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Sample records for lipoprotein explain increased

  1. Emerging strategies for increasing high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Forrester, James S; Shah, Prediman K

    2006-12-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol is a potent and independent epidemiologic risk factor and is a proved antiatherosclerotic agent in animal models of atherosclerosis, acting through the principal mechanisms of accelerating cholesterol efflux and inhibiting oxidation and inflammation. Lifestyle modification increases serum levels by 5% to 15%, whereas niacin, the drug most widely used to increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, increases it by 25% to 35% at the highest doses. This review examines the potent methods of increasing high-density lipoprotein and/or enhancing reverse cholesterol transport, including cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors, apolipoprotein A-I Milano, D4F, the dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists, and rimonabant, that are now in clinical trials. In conclusion, these new agents, used alone or in combination with existing therapies, carry the potential to markedly reduce the incidence of new coronary disease and cardiac events in this decade.

  2. Fine Mapping of Five Loci Associated with Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Detects Variants That Double the Explained Heritability

    PubMed Central

    Sidore, Carlo; Kang, Hyun M.; Jackson, Anne U.; Piras, Maria Grazia; Usala, Gianluca; Maninchedda, Giuseppe; Sassu, Alessandro; Serra, Fabrizio; Palmas, Maria Antonietta; Wood, William H.; Njølstad, Inger; Laakso, Markku; Hveem, Kristian; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Lakka, Timo A.; Rauramaa, Rainer; Boehnke, Michael; Cucca, Francesco; Uda, Manuela; Schlessinger, David; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.

    2011-01-01

    Complex trait genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide an efficient strategy for evaluating large numbers of common variants in large numbers of individuals and for identifying trait-associated variants. Nevertheless, GWAS often leave much of the trait heritability unexplained. We hypothesized that some of this unexplained heritability might be due to common and rare variants that reside in GWAS identified loci but lack appropriate proxies in modern genotyping arrays. To assess this hypothesis, we re-examined 7 genes (APOE, APOC1, APOC2, SORT1, LDLR, APOB, and PCSK9) in 5 loci associated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in multiple GWAS. For each gene, we first catalogued genetic variation by re-sequencing 256 Sardinian individuals with extreme LDL-C values. Next, we genotyped variants identified by us and by the 1000 Genomes Project (totaling 3,277 SNPs) in 5,524 volunteers. We found that in one locus (PCSK9) the GWAS signal could be explained by a previously described low-frequency variant and that in three loci (PCSK9, APOE, and LDLR) there were additional variants independently associated with LDL-C, including a novel and rare LDLR variant that seems specific to Sardinians. Overall, this more detailed assessment of SNP variation in these loci increased estimates of the heritability of LDL-C accounted for by these genes from 3.1% to 6.5%. All association signals and the heritability estimates were successfully confirmed in a sample of ∼10,000 Finnish and Norwegian individuals. Our results thus suggest that focusing on variants accessible via GWAS can lead to clear underestimates of the trait heritability explained by a set of loci. Further, our results suggest that, as prelude to large-scale sequencing efforts, targeted re-sequencing efforts paired with large-scale genotyping will increase estimates of complex trait heritability explained by known loci. PMID:21829380

  3. An increase in lipoprotein oxidation and endogenous lipid peroxides in serum of obese women.

    PubMed

    Mutlu-Türkoğlu, U; Oztezcan, S; Telci, A; Orhan, Y; Aykaç-Toker, G; Sivas, A; Uysal, M

    2003-02-01

    Endogenous malondialdehyde and diene conjugate levels, the susceptibility of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins to copper-induced lipid peroxidation, and antibody titer against oxidized low-density lipoproteins were increased, but serum antioxidant activity was unchanged in obese women. Serum cholesterol, low-density lipoproteincholesterol, and trigliceride levels were also elevated, but high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels remained unchanged in obese women. In vitro, oxidation of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and levels of antibody against oxidized low-density lipoprotein correlated with body mass index, serum total cholesterol, and low-density lipoproteincholesterol levels in obese women. These results indicate that obesity is associated with increases in endogenous lipid peroxides, oxidation of low-density lipoproteins, and lipids in serum.

  4. Increased Very Low Density Lipoprotein Secretion, Hepatic Steatosis, and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Hee; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2011-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) not only affects regulation of carbohydrate metabolism, but all aspects of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. IR is associated with increased secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and increased plasma triglycerides, as well as hepatic steatosis, despite the increased VLDL secretion. Here, we link IR with increased VLDL secretion and hepatic steatosis at both the physiologic and molecular levels. Increased VLDL secretion, together with the downstream effects on high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein size is pro-atherogenic. Hepatic steatosis is a risk for steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Understanding the complex inter-relationship between IR and these abnormalities of liver lipid homeostasis may provide insights relevant to new therapies for these increasing clinical problems. PMID:21616678

  5. High density lipoprotein level is negatively associated with the increase of oxidized low density lipoprotein lipids after a fatty meal.

    PubMed

    Tiainen, Sanna; Ahotupa, Markku; Ylinen, Petteri; Vasankari, Tommi

    2014-12-01

    Recent reports show that a fatty meal can substantially increase the concentration of oxidized lipids in low density lipoprotein (LDL). Knowing the LDL-specific antioxidant effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL), we aimed to investigate whether HDL can modify the postprandial oxidative stress after a fatty meal. Subjects of the study (n = 71) consumed a test meal (a standard hamburger meal) rich in lipid peroxides, and blood samples were taken before, 120, 240, and 360 min after the meal. The study subjects were divided into four subgroups according to the pre-meal HDL cholesterol value (HDL subgroup 1, 0.66-0.91; subgroup 2, 0.93-1.13; subgroup 3, 1.16-1.35; subgroup 4, 1.40-2.65 mmol/L). The test meal induced a marked postprandial increase in the concentration of oxidized LDL lipids in all four subgroups. The pre-meal HDL level was associated with the extent of the postprandial rise in oxidized LDL lipids. From baseline to 6 h after the meal, the concentration of ox-LDL increased by 48, 31, 24, and 16% in the HDL subgroup 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, and the increase was higher in subgroup 1 compared to subgroup 3 (p = 0.028) and subgroup 4 (p = 0.0081), respectively. The pre-meal HDL correlated with both the amount and the rate of increase of oxidized LDL lipids. Results of the present study show that HDL is associated with the postprandial appearance of lipid peroxides in LDL. It is therefore likely that the sequestration and transport of atherogenic lipid peroxides is another significant mechanism contributing to cardioprotection by HDL.

  6. Dietary Squalene Increases High Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol and Paraoxonase 1 and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gabás-Rivera, Clara; Barranquero, Cristina; Martínez-Beamonte, Roberto; Navarro, María A.; Surra, Joaquín C.; Osada, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Squalene, the main hydrocarbon in the unsaponifiable fraction of virgin olive oil, is involved in cholesterol synthesis and it has been reported to own antiatherosclerotic and antiesteatosic effects. However, the squalene's role on lipid plasma parameters and the influence of genotype on this effect need to be addressed. Experimental Approaches Three male mouse models (wild-type, Apoa1- and Apoe- deficient) were fed chow semisynthetic diets enriched in squalene to provide a dose of 1 g/kg during 11 weeks. After this period, their plasma parameters and lipoprotein profiles were analyzed. Key Results Squalene administration at a dose of 1 g/kg showed decreased reactive oxygen species in lipoprotein fractions independently of the animal background and caused an specific increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels, accompanied by an increase in phosphatidylcholine and paraoxonase 1 and no changes in apolipoproteins A1 and A4 in wild-type mice. In these mice, the cholesterol increase was due to its esterified form and associated with an increased hepatic expression of Lcat. These effects were not observed in absence of apolipoprotein A1. The increases in HDL- paraoxonase 1 were translated into decreased plasma malondialdehyde levels depending on the presence of Apolipoprotein A1. Conclusions and Implications Dietary squalene promotes changes in HDL- cholesterol and paraoxonase 1 and decreases reactive oxygen species in lipoproteins and plasma malondialdehyde levels, providing new benefits of its intake that might contribute to explain the properties of virgin olive oil, although the phenotype related to apolipoproteins A1 and E may be particularly relevant. PMID:25117703

  7. A rapid increase in lipoprotein (a) levels after ethanol withdrawal in alcoholic men

    SciTech Connect

    Kervinen, K.; Savolainen, J.J.; Kesaeniemi, Y.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)) were studied in 11 male alcoholics at the end of a drinking period and monitored during subsequent abstinence. Lp(a) levels showed a daily increase for four consecutive days after the beginning of abstinence, the values for the third and the fourth day being significantly higher than those of the first day. The changes in Lp(a) showed no association with the changes in low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels. In one alcoholic subject with a heterozygous form of familial hypercholesterolemia who was monitored for 11 days, the Lp(a) levels rose up to the fourth day and remained at a high level thereafter. These results suggest that ethanol ingestion may be associated with a lower of Lp(a) levels, which may contribute to the delayed progression of atherosclerosis observed in alcohol drinkers.

  8. Increases in plasma pool size of lipoprotein components in copper-deficient hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Othman, A.A.; Rosenstein, F.; Lei, K.Y. )

    1991-03-15

    Twenty-four male Golden Syrian hamsters, were randomly assigned to 2 dietary copper (Cu) treatments; deficient and adequate. Reductions in weight gain, hematocrit and liver Cu as well as increases in heart weight and plasma volume were observed in CD hamsters after 7 weeks of treatment. Plasma very low (VLDL), low (LDL) and high (HDL) density lipoproteins were isolated by ultracentrifugation and Sepharose column chromatography. The percentage of total plasma cholesterol carried by LDL was increased from 20 to 24% but was reduced from 71 to 68% for HDL as a result of Cu deficiency. In LDL the % composition of triglycerides (TG) and phospholipids (PL) was increased by 25% but that of cholesterol was reduced by 13%. The % composition of protein was reduced 24% but that of TG was increased 18% in VLDL by Cu deficiency. Since plasma volume was increased 50% in CD hamsters, the data were expressed as the amount present in the plasma pool corrected for body weight. With the exceptions of smaller increased in VLDL protein and PL as well as the more than threefold increases in LDL TG and PL plasma pool size, the pool size for the rest of the lipoprotein components were increased about twofold in CD hamsters. The lipoprotein data further indicate that Cu deficiency increased the particle number of VLDL, LDL and HDL but enlarged the size of only VLDL and LDL.

  9. Chitosan oligosaccharide decreases very-low-density lipoprotein triglyceride and increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in high-fat-diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daxin; Han, Jiju; Yu, Yang; Li, Xueping; Wang, Yun; Tian, Hua; Guo, Shoudong; Jin, Shiguang; Luo, Tian; Qin, Shucun

    2011-09-01

    It is well known that chitosan has beneficial lipid-regulating effects, but it remains unknown whether chitosan oligosaccharide (COS), the chitosan degradation product, has the same lipid benefits. High-fat-diet-fed Wistar rats were administrated with COS by gastric gavage for three weeks. The effects of COS on lipids, lipoprotein components and lipid metabolism related protein activities were investigated. Plasma lipids level assays by an enzyme method showed that COS decreased triglyceride (TG) by 29-31%, and increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol by 8-11%, but did not affect low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Lipid distribution analysis through fast protein liquid chromatography indicated that COS significantly decreased TG content distributed in very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)/LDL fractions but increased cholesterol content in HDL fractions. Apolipoprotein analysis through plasma ultracentrifugation and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis displayed that COS decreased apolipoprotein B-100 of LDL and increased apolipoprotein E of LDL and apolipoprotein B-100 of VLDL, but did not change apoA-I content of HDL particles. Lipoprotein formation associated protein determination showed that COS also increased plasma activity of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase but not phospholipid transfer protein. The present study suggests that COS may play a beneficial role in plasma lipid regulation of rats with dyslipidemia induced by high-fat diet. The COS-decreased VLDL/LDL TG and -enhanced HDL cholesterol may be related to the upregulated activity of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase.

  10. Increased production of apolipoprotein B and its lipoproteins by oleic acid in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Dashti, N; Smith, E A; Alaupovic, P

    1990-01-01

    The production of lipids, apolipoproteins (apo), and lipoproteins induced by oleic acid has been examined in Caco-2 cells. The rates of accumulation in the control medium of 15-day-old Caco-2 cells of triglycerides, unesterified cholesterol, and cholesteryl esters were 102 +/- 8, 73 +/- 5, and 11 +/- 1 ng/mg cell protein/h, respectively; the accumulation rates for apolipoproteins A-I, B, C-III, and E were 111 +/- 9, 53 +/- 4, 13 +/- 1, and 63 +/- 4 ng/mg cell protein/h, respectively. Whereas apolipoproteins A-IV and C-II were detected by immunoblotting, apoA-II was absent in most culture media. In contrast to an early production of apolipoproteins A-I and E occurring 2 days after plating, the apoB expression appeared to be differentiation-dependent and was not measurable in the medium until the sixth day post-confluency. In the control medium, very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), low density lipoproteins (LDL), high density lipoproteins (HDL), and lipid-poor very high density lipoproteins (VHDL) accounted for 12%, 46%, 18%, and 24% of the total lipid and apolipoprotein contents, respectively. The triglyceride-rich VLDL contained mainly apoE (75%) and apoB (23%), while the protein moiety of LDL was composed of apoB (59%), apoE (20%), apoA-I (15%), and apoC-III (6%). The cholesterol-rich HDL contained mainly apoA-I (69%) and apoE (27%). In the control medium, major portions of apolipoproteins B and C-III (93-97%) were present in LDL, whereas the main parts of apoA-I (92%) and apoE (76%) were associated with HDL and VHDL. Oleate increased the production of triglycerides 10-fold, cholesteryl esters 7-fold, and apoB 2- to 4-fold. There was also a moderate increase (39%) in the production of apoC-III but no significant changes in those of apolipoproteins A-I and E. These increases were reflected mainly in a 55-fold elevation in the concentration of VLDL, and a 2-fold increase in the level of LDL; there were no significant changes in HDL and VHDL. VLDL contained the

  11. [Increased lipoprotein(a) in a paediatric patient associated with nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Menéndez Valladares, Paloma; Arrobas Velilla, Teresa; Bermúdez de la Vega, José Antonio; Romero Pérez, María Del Mar; Fabiani Romero, Fernando; González Rodríguez, Concepción

    A common complication in paediatric patients with nephrotic syndrome (NS) is hyperlipidaemia. About 20% of children do not respond to treatment with corticosteroids, presenting with a cortico-resistant NS (CRNS), which can progress to kidney failure. It has been observed that paediatric patients with CRNS have an elevated low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-c), and triglycerides levels, as well as elevated Lipoprotein-a [Lp (a)] levels. The case is presented of a 5 year old boy, diagnosed with CRNS, presenting with dyslipidaemia with increased LDL-c, Apo-B100, and Lp(a) levels. After the poor prognosis of the renal function, immunosuppressant treatment was started with tacrolimus and atorvastatin to control dyslipidaemia. Although tacrolimus causes an elevation of total cholesterol and LDL-c, the significant alterations of the children lipid profile suggest the existence of a high cardiovascular risk. In these cases, it would be interesting to have reference values in children in our health area.

  12. Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis increase hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ness, G C; Zhao, Z; Lopez, D

    1996-01-15

    Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis are believed to lower serum cholesterol levels by enhancing the removal of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by increasing hepatic LDL receptor function. Thus, the effects of several different inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis were examined for their effects on the expression of the hepatic LDL receptor in rats. We found that administration of inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase such as lovastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, and rivastatin resulted in increased hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. Surprisingly, these agents failed to increase levels of immunoreactive LDL receptor protein in rat liver even when the dose and length of treatment were increased. Treatment of rats with zaragozic acid A, an inhibitor of squalene synthase, caused even greater increases in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels, but did not increase levels of immunoreactive protein. Further investigation revealed that the rate of degradation of the hepatic LDL receptor was increased in rats given inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. The greatest increase in the rate of degradation was seen in animals treated with zaragozic acid A which caused the largest increase in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. In contrast, hepatic LDL receptor protein was stabilized in cholesterol-fed rats. It appears that increased potential for LDL receptor protein synthesis, reflected in increased mRNA levels, is offset by a corresponding increase in the rate of receptor protein degradation resulting in constant steady-state levels of hepatic LDL receptor protein. These findings are suggestive of increased cycling of the hepatic LDL receptor. This postulated mechanism can provide for enhanced hepatic uptake of lipoproteins without increasing steady-state levels of LDL receptor protein.

  13. Increased expression of apolipoprotein E in transgenic rabbits results in reduced levels of very low density lipoproteins and an accumulation of low density lipoproteins in plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, J; Ji, Z S; Huang, Y; de Silva, H; Sanan, D; Mahley, R W; Innerarity, T L; Taylor, J M

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic rabbits expressing human apo E3 were generated to investigate mechanisms by which apo E modulates plasma lipoprotein metabolism. Compared with nontransgenic littermates expressing approximately 3 mg/dl of endogenous rabbit apo E, male transgenic rabbits expressing approximately 13 mg/dl of human apo E had a 35% decrease in total plasma triglycerides that was due to a reduction in VLDL levels and an absence of large VLDL. With its greater content of apo E, transgenic VLDL had an increased binding affinity for the LDL receptor in vitro, and injected chylomicrons were cleared more rapidly by the liver in transgenic rabbits. In contrast to triglyceride changes, transgenic rabbits had a 70% increase in plasma cholesterol levels due to an accumulation of LDL and apo E-rich HDL. Transgenic and control LDL had the same binding affinity for the LDL receptor. Both transgenic and control rabbits had similar LDL receptor levels, but intravenously injected human LDL were cleared more slowly in transgenic rabbits than in controls. Changes in lipoprotein lipolysis did not contribute to the accumulation of LDL or the reduction in VLDL levels. These observations suggest that the increased content of apo E3 on triglyceride-rich remnant lipoproteins in transgenic rabbits confers a greater affinity for cell surface receptors, thereby increasing remnant clearance from plasma. The apo E-rich large remnants appear to compete more effectively than LDL for receptor-mediated binding and clearance, resulting in delayed clearance and the accumulation of LDL in plasma. PMID:9593771

  14. Down-regulation of lipoprotein lipase increases glucose uptake in L6 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Veronica; Saraff, Kumuda; Medh, Jheem D.

    2009-11-06

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are synthetic hypoglycemic agents used to treat type 2 diabetes. TZDs target the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-{gamma}) and improve systemic insulin sensitivity. The contributions of specific tissues to TZD action, or the downstream effects of PPAR-{gamma} activation, are not very clear. We have used a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6 cells) to demonstrate that TZDs directly target PPAR-{gamma} in muscle cells. TZD treatment resulted in a significant repression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) expression in L6 cells. This repression correlated with an increase in glucose uptake. Down-regulation of LPL message and protein levels using siRNA resulted in a similar increase in insulin-dependent glucose uptake. Thus, LPL down-regulation improved insulin sensitivity independent of TZDs. This finding provides a novel method for the management of insulin resistance.

  15. Inactive lipoprotein lipase (LPL) alone increases selective cholesterol ester uptake in vivo, whereas in the presence of active LPL it also increases triglyceride hydrolysis and whole particle lipoprotein uptake.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Martin; Heeren, Jörg; Dudeck, Wiebke; Rinninger, Franz; Radner, Herbert; Breslow, Jan L; Goldberg, Ira J; Zechner, Rudolf; Greten, Heiner

    2002-03-01

    We have previously shown that transgenic expression of catalytically inactive lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in muscle (Mck-N-LPL) enhances triglyceride hydrolysis as well as whole particle lipoprotein and selective cholesterol ester uptake. In the current study, we have examined whether these functions can be performed by inactive LPL alone or require the presence of active LPL expressed in the same tissue. To study inactive LPL in the presence of active LPL in the same tissue, the Mck-N-LPL transgene was bred onto the heterozygous LPL-deficient (LPL1) background. At 18 h of age, Mck-N-LPL reduced triglycerides by 35% and markedly increased muscle lipid droplets. In adult mice, it reduced triglycerides by 40% and increased lipoprotein particle uptake into muscle by 60% and cholesterol ester uptake by 110%. To study inactive LPL alone, the Mck-N-LPL transgene was bred onto the LPL-deficient (LPL0) background. These mice die at approximately 24 h of age. At 18 h of age, in the absence of active LPL, inactive LPL expression did not diminish triglycerides nor did it result in the accumulation of muscle lipid droplets. To study inactive LPL in the absence of active LPL in the same tissue in adult animals, the Mck-N-LPL transgene was bred onto mice that only expressed active LPL in the heart (LPL0/He-LPL). In this case, Mck-N-LPL did not reduce triglycerides or increase the uptake of lipoprotein particles but did increase muscle uptake of chylomicron and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol ester by 40%. Thus, in the presence of active LPL in the same tissue, inactive LPL augments triglyceride hydrolysis and increases whole particle triglyceride-rich lipoprotein and selective cholesterol ester uptake. In the absence of active LPL in the same tissue, inactive LPL only mediates selective cholesterol ester uptake.

  16. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases acetylcholinesterase activity correlating with reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Yamchuen, Panit; Aimjongjun, Sathid; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2014-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and their oxidized forms, and oxidative stress are suspected to be a key combination in the onset of AD and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) plays a part in this pathology. The present study aimed to link these parameters using differentiated SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells in culture. Both mildly and fully oxidized human LDL (mox- and fox-LDL), but not native (non-oxidized) LDL were cytotoxic in dose- and time-dependent patterns and this was accompanied by an increased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidized LDL (10-200 μg/mL) augmented AChE activity after 4 and 24h treatments, respectively while the native LDL was without effect. The increased AChE with oxidized LDLs was accompanied by a proportionate increase in intracellular ROS formation (R=0.904). These findings support the notion that oxidized LDLs are cytotoxic and that their action on AChE may reduce central cholinergic transmission in AD and affirm AChE as a continued rational for anticholinesterase therapy but in conjunction with antioxidant/antihyperlipidemic cotreatments.

  17. Increasing adipocyte lipoprotein lipase improves glucose metabolism in high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Walton, R Grace; Zhu, Beibei; Unal, Resat; Spencer, Michael; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Charnigo, Richard; Katz, Wendy S; Daugherty, Alan; Howatt, Deborah A; Kern, Philip A; Finlin, Brian S

    2015-05-01

    Lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle contributes to co-morbidities associated with diabetes and obesity. We made a transgenic mouse in which the adiponectin (Adipoq) promoter drives expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in adipocytes to potentially increase adipose tissue lipid storage. These mice (Adipoq-LPL) have improved glucose and insulin tolerance as well as increased energy expenditure when challenged with a high fat diet (HFD). To identify the mechanism(s) involved, we determined whether the Adipoq-LPL mice diverted dietary lipid to adipose tissue to reduce peripheral lipotoxicity, but we found no evidence for this. Instead, characterization of the adipose tissue of the male mice after HFD challenge revealed that the mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and a number of PPARγ-regulated genes were higher in the epididymal fat pads of Adipoq-LPL mice than control mice. This included adiponectin, whose mRNA levels were increased, leading to increased adiponectin serum levels in the Adipoq-LPL mice. In many respects, the adipose phenotype of these animals resembles thiazolidinedione treatment except for one important difference, the Adipoq-LPL mice did not gain more fat mass on HFD than control mice and did not have increased expression of genes in adipose such as glycerol kinase, which are induced by high affinity PPAR agonists. Rather, there was selective induction of PPARγ-regulated genes such as adiponectin in the adipose of the Adipoq-LPL mice, suggesting that increasing adipose tissue LPL improves glucose metabolism in diet-induced obesity by improving the adipose tissue phenotype. Adipoq-LPL mice also have increased energy expenditure.

  18. Goat milk fat naturally enriched with conjugated linoleic acid increased lipoproteins and reduced triacylglycerol in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Raphaela; Soares, Juliana; Garcia, Hugo; Nascimento, Claudenice; Medeiros, Maria; Bomfim, Marco; Medeiros, Maria Carmo; Queiroga, Rita

    2014-03-24

    Goat milk is source of different lipids, including conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). CLA reduces body fat and protect against cardiovascular diseases. In the present study fat from goat milk naturally enriched with CLA was used. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups that received during a 10 week diet with different lipid sources: soybean oil (CON), coconut oil (CO) and goat milk fat naturally enriched with CLA (GM-CLA). We evaluated the effects of a GM-CLA on biochemistry parameters--high density lipoprotein (HDL), triacylglycerol (TAG), TAG/HDL ratio, total cholesterol and glucose, body weight and histopathological aspects of the intestine and liver. GM-CLA increased body weight from the second to the fifth week of the experiment compared to CON. Feed intake differed between the CON group and GM-CLA early in the first to third week of the experiments and later between the ninth and tenth week. The CLA-diet group showed increased levels of HDL, reduced levels of TAG and TAG/HDL ratio and no effect on LDL, but enhanced total cholesterol. Serum glucose of the GM-CLA group showed no difference from the control group. Thus, a GM-CLA diet promoted growth in young rats and acted as protector of cardiovascular function, but further studies are still needed to clarify these effects.

  19. [Atherogenic lipoprotein remnants in humans].

    PubMed

    Wikinski, Regina; Schreier, Laura E; Berg, Gabriela A; Brites, Fernando D; López, Graciela; González, Ana I; Zago, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    Remnant lipoproteins (RLPs) are the lipolytic product of triglycerides transported by very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) of hepatic and intestinal origin and intestinal chylomicrons. Lipoprotein lipase activity hydrolyse triglycerides in several steps, producing heterogeneous particles. Fasting plasma concentration in normolipidemic subjects is low, but it increases in post-prandial states. Genetic alterations in Apo-E subtypes increases RLPs plasma concentration and produce dyslipoproteinemia phenotype. RLPs atherogenicity depends on their role as endothelial injuring factors, their impaired recognition by lipoprotein receptors, and their susceptibility to oxidative stress. They also promote the circulation of molecular adhesion molecules, the internalization in subendothelial macrophages via scavenger receptors and the accumulation in foam cells, all of them early mechanisms of atheromatosis. RLPs metabolism has been a subject of controversial studies. Their origin from different lipoproteins may explain their structural heterogeneity, therefore increasing the methodological difficulties to include RLPs in the atherogenic lipoprotein profile in the epidemiological studies of the field. Last advances on metabolism of RLPs and their emergent clinical role justifies an up dated revision of RLPs.

  20. Dietary Resistant Starch Supplementation Increases High-Density Lipoprotein Particle Number in Pigs Fed a Western Diet.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Todd C; Harding, Scott V; Raslawsky, Amy; Rempel, Curtis B

    2017-05-04

    Resistant starch (RS) has been well characterized for its glycemic control properties; however, there is little consensus regarding the influence of RS on blood lipid concentrations and lipoprotein distribution and size. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize the effect of daily RS supplementation in a controlled capsule delivery on biomarkers of cardiovascular (blood lipids, lipoproteins) and diabetes (glucose, insulin) risk in a pig model. Twelve 8-week-old male Yorkshire pigs were placed on a synthetic Western diet and randomly divided into two groups (n = 6/group) for 30 days: (1) a placebo group supplemented with capsules containing unmodified pre-gelatinized potato starch (0 g/RS/day); and (2) an RS group supplemented with capsules containing resistant potato starch (10 g/RS/day). Serum lipids including total-cholesterol (C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides did not differ (p > 0.05) between the RS and placebo groups. Although the total numbers of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles were similar (p > 0.05) between the two groups, total high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles were higher (+28%, p < 0.05) in the RS group compared with placebo, resulting from an increase (p < 0.05) in the small HDL subclass particles (+32%). Compared with the placebo group, RS supplementation lowered (p < 0.05) fasting serum glucose (-20%) and improved (p < 0.05) insulin resistance as estimated by Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) without a change in insulin. Additionally, total serum glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) was higher (+141%, p < 0.05) following RS supplementation compared with placebo. This data suggests that in addition to the more well-characterized effect of RS intake in lowering blood glucose and improving insulin sensitivity, the consumption of RS may be beneficial in lipid management strategies by enhancing total

  1. Minimal oxidation and storage of low density lipoproteins result in an increased susceptibility to phospholipid hydrolysis by phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Eckey, R; Menschikowski, M; Lattke, P; Jaross, W

    1997-07-25

    In vitro-studies have shown that phospholipid hydrolysis of low density lipoproteins (LDL) by bee venom or porcine pancreatic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) leads to an increased uptake of these lipoproteins by macrophages transforming them into foam cells. Recently, a secretory phospholipase A2, group II, was detected in human atherosclerotic plaques. In order to investigate the role of this enzyme in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, a structurally identical human secretory PLA2 was purified from the medium of HepG2 cells stimulated with interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. The activity of the purified enzyme towards the phospholipids of native and modified low density lipoproteins was compared with the activity towards Escherichia coli-membranes and other phospholipid substrates. Compared to E. coli-membranes, native LDL proved to be a poor substrate for group II PLA2. After mild oxidation induced by copper ions or by 2,2-azobis(2-amidinopropane) (AAPH), the susceptibility of LDL to phospholipid hydrolysis was found to be increased by 25 and 23%, respectively, whereas extensive copper-mediated oxidation caused a decreased hydrolysis. Aging of LDL at 6 degrees C for weeks or at 37 degrees C for hours resulted in an increase in PLA2-catalyzed phospholipid hydrolysis of up to 26-fold. LDL protected from oxidation by probucol during aging showed a lesser increase in susceptibility to phospholipid hydrolysis. Our results suggest that PLA2, group II, can increase the atherogenicity of LDL by its ability to hydrolyze the phospholipids of these lipoproteins, especially after modifications that are likely to occur in vivo.

  2. Increased expression of low-density lipoprotein receptors in a Smith-Lemli-Opitz infant with elevated bilirubin levels.

    PubMed

    Ness, G C; Lopez, D; Borrego, O; Gilbert-Barness, E

    1997-01-31

    We report on an infant girl with severe RSH or Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome with hyperbilirubinemia. The infant died at age 2 months. Sterol analysis of liver and brain tissues showed marked elevations of 7-dehydrocholesterol with decreased levels of cholesterol. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated remarkable increases in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in these tissues, indicative of a deficiency in available cholesterol for tissue needs.

  3. Protection from Cardiovascular Disease Due to Increased High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in African Black Populations: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed

    Woudberg, Nicholas J; Goedecke, Julia H; Lecour, Sandrine

    2016-10-20

    The burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in sub-Saharan Africa has increased over the last decade. Despite this, African Black populations present with relatively low incidences of coronary heart disease and ischemic heart disease, which may be attributed to their lower total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, compared with White populations. Commensurate with these lower lipid levels, it was believed that high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations would be higher in Black populations compared with their White counterparts. This is based on data from previous studies of African and African American populations; however, recent studies conducted in Africa found similar or lower HDL-C concentrations in Black compared with White individuals. Current research, therefore, suggests that HDL-C may not be a good indicator of cardiovascular risk and future research should focus on HDL quality (vs quantity), by measuring HDL functionality and subclass.

  4. Interactions between Defining, Explaining and Classifying: The Case of Increasing and Decreasing Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcock, Lara; Simpson, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a study in which we investigated relationships between defining mathematical concepts--increasing and decreasing infinite sequences--explaining their meanings and classifying consistently with formal definitions. We explored the effect of defining, explaining or studying a definition on subsequent classification, and the…

  5. Increased Free Cholesterol in Plasma Low and Very Low Density Lipoproteins in Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus: Its Role in the Inhibition of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Christopher J.; Reaven, Gerald M.; Liu, George; Fielding, Phoebe E.

    1984-04-01

    Recombination of low and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL and LDL) from normal subjects with plasma from patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus significantly increased the reduced rate of transfer of cholesteryl ester to these lipoproteins, which is characteristic of diabetic plasma, whereas diabetic VLDL and LDL reduced cholesteryl ester transfer rates in normal plasma. VLDL and LDL from diabetic plasma had an increased ratio of free cholesterol to phospholipid compared to normal, and unlike normal VLDL and LDL spontaneously lost free cholesterol to high density lipoprotein. These data suggest that the block to cholesteryl ester transfer to these lipoproteins in non-insulin-dependent diabetes is mediated by their increased free cholesterol content and may be related to the increased risk of these patients for developing atherosclerosis.

  6. Antagonism of Secreted PCSK9 Increases Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Expression in HepG2 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, Markey C.; Kwon, Hyock Joo; Chen, Chiyuan; Chen, Justin R.; Horton, Jay D.; Lagace, Thomas A.

    2009-07-10

    PCSK9 is a secreted protein that degrades low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) in liver by binding to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A (EGF-A) domain of the LDLR. It is not known whether PCSK9 causes degradation of LDLRs within the secretory pathway or following secretion and reuptake via endocytosis. Here we show that a mutation in the LDLR EGF-A domain associated with familial hypercholesterolemia, H306Y, results in increased sensitivity to exogenous PCSK9-mediated cellular degradation because of enhanced PCSK9 binding affinity. The crystal structure of the PCSK9-EGF-A(H306Y) complex shows that Tyr-306 forms a hydrogen bond with Asp-374 in PCSK9 at neutral pH, which strengthens the interaction with PCSK9. To block secreted PCSK9 activity, LDLR (H306Y) subfragments were added to the medium of HepG2 cells stably overexpressing wild-type PCSK9 or gain-of-function PCSK9 mutants associated with hypercholesterolemia (D374Y or S127R). These subfragments blocked secreted PCSK9 binding to cell surface LDLRs and resulted in the recovery of LDLR levels to those of control cells. We conclude that PCSK9 acts primarily as a secreted factor to cause LDLR degradation. These studies support the concept that pharmacological inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR interaction extracellularly will increase hepatic LDLR expression and lower plasma low density lipoprotein levels.

  7. Antagonism of secreted PCSK9 increases low density lipoprotein receptor expression in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    McNutt, Markey C; Kwon, Hyock Joo; Chen, Chiyuan; Chen, Justin R; Horton, Jay D; Lagace, Thomas A

    2009-04-17

    PCSK9 is a secreted protein that degrades low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) in liver by binding to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A (EGF-A) domain of the LDLR. It is not known whether PCSK9 causes degradation of LDLRs within the secretory pathway or following secretion and reuptake via endocytosis. Here we show that a mutation in the LDLR EGF-A domain associated with familial hypercholesterolemia, H306Y, results in increased sensitivity to exogenous PCSK9-mediated cellular degradation because of enhanced PCSK9 binding affinity. The crystal structure of the PCSK9-EGF-A(H306Y) complex shows that Tyr-306 forms a hydrogen bond with Asp-374 in PCSK9 at neutral pH, which strengthens the interaction with PCSK9. To block secreted PCSK9 activity, LDLR (H306Y) subfragments were added to the medium of HepG2 cells stably overexpressing wild-type PCSK9 or gain-of-function PCSK9 mutants associated with hypercholesterolemia (D374Y or S127R). These subfragments blocked secreted PCSK9 binding to cell surface LDLRs and resulted in the recovery of LDLR levels to those of control cells. We conclude that PCSK9 acts primarily as a secreted factor to cause LDLR degradation. These studies support the concept that pharmacological inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR interaction extracellularly will increase hepatic LDLR expression and lower plasma low density lipoprotein levels.

  8. Increased Antioxidant Quality Versus Lower Quantity of High Density Lipoprotein in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Ozgur; Ellidag, Hamit Yasar; Eren, Esin; Ay, Nurullah; Yalçınkaya, Soner; Yilmaz, Necat

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of every human disease. To understand its possible role in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), we measured the overall oxidative status of patients with BPH and the serum activity of the high density lipoprotein (HDL)-related antioxidant enzymes paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and arylesterase (ARE). Methods Fifty-six urology outpatient clinic patients with BPH (mean age 64±8.6 years) were prospectively included in the study. Forty volunteer healthy controls from the laboratory staff (mean age 62±10 years) were enrolled for comparison. Serum total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), PON1, ARE, and HDL levels were measured by commercially available, ready-to-use kits. Results Serum TAS and HDL levels were significantly lower in the BPH group than in the control group (P=0.004 and P=0.02, respectively). No significant between-group differences were observed for TOS levels or PON1 and ARE enzyme activities (P=0.30, P=0.89, and P=0.74, respectively). In the BPH group, the calculated parameters PON1/HDL and ARE/HDL were significantly higher (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively). Conclusions Our findings agree with the previous reports of impaired oxidant/antioxidant balance in BPH patients. The activities of HDL-related enzymes between groups with significantly different HDL levels may be deceptive; adjusted values may help to reach more accurate conclusions.

  9. Lipoprotein metabolism indicators improve cardiovascular risk prediction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cardiovascular disease risk increases when lipoprotein metabolism is dysfunctional. We have developed a computational model able to derive indicators of lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes from a single lipoprotein profile measurement. This is the first study to inves...

  10. The ACAT inhibitor avasimibe increases the fractional clearance rate of postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in miniature pigs.

    PubMed

    Burnett, John R; Telford, Dawn E; Barrett, P Hugh R; Huff, Murray W

    2005-12-30

    Previously, we have shown, in vivo, that the acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor avasimibe decreases hepatic apolipoprotein (apo) B secretion into plasma. To test the hypothesis that avasimibe modulates postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) metabolism in vivo, an oral fat load (2 g fat/kg) containing retinol was given to 9 control miniature pigs and to 9 animals after 28 days treatment with avasimibe (10 mg/kg/day, n=5; 25 mg/kg/day, n=4). The kinetic parameters for plasma retinyl palmitate (RP) metabolism were determined by multi-compartmental modeling using SAAM II. Avasimibe decreased the 2-h TRL (d<1.006 g/mL; S(f)>20) triglyceride concentrations by 34%. The TRL triglyceride 0-12 h area under the curve (AUC) was decreased by 21%. In contrast, avasimibe had no effect on peak TRL RP concentrations, time to peak, or its rate of appearance into plasma, however, the TRL RP 0-12 h AUC was decreased by 17%. Analysis of the RP kinetic parameters revealed that the TRL fractional clearance rate (FCR) was increased 1.4-fold with avasimibe. The TRL RP FCR was negatively correlated with very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) apoB production rate measured in the fasting state (r=-0.504). No significant changes in total intestinal lipid concentrations were observed. Thus, although avasimibe had no effect on intestinal TRL secretion, plasma TRL clearance was significantly increased; an effect that may relate to a decreased competition with hepatic VLDL for removal processes.

  11. Income Inequality Explains Why Economic Growth Does Not Always Translate to an Increase in Happiness.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Kesebir, Selin

    2015-10-01

    One of the most puzzling social science findings in the past half century is the Easterlin paradox: Economic growth within a country does not always translate into an increase in happiness. We provide evidence that this paradox can be partly explained by income inequality. In two different data sets covering 34 countries, economic growth was not associated with increases in happiness when it was accompanied by growing income inequality. Earlier instances of the Easterlin paradox (i.e., economic growth not being associated with increasing happiness) can thus be explained by the frequent concurrence of economic growth and growing income inequality. These findings suggest that a more even distribution of growth in national wealth may be a precondition for raising nationwide happiness.

  12. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases RANKL level in human vascular cells. Involvement of oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Mazière, Cécile; Salle, Valéry; Gomila, Cathy; Mazière, Jean-Claude

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Oxidized LDL enhances RANKL level in human smooth muscle cells. •The effect of OxLDL is mediated by the transcription factor NFAT. •UVA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and buthionine sulfoximine also increase RANKL level. •All these effects are observed in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been shown to play a role not only in bone remodeling but also in inflammation, arterial calcification and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In human smooth muscle cells, Cu{sup 2+}-oxidized LDL (CuLDL) 10–50 μg/ml increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RANKL level in a dose-dependent manner, whereas OPG level was not affected. The lipid extract of CuLDL reproduced the effects of the whole particle. Vivit, an inhibitor of the transcription factor NFAT, reduced the CuLDL-induced increase in RANKL, whereas PKA and NFκB inhibitors were ineffective. LDL oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO-LDL), or other pro-oxidant conditions such as ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, incubation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis{sub ,} also induced an oxidative stress and enhanced RANKL level. The increase in RANKL in pro-oxidant conditions was also observed in fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Since RANKL is involved in myocardial inflammation, vascular calcification and plaque rupture, this study highlights a new mechanism whereby OxLDL might, by generation of an oxidative stress, exert a deleterious effect on different cell types of the arterial wall.

  13. Elevated Mutagenesis Does Not Explain the Increased Frequency of Antibiotic Resistant Mutants in Starved Aging Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Sophia; Hershberg, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of mutants resistant to the antibiotic rifampicin has been shown to increase in aging (starved), compared to young colonies of Eschierchia coli. These increases in resistance frequency occur in the absence of any antibiotic exposure, and similar increases have also been observed in response to additional growth limiting conditions. Understanding the causes of such increases in the frequency of resistance is important for understanding the dynamics of antibiotic resistance emergence and spread. Increased frequency of rifampicin resistant mutants in aging colonies is cited widely as evidence of stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM), a mechanism thought to allow bacteria to increase mutation rates upon exposure to growth-limiting stresses. At the same time it has been demonstrated that some rifampicin resistant mutants are relatively fitter in aging compared to young colonies, indicating that natural selection may also contribute to increased frequency of rifampicin resistance in aging colonies. Here, we demonstrate that the frequency of mutants resistant to both rifampicin and an additional antibiotic (nalidixic-acid) significantly increases in aging compared to young colonies of a lab strain of Escherichia coli. We then use whole genome sequencing to demonstrate conclusively that SIM cannot explain the observed magnitude of increased frequency of resistance to these two antibiotics. We further demonstrate that, as was previously shown for rifampicin resistance mutations, mutations conferring nalidixic acid resistance can also increase fitness in aging compared to young colonies. Our results show that increases in the frequency of antibiotic resistant mutants in aging colonies cannot be seen as evidence of SIM. Furthermore, they demonstrate that natural selection likely contributes to increases in the frequency of certain antibiotic resistance mutations, even when no selection is exerted due to the presence of antibiotics. PMID:24244205

  14. Can we explain increases in young people's psychological distress over time?

    PubMed

    Sweeting, Helen; West, Patrick; Young, Robert; Der, Geoff

    2010-11-01

    This paper aims to explain previously described increases in self-reported psychological distress between 1987 and 2006 among samples identical in respect of age (15 years), school year and geographical location (West of Scotland). Such increases might be explained by changes in exposure (changes in levels of risk or protective factors) and/or by changes in vulnerability (changes in the relationship between risk/protective factors and psychological distress). Key areas of social change over this time period allow identification of potential explanatory factors, categorised as economic, family, educational, values and lifestyle and represented by variables common to each study. Psychological distress was measured via the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, Likert scored. Analyses were conducted on those with complete data on all variables (N = 3276 of 3929), and separately for males and females. Between 1987 and 2006, levels of almost every potential explanatory factor changed in line with general societal trends. Associations between explanatory factors and GHQ tended to be stronger among females, and at the later date. The strongest associations were with worries, arguments with parents, and, at the later date, school disengagement. The factors which best accounted for the increase in mean GHQ between 1987 and 2006 were arguments with parents, school disengagement, worry about school and, for females, worry about family relationships, reflecting both increasing exposure and vulnerability to these risk factors. A number of limitations to our analysis can be identified. However, our results reinforce the conclusions of others in highlighting the role of family and educational factors as plausible explanations for increases in young people's psychological distress.

  15. Can we explain increases in young people’s psychological distress over time?

    PubMed Central

    Sweeting, Helen; West, Patrick; Young, Robert; Der, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to explain previously described increases in self-reported psychological distress between 1987 and 2006 among samples identical in respect of age (15 years), school year and geographical location (West of Scotland). Such increases might be explained by changes in exposure (changes in levels of risk or protective factors) and/or by changes in vulnerability (changes in the relationship between risk/protective factors and psychological distress). Key areas of social change over this time period allow identification of potential explanatory factors, categorised as economic, family, educational, values and lifestyle and represented by variables common to each study. Psychological distress was measured via the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, Likert scored. Analyses were conducted on those with complete data on all variables (N = 3276 of 3929), and separately for males and females. Between 1987 and 2006, levels of almost every potential explanatory factor changed in line with general societal trends. Associations between explanatory factors and GHQ tended to be stronger among females, and at the later date. The strongest associations were with worries, arguments with parents, and, at the later date, school disengagement. The factors which best accounted for the increase in mean GHQ between 1987 and 2006 were arguments with parents, school disengagement, worry about school and, for females, worry about family relationships, reflecting both increasing exposure and vulnerability to these risk factors. A number of limitations to our analysis can be identified. However, our results reinforce the conclusions of others in highlighting the role of family and educational factors as plausible explanations for increases in young people’s psychological distress. PMID:20870334

  16. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a gene encoding cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase into hamsters increases hepatic enzyme activity and reduces plasma total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Spady, D K; Cuthbert, J A; Willard, M N; Meidell, R S

    1995-01-01

    Clinical interventions that accelerate conversion of cholesterol to bile acids reduce circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. The initial and rate-limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway is catalyzed by hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase. To examine the effects of transient primary overexpression of this enzyme on sterol metabolism and lipoprotein transport, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus in which a cDNA encoding rat 7 alpha-hydroxylase is expressed from the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (AdCMV7 alpha). Syrian hamsters administered AdCMV7 alpha intravenously accumulated transgene-specific mRNA in the liver and demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in hepatic microsomal 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity. The increased conversion of cholesterol to bile acids resulted in a compensatory increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis. In addition, overexpression of 7 alpha-hydroxylase reduced the rate of LDL cholesterol entry into the plasma space and, in animals maintained on a Western-type diet, restored hepatic LDL receptor expression. As a consequence, plasma LDL concentrations fell by approximately 60% in animals maintained on control diet and by approximately 75% in animals consuming a Western-type diet. Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were reduced to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate that transient upregulation of bile acid synthesis by direct transfer of a 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene favorably alters circulating lipoprotein profiles and suggest one potential molecular target for genetic strategies aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk. Images PMID:7635963

  17. Maternal undernutrition leads to elevated hepatic triglycerides in male rat offspring due to increased expression of lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-Fen; Zhu, Jian-Fang; Liang, Li; Shen, Zheng; Wang, Ying-Min

    2016-05-01

    Small for gestational age (SGA) at birth increases the risk of developing metabolic syndrome, which encompasses various symptoms including hypertriglyceridemia. The aim of the present study was to determine whether maternal undernutrition during pregnancy may lead to alterations in hepatic triglyceride content and the gene expression levels of hepatic lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in SGA male offspring. The present study focused on the male offspring in order to prevent confounding factors, such as estrus cycle and hormone profile. Female Sprague Dawley rats were arbitrarily assigned to receive an ad libitum chow diet or 50% food restricted diet from pregnancy day 1 until parturition. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to measure the gene expression levels of hepatic LPL at day 1 and upon completion of the third week of age. Chromatin immunoprecipitation quantified the binding activity of liver X receptor‑α (LXR‑α) gene to the LXR response elements (LXRE) on LPL promoter and LPL epigenetic characteristics. At 3 weeks of age, SGA male offspring exhibited significantly elevated levels of hepatic triglycerides, which was concomitant with increased expression levels of LPL. Since LPL is regulated by LXR‑α, the expression levels of LXR‑α were detected in appropriate for gestational age and SGA male offspring. Maternal undernutrition during pregnancy led to an increase in the hepatic expression levels of LXR‑α, and enriched binding to the putative LXR response elements in the LPL promoter regions in 3‑week‑old male offspring. In addition, enhanced acetylation of histone H3 [H3 lysine (K)9 and H3K14] was detected surrounding the LPL promoter. The results of the present study indicated that maternal undernutrition during pregnancy may lead to an increase in hepatic triglycerides, via alterations in the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of the LPL gene.

  18. Evolutionary conservatism explains increasing relatedness of plant communities along a flooding gradient.

    PubMed

    Tanentzap, Andrew J; Lee, William G

    2017-01-01

    Abiotic filters have been found either to increase or reduce evolutionary relatedness in plant communities, making it difficult to generalize responses of this major feature of biodiversity to future environmental change. Here, we hypothesized that the responses of phylogenetic structure to environmental change ultimately depend on how species have evolved traits for tolerating the resulting abiotic changes. Working within ephemeral wetlands, we tested whether species were increasingly related as flooding duration intensified. We also identified the mechanisms underlying increased relatedness by measuring root aerenchyma volume (RAV), a trait which promotes waterlogging tolerance. We found that species-specific responses to flooding explained most of the variation in occurrence for 63 vascular plant species across 5170 plots. For a subset of 22 species, we attributed these responses to variation in RAV. Large RAV specifically increased occurrence when flooding lasted for longer time periods, because large RAV reduced above-ground biomass loss. As large RAV was evolutionarily conserved within obligate wetland species, communities were more phylogenetically related as flooding increased. Our study shows how reconstructing the evolutionary history of traits that influence the responses of species to environmental change can help to predict future patterns in phylogenetic structure.

  19. Plasma levels of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 are increased in patients with β-thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Tselepis, Alexandros D.; Hahalis, George; Tellis, Constantinos C.; Papavasiliou, Eleni C.; Mylona, Panagiota T.; Kourakli, Alexandra; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios C.

    2010-01-01

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is an independent cardiovascular risk factor. We investigated the plasma levels of Lp-PLA2 activity and mass as a function of plasma lipid levels, LDL subclass profile, and oxidative stress in patients with β-thalassemia. Thirty-five patients with β-thalassemia major (β-TM) and 25 patients with β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI) participated in the study. Lp-PLA2 activity and mass were measured in total plasma, in apolipoprotein (apo)B-depleted plasma (HDL-Lp-PLA2), and in LDL subclasses. Lp-PLA2 activity produced and secreted from peripheral blood monocytes in culture was also determined. Patients with β-thalassemia are characterized by a predominance of small-dense LDL particles, increased oxidative stress, and very high plasma levels of Lp-PLA2 mass and activity, despite low LDL-cholesterol levels. A significant positive correlation between plasma Lp-PLA2 activity or mass and 8-isoprostane (8-epiPGF2a) and ferritin levels as well as intima-media thickness (IMT) values was observed. An increase in secreted and cell-associated Lp-PLA2 activity from monocytes in culture was observed in both patient groups. The HDL-Lp-PLA2 activity and mass as well as the ratio of HDL-Lp-PLA2/plasma Lp-PLA2 were significantly higher in both patient groups compared with the control group. In conclusion, patients with β-thalassemia exhibit high plasma Lp-PLA2 levels, attributed to increased enzyme secretion from monocytes/macrophages and to the predominance of sdLDL particles in plasma. Plasma Lp-PLA2 is correlated with carotid IMT, suggesting that this enzyme may be implicated in premature carotid atherosclerosis observed in β-thalassemia. PMID:20625038

  20. Can Drug Effects Explain the Recent Temporal Increase in Atonic Postpartum Haemorrhage?

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, K. S.; Sheehy, Odile; Mehrabadi, Azar; Urquia, Marcelo L.; Hutcheon, Jennifer A.; Kramer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Rates of postpartum haemorrhage and atonic postpartum haemorrhage have increased in several high‐income countries. We carried out a study to examine if drug use in pregnancy, or drug and other interactions, explained this increase in postpartum haemorrhage. Methods The linked administrative and hospital databases of the Québec Pregnancy Cohort were used to define a cohort of pregnant women in Québec, Canada, from 1998 to 2009 (n = 138 704). Case–control studies on any postpartum haemorrhage and atonic postpartum haemorrhage were carried out within this population, with up to five controls randomly selected for each case after matching on index date and hospital of delivery (incidence density sampling). Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the effects of drug use on postpartum haemorrhage and atonic postpartum haemorrhage. Results There was an unexpected non‐linear, declining temporal pattern in postpartum haemorrhage and atonic postpartum haemorrhage between 1998 and 2009. Use of antidepressants (mainly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) was associated with higher rates of postpartum haemorrhage [adjusted rate ratio (aRR) 1.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23, 1.77] and atonic postpartum haemorrhage [aRR 1.40, 95% CI 1.13, 1.74]. Thrombocytopenia was also associated with higher rates of postpartum haemorrhage [aRR 1.52, 95% CI 1.16, 2.00]. There were no statistically significant drug interactions. Adjustment for maternal factors and drug use had little effect on temporal trends in postpartum haemorrhage and atonic postpartum haemorrhage. Conclusions Although antidepressant use and thrombocytopenia were associated with higher rates of atonic postpartum haemorrhage, antidepressant and other drug use did not explain temporal trends in postpartum haemorrhage. PMID:25847112

  1. Rapid Increase in Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Concentration during Hepatitis C Interferon-Free Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abiru, Seigo; Komori, Atsumasa; Nagaoka, Shinya; Saeki, Akira; Uchida, Shinjiro; Bekki, Shigemune; Kugiyama, Yuki; Nagata, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Minoru; Migita, Kiyoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim We performed lipid analyses at the early period of therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C who underwent interferon (IFN)-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment, and we attempted to identify the factors that contributed to a rapid increase in the patients’ serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the cases of 100 consecutive patients with HCV infection treated at the National Hospital Organization Nagasaki Medical Center: 24 patients underwent daclatasvir (DCV) and asunaprevir (ASV) combination therapy (DCV/ASV) for 24 weeks, and the other 76 patients underwent ledipasvir and sofosbuvir combination therapy (LDV/SOF) for 12 weeks. ΔLDL-C was defined as the changed in LDL-C level at 28 days from the start of therapy. To determine whether ΔLDL-C was associated with several kinds of factors including viral kinetics, we performed a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Results The LDL-C levels in patients treated with LDV/SOF were markedly and significantly elevated (87.45 to 122.5 mg/dl; p<10−10) compared to those in the DCV/ASV-treated patients (80.15 to 87.8 mg/dl; p = 0.0056). The median levels of ΔLDL-C in the LDV/SOF and DCV/ASV groups were 33.2 and 13.1, respectively. LDV/SOF combination therapy as an IFN-free regimen (p<0.001) and ΔHCV core antigen (0–1 day drop) (p<0.044) were identified as independent factors that were closely related to the ΔLDL-C. Conclusions A rapid increase in the serum LDL-C concentration during the IFN-free treatment of hepatitis C was associated with the type of HCV therapy and a decline of HCV core protein. PMID:27680885

  2. Testosterone increases the muscle protein synthesis rate but does not affect very-low-density lipoprotein metabolism in obese premenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuewen; Smith, Gordon I.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Reeds, Dominic N.; Kampelman, Janine; Magkos, Faidon

    2012-01-01

    Men and women with hyperandrogenemia have a more proatherogenic plasma lipid profile [e.g., greater triglyceride (TG) and total and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations] than healthy premenopausal women. Furthermore, castration of male rats markedly reduces testosterone availability below normal and decreases plasma TG concentration, and testosterone replacement reverses this effect. Testosterone is, therefore, thought to be an important regulator of plasma lipid homeostasis. However, little is known about the effect of testosterone on plasma TG concentration and kinetics. Furthermore, testosterone is a potent skeletal muscle protein anabolic agent in men, but its effect on muscle protein turnover in women is unknown. We measured plasma lipid concentrations, hepatic very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG and VLDL-apolipoprotein B-100 secretion rates, and the muscle protein fractional synthesis rate in 10 obese women before and after trandermal testosterone (1.25 g of 1% AndroGel daily) treatment for 3 wk. Serum total and free testosterone concentrations increased (P < 0.05) by approximately sevenfold in response to testosterone treatment, reaching concentrations that are comparable to those in women with hyperandrogenemia, but lower than the normal range for eugonadal men. Except for a small (∼10%) decrease in plasma high-density lipoprotein particle and cholesterol concentrations (P < 0.04), testosterone therapy had no effect on plasma lipid concentrations, lipoprotein particle sizes, and hepatic VLDL-TG and VLDL-apolipoprotein B-100 secretion rates (all P > 0.05); the muscle protein fractional synthesis rate, however, increased by ∼45% (P < 0.001). We conclude that testosterone is a potent skeletal muscle protein anabolic agent, but not an important regulator of plasma lipid homeostasis in obese women. PMID:22252942

  3. Trans-ethnic fine-mapping of lipid loci identifies population-specific signals and allelic heterogeneity that increases the trait variance explained.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Waite, Lindsay L; Jackson, Anne U; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Buyske, Steven; Absher, Devin; Arnett, Donna K; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Carty, Cara L; Cheng, Iona; Cochran, Barbara; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Dumitrescu, Logan; Eaton, Charles B; Franceschini, Nora; Guo, Xiuqing; Henderson, Brian E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Kim, Eric; Kinnunen, Leena; Komulainen, Pirjo; Lee, Wen-Jane; Le Marchand, Loic; Lin, Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Lingaas-Holmen, Oddgeir; Mitchell, Sabrina L; Narisu, Narisu; Robinson, Jennifer G; Schumacher, Fred; Stančáková, Alena; Sundvall, Jouko; Sung, Yun-Ju; Swift, Amy J; Wang, Wen-Chang; Wilkens, Lynne; Wilsgaard, Tom; Young, Alicia M; Adair, Linda S; Ballantyne, Christie M; Bůžková, Petra; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Francis S; Duggan, David; Feranil, Alan B; Ho, Low-Tone; Hung, Yi-Jen; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Juang, Jyh-Ming J; Kesäniemi, Antero Y; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lee, I-Te; Leppert, Mark F; Matise, Tara C; Moilanen, Leena; Njølstad, Inger; Peters, Ulrike; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rotter, Jerome I; Saramies, Jouko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Boehnke, Michael; Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Yii-Der I; Kooperberg, Charles; Assimes, Themistocles L; Crawford, Dana C; Hsiung, Chao A; North, Kari E; Mohlke, Karen L

    2013-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ~100 loci associated with blood lipid levels, but much of the trait heritability remains unexplained, and at most loci the identities of the trait-influencing variants remain unknown. We conducted a trans-ethnic fine-mapping study at 18, 22, and 18 GWAS loci on the Metabochip for their association with triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), respectively, in individuals of African American (n = 6,832), East Asian (n = 9,449), and European (n = 10,829) ancestry. We aimed to identify the variants with strongest association at each locus, identify additional and population-specific signals, refine association signals, and assess the relative significance of previously described functional variants. Among the 58 loci, 33 exhibited evidence of association at P<1 × 10(-4) in at least one ancestry group. Sequential conditional analyses revealed that ten, nine, and four loci in African Americans, Europeans, and East Asians, respectively, exhibited two or more signals. At these loci, accounting for all signals led to a 1.3- to 1.8-fold increase in the explained phenotypic variance compared to the strongest signals. Distinct signals across ancestry groups were identified at PCSK9 and APOA5. Trans-ethnic analyses narrowed the signals to smaller sets of variants at GCKR, PPP1R3B, ABO, LCAT, and ABCA1. Of 27 variants reported previously to have functional effects, 74% exhibited the strongest association at the respective signal. In conclusion, trans-ethnic high-density genotyping and analysis confirm the presence of allelic heterogeneity, allow the identification of population-specific variants, and limit the number of candidate SNPs for functional studies.

  4. Trans-Ethnic Fine-Mapping of Lipid Loci Identifies Population-Specific Signals and Allelic Heterogeneity That Increases the Trait Variance Explained

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying; Waite, Lindsay L.; Jackson, Anne U.; Sheu, Wayne H-H.; Buyske, Steven; Absher, Devin; Arnett, Donna K.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Carty, Cara L.; Cheng, Iona; Cochran, Barbara; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Dumitrescu, Logan; Eaton, Charles B.; Franceschini, Nora; Guo, Xiuqing; Henderson, Brian E.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Kim, Eric; Kinnunen, Leena; Komulainen, Pirjo; Lee, Wen-Jane; Le Marchand, Loic; Lin, Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Lingaas-Holmen, Oddgeir; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Narisu, Narisu; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Schumacher, Fred; Stančáková, Alena; Sundvall, Jouko; Sung, Yun-Ju; Swift, Amy J.; Wang, Wen-Chang; Wilkens, Lynne; Wilsgaard, Tom; Young, Alicia M.; Adair, Linda S.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Bůžková, Petra; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Francis S.; Duggan, David; Feranil, Alan B.; Ho, Low-Tone; Hung, Yi-Jen; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Juang, Jyh-Ming J.; Kesäniemi, Antero Y.; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lee, I-Te; Leppert, Mark F.; Matise, Tara C.; Moilanen, Leena; Njølstad, Inger; Peters, Ulrike; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saramies, Jouko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Mohlke, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ∼100 loci associated with blood lipid levels, but much of the trait heritability remains unexplained, and at most loci the identities of the trait-influencing variants remain unknown. We conducted a trans-ethnic fine-mapping study at 18, 22, and 18 GWAS loci on the Metabochip for their association with triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), respectively, in individuals of African American (n = 6,832), East Asian (n = 9,449), and European (n = 10,829) ancestry. We aimed to identify the variants with strongest association at each locus, identify additional and population-specific signals, refine association signals, and assess the relative significance of previously described functional variants. Among the 58 loci, 33 exhibited evidence of association at P<1×10−4 in at least one ancestry group. Sequential conditional analyses revealed that ten, nine, and four loci in African Americans, Europeans, and East Asians, respectively, exhibited two or more signals. At these loci, accounting for all signals led to a 1.3- to 1.8-fold increase in the explained phenotypic variance compared to the strongest signals. Distinct signals across ancestry groups were identified at PCSK9 and APOA5. Trans-ethnic analyses narrowed the signals to smaller sets of variants at GCKR, PPP1R3B, ABO, LCAT, and ABCA1. Of 27 variants reported previously to have functional effects, 74% exhibited the strongest association at the respective signal. In conclusion, trans-ethnic high-density genotyping and analysis confirm the presence of allelic heterogeneity, allow the identification of population-specific variants, and limit the number of candidate SNPs for functional studies. PMID:23555291

  5. Exercise attenuates the increase in plasma monounsaturated fatty acids and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol but not high-density lipoprotein 2b cholesterol caused by high-oleic ground beef in women.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, L Anne; Crouse, Stephen F; Carbuhn, Aaron; Klooster, Jennifer; Calles, José Antonio Elias; Meade, Thomas; Smith, Stephen B

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that dietary monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and exercise increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) by independent mechanisms, so there would be additive effects between a single, intensive session of exercise and high-MUFA ground beef on HDL-C and blood risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Seventeen postmenopausal women completed a 2-way crossover design in which they consumed five 114-g ground beef patties per week for two 6-week periods separated by a 4-week washout (habitual diet) period. The ground beef patties contained 21% total fat with either 9.97 (low-MUFA) or 12.72 (high-MUFA) g total MUFA. Blood was taken at entry, at the end of each 6-week diet period, after the 4-week washout period, and 24 hours after aerobic exercise sessions (75% VO₂peak, 2.07 MJ). After the ground beef intervention, the high-MUFA ground beef increased plasma palmitoleic acid and oleic acid, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle density, HDL-C, and HDL2b-C (all P < .05), whereas the low-MUFA ground beef increased LDL density. After the washout (habitual diet) period, the single exercise session increased serum LDL cholesterol, HDL-C, and HDL2a and decreased TAG and oleic acid. After the low-MUFA ground beef diet, exercise increased LDL size and HDL density and decreased LDL density and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but had no effect on HDL-C fractions. After the high-MUFA ground beef intervention, exercise decreased palmitioleic acid, oleic acid, HDL-C, and HDL2a-C, but not HDL2b-C. Contrary to our hypothesis, the effects of exercise and a high-MUFA diet were not additive; instead, exercise attenuated the effects of the high-MUFA ground beef on HDL-C and plasma MUFAs. The differential effects of high-MUFA ground beef and exercise on HDL2a-C and HDL2b-C indicate that diet and exercise affect HDL-C by different mechanisms.

  6. Increases in oxidized low-density lipoprotein and other inflammatory and adhesion molecules with a concomitant decrease in high-density lipoprotein in the individuals exposed to arsenic in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Karim, Md Rezaul; Rahman, Mashiur; Islam, Khairul; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Hossain, Shakhawoat; Hossain, Ekhtear; Aziz, Abdul; Yeasmin, Fouzia; Agarwal, Smita; Hossain, Md Imam; Saud, Zahangir Alam; Nikkon, Farjana; Hossain, Mostaque; Mandal, Abul; Jenkins, Richard O; Haris, Parvez I; Miyataka, Hideki; Himeno, Seiichiro; Hossain, Khaled

    2013-09-01

    Elevated exposure to arsenic has been suggested to be associated with atherosclerosis leading to cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, biochemical events underlying the arsenic-induced atherosclerosis have not yet been fully documented. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of circulating molecules involved in atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure in the individuals exposed to arsenic in Bangladesh. A total of 324 study subjects, 218 from arsenic-endemic areas and 106 from nonendemic areas in Bangladesh, were recruited. Drinking water, hair, nail, and blood samples were collected from the study subjects for analysis. Total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were lower in arsenic-endemic subjects than those of nonendemic subjects. Oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) levels were significantly higher in arsenic-endemic subjects than those in nonendemic subjects. All these circulating molecules showed significant correlations with arsenic exposure (water, hair, and nail arsenic concentrations), and all these relations were significant before and after adjusting for relevant covariates. Among the circulating molecules tested in this study, HDL, Ox-LDL, and CRP showed dose-response relationships with arsenic exposure. Ox-LDL/HDL ratios were increased with the increasing concentrations of arsenic in the water, hair, and nails. Furthermore, non-HDL cholesterol and TC/HDL ratios were significantly correlated with arsenic exposure before and after adjusting for relevant covariates. Thus, all the observed associations may be the major features of arsenic exposure-related atherosclerosis leading to CVD.

  7. Brazil nut ingestion increased plasma selenium but had minimal effects on lipids, apolipoproteins, and high-density lipoprotein function in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Strunz, Célia C; Oliveira, Tatiane V; Vinagre, Juliana C M; Lima, Adriana; Cozzolino, Silvia; Maranhão, Raul C

    2008-03-01

    The Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) of the Amazon region is consumed worldwide. It is rich in both monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids and is known for its high selenium content. This study tested the hypothesis whether the consumption of this nut could affect the plasma lipids and apolipoproteins and some functional properties of the antiatherogenic high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Fifteen normolipidemic subjects aged 27.3 +/- 3.9 years and with body mass index of 23.8 +/- 2.8 kg/m(2) consumed 45 g of Brazil nuts per day during a 15-day period. On days 0 and 15, blood was collected for biochemical analysis, determination of HDL particle size, paraoxonase 1 activity, and lipid transfer from a lipoprotein-like nanoparticle to the HDL fraction. Brazil nut ingestion did not alter HDL, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein A-I, or apolipoprotein B concentrations. HDL particle diameter and the activity of antioxidative paraoxonase 1, mostly found in the HDL fraction, were also unaffected. Supplementation increased the reception of cholesteryl esters (P < .05) by the HDL yet did not alter the reception of phospholipids, free cholesterol, or triacylglycerols. As expected, plasma selenium was significantly increased. However, the consumption of Brazil nuts for short duration by normolipidemic subjects in comparable amounts to those tested for other nuts did not alter serum lipid profile. The only alteration in HDL function was the increase in cholesteryl ester transfer. This latter finding may be beneficial because it would improve the nonatherogenic reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

  8. [Deprivation versus importation: a model explaining the increase of suicide rates in custody].

    PubMed

    Frottier, P; Frühwald, S; Ritter, K; König, F

    2001-02-01

    High suicide rates in jail, lock-up or prison settings have given rise to a debate about whether suicides result chiefly from the type of people confined, or from the types of places they are confined in, the types of confinement. This is summarily framed by the terms of an associated debate in criminology, between importation and deprivation theory. This paper describes the importation versus deprivation theory, concerning the circumstances in Austrian prisons and jails. The article reports on all completed suicides over the period from 1947 to 1999 (n = 410). The increase of suicide rates in Austrian jails and prisons is significant over the last fifty years. While the rate was stable between 1947 and 1975, we have a significantly increasing rate since 1975. In 1975 there was an important legislational reform of the criminal law in Austria. The implications of this reform are discussed in the light of the importation/deprivation theory.

  9. Explaining the Increase in Unemployment Compensation for Ex-Servicemembers During the Global War on Terror

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Solvents Paints Ionizing radiation Radar/microwaves Lasers Loud noises Excessive vibration Industrial pollution Sand/dust Depleted Uranium (If yes...0002. iii Preface This document was produced as part of the RAND project “Understanding Recent Trends in Veteran Unemployment.” That project was...motivated by increases in the official unemploy- ment rate for young veterans and in the number of veterans claiming Unemployment Com- pensation for Ex

  10. Symptoms of notalgia paresthetica may be explained by increased dermal innervation.

    PubMed

    Springall, D R; Karanth, S S; Kirkham, N; Darley, C R; Polak, J M

    1991-09-01

    Notalgia paresthetica is a sensory neuropathy characterized by infrascapular pruritus, burning pain, hyperalgesia, or tenderness. To assess whether the symptoms may be caused by alterations in the cutaneous innervation, skin from the affected area of patients (n = 5) was compared with controls (n = 10) comprising the contralateral unaffected area from the same patients and site-matched biopsies of normals, using immunohistochemistry. Frozen sections were immunostained with antisera to the neuropeptides substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, and neuropeptide with tyrosine, and to the general neural marker PGP 9.5 and the glial marker S-100 to show the overall innervation and glial cells, respectively. No discernible change in the distribution of neuropeptide-immunoreactive axons was found, but all of the specimens from the affected areas had a significant increase in the number of intradermal PGP 9.5-immunoreactive nerve fibers compared with unaffected areas from the same patients and normal controls. Epidermal dendritic cells immunoreactive for S-100, possibly Langerhans cells, were substantially increased. It is concluded that there is an increase in the sensory epidermal innervation in the affected skin areas in notalgia paresthetica, which could contribute to the symptoms, and that neural immunohistochemistry of skin biopsies could be helpful in the diagnosis of the disease.

  11. Do historical changes in parent-child relationships explain increases in youth conduct problems?

    PubMed

    Collishaw, Stephan; Gardner, Frances; Maughan, Barbara; Scott, Jacqueline; Pickles, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The coincidence of historical trends in youth antisocial behavior and change in family demographics has led to speculation of a causal link, possibly mediated by declining quality of parenting and parent-child relationships. No study to date has directly assessed whether and how parenting and parent-child relationships have changed. Two national samples of English adolescents aged 16-17 years in 1986 (N = 4,524 adolescents, 7,120 parents) and 2006 (N = 716 adolescents, 734 parents) were compared using identical questionnaire assessments. Youth-reported parental monitoring, expectations, and parent-child quality time increased between 1986 and 2006. Ratings of parental interest did not change. Parenting differences between affluent and disadvantaged families narrowed over time. There was thus little evidence of a decline in quality of parenting for the population as a whole or for disadvantaged subgroups. Parent-reported youth conduct problems showed a modest increase between 1986 and 2006. Findings suggested that the increase in youth conduct problems was largely unrelated to observed change in parent-child relationships.

  12. Surface properties of native human plasma lipoproteins and lipoprotein models.

    PubMed Central

    Massey, J B; Pownall, H J

    1998-01-01

    Plasma lipoprotein surface properties are important but poorly understood determinants of lipoprotein catabolism. To elucidate the relation between surface properties and surface reactivity, the physical properties of surface monolayers of native lipoproteins and lipoprotein models were investigated by fluorescent probes of surface lipid fluidity, surface lateral diffusion, and interfacial polarity, and by their reactivity to Naja melanoleuca phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Native lipoproteins were human very low, low-, and subclass 3 high-density lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL, and HDL3); models were 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) or its ether analog in single-bilayer vesicles, large and small microemulsions of POPC and triolein, and reassembled HDL (apolipoprotein A-I plus phospholipid). Among lipoproteins, surface lipid fluidity increased in the order HDL3 < LDL < VLDL, varying inversely with their (protein + cholesterol)/phospholipid ratios. Models resembled VLDL in fluidity. Both lateral mobility in the surface monolayer and polarity of the interfacial region were lower in native lipoproteins than in models. Among native lipoproteins and models, increased fluidity in the surface monolayer was associated with increased reactivity to PLA2. Addition of cholesterol (up to 20 mol%) to models had little effect on PLA2 activity, whereas the addition of apolipoprotein C-III stimulated it. Single-bilayer vesicles, phospholipid-triolein microemulsions, and VLDL have surface monolayers that are quantitatively similar, and distinct from those of LDL and HDL3. Surface property and enzymatic reactivity differences between lipoproteins and models were associated with differences in surface monolayer protein and cholesterol contents. Thus differences in the surface properties that regulate lipolytic reactivity are a predictable function of surface composition. PMID:9533698

  13. Higher Levels of Lipoprotein Associated Phospholipase A2 is associated with Increased Prevalence of Cognitive Impairment: the APAC Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ruixuan; Chen, Shengyun; Shen, Yuan; Wu, Jianwei; Chen, Shuohua; Wang, Anxin; Wu, Shouling; Zhao, Xingquan

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is a unique circulating phospholipase with inflammatory and oxidative activities and the limited data regarding the relationship between Lp-PLA2 and cognitive impairment are conflicted. We conducted a cross-sectional study including 1,374 Chinese adults recruited from 2010 to 2011, aiming to evaluate the relationship between Lp-PLA2 levels and the prevalence of cognitive impairment in a Chinese community-based population. Participants underwent standardized evaluation. Serum Lp-PLA2 mass was measured by ELISA. Cognition status was evaluated via the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) and cognitive impairment was identified as MMSE <24. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the associations of Lp-PLA2 mass with cognitive impairment. Lp-PLA2 mass was significantly associated with the prevalence of cognitive impairment after adjusting for other potential confounding factors (compared with the first quartile, adjusted ORs of the second, third, and fourth quartile were 2.058 (95% CI, 0.876–4.835), 2.834 (95% CI, 1.255–6.398), and 4.882 (95% CI, 2.212–10.777), p < 0.0001). In conclusion, elevated level of Lp-PLA2 mass was independently associated with the prevalence of cognitive impairment in Chinese adults. PMID:27609335

  14. Liquid films on shake flask walls explain increasing maximum oxygen transfer capacities with elevating viscosity.

    PubMed

    Giese, Heiner; Azizan, Amizon; Kümmel, Anne; Liao, Anping; Peter, Cyril P; Fonseca, João A; Hermann, Robert; Duarte, Tiago M; Büchs, Jochen

    2014-02-01

    In biotechnological screening and production, oxygen supply is a crucial parameter. Even though oxygen transfer is well documented for viscous cultivations in stirred tanks, little is known about the gas/liquid oxygen transfer in shake flask cultures that become increasingly viscous during cultivation. Especially the oxygen transfer into the liquid film, adhering on the shake flask wall, has not yet been described for such cultivations. In this study, the oxygen transfer of chemical and microbial model experiments was measured and the suitability of the widely applied film theory of Higbie was studied. With numerical simulations of Fick's law of diffusion, it was demonstrated that Higbie's film theory does not apply for cultivations which occur at viscosities up to 10 mPa s. For the first time, it was experimentally shown that the maximum oxygen transfer capacity OTRmax increases in shake flasks when viscosity is increased from 1 to 10 mPa s, leading to an improved oxygen supply for microorganisms. Additionally, the OTRmax does not significantly undermatch the OTRmax at waterlike viscosities, even at elevated viscosities of up to 80 mPa s. In this range, a shake flask is a somehow self-regulating system with respect to oxygen supply. This is in contrary to stirred tanks, where the oxygen supply is steadily reduced to only 5% at 80 mPa s. Since, the liquid film formation at shake flask walls inherently promotes the oxygen supply at moderate and at elevated viscosities, these results have significant implications for scale-up.

