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Sample records for lipoprotein receptor knockout

  1. Cholesterol lowering in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice overexpressing apolipoprotein E.

    PubMed Central

    Osuga, J; Yonemoto, M; Yamada, N; Shimano, H; Yagyu, H; Ohashi, K; Harada, K; Kamei, T; Yazaki, Y; Ishibashi, S

    1998-01-01

    Apo E is a key molecule in the lipoprotein metabolism; thus, genetic manipulation of apo E may prove useful in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. To test the feasibility of this idea, we have generated low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) knockout mice that overexpress the rat apo E transgene (ETg+/+:LDLRKO), and compared their plasma lipoprotein profiles with those of nonexpressing LDLR knockout mice (ETg-/-:LDLRKO). On a normal chow diet, the mean plasma cholesterol level of ETg+/+:LDLRKO mice was significantly lower than that of ETg-/-:LDLRKO mice (189 versus 240 mg/dl, P < 0. 01). The LDL fraction was selectively reduced in the ETg+/+:LDLRKO mice. Despite the challenge with an atherogenic diet, cholesterol lowering was persistently observed and fatty streak lesions in the aortic sinus were significantly suppressed in the mice overexpressing apo E. These results imply that stimulation of hepatic production of apo E may be used as a promising adjunctive therapy for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:9664080

  2. Dietary corn fractions reduce atherogenesis in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Masisi, Kabo; Le, Khuong; Ghazzawi, Nora; Moghadasian, Mohammed H; Beta, Trust

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has suggested that intake of whole grains is a protective factor against pathogenesis of coronary artery disease. The exact mechanisms, however, are still not clearly understood. In this study, we hypothesized that adequate intake of corn fractions (aleurone, endosperm and germ) can modify lipid profiles in relation to atherosclerotic lesion development in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr-KO) mice. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential cardiovascular benefits of corn fractions in LDLr-KO mice through a number of biomarkers including lipid profile, and morphologic and morphometrical analysis of atherosclerotic lesions in aortic root. Four groups of male LDLr-KO mice were fed with the experimental diets supplemented with (3 treated) or without (control) 5% (wt/wt) of each of corn fractions for 10 weeks. All diets were supplemented with 0.06% (wt/wt) cholesterol. Compared with mice in the control group, atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic roots were significantly reduced (P=.003) in the mice that were fed diet supplemented with aleurone and germ fractions. This effect was associated with significant reductions in plasma total (P=.02) and LDL (P=.03) cholesterol levels, and an increase in fecal cholesterol excretion (P=.04). Furthermore, abdominal fat mass was significantly reduced by consumption of aleurone (P=.03). In summary, the consumption of aleurone and germ may help attenuate atherosclerosis by reducing plasma total and LDL cholesterol levels.

  3. Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency increases atherosclerosis in the low density lipoprotein receptor and apolipoprotein E knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Furbee, James W; Sawyer, Janet K; Parks, John S

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency would accelerate atherosclerosis development in low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLr-/-) and apoE (apoE-/-) knockout mice. After 16 weeks of atherogenic diet (0.1% cholesterol, 10% calories from palm oil) consumption, LDLr-/- LCAT-/- double knockout mice, compared with LDLr-/- mice, had similar plasma concentrations of free (FC), esterified (EC), and apoB lipoprotein cholesterol, increased plasma concentrations of phospholipid and triglyceride, decreased HDL cholesterol, and 2-fold more aortic FC (142 +/- 28 versus 61 +/- 20 mg/g protein) and EC (102 +/- 27 versus 61+/- 27 mg/g). ApoE-/- LCAT-/- mice fed the atherogenic diet, compared with apoE-/- mice, had higher concentrations of plasma FC, EC, apoB lipoprotein cholesterol, and phospholipid, and significantly more aortic FC (149 +/- 62 versus 109 +/- 33 mg/g) and EC (101 +/- 23 versus 69 +/- 20 mg/g) than did the apoE-/- mice. LCAT deficiency resulted in a 12-fold increase in the ratio of saturated + monounsaturated to polyunsaturated cholesteryl esters in apoB lipoproteins in LDLr-/- mice and a 3-fold increase in the apoE-/- mice compared with their counterparts with active LCAT. We conclude that LCAT deficiency in LDLr-/- and apoE-/- mice fed an atherogenic diet resulted in increased aortic cholesterol deposition, likely due to a reduction in plasma HDL, an increased saturation of cholesteryl esters in apoB lipoproteins and, in the apoE-/- background, an increased plasma concentration of apoB lipoproteins.

  4. Development of Accelerated Coronary Atherosclerosis Model Using Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Knock-Out Swine with Balloon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ogita, Manabu; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Onishi, Akira; Tsuboi, Shuta; Wada, Hideki; Konishi, Hirokazu; Naito, Ryo; Dohi, Tomotaka; Kasai, Takatoshi; Kojima, Yuko; Schwartz, Robert S.; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Several animal models have facilitated the evaluation and pathological understanding of atherosclerosis, but a definitive animal model of coronary atherosclerosis is not available. We therefore developed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR-KO) pigs with hypercholesterolemia, a model which rapidly developed coronary atherosclerosis following balloon injury. Methods and Results We deleted LDLR exon regions from cultured porcine fetal fibroblasts and cloned LDLR knockout (LDLR-KO) embryos microinjecting fetal fibroblast nuclei into enucleated oocytes. Twelve LDLR-KO pigs were fed a 2.0% cholesterol and 20% fat diet. Baseline serum LDL cholesterol level was 510.0±86.1 mg/dL. Balloon injury was created in 46 coronary segments and necropsy were obtained 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks later. Coronary artery sections were reviewed to evaluate lesion progression. We found lipid accumulation with foam cells and inflammatory cells beginning four weeks after balloon injury. The mean ratio of macrophages to plaque area was significantly higher in the four- weeks and eight-week animals compared with those at 2-weeks (8.79% ± 5.98% and 17.00% ± 10.38% vs. 1.14% ± 1.88%, P < 0.0001). At 12 weeks the ratio decreased toward the level at 2 week level (4.00% ± 4.56%, P = 0.66 vs. baseline). Advanced coronary atherosclerotic lesions contained lipid pools at eight-weeks with fibrous components beginning at 12 weeks. Conclusions We developed a model of rapid coronary atherosclerosis using LDLR KO pigs with balloon injury. This model may be useful for preclinical evaluation of medication or devices, and may also help investigate mechanisms of plaque progression. PMID:27631974

  5. Effect of hyperlipidemia on femoral biomechanics and morphology in low-density lipoprotein receptor gene knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Soares, Evelise Aline; Nakagaki, Wilson Romero; Garcia, José Antonio Dias; Camilli, José Angelo

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of hyperlipidemia on the biomechanical and morphological properties of the femur of low-density lipoprotein receptor gene knockout mice (LDLr-/-) mice. Ten wild-type mice (C57BL6) and 10 LDLr-/- mice generated on a C57BL6 background were used. Male 3-month-old animals were divided into four groups (n = 5): group W (wild type) and group L (LDLr-/-) receiving low-fat commercial ration, and group WH (wild type) and group LH (LDLr-/-) receiving a high-fat diet. After 60 days, blood samples were collected for laboratory analysis of calcium, triglycerides, and cholesterol. The femur was excised for mechanical testing and morphometric analysis. LDLr-/- mice receiving the high-fat diet presented more marked alterations in the mechanical and morphological properties of femoral cortical and trabecular bone. Changes in the plasma levels of calcium, triglycerides, cholesterol, and fractions were also more pronounced in this group. The present results demonstrate that hyperlipidemia causes alterations in the structure and mechanical properties of the femur of LDLr-/- mice. These effects were more pronounced when associated with a high-fat diet.

  6. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: Unique tissue-specific functions revealed by selective gene knockout studies

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Van Duyn, Lauren B.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2008-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (originally called LRP, but now referred to as LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that is widely expressed in several tissues. LRP1 is a member of the LDL receptor family that plays diverse roles in various biological processes including lipoprotein metabolism, degradation of proteases, activation of lysosomal enzymes and cellular entry of bacterial toxins and viruses. Deletion of the LRP1 gene leads to lethality in mice, revealing a critical, but as of yet, undefined role in development. Tissue-specific gene deletion studies reveal an important contribution of LRP1 in the vasculature, central nervous system, in macrophages and in adipocytes. Three important properties of LRP1 dictate its diverse role in physiology: first, its ability to recognize more than thirty distinct ligands; second, its ability to bind a large number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins via determinants located on its cytoplasmic domain in a phosphorylation-specific manner; and third, its ability to associate with and modulate the activity of other transmembrane receptors such as integrins and receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:18626063

  7. Hypercholesterolemia in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice and its reversal by adenovirus-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, S; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L; Gerard, R D; Hammer, R E; Herz, J

    1993-01-01

    We employed homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells to produce mice lacking functional LDL receptor genes. Homozygous male and female mice lacking LDL receptors (LDLR-/- mice) were viable and fertile. Total plasma cholesterol levels were twofold higher than those of wild-type litter-mates, owing to a seven- to ninefold increase in intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL) and LDL without a significant change in HDL. Plasma triglyceride levels were normal. The half-lives for intravenously administered 125I-VLDL and 125I-LDL were prolonged by 30-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively, but the clearance of 125I-HDL was normal in the LDLR-/- mice. Unlike wild-type mice, LDLR-/- mice responded to moderate amounts of dietary cholesterol (0.2% cholesterol/10% coconut oil) with a major increase in the cholesterol content of IDL and LDL particles. The elevated IDL/LDL level of LDLR-/- mice was reduced to normal 4 d after the intravenous injection of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus encoding the human LDL receptor driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The virus restored expression of LDL receptor protein in the liver and increased the clearance of 125I-VLDL. We conclude that the LDL receptor is responsible in part for the low levels of VLDL, IDL, and LDL in wild-type mice and that adenovirus-encoded LDL receptors can acutely reverse the hypercholesterolemic effects of LDL receptor deficiency. Images PMID:8349823

  8. Development of Human-Like Advanced Coronary Plaques in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Knockout Pigs and Justification for Statin Treatment Before Formation of Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuxin; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Sudo, Mitsumasa; Haruta, Hironori; Lin, Qing-Fei; Takayama, Tadateru; Morita, Shotaro; Nochi, Tomonori; Suzuki, Shunichi; Sembon, Shoichiro; Nakai, Michiko; Kojima, Misaki; Iwamoto, Masaki; Hashimoto, Michiko; Yoda, Shunichi; Kunimoto, Satoshi; Hiro, Takafumi; Matsumoto, Taro; Mitsumata, Masako; Sugitani, Masahiko; Saito, Satoshi; Hirayama, Atsushi; Onishi, Akira

    2016-04-18

    Although clinical trials have proved that statin can be used prophylactically against cardiovascular events, the direct effects of statin on plaque development are not well understood. We generated low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR(-/-)) pigs to study the effects of early statin administration on development of atherosclerotic plaques, especially advanced plaques. LDLR(-/-) pigs were generated by targeted deletion of exon 4 of the LDLR gene. Given a standard chow diet, LDLR(-/-) pigs showed atherosclerotic lesions starting at 6 months of age. When 3-month-old LDLR(-/-) pigs were fed a high-cholesterol, high-fat (HCHF) diet for 4 months (HCHF group), human-like advanced coronary plaques developed. We also fed 3-month-old LDLR(-/-) pigs an HCHF diet with pitavastatin for 4 months (Statin Prophylaxis Group). Although serum cholesterol concentrations did not differ significantly between the 2 groups, intravascular ultrasound revealed 52% reduced plaque volume in statin-treated pigs. Pathological examination revealed most lesions (87%) in the statin prophylaxis group were early-stage lesions, versus 45% in the HCHF diet group (P<0.01). Thin-cap fibroatheroma characterized 40% of the plaques in the HCHF diet group versus 8% in the statin prophylaxis group (P<0.01), intraplaque hemorrhage characterized 11% versus 1% (P<0.01), and calcification characterized 22% versus 1% (P<0.01). Results of our large animal experiment support statin prophylaxis before the occurrence of atherosclerosis. Early statin treatment appears to retard development of coronary artery atherosclerosis and ensure lesion stability. In addition, the LDLR(-/-) pigs we developed represent a large animal model of human-like advanced coronary plaque suitable for translational research. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  9. Cholesterol reduction ameliorates glucose-induced calcium handling and insulin secretion in islets from low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Souza, J C; Vanzela, E C; Ribeiro, R A; Rezende, L F; de Oliveira, C A; Carneiro, E M; Oliveira, H C F; Boschero, A C

    2013-04-01

    Changes in cellular cholesterol level may contribute to beta cell dysfunction. Islets from low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR(-/-)) mice have higher cholesterol content and secrete less insulin than wild-type (WT) mice. Here, we investigated the association between cholesterol content, insulin secretion and Ca(2+) handling in these islets. Isolated islets from both LDLR(-/-) and WT mice were used for measurements of insulin secretion (radioimmunoassay), cholesterol content (fluorimetric assay), cytosolic Ca(2+) level (fura-2AM) and SNARE protein expression (VAMP-2, SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1A). Cholesterol was depleted by incubating the islets with increasing concentrations (0-10mmol/l) of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD). The first and second phases of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) were lower in LDLR(-/-) than in WT islets, paralleled by an impairment of Ca(2+) handling in the former. SNAP-25 and VAMP-2, but not syntaxin-1A, were reduced in LDLR(-/-) compared with WT islets. Removal of excess cholesterol from LDLR(-/-) islets normalized glucose- and tolbutamide-induced insulin release. Glucose-stimulated Ca(2+) handling was also normalized in cholesterol-depleted LDLR(-/-) islets. Cholesterol removal from WT islets by 0.1 and 1.0mmol/l MβCD impaired both GSIS and Ca(2+) handling. In addition, at 10mmol/l MβCD WT islet showed a loss of membrane integrity and higher DNA fragmentation. Abnormally high (LDLR(-/-) islets) or low cholesterol content (WT islets treated with MβCD) alters both GSIS and Ca(2+) handling. Normalization of cholesterol improves Ca(2+) handling and insulin secretion in LDLR(-/-) islets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lipoprotein Receptors Redundantly Participate in Entry of Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satomi; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Ono, Chikako; Uemura, Kentaro; Kawachi, Yukako; Shiokawa, Mai; Mori, Hiroyuki; Wada, Masami; Shima, Ryoichi; Okamoto, Toru; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Chayama, Kazuaki; Wakita, Takaji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-05-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) are known to be involved in entry of hepatitis C virus (HCV), but their precise roles and their interplay are not fully understood. In this study, deficiency of both SR-B1 and LDLR in Huh7 cells was shown to impair the entry of HCV more strongly than deficiency of either SR-B1 or LDLR alone. In addition, exogenous expression of not only SR-B1 and LDLR but also very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) rescued HCV entry in the SR-B1 and LDLR double-knockout cells, suggesting that VLDLR has similar roles in HCV entry. VLDLR is a lipoprotein receptor, but the level of its hepatic expression was lower than those of SR-B1 and LDLR. Moreover, expression of mutant lipoprotein receptors incapable of binding to or uptake of lipid resulted in no or slight enhancement of HCV entry in the double-knockout cells, suggesting that binding and/or uptake activities of lipid by lipoprotein receptors are essential for HCV entry. In addition, rescue of infectivity in the double-knockout cells by the expression of the lipoprotein receptors was not observed following infection with pseudotype particles bearing HCV envelope proteins produced in non-hepatic cells, suggesting that lipoproteins associated with HCV particles participate in the entry through their interaction with lipoprotein receptors. Buoyant density gradient analysis revealed that HCV utilizes these lipoprotein receptors in a manner dependent on the lipoproteins associated with HCV particles. Collectively, these results suggest that lipoprotein receptors redundantly participate in the entry of HCV.

  11. Profound induction of hepatic cholesteryl ester transfer protein transgene expression in apolipoprotein E and low density lipoprotein receptor gene knockout mice. A novel mechanism signals changes in plasma cholesterol levels.

    PubMed Central

    Masucci-Magoulas, L; Plump, A; Jiang, X C; Walsh, A; Breslow, J L; Tall, A R

    1996-01-01

    The plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesteryl esters from HDL to other lipoproteins and is a key regulated component of reverse cholesterol transport. Dietary hypercholesterolemia results in increased hepatic CETP gene transcription and higher plasma CETP levels. To investigate the mechanisms by which the liver senses hypercholesterolemia, mice containing a natural flanking region CETP transgene (NFR-CETP transgene) were bred with apo E or LDL receptor gene knockout mice (E0 or LDLr0 mice). Compared to NFR-CETP transgenic (Tg) mice with intact apo E genes, in NFR-CETP Tg/E0 mice there was an eightfold induction of plasma CETP levels and a parallel increase in hepatic CETP mRNA levels. Other sterol-responsive genes (LDL receptor and hydroxymethyl glutaryl CoA reductase) also showed evidence of altered regulation with decreased abundance of their mRNAs in the E0 background. A similar induction of plasma CETP and hepatic CETP mRNA levels resulted from breeding the NFR-CETP transgene into the LDL receptor gene knockout background. When placed on a high cholesterol diet, there was a further increase in CETP levels in both E0 and LDLr0 backgrounds. In CETP Tg, CETP Tg/E0, and CETP Tg/LDLr0 mice on different diets, plasma CETP and CETP mRNA levels were highly correlated with plasma cholesterol levels. The results indicate that hepatic CETP gene expression is driven by a mechanism which senses changes in plasma cholesterol levels independent of apo E and LDL receptors. Hepatic sterol-sensitive genes have mechanisms to sense hypercholesterolemia that do not require classical receptor-mediated lipoprotein uptake. PMID:8550828

  12. Scavenger Receptor Class B Type 1 Deletion Led to Coronary Atherosclerosis and Ischemic Heart Disease in Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor Knockout Mice on Modified Western-type Diet

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiawei; Guo, Xin; Wang, Mengyu; Dong, Chengyan; Gao, Mingming; Wang, Huan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Shen, Qiang; Wang, Yuhui; Wang, Fan; Liu, George

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E (apoE) or low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) knockout (KO) mice are generally resistant to developing coronary atherosclerosis (CA) and ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, studies have demonstrated the occurrence of spontaneous CA and IHD in scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI)/apoE double KO (dKO) mice, which suggests that SR-BI could be a potential target for the prevention and therapy of CA and IHD. This possibility was later investigated in SR-BI/LDL-R dKO mice, but no signs of CA or IHD was identified when mice were fed a normal western-type diet. Here we explored whether SR-BI deletion could result in CA and IHD in LDL-R KO mice when fed a modified western-type diet containing higher (0.5%) cholesterol. Methods: Cardiac functions were detected by electrocardiography, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), echocardiography (Echo) and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. CA was visualized by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Results: After 12 weeks on the modified diet, SR-BI/LDL-R dKO mice developed cardiac ischemia/infarction, together with systolic dysfunction and left ventricular dilatation. CA was most severe at the aortic sinus level to an extent that no dKO mice survived to 20 weeks on the modified diet. None of control mice, however, developed CA or IHD. Conclusions: SR-BI deletion led to CA and IHD in LDL-R KO mice when fed the modified western-type diet. We established SR-BI/LDL-R dKO mice as a diet-induced murine model of human IHD and developed detection methods, using a combination of SPECT and Echo, for effective in vivo evaluation of cardiac functions. PMID:27373983

  13. Suppression of atherogenesis in female low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice following magnesium fortification of drinking water: the importance of diet.

    PubMed

    Sherer, Y; Shoenfeld, Y; Shaish, A; Levkovitz, H; Bitzur, R; Harats, D

    2000-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) has previously been found to modulate blood lipid levels, atherogenesis and atherosclerosis in rabbits when used as a dietary supplement. In addition, we have reported that Mg fortification of drinking water can attenuate atherogenesis in male low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor-deficient mice, but had a mild and nonsignificant effect on female mice fed a high-cholesterol diet supplemented with cholic acid. The aim of this study was to examine whether Mg has an antiatherogenic effect in female mice fed a high-cholesterol diet without cholic acid. Two groups of female LDL-receptor-deficient mice were included. The mice received either distilled water or water with 50 g of Mg sulfate per liter. In the first (12 weeks) and second (6 weeks) stages of the experiment, the mice received low- and high-cholesterol diets, respectively, both without cholic acid. At the end of each stage of the experiment, blood was drawn for the determination of plasma Mg, calcium and lipid levels. In addition, the extent of atherosclerosis was determined at the aortic sinus level. Mg fortification was associated with higher levels of plasma Mg while the mice were on a high-cholesterol diet, and the extent of atherosclerosis at the aortic sinus was significantly decreased in the female mice that received high levels of Mg compared with the female mice that received distilled water. The female mice that received water fortified with Mg had lower levels of triglycerides after stage 2, whereas no differences regarding cholesterol levels were found. These results confirm that Mg fortification of drinking water is capable of inhibiting atherogenesis also in female LDL-receptor-deficient mice fed a high-cholesterol diet, and demonstrate the importance of the nutritional composition of diet in this experimental model. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Diphenyl diselenide differently modulates cardiovascular redox responses in young adult and middle-aged low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout hypercholesterolemic mice.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Gianni; de Oliveira, Jade; Hort, Mariana Appel; Moreira, Eduardo Luiz Gasnhar; Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa Maria; Rocha, João Batista Texeira; de Bem, Andreza Fabro

    2014-03-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the effect of (PhSe)2 on cardiovascular age-related oxidative stress in hypercholesterolemic mice. To this end, LDL receptor knockout (LDLr(-/-) ) mice, 3 months (young adult) and 12 months (middle-aged) old, were orally treated with (PhSe)2 . Hypercholesterolemia, regardless of age, impaired the mitochondrial antioxidant defence in the cardiac tissue, which was characterized by a decline in mitochondrial aortic glutathione (GSH) levels and increased reactive oxygen species production in the heart. (PhSe)2 treatment improved GSH levels, thioredoxin reductase (TRxR) and GSH reductase (GR) activity, and decreased malondialdehyde levels in the heart of young adult LDLr(-/-) mice. Moreover, (PhSe)2 increased GPx activity in both age groups, and GR activity in the aorta of middle-aged LDLr(-/-) mice. Therefore, (PhSe)2 enhances the antioxidant defences in the cardiovascular system of LDLr(-/-) mice, which could explain its success as an anti-atherogenic compound. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. [Lipoprotein receptors. Old acquaintances and newcomers].

    PubMed

    Ducobu, J

    1997-02-01

    Lipoprotein receptors are plasma membrane proteins of high affinity which interact with circulating lipoprotein particles. The well characterized LDL receptor continues to be analysed and some new findings on its intracellular mechanisms of action have emerged. New lipoprotein receptors have recently been described: the chylomicron remnant receptor or LDL-related protein (LRP), the lipolysis stimulated receptor (LSR), the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), the HDL receptor (HDLR) and the scavenger receptor (SR). The molecular details of the receptors will facilitate the development of new therapeutic means to improve receptor-mediated clearance of lipoproteins.

  16. Echium oil reduces plasma triglycerides by increasing intravascular lipolysis in apoB100-only low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lolita M; Lough, Christopher M; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y; Gebre, Abraham K; Smith, Thomas L; Colvin, Perry L; Parks, John S

    2013-07-12

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model.

  17. Echium Oil Reduces Plasma Triglycerides by Increasing Intravascular Lipolysis in apoB100-Only Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Lolita M.; Lough, Christopher M.; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y.; Gebre, Abraham K.; Smith, Thomas L.; Colvin, Perry L.; Parks, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model. PMID:23857172

  18. Regulation of Plasma Cholesterol by Lipoprotein Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael S.; Kovanen, Petri T.; Goldstein, Joseph L.

    1981-05-01

    The lipoprotein transport system holds the key to understanding the mechanisms by which genes, diet, and hormones interact to regulate the plasma cholesterol level in man. Crucial components of this system are lipoprotein receptors in the liver and extrahepatic tissues that mediate the uptake and degradation of cholesterol-carrying lipoproteins. The number of lipoprotein receptors, and hence the efficiency of disposal of plasma cholesterol, can be increased by cholesterol-lowering drugs. Regulation of lipoprotein receptors can be exploited pharmacologically in the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in man.

