicotine-induced leukocyte rolling, while anti-CD18 antibody effectively inhibited leukocyte adhesion, but not rolling in similar experiments. Nicotine-induced leukocyte rolling and adhesion were also inhibited by superoxide dismutase and catalase. These data suggest that nicotine, the principle pharmacological agent in cigarette smoke and related tobacco products, acts via a ganglionic-type nicotinic receptor to enhance leukocyte rolling via P-selectin and reactive oxygen radical-dependent mechanisms in cerebral microcirculation of the mouse. PMID:9413272

  11. H2S induces vasoconstriction of rat cerebral arteries via cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Lei; Mi, Yan-Ni; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2015-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), traditionally known for its toxic effects, is now involved in regulating vascular tone. Here we investigated the vasoconstrictive effect of H2S on cerebral artery and the underlying mechanism. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, concentration-dependently induced vasoconstriction on basilar artery, which was enhanced in the presence of isoprenaline, a β-adrenoceptor agonist or forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator. Administration of NaHS attenuated the vasorelaxant effects of isoprenaline or forskolin. Meanwhile, the NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was diminished in the presence of 8B-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, but was not affected by Bay K-8644, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist. These results could be explained by the revised effects of NaHS on isoprenaline-induced cAMP elevation and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity. Additionally, NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was enhanced by removing the endothelium or in the presence of L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. L-NAME only partially attenuated the effect of NaHS which was given together with forskolin on the pre-contracted artery. In conclusion, H2S induces vasoconstriction of cerebral artery via, at least in part, cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

  12. Thoracic Duct Embolization with Lipiodol for Chylothorax due to Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair with Debranching Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Hyoung; Jung, Jae Seung; Cho, Sung Bum; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Hee Jung; Son, Ho Sung

    2015-01-01

    Chylothorax is a rare postoperative complication of a thoracic surgical procedure. Here, we report a case of chylothorax after thoracic endovascular aortic repair with debranching for the distal arch aneurysm of the aorta. First, the patient was treated by a medical method (nil per os, fat-free diet, and octreotide), but this method failed. The patient strongly refused surgical treatment. Therefore, we tried to occlude the thoracic duct by lymphangiography Lipiodol, and this line of treatment was successful. PMID:25705604

  13. Lipiodol Trans-arterial Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Idarubicin: First Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Favelier, Sylvain; Boulin, Mathieu; Hamza, Samia; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Cherblanc, Violaine; Lepage, Come; Hillon, Patrick; Chauffert, Bruno; Krause, Denis; Guiu, Boris

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundThere is still no consensus about the best chemotherapeutic agent for transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). A recent in vitro study demonstrated that idarubicin, an anthracycline, was by far the most cytotoxic drug on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. Idarubicin is much more lipophilic than doxorubicin, leading to higher cell penetration through lipidic membranes and greater accumulation of the drug in the lipiodol. Furthermore, idarubicin has the ability to overcome multidrug resistance. Therefore, we designed this pilot human study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of lipiodol TACE using idarubicin.MethodsIn 21 consecutive patients treated by lipiodol TACE with idarubicin (10 mg) for HCC, safety data, tumor response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, mRECIST), time to treatment failure (TTTF), and overall survival were evaluated.ResultsPostembolization syndrome was observed after 30.9 % (17 of 55) of sessions. No patient died from a TACE-related complication. No hematological grade 3-5 adverse event was observed. At least one grade 3 or higher adverse event occurred in 19 % (4 of 21) of patients. On imaging, no progression was encountered; four patients (24 %) exhibited stable disease, 12 (57 %) exhibited a partial response, and five (19 %) exhibited a complete response. Median TTTF was 16.7 months (Kaplan-Meier analysis). At 6 months, 94.7 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 68.1-99.2) of patients did not reach treatment failure, whereas treatment failure was not reached in 50.6 % (95 % CI 21.6-73.9) of patients at 1 year. Overall survival was 83.5 % (95 % CI 57-94.4) at 1 year.ConclusionIdarubicin seems safe and effective in lipiodol TACE of HCC. This warrants further study to determine the potential of this drug to replace doxorubicin for TACE.

  14. An Experimental Model of Vasovagal Syncope Induces Cerebral Hypoperfusion and Fainting-Like Behavior in Awake Rats

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Devin W.; Reis, Cesar; Frank, Ethan; Klebe, Damon W.; Zhang, John H.; Applegate, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Vasovagal syncope, a contributing factor to elderly falls, is the transient loss of consciousness caused by decreased cerebral perfusion. Vasovagal syncope is characterized by hypotension, bradycardia, and reduced cerebral blood flow, resulting in fatigue, altered coordination, and fainting. The purpose of this study is to develop an animal model which is similar to human vasovagal syncope and establish an awake animal model of vasovagal syncope. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS). Blood pressure, heart rate, and cerebral blood flow were monitored before, during, and post-stimulation. sGVS resulted in hypotension, bradycardia, and decreased cerebral blood flow. One cohort of animals was subjected to sGVS while freely moving. sGVS in awake animals produced vasovagal syncope-like symptoms, including fatigue and uncoordinated movements; two animals experienced spontaneous falling. Another cohort of animals was preconditioned with isoflurane for several days before being subjected to sGVS. Isoflurane preconditioning before sGVS did not prevent sGVS-induced hypotension or bradycardia, yet isoflurane preconditioning attenuated sGVS-induced cerebral blood flow reduction. The sGVS rat model mimics elements of human vasovagal syncope pathophysiology (hypotension, bradycardia, and decreased cerebral perfusion), including behavioral symptoms such as fatigue and altered balance. This study indicates that the sGVS rat model is similar to human vasovagal syncope and that therapies directed at preventing cerebral hypoperfusion may decrease syncopal episodes and reduce injuries from syncopal falls. PMID:27658057

  15. Arterial Hepatic Embolization of Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using a Cyanoacrylate/Lipiodol Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Berghammer, Peter; Pfeffel, Franz; Winkelbauer, Fritz; Wiltschke, Christoph; Schenk, Thomas; Lammer, Johannes; Mueller, Christian; Zielinski, Christoph

    1998-05-15

    Purpose: A survival analysis in 16 patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) undergoing transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) using a combination of lipiodol and N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (5 : 1) was performed in a retrospective study. Methods: A combination of lipiodol and N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (5 : 1) was used for TAE. All patients had disease compatible with Okuda stages I and II. Results: Twenty-four embolizations were done; five patients had more than one embolization. Median alpha-fetoprotein levels declined from 116 to 48.6 ng/ml. A median of 0.3 ml cyanoacrylate was administered per patient. Median survival was 8.5 months (range 2-49 months). After a median follow-up of 4 years, 12 patients have died (75%). Okuda stage I and II patients had a median survival time of 34.4 and 5.5 months respectively. Few side effects (19%) were seen. Conclusion: We conclude that the TAE procedure used [lipiodol and N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (5 : 1)] is safe and produced only few side effects, thus constituting a valuable therapeutic option for patients with Okuda stage I andII HCC.

  16. MFGE8 inhibits inflammasome-induced IL-1β production and limits postischemic cerebral injury

    PubMed Central

    Deroide, Nicolas; Li, Xuan; Lerouet, Dominique; Van Vré, Emily; Baker, Lauren; Harrison, James; Poittevin, Marine; Masters, Leanne; Nih, Lina; Margaill, Isabelle; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Ryffel, Bernhard; Pocard, Marc; Tedgui, Alain; Kubis, Nathalie; Mallat, Ziad

    2013-01-01

    Milk fat globule-EGF 8 (MFGE8) plays important, nonredundant roles in several biological processes, including apoptotic cell clearance, angiogenesis, and adaptive immunity. Several recent studies have reported a potential role for MFGE8 in regulation of the innate immune response; however, the precise mechanisms underlying this role are poorly understood. Here, we show that MFGE8 is an endogenous inhibitor of inflammasome-induced IL-1β production. MFGE8 inhibited necrotic cell–induced and ATP-dependent IL-1β production by macrophages through mediation of integrin β3 and P2X7 receptor interactions in primed cells. Itgb3 deficiency in macrophages abrogated the inhibitory effect of MFGE8 on ATP-induced IL-1β production. In a setting of postischemic cerebral injury in mice, MFGE8 deficiency was associated with enhanced IL-1β production and larger infarct size; the latter was abolished after treatment with IL-1 receptor antagonist. MFGE8 supplementation significantly dampened caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production and reduced infarct size in wild-type mice, but did not limit cerebral necrosis in Il1b-, Itgb3-, or P2rx7-deficient animals. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MFGE8 regulates innate immunity through inhibition of inflammasome-induced IL-1β production. PMID:23454767

  17. Curcumin attenuates the middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced reduction in γ-enolase expression in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Gim, Sang-Ah; Lee, So-Ra; Shah, Fawad-Ali

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin exerts a protective effect in cerebral ischemia through its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. γ-enolase is a glycolytic enzyme expressed in neurons that is known to exerts a neuroprotective effect. We investigated whether curcumin regulates γ-enolase expression in focal cerebral ischemic injury in rats. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was performed to induce focal cerebral ischemia. Adult male rats were injected intraperitoneally with either vehicle or curcumin (50 mg/kg) 1 h after MCAO and cerebral cortex tissues were isolated 24 h after MCAO. We found that MCAO-induced injury resulted in a reduction in γ-enolase expression in vehicle-treated animals using a proteomics approach. However, this reduction was attenuated in animals with MCAO treated with curcumin. Reverse-transcription PCR and Western blot analyses also showed that curcumin treatment prevented the MCAO injury-induced reduction in γ-enolase expression. The results of this study suggest that curcumin exerts its neuroprotective function in focal cerebral ischemia by regulating the expression of γ-enolase. PMID:26755923

  18. Curcumin attenuates the middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced reduction in γ-enolase expression in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Gim, Sang-Ah; Lee, So-Ra; Shah, Fawad-Ali; Koh, Phil-Ok

    2015-12-01

    Curcumin exerts a protective effect in cerebral ischemia through its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. γ-enolase is a glycolytic enzyme expressed in neurons that is known to exerts a neuroprotective effect. We investigated whether curcumin regulates γ-enolase expression in focal cerebral ischemic injury in rats. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was performed to induce focal cerebral ischemia. Adult male rats were injected intraperitoneally with either vehicle or curcumin (50 mg/kg) 1 h after MCAO and cerebral cortex tissues were isolated 24 h after MCAO. We found that MCAO-induced injury resulted in a reduction in γ-enolase expression in vehicle-treated animals using a proteomics approach. However, this reduction was attenuated in animals with MCAO treated with curcumin. Reverse-transcription PCR and Western blot analyses also showed that curcumin treatment prevented the MCAO injury-induced reduction in γ-enolase expression. The results of this study suggest that curcumin exerts its neuroprotective function in focal cerebral ischemia by regulating the expression of γ-enolase. PMID:26755923

  19. Bench-to-bedside review: Burn-induced cerebral inflammation--a neglected entity?

    PubMed

    Flierl, Michael A; Stahel, Philip F; Touban, Basel M; Beauchamp, Kathryn M; Morgan, Steven J; Smith, Wade R; Ipaktchi, Kyros R

    2009-01-01

    Severe burn injury remains a major burden on patients and healthcare systems. Following severe burns, the injured tissues mount a local inflammatory response aiming to restore homeostasis. With excessive burn load, the immune response becomes disproportionate and patients may develop an overshooting systemic inflammatory response, compromising multiple physiological barriers in the lung, kidney, liver, and brain. If the blood-brain barrier is breached, systemic inflammatory molecules and phagocytes readily enter the brain and activate sessile cells of the central nervous system. Copious amounts of reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, proteases, cytokines/chemokines, and complement proteins are being released by these inflammatory cells, resulting in additional neuronal damage and life-threatening cerebral edema. Despite the correlation between cerebral complications in severe burn victims with mortality, burn-induced neuroinflammation continues to fly under the radar as an underestimated entity in the critically ill burn patient. In this paper, we illustrate the molecular events leading to blood-brain barrier breakdown, with a focus on the subsequent neuroinflammatory changes leading to cerebral edema in patients with severe burns.

  20. Investigation of redox status in chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced neurodegeneration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Anil Kumar; Abdul-Majeed, Saif Saad; Gurtu, Sunil; Mohamed, Wael M.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aging related reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been linked with neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Experimentally, a condition of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion due to reduced CBF can be induced by permanent bilateral occlusion of common carotid arteries (2-vessel occlusion, 2VO) in rats. Since oxidative stress, leading to neuronal apoptosis and death, is one of the mechanisms, which is thought to play a significant role in chronic degenerative neurological disorders, the present study was planned to assess the ROS status by measuring the levels of anti-oxidant enzymes that might occur during chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Antioxidant enzymes namely glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase were measured in the brain tissue at eight weeks of 2VO induction in rats. Results show significantly elevated levels of GPx, SOD, and catalase enzymes as compared with the control group. It is possible that compensatory rise in antioxidant enzymes occurs in response to increased oxidative stress following ischemic insult. PMID:26937356

  1. Dexamethasone exacerbates cerebral edema and brain injury following lithium-pilocarpine induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Duffy, B A; Chun, K P; Ma, D; Lythgoe, M F; Scott, R C

    2014-03-01

    Anti-inflammatory therapies are the current most plausible drug candidates for anti-epileptogenesis and neuroprotection following prolonged seizures. Given that vasogenic edema is widely considered to be detrimental for outcome following status epilepticus, the anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone is sometimes used in clinic for alleviating cerebral edema. In this study we perform longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging in order to assess the contribution of dexamethasone on cerebral edema and subsequent neuroprotection following status epilepticus. Lithium-pilocarpine was used to induce status epilepticus in rats. Following status epilepticus, rats were either post-treated with saline or with dexamethasone sodium phosphate (10mg/kg or 2mg/kg). Brain edema was assessed by means of magnetic resonance imaging (T2 relaxometry) and hippocampal volumetry was used as a marker of neuronal injury. T2 relaxometry was performed prior to, 48 h and 96 h following status epilepticus. Volume measurements were performed between 18 and 21 days after status epilepticus. Unexpectedly, cerebral edema was worse in rats that were treated with dexamethasone compared to controls. Furthermore, dexamethasone treated rats had lower hippocampal volumes compared to controls 3 weeks after the initial insult. The T2 measurements at 2 days and 4 days in the hippocampus correlated with hippocampal volumes at 3 weeks. Finally, the mortality rate in the first week following status epilepticus increased from 14% in untreated rats to 33% and 46% in rats treated with 2mg/kg and 10mg/kg dexamethasone respectively. These findings suggest that dexamethasone can exacerbate the acute cerebral edema and brain injury associated with status epilepticus.

  2. Cerebral pachyleptomeningitis associated with MPO-ANCA induced by PTU therapy.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takato; Nogawa, Shigeru; Tanahashi, Norio; Shiraishi, Junichi; Ikeda, Eiji; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2007-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman with hyperthyroidism, who had been previously treated with propylthiouracil (PTU) is reported. She was admitted because of clumsiness in her left hand and abnormal behavior. A neurological examination demonstrated impairment of higher cortical function, and weakness and hyperreflexia of the left leg. An MRI scan with gadolinium enhancement showed pachyleptomeningeal thickening in the right frontoparietal lobe. Blood tests revealed a high MPO-ANCA titer of 122 EU (normal:<10 EU). After steroid administration, the neurological symptoms and the MRI findings improved markedly. This is the first report of PTU-induced cerebral pachyleptomeningitis associated with a high serum MPO-ANCA titer.

  3. In vivo photoacoustic tomography of mouse cerebral edema induced by cold injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhun; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-06-01

    For the first time, we have implemented photoacoustic tomography (PAT) to image the water content of an edema in vivo. We produced and imaged a cold-induced cerebral edema transcranially, then obtained blood vessel and water accumulation images at 610 and 975 nm, respectively. We tracked the changes at 12, 24, and 36 h after the cold injury. The blood volume decreased after the cold injury, and the maximum area of edema was observed 24 h after the cold injury. We validated PAT of the water content of the edema through magnetic Resonance Imaging and the water spectrum from the spectrophotometric measurement.

  4. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion induces vascular plasticity and hemodynamics but also neuronal degeneration and cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Zhen; Shi, Changzheng; Zhu, Lihui; Xiang, Yonghui; Chen, Peihao; Xiong, Zhilin; Li, Wenxian; Ruan, Yiwen; Huang, Li'an

    2015-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) induces cognitive impairment, but the compensative mechanism of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is not fully understood. The present study mainly investigated dynamic changes in CBF, angiogenesis, and cellular pathology in the cortex, the striatum, and the cerebellum, and also studied cognitive impairment of rats induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, immunochemistry, and Morris water maze were employed to the study. The CBF of the cortex, striatum, and cerebellum dramatically decreased after right common carotid artery occlusion (RCCAO), and remained lower level at 2 weeks after BCCAO. It returned to the sham level from 3 to 6 weeks companied by the dilation of vertebral arteries after BCCAO. The number of microvessels declined at 2, 3, and 4 weeks but increased at 6 weeks after BCCAO. Neuronal degeneration occurred in the cortex and striatum from 2 to 6 weeks, but the number of glial cells dramatically increased at 4 weeks after BCCAO. Cognitive impairment of ischemic rats was directly related to ischemic duration. Our results suggest that CCH induces a compensative mechanism attempting to maintain optimal CBF to the brain. However, this limited compensation cannot prevent neuronal loss and cognitive impairment after permanent ischemia. PMID:25853908

  5. Severe chronic cerebral hypoperfusion induces microglial dysfunction leading to memory loss in APPswe/PS1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Maude; ElAli, Ayman; Rivest, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasculature plays a key role in controlling brain homeostasis. Cerebral vasculature dysfunction, associated to irregularities in cerebral blood perfusion, has been proposed to directly contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. More precisely, chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, which impairs brain homeostasis, was demonstrated to take place even before cognitive decline. However, the mechanisms underlying the implication of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in AD pathogenesis remain elusive. Therefore, this study aims at investigating the role of severe chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (SCCH) in AD pathogenesis. For this purpose, SCCH was induced in young APPswe/PS1 in order to evaluate the progression of AD-like pathology in these mice. We observed that SCCH accelerated the cognitive decline of young APPswe/PS1 mice, which was associated with an increased amyloid plaque number in brain parenchyma. In addition, SCCH reduced the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), which has been shown to play an important role in the adaptive responses of neurons. Importantly, SCCH impaired the function of microglial cells, which are implicated in amyloid-β (Aβ) elimination. In vitro approaches underlined the ability of a low-glucose microenvironment to decrease the general activity and phagocytic capacity of microglia. By using a new model of SCCH, our study unravels new insights into the implication of severe chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in AD pathogenesis, mainly by altering microglial cell activity and consequently Aβ clearance. PMID:26918610

  6. Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization (TACE) with Lipiodol to Treat Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Survey Results from the TACE Study Group of Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Satake, Mituo; Uchida, Hideo; Arai, Yasuaki; Anai, Hiroshi Sakaguchi, Hirosi; Nagata, Takashi; Yamane, Tomohiko; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Osaki, Yukio; Okazaki, Masatoshi Higashihara, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Hironobu Osuga, Keigo; Nakao, Norio Hirota, Shouzou

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively clarify the current status in Japan of TACE using Lipiodol together with anticancer agents to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We retrospectively surveyed 4,659 (average annual total) procedures for HCC over the years 2002-2004 at 17 institutions included in the TACE Study Group of Japan. The survey included six questions that were related mainly to TACE and Lipiodol for HCC treatment. The most frequently applied among the 4,659 procedures at the 17 institutions were TACE (2,310; 50%) and local ablation (1,395; 30%). Five of the institutions applied 201-300 procedures and 4 applied 101-200. Lipiodol was used in 'all procedures' and in '90% or more' at seven and nine institutions, respectively. Almost all institutions applied 4-6 (mean, 5) ml of Lipiodol during TACE to treat tumors 5 cm in diameter. In conclusion, this survey clarified that TACE using Lipiodol and anticancer agents is a popular option for HCC treatment in Japan.

  7. Biodistribution of phenylboric acid derivative entrapped lipiodol and 4-borono-2-18F-fluoro-L-phenylalanine-fructose in GP7TB liver tumor bearing rats for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Liao, A H; Chou, F I; Kuo, Y C; Chen, H W; Kai, J J; Chang, C W; Chen, F D; Hwang, J J

    2010-03-01

    A new phenylboric acid derivative entrapped lipiodol (PBAD-lipiodol) was developed as a boron carrier for the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of hepatoma in Taiwan. The biodistribution of both PBAD-lipiodol and BPA-fructose was assayed in GP7TB hepatoma-bearing rat model. The highest uptake of PBAD-lipiodol was found at 2h post injection. The application of BNCT for the hepatoma treatment in tumor-bearing rats is suggested to be 2-4h post PBAD-lipiodol injection.

  8. Behavior of Lipiodol Markers During Image Guided Radiotherapy of Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Xiangfei; Herk, Marcel van; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de; Remeijer, Peter; Bex, Axel; Betgen, Anja; De Reijke, Theo M.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Pos, Floris J.; Bel, Arjan

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the stability of a novel type of markers used in partial bladder tumor irradiation and tumor deformation as indicated by the markers. Materials and Methods: In 15 patients with solitary bladder cancer, lipiodol was injected in the bladder wall during flexible cystoscopy to identify the tumor. A planning CT scan was made, followed by daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans during treatment. To study the accuracy of using these markers for image guidance, uncertainties U1 and U2 were calculated, which were defined as the difference between submask registration (covering single marker) and the average of all submask registrations and the difference between the submask registration and the general mask registration (including all markers), respectively. Finally, to study tumor deformation, the relative movement of each marker pair was correlated with the relative bladder volume (RBV). Results: The analyzed patients had 2.3 marker injections on average. The lipiodol spot size was 0.72 +- 1.1 cm{sup 3}. The intensity of spots in both CT and CBCT was significantly higher than the surrounding bladder tissue. The uncertainties U1 and U2 were comparable, and the uncertainties in left-right direction (0.14-0.19 cm) were smaller than those in cranial-caudal and anterior-posterior directions (0.19-0.32 cm). The relative marker movement of within-zone marker pairs was much smaller (and has less dependence on the RBV) than across-zones marker pairs. Conclusions: Lipiodol markers are a feasible method to track bladder tumor by using online CBCT. Tumor deformation is observed, especially for tumors that cross the defined bladder zones.

  9. Inorganic Arsenic Induces NRF2-Regulated Antioxidant Defenses in Both Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Duan, Xiaoxu; Li, Jinlong; Zhao, Shuo; Li, Wei; Zhao, Lu; Li, Wei; Nie, Huifang; Sun, Guifang; Li, Bing

    2016-08-01

    Inorganic arsenic is reported to induce the reactive oxygen species-mediated oxidative stress, which is supposed to be one of the main mechanisms of arsenic-related neurological diseases. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a master regulator of antioxidant defense systems, up-regulates the expression of target genes to fight against oxidative damages caused by harmful substances, including metals. In the present study, mice were used as a model to investigate the oxidative stress levels and the expressions of NRF2-regulated antioxidant substances in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg NaAsO2 exposure intra-gastrically. Our results showed that acute NaAsO2 treatment resulted in decreased total anti-oxidative capacity (T-AOC) and increased maleic dialdehyde production in the nervous system. We also detected rapidly elevation of NRF2 protein levels by enhancement of Nrf2 transcription, especially at 20 mg/kg NaAsO2 exposure group. In the meantime, mRNA and protein levels of Nrf2 encoding antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H: quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were consistently elevated time- and dose-dependently both in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Taken together, the presence study demonstrated the activation of NRF2 pathway, an early antioxidant defensive response, in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus upon inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure in vivo. A better knowledge on the roles of NRF2 pathway in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis would be helpful for the strategies on improvement of neurotoxicity related to this metalloid. PMID:27165637

  10. Ozone autohemotherapy induces long-term cerebral metabolic changes in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Molinari, F; Simonetti, V; Franzini, M; Pandolfi, S; Vaiano, F; Valdenassi, L; Liboni, W

    2014-01-01

    Ozone autohemotherapy is an emerging therapeutic technique that is gaining increasing importance in treating neurological disorders. A validated and standard methodology to assess the effect of such therapy on brain metabolism and circulation is however still lacking. We used a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system to monitor the cerebral metabolism and a transcranial Doppler (TCD) to monitor the blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries. Fifty-four subjects (32 neurological patients and 22 controls) were tested before, during, and after ozone autohemotherapy. We monitored the concentration changes in the level of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin, and in the level of the Cytochrome-c-oxidase (CYT-c). As a primary endpoint of the work, we showed the changes in the brain metabolism and circulation of the entire population. The concentration of oxygenated haemoglobin increased after the reinjection of the ozoned blood and remained higher than the beginning for another 1.5 hours. The concentration of the deoxygenated haemoglobin decreased during the therapy and the CYT-c concentration markedly increased about 1 hour after the reinjection. No significant changes were observed on the blood flow velocity. As secondary endpoint, we compared the NIRS metabolic pattern of 20 remitting-relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) patients against 20 controls. We showed that by using only 7 NIRS variables it was possible to characterize the metabolic brain pattern of the two groups of subjects. The MS subjects showed a marked increase of the CYT-c activity and concentration about 40 minutes after the end of the autohemotherapy, possibly revealing a reduction of the chronic oxidative stress level typical of MS sufferers. From a technical point of view, this preliminary study showed that NIRS could be useful to show the effects of ozone autohemotherapy at cerebral level, in a long-term monitoring. The clinical result of this study is the quantitative measurement of the

  11. Aging exacerbates hypertension-induced cerebral microhemorrhages in mice: role of resveratrol treatment in vasoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Springo, Zsolt; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Gautam, Tripti; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D; Koller, Akos; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that aging exacerbates hypertension-induced cognitive decline, but the specific age-related mechanisms remain elusive. Cerebral microhemorrhages (CMHs) are associated with rupture of small intracerebral vessels and are thought to progressively impair neuronal function. To determine whether aging exacerbates hypertension-induced CMHs young (3 months) and aged (24 months) mice were treated with angiotensin II plus L-NAME. We found that the same level of hypertension leads to significantly earlier onset and increased incidence of CMHs in aged mice than in young mice, as shown by neurological examination, gait analysis, and histological assessment of CMHs in serial brain sections. Hypertension-induced cerebrovascular oxidative stress and redox-sensitive activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were increased in aging. Treatment of aged mice with resveratrol significantly attenuated hypertension-induced oxidative stress, inhibited vascular MMP activation, significantly delayed the onset, and reduced the incidence of CMHs. Collectively, aging promotes CMHs in mice likely by exacerbating hypertension-induced oxidative stress and MMP activation. Therapeutic strategies that reduce microvascular oxidative stress and MMP activation may be useful for the prevention of CMHs, protecting neurocognitive function in high-risk elderly patients. PMID:25677910

  12. Aging exacerbates hypertension-induced cerebral microhemorrhages in mice: role of resveratrol treatment in vasoprotection.

    PubMed

    Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Springo, Zsolt; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Gautam, Tripti; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D; Koller, Akos; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that aging exacerbates hypertension-induced cognitive decline, but the specific age-related mechanisms remain elusive. Cerebral microhemorrhages (CMHs) are associated with rupture of small intracerebral vessels and are thought to progressively impair neuronal function. To determine whether aging exacerbates hypertension-induced CMHs young (3 months) and aged (24 months) mice were treated with angiotensin II plus L-NAME. We found that the same level of hypertension leads to significantly earlier onset and increased incidence of CMHs in aged mice than in young mice, as shown by neurological examination, gait analysis, and histological assessment of CMHs in serial brain sections. Hypertension-induced cerebrovascular oxidative stress and redox-sensitive activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were increased in aging. Treatment of aged mice with resveratrol significantly attenuated hypertension-induced oxidative stress, inhibited vascular MMP activation, significantly delayed the onset, and reduced the incidence of CMHs. Collectively, aging promotes CMHs in mice likely by exacerbating hypertension-induced oxidative stress and MMP activation. Therapeutic strategies that reduce microvascular oxidative stress and MMP activation may be useful for the prevention of CMHs, protecting neurocognitive function in high-risk elderly patients. PMID:25677910

  13. ATP induces mild hypothermia in rats but has a strikingly detrimental impact on focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meijuan; Li, Wenjin; Niu, Guangming; Leak, Rehana K; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a devastating condition lacking effective therapies. A promising approach to attenuate ischemic injury is mild hypothermia. Recent studies show that adenosine nucleotides can induce hypothermia in mice. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) induces mild hypothermia in rats and reduces ischemic brain injury. We found that intraperitoneal injections of ATP decreased core body temperature in a dose-dependent manner; the dose appropriate for mild hypothermia was 2 g/kg. When ATP-induced hypothermia was applied to stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion, however, a neuroprotective effect was not observed. Instead, the infarct volume grew even larger in ATP-treated rats. This was accompanied by an increased rate of seizure events, hemorrhagic transformation, and higher mortality. Continuous monitoring of physiologic parameters revealed that ATP reduced heartbeat rate and blood pressure. ATP also increased blood glucose, accompanied by severe acidosis and hypocalcemia. Western blotting showed that ATP decreased levels of both phospho-Akt and total-Akt in the cortex. Our results reveal that, despite inducing hypothermia, ATP is not appropriate for protecting the brain against stroke. Instead, we show for the first time that ATP treatment is associated with exaggerated ischemic outcomes and dangerous systemic side effects. PMID:23072747

  14. Intravascular pressure augments cerebral arterial constriction by inducing voltage-insensitive Ca2+ waves.

    PubMed

    Mufti, Rania E; Brett, Suzanne E; Tran, Cam Ha T; Abd El-Rahman, Rasha; Anfinogenova, Yana; El-Yazbi, Ahmed; Cole, William C; Jones, Peter P; Chen, S R Wayne; Welsh, Donald G

    2010-10-15

    This study examined whether elevated intravascular pressure stimulates asynchronous Ca(2+) waves in cerebral arterial smooth muscle cells and if their generation contributes to myogenic tone development. The endothelium was removed from rat cerebral arteries, which were then mounted in an arteriograph, pressurized (20-100 mmHg) and examined under a variety of experimental conditions. Diameter and membrane potential (V(M)) were monitored using conventional techniques; Ca(2+) wave generation and myosin light chain (MLC(20))/MYPT1 (myosin phosphatase targeting subunit) phosphorylation were assessed by confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis, respectively. Elevating intravascular pressure increased the proportion of smooth muscle cells firing asynchronous Ca(2+) waves as well as event frequency. Ca(2+) wave augmentation occurred primarily at lower intravascular pressures (<60 mmHg) and ryanodine, a plant alkaloid that depletes the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of Ca(2+), eliminated these events. Ca(2+) wave generation was voltage insensitive as Ca(2+) channel blockade and perturbations in extracellular [K(+)] had little effect on measured parameters. Ryanodine-induced inhibition of Ca(2+) waves attenuated myogenic tone and MLC(20) phosphorylation without altering arterial V(M). Thapsigargin, an SR Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor also attenuated Ca(2+) waves, pressure-induced constriction and MLC(20) phosphorylation. The SR-driven component of the myogenic response was proportionally greater at lower intravascular pressures and subsequent MYPT1 phosphorylation measures revealed that SR Ca(2+) waves facilitated pressure-induced MLC(20) phosphorylation through mechanisms that include myosin light chain phosphatase inhibition. Cumulatively, our findings show that mechanical stimuli augment Ca(2+) wave generation in arterial smooth muscle and that these transient events facilitate tone development particularly at lower intravascular pressures by providing a proportion of the Ca

  15. Mechanisms underlying the cerebral microvascular responses to angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vital, Shantel A; Terao, Satoshi; Nagai, Mutsumi; Granger, D Neil

    2010-11-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) and AngII type-1 receptors (AT1r) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and ischemic stroke. The objectives of this study was to determine if/how chronic AngII administration affects blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and blood cell adhesion in the cerebral microvasculature. AngII-loaded osmotic pumps were implanted in wild type (WT) and mutant mice. Leukocyte and platelet adhesion were monitored in cerebral venules by intravital microscopy and BBB permeability detected by Evans blue leakage. AngII (two week) infusion increased blood pressure in WT mice. This was accompanied by an increased BBB permeability and a high density of adherent leukocytes and platelets. AT1r (on the vessel wall, but not on blood cells) was largely responsible for the microvascular responses to AngII. Immunodeficient (Rag-1(-/-) ) mice exhibited blunted blood cell recruitment responses without a change in BBB permeability. A similar protection pattern was noted in RANTES(-/-) and P-selectin(-/-) mice, with bone marrow chimeras (blood cell deficiency only) yielding responses comparable to the respective knockouts. These findings implicate AT1r in the microvascular dysfunction associated with AngII-induced hypertension and suggest that immune cells and blood cell-associated RANTES and P-selectin contribute to the blood cell recruitment, but not the BBB failure, elicited by AngII. PMID:21044218

  16. Krypton laser-induced photothrombotic distal middle cerebral artery occlusion without craniectomy in mice.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, Hiroshi; Yao, Hiroshi; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Iida, Mitsuo

    2004-08-01

    Recent advances in genetical engineering of the mouse have highlighted the importance of reproducible and less invasive models of cerebral ischemia in mice. In this paper, we developed minimally invasive and reproducible model of distal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion in mice using krypton (Kr) laser-induced photothrombosis. C57BL/6 or BALB mice (n=8 each) were anesthetized with halothane. The skin was cut, the temporal muscle was retracted, and the right distal MCA was observed through the skull. A Kr laser beam of wavelength 568 nm was focused onto the MCA over the intact skull. Upon laser irradiation, intravenous administration of a rose bengal solution was begun. After 4 min of irradiation, the laser beam was refocused on the MCA just proximal to the first spot, and another 4-min irradiation was performed. Then, the right common carotid artery (CCA) was ligated. Three days later, the brain was removed, and infarct volume was determined. Infarction confined almost solely to the cortical area was produced in each mouse. Mean infarct volume in C57BL/6 mice was 25.2+/-13.7 mm3. The BALB mice group showed significantly larger and more reproducible infarction (44.1+/-5.2 mm3; the coefficient of variation was 12%) than did C57BL/6 mice (P<0.005). Our photothrombosis model of stroke in mice can be performed without craniectomy, and its reproducibility is satisfactory when using BALB mice.

  17. Transdifferentiation-Induced Neural Stem Cells Promote Recovery of Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Maoying; Li, Shaowu; Wu, Bingshan; Nie, Xiaohu; Jiao, Jiao; Zhao, Hao; Wang, Shanshan; Yang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yesen; Sun, Yilin; Wicha, Max S.; Chang, Alfred E.; Gao, Shaorong; Li, Qiao; Xu, Ruxiang

    2015-01-01

    Induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) can be directly transdifferentiated from somatic cells. One potential clinical application of the iNSCs is for nerve regeneration. However, it is unknown whether iNSCs function in disease models. We produced transdifferentiated iNSCs by conditional overexpressing Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Mycin mouse embryonic fibroblasts. They expanded readily in vitro and expressed NSC mRNA profile and protein markers. These iNSCs differentiated into mature astrocytes, neurons and oligodendrocytes in vitro. Importantly, they reduced lesion size, promoted the recovery of motor and sensory function as well as metabolism status in middle cerebral artery stroke rats. These iNSCs secreted nerve growth factors, which was associated with observed protection of neurons from apoptosis. Furthermore, iNSCs migrated to and passed through the lesion in the cerebral cortex, where Tuj1+ neurons were detected. These findings have revealed the function of transdifferentiated iNSCs in vivo, and thus provide experimental evidence to support the development of personalized regenerative therapy for CNS diseases by using genetically engineered autologous somatic cells. PMID:26352672

  18. In Utero Bisphenol A Exposure Induces Abnormal Neuronal Migration in the Cerebral Cortex of Mice.

    PubMed

    Ling, Wenting; Endo, Toshihiro; Kubo, Ken-Ichiro; Nakajima, Kazunori; Kakeyama, Masaki; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has been known to have endocrine-disrupting activity to induce reproductive and behavioral abnormalities in offspring of laboratory animal species. However, morphological basis of this abnormality during brain development is largely unknown. Cerebral cortex plays a crucial role in higher brain function, and its precisely laminated structure is formed by neuronal migration. In the present study, transfecting a plasmid (pCAG-mCherry) by in utero electroporation (IUE), we visualized developing neurons and investigated the possible effects of in utero BPA exposure on neuronal migration. Pregnant mice were exposed to BPA by osmotic pump at estimated daily doses of 0, 40 (BPA-40), or 400 (BPA-400) μg/kg from embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) to E18.5. IUE was performed at E14.5 and neuronal migration was analyzed at E18.5. Compared with the control group, neuronal migration in the cortical plate was significantly decreased in the BPA-40 group; however, there was no significant difference in the BPA-400 group. Among several neuronal migration-related genes and cortical layer-specific genes, TrkB in the BPA-400 group was found significantly upregulated. In conclusion, in utero exposure to low BPA dose was found to disrupt neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex in a dose-specific manner. PMID:26869994

  19. In Utero Bisphenol A Exposure Induces Abnormal Neuronal Migration in the Cerebral Cortex of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Wenting; Endo, Toshihiro; Kubo, Ken-ichiro; Nakajima, Kazunori; Kakeyama, Masaki; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has been known to have endocrine-disrupting activity to induce reproductive and behavioral abnormalities in offspring of laboratory animal species. However, morphological basis of this abnormality during brain development is largely unknown. Cerebral cortex plays a crucial role in higher brain function, and its precisely laminated structure is formed by neuronal migration. In the present study, transfecting a plasmid (pCAG-mCherry) by in utero electroporation (IUE), we visualized developing neurons and investigated the possible effects of in utero BPA exposure on neuronal migration. Pregnant mice were exposed to BPA by osmotic pump at estimated daily doses of 0, 40 (BPA-40), or 400 (BPA-400) μg/kg from embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) to E18.5. IUE was performed at E14.5 and neuronal migration was analyzed at E18.5. Compared with the control group, neuronal migration in the cortical plate was significantly decreased in the BPA-40 group; however, there was no significant difference in the BPA-400 group. Among several neuronal migration-related genes and cortical layer-specific genes, TrkB in the BPA-400 group was found significantly upregulated. In conclusion, in utero exposure to low BPA dose was found to disrupt neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex in a dose-specific manner. PMID:26869994

  20. In Utero Bisphenol A Exposure Induces Abnormal Neuronal Migration in the Cerebral Cortex of Mice.

    PubMed

    Ling, Wenting; Endo, Toshihiro; Kubo, Ken-Ichiro; Nakajima, Kazunori; Kakeyama, Masaki; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has been known to have endocrine-disrupting activity to induce reproductive and behavioral abnormalities in offspring of laboratory animal species. However, morphological basis of this abnormality during brain development is largely unknown. Cerebral cortex plays a crucial role in higher brain function, and its precisely laminated structure is formed by neuronal migration. In the present study, transfecting a plasmid (pCAG-mCherry) by in utero electroporation (IUE), we visualized developing neurons and investigated the possible effects of in utero BPA exposure on neuronal migration. Pregnant mice were exposed to BPA by osmotic pump at estimated daily doses of 0, 40 (BPA-40), or 400 (BPA-400) μg/kg from embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) to E18.5. IUE was performed at E14.5 and neuronal migration was analyzed at E18.5. Compared with the control group, neuronal migration in the cortical plate was significantly decreased in the BPA-40 group; however, there was no significant difference in the BPA-400 group. Among several neuronal migration-related genes and cortical layer-specific genes, TrkB in the BPA-400 group was found significantly upregulated. In conclusion, in utero exposure to low BPA dose was found to disrupt neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex in a dose-specific manner.

  1. Substance P-induced relaxation and hyperpolarization in human cerebral arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, J.; Zygmunt, P. M.; Brandt, L.; Högestätt, E. D.

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular effects of substance P were studied in human isolated pial arteries removed from 14 patients undergoing cerebral cortical resection. 2. Substance P induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in the presence of indomethacin. No relaxation was seen in arteries where the endothelium had been removed. 3. N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 0.3 mM) abolished the relaxation in arteries from six patients. The relaxation was only partially inhibited in the remaining eight patients, the reduction of the maximum relaxation being less than 50% in each patient. 4. The L-NOARG-resistant relaxation was abolished when the external K+ concentration was raised above 30 mM. 5. Substance P caused a smooth muscle hyperpolarization (in the presence of L-NOARG and indomethacin), but only when the artery showed an L-NOARG-resistant relaxation. 6. The results indicate that nitric oxide is an important mediator of endothelium-dependent relaxation in human cerebral arteries. Furthermore, another endothelium-dependent pathway, causing hyperpolarization and vasodilatation, was identified in arteries from more than half the population of patients. PMID:7582516

  2. Functional response of cerebral blood flow induced by somatosensory stimulation in rats with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiguo; Huang, Qin; Liu, Peng; Li, Pengcheng; Ma, Lianting; Lu, Jinling

    2015-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by cerebral vasospasm (CVS), which is the phenomenon of narrowing of large cerebral arteries, and then can produce delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) such as lateralized sensory dysfunction. CVS was regarded as a major contributor to DIND in patients with SAH. However, therapy for preventing vasospasm after SAH to improve the outcomes may not work all the time. It is important to find answers to the relationship between CVS and DIND after SAH. How local cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated during functional activation after SAH still remains poorly understood, whereas, the regulation of CBF may play an important role in weakening the impact of CVS on cortex function. Therefore, it is worthwhile to evaluate the functional response of CBF in the activated cortex in an SAH animal model. Most evaluation of the effect of SAH is presently carried out by neurological behavioral scales. The functional imaging of cortical activation during sensory stimulation may help to reflect the function of the somatosensory cortex more locally than the behavioral scales do. We investigated the functional response of CBF in the somatosensory cortex induced by an electrical stimulation to contralateral forepaw via laser speckle imaging in a rat SAH model. Nineteen Sprague-Dawley rats from two groups (control group, n=10 and SAH group, n=9) were studied. SAH was induced in rats by double injection of autologous blood into the cisterna magna after CSF aspiration. The same surgical procedure was applied in the control group without CSF aspiration or blood injection. Significant CVS was found in the SAH group. Meanwhile, we observed a delayed peak of CBF response in rats with SAH compared with those in the control group, whereas no significant difference was found in magnitude, duration, and areas under curve of relative CBF changes between the two groups. The results suggest that the regulation function of local CBF during

  3. Lysine and Arginine Reduce the Effects of Cerebral Ischemic Insults and Inhibit Glutamate-Induced Neuronal Activity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, Takashi; Kameishi, Makiko; Mallick, Hruda Nanda; Ono, Taketoshi; Torii, Kunio

    2010-01-01

    Intravenous administration of arginine was shown to be protective against cerebral ischemic insults via nitric oxide production and possibly via additional mechanisms. The present study aimed at evaluating the neuroprotective effects of oral administration of lysine (a basic amino acid), arginine, and their combination on ischemic insults (cerebral edema and infarction) and hemispheric brain swelling induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion in rats. Magnetic resonance imaging and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining were performed 2 days after ischemia induction. In control animals, the major edematous areas were observed in the cerebral cortex and striatum. The volumes associated with cortical edema were significantly reduced by lysine (2.0 g/kg), arginine (0.6 g/kg), or their combined administration (0.6 g/kg each). Protective effects of these amino acids on infarction were comparable to the inhibitory effects on edema formation. Interestingly, these amino acids, even at low dose (0.6 g/kg), were effective to reduce hemispheric brain swelling. Additionally, the effects of in vivo microiontophoretic (juxtaneuronal) applications of these amino acids on glutamate-evoked neuronal activity in the ventromedial hypothalamus were investigated in awake rats. Glutamate-induced neuronal activity was robustly inhibited by microiontophoretic applications of lysine or arginine onto neuronal membranes. Taken together, our results demonstrate the neuroprotective effects of oral ingestion of lysine and arginine against ischemic insults (cerebral edema and infarction), especially in the cerebral cortex, and suggest that suppression of glutamate-induced neuronal activity might be the primary mechanism associated with these neuroprotective effects. PMID:20589237

  4. Measurement of in vivo cerebral volumetric strain induced by the Valsalva maneuver.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Reza; Fehlner, Andreas; Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Braun, Jürgen; Samani, Abbas; Sack, Ingolf

    2014-05-01

    Compressibility of biological tissues such as brain parenchyma is related to its poroelastic nature characterized by the geometry and pressure of vasculature and interconnected fluid-filled spaces. Thus, cerebral volumetric strain may be sensitive to intracranial pressure which can be altered under physiological conditions. So far volumetric strain has attained little attention in studies of the mechanical behavior of the brain. This paper reports a study of measuring the in vivo cerebral volumetric strain induced by the Valsalva maneuver (VM) where forced expiration against a closed glottis leads to a transient increase in the intracranial pressure. For this purpose we applied three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging equipped with a patient-controlled acquisition system to five healthy volunteers. With each volunteer, three experiments were performed: one with VM and two in resting state. i.e. normal ventilation, which were conducted before and after VM. The VM data were registered to reference data by morphology based non-rigid deformation, yielding 3D maps of total displacements and volumetric strain. On average, VM induced volumetric strain correlated to whole-brain dilatation of -3.14±0.87% and -2.80±0.71% compared to the reference states before and after VM, respectively. These values were well reproduced by repetitive experiments during the same scan as well as by repeated measurements in one volunteer on different days. Combined with literature data of intracranial pressure changes, our volumetric strain values can be used to elucidate the static compression modulus of the in vivo human brain. These results add knowledge to the understanding of the brain׳s biomechanical properties under physiological conditions.

  5. Neurophysiological changes induced by the botulinum toxin type A injection in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Frascarelli, Flaminia; Di Rosa, Giuseppe; Bisozzi, Eleonora; Castelli, Enrico; Santilli, Valter

    2011-01-01

    In the last few years botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) has been widely used in the management of spasticity in children with cerebral palsy in order to reduce hypertonicity and improve functional outcomes enhancing motor skill development. The botulinum toxin injection seems to interact with intrafusal and extrafusal fibers producing a reduction of hypertone both through synaptic blockade and inhibition of stretch reflex loop and these changes may influence not only the spinal cord but also the central nervous system (CNS). The purpose of our study was to determine the neurophysiological changes induced by the BTX-A through an evaluation of cortical somatosensory Evoked Potential (SEP) and Soleus H wave, that is the index of excitability of stretch reflex loop. Eighteen children with Cerebral Palsy (CP), aged between 5 and 12, were recruited at Children's Hospital "Bambino Gesù" of Rome. All children were evaluated with appropriate clinical scales before and 1 month after the BTX-A injection. Neurophysiological measurements were performed before, and 1 month after botulinum toxin injection through lower limb SEPs, M-wave and Soleus H wave recording. After the injection the results showed a statistically significant improvement both of clinical scales and the neurophysiological variables. These findings suggest that spasticity itself can be considered as a factor affecting the cortical SEPs. And even though it seems that BTX-A does not have any direct central effect on sensory pathways we suppose an indirect mechanism on modulation of afferent fibers Ia due to the modification induced by BTX-A to central loop reflex.

  6. Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery after Preoperative CT-Guided Lipiodol Marking of Small or Impalpable Pulmonary Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Yajima, Toshiki; Tomizawa, Kenji; Onozato, Ryoichi; Tanaka, Shigebumi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Small pulmonary lesions that include ground-glass attenuation have been increasingly discovered because of progressive imaging diagnostic technologies. Despite the detection of such small lesions, sometimes it is quite difficult to localize them because of their size or considerable depth from the visceral pleura. In the present study, we examined the usefulness of computed tomography-guided lipiodol marking for thoracoscopic resection of impalpable pulmonary nodules. Methods: Fifty-six patients with an undiagnosed peripheral lesion(s) of the lung who had undergone preoperative computed tomography-guided lipiodol marking followed by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery were studied. Results: All of the nodules were successfully marked by computed tomography-guided lipiodol marking, and all except for one case were localized by means of intraoperative fluoroscopy as clear spots. With regard to complications, pneumothorax occurred in 21 patients (37.5%), and only one patient required transient drainage. Although hemorrhaging in the lung parenchyma and hemosputum occurred in nine patients (16.1%) and one patient (1.8%), respectively, no patients were in serious condition. No intra- or postoperative mortality or morbidity was observed. Conclusion: Preoperative computed tomography-guided lipiodol marking of small or impalpable pulmonary nodules is a safe and useful procedure for thoracoscopic resection of the lung. PMID:26004116

  7. Neuroprotective Effects of Agomelatine and Vinpocetine Against Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Induced Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Surbhi; Singh, Prabhat; Sharma, Brij Mohan; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) has been considered as a critical cause for the development of cognitive decline and dementia of vascular origin. Melatonin receptors have been reported to be beneficial in improving memory deterioration. Phosphodiesterase-1 (PDE1) enzyme offers protection against cognitive impairments and cerebrovascular disorders. Aim of this study is to explore the role of agomelatine (a dual MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptor agonist) and vinpocetine (selective PDE1 inhibitor) in CCH induced vascular dementia (VaD). Two vessel occlusion (2VO) or bilateral common carotid arteries ligation method was performed to initiate a phase of chronic hypoperfusion in mice. 2VO animals have shown significant cognitive deficits (Morris water maze), cholinergic dysfunction (increased acetyl cholinesterase -AChE) activity alongwith increased brain oxidative stress (decreased brain catalase, glutathione, as well as superoxide dismutase with an increase in malondialdehyde levels), and significant increase in brain infarct size (2,3,5- triphenylterazolium chloride-TTC staining). Treatment of agomelatine and vinpocetine reduced CCH induced learning and memory deficits and limited cholinergic dysfunction, oxidative stress, and tissue damage, suggesting that agomelatine and vinpocetine may provide benefits in CCH induced VaD. PMID:26036976

  8. Reduction of the systemic inflammatory induced by acute cerebral infarction through ultra-early thrombolytic therapy

    PubMed Central

    YE, LICHAO; CAI, RUOWEI; YANG, MEILI; QIAN, JIAQIANG; HONG, ZHILIN

    2015-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke induces systemic inflammation, exhibited as changes in body temperature, white blood cell counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of intravenous thrombolytic therapy on inflammatory indices in order to investigate the hypothesis that post-stroke systemic inflammatory response occurs in response to the necrosis of brain tissues. In this study, 62 patients with acute cerebral infarction and indications for intravenous thrombolysis were divided into three groups on the basis of their treatment and response: Successful thrombolysis (n=36), failed thrombolysis (n=12) and control (n=14) groups. The body temperature, white blood cell counts and high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP levels were recorded pre-treatment and on post-stroke days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Spearman's correlation analysis showed that the pre-treatment National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score positively correlated with body temperature, white blood cell count and hs-CRP levels. On day 3 of effective intravenous thrombolysis, the body temperature and white blood cell were decreased and on days 3 and 5, the serum levels of hs-CRP were reduced compared with those in the failed thrombolysis and control groups. The results indicate that the systemic inflammatory response following acute cerebral infarction was mainly caused by ischemic injury of local brain tissue; the more serious the stroke, the stronger the inflammatory response. Ultra-early thrombolytic therapy may inhibit the necrosis of brain tissue and thereby reduce the inflammatory response. PMID:26622513

  9. Asiaticoside attenuates memory impairment induced by transient cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in mice through anti-inflammatory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, She; Yin, Zhu-Jun; Jiang, Chen; Ma, Zhan-Qiang; Fu, Qiang; Qu, Rong; Ma, Shi-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Asiaticoside (AS) is isolated from Centella asiatica (L.) which has been using for a long time as a memory enhancing drug in India. This study was to investigate the effects of AS on memory impairment and inflammatory cytokines expression induced by transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in mice, as well as the potential signaling pathway. Transient bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (tBCCAO) induced severe memory deficits in mice according to the Morris water maze task and the step-down passive avoidance test. Meanwhile the microglial activation and the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were increased in the hippocampus of the mice with cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. Oral administration of AS (40 and 60 mg/kg, once per day, started the day after surgery and lasted for 7 days) significantly ameliorated the memory impairment and the inflammation. Moreover, AS (20, 40 and 60 mg/kg) markedly reduced the microglial overactivation and the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in hippocampus compared with the transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion group. These results suggested that AS showed the neuroprotective effect against transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in mice, and this effect might be associated with the anti-inflammation effect of AS via inhibiting overactivation of p38 MAPK pathway.

  10. Increases of Catalase and Glutathione Peroxidase Expressions by Lacosamide Pretreatment Contributes to Neuroprotection Against Experimentally Induced Transient Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Young; Park, Joon Ha; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich Na; Lee, Yun Lyul; Kim, In Hye; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Lee, Jae-Chul; Won, Moo-Ho; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Yan, Bing Chun; Hwang, In Koo; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Young-Myeong; Kim, Sung Koo

    2016-09-01

    Lacosamide is a new antiepileptic drug which is widely used to treat partial-onset seizures. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective effect of lacosamide against transient ischemic damage and expressions of antioxidant enzymes such as Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD2), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) region following 5 min of transient global cerebral ischemia in gerbils. We found that pre-treatment with 25 mg/kg lacosamide protected CA1 pyramidal neurons from transient global cerebral ischemic insult using hematoxylin-eosin staining and neuronal nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. Transient ischemia dramatically changed expressions of SOD1, SOD2 and GPX, not CAT, in the CA1 pyramidal neurons. Lacosamide pre-treatment increased expressions of CAT and GPX, not SOD1 and 2, in the CA1 pyramidal neurons compared with controls, and their expressions induced by lacosamide pre-treatment were maintained after transient cerebral ischemia. In brief, pre-treatment with lacosamide protected hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from ischemic damage induced by transient global cerebral ischemia, and the lacosamide-mediated neuroprotection may be closely related to increases of CAT and GPX expressions by lacosamide pre-treatment. PMID:27209305

  11. Paradoxical Air Microembolism Induces Cerebral Bioelectrical Abnormalities and Occasionally Headache in Patent Foramen Ovale Patients With Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Sevgi, Eser Başak; Erdener, Sefik Evren; Demirci, Mehmet; Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Dalkara, Turgay

    2012-01-01

    Background Although controversial, paradoxical embolism via patent foramen ovale (PFO) may account for some of the migraine attacks in a subset of migraine with aura (MA) patients. Induction of MA attacks with air bubble injection during transcranial Doppler ultrasound in MA patients with PFO supports this view. It is likely that cerebral embolism in patients with right-to-left shunt induces bioelectrical abnormalities to initiate MA under some conditions. Methods and Results We investigated changes in cerebral bioelectrical activity after intravenous microbubble injection in 10 MA patients with large PFO and right-to-left cardiac shunt. Eight PFO patients without migraine but with large right-to-left shunt and 12 MA patients without PFO served as controls. Four MA patients with PFO were reexamined with sham injections of saline without microbubbles. Bioelectrical activity was evaluated using spectral electroencephalography and, passage of microbubbles through cerebral arteries was monitored with transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Microbubble embolism caused significant electroencephalographic power increase in MA+PFO patients but not in control groups including the sham-injected MA+PFO patients. Headache developed in 2 MA with PFO patients after microbubble injection. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that air microembolism through large PFOs may cause cerebral bioelectrical disturbances and, occasionally, headache in MA patients, which may reflect an increased reactivity of their brain to transient subclinical hypoxia–ischemia, and suggest that paradoxical embolism is not a common cause of migraine but may induce headache in the presence of a large PFO and facilitating conditions. PMID:23316313

  12. Comparative pharmacokinetics of five rhubarb anthraquinones in normal and thrombotic focal cerebral ischemia-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Su-xiang; Li, Jian-sheng; Qu, Ling-bo; Shi, Yan-mei; Zhao, Di

    2013-10-01

    A comparative oral pharmacokinetic study of five anthraquinones (aloe-emodin, emodin, rhein, chrysophanol and physcion) from the extract of Rheum palmatum L. was performed in normal and thrombotic focal cerebral ischemia (TFCI)-induced rats. The plasma samples were clarified through solid phase extraction prior to simultaneous determination of the anthraquinones with a validated high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence system. The results indicated that the Cmax, t(1/2) and AUC(0-t), of aloe-emodin, rhein, emodin and chrysophanol in TFCI-induced rats were nearly double, whereas the CL values were remarkably decreased (p < 0.05) over those of the normal rats. The plasma drug concentration-time data of five anthraquinones to rats fitted a two-compartment open model. The five anthraquinones in rat plasma were absorbed quickly and eliminated slowly in both groups. The obtained results could be helpful for evaluating the impact of the efficacy and safety of the drug in clinical applications.

  13. Procaspase-9 induces its cleavage by transnitrosylating XIAP via the Thioredoxin system during cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dengyue; Zhao, Ningjun; Ma, Bin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Gongliang; Yan, Xianliang; Hu, Shuqun; Xu, Tie

    2016-01-01

    Transnitrosylation is an important mechanism by which nitric oxide (NO) modulates cell signaling pathways. For instance, SNO-caspase-3 can transnitrosylate the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) to enhance apoptosis. XIAP is a potent antagonist of caspase apoptotic activity. Decrease in XIAP activity via nitrosylation results in SNO-XIAP-mediated caspase activation. Considering the functional liaison of procaspase-9 and XIAP, we hypothesized that procaspase-9 nitrosylates XIAP directly. Our data confirmed that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion induced XIAP nitrosylation, procaspase-9 denitrosylation and cleavage. Interestingly, the time courses of the nitrosylation of procaspase-9 and XIAP were negatively correlated, which was more prominent after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, suggesting a direct interaction. The nitrosylation of XIAP, as well as the denitrosylation and cleavage of procaspase-9, were inhibited by DNCB, TrxR1 AS-ODNs, or TAT-AVPY treatment. Meanwhile, DNCB, TrxR1 AS-ODNs, or TAT-AVPY also inhibited the decrease in hippocampal CA1 neurons induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats. The denitrosylation and cleavage of procaspase-9 induced by OGD/reoxygenation in SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited when cells were co-transfected with wild-type procaspase-9 and XIAP mutant (C449G). These data suggest that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion induces a transnitrosylation from procaspase-9 to XIAP via the Trx system to consequently cause apoptosis. Additionally, Cys325 is a critical S-nitrosylation site of procaspase-9. PMID:27052476

  14. Procaspase-9 induces its cleavage by transnitrosylating XIAP via the Thioredoxin system during cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dengyue; Zhao, Ningjun; Ma, Bin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Gongliang; Yan, Xianliang; Hu, Shuqun; Xu, Tie

    2016-01-01

    Transnitrosylation is an important mechanism by which nitric oxide (NO) modulates cell signaling pathways. For instance, SNO-caspase-3 can transnitrosylate the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) to enhance apoptosis. XIAP is a potent antagonist of caspase apoptotic activity. Decrease in XIAP activity via nitrosylation results in SNO-XIAP-mediated caspase activation. Considering the functional liaison of procaspase-9 and XIAP, we hypothesized that procaspase-9 nitrosylates XIAP directly. Our data confirmed that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion induced XIAP nitrosylation, procaspase-9 denitrosylation and cleavage. Interestingly, the time courses of the nitrosylation of procaspase-9 and XIAP were negatively correlated, which was more prominent after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, suggesting a direct interaction. The nitrosylation of XIAP, as well as the denitrosylation and cleavage of procaspase-9, were inhibited by DNCB, TrxR1 AS-ODNs, or TAT-AVPY treatment. Meanwhile, DNCB, TrxR1 AS-ODNs, or TAT-AVPY also inhibited the decrease in hippocampal CA1 neurons induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats. The denitrosylation and cleavage of procaspase-9 induced by OGD/reoxygenation in SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited when cells were co-transfected with wild-type procaspase-9 and XIAP mutant (C449G). These data suggest that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion induces a transnitrosylation from procaspase-9 to XIAP via the Trx system to consequently cause apoptosis. Additionally, Cys325 is a critical S-nitrosylation site of procaspase-9. PMID:27052476

  15. Ginsenoside Rg1 prevents cerebral and cerebellar injury induced by obstructive jaundice in rats via inducing expression of TIPE-2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tingting; Zu, Guo; Zhou, Lu; Che, Ningwei; Guo, Jing; Liang, Zhanhua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1) on cerebral and cerebellar injury in experimental obstructive jaundice (OJ). OJ was done by ligature and section of extrahepatic biliary duct. Rg1 was injected intraperitoneally (10 mg kg(-1)d(-1) or 20 mg kg(-1) d(-1)). Comparison of serum total bile salts (TBA), total bilirubin (TBil), direct bilirubin (DBil), TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β among groups. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined, also apoptosis and mRNA and protein levels of TIPE2 (TNF-α-inducible protein 8-like 2) were tested in cerebrum and cerebellum. Our results showed that Rg1 reduced MDA and apoptosis in cerebrum and cerebellum induced by OJ, also GSH and antioxidant enzyme activity were raised obviously in rats treated with Rg1. Moreover, decreased mRNA and protein levels of TIPE2 in OJ rats and Rg1 could improve the decreased mRNA and protein levels of TIPE2 in OJ rats. In conclusion, Rg1 decreased oxidative stress and apoptosis, also recovered the antioxidant status and mRNA and protein levels of TIPE2 in the cerebrum and cerebellum of OJ rats.