  15. A Minimalistic Resource Allocation Model to Explain Ubiquitous Increase in Protein Expression with Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Leeat; Segal, Eran; Milo, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins show changes in level across growth conditions. Many of these changes seem to be coordinated with the specific growth rate rather than the growth environment or the protein function. Although cellular growth rates, gene expression levels and gene regulation have been at the center of biological research for decades, there are only a few models giving a base line prediction of the dependence of the proteome fraction occupied by a gene with the specific growth rate. We present a simple model that predicts a widely coordinated increase in the fraction of many proteins out of the proteome, proportionally with the growth rate. The model reveals how passive redistribution of resources, due to active regulation of only a few proteins, can have proteome wide effects that are quantitatively predictable. Our model provides a potential explanation for why and how such a coordinated response of a large fraction of the proteome to the specific growth rate arises under different environmental conditions. The simplicity of our model can also be useful by serving as a baseline null hypothesis in the search for active regulation. We exemplify the usage of the model by analyzing the relationship between growth rate and proteome composition for the model microorganism E.coli as reflected in recent proteomics data sets spanning various growth conditions. We find that the fraction out of the proteome of a large number of proteins, and from different cellular processes, increases proportionally with the growth rate. Notably, ribosomal proteins, which have been previously reported to increase in fraction with growth rate, are only a small part of this group of proteins. We suggest that, although the fractions of many proteins change with the growth rate, such changes may be partially driven by a global effect, not necessarily requiring specific cellular control mechanisms. PMID:27073913

  16. A Minimalistic Resource Allocation Model to Explain Ubiquitous Increase in Protein Expression with Growth Rate.

    PubMed

    Barenholz, Uri; Keren, Leeat; Segal, Eran; Milo, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins show changes in level across growth conditions. Many of these changes seem to be coordinated with the specific growth rate rather than the growth environment or the protein function. Although cellular growth rates, gene expression levels and gene regulation have been at the center of biological research for decades, there are only a few models giving a base line prediction of the dependence of the proteome fraction occupied by a gene with the specific growth rate. We present a simple model that predicts a widely coordinated increase in the fraction of many proteins out of the proteome, proportionally with the growth rate. The model reveals how passive redistribution of resources, due to active regulation of only a few proteins, can have proteome wide effects that are quantitatively predictable. Our model provides a potential explanation for why and how such a coordinated response of a large fraction of the proteome to the specific growth rate arises under different environmental conditions. The simplicity of our model can also be useful by serving as a baseline null hypothesis in the search for active regulation. We exemplify the usage of the model by analyzing the relationship between growth rate and proteome composition for the model microorganism E.coli as reflected in recent proteomics data sets spanning various growth conditions. We find that the fraction out of the proteome of a large number of proteins, and from different cellular processes, increases proportionally with the growth rate. Notably, ribosomal proteins, which have been previously reported to increase in fraction with growth rate, are only a small part of this group of proteins. We suggest that, although the fractions of many proteins change with the growth rate, such changes may be partially driven by a global effect, not necessarily requiring specific cellular control mechanisms.

  17. Postprandial lipemia in the elderly involves increased incorporation of ingested fat in plasma free fatty acids and small (Sf 20-400) triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Puga, Guilherme M; Meyer, Christian; Everman, Sarah; Mandarino, Lawrence J; Katsanos, Christos S

    2011-08-01

    In the elderly, the rise in postprandial plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations is increased, contributing to their increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We sought to determine the incorporation of ingested fat (whipping cream enriched with [1,1,1-(13)C]triolein) into plasma lipids during the postprandial period in six healthy elderly (67 ± 1 yr old) and six healthy young (23 ± 2 yr old) subjects. Blood and expired air samples were taken before and at 2-h intervals during the 8-h postprandial period. As expected, the area under the curve of postprandial plasma TG concentrations was larger in the elderly compared with the young subjects (152 ± 38 vs. 66 ± 27 mg·dl(-1)·h, P < 0.05). The incorporation of [(13)C]oleate in plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) and TG of the small (S(f) = 20-400) triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) fraction was significantly higher in the elderly compared with the young subjects, resulting in increased postprandial contributions of the ingested lipid to plasma FFAs (41 ± 3 vs. 26 ± 6%, P < 0.05) and the small TRL fraction (36 ± 5 vs. 21 ± 3%, P < 0.05) in elderly. Plasma apoB-100 concentration was higher, whereas the rate of oxidation of the ingested lipid was lower (P < 0.05) in the elderly. We conclude that increased postprandial lipemia in the elderly involves increased contribution of ingested lipid to the plasma small TRLs. This appears to be driven at least in part by increased appearance of the ingested fat as plasma FFA and increased availability of apo B-100 lipoproteins in the elderly.

  18. Postprandial lipemia in the elderly involves increased incorporation of ingested fat in plasma free fatty acids and small (Sf 20–400) triglyceride-rich lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Guilherme M.; Meyer, Christian; Everman, Sarah; Mandarino, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    In the elderly, the rise in postprandial plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations is increased, contributing to their increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We sought to determine the incorporation of ingested fat (whipping cream enriched with [1,1,1-13C]triolein) into plasma lipids during the postprandial period in six healthy elderly (67 ± 1 yr old) and six healthy young (23 ± 2 yr old) subjects. Blood and expired air samples were taken before and at 2-h intervals during the 8-h postprandial period. As expected, the area under the curve of postprandial plasma TG concentrations was larger in the elderly compared with the young subjects (152 ± 38 vs. 66 ± 27 mg·dl−1·h, P < 0.05). The incorporation of [13C]oleate in plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) and TG of the small (Sf = 20–400) triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) fraction was significantly higher in the elderly compared with the young subjects, resulting in increased postprandial contributions of the ingested lipid to plasma FFAs (41 ± 3 vs. 26 ± 6%, P < 0.05) and the small TRL fraction (36 ± 5 vs. 21 ± 3%, P < 0.05) in elderly. Plasma apoB-100 concentration was higher, whereas the rate of oxidation of the ingested lipid was lower (P < 0.05) in the elderly. We conclude that increased postprandial lipemia in the elderly involves increased contribution of ingested lipid to the plasma small TRLs. This appears to be driven at least in part by increased appearance of the ingested fat as plasma FFA and increased availability of apo B-100 lipoproteins in the elderly. PMID:21558545

  19. Expectations of increased and decreased pain explain the effect of conditioned pain modulation in females

    PubMed Central

    Bjørkedal, Espen; Flaten, Magne Arve

    2012-01-01

    Objective Chronic pain is believed to be related to a dysfunction of descending pain modulatory mechanisms. Functioning of descending pain modulation can be assessed by various methods, including conditioned pain modulation (CPM). CPM refers to the inhibition of one source of pain by a second noxious stimulus, termed the conditioning stimulus. This procedure can activate an endogenous pain inhibitory mechanism that inhibits early nociceptive processing. Chronic pain and anxiety disorders are more prevalent among females and it has been hypothesized that females react with more negative emotions towards unpleasant stimuli and this might be part of the explanation of greater pain sensitivity in females. The present study investigated whether expectations modulate the effect of conditioning stimulation on pain, subjective stress, and heart rate. In addition, we investigated whether the modulation of CPM by expectations differed between males and females. Methods Seventy-two subjects (including 36 women) received six noxious heat stimuli to the forearm. During three of these stimuli, a conditioning stimulus (cold-water bath) was applied to the contralateral arm in order to activate CPM. One third of the subjects were told that this would reduce pain (analgesia group), one-third that it would increase pain (hyperalgesia group), and one third received no information about its effect (no info group). Results Information that conditioning stimulation decreased or enhanced pain had the corresponding effect in females, but not in males. Conditioning stimulation increased stress, but not heart rate in females in the hyperalgesia group. A higher expectation of analgesia and lower stress during conditioning stimulation was associated with larger inhibitory CPM. Conclusion These results suggest that reduced inhibitory CPM can be due to contextually induced cognitive and emotional factors and not necessarily a dysfunction of descending inhibitory pathways. PMID:23049277

  20. Echium Oil Reduces Plasma Triglycerides by Increasing Intravascular Lipolysis in apoB100-Only Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Lolita M.; Lough, Christopher M.; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y.; Gebre, Abraham K.; Smith, Thomas L.; Colvin, Perry L.; Parks, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model. PMID:23857172

  1. Echium oil reduces plasma triglycerides by increasing intravascular lipolysis in apoB100-only low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lolita M; Lough, Christopher M; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y; Gebre, Abraham K; Smith, Thomas L; Colvin, Perry L; Parks, John S

    2013-07-12

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model.

  2. Lipid composition of human serum lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Skipski, V. P.; Barclay, Marion; Barclay, R. K.; Fetzer, Valentina A.; Good, J. J.; Archibald, F. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The lipid compositions of the low-density lipoproteins, the high-density lipoproteins and the ultracentrifugal residue of human serum are presented, with emphasis on certain lipoprotein classes and lipid components not previously described. 2. Except for the lipoproteins with the lowest and highest densities, there is a trend for stepwise successive increase or, respectively, decrease in the relative amounts of the main constituents of lipoproteins. 3. High-density lipoprotein-2 and high-density lipoprotein-3 have different amounts of certain lipids; high-density lipoprotein-2 has relatively more free cholesterol and sphingomyelin; high-density lipoprotein-3 has more free fatty acids, diglycerides and ceramide monohexosides. 4. All the lipoproteins contain hydrocarbons of the alkane series. The greatest amount, which averages 4·4% of total lipid extracted, is in the ultracentrifugal residue; n-alkanes comprise 18–50% of the hydrocarbons. 5. All the lipoproteins contain ceramide monohexosides. The highest relative contents of these glycolipids are in high-density lipoprotein-3 and in the ultracentrifugal residue. 6. The ultracentrifugal residue contains 55% of the total quantity of free fatty acids present in serum. The remaining free fatty acids are distributed among the other lipoprotein classes. 7. The choline-containing phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin) comprise about 90% of the phospholipids in all the lipoprotein classes except the low-density lipoprotein-2, which contains about 80% of these phospholipids. 8. The presence of a large amount of lysophosphatidylcholine in the ultracentrifugal residue and the successive decrease of sphingomyelin from the low-density lipoprotein-1 to the ultracentrifugal residue was confirmed. 9. The low-density lipoprotein-2 and the ultracentrifugal residue are characterized by relatively high contents of the lower glycerides. PMID:6048776

  3. Increased inflammation in sanctuary sites may explain viral blips in HIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Piovoso, Michael J.; Cardozo, E. Fabian; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2016-08-01

    Here, combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) suppress HIV-1 viral replication, such that viral load in plasma remains below the limit of detection in standard assays. However, intermittent episodes of transient viremia (blips) occur in a set of HIV-patients. Given that follicular hyperplasia occurs during lymphoid inflammation as a normal response to infection, it is hypothesised that when the diameter of the lymph node follicle (LNF) increases and crosses a critical size, a viral blip occurs due to cryptic viremia. To study this hypothesis, a theoretical analysis of a mathematical model is performed to find the conditions for virus suppression in all compartments and different scenarios of LNF size changes are simulated. According to the analysis, blips with duration of around 30 days arise when the diameter rise rate is between 0.02 and 0.03 days–1. Moreover, the final diameter of the site is directly related to the steady states of the virus load after the occurrence of a blip. When the value of R0 is around 2.1, to have a steady-state below the limit of detection after the viral blip, the maximum final diameters should be greater than 0.7 mm so that there is a relative loss of connection between compartments.

  4. Increased inflammation in sanctuary sites may explain viral blips in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, E Fabian; Piovoso, Michael J; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2016-08-01

    Combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) suppress HIV-1 viral replication, such that viral load in plasma remains below the limit of detection in standard assays. However, intermittent episodes of transient viremia (blips) occur in a set of HIV-patients. Given that follicular hyperplasia occurs during lymphoid inflammation as a normal response to infection, it is hypothesised that when the diameter of the lymph node follicle (LNF) increases and crosses a critical size, a viral blip occurs due to cryptic viremia. To study this hypothesis, a theoretical analysis of a mathematical model is performed to find the conditions for virus suppression in all compartments and different scenarios of LNF size changes are simulated. According to the analysis, blips with duration of around 30 days arise when the diameter rise rate is between 0.02 and 0.03 days(-1). Moreover, the final diameter of the site is directly related to the steady states of the virus load after the occurrence of a blip. When the value of R0 is around 2.1, to have a steady-state below the limit of detection after the viral blip, the maximum final diameters should be greater than 0.7 mm so that there is a relative loss of connection between compartments.

  5. Increased inflammation in sanctuary sites may explain viral blips in HIV infection

    DOE PAGES

    Piovoso, Michael J.; Cardozo, E. Fabian; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2016-08-01

    Here, combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) suppress HIV-1 viral replication, such that viral load in plasma remains below the limit of detection in standard assays. However, intermittent episodes of transient viremia (blips) occur in a set of HIV-patients. Given that follicular hyperplasia occurs during lymphoid inflammation as a normal response to infection, it is hypothesised that when the diameter of the lymph node follicle (LNF) increases and crosses a critical size, a viral blip occurs due to cryptic viremia. To study this hypothesis, a theoretical analysis of a mathematical model is performed to find the conditions for virus suppression in allmore » compartments and different scenarios of LNF size changes are simulated. According to the analysis, blips with duration of around 30 days arise when the diameter rise rate is between 0.02 and 0.03 days–1. Moreover, the final diameter of the site is directly related to the steady states of the virus load after the occurrence of a blip. When the value of R0 is around 2.1, to have a steady-state below the limit of detection after the viral blip, the maximum final diameters should be greater than 0.7 mm so that there is a relative loss of connection between compartments.« less

  6. Changes in plasma lipids and increased low-density lipoprotein susceptibility to oxidation in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes: consequences of obesity.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vera, Isabel; Bonet, Bartolome; Viana, Marta; Quintanar, Amalia; Martín, Maria D; Blanco, Pilar; Donnay, Sergio; Albi, Manuel

    2007-11-01

    Dyslipidemia is associated with increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) susceptibility to oxidation, a phenomenon associated with endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, cell toxicity, and intrauterine growth retardation. The present study was designed to determine if women developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have both increased plasma lipids and LDL susceptibility to oxidation throughout pregnancy. We also wanted to study the effects of obesity upon these parameters. A nested case-control study was carried out in 45 women with uncomplicated pregnancies and 62 women diagnosed with GDM following the criteria of the American Diabetes Association. In all women, blood was drawn at 15, 24, and 32 weeks of gestation. Low-density lipoprotein oxidation was initiated by the addition of CuCl2, and formation of conjugated dienes was monitored. Glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, vitamin E, estradiol, and progesterone were determined. In GDM, elevated levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides were observed when compared with the control group even in the first trimester, before the detection of diabetes. In the control group, the lag phase in the LDL oxidation was 85.3, 84.4, and 95.6 minutes at 15, 24, and 32 weeks of pregnancy, compared with 63.3, 63.4, and 74.5 minutes in the GDM group (P < .001 in the 3 periods). These differences remained when adjusted for the body mass index. In a multiple linear regression analysis, a negative correlation was observed between the lag phase and the body mass index (P < .001) and cholesterol (P < .001), whereas a positive one appeared with vitamin E (P < .05) and time of gestation (P < .001). In pregnancy, GDM increases LDL susceptibility to oxidation. Obesity and hypercholesterolemia further exacerbate this effect.

  7. Participation of decreased serum cholesteryl ester transfer activity, independent of increased serum lipoprotein(a), in angina pectoris in normolipemic elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Y; Morimoto, S; Fukuo, K; Imanaka, S; Koh, E; Tamatani, M; Ogihara, T

    1992-01-01

    The cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) is a measurement of the transfer of cholesteryl ester from HDL to VLDL, LDL or peripheral cells. Its role in the development of early coronary heart disease is not clear. In the present study, serum levels of CETA, lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and other lipid-related factors were compared in 10 normal young subjects, 28 healthy elderly subjects and 14 normolipemic elderly patients with angina pectoris. Compared to the young normals and healthy elderly subjects, the elderly patients with angina pectoris showed significantly decreased mean serum CETA levels, and significantly increased mean serum levels of Lp(a) and apoprotein B. These results may indicate that decreased serum values of CETA participate in the development of angina pectoris in normolipemic elderly patients.

  8. Intrauterine growth restriction combined with a maternal high-fat diet increases hepatic cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein receptor activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Zinkhan, Erin K; Zalla, Jennifer M; Carpenter, Jeanette R; Yu, Baifeng; Yu, Xing; Chan, Gary; Joss-Moore, Lisa; Lane, Robert H

    2016-07-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and maternal consumption of a high-saturated-fat diet (HFD) increase the risk of hypercholesterolemia, a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Many pregnant women eat a HFD, thus exposing the fetus to a HFD in utero. The cumulative effect of in utero exposure to IUGR and a HFD on offspring cholesterol levels remains unknown. Furthermore, little is known about the mechanism through which IUGR and maternal HFD consumption increase cholesterol. We hypothesize that IUGR combined with a maternal HFD would increase offspring serum and hepatic cholesterol accumulation via alteration in levels of key proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism. To test our hypothesis we used a rat model of surgically induced IUGR and fed the dams a regular diet or a HFD HFD-fed dams consumed the same kilocalories as regular diet-fed dams, with no difference between surgical intervention groups. In the offspring, IUGR combined with a maternal HFD increased hepatic cholesterol levels, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor protein levels, and Ldlr activity in female rat offspring at birth and both sexes at postnatal day 14 relative to non-IUGR offspring both from regular diet- and HFD-fed dams. These findings suggest that IUGR combined with a maternal HFD increases hepatic cholesterol accumulation via increased LDL cholesterol uptake into the liver with resulting persistent increases in hepatic cholesterol accumulation.

  9. The effects of glibenclamide and insulin on plasma high density lipoprotein in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Tamai, T; Nakai, T; Yamada, S; Kobayashi, T; Hayashi, T; Kutsumi, Y; Oida, K; Takeda, R

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of various types of treatment such as glibenclamide and insulin on plasma lipids and lipoprotein concentration in diabetics. Treatment of diabetes mellitus was reevaluated from the standpoint of high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Twenty-one diabetic patients (6 men and 15 women) who have been admitted in the hospital and kept on Japanese standard diet for diabetes mellitus, have been studied. Changes of plasma lipoprotein in diabetic patients were followed up before and after treatment with glibenclamide or insulin. Very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) were decreased and HDL was increased with insulin treatment. However, glibenclamide induced a significant decrease in HDL- cholesterol (Ch). Relationship between triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins and HDL metabolism was studied. A significant negative correlation was found between pretreatment VLDL-TG and changes of VLDL-TG with insulin treatment, indicating an accelerated catabolism of VLDL-TG with possible increase of triglyceride lipases. There was a significant negative correlation between VLDL-TG and HDL-Ch before insulin treatment, but not after treatment. There was no negative correlation between changes of VLDL-TG and changes of HDL-Ch with insulin therapy. These results indicate that an increment of HDL with insulin treatment can not be explained solely by increased HDL formation from TG-rich lipoprotein and that insulin might increase synthesis and secretion of HDL in liver and/or intestine.

  10. Can the progressive increase of C₄ bundle sheath leakiness at low PFD be explained by incomplete suppression of photorespiration?

    PubMed

    Kromdijk, Johannes; Griffiths, Howard; Schepers, Hans E

    2010-11-01

    The ability to concentrate CO₂ around Rubisco allows C₄ crops to suppress photorespiration. However, as phosphoenolpyruvate regeneration requires ATP, the energetic efficiency of the C₄ pathway at low photosynthetic flux densities (PFD) becomes a balancing act between primary fixation and concentration of CO₂ in mesophyll (M) cells, and CO₂ reduction in bundle sheath (BS) cells. At low PFD, retro-diffusion of CO₂ from BS cells, relative to the rate of bicarbonate fixation in M cells (termed leakiness φ), is known to increase. This paper investigates whether this increase in ϕ could be explained by incomplete inhibition of photorespiration. The PFD response of φ was measured at various O₂ partial pressures in young Zea mays plants grown at 250 (LL) and 750 µmol m⁻² s⁻¹ PFD (HL). φ increased at low PFD and was positively correlated with O₂ partial pressure. Low PFD during growth caused BS conductance and interveinal distance to be lower in the LL plants, compared to the HL plants, which correlated with lower φ. Model analysis showed that incomplete inhibition of photorespiration, especially in the HL plants, and an increase in the relative contribution of mitochondrial respiration at low PFD could explain the observed increases in φ.

  11. Role of lipoprotein lipase activity on lipoprotein metabolism and the fate of circulating triglycerides in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Herrera, E; Lasunción, M A; Gomez-Coronado, D; Aranda, P; López-Luna, P; Maier, I

    1988-06-01

    The mechanism that induces maternal hypertriglyceridemia in late normal pregnancy, and its physiologic significance are reviewed as a model of the effects of sex steroids on lipoprotein metabolism. In the pregnant rat, maternal carcass fat content progressively increases up to day 19 of gestation, then declines at day 21. The decline may be explained by the augmented lipolytic activity in adipose tissue that is seen in late pregnancy in the rat. This change causes maternal circulating free fatty acids and glycerol levels to rise. Although the liver is the main receptor organ for these metabolites, liver triglyceride content is reduced. Circulating triglycerides and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-triglyceride levels are highly augmented in the pregnant rat, indicating that liver-synthesized triglycerides are rapidly released into the circulation. Similar increments in circulating VLDL-triglycerides are seen in pregnant women during the third trimester of gestation. This increase is coincident with a decrease in plasma postheparin lipoprotein lipase activity, indicating a reduced removal of circulating triglycerides by maternal tissues or a redistribution in their use among the different tissues. During late gestation in the rat, tissue lipoprotein lipase activity varies in different directions; it decreases in adipose tissue, the liver, and to a smaller extent the heart, but increases in placental and mammary gland tissue. These changes play an important role in the fate of circulating triglycerides, which are diverted from uptake by adipose tissue to uptake by the mammary gland for milk synthesis, and probably by the placenta for hydrolysis and transfer of released nonesterified fatty acids to the fetus. After 24 hours of starvation, lipoprotein lipase activity in the liver greatly increases in the rat in late pregnancy; this change is not seen in virgin animals. This alteration is similar to that seen in liver triglyceride content and plasma ketone body

  12. Phytosterols, Phytostanols, and Lipoprotein Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gylling, Helena; Simonen, Piia

    2015-09-17

    The efficacy of phytosterols and phytostanols added to foods and food supplements to obtain significant non-pharmacologic serum and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol reduction is well documented. Irrespective of age, gender, ethnic background, body weight, background diet, or the cause of hypercholesterolemia and, even added to statin treatment, phytosterols and phytostanols at 2 g/day significantly lower LDL cholesterol concentration by 8%-10%. They do not affect the concentrations of high density lipoprotein cholesterol, lipoprotein (a) or serum proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. In some studies, phytosterols and phytostanols have modestly reduced serum triglyceride levels especially in subjects with slightly increased baseline concentrations. Phytosterols and phytostanols lower LDL cholesterol by displacing cholesterol from mixed micelles in the small intestine so that cholesterol absorption is partially inhibited. Cholesterol absorption and synthesis have been carefully evaluated during phytosterol and phytostanol supplementation. However, only a few lipoprotein kinetic studies have been performed, and they revealed that LDL apoprotein B-100 transport rate was reduced. LDL particle size was unchanged, but small dense LDL cholesterol concentration was reduced. In subjects with metabolic syndrome and moderate hypertriglyceridemia, phytostanols reduced not only non- high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration but also serum triglycerides by 27%, and reduced the large and medium size very low density lipoprotein particle concentrations. In the few postprandial studies, the postprandial lipoproteins were reduced, but detailed studies with apoprotein B-48 are lacking. In conclusion, more kinetic studies are required to obtain a more complete understanding of the fasting and postprandial lipoprotein metabolism caused by phytosterols and phytostanols. It seems obvious, however, that the most atherogenic lipoprotein particles will be

  13. Effects of hormones on lipids and lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.

    1991-12-01

    Levels of plasma lipids and lipoproteins are strong predictors for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. In women, as in men, numerous factors contribute to variations in plasma lipoproteins that may affect cardiovascular disease risk. These include age, dietary components, adiposity, genetic traits, and hormonal changes. Each of these factors may operate to varying degrees in determining changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles accompanying menopause- Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested increases in levels of cholesterol, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins associated with menopause. High density lipoproteins (HDL), which are higher in women than men and are thought to contribute to relative protection of premenopausal women from cardiovascular disease, remain relatively constant in the years following menopause, although small, and perhaps transient reductions in the HDL{sub 2} subfraction have been reported in relation to reduced estradiol level following menopause. Despite these associations, it has been difficult to determine the role of endogenous hormones in influencing the plasma lipoproteins of postmenopausal women. In principle, the effects of hormone replacement should act to reverse any alterations in lipoprotein metabolism that are due to postmenopausal hormone changes. While there may be beneficial effects on lipoproteins, hormone treatment does not restore a premenopausal lipoprotein profile. Furthermore, it is not dear to what extent exogenous hormone-induced lipoprotein changes contribute to the reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy.

  14. MicroRNAs regulating apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liye; Irani, Sara; Sirwi, Alaa; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2016-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have been implicated in many pathological conditions. Significant progress has been made to unveil their role in lipid metabolism. This review aims at summarizing the role of different miRs that regulate hepatic assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins. Overproduction and/or impaired clearance of these lipoproteins from circulation increase plasma concentrations of lipids enhancing risk for cardiovascular disease. So far, three miRs, miR-122, miR-34a, and miR-30c have been shown to modulate hepatic production of apoB-containing low density lipoproteins. In this review, we will first provide a brief overview of lipid metabolism and apoB-containing lipoprotein assembly to orient readers to different steps that have been shown to be regulated by miRs. Then, we will discuss the role of each miR on plasma lipids and atherosclerotic burden. Furthermore, we will summarize mechanistic studies explaining how these miRs regulate hepatic lipid synthesis, fatty acid oxidation, and lipoprotein secretion. Finally, we will briefly highlight the potential use of each miR as a therapeutic drug for treating cardiovascular diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MicroRNAs and lipid/energy metabolism and related diseases edited by Carlos Fernández-Hernando and Yajaira Suárez.

  15. Identification of the Functional Variant(s) that Explain the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) GWAS SNP rs6511720 Association with Lower LDL-C and Risk of CHD

    PubMed Central

    Palmen, Jutta; Kalea, Anastasia Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) SNP rs6511720 (G>T), located in intron-1 of the gene, has been identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) as being associated with lower plasma levels of LDL-C and a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Whether or not rs6511720 is itself functional or a marker for a functional variant elsewhere in the gene is not known. Methods The association of LDLR SNP rs6511720 with incidence of CHD and levels of LDL-C was determined by reference to CARDIoGRAM, C4D and Global lipids genetics consortium (GLGC) data. SNP annotation databases were used to identify possible SNP function and prioritization. Luciferase reporter assays in the liver cell line Huh7 were used to measure the effect of variant genotype on gene expression. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSAs) were used to identify the Transcription Factors (TFs) involved in gene expression regulation. Results The phenotype-genotype analysis showed that the rs6511720 minor allele is associated with lower level of LDL-C [beta = -0.2209, p = 3.85 x10-262], and lower risk of CHD [log (OR) = 0.1155, p = 1.04 x10-7]. Rs6511720 is in complete linkage. Rs6511720 is in complete linkage disequilibrium (LD) with three intron-1 SNPs (rs141787760, rs60173709, rs57217136). Luciferase reporter assays in Huh7 cells showed that the rare alleles of both rs6511720 and rs57217136 caused a significant increase in LDLR expression compared to the common alleles (+29% and +24%, respectively). Multiplex Competitor-EMSAs (MC-EMSA) identified that the transcription factor serum response element (SRE) binds to rs6511720, while retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) bind to rs57217136. Conclusion Both LDLR rs6511720 and rs57217136 are functional variants. Both these minor alleles create enhancer-binding protein sites for TFs and may contribute to increased LDLR expression, which is consequently associated with reduced

  16. Does plasticity in plant physiological traits explain the rapid increase in water use efficiency? An ecohydrological modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrotheodoros, Theodoros; Fatichi, Simone; Pappas, Christoforos; Molnar, Peter; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The rise of atmospheric CO2 concentration is expected to stimulate plant productivity by enhancing photosynthesis and reducing stomatal conductance and thus increasing plant water use efficiency (WUE) worldwide. An analysis of eddy covariance flux tower data from 21 forested ecosystems across the north hemisphere detected an unexpectedly large increase in WUE (Keenan et al, 2013), which was six times larger than the increase found by most previous studies based on controlled experiments (e.g., FACE), leaf-scale analyses, and numerical modelling. This increase could be solely attributed to the increase in atmospheric CO2 since other confounding factors were ruled out. Here, we investigate the potential contribution of plant plasticity, reflected in the temporal adjustment of major plant physiological traits, on changes in WUE using the ecohydrological model Tethys and Chloris (T&C). We hypothesize that the increase in WUE can be attributed to small variations in plant physiological traits, undetectable through observations, eventually triggered by the atmospheric CO2 increase. Data from the 21 sites in the above mentioned study are used to force the model. Simulation results with and without plasticity in the physiological traits (i.e., model parameters in our numerical experiments) are compared with the observed trends in WUE. We test several plant adaptation strategies in being effective in explaining the observed increase in WUE using a multifactorial numerical experiment in which we perturb in a systematic way selected plant parameters. Keenan, T. F., Hollinger, D. Y., Bohrer, G., Dragoni, D., Munger, J. W., Schmid, H. P., and Richardson, A. D. (2013). Increase in forest water-use efficiency as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations rise. Nature, 499(7458), 324-7.

  17. An increase in minimum metabolic rate and not activity explains field metabolic rate changes in a breeding seabird.

    PubMed

    Green, J A; Aitken-Simpson, E J; White, C R; Bunce, A; Butler, P J; Frappell, P B

    2013-05-01

    The field metabolic rate (FMR) of a free-ranging animal can be considered as the sum of its maintenance costs (minimum metabolic rate, MMR) and additional costs associated with thermoregulation, digestion, production and activity. However, the relationships between FMR and BMR and how they relate to behaviour and extrinsic influences is not clear. In seabirds, FMR has been shown to increase during the breeding season. This is presumed to be the result of an increase in foraging activity, stimulated by increased food demands from growing chicks, but few studies have investigated in detail the factors that underlie these increases. We studied free-ranging Australasian gannets (Morus serrator) throughout their 5 month breeding season, and evaluated FMR, MMR and activity-related metabolic costs on a daily basis using the heart rate method. In addition, we simultaneously recorded behaviour (flying and diving) in the same individuals. FMR increased steadily throughout the breeding season, increasing by 11% from the incubation period to the long chick-brooding period. However, this was not accompanied by either an increase in flying or diving behaviour, or an increase in the energetic costs of activity. Instead, the changes in FMR could be explained exclusively by a progressive increase in MMR. Seasonal changes in MMR could be due to a change in body composition or a decrease in body condition associated with changing the allocation of resources between provisioning adults and growing chicks. Our study highlights the importance of measuring physiological parameters continuously in free-ranging animals in order to understand fully the mechanisms underpinning seasonal changes in physiology and behaviour.

  18. Obesity development in neuron-specific lipoprotein lipase deficient mice is not responsive to increased dietary fat content or change in fat composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Taussig, Matthew D; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V; Bruce, Kimberley; Piomelli, Daniele; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-07-01

    We have previously reported that mice with neuron-specific LPL deficiency (NEXLPL-/-) become obese by 16weeks of age on chow. Moreover, these mice had reduced uptake of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoprotein-derived fatty acids and lower levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in the hypothalamus. Here, we asked whether increased dietary fat content or altered dietary composition could modulate obesity development in NEXLPL-/- mice. Male NEXLPL-/- mice and littermate controls (WT) were randomly assigned one of three synthetic diets; a high carbohydrate diet (HC, 10% fat), a high-fat diet (HF, 45% fat), or a HC diet supplemented with n-3 PUFAs (HCn-3, 10% fat, Lovaza, GSK®). After 42weeks of HC feeding, body weight and fat mass were increased in the NEXLPL-/- mice compared to WT. WT mice fed a HF diet displayed typical diet-induced obesity, but weight gain was only marginal in HF-fed NEXLPL-/- mice, with no significant difference in body composition. Dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation did not prevent obesity in NEXLPL-/- mice, but was associated with differential modifications in hypothalamic gene expression and PUFA concentration compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that neuronal LPL is involved in the regulation of body weight and composition in response to either the change in quantity (HF feeding) or quality (n-3 PUFA-enriched) of dietary fat. The precise role of LPL in lipid sensing in the brain requires further investigation.

  19. Enhanced bridging function and augmented monocyte adhesion by lipoprotein lipase N9: insights into increased risk of coronary artery disease in N9 carriers.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Rachel M; Benhizia, Ferdaous; Schreiber, Renate; Makoveichuk, Elena; Putt, Wendy; Al-Haideri, Maysoon; Deckelbaum, Richard J; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Humphries, Steve E; Talmud, Philippa J

    2003-02-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is central to triacylglycerol (TG) metabolism, having both hydrolytic and bridging functions. The common LPL gene variant D9N is associated with raised TG, reduced HDL-cholesterol concentrations and increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). To investigate the functional basis for the phenotype in N9 carriers, CHO K1 cells were stably transfected with wild type (D9) or mutant (N9) LPL cDNA. LPL RNA expression levels, monomer-to-dimer ratios, and dimer specific activities were similar in D9 and N9 cells. Significantly enhanced binding (4.6-fold) and internalisation (2.6-fold) of 125I-LDL by N9 compared with D9 cells was eradicated by pre-treatment with either heparin or heparinase, confirming involvement of LPL and cell surface proteoglycans. N9 cells bound and internalised 3.8- and 4.4-fold more oxidised 125I-LDL, respectively, than D9 cells (both P<0.0001). Binding of monocytes was 7-fold greater to plates coated with purified LPL-N9 dimer compared with LPL-D9 (P<=0.005). Thus once on the cell surface, LPL-N9 enhances bridging, as assessed both by LDL binding and internalisation, and monocyte adhesion. This augmented LPL-N9 bridging provides a mechanism for the reported increased CAD risk in N9 carriers.

  20. Mechanism of hypertriglyceridemia in human apolipoprotein (apo) CIII transgenic mice. Diminished very low density lipoprotein fractional catabolic rate associated with increased apo CIII and reduced apo E on the particles.

    PubMed Central

    Aalto-Setälä, K; Fisher, E A; Chen, X; Chajek-Shaul, T; Hayek, T; Zechner, R; Walsh, A; Ramakrishnan, R; Ginsberg, H N; Breslow, J L

    1992-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is common in the general population, but its mechanism is largely unknown. In previous work human apo CIII transgenic (HuCIIITg) mice were found to have elevated triglyceride levels. In this report, the mechanism for the hypertriglyceridemia was studied. Two different HuCIIITg mouse lines were used: a low expressor line with serum triglycerides of approximately 280 mg/dl, and a high expressor line with serum triglycerides of approximately 1,000 mg/dl. Elevated triglycerides were mainly in VLDL. VLDL particles were 1.5 times more triglyceride-rich in high expressor mice than in controls. The total amount of apo CIII (human and mouse) per VLDL particle was 2 and 2.5 times the normal amount in low and high expressors, respectively. Mouse apo E was decreased by 35 and 77% in low and high expressor mice, respectively. Under electron microscopy, VLDL particles from low and high expressor mice were found to have a larger mean diameter, 55.2 +/- 16.6 and 58.2 +/- 17.8 nm, respectively, compared with 51.0 +/- 13.4 nm from control mice. In in vivo studies, radiolabeled VLDL fractional catabolic rate (FCR) was reduced in low and high expressor mice to 2.58 and 0.77 pools/h, respectively, compared with 7.67 pools/h in controls, with no significant differences in the VLDL production rates. In an attempt to explain the reduced VLDL FCR in transgenic mice, tissue lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was determined in control and high expressor mice and no differences were observed. Also, VLDLs obtained from control and high expressor mice were found to be equally good substrates for purified LPL. Thus excess apo CIII in HuCIIITg mice does not cause reduced VLDL FCR by suppressing the amount of extractable LPL in tissues or making HuCIIITg VLDL a bad substrate for LPL. Tissue uptake of VLDL was studied in hepatoma cell cultures, and VLDL from transgenic mice was found to be taken up much more slowly than control VLDL (P < 0.0001), indicating that HuCIIITg VLDL is

  1. Consumption of wonderful variety pomegranate juice and extract by diabetic patients increases paraoxonase 1 association with high-density lipoprotein and stimulates its catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Rock, Wasseem; Rosenblat, Mira; Miller-Lotan, Rachel; Levy, Andrew P; Elias, Mazen; Aviram, Michael

    2008-09-24

    Association of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) stabilizes the enzyme. In diabetic patients, PON1 dissociates from HDL and, as a consequence, is less biologically active. Our aim was to investigate the effects of Wonderful variety pomegranate juice (WPJ) and pomegranate polyphenol extract (WPOMxl) consumption on PON1 association with HDL in diabetic patients. Thirty patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus participated in the study. Ten male patients and 10 female patients received concentrated WPJ (50 mL/day for 4 weeks), while another group of 10 male patients received WPOMxl (5 mL/day for 6 weeks). There were no significant effects of WPJ or WPOMxl consumption on fasting blood glucose or hemoglobin A1c levels. After 4 weeks of WPJ consumption by male patients, basal serum oxidative stress was significantly decreased by 35%, whereas serum concentrations of thiol groups significantly increased by 25%. Moreover, HDL-associated PON1 arylesterase, paraoxonase, and lactonase activities increased significantly after WPJ consumption by 34-45%, as compared to the baseline levels. PON1 protein binding to HDL was significantly increased by 30% following WPJ consumption, and the enzyme became more stable. In male patients that consumed WPOMxl and in female patients that consumed PJ, a similar pattern was observed, although to a lesser extent. We conclude that WPJ as well as WPOMxl consumption by diabetic patients does not worsen their diabetic parameters. Furthermore, WPJ as well as WPOMxl consumption contribute to PON1 stabilization, increased association with HDL, and enhanced catalytic activities. These beneficial effects of pomegranate consumption on serum PON1 stability and activity could lead to retardation of atherosclerosis development in diabetic patients.

  2. Species-specific adaptations explain resilience of herbaceous understorey to increased precipitation variability in a Mediterranean oak woodland.

    PubMed

    Jongen, Marjan; Hellmann, Christine; Unger, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    To date, the implications of the predicted greater intra-annual variability and extremes in precipitation on ecosystem functioning have received little attention. This study presents results on leaf-level physiological responses of five species covering the functional groups grasses, forbs, and legumes in the understorey of a Mediterranean oak woodland, with increasing precipitation variability, without altering total annual precipitation inputs. Although extending the dry period between precipitation events from 3 to 6 weeks led to increased soil moisture deficit, overall treatment effects on photosynthetic performance were not observed in the studied species. This resilience to prolonged water stress was explained by different physiological and morphological strategies to withstand periods below the wilting point, that is, isohydric behavior in Agrostis, Rumex, and Tuberaria, leaf succulence in Rumex, and taproots in Tolpis. In addition, quick recovery upon irrigation events and species-specific adaptations of water-use efficiency with longer dry periods and larger precipitation events contributed to the observed resilience in productivity of the annual plant community. Although none of the species exhibited a change in cover with increasing precipitation variability, leaf physiology of the legume Ornithopus exhibited signs of sensitivity to moisture deficit, which may have implications for the agricultural practice of seeding legume-rich mixtures in Mediterranean grassland-type systems. This highlights the need for long-term precipitation manipulation experiments to capture possible directional changes in species composition and seed bank development, which can subsequently affect ecosystem state and functioning.

  3. Krill oil supplementation lowers serum triglycerides without increasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in adults with borderline high or high triglyceride levels.

    PubMed

    Berge, Kjetil; Musa-Veloso, Kathy; Harwood, Melody; Hoem, Nils; Burri, Lena

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the effects of 12 weeks daily krill oil supplementation on fasting serum triglyceride (TG) and lipoprotein particle levels in subjects whose habitual fish intake is low and who have borderline high or high fasting serum TG levels (150-499 mg/dL). We hypothesized that Krill oil lowers serum TG levels in subjects with borderline high or high fasting TG levels. To test our hypothesis 300 male and female subjects were included in a double-blind, randomized, multi-center, placebo-controlled study with five treatment groups: placebo (olive oil) or 0.5, 1, 2, or 4 g/day of krill oil. Serum lipids were measured after an overnight fast at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Due to a high intra-individual variability in TG levels, data from all subjects in the four krill oil groups were pooled to increase statistical power, and a general time- and dose-independent one-way analysis of variance was performed to assess efficacy. Relative to subjects in the placebo group, those administered krill oil had a statistically significant calculated reduction in serum TG levels of 10.2%. Moreover, LDL-C levels were not increased in the krill oil groups relative to the placebo group. The outcome of the pooled analysis suggests that krill oil is effective in reducing a cardiovascular risk factor. However, owing to the individual fluctuations of TG concentrations measured, a study with more individual measurements per treatment group is needed to increase the confidence of these findings.

  4. Different Mechanisms Must Be Considered to Explain the Increase in Hippocampal Neural Precursor Cell Proliferation by Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Overall, Rupert W.; Walker, Tara L.; Fischer, Tim J.; Brandt, Moritz D.; Kempermann, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    The number of proliferating neural precursor cells in the adult hippocampus is strongly increased by physical activity. The mechanisms through which this behavioral stimulus induces cell proliferation, however, are not yet understood. In fact, even the mode of proliferation of the stem and progenitor cells is not exactly known. Evidence exists for several mechanisms including cell cycle shortening, reduced cell death and stem cell recruitment, but as yet no model can account for all observations. An appreciation of how the cells proliferate, however, is crucial to our ability to model the neurogenic process and predict its behavior in response to pro-neurogenic stimuli. In a recent study, we addressed modulation of the cell cycle length as one possible mode of regulation of precursor cell proliferation in running mice. Our results indicated that the observed increase in number of proliferating cells could not be explained through a shortening of the cell cycle. We must therefore consider other mechanisms by which physical activity leads to enhanced precursor cell proliferation. Here we review the evidence for and against several different hypotheses and discuss the implications for future research in the field. PMID:27536215

  5. Phospholipase D-modified low density lipoprotein is taken up by macrophages at increased rate. A possible role for phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Aviram, M; Maor, I

    1993-01-01

    Macrophage uptake of modified forms of LDL leads to cellular cholesterol accumulation. Upon incubation of LDL with phospholipase D (PLase D), a time- and enzyme dose-dependent production of phosphatidic acid (PA), paralleled by a rapid reduction in LDL phosphatidyl choline content (up to 65% within 15 min of incubation) was noted. No lipid peroxidation could be found in PLase D-modified LDL. Upon in vitro incubation of PLase D-LDL with copper ions, however, this modified LDL was substantially oxidized. The addition of 100 micrograms PA/ml to native LDL for the period of its in vitro oxidation resulted in a 63% elevation in the lipoprotein peroxides content. Incubation of PLase D-LDL with J-774A.1 macrophage-like cell line resulted in an increase in its cellular binding and degradation (up to 91 and 110%, respectively) in comparison with native LDL (via the LDL receptor). When PA was added to LDL before its incubation with the macrophages, a PA dose-dependent elevation in the cellular uptake of LDL (by up to twofold) was noted in comparison with LDL that was incubated without PA, suggesting that PA production in PLase D-LDL may be involved in the increased cellular uptake of PLase D-LDL. PLase D activity towards LDL was demonstrated in J-774A.1 macrophages. Human plasma was also shown to possess PLase D activity. Thus, PLase D modification of LDL may take place under certain pathological conditions and PLase D-LDL interaction with arterial wall macrophages can potentially lead to foam cell formation. PMID:8486764

  6. Dietary non-tocopherol antioxidants present in extra virgin olive oil increase the resistance of low density lipoproteins to oxidation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, S A; Mathot, J N; de Fouw, N J; Tijburg, L B

    1996-02-01

    Consumption of a range of dietary antioxidants may be beneficial in protecting low density lipoprotein (LDL) against oxidative modification, as studies have demonstrated that antioxidants other than vitamin E may also function against oxidation of LDL in vitro. In the present study, the effect of polyphenol antioxidants on the susceptibility of LDL to copper-mediated oxidation was investigated after feeding semi-purified diets to 3 groups of New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits. All diets comprised 40% energy as fat with 17% energy as oleic acid. Dietary fatty acid compositions were identical. Oils with different polyphenol contents were used to provide the dietary source of oleic acid-refined olive oil, extra virgin olive oil and Trisun high oleic sunflower seed oil. Polyphenolic compounds (hydroxytyrosol and p-tyrosol) could only be detected in the extra virgin olive oil. Vitamin E was equalised in all diets. LDL oxidizability in vitro was determined by continuously monitoring the copper-induced formation of conjugated dienes after 6 weeks of experimental diet feeding. The lag phase before demonstrable oxidation occurred was significantly increased in the high polyphenol, extra virgin olive oil group (P < 0.05) when compared with combined results from the low polyphenol group (refined olive oil and Trisun), even though the LDL vitamin E concentration in the high polyphenol group was significantly lower. The rate of conjugated diene formation was not influenced by the presence of dietary polyphenols. Results demonstrate that antioxidants, possibly phenolic compounds which are present only in extra virgin olive oil, may contribute to the endogenous antioxidant capacity of LDL, resulting in an increased resistance to oxidation as determined in vitro.

  7. Increase in SGLT1-mediated transport explains renal glucose reabsorption during genetic and pharmacological SGLT2 inhibition in euglycemia.

    PubMed

    Rieg, Timo; Masuda, Takahiro; Gerasimova, Maria; Mayoux, Eric; Platt, Kenneth; Powell, David R; Thomson, Scott C; Koepsell, Hermann; Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    In the kidney, the sodium-glucose cotransporters SGLT2 and SGLT1 are thought to account for >90 and ∼3% of fractional glucose reabsorption (FGR), respectively. However, euglycemic humans treated with an SGLT2 inhibitor maintain an FGR of 40-50%, mimicking values in Sglt2 knockout mice. Here, we show that oral gavage with a selective SGLT2 inhibitor (SGLT2-I) dose dependently increased urinary glucose excretion (UGE) in wild-type (WT) mice. The dose-response curve was shifted leftward and the maximum response doubled in Sglt1 knockout (Sglt1-/-) mice. Treatment in diet with the SGLT2-I for 3 wk maintained 1.5- to 2-fold higher urine glucose/creatinine ratios in Sglt1-/- vs. WT mice, associated with a temporarily greater reduction in blood glucose in Sglt1-/- vs. WT after 24 h (-33 vs. -11%). Subsequent inulin clearance studies under anesthesia revealed free plasma concentrations of the SGLT2-I (corresponding to early proximal concentration) close to the reported IC50 for SGLT2 in mice, which were associated with FGR of 64 ± 2% in WT and 17 ± 2% in Sglt1-/-. Additional intraperitoneal application of the SGLT2-I (maximum effective dose in metabolic cages) increased free plasma concentrations ∼10-fold and reduced FGR to 44 ± 3% in WT and to -1 ± 3% in Sglt1-/-. The absence of renal glucose reabsorption was confirmed in male and female Sglt1/Sglt2 double knockout mice. In conclusion, SGLT2 and SGLT1 account for renal glucose reabsorption in euglycemia, with 97 and 3% being reabsorbed by SGLT2 and SGLT1, respectively. When SGLT2 is fully inhibited by SGLT2-I, the increase in SGLT1-mediated glucose reabsorption explains why only 50-60% of filtered glucose is excreted.

  8. Lipoprotein apheresis for the treatment of elevated circulating levels of lipoprotein(a): a critical literature review

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Capuzzo, Enrico; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a), which consists of a low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle linked to an apolipoprotein(a) moiety, is currently considered an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease due to its atherogenic (LDL-like) and prothrombotic (plasminogen-like) properties. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current and newer therapies for lowering increased lipoprotein(a) levels, focusing on lipoprotein apheresis. After a systematic literature search, we identified ten studies which, overall, documented that lipoprotein apheresis is effective in reducing increased lipoprotein(a) levels and cardiovascular events. PMID:26710351

  9. A germ-line-selective advantage rather than an increased mutation rate can explain some unexpectedly common human disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Kyung; Yoon, Song-Ro; Calabrese, Peter; Arnheim, Norman

    2008-07-22

    Two nucleotide substitutions in the human FGFR2 gene (C755G or C758G) are responsible for virtually all sporadic cases of Apert syndrome. This condition is 100-1,000 times more common than genomic mutation frequency data predict. Here, we report on the C758G de novo Apert syndrome mutation. Using data on older donors, we show that spontaneous mutations are not uniformly distributed throughout normal testes. Instead, we find foci where C758G mutation frequencies are 3-4 orders of magnitude greater than the remaining tissue. We conclude this nucleotide site is not a mutation hot spot even after accounting for possible Luria-Delbruck "mutation jackpots." An alternative explanation for such foci involving positive selection acting on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonia experiencing the rare mutation could not be rejected. Further, the two youngest individuals studied (19 and 23 years old) had lower mutation frequencies and smaller foci at both mutation sites compared with the older individuals. This implies that the mutation frequency of foci increases as adults age, and thus selection could explain the paternal age effect for Apert syndrome and other genetic conditions. Our results, now including the analysis of two mutations in the same set of testes, suggest that positive selection can increase the relative frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying such mutations, although individuals who inherit them have reduced fitness. In addition, we compared the anatomical distribution of C758G mutation foci with both new and old data on the C755G mutation in the same testis and found their positions were not correlated with one another.

  10. trans-10,cis-12 Conjugated linoleic acid inhibits lipoprotein lipase but increases the activity of lipogenic enzymes in adipose tissue from hamsters fed an atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Amaia; Churruca, Itziar; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Rodríguez, Víctor M; Macarulla, M Teresa; Martínez, J Alfredo; Portillo, María P

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the effects of trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on the activity and expression of lipogenic enzymes and lipoprotein lipase (LPL), as well as on the expression of transcriptional factors controlling these enzymes, in adipose tissue from hamsters, and to evaluate the involvement of these changes in the body fat-reducing effect of this CLA isomer. Thirty male hamsters were divided into three groups and fed atherogenic diets supplemented with 0 (linoleic group), 5 or 10 g trans-10,cis-12 CLA/kg diet, for 6 weeks. Body and adipose tissue weights, food intake and serum insulin were measured. Total and heparin-releasable LPL and lipogenic enzyme activities (acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC); fatty acid synthase (FAS); glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH); and malic enzyme (ME)) were assessed. ACC, FAS, LPL, sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP-1a), SREBP-1c and PPARgamma mRNA levels were also determined by real-time PCR. CLA did not modify food intake, body weight and serum insulin level. CLA feeding reduced adipose tissue weight, LPL activity and expression, and increased lipogenic enzyme activities, despite a significant reduction in ACC and FAS mRNA levels. The expression of the three transcriptional factors analysed (SREBP-1a, SREBP-1c and PPARgamma) was also reduced. These results appear to provide a framework for partially understanding the reduction in body fat induced by CLA. Inhibition of LPL activity seems to be an important mechanism underlying body fat reduction in hamsters. Further research is needed to better characterize the effects of CLA on lipogenesis and the role of these effects in CLA action.

  11. Increased beta-amyloid levels in the choroid plexus following lead exposure and the involvement of low-density lipoprotein receptor protein-1.

    PubMed

    Behl, Mamta; Zhang, Yanshu; Monnot, Andrew D; Jiang, Wendy; Zheng, Wei

    2009-10-15

    The choroid plexus, a barrier between the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is known to accumulate lead (Pb) and also possibly function to maintain brain's homeostasis of Abeta, an important peptide in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. This study was designed to investigate if Pb exposure altered Abeta levels at the blood-CSF barrier in the choroid plexus. Rats received ip injection of 27 mg Pb/kg. Twenty-four hours later, a FAM-labeled Abeta (200 pmol) was infused into the lateral ventricle and the plexus tissues were removed to quantify Abeta accumulation. Results revealed a significant increase in intracellular Abeta accumulation in the Pb-exposed animals compared to controls (p<0.001). When choroidal epithelial Z310 cells were treated with 10 microM Pb for 24 h and 48 h, Abeta (2 microM in culture medium) accumulation was significantly increased by 1.5 fold (p<0.05) and 1.8 fold (p<0.05), respectively. To explore the mechanism, we examined the effect of Pb on low-density lipoprotein receptor protein-1 (LRP1), an intracellular Abeta transport protein. Following acute Pb exposure with the aforementioned dose regimen, levels of LRP1 mRNA and proteins in the choroid plexus were decreased by 35% (p<0.05) and 31.8% (p<0.05), respectively, in comparison to those of controls. In Z310 cells exposed to 10 microM Pb for 24 h and 48 h, a 33.1% and 33.4% decrease in the protein expression of LRP1 was observed (p<0.05), respectively. Knocking down LRP1 resulted in even more substantial increases of cellular accumulation of Abeta, from 31% in cells without knockdown to 72% in cells with LRP1 knockdown (p<0.05). Taken together, these results suggest that the acute exposure to Pb results in an increased accumulation of intracellular Abeta in the choroid plexus; the effect appears to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of LRP1 production following Pb exposure.

  12. Increased {beta}-amyloid levels in the choroid plexus following lead exposure and the involvement of low-density lipoprotein receptor protein-1

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, Mamta; Zhang Yanshu; Monnot, Andrew D.; Jiang, Wendy; Zheng Wei

    2009-10-15

    The choroid plexus, a barrier between the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is known to accumulate lead (Pb) and also possibly function to maintain brain's homeostasis of A{beta}, an important peptide in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. This study was designed to investigate if Pb exposure altered A{beta} levels at the blood-CSF barrier in the choroid plexus. Rats received ip injection of 27 mg Pb/kg. Twenty-four hours later, a FAM-labeled A{beta} (200 pmol) was infused into the lateral ventricle and the plexus tissues were removed to quantify A{beta} accumulation. Results revealed a significant increase in intracellular A{beta} accumulation in the Pb-exposed animals compared to controls (p < 0.001). When choroidal epithelial Z310 cells were treated with 10 {mu}M Pb for 24 h and 48 h, A{beta} (2 {mu}M in culture medium) accumulation was significantly increased by 1.5 fold (p < 0.05) and 1.8 fold (p < 0.05), respectively. To explore the mechanism, we examined the effect of Pb on low-density lipoprotein receptor protein-1 (LRP1), an intracellular A{beta} transport protein. Following acute Pb exposure with the aforementioned dose regimen, levels of LRP1 mRNA and proteins in the choroid plexus were decreased by 35% (p < 0.05) and 31.8% (p < 0.05), respectively, in comparison to those of controls. In Z310 cells exposed to 10 {mu}M Pb for 24 h and 48 h, a 33.1% and 33.4% decrease in the protein expression of LRP1 was observed (p < 0.05), respectively. Knocking down LRP1 resulted in even more substantial increases of cellular accumulation of A{beta}, from 31% in cells without knockdown to 72% in cells with LRP1 knockdown (p < 0.05). Taken together, these results suggest that the acute exposure to Pb results in an increased accumulation of intracellular A{beta} in the choroid plexus; the effect appears to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of LRP1 production following Pb exposure.

  13. Exhaustive exercise increases plasma/serum total oxidation resistance in moderately trained men and women, whereas their VLDL + LDL lipoprotein fraction is more susceptible to oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kaikkonen, J; Porkkala-Sarataho, E; Tuomainen, T P; Nyyssönen, K; Kosonen, L; Ristonmaa, U; Lakka, H M; Salonen, R; Korpela, H; Salonen, J T

    2002-01-01

    exhaustive exercise can increase plasma/serum total resistance towards oxidation, the oxidation resistance of the atherogenic lipoprotein fraction might be diminished. On the basis of these results, several in vitro measurements of lipid peroxidation assessing both water and lipid soluble plasma fractions are needed if a true perspective of the plasma redox status is to be obtained.

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Sander

    2008-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that mediates the effect of dietary fatty acids and certain drugs on plasma lipoproteins are the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs). Three PPAR isotypes can be distinguished, all of which have a major role in regulating lipoprotein metabolism. PPARα is the molecular target for the fibrate class of drugs. Activation of PPARα in mice and humans markedly reduces hepatic triglyceride production and promotes plasma triglyceride clearance, leading to a clinically significant reduction in plasma triglyceride levels. In addition, plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels are increased upon PPARα activation in humans. PPARγ is the molecular target for the thiazolidinedione class of drugs. Activation of PPARγ in mice and human is generally associated with a modest increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol and a decrease in plasma triglycerides. The latter effect is caused by an increase in lipoprotein lipase-dependent plasma triglyceride clearance. Analogous to PPARα, activation of PPARβ/δ leads to increased plasma HDL-cholesterol and decreased plasma triglyceride levels. In this paper, a fresh perspective on the relation between PPARs and lipoprotein metabolism is presented. The emphasis is on the physiological role of PPARs and the mechanisms underlying the effect of synthetic PPAR agonists on plasma lipoprotein levels. PMID:18288277

  15. Lipoprotein-inspired nanoparticles for cancer theranostics.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth K; Lovell, Jonathan F; Zheng, Gang

    2011-10-18

    Over hundreds of millions of years, animals have evolved endogenous lipoprotein nanoparticles for shuttling hydrophobic molecules to different parts of the body. In the last 70 years, scientists have developed an understanding of lipoprotein function, often in relationship to lipid transport and heart disease. Such biocompatible, lipid-protein complexes are also ideal for loading and delivering cancer therapeutic and diagnostic agents, which means that lipoprotein and lipoprotein-inspired nanoparticles also offer opportunities for cancer theranostics. By mimicking the endogenous shape and structure of lipoproteins, the nanocarrier can remain in circulation for an extended period of time, while largely evading the reticuloendothelial cells in the body's defenses. The small size (less than 30 nm) of the low-density (LDL) and high-density (HDL) classes of lipoproteins allows them to maneuver deeply into tumors. Furthermore, lipoproteins can be targeted to their endogenous receptors, when those are implicated in cancer, or to other cancer receptors. In this Account, we review the field of lipoprotein-inspired nanoparticles related to the delivery of cancer imaging and therapy agents. LDL has innate cancer targeting potential and has been used to incorporate diverse hydrophobic molecules and deliver them to tumors. Nature's method of rerouting LDL in atherosclerosis provides a strategy to extend the cancer targeting potential of lipoproteins beyond its narrow purview. Although LDL has shown promise as a drug nanocarrier for cancer imaging and therapy, increasing evidence indicates that HDL, the smallest lipoprotein, may also be of use for drug targeting and uptake into cancer cells. We also discuss how synthetic HDL-like nanoparticles, which do not include human or recombinant proteins, can deliver molecules directly to the cytoplasm of certain cancer cells, effectively bypassing the endosomal compartment. This strategy could allow HDL-like nanoparticles to be used to

  16. Four Statin Benefit Groups Defined by The 2013 ACC/AHA New Cholesterol Guideline are Characterized by Increased Plasma Level of Electronegative Low-Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chih-Sheng; Ke, Liang-Yin; Chan, Hua-Chen; Chan, Hsiu-Chua; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Cheng, Kai-Hung; Lee, Hsiang-Chun; Kuo, Hsuan-Fu; Chang, Ching-Tang; Chang, Kuan-Cheng; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Chen, Chu-Huang; Lai, Wen-Ter

    2016-01-01

    Background Significantly higher cytotoxic and thrombogenic human electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or L5, has been found in patients with stable coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome. We hypothesized that the statin-benefit groups (SBGs) defined by the new cholesterol guideline were of higher electronegative L5. Methods In total, 62 hyperlipidemia patients (mean age 59.4 ± 10.5, M/F 40/22) were retrospectively divided into SBGs (n = 44) and N-SBGs (n = 18). The levels of complete basic lipid panel, biochemical profile and electronegative L5 of each individual were obtained before and after rosuvastatin 10 mg/day for 3 months. Results After 3 months’ statin therapy, significant reduction of total cholesterol, LDL-C and triglyceride were demonstrated (all p-values < 0.05), with 38.4% LDL-C reduction. The percentage of L5 was significantly reduced by 40.9% (from 4.4% to 2.6%) after statin therapy (p = 0.001). Regarding absolute L5 concentration, derived from L5% multiplied by LDL-C, there was approximate 63.8% reduction (from 6.3 mg/dL to 2.3 mg/dL) of absolute L5 (p < 0.001) after statin treatment. Notably, while plasma LDL-C levels were similar between SBGs and N-SBGs (152.8 ± 48.6 vs. 146.9 ± 35.0 mg/dL), the SBGs had significantly elevated L5% (5.2 ± 7.4% vs. 2.6 ± 1.9%, p = 0.031) and higher absolute L5 concentration (7.4 ± 10.4 vs. 3.7 ± 3.1 mg/dL, p = 0.036). Linear regression showed the significantly positive correlation between the plasma L5 concentration and the 10-year cardiovascular risk by pooled cohort equation (r = 0.297, p < 0.05). Conclusions The four SBGs defined by the 2013 ACC/AHA new cholesterol guideline tend to have increased atherogenic electronegative L5. Statin therapy can effectively reduce the electronegative L5 of these four major SBGs. PMID:27899853

  17. Binding of anthracycline derivatives to human serum lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chassany, O; Urien, S; Claudepierre, P; Bastian, G; Tillement, J P

    1994-01-01

    The binding of eight anthracycline analogues (including mitoxantrone) to isolated serum lipoproteins (high, low and very low density lipoproteins) was studied in order to elucidate some determinants of their interaction with lipidic structures. Serum lipoproteins were isolated by ultracentrifugation. Drug binding experiments were run by ultrafiltration at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4. Anthracycline concentrations (total and free) were determined by HPLC with fluorometric detection. All the ligands were significantly bound to the three lipoprotein classes, and for each ligand the binding increased as the lipidic fraction of lipoprotein increased. From doxorubicin to iododoxorubicin, there was a tenfold increase in lipoprotein binding (doxorubicin < mitoxantrone < epirubicin < daunorubicin < pirarubicin < aclarubicin < zorubicin < iododoxorubicin). For all the ligands studied, the extent of lipoprotein binding appears to be related to chemical determinants of lipophilicity.

  18. Arachnid lipoproteins: comparative aspects.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Mónica; Garcia, Fernando; Pollero, Ricardo J

    2007-01-01

    Findings on hemolymph lipoproteins in the class Arachnida are reviewed in relation to their lipid and protein compositions, hydrated densities, the capacity of apoproteins to bind lipids, and the influence of xenobiotics on their structures and functionality. The occurrence of hemolymphatic lipoproteins in arachnids has been reported in species belonging to the orders Araneida, Scorpionida, Solpugida and Acarina. However, lipoproteins were properly characterized in only three species, Eurypelma californicum, Polybetes pythagoricus and Latrodectus mirabilis. Like insect and crustaceans the arachnids examined contain high density lipoproteins (HDLs) as predominant circulating lipoproteins. Although in most arachnids these particles resemble those of insect HDLs called "lipophorins", in two arachnid species they differ from lipophorins in their apoproteins, total mass and lipid composition. The hemolymph of P. pythagoricus and L. mirabilis contains another HDL of higher density, while P. pythagoricus and E. californicum hemolymph contain a third lipoprotein of very high density (VHDL). Composition of arachnid lipoproteins regarding apoprotein classes as well as lipid classes differ among species. Hemocyanin, in addition to the classical role of this protein as respiratory pigment, is presented here performing the function of apolipoprotein in some arachnid species. Reports on experiments demonstrating the capacity of hemocyanin to bind neutral and polar lipid classes, including ecdysteroids, are commented. Recent works about the changes evoked by a phosphorous pesticide on the structures and functionality of spider lipoproteins are also reviewed.

  19. Glycosaminoglycan-lipoprotein interaction.

    PubMed

    Olsson, U; Ostergren-Lundén, G; Moses, J

    2001-10-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) bound to various proteoglycans (PGs) present in the cardiovascular system have been proposed to perform a wide range of functions. These include conferring viscoelastic properties; interacting with and modulating growth factors and enzymes; and as receptors and co-receptors in lipoprotein metabolism. Binding of apoB-100 lipoproteins, particularly low density lipoproteins (LDL), to GAGs of extracellular matrix PGs in arteries has been proposed to be an initiating event in development of atherosclerosis. This study was initiated with the aim of getting an overview of the binding patterns of different lipoprotein subclasses with individual GAG categories. We thus evaluated the interaction of lipoproteins with GAGs commonly found in the cardiovascular system using a gel mobility-shift assay developed for this purpose. The same procedure was used to measure lipoproteins binding to metabolically [(35)S]-labeled whole PGs prepared from three cell types, arterial smooth muscle cells, THP-1 macrophages and from HepG2 cells. The effect of GAG composition on PGs on lipoprotein binding was evaluated by enzymatic degradation of the carbohydrate chains. Heparan sulfate was found to bind beta very low density lipoproteins (beta-VLDL) and a chylomicron remnant model (beta-VLDL+apoE), but not LDL. Dermatan sulfate was found to bind LDL, but not beta-VLDL or the chylomicron remnant model. Chondroitin sulfate and heparin were found to bind all lipoproteins tested (LDL, beta-VLDL and beta-VLDL+apoE) although with different affinities. We can conclude that each lipoprotein subclass tested binds a specific assortment of the GAGs tested. The observations made contribute to the understanding of new and complex mechanisms by which carbohydrate and lipid metabolism may be linked.

  20. [Lipid and lipoprotein profile in psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Deiana, L; Pes, G M; Carru, C; Tidore, M; Cherchi, G M

    1992-12-01

    Psoriasis is a common relapsing dermatosis characterized by an increased epidermal cell proliferation. In this work we studied the lipid and lipoprotein pattern in 17 patients affected by long-standing psoriasis and in 20 normal controls. Total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol and Apolipoprotein AI and B levels were measured; VLDL, LDL and HDL chemical composition was assessed by preparative ultracentrifugation. Plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels were significantly lower in the patient group; chemical analysis of the main lipoprotein classes showed compositional abnormalities consistent with an accelerated turnover of these particles. We believe that epidermal cell proliferation can play a role in determining these changes.

  1. Can increases in capillarization explain the early adaptations in metabolic regulation in human muscle to short-term training?

    PubMed

    Green, Howard J; Burnett, Margaret; Kollias, Helen; Ouyang, Jing; Smith, Ian; Tupling, Susan

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that increases in fibre capillary density would precede increases in oxidative potential following training onset, tissue was extracted from the vastus lateralis prior to (0 days) and following 3 and 6 consecutive days of submaximal cycle exercise (2 h·day(-1)). Participants were untrained males (age = 21.4 ± 0.58 years; peak oxygen consumption = 46.2 ± 1.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1); mean ± standard error (SE)). Tissue was assessed for succinic dehydrogenase activity (SDH) by microphotometry and indices of capillarization based on histochemically assessed area and capillary counts (CC) in specific fibre types. Three days of training (n = 13) resulted in a generalized decrease (p < 0.05) in fibre area (-14.2% ± 3.0%; mean ± SE) and increase (p < 0.05) in CC/Area (20.4% ± 2.7%) and no change in either CC or SDH activity. Following 6 days of treatment (n = 6), increases (p < 0.05) in CC (18.2% ± 4.2%), CC/Area (28.9% ± 3.2%), and SDH activity (22.9% ± 6.0%) occurred that was not specific to major fibre type. No changes in either fibre area or fibre-type distribution were observed with additional training. We conclude that increases in angiogenic-based capillary density and oxidative potential occur coincidentally following training onset, while increases in capillary density, mediated by reductions in fibre area, represent an initial isolated response, the significance of which may be linked to the metabolic alterations that also result.

  2. Mass incarceration can explain population increases in TB and multidrug-resistant TB in European and central Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Stuckler, David; Basu, Sanjay; McKee, Martin; King, Lawrence

    2008-09-09

    Several microlevel studies have pinpointed prisons as an important site for tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant TB in European and central Asian countries. To date, no comparative analyses have examined whether rises in incarceration rates can account for puzzling differences in TB trends among overall populations. Using longitudinal TB and cross-sectional multidrug-resistant TB data for 26 eastern European and central Asian countries, we examined whether and to what degree increases in incarceration account for differences in population TB and multidrug-resistant TB burdens. We find that each percentage point increase in incarceration rates relates to an increased TB incidence of 0.34% (population attributable risk, 95% C.I.: 0.10-0.58%, P < 0.01), after controlling for TB infrastructure; HIV prevalence; and several surveillance, economic, demographic, and political indicators. Net increases in incarceration account for a 20.5% increase in TB incidence or nearly three-fifths of the average total increase in TB incidence in the countries studied from 1991 to 2002. Although the number of prisoners is a significant determinant of differences in TB incidence and multidrug-resistant TB prevalence among countries, the rate of prison growth is a larger determinant of these outcomes, and its effect is exacerbated but not confounded by HIV. Differences in incarceration rates are a major determinant of differences in population TB outcomes among eastern European and central Asian countries, and treatment expansion alone does not appear to resolve the effect of mass incarceration on TB incidence.

  3. Cohort effects explain the increase in autism diagnosis among children born from 1992 to 2003 in California

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Katherine M; Susser, Ezra; Cheslack-Postava, Keely; Fountain, Christine; Liu, Kayuet; Bearman, Peter S

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence and prevalence of autism have dramatically increased over the last 20 years. Decomposition of autism incidence rates into age, period and cohort effects disentangle underlying domains of causal factors linked to time trends. We estimate an age-period-cohort effect model for autism diagnostic incidence overall and by level of functioning. Methods Data are drawn from sequential cohorts of all 6 501 262 individuals born in California from 1992 to 2003. Autism diagnoses from 1994 to 2005 were ascertained from the California Department of Development Services Client Development and Evaluation Report. Results Compared with those born in 1992, each successively younger cohort has significantly higher odds of an autism diagnosis than the previous cohort, controlling for age and period effects. For example, individuals born in 2003 have 16.6 times the odds of an autism diagnosis compared with those born in 1992 [95% confidence interval (CI) 7.8–35.3]. The cohort effect observed in these data is stronger for high than for low-functioning children with an autism diagnosis. Discussion Autism incidence in California exhibits a robust and linear positive cohort effect that is stronger among high-functioning children with an autism diagnosis. This finding indicates that the primary drivers of the increases in autism diagnoses must be factors that: (i) have increased linearly year-to-year; (ii) aggregate in birth cohorts; and (iii) are stronger among children with higher levels of functioning. PMID:22253308

  4. Insulin response dysregulation explains abnormal fat storage and increased risk of diabetes mellitus type 2 in Cohen Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Limoge, Floriane; Faivre, Laurence; Gautier, Thomas; Petit, Jean-Michel; Gautier, Elodie; Masson, David; Jego, Gaëtan; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Marle, Nathalie; Carmignac, Virginie; Deckert, Valérie; Brindisi, Marie-Claude; Edery, Patrick; Ghoumid, Jamal; Blair, Edward; Lagrost, Laurent; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Duplomb, Laurence

    2015-12-01

    Cohen Syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, with defective glycosylation secondary to mutations in the VPS13B gene, which encodes a protein of the Golgi apparatus. Besides congenital neutropenia, retinopathy and intellectual deficiency, CS patients are faced with truncal obesity. Metabolism investigations showed abnormal glucose tolerance tests and low HDL values in some patients, and these could be risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus and/or cardiovascular complications. To understand the mechanisms involved in CS fat storage, we used two models of adipogenesis differentiation: (i) SGBS pre-adipocytes with VPS13B invalidation thanks to siRNA delivery and (ii) CS primary fibroblasts. In both models, VPS13B invalidation led to accelerated differentiation into fat cells, which was confirmed by the earlier and increased expression of specific adipogenic genes, consequent to the increased response of cells to insulin stimulation. At the end of the differentiation protocol, these fat cells exhibited decreased AKT2 phosphorylation after insulin stimulation, which suggests insulin resistance. This study, in association with the in-depth analysis of the metabolic status of the patients, thus allowed us to recommend appropriate nutritional education to prevent the occurrence of diabetes mellitus and to put forward recommendations for the follow-up of CS patients, in particular with regard to the development of metabolic syndrome. We also suggest replacing the term obesity by abnormal fat distribution in CS, which should reduce the number of inappropriate diagnoses in patients who are referred only on the basis of intellectual deficiency associated with obesity.