  19. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Sander

    2008-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that mediates the effect of dietary fatty acids and certain drugs on plasma lipoproteins are the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs). Three PPAR isotypes can be distinguished, all of which have a major role in regulating lipoprotein metabolism. PPARα is the molecular target for the fibrate class of drugs. Activation of PPARα in mice and humans markedly reduces hepatic triglyceride production and promotes plasma triglyceride clearance, leading to a clinically significant reduction in plasma triglyceride levels. In addition, plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels are increased upon PPARα activation in humans. PPARγ is the molecular target for the thiazolidinedione class of drugs. Activation of PPARγ in mice and human is generally associated with a modest increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol and a decrease in plasma triglycerides. The latter effect is caused by an increase in lipoprotein lipase-dependent plasma triglyceride clearance. Analogous to PPARα, activation of PPARβ/δ leads to increased plasma HDL-cholesterol and decreased plasma triglyceride levels. In this paper, a fresh perspective on the relation between PPARs and lipoprotein metabolism is presented. The emphasis is on the physiological role of PPARs and the mechanisms underlying the effect of synthetic PPAR agonists on plasma lipoprotein levels. PMID:18288277

  20. Severe hypertriglyceridemia, reduced high density lipoprotein, and neonatal death in lipoprotein lipase knockout mice. Mild hypertriglyceridemia with impaired very low density lipoprotein clearance in heterozygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, P H; Bisgaier, C L; Aalto-Setälä, K; Radner, H; Ramakrishnan, R; Levak-Frank, S; Essenburg, A D; Zechner, R; Breslow, J L

    1995-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-deficient mice have been created by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. At birth, homozygous knockout pups have threefold higher triglycerides and sevenfold higher VLDL cholesterol levels than controls. When permitted to suckle, LPL-deficient mice become pale, then cyanotic, and finally die at approximately 18 h of age. Before death, triglyceride levels are severely elevated (15,087 +/- 3,805 vs 188 +/- 71 mg/dl in controls). Capillaries in tissues of homozygous knockout mice are engorged with chylomicrons. This is especially significant in the lung where marginated chylomicrons prevent red cell contact with the endothelium, a phenomenon which is presumably the cause of cyanosis and death in these mice. Homozygous knockout mice also have diminished adipose tissue stores as well as decreased intracellular fat droplets. By crossbreeding with transgenic mice expressing human LPL driven by a muscle-specific promoter, mouse lines were generated that express LPL exclusively in muscle but not in any other tissue. This tissue-specific LPL expression rescued the LPL knockout mice and normalized their lipoprotein pattern. This supports the contention that hypertriglyceridemia caused the death of these mice and that LPL expression in a single tissue was sufficient for rescue. Heterozygous LPL knockout mice survive to adulthood and have mild hypertriglyceridemia, with 1.5-2-fold elevated triglyceride levels compared with controls in both the fed and fasted states on chow, Western-type, or 10% sucrose diets. In vivo turnover studies revealed that heterozygous knockout mice had impaired VLDL clearance (fractional catabolic rate) but no increase in transport rate. In summary, total LPL deficiency in the mouse prevents triglyceride removal from plasma, causing death in the neonatal period, and expression of LPL in a single tissue alleviates this problem. Furthermore, half-normal levels of LPL cause a decrease in VLDL fractional catabolic rate and mild

  1. Lipoprotein lipase, LDL receptors and apo-lipoproteins in human fetal membranes at term.

    PubMed

    Huter, O; Wolf, H J; Schnetzer, A; Pfaller, K

    1997-11-01

    Ultrastructurally, all cells of human fetal membranes strongly exhibit a large amount of lipid deposits throughout pregnancy. Their origin and function is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization of key components of lipid metabolism in this tissue. Using immunohistochemical techniques, the distribution of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), low density lipoprotein receptors (LDL receptors), and apo-lipoprotein B and E was investigated in 20 human fetal membranes at term. In addition, electron microscopy was used to study the intracellular localization of lipoprotein-sized particles. Amnionic epithelium and trophoblast cells reacted strongly for LPL. LDL receptors and apo-lipoproteins were present in amnionic epithelium and fibroblasts of the amnion. In none of the investigated cells were lipoprotein-sized particles identified. Similar results were obtained in all 20 cases. The findings indicate that lipoprotein from the amniotic fluid or from the maternal circulation may serve as substrate for lipids in human fetal membranes.

  2. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Dependent and Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Independent Mechanisms of Cyclosporin A-Induced Dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Kockx, Maaike; Glaros, Elias; Leung, Betty; Ng, Theodore W; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Deswaerte, Virginie; Nawara, Diana; Quinn, Carmel; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Jessup, Wendy; Rensen, Patrick C N; Meikle, Peter J; Kritharides, Leonard

    2016-07-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is an immunosuppressant commonly used to prevent organ rejection but is associated with hyperlipidemia and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Although studies suggest that CsA-induced hyperlipidemia is mediated by inhibition of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr)-mediated lipoprotein clearance, the data supporting this are inconclusive. We therefore sought to investigate the role of the LDLr in CsA-induced hyperlipidemia by using Ldlr-knockout mice (Ldlr(-/-)). Ldlr(-/-) and wild-type (wt) C57Bl/6 mice were treated with 20 mg/kg per d CsA for 4 weeks. On a chow diet, CsA caused marked dyslipidemia in Ldlr(-/-) but not in wt mice. Hyperlipidemia was characterized by a prominent increase in plasma very low-density lipoprotein and intermediate-density lipoprotein/LDL with unchanged plasma high-density lipoprotein levels, thus mimicking the dyslipidemic profile observed in humans. Analysis of specific lipid species by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry suggested a predominant effect of CsA on increased very low-density lipoprotein-IDL/LDL lipoprotein number rather than composition. Mechanistic studies indicated that CsA did not alter hepatic lipoprotein production but did inhibit plasma clearance and hepatic uptake of [(14)C]cholesteryl oleate and glycerol tri[(3)H]oleate-double-labeled very low-density lipoprotein-like particles. Further studies showed that CsA inhibited plasma lipoprotein lipase activity and increased levels of apolipoprotein C-III and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. We demonstrate that CsA does not cause hyperlipidemia via direct effects on the LDLr. Rather, LDLr deficiency plays an important permissive role for CsA-induced hyperlipidemia, which is associated with abnormal lipoprotein clearance, decreased lipoprotein lipase activity, and increased levels of apolipoprotein C-III and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. Enhancing LDLr and lipoprotein lipase activity and decreasing

  3. Liver-specific inactivation of the abetalipoproteinemia gene completely abrogates very low density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein production in a viable conditional knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Chang, B H; Liao, W; Li, L; Nakamuta, M; Mack, D; Chan, L

    1999-03-05

    Conventional knockout of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein large subunit (lMTP) gene is embryonic lethal in the homozygous state in mice. We have produced a conditional lMTP knockout mouse by inserting loxP sequences flanking exons 5 and 6 by gene targeting. Homozygous floxed mice were born live with normal plasma lipids. Intravenous injection of an adenovirus harboring Cre recombinase (AdCre1) produced deletion of exons 5 and 6 and disappearance of lMTP mRNA and immunoreactive protein in a liver-specific manner. There was also disappearance of plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B-100 and marked reduction in apoB-48 levels. Wild-type mice showed no response, and heterozygous mice, an intermediate response, to AdCre1. Wild-type mice doubled their plasma cholesterol level following a high cholesterol diet. This hypercholesterolemia was abolished in AdCre1-treated lMTP-/- mice, the result of a complete absence of very low/intermediate/low density lipoproteins and a slight reduction in high density lipoprotein. Heterozygous mice showed an intermediate lipoprotein phenotype. The rate of accumulation of plasma triglyceride following Triton WR1339 treatment in lMTP-/- mice was <10% that in wild-type animals, indicating a failure of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein production. Pulse-chase experiments using hepatocytes isolated from wild-type and lMTP-/- mice revealed a failure of apoB secretion in lMTP-/- animals. Therefore, the liver-specific inactivation of the lMTP gene completely abrogates apoB-100 and very low/intermediate/low density lipoprotein production. These conditional knockout mice are a useful in vivo model for studying the role of MTP in apoB biosynthesis and the biogenesis of apoB-containing lipoproteins.

  4. Modulation of lipoprotein receptor functions by intracellular adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Stolt, Peggy C; Bock, Hans H

    2006-10-01

    Members of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family are critically involved in a wide range of physiological processes including lipid and vitamin homeostasis, cellular migration, neurodevelopment, and synaptic plasticity, to name a few. Lipoprotein receptors exert these diverse biological functions by acting as cellular uptake receptors or by inducing intracellular signaling cascades. It was discovered that a short sequence in the intracellular region of all lipoprotein receptors, Asn-Pro-X-Tyr (NPXY) is important for mediating either endocytosis or signal transduction events, and that this motif serves as a binding site for phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain containing scaffold proteins. These molecular adaptors connect the transmembrane receptors with the endocytosis machinery and regulate cellular trafficking, or function as assembly sites for dynamic multi-protein signaling complexes. Whereas the LDL receptor represents the archetype of an endocytic lipoprotein receptor, the structurally closely related apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor activate a kinase-dependent intracellular signaling cascade after binding to the neuronal signaling molecule Reelin. This review focuses on two related PTB domain containing adaptor proteins that mediate these divergent lipoprotein receptor responses, ARH (autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) and Dab1 (disabled-1), and discusses the structural and molecular basis of this different behaviour.

  5. Hepatic changes in metabolic gene expression in old ghrelin and ghrelin receptor knockout mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ghrelin knockout (GKO) and ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor) knockout (GHSRKO) mice exhibit enhanced insulin sensitivity, but the mechanism is unclear. Insulin sensitivity declines with age and is inversely associated with accumulation of lipid in liver, a key glucoregulatory ...

  6. Knockout of the abetalipoproteinemia gene in mice: reduced lipoprotein secretion in heterozygotes and embryonic lethality in homozygotes.

    PubMed

    Raabe, M; Flynn, L M; Zlot, C H; Wong, J S; Véniant, M M; Hamilton, R L; Young, S G

    1998-07-21

    Abetalipoproteinemia, an inherited human disease characterized by a near-complete absence of the apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins in the plasma, is caused by mutations in the gene for microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). We used gene targeting to knock out the mouse MTP gene (Mttp). In heterozygous knockout mice (Mttp+/- ), the MTP mRNA, protein, and activity levels were reduced by 50%, in both liver and intestine. Compared with control mice (Mttp+/+), chow-fed Mttp+/- mice had reduced plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and had a 28% reduction in plasma apoB100 levels. On a high-fat diet, the Mttp+/- mice exhibited a marked reduction in total plasma cholesterol levels, compared with those in Mttp+/+ mice. Both the livers of adult Mttp+/- mice and the visceral endoderm of the yolk sacs from Mttp+/- embryos manifested an accumulation of cytosolic fat. All homozygous embryos (Mttp-/-) died during embryonic development. In the visceral endoderm of Mttp-/- yolk sacs, lipoprotein synthesis was virtually absent, and there was a marked accumulation of cytosolic fat droplets. In summary, half-normal MTP levels do not support normal levels of lipoprotein synthesis and secretion, and a complete deficiency of MTP causes lethal developmental abnormalities, perhaps because of an impaired capacity of the yolk sac to export lipids to the developing embryo.

  7. Uptake and catabolism of modified LDL in scavenger-receptor class A type I/II knock-out mice.

    PubMed Central

    Van Berkel, T J; Van Velzen, A; Kruijt, J K; Suzuki, H; Kodama, T

    1998-01-01

    The liver is the major organ responsible for the uptake of modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from the blood circulation, with endothelial and Kupffer cells as major cellular uptake sites. Scavenger-receptors, which include various classes, are held responsible for this uptake. Mice deficient in scavenger-receptor class A types I and II were created and the fate of acetylated LDL (Ac-LDL) in vivo and its interaction with liver endothelial, Kupffer and peritoneal macrophages was characterized. Surprisingly, the decay in vivo (t12 < 2 min), tissue distribution and liver uptake (at 5 min it was 77.4 +/- 4.6% of the injected dose) of Ac-LDL in the knock-out mice were not significantly different from control mice (t12 < 2 min and liver uptake 79.1 +/- 4.6% of the injected dose). A separation of mice liver cells into parenchymal, endothelial and Kupffer cells 10 min after injection of Ac-LDL indicated that in both control and knock-out mice the liver endothelial cells were responsible for more than 70% of the liver uptake. Both in control and knock-out mice, preinjection of polyinosinic acid (poly I, 200 microg) completely blocked the liver uptake, indicating that both in control and knock-out mice the scavenger-receptors are sensitive to poly I. Preinjection of suboptimal poly I concentrations (20 and 50 microg) provided evidence that the serum decay and liver uptake of Ac-LDL is more readily inhibited in the knock-out mice as compared with the control mice, indicating less efficient removal of Ac-LDL in vivo in the knock-out mice under these conditions. Studies in vitro with isolated liver endothelial and Kupffer cells from knock-out mice indicate that the cell association of Ac-LDL during 2 h at 37 degrees C is 50 and 53% of the control, respectively, whereas the degradation reaches values of 58 and 63%. For peritoneal macrophages from knock-out mice the cell association of Ac-LDL was identical to the control mice whereas the Ac-LDL degradation in cells from the

  8. Sensorimotor development in neonatal progesterone receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Willing, Jari; Wagner, Christine K

    2014-01-01

    Early exposure to steroid hormones can permanently and dramatically alter neural development. This is best understood in the organizational effects of hormones during development of brain regions involved in reproductive behaviors or neuroendocrine function. However, recent evidence strongly suggests that steroid hormones play a vital role in shaping brain regions involved in cognitive behavior such as the cerebral cortex. The most abundantly expressed steroid hormone receptor in the developing rodent cortex is the progesterone receptor (PR). In the rat, PR is initially expressed in the developmentally-critical subplate at E18, and subsequently in laminas V and II/III through the first three postnatal weeks (Quadros et al. [2007] J Comp Neurol 504:42-56; Lopez & Wagner [2009]: J Comp Neurol 512:124-139), coinciding with significant periods of dendritic maturation, the arrival of afferents and synaptogenesis. In the present study, we investigated PR expression in the neonatal mouse somatosensory cortex. Additionally, to investigate the potential role of PR in developing cortex, we examined sensorimotor function in the first two postnatal weeks in PR knockout mice and their wildtype (WT) and heterozygous (HZ) counterparts. While the three genotypes were similar in most regards, PRKO and HZ mice lost the rooting reflex 2-3 days earlier than WT mice. These studies represent the first developmental behavioral assessment of PRKO mice and suggest PR expression may play an important role in the maturation of cortical connectivity and sensorimotor integration. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Functional Roles of the Interaction of APP and Lipoprotein Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pohlkamp, Theresa; Wasser, Catherine R.; Herz, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    The biological fates of the key initiator of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and a family of lipoprotein receptors, the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related proteins (LRPs) and their molecular roles in the neurodegenerative disease process are inseparably interwoven. Not only does APP bind tightly to the extracellular domains (ECDs) of several members of the LRP group, their intracellular portions are also connected through scaffolds like the one established by FE65 proteins and through interactions with adaptor proteins such as X11/Mint and Dab1. Moreover, the ECDs of APP and LRPs share common ligands, most notably Reelin, a regulator of neuronal migration during embryonic development and modulator of synaptic transmission in the adult brain, and Agrin, another signaling protein which is essential for the formation and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and which likely also has critical, though at this time less well defined, roles for the regulation of central synapses. Furthermore, the major independent risk factors for AD, Apolipoprotein (Apo) E and ApoJ/Clusterin, are lipoprotein ligands for LRPs. Receptors and ligands mutually influence their intracellular trafficking and thereby the functions and abilities of neurons and the blood-brain-barrier to turn over and remove the pathological product of APP, the amyloid-β peptide. This article will review and summarize the molecular mechanisms that are shared by APP and LRPs and discuss their relative contributions to AD. PMID:28298885

  10. Oxidized high-density lipoprotein accelerates atherosclerosis progression by inducing the imbalance between treg and teff in LDLR knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ru, Ding; Zhiqing, He; Lin, Zhu; Feng, Wu; Feng, Zhang; Jiayou, Zhang; Yusheng, Ren; Min, Fan; Chun, Liang; Zonggui, Wu

    2015-05-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) dysfunction has been widely reported in clinic, and oxidation of HDL (ox-HDL) was shown to be one of the most common modifications in vivo and participate in the progression of atherosclerosis. But the behind mechanisms are still elusive. In this study, we firstly analyzed and found strong relationship between serum ox-HDL levels and risk factors of coronary artery diseases in clinic, then the effects of ox-HDL in initiation and progression of atherosclerosis in LDLR knockout mice were investigated by infusion of ox-HDL dissolved in chitosan hydrogel before the formation of lesions in vivo. Several new evidence were shown: (i) the serum levels of ox-HDL peaked early before the formation of lesions in LDLR mice fed with high fat diet similar to oxidative low density lipoprotein, (ii) the formation of atherosclerotic lesions could be accelerated by infusion of ox-HDL, (iii) the pro-atherosclerotic effects of ox-HDL were accompanied by imbalanced levels of effector and regulatory T cells and relative gene expressions, which implied that imbalance of teff and treg might contribute to the pro-atherosclerosis effects of ox-HDL.

  11. Phagocytosis of aggregated lipoprotein by macrophages: Low density lipoprotein receptor-dependent foam-cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, A.G.; Chait, A.; Aviram, M.; Heinecke, J.W. )

    1989-04-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) modified by incubation with phospholipase C (PLC-LDL) aggregates in solution and is rapidly taken up and degraded by human and mouse macrophages, producing foam cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rabbit macrophages degraded {sup 125}I-labeled PLC-LDL ({sup 125}I-PLC-LDL) more rapidly than native {sup 125}I-labeled LDL ({sup 125}I-LDL), while nonphagocytic cells such as human fibroblasts and bovine aortic endothelial cells degraded {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL more slowly than {sup 125}I-LDL. This suggested the mechanism for internalization of PLC-LDL was phagocytosis. When examined by electron microscopy, mouse peritoneal macrophages appeared to be phagocytosing PLC-LDL. The uptake and degradation of {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL by human macrophages was inhibited >80% by the monoclonal antibody C7 (IgG2b) produced by hybridoma C7, which blocks the ligand binding domain of the LDL receptor. Similarly, methylation of {sup 125}I-LDL ({sup 125}I-MeLDL) prior to treatment with phospholipase C decreased its subsequent uptake and degradation by human macrophages by >90%. The uptake and degradation of phospholipase C-modified {sup 125}I-MeLDL by macrophages could be restored by incubation of the methylated lipoprotein with apoprotein E, a ligand recognized by the LDL receptor. These results indicate that macrophages internalize PLC-LDL by LDL receptor-dependent phagocytosis.

  12. Serum lipoproteins attenuate macrophage activation and Toll-Like Receptor stimulation by bacterial lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chlamydia trachomatis was previously shown to express a lipoprotein, the macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip), exposed at the bacterial surface, and able to stimulate human primary monocytes/macrophages through Toll Like Receptor (TLR)2/TLR1/TLR6, and CD14. In PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells the proinflammatory activity of Mip was significantly higher in the absence than in the presence of serum. The present study aims to investigate the ability of different serum factors to attenuate Mip proinflammatory activity in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells and in primary human differentiated macrophages. The study was also extend to another lipoprotein, the Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein (Osp)A. The proinflammatory activity was studied through Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) and Interleukin (IL)-8 release. Finally, TLR1/2 human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) transfected cells were used to test the ability of the serum factors to inhibit Mip and OspA proinflammatory activity. Results In the absence of any serum and in the presence of 10% delipidated FBS, production of Mip-induced TNF-α and IL-8 in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were similar whereas they were significantly decreased in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting an inhibiting role of lipids present in FBS. In the presence of 10% human serum, the concentrations of TNF-α and IL-8 were 2 to 5 times lower than in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting the presence of more potent inhibitor(s) in human serum than in FBS. Similar results were obtained in primary human differentiated macrophages. Different lipid components of human serum were then tested (total lipoproteins, HDL, LDL, VLDL, triglyceride emulsion, apolipoprotein (apo)A-I, B, E2, and E3). The most efficient inhibitors were LDL, VLDL, and apoB that reduced the mean concentration of TNF-α release in Mip-induced macrophages to 24, 20, and 2%, respectively (p < 0.0001). These lipid components were also able to prevent TLR1/2 induced

  13. Constitutive androstane receptor activation decreases plasma apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Sberna, Anne-Laure; Assem, Mahfoud; Xiao, Rui; Ayers, Steve; Gautier, Thomas; Guiu, Boris; Deckert, Valérie; Chevriaux, Angélique; Grober, Jacques; Le Guern, Naig; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Moore, David D; Lagrost, Laurent; Masson, David

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the impact of the nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) on lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) and apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice fed a Western-type diet were treated weekly with the Car agonist 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) or the vehicle only for 8 weeks. In Ldlr(-/-) mice, treatment with TCPOBOP induced a decrease in plasma triglyceride and intermediate-density lipoprotein/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (≈30% decrease in both cases after 2 months, P<0.01). These mice also showed a significant reduction in the production of very-low-density lipoproteins associated with a decrease in hepatic triglyceride content and the repression of several genes involved in lipogenesis. TCPOBOP treatment also induced a marked increase in the very-low-density lipoprotein receptor in the liver, which probably contributed to the decrease in intermediate-density lipoprotein/low-density lipoprotein levels. Atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic valves of TCPOBOP-treated Ldlr(-/-) mice were also reduced (-60%, P<0.001). In ApoE(-/-) mice, which lack the physiological apoE ligand for the very-low-density lipoprotein receptor, the effect of TCPOBOP on plasma cholesterol levels and the development of atherosclerotic lesions was markedly attenuated. CAR is a potential target in the prevention and treatment of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis.

  14. Bone growth and turnover in progesterone receptor knockout mice.

    SciTech Connect

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jaime C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O'Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-05-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and mCT analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 weeks of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain and tibia longitudinal bone growth was normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total and cortical bone mass were increased in long bones of post-pubertal (12 and 26-week-old) PRKO mice, whereas cancellous bone mass was normal in the tibia but increased in the humerus. The striking 57% decrease in cancellous bone from the proximal tibia metaphysis which occurred between 6 and 26 weeks in WT mice was abolished in PRKO mice. The improved bone balance in aging PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice attenuates the accumulation of cortical bone mass during adolescence and is required for early age-related loss of cancellous bone.

  15. Distinct Hepatic Receptors for Low Density Lipoprotein and Apolipoprotein E in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, Jeffrey M.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Gregg, Richard E.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Brewer, H. Bryan

    1985-02-01

    Since the liver is a central organ for lipid and lipoprotein synthesis and catabolism, hepatic receptors for specific apolipoproteins on plasma lipoproteins would be expected to modulate lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The role of hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E-containing lipoproteins was evaluated in patients with complementary disorders in lipoprotein metabolism: abetalipoproteinemia and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. In addition, hepatic membranes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia were studied and compared before and after portacaval shunt surgery. The results establish that the human liver has receptors for apolipoproteins B and E. Furthermore, in the human, hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E are genetically distinct and can undergo independent control.

  16. INDUCTION OF MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor knockout ( ERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted Er signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute t...

  17. INDUCTION OF MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor knockout ( ERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted Er signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute t...

  18. Low-density-lipoprotein receptors in different rabbit liver cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nenseter, M S; Myklebost, O; Blomhoff, R; Drevon, C A; Nilsson, A; Norum, K R; Berg, T

    1989-01-01

    Receptor-dependent uptake mechanisms for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were studied in rabbit liver parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells. Hybridization studies with a cDNA probe revealed that mRNA for the apo (apolipoprotein) B,E receptor was present in endothelial and Kupffer cells as well as in parenchymal cells. By ligand-blotting experiments we showed that apo B,E-receptor protein was present in both parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells. Studies of binding of homologous LDL in cultured rabbit parenchymal cells suggested that about 63% of the specific LDL binding was mediated via the apo B,E receptor. Approx. 47% of the specific LDL binding was dependent on Ca2+, suggesting that specific Ca2+-dependent as well as Ca2+-independent LDL-binding sites exist in liver parenchymal cells. Methylated LDL bound to the parenchymal cells in a saturable manner. Taken together, our results showed that apo B,E receptors are present in rabbit liver endothelial and Kupffer cells as well as in the parenchymal cells, and that an additional saturable binding activity for LDL may exist on rabbit liver parenchymal cells. This binding activity was not inhibited by EGTA or reductive methylation of lysine residues in apo B. LDL degradation in parenchymal cells was mainly mediated via the apo B,E receptor. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2549976

  19. Liver-Specific Loss of Lipolysis-Stimulated Lipoprotein Receptor Triggers Systemic Hyperlipidemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Narvekar, Prachiti; Berriel Diaz, Mauricio; Krones-Herzig, Anja; Hardeland, Ulrike; Strzoda, Daniela; Stöhr, Sigrid; Frohme, Marcus; Herzig, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In mammals, proper storage and distribution of lipids in and between tissues is essential for the maintenance of energy homeostasis. In contrast, aberrantly high levels of triglycerides in the blood (“hypertriglyceridemia”) represent a hallmark of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. As hypertriglyceridemia has been identified as an important risk factor for cardiovascular complications, in this study we aimed to identify molecular mechanisms in aberrant triglyceride elevation under these conditions. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS To determine the importance of hepatic lipid handling for systemic dyslipidemia, we profiled the expression patterns of various hepatic lipid transporters and receptors under healthy and type 2 diabetic conditions. A differentially expressed lipoprotein receptor was functionally characterized by generating acute, liver-specific loss- and gain-of-function animal models. RESULTS We show that the hepatic expression of lipid transporter lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is specifically impaired in mouse models of obesity and type 2 diabetes and can be restored by leptin replacement. Experimental imitation of this pathophysiological situation by liver-specific knockdown of LSR promotes hypertriglyceridemia and elevated apolipoprotein (Apo)B and E serum levels in lean wild-type and ApoE knockout mice. In contrast, genetic restoration of LSR expression in obese animals to wild-type levels improves serum triglyceride levels and serum profiles in these mice. CONCLUSIONS The dysregulation of hepatic LSR under obese and diabetic conditions may provide a molecular rationale for systemic dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome and represent a novel target for alternative treatment strategies in these patients. PMID:19188430

  20. Expression of scavenger receptor-BI and low-density lipoprotein receptor and differential use of lipoproteins to support early steroidogenesis in luteinizing macaque granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Puttabyatappa, Muraly; Greason, Erin; Rodriguez, Annabelle; VandeVoort, Catherine A; Chaffin, Charles L

    2009-02-01

    An ovulatory hCG stimulus to rhesus macaques undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation protocols results in a rapid and sustained increase in progesterone synthesis. The use of lipoproteins as a substrate for progesterone synthesis remains unclear, and the expression of lipoprotein receptors [very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and scavenger receptor-BI (SR-BI)] soon after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) (<12 h) has not been characterized. This study investigated lipoprotein receptor expression and lipoprotein (VLDL, LDL, and HDL) support of steroidogenesis during luteinization of macaque granulosa cells. Granulosa cells were aspirated from rhesus monkeys undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation before or up to 24 h after an ovulatory hCG stimulus. The expression of VLDLR decreased within 3 h of hCG, whereas LDLR and SR-BI increased at 3 and 12 h, respectively. Granulosa cells isolated before hCG were cultured for 24 h in the presence of FSH or FSH plus hCG with or without VLDL, LDL, or HDL. Progesterone levels increased in the presence of hCG regardless of lipoprotein addition, although LDL, but not HDL, further augmented hCG-induced progesterone. Other cells were cultured with FSH or FSH plus hCG without an exogenous source of lipoprotein for 24 h, followed by an additional 24 h culture with or without lipoproteins. Cells treated with hCG in the absence of any lipoprotein were unable to maintain progesterone levels through 48 h, whereas LDL (but not HDL) sustained progesterone synthesis. These data suggest that an ovulatory stimulus rapidly mobilizes stored cholesterol esters for use as a progesterone substrate and that as these are depleted, new cholesterol esters are obtained through an LDLR- and/or SR-BI-mediated mechanism.