  16. Effect of age on exercise-induced alterations in cognitive executive function: relationship to cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Ainslie, Philip N; Murrell, Carissa J; Thomas, Kate N; Franz, Elizabeth A; Cotter, James D

    2012-08-01

    Regular exercise improves the age-related decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and is associated with improved cognitive function; however, less is known about the direct relationship between CBF and cognitive function. We examined the influence of healthy aging on the capability of acute exercise to improve cognition, and whether exercise-induced improvements in cognition are related to CBF and cortical hemodynamics. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv; Doppler) and cortical hemodynamics (NIRS) were measured in 13 young (24±5 y) and 9 older (62±3 y) participants at rest and during cycling at 30% and 70% of heart rate range (HRR). Cognitive performance was assessed using a computer-adapted Stroop task (i.e., test of executive function cognition) at rest and during exercise. Average response times on the Stroop task were slower for the older compared to younger group for both simple and difficult tasks (P<0.01). Independent of age, difficult-task response times improved during exercise (P<0.01), with the improvement greater at 70% HRR exercise (P=0.04 vs. 30% HRR). Higher MCAv was correlated with faster response times for simple and difficult tasks at rest (R(2)=0.47 and R(2)=0.47, respectively), but this relation uncoupled progressively during exercise. Exercise-induced increases in MCAv were similar and unaltered during cognitive tasks for both age groups. In contrast, prefrontal cortical hemodynamic NIRS measures [oxyhemoglobin (O(2)Hb) and total hemoglobin (tHb)] were differentially affected by exercise intensity, age and cognitive task; e.g., there were smaller increases in [O(2)Hb] and [tHb] in the older group between exercise intensities (P<0.05). These data indicate that: 1) Regardless of age, cognitive (executive) function is improved while exercising; 2) while MCAv is strongly related to cognition at rest, this relation becomes uncoupled during exercise, and 3) there is dissociation between global CBF and regional cortical oxygenation and

  17. Neuroplastic Sensorimotor Resting State Network Reorganization in Children With Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy Treated With Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Manning, Kathryn Y; Menon, Ravi S; Gorter, Jan Willem; Mesterman, Ronit; Campbell, Craig; Switzer, Lauren; Fehlings, Darcy

    2016-02-01

    Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we aim to understand the neurologic basis of improved function in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy treated with constraint-induced movement therapy. Eleven children including 4 untreated comparison subjects diagnosed with hemiplegic cerebral palsy were recruited from 3 clinical centers. MRI and clinical data were gathered at baseline and 1 month for both groups, and 6 months later for the case group only. After constraint therapy, the sensorimotor resting state network became more bilateral, with balanced contributions from each hemisphere, which was sustained 6 months later. Sensorimotor resting state network reorganization after therapy was correlated with a change in the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test score at 1 month (r = 0.79, P = .06), and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure scores at 6 months (r = 0.82, P = .05). This clinically correlated resting state network reorganization provides further evidence of the neuroplastic mechanisms underlying constraint-induced movement therapy.

  18. Neuroplastic Sensorimotor Resting State Network Reorganization in Children With Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy Treated With Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Manning, Kathryn Y; Menon, Ravi S; Gorter, Jan Willem; Mesterman, Ronit; Campbell, Craig; Switzer, Lauren; Fehlings, Darcy

    2016-02-01

    Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we aim to understand the neurologic basis of improved function in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy treated with constraint-induced movement therapy. Eleven children including 4 untreated comparison subjects diagnosed with hemiplegic cerebral palsy were recruited from 3 clinical centers. MRI and clinical data were gathered at baseline and 1 month for both groups, and 6 months later for the case group only. After constraint therapy, the sensorimotor resting state network became more bilateral, with balanced contributions from each hemisphere, which was sustained 6 months later. Sensorimotor resting state network reorganization after therapy was correlated with a change in the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test score at 1 month (r = 0.79, P = .06), and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure scores at 6 months (r = 0.82, P = .05). This clinically correlated resting state network reorganization provides further evidence of the neuroplastic mechanisms underlying constraint-induced movement therapy. PMID:26078420

  19. Unique action mechanisms of tramadol in global cerebral ischemia-induced mechanical allodynia.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Wataru; Kageyama, Erika; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-06-15

    Central poststroke pain is associated with specific somatosensory abnormalities, such as neuropathic pain syndrome. Although central poststroke pain is a serious condition, details pertaining to underlying mechanisms are not well established, making current standard treatments only partially effective. Here, we assessed the effects of tramadol, an analgesic drug mediated by opioid receptors, using a mouse model of global cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was induced by bilateral carotid artery occlusion (30 min) in male ddY mice. Development of hind-paw mechanical allodynia was measured 3 days after bilateral carotid artery occlusion using the von Frey test. Mechanical allodynia was significantly and dose dependently suppressed by intraperitoneal tramadol (10 or 20 mg/kg). These effects, which peaked at 10 min and continued for at least 60 min, were inhibited by naloxone (nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Tramadol antinociception was significantly negated by β-funaltrexamine (selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist, 20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), but not naltrindole (selective δ-opioid receptor antagonist, 5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) or nor-binaltorphimine (selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) after 5 min, by β-funaltrexamine and nor-binaltorphimine but not naltrindole after 10 min, and by all selective opioid receptor antagonists at 15 and 30 min after tramadol treatment. These results suggested that antinociception induced by tramadol through various opioid receptors was time dependent. Furthermore, it is possible that the opioid receptors involved in tramadol-induced antinociception change over time with the metabolism of this drug.

  20. A rare case of chemotherapy induced reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome in a patient of acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sankhe, Shilpa; Kamath, Namita; Sahu, Arpita

    2015-01-01

    Neurotoxic reactions of chemotherapy occur frequently and are often dose limiting side effects of chemotherapy. It is important to differentiate these various nonneoplastic effects from metastases, or sometimes even from each other, since the therapeutic approach differs accordingly. To arrive at a definitive and comprehensive diagnosis, the radiologist should integrate imaging findings, clinical signs, and laboratory results together. Here we present a unique case of chemotherapy induced reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome in a 13-year-old patient of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  1. Extremely low frequency magnetic field induced changes in motor behaviour of gerbils submitted to global cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Rauš, Snežana; Selaković, Vesna; Radenović, Lidija; Prolić, Zlatko; Janać, Branka

    2012-03-17

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate behavioural effects of an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) in 3-month-old Mongolian gerbils submitted to global cerebral ischemia. After 10-min occlusion of both common carotid arteries, the gerbils were placed in the vicinity of an electromagnet and continuously exposed to ELF-MF (50Hz, 0.5mT) for 7 days. Their behaviour (locomotion, stereotypy, rotations, and immobility) was monitored on days 1, 2, 4, 7, and 14 after reperfusion for 60min in the open field. It was shown that the 10-min global cerebral ischemia per se induced a significant motor activity increase (locomotion, stereotypy and rotations), and consequently immobility decrease until day 4 after reperfusion, compared to control gerbils. Exposure to ELF-MF inhibited development of ischemia-induced motor hyperactivity during the whole period of registration, but significantly in the first 2 days after reperfusion, when the postischemic hyperactivity was most evident. Motor activity of these gerbils was still significantly increased compared to control ones, but only on day 1 after reperfusion. Our results revealed that the applied ELF-MF (50Hz, 0.5mT) decreased motor hyperactivity induced by the 10-min global cerebral ischemia, via modulation of the processes that underlie this behavioural response.

  2. Mas receptor deficiency exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced cerebral and systemic inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Lima, Onésia C; Pinto, Mauro C X; Duchene, Johan; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Souza, Laura L; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A S; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana

    2015-12-01

    Beyond the classical actions of the renin-angiotensin system on the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis, several studies have shown its involvement in acute and chronic inflammation. The G protein-coupled receptor Mas is a functional binding site for the angiotensin-(1-7); however, its role in the immune system has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the effect of genetic deletion of Mas receptor in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic and cerebral inflammation in mice. Inflammatory response was triggered in Mas deficient (Mas(-/-)) and C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice (8-12 weeks-old) by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (5 mg/kg). Mas(-/-) mice presented more intense hypothermia compared to WT mice 24 h after LPS injection. Systemically, the bone marrow of Mas(-/-) mice contained a lower number of neutrophils and monocytes 3 h and 24 h after LPS injection, respectively. The plasma levels of inflammatory mediators KC, MCP-1 and IL-10 were higher in Mas(-/-) mice 24 h after LPS injection in comparison to WT. In the brain, Mas(-/-) animals had a significant increase in the number of adherent leukocytes to the brain microvasculature compared to WT mice, as well as, increased number of monocytes and neutrophils recruited to the pia-mater. The elevated number of adherent leukocytes on brain microvasculature in Mas(-/-) mice was associated with increased expression of CD11b - the alpha-subunit of the Mac-1 integrin - in bone marrow neutrophils 3h after LPS injection, and with increased brain levels of chemoattractants KC, MIP-2 and MCP-1, 24 h later. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Mas receptor deficiency results in exacerbated inflammation in LPS-challenged mice, which suggest a potential role for the Mas receptor as a regulator of systemic and brain inflammatory response induced by LPS.

  3. Sources of activator calcium for potassium- and serotonin-induced constriction of isolated bovine cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    Previous in vitro studies with the calcium channel blockers (CCB) indirectly suggest that K/sup +/ and serotonin (5HT) constrict bovine middle cerebral arteries (BMCA) by promoting the influx of extracellular calcium (Ca) through CCB-sensitive channels. In this study, the authors directly determined the sources of activator Ca for K/sup +/- and 5HT-induced constriction of BMCA, using radiolabelled /sup 4/)2%Ca and /sup 3/H-sorbitol. EGTA-resistant Ca uptake, an estimate of Ca influx into vascular smooth muscle, was determined by exposure to Ca-deficient 2 mM EGTA solutions at 1/sup 0/C. The total Ca content of BMCA was 4.4 nmole/mg (wet wt.) after equilibration at 37/sup 0/C. The total exchangeable Ca content was 1.64 nmole/mg after 1 hr of /sup 45/Ca loading; the Ca content of the extracellular water was 0.30 nmole/mg, as estimated from the /sup 3/H-sorbitol space (0.25 ul/mg). The EGTA-resistant Ca uptake at 1 hr was 134 pmole/mg. K/sup +/ and 5HT significantly increased EGTA-resistant Ca uptake during 5 min of /sup 45/Ca loading; for K/sup +/, Ca uptake increased from 71 to 202 pmole/mg, and for 5HT, from 65 to 102 pmole/mg. Verapamil (10/sup -5/ M) or nifedipine (3.3 x 10/sup -7/ M) significantly blocked the increase in EGTA-resistant Ca uptake induced by K/sup +/ or 5HT. These results provide direct evidence that K/sup +/ or 5HT may constrict BMCA by promoting the influx of extracellular Ca through CCB-sensitive channels.

  4. Adjuvant Intrahepatic Injection Iodine-131-Lipiodol Improves Prognosis of Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Resection: a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ye; Wu, Lu-Peng; Ye, Feng; Zhou, Yan-Ming

    2015-12-01

    High incidence of intrahepatic recurrence is a major surgical limitation following hepatectomy of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study was intended to investigate the effects of adjuvant intrahepatic injection of iodine-131-lipiodol on disease recurrence and survival in patients with HCC who underwent resection. A computerized literature search was performed to identify relevant articles. Data synthesis was performed using Review Manager 5.0 software, and results are presented as odds ratio (OR) with 95 % confidence intervals. Two randomized controlled trials and three case-control studies with a total of 334 participants were analyzed. Iodine-131-lipiodol treatment achieved significantly lower rates of intrahepatic recurrence (OR = 0.48, 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) = 0.30-0.74; P = 0.001) and early recurrence (<2 year) (OR = 0.45, 95 % CI = 0.23-0.89; P = 0.02). Likewise, iodine-131-lipiodol treatment improved both the 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival significantly (OR = 1.85, 95 % CI = 1.13-3.03; P = 0.01; OR = 2.00, 95 % CI = 0.99-4.04; P = 0.05, respectively). Adjuvant intrahepatic injection of iodine-131-lipiodol resulted in a preventive effect on recurrence and improved survival after resection of HCC. Further larger, multi-centred, randomized prospective trial is warranted. PMID:27011542

  5. Neuroprotective Effects of Inhibiting Fyn S-Nitrosylation on Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Damage to CA1 Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lingyun; Wei, Xuewen; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Guangyi; Qi, Suhua

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) can regulate signaling pathways via S-nitrosylation. Fyn can be post-translationally modified in many biological processes. In the present study, using a rat four-vessel-occlusion ischemic model, we aimed to assess whether Fyn could be S-nitrosylated and to evaluate the effects of Fyn S-nitrosylation on brain damage. In vitro, Fyn could be S-nitrosylated by S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, an exogenous NO donor), and in vivo, endogenous NO synthesized by NO synthases (NOS) could enhance Fyn S-nitrosylation. Application of GSNO, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, an inhibitor of neuronal NOS) and hydrogen maleate (MK-801, the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist) could decrease the S-nitrosylation and phosphorylation of Fyn induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Cresyl violet staining validated that these compounds exerted neuroprotective effects against the cerebral I/R-induced damage to hippocampal CA1 neurons. Taken together, in this study, we demonstrated that Fyn can be S-nitrosylated both in vitro and in vivo and that inhibiting S-nitrosylation can exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral I/R injury, potentially via NMDAR-mediated mechanisms. These findings may lead to a new field of inquiry to investigate the underlying pathogenesis of stroke and the development of novel treatment strategies. PMID:27420046

  6. Neuroprotective Effects of Inhibiting Fyn S-Nitrosylation on Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Damage to CA1 Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lingyun; Wei, Xuewen; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Guangyi; Qi, Suhua

    2016-07-12

    Nitric oxide (NO) can regulate signaling pathways via S-nitrosylation. Fyn can be post-translationally modified in many biological processes. In the present study, using a rat four-vessel-occlusion ischemic model, we aimed to assess whether Fyn could be S-nitrosylated and to evaluate the effects of Fyn S-nitrosylation on brain damage. In vitro, Fyn could be S-nitrosylated by S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, an exogenous NO donor), and in vivo, endogenous NO synthesized by NO synthases (NOS) could enhance Fyn S-nitrosylation. Application of GSNO, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, an inhibitor of neuronal NOS) and hydrogen maleate (MK-801, the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist) could decrease the S-nitrosylation and phosphorylation of Fyn induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Cresyl violet staining validated that these compounds exerted neuroprotective effects against the cerebral I/R-induced damage to hippocampal CA1 neurons. Taken together, in this study, we demonstrated that Fyn can be S-nitrosylated both in vitro and in vivo and that inhibiting S-nitrosylation can exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral I/R injury, potentially via NMDAR-mediated mechanisms. These findings may lead to a new field of inquiry to investigate the underlying pathogenesis of stroke and the development of novel treatment strategies.

  7. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  8. Curcumin treatment recovery the decrease of protein phosphatase 2A subunit B induced by focal cerebral ischemia in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Fawad-Ali; Park, Dong-Ju; Gim, Sang-Ah

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin provides various biological effects through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Moreover, curcumin exerts a neuroprotective effect against ischemic condition-induced brain damage. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a ubiquitous serine and threonine phosphatase with various cell functions and broad substrate specificity. Especially PP2A subunit B plays an important role in nervous system. This study investigated whether curcumin regulates PP2A subunit B expression in focal cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced surgically by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Adult male rats were injected with either vehicle or curcumin (50 mg/kg) 1 h after MCAO and cerebral cortex tissues were isolated 24 h after MCAO. A proteomics study, reverse transverse-PCR and Western blot analyses were performed to examine PP2A subunit B expression levels. We identified a reduction in PP2A subunit B expression in MCAO-operated animals using a proteomic approach. However, curcumin treatment prevented injury-induced reductions in PP2A subunit B levels. Reverse transverse-PCR and Western blot analyses confirmed that curcumin treatment attenuated the injury-induced reduction in PP2A subunit B levels. These findings can suggest that the possibility that curcumin maintains levels of PP2A subunit B in response to cerebral ischemia, which likely contributes to the neuroprotective function of curcumin in cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:26472966

  9. Long-Term Outcome of Transcatheter Subsegmental and Segmental Arterial Chemoemobolization Using Lipiodol for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Takaki, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Anai, Hiroshi Tanaka, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Kiyosei; Morimoto, Kengo; Nishiofuku, Hideyuki; Inoue, Masayoshi; Sueyoshi, Satoru; Nagata, Takeshi; Hidaka, Teruyuki; Uchida, Hideo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To clarify the efficacy of transcatheter hepatic sub-subsegmental, subsegmental, and segmental arterial chemoembolization using lipiodol (subseg/seg lip-TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), long-term outcomes of patients who had been treated using subseg/seg lip-TACE alone were retrospectively examined. Materials and Methods: Subjects comprised 199 patients with HCC (T1/2/{>=}3 = 30/108/61; Child-Pugh A/B/C = 115/52/32; Japan Integrated Staging [JIS] score {<=}1/2/{>=}3 = 88/64/47) who underwent subseg/seg lip-TACE using lipiodol mixed with an anticancer drug followed by injection of gelatin sponge particles. Each patient was followed-up every 3 months, and repeat subseg/seg lip-TACE and/or conventional lip-TACE was performed in cases showing recurrence. One-, 3-, 5-, 7-, and 10-year cumulative survival rates were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed by stratifying the population according to T-factor, Child-Pugh classification, and JIS score. Results: Median duration of follow-up was 3.8 years (range 0.2 to 16.4). Median overall survival was 3.8 years. One-, 3-, 5-, 7- and 10-year survival rates were 91.5, 66.1, 38.8, 20.3, and 9.4% for all patients, and 95.5, 76.9, 51.9, 27.9 and 20.4% for patients with JIS {<=}1, respectively. Significant survival differences were found across two subgroups of staging systems (T2 vs. T3{<=} [P = 0.0012] and JIS score {<=}1 vs. 2 [P = 0.0036]). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that subseg/seg lip-TACE is a feasible treatment for obtaining prolonged survival in patients with localized HCC showing rich vasculature. Outcomes are influenced by both tumor stage and liver function, as seen in the best prolonged survival in patients with JIS score {<=}1.

  10. TIGAR contributes to ischemic tolerance induced by cerebral preconditioning through scavenging of reactive oxygen species and inhibition of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun-Hao; Zhang, Tong-Tong; Song, Dan-Dan; Xia, Yun-Fei; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Sheng, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Previous study showed that TIGAR (TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator) protected ischemic brain injury via enhancing pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) flux and preserving mitochondria function. This study was aimed to study the role of TIGAR in cerebral preconditioning. The ischemic preconditioning (IPC) and isoflurane preconditioning (ISO) models were established in primary cultured cortical neurons and in mice. Both IPC and ISO increased TIGAR expression in cortical neurons. Preconditioning might upregulate TIGAR through SP1 transcription factor. Lentivirus mediated knockdown of TIGAR significantly abolished the ischemic tolerance induced by IPC and ISO. ISO also increased TIGAR in mouse cortex and hippocampus and alleviated subsequent brain ischemia-reperfusion injury, while the ischemic tolerance induced by ISO was eliminated with TIGAR knockdown in mouse brain. ISO increased the production of NADPH and glutathione (GSH), and scavenged reactive oxygen species (ROS), while TIGAR knockdown decreased GSH and NADPH production and increased the level of ROS. Supplementation of ROS scavenger NAC and PPP product NADPH effectively rescue the neuronal injury caused by TIGAR deficiency. Notably, TIGAR knockdown inhibited ISO-induced anti-apoptotic effects in cortical neurons. These results suggest that TIGAR participates in the cerebral preconditioning through reduction of ROS and subsequent cell apoptosis. PMID:27256465

  11. TIGAR contributes to ischemic tolerance induced by cerebral preconditioning through scavenging of reactive oxygen species and inhibition of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun-Hao; Zhang, Tong-Tong; Song, Dan-Dan; Xia, Yun-Fei; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Sheng, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Previous study showed that TIGAR (TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator) protected ischemic brain injury via enhancing pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) flux and preserving mitochondria function. This study was aimed to study the role of TIGAR in cerebral preconditioning. The ischemic preconditioning (IPC) and isoflurane preconditioning (ISO) models were established in primary cultured cortical neurons and in mice. Both IPC and ISO increased TIGAR expression in cortical neurons. Preconditioning might upregulate TIGAR through SP1 transcription factor. Lentivirus mediated knockdown of TIGAR significantly abolished the ischemic tolerance induced by IPC and ISO. ISO also increased TIGAR in mouse cortex and hippocampus and alleviated subsequent brain ischemia-reperfusion injury, while the ischemic tolerance induced by ISO was eliminated with TIGAR knockdown in mouse brain. ISO increased the production of NADPH and glutathione (GSH), and scavenged reactive oxygen species (ROS), while TIGAR knockdown decreased GSH and NADPH production and increased the level of ROS. Supplementation of ROS scavenger NAC and PPP product NADPH effectively rescue the neuronal injury caused by TIGAR deficiency. Notably, TIGAR knockdown inhibited ISO-induced anti-apoptotic effects in cortical neurons. These results suggest that TIGAR participates in the cerebral preconditioning through reduction of ROS and subsequent cell apoptosis. PMID:27256465

  12. Microglia, apoptosis and interleukin-1beta expression in the effect of sophora japonica l. on cerebral infarct induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Lao, Chih-Jui; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Kuo, Jon-Son; Chao, Pei-dawn Lee; Cheng, Chin-Yi; Tang, Nou-Ying; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2005-01-01

    Sophora Japonica L. (SJ) is a traditional Chinese herb used to cool blood, stop bleeding and to treat hemorrhoids with bleeding. Although several recent studies found that both SJ and Ginkgo biloba have the same components of quercetin and rutin, only Ginkgo biloba has been widely used to treat cerebrovascular disorders and dementia in humans. This study investigated the effect of SJ on cerebral infarct in rats. A total of 66 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were studied. Focal cerebral infarct was established by occluding the bilateral common carotid arteries and the right middle cerebral artery for 90 minutes. After 24 hours of reperfusion, the neurological status was evaluated. The rats were then killed, and brain tissue was stained with 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride. The grading scale of neurological deficit and the ratio of cerebral infarction area were used as an index to evaluate the effect of SJ on cerebral infarct. In addition, the number of ED1 and interleukin-1beta immunostaining positive cells, and apoptotic cells were measured in the cerebral infarction zone. The results indicated that pre-treatment with 100 or 200 mg/kg SJ and post-treatment with 200 mg/kg SJ significantly reduced the grade of neurological deficit and the ratio of cerebral infarction area. In addition, pre-treatment with 200 mg/kg SJ also significantly reduced ED1 and interleukin-1beta immunostaining positive cells, and apoptotic cells in ischemia-reperfusion cerebral infarct rats. This study demonstrated that SJ could reduce the cerebral infarction area and neurological deficit induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats, suggesting its potential as a treatment for cerebral infarct in humans. This effect of SJ involves its suppressive action of microglia, interleukin-1beta and apoptosis. PMID:16047560

  13. Intra-carotid cold magnesium sulfate infusion induces selective cerebral hypothermia and neuroprotection in rats with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Wu, Yong-Ming; Ji, Zhong; Ji, Ya-Bin; Wang, Sheng-Nan; Pan, Su-Yue

    2013-04-01

    Local hypothermia induced by intra-arterial infusion of cold saline reduces brain injury in ischemic stroke. Administration of magnesium sulfate through the internal carotid artery is also known to reduce ischemic brain damage. The neuroprotective effects of combination therapy with local endovascular hypothermia and intra-carotid magnesium sulfate infusion has not been evaluated. The aim of the study was to determine whether infusion of intra-carotid cold magnesium offers neuroprotective efficacy superior to cold saline infusion alone. Sixty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 3 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion and were randomly divided into six groups: sham-operated group; stroke control group; local cold magnesium infusion group; local cold saline infusion group; local normothermic magnesium infusion group; and local normothermic saline infusion group. Before reperfusion, ischemic rats received local infusion or no treatment. Infarct volume, neurological deficit, and brain water content were evaluated at 48 h after reperfusion. Selective brain hypothermia (33-34 °C) was successfully induced by intra-carotid cold infusion. Local cold saline infusion and local cold magnesium infusion reduced the infarct volumes by 48 % (p < 0.001) and 65 % (p < 0.001), respectively, compared with stroke controls. Brain water content was decreased significantly in animals treated with local cold magnesium infusion. Furthermore, the rats given a local cold magnesium infusion had the best neurological outcome. Local normothermic infusion failed to improve ischemic brain damage. These data suggest that local hypothermia induced by intra-carotid administration of cold magnesium is more effective in reducing acute ischemic damage than infusion of cold saline alone.

  14. Pharmacological neutropenia prevents endothelial dysfunction but not smooth muscle functions impairment induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Pétrault, Olivier; Ouk, Thavarak; Gautier, Sophie; Laprais, Maud; Gelé, Patrick; Bastide, Michèle; Bordet, Régis

    2005-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) activation and mobilization observed in acute cerebral infarction contribute to the brain tissue damage, but PMN could also be involved in postischemic functional injury of ischemied blood vessel. This study was undertaken to investigate whether pharmacological neutropenia could modify the postischemic endothelial dysfunction in comparison to smooth muscle whose impairment is likely more related to reperfusion and oxidative stress. A cerebral ischemia–reperfusion by endoluminal occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCA) was performed 4 days after intravenous administration of vinblastine or 12 h after RP-3 anti-rat neutrophils monoclonal antibody (mAb RP-3) injection into the peritoneal cavity, on male Wistar rats with 1-h ischemia then followed by 24-h reperfusion period. Brain infarct volume was measured by histomorphometric analysis and vascular endothelial and smooth muscle reactivity of MCA was analysed using Halpern myograph. Neutropenia induced a neuroprotective effect as demonstrated by a significant decrease of brain infarct size. In parallel to neuroprotection, neutropenia prevented postischemic impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxing response to acetylcholine. In contrast, smooth muscle functional alterations were not prevented by neutropenia. Ischemia–reperfusion-induced myogenic tone impairment remained unchanged in vinblastine and mAb RP-3-treated rats. Postischemic Kir2.x-dependent relaxation impairment was not prevented in neutropenic conditions. The fully relaxation of smooth muscle response to sodium nitroprusside was similar in all groups. Our results evidenced the dissociate prevention of pharmacologically induced neutropenia on postischemic vascular endothelial and smooth muscle impairment. The selective endothelial protection by neutropenia is parallel to a neuroprotective effect suggesting a possible relationship between the two phenomena. PMID:15700030

  15. [Improvement of the viscosity and the intrahepatic distribution of miriplatin-lipiodol suspension].

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Shuichi; Adachi, Shingo; Masui, Aya; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Fukushima, Shoji

    2014-11-01

    The effects of warming or emulsification with the water-soluble contrast medium, Iomeron (IOM), on reducing the viscosity of miriplatin-lipiodol (MPT-LPD) suspension were studied. Reduction in the viscosity of MPT-LPD suspension was ob- served upon increasing the temperature. Although the O/W MPT-LPD emulsion with a low ratio of MPT-LPD to IOM reduced the viscosity, the effect was lesser than that achieved with the warming treatment. Radiographic images of the liver obtained after administration of the emulsion into the rat portal vein showed that warming resulted in improved intrahepatic distribution of the formulation, which was dependent on the reduction of viscosity. Emulsification also led to better intrahepatic distribution, but this distribution did not depend on the viscosity of the formulation. The MPT-LPD emulsion showed different distribution properties from the MPT-LPD suspension, and it was difficult to estimate the intrahepatic distribution property from the viscosity of the emulsion. Thus, we suggest that emulsification and warming of MPT-LPD are effective methods for improving the intrahepatic distribution of the MPT formulation.

  16. Epidermal growth factor-like repeats of tenascin-C-induced constriction of cerebral arteries via activation of epidermal growth factor receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Masashi; Shiba, Masato; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Liu, Lei; Nakasaki, Asuka; Shimojo, Naoshi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2016-07-01

    Tenascin-C (TNC), one of matricellular proteins, has been suggested to be involved in cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, the mechanisms of how TNC constricts cerebral arteries remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine if epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats of TNC is involved in TNC-induced constriction of cerebral arteries in rats via EGF receptor (EGFR) activation. Two dosages of recombinant TNC (r-TNC) consisting of the EGF-like repeats was administered intracisternally to healthy rats, and its vasoconstrictor effects were evaluated by neurobehavioral tests and India-ink angiography at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the administration. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to explore the underlying mechanisms on constricted cerebral arteries after 24 hours. The effects of a selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (AG1478) on r-TNC-induced vasoconstriction were evaluated by neurobehavioral tests, India-ink angiography and immunohistochemistry at 24 hours after the administration. A higher dosage of r-TNC induced cerebral arterial constriction more severely, which continued for 48 hours. The effects were associated with the activation of EGFR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in the smooth muscle cell layer of the constricted cerebral artery, while c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 were not activated. AG1478 blocked r-TNC-induced vasoconstrictive effects, as well as activation of EGFR and ERK1/2. These findings demonstrate that TNC induces constriction of cerebral arteries via activation of EGFR and ERK1/2.

  17. Neuron regeneration reverses 3-acetylpyridine-induced cell loss in the cerebral cortex of adult lizards.

    PubMed

    Font, E; García-Verdugo, J M; Alcántara, S; López-García, C

    1991-06-14

    Systemic administration of the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine to adult lizards results in extensive loss of neurons in the medial cerebral cortex, other brain areas remaining largely unaffected. After the neurotoxic trauma, new cells are produced by mitotic division of cells in the ventricular wall. The new cells migrate along radial glial fibers and replace lost neurons in the medial cortex. Electron microscopic examination of cells labeled with [3H]thymidine confirms that the newly generated cells are neurons. Thus, neuron regeneration can occur in the cerebral cortex of adult lizards.

  18. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-15

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  19. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-01

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  20. Cognitive deficits induced by global cerebral ischaemia: prospects for transplant therapy.

    PubMed

    Hodges, H; Nelson, A; Virley, D; Kershaw, T R; Sinden, J D

    1997-04-01

    Global ischaemia induced by interruption of cerebral blood flow results in damage to vulnerable cells, notably in the CA1 and hilar hippocampal fields, and is frequently associated with memory deficits. This review examines cognitive deficits that occur in animal models of global ischaemia in rats and monkeys, the extent to which these deficits are associated with CA1 cell loss, and the evidence for functional recovery following transplants of foetal CA1 cells and grafts of conditionally immortalised precursor cells. In rats, impairments are seen most consistently in tasks of spatial learning and spatial working memory dependent on use of allocentric environmental cues. In monkeys, ischaemic deficits have been shown to a moderate extent in delayed object recognition tasks, but animals with a selective excitotoxic CA1 lesion show a profound impairment in conditional discrimination tasks, suggesting that these may be a more sensitive measure of ischaemic impairments. Several studies have reported correlational links between the extent of CA1 cell loss following two or four vessel occlusion (2 VO, 4 VO) in rats and behavioural impairments, but recent findings indicate that at intermediate levels of damage these relationships are weak and variable, and emerge clearly only when animals with maximal CA1 cell loss are included, suggesting that the deficits involve more than damage to the CA1 field. Nevertheless, ischaemic rats and CA1-lesioned marmosets with grafts of foetal CA1 cells show substantial improvements; in rats these are not found with grafts from other hippocampal fields. Conditionally immortalised cell lines and trophic grafts are currently being assessed for their functional potential in animal models, because clinical use of foetal cells will not be practicable. Recent findings suggest that an expanded population of neuroepithelial cells derived from the conditionally immortalised H-2Kb-tsA58 transgenic mouse improve spatial learning as effectively as CA1

  1. Exercise preconditioning reduces ischemia reperfusion-induced focal cerebral infarct volume through up-regulating the expression of HIF-1α.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Deng, Wenqian; Yuan, Qiongjia; Yang, Huijun

    2015-03-01

    To study the effect and mechanism of exercise preconditioning on focal cerebral ischemia reperfusion induced cerebral infarction via rat model; Sixty Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups at random: ischemia reperfusion group (IR, n=24), sham group (sham, n=12) and exercise preconditioning group (EP, n=24). Group EP carried out moderate exercise preconditioning for 4 weeks (swimming with non-weight bearing, 60 minutes/day, 6 days/week), Rats in Group EP and IR were established cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury model by Zea Longa's thread method. The cerebral infarct volume in rat of different group was evaluated after 2%TTC staining, expression of HIF-1α in rats' brain was detected by real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochmeistry method and western blot. No cerebral infarction and significant expression of HIF-1α in Group sham. Compared with Group IR, there was smaller infarct volume and stronger HIF-1α expression in Group EP (P<0.05). Moderate exercise preconditioning reduces ischemia reperfusion induced focal cerebral infarct volume through up-regulating the expression of HIF-1α.

  2. Modified Constraint-Induced Therapy for Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallen, Margaret; Ziviani, Jenny; Naylor, Olivia; Evans, Ruth; Novak, Iona; Herbert, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Conventional constraint-based therapies are intensive and demanding to implement, particularly for children. Modified forms of constraint-based therapies that are family-centred may be more acceptable and feasible for families of children with cerebral palsy (CP)-but require rigorous evaluation using randomized trials. The aim of this study…

  3. Changes in cerebral blood oxygenation induced by active standing test in children with POTS and NMS.

    PubMed

    Endo, Ayumi; Fujita, Yukihiko; Fuchigami, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Shori; Mugishima, Hideo; Skatani, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Orthostatic dysregulation (OD) has been classified into subtypes by heart rate and blood pressure; however, the hemodynamics of brains have not yet been revealed. Therefore, we investigated changes in cerebral blood flow and oxygenation during an active standing test to clarify the pathophysiology of two subtypes: postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and neurally mediated syncope (NMS). We studied 31 children (15 boys, 16 girls; mean age, 14.0 ± 1.7 years) who presented with OD at the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Nihon University School of Medicine between 2009 and 2011. OD was diagnosed using the Japanese clinical guidelines for juvenile orthostatic dysregulation. After a 10-min resting period in the supine position, patients were asked to quickly stand up and keep upright for 10 min. Cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygenation were measured using transcranial Doppler sonography and near-infrared spectroscopy. POTS showed a significant decrease of oxy-Hb and resistance index (RI), suggesting transient ischemia with maintainable cerebral autoregulation. NMS showed a decrease of oxy-Hb and an increase of RI, suggesting ischemia and impairment of autoregulation.

  4. Expression of Tau protein in rats with cognitive dysfunction induced by cerebral hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji-Feng; Wang, Zhou; Sun, Qin-Jian; Du, Yi-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and the occurrence and development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A cerebral hypoperfusion rat model was established by two vessels occlusion (2VO). The cognitive function of the rats with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and the expression of p-Tau protein in the hippocampus were observed dynamically. Before the operation, no differences were observed in the cognitive functions of the control and 2VO group (P > 0.05). However, a significant difference was found at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the operation. The shock number required to reach the “learned” standard in the 2VO group increased remarkably compared with that of the control group (P < 0.01). With the passage of time, the shock number in the model group increased gradually. The p-Tau-positive cells in the CA1 region of the hippocampus also increased markedly in the model group in a time-dependent manner as compared with that in the control group (P < 0.01). Cerebral hypoperfusion can cause and aggravate the phosphorylation of Tau protein in the brain, leading to cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, this protein is an important initiating and promoting factor involved in the development of AD. PMID:26770632

  5. Mirror Visual Feedback Induces Lower Neuromuscular Activity in Children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feltham, Max G.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effects of mirror feedback information on neuromuscular activation during bimanual coordination in eight children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy (SHCP) and a matched control group. The "mirror box" creates a visual illusion, which gives rise to a visual perception of a zero lag, symmetric movement between the two…

  6. Cholinergic receptor blockade by scopolamine and mecamylamine exacerbates global cerebral ischemia induced memory dysfunction in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Ray, R S; Rai, S; Katyal, A

    2014-12-01

    Global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (GCI/R) injury encompasses complex pathophysiological sequalae, inducing loss of hippocampal neurons and behavioural deficits. Progressive neuronal death and memory dysfunctions culminate from several different mechanisms like oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation and cholinergic hypofunction. Experimental evidences point to the beneficial effects of cholinomimetic agents such as rivastigmine and galantamine in improving memory outcomes following GCI/R injury. However, the direct implications of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor blockade during global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury have not been investigated. Therefore, we evaluated the relative involvement of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in spatial/associative memory functions and neuronal damage during global cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. The outcomes of present study support the idea that preservation of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptor functions is essential to alleviate hippocampal neuronal death in CA1 region following global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:25168578

  7. β-cypermethrin-induced acute neurotoxicity in the cerebral cortex of mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, DeQing; Chen, Nan; Zhu, ChunXiao; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Li; Yang, Jun; An, Li

    2015-01-01

    A Type II pyrethroid pesticide β-cypermethrin is widely used in agriculture and domestic applications for pest control. However, the effect of β-cypermethrin on the glutamate neurotransmitter has not been well-documented. In the current study, mice were treated with 20, 40, or 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin by a single oral gavage, with corn oil as a vehicle control. Four hours after treatment, we investigated glutamate levels and glutamate-metabolizing enzyme (phosphate-activated glutaminase, PAG; glutamine synthetase, GS) activities in the cerebral cortex of mice, using a HPLC system with ultraviolet detectors and a colorimetric assay. Glutamate uptake levels in the synaptosomes of cerebral cortex and mRNA expression levels of PAG, GS, and glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) in the cerebral cortex were detected by a radioactive labeling method and qRT-PCR, respectively. Toxic symptoms were observed in mice treated with 40 or 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin. Compared with the control, significant decreases in glutamate level and GS activity, and an obvious increase in synaptosomal glutamate uptake, were found in the cerebral cortex of mice treated with 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin. No significant changes were found among groups in PAG activity or PAG, GS, and GLT-1 mRNA expression levels. These results suggest that β-cypermethrin treatment may reduce the glutamate level in the mouse cerebral cortex, which is associated with decreased GS activity and increased synaptosomal glutamate uptake. Our findings provide a partial explanation for the neurotoxic effects of synthetic β-cypermethrin insecticides.

  8. LPS-induced microglial secretion of TNFα increases activity-dependent neuronal apoptosis in the neonatal cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Nimmervoll, Birgit; White, Robin; Yang, Jenq-Wei; An, Shuming; Henn, Christopher; Sun, Jyh-Jang; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2013-07-01

    During the pre- and neonatal period, the cerebral cortex reveals distinct patterns of spontaneous synchronized activity, which is critically involved in the formation of early networks and in the regulation of neuronal survival and programmed cell death (apoptosis). During this period, the cortex is also highly vulnerable to inflammation and in humans prenatal infection may have a profound impact on neurodevelopment causing long-term neurological deficits. Using in vitro and in vivo multi-electrode array recordings and quantification of caspase-3 (casp-3)-dependent apoptosis, we demonstrate that lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation causes rapid alterations in the pattern of spontaneous burst activities, which subsequently leads to an increase in apoptosis. We show that these inflammatory effects are specifically initiated by the microglia-derived pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α and the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2. Our data demonstrate that inflammation-induced modifications in spontaneous network activities influence casp-3-dependent cell death in the developing cerebral cortex.

  9. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Correlates with Conventional Helical Computed Tomography in Evaluation of Lipiodol Accumulation in HCC after Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Abe, Satoshi; Hoshii, Asami; Yamada, Yumi; Iiduka, Akihiko; Nemoto, Takeo; Takeda, Keiko; Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The amount of drug-loaded lipiodol in an HCC tumor post-transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) correlates with the risk of local tumor recurrence. Lipiodol enhancement of a tumor on conventional CT, measured in Hounsfield units (HU), can predict tumor response. Here we investigate whether cone-beam CT (CBCT) can also be used to predict tumor response, providing the benefit of being able to optimize the patient’s treatment plan intra-procedurally. Methods A total of 82 HCC nodules (82 patients), ≤5 cm in diameter, were treated with balloon-occluded TACE using miriplatin between December 2013 and November 2014. For each patient, both CBCT and conventional CT images were obtained post-TACE. The degree of correlation between CBCT and conventional CT was determined by comparing identical regions of interest for each imaging modality using pixel values. Results The pixel values from conventional CT and CBCT were highly correlated, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.912 (p<0.001). The location of the nodules within the liver did not affect the results; the correlation coefficient was 0.891 (p<0.001) for the left lobe and 0.926 (p<0.001) for the right lobe. The mean pixel value for conventional CT was 439 ± 279 HU, and the mean pixel value for CBCT was 416 ± 311 HU. Conclusions CBCT may be used as a substitute for conventional CT to quantitatively evaluate the amount of drug-loaded lipiodol within an HCC nodule and, hence, the efficacy of TACE treatment. The major benefit of using CBCT is the ability to predict the likelihood of local recurrence intra-procedurally, enabling subsequent treatment optimization. PMID:26752696

  10. Transarterial Chemoembolization With Cisplatin as Second-Line Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Unresponsive to Chemoembolization With Epirubicin-Lipiodol Emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Noboru Osuga, Keigo; Higashihara, Hiroki; Tomoda, Kaname; Mikami, Koji; Nakazawa, Tetsuro; Nakamura, Hironobu; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) using cisplatin as a second-line treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) unresponsive to TACE using epirubicin-Lipiodol emulsion at our institution. Materials and Methods: Between January 2006 and March 2009, 51 patients with unresectable HCC underwent TACE using cisplatin. All patients had shown persistent viable tumor or tumor progression after at least 2 sessions of TACE using epirubicin-Lipiodol emulsion. TACE procedures consisted of arterial injection of a mixture of Lipiodol and cisplatin (30-100 mg [mean 57 {+-} 21]) (n = 29) or arterial infusion of cisplatin (30-100 mg [mean 87 {+-} 19]) solution (n = 22) followed by injection of 1-mm porous gelatin particles. Early tumor response was assessed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria. Overall survival and progression-free survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed according to NCI-CTCAE version 3 criteria. Results: Response rates were 11.8 and 27.5% by RECIST and EASL criteria, respectively. Overall survival rates were 61.9, 48.2, and 28.9% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively, and the median survival time was 15.4 months. Progression-free survival rate was 35.2% at 1 year, and median progression-free survival time was 3.1 months. No major complications were observed, and the occurrence of postembolization syndrome was minimal. Grade 3 to 4 toxicities included thrombocytopenia (5.8%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (AST) level (35.3%), and increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level (23.5%). Conclusions: witching the TACE anticancer drug from epirubicin to cisplatin might be the feasible option for advanced HCC, even when considered resistant to the initial form of TACE.

  11. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  12. FNIRS-based evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-03-01

    Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2 ± 2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger tapping task were quantified before, immediately after, and six months after CIMT. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8 ± 1.3 years old) were also imaged at the same time points to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. In children with CP the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted six months later. In contrast to this longer term improvement in localized activation response, the laterality index that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed six months later.

  13. [Digital angiography and lipiodol computerized tomography in the anatomopathological framework of hepatocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Pozzi-Mucelli, R; Pozzi-Mucelli, R; Pagnan, L; Dalla Palma, L

    1994-12-01

    The introduction of therapies other than conventional surgery of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) requires an accurate pathologic classification, which is important because it is well known that HCC may have multicentric growth. The Liver Cancer Study Group of Japan has proposed a classification dividing HCCs into three macroscopic forms from the pathologic point of view: nodular, massive and infiltrating HCCs. The nodular type is subdivided into four types: single nodular type, single nodular type with surrounding proliferation, multinodular fused type and multinodular type. Forty-six HCC patients were examined with Lipiodol Computed Tomography (LCT) to investigate the agreement between pathologic and imaging findings. LCT proved to be in close agreement with pathologic findings. Sixteen cases were classified as type I (single nodular type), 8 as type II (single nodular type with limited foci), 1 as type III (multinodular fused type), 18 as type IV (multiple nodular type with diffuse foci) and 3 cases as type V (massive form). No cases of infiltrative forms were observed in our series. Based on LCT findings, the capabilities of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were studied in the pathologic classification of HCCs. DSA exhibited some limitations in the pathologic classification of HCCs in 5 of 16 patients with type I lesions. In these cases DSA suggested false-positive diagnoses because of regenerative nodules in cirrhotic liver in 3 cases and of daughter nodules (not confirmed at LCT) in 2 cases. In 7 of 8 patients with type II HCCs, DSA failed to show the daughter nodules surrounding the main nodule. In the 18 patients with multiple distant nodules (type IV), DSA was less sensitive in defining nodule number and site. In the massive form, the information obtained with LCT and DSA was comparable. In conclusion, LCT should be considered a basic examination in the study of HCC extent. Based on LCT findings, the most appropriate treatment can be selected, be it

  14. Transarterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin-Lipiodol Suspension With or Without Embolization for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Aikata, Hiroshi Takaki, Shintaro; Katamura, Yoshio; Hiramatsu, Akira; Waki, Koji; Takahashi, Shoichi; Hieda, Masashi; Toyota, Naoyuki; Ito, Katsuhide; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2009-07-15

    We evaluate the long-term prognosis and prognostic factors in patients treated with transarterial infusion chemotherapy using cisplatin-lipiodol (CDDP/LPD) suspension with or without embolization for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Study subjects were 107 patients with HCC treated with repeated transarterial infusion chemotherapy alone using CDDP/LPD (adjusted as CDDP 10mg/LPD 1ml). The median number of transarterial infusion procedures was two (range, one to nine), the mean dose of CDDP per transarterial infusion chemotherapy session was 30 mg (range, 5.0-67.5 mg), and the median total dose of transarterial infusion chemotherapy per patient was 60 mg (range, 10-390 mg). Survival rates were 86% at 1 year, 40% at 3 years, 20% at 5 years, and 16% at 7 years. For patients with >90% LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy, rates were 98% at 1 year, 60% at 3 years, and 22% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis identified >90% LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy (p = 0.001), absence of portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT; p < 0.001), and Child-Pugh class A (p = 0.012) as independent determinants of survival. Anaphylactic shock was observed in two patients, at the fifth transarterial infusion chemotherapy session in one and the ninth in the other. In conclusion, transarterial infusion chemotherapy with CDDP/LPD appears to be a useful treatment option for patients with unresectable HCC without PVTT and in Child-Pugh class A. LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy is an important prognostic factor. Careful consideration should be given to the possibility of anaphylactic shock upon repeat infusion with CDDP/LPD.

  15. CT measurement of indomethacin-induced cerebral hemodynamic changes in the newborn piglet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Derek W.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2003-05-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), a common condition among preterm infants, increases the risk of intraventricular hemorrhage, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and death in afflicted individuals. Current clinical treatment of PDA relies on use of the drug indomethacin to close the ductus arteriosus. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of indomethacin on cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and cerebral mean transit time (MTT) in newborn piglets using computed tomography (CT) perfusion. Twenty newborn piglets divided by age into two groups, less than 12 hours of age (n = 10) and greater than 12 hours of age (n = 10) were studied. Five piglets in each group received indomethacin treatment (0.2 mg/kg infused over 30 min) while remaining piglets served as controls. No significant changes in CBF were observed in control groups. In both indomethacin treated groups, average CBF decreased 32.3% and 34.3% (P > 0.05) below baseline immediately post infusion in piglets less than and greater than 12 hours of age respectively. Piglets less than 12hours of age treated with indomethacin also exhibited a delayed increase in CBF, maximum average increase of 41.7% (P > 0.05) above baseline at 210 min post infusion, a response not observed in the corresponding group of piglets greater than 12 hours of age. The observed age dependent response may be due to functional/anatomical closure of the PDA.

  16. Sustained neurological recovery induced by resveratrol is associated with angioneurogenesis rather than neuroprotection after focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Dirk M; Zechariah, Anil; Kaltwasser, Britta; Bosche, Bert; Caglayan, Ahmet B; Kilic, Ertugrul; Doeppner, Thorsten R

    2015-11-01

    According to the French paradox, red wine consumption reduces the incidence of vascular diseases even in the presence of highly saturated fatty acid intake. This phenomenon is widely attributed to the phytoalexin resveratrol, a red wine ingredient. Experimental studies suggesting that resveratrol has neuroprotective properties mostly used prophylactic delivery strategies associated with short observation periods. These studies did not allow conclusions to be made about resveratrol's therapeutic efficacy post-stroke. Herein, we systematically analyzed effects of prophylactic, acute and post-acute delivery of resveratrol (50mg/kg) on neurological recovery, tissue survival, and angioneurogenesis after focal cerebral ischemia induced by intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. Over an observation period of four weeks, only prolonged post-acute resveratrol delivery induced sustained neurological recovery as assessed by rota rod, tight rope and corner turn tests. Although prophylactic and acute resveratrol delivery reduced infarct volume and enhanced blood-brain-barrier integrity at 2 days post-ischemia by elevating resveratrol's downstream signal sirtuin-1, increasing cell survival signals (phosphorylated Akt, heme oxygenase-1, Bcl-2) and decreasing cell death signals (Bax, activated caspase-3), a sustained reduction of infarct size on day 28 was not observed in any of the three experimental conditions. Instead, enhanced angiogenesis and neurogenesis were noted in animals receiving post-acute resveratrol delivery, which were associated with elevated concentrations of GDNF and VEGF in the brain. Thus, sustained neurological recovery induced by resveratrol depends on successful brain remodeling rather than structural neuroprotection. The recovery promoting effect of delayed resveratrol delivery opens promising perspectives for stroke therapy. PMID:26316359

  17. Effects of KR-33028, a novel Na+/H+ exchanger-1 inhibitor, on glutamate-induced neuronal cell death and ischemia-induced cerebral infarct.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Kyung; Lee, Dong Ha; Park, Sok; Park, Sung Lyea; Yoon, Jae-Seok; Lee, Min Goo; Lee, Sunkyung; Yi, Kyu Yang; Yoo, Sung Eun; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, You-Sun; Lee, Soo Hwan; Baik, Eun Joo; Moon, Chang-Hyun; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2009-01-12

    We investigated the effects of a novel Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 (NHE-1) inhibitor KR-33028 on glutamate excitotoxicity in cultured neuron cells in vitro and cerebral infarct in vivo by comparing its potency with that of zoniporide, a well-known, highly potent NHE-1 inhibitor. KR-33028 inhibited NHE-1 activation in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50)=2.2 nM), with 18-fold greater potency than that of zoniporide (IC(50)=40.7 nM). KR-33028 significantly attenuated glutamate-induced LDH release with approximately 100 times lower EC(25) than that of zoniporide in cortical neurons in vitro (EC(25) of 0.007 and 0.81 microM, respectively), suggesting its 100-fold greater potency than zoniporide in producing anti-necrotic effect. In addition, the EC(50) of KR-33028 for anti-apoptotic effect was 100 times lower than that of zoniporide shown by TUNEL positivity (0.005 and 0.62 microM, respectively) and caspase-3 activity (0.01 and 2.64 microM, respectively). Furthermore, the EC(50) value of KR-33028 against glutamate-induced intracellular Ca(2+) overload was also 100 times lower than that of zoniporide (EC(50) of 0.004 and 0.65 microM, respectively). In the in vivo cerebral infarct model (60 min middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by 24 h reperfusion), KR-33028 reduced infarct size in a dose-dependent manner. Its ED(25) value, however, was quite similar to that of zoniporide (ED(25) of 0.072 and 0.097 mg/kg, respectively). Hence these results suggest that the novel NHE-1 inhibitor, KR-33028, could be an efficient therapeutic tool to protect neuronal cells against ischemic injury.

  18. Macrophageal/microglial cell activation and cerebral injury induced by excretory-secretory products secreted by Paragonimus westermani.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Geum-Sil; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Shin, Myeong Heon; Lim, Ji Hyae; Kim, Won-Ki

    2006-02-01

    Cerebral paragonimiasis causes various neurological disorders including seizures, visual impairment and hemiplegia. The excretory-secretory product (ESP) released by Paragonimus westermani has a cysteine protease activity and plays important roles in its migration in the host tissue and modulation of host immune responses. To gain more insight into the pathogenesis of ESP in the brain, we investigated the inflammatory reaction and cerebral injury following microinjection of ESP into rat striatum. The size of injury was maximally observed 3 days after microinjection of ESP and then declined to control levels as astrocytes have repopulated the injury. ED1-positive monocytes and microglia were confluently found inside the injury. The mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) occurred as early as 9h after ESP injection and then declined to control levels within 1 day. The iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine largely decreased the expression of iNOS but did not reduce the size of lesion caused by ESP. Interestingly, however, heat inactivation of ESP caused a decrease of injury formation with no altered expression of iNOS. The data indicate that ESP produces brain tissue injury by recruiting activated monocytes/microglia via heat-labile protease activity.

  19. Neuroprotection of a novel synthetic caffeic acid-syringic acid hybrid compound against experimentally induced transient cerebral ischemic damage.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Hye; Yan, Bing Chun; Park, Joon Ha; Yeun, Go Heum; Yim, Yongbae; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Chul; Hwang, In Koo; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Young-Myeong; Lee, Yun Lyul; Park, Jeong Ho; Won, Moo-Ho

    2013-03-01

    We investigated effects of caffeic acid, syringic acid, and their synthesis on transient cerebral ischemic damage in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region. In the 10 mg/kg caffeic acid-, syringic acid-, and 20 mg/kg syringic-treated ischemia groups, we did not find any significant neuroprotection in the ischemic hippocampal CA region. In the 20 mg/kg caffeic acid- and 10 mg/kg caffeic acid-syringic acid-treated ischemia groups, moderate neuroprotection was found in the hippocampal CA1 region. In the 20 mg/kg caffeic acid-syringic acid-treated ischemia group, a strong neuroprotective effect was found in the ischemic hippocampal CA1 region: about 89 % of hippocampal CA1 region pyramidal neurons survived. We also observed changes in glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) in the ischemic hippocampal CA1 region in all the groups. Among them, the distribution pattern of the glial cells was only in the 20 mg/kg caffeic acid-syringic acid-treated ischemia group similar to that in the sham group (control). In brief, 20 mg/kg caffeic acid-syringic acid showed a strong neuroprotective effect with an inhibition of glia activation in the hippocampal CA1 region induced by transient cerebral ischemia.

  20. Pilot Study of the Efficacy of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Infants and Toddlers with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Lowes, Linda Pax; Mayhan, Marianne; Orr, Teresa; Batterson, Nancy; Tonneman, Jill Alyce; Meyer, Angela; Alfano, Lindsay; Wang, Wei; Whalen, Cara N; Nelin, Mary Ann; Lo, Warren David; Case-Smith, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The evidence for Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) effectiveness for infants and toddlers with unilateral cerebral palsy is minimal. We performed a pilot study of CIMT using one-month usual care, one-month intervention, and one-month maintenance (return to usual care) phases on five infants (7- to 18-month old). For the CIMT phase, the infants received 2 hr of occupational therapy and 1 hr of parent-implemented home program for five days/week. The infants were casted for the rst 23 days, and bimanual therapy was provided for the last three days. Fine motor skills for the more affected arm and gross motor skills improved significantly during the CIMT; these gains were maintained at one-month follow-up. Individual infant data show mixed effects. This pilot study provides initial evidence that CIMT is feasible for infants with unilateral cerebral palsy, and presents preliminary data for CIMT on fine and gross motor performance. PMID:23848499

  1. Preparation and evaluation of biocompatible long-term radiopaque microspheres based on polyvinyl alcohol and lipiodol for embolization.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wen-Jing; Lu, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Huan; Fan, Tian-Yuan; Cui, Dai-Chao; Zhang, Shui-Sheng; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao; Guan, Hai-Tao; Song, Li; Zou, Ying-Hua

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to develop long-term radiopaque microspheres (LRMs) by entrapping lipiodol in biocompatible polyvinyl alcohol with multiple emulsions chemical crosslinking method. The high content of lipiodol (0.366 g/mL) was hardly released from LRMs in vitro and the radiopacity could maintain at least 3 months after subcutaneous injection in mice without weakening. A series of tests was performed to evaluate the feasibility of LRMs for embolization. LRMs were proved to be smooth, spherical, and well dispersed with diameter range of 100-1200 μm. Young's modulus of LRMs was 55.39 ± 9.10 kPa and LRMs could be easily delivered through catheter without aggregating or clogging. No toxicity of LRMs was found to mouse L929 fibroblasts cells and only moderate inflammatory in surrounding tissue of mice was found after subcutaneous injection of LRMs. After LRMs were embolized in renal artery of a rabbit, the distribution and radiopacity of LRMs in vivo were easily detectable by X-ray fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT) imaging, respectively. More accurate distribution of LRMs in embolized kidney and vessels could be detected by high-revolution visualization of micro-CT ex vivo. In conclusion, the LRMs were proved to be biocompatible and provide long-term radiopacity with good physical and mechanical properties for embolization.

  2. Effects of Home-Based Constraint-Induced Therapy versus Dose-Matched Control Intervention on Functional Outcomes and Caregiver Well-Being in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Keh-chung; Wang, Tien-ni; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Chia-ling; Chang, Kai-chieh; Lin, Yu-chan; Chen, Yi-ju

    2011-01-01

    This study compared home-based constraint-induced therapy (CIT) with a dose-matched home-based control intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The differences in unilateral and bilateral motor performance, daily functions, and quality of parental well-being (i.e., the stress level of their parents) were evaluated. The study included 21…

  3. Effects of calcium antagonists on isolated bovine cerebral arteries: inhibition of constriction and calcium-45 uptake induced by potassium or serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, W.W.; Harakal, C.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanisms by which organic calcium channel blockers inhibit cerebral vasoconstriction. Isolated bovine middle cerebral arteries were cut into rings to measure contractility or into strips to measure radioactive calcium (/sup 45/Ca) influx and efflux. Calcium channel blockers (10(-5) M verapamil or 3.3 X 10(-7) M nifedipine) and calcium-deficient solutions all produced near-maximal inhibition of both potassium- and serotonin-induced constriction. In calcium-deficient solutions containing potassium or serotonin, verapamil and nifedipine each blocked subsequent calcium-induced constriction in a competitive manner. Potassium and serotonin significantly increased /sup 45/Ca uptake into cerebral artery strips during 5 minutes of /sup 45/Ca loading; for potassium /sup 45/Ca uptake increased from 62 to 188 nmol/g, and for serotonin from 65 to 102 nmol/g. Verapamil or nifedipine had no effect on basal /sup 45/Ca uptake but significantly blocked the increase in /sup 45/Ca uptake induced by potassium or serotonin. Potassium, and to a lesser extent serotonin, each induced a brief increase in the rate of /sup 45/Ca efflux into calcium-deficient solutions. Verapamil or nifedipine had no effect on basal or potassium-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux. The results demonstrate that verapamil and nifedipine block /sup 45/Ca uptake through both potential-operated (potassium) and receptor-operated (serotonin) channels in bovine middle cerebral arteries.