  5. [The high content of palmitinic fatty acid in food as a major cause of increase of concentration of cholesterol and low density lipoproteins and atheromatous plaques of arteries' intima].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2013-02-01

    The positioning of individual triglycerides of blood serum in palmitinic and oleic lipoproteins ofvery low density in the order ofincrease of the rate constant of their hydrolysis under action of post-heparin lipoprotein leads to the sequence as follows: palmitoil-palmitoil-palmitate-->palmitoil-palmitoil-oleate-->palmitoil-oleil-palmitat-->oleil-palmitoil-palmitate-->oleil-palmitate-palmitate-->oleil-oleil-palmitate-->oleil-oleil-oleate. The shift to the left and to the right is discerned with this spectrum of isoforms of triglycerides. The shift to the left into direction of palmitinicc triglycerides occurs in case of eating of animal food (i.e. beef andfoodstuf of fat saw milk) when the content of palmitinic saturated fatty acid supersedes 15% of fatty acids total and under the development of endogenic syndrome of insulin resistance. The content of low density lipoproteins cholesterol is high in blood The shift to the right with prevalence of oleinic triglycerides occurs in case of low content of beef and foodstuff of fat saw milk in food, fish eating, seafood and olive oil. The physiologic levels of carbohydrates in food and insulin function are present too. The shift to the right initiates the action of insulin, ometa-3 essential polyenic fatty acids, glytazones and fibrates. They increase the activity of delta9-stearil-KoA-desaturase-2 and the transformation of palmitine saturated fatty acid into mono unsaturated oleinic fatty acid. The shift to the left forms the palmitine alternative of metabolism of substrate to supply cells with energy. The shift to the right is a more effective oleinic alternative.

  6. Increased conspicuousness can explain the match between visual sensitivities and blue plumage colours in fairy-wrens

    PubMed Central

    Delhey, Kaspar; Hall, Michelle; Kingma, Sjouke A.; Peters, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Colour signals are expected to match visual sensitivities of intended receivers. In birds, evolutionary shifts from violet-sensitive (V-type) to ultraviolet-sensitive (U-type) vision have been linked to increased prevalence of colours rich in shortwave reflectance (ultraviolet/blue), presumably due to better perception of such colours by U-type vision. Here we provide the first test of this widespread idea using fairy-wrens and allies (Family Maluridae) as a model, a family where shifts in visual sensitivities from V- to U-type eyes are associated with male nuptial plumage rich in ultraviolet/blue colours. Using psychophysical visual models, we compared the performance of both types of visual systems at two tasks: (i) detecting contrast between male plumage colours and natural backgrounds, and (ii) perceiving intraspecific chromatic variation in male plumage. While U-type outperforms V-type vision at both tasks, the crucial test here is whether U-type vision performs better at detecting and discriminating ultraviolet/blue colours when compared with other colours. This was true for detecting contrast between plumage colours and natural backgrounds (i), but not for discriminating intraspecific variability (ii). Our data indicate that selection to maximize conspicuousness to conspecifics may have led to the correlation between ultraviolet/blue colours and U-type vision in this clade of birds. PMID:23118438

  7. The affective reactivity of psychotic speech: The role of internal source monitoring in explaining increased thought disorder under emotional challenge.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Paulo; Sellwood, William; Spray, Amy; Bentall, Richard P

    2016-04-01

    Thought disorder (TD) has been shown to vary in relation to negative affect. Here we examine the role internal source monitoring (iSM, i.e. ability to discriminate between inner speech and verbalized speech) in TD and whether changes in iSM performance are implicated in the affective reactivity effect (deterioration of TD when participants are asked to talk about emotionally-laden topics). Eighty patients diagnosed with schizophrenia-spectrum disorder and thirty healthy controls received interviews that promoted personal disclosure (emotionally salient) and interviews on everyday topics (non-salient) on separate days. During the interviews, participants were tested on iSM, self-reported affect and immediate auditory recall. Patients had more TD, poorer ability to discriminate between inner and verbalized speech, poorer immediate auditory recall and reported more negative affect than controls. Both groups displayed more TD and negative affect in salient interviews but only patients showed poorer performance on iSM. Immediate auditory recall did not change significantly across affective conditions. In patients, the relationship between self-reported negative affect and TD was mediated by deterioration in the ability to discriminate between inner speech and speech that was directed to others and socially shared (performance on the iSM) in both interviews. Furthermore, deterioration in patients' performance on iSM across conditions significantly predicted deterioration in TD across the interviews (affective reactivity of speech). Poor iSM is significantly associated with TD. Negative affect, leading to further impaired iSM, leads to increased TD in patients with psychosis. Avenues for future research as well as clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. Increased Back-Bonding Explains Step-Edge Reactivity and Particle Size Effect for CO Activation on Ru Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Foppa, Lucas; Copéret, Christophe; Comas-Vives, Aleix

    2016-12-28

    Carbon monoxide is a ubiquitous molecule, a key feedstock and intermediate in chemical processes. Its adsorption and activation, typically carried out on metallic nanoparticles (NPs), are strongly dependent on the particle size. In particular, small NPs, which in principle contain more corner and step-edge atoms, are surprisingly less reactive than larger ones. Hereby, first-principles calculations on explicit Ru NP models (1-2 nm) show that both small and large NPs can present step-edge sites (e.g., B5 and B6 sites). However, such sites display strong particle-size-dependent reactivity because of very subtle differences in local chemical bonding. State-of-the-art crystal orbital Hamilton population analysis allows a detailed molecular orbital picture of adsorbed CO on step-edges, which can be classified as flat (η(1) coordination) and concave (η(2) coordination) sites. Our analysis shows that the CO π-metal dπ hybrid band responsible for the electron back-donation is better represented by an oxygen lone pair on flat sites, whereas it is delocalized on both C and O atoms on concave sites, increasing the back-bonding on these sites compared to flat step-edges or low-index surface sites. The bonding analysis also rationalizes why CO cleavage is easier on step-edge sites of large NPs compared to small ones irrespective of the site geometry. The lower reactivity of small NPs is due to the smaller extent of the Ru-O interaction in the η(2) adsorption mode, which destabilizes the η(2) transition-state structure for CO direct cleavage. Our findings provide a molecular understanding of the reactivity of CO on NPs, which is consistent with the observed particle size effect.

  9. Protein Kinase C-α–Mediated Regulation of Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor–Related Protein and Urokinase Increases Astrocytoma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Samson; Mut, Melike; diPierro, Charles G.; Carpenter, Joan E.; Xiao, Aizhen; Kohutek, Zachary A.; Redpath, Gerard T.; Zhao, Yunge; Wang, Jiahu; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Hussaini, Isa M.

    2008-01-01

    Aggressive and infiltrative invasion is one of the hallmarks of glioblastoma. Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP) is expressed by glioblastoma, but the role of this receptor in astrocytic tumor invasion remains poorly understood. We show that activation of protein kinase C-α (PKC-α) phosphorylated and down-regulated LRP expression. Pretreatment of tumor cells with PKC inhibitors, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, PKC-α small interfering RNA (siRNA), and short hairpin RNA abrogated phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate–induced down-regulation of LRP and inhibited astrocytic tumor invasion in vitro. In xenograft glioblastoma mouse model and in vitro transmembrane invasion assay, LRP-deficient cells, which secreted high levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), invaded extensively the surrounding normal brain tissue, whereas the LRP-overexpressing and uPA-deficient cells did not invade into the surrounding normal brain. siRNA, targeted against uPA in LRP-deficient clones, attenuated their invasive potential. Taken together, our results strongly suggest the involvement of PKC-α/PI3K signaling pathways in the regulation of LRP-mediated astrocytoma invasion. Thus, a strategy of combining small molecule inhibitors of PKC-α and PI3K could provide a new treatment paradigm for glioblastomas. PMID:17974965

  10. Postprandial Hyperlipidemia and Remnant Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Shizuya

    2017-01-01

    Fasting hypertriglyceridemia is positively associated with the morbidity of coronary heart disease (CHD), and postprandial (non-fasting) hypertriglyceridemia is also correlated with the risk status for CHD, which is related to the increase in chylomicron (CM) remnant lipoproteins produced from the intestine. CM remnant particles, as well as oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) or very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) remnants, are highly atherogenic and act by enhancing systemic inflammation, platelet activation, coagulation, thrombus formation, and macrophage foam cell formation. The cholesterol levels of remnant lipoproteins significantly correlate with small, dense LDL; impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and CHD prevalence. We have developed an assay of apolipoprotein (apo)B-48 levels to evaluate the accumulation of CM remnants. Fasting apoB-48 levels correlate with the morbidity of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, obesity, type III hyperlipoproteinemia, the metabolic syndrome, hypothyroidism, chronic kidney disease, and IGT. Fasting apoB-48 levels also correlate with carotid intima-media thickening and CHD prevalence, and a high apoB-48 level is a significant predictor of CHD risk, independent of the fasting TG level. Diet interventions, such as dietary fibers, polyphenols, medium-chain fatty acids, diacylglycerol, and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), ameliorate postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, moreover, drugs for dyslipidemia (n-3 PUFA, statins, fibrates or ezetimibe) and diabetes concerning incretins (dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitor or glucagon like peptide-1 analogue) may improve postprandial hypertriglyceridemia. Since the accumulation of CM remnants correlates to impaired lipid and glucose metabolism and atherosclerotic cardiovascular events, further studies are required to investigate the characteristics, physiological activities, and functions of CM remnants for the development of new interventions to reduce atherogenicity. PMID

  11. Increased serum soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 levels in patients with biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Oguzhan; Colak, Yasar; Senates, Ebubekir; Yilmaz, Yusuf; Ulasoglu, Celal; Doganay, Levent; Ozkanli, Seyma; Oltulu, Yasemin Musteri; Coskunpinar, Ender; Tuncer, Ilyas

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the relationship between the serum lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) levels and clinical and histopathological features of biopsy-confirmed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. METHODS: Fifty-three consecutive, biopsy-proven NAFLD patients (31 males and 22 females, mean age 42.5 ± 9.6 years) and 26 age- and gender-matched, healthy controls (14 males and 12 females, mean age 39 ± 10.7 years) were included. The patients with NAFLD were consecutive patients who had been admitted to the hepatology outpatient clinic within the last year and had been diagnosed with NAFLD as the result of liver biopsy. The healthy controls were individuals who attended the outpatient clinic for routine health control and had no known chronic illnesses. The histological evaluation was conducted according to the NAFLD activity scoring system recommended by The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network. The serum LOX-1 levels were measured using an ELISA kit (Life Science Inc. USCN. Wuhan, Catalog No. E1859Hu) in both patients and healthy controls. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to identify the optimal cutoff value of LOX-1 and thereby distinguish between patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and healthy controls. A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: NAFLD and healthy control groups were similar in terms of age and sex. NAFLD patients consisted of 8 patients with simple steatosis (15%), 27 with borderline NASH (51%) and 18 with definitive NASH (34%). Metabolic syndrome was found in 62.2% of the patients with NAFLD. The mean serum LOX-1 level in biopsy-proven NAFLD patients was 8.49 ± 6.43 ng/mL compared to 4.08 ± 4.32 ng/mL in healthy controls (P = 0.001). The LOX-1 levels were significantly different between controls, simple steatosis and NASH (borderline+definite) cases (4

  12. Human ABCA1 BAC transgenic mice show increased high density lipoprotein cholesterol and ApoAI-dependent efflux stimulated by an internal promoter containing liver X receptor response elements in intron 1.

    PubMed

    Singaraja, R R; Bocher, V; James, E R; Clee, S M; Zhang, L H; Leavitt, B R; Tan, B; Brooks-Wilson, A; Kwok, A; Bissada, N; Yang, Y Z; Liu, G; Tafuri, S R; Fievet, C; Wellington, C L; Staels, B; Hayden, M R

    2001-09-07

    By using BAC transgenic mice, we have shown that increased human ABCA1 protein expression results in a significant increase in cholesterol efflux in different tissues and marked elevation in high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels associated with increases in apoAI and apoAII. Three novel ABCA1 transcripts containing three different transcription initiation sites that utilize sequences in intron 1 have been identified. In BAC transgenic mice there is an increased expression of ABCA1 protein, but the distribution of the ABCA1 product in different cells remains similar to wild type mice. An internal promoter in human intron 1 containing liver X response elements is functional in vivo and directly contributes to regulation of the human ABCA1 gene in multiple tissues and to raised HDL cholesterol, apoAI, and apoAII levels. A highly significant relationship between raised protein levels, increased efflux, and level of HDL elevation is evident. These data provide proof of the principle that increased human ABCA1 efflux activity is associated with an increase in HDL levels in vivo.

  13. Revisiting the Gram-Negative Lipoprotein Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    LoVullo, Eric D.; Wright, Lori F.; Isabella, Vincent; Huntley, Jason F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The processing of lipoproteins (Lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted by the Lol system, with most Lpps inserted into the outer membrane (OM). We demonstrate here that the lnt gene is not essential to the Gram-negative pathogen Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis strain Schu or to the live vaccine strain LVS. An LVS Δlnt mutant has a small-colony phenotype on sucrose medium and increased susceptibility to globomycin and rifampin. We provide data indicating that the OM lipoprotein Tul4A (LpnA) is diacylated but that it, and its paralog Tul4B (LpnB), still sort to the OM in the Δlnt mutant. We present a model in which the Lol sorting pathway of Francisella has a modified ABC transporter system that is capable of recognizing and sorting both triacylated and diacylated lipoproteins, and we show that this modified system is present in many other Gram-negative bacteria. We examined this model using Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which has the same Lol architecture as that of Francisella, and found that the lnt gene is not essential in this organism. This work suggests that Gram-negative bacteria fall into two groups, one in which full lipoprotein processing is essential and one in which the final acylation step is not essential, potentially due to the ability of the Lol sorting pathway in these bacteria to sort immature apolipoproteins to the OM. IMPORTANCE This paper describes the novel finding that the final stage in lipoprotein processing (normally considered an essential process) is not required by Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The paper provides a potential reason for this and shows that it may be widespread in other Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25755189

  14. Role for circulating lipoproteins in protection from endotoxin toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, K R; Funk, J L; Moser, A H; Shigenaga, J K; Rapp, J H; Grunfeld, C

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS])-induced death can be prevented by preincubating LPS with lipoproteins in vitro or by infusing large quantities of lipids into animals prior to LPS administration. In the present study we determined whether physiological levels of lipids also provide protection. Serum lipid levels were decreased by two different mechanisms: administration of 4-aminopyrolo-(3,4-D)pyrimide, which prevents the hepatic secretion of lipoproteins, and administration of pharmacological doses of estradiol, which increases the number of hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptors, leading to increased lipoprotein clearance. In both hypolipidemic models, LPS-induced mortality is markedly increased compared with that of controls with normal serum lipid levels. In both hypolipidemic models, administration of exogenous lipoproteins, which increase levels of serum lipids into the physiological range, reduces the increased mortality to levels similar to that seen in normal animals. In normal lipidemic animals, 63% of 125I-LPS in plasma is associated with lipoproteins, where it would not be capable of stimulating cytokine production. In contrast, in hypolipidemic animals, very little LPS (12 to 17%) is associated with lipoproteins. Rather, more LPS is in the lipoprotein-free plasma compartment, where it could exert biological effects. In both hypolipidemic models, LPS produces a greater increase in serum tumor necrosis factor levels than it does in controls (three- to fivefold increase), and administration of exogenous lipoproteins prevents this increase. Cytokines, in particular tumor necrosis factor, are responsible for most of the toxic effects of LPS. These data provide evidence that physiological levels of serum lipids protect animals from LPS toxicity. Thus, lipoproteins, in addition to playing a role in lipid transport, may have protective functions. Moreover, as part of the immune response, cytokine-induced increases in

  15. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  16. [Hormonal regulation of lipoprotein metabolism: the role in pathogenesis of coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Sokolov, E I; Metel'skaia, V A; Perova, N V; Shchukina, G N

    2006-01-01

    The character and role of hormonal dysregulation of lipoprotein metabolism during postprandial hyperlipemia were studied in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and hyperthyroidism as compared with healthy subjects. Pronounced hypertriglyceridemia alongside with the decreased high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL C) after standard fat load were associated with increased level of insulin and decreased level of cortisol. Moreover, in CHD patients fasting hyperinsulinemia becoming even stronger postprandially resulted in prevalence of antilipolytic action of insulin over lipid-mobilizing effect of cortisol; and an extended postprandial hypertriglyceridemia took place. Patients with hyperthyroidism and low cholesterol level both in atherogenic LDL and antiatherogenic HDL, demonstrated decreased level of apo AI (as in CHD patients) and apo B (three times lower than in CHD patients). Very low ratio of apo B/AI in patients with hyperthyroidism both in fasting and postprandial state was a clear indication of their lipoprotein profile antiatherogeneity. Thus, in patients with hyperthyroidism despite of low HDL C and apo AI levels, antiatherogenic properties of lipoprotein profile are probably determined by very low apo B/AI ratio induced by thyroid hormones, and might be explained by the influence of thyroid hormones on the expression of genes coding these apoproteins.

  17. Lipoprotein electrostatic properties regulate hepatic lipase association and activity.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Jonathan G; Nguyen, Trang; Sparks, Daniel L

    2007-12-01

    The effect of lipoprotein electrostatic properties on the catalytic regulation of hepatic lipase (HL) was investigated. Enrichment of serum or very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) with oleic acid increased lipoprotein negative charge and stimulated lipid hydrolysis by HL. Similarly, enrichment of serum or isolated lipoproteins with the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidic acid, or phosphatidylserine also increased lipoprotein negative charge and stimulated hydrolysis by HL. Anionic lipids had a small effect on phospholipid hydrolysis, but significantly stimulated triacylglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. High density lipoprotein (HDL) charge appears to have a specific effect on lipolysis. Enrichment of HDL with PI significantly stimulated VLDL-TG hydrolysis by HL. To determine whether HDL charge affects the association of HL with HDL and VLDL, HL-lipoprotein interactions were probed immunochemically. Under normal circumstances, HL associates with HDL particles, and only small amounts bind to VLDL. PI enrichment of HDL blocked the binding of HL with HDL. These data indicate that increasing the negative charge of HDL stimulates VLDL-TG hydrolysis by reducing the association of HL with HDL. Therefore, HDL controls the hydrolysis of VLDL by affecting the interlipoprotein association of HL. Lipoprotein electrostatic properties regulate lipase association and are an important regulator of the binding and activity of lipolytic enzymes.

  18. Lipoprotein marker for hypertriglyceridemia

    DOEpatents

    Cubicciotti, Roger S.; Karu, Alexander E.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    1986-01-01

    Methods and compositions are provided for the detection of a particular low density lipoprotein which has been found to be a marker for patients suffering from type IV hypertriglyceridemia. A monoclonal antibody capable of specifically binding to a characteristic epitopic site on this LDL subspecies can be utilized in a wide variety of immunoassays. Hybridoma cell line SPL.IVA5A1 was deposited at the American Type Culture Collection on Mar. 29, 1984, and granted accession no. HB 8535.

  19. Beneficial effects of weight loss associated with moderate calorie/carbohydrate restriction, and increased proportional intake of protein and unsaturated fat on serum urate and lipoprotein levels in gout: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dessein, P; Shipton, E; Stanwix, A; Joffe, B; Ramokgadi, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Insulin resistance (IR) has been increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of gout. The lipoprotein abnormalities described in hyperuricaemic subjects are similar to those associated with IR, and insulin influences renal urate excretion. In this study it was investigated whether dietary measures, reported to be beneficial in IR, have serum uric acid (SU) and lipid lowering effects in gout.
METHODS—Thirteen non-diabetic men (median age 50, range 38-62) were enrolled. Each patient had had at least two gouty attacks during the four months before enrolment. Dietary recommendations consisted of calorie restriction to 6690 kJ (1600 kcal) a day with 40% derived from carbohydrate, 30% from protein, and 30% from fat; replacement of refined carbohydrates with complex ones and saturated fats with mono- and polyunsaturated ones. At onset and after 16 weeks, fasting blood samples were taken for determination of SU, serum cholesterol (C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TGs). Results were expressed as median (SD).
RESULTS—At onset, the body mass index (BMI) was 30.5 (8.1) kg/m2. Dietary measures resulted in weight loss of 7.7 (5.4) kg (p=0.002) and a decrease in the frequency of monthly attacks from 2.1 (0.8) to 0.6 (0.7) (p=0.002). The SU decreased from 0.57 (0.10) to 0.47 (0.09) mmol/l (p=0.001) and normalised in 7 (58%) of the 12 patients with an initially raised level. Serum cholesterol decreased from 6.0 (1.7) to 4.7 (0.9) mmol/l (p=0.002), LDL-C from 3.5 (1.2) to 2.7 (0.8) mmol/l (p=0.004), TGs from 4.7 (4.2) to 1.9 (1.0) mmol/l (p=0.001), and C:HDL-C ratios from 6.7 (1.7) to 5.2 (1.0) (p=0.002). HDL-C levels increased insignificantly. High baseline SU, frequency of attacks, total cholesterol, LDL-C and TG levels, and total C:HDL-C ratios correlated with higher decreases in the respective variables upon dietary intervention (p<0.05).

  20. Astronomy Explained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Gerald

    Every year large numbers of people take up the study of astronomy, mostly at amateur level. There are plenty of elementary books on the market, full of colourful photographs, but lacking in proper explanations of how and why things are as they are. Many people eventually wish to go beyond the 'coffee-table book' stage and study this fascinating subject in greater depth. This book is written for them. In addition, many people sit for public examinations in this subject each year and this book is also intended to be of use to them. All the topics from the GCSE syllabus are covered here, with sample questions at the end of each chapter. Astronomy Explained provides a comprehensive treatment of the subject in more depth than is usually found in elementary works, and will be of interest to both amateur astronomers and students of astronomy.

  1. A Cross-Sectional Study Demonstrating Increased Serum Amyloid A Related Inflammation in High-Density Lipoproteins from Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and How This Association Was Augmented by Poor Glycaemic Control

    PubMed Central

    McEneny, Jane; Daniels, Jane-Ann; McGowan, Anne; Gunness, Anjuli; Moore, Kevin; Stevenson, Michael; Young, Ian S.; Gibney, James

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory atherosclerosis is increased in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Normally high-density lipoproteins (HDL) protect against atherosclerosis; however, in the presence of serum amyloid-A- (SAA-) related inflammation this property may be reduced. Fasting blood was obtained from fifty subjects with T1DM, together with fifty age, gender and BMI matched control subjects. HDL was subfractionated into HDL2 and HDL3 by rapid ultracentrifugation. Serum-hsCRP and serum-, HDL2-, and HDL3-SAA were measured by ELISAs. Compared to control subjects, SAA was increased in T1DM subjects, nonsignificantly in serum (P = 0.088), and significantly in HDL2(P = 0.003) and HDL3(P = 0.005). When the T1DM group were separated according to mean HbA1c (8.34%), serum-SAA and HDL3-SAA levels were higher in the T1DM subjects with HbA1c ≥ 8.34%, compared to when HbA1c was <8.34% (P < 0.05). Furthermore, regression analysis illustrated, that for every 1%-unit increase in HbA1c, SAA increased by 20% and 23% in HDL2 and HDL3, respectively, independent of BMI. HsCRP did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). This cross-sectional study demonstrated increased SAA-related inflammation in subjects with T1DM that was augmented by poor glycaemic control. We suggest that SAA is a useful inflammatory biomarker in T1DM, which may contribute to their increased atherosclerosis risk. PMID:26557720

  2. Radiation Dose Associated with Renal Failure Mortality: A Potential Pathway to Partially Explain Increased Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Observed after Whole-Body Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael Jacob; Grant, Eric J.; Kodama, Kazunori; Shimizu, Yukiko; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Suyama, Akihiko; Sakata, Ritsu; Akahoshi, Masazumi

    2012-01-01

    Whole-body and thoracic ionizing radiation exposure are associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. In atomic bomb survivors, radiation dose is also associated with increased hypertension incidence, suggesting that radiation dose may be associated with chronic renal failure (CRF), thus explaining part of the mechanism for increased CVD. Multivariate Poisson regression was used to evaluate the association of radiation dose with various definitions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) mortality in the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors. A secondary analysis was performed using a subsample for whom self-reported information on hypertension and diabetes, the two biggest risk factors for CRF, had been collected. We found a significant association between radiation dose and only our broadest definition of CRF among the full cohort. A quadratic dose excess relative risk model [ERR/Gy2 = 0.091 (95% CI: 0.05, 0.198)] fit minimally better than a linear model. Within the subsample, association was also observed only with the broadest CRF definition [ERR/Gy2 = 0.15 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.32)]. Adjustment for hypertension and diabetes improved model fit but did not substantially change the ERR/Gy2 estimate, which was 0.17 (95% CI: 0.04, 0.35). We found a significant quadratic dose relationship between radiation dose and possible chronic renal disease mortality that is similar in shape to that observed between radiation and incidence of hypertension in this population. Our results suggest that renal dysfunction could be part of the mechanism causing increased CVD risk after whole-body irradiation, a hypothesis that deserves further study. PMID:22149958

  3. Reversible and irreversible interactions between elastin and plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Winlove, C P; Parker, K H; Ewins, A R

    1985-03-08

    The interactions between radiolabeled, human plasma lipoproteins and elastin derived from bovine ligamentum nuchae were investigated using a washout technique. The interaction was characterised by Ki, a coefficient of irreversible binding, and Kr, the reversible partition coefficient. For both low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) the Ki values decreased as total lipoprotein concentration increased, suggesting that the binding is saturable, and were similar in magnitude to those measured by other workers using elastin derived from the human aorta. For both LDL and HDL the Kr values were independent of lipoprotein concentration in the range 0.1 microgram/ml-1.5 micrograms/ml. At a total protein concentration of 1.5 mg/ml in the incubation medium, the reversible interactions were comparable in magnitude to the irreversible.

  4. The fibrate drug gemfibrozil disrupts lipoprotein metabolism in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Prindiville, John S. Mennigen, Jan A.; Zamora, Jake M.; Moon, Thomas W.; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2011-03-15

    Gemfibrozil (GEM) is a fibrate drug consistently found in effluents from sewage treatment plants. This study characterizes the pharmacological effects of GEM on the plasma lipoproteins of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Our goals were to quantify the impact of the drug on: 1) lipid constituents of lipoproteins (phospholipids (PL), triacylglycerol (TAG), and cholesterol), 2) lipoprotein classes (high, low and very low density lipoproteins), and 3) fatty acid composition of lipoproteins. Potential mechanisms of GEM action were investigated by measuring lipoprotein lipase activity (LPL) and the hepatic gene expression of LPL and of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} isoforms. GEM treatment resulted in decreased plasma lipoprotein levels (- 29%) and a reduced size of all lipoprotein classes (lower PL:TAG ratios). However, the increase in HDL-cholesterol elicited by GEM in humans failed to be observed in trout. Therefore, HDL-cholesterol cannot be used to assess the impact of the drug on fish. GEM also modified lipoprotein composition by reducing the abundance of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, thereby potentially reducing the nutritional quality of exposed fish. The relative gene expression of LPL was increased, but the activity of the enzyme was not, and we found no evidence for the activation of PPAR pathways. The depressing effects of GEM on fish lipoproteins demonstrated here may be a concern in view of the widespread presence of fibrates in aquatic environments. Work is needed to test whether exposure to environmental concentrations of these drugs jeopardizes the capacity of fish for reproduction, temperature acclimation or migratory behaviors.

  5. Release of endothelial cell lipoprotein lipase by plasma lipoproteins and free fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, U.; Witte, L.D.; Goldberg, I.J.

    1989-03-15

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) bound to the lumenal surface of vascular endothelial cells is responsible for the hydrolysis of triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins. Studies were performed to investigate whether human plasma lipoproteins and/or free fatty acids would release LPL which was bound to endothelial cells. Purified bovine milk LPL was incubated with cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells resulting in the association of enzyme activity with the cells. When the cells were then incubated with media containing chylomicrons or very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), a concentration-dependent decrease in the cell-associated LPL enzymatic activity was observed. In contrast, incubation with media containing low density lipoproteins or high density lipoproteins produced a much smaller decrease in the cell-associated enzymatic activity. The addition of increasing molar ratios of oleic acid:bovine serum albumin to the media also reduced enzyme activity associated with the endothelial cells. To determine whether the decrease in LPL activity was due to release of the enzyme from the cells or inactivation of the enzyme, studies were performed utilizing radioiodinated bovine LPL. Radiolabeled LPL protein was released from endothelial cells by chylomicrons, VLDL, and by free fatty acids (i.e. oleic acid bound to bovine serum albumin). The release of radiolabeled LPL by VLDL correlated with the generation of free fatty acids from the hydrolysis of VLDL triglyceride by LPL bound to the cells. Inhibition of LPL enzymatic activity by use of a specific monoclonal antibody, reduced the extent of release of /sup 125/I-LPL from the endothelial cells by the added VLDL. These results demonstrated that LPL enzymatic activity and protein were removed from endothelial cells by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (chylomicrons and VLDL) and oleic acid.

  6. Explaining happiness.

    PubMed

    Easterlin, Richard A

    2003-09-16

    What do social survey data tell us about the determinants of happiness? First, that the psychologists' setpoint model is questionable. Life events in the nonpecuniary domain, such as marriage, divorce, and serious disability, have a lasting effect on happiness, and do not simply deflect the average person temporarily above or below a setpoint given by genetics and personality. Second, mainstream economists' inference that in the pecuniary domain "more is better," based on revealed preference theory, is problematic. An increase in income, and thus in the goods at one's disposal, does not bring with it a lasting increase in happiness because of the negative effect on utility of hedonic adaptation and social comparison. A better theory of happiness builds on the evidence that adaptation and social comparison affect utility less in the nonpecuniary than pecuniary domains. Because individuals fail to anticipate the extent to which adaptation and social comparison undermine expected utility in the pecuniary domain, they allocate an excessive amount of time to pecuniary goals, and shortchange nonpecuniary ends such as family life and health, reducing their happiness. There is need to devise policies that will yield better-informed individual preferences, and thereby increase individual and societal well-being.

  7. Colistin-Resistant, Lipopolysaccharide-Deficient Acinetobacter baumannii Responds to Lipopolysaccharide Loss through Increased Expression of Genes Involved in the Synthesis and Transport of Lipoproteins, Phospholipids, and Poly-β-1,6-N-Acetylglucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Rebekah; Vithanage, Nuwan; Harrison, Paul; Seemann, Torsten; Coutts, Scott; Moffatt, Jennifer H.; Nation, Roger L.; Li, Jian; Harper, Marina; Adler, Ben

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii can result from mutational inactivation of genes essential for lipid A biosynthesis (Moffatt JH, et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 54:4971–4977). Consequently, strains harboring these mutations are unable to produce the major Gram-negative bacterial surface component, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To understand how A. baumannii compensates for the lack of LPS, we compared the transcriptional profile of the A. baumannii type strain ATCC 19606 to that of an isogenic, LPS-deficient, lpxA mutant strain. The analysis of the expression profiles indicated that the LPS-deficient strain showed increased expression of many genes involved in cell envelope and membrane biogenesis. In particular, upregulated genes included those involved in the Lol lipoprotein transport system and the Mla-retrograde phospholipid transport system. In addition, genes involved in the synthesis and transport of poly-β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) also were upregulated, and a corresponding increase in PNAG production was observed. The LPS-deficient strain also exhibited the reduced expression of genes predicted to encode the fimbrial subunit FimA and a type VI secretion system (T6SS). The reduced expression of genes involved in T6SS correlated with the detection of the T6SS-effector protein AssC in culture supernatants of the A. baumannii wild-type strain but not in the LPS-deficient strain. Taken together, these data show that, in response to total LPS loss, A. baumannii alters the expression of critical transport and biosynthesis systems associated with modulating the composition and structure of the bacterial surface. PMID:22024825

  8. Intima-media thickness of the carotid artery and the distribution of lipoprotein subclasses in men aged 40 to 49 years between whites in the United States and the Japanese in Japan for the ERA JUMP study.

    PubMed

    Sekikawa, Akira; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Kadowaki, Takashi; El-Saed, Aiman; Okamura, Tomonori; Takamiya, Tomoko; Ueno, Yoshiki; Evans, Rhobert W; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Kuller, Lewis H

    2008-02-01

    In men in the post-World War II birth cohort, that is, men aged 40 to 49 years, whites in the United States had significantly higher levels of intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries (IMT) than the Japanese in Japan (Electron-Beam Tomography and Risk Assessment Among Japanese and US Men in the Post World War II Birth Cohort [ERA JUMP] study). The difference remained after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Primary genetic effects are unlikely, given the degree to which IMT is increased in the Japanese who migrated to the United States. We investigated whether the differences in the distributions of lipoprotein subclasses explain the difference in IMT between the 2 populations. We examined population-based samples of 466 randomly selected men aged 40 to 49 years (215 whites from Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, and 241 Japanese from Kusatsu, Shiga, Japan). Lipoprotein subclasses were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The whites had significantly higher levels of large very low-density lipoprotein particles and significantly lower levels of large high-density lipoprotein particles than the Japanese, whereas the 2 populations had similar levels of small low-density lipoprotein particles. The 2 populations had similar associations of IMT with NMR lipoproteins. Adjusting for NMR lipoproteins did not attenuate the significant difference in IMT between the 2 populations (0.671 +/- 0.006 mm for the whites and 0.618 +/- 0.006 mm for the Japanese, P = .01, mean +/- SE). Differences in the distributions of NMR lipoproteins between the 2 populations did not explain the higher IMT in the whites.

  9. Human intestinal lipoproteins. Studies in chyluric subjects.

    PubMed

    Green, P H; Glickman, R M; Saudek, C D; Blum, C B; Tall, A R

    1979-07-01

    To explore the role of the human intestine as a source of apolipoproteins, we have studied intestinal lipoproteins and apoprotein secretion in two subjects with chyluria (mesenteric lymphatic-urinary fistulae). After oral corn oil, apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) output in urine increased in parallel to urinary triglyceride. One subject, on two occasions, after 40 g of corn oil, excreted 8.4 and 8.6 g of triglyceride together with 196 and 199 mg apoA-I and on one occasion, 56 mg apoA-II. The other subject, after 40 g corn oil, excreted 0.3 g triglyceride and 17.5 mg apoA-I, and, after 100 g of corn oil, excreted 44.8 mg apoA-I and 5.8 mg apoA-II. 14.5+/-2.1% of apoA-I and 17.7+/-4.3% of apoA-II in chylous urine was in the d < 1.006 fraction (chylomicrons and very low density lipoprotein). Calculations based on the amount of apoA-I and apoA-II excreted on triglyceride-rich lipoproteins revealed that for these lipid loads, intestinal secretion could account for 50 and 33% of the calculated daily synthetic rate of apoA-I and apoA-II, respectively. Similarly, subject 2 excreted 48-70% and 14% of the calculated daily synthetic rate of apoA-I and apoA-II, respectively. Chylous urine contained chylomicrons, very low density lipoproteins and high density lipoproteins, all of which contained apoA-I. Chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins contained a previously unreported human apoprotein of 46,000 mol wt. We have called this apoprotein apoA-IV because of the similarity of its molecular weight and amino acid composition to rat apoA-IV. In sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, chylomicron apoproteins consisted of apoB 3.4+/-0.7%, apoA-IV 10.0+/-3.3%, apoE 4.4+/-0.3%, apoA-I 15.0+/-1.8%, and apoC and apoA-II 43.3+/-11.3%. Very low density lipoprotein contained more apoB and apoA-IV and less apoC than chylomicrons. Ouchterlony immunodiffusion of chylomicron apoproteins revealed the presence of apoC-I, apoC-II, and apoC-III. In contrast, plasma

  10. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 decreases oxidized lipoprotein cellular association by human macrophages and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Chu, Eugene M; Caslake, Muriel J; Edelstein, Celina; Scanu, Angelo M; Hill, John S

    2010-02-01

    We investigated whether the presence of endogenous or exogenous lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) can modify the cellular association of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxidized lipoprotein(a) (oxLp(a)) by human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and hepatocytes (HepG2). Purified recombinant Lp-PLA2 was used as a source of exogenous enzyme whereas Pefabloc (serine esterase inhibitor) was used to inhibit the endogenous Lp-PLA2 activity associated with isolated lipoproteins. Cellular association studies were performed with DiI-labeled oxLDL or oxLp(a) and human monocyte-derived macrophages and HepG2 cells. Active Lp-PLA2 decreased the cellular association of oxLDL and oxLp(a) in macrophages and HepG2 cells by approximately 30-40%, whereas the inactive enzyme did not significantly change oxidized lipoprotein cellular association by either cell type. OxLDL pretreated by Pefabloc increased oxLDL cellular association by MDM and HepG2 cells compared to untreated oxLDL. Therefore, unlike some lipases, Lp-PLA2 did not appear to have any catalytic independent function in oxLDL cellular association. To assess whether the reduced cellular association mediated by Lp-PLA2 was due to the hydrolysis of oxidized phosphatidylcholine (oxPC), we measured the concentration of lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) in lipoprotein fractions after Lp-PLA2 treatment. LysoPC was increased by 20% (0.4 microM) and 87% (0.7 microM) by active Lp-PLA2 compared to inactive Lp-PLA2 for oxLDL and Lp(a), respectively. LysoPC at higher concentration dose-dependently increased the cellular association of oxLDL and oxLp(a) in MDM and HepG2 cells. We conclude that Lp-PLA2 mediates a decrease in oxidized lipoprotein cellular association in human macrophages and HepG2 cells by reducing the concentration of oxPC within these lipoproteins.

  11. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J.

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  12. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol: current perspective for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2009-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins are regarded as ''good guys'' but not always. Situations involving high-density lipoproteins are discussed and medication results are considered. Clinicians usually consider high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Nicotinic acid is the best available medication to elevate high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and this appears beneficial for cardiovascular risk. The major problem with nicotinic acid is that many patients do not tolerate the associated flushing. Laropiprant decreases this flushing and has an approval in Europe but not in the United States. The most potent medications for increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors. The initial drug in this class, torcetrapib, was eliminated by excess cardiovascular problems. Two newer cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors, R1658 and anacetrapib, initially appear promising. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol may play an important role in improving cardiovascular risk in the 60% of patients who do not receive cardiovascular mortality/morbidity benefit from low-density lipoproteins reduction by statins.

  13. Consuming a buttermilk drink containing lutein-enriched egg yolk daily for 1 year increased plasma lutein but did not affect serum lipid or lipoprotein concentrations in adults with early signs of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    van der Made, Sanne M; Kelly, Elton R; Berendschot, Tos T J M; Kijlstra, Aize; Lütjohann, Dieter; Plat, Jogchum

    2014-09-01

    Dietary lutein intake is postulated to interfere with the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Because egg yolk-derived lutein has a high bioavailability, long-term consumption of lutein-enriched eggs might be effective in preventing AMD development, but alternatively might increase cardiovascular disease risk. Here, we report the effect of 1-y daily consumption of a buttermilk drink containing 1.5 lutein-rich egg yolks on serum lipid and lipoprotein and plasma lutein concentrations. Additionally, subgroups that could potentially benefit the most from the intervention were identified. Men and women who had early signs of AMD in at least 1 eye, but were otherwise healthy, participated in a 1-y randomized, placebo-controlled parallel intervention trial. At the start of the study, 101 participants were included: 52 in the experimental (Egg) group and 49 in the control (Con) group. Final analyses were performed with 45 participants in the Egg group and 43 participants in the Con group. As expected, the increase in plasma lutein concentrations in the Egg group was 83% higher than that in the Con group (P < 0.001). Changes in serum total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol, as well as the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol, were not different between the 2 groups. Interestingly, participants classified as cholesterol absorbers had higher serum HDL cholesterol concentrations than participants classified as cholesterol synthesizers or participants with average campesterol-to-lathosterol ratios (P < 0.05) at baseline. In addition, cholesterol absorbers had a 229% higher increase in plasma lutein concentrations than participants who were classified as having an average campesterol-to-lathosterol ratio upon consumption of the lutein-enriched egg yolk drink (P < 0.05). Moreover, the change in serum HDL cholesterol upon consumption was significantly different between these 3 groups (P < 0.05). We suggest that cholesterol absorbers particularly might benefit

  14. Lipoprotein abnormalities in South Asians and its association with cardiovascular disease: Current state and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Bilen, Ozlem; Kamal, Ayeesha; Virani, Salim S

    2016-01-01

    South Asians have a high prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and suffer from early-onset CHD compared to other ethnic groups. Conventional risk factors may not fully explain this increased CHD risk in this population. Indeed, South Asians have a unique lipid profile which may predispose them to premature CHD. Dyslipidemia in this patient population seems to be an important contributor to the high incidence of coronary atherosclerosis. The dyslipidemia in South Asians is characterized by elevated levels of triglycerides, low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, elevated lipoprotein(a) levels, and a higher atherogenic particle burden despite comparable low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels compared with other ethnic subgroups. HDL particles also appear to be smaller, dysfunctional, and proatherogenic in South Asians. Despite the rapid expansion of the current literature with better understanding of the specific lipid abnormalities in this patient population, studies with adequate sample sizes are needed to assess the significance and contribution of a given lipid parameter on overall cardiovascular risk in this population. Specific management goals and treatment thresholds do not exist for South Asians because of paucity of data. Current treatment recommendations are mostly extrapolated from Western guidelines. Lastly, large, prospective studies with outcomes data are needed to assess cardiovascular benefit associated with various lipid-lowering therapies (including combination therapy) in this patient population. PMID:27022456

  15. Multiple aberrations in shared inflammatory and oxidative & nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways explain the co-association of depression and cardiovascular disorder (CVD), and the increased risk for CVD and due mortality in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Ruckoanich, Piyanuj; Chang, Young Seun; Mahanonda, Nithi; Berk, Michael

    2011-04-29

    There is evidence that there is a bidirectional relationship between major depression and cardiovascular disorder (CVD): depressed patients are a population at risk for increased cardiac morbidity and mortality, and depression is more frequent in patients who suffer from CVD. There is also evidence that inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways underpin the common pathophysiology of both CVD and major depression. Activation of these pathways may increase risk for both disorders and contribute to shared risk. The shared IO&NS pathways that may contribute to CVD and depression comprise the following: increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, like interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ; T cell activation; increased acute phase proteins, like C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, fibrinogen and α1-antitrypsin; complement factors; increased LPS load through bacterial translocation and subsequent gut-derived inflammation; induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase with increased levels of tryptophan catabolites; decreased levels of antioxidants, like coenzyme Q10, zinc, vitamin E, glutathione and glutathione peroxidase; increased O&NS characterized by oxidative damage to low density lipoprotein (LDL) and phospholipid inositol, increased malondialdehyde, and damage to DNA and mitochondria; increased nitrosative stress; and decreased ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). The complex interplay between the abovementioned IO&NS pathways in depression results in pro-atherogenic effects and should be regarded as a risk factor to future clinical CVD and due mortality. We suggest that major depression should be added as a risk factor to the Charlson "comorbidity" index. It is advised that patients with (sub)chronic or recurrent major depression should routinely be assessed by serology tests to predict if they have an increased risk to cardiovascular disorders.

  16. Regulation of hepatic lipase activity by sphingomyelin in plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is an important enzyme in the clearance of triacylglycerol (TAG) from the circulation, and has been proposed to have pro-atherogenic as well as anti-atherogenic properties. It hydrolyzes both phospholipids and TAG of lipoproteins, and its activity is negatively correlated with HDL levels. Although it is known that HL acts preferentially on HDL lipids, the basis for this specificity is not known, since it does not require any specific apoprotein for activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), whose concentration is much higher in VLDL and LDL compared to HDL, is an inhibitor of HL, and that this could explain the lipoprotein specificity of the enzyme. The results presented show that the depletion of SM from normal lipoproteins activated the HL roughly in proportion to their SM content. SM depletion stimulated the hydrolysis of both phosphatidylcholine (PC) and TAG, although the PC hydrolysis was stimulated more. In the native lipoproteins, HL showed specificity for PC species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids at sn-2 position, and produced more unsaturated lyso PC species. The enzyme also showed preferential hydrolysis of certain TAG species over others. SM depletion affected the specificity of the enzyme towards PC and TAG species modestly. These results show that SM is a physiological inhibitor of HL activity in lipoproteins and that the specificity of the enzyme towards HDL is at least partly due to its low SM content.

  17. Regulation of hepatic lipase activity by sphingomyelin in plasma lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng; Subbaiah, Papasani V.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is an important enzyme in the clearance of triacylglycerol (TAG) from the circulation, and has been proposed to have pro-atherogenic as well as anti-atherogenic properties. It hydrolyzes both phospholipids and TAG of lipoproteins, and its activity is negatively correlated with HDL levels. Although it is known that HL acts preferentially on HDL lipids, the basis for this specificity is not known, since it does not require any specific apoprotein for activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), whose concentration is much higher in VLDL and LDL compared to HDL, is an inhibitor of HL, and that this could explain the lipoprotein specificity of the enzyme. The results presented show that the depletion of SM from normal lipoproteins activated the HL roughly in proportion to their SM content. SM depletion stimulated the hydrolysis of both phosphatidylcholine (PC) and TAG, although the PC hydrolysis was stimulated more. In the native lipoproteins, HL showed specificity for PC species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids at sn-2 position, and produced more unsaturated lyso PC species. The enzyme also showed preferential hydrolysis of certain TAG species over others. SM depletion affected the specificity of the enzyme towards PC and TAG species modestly. These results show that SM is a physiological inhibitor of HL activity in lipoproteins and that the specificity of the enzyme towards HDL is at least partly due to its low SM content. PMID:26193433

  18. [Very low density lipoproteins and subclasses of intermediate density lipoproteins in postmenopausal women].

    PubMed

    Berg, G; Halperín, H; Siseles, N; Wikinski, R

    1996-01-01

    Post menopausal women present an increase of cardiovascular risk associated with the atherogenic plasma lipoproteins IDL and LDL. Our purpose was to study the composition of VLDL, IDL and the subfractions IDL-1 and IDL-2, and the Lipoprotein Lipase and Hepatic Lipase activities in a group of twelve healthy post menopausal women as compared with eleven fertile controls. The mean values of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol were significantly increased in the post menopausal group compared to the controls (p < 0.005 and p < 0.001 respectively). The contribution of the HDL-cholesterol plasma concentration to total cholesterol was lower in the postmenopausal women (p < 0.02) although no one had HDL-cholesterol lower than 35 mg/dl and the mean value was 50 mg/dl. Postmenopausal women had increased concentrations of VLDL, total IDL and IDL-2 compared to controls (p < 0.05, p < 0.005 and p < 0.001 respectively). Plasma concentrations of total IDL was increased in postmenopausal women (33.6 +/- 3.4 vs 22.6 +/- 0.8 mg/dl, p < 0.005). The increase in total IDL was due to IDL-2 (19.9 +/- 1.7 vs 11.5 +/- 0.8 mg/dl, p < 0.001, in postmenopausal women vs controls). The IDL-2 subfraction was 60 +/- 2.6% of total IDL in postmenopausal women and 51 +/- 2.0% in controls (p < 0.02). In postmenopausal women and in controls the ratio triglyceride/protein (which indicates particles size) was significantly higher in IDL-1 than in IDL-2 (p < 0.005 and p < 0.01 respectively), but this ratio did not show differences when VLDL, total IDL and IDL-2 were compared between postmenopausal and control women. Then, the increased plasma concentration of these lipoproteins would show an increased number of particles in the postmenopausal women vs controls. There were no differences in the Lipoprotein Lipase and Hepatic Lipase activities between both groups. Lipoprotein Lipase vs total IDL-triglycerides and IDL-2-triglycerides showed a significant inverse correlation in controls (p < 0.05) but not

  19. Identification of low density lipoprotein as a regulator of Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, R D; Khoo, M; Lund-Katz, S; Scerbo, L; Esfahani, M

    1990-01-01

    Optimal expression of the high-affinity Fc receptor for IgG (FcRI) by the human monocyte cell line U-937 requires the presence of low density lipoprotein (LDL), and neither cholesterol nor high density lipoprotein can provide the component necessary for optimal FcRI expression. Here we show that FcR-mediated phagocytosis also requires LDL. U-937 cells were cultured in medium containing interferon gamma and either fetal calf serum (FCS) or delipidated FCS (DLFCS). The phagocytosis of IgG-coated erythrocytes was measured by a colorimetric assay. U-937 cells cultured in DLFCS medium had less than 16% of the phagocytic activity of cells cultured in normal FCS medium. Phagocytosis of IgG-coated erythrocytes could be inhibited 85% by the addition of murine IgG2a myeloma protein (5 micrograms/ml). U-937 cells cultured in DLFCS medium supplemented with pure cholesterol in ethanol (10 micrograms/ml) had only 30% of the phagocytic activity of cells grown in FCS medium. Addition of very low density lipoprotein (0.2 mg of protein per ml) to DLFCS medium also failed to increase phagocytosis. However, the addition of LDL (0.2 mg of protein per ml) to DLFCS medium restored 90% of the phagocytic activity. Since neither pure cholesterol nor very low density lipoprotein restored normal phagocytic function to U-937 cells despite a normalization of cellular cholesterol content, the restoration of phagocytosis observed with LDL replacement cannot be explained by mere delivery of cholesterol by LDL. Thus, LDL is required for the expression of FcRI and FcR-mediated phagocytosis by U-937 cells and may be an important regulator of phagocytic activity of monocytes and macrophages in vivo. PMID:2367519

  20. Explaining the increased health care expenditures associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease among elderly Medicare beneficiaries with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cost-decomposition analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ajmera, Mayank; Raval, Amit D; Shen, Chan; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate excess health care expenditures associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) among elderly individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and examine the contribution of predisposing characteristics, enabling resources, need variables, personal health care practices, and external environment factors to the excess expenditures, using the Blinder–Oaxaca linear decomposition technique. Methods This study utilized a cross-sectional, retrospective study design, using data from multiple years (2006–2009) of the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey linked with fee-for-service Medicare claims. Presence of COPD and GERD was identified using diagnoses codes. Health care expenditures consisted of inpatient, outpatient, prescription drugs, dental, medical provider, and other services. For the analysis, t-tests were used to examine unadjusted subgroup differences in average health care expenditures by the presence of GERD. Ordinary least squares regressions on log-transformed health care expenditures were conducted to estimate the excess health care expenditures associated with GERD. The Blinder–Oaxaca linear decomposition technique was used to determine the contribution of predisposing characteristics, enabling resources, need variables, personal health care practices, and external environment factors, to excess health care expenditures associated with GERD. Results Among elderly Medicare beneficiaries with COPD, 29.3% had co-occurring GERD. Elderly Medicare beneficiaries with COPD/GERD had 1.5 times higher ($36,793 vs $24,722 [P<0.001]) expenditures than did those with COPD/no GERD. Ordinary least squares regression revealed that individuals with COPD/GERD had 36.3% (P<0.001) higher expenditures than did those with COPD/no GERD. Overall, 30.9% to 43.6% of the differences in average health care expenditures were explained by differences in predisposing characteristics, enabling resources, need variables, personal health care

  1. Increased temperature tolerance of the air-breathing Asian swamp eel Monopterus albus after high-temperature acclimation is not explained by improved cardiorespiratory performance.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, S; Findorf, I; Bayley, M; Huong, D T T; Wang, T

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that in the Asian swamp eel Monopterus albus, an air-breathing fish from south-east Asia that uses the buccopharyngeal cavity for oxygen uptake, the upper critical temperature (TU) is increased by acclimation to higher temperature, and that the increased TU is associated with improved cardiovascular and respiratory function. Monopterus albus were therefore acclimated to 27° C (current average) and 32° C (current maximum temperature as well as projected average within 100-200 years), and both the effect of acclimation and acute temperature increments on cardiovascular and respiratory functions were investigated. Two weeks of heat acclimation increased upper tolerated temperature (TU ) by 2° C from 36·9 ± 0·1° C to 38·9 ± 0·1° C (mean ± s.e.). Oxygen uptake (M˙O2) increased with acclimation temperature, accommodated by increases in both aerial and aquatic respiration. Overall, M˙O2 from air (M˙O2a ) was predominant, representing 85% in 27° C acclimated fish and 80% in 32° C acclimated fish. M˙O2 increased with acute increments in temperature and this increase was entirely accommodated by an increase in air-breathing frequency and M˙O2a . Monopterus albus failed to upregulate stroke volume; rather, cardiac output was maintained through increased heart rate with rising temperature. Overall, acclimation of M. albus to 32° C did not improve its cardiovascular and respiratory performance at higher temperatures, and cardiovascular adaptations, therefore, do not appear to contribute to the observed increase in TU.

  2. Bath and Shower Effects in the Rat Parotid Gland Explain Increased Relative Risk of Parotid Gland Dysfunction After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Luijk, Peter van Faber, Hette; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Meertens, Harm; Coppes, Robert P.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To assess in a rat model whether adding a subtolerance dose in a region adjacent to a high-dose irradiated subvolume of the parotid gland influences its response (bath-and-shower effect). Methods and Materials: Irradiation of the whole, cranial 50%, and/or the caudal 50% of the parotid glands of Wistar rats was performed using 150-MeV protons. To determine suitable (i.e., subtolerance) dose levels for a bath-dose, both whole parotid glands were irradiated with 5 to 25 Gy. Subsequently groups of Wistar rats received 30 Gy to the caudal 50% (shower) and 0 to 10 Gy to the cranial 50% (bath) of both parotid glands. Stimulated saliva flow rate (function) was measured before and up to 240 days after irradiation. Results: Irradiation of both glands up to a dose of 10 Gy did not result in late loss of function and is thus regarded subtolerance. Addition of a dose bath of 1 to 10 Gy to a high-dose in the caudal 50% of the glands resulted in enhanced function loss. Conclusion: Similar to the spinal cord, the parotid gland demonstrates a bath and shower effect, which may explain the less-than-expected sparing of function after IMRT.

  3. Classifying lipoproteins based on their polar profiles.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas; Uversky, Vladimir N; Amkie, Rafael Zonana

    2016-01-01

    The lipoproteins are an important group of cargo proteins known for their unique capability to transport lipids. By applying the Polarity index algorithm, which has a metric that only considers the polar profile of the linear sequences of the lipoprotein group, we obtained an analytical and structural differentiation of all the lipoproteins found in UniProt Database. Also, the functional groups of lipoproteins, and particularly of the set of lipoproteins relevant to atherosclerosis, were analyzed with the same method to reveal their structural preference, and the results of Polarity index analysis were verified by an alternate test, the Cumulative Distribution Function algorithm, applied to the same groups of lipoproteins.

  4. Fungal-mediated mortality explains the different effects of dung leachates on the germination response of grazing increaser and decreaser species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, Carlos P.; Navarro, Elena; Peco, Begoña

    2016-01-01

    Depending on their response to grazing, grassland species can be categorized as grazing increasers or decreasers. Grazing by livestock includes several different activities that can impact species differently. Recent evidence suggest that one of these actions, dung deposition, can reduce the germinative performance of decreaser species, thus favouring increasers. The present study tested the hypothesis that decreased germinative success of decreaser species is caused by a greater activity of fungal pathogens under the influence of dung leachates. We performed a phytotron experiment analysing the germination and fungal infections of fourteen species from Mediterranean grasslands. Species were grouped into phylogenetically-related pairs, composed of an increaser and a decreaser species. Seeds of each species were germinated under four different treatments (control, dung leachate addition, fungicide addition and dung leachate and fungicide addition), and the differences in germination percentage, germination speed and infection rate between each increaser species and its decreaser counterpart were analysed. Decreaser species were more affected by mortality than increaser ones, and these differences were higher under the presence of dung leachates. The differences in germinative performance after excluding the effect of seed mortality did not differ between treatments, showing that the main mechanism by which dung leachates favour increaser species is through increased mortality of the seeds of decreaser species. Drastic reductions in the number of dead seeds in the treatments including fungicide addition further revealed that fungal pathogens are responsible for these differences between species with different grazing response. The different vulnerabilities of increaser and decreaser species to the increased activity of fungal pathogens under the presence of dung leachates seems the main reason behind the differential effect of these leachates on species with

  5. [Effect of rations with an increased sunflower seed oil level on the rate of very low-density lipoprotein formation in the liver, secretion into the blood and composition in the blood].

    PubMed

    Liapkov, B G

    1978-01-01

    Feeding of rats on a ration with an excessive content of sunflower-oil (60 per cent of the total calorific value of the ration) for a period of 30 days resulted in lowering the rate of the apoproteins, prolipoproteins synthesis in the liver and in their loading with triglycerides and cholesterol. As a consequence of this it diminished secretion of endogenously formed tryglycerides and cholesterol from the liver into the blood and a changed lipid composition of lipoproteins of a very low density in the blood.

  6. Aerosol preparation of intact lipoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W Henry [Danville, CA; Krauss, Ronald M [Berkeley, CA; Blanche, Patricia J [Berkeley, CA

    2012-01-17

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  7. Ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.

    2007-08-21

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  8. Does Increasing Reliance on Student Debt Explain Declines in Entrepreneurial Activity? Posing the Question, Gathering Evidence, Considering Policy Options. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, concerns have emerged both about declines in entrepreneurial activity, and about increases in the amount students borrow to finance postsecondary education--in the aggregate as well as on average. Because the financial obligations associated with student debt could limit access to credit for individuals seeking to start…

  9. A mechanistic study explaining the synergistic viscosity increase obtained from polyethylene oxide (PEO) and {beta}-naphthalene sulfonate (BNS) in shotcrete

    SciTech Connect

    Pickelmann, J.; Plank, J.

    2012-11-15

    In shotcrete, a combination of polyethylene oxide (PEO) and {beta}-naphthalene sulfonate (BNS) is commonly applied to reduce rebound. Here, the mechanism for the synergistic viscosity increase resulting from this admixture combination was investigated via x-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. It was found that the electron-rich aromatic rings present in BNS donate electrons to the alkyl protons of PEO and thus increase the electron density there. This rare interaction is known as CH-{pi} interaction and leads to the formation of a supramolecular structure whereby PEO chains bind weakly to BNS molecules. Through this mechanism a polymer network exhibiting exceptionally high molecular weight and thus viscosity is formed. Among polycondensates, sulfanilic acid-phenol-formaldehyde (SPF) provides even higher synergy with PEO than BNS while melamine (PMS), acetone (AFS) or polycarboxylate (PCE) based superplasticizers do not work at all. Effectiveness of lignosulfonates is dependent on their degree of sulfonation.

  10. What are Lipoproteins doing in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Eckel, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Lipoproteins in plasma transport lipids between tissues, however, only high density lipoproteins (HDL) appear to traverse the blood brain barrier; thus, lipoproteins found in the brain must be produced within the central nervous system. Apolipoproteins E (ApoE) and ApoJ are the most abundant apolipoproteins in the brain, are mostly synthesized by astrocytes and are found on HDL. In the hippocampus and other brain regions lipoproteins help regulate neurobehavioral functions by processes that are lipoprotein receptor-mediated. Moreover, lipoproteins and their receptors also have roles in the regulation of body weight and energy balance, i.e. through lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and the LDL receptor-related protein (LRP). Thus, understanding lipoproteins and their metabolism in the brain provides a new opportunity with potential therapeutic relevance. PMID:24189266

  11. Lipoprotein metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhenghui Gordon; Robson, Simon C.; Yao, Zemin

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an escalating health problem worldwide, covers a spectrum of pathologies characterized by fatty accumulation in hepatocytes in early stages, with potential progression to liver inflammation, fibrosis, and failure. A close, yet poorly understood link exists between NAFLD and dyslipidemia, a constellation of abnormalities in plasma lipoproteins including triglyceride-rich very low density lipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are a group of primarily liver-derived proteins found in serum lipoproteins; they not only play an extracellular role in lipid transport between vital organs through circulation, but also play an important intracellular role in hepatic lipoprotein assembly and secretion. The liver functions as the central hub for lipoprotein metabolism, as it dictates lipoprotein production and to a significant extent modulates lipoprotein clearance. Lipoprotein metabolism is an integral component of hepatocellular lipid homeostasis and is implicated in the pathogenesis, potential diagnosis, and treatment of NAFLD. PMID:23554788

  12. Searching for events in Chinese ancient records to explain the increase in 14C from AD 774-775 and AD 993-994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Ya-Ting; Zou, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-01

    According to analysis of the 14C content in two Japanese trees, that grew over a period of approximately 3000 years, with high time resolution, Miyake et al. found a rapid increase at AD 774-775 and another one at AD 993-994. These increases correspond to high-energy events that happened within those years and radiated γ-ray energy of about 7×1024 erg toward the Earth. The origin of these events is a mystery. Such strong events should have an unusual optical counterpart, and have been recorded in historical literatures. We searched Chinese historical materials around AD 744-775 and AD 993-994, but no remarkable event was found except for a violent thunderstorm in AD 775. However, the possibility of a thunderstorm containing so much energy is unlikely. We conclude that the events, which caused the 14C increase, are still unclear. These events most probably had no optical counterpart, and a short gamma-ray burst, giant flare of a soft gamma-ray repeater or a terrestrial γ-ray flash could all be candidates.

  13. Revisiting the gram-negative lipoprotein paradigm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The processing of lipoproteins (lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered to be an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein n-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted...

  14. Cotinine exposure increases Fallopian tube PROKR1 expression via nicotinic AChRalpha-7: a potential mechanism explaining the link between smoking and tubal ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julie L V; Oliver, Elizabeth; Lee, Kai-Fai; Entrican, Gary; Jabbour, Henry N; Critchley, Hilary O D; Horne, Andrew W

    2010-11-01

    Tubal ectopic pregnancy (EP) is the most common cause of maternal mortality in the first trimester of pregnancy; however, its etiology is uncertain. In EP, embryo retention within the Fallopian tube (FT) is thought to be due to impaired smooth muscle contractility (SMC) and alterations in the tubal microenvironment. Smoking is a major risk factor for EP. FTs from women with EP exhibit altered prokineticin receptor-1 (PROKR1) expression, the receptor for prokineticins (PROK). PROK1 is angiogenic, regulates SMC, and is involved in intrauterine implantation. We hypothesized that smoking predisposes women to EP by altering tubal PROKR1 expression. Sera/FT were collected at hysterectomy (n=21). Serum levels of the smoking metabolite, cotinine, were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. FTs were analyzed by q-RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting for expression of PROKR1 and the predicted cotinine receptor, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α-7 (AChRα-7). FT explants (n=4) and oviductal epithelial cells (cell line OE-E6/E7) were treated with cotinine and an nAChRα-7 antagonist. PROKR1 transcription was higher in FTs from smokers (P<0.01). nAChRα-7 expression was demonstrated in FT epithelium. Cotinine treatment of FT explants and OE-E6/E7 cells increased PROKR1 expression (P<0.05), which was negated by cotreatment with nAChRα-7 antagonist. Smoking targets human FTs via nAChRα-7 to increase tubal PROKR1, leading to alterations in the tubal microenvironment that could predispose to EP.

  15. The Prevalence of Erosive Esophagitis Is Not Significantly Increased in a Healthy Korean Population - Could It Be Explained?: A Multi-center Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Geom Seog; Jeon, Byung Jun; Chung, Jin Soo; Joo, Young-Eun; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Jeong Eun; Kim, Heung Up; Park, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Nayoung

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Researches on the potential risk factors for the development of erosive esophagitis have been conducted extensively, however, the results are conflicting. The aim of this multicenter study was to identify the prevalence rate and risk factors of erosive esophagitis and their interactions with residency status. Methods A total of 4,023 eligible subjects at 8 tertiary health care centers were evaluated using questionnaires, laboratory tests and endoscopy. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify independent risk factors for erosive esophagitis. Results The prevalence rate of reflux esophagitis was 8.8%. Los Angeles grade A was common type of erosive esophagitis. Residence in a large urban areas was negatively associated with the development of erosive esophagitis (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.40-0.90). The high body mass index (≥ 25 kg/m2) was more frequent in residents of small and medium-sized cities than those in big cities (38.8% and 26.9%, respectively; P < 0.001). Seronegativity of Helicobacter pylori was associated with increased erosive esophagitis (OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.48-2.46). Triglyceride ≥ 150 mg/dL (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.08-2.07), fasting glucose level ≥ 126 mg/dL (OR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.06-2.81), and hiatal hernia (OR, 3.11; 95% CI, 1.87-5.16) were also associated with erosive esophagitis. Conclusions The prevalence rate of erosive esophagitis and its risk factors in this study were similar to the result of 8.0% of nationwide study in 2006. Residency and obesity are more important independent risk factors than H. pylori infection status for development of erosive esophagitis in Korea. These results suggest that the prevalence rate of erosive esophagitis in Korea might not increase as in the Western countries. PMID:23350050

  16. Regulation of high density lipoprotein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.

    1982-03-01

    An increasing awareness of the physiologic and pathologic importance of serum high density lipoproteins (HDL) has led to a large number of observations regarding factors which influence their concentrations. HDL consists of a heterogeneous collection of macromolecules with diverse physical properties and chemical constituents. While laboratory techniques have made it possible to measure HDL and their individual components, there are as yet large gaps in our knowledge of the biochemical mechanisms and clinical significance of changes in these laboratory parameters. In this review, current concepts of the structure and metabolism of HDL will be briefly summarized, and the factors influencing their levels in humans will be surveyed. 313 references.

  17. [Intermediate-density lipoproteins and liver lipase in postmenopausal women].

    PubMed

    Halperin, H; Berg, G; Aisemberg, L; Brites, F; Siseles, N; Wikinski, R

    1992-01-01

    In order to evaluate atherogenic lipoproteins in post-menopause, we studied 73 healthy women, 49 to 65 years old (Post-menopausal Group), with 1 to 10 years of amenorrhea and body mass index below 27 Kg/m2, and 20 young women (Control Group). We have determined plasma cholesterol concentration in the lipoproteins of intermediate density in addition to the classical lipoprotein parameters: total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and fractionation of lipoproteins by electrophoresis. In 63 women from the Post-menopausal Group and 16 from the Control Group we studied the activity of hepatic lipase. Among these patients we selected at random 25 post-menopausal women and 13 controls to add measurements of triglycerides in the lipoproteins of intermediate density. Table 1 shows that the average plasma concentration of total cholesterol in the Post-menopausal Group was higher than that of the Controls (p < 0.001). The same was found for LDL-cholesterol (p < 0.001) and for triglycerides (p < 0.001) whereas the average concentration of HDL-cholesterol did not show significant differences. The Post-menopausal Group had high values of plasma lipoproteins of intermediate density, even with normal phenotypes (Table 2). Cholesterol but also triglycerides (Fig. 1) were responsible for this increase. A triglyceride rich lipoprotein subspecies of intermediate density was predominant in 73% of Post-menopausal women vs 23% of the Controls (p < 0.01, Table 3). No differences in hepatic lipase activity were seen between the two groups (Table 4), and non statistic correlation between the enzyme activity and IDL-triglycerides or HDL-cholesterol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Enhanced Botrytis cinerea resistance of Arabidopsis plants grown in compost may be explained by increased expression of defense-related genes, as revealed by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Segarra, Guillem; Santpere, Gabriel; Elena, Georgina; Trillas, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Composts are the products obtained after the aerobic degradation of different types of organic matter waste and can be used as substrates or substrate/soil amendments for plant cultivation. There is a small but increasing number of reports that suggest that foliar diseases may be reduced when using compost, rather than standard substrates, as growing medium. The purpose of this study was to examine the gene expression alteration produced by the compost to gain knowledge of the mechanisms involved in compost-induced systemic resistance. A compost from olive marc and olive tree leaves was able to induce resistance against Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis, unlike the standard substrate, perlite. Microarray analyses revealed that 178 genes were differently expressed, with a fold change cut-off of 1, of which 155 were up-regulated and 23 were down-regulated in compost-grown, as against perlite-grown plants. A functional enrichment study of up-regulated genes revealed that 38 Gene Ontology terms were significantly enriched. Response to stress, biotic stimulus, other organism, bacterium, fungus, chemical and abiotic stimulus, SA and ABA stimulus, oxidative stress, water, temperature and cold were significantly enriched, as were immune and defense responses, systemic acquired resistance, secondary metabolic process and oxireductase activity. Interestingly, PR1 expression, which was equally enhanced by growing the plants in compost and by B. cinerea inoculation, was further boosted in compost-grown pathogen-inoculated plants. Compost triggered a plant response that shares similarities with both systemic acquired resistance and ABA-dependent/independent abiotic stress responses.

  19. Linkage of low-density lipoprotein size to the lipoprotein lipase gene in heterozygous lipoprotein lipase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Hokanson, J E; Brunzell, J D; Jarvik, G P; Wijsman, E M; Austin, M A

    1999-01-01

    Small low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles are a genetically influenced coronary disease risk factor. Lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the formation of LDL particles. The current study examined genetic linkage of LDL particle size to the LpL gene in five families with structural mutations in the LpL gene. LDL particle size was smaller among the heterozygous subjects, compared with controls. Among heterozygous subjects, 44% were classified as affected by LDL subclass phenotype B, compared with 8% of normal family members. Plasma triglyceride levels were significantly higher, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were lower, in heterozygous subjects, compared with normal subjects, after age and sex adjustment. A highly significant LOD score of 6.24 at straight theta=0 was obtained for linkage of LDL particle size to the LpL gene, after adjustment of LDL particle size for within-genotype variance resulting from triglyceride and HDL-C. Failure to adjust for this variance led to only a modest positive LOD score of 1.54 at straight theta=0. Classifying small LDL particles as a qualitative trait (LDL subclass phenotype B) provided only suggestive evidence for linkage to the LpL gene (LOD=1. 65 at straight theta=0). Thus, use of the quantitative trait adjusted for within-genotype variance, resulting from physiologic covariates, was crucial for detection of significant evidence of linkage in this study. These results indicate that heterozygous LpL deficiency may be one cause of small LDL particles and may provide a potential mechanism for the increase in coronary disease seen in heterozygous LpL deficiency. This study also demonstrates a successful strategy of genotypic specific adjustment of complex traits in mapping a quantitative trait locus. PMID:9973300

  20. New insights into the role of lipoprotein(a)-associated lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Tsimikas, Sotirios; Tsironis, Loukas D; Tselepis, Alexandros D

    2007-10-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] plays an important role in atherosclerosis. The biological effects of Lp(a) have been attributed either to apolipoprotein(a) or to its low-density lipoprotein-like particle. Lp(a) contains platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, an enzyme that exhibits a Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 activity and is complexed to lipoproteins in plasma; thus, it is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. Substrates for lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 include phospholipids containing oxidatively fragmented residues at the sn-2 position (oxidized phospholipids; OxPLs). OxPLs may play important roles in vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Plasma levels of OxPLs present on apolipoprotein B-100 particles (OxPL/apolipoprotein B) are correlated with coronary artery, carotid, and peripheral arterial disease. Furthermore, OxPL/apolipoprotein B levels in plasma are strongly correlated with Lp(a) levels, are preferentially sequestered on Lp(a), and thus are potentially subjected to degradation by the Lp(a)-associated lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. The present review article focuses specifically on the characteristics of the lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 associated with Lp(a) and discusses the possible role of this enzyme in view of emerging data showing that OxPLs in plasma are preferentially sequestered on Lp(a) and may significantly contribute to the increased atherogenicity of this lipoprotein.

  1. [Lipoprotein receptors. Old acquaintances and newcomers].

    PubMed

    Ducobu, J

    1997-02-01

    Lipoprotein receptors are plasma membrane proteins of high affinity which interact with circulating lipoprotein particles. The well characterized LDL receptor continues to be analysed and some new findings on its intracellular mechanisms of action have emerged. New lipoprotein receptors have recently been described: the chylomicron remnant receptor or LDL-related protein (LRP), the lipolysis stimulated receptor (LSR), the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), the HDL receptor (HDLR) and the scavenger receptor (SR). The molecular details of the receptors will facilitate the development of new therapeutic means to improve receptor-mediated clearance of lipoproteins.

  2. A lipoprotein characterizing obstructive jaundice. I. Method for quantitative separation and identification of lipoproteins in jaundiced subjects

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, D.; Alaupovic, P.; Furman, R. H.