  1. Diphenyl diselenide prevents cortico-cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress induced by hypercholesterolemia in LDL receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Jade; Moreira, Eduardo Luiz Gasnhar; Mancini, Gianni; Hort, Mariana Appel; Latini, Alexandra; Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa Maria; Farina, Marcelo; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; de Bem, Andreza Fabro

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have indicated a causal link between high dietary cholesterol intake and brain oxidative stress. In particular, we have previously shown a positive correlation between elevated plasma cholesterol levels, cortico-cerebral oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr(-/-)) mice, a mouse model of familial hypercholesterolemia. Here we show that the organoselenium compound diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 (1 mg/kg; o.g., once a day for 30 days) significantly blunted the cortico-cerebral oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by a hypercholesterolemic diet in LDLr(-/-) mice. (PhSe)2 effectively prevented the inhibition of complex I and II activities, significantly increased the reduced glutathione (GSH) content and reduced lipoperoxidation in the cerebral cortex of hypercholesterolemic LDLr(-/-) mice. Overall, (PhSe)2 may be a promising molecule to protect against hypercholesterolemia-induced effects on the central nervous system, in addition to its already demonstrated antiatherogenic effects.

  2. Effects of morphine on pentobarbital-induced responses in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Y; Ho, I K; Jang, C G; Tanaka, S; Ma, T; Loh, H H; Ko, K H

    2001-03-15

    Effects of morphine on the potentiation of pentobarbital-induced responses were investigated using mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. The duration of loss of righting reflex, hypothermia, and loss of motor coordination induced by pentobarbital were measured after pretreatment with either morphine or saline. Morphine pretreatment failed to show potentiation of both pentobarbital-induced loss of righting reflex and hypothermia in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice, while it significantly potentiated these responses in the wild-type controls. For motor incoordination test, morphine potentiated pentobarbital-induced motor incoordination in the wild-type mice. However, morphine may have opposite effects in the mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. These results demonstrate that synergism between morphine and pentobarbital is not detected in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice and that potentiation of pentobarbital-induced loss of righting reflex and hypothermia by morphine is mediated through mu-opioid receptor. It was interesting to note that pentobarbital-induced decrease in body temperature was less severe in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice than in wild-type mice.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide Is Cleared from the Circulation by Hepatocytes via the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Elena; Cirstea, Mihai; Kong, HyeJin Julia; Boyd, John H.; Wang, Yingjin; Russell, James A.; Walley, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. While decreased Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin type 9 (PCSK9) function improves clinical outcomes in murine and human sepsis, the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major Gram-negative bacteria endotoxin, is cleared from the circulation by hepatocyte Low Density Lipoprotein Receptors (LDLR)—receptors downregulated by PCSK9. We directly visualized LPS uptake and found that LPS is rapidly taken up by hepatocytes into the cell periphery. Over the course of 4 hours LPS is transported towards the cell center. We next found that clearance of injected LPS from the blood was reduced substantially in Ldlr knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice compared to wild type controls and, simultaneously, hepatic uptake of LPS was also reduced in Ldlr-/- mice. Specifically examining the role of hepatocytes, we further found that primary hepatocytes isolated from Ldlr-/- mice had greatly decreased LPS uptake. In the HepG2 immortalized human hepatocyte cell line, LDLR silencing similarly resulted in decreased LPS uptake. PCSK9 treatment reduces LDLR density on hepatocytes and, therefore, was another independent strategy to test our hypothesis. Incubation with PCSK9 reduced LPS uptake by hepatocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that hepatocytes clear LPS from the circulation via the LDLR and PCSK9 regulates LPS clearance from the circulation during sepsis by downregulation of hepatic LDLR. PMID:27171436

  4. Inflammatory pain is enhanced in delta opioid receptor-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Karchewski, Laurie A.; Hever, Xavier; Matifas, Audrey; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2015-01-01

    To examine the involvement of opioid receptors in inflammatory pain, we compared Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-induced hyperalgesia in mice lacking mu, delta or kappa receptors under the same experimental conditions. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured using von Frey filaments and the plantar test, respectively. All three receptor-knockout mice, as well as wild-type animals, developed inflammatory hyperalgesia following Complete Freund’s Adjuvant administration. Mu-receptor mutants showed similar hyperalgesia to wild-types in the two tests. Kappa-receptor mutants exhibited enhanced mechanical allodynia compared with wild-type mice but similar thermal hyperalgesia. In contrast, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were both markedly augmented in delta-receptor mutants, indicating a role for an endogenous delta-receptor tone in the control of inflammatory pain. Treatment with the delta-selective agonist SNC80 produced antihyperalgesia, and this effect was abolished in the delta-receptor knockout mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate that delta receptors inhibit inflammatory pain when activated either endogenously or exogenously. We have previously shown enhanced neuropathic pain in delta-receptor knockout mice. The delta receptor definitely represents a promising target for treating chronic pain conditions. PMID:18513322

  5. Ghrelin Receptor Deficiency does not Affect Diet-Induced Atherosclerosis in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Habegger, Kirk M.; Grant, Erin; Pfluger, Paul Thomas; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Daugherty, Alan; Bruemmer, Dennis; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Hofmann, Susanna M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Ghrelin, a stomach-derived, secreted peptide, and its receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHSR) are known to modulate food intake and energy homeostasis. The ghrelin system is also expressed broadly in cardiovascular tissues. Since ghrelin has been associated with anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties, but is also well known to promote obesity and impair glucose metabolism, we investigated whether ghrelin has any impact on the development of atherosclerosis. The hypothesis that endogenous ghrelin signaling may be involved in atherosclerosis has not been tested previously. Methods and Results: We crossed ghrelin receptor knockout mice (GHSr−/−) into a low-density lipoprotein receptor-null (Ldlr−/−) mouse line. In this model, atherosclerotic lesions were promoted by feeding a high-fat, high-cholesterol Western-type diet for 13 months, following a standard protocol. Body composition and glucose homeostasis were similar between Ldlr−/− and Ldlr/GHSR−/−ko mice throughout the study. Absence or presence of GHSr did not alter the apolipoprotein profile changes in response to diet exposure on an LDLRko background. Atherosclerotic plaque volume in the aortic arch and thoracic aorta were also not affected differentially in mice without ghrelin signaling due to GHSR gene disruption as compared to control LDLRko littermates. In light of the associations reported for ghrelin with cardiovascular disease in humans, the lack of a phenotype in these loss-of-function studies in mice suggests no direct role for endogenous ghrelin in either the inhibition or the promotion of diet-induced atherosclerosis. Conclusion: These data indicate that, surprisingly, the complex and multifaceted actions of endogenous ghrelin receptor mediated signaling on the cardiovascular system have minimal direct impact on atherosclerotic plaque progression as based on a loss-of-function mouse model of the disease. PMID:22649381

  6. Effect of vitamin D receptor knockout on cornea epithelium wound healing and tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Elizondo, Rodolfo A; Yin, Zhaohong; Lu, Xiaowen; Watsky, Mitchell A

    2014-07-24

    Our laboratory previously determined that vitamin D3, the vitamin D receptor (VDR), and 1α hydroxylase are present and active in the eye. In this study, we examined the effects of VDR knockout on wound healing, the tight junction-associated proteins occludin and ZO-1, and tight junction numbers in mouse corneas. Epithelial wounds (2-mm) were made with an agar brush on 4-week-old and 10-week-old wild-type, heterozygous, and VDR knockout mouse corneas. Mice were on a normal or high lactose, Ca(2+), and PO₄(-) diet. Wound-healing area was measured over time. Real-time PCR was used to quantify occludin and ZO-1 message expression. Western blot was used for protein expression. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine corneal epithelium and endothelium tight junctions. Immunofluorescence was used to examine epithelial ZO-1 distribution. Results showed a decreased healing rate in 10-week-old VDR knockout mice compared with wild-types. Vitamin D receptor knockout mice on the special diet had no difference in healing rate compared with wild-types. Real-time PCR showed decreased expression of occludin and ZO-1 in 10-week-old VDR knockout mice compared with wild-types. Western blot of 10-week-old knockout mouse corneas showed decreased occludin expression compared with wild-types. Transmission electron microscopy showed a significant difference in tight junction numbers in VDR knockouts versus wild-types. Immunofluorescence showed a change in ZO-1 distribution among genotypes. Vitamin D receptor knockout affects mouse corneal epithelium wound healing and tight junction integrity. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  7. Naloxone fails to produce conditioned place aversion in mu-opioid receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Skoubis, P D; Matthes, H W; Walwyn, W M; Kieffer, B L; Maidment, N T

    2001-01-01

    There is growing evidence that tonic activity of the opioid system may be important in the modulation of affective state. Naloxone produces a conditioned place aversion in rodents, an effect that is centrally mediated. Previous pharmacological data using antagonists with preferential actions at mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptors indicate the importance of the mu-opioid receptor in mediating this effect. We sought to test the mu-opioid receptor selectivity of naloxone aversion using mu-opioid receptor knock-out mice. mu-Opioid receptor knock-out and wild-type mice were tested for naloxone (10 mg/kg, s.c.) aversion using a place conditioning paradigm. As a positive control for associative learning, knock-out mice were tested for conditioned place aversion to a kappa agonist, U50,488H (2 mg/kg, s.c.). Naloxone produced a significant place aversion in wild-type mice, but failed to have any effect in mu-opioid receptor knock-out mice. On the other hand, both knock-out and wild-type mice treated with U50,488H spent significantly less time in the drug-paired chamber compared to their respective vehicle controls. We conclude that the mu-opioid receptor is crucial for the acquisition of naloxone-induced conditioned place aversion. Furthermore, in a separate experiment using C57BL/6 mice, the delta-selective antagonist naltrindole (10 or 30 mg/kg, s.c.) failed to produce conditioned place aversion.Taken together, these data further support the notion that naloxone produces aversion by antagonizing tonic opioid activity at the mu-opioid receptor.

  8. [Roles of histamine receptors in pain perception: a study using receptors gene knockout mice].

    PubMed

    Yanai, Kazuhiko; Mobarakeh, Jalal Izadi; Kuramasu, Atsuo; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2003-11-01

    To study the participation of histamine H1- and H2-receptors in pain perception, H1 and H2 receptor knockout (KO) mice were examined for pain threshold by means of three kinds of nociceptive tasks. These included assays for thermal, mechanical, and chemical nociception. H1KO mice showed significantly fewer nociceptive responses to the hot-plate, tail-flick, tail-pressure, paw-withdrawal, formalin, capsaicin, and abdominal constriction tests. Sensitivity to noxious stimuli in H1KO mice was significantly decreased when compared to wild-type mice. The antinociceptive phenotypes of H2KO were relatively less prominent when compared to H1KO mice. We also examined the antinociceptive effects of intrathecally-, intracerebroventricularly-, and subcutaneously-administered morphine in H1KO and H2KO mice. In these nociceptive assays, the antinociceptive effects produced by morphine were more enhanced in both H1KO and H2KO mice. The effects of histamine H1- and H2-receptor antagonists on morphine-induced antinociception were studied in ICR mice. The intrathecal, intracerebroventricular and subcutaneous co-administrations of d-chlorpheniramine enhanced the effects of morphine in all nociceptive assays examined. In addition, intrathecal co-administrations of cimetidine enhanced the antinociception of morphine in the hot plate tests. These results suggest that existing H1 and H2 receptors play an inhibitory role in morphine-induced antinociception in the spinal and supra-spinal levels.

  9. Interaction of the Clostridium difficile Binary Toxin CDT and Its Host Cell Receptor, Lipolysis-stimulated Lipoprotein Receptor (LSR)*

    PubMed Central

    Hemmasi, Sarah; Czulkies, Bernd A.; Schorch, Björn; Veit, Antonia; Aktories, Klaus; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase) is a binary, actin ADP-ribosylating toxin frequently associated with hypervirulent strains of the human enteric pathogen C. difficile, the most serious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. CDT leads to the collapse of the actin cytoskeleton and, eventually, to cell death. Low doses of CDT result in the formation of microtubule-based protrusions on the cell surface that increase the adherence and colonization of C. difficile. The lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is the host cell receptor for CDT, and our aim was to gain a deeper insight into the interplay between both proteins. We show that CDT interacts with the extracellular, Ig-like domain of LSR with an affinity in the nanomolar range. We identified LSR splice variants in the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116 and disrupted the LSR gene in these cells by applying the CRISPR-Cas9 technology. LSR truncations ectopically expressed in LSR knock-out cells indicated that intracellular parts of LSR are not essential for plasma membrane targeting of the receptor and cellular uptake of CDT. By generating a series of N- and C-terminal truncations of the binding component of CDT (CDTb), we found that amino acids 757–866 of CDTb are sufficient for binding to LSR. With a transposon-based, random mutagenesis approach, we identified potential LSR-interacting epitopes in CDTb. This study increases our understanding about the interaction between CDT and its receptor LSR, which is key to the development of anti-toxin strategies for preventing cell entry of the toxin. PMID:25882847

  10. Interaction of the Clostridium difficile Binary Toxin CDT and Its Host Cell Receptor, Lipolysis-stimulated Lipoprotein Receptor (LSR).

    PubMed

    Hemmasi, Sarah; Czulkies, Bernd A; Schorch, Björn; Veit, Antonia; Aktories, Klaus; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis

    2015-05-29

    CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase) is a binary, actin ADP-ribosylating toxin frequently associated with hypervirulent strains of the human enteric pathogen C. difficile, the most serious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. CDT leads to the collapse of the actin cytoskeleton and, eventually, to cell death. Low doses of CDT result in the formation of microtubule-based protrusions on the cell surface that increase the adherence and colonization of C. difficile. The lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is the host cell receptor for CDT, and our aim was to gain a deeper insight into the interplay between both proteins. We show that CDT interacts with the extracellular, Ig-like domain of LSR with an affinity in the nanomolar range. We identified LSR splice variants in the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116 and disrupted the LSR gene in these cells by applying the CRISPR-Cas9 technology. LSR truncations ectopically expressed in LSR knock-out cells indicated that intracellular parts of LSR are not essential for plasma membrane targeting of the receptor and cellular uptake of CDT. By generating a series of N- and C-terminal truncations of the binding component of CDT (CDTb), we found that amino acids 757-866 of CDTb are sufficient for binding to LSR. With a transposon-based, random mutagenesis approach, we identified potential LSR-interacting epitopes in CDTb. This study increases our understanding about the interaction between CDT and its receptor LSR, which is key to the development of anti-toxin strategies for preventing cell entry of the toxin. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 is required for parathyroid hormone-induced Sost suppression.

    PubMed

    Li, Changjun; Wang, Weishan; Xie, Liang; Luo, Xianghang; Cao, Xu; Wan, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) suppresses the expression of the bone formation inhibitor sclerostin (Sost) in osteocytes by inducing nuclear accumulation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) to inhibit the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2)-dependent Sost bone enhancer. Previous studies revealed that lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) mediates the intracellular signaling activation and the anabolic bone effect of PTH. Here, we investigated whether LRP6 mediates the inhibitory effect of PTH on Sost using an osteoblast-specific Lrp6-knockout (LRP6-KO) mouse model. An increased level of Sost mRNA expression was detected in femur tissue from LRP6-KO mice, compared to wild-type littermates. The number of osteocytes expressing sclerostin protein was also increased in bone tissue of LRP6-KO littermates, indicating a negative regulatory role of LRP6 on Sost/sclerostin. In wild-type littermates, intermittent PTH treatment significantly suppressed Sost mRNA expression in bone and the number of sclerostin(+) osteocytes, while the effect of PTH was much less significant in LRP6-KO mice. Additionally, PTH-induced downregulation of MEF2C and 2D, as well as HDAC changes in osteocytes, were abrogated in LRP6-KO mice. These data indicate that LRP6 is required for PTH suppression of Sost expression.

  12. Giardia lamblia low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein is involved in selective lipoprotein endocytosis and parasite replication.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Maria R; Miras, Silvana L; Quiroga, Rodrigo; Rópolo, Andrea S; Touz, Maria C

    2011-03-01

    As Giardia lamblia is unable to synthesize cholesterol de novo, this steroid might be obtained from the host's intestinal milieu by endocytosis of lipoproteins. In this work, we identified a putative Giardia lamblia low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (GlLRP), a type I membrane protein, which shares the substrate N-terminal binding domain and a FXNPXY-type endocytic motif with human LRPs. Expression of tagged GlLRP showed that it was localized predominantly in the endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomal-like peripheral vacuoles and plasma membrane. However, the FXNPXY-deleted GlLRP was retained at the plasma membrane suggesting that it is abnormally transported and processed. The low-density lipoprotein and chylomicrons interacted with GlLRP, with this interaction being necessary for lipoprotein internalization and cell proliferation. Finally, we show that GlLRP binds directly to the medium subunit of Giardia adaptor protein 2, indicating that receptor-mediated internalization occurs through an adaptin mechanism.

  13. Particulate Matter Promotes In Vitro Receptor-Recognizable Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Dysfunction of Lipid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-León, Natalia; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Sevilla-Tapia, Laura; Morales-Bárcenas, Rocío; Serrano, Jesús; O’Neill, Marie S.; García-Cuellar, Claudia M.; Quintana, Raúl; Vázquez-López, Inés

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter may promote cardiovascular disease, possibly as a consequence of its oxidative potential. Studies using susceptible animals indicate that particulate matter aggravates atherosclerosis by increasing lipid/macrophage content in plaques. Macrophage lipid uptake requires oxidized low-density lipoprotein and scavenger receptors; same receptors are involved in particulate matter uptake. We studied in vitro particulate matter potential to oxidize low-density lipoproteins and subsequent cell uptake through scavenger receptors. Particulate matter-induced low-density lipoproteins oxidation was evaluated by the thiobarbituric acid assay. Binding/internalization was tested in wild type and scavenger receptor–transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, and in RAW264.7 cells using fluorescently labeled low-density lipoproteins. Dose-dependent binding/internalization only occurred in scavenger receptor–transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells and RAW264.7 cells. Competition binding/internalization using particles showed that particulate matter induced decreased binding (~50%) and internalization (~70%) of particle-oxidized low-density lipoproteins and native low-density lipoproteins. Results indicate that particulate matter was capable of oxidizing low-density lipoproteins, favoring macrophage internalization, and also altered scavenger and low-density lipoproteins receptor function. PMID:23297186

  14. Normal maternal behavior, but increased pup mortality, in conditional oxytocin receptor knockout females.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Abbe H; Stepp, Jennifer E; Lee, Heon-Jin; Young, W Scott; Caldwell, Heather K

    2010-10-01

    Oxytocin (Oxt) and the Oxt receptor (Oxtr) are implicated in the onset of maternal behavior in a variety of species. Recently, we developed two Oxtr knockout lines: a total body knockout (Oxtr-/-) and a conditional Oxtr knockout (OxtrFB/FB) in which the Oxtr is lacking only in regions of the forebrain, allowing knockout females to potentially nurse and care for their biological offspring. In the current study, we assessed maternal behavior of postpartum OxtrFB/FB females toward their own pups and maternal behavior of virgin Oxtr-/- females toward foster pups and compared knockouts of both lines to wildtype (Oxtr+/+) littermates. We found that both Oxtr-/- and OxtrFB/FB females appear to have largely normal maternal behaviors. However, with first litters, approximately 40% of the OxtrFB/FB knockout dams experienced high pup mortality, compared to fewer than 10% of the Oxtr+/+ dams. We then went on to test whether or not this phenotype occurred in subsequent litters or when the dams were exposed to an environmental disturbance. We found that regardless of the degree of external disturbance, OxtrFB/FB females lost more pups on their first and second litters compared to wildtype females. Possible reasons for higher pup mortality in OxtrFB/FB females are discussed.

  15. Postnatal handling reverses social anxiety in serotonin receptor 1A knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zanettini, C; Carola, V; Lo Iacono, L; Moles, A; Gross, C; D'Amato, F R

    2010-02-01

    Mice lacking the serotonin receptor 1A (Htr1a knockout, Htr1a(KO)) show increased innate and conditioned anxiety. This phenotype depends on functional receptor activity during the third through fifth weeks of life and thus appears to be the result of long-term changes in brain function as a consequence of an early deficit in serotonin signaling. To evaluate whether this phenotype can be influenced by early environmental factors, we subjected Htr1a knockout mice to postnatal handling, a procedure known to reduce anxiety-like behavior and stress responses in adulthood. Offspring of heterozygous Htr1a knockout mice were separated from their mother and exposed 15 min each day from postnatal day 1 (PD1) to PD14 to clean bedding. Control animals were left undisturbed. Maternal behavior was observed during the first 13 days of life. Adult male offspring were tested in the open field, social approach and resident-intruder tests and assessed for corticosterone response to restraint stress. Knockout mice showed increased anxiety in the open field and in the social approach test as well as an enhanced corticosterone response to stress. However, while no effect of postnatal handling was seen in wild-type mice, handling reduced anxiety-like behavior in the social interaction test and the corticosterone response to stress in knockout mice. These findings extend the anxiety phenotype of Htr1a(KO) mice to include social anxiety and demonstrate that this phenotype can be moderated by early environmental factors.

  16. Altered Sleep and Affect in the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Karrie; Winrow, Christopher J.; Gotter, Anthony L.; Millstein, Joshua; Arbuzova, Janna; Brunner, Joseph; Kasarskis, Andrew; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Renger, John J.; Turek, Fred W.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: Sleep and mood disorders have long been understood to have strong genetic components, and there is considerable comorbidity of sleep abnormalities and mood disorders, suggesting the involvement of common genetic pathways. Here, we examine a candidate gene implicated in the regulation of both sleep and affective behavior using a knockout mouse model. Design: Previously, we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for REM sleep amount, REM sleep bout number, and wake amount in a genetically segregating population of mice. Here, we show that traits mapping to this QTL correlated with an expression QTL for neurotensin receptor 1 (Ntsr1), a receptor for neurotensin, a ligand known to be involved in several psychiatric disorders. We examined sleep as well as behaviors indicative of anxiety and depression in the NTSR1 knockout mouse. Measurements and Results: NTSR1 knockouts had a lower percentage of sleep time spent in REM sleep in the dark phase and a larger diurnal variation in REM sleep duration than wild types under baseline conditions. Following sleep deprivation, NTSR1 knockouts exhibited more wake and less NREM rebound sleep. NTSR1 knockouts also showed increased anxious and despair behaviors. Conclusions: Here we illustrate a link between expression of the Ntsr1 gene and sleep traits previously associated with a particular QTL. We also demonstrate a relationship between Ntsr1 and anxiety and despair behaviors. Given the considerable evidence that anxiety and depression are closely linked with abnormalities in sleep, the data presented here provide further evidence that neurotensin and Ntsr1 may be a component of a pathway involved in both sleep and mood disorders. Citation: Fitzpatrick K; Winrow CJ; Gotter AL; Millstein J; Arbuzova J; Brunner J; Kasarskis A; Vitaterna MH; Renger JJ; Turek FW. Altered sleep and affect in the neurotensin receptor 1 knockout mouse. SLEEP 2012;35(7):949-956. PMID:22754041

  17. Inhibitory Effects of North American Wild Rice on Monocyte Adhesion and Inflammatory Modulators in LDL Receptor-Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Moghadasian, Mohammed H; Zhao, Ruozhi; Ghazzawi, Nora; Le, Khuong; Apea-Bah, Franklin B; Beta, Trust; Shen, Garry

    2017-09-25

    The present study examined the effects of wild rice on monocyte adhesion, inflammatory and fibrinolytic mediators in low-density lipoprotein receptor-knockout (LDLr-KO) mice. Male LDLr-KO mice received cholesterol (0.06%, w/w) supplemented diet with or without white rice or wild rice (60%, w/w) for 20 weeks. White rice significantly increased monocyte adhesion, abundances of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tissue necrosis factor-α, intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), and uPA receptor in aortae and hearts of LDLr-KO mice compared to control diet. Wild rice inhibited monocyte adhesion to aorta, atherosclerosis and the abundances of the inflammatory and fibrinolytic regulators in the cardiovascular tissue of LDLr-KO mice compared to white rice. White or wild rice did not significantly alter the levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, or antioxidant enzymes in plasma. The anti-atherosclerotic effect of wild rice may result from its inhibition on monocyte adhesion and inflammatory modulators in LDLr-KO mice.