  4. Motor Learning Curve and Long-Term Effectiveness of Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geerdink, Yvonne; Aarts, Pauline; Geurts, Alexander C.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the progression of manual dexterity during 6 weeks (54 h) (modified) constraint-induced movement therapy ((m)CIMT) followed by 2 weeks (18 h) bimanual training (BiT) in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP), to establish whether and when a maximal training effect was reached and which factors…

  5. Logistic Regression Analyses for Predicting Clinically Important Differences in Motor Capacity, Motor Performance, and Functional Independence after Constraint-Induced Therapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Tien-ni; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Chia-ling; Shieh, Jeng-yi; Lu, Lu; Lin, Keh-chung

    2013-01-01

    Given the growing evidence for the effects of constraint-induced therapy (CIT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP), there is a need for investigating the characteristics of potential participants who may benefit most from this intervention. This study aimed to establish predictive models for the effects of pediatric CIT on motor and functional…

  6. Diosgenin attenuates the brain injury induced by transient focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxin; Xue, Xuanji; Zhao, Jing; Qian, Chunxiang; Guo, Zengjun; Ito, Yoichiro; Sun, Wenji

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore the potential cerebroprotection of diosgenin against the transient focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and its possible underlying mechanisms. The diosgenin at two dose levels, namely 100 and 200mgkg(-1), was intragastrically administrated once daily for 7-day period prior to the surgery. Then, the rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) using the intraluminal thread for 90min. After 24h reperfusion, several diagnostic indicators were evaluated and all animals were sacrificed to harvest their brains and blood for subsequent biochemical analyses. The results indicated that diosgenin treatment significantly inhibited the death rate and improved the impaired neurological functions along with neurological deficit scores and cerebral infarct size as compared with the rats exposed to I/R insult without agents administration. The increase in the number of apoptotic cells determined by TUNEL in the hippocampus CA1 and cortex was also apparently attenuated in the diosgenin treatment group, which was closely correlated with suppression of Caspase-3 activity and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. In addition the elevated concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) in blood serum of the I/R treated rats were reduced almost to their normal level. Further results obtained from the Western blotting analysis revealed that the protein expression of IκBα in the injured brain was up-regulated, while the p65 subunit of NF-κB was down-regulated in nucleus after the treatment. Collectively, this neuroprotection of diosgenin against I/R injury may be attained through its anti-apoptosis, anti-inflammation and intervening the NF-κB signal pathway properties. Due to the satisfactory findings, diosgenin might be a powerful therapeutic agent to combat the similar disease in future clinic. PMID:27425638

  7. Behavioral Stress-induced Activation of FoxO3a in the Cerebral Cortex of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenjun; Chen, Ligong; Yang, Sufen; Li, Fuzeng; Li, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    Background The transcription factor FoxO3a is highly expressed in brain, but little is known about the response of FoxO3a to behavioral stress and its impact in the associated behavioral changes. Methods We tested the response of brain FoxO3a in the learned helplessness (LH) paradigm and tested signaling pathways that mediate the response of FoxO3a. Results A single session of inescapable shocks (IES) in mice reduced FoxO3a phosphorylation at the Akt-regulating serine/threonine residues and induced prolonged nuclear accumulation of FoxO3a in the cerebral cortex, both indicate activation of FoxO3a in brain. The response of FoxO3a is accompanied by a transient inactivation of Akt and a prolonged activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3β). Noticeably, FoxO3a formed a protein complex with GSK3β in the cerebral cortex, and the interaction between the two proteins was stronger in IES-treated mice. Inhibition of GSK3 was able to abolish IES-induced LH behavior, disrupt IES-induced GSK3β-FoxO3a interaction, and reduce nuclear FoxO3a accumulation. In vitro approaches further revealed that the interaction between GSK3β and FoxO3a was strongest when both were active, FoxO3a was phosphorylated by recombinant GSK3β, and GSK3 inhibitors effectively reduced FoxO3a transcriptional activity. Importantly, IES-induced LH behavior was markedly diminished in FoxO3a-deficient mice that have minimal FoxO3a expression and reduced levels of FoxO3a-inducible genes. Conclusions FoxO3a is activated in response to IES by interacting with GSK3β, and inhibition of GSK3β or reducing FoxO3a expression promotes resistance to stress-induced behavioral disturbance by disrupting this signaling mechanism. PMID:21978520

  8. Cerebral blood flow during paroxysmal EEG activation induced by sleep in patients with complex partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Gozukirmizi, E.; Meyer, J.S.; Okabe, T.; Amano, T.; Mortel, K.; Karacan, I.

    1982-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements were combined with sleep polysomnography in nine patients with complex partial seizures. Two methods were used: the 133Xe method for measuring regional (rCBF) and the stable xenon CT method for local (LCBF). Compared to nonepileptic subjects, who show diffuse CBF decreases during stages I-II, non-REM sleep onset, patients with complex partial seizures show statistically significant increases in CBF which are maximal in regions where the EEG focus is localized and are predominantly seen in one temporal region but are also propagated to other cerebral areas. Both CBF methods gave comparable results, but greater statistical significance was achieved by stable xenon CT methodology. CBF increases are more diffuse than predicted by EEG paroxysmal activity recorded from scalp electrodes. An advantage of the 133Xe inhalation method was achievement of reliable data despite movement of the head. This was attributed to the use of a helmet which maintained the probes approximated to the scalp. Disadvantages were poor resolution (7 cm3) and two-dimensional information. The advantage of stable xenon CT method is excellent resolution (80 mm3) in three dimensions, but a disadvantage is that movement of the head in patients with seizure disorders may limit satisfactory measurements.

  9. Dexmedetomidine Protects against Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Induced Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xichun; Wang, Qi; Li, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    Background Transient global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is a major perioperative complication, and diabetes increases the response of oxidative stress and inflammation induced by I/R. The objective of this study was to determine the protective effect of dexmedetomidine against transient global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion induced oxidative stress and inflammation in diabetic rats. Methods Sixty-four rats were assigned into four experimental groups: normoglycemia, normoglycemia + dexmedetomidine, hyperglycemia, and hyperglycemia + dexmedetomidine and all subsequent neurological examinations were evaluated by a blinded observer. Damage to the brain was histologically assessed using the TUNEL staining method while western blotting was used to investigate changes in the expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins as well as the microglia marker, ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1). Water content in the brain was also analyzed. In addition, hippocampal concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and Nox2 (a member of the Nox family of NADPH oxidases), and the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase were analyzed. Finally, changes in serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6 were detected. Results Results showed that diabetes increased brain water content, the number of apoptotic neurons, early neurological deficit scores, oxidative stress (MDA and Nox2) and inflammation (pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-6) levels following transient global I/R injury, but that these symptoms were attenuated following administration of dexmedetomidine. Conclusions These findings suggest that dexmedetomidine can significantly alleviate damage resulting from I/R, and this mechanism may be related to a reduction in both oxidative stress and inflammation which is normally associated with I/R. PMID:26982373

  10. LPS Induces Occludin Dysregulation in Cerebral Microvascular Endothelial Cells via MAPK Signaling and Augmenting MMP-2 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lan-hui; Huang, Wen; Mo, Xue-an; Chen, Yan-lan; Wu, Xiang-hong

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity contributes to cerebral edema during central nervous system infection. The current study explored the mechanism of lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced dysregulation of tight junction (TJ) proteins. Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) were exposed to LPS, SB203580 (p38MAPK inhibitor), or SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), and cell vitality was determined by MTT assay. The proteins expressions of p38MAPK, JNK, and TJs (occludin and zonula occludens- (ZO-) 1) were determined by western blot. The mRNA levels of TJ components and MMP-2 were measured with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and MMP-2 protein levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). LPS, SB203580, and SP600125 under respective concentrations of 10, 7.69, or 0.22 µg/mL had no effects on cell vitality. Treatment with LPS decreased mRNA and protein levels of occludin and ZO-1 and enhanced p38MAPK and JNK phosphorylation and MMP-2 expression. These effects were attenuated by pretreatment with SB203580 or SP600125, but not in ZO-1 expression. Both doxycycline hyclate (a total MMP inhibitor) and SB-3CT (a specific MMP-2 inhibitor) partially attenuated the LPS-induced downregulation of occludin. These data suggest that MMP-2 overexpression and p38MAPK/JNK pathways are involved in the LPS-mediated alterations of occludin in hCMEC/D3; however, ZO-1 levels are not influenced by p38MAPK/JNK. PMID:26290681

  11. Honokiol suppresses TNF-α-induced neutrophil adhesion on cerebral endothelial cells by disrupting polyubiquitination and degradation of IκBα

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Jen; Wang, Yu-Ling; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chen, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Shen, Jiann-Jong; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion molecules expressed on cerebral endothelial cells (ECs) mediate leukocyte recruitment and play a significant role in cerebral inflammation. Increased levels of adhesion molecules on the EC surface induce leukocyte infiltration into inflammatory areas and are thus hallmarkers of inflammation. Honokiol, isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Magnolia officinalis, has various pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory effects, yet the nature of honokiol targeting molecules remains to be revealed. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of honokiol on neutrophil adhesion and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression, which underlie its molecular target, and mechanisms for inactivating nuclear factor κ enhancer binding protein (NF-κB) in mouse cerebral ECs. Honokiol inhibited tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced neutrophil adhesion and VCAM-1 gene expression in cerebral ECs. The inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB was downregulated by honokiol. Honokiol significantly blocked TNF-α–induced NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and degradation of the proteasome-dependent inhibitor of NF-κB α (IκBα). From docking model prediction, honokiol directly targeted the ubiquitin–ubiquitin interface of Lys48-linked polychains. Moreover, honokiol prevented the TNF-α-induced Lys48-linked polyubiquitination, including IκBα-polyubiquitin interaction. Honokiol has protective anti-inflammatory effects on TNF-α-induced neutrophil adhesion and VCAM-1 gene expression in cerebral ECs, at least in part by directly inhibiting ubiquitination-mediated IκBα degradation and then preventing NF-κB nuclear translocation. PMID:27212040

  12. Cognitive Improvement Induced by Environment Enrichment in Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Rats: a Result of Upregulated Endogenous Neuroprotection?

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Zhang, Junjian; Xiong, Li; Deng, Min; Wang, Jing; Xin, Jiawei; Liu, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Environment enrichment (EE) has been demonstrated to improve the cognitive impairment that is induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH), but the underlying mechanism has not yet been elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the role of endogenous neuroprotection in EE-induced cognitive improvement in rats with CCH. Permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusions (2-vessel occlusions (2VOs)) were performed to induce CCH in male adult Wistar rats. Four weeks after the surgeries, the rats were exposed to enriched environments for 4 weeks (6 h/day). Subsequently, we assessed the effects of EE on cognitive function, brain histone acetylation levels, neuroprotection-related transcription factors (i.e., cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), phospho-CREB (p-CREB), hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) α, and nuclear regulatory factor 2 (Nrf2)), and oxidative stress and histological changes in the brain. After 2VO, the rats exposed to the EE treatment exhibited increased acetylation of histone 4 and increased p-CREB and Nrf2 protein levels in the brain. HIF-1α levels were increased after 2VO and reduced after EE treatment. The oxidative damage, histopathological changes in the brain, and spatial learning and memory impairments induced by 2VO were subsequently restored after EE treatment. These data indicate that EE promotes the acetylation of histone 4, regulates some neuroprotection-related transcription factors, attenuates oxidative damage, and protects against the histopathological damage to the brain induced by CCH. Together, the effects of EE in CCH rats might contribute to the recovery of spatial learning and memory.

  13. Cortical reorganization induced by virtual reality therapy in a child with hemiparetic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    You, Sung H; Jang, Sung Ho; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kwon, Yong-Hyun; Barrow, Irene; Hallett, Mark

    2005-09-01

    Virtual reality (VR) therapy is a new, neurorehabilitation intervention aimed at enhancing motor performance in children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP). This case report investigated the effects of VR therapy on cortical reorganization and associated motor function in an 8-year-old male with hemiparetic CP. Cortical activation and associated motor development were measured before and after VR therapy using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and standardized motor tests. Before VR therapy, the bilateral primary sensorimotor cortices (SMCs) and ipsilateral supplementary motor area (SMA) were predominantly activated during affected elbow movement. After VR therapy, the altered activations disappeared and the contralateral SMC was activated. This neuroplastic change was associated with enhanced functional motor skills including reaching, self-feeding, and dressing. These functions were not possible before the intervention. To our knowledge, this is the first fMRI study in the literature that provides evidence for neuroplasticity after VR therapy in a child with hemiparetic CP. PMID:16138671

  14. Network and external perturbation induce burst synchronisation in cat cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameu, Ewandson L.; Borges, Fernando S.; Borges, Rafael R.; Batista, Antonio M.; Baptista, Murilo S.; Viana, Ricardo L.

    2016-05-01

    The brain of mammals are divided into different cortical areas that are anatomically connected forming larger networks which perform cognitive tasks. The cat cerebral cortex is composed of 65 areas organised into the visual, auditory, somatosensory-motor and frontolimbic cognitive regions. We have built a network of networks, in which networks are connected among themselves according to the connections observed in the cat cortical areas aiming to study how inputs drive the synchronous behaviour in this cat brain-like network. We show that without external perturbations it is possible to observe high level of bursting synchronisation between neurons within almost all areas, except for the auditory area. Bursting synchronisation appears between neurons in the auditory region when an external perturbation is applied in another cognitive area. This is a clear evidence that burst synchronisation and collective behaviour in the brain might be a process mediated by other brain areas under stimulation.

  15. Caffeic acid protects mice from memory deficits induced by focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro Fernandes, Francisco Diego; Fontenele Menezes, Ana Paula; de Sousa Neves, Julliana Catharina; Fonteles, Analu Aragão; da Silva, Ana Thais Araújo; de Araújo Rodrigues, Patrícia; Santos do Carmo, Marta Regina; de Souza, Carolina Melo; de Andrade, Geanne Matos

    2014-10-01

    Brain ischemia pathophysiology involves a complex cascade of events such as inflammation and oxidative stress that lead to neuronal loss and cognitive deficits. Caffeic acid (CA) is a natural phenolic compound with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. To evaluate the neuroprotective efficacy of this compound in mice subjected to a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, animals were pretreated and post-treated with CA, 2, 20, and 60 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally, at 24, 48, 72, 96, or 120 h after ischemia. Animals were evaluated at 24 h after the permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion for brain infarction and neurological deficit score. At 72 h after the occlusion, animals were evaluated for locomotor activity, working memory, and short-term aversive memory; long-term aversive memory was evaluated 24 h after the evaluation of short-term aversive memory. Finally, at 120 h after the event, spatial memory and the expression levels of synaptophysin (SYP), SNAP-25, and caspase 3 were evaluated. The treatment with CA reduced the infarcted area and improved neurological deficit scores. There was no difference in locomotor activity between groups. The working, spatial, and long-term aversive memory deficits improved with CA. Furthermore, western blotting data showed that the expression of SYP, which correlates with synaptic formation and function, decreased after ischemic insult, and CA inhibited the reduction of SYP expression. Ischemia also increased, and CA treatment decreased, caspase 3 expression. These results suggest that CA exerts neuroprotective and antidementia effects, at least in part, by preventing the loss of neural cells and synapses in ischemic brain injury. PMID:25171077

  16. Up-regulation of ryanodine receptor expression increases the calcium-induced calcium release and spontaneous calcium signals in cerebral arteries from hindlimb unloaded rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Luc; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Porte, Yves; Prevot, Anne; Macrez, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Microgravity induces a redistribution of blood volume. Consequently, astronauts' body pressure is modified so that the upright blood pressure gradient is abolished, thereby inducing a modification in cerebral blood pressure. This effect is mimicked in the hindlimb unloaded rat model. After a duration of 8 days of unloading, Ca2+ signals activated by depolarization and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate intracellular release were increased in cerebral arteries. In the presence of ryanodine and thapsigargin, the depolarization-induced Ca2+ signals remained increased in hindlimb suspended animals, indicating that Ca2+ influx and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism were both increased. Spontaneous Ca2+ waves and localized Ca2+ events were also investigated. Increases in both amplitude and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ waves were measured in hindlimb suspension conditions. After pharmacological segregation of Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ sparklets, their kinetic parameters were characterized. Hindlimb suspension induced an increase in the frequencies of both Ca2+ localized events, suggesting an increase of excitability. Labeling with bodipy compounds suggested that voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptor expressions were increased. Finally, the expression of the ryanodine receptor subtype 1 (RyR1) was increased in hindlimb unloading conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that RyR1 expression and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels activity are the focal points of the regulation of Ca2+ signals activated by vasoconstriction in rat cerebral arteries with an increase of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx. PMID:24233561

  17. Human recombinant glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase 1 (GOT1) supplemented with oxaloacetate induces a protective effect after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mato, M; Ramos-Cabrer, P; Sobrino, T; Blanco, M; Ruban, A; Mirelman, D; Menendez, P; Castillo, J; Campos, F

    2014-01-09

    Blood glutamate scavenging is a novel and attractive protecting strategy to reduce the excitotoxic effect of extracellular glutamate released during ischemic brain injury. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase 1 (GOT1) activation by means of oxaloacetate administration has been used to reduce the glutamate concentration in the blood. However, the protective effect of the administration of the recombinant GOT1 (rGOT1) enzyme has not been yet addressed in cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study was to analyze the protective effect of an effective dose of oxaloacetate and the human rGOT1 alone and in combination with a non-effective dose of oxaloacetate in an animal model of ischemic stroke. Sixty rats were subjected to a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Infarct volumes were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before treatment administration, and 24 h and 7 days after MCAO. Brain glutamate levels were determined by in vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS) during artery occlusion (80 min) and reperfusion (180 min). GOT activity and serum glutamate concentration were analyzed during the occlusion and reperfusion period. Somatosensory test was performed at baseline and 7 days after MCAO. The three treatments tested induced a reduction in serum and brain glutamate levels, resulting in a reduction in infarct volume and sensorimotor deficit. Protective effect of rGOT1 supplemented with oxaloacetate at 7 days persists even when treatment was delayed until at least 2 h after onset of ischemia. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the combination of human rGOT1 with low doses of oxaloacetate seems to be a successful approach for stroke treatment.

  18. High matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression induces angiogenesis and basement membrane degradation in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats after cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Huilian; Zhang, Guanjun; Wang, Hongyan; Gong, Huilin; Wang, Chunbao; Zhang, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    Basement membrane degradation and blood-brain barrier damage appear after cerebral infarction, severely impacting neuronal and brain functioning; however, the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we induced cerebral infarction in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats by intragastric administration of high-sodium water (1.3% NaCl) for 7 consecutive weeks. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that, compared with the non-infarcted contralateral hemisphere, stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats on normal sodium intake and Wistar-Kyoto rats, matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression, the number of blood vessels with discontinuous collagen IV expression and microvessel density were significantly higher, and the number of continuous collagen IV-positive blood vessels was lower in the infarct border zones of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats given high-sodium water. Linear correlation analysis showed matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression was positively correlated with the number of discontinuously collagen IV-labeled blood vessels and microvessel density in cerebral infarcts of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats. These results suggest that matrix metalloproteinase-9 upregulation is associated with increased regional angiogenesis and degradation of collagen IV, the major component of the basal lamina, in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats with high-sodium water-induced focal cerebral infarction. PMID:25206775

  19. The effects of MEK1/2 inhibition on cigarette smoke exposure-induced ET receptor upregulation in rat cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Yong-Xiao; Li, Wei; Cai, Yan; Warfvinge, Karin; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Cigarette smoking, a major stroke risk factor, upregulates endothelin receptors in cerebral arteries. The present study examined the effects of MEK1/2 pathway inhibition on cigarette smoke exposure-induced ET receptor upregulation. Rats were exposed to the secondhand smoke (SHS) for 8weeks followed by intraperitoneal injection of MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 for another 4weeks. The urine cotinine levels were assessed with high-performance liquid chromatography. Contractile responses of isolated cerebral arteries were recorded by a sensitive wire myograph. The mRNA and protein expression levels of receptor and MEK/ERK1/2 pathway molecules were examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Cerebral artery receptor localization was determined with immunohistochemistry. The results showed the urine cotinine levels from SHS exposure group were significantly higher than those from the fresh group. In addition, the MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 significantly reduced SHS exposure-increased ETA receptor mRNA and protein levels as well as contractile responses mediated by ETA receptors. The immunoreactivity of increased ETA receptor expression was primarily cytoplasmic in smooth muscle cells. In contrast, ETB receptor was noted in endothelial cells. However, the SHS-induced decrease in endothelium-dependent relaxation was unchanged after U0126 treatment. Furthermore, SHS increased the phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 protein in cerebral arteries. By using U0126 could inhibit the phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein but not MEK1/2. Taken together, our data show that treatment with MEK1/2 pathway inhibitor offsets SHS exposure-induced ETA receptor upregulation in rat cerebral arteries. PMID:27212444

  20. Intensity of halothane- and hypercapnia-induced cerebral hyperemia is strain-dependent in rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Kirsch, J R; Okada, T; Traystman, R J

    1996-08-01

    Cerebrovascular responses to physiologic and pharmacologic stimuli vary between laboratories using different strains of the same species. We tested whether the cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to 1% halothane or hypercapnia is strain-dependent in rats. Age-matched adult male (n = 14 of each strain) Wistar, Wistar-Kyoto (WKY), and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were anesthetized with pentobarbital and mechanically ventilated. Under baseline conditions blood flow to cerebrum (microspheres) in WKY (66 +/- 5 mL.min-1.100 g-1) was less than (P < 0.05) in Wistar (88 +/- 5 mL.min-1.100g-1) and SHR (83 +/- 5 mL.min-1.100 g-1). Blood flow to brainstem was greater (P < 0.05) in Wistar (106 +/- 8 mL. min-1.100 g-1) than in WKY (71 +/- 5 mL.min-1. 100 g-1) and SHR (84 +/- 4 mL.min-1.100 g-1). In the halothane protocol (n = 8 each strain), administration of 1% halothane, during normocapnia, increased blood flow to the cerebrum in WKY (64 +/- 6 to 120 +/- 12 mL.min-1.100 g-1, P < 0.05) and SHR (78 +/- 6 to 115 +/- 8 mL.min-1.100 g-1, P < 0.05) but not Wistar rats (88 +/- 8 to 102 +/- 5 mL.min-1.100 g-1, not significant). Discontinuing halothane caused blood flow to return to baseline values. In the hypercapnia protocol (n = 6 each strain), exposure to 3% CO2 (to achieve a PaCO2 of 50-55 mm Hg) and 6% CO2 (to achieve a PaCO2 of 60-70 mm Hg) caused blood flow to the cerebrum to increase in Wistar (87 +/- 11 to 112 +/- 15 to 162 +/- 23) to similar amount as observed in WKY (69 +/- 7 to 115 +/- 13 to 162 +/- 23 mL.min-1. 100 g-1) but less than that observed in SHR (89 +/- 7 to 174 +/- 24 to 237 +/- 28 mL.min-1.100 g-1). These data demonstrate that the cerebral hyperemic response to vasodilator stimuli is strain-dependent in rats.

  1. Pretreatment of 6-shogaol attenuates oxidative stress and inflammation in middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Na, Ji-Young; Song, Kibbeum; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Sokho; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-10-01

    6-Shogaol can be extracted from ginger and has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities, which are potentially relevant to the treatment of central nervous system disorders. Oxidative stress and inflammation are closely associated with ischemic injury and can eventually result in neuronal death. The aim of this study was to evaluate if 6-shogaol exerts neuroprotective activity. To this end, we determined its effects on oxidative stress and inflammation in a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced brain damage. In this model, MCAO was induced in C57BL/6 mice (30-35g, 9 weeks) for 1h, followed by 24h reperfusion. Mice were treated orally with 6-shogaol (0.1ml, 5 or 20mg/kg) once daily for 7 consecutive days prior to MCAO. We found that 6-shogaol significantly reduced neurological deficit scores and the mean infarct area. Moreover, 6-shogaol improved the behavioral deficits in the MCAO group. In addition, 6-shogaol pretreatment dampened MCAO-mediated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines. Mechanistic studies revealed that 6-shogaol inhibits the cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor (CysLT1R) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling proteins, thus providing a potential pharmacological mechanism for our observations. These results suggest that 6-shogaol can ameliorate the outcomes of MCAO and could thus be used as a potential preventive of stroke. PMID:27346834

  2. Potential predictors of functional outcomes after home-based constraint-induced therapy for children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-ling; Lin, Keh-chung; Kang, Lin-ju; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Hsieh-ching; Hsieh, Yu-wei

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Our objective was to identify predictors for treatment outcomes after home-based constraint-induced therapy (CIT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). METHOD. Forty-three children (aged 4-12 yr) with CP were treated with individualized CIT at home for 4 wk. Potential predictors were age, sex, affected hand, and upper-extremity motor capacity measured by the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale, 2nd edition (PDMS-2). Outcomes were the Pediatric Motor Activity Log (PMAL) Amount of Hand Use and Quality of Hand Use subscales and the Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM). RESULTS. A higher PDMS-2 Visual-Motor Integration subscale score predicted a better WeeFIM score after home-based CIT (adjusted R² = .35). Younger age predicted better performance on the PMAL Amount of Hand Use and Quality of Hand Use subscales (adjusted R² = .06-.08) after home-based CIT. CONCLUSION. The potential predictors may allow occupational therapy practitioners to target those children who will benefit most after home-based constraint-induced therapy.

  3. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  4. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... movement problems a child has. What is spastic CP? Spastic means tight or stiff muscles, or muscles ...

  5. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  6. Novel predictors for immediate puncture site bleed during endoscopic glue injection for gastric varices without using lipiodol.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, T S; Menachery, John; Gokul, B J; Murugesh, M; Vivek Sandeep, T C

    2013-05-01

    Endoscopic obturation of gastric varices using tissue adhesive glues like cyanoacrylate is an accepted modality for the treatment of gastric varices. This study was undertaken to determine whether it was possible to predict immediate puncture site bleed on withdrawal of needle catheter during endoscopic glue injection without lipiodol. We prospectively analyzed 100 consecutive patients with cirrhosis who underwent glue injection. Glue injection was successful in all the patients. Immediate puncture site bleed was observed in only four cases and all of them correlated with negative catheter pull sign and positive red catheter sign. Catheter pull sign and red catheter sign were excellent predictors of immediate puncture site bleed during endoscopic glue injection and should be routinely tested.

  7. Cerebroprotective Effect of Moringa oleifera against Focal Ischemic Stroke Induced by Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Tong-Un, Terdthai; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Wannanon, Panakaporn; Jittiwat, Jinatta

    2013-01-01

    The protection against ischemic stroke is still required due to the limitation of therapeutic efficacy. Based on the role of oxidative stress in stroke pathophysiology, we determined whether Moringa oleifera, a plant possessing potent antioxidant activity, protected against brain damage and oxidative stress in animal model of focal stroke. M. oleifera leaves extract at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg·kg−1 was orally given to male Wistar rats (300–350 g) once daily at a period of 2 weeks before the occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (Rt.MCAO) and 3 weeks after Rt.MCAO. The determinations of neurological score and temperature sensation were performed every 7 days throughout the study period, while the determinations of brain infarction volume, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px were performed 24 hr after Rt.MCAO. The results showed that all doses of extract decreased infarction volume in both cortex and subcortex. The protective effect of medium and low doses of extract in all areas occurred mainly via the decreased oxidative stress. The protective effect of the high dose extract in striatum and hippocampus occurred via the same mechanism, whereas other mechanisms might play a crucial role in cortex. The detailed mechanism required further exploration. PMID:24367723

  8. An experimental study on laser-induced suturing of venous grafts in cerebral revascularization surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puca, Alfredo; Albanese, Alessio; Esposito, Giuseppe; Maira, Giulio; Rossi, Giacomo; Pini, Roberto

    2005-04-01

    To test laser-assisted high flow bypass in cerebral revascularization procedures, we set up an experimental model on rabbits which included harvesting a jugular vein graft and its implantation on the common carotid artery through a double end-to-side anastomosis. The study was carried out on 25 New Zealand rabbits by performing on each animal the proximal anastomosis using conventional suturing, while the distal one was obtained by means of low-power diode laser welding in association with the topical application of Indocyanine Green (ICG) solution to enhance local absorption of the laser light. After the procedure, the animals were subjected to a follow-up from 2 to 9 days. Bypass patency was evaluated by means of Doppler study. The vascular segments were excised and evaluated by histological and immunohistochemical examinations. Utilization of the diode laser was associated with a substantial shortening of the operative time, as well as with a more active endothelial regeneration process at the anastomotic site.

  9. Cerebroprotective effect of Moringa oleifera against focal ischemic stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kirisattayakul, Woranan; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Tong-Un, Terdthai; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Wannanon, Panakaporn; Jittiwat, Jinatta

    2013-01-01

    The protection against ischemic stroke is still required due to the limitation of therapeutic efficacy. Based on the role of oxidative stress in stroke pathophysiology, we determined whether Moringa oleifera, a plant possessing potent antioxidant activity, protected against brain damage and oxidative stress in animal model of focal stroke. M. oleifera leaves extract at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg·kg(-1) was orally given to male Wistar rats (300-350 g) once daily at a period of 2 weeks before the occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (Rt.MCAO) and 3 weeks after Rt.MCAO. The determinations of neurological score and temperature sensation were performed every 7 days throughout the study period, while the determinations of brain infarction volume, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px were performed 24 hr after Rt.MCAO. The results showed that all doses of extract decreased infarction volume in both cortex and subcortex. The protective effect of medium and low doses of extract in all areas occurred mainly via the decreased oxidative stress. The protective effect of the high dose extract in striatum and hippocampus occurred via the same mechanism, whereas other mechanisms might play a crucial role in cortex. The detailed mechanism required further exploration. PMID:24367723

  10. Computer-aided detection of radiation-induced cerebral microbleeds on susceptibility-weighted MR images☆

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Wei; Hess, Christopher P.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Lupo, Janine M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent interest in exploring the clinical relevance of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) has motivated the search for a fast and accurate method to detect them. Visual inspection of CMBs on MR images is a lengthy, arduous task that is highly prone to human error because of their small size and wide distribution throughout the brain. Several computer-aided CMB detection algorithms have recently been proposed in the literature, but their diagnostic accuracy, computation time, and robustness are still in need of improvement. In this study, we developed and tested a semi-automated method for identifying CMBs on minimum intensity projected susceptibility-weighted MR images that are routinely used in clinical practice to visually identify CMBs. The algorithm utilized the 2D fast radial symmetry transform to initially detect putative CMBs. Falsely identified CMBs were then eliminated by examining geometric features measured after performing 3D region growing on the potential CMB candidates. This algorithm was evaluated in 15 patients with brain tumors who exhibited CMBs on susceptibility-weighted images due to prior external beam radiation therapy. Our method achieved heightened sensitivity and acceptable amount of false positives compared to prior methods without compromising computation speed. Its superior performance and simple, accelerated processing make it easily adaptable for detecting CMBs in the clinic and expandable to a wide array of neurological disorders. PMID:24179783

  11. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Palsy Information Page Clinical Trials Trial of Erythropoietin Neuroprotection ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Palsy? The term cerebral palsy refers to a group ...

  12. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  13. A Water-Ethanol Extract from the Willow Bracket Mushroom, Phellinus igniarius (Higher Basidiomycetes), Reduces Transient Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Neuronal Death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Choi, Bo Young; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, In Yeol; Lee, Bo Eun; Sohn, Min; Park, Hyoung Jin; Suh, Sang Won

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the potential neuroprotective effect of a mushroom extract from Phellinus igniarius (Piwep) after transient cerebral ischemia. Ph. Igniarius, which has a history of traditional medicinal use, contains immunomodulatory compounds that have been described to have effects on the human immune system. Using a model of transient cerebral ischemia induced by both common carotid artery occlusion and hypovolemia, a water-ethanol extract precipitate of Ph. Igniarius (Piwep) was delivered intraperitoneally immediately after the insult and was injected subsequently every other day for the experimental course. Neuronal death was examined by Fluoro-Jade B staining 1 week after the insult. Piwep injection lead to decreased hippocampal neuronal death, suppression of oxidative injury, activation of microglia, and disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We conclude that Piwep potently inhibits hippocampal neuronal death following ischemia and may have a high therapeutic potential for ameliorating stroke-induced neuron death in the clinical setting.

  14. A Water-Ethanol Extract from the Willow Bracket Mushroom, Phellinus igniarius (Higher Basidiomycetes), Reduces Transient Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Neuronal Death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Choi, Bo Young; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, In Yeol; Lee, Bo Eun; Sohn, Min; Park, Hyoung Jin; Suh, Sang Won

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the potential neuroprotective effect of a mushroom extract from Phellinus igniarius (Piwep) after transient cerebral ischemia. Ph. Igniarius, which has a history of traditional medicinal use, contains immunomodulatory compounds that have been described to have effects on the human immune system. Using a model of transient cerebral ischemia induced by both common carotid artery occlusion and hypovolemia, a water-ethanol extract precipitate of Ph. Igniarius (Piwep) was delivered intraperitoneally immediately after the insult and was injected subsequently every other day for the experimental course. Neuronal death was examined by Fluoro-Jade B staining 1 week after the insult. Piwep injection lead to decreased hippocampal neuronal death, suppression of oxidative injury, activation of microglia, and disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We conclude that Piwep potently inhibits hippocampal neuronal death following ischemia and may have a high therapeutic potential for ameliorating stroke-induced neuron death in the clinical setting. PMID:26756300

  15. Adenosine A2A receptor deficiency up-regulates cystatin F expression in white matter lesions induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wei; Ran, Hong; Zhou, Zhujuan; He, Qifen; Zheng, Jian

    2012-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that the inactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor exacerbates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced white matter lesions (WMLs) by enhancing neuroinflammatory responses. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor remains unknown. Recent studies have demonstrated that cystatin F, a potent endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor, is selectively expressed in immune cells in association with inflammatory demyelination in central nervous system diseases. To understand the expression of cystatin F and its potential role in the effect of A2A receptor on WMLs induced through chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, we investigated cystatin F expression in the WMLs of A2A receptor gene knockout mice, the littermate wild-type mice and wild-type mice treated daily with the A2A receptor agonist CGS21680 or both CGS21680 and A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. The results of quantitative-PCR and western blot analysis revealed that cystatin F mRNA and protein expression were significantly up-regulated in the WMLs after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. In addition, cystatin F expression in the corpus callosum was significantly increased in A2A receptor gene knockout mice and markedly decreased in mice treated with CGS21680 on both the mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, SCH58261 counteracted the attenuation of cystatin F expression produced by CGS21680 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Moreover, double immunofluorescence staining revealed that cystatin F was co-localized with the activated microglia marker CD11b. In conclusion, the cystatin F expression in the activated microglia is closely associated with the effect of the A2A receptors, which may be related to the neuroinflammatory responses occurring during the pathological process.

  16. Evaluation of near infrared spectroscopy for detecting the β blocker-induced decrease in cerebral oxygenation during hemodilution in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Tadayoshi; Morita, Koji; Sato, Shigehito

    2015-12-01

    β blockers reduce cerebral oxygenation after acute hemodilution and may contribute to the incidence of stroke when used perioperatively. The goal of the study was to investigate whether cerebral tissue oxygenation using near infrared spectroscopy can detect the β blocker-induced decrease in cerebral oxygenation depending on the severity of hemodilution and/or the dose of β blockers. Animals were anesthetized with 2% isoflurane and randomly assigned to a landiolol or esmolol group. After baseline measurement, landiolol or esmolol was administered at 40 µg/kg/min for 20 min, increased to 200 µg/kg/min for 20 min, and then stopped. Hemodynamic and arterial variables and the tissue oxygenation index (TOI) were recorded at each β blocker dose. Two stages of hemodilution were sequentially induced by repeated hemorrhage of 600 ml (33% of estimated blood volume) and infusion of the same volume of hydroxyethylstarch. During each stage, landiolol or esmolol was similarly administered and measurements were made. Landiolol and esmolol both dose-dependently decreased heart rate, mean arterial pressure and cardiac output, depending on the severity of hemodilution. Landiolol at 40 µg/kg/min was almost equivalent in potency to 200 µg/kg/min esmolol for decreasing HR before hemodilution. Based on the TOI, short-acting β blockers reduced cerebral oxygenation in a dose-dependent manner during hemodilution, and oxygenation returned to the baseline level after drug infusion was stopped. TOI may be useful for identification of a decrease in cerebral oxygenation for patients receiving β blockade during surgery associated with major bleeding. PMID:25876017

  17. Radiation-Induced Changes in Normal Appearing White Matter in Patients with Cerebral Tumors: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagesh, V.; Tsien, C.I.; Chenevert, T.L.; Ross, B.D.; Lawrence, T.S.; Junck, L.; Cao, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify radiation-induced changes in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) before, during and after radiation therapy (RT) in cerebral tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with low-grade glioma, high-grade glioma or benign tumor treated with RT were studied using diffusion tensor MRI. The biologically corrected doses ranged from 50 to 81 Gy. Temporal changes were assessed before, during, and till 45 weeks after start of RT. The mean diffusivity of water , fractional anisotropy (FA) of diffusion, diffusivity perpendicular (λ⊥) and parallel (λ∥) to white matter fibers were calculated in normal-appearing genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Results: In the genu and splenium, FA decreased and , λ∥, and λ⊥ increased linearly and significantly over time (p< 0.01). At 45 weeks after start of RT, λ⊥ increased ∼30% in the genu and splenium, while λ∥ increased 5% in the genu and 9% in the splenium, suggesting demyelination is predominant. The increases in λ⊥ and λ∥ were dose-dependent starting at 3 weeks and continuing to 32 weeks from the start of RT. The dose-dependent increase in λ⊥ and λ∥ were not sustained after 32 weeks indicating the transition from the focal to diffuse effects. Conclusions: The acute and sub-acute changes in normal appearing white matter fibers indicate radiation-induced demyelination and mild structural degradation of axonal fibers. The structural changes after RT are progressive, with early dose-dependent demyelination and subsequent diffuse dose-independent demyelination and mild axonal degradation. DT-MR imaging is potentially a marker for assessment of radiation-induced white matter injury. PMID:18313524

  18. Radiation-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing White Matter in Patients With Cerebral Tumors: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nagesh, Vijaya Tsien, Christina I.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Ross, Brian D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Junick, Larry; Cao Yue

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the radiation-induced changes in normal-appearing white matter before, during, and after radiotherapy (RT) in cerebral tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with low-grade glioma, high-grade glioma, or benign tumor treated with RT were studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. The biologically corrected doses ranged from 50 to 81 Gy. The temporal changes were assessed before, during, and to 45 weeks after the start of RT. The mean diffusivity of water (), fractional anisotropy of diffusion, diffusivity perpendicular ({lambda}{sub perpendicular}) and parallel ({lambda}{sub parallel}) to white matter fibers were calculated in normal-appearing genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Results: In the genu and splenium, fractional anisotropy decreased and , {lambda}{sub parallel}, {lambda}{sub -perpendicular} increased linearly and significantly with time (p < 0.01). At 45 weeks after the start of RT, {lambda}{sub -perpendicular} had increased {approx}30% in the genu and splenium, and {lambda}{sub parallel} had increased 5% in the genu and 9% in the splenium, suggesting that demyelination is predominant. The increases in {lambda}{sub perpendicular} and {lambda}{sub parallel} were dose dependent, starting at 3 weeks and continuing to 32 weeks from the start of RT. The dose-dependent increase in {lambda}{sub perpendicular} and {lambda}{sub parallel} was not sustained after 32 weeks, indicating the transition from focal to diffuse effects. Conclusion: The acute and subacute changes in normal-appearing white matter fibers indicate radiation-induced demyelination and mild structural degradation of axonal fibers. The structural changes after RT are progressive, with early dose-dependent demyelination and subsequent diffuse dose-independent demyelination and mild axonal degradation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging is potentially a biomarker for the assessment of radiation-induced white matter injury.

  19. Exercise enhanced functional recovery and expression of GDNF after photochemically induced cerebral infarction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Ikeda, Satoshi; Harada, Katsuhiro; Kamikawa, Yurie; Yoshida, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Exercise has been considered to affect the functional recovery from central nervous damage. Neurotrophic factors have various effects on brain damage. However, the effects of exercise for expression of GDNF on functional recovery with brain damage are not well known. We investigated the difference in functional recovery between non-exercise and beam-walking exercise groups, and the expression of GDNF in both groups after photochemical infarction. Adult male Wistar rats (N = 64) were used. Animals were divided into two groups: non-exercise (N = 35), and beam-walking exercise (N = 29). All rats underwent surgical photochemical infarction. The rats of the beam-walking group were trained every day to walk on a narrow beam after a one-day recovery period and those of the non-exercise group were left to follow a natural course. Animals were evaluated for hind limb function every day using a beam-walking task with an elevated narrow beam. The number of GDNF-like immunoreactive cells in the temporal cortex surrounding the lesion was counted 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after the infarction. Functional recovery of the beam-walking exercise group was significantly earlier than that of the non-exercise group. At 3 days after infarction, the number of GDNF-positive cells in the temporal cortex surrounding the infarction was significantly increased in the beam-walking exercise group compared with that in the non-exercise group. In the exercise group, motor function was remarkably recovered with the increased expression of GDNF-like immunoreactive cells. Our results suggested that a rehabilitative approach increased the expression of GDNF and facilitated functional recovery from cerebral infarction. PMID:26600736

  20. Early immature neuronal death initiates cerebral ischemia-induced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; Lee, H E; Kwon, K J; Park, S J; Heo, H; Lee, Y; Choi, J W; Shin, C Y; Ryu, J H

    2015-01-22

    Throughout adulthood, neurons are continuously replaced by new cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, and this neurogenesis is increased by various neuronal injuries including ischemic stroke and seizure. While several mechanisms of this injury-induced neurogenesis have been elucidated, the initiation factor remains unclear. Here, we investigated which signal(s) trigger(s) ischemia-induced cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG region. We found that early apoptotic cell death of the immature neurons occurred in the DG region following transient forebrain ischemia/reperfusion in mice. Moreover, early immature neuronal death in the DG initiated transient forebrain ischemia/reperfusion-induced neurogenesis through glycogen synthase kinase-3β/β-catenin signaling, which was mediated by microglia-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Additionally, we observed that the blockade of immature neuronal cell death, early microglial activation, or IGF-1 signaling attenuated ischemia-induced neurogenesis. These results suggest that early immature neuronal cell death initiates ischemia-induced neurogenesis through microglial IGF-1 in mice.

  1. Predictive Risk of Radiation Induced Cerebral Necrosis in Pediatric Brain Cancer Patients after VMAT Versus Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Derek; Zhang, Rui; Sanders, Mary; Newhauser, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Cancer of the brain and central nervous system (CNS) is the second most common of all pediatric cancers. Treatment of many of these cancers includes radiation therapy of which radiation induced cerebral necrosis (RICN) can be a severe and potentially devastating side effect. Risk factors for RICN include brain volume irradiated, the dose given per fraction and total dose. Thirteen pediatric patients were selected for this study to determine the difference in predicted risk of RICN when treating with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) compared to passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Plans were compared on the basis of dosimetric endpoints in the planned treatment volume (PTV) and brain and a radiobiological endpoint of RICN calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman probit model. Uncertainty tests were performed to determine if the predicted risk of necrosis was sensitive to positional errors, proton range errors and selection of risk models. Both PSPT and IMPT plans resulted in a significant increase in the maximum dose to the brain, a significant reduction in the total brain volume irradiated to low doses, and a significant lower predicted risk of necrosis compared with the VMAT plans. The findings of this study were upheld by the uncertainty analysis. PMID:25866999

  2. Intravenous Administration of Cilostazol Nanoparticles Ameliorates Acute Ischemic Stroke in a Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Injury Model.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Yoshioka, Chiaki; Ito, Yoshimasa; Funakami, Yoshinori; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that cilostazol (CLZ) suppressed disruption of the microvasculature in ischemic areas. In this study, we have designed novel injection formulations containing CLZ nanoparticles using 0.5% methylcellulose, 0.2% docusate sodium salt, and mill methods (CLZnano dispersion; particle size 81 ± 59 nm, mean ± S.D.), and investigated their toxicity and usefulness in a cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury model (MCAO/reperfusion mice). The pharmacokinetics of injections of CLZnano dispersions is similar to that of CLZ solutions prepared with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, and no changes in the rate of hemolysis of rabbit red blood cells, a model of cell injury, were observed with CLZnano dispersions. In addition, the intravenous injection of 0.6 mg/kg CLZnano dispersions does not affect the blood pressure and blood flow, and the 0.6 mg/kg CLZnano dispersions ameliorate neurological deficits and ischemic stroke in MCAO/reperfusion mice. It is possible that the CLZnano dispersions will provide effective therapy for ischemic stroke patients, and that injection preparations of lipophilic drugs containing drug nanoparticles expand their therapeutic usage. PMID:26690139

  3. Modulation of antioxidant enzyme expression by PTU-induced hypothyroidism in cerebral cortex of postnatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bhanja, Shravani; Jena, Srikanta

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the effect of 6-n-propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism on oxidative stress parameters and expression of antioxidant enzymes in cerebral cortex of rat brain during postnatal development. A significant decrease in levels of lipid peroxidation and H(2)O(2) were seen in 7 and 30 days old PTU-treated rats with respect to their controls. Significantly decreased activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) along with the translated products of SOD1 and SOD2 were observed in 7, 15 and 30 days old PTU-treated rats as compared to their respective controls. However, increase in translated product of CAT was seen in all age groups of PTU-treated rats. Glutathione peroxidase activity was decreased in 7 days and increased in 15 days old PTU-treated rats with respect to their control groups. Histological sections clearly show a decline in neuronal migration with neurons packed together in the hypothyroid group as compared to the control.

  4. Gallic acid exhibits risks of inducing muscular hemorrhagic liposis and cerebral hemorrhage--its action mechanism and preventive strategy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chiu-Lan; Lin, Chien-Hong; Wang, Hui-Er; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Peng, Robert Y

    2015-02-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid) (GA) occurs in many plants. The adverse effects of GA are seldom cited. GA (6-14 μM) provoked the hemorrhagic liposis of the cervical muscles and intracranial hemorrhage. The cause of these pathological events and the method for prevention are still lacking. Using the chicken embryo model and some selected nutraceutics such as folate, glutathione (GSH), N-acetylcysteine, and vitamin E (Vit E), we carried out this study. Results revealed that the action mechanism of GA involved (i) inducing hypoxia with upregulated gene hif-1α and downregulated ratio vegf-r2/vegf-a, leading to dys-vascularization and myopathy; (ii) impairing cytochrome c oxidase; (iii) stimulating creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase release; (iv) eliciting carnitine accumulation and liposis via downregulating gene CPT1; (v) suppressing superoxide dismutase and stimulating NO, H2O2, and malondialdehyde; and (vi) depleting erythrocytic and tissue GSH, resulting in hemorrhage. When both Vit E and GSH were applied to the day 1 chicks, a better alleviation effect was revealed. Conclusively, GA potentially exhibits adverse effect by eliciting hemorrhagic liposis of cervical muscles and cerebral hemorrhage. Supplementation with GSH, Vit E, and N-acetylcysteine is able to ameliorate these adverse effects, warranting the importance of restricting the clinical phytotherapeutic doses of GA and related compounds.

  5. Efficacy of constraint-induced movement therapy and bimanual training in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy in an educational setting.

    PubMed

    Gelkop, Nava; Burshtein, Dikla Gol; Lahav, Anat; Brezner, Amichi; Al-Oraibi, Saleh; Ferre, Claudio L; Gordon, Andrew M

    2015-02-01

    We examined the efficacy of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy (HABIT) in a special education preschool/kindergarten in Israel. Twelve children (1.5-7 years) with congenital hemiplegic cerebral palsy were randomized to receive modified CIMT (n = 6) or HABIT (n = 6). Occupational and physical therapists administered usual and customary care for 8 weeks; children then crossed over to receive CIMT or HABIT 2 hr/day, 6 days/week for 8 weeks from their occupational therapist. The Assisting Hand Assessment and Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test were administered 2 months prior to the intervention, immediately before, immediately after intervention, and 6 months after the first baseline assessment. Both groups demonstrated no change during baseline and comparable improvement following CIMT and HABIT (p < .001), which was maintained at 6-month follow-up. Results suggest that modified CIMT and HABIT provided in school-based settings can lead to improvements in quality of bimanual skill and movement patterns.

  6. The use of EEG to measure cerebral changes during computer-based motion-sickness-inducing tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strychacz, Christopher; Viirre, Erik; Wing, Shawn

    2005-05-01

    Motion sickness (MS) is a stressor commonly attributed with causing serious navigational and performance errors. The distinct nature of MS suggests this state may have distinct neural markers distinguishable from other states known to affect performance (e.g., stress, fatigue, sleep deprivation, high workload). This pilot study used new high-resolution electro-encephalograph (EEG) technologies to identify distinct neuronal activation changes that occur during MS. Brain EEG activity was monitored while subjects performed a ball-tracking task and viewed stimuli on a projection screen intended to induce motion sickness/spatial disorientation. Results show the presence of EEG spectral changes in all subjects who developed motion sickness when compared to baseline levels. These changes included: 1) low frequency (1 to 10 Hz) changes that may reflect oculomotor movements rather than intra-cerebral sources; 2) increased spectral power across all frequencies (attributable to increased scalp conductivity related to sweating), 3) local increases of power spectra in the 20-50 Hz range (likely attributable to external muscles on the skull) and; 4) a central posterior (occipital) independent component that shows suppression of a 20 Hz peak in the MS condition when compared to baseline. Further research is necessary to refine neural markers, characterize their origin and physiology, to distinguish between motion sickness and other states and to enable markers to be used for operator state monitoring and the designing of interventions for motion sickness.

  7. Astrocytic adaptation during cerebral angiogenesis follows the new vessel formation induced through chronic hypoxia in adult mouse cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masamoto, Kazuto; Kanno, Iwao

    2014-03-01

    We examined longitudinal changes of the neuro-glia-vascular unit during cerebral angiogenesis induced through chronic hypoxia in the adult mouse cortex. Tie2-GFP mice in which the vascular endothelial cells expressed green fluorescent proteins (GFP) were exposed to chronic hypoxia, while the spatiotemporal developments of the cortical capillary sprouts and the neighboring astrocytic remodeling were characterized with repeated two-photon microscopy. The capillary sprouts appeared at early phases of the hypoxia adaptation (1-2 weeks), while the morphological changes of the astrocytic soma and processes were not detected in this phase. In the later phases of the hypoxia adaptation (> 2 weeks), the capillary sprouts created a new connection with existing capillaries, and its neighboring astrocytes extended their processes to the newly-formed vessels. The findings show that morphological adaptation of the astrocytes follow the capillary development during the hypoxia adaptation, which indicate that the newly-formed vessels provoke cellular interactions with the neighboring astrocytes to strengthen the functional blood-brain barrier.

  8. Intravenous Administration of Cilostazol Nanoparticles Ameliorates Acute Ischemic Stroke in a Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Noriaki; Yoshioka, Chiaki; Ito, Yoshimasa; Funakami, Yoshinori; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that cilostazol (CLZ) suppressed disruption of the microvasculature in ischemic areas. In this study, we have designed novel injection formulations containing CLZ nanoparticles using 0.5% methylcellulose, 0.2% docusate sodium salt, and mill methods (CLZnano dispersion; particle size 81 ± 59 nm, mean ± S.D.), and investigated their toxicity and usefulness in a cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury model (MCAO/reperfusion mice). The pharmacokinetics of injections of CLZnano dispersions is similar to that of CLZ solutions prepared with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, and no changes in the rate of hemolysis of rabbit red blood cells, a model of cell injury, were observed with CLZnano dispersions. In addition, the intravenous injection of 0.6 mg/kg CLZnano dispersions does not affect the blood pressure and blood flow, and the 0.6 mg/kg CLZnano dispersions ameliorate neurological deficits and ischemic stroke in MCAO/reperfusion mice. It is possible that the CLZnano dispersions will provide effective therapy for ischemic stroke patients, and that injection preparations of lipophilic drugs containing drug nanoparticles expand their therapeutic usage. PMID:26690139

  9. High Glucose-Induced Mitochondrial Respiration and Reactive Oxygen Species in Mouse Cerebral Pericytes is Reversed by Pharmacological Inhibition of Mitochondrial Carbonic Anhydrases: Implications for Cerebral Microvascular Disease in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Gul N.; Morofuji, Yoichi; Banks, William A.; Price, Tulin O.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress leads to diabetes-associated damage to the microvasculature of the brain. Pericytes in close proximity to endothelial cells in the brain microvessels are vital to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and are especially susceptible to oxidative stress. According to our recently published results, streptozotocin-diabetic mouse brain exhibits oxidative stress and loose pericytes by twelve weeks of diabetes, and cerebral pericytes cultured in high glucose media suffer intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis. Oxidative stress in diabetes is hypothesized to be caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during hyperglycemia-induced enhanced oxidative metabolism of glucose (respiration). To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of high glucose on respiration rate and ROS production in mouse cerebral pericytes. Previously, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases protects the brain from oxidative stress and pericyte loss. The high glucose-induced intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis of pericytes in culture were also reversed by inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases. Therefore, we extended our current study to determine the effect of these inhibitors on high glucose-induced increases in pericyte respiration and ROS. We now report that both the respiration and ROS are significantly increased in pericytes challenged with high glucose. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases significantly slowed down both the rate of respiration and ROS production. These data provide new evidence that pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases, already in clinical use, may prove beneficial in protecting the brain from oxidative stress caused by ROS produced as a consequence of hyperglycemia-induced enhanced respiration. PMID:24076121

  10. High glucose-induced mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species in mouse cerebral pericytes is reversed by pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases: Implications for cerebral microvascular disease in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Gul N; Morofuji, Yoichi; Banks, William A; Price, Tulin O

    2013-10-18

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress leads to diabetes-associated damage to the microvasculature of the brain. Pericytes in close proximity to endothelial cells in the brain microvessels are vital to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and are especially susceptible to oxidative stress. According to our recently published results, streptozotocin-diabetic mouse brain exhibits oxidative stress and loose pericytes by twelve weeks of diabetes, and cerebral pericytes cultured in high glucose media suffer intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis. Oxidative stress in diabetes is hypothesized to be caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during hyperglycemia-induced enhanced oxidative metabolism of glucose (respiration). To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of high glucose on respiration rate and ROS production in mouse cerebral pericytes. Previously, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases protects the brain from oxidative stress and pericyte loss. The high glucose-induced intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis of pericytes in culture were also reversed by inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases. Therefore, we extended our current study to determine the effect of these inhibitors on high glucose-induced increases in pericyte respiration and ROS. We now report that both the respiration and ROS are significantly increased in pericytes challenged with high glucose. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases significantly slowed down both the rate of respiration and ROS production. These data provide new evidence that pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases, already in clinical use, may prove beneficial in protecting the brain from oxidative stress caused by ROS produced as a consequence of hyperglycemia-induced enhanced respiration.

  11. Mechanical Injury Induces Brain Endothelial-Derived Microvesicle Release: Implications for Cerebral Vascular Injury during Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Allison M; Lutton, Evan M; Merkel, Steven F; Razmpour, Roshanak; Ramirez, Servio H

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the endothelium responds to mechanical forces induced by changes in shear stress and strain. However, our understanding of vascular remodeling following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains incomplete. Recently published studies have revealed that lung and umbilical endothelial cells produce extracellular microvesicles (eMVs), such as microparticles, in response to changes in mechanical forces (blood flow and mechanical injury). Yet, to date, no studies have shown whether brain endothelial cells produce eMVs following TBI. The brain endothelium is highly specialized and forms the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which regulates diffusion and transport of solutes into the brain. This specialization is largely due to the presence of tight junction proteins (TJPs) between neighboring endothelial cells. Following TBI, a breakdown in tight junction complexes at the BBB leads to increased permeability, which greatly contributes to the secondary phase of injury. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that brain endothelium responds to mechanical injury, by producing eMVs that contain brain endothelial proteins, specifically TJPs. In our study, primary human adult brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) were subjected to rapid mechanical injury to simulate the abrupt endothelial disruption that can occur in the primary injury phase of TBI. eMVs were isolated from the media following injury at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h. Western blot analysis of eMVs demonstrated a time-dependent increase in TJP occludin, PECAM-1 and ICAM-1 following mechanical injury. In addition, activation of ARF6, a small GTPase linked to extracellular vesicle production, was increased after injury. To confirm these results in vivo, mice were subjected to sham surgery or TBI and blood plasma was collected 24 h post-injury. Isolation and analysis of eMVs from blood plasma using cryo-EM and flow cytometry revealed elevated levels of vesicles containing occludin following brain trauma

  12. Mechanical Injury Induces Brain Endothelial-Derived Microvesicle Release: Implications for Cerebral Vascular Injury during Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Allison M.; Lutton, Evan M.; Merkel, Steven F.; Razmpour, Roshanak; Ramirez, Servio H.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the endothelium responds to mechanical forces induced by changes in shear stress and strain. However, our understanding of vascular remodeling following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains incomplete. Recently published studies have revealed that lung and umbilical endothelial cells produce extracellular microvesicles (eMVs), such as microparticles, in response to changes in mechanical forces (blood flow and mechanical injury). Yet, to date, no studies have shown whether brain endothelial cells produce eMVs following TBI. The brain endothelium is highly specialized and forms the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which regulates diffusion and transport of solutes into the brain. This specialization is largely due to the presence of tight junction proteins (TJPs) between neighboring endothelial cells. Following TBI, a breakdown in tight junction complexes at the BBB leads to increased permeability, which greatly contributes to the secondary phase of injury. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that brain endothelium responds to mechanical injury, by producing eMVs that contain brain endothelial proteins, specifically TJPs. In our study, primary human adult brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) were subjected to rapid mechanical injury to simulate the abrupt endothelial disruption that can occur in the primary injury phase of TBI. eMVs were isolated from the media following injury at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h. Western blot analysis of eMVs demonstrated a time-dependent increase in TJP occludin, PECAM-1 and ICAM-1 following mechanical injury. In addition, activation of ARF6, a small GTPase linked to extracellular vesicle production, was increased after injury. To confirm these results in vivo, mice were subjected to sham surgery or TBI and blood plasma was collected 24 h post-injury. Isolation and analysis of eMVs from blood plasma using cryo-EM and flow cytometry revealed elevated levels of vesicles containing occludin following brain trauma

  13. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Hibah O; Gonzalez, Larry P; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000-30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined, following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p < 0.05; n = 8-11). Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p < 0.05; n = 4-6) and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p < 0.05; n = 5-6). PMID:26136722

  14. Diphenyl ditelluride induces hypophosphorylation of intermediate filaments through modulation of DARPP-32-dependent pathways in cerebral cortex of young rats.

    PubMed

    Heimfarth, Luana; Loureiro, Samanta Oliveira; Reis, Karina Pires; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Zamboni, Fernanda; Lacerda, Sabrina; Soska, Angela Kronbauer; Wild, Luisa; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effect of different concentrations of diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe)(2) on the in vitro phosphorylation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and neurofilament (NF) subunits from cerebral cortex and hippocampus of rats during development. (PhTe)(2)-induced hypophosphorylation of GFAP and NF subunits only in cerebral cortex of 9- and 15-day-old animals but not in hippocampus. Hypophosphorylation was dependent on ionotropic glutamate receptors, as demonstrated by the specific inhibitors 10 μM DL-AP5 and 50 μM MK801, 100 μM CNQX and 100 μM DNQX. Also, 10 μM verapamil and 10 μM nifedipine, two L-voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (L-VDCC) blockers; 50 μM dantrolene, a ryanodine channel blocker, and the intracellular Ca(2+) chelator Bapta-AM (50 μM) totally prevented this effect. Results obtained with 0.2 μM calyculin A (PP1 and PP2A inhibitor), 1 μM Fostriecin a potent protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibitor, 100 μM FK-506 or 100 μM cyclosporine A, specific protein phosphatase 2B inhibitors, pointed to PP1 as the protein phosphatase directly involved in the hypophosphorylating effect of (PhTe)(2). Finally, we examined the activity of DARPP-32, an important endogenous Ca(2+)-mediated inhibitor of PP1 activity. Western blot assay using anti-DARPP-32, anti-pThr34DARPP-32, and anti-pThr75DARPP-32 antibodies showed a decreased phosphorylation level of the inhibitor at Thr34, compatible with inactivation of protein kinase A (PKA) by pThr75 DARPP-32. Decreased cAMP and catalytic subunit of PKA support that (PhTe)(2) acted on neuron and astrocyte cytoskeletal proteins through PKA-mediated inactivation of DARPP-32, promoting PP1 release and hypophosphorylation of IF proteins of those neural cells. Moreover, in the presence of Bapta, the level of the PKA catalytic subunit was not decreased by (PhTe)(2), suggesting that intracellular Ca(2+) levels could be upstream the signaling pathway elicited by this neurotoxicant and targeting the

  15. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Hibah O.; Gonzalez, Larry P.; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J.; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000–30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined, following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p < 0.05; n = 8–11). Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p < 0.05; n = 4–6) and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p < 0.05; n = 5–6). PMID:26136722

  16. Effects of Adjuvant Analgesics on Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Mechanical Allodynia.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Wataru; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain (CPSP), a potential sequela of stroke, is classified as neuropathic pain. Although we recently established a CPSP-like model in mice, the effects of adjuvant analgesics as therapeutic drugs for neuropathic pain in this model are unknown. Hence, the aim of the present study was to assess the usefulness of our model by evaluating the effects of adjuvant analgesics used for treating neuropathic pain in this mouse model of CPSP. Male ddY mice were subjected to 30 min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). The development of hind paw mechanical allodynia was measured after BCAO using the von Frey test. The mechanical allodynia was significantly increased on day 3 after BCAO compared with that during the pre-BCAO assessment. BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia was significantly decreased by intraperitoneal injections of imipramine (a tricyclic antidepressant), mexiletine (an antiarrhythmic), gabapentin (an antiepileptic), or a subcutaneous injection of morphine (an opioid receptor agonist) compared with that following vehicle treatment in BCAO-mice. By contrast, milnacipran (a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor), paroxetine (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), carbamazepine (antiepileptic), and indomethacin (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) did not affect the BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia. Our results show that BCAO in mice may be useful as an animal model of CPSP. In addition, BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia may be suppressed by some adjuvant analgesics used to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:27150152

  17. Ameliorating effects of traditional Chinese medicine preparation, Chinese materia medica and active compounds on ischemia/reperfusion-induced cerebral microcirculatory disturbances and neuron damage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Fan, Jingyu; Han, Jingyan

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury induced by thrombolytic therapy are conditions with high mortality and serious long-term physical and cognitive disabilities. They have a major impact on global public health. These disorders are associated with multiple insults to the cerebral microcirculation, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, leukocyte adhesion and infiltration, brain blood barrier (BBB) disruption, and capillary hypoperfusion, ultimately resulting in tissue edema, hemorrhage, brain injury and delayed neuron damage. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used in China, Korea, Japan and other Asian countries for treatment of a wide range of diseases. In China, the usage of compound TCM preparation to treat cerebrovascular diseases dates back to the Han Dynasty. Even thousands of years earlier, the medical formulary recorded many classical prescriptions for treating cerebral I/R-related diseases. This review summarizes current information and underlying mechanisms regarding the ameliorating effects of compound TCM preparation, Chinese materia medica, and active components on I/R-induced cerebral microcirculatory disturbances, brain injury and neuron damage. PMID:26579420

  18. Induction of oxidative stress and inhibition of superoxide dismutase expression in rat cerebral cortex and cerebellum by PTU-induced hypothyroidism and its reversal by curcumin.