    1969-01-01

    Three immunochemically and electrophoretically distinct lipoproteins, LP-A, LP-B, and LP-X,1 were isolated from the low density lipoprotein fraction (1.006-1.063 g/ml) in plasma from patients with biliary obstruction by a separation procedure which combines ultracentrifugation, heparin precipitation, and ethanol fractionation. This method, here described, permits the quantitative determination of individual plasma lipoprotein families on the basis of their protein moieties, rather than on the basis of their lipid moieties or density. The chemical composition of the unique lipoprotein, LP-X, was similar to that of an abnormal lipoprotein, OLP, isolated by Russ et al. (29) and by Switzer (30). In obstructive jaundice plasma, the combined LP-X and LP-B accounted for 98% and the LP-A for only 2% of the total protein content of the LDL fraction. This study indicates that the plasma lipoprotein pattern in obstructive jaundice is characterized by (a) a decreased concentration of HDL, (b) an increased concentration of LDL, and (c) the presence in the LDL fraction of varying amounts of a specific lipoprotein, LP-X, immunochemically and chemically distinct from LP-A and LP-B. LP-X, with its characteristically high content of unesterified cholesterol and phospholipids, is primarily responsible for the unusual protein and lipid content of the LDL fraction. Screening tests in 61 patients with various forms of jaundice indicated that a characteristic immunoelectrophoretic precipitin are between plasma samples and purified antibodies to LP-X was observed only in patients with obstructive jaundice. This simple immunochemical test may represent a valuable new tool in the differential diagnosis of obstructive and nonobstructive jaundice. Images PMID:4978447

  3. Lipoprotein metabolism and lipoprotein lipase in severe cystic acne.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, P; Altomare, G F; Negri, M; Finzi, A F; Vigotti, G; Vergani, C

    1985-01-01

    In severe cystic acne we found low levels of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A (Apo-A) in the presence of normal total lipids. In a larger number of patients, we always observed significantly lower levels of HDL-C and Apo-A than in either age-matched controls or subjects with acne vulgaris. Since lipoprotein lipase is one major determinant of HDL concentration, we assayed the lipase activity in liver and extra-hepatic tissues by the method of Krauss et al. There was highly significant less total and hepatic lipase activity than in age-matched controls. HDL distribution was examined by zonal ultracentrifugation and a decrease in the HDL2 subclass was discovered. Since HDL are inversely correlated to atherosclerosis, cystic acne is one risk factor for atherosclerosis. The linkage between low HDL levels and severe cystic acne should be further investigated.

  4. Structural Stability and Functional Remodeling of High-Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Gursky, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Lipoproteins are protein-lipid nanoparticles that transport lipids in circulation and are central in atherosclerosis and other disorders of lipid metabolism. Apolipoproteins form flexible structural scaffolds and important functional ligands on the particle surface and direct lipoprotein metabolism. Lipoproteins undergo multiple rounds of metabolic remodeling that is crucial to lipid transport. Important aspects of this remodeling, including apolipoprotein dissociation and particle fusion, are mimicked in thermal or chemical denaturation and are modulated by free energy barriers. Here we review our biophysical studies that revealed kinetic mechanism of lipoprotein stabilization and unraveled its structural basis. The main focus is on high-density lipoprotein (HDL). An inverse correlation between stability and functions of various HDLs in cholesterol transport suggests functional role of structural disorder. A mechanism for conformational adaptation of the major HDL proteins, apoA-I and apoA-II, to the increasing lipid load is proposed. Together, these studies help understand why HDL form discrete subclasses separated by kinetic barriers, which have distinct composition, conformation and functional properties. Understanding these properties may help improve HDL quality and develop novel therapies for cardiovascular disease. PMID:25749369

  5. Low density lipoproteins mediated nanoplatforms for cancer targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Kesharwani, Prashant; Jain, Narendra K.

    2013-09-01

    Chemotherapy is a foremost remedial approach for the treatment of localized and metastasized tumors. In order to explore new treatment modalities for cancer, it is important to identify qualitative or quantitative differences in metabolic processes between normal and malignant cells. One such difference may be that of increased receptor-mediated cellular uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDLs) by cancer cells. Lipoproteins in general and specifically LDL are ideal candidates for loading and delivering cancer therapeutic and diagnostic agents due to their biocompatibility. By mimicking the endogenous shape and structure of lipoproteins, the reconstituted lipoproteins can remain in circulation for an extended period of time, while largely evading the reticuloendothelial cells in the body's defenses. In this account, we review the field of low density inspired nanoparticles in relation to the delivery of cancer imaging and therapeutic agents. LDL has instinctive cancer targeting potential and has been used to incorporate various lipophillic molecules to transport them to tumors. Nature's method of rerouting LDL provides a strategy to extend the cancer targeting potential of lipoproteins far off its constricted purview. In this review, we have discussed the various aspects of LDL including its role in cancer imaging and chemotherapy in retrospect and prospect and current efforts aimed to further improve the delivery efficacy of LDL-drug complexes with reduced chances of drug resistance leading to optimal drug delivery. This review provides a strong support for the concept of using LDL as a drug carrier.

  6. Characterization of chick serum lipoproteins isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Vico, F; Lopez, J M; Castillo, M; Zafra, M F; Garcia-Peregrin, E

    1992-01-01

    Serum lipoproteins from 12h fasted male chicks (15-day-old) were separated into 20 fractions by isopycnic density gradient ultracentrifugation. A new procedure was described by collecting the different fractions from the bottom of tube instead of by aspiration from the meniscus of each tube. Analyses of chemical composition of serum lipoproteins have permitted to reevaluate the density limits of major classes: VHDL, d greater than 1.132 g/ml; HDL, d 1.132-1.084 g/ml; LDL, d 1.084-1.038; IDL, d 1.038-1.022; and VLDL d less than 1.022. HDL fractions clearly predominated (approx. 77% of total lipoproteins) while IDL and VLDL were present at low percentage. LDL was the fraction richest in cholesterol; triacylglycerol content clearly increased from HDL to VLDL, while protein content decreased. All the chemical components of chick serum lipoproteins were accumulated in HDL, although triacylglycerol was relatively distributed in all the lipoprotein classes.

  7. RP105 facilitates macrophage activation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Antje; Kobayashi, Toshihiko; Pierini, Lynda M; Banaei, Niaz; Ernst, Joel D; Miyake, Kensuke; Ehrt, Sabine

    2009-01-22

    RP105, phylogenetically related to Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, is reported to facilitate B cell activation by the TLR4-agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS)--but to limit LPS-induced cytokine production by antigen-presenting cells. Here, we show that the role of RP105 extends beyond LPS recognition and that RP105 positively regulates macrophage responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) lipoproteins. Mtb-infected RP105(-/-) mice exhibited impaired proinflammatory cytokine responses associated with enhanced bacterial burden and increased lung pathology. The Mtb 19 kDa lipoprotein induced release of tumor necrosis factor in a manner dependent on both TLR2 and RP105, and macrophage activation by Mtb lacking mature lipoproteins was not RP105 dependent. Thus, mycobacterial lipoproteins are RP105 agonists. RP105 physically interacted with TLR2, and both RP105 and TLR2 were required for optimal macrophage activation by Mtb. Our data identify RP105 as an accessory molecule for TLR2, forming part of the receptor complex for innate immune recognition of mycobacterial lipoproteins.

  8. A green tea catechin extract upregulates the hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor in rats.

    PubMed

    Bursill, Christina A; Roach, Paul D

    2007-07-01

    Green tea extracts have hypocholesterolaemic properties in epidemiological and animal intervention studies. Upregulation of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor may be one mechanism to explain this as it is the main way cholesterol is removed from the circulation. This study aimed to determine if a green tea extract could upregulate the hepatic LDL receptor in vivo in the rat. A green tea extract (GTE) enriched in its anti-oxidant constituents, the catechins, was fed to rats (n = 6) at concentrations of either 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0% (w/w) mixed in with their normal chow along with 0.25% (w/w) cholesterol for 12 days. Administration of the GTE had no effect on plasma total or LDL cholesterol concentrations but high-density lipoprotein significantly increased (41%; p < 0.05). Interestingly, there was a significant increase in LDL receptor binding activity (2.7-fold) and LDL receptor protein (3.4-fold) in the 2% (w/w) treatment group compared to controls. There were also significant reductions in liver total and unesterified cholesterol (40%). Administration of the GTE significantly reduced cholesterol absorption (24%) but did not affect cholesterol synthesis. These results show that, despite no effect on plasma cholesterol, the GTE upregulated the LDL receptor in vivo. This appears to be via a reduction in liver cholesterol concentration and suggests that the green tea extract was able to increase the efflux of cholesterol from liver cells.

  9. Explaining Increases in Higher Education Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archibald, Robert B.; Feldman, David H.

    2008-01-01

    The real cost of higher education per full-time equivalent student has grown substantially over the last 75 years, and the rapid rise since the early 1980s is a cause of considerable public concern. Opinion surveys consistently find that how much one has to pay for a college education is a serious national issue. In his July 1996 congressional…

  10. Biogenesis and Membrane Targeting of Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins, which are anchored to membranes through triacyl chains attached to the amino-terminal cysteine. They are involved in various functions localized in cell envelope. Escherichia coli possesses more than 90 species of lipoproteins, most of which are localized in the outer membrane, with others being in the inner membrane. All lipoproteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm with an N-terminal signal peptide, translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, and converted to mature lipoproteins through sequential reactions catalyzed by three lipoprotein-processing enzymes: Lgt, LspA, and Lnt. The sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane requires a system comprising five Lol proteins. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, LolCDE, initiates the sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane. Formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is coupled to this LolCDE-dependent release reaction. LolA accommodates the amino-terminal acyl chain of lipoproteins in its hydrophobic cavity, thereby generating a hydrophilic complex that can traverse the periplasmic space by diffusion. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB on the outer membrane and anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane by the action of LolB. In contrast, since LolCDE does not recognize lipoproteins possessing Asp at position +2, these lipoproteins remain anchored to the inner membrane. Genes for Lol proteins are widely conserved among gram-negative bacteria, and Lol-mediated outer membrane targeting of lipoproteins is considered to be the general lipoprotein localization mechanism.

  11. Extended-release niacin for modifying the lipoprotein profile.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R

    2004-06-01

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) favourably modifies all aspects of the lipoprotein profile; it raises high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, lowers triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and lipoprotein(a) levels and reduces atherogenic small, dense LDL particles. One large monotherapy trial and multiple trials of niacin in combination with other lipid-modifying drugs show remarkable consistency in the ability of niacin to improve angiographic and clinical outcomes. In practice, however, the use of regular, immediate-release niacin (niacin IR) has been limited by the side effect of flushing. Sustained-release (SR) formulations, developed in order to reduce flushing, were found to cause serious hepatotoxicity at varying frequencies. Extended-release niacin (niacin ER; Niaspan), Kos Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) is a prescription formulation of niacin, administered once-daily at bedtime. Niacin ER is as effective in modifying lipoprotein levels as an equal daily dose of niacin IR and it causes less flushing. In addition, niacin ER administered once-daily is not associated with the increased hepatotoxicity reported with SR formulations. Niacin ER has been studied extensively in combination therapy with statins, including lovastatin in a recently introduced combination tablet. Myopathy has not been a substantial problem in statin/niacin ER combination therapy. Finally, a study of niacin ER given to diabetic patients showed only mild trends towards increased glycosylated haemoglobin concentrations and a need for additional antidiabetic medication. Thus, niacin ER represents an effective and safe option in the management of low levels of HDL-C and other lipoprotein abnormalities in a variety of settings.

  12. [Lipids, lipoproteins, arterial accidents and oral contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Bakir, R; Hilliquin, P

    1986-01-01

    This work reviews lipoprotein metabolism and relationships to atherosclerosis, examines the nature of arterial accidents and lipid modifications that occur with oral contraceptive (OC) use, and assesses the practical consequences for OC prescription. Cholesterol, triglycerides, and phospholipids are not soluble in aqueous milieus, and their transport in plasma is provided by macromolecules comprising a protein part and a lipid part. 5 types of these lipoproteins are distinguished by their relative richness in lipids and protein and by the nature of their proteins. The chylomicrons carry exogenous triglycerides to the peripheral tissues and cholesterol of dietary origin to the liver. Very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol is secreted by the liver and transports triglycerides and cholesterol of endogenous origin. Low denisty lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol originates in the degradation of VLDL cholesterol and transports cholesterol to the cells. High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is secreted by the liver and intestines or formed in the course of degradation of chylomicrons and VLDL cholesterol. Its role is to carry excess cholesterol in the peripheral tissues to the liver for elimination in the bile. Cholesterol thus follows 2 different pathways in the body: a path from the liver to the peripheral cells, whose markers are LDL and VLDL cholesterol and the plasma apoprotein B, and a path of return of excess cholesterol from the tissues and especially the arteries to the liver, marked by HDL cholesterol and the plasma apoprotein A. Only a proper balance between the 2 flows can prevent an excess of cholesterol in the arteries and the consequent constitution of atherosclerotic lesions. LDL and to a lesser extent VLDL cholesterol are strongly and positively correlated to atherogenic risk, while HDL cholesterol is negatively correlated to risk, independently of other risk factors. Arterial accidents occurring with OC use do not seem to be atheromatous in

  13. Lipoprotein metabolism differs between Marek's disease susceptible and resistant chickens.

    PubMed

    Yuan, P; Yu, Y; Luo, J; Tian, F; Zhang, H; Chang, S; Ramachandran, R; Zhang, L; Song, J

    2012-10-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens caused by MD virus and has an important impact on the poultry industry worldwide. There have been reports showing different physiological characteristics between MD susceptible and resistant chickens. However, little is known about whether there are differences in lipid metabolism between MD susceptible and resistant lines of chickens. In this study, we examined the BW and the weight of tissues (abdominal fat, breast muscle with bone, leg muscle with bone, liver, and heart), the lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations and distributions, and the plasma and tissue levels of adiponectin and its receptors in the highly resistant and susceptible lines during chicken growth. Our data showed that the increase in total cholesterol during growth was mainly due to the elevation of cholesterol in the low-density/very low-density lipoprotein fraction in MD susceptible chickens, whereas the increase of total cholesterol was mainly attributable to the increase in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in MD resistant chickens. Meanwhile, the MD resistant line appeared to have increased plasma adiponectin levels compared with MD susceptible chickens during growth. Taken together, our data suggested that lipoprotein-cholesterol and adiponectin metabolism are different between MD susceptible and resistant chickens.

  14. Polyacrylate adsorbents for the selective adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins from plasma or blood

    PubMed Central

    Heuck, Claus-Chr.

    2011-01-01

    Polyacrylate (PAA) adsorbents selectively bind low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human plasma and blood, whereas very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) are only minimally adsorbed. The adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins to PAA adsorbents is related to the molecular weight (mw) of the polyanion ligand. Ca++ and Mg++ inhibit the binding of LDL to PAA adsorbents. The chemical composition of the organic hardgels of the adsorbents does not have an influence on adsorption. The selective adsorption of LDL to PAA adsorbents can be explained to result from their low negative surface charge density and the specific colloid-chemical properties of the surface-bound PAA, which do not prevent LDL from binding to charge-like domains of the ligand. By contrast, VLDL and high density lipoproteins (HDL) are repelled from the adsorbents due to their higher negative surface charge density. PMID:21289994

  15. Polyacrylate adsorbents for the selective adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins from plasma or blood.

    PubMed

    Heuck, Claus-Chr

    2011-01-24

    Polyacrylate (PAA) adsorbents selectively bind low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human plasma and blood, whereas very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) are only minimally adsorbed. The adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins to PAA adsorbents is related to the molecular weight (mw) of the polyanion ligand. Ca(++) and Mg(++) inhibit the binding of LDL to PAA adsorbents. The chemical composition of the organic hardgels of the adsorbents does not have an influence on adsorption. The selective adsorption of LDL to PAA adsorbents can be explained to result from their low negative surface charge density and the specific colloid-chemical properties of the surface-bound PAA, which do not prevent LDL from binding to charge-like domains of the ligand. By contrast, VLDL and high density lipoproteins (HDL) are repelled from the adsorbents due to their higher negative surface charge density.

  16. A More Flexible Lipoprotein Sorting Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chahales, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Lipoprotein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria occurs by a conserved pathway, each step of which is considered essential. In contrast to this model, LoVullo and colleagues demonstrate that the N-acyl transferase Lnt is not required in Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This suggests the existence of a more flexible lipoprotein pathway, likely due to a modified Lol transporter complex, and raises the possibility that pathogens may regulate lipoprotein processing to modulate interactions with the host. PMID:25755190

  17. Lipoprotein Changes in HIV-Infected Antiretroviral-Naïve Individuals after Starting Antiretroviral Therapy: ACTG Study A5152s Stein: Lipoprotein Changes on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Stein, James H; Komarow, Lauren; Cotter, Bruno R; Currier, Judith S; Dubé, Michael P; Fichtenbaum, Carl J; Gerschenson, Mariana; Mitchell, Carol K C; Murphy, Robert L; Squires, Kathleen; Parker, Robert A; Torriani, Francesca J

    2008-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Dyslipidemia is a frequent complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV). The effects of ART on lipoproteins are less well-understood, and have not been investigated in a prospective study where assignment to ART is randomized. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of three class-sparing ART regimens on lipids and lipoproteins. METHODS: This was a substudy of a prospective, multicenter study treatment-naïve HIV-infected individuals randomly assigned to receive a regimen of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) + the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor efavirenz, NRTIs + the protease inhibitor lopinavir/ritonavir, or a NRTI-sparing regimen of efavirenz + lopinavir/ritonavir. Lipoproteins were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. RESULTS: Among the 82 participants, total and small low-density lipoprotein concentrations increased (median, interquartile range) by 152 (-49 - +407, p<0.01) and 130 (-98 - +417, p<0.01) nmol/L, respectively, especially in the arms containing lopinavir/ritonavir (p(KW)<0.04). Very low-density lipoproteins also increased (p<0.01), with a larger increase in the arms that contained lopinavir/ritonavir (p=0.022). High-density lipoproteins increased by 6.0 nmol/L (2.8 - 10.4, p<0.01), but differences between arms were not significant (p(KW)=0.069). Changes were not related to changes in markers of insulin/glucose metabolism. CONCLUSIONS: Total and small low-density lipoprotein concentrations increased, especially in the arms containing lopinavir/ritonavir, as did increases in total very low-density lipoproteins. Adverse changes were especially prominent in the arm with efavirenz + lopinavir/ritonavir.

  18. LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE RELEASES ESTERIFIED OXYLIPINS FROM VERY LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Defects in lipoprotein metabolism alter the lipoprotein distribution of oxidized PUFAs, and we speculate that lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is a determinant in the release of VLDL-associated oxylipins. Here, using 12 wk old normolipidemic (lean) and hyperlipidemic (obese) Zucker-rats, we measured PUFA al...

  19. Simultaneous labeling of lipoprotein intracellular trafficking in pigeon monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, N. L.

    1997-01-01

    Macrophage foam cell formation resulting from the accumulation of cholesterol and cholesterol esters derived from plasma lipoproteins is important for progression of atherosclerosis. Hypothetically, intracellular processing of lipoproteins that stimulate foam cell formation differs from processing of lipoproteins that do not. To test this, we examined simultaneous subcellular trafficking of lipoproteins in pigeon monocyte-derived macrophages. Pigeon beta-very-low-density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and acetylated low-density lipoprotein (Ac-LDL), differentially labeled with colloidal gold, were added in pairs to cells at 4 degrees C for 2 hours before uptake at 18 degrees C, 22 degrees C, or 37 degrees C for either 30 minutes or 2 hours. The colloidal gold distribution and percent co-labeling as observed by transmission electron microscopy were determined for organelles of the endocytic pathway. Incubations at 18 degrees C and 22 degrees C blocked lipoprotein trafficking to lysosomes. Incubation at 18 degrees C increased the percent distribution of lipoproteins in the endocytic pathway up to the early cisternal endosomes. Incubations at 22 degrees C resulted in a greater distribution of lipoproteins in the spherical late endosomes and late endosomal-prelysosomal tubular reticular compartment. The distribution in the endocytic pathway was a factor of time and temperature rather than lipoprotein type. The percentage of co-labeling of organelles for the three pairs of lipoproteins examined, Ac-LDL plus beta-VLDL, LDL plus beta-VLDL, and LDL plus Ac-LDL, was similar. Fewer noncoated and clathrin-coated pits and vesicles were co-labeled (average of 6%, maximum of 17%) than the rest of the endocytic pathway, early cisternal endosomes, spherical late endosomes, late endosomal-prelysosomal tubuloreticular compartment, and spherical lysosomes (average of 36%, maximum of 47%). The 36% of co-labeled later endocytic organelles contained an average

  20. Effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Scharnagl, Hubert; Kist, Manfred; Grawitz, Andrea Busse; Koenig, Wolfgang; Wieland, Heinrich; März, Winfried

    2004-01-15

    We examined the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication on lipids and apolipoproteins in 87 patients with duodenal ulcers. A significant increase was observed in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (+24.7%, p <0.001), apolipoprotein AI (+9.0%, p <0.001), and apolipoprotein AII (+11.7%, p <0.001) after eradication. Minor increases occurred in total cholesterol, triglycerides, and apolipoprotein B, whereas low-density lipoprotein cholesterol remained unchanged. Our results suggest that chronic H. pylori infection reduces plasma levels of HDL cholesterol and that eradication improves the lipoprotein pattern.

  1. Effect of proteolysis of low-density serum lipoproteins on their interaction with macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Karmanskii, I.M.; Kovaleva, G.G.; Viktorova, L.N.; Shpikiter, V.O.

    1987-01-01

    The authors previously postulated, on the basis of changes observed in the structural stability of low-density lipoproteins during treatment with pepsin or aortic cathepsin, that enzymatic modifications may lead to potentiation of the atherogenic properties of the lipoproteins. They also reported that treatment of lipoproteins with trypsin causes an increase in their binding with aortic glycosaminoglycans and to increased degradation by fibroblasts of patients with hereditary hypercholesterolemia. Limited proteolysis of lipoproteins with pepsin facilitated their binding with fibronectin. In this paper the authors investigate the uptake and degradation of low-density lipoproteins by macrophages after their limited hydrolysis by pepsin, an analog of tissue cathepsin D. The lipoproteins were isolated from the serum of healthy blood donors by ultracentrifugation. Iodination of the proteins with I 125 was carried out by the iodine monochloride method. Uptake and retention of the labelled lipoprotein were measured with a gamma counter. The increased uptake of the proteins, partially hydrolized by pepsin, was accompanied by their more intense degradation by macrophages.

  2. Intestinal Lipid Absorption and Lipoprotein Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to summarize evidence for the presence of two pathways of lipid absorption and their regulation. Recent findings Lipid absorption involves hydrolysis of dietary fat in the lumen of the intestine followed by the uptake of hydrolyzed products by enterocytes. Lipids are re-synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and are either secreted with chylomicrons and high density lipoproteins or stored as cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Lipids in the droplets are hydrolyzed and are secreted at a later time. Secretion of lipids by the chylomicron and HDL pathways are critically dependent on MTP and ABCA1, respectively, and are regulated independently. Gene ablation studies showed that MTP function and chylomicron assembly is essential for the absorption of triglyceride and retinyl esters. Ablation of MTP abolishes triglyceride absorption and results in massive triglyceride accumulation in enterocytes. Although majority of phospholipid, cholesterol and vitamin E are absorbed through the chylomicron pathway, a significant amount of these lipids are also absorbed via the HDL pathway. Chylomicron assembly and secretion is increased by the enhanced availability of fatty acids, whereas HDL pathway is upregulated by LXR agonists. Intestinal insulin resistance increases chylomicron and might reduce HDL production. Summary Triglycerides are exclusively transported via the chylomicron pathway and this process is critically dependent on MTP. Besides chylomicrons, absorption of phospholipids, free cholesterol, retinol, and vitamin E also involves high density lipoproteins. These two pathways are complementary and are regulated independently. They may be targeted to lower lipid absorption in order to control hyperlipidemia, obesity, metabolic syndrome, steatosis, insulin resistance, atherosclerosis and other disorders. PMID:24751933

  3. Lipoprotein binding to cultured human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Krempler, F; Kostner, G M; Friedl, W; Paulweber, B; Bauer, H; Sandhofer, F

    1987-01-01

    Binding of various 125I-lipoproteins to hepatic receptors was studied on cultured human hepatoma cells (Hep G2). Chylomicrons, isolated from a chylothorax, chylomicron remnants, hypertriglyceridemic very low-density lipoproteins, normotriglyceridemic very low-density lipoproteins (NTG-VLDL), their remnants, low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and HDL-E (an Apo E-rich high-density lipoprotein isolated from the plasma of a patient with primary biliary cirrhosis) were bound by high-affinity receptors. Chylomicron remnants and HDL-E were bound with the highest affinity. The results, obtained from competitive binding experiments, are consistent with the existence of two distinct receptors on Hep G2 cells: (a) a remnant receptor capable of high-affinity binding of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and HDL-E, but not of Apo E free LDL, and (b) a LDL receptor capable of high-affinity binding of LDL, NTG-VLDL, and HDL-E. Specific binding of Apo E-free LDL was completely abolished in the presence of 3 mM EDTA, indicating that binding to the LDL receptor is calcium dependent. Specific binding of chylomicron remnants was not inhibited by the presence of even 10 mM EDTA. Preincubation of the Hep G2 cells in lipoprotein-containing medium resulted in complete suppression of LDL receptors but did not affect the remnant receptors. Hep G2 cells seem to be a suitable model for the study of hepatic receptors for lipoprotein in man. Images PMID:3038957

  4. Altered Serum Lipoprotein Profiles in Male and Female Power Lifters Ingesting Anabolic Steroids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jonathan C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Serum lipoprotein profiles were measured in nine male and three female weightlifters who were taking anabolic steroids. The profiles suggest that steriod users may face an increased risk of coronary artery disease. (Author/MT)

  5. Lipoprotein lipase, LDL receptors and apo-lipoproteins in human fetal membranes at term.

    PubMed

    Huter, O; Wolf, H J; Schnetzer, A; Pfaller, K

    1997-11-01

    Ultrastructurally, all cells of human fetal membranes strongly exhibit a large amount of lipid deposits throughout pregnancy. Their origin and function is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization of key components of lipid metabolism in this tissue. Using immunohistochemical techniques, the distribution of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), low density lipoprotein receptors (LDL receptors), and apo-lipoprotein B and E was investigated in 20 human fetal membranes at term. In addition, electron microscopy was used to study the intracellular localization of lipoprotein-sized particles. Amnionic epithelium and trophoblast cells reacted strongly for LPL. LDL receptors and apo-lipoproteins were present in amnionic epithelium and fibroblasts of the amnion. In none of the investigated cells were lipoprotein-sized particles identified. Similar results were obtained in all 20 cases. The findings indicate that lipoprotein from the amniotic fluid or from the maternal circulation may serve as substrate for lipids in human fetal membranes.

  6. The pathophysiology of intestinal lipoprotein production

    PubMed Central

    Giammanco, Antonina; Cefalù, Angelo B.; Noto, Davide; Averna, Maurizio R.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal lipoprotein production is a multistep process, essential for the absorption of dietary fats and fat-soluble vitamins. Chylomicron assembly begins in the endoplasmic reticulum with the formation of primordial, phospholipids-rich particles that are then transported to the Golgi for secretion. Several classes of transporters play a role in the selective uptake and/or export of lipids through the villus enterocytes. Once secreted in the lymph stream, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) are metabolized by Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of triacylglycerols of very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs) and chylomicrons, thereby delivering free fatty acids to various tissues. Genetic mutations in the genes codifying for these proteins are responsible of different inherited disorders affecting chylomicron metabolism. This review focuses on the molecular pathways that modulate the uptake and the transport of lipoproteins of intestinal origin and it will highlight recent findings on TRLs assembly. PMID:25852563

  7. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... measure lipoprotein in serum and plasma. Lipoprotein measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... measure lipoprotein in serum and plasma. Lipoprotein measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... measure lipoprotein in serum and plasma. Lipoprotein measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... measure lipoprotein in serum and plasma. Lipoprotein measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... measure lipoprotein in serum and plasma. Lipoprotein measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  12. The expanding role of lipoprotein apheresis in the treatment of raised lipoprotein(a) in ischaemic heart disease and refractory angina

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tina Z; Pottle, Alison; Pennell, Dudley J; Barbir, Mahmoud S

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly recognised that lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], an inherited, genetically-determined form of LDL-cholesterol, is an independent cardiovascular risk factor and predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Lp(a) is felt to increase cardiovascular risk via its pro-thrombotic effect and by enhancing intimal lipoprotein deposition. Lipoprotein apheresis is currently the most effective treatment for raised Lp(a). There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that aggressively lowering raised Lp(a) may improve cardiovascular and clinical outcomes, although much more research is required in this field. Angina which is refractory to conventional medical therapy and revascularisation, is extremely challenging to manage. Treatment options for such patients remain very limited. We describe the case of a patient with refractory angina and raised lipoprotein(a) in whom aggressive reduction of Lp(a) with lipoprotein apheresis successfully ameliorated the progression of coronary stenosis and provided effective and durable relief of angina symptoms. In our centre, we are currently conducting a prospective, randomised controlled cross-over study of patients with refractory angina and raised Lp(a), randomised to undergoing lipoprotein apheresis or ‘sham’ apheresis with assessment of myocardial perfusion, carotid atherosclerosis, endothelial vascular function, thrombogenesis, oxidised phospholipids and their antibodies, exercise capacity, angina symptoms and quality of life at the beginning and end of treatment. PMID:25054114

  13. Lipoprotein composition and oxidative modification during therapy with gemfibrozil and lovastatin in patients with combined hyperlipidaemia

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, M; Zambón, D; Hernández, Y; Adzet, T; Merlos, M; Ros, E; Laguna, J C

    1998-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the resistance to oxidation of human lipoproteins after hypolipidaemic therapy. Methods VLDL and LDL samples were obtained from patients with Familial Combined Hyperlipidaemia included in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study, with 8 weeks of active treatment (gemfibrozil, 600 mg twice daily, or lovastatin, 40 mg daily) and a 4-week wash-out period. Oxidation related analytes after Cu-induced oxidation of VLDL and LDL have been investigated. Further, in order to relate possible changes in oxidative behaviour to lipoprotein composition, the proportion of the lipid species transported by lipoproteins (triglycerides, phospholipids, and cholesteryl esters), the molar composition of fatty acids for each lipoprotein lipid, and the content of antioxidant vitamins in plasma (vitamin C) and lipoproteins (vitamin E) have been studied. Results Both drugs reduced the plasma concentration of apo-B lipoproteins (−23% gemfibrozil, −26% lovastatin), but whereas lovastatin affected mainly LDL-cholesterol (−30%), gemfibrozil reduced triglycerides (−49%) and VLDL-cholesterol (−48%). Lovastatin treatment had no effect on the lipid and protein composition, the fatty acid profile, or the vitamin E content of either VLDL or LDL; likewise, lipoprotein oxidation markers (Cu-induced conjugated dienes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation, and lysine residues) were similar before and after lovastatin treatment. Gemfibrozil therapy also had no effect on lipoprotein oxidation; nevertheless, it consistently: a) decreased the proportion of LDL-triglycerides (−32%), and b) increased the proportion (molar%) of 18:3 n-6 in VLDL triglycerides (+140%), phospholipids (+363%) and cholesteryl esters (+53%). Conclusions Based on these results, lovastatin and gemfibrozil do not adversely affect lipoprotein oxidation in patients with mixed dyslipidaemia. In the case of gemfibrozil, this occurs in spite of an increased proportion of some polyunsaturated fatty

  14. Effect of Antiepileptic drugs on plasma lipoprotein (a) and other lipid levels in childhood.

    PubMed

    Aynaci, F M; Orhan, F; Orem, A; Yildirmis, S; Gedik, Y

    2001-05-01

    Antiepileptic drugs may alter plasma lipid status in epileptic patients. We conducted a study to assess the effect of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproate on plasma levels of lipoprotein (a), total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A, and apolipoprotein B in 22 epileptic children. The children were separated as group 1, seven children, mean age 1.6+/-0.2 years, treated with phenobarbital, 5 mg/kg/day, twice daily; group 2, seven children, mean age 9.8+/-1.2 years, treated with carbamazepine, 20 mg/kg/day, twice daily; and group 3, eight children, mean age 6.8+/-0.6 years, treated with valproate, 20 mg/kg/day, twice daily. Plasma lipoprotein (a) and other lipid levels were studied before (pretreatment) and at 3 and 6 months of treatment. Friedman two-way analysis of variance and Wilcoxon's signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis, and the results were expressed as the mean and standard error of the mean. The mean age of children in group 1 was significantly low, compared with groups 2 and, 3 (P < .001). The mean pretreatment lipid levels between the groups were not significant. The increase in lipoprotein (a) at 3 and 6 months and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at 6 months was statistically significant in group 1 (P < .025). We suggest a careful monitoring of plasma levels of lipoprotein (a) and other lipids in epileptic children treated with antiepileptic drugs.

  15. Characterization of biophysical properties of baboon lipoproteins: modulation by dietary fat and cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Babiak, J.

    1984-04-01

    The serum lipoproteins of baboons fed diets containing differing types and amounts of fat and varying amounts of cholesterol were examined by analytic ultracentrifugation, gradient gel electrophoresis, density gradient ultracentrifugation, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis, electron microscopy, and standard protein and lipid composition assays. These studies characterized the lipoproteins of the baboon, observed how concentrations and physical-chemical properties of the lipoproteins are modulated by dietary fat and cholesterol and described the suitability of the baboon as an animal model of human lipoprotein metabolism. Results indicate that baboon high density lipoproteins (HDL), though higher in total serum concentration than human HDL, are remarkably similar to human HDL. The concentration of baboon HDL is increased by dietary saturated fat but decreased by the addition of cholesterol. While serum concentrations of low density lipoproteins (LDL) tend to be lower in baboons, the physical-chemical properties of the LDL of baboons and humans are comparable. The LDL of both species contains apolipoprotein B as their major apolipoprotein and exhibit considerable polydispersity in particle size. LDL of both species consists of seven discrete subpopulations. The analytical and statistical data presented in this dissertation indicate that the baboon is a good model for studying the role of lipoproteins in the development of atherosclerosis. 125 references, 31 figures, 28 tables.

  16. Thermal transitions in the low-density lipoprotein and lipids of the egg yolk of hens.

    PubMed

    Smith, M B; Back, J F

    1975-05-22

    1. Differential sanning calorimetry and light-scattering have been used to investigate temperature-dependent transitions in low-density lipoprotein and in lipids from hens' egg yolk. Yolks of different fatty acid composition were obtained by varying the dietary lipid and by adding methyl sterculate to the hen's diet. 2. Lipoprotein solutions in 50 percent glycerol/water gave characteristic melting curves between -25 degrees C and 50 degrees C, and on cooling showed increases in light-scattering between 10 degrees C and -20 degrees C. The temperatures at which major changes occurred depended on the proportions of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. 3. The thermal transitions in the intact lipoprotein in glycerol solution were reversible, but with marked hysteresis. Lipid extracted from the lipoprotein did not show temperature hystersis but the transition heats and melting curves similar to those of the intact lipoprotein. The results support the hypothesis of a "lipid-core" structure for low-density lipoproteins. 4. Scanning calorimetry of egg-yolk lecithins indicated a strong dependence of transition temperature on water content in the rane 3 percent-20 percent water. A rise in the mid-temperature of the liquid-crystalline to gel transition as the water content is lowered on freezing may be the primary event in the irreversible gelation of egg yolk and aggregation of lipoprotein.

  17. Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Show Altered Lipoprotein Profiles with Dysfunctional High-Density Lipoproteins that Can Exacerbate Inflammatory and Atherogenic Process

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Eun-Young; Park, Jin Kyun; Song, Yeong Wook; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective In order to identify putative biomarkers in lipoprotein, we compared lipid and lipoprotein properties between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and control with similar age. Methods We analyzed four classes of lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL, HDL2, HDL3) from both male (n = 8, 69±4 year-old) and female (n = 25, 53±7 year-old) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients as well as controls with similar age (n = 13). Results Although RA group showed normal levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and glucose, however, the RA group showed significantly reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-C level and ratio of HDL-C/TC. The RA group showed significantly elevated levels of blood triglyceride (TG), uric acid, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity. The RA group also showed elevated levels of advanced glycated end (AGE) products in all lipoproteins and severe aggregation of apoA-I in HDL. As CETP activity and TG contents were 2-fold increased in HDL from RA group, paraoxonase activity was reduced upto 20%. Electron microscopy revealed that RA group showed much less HDL2 particle number than control. LDL from the RA group was severely oxidized and glycated with greater fragmentation of apo-B, especially in female group, it was more atherogenic via phagocytosis. Conclusion Lipoproteins from the RA patients showed severely altered structure with impaired functionality, which is very similar to that observed in coronary heart patients. These dysfunctional properties in lipoproteins from the RA patients might be associated with high incidence of cardiovascular events in RA patients. PMID:27736980

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Aortae from Human Lipoprotein(a) Transgenic Mice Shows an Early Metabolic Response Independent of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodger, Euan J.; Suetani, Rachel J.; Jones, Gregory T.; Kleffmann, Torsten; Carne, Alan; Legge, Michael; McCormick, Sally P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Elevated low density lipoprotein (LDL) and lipoprotein(a) are independent risk factors for the development of atherosclerosis. Using a proteomic approach we aimed to determine early changes in arterial protein expression in transgenic mice containing both human LDL and lipoprotein(a) in circulation. Methods and Results Plasma lipid analyses showed the lipoprotein(a) transgenic mice had significantly higher lipid levels than wildtype, including a much increased LDL and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Analysis of aortae from lipoprotein(a) mice showed lipoprotein(a) accumulation but no lipid accumulation or foam cells, leaving the arteries essentially atherosclerosis free. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we identified 34 arterial proteins with significantly altered abundance (P<0.05) in lipoprotein(a) transgenic mice compared to wildtype including 17 that showed a ≥2 fold difference. Some proteins of interest showed a similarly altered abundance at the transcript level. These changes collectively indicated an initial metabolic response that included a down regulation in energy, redox and lipid metabolism proteins and changes in structural proteins at a stage when atherosclerosis had not yet developed. Conclusions Our study shows that human LDL and lipoprotein(a) promote changes in the expression of a unique set of arterial proteins which may be early indicators of the metabolic disturbances preceding atherosclerosis. PMID:22276189

  19. Lipoprotein alterations, abdominal fat distribution and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schreier, L E; Berg, G A; Basilio, F M; Lopez, G I; Etkin, A E; Wikinski, R L

    1999-04-01

    Plasma lipid profile and abdominal obesity have been associated with breast cancer risk, however published results have been inconsistent. To clarify these associations we studied lipid and lipoprotein alterations, obesity degree and body fat distribution, in 30 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients without treatment and 30 controls matched by age and menopausal status. Both pre and postmenopausal breast cancer patients presented higher body mass index, waist/hip ratio and insulin levels than their matched controls. An increase in triglycerides and a decrease in HDL-cholesterol, especially in the HDL2 subfraction, were observed in patients with breast cancer. Besides, HDL particle from these patients showed increased apo A1/HDL-cholesterol ratio. These alterations were correlated with waist/hip ratio. The association between lipoprotein alterations and abdominal obesity independent of menopausal status, in untreated newly diagnosed breast cancer patients is reported for the first time in this study.

  20. Hydrolysis of bovine and caprine milk fat globules by lipoprotein lipase. Effects of heparin and skim milk on lipase distribution and on lipolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sundheim, G.; Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.

    1987-12-01

    Heparin can dissociate lipoprotein lipase from casein micelles, and addition of heparin enhances lipolysis in bovine but not in caprine milk. Heparin shortened the lag-time for binding of lipoprotein lipase to milk fat globules and for lipolysis. Heparin counteracted the inhibitory effects of skim milk on binding of lipase and on lipolysis. Heparin stimulated lipolysis in all bovine milk samples when added before cooling and in spontaneously lipolytic milk samples also when added after cooling. Heparin enhanced lipolysis of isolated milk fat globules. Hence, its effect is not solely due to dissociation of lipoprotein lipase from the casein micelles. Cooling of goat milk caused more marked changes in the distribution of lipase than cooling of bovine milk; the fraction of added /sup 125/I-labeled lipase that bound to cream increased from about 8 to 60%. In addition, caprine skim milk caused less inhibition of lipolysis than bovine skim milk. These observations provide an explanation for the high degree of cold storage lipolysis in goat milk. Heparin had only small effects on the distribution of lipoprotein lipase in caprine milk, which explains why heparin has so little effect on lipolysis in caprine milk. The distribution of /sup 35/S-labeled heparin in bovine milk was studied. In warm milk less than 10% bound to the cream fraction, but when milk was cooled, binding of heparin to cream increased to 45%. These results suggest that there exists in the skim fraction a relatively small amount of a heparin-binding protein, which on cooling of milk adsorbs to the milk fat, or suggests that cooling induces a conformational change in a membrane protein such that its affinity for heparin increases.

  1. Breast milk jaundice; the role of lipoprotein lipase and the free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Constantopoulos, A; Messaritakis, J; Matsaniotis, N

    1980-06-01

    Lipoprotein lipase activity and free fatty acid concentrations were measured in samples of milk collected from mothers of infants without and with prolonged neonatal jaundice. The lipoprotein lipase and free fatty acid values in the milk from mothers of infants without jaundice were found to increase with the duration of breast-feeding until the 12th post-partum day, and then to fall to the original levels. In the group of mothers with jaundiced infants both lipoprotein lipase and free fatty acid values were found within normal limits when measured between 15th and 37th days post-partum. These findings indicate that increased values of lipoprotein lipase and free fatty acids in the milk are not responsible for the development of breast-milk jaundice.

  2. Measurement of cholesterol and other lipoprotein constituents in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Warnick, G R

    2000-04-01

    Measurements of lipids and lipoproteins in the clinical laboratory have become increasingly important because of their predictive association with cardiovascular diseases, especially coronary artery disease. The US National Institutes of Health-sponsored National Cholesterol Education Program and counterparts in other countries have developed national consensus guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease which provide risk cut-points and define use of the lipid/lipoprotein analytes in case finding and therapy. Total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are measured as positive risk factors and high density lipoprotein cholesterol as an inverse risk factor for coronary artery disease. A National Cholesterol Education Program-sponsored expert laboratory panel has developed guidelines for measurements with requisite analytical performance targets for total error and corresponding precision and bias. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have established reference methods for total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol and for triglycerides, with a method for low density lipoprotein cholesterol in development. Standardization programs for research laboratories and a Cholesterol Reference Method Laboratory Network for diagnostic manufacturers and clinical laboratories provide reliable access and documentation of traceability to accepted reference methods. Methods for the lipid/lipoprotein analytes have improved dramatically in recent years and, coupled with improved chemistry analyzer systems and more attention to standardization by manufacturers, offer considerable improvement in analytical performance. Fully automated homogeneous assays for high density lipoprotein cholesterol and newer similar assays for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol have potential for better precision as well as more convenient and cost-effective measurements. Attention to pre-analytical sources of variation is also important in making

  3. Cellular uptake of lipoproteins and persistent organic compounds-An update and new data

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelmborg, Philip Sebastian; Andreassen, Thomas Kjaergaard; Bonefeld-Jorgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2008-10-15

    There are a number of interactions related to the transport of lipophilic xenobiotic compounds in the blood stream of mammals. This paper will focus on the interactions between lipoproteins and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and how these particles are taken up by cells. A number of POPs including the pesticide p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and especially its metabolite p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (DDE), interacts with nuclear hormone receptors causing these to malfunction, which in turn results in a range of deleterious health effects in humans. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of lipoprotein receptors in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells in conjunction with uptake of DDT-lipoprotein complexes from supplemented media in vitro. Uptake of DDT by MEF cells was investigated using MEF1 cells carrying the receptors low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) present and MEF4 cells with no LRP and LDLR expression. Cells were incubated together with the complex of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and [{sup 14}C]DDT. The receptor function was further evaluated by adding the 40 kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP) which blocks receptor activity. The results showed that [{sup 14}C]DDT uptake was decreasing when the LDL concentration was increasing. There was no strong evidence for a receptor-mediated uptake of the [{sup 14}C]DDT-lipoprotein complex. To conclude, DDT travels in the blood stream and can cross cell membranes while being transported as a DDT-lipoprotein complex. The lipoproteins do not need receptors to cross cell membranes since passive diffusion constitutes a major passageway.

  4. Nanocrystal Core Lipoprotein Biomimetics for Imaging of Lipoproteins and Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Francois; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Cormode, David P.; Skajaa, Torjus; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoproteins are natural nanoparticles composed of phospholipids and apolipoproteins that transport lipids throughout the body. As key effectors of lipid homeostasis, the functions of lipoproteins have been demonstrated to be crucial during the development of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore various strategies have been used to study their biology and detect them in vivo. A recent approach has been the production of lipoprotein biomimetic particles loaded with diagnostically active nanocrystals in their core. These include, but are not limited to: quantum dots, iron oxide or gold nanocrystals. Inclusion of these nanocrystals enables the utilization of lipoproteins as probes for a variety of imaging modalities (computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, fluorescence) while preserving their biological activity. Furthermore as some lipoproteins naturally accumulate in atherosclerotic plaque or specific tumor tissues, nanocrystal core lipoprotein biomimetics have been developed as contrast agents for early diagnosis of these diseases. PMID:23687557

  5. Low-density lipoprotein density determination by electric conductivity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Higuero, José A; Salvador, Ana M; Arrondo, José L R; Milicua, José Carlos G

    2011-10-15

    The predominance of small dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. A simple but precise method has been developed, based on electrical conductivity of an isopycnic gradient of KBr, to obtain density values of human LDL fraction. The results obtained can distinguish LDL density populations and their subfractions from different patients. These data were corroborated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) (structure) and light-scattering analyses (size).

  6. Understanding Lipoproteins as Transporters of Cholesterol and Other Lipids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggerstaff, Kyle D.; Wooten, Joshua S.

    2004-01-01

    A clear picture of lipoprotein metabolism is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Many students are taught that low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "bad" and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "good." This misconception leads to students thinking that lipoproteins are types of cholesterol rather than…

  7. Effects of carbon tetrachloride on isolated rat hepatocytes. Inhibition of protein and lipoprotein secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Gravela, E; Albano, E; Dianzani, M U; Poli, G; Slater, T F

    1979-01-01

    The effects of carbon tetrachloride on protein and lipoprotein secretion, and on lipid peroxidation, have been investigated in isolated rat hepatocytes. It was found that although the free-radical scavenger promethazine completely suppressed the increased peroxidation produced by carbon tetrachloride, it had no effect on the inhibitory action of carbon tetrachloride on lipoprotein secretion. In consequence, the latter effect of carbon tetrachloride does not appear to be mediated through a peroxidative stage. PMID:444227

  8. Association between tumour status and serum lipoprotein cholesterol in hemopoietic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Venkatanarayanan, S; Nagarajan, B

    1988-09-01

    Total and lipoprotein cholesterol in serum have been determined in patients with leukemia and lymphoma. Untreated patients were hypocholesterolemic with reduced lipoprotein cholesterol content. On successful chemotherapy most of the patients showed near normal total cholesterol levels with a subsequent increase in LDL cholesterol content. A rapid, sensitive and inexpensive method is reported using agarose electrophoresis and quantitation of cholesterol by Liebermann-Burchard reaction.

  9. Lipoprotein subclass metabolism in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis[S

    PubMed Central

    Männistö, Ville T.; Simonen, Marko; Soininen, Pasi; Tiainen, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Kaminska, Dorota; Venesmaa, Sari; Käkelä, Pirjo; Kärjä, Vesa; Gylling, Helena; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is associated with increased synthesis of triglycerides and cholesterol coupled with increased VLDL synthesis in the liver. In addition, increased cholesterol content in the liver associates with NASH. Here we study the association of lipoprotein subclass metabolism with NASH. To this aim, liver biopsies from 116 morbidly obese individuals [age 47.3 ± 8.7 (mean ± SD) years, BMI 45.1 ± 6.1 kg/m2, 39 men and 77 women] were used for histological assessment. Proton NMR spectroscopy was used to measure lipid concentrations of 14 lipoprotein subclasses in native serum samples at baseline and after obesity surgery. We observed that total lipid concentration of VLDL and LDL subclasses, but not HDL subclasses, associated with NASH [false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.1]. More specifically, total lipid and cholesterol concentration of VLDL and LDL subclasses associated with inflammation, fibrosis, and cell injury (FDR < 0.1), independent of steatosis. Cholesterol concentration of all VLDL subclasses also correlated with total and free cholesterol content in the liver. All NASH-related changes in lipoprotein subclasses were reversed by obesity surgery. High total lipid and cholesterol concentration of serum VLDL and LDL subclasses are linked to cholesterol accumulation in the liver and to liver cell injury in NASH. PMID:25344588

  10. Further characterization of the metabolic properties of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from human and mouse apoC-III transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Aalto-Setälä, K; Weinstock, P H; Bisgaier, C L; Wu, L; Smith, J D; Breslow, J L

    1996-08-01

    We previously showed that human apoC-III expression in transgenic mice causes hypertriglyceridemia due to the accumulation of enlarged very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-like particles, with increased triglycerides and apoC-III and decreased apoE. In vivo turnover studies indicated the metabolic basis was decreased particle fractional catabolic rate. The presence of enlarged triglyceride-rich particles with prolonged residence time in plasma implied defective lipolysis, but in vitro these particles were good substrates for purified lipoprotein lipase (LPL). In the current study we further characterize the metabolic properties of these particles. We show that expression of a mouse apoC-III transgene can also cause hypertriglyceridemia with a similar accumulation of a VLDL-like particle with increased apoC-III and decreased apoE. A vitamin A fat tolerance test was used to show that MoCIIITg and HuCIIITg mice had similarly delayed clearance of triglyceride-rich postprandial particles. Thus, the previously observed hypertriglyceridemia caused by human apoC-III transgene expression was not due interspecies incompatibility but a property of apoC-III. In further experiments we showed VLDL from apoC-III transgenic mice interacted poorly with fibroblast lipoprotein receptors and this could be corrected by adding exogenous apoE. In addition, control VLDL interaction could be decreased by exogenous apoC-III. Moreover, the hypertriglyceridemia of HuCIIITg mice could be normalized by crossbreeding with HuETg mice. Thus, a functionally significant reciprocal relationship of apoC-III and apoE exists, presumably due to competition for space on the surface of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Finally, VLDL from HuCIITg and MoCIIITg mice showed decreased binding to heparin-Sepharose. This suggests and additional locus of the defect in these mice could potentially be in the binding of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins to heparan sulfate proteoglycan matrix on the surface of endothelial

  11. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles*

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. PMID:26018414

  12. Contribution of lipoproteins and lipoprotein processing to endocarditis virulence in Streptococcus sanguinis.

    PubMed

    Das, Sankar; Kanamoto, Taisei; Ge, Xiuchun; Xu, Ping; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L; Kitten, Todd

    2009-07-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is an important cause of infective endocarditis. Previous studies have identified lipoproteins as virulence determinants in other streptococcal species. Using a bioinformatic approach, we identified 52 putative lipoprotein genes in S. sanguinis strain SK36 as well as genes encoding the lipoprotein-processing enzymes prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (lgt) and signal peptidase II (lspA). We employed a directed signature-tagged mutagenesis approach to systematically disrupt these genes and screen each mutant for the loss of virulence in an animal model of endocarditis. All mutants were viable. In competitive index assays, mutation of a putative phosphate transporter reduced in vivo competitiveness by 14-fold but also reduced in vitro viability by more than 20-fold. Mutations in lgt, lspA, or an uncharacterized lipoprotein gene reduced competitiveness by two- to threefold in the animal model and in broth culture. Mutation of ssaB, encoding a putative metal transporter, produced a similar effect in culture but reduced in vivo competiveness by >1,000-fold. [(3)H]palmitate labeling and Western blot analysis confirmed that the lgt mutant failed to acylate lipoproteins, that the lspA mutant had a general defect in lipoprotein cleavage, and that SsaB was processed differently in both mutants. These results indicate that the loss of a single lipoprotein, SsaB, dramatically reduces endocarditis virulence, whereas the loss of most other lipoproteins or of normal lipoprotein processing has no more than a minor effect on virulence.

  13. Effect of antiepileptic drugs on plasma lipids, lipoprotein (a), and liver enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Demir, Ercan; Orem, Asim; Yildirmis, Sermet; Orhan, Fazil; Aslan, Adnan; Topbas, Murat

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a study to assess the effect of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproate on serum lipid profiles and lipoprotein (a) in 64 children with epilepsy (aged between 1 and 15 years) admitted to the child neurology outpatient clinic between July 2000 and July 2002. The children were separated as group 1 (18 children), treated with phenobarbital, 5 mg/kg/day; group 2 (22 children), treated with carbamazepine, 10 to 15 mg/kg/day; and group 3 (24 children), treated with sodium valproate, 20 mg/kg/day. Plasma lipoprotein (a), total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A and apolipoprotein B levels, and liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase were determined before the initiation of the treatment and at 3, 6, and 12 months of the treatment period. The mean age of children in group 1 was significantly low compared with those in groups 2 and 3 (P <.05). The mean pretreatment lipid levels among the groups were not significantly increased. The mean lipoprotein (a) levels were significantly increased in all groups at 3, 6, and 12 months of the treatment period (P <.05). The increase in alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at 3, 6, and 12 months was statistically significant in group 1 (P <.05). The higher levels in lipoprotein (a) (mean > 30 mg/dL) were observed only in carbamazepine-treated patients at 6 and 12 months. The percentage of children with lipoprotein (a) levels over 30 mg/dL was 44%, 63%, and 33% in the phenobarbital-, carbamazepine-, and valproate-treated children, respectively. Antiepileptic drugs significantly increase the level of lipoprotein (a), which is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, and also have variable effects on other lipid parameters

  14. Cholesterol in serum lipoprotein fractions after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Philip C., Jr.; Krauhs, Jane M.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are reported from blood-lipid measurements obtained from 125 Space Shuttle crew members before and after space flight. The data are presented in tables and discussed in detail. The main differences noted between preflight and postflight values are a 12.8-percent decrease in high-density lipoproteins on postflight day 1 and significant decreases in total cholesterol and both high- and low-density lipoproteins later in the 23-day postflight period.

  15. Ultrafiltration of lipoproteins through a synthetic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Colton, Clark K.; Friedman, Sigmund; Wilson, Dana E.; Lees, Robert S.

    1972-01-01

    To investigate the interaction of lipoproteins with semipermeable membranes, solutions of low density lipoproteins (LDL), very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), mixtures of the two, and diluted, normal, and hyperlipidemic serum were ultrafiltered through a synthetic membrane (500 A nominal pore diameter) using a stirred laboratory ultrafiltration cell. The pressure dependence of ultrafiltrate flux showed that a concentrated layer of lipoproteins was built up at the membrane surface (concentration polarization) and that VLDL was more subject to polarization than LDL. This phenomenon controlled the observed lipoprotein transport behavior. Whereas true membrane rejection (the fraction of the solute on the membrane surface which does not pass through the membrane) was greater than 0.95 for both LDL and VLDL, observed solute rejection varied from nearly 0 to 1.0, depending upon experimental conditions. If concentration polarization occurs in the arterial system, these results suggest that lipoprotein transport into arterial wall may be influenced not only by arterial blood pressure and the properties of the arterial wall, but also by local hemodynamic conditions and by the relative as well as absolute magnitudes of LDL and VLDL concentration. PMID:4344733

  16. [Lipoprotein metabolism in menopause. Effect of hormonal substitution therapy].

    PubMed

    Heckers, H; Platt, D

    1991-06-20

    Oral administration of conjugated estrogens, estradiol valerate and micronized estradiol--but not the percutaneous application--in the postmenopause modifies the plasmic lipoprotein profile by lowering, dose-dependently, LDL and elevating HDL (HDL2). In parallel, the cardiovascular mortality is decreased by 50-66%, with smokers also benefiting to the same extent. On account of the increased risk for endometrial carcinoma associated with postmenopausal estrogen monotherapy, combination with a lowest-dose gestagen is imperative. However, the very numerous synthetic gestagens can antagonize the favorable effects of the estrogen on lipoprotein metabolism. This applies in particular to the gestagens of the 19-nortestosterone type, such as norethisterone acetate and, in particular, levonorgestrel, but less so the 17-hydroxyprogesterone derivatives medroxyprogesterone acetate and medrogestone with their very low androgenic effect.

  17. Acrolein consumption induces systemic dyslipidemia and lipoprotein modification

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg A.; Lesgards, Jean-Francois; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Prough, Russell A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Liu, SiQi; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2010-02-15

    Aldehydes such as acrolein are ubiquitous pollutants present in automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. Such aldehydes are also constituents of several food substances and are present in drinking water, irrigation canals, and effluents from manufacturing plants. Oral intake represents the most significant source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. To study the effects of short-term oral exposure to acrolein on lipoprotein levels and metabolism, adult mice were gavage-fed 0.1 to 5 mg acrolein/kg bwt and changes in plasma lipoproteins were assessed. Changes in hepatic gene expression related to lipid metabolism and cytokines were examined by qRT-PCR analysis. Acrolein feeding did not affect body weight, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, electrolytes, cytokines or liver enzymes, but increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Similar results were obtained with apoE-null mice. Plasma lipoproteins from acrolein-fed mice showed altered electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels. Chromatographic analysis revealed elevated VLDL cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides levels with little change in LDL or HDL. NMR analysis indicated shifts from small to large VLDL and from large to medium-small LDL with no change in the size of HDL particles. Increased plasma VLDL was associated with a significant decrease in post-heparin plasma hepatic lipase activity and a decrease in hepatic expression of hepatic lipase. These observations suggest that oral exposure to acrolein could induce or exacerbate systemic dyslipidemia and thereby contribute to cardiovascular disease risk.

  18. Acrolein Consumption Induces Systemic Dyslipidemia and Lipoprotein Modification

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg A.; Lesgards, Jean-Francois; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Prough, Russell A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Liu, SiQi; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2010-01-01

    Aldehydes such as acrolein are ubiquitous pollutants present in automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. Such aldehydes are also constituents of several food substances and are present in drinking water, irrigation canals, and effluents from manufacturing plants. Oral intake represents the most significant source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. To study the effects of short-term oral exposure to acrolein on lipoprotein levels and metabolism, adult mice were gavage fed 0.1 to 5 mg acrolein/kg bwt and changes in plasma lipoproteins were assessed. Changes in hepatic gene expression related to lipid metabolism and cytokines were examined by qRT-PCR analysis. Acrolein feeding did not affect body weight, BUN, plasma creatinine, electrolytes, cytokines or liver enzymes, but increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Similar results were obtained with apoE-null mice. Plasma lipoproteins from acrolein-fed mice showed altered electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels. Chromatographic analysis revealed elevated VLDL cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides levels with little change in LDL or HDL. NMR analysis indicated shifts from small to large VLDL and from large to medium-small LDL with no change in the size of HDL particles. Increased plasma VLDL was associated with a significant decrease in post-heparin plasma hepatic lipase activity and a decrease in hepatic expression of hepatic lipase. These observations suggest that oral exposure to acrolein could induce or exacerbate systemic dyslipidemia and thereby contribute to cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:20034506

  19. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 facilitates heme scavenging after intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaiqing; Manaenko, Anatol; Shao, Anwen; Ou, Yibo; Yang, Peng; Budbazar, Enkhjargal; Nowrangi, Derek; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2016-06-17

    Heme-degradation after erythrocyte lysis plays an important role in the pathophysiology of intracerebral hemorrhage. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 is a receptor expressed predominately at the neurovascular interface, which facilitates the clearance of the hemopexin and heme complex. In the present study, we investigated the role of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 in heme removal and neuroprotection in a mouse model of intracerebral hemorrhage. Endogenous low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 and hemopexin were increased in ipsilateral brain after intracerebral hemorrhage, accompanied by increased hemoglobin levels, brain water content, blood-brain barrier permeability and neurological deficits. Exogenous human recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 protein reduced hematoma volume, brain water content surrounding hematoma, blood-brain barrier permeability and improved neurological function three days after intracerebral hemorrhage. The expression of malondialdehyde, fluoro-Jade C positive cells and cleaved caspase 3 was increased three days after intracerebral hemorrhage in the ipsilateral brain tissues and decreased with recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1. Intracerebral hemorrhage decreased and recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 increased the levels of superoxide dismutase 1. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 siRNA reduced the effect of human recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 on all outcomes measured. Collectively, our findings suggest that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 contributed to heme clearance and blood-brain barrier protection after intracerebral hemorrhage. The use of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 as supplement provides a novel approach to ameliorating intracerebral hemorrhage brain injury via its pleiotropic neuroprotective effects.

  20. Cigarette smoking and serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations: an analysis of published data.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, W. Y.; Palomaki, G. E.; Haddow, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    To examine the association between cigarette smoking in adults and serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations the results of 54 published studies were analysed. Overall, smokers had significantly higher serum concentrations of cholesterol (3.0%), triglycerides (9.1%), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (10.4%), and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (1.7%) and lower serum concentrations of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (-5.7%) and apolipoprotein AI (-4.2%) compared with nonsmokers. Among non-smokers and light, moderate, and heavy smokers a significant dose response effect was present for cholesterol (0, 1.8, 4.3, and 4.5% respectively), triglycerides (0, 10.7, 11.5, and 18.0%), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (0, 7.2, 44.4, and 39.0%), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (0, -1.1, 1.4, and 11.0%), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (0, -4.6, -6.3, and -8.9%), and apolipoprotein AI (0, -3.7 and -5.7% in non-smokers and light and heavy smokers). These dose response effects may provide new evidence for a causal relation between exposure to cigarette smoke and changes in serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations whether as a direct result of physiological changes or of dietary changes induced by smoking. Adequate prospective data to estimate the excess risk of coronary artery disease existed only for cholesterol concentration. When that information was combined with data from the present study, and given that smokers as a group face an average overall excess risk of coronary artery disease of 70%, it was estimated that the observed increased serum cholesterol concentration in smokers may account for at least 9% of that excess risk. Furthermore, the dose response effect of smoking on serum cholesterol concentration suggests a gradient of increased absolute risk of coronary artery disease between light and heavy smokers. PMID:2496857

  1. Serum Lipoproteins are Critical for Pulmonary Innate Defense against Staphylococcus aureus Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Manifold-Wheeler, Brett C.; Elmore, Bradley O.; Triplett, Kathleen D.; Castleman, Moriah J.; Otto, Michael; Hall, Pamela R.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia has been extensively studied in the context of atherosclerosis, whereas the potential health consequences of the opposite extreme, hypolipidemia, remain largely uninvestigated. Circulating lipoproteins are essential carriers of insoluble lipid molecules and are increasingly recognized as innate immune effectors. Importantly, severe hypolipidemia, which may occur with trauma or critical illness, is clinically associated with bacterial pneumonia. To test the hypothesis that circulating lipoproteins are essential for optimal host innate defense in the lung, we used lipoprotein deficient mice and a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia in which invasive infection requires virulence factor expression controlled by the accessory gene regulator (agr) operon. Activation of agr and subsequent virulence factor expression is inhibited by apolipoprotein B, the structural protein of low density lipoprotein, which binds and sequesters the secreted agr-signaling peptide (AIP). Here we report that lipoprotein deficiency impairs early pulmonary innate defense against S. aureus quorum-sensing dependent pathogenesis. Specifically, apoB levels in the lung early post-infection are significantly reduced with lipoprotein deficiency, coinciding with impaired host control of S. aureus agr-signaling and increased agr-dependent morbidity (weight loss) and inflammation. Given that lipoproteins also inhibit LTA- and LPS-mediated inflammation, these results suggest that hypolipidemia may broadly impact post-trauma pneumonia susceptibility to both Gram positive and Gram negative pathogens. Together with previous reports demonstrating that hyperlipidemia also impairs lung innate defense, these results suggest that maintenance of normal serum lipoprotein levels is necessary for optimal host innate defense in the lung. PMID:26608923

  2. Lipolytic degradation of human very low density lipoproteins by human milk lipoprotein lipase: the identification of lipoprotein B as the main lipoprotein degradation product.

    PubMed

    Alaupovic, P; Wang, C S; McConathy, W J; Weiser, D; Downs, D

    1986-01-01

    Although the direct conversion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) into low density (LDL) and high density (HDL) lipoproteins only requires lipoprotein lipase (LPL) as a catalyst and albumin as the fatty acid acceptor, the in vitro-formed LDL and HDL differ chemically from their native counterparts. To investigate the reason(s) for these differences, VLDL were treated with human milk LPL in the presence of albumin, and the LPL-generated LDL1-, LDL2-, and HDL-like particles were characterized by lipid and apolipoprotein composition. Results showed that the removal of apolipoproteins B, C, and E from VLDL was proportional to the degree of triglyceride hydrolysis with LDL2 particles as the major and LDL1 and HDL + VHDL particles as the minor products of a complete in vitro lipolysis of VLDL. In comparison with native counterparts, the in vitro-formed LDL2 and HDL + VHDL were characterized by lower levels of triglyceride and cholesterol ester and higher levels of free cholesterol and lipid phosphorus. The characterization of lipoprotein particles present in the in vitro-produced LDL2 showed that, as in plasma LDL2, lipoprotein B (LP-B) was the major apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein accounting for over 90% of the total apolipoprotein B. Other, minor species of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins included LP-B:C-I:E and LP-B:C-I:C-II:C-III. The lipid composition of in vitro-formed LP-B closely resembled that of plasma LP-B. The major parts of apolipoproteins C and E present in VLDL were released to HDL + VHDL as simple, cholesterol/phospholipid-rich lipoproteins including LP-C-I, LP-C-II, LP-C-III, and LP-E. However, some of these same simple lipoprotein particles were present after ultracentrifugation in the LDL2 density segment because of their hydrated density and/or because they formed, in the absence of naturally occurring acceptors (LP-A-I:A-II), weak associations with LP-B. Thus, the presence of varying amounts of these cholesterol

  3. A database of bacterial lipoproteins (DOLOP) with functional assignments to predicted lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Babu, M Madan; Priya, M Leena; Selvan, A Tamil; Madera, Martin; Gough, Julian; Aravind, L; Sankaran, K

    2006-04-01

    Lipid modification of the N-terminal Cys residue (N-acyl-S-diacylglyceryl-Cys) has been found to be an essential, ubiquitous, and unique bacterial posttranslational modification. Such a modification allows anchoring of even highly hydrophilic proteins to the membrane which carry out a variety of functions important for bacteria, including pathogenesis. Hence, being able to identify such proteins is of great value. To this end, we have created a comprehensive database of bacterial lipoproteins, called DOLOP, which contains information and links to molecular details for about 278 distinct lipoproteins and predicted lipoproteins from 234 completely sequenced bacterial genomes. The website also features a tool that applies a predictive algorithm to identify the presence or absence of the lipoprotein signal sequence in a user-given sequence. The experimentally verified lipoproteins have been classified into different functional classes and more importantly functional domain assignments using hidden Markov models from the SUPERFAMILY database that have been provided for the predicted lipoproteins. Other features include the following: primary sequence analysis, signal sequence analysis, and search facility and information exchange facility to allow researchers to exchange results on newly characterized lipoproteins. The website, along with additional information on the biosynthetic pathway, statistics on predicted lipoproteins, and related figures, is available at http://www.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/genomes/dolop/.

  4. Apolipoprotein AV accelerates plasma hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by interaction with proteoglycan-bound lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Martin; Loeffler, Britta; Kluger, Malte; Fabig, Nathalie; Geppert, Gesa; Pennacchio, Len A; Laatsch, Alexander; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-06-03

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is associated with differences in triglyceride levels and familial combined hyperlipidemia. In genetically engineered mice, apoAV plasma levels are inversely correlated with plasma triglycerides. To elucidate the mechanism by which apoAV influences plasma triglycerides, metabolic studies and in vitro assays resembling physiological conditions were performed. In human APOA5 transgenic mice (hAPOA5tr), catabolism of chylomicrons and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) was accelerated due to a faster plasma hydrolysis of triglycerides by lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Hepatic VLDL and intestinal chylomicron production were not affected. The functional interplay between apoAV and LPL was further investigated by cross-breeding a human LPL transgene with the apoa5 knock-out and the hAPOA5tr to an lpl-deficient background. Increased LPL activity completely normalized hypertriglyceridemia of apoa5-deficient mice; however, overexpression of human apoAV modulated triglyceride levels only slightly when LPL was reduced. To reflect the physiological situation in which LPL is bound to cell surface proteoglycans, we examined hydrolysis in the presence or absence of proteoglycans. Without proteoglycans, apoAV derived either from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, hAPOA5tr high density lipoprotein, or a recombinant source did not alter the LPL hydrolysis rate. In the presence of proteoglycans, however, apoAV led to a significant and dose-dependent increase in LPL-mediated hydrolysis of VLDL triglycerides. These results were confirmed in cell culture using a proteoglycan-deficient cell line. A direct interaction between LPL and apoAV was found by ligand blotting. It is proposed, that apoAV reduces triglyceride levels by guiding VLDL and chylomicrons to proteoglycan-bound LPL for lipolysis.

  5. Effect of improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on low-density lipoprotein size, electronegative low-density lipoprotein and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 distribution.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Quesada, José L; Vinagre, Irene; de Juan-Franco, Elena; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Pérez, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intensified hypoglycemic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on the distribution of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity between high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its relation with the lipid profile and other qualitative properties of LDL. Forty-two patients with type 2 diabetes on the basis of poor glycemic control and normal or near normal LDL cholesterol were recruited. Lifestyle counseling and pharmacologic hypoglycemic therapy were intensified to improve glycemic control, but lipid-lowering therapy was unchanged. At 4 ± 2 months, glycosylated hemoglobin had decreased by a mean of 2.1%, but the only effect on the lipid profile were statistically significant decreases in nonesterified fatty acids and apolipoprotein B concentration. LDL size increased and the proportion of electronegative LDL decreased significantly. In parallel, total Lp-PLA2 activity decreased significantly, promoting a redistribution of Lp-PLA2 activity toward a higher proportion in high-density lipoprotein. Improvements in glycemic control led to more marked changes in Lp-PLA2 activity and distribution in patients with diabetes who had not received previous lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, optimizing glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes promotes atheroprotective changes, including larger LDL size, decreased electronegative LDL, and a higher proportion of Lp-PLA2 activity in high-density lipoprotein.

  6. Explaining the Oxbridge Figures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Bronwyn; Harre, Rom

    1989-01-01

    Rejects sociobiological theories on female academic achievement and bases findings on social structure to explain why undergraduate women at Oxford University (England) achieve fewer first places and more second places in class honors. Bases theory on bipolarity of gender as an organizing principle of society. Claims that the double bind of social…

  7. Assessment of permeation of lipoproteins in human carotid tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Syed, Saba H.; Leba, Michael; Morrisett, Joel D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in the United States. Specifically, atherosclerosis is an increasingly devastating contributor to the tally and has been found to be a byproduct of arterial permeability irregularities in regards to lipoprotein penetration. To further explore arterial physiology and molecular transport, the imaging technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was employed. With OCT, the permeation of glucose (MW = 180 Da), low density lipoprotein (LDL; MW = 2.1 × 106 Da), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; MW = 2.5 × 105 Da) in human carotid tissue was studied to determine the effect of different molecular characteristics on permeation in atherosclerotic tissues. The permeability rates calculated from the diffusion of the molecular agents into the abnormal carotid tissue samples is compared to those of normal, healthy tissue. The results show that in the abnormal tissue, the permeation of agents correlate to the size constraints. The larger molecules of LDL diffuse the slowest, while the smallest molecules of glucose diffuse the fastest. However, in normal tissue, LDL permeates at a faster rate than the other two agents, implying the existence of a transport mechanism that facilitates the passage of LDL molecules. These results highlight the capability of OCT as a sensitive and specific imaging technique as well as provide significant information to the understanding of atherosclerosis and its effect on tissue properties.

  8. Autophagy-mediated longevity is modulated by lipoprotein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Seah, Nicole E; de Magalhaes Filho, C Daniel; Petrashen, Anna P; Henderson, Hope R; Laguer, Jade; Gonzalez, Julissa; Dillin, Andrew; Hansen, Malene; Lapierre, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy-dependent longevity models in C. elegans display altered lipid storage profiles, but the contribution of lipid distribution to life-span extension is not fully understood. Here we report that lipoprotein production, autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis are linked to modulate life span in a conserved fashion. We find that overexpression of the yolk lipoprotein VIT/vitellogenin reduces the life span of long-lived animals by impairing the induction of autophagy-related and lysosomal genes necessary for longevity. Accordingly, reducing vitellogenesis increases life span via induction of autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis. Life-span extension due to reduced vitellogenesis or enhanced lysosomal lipolysis requires nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) NHR-49 and NHR-80, highlighting novel roles for these NHRs in lysosomal lipid signaling. In dietary-restricted worms and mice, expression of VIT and hepatic APOB (apolipoprotein B), respectively, are significantly reduced, suggesting a conserved longevity mechanism. Altogether, our study demonstrates that lipoprotein biogenesis is an important mechanism that modulates aging by impairing autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis.