  18. Transcriptional Activation of Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene by DJ-1 and Effect of DJ-1 on Cholesterol Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Kato, Izumi; Niki, Takeshi; Goldberg, Matthew S.; Shen, Jie; Ishimoto, Kenji; Doi, Takefumi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2012-01-01

    DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and also causative gene for familial Parkinson’s disease park7. DJ-1 has multiple functions that include transcriptional regulation, anti-oxidative reaction and chaperone and mitochondrial regulation. For transcriptional regulation, DJ-1 acts as a coactivator that binds to various transcription factors, resulting in stimulation or repression of the expression of their target genes. In this study, we found the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene is a transcriptional target gene for DJ-1. Reduced expression of LDLR mRNA and protein was observed in DJ-1-knockdown cells and DJ-1-knockout mice and this occurred at the transcription level. Reporter gene assays using various deletion and point mutations of the LDLR promoter showed that DJ-1 stimulated promoter activity by binding to the sterol regulatory element (SRE) with sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) and that stimulating activity of DJ-1 toward LDLR promoter activity was enhanced by oxidation of DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, gel-mobility shift and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that DJ-1 made a complex with SREBP on the SRE. Furthermore, it was found that serum LDL cholesterol level was increased in DJ-1-knockout male, but not female, mice and that the increased serum LDL cholesterol level in DJ-1-knockout male mice was cancelled by administration with estrogen, suggesting that estrogen compensates the increased level of serum LDL cholesterol in DJ-1-knockout female mice. This is the first report that DJ-1 participates in metabolism of fatty acid synthesis through transcriptional regulation of the LDLR gene. PMID:22666465

  19. Transcriptional activation of low-density lipoprotein receptor gene by DJ-1 and effect of DJ-1 on cholesterol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shiori; Yamane, Takuya; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Kato, Izumi; Niki, Takeshi; Goldberg, Matthew S; Shen, Jie; Ishimoto, Kenji; Doi, Takefumi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2012-01-01

    DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and also causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease park7. DJ-1 has multiple functions that include transcriptional regulation, anti-oxidative reaction and chaperone and mitochondrial regulation. For transcriptional regulation, DJ-1 acts as a coactivator that binds to various transcription factors, resulting in stimulation or repression of the expression of their target genes. In this study, we found the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene is a transcriptional target gene for DJ-1. Reduced expression of LDLR mRNA and protein was observed in DJ-1-knockdown cells and DJ-1-knockout mice and this occurred at the transcription level. Reporter gene assays using various deletion and point mutations of the LDLR promoter showed that DJ-1 stimulated promoter activity by binding to the sterol regulatory element (SRE) with sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) and that stimulating activity of DJ-1 toward LDLR promoter activity was enhanced by oxidation of DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, gel-mobility shift and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that DJ-1 made a complex with SREBP on the SRE. Furthermore, it was found that serum LDL cholesterol level was increased in DJ-1-knockout male, but not female, mice and that the increased serum LDL cholesterol level in DJ-1-knockout male mice was cancelled by administration with estrogen, suggesting that estrogen compensates the increased level of serum LDL cholesterol in DJ-1-knockout female mice. This is the first report that DJ-1 participates in metabolism of fatty acid synthesis through transcriptional regulation of the LDLR gene.

  20. Neuron-specific (pro)renin receptor knockout prevents the development of salt-sensitive hypertension.

    PubMed

    Li, Wencheng; Peng, Hua; Mehaffey, Eamonn P; Kimball, Christie D; Grobe, Justin L; van Gool, Jeanette M G; Sullivan, Michelle N; Earley, Scott; Danser, A H Jan; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Feng, Yumei

    2014-02-01

    The (pro)renin receptor (PRR), which binds both renin and prorenin, is a newly discovered component of the renin-angiotensin system that is highly expressed in the central nervous system. The significance of brain PRRs in mediating local angiotensin II formation and regulating blood pressure remains unclear. The current study was performed to test the hypothesis that PRR-mediated, nonproteolytic activation of prorenin is the main source of angiotensin II in the brain. Thus, PRR knockout in the brain is expected to prevent angiotensin II formation and development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced hypertension. A neuron-specific PRR (ATP6AP2) knockout mouse model was generated using the Cre-LoxP system. Physiological parameters were recorded by telemetry. PRR expression, detected by immunostaining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, was significantly decreased in the brains of knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. Intracerebroventricular infusion of mouse prorenin increased blood pressure and angiotensin II formation in wild-type mice. This hypertensive response was abolished in PRR-knockout mice in association with a reduction in angiotensin II levels. Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt increased PRR expression and angiotensin II formation in the brains of wild-type mice, an effect that was attenuated in PRR-knockout mice. PRR knockout in neurons prevented the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced hypertension as well as activation of cardiac and vasomotor sympathetic tone. In conclusion, nonproteolytic activation of prorenin through binding to the PRR mediates angiotensin II formation in the brain. Neuron-specific PRR knockout prevents the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced hypertension, possibly through diminished angiotensin II formation.

  1. Knockout of the vascular endothelial glucocorticoid receptor abrogates dexamethasone-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    GOODWIN, Julie E.; ZHANG, Junhui; GONZALEZ, David; ALBINSSON, Sebastian; GELLER, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-mediated hypertension is incompletely understood. Recent studies have suggested the primary mechanism of this form of hypertension may be through the effects of glucocorticoids on vascular tissues and not to excess sodium and water reabsorption as traditionally believed. Objective The goal of this study was to better understand the role of the vasculature in the generation and maintenance of glucocorticoid-mediated hypertension. Methods We created a mouse model with a tissue-specific knockout of the glucocorticoid receptor in the vascular endothelium. Results We show that these mice are relatively resistant to dexamethasone-induced hypertension. After one week of dexamethasone treatment, control animals have a mean blood pressure increase of 13.1 mm Hg while knockout animals have only a 2.7 mm Hg increase (p<0.001). Interestingly, the knockout mice have slightly elevated baseline BP compared to the controls (112.2 ± 2.5 mm Hg vs. 104.6 ± 1.2 mm Hg, p = 0.04), a finding which is not entirely explained by our data. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the knockout resistance arterioles have a decreased contractile response to dexamethasone with only 6.6% contraction in knockout vessels compared to 13.4% contraction in control vessels (p=0.034). Finally, we show that in contrast to control animals, the knockout animals are able to recover a significant portion of their normal circadian blood pressure rhythm suggesting that the vascular endothelial glucocorticoid receptor may function as a peripheral circadian clock. Conclusions Our study highlights the importance of the vascular endothelial GR in several fundamental physiologic processes, namely blood pressure homeostasis and circadian rhythm. PMID:21659825

  2. Enhanced morphine-induced antinociception in histamine H3 receptor gene knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mobarakeh, Jalal Izadi; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2009-09-01

    Previous studies have implicated a potential role for histamine H3 receptor in pain processing. There have been conflicting data, however, on the roles of H3 receptors in pain perception, and little information is available about the role of spinal histamine H3 receptors in morphine-induced antinociception. In the present study we examined the role of histamine H3 receptor in morphine-induced antinociception using histamine H3 receptor knockout mice and a histamine H3 receptor antagonist. Anitinociception was evaluated by assays for four nociceptive stimuli: hot-plate, tail-flick, paw-withdrawal, and formalin tests. Antinociception induced by morphine (0.125 nmol/5 microl, i.t.) was significantly augmented in histamine H3 receptor knockout (-/-) mice compared to the wild-type (+/+) mice in all four assays of pain. Furthermore, the effect of intrathecally administered morphine with thioperamide, a histamine H3 antagonist, was examined in C57BL/6J mice. A low dose of i.t. administered thioperamide (0.125 nmol/5 microl) alone had no significant effect on the nociceptive response. In contrast, the combination of morphine (0.125 nmol/5 microl, i.t.) with the same dose of thioperamide resulted in a significant reduction in the pain-related behaviors in all four nociceptive tests. These results suggest that histamine exerts inhibitory effects on morphine-induced antinociception through H3 receptors at the spinal level.

  3. Enhanced antinociceptive effects of morphine in histamine H2 receptor gene knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mobarakeh, Jalal Izadi; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Sakurada, Shinobu; Kuramasu, Atsuo; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2006-09-01

    We have previously shown that antinociceptive effects of morphine are enhanced in histamine H1 receptor gene knockout mice. In the present study, involvement of supraspinal histamine H2 receptor in antinociception by morphine was examined using histamine H2 receptor gene knockout (H2KO) mice and histamine H2 receptor antagonists. Antinociception was evaluated by assays for thermal (hot-plate, tail-flick and paw-withdrawal tests), mechanical (tail-pressure test) and chemical (formalin and capsaicin tests) stimuli. Thresholds for pain perception in H2KO mice were higher than wild-type mice. Antinociceptive effects of intracerebroventricularly administered morphine were enhanced in the H2KO mice compared to wild-type mice. Intracerebroventricular co-administration of morphine and cimetidine produced significant antinociceptive effects in the wild-type mice when compared to morphine or cimetidine alone. Furthermore, zolantidine, a selective and hydrophobic H2 receptor antagonist, enhanced the effects of morphine in all nociceptive assays examined. These results suggest that histamine exerts inhibitory effects on morphine-induced antinociception through H2 receptors at the supraspinal level. Our present and previous studies suggest that H1 and H2 receptors cooperatively function to modulate pain perception in the central nervous system.

  4. Collecting duct-specific knockout of the endothelin B receptor causes hypertension and sodium retention.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yuqiang; Bagnall, Alan; Stricklett, Peter K; Strait, Kevin; Webb, David J; Kotelevtsev, Yuri; Kohan, Donald E

    2006-12-01

    Collecting duct (CD)-derived endothelin-1 (ET-1) inhibits renal Na reabsorption and its deficiency increases blood pressure (BP). The role of CD endothelin B (ETB) receptors in mediating these effects is unknown. CD-specific knockout of the ETB receptor was achieved using an aquaporin-2 promoter-Cre recombinase transgene and the loxP-flanked ETB receptor gene (CD ETB KO). Systolic BP in mice with CD-specific knockout of the ETB receptor, ETA receptor (CD ETA KO) and ET-1 (CD ET-1 KO), and their respective controls were compared during normal- and high-salt diet. On a normal-sodium diet, CD ETB KO mice had elevated BP, which increased further during high salt feeding. However, the degree of hypertension in CD ETB KO mice and the further increase in BP during salt feeding were lower than that of CD ET-1 KO mice, whereas CD ETA KO mice were normotensive. CD ETB KO mice had impaired sodium excretion following acute sodium loading. Aldosterone and plasma renin activity were decreased in CD ETB KO mice on normal- and high-sodium diets, while plasma and urinary ET-1 levels did not differ from controls. In conclusion, the CD ETB receptor partially mediates the antihypertensive and natriuretic effects of ET-1. CD ETA and ETB receptors do not fully account for the antihypertensive and natriuretic effects of CD-derived ET-1, suggesting paracrine effects of this peptide.

  5. Changes in signaling pathways regulating neuroplasticity induced by neurokinin 1 receptor knockout.

    PubMed

    Musazzi, Laura; Perez, Jorge; Hunt, Stephen P; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2005-03-01

    Neurokinin 1 (NK-1) receptor knockout mice showed behavioral responses similar to animals chronically treated with antidepressants. The aim of this study was to analyse, in NK-1 receptor knockout, the molecular modifications of signaling pathways involved in the pathophysiology of depression and antidepressant mechanism. We found, in total cell cytosol from the prefrontal/frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum, a marked up-regulation of Ca(2+)-independent enzymatic activity and Thr(286) autophosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) II. Similar changes in CaMKII regulation were previously observed in rats chronically treated with antidepressants. In striatum, up-regulation of the activity and phosphorylation of CaMKII was also found in the homogenate and synaptosomes. No major changes were observed in the Ca(2+)-dependent kinase activity, with the exception of homogenate from the prefrontal/frontal cortex. We also analysed the expression and phosphorylation of presynaptic proteins, which modulate synaptic vesicle trafficking and exocytosis, and found a marked decrease in synapsin I total expression and basal phosphorylation of Ser(603) (the phosphorylation site for CaMKII) in the prefrontal/frontal cortex. Accordingly, the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent posthoc endogenous phosphorylation of synapsin I in the same area was increased. The knockout of NK-1 receptor had no consequences on the expression or phosphorylation levels of the transcription factor cAMP-responsive element-binding protein and its regulating kinase CaMKIV. However, phosphorylation of ERK1/2-mitogen-activated protein kinases was reduced in the hippocampus and striatum, again resembling an effect previously observed in antidepressant-treated rats. These results show similarities between NK-1 knockouts and animals chronically treated with antidepressants and support the putative antidepressant activity of NK-1 receptor antagonists.

  6. Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 variant interacts with saturated fatty acids in Puerto Ricans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Low density lipoprotein related receptor protein 1 (LRP1) is a multi-functional endocytic receptor that is highly expressed in adipocytes and the hypothalamus. Animal models and in vitro studies support a role for LRP1 in adipocyte metabolism and leptin signaling, but genetic polymorphisms have not ...

  7. Development of osteoarthritic features in estrogen receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sniekers, Y H; van Osch, G J V M; Ederveen, A G H; Inzunza, J; Gustafsson, J-A; van Leeuwen, J P T M; Weinans, H

    2009-10-01

    Estrogens are suggested to play a role in the development of osteoarthritis as indicated by the increased prevalence in women after menopause. We studied whether deletion of the estrogen receptor (ER) alpha, beta, or both in female mice results in cartilage damage, osteophytosis, and changes in subchondral bone of skeletally mature animals. We studied knee joints of 6-month-old female ERalpha-/-, ERbeta-/-, and (double) ERalpha-/-beta-/- mice and their wild type (wt) littermates. The presence and size of osteophytes and osteoarthritic changes in cartilage were analyzed using histology. Changes in subchondral plate and trabecular bone were studied using micro-CT. In ERalpha-/-beta-/- mice, we observed an increase in number and/or size of osteophytes and thinning of the lateral subchondral plate. However, cartilage damage was not different from wt. In ERalpha-/- or ERbeta-/- mice, no significant differences in cartilage damage score, osteophyte formation, or subchondral plate thickness were found. The bone volume fraction of the epiphyseal trabecular bone was unchanged in ERalpha-/- mice, increased in ERbeta-/- mice, and decreased in ERalpha-/-beta-/- mice. We conclude that deletion of both ERs leads to increased osteophytosis, but deletion of one or both ERs does not lead to overt cartilage damage in 6-month-old mice.

  8. ApoB-containing lipoproteins regulate angiogenesis by modulating expression of VEGF receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Avraham-Davidi, Inbal; Ely, Yona; Pham, Van N; Castranova, Daniel; Grunspan, Moshe; Malkinson, Guy; Gibbs-Bar, Liron; Mayseless, Oded; Allmog, Gabriella; Lo, Brigid; Warren, Carmen M; Chen, Tom T; Ungos, Josette; Kidd, Kameha; Shaw, Kenna; Rogachev, Ilana; Wan, Wuzhou; Murphy, Philip M; Farber, Steven A; Carmel, Liran; Shelness, Gregory S; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa; Weinstein, Brant M; Yaniv, Karina

    2014-01-01

    Despite the clear major contribution of hyperlipidemia to the prevalence of cardiovascular disease in the developed world, the direct effects of lipoproteins on endothelial cells have remained obscure and are under debate. Here we report a previously uncharacterized mechanism of vessel growth modulation by lipoprotein availability. Using a genetic screen for vascular defects in zebrafish, we initially identified a mutation, stalactite (stl), in the gene encoding microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (mtp), which is involved in the biosynthesis of apolipoprotein B (ApoB)-containing lipoproteins. By manipulating lipoprotein concentrations in zebrafish, we found that ApoB negatively regulates angiogenesis and that it is the ApoB protein particle, rather than lipid moieties within ApoB-containing lipoproteins, that is primarily responsible for this effect. Mechanistically, we identified downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1), which acts as a decoy receptor for VEGF, as a key mediator of the endothelial response to lipoproteins, and we observed VEGFR1 downregulation in hyperlipidemic mice. These findings may open new avenues for the treatment of lipoprotein-related vascular disorders. PMID:22581286

  9. ApoB-containing lipoproteins regulate angiogenesis by modulating expression of VEGF receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Avraham-Davidi, Inbal; Ely, Yona; Pham, Van N; Castranova, Daniel; Grunspan, Moshe; Malkinson, Guy; Gibbs-Bar, Liron; Mayseless, Oded; Allmog, Gabriella; Lo, Brigid; Warren, Carmen M; Chen, Tom T; Ungos, Josette; Kidd, Kameha; Shaw, Kenna; Rogachev, Ilana; Wan, Wuzhou; Murphy, Philip M; Farber, Steven A; Carmel, Liran; Shelness, Gregory S; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa; Weinstein, Brant M; Yaniv, Karina

    2012-06-01

    Despite the clear major contribution of hyperlipidemia to the prevalence of cardiovascular disease in the developed world, the direct effects of lipoproteins on endothelial cells have remained obscure and are under debate. Here we report a previously uncharacterized mechanism of vessel growth modulation by lipoprotein availability. Using a genetic screen for vascular defects in zebrafish, we initially identified a mutation, stalactite (stl), in the gene encoding microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (mtp), which is involved in the biosynthesis of apolipoprotein B (ApoB)-containing lipoproteins. By manipulating lipoprotein concentrations in zebrafish, we found that ApoB negatively regulates angiogenesis and that it is the ApoB protein particle, rather than lipid moieties within ApoB-containing lipoproteins, that is primarily responsible for this effect. Mechanistically, we identified downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1), which acts as a decoy receptor for VEGF, as a key mediator of the endothelial response to lipoproteins, and we observed VEGFR1 downregulation in hyperlipidemic mice. These findings may open new avenues for the treatment of lipoprotein-related vascular disorders.

  10. Hepatic Farnesoid X-Receptor Isoforms α2 and α4 Differentially Modulate Bile Salt and Lipoprotein Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boesjes, Marije; Bloks, Vincent W.; Hageman, Jurre; Bos, Trijnie; van Dijk, Theo H.; Havinga, Rick; Wolters, Henk; Jonker, Johan W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor FXR acts as an intracellular bile salt sensor that regulates synthesis and transport of bile salts within their enterohepatic circulation. In addition, FXR is involved in control of a variety of crucial metabolic pathways. Four FXR splice variants are known, i.e. FXRα1-4. Although these isoforms show differences in spatial and temporal expression patterns as well as in transcriptional activity, the physiological relevance hereof has remained elusive. We have evaluated specific roles of hepatic FXRα2 and FXRα4 by stably expressing these isoforms using liver-specific self-complementary adeno-associated viral vectors in total body FXR knock-out mice. The hepatic gene expression profile of the FXR knock-out mice was largely normalized by both isoforms. Yet, differential effects were also apparent; FXRα2 was more effective in reducing elevated HDL levels and transrepressed hepatic expression of Cyp8b1, the regulator of cholate synthesis. The latter coincided with a switch in hydrophobicity of the bile salt pool. Furthermore, FXRα2-transduction caused an increased neutral sterol excretion compared to FXRα4 without affecting intestinal cholesterol absorption. Our data show, for the first time, that hepatic FXRα2 and FXRα4 differentially modulate bile salt and lipoprotein metabolism in mice. PMID:25506828

  11. Lipoprotein lipase regulates Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis by macrophages maintained in glucose-deficient medium.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, B; Loike, J D; Kako, Y; Weinstock, P H; Breslow, J L; Silverstein, S C; Goldberg, I J

    1997-01-01

    During periods of intense activity such as phagocytosis, macrophages are thought to derive most of their energy from glucose metabolism under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To determine whether fatty acids released from lipoproteins by macrophage lipoprotein lipase (LPL) could substitute for glucose as a source of energy for phagocytosis, we cultured peritoneal macrophages from normal and LPL knockout (LPL-KO) mice that had been rescued from neonatal demise by expression of human LPL via the muscle creatine kinase promoter. Normal and LPL-KO macrophages were cultured in medium containing normal (5 mM) or low (1 mM) glucose, and were tested for their capacity to phagocytose IgG-opsonized sheep erythrocytes. LPL-KO macrophages maintained in 1 and 5 mM glucose phagocytosed 67 and 79% fewer IgG-opsonized erythrocytes, respectively, than macrophages from normal mice. Addition of VLDL to LPL-expressing macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose enhanced the macrophages' phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes, but did not stimulate phagocytosis by LPL-KO macrophages. Inhibition of secreted LPL with a monoclonal anti-LPL antibody or with tetrahydrolipstatin blocked the ability of VLDL to enhance phagocytosis by LPL-expressing macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose. Addition of oleic acid significantly enhanced phagocytosis by both LPL-expressing and LPL-KO macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose. Moreover, oleic acid stimulated phagocytosis in cells cultured in non-glucose-containing medium, and increased the intracellular stores of creatine phosphate. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, but not of glycolysis, blocked the capacity of oleic acid to stimulate phagocytosis. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of acetyl LDL by macrophages from LPL-expressing and LPL-KO mice was similar whether the cells were maintained in 5 or 1 mM glucose, and was not augmented by VLDL. We postulate that fatty acids derived from macrophage LPL-catalyzed hydrolysis of triglycerides and

  12. A nanoformulation containing a scFv reactive to electronegative LDL inhibits atherosclerosis in LDL receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Marcela Frota; Kazuma, Soraya Megumi; Bender, Eduardo André; Adorne, Márcia Duarte; Ullian, Mayara; Veras, Mariana Matera; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Maranhão, Andrea Queiroz; Guterres, Silvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Abdalla, Dulcineia Saes Parra

    2016-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease responsible for the majority of cases of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. The electronegative low-density lipoprotein, a modified subfraction of native LDL, is pro-inflammatory and plays an important role in atherogenesis. To investigate the effects of a nanoformulation (scFv anti-LDL(-)-MCMN-Zn) containing a scFv reactive to LDL(-) on the inhibition of atherosclerosis, its toxicity was evaluated in vitro and in vivo and further it was also administered weekly to LDL receptor knockout mice. The scFv anti-LDL(-)-MCMN-Zn nanoformulation did not induce cell death in RAW 264.7 macrophages and HUVECs. The 5mg/kg dose of scFv anti-LDL(-)-MCMN-Zn did not cause any typical signs of toxicity and it was chosen for the evaluation of its atheroprotective effect in Ldlr(-/-) mice. This nanoformulation significantly decreased the atherosclerotic lesion area at the aortic sinus, compared with that in untreated mice. In addition, the Il1b mRNA expression and CD14 protein expression were downregulated in the atherosclerotic lesions at the aortic arch of Ldlr(-/-) mice treated with scFv anti-LDL(-)-MCMN-Zn. Thus, the scFv anti-LDL(-)-MCMN-Zn nanoformulation inhibited the progression of atherosclerotic lesions, indicating its potential use in a future therapeutic strategy for atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Lipoprotein binding and endosomal itinerary of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, H.; Takahashi, K.; Hamilton, R.L.; Havel, R.J. )

    1989-12-01

    The high affinity of {sup 45}Ca binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) and the LDL-R-related protein (LRP) was utilized to study the subcellar distribution of these two proteins in rat liver. Like the LDL-R, LRP was manyfold enriched in rat liver endosomal membranes with a relative distribution in early and late endosomal compartments consistent with recycling between endosomes and the cell surface. The high concentration of LRP in hepatic endosomal membranes greatly facilitated demonstration of Ca-dependent binding of apolipoprotein E- and B-containing lipoproteins in ligand blots. LRP was severalfold more abundant than the LDL-R in hepatic parenchymal cells, showed extensive degradation in hepatic endosomes, and was found in high concentrations in the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum. These data suggest a high a rate of synthesis of LRP that appeared to be unaffected by treatment of rats with estradiol. The repeating cysteine-rich A-motif found in the ligand-binding domain of LRP appeared to be responsible for Ca binding by LRP, LDL-R, and complement factor C9 and accounted for immunological cross-reactivity among these proteins. The data suggest an extensive proteolytic processing of this protein and are consistent with a functional role of LRP in lipoprotein metabolism.

  14. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  15. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  16. Absence of the SP/SP receptor circuitry in the substance P-precursor knockout mice or SP receptor, neurokinin (NK)1 knockout mice leads to an inhibited cytokine response in granulomas associated with murine Taenia crassiceps infection.

    PubMed

    Garza, Armandina; Weinstock, Joel; Robinson, Prema

    2008-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis, caused by the cestode Taenia solium, is the most common parasitic infection of the human central nervous system that leads to seizures. Taenia crassiceps cysticercosis in mice is an experimental model for Taenia solium cysticercosis. Similar to the human infection, live parasites cause little or no granulomatous inflammation. Dying parasites initiate a granulomatous reaction. The neuropeptide, substance P (SP), stimulates T-helper (TH) 1 cytokine production. In the current studies, we determined whether absence of SP/SP receptor circuitry in the SP-precursor, preprotachykinin, knockout or SP-receptor, neurokinin (NK) 1, knockout mice affected granuloma cytokine production. We hence compared the levels of Th1 cytokines interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-gamma, and levels of Th2/immunoregulatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in T. crassiceps-induced granulomas derived from infected C57BL/6 wild type (WT) versus SP-precursor knockout and NK1 knockout mice. We found that mean levels of IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4, and IL-10 in infected WT-derived granulomas were significantly higher than those of granulomas derived from infected SP-precursor knockout or the NK1 receptor (NKIR)knockout mice. Levels of Th2/immunoregulatory cytokines, IL-4 and IL-10 were higher in early stage granulomas (histologically-staged on basis of evidence of parasite remnants) versus late stage granulomas (no parasite-remnants) of both knockouts, whereas the reverse was noted in WT-derived granulomas. These study established that the absence of an SP/SP receptor circuitry in the SP precursor knockout mice or NK1 receptor knockout mice led to an inhibited cytokine response.