    PubMed

    Jena, Srikanta; Anand, Chinmay; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda; Dandapat, Jagneshwar

    2012-08-01

    The present study was carried out to elucidate the effectiveness of curcumin in ameliorating the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of rat brain under 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism. Induction of hypothyroidism in adult rats by PTU resulted in augmentation of lipid peroxidation (LPx), an index of oxidative stress in cerebellum but not in cerebral cortex. Curcumin-supplementation to PTU-treated (hypothyroid) rats showed significant reduction in the level of LPx in both the regions of brain. The decreased translated products (SOD1 and SOD2) and the unchanged activity of SOD in cerebral cortex of PTU-treated rats were increased on supplementation of curcumin to the hypothyroid rats. Declined translated products of SOD1 and SOD2 in cerebellum of PTU-treated rats were alleviated on administration of curcumin to hypothyroid rats. On the other hand, the decreased activity of SOD in cerebellum of PTU-treated rats was further declined on administration of curcumin to the hypothyroid rats. Results of the present investigation indicate that curcumin differentially modulates the expression of superoxide dismutase in rat brain cortex and cerebellum under PTU-induced hypothyroidism.

  19. Dense Accumulation of Lipiodol Emulsion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Nodule during Selective Balloon-occluded Transarterial Chemoembolization: Measurement of Balloon-occluded Arterial Stump Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Irie, Toshiyuki Kuramochi, Masashi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To reveal the mechanism of dense accumulation of lipiodol emulsion (LE) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during selective balloon-occluded transarterial chemoembolization (B-TACE). Methods. Balloon-occluded arterial stump pressure (BOASP) at the embolization portion was measured during selective B-TACE for 43 nodules in 42 patients. Fluoroscopy and digital subtraction angiography were prospectively observed during selective B-TACE to note whether dense LE accumulation in HCC occurred. The LE concentration ratio of HCC to embolized liver parenchyma (LECHL ratio) was also calculated for each treatment on the basis of the computed tomographic scan obtained immediately after selective B-TACE. The relationships between degree of LE accumulation and the BOASP, as well as the LECHL ratio, were analyzed. Results. Arterial flow beyond the catheter tip was maintained even after balloon inflation. In 39 of 43 treatments, LE inflow into the nontumorous liver parenchyma ceased immediately after LE droplets were filled in arteries of the nontumorous liver parenchyma while LE inflow into the HCC nodule continued (group 1). More dense LE accumulation in HCC nodule was obtained in these 39 treatments. In four treatments, LE inflow both into the nontumorous liver parenchyma and into the HCC nodule continued, and no dense LE accumulation in HCC nodule was observed (group 2). In these four treatments, thick anastomotic vessels with collateral artery were noted. The BOASP in group 1 was (mean {+-} SD) 33.8 {+-} 12.8 mmHg (range 13-64 mmHg) and that in group 2 was 92.3 {+-} 7.4 mmHg (range 83-100 mmHg). There was a statistically significant difference in BOASP between groups (p = 0.00004, Welch's t test). The LECHL ratio in group 1 was 18.3 {+-} 13.9 (range 2.9-54.2) and that in group 2 was 2.6 {+-} 1.1 (range 1.7-4.2). There was a statistically significant difference in the LECHL ratio between the groups (p = 0.000034, Welch's t test). Conclusion. Selective B-TACE induced

  20. Protective Effect of Glycyrrhizin, a Direct HMGB1 Inhibitor, on Focal Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Libang; Hu, Ling; Wu, Wei; Cai, Lin; Yin, Liang; Dong, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    Aim Glycyrrhizin (GL) has been reported to protect against ischemia and reperfusion (I/R)-induced injury by inhibiting the cytokine activity of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In the present study, the protective effects of GL against I/R injury, as well as the related molecular mechanisms, were investigated in rat brains. Methods Focal cerebral I/R injury was induced by intraluminal filamentous occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in Male Sprague-Dawley rats. GL alone or GL and rHMGB1 were administered intravenously at the time of reperfusion. Serum levels of HMGB1 and inflammatory mediators were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Histopathological examination, immunofluorescence, RT-PCR and western blotting analyses were performed to investigate the protective and anti-apoptotic effects and related molecular mechanisms of GL against I/R injury in rat brains. Results Pre-treatment with GL significantly reduced infarct volume and improved the accompanying neurological deficits in locomotor function. The release of HMGB1 from the cerebral cortex into the serum was inhibited by GL administration. Moreover, pre-treatment with GL alleviated apoptotic injury resulting from cerebral I/R through the inhibition of cytochrome C release and caspase 3 activity. The expression levels of inflammation- and oxidative stress-related molecules including TNF-α, iNOS, IL-1β, and IL-6, which were over-expressed in I/R, were decreased by GL. P38 and P-JNK signalling were involved in this process. All of the protective effects of GL could be reversed by rHMGB1 administration. Conclusions GL has a protective effect on ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat brains through the inhibition of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptotic injury by antagonising the cytokine activity of HMGB1. PMID:24594628

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Ependymal Ciliary Loss Decreases Cerebral Spinal Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Guoxiang; Elkind, Jaclynn A.; Kundu, Suhali; Smith, Colin J.; Antunes, Marcelo B.; Tamashiro, Edwin; Kofonow, Jennifer M.; Mitala, Christina. M.; Stein, Sherman C.; Grady, M. Sean; Einhorn, Eugene; Cohen, Noam A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) afflicts up to 2 million people annually in the United States and is the primary cause of death and disability in young adults and children. Previous TBI studies have focused predominantly on the morphological, biochemical, and functional alterations of gray matter structures, such as the hippocampus. However, little attention has been given to the brain ventricular system, despite the fact that altered ventricular function is known to occur in brain pathologies. In the present study, we investigated anatomical and functional alterations to mouse ventricular cilia that result from mild TBI. We demonstrate that TBI causes a dramatic decrease in cilia. Further, using a particle tracking technique, we demonstrate that cerebrospinal fluid flow is diminished, thus potentially negatively affecting waste and nutrient exchange. Interestingly, injury-induced ventricular system pathology resolves completely by 30 days after injury as ependymal cell ciliogenesis restores cilia density to uninjured levels in the affected lateral ventricle. PMID:24749541

  2. Toward a theory of the general-anesthetic-induced phase transition of the cerebral cortex. I. A thermodynamics analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Steyn-Ross, D. A.; Sleigh, J. W.; Wilcocks, Lara C.

    2001-07-01

    In a recent paper the authors developed a stochastic model for the response of the cerebral cortex to a general anesthetic agent. The model predicted that there would be an anesthetic-induced phase change at the point of transition into unconsciousness, manifested as a divergence in the electroencephalogram spectral power, and a change in spectral energy distribution from being relatively broadband in the conscious state to being strongly biased towards much lower frequencies in the unconscious state. Both predictions have been verified in recent clinical measurements. In the present paper we extend the model by calculating the equilibrium distribution function for the cortex, allowing us to establish a correspondence between the cortical phase transition and the more familiar thermodynamic phase transitions. This correspondence is achieved by first identifying a cortical free energy function, then by postulating that there exists an inverse relationship between an anesthetic effect and a quantity we define as cortical excitability, which plays a role analogous to temperature in thermodynamic phase transitions. We follow standard thermodynamic theory to compute a cortical entropy and a cortical ``heat capacity,'' and we investigate how these will vary with anesthetic concentration. The significant result is the prediction that the entropy will decrease discontinuously at the moment of induction into unconsciousness, concomitant with a release of ``latent heat'' which should manifest as a divergence in the analogous heat capacity. There is clear clinical evidence of heat capacity divergence in historical anesthetic-effect measurements performed in 1977 by Stullken et al. [Anesthesiology 46, 28 (1977)]. The discontinuous step change in cortical entropy suggests that the cortical phase transition is analogous to a first-order thermodynamic transition in which the comatose-quiescent state is strongly ordered, while the active cortical state is relatively disordered.

  3. Characterization of dilatation induced by electrical field stimulation in mammalian cerebral and peripheral vessels.

    PubMed

    Hardebo, J E; Kåhrström, J; Owman, C

    1989-07-01

    The ability of electrical field stimulation in releasing transmitter from isolated blood vessels in vitro, during recordings of constrictor or dilator responses, is dependent upon an appropriate choice of stimulation parameters which avoid concomitant change in tone due to a direct effect on the vascular smooth muscle membrane. In many species, including man, small arteries such as pial arteries frequently respond to electrical field stimulation with a dilatation which is TTX-resistant. Such dilatations occur even with stimulus parameters of 7.5 V/60 mA at 0.1 ms, 6 Hz. The stimulation parameters required to induce the TTX-resistant response are just above those needed to obtain a purely neurogenic contractile or dilatory response in vessels equipped with a dense net of adrenergic nerves, such as rabbit central ear artery, and, in addition, highly sensitive postsynaptic alpha- or beta-adrenergic receptors, such as the buccal segment of the facial vein. This prompted us to characterize further the nature of the response. It was tested whether the relaxation, despite being TTX-resistant, might be neurogenic in origin. 4-Aminopyridine, in doses that usually enhance the transmitter release from nerves, did not affect the response. Blockade by a variety of dilator antagonists, the presence of excess amounts of known dilators or removal or emptying of known vasodilator nerves did not inhibit the response. Removal of extracellular calcium did not abolish the response. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that neuronal release is involved to any measurable extent in this response. The relaxation was not significantly affected by removal of endothelium, blockade of endothelium-derived relaxing factor, or interference with mast cells. At modest stimulatory parameters (12-13 V/96-104 mA at 0.1 ms, 7-8 V/56-64 mA at 0.3 ms, at 6 Hz) chlorine gas bubbles could be seen forming at the electrode or mounting hook; this gas is toxic to the musculature and relaxes a pre-contracted vessel

  4. Visually induced nausea causes characteristic changes in cerebral, autonomic and endocrine function in humans

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Adam D; Ban, Vin F; Coen, Steven J; Sanger, Gareth J; Barker, Gareth J; Gresty, Michael A; Giampietro, Vincent P; Williams, Steven C; Webb, Dominic L; Hellström, Per M; Andrews, Paul L R; Aziz, Qasim

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An integrated understanding of the physiological mechanisms involved in the genesis of nausea remains lacking. We aimed to describe the psychophysiological changes accompanying visually induced motion sickness, using a motion video, hypothesizing that differences would be evident between subjects who developed nausea in comparison to those who did not. A motion, or a control, stimulus was presented to 98 healthy subjects in a randomized crossover design. Validated questionnaires and a visual analogue scale (VAS) were used for the assessment of anxiety and nausea. Autonomic and electrogastrographic activity were measured at baseline and continuously thereafter. Plasma vasopressin and ghrelin were measured in response to the motion video. Subjects were stratified into quartiles based on VAS nausea scores, with the upper and lower quartiles considered to be nausea sensitive and resistant, respectively. Twenty-eight subjects were exposed to the motion video during functional neuroimaging. During the motion video, nausea-sensitive subjects had lower normogastria/tachygastria ratio and cardiac vagal tone but higher cardiac sympathetic index in comparison to the control video. Furthermore, nausea-sensitive subjects had decreased plasma ghrelin and demonstrated increased activity of the left anterior cingulate cortex. Nausea VAS scores correlated positively with plasma vasopressin and left inferior frontal and middle occipital gyri activity and correlated negatively with plasma ghrelin and brain activity in the right cerebellar tonsil, declive, culmen, lingual gyrus and cuneus. This study demonstrates that the subjective sensation of nausea is associated with objective changes in autonomic, endocrine and brain networks, and thus identifies potential objective biomarkers and targets for therapeutic interventions. Key points Nausea is a highly individual and variable experience. The reasons for this variability are incompletely understood although

  5. Learning-induced changes in the cerebral processing of voice identity.

    PubMed

    Latinus, Marianne; Crabbe, Frances; Belin, Pascal

    2011-12-01

    Temporal voice areas showing a larger activity for vocal than non-vocal sounds have been identified along the superior temporal sulcus (STS); more voice-sensitive areas have been described in frontal and parietal lobes. Yet, the role of voice-sensitive regions in representing voice identity remains unclear. Using a functional magnetic resonance adaptation design, we aimed at disentangling acoustic- from identity-based representations of voices. Sixteen participants were scanned while listening to pairs of voices drawn from morphed continua between 2 initially unfamiliar voices, before and after a voice learning phase. In a given pair, the first and second stimuli could be identical or acoustically different and, at the second session, perceptually similar or different. At both sessions, right mid-STS/superior temporal gyrus (STG) and superior temporal pole (sTP) showed sensitivity to acoustical changes. Critically, voice learning induced changes in the acoustical processing of voices in inferior frontal cortices (IFCs). At the second session only, right IFC and left cingulate gyrus showed sensitivity to changes in perceived identity. The processing of voice identity appears to be subserved by a large network of brain areas ranging from the sTP, involved in an acoustic-based representation of unfamiliar voices, to areas along the convexity of the IFC for identity-related processing of familiar voices.

  6. Flight-induced inhibition of the cerebral median peptidergic neurosecretory system in Locusta migratoria

    SciTech Connect

    Diederen, J.H.; van Etten, E.W.; Biegstraaten, A.I.; Terlou, M.; Vullings, H.G.; Jansen, W.F.

    1988-08-01

    This study discusses the effects of a 1-hr period of flight on the peptidergic pars intercerebralis (PI)-corpus cardiacum storage part (CCS) system in male Locusta migratoria, particularly the effect on material in this system stained by a histochemical method for peptidergic neurosecretory material (NSM) or labeled by in vivo incorporation of radioactive amino acid molecules. By use of an automatic image analysis system a number of parameters of the stained or radioactively labeled substances were measured to quantify the flight-induced effects and to get information on the manner in which the neurosecretory cell bodies in the PI and their axonal endings in the CCS accommodate changing amounts of NSM. The CCS of flown locusts contained distinctly more stained and radioactively labeled substances than the CCS of unflown locusts. A tendency to similar differences was observed in the cluster of neurosecretory cell bodies in the PI. The results indicate that 1 hr flight inhibited the release of NSM by the PI-CCS system. After the onset of reduced release activity by flight, some NSM continued to be synthesized and transported from the PI to the CCS, gradually filling up and expanding the entire PI-CCS system, the NSM at the same time becoming more and more densely packed. It is concluded that the peptidergic PI-CCS system is not actively involved in the control of flight metabolism or flight behavior.

  7. Muscle Recruitment and Coordination following Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy with Electrical Stimulation on Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kaishou; He, Lu; Mai, Jianning; Yan, Xiaohua; Chen, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate changes of muscle recruitment and coordination following constraint-induced movement therapy, constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation, and traditional occupational therapy in treating hand dysfunction. Methods In a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial, children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy were randomly assigned to receive constraint-induced movement therapy (n = 22), constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation (n = 23), or traditional occupational therapy (n = 23). Three groups received a 2-week hospital-based intervention and a 6-month home-based exercise program following hospital-based intervention. Constraint-induced movement therapy involved intensive functional training of the involved hand during which the uninvolved hand was constrained. Electrical stimulation was applied on wrist extensors of the involved hand. Traditional occupational therapy involved functional unimanual and bimanual training. All children underwent clinical assessments and surface electromyography (EMG) at baseline, 2 weeks, 3 and 6 months after treatment. Surface myoelectric signals were integrated EMG, root mean square and cocontraction ratio. Clinical measures were grip strength and upper extremity functional test. Results Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation group showed both a greater rate of improvement in integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors and cocontraction ratio compared to the other two groups at 3 and 6 months, as well as improving in root mean square of the involved wrist extensors than traditional occupational therapy group (p<0.05). Positive correlations were found between both upper extremity functional test scores and integrated EMG of the involved wrist as well as grip strength and integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors (p<0.05). Conclusions Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation is likely to produce the best outcome in

  8. Visually induced nausea causes characteristic changes in cerebral, autonomic and endocrine function in humans.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Ban, Vin F; Coen, Steven J; Sanger, Gareth J; Barker, Gareth J; Gresty, Michael A; Giampietro, Vincent P; Williams, Steven C; Webb, Dominic L; Hellström, Per M; Andrews, Paul L R; Aziz, Qasim

    2015-03-01

    An integrated understanding of the physiological mechanisms involved in the genesis of nausea remains lacking. We aimed to describe the psychophysiological changes accompanying visually induced motion sickness, using a motion video, hypothesizing that differences would be evident between subjects who developed nausea in comparison to those who did not. A motion, or a control, stimulus was presented to 98 healthy subjects in a randomized crossover design. Validated questionnaires and a visual analogue scale (VAS) were used for the assessment of anxiety and nausea. Autonomic and electrogastrographic activity were measured at baseline and continuously thereafter. Plasma vasopressin and ghrelin were measured in response to the motion video. Subjects were stratified into quartiles based on VAS nausea scores, with the upper and lower quartiles considered to be nausea sensitive and resistant, respectively. Twenty-eight subjects were exposed to the motion video during functional neuroimaging. During the motion video, nausea-sensitive subjects had lower normogastria/tachygastria ratio and cardiac vagal tone but higher cardiac sympathetic index in comparison to the control video. Furthermore, nausea-sensitive subjects had decreased plasma ghrelin and demonstrated increased activity of the left anterior cingulate cortex. Nausea VAS scores correlated positively with plasma vasopressin and left inferior frontal and middle occipital gyri activity and correlated negatively with plasma ghrelin and brain activity in the right cerebellar tonsil, declive, culmen, lingual gyrus and cuneus. This study demonstrates that the subjective sensation of nausea is associated with objective changes in autonomic, endocrine and brain networks, and thus identifies potential objective biomarkers and targets for therapeutic interventions.

  9. Rat Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Is Not a Suitable Model for the Study of Stroke-Induced Spontaneous Infections

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Martorell, Mireia; Hernández-Guillamón, Mar; Rosell, Anna; Gomis, Javier; Salat, David; García-Bonilla, Lidia; Montaner, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Background Infections related to stroke-induced immunodepression are an important complication causing a high rate of death in patients. Several experimental studies in mouse stroke models have described this process but it has never been tested in other species such as rats. Methods Our study focused on the appearance of secondary systemic and pulmonary infections in ischemic rats, comparing with sham and naive animals. For that purpose, male Wistar rats were subjected to embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion (eMCAO) or to transient MCAO (tMCAO) inserting a nylon filament. Forty-eight hours after ischemia, blood and lung samples were evaluated. Results In eMCAO set, ischemic rats showed a significant decrease in blood-peripheral lymphocytes (naive = 58.8±18.1%, ischemic = 22.9±16.4%) together with an increase in polymorphonuclears (PMNs) (naive = 29.2±14.7%, ischemic = 71.7±19.5%), while no change in monocytes was observed. The increase in PMNs counts was positively correlated with worse neurological outcome 48 hours after eMCAO (r = 0.55, p = 0.043). However, sham animals showed similar changes in peripheral leukocytes as those seen in ischemic rats (lymphocytes: 40.1±19.7%; PMNs: 51.7±19.2%). Analysis of bacteriological lung growth showed clear differences between naive (0±0 CFU/mL; log10) and both sham (3.9±2.5 CFU/mL; log10) and ischemic (4.3±2.9 CFU/mL; log10) groups. Additionally, naive animals presented non-pathological lung histology, while both sham and ischemic showed congestion, edema or hemorrhage. Concordant results were found in the second set of animals submitted to a tMCAO. Conclusions Inflammatory and infection changes in Wistar rats subjected to MCAO models may be attributed not only to the brain ischemic injury but to the surgical aggression and/or anaesthetic stress. Consequently, we suggest that stroke-induced immunodepression in ischemic experimental models should be interpreted with caution in further

  10. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wimalasundera, Neil; Stevenson, Valerie L

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral palsy has always been known as a disorder of movement and posture resulting from a non-progressive injury to the developing brain; however, more recent definitions allow clinicians to appreciate more than just the movement disorder. Accurate classification of cerebral palsy into distribution, motor type and functional level has advanced research. It also facilitates appropriate targeting of interventions to functional level and more accurate prognosis prediction. The prevalence of cerebral palsy remains fairly static at 2-3 per 1000 live births but there have been some changes in trends for specific causal groups. Interventions for cerebral palsy have historically been medical and physically focused, often with limited evidence to support their efficacy. The use of more appropriate outcome measures encompassing quality of life and participation is helping to deliver treatments which are more meaningful for people with cerebral palsy and their carers.

  11. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during cardiopulmonary bypass with special reference to effects of hypotension induced by prostacyclin

    SciTech Connect

    Feddersen, K.; Aren, C.; Nilsson, N.J.; Radegran, K.

    1986-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow and metabolism of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were studied in 43 patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass. Twenty-five patients received prostacyclin infusion, 50 ng per kilogram of body weight per minute, during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and 18 patients served as a control group. Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was studied by intraarterially injected xenon 133 and a single scintillation detector. Oxygen tension, carbon dioxide tension, oxygen saturation, glucose, and lactate were measured in arterial and cerebral venous blood. Mean arterial blood pressure decreased during hypothermia and prostacyclin infusion to less than 30 mm Hg. The regional CBF was, on average, 22 (standard deviation (SD) 4) ml/100 gm/min before CPB. It increased in the control group during hypothermia to 34 (SD 12) ml/100 gm/min, but decreased in the prostacyclin group to 15 (SD 5) ml/100 gm/min. It increased during rewarming in the prostacyclin group. After CPB, regional CBF was about 40 ml/100 gm/min in both groups. The cerebral arteriovenous oxygen pressure difference decreased more in the control group than in the prostacyclin group during hypothermia. The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen decreased in both groups from approximately 2 ml/100 gm/min to about 1 ml/100 gm/min during hypothermia, increased again during rewarming, and after CPB was at the levels measured before bypass in both groups. There was no difference between the groups in regard to glucose and lactate metabolism.

  12. Hemodynamic changes in a rat parietal cortex after endothelin-1-induced middle cerebral artery occlusion monitored by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Ma, Yushu; Dou, Shidan; Wang, Yi; La, Dongsheng; Liu, Jianghong; Ma, Zhenhe

    2016-07-01

    A blockage of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) on the cortical branch will seriously affect the blood supply of the cerebral cortex. Real-time monitoring of MCA hemodynamic parameters is critical for therapy and rehabilitation. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful imaging modality that can produce not only structural images but also functional information on the tissue. We use OCT to detect hemodynamic changes after MCA branch occlusion. We injected a selected dose of endothelin-1 (ET-1) at a depth of 1 mm near the MCA and let the blood vessels follow a process first of occlusion and then of slow reperfusion as realistically as possible to simulate local cerebral ischemia. During this period, we used optical microangiography and Doppler OCT to obtain multiple hemodynamic MCA parameters. The change trend of these parameters from before to after ET-1 injection clearly reflects the dynamic regularity of the MCA. These results show the mechanism of the cerebral ischemia-reperfusion process after a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and confirm that OCT can be used to monitor hemodynamic parameters.

  13. Hemodynamic changes in a rat parietal cortex after endothelin-1-induced middle cerebral artery occlusion monitored by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Ma, Yushu; Dou, Shidan; Wang, Yi; La, Dongsheng; Liu, Jianghong; Ma, Zhenhe

    2016-07-01

    A blockage of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) on the cortical branch will seriously affect the blood supply of the cerebral cortex. Real-time monitoring of MCA hemodynamic parameters is critical for therapy and rehabilitation. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful imaging modality that can produce not only structural images but also functional information on the tissue. We use OCT to detect hemodynamic changes after MCA branch occlusion. We injected a selected dose of endothelin-1 (ET-1) at a depth of 1 mm near the MCA and let the blood vessels follow a process first of occlusion and then of slow reperfusion as realistically as possible to simulate local cerebral ischemia. During this period, we used optical microangiography and Doppler OCT to obtain multiple hemodynamic MCA parameters. The change trend of these parameters from before to after ET-1 injection clearly reflects the dynamic regularity of the MCA. These results show the mechanism of the cerebral ischemia-reperfusion process after a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and confirm that OCT can be used to monitor hemodynamic parameters.

  14. Brazilein inhibits neuronal inflammation induced by cerebral ischemia and oxygen-glucose deprivation through targeting NOD2 expression.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-Jin; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Yuan, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Xin-Pei; Jiang, Jing-Fei; Lei, Fan; Xing, Dong-Ming; DU, Li-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Brazilein is reported to have immunosuppressive effect on cardiovascular and cerebral-vascular diseases. The essential roles of innate immunity in cerebral ischemia are increasingly identified, but no studies concerning the influence of brazilein on the innate immunity receptors have been reported. The present study was designed to investigate the regulation of NOD2 (Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2) by brazilein for its protection of neuron in cerebral ischemia in vivo and oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro. The results showed that brazilein could reverse the elevated expression of NOD2 and TNFα (tumor necrosis factor alpha) elicited by cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. This reduction could also be detected in normal mice and C17.2 cells, indicating that this suppressive effect of brazilein was correlated with NOD2. The results from GFP reporter plasmid assay suggested brazilein inhibited NOD2 gene transcription. In conclusion, brazilein could attenuate NOD2 and TNFα expression in cerebral ischemia and NOD2 may be one possible target of brazilein for its immune suppressive effect in neuro-inflammation. PMID:27478098

  15. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-07

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging.

  16. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging. PMID:27188686

  17. Efficacy of constraint-induced therapy on functional performance and health-related quality of life for children with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hsin, Yi-jung; Chen, Fei-Chuan; Lin, Keh-chung; Kang, Lin-ju; Chen, Chia-ling; Chen, Chung-yao

    2012-08-01

    To better generalize training effects to the context of daily living, home-based constraint-induced therapy has been proposed. Therapeutic success of constraint-induced therapy is limited as to whether the improvements in functional performance can be transferred to quality of life. This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the efficacy of home-based constraint-induced therapy on functional performance and health-related quality of life. Twenty-two children with spastic unilateral cerebral palsy (6-8 years, 10 boys) were randomly assigned to receive constraint-induced therapy or traditional rehabilitation. Home-based constraint-induced therapy had immediate and maintaining effects on motor efficacy and functional performance and induced greater gains in health-related quality of life in the long run than in the short term. The home-based constraint-induced therapy protocol (relatively moderate intensity and shortened constraint time), which might balance the effectiveness and compliance of participants and caregivers, may be an effective alternative to conventional constraint-induced therapy.

  18. Facilitating Mitochondrial Calcium Uptake Improves Activation-Induced Cerebral Blood Flow and Behavior after mTBI

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Madhuvika; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Kannurpatti, Sridhar S.

    2016-01-01

    Mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) leads to secondary neuronal loss via excitotoxic mechanisms, including mitochondrial Ca2+ overload. However, in the surviving cellular population, mitochondrial Ca2+ influx, and oxidative metabolism are diminished leading to suboptimal neuronal circuit activity and poor prognosis. Hence we tested the impact of boosting neuronal electrical activity and oxidative metabolism by facilitating mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in a rat model of mTBI. In developing rats (P25-P26) sustaining an mTBI, we demonstrate post-traumatic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the sensorimotor cortex in response to whisker stimulation compared to sham using functional Laser Doppler Imaging (fLDI) at adulthood (P67-P73). Compared to sham, whisker stimulation-evoked positive CBF responses decreased while negative CBF responses increased in the mTBI animals. The spatiotemporal CBF changes representing underlying neuronal activity suggested profound changes to neurovascular activity after mTBI. Behavioral assessment of the same cohort of animals prior to fLDI showed that mTBI resulted in persistent contralateral sensorimotor behavioral deficit along with ipsilateral neuronal loss compared to sham. Treating mTBI rats with Kaempferol, a dietary flavonol compound that enhanced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, eliminated the inter-hemispheric asymmetry in the whisker stimulation-induced positive CBF responses and the ipsilateral negative CBF responses otherwise observed in the untreated and vehicle-treated mTBI animals in adulthood. Kaempferol also improved somatosensory behavioral measures compared to untreated and vehicle treated mTBI animals without augmenting post-injury neuronal loss. The results indicate that reduced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in the surviving populations affect post-traumatic neural activation leading to persistent behavioral deficits. Improvement in sensorimotor behavior and spatiotemporal neurovascular activity following kaempferol

  19. The Comparisons of Cerebral Hemodynamics Induced by Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Arousal and Periodic Limb Movement with Arousal: A Pilot NIRS Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS) with periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS) are two sleep disorders characterized by repetitive respiratory or movement events associated with cortical arousals. We compared the cerebral hemodynamic changes linked to periodic apneas/hypopneas with arousals (AHA) in four OSA-patients with periodic limb movements (PLMA) with arousals in four patients with RLS-PLMS using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). AHA induced homogenous pattern of periodic fluctuations in oxygenated (HbO2) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin, i.e., the decrease of HbO2 was accompanied by an increase of HHb during the respiratory event and resolved to reverse pattern when cortical arousal started. Blood volume (BV) showed the same pattern as HHb but with relative smaller amplitude in most of the AHA events.These changing patterns were significant as Wilcoxon signed-rank tests gave p < 0.001 when comparing the area under the curve of these hemodynamic parameters to zero. By contrast, in PLMA limb movements induced periodic increments in HbO2 and BV (Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, p < 0.001), but HHb changed more heterogeneously even during the events coming from the same patient. Heart rate (HR) also showed different patterns between AHA and PLMA. It significantly decreased during the respiratory event (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then increased after the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001); while in PLMA HR first increased preceding the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then decreased. The results of this preliminary study show that both AHA and PLMA induce changes in cerebral hemodynamics. The occurrence of cortical arousal is accompanied by increased HR in both events, but by different BV changes (i.e., decreased/increased BV in AHA/PLMA, respectively). HR changes may partially account for the increased cerebral hemodynamics during PLMA

  20. The Comparisons of Cerebral Hemodynamics Induced by Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Arousal and Periodic Limb Movement with Arousal: A Pilot NIRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS) with periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS) are two sleep disorders characterized by repetitive respiratory or movement events associated with cortical arousals. We compared the cerebral hemodynamic changes linked to periodic apneas/hypopneas with arousals (AHA) in four OSA-patients with periodic limb movements (PLMA) with arousals in four patients with RLS-PLMS using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). AHA induced homogenous pattern of periodic fluctuations in oxygenated (HbO2) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin, i.e., the decrease of HbO2 was accompanied by an increase of HHb during the respiratory event and resolved to reverse pattern when cortical arousal started. Blood volume (BV) showed the same pattern as HHb but with relative smaller amplitude in most of the AHA events.These changing patterns were significant as Wilcoxon signed-rank tests gave p < 0.001 when comparing the area under the curve of these hemodynamic parameters to zero. By contrast, in PLMA limb movements induced periodic increments in HbO2 and BV (Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, p < 0.001), but HHb changed more heterogeneously even during the events coming from the same patient. Heart rate (HR) also showed different patterns between AHA and PLMA. It significantly decreased during the respiratory event (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then increased after the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001); while in PLMA HR first increased preceding the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then decreased. The results of this preliminary study show that both AHA and PLMA induce changes in cerebral hemodynamics. The occurrence of cortical arousal is accompanied by increased HR in both events, but by different BV changes (i.e., decreased/increased BV in AHA/PLMA, respectively). HR changes may partially account for the increased cerebral hemodynamics during PLMA

  1. The Comparisons of Cerebral Hemodynamics Induced by Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Arousal and Periodic Limb Movement with Arousal: A Pilot NIRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS) with periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS) are two sleep disorders characterized by repetitive respiratory or movement events associated with cortical arousals. We compared the cerebral hemodynamic changes linked to periodic apneas/hypopneas with arousals (AHA) in four OSA-patients with periodic limb movements (PLMA) with arousals in four patients with RLS-PLMS using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). AHA induced homogenous pattern of periodic fluctuations in oxygenated (HbO2) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin, i.e., the decrease of HbO2 was accompanied by an increase of HHb during the respiratory event and resolved to reverse pattern when cortical arousal started. Blood volume (BV) showed the same pattern as HHb but with relative smaller amplitude in most of the AHA events.These changing patterns were significant as Wilcoxon signed-rank tests gave p < 0.001 when comparing the area under the curve of these hemodynamic parameters to zero. By contrast, in PLMA limb movements induced periodic increments in HbO2 and BV (Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, p < 0.001), but HHb changed more heterogeneously even during the events coming from the same patient. Heart rate (HR) also showed different patterns between AHA and PLMA. It significantly decreased during the respiratory event (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then increased after the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001); while in PLMA HR first increased preceding the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then decreased. The results of this preliminary study show that both AHA and PLMA induce changes in cerebral hemodynamics. The occurrence of cortical arousal is accompanied by increased HR in both events, but by different BV changes (i.e., decreased/increased BV in AHA/PLMA, respectively). HR changes may partially account for the increased cerebral hemodynamics during PLMA

  2. Montelukast, a cysteinyl leukotriene receptor-1 antagonist protects against hippocampal injury induced by transient global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Saad, M A; Abdelsalam, R M; Kenawy, S A; Attia, A S

    2015-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) are potent pro-inflammatory and immune modulating lipid mediators involved in inflammatory diseases and were boosted in human brain after acute phase of cerebral ischemia. The antagonism of CysLTs receptors may offer protection against ischemic damage. Therefore it seemed interesting to study the possible neuroprotective effect of Montelukast, a CysLTR1 antagonist in global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury in rats. Global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion was induced by bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 15 min followed by 60 min reperfusion period. Animals were randomly allocated into three groups (n = 30 per group): Sham operated, I/R control and rats treated with montelukast (0.5 mg/kg, po) daily for 7 days then I/R was induced 1 h after the last dose of montelukast. After reperfusion rats were killed by decapitation, brains were removed and both hippocampi separated and the following biochemical parameters were estimated; lactate dehydrogenase activity, oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and reduced glutathione), inflammatory markers (myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, nuclear factor kappa-B, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10), apoptotic biomarkers (caspase 3 and cytochrome C), neurotransmitters (glutamate, gamma aminobutyric acid), Cys-LTs contents and CysLT1 receptor expression; as well as total brain infarct size and histopathological examination of the hippocampus were assessed. Montelukast protected hippocampal tissue by reducing oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic markers. Furthermore, it reduced glutamate and lactate dehydrogenase activity as well as infarct size elevated by I/R. These results were consistent with the histopathological findings. Montelukast showed a neuroprotective effects through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms. PMID:25403620

  3. Ruscogenin Attenuates Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction by Suppressing TXNIP/NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and the MAPK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guosheng; Jiang, Nan; Hu, Yang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Guangyun; Yin, Mingzhu; Ma, Xiaonan; Zhou, Kecheng; Qi, Jin; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Ruscogenin, an important steroid sapogenin derived from Ophiopogon japonicus, has been shown to inhibit cerebral ischemic injury. However, its potential molecular action on blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction after stroke remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ruscogenin on BBB dysfunction and the underlying mechanisms in middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (MCAO/R)-injured mice and oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R)-injured mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (bEnd.3). The results demonstrated that administration of ruscogenin (10 mg/kg) decreased the brain infarction and edema, improved neurological deficits, increased cerebral brain flow (CBF), ameliorated histopathological damage, reduced evans blue (EB) leakage and upregulated the expression of tight junctions (TJs) in MCAO/R-injured mice. Meanwhile, ruscogenin (0.1-10 µM) treatment increased cell viability and trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) value, decreased sodium fluorescein leakage, and modulated the TJs expression in OGD/R-induced bEnd.3 cells. Moreover, ruscogenin also inhibited the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and caspase-1, and markedly suppressed the expression of Nucleotide-binding domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) and thiredoxin-interactive protein (TXNIP) in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, ruscogenin decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and inhibited the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in OGD/R-induced bEnd.3 cells. Our findings provide some new insights into its potential application for the prevention and treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID:27589720

  4. Effectiveness of Constraint induced movement therapy as compared to bimanual therapy in Upper motor function outcome in child with hemiplegic Cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Zafer, Hira; Amjad, Imran; Malik, Arshad Nawaz; Shaukat, Enfall

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims at determining the effectiveness of constraint induced movement therapy as compared to bimanual therapy for improving functional status in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Methods: This study was a randomized control trial, children (n = 20) with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy was randomly allocated to CIMT (constraint induced movement therapy) and BMT (bimanual therapy) group. The children with spastic hemiplegia, age between 1.5 and 12 year and having 10 degrees of wrist extension and 10 degrees of finger extension were included in study. Treatment regime was two hours of daily training six days a week for two weeks. Constraint was applied to CIMT group for six hours. The outcome tool QUEST was used for baseline and post treatment assessment. Result: CIMT had superior outcome as compared to BMT in improving functional status (p=0.007). On QUEST tool grasp and dissociated movements results were significant (p=0.005) and (p=0.028) respectively. Weight bearing and protective extension resulted in no significant outcome (p=0.080) and (p=0.149) respectively. Dissociated movements and grasp are significantly improved but there is no difference for weight bearing and protective extension in CIMT treated group as compared to BMT treated group. Conclusion: CIMT approach is better in improving functional status of child with cerebral palsy as compared to BMT. Significant improvement in grasp and dissociated movement is noted in group of CIMT while there was no significant improvement in weight bearing and protective extension in CIMT group when compared to BMT. CIMT is considered the appropriate treatment approach for unilateral conditions while BMT for bilateral conditions. PMID:27022371

  5. Ruscogenin Attenuates Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction by Suppressing TXNIP/NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and the MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guosheng; Jiang, Nan; Hu, Yang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Guangyun; Yin, Mingzhu; Ma, Xiaonan; Zhou, Kecheng; Qi, Jin; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Ruscogenin, an important steroid sapogenin derived from Ophiopogon japonicus, has been shown to inhibit cerebral ischemic injury. However, its potential molecular action on blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction after stroke remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ruscogenin on BBB dysfunction and the underlying mechanisms in middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (MCAO/R)-injured mice and oxygen–glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R)-injured mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (bEnd.3). The results demonstrated that administration of ruscogenin (10 mg/kg) decreased the brain infarction and edema, improved neurological deficits, increased cerebral brain flow (CBF), ameliorated histopathological damage, reduced evans blue (EB) leakage and upregulated the expression of tight junctions (TJs) in MCAO/R-injured mice. Meanwhile, ruscogenin (0.1–10 µM) treatment increased cell viability and trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) value, decreased sodium fluorescein leakage, and modulated the TJs expression in OGD/R-induced bEnd.3 cells. Moreover, ruscogenin also inhibited the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and caspase-1, and markedly suppressed the expression of Nucleotide-binding domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) and thiredoxin-interactive protein (TXNIP) in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, ruscogenin decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and inhibited the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in OGD/R-induced bEnd.3 cells. Our findings provide some new insights into its potential application for the prevention and treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID:27589720

  6. Cerebral palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with pain and spasticity Place feeding tubes Release joint contractures ... the hip joint Injuries from falls Pressure sores Joint ... of the people who are affected by cerebral palsy) Social stigma

  7. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a ... ability to move and maintain balance and posture. CP is the most common motor disability in childhood. ...

  8. Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral arteriosclerosis is the result of thickening and hardening of the walls of the arteries in the ... cause an ischemic stroke. When the thickening and hardening is uneven, arterial walls can develop bulges (called ...

  9. Cerebral hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... death. Treatment depends on the cause of the hypoxia. Basic life support is most important. Treatment involves: Breathing ... Complications of cerebral hypoxia include a prolonged vegetative ... sleep-wake cycle, and eye opening, but the person is not alert ...

  10. Lactulose ameliorates cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats by inducing hydrogen by activating Nrf2 expression.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xiao; Chen, Xiao; Shi, Jiazi; Shi, Duo; Ye, Zhouheng; Liu, Wenwu; Li, Ming; Wang, Qijin; Kang, Zhimin; Bi, Hongda; Sun, Xuejun

    2013-12-01

    Molecular hydrogen has been proven effective in ameliorating cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury by selectively neutralizing reactive oxygen species. Lactulose can produce a considerable amount of hydrogen through fermentation by the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. To determine the neuroprotective effects of lactulose against cerebral I/R injury in rats and explore the probable mechanisms, we carried out this study. The stroke model was produced in Sprague-Dawley rats through middle cerebral artery occlusion. Intragastric administration of lactulose substantially increased breath hydrogen concentration. Behavioral and histopathological verifications matched biochemical findings. Behaviorally, rats in the lactulose administration group won higher neurological scores and showed shorter escape latency time in the Morris test. Morphologically, 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride showed smaller infarction volume; Nissl staining manifested relatively clear and intact neurons and TUNEL staining showed fewer apoptotic neurons. Biochemically, lactulose decreased brain malondialdehyde content, caspase-3 activity, and 3-nitrotyrosine and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine concentration and increased superoxide dismutase activity. The effects of lactulose were superior to those of edaravone. Lactulose orally administered activated the expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the brain as verified by RT-PCR and Western blot. The antibiotics suppressed the neuroprotective effects of lactulose by reducing hydrogen production. Our study for the first time demonstrates a novel therapeutic effect of lactulose on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and the probable underlying mechanisms. Lactulose intragastrically administered possessed neuroprotective effects on cerebral I/R injury in rats, which could be attributed to hydrogen production by the fermentation of lactulose through intestinal bacteria and Nrf2 activation.

  11. Triptan-induced contractile (5-HT1B receptor) responses in human cerebral and coronary arteries: relationship to clinical effect.

    PubMed

    Edvinsson, Lars; Uddman, Erik; Wackenfors, Angelica; Davenport, Anthony; Longmore, Jenny; Malmsjö, Malin

    2005-09-01

    Triptans are agonists at 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D (where 5-HT is 5-hydroxytryptamine; serotonin) receptors and cause vasoconstriction of isolated blood vessels. The aim of the present study was to determine vasoconstrictor potency (EC50) of triptans in human coronary and cerebral arteries and to examine whether there was any relationship with the maximal plasma concentrations (Cmax; nM) of the drugs achieved following oral administration of clinically relevant doses to man using values reported in the literature. We also examined the expression of 5-HT1B receptors in atherosclerotic and normal coronary arteries. The vasocontractile responses to sumatriptan, rizatriptan or eletriptan were characterized by in vitro pharmacology. The ratio of Cmax/EC50 was calculated. 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors were visualized by immunohistochemical techniques in coronary arteries. Sumatriptan, rizatriptan and eletriptan were powerful vasoconstrictors in cerebral artery. The rank order of agonist potency was eletriptan=rizatriptan=sumatriptan. In the coronary artery, the triptans were weaker vasoconstrictors. The rank order of potency was similar. In cerebral artery the ratio of Cmax/EC50 was not significantly different from unity, indicating a relationship between these two parameters. In general for the coronary artery, the ratios were significantly less than unity, indicating no direct relationship. Immunohistochemistry showed expression of 5-HT1B receptors in the medial layer, but did not reveal any obvious difference in 5-HT1B receptor expression between normal and atherosclerotic coronary arteries. The results support the notion that triptans are selective vasoconstrictors of cerebral arteries over coronary arteries and that there is a relationship between vasoconstrictor potency in cerebral arteries and clinically relevant plasma levels. PMID:15853772

  12. Preparation of the core-shell structure adriamycin lipiodol microemulsions and their synergistic anti-tumor effects with diethyldithiocarbamate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Daocheng, Wu; Mingxi, Wan

    2010-11-01

    We prepared the core-shell structure adriamycin lipiodol microemulsions (ADM-CSLMs) and evaluated their in vivo antitumor effects in combination with Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC). Two types of ADM-CSLMs, adriamycin liposome-lipiodol microemulsion(ADM-LLM) and adriamycin microsphere lipiodol microemulsion (ADM-MLM), were prepared through the emulsification method. The drug loading and encapsulation efficiency of ADM-CSLMs were measured by the high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC). The size and shape of the ADM-CSLMs were determined by an atom force microscopy (AFM), a transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and a particle size analyzer, respectively. The synergistic effects of DDC and ADM-CSLMs for cancer treatment of carcinoma drug-resistance cell was evaluated by the MTT method, the activation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was detected by chemiluminescence, and the ADM accumulation in cells was measured by flow cytometry. Walker-256 carcinoma was transplanted to the livers of the male SD rats, ADM-CSLMs were administrated to the livers of the rats by intervention hepatic artery embolization through microsurgery. The tumor growth and animal survival were evaluated. The results show that the average diameter of ADM-LLM and ADM-MLM were 4.23 ± 1.2 μm and 4.67 ± 1.4 μm, respectively, and their ADM encapsulation efficiency were 83.7% and 87.2% with respect to loading efficiency of 82 μg/ml and 91 μg/ml. The tumor growth and animal survival in two of the ADM-CSLMs combined with DDC groups were significantly higher than that of ADM only treatment, ADM liposome combined with DDC (P < 0.01), as well as the ADM microsphere combined with DDC (P < 0.01). Therefore, ADM-CSLMs are useful carriers for the treatment of carcinoma and their anti-tumor effect can be enhanced by DDC in a suitable concentration. PMID:20888179

  13. Intra-Arterial Rhenium-188 Lipiodol in the Treatment of Inoperable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Results of an IAEA-Sponsored Multination Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, Patricia; Raoul, Jean-Luc Vidmar, Gaj; Sereegotov, Erdenechimeg; Sundram, Felix X.; Kumar, Ajay; Jeong, Jae Min; Pusuwan, Pawana; Divgi, Chaitanya; Zanzonico, Pat; Stare, Janez; Buscombe, John; Chau Trinh Thi Minh; Saw, Maung Maung; Chen Shaoliang; Ogbac, Ruben; Padhy, Ajit K.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Intra-arterial injections (IAI) of 131I-lipiodol is effective in treating hepatocellular carcinoma patients, but is expensive and requires a 7-day hospitalization in a radioprotection room. 188Re is inexpensive, requires no patient isolation, and can be used with lipiodol. Methods and Materials: This International Atomic Energy Agency-sponsored phase II trial aimed to assess the safety and the efficacy of a radioconjugate 188Re + lipiodol (188Re-Lip) in a large cohort of hepatocellular carcinoma patients from developing countries. A scout dose is used to determine the maximal tolerated dose (lungs <12 Gy, normal liver <30 Gy, bone marrow <1.5 Gy) and then the delivery of the calculated activity. Efficacy was assessed using response evaluation criteria in solid tumor (RECIST) and alpha-feto-protein ({alpha}FP) levels and severe adverse events were graded using the Common Toxicity Criteria of the National Cancer Institute scale v2.0. Results: The trial included 185 patients from eight countries. The procedure was feasible in all participating centers. One treatment was given to 134 patients; 42, 8, and 1 received two, three, and four injections, respectively. The injected activity during the first treatment was 100 mCi. Tolerance was excellent. We observed three complete responses and 19 partial responses (22% of evaluable patients, 95% confidence interval 16-35%); 1- and 2-year survivals were 46% and 23%. Some factors affected survival: country of origin, existence of a cirrhosis, Cancer of the Liver Italian Program score, tumor dose, absence of progression, and posttreatment decrease in {alpha}FP level. Conclusions: IAI of 188Re-Lip in developing countries is feasible, safe, cost-effective, and deserves a phase III trial.

  14. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  15. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan. PMID:1095292

  16. Contributions of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and -2 to nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and injury from focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoling; Klaus, Judith A; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Zhenfeng; Kibler, Kathleen K; Andrabi, Shaida A; Rao, Karthik; Yang, Zeng-Jin; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L; Koehler, Raymond C

    2010-05-01

    Excessive oxidative damage to DNA leads to activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), accumulation of PAR polymers, translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria to the nucleus, and cell death. In this study, we compared the effect of gene deletion of PARP-1 and PARP-2, enzymes activated by DNA oxidative damage, in male mice subjected to 2 h of focal cerebral ischemia. Infarct volume at 3 days of reperfusion was markedly decreased to a similar extent in PARP-1- and PARP-2-null mice. The ischemia-induced increase in nuclear AIF accumulation was largely suppressed in both knockout genotypes. The transient increase in PAR during early reperfusion was nearly blocked in PARP-1-null mice, but only moderately decreased at 1-h reperfusion in PARP-2-null mice. Differences in the tissue volume at risk, as assessed by arterial casts and autoradiographic analysis of regional blood flow, did not fully account for the large reductions in AIF translocation and infarct volume in both PARP null mice. Cell death was attenuated in PARP-2-null neurons exposed to a submaximal concentration of 100 microM NMDA for 5 min, but not in those exposed to a near-maximal toxic concentration of 500 microM NMDA. We conclude that PARP-2 contributes substantially to nuclear translocation of AIF and infarct size after transient focal cerebral ischemia in male mice, but that protection is disproportionate to the attenuation of overall PARP activity.

  17. Warming Effect on Miriplatin-Lipiodol Suspension as a Chemotherapeutic Agent for Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Preliminary Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kora, Shinn-ichi; Urakawa, Hiroshi; Mitsufuji, Toshimichi; Osame, Akinobu; Higashihara, Hideyuki; Yoshimitsu, Kengo

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo retrospectively elucidate the preliminary clinical impact of warmed miriplatin-lipiodol suspension (MPT-LPD) when used as a chemotherapeutic agent for transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and MethodsBetween June and December 2010, TACE was performed with MPT-LPD at room temperature (RT group), and after January 2011, TACE with MPT-LPD warmed to 40 Degree-Sign C was performed (W group). The intraarterial appearance of MPT-LPD immediately after injection through microcatheters at the second-order branches was compared between the two groups with a 5-point grading system. Local therapeutic effects of HCCs as assessed by follow-up computed tomography (CT) obtained 1-3 months after TACE were compared between the groups with a 4-point grading system (TE1-TE4). After April 2011, angiography-assisted CT was routinely performed at TACE, and HCCs that revealed apparent corona enhancement (CE) were retrospectively selected. The degree of concordance between CE and MPT-LPD accumulation as assessed by CT immediately after TACE was assessed with a 3-point grading scale.ResultsMPT-LPD therapy resulted in a smooth and continuous appearance in the W group (grades 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 were, respectively, 1, 2, 11, 18, and 4) compared to the RT group (4, 0, 1, 2, and 0). The W group (TE1, TE2, TE3, and TE4 were 1, 9, 11, and 12) revealed better local therapeutic effects than the RT group (6, 3, 9, and 0) (p < 0.05). CE was found in 26 HCC nodules, and concordance between CE and MPT-LPD accumulation was observed in 66 % (grades 1, 2, and 3 were, respectively, 2, 8, and 19).ConclusionWarmed MPT-LPD flowed more smoothly within vascular lumen, passed through tumor sinusoid of HCC, and had better local therapeutic effects at short-term observation than MPT-LPD at room temperature.

  18. Hyperthermia-induced seizures alter adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    León-Navarro, David Agustín; Albasanz, José L; Martín, Mairena

    2015-08-01

    Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The neuromodulator adenosine exerts anticonvulsant actions through binding adenosine receptors. Here, the impact of hyperthermia-induced seizures on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity has been studied at different periods in the cerebral cortical area by using radioligand binding, real-time PCR, and 5'-nucleotidase activity assays. Hyperthermic seizures were induced in 13-day-old rats using a warmed air stream from a hair dryer. Neonates exhibited rearing and falling over associated with hindlimb clonus seizures (stage 5 on Racine scale criteria) after hyperthermic induction. A significant increase in A1 receptor density was observed using [(3) H]DPCPX as radioligand, and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density was detected, using [(3) H]ZM241385 as radioligand, 48 h after hyperthermia-evoked convulsions. These short-term changes in A1 and A2A receptors were also accompanied by a loss of 5'-nucleotidase activity. No significant variations either in A1 or A2A receptor density or 5'-nucleotidase were observed 5 and 20 days after hyperthermic seizures. Taken together, both regulation of A1 and A2A receptors and loss of 5'-nucleotidase in the cerebral cortex suggest the existence of a neuroprotective mechanism against seizures. Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The consequences of hyperthermia-induced seizures (animal model of febrile seizures) on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity have been studied at different periods in cerebral cortical area. A significant increase in A1 receptor density and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density and 5'-nucleotidase activity was detected 48 h after convulsions evoked by hyperthermia

  19. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  20. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  1. Effects and Mechanism of Action of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase on Apoptosis in a Rat Model of Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Ding, Junli; Wang, Jianwei; Zhou, Changman; Zhang, Weiguang

    2016-02-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is a key enzyme in regulating nitric oxide (NO) synthesis under stress, and NO has varying ability to regulate apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and possible mechanism of action of iNOS on neuronal apoptosis in a rat model of cerebral focal ischemia and reperfusion injury in rats treated with S-methylisothiourea sulfate (SMT), a high-selective inhibitor of iNOS. Seventy-two male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups: the sham, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) + vehicle, and MCAO + SMT groups. Neurobehavioral deficits, infarct zone size, and cortical neuron morphology were evaluated through the modified Garcia scores, 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC), and Nissl staining, respectively. Brain tissues and serum samples were collected at 72 hr post-reperfusion for immunohistochemical analysis, Western blotting, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin Nick End Labeling assay (TUNEL) staining, and enzyme assays. The study found that inhibition of iNOS significantly attenuated the severity of the pathological changes observed as a result of ischemia-reperfusion injury: SMT reduced NO content as well as total nitric oxide synthase (tNOS) and iNOS activities in both ischemic cerebral hemisphere and serum, improved neurobehavioral scores, reduced mortality, reduced the infarct volume ratio, attenuated morphological changes in cortical neurons, decreased the rate of apoptosis (TUNEL and caspase-3-positive), and increased phospho (p)-AKT expression in ischemic penumbra. These results suggested that inhibition of iNOS might reduce the severity of ischemia-reperfusion injury by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis via maintaining p-AKT activity.

  2. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Colver, Allan; Fairhurst, Charles; Pharoah, Peter O D

    2014-04-01

    The syndrome of cerebral palsy encompasses a large group of childhood movement and posture disorders. Severity, patterns of motor involvement, and associated impairments such as those of communication, intellectual ability, and epilepsy vary widely. Overall prevalence has remained stable in the past 40 years at 2-3·5 cases per 1000 livebirths, despite changes in antenatal and perinatal care. The few studies available from developing countries suggest prevalence of comparable magnitude. Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder; approaches to intervention, whether at an individual or environmental level, should recognise that quality of life and social participation throughout life are what individuals with cerebral palsy seek, not improved physical function for its own sake. In the past few years, the cerebral palsy community has learned that the evidence of benefit for the numerous drugs, surgery, and therapies used over previous decades is weak. Improved understanding of the role of multiple gestation in pathogenesis, of gene environment interaction, and how to influence brain plasticity could yield significant advances in treatment of the disorder. Reduction in the prevalence of post-neonatal cerebral palsy, especially in developing countries, should be possible through improved nutrition, infection control, and accident prevention.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Coinfection Has No Impact on Plasmodium berghei ANKA-Induced Experimental Cerebral Malaria in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Blank, Jannike; Behrends, Jochen; Jacobs, Thomas; Schneider, Bianca E

    2016-02-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe complication of human infection with Plasmodium falciparum. The mechanisms predisposing to CM are still not fully understood. Proinflammatory immune responses are required for the control of blood-stage malaria infection but are also implicated in the pathogenesis of CM. A fine balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses is required for parasite clearance without the induction of host pathology. The most accepted experimental model to study human CM is Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbANKA) infection in C57BL/6 mice that leads to the development of a complex neurological syndrome which shares many characteristics with the human disease. We applied this model to study the outcome of PbANKA infection in mice previously infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is coendemic with malaria in large regions in the tropics, and mycobacteria have been reported to confer some degree of unspecific protection against rodent Plasmodium parasites in experimental coinfection models. We found that concomitant M. tuberculosis infection did not change the clinical course of PbANKA-induced experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in C57BL/6 mice. The immunological environments in spleen and brain did not differ between singly infected and coinfected animals; instead, the overall cytokine and T cell responses in coinfected mice were comparable to those in animals solely infected with PbANKA. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis coinfection is not able to change the outcome of PbANKA-induced disease, most likely because the inflammatory response induced by the parasite rapidly dominates in mice previously infected with M. tuberculosis.

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Coinfection Has No Impact on Plasmodium berghei ANKA-Induced Experimental Cerebral Malaria in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Jannike; Behrends, Jochen; Jacobs, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe complication of human infection with Plasmodium falciparum. The mechanisms predisposing to CM are still not fully understood. Proinflammatory immune responses are required for the control of blood-stage malaria infection but are also implicated in the pathogenesis of CM. A fine balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses is required for parasite clearance without the induction of host pathology. The most accepted experimental model to study human CM is Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbANKA) infection in C57BL/6 mice that leads to the development of a complex neurological syndrome which shares many characteristics with the human disease. We applied this model to study the outcome of PbANKA infection in mice previously infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is coendemic with malaria in large regions in the tropics, and mycobacteria have been reported to confer some degree of unspecific protection against rodent Plasmodium parasites in experimental coinfection models. We found that concomitant M. tuberculosis infection did not change the clinical course of PbANKA-induced experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in C57BL/6 mice. The immunological environments in spleen and brain did not differ between singly infected and coinfected animals; instead, the overall cytokine and T cell responses in coinfected mice were comparable to those in animals solely infected with PbANKA. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis coinfection is not able to change the outcome of PbANKA-induced disease, most likely because the inflammatory response induced by the parasite rapidly dominates in mice previously infected with M. tuberculosis. PMID:26644378

  5. Sustained subcutaneous infusion of nicotine enhances cholinergic vasodilation in the cerebral cortex induced by stimulation of the nucleus basalis of Meynert in rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae; Hotta, Harumi; Misawa, Hidemi; Kawashima, Koichiro

    2011-03-11

    The present study examined the effects of sustained nicotine exposure on the cholinergic vasodilative system originating in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) and projecting to the cerebral cortex in rats. Rats received sustained subcutaneous nicotine (100μg/kg/h) for 14 days. Under urethane anesthesia, the vasodilation response and acetylcholine release in the parietal cortex induced by electrical stimulation of the NBM (10-200μA) were measured. The basal level of acetylcholine release was significantly higher in nicotine-treated rats than in saline-treated control rats. In the control rats, both the acetylcholine release and blood flow were increased by NBM stimulation in a stimulus intensity-dependent manner, and a threshold of 50μA. In nicotine-treated rats, the threshold intensity of NBM stimulation producing increases in acetylcholine release and blood flow was reduced to 20μA. The stimulus intensity-dependent acetylcholine release and vasodilation by NBM stimulation were significantly larger in nicotine-treated rats than in control rats. We conclude that sustained subcutaneous infusion of nicotine enhances cholinergic vasodilative system in the cerebral cortex originating in the NBM.