  9. Autophagy-mediated longevity is modulated by lipoprotein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seah, Nicole E.; de Magalhaes Filho, C. Daniel; Petrashen, Anna P.; Henderson, Hope R.; Laguer, Jade; Gonzalez, Julissa; Dillin, Andrew; Hansen, Malene; Lapierre, Louis R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy-dependent longevity models in C. elegans display altered lipid storage profiles, but the contribution of lipid distribution to life-span extension is not fully understood. Here we report that lipoprotein production, autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis are linked to modulate life span in a conserved fashion. We find that overexpression of the yolk lipoprotein VIT/vitellogenin reduces the life span of long-lived animals by impairing the induction of autophagy-related and lysosomal genes necessary for longevity. Accordingly, reducing vitellogenesis increases life span via induction of autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis. Life-span extension due to reduced vitellogenesis or enhanced lysosomal lipolysis requires nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) NHR-49 and NHR-80, highlighting novel roles for these NHRs in lysosomal lipid signaling. In dietary-restricted worms and mice, expression of VIT and hepatic APOB (apolipoprotein B), respectively, are significantly reduced, suggesting a conserved longevity mechanism. Altogether, our study demonstrates that lipoprotein biogenesis is an important mechanism that modulates aging by impairing autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis. PMID:26671266

  10. Chylomicron remnant cholesteryl esters as the major constituent of very low density lipoproteins in plasma of cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ross, A C; Zilversmit, D B

    1977-03-01

    Feeding rabbits 500 mg of cholesterol daily for 4 to 15 days greatly increased the concentration of esterified cholesterol in lipoproteins of d less than 1.006 g/ml. The origin of hypercholesterolemic very low density lipoproteins was investigated by monitoring the degradation of labeled lymph chyomicrons administered to normal and cholesterol-fed rabbits. Chylomicrons were labeled in vivo by feeding either 1) [3H]cholesterol and [14C]oleic acid or 2) [14C]cholesterol and [3H]retinyl acetate. After intravenous injection of labeled chylomicrons to recipient rabbits, [14C]triglyceride hydrolysis was equally rapid in normal and cholesterol-fed animals. Normal rabbits rapidly removed from plasma both labeled cholesteryl and retinyl esters, whereas cholesterol-fed rabbits retained nearly 50% of doubly labeled remnants in plasma 25 min after chylomicron injection. Ultracentrifugal separation of plasma into subfractions of very low density lipoproteins showed that chylomicron remnants in cholesterol-fed animals are found among all subclasses of very low density lipoproteins. Analysis of cholesteryl ester specific activity-time curves for the very low density lipoproteins subfraction from hypercholesterolemic plasma showed that nearly all esterified cholesterol in large very low density lipoproteins and approximately 30% of esterified cholesterol in small very low density lipoproteins was derived from chylomicron degradation. Apparently, nearly two-thirds of the esterified cholesterol in total very low density lipoproteins from moderately hypercholesterolemic rabbits is of dietary origin.

  11. Particulate Matter Promotes In Vitro Receptor-Recognizable Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Dysfunction of Lipid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-León, Natalia; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Sevilla-Tapia, Laura; Morales-Bárcenas, Rocío; Serrano, Jesús; O’Neill, Marie S.; García-Cuellar, Claudia M.; Quintana, Raúl; Vázquez-López, Inés

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter may promote cardiovascular disease, possibly as a consequence of its oxidative potential. Studies using susceptible animals indicate that particulate matter aggravates atherosclerosis by increasing lipid/macrophage content in plaques. Macrophage lipid uptake requires oxidized low-density lipoprotein and scavenger receptors; same receptors are involved in particulate matter uptake. We studied in vitro particulate matter potential to oxidize low-density lipoproteins and subsequent cell uptake through scavenger receptors. Particulate matter-induced low-density lipoproteins oxidation was evaluated by the thiobarbituric acid assay. Binding/internalization was tested in wild type and scavenger receptor–transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, and in RAW264.7 cells using fluorescently labeled low-density lipoproteins. Dose-dependent binding/internalization only occurred in scavenger receptor–transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells and RAW264.7 cells. Competition binding/internalization using particles showed that particulate matter induced decreased binding (~50%) and internalization (~70%) of particle-oxidized low-density lipoproteins and native low-density lipoproteins. Results indicate that particulate matter was capable of oxidizing low-density lipoproteins, favoring macrophage internalization, and also altered scavenger and low-density lipoproteins receptor function. PMID:23297186

  12. A Phospholipidomic Analysis of All Defined Human Plasma Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Dashti, Monireh; Kulik, Willem; Hoek, Frans; Veerman, Enno C.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2011-01-01

    Since plasma lipoproteins contain both protein and phospholipid components, either may be involved in processes such as atherosclerosis. In this study the identification of plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipids, which is essential for understanding these processes at the molecular level, are performed. LC-ESI/MS, LC-ESI-MS/MS and High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC) analysis of different lipoprotein fractions collected from pooled plasma revealed the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and sphingomyeline (SM) only on lipoproteins and phosphatidylcholine (PC), Lyso-PC on both lipoproteins and plasma lipoprotein free fraction (PLFF). Cardiolipin, phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and Phosphatidylserine (PS) were observed neither in the lipoprotein fractions nor in PLFF. All three approaches led to the same results regarding phospholipids occurrence in plasma lipoproteins and PLFF. A high abundancy of PE and SM was observed in VLDL and LDL fractions respectively. This study provides for the first time the knowledge about the phospholipid composition of all defined plasma lipoproteins. PMID:22355656

  13. Changes in the distribution and composition of plasma high density lipoproteins after ingestion of fat.

    PubMed

    Tall, A R; Blum, C B; Forester, G P; Nelson, C A

    1982-01-10

    Following ingestion of a fatty meal there is an increase in concentration of phospholipids and proteins in the plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL). To evaluate the resulting changes in HDL subclasses, the plasma HDL of six subjects were analyzed 4 to 8 h after ingestion of 100 ml of corn oil or 80 ml of corn oil with four eggs. Isopycnic density gradient ultracentrifugation of fasting plasma showed two broad components of HDL: a major peak of density (d) 1.11 to 1.17 g/ml (HDL3) and a smaller peak of d 1.07 to 1.11 g/ml (HDL2). Following ingestion of either type of fatty meal, there was an increase in lipoprotein mass in both peaks of HDL and their centers of mass were shifted to lower density (1.140 leads to 1.120 to 1.130 g/ml; 1.095 leads to 1.090 g/ml). Calculation of changes in HDL concentration (lipemic minus fasting) showed that the alterations in density gradient profile were due to a major increase in lipoproteins of d 1.102 to 1.137 g/ml, a smaller increase in a separate lipoprotein peak of 1.080 to 1.102 g/ml, and a small decrease in lipoproteins of d 1.137 to 1.165 g/ml. Redistribution of HDL mass into larger, less dense lipoproteins was also demonstrated by agarose gel chromatography or by minimal spin density gradient ultracentrifugation in a vertical rotor. The increase in mass of 1.080 to 1.102 lipoproteins was largely due to increased concentrations of phospholipid, cholesterol ester, and apoA-I, while the increase in 1.102 to 1.137 lipoproteins was due to increased concentrations of apoA-I, apoA-II, phospholipids, cholesterol, and cholesterol esters. Analytical ultracentrifugation of representative samples within these density intervals showed lipoprotein species with molecular weights and sedimentation coefficients, respectively, of 378,000, 5.8 (d 1.080 to 1.095); 248,000, 3.5 (d 1.110 to 1.120); and 173,000, 1.6 (d 1.135 to 1.150). Polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis showed that the 1.080 to 1.102 lipoproteins contained a single

  14. Serum prolactin, leptin, lipids and lipoproteins levels during antipsychotics treatment in Parkinson's disease and related psychosis.

    PubMed

    Rustembegovic, Avdo; Sofic, Emin; Wichart, Ildiko

    2006-01-01

    Weight gain is a common adverse effect associated with the use of most typical and atypical antipsychotic. Aim of this study was to investigate serum prolactin, leptin, cholesterol, triglyceride, lipoproteins, such high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD)-related psychosis during long-term medication with atypical antipsychotic. The study population comprised 40 patients, who were divided into 4 groups: olanzapine (n=10), risperidone (n=10), seroquel (n=10) monotherapy, a group of 10 patients receiving only antiparkinson drugs and a control group of 8 healthy persons. The patients were evaluated at baseline and at the sixth and twelfth week according to the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), body mass index (BMI), and fasting serum prolactin, leptin, lipids and lipoproteins levels. Treatment of patients with olanzapine caused marked increase of serum LDL, cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin levels (p<0,02). No changes in HDL concentrations. There was positive relationship between serum leptin, lipid levels and BMI. However, treatment of patients with seroquel did not cause changes in serum prolactin, leptin, lipids, and lipoproteins levels. Our results suggest that treatment of patients with PD-related psychosis with seroquel appears to have minimal influence on serum leptin, prolactin, lipids, lipoproteins and BMI compared with olanzapine and risperidone.

  15. Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients display an altered lipoprotein profile with dysfunctional HDL

    PubMed Central

    Jorissen, Winde; Wouters, Elien; Bogie, Jeroen F.; Vanmierlo, Tim; Noben, Jean-Paul; Sviridov, Denis; Hellings, Niels; Somers, Veerle; Valcke, Roland; Vanwijmeersch, Bart; Stinissen, Piet; Mulder, Monique T.; Remaley, Alan T.; Hendriks, Jerome J. A.

    2017-01-01

    Lipoproteins modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. In the chronic inflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS), reports on lipoprotein level alterations are inconsistent and it is unclear whether lipoprotein function is affected. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we analysed the lipoprotein profile of relapsing-remitting (RR) MS patients, progressive MS patients and healthy controls (HC). We observed smaller LDL in RRMS patients compared to healthy controls and to progressive MS patients. Furthermore, low-BMI (BMI ≤ 23 kg/m2) RRMS patients show increased levels of small HDL (sHDL), accompanied by larger, triglyceride (TG)-rich VLDL, and a higher lipoprotein insulin resistance (LP-IR) index. These alterations coincide with a reduced serum capacity to accept cholesterol via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G1, an impaired ability of HDL3 to suppress inflammatory activity of human monocytes, and modifications of HDL3’s main protein component ApoA-I. In summary, lipoprotein levels and function are altered in RRMS patients, especially in low-BMI patients, which may contribute to disease progression in these patients. PMID:28230201

  16. The effect of chronic cholesterol feeding on intestinal lipoproteins in the rat.

    PubMed

    Riley, J W; Glickman, R M; Green, P H; Tall, A R

    1980-09-01

    change in triglyceride outputs (49 +/- 2 versus 58 +/- 7 mg/hr). Analysis of individual lymph lipoproteins from chronically cholesterol-fed animals revealed that significantly less apoA-I and cholesterol was carried in d < 1.006 g/ml lipoproteins than in controls. There was however, both a relative and absolute increase in the cholesterol and apoA-I content of intermediate and low density lymph subfractions. Particularly prominent in lymph from chronically cholesterol-fed animals was a lipoprotein (d 1.006-1.030 g/ml) which was inconsistently found in controls. This particle was rich in cholesterol and contained apoA-I. [(3)H]Retinol infusion studies revealed that this particle contained increased retinyl ester when compared to plasma, suggesting an intestinal origin. These results demonstrate that chronic cholesterol feeding in the rat results in altered mesenteric lymph lipoproteins which may contribute to the abnormalities found in plasma.-Riley, J. W., R. M. Glickman, P. H. R. Green, and A. R. Tall. The effect of chronic cholesterol feeding on intestinal lipoproteins in the rat.

  17. Lipoprotein lipase gene variants and risk of coronary disease: a quantitative analysis of population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Hokanson, J E

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the magnitude of the association between common variants in the lipoprotein lipase gene and coronary disease, based on published population-based studies. Fourteen studies, representing 15,708 subjects, report allelic distribution for lipoprotein lipase gene variants among coronary disease patients and control subjects. Patient outcomes included clinical coronary disease events and documented coronary disease based on angiography. Allele frequencies are estimated for disease and non-disease groups within each study. A 2 x 2 contingency table is used to compute individual study odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, relating the presence of the rare allele to disease status. Mantel-Haenszel-stratified analysis of each allelic variant results in a summary odds ratio and 95% confidence interval for the association between each rare allele in the lipoprotein lipase gene and coronary disease. The lipoprotein lipase D9N allele has a summary odds ratio of 1.59 (95% confidence interval 1.03-2.55), indicating a 59% increase in risk of coronary disease for carriers with this allelic variant. The lipoprotein lipase N291S allele showed no association with coronary disease (summary odds ratio 0.93, 95% confidence interval 0.73-1.19). The summary odds ratio for lipoprotein lipase S447Ter allele is 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.65-1.0), indicating a marginal negative association between this variant and coronary disease. The common lipoprotein lipase Pvu II polymorphism shows no relation to coronary disease (summary odds ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.80-1.01). The rare allele of the lipoprotein lipase HindIII polymorphism is negatively associated with coronary disease (summary odds ratio 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.73-0.96). The lipoprotein lipase D9N allele is associated with high levels of triglyceride and low levels of high-density lipoprotein. Similar atherogenic lipid levels are observed in subjects with structural

  18. Give me A5 for lipoprotein hydrolysis!

    PubMed

    Merkel, Martin; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-10-01

    APOA5 is a newly identified apolipoprotein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of plasma triglyceride levels. In several human studies, common APOA5 single nucleotide polymorphisms have been strongly associated with elevated plasma triglyceride levels. In this issue of the JCI, Marçais et al. report that the rare Q139X mutation in APOA5 leads to severe hypertriglyceridemia by exerting a dominant-negative effect on the plasma lipolytic system for triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. The presented data support the idea that the molecular mechanism of APOA5 function may include the enhancement of binding between lipoproteins and proteoglycans at the vascular wall and activation of proteoglycan-bound lipoprotein lipase.

  19. Immune response to lipoproteins in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Samson, Sonia; Mundkur, Lakshmi; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation result in changes in their function and activate both innate and adaptive immune system. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been identified as one of the most important autoantigens in atherosclerosis. This escape from self-tolerance is dependent on the formation of oxidized phospholipids. The emerging understanding of the importance of immune responses against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis has focused attention on the possibility of development of novel therapy for atherosclerosis. This review provides an overview of immune response to lipoproteins and the fascinating possibility of developing an immunomodulatory therapy for atherosclerosis.

  20. Lipids and lipoproteins in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J L; Chamberlain, S; Robinson, N

    1980-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessively inherited disease affecting the nervous system with a high incidence of heart involvement. Abnormalities of lipid metabolism are known to be associated with several progressive ataxic conditions. In this study of 46 Friedreich's ataxia patients, serum lipids, fatty acids and lipoproteins were assayed and compared with some earlier findings on Friedreich's ataxia and related disorders. Abnormalities of low and high density lipoproteins suggestive of a major defect have been reported; in the present study the level and chemical composition of high density lipoprotein has been assessed in 20 Friedreich's ataxia patients but previous abnormalities could not be substantiated. Lipid compositional analysis of Friedreich's ataxia central nervous tissue and heart, which has not been previously reported, did not markedly differ from control tissue. PMID:7359148

  1. Analysis of individual lipoproteins and liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, D.L.; Keller, R.A.; Nolan, J.P.

    1997-08-01

    We describe the application of single molecule detection (SMD) technologies for the analysis of natural (serum lipoproteins) and synthetic (liposomes) transport systems. The need for advanced analytical procedures of these complex and important systems is presented with the specific enhancements afforded by SMD with flowing sample streams. In contrast to bulk measurements which yield only average values, measurement of individual species allows creation of population histograms from heterogeneous samples. The data are acquired in minutes and the analysis requires relatively small sample quantities. Preliminary data are presented from the analysis of low density lipoprotein, and multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles.

  2. Dendrite Model Explained

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Angie Jackman, a NASA project manager in microgravity research, explains a model of a dendrite to a visitor to the NASA exhibit at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI. The model depicts microscopic dendrites that grow as molten metals solidify. NASA sponsored three experiments aboard the Space Shuttle that used the microgravity environment to study the formation of large (1 to 4 mm) dendrites without Earth's gravity disrupting their growth. Three advanced follow-on experiments, managed by Jackman, are being developed for the International Space Station (ISS).

  3. Low-density lipoprotein, its susceptibility to oxidation and the role of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and carboxyl ester lipase lipases in atherosclerotic plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Burchardt, Paweł; Zurawski, Jakub; Zuchowski, Bartosz; Kubacki, Tomasz; Murawa, Dawid; Wiktorowicz, Krzysztof; Wysocki, Henryk

    2013-02-21

    An increased level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is a very well established risk factor of coronary artery disease (CAD). Unoxidized LDL is an inert transport vehicle of cholesterol and other lipids in the body and is thought to be atherogenic. Recently it has been appreciated that oxidized products of LDL are responsible for plaque formation properties previously attributed to the intact particle. The goal of this article is to review the recent understanding of the LDL oxidation pathway. The role of oxidized products and key enzymes (lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and carboxyl ester lipase) are also extensively discussed in the context of clinical conditions.

  4. Explaining embodied cognition results.

    PubMed

    Lakoff, George

    2012-10-01

    From the late 1950s until 1975, cognition was understood mainly as disembodied symbol manipulation in cognitive psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and the nascent field of Cognitive Science. The idea of embodied cognition entered the field of Cognitive Linguistics at its beginning in 1975. Since then, cognitive linguists, working with neuroscientists, computer scientists, and experimental psychologists, have been developing a neural theory of thought and language (NTTL). Central to NTTL are the following ideas: (a) we think with our brains, that is, thought is physical and is carried out by functional neural circuitry; (b) what makes thought meaningful are the ways those neural circuits are connected to the body and characterize embodied experience; (c) so-called abstract ideas are embodied in this way as well, as is language. Experimental results in embodied cognition are seen not only as confirming NTTL but also explained via NTTL, mostly via the neural theory of conceptual metaphor. Left behind more than three decades ago is the old idea that cognition uses the abstract manipulation of disembodied symbols that are meaningless in themselves but that somehow constitute internal "representations of external reality" without serious mediation by the body and brain. This article uniquely explains the connections between embodied cognition results since that time and results from cognitive linguistics, experimental psychology, computational modeling, and neuroscience.

  5. Proteomic Analysis of and Immune Responses to Ehrlichia chaffeensis Lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Lin, Mingqun ..; Wang, Xueqi; Kikuchi, Takane; Mottaz, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2008-08-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligatory intracellular Gram-negative bacterium and is the etiologic agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME). Although E. chaffeensis induces generation of several cytokines and chemokines by leukocytes, E. chaffeensis lacks LPS and peptidoglycan. Bioinfomatic analysis of the E. chaffeensis genome, however, predicted genes encoding fifteen lipoproteins and three posttranslational lipoprotein processing enzymes. The present study showed that using multidimensional liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry, all predicted lipoproteins as well as lipoprotein-processing enzymes were expressed by E. chaffeensis cultured in human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60. Consistent with this observation, a signal peptidase II inhibitor, globomycin was found to inhibit E. chaffeensis infection and lipoprotein processing in HL-60 cell culture. To study in vivo E.chaffeensis lipoprotein expression and host immune responses to E. chaffeensis lipoproteins, thirteen E. chaffeensis lipoprotein genes were cloned into a mammalian expression vector.

  6. Kinetic studies of atherogenic lipoproteins in hemodialysis patients: do they tell us more about their pathology?

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Florian; Ikewaki, Katsunori; Schaefer, Juergen R; König, Paul; Dieplinger, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease have one of the highest risks for atherosclerotic complications. Several large epidemiological studies described an opposite association of total and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol with cardiovascular complications and total mortality compared to the general population, a circumstance often called "reverse epidemiology." Many factors might contribute to this reversal such as interaction with malnutrition/inflammation, pronounced fluctuations of atherogenic lipoproteins during the course of renal disease, heterogeneity of lipoprotein particles with preponderance of remnant particles, and chemical modification of lipoproteins caused by the uremic environment. A vicious cycle has been suggested in uremia in which the decreased catabolism of atherogenic lipoproteins such as LDL, IDL and Lp(a) leads to their increased plasma residence time and further modification of these lipoproteins by oxidation, carbamylation, and glycation. Using stable isotope techniques, it has been shown recently that the plasma residence time of these particles is more than twice as long in hemodialysis patients as in nonuremic subjects. This reduced catabolism, however, is masked by the decreased production of LDL, resulting in near-normal plasma levels of LDL. The production rate of Lp(a) in hemodialysis patients is similar to that in controls which together with the doubled residence time results in elevated Lp(a) levels. An increased clearance of these altered lipoproteins via the scavenger receptors of macrophages leads to the transformation of macrophages into foam cells in the vascular wall and might contribute to the pronounced risk for cardiovascular complications of these patients. These observations suggest that the real danger of these particles is not reflected by the measured concentrations but by their metabolic qualities.

  7. LIPOPROTEIN GRANULES IN THE CORTICAL COLLECTING TUBULES OF MOUSE KIDNEY

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Fritz

    1961-01-01

    The light and, to a lesser extent, the dark cells of the cortical collecting tubules in mouse kidney contain a great number of granules which according to histochemical tests are composed of phospholipids and proteins. These granules are bounded by a triple-layered membrane measuring approximately 75 A across, and contain one or several crystals with a hexagonal or square lattice. These crystals are built up of rod-shaped units, which appear dense after osmium fixation, measure about 48 A in diameter, and are separated by a light interspace of similar dimensions. The mean center-to-center distance of the rods is about 96 A. The structure is explained as a lipoprotein crystallized within a membrane-bounded vacuole. No relationship between these granules and mitochondria was found. The physiological significance of the granules remains unknown. PMID:13770761

  8. Allotypy of High Density Lipoprotein of Rabbit Serum

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Kåre; Boman, Helge; Torsvik, Harald; Walker, Suzanne M.

    1971-01-01

    A common antigenic polymorphism of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in rabbit serum is described. The presence or absence of an antigen termed Hl 1 appears to be controlled by autosomal dominant inheritance. The polymorphism should be a useful tool in the study of serum lipoproteins, particularly since genetic polymorphisms within the low density lipoprotein are already known in several species. The Hl polymorphism may make the rabbit more useful for model studies of serum lipoproteins in health and disease. Images PMID:4995822

  9. Triacylglycerol kinetics in endotoxic rats with suppressed lipoprotein lipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, G.J.; Corll, C.B.; Martinez, R.R.

    1987-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia observed in animals after bacterial endotoxin administration and some forms of sepsis can result from increased hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) output or decreased TG clearance by extrahepatic tissues. To differentiate between these two possibilities, TG and free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics were determined in control and endotoxin-injected rats 18 h after treatment. Plasma TG and FFA kinetics were assessed by a constant intravenous infusion with (9,10-/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled very low-density lipoprotein and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate bound to albumin, respectively. In addition, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was determined in heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue as well as in postheparin plasma of functionally hepatectomized, adrenalectomized, and gonadectomized rats. Plasma FFA acid concentrations were slightly increased in endotoxin-treated rats but their turnover did not differ from control. Endotoxin-treated rats had a threefold increase in plasma TG concentrations and decreased heart, skeletal muscle, and post-heparin plasma LPL activity. Plasma TG turnover was decreased, indicating that hypertriglyceridemia was not due to an increased TG output by the liver. Instead, the endotoxin-induced increase in plasma TG concentration was consequence of the 80% reduction in TG metabolic clearance rate. Thus, suppression of LPL activity in endotoxic animals impairs TG clearance resulting in hypertriglyceridemia. Furthermore, endotoxin administration reduced the delivery of TG-FFA to extrahepatic tissues because hepatic synthesis and secretion of TG from plasma FFA was decreased and LPL activity was suppressed.

  10. Explaining wartime rape.

    PubMed

    Gottschall, Jonathan

    2004-05-01

    In the years since the first reports of mass rapes in the Yugoslavian wars of secession and the genocidal massacres in Rwanda, feminist activists and scholars, human rights organizations, journalists, and social scientists have dedicated unprecedented efforts to document, explain, and seek solutions for the phenomenon of wartime rape. While contributors to this literature agree on much, there is no consensus on causal factors. This paper provides a brief overview of the literature on wartime rape in historical and ethnographical societies and a critical analysis of the four leading explanations for its root causes: the feminist theory, the cultural pathology theory, the strategic rape theory, and the biosocial theory. The paper concludes that the biosocial theory is the only one capable of bringing all the phenomena associated with wartime rape into a single explanatory context.

  11. Explaining moral religions.

    PubMed

    Baumard, Nicolas; Boyer, Pascal

    2013-06-01

    Moralizing religions, unlike religions with morally indifferent gods or spirits, appeared only recently in some (but not all) large-scale human societies. A crucial feature of these new religions is their emphasis on proportionality (between deeds and supernatural rewards, between sins and penance, and in the formulation of the Golden Rule, according to which one should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself). Cognitive science models that account for many properties of religion can be extended to these religions. Recent models of evolved dispositions for fairness in cooperation suggest that proportionality-based morality is highly intuitive to human beings. The cultural success of moralizing movements, secular or religious, could be explained based on proportionality.

  12. Limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol assay for diagnostic use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    I wish to comment on the limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RemL-C) assay reported in Clinical Chemistry. Remnants are lipoprotein particles produced after newly formed triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) of either hepatic or intestinal origin enter the plasma space and unde...

  13. Effect of very high-fat diets on body weight, lipoproteins, and glycemic status in the obese.

    PubMed

    Samaha, Frederick F

    2005-11-01

    Given the increased prevalence of obesity in the United States, despite reduced fat intake, there has been increasing interest in the effect of dietary fat on body weight, lipoproteins, and glycemic status. Despite predictions from epidemiologic and physiologic studies, recent prospective trials have demonstrated equivalent weight loss on high-fat versus low-fat diets. Nevertheless, the type of dietary fat consumed has substantially different effects on lipoproteins. Saturated fat raises high-density lipoprotein cholesterol but has unfavorable effects on total cholesterol, and has been associated with increased cardiovascular events. In contrast, unsaturated fats, and particularly omega-3 fatty acids, have the combined benefits of lowering serum cholesterol and raising high-density lipoprotein, as well as favorable effects on insulin resistance and inflammation; they also lower cardiovascular events in high-risk patients. Although current national guidelines modestly liberalize unsaturated fat consumption, important questions still remain about the optimal percentage of unsaturated fats in the diet.

  14. Bidirectional flux of cholesterol between cells and lipoproteins. Effects of phospholipid depletion of high density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.J.; Bamberger, M.J.; Latta, R.A.; Rapp, P.E.; Phillips, M.C.; Rothblat, G.H.

    1986-05-05

    The bidirectional surface transfer of free cholesterol (FC) between Fu5AH rat hepatoma cells and human high density lipoprotein (HDL) was studied. Cells and HDL were prelabeled with (4-/sup 14/C)FC and (7-/sup 3/H)FC, respectively. Influx and efflux of FC were measured simultaneously from the appearance of /sup 3/H counts in cells and /sup 14/C counts in medium. Results were analyzed by a computerized procedure which fitted sets of kinetic data to a model assuming that cell and HDL FC populations each formed a single homogeneous pool and that together the pools formed a closed system. This analysis yielded values for the first-order rate constants of FC influx and efflux (ki and ke), from which influx and efflux of FC mass (Fi and Fe) could be calculated. With normal HDL, the uptake and release of FC tracers conformed well to the above-described model; Fi and Fe were approximately equal, suggesting an exchange of FC between cells and HDL. HDL was depleted of phospholipid (PL) by treatment with either phospholipase A2 or heparin-releasable rat hepatic lipase, followed by incubation with bovine serum albumin. PL depletion of HDL had little or no effect on ki, but reduced ke, indicating that PL-deficient HDL is a relatively poor acceptor of cell cholesterol. The reduction in ke resulted in initial Fi greater than Fe and, thus, in net uptake of FC by the cells. This result explained previous results demonstrating net uptake of FC from PL-depleted HDL. In the presence of an inhibitor of acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase, the steady state distribution of FC mass between cells and HDL was accurately predicted by the ratio of rate constants for FC flux. This result provided additional validation for describing FC flux in terms of first-order rate constants and homogeneous cell and HDL FC pools.

  15. Effect of dietary fat source on lipoprotein composition and plasma lipid concentrations in pigs.

    PubMed

    Faidley, T D; Luhman, C M; Galloway, S T; Foley, M K; Beitz, D C

    1990-10-01

    Most studies of the effects of dietary fat sources on plasma lipid components have used diets with extreme fat compositions; the current study was designed to more nearly mimic human dietary fat intake. Young growing pigs were fed diets containing either 20 or 40% of energy as soy oil, beef tallow or a 50/50 blend of soy oil and tallow. Different dietary fats did not affect concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol or protein in plasma or major lipoprotein fractions. The concentration of phospholipid was less in plasma and in very low density lipoproteins with soy oil feeding than with tallow feeding. The weight percentage of cholesteryl ester in the low density lipoprotein fraction tended to be greater with 40% than with 20% tallow and tended to be less with 40% than with 20% soy oil. Phospholipid as a weight percentage of low density lipoprotein was least in pigs fed soy oil. Tallow feeding increased the percentage of myristic, palmitic, palmitoleic and oleic acids in plasma, relative to both other groups. Soy oil feeding increased the percentage of linoleic and linolenic acids. These moderate diets were not hypercholesterolemic, but they did alter plasma fatty acid composition and phospholipid concentrations in plasma and very low density lipoprotein.

  16. Cultured human astrocytes secrete large cholesteryl ester- andtriglyceride-rich lipoproteins along with endothelial lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lin; Liu, Yanzhu; Forte, Trudy M.; Chisholm, Jeffrey W.; Parks, John S.; Shachter, Neil S.

    2003-12-01

    We cultured normal human astrocytes and characterized their secreted lipoproteins. Human astrocytes secreted lipoproteins in the size range of plasma VLDL (Peak 1), LDL (Peak 2), HDL (Peak 3) and a smaller peak (Peak 4), as determined by gel filtration chromatography, nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and transmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol enrichment of astrocytes led to a particular increase in Peak 1. Almost all Peak 2, 3 and 4 cholesterol and most Peak 1 cholesterol was esterified (unlike mouse astrocyte lipoproteins, which exhibited similar peaks but where cholesterol was predominantly non-esterified). Triglycerides were present at about 2/3 the level of cholesterol. LCAT was detected along with two of its activators, apolipoprotein (apo) A-IV and apoC-I. ApoA-I and apoA-II mRNA and protein were absent. ApoJ was present equally in all peaks but apoE was present predominantly in peaks 3 and 4. ApoB was not detected. The electron microscopic appearance of Peak 1 lipoproteins suggested partial lipolysis leading to the detection of a heparin-releasable triglyceride lipase consistent with endothelial lipase. The increased neuronal delivery of lipids from large lipoprotein particles, for which apoE4 has greater affinity than does apoE3, may be a mechanism whereby the apoE {var_epsilon}4 allele contributes to neurodegenerative risk.

  17. Social Inclusion Predicts Lower Blood Glucose and Low-Density Lipoproteins in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Kory; Veksler, Alice E; McEwan, Bree; Hesse, Colin; Boren, Justin P; Dinsmore, Dana R; Pavlich, Corey A

    2016-07-27

    Loneliness has been shown to have direct effects on one's personal well-being. Specifically, a greater feeling of loneliness is associated with negative mental health outcomes, negative health behaviors, and an increased likelihood of premature mortality. Using the neuroendocrine hypothesis, we expected social inclusion to predict decreases in both blood glucose levels and low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) and increases in high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). Fifty-two healthy adults provided self-report data for social inclusion and blood samples for hematological tests. Results indicated that higher social inclusion predicted lower levels of blood glucose and LDL, but had no effect on HDL. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  18. Six new loci associated with blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglycerides in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and blood triglycerides reflect key metabolic processes including sensitivity to insulin. Blood lipoprotein and lipid concentrations are heritable. To date, the identification o...

  19. Subfractions of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and dysfunctional HDL in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Rysz-Górzyńska, Magdalena; Banach, Maciej

    2016-08-01

    A number of studies have shown that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic kidney disease is characterized by significant disturbances in lipoprotein metabolism, including differences in quantitative and qualitative content of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Recent studies have revealed that serum HDL cholesterol levels do not predict CVD in CKD patients; thus CKD-induced modifications in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be responsible for the increase in CV risk in CKD patients. Various methods are available to separate several subclasses of HDL and confirm their atheroprotective properties. However, under pathological conditions associated with inflammation and oxidation, HDL can progressively lose normal biological activities and be converted into dysfunctional HDL. In this review, we highlight the current state of knowledge on subfractions of HDL and HDL dysfunction in CKD.

  20. Subfractions of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and dysfunctional HDL in chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic kidney disease is characterized by significant disturbances in lipoprotein metabolism, including differences in quantitative and qualitative content of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Recent studies have revealed that serum HDL cholesterol levels do not predict CVD in CKD patients; thus CKD-induced modifications in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be responsible for the increase in CV risk in CKD patients. Various methods are available to separate several subclasses of HDL and confirm their atheroprotective properties. However, under pathological conditions associated with inflammation and oxidation, HDL can progressively lose normal biological activities and be converted into dysfunctional HDL. In this review, we highlight the current state of knowledge on subfractions of HDL and HDL dysfunction in CKD. PMID:27478466

  1. Explaining Warm Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; Karpen, Judy T.; Patsourakos, Spiros

    2008-01-01

    One of the great mysteries of coronal physics that has come to light in the last few years is the discovery that warn (- 1 INK) coronal loops are much denser than expected for quasi-static equilibrium. Both the excess densities and relatively long lifetimes of the loops can be explained with bundles of unresolved strands that are heated impulsively to very high temperatures. Since neighboring strands are at different stages of cooling, the composite loop bundle is multi-thermal, with the distribution of temperatures depending on the details of the "nanoflare storm." Emission hotter than 2 MK is predicted, but it is not clear that such emission is always observed. We consider two possible explanations for the existence of over-dense warm loops without corresponding hot emission: (1) loops are bundles of nanoflare heated strands, but a significant fraction of the nanoflare energy takes the form of a nonthermal electron beam rather then direct plasma heating; (2) loops are bundles of strands that undergo thermal nonequilibrium that results when steady heating is sufficiently concentrated near the footpoints. We present numerical hydro simulations of both of these possibilities and explore the observational consequences, including the production of hard X-ray emission and absorption by cool material in the corona.

  2. Explaining gender segregation.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Robert M; Browne, Jude; Brooks, Bradley; Jarman, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Occupational gender segregation--the tendency for women and men to work in different occupations--is an important feature of all societies, and particularly the wealthy industrialized ones. To understand this segregation, and to explain its significance, we need to distinguish between vertical segregation entailing inequality and horizontal segregation representing difference without inequality, with overall segregation being the resultant of these components. Three major theoretical approaches to understanding occupational gender segregation are examined: human capital/rational choice, patriarchy, and preference theories. All are found to be inadequate; they tend to confuse overall segregation with its vertical component, and each entails a number of other faults. It is generally assumed or implied that greater empowerment of women would reduce gender segregation. This is the reverse of what actually happens; in countries where the degree of women's empowerment is greater, the level of gender segregation is also greater. An alternative theoretical approach based on processes of social reproduction is shown to be more useful.

  3. Explaining Synthesized Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanBaalen, Jeffrey; Robinson, Peter; Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, Thomas; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Motivated by NASA's need for high-assurance software, NASA Ames' Amphion project has developed a generic program generation system based on deductive synthesis. Amphion has a number of advantages, such as the ability to develop a new synthesis system simply by writing a declarative domain theory. However, as a practical matter, the validation of the domain theory for such a system is problematic because the link between generated programs and the domain theory is complex. As a result, when generated programs do not behave as expected, it is difficult to isolate the cause, whether it be an incorrect problem specification or an error in the domain theory. This paper describes a tool we are developing that provides formal traceability between specifications and generated code for deductive synthesis systems. It is based on extensive instrumentation of the refutation-based theorem prover used to synthesize programs. It takes augmented proof structures and abstracts them to provide explanations of the relation between a specification, a domain theory, and synthesized code. In generating these explanations, the tool exploits the structure of Amphion domain theories, so the end user is not confronted with the intricacies of raw proof traces. This tool is crucial for the validation of domain theories as well as being important in everyday use of the code synthesis system. It plays an important role in validation because when generated programs exhibit incorrect behavior, it provides the links that can be traced to identify errors in specifications or domain theory. It plays an important role in the everyday use of the synthesis system by explaining to users what parts of a specification or of the domain theory contribute to what pieces of a generated program. Comments are inserted into the synthesized code that document these explanations.

  4. Effect of caponization and exogenous androgens implantation on blood lipid and lipoprotein profile in male chickens.

    PubMed

    Chen, K L; Lee, T Y; Huang, C C; Chen, Y C; Chiou, P W S

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated effects of caponization and different forms of androgen implantation on blood lipid and lipoprotein profile of capons to understand the role of different androgens. Male chickens were caponized at 12 wk of age and selected at 16 wk of age for a 10-wk feeding period. Sixteen intact caponized (capon) male chickens and 16 female chickens were assigned for trial 1, and 16 sham-operated (sham) male chickens and 64 capons were selected for trial 2, in which capons were randomly divided into cholesterol (CHOL), testosterone (TES), 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, or 19-nortestosterone (19-NorT) implantation at 16, 20, and 24 wk of age. Trial 1 showed that caponization decreased TES concentration (P < 0.05) in male chickens while showing no difference with females (P > 0.05). Caponization increased lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity and relative abdominal fat weight (P < 0.05) to a level compatible with females (P > 0.05). Caponization also increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) content and LDL-protein percentage (P < 0.05) but decreased high-density lipoprotein-free CHOL percentage (P < 0.05) compared with intact males. In trial 2, androgen implantation showed lower relative abdominal fat weight (P < 0.05) than CHOL. Only 19-NorT reached a level compatible with the sham (P > 0.05). Cholesterol implantation increased LPL activity compared with the sham (P < 0.05), and 19-NorT and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone showed the lowest LPL activity (P < 0.05). Different androgen implantations increased LDL and very low density lipoprotein + LDL ratios and decreased high-density lipoprotein ratio (P < 0.05) to the compatible level with the sham (P > 0.05). Different levels of androgen implantation also demonstrated changes in LDL triacylglyceride and protein percentage and reached a level compatible with the sham (P > 0.05). Caponization decreased blood TES concentration in male chickens, increased LPL activity, and changed the lipoprotein composition, leading to an

  5. A high-fat diet and the threonine-encoding allele (Thr54) polymorphism of fatty acid–binding protein 2 reduce plasma triglyceride–rich lipoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Thr54 allele of the fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2) DNA polymorphism is associated with increased triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and insulin resistance. We investigated whether the triglyceride-rich lipoprotein response to diets of varied fat content is affected by the fatty acid binding pr...

  6. Hitch-hiking between cells on lipoprotein particles.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Sylvia; Harterink, Martin; Sprong, Hein

    2007-04-01

    Cell surface proteins containing covalently linked lipids associate with specialized membrane domains. Morphogens like Hedgehog and Wnt use their lipid anchors to bind to lipoprotein particles and employ lipoproteins to travel through tissues. Removal of their lipid anchors or decreasing lipoprotein levels give rise to adverse Hedgehog and Wnt signaling. Some parasites can also transfer their glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored surface proteins to host lipoprotein particles. These antigen-loaded lipoproteins spread throughout the circulation, and probably hamper an adequate immune response by killing neutrophils. Together, these findings imply a widespread role for lipoproteins in intercellular transfer of lipid-anchored surface proteins, and may have various physiological consequences. Here, we discuss how lipid-modified proteins may be transferred to and from lipoproteins at the cellular level.

  7. The syndecan family of proteoglycans. Novel receptors mediating internalization of atherogenic lipoproteins in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fuki, I V; Kuhn, K M; Lomazov, I R; Rothman, V L; Tuszynski, G P; Iozzo, R V; Swenson, T L; Fisher, E A; Williams, K J

    1997-01-01

    Cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been shown to participate in lipoprotein catabolism, but the roles of specific proteoglycan classes have not been examined previously. Here, we studied the involvement of the syndecan proteoglycan family. First, transfection of CHO cells with expression vectors for several syndecan core proteins produced parallel increases in the cell association and degradation of lipoproteins enriched in lipoprotein lipase, a heparan-binding protein. Second, a chimeric construct, FcR-Synd1, that consists of the ectodomain of the IgG Fc receptor Ia linked to the highly conserved transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of syndecan-1 directly mediated efficient internalization, in a process triggered by ligand clustering. Third, internalization of lipase-enriched lipoproteins via syndecan-1 and of clustered IgGs via the chimera showed identical kinetics (t1/2 = 1 h) and identical dose-response sensitivities to cytochalasin B, which disrupts microfilaments, and to genistein, which inhibits tyrosine kinases. In contrast, internalization of the receptor-associated protein, which proceeds via coated pits, showed a t1/2 < 15 min, limited sensitivity to cytochalasin B, and complete insensitivity to genistein. Thus, syndecan proteoglycans can directly mediate ligand catabolism through a pathway with characteristics distinct from coated pits, and might act as receptors for atherogenic lipoproteins and other ligands in vivo. PMID:9294130

  8. Systemic Inflammatory Markers Are Closely Associated with Atherogenic Lipoprotein Subfractions in Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha; Xu, Rui-Xia; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Sun, Jing; Li, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between inflammatory markers and atherogenic lipoprotein subfractions. Methods. We studied 520 eligible subjects who were not receiving any lipid-lowering therapy. The inflammatory markers including white blood cell (WBC) count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), fibrinogen, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and D-dimer were measured. A multimarker inflammatory index was developed. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) separation processes were performed using Lipoprint System. Results. In age- and sex-adjusted analysis, several inflammatory markers (WBC count, hs-CRP, fibrinogen, and ESR) were positively related to circulating non-HDL cholesterol and remnant cholesterol (p < 0.05, all). Among lipoprotein subfractions, we observed a positive association of inflammatory markers with very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, small LDL cholesterol, and LDL score (p < 0.05, all). Meanwhile, a negative association was detected between inflammatory markers and mean LDL particle size (p < 0.05) or large HDL cholesterol (p < 0.05). Moreover, we found that the relationships between multimarker index quartiles and small LDL cholesterol, LDL score, and mean LDL particle size were slightly stronger in patients with CAD. Conclusions. Systemic inflammatory markers are positively correlated with small LDL cholesterol and LDL score while being negatively linked with mean LDL particle size and large HDL cholesterol, highlighting the potential contribution to increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:26688615

  9. Effect of genistein against copper-induced lipid peroxidation of human high density lipoproteins (HDL).

    PubMed

    Ferretti, G; Bacchetti, T; Menanno, F; Curatola, G

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the isoflavone genistein exerts a protective effect against lipid peroxidation of low density lipoproteins (LDL). Aim of our study was to investigate whether genistein protects high density lipoproteins (HDL), isolated from normolipemic subjects, against Cu(++)-induced lipid peroxidation. Our results demonstrated that genistein exerts an inhibitory effect against Cu(++)-induced lipid peroxidation of HDL, as shown by the lower increase in the levels of conjugated dienes in lipoproteins oxidized after preincubation with different concentrations of genistein (0.5-2.5microM). Moreover the analysis of fluorescence emission spectra of tryptophan (Trp) and Laurdan (6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethyl-aminonaphthalene) demonstrated that genistein prevents the alterations of apoprotein structure and physico-chemical properties, associated with Cu(++)-triggered lipid peroxidation of lipoproteins. The protective effect exerted by genistein against oxidative damage of lipoproteins was realized at concentrations similar to those observed in plasma of human subjects consuming a traditional soy diet or receiving a soy supplement. Therefore, we suggested that antioxidant activity exerted by genistein against lipid peroxidation of HDL in vitro could be of physiological relevance.

  10. ENIGMATIC ROLE OF LIPOPROTEIN(a) IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Anuurad, Erdembileg; Enkhmaa, Byambaa; Berglund, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a), Lp(a), has many properties in common with low density lipoprotein, LDL, but contains a unique protein apolipoprotein(a), linked to apolipoprotein B-100 by a single disulfide bond. There is a substantial size heterogeneity of apo(a), and generally smaller apo(a) sizes tend to correspond to higher plasma Lp(a) levels, but this relation is far from linear, underscoring the importance to assess allele-specific apo(a) levels. The presence of apo(a), a highly charged, carbohydrate-rich, hydrophilic protein may obscure key features of the LDL moiety and offer opportunities for binding to vessel wall elements. Recently, interest in Lp(a) has increased because studies over the past decade have confirmed and more robustly demonstrated a risk factor role of Lp(a) for cardiovascular disease. In particular, levels of Lp(a) carried in particles with smaller size apo(a) isoforms are associated with CAD. Other studies suggest that pro-inflammatory conditions may modulate risk factor properties of Lp(a). Further, Lp(a) may act as a preferential acceptor for pro-inflammatory oxidized phospholipids transferred from tissues or from other lipoproteins. However, at present only a limited number of agents (e.g. nicotinic acid and estrogen) has proven efficacy in lowering Lp(a) levels. Although Lp(a) has not been definitely established as a cardiovascular risk factor and no guidelines presently recommend intervention, Lp(a)-lowering therapy might offer benefits in subgroups of patients with high Lp(a) levels. PMID:21167011

  11. Analyzing the molecular mechanism of lipoprotein localization in Brucella

    PubMed Central

    Goolab, Shivani; Roth, Robyn L.; van Heerden, Henriette; Crampton, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins possess diverse structure and functionality, ranging from bacterial physiology to pathogenic processes. As such many lipoproteins, originating from Brucella are exploited as potential vaccines to countermeasure brucellosis infection in the host. These membrane proteins are translocated from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane where they are anchored peripherally by a multifaceted targeting mechanism. Although much research has focused on the identification and classification of Brucella lipoproteins and their potential use as vaccine candidates for the treatment of Brucellosis, the underlying route for the translocation of these lipoproteins to the outer surface of the Brucella (and other pathogens) outer membrane (OM) remains mostly unknown. This is partly due to the complexity of the organism and evasive tactics used to escape the host immune system, the variation in biological structure and activity of lipoproteins, combined with the complex nature of the translocation machinery. The biosynthetic pathway of Brucella lipoproteins involves a distinct secretion system aiding translocation from the cytoplasm, where they are modified by lipidation, sorted by the lipoprotein localization machinery pathway and thereafter equipped for export to the OM. Surface localized lipoproteins in Brucella may employ a lipoprotein flippase or the β-barrel assembly complex for translocation. This review provides an overview of the characterized Brucella OM proteins that form part of the OM, including a handful of other characterized bacterial lipoproteins and their mechanisms of translocation. Lipoprotein localization pathways in gram negative bacteria will be used as a model to identify gaps in Brucella lipoprotein localization and infer a potential pathway. Of particular interest are the dual topology lipoproteins identified in Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenza. The localization and topology of these lipoproteins from other gram negative bacteria

  12. Jupiter's Gossamer Rings Explained.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past several years, Galileo measurements and groundbased imaging have drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint ring system. We now recognize that the ring consists of four components: a main ring 7000km wide, whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of more tenuous Gossamer rings, one associated with each of the small moons Thebe and Amalthea. When viewed edge on, the Gossamer rings appear as diaphanous disks whose thicknesses agree with the vertical excursions of the inclined satellites from the equatorial plane. In addition, the brightness of each Gossamer ring drops off sharply outside the satellite orbits. These correlations allowed Burns etal (1999, Science, 284, 1146) to argue convincingly that the satellites act as sources of the dusty ring material. In addition, since most material is seen inside the orbits of the source satellites, an inwardly-acting dissipative force such as Poynting-Robertson drag is implicated. The most serious problem with this simple and elegant picture is that it is unable to explain the existence of a faint swath of material that extends half a jovian radius outward from Thebe. A key constraint is that this material has the same thickness as the rest of the Thebe ring. In this work, we identify the mechanism responsible for the outward extension: it is a shadow resonance, first investigated by Horanyi and Burns (1991, JGR, 96, 19283). When a dust grain enters Jupiter's shadow, photoelectric processes shut down and the grain's electric charge becomes more negative. The electromagnetic forces associated with the varying charge cause periodic oscillations in the orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis as the orbital pericenter precesses. This results in a ring which spreads both inward and outward of its source satellite while preserving its vertical thickness - just as is observed for the Thebe ring. Predictions of the model are: i) gaps of micron-sized material interior to Thebe and

  13. Hypertriglyceridemia and unusual lipoprotein subclass distributions associated with late pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, T.M.; Kretchmer, N.; Silliman, K. )

    1991-03-15

    In the human adult population elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) levels are associated with decreased high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and decreased HDL and LDL particle sizes. Late pregnancy is a hypertriglyceridemic state where little is known about LDL and HDL subpopulation distribution. Plasma lipids, apolipoproteins (apo) and lipoprotein subpopulations were examined in 36 pregnant women at 36 wk pregnancy and 6 wk postpartum and correlated with HDL and LDL size. There was a significant decrease in LDL diameter at 36 wk pre, 25 {plus minus} 0.7 nm compared, with 6 wk post, 26.4 {plus minus} 0.8 nm. A total of 97% of the 36 wk pre subjects had small dense LDL which paralleled increases in apoB concentration. Unlike LDL HDL at 36 wks pre showed a significant increase in larger sized particles where HDL{sub 2b} predominated. There was a positive correlation between HDL{sub 2b} mass and apoAl and HDL-C concentrations. Late pregnancy is a metabolic state where the predominance of large, HDL{sub 2b} particles is discordant with the predominance of small LDL and elevated TG. This annual metabolic pattern may in part be due to hormonal changes occurring in late pregnancy.

  14. Lipid profiling of lipoprotein X: Implications for dyslipidemia in cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Heimerl, Susanne; Boettcher, Alfred; Kaul, Harald; Liebisch, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Lipoprotein X (Lp-X) is an abnormal lipoprotein that may typically be formed in intra- and extrahepatic cholestasis and potentially interfere with lipid analysis in the routine lab. To gain insight into lipid class and species composition, Lp-X, LDL and HDL from cholestatic and control serum samples were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis including phospholipids (PL), sphingolipids, free cholesterol (FC), cholesteryl esters (CE) and bile acids. Our analysis of Lp-X revealed a content of 46% FC, 49% PL with 34% phosphatidylcholine (PC) as main PL component. The lipid species pattern of Lp-X showed remarkable high fractions of mono-unsaturated species including PC 32:1 and PC 34:1 and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) 32:1 and 34:1. LDL and HDL lipid composition in the same specimens strongly reflected the lipid composition of Lp-X with increased PC 32:1, PC 34:1, PE 32:1, PE 34:1 and FC accompanied by decreased CE compared to controls. Comparison of Lp-X and biliary lipid composition clearly indicates that Lp-X does not originate from a sole release of bile lipids. Moreover, these data present evidence for increased hepatic fatty acid and PL synthesis which may represent a reaction to high hepatic FC level observed during cholestasis.

  15. Age-related changes of serum lipoprotein oxidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukiko Kawashima; Omaye, Stanley Teruo

    2004-01-23

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) may be a prelude to atherogenesis and directly age related. To assess whether there may be relationship between age and plasma lipoprotein (LP) oxidation, we studied copper-mediated LP oxidation isolated from the blood of 2 months, 7 months, and 15 months old rats. We determined whether the susceptibility of LP to oxidation might be related to vitamin C levels in serum, vitamin E levels in LP, or the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of serum or LP. Serum vitamin C content was inversely related to age, malondialdehyde (MDA) propagation rate, and maximum change of MDA concentrations. However, there were no significant relationships between age and serum TAC, LP TAC, serum vitamin E, or the ratio of LP vitamin E to serum vitamin C content. The lag phase of MDA formation was significantly decreased with age and the ratio of LP vitamin E content to serum vitamin C content, increased with age. Maximum change of MDA concentration was positively correlated with the ratio of LP vitamin E contents to serum vitamin C concentration. Thus, as the rat ages, vitamin C status decreases with an increased LP susceptibility to oxidation. It is tempting to speculate that enhanced LP oxidation in older rats may reflect a reduced amount of recycling of LDL vitamin E by serum vitamin C.

  16. Inclusion of bovine lipoproteins and the vitamin E analogue, Trolox, during in vitro culture of bovine embryos changes both embryo and fetal development.

    PubMed

    Rooke, J A; Watt, R G; Ashworth, C J; McEvoy, T G

    2012-01-01

    This experiment investigated effects of lipoproteins and Trolox (vitamin E analogue) on bovine embryo and fetal development. The treatments were: in vitro culture (IVC) in synthetic oviducal fluid alone (SOF); with bovine lipoproteins (2% v/v; SOFLP); with Trolox (100μM; SOFT); and with lipoproteins and Trolox (SOFLPT). In vitro culture with lipoproteins increased fatty acid content of blastocysts (P<0.001) whereas inclusion of Trolox had no effect (P>0.05). Whereas lipoproteins reduced zygote development to blastocysts (P=0.03), Trolox facilitated increased development (P<0.001) and counteracted the reduction observed with lipoproteins (interaction, P=0.009). Lipoproteins also compromised (P<0.001) but presence of Trolox (P>0.05) had no effect on blastocyst morphological grade. Pregnancy rates resulting from synchronous transfer of IVP embryos were not affected by IVC treatment. At Day 70 of pregnancy, compared with SOF, fetal weight was lower in SOFLP but not SOFLPT (interaction, P<0.001). Liver weight (g kg(-1) fetal weight) was greater (P=0.03) in treatments containing Trolox. Placentome numbers were greater in SOF and SOFLPT compared with SOFLP and SOFT (interaction, P=0.002); superior embryo grades were also associated with increased numbers of placentomes (P=0.024). In conclusion, the interactive effects of lipoprotein and Trolox inclusion on in vitro embryo development were also evident in fetal development at Day 70.

  17. Lipids and lipoproteins in subjects at 1,000 and 3,500 meter altitudes.

    PubMed

    de Mendoza, S; Nucete, H; Ineichen, E; Salazar, E; Zerpa, A; Glueck, C J

    1979-01-01

    To assess the relationship between altitude, atherogenic, and anti-atherogenic lipoprotein cholesterols (low- [C-LDL] and high [C-HDL] density lipoprotein cholesterols, respectively), 136 and 94 Venezuelan Mestizos living at 1,000 and 3,500 in elevation were studied. The two groups did not differ in regard to height, weight, ethnic origin, social or economic status, nutritional patterns, age, or occupation. Both groups had a high level of daily physical exertion, an imperative in their subsistence rural agricultural economy. Due to the mountainous terrain, high altitude residents were thought to have increased levels of physical activity. Males and females at high altitude had significantly lower plasma total cholesterol and C-LDL levels, and slightly lower C-HDL levels than those at low altitudes. It is speculated that reduced coronary heart disease event rates at high altitude might be related to lower levels of the atherogenic lipoprotein cholesterol, C-LDL.

  18. Lipoprotein secretion: It takes two to TANGO.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2016-05-09

    An unsolved mystery in cell biology is how unusually large secretory cargoes are exported from the endoplasmic reticulum. In this issue, Santos et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201603072) report the function of a Mia2/cTAGE5 transcript fusion, named TALI, in the endoplasmic reticulum export of chylomicrons and very low-density lipoproteins, but not collagen XII.

  19. Internet organ solicitation, explained.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark E

    2006-01-01

    The growth of internet-based communications and the increasing demand for living organ donors are resulting in more use of Web sites for organ solicitation. Web resources have the capacity to improve public awareness about both organ donations and transplant outcomes. Rules for organ donation and fair allocation must follow legal principles regarding organ solicitation. Categories of internet recipient/donor matching services include "clearing house," "membership," and "individual" sites. All these raise ethical concerns related to the individual recipient/donor relationship and to the current system of organ allocation. However, a lack of rules and regulations regarding internet solicitation exists. Several pragmatic steps are proposed.

  20. Utility of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in hemodialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Laura; González, Ana I; Elbert, Alicia; Berg, Gabriela; Wikinski, Regina

    2004-08-01

    Non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) is proposed as a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Measuring non-HDL-C, as total cholesterol minus HDL-C, is convenient for routine practice because, among other advantages, fasting is not required. There are limited data of non-HDL-C in end-stage renal disease patients. We applied non-HDL-C calculation to 50 chronic renal patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis (HD) and 20 healthy subjects, apart from measurement of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) HDL, intermediate-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (IDL-C), apoprotein (apo) B, and triglycerides. HD patients presented higher plasma triglycerides and IDL-C and lower HDL-C than the control group, even after adjustment for age (P < .05). VLDL-C increased in HD patients (P < .001) while differences in non-HDL-C did not reach significance (P = .08). To detect which parameter constitutes a better marker of CVD risk among HD patients, a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed considering HD patients in the highest risk group for CVD. In the ROC graphic, the plots of VLDL and IDL-C exhibited the greater observed accuracy and the best performance, while non-HDL-C showed a curve close to the 45 degrees line indicating that this parameter is a poor discriminator for evaluating CVD risk among HD patients. Non-HDL-C calculation, expressing all apo B-containing lipoproteins, may miss the significant contribution of each atherogenic lipoprotein, such as increase in IDL. This observation would not be in agreement with the currently proposed application of non-HDL-C a useful tool for risk assessment among HD patients.

  1. [A history and review of cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and their contribution to the understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of high density lipoprotein].

    PubMed

    Corral, Pablo; Schreier, Laura

    2014-01-01

    There is irrefutable evidence that statins reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in a magnitude proportional to the intensity of the decrease in cholesterol transport by the low density lipoproteins. Despite this great advance there is still a residual risk of cardiovascular events. For this reason, an increase in the levels of high density lipoprotein is considered in order to boost the main action of this lipoprotein, which is reverse cholesterol transport. Distinct classes of evidence (epidemiological, genetic, and pathophysiological) show that the inhibition and/or modulation of cholesterol ester transfer protein increases plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. The main reason for presenting this review is to look at the physiology of cholesterol ester transfer protein, its interrelationship with high density lipoproteins, and to give an update on the development of different cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitor/modulator molecules.

  2. Lipoprotein(a) accelerates atherosclerosis in uremic mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Tanja X.; McCormick, Sally P.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Bro, Susanne; Nielsen, Lars B.

    2010-01-01

    Uremic patients have increased plasma lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels and elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. Lp(a) is a subfraction of LDL, where apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] is disulfide bound to apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB). Lp(a) binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPL), and uremia increases lipoprotein-associated OxPL. Thus, Lp(a) may be particularly atherogenic in a uremic setting. We therefore investigated whether transgenic (Tg) expression of human Lp(a) increases atherosclerosis in uremic mice. Moderate uremia was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (NX) in Tg mice with expression of human apo(a) (n = 19), human apoB-100 (n = 20), or human apo(a) + human apoB [Lp(a)] (n = 15), and in wild-type (WT) controls (n = 21). The uremic mice received a high-fat diet, and aortic atherosclerosis was examined 35 weeks later. LDL-cholesterol was increased in apoB-Tg and Lp(a)-Tg mice, but it was normal in apo(a)-Tg and WT mice. Uremia did not result in increased plasma apo(a) or Lp(a). Mean atherosclerotic plaque area in the aortic root was increased 1.8-fold in apo(a)-Tg (P = 0.025) and 3.3-fold (P = 0.0001) in Lp(a)-Tg mice compared with WT mice. Plasma OxPL, as detected with the E06 antibody, was associated with both apo(a) and Lp(a). In conclusion, expression of apo(a) or Lp(a) increased uremia-induced atherosclerosis. Binding of OxPL on apo(a) and Lp(a) may contribute to the atherogenicity of Lp(a) in uremia. PMID:20584868

  3. Essential protective role attributed to the surface lipoproteins of Borrelia burgdorferi against innate defenses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qilong; McShan, Kristy; Liang, Fang Ting

    2008-01-01

    Summary To initiate infection, a microbial pathogen must be able to evade innate immunity. Here we show that the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi depends on its surface lipoproteins for protection against innate defenses. The deficiency for OspC, an abundantly expressed surface lipoprotein during early infection, led to quick clearance of B. burgdorferi after inoculation into the skin of SCID mice. Increasing expression of any of the four randomly chosen surface lipoproteins, OspA, OspE, VlsE or DbpA, fully protected the ospC mutant from elimination from the skin tissue of SCID mice; moreover, increased OspA, OspE, or VlsE expression allowed the mutant to cause disseminated infection and restored the ability to effectively colonize both joint and skin tissues, albeit the dissemination process was much slower than that of the mutant restored with OspC expression. When the ospC mutant was modified to express OspA under control of the ospC regulatory elements, it registered only a slight increase in the 50% infectious dose than the control in SCID mice but a dramatic increase in immunocompetent mice. Taken together, the study demonstrated that the surface lipoproteins provide B. burgdorferi with an essential protective function against host innate elimination. PMID:18452586

  4. The effect of oral lipids and circulating lipoproteins on the metabolism of drugs.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jigar P; Brocks, Dion R

    2009-11-01

    The oral bioavailability of many lipophilic drugs is known to increase when coadministered with fatty meals. Although such a phenomenon is typically ascribed to increased solubilization and absorption of drug, in some cases this increase in systemic exposure may be in part due to the influence of lipids on the presystemic metabolism of the affected drug. Oral lipids on their absorption may interfere with the drug metabolizing enzymes expressed in the small intestine and/or liver. Fatty acids incorporated in dietary triglyceride can modulate the expression and activity of drug metabolizing enzymes within the small intestine. Lipoproteins, which are the major carriers of lipids in the systemic circulation, can become associated with lipophilic drugs. Such a combination may influence the metabolism of lipophilic drugs through limiting their uptake into the cells thereby decreasing their metabolism. In a contrary manner, an increased uptake and metabolism of lipoprotein-bound drug may be facilitated by lipoprotein receptors mediated uptake. The components of lipoproteins may also modulate the expression or activity of hepatic and extrahepatic drug metabolizing enzymes.

  5. High-density lipoprotein-raising strategies: update 2010.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Frank; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Tschöpe, Carsten; Van Linthout, Sophie

    2010-05-01

    Population studies have consistently shown that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels are a strong, independent inverse predictor of cardiovascular disease. Every 1 mg/dl increase in HDL cholesterol is associated with a 2% to 3% decrease in coronary artery disease risk, independent of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The primary mechanism for this protective effect is believed to be reverse cholesterol transport, but several other anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidative functions for HDL have also been identified. Low HDL cholesterol is predictive of cardiovascular events in statin-treated patients with low LDL cholesterol, indicating that intensive lipid lowering strategies with statins alone are not sufficient to prevent cardiovascular events, and merging for additional effective HDL-raising therapy. This review focuses at giving an overview of current established HDL-raising pharmaca, including statins, fibrates, thiazolidinediones, and nicotinic acids, and of novel therapies including cholesterol ester transfer protein-inhibitors, liver X receptor agonists, reconstituted HDL, and apolipoprotein A-I mimetics. Working mechanisms are described and results from clinical trials of monotherapy and combination therapy are discussed.

  6. Lipoprotein (a) and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Palmeira, Ástrid Camêlo; Leal, Adriana Amorim de F.; Ramos, Nathaly de Medeiros N.; de Alencar F., José; Simões, Mônica Oliveira da S.; Medeiros, Carla Campos M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCES: This systematic review included studies from 2001 to 2011, a ten-year time period. Epidemiological studies with children and/or adolescents published in English, Portuguese or Spanish and fully available online were included. The searches were performed in Science Direct, PubMed/Medline, BVS (Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde) and Cochrane Library databases, using the following combination of key-words: "lipoprotein a" and "cardiovascular diseases" and "obesity". DATA SYNTHESIS: Overall, 672 studies were obtained but only seven were included. Some studies assessed the family history for CVD. In all of them, Lp(a) levels were increased in patients with family history for CVD. There was also a positive correlation between Lp(a) and LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B levels, suggesting an association between Lp(a) levels and the lipid profile. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence that CVD may originate in childhood and adolescence leads to the need for investigating the risk factors during this period in order to propose earlier and possibly more effective interventions to reduce morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:24473960

  7. Oral but not transdermal estrogen replacement therapy changes the composition of plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Vrablik, Michal; Fait, Tomas; Kovar, Jan; Poledne, Rudolf; Ceska, Richard

    2008-08-01

    The role of hormone replacement therapy and estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) in cardiovascular disease prevention has not been unambiguously defined yet. The metabolic effects of estrogens may vary depending upon the route of administration. Therefore, we compared the impact of unopposed oral or transdermal ERT on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in 41 hysterectomized women. This was an open-label, randomized, crossover study (with 2 treatments and 2 periods). The 41 hysterectomized women were randomized to receive oral or transdermal 17beta-estradiol in the first or second of two 12-week study periods. Plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels were assayed before and after each treatment using standard automated methods. Lipid content of lipoprotein subclasses was assessed by sequential ultracentrifugation. The atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) was calculated as log(triglyceride [TG]/high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol). The difference between the 2 forms of administration was tested using a linear mixed model. The change from baseline for each of the forms was tested using paired t test. Oral ERT resulted in a significant increase in HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I levels, whereas it significantly decreased total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and increased TG concentrations. Transdermal ERT had no such effect. Oral ERT led to a significant TG enrichment of HDL (0.19 +/- 0.06 vs 0.27 +/- 0.07 mmol/L, P < .001) and LDL particles (0.23 +/- 0.08 vs 0.26 +/- 0.10 mmol/L, P < .001) compared with baseline, whereas transdermal therapy did not have any effect on lipoprotein subclasses composition. The difference between the 2 treatments was statistically significant for HDL-TG and LDL-TG (0.27 +/- 0.07 vs 0.19 +/- 0.05 mmol/L, P < .001 and 0.26 +/- 0.10 vs 0.22 +/- 0.07 mmol/L, P< .001, respectively). The transdermal but not oral ERT significantly reduced the AIP compared with baseline (-0.17 +/- 0.26 vs -0.23 +/- 0.25, P = .023), making the

  8. [Reducing low density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels by apheresis].

    PubMed

    Reiber, I; Gógl, A

    1994-03-13

    The predominate number of homozygote familial hypercholesterolemic and approximately 20% of heterozygotes are resistant to low cholesterol diet and lipid lowering pharmacological treatment even in combination of 2 or more drugs. In such cases, the selective lipoprotein apheresis has become a promising alternative and indicated absolute (homozygotes) or relative (heterozygotes). The combination of low density lipoprotein apheresis, together with diet and drugs, should allow a maximal lowering of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (-60-70%). Besides low density lipoprotein, various apheresis procedures may also eliminate other potentially atherogenic factors, such as lipoprotein(a) and fibrinogen and acutely improve the haemo-rheological status of the patient. The authors review several lipoprotein apheresis procedures with varying degrees of selectivity, those have and furthermore analysis the advantages and disadvantages and cost of each procedure.

  9. Effect of obesity on high-density lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Shirya; Genest, Jacques

    2007-12-01

    Reduced levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) in non-obese and obese states are associated with increased risk for the development of coronary artery disease. Therefore, it is imperative to determine the mechanisms responsible for reduced HDL in obese states and, conversely, to examine therapies aimed at increasing HDL levels in these individuals. This paper examines the multiple causes for reduced HDL in obese states and the effect of exercise and diet--two non-pharmacologic therapies--on HDL metabolism in humans. In general, the concentration of HDL-cholesterol is adversely altered in obesity, with HDL-cholesterol levels associated with both the degree and distribution of obesity. More specifically, intra-abdominal visceral fat deposition is an important negative correlate of HDL-cholesterol. The specific subfractions of HDL that are altered in obese states include the HDL2, apolipoprotein A-I, and pre-beta1 subfractions. Decreased HDL levels in obesity have been attributed to both an enhancement in the uptake of HDL2 by adipocytes and an increase in the catabolism of apolipoprotein A-I on HDL particles. In addition, there is a decrease in the conversion of the pre-beta1 subfraction, the initial acceptor of cholesterol from peripheral cells, to pre-beta2 particles. Conversely, as a means of reversing the decrease in HDL levels in obesity, sustained weight loss is an effective method. More specifically, weight loss achieved through exercise is more effective at raising HDL levels than dieting. Exercise mediates positive effects on HDL levels at least partly through changes in enzymes of HDL metabolism. Increased lipid transfer to HDL by lipoprotein lipase and reduced HDL clearance by hepatic triglyceride lipase as a result of endurance training are two important mechanisms for increases in HDL observed from exercise.

  10. Severe hypertriglyceridemia, reduced high density lipoprotein, and neonatal death in lipoprotein lipase knockout mice. Mild hypertriglyceridemia with impaired very low density lipoprotein clearance in heterozygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, P H; Bisgaier, C L; Aalto-Setälä, K; Radner, H; Ramakrishnan, R; Levak-Frank, S; Essenburg, A D; Zechner, R; Breslow, J L

    1995-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-deficient mice have been created by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. At birth, homozygous knockout pups have threefold higher triglycerides and sevenfold higher VLDL cholesterol levels than controls. When permitted to suckle, LPL-deficient mice become pale, then cyanotic, and finally die at approximately 18 h of age. Before death, triglyceride levels are severely elevated (15,087 +/- 3,805 vs 188 +/- 71 mg/dl in controls). Capillaries in tissues of homozygous knockout mice are engorged with chylomicrons. This is especially significant in the lung where marginated chylomicrons prevent red cell contact with the endothelium, a phenomenon which is presumably the cause of cyanosis and death in these mice. Homozygous knockout mice also have diminished adipose tissue stores as well as decreased intracellular fat droplets. By crossbreeding with transgenic mice expressing human LPL driven by a muscle-specific promoter, mouse lines were generated that express LPL exclusively in muscle but not in any other tissue. This tissue-specific LPL expression rescued the LPL knockout mice and normalized their lipoprotein pattern. This supports the contention that hypertriglyceridemia caused the death of these mice and that LPL expression in a single tissue was sufficient for rescue. Heterozygous LPL knockout mice survive to adulthood and have mild hypertriglyceridemia, with 1.5-2-fold elevated triglyceride levels compared with controls in both the fed and fasted states on chow, Western-type, or 10% sucrose diets. In vivo turnover studies revealed that heterozygous knockout mice had impaired VLDL clearance (fractional catabolic rate) but no increase in transport rate. In summary, total LPL deficiency in the mouse prevents triglyceride removal from plasma, causing death in the neonatal period, and expression of LPL in a single tissue alleviates this problem. Furthermore, half-normal levels of LPL cause a decrease in VLDL fractional catabolic rate and mild

  11. Correlation of Serum Lipoprotein Ratios with Insulin Resistance in Infertile Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffarzad, Aisa; Amani, Reza; Mehrzad Sadaghiani M.D.3, Mahzad; Darabi, Masoud; Cheraghian, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia and insulin resistance (IR), occurring in most infertile women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to assess the relationships between lipoprotein ratios and IR in PCOS women. Materials and Methods Thirty six infertile women with PCOS selected based on Androgen Excess Society (AES) criteria and 29 healthy women matched for age were recruited to this case-control study. After physical measurements, fasting serum glucose (Glu), insulin and lipid profile levels [triglycerides (TGs), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoproteincholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C)] were measured, while lipoprotein ratios (TC/HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C, TG/HDL-C) were calculated. IR was also calculated using homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-IR. The optimal cutoffs of lipoprotein ratios in relation to HOMA-IR were calculated based on the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve analysis using the area under curve (AUC). Results Waist circumference (WC), insulin levels, HOMA-IR, TG levels, and all lipoprotein ratios were significantly higher, while HDL-C was lower in PCOS group as compared to healthy controls. All lipoprotein ratios, TG levels, and WC are significantly correlated with insulin levels and HOMA-IR. Among lipoprotein ratios, the highest AUC of the ROC belonged to TG/HDL-C ratio with sensitivity of 63.6% and specificity of 84.4% (TG/HDL-C>3.19) as a marker of IR in infertile PCOS women. Conclusion Lipoprotein ratios, particularly TG/HDL-C, are directly correlated with insulin levels and can be used as a marker of IR (HOMA-IR) in infertile PCOS patients. PMID:27123197

  12. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  14. Apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Michael D.; Fazio, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol-rich, apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins are now widely accepted as the most important causal agents of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Multiple unequivocal and orthogonal lines of evidence all converge on low-density lipoprotein and related particles as being the principal actors in the genesis of atherosclerosis. Here, we review the fundamental role of atherogenic apoB-containing lipoproteins in cardiovascular disease and several other humoral and parietal factors that are required to initiate and maintain arterial degeneration. The biology of foam cells and their interactions with high-density lipoproteins, including cholesterol efflux, are also briefly reviewed. PMID:28299190

  15. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-05

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology.