  17. Aggravated restenosis and atherogenesis in ApoCIII transgenic mice but lack of protection in ApoCIII knockouts: the effect of authentic triglyceride-rich lipoproteins with and without ApoCIII.

    PubMed

    Li, Haibo; Han, Yingchun; Qi, Rong; Wang, Yuhui; Zhang, Xiaohong; Yu, Maomao; Tang, Yin; Wang, Mengyu; Shu, Ya-Nan; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xinfeng; Rodrigues, Brian; Han, Mei; Liu, George

    2015-09-01

    Previously, our group and others have demonstrated a causative relationship between severe hypertriglyceridaemia and atherogenesis in mice. Furthermore, clinical investigations have shown high levels of plasma Apolipoprotein C-III (ApoCIII) associated with hypertriglyceridaemia and even cardiovascular disease. However, it remains unclear whether ApoCIII affects restenosis in vivo, and whether such an effect is mediated by ApoCIII alone, or in combination with hypertriglyceridaemia. We sought to investigate ApoCIII in restenosis and clarify how smooth muscle cells (SMCs) respond to authentic triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) with or without ApoCIII (TRLs ± ApoCIII). ApoCIII transgenic (ApoCIIItg) and knockout (ApoCIII-/-) mice underwent endothelial denudation to model restenosis. Here, ApoCIIItg mice displayed severe hypertriglyceridaemia and increased neointimal formation compared with wild-type (WT) or ApoCIII-/- mice. Furthermore, increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells, Mac-3, and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1) expression, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) production were found in lesion sites. ApoCIIItg and ApoCIII-/- mice were then crossed to low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr-/-) mice and fed an atherogenic diet. ApoCIIItg/Ldlr-/- mice had significantly increased atherosclerotic lesions. However, there was no statistical difference in restenosis between ApoCIII-/- and WT mice, and in atherosclerosis between ApoCIII/Ldlr double knockout and Ldlr-/- mice. SMCs were then incubated in vitro with authentic TRLs ± ApoCIII isolated from extreme hypertriglyceridaemia glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein-binding protein 1-deficient (GPIHBP1-/-) mice crossed with ApoCIIItg or ApoCIII-/- mice. It was shown that TRLs + ApoCIII promoted SMC proliferation, VCAM-1 expression, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and activated the Akt pathway. Scavenging ROS significantly reduced SMC

  18. Caffeine reverses antinociception by oxcarbazepine by inhibition of adenosine A1 receptors: insights using knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, Jana; Reid, Allison R; Fredholm, Bertil B

    2010-04-12

    Oxcarbazepine is an anticonvulsant drug that has been explored as a novel therapeutic agent to treat neuropathic pain in humans. It produces antinociception in several preclinical models of pain, and these actions are blocked by methylxanthine adenosine receptor antagonists which implicates adenosine it its actions. In this study, the antinociceptive effect of oxcarbazepine, and the ability of caffeine to reverse its actions, were examined using the formalin test (2%) in wild-type mice and in mice lacking adenosine A(1) receptors by way of further exploring the involvement of adenosine in its actions. Oxcarbazepine produced dose-related suppression of formalin-evoked flinching responses in wild-type mice following both systemic and intraplantar administration, and this action was reversed by systemic and intraplantar administration of caffeine, respectively. The ability of oxcarbazepine to inhibit flinching after systemic and intraplantar administration was unaltered in homozygous (-/-) and heterozygous (+/-) adenosine A(1) receptor knockout mice. However, caffeine no longer reversed this antinociception. Our results indicate that, while adenosine A(1) receptors are not required for oxcarbazepine to produce antinociception in knockout mice, such receptors are essential in order to see caffeine reversal of this antinociceptive effect. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The low-density lipoprotein receptor gene family: a cellular Swiss army knife?

    PubMed

    Nykjaer, Anders; Willnow, Thomas E

    2002-06-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor gene family is an evolutionarily conserved group of cell-surface receptors produced by mammals and other organisms. Initially thought to be endocytic receptors that mediate the uptake of lipoproteins, recent findings have shown that these receptors have other roles in a range of cellular processes. Among other activities, members of this family act as signal transducers in neuronal migration processes, regulate synaptic plasticity or control vitamin homeostasis. Such multifunctionality is achieved by interaction with diverse cell-surface proteins including glycolipid-anchored receptors, G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels. Here, we review the molecular interactions of this protein family with other cell-surface proteins that provide specificity and versatility - a versatility that may be reminiscent of a cellular Swiss army knife.

  20. Cardiac-Specific Knockout of ETA Receptor Mitigates Paraquat-Induced Cardiac Contractile Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxing; Lu, Songhe; Zheng, Qijun; Hu, Nan; Yu, Wenjun; Li, Na; Liu, Min; Gao, Beilei; Zhang, Guoyong; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Haichang

    2016-07-01

    Paraquat (1,1'-dim ethyl-4-4'-bipyridinium dichloride), a highly toxic quaternary ammonium herbicide widely used in agriculture, exerts potent toxic prooxidant effects resulting in multi-organ failure including the lung and heart although the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Recent evidence suggests possible involvement of endothelin system in paraquat-induced acute lung injury. This study was designed to examine the role of endothelin receptor A (ETA) in paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and mitochondrial injury. Wild-type (WT) and cardiac-specific ETA receptor knockout mice were challenged to paraquat (45 mg/kg, i.p.) for 48 h prior to the assessment of echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties, as well as apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. Levels of the mitochondrial proteins for biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation including UCP2, HSP90 and PGC1α were evaluated. Our results revealed that paraquat elicited cardiac enlargement, mechanical anomalies including compromised echocardiographic parameters (elevated left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic diameters as well as reduced factional shortening), suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) handling, overt apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. ETA receptor knockout itself failed to affect myocardial function, apoptosis, mitochondrial integrity and mitochondrial protein expression. However, ETA receptor knockout ablated or significantly attenuated paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) defect, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. Taken together, these findings revealed that endothelin system in particular the ETA receptor may be involved in paraquat-induced toxic myocardial contractile anomalies possibly related to apoptosis and mitochondrial damage.

  1. Remnant lipoproteins induced proliferation of human prostate cancer cell, PC-3 but not LNCaP, via low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yoshitaka; Koike, Hidekazu; Nakano, Takamitsu; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Takahashi, Sadao; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2009-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia has been shown to be one of the risk factors for prostate cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of remnant lipoproteins on cell growth in prostate cancer cell lines. Remnant lipoproteins were isolated as remnant like particles (RLP) from human plasma. We used RLP for TG-rich lipoproteins and low density lipoproteins (LDL) for cholesterol-rich lipoproteins respectively and examined the effect of lipoproteins on proliferation of PC-3 and LNCaP cells using MTS assays. Moreover, we studied the effect of RLP and LDL treatment on the regulation of lipoprotein receptors in prostate cancer cells to investigate the relationship between lipoprotein-induced cell proliferation and lipoprotein receptor expression using real-time PCR, Western blotting assays and siRNA. RLP effectively induced PC-3 cell proliferation more than LDL, whereas both RLP and LDL could not induce LNCaP cell proliferation except at a higher concentration of RLP. LDL receptor (LDLr) was expressed in both prostate cancer cells but there was a sharp difference of sterol regulation between two cells. In PC-3 cells, LDL decreased the LDLr expression in some degree, but RLP did not. Meanwhile LDLr expression in LNCaP was easily downregulated by RLP and LDL. Blocking LDLr function significantly inhibited both RLP- and LDL-induced PC-3 cell proliferation. This study demonstrated that RLP-induced PC-3 cell proliferation more than LDL; however, both RLP and LDL hardly induced LNCaP cell proliferation. The differences of proliferation by lipoproteins might be involved in the regulation of LDLr expression.

  2. Assessment of 5-HT7 Receptor Agonists Selectivity Using Nociceptive and Thermoregulation Tests in Knockout versus Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brenchat, Alex; Rocasalbas, Maria; Zamanillo, Daniel; Hamon, Michel; Vela, José Miguel; Romero, Luz

    2012-01-01

    No study has ever examined the effect of 5-HT7 receptor agonists on nociception by using 5-HT7 receptor knockout mice. Basal sensitivity to noxious heat stimuli and formalin-induced nociception in both phase I and II of the formalin test did not differ in 5-HT7 receptor knockout mice and paired wild-type controls. Similarly, there was no significant difference in basal body temperature between both genotypes. Subcutaneous administration of 5-HT7 receptor agonists AS-19 (10 mg/kg), E-57431 (10 mg/kg), and E-55888 (20 mg/kg) significantly reduced formalin-induced licking/biting behavior during the phase II of the test in wild-type but not in 5-HT7 receptor knockout mice. At these active analgesic doses, none of the three 5-HT7 receptor agonists modified the basal body temperature neither in wild-type nor in 5-HT7 receptor knockout mice. However, a significant decrease in body temperature was observed at a higher dose (20 mg/kg) of AS-19 and E-57431 in both genotypes. Our data strongly suggest that the 5-HT7 receptor agonists AS-19, E-57431, and E-55888 produce antinociception in the formalin test by activating 5-HT7 receptors. These results also strengthen the idea that the 5-HT7 receptor plays a role in thermoregulation, but by acting in concert with other receptors. PMID:22761612

  3. Acetylcholine receptors in the retinas of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mouse

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Fred G. Oliveira; Bruce, Kady S.; Strang, Christianne E.; Morley, Barbara J.; Keyser, Kent T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is widely expressed in the nervous system, including in the inner retinal neurons in all species studied to date. Although reductions in the expression of α7 nAChRs are thought to contribute to the memory and visual deficits reported in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and schizophrenia , the α7 nAChR knockout (KO) mouse is viable and has only slight visual dysfunction. The absence of a major phenotypic abnormality may be attributable to developmental mechanisms that serve to compensate for α7 nAChR loss. We hypothesized that the upregulation of genes encoding other nAChR subunits or muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes during development partially accounts for the absence of major deficiencies in the α7 nAChR KO mouse. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the deletion of the α7 nAChR subunit in a mouse model resulted in changes in the regulation of other cholinergic receptors or other ion channels in an α7 nAChR KO mouse when compared to a wild-type (WT) mouse. Methods To examine gene expression changes, we employed a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) using whole retina RNA extracts as well as RNA extracted from selected regions of the retina. These extracts were collected using laser capture microdissection (LCM). The presence of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunit and subtype proteins was determined via western blotting. To determine any differences in the number and distribution of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) amacrine cells, we employed wholemount and vertical immunohistochemistry (IHC) and cell counting. Additionally, in both WT and α7 nAChR KO mouse retinas, the distribution of the nAChR subunit and mAChR subtype proteins were determined via IHC for those KO mice that experienced mRNA changes. Results In the whole retina, there was a statistically significant upregulation of α2, α9, α10, β4, nAChR subunit, and m1 and m4 mAChR subtype

  4. Quantification of beta adrenergic receptor subtypes in beta-arrestin knockout mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Akhil; Strachan, Ryan T; Walker, Julia K L

    2015-01-01

    In allergic asthma Beta 2 adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) are important mediators of bronchorelaxation and, paradoxically, asthma development. This contradiction is likely due to the activation of dual signaling pathways that are downstream of G proteins or β-arrestins. Our group has recently shown that β-arrestin-2 acts in its classical role to desensitize and constrain β2AR-induced relaxation of both human and murine airway smooth muscle. To assess the role of β-arrestins in regulating β2AR function in asthma, we and others have utilized β-arrestin-1 and -2 knockout mice. However, it is unknown if genetic deletion of β-arrestins in these mice influences β2AR expression in the airways. Furthermore, there is lack of data on compensatory expression of βAR subtypes when either of the β-arrestins is genetically deleted, thus necessitating a detailed βAR subtype expression study in these β-arrestin knockout mice. Here we standardized a radioligand binding methodology to characterize and quantitate βAR subtype distribution in the airway smooth muscle of wild-type C57BL/6J and β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2 knockout mice. Using complementary competition and single-point saturation binding assays we found that β2ARs predominate over β1ARs in the whole lung and epithelium-denuded tracheobronchial smooth muscle of C57BL/6J mice. Quantification of βAR subtypes in β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2 knockout mouse lung and epithelium-denuded tracheobronchial tissue showed that, similar to the C57BL/6J mice, both knockouts display a predominance of β2AR expression. These data provide further evidence that β2ARs are expressed in greater abundance than β1ARs in the tracheobronchial smooth muscle and that loss of either β-arrestin does not significantly affect the expression or relative proportions of βAR subtypes. As β-arrestins are known to modulate β2AR function, our analysis of βAR subtype expression in β-arrestin knockout mice airways sets a reference

  5. The syndecan family of proteoglycans. Novel receptors mediating internalization of atherogenic lipoproteins in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fuki, I V; Kuhn, K M; Lomazov, I R; Rothman, V L; Tuszynski, G P; Iozzo, R V; Swenson, T L; Fisher, E A; Williams, K J

    1997-01-01

    Cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been shown to participate in lipoprotein catabolism, but the roles of specific proteoglycan classes have not been examined previously. Here, we studied the involvement of the syndecan proteoglycan family. First, transfection of CHO cells with expression vectors for several syndecan core proteins produced parallel increases in the cell association and degradation of lipoproteins enriched in lipoprotein lipase, a heparan-binding protein. Second, a chimeric construct, FcR-Synd1, that consists of the ectodomain of the IgG Fc receptor Ia linked to the highly conserved transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of syndecan-1 directly mediated efficient internalization, in a process triggered by ligand clustering. Third, internalization of lipase-enriched lipoproteins via syndecan-1 and of clustered IgGs via the chimera showed identical kinetics (t1/2 = 1 h) and identical dose-response sensitivities to cytochalasin B, which disrupts microfilaments, and to genistein, which inhibits tyrosine kinases. In contrast, internalization of the receptor-associated protein, which proceeds via coated pits, showed a t1/2 < 15 min, limited sensitivity to cytochalasin B, and complete insensitivity to genistein. Thus, syndecan proteoglycans can directly mediate ligand catabolism through a pathway with characteristics distinct from coated pits, and might act as receptors for atherogenic lipoproteins and other ligands in vivo. PMID:9294130

  6. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 facilitates heme scavenging after intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaiqing; Manaenko, Anatol; Shao, Anwen; Ou, Yibo; Yang, Peng; Budbazar, Enkhjargal; Nowrangi, Derek; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2017-04-01

    Heme-degradation after erythrocyte lysis plays an important role in the pathophysiology of intracerebral hemorrhage. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 is a receptor expressed predominately at the neurovascular interface, which facilitates the clearance of the hemopexin and heme complex. In the present study, we investigated the role of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 in heme removal and neuroprotection in a mouse model of intracerebral hemorrhage. Endogenous low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 and hemopexin were increased in ipsilateral brain after intracerebral hemorrhage, accompanied by increased hemoglobin levels, brain water content, blood-brain barrier permeability and neurological deficits. Exogenous human recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 protein reduced hematoma volume, brain water content surrounding hematoma, blood-brain barrier permeability and improved neurological function three days after intracerebral hemorrhage. The expression of malondialdehyde, fluoro-Jade C positive cells and cleaved caspase 3 was increased three days after intracerebral hemorrhage in the ipsilateral brain tissues and decreased with recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1. Intracerebral hemorrhage decreased and recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 increased the levels of superoxide dismutase 1. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 siRNA reduced the effect of human recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 on all outcomes measured. Collectively, our findings suggest that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 contributed to heme clearance and blood-brain barrier protection after intracerebral hemorrhage. The use of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 as supplement provides a novel approach to ameliorating intracerebral hemorrhage brain injury via its pleiotropic neuroprotective effects.

  7. PTPRO Promotes Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Induced Oxidative Stress and Cell Apoptosis through Toll-Like Receptor 4/Nuclear Factor κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liang, Caihong; Wang, Xiaochen; Hu, Jianping; Lian, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Tiantian; Zhang, Hui; Gu, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Critical roles of phosphatase receptor type O (PTPRO) and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) have been implicated in inflammation. However, little is known about their functional effects on atherosclerosis (AS). We aim to study their potential function in AS. An oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced AS model constructed with PTPRO over-expressing RAW264.7 cells and PTPRO knockout macrophages. Cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry and fatty accumulation was evaluated by oil red staining. The production of ROS (reactive oxygen species), SOD (superoxide dismutase), MDA (malondialdehyde), TC (Triglyceride), and TG (total cholesterol) was evaluated. Western blot was performed to detect the expression of CD36, TLR4 and nuclear factor kB (NF-κB). PTPRO expression was promoted in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner following ox-LDL challenging. In PTPRO-over-expressing cells, CD36 expression and the level of oil-red staining, TC and TG were increased; ROS production, MDA and level of cell apoptosis were improved, but SOD was reduced. However, in PTPRO knockout cells opposite results were found. TLR4 and NF-κB/p65 phosphorylation was significantly enhanced in PTPRO over-expressing cells, while significantly down-regulated in PTPRO knockout cells. PTPRO plays ital roles in AS via promoting ox-LDL induced oxidative stress and cell apoptosis through TLR4/NF-κB pathway. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Negatively Cooperative Binding of High Density Lipoprotein to the HDL Receptor SR-BI†

    PubMed Central

    Nieland, Thomas J.F.; Xu, Shangzhe; Penman, Marsha; Krieger, Monty

    2011-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor, which also binds low density lipoprotein (LDL), and mediates the cellular selective uptake of cholesteryl esters from lipoproteins. SR-BI also is a co-receptor for hepatitis C virus and a signaling receptor that regulates cell metabolism. Many investigators have reported that lipoproteins bind to SR-BI via a single class of independent (not interacting), high affinity binding sites (one site model). We have re-investigated the ligand concentration dependence of 125I-HDL binding to SR-BI and SR-BI-mediated specific uptake of [3H]CE from [3H]CE-HDL using an expanded range of ligand concentrations (<1 µg protein/ml, lower than previously reported). Scatchard and non-linear least squares model fitting analyses of the binding and uptake data were both inconsistent with a single class of independent binding sites binding univalent lipoprotein ligands. The data are best fit by models in which SR-BI has either two independent classes of binding sites, or one class of sites exhibiting negative cooperativity due to either classic allostery or ensemble effects (‘ lattice model’). Similar results were observed for LDL. Application of the ‘infinite dilution’ dissociation rate method established that the binding of 125I-HDL to SR-BI at 4 °C exhibits negative cooperativity. The unexpected complexity of the interactions of lipoproteins with SR-BI should be taken into account when interpreting the results of experiments that explore the mechanism(s) by which SR-BI mediates ligand binding, lipid transport and cell signaling. PMID:21254782

  9. Development and Characterization of Uterine Glandular Epithelium Specific Androgen Receptor Knockout Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaesung Peter; Zheng, Yu; Skulte, Katherine A; Handelsman, David J; Simanainen, Ulla

    2015-11-01

    While estrogen action is the major driver of uterine development, androgens acting via the androgen receptor (AR) may also promote uterine growth as suggested by uterine phenotypes in global AR knockout (ARKO) female mice. Because AR is expressed in uterine endometrial glands, we generated (Cre/loxP) uterine gland epithelium-specific ARKO (ugeARKO) to determine the role of endometrial gland-specific androgen actions. However, AR in uterine gland epithelium may not be required for normal uterine development and function because ugeARKO females had normal uterine development and fertility. To determine if exogenous androgens acting via AR can fully support uterine growth in the absence of estrogens, the ARKO and ugeARKO females were ovariectomized and treated with supraphysiological doses of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (nonaromatizable androgen). Both dihydrotestosterone and testosterone supported full uterine regrowth in wild-type females while ARKO females had no regrowth (comparable to ovariectomized only). These findings suggest that androgens acting via AR can promote full uterine regrowth in the absence of estrogens. The ugeARKO had 50% regrowth when compared to intact uterine glands, and histomorphologically, both the endometrial and myometrial areas were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced, suggesting glandular epithelial AR located in the endometrium may indirectly modify myometrial development. Additionally, to confirm Cre function in endometrial glands, we generated uge-specific PTEN knockout mouse model. The ugePTEN knockout females developed severe endometrial hyperplasia and therefore present a novel model for future research.

  10. Retinoid-related orphan receptor γ (RORγ) adult induced knockout mice develop lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Liljevald, Maria; Rehnberg, Maria; Söderberg, Magnus; Ramnegård, Marie; Börjesson, Jenny; Luciani, Donatella; Krutrök, Nina; Brändén, Lena; Johansson, Camilla; Xu, Xiufeng; Bjursell, Mikael; Sjögren, Anna-Karin; Hornberg, Jorrit; Andersson, Ulf; Keeling, David; Jirholt, Johan

    2016-11-01

    RORγ is a nuclear hormone receptor which controls polarization of naive CD4(+) T-cells into proinflammatory Th17 cells. Pharmacological antagonism of RORγ has therapeutic potential for autoimmune diseases; however, this mechanism may potentially carry target-related safety risks, as mice deficient in Rorc, the gene encoding RORγ, develop T-cell lymphoma with 50% frequency. Due to the requirement of RORγ during development, the Rorc knockout (KO) animals lack secondary lymphoid organs and have a dysregulation in the generation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We wanted to extend the evaluation of RORγ deficiency to address the question whether lymphomas, similar to those observed in the Rorc KO, would develop in an animal with an otherwise intact adult immune system. Accordingly, we designed a conditional RORγ knockout mouse (Rorc CKO) where the Rorc locus could be deleted in adult animals. Based on these studies we can confirm that these animals also develop lymphoma in a similar time frame as embryonic Rorc knockouts. This study also suggests that in animals where the gene deletion is incomplete, the thymus undergoes a rapid selection process replacing Rorc deficient cells with remnant thymocytes carrying a functional Rorc locus and that subsequently, these animals do not develop lymphoblastic lymphoma.

  11. Axonal regeneration of optic nerve after crush in Nogo66 receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Su, Ying; Wang, Feng; Teng, Yan; Zhao, Shi-Guang; Cui, Hao; Pan, Shang-Ha

    2009-09-04

    Mature retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) cannot regenerate injured axons because some neurite growth inhibitors, including the C-terminal of Nogo-A (Nogo66), myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and Omgp, exert their effects on neuron regeneration through the Nogo receptor (NgR). In this study, the axonal regeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after optic nerve (ON) crush was investigated both in vivo and in vitro in NgR knockout mice. We used NgR knockout mice as the experimental group, and C57BL/6 mice as the control group. Partial ON injury was induced by using a specially designed ON clip to pinch the ON 1mm behind the mouse eyeball with 40g pressure for 9s. NgR mRNA was studied by in situ hybridization (ISH). NgR protein was studied by Western blot. Growth Associated Protein 43 (GAP-43), a plasticity protein expressed highly during axon regeneration, was studied by immunofluorescence staining on the frozen sections. RGCs were cultured and purified. The axonal growth of RGCs was calculated by a computerized image analyzer. We found that compared with the control group, the GAP-43 expression was significantly higher and the axonal growth was significantly more active at every observation time point in the experimental group. These results indicate that NgR genes play an important role in the axonal regeneration after ON injury, while knockout of NgR is effective for eliminating this inhibition and enhancing axonal regeneration.

  12. Impairments in the initiation of maternal behavior in oxytocin receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Rich, Megan E; deCárdenas, Emily J; Lee, Heon-Jin; Caldwell, Heather K

    2014-01-01

    Oxytocin (Oxt) acting through its single receptor subtype, the Oxtr, is important for the coordination of physiology and behavior associated with parturition and maternal care. Knockout mouse models have been helpful in exploring the contributions of Oxt to maternal behavior, including total body Oxt knockout (Oxt -/-) mice, forebrain conditional Oxtr knockout (Oxtr FB/FB) mice, and total body Oxtr knockout (Oxtr -/-) mice. Since Oxtr -/- mice are unable to lactate, maternal behavior has only been examined in virgin females, or in dams within a few hours of parturition, and there have been no studies that have examined their anxiety-like and depression-like behavior following parturition. To improve our understanding of how the absence of Oxt signaling affects maternal behavior, mood and anxiety, we designed a study using Oxtr -/- mice that separated nursing behavior from other aspects of maternal care, such as licking and grooming by thelectomizing (i.e. removing the nipples) of Oxtr +/+ mice and sham-thelectomizing Oxtr -/- mice, and pairing both genotypes with a wet nurse. We then measured pup abandonment, maternal behavior, and postpartum anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors. We hypothesized that genetic disruption of the Oxtr would impact maternal care, mood and anxiety. Specifically, we predicted that Oxtr -/- dams would have impaired maternal care and increased anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors in the postpartum period. We found that Oxtr -/- dams had significantly higher levels of pup abandonment compared to controls, which is consistent with previous work in Oxtr FB/FB mice. Interestingly, Oxtr -/- dams that initiated maternal care did not differ from wildtype controls in measures of maternal behavior. We also did not find any evidence of altered anxiety-like or depressive-like behavior in the postpartum period of Oxtr -/- dams. Thus, our data suggest that Oxt lowers the threshold for the initiation of maternal behavior.