  6. [Neuroprotective activity of the proline-containing dipeptide noopept on the model of brain ischemia induced by the middle cerebral artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Gavrilova, S A; Us, K S; Ostrovskaia, R U; Koshelev, V B

    2006-01-01

    The influence of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester, GVS-111) on the extent of ischemic cortical stroke was investigated in experiments on white mongrel male rats with ischemia induced by a combination of the middle cerebral artery occlusion with ipsilateral common carotid artery ligation. Animals were treated with noopept (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) according to the following schedule: 15 min and 2, 24, and 48 h after the occlusion. Test rats were decapitated 72 h after occlusion, brains were extracted and frozen, and thin brain slices were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. The slices were scanned and processed using Auc 1 computer program, which estimates the percentage of damaged area relative to that of the whole ipsilateral hemisphere. The conditions of coagulation the distal segment of middle cerebral artery were selected, which caused necrosis localized in the fronto-parietal and dorso-lateral regions of the brain cortex without any damage of subcortical structures. The extent of the brain damage in control group (treated by saline) was 18.6%, while that in the group treated with noopept was 12.2%, thus demonstrating a decrease in the infarction area by 34.5% (p < 05). The data on noopept efficacy on the model of the extensive ischemic injury of brain cortex show that this drug has good prospects for use in the neuroprotective treatment of stroke. PMID:16995431

  7. Fluoxetine ameliorates cognitive impairments induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion via down-regulation of HCN2 surface expression in the hippocampal CA1 area in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pan; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Lu, Yun; Chen, Cheng; Li, Changjun; Zhou, Mei; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; Shen, Guanxin; Guo, Lianjun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) causes cognitive impairments and increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) through several biologically plausible pathways, yet the underlying neurobiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), could play a neuroprotective role against chronic cerebral hypoperfusion injury and to clarify underlying mechanisms of its efficacy. Rats were subjected to permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO). Two weeks later, rats were treated with 30 mg/kg fluoxetine (intragastric injection, i.g.) for 6 weeks. Cognitive function was evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM) and novel objects recognition (NOR) test. Long-term potentiation (LTP) was used to address the underlying synaptic mechanisms. Western blotting was used to quantify the protein levels. Our results showed that fluoxetine treatment significantly improved the cognitive impairments caused by 2VO, accompanied with a reversion of 2VO-induced inhibitory of LTP. Furthermore, 2VO caused an up-regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 2 (HCN2) surface expressions in the hippocampal CA1 area and fluoxetine also effectively recovered the disorder of HCN2 surface expressions, which may be a possible mechanism that fluoxetine treatment ameliorates cognitive impairments in rats with CCH. PMID:26549214

  8. 3-Nitropropionic acid-induced ischemia tolerance in the rat brain is mediated by reduced metabolic activity and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Bracko, Oliver; Di Pietro, Valentina; Lazzarino, Giacomo; Amorini, Angela M; Tavazzi, Barbara; Artmann, Judith; Wong, Eric C; Buxton, Richard B; Weller, Michael; Luft, Andreas R; Wegener, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Tissue tolerance to ischemia can be achieved by noxious stimuli that are below a threshold to cause irreversible damage (‘preconditioning'). Understanding the mechanisms underlying preconditioning may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets for diseases such as stroke. We here used the oxidative chain inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid (NPA) to induce ischemia tolerance in a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and structural integrity were characterized by longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with behavioral, histologic, and biochemical assessment of NPA-preconditioned animals and controls. Using this approach we show that the ischemia-tolerant state is characterized by a lower energy charge potential and lower CBF, indicating a reduced baseline metabolic demand, and therefore a cellular mechanism of neural protection. Blood vessel density and structural integrity were not altered by NPA treatment. When subjected to MCAO, preconditioned animals had a characteristic MRI signature consisting of enhanced CBF maintenance within the ischemic territory and intraischemic reversal of the initial cytotoxic edema, resulting in reduced infarct volumes. Thus, our data show that tissue protection through preconditioning occurs early during ischemia and indicate that a reduced cellular metabolism is associated with tissue tolerance to ischemia. PMID:24938399

  9. Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined with Bimanual Training (mCIMT-BiT) in Children with Unilateral Spastic Cerebral Palsy: How Are Improvements in Arm-Hand Use Established?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarts, Pauline B.; Jongerius, Peter H.; Geerdink, Yvonne A.; van Limbeek, Jacques; Geurts, Alexander C.

    2011-01-01

    A recent randomized controlled trial indicated that modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy followed by Bimanual Training (mCIMT-BiT) is an effective intervention to improve spontaneous use of the affected upper limb in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The present study aimed to investigate how the above-mentioned…

  10. Pressure changes within the sac of human cerebral aneurysms in response to artificially induced transient increases in systemic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Hasan, David M; Hindman, Bradley J; Todd, Michael M

    2015-08-01

    Formation and rupture of cerebral aneurysms have been associated with chronic hypertension. The effect of transient increase in blood pressure and its effect on intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics have not been studied. We examined the effects of controlled increases in blood pressure on different pressure parameters inside the sac of human cerebral aneurysms and corresponding parent arteries using invasive technology. Twelve patients (10 female, 2 male, age 54±15 years) with unruptured cerebral aneurysms undergoing endovascular coiling were recruited. Dual-sensor microwires with the capacity to simultaneously measure flow velocity and pressure were used to measure systolic, diastolic, and mean pressure inside the aneurysm sac and to measure both pressures and flow velocities in the feeder vessel just outside the aneurysm. These pressures were recorded simultaneously with pressures from a radial arterial catheter. Measurements were taken at baseline and then during a gradual increase in systemic systolic blood pressure to a target value of ≈25 mm Hg above baseline, using a phenylephrine infusion. The dose needed to achieve the required increase in radial arterial systolic blood pressure was 0.8±0.2 μg/kg/min. There was a clear linear relationship between changes in radial and aneurysmal pressures with substantial patient-by-patient variation in the slopes of those relationships. The overall increases in systolic and mean pressures in both radial artery and in the aneurysms were similar. Pressures in the aneurysm and in the parent vessels were similar. Peak and mean flow velocities in the parent arteries did not change significantly with phenylephrine infusion, nor did vessel diameters as measured angiographically.

  11. Heat shock pretreatment may protect against heatstroke-induced circulatory shock and cerebral ischemia by reducing oxidative stress and energy depletion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jui-Ling; Ke, Der-Shin; Lin, Mao-Tsun

    2005-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying the protective effects of heat shock pretreatment on heatstroke remain unclear. Here we attempted to ascertain whether the possible occurrence of oxidative stress and energy depletion exhibited during heatstroke can be reduced by heat shock preconditioning. In the present study, colonic temperature, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, striatal levels of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72), local Po2, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, cellular ischemia and damage markers, dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), lipid peroxidation, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and reductase activities, and ATP were assayed in normothermic control rats and in heatstroke rats with or without preconditioning 16 or 96 h before initiation of heatstroke. Heatstroke was induced by exposing the anesthetized rats to a high ambient temperature (Ta = 43 degrees C) until the moment at which MAP decreased from its peak level. Sublethal heat shock pretreatment 16 h before initiation of heatstroke, in addition to increasing striatal HSP72 levels, conferred significant protection against heatstroke-induced arterial hypotension, striatal ischemia and damage, increment of hydroxyl radical formation, lipid peroxidation, glutathione oxidation, and decrement of glutathione peroxidase activity and ATP. However, at 96 h after heat shock, when striatal HSP72 expression returned to basal levels, the above responses that occurred during onset of heatstroke were indistinguishable between the two groups. These results suggest that heat shock pretreatment induces HSP72 overexpression in striatum and confers protection against heatstroke-induced striatal ischemia and damage by reducing oxidative stress and energy depletion.

  12. Resting State and Diffusion Neuroimaging Predictors of Clinical Improvements Following Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in Children With Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Manning, Kathryn Y; Fehlings, Darcy; Mesterman, Ronit; Gorter, Jan Willem; Switzer, Lauren; Campbell, Craig; Menon, Ravi S

    2015-10-01

    The aim was to identify neuroimaging predictors of clinical improvements following constraint-induced movement therapy. Resting state functional magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging data was acquired in 7 children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were acquired at baseline and 1 month later following a 3-week constraint therapy regimen. A more negative baseline laterality index characterizing an atypical unilateral sensorimotor resting state network significantly correlated with an improvement in the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure score (r = -0.81, P = .03). A more unilateral network with decreased activity in the affected hemisphere was associated with greater improvements in clinical scores. Higher mean diffusivity in the posterior limb of the internal capsule of the affect tract correlated significantly with improvements in the Jebsen-Taylor score (r = -0.83, P = .02). Children with more compromised networks and tracts improved the most following constraint therapy.

  13. Prolonged waking reduces human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein 120- or tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis in the cerebral cortex of rats.

    PubMed

    Montes-Rodríguez, Corinne J; Alavez, Silvestre; Elder, John H; Haro, Reyes; Morán, Julio; Prospéro-García, Oscar

    2004-04-29

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) induces neuronal death, presumably by apoptosis. This effect may be triggered by the glycoprotein 120 (HIVgp120) released by HIV when infecting a cell, and mediated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), a pro-inflammatory cytokine. Both molecules, HIVgp120 and TNFalpha, increase sleep when administered acutely in the brain. On the other hand, sleep deprivation increases the levels of several growth factors. In this context, we challenged rats with HIVgp120 or TNFalpha simultaneously with sleep deprivation. Our results indicate that both HIVgp120 and TNFalpha increase neuronal death in the rat cerebral cortex, but not hippocampus, and that this effect is completely prevented by total deprivation of sleep. These results suggest that acute total deprivation of sleep protects against the HIVgp120 and TNFalpha deleterious effects.

  14. The Degree of Lipiodol Accumulation Can Be an Indicator of Successful Treatment for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Patients - in the Case of Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization (TACE) and External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Wang, Bin-Liang; Zhang, Jian-Ying; Fan, Jia; Zhou, Jian; Hu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) results in improved survival due to better local control in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The purpose of this study was to investigate lipiodol accumulation, as it reflects tumor burden and is a potential prognostic factor, in HCC patients treated with TACE/EBRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 147 patients with unresectable HCC treated with TACE and EBRT. Clinical features, adverse reactions, and prognostic factors were analyzed. All patients were treated with TACE 1-6 times in combination with EBRT (44-66 Gy) in dose of 2 Gy/fraction given once a day five times a week. Tumor status and laboratory findings were followed. The degree of lipiodol accumulation was assessed by computed tomography before EBRT, and was categorized as either complete/intense or low/moderate. Results: The response rate of tumor size after EBRT was 68.2%, median survival was 23.1 months, and overall survival rates were 86.6%, 49.2%, and 28.2% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that lower hemoglobin levels, higher alkaline phosphatase levels, Child-Pugh B, negative alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) response after EBRT, poor treatment response after EBRT, tumor diameter >10 cm, and poor lipiodol accumulation were unfavorable prognostic factors. On multivariate analysis, higher hemoglobin levels, Child-Pugh A, decreased AFP levels after treatment, Helical Tomotherapy (HT) and intense lipiodol accumulation after TACE were significant favorable predictors. Conclusions: The degree of lipiodol accumulation before EBRT is a prognostic factor in patients with unresectable HCC. Increased AFP levels after EBRT are always associated with poor survival. HT is recommended as a potentially better EBRT modality than three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). PMID:27471557

  15. Iterative image reconstruction for cerebral perfusion CT using a pre-contrast scan induced edge-preserving prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Yang; Huang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Feng, Qianjing; Chen, Wufan

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral perfusion x-ray computed tomography (PCT) imaging, which detects and characterizes the ischemic penumbra, and assesses blood-brain barrier permeability with acute stroke or chronic cerebrovascular diseases, has been developed extensively over the past decades. However, due to its sequential scan protocol, the associated radiation dose has raised significant concerns to patients. Therefore, in this study we developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) principle to yield a clinically acceptable cerebral PCT image with lower milliampere-seconds (mA s). To preserve the edges of the reconstructed image, an edge-preserving prior was designed using a normal-dose pre-contrast unenhanced scan. For simplicity, the present algorithm was termed as ‘MAP-ndiNLM’. Evaluations with the digital phantom and the simulated low-dose clinical brain PCT datasets clearly demonstrate that the MAP-ndiNLM method can achieve more significant gains than the existing FBP and MAP-Huber algorithms with better image noise reduction, low-contrast object detection and resolution preservation. More importantly, the MAP-ndiNLM method can yield more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps than the MAP-Huber method.

  16. Iterative image reconstruction for cerebral perfusion CT using pre-contrast scan induced edge-preserving prior

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Yang; Huang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Feng, Qianjing; Chen, Wufan

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion X-ray computed tomography (PCT) imaging, which detects and characterizes the ischemic penumbra, and assesses blood-brain barrier permeability with acute stroke or chronic cerebrovascular diseases, has been developed extensively over the past decades. However, due to its sequential scan protocol, the associated radiation dose has raised significant concerns to patients. Therefore, in this study we developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) principle to yield a clinically acceptable cerebral PCT image with lower milliampere seconds (mAs). To preserve the edges of the reconstructed image, an edge-preserving prior was designed using a normal-dose pre-contrast unenhanced scan. For simplicity, the present algorithm was termed as “MAP-ndiNLM”. Evaluations with the digital phantom and the simulated low-dose clinical brain PCT datasets clearly demonstrate that the MAP-ndiNLM method can achieve more significant gains than the existing FBP and MAP-Huber algorithms with better image noise reduction, low-contrast object detection and resolution preservation. More importantly, the MAP-ndiNLM method can yield more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps than the MAP-Huber method. PMID:23104003

  17. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion induces memory deficits and facilitates Aβ generation in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingxi; Du, Yehong; Wang, Kejian; Xu, Ge; Luo, Shifang; He, Guiqiong

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia frequently responsible for cognitive decline in the elderly. The etiology and molecular mechanism of AD pathogenesis remain inconclusive. Aging and vascular factors are important independent causes and contributors to sporadic AD. Clinical imaging studies showed that cerebral blood flow decreases before cognitive impairment in patients with AD. To investigate the effect of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) on cognitive impairment and morphological features, we developed a new manner of CCH mouse model by narrowing bilateral common carotid arteries. Mice started to manifest spatial memory deficits 1month after the surgery and exhibited behavioral changes in a time-dependent manner. Mice also presented memory deficits accompanied with morphological changes at the neuronal and synaptic levels. CCH damaged the normal neuronal morphology and significantly reduced the expression level of PSD95. CCH activated astrocytes, increased the co-expression of GFAP and AQP4, and destroyed the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Furthermore, CCH facilitated intracellular and extracellular Aβ deposition by up-regulating γ-secretase and β-secretase levels. Our results showed good reproducibility of post-CCH pathological processes, which are characterized by neuronal apoptosis, axonal abnormalities, glial activation, BBB damage, amyloid deposition, and cognitive dysfunction; these processes may be used to decipher the complex interplay and pathological process between CCH and AD. This study provides laboratory evidence for the prevention and treatment of cognitive malfunction and AD. PMID:27421879

  18. Effects of Buprenorphine and Meloxicam Analgesia on Induced Cerebral Ischemia in C57BL/6 Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Fauerby, Natasha; Raida, Zindy; Kalliokoski, Otto; Hau, Jann; Johansen, Flemming F; Abelson, Klas SP

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory mice constitute an extensively used model to study the pathologic and functional outcomes of cerebral ischemic stroke. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model requires surgical intervention, which potentially can result in postsurgical pain and stress. In the present study, we investigated whether buprenorphine and meloxicam, at clinically relevant doses provided pain relief without altering infarct volume in male C57BL/6 mice. Common known side-effects of buprenorphine, including decreased food consumption, were noted after surgery in buprenorphine-treated mice, but these effects were brief and seen only during the treatment period. Fecal corticosterone metabolites did not differ significantly between the groups. In the present study, buprenorphine treatment did not alter infarction volume when compared with that of mice that did not receive analgesia. In contrast, meloxicam treatment significantly reduced infarct volume and may be a confounder if used as an analgesic during MCAO surgery. Furthermore, investigation of behavioral profiles by using an automated behavioral scoring system showed that rearing and sniffing behaviors decreased as infarct volume increased. This suggests that studies of exploratory behavior may aid in developing new markers of short-term stroke-related behavioral deficiencies in laboratory mice. PMID:23582417

  19. Induction of Nerve Injury-Induced Protein 1 (Ninjurin 1) in Myeloid Cells in Rat Brain after Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Hahnbie; Luo, Lidan

    2016-01-01

    Nerve injury-induced protein-1 (Ninjurin-1, Ninj1) was initially identified as a novel adhesion molecule in rat sciatic nerve and to be up-regulated in neurons and Schwann cells of distal nerve segments after nerve transection or crush injury. Recently, Ninj1 was found to act as a modulator of cell migration, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that innate immune response plays beneficial and deleterious roles in brain ischemia, and the trans-endothelial migration of blood-derived immune cells is key initiator of this response. In the present study, we examined the expression profile and cellular distribution of Ninj1 in rat brain after transient focal cerebral ischemia. Ninj1 expression was found to be significantly induced in cortical penumbras 1 day after 60 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and to increase gradually for 8 days and then declined. In infarction cores of cortices, patterns of Ninj1 expression were similar to those observed in cortical penumbras, except induction was maintained for 10 days. At 1 day post-MCAO, Ninj1 inductions were detected mainly in neutrophils and endothelial cells in both infarction cores and penumbras, but reactive macrophages were the major cellular expressers of Ninj1 at 4 days post-MCAO. Expressional induction in reactive macrophages was maintained in infarction cores after 12 days post-MCAO but not in penumbras. These dynamic expressions of Ninj1 in different immune cells at different times suggest that this protein performs various, critical roles in the modulation of acute and delayed immune responses in the postischemic brain. PMID:27122992

  20. Protective mechanisms of CA074-me (other than cathepsin-B inhibition) against programmed necrosis induced by global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Wang, Jingye; Song, Xinghui; Wei, Ruili; He, Fangping; Peng, Guoping; Luo, Benyan

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the key role of lysosomes in ischemic cell death in the brain and have led to the "lysosomocentric" hypothesis. In this hypothesis, the release of cathepsin-B due to a change of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) or rupture is critical, and this can be prevented by its inhibitors CA074 and CA074-me. However, the role of CA074-me in neuronal death and its effect on the change of lysosomal membrane integrity after global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is not clear, so we investigated this here. Rat hippocampal CA1 neuronal death was evaluated after 20-min global cerebral I/R injury. CA074-me (1 μg, 10 μg) were given intracerebroventricularly 1h before ischemia or 1h post reperfusion. The changes of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), cathepsin-B, lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1), receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3), and the change of lysosomal pH were evaluated respectively. Hippocampal CA1 neuronal programmed necrosis induced by global cerebral I/R injury was prevented by CA074-me both pre-treatment and post-treatment. Diffuse cytoplasmic cathepsin-B and LAMP-1 immunostaining synchronized with the pyknotic nuclear changes 2 days post reperfusion, and a rise of lysosomal pH with the leakage of DND-153, a dye of lysosomes, after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) was detected. Both of these changes demonstrated the rupture of lysosomal membrane and the leakage of cathepsin-B, and this was strongly inhibited by CA074-me pre-treatment. The overexpression and nuclear translocation of RIP3 and the reduction of NAD(+) level after I/R injury were also inhibited, while the upregulation of Hsp70 was strengthened by CA074-me pre-treatment. Delayed fulminant leakage of cathepsin-B due to lysosomal rupture is a critical harmful factor in neuronal programmed necrosis induced by 20-min global I/R injury. In addition to being an inhibitor of cathepsin-B, CA074-me may have an indirect neuroprotective effect by

  1. Voluntary suppression of hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation mitigates the reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity during exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Bun; Honda, Yasushi; Ikebe, Yusuke; Fujii, Naoto; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2015-04-15

    Hyperthermia during prolonged exercise leads to hyperventilation, which can reduce arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2 ) and, in turn, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and thermoregulatory response. We investigated 1) whether humans can voluntarily suppress hyperthermic hyperventilation during prolonged exercise and 2) the effects of voluntary breathing control on PaCO2 , CBF, sweating, and skin blood flow. Twelve male subjects performed two exercise trials at 50% of peak oxygen uptake in the heat (37°C, 50% relative humidity) for up to 60 min. Throughout the exercise, subjects breathed normally (normal-breathing trial) or they tried to control their minute ventilation (respiratory frequency was timed with a metronome, and target tidal volumes were displayed on a monitor) to the level reached after 5 min of exercise (controlled-breathing trial). Plotting ventilatory and cerebrovascular responses against esophageal temperature (Tes) showed that minute ventilation increased linearly with rising Tes during normal breathing, whereas controlled breathing attenuated the increased ventilation (increase in minute ventilation from the onset of controlled breathing: 7.4 vs. 1.6 l/min at +1.1°C Tes; P < 0.001). Normal breathing led to decreases in estimated PaCO2 and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAV) with rising Tes, but controlled breathing attenuated those reductions (estimated PaCO2 -3.4 vs. -0.8 mmHg; MCAV -10.4 vs. -3.9 cm/s at +1.1°C Tes; P = 0.002 and 0.011, respectively). Controlled breathing had no significant effect on chest sweating or forearm vascular conductance (P = 0.67 and 0.91, respectively). Our results indicate that humans can voluntarily suppress hyperthermic hyperventilation during prolonged exercise, and this suppression mitigates changes in PaCO2 and CBF.

  2. Cocaine-induced changes in the expression of apoptosis-related genes in the fetal mouse cerebral wall.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Svetlana I; He, Fang; Bai, Jie; Badan, Irina; Lidow, Irina A; Lidow, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that exposure to cocaine increases cell death in the fetal CNS. To examine the molecular mechanisms of this effect, we employed mouse oligo microarrays followed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) to compare expressions of apoptosis-related genes in the cerebral wall of 18-day-old (E18) fetuses from cocaine-treated (20 mg/kg cocaine, s.c., b.i.d., E8th-E18th) and drug-naive (saline, s.c.) mice. Out of approximately 400 relevant genes in the arrays, 53 showed alterations in expression in cocaine-exposed fetuses. Upregulation was observed in 35 proapoptotic and 8 antiapoptotic genes; 4 proapoptotic and 6 antiapoptotic genes were down-regulated. The affected genes encode a wide range of apoptosis-related proteins, including death receptors (NTF-R1, NTF-R2, DR3, DR5, LTbeta-R, GITR, P57 TR-1) and their adaptor and regulatory proteins (MASGE-D1, TRAF-2, SIVA, MET, FLIP, FAIM, IAP1, ATFA), members of transcription regulatory pathways (JNK, NF-kappaB, P53), members of BCL-2 family of proteins (BID, BAD, BAX, BIK, NIP21, NIP3, NIX, BCL-2), DNA damage sensor (PARP-1), caspases and their substrates and regulatory proteins (caspases 8, 4, 9, and 3, ACINUS, CIDE-A, CIDE-B, GAS2), mitochondrially released factors (cytochrome c, AIF, PRG3), specific endoplasmic reticulum- and oxidative stress-associated factors (BACH2, ABL1, ALG2, CHOP), members of cell survival AKT and HSP70 pathways (PIK3GA, PTEN, HSP70, BAG1, BAG2), and others. This suggests that cocaine affects survival of developing cerebral cells via multiple apoptosis-regulating mechanisms.

  3. Cocaine-induced changes in the expression of apoptosis-related genes in the fetal mouse cerebral wall.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Svetlana I; He, Fang; Bai, Jie; Badan, Irina; Lidow, Irina A; Lidow, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that exposure to cocaine increases cell death in the fetal CNS. To examine the molecular mechanisms of this effect, we employed mouse oligo microarrays followed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) to compare expressions of apoptosis-related genes in the cerebral wall of 18-day-old (E18) fetuses from cocaine-treated (20 mg/kg cocaine, s.c., b.i.d., E8th-E18th) and drug-naive (saline, s.c.) mice. Out of approximately 400 relevant genes in the arrays, 53 showed alterations in expression in cocaine-exposed fetuses. Upregulation was observed in 35 proapoptotic and 8 antiapoptotic genes; 4 proapoptotic and 6 antiapoptotic genes were down-regulated. The affected genes encode a wide range of apoptosis-related proteins, including death receptors (NTF-R1, NTF-R2, DR3, DR5, LTbeta-R, GITR, P57 TR-1) and their adaptor and regulatory proteins (MASGE-D1, TRAF-2, SIVA, MET, FLIP, FAIM, IAP1, ATFA), members of transcription regulatory pathways (JNK, NF-kappaB, P53), members of BCL-2 family of proteins (BID, BAD, BAX, BIK, NIP21, NIP3, NIX, BCL-2), DNA damage sensor (PARP-1), caspases and their substrates and regulatory proteins (caspases 8, 4, 9, and 3, ACINUS, CIDE-A, CIDE-B, GAS2), mitochondrially released factors (cytochrome c, AIF, PRG3), specific endoplasmic reticulum- and oxidative stress-associated factors (BACH2, ABL1, ALG2, CHOP), members of cell survival AKT and HSP70 pathways (PIK3GA, PTEN, HSP70, BAG1, BAG2), and others. This suggests that cocaine affects survival of developing cerebral cells via multiple apoptosis-regulating mechanisms. PMID:15681117

  4. Diabetes augments cognitive dysfunction in chronic cerebral hypoperfusion by increasing neuronal cell death: implication of cilostazol for diabetes mellitus-induced dementia.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kyoung Ja; Lee, Eun Joo; Kim, Min Kyeong; Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Jung Nam; Kim, Jin Ok; Kim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Hahn Young; Han, Jung-Soo; Shin, Chan Young; Han, Seol-Heui

    2015-01-01

    hypothesis that there are deleterious interactions between chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and T2DM. That is, metabolic diseases such as diabetes may exacerbate cognitive impairment in a rat model of vascular dementia. We also suggest that surprisingly, the phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, cilostazol may be useful for the treatment of cognitive impairment in diabetes mellitus-induced dementia. In conclusion, diabetes can aggravate cognitive dysfunction in vascular dementia, and PDE-3 inhibitors, such as cilostazol, may form the basis of a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetes-associated cognitive impairment or vascular dementia.

  5. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information About ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  6. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  7. Dietary Sutherlandia and Elderberry Mitigate Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Neuronal Damage and Attenuate p47phox and Phospho-ERK1/2 Expression in Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Dennis Y.; Cui, Jiankun; Simonyi, Agnes; Engel, Victoria A.; Chen, Shanyan; Fritsche, Kevin L.; Thomas, Andrew L.; Applequist, Wendy L.; Folk, William R.; Lubahn, Dennis B.; Sun, Albert Y.; Sun, Grace Y.

    2014-01-01

    Sutherlandia (Sutherlandia frutescens) and elderberry (Sambucus spp.) are used to promote health and for treatment of a number of ailments. Although studies with cultured cells have demonstrated antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of these botanicals, little is known about their ability to mitigate brain injury. In this study, C57BL/6 J male mice were fed AIN93G diets without or with Sutherlandia or American elderberry for 2 months prior to a 30-min global cerebral ischemia induced by occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries (BCCAs), followed by reperfusion for 3 days. Accelerating rotarod assessment at 24 h after BCCA occlusion showed amelioration of sensorimotor impairment in the mice fed the supplemented diets as compared with the ischemic mice fed the control diet. Quantitative digital pathology assessment of brain slides stained with cresyl violet at 3 days after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) revealed significant reduction in neuronal cell death in both dietary groups. Immunohistochemical staining for ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule-1 demonstrated pronounced activation of microglia in the hippocampus and striatum in the ischemic brains 3 days after I/R, and microglial activation was significantly reduced in animals fed supplemented diets. Mitigation of microglial activation by the supplements was further supported by the decrease in expression of p47phox, a cytosolic subunit of NADPH oxidase, and phospho-ERK1/2, a mitogen-activated protein kinase known to mediate a number of cytoplasmic processes including oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory responses. These results demonstrate neuroprotective effect of Sutherlandia and American elderberry botanicals against oxidative and inflammatory responses to cerebral I/R. PMID:25324465

  8. Melatonin Counteracts at a Transcriptional Level the Inflammatory and Apoptotic Response Secondary to Ischemic Brain Injury Induced by Middle Cerebral Artery Blockade in Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Sergio D.; Rancan, Lisa; Kireev, Roman; González, Alberto; Louzao, Pedro; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; García, Cruz; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesús A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aging increases oxidative stress and inflammation. Melatonin counteracts inflammation and apoptosis. This study investigated the possible protective effect of melatonin on the inflammatory and apoptotic response secondary to ischemia induced by blockade of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) in aging male Wistar rats. Animals were subjected to MCA obstruction. After 24 h or 7 days of procedure, 14-month-old nontreated and treated rats with a daily dose of 10 mg/kg melatonin were sacrificed and right and left hippocampus and cortex were collected. Rats aged 2 and 6 months, respectively, were subjected to the same brain injury protocol, but they were not treated with melatonin. mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD), Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and sirtuin 1 was measured by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. In nontreated animals, a significant time-dependent increase in IL-1β, TNF-α, BAD, and BAX was observed in the ischemic area of both hippocampus and cortex, and to a lesser extent in the contralateral hemisphere. Hippocampal GFAP was also significantly elevated, while Bcl-2 and sirtuin 1 decreased significantly in response to ischemia. Aging aggravated these changes. Melatonin administration was able to reverse significantly these alterations. In conclusion, melatonin may ameliorate the age-dependent inflammatory and apoptotic response secondary to ischemic cerebral injury. PMID:26594596

  9. Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induces Neurological Side Effects Independent on Thrombolysis in Mechanical Animal Models of Focal Cerebral Infarction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, You-Dong; Liu, Yi-Yun; Ren, Yi-Fei; Liang, Zi-Hong; Wang, Hai-Yang; Zhao, Li-Bo; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is the only effective drug approved by US FDA to treat ischemic stroke, and it contains pleiotropic effects besides thrombolysis. We performed a meta-analysis to clarify effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) on cerebral infarction besides its thrombolysis property in mechanical animal stroke. Methods Relevant studies were identified by two reviewers after searching online databases, including Pubmed, Embase, and ScienceDirect, from 1979 to 2016. We identified 6, 65, 17, 12, 16, 12 and 13 comparisons reporting effect of endogenous tPA on infarction volume and effects of rtPA on infarction volume, blood-brain barrier, brain edema, intracerebral hemorrhage, neurological function and mortality rate in all 47 included studies. Standardized mean differences for continuous measures and risk ratio for dichotomous measures were calculated to assess the effects of endogenous tPA and rtPA on cerebral infarction in animals. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable score. Subgroup analysis, meta-regression and sensitivity analysis were performed to explore sources of heterogeneity. Funnel plot, Trim and Fill method and Egger’s test were obtained to detect publication bias. Results We found that both endogenous tPA and rtPA had not enlarged infarction volume, or deteriorated neurological function. However, rtPA would disrupt blood-brain barrier, aggravate brain edema, induce intracerebral hemorrhage and increase mortality rate. Conclusions This meta-analysis reveals rtPA can lead to neurological side effects besides thrombolysis in mechanical animal stroke, which may account for clinical exacerbation for stroke patients that do not achieve vascular recanalization with rtPA. PMID:27387385

  10. Anesthesia and cerebral apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Brée, B; Gourdin, M; De Kock, M

    2008-01-01

    General anesthetics interact with targets at the cellular and molecular levels. They have the potential to induce changes in the body and the brain. Usually, these interactions are thought to be short lasting. In contrast, recent evidences suggest that alcohol, a toxic sharing many mechanisms with general anesthetics, induces long term effect at these levels. This is particularly evident in the period of synaptogenesis during which alcohol can induce excessive cerebral apoptosis (histopathologic changes) in juvenile animal models. Even if the vast majority of our patients seems to completely restore homeostasis after general anesthesia, we don't know if the changes induced at the brain level in animal models exist in human. This article intends to supply biological, pharmacological and experimental basis for a possible long term effect of general anesthetics on the human developing brain. PMID:19051443

  11. Cerebral Area Differential Redox Response of Neonatal Rats to Selenite-Induced Oxidative Stress and to Concurrent Administration of Highbush Blueberry Leaf Polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Mermigki, Penelope G; Makri, Olga E; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Koulakiotis, Nikolaos S; Margarity, Marigoula; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony; Georgakopoulos, Constantinos D; Lamari, Fotini N

    2015-11-01

    Our goal was to delineate the mechanisms of selenite-induced oxidative stress in neonatal rats and investigate the potential of blueberry leaf polyphenols to counteract the induced stress. Vaccinium corymbosum leaf decoction (BLD) was analyzed by UPLC-MS and LC-DAD, along with its in vitro antioxidant activity (DPPH radical scavenging, FRAP, ferrous chelation). Newborn suckling Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: 'Se' and 'SeBLD' received 20 μmol Na2SeO3/kg BW subcutaneously (PN day 10); 'SeBLD' received 100 mg dry BLD/kg BW intraperitoneally (PN11 and 12) and Group 'C' received normal saline. Βiochemical analysis revealed tissue-specific effects of selenite. Brain as a whole was more resistant to selenite toxicity in comparison to liver; midbrain and cerebellum were in general not affected, but cortex was moderately disturbed. Liver lipid peroxidation, GSH, SOD, CAT, GPx were significantly affected, whereas proteolytic activity was not. BLD, which is rich in chlorogenic acid and flavonols (especially quercetin derivatives), exerted significant antioxidant protective effects in all regions. In conclusion, we provide for the first time an insight to the neonatal rat cerebral and liver redox response against a toxic selenite dose and blueberry leaf polyphenols. PMID:26357951

  12. Effects of endurance exercise on expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein and myelin basic protein in developing rats with maternal infection-induced cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kijeong; Shin, Mal-Soon; Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Young-Pyo

    2014-02-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is a common white matter lesion affecting the neonatal brain. PVL is closely associated with cerebral palsy (CP) and characterized by increase in the number of astrocytes, which can be detected by positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Change in myelin basic protein (MBP) is an early sign of white matter abnormality. Maternal or placental infection can damage the neonatal brain. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill walking exercise on GFAP and MBP expressions in rats with maternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PVL. Immunohistochemistry was performed for the detection of GFAP and MBP. The present results showed that intracervical maternal LPS injection during pregnancy increased GFAP expression in the striatum and decreased MBP expression in the corpus callosum of rats. The results also showed that treadmill walking exercise suppressed GFAP expression and enhanced MBP expression in the brains of rats with maternal LPS-induced PVL. The present study revealed that treadmill walking exercise is effective for the suppressing astrogliosis and hypomyelination associated with PVL. Here in this study, we showed that treadmill walking exercise may be effective therapeutic strategy for alleviating the detrimental effects of CP.

  13. Mechanistic insight into neurotoxicity of tissue plasminogen activator-induced thrombolysis products in a rat intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion model.

    PubMed

    Oka, Fumiaki; Fujisawa, Hirosuke; Nomura, Sadahiro; Kajiwara, Koji; Kato, Shoichi; Fujii, Masami; Izuma, Hiroshi; Uozumi, Kanako; Gondo, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2009-09-01

    Thrombolytic therapy with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) after ischemic stroke is effective. However, rtPA potentiates neuronal damage, and interactions between rtPA and thrombolysis products (TLP) have been reported to play a role in this. In the present study we investigated the mechanisms underlying rtPA- and TLP-induced neurotoxicity. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 60-min intraluminal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, and then treated with rtPA (10 mg/kg), TLP, or saline. To evaluate the effects of a free radical scavenger, treatment with edaravone and TLP was evaluated. To investigate the role of red blood cells (RBCs), RBC-depleted TLP was used. Neurological deficit scores, infarct volume, and immuno-histochemical localization of oxidative end products for lipid and DNA (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [4-HNE] and 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG]) were evaluated. TLP increased the infarct volume, worsened the neurological deficits, and increased accumulations of 4-HNE and 8-OHdG. Edaravone treatment significantly reduced the lesion volume and improved the neurological score. Both infarct volume and accumulation of oxidative products were significantly suppressed when RBC-depleted TLP was used. In this mechanical model of MCA occlusion, rtPA-induced TLP, especially in the presence of RBCs, contributed to neuronal damage by accelerating free radical injury.

  14. Evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy based on functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R; Clegg, Nancy J; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-04-01

    Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2±2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger-tapping task and the resting-state functional connectivity were quantified before, immediately after, and 6 months after CIMT. These fNIRS-based metrics were used to help explain changes in clinical scores of manual performance obtained concurrently with imaging time points. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8±1.3 years old) were also imaged to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. Interestingly, the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted 6 months later. In contrast to this improved localized activation response, the laterality index and resting-state connectivity metrics that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed 6 months later. In addition, for the subjects measured in this work, there was either a trade-off between improving unimanual versus bimanual performance when sensorimotor activation patterns normalized after CIMT, or an improvement occurred in both unimanual and bimanual performance but at the cost of very abnormal plastic changes in sensorimotor activity.

  15. Reperfusion-induced temporary appearance of therapeutic window in penumbra after 2 h of photothrombotic middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hiroshi; Yoshii, Narihiko; Akira, Toshiaki; Nakahara, Tatsuo

    2009-03-01

    To explore the effects of reperfusion on evolution of focal ischemic injury, spontaneously hypertensive male rats were subjected to photothrombotic distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with or without YAG laser-induced reperfusion. The volume of fodrin breakdown zone, water content, and brain tissue levels of sodium (Na(+)) and potassium (K(+)) were measured in the ischemic core and penumbra. Reperfusion attenuated fodrin breakdown, and the volume containing fodrin breakdown product at 3 h after reperfusion (5 h after MCAO) (30+/-7 mm(3)) was significantly smaller than the 42+/-3 mm(3) of the permanent occlusion group. After 3 to 6 h of ischemia, Na(+) increased, and K(+) decreased in the ischemic core. Reperfusion after 2 h of MCA occlusion did not mitigate the ischemia-induced changes in brain tissue electrolytes and water content at 3 to 6 h of ischemia. Even in reperfusion after comparatively long periods of occlusion where brain infarction size, assessed 3 days after MCAO, was not significantly reduced by reperfusion, and the precipitating indicators of the ischemic core (Na(+), K(+), water content) did not improve, temporary improvement or a delay in progression of ischemic injury was discernible in the penumbra. These results indicate the possibility that treatment with reperfusion is permissive to the effects of neuroprotection. PMID:19088742

  16. Evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy based on functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-04-01

    Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2±2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger-tapping task and the resting-state functional connectivity were quantified before, immediately after, and 6 months after CIMT. These fNIRS-based metrics were used to help explain changes in clinical scores of manual performance obtained concurrently with imaging time points. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8±1.3 years old) were also imaged to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. Interestingly, the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted 6 months later. In contrast to this improved localized activation response, the laterality index and resting-state connectivity metrics that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed 6 months later. In addition, for the subjects measured in this work, there was either a trade-off between improving unimanual versus bimanual performance when sensorimotor activation patterns normalized after CIMT, or an improvement occurred in both unimanual and bimanual performance but at the cost of very abnormal plastic changes in sensorimotor activity.

  17. Cerebral Area Differential Redox Response of Neonatal Rats to Selenite-Induced Oxidative Stress and to Concurrent Administration of Highbush Blueberry Leaf Polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Mermigki, Penelope G; Makri, Olga E; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Koulakiotis, Nikolaos S; Margarity, Marigoula; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony; Georgakopoulos, Constantinos D; Lamari, Fotini N

    2015-11-01

    Our goal was to delineate the mechanisms of selenite-induced oxidative stress in neonatal rats and investigate the potential of blueberry leaf polyphenols to counteract the induced stress. Vaccinium corymbosum leaf decoction (BLD) was analyzed by UPLC-MS and LC-DAD, along with its in vitro antioxidant activity (DPPH radical scavenging, FRAP, ferrous chelation). Newborn suckling Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: 'Se' and 'SeBLD' received 20 μmol Na2SeO3/kg BW subcutaneously (PN day 10); 'SeBLD' received 100 mg dry BLD/kg BW intraperitoneally (PN11 and 12) and Group 'C' received normal saline. Βiochemical analysis revealed tissue-specific effects of selenite. Brain as a whole was more resistant to selenite toxicity in comparison to liver; midbrain and cerebellum were in general not affected, but cortex was moderately disturbed. Liver lipid peroxidation, GSH, SOD, CAT, GPx were significantly affected, whereas proteolytic activity was not. BLD, which is rich in chlorogenic acid and flavonols (especially quercetin derivatives), exerted significant antioxidant protective effects in all regions. In conclusion, we provide for the first time an insight to the neonatal rat cerebral and liver redox response against a toxic selenite dose and blueberry leaf polyphenols.

  18. Evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy based on functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2±2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger-tapping task and the resting-state functional connectivity were quantified before, immediately after, and 6 months after CIMT. These fNIRS-based metrics were used to help explain changes in clinical scores of manual performance obtained concurrently with imaging time points. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8±1.3 years old) were also imaged to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. Interestingly, the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted 6 months later. In contrast to this improved localized activation response, the laterality index and resting-state connectivity metrics that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed 6 months later. In addition, for the subjects measured in this work, there was either a trade-off between improving unimanual versus bimanual performance when sensorimotor activation patterns normalized after CIMT, or an improvement occurred in both unimanual and bimanual performance but at the cost of very abnormal plastic changes in sensorimotor activity. PMID:25900145

  19. The role of the cerebral ganglia in the venom-induced behavioral manipulation of cockroaches stung by the parasitoid jewel wasp.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Maayan; Libersat, Frederic

    2015-04-01

    The jewel wasp stings cockroaches and injects venom into their cerebral ganglia, namely the subesophageal ganglion (SOG) and supraesophageal ganglion (SupOG). The venom induces a long-term hypokinetic state, during which the stung cockroach shows little or no spontaneous walking. It was shown that venom injection to the SOG reduces neuronal activity, thereby suggesting a similar effect of venom injection in the SupOG. Paradoxically, SupOG-ablated cockroaches show increased spontaneous walking in comparison with control. Yet most of the venom in the SupOG of cockroaches is primarily concentrated in and around the central complex (CX). Thus the venom could chiefly decrease activity in the CX to contribute to the hypokinetic state. Our first aim was to resolve this discrepancy by using a combination of behavioral and neuropharmacological tools. Our results show that the CX is necessary for the initiation of spontaneous walking, and that focal injection of procaine to the CX is sufficient to induce the decrease in spontaneous walking. Furthermore, it was shown that artificial venom injection to the SOG decreases walking. Hence our second aim was to test the interactions between the SupOG and SOG in the venom-induced behavioral manipulation. We show that, in the absence of the inhibitory control of the SupOG on walking initiation, injection of venom in the SOG alone by the wasp is sufficient to induce the hypokinetic state. To summarize, we show that venom injection to either the SOG or the CX of the SupOG is, by itself, sufficient to decrease walking.

  20. Ethanol exposure during neurogenesis induces persistent effects on neural maturation: evidence from an ex vivo model of fetal cerebral cortical neuroepithelial progenitor maturation.

    PubMed

    Camarillo, Cynthia; Miranda, Rajesh C

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol is a significant neuroteratogen. We previously used fetal cortical-derived neurosphere cultures as an ex vivo model of the second trimester ventricular neuroepithelium, and showed that ethanol directly induced fetal stem and progenitor cell proliferation and maturation without inducing death. However, ethanol is defined as a teratogen because of its capacity to persistently disrupt neural maturation beyond a specific exposure period. We therefore utilized a simplified neuronal maturation paradigm to examine the immediate and persistent changes in neuronal migration following ethanol exposure during the phase of neuroepithelial proliferation. Our data indicate that mRNA transcripts for migration-associated genes RhoA, Paxillin (Pxn), and CDC42 were immediately induced following ethanol exposure, whereas dynein light chain, LC8-type 1 (DYNLL1), and growth-associated protein (Gap)-43 were suppressed. With the exception of Gap43, ethanol did not induce persistent changes in the other mRNAs, suggesting that ethanol had an activational, rather than organizational, impact on migration-associated mRNAs. However, despite this lack of persistent effects on these mRNAs, ethanol exposure during the proliferation period significantly increased subsequent neuronal migration. Moreover, differentiating neurons, pretreated with ethanol during the proliferation phase, exhibited reduced neurite branching and an increased length of primary neurites, indicating a persistent destabilization of neuronal maturation. Collectively, our data indicate that ethanol-exposed proliferating neuroepithelial precursors exhibit subsequent differentiation-associated increases in migratory behavior, independent of mRNA transcript levels. These data help explain the increased incidence of cerebral cortical neuronal heterotopias associated with the fetal alcohol syndrome.

  1. PCP-induced alterations in cerebral glucose utilization in rat brain: blockade by metaphit, a PCP-receptor-acylating agent

    SciTech Connect

    Tamminga, C.A.; Tanimoto, K.; Kuo, S.; Chase, T.N.; Contreras, P.C.; Rice, K.C.; Jackson, A.E.; O'Donohue, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of phencyclidine (PCP) on regional cerebral glucose utilization was determined by using quantitative autoradiography with (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose. PCP increased brain metabolism in selected areas of cortex, particularly limbic, and in the basal ganglia and thalamus, whereas the drug decreased metabolism in areas related to audition. These results are consistent with the known physiology of central PCP neurons and may help to suggest brain areas involved in PCP-mediated actions. Moreover, based on the behavioral similarities between PCP psychosis and an acute schizophrenic episode, these data may be relevant to the understanding of schizophrenia. The PCP-receptor-acylating agent, metaphit, blocked most of these PCP actions. In addition, metaphit by itself was found to diminish glucose utilization rather uniformly throughout brain. These results indicate an antagonist effect of metaphit on the PCP system and suggest a widespread action of metaphit, putatively at a PCP-related site, possibly in connection with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor.

  2. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-li; Liu, Yuan-shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-dong; Chang, Rui-ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-gen; Fang, Xiang-shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-yuan; Huang, Zi-tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  3. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Yuan-Shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-Dong; Chang, Rui-Ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Fang, Xiang-Shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-Yuan; Huang, Zi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of Alpinia katsumadai against neuronal damage in the gerbil hippocampus induced by transient cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon; Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Jong-Dai; Kim, Young-Myeong; Kang, Il-Jun; Won, Moo-Ho

    2011-09-01

    Alpinia katsumadai, one of the family Zingiberaceae, contains chalcone, flavonoids, diarylheptanoids, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenoids, stilbenes, and labdanes. It has been reported that the extract of Alpinia katsumadai seed (EAKS) has antiinflammatory effects, and enhances antioxidant activities. We observed the neuroprotective effects of EAKS against ischemic damage in gerbils received oral administrations of EAKS (50 mg/kg) once a day for 7 days before transient cerebral ischemia. In the EAKS-treated ischemia group, neuronal nuclei (NeuN, a marker for neurons)-immunoreactive pyramidal neurons were abundant (68.3% of the sham group) in the hippocampal CA1 region (CA1) 4 days after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) compared to those in the vehicle-treated ischemia group (13.18%). We also observed that EAKS treatment significantly decreased the activation of astrocytes and microglia in the CA1 compared with the vehicle-treated ischemia group 4 days postischemia. In addition, protein levels of GFAP and Iba-1 in the EAKS-treated ischemia group were much lower than those in the vehicle-treated ischemia group 4 days after I/P. Our findings indicate that the repeated supplements of EAKS could protect neurons from an ischemic damage, showing that glial activation is markedly decreased in the ischemic area.

  5. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Yuan-Shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-Dong; Chang, Rui-Ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Fang, Xiang-Shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-Yuan; Huang, Zi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  6. Cerebral Microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Young, Bethany; Kalanuria, Atul; Kumar, Monisha; Burke, Kathryn; Balu, Ramani; Amendolia, Olivia; McNulty, Kyle; Marion, BethAnn; Beckmann, Brittany; Ciocco, Lauren; Miller, Kimberly; Schuele, Donnamarie; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Frangos, Suzanne; Wright, Danielle

    2016-03-01

    A variety of neuromonitoring techniques are available to aid in the care of neurocritically ill patients. However, traditional monitors lack the ability to measure brain biochemistry and may provide inadequate warning of potentially reversible deleterious conditions. Cerebral microdialysis (CMD) is a safe, novel method of monitoring regional brain biochemistry. Analysis of CMD analytes as part of a multimodal approach may help inform clinical decision making, guide medical treatments, and aid in prognostication of patient outcome. Its use is most frequently documented in traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Incorporating CMD into clinical practice is a multidisciplinary effort.

  7. Long-term probucol therapy continues to suppress markers of neurovascular inflammation in a dietary induced model of cerebral capillary dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Probucol has been shown to prevent cerebral capillary disturbances characterized by blood-to-brain extravasation of plasma derived proteins and neurovascular inflammation in mice maintained on western-styled diets for 12 weeks. However the effect of probucol on capillary integrity in aging models with capillary dysfunction is not known. Methods Wild-type C57BL6 mice were randomized to a low-fat (LF); saturated-fat (SFA); or SFA + Probucol diet for up to12 months of intervention. Results Mice fed the LF diet had substantially greater parenchymal abundance of plasma derived IgG and apo B lipoproteins at 12 months, compared to LF mice at 3 months of intervention. Markers of neurovascular inflammation were also greater at 12 months in LF fed mice compared to LF mice at 3 months. The SFA diet exacerbated the aging induced parenchymal abundance of IgG and of apo B lipoproteins and neurovascular inflammation at 12 months. The SFA effects were associated with increased production of intestinal lipoprotein amyloid-β (Aβ). The co-provision of probucol with the SFA completely abolished heightened inflammation at 12 months. Probucol attenuated SFA-induced capillary permeability but had only a modest inhibitory effect on parenchymal retention of apoB lipoproteins. The improvements in markers of inflammation and capillary integrity because of probucol correlated with enterocytic genesis of chylomicron Aβ. Conclusion In this long-term feeding study, probucol profoundly suppressed dietary SFA induced disturbances in capillary integrity but had a more modest effect on age-associated changes. PMID:24890126

  8. Cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Postels, Douglas G; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-01-01

    Malaria, the most significant parasitic disease of man, kills approximately one million people per year. Half of these deaths occur in those with cerebral malaria (CM). The World Health Organization (WHO) defines CM as an otherwise unexplained coma in a patient with malarial parasitemia. Worldwide, CM occurs primarily in African children and Asian adults, with the vast majority (greater than 90%) of cases occurring in children 5 years old or younger in sub-Saharan Africa. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex and involves infected erythrocyte sequestration, cerebral inflammation, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. A recently characterized malarial retinopathy is visual evidence of Plasmodium falciparum's pathophysiological processes occurring in the affected patient. Treatment consists of supportive care and antimalarial administration. Thus far, adjuvant therapies have not been shown to improve mortality rates or neurological outcomes in children with CM. For those who survive CM, residual neurological abnormalities are common. Epilepsy, cognitive impairment, behavioral disorders, and gross neurological deficits which include motor, sensory, and language impairments are frequent sequelae. Primary prevention strategies, including bed nets, vaccine development, and chemoprophylaxis, are in varied states of development and implementation. Continuing efforts to find successful primary prevention options and strategies to decrease neurological sequelae are needed. PMID:23829902

  9. Curcumin induces ABCA1 expression and apolipoprotein A-I-mediated cholesterol transmembrane in the chronic cerebral hypoperfusion aging rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingyuan; Zhang, Xiong; Wang, Linhui; Li, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral hypoperfusion or aging often results in the disturbances of cholesterol and lipoprotein, which have been well depicted as a common pathological status contributing to neurodegenerative diseases such as vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's dementia (AD). The pathway of the liver X receptor-β (LXR-β)/retinoic X receptor-α (RXR-α)/ABCA1 plays a vital role in lipoprotein metabolism. Curcumin, a kind of phenolic compound, has been widely used. It has been reported that curcumin can reduce the levels of cholesterol in serum, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the effects of curcumin on the cholesterol level in brain, vascular cognitive impairment and explored whether the mechanisms for those effects are through activating LXR-β/RXR-α and ABCA1 expression and apoA-I. With a Morris water test, we found that curcumin treatment could attenuate cognitive impairment. With HE and Nissl staining, we found that curcumin could significantly ameliorate the abnormal changes of pyramidal neurons. Meanwhile, the expression of LXR-β, RXR-α, ABCA1 and apoA-I mRNA and protein were increased in a dose-dependent manner after curcumin treatment. Interestingly, both serum HDL cholesterol and total cholesterol levels were statistically higher in the curcumin treatment group than those other groups. We conclude that curcumin has the ability to activate permissive LXR-β/RXR-α signaling and thereby modulate ABCA1 and apoA-I-mediated cholesterol transmembrane transportation, which is a new preventive and therapeutic strategy for cerevascular diseases.

  10. Cadmium induced inhibition of autophagy is associated with microtubule disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction in primary rat cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Qiwen; Song, Ruilong; Zhang, Yajing; Yang, Jinlong; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Gu, Jianhong; Zhu, Jiaqiao; Liu, Zongping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that mitochondria serve as direct targets for cadmium- (Cd-) induced neuronal toxicity, which can be attenuated by autophagy. The molecular mechanisms' underlying Cd-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagy in neurons are not known. In this study, we studied the upstream signaling pathways induced by Cd-mediated mitochondrial metabolism alterations using primary rat neuron as a model. We found that Cd induced the destruction of microtubules (MTs), and resulted in tau hyper-phosphorylation and decreased acetylated tubulin levels, which were related to a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. As a result of taxol disruption, alterations in macroautophagy, like altered cellular distribution of the autophagy-related protein light chain 3 beta (LC3B) and the expression of Atg5 were found compared with Cd group. We found for the first time that MT disruption induced by Cd reduced the levels of autophagy, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. These observations suggest new therapeutic strategies aimed to activate or ameliorate pro-survival macroautophagy.

  11. BID Mediates Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Neuronal Injury in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures and Modulates Tissue Inflammation in a Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia Model without Changing Lesion Volume

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Nellie Anne; Bonner, Helena; Elkjær, Maria Louise; D’Orsi, Beatrice; Chen, Gang; König, Hans Georg; Svensson, Martina; Deierborg, Tomas; Pfeiffer, Shona; Prehn, Jochen H.; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in death receptor-induced and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Recently, it has also been suggested that BID is involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses in the central nervous system. We found that BID deficiency protected organotypic hippocampal slice cultures in vitro from neuronal injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation. In vivo, BID-knockout (KO) mice and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to 60 min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) to induce focal cerebral ischemia, and allowed to recover for 24 h. Infarct volumes and functional outcome were assessed and the inflammatory response was evaluated using immunofluorescence, Western blotting, quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Mesoscale multiplex analysis. We observed no difference in the infarct volume or neurological outcome between BID-KO and WT mice. The inflammatory response was reduced by BID deficiency as indicated by a change in microglial/leukocyte response. In conclusion, our data suggest that BID deficiency is neuroprotective in an in vitro model and modulates the inflammatory response to focal cerebral ischemia in vivo. However, this is not translated into a robust neuroprotection in vivo. PMID:26869884

  12. Frozen fruit pulp of Euterpe oleraceae Mart. (Acai) prevents hydrogen peroxide-induced damage in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Spada, Patricia D S; Dani, Caroline; Bortolini, Giovana V; Funchal, Claudia; Henriques, João A P; Salvador, Mirian

    2009-10-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in several human illnesses, including neurological disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Acai is largely consumed in Brazil and contains high levels of antioxidant compounds. This work aims to study the antioxidant activity of acai frozen fruit pulp in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of rats treated with the oxidizing agent hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Pretreatment of tissue with acai decreased H(2)O(2)-induced damage of both lipids and proteins in all tissues tested. This fruit was also able to reduce the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase to basal levels. We observed a negative correlation between the polyphenol content of acai and the levels of lipid (r = -0.689; P

  13. Neurochemical evidence that the metabolites accumulating in 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency induce oxidative damage in cerebral cortex of young rats.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Ângela; Moura, Alana Pimentel; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Knebel, Lisiane Aurélio; Grings, Mateus; Lobato, Vannessa Araújo; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Wajner, Moacir

    2013-01-01

    Isolated 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency (3MCCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of leucine metabolism biochemically characterized by accumulation of 3-methylcrotonylglycine (3MCG), 3-methylcrotonic acid (3MCA) and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid. A considerable number of affected individuals present neurological symptoms with or without precedent crises of metabolic decompensation and brain abnormalities whose pathogenesis is poorly known. We investigated the in vitro effects of 3MCG and 3MCA on important parameters of oxidative stress in cerebral cortex of young rats. 3MCG and 3MCA significantly increased TBA-RS and carbonyl formation, indicating that these compounds provoke lipid and protein oxidation, respectively. In contrast, nitric oxide production was not affected by 3MCG and 3MCA. Furthermore, 3MCG- and 3MCA-induced elevation of TBA-RS values was fully prevented by melatonin, trolox and reduced glutathione, but not by the nitric oxide inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or the combination of catalase plus superoxide dismutase, indicating that reactive oxygen species were involved in the oxidative damage caused by these compounds. We also found that the activity of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase, catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase were not altered in vitro by 3MCG and 3MCA. It is therefore presumed that alterations of the cellular redox homeostasis caused by the major metabolites accumulating in 3MCCD may potentially be involved in the pathophysiology of the neurological dysfunction and structural brain alterations found in patients affected by this disorder.

  14. Epac2-deficiency leads to more severe retinal swelling, glial reactivity and oxidative stress in transient middle cerebral artery occlusion induced ischemic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Yeung, Patrick Ka Kit; Cheng, Lu; Lo, Amy Cheuk Yin; Chung, Stephen Sum Man; Chung, Sookja Kim

    2015-06-01

    Ischemia occurs in diabetic retinopathy with neuronal loss, edema, glial cell reactivity and oxidative stress. Epacs, consisting of Epac1 and Epac2, are cAMP mediators playing important roles in maintenance of endothelial barrier and neuronal functions. To investigate the roles of Epacs in the pathogenesis of ischemic retinopathy, transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) was performed on Epac1-deficient (Epac1 (-/-)) mice, Epac2-deficient (Epac2 (-/-)) mice, and their wild type counterparts (Epac1 (+/+) and Epac2 (+/+)). Two-hour occlusion and 22-hour reperfusion were conducted to induce ischemia/reperfusion injury to the retina. After tMCAO, the contralateral retinae displayed similar morphology between different genotypes. Neuronal loss, retinal edema and increase in immunoreactivity for aquaporin 4 (AQP4), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), peroxiredoxin 6 (Prx6) were observed in ipsilateral retinae. Epac2 (-/-) ipsilateral retinae showed more neuronal loss in retinal ganglion cell layer, increased retinal thickness and stronger immunostaining of AQP4, GFAP, and Prx6 than those of Epac2 (+/+). However, Epac1 (-/-) ipsilateral retinae displayed similar pathology as those in Epac1 (+/+) mice. Our observations suggest that Epac2-deficiency led to more severe ischemic retinopathy after retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  15. Trans-arterial chemo-embolization (TACE), with either lipiodol (traditional TACE) or drug-eluting microspheres (precision TACE, pTACE) in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: efficacy and safety results from a large mono-institutional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    More data about TACE and pTACE seem necessary to better define the global treatment strategy for HCC. Aim of our analysis was to evaluate the role of TACE, either with lipiodol (traditional) or drug-eluting microspheres in terms of response rate (RR), time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS) and toxicity in HCC. Patients with HCC undergoing traditional TACE or pTACE (either alone or in combination with other treatment options) were eligible One hundred and fifty patients were analyzed. In the global patient population median OS was 46 months for lipiodol TACE and 19 months for pTACE (p < 0.0001), TTP was 30 months versus 16 months for patients receiving TACE or pTACE respectively (p = 0.003). These results were confirmed also among the group of patients who received exclusive TACE or pTACE. Neither RR nor toxicity was different between TACE or pTACE. At multivariate analysis, age, the Okuda stage, type of TACE and number of TACE proved to be independent prognostic factors influencing overall survival. In our experience, lipiodol TACE showed a better OS and TTP over pTACE, without difference in toxicity profile and RR. Among the staging systems analyzed only the Okuda stage seemed able to reliably predict patients outcome. PMID:21159184

  16. [Cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Malagón Valdez, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The term cerebral palsy (CP), is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the non-evolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations. PMID:18422084

  17. Cerebral edema induced in mice by a convulsive dose of soman. Evaluation through diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and histology

    SciTech Connect

    Testylier, Guy . E-mail: guytestylier@crssa.net; Lahrech, Hana; Montigon, Olivier; Foquin, Annie; Delacour, Claire; Bernabe, Denis; Segebarth, Christoph; Dorandeu, Frederic; Carpentier, Pierre

    2007-04-15

    Purpose: In the present study, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and histology were used to assess cerebral edema and lesions in mice intoxicated by a convulsive dose of soman, an organophosphate compound acting as an irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor. Methods: Three hours and 24 h after the intoxication with soman (172 {mu}g/kg), the mice were anesthetized with an isoflurane/N{sub 2}O mixture and their brain examined with DW-MRI. After the imaging sessions, the mice were sacrificed for histological analysis of their brain. Results: A decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was detected as soon as 3 h after the intoxication and was found strongly enhanced at 24 h. A correlation was obtained between the ADC change and the severity of the overall brain damage (edema and cellular degeneration): the more severe the damage, the stronger the ADC drop. Anesthesia was shown to interrupt soman-induced seizures and to attenuate edema and cell change in certain sensitive brain areas. Finally, brain water content was assessed using the traditional dry/wet weight method. A significant increase of brain water was observed following the intoxication. Conclusions: The ADC decrease observed in the present study suggests that brain edema in soman poisoning is mainly intracellular and cytotoxic. Since entry of water into Brain was also evidenced, this type of edema is certainly mixed with others (vasogenic, hydrostatic, osmotic). The present study confirms the potential of DW-MRI as a non-invasive tool for monitoring the acute neuropathological consequences (edema and neurodegeneration) of soman-induced seizures.