  16. A Pressure-dependent Model for the Regulation of Lipoprotein Lipase by Apolipoprotein C-II*

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Nathan L.; Larsson, Mikael; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Small, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) is the co-factor for lipoprotein lipase (LPL) at the surface of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. LPL hydrolyzes triacylglycerol, which increases local surface pressure as surface area decreases and amphipathic products transiently accumulate at the lipoprotein surface. To understand how apoC-II adapts to these pressure changes, we characterized the behavior of apoC-II at multiple lipid/water interfaces. ApoC-II adsorption to a triacylglycerol/water interface resulted in large increases in surface pressure. ApoC-II was exchangeable at this interface and desorbed on interfacial compressions. These compressions increase surface pressure and mimic the action of LPL. Analysis of gradual compressions showed that apoC-II undergoes a two-step desorption, which indicates that lipid-bound apoC-II can exhibit at least two conformations. We characterized apoC-II at phospholipid/triacylglycerol/water interfaces, which more closely mimic lipoprotein surfaces. ApoC-II had a large exclusion pressure, similar to that of apoC-I and apoC-III. However, apoC-II desorbed at retention pressures higher than those seen with the other apoCs. This suggests that it is unlikely that apoC-I and apoC-III inhibit LPL via displacement of apoC-II from the lipoprotein surface. Upon rapid compressions and re-expansions, re-adsorption of apoC-II increased pressure by lower amounts than its initial adsorption. This indicates that apoC-II removed phospholipid from the interface upon desorption. These results suggest that apoC-II regulates the activity of LPL in a pressure-dependent manner. ApoC-II is provided as a component of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins and is the co-factor for LPL as pressure increases. Above its retention pressure, apoC-II desorbs and removes phospholipid. This triggers release of LPL from lipoproteins. PMID:26026161

  17. [Lack of association between the S447X variant of the lipoprotein lipase gene and plasma lipids. A preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Zambrano Morales, Mariana; Fernández Salgado, Erika; Balzán Urdaneta, Ligia; Labastidas, Neila; Aranguren-Méndez, José; Connell, Lissette; Molero Paredes, Tania; Rojas, Alicia; Panunzio, Amelia

    2014-06-01

    The increase in lipid plasma values is an important cardiovascular risk factor. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) plays an important role in the lipoprotein metabolism and metabolic and genetic factors may influence its levels and functions. The S447X variant of the lipoprotein lipase gene is associated with changes in plasma lipids in different populations. The objective of this research was to analyze the S447X variant of the LPL gene and its relation with plasma lipids of individuals in Zulia state, Venezuela. With this purpose, we studied 75 individuals (34 men and 41 women) between 20 and 60 years of age. Each subject had a medical history which included family history, anthropometric characteristics, nutritional status evaluation and biochemical tests. Genomic DNA was extracted for the molecular study and the polymerase chain reaction was used, followed by enzyme digestion, for restriction fragments length polymorphisms using the Hinf I enzyme. The individuals studied had normal levels of blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low density lipoproteins (LDL-C) and slightly decreased levels of high density lipoproteins (HDL-C). The genotypic distribution of the LPL gene S447X variant in the studied population was 90.6% for the homozygous genotype SS447 and 9.4% for the heterozygote SX447. The genotype 447XX was not identified. The population was found in Hardy Weinberg genetic equilibrium. No association between the S447X polymorphism of lipoprotein lipase gene and plasma lipids was observed.

  18. Seasonal variation in plasma lipids, lipoproteins, apolipoprotein A-I and vitellogenin in the freshwater turtle, Chrysemys picta.

    PubMed

    Duggan, A; Paolucci, M; Tercyak, A; Gigliotti, M; Small, D; Callard, I

    2001-09-01

    An analysis of plasma lipids and lipoprotein fractions was performed over the course of the annual ovarian cycle of the female turtle, Chrysemys picta. Determinations of total plasma triglycerides, cholesterol, vitellogenin and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) were made. The lipid and protein composition of the lipoprotein fractions [very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL) and very high density lipoprotein (VHDL)] were also observed over the same period. Plasma triglyceride and vitellogenin levels were significantly increased in the spring preovulatory period and fall recrudescent phase. Total plasma cholesterol levels were significantly elevated only at the onset of the fall recrudescent phase and apoA-I levels were highest during the postoviposition/ovarian arrest phase. The triglyceride content of VLDL was highest in preovulatory animals and there were apparent seasonal changes in the expression of apoA-I and apoE of HDL/VHDL. We conclude that the coordinate regulation of lipids and protein contributes to seasonal ovarian growth and clearance of lipids from plasma, both of which are most likely under hormonal control.

  19. Improved cholesterol phenotype analysis by a model relating lipoprotein life cycle processes to particle size[S

    PubMed Central

    van Schalkwijk, Daniël B.; de Graaf, Albert A.; van Ommen, Ben; van Bochove, Kees; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Havekes, Louis M.; van de Pas, Niek C. A.; Hoefsloot, Huub C. J.; van der Greef, Jan; Freidig, Andreas P.

    2009-01-01

    Increased plasma cholesterol is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Lipoprotein particles transport both cholesterol and triglycerides through the blood. It is thought that the size distribution of these particles codetermines cardiovascular disease risk. New types of measurements can determine the concentration of many lipoprotein size-classes but exactly how each small class relates to disease risk is difficult to clear up. Because relating physiological process status to disease risk seems promising, we propose investigating how lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes depend on particle size. To do this, we introduced a novel model framework (Particle Profiler) and evaluated its feasibility. The framework was tested using existing stable isotope flux data. The model framework implementation we present here reproduced the flux data and derived lipoprotein size pattern changes that corresponded to measured changes. It also sensitively indicated changes in lipoprotein metabolism between patient groups that are biologically plausible. Finally, the model was able to reproduce the cholesterol and triglyceride phenotype of known genetic diseases like familial hypercholesterolemia and familial hyperchylomicronemia. In the future, Particle Profiler can be applied for analyzing detailed lipoprotein size profile data and deriving rates of various lipolysis and uptake processes if an independent production estimate is given. PMID:19515990

  20. Changes in Soil Moisture, Microbial Biomass, Mineralization and Nitrification Explain Increases in N2O Emissions from a Spring Barley Crop Under Combined Reduced Tillage and Cover Crop Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueangritsarakul, K.; Jones, M.; Roth, B.; Abdalla, M.; Williams, M.

    2012-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of conventional tillage (CT), combined reduced tillage-cover crop (RT-CC), and reduced N application on crop yield and N2O emissions from spring barley. Reduced tillage plots were established for seven years, the final four incorporating a mustard cover crop. Higher N2O fluxes were from fertilized, RT-CC plots due to higher WFPS, soil nitrate, and soil carbon. Fluxes during the non-growing season were variable and the main source of cumulative emissions. Emission factors were in the range of IPCC default values. Low N fertilization reduced cumulative emissions, however during the wetter growing season this reduction was smaller than the reduction in barley production particular in the conventional tillage plots. Adopting RT-CC management for cereal crops may be problematic in reducing GHG emissions due to high N2O fluxes. Reducing N fertilizer in order to reduce N2O emissions is not feasible due to high inter-annual variation in crop yield. N2O flux in all plots was positively correlated with microbial biomass carbon, net nitrification and mineralization determined in the field. Increased emissions of N2O in the RT-CC plots are accounted for by increases in organic carbon in the soil and increases in mineralization.

  1. Role of Plasma Lipoproteins in Cortisone-Induced Fat Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Mahley, Robert W.; Gray, Mary E.; LeQuire, Virgil S.

    1972-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of fat embolism can be a complication in patients who have suffered long-bone fracture, and has been associated with a number of conditions in which bone fracture is not a factor. The origin of embolic fat (bone marrow or depot fat versus plasma lipoproteins) has been debated. To test the hypothesis that alterations in the composition of plasma very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) could lead to their coalescence and subsequent impaction in pulmonary vasculature, New Zealand white rabbits were injected intramuscularly with 25 mg of cortisone twice a day for 2, 4, 6, 11 and 12 days. Blood samples were obtained from unanesthetized animals prior to the cortisone treatment and at sacrifice. Pulmonary fat embolism that was similar histologically to that found in the human patient with the clinical syndrome was produced in all rabbits treated for 4-12 days. After the fourth day, all animals were hyperlipidemic. There was a tenfold increase in plasma VLDL concentration and the mean particle diameter of the VLDL was increased from 620 Å to 1016 Å. The proportion of triglyceride (TG) was increased, protein (PR) and phospholipid (PL) were decreased and total cholesterol (TC) was unaltered (untreated controls: PR, 16.4%; TG, 58.5%; PL, 19.2%; TC, 6.7% and cortisone-treated: PR, 8.4%; TG, 75.1%; PL, 11%; TC, 6.4%). The lipid composition of pulmonary embolic fat from rabbits treated with cortisone for 6 or 11 days was TG, 81%; PL, 13% and TC, 6%. VLDL from similarly treated rabbits had a lipid composition of TG, 79%; PL, 14.5% and TC, 6.6%. The TC concentration of bone marrow and depot fat from animals treated with cortisone for 11 days was <1%, and the PL concentration was <2%. These data support the hypothesis that plasma lipoproteins, primarily the VLDL, when altered in size and composition can coalesce into globules of sufficient size to occlude peripheral capillaries. ImagesFig 1Fig 2 PMID:5009252

  2. Ethnic differences in serum lipids and lipoproteins in overweight/obese African-American and white American women with pre-diabetes: significance of NMR-derived lipoprotein particle concentrations and sizes

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Trudy; Osei, Kwame

    2016-01-01

    Objective African-American women (AAW) suffer disproportionately from higher rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality compared with white American women (WAW), despite favorable lipid and lipoprotein profile. Therefore, we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine lipoprotein particle concentrations and sizes in overweight/obese AAW and WAW with pre-diabetes. Participants and methods We studied 69 AAW and 41 WAW, with mean age 46.5±11.3 years and body mass index (BMI) 37.8±6.4 kg/m2. All participants completed standard oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT). Insulin sensitivity (Si) was calculated using MINIMOD method. Body composition was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Fasting blood was obtained for traditional lipids/lipoproteins and NMR-derived lipoprotein particle sizes and concentrations. Results We found that AAW with pre-diabetes were more obese (BMI 38.8±6.7 vs 36.0±5.4 kg/m2, p=0.02) than WAW. Mean Si was not significantly different. However, the mean serum triglycerides were lower, whereas the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1) were significantly higher in AAW versus WAW. The large HDL particle concentration (6.1±3.1 vs 4.6±3.1 µmol/L, p=0.02) was significantly higher in AAW versus WAW. Mean total very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle concentration was lower in AAW versus WAW (39.9±24.4 vs 59.2±25.6 nmol/L, p≤0.001). While mean total LDL particle concentrations were not different, mean small LDL particle concentrations were lower in AAW versus WAW (538.8±294.1 vs 638.4±266 nmol/L, p=0.07). Conclusions We found a more favorable NMR-derived lipoprotein profile in AAW that extends the traditional antiatherogenic lipid/lipoprotein profiles. Clinically, these favorable lipid/lipoprotein profiles cannot explain the paradoxically higher CVD mortality in AAW than WAW and warrant further

  3. Effects of Diet on Genetic Regulation of Lipoprotein Metabolism in Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Rainwater, David L.; VandeBerg, John L.; Mahaney, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Several measures of lipoprotein phenotype are significant predictors of cardiovascular risk. Although such lipoprotein phenotypes are under strong genetic control, it is not clear to what extent they are controlled by the same - and by different - genes and whether these relationships may be altered in different dietary environments. Therefore, we measured six lipoprotein traits (three LDL traits - LDLC and apoB concentrations and LDL size - and three HDL traits - HDLC and apoA1 concentrations and HDL size) on each of three diets differing in level of fat and cholesterol. In bivariate analyses, all but two metabolically related trait pairs were genetically correlated, though none were completely correlated, implying additive genetic effects by both pleiotropic and unique genes. In comparing genetic correlations for the same pair of traits across diet, we detected evidence of diet effects on genetic control of these metabolically related traits; specifically, increasing level of dietary cholesterol was associated with a significant decrease in the genetic correlation of apoA1 with HDL size, and a significant increase in the genetic correlations of LDL size with LDLC and apoB. The results suggest a complex network of genes affecting lipoprotein metabolism: the genes may exert both unique and pleiotropic effects; the genes may exert detectable effects in many or only in specific dietary environments. PMID:20880526

  4. Lipoprotein Receptors Redundantly Participate in Entry of Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satomi; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Ono, Chikako; Uemura, Kentaro; Kawachi, Yukako; Shiokawa, Mai; Mori, Hiroyuki; Wada, Masami; Shima, Ryoichi; Okamoto, Toru; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Chayama, Kazuaki; Wakita, Takaji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-05-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) are known to be involved in entry of hepatitis C virus (HCV), but their precise roles and their interplay are not fully understood. In this study, deficiency of both SR-B1 and LDLR in Huh7 cells was shown to impair the entry of HCV more strongly than deficiency of either SR-B1 or LDLR alone. In addition, exogenous expression of not only SR-B1 and LDLR but also very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) rescued HCV entry in the SR-B1 and LDLR double-knockout cells, suggesting that VLDLR has similar roles in HCV entry. VLDLR is a lipoprotein receptor, but the level of its hepatic expression was lower than those of SR-B1 and LDLR. Moreover, expression of mutant lipoprotein receptors incapable of binding to or uptake of lipid resulted in no or slight enhancement of HCV entry in the double-knockout cells, suggesting that binding and/or uptake activities of lipid by lipoprotein receptors are essential for HCV entry. In addition, rescue of infectivity in the double-knockout cells by the expression of the lipoprotein receptors was not observed following infection with pseudotype particles bearing HCV envelope proteins produced in non-hepatic cells, suggesting that lipoproteins associated with HCV particles participate in the entry through their interaction with lipoprotein receptors. Buoyant density gradient analysis revealed that HCV utilizes these lipoprotein receptors in a manner dependent on the lipoproteins associated with HCV particles. Collectively, these results suggest that lipoprotein receptors redundantly participate in the entry of HCV.

  5. Lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, and retinal arteriosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Javadzadeh, Alireza; Argani, Hassan; Nezami, Nariman; Rashtchizadeh, Nadereh; Rafeey, Mandana; Rohbaninoubar, Mohammad; Rahimi-Ardabili, Babak

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Elevated levels of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and homocysteine (Hcy) have been implicated as risk factors for vascular diseases. The study was performed to explore the possible relationship between retinal arteriosclerosis and serum Lp(a) and Hcy levels. Methods Study subjects consisted of 80 nonsmoking male patients with retinal arteriosclerosis and 54 healthy nonsmoker males as controls. Retinal arteriosclerosis was graded according to the Scheie classification. Serum levels of lipids, lipoproteins, Lp(a), and Hcy were measured by standard methods. Results The serum level of Hcy was higher in patients (24.2±8.1 μmol/l) than controls (10.5±4.1 μmol/l); p<0.01. Serum levels of Lp(a) in patients (47.9±33.1 mg/dl) was also higher than controls (11.7±7.6 mg/dl); p<0.01. There was a significant direct linear correlation between the degree of retinal arteriosclerosis and Lp(a) level (r=0.61, p<0.01), the degree of retinal arteriosclerosis and Hcy level (r=0.72, p<0.01), and also between Lp(a) and Hcy levels (r=0.67, p<0.01). Conclusions The association between retinal arteriosclerosis and serum Lp(a) and Hcy levels suggests that Lp(a) as well as Hcy could play a role in the development of retinal arteriosclerosis. PMID:18806883

  6. Lipoprotein nature of Bacillus licheniformis membrane penicillinase.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, J B; Caulfield, M P; Lampen, J O

    1981-06-01

    Membrane penicillinase (penicillin amido-beta-lactamhydrolase, EC 3.5.2.6) from Bacillus licheniformis bears a striking resemblance to the major outer membrane lipoprotein of Escherichia coli. It can be specifically labeled in vivo with [3H]glycerol, [35S]cysteine, or [3H]palmitate but not by [32P]orthophosphate. The labeled residues are located at or near the NH2 terminus of the membrane penicillinase because they can be completely removed by trypsin which cleaves a hydrophobic peptide(s) from the NH2 terminus, thereby rendering the enzyme hydrophilic. The membrane penicillinase produced by the 749/C gene carried in E. coli on phage lambda is similar to the enzyme formed in strain 749/C itself. The peptide antibiotic globomycin, which prevents processing of the E. coli prolipoprotein, severely inhibited the attachment of [3H]palmitate or [3H]glycerol to the 749/C enzyme (either in B. licheniformis 749/C or in E. coli), blocked the accumulation of penicillinase in the plasma membrane, and enhanced the formation of exoenzyme. Under the same conditions, globomycin does not prevent the attachment of palmitate or glycerol to the E. coli prolipoprotein but inhibits processing of the modified precursor to the mature lipoprotein. These results are in contrast with the lack of effect of globomycin on the RTEM-beta-lactamase of E. coli which has no detectable hydrophobic membrane form and was not labeled with palmitate or glycerol.

  7. Relationship between lipoprotein (a) and micro/macro complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a forgotten target

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Rocio; Segura, Eduardo; Nuñez-Cortes, Jesús Millan; Pedro-Botet, Juan Carlos; Quezada-Feijoo, Maribel; Mangas, Alipio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Increased lipoprotein (a) serum concentrations seems to be a cardiovascular risk factor; this has not been confirmed in extracoronary atherosclerosis complications. We therefore wished to gain a deeper insight into relationship between the plasma concentrations of lipoprotein (a) and the micro- and macro-vascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus and to identify possible differences in this association. Methods This is a descriptive observational cross-sectional study. Two-hundred and seventeen elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were included from the internal medicine outclinic. Anthropometric data, analytical data (insulin reserve, basal and postprandial peptide C, glycosylated hemoglobin, renal parameters, lipid profile and clinical data as hypertension, obesity, micro- and macrovascular complications were collected. Results Patients were grouped according to the type 2 diabetes mellitus time of evolution. The mean plasma concentration of lipoprotein (a) was 22.2 ± 17.3 mg/dL (22.1 ± 15.9 mg/dL for males, and 22.1 ± 18.4 mg/dL for females). Patients with hypertension, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular accident, microalbuminuria and proteinuria presented a statistically significant increased level of lipoprotein (a). Similarly, the patients with hyperlipoprotein (a) (≥ 30 mg/dL) presented significantly increased levels of urea and total cholesterol. In the multivariate regression model, the level of lipoprotein (a) is positively correlated with coronary heart disease and diabetic nephropathy (P < 0.01 and P < 0.005, respectively). Conclusions The elevation of plasma levels of lipoprotein (a) are associated with the development of coronary heart disease and diabe tic nephropathy. Therefore, we consider that the determination of lipoprotein (a) may be a prognostic marker of vascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25870610

  8. Methylation at CPT1A locus is associated with lipoprotein subfraction profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoprotein subfractions help discriminate cardiometabolic disease risk. Genetic loci validated as associating with lipoprotein measures do not account for a large proportion of the individual variation in lipoprotein measures. We hypothesized that DNA methylation levels across the genome contribute...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of alpha-1-lipoprotein may aid in the diagnosis of Tangier disease (a hereditary disorder of fat metabolism)....

  10. The Mayer Hashi Large-Scale Program to Increase Use of Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives and Permanent Methods in Bangladesh: Explaining the Disappointing Results. An Outcome and Process Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mizanur; Haider, M Moinuddin; Curtis, Sian L; Lance, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Bangladesh has achieved a low total fertility rate of 2.3. Two-thirds of currently married women of reproductive age (CMWRA) want to limit fertility, and many women achieve their desired fertility before age 30. The incidence of unintended pregnancy and pregnancy termination is high, however. Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), consisting of the intrauterine device and implant, and permanent methods (PM), including female sterilization and vasectomy, offer several advantages in this situation, but only 8% of CMWRA or 13% of method users use these methods. Program: The Mayer Hashi (MH) program (2009–2013) aimed to improve access to and the quality of LARC/PM services in 21 of the 64 districts in Bangladesh. It was grounded in the SEED (supply–enabling environment–demand) Programming Model. Supply improvements addressed provider knowledge and skills, system strengthening, and logistics. Creating an enabling environment involved holding workshops with local and community leaders, including religious leaders, to encourage them to help promote demand for LARCs and PMs and overcome cultural barriers. Demand promotion encompassed training of providers in counseling, distribution of behavior change communication materials in the community and in facilities, and community mobilization. Methods: We selected 6 MH program districts and 3 nonprogram districts to evaluate the program. We used a before–after and intervention–comparison design to measure the changes in key contraceptive behavior outcomes, and we used a difference-in-differences (DID) specification with comparison to the nonprogram districts to capture the impact of the program. In addition to the outcome evaluation, we considered intermediate indicators that measured the processes through which the interventions were expected to affect the use of LARCs and PMs. Results: The use of LARCs/PMs among CMWRA increased between 2010 and 2013 in both program (from 5.3% to 7.5%) and

  11. Intermittent hypoxia inhibits clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and inactivates adipose lipoprotein lipase in a mouse model of sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Drager, Luciano F.; Li, Jianguo; Shin, Mi-Kyung; Reinke, Christian; Aggarwal, Neil R.; Jun, Jonathan C.; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Sztalryd, Carole; O'Byrne, Sheila M.; Kroupa, Olessia; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Blaner, William S.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Delayed lipoprotein clearance is associated with atherosclerosis. This study examined whether chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a hallmark of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), can lead to hyperlipidaemia by inhibiting clearance of triglyceride rich lipoproteins (TRLP). Methods and results Male C57BL/6J mice on high-cholesterol diet were exposed to 4 weeks of CIH or chronic intermittent air (control). FIO2 was decreased to 6.5% once per minute during the 12 h light phase in the CIH group. After the exposure, we measured fasting lipid profile. TRLP clearance was assessed by oral gavage of retinyl palmitate followed by serum retinyl esters (REs) measurements at 0, 1, 2, 4, 10, and 24 h. Activity of lipoprotein lipase (LpL), a key enzyme of lipoprotein clearance, and levels of angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4), a potent inhibitor of the LpL activity, were determined in the epididymal fat pads, skeletal muscles, and heart. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induced significant increases in levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides, which occurred in TRLP and LDL fractions (P< 0.05 for each comparison). Compared with control mice, animals exposed to CIH showed increases in REs throughout first 10 h after oral gavage of retinyl palmitate (P< 0.05), indicating that CIH inhibited TRLP clearance. CIH induced a >5-fold decrease in LpL activity (P< 0.01) and an 80% increase in Angptl4 mRNA and protein levels in the epididymal fat, but not in the skeletal muscle or heart. Conclusions CIH decreases TRLP clearance and inhibits LpL activity in adipose tissue, which may contribute to atherogenesis observed in OSA. PMID:21478490

  12. Expression of human apolipoprotein B and assembly of lipoprotein(a) in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Callow, M.J.; Stoltzfus, L.J.; Rubin, E.M.; Lawn, R.M.

    1994-03-15

    The atherogenic macromolecule lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] has resisted in vivo analyses partly because it is found in a limited number of experimental animals. Although transgenic mice expressing human apolipoprotein (a) [apo(a)] have previously been described, they failed to assemble Lp(a) particles because of the inability of human apo(a) to associate with mouse apolipoprotein B (apoB). The authors isolated a 90-kilobase P1 phagemid containing the human apoB gene and with this DNA generated 13 lines of transgenic mice of which 11 expressed human apoB. The human apoB transcript was expressed and edited in the liver of the transgenic mice. Plasma concentrations of human apoB, as well as low density lipoprotein (LDL), were related to transgene copy number; the transgenic line with the most copies of human apoB had a >4-fold increase in LDL cholesterol compared with nontransgenics and a lipoprotein profile similar to that of humans. When human apoB and apo(a) transgenic mice were bred together, plasma apo(a) in mice expressing both human proteins was tightly associated with lipoproteins in the LDL density region. These studies demonstrate the successful expression of human apoB and the efficient assembly of Lp(a) in mice.

  13. A clustering analysis of lipoprotein diameters in the metabolic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of smaller low-density lipoproteins (LDL) has been associated with atherosclerosis risk, and the insulin resistance (IR) underlying the metabolic syndrome (MetS). In addition, some research has supported the association of very low-, low- and high-density lipoprotein (VLDL HDL) particle...

  14. The Impact of Cardiorespiratory Fitness on Age-Related Lipids and Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Moon Mark; Sui, Xuemei; Liu, Junxiu; Zhou, Haiming; Kokkinos, Peter F.; Lavie, Carl J.; Hardin, James W.; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence on the effect of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) on age-related longitudinal changes of lipids and lipoproteins is scarce. Objectives This study sought to assess the longitudinal, aging trajectory of lipids and lipoproteins for the life course in adults, and to determine whether CRF modifies the age-associated trajectory of lipids and lipoproteins. Methods Data came from 11,418 men, 20 to 90 years of age, without known high cholesterol, high triglycerides, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline and during follow-up from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. There were 43,821 observations spanning 2 to 25 (mean 3.5) health examinations between 1970 and 2006. CRF was quantified by a maximal treadmill exercise test. Marginal models using generalized estimating equations were applied. Results Total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) presented similar inverted U-shaped quadratic trajectories with aging: gradual increases were noted until the mid-40s to early 50s, with subsequent declines (all p < 0.0001). Compared to men with higher CRF, those with lower CRF developed abnormal values earlier in life: TC (≥200 mg/dl), LDL-C (≥130 mg/dl), non-HDL-C (≥160 mg/dl), and TG/HDL-C ratio (≥3.0). Notably, abnormal values for TC and LDL-C in men with low CRF were observed around 15 years earlier than in those with high CRF. After adjusting for time-varying covariates, a significant interaction was found between age and CRF in each trajectory, indicating that CRF was more strongly associated with the aging trajectories of lipids and lipoproteins in young to middle-aged men than in older men. Conclusions Our investigation reveals a differential trajectory of lipids and lipoproteins with aging according to CRF in healthy men, and suggests that promoting increased CRF levels may help delay the development of dyslipidemia. PMID:25975472

  15. Lipids, lipoprotein distribution and depressive symptoms: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ong, K L; Morris, M J; McClelland, R L; Maniam, J; Allison, M A; Rye, K-A

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggest lower concentrations of total and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to be predictive of depression. We therefore investigated the relationship of lipids and lipoprotein distribution with elevated depressive symptoms (EDS) in healthy men and women from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Participants were followed up over a 9.5-year period. EDS were defined as a Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) score ⩾16 and/or use of antidepressant drugs. Lipoprotein distribution was determined from plasma using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Among 4938 MESA participants (mean age=62 years) without EDS at baseline, 1178 (23.9%) developed EDS during follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression analyses, lower total, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and non-HDL cholesterol concentrations at baseline were associated with incident EDS over 9.5 years (hazards ratio (HR)=1.11–1.12 per s.d. decrease, all P<0.01), after adjusting for demographic factors, traditional risk factors including LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Lipoprotein particle subclasses and sizes were not associated with incident EDS. Among participants without EDS at both baseline and visit 3, a smaller increase in total or non-HDL cholesterol between these visits was associated with lower risk of incident EDS after visit 3 (HR=0.88–0.90 per s.d. decrease, P<0.05). Lower baseline concentrations of total, LDL and non-HDL cholesterol were significantly associated with a higher risk of incident EDS. However, a short-term increase in cholesterol concentrations did not help to reduce the risk of EDS. Further studies are needed to replicate our findings in cohorts with younger participants. PMID:27898070

  16. Lipoprotein ratios: Physiological significance and clinical usefulness in cardiovascular prevention

    PubMed Central

    Millán, Jesús; Pintó, Xavier; Muñoz, Anna; Zúñiga, Manuel; Rubiés-Prat, Joan; Pallardo, Luis Felipe; Masana, Luis; Mangas, Alipio; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; González-Santos, Pedro; Ascaso, Juan F; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentration has been the prime index of cardiovascular disease risk and the main target for therapy. However, several lipoprotein ratios or “atherogenic indices” have been defined in an attempt to optimize the predictive capacity of the lipid profile. In this review, we summarize their pathophysiological aspects, and highlight the rationale for using these lipoprotein ratios as cardiovascular risk factors in clinical practice, specifying their cut-off risk levels and a target for lipid-lowering therapy. Total/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and LDL/HDL cholesterol ratios are risk indicators with greater predictive value than isolated parameters used independently, particularly LDL. Future recommendations regarding the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia, including instruments for calculating cardiovascular risk or action guidelines, should include the lipoprotein ratios with greater predictive power which, in view of the evidence-based results, are none other than those which include HDL cholesterol. PMID:19774217

  17. Apolipoprotein AV Accelerates Plasma Hydrolysis OfTriglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins By Interaction With Proteoglycan BoundLipoprotein Lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Martin; Loeffler, Britta; Kluger, Malte; Fabig, Nathalie; Geppert, Gesa; Pennacchio, Len A.; Laatsch, Alexander; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-02-22

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is associated with differences intriglyceride levels and familial combined hyperlipidemia. In genetically engineered mice, apoAV plasma levels are inversely correlated with plasmatriglycerides. To elucidate the mechanism by which apoAV influences plasma triglycerides, metabolic studies and in vitro assays resembling physiological conditions were performed. In hAPOA5 transgenic mice(hAPOA5tr), catabolism of chylomicrons and VLDL was accelerated due to a faster plasma hydrolysis of triglycerides by lipoprotein lipase (LPL).Hepatic VLDL and intestinal chylomicron production were not affected. The functional interplay between apoAV and LPL was further investigated by crossbreeding a human LPL transgene with the apoa5 knockout, and the hAPOA5tr to an LPL deficient background. Increased LPL activity completely normalized hypertriglyceridemia of apoa5 deficient mice,however, over expression of human apoAV modulated triglyceride levels only slightly when LPL was reduced. To reflect the physiological situation in which LPL is bound to cell surface proteoglycans, we examined hydrolysis in the presence or absence of proteoglycans. Without proteoglycans, apoAV derived either from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, hAPOA5tr HDL, or a recombinant source did not alter the LPL hydrolysis rate. In the presence of proteoglycans, however, apoAV led to a significant and dose-dependent increase in LPL mediated hydrolysis of VLDL triglycerides. These results were confirmed in cell culture using a proteoglycan-deficient cell line.A direct interaction between LPL and apoAV was found by ligand blotting.It is proposed, that apoAV reduces triglyceride levels by guiding VLDL and chylomicrons to proteoglycans bound LPL for lipolysis.

  18. Explaining the increased mortality in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mameli, Chiara; Mazzantini, Sara; Ben Nasr, Moufida; Fiorina, Paolo; Scaramuzza, Andrea E; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Despite large improvements in the management of glucose levels and in the treatment of cardiovascular risk factors, the mortality rate in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is still high. Recently, Lind et al found that T1D individuals with glycated hemoglobin levels of 6.9% or lower had a risk of death from any cause or from cardiovascular causes that is twice as high as the risk for matched controls. T1D is a chronic disease with an early onset (e.g., pediatric age) and thus in order to establish a clear correlation between death rate and the glycometabolic control, the whole history of glycemic control should be considered; particularly in the early years of diabetes. The switch from a normo- to hyperglycemic milieu in an individual with T1D in the pediatric age, represents a stressful event that may impact outcomes and death rate many years later. In this paper we will discuss the aforementioned issues, and offer our view on these findings, paying a particular attention to the several alterations occurring in the earliest phases of T1D and to the many factors that may be associated with the chronic history of T1D. This may help us to better understand the recently published death rate data and to develop future innovative and effective preventive strategies. PMID:26185597

  19. Proprotein convertases in high-density lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seungbum; Korstanje, Ron

    2013-09-18

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexins (PCSKs) are a serine endopeptidase family. PCSK members cleave amino acid residues and modulate the activity of precursor proteins. Evidence from patients and animal models carrying genetic alterations in PCSK members show that PCSK members are involved in various metabolic processes. These studies further revealed the molecular mechanism by which genetic alteration of some PCSK members impairs normal molecular and physiological functions, which in turn lead to cardiovascular disease. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is anti-atherogenic as it removes excessive amount of cholesterol from blood and peripheral tissues. Several PCSK members are involved in HDL metabolism. PCSK3, PCSK5, and PCSK6 process two triglyceride lipase family members, endothelial lipase and lipoprotein lipase, which are important for HDL remodeling. Recent studies in our lab found evidence that PCSK1 and PCSK9 are also involved in HDL metabolism. A mouse model carrying an amino acid substitution in PCSK1 showed an increase in serum apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) level. Another mouse model lacking PCSK9 showed a decrease in APOE-containing HDL. In this review, we summarize the role of the five PCSK members in lipid, glucose, and bile acid (BA) metabolism, each of which can influence HDL metabolism. We propose an integrative model in which PCSK members regulate HDL metabolism through various molecular mechanisms and metabolic processes and genetic variation in some PCSK members may affect the efficiency of reverse cholesterol transport. PCSK members are considered as attractive therapeutic targets. A greater understanding of the molecular and physiological functions of PCSK members will improve therapeutic strategies and drug efficacy for cardiovascular disease where PCSK members play critical role, with fewer adverse effects.

  20. Causes and consequences of lipoprotein(a) abnormalities in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Florian

    2014-04-01

    Lipoprotein(a) is one of the strongest genetically determined risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and patients with chronic kidney disease have major disturbances in lipoprotein(a) metabolism. Concentrations are increased and are influenced by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the amount of proteinuria. The reason for this elevation can be increased synthesis, as is the case for patients with nephrotic syndrome or those treated by peritoneal dialysis. In hemodialysis patients, a catabolic block is the reason for this elevation. The elevated concentrations might contribute to the tremendous cardiovascular risk in this particular population. In particular, the genetically determined small apolipoprotein(a) isoforms are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular events and total mortality.

  1. Lipoprotein redox status evaluation as a marker of cardiovascular disease risk in patients with inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Ungurianu, Anca; Margină, Denisa; Grădinaru, Daniela; Băcanu, Claudia; Ilie, Mihaela; Tsitsimpikou, Christina; Tsarouhas, Konstantinos; Spandidos, Demetrios A.; Tsatsakis, Aristides M.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic inflammatory disorders (ID) have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, and routinely determined parameters do not reveal the real metabolic status of specific subgroups, such as patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, in order to evaluate state of the art markers for the assessment of cardiometabolic risk, abnormalities in lipoprotein levels in patients with a low-grade inflammatory status [diabetes mellitus (DM) subgroup] and in patients with a high systemic inflammatory burden (RA subgroup) was determined. The study group comprised patients with ID [DM (n=20) and RA (n=20)], with an aged-matched control group (n=17). Patient serum was used to determine routine biochemical parameters and to isolate low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The heparin-citrate method was used for LDL precipitation and the phosphotungstic acid-MgCl2 technique for the isolation of HDL. Further, Amplex Red and advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) assays were applied to determine lipid peroxides and protein oxidation, respectively, while the levels of serum advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were also determined. Although the differences in the routinely determined lipidemic profile were notable between the DM and RA subgroups, markers of lipid peroxidation and of advanced protein oxidation/glycation did not differ significantly, indicating possible similar oxidative damage of serum lipoproteins. On the whole, as alterations in lipoprotein functionality can occur long before any changes in routinely measured biochemical parameters are observed, more sensitive markers for the assessment of cardiovascular risk are required. As AOPPs, AGEs, oxidized LDL (oxLDL) and especially oxidized HDL (oxHDL) are affected during the early stages of inflammatory disease, and due to their known link to coronary artery disease, it would be wise to include these markers in the routine cardiovascular evaluation of

  2. Targeted mutation of plasma phospholipid transfer protein gene markedly reduces high-density lipoprotein levels

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xian-cheng; Bruce, Can; Mar, Jefferson; Lin, Min; Ji, Yong; Francone, Omar L.; Tall, Alan R.

    1999-01-01

    It has been proposed that the plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) facilitates the transfer of phospholipids and cholesterol from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) into high-density lipoproteins (HDL). To evaluate the in vivo role of PLTP in lipoprotein metabolism, we used homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells and produced mice with no PLTP gene expression. Analysis of plasma of F2 homozygous PLTP–/– mice showed complete loss of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, and partial loss of free cholesterol transfer activities. Moreover, the in vivo transfer of [3H]phosphatidylcholine ether from very-low-density proteins (VLDL) to HDL was abolished in PLTP–/– mice. On a chow diet, PLTP–/– mice showed marked decreases in HDL phospholipid (60%), cholesterol (65%), and apo AI (85%), but no significant change in non-HDL lipid or apo B levels, compared with wild-type littermates. On a high-fat diet, HDL levels were similarly decreased, but there was also an increase in VLDL and LDL phospholipids (210%), free cholesterol (60%), and cholesteryl ester (40%) without change in apo B levels, suggesting accumulation of surface components of TRL. Vesicular lipoproteins were shown by negative-stain electron microscopy of the free cholesterol– and phospholipid-enriched IDL/LDL fraction. Thus, PLTP is the major factor facilitating transfer of VLDL phospholipid into HDL. Reduced plasma PLTP activity causes markedly decreased HDL lipid and apoprotein, demonstrating the importance of transfer of surface components of TRL in the maintenance of HDL levels. Vesicular lipoproteins accumulating in PLTP–/– mice on a high-fat diet could influence the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:10079112

  3. Aerobic exercise and lipids and lipoproteins in men: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Kelley, George A; Kelley, Kristi S

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aerobic exercise is recommended for improving lipoprotein and lipid levels which at less than their optimal levels are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Evidence seems lacking for the effectiveness of exercise in reducing these levels, possibly due to small sizes in studies. We concluded a meta-analysis of the studies to examine the effects of aerobic exercise on lipids and lipoproteins in adult men. METHODS: Studies were retrieved via computerized literature searches, cross-referencing from retrieved articles, hand-searching, and expert review of our reference list. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials, aerobic exercise ≥8 weeks, adult men ≥18 years of age, studies published in journal, dissertation, or master's thesis format, studies published in the English-language between January 1, 1955 and January 1, 2003, and assessment of one or more of the following lipids and lipoproteins: total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), and triglycerides (TG). All coding was conducted by both authors, independent of each other. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: Forty-nine randomized controlled trials representing up to 67 outcomes from 2,990 men (1,741 exercise, 1,249 control) were pooled for analysis. Using random-effects modeling, statistically significant improvements were observed for TC, HDL-C and TG, and a trend for decreases was observed for LDL-C. Changes were equivalent to improvements of 2% for TC and HDL-C, 3% of LDL-C, and 9% for TG. CONCLUSIONS: Aerobic exercise reduces TC and TG and increases HDL-C in men 18 years of age and older.

  4. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  6. Oxidized phospholipids on apoB-100-containing lipoproteins: a biomarker predicting cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Taleb, Adam; Witztum, Joseph L; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a well-known etiologic factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. Oxidation of lipoproteins, and in particular of low density lipoprotein, is a necessary if not obligatory mechanism for the generation of macrophage-derived foam cells, the first major initiating factor in the development of an atherosclerotic plaque. Oxidation of lipoproteins does not result in the generation of a single, defined molecular species, but of a variety of oxidation-specific epitopes, such as oxidized phospholipids and malondialdehyde-lysine epitopes. Unique monoclonal antibodies have been developed to bind these well-defined epitopes, and have been used in in vitro assays to detect them on circulating lipoproteins present in plasma. This article will summarize the accumulating clinical data of one oxidation-specific biomarker, oxidized phospholipids (OxPL) on apoB-100 lipoproteins. Elevated levels of OxPL/apoB predict the presence and progression of coronary, femoral and carotid artery disease, are increased following acute coronary syndromes and percutaneous coronary intervention, and predict the development of death, myocardial infarction, stroke and need for revascularization in unselected populations. OxPL/apoB levels are independent of traditional risk factors and the metabolic syndrome, and enhance the risk prediction of the Framingham Risk Score. The OxPLs measured in this assay reflect the biological activity of the most atherogenic lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) particles, reflected in patients with high plasma Lp(a) levels with small apo(a) isoforms. The predictive value of OxPL/apoB is amplified by Lp(a) and phospholipases such as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and secretory phospholipase A2, which are targets of therapy in clinical trials. This assay has now been validated in over 10,000 patients and efforts are underway to make it available to the research and clinical communities. PMID:22003918

  7. Characterization of Lipid Composition and High-Density Lipoprotein Function in HIV-Infected Individuals on Stable Antiretroviral Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Alana M.; Chow, Dominic C.; Playford, Martin P.; Parikh, Nisha I.; Gangcuangco, Louie Mar A.; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is an increase in the cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity in individuals infected with HIV that may be due to inflammatory lipid modulation not captured by traditional lipid measures. The objective of this study was to perform advanced lipoprotein phenotyping inclusive of the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol efflux capacity and lipoprotein particle concentration and size in a well-phenotyped group of 118 patients infected with HIV. We used simple and multivariable analyses to determine the associations between advanced lipoprotein parameters and known cardiometabolic risk factors. Participants were on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART) and had benign traditional lipid panels [median total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-C, HDL-C, and triglycerides of 178 mg/dl, 108 mg/dl, 44 mg/dl, and 122.5 mg/dl, respectively]. However, advanced lipoprotein phenotyping demonstrated an elevation of LDL particle number (median of 1,233 nmol/liter) and a decrease in LDL size (median of 20.4 nm), along with a decrease in protective, large HDL particles (median of 3.15 μmol/liter) and reduced HDL cholesterol efflux capacity in comparison to controls of other studies. HDL cholesterol efflux capacity was associated with HDL levels (β=0.395, p<0.001), small LDL particle concentration (β=–0.198, p=0.031), insulin sensitivity by the Matsuda index (β=0.218, p=0.029), and the Framingham Risk Score (β=–0.184, p=0.046). We demonstrate an atherogenic lipoprotein profile by NMR spectroscopy and HDL efflux measurement in a group of HIV-infected patients on stable ART with normal lipid panels. PMID:25416403

  8. Lipoproteins of Treponema denticola: their effect on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sela, M N; Bolotin, A; Naor, R; Weinberg, A; Rosen, G

    1997-07-01

    microM) resulted in a synergistic activation of LDCL. At 21 micrograms/ml, dLPP also induced lysozyme release by the PMN at approximately 30% of the release induced by the chemotactic peptide at 1 microM. In addition, dLPP (21 micrograms/ml) increased additively the release of lysozyme caused by 1 microM FMLP. The release of beta-glucuronidase was not affected. The modulation of neutrophil activity was abolished by preincubation of dLPP with proteinase K. The purified 14 kDa had no effect on either LDCL or exocytosis of lysosomal enzymes of PMN. These data strongly suggest that T. denticola possesses several lipoproteins including outer sheath major oligomeric polypeptides (113-234 kDa) and a lipooligosaccharide of molecular mass of 14 kDa. In addition, an enriched lipoprotein fraction from this oral spirochaete modulates oxygen dependent and independent mechanisms for controlling microorganisms by human PMN.

  9. Influence of different fat emulsions with 10 or 20% MCT/LCT or LCT on lipoproteins in plasma of patients after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hailer, S; Jauch, K W; Wolfram, G

    1998-01-01

    In patients after elective abdominal surgery, different fat emulsions were used to compare their efficacy in total parenteral nutrition and in normalizing plasma lipoprotein levels. In five different groups with 5 patients each, half of the nonprotein calories were given as medium-chain triglycerides/long-chain triglycerides (1:1) or as long-chain triglycerides alone in 10 or 20% fat emulsions or as glucose alone in a control group for 7 days. After surgery, an initial decrease of all plasma lipoprotein components was followed by a different behavior of glyceride-glycerol, cholesterol, phospholipids, and apolipoproteins. Glyceride-glycerol in very-low-density lipoproteins and high-density lipoproteins is increasing during infusion of fat emulsions and decreasing during overnight interruption of infusions. After the 7-day infusion period, there was no significant difference in very-low-density lipoprotein glyceride-glycerol as compared with the values before different infusions. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is reaching and exceeding preoperative concentrations between the 4th and the 7th day, most during infusion of 10% fat emulsion and especially due to an increase of free cholesterol. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I reach preoperative levels during infusion of fat emulsions but not with glucose alone. Higher than preoperative values are reached in phospholipids with all fat infusions already on day 4. Abnormal lipoprotein X occurred least with the medium-chain/long-chain triglyceride 20% fat-infusion. This fat emulsion is suggested as having the best normalizing effect on plasma lipoproteins and best tolerance in patients after surgery.

  10. Explaining Mercury's peculiar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicht, Johannes; Cao, Hao; Heyner, Daniel; Dietrich, Wieland; Christensen, Ulrich R.

    2014-05-01

    MESSENGER magnetometer data revealed that Mercury's magnetic field is not only particularly weak but also has a peculiar geometry. The MESSENGER team finds that the location of the magnetic equator always lies significantly north of the geographic equator, is largely independent of the distance to the planet, and also varies only weakly with longitude. The field is best described by an axial dipole that is offset to the north by about 20% of the planetary radius. In terms of classical Gauss coefficients, this translates into a low axial dipole component of g10= -190 nT but a relatively large axial quadrupole contribution that amounts to roughly 40% of this value. The axial octupole is also sizable while higher harmonic contributions are much weaker. Very remarkable is also the fact that the equatorial dipole contribution is very small, consistent with a dipole tilt below 0.8 degree, and this is also true for the other non-axisymmetic field contributions. We analyze several numerical dynamos concerning their capability of explaining Mercury's magnetic field. Classical schemes geared to model the geomagnetic field typically show a much weaker quadrupole component and thus a smaller offset. The onset only becomes larger when the dynamo operates in the multipolar regime at higher Rayleigh numbers. However, since the more complex dynamics generally promotes all higher multipole contributions the location of the magnetic equator varies strongly with longitude and distance to the planet. The situation improves when introducing a stably stratified outer layer in the dynamo region, representing either a rigid FeS layer or a sub-adiabatic core-mantle boundary heat flux. This layer filters out the higher harmonic contributions and the field not only becomes sufficiently weak but also assumes a Mercury like offset geometry during a few percent of the simulation time. To increase the likelihood for the offset configuration, the north-south symmetry must be permanently broken

  11. The influence of repeated administration of poloxamer 407 on serum lipoproteins and protease activity in mouse liver and heart.

    PubMed

    Korolenko, Tatyana A; Tuzikov, Fedor V; Johnston, Thomas P; Tuzikova, Natalia A; Kisarova, Yana A; Zhanaeva, Svetlana Ya; Alexeenko, Tatyana V; Zhukova, Natalia A; Brak, Ivan V; Spiridonov, Victor K; Filjushina, Elena E; Cherkanova, Marina S; Monoszon, Anna A

    2012-11-01

    The effects of repeated administration of poloxamer 407 (P-407) on lipoprotein-cholesterol (LP-C) and lipoprotein-triglyceride (LP-TG) fractions and subfractions, as well as the effect on liver and heart proteases, were studied. Repeated administration of P-407 to male CBA mice resulted in a model of atherosclerosis with increased diastolic blood pressure; there was a drastic increase in total serum cholesterol and especially TG. A novel small-angle X-ray scattering method for the determination of the fractional and subfractional composition of LP-C and LP-TG was used. In chronically P-407-treated mice, P-407 significantly increased atherogenic low-density lipoprotein C (LDL-C) fractions, as well as intermediate-density lipoprotein C (IDL-C), and LDL₁₋₃-C subfractions, and very-low-density lipoprotein-C (VLDL-C) fractions, as well as VLDL₁₋₂-C and VLDL₃₋₅-C subfractions), to a lesser extent, the total anti-atherogenic high-density lipoprotein C (HDL-C) fraction, as well as HDL₂-C and HDL₃-C subfractions. Additionally, we demonstrated an increase in the serum chitotriosidase activity, without significant changes in serum matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity. Morphological changes observed in P-407-treated mice included atherosclerosis in the heart and storage syndrome in the liver macrophages. P-407 significantly increased the activity of cysteine, aspartate proteases, and MMPs in the heart, and only the activity of cathepsin B and MMPs in the liver of mice. Thus, repeated administration of P-407 to mice induced atherosclerosis secondary to sustained dyslipidemia and formation of foamy macrophages in liver, and also modulated the activity of heart and liver proteases.

  12. Dynamics of lipoprotein level in blood plasma of pregnant women as a function of gestational age according to FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolik, E. V.; Korolenko, E. A.; Tretinnikov, O. N.; Kozlyakova, O. V.; Korolik, A. K.; Kirkovskiy, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Results of an IR spectroscopic investigation of films of blood plasma taken from women of reproductive age, pregnant women with positive and negative Rh factors, and Rh-immunized women were presented as a function of gestational age. It was found that the lipoprotein content in blood plasma of all groups of pregnant women increased during the early stages of pregnancy (17-23 weeks) irrespective of the Rh factor and attained its peak value by weeks 30-35. It was shown that the lipoprotein level in blood plasma as a function of gestational age was quantitatively the same for pregnant women with positive and negative Rh factors. It was established for the first time that this dependence for Rh-immunized women featured a considerable increase of lipoprotein content at gestational age 30-32 weeks and declined acutely by week 36.

  13. Reduced adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase responses, postprandial lipemia, and low high-density lipoprotein-2 subspecies levels in older athletes with silent myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Katzel, L I; Busby-Whitehead, M J; Rogus, E M; Krauss, R M; Goldberg, A P

    1994-02-01

    Healthy older (64 +/- 1 years, mean +/- SEM) athletic (maximal oxygen consumption [VO2max] > 40 mL/kg/min) normocholesterolemic men with no prior history of coronary artery disease (CAD) were recruited for cardiovascular and metabolic studies. Thirty-three percent had asymptomatic exercise-induced ST segment depression on their exercise electrocardiogram (ECG), consistent with silent myocardial ischemia (SI). We hypothesized that abnormalities in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and postprandial triglyceride (TG) metabolism may increase their risk for CAD. Compared with 12 nonischemic controls of comparable age, percent body fat, and VO2max, the 13 men with SI had decreased fasting HDL cholesterol ([HDL-C] 41 +/- 2 v 50 +/- 2 mg/dL, P < .001) and %HDL2b subspecies levels as measured by gradient gel electrophoresis (22 +/- 2 v 34 +/- 3, P < .001). Fasting plasma TG and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were the same in both groups. Although plasma glucose levels during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were similar in both groups, the total insulin area was higher in men with SI (P < .05). After consumption of a standard high-fat meal (680 kcal/m2 body surface area of a formula in which 86% of the calories were derived from fat), postprandial plasma TG, chylomicron-TG, and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG levels and postprandial areas were higher in men with SI (P < .001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, generates two bioactive products during the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein: use of a novel inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, C H; Moores, K E; Boyd, H F; Dhanak, D; Ife, R J; Leach, C A; Leake, D S; Milliner, K J; Patterson, R A; Suckling, K E; Tew, D G; Hickey, D M

    1999-01-01

    A novel and potent azetidinone inhibitor of the lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), i.e. platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, is described for the first time. This inhibitor, SB-222657 (Ki=40+/-3 nM, kobs/[I]=6. 6x10(5) M-1.s-1), is inactive against paraoxonase, is a poor inhibitor of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase and has been used to investigate the role of Lp-PLA2 in the oxidative modification of lipoproteins. Although pretreatment with SB-222657 did not affect the kinetics of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by Cu2+ or an azo free-radical generator as determined by assay of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOHs), conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances, in both cases it inhibited the elevation in lysophosphatidylcholine content. Moreover, the significantly increased monocyte chemoattractant activity found in a non-esterified fatty acid fraction from LDL oxidized by Cu2+ was also prevented by pretreatment with SB-222657, with an IC50 value of 5.0+/-0.4 nM. The less potent diastereoisomer of SB-222657, SB-223777 (Ki=6.3+/-0.5 microM, kobs/[I]=1.6x10(4) M-1.s-1), was found to be significantly less active in both assays. Thus, in addition to generating lysophosphatidylcholine, a known biologically active lipid, these results demonstrate that Lp-PLA2 is capable of generating oxidized non-esterified fatty acid moieties that are also bioactive. These findings are consistent with our proposal that Lp-PLA2 has a predominantly pro-inflammatory role in atherogenesis. Finally, similar studies have demonstrated that a different situation exists during the oxidation of high-density lipoprotein, with enzyme(s) other than Lp-PLA2 apparently being responsible for generating lysophosphatidylcholine. PMID:10024526

  15. ApoAV reduces plasma triglycerides by inhibiting very low density lipoprotein-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) production and stimulating lipoprotein lipase-mediated VLDL-TG hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Schaap, Frank G; Rensen, Patrick C N; Voshol, Peter J; Vrins, Carlos; van der Vliet, Hendrik N; Chamuleau, Robert A F M; Havekes, Louis M; Groen, Albert K; van Dijk, Ko Willems

    2004-07-02

    ApoAV has been discovered recently as a novel modifier of triglyceride (TG) metabolism, but the pathways involved are currently unknown. To gain insight into the function of apoAV, adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of murine apoa5 to C57Bl/6 mice was employed. The injection of low doses of Ad-apoa5 (1-5 x 10(8) plaqueforming units/mouse) dose-dependently reduced plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG levels. First, we evaluated whether a reduced hepatic VLDL production contributed to the TG-lowering effect. Ad-apoa5 treatment dose-dependently diminished (29-37%) the VLDL-TG production rate without affecting VLDL particle production, suggesting that apoAV impairs the lipidation of apoB. Second, Ad-apoa5 treatment dose-dependently reduced (68-88%) the postprandial hypertriglyceridemia following an intragastric fat load, suggesting that apoAV also stimulates the lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-dependent clearance of TG-rich lipoproteins. Indeed, recombinant apoAV was found to dose-dependently stimulate LPL activity up to 2.3-fold in vitro. Accordingly, intravenously injected VLDL-like TG-rich emulsions were cleared at an accelerated rate concomitant with the increased uptake of emulsion TG-derived fatty acids by skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue in Ad-apoa5-treated mice. From these data, we conclude that apoAV is a potent stimulator of LPL activity. Thus, apoAV lowers plasma TG by both reducing the hepatic VLDL-TG production rate and by enhancing the lipolytic conversion of TG-rich lipoproteins.

  16. An efficient depyrogenation method for recombinant bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Basto, Afonso P; Morais, Joana; Marcelino, Eduardo; Leitão, Alexandre; Santos, Dulce M

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins are anchored in the outer membrane lipid layer in close association with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and with other hydrophobic membrane proteins, making their purification technically challenging. We have previously shown that a thorough delipidation of outer membrane preparations from the Escherichia coli expression host is an important step to eliminate contaminant proteins when purifying recombinant antigens expressed in fusion with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprI lipoprotein. Here we report the cloning and expression of three antigens in fusion with OprI (ovalbumin, eGFP and BbPDI) and our efforts to deal with the variable LPS contamination levels observed in different batches of purified lipoproteins. The use of polymyxin B columns or endotoxin removal polycationic magnetic beads for depyrogenation of purified lipoproteins resulted in high protein losses and the use of Triton X-114 or sodium deoxycholate during the course of affinity chromatography showed to be ineffective to reduce LPS contamination. Instead, performing a hot phenol/water LPS extraction from outer membrane preparations prior to metal affinity chromatography allowed the purification of the recombinant fusion lipoproteins with LPS contents below 0.02EU/μg of protein. The purified recombinant lipoproteins retain their capacity to stimulate bone marrow-derived dendritic cells allowing for the study of their immunomodulatory properties through TLR2/1. This is a simple and easy to scale up method that can also be considered for the purification of other outer membrane lipoproteins.

  17. Lipoprotein mediated lipid uptake in oocytes of polychaetes (Annelida).

    PubMed

    Schenk, Sven; Hoeger, Ulrich

    2009-08-01

    The uptake of the 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled sex-unspecific Nereis lipoprotein was investigated in oocytes of the nereidid polychaetes Nereis virens and Platynereis dumerilii. The fluorescence label was first observed in endocytic vesicles (<1 microm diameter), which later fused to larger vesicles (2-3 microm); these were finally incorporated into existing unlabeled yolk granules (5-6 microm). In Platynereis oocytes, the fusion of endocytic vesicles was delayed in oocytes at their final stage of development compared with those at an early stage of development. Lipoprotein double-labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and DiI revealed that both the protein and the lipid moiety remained co-localized during incorporation into the yolk granules of the oocyte. No labeling of the cytoplasmic lipid droplets was observed. In N. virens, unlabeled Nereis lipoprotein was effective as a competitive inhibitor of DiI-labeled Nereis lipoprotein. Ligand blot experiments demonstrated the presence of a lipoprotein receptor with an apparent molecular mass of 120 kDa, which is different from that of the known yolk protein receptor. This indicates the presence, in the polychaete oocyte, of two distinct receptors mediating yolk protein and lipoprotein uptake, respectively. Thus, the sex-unspecific lipoprotein contributes to the lipid supply of the growing oocyte in addition to the known uptake of the yolk-protein-associated lipids. The absence of label in the cytoplasmic lipid droplets, even after prolonged incubation with labeled lipoprotein, suggests that these lipids arise either by the breakdown and resynthesis of lipoprotein-derived lipids and/or by de novo synthesis within the oocyte.

  18. Explaining the Intergenerational Transmission of Divorce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Paul R.

    1996-01-01

    Uses national longitudinal data to explain the intergenerational transmission of divorce. Findings suggest that parental divorce elevates the risk of offspring divorce by increasing the likelihood that offspring exhibit behaviors that interfere with the maintenance of mutually rewarding intimate relationships. Offers four hypotheses for future…

  19. Hepatitis C virus relies on lipoproteins for its life cycle

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Germana; Di Caprio, Giorgia; Fimia, Gian Maria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Marco; Alonzi, Tonino

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 150 million people worldwide. In most cases, HCV infection becomes chronic causing liver disease ranging from fibrosis to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Viral persistence and pathogenesis are due to the ability of HCV to deregulate specific host processes, mainly lipid metabolism and innate immunity. In particular, HCV exploits the lipoprotein machineries for almost all steps of its life cycle. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge concerning the interplay between HCV and lipoprotein metabolism. We discuss the role played by members of lipoproteins in HCV entry, replication and virion production. PMID:26877603

  20. Nondenaturing electrophoresis of lipoproteins in agarose and polyacrylamide gradient gels

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, V.G.

    1989-12-19

    The plasma lipoproteins frequently are classified according to density and/or electrophoretic mobility. The lipoprotein classes differ characteristically also in particle size and apolipoprotein composition. Each class is heterogeneous in size and composition as well. Nondenaturing electrophoresis in agarose gels and polyacrylamide gradient gels are complementary analytical methods for classification of lipoproteins and determining distribution profiles of the major classes. In addition, gradient gel electrophoresis (GGE) has a high resolving capability for subfractionating each class according to particle size. Combination of gel electrophoresis with immunoblotting yields information on heterogeneity in apolipoprotein distribution. 14 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Alterations of Lipid-Lipoprotein and Leptin in Bipolar Disorder Associated with Clinic Process

    PubMed Central

    BÜLBÜL, Feridun; ERYİĞİT, Ayşegül Giray; ERBAĞCI, A. Binnur; SELEK, Salih; SAVAŞ, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is more common among patients with bipolar disorder as compared to normal population. There are studies showing increased leptin levels in obese patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the alterations in leptin levels, body mass index (BMI), and lipid-lipoprotein levels during manic period, as well as during euthymic period, after one month in patients with bipolar disorder. Methods Thirty-one adult patients, who had been hospitalized in the psychiatry clinic because of manic period of bipolar disorder, were included in the present study. Serum leptin and lipid-lipoprotein levels and BMI of the patients were analyzed both on the first day and 30th day of hospitalization after they became euthymic. Results Total cholesterol and triglyceride levels significantly increased in male patients (p<.05). The increase in total cholesterol and LDL-C levels was not significant in female patients (p=.066 and p=.056, respectively). BMI was significantly, but slightly increased in both genders (.56±.14 kg/m2), however, such a change was not observed in serum leptin levels. Conclusion Results of the present study demonstrated that clinical improvement in bipolar patients showed different association in each gender with the alterations in BMI and serum lipid and/or lipoprotein levels. Such an alteration might have resulted from direct or indirect effect of drugs, as well as from lifestyle changes.

  2. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency and CETP in streptozotocin-treated apoB-expressing mice.

    PubMed

    Kako, Yuko; Massé, Maureen; Huang, Li-Shin; Tall, Alan R; Goldberg, Ira J

    2002-06-01

    Both hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia have been postulated to increase atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus. To study the effects of diabetes on lipoprotein profiles and atherosclerosis in a rodent model, we crossed mice that express human apolipoprotein B (HuB), mice that have a heterozygous deletion of lipoprotein lipase (LPL1), and transgenic mice expressing human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). Lipoprotein profiles due to each genetic modification were assessed while mice were consuming a Western type diet. Fast-protein liquid chromatography analysis of plasma samples showed that HuB/LPL1 mice had increased VLDL triglyceride, and HuB/LPL1/CETP mice had decreased HDL and increased VLDL and IDL/LDL. All strains of mice were made diabetic using streptozotocin (STZ); diabetes did not alter lipid profiles or atherosclerosis in HuB or HuB/LPL1/CETP mice. In contrast, STZ-treated HuB/LPL1 mice were more diabetic, severely hyperlipidemic due to increased cholesterol and triglyceride in VLDL and IDL/LDL, and had more atherosclerosis.

  3. [Lipoprotein (a)--a mysterious factor in atherogenesis].

    PubMed

    Jelaković, Bojan; Laganović, Mario; Kuzmanić, Dusko

    2002-01-01

    Etiopathogenesis of arterial hypertension and coronary disease involves interaction of numerous exogenous factors which determine the clinical course and therapeutic response in genetically predisposed individuals. The role of numerous cardiovascular risk factors has been reevaluated during the past few years, yet some unresolved issues and gaps still remain. One of the still insufficiently studied factors is lipoprotein (a) [Lp (a)] which belongs to a subclass of LDL lipoproteins. Its important component is apolipoprotein (a) which is structurally similar to plasminogen. This characteristic can be followed through evolution and is probably crucial for its physiologic but also pathophysiologic role. Actually, through its competition with plasminogen, Lp (a) interferes with the process of fibrinolysis and may contribute to tissue healing and restoration but also support and accelerate atherothrombotic process. Lp (a) concentration is stable and genetically determined in an individual and the indication that persons with elevated levels are permanently exposed to increased risk is supported by the data on twofold incidence of myocardial infarction in mothers of children with highest Lp (a) concentrations. Apart from competing with plasminogen via apolipoprotein (a), Lp (a) increases the activity of inhibitors of plasminogen-I activator and reduces the activity of transforming growth factor-beta. This results both in the absence of fibrinolysis and promotion of migration and proliferation of media smooth muscle cells, which are important in the onset of atherosclerotic process. Lp (a) binds to elastin via apolipoprotein B, resulting in oxidation and facilitated entry into macrophages and their transition into the so-called foam cells, also an important sign of early atherosclerosis. Although many pathophysiologic processes by which Lp (a) contributes to atherosclerosis have also been confirmed by animal experiments as well as by the presence of histologic evidence

  4. Association between moderately oxidized low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein particle subclass distribution in hemodialyzed and post-renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Kimak, Elżbieta; Hałabiś, Magdalena; Baranowicz-Gąszczyk, Iwona; Solski, Janusz; Książek, Andrzej

    2011-05-01

    Disturbances in the metabolism of lipoprotein profiles and oxidative stress in hemodialyzed (HD) and post-renal transplant (Tx) patients are proatherogenic, but elevated concentrations of plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the concentrations of lipid, lipoprotein, HDL particle, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and anti-ox-LDL, and paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) activity in HD (n=33) and Tx (n=71) patients who were non-smokers without active inflammatory disease, liver disease, diabetes, or malignancy. HD patients had moderate hypertriglyceridemia, normocholesterolemia, low HDL-C, apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and HDL particle concentrations as well as PON-1 activity, and increased ox-LDL and anti-ox-LDL levels. Tx patients had hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, moderately decreased HDL-C and HDL particle concentrations and PON-1 activity, and moderately increased ox-LDL and anti-ox-LDL levels as compared to the reference, but ox-LDL and anti-ox-LDL levels and PON-1 activity were more disturbed in HD patients. However, in both patient groups, lipid and lipoprotein ratios (total cholesterol (TC)/HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C, triglyceride (TG)/HDL-C, HDL-C/non-HDL-C, apoA-I/apoB, HDL-C/apoA-I, TG/HDL) were atherogenic. The Spearman's rank coefficient test showed that the concentration of ox-LDL correlated positively with HDL particle level (R=0.363, P=0.004), and negatively with TC (R=-0.306, P=0.012), LDL-C (R=-0.283, P=0.020), and non-HDL-C (R=-0.263, P=0.030) levels in Tx patients. Multiple stepwise forward regression analysis in Tx patients demonstrated that ox-LDL concentration, as an independent variable, was associated significantly positively with HDL particle level. The results indicated that ox-LDL and decreased PON-1 activity in Tx patients may give rise to more mildly-oxidized HDLs, which are less stable, easily undergo metabolic remodeling, generate a greater number of smaller pre-β-HDL particles

  5. Effects of calcium, magnesium, lead, or cadmium on lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis in the pigeon

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, N.W.; Major, T.C.; Horton, C.Y.

    1980-01-01

    Epidemiological and clincal studies suggest that the incidence of atherosclerosis is higher in soft-water areas than in hard-water areas. In an attempt to discern the factor(s) in drinking water that may be associated with these observations, the current studies were performed to determine the effects of several elements associated with hard (i.e., calcium and magnesium) or soft (i.e., calcium and magnesium) or soft (i.e., cadmium and lead) water in the induction and progression of atherosclerosis in the white carneau pigeon. The effect of these elements on lipoprotein metabolism was also assessed because it has been suggested that changes in the metabolism of lipoprotein may play a role in the etiology of atherosclerosis. Results show that the number and size of atherosclerotic plaques in the aorta were increased in pigeons given drinking water containing lead and/or cadmium. The effects of these elements were antagonized by the addition of calcium to drinking water containing lead and/or cadmium. Although lead and cadmium altered the profile of lipoproteins, this change did not appear to be related to an increase in the number and size of atherosclerotic plaques of the aorta. However, in pigeons treated with calcium alone the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) increased fourfold, and arteriosclerosis of the coronary arteries was observed. This result suggests that marked increases in the LDL protein may be related to arteriosclerosis of the coronary arteries. Based on these preliminary results, we suggest that lead, cadmium, and the LDL protein may be important factors in the induction and progression of atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis in the pigeon.

  6. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590... Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. (a) Identification. A lipoprotein X immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques lipoprotein X (a...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590... Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. (a) Identification. A lipoprotein X immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques lipoprotein X (a...

  8. Systemic excretion of benzo(a)pyrene in the control and microsomally induced rat: the influence of plasma lipoproteins and albumin as carrier molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, H.P.; Bymun, E.N.

    1983-02-01

    In vitro studies have previously indicated that benzo(a)pyrene distributes primarily into the plasma lipoprotein fraction when incubated with whole plasma. Hydroxylated metabolites of benzo(a)pyrene distribute increasingly into the albumin fraction as the degree of metabolite hydroxylation increases. This report assesses the influence of plasma lipoproteins and albumin as carriers for benzo(a)pyrene on carcinogen excretion in the control and microsomally induced rat. Male Sprague-Dawley rats cannulated in the bile duct received i.v. injections of radiolabeled benzo(a)pyrene noncovalently bound to the very-low-density, low-density, or high-density lipoproteins in equimolar amounts. Bile was collected and measured for radioactivity. Cumulative biliary excretions of benzo(a)pyrene complexed with rat lipoproteins were 39.6 +/- 9.7 (S.D.), 24.6 +/- 1.3, and 21.2 +/- 8.8% for very low-density, low-density, and high-density lipoprotein, respectively. Values for excretion of benzo(a)pyrene complexed with rat or human lipoproteins were comparable. These data suggest that the transport molecule can effect a 2-fold difference in benzo(a)pyrene excretion under conditions of the present study. Thus, excretion increased as the degree of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylation increased. The effect of microsomal enzyme induction on excretion of lipoprotein-bound benzo(a)pyrene was also assessed. Contrary to expectation, excretion of benzo(a)pyrene bound to the very-low-density, low-density, or high-density lipoproteins in Aroclor-induced rats was not greater than that of control animals. Hence, under the conditions of the present study, 60 to 80% of the injected benzo(a)pyrene and 50 to 60% of the injected benzo(a)pyrene metabolites were not excreted immediately in control or microsomally induced animals. This benzo(a)pyrene may represent a carcinogen pool that is slowly excreted.

  9. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein alters endothelial progenitor cell populations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuqi; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala A; Liu, Lingjuan; Li, Xin; Xiao, Yuan; Zhang, Jia; Xie, Xiaoyun; Hao, Hong; Liu, Jason Z; He, Guanglong; Cowan, Peter J; Cui, Lianqun; Zhu, Hua; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Liu, Zhenguo

    2015-06-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is critical to atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemia. Bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are important to preventing atherosclerosis, and significantly decreased in hyperlipidemia. This study was to demonstrate ox-LDL and hyperlipidemia could exhibit similar effect on EPC population and the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS production in BM and blood was significantly increased in male C57BL/6 mice with intravenous ox-LDL treatment, and in hyperlipidemic LDL receptor knockout mice with 4-month high-fat diet. ROS formation was effectively blocked with overexpression of antioxidant enzymes or N-acetylcysteine treatment. In hyperlipidemic and ox-LDL-treated mice, c-Kit(+)/CD31(+) cell number in BM and blood, and Sca-1(+)/Flk-1(+) cell number in blood, not in BM, were significantly decreased, which were not affected by inhibiting ROS production, while blood CD34(+)/Flk-1(+) cell number was significantly increased that was prevented with reduced ROS formation. However, blood CD34(+)/CD133(+) cell number increased in ox-LDL-treated mice, while decreased in hyperlipidemic mice. These data suggested that ox-LDL produced significant changes in BM and blood EPC populations similar (but not identical) to chronic hyperlipidemia with predominantly ROS-independent mechanism(s).

  10. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism.

  11. PFOS induced lipid metabolism disturbances in BALB/c mice through inhibition of low density lipoproteins excretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yu; Liang, Yong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Aiqian; Fu, Jianjie; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-04-01

    Male BALB/c mice fed with either a regular or high fat diet were exposed to 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) for 14 days. Increased body weight, serum glucose, cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were observed in mice given a high fat diet. However, all PFOS-treated mice got reduced levels of serum lipid and lipoprotein. Decreasing liver glycogen content was also observed, accompanied by reduced serum glucose levels. Histological and ultrastructural examination detected more lipid droplets accumulated in hepatocytes after PFOS exposure. Moreover, transcripitonal activity of lipid metabolism related genes suggests that PFOS toxicity is probably unrelevant to PPARα's transcription. The present study demonstrates a lipid disturbance caused by PFOS and thus point to its role in inhibiting the secretion and normal function of low density lipoproteins.

  12. PFOS induced lipid metabolism disturbances in BALB/c mice through inhibition of low density lipoproteins excretion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yu; Liang, Yong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Aiqian; Fu, Jianjie; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-01-01

    Male BALB/c mice fed with either a regular or high fat diet were exposed to 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) for 14 days. Increased body weight, serum glucose, cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were observed in mice given a high fat diet. However, all PFOS-treated mice got reduced levels of serum lipid and lipoprotein. Decreasing liver glycogen content was also observed, accompanied by reduced serum glucose levels. Histological and ultrastructural examination detected more lipid droplets accumulated in hepatocytes after PFOS exposure. Moreover, transcripitonal activity of lipid metabolism related genes suggests that PFOS toxicity is probably unrelevant to PPARα's transcription. The present study demonstrates a lipid disturbance caused by PFOS and thus point to its role in inhibiting the secretion and normal function of low density lipoproteins. PMID:24694979

  13. Explaining Errors in Children's Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Caroline F.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to explain the occurrence of errors in children's speech is an essential component of successful theories of language acquisition. The present study tested some generativist and constructivist predictions about error on the questions produced by ten English-learning children between 2 and 5 years of age. The analyses demonstrated that,…

  14. Does market competition explain fairness?

    PubMed

    Descioli, Peter

    2013-02-01

    The target article by Baumard et al. uses their previous model of bargaining with outside options to explain fairness and other features of human sociality. This theory implies that fairness judgments are determined by supply and demand but humans often perceive prices (divisions of surplus) in competitive markets to be unfair.

  15. Streptozotocin-Treated High Fat Fed Mice: A New Type 2 Diabetes Model Used to Study Canagliflozin-Induced Alterations in Lipids and Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian; Sungelo, Mitchell J; Goldberg, Ira J; Wang, Hong; Eckel, Robert H

    2017-04-10

    The pharmacological effects of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) medications on lipoprotein metabolism are difficult to assess in preclinical models because those created failure to replicate the human condition in which insulin deficiency is superimposed on obesity-related insulin resistance. To create a better model, we fed mice with high fat (HF) diet and treated the animals with low dose streptozotocin (STZ) to mimic T2DM. We used this model to evaluate the effects of canagliflozin (CANA), a drug that reduces plasma glucose by inhibiting the sodium-glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2), which mediates ~90% of renal glucose reabsorption] on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. After 6 weeks of CANA (30 mg/kg/day) treatment, the increase in total plasma cholesterol in HF-STZ diabetic mice was reversed, but plasma triglycerides were not affected. Lipoprotein fractionation and cholesterol distribution analysis showed that CANA kept HDL-Cholesterol, LDL-Cholesterol, and IDL-Cholesterol levels steady while these lipoprotein species were increased in placebo- and insulin-treated control groups. CANA treatment of HF-STZ mice reduced post-heparin plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity at 2 (-40%) and 5 (-30%) weeks compared to placebo. Tissue-specific LPL activity following CANA treatment showed similar reduction. In summary, CANA prevented the total cholesterol increase in HF-STZ mice without effects on plasma lipids or lipoproteins, but did decrease LPL, implying a potential role of LPL-dependent lipoprotein metabolism in CANA action. These effects did not recapitulate the effect of SGLT2 inhibitors on lipids and lipoproteins in human, suggesting that a better murine T2DM model (such as the ApoB100 humanized CETP-overexpressing mouse) is needed next.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein promotes neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Neufert, C; Pai, R K; Noss, E H; Berger, M; Boom, W H; Harding, C V

    2001-08-01

    Certain microbial substances, e.g., LPS, can activate neutrophils or prime them to enhance their response to other activating agents, e.g., fMLP. We investigated the role of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) 19-kDa lipoprotein in activation of human neutrophils. MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein initiated phenotypic changes characteristic of neutrophil activation, including down-regulation of CD62 ligand (L-selectin) and up-regulation of CD35 (CR1) and CD11b/CD18 (CR3, Mac-1). In addition, exposure of neutrophils to MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein enhanced the subsequent oxidative burst in response to fMLP as assessed by oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (determined by flow cytometry). LPS also produced these effects with similar kinetics, but an oligodeoxynucleotide containing a CpG motif failed to induce any priming or activation response. Although the effects of LPS required the presence of serum, neutrophil activation by MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein occurred independently of serum factors, suggesting the involvement of different receptors and signaling mechanisms for LPS and MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein. Thus, MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein serves as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that promotes neutrophil priming and activation.