  13. Control of excitatory synaptic transmission by capsaicin is unaltered in TRPV1 vanilloid receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, Felix; Freund, Tamás F.; Hájos, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Several studies have shown that capsaicin could effectively regulate excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system, but the assumption that this effect is mediated by TRPV1 vanilloid receptors (TRPV1Rs) has not been tested directly. To provide direct evidence, we compared the effect of capsaicin on excitatory synapses in wild type mice and TRPV1R knockouts. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques, excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded in granule cells of the dentate gyrus. First, we investigated the effect of capsaicin on EPSCs evoked by focal stimulation of fibers in the stratum moleculare. Bath application of 10 μM capsaicin reduced the amplitude of evoked EPSCs both in wild type and TRPV1R knockout animals to a similar extent. Treatment of the slices with the TRPV1R antagonist capsazepine (10 μM) alone, or together with the agonist capsaicin, also caused a decrease in the EPSC amplitude both in wild type and TRPV1R knockout animals. Both drugs appeared to affect the efficacy of excitatory synapses at presynaptic sites, since a significant increase was observed in paired-pulse ratio of EPSC amplitude after drug treatment. Next we examined the effect of capsaicin on spontaneously occurring EPSCs. This prototypic vanilloid ligand increased the frequency of events without changing their amplitude in wild type mice. Similar enhancement in the frequency without altering the amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs was observed in TRPV1R knockout mice. These data strongly argue against the hypothesis that capsaicin modulates excitatory synaptic transmission by activating TRPV1Rs, at least in the hippocampal network. PMID:17651868

  14. mu-Opioid receptor knockout mice are insensitive to methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xine; Purser, Chris; Tien, Lu-Tai; Chiu, Chi-Tso; Paul, Ian A; Baker, Rodney; Loh, Horace H; Ho, Ing K; Ma, Tangeng

    2010-08-01

    Repeated administration of psychostimulants to rodents can lead to behavioral sensitization. Previous studies, using nonspecific opioid receptor (OR) antagonists, revealed that ORs were involved in modulation of behavioral sensitization to methamphetamine (METH). However, the contribution of OR subtypes remains unclear. In the present study, using mu-OR knockout mice, we examined the role of mu-OR in the development of METH sensitization. Mice received daily intraperitoneal injection of drug or saline for 7 consecutive days to initiate sensitization. To express sensitization, animals received one injection of drug (the same as for initiation) or saline on day 11. Animal locomotor activity and stereotypy were monitored during the periods of initiation and expression of sensitization. Also, the concentrations of METH and its active metabolite amphetamine in the blood were measured after single and repeated administrations of METH. METH promoted significant locomotor hyperactivity at low doses and stereotyped behaviors at relative high doses (2.5 mg/kg and above). Repeated administration of METH led to the initiation and expression of behavioral sensitization in wild-type mice. METH-induced behavioral responses were attenuated in the mu-OR knockout mice. Haloperidol (a dopamine receptor antagonist) showed a more potent effect in counteracting METH-induced stereotypy in the mu-OR knockout mice. Saline did not induce behavioral sensitization in either genotype. No significant difference was observed in disposition of METH and amphetamine between the two genotypes. Our study indicated that the mu-opioid system is involved in modulating the development of behavioral sensitization to METH. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. μ-Opioid Receptor Knockout Mice Are Insensitive to Methamphetamine-Induced Behavioral Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xine; Purser, Chris; Tien, Lu-Tai; Chiu, Chi-Tso; Paul, Ian A.; Baker, Rodney; Loh, Horace H.; Ho, Ing K.; Ma, Tangeng

    2011-01-01

    Repeated administration of psychostimulants to rodents can lead to behavioral sensitization. Previous studies, using nonspecific opioid receptor (OR) antagonists, revealed that ORs were involved in modulation of behavioral sensitization to methamphetamine (METH). However, the contribution of OR subtypes remains unclear. In the present study, using μ-OR knockout mice, we examined the role of μ-OR in the development of METH sensitization. Mice received daily intraperitoneal injection of drug or saline for 7 consecutive days to initiate sensitization. To express sensitization, animals received one injection of drug (the same as for initiation) or saline on day 11. Animal locomotor activity and stereotypy were monitored during the periods of initiation and expression of sensitization. Also, the concentrations of METH and its active metabolite amphetamine in the blood were measured after single and repeated administrations of METH. METH promoted significant locomotor hyperactivity at low doses and stereotyped behaviors at relative high doses (2.5 mg/kg and above). Repeated administration of METH led to the initiation and expression of behavioral sensitization in wild-type mice. METH-induced behavioral responses were attenuated in the μ-OR knockout mice. Haloperidol (a dopamine receptor antagonist) showed a more potent effect in counteracting METH-induced stereotypy in the μ-OR knockout mice. Saline did not induce behavioral sensitization in either genotype. No significant difference was observed in disposition of METH and amphetamine between the two genotypes. Our study indicated that the μ-opioid system is involved in modulating the development of behavioral sensitization to METH. PMID:20209629

  16. ApoC-III inhibits clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins through LDL family receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gordts, Philip L.S.M.; Son, Ni-Huiping; Ramms, Bastian; Lew, Irene; Gonzales, Jon C.; Thacker, Bryan E.; Basu, Debapriya; Lee, Richard G.; Mullick, Adam E.; Graham, Mark J.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Crooke, Rosanne M.; Witztum, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and plasma triglycerides (TGs) correlate strongly with plasma apolipoprotein C-III (ApoC-III) levels. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) for ApoC-III reduce plasma TGs in primates and mice, but the underlying mechanism of action remains controversial. We determined that a murine-specific ApoC-III–targeting ASO reduces fasting TG levels through a mechanism that is dependent on low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) and LDLR-related protein 1 (LRP1). ApoC-III ASO treatment lowered plasma TGs in mice lacking lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hepatic heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptors, LDLR, or LRP1 and in animals with combined deletion of the genes encoding HSPG receptors and LDLRs or LRP1. However, the ApoC-III ASO did not lower TG levels in mice lacking both LDLR and LRP1. LDLR and LRP1 were also required for ApoC-III ASO–induced reduction of plasma TGs in mice fed a high-fat diet, in postprandial clearance studies, and when ApoC-III–rich or ApoC-III–depleted lipoproteins were injected into mice. ASO reduction of ApoC-III had no effect on VLDL secretion, heparin-induced TG reduction, or uptake of lipids into heart and skeletal muscle. Our data indicate that ApoC-III inhibits turnover of TG-rich lipoproteins primarily through a hepatic clearance mechanism mediated by the LDLR/LRP1 axis. PMID:27400128

  17. ApoC-III inhibits clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins through LDL family receptors.

    PubMed

    Gordts, Philip L S M; Nock, Ryan; Son, Ni-Huiping; Ramms, Bastian; Lew, Irene; Gonzales, Jon C; Thacker, Bryan E; Basu, Debapriya; Lee, Richard G; Mullick, Adam E; Graham, Mark J; Goldberg, Ira J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Witztum, Joseph L; Esko, Jeffrey D

    2016-08-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and plasma triglycerides (TGs) correlate strongly with plasma apolipoprotein C-III (ApoC-III) levels. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) for ApoC-III reduce plasma TGs in primates and mice, but the underlying mechanism of action remains controversial. We determined that a murine-specific ApoC-III-targeting ASO reduces fasting TG levels through a mechanism that is dependent on low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) and LDLR-related protein 1 (LRP1). ApoC-III ASO treatment lowered plasma TGs in mice lacking lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hepatic heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptors, LDLR, or LRP1 and in animals with combined deletion of the genes encoding HSPG receptors and LDLRs or LRP1. However, the ApoC-III ASO did not lower TG levels in mice lacking both LDLR and LRP1. LDLR and LRP1 were also required for ApoC-III ASO-induced reduction of plasma TGs in mice fed a high-fat diet, in postprandial clearance studies, and when ApoC-III-rich or ApoC-III-depleted lipoproteins were injected into mice. ASO reduction of ApoC-III had no effect on VLDL secretion, heparin-induced TG reduction, or uptake of lipids into heart and skeletal muscle. Our data indicate that ApoC-III inhibits turnover of TG-rich lipoproteins primarily through a hepatic clearance mechanism mediated by the LDLR/LRP1 axis.

  18. A Novel Apolipoprotein C-II Mimetic Peptide That Activates Lipoprotein Lipase and Decreases Serum Triglycerides in Apolipoprotein E–Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Toshihiro; Sakurai-Ikuta, Akiko; Sviridov, Denis; Freeman, Lita; Ahsan, Lusana; Remaley, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mimetic peptides are currently being developed as possible new agents for the treatment of cardiovascular disease based on their ability to promote cholesterol efflux and their other beneficial antiatherogenic properties. Many of these peptides, however, have been reported to cause transient hypertriglyceridemia due to inhibition of lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase (LPL). We describe a novel bihelical amphipathic peptide (C-II-a) that contains an amphipathic helix (18A) for binding to lipoproteins and stimulating cholesterol efflux as well as a motif based on the last helix of apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) that activates lipolysis by LPL. The C-II-a peptide promoted cholesterol efflux from ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1-transfected BHK cells similar to apoA-I mimetic peptides. Furthermore, it was shown in vitro to be comparable to the full-length apoC-II protein in activating lipolysis by LPL. When added to serum from a patient with apoC-II deficiency, it restored normal levels of LPL-induced lipolysis and also enhanced lipolysis in serum from patients with type IV and V hypertriglyceridemia. Intravenous injection of C-II-a (30 mg/kg) in apolipoprotein E–knockout mice resulted in a significant reduction of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides of 38 ± 6% and 85 ± 7%, respectively, at 4 hours. When coinjected with the 5A peptide (60 mg/kg), the C-II-a (30 mg/kg) peptide was found to completely block the hypertriglyceridemic effect of the 5A peptide in C57Bl/6 mice. In summary, C-II-a is a novel peptide based on apoC-II, which promotes cholesterol efflux and lipolysis and may therefore be useful for the treatment of apoC-II deficiency and other forms of hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:25395590

  19. A novel apolipoprotein C-II mimetic peptide that activates lipoprotein lipase and decreases serum triglycerides in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Amar, Marcelo J A; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Sakurai-Ikuta, Akiko; Sviridov, Denis; Freeman, Lita; Ahsan, Lusana; Remaley, Alan T

    2015-02-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mimetic peptides are currently being developed as possible new agents for the treatment of cardiovascular disease based on their ability to promote cholesterol efflux and their other beneficial antiatherogenic properties. Many of these peptides, however, have been reported to cause transient hypertriglyceridemia due to inhibition of lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase (LPL). We describe a novel bihelical amphipathic peptide (C-II-a) that contains an amphipathic helix (18A) for binding to lipoproteins and stimulating cholesterol efflux as well as a motif based on the last helix of apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) that activates lipolysis by LPL. The C-II-a peptide promoted cholesterol efflux from ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1-transfected BHK cells similar to apoA-I mimetic peptides. Furthermore, it was shown in vitro to be comparable to the full-length apoC-II protein in activating lipolysis by LPL. When added to serum from a patient with apoC-II deficiency, it restored normal levels of LPL-induced lipolysis and also enhanced lipolysis in serum from patients with type IV and V hypertriglyceridemia. Intravenous injection of C-II-a (30 mg/kg) in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice resulted in a significant reduction of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides of 38 ± 6% and 85 ± 7%, respectively, at 4 hours. When coinjected with the 5A peptide (60 mg/kg), the C-II-a (30 mg/kg) peptide was found to completely block the hypertriglyceridemic effect of the 5A peptide in C57Bl/6 mice. In summary, C-II-a is a novel peptide based on apoC-II, which promotes cholesterol efflux and lipolysis and may therefore be useful for the treatment of apoC-II deficiency and other forms of hypertriglyceridemia. U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  20. Multiple CNS nicotinic receptors mediate L-dopa-induced dyskinesias: studies with parkinsonian nicotinic receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Quik, Maryka; Campos, Carla; Grady, Sharon R

    2013-10-15

    Accumulating evidence supports the idea that drugs acting at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) may be beneficial for Parkinson's disease, a neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by a loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Nicotine administration to parkinsonian animals protects against nigrostriatal damage. In addition, nicotine and nAChR drugs improve L-dopa-induced dyskinesias, a debilitating side effect of L-dopa therapy which remains the gold-standard treatment for Parkinson's disease. Nicotine exerts its antidyskinetic effect by interacting with multiple nAChRs. One approach to identify the subtypes specifically involved in L-dopa-induced dyskinesias is through the use of nAChR subunit null mutant mice. Previous work with β2 and α6 nAChR knockout mice has shown that α6β2* nAChRs were necessary for the development/maintenance of L-dopa-induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs). The present results in parkinsonian α4 nAChR knockout mice indicate that α4β2* nAChRs also play an essential role since nicotine did not reduce L-dopa-induced AIMs in such mice. Combined analyses of the data from α4 and α6 knockout mice suggest that the α6α4β2β3 subtype may be critical. In contrast to the studies with α4 and α6 knockout mice, nicotine treatment did reduce L-dopa-induced AIMs in parkinsonian α7 nAChR knockout mice. However, α7 nAChR subunit deletion alone increased baseline AIMs, suggesting that α7 receptors exert an inhibitory influence on L-dopa-induced AIMs. In conclusion, α6β2*, α4β2* and α7 nAChRs all modulate L-dopa-induced AIMs, although their mode of regulation varies. Thus drugs targeting one or multiple nAChRs may be optimal for reducing L-dopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease.

  1. Drosophila Lipophorin Receptors Recruit the Lipoprotein LTP to the Plasma Membrane to Mediate Lipid Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Míriam; Mejía-Morales, John E.; Culi, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    Lipophorin, the main Drosophila lipoprotein, circulates in the hemolymph transporting lipids between organs following routes that must adapt to changing physiological requirements. Lipophorin receptors expressed in developmentally dynamic patterns in tissues such as imaginal discs, oenocytes and ovaries control the timing and tissular distribution of lipid uptake. Using an affinity purification strategy, we identified a novel ligand for the lipophorin receptors, the circulating lipoprotein Lipid Transfer Particle (LTP). We show that specific isoforms of the lipophorin receptors mediate the extracellular accumulation of LTP in imaginal discs and ovaries. The interaction requires the LA-1 module in the lipophorin receptors and is strengthened by a contiguous region of 16 conserved amino acids. Lipophorin receptor variants that do not interact with LTP cannot mediate lipid uptake, revealing an essential role of LTP in the process. In addition, we show that lipophorin associates with the lipophorin receptors and with the extracellular matrix through weak interactions. However, during lipophorin receptor-mediated lipid uptake, LTP is required for a transient stabilization of lipophorin in the basolateral plasma membrane of imaginal disc cells. Together, our data suggests a molecular mechanism by which the lipophorin receptors tether LTP to the plasma membrane in lipid acceptor tissues. LTP would interact with lipophorin particles adsorbed to the extracellular matrix and with the plasma membrane, catalyzing the exchange of lipids between them. PMID:26121667

  2. Effects of High Fat Feeding and Diabetes on Regression of Atherosclerosis Induced by Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Therapy in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Willecke, Florian; Yuan, Chujun; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Hu, Yunying; Barnhart, Shelley; Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether a high fat diet (HFD) containing the inflammatory dietary fatty acid palmitate or insulin deficient diabetes altered the remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques in LDL receptor knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice. Cholesterol reduction was achieved by using a helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) carrying the gene for the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr; HDAd-LDLR). After injection of the HDAd-LDLR, mice consuming either HFD, which led to insulin resistance but not hyperglycemia, or low fat diet (LFD), showed regression compared to baseline. However there was no difference between the two groups in terms of atherosclerotic lesion size, or CD68+ cell and lipid content. Because of the lack of effects of these two diets, we then tested whether viral-mediated cholesterol reduction would lead to defective regression in mice with greater hyperglycemia. In both normoglycemic and streptozotocin (STZ)-treated hyperglycemic mice, HDAd-LDLR significantly reduced plasma cholesterol levels, decreased atherosclerotic lesion size, reduced macrophage area and lipid content, and increased collagen content of plaque in the aortic sinus. However, reductions in anti-inflammatory and ER stress-related genes were less pronounced in STZ-diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated Ldlr gene therapy is an effective and simple method to induce atherosclerosis regression in Ldlr-/- mice in different metabolic states. PMID:26046657

  3. Raphe serotonin neuron-specific oxytocin receptor knockout reduces aggression without affecting anxiety-like behavior in male mice only

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Jerome H.; Williams Avram, Sarah K.; Cui, Zhenzhong; Song, June; Mezey, Éva; Senerth, Julia M.; Baumann, Michael H.; Young, W. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin and oxytocin influence aggressive and anxiety-like behaviors, though it is unclear how the two may interact. That the oxytocin receptor is expressed in the serotonergic raphe nuclei suggests a mechanism by which the two neurotransmitters may cooperatively influence behavior. We hypothesized that oxytocin acts on raphe neurons to influence serotonergically-mediated anxiety-like, aggressive and parental care behaviors. We eliminated expression of the oxytocin receptor in raphe neurons by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the serotonin transporter promoter (Slc6a4) with our conditional oxytocin receptor knockout line. The knockout mice generated by this cross are normal across a range of behavioral measures: there are no effects for either sex on locomotion in an open-field, olfactory habituation/dishabituation or, surprisingly, anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated O and plus mazes. There was a profound deficit in male aggression: only one of 11 raphe oxytocin receptor knockouts showed any aggressive behavior, compared to eight of 11 wildtypes. In contrast, female knockouts displayed no deficits in maternal behavior or aggression. Our results show that oxytocin, via its effects on raphe neurons, is a key regulator of resident-intruder aggression in males but not maternal aggression. Furthermore, this reduction in male aggression is quite different from the effects reported previously after forebrain or total elimination of oxytocin receptors. Finally, we conclude that when constitutively eliminated, oxytocin receptors expressed by serotonin cells do not contribute to baseline anxiety-like behaviors or maternal care. PMID:25677455

  4. Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis increase hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ness, G C; Zhao, Z; Lopez, D

    1996-01-15

    Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis are believed to lower serum cholesterol levels by enhancing the removal of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by increasing hepatic LDL receptor function. Thus, the effects of several different inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis were examined for their effects on the expression of the hepatic LDL receptor in rats. We found that administration of inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase such as lovastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, and rivastatin resulted in increased hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. Surprisingly, these agents failed to increase levels of immunoreactive LDL receptor protein in rat liver even when the dose and length of treatment were increased. Treatment of rats with zaragozic acid A, an inhibitor of squalene synthase, caused even greater increases in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels, but did not increase levels of immunoreactive protein. Further investigation revealed that the rate of degradation of the hepatic LDL receptor was increased in rats given inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. The greatest increase in the rate of degradation was seen in animals treated with zaragozic acid A which caused the largest increase in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. In contrast, hepatic LDL receptor protein was stabilized in cholesterol-fed rats. It appears that increased potential for LDL receptor protein synthesis, reflected in increased mRNA levels, is offset by a corresponding increase in the rate of receptor protein degradation resulting in constant steady-state levels of hepatic LDL receptor protein. These findings are suggestive of increased cycling of the hepatic LDL receptor. This postulated mechanism can provide for enhanced hepatic uptake of lipoproteins without increasing steady-state levels of LDL receptor protein.

  5. Development of a conditional Mesd (mesoderm development) allele for functional analysis of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related family in defined tissues.

    PubMed

    Taibi, Andrew V; Lighthouse, Janet K; Grady, Richard C; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Holdener, Bernadette C

    2013-01-01

    The Low-density lipoprotein receptor-Related Protein (LRP) family members are essential for diverse processes ranging from the regulation of gastrulation to the modulation of lipid homeostasis. Receptors in this family bind and internalize a diverse array of ligands in the extracellular matrix (ECM). As a consequence, LRPs regulate a wide variety of cellular functions including, but not limited to lipid metabolism, membrane composition, cell motility, and cell signaling. Not surprisingly, mutations in single human LRPs are associated with defects in cholesterol metabolism and development of atherosclerosis, abnormalities in bone density, or aberrant eye vasculature, and may be a contributing factor in development of Alzheimer's disease. Often, members of this diverse family of receptors perform overlapping roles in the same tissues, complicating the analysis of their function through conventional targeted mutagenesis. Here, we describe development of a mouse Mesd (Mesoderm Development) conditional knockout allele, and demonstrate that ubiquitous deletion of Mesd using Cre-recombinase blocks gastrulation, as observed in the traditional knockout and albino-deletion phenotypes. This conditional allele will serve as an excellent tool for future characterization of the cumulative contribution of LRP members in defined tissues.

  6. Knockout of a difficult-to-remove CHO host cell protein, lipoprotein lipase, for improved polysorbate stability in monoclonal antibody formulations.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Josephine; Valente, Kristin N; Levy, Nicholas E; Min, Lie; Lenhoff, Abraham M; Lee, Kelvin H

    2017-05-01

    While the majority of host cell protein (HCP) impurities are effectively removed in typical downstream purification processes, a small population of HCPs are particularly challenging. Previous studies have identified HCPs that are challenging for a variety of reasons. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) HCP that functions to hydrolyze esters in triglycerides-was one of ten HCPs identified in previous studies as being susceptible to retention in downstream processing. LPL may degrade polysorbate 80 (PS-80) and polysorbate 20 (PS-20) in final product formulations due to the structural similarity between polysorbates and triglycerides. In this work, recombinant LPL was found to have enzymatic activity against PS-80 and PS-20 in a range of solution conditions that are typical of mAb formulations. LPL knockout CHO cells were created with CRISPR and TALEN technologies and resulting cell culture harvest fluid demonstrated significantly reduced polysorbate degradation without significant impact on cell viability when compared to wild-type samples. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1006-1015. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Different zonal distribution of the asialoglycoprotein receptor, the alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low-density-lipoprotein receptor-related protein and the lipoprotein-remnant receptor of rat liver parenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Voorschuur, A H; Kuiper, J; Neelissen, J A; Boers, W; Van Berkel, T J

    1994-11-01

    Periportal and perivenous parenchymal cells were isolated by the digitonin-pulse perfusion method. The digitonin-pulse perfusion was shown to lead to selective lysis of the correct zone with a straight and sharp border of two to three cells. The mean ratios of alanine aminotransferase activity (a marker for periportal parenchymal cells) and glutamine synthetase activity (a perivenous marker) of periportal to perivenous parenchymal cells were 1.76 and 0.025 respectively. Cells were incubated in vitro with 125I-asialo-orosomucoid (ASOR), 125I-trypsin-activated alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M-T) or 125I-beta-migrating very-low-density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), in order to determine the zonal distribution of the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPr), the alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low-density-lipoprotein receptor-related protein (alpha 2Mr/LRP) and the lipoprotein-remnant receptor, respectively. Maximum binding capacity for 125I-ASOR on parenchymal cells showed a periportal/perivenous ratio of 0.70. The periportal/perivenous ratio of Bmax. values of binding of 125I-alpha 2M-T to parenchymal cells was 1.51. The Bmax. values of binding of 125I-beta-VLDL, however, were about equal for both cell populations. It is concluded that the maximum binding capacity of the ASGPr on isolated periportal parenchymal cells is 0.70 times that of perivenous parenchymal cells. The 1.51-fold higher expression of the alpha 2Mr/LRP on periportal cells, compared with perivenous parenchymal cells, indicates a zonal specialization for the uptake of the suggested multiple ligands. In contrast, the observed homogeneous distribution of the lipoprotein-remnant receptor is in accordance with the suggestion that lipoprotein remnants bind to a specific receptor, which is different from the alpha 2Mr/LRP. The zonal heterogeneity in the expression of receptors suggests that receptor-dependent uptake pathways are under zonal control, leading to intrahepatic heterogeneity in the removal of ligands from

  8. Collecting duct-specific endothelin B receptor knockout increases ENaC activity

    PubMed Central

    Bugaj, Vladislav; Mironova, Elena; Kohan, Donald E.