  18. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces apoptotic insults to mouse cerebral endothelial cells via a Bax-mitochondria-caspase protease pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.-G.; Chen, T.-L.; Chang, H.-C.; Tai, Y.-T.; Cherng, Y.-G.; Chang, Y.-T.; Chen, R.-M. . E-mail: rmchen@tmu.edu.tw

    2007-02-15

    Cerebral endothelial cells (CECs) are crucial components of the blood-brain barrier. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) can induce cell injuries. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of oxLDL on mouse CECs and its possible mechanisms. Mouse CECs were isolated from brain tissues and identified by immunocytochemical staining of vimentin and Factor VIII. oxLDL was prepared from LDL oxidation by copper sulfate. Exposure of mouse CECs to oxLDL decreased cell viability in concentration- and time-dependent manners. oxLDL time-dependently caused shrinkage of cell morphologies. Administration of oxLDL to CECs induced DNA fragmentation in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Analysis of the cell cycle revealed that oxLDL concentration- and time-dependently increased the proportion of CECs which underwent apoptosis. Analysis of confocal microscopy and immunoblot revealed that oxLDL significantly increased cellular and mitochondrial Bax levels as well as the translocation of this proapoptotic protein from the cytoplasm to mitochondria. In parallel with the increase in the levels and translocation of Bax, oxLDL time-dependently decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential. Exposure of mouse CECs to oxLDL decreased the amounts of mitochondrial cytochrome c, but enhanced cytosolic cytochrome c levels. The amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species were significantly augmented after oxLDL administration. Sequentially, oxLDL increased activities of caspase-9, -3, and -6 in time-dependent manners. Pretreatment with Z-VEID-FMK, an inhibitor of caspase-6, significantly decreased caspase-6 activity and the oxLDL-induced DNA fragmentation and cell apoptosis. This study showed that oxLDL induces apoptotic insults to CECs via signal-transducing events, including enhancing Bax translocation, mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species, and cascade activation of caspase-9, -3, and -6. Therefore, ox

  19. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces apoptotic insults to mouse cerebral endothelial cells via a Bax-mitochondria-caspase protease pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tyng-Guey; Chen, Ta-Liang; Chang, Huai-Chia; Tai, Yu-Ting; Cherng, Yih-Giun; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2007-02-15

    Cerebral endothelial cells (CECs) are crucial components of the blood-brain barrier. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) can induce cell injuries. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of oxLDL on mouse CECs and its possible mechanisms. Mouse CECs were isolated from brain tissues and identified by immunocytochemical staining of vimentin and Factor VIII. oxLDL was prepared from LDL oxidation by copper sulfate. Exposure of mouse CECs to oxLDL decreased cell viability in concentration- and time-dependent manners. oxLDL time-dependently caused shrinkage of cell morphologies. Administration of oxLDL to CECs induced DNA fragmentation in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Analysis of the cell cycle revealed that oxLDL concentration- and time-dependently increased the proportion of CECs which underwent apoptosis. Analysis of confocal microscopy and immunoblot revealed that oxLDL significantly increased cellular and mitochondrial Bax levels as well as the translocation of this proapoptotic protein from the cytoplasm to mitochondria. In parallel with the increase in the levels and translocation of Bax, oxLDL time-dependently decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential. Exposure of mouse CECs to oxLDL decreased the amounts of mitochondrial cytochrome c, but enhanced cytosolic cytochrome c levels. The amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species were significantly augmented after oxLDL administration. Sequentially, oxLDL increased activities of caspase-9, -3, and -6 in time-dependent manners. Pretreatment with Z-VEID-FMK, an inhibitor of caspase-6, significantly decreased caspase-6 activity and the oxLDL-induced DNA fragmentation and cell apoptosis. This study showed that oxLDL induces apoptotic insults to CECs via signal-transducing events, including enhancing Bax translocation, mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species, and cascade activation of caspase-9, -3, and -6. Therefore, ox

  20. Decreased light attenuation in cerebral cortex during cerebral edema detected using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carissa L. R.; Szu, Jenny I.; Eberle, Melissa M.; Wang, Yan; Hsu, Mike S.; Binder, Devin K.; Park, B. Hyle

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Cerebral edema develops in response to a variety of conditions, including traumatic brain injury and stroke, and contributes to the poor prognosis associated with these injuries. This study examines the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for detecting cerebral edema in vivo. Three-dimensional imaging of an in vivo water intoxication model in mice was performed using a spectral-domain OCT system centered at 1300 nm. The change in attenuation coefficient was calculated and cerebral blood flow was analyzed using Doppler OCT techniques. We found that the average attenuation coefficient in the cerebral cortex decreased over time as edema progressed. The initial decrease began within minutes of inducing cerebral edema and a maximum decrease of 8% was observed by the end of the experiment. Additionally, cerebral blood flow slowed during late-stage edema. Analysis of local regions revealed the same trend at various locations in the brain, consistent with the global nature of the cerebral edema model used in this study. These results demonstrate that OCT is capable of detecting in vivo optical changes occurring due to cerebral edema and highlights the potential of OCT for precise spatiotemporal detection of cerebral edema. PMID:25674578

  1. Protective Effect of Topiramate on Hyperglycemia-Induced Cerebral Oxidative Stress, Pericyte Loss and Learning Behavior in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Price, Tulin O.; Farr, Susan A.; Niehoff, Michael L.; Ercal, Nuran; Morley, John E.; Shah, Gul N.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus-associated damage to the microvasculature of the brain is caused by hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress, which results in pericyte loss, blood-brain barrier disruption, and impaired cognitive function. Oxidative stress, in diabetes, is caused by reactive oxygen species produced during accelerated respiration (mitochondrial oxidative metabolism of glucose). The rate of respiration is regulated by mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases (CAs). Inhibition of these enzymes protects the brain from diabetic damage. Previously, we reported that topiramate, a mitochondrial CA inhibitor, at a dose of 50 mg/kg/day protects the brain in diabetes by reducing oxidative stress and restoring pericyte numbers. Topiramate has high affinity for both mitochondrial CAs; therefore, it is conceivable that a much lower dose may inhibit these enzymes and thus protect the brain from hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage. Therefore, in an effort to reduce the toxicity associated with higher doses of topiramate, the current study was designed to investigate the effect of 1.0 mg/kg topiramate on reducing oxidative stress, restoring pericyte numbers in the brain, and improving the impaired learning behavior in diabetic mouse. Diabetes was induced by a one-time injection of streptozotocin and topiramate was administered daily for 12 weeks. Levels of oxidative stress, reduced glutathione (GSH) and 4-hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal (HNE) were measured in the brain and pericyte/endothelial cell ratios in isolated brain microvessels. Learning behavior was assessed by T-maze foot shock avoidance test. A significant decrease in GSH (control, 12.2 ± 0.4 vs. diabetic, 10.8 ± 0.4 vs. diabetic + topiramate, 12.6 ± 0.6, p<0.05) and an increase in HNE (control, 100 ± 4.2, vs. diabetic, 127.3 ± 8.8 vs. diabetic + topiramate, 93.9 ± 8.4 p<0.05) in diabetic mice were corrected by topiramate treatment. Topiramate treatment also resulted in restoration of pericyte numbers in diabetic mice (control

  2. Structural changes induced by daily music listening in the recovering brain after middle cerebral artery stroke: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Särkämö, Teppo; Ripollés, Pablo; Vepsäläinen, Henna; Autti, Taina; Silvennoinen, Heli M; Salli, Eero; Laitinen, Sari; Forsblom, Anita; Soinila, Seppo; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Music is a highly complex and versatile stimulus for the brain that engages many temporal, frontal, parietal, cerebellar, and subcortical areas involved in auditory, cognitive, emotional, and motor processing. Regular musical activities have been shown to effectively enhance the structure and function of many brain areas, making music a potential tool also in neurological rehabilitation. In our previous randomized controlled study, we found that listening to music on a daily basis can improve cognitive recovery and improve mood after an acute middle cerebral artery stroke. Extending this study, a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis utilizing cost function masking was performed on the acute and 6-month post-stroke stage structural magnetic resonance imaging data of the patients (n = 49) who either listened to their favorite music [music group (MG), n = 16] or verbal material [audio book group (ABG), n = 18] or did not receive any listening material [control group (CG), n = 15] during the 6-month recovery period. Although all groups showed significant gray matter volume (GMV) increases from the acute to the 6-month stage, there was a specific network of frontal areas [left and right superior frontal gyrus (SFG), right medial SFG] and limbic areas [left ventral/subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (SACC) and right ventral striatum (VS)] in patients with left hemisphere damage in which the GMV increases were larger in the MG than in the ABG and in the CG. Moreover, the GM reorganization in the frontal areas correlated with enhanced recovery of verbal memory, focused attention, and language skills, whereas the GM reorganization in the SACC correlated with reduced negative mood. This study adds on previous results, showing that music listening after stroke not only enhances behavioral recovery, but also induces fine-grained neuroanatomical changes in the recovering brain.

  3. Prolonged diet induced obesity has minimal effects towards brain pathology in mouse model of cerebral amyloid angiopathy: implications for studying obesity-brain interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Freeman, Linnea R; Pepping, Jennifer K; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, M Paul; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) occurs in nearly every individual with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome, and is the second largest cause of intracerebral hemorrhage. Mouse models of CAA have demonstrated evidence for increased gliosis contributing to CAA pathology. Nearly two thirds of Americans are overweight or obese, with little known about the effects of obesity on the brain, although increasingly the vasculature appears to be a principle target of obesity effects on the brain. In the current study we describe for the first time whether diet induced obesity (DIO) modulates glial reactivity, amyloid levels, and inflammatory signaling in a mouse model of CAA. In these studies we identify surprisingly that DIO does not significantly increase Aβ levels, astrocyte (GFAP) or microglial (IBA-1) gliosis in the CAA mice. However, within the hippocampal gyri a localized increase in reactive microglia were increased in the CA1 and stratum oriens relative to CAA mice on a control diet. DIO was observed to selectively increase IL-6 in CAA mice, with IL-1β and TNF-α not increased in CAA mice in response to DIO. Taken together, these data show that prolonged DIO has only modest effects towards Aβ in a mouse model of CAA, but appears to elevate some localized microglial reactivity within the hippocampal gyri and selective markers of inflammatory signaling. These data are consistent with the majority of the existing literature in other models of Aβ pathology, which surprisingly show a mixed profile of DIO effects towards pathological processes in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease. The importance for considering the potential impact of ceiling effects in pathology within mouse models of Aβ pathogenesis, and the current experimental limitations for DIO in mice to fully replicate metabolic dysfunction present in human obesity, are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Animal Models of Disease.

  4. Structural Changes Induced by Daily Music Listening in the Recovering Brain after Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Särkämö, Teppo; Ripollés, Pablo; Vepsäläinen, Henna; Autti, Taina; Silvennoinen, Heli M.; Salli, Eero; Laitinen, Sari; Forsblom, Anita; Soinila, Seppo; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Music is a highly complex and versatile stimulus for the brain that engages many temporal, frontal, parietal, cerebellar, and subcortical areas involved in auditory, cognitive, emotional, and motor processing. Regular musical activities have been shown to effectively enhance the structure and function of many brain areas, making music a potential tool also in neurological rehabilitation. In our previous randomized controlled study, we found that listening to music on a daily basis can improve cognitive recovery and improve mood after an acute middle cerebral artery stroke. Extending this study, a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis utilizing cost function masking was performed on the acute and 6-month post-stroke stage structural magnetic resonance imaging data of the patients (n = 49) who either listened to their favorite music [music group (MG), n = 16] or verbal material [audio book group (ABG), n = 18] or did not receive any listening material [control group (CG), n = 15] during the 6-month recovery period. Although all groups showed significant gray matter volume (GMV) increases from the acute to the 6-month stage, there was a specific network of frontal areas [left and right superior frontal gyrus (SFG), right medial SFG] and limbic areas [left ventral/subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (SACC) and right ventral striatum (VS)] in patients with left hemisphere damage in which the GMV increases were larger in the MG than in the ABG and in the CG. Moreover, the GM reorganization in the frontal areas correlated with enhanced recovery of verbal memory, focused attention, and language skills, whereas the GM reorganization in the SACC correlated with reduced negative mood. This study adds on previous results, showing that music listening after stroke not only enhances behavioral recovery, but also induces fine-grained neuroanatomical changes in the recovering brain. PMID:24860466

  5. Regulation of Extrasynaptic GABAA α4 Receptors by Ethanol-Induced Protein Kinase A, but Not Protein Kinase C Activation in Cultured Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Stephen L; Bohnsack, J Peyton; Patel, Vraj; Morrow, A Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol produces changes in GABAA receptor trafficking and function that contribute to ethanol dependence symptomatology. Extrasynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid A receptors (GABAA-R) mediate inhibitory tonic current and are of particular interest because they are potentiated by physiologically relevant doses of ethanol. Here, we isolate GABAA α4δ receptors by western blotting in subsynaptic fractions to investigate protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) modulation of ethanol-induced receptor trafficking, while extrasynaptic receptor function is determined by measurement of tonic inhibition and responses evoked by 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP). Rat cerebral cortical neurons were grown for 18 days in vitro and exposed to ethanol and/or PKA/PKC modulators. Ethanol exposure (1 hour) did not alter GABAA α4 receptor abundance, but it increased tonic current amplitude, an effect that was prevented by inhibiting PKA, but not PKC. Direct activation of PKA, but not PKC, increased the abundance and tonic current of extrasynaptic α4δ receptors. In contrast, prolonged ethanol exposure (4 hours) reduced α4δ receptor abundance as well as tonic current, and this effect was also PKA dependent. Finally, PKC activation by ethanol or phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (PdBu) had no effect on extrasynaptic α4δ subunit abundance or activity. We conclude that ethanol alters extrasynaptic α4δ receptor function and expression in cortical neurons in a PKA-dependent manner, but ethanol activation of PKC does not influence these receptors. These results could have clinical relevance for therapeutic strategies to restore normal GABAergic functioning for the treatment of alcohol use disorders.

  6. Gigantic Cavernous Hemangioma of the Liver Treated by Intra-Arterial Embolization with Pingyangmycin-Lipiodol Emulsion: A Multi-Center Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Qingle; Li Yanhao; Chen Yong; Ouyang Yong; He Xiang; Zhang Heping

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic effect and safety of pingyangmycin-lipiodol emulsion (PLE) intra-arterial embolization for treating gigantic cavernous hemangioma of the liver (CHL).Methods: Three hospitals (Nanfang Hospital, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region's Hospital and Huai He Hospital) participated in the study during 1997-2001. A total of 98 patients with CHL were embolized with PLE via the hepatic artery. The therapeutic effects including changes in tumor diameter, symptomatic improvement and occurrence of complications were evaluated for a period of 12 months after the procedure.Results: The tumor diameters decreased significantly from 9.7 {+-} 2.3 cm to 5.6 {+-} 1.6 cm 6 months after the treatment (P < 0.01), and then to 3.0 {+-} 1.2 cm at 12 months (P < 0.01). Transient impairment of liver function was found in 77 cases after embolization, 69 cases of which returned to normal in 2 weeks, and the other eight cases of which recovered 1 month later. The clinical symptoms were significantly relieved in all 53 symptomatic patients. Persistent pain in the hepatic region was found in two cases, and these two patients resorted to surgery eventually.Conclusion: Intra-arterial PLE embolization proves to be effective and safe in treating patients with CHL.

  7. Computed Tomography Guided Percutaneous Injection of a Mixture of Lipiodol and Methylene Blue in Rabbit Lungs: Evaluation of Localization Ability for Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Kwang Nam; Kim, Tae Jung; Song, Yong Sub; Kim, Dong Il

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative localization is necessary prior to video assisted thoracoscopic surgery for the detection of small or deeply located lung nodules. We compared the localization ability of a mixture of lipiodol and methylene blue (MLM) (0.6 mL, 1:5) to methylene blue (0.5 mL) in rabbit lungs. CT-guided percutaneous injections were performed in 21 subjects with MLM and methylene blue. We measured the extent of staining on freshly excised lung and evaluated the subjective localization ability with 4 point scales at 6 and 24 hr after injections. For MLM, radio-opacity was evaluated on the fluoroscopy. We considered score 2 (acceptable) or 3 (excellent) as appropriate for localization. The staining extent of MLM was significantly smaller than methylene blue (0.6 vs 1.0 cm, P<0.001). MLM showed superior staining ability over methylene blue (2.8 vs 2.2, P=0.010). Excellent staining was achieved in 17 subjects (81%) with MLM and 8 (38%) with methylene blue (P=0.011). An acceptable or excellent radio-opacity of MLM was found in 13 subjects (62%). An appropriate localization rate of MLM was 100% with the use of the directly visible ability and radio-opacity of MLM. MLM provides a superior pulmonary localization ability over methylene blue. PMID:24431917

  8. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Additional Content Medical News Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations By James E. Wilberger, MD, Derrick A. Dupre, ... a direct, strong blow to the head. Cerebral lacerations are tears in brain tissue, caused by a ...

  9. Cerebral aneurysm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... area within the vessel wall. If a cerebral (brain) aneurysm ruptures, the escaping blood within the brain may cause severe neurologic complications or death. A person who has a ruptured cerebral aneurysm may complain of the sudden onset of "the ...

  10. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be sure to follow us on Twitter . United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  11. Cerebral Lactate Metabolism After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Patet, Camille; Suys, Tamarah; Carteron, Laurent; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral energy dysfunction has emerged as an important determinant of prognosis following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A number of studies using cerebral microdialysis, positron emission tomography, and jugular bulb oximetry to explore cerebral metabolism in patients with TBI have demonstrated a critical decrease in the availability of the main energy substrate of brain cells (i.e., glucose). Energy dysfunction induces adaptations of cerebral metabolism that include the utilization of alternative energy resources that the brain constitutively has, such as lactate. Two decades of experimental and human investigations have convincingly shown that lactate stands as a major actor of cerebral metabolism. Glutamate-induced activation of glycolysis stimulates lactate production from glucose in astrocytes, with subsequent lactate transfer to neurons (astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle). Lactate is not only used as an extra energy substrate but also acts as a signaling molecule and regulator of systemic and brain glucose use in the cerebral circulation. In animal models of brain injury (e.g., TBI, stroke), supplementation with exogenous lactate exerts significant neuroprotection. Here, we summarize the main clinical studies showing the pivotal role of lactate and cerebral lactate metabolism after TBI. We also review pilot interventional studies that examined exogenous lactate supplementation in patients with TBI and found hypertonic lactate infusions had several beneficial properties on the injured brain, including decrease of brain edema, improvement of neuroenergetics via a "cerebral glucose-sparing effect," and increase of cerebral blood flow. Hypertonic lactate represents a promising area of therapeutic investigation; however, larger studies are needed to further examine mechanisms of action and impact on outcome. PMID:26898683

  12. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  13. A Combination of Remote Ischemic Perconditioning and Cerebral Ischemic Postconditioning Inhibits Autophagy to Attenuate Plasma HMGB1 and Induce Neuroprotection Against Stroke in Rat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue; Han, Dong; Sun, Miao; Feng, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Remote ischemic perconditioning (RIPerC) and ischemic postconditioning (IPOC) are well-acknowledged neuroprotective procedures during ischemic injury. The present study established a combined RIPerC and IPOC (RIPerC + IPOC) model in rats and studied how it would regulate the autophagy process and affect HMGB1 levels in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Rats with MCAO were treated with RIPerC by fastening and release of the left hind limb to achieve 4 cycles of 5 min remote ischemia reperfusion, 40 min prior to cerebral reperfusion, and then treated with IPOC by exposing the cerebral middle artery to 3 cycles of 30 s reperfusion/30 s occlusion at the onset of cerebral reperfusion. Infarction volumes, neurological deficits, and pathological changes were assessed 24 h after ischemia. The autophagy activator rapamycin (RAP) and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) were administrated for further mechanism. The expression and location of HMGB1 and the autophagy-related proteins like LC3, Beclin1, and P62 as well as plasma HMGB1 levels were measured. Our results suggested that RIPerC + IPOC attenuated plasma HMGB1 levels to intensify its neuroprotective effect against cerebral ischemic reperfusion injury via inhibiting the autophagy process. PMID:26852332

  14. Relationship between cerebral sodium-glucose transporter and hyperglycemia in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yui; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2015-09-14

    Post-ischemic hyperglycemia exacerbates the development of cerebral ischemia. To elucidate this exacerbation mechanism, we focused on sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT) as a mediator that lead hyperglycemia to cerebral ischemia. SGLT transport glucose into the cell, together with sodium ion, using the sodium concentration gradient. We have previously reported that suppression of cerebral SGLT ameliorates cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. However, detail relationship cerebral between SGLT and post-ischemic hyperglycemia remain incompletely defined. Therefore, we examined the involvement of cerebral SGLT on cerebral ischemic neuronal damage with or without hyperglycemic condition. Cell survival rate of primary cultured neurons was assessed by biochemical assay. A mouse model of focal ischemia was generated using a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Neuronal damage was assessed with histological and behavioral analyses. Concomitant hydrogen peroxide/glucose treatment exacerbated hydrogen peroxide alone-induced cell death. Although a SGLT family-specific inhibitor, phlorizin had no effect on developed hydrogen peroxide alone-induced cell death, it suppressed cell death induced by concomitant hydrogen peroxide/glucose treatment. α-MG induced a concentration-dependent and significant decrease in neuronal survival. PHZ administered on immediately after reperfusion had no effect, but PHZ given at 6h after reperfusion had an effect. Our in vitro study indicates that SGLT is not involved in neuronal cell death in non-hyperglycemic condition. We have already reported that post-ischemic hyperglycemia begins to develop at 6h after MCAO. Therefore, current our in vivo study show post-ischemic hyperglycemic condition may be necessary for the SGLT-mediated exacerbation of cerebral ischemic neuronal damage.

  15. Acute stress induces an increase in rat cerebral cortex levels of n-butyl-?-carboline-3-carboxylate, an endogenous benzodiazepine binding inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Medina, J H; Peña, C; Novas, M L; Paladini, A C; De Robertis, E

    1987-01-01

    The effect of an acute swimming stress in rats on the amount of n-butyl-?-carboline-3-carboxylate, an endogenous benzodiazepine receptor binding inhibitor, was investigated. In 15 min this substance increased two fold in the cerebral cortex of the stressed rat and this increase was blocked by the previous injection of diazepam; however, no changes were observed in the cerebellum with stress. These results are discussed in relation to previous findings that, after the acute stress, [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding decreases in cerebral cortex and hippocampus, but not in cerebellum. A possible relationship between this benzodiazepine receptor binding inhibitor and the state of "anxiety" produced by stress is postulated.

  16. Use of Ethanol in the Trans-Arterial Lipiodol Embolization (TAELE) of Intermediated-Stage HCC: Is This Safer than Conventional Trans-Arterial Chemo-Embolization (c-TACE)?

    PubMed Central

    Somma, Francesco; D’Angelo, Roberto; Serra, Nicola; Gatta, Gianluca; Grassi, Roberto; Fiore, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate safety and efficacy of Trans-Arterial Ethanol-Lipiodol Embolization (TAELE) compared with conventional Trans-Arterial Chemo-Embolization (cTACE) in the treatment of small intermediate-HCC (BCLC-Stage B). Materials and Methods A random sample of 87 patients (37.93% male; 62.07% female; age range, 36–86 years) with documented small intermediate-HCC and treated with TAELE (mixture 1:1 of Ethanol and Lipiodol) or cTACE (mixture of 50mg-Epirubicin and 5cc-Lipiodol) were retrospectively studied in an institutional review board approved protocol. The two procedures were compared with χ2-test, χ2-test with Yates correction, McNemar’s exact test, ANOVA test and log-rank test. Results TAELE and cTACE therapies were performed in 45 and 42 patients, respectively. Thirty days after the procedure, a Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) showed no significant difference in the number of patients with partial and complete response between the two groups (p-value = 0.958), according to mRECIST. Contrary, significant differences were found in tumor-devascularization, lesion-reduction and post-embolization syndrome occurrence (p-value = 0.0004, p-value = 0.0003 and p-value = 0.009, respectively). Similar survival was observed during 36-month follow-up (p-value = 0.884). Conclusion Compared to cTACE, TAELE showed a better toxicity profile with similar 36-month survival and similar one-month anti-tumor effects, which makes it better tolerated by patients, especially in case of more than one treatment. PMID:26110810

  17. Effects of home-based constraint-induced therapy versus dose-matched control intervention on functional outcomes and caregiver well-being in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Keh-chung; Wang, Tien-ni; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Chia-ling; Chang, Kai-chieh; Lin, Yu-chan; Chen, Yi-ju

    2011-01-01

    This study compared home-based constraint-induced therapy (CIT) with a dose-matched home-based control intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The differences in unilateral and bilateral motor performance, daily functions, and quality of parental well-being (i.e., the stress level of their parents) were evaluated. The study included 21 children with CP (age range, 48-119 months) who were randomly assigned to the CIT or control group. All participants received individualized home-based interventions, 3.5-4h a day, twice a week for 4weeks. Primary outcomes were measured by the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales II (PDMS-2) and the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP) is the whole name of the assessment. All first letters of this instrument title should be in upper case. Secondary outcome measures were the Pediatric Motor Activity Log (PMAL), the Caregiver Functional Use Survey (CFUS), and the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI). Outcome measures were performed at baseline (pretreatment), 4weeks (posttreatment), and 6-month (follow-up). Compared with the control group, the CIT group exhibited significantly better performance in grasping control as measured by the PDMS-2, unilateral/bilateral motor efficacy as measured by the BOTMP, and unilateral hand function as measured by the PMAL immediately after the treatment. At the 6-month follow-up, CIT had beneficial effects on grasping control assessed by PDMS-2 and on unilateral/bilateral functional performance measured by the PMAL and CFUS. Parents in both groups reported comparable stress levels at the 6-month follow-up, although the parent-child dysfunctional interaction deteriorated more immediately after CIT than after the control intervention. The follow-up of this randomized controlled trial suggested beneficial effects of home-based CIT on unilateral grasping skills and unilateral/bilateral functional performance at 6 months. The higher stress level reported by the parents in the

  18. The gene expression profiles of induced pluripotent stem cells from individuals with childhood cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy are consistent with proposed mechanisms of pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a complex disorder with variable expressivity that affects the nervous, adrenocortical and male reproductive systems. Although ABCD1 mutations are known to provide the genetic basis for X-ALD, its pathogenesis is not fully elucidated. While elevated very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) levels in blood and reduced VLCFA catabolic activity in cultured fibroblasts are biomarkers used to identify ABCD1 mutation carriers, the roles peroxisomal lipid metabolism play in disease etiology are unknown. Methods Primary skin fibroblasts from two male patients with the childhood cerebral form of the disease (CCALD) caused by ABCD1 frameshift or missense mutations and three healthy donors were transduced with retroviral vectors expressing the OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC factors. Candidate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were subject to global gene expression, DNA methylation, DNA copy number variation, and genotyping analysis and tested for pluripotency through in vitro differentiation and teratoma formation. Saturated VLCFA (sVLCFA) and plasmalogen levels in primary fibroblasts and iPSCs from healthy donors as well as CCALD patients were determined through mass spectroscopy. Results Skin fibroblasts from CCALD patients and healthy donors were reprogrammed into validated iPSCs. Unlike fibroblasts, CCALD patient iPSCs show differentially expressed genes (DEGs) relevant to both peroxisome abundance and neuroinflammation. Also, in contrast to fibroblasts, iPSCs from patients showed no significant difference in sVLCFA levels relative to those from controls. In all cell types, the plasmalogen levels tested did not correlate with ABCD1 mutation status. Conclusion Normal ABCD1 gene function is not required for reprogramming skin fibroblasts into iPSCs or maintaining pluripotency. Relative to DEGs found in fibroblasts, DEGs uncovered in comparisons of CCALD patient and control iPSCs are more consistent with major hypotheses

  19. Synthesis of CNS active thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-like peptides: Biological evaluation and effect on cognitive impairment induced by cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Meena, Chhuttan L; Thakur, Avinash; Nandekar, Prajwal P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Sharma, Shyam S; Jain, Rahul

    2015-09-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-like peptides were synthesized by replacing critical histidine and pGlu residues in the native peptide. The peptides were evaluated in vitro for receptor binding activity assay and in the cell functional assay; the peptides exhibit selective basal signaling agonist behavior toward TRH-R2. For example, peptides 8a, 8b, 8c, 8 f, 8 h, 8 l and 12 d activated TRH-R2 with potency (EC50) of 0.53 μM, 0.048 μM, 0.05 μM, 0.006 μM, 0.31 μM, 0.034 μM and 0.004 μM, respectively. In contrast for signaling activation of TRH-R1, the same peptide required higher concentration of 19.35 μM, 3.98 μM, 2.54 μM, 0.287 μM, 11.28 μM, 0.986 μM and 0.944 μM, respectively. The results showed that peptides were 36.5, 82.9, 50.8, 47.8, 36.3, 32.6 and 235-fold selective to TRH-R2 receptor subtype. The peptides were investigated for CNS activity at 10 μmol/kg in pentobarbital-induced sleep assay study. Peptides 8c (16.5 ± 1.4 min) and 8l (16.5 ± 2.1 min) displayed excellent CNS activity. In an in vivo study, peptide 8c did not cause significant change in the rat plasma TSH levels. The peptide 8c was further investigated for neuroprotective potential, and significantly reduced infracts volume and neurological score in the focal cerebral ischemia model in mice. Peptide 8c also significantly lowered MDA levels, indicating reduction of oxidative and enhanced percentage cell survival in CA1 region, when compared to ischemic brain. PMID:26216015

  20. Local cerebral metabolic effects of L-dopa therapy in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced parkinsonism in monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Porrino, L.J.; Burns, R.S.; Crane, A.M.; Palombo, E.; Kopin, I.J.; Sokoloff, L.

    1987-08-01

    The quantitative 2-deoxy(/sup 14/C) glucose autoradiographic method was used to map the distribution of alterations in local cerebral glucose utilization that accompanies clinically effective chronic L-dopa therapy of rhesus monkeys made parkinsonian by the administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). This pattern of changes was compared to the effects of a similar treatment regimen in normal monkeys. L-Dopa was administered orally to normal and parkinsonian monkeys 3 times daily for 60-120 days prior to measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization. In parkinsonian monkeys treated with L-dopa, signs and symptoms of parkinsonism were controlled or suppressed, and widespread increases in glucose utilization were seen throughout the brain. Cerebral metabolic activity was increased both in areas rich in dopaminergic receptors, such as the caudate and putamen, and in nondopaminergic areas involved in motor functions. In many structures the rates of glucose utilization in L-dopa-treated parkinsonian monkeys were increased to levels that far exceeded rates measured in normal monkeys. In sharp contrast, similar treatment with L-dopa in normal monkeys had little if any effect on local cerebral glucose utilization. L-Dopa, then, appears to have an action in animals with selective lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta produced by MPTP that is distinctly different from its effects in the normal monkey.

  1. Association of cisplatin and intra-arterial injection of {sup 131}I-lipiodol in treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: Results of phase II trial

    SciTech Connect

    Raoul, Jean-Luc . E-mail: raoul@rennes.fnclcc.fr; Boucher, Eveline; Olivie, Damien; Guillygomarc'h, Anne; Boudjema, Karim; Garin, Etienne

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: Intra-arterial injections of {sup 131}I-lipiodol ({sup 131}I-Lip) provide an effective treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma. In hepatocellular carcinoma cell cultures, concurrent administration of cisplatin increases the cytotoxicity of {sup 131}I. The efficacy and tolerance of intra-arterial injections of {sup 131}I-Lip combined with systemic cisplatin was tested in a phase II trial. Methods and Materials: The inclusion criteria were proven unresectable nonmetastatic hepatocellular carcinoma, compensated liver disease, and adequate laboratory test findings. Treatment comprised the combination of intra-arterial injection of {sup 131}I-Lip (2.2 GBq) with intravenous infusion of low-dose cisplatin. The combined treatment could be repeated. Results: A total of 41 patients were included; 37 had cirrhosis and 38 had measurable tumors. One to four treatments (median, two) were given. The cisplatin dose was 75 mg for the first course and 72 mg for the second. Grade 3-4 (n/n) adverse effects were observed in 14 patients, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (3/0), platelets (5/1), asthenia (1/0), pain (1/0), and vomiting (1/0). Four patients developed pulmonary toxicity; 2 cases were likely related to {sup 131}I-Lip administration and 1 was fatal. The response rate was 47% (18 of 38), and the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 73% {+-} 7% and 48% {+-} 9%, respectively. Conclusion: This combination had a tolerable toxicity profile and provided an objective response rate, warranting a phase III trial.

  2. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  3. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy or bimanual occupational therapy following injection of Botulinum toxin-A to improve bimanual performance in young children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial methods paper

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Use of Botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) for treatment of upper limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy has become routine clinical practice in many paediatric treatment centres worldwide. There is now high-level evidence that upper limb BoNT-A injection, in combination with occupational therapy, improves outcomes in children with cerebral palsy at both the body function/structure and activity level domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Investigation is now required to establish what amount and specific type of occupational therapy will further enhance functional outcomes and prolong the beneficial effects of BoNT-A. Methods/Design A randomised, controlled, evaluator blinded, prospective parallel-group trial. Eligible participants were children aged 18 months to 6 years, diagnosed with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy and who were able to demonstrate selective motor control of the affected upper limb. Both groups received upper limb injections of BoNT-A. Children were randomised to either the modified constraint-induced movement therapy group (experimental) or bimanual occupational therapy group (control). Outcome assessments were undertaken at pre-injection and 1, 3 and 6 months following injection of BoNT-A. The primary outcome measure was the Assisting Hand Assessment. Secondary outcomes included: the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test; Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory; Canadian Occupational Performance Measure; Goal Attainment Scaling; Pediatric Motor Activity Log; modified Ashworth Scale and; the modified Tardieu Scale. Discussion The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (a uni-manual therapy) versus bimanual occupational therapy (a bimanual therapy) on improving bimanual upper limb performance of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy following upper limb injection of Bo

  4. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  5. Sudden death of a 15-year-old girl due to fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus-diabetic ketoacidosis induced cerebral edema?

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongmei; Liu, Liang; Zhou, Yiwu; Mu, Jiao; Zhang, Ji

    2014-08-01

    Sudden death from fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus is uncommon in forensic practice. Here we report the sudden death of a 15-year-old girl who presented with vomiting, fever and abdominal pain and died unexpectedly. Postmortem examination showed severe pancreatic islet destruction, cerebral edema and lipid vacuolization of the epithelium of the renal proximal tubules and liver cells. The biochemical analysis in reserved heart blood and vitreous fluid indicated the elevated levels of glucose and ketone bodies and lower glycosylated hemoglobin and C-peptide. The cause of death was attributed to fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus which led to diabetic ketoacidosis-associated cerebral edema. This report suggested that the histological examination of the pancreas, liver and kidney, insulin immunohistochemistry, as well as biochemical analysis could be useful for the diagnosis of diabetes related death.

  6. Cerebral Asymmetries and Reading Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are historical developments regarding the concepts of cerebral localization, and analyzed are implications of current research on the role of the cerebral hemispheres in reading disorders. (CL)

  7. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  8. Hemihyperhidrosis in cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Faruqi, Shoaib; Redmond, Gemma; Ram, Pusbar; Owens, Val B; Sangster, Graeme; Barrett, James A

    2004-09-01

    Increased sweating on the hemiparetic side in cerebral infarcts is not a common clinical finding. The onset, severity and duration of symptoms can vary. The structural lesion responsible for this is a subject of conjecture. We present the case of a 66-year-old man who developed hemihyperhidrosis secondary to a cerebral infarct. PMID:15315923

  9. A randomized controlled trial of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization with lipiodol, doxorubicin and cisplatin versus intravenous doxorubicin for patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mabed, Mohamed; Esmaeel, M; El-Khodary, T; Awad, M; Amer, T

    2009-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major and often therapeutically frustrating oncological problem. A total of 100 patients with unresectable HCC were recruited and randomized to be treated with either transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) or systemic chemotherapy. Fifty patients were treated with TACE using lipiodol, doxorubicin and cisplatin, while 50 patients were treated with systemic doxorubicin alone. Patients treated with TACE achieved a significantly higher response rate, with partial response achieved in 16 patients (32%) versus five patients (10%) in the chemotherapy arm (P = 0.007). A significantly more favourable tumour response to chemoembolization was found in patients with single lesions (P = 0.02), Child class A (P = 0.007), Okuda stage 1 (P = 0.005) and alpha-feto protein less than 400 ng/mL (P < 0.001). The probability of tumour progression was significantly lower in cases treated with TACE where the median progression free survival was 32 weeks (range, 16-70 weeks) versus 26 weeks (range, 14-54 weeks) for patients treated with systemic chemotherapy (P = 0.03). However, the median overall survival did not differ significantly in cases treated with TACE (38 weeks) compared with those treated with chemotherapy (32 weeks) (P = 0.08), except for patients with serum albumin >3.3 g/dL (60 vs. 36 weeks; P = 0.003). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that a rise of serum albumin by 1 g/dL is associated with a decrease in the risk of death by 33% (95% confidence interval: 0.12-0.94, P = 0.038). Mortality in the chemoembolization arm was due to tumour progression in 18 patients (53%), liver failure in 11 patients (32%) and gastro intestinal tract (GIT) bleeding in 5 patients (15%). Mortality in the chemotherapy arm was due to tumour progression in 23 patients (64%), liver failure in 9 patients (25%) and GIT bleeding in 4 patients (11%). Treatment-related mortality was 4% in the TACE arm versus 0% in the chemotherapy arm. In conclusion

  10. Shengmai injection attenuates the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion induced autophagy via modulation of the AMPK, mTOR and JNK pathways.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haopeng; Li, Long; Zhou, Kecheng; Wang, Yuqing; Guan, Teng; Chai, Chengzhi; Kou, Junping; Yu, Boyang; Yan, Yongqing

    2016-10-01

    Context Shengmai injection (SMI) is a patented Chinese medicine originated from the ancient Chinese herbal compound Shengmai san, which is used extensively for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease in the clinic. Objective To determine the neuroprotective effect of SMI, we investigated the effect of SMI on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in mice as well as the mechanisms underlying this effect. Materials and methods Right middle cerebral artery was occluded by inserting a thread through internal carotid artery for 1 h, and then reperfused for 24 h in mice. The neuroprotective effects were determined using transmission electron microscopic examination, the evaluation of infarct volume, neurological deficits and water brain content. Related mechanisms were evaluated by immunofluorescence staining and western blotting. SMI was injected intraperitoneally after 1 h of ischemia at doses of 1.42, 2.84 and 5.68 g/kg. The control group received saline as the SMI vehicle. Results Results showed that SMI (1.42, 2.84 and 5.68 g/kg) could significantly reduce the infarct volume, SMI (5.68 g/kg) could also significantly improve the neurological deficits, decreased brain water content, as well as the neuronal morphological changes. SMI (5.68g/kg) could significantly inhibit the expression of autophagy-related proteins: Beclin1 and LC3. It also reduced the increase in LC3-positive cells. SMI (5.68 g/kg) remarkably inhibited the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK), and down-regulated the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) after 24 h of reperfusion. Discussion and conclusion The results indicate that SMI provides remarkable protection against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, which may be partly due to the inhibition of autophagy and related signalling pathways.

  11. Effects of cerebral ischemia on neuronal hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    He, Yangdong; Hua, Ya; Liu, Wenquan; Hu, Haitao; Keep, Richard F.; Xi, Guohua

    2009-01-01

    Summary The present study examined whether or not neuronal hemoglobin (Hb) is present in rats. It then examined whether cerebral ischemia or ischemic preconditioning (IPC) affects neuronal Hb levels in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either 15 minutes of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with 24 hours of reperfusion, an IPC stimulus, or 24 hours of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO), or IPC followed three days later by 24 hours of pMCAO. In vitro, primary cultured neurons were exposed to 2 hours of oxygen-glucose deprivation with 22 hours of reoxygenation. Results showed that Hb is widely expressed in rat cerebral neurons but not astrocytes. Hb expression was significantly upregulated in the ipsilateral caudate and the cortical core of the middle cerebral artery territory after IPC. Hb levels also increased in more penumbral cortex and the contralateral hemisphere 24 hours after pMCAO, but expression in the ipsilateral caudate and cortical core area were decreased. Ischemic preconditioning modified pMCAO-induced brain Hb changes. Neuronal Hb levels in vitro were increased by 2 hours of oxygen-glucose deprivation and 22 hours of reoxygenation. These results indicate that Hb is synthesized in neurons and can be upregulated by ischemia. PMID:19066615

  12. Acquired Cerebral Trauma: Epilogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    The article summarizes a series of articles concerning acquired cerebral trauma. Reviewed are technological advances, treatment, assessment, potential innovative therapies, long-term outcome, family impact of chronic brain injury, and prevention. (DB)

  13. Cerebral Vascular Control and Metabolism in Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Bain, Anthony R; Nybo, Lars; Ainslie, Philip N

    2015-07-01

    This review provides an in-depth update on the impact of heat stress on cerebrovascular functioning. The regulation of cerebral temperature, blood flow, and metabolism are discussed. We further provide an overview of vascular permeability, the neurocognitive changes, and the key clinical implications and pathologies known to confound cerebral functioning during hyperthermia. A reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), derived primarily from a respiratory-induced alkalosis, underscores the cerebrovascular changes to hyperthermia. Arterial pressures may also become compromised because of reduced peripheral resistance secondary to skin vasodilatation. Therefore, when hyperthermia is combined with conditions that increase cardiovascular strain, for example, orthostasis or dehydration, the inability to preserve cerebral perfusion pressure further reduces CBF. A reduced cerebral perfusion pressure is in turn the primary mechanism for impaired tolerance to orthostatic challenges. Any reduction in CBF attenuates the brain's convective heat loss, while the hyperthermic-induced increase in metabolic rate increases the cerebral heat gain. This paradoxical uncoupling of CBF to metabolism increases brain temperature, and potentiates a condition whereby cerebral oxygenation may be compromised. With levels of experimentally viable passive hyperthermia (up to 39.5-40.0 °C core temperature), the associated reduction in CBF (∼ 30%) and increase in cerebral metabolic demand (∼ 10%) is likely compensated by increases in cerebral oxygen extraction. However, severe increases in whole-body and brain temperature may increase blood-brain barrier permeability, potentially leading to cerebral vasogenic edema. The cerebrovascular challenges associated with hyperthermia are of paramount importance for populations with compromised thermoregulatory control--for example, spinal cord injury, elderly, and those with preexisting cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26140721

  14. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed.

  15. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Allroggen, H.; Abbott, R.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of compensation in the early stages of thrombus formation. Systemic inflammatory diseases and inherited as well as acquired coagulation disorders are frequent causes, although in up to 30% of cases no underlying cause can be identified. The oral contraceptive pill appears to be an important additional risk factor. The spectrum of clinical presentations ranges from headache with papilloedema to focal deficit, seizures and coma. Magnetic resonance imaging with venography is the investigation of choice; computed tomography alone will miss a significant number of cases. It has now been conclusively shown that intravenous heparin is the first-line treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because of its efficacy, safety and feasability. Local thrombolysis may be indicated in cases of deterioration, despite adequate heparinisation. This should be followed by oral anticoagulation for 3-6 months. The prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is generally favourable. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.


Keywords: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis PMID:10622773

  16. Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis by Exophiala dermatitidis.

    PubMed

    Sood, S; Vaid, V K; Sharma, M; Bhartiya, H

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis is a rare and frequently fatal disease. We report a case of cerebral phaeohyphomycosis caused by Exophiala dermatitidis in a young immuno competent male presenting to a tertiary care hospital in Jaipur. PMID:24713913

  17. Cardiovascular responses induced by Catalase Inhibitior into the Fourth Cerebral Ventricle is changed in Wistar rats exposed to sidestream cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Valenti, Vitor E.; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Fonseca, Fernando L. A.; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Adami, Fernando; Ferreira, Celso

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This experimental study aimed to evaluate the effects of central catalase inhibition on cardiovascular responses in rats exposed to sidestream cigarette smoke (SSCS) for 3 weeks. Methodology A total of 20 males Wistar rats (320–370g) were implanted with a stainless steel guide cannula into the fourth cerebral ventricle (4thV). Femoral artery and vein were cannulated for mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) measurement and drug infusion, respectively. Rats were exposed to SSCS for three weeks, 180 minutes per day, 5 days/week [carbon monoxide (CO): 100–300 ppm)]. Baroreflex was tested with one pressor dose of phenylephrine (PHE, 8 μg/kg, bolus) and one depressor dose of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 50 μg/kg, bolus). Cardiovascular responses were evaluated before and 15 minutes after 3-amino-1, 2, 4-triazole (ATZ, catalase inhibitor, 0.001g/100μL) injection into the 4th V. Results Vehicle treatment into the 4th V did not change cardiovascular responses. Central catalase inhibition increased tachycardic peak, attenuated bradycardic peak and reduced HR range at 15 minutes, increased MAP at 5, 15 and 30 min and increased HR at 5 and 15 min. In rats exposed to SSCS, central ATZ increased basal MAP after 5 min and increased HR at 5, 15 and 30 minutes, respectively, and attenuated bradycardic peak at 15 minutes. Conclusion This study suggests that brain oxidative stress caused by SSCS influences autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system. PMID:24421748

  18. Neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Namura, Shobu; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Liu, Jialing; Yenari, Midori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, a focal or global insufficiency of blood flow to the brain, can arise through multiple mechanisms, including thrombosis and arterial hemorrhage. Ischemia is a major driver of stroke, one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the general etiology of cerebral ischemia and stroke has been known for some time, the conditions have only recently been considered treatable. This report describes current research in this field seeking to fully understand the pathomechanisms underlying stroke; to characterize the brain’s intrinsic injury, survival, and repair mechanisms; to identify putative drug targets as well as cell-based therapies; and to optimize the delivery of therapeutic agents to the damaged cerebral tissue. PMID:23488559

  19. Regulation of cerebral blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Querido, Jordan S; Sheel, A William

    2007-01-01

    Constant cerebral blood flow (CBF) is vital to human survival. Originally thought to receive steady blood flow, the brain has shown to experience increases in blood flow during exercise. Although increases have not consistently been documented, the overwhelming evidence supporting an increase may be a result of an increase in brain metabolism. While an increase in metabolism may be the underlying causative factor for the increase in CBF during exercise, there are many modulating variables. Arterial blood gas tensions, most specifically the partial pressure of carbon dioxide, strongly regulate CBF by affecting cerebral vessel diameter through changes in pH, while carbon dioxide reactivity increases from rest to exercise. Muscle mechanoreceptors may contribute to the initial increase in CBF at the onset of exercise, after which exercise-induced hyperventilation tends to decrease flow by pial vessel vasoconstriction. Although elite athletes may benefit from hyperoxia during intense exercise, cerebral tissue is well protected during exercise, and cerebral oxygenation does not appear to pose a limiting factor to exercise performance. The role of arterial blood pressure is important to the increase in CBF during exercise; however, during times of acute hypotension such as during diastole at high-intensity exercise or post-exercise hypotension, cerebral autoregulation may be impaired. The impairment of an increase in cardiac output during exercise with a large muscle mass similarly impairs the increase in CBF velocity, suggesting that cardiac output may play a key role in the CBF response to exercise. Glucose uptake and CBF do not appear to be related; however, there is growing evidence to suggest that lactate is used as a substrate when glucose levels are low. Traditionally thought to have no influence, neural innervation appears to be a protective mechanism to large increases in cardiac output. Changes in middle cerebral arterial velocity are independent of changes in

  20. Unusual Cerebral Emboli.

    PubMed

    Zakhari, Nader; Castillo, Mauricio; Torres, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    The heart and the carotid arteries are the most common sites of origin of embolic disease to the brain. Clots arising from these locations are the most common types of brain emboli. Less common cerebral emboli include air, fat, calcium, infected vegetations, and tumor cells as well as emboli originating in the venous system. Although infarcts can be the final result of any type of embolism, described herein are the ancillary and sometimes unique imaging features of less common types of cerebral emboli that may allow for a specific diagnosis to be made or at least suspected in many patients.

  1. Diabetes aggravates nanoparticles induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier permeability, brain edema formation, alterations in cerebral blood flow and neuronal injury. An experimental study using physiological and morphological investigations in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna

    2010-12-01

    The possibility that diabetes aggravates nanoparticles induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, edema formation and brain pathology was examined in a rat model. Engineered nanoparticles from metals Ag and Cu (50-60 mn) were administered (50 mg/kg, i.p.) once daily for 7 days in normal and streptozotocine induced diabetic rats. On the 8th day, BBB permeability to Evans blue and radioactive iodine (131I-sodium) was examined in 16 brain regions. In these brain regions alterations in regional CBF was also evaluated using radiolabelled (125I) carbonized microspheres (o.d. 15 +/- 6 microm). Regional brain edema and Na+, K+ and Cl- ion analysis were done in 8 selected brain regions. Histopathology was used to detect neuronal damage employing Nissl staining. Nanoparticles treatment in diabetic rats showed much more profound disruption of the BBB to Evans blue albumin (EBA) and radioiodine in almost all the 16 regions examined as compared to the normal animals. In these diabetic animals reduction in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was more pronounced than in normal rats. Edema development as seen using water content and increase in Na+ and a decrease in K+ ion were most marked in diabetic rats as compared to normal rats after nanoparticles treatment. Cell changes in the regions of BBB disruptions were also exacerbated in diabetic rats compared to normal group after nanoparticles treatment. Taken together, these observations are the first to show that diabetic rats are more susceptible to nanoparticles induced cerebrovascular reactions in the brain and neuronal damage. The possible mechanisms and significance of the present findings are discussed. PMID:21121280

  2. Elevated Aminopeptidase P Attenuates Cerebral Arterial Responses to Bradykinin in Fawn-Hooded Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Hye Khan, Md Abdul; Sharma, Amit; Rarick, Kevin R; Roman, Richard J; Harder, David R; Imig, John D

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral arterial myogenic and autoregulatory responses are impaired in Fawn Hooded hypertensive (FHH) rats. Cerebral autoregulatory responses are restored in the congenic rat strain in which a segment of chromosome 1 from the Brown Norway (BN) rat was transferred into the FHH genetic background (FHH.1BN). The impact of this region on cerebral arterial dilator responses remains unknown. Aminopeptidase is a gene that was transferred into the FHH genetic background to generate the FHH.1BN rats and is responsible for degradation of the vasodilator bradykinin. Thus, we hypothesized that FHH rats will have increased aminopeptidase P levels with impaired cerebral arterial responses to bradykinin compared to BN and FHH.1BN rats. We demonstrated higher cerebral arterial expression of aminopeptidase P in FHH compared to BN rats. Accordingly, we demonstrated markedly impaired cerebral arterial dilation to bradykinin in FHH compared to BN rats. Interestingly, aminopeptidase P expression was lower in FHH.1BN compared to FHH rats. Decreased aminopeptidase P levels in FHH.1BN rats were associated with increased cerebral arterial bradykinin-induced dilator responses. Aminopeptidase P inhibition by apstatin improved cerebral arterial bradykinin dilator responses in FHH rats to a level similar to FHH.1BN rats. Unlike bradykinin, cerebral arterial responses to acetylcholine were similar between FHH and FHH.1BN groups. These findings indicate decreased bradykinin bioavailability contributes to impaired cerebral arterial dilation in FHH rats. Overall, these data indicate an important role of aminopeptidase P in the impaired cerebral arterial function in FHH rat.

  3. The cerebral venous system and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Imray, Christopher H E

    2016-01-15

    Most hypobaric hypoxia studies have focused on oxygen delivery and therefore cerebral blood inflow. Few have studied venous outflow. However, the volume of blood entering and leaving the skull (∼700 ml/min) is considerably greater than cerebrospinal fluid production (0.35 ml/min) or edema formation rates and slight imbalances of in- and outflow have considerable effects on intracranial pressure. This dynamic phenomenon is not necessarily appreciated in the currently taught static "Monro-Kellie" doctrine, which forms the basis of the "Tight-Fit" hypothesis thought to underlie high altitude headache, acute mountain sickness, and high altitude cerebral edema. Investigating both sides of the cerebral circulation was an integral part of the 2007 Xtreme Everest Expedition. The results of the relevant studies performed as part of and subsequent to this expedition are reviewed here. The evidence from recent studies suggests a relative venous outflow insufficiency is an early step in the pathogenesis of high altitude headache. Translation of knowledge gained from high altitude studies is important. Many patients in a critical care environment develop hypoxemia akin to that of high altitude exposure. An inability to drain the hypoxemic induced increase in cerebral blood flow could be an underappreciated regulatory mechanism of intracranial pressure.

  4. Neuronal damage in hippocampal subregions induced by various durations of transient cerebral ischemia in gerbils using Fluoro-Jade B histofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong-Kun; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Shin, Bich Na; Kim, In Hye; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon; Cho, Yong-Jun; Kang, Il-Jun; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho

    2012-02-01

    Although there are many studies on ischemic brain damage in the gerbil, which is a good model of transient cerebral ischemia, studies on neuronal damage according to the duration of ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) time are limited. We carried out neuronal damage in the gerbil hippocampus after various durations of I-R (5, 10, 15 and 20 min) using Fluoro-Jade B (F-J B, a maker for neuronal degeneration) histofluorescence as well as cresyl violet (CV) staining. The changes of CV positive ((+)) neurons were well detected in the hippocampal CA1 region, not in the other regions. F-J B histofluorescence staining showed apparent neuronal damage in all the hippocampal subregions. In the CA1, most of the pyramidal neurons of the stratum pyramidale (SP) were stained with F-J B (about 100/mm(2) in a section), and F-J B(+) neurons in the other ischemia-groups were not changed. In the CA2, a few F-J B(+) neurons were detected in the SP of the 5 min ischemia-group, and F-J B(+) neurons were gradually increased with the longer time of ischemia: in the 20 min ischemia-group, the mean number of F-J B(+) neurons was about 85/mm(2) in a section. In the CA3, some F-J B(+) neurons were observed only in the SP of the 20 min ischemia-group. In the dentate gyrus, some F-J B positive neurons were detected only in the polymorphic layer (PL) of the 5 min ischemia-group, and the number of F-J B(+) neurons were gradually increased with the longer ischemic time. Our findings indicate that F-J B histofluorescence showed a very high quality of neuronal damage in all the hippocampal subregions.

  5. Enhanced neurofibrillary tangle formation, cerebral atrophy, and cognitive deficits induced by repetitive mild brain injury in a transgenic tauopathy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yoshiyama, Yasumasa; Uryu, Kunihiro; Higuchi, Makoto; Longhi, Luca; Hoover, Rachel; Fujimoto, Scott; McIntosh, Tracy; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2005-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and repetitive TBI (rTBI) may culminate in dementia pugilistica (DP), a syndrome characterized by progressive dementia, parkinsonism, and the hallmark brain lesions of AD, including neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), formed by abnormal tau filaments and senile plaques (SPs) composed of Abeta fibrils. Previous study showed that mild rTBI (mrTBI) accelerated the deposition of Abeta in the brains of transgenic (Tg) mice (Tg2576) that over-express human Abeta precursor proteins with the familial AD Swedish mutations (APP695swe) and model of AD-like amyloidosis. Here, we report studies of the effects of mrTBI on AD-like tau pathologies in Tg mice expressing the shortest human tau isoform (T44) subjected to mrTBI, causing brain concussion without structural brain damage to simulate injuries linked to DP. Twelve-month-old Tg T44 (n = 18) and wild-type (WT; n = 24) mice were subjected to mrTBI (four times a day, 1 day per week, for 4 weeks; n = 24) or sham treatment (n = 18). Histopathological analysis of mice at 9 months after mrTBI revealed that one of the Tg T44 mice showed extensive telencephalic NFT and cerebral atrophy. Although statistical analysis of neurobehavioral tests at 6 months after mrTBI did not show any significant difference in any of groups of mice, the Tg T44 mouse with extensive NFT had an exceptionally low neurobehavioral score. The reasons for the augmentation of tau pathologies in only one T44 tau Tg mouse subjected to mrTBI remain to be elucidated.

  6. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  7. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  8. The Pirate group intervention protocol: description and a case report of a modified constraint-induced movement therapy combined with bimanual training for young children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Pauline B; van Hartingsveldt, Margo; Anderson, Patricia G; van den Tillaar, Ingrid; van der Burg, Jan; Geurts, Alexander C

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a child-friendly modified constraint-induced movement therapy protocol that is combined with goal-directed task-specific bimanual training (mCIMT-BiT). This detailed description elucidates the approach and supports various research reports. This protocol is used in a Pirate play group setting and aims to extend bimanual skills in play and self-care activities for children with cerebral palsy and unilateral spastic paresis of the upper limb. To illustrate the content and course of treatment and its effect, a case report of a two-year-old boy is presented. After the eight-week mCIMT-BiT intervention, the child improved the capacity of his affected arm and hand in both quantitative and qualitative terms and his bimanual performance in daily life as assessed by the Assisting Hand Assessment, ABILHAND-Kids, Video Observations Aarts and Aarts Module Determine Developmental Disregard, Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and Goal Attainment Scaling. It is argued that improvement of affected upper-limb capacity in a test situation may be achieved and retained relatively easily, but it may take a lot more training to stabilize the results and automate motor control of the upper limb. Future studies with groups of children should elaborate on these intensity and generalization issues.

  9. Focal cerebral ischaemia induces a decrease in activity and a shift in ouabain affinity of Na+, K+-ATPase isoforms without modifications in mRNA and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Jamme, I; Barbey, O; Trouvé, P; Charlemagne, D; Maixent, J M; MacKenzie, E T; Pellerin, L; Nouvelot, A

    1999-02-20

    In a mouse model of focal cerebral ischaemia, we observed after 1 h of ischaemia, that the total Na+, K+-ATPase activity was decreased by 39.4%, and then did not vary significantly up to 6 h post-occlusion. In the sham group, the dose-response curves for ouabain disclosed three inhibitory sites of low (LA), high (HA) and very high (VHA) affinity. In ischaemic animals, we detected the presence of only two inhibitory sites for ouabain. After 1 h of permanent occlusion, the first site exhibited a low affinity while the second site presented an affinity intermediate between those of HA and VHA sites, which evolved after 3 h and 6 h of occlusion towards that of the VHA site. The presence of only two ouabain sites for Na+, K+-ATPase after ischaemia could result from a change in ouabain affinity of both HA and VHA sites (alpha2 and alpha3 isoforms, respectively) to form a unique component. Irrespective of the duration of ischaemia, the smaller activity of this second site accounted entirely for the loss in total activity. Surprisingly, no modifications in protein and mRNA expression of any alpha or beta isoforms of the enzyme were observed, thus suggesting that ischaemia could induce intrinsic modifications of the Na+, K+-ATPase. PMID:10082868

  10. Cerebral White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Smith, Eric E.; Eichler, Florian S.; Filley, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of the cerebral white matter (WM) result in focal neurobehavioral syndromes, neuropsychiatric phenomena, and dementia. The cerebral WM contains fiber pathways that convey axons linking cerebral cortical areas with each other and with subcortical structures, facilitating the distributed neural circuits that subserve sensorimotor function, intellect, and emotion. Recent neuroanatomical investigations reveal that these neural circuits are topographically linked by five groupings of fiber tracts emanating from every neocortical area: (1) cortico-cortical association fibers; (2) corticostriatal fibers; (3) commissural fibers; and cortico-subcortical pathways to (4) thalamus and (5) pontocerebellar system, brain stem, and/or spinal cord. Lesions of association fibers prevent communication between cortical areas engaged in different domains of behavior. Lesions of subcortical structures or projection/striatal fibers disrupt the contribution of subcortical nodes to behavior. Disconnection syndromes thus result from lesions of the cerebral cortex, subcortical structures, and WM tracts that link the nodes that make up the distributed circuits. The nature and the severity of the clinical manifestations of WM lesions are determined, in large part, by the location of the pathology: discrete neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms result from focal WM lesions, whereas cognitive impairment across multiple domains—WM dementia—occurs in the setting of diffuse WM disease. We present a detailed review of the conditions affecting WM that produce these neurobehavioral syndromes, and consider the pathophysiology, clinical effects, and broad significance of the effects of aging and vascular compromise on cerebral WM, in an attempt to help further the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of these disorders. PMID:18990132

  11. Vesicular antioxidants: role in age-related cerebral oxidative injury.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sibani; Mandal, Ardhendu Kumar; Das, Nirmalendu

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress, due to the generation of reactive oxygen species, is a major factor in cerebral ischemic damage and changes the activities of antioxidant enzymes and substantially influences the aging process. Free chemical antioxidant is almost ineffective to treat brain ischemia as blood-brain barrier exists in between blood and brain interstitial fluid, limiting component to pass from the circulation into cerebral region. Different compounds have been tested in vivo in different vesiculated forms to prevent cerebral ischemia. Nanoparticle-encapsulated drug treatment resulted in a significant protection of the antioxidant enzymes in both young and old rats. Nanocapsulated drug treatment causes a substantial protection against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion-induced oxidative damage to all parts of brain specifically hippocampal regions of all age groups of rat brain. PMID:23740123

  12. [Raman spectra of monkey cerebral cortex tissue].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-chun; Guo, Jian-yu; Cai, Wei-ying; Wang, Zu-geng; Sun, Zhen-rong

    2010-01-01

    Monkey cerebral cortex, an important part in the brain to control action and thought activities, is mainly composed of grey matter and nerve cell. In the present paper, the in situ Raman spectra of the cerebral cortex of the birth, teenage and aged monkeys were achieved for the first time. The results show that the Raman spectra for the different age monkey cerebral cortex exhibit most obvious changes in the regions of 1000-1400 and 2800-3000 cm(-1). With monkey growing up, the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1313 and 2885 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH2 chain vibrational mode of lipid become stronger and stronger whereas the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1338 and 2932 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH3 chain vibrational mode of protein become weaker and weaker. In addition, the two new Raman bands at 1296 and 2850 cm(-1) are only observed in the aged monkey cerebral cortex, therefore, the two bands can be considered as a character or "marker" to differentiate the caducity degree with monkey growth In order to further explore the changes, the relative intensity ratios of the Raman band at 1313 cm(-1) to that at 1338 cm(-1) and the Raman band at 2885 cm(-1) to that at 2 932 cm(-1), I1313/I1338 and I2885/I2932, which are the lipid-to-protein ratios, are introduced to denote the degree of the lipid content. The results show that the relative intensity ratios increase significantly with monkey growth, namely, the lipid content in the cerebral cortex increases greatly with monkey growth. So, the authors can deduce that the overmuch lipid is an important cause to induce the caducity. Therefore, the results will be a powerful assistance and valuable parameter to study the order of life growth and diagnose diseases.