  17. Isolation and characterization of the haemolymph lipoproteins of Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Fichera, L E; Brenner, R R

    1982-01-01

    1. Three lipoproteins differing in hydrated densities were isolated by ultracentrifugal procedures from the haemolymph of adult and fasted Triatoma infestans. 2. They are the high density lipoprotein HDL (d = 1.115-1.152) and the two very high density lipoproteins VHDL-I (d = 1.190-1.231) and VHDL-II (d = 1.245-1.260). HDL was the predominant lipoprotein. 3. The total lipid content expressed as % of lipoprotein weight in HDL, VHDL-I an VHDL-II was 30.1, 7.8 ad 2.9% respectively. Diacylglycerols are the predominant lipids of HDL (38.7%) and VHDL-I (27.0%) but only amount of 6.2% in VHDL-II. 4. Triacylglycerols are minor components (about 6.0%) of all fractions. 5. The phospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine), sterols, sterol esters and hydrocarbons were present in all lipoprotein fractions. 6. Phospholipids and hydrocarbons were the most abundant lipids of VHDL-II.

  18. The use of transgenic animals to study lipoprotein metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.M.; Plump, A.S.

    1993-12-01

    The application of transgenic technology to lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis was first reported in 1988. Today, a large percentage of the genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism have been overexpressed in mice, and a substantial number of these same genes have been disrupted by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. The utility of animal models of lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis is far-reaching given the complex nature of these systems. There are at least 17 known genes directly involved in lipoprotein metabolism and likely dozens more may be involved. This massive network of interacting factors has necessitated the development of in vivo systems which can be subject to genetic manipulation. The power of overexpression is obvious: elucidating function in a relatively controlled genetic environment in which the whole system is present and operational. The not-so-obvious problem with transgenics is ``background,`` or for purposes of the current discussion, the mouse`s own lipoprotein system. With the advent of gene knockout, we have been given the ability to overcome ``background.`` By recreating the genetic complement of the mouse we can alter a system in essentially any manner desired. As unique tools, and in combination with one another, the overexpression of foreign genes and the targeted disruption or alteration of endogenous genes has already and will continue to offer a wealth of information on the biology of lipoprotein metabolism and its effect on atherosclerosis susceptibility.

  19. Modulation of lipoprotein receptor functions by intracellular adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Stolt, Peggy C; Bock, Hans H

    2006-10-01

    Members of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family are critically involved in a wide range of physiological processes including lipid and vitamin homeostasis, cellular migration, neurodevelopment, and synaptic plasticity, to name a few. Lipoprotein receptors exert these diverse biological functions by acting as cellular uptake receptors or by inducing intracellular signaling cascades. It was discovered that a short sequence in the intracellular region of all lipoprotein receptors, Asn-Pro-X-Tyr (NPXY) is important for mediating either endocytosis or signal transduction events, and that this motif serves as a binding site for phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain containing scaffold proteins. These molecular adaptors connect the transmembrane receptors with the endocytosis machinery and regulate cellular trafficking, or function as assembly sites for dynamic multi-protein signaling complexes. Whereas the LDL receptor represents the archetype of an endocytic lipoprotein receptor, the structurally closely related apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor activate a kinase-dependent intracellular signaling cascade after binding to the neuronal signaling molecule Reelin. This review focuses on two related PTB domain containing adaptor proteins that mediate these divergent lipoprotein receptor responses, ARH (autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) and Dab1 (disabled-1), and discusses the structural and molecular basis of this different behaviour.

  20. Green tea catechins prevent low-density lipoprotein oxidation via their accumulation in low-density lipoprotein particles in humans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Sugihara, Norie; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Saita, Emi; Taguchi, Chie; Kobayashi, Makoto; Ichitani, Masaki; Ukawa, Yuuichi; Sagesaka, Yuko M; Suzuki, Emiko; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Green tea is rich in polyphenols, including catechins which have antioxidant activities and are considered to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health. In the present study, we investigated the effects of green tea catechins on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in vitro and in human studies to test the hypothesis that catechins are incorporated into LDL particles and exert antioxidant properties. In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial, 19 healthy men ingested green tea extract (GTE) in the form of capsules at a dose of 1 g total catechin, of which most (>99%) was the gallated type. At 1 hour after ingestion, marked increases of the plasma concentrations of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and (-)-epicatechin gallate were observed. Accordingly, the plasma total antioxidant capacity was increased, and the LDL oxidizability was significantly reduced by the ingestion of GTE. We found that gallated catechins were incorporated into LDL particles in nonconjugated forms after the incubation of GTE with plasma in vitro. Moreover, the catechin-incorporated LDL was highly resistant to radical-induced oxidation in vitro. An additional human study with 5 healthy women confirmed that GTE intake sufficiently increased the concentration of gallated catechins, mainly in nonconjugated forms in LDL particles, and reduced the oxidizability of LDL. In conclusion, green tea catechins are rapidly incorporated into LDL particles and play a role in reducing LDL oxidation in humans, which suggests that taking green tea catechins is effective in reducing atherosclerosis risk associated with oxidative stress.

  1. Effect of drugs on high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    McKenney, James M

    2007-03-01

    The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III found evidence for raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) to reduce coronary artery disease (CAD) events supports use of HDL-C to help modify low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering goals, but not to establish new HDL-C-focused treatment recommendations. However, the HDL-C-raising clinical trials provide important lessons to help guide clinical management of dyslipidemic patients. The fibrate outcome trials demonstrate that these drugs reduce CAD events, but not death. Their greatest benefit is in patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia characterized by high triglycerides, small LDL particles, and low HDL-C. Unfortunately, there is no information on whether these drugs extend risk reduction when added to a statin. The niacin outcome trials also demonstrate a reduction in CAD events, both with niacin monotherapy and in combination with a statin. Unfortunately, most of the trials are too small to address the impact of niacin on mortality. In the clinic, statins are most useful for their LDL-C-lowering efficacy, although their modest HDL-C-raising effects can be important in CAD risk reduction. In most cases, other therapies will need to be added to a statin to augment HDL-C-raising, and the most effective drug for achieving this is niacin. The greatest challenge with the use of niacin is managing the vasodilatory side effects, but this can be effectively done in the majority of patients. Fibrates can also be added to a statin for management of atherogenic dyslipidemia. These drugs are among the most effective triglyceride-lowering drugs, and they also increase HDL-C levels, but not as much as niacin. The biggest concern with combining a fibrate with a statin is the enhanced risk of severe muscle toxicity, but this appears to be a problem unique to gemfibrozil, and not fenofibrate. In the research center, new approaches are under development for enhancing the availability of

  2. Lipoproteins and the progression/regression of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Barth, J D

    1995-10-01

    Lipoproteins and the impact of lipid lowering on progression and regression of coronary artery disease are discussed. Angiographically assessed regression studies are reviewed (NHLBI, LIT, LHT, CLAS I and II, FATS, POSCH, Heidelberg, STARS, SCRIP, MAAS, PLAC I, HARP, UC-SF), as are B-mode ultrasound studies (ACAPS, PLAC II) and survival studies (Oslo diet-smoking study, SSSS, Pravastatin, Oxford). Although study populations and the interventions are different in the studies, I have come to the following conclusions. Regression of atherosclerosis correlates well with reduction in LDL cholesterol and an increase in HDL cholesterol. Although overall improvement in the severity and extent of the disease was modest, reduction of clinical events was impressive. Lipid modulation may stabilize existing lesions by improving the stability of the lesion cap and/or promoting loss of cholesterol content from within the plaque. Survival studies indicate that lipid lowering lowers morbidity and increases longevity in patients with established coronary heart disease. The B-mode ultrasound studies using the carotid artery as surrogate for the change in atherosclerosis in the coronary seems extremely promising. The atherosclerotic process as well as complications may be studied at an early stage using noninvasive methods.

  3. Hemorheological abnormalities in lipoprotein lipase deficient mice with severe hypertriglyceridemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Tieqiang; Guo Jun; Li Hui; Huang Wei; Xian Xunde; Ross, Colin J.D.; Hayden, Michael R.; Wen Zongyao . E-mail: rheol@bjmu.edu.cn; Liu George . E-mail: vangeorgeliu@gmail.com

    2006-03-24

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a metabolic disturbance often seen in clinical practice. It is known to induce life-threatening acute pancreatitis, but its role in atherogenesis remains elusive. Hemorheological abnormality was thought to play an important role in pathogenesis of both pancreatitis and atherosclerosis. However, hemorheology in severe HTG was not well investigated. Recently, we established a severe HTG mouse model deficient in lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in which severe HTG was observed to cause a significant increase in plasma viscosity. Disturbances of erythrocytes were also documented, including decreased deformability, electrophoresis rate, and membrane fluidity, and increased osmotic fragility. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that most erythrocytes of LPL deficient mice deformed with protrusions, irregular appearances or indistinct concaves. Analysis of erythrocyte membrane lipids showed decreased cholesterol (Ch) and phospholipid (PL) contents but unaltered Ch/PL ratio. The changes of membrane lipids may be partially responsible for the hemorheological and morphologic abnormalities of erythrocytes. This study indicated that severe HTG could lead to significant impairment of hemorheology and this model may be useful in delineating the role of severe HTG in the pathogenesis of hyperlipidemic pancreatitis and atherosclerosis.

  4. Tiliroside and gnaphaliin inhibit human low density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Schinella, Guillermo R; Tournier, Horacio A; Máñez, Salvador; de Buschiazzo, Perla M; Del Carmen Recio, María; Ríos, José Luis

    2007-01-01

    Two flavonoids, gnaphaliin and tiliroside, isolated from Helichrysum italicum, were studied in vitro for their capacity to inhibit Cu(2+)-induced human low density lipoprotein (LDL) and diluted plasma oxidation. LDL oxidation was monitored by conjugated diene, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) formation and electrophoretic mobility on agarose gel. Gnaphaliin and tiliroside increased the lag-phase for diene conjugate production in a dose-dependent manner. The reduction of TBARS production confirmed the antioxidant activity of gnaphaliin and tiliroside with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values of 8.0+/-3.9 microM and 7.0+/-2.6 microM respectively. Furthermore, the flavonoids negated the Cu(2+)-induced increase in electrophoretic mobility of LDL. Antioxidant activity of gnaphaliin and tiliroside was significantly different when diluted plasma was oxidised by adding 1 mM CuSO(4). Although both flavonoids again reduced the TBARS production, tiliroside showed higher activity than gnaphaliin (IC(50)=10.6+/-2.5 microM vs. IC(50)>50 microM). In conclusion, tiliroside and gnaphaliin are antioxidants against in vitro Cu(2+)-induced LDL oxidation in the same order of magnitude compared to that of the reference drug, probucol.

  5. Modulation of human lipids and lipoproteins by dietary palm oil and palm olein: a review.

    PubMed

    Sundram, K

    1997-03-01

    Several human clinical trials have now evaluated palm oil's effects on blood lipids and lipoproteins. These studies suggest that palm oil and palm olein diets do not raise plasma TC and LDL-cholesterol levels to the extent expected from its fatty acid composition. With maximum substitution of palm oil in a Western type diet some coronary heart disease risk factors were beneficially modulated: HDL2-cholesterol was significantly increased while the apolipoprotein B/A1 ratio was beneficially lowered by palm oil. Comparison of palm olein with a variety of monounsaturated edible oils including rapeseed, canola, and olive oils has shown that plasma and LDL-cholesterol were not elevated by palm olein. To focus these findings, specific fatty acid effects have been evaluated. Myristic acid may be the most potent cholesterol raising saturated fatty acid. Palmitic acid effects were largely comparable to the monounsaturated oleic acid in normolipidaemic subjects while trans fatty acids detrimentally increased plasma cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, lipoprotein Lp(a) and lowered the beneficial HDL-cholesterol. Apart from these fatty acids there is evidence that the tocotrienols in palm oil products may have a hypocholesterolaemic effect. This is mediated by the ability of the tocotrienols to suppress HMG-CoA reductase. These new findings on palm oil merit a scientific reexamination of the classical saturated fat-lipid hypothesis and its role in lipoprotein regulation.

  6. Very low density lipoproteins in intestinal lymph: role in triglyceride and cholesterol transport during fat absorption

    PubMed Central

    Ockner, Robert K.; Hughes, Faith B.; Isselbacher, Kurt J.

    1969-01-01

    The role of nonchylomicron very low density lipoproteins (VLDL, Sf 20-400) in the transport of triglyceride and cholesterol was studied during lipid absorption. Various long chain fatty acids were infused intraduodenally in the form of mixed fatty acid—mono-olein-taurocholate micelles; control animals received saline or taurocholate. As compared with controls, all fatty acids (palmitic, oleic, linoleic) resulted in significant increases in chylomicron (Sf > 400) triglyceride. In addition, palmitic acid resulted in a twofold increase in VLDL triglyceride, whereas with the absorption of oleic or linoleic acid VLDL triglyceride did not change significantly. Differences in triglyceride fatty acid composition between chylomicrons and VLDL were observed during lipid absorption. Although the absolute amount of endogenous cholesterol in intestinal lymph was not significantly affected by lipid absorption under these conditions, its lipoprotein distribution differed substantially among the lipid-infused groups. During palmitate absorption, VLDL cholesterol was similar to that in the taurocholate-infused controls, and was equal to chylomicron cholesterol. In contrast, during oleate and linoleate absorption the VLDL cholesterol fell markedly, and was less than half of the chylomicron cholesterol in these groups. The half-time of plasma survival of VLDL cholesterol-14C was found to be twice that of chylomicron cholesterol-14C. These studies demonstrate that dietary long chain fatty acids differ significantly in their effects upon the transport of triglyceride and cholesterol by lipoproteins of rat intestinal lymph. These findings, together with the observed differences in rates of removal of chylomicrons and VLDL from plasma, suggest that variations in lipoprotein production at the intestinal level may be reflected in differences in the subsequent metabolism of absorbed dietary and endogenous lipids. PMID:5355348

  7. Absorption and transport of deuterium-substituted 2R,4'R,8'R-alpha-tocopherol in human lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Traber, M.G.; Ingold, K.U.; Burton, G.W.; Kayden, H.J.

    1988-08-01

    Oral administration of a single dose of tri- or hexadeuterium substituted 2R,4'R,8'R-alpha-tocopheryl acetate (d3- or d6-alpha-T-Ac) to humans was used to follow the absorption and transport of vitamin E in plasma lipoproteins. Three hr after oral administration of d3-alpha-T-Ac (15 mg) to 2 subjects, plasma levels of d3-alpha-T were detectable; these increased up to 10 hr, reached a plateau at 24 hr, then decreased. Following administration of d6-alpha-T-Ac (15-16 mg) to 2 subjects, the percentage of deuterated tocopherol relative to the total tocopherol in chylomicrons increased more rapidly than the corresponding percentage in whole plasma. Chylomicrons and plasma lipoproteins were isolated from 2 additional subjects following administration of d3-alpha-T-Ac (140 or 60 mg). The percentage of deuterated tocopherol relative to the total tocopherol increased most rapidly in chylomicrons, then in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), followed by essentially identical increases in low and high density lipoproteins (LDL and HDL, respectively) and lastly, in the red blood cells. This pattern of appearance of deuterated tocopherol is consistent with the concept that newly absorbed vitamin E is secreted by the intestine into chylomicrons; subsequently, chylomicron remnants are taken up by the liver from which the vitamin E is secreted in VLDL. The metabolism of VLDL in the circulation results in the simultaneous delivery of vitamin E into LDL and HDL.

  8. Effects of maximal doses of atorvastatin versus rosuvastatin on small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maximal doses of atorvastatin and rosuvastatin are highly effective in lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels; however, rosuvastatin has been shown to be significantly more effective than atorvastatin in lowering LDL cholesterol and in increasing high-density lipo...

  9. Serum high-density lipoprotein is associated with better cognitive function in a cross-sectional study of aging women.

    PubMed

    Bates, Kristyn A; Sohrabi, Hamid R; Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R; Weinborn, Michael; Bucks, Romola S; Rodrigues, Mark; Beilby, John; Howard, Matthew; Taddei, Kevin; Martins, Georgia; Paton, Athena; Shah, Tejal; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Foster, Jonathan K; Martins, Ian J; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Mastaglia, Frank L; Gandy, Samuel E; Martins, Ralph N

    2017-03-01

    Purpose/Aim of the study: Poor cardiovascular health, including obesity and altered lipid profiles at mid-life, are linked to increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The biological mechanisms linking cardiovascular health and cognitive function are unclear though are likely to be multifactorial. This study examined the association between various lipoproteins and cognitive functioning in ageing women.

  10. Explaining mirror-touch synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jamie; Banissy, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Mirror-touch synesthesia (MTS) is the conscious experience of tactile sensations induced by seeing someone else touched. This paper considers two different, although not mutually exclusive, theoretical explanations and, in the final section, considers the relation between MTS and other forms of synesthesia and also other kinds of vicarious perception (e.g., contagious yawning). The Threshold Theory explains MTS in terms of hyper-activity within a mirror system for touch and/or pain. This offers a good account for some of the evidence (e.g., from fMRI) but fails to explain the whole pattern (e.g., structural brain differences outside of this system; performance on some tests of social cognition). The Self-Other Theory explains MTS in terms of disturbances in the ability to distinguish the self from others. This can be construed in terms of over-extension of the bodily self in to others, or as difficulties in the control of body-based self-other representations. In this account, MTS is a symptom of a broader cognitive profile. We suggest this meets the criteria for synesthesia, despite the proximal causal mechanisms remaining largely unknown, and that the tendency to localize vicarious sensory experiences distinguishes it from other kinds of seemingly related phenomena (e.g., non-localized affective responses to observing pain).

  11. Explaining the Gender Wealth Gap

    PubMed Central

    Ruel, Erin; Hauser, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    To assess and explain the United States’ gender wealth gap, we use the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study to examine wealth accumulated by a single cohort over 50 years by gender, by marital status, and limited to the respondents who are their family’s best financial reporters. We find large gender wealth gaps between currently married men and women, and never-married men and women. The never-married accumulate less wealth than the currently married, and there is a marital disruption cost to wealth accumulation. The status-attainment model shows the most power in explaining gender wealth gaps between these groups explaining about one-third to one-half of the gap, followed by the human-capital explanation. In other words, a lifetime of lower earnings for women translates into greatly reduced wealth accumulation. A gender wealth gap remains between married men and women after controlling for the full model that we speculate may be related to gender differences in investment strategies and selection effects. PMID:23264038

  12. Phagocytosis of aggregated lipoprotein by macrophages: Low density lipoprotein receptor-dependent foam-cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, A.G.; Chait, A.; Aviram, M.; Heinecke, J.W. )

    1989-04-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) modified by incubation with phospholipase C (PLC-LDL) aggregates in solution and is rapidly taken up and degraded by human and mouse macrophages, producing foam cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rabbit macrophages degraded {sup 125}I-labeled PLC-LDL ({sup 125}I-PLC-LDL) more rapidly than native {sup 125}I-labeled LDL ({sup 125}I-LDL), while nonphagocytic cells such as human fibroblasts and bovine aortic endothelial cells degraded {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL more slowly than {sup 125}I-LDL. This suggested the mechanism for internalization of PLC-LDL was phagocytosis. When examined by electron microscopy, mouse peritoneal macrophages appeared to be phagocytosing PLC-LDL. The uptake and degradation of {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL by human macrophages was inhibited >80% by the monoclonal antibody C7 (IgG2b) produced by hybridoma C7, which blocks the ligand binding domain of the LDL receptor. Similarly, methylation of {sup 125}I-LDL ({sup 125}I-MeLDL) prior to treatment with phospholipase C decreased its subsequent uptake and degradation by human macrophages by >90%. The uptake and degradation of phospholipase C-modified {sup 125}I-MeLDL by macrophages could be restored by incubation of the methylated lipoprotein with apoprotein E, a ligand recognized by the LDL receptor. These results indicate that macrophages internalize PLC-LDL by LDL receptor-dependent phagocytosis.

  13. Lipoprotein alterations in hemodialysis: differences between diabetic and nondiabetic patients.

    PubMed

    González, Ana Inés; Schreier, Laura; Elbert, Alicia; Berg, Gabriela; Beresan, Hugo; López, Graciela; Wikinski, Regina

    2003-01-01

    Both renal failure and type 2 diabetes may contribute synergistically to the dyslipemia of diabetic renal failure with the development of atherosclerosis as the possible consequence. It has not yet been conclusively evaluated whether diabetic patients with end-stage renal failure under maintenance hemodialysis (HD) show accentuated alterations in plasma lipids and lipoproteins in comparison to nondiabetics under HD. These abnormalities would involve hepatic lipase activity and the regulation of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether type 2 diabetic patients undergoing HD exhibited a lipid-lipoprotein profile different from that of nondiabetic hemodialyzed patients. We compared plasma lipids, apoprotein (apo) A-I and B, and lipoprotein parameters among 3 groups: 25 type 2 diabetics, 25 nondiabetics, both undergoing HD, and 20 healthy control subjects. Intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were isolated by sequential ultracentrifugation. Hepatic lipase activity was measured in postheparin plasma. Both groups of HD patients showed higher triglyceride and IDL cholesterol (P <.001), and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (P <.01) and apo A-I (P <.001) levels compared to the control group, even after adjustment for age and body mass index (BMI). However, no differences were found in lipid, lipoprotein, and apoprotein concentrations between diabetic and nondiabetic HD patients, except for high LDL triglyceride content of diabetic HD patients (P <.01). Nondiabetics undergoing HD also presented higher LDL triglyceride levels than controls (P <.05). LDL triglyceride correlated with plasma triglycerides (r = 0.51, P <.001). A lower LDL cholesterol/apo B ratio was found in each group of HD patients in comparison to controls (P <.02). Comparing the diabetic and nondiabetic patients, hepatic lipase activity remained unchanged, but significantly lower than control subjects

  14. Effects of PCSK9 Inhibition With Alirocumab on Lipoprotein Metabolism in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pavlyha, Marianna; Ngai, Colleen; Thomas, Tiffany; Holleran, Stephen; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Karmally, Wahida; Nandakumar, Renu; Fontanez, Nelson; Obunike, Joseph; Marcovina, Santica M.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.; Matthan, Nirupa R.; Matta, James; Maroccia, Magali; Becue, Frederic; Poitiers, Franck; Swanson, Brian; Cowan, Lisa; Sasiela, William J.; Surks, Howard K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Alirocumab, a monoclonal antibody to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), lowers plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein B100 (apoB). Although studies in mice and cells have identified increased hepatic LDL receptors as the basis for LDL lowering by PCSK9 inhibitors, there have been no human studies characterizing the effects of PCSK9 inhibitors on lipoprotein metabolism. In particular, it is not known whether inhibition of PCSK9 has any effects on very low-density lipoprotein or intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL) metabolism. Inhibition of PCSK9 also results in reductions of plasma lipoprotein (a) levels. The regulation of plasma Lp(a) levels, including the role of LDL receptors in the clearance of Lp(a), is poorly defined, and no mechanistic studies of the Lp(a) lowering by alirocumab in humans have been published to date. Methods: Eighteen (10 F, 8 mol/L) participants completed a placebo-controlled, 2-period study. They received 2 doses of placebo, 2 weeks apart, followed by 5 doses of 150 mg of alirocumab, 2 weeks apart. At the end of each period, fractional clearance rates (FCRs) and production rates (PRs) of apoB and apo(a) were determined. In 10 participants, postprandial triglycerides and apoB48 levels were measured. Results: Alirocumab reduced ultracentrifugally isolated LDL-C by 55.1%, LDL-apoB by 56.3%, and plasma Lp(a) by 18.7%. The fall in LDL-apoB was caused by an 80.4% increase in LDL-apoB FCR and a 23.9% reduction in LDL-apoB PR. The latter was due to a 46.1% increase in IDL-apoB FCR coupled with a 27.2% decrease in conversion of IDL to LDL. The FCR of apo(a) tended to increase (24.6%) without any change in apo(a) PR. Alirocumab had no effects on FCRs or PRs of very low-density lipoproteins-apoB and very low-density lipoproteins triglycerides or on postprandial plasma triglycerides or apoB48 concentrations. Conclusions: Alirocumab decreased LDL-C and LDL-apoB by increasing IDL- and LDL

  15. Aminoacylation of the N-terminal cysteine is essential for Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes but does not depend on lipoprotein sorting signals.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ayumu; Matsuyama, Shin-Ichi; Hara, Takashi; Nakayama, Jiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-11-08

    Lipoproteins are present in a wide variety of bacteria and are anchored to membranes through lipids attached to the N-terminal cysteine. The Lol system of Escherichia coli mediates the membrane-specific localization of lipoproteins. Aspartate at position 2 functions as a Lol avoidance signal and causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane, whereas lipoproteins having residues other than aspartate at position 2 are released from the inner membrane and localized to the outer membrane by the Lol system. Phospholipid:apolipoprotein transacylase, Lnt, catalyzes the last step of lipoprotein modification, converting apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein. To reveal the importance of this aminoacylation for the Lol-dependent membrane localization, apolipoproteins were prepared by inhibiting lipoprotein maturation. Lnt was also purified and used to convert apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein in vitro. The release of these lipoproteins was examined in proteoliposomes. We show here that the aminoacylation is essential for the Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes. Furthermore, lipoproteins with aspartate at position 2 were found to be aminoacylated both in vivo and in vitro, indicating that the lipoprotein-sorting signal does not affect lipid modification.

  16. Heavy fermion behavior explained by bosons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallio, A.; Poykko, S.; Apaja, V.

    1995-01-01

    Conventional heavy fermion (HF) theories require existence of massive fermions. We show that heavy fermion phenomena can also be simply explained by existence of bosons with moderate mass but temperature dependent concentration below the formation temperature T(sub B), which in turn is close to room temperature. The bosons B(++) are proposed to be in chemical equilibrium with a system of holes h(+): B(++) = h(+) + h(+). This equilibrium is governed by a boson breaking function f(T), which determines the decreasing boson density and the increasing fermion density with increasing temperature. Since HF-compounds are hybridized from minimum two elements, we assume in addition existence of another fermion component h(sub s)(+) with temperature independent density. This spectator component is thought to be the main agent in binding the bosons in analogy with electronic or muonic molecules. Using a linear boson breaking function we can explain temperature dependence of the giant linear specific heat coefficient gamma(T) coming essentially from bosons. The maxima in resistivity, Hall coefficient, and susceptibility are explained by boson localization effects due to the Wigner crystallization. The antiferromagnetic transitions in turn are explained by similar localization of the pairing fermion system when their density n(sub h)(T(sub FL)) becomes lower than n(sub WC), the critical density of Wigner crystallization. The model applies irrespective whether a compound is superconducting or not. The same model explains the occurrence of low temperature antiferromagnetism also in high-T(sub c) superconductors. The double transition in UPt3 is proposed to be due to the transition of the pairing fermion liquid from spin polarized to unpolarized state.

  17. Effects of exercise accumulation on plasma lipids and lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Wagganer, Jason D; Robison, Charles E; Ackerman, Terry A; Davis, Paul G

    2015-05-01

    Debate exists as to whether improvements in some cardiometabolic risk factors following exercise training result more from the last session of, or from an accumulation of, exercise sessions. This study was designed to compare the effect of a single exercise session with 3 consecutive days of exercise on triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C). Twelve young adult (aged 22.5±2.5 years), overweight (body mass index=29.7±4 kg·m(-2)), sedentary, black (n=5) and white (n=7) men (n=6) and women (n=6) completed, in random order, a single treadmill exercise session at 60% maximal oxygen uptake for 90 min (1EX), accumulated exercise sessions (same as for 1EX) for 3 consecutive days (3EX), and a control protocol (no exercise for 6 days). Plasma samples were collected from baseline through 24, 48, and 72 h postexercise. Significant treatment-by-time interactions (p<0.05) existed in HDL-C and LDL-C. Postexercise responses of HDL-C differed at 48 h (1EX: -3.6, 3EX: +3.7 mg·dL(-1)) and 72 h (1EX: -1.7, 3EX: +3.2 mg·dL(-1)). LDL-C responses differed at 48 h (1EX: -16, 3EX: +6 mg·dL(-1)). Although not statistically significant, TG concentrations decreased by 29% at 24 h after 3EX, compared with -7% after 1EX. An inverse relationship between baseline and postexercise reduction in TG was present with 3EX (r=-0.655; p<0.05). In conclusion, 3EX increased HDL-C and decreased TG more than 1EX, while the decrease in LDL-C after 1EX was suppressed. Blood lipid panel changes may be due to more accumulated effects over time rather than just a result of the most recent exercise session.

  18. Should we take high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels at face value?

    PubMed

    Leite, Jose Oyama; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2010-01-01

    The inverse correlation between high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and cardiovascular disease has driven several investigators to target the increase in this lipoprotein to prevent atherosclerosis and its complications. However, many reports have demonstrated that the use of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels as a means to prevent and treat atherosclerosis has mainly resulted in negative outcomes. These findings may help to increase our knowledge of HDL metabolism and its protective effect. There is evidence that the mechanism by which HDL-C levels are raised has a great impact on cardiovascular outcomes. When the increase in HDL-C levels is secondary to greater synthesis, a strong beneficial effect in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases is observed. Even small increases in HDL-C levels induce a marked reduction in cardiovascular events; this has been observed during treatment with fibrates. In contrast, when the increase in HDL-C levels is secondary to a reduction in HDL catabolism, unexpectedly, the opposite effects are usually noted. Even dramatic increases in HDL-C levels are not associated with better cardiovascular outcomes. In fact, these increases have been related to a greater number of cardiovascular-related deaths. This became clear from the results of trials that tested inhibitors of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). We suggest that increases in reverse cholesterol transport are more important than HDL-C levels. Strong evidence is provided by individuals that express apolipoprotein (apo)A-I Milano. These individuals have extremely low HDL-C levels due to greater catabolism of the lipoprotein. However, reverse cholesterol transport is increased in these individuals and, as a consequence, they have a low incidence of cardiovascular diseases. We reinforce that, in clinical practice, the currently recommended levels of HDL-C should still be a major target to be aimed for. However, in the research field, we emphasize the need to look for other

  19. Development and application of proton NMR methodology to lipoprotein analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Ari Juhani

    1998-11-01

    The present thesis describes the development of 1H NMR spectroscopy and its applications to lipoprotein analysis in vitro, utilizing biochemical prior knowledge and advanced lineshape fitting analysis in the frequency domain. A method for absolute quantification of lipoprotein lipids and proteins directly from the terminal methyl-CH3 resonance region of 1H NMR spectra of human blood plasma is described. Then the use of NMR methodology in time course studies of the oxidation process of LDL particles is presented. The function of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in lipoprotein mixtures was also assessed by 1H NMR, which allows for dynamic follow-up of the lipid transfer reactions between VLDL, LDL, and HDL particles. The results corroborated the suggestion that neutral lipid mass transfer among lipoproteins is not an equimolar heteroexchange. A novel method for studying lipoprotein particle fusion is also demonstrated. It is shown that the progression of proteolytically (α- chymotrypsin) induced fusion of LDL particles can be followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy and, moreover, that fusion can be distinguished from aggregation. In addition, NMR methodology was used to study the changes in HDL3 particles induced by phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in HDL3 + PLTP mixtures. The 1H NMR study revealed a gradual production of enlarged HDL particles, which demonstrated that PLTP-mediated remodeling of HDL involves fusion of the HDL particles. These applications demonstrated that the 1H NMR approach offers several advantages both in quantification and in time course studies of lipoprotein-lipoprotein interactions and of enzyme/lipid transfer protein function.

  20. Effects of acute exercise on high density lipoprotein cholesterol and high density lipoprotein subfractions in moderately trained females

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, P. M.; Fowler, S.; Warty, V.; Danduran, M.; Visich, P.; Keteyian, S.

    1998-01-01

    Increases in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels have previously been reported after moderate exercise bouts lasting less than two hours in men. Little information exists, however, on HDL-C responses after moderate duration exercise in women. Post-exercise HDL- C modifications may appear differently in women because of higher baseline HDL-C concentrations and differences in lipolytic activity. To determine the influence of exercise on acute HDL-C responses in women, 12 trained premenopausal women (22 (4) years old; mean (SD)) who ran 24- 48 km a week exercised on a motor driven treadmill at 75% VO2MAX until 3.34 MJ (800 kcal) were expended (72 (9) min). Subjects were all tested during the early follicular phase of their menstrual cycle. Fasting blood samples were obtained before exercise (baseline), immediately after (IPE), one hour after (1 h PE), 24 hours after (24 h PE), and 48 hours after (48 h PE) exercise. Plasma was analysed for HDL-C, HDL2-C, and HDL3-C. A significant increase in HDL-C was observed 48 h PE (p<0.05). HDL3-C increased IPE (p<0.01) but returned to baseline at 1 h PE. In contrast, HDL2-C was not significantly different from baseline at any time point. The rise in HDL-C, however, was attributed to an increase in both HDL2 and HDL3. Moreover, at 48 h PE, the increase in HDL-C correlated highly with changes in HDL2-C (r = 0.92). Thus it appears that exercise of moderate duration can elicit similar post- exercise increases in HDL-C in women to those previously reported in men. However, the changes in HDL subfractions leading to the rise in HDL-C may be different in women. 


 PMID:9562167

  1. Serum lipoproteins of patients with glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, E L; Chibisov, I V; Karmansky, I M; Tabolin, V A; Chistova, L V; Leontiev, A F

    1980-03-14

    Seventeen patients with different types of glycogen storage disease (GSD) were under observation. The type of the disease was defined from glucaemic and lactotaemic curves obtained in glucose, galactose and adrenaline tolerance tests and by biochemical analysis of liver biopsy specimens. Seven patients were found to have Type I; five patients, Type III; one patient, Type VI; and four patients, the Type IX (or X) of GSD. The serum lipoprotein (LP) content was determined in all patients using analytical ultracentrifugation. Hyperlipoproteinaemia (HLP) was found in virtually all patients. Patients with Type I of GSD were found to have Types 2b and 4 of HLP; and patients with Type III of GSD, 2b Type of HLP. 2a Type of HLP was diagnosed in patients with GSD of VI and IX (X) Types. Patients with Type III GSD, in contrast to those with GSD of other types, had enhanced levels of Sf 12-20 LP. The levels of Sf 100-400 and Sf 20-100 LP were greatly increased only in patients with Type I GSD.

  2. Parathyroid hormone is not an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Arnadottir, M; Nilsson-Ehle, P

    1994-01-01

    The reduced lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities in uraemia are reflected by increased serum triglyceride concentrations and reduced HDL cholesterol concentrations. Both hyperparathyroidism and circulating inhibitor(s) of LPL have been associated with the disturbances of lipid metabolism in uraemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if parathyroid hormone (PTH) had an inhibitory effect on LPL activity. Plasma post-heparin LPL activities, plasma LPL inhibitory activities, serum PTHintact and serum PTHC-terminal concentrations were analysed in 20 patients on haemodialysis and 20 healthy controls. The effects of purified, human PTHintact and a carboxyterminal fragment of PTH (PTH39-84) on LPL activities in post-heparin plasma from healthy individuals and on the enzyme activity of purified, bovine milk LPL, activated with apolipoprotein CII, were studied. Patients had significantly higher plasma LPL inhibitory activities than controls, but there was no correlation between plasma LPL inhibitory activities and serum PTH concentrations. Neither PTHintact nor PTH39-84 had a significant effect on LPL activities in vitro. Thus there was no evidence of a direct inhibition of LPL activity by PTH under the present in-vivo or in-vitro conditions.

  3. High-density lipoprotein exerts vasculoprotection via endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Petoumenos, Vasileios; Nickenig, Georg; Werner, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) enhance endothelial cell repair, improve endothelial dysfunction and are a predictor for cardiovascular mortality. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels inversely correlate with cardiovascular events and have vasculoprotective effects. Here we postulate that HDL influences EPC biology. HDL and EPC were isolated according to standard procedures. Differentiation of mononuclear cells into DiLDL/lectin positive cells was enhanced after HDL treatment compared to vehicle. HDL was able to inhibit apoptosis (TUNEL assay, annexin V staining) while proliferation (BrdU incorporation) of early outgrowth colonies after extended cell cultivation (14 days) was increased. Flow chamber experiments revealed an improved adhesion of HDL pre-incubated EPC on human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) compared to vehicle while HDL treatment of HCAEC prevented adhesion of inflammatory cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated an up-regulation of β2- and α4-integrins on HDL pre-incubated EPC. Blocking experiments revealed a unique role of β2-integrin in EPC adhesion. Treatment of wild-type mice with recombinant HDL after endothelial denudation resulted in enhanced re-endothelialization compared to vehicle. Finally, in patients with coronary artery disease a correlation between circulating EPC and HDL concentrations was demonstrated. We provide evidence that HDL mediates important vasculoprotective action via the improvement of function of circulating EPC. PMID:18705697

  4. Synthetic high-density lipoproteins for delivery of 10-hydroxycamptothecin

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yue; Wen, Jian; Tang, Jie; Kan, Qiming; Ackermann, Rose; Olsen, Karl; Schwendeman, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel synthetic high-density lipoprotein (sHDL) nanoparticle delivery system for 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) for treatment of colon carcinoma. HDL is recognized by scavenger receptor B-I (SR-BI) over-expressed in colon carcinomas 5- to 35-fold relative to the human fibroblasts. The sHDL nanoparticles were composed of apolipoprotein A-I mimic peptide (5A) and contained 0.5%–1.5% (w/w) of HCPT. An optimized HCPT-sHDL formulation exhibited 0.7% HCPT loading with 70% efficiency with an average size of 10–12 nm. Partitioning of HCPT in the sHDL lipid membrane enhanced drug stability in its active lactone form, increased solubilization, and enabled slow release. Cytotoxicity studies in HT29 colon carcinoma cells revealed that the IC50 of HCPT-sHDL was approximately 3-fold lower than that of free HCPT. Pharmacokinetics in rats following intravenous administration showed that the area under the serum concentration-time curve (AUC0−t) and Cmax of HCPT-HDL were 2.7- and 6.5-fold higher relative to the values for the free HCPT, respectively. These results suggest that sHDL-based formulations of hydrophobic drugs are useful for future evaluation in treatment of SR-BI-positive tumors. PMID:27920529

  5. Intercorrelations of lipoprotein subfractions and their covariation with lifestyle factors in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Eckoldt, Joachim; Winkler, Karl; Bode, Christian J; Schäfer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    So far, little is known about the effect of nutrition and lifestyle on the composition of circulating lipoprotein subfractions. In the current study, we measured the correlations among physical activity, nutrient intake, smoking, body-mass index (BMI), and age with the concentration of triglycerides, cholesterol, phospholipids, and apolipoproteins (ApoA1, ApoA2 and ApoB) in subfractions of LDL and HDL in 265 healthy working men. Concentrations of cholesterol, phospholipids, and ApoB in small, dense atherogenic LDL particles (sdLDL) correlated negatively (p<0.001) with those of cholesterol, phospholipids, and ApoA1 in HDL2, respectively. Age correlated positively with sdLDL while increasing BMI correlated with an atherogenic shift of cholesterol, phospholipids, and ApoB from large, buoyant LDL (lbLDL) to sdLDL and decreasing concentrations of HDL2 constituents. Physical activity and alcohol intake correlated negatively with sdLDL constituents and positively with HDL2 components. Consumption of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) correlated with a lower ratio of sdLDL to HDL2 cholesterol. A favorable lipoprotein subfraction profile linked to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease in men was associated with physical activity, moderate alcohol consumption, and dietary intake of MUFA, which might be exploited in future interventions for prevention of age- and BMI-associated atherogenic shifts of lipoprotein subfractions. PMID:24895480

  6. Expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein in lipoprotein-synthesizing tissues of the developing chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Eresheim, Christine; Plieschnig, Julia; Ivessa, N Erwin; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Hermann, Marcela

    2014-06-01

    In contrast to mammals, in the chicken major sites of lipoprotein synthesis and secretion are not only the liver and intestine, but also the kidney and the embryonic yolk sac. Two key components in the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and apolipoprotein B (apoB). We have analyzed the expression of MTP in the embryonic liver, small intestine, and kidney, and have studied the expression of MTP in, and the secretion of apoB from, the developing yolk sac (YS). Transcript and protein levels of MTP increase during embryogenesis in YS, liver, kidney, and small intestine, and decrease in YS, embryonic liver, and kidney after hatching. In small intestine, the MTP mRNA level rises sharply during the last trimester of embryo development (after day 15), while MTP protein is detectable only after hatching (day 21). In the YS of 15- and 20-day old embryos, apoB secretion was detected by pulse-chase metabolic radiolabeling experiments and subsequent immunoprecipitation. Taken together, our data reveal the importance of coordinated production of MTP and apoB in chicken tissues capable of secreting triglyceride-rich lipoproteins even before hatching.

  7. Lipoprotein processing is essential for resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to malachite green.

    PubMed

    Banaei, Niaz; Kincaid, Eleanor Z; Lin, S-Y Grace; Desmond, Edward; Jacobs, William R; Ernst, Joel D

    2009-09-01

    Malachite green, a synthetic antimicrobial dye, has been used for over 50 years in mycobacterial culture medium to inhibit the growth of contaminants. The molecular basis of mycobacterial resistance to malachite green is unknown, although the presence of malachite green-reducing enzymes in the cell envelope has been suggested. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of lipoproteins in resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to malachite green. The replication of an M. tuberculosis lipoprotein signal peptidase II (lspA) mutant (DeltalspA::lspAmut) on Middlebrook agar with and without 1 mg/liter malachite green was investigated. The lspA mutant was also compared with wild-type M. tuberculosis in the decolorization rate of malachite green and sensitivity to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) detergent and first-line antituberculosis drugs. The lspA mutant has a 10(4)-fold reduction in CFU-forming efficiency on Middlebrook agar with malachite green. Malachite green is decolorized faster in the presence of the lspA mutant than wild-type bacteria. The lspA mutant is hypersensitive to SDS detergent and shows increased sensitivity to first-line antituberculosis drugs. In summary, lipoprotein processing by LspA is essential for resistance of M. tuberculosis to malachite green. A cell wall permeability defect is likely responsible for the hypersensitivity of lspA mutant to malachite green.

  8. Enhanced detection of lipid transfer inhibitor protein activity by an assay involving only low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Morton, R E; Greene, D J

    1994-11-01

    Lipid transfer inhibitor protein (LTIP) activity has been typically quantitated by its ability to suppress lipid transfer protein-mediated lipid movement between low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL). In an attempt to establish an LTIP activity assay that is more sensitive, we have exploited the reported preference of the inhibitor protein to interact with LDL. A lipid transfer assay was established that involves LDL as both the donor and the acceptor; LDL in one of these two pools was biotinylated to facilitate its removal with immobilized avidin. Compared to the standard LDL to HDL assay, LTIP inhibited lipid transfer from radiolabeled LDL to biotin-LDL 7-fold more. In the absence of LTIP, lipid transfer activity was the same in both assays. An added benefit of this assay was the near linearity (up to 85%) of the inhibitory response, in contrast to the highly curvilinear response of LTIP in LDL to HDL transfer assays. The high sensitivity of the LDL to biotin-LDL transfer assay in measuring LTIP activity could not be duplicated by other transfer assays including assays containing only HDL (HDL to biotin-HDL), assays between liposomes and LDL, or assays between LDL and HDL where the concentration of lipoproteins was reduced 10-fold. Thus, LTIP activity is most effectively measured in homologous lipid transfer assays involving only LDL (and its biotin derivative). This increased sensitivity to LTIP suggests that the inhibitor binds more avidly to the LDL surface than does lipid transfer protein.

  9. Ginsenoside Rf, a component of ginseng, regulates lipoprotein metabolism through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunghee; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Yoon, Michung . E-mail: yoon60@mokwon.ac.kr

    2006-01-06

    We investigated whether ginseng regulates lipoprotein metabolism by altering peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha})-mediated pathways, using a PPAR{alpha}-null mouse model. Administration of ginseng extract, ginsenosides, and ginsenoside Rf (Rf) to wild-type mice not only significantly increased basal levels of hepatic apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and C-III mRNA compared with wild-type controls, but also substantially reversed the reductions in mRNA levels of apo A-I and C-III expected following treatment with the potent PPAR{alpha} ligand Wy14,643. In contrast, no effect was detected in the PPAR{alpha}-null mice. Testing of eight main ginsenosides on PPAR{alpha} reporter gene expression indicated that Rf was responsible for the effects of ginseng on lipoprotein metabolism. Furthermore, the inhibition of PPAR{alpha}-dependent transactivation by Rf seems to occur at the level of DNA binding. These results demonstrate that ginseng component Rf regulates apo A-I and C-III mRNA and the actions of Rf on lipoprotein metabolism are mediated via interactions with PPAR{alpha}.

  10. The age dependency of gene expression for plasma lipids, lipoproteins, and apolipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Snieder, H.; Doornen, L.J.P. van; Boomsma, D.I.

    1997-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and disentangle the genetic and nongenetic causes of stability and change in lipids and (apo)lipoproteins that occur during the lifespan. Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides, apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), apolipoprotein B (ApoB), and lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) were measured in a group of 160 middle-aged parents and their twin offspring (first project) and in a group of 203 middle-aged twin pairs (second project). Combining the data of both projects enabled the estimation of the extent to which measured lipid parameters are influenced by different genes in adolescence and adulthood. To that end, an extended quantitative genetic model was specified, which allowed the estimation of heritabilities for each sex and generation separately. Heritabilities were similar for both sexes and both generations. Larger variances in the parental generation could be ascribed to proportional increases in both unique environmental and additive genetic variance from childhood to adulthood, which led to similar heritability estimates in adolescent and middle-aged twins. Although the magnitudes of heritabilities were similar across generations, results showed that, for total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, and LDL, partly different genes are expressed in adolescence compared to adulthood. For triglycerides, only 46% of the genetic variance was common to both age groups; for total cholesterol this was 80%. Intermediate values were found for HDL (66%) and LDL (76%). For ApoA1, ApoB, and Lp(a), the same genes seem to act in both generations. 56 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Unidirectional transfer in vivo of high-density lipoprotein cholesteryl esters to lower-density lipoproteins in the pig, an animal species without plasma cholesteryl ester transfer activity.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, A H; Stucchi, A F; Foxall, T L; Shwaery, G T; Vespa, D B; Nicolosi, R J

    1993-12-01

    The metabolism of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesteryl esters (CE) was studied in the pig, an animal species without plasma cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA). In the first series of experiments, LDL and HDL from normocholesterolemic pigs were radiolabeled with cholesteryl (1-14C)oleate and intravenously administered to two groups of four normocholesterolemic pigs. Radioactive tracer in LDL remained associated with the LDL fraction, and there was no transfer of LDL-CE to HDL. The transport rate (which represents the production and disposal rate) of LDL-CE in normocholesterolemic pigs was 39 mumol CE/h/L. However, radiolabeled HDL-CE were transferred to LDL (25%), and 36% of the LDL-CE mass was derived from the HDL. The transport rate of HDL-CE was 54 mumol CE/h/L, and the flux of HDL-CE to LDL was 14 mumol CE/h/L. There was no accumulation of radiolabeled HDL-CE in very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), which suggests that there was no transfer to VLDL. However, this does not rule out the possibility that either the very low levels of VLDL-CE (< 0.09 mmol/L) or the rapid turnover rate of the VLDL pool might have prevented the accumulation of substantial amounts of tracer in VLDL. Therefore, in a second set of experiments, the kinetics of HDL-CE were studied in high-fat-and high-cholesterol-fed pigs with elevated VLDL-CE concentrations (1.92 mmol/L). Hypercholesterolemia was associated with increased transport rates of LDL-CE (165 mumol/h/L) and HDL-CE (78 mumol/h/L) and with an increased flux of HDL-CE to LDL (78 mumol/h/L).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Modulation of hepatic apolipoprotein B, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor mRNA and plasma lipoprotein concentrations by defined dietary fats. Comparison of trimyristin, tripalmitin, tristearin and triolein.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, A J; Billett, M A; Salter, A M; Mangiapane, E H; Bruce, J S; Anderton, K L; Marenah, C B; Lawson, N; White, D A

    1995-01-01

    Different dietary fatty acids exert specific effects on plasma lipids but the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Hamsters were fed on low-cholesterol diets containing triacylglycerols enriched in specific saturated fatty acids, and effects on plasma lipids and the expression of genes involved in hepatic lipoprotein metabolism were measured. Trimyristin and tripalmitin caused significant rises in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol which were accompanied by significant reductions in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. Tripalmitin also increased hepatic expression of the apolipoprotein B gene, implying an increased production of LDL via very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and decreased removal of LDL in animals fed this fat. Hepatic levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA did not vary significantly between the groups. Compared with triolein, tristearin had little effect on hepatic gene expression or total plasma cholesterol. However, it caused a marked decrease in VLDL cholesterol and a rise in LDL cholesterol such that overall it appeared to be neutral. Lipid analysis suggested a rapid desaturation of much of the dietary stearate. The differential changes in plasma lipids and hepatic mRNA levels induced by specific dietary fats suggests a role for fatty acids or a metabolite thereof in the regulation of the expression of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism. PMID:7575449

  13. Apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein particle assembly: Lipid capacity of the nascent lipoprotein particle

    SciTech Connect

    Manchekar, Medha; Forte, Trudy M.; Datta, Geeta; Richardson, Paul E.; Segrest, Jere P.; Dashti, Nassrin

    2003-12-01

    We previously proposed that the N-terminal 1000 residue {beta}{alpha}{sub 1} domain of apolipoprotein B (apoB) forms a bulk lipid pocket homologous to that of lamprey lipovitellin (LV). In support of this ''lipid pocket'' hypothesis, apoB:1000 (residues 1-1000) was shown to be secreted by a stable transformant of McA-RH7777 cells as a monodisperse particle with HDL{sub 3} density and Stokes diameter of 112 {angstrom}. In contrast, apoB:931 (residues 1-931), missing only 69 residues of the sequence homologous to LV, was secreted as a particle considerably more dense than HDL with Stokes diameter of 110 {angstrom}. The purpose of the present study was to determine the stoichiometry of the lipid component of the apoB:931 and apoB:1000 particles. This was accomplished by metabolic labeling of cells with either [{sup 14}C]oleic acid or [{sup 3}H]glycerol followed by immunoprecipitation (IP) or nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (NDGGE) of secreted lipoproteins and by immunoaffinity chromatography of secreted unlabeled lipoproteins. The [{sup 3}H]-labeled apoB:1000-containing particles, isolated by NDGGE, contained 50 phospholipids (PL) and 11 triacylglycerols (TAG) molecules per particle. In contrast, apoB:931-containing particles contained only a few molecules of PL and were devoid of TAG. The unlabeled apoB:1000-containing particles isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography and analyzed for lipid mass, contained 56 PL, 8 TAG, and 7 cholesteryl ester molecules per particle. The surface:core lipid ratio of apoB:1000-containing particles was approximately 4:1 and was not affected by incubation of cells with oleate. Although small amounts of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) were associated with apoB:1000-containing particles, it never approached a 1:1 molar ratio of MTP to apoB. These results support a model in which: (1) the first 1000 amino acid residues of apoB are competent to complete the ''lipid pocket'' without a structural requirement for MTP

  14. New and emerging regulators of intestinal lipoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changting; Dash, Satya; Morgantini, Cecilia; Lewis, Gary F

    2014-04-01

    Overproduction of hepatic apoB100-containing VLDL particles has been well documented in animal models and in humans with insulin resistance such as the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and contributes to the typical dyslipidemia of these conditions. In addition, postprandial hyperlipidemia and elevated plasma concentrations of intestinal apoB48-containing chylomicron and chylomicron remnant particles have been demonstrated in insulin resistant states. Intestinal lipoprotein production is primarily determined by the amount of fat ingested and absorbed. Until approximately 10 years ago, however, relatively little attention was paid to the role of the intestine itself in regulating the production of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) and its dysregulation in pathological states such as insulin resistance. We and others have shown that insulin resistant animal models and humans are characterized by overproduction of intestinal apoB48-containing lipoproteins. Whereas various factors are known to regulate hepatic lipoprotein particle production, less is known about factors that regulate the production of intestinal lipoprotein particles. Monosacharides, plasma free fatty acids (FFA), resveratrol, intestinal peptides (e.g. GLP-1 and GLP-2), and pancreatic hormones (e.g. insulin) have recently been shown to be important regulators of intestinal lipoprotein secretion. Available evidence in humans and animal models strongly supports the concept that the small intestine is not merely an absorptive organ but rather plays an active role in regulating the rate of production of chylomicrons in fed and fasting states. Metabolic signals in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes and in some cases an aberrant intestinal response to these factors contribute to the enhanced formation and secretion of TRL. Understanding the regulation of intestinal lipoprotein production is imperative for the development of new therapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of

  15. Heterogeneity of lipoprotein particles in hepatic Golgi fractions

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Newly synthesized phospholipids, labeled with either [14C]choline, [3H]myo-inositol, or [33P]phosphate, partioned preferentially (greater than 80% of total incorporated radioactivity) in a Golgi membrane subfraction, although the cognate content subfraction contained a relatively large amount of secretory lipoproteins. The labeling pattern was the same for all phospholipids tested in the two subfractions. An active exchange process of polar lipids between Golgi membranes and Golgi secretory lipoproteins is postulated as a plausible explanation for these findings. Less than half of all Golgi lipoprotein particles have the density of serum VLDLs and a similar, but not identical, biochemical composition. The remaining lipoprotein particles are characterized by a continuous spectrum of sizes, and (to the extent tested) by a lipid and protein composition different from that of serum VLDLs and HDLs. Results obtained in control experiments rule out the possibility that the heterogeneous population of Golgi lipoprotein particles is an artefact caused by our preparation procedures. It is assumed that these heterogeneous particles are immature precursors of both VLDLs and HDLs. PMID:7085757

  16. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Jain, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  17. Learning from Biology: Synthetic Lipoproteins for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huang; Cruz, William; Chen, Juan; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic lipoproteins represent a relevant tool for targeted delivery of biological/chemical agents (chemotherapeutics, siRNAs, photosensitizers and imaging contrast agents) into various cell types. These nanoparticles offer a number of advantages on drugs delivery over their native counterparts while retaining their natural characteristics and biological functions. Their ultra-small size (<30nm), high biocompatibility, favorable circulation half-life and natural ability to bind specific lipoprotein receptors i.e. low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and Scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SRB1) that are found in a number of pathological conditions (e.g. cancer, atherosclerosis), make them superior delivery strategies when compared to other nanoparticle systems. We review the various approaches that have been developed for the generation of synthetic lipoproteins and their respective applications in vitro and in vivo. More specifically, we summarize the way to address the limitation on use of reconstituted lipoproteins by means of natural or recombinant apolipoproteins, as well as apolipoprotein mimetic molecules. Finally, we provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches and discuss future perspectives for clinical translation of these nanoparticles. PMID:25346461

  18. Chlordecone, a mixed pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) agonist, alters cholesterol homeostasis and lipoprotein metabolism in C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junga; Scheri, Richard C.; Zhang Yuan; Curtis, Lawrence R.

    2008-12-01

    Chlordecone (CD) is one of many banned organochlorine (OC) insecticides that are widespread persistent organic pollutants. OC insecticides alter lipid homeostasis in rodents at doses that are not neurotoxic or carcinogenic. Pretreatment of mice or rats with CD altered tissue distribution of a subsequent dose of [{sup 14}C]CD or [{sup 14}C]cholesterol (CH). Nuclear receptors regulate expression of genes important in the homeostasis of CH and other lipids. In this study, we report that CD suppresses in vitro reporter systems for human liver X receptors (LXRs) and activates those for human farnesoid X receptor (FXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) in a concentration-dependent manner (0-50 {mu}M). Consistent with human PXR activation in vitro, three days after a single dose of CD (15 mg/kg) hepatic microsomal CYP3A11 protein increases in C57BL/6 mice. CD decreases hepatic CH ester content without altering total CH concentration. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) contents of hepatic lipoprotein-rich and microsomal fractions of CD-treated mice are higher than controls. There is a significant reduction in non-high density lipoprotein CH but not apolipoprotein B-48/100 (apoB-48/100) in plasma from CD-treated mice after a 4 h fast. At 14 days after 15 mg CD/kg apoA-I and apoB-100 proteins but not CYP3A11 protein in hepatic microsomes are similar to controls. This work indicates that altered CH homeostasis is a mode of OC insecticide action of relevance after a single dose. This at least partially explains altered CH tissue distribution in CD-pretreated mice.

  19. Orange juice decreases low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic subjects and improves lipid transfer to high-density lipoprotein in normal and hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Cesar, Thais B; Aptekmann, Nancy P; Araujo, Milena P; Vinagre, Carmen C; Maranhão, Raul C

    2010-10-01

    Orange juice (OJ) is regularly consumed worldwide, but its effects on plasma lipids have rarely been explored. This study hypothesized that consumption of OJ concentrate would improve lipid levels and lipid metabolism, which are important in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function in normolipidemic (NC) and hypercholesterolemic (HCH) subjects. Fourteen HCH and 31 NC adults consumed 750 mL/day OJ concentrate (1:6 OJ/water) for 60 days. Eight control subjects did not consume OJ for 60 days. Plasma was collected before and on the last day for biochemical analysis and an in vitro assay of transfers of radioactively labeled free-cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, phospholipids, and triglycerides from lipoprotein-like nanoemulsions to HDL. Orange juice consumption decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (160 ± 17 to 141 ± 26 mg/dL, P < .01) in the HCH group but not in the NC group. HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides remained unchanged in both groups. Free-cholesterol transfer to HDL increased (HCH: 4.4 ± 2 to 5.6 ± 1%, NC: 3.2 ± 2 to 6.2 ± 1%, P< .05) whereas triglyceride (HCH 4.9 ± 1 to 3.1 ± 1%, NC 4.4 ± 1 to 3.4 ± 1%, P< .05) and phospholipid (HCH 21.6 ± 2 to 18.6 ± 3%, NC 20.2 ± 2 to 18.4 ± 2%, P < .05) transfers decreased in both groups. Cholesteryl-ester transfer decreased only in HCH (3.6 ± 1 to 3.1 ± 1%, P < .05), but not in NC. In control subjects, plasma lipids and transfers were unaltered for 60 days. Thus, by decreasing atherogenic low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in HCH and increasing HDL ability to take up free cholesterol in HCH and NC, OJ may be beneficial to both groups as free-cholesterol transfer to HDL is crucial for cholesterol esterification and reverse cholesterol transport.

  20. Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins as a causal factor for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Peter P

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25% of US adults are estimated to have hypertriglyceridemia (triglyceride [TG] level ≥150 mg/dL [≥1.7 mmol/L]). Elevated TG levels are associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and severe hypertriglyceridemia (TG levels ≥500 mg/dL [≥5.6 mmol/L]) is a well-established risk factor for acute pancreatitis. Plasma TG levels correspond to the sum of the TG content in TG-rich lipoproteins (TRLs; ie, very low-density lipoproteins plus chylomicrons) and their remnants. There remains some uncertainty regarding the direct causal role of TRLs in the progression of atherosclerosis and CVD, with cardiovascular outcome studies of TG-lowering agents, to date, having produced inconsistent results. Although low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) remains the primary treatment target to reduce CVD risk, a number of large-scale epidemiological studies have shown that elevated TG levels are independently associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events, even in patients treated effectively with statins. Genetic studies have further clarified the causal association between TRLs and CVD. Variants in several key genes involved in TRL metabolism are strongly associated with CVD risk, with the strength of a variant’s effect on TG levels correlating with the magnitude of the variant’s effect on CVD. TRLs are thought to contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis and CVD via a number of direct and indirect mechanisms. They directly contribute to intimal cholesterol deposition and are also involved in the activation and enhancement of several proinflammatory, proapoptotic, and procoagulant pathways. Evidence suggests that non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the sum of the total cholesterol carried by atherogenic lipoproteins (including LDL, TRL, and TRL remnants), provides a better indication of CVD risk than LDL-C, particularly in patients with hypertriglyceridemia. This article aims to provide an overview of the

  1. Explaining the harmonic sequence paradox.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ulrich; Zimper, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    According to the harmonic sequence paradox, an expected utility decision maker's willingness to pay for a gamble whose expected payoffs evolve according to the harmonic series is finite if and only if his marginal utility of additional income becomes zero for rather low payoff levels. Since the assumption of zero marginal utility is implausible for finite payoff levels, expected utility theory - as well as its standard generalizations such as cumulative prospect theory - are apparently unable to explain a finite willingness to pay. This paper presents first an experimental study of the harmonic sequence paradox. Additionally, it demonstrates that the theoretical argument of the harmonic sequence paradox only applies to time-patient decision makers, whereas the paradox is easily avoided if time-impatience is introduced.

  2. Direct adsorption of low-density lipoprotein and lipoprotein(a) from whole blood: results of the first clinical long-term multicenter study using DALI apheresis.

    PubMed

    Bosch, T; Lennertz, A; Schenzle, D; Dräger, J

    2002-01-01

    Direct adsorption of lipoproteins (DALI) is the first low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-apheresis technique by which atherogenic LDL and lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) can be selectively removed from whole blood without plasma separation. The present study was performed to evaluate the efficacy, selectivity and safety of long-term DALI apheresis. Sixty-three hypercholesterolemic coronary patients were treated by weekly DALI sessions. Initial LDL-cholesterol (C) plasma levels averaged 238 +/- 87 mg/dl (range 130-681 mg/dl). On average, 34 sessions (1-45) were performed processing 1.5 patient blood volumes. The primary aim was to acutely reduce LDL-C by >or=60% per session. To this end, three different adsorber sizes could be employed, i.e., DALI 500, 750, and 1000, which were used in 4, 73, and 23% of the 2156 sessions, respectively. On average, 7387 ml of blood were processed in 116 min per session. This resulted in the following mean acute changes: LDL-C 198 --> 63 mg/dl (-69%), Lp(a) 86 --> 32 mg/dl (-64%), triglycerides 185 --> 136 mg/dl (-27%). HDL-C (-11%) and fibrinogen (-15%) were not significantly influenced. The mean long-term reduction of LDL-C was 42% compared to baseline while HDL-C slightly increased in the long run (+4%). The selectivity of LDL removal was good as recoveries of albumin, immunoglobulins, and other proteins exceeded 85%. Ninety-five percent of 2156 sessions were completely uneventful. The most frequent adverse effects were hypotension (1.2% of sessions) and paresthesia (1.1%), which were probably due to citrate anticoagulation. Access problems had to be overcome in 1.5%, adsorber and hardware problems in 0.5% of the sessions. In this multicenter long-term study, DALI apheresis proved to be an efficient, safe, and easy procedure for extracorporeal LDL and Lp(a) elimination.

  3. The association between circulating lipoprotein(a) and type 2 diabetes: is it causal?

    PubMed

    Ye, Zheng; Haycock, Philip C; Gurdasani, Deepti; Pomilla, Cristina; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Forouhi, Nita G

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports a direct and causal association between lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels and coronary risk, but the nature of the association between Lp(a) levels and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is unclear. In this study, we assessed the association of Lp(a) levels with risk of incident T2D and tested whether Lp(a) levels are causally linked to T2D. We analyzed data on 18,490 participants from the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk cohort that included adults aged 40-79 years at baseline 1993-1997. During an average 10 years of follow-up, 593 participants developed incident T2D. Cox regression models were used to estimate the association between Lp(a) levels and T2D. In Mendelian randomization analyses, based on EPIC-Norfolk combined with DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis data involving a total of 10,088 diabetes case participants and 68,346 control participants, we used a genetic variant (rs10455872) as an instrument to test whether the association between Lp(a) levels and T2D is causal. In adjusted analyses, there was an inverse association between Lp(a) levels and T2D: hazard ratio was 0.63 (95% CI 0.49-0.81; P trend = 0.003) comparing the top versus bottom quintile of Lp(a). In EPIC-Norfolk, a 1-SD increase in logLp(a) was associated with a lower risk of T2D (odds ratio [OR] 0.88 [95% CI: 0.80-0.95]). However, in Mendelian randomization analyses, a 1-SD increase in logLp(a) due to rs10455872, which explained 26.8% of the variability in Lp(a) levels, was not associated with risk of T2D (OR 1.03 [0.96-1.10]; P = 0.41). These prospective findings demonstrate a strong inverse association of Lp(a) levels with risk of T2D. However, a genetic variant that elevated Lp(a) levels was not associated with risk of T2D, suggesting that elevated Lp(a) levels are not causally associated with a lower risk of T2D.

  4. The association between circulating lipoprotein(a) and type 2 diabetes: is it causal?

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zheng; Haycock, Philip C; Gurdasani, Deepti; Pomilla, Cristina; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports a direct and causal association between lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels and coronary risk, but the nature of the association between Lp(a) levels and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is unclear. In this study, we assessed the association of Lp(a) levels with risk of incident T2D, and tested whether Lp(a) levels are causally linked to T2D. We analysed data on 18,490 participants from the EPIC-Norfolk cohort that included adults aged 40-79 years at baseline 1993-1997. During average 10 years of follow-up, 593 participants developed incident T2D. Cox regression models were used to estimate the association between Lp(a) levels and T2D. In Mendelian randomisation analyses, based on EPIC-Norfolk combined with DIAGRAM data involving a total of 10,088 diabetes cases and 68,346 controls, we used a genetic variant (rs10455872) as an instrument to test whether the association between Lp(a) levels and T2D is causal. In adjusted analyses there was an inverse association between Lp(a) levels and T2D: hazard ratio (HR) was 0.63 (95% confidence interval 0.49-0.81; p-trend=0.003) comparing the top versus bottom quintile of Lp(a). In EPIC-Norfolk, a 1-SD increase in logLp(a) was associated with a lower risk of T2D (OR=0.88, 95%CI: 0.80-0.95). However, in Mendelian randomisation analyses, a 1-SD increase in logLp(a) due to rs10455872, which explained 26.8% of the variability in Lp(a) levels, was not associated with risk of T2D (OR=1.03, 95%CI: 0.96-1.10, p = 0.41). These prospective findings demonstrate a strong inverse association of Lp(a) levels with risk of T2D. However, a genetic variant that elevated Lp(a) levels was not associated with risk of T2D, suggesting that elevated Lp(a) levels are not causally associated with a lower risk of T2D. PMID:24089516

  5. Effects of bioactive lipids and lipoproteins on bone

    PubMed Central

    Tintut, Yin; Demer, Linda L.

    2013-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies from the past two decades show a link between atherosclerotic vascular disease and bone loss, that is independent of age, the mechanism is still unclear. This review focuses on evidence that suggests a role for atherogenic lipids and lipoproteins in the pathogenesis of bone loss, including direct effects of these bioactive lipids/lipoproteins on bone cells, inhibiting osteoblastic differentiation and promoting osteoclastic differentiation. It also addresses recent evidence that suggests that bioactive lipids blunt the effects of bone anabolic agents, such as teriparatide and bone morphogenetic proteins. The role of systemic and intracellular oxidant stress and inflammation in mediating the effects of bioactive lipids/lipoproteins are implicated. PMID:24183940

  6. Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Katayoon B.; Handa, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly. While excellent treatment has emerged for neovascular disease, treatment for early AMD is lacking due to an incomplete understanding of the early molecular events. A prominent age-related change is the accumulation of neutral lipid in normal Bruch's membrane (BrM) throughout adulthood and also disease-related BrM accumulations called basal deposits and drusen. AMD lesion formation has thus been conceptualized as sharing mechanisms with atherosclerotic plaque formation, where low-density lipoprotein (LDL) retention within the arterial wall initiates a cascade of pathologic events. However, we do not yet understand how lipoproteins contribute to AMD. This paper explores how systemic and local production of lipoproteins might contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:21822496

  7. Effect of two oral contraceptives containing ethinyl estradiol and gestodene or norgestimate on different lipid and lipoprotein parameters.

    PubMed

    Wiegratz, I; Jung-Hoffmann, C; Gross, W; Kuhl, H

    1998-08-01

    The effect of a triphasic oral contraceptive containing ethinyl estradiol and gestodene (EE/GSD) on various lipid and lipoprotein parameters was compared with that of a monophasic formulation containing 35 micrograms ethinyl estradiol and 250 micrograms norgestimate (EE/NGM). Blood samples were collected from 46 women on days 2, 11, and 21 of the preceding control cycle and of the third, sixth, and twelfth treatment cycles. There was no significant difference between formulations with regard to the influence on any measured parameter. As compared with controls, a significant increase was observed in the plasma levels of total triglycerides (24-78%), total phospholipids (7-20%), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) triglycerides (61-76%), VLDL-phospholipids (14-60%), low density lipoprotein (LDL) triglycerides (8-35%), LDL-phospholipids (28-30%), high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (8-16%), HDL 3-cholesterol (11-20%), HDL-triglycerides (17-66%), HDL-phospholipids, HDL 3-phospholipids (7-11%), apolipoprotein (apo) A-I (5-20%) and apo A-II (10-40%) during treatment with both formulations. In contrast, the LDL-cholesterol levels were significantly decreased. These changes in lipid metabolism appear to reflect a predominance of the effect of the estrogen component. The results indicate that both low dose oral contraceptives containing different progestins and different amounts of EE do not exert a deleterious effect on lipoprotein metabolism, as high HDL-cholesterol and low LDL-cholesterol levels are known as low risk factors of cardiovascular disease. In contrast to endogenous hypertriglyceridemia, an EE-induced rise in triglyceride levels does not appear to increase cardiovascular risk if LDL is not increased.

  8. Effects of an evidence-based computerized virtual clinician on low-density lipoprotein and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in adults without cardiovascular disease: The Interactive Cholesterol Advisory Tool.

    PubMed

    Block, Robert C; Abdolahi, Amir; Niemiec, Christopher P; Rigby, C Scott; Williams, Geoffrey C

    2016-12-01

    There is a lack of research on the use of electronic tools that guide patients toward reducing their cardiovascular disease risk. We conducted a 9-month clinical trial in which participants who were at low (n = 100) and moderate (n = 23) cardiovascular disease risk-based on the National Cholesterol Education Program III's 10-year risk estimator-were randomized to usual care or to usual care plus use of an Interactive Cholesterol Advisory Tool during the first 8 weeks of the study. In the moderate-risk category, an interaction between treatment condition and Framingham risk estimate on low-density lipoprotein and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was observed, such that participants in the virtual clinician treatment condition had a larger reduction in low-density lipoprotein and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol as their Framingham risk estimate increased. Perceptions of the Interactive Cholesterol Advisory Tool were positive. Evidence-based information about cardiovascular disease risk and its management was accessible to participants without major technical challenges.

  9. Structural changes of lipoprotein lipids by 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-Korpela, M.; Oja, J.; Lounila, J.; Jokisaari, J.; Savolainen, M. J.; Kesäniemi, Y. A.

    1995-08-01

    A new procedure for detecting structural changes of lipoprotein lipids is introduced and applied to study native low (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. The method involves lineshape fitting analyses of specific resonances in proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra together with numerical derivation of the obtained intensity curves with respect to temperature. In addition to the well-known phase transition of the LDL core cholesterol esters, a novel structural change was revealed in the phospholipid monolayer of both native LDL and HDL particles. The attributes of this phenomenon are discussed.

  10. JCL Roundtable: Hypertriglyceridemia due to defects in lipoprotein lipase function.

    PubMed

    Brown, W Virgil; Goldberg, Ira J; Young, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    In this Roundtable, our intent is to discuss those rare genetic disorders that impair the function of lipoprotein lipase. These cause severe hypertriglyceridemia that appears in early childhood with Mendelian inheritance and usually with full penetrance in a recessive pattern. Dr Ira Goldberg from New York University School of Medicine and Dr Stephen Young from the University of California, Los Angeles have agreed to answer my questions about this topic. Both have done fundamental work in recent years that has markedly altered our views on lipoprotein lipase function. I am going to start by asking them to give us a brief history of this enzyme system as a clinical entity.

  11. Red grape seed extract improves lipid profiles and decreases oxidized low-density lipoprotein in patients with mild hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Seyed-Mostafa; Gholamin, Sharareh; Eskandari, Ali; Mohsenian, Nakta; Ghorbanihaghjo, Amir; Delazar, Abbas; Rashtchizadeh, Nadereh; Keshtkar-Jahromi, Maryam; Argani, Hassan

    2013-03-01

    Hyperlipidemia can lead to atherosclerosis by lipoprotein deposition inside the vessel wall and oxidative stress induction that leads to the formation of atherosclerotic plaque. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein particles (Ox-LDL) have a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The lipid-lowering properties and antioxidants of the grape seed can be beneficial in atherosclerosis prevention. We conducted a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial. Fifty-two mildly hyperlipidemic individuals were divided into two groups that received either 200 mg/day of the red grape seed extract (RGSE) or placebo for 8 weeks. After an 8-week washout period, the groups were crossed over for another 8 weeks. Lipid profiles and Ox-LDL were measured at the beginning and the end of each phase. RGSE consumption reduced total cholesterol (-10.68±26.76 mg/dL, P=.015), LDL cholesterol (-9.66±23.92 mg/dL, P=.014), and Ox-LDL (-5.47±12.12 mg/dL, P=.008). While triglyceride and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were decreased and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was increased by RGSE, the changes were not statistically significant. RGSE consumption decreases Ox-LDL and has beneficial effects on lipid profile-consequently decreasing the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disorders-in mild hyperlipidemic individuals.