    2012-01-01

    Collecting duct (CD)-derived endothelin-1 (ET-1) acting via endothelin B (ETB) receptors promotes Na+ excretion. Compromise of ET-1 signaling or ETB receptors in the CD cause sodium retention and increase blood pressure. Activity of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) is limiting for Na+ reabsorption in the CD. To test for ETB receptor regulation of ENaC, we combined patch-clamp electrophysiology with CD-specific knockout (KO) of endothelin receptors. We also tested how ET-1 signaling via specific endothelin receptors influences ENaC activity under differing dietary Na+ regimens. ET-1 significantly decreased ENaC open probability in CD isolated from wild-type (WT) and CD ETA KO mice but not CD ETB KO and CD ETA/B KO mice. ENaC activity in WT and CD ETA but not CD ETB and CD ETA/B KO mice was inversely related to dietary Na+ intake. ENaC activity in CD ETB and CD ETA/B KO mice tended to be elevated under all dietary Na+ regimens compared with WT and CD ETA KO mice, reaching significance with high (2%) Na+ feeding. These results show that the bulk of ET-1 inhibition of ENaC activity is mediated by the ETB receptor. In addition, they could explain the Na+ retention and elevated blood pressure observed in CD ET-1 KO, CD ETB KO, and CD ETA/B KO mice consistent with ENaC regulation by ET-1 via ETB receptors contributing to the antihypertensive and natriuretic effects of the local endothelin system in the mammalian CD. PMID:21918182

  9. Oxidized or acetylated low density lipoproteins are rapidly cleared by the liver in mice with disruption of the scavenger receptor class A type I/II gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, W; Lougheed, M; Suzuki, H; Buchan, A; Kodama, T; Steinbrecher, U P

    1997-01-01

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) and acetyl LDL are recognized by the scavenger receptor class A type I/II (SR-AI/II) on macrophages and liver endothelial cells. Several investigators have suggested that there are additional receptors specific for oxidized LDL, but characterization of these alternate receptors for oxidized LDL and evaluation of their quantitative importance in uptake of oxidized LDL has been difficult because of overlapping ligand specificity with SR-AI/II. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of SR-AI/II in the removal of modified LDL from the bloodstream in vivo. The clearance rate of oxidized LDL from plasma in normal mice was very rapid, and > 90% of injected dose was removed from the blood within 5 min. Clearance rates of oxidized LDL were equally high in SR-AI/II knockout mice, indicating that this receptor is not required for removal of oxidized LDL from plasma. Surprisingly, there was no difference in the clearance rate of acetyl LDL in wild-type and SR-AI/II knockout animals. The plasma clearance of radioiodinated acetyl LDL was almost fully blocked by a 50-fold excess of unlabeled acetyl LDL, but the latter only inhibited oxidized LDL clearance by approximately 5%. Both modified LDLs were cleared mostly by the liver, and there was no difference in the tissue distribution of modified LDL in control and knockout mice. Studies in isolated nonparenchymal liver cells showed that Kupffer cells accounted for most of the uptake of oxidized LDL. Extensively oxidized LDL and LDL modified by exposure to fatty acid peroxidation products were efficient competitors for the uptake of labeled oxidized LDL by SR-AI/II-deficient Kupffer cells, while acetyl LDL and malondialdehyde-modified LDL were relatively poor competitors. PMID:9218499

  10. Comparison of muscarinic receptor selectivity of solifenacin and oxybutynin in the bladder and submandibular gland of muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshihiko; Oyunzul, Luvsandorj; Yoshida, Akira; Fujino, Tomomi; Noguchi, Yukiko; Yuyama, Hironori; Ohtake, Akiyoshi; Suzuki, Masanori; Sasamata, Masao; Matsui, Minoru; Yamada, Shizuo

    2009-08-01

    Solifenacin is a novel selective antagonist of M(3) muscarinic receptor developed for the treatment of overactive bladder. The current study was undertaken to characterize in vivo muscarinic receptor subtype selectivity of solifenacin in the bladder and submandibular gland by using muscarinic receptor subtype knockout (KO) mice. Muscarinic receptors in the bladder and submandibular gland of wild type, M(2)R KO and M(3)R KO mice under in vitro and after oral administration of solifenacin and oxybutynin were measured by radioligand binding assay using [N-methyl-(3)H]scopolamine ([(3)H]NMS). There was little difference between the bladder and submandibular gland of M(2)R KO mice in the receptor binding activities of oxybutynin and solifenacin in vitro, suggesting equal affinity for residual (predominantly M(3) subtype) muscarinic receptors in both tissues. In contrast, compared with oral oxybutynin, oral administration of solifenacin exerted a significantly greater activity to bind muscarinic receptors in the bladder of M(2)R KO mice, while exhibiting a significantly less activity to bind those in the submandibular gland. In the bladder and submandibular gland of M(3)R KO mice, the binding activity of solifenacin and oxybutynin showed no significant difference. Plasma concentrations of solifenacin and oxybutynin after oral administration differed little among wild type, M(2)R KO and M(3)R KO mice. The results indicate that oral solifenacin, unlike oral oxybutynin, may selectively bind to the muscarinic M(3) subtype in the bladder compared with such receptors in the submandibular gland in vivo. Oral solifenacin may be advantageous for the treatment of overactive bladder, in terms of high affinity for M(3) receptors in the bladder.

  11. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 dependent endosomal trapping and recycling of apolipoprotein E.

    PubMed

    Laatsch, Alexander; Panteli, Malamatenia; Sornsakrin, Marijke; Hoffzimmer, Britta; Grewal, Thomas; Heeren, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    Lipoprotein receptors from the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family are multifunctional membrane proteins which can efficiently mediate endocytosis and thereby facilitate lipoprotein clearance from the plasma. The biggest member of this family, the LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), facilitates the hepatic uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) via interaction with apolipoprotein E (apoE). In contrast to the classical LDL degradation pathway, TRL disintegrate in peripheral endosomes, and core lipids and apoB are targeted along the endocytic pathway for lysosomal degradation. Notably, TRL-derived apoE remains within recycling endosomes and is then mobilized by high density lipoproteins (HDL) for re-secretion. The aim of this study is to investigate the involvement of LRP1 in the regulation of apoE recycling. Immunofluorescence studies indicate the LRP1-dependent trapping of apoE in EEA1-positive endosomes in human hepatoma cells. This processing is distinct from other LRP1 ligands such as RAP which is efficiently targeted to lysosomal compartments. Upon stimulation of HDL-induced recycling, apoE is released from LRP1-positive endosomes but is targeted to another, distinct population of early endosomes that contain HDL, but not LRP1. For subsequent analysis of the recycling capacity, we expressed the full-length human LRP1 and used an RNA interference approach to manipulate the expression levels of LRP1. In support of LRP1 determining the intracellular fate of apoE, overexpression of LRP1 significantly stimulated HDL-induced apoE recycling. Vice versa LRP1 knockdown in HEK293 cells and primary hepatocytes strongly reduced the efficiency of HDL to stimulate apoE secretion. We conclude that LRP1 enables apoE to accumulate in an early endosomal recycling compartment that serves as a pool for the intracellular formation and subsequent re-secretion of apoE-enriched HDL particles.

  12. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1 Dependent Endosomal Trapping and Recycling of Apolipoprotein E

    PubMed Central

    Laatsch, Alexander; Panteli, Malamatenia; Sornsakrin, Marijke; Hoffzimmer, Britta; Grewal, Thomas; Heeren, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipoprotein receptors from the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family are multifunctional membrane proteins which can efficiently mediate endocytosis and thereby facilitate lipoprotein clearance from the plasma. The biggest member of this family, the LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), facilitates the hepatic uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) via interaction with apolipoprotein E (apoE). In contrast to the classical LDL degradation pathway, TRL disintegrate in peripheral endosomes, and core lipids and apoB are targeted along the endocytic pathway for lysosomal degradation. Notably, TRL-derived apoE remains within recycling endosomes and is then mobilized by high density lipoproteins (HDL) for re-secretion. The aim of this study is to investigate the involvement of LRP1 in the regulation of apoE recycling. Principal Findings Immunofluorescence studies indicate the LRP1-dependent trapping of apoE in EEA1-positive endosomes in human hepatoma cells. This processing is distinct from other LRP1 ligands such as RAP which is efficiently targeted to lysosomal compartments. Upon stimulation of HDL-induced recycling, apoE is released from LRP1-positive endosomes but is targeted to another, distinct population of early endosomes that contain HDL, but not LRP1. For subsequent analysis of the recycling capacity, we expressed the full-length human LRP1 and used an RNA interference approach to manipulate the expression levels of LRP1. In support of LRP1 determining the intracellular fate of apoE, overexpression of LRP1 significantly stimulated HDL-induced apoE recycling. Vice versa LRP1 knockdown in HEK293 cells and primary hepatocytes strongly reduced the efficiency of HDL to stimulate apoE secretion. Conclusion We conclude that LRP1 enables apoE to accumulate in an early endosomal recycling compartment that serves as a pool for the intracellular formation and subsequent re-secretion of apoE-enriched HDL particles. PMID:22238606

  13. Body water balance and body temperature in vasopressin V1b receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Daikoku, R; Kunitake, T; Kato, K; Tanoue, A; Tsujimoto, G; Kannan, H

    2007-10-30

    In an attempt to determine whether there is a specific vasopressin receptor (V(1b)) subtype involved in the regulation of body water balance and temperature, vasopressin V(1b) receptor knockout mice were used. Daily drinking behavior and renal excretory function were examined in V(1b)-deficient (V(1b)(-/-)) and control (V(1b)(+/+)) mice under the basal and stress-induced condition. In addition, body temperature and locomotor activity were measured with a biotelemetry system. The baseline daily water intake and urine volume were larger in V(1b)(-/-) mice than in V(1b)(+/+) mice. V(1b)(-/-) mice (V(1b)(-/-)) had significantly higher locomotor activity than wild-type, whereas the body temperature and oxygen consumption were lower in V(1b)(-/-) than in the V(1b)(+/+) mice. Next, the V(1b)(-/-) and V(1b)(+/+) mice were subjected to water deprivation for 48 hr. Under this condition, their body temperature decreased with the time course, which was significantly larger for V(1b)(-/-) than for V(1b)(+/+) mice. Central vasopressin has been reported to elicit drinking behavior and antipyretic action, and the V(1b) receptor has been reported to be located in the kidney. Thus, the findings suggest that the V(1b) receptor may be, at least in part, involved in body water balance and body temperature regulation.

  14. Acceleration of intestinal polyposis through prostaglandin receptor EP2 in Apc(Delta 716) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sonoshita, M; Takaku, K; Sasaki, N; Sugimoto, Y; Ushikubi, F; Narumiya, S; Oshima, M; Taketo, M M

    2001-09-01

    Arachidonic acid is metabolized to prostaglandin H(2) (PGH(2)) by cyclooxygenase (COX). COX-2, the inducible COX isozyme, has a key role in intestinal polyposis. Among the metabolites of PGH(2), PGE(2) is implicated in tumorigenesis because its level is markedly elevated in tissues of intestinal adenoma and colon cancer. Here we show that homozygous deletion of the gene encoding a cell-surface receptor of PGE(2), EP2, causes decreases in number and size of intestinal polyps in Apc(Delta 716) mice (a mouse model for human familial adenomatous polyposis). This effect is similar to that of COX-2 gene disruption. We also show that COX-2 expression is boosted by PGE(2) through the EP2 receptor via a positive feedback loop. Homozygous gene knockout for other PGE(2) receptors, EP1 or EP3, did not affect intestinal polyp formation in Apc(Delta 716) mice. We conclude that EP2 is the major receptor mediating the PGE2 signal generated by COX-2 upregulation in intestinal polyposis, and that increased cellular cAMP stimulates expression of more COX-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor in the polyp stroma.

  15. GABAA-receptor modification in taurine transporter knockout mice causes striatal disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, O A; Fleischer, W; Chepkova, A N; Warskulat, U; Häussinger, D; Siebler, M; Haas, H L

    2007-12-01

    The Striatum is involved in the regulation of movements and motor skills. We have shown previously, that the osmolyte and neuromodulator taurine plays a role in striatal plasticity. We demonstrate now that hereditary taurine deficiency in taurine-transporter knock-out (TAUT KO) mice results in disinhibition of striatal network activity, which can be corrected by taurine supplementation. Modification of GABAA but not glycine receptors (taurine is a ligand for both receptor types) underlies this disinhibition. Whole-cell recordings from acutely isolated as well as cultured striatal neurons revealed a decreased agonist sensitivity of the GABAA receptor in TAUT KO neurons in the absence of changes in the maximal GABA-evoked current amplitude. The striatal GABA level in TAUT KO mice was unchanged. The amplitude enhancement of spontaneous IPSCs by zolpidem was stronger in TAUT KO than in wild-type (WT) animals. Tonic inhibition was absent in striatal neurons under control conditions but was detected after incubation with the GABA-transaminase inhibitor vigabatrin: bicuculline induced a larger shift of baseline current in WT as compared to TAUT KO neurons. Lack of taurine leads to reduced sensitivity of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors and consequently to disinhibition. These findings help in understanding neuropathologies accompanied by the loss of endogenous taurine, for instance in hepatic encephalopathy.

  16. Macrophage impairment produced by Fc receptor gamma deficiency plays a principal role in the development of lipoprotein glomerulopathy in concert with apoE abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenji; Nakashima, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Maho; Ishimura, Atsunori; Miyahara, Yoshito; Abe, Yasuhiro; Yasuno, Tetsuhiko; Ifuku, Masakazu; Sasatomi, Yoshie; Saito, Takao

    2012-10-01

    To obtain a clear understanding of the pathogenesis of lipoprotein glomerulopathy (LPG), we studied the role of the deficiency of Fc receptor gamma chain (FcRγ) for the development of LPG in concert with apolipoprotein E (apoE) abnormalities. We generated apoE and FcRγ double-knockout (FcRγ/apoE-KO) mice, and subsequently introduced several kinds of human recombinant apoE genes. At 21 days after infection, the mice were sacrificed and histologically examined. Peritoneal macrophages were evaluated for their response to modified lipids. In the FcRγ/apoE-KO mice, the human apoE3-injected mice showed the most drastic LPG-like changes, as well as prominent hypertriglyceridemia. Meanwhile, relative to the human apoE3-injected mice, the FcRγ/apoE-KO mice showed greater lipoprotein deposition and less macrophage infiltration into the mesangial area. Moreover, the peritoneal macrophages in the apoE/FcRγ-KO mice were impaired in lipid uptake and secretion of the cytokines monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted, after the uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. These results suggest that the impairment of macrophage function resulting from FcRγ deficiency plays a principal role in the development of LPG in the presence of apoE abnormalities.

  17. Comparative effects of chlorpyrifos in wild type and cannabinoid Cb1 receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Baireddy, Praveena; Liu, Jing; Hinsdale, Myron; Pope, Carey

    2011-11-15

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55.212-2 (WIN) can modulate organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase toxicity in rats, presumably by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh) release. Some OP anticholinesterases also inhibit eCB-degrading enzymes. We studied the effects of the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinergic signs of toxicity, cholinesterase activity and ACh release in tissues from wild type (+/+) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout (-/-) mice. Mice of both genotypes (n = 5-6/treatment group) were challenged with CPF (300 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg in peanut oil, sc) and evaluated for functional and neurochemical changes. Both genotypes exhibited similar cholinergic signs and cholinesterase inhibition (82-95% at 48 h after dosing) in cortex, cerebellum and heart. WIN reduced depolarization-induced ACh release in vitro in hippocampal slices from wild type mice, but had no effect in hippocampal slices from knockouts or in striatal slices from either genotype. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO, 100 {mu}M) reduced release in hippocampal slices from both genotypes in vitro, but with a greater reduction in tissues from wild types (21% vs 12%). CPO had no significant in vitro effect on ACh release in striatum. CPF reduced ACh release in hippocampus from both genotypes ex vivo, but reduction was again significantly greater in tissues from wild types (52% vs 36%). In striatum, CPF led to a similar reduction (20-23%) in tissues from both genotypes. Thus, while CB1 deletion in mice had little influence on the expression of acute toxicity following CPF, CPF- or CPO-induced changes in ACh release appeared sensitive to modulation by CB1-mediated eCB signaling in a brain-regional manner. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C57Bl/6 mice showed dose-related cholinergic toxicity following subcutaneous chlorpyrifos exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wild type and

  18. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 mediated endocytosis of β1-integrin influences cell adhesion and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Rabiej, Verena K; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Wagner, Timo; Goetze, Kristina; Storck, Steffen E; Eble, Johannes A; Weggen, Sascha; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) has been shown to interact with β1-integrin and regulate its surface expression. LRP1 knock-out cells exhibit altered cytoskeleton organization and decreased cell migration. Here we demonstrate coupled endocytosis of LRP1 and β1-integrin and the involvement of the intracellular NPxY2 motif of LRP1 in this process. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts harboring a knock in replacement of the NPxY2 motif of LRP1 by a multiple alanine cassette (AAxA) showed elevated surface expression of β1-integrin and decreased β1-integrin internalization rates. As a consequence, cell spreading was altered and adhesion rates were increased in our cell model. Cells formed more focal adhesion complexes, whereby in vitro cell migration rates were decreased. Similar results could be observed in a corresponding mouse model, the C57Bl6 LRP1 NPxYxxL knock in mice, therefore, the biochemistry of cellular adhesion was altered in primary cortical neurons. In vivo cell migration experiments demonstrated a disturbance of neuroblast cell migration along the rostral migratory stream. In summary, our results indicate that LRP1 interacts with β1-integrin mediating integrin internalization and thus correlates with downstream signaling of β1-integrin such as focal adhesion dynamics. Consequently, the disturbance of this interaction resulted in a dysfunction in in vivo and in vitro cell adhesion and cell migration.

  19. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Mediates Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion in Smooth Muscle Cells Induced by Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Li Juan; Liu, Xin He; Liu, Zhu Hui; Wang, Xiao Qun; Chen, Qiu Jin; Lu, Lin; Shen, Wei Feng; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-regulated secretion of inflammatory cytokines in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is regarded as an important step in the progression of atherosclerosis; however, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the role of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in oxLDL-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines in SMCs both in vivo and in vitro. We found that the levels of TLR4, interleukin 1-β (IL1-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression were increased in the SMCs of atherosclerotic plaques in patients with femoral artery stenosis. In cultured primary arterial SMCs from wild type mice, oxLDL caused dose- and time-dependent increase in the expression levels of TLR4 and cytokines. These effects were significantly weakened in arterial SMCs derived from TLR4 knockout mice (TLR4−/−). Moreover, the secretion of inflammatory cytokines was blocked by TLR4-specific antibodies in primary SMCs. Ox-LDL induced activation of p38 and NFκB was also inhibited in TLR4−/− primary SMCs or when treated with TLR4-specific antibodies. These results demonstrated that TLR4 is a crucial mediator in oxLDL-induced inflammatory cytokine expression and secretion, and p38 and NFκB activation. PMID:24755612

  20. Immune malfunction in the GPR39 zinc receptor of knockout mice: Its relationship to depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Młyniec, Katarzyna; Trojan, Ewa; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Głombik, Katarzyna; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Skrzeszewski, Jakub; Siwek, Agata; Holst, Birgitte; Nowak, Gabriel

    2016-02-15

    Depression is a serious psychiatric disorder affecting not only the monaminergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic neurosystems, but also the immune system. Patients suffering from depression show disturbance in the immune parameters as well as increased susceptibility to infections. Zinc is well known as an anti-inflammatory agent, and its link with depression has been proved, zinc deficiency causing depression- and anxiety-like behavior with immune malfunction. It has been discovered that trace-element zinc acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system via zinc receptor GPR39. In this study we investigated whether GPR39 knockout would cause depressive-like behavior as measured by the forced swim test, and whether these changes would coexist with immune malfunction. In GPR39 knockout mice versus a wild-type control we found: i) depressive-like behavior; ii) significantly reduced thymus weight; (iii) reduced cell viability of splenocytes; iv) reduced proliferative response of splenocytes; and v) increased IL-6 production of splenocytes after ConA stimulation and decreased IL-1b and IL-6 release after LPS stimulation. The results indicate depressive-like behavior in GPR39 KO animals with an immune response similar to that observed in depressive disorder. Here for the first time we show immunological changes under GPR39-deficient conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sex-dependence of anxiety-like behavior in cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Mallory E.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological data suggest women are at increased risk for developing anxiety and depression, although the mechanisms for this sex/gender difference remain incompletely understood. Pre-clinical studies have begun to investigate sex-dependent emotional learning and behavior in rodents, particularly as it relates to psychopathology; however, information about how gonadal hormones interact with the central nervous system is limited. We observe greater anxiety-like behavior in male mice with global knockout of the cannabinoid 1 receptor (Cnr1) compared to male, wild-type controls as measured by percent open arm entries on an elevated plus maze test. A similar increase in anxiety-like behavior, however, is not observed when comparing female Cnr1 knockouts to female wild-type subjects. Although, ovariectomy in female mice did not reverse this effect, both male and female adult mice with normative development were sensitive to Cnr1 antagonist-mediated increases in anxiety-like behavior. Together, these data support an interaction between sex, potentially mediated by gonadal hormones, and the endocannabinoid system at an early stage of development that is critical for establishing adult anxiety-like behavior. PMID:26684509

  2. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) knockout reduces fetal dysmorphogenesis in murine diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ejdesjö, Andreas; Brings, Sebastian; Fleming, Thomas; Fred, Rikard G; Nawroth, Peter P; Eriksson, Ulf J

    2016-07-01

    The receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, but its importance in diabetic embryopathy is unclear. We therefore investigated the role of RAGE in diabetic embryopathy using streptozotocin induced diabetes in female wild type (WT) C57Bl/6N and RAGE knockout C57Bl/6N (RAGE(-/-)) mice, mated with control males of the same genotype. Maternal diabetes induced more fetal resorption and malformation (facial skeleton, neural tube) in the WT than in the RAGE(-/-) fetuses. Maternal plasma glucose and methylgyoxal concentrations, as well as embryonic N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) levels were increased to the same extent in diabetic WT and RAGE(-/-) pregnancy. However, maternal diabetes induced increased fetal hepatic isoprostane 8-iso-PGF2α levels (oxidative stress marker) and embryonic activation of NFκB in WT only (not in RAGE(-/-) embryos). The association between RAGE knockout and diminished embryonic dysmorphogenesis in diabetic pregnancy suggests that embryonic RAGE activation is involved in diabetic embryopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased susceptibility to amyloid-β-induced neurotoxicity in mice lacking the low-density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Jade; Moreira, Eduardo Luiz Gasnhar; dos Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Piermartiri, Tetsadê Camboim; Dutra, Rafael Cypriano; Pinton, Simone; Tasca, Carla Inês; Farina, Marcelo; Prediger, Rui Daniel Schröder; de Bem, Andreza Fabro

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is caused by inherited genetic abnormalities that directly or indirectly affect the function of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. This condition is characterized by defective catabolism of LDL which results in increased plasma cholesterol concentrations and premature coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, there is increasing preclinical and clinical evidence indicating that familial hypercholesterolemia subjects show a particularly high incidence of mild cognitive impairment. Moreover, the LDL receptor (LDLr) has been implicated as the main central nervous system apolipoprotein E receptor that regulates amyloid deposition in distinct mouse models of β-amyloidosis. In this regard, herein we hypothesized that the lack of LDLr would enhance the susceptibility to amyloid-β-(Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity in mice. Using the acute intracerebroventricular injection of aggregated Aβ(1-40) peptide (400 pmol/mouse), a useful approach for the investigation of molecular mechanisms involved in Aβ toxicity, we observed oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and neuronal membrane damage within the hippocampus of C57BL/6 wild-type mice, which were associated with spatial reference memory and working memory impairments. In addition, our data show that LDLr knockout (LDLr(-/-)) mice, regardless of Aβ treatment, displayed memory deficits and increased blood-brain barrier permeability. Nonetheless, LDLr(-/-) mice treated with Aβ(1-40) peptide presented increased acetylcholinesterase activity, astrogliosis, oxidative imbalance, and cell permeability within the hippocampus in comparison with Aβ(1-40)-treated C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Overall, the present study shows that the lack of LDLr increases the susceptibility to Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in mice providing new evidence about the crosslink between familial hypercholesterolemia and cognitive impairment.

  4. Food intake, tumor growth, and weight loss in EP2 receptor subtype knockout mice bearing PGE2-producing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Wang, Wenhua; Nilsberth, Camilla; Andersson, Marianne; Lönnroth, Christina; Smedh, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that prostaglandin (PG) E2 is involved in anorexia/cachexia development in MCG 101 tumor-bearing mice. In the present study, we investigate the role of PGE receptor subtype EP2 in the development of anorexia after MCG 101 implantation in wild-type (EP2+/+) or EP2-receptor knockout (EP2−/−) mice. Our results showed that host absence of EP2 receptors attenuated tumor growth and development of anorexia in tumor-bearing EP2 knockout mice compared to tumor-bearing wild-type animals. Microarray profiling of the hypothalamus revealed a relative twofold change in expression of around 35 genes including mRNA transcripts coding for Phospholipase A2 and Prostaglandin D2 synthase (Ptgds) in EP2 receptor knockout mice compared to wild-type mice. Prostaglandin D2 synthase levels were increased significantly in EP2 receptor knockouts, suggesting that improved food intake may depend on altered balance of prostaglandin production in hypothalamus since PGE2 and PGD2 display opposing effects in feeding control. PMID:26197930

  5. Effect of P2X7 Receptor Knockout on AQP-5 Expression of Type I Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, Georg; Bläsche, Robert; Hofmann, Falk; Augstein, Antje; Kasper, Michael; Barth, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    P2X7 receptors, ATP-gated cation channels, are specifically expressed in alveolar epithelial cells. The pathophysiological function of this lung cell type, except a recently reported putative involvement in surfactant secretion, is unknown. In addition, P2X7 receptor-deficient mice show reduced inflammation and lung fibrosis after exposure with bleomycin. To elucidate the role of the P2X7 receptor in alveolar epithelial type I cells we characterized the pulmonary phenotype of P2X7 receptor knockout mice by using immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time RT PCR. No pathomorphological signs of fibrosis were found. Results revealed, however, a remarkable loss of aquaporin-5 protein and mRNA in young knockout animals. Additional in vitro experiments with bleomycin treated precision cut lung slices showed a greater sensitivity of the P2X7 receptor knockout mice in terms of aquaporin-5 reduction as wild type animals. Finally, P2X7 receptor function was examined by using the alveolar epithelial cell lines E10 and MLE-12 for stimulation experiments with bleomycin. The in vitro activation of P2X7 receptor was connected with an increase of aquaporin-5, whereas the inhibition of the receptor with oxidized ATP resulted in down regulation of aquaporin-5. The early loss of aquaporin-5 which can be found in different pulmonary fibrosis models does not implicate a specific pathogenetic role during fibrogenesis. PMID:24941004

  6. No further loss of dorsal root ganglion cells after axotomy in p75 neurotrophin receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Bodil; Tandrup, Trine; Koltzenburg, Martin; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2003-05-05

    The role of the p75 neurotrophin receptor for neuronal survival after nerve crush was studied in L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of knockout mice and controls with assumption-free stereological methods. Numbers of neuronal A- and B-cells were obtained using the optical fractionator and optical disector techniques. At birth, the total number of DRG neurons was 10,000 +/- 2,600 in control mice compared with 5,100 +/- 1,300 in p75 knockout mice. During postnatal development, 1,400 neuronal B-cell bodies were lost in p75 knockouts (2P < 0.05) and 1,100 in controls (NS), whereas the A-cell population remained stable. After a sciatic nerve crush, the total neuron loss in controls was 15.4% +/- 3.5% (2P < 0.05) and 22.7% +/- 5.1% (2P < 0.05) at days 14 and 42, respectively. In contrast, there was no loss in total number of neurons after crush in p75 knockout mice. Neuronal A-cell number was unchanged after the crush in p75 knockouts as well as in controls at both times. At 14 days, the population of B-cells was reduced by 24.8% +/- 3.6% in controls and by 6.1% +/- 3.5% in p75 knockouts, this difference being significant (2P < 0.001). At 42 days, the B-cell loss was 29.6% +/- 5.5% in controls and 4.2% +/- 6.4% in p75 knockouts (2P < 0.001). In conclusion, the lack of the p75 receptor results in neuronal DRG cells that are resistant to nerve injury, pointing to a role for the receptor in apoptosis. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Impairments in the Initiation of Maternal Behavior in Oxytocin Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Megan E.; deCárdenas, Emily J.; Lee, Heon-Jin; Caldwell, Heather K.