  13. Effect of pyritinol, a cerebral protector, on learning and memory deficits induced by prenatal undernutrition and environmental impoverishment in young rats.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, A K; Upadhyay, S N; Bhattacharya, S K

    1990-07-01

    The study was conducted on 64 CF strain albino rats, which were equally distributed into 8 evenly matched groups following a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design, by varying three independent factors at two levels: nutrition--normal and undernutrition; environment--enrichment and impoverishment, and drug treatment--vehicle and pyritinol (100 mg/kg, ip). Prenatal undernutrition was induced by restricting the mother's food intake. The environmental enrichment/impoverishment and the vehicle/pyritinol treatments were given during the postweaning period of the pups. The rats were subjected to original and subsequent reversal brightness discrimination learning tests in a single unit T-maze at 8-9 weeks of age. Thereafter, the animals were tested for the passive avoidance learning. The results indicate that undernutrition caused significant original discrimination learning deficits whereas environmental deprivation attenuated both the original and reversal learning performance. Environmental impoverishment attenuated the retention of passive avoidance behaviour but undernutrition had no effect on this paradigm. Pyritinol treatment improved the learning and retention performance of normally reared rats and also attenuated the original and reversal learning deficits induced by parental undernutrition and postweaning environmental impoverishment. The results indicate that pyritinol may be useful in learning and memory deficits induced by malnutrition and environmental deprivation.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D; McDonald, W I; Tofts, P S; Johnson, G; Landon, D N

    1986-01-01

    Triethyl tin(TET)-induced cerebral oedema has been studied in cats by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the findings correlated with the histology and fine structure of the cerebrum following perfusion-fixation. MRI is a sensitive technique for detecting cerebral oedema, and the distribution and severity of the changes correlate closely with the morphological abnormalities. The relaxation times, T1 and T2 increase progressively as the oedema develops, and the proportional increase in T2 is approximately twice that in T1. Analysis of the magnetisation decay curves reveals slowly-relaxing and rapidly-relaxing components which probably correspond to oedema fluid and intracellular water respectively. The image appearances taken in conjunction with relaxation data provide a basis for determining the nature of the oedema in vivo. Images PMID:3806109

  15. Cerebral monitoring during carotid endarterectomy using near-infrared diffuse optical spectroscopies and electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yu; Cheng, Ran; Dong, Lixin; Ryan, Stephen J.; Saha, Sibu P.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2011-05-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics during carotid endarterectomy (CEA) provides essential information for detecting cerebral hypoperfusion induced by temporary internal carotid artery (ICA) clamping and post-CEA hyperperfusion syndrome. This study tests the feasibility and sensitivity of a novel dual-wavelength near-infrared diffuse correlation spectroscopy technique in detecting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral oxygenation in patients undergoing CEA. Two fiber-optic probes were taped on both sides of the forehead for cerebral hemodynamic measurements, and the instantaneous decreases in CBF and electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha-band power during ICA clamping were compared to test the measurement sensitivities of the two techniques. The ICA clamps resulted in significant CBF decreases (-24.7 ± 7.3%) accompanied with cerebral deoxygenation at the surgical sides (n = 12). The post-CEA CBF were significantly higher (+43.2 ± 16.9%) than the pre-CEA CBF. The CBF responses to ICA clamping were significantly faster, larger and more sensitive than EEG responses. Simultaneous monitoring of CBF, cerebral oxygenation and EEG power provides a comprehensive evaluation of cerebral physiological status, thus showing potential for the adoption of acute interventions (e.g., shunting, medications) during CEA to reduce the risks of severe cerebral ischemia and cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome.

  16. Cerebral and Tissue Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Steppan, Jochen; Hogue, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been increasingly adopted in cardiac surgery to measure regional cerebral oxygen saturation. This method takes advantage of the fact that light in the near-infrared spectrum penetrates tissue, including bone and muscle. Sensors are placed at fixed distances from a light emitter, and algorithms subtract superficial light absorption from deep absorption to provide an index of tissue oxygenation. Although the popularity of NIRS monitoring is growing, definitive data that prove outcome benefits with its use remain sparse. Therefore, widespread, routine use of NIRS as a standard-of-care monitor cannot be recommended at present. Recent investigations have focused on the use of NIRS in subgroups that may benefit from NIRS monitoring, such as pediatric patients. Furthermore, a novel application of processed NIRS information for monitoring cerebral autoregulation and tissue oxygenation (e.g., kidneys and the gut) is promising. PMID:25480772

  17. Music and cerebral hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Marinoni, M; Grassi, E; Latorraca, S; Caruso, A; Sorbi, S

    2000-09-01

    Previous studies performed by positron emission tomography and Transcranial Doppler (TCD) found a different cerebral activation during musical stimuli in musicians compared to non-musicians. The aim of our study is to evaluate by means of TCD, possible different pattern of cerebral activation during the performance of different musical tasks in musicians, non-musicians and lyrical singers. Our findings show a left hemispheric activation in musicians and a right one in non-musicians. Preliminary data on lyrical singers' activation patterns need further confirmation with a larger population. These data could be related to a different approach to music listening in musicians (analytical) and non-musicians who are supposed to have an emotional approach to music. PMID:10942664

  18. Cerebral localization in antiquity.

    PubMed

    Rose, F Clifford

    2009-07-01

    Fragments of neurology can be found in the oldest medical writings in antiquity. Recognizable cerebral localization is seen in Egyptian medical papyri. Most notably, the Edwin Smith papyrus describes hemiplegia after a head injury. Similar echoes can be seen in Homer, the Bible, and the pre-Hippocratic writer Alcmaeon of Croton. While Biblical writers thought that the heart was the seat of the soul, Hippocratic writers located it in the head. Alexandrian anatomists described the nerves, and Galen developed the ventricular theory of cognition whereby mental functions are classified and localized in one of the cerebral ventricles. Medieval scholars, including the early Church Fathers, modified Galenic ventricular theory so as to make it a dynamic model of cognition. Physicians in antiquity subdivided the brain into separate areas and attributed to them different functions, a phenomenon that connects them with modern neurologists. PMID:20183203

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid ionic regulation, cerebral blood flow, and glucose use during chronic metabolic alkalosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeck, H.K.; Kuschinsky, W. )

    1989-10-01

    Chronic metabolic alkalosis was induced in rats by combining a low K+ diet with a 0.2 M NaHCO3 solution as drinking fluid for either 15 or 27 days. Local cerebral blood flow and local cerebral glucose utilization were measured in 31 different structures of the brain in conscious animals by means of the iodo-(14C)antipyrine and 2-(14C)deoxy-D-glucose method. The treatment induced moderate (15 days, base excess (BE) 16 mM) to severe (27 days, BE 25 mM) hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and K+ depletion. During moderate metabolic alkalosis no change in cerebral glucose utilization and blood flow was detectable in most brain structures when compared with controls. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) K+ and H+ concentrations were significantly decreased. During severe hypochloremic alkalosis, cerebral blood flow was decreased by 19% and cerebral glucose utilization by 24% when compared with the control values. The decrease in cerebral blood flow during severe metabolic alkalosis is attributed mainly to the decreased cerebral metabolism and to a lesser extent to a further decrease of the CSF H+ concentration. CSF K+ concentration was not further decreased. The results show an unaltered cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization together with a decrease in CSF H+ and K+ concentrations at moderate metabolic alkalosis and a decrease in cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization together with a further decreased CSF H+ concentration at severe metabolic alkalosis.

  20. Regional cerebral blood flow during comprehension and speech (in cerebrally healthy subjects)

    SciTech Connect

    Lechevalier, B.; Petit, M.C.; Eustache, F.; Lambert, J.; Chapon, F.; Viader, F. )

    1989-07-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by the xenon-133 inhalation method in 10 cerebrally healthy subjects at rest and during linguistic activation tests. These consisted of a comprehension test (binaural listening to a narrative text) and a speech test (making sentences from a list of words presented orally at 30-s intervals). The comprehension task induced a moderate increase in the mean right CBF and in both inferior parietal areas, whereas the speech test resulted in a diffuse increase in the mean CBF of both hemispheres, predominating regionally in both inferior parietal, left operculary, and right upper motor and premotor areas. It is proposed that the activation pattern induced by linguistic stimulation depends on not only specific factors, such as syntactic and semantic aspects of language, but also the contents of the material proposed and the attention required by the test situation.

  1. Effect of vitamin E on cerebral cortical oxidative stress and brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression induced by hypoxia and exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakr, H F; Abbas, A M; El Samanoudy, A Z

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in the proliferation of neurons, and its expression increases significantly with exercise. We aimed to investigate the effects of chronic exercise (swimming) and sustained hypoxia on cortical BDNF expression in both the presence and absence of vitamin E. Sixty four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two equal groups; a normoxic group and a hypoxic group. Both groups were equally subdivided into four subgroups: sedentary, sedentary with vitamin E, chronic exercise either with or without vitamin E supplementation. Arterial PO(2), and the levels of cortical malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidants (reduced glutathione GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and vitamin E) and BDNF gene expression were investigated. Hypoxia significantly increased MDA production and BDNF gene expression and decreased the antioxidants compared to control rats. Chronic exercise in hypoxic and normoxic rats increased MDA level and BDNF gene expression and decreased the antioxidants. Providing vitamin E supplementation to the hypoxic and normoxic rats significantly reduced MDA and BDNF gene expression and increased antioxidants. We conclude that sustained hypoxia and chronic exercise increased BDNF gene expression and induced oxidative stress. Moreover, vitamin E attenuated the oxidative stress and decreased BDNF gene expression in sustained hypoxia and chronic exercise which confirms the oxidative stress-induced stimulation of BDNF gene expression.

  2. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Stroke What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Jun 13,2014 About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis ... to view an animation What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a weak area in a ...

  3. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  4. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  5. Endogenous heme oxygenase prevents impairment of cerebral vascular functions caused by seizures.

    PubMed

    Carratu, Pierluigi; Pourcyrous, Massroor; Fedinec, Alex; Leffler, Charles W; Parfenova, Helena

    2003-09-01

    In newborn pigs, the mechanism of seizure-induced cerebral hyperemia involves carbon monoxide (CO), the vasodilator product of heme catabolism by heme oxygenase (HO). We hypothesized that seizures cause cerebral vascular dysfunction when HO activity is inhibited. With the use of cranial window techniques, we examined cerebral vascular responses to endothelium-dependent (hypercapnia and bradykinin) and endothelium-independent (isoproterenol and sodium nitroprusside) dilators during the recovery from bicuculline-induced seizures in saline controls and in animals pretreated with a HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin (SnPP). SnPP (3 mg/kg iv) blocked dilation to heme and reduced the CO level in cortical periarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid, indicating HO inhibition in the cerebral microcirculation. In saline control piglets, seizures increased the CO level, which correlated with the time-dependent cerebral vasodilation; during the recovery (2 h after seizure induction), responses to all vasodilators were preserved. In SnPP-treated animals, cerebral vasodilation and the CO responses to seizures were greatly reduced, and cerebral vascular reactivity was severely impaired during the recovery. These findings suggest that HO in the cerebral microcirculation is rapidly activated during seizures and provides endogenous protection against seizure-induced vascular injury.

  6. Neuroprotective effects of systemic cerebral endothelial cell transplantation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Min-Cheol; Choi, Kang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Kil; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC)/D3 cells, which are from a stable clonal cell line of human immortalized cerebral endothelial cells, were intra-arterially transplanted through the common carotid artery in a rat model of photochemical-induced cerebral ischemia. Their therapeutic effects on infarct size, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, and outcome were examined. The hCMEC/D3 cells were genetically modified with the firefly luciferase gene for in vivo imaging post-transplantation. Transplanted hCMEC/D3 cells were identified in the infarcted brain by bioluminescence imaging at 1 day after transplantation. Compared with the control group, the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group showed reduced infarct size on day 3, reduced Evans blue dye leakage on day 1 indicating decreased BBB breakdown, and early recovery from Rotarod test neurological deficits. The hCMEC/D3-transplanted group also showed decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which were inversely correlated with TIMP-1 levels on post-transplantation days 1 and 3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were markedly diminished in the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group compared with controls. The systemically transplanted cells selectively migrated and integrated into the ischemically lesioned area, which accelerated neurological recovery. This new cerebral endothelial cell-based therapy may hold promise for clinical trials in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:27347342

  7. Correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow simultaneously measured before and after acetazolamide administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroichiro; Yamauchi, Hideto; Hazama, Shiro; Hamamoto, Hirotsugu; Inoue, Nobuhiro

    1999-10-01

    The cerebral circulation and metabolism of ten preoperative cardiac surgery patients were assessed. Alterations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), measured by 123I-N- isopropyl-p-iodo-amphetamine single-photon emission computed tomography, and in cerebral oxygen metabolism, simultaneously detected by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) before and after acetazolamide administration, were investigated. The rCBF (ml/min/100 g) increased significantly from 40.21 +/- 7.65 to 56.24 +/- 13.69 (p equals 0.001), and a significant increase in oxyhemoglobin (Oxy-Hb) of 13.9% (p equals 0.0022) and total hemoglobin (Total-Hb) of 5.7% (0.0047) along with a significant decrease in deoxyhemoglobin (Deoxy-Hb) of 8.9% (p equals 0.0414) were observed concomitantly. Thus, the Oxy-Hb/Total- Hb ratio (%Oxy-Hb) rose significantly from 67.26 +/- 9.82% to 72.98 +/- 8.09% (p equals 0.0022). Examination of the relationships between individual parameters showed that the percentage changes in rCBF and Oxy-Hb were significantly correlated (r equals 0.758, p equals 0.011). The percentage changes in rCBF and %Oxy-Hb were also correlated significantly (r equals 0.740, p equals 0.014). In conclusion, this evidence suggested that NIRS is able to detect relative changes in cerebral hemodynamics and reflect luxury perfusion induced by acetazolamide.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of systemic cerebral endothelial cell transplantation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Min-Cheol; Choi, Kang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Kil; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC)/D3 cells, which are from a stable clonal cell line of human immortalized cerebral endothelial cells, were intra-arterially transplanted through the common carotid artery in a rat model of photochemical-induced cerebral ischemia. Their therapeutic effects on infarct size, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, and outcome were examined. The hCMEC/D3 cells were genetically modified with the firefly luciferase gene for in vivo imaging post-transplantation. Transplanted hCMEC/D3 cells were identified in the infarcted brain by bioluminescence imaging at 1 day after transplantation. Compared with the control group, the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group showed reduced infarct size on day 3, reduced Evans blue dye leakage on day 1 indicating decreased BBB breakdown, and early recovery from Rotarod test neurological deficits. The hCMEC/D3-transplanted group also showed decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which were inversely correlated with TIMP-1 levels on post-transplantation days 1 and 3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were markedly diminished in the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group compared with controls. The systemically transplanted cells selectively migrated and integrated into the ischemically lesioned area, which accelerated neurological recovery. This new cerebral endothelial cell-based therapy may hold promise for clinical trials in patients with ischemic stroke.

  9. Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy combined with Bimanual Training (mCIMT-BiT) in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy: how are improvements in arm-hand use established?

    PubMed

    Aarts, Pauline B; Jongerius, Peter H; Geerdink, Yvonne A; van Limbeek, Jacques; Geurts, Alexander C

    2011-01-01

    A recent randomized controlled trial indicated that modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy followed by Bimanual Training (mCIMT-BiT) is an effective intervention to improve spontaneous use of the affected upper limb in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The present study aimed to investigate how the above-mentioned improvements as a result of 8 weeks mCIMT-BiT were established. 52 children with unilateral spastic CP with Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) scores I, II or III and aged 2.5-8 years were randomly allocated to either mCIMT-BiT (n = 28) or Usual Care (UC) (n = 24). Developmental disregard ('learned non-use') and upper limb capacity and performance scores were derived from the Video Observations Aarts and Aarts, module Determine Developmental Disregard. Active and passive range of motion at the affected wrist and elbow were assessed using goniometry during isolated movements. Upper limb capacity and performance demonstrated significantly greater improvements after mCIMT-BiT compared to UC, which lasted up to 8 weeks follow-up, whereas developmental disregard and passive and active range of motion did not show differential effects. The results support the notion that improvement of capacity and performance of the upper limb through mCIMT-BiT in children with unilateral spastic CP is based on a better utilization of existing motor functions of the affected arm and hand. However, enhancement of the overall amount of use (or the reduction of learned non-use) may still be suboptimal leaving room for improvement of this treatment.

  10. Cerebral Hemodynamics and Vascular Reactivity in Mild and Severe Ischemic Rodent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jeongeun; Jo, Areum; Kang, Bok-Man; Lee, Sohee; Bang, Oh Young; Heo, Chaejeong; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Lee, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia can cause decreased cerebral neurovascular coupling, leading to a failure in the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow. This study aims to investigate the effect of varying degrees of ischemia on cerebral hemodynamic reactivity using in vivo real-time optical imaging. We utilized direct cortical stimulation to elicit hyper-excitable neuronal activation, which leads to induced hemodynamic changes in both the normal and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) ischemic stroke groups. Hemodynamic measurements from optical imaging accurately predict the severity of occlusion in mild and severe MCAO animals. There is neither an increase in cerebral blood volume nor in vessel reactivity in the ipsilateral hemisphere (I.H) of animals with severe MCAO. The pial artery in the contralateral hemisphere (C.H) of the severe MCAO group reacted more slowly than both hemispheres in the normal and mild MCAO groups. In addition, the arterial reactivity of the I.H in the mild MCAO animals was faster than the normal animals. Furthermore, artery reactivity is tightly correlated with histological and behavioral results in the MCAO ischemic group. Thus, in vivo optical imaging may offer a simple and useful tool to assess the degree of ischemia and to understand how cerebral hemodynamics and vascular reactivity are affected by ischemia. PMID:27358581

  11. N-Nitrosodiethylamine-Induced Pig Liver Hepatocellular Carcinoma Model: Radiological and Histopathological Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiao; Zhou Xiangping Guan Yongsong; Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Scutt, Diane; Gong Qiyong

    2006-06-15

    Experimental research involving animal models plays a critical role in the development and improvement of minimally invasive therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). As a large animal, the pig is commonly used for surgery and interventional radiology research. In this study, liver multicentric HCC with cirrhosis was induced in six China Taihu pigs by intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg of N-nitrosodiethylamine once a week for 3 months, followed by a period of 10-12 months without N-nitrosodiethylamine treatment. All pigs were in generally good health until the end of the study. The tumor nodules appeared hyperattenuating in the arterial phase of a dynamic computed tomography (CT) scan. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and CT angiography demonstrated that the tumors derived their blood supply mainly from the hepatic artery system. Lipiodol-CT showed Lipiodol retention in tumor areas. The histology and electron microscopic ultrastructure of the chemically induced liver HCC in this study resembled human HCC with a cirrhosis background. An immunohistochemistry study confirmed that the tumors were of hepatocyte origin. All highly, moderately, and poorly differentiated HCC tumors were identified in this study. Cholangiocarcinoma was not seen in any of the animals. Due to its comparable size to human anatomy, the pig liver HCC model would give a better scope for interventional and surgical manipulations than small animal models.

  12. Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) is expressed in astrocytes and melatonin treatment maintains AANAT in the gerbil hippocampus induced by transient cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Ok Kyu; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon; Hwang, In Koo; Park, Jun Hong; Kwon, Young-Guen; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho

    2010-07-15

    Melatonin is synthesized from serotonin by the action of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase. In this study, we observed cellular changes of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.87; AANAT) in the hippocampal CA1 region at various time points after ischemia/reperfusion. In vehicle-treated sham group, AANAT immunoreaction was detected in pyramidal neurons of the CA1 region. AANAT immunoreactivity in the neurons was highest 2 days and disappeared from 4 days after ischemia/reperfusion. From 3 days after ischemia/reperfusion, AANAT immunoreaction was expressed in astrocytes in the strata oriens and radiatum of the CA1 region. AANAT protein and mRNA levels were significantly increased 2 days after ischemia/reperfusion, and markedly decreased from 5 days after ischemia/reperfusion. The repeated administration of melatonin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) 3 times (once a day) to gerbils before ischemia/reperfusion significantly reduced ischemia-induced hyperactivity as well as neuronal death compared to those in the vehicle-treated ischemia group. Melatonin treatment also maintained AANAT immunoreactivity and its protein levels in the CA1 region after ischemia/reperfusion. These results suggest that the reduction of AANAT in ischemic CA1 region is associated with delayed neuronal death following transient ischemia, and melatonin treatment shows neuroprotection with maintenance of AANAT levels in the ischemic CA1 region.

  13. Brain endothelial dysfunction in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Musolino, Patricia L; Gong, Yi; Snyder, Juliet M T; Jimenez, Sandra; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Moser, Ann B; Grabowski, Eric F; Frosch, Matthew P; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-11-01

    See Aubourg (doi:10.1093/awv271) for a scientific commentary on this article.X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene leading to accumulation of very long chain fatty acids. Its most severe neurological manifestation is cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we demonstrate that progressive inflammatory demyelination in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy coincides with blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased MMP9 expression, and changes in endothelial tight junction proteins as well as adhesion molecules. ABCD1, but not its closest homologue ABCD2, is highly expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, far exceeding its expression in the systemic vasculature. Silencing of ABCD1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells causes accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, but much later than the immediate upregulation of adhesion molecules and decrease in tight junction proteins. This results in greater adhesion and transmigration of monocytes across the endothelium. PCR-array screening of human brain microvascular endothelial cells after ABCD1 silencing revealed downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of the transcription factor c-MYC (encoded by MYC). Interestingly, MYC silencing mimicked the effects of ABCD1 silencing on CLDN5 and ICAM1 without decreasing the levels of ABCD1 protein itself. Together, these data demonstrate that ABCD1 deficiency induces significant alterations in brain endothelium via c-MYC and may thereby contribute to the increased trafficking of leucocytes across the blood-brain barrier as seen in cerebral adrenouleukodystrophy. PMID:26377633

  14. Focal embolic cerebral ischemia in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Rui Lan; Jiang, Quan; Ding, Guangliang; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of focal cerebral ischemia are well accepted for investigating the pathogenesis and potential treatment strategies for human stroke. Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) with an endovascular filament is a widely used model to induce focal cerebral ischemia. However, this model is not amenable to thrombolytic therapies. As thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is a standard of care within 4.5 hours of human stroke onset, suitable animal models that mimic cellular and molecular mechanisms of thrombosis and thrombolysis of stroke are required. By occluding the MCA with a fibrin-rich allogeneic clot, we have developed an embolic model of MCA occlusion in the rat, which recapitulates the key components of thrombotic development and of thrombolytic therapy of rtPA observed from human ischemic stroke. The surgical procedures of our model can be typically completed within approximately 30 min and are highly adaptable to other strains of rats as well as mice for both genders. Thus, this model provides a powerful tool for translational stroke research. PMID:25741989

  15. Personality factors correlate with regional cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, R L; Kumari, V; Williams, S C R; Zelaya, F O; Connor, S E J; Alsop, D C; Gray, J A

    2006-06-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence pointing to a neurobiological basis of personality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological bases of the major dimensions of Eysenck's and Cloninger's models of personality using a noninvasive magnetic resonance perfusion imaging technique in 30 young, healthy subjects. An unbiased voxel-based analysis was used to identify regions where the regional perfusion demonstrated significant correlation with any of the personality dimensions. Highly significant positive correlations emerged between extraversion and perfusion in the basal ganglia, thalamus, inferior frontal gyrus and cerebellum and between novelty seeking and perfusion in the cerebellum, cuneus and thalamus. Strong negative correlations emerged between psychoticism and perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalamus and between harm avoidance and perfusion in the cerebellar vermis, cuneus and inferior frontal gyrus. These observations suggest that personality traits are strongly associated with resting cerebral perfusion in a variety of cortical and subcortical regions and provide further evidence for the hypothesized neurobiological basis of personality. These results may also have important implications for functional neuroimaging studies, which typically rely on the modulation of cerebral hemodynamics for detection of task-induced activation since personality effects may influence the intersubject variability for both task-related activity and resting cerebral perfusion. This technique also offers a novel approach for the exploration of the neurobiological correlates of human personality.

  16. Opiates and cerebral functional activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Trusk, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral activity was measured using the free-fatty acid (1-/sup 14/C) octanoate as a fast functional tracer in conscious, unrestrained rats 5 minutes after intravenous injection of heroin, cocaine or saline vehicle. Regional changes of octanoate labeling density in the autoradiograms relative to saline-injected animals were used to determine the functional activity effects of each drug. Heroin and cocaine each produced a distinctive pattern of activity increases and suppression throughout the rat brain. Similar regional changes induced by both drugs were found in limbic brain regions implicated in drug reinforcement. Labeled octanoate autoradiography was used to measure the cerebral functional response to a tone that had previously been paired to heroin injections. Rats were trained in groups of three consisting of one heroin self-administration animal, and two animals receiving yoked infusion of heroin or saline. A tone was paired with each infusion during training. Behavioral experiments in similarly trained rats demonstrated that these training conditions impart secondary reinforcing properties to the tone in animals previously self-administering heroin, while the tone remains behaviorally neutral in yoked-infusion rats. Cerebral functional activity was measured during presentation of the tone without drug infusion. Octanoate labeling density changed in fifteen brain areas in response to the tone previously paired to heroin without response contingency. Labeling density was significantly modified in sixteen regions as a result of previously pairing the tone to response-contingent heroin infusions.

  17. Brain endothelial dysfunction in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Musolino, Patricia L; Gong, Yi; Snyder, Juliet M T; Jimenez, Sandra; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Moser, Ann B; Grabowski, Eric F; Frosch, Matthew P; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-11-01

    See Aubourg (doi:10.1093/awv271) for a scientific commentary on this article.X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene leading to accumulation of very long chain fatty acids. Its most severe neurological manifestation is cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we demonstrate that progressive inflammatory demyelination in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy coincides with blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased MMP9 expression, and changes in endothelial tight junction proteins as well as adhesion molecules. ABCD1, but not its closest homologue ABCD2, is highly expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, far exceeding its expression in the systemic vasculature. Silencing of ABCD1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells causes accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, but much later than the immediate upregulation of adhesion molecules and decrease in tight junction proteins. This results in greater adhesion and transmigration of monocytes across the endothelium. PCR-array screening of human brain microvascular endothelial cells after ABCD1 silencing revealed downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of the transcription factor c-MYC (encoded by MYC). Interestingly, MYC silencing mimicked the effects of ABCD1 silencing on CLDN5 and ICAM1 without decreasing the levels of ABCD1 protein itself. Together, these data demonstrate that ABCD1 deficiency induces significant alterations in brain endothelium via c-MYC and may thereby contribute to the increased trafficking of leucocytes across the blood-brain barrier as seen in cerebral adrenouleukodystrophy.

  18. Middle Cerebral Artery Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Liou, Michelle; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hua-Shan; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chou, Ming-Chung; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Calcification of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) is uncommon in the healthy elderly. Whether calcification of the MCA is associated with cerebral ischemic stroke remains undetermined. We intended to investigate the association using Agatston calcium scoring of the MCA. This study retrospectively included 354 subjects with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory and 1518 control subjects who underwent computed tomography (CT) of the brain. We recorded major known risk factors for ischemic stroke, including age, gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and obesity, along with the MCA calcium burden, measured with the Agatston calcium scoring method. Univariate and modified logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between the MCA calcification and ischemic stroke. The univariate analyses showed significant associations of ischemic stroke with age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, total MCA Agatston score, and the presence of calcification on both or either side of the MCA. Subjects with the presence of MCA calcification on both or either side of the MCA were 8.46 times (95% confidence interval, 4.93–14.53; P < 0.001) more likely to have a cerebral infarct than subjects without MCA calcification after adjustment for the major known risk factors, including age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. However, a higher degree of MCA calcification reflected by the Agatston score was not associated with higher risk of MCA ischemic stroke after adjustment for the confounding factors and presence of MCA calcification. These results suggest that MCA calcification is associated with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory. Further prospective studies are required to verify the clinical implications of the MCA calcification. PMID:26683969

  19. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uygun, M A; Ozkal, E; Acar, O; Erongun, U

    1996-01-01

    Hyponatremia following acute or chronic central nervous system injury which is due to excessive Na+ loss in the urine without an increase in the body fluid, has been described as Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome (CSWS). This syndrome is often confused with dilutional hyponatremia secondary to inappropriate ADH secretion. Accurate diagnosis and management are mandatory for to improve the course of the disease. In this study a patient with CSW Syndrome is presented and the treatment and diagnosis of this syndrome are discussed in view of the literature.

  20. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  1. Protection by vanadium, a contemporary treatment approach to both diabetes and focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenquan; Li, Pengtao; Zhao, Dan; Tang, Huiling; Guo, Jianyou

    2012-01-01

    There is now substantial epidemiological evidence that diabetes is a risk factor for cerebrovascular disease. The protection by vanadium from focal cerebral ischemia in diabetic rats was studied in this paper. Rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by 4 weeks of administration of 0.6 mg/ml sodium orthovanadate in drinking water. Vanadium significantly improved the outcome in diabetic rats after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in terms of neurobehavioral function. Vanadium reduces brain damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by imitating action of insulin.

  2. Propofol Prevents Hippocampal Neuronal Loss and Memory Impairment in Cerebral Ischemia Injury Through Promoting PTEN Degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Du, Ye-Mu; Xu, Feng; Liu, Dai; Wang, Yuan-Lin

    2016-09-01

    Neuroprotective effect of propofol against cerebral ischemia injury was widely investigated. However, its mechanisms remain unclear. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathway is supposed as a cell survival pathway, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) is a negative regulator of AKT phosphorylation. Whether PTEN was involved in the protective effect of propofol against cerebral ischemia injury was not elucidated. In this study, the function of PTEN in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia injury was investigated. Our data showed that propofol promoted the PTEN degradation in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia injury and concurrently activated AKT phosphorylation. The increase of ubiquitinated PTEN caused by cerebral ischemia injury were degraded in propofol-pretreated rats. Moreover, we evidenced that proteasome activity was stimulated in propofol-treated rats. These data pointed that PTEN degradation was facilitated in the acute phase after propofol treatment possibly through activating ubiquitin-proteasome system. Therefore, we applied PTEN inhibitor-bpV before cerebral ischemia injury. Like propofol, bpV pretreatment also mitigated cerebral ischemia injury-induced cell loss in CA1 region and memory impairment. Taken together, our data suggest that PTEN degradation is neuroprotective against cerebral ischemia injury and propofol facilitates PTEN degradation to prevent hippocampal neuronal loss and memory deficit in cerebral ischemia injury.

  3. Propofol Prevents Hippocampal Neuronal Loss and Memory Impairment in Cerebral Ischemia Injury Through Promoting PTEN Degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Du, Ye-Mu; Xu, Feng; Liu, Dai; Wang, Yuan-Lin

    2016-09-01

    Neuroprotective effect of propofol against cerebral ischemia injury was widely investigated. However, its mechanisms remain unclear. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathway is supposed as a cell survival pathway, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) is a negative regulator of AKT phosphorylation. Whether PTEN was involved in the protective effect of propofol against cerebral ischemia injury was not elucidated. In this study, the function of PTEN in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia injury was investigated. Our data showed that propofol promoted the PTEN degradation in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia injury and concurrently activated AKT phosphorylation. The increase of ubiquitinated PTEN caused by cerebral ischemia injury were degraded in propofol-pretreated rats. Moreover, we evidenced that proteasome activity was stimulated in propofol-treated rats. These data pointed that PTEN degradation was facilitated in the acute phase after propofol treatment possibly through activating ubiquitin-proteasome system. Therefore, we applied PTEN inhibitor-bpV before cerebral ischemia injury. Like propofol, bpV pretreatment also mitigated cerebral ischemia injury-induced cell loss in CA1 region and memory impairment. Taken together, our data suggest that PTEN degradation is neuroprotective against cerebral ischemia injury and propofol facilitates PTEN degradation to prevent hippocampal neuronal loss and memory deficit in cerebral ischemia injury. PMID:27480093

  4. Modeling human brain development with cerebral organoids.

    PubMed

    Muzio, Luca; Consalez, G Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of a new three-dimensional culture system for the derivation of cerebral organoids from human induced pluripotent stem cells provides developmental neurobiologists with the first example of a three-dimensional framework for the study of human brain development. This innovative approach permits the in vitro assembly of a human embryonic brain rudiment that recapitulates the developing human cerebrum. Organoids contain progenitor populations that develop to yield mature cortical neuron subtypes, potentially allowing investigators to study complex brain diseases that lack appropriate animal models. PMID:24367992

  5. Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Brandi D.; Martins, Yuri C.; Akide-Ndunge, Oscar B.; Bruno, Fernando P.; Wang, Hua; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Spray, David C.; Desruisseaux, Mahalia S.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection causes a wide spectrum of diseases, including cerebral malaria, a potentially life-threatening encephalopathy. Vasculopathy is thought to contribute to cerebral malaria pathogenesis. The vasoactive compound endothelin-1, a key participant in many inflammatory processes, likely mediates vascular and cognitive dysfunctions in cerebral malaria. We previously demonstrated that C57BL6 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA, our fatal experimental cerebral malaria model, sustained memory loss. Herein, we demonstrate that an endothelin type A receptor (ETA) antagonist prevented experimental cerebral malaria-induced neurocognitive impairments and improved survival. ETA antagonism prevented blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebral vasoconstriction during experimental cerebral malaria, and reduced brain endothelial activation, diminishing brain microvascular congestion. Furthermore, exogenous endothelin-1 administration to P. berghei NK65-infected mice, a model generally regarded as a non-cerebral malaria negative control for P. berghei ANKA infection, led to experimental cerebral malaria-like memory deficits. Our data indicate that endothelin-1 is critical in the development of cerebrovascular and cognitive impairments with experimental cerebral malaria. This vasoactive peptide may thus serve as a potential target for adjunctive therapy in the management of cerebral malaria. PMID:27031954

  6. Cerebral blood flow velocity in two patients with neonatal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, S; Seki, K; Yokota, S

    2001-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery of two patients who exhibited unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction during the neonatal period. Doppler studies demonstrated increases in cerebral blood flow velocity but decreases in the resistance index on the affected side of the middle cerebral artery in the neonate who developed hemiplegia with cystic encephalomalacia, although the neonate with normal neurologic outcome exhibited symmetric cerebral blood flow velocity and resistance index. The asymmetry in cerebral blood flow velocity measurements of both middle cerebral arteries may be useful to evaluate the severity of brain damage and predict the neurodevelopmental prognosis of unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction. PMID:11377112

  7. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    PubMed

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics.

  8. [Noradrenaline and cerebral aging].

    PubMed

    Jouvet, M; Albarede, J L; Lubin, S; Meyrignac, C

    1991-01-01

    The central functions of norepinephrine (NE) are a recent discovery: regulation of alertness and of the wakefulness-sleep cycle, maintenance of attention, memory and learning, cerebral plasticity and neuro-protection. The anatomical, histological, biochemical and physiological properties of the central noradrenergic system: extreme capacity for ramification and arborization; slow conduction, non-myelinized axons with extrasynaptic varicosities producing and releasing NE; frequency of co-transmission phenomena, and; neuromodulation with fiber effect responsible for improvement in the signal over background noise ratio and selection of significant stimuli form a true interface between the outside world and the central nervous system, notably for the neocortex in the context of the cognitive treatment of information. This central noradrenergic system is involved in the neurophysiology and the clinical features of cerebral aging (ideation-motor and cognitive function slowing down, loss of behavioral adjustment), neuro-degenerative disorders (SDAT, Parkinson's disease), certain aspects of depression and less obvious conditions (head injuries, sequelae of cerebrovascular accidents, sub-cortical dementia). The recent development of medications improving alertness (adrafinil, modafinil) with a pure central action and specifically noradrenergic, may contribute to an improvement in these multifactorial disorders. PMID:1864252

  9. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  10. What constitutes cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Badawi, N; Watson, L; Petterson, B; Blair, E; Slee, J; Haan, E; Stanley, F

    1998-08-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a term of convenience applied to a group of motor disorders of central origin defined by clinical description. It is not a diagnosis in that its application infers nothing about pathology, aetiology, or prognosis. It is an umbrella term covering a wide range of cerebral disorders which result in childhood motor impairment. The precise inclusion criteria vary with the objectives for using the term. For meaningful comparison of rates of CP, as performed by and between CP registers, it is important that the rates should be generated using the same criteria. As generally understood there must be motor impairment, and this impairment must stem from a malfunction of the brain (rather than spinal cord or muscles). Furthermore, the brain malfunction must be non-progressive and it must be manifest early in life. For the purposes of comparisons of rates across time even when the condition meets all the above criteria, it must not historically have been excluded from the category of CP. This paper addresses the problem of standardizing the inclusion criteria for selecting people included on CP registers with particular reference to this last criterion. PMID:9746004

  11. Simultaneous study of haemodynamic, metabolic and behavioural sequelae in a model of cerebral ischaemia in aged rats: effects of nicergoline.

    PubMed

    Le Poncin-Lafitte, M; Grosdemouge, C; Duterte, D; Rapin, J R

    1984-01-01

    Unilateral cerebral ischaemia was induced in 18-month-old Long-Evans rats by injection of 2,000 labelled microspheres (phi 50 microns) into the carotid blood stream. This results in an ipsilateral decrease in cerebral blood flow, development of severe oedema and modifications of glucose uptake and consumption. Furthermore, this ischaemia led to a deterioration of the avoidance response in conditioned animals. All these disturbances, including the cerebral oedema, diminished with nicergoline pretreatment. PMID:6706123

  12. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation measured with coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Tgavalekos, Kristen T.; Fantini, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    Coherent Hemodynamics Spectroscopy (CHS) is a novel technique for non-invasive measurements of local microcirculation quantities such as the capillary blood transit times and dynamic autoregulation. The basis of CHS is to measure, for instance with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), peripheral coherent hemodynamic changes that are induced by controlled perturbations in the systemic mean arterial pressure (MAP). In this study, the MAP perturbation was induced by the fast release of two pneumatic cuffs placed around the subject's thighs after they were kept inflated (at 200 mmHg) for two minutes. The resulting transient changes in cerebral oxy- (O) and deoxy- (D) hemoglobin concentrations measured with NIRS on the prefrontal cortex are then described by a novel hemodynamic model, from which quantifiable parameters such as the capillary blood transit time and a cutoff frequency for cerebral autoregulation are obtained. We present results on eleven healthy volunteers in a protocol involving measurements during normal breathing and during hyperventilation, which is known to cause a hypocapnia-induced increase in cerebral autoregulation. The measured capillary transit time was unaffected by hyperventilation (normal breathing: 1.1±0.1 s; hyperventilation: 1.1±0.1 s), whereas the cutoff frequency of autoregulation, which increases for higher autoregulation efficiency, was indeed found to be significantly greater during hyperventilation (normal breathing: 0.017±0.002 Hz; hyperventilation: 0.034±0.005 Hz). These results provide a validation of local cerebral autoregulation measurements with the new technique of CHS.

  13. Cerebral organoids model human brain development and microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Madeline A; Renner, Magdalena; Martin, Carol-Anne; Wenzel, Daniel; Bicknell, Louise S; Hurles, Matthew E; Homfray, Tessa; Penninger, Josef M; Jackson, Andrew P; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2013-09-19

    The complexity of the human brain has made it difficult to study many brain disorders in model organisms, highlighting the need for an in vitro model of human brain development. Here we have developed a human pluripotent stem cell-derived three-dimensional organoid culture system, termed cerebral organoids, that develop various discrete, although interdependent, brain regions. These include a cerebral cortex containing progenitor populations that organize and produce mature cortical neuron subtypes. Furthermore, cerebral organoids are shown to recapitulate features of human cortical development, namely characteristic progenitor zone organization with abundant outer radial glial stem cells. Finally, we use RNA interference and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells to model microcephaly, a disorder that has been difficult to recapitulate in mice. We demonstrate premature neuronal differentiation in patient organoids, a defect that could help to explain the disease phenotype. Together, these data show that three-dimensional organoids can recapitulate development and disease even in this most complex human tissue.

  14. Cerebral microvascular effects of nimodipine in combination with soman.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Lars-Owe D; Runnerstam, Magnus; Koch, Mona; Karlsson, Britt M

    2012-11-01

    Nimodipine, a calcium antagonist, has been shown to increase the detoxification of soman. In this study the cerebral microcirculatory effects of nimodipine and the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor soman was studied. Anaesthetised rats were administered nimodipine, 10 mg kg(-1) or vehicle intra-peritoneally, and 1h later exposed to 45 μg kg(-1) soman intravenously. The regional blood flows were measured using the microsphere method. Nimodipine and soman markedly increased the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and reduced the vascular resistance. Total CBF increased by 146% after nimodipine and by 105% after soman administration. Combined administration of nimodipine and soman caused additional but not fully additive effects on CBF and vascular resistance, indicating possible different mechanisms of the two agents. A part of the nimodipine induced increased detoxification after AChE-inhibition may be associated with this cerebral vasodilation.

  15. Multiple molecular penumbras after focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sharp, F R; Lu, A; Tang, Y; Millhorn, D E

    2000-07-01

    Though the ischemic penumbra has been classically described on the basis of blood flow and physiologic parameters, a variety of ischemic penumbras can be described in molecular terms. Apoptosis-related genes induced after focal ischemia may contribute to cell death in the core and the selective cell death adjacent to an infarct. The HSP70 heat shock protein is induced in glia at the edges of an infarct and in neurons often at some distance from the infarct. HSP70 proteins are induced in cells in response to denatured proteins that occur as a result of temporary energy failure. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is also induced after focal ischemia in regions that can extend beyond the HSP70 induction. The region of HIF induction is proposed to represent the areas of decreased cerebral blood flow and decreased oxygen delivery. Immediate early genes are induced in cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and other brain regions. These distant changes in gene expression occur because of ischemia-induced spreading depression or depolarization and could contribute to plastic changes in brain after stroke. PMID:10908035

  16. Melatonin suppresses cerebral edema caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion in rats assessed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Torii, Kunio; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Nishino, Hitoo; Kondoh, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Melatonin, a pineal secretory product synthesized from tryptophan, has been found to be effective against neurotoxicity. The present study was aimed at demonstrating the effectiveness of melatonin in vivo in reducing ischemia-induced cerebral edema using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion/reperfusion surgery. Melatonin was administered twice (6.0 mg/kg, p.o.) just prior to 1 hr of MCA occlusion and 1 day after the surgery. T2-weighted multislice spin-echo images were acquired 1 day after the surgery. In the saline-treated control rats, increases in T2-weighted signals (water content) were clearly observed in the striatum and in the cerebral cortex. In the melatonin-treated group, total volume of edema was reduced by 51.6% compared with control group (P < 0.01). The protective effect of melatonin against edema was more clearly observed in the cerebral cortex (reduced by 59.8%, P < 0.01) than in the striatum (reduced by 34.2%, P < 0.05). Edema volume in a coronal slice was the greatest at the level of the bregma. Suppression of cerebral edema by melatonin was more effective posterior than anterior to the bregma. Melatonin appeared to reduce the volume of the edematous sites rather than to shift the signal intensity distribution. The present MRI study clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of melatonin against cerebral edema formation in ischemic animals in vivo, especially in the cerebral cortex. Melatonin may be highly useful in preventing cortical dysfunctions such as motor, sensory, memory, and psychological impairments associated with ischemic stroke.

  17. Inhaled Carbon Monoxide Provides Cerebral Cytoprotection in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Mahan, Vicki L.; Zurakowski, David

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) at low concentrations imparts protective effects in numerous preclinical small animal models of brain injury. Evidence of protection in large animal models of cerebral injury, however, has not been tested. Neurologic deficits following open heart surgery are likely related in part to ischemia reperfusion injury that occurs during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Using a model of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) in piglets, we evaluated the effects of CO to reduce cerebral injury. DHCA and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) induced significant alterations in metabolic demands, including a decrease in the oxygen/glucose index (OGI), an increase in lactate/glucose index (LGI) and a rise in cerebral blood pressure that ultimately resulted in increased cell death in the neocortex and hippocampus that was completely abrogated in piglets preconditioned with a low, safe dose of CO. Moreover CO-treated animals maintained normal, pre-CPB OGI and LGI and corresponding cerebral sinus pressures with no change in systemic hemodynamics or metabolic intermediates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that inhaled CO may be beneficial in preventing cerebral injury resulting from DHCA and offer important therapeutic options in newborns undergoing DHCA for open heart surgery. PMID:22879904

  18. The TRIF-dependent signaling pathway is not required for acute cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Fang; Wang, Jun; Sayeed, Iqbal; Ishrat, Tauheed; Atif, Fahim; Stein, Donald G.

    2009-12-18

    TIR domain-containing adaptor protein (TRIF) is an adaptor protein in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways. Activation of TRIF leads to the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). While studies have shown that TLRs are implicated in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and in neuroprotection against ischemia afforded by preconditioning, little is known about TRIF's role in the pathological process following cerebral I/R. The present study investigated the role that TRIF may play in acute cerebral I/R injury. In a mouse model of cerebral I/R induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, we examined the activation of NF-{kappa}B and IRF3 signaling in ischemic cerebral tissue using ELISA and Western blots. Neurological function and cerebral infarct size were also evaluated 24 h after cerebral I/R. NF-{kappa}B activity and phosphorylation of the inhibitor of kappa B (I{kappa}B{alpha}) increased in ischemic brains, but IRF3, inhibitor of {kappa}B kinase complex-{epsilon} (IKK{epsilon}), and TANK-binding kinase1 (TBK1) were not activated after cerebral I/R in wild-type (WT) mice. Interestingly, TRIF deficit did not inhibit NF-{kappa}B activity or p-I{kappa}B{alpha} induced by cerebral I/R. Moreover, although cerebral I/R induced neurological and functional impairments and brain infarction in WT mice, the deficits were not improved and brain infarct size was not reduced in TRIF knockout mice compared to WT mice. Our results demonstrate that the TRIF-dependent signaling pathway is not required for the activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling and brain injury after acute cerebral I/R.

  19. Cerebral aneurysms following radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, P.J.; Sung, J.H.

    1989-04-01

    Three patients, two males and one female aged 21, 14, and 31 years, respectively, developed cerebral saccular aneurysms several years after undergoing radiotherapy for cerebellar medulloblastoma at 2, 5, and 14 years of age, respectively. Following surgery, all three received combined cobalt-60 irradiation and intrathecal colloidal radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) therapy, and died from rupture of the aneurysm 19, 9, and 17 years after the radiotherapy, respectively. Autopsy examination revealed no recurrence of the medulloblastoma, but widespread radiation-induced vasculopathy was found at the base of the brain and in the spinal cord, and saccular aneurysms arose from the posterior cerebral arteries at the basal cistern or choroidal fissure. The aneurysms differed from the ordinary saccular aneurysms of congenital type in their location and histological features. Their locations corresponded to the areas where intrathecally administered colloidal /sup 198/Au is likely to pool, and they originated directly from a segment of the artery rather than from a branching site as in congenital saccular aneurysms. It is, therefore, concluded that the aneurysms in these three patients were most likely radiation-induced.

  20. Cerebral Laterality and Verbal Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Jay L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Research suggests that we process information by way of two distinct and functionally separate coding systems. Their location, somewhat dependent on cerebral laterality, varies in right- and left-handed persons. Tests this dual coding model. (Editor/RK)

  1. Neuroprotective effect of nobiletin on cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in transient middle cerebral artery-occluded rats.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Nodoka; Ishii, Takayuki; Oyama, Dai; Fukuta, Tatsuya; Agato, Yurika; Sato, Akihiko; Shimizu, Kosuke; Asai, Tomohiro; Asakawa, Tomohiro; Kan, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Shizuo; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Oku, Naoto

    2014-04-22

    Nobiletin, a citrus polymethoxylated flavone, is reported to possess various pharmacological activities such as anticancer, anti-inflammation, and antioxidant effects. Recently, nobiletin was shown to provide therapeutic benefit for the treatment of Alzheimer׳s disease by activating cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB). In the present study, we investigated whether nobiletin could protect the brain against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and improve functional outcome in cerebral I/R model rats, since CREB activation is known to protect neuronal cells in cerebral ischemia. Nobiletin was injected twice at 0 and 1h after the start of reperfusion in transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (t-MCAO) rats. Cerebral I/R induced prominent brain damage in the ischemic hemisphere of t-MCAO rat brains; however, nobiletin treatment significantly reduced the infarct volume and suppressed the brain edema. Immunohistochemical and TUNEL staining indicated that nobiletin treatment significantly suppressed neutrophil invasion into the ischemic region and significantly decreased apoptotic brain cell death in ischemic hemisphere, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect and anti-apoptotic effect should be regarded as the neuroprotective mechanism of nobiletin. Moreover, nobiletin treatment ameliorated motor functional deficits in the ischemic rats compared with those deficits of the vehicle-treated group. These results indicate that nobiletin is a potential neuroprotectant for the treatment of cerebral I/R injury.

  2. Adrenergic and prostanoid mechanisms in control of cerebral blood flow in hypotensive newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Armstead, W.M.; Leffler, C.W.; Busija, D.W.; Beasley, D.G.; Mirro, R. )

    1988-04-01

    The interaction between adrenergic and prostanoid mechanisms in the control of cerebral hemodynamics in the conscious, hypotensive newborn pig was investigated. Pretreatment with the selective {alpha}{sub 1}- and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor antagonists prazosin and yohimbine, respectively, had no effect on cerebral blood flow, calculated cerebral vascular resistance, or cerebral metabolic rate either before or after hemmorrhagic hypotension. Indomethacin treatment (5 mg/kg ia) of piglets following hemorrhage caused a significant decrease in blood flow to all brain regions within 20 min. This decrease in cerebral blood flow resulted from increased cerebral vascular resistances of 54 and 177%, 20 and 40 min after treatment, respectively. Cerebral oxygen consumption was reduced from 2.42 {+-} 0.28 to 1.45 {+-} 0.28 ml{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1} and to 1.0 {+-} 0.28 ml{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1} 20 and 40 min after indomethacin, respectively, in hemorrhaged piglets. Decreases in cerebral blood flow and metabolic rate and increases in vascular resistance on treatment with indomethacin were the same as in animals pretreated with vehicle, prazosin, or yohimbine. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the prostanoid system contributes to the maintenance of cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate during hypotension in the newborn, as reported previously. These data do not implicate removal of sympathetic modulation by prostanoids as a mechanism for indomethacin-induced cerebral vasoconstriction in hypotensive newborn piglets.

  3. The role of Rho/Rho-kinase pathway and the neuroprotective effects of fasudil in chronic cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ya-yun; Wang, Xiao-ming; Jiang, Yan; Chen, Han; He, Jin-ting; Mang, Jing; Shao, Yan-kun; Xu, Zhong-xin

    2015-01-01

    The Rho/Rho-kinase signaling pathway plays an important role in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, very few studies have examined in detail the changes in the Rho/Rho-kinase signaling pathway in chronic cerebral ischemia. In this study, rat models of chronic cerebral ischemia were established by permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion and intragastrically administered 9 mg/kg fasudil, a powerful ROCK inhibitor, for 9 weeks. Morris water maze results showed that cognitive impairment progressively worsened as the cerebral ischemia proceeded. Immunohistochemistry, semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of Rho-kinase, its substrate myosin-binding subunit, and its related protein alpha smooth muscle actin, significantly increased after chronic cerebral ischemia. TUNEL staining showed that chronic cerebral ischemia could lead to an increase in neuronal apoptosis, as well as the expression level of caspase-3 in the frontal cortex of rats subjected to chronic cerebral ischemia. Fasudil treatment alleviated the cognitive impairment in rats with chronic cerebral ischemia, and decreased the expression level of Rho-kinase, myosin-binding subunit and alpha smooth muscle actin. Furthermore, fasudil could regulate cerebral injury by reducing cell apoptosis and decreasing caspase-3 expression in the frontal cortex. These findings demonstrate that fasudil can protect against cognitive impairment induced by chronic cerebral ischemia via the Rho/Rho-kinase signaling pathway and anti-apoptosis mechanism. PMID:26604905

  4. Anti-inflammatory properties of lipoxin A4 protect against diabetes mellitus complicated by focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiang-quan; Liu, Cheng-ling; Wang, Zheng-yuan; Liu, Ling; Cheng, Ling; Fan, Ya-dan

    2016-01-01

    Lipoxin A4 can alleviate cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by reducing the inflammatory reaction, but it is currently unclear whether it has a protective effect on diabetes mellitus complicated by focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this study, we established rat models of diabetes mellitus using an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. We then induced focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 2 hours and reperfusion for 24 hours. After administration of lipoxin A4 via the lateral ventricle, infarction volume was reduced, the expression levels of pro-inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor alpha and nuclear factor-kappa B in the cerebral cortex were decreased, and neurological functioning was improved. These findings suggest that lipoxin A4 has strong neuroprotective effects in diabetes mellitus complicated by focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and that the underlying mechanism is related to the anti-inflammatory action of lipoxin A4. PMID:27212926

  5. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and cerebral blood flow and O2 uptake during dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Madsen, P L; Sperling, B K; Warming, T; Schmidt, J F; Secher, N H; Wildschiødtz, G; Holm, S; Lassen, N A

    1993-01-01

    Results obtained by the 133Xe clearance method with external detectors and by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) suggest that dynamic exercise causes an increase of global average cerebral blood flow (CBF). These data are contradicted by earlier data obtained during less-well-defined conditions. To investigate this controversy, we applied the Kety-Schmidt technique to measure the global average levels of CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during rest and dynamic exercise. Simultaneously with the determination of CBF and CMRO2, we used TCD to determine mean maximal flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA Vmean). For values of CBF and MCA Vmean a correction for an observed small drop in arterial PCO2 was carried out. Baseline values for global CBF and CMRO2 were 50.7 and 3.63 ml.100 g-1.min-1, respectively. The same values were found during dynamic exercise, whereas a 22% (P < 0.0001) increase in MCA Vmean was observed. Hence, the exercise-induced increase in MCA Vmean is not a reflection of a proportional increase in CBF.

  6. Cerebral versus systemic hemodynamics during graded orthostatic stress in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, B. D.; Giller, C. A.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    estimated from changes in the blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) using transcranial Doppler. Pulsatility (systolic minus diastolic/mean velocity) normalized for systemic arterial pressure pulsatility was used as an index of distal cerebral vascular resistance. End-tidal PACO2 was closely monitored during LBNP. From rest to maximal LBNP before the onset of symptoms or systemic hypotension, Qc and FBF decreased by 29.9% and 34.4%, respectively. VMCA decreased less, by 15.5% consistent with a smaller decrease in CBF. Similarly, SVR and FVR increased by 62.8% and 69.8%, respectively, whereas pulsatility increased by 17.2%, suggestive of a mild degree of small-vessel cerebral vasoconstriction. Seven of 13 subjects had presyncope during LBNP, all associated with a sudden drop in BP (29 +/- 9%). By comparison, hyperventilation alone caused greater changes in VMCA (42 +/- 2%) and pulsatility but never caused presyncope. In a separate group of 3 subjects, superimposition of hyperventilation during highlevel LBNP caused a further decrease in VMCA (31 +/- 7%) but no change in BP or level of consciousness. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that cerebral vasoconstriction occurs in healthy humans during graded reductions in central blood volume caused by LBNP. However, the magnitude of this response is small compared with changes in SVR or FVR during LBNP or other stimuli known to induce cerebral vasoconstriction (hypocapnia). We speculate that this degree of cerebral vasoconstriction is not by itself sufficient to cause syncope during orthostatic stress. However, it may exacerbate the decrease in CBF associated with hypotension if hemodynamic instability develops.

  7. Radon inhalation protects against transient global cerebral ischemic injury in gerbils.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Takahiro; Etani, Reo; Takata, Yuji; Nishiyama, Yuichi; Kawabe, Atsushi; Kumashiro, Masayuki; Taguchi, Takehito; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2014-10-01

    Although brain disorders are not the main indication for radon therapy, our previous study suggested that radon inhalation therapy might mitigate brain disorders. In this study, we assessed whether radon inhalation protects against transient global cerebral ischemic injury in gerbils. Gerbils were treated with inhaled radon at a concentration of 2,000 Bq/m(3) for 24 h. After radon inhalation, transient global cerebral ischemia was induced by bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. Results showed that transient global cerebral ischemia induced neuronal damage in hippocampal CA1, and the number of damaged neurons was significantly increased compared with control. However, radon treatment inhibited ischemic damage. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the radon-treated gerbil brain was significantly higher than that in sham-operated gerbils. These findings suggested that radon inhalation activates antioxidative function, especially SOD, thereby inhibiting transient global cerebral ischemic injury in gerbils.