  12. Effect of chronic exposure to cadmium on serum lipid, lipoprotein and oxidative stress indices in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Shabestari, Mahmoud M.; Azad, Farahzad Jabbari; Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Bafandeh, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxic metal implicated in lipid abnormalities. The present study was designed to elucidate the possible association between chronic exposure to Cd concentration and alterations in plasma lipid, lipoprotein, and oxidative stress indices in rats. Sixteen male rats were assigned to 2 groups of 8 rats each (test and control). The Cd-exposed group obtained drinking water containing cadmium chloride (CdCl2) in the concentration of 2.0 mg Cd/L in drinking water for 3 months. At the end of the experimental period, blood samples were obtained to determine the changes of serum triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), highdensity lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and also serum Cd contents. The results of the present study indicated that Cd administration significantly increased the serum levels of TG, TC, LDL-C, MDA and Cd with reduction in the HDL-C and GSH levels. In conclusion, evidence is presented that chronic exposure to low Cd concentration can adversely affect the lipid and lipoprotein profile via lipid peroxidation. PMID:27486375

  13. Partnership of PGC-1alpha and HNF4alpha in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rhee, James; Ge, Hongfei; Yang, Wenli; Fan, Melina; Handschin, Christoph; Cooper, Marcus; Lin, Jiandie; Li, Cai; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2006-05-26

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) is a transcriptional coactivator involved in several aspects of energy metabolism. It is induced or activated under different stimuli in a highly tissue-specific manner and subsequently partners with certain transcription factors in those tissues to execute various biological programs. In the fasted liver, PGC-1alpha is induced and interacts with hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha) and other transcription factors to activate gluconeogenesis and increase hepatic glucose output. Given the broad spectrum of liver genes responsive to HNF4alpha, we sought to determine those that were specifically targeted by the combination of PGC-1alpha and HNF4alpha. Coexpression of these two molecules in murine stem cells reveals a high induction of mRNA for apolipoproteins A-IV and C-II. Forced expression of PGC-1alpha in mouse and human hepatoma cells increases the mRNA of a subset of apolipoproteins implicated in very low density lipoprotein and triglyceride metabolism, including apolipoproteins A-IV, C-II, and C-III. Coactivation of the apoC-III/A-IV promoter region by PGC-1alpha occurs through a highly conserved HNF4alpha response element, the loss of which completely abolishes activation by PGC-1alpha and HNF4alpha. Adenoviral infusion of PGC-1alpha into live mice increases hepatic expression of apolipoproteins A-IV, C-II, and C-III and increases serum and very low density lipoprotein triglyceride levels. Conversely, knock down of PGC-1alpha in vivo causes a decrease in both apolipoprotein expression and serum triglyceride levels. These data point to a crucial role for the PGC-1alpha/HNF4alpha partnership in hepatic lipoprotein metabolism.

  14. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-density lipoprotein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of lipoprotein X aids in the diagnosis of obstructive liver disease. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  15. One precursor, three apolipoproteins: the relationship between two crustacean lipoproteins, the large discoidal lipoprotein and the high density lipoprotein/β-glucan binding protein.

    PubMed

    Stieb, Stefanie; Roth, Ziv; Dal Magro, Christina; Fischer, Sabine; Butz, Eric; Sagi, Amir; Khalaila, Isam; Lieb, Bernhard; Schenk, Sven; Hoeger, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    The novel discoidal lipoprotein (dLp) recently detected in the crayfish, differs from other crustacean lipoproteins in its large size, apoprotein composition and high lipid binding capacity, We identified the dLp sequence by transcriptome analyses of the hepatopancreas and mass spectrometry. Further de novo assembly of the NGS data followed by BLAST searches using the sequence of the high density lipoprotein/1-glucan binding protein (HDL-BGBP) of Astacus leptodactylus as query revealed a putative precursor molecule with an open reading frame of 14.7 kb and a deduced primary structure of 4889 amino acids. The presence of an N-terminal lipid bind- ing domain and a DUF 1943 domain suggests the relationship with the large lipid transfer proteins. Two-putative dibasic furin cleavage sites were identified bordering the sequence of the HDL-BGBP. When subjected to mass spectroscopic analyses, tryptic peptides of the large apoprotein of dLp matched the N-terminal part of the precursor, while the peptides obtained for its small apoprotein matched the C-terminal part. Repeating the analysis in the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii revealed a similar protein with identical domain architecture suggesting that our findings do not represent an isolated instance. Our results indicate that the above three apolipoproteins (i.e HDL-BGBP and both the large and the small subunit of dLp) are translated as a large precursor. Cleavage at the furin type sites releases two subunits forming a heterodimeric dLP particle, while the remaining part forms an HDL-BGBP whose relationship with other lipoproteins as well as specific functions are yet to be elucidated.

  16. Relation Between Cigarette Smoking, Body Fat Distribution and Density of Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Women.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Cholesterol in Women Linda R. Beson, Major AFIT Student Attending: University of Florida AFIT/CI/CIA-92-085 DTIC Wright-Patterson AFB OH 45433-6583 ELECTE 1...CIGARETTE SMOKING, BODY FAT DISTRIBUTION AND DENSITY OF LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL IN WOMEN By W: , LINDA R. BESON " Di t A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE...12 Cholesterol and Serum Lipoproteins ......... .. 14 Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Cholesterol . . . 18 High Density Lipoprotein (HDL

  17. Modulation of adipocyte lipoprotein lipase expression as a strategy for preventing or treating visceral obesity.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2001-08-01

    As compared to subcutaneous adipocytes, visceral adipocytes have high basal lipolysis, are highly sensitive to catecholamines, and are poorly sensitive to insulin; these traits are amplified when visceral adipocytes hypertrophy. As a result, enlarged visceral fat stores tend to flood the portal circulation with free fatty acids at metabolically inappropriate times when fatty acids are unlikely to be oxidized, thus exposing tissues to excessive free fatty acid levels and giving rise to the insulin resistance syndrome. A logical approach to preventing or correcting visceral obesity is to down-regulate the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity of visceral adipocytes relative to that expressed in subcutaneous adipocytes and skeletal muscle. IGF-I activity appears to be a primary determinant of visceral LPL activity in humans; systemic IGF-I activity is decreased when diurnal insulin secretion is low, when hepatocytes detect a relative paucity of certain essential amino acids, and when estrogens are administered orally. The ability of alpha-glucosidase inhibitor therapy to selectively reduce visceral adiposity suggests that down-regulation of diurnal insulin secretion and/or IGF-I activity may indeed have a greater impact on LPL activity in visceral fat than in subcutaneous fat. Thus, low-glycemic-index, vegan, high-protein, or hypocaloric diets can be expected to decrease visceral LPL activity, as can postmenopausal estrogen therapy. Furthermore, estrogen enhances the LPL activity of non-pathogenic gluteofemoral fat cells, whereas testosterone decreases visceral LPL activity in men; this may explain why sex hormone replacement in middle-aged people of both sexes has a favorable impact on visceral fat and insulin sensitivity. Beta-adrenergic activity suppresses transcription of LPL in adipocytes; this phenomenon may contribute to the favorable impact of exercise training on visceral obesity; conceivably, preadministration of safe drugs that boost catecholamine activity

  18. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol esterification and transfer rates to lighter density lipoproteins mediated by cholesteryl ester transfer protein in the fasting and postprandial periods are not altered in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Medina; Nunes; Carrilho; Shimabukuru; Lottenberg; Lottenberg; McPherson; Krauss; Quintão

    2000-10-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is associated with atherosclerosis that has, in part, been ascribed to abnormalities in the reverse cholesterol transport system. Methods: We determined, in the fasting and post-alimentary periods, rates of HDL cholesterol esterification and transfer to apoB-containing lipoproteins, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) concentration, and apoB lipoprotein size in 10 type 1 diabetics and 10 well-matched controls. Autologous HDL was labeled with [14C]cholesterol and incubated at 37 degrees C during a period of 30 min for measurement of the cholesterol esterification rate (CER), as well as for 24 h for measurement of the endogenous HDL [14C]cholesteryl ester ([14C]CE) transfer rate to apoB-containing lipoproteins after 2- and 4-h incubations with the subject's own plasma. Exogenous cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) was estimated by incubation of the participant's plasma (CETP source) with [14C]CE-HDL and VLDL from a pool of plasma donors. ApoB lipoprotein size was determined using non-denaturing polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis of whole plasma. Results: Contrary to previous studies, we showed that even not well-controlled type 1 diabetics did not differ from lipid-matched, non-diabetic subjects in HDL-[14C]cholesterol esterification rate, transfer rates, or CETP concentration. CETP concentration correlates with the exogenous method of [14C]CE transfer and with the endogenous method only when the latter is corrected for plasma triacylglycerol (TG) concentration. In addition, during the postprandial phase, diabetic patients' VLDL are smaller and IDL size increases less than in controls. Conclusion: In type 1 diabetes mellitus, CETA is not altered when the plasma levels of donor and/or acceptor lipoproteins are within the normal range.

  19. High-density lipoprotein affects antigen presentation by interfering with lipid raft: a promising anti-atherogenic strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-H; Yuan, S-G; Peng, D-Q; Zhao, S-P

    2010-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease. Immunomodulation of atherosclerosis emerges as a promising approach to prevention and treatment of this widely prevalent disease. The function of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to promote reverse cholesterol transport may explain the ability of its protection against atherosclerosis. Findings that HDL and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) inhibited the ability of antigen presenting cells (APCs) to stimulate T cells might be attributed to lipid raft, a cholesterol-rich microdomain exhibiting functional properties depending largely upon its lipid composition. Thus, modulating cholesterol in lipid raft may provide a promising anti-atherogenic strategy.

  20. Dysfunctional High-Density Lipoprotein and the Potential of Apolipoprotein A-1 Mimetic Peptides to Normalize the Composition and Function of Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Satoshi; Navab, Mohamad; Morgantini, Cecilia; Charles-Sehoeman, Christina; Su, Feng; Gao, Feng; Kwon, Murray; Ganapathy, Ekambaram; Meriwether, David; Farias-Eisner, Robin; Fogelman, Alan M.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.

    2013-01-01

    Although high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in large epidemiological studies are inversely related to the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), increasing the level of circulating HDL-C does not necessarily decrease the risk of CHD events, CHD deaths, or mortality, HDL can act as an anti- or a proinflammatory molecule, depending on the context and environment. Based on a number of recent studies, it appears that the anti- or proinflammatory nature of HDL may be a more sensitive indicator of the presence or absence of atherosclerosis than HDL-C levels. The HDL proteome has been suggested to be a marker, and perhaps a mediator, of CHD. Apolipoprotein A-1 (apoA-I), the major protein in HDL is a selective target for oxidation by myeloperoxidase, which results in impaired HDL function. Improving HDL function through modification of its lipid and/or protein content maybe a therapeutic target for the treatment of CHD and many inflammatory disorders. HDL/apoA-I mimetic peptides may have the ability to modify the lipid and protein content of HDL and convert dysfunctional HDL to functional HDL. This review focuses on recent studies of dysfunctional HDL in animal models and human disease, and the potential of apoA-I mimetic peptides to normalize the composition and (function of lipoproteins. PMID:21628835

  1. Impact on lipoprotein profile after long-term testosterone replacement in hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Berg, G; Schreier, L; Geloso, G; Otero, P; Nagelberg, A; Levalle, O

    2002-02-01

    Testosterone serum levels may influence the lipoprotein metabolism and possibly atherogenic risk. Our aim was to investigate the effects of long-term testosterone supplementation in hypogonadal men on multiple lipoprotein markers. 18 Hypogonadal men were studied before and after 3, 6, and 18 (n = 7) months of treatment with testosterone enanthate. During treatment, serum testosterone and estradiol increased, reaching normal levels (p < 0.0001 and 0.003, respectively). This was associated with a decrease in HDL cholesterol (from 1.40 +/- 0.10 mmol/l to 1.22 +/- 0.08 mmol/l, p < 0.001) after six months at the expense of HDL2 cholesterol (p < 0.01), as well as apoprotein A1 (from 139 +/- 3.4 mg/dl to 126 +/- 3.0 mg/dl, p < 0.005). Hepatic lipase activity increased (p < 0.05) and correlated positively with testosterone (r = 0.56, p < 0.02) and negatively with HDL cholesterol (r = - 0.58, p < 0.02). Total and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and apoprotein B did not increase. Among the seven patients who completed 18 months of treatment, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL and HDL cholesterol, as well as total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio values did not differ from baseline while apoprotein A1 (p < 0.03) and HDL cholesterol (p < 0.015) remained decreased and hepatic lipase unchanged. Restoration of testosterone levels in hypogonadal men in this study did not reveal unfavorable changes based on total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol/apoprotein B ratios, which are both atherogenic risk markers. Whether the changes in light of lipoprotein metabolism will adversely influence cardiovascular risk over time remains to be determined.

  2. Overexpression of porcine lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 in swine.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaochun; Wang, Gangqi; Liu, Xingxing; Han, Xiaolei; Li, Zhuang; Ran, Guangyao; Li, Zhanjun; Song, Qi; Ji, Yuan; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Yuhui; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Pang, Daxin

    2015-09-25

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A 2 (Lp-PLA2) is associated with the risk of vascular disease. It circulates in human blood predominantly in association with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and hydrolyses oxidized phospholipids into pro-inflammatory products. However, in the mouse circulation, it predominantly binds to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. To further investigate the effects of Lp-PLA2 in the circulation, we generated over-expressed Lp-PLA2 transgenic swine. The eukaryotic expression plasmid of porcine Lp-PLA2 which driven by EF1α promoter was constructed and generate transgenic swine via SCNT. The expression and activity of Lp-PLA2 in transgenic swine were evaluated, and the total cholesterol (TC), HDL-C, LDL-C and triglyceride (TG) levels in the fasting and fed states were also assessed. Compared with wild-type swine controls, the transgenic swine exhibited elevated Lp-PLA2 mRNA levels and activities, and the activity did not depend on the feeding state. The TC, HDL-C and LDL-C levels were not significantly increased. There was no change in the TG levels in the fasting state between transgenic and control pigs. However, in the fed state, the TG levels of transgenic swine were slightly increased compared with the control pigs and were significantly elevated compared with the fasting state. In addition, inflammatory gene (interleukin [IL]-6, monocyte chemotactic protein [MCP]-1 and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) mRNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were significantly increased. The results demonstrated that Lp-PLA2 is associated with triglycerides which may be helpful for understanding the relationship of this protein with cardiovascular disease.

  3. Postprandial elevation of remnant lipoprotein leads to endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Funada, Jun-ichi; Sekiya, Michihito; Hamada, Mareomi; Hiwada, Kunio

    2002-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that elevated levels of cholesterol in the form of remnant-like particles (RLP-C) induce deterioration of endothelial function during the fasting state, but it is not known whether postprandial RLP-C elevation has the same effect. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of postprandial RLP-C elevation on endothelial function in 24 fasting normolipidemic subjects. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) during reactive hyperemia in the brachial artery was investigated. Serum lipids and lipoproteins during fasting and 4h after regular fat-loading were measured. Subjects were divided into 2 groups: the high responders (postprandial RLP-C level >7.5mg/dl, n=8) and the normal responders (postprandial RLP-C level < or =7.5mg/dl, n=16). Significant increases in the level of both triglycerides and RLP-C were observed in the high responders. Basal FMD in the high responders (4.3+/-3.0%) was significantly lower than that in the normal responders (8.3+/-2.4%) (p<0.01), but FMD after the fat-loading in both groups did not change significantly. The change in RLP-C levels during the fat-loading test correlated significantly with basal FMD (r=-0.588, p<0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed a significant correlation between basal FMD and the change in RLP-C levels (r=-0.488, p<0.02). The results of this study suggest that postprandial RLP-C elevation could be associated with atherosclerotic progression even in normolipidemic subjects.

  4. Lifecycle of a Lipoprotein from a Biophysical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, John C.; Huser, Thomas; Voss, John; Chan, James; Parikh, Atul

    The goal of our project was to understand how lipids and lipoproteins interact with cell membranes. This chapter will present the five major areas in which we have focused our attention on understanding how lipids and lipoproteins interact with cell membranes (Fig. 11.1): (1) triglycerides and vascular injury, (2) single lipoprotein analysis, (3) apolipoprotein E (apoE) conformation changes in the postprandial state, (4) triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRLs) and endothelial cell inflammation, and (5) TGRL lipolysis products and monocyte activation. For over a hundred years, Western civilization has questioned how the food we eat translates into disease, and specifically atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Although most information indicates that this basic pathophysiological process is mediated through consumption of excess saturated fats, much remains unknown. After humans eat a meal, there is an elevation of triglycerides in the blood in the postprandial state. In normal individuals, triglycerides can rise after a meal by 50 to 100%. This has been documented many times in the past, including a paper by Hyson et al, (1998) [1]. In that study, normal healthy individuals were given a 40%-fat meal. Plasma triglycerides, which were modestly elevated initially, rose about 60% higher three to four hours after ingestion of the meal. Subsequently plasma triglycerides fell to baseline levels six hours after the meal. Even in these healthy individuals, a significant elevation of triglycerides was noted after ingestion of a moder ately high-fat meal.

  5. Serum lipid and lipoprotein patterns of Iranian horses.

    PubMed

    Asadi, F; Asadian, P; Shahriari, A; Pourkabir, M; Kazemi, A

    2011-12-01

    Patterns of serum biochemical parameters vary among horse breeds. The objective of the present study was to compare serum lipoproteins of Iranian Caspian ponies with those of other horses (Arabs and Thoroughbreds) in the Iranian region. Serum lipoprotein values were determined by agar-agarose gel electrophoresis and measured by scan densitometry. Moreover, serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations were determined and the results were analysed by one-way analysis of variance. Serum triglyceride and cholesterol values were 1.13 +/- 0.23 and 2.38 +/- 0.18 mmol/l in Caspian ponies, 1.96 +/- 0.49 and 1.92 +/- 0.25 mmol/l in Arab horses and 1.38 +/- 0.26 and 2.17 +/- 0.53 mmol/l in Thoroughbred horses. The relative percentages of alpha- (72.63 +/- 17.76%) and beta-lipoproteins (29.10 +/- 5.49%) in serum electrophoretic tracings from Caspian ponies were not significantly different from those of other horses (p > 0.05). The lipoprotein phenotype in Caspian ponies may be useful for evaluating metabolic diseases.

  6. PCSK9 and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Druce, Irena; Abujrad, Hussein; Ooi, Teik Chye

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pro-protein convertase subtilisin-kexin 9 (PCSK9) is known to affect low-density lipoprotein (LDL) metabolism, but there are indications from several lines of research that it may also influence the metabolism of other lipoproteins, especially triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL). This review summarizes the current data on this possible role of PCSK9. A link between PCSK9 and TRL has been suggested through the demonstration of (1) a correlation between plasma PCSK9 and triglyceride (TG) levels in health and disease, (2) a correlation between plasma PCSK9 and markers of carbohydrate metabolism, which is closely related to TG metabolism, (3) an effect of TG-lowering fibrate therapy on plasma PCSK9 levels, (4) an effect of PCSK9 on postprandial lipemia, (5) an effect of PCSK9 on adipose tissue biology, (6) an effect of PCSK9 on apolipoprotein B production from the liver and intestines, (7) an effect of PCSK9 on receptors other than low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) that are involved in TRL metabolism, and (8) an effect of anti-PCSK9 therapy on serum TG levels. The underlying mechanisms are unclear but starting to emerge. PMID:26320603

  7. [Residual risk: The roles of triglycerides and high density lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Grammer, Tanja; Kleber, Marcus; Silbernagel, Günther; Scharnagl, Hubert; März, Winfried

    2016-06-01

    In clinical trials, the reduction of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) with statins reduces the incidence rate of cardiovascular events by approximately one third. This means, that a sizeable "residual risk" remains. Besides high lipoprotein (a), disorders in the metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and high density liproteins have been implicated as effectors of the residual risk. Both lipoprotein parameters correlate inversely with each other. Therefore, the etiological contributions of triglycerides and / or of HDL for developing cardiovascular disease can hardly be estimated from either observational studies or from intervention studies. The largely disappointing results of intervention studies with inhibitors of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein and in particular the available set of genetically-epidemiological studies suggest that in the last decade, the importance of HDL cholesterol has been overvalued, while the importance of triglycerides has been underestimated. High triglycerides not always atherogenic, but only if they are associated with the accumulation relatively cholesterol-enriched, incompletely catabolized remnants of chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins (familial type III hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus). The normalization of the concentration of triglycerides and remnants by inhibiting the expression of apolipoprotein C3 is hence a new, promising therapeutic target.

  8. Relative atherogenicity and predictive value of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a well-established atherogenic factor for coronary heart disease, it does not completely represent the risk associated with atherogenic lipoproteins in the presence of high triglyceride (TG) levels. Constituent lipoproteins constituting non–hig...

  9. Ceruloplasmin as low-density lipoprotein oxidase: activation by ascorbate and dehydroascorbate.

    PubMed

    Feichtenhofer, S; Fabjan, J S; Abuja, P M

    2001-07-13

    The ability of ceruloplasmin (Cp) to oxidize low-density lipoproteins (LDL) in the presence of water-soluble antioxidants was investigated and a reaction mechanism proposed. Ascorbate strongly enhanced LDL oxidation, but only after its rapid consumption. Dehydroascorbate enhanced Cp-mediated LDL oxidation even more strongly. Lipid-soluble antioxidants and water-soluble peroxides did not show noticeable activation. However, loading of LDL with lipid hydroperoxides increased the initial oxidation rate. We conclude that Cp mediates a localized redox cycle, where reduction of Cp-Cu2+ is effected by water-soluble reductants and reoxidation by liposoluble hydroperoxides.

  10. Health benefits of high-density lipoproteins in preventing cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Berrougui, Hicham; Momo, Claudia N; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2012-01-01

    Plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) are strongly and inversely correlated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. However, it is becoming clear that a functional HDL is a more desirable target than simply increasing HDL-cholesterol levels. The best known antiatherogenic function of HDL particles relates to their ability to promote reverse cholesterol transport from peripheral cells. However, HDL also possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic effects. This review focuses on the state of knowledge regarding assays of HDL heterogeneity and function and their relationship to cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Effects of rice bran oil on plasma lipid concentrations, lipoprotein composition, and glucose dynamics in mares.

    PubMed

    Frank, N; Andrews, F M; Elliott, S B; Lew, J; Boston, R C

    2005-11-01

    Plasma lipid concentrations, lipoprotein composition, and glucose dynamics were measured and compared between mares fed diets containing added water, corn oil (CO), refined rice bran oil (RR), or crude rice bran oil (CR) to test the hypothesis that rice bran oil lowers plasma lipid concentrations, alters lipoprotein composition, and improves insulin sensitivity in mares. Eight healthy adult mares received a basal diet fed at 1.5 times the DE requirement for maintenance and each of the four treatments according to a repeated 4 x 4 Latin square design consisting of four 5-wk feeding periods. Blood samples were collected for lipid analysis after mares were deprived of feed overnight at 0 and 5 wk. Glucose dynamics were assessed at 0 and 4 wk in fed mares by combined intravenous glucose-insulin tolerance tests. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured, and estimated values of insulin sensitivity (SI), glucose effectiveness, and net insulin response were obtained using the minimal model. Mean BW increased (P = 0.014) by 29 kg (range = 10 to 50 kg) over 5 wk. Mean plasma concentrations of NEFA, triglyceride (TG), and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) decreased (P < 0.001) by 55, 30, and 39%, respectively, and plasma high-density lipoprotein and total cholesterol (TC) concentrations increased (P < 0.001) by 15 and 12%, respectively, over 5 wk. Changes in plasma NEFA (r = 0.58; P < 0.001) and TC (r = 0.44; P = 0.013) concentrations were positively correlated with weight gain over 5 wk. Lipid components of VLDL decreased (P < 0.001) in abundance over 5 wk, whereas the relative protein content of VLDL increased by 39% (P < 0.001). Addition of oil to the basal diet instead of water lowered plasma NEFA and TG concentrations further (P = 0.002 and 0.020, respectively) and increased plasma TC concentrations by a greater magnitude (P = 0.072). However, only plasma TG concentrations and VLDL free cholesterol content were affected (P = 0.024 and 0.009, respectively

  12. Serum lipid, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein changes in gestational diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional and prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Koukkou, E; Watts, G F; Lowy, C

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To compare serum lipid, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein concentrations during and six to 12 months after pregnancy in control and diabetic women. METHODS: The serum lipid, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein concentrations were measured in 20 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 22 women with normal glucose tolerance (controls) during the third trimester of pregnancy and six to 12 months after delivery. RESULTS: During pregnancy the women with GDM had higher serum triglyceride (mean (95% confidence interval (CI)), 2.91 (2.22-3.51) v 2.1 (1.75-2.52)) but lower low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations compared with controls (mean (SD), 3.08 (1.2) v 4.01 (1.1). Total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein concentrations were not significantly different between the two groups. After pregnancy, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and apolipoprotein A1 and B decreased in a parallel manner, resulting in lower concentrations, comparable between the two groups. LDL cholesterol concentrations decreased after pregnancy in the controls (mean (SD), 4.01 (1.1) v 2.69 (0.6)) but not in those with GDM (3.08 (1.2) v 2.72 (0.7)). The change in lipid concentrations was not related to change in weight. CONCLUSION: Development of diabetes during pregnancy induces a state of dyslipidaemia characterised by elevated triglyceride concentrations, as seen in other insulin resistance states. However, GDM seems to blunt the increase in LDL cholesterol during pregnancy and this requires further investigation. Whether the changes in lipoprotein metabolism in GDM are significant for the health status of the mother and the foetus requires further study. PMID:8881912

  13. Lipid and lipoprotein changes in women following 6 months of exercise training in a worksite fitness program.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, P W; Oden, G L; Crouse, S F; Brown, J A; Green, J S

    1996-03-01

    It was the purpose of this investigation to examine the influence of a worksite aerobic training program on serum lipid and lipoproteins and cardiovascular fitness in female employees. Thirty-seven healthy but previously untrained, female employees (Ss) from Westinghouse Corporation, (College Station, Texas) volunteered for the study. Ss were randomly assigned to either an exercise group (Ex) (n = 20) or control group (C) (n = 17). Prior to training (PRE) and following training (POST), all Ss were measured for weight (WT), body composition (%FAT) and tested for maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max). PRE and POST Lipid analysis included: total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), and triglycerides (TG). Following PRE testing, the Ex group aerobically trained by walking, jogging and/or cycling, at least 3 days per wk for 24 wks. Exercise training resulted in an improvement in VO2 max (p < 0.0006) and a 2 kg WT loss in Ex (p < 0.025) with no change in C. Both Ex and C Ss exhibited a loss in %-FAT (p < 0.0001), and a decrease in TC (p < 0.0001) and LDL-C (p < 0.0001). No differences were observed between groups or over the training period for VLDL-C or TG. Although HDL-C increased 6 mg/dl in the Ex group but not in C, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p < 0.0625). These results demonstrate that aerobic training by females in a worksite fitness program significantly improves cardiovascular fitness without altering lipids or lipoproteins.

  14. EXPLAINING THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN INCARCERATION AND DIVORCE*

    PubMed Central

    Siennick, Sonja E.; Stewart, Eric A.; Staff, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that incarceration dramatically increases the odds of divorce, but we know little about the mechanisms that explain the association. This study uses prospective longitudinal data from a subset of married young adults in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 1,919) to examine whether incarceration is associated with divorce indirectly via low marital love, economic strain, relationship violence, and extramarital sex. The findings confirmed that incarcerations occurring during, but not before, a marriage were associated with an increased hazard of divorce. Incarcerations occurring during marriage also were associated with less marital love, more relationship violence, more economic strain, and greater odds of extramarital sex. Above-average levels of economic strain were visible among respondents observed preincarceration, but only respondents observed postincarceration showed less marital love, more relationship violence, and higher odds of extramarital sex than did respondents who were not incarcerated during marriage. These relationship problems explained approximately 40 percent of the association between incarceration and marital dissolution. These findings are consistent with theoretical predictions that a spouse’s incarceration alters the rewards and costs of the marriage and the relative attractiveness of alternative partners. PMID:25598544

  15. Serum lipoprotein composition, lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase and tissue lipase activities in pregnant diabetic rats and their offspring receiving enriched n-3 PUFA diet.

    PubMed

    Soulimane-Mokhtari, N A; Guermouche, B; Saker, M; Merzouk, S; Merzouk, H; Hichami, A; Madani, S; Khan, N A; Prost, J

    2008-03-01

    The effects of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on lipoprotein concentrations and on lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hepatic triglyceride lipase (HTGL) and lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activities were studied in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats during pregnancy and in their macrosomic offspring from birth to adulthood. Pregnant diabetic and control rats were fed Isio-4 diet (vegetable oil) or EPAX diet (concentrated marine omega-3 EPA/DHA oil), the same diets were consumed by pups at weaning. Compared with control rats, diabetic rats showed, during pregnancy, a significant elevation in very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low and high density lipoprotein (LDL-HDL(1))-triglyceride, cholesterol and apoprotein B100 concentrations and a reduction in apoprotein A-I levels. HTGL activity was high while LPL and LCAT activities were low in these rats. The macrosomic pups of Isio-4-fed diabetic rats showed a significant enhancement in triglyceride and cholesterol levels at birth and during adulthood with a concomitant increase in lipase and LCAT activities. EPAX diet induces a significant diminution of VLDL and LDL-HDL(1) in mothers and in their macrosomic pups, accompanied by an increase in cholesterol and apoprotein A-I levels in HDL(2-3) fraction. It also restores LPL, HTGL and LCAT activities to normal range. EPAX diet ameliorates considerably lipoprotein disorders in diabetic mothers and in their macrosomic offspring.

  16. Lipoprotein products of lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase and cholesteryl ester transfer.

    PubMed

    Rose, H G; Ellerbe, P

    1982-09-14

    High-density lipoprotein substrates and products of human plasma lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase have been labelled with radioisotopic cholesteryl esters in order to facilitate identification. [3H]Cholesteryl esters were formed by endogenous HDL3/VHDL enzyme (d greater than 1.125 g/ml) following incubation with mixed vesicles of phosphatidylcholine, unesterified cholesterol and 3H-labelled unesterified cholesterol. Transfer of labelled esters to acceptor lipoproteins (VLDL+LDL, d less than 1.063 g/ml) was employed to distinguish a hypothetical transfer complex. Separation of labelled HDL3/VHDL was by gel-permeation chromatography. The results indicate that a subpopulation of labelled HDL3/VHDL cholesteryl esters (43-61% of total) were removed by VLDL/LDL during a 3 h transfer period and these derive from the smaller lipoproteins of the spectrum. HDL carrying non-transferable [3H]cholesteryl esters localize to the larger HDL3. Transfer rates were proportional to ratios of acceptor to donor lipoproteins. Net transfer of cholesteryl esters from the smaller HDL3 also occurred, but was smaller in magnitude (about 10.5% of total). Acyltransferase assays indicated that enzyme distribution is skewed to larger-sized HDL3, suggesting that the non-transferable components might be lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase-containing parent complexes, while the smaller transfer products contain little acyltransferase. The results fit the hypothesis that a parent HDL3-lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase complex generates a smaller-sized lipoprotein product which is active in cholesteryl ester transport.

  17. [The microanalysis of serum lipoprotein lipids (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Leiss, O; Murawski, U; Egge, H

    1979-10-01

    A method is described which allows the determination of phospholipids, free and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids in lipoprotein fractions starting from 50 microliter of serum. Lipoproteins were separated by successive precipitation: VLDL with Heparin/Mg++, LDL with Dextran sulfate/Mg++ and finally HDL with Dextran sulfate/Mn++. Lipids extracted from the precipitated lipoproteins were determined gravimetrically and by densitometry after thin layer chromatography and charring (van Gent, C.M. (1968), Z. Anal. Chem. 236, 344--350; Egge, H. et al. (1970) Z. Klin. Chem. Klin. Biochem. 8, 488--491). The results obtained from the serum of 12 adult healthy persons were compared with those from lipoprotein fractions separated by preparative ultracentrifugation (Havel, R. J. et al. (1955) J. Clin. Invest. 34, 1345--1353). The distribution of lipids in beta-lipoproteins (d less than 1.063 g/ml) and HDL (1.063 less than d less than 1.21 g/ml) prepared by both methods showed good agreement. Some differences were observed between VLDL (d less than 1.006 g/ml) and VHDL (d greater than 1.21 g/ml) prepared either by precipitation or ultracentrifugation. Compared to the total lipid of the sera, recovery rates were 95--105%. Variation coefficients were in the range of 15--20% for VLDL lipids, 5--10% for LDL and HDL lipids and 10--15% for VHDL lipids. Gravimetrically determined total lipids had a variation coefficient of 4 and 6% for LDL and HDL respectively.

  18. The Role of Dietary Cholesterol in Lipoprotein Metabolism and Related Metabolic Abnormalities: A Mini-review.

    PubMed

    Kapourchali, Fatemeh Ramezani; Surendiran, Gangadaran; Goulet, Amy; Moghadasian, Mohammed H

    2016-10-25

    Cholesterol plays a vital role in cell biology. Dietary cholesterol or "exogenous" cholesterol accounts for approximately one-third of the pooled body cholesterol, and the remaining 70% is synthesized in the body (endogenous cholesterol). Increased dietary cholesterol intake may result in increased serum cholesterol in some individuals, while other subjects may not respond to dietary cholesterol. However, diet-increased serum cholesterol levels do not increase the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein (LDL/HDL) cholesterol ratio, nor do they decrease the size of LDL particles or HDL cholesterol levels. Elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, reduced HDL cholesterol levels, and small, dense LDL particles are independent risk factors for coronary artery disease. Dietary cholesterol is the primary approach for treatment of conditions such as the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Recent studies have highlighted mechanisms for absorption of dietary cholesterol. These studies have help understand how dietary and/or pharmaceutical agents inhibit cholesterol absorption and thereby reduce LDL cholesterol concentrations. In this article, various aspects of cholesterol metabolism, including dietary sources, absorption, and abnormalities in cholesterol metabolism, have been summarized and discussed.

  19. Influence of smoking on serum lipid and lipoprotein levels among family medicine patients.

    PubMed

    Batic-Mujanovic, Olivera; Beganlic, Azijada; Salihefendic, Nizama; Pranjic, Nurka; Kusljugic, Zumreta

    2008-01-01

    Smoking causes decrease of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and increase of total cholesterol, triglyceride and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Low HDL-C levels and high cholesterol and LDL-C levels are associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of smoking status on serum lipid and lipoproteins levels among patients in family medicine practice. This trial was designed to detect differences in serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL-C and HDL-C levels between smokers and non-smokers. We had placed a limit of 300 patients for data collection. We excluded 195 patients who met excluding criteria (diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, renal and hepatic failure, hypothyroidism; using beta blockers, thiazide diuretics, hormonal replacement therapy and corticosteroids; more than light physical activity; alcohol consumption and obesity), so the sample size included 105 randomly selected patients from Family Medicine Teaching Center Tuzla, mean age 52.05 +/- 11.61 years. Main outcomes were smoking status in all participants and serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL-C and HDL-C levels in smokers and non-smokers. Our results showed that smoking prevalence was 49.52%. Smokers had significantly higher serum total cholesterol (P=0.01), triglyceride (P=0.002) and LDL-C level (P=0.03) and significantly lower HDL-C level (P=0.003) comparing with nonsmokers. There was no significant difference in serum lipid and lipoprotein levels between ex-smokers and never smokers. These results suggest that cigarette smoking adversely affects serum lipid and lipoprotein levels which further increases the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  20. Lipid and lipoprotein profile in menopausal transition. Effects of hormones, age and fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Berg, G; Mesch, V; Boero, L; Sayegh, F; Prada, M; Royer, M; Muzzio, M L; Schreier, L; Siseles, N; Benencia, H

    2004-04-01

    The behavior of lipoproteins during the menopausal transition and their relationship with sex hormones and body fat distribution is still unclear. Our aim was to evaluate atherogenic IDL, LDL, Lp(a) and antiatherogenic HDL lipoproteins in four groups of women: premenopausal (n = 20), menopausal transition women with menstrual bleeding (n = 31), menopausal transition women with 3 to 6 months amenorrhea (n = 36), and postmenopausal women (n = 30). We also measured their FSH, LH and estradiol levels along with BMI and waist circumference. Menopausal transition and postmenopausal women showed higher values of waist circumference (p < 0.0032), LDL-cholesterol (p < 0.002), IDL-cholesterol (p < 0.002) and apoprotein B (p < 0.0001) than premenopausal women. Total-cholesterol (p < 0.0001), triglycerides (p < 0.004), IDL-cholesterol and Lp(a) were higher in menopausal transition women with amenorrhea and in postmenopausal women in comparison with premenopausal women. After adjustment according to age and waist circumference, multiple regression analysis showed the increase in total-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol to be linearly associated to menopausal status and estradiol concentration, whereas Lp(a) was only related to menopausal status. Age was found to be an independent variable in relation to apoprotein B concentration changes. The effect of menopausal status on TG levels did not remain in the model when age, waist and BMI were included (beta = 0.05, p = 0.356). HDL-cholesterol levels were the same in all the groups. Menopause, age and the increase in abdominal fat distribution were three independent and significant factors impairing lipoprotein profiles from the beginning of the menopausal transition.

  1. Retinal pigment epithelial acid lipase activity and lipoprotein receptors: effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, Victor M

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show that fish oil-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, delivered to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by circulating low-density lipoproteins (LDL), enhance already considerable RPE lysosomal acid lipase activity, providing for more efficient hydrolysis of intralysosomal RPE lipids, an effect that may help prevent development of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). METHODS: Colorimetric biochemical and histochemical techniques were used to demonstrate RPE acid lipase in situ, in vitro, and after challenge with phagocytic stimuli. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of fluorescently labeled native, aceto-acetylated, and oxidized LDL was studied in vitro and in vivo. LDL effects on RPE lysosomal enzymes were assessed. Lysosomal enzyme activity was compared in RPE cells from monkeys fed diets rich in fish oil to those from control animals and in cultured RPE cells exposed to sera from these monkeys. RESULTS: RPE acid lipase activity was substantial and comparable to that of mononuclear phagocytes. Acid lipase activity increased significantly following phagocytic challenge with photoreceptor outer segment (POS) membranes. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of labeled lipoproteins was determined in vitro. Distinctive uptake of labeled lipoproteins occurred in RPE cells and mononuclear phagocytes in vivo. Native LDL enhanced RPE lysosomal enzyme activity. RPE lysosomal enzymes increased significantly in RPE cells from monkeys fed fish oil-rich diets and in cultured RPE cells exposed to their sera. CONCLUSIONS: RPE cells contain substantial acid lipase for efficient metabolism of lipids imbibed by POS phagocytosis and LDL uptake. Diets rich in fish oil-derived omega-3 fatty acids, by enhancing acid lipase, may reduce RPE lipofuscin accumulation, RPE oxidative damage, and the development of ARMD. PMID:12545699

  2. Lipoprotein Particles in Adolescents and Young Women With PCOS Provide Insights Into Their Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lodish, M.; Shamburek, R.; Keil, M.; Wesley, R.; Walter, M.; Sampson, M.; Bernstein, S.; Khurana, D.; Lyssikatos, C.; Ten, S.; Dobs, A.; Remaley, A. T.; Stratakis, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Adult women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, but the evidence for this is controversial in adolescents and young women with PCOS. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle number, measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a novel technology to assess cardiovascular risk. Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate lipoprotein particle number and size in young women with PCOS and its relationship with insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism. Design: This was a cross-sectional case control study. Setting: The study was conducted at a clinical research center. Participants: Women with PCOS (n = 35) and normal controls (n = 20) participated in the study. Interventions: Blood samples and anthropometric measures were obtained. Main Outcome Measures: LDL particle size and number were measured using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A secondary outcome was to investigate the correlation of LDL particle number with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, waist to hip ratio, hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance, and adiponectin. Results: Women with PCOS had higher LDL particle number when compared with healthy controls (935 ± 412 vs 735 ± 264, P = .032); LDL particle number correlated strongly with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (r = 0.37, P = .006) and waist-to-hip (r = 0.57, P = .0003). The higher LDL particle number was driven mainly due to differences in the small LDL particle number (sLDLp), with PCOS patients having more sLDLp (348 ± 305 vs 178 ± 195, P = .015). The sLDLp correlated with the Matsuda index (r = −0.51, P = .0001), homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (r = 0.41, P = .002), and adiponectin (r = −0.46, P = .0004) but not with T. Conclusion: Adolescent and young women with PCOS have an atherogenic lipoprotein profile suggestive of increased cardiovascular risk that appears to be driven by the degree of visceral adiposity

  3. Giardia lamblia low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein is involved in selective lipoprotein endocytosis and parasite replication.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Maria R; Miras, Silvana L; Quiroga, Rodrigo; Rópolo, Andrea S; Touz, Maria C

    2011-03-01

    As Giardia lamblia is unable to synthesize cholesterol de novo, this steroid might be obtained from the host's intestinal milieu by endocytosis of lipoproteins. In this work, we identified a putative Giardia lamblia low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (GlLRP), a type I membrane protein, which shares the substrate N-terminal binding domain and a FXNPXY-type endocytic motif with human LRPs. Expression of tagged GlLRP showed that it was localized predominantly in the endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomal-like peripheral vacuoles and plasma membrane. However, the FXNPXY-deleted GlLRP was retained at the plasma membrane suggesting that it is abnormally transported and processed. The low-density lipoprotein and chylomicrons interacted with GlLRP, with this interaction being necessary for lipoprotein internalization and cell proliferation. Finally, we show that GlLRP binds directly to the medium subunit of Giardia adaptor protein 2, indicating that receptor-mediated internalization occurs through an adaptin mechanism.

  4. Behavior of the thermal diffusivity of native and oxidized human low-density lipoprotein solutions studied by the Z-scan technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Priscila R.; Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C.; Monteiro, Andrea M.; Miyamoto, Sayuri; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio M.

    2012-10-01

    Modifications in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) have emerged as a major pathogenic factor of atherosclerosis, which is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Measurements of the heat diffusivity of human LDL solutions in their native and in vitro oxidized states are presented by using the Z-Scan (ZS) technique. Other complementary techniques were used to obtain the physical parameters necessary to interpret the optical results, e.g., pycnometry, refractometry, calorimetry, and spectrophotometry, and to understand the oxidation phase of LDL particles. To determine the sample's thermal diffusivity using the thermal lens model, an iterative one-parameter fitting method is proposed which takes into account several characteristic ZS time-dependent and the position-dependent transmittance measurements. Results show that the thermal diffusivity increases as a function of the LDL oxidation degree, which can be explained by the increase of the hydroperoxides production due to the oxidation process. The oxidation products go from one LDL to another, disseminating the oxidation process and caring the heat across the sample. This phenomenon leads to a quick thermal homogenization of the sample, avoiding the formation of the thermal lens in highly oxidized LDL solutions.

  5. What Explains Consciousness? Or…What Consciousness Explains?

    PubMed Central

    Dulany, Donelson E.

    2014-01-01

    In this invited commentary I focus on the topic addressed in three papers: De Sousa's (2013[1617]) Toward an Integrative Theory of Consciousness, a monograph with Parts 1 & 2, as well as commentaries by Pereira (2013a[59]) and Hirstein (2013[42]). All three are impressively scholarly and can stand—and shout—on their own. But theory of consciousness? My aim is to slice that topic into the two fundamentally different kinds of theories of consciousness, say what appears to be an ideology, out of behaviourism into cognitivism, now also influencing the quest for an “explanation of consciousness” in cognitive neuroscience. I will then say what can be expected given what we know of the complexity of brain structure, the richness of a conscious “vocabulary”, and current technological limits of brain imaging. This will then turn to the strategy for examining “what consciousness explains”—metatheory, theories, mappings, and a methodology of competitive support, a methodology especially important where there are competing commitments. There are also increasingly common identifications of methodological bias in, along with failures to replicate, studies reporting unconscious controls in decision, social priming—as there have been in perception, learning, problem solving, etc. The literature critique has provided evidence taken as reducing, and in some cases eliminating, a role for conscious controls—a position consistent with that ideology out of behaviourism into cognitivism. It is an ideological position that fails to recognize the fundamental distinction between theoretical and metaphysical assertions. PMID:24891796

  6. Assembly and secretion of hepatic very-low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, G F

    1990-01-01

    In contrast to water-soluble fuels such as glucose or ketone bodies, the use of lipids as an energy source for tissues has required the development of complex structures for their transport through the aqueous plasma. In the case of endogenously synthesized triacylglycerol this is achieved by the assembly and secretion of hepatic VLDL which provides the necessary stability in an aqueous medium. An essential component of this assembly process is apo B. Dietary changes which require an increase in hepatic VLDL secretion appear to be accompanied by increases in the availability of functional apo B. Interesting questions relate to: (a) the intracellular site(s) of triacylglycerol association with apo B, and (b) the mechanism(s) by which the availability of functional apo B at this site responds to metabolic and hormonal signals which reflect dietary status and, thus, the need to secrete triacylglycerol. As regards the latter, although in some cases changes in apo B synthesis occur in response to VLDL secretion hepatic apo B mRNA levels appear to be quite stable in vitro. Intracellular switching of apo B between the secretory and degradative pathways may be important in controlling VLDL assembly and post-translational modifications of the apoprotein may also play a role by influencing its ability to bind to triacylglycerol. Transport is not the only problem associated with the utilization of a concentrated energy source such as triacylglycerol and the complex problems of waste product disposal and recycling have to be dealt with. In the case of triacylglycerol, potentially toxic waste products include atherogenic remnants and LDL. The overall problem, then, in the long-term, involves the development of a 'safe' means of utilizing triacylglycerol and this requirement accounts for much of the complexity of plasma lipoprotein metabolism. In this area, the rat could teach the human a few tricks. One of these appears to be the utilization of hepatic apo B48 rather than apo B

  7. Insights on the structure and stability of Licanantase: a trimeric acid-stable coiled-coil lipoprotein from Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Fernando; Gutierrez-Maldonado, Sebastian E; Parada, Pilar; Martinez, Patricio; Maass, Alejandro; Perez-Acle, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Licanantase (Lic) is the major component of the secretome of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans when grown in elemental sulphur. When used as an additive, Lic improves copper recovery from bioleaching processes. However, this recovery enhancement is not fully understood. In this context, our aim is to predict the 3D structure of Lic, to shed light on its structure-function relationships. Bioinformatics analyses on the amino acid sequence of Lic showed a great similarity with Lpp, an Escherichia coli Lipoprotein that can form stable trimers in solution. Lic and Lpp share the secretion motif, intracellular processing and alpha helix structure, as well as the distribution of hydrophobic residues in heptads forming a hydrophobic core, typical of coiled-coil structures. Cross-linking experiments showed the presence of Lic trimers, supporting our predictions. Taking the in vitro and in silico evidence as a whole, we propose that the most probable structure for Lic is a trimeric coiled-coil. According to this prediction, a suitable model for Lic was produced using the de novo algorithm "Rosetta Fold-and-Dock". To assess the structural stability of our model, Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Replica Exchange MD simulations were performed using the structure of Lpp and a 14-alanine Lpp mutant as controls, at both acidic and neutral pH. Our results suggest that Lic was the most stable structure among the studied proteins in both pH conditions. This increased stability can be explained by a higher number of both intermonomer hydrophobic contacts and hydrogen bonds, key elements for the stability of Lic's secondary and tertiary structure.

  8. Identification of a small molecule that stabilizes lipoprotein lipase in vitro and lowers triglycerides in vivo.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mikael; Caraballo, Rémi; Ericsson, Madelene; Lookene, Aivar; Enquist, Per-Anders; Elofsson, Mikael; Nilsson, Stefan K; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2014-07-25

    Patients at increased cardiovascular risk commonly display high levels of plasma triglycerides (TGs), elevated LDL cholesterol, small dense LDL particles and low levels of HDL-cholesterol. Many remain at high risk even after successful statin therapy, presumably because TG levels remain high. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) maintains TG homeostasis in blood by hydrolysis of TG-rich lipoproteins. Efficient clearance of TGs is accompanied by increased levels of HDL-cholesterol and decreased levels of small dense LDL. Given the central role of LPL in lipid metabolism we sought to find small molecules that could increase LPL activity and serve as starting points for drug development efforts against cardiovascular disease. Using a small molecule screening approach we have identified small molecules that can protect LPL from inactivation by the controller protein angiopoietin-like protein 4 during incubations in vitro. One of the selected compounds, 50F10, was directly shown to preserve the active homodimer structure of LPL, as demonstrated by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. On injection to hypertriglyceridemic apolipoprotein A-V deficient mice the compound ameliorated the postprandial response after an olive oil gavage. This is a potential lead compound for the development of drugs that could reduce the residual risk associated with elevated plasma TGs in dyslipidemia.

  9. Lipoproteins in pregnant women before and during delivery: influence on neonatal haemorheology.

    PubMed Central

    Uberos-Fernández, J; Muñoz-Hoyos, A; Molina-Carballo, A; Puertas-Prieto, A; Valenzuela-Ruiz, A; Ruiz-Cosano, C; Molina-Font, J A

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate whether the lipid profile of pregnant women during parturition differs from the profile at previous stages of pregnancy and to determine the effects of maternal lipid changes on fetal or neonatal haemorheology. METHODS: Sixty pregnant women were studied, divided into two groups. Group 1 contained 30 women of mean age of 27 (SD 3) years and gestational age > 38 weeks in whom delivery had not yet begun; all these pregnancies followed an uncomplicated course and there was no evidence of any fetal pathology from previous obstetric examinations. All the women reached term and birth weight was 3340 (350) g. Group 2 contained women of mean age 26 (4) years, in whom delivery was ongoing, all of whose pregnancies reached term. The following variables were determined in all cases: total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoproteins (HDL), low density lipoproteins (LDL), free fatty acids and phospholipids, and apoprotein A (apo-A) and apoprotein B (apo-B). Serum and plasma viscosity was measured with a capillary viscosimeter. RESULTS: The apo-B/apo-A and HDL/apo-A ratios increased during delivery, indicating that in pregnant women these atherogenic indices are raised during delivery compared with previous gestational stages. Significant correlation coefficients were obtained between maternal lipids (triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL, total cholesterol/HDL, and LDL/HDL) and plasma viscosity in the neonate. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma atherogenic indices increase progressively until birth. These changes have implications for neonatal haemorheology because they cause an increase in plasma viscosity. PMID:8655676

  10. Serum Lipoprotein (a) Levels in Black South African Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)) which is a low-density lipoprotein-like particle containing apo(a) is considered as an emergent cardiovascular risk factor. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with a two- to threefold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of Lp(a) in Black South African T2DM patients and its association with other metabolic factors. 67 T2DM patients and 48 healthy control participants were recruited for the cross-sectional study. The Lp(a) level was determined by ELISA and the result was analyzed using SPSS. The Lp(a) level in diabetics was found to be significantly increased (P = 0.001) when compared to the normal healthy group. In the diabetic group, the Lp(a) levels correlated significantly with the duration of diabetes (P = 0.008) and oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) levels (P = 0.03) and decreased total antioxidant capacity (P = 0.001). The third tertile of Lp(a) was significantly correlated with increased ox-LDL, C-reactive protein, and triglycerides and decreased total antioxidant capacity. PMID:27833702

  11. Effects of estrogen on very low-density lipoprotein triglyceride metabolism in fed and fasted chicks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    A single injection of estrogen into growing chicks resulted in a marked elevation in plasma triglyceride (TG) followed by phospholipid (PL) and cholesterol (CH) in both fed and fasted chicks. Estrogen caused a development of massive fatty liver in fed chicks. Hepatic malic enzyme and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities also increased significantly in fed chicks and, to a small extent, in fasted chicks. Very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) were barely detectable in the fasted control plasma. However, the VLDL concentration increased markedly upon estrogen injection, becoming the most prevalent lipoprotein in the plasma. The administration of estrogen resulted in an increase in oleic acid and a decrease in linoleic acid content except in the cholesteryl ester of VLDL and LDL. VLDL of estrogenized birds had {beta}-mobility on agarose gel electrophoresis, and they eluted in two peaks on agarose gel filtration chromatography. Both peaks on gel filtration exhibited the same {beta}-mobility on agarose gel electrophoresis. Nevertheless, the apoprotein composition of these two peaks were substantially different from each other; apo B was not present in the first peak VLDL. VLDL-TG kinetic studies conducted in vivo, using {sup 14}C-TG-VLDL prepared endogenously from control and estrogenized chicks revealed that VLDL-TG produced from the former had a higher fractional catabolic rate (FCR) than VLDL-TG from the latter.

  12. Decreased susceptibility to copper-induced oxidation of rat-lipoproteins after fibrate treatment: influence of fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M; Merlos, M; Adzet, T; Laguna, J C

    1996-03-01

    1. The effect of clofibrate (CFB), bezafibrate (BFB), and gemfibrozil (GFB) on plasma lipoprotein (VLDL and LDL) concentration, composition and resistance to copper-induced oxidation has been studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats after a 15 day treatment. 2. Plasma triglyceride levels were reduced by CFB (41%) and BFB (39%). This effect was related to a significant reduction (67% for CFB and 56% for BFB) in the amount of circulating VLDL-protein. 3. Plasma total cholesterol was reduced by 28% and 45% in CFB- and BFB-treated animals, respectively, mainly by modification of the cholesteryl ester fraction. In contrast, GFB significantly increased total cholesterol (27%). No modification in the LDL protein or lipid content was introduced by fibrates, although GFB decreased the proportion of LDL-triglycerides, at the expense of an increase in total cholesterol. 4. The fatty acid species carried by VLDL and LDL were affected after fibrate treatment. In general, both particles showed an increase in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) (18:1) and a decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) species (18:2 n-6, 20:4 n-6, 18:3 n-3, 20:5 n-3). As a consequence, the ratio of PUFA/(SFA+MUFA) for the whole lipoproteins was markedly reduced. 5. The degree of copper-induced VLDL- and LDL-oxidation was assessed by means of the analysis of lysine content, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) production and conjugated dienes formation. Lipoproteins obtained from fibrate-treated rats were more resistant to the oxidative challenge. For each lipoprotein, BFB was the most effective drug, followed by CFB and GFB. 6. The observed antioxidant effect can be ascribed to two independent phenomena produced by fibrates: the reduction of the amount of substrate for the oxidation process due to their hypolipidemic activity, and the alteration in the type of fatty acids transported by the lipoproteins towards an enrichment in species resistant to the oxidation process. 7. As similar

  13. Decreased susceptibility to copper-induced oxidation of rat-lipoproteins after fibrate treatment: influence of fatty acid composition.

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, M.; Merlos, M.; Adzet, T.; Laguna, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effect of clofibrate (CFB), bezafibrate (BFB), and gemfibrozil (GFB) on plasma lipoprotein (VLDL and LDL) concentration, composition and resistance to copper-induced oxidation has been studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats after a 15 day treatment. 2. Plasma triglyceride levels were reduced by CFB (41%) and BFB (39%). This effect was related to a significant reduction (67% for CFB and 56% for BFB) in the amount of circulating VLDL-protein. 3. Plasma total cholesterol was reduced by 28% and 45% in CFB- and BFB-treated animals, respectively, mainly by modification of the cholesteryl ester fraction. In contrast, GFB significantly increased total cholesterol (27%). No modification in the LDL protein or lipid content was introduced by fibrates, although GFB decreased the proportion of LDL-triglycerides, at the expense of an increase in total cholesterol. 4. The fatty acid species carried by VLDL and LDL were affected after fibrate treatment. In general, both particles showed an increase in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) (18:1) and a decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) species (18:2 n-6, 20:4 n-6, 18:3 n-3, 20:5 n-3). As a consequence, the ratio of PUFA/(SFA+MUFA) for the whole lipoproteins was markedly reduced. 5. The degree of copper-induced VLDL- and LDL-oxidation was assessed by means of the analysis of lysine content, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) production and conjugated dienes formation. Lipoproteins obtained from fibrate-treated rats were more resistant to the oxidative challenge. For each lipoprotein, BFB was the most effective drug, followed by CFB and GFB. 6. The observed antioxidant effect can be ascribed to two independent phenomena produced by fibrates: the reduction of the amount of substrate for the oxidation process due to their hypolipidemic activity, and the alteration in the type of fatty acids transported by the lipoproteins towards an enrichment in species resistant to the oxidation process. 7. As similar

  14. Modifications in high-density lipoprotein lipid composition and structure alter the plasma distribution of free and liposomal annamycin.

    PubMed

    Wasan, K M; Ng, S; Cassidy, S M

    1997-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that changes in lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentration alters the plasma distribution of free (Ann.) and liposomal annamycin (LAnn) and that the majority of Ann. is associated with high-density lipoproteins (HDL) following the incubation in plasma of LAnn. To demonstrate that alterations in HDL lipid composition and HDL structure may influence the plasma distribution of Ann. and LAnn, Ann. and LAnn (20 micrograms/mL) were incubated in plasma pretreated with dithionitrobenzoate (DTNB, a compound which inhibits the conversion of free cholesterol to esterified cholesterol) 18 h prior to the experiment or in untreated plasma for 60 min at 37 degrees C. In addition, Ann. and LAnn were co-incubated with DTNB in plasma for 60 min at 37 degrees C. Following incubation the plasma was separated into its HDL, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and lipoprotein-deficient plasma (LPDP) fractions by ultracentrifugation and assayed for Ann. by fluorimetry. The HDL plasma cholesterol:triglyceride concentration ratio was significantly decreased following 18 h of DTNB pretreatment compared to untreated plasma controls. No significant differences in LDL/VLDL plasma cholesterol:triglyceride concentration ratio following 18 h of DTNB pretreatment was observed. An increased number of discoidal HDL particles were observed following 18 h of DTNB pretreatment. When Ann. was incubated in plasma pretreated with DTNB for 18 h the percentage of Ann. recovered in the HDL, LDL, and VLDL fractions significantly increased. However, the percentage of Ann. recovered within the LPDP fraction was significantly decreased. When LAnn was incubated in plasma pretreated with DTNB for 18 h the percentage of Ann. recovered in the HDL fraction significantly decreased. The percentage of Ann. recovered in the LPDP fraction significantly increased when LAnn was incubated in plasma pretreated with DTNB for 18 h. No significant differences

  15. TAT-pathway-dependent lipoproteins as a niche-based adaptation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Shruthi, Hamsanathan; Babu, Mohan Madan; Sankaran, Krishnan

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins, characterized by the N-terminal N-acyl S-diacylglyceryl Cysteine, are key membrane proteins in bacterial homeostasis. It is generally thought that during the modification lipoprotein precursors are translocated via the Sec-machinery in an unfolded state. The recent discovery of twin-arginine translocation (TAT) machinery, meant for exporting folded-proteins, and the presence of TAT-type signal sequences in co-factor-containing (hence already folded) lipoproteins, prompted us to investigate its role and significance in lipoprotein biosynthesis. We systematically analyzed 696 prokaryotic genomes using an algorithm based on DOLOP and TatP rules to predict TAT-pathway-dependent lipoprotein substrates. Occurrence of the deduced TAT-pathway-dependent lipoprotein substrates in relation to genome size, presence or absence of TAT machinery, and extent of its usage for lipoprotein export and habitat types revealed that unlike the host-obligates, the free-living prokaryotes in complex hostile environments (e.g., soil) depend more on TAT-exported lipoproteins. Functional classification of the predicted TAT-dependent lipoproteins revealed enrichment in hydrolases and oxido-reductases, which are fast-folding and co-factor-containing proteins. The role of the TAT pathway in the export of folded-lipoproteins and in niche-specific adaptation for survival has important implications not only in lipoprotein biosynthesis, but also for protein and metabolic engineering applications.

  16. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane.

  17. Distinct Hepatic Receptors for Low Density Lipoprotein and Apolipoprotein E in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, Jeffrey M.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Gregg, Richard E.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Brewer, H. Bryan

    1985-02-01

    Since the liver is a central organ for lipid and lipoprotein synthesis and catabolism, hepatic receptors for specific apolipoproteins on plasma lipoproteins would be expected to modulate lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The role of hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E-containing lipoproteins was evaluated in patients with complementary disorders in lipoprotein metabolism: abetalipoproteinemia and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. In addition, hepatic membranes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia were studied and compared before and after portacaval shunt surgery. The results establish that the human liver has receptors for apolipoproteins B and E. Furthermore, in the human, hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E are genetically distinct and can undergo independent control.

  18. Concordant lipoprotein and weight responses to dietary fat changein identical twins with divergent exercise levels

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul T.; Blanche, Patricia J.; Rawlings, Robin; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2004-06-01

    Background/Objective: The purpose of this study is to testthe extent that individual lipoprotein responses to diet can beattributed to genes in the presence of divergent exercise levels.Design:Twenty-eight pairs of male monozygotic twins (one mostly sedentary, theother running an average of 50 km/week more than the sedentary twin) wentfrom a 6-week 40 percent fat diet to a 6-week 20 percent fat diet in acrossover design. The diets reduced fat primarily by reducing saturatedand polyunsaturated fat (both from 14 percent to 4 percent), whileincreasing carbohydrate intake from 45 percent to 65 percent. Results:Despite the twins' differences in physical activity, the dietarymanipulation produced significantly correlated changes (P<0.05) in thetwin's total cholesterol (r=0.56), low-density lipoprotein(LDL)-cholesterol (r=0.70), large, buoyant LDL (Sf7-12, r=0.52), apo A-I(r=0.49), Lp(a) (r=0.49), electrophoresis measurements of LDL-I (LDLsbetween 26 and 28.5 nm diameter, r=0.48), LDL-IIB (25.2-24.6 nm, r=0.54),LDL-IV (22-24.1 nm, r=0.50), and body weights (r=0.41). Replacing fatswith carbohydrates significantly decreased the size and ultracentrifugeflotation rate of the major LDL, the LDL mass concentrations of Sf7-12,LDL-I, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and apo A-I, andsignificantly increased LDL-IIIA (24.7-25.5 nm diameter) and Lp(a).Conclusions: Even in the presence of extreme exercise difference, genessignificantly affect changes in LDL, apo A-I, Lp(a) and body weight whendietary fats are replaced with carbohydrates.

  19. Oxidation of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and antioxidant status in young and elderly humans.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukiko K; Read, Marsha H; Elias, Jeffrey W; Omaye, Stanley T

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of atherosclerosis increases with age, as do various indices of free-radical mediated damage, e.g., lipid peroxidation. Because lipid peroxidation plays a prominent role in lipoprotein oxidation, likely a prelude to atherosclerosis, we compared the susceptibility of lipoproteins to oxidation in young (19-30 years) and elderly (59-86 years) groups. Although we found no significant differences in serum malondialdehyde (MDA) or oxidized LDL antibodies (OLAB) between young and elderly lipoproteins, MDA was directly related to OLAB regardless of age (r = 0.322, p = 0.005) and there was a trend for lower OLAB levels (30.5%, p = 0.079) in the elderly compared to the young population. Overall, serum antioxidant status was either similar or greater in the elderly group compared to the young group, likely reflecting antioxidant supplementation by the elderly group. OLAB was inversely related to Vitamin C (r = -0.310, p = 0.008) and Vitamin E intake (r = -0.277, p = 0.018) from foods and supplements. Serum levels of Vitamin C and Vitamin E were significantly higher (18.5%, p = 0.021 and 58.1 %, p < 0.001, respectively) in the elderly group compared to the young group and the ratio of Vitamin E to Vitamin C was significantly higher (30.4%, p = 0.042) in the serum of the elderly group. Oxidation of serum LDL and antioxidant status were not affected by age; however, the ratio of serum Vitamin E to Vitamin C was higher in the elderly group which may affect Vitamin E recycling.

  20. Apolipoprotein B RNA editing enzyme-deficient mice are viable despite alterations in lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, J R; Pászty, C; Stevens, M E; Hughes, S D; Forte, T; Scott, J; Rubin, E M

    1996-01-01

    RNA editing in the nucleus of higher eukaryotes results in subtle changes to the RNA sequence, with the ability to effect dramatic changes in biological function. The first example to be described and among the best characterized, is the cytidine-to-uridine editing of apolipoprotein B (apo-B) RNA. The editing of apo-B RNA is mediated by a novel cytidine deaminase, apobec-1, which has acquired the ability to bind RNA. The stop translation codon generated by the editing of apo-B RNA truncates the full-length apo-B100 to form apo-B48. The recent observations of tumor formation in Apobec-1 transgenic animals, together with the fact that Apobec-1 is expressed in numerous tissues lacking apo-B, raises the issue of whether this enzyme is essential for a variety of posttranscriptional editing events. To directly test this, mice were created with a null mutation in Apobec-1 using homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Mice, homozygous for this mutation, were viable and made apo-B100 but not apo-B48. The null animals were fertile, and a variety of histological, behavioral, and morphological analyses revealed no phenotype other than abnormalities in lipoprotein metabolism, which included an increased low density lipoprotein fraction and a reduction in high density lipoprotein cholesterol. These studies demonstrate that neither apobec-1 nor apo-B48 is essential for viability and suggest that the major role of apobec-1 may be confined to the modulation of lipid transport. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8692961

  1. Role of high density lipoproteins in the biodistribution of two radioiodinated probes in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Pohland, R.C.; Counsell, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Two radioiodinated probes, /sup 125/I-cholesteryl oleate (/sup 125/I-CO), a derivative of a natural constituent of lipoproteins, and 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-1-(4(/sup 125/I)iodophenyl)-2,2-dichlorethane (/sup 125/I-DDD), an analog of the adrenolytic drug o,p'-DDD (mitotane), were selected to study the role of lipoproteins in drug disposition and to examine the ability of these vehicles to direct foreign molecules to specific tissues. In vivo and in vitro techniques were utilized to associate these probes with rat high density lipoproteins (HDL). Tissue distribution studies indicated that prior incorporation of /sup 125/I-CO into rat HDL increased the uptake of /sup 125/I-CO by rat adrenal, which was dramatically enhanced when this preparation was administered to animals made hypolipidemic with 4-aminopyrazolo(3,4-d)-pyrimidine (4-APP). Acetylation of HDL labeled with /sup 125/I-CO provided evidence that the observed uptake into the adrenal was via a receptor-mediated process. In contrast with these results, prior association of /sup 125/I-DDD with rat HDL failed to alter the ability of this compound to accumulate in adrenal tissue of normal or hypolipidemic animals. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was utilized to examine the stability of the association of /sup 125/I-CO and /sup 125/I-DDD with rat HDL. These results suggested that /sup 125/I-CO was associated with the lipophilic core of HDL, whereas /sup 125/I-DDD appeared to be partially associated with the surface components of HDL. Saturation of surface components with stable o,p'-DDD offered data to suggest that this binding to apoproteins may disrupt the normal receptor-mediated uptake process.

  2. Influence of dietary lipids on hepatic mRNA levels of proteins regulating plasma lipoproteins in baboons with high and low levels of large high density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, R S; McMahan, C A; Mott, G E; Carey, K D; Reardon, C A; Getz, G S; McGill, H C

    1991-12-01

    Selective breeding of baboons has produced families with increased plasma levels of large high density lipoproteins (HDL1) and very low (VLDL) and low (LDL) density lipoproteins when the animals consume a diet enriched in cholesterol and saturated fat. High HDL1 baboons have a slower cholesteryl ester transfer, which may account for the accumulation of HDL1, but not of VLDL and LDL. To investigate the mechanism of accumulation of VLDL + LDL in plasma of the high HDL1 phenotype, we selected eight half-sib pairs of baboons, one member of each pair with high HDL1, the other member with little or no HDL1 on the same high cholesterol, saturated fat diet. Baboons were fed a chow diet and four experimental diets consisting of high and low cholesterol with corn oil, and high and low cholesterol with lard, each for 6 weeks, in a crossover design. Plasma lipids and lipoproteins and hepatic mRNA levels were measured on each diet. HDL1 phenotype, type of dietary fat, and dietary cholesterol affected plasma cholesterol and apolipoprotein (apo) B concentrations, whereas dietary fat alone affected plasma triglyceride and apoA-I concentrations. HDL1 phenotype and dietary cholesterol alone did not influence hepatic mRNA levels, whereas dietary lard, compared to corn oil, significantly increased hepatic apoE mRNA levels and decreased hepatic LDL receptor and HMG-CoA synthase mRNA levels. Hepatic apoA-I message was associated with cholesterol concentration in HDL fractions as well as with apoA-I concentrations in the plasma or HDL. However, hepatic apoB message level was not associated with plasma or LDL apoB levels. Total plasma cholesterol, including HDL, was negatively associated with hepatic LDL receptor and HMG-CoA synthase mRNA levels. However, compared with low HDL1 baboons, high HDL1 baboons had higher concentrations of LDL and HDL cholesterol at the same hepatic mRNA levels. These studies suggest that neither overproduction of apoB from the liver nor decreased hepatic LDL

  3. Inherited susceptibility determines the distribution of dense low-density lipoprotein subfraction profiles in familial combined hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed Central

    Bredie, S. J.; Kiemeney, L. A.; de Haan, A. F.; Demacker, P. N.; Stalenhoef, A. F.

    1996-01-01

    Familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH) is a heritable lipid disorder, in which dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfraction profiles due to a predominance of small dense LDL particles are frequently observed. These small dense LDL particles are associated with cardiovascular disease. Using segregation analysis, we investigated to what extent these LDL subfraction profiles are genetically determined; also, the mode of inheritance was studied. Individual LDL subfraction profiles were determined by density gradient ultracentrifugation in 623 individuals of 40 well-defined Dutch FCH families. The individual LDL subfraction profile was defined as a quantitative trait by the continuous variable K, a reliable estimate of the relative contribution of each LDL subfraction to the overall profile. Variation in parameter K due to age, sex, and hormonal status was taken into account by introducing liability classes. Segregation analysis was performed by fitting a series of class D regressive models, implemented in the Statistical Analysis for Genetic Epidemiology (SAGE) program, after which genetic models were compared using log-likelihood ratio tests. Our data show that 60% of the variability of parameter K could be explained by lipid and lipoprotein levels and that a major autosomal locus, recessively inherited, with a population frequency of .42 +/- .07, and an additional polygenic component of .25 best explained the clustering of atherogenic dense LDL subfraction profiles in these FCH families. Therefore, dense LDL subfraction profiles, associated with elevated lipid levels, appear to have a genetic basis in FCH. PMID:8644746

  4. Cholesterol, lipoproteins and subclinical interstitial lung disease: the MESA study.

    PubMed

    Podolanczuk, Anna J; Raghu, Ganesh; Tsai, Michael Y; Kawut, Steven M; Peterson, Eric; Sonti, Rajiv; Rabinowitz, Daniel; Johnson, Craig; Barr, R Graham; Hinckley Stukovsky, Karen; Hoffman, Eric A; Carr, J Jeffrey; Ahmed, Firas S; Jacobs, David R; Watson, Karol; Shea, Steven J; Lederer, David J

    2017-01-27

    We investigated associations of plasma lipoproteins with subclinical interstitial lung disease (ILD) by measuring high attenuation areas (HAA: lung voxels between -600 and -250 Hounsfield units) in 6700 adults and serum MMP-7 and SP-A in 1216 adults age 45-84 without clinical cardiovascular disease in Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. In cross-sectional analyses, each SD decrement in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was associated with a 2.12% HAA increment (95% CI 1.44% to 2.79%), a 3.53% MMP-7 increment (95% CI 0.93% to 6.07%) and a 6.37% SP-A increment (95% CI 1.35% to 11.13%), independent of demographics, smoking and inflammatory biomarkers. These findings support a novel hypothesis that HDL-C might influence subclinical lung injury and extracellular matrix remodelling.

  5. Transgenic rabbit that expresses a functional human lipoprotein (a)

    DOEpatents

    Rouy, Didier; Duverger, Nicolas; Emmanuel, Florence; Denefle, Patrice; Houdebine, Louis-Marie; Viglietta, Celine; Rubin, Edward M.; Hughes, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    A transgenic rabbit which has in its genomic DNA sequences that encode apolipoprotein (a) and apolipoprotein B polypeptides which are capable of combining to produce lipoprotein (a), a process for creating such a rabbit, and the use of the rabbit to identify compounds which are effective in the treatment of human diseases which are associated with, induced and/or exacerbated by Lp(a) expression.

  6. Preliminary model for human lipoprotein metabolism in hyperlipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Phair, R D; Hammond, M G; Bowden, J A; Fried, M; Fisher, W R; Berman, M

    1975-12-01

    A model is proposed for the metabolism of plasma lipoprotein apoproteins based on studies of a hyperlipoproteinemic subject who received 2.5 mCi[3H]leucine intravenously. Measurement