  8. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  9. Hypocapnia and cerebral hypoperfusion in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, V.; Spies, J. M.; Novak, P.; McPhee, B. R.; Rummans, T. A.; Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Orthostatic and other stresses trigger tachycardia associated with symptoms of tremulousness, shortness of breath, dizziness, blurred vision, and, often, syncope. It has been suggested that paradoxical cerebral vasoconstriction during head-up tilt might be present in patients with orthostatic intolerance. We chose to study middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity (BFV) and cerebral vasoregulation during tilt in patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI). METHODS: Beat-to-beat BFV from the MCA, heart rate, CO2, blood pressure (BP), and respiration were measured in 30 patients with OI (25 women and 5 men; age range, 21 to 44 years; mean age, 31.3+/-1.2 years) and 17 control subjects (13 women and 4 men; age range, 20 to 41 years; mean age, 30+/-1.6 years); ages were not statistically different. These indices were monitored during supine rest and head-up tilt (HUT). We compared spontaneous breathing and hyperventilation and evaluated the effect of CO2 rebreathing in these 2 positions. RESULTS: The OI group had higher supine heart rates (P<0.001) and cardiac outputs (P<0.01) than the control group. In response to HUT, OI patients underwent a greater heart rate increment (P<0.001) and greater reductions in pulse pressure (P<0.01) and CO2 (P<0.001), but total systemic resistance failed to show an increment. Among the cerebrovascular indices, all BFVs (systolic, diastolic, and mean) decreased significantly more, and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) was increased in OI patients (P<0.01) compared with control subjects. In both groups, hyperventilation induced mild tachycardia (P<0.001), a significant reduction of BFV, and a significant increase of CVR associated with a fall in CO2. Hyperventilation during HUT reproduced hypocapnia, BFV reduction, and tachycardia and worsened symptoms of OI; these symptoms and indices were improved within 2 minutes of CO2 rebreathing. The relationships between CO2 and BFV and heart rate were well described by

  10. Transcranial laser stimulation improves human cerebral oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fenghua; Hase, Snehal N.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Transcranial laser stimulation of the brain with near‐infrared light is a novel form of non‐invasive photobiomodulation or low‐level laser therapy (LLLT) that has shown therapeutic potential in a variety of neurological and psychological conditions. Understanding of its neurophysiological effects is essential for mechanistic study and treatment evaluation. This study investigated how transcranial laser stimulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation in the human brain in vivo using functional near‐infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Materials and Methods Two separate experiments were conducted in which 1,064‐nm laser stimulation was administered at (1) the center and (2) the right side of the forehead, respectively. The laser emitted at a power of 3.4 W and in an area of 13.6 cm2, corresponding to 0.25 W/cm2 irradiance. Stimulation duration was 10 minutes. Nine healthy male and female human participants of any ethnic background, in an age range of 18–40 years old were included in each experiment. Results In both experiments, transcranial laser stimulation induced an increase of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO2]) and a decrease of deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[Hb]) in both cerebral hemispheres. Improvements in cerebral oxygenation were indicated by a significant increase of differential hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbD] = Δ[HbO2] − Δ[Hb]). These effects increased in a dose‐dependent manner over time during laser stimulation (10 minutes) and persisted after laser stimulation (6 minutes). The total hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbT] = Δ[HbO2] + Δ[Hb]) remained nearly unchanged in most cases. Conclusion Near‐infrared laser stimulation applied to the forehead can transcranially improve cerebral oxygenation in healthy humans. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:343–349, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26817446

  11. Increase of cortical cerebral blood flow and further cerebral microcirculatory effects of Serelaxin in a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Sabine J; Schmidt, Martin; Lehmann, Thomas; Irintchev, Andrey; Schubert, Harald; Jung, Christian; Schwab, Matthias; Huber, Otmar; Matziolis, Georg; Schiffner, René

    2016-09-01

    Serelaxin, recombinant human relaxin-2, modulates endothelial vasodilatory functionality and is under evaluation for treatment of acute heart failure. Little is known about acute effects on cerebral perfusion. We tested the hypothesis that Serelaxin might also have effects on the cerebral microcirculation in a sheep model, which resembles human brain structure quite well. We used laser Doppler flowmetry and sidestream dark-field (SDF) imaging techniques, which are reliable tools to continuously assess dynamic changes in cerebral perfusion. Laser Doppler flowmetry shows that bolus injection of 30 μg Serelaxin/kg body wt induces an increase (P = 0.006) to roughly 150% of cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF), whereas subcortical CBF remains unchanged (P = 0.688). The effects on area-dependent CBF were significantly different after the bolus injection (P = 0.042). Effects on cortical CBF were further confirmed by SDF imaging. The bolus injection of Serelaxin increased total vessel density to 127% (P = 0.00046), perfused vessel density to 145% (P = 0.024), and perfused capillary density to 153% (P = 0.024). Western blotting confirmed the expression of relaxin receptors RXFP1 and truncated RXFP2-variants in the respective brain regions, suggesting a possible contribution of RXFP1 on the effects of Serelaxin. In conclusion, the injection of a high dose of Serelaxin exerts quick effects on the cerebral microcirculation. Therefore, Serelaxin might be suitable to improve cortical microcirculation and exert neuroprotective effects in clinically relevant scenarios that involve cortical hypoperfusion. These findings need to be confirmed in relevant experimental settings involving cerebral cortical hypoperfusion and can possibly be translated into clinical practice. PMID:27402664

  12. Exercise preconditioning exhibits neuroprotective effects on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shamsaei, Nabi; Khaksari, Mehdi; Erfani, Sohaila; Rajabi, Hamid; Aboutaleb, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the neuroprotective effects of physical exercise on cerebral ischemic injury. However, the role of physical exercise in cerebral ischemia-induced hippocampal damage remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pre-ischemia treadmill training on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia. Male adult rats were randomly divided into control, ischemia and exercise + ischemia groups. In the exercise + ischemia group, rats were subjected to running on a treadmill in a designated time schedule (5 days per week for 4 weeks). Then rats underwent cerebral ischemia induction through occlusion of common carotids followed by reperfusion. At 4 days after cerebral ischemia, rat learning and memory abilities were evaluated using passive avoidance memory test and rat hippocampal neuronal damage was detected using Nissl and TUNEL staining. Pre-ischemic exercise significantly reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells and necrotic cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region as compared to the ischemia group. Moreover, pre-ischemic exercise significantly prevented ischemia-induced memory dysfunction. Pre-ischemic exercise mighct prevent memory deficits after cerebral ischemia through rescuing hippocampal CA1 neurons from ischemia-induced degeneration. PMID:26487851

  13. Neuroprotective effects of tadalafil on gerbil dopaminergic neurons following cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Taek; Chung, Kyung Jin; Lee, Han Sae; Ko, Il Gyu; Kim, Chang Ju; Na, Yong Gil; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2013-03-15

    Impairment of dopamine function, which is known to have major effects on behaviors and cognition, is one of the main problems associated with cerebral ischemia. Tadalafil, a long-acting phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor, is known to ameliorate neurologic impairment induced by brain injury, but not in dopaminergic regions. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of treatment with tadalafil on cyclic guanosine monophosphate level and dopamine function following cerebral ischemia. Forty adult Mongolian gerbils were randomly and evenly divided into five groups (n = 8 in each group): Sham-operation group, cerebral ischemia-induced and 0, 0.1, 1, and 10 mg/kg tadalafil-treated groups, respectively. Tadalafil dissolved in distilled water was administered orally for 7 consecutive days, starting 1 day after surgery. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate assay and immunohistochemistry were performed for thyrosine hydroxylase expression and western blot analysis for dopamine D2 receptor expression. A decrease in cyclic guanosine monophosphate level following cerebral ischemia was found with an increase in thyrosine hydroxylase activity and a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor expression in the striatum and substantia nigra region. However, treatment with tadalafil increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate expression, suppressed thyrosine hydroxylase expression and increased dopamine D2 receptor expression in the striatum and substantia nigra region in a dose-dependent manner. Tadalafil might ameliorate cerebral ischemia-induced dopaminergic neuron injury. Therefore, tadalafil has the potential as a new neuroprotective treatment strategy for cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:25206715

  14. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  15. A case of cerebral gigantism and hepatocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, G I; Heuser, E T; Reed, W B

    1977-06-01

    A 14-year-old boy, who had the physical and neurological characteristics of cerebral gigantism (Sotos syndrome), developed hepatocarcinoma. This tumor is rare in children and has never, to our knowledge, been recorded in a patient with cerebral gigantism. An autopsy was performed, the first we are aware of in a patient with cerebral gigantism without increased size in ventricles.

  16. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  17. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  18. Cerebral radionecrosis: is surgery necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Woo, E; Lam, K; Yu, Y L; Lee, P W; Huang, C Y

    1987-01-01

    Seven patients with cerebral necrosis after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the nasopharynx are presented. The clinical features included seizures and a varying degree of intellectual impairment. In spite of significant mass effect on CT scan, the patients remained alert, ambulatory and independent. We believe that some cases of cerebral necrosis following radiotherapy for extra-cranial neoplasms present in a more benign fashion than has been portrayed in the literature, and in the absence of clinical evidence of raised intracranial pressure, surgical intervention is unnecessary. The importance of careful fractionation of an optimum radiation dose as a preventive measure is emphasised. Images PMID:3694200

  19. Beneficial synergistic effects of concurrent treatment with theanine and caffeine against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingyan; Tian, Xia; Gou, Lingshan; Ling, Xin; Wang, Ling; Feng, Yan; Yin, Xiaoxing; Liu, Yi

    2013-07-01

    Theanine and caffeine, 2 naturally occurring components in tea, have repeatedly been shown to deliver unique cognitive benefits when consumed in combination. In this study, we assessed the beneficial synergistic effects of concurrent treatment with theanine and caffeine against cerebral damage in rats. Theanine and caffeine had no effect on physiological variables, including pH, partial pressures of oxygen (PaO2) and carbon dioxide (PaCO2), mean arterial blood pressure, plasma glucose, or regional cerebral blood flow. Treatment with theanine (1 mg/kg body mass, intraperitoneal injection) alone significantly reduced cerebral infarction induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, but caffeine (10 mg/kg, intravenous administration) alone only had a marginal effect. However, the combination of theanine plus caffeine resulted in a significant reduction of cerebral infarction and brain edema compared with theanine monotherapy. Meanwhile, increased malondialdehyde levels as well as decreased superoxide dismutase activity, glutathione peroxidase activity, and glutathione levels observed in the cerebral cortex after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion were significantly ameliorated by the combination therapy. Furthermore, the elevated inflammatory response levels observed in the cortex after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion were markedly attenuated by the combined treatment. Thus, it is suggested that the neuroprotective potential of a combination therapy with theanine and caffeine against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion is partly ascribed to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

  20. Laser Speckle Imaging of Cerebral Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming; Jiang, Chao; Li, Pengcheng; Cheng, Haiying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Zheng; Tuchin, Valery V.

    Monitoring the spatio-temporal characteristics of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is crucial for studying the normal and pathophysiologic conditions of brain metabolism. By illuminating the cortex with laser light and imaging the resulting speckle pattern, relative CBF images with tens of microns spatial and millisecond temporal resolution can be obtained. In this chapter, a laser speckle imaging (LSI) method for monitoring dynamic, high-resolution CBF is introduced. To improve the spatial resolution of current LSI, a modified LSI method is proposed. To accelerate the speed of data processing, three LSI data processing frameworks based on graphics processing unit (GPU), digital signal processor (DSP), and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) are also presented. Applications for detecting the changes in local CBF induced by sensory stimulation and thermal stimulation, the influence of a chemical agent on CBF, and the influence of acute hyperglycemia following cortical spreading depression on CBF are given.

  1. Pathogenesis of diabetic cerebral vascular disease complication

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most potent independent risk factors for the development of diabetic cerebral vascular disease (CVD). Many evidences suggested that hyperglycemia caused excess free fatty acids, the loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, insulin resistance, the prothrombotic state, endothelial dysfunction, the abnormal release of endothelial vasoactivators, vascular smooth muscle dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the downregulation of miRs participated in vessel generation and recovery as well as the balance of endotheliocytes. In turn, these abnormalities, mainly via phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, polyol, hexosamine, protein kinase C activation, and increased generation of advanced glycosylation end products pathway, play an important role in inducing diabetic CVD complication. A deeper comprehension of pathogenesis producing diabetic CVD could offer base for developing new therapeutic ways preventing diabetic CVD complications, therefore, in the paper we mainly reviewed present information about the possible pathogenesis of diabetic CVD complication. PMID:25685278

  2. Impaired cerebral vasoreactivity after embolization of arteriovenous malformations: assessment with serial acetazolamide challenge xenon CT

    SciTech Connect

    Tarr, R.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Horton, J.A.; Yonas, H.; Pentheny, S.; Durham, S.; Jungreis, C.A.; Hecht, S.T. )

    1991-05-01

    Embolization of a portion of the nidus of an arteriovenous malformation not only may alter hemodynamics within the nidus, but also may change blood flow dynamics in adjacent normal vessels. Sequential acetazolamide-challenge xenon CT cerebral blood flow studies were performed in eight patients before and after embolization of arteriovenous malformations to assess the hemodynamic effects on the major vascular territories supplying the malformation. Acetazolamide is a potent cerebral vasodilator, and its administration combined with cerebral blood flow studies allows assessment of cerebral vasoreactivity. In seven of the eight patients, one or more parenchymal areas exhibited a normal cerebral blood flow augmentation response to acetazolamide before embolization, but diminished acetazolamide flow augmentation was seen after embolization, indicating abnormal vasoreactivity. We found that the decrease in vasoreactivity peaked 6-10 days after embolization. In one of the eight patients, a temporary delayed neurologic deficit developed during a period of impaired cerebral vasoreactivity following embolization. Our results suggest that embolization of an arteriovenous malformation can induce vasoreactivity changes in adjacent normal vessels. Because these changes appear to be somewhat time-dependent, an appropriate interval should be observed between embolization stages or before surgical resection of an arteriovenous malformation following embolization to allow hemodynamic equilibration to occur. Acetazolamide challenge combined with serial cerebral blood flow studies following embolization enables determination of this hemodynamic equilibration.

  3. The Hemodynamic Effects of Blood Flow-Arterial Wall Interaction on Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Marie

    2005-11-01

    Mechanical stresses such as wall shear induced by blood flow play an important role on cardiovascular diseases and cerebral disorders like arterioscleroses and cerebral aneurysm. In order to obtain a better understanding of mechanism of formation, growth, and rupture of cerebral aneurysm, this paper focuses on investigation of cerebral hemodynamics and its effects on aneurismal wall. The paper mainly consists of three parts. Since it is important to obtain the detailed information on the hemodynamic properties in the cerebral circulatory system, the first part discusses a large-scale hemodynamic simulation of the Cerebral Arterial Circle of Willis. The second part presents the simulation and in-vitro experiment of cerebral aneurysm with the consideration of blood flow-arterial wall interaction. Both simulations in the first and the second parts are conducted in a patient specific manner using medical images and also include modeling of boundary conditions to emulate realistic hemodynamic conditions. The present mathematical model, however, includes only macroscopic mechanical functions. Therefore, in the third part, the paper touches upon on future prospects in modeling of microscopic functions such as the effects of endothelial cells and multi physics functions such as physiological effects.

  4. Regional brain blood flow and cerebral hemispheric oxygen consumption during acute hypoxaemia in the llama fetus

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Aníbal J; Riquelme, Raquel A; Sanhueza, Emilia M; Herrera, Emilio; Cabello, Gertrudis; Giussani, Dino A; Parer, Julian T

    2002-01-01

    Unlike fetal animals of lowland species, the llama fetus does not increase its cerebral blood flow during an episode of acute hypoxaemia. This study tested the hypothesis that the fetal llama brain maintains cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption by increasing cerebral O2 extraction rather than decreasing cerebral oxygen utilisation during acute hypoxaemia. Six llama fetuses were surgically instrumented under general anaesthesia at 217 days of gestation (term ca 350 days) with vascular and amniotic catheters in order to carry out cardiorespiratory studies. Following a control period of 1 h, the llama fetuses underwent 3 × 20 min episodes of progressive hypoxaemia, induced by maternal inhalational hypoxia. During basal conditions and during each of the 20 min of hypoxaemia, fetal cerebral blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres, cerebral oxygen extraction was calculated, and fetal cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption was determined by the modified Fick principle. During hypoxaemia, fetal arterial O2 tension and fetal pH decreased progressively from 24 ± 1 to 20 ± 1 Torr and from 7.36 ± 0.01 to 7.33 ± 0.01, respectively, during the first 20 min episode, to 16 ± 1 Torr and 7.25 ± 0.05 during the second 20 min episode and to 14 ± 1 Torr and 7.21 ± 0.04 during the final 20 min episode. Fetal arterial partial pressure of CO2 (Pa,CO2, 42 ± 2 Torr) remained unaltered from baseline throughout the experiment. Fetal cerebral hemispheric blood flow and cerebral hemispheric oxygen extraction were unaltered from baseline during progressive hypoxaemia. In contrast, a progressive fall in fetal cerebral hemispheric oxygen consumption occurred during the hypoxaemic challenge. In conclusion, these data do not support the hypothesis that the fetal llama brain maintains cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption by increasing cerebral hemispheric O2 extraction. Rather, the data show that in the llama fetus, a reduction in cerebral hemispheric metabolism occurs during acute

  5. Investigating cerebral oedema using poroelasticity.

    PubMed

    Vardakis, John C; Chou, Dean; Tully, Brett J; Hung, Chang C; Lee, Tsong H; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral oedema can be classified as the tangible swelling produced by expansion of the interstitial fluid volume. Hydrocephalus can be succinctly described as the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain which ultimately leads to oedema within specific sites of parenchymal tissue. Using hydrocephalus as a test bed, one is able to account for the necessary mechanisms involved in the interaction between oedema formation and cerebral fluid production, transport and drainage. The current state of knowledge about integrative cerebral dynamics and transport phenomena indicates that poroelastic theory may provide a suitable framework to better understand various diseases. In this work, Multiple-Network Poroelastic Theory (MPET) is used to develop a novel spatio-temporal model of fluid regulation and tissue displacement within the various scales of the cerebral environment. The model is applied through two formats, a one-dimensional finite difference - Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling framework, as well as a two-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) formulation. These are used to investigate the role of endoscopic fourth ventriculostomy in alleviating oedema formation due to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction (1D coupled model) in addition to observing the capability of the FEM template in capturing important characteristics allied to oedema formation, like for instance in the periventricular region (2D model).

  6. Confusional state and cerebral infarcts.

    PubMed Central

    García-Albea, E.

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen patients with confusional state and cerebral infarction were studied. Seven patients had optic pathway alterations. On computed tomographic scan, 2 patients had multiple infarctions and 10 had single infarctions, predominantly located in the temporo-occipital associative cortex. One patient had a normal scan. Reduction of 'selective attention', 'release' hallucinations, amnesic syndrome and secondary individual adjustment could explain the confusional state. PMID:2608563

  7. Neuropathology of Acquired Cerebral Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1987-01-01

    To help educators understand the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of cerebral injury, the neuropathology of traumatic brain injury and the main neuropathological features resulting from trauma-related brain damage are reviewed. A glossary with definitions of 37 neurological terms is appended. (Author/DB)

  8. Endogenous Protease Nexin-1 Protects against Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin’s endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1−/− mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection. PMID:23949634

  9. Endogenous protease nexin-1 protects against cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-08-14

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin's endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1(-/-) mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection.

  10. Endogenous protease nexin-1 protects against cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin's endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1(-/-) mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection. PMID:23949634

  11. Coffee component 3-caffeoylquinic acid increases antioxidant capacity but not polyphenol content in experimental cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Crespo, Silvia; Trejo-Gabriel-Galan, Jose M; Cavia-Saiz, Monica; Muñiz, Pilar

    2012-05-01

    Although coffee has antioxidant capacity, it is not known which of its bioactive compounds is responsible for it, nor has it been analyzed in experimental cerebral infarction. We studied the effect one of its compounds, 3-caffeoylquinic acid (3-CQA), at doses of 4, 25 and 100 μg on plasma antioxidant capacity and plasma polyphenol content, measuring the differences before and after inducing a cerebral infarction in an experimental rat model. We compared them with 3-caffeoylquinic-free controls. The increase in total antioxidant capacity was only higher than in controls in 3-CQA treated animals with the highest dose. This increase in antioxidant capacity was not due to an increase in polyphenols. No differences between the experimental and control group were found regarding polyphenol content and cerebral infarction volume. In conclusion, this increase in antioxidant capacity in the group that received the highest dose of 3-CQA was not able to reduce experimental cerebral infarction.

  12. Malignant Hemispheric Cerebral Infarction Associated with Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Kei; Mikami, Takeshi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Aisaka, Wakiko; Irifune, Hideto; Narimatsu, Eichi

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome (ISCLS) is a rare condition that is characterized by unexplained episodic capillary hyperpermeability due to a shift of fluid and protein from the intravascular to the interstitial space. This results in diffuse general swelling, fetal hypovolemic shock, hypoalbuminemia, and hemoconcentration. Although ISCLS rarely induces cerebral infarction, we experienced a patient who deteriorated and was comatose as a result of massive cerebral infarction associated with ISCLS. In this case, severe hypotensive shock, general edema, hemiparesis, and aphasia appeared after serious antecedent gastrointestinal symptoms. Progressive life-threatening ischemic cerebral edema required decompressive hemicraniectomy. The patient experienced another episode of severe hypotension and limb edema that resulted in multiple extremity compartment syndrome. Treatment entailed forearm and calf fasciotomies. Cerebral edema in the ischemic brain progresses rapidly in patients suffering from ISCLS. Strict control of fluid volume resuscitation and aggressive diuretic therapy may be needed during the post-leak phase of fluid remobilization. PMID:24163674

  13. Detection of Cerebral Hemorrhage in Rabbits by Time-Difference Magnetic Inductive Phase Shift Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wencai; Yan, Qingguang; Qin, Mingxin; Jin, Gui; Sun, Jian; Ning, Xu; Zhuang, Wei; Peng, Bin; Li, Gen

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage, a difficult issue in clinical practice, is often detected and studied with computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). However, these expensive devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions, and hence are unable to provide bedside and emergency on-site monitoring. The magnetic inductive phase shift (MIPS) is an emerging technology that may become a new tool to detect cerebral hemorrhage and to serve as an inexpensive partial substitute to medical imaging. In order to study a wider band of cerebral hemorrhage MIPS and to provide more useful information for measuring cerebral hemorrhage, we established a cerebral hemorrhage magnetic induction phase shift spectroscopy (MIPSS) detection system. Thirteen rabbits with five cerebral hemorrhage states were studied using a single coil-coil within a 1 MHz-200 MHz frequency range in linear sweep. A feature band (FB) with the highest detection sensitivity and the greatest stability was selected for further analysis and processing. In addition, a maximum conductivity cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI was performed to verify and interpret the MIPSS result. The average phase shift change induced by a 3 ml injection of autologous blood under FB was -7.7503° ± 1.4204°, which was considerably larger than our previous work. Data analysis with a non-parametric statistical Friedman M test showed that in the FB, MIPSS could distinguish the five states of cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits, with a statistical significance of p<0.05. A B-F distribution profile was designed according to the MIPSS under FB that can provide instantaneous diagnostic information about the cerebral hemorrhage severity from a single set of measurements. The results illustrate that the MIPSS detection method is able to provide a new possibility for real-time monitoring and diagnosis of the severity of cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:26001112

  14. Proteomic identification of proteins differentially expressed in response to resveratrol treatment in middle cerebral artery occlusion stroke model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Fawad-Ali; Gim, Sang-Ah; Kim, Myeong-Ok; Koh, Phil-Ok

    2014-10-01

    Resveratrol has a neuroprotective effect against cerebral ischemia. The objective of this study was to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in the cerebral cortex of vehicle- and resveratrol-treated animals during ischemic injury. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced as middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in male rats. Rats were treated with vehicle or resveratrol before MCAO, and cerebral cortex was collected 24 hr after MCAO. Cerebral cortex proteins were identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Several proteins were identified as differentially expressed between vehicle- and resveratrol-treated animals. Among these proteins, expression of peroxiredoxin-5, isocitrate dehydrogenase [NAD(+)], apolipoprotein A-I and ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolase L1 was decreased in the vehicle-treated group, whereas resveratrol attenuated the injury-induced decrease in expression of these proteins. However, expression of collapsing response mediator protein 2 was increased in the vehicle-treated group, whereas resveratrol prevented the injury-induced increase in the expression of this protein. These findings suggest that resveratrol modulates the expression of various proteins that associated with oxidative stress and energy metabolism in focal cerebral ischemia.

  15. Intraoperative microvascular Doppler ultrasonography in cerebral aneurysm surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stendel, R.; Pietila, T.; Al, H; Schilling, A.; Brock, M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Outcome of surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms may be severely compromised by local cerebral ischaemia or infarction resulting from the inadvertent occlusion of an adjacent vessel by the aneurysm clip, or by incomplete aneurysm closure. It is therefore mandatory to optimise clip placement in situ to reduce the complication rate. The present study was performed to investigate the reliability of intraoperative microvascular Doppler ultrasonography (MDU) in cerebral aneurysm surgery, and to assess the impact of this method on the surgical procedure itself.
METHODS—Seventy five patients (19 men, 56 women, mean age 54.8 years, range 22-84 years) with 90 saccular cerebral aneurysms were evaluated. Blood flow velocities in the aneurysmal sac and in the adjacent vessels were determined by MDU before and after aneurysm clipping. The findings of MDU were analysed and compared with those of visual inspection of the surgical site and of postoperative angiography. Analysis was also made of the cases in which the clip was repositioned due to MDU findings.
RESULTS—A relevant stenosis of an adjacent vessel induced by clip positioning that had escaped detection by visual inspection was identified by Doppler ultrasonography in 17 out of 90 (18.9%) aneurysms. In addition, Doppler ultrasound demonstrated a primarily unoccluded aneurysm in 11 out of 90 (12.2%) patients. The aneurysm clip was repositioned on the basis of the MDU findings in 26 out of 90 (28.8%) cases. In middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms, the MDU results were relevant to the surgical procedure in 17out of 44 (38.6%) cases. Whereas with aneurysms of the anterior cerebral artery significant findings occurred in only five of 32cases (15.6%; p<0.05). The clip was repositioned on the basis of the MDU results in 18 out of 50 (36%) aneurysms in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) grade I-V compared with only eight out of 40 (20%) aneurysms in patients without SAH (p<0.05).

  16. Modulation of cerebral microvascular permeability by endothelial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Brian T; Egleton, Richard D; Davis, Thomas P

    2005-07-01

    Nicotine increases the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in vivo. This implies a possible role for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the regulation of cerebral microvascular permeability. Expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in cerebral microvessels was investigated with immunofluorescence microscopy. Positive immunoreactivity was found for receptor subunits alpha3, alpha5, alpha7, and beta2, but not subunits alpha4, beta3, or beta4. Blood-brain barrier permeability was assessed via in situ brain perfusion with [14C]sucrose. Nicotine increased the rate of sucrose entry into the brain from 0.3 +/- 0.1 to 1.1 +/- 0.2 microl.g(-1).min(-1), as previously described. This nicotine-induced increase in blood-brain barrier permeability was significantly attenuated by both the blood-brain barrier-permeant nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine and the blood-brain barrier-impermeant nicotinic antagonist hexamethonium to 0.5 +/- 0.2 and 0.3 +/- 0.2 microl.g(-1).min(-1), respectively. These data suggest that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on the cerebral microvascular endothelium mediate nicotine-induced changes in blood-brain barrier permeability.

  17. Cerebral autoregulation with changes in arterial and cerebral venous pressure

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, R.W.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of cerebral venous pressure (Pcv) elevation on cerebral autoregulation has been incompletely studied. The authors compared the effect of decreased cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by elevated Pcv and decreased arterial pressure (Pa) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a canine modified bypass model. CPP of 80, 70, 60, 50, 40 and 30 mmHg were produced by decreasing Pa with intracranial pressure (ICP) and Pcv maintained at 0 mmHg (group 1, n = 5), or by elevating Pcv as Pa was maintained at 80 mmHg (group 2, n = 5. CBF was measured using radiolabeled microspheres, and CMRO/sub 2/ = CBF times arterial-sagittal sinus O/sub 2/ content difference. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) = CPP/CBF. In group 1 CBF (ml/100 gm/min) was unchanged from control (36 +/- 4) as CPP was decreased from 80 to 40 mmHg. As CPP was decreased to 30 mmHg, CBF decreased to 28 +/- 1. CVR (mmHg/ml/min/100 gm) was 2.3 +/- 0.3 and progressively decreased to 1.0 +/- 0.1 at CPP of 30 mmHg. In group 2 CBF was 34 +/- 3 and was unchanged as CPP decreased to 50 mmHg. At CPP of 40 and 30 mmHg CBF decreased to 25 +/- 3 and 22 +/- 2 respectively. Control CRV was 2.4 +/- 0.2 and progressively decreased to 1.4 +/- 0.1 as CPP decreased to 30 mmHg. CMRO/sub 2/ was unchanged from control in both groups. Thus, CBF is maintained to low CPP regardless of whether vascular transmural pressure was decreased (decrease Pa) or increased (increased Pcv) demonstrating that the myogenic mechanism of autoregulation may be unimportant in normoxic dogs.

  18. Pertussis Toxin Exploits Host Cell Signaling Pathways Induced by Meningitis-Causing E. coli K1-RS218 and Enhances Adherence of Monocytic THP-1 Cells to Human Cerebral Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Starost, Laura Julia; Karassek, Sascha; Sano, Yasuteru; Kanda, Takashi; Kim, Kwang Sik; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, Marcus Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTx), the major virulence factor of the whooping cough-causing bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis, permeabilizes the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in vitro and in vivo. Breaking barriers might promote translocation of meningitis-causing bacteria across the BBB, thereby facilitating infection. PTx activates several host cell signaling pathways exploited by the neonatal meningitis-causing Escherichia coli K1-RS218 for invasion and translocation across the BBB. Here, we investigated whether PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 exert similar effects on MAPK p38, NF-κB activation and transcription of downstream targets in human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells using qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and ELISA in combination with specific inhibitors. PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 activate MAPK p38, but only E. coli K1-RS218 activates the NF-κB pathway. mRNA and protein levels of p38 and NF-κB downstream targets including IL-6, IL-8, CxCL-1, CxCL-2 and ICAM-1 were increased. The p38 specific inhibitor SB203590 blocked PTx-enhanced activity, whereas E. coli K1-RS218’s effects were inhibited by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Further, we found that PTx enhances the adherence of human monocytic THP-1 cells to human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells, thereby contributing to enhanced translocation. These modulations of host cell signaling pathways by PTx and meningitis-causing E. coli support their contributions to pathogen and monocytic THP-1 cells translocation across the BBB. PMID:27754355

  19. Bruxism Control in a Child with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Cristiana Aroeira G. R.; de Paula, Viviane Andrade Cancio; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Primo, Laura Salignac Guimarães; Castro, Gloria Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most severe childhood disabilities due to a lesion in the developing brain. Oral conditions often observed in this pathogenic are a tendency for the delayed eruption of permanent molars, higher percentages of malocclusion and parafunctional habits, including bruxism. The significance of oral conditions observed in CP patients demonstrates the need for intensive home and professional care for these individuals. This paper presents a 7-year-old boy, with cerebral palsy, severe mental retardation, who had high abrasion wear of the primary teeth related to bruxism. Dental care was carried out under oxide-induced sedation, and management of the bruxism was achieved after the use of a resin acrylic protective appliance fixed on both sides of the mandibula. The treatment performed offered efficiency advantages, was clinically viable, and should be a valuable option to practitioners considering appliance therapy to control parafunctional behavior. PMID:21991456

  20. Motor performance improved by exercises in cerebral ischemic rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yea-Ru; Chang, Heng-Chih; Wang, Paulus S; Wang, Ray-Yau

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise may induce neuroprotective effects against brain damage after stroke. The authors aimed to investigate the effects of various exercises on motor function, striatal angiogenesis, and infarct volume in cerebral ischemic rats. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion and randomly assigned to 1 of the 4 groups: Rota-rod training, lower speed treadmill training, higher speed treadmill training, or no exercise control. Motor function, striatal angiogenesis, and infarct volume were evaluated before or after motor training. After training, motor function and striatal angiogenesis changed significantly in Rota-rod and higher speed treadmill training groups as compared with the control group. Improvement in motor function significantly correlated with striatal angiogenesis after motor training. Infarct volumes were significantly decreased in lower and higher speed treadmill training groups. The results indicated that both motor training procedures can be used as effective training programs in stroke rehabilitation.

  1. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin on focal cerebral ischemic rats by preventing blood-brain barrier damage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yong Jun; Hu, Mei; Li, Fei; Zhu, Dong Ya

    2007-04-30

    Curcumin, a member of the curcuminoid family of compounds, is a yellow colored phenolic pigment obtained from powdered rhizome of C. longa Linn. Recent studies have demonstrated that curcumin has protective effects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, little is known about its mechanism. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier occurs after stroke. Protection of the blood-brain barrier has become an important target of stroke interventions in experimental therapeutic. The objective of the present study was to determine whether curcumin prevents cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by protecting blood-brain barrier integrity. We report that a single injection of curcumin (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.v.) 30 min after focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats significantly diminished infarct volume, improved neurological deficit, decreased mortality, reduced the water content of the brain and the extravasation of Evans blue dye in ipsilateral hemisphere in a dose-dependent manner. In cultured astrocytes, curcumin significantly inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO(x) (Nitrites/nitrates contents) production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF(alpha)). Furthermore, curcumin prevented ONOO(-) donor SIN-1-induced cerebral capillaries endothelial cells damage. We concluded that curcumin ameliorates cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by preventing ONOO(-) mediated blood-brain barrier damage. PMID:17303117

  2. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) enhance neurogenesis and spine density following focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad M; Wakade, Chandramohan; de Sevilla, Liesl; Brann, Darrell W

    2015-02-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been reported to enhance synaptic plasticity and improve cognitive performance in adult rats. SERMs have also been shown to induce neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia and other CNS insults. In this study, we sought to determine whether acute regulation of neurogenesis and spine remodeling could be a novel mechanism associated with neuroprotection induced by SERMs following cerebral ischemia. Toward this end, ovariectomized adult female rats were either implanted with pellets of 17β-estradiol (estrogen) or tamoxifen, or injected with raloxifene. After one week, cerebral ischemia was induced by the transient middle-cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) method. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected to label dividing cells in brain. We analyzed neurogenesis and spine density at day-1 and day-5 post MCAO. In agreement with earlier findings, we observed a robust induction of neurogenesis in the ipsilateral subventricular zone (SVZ) of both the intact as well as ovariectomized female rats following MCAO. Interestingly, neurogenesis in the ipsilateral SVZ following ischemia was significantly higher in estrogen and raloxifene-treated animals compared to placebo-treated rats. In contrast, this enhancing effect on neurogenesis was not observed in tamoxifen-treated rats. Finally, both SERMs, as well as estrogen significantly reversed the spine density loss observed in the ischemic cortex at day-5 post ischemia. Taken, together these results reveal a profound structural remodeling potential of SERMs in the brain following cerebral ischemia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Sex steroids and brain disorders".

  3. Effects of superior cervical ganglionectomy on alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in dog cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, M.; Tsukahara, T.; Taniguchi, T.; Usui, H.

    1986-03-01

    Norepinephrine (NE)- and clonidine-induced contractions of dog cerebral arteries were attenuated by yohimbine but not affected by prazosin. There was no detectable /sup 3/H-prazosin binding site in the cerebral arteries. On the other hand, /sup 3/H-yohimbine binding studies revealed the presence of two binding sites with high and low affinities in the cerebral arteries. After superior cervical ganglionectomy, NE- and clonidine-induced contractions of the denervated cerebral arteries were not altered compared with the control arteries. The binding study revealed that there was low affinity /sup 3/H-yohimbine binding sites, whereas high affinity sites were not detectable. These results suggest that there are two different NE binding sites in alpha 2 adrenergic receptors, and that the high affinity sites are presynaptically located and low affinity sites are postsynaptic. It is also suggested that NE-induced contractions are mediated by postsynaptic low affinity sites of alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in the dog cerebral arteries.

  4. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  5. [Cerebral syndromes in premature children].

    PubMed

    Edel'shteĭn, E A; Bandarenko, E S

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral disturbances observed in premature infants are analyzed. These disturbances are a consequence of developmental slowdown and are associated with the pathological immaturity of the brain structures. On condition an active pathogenetic therapy is given these disturbances may gradually regress. On the basis of long-term observations of 600 prematurely born infants the authors describe the following clinical syndromes: muscular hypotonicity lasting up to 4-5 months and followed with a rise of the tone; the syndrome of "paretic hands" observed during the first two months of life; a hypertensive-hydrocephalic syndrome combined with a rise of the neuro-reflectory excitability; the syndrome of psychomotor development retardation followed at an age of over 1.5 to 2 years by complete recovery or minimal cerebral insufficiency with belated development of motor speech and neurosis-like reactions. PMID:6880498

  6. Transfer function analysis of dynamic cerebral autoregulation in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, R.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Giller, C. A.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that spontaneous changes in cerebral blood flow are primarily induced by changes in arterial pressure and that cerebral autoregulation is a frequency-dependent phenomenon, we measured mean arterial pressure in the finger and mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) during supine rest and acute hypotension induced by thigh cuff deflation in 10 healthy subjects. Transfer function gain, phase, and coherence function between changes in arterial pressure and VMCA were estimated using the Welch method. The impulse response function, calculated as the inverse Fourier transform of this transfer function, enabled the calculation of transient changes in VMCA during acute hypotension, which was compared with the directly measured change in VMCA during thigh cuff deflation. Beat-to-beat changes in VMCA occurred simultaneously with changes in arterial pressure, and the autospectrum of VMCA showed characteristics similar to arterial pressure. Transfer gain increased substantially with increasing frequency from 0.07 to 0.20 Hz in association with a gradual decrease in phase. The coherence function was > 0.5 in the frequency range of 0.07-0.30 Hz and < 0.5 at < 0.07 Hz. Furthermore, the predicted change in VMCA was similar to the measured VMCA during thigh cuff deflation. These data suggest that spontaneous changes in VMCA that occur at the frequency range of 0.07-0.30 Hz are related strongly to changes in arterial pressure and, furthermore, that short-term regulation of cerebral blood flow in response to changes in arterial pressure can be modeled by a transfer function with the quality of a high-pass filter in the frequency range of 0.07-0.30 Hz.

  7. Diabetic microangiopathy: impact of impaired cerebral vasoreactivity and delayed angiogenesis after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion on stroke damage and cerebral repair in mice.

    PubMed

    Poittevin, Marine; Bonnin, Philippe; Pimpie, Cynthia; Rivière, Léa; Sebrié, Catherine; Dohan, Anthony; Pocard, Marc; Charriaut-Marlangue, Christiane; Kubis, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes increases the risk of stroke by three, increases related mortality, and delays recovery. We aimed to characterize functional and structural alterations in cerebral microvasculature before and after experimental cerebral ischemia in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that preexisting brain microvascular disease in patients with diabetes might partly explain increased stroke severity and impact on outcome. Diabetes was induced in 4-week-old C57Bl/6J mice by intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). After 8 weeks of diabetes, the vasoreactivity of the neurovascular network to CO2 was abolished and was not reversed by nitric oxide (NO) donor administration; endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) mRNA, phospho-eNOS protein, nNOS, and phospho-nNOS protein were significantly decreased; angiogenic and vessel maturation factors (vascular endothelial growth factor a [VEGFa], angiopoietin 1 (Ang1), Ang2, transforming growth factor-β [TGF-β], and platelet-derived growth factor-β [PDGF-β]) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) occludin and zona occludens 1 (ZO-1) expression were significantly decreased; and microvessel density was increased without changes in ultrastructural imaging. After permanent focal cerebral ischemia induction, infarct volume and neurological deficit were significantly increased at D1 and D7, and neuronal death (TUNEL+ / NeuN+ cells) and BBB permeability (extravasation of Evans blue) at D1. At D7, CD31+ / Ki67+ double-immunolabeled cells and VEGFa and Ang2 expression were significantly increased, indicating delayed angiogenesis. We show that cerebral microangiopathy thus partly explains stroke severity in diabetes. PMID:25288671

  8. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. PMID:25698610

  9. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms.

  10. [Pathogenesis of infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Semenova, K A

    1980-01-01

    Some causes of the pathological activity of postural reflexes and other motor disturbances underlying the clinical picture of infantile cerebral paralysis are considered. It is shown that disturbed metabolism of corticosteroids observed in that disease, as well as impaired functional activity of T lymphocytes promote the development of both inflammatory and neuroimmune processes in the brain, mainly in large hemispheres--and this may be one of the causes of the pathological postural activity. PMID:6969015

  11. Hydrocephalus in cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zuurbier, Susanna M; van den Berg, René; Troost, Dirk; Majoie, Charles B; Stam, Jan; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure is common in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), but hydrocephalus is rarely reported in these patients. We examined the frequency, pathophysiology and associated clinical manifestations of hydrocephalus in patients with CVT admitted to our hospital between 2000 and 2010 (prospectively since July 2006). Hydrocephalus was defined as a bicaudate index larger than the 95th percentile for age, and/or a radial width of the temporal horn of ≥ 5 mm. We excluded patients in whom hydrocephalus was caused by a disease other than CVT or if it was iatrogenic. 20 out of 99 patients with CVT had hydrocephalus. 6 patients with hydrocephalus were excluded from the analysis. Patients with hydrocephalus more often had focal neurological deficits (86 vs. 49%, p = 0.02) and were more frequently comatose (43 vs. 16%, p = 0.06), as compared to patients without hydrocephalus. Deep cerebral venous thrombosis (64 vs. 9%, p < 0.001) and edema of the basal ganglia and thalami (64 vs. 4%, p < 0.001) were more common in patients with hydrocephalus. Intraventricular hemorrhage was present in 1 patient with hydrocephalus, compared to none among patients without hydrocephalus (7 vs. 0%, p = 0.15). Outcome at follow-up was worse in patients with hydrocephalus (mRS 0-1, 36 vs. 68%, p = 0.02; mortality 29 vs. 9%, p = 0.07). Hydrocephalus occurs more frequently in cerebral venous thrombosis than previously believed, especially in patients with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and edema of the basal ganglia. The presence of hydrocephalus is associated with a worse clinical outcome, but a direct causal relation is unlikely. Routine shunting procedures are not advisable.

  12. The relationship between cerebral palsy and cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Hutson, J M; Beasley, S W; Reddihough, D S

    1989-12-01

    This study examined the reported association between cerebral palsy and cryptorchidism. A comparison was made among 25 boys with cerebral palsy under the age of 2 years and 6 months, 25 boys with cerebral palsy aged between 5 and 10 years, and age-matched controls. The testes remained in the same position with age in boys with cerebral palsy, whereas in normal children the testes were slightly lower initially (P less than .005) and became lower still with growth (P less than .001). This result, taken in conjunction with previous studies, casts doubts on the theories of early damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis as the cause of maldescent in cerebral palsy. It is postulated that any apparent increase in cryptorchidism in older patients with cerebral palsy may be caused by spasticity of the cremaster muscle leading to pathologic retraction of the testis out of the scrotum.

  13. Cerebral ischaemia: A neuroradiological study

    SciTech Connect

    Bories, J.

    1985-01-01

    After a brief clinical and pathophysiological approach, the papers presented in this book are devoted to CT and angiography. Concerning CT, a particular study has been made of cerebral arterial territories on cuts parallel to the orbito-meatal line: these are very important in making the differential diagnosis from some tumors. Also concerning CT, a paper has been devoted to cerebral ''lacunae.'' The term ''lacuna'' as far as CT imaging is concerned, should be reserved only for those hypodense areas corresponding to small cavities containing fluid, which are sequelae of infarcts in the territory of penetrating arteries. Before this sequellar state come all the evolutive states of a small deep infarct. The angiographic study specifies the indications of angiography in the study of cerebral ischemia, and the techniques to be used. It shows the main etiologic aspects. Because of the important place of vascular surgery today, it seemed necessary to show also the main post operative angiographic aspects. After CT and angiography, some pages are reserved to more modern techniques. Finally, some pages are devoted to certain particular associations and etiologies: childhood, cardiopathies, migraine, oral contraception and end with venous infarction.

  14. Bone age in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Palmieri, Maurício D'arc; de Assumpção, Rodrigo Montezuma César; Yamada, Helder Henzo; Rancan, Daniela Regina; Fucs, Patrícia Maria de Moraes Barros

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the chronological age and bone age among cerebral palsy patients in the outpatient clinic and its correlation with the type of neurological involvement, gender and functional status. Methods 401 patients with spastic cerebral palsy, and ages ranging from three months to 20 years old, submitted to radiological examination for bone age and analyzed by two independent observers according Greulich & Pyle. Results In the topographic distribution, there was a significant delay (p<0.005) in tetraparetic (17.7 months), hemiparetic (10.1 months), and diparetic patients (7.9 months). In the hemiparetic group, the mean bone age in the affected side was 96.88 months and the uncompromised side was 101.13 months (p<0.005). Regarding functional status, the ambulatory group showed a delay of 18.73 months in bone age (p<0.005). Comparing bone age between genders, it was observed a greater delay in males (13.59 months) than in females (9.63 months), but not statistically significant (p = 0.54). Conclusion There is a delay in bone age compared to chronological age influenced by the topography of spasticity, functional level and gender in patients with cerebral palsy. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453693

  15. Cerebral Palsy. Fact Sheet = La Paralisis Cerebral. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is written in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition of cerebral palsy and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy:…

  16. Parasympathetic tonic dilatory influences on cerebral vessels.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Nicholas C; Dragon, Deidre Nitschke; Talman, William T

    2009-05-11

    Parasympathetic nerves from the pterygopalatine ganglia may participate in development of cluster headaches, in vascular responses to hypertension and in modulation of damage due to stroke. Stimulation of the nerves elicits cerebral vasodilatation, but it is not known if the nerves tonically influence cerebrovascular tone. We hypothesized that parasympathetics provide a tonic vasodilator influence and tested that hypothesis by measuring cerebral blood flow in anesthetized rats before and after removal of a pterygopalatine ganglion. Ganglion removal led to reduced cerebral blood flow without changing blood pressure. Thus, parasympathetic nerves provide tonic vasodilatory input to cerebral blood vessels. PMID:19195933

  17. Sympathetic regulation of cerebral blood flow during seizures in newborn lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, C.D.; Wagerle, L.C.; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M. )

    1988-09-01

    The authors examined cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation by the sympathetic nerves in 12 newborn lambs during seizures, a potent reflex stimulator of the sympathetic nervous system. CBF was measured with microspheres, and seizures were induced with bicuculline. In six of these lambs, one hemibrain was denervated (D) chronically by interrupting the ipsilateral cervical sympathetic trunk; the other hemibrain remained innervated (I). Before and after 10, 35, and 70 min of seizures, cerebral gray matter blood flow was measured. In the cerebral white matter, hippocampus, caudate, and thalamus blood flows to the D and I hemibrains were similar before seizures but during seizures they were 10-39% greater in the D than in the I hemibrain. Midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellum D and I blood flows were always similar. In the other six lambs, acute denervation during seizures increased ipsilateral cerebral gray and hippocampus blood flow by 10-31%, but unilateral electrical stimulation decreased ipsilateral cerebral gray, cerebral white, hippocampus, thalamus, and caudate blood flow by 17-27%. The data demonstrate that, during seizures, sympathetic nerve activity modifies regional CBF and the effect is sustained, suggesting a role for the sympathetic nervous system in newborn CBF regulation.

  18. Mechanistic insights into a TIMP3-sensitive pathway constitutively engaged in the regulation of cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Carmen; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Baron-Menguy, Celine; Chalaris, Athena; Ghezali, Lamia; Domenga-Denier, Valérie; Schmidt, Stefanie; Huneau, Clément; Rose-John, Stefan; Nelson, Mark T; Joutel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a leading cause of stroke and dementia. CADASIL, an inherited SVD, alters cerebral artery function, compromising blood flow to the working brain. TIMP3 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3) accumulation in the vascular extracellular matrix in CADASIL is a key contributor to cerebrovascular dysfunction. However, the linkage between elevated TIMP3 and compromised cerebral blood flow (CBF) remains unknown. Here, we show that TIMP3 acts through inhibition of the metalloprotease ADAM17 and HB-EGF to regulate cerebral arterial tone and blood flow responses. In a clinically relevant CADASIL mouse model, we show that exogenous ADAM17 or HB-EGF restores cerebral arterial tone and blood flow responses, and identify upregulated voltage-dependent potassium channel (KV) number in cerebral arterial myocytes as a heretofore-unrecognized downstream effector of TIMP3-induced deficits. These results support the concept that the balance of TIMP3 and ADAM17 activity modulates CBF through regulation of myocyte KV channel number. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17536.001 PMID:27476853

  19. Dynamics of enhanced mitochondrial respiration in female compared with male rat cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V; Busija, David W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial respiration has never been directly examined in intact cerebral arteries. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial energetics of large cerebral arteries ex vivo are sex dependent. The Seahorse XFe24 analyzer was used to examine mitochondrial respiration in isolated cerebral arteries from adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. We examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial respiration under basal conditions, using N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and following pharmacological challenge using diazoxide (DZ), and also determined levels of mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial proteins using Western blot, and vascular diameter responses to DZ. The components of mitochondrial respiration including basal respiration, ATP production, proton leak, maximal respiration, and spare respiratory capacity were elevated in females compared with males, but increased in both male and female arteries in the presence of the NOS inhibitor. Although acute DZ treatment had little effect on mitochondrial respiration of male arteries, it decreased the respiration in female arteries. Levels of mitochondrial proteins in Complexes I-V and the voltage-dependent anion channel protein were elevated in female compared with male cerebral arteries. The DZ-induced vasodilation was greater in females than in males. Our findings show that substantial sex differences in mitochondrial respiratory dynamics exist in large cerebral arteries and may provide the mechanistic basis for observations that the female cerebral vasculature is more adaptable after injury.

  20. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2015-06-24

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit.

  1. Reduced postnatal cerebral glucose metabolism measured by PET after asphyxia in near term fetal lambs.

    PubMed

    Thorngren-Jerneck, K; Ley, D; Hellström-Westas, L; Hernandez-Andrade, E; Lingman, G; Ohlsson, T; Oskarsson, G; Pesonen, E; Sandell, A; Strand, S E; Werner, O; Marsal, K

    2001-12-01

    The effects of fetal asphyxia on cerebral function and development, involve the transition from fetal to neonatal life. Changes in cerebral glucose metabolism may be an early postnatal indicator of fetal asphyxia. The objective is to develop an experimental lamb model involving the transition from fetal to neonatal life and to examine the effect of fetal asphyxia with cerebral hypoxic ischemia on early postnatal cerebral glucose metabolism. Fetal asphyxia was induced by total umbilical cord occlusion in eight near-term fetal lambs (134-138 days) with the ewe under isoflurane-opiate anesthesia. The mean occlusion time until cardiac arrest was 14.5 (4.2) min (SD). Lambs were immediately delivered and standardized resuscitation was instituted after 2 min asystole. At 4 hr postnatal age, [18-F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (18-FDG) was injected intravenously in eight asphyxiated lambs and in eight controls. Cerebral glucose metabolism was examined by positron emission tomography (PET). As a result the mean arterial blood pressure, acid-base values, blood glucose and serum lactate at 4 hr postnatal age did not differ significantly between lambs subjected to umbilical cord occlusion and controls. EEG was abnormal in all lambs subjected to cord occlusion and normal in the controls at 4 hr postnatal age. Global cerebral metabolic rate (CMRgl) as determined by PET was significantly lower in lambs subjected to cord occlusion mean/median (SD) 22.2/19.6 (8.4) micromol/min/100 g) than in controls mean/median (SD) 37.8/35.9 (6.1); P < 0.01). Global CMRgl is significantly reduced in newborn lambs 4 hr after fetal asphyxia induced by umbilical cord occlusion. A reduction in CMRgl is an early indicator of global hypoxic cerebral ischemia.

  2. Role of calcium in the constriction of isolated cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, W.W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium entry blockers (CEB) have been used in the experimental treatment or prevention of many cerebrovascular disorders including stroke, post-ischemic hypoperfusion after cardiac arrest, cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage, and migraine headache. However, the mechanism of action of these drugs on the cerebral circulation is poorly understood. This study examined the effects of calcium antagonists, Ca/sup 2 +/-deficient solutions, and vasocostrictors on cerebrovascular tone and /sup 45/Ca fluxes, to determine the role of calcium in cerebral arterial constriction. A Scatchard plot of /sup 45/Ca binding to BMCA showed that Ca/sup 2 +/ was bound at either low or high affinity binding sties. The four vasoconstrictors (potassium, serotonin, PGF/sub 2 ..cap alpha../, or SQ-26,655) each increased low affinity /sup 45/Ca uptake into BMCA. The results demonstrate that: (1) Potassium and serotonin constrict BMCA mainly by promoting Ca/sup 2 +/ influx through CEB-sensitive channels; (2) PGF/sub 2 ..cap alpha../ and SQ-26,655 constrict BMCA in part by promoting Ca/sup 2 +/ influx through CEB-sensitive channels, and in part by releasing Ca/sup 2 +/ from depletable internal stores; (3) The major action of CEB on BMCA is to block vasoconstrictor-induced Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake through both potential-operated (K/sup +/-stimulated) and receptor-operated channels.

  3. Cerebral organoids model human brain development and microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Madeline A; Renner, Magdalena; Martin, Carol-Anne; Wenzel, Daniel; Bicknell, Louise S; Hurles, Matthew E; Homfray, Tessa; Penninger, Josef M; Jackson, Andrew P; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2013-09-19

    The complexity of the human brain has made it difficult to study many brain disorders in model organisms, highlighting the need for an in vitro model of human brain development. Here we have developed a human pluripotent stem cell-derived three-dimensional organoid culture system, termed cerebral organoids, that develop various discrete, although interdependent, brain regions. These include a cerebral cortex containing progenitor populations that organize and produce mature cortical neuron subtypes. Furthermore, cerebral organoids are shown to recapitulate features of human cortical development, namely characteristic progenitor zone organization with abundant outer radial glial stem cells. Finally, we use RNA interference and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells to model microcephaly, a disorder that has been difficult to recapitulate in mice. We demonstrate premature neuronal differentiation in patient organoids, a defect that could help to explain the disease phenotype. Together, these data show that three-dimensional organoids can recapitulate development and disease even in this most complex human tissue. PMID:23995685

  4. High-altitude cerebral edema with absence of headache.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Oyvind; Skaiaa, Sven Chr

    2007-01-01

    Headache is the cardinal symptom of acute mountain sickness (AMS). The headache normally worsens, with increased cerebral affection and the development of high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE). A Norwegian expedition aimed to climb Baruntse (7129 m) in Nepal in 2003. At 5400 m a 35-year-old man felt exhausted. The next day he aborted his attempt at further climbing as a result of extreme fatigue. Over the next 24 hours he developed cough, dyspnea, and severe hypoxia before progressing to ataxia and blurred vision. At no point did he experience headache or nausea. The patient was evacuated by helicopter. He improved immediately after descent and recovered completely within a week. The speed of progression from AMS to HACE varies. Abrupt onset of HACE is occasionally reported. High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) may induce severe hypoxia that can lead to rapid development of HACE. High-altitude cerebral edema in the setting of HAPE was the most likely diagnosis despite the unusual lack of headache. Rapid onset of HAPE with subsequent severe desaturation should raise awareness of the development of HACE, even in the absence of headache. PMID:17447714

  5. Activation-flow coupling during graded cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Mark G; Detre, John A; Greenberg, Joel H

    2005-06-14

    Most functional neuroimaging techniques rely on activation-flow coupling (AFC) to detect changes in regional brain function, but AFC responses may also be altered during pathophysiological conditions such as ischemia. To define the relationship between progressive ischemia and the AFC response, graded levels of cerebral blood flow reduction were produced using a rat compression ischemia model, and the cerebral hemodynamic response to forepaw stimulation was measured. Graded levels of cortical ischemia of the somatosensory cortex were induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 16) by compressing the intact dura with a 4-mm-diameter cylinder equipped with a laser-Doppler probe, combined with ipsilateral common carotid artery occlusion. At each level of CBF reduction, electric forepaw stimulation was conducted, and signal-averaged laser Doppler and evoked potential responses were recorded. A visible AFC response was present at all levels of CBF reduction (0-90% reduction from baseline), and the temporal characteristics of the response appeared largely preserved. However, the amplitude of the AFC response began to decline at levels of mild ischemia (10% flow reduction) and progressively decreased with further CBF reduction. The amplitude of the evoked response appeared to decrease in concert with the AFC amplitude and appeared to be equally sensitive to ischemia. AFC appears to be a sensitive marker for cerebral ischemia, and alterations in the AFC response occur at CBF reductions above the accepted thresholds for infarction. However, the AFC response is also preserved when flow is reduced below ischemic thresholds. PMID:15893740

  6. Clostridium butyricum attenuates cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in diabetic mice via modulation of gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Wang, Fangyan; Ling, Zongxin; Yu, Xichong; Chen, Wenqian; Li, Haixiao; Jin, Jiangtao; Pang, Mengqi; Zhang, Huiqing; Yu, Junjie; Liu, Jiaming

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes is known to exacerbate cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Here, we investigated the effects of Clostridium butyricum on cerebral I/R injury in the diabetic mice subjected to 30min of bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (BCCAO). The cognitive impairment, the blood glucose level, neuronal injury, apoptosis, and expressions of Akt, phospho-Akt (p-Akt), and caspase-3 level were assessed. Meanwhile, the changes of gut microbiota in composition and diversity in the colonic feces were evaluated. Our results showed that diabetic mice subjected to BCCAO exhibited worsened cognitive impairment, cell damage and apoptosis. These were all attenuated by C. butyricum. Moreover, C. butyricum reversed cerebral I/R induced decreases in p-Akt expression and increases in caspase-3 expression, leading to inhibiting neuronal apoptosis. C. butyricum partly restored cerebral I/R induced decreases of fecal microbiota diversity, changes of fecal microbiota composition. Together, these findings highlight the important role of bacteria in the bidirectional communication of the gut-brain axis and suggest that certain probiotics might prove to be useful therapeutic adjuncts in cerebral I/R injury with diabetes. PMID:27037183

  7. Cigarette smoking impairs nitric oxide-mediated cerebral blood flow increase: Implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Okamura, Tomio

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral blood flow is mainly regulated by nitrergic (parasympathetic, postganglionic) nerves and nitric oxide (NO) liberated from endothelial cells in response to shear stress and stretch of vasculature, whereas sympathetic vasoconstrictor control is quite weak. On the other hand, peripheral vascular resistance and blood flow are mainly controlled by adrenergic vasoconstrictor nerves; endothelium-derived NO and nitrergic nerves play some roles as vasodilator factors. Cigarette smoking impairs NO synthesis in cerebral vascular endothelial cells and nitrergic nerves leading to interference with cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in the brain. Smoking-induced cerebral hypoperfusion is induced by impairment of synthesis and actions of NO via endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibition and by increased production of oxygen radicals, resulting in decreased actions of NO on vascular smooth muscle. Nicotine acutely and chronically impairs the action of endothelial NO and also inhibits nitrergic nerve function in chronic use. Impaired cerebral blood supply promotes the synthesis of amyloid β that accelerates blood flow decrease. This vicious cycle is thought to be one of the important factors involving in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Quitting smoking is undoubtedly one of the important ways to prevent and delay the genesis or slow the progress of impaired cognitive function and AD. PMID:27530818

  8. Protective effects of Echium amoenum Fisch. and C.A. Mey. against cerebral ischemia in the rats

    PubMed Central

    Safaeian, Leila; Tameh, Abolfazl Azami; Ghannadi, Alireza; Naghani, Elmira Akbari; Tavazoei, Hamed; Alavi, Samaneh Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of Echium amoenum total anthocyanin extract (ETAE) on partial/transient cerebral ischemia in the rats. Materials and Methods: Rats received ETAE (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before the induction of cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced by bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (BCCAO) for 30 min, followed by 72 h reperfusion. The neurological deficit, brain performance, and sensory motor function were assessed 48 h and 72 h after surgery. After sacrification, the brains were evaluated for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histopathological changes. Results: Our results showed that motor function significantly decreased in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) group as compared to the sham group. Histopathological analysis exhibited the shrinkage and atrophy of the neurons in I/R group. ETAE at the dose of 200 mg/kg improved spontaneous activity and memory induced by cerebral ischemia compared to the control group and also decreased brain MPO activity following cerebral ischemia. However, it could not affect the ability to climbing, body proprioception, vibrissae touch and brain water content. In addition, pretreatment with ETAE at higher doses significantly reduced ischemia-induced neuronal loss of the brain. Conclusion: The anthocyanin rich fraction from E. amoenum was found to have protective effects against some brain damages postischemic reperfusion. However, further researches are required for investigating the exact mechanisms of the effect of this plant in the prevention of cerebral ischemia in human. PMID:26261809

  9. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  10. Restenosis After Balloon Angioplasty for Cerebral Vasospasm

    SciTech Connect

    Sedat, J. Chau, Y.; Popolo, M.; Gindre, S.; Rami, L.; Orban, J. C.

    2009-03-15

    Transluminal balloon dilatation for symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage is effective, and clinical studies have shown that it achieves long-lasting dilatation of spastic cerebral arteries. Delayed arterial renarrowing has not been reported. Here we report the case of a 58-year-old woman who presented asymptomatic and permanent restenosis after angioplasty for cerebral vasospasm.

  11. Primary cerebral alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in adult

    PubMed Central

    Pirillo, Vania; Cipriano Cecchi, Paolo; Tripodi, Massimo; Maier, Klaus; Rizzo, Paolo; Schwarz, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Primary cerebral rhabdomyosarcomas are very rare and malignant tumors that occur predominantly in the posterior fossa of pediatric patients. We report a rare case of primary cerebral rhabdomyosarcoma located in the supratentorial compartment of a 51 year-old woman together with a review of the pertinent Literature especially regarding the histological diagnosis and pitfalls. PMID:21769325

  12. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  13. Sumatriptan and cerebral perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Scott, A K; Grimes, S; Ng, K; Critchley, M; Breckenridge, A M; Thomson, C; Pilgrim, A J

    1992-04-01

    1. The effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral perfusion was studied in healthy volunteers. 2. Intravenous sumatriptan (2 mg) had no detectable effect on regional cerebral perfusion as measured using a SPECT system with 99technetiumm labelled hexemethylpropyleneamineoxime. 3. Sumatriptan had no effect on pulse, blood pressure or ECG indices. 4. All six volunteers experienced minor adverse effects during the intravenous infusion.

  14. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…