    2014-01-01

    Oxytocin (Oxt) acting through its single receptor subtype, the Oxtr, is important for the coordination of physiology and behavior associated with parturition and maternal care. Knockout mouse models have been helpful in exploring the contributions of Oxt to maternal behavior, including total body Oxt knockout (Oxt −/−) mice, forebrain conditional Oxtr knockout (Oxtr FB/FB) mice, and total body Oxtr knockout (Oxtr −/−) mice. Since Oxtr −/− mice are unable to lactate, maternal behavior has only been examined in virgin females, or in dams within a few hours of parturition, and there have been no studies that have examined their anxiety-like and depression-like behavior following parturition. To improve our understanding of how the absence of Oxt signaling affects maternal behavior, mood and anxiety, we designed a study using Oxtr −/− mice that separated nursing behavior from other aspects of maternal care, such as licking and grooming by thelectomizing (i.e. removing the nipples) of Oxtr +/+ mice and sham-thelectomizing Oxtr −/− mice, and pairing both genotypes with a wet nurse. We then measured pup abandonment, maternal behavior, and postpartum anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors. We hypothesized that genetic disruption of the Oxtr would impact maternal care, mood and anxiety. Specifically, we predicted that Oxtr −/− dams would have impaired maternal care and increased anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors in the postpartum period. We found that Oxtr −/− dams had significantly higher levels of pup abandonment compared to controls, which is consistent with previous work in Oxtr FB/FB mice. Interestingly, Oxtr −/− dams that initiated maternal care did not differ from wildtype controls in measures of maternal behavior. We also did not find any evidence of altered anxiety-like or depressive-like behavior in the postpartum period of Oxtr −/− dams. Thus, our data suggest that Oxt lowers the threshold for the initiation of

  8. Lipoprotein receptors and cholesterol in APP trafficking and proteolytic processing, implications for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Marzolo, Maria-Paz; Bu, Guojun

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide accumulation in the brain is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Aβ is produced through proteolytic processing of a transmembrane protein, β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), by β- and γ-secretases. Mounting evidence has demonstrated that alterations in APP cellular trafficking and localization directly impact its processing to Aβ. Members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, including LRP, LRP1B, SorLA/LR11, and apoER2, interact with APP and regulate its endocytic trafficking. Additionally, APP trafficking and processing are greatly affected by cellular cholesterol content. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the roles of lipoprotein receptors and cholesterol in APP trafficking and processing and their implication for AD pathogenesis and therapy. PMID:19041409

  9. Tempol improves lipid profile and prevents left ventricular hypertrophy in LDL receptor gene knockout (LDLr-/-) mice on a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Viana Gonçalves, Igor Cândido; Cerdeira, Cláudio Daniel; Poletti Camara, Eduardo; Dias Garcia, José Antônio; Ribeiro Pereira Lima Brigagão, Maísa; Bessa Veloso Silva, Roberta; Bitencourt Dos Santos, Gérsika

    2017-09-01

    Dyslipidemia is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis, and hence with high morbidity and mortality. This study investigated the effects of the nitroxide 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (Tempol) on lipid profile and cardiac morphology in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene knockout (LDLr-/-) mice. Male LDLr-/- mice (three months old, approximately 22 g weight) were divided into the following groups: controls, including (1) standard chow (SC, n=8) and (2) high-fat diet (HFD, n=8); and treatment, including (3) standard chow + Tempol (SC+T, n=8) (30 mg/kg administered by gavage, once daily) and (4) high-fat diet + Tempol (HFD+T, n=8) (30 mg/kg). After 30 days of the diet/treatment, whole blood was collected for analysis of biochemical parameters (total cholesterol, triglycerides [TG], high-density lipoprotein [HDL], LDL, and very low-density lipoprotein [VLDL]). The heart was removed through thoracotomy and histological analysis of the left ventricle was performed. A significant increase in TG, LDL, and VLDL and marked left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) were demonstrated in the HFD group relative to the SC group (p<0.05), while Tempol treatment (HFD+T group) significantly (p<0.05) prevented increases in the levels of these lipid profile markers and attenuated LVH compared with the HFD group. In this study, Tempol showed potential for the prevention of events related to serious diseases of the cardiovascular system. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Trilostane exerts antidepressive effects among wild-type, but not estrogen receptor [beta] knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Koonce, Carolyn J; Walf, Alicia A; Frye, Cheryl A

    2009-08-05

    Women with estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, who are treated with the ER blocker, tamoxifen, have an increased risk of depression. Trilostane, a 3b-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitor, is now being used to treat tamoxifen-insensitive breast cancer. In-vitro assays show that trilostane may have actions through ERb. Results of in-vivo research shows that actions at ERb may underline some antidepressant effects of estrogen. We hypothesized that trilostane may exert antidepressive effects in the forced swim in part due to actions through ERb. Trilostane (25 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), compared with vehicle, had significant antidepressant-like effects but only when administered to wild-type, not ERb knockout, mice. Thus, actions of trilostane through ERb may underlie some of its antidepressant-like effects.

  11. Trilostane exerts antidepressive effects among wild-type, but not estrogen receptor β knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Koonce, Carolyn J.; Walf, Alicia A.; Frye, Cheryl A.

    2013-01-01

    Women with estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, who are treated with the ER blocker, tamoxifen, have an increased risk of depression. Trilostane, a 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitor, is now being used to treat tamoxifen-insensitive breast cancer. In-vitro assays show that trilostane may have actions through ERβ. Results of in-vivo research shows that actions at ERβ may underline some antidepressant effects of estrogen. We hypothesized that trilostane may exert antidepressive effects in the forced swim in part due to actions through ERβ. Trilostane (25 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), compared with vehicle, had significant antidepressant-like effects but only when administered to wild-type, not ERβ knockout, mice. Thus, actions of trilostane through ERβ may underlie some of its antidepressant-like effects. PMID:19593916

  12. Thromboelastography After Murine TBI and Implications of Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Knockout.

    PubMed

    Liou, Douglas Z; Ko, Ara; Volod, Oksana; Barmparas, Galinos; Harada, Megan Y; Martin, Matthew J; Salim, Ali; Dhillon, Navpreet; Thomsen, Gretchen M; Ley, Eric J

    2016-08-01

    The source of coagulopathy in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is multifactorial and may include adrenergic stimulation. The aim of this study was to assess coagulopathy after TBI using thromboelastography (TEG), and to investigate the implications of β-adrenergic receptor knockout. Adult male wild type c57/bl6 (WT) and β1/β2-adrenergic receptor knockout (BKO) mice were assigned to either TBI (WT-TBI, BKO-TBI) or sham injury (WT-sham, BKO-sham). Mice assigned to TBI were subject to controlled cortical impact (CCI). At 24 h post-injury, whole blood samples were obtained and taken immediately for TEG. At 24 h after injury, a trend toward increased fibrinolysis was seen in WT-TBI compared to WT-sham although this did not reach significance (EPL 8.1 vs. 0 %, p = 0.18). No differences were noted in fibrinolysis in BKO-TBI compared to BKO-sham (LY30 2.6 vs. 2.5 %, p = 0.61; EPL 3.4 vs. 2.9 %, p = 0.61). In addition BKO-TBI demonstrated increased clot strength compared to BKO-sham (MA 76.6 vs. 68.6, p = 0.03; G 18.2 vs. 11.3, p = 0.03). In a mouse TBI model, WT mice sustaining TBI demonstrated a trend toward increased fibrinolysis at 24 h after injury while BKO mice did not. These findings suggest β-blockade may attenuate the coagulopathy of TBI and minimize progression of intracranial hemorrhage by reducing fibrinolysis and increasing clot strength.

  13. Knockout of NMDA receptors in parvalbumin interneurons recreates autism-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Saunders, John A; Tatard-Leitman, Valerie M; Suh, Jimmy; Billingslea, Eddie N; Roberts, Timothy P; Siegel, Steven J

    2013-04-01

    Autism is a disabling neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social deficits, language impairment, and repetitive behaviors with few effective treatments. New evidence suggests that autism has reliable electrophysiological endophenotypes and that these measures may be caused by n-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) disruption on parvalbumin (PV)-containing interneurons. These findings could be used to create new translational biomarkers. Recent developments have allowed for cell-type selective knockout of NMDARs in order to examine the perturbations caused by disrupting specific circuits. This study examines several electrophysiological and behavioral measures disrupted in autism using a PV-selective reduction in NMDA R1 subunit. Mouse electroencephalograph (EEG) was recorded in response to auditory stimuli. Event-related potential (ERP) component amplitude and latency analysis, social testing, and premating ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) recordings were performed. Correlations were examined between the ERP latency and behavioral measures. The N1 ERP latency was delayed, sociability was reduced, and mating USVs were impaired in PV-selective NMDA Receptor 1 Knockout (NR1 KO) as compared with wild-type mice. There was a significant correlation between N1 latency and sociability but not between N1 latency and premating USV power or T-maze performance. The increases in N1 latency, impaired sociability, and reduced vocalizations in PV-selective NR1 KO mice mimic similar changes found in autism. Electrophysiological changes correlate to reduced sociability, indicating that the local circuit mechanisms controlling N1 latency may be utilized in social function. Therefore, we propose that behavioral and electrophysiological alterations in PV-selective NR1 KO mice may serve as a useful model for therapeutic development in autism. Autism Res 2013, 6: 69-77. © 2013 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International Society for

  14. Knockout of NMDA Receptors in Parvalbumin Interneurons Recreates Autism-Like Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, John A.; Tatard-Leitman, Valerie M.; Suh, Jimmy; Billingslea, Eddie N.; Roberts, Timothy P.; Siegel, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Autism is a disabling neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social deficits, language impairment, and repetitive behaviors with few effective treatments. New evidence suggests that autism has reliable electrophysiological endophenotypes and that these measures may be caused by n-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) disruption on parvalbumin (PV)-containing interneurons. These findings could be used to create new translational biomarkers. Recent developments have allowed for cell-type selective knockout of NMDARs in order to examine the perturbations caused by disrupting specific circuits. This study examines several electrophysiological and behavioral measures disrupted in autism using a PV-selective reduction in NMDA R1 subunit. Mouse electroencephalograph (EEG) was recorded in response to auditory stimuli. Event-related potential (ERP) component amplitude and latency analysis, social testing, and premating ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) recordings were performed. Correlations were examined between the ERP latency and behavioral measures. The N1 ERP latency was delayed, sociability was reduced, and mating USVs were impaired in PV-selective NMDA Receptor 1 Knockout (NR1 KO) as compared with wild-type mice. There was a significant correlation between N1 latency and sociability but not between N1 latency and premating USV power or T-maze performance. The increases in N1 latency, impaired sociability, and reduced vocalizations in PV-selective NR1 KO mice mimic similar changes found in autism. Electrophysiological changes correlate to reduced sociability, indicating that the local circuit mechanisms controlling N1 latency may be utilized in social function. Therefore, we propose that behavioral and electrophysiological alterations in PV-selective NR1 KO mice may serve as a useful model for therapeutic development in autism. PMID:23441094

  15. New low-density lipoprotein receptor upregulators acting via a novel mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ashton, M J; Brown, T J; Fenton, G; Halley, F; Harper, M F; Lockey, P M; Porter, B; Roach, A G; Stuttle, K A; Vicker, N; Walsh, R J

    1996-08-16

    The synthesis and biological activity of a new series of benzamides and related compounds that upregulate the expression of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor in human hepatocytes (HepG2 cells) by a novel mechanism are described. The lead compound, N-[5-[(3-cyclohexylpropionyl)amino]-2-methylphenyl]-4-hydroxybe nzamide (1, RPR102359), increased the expression of the LDL receptors in HepG2 cells by 80% when tested at a concentration of 3 microM. Mevinolin (lovastatin) was found to increase the LDL receptor expression by 70% at the same concentration. In contrast to mevinolin, 1 was found to have no effect on cholesterol biosynthesis in liver homogenates or in HepG2 cells at doses where substantial upregulation of the LDL receptor was observed and thus stimulated LDL receptor expression by a novel mechanism.

  16. Conditional Knockout of NMDA Receptors in Dopamine Neurons Prevents Nicotine-Conditioned Place Preference

    PubMed Central

    Phillip Wang, Lei; Li, Fei; Shen, Xiaoming; Tsien, Joe Z.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotine from smoking tobacco produces one of the most common forms of addictive behavior and has major societal and health consequences. It is known that nicotine triggers tobacco addiction by activating nicotine acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the midbrain dopaminergic reward system, primarily via the ventral tegmental area. Heterogeneity of cell populations in the region has made it difficult for pharmacology-based analyses to precisely assess the functional significance of glutamatergic inputs to dopamine neurons in nicotine addiction. By generating dopamine neuron-specific NR1 knockout mice using cre/loxP-mediated method, we demonstrate that genetic inactivation of the NMDA receptors in ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons selectively prevents nicotine-conditioned place preference. Interestingly, the mutant mice exhibit normal performances in the conditioned place aversion induced by aversive air puffs. Therefore, this selective effect on addictive drug-induced reinforcement behavior suggests that NMDA receptors in the dopamine neurons are critical for the development of nicotine addiction. PMID:20062537

  17. Conditional knockout of NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons prevents nicotine-conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei Phillip; Li, Fei; Shen, Xiaoming; Tsien, Joe Z

    2010-01-07

    Nicotine from smoking tobacco produces one of the most common forms of addictive behavior and has major societal and health consequences. It is known that nicotine triggers tobacco addiction by activating nicotine acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the midbrain dopaminergic reward system, primarily via the ventral tegmental area. Heterogeneity of cell populations in the region has made it difficult for pharmacology-based analyses to precisely assess the functional significance of glutamatergic inputs to dopamine neurons in nicotine addiction. By generating dopamine neuron-specific NR1 knockout mice using cre/loxP-mediated method, we demonstrate that genetic inactivation of the NMDA receptors in ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons selectively prevents nicotine-conditioned place preference. Interestingly, the mutant mice exhibit normal performances in the conditioned place aversion induced by aversive air puffs. Therefore, this selective effect on addictive drug-induced reinforcement behavior suggests that NMDA receptors in the dopamine neurons are critical for the development of nicotine addiction.

  18. Pregnane X Receptor Knockout Mice Display Aging-Dependent Wearing of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Kotaro; Casey, Stephanie C.; Urano, Tomohiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Blumberg, Bruce; Inoue, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR) and its murine ortholog, pregnane X receptor (PXR), are nuclear receptors that are expressed at high levels in the liver and the intestine where they function as xenobiotic sensors that induce expression of genes involved in detoxification and drug excretion. Recent evidence showed that SXR and PXR are also expressed in bone tissue where they mediate bone metabolism. Here we report that systemic deletion of PXR results in aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage of knee joints. Histomorphometrical analysis showed remarkable reduction of width and an enlarged gap between femoral and tibial articular cartilage in PXR knockout mice. We hypothesized that genes induced by SXR in chondrocytes have a protective effect on articular cartilage and identified Fam20a (family with sequence similarity 20a) as an SXR-dependent gene induced by the known SXR ligands, rifampicin and vitamin K2. Lastly, we demonstrated the biological significance of Fam20a expression in chondrocytes by evaluating osteoarthritis-related gene expression of primary articular chondrocytes. Consistent with epidemiological findings, our results indicate that SXR/PXR protects against aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage and that ligands for SXR/PXR have potential role in preventing osteoarthritis caused by aging. PMID:25749104

  19. Improved androgen specificity of AR-EcoScreen by CRISPR based glucocorticoid receptor knockout.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Nick; Andringa, Dave; de Leeuw, Willem-Jan; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Iida, Mitsuru; Houtman, Corine J; de Boer, Jacob; Kool, Jeroen; Lamoree, Marja H; Hamers, Timo

    2017-08-11

    The AR-EcoScreen is a widely used reporter assay for the detection of androgens and anti-androgens. Endogenous expression of glucocorticoid receptors and their affinity for the androgen responsive element that drives reporter expression, however, makes the reporter cells sensitive to interference by glucocorticoids and less specific for (anti-)androgens. To create a glucocorticoid insensitive derivative of the AR-EcoScreen, CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing was used to develop glucocorticoid receptor knockout mutants by targeting various sites in the glucocorticoid gene. Two mutant cell lines were further characterized and validated against the unmodified AR-EcoScreen with a set of 19 environmentally relevant chemicals and a series of environmental passive sampler extracts with (anti-)androgenic activity. Sequencing of the targeted sites revealed premature stop codons following frame-shift mutations, leading to an absence of functional glucocorticoid receptor expression. The introduced mutations rendered cell lines insensitive to glucocorticoid activation and caused no significant difference in the responsiveness towards (anti-)androgens, compared to the unmodified AR-EcoScreen cells, allowing the selective, GR-independent, determination of (anti-)androgenicity in environmental passive sampler extracts. The increase in selectivity for (anti-)androgens improves reliability of the AR-EcoScreen and will provide higher accuracy in determining (anti-)androgenic potential when applied in toxicity screening and environmental monitoring of both single compounds and mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Upregulation of P2X3 receptors in dorsal root ganglion of TRPV1 knockout female mice].

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao; Shi, Xiao-Han; Huang, Li-Bin; Rong, Wei-Fang; Ma, Bei

    2014-08-25

    The study was aimed to investigate the changes in mechanical pain threshold in the condition of chronic inflammatory pain after transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) gene was knockout. Hind-paw intraplantar injection of complete freund's adjuvant (CFA, 20 μL) produced peripheral inflammation in wild-type and TRPV1 knockout female mice. The mechanical pain thresholds were measured during the 8 days after injection and pre-injection by using Von-Frey hair. Nine days after injection, mice were killed and the differences of expression of c-Fos and P2X3 receptor in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord dorsal horn were examined by Western blotting between the two groups. Compared with that in wild-type mice, the mechanical pain threshold was increased significantly in TRPV1 knockout mice (P < 0.05); 3 days after CFA injection, the baseline mechanical pain threshold in the TRPV1 knockout mice group was significantly higher than that in the wild-type mice group (P < 0.05); The result of Western blotting showed that the expression of c-Fos protein both in DRG and spinal cord dorsal horn of TRPV1 knockout mice group was decreased significantly compared with that in wild-type mice group (P < 0.01, P < 0.05), while the expression of P2X3 receptor in DRG of TRPV1 knockout mice group was increased significantly compared with that in wild-type mice group (P < 0.05). Our findings indicate that TRPV1 may influence the peripheral mechanical pain threshold by mediating the expression of c-Fos protein both in DRG and spinal cord dorsal horn and changing the expression of P2X3 receptor in DRG.

  1. Chronic allergic pulmonary inflammation is aggravated in angiotensin-(1-7) Mas receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Giselle S; Rodrigues-Machado, Maria Glória; Motta-Santos, Daisy; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A; Barcelos, Lucíola S; Campagnole-Santos, Maria José

    2016-12-01

    The angiotensin-(1-7) [ANG-(1-7)]/Mas receptor pathway is currently recognized as a counterbalancing mechanism of the renin-angiotensin system in different pathophysiological conditions. We have previously described that treatment with ANG-(1-7) attenuates lung inflammation and remodeling in an experimental model of asthma. In the present study, we investigated whether lack of the Mas receptor could alter the inflammatory response in a model of chronic allergic lung inflammation induced by ovalbumin (OVA). Mas receptor wild-type (MasWT) and knockout (MasKO) mice were subjected to four doses of OVA (20 μg/mice ip) with a 14-day interval. At the 21st day, nebulization with OVA (1%) was started, three times per week until the 46th day. Control groups received saline (0.9% ip) and were nebulized with saline (0.9%). MasWT-OVA developed a modest inflammatory response and minor pulmonary remodeling to OVA challenge. Strikingly, MasKO-OVA presented a significant increase in inflammatory cell infiltrate, increase in extracellular matrix deposition, increase in thickening of the alveolar parenchyma, increase in thickening of the smooth muscle layer of the pulmonary arterioles, increase in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in the lungs, characteristic of chronic asthma. Additionally, MasKO-OVA presented an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation compared with MasWT-OVA. Furthermore, MasKO-OVA showed a worse performance in a test of maximum physical exercise compared with MasWT-OVA. Our study shows that effects triggered by the Mas receptor are important to attenuate the inflammatory and remodeling processes in a model of allergic lung inflammation in mice. Our data indicate that impairment of the ANG-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway may lead to worsening of the pathophysiological changes of asthma. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  3. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  4. CB1 receptor knockout mice display reduced ethanol-induced conditioned place preference and increased striatal dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Houchi, Hakim; Babovic, Daniela; Pierrefiche, Olivier; Ledent, Catherine; Daoust, Martine; Naassila, Mickaël

    2005-02-01

    Cannabinoids and ethanol activate the same reward pathways, and recent advances in the understanding of the neurobiological basis of alcoholism suggest that the CB1 receptor system may play a key role in the reinforcing effects of ethanol and in modulating ethanol intake. In the present study, male CB1 receptors knockout mice generated on a CD1 background displayed decreased ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) compared to wild-type (CB1(+/+)) mice. Ethanol (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 g/kg) induced significant CPP in CB1(+/+) mice at all doses tested, whereas it induced significant CPP only at the highest dose of ethanol (2.0 g/kg) in CB1(-/-) mice. However, there was no genotypic difference in cocaine (20 mg/kg)-induced CPP. There was also no genotypic difference, neither in cocaine (10-50 mg/kg) nor in D-amphetamine (1.2-5 mg/kg)-induced locomotor effects. In addition, mutant and wild-type mice did not differ in sensitivity to the anxiolytic effects of ethanol (1.5 g/kg) when tested using the elevated plus maze. Interestingly, this decrease in ethanol efficacy to induce CPP in CB1(-/-) mice was correlated with an increase in D2/D3 receptors, as determined by [3H]raclopride binding, whereas there was no difference in D1-like receptors, as determined by [3H]SCH23390 binding, measured in the striatum from drug-naive mice. This increase in D2/D3 binding sites observed in CB1 knockout mice was associated with an altered locomotor response to the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole (low doses 0.02-0.1 mg/kg) but not to an alteration of quinpirole (0.1-1.0 mg/kg)-induced CPP compared to wild-type mice. Altogether, the present results indicate that lifelong deletion of CB1 receptors reduced ethanol-induced CPP and that these reduced rewarding effects of ethanol are correlated to an overexpression of striatal dopamine D2 receptors.

  5. Differences in triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism and resistance to obesity in male and female vitamin D receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Weber, K; Erben, R G

    2013-08-01

    A lean phenotype has been detected in vitamin D receptor (VDR) knockout mice; however, the gender differences in fat metabolism between male and female mice both with age and in response to a high-fat diet have not been studied before. The objective of our study was to assess changes in body and fat tissue weight, food intake and serum cholesterol and triglyceride in VDR knockout mice from weaning to adulthood and after a challenge of adult animals with a high-fat diet. Although VDR knockout mice of both sexes consumed more food than wild-type and heterozygous littermates, their body weight and the weight of fat depots was lower after 6 months on a diet with 5% crude fat content. When adult animals were challenged with a high-fat diet containing 21% crude fat content for 8 weeks, VDR knockout mice of both sexes had a significantly higher food intake but gained less weight than their wild-type littermates. Cholesterol levels were higher after 2 days on the high-fat diet in both sexes, but in the VDR knockout mice, less cholesterol was detected in the serum after 8 weeks. Wild-type male mice showed signs of fatty liver disease at the end of the experiment, which was not detected in the other groups. In conclusion, lack of the VDR receptor results in reduced fat accumulation with age and when adult mice are fed a high-fat diet, despite a higher food intake of VDR knockout mice relative to their wild-type littermates. These effects can be detected in both sexes. Wild-type male mice react with the highest weight gain and cholesterol levels of all groups and develop fatty liver disease after 8 weeks on a high-fat diet, while male VDR knockout mice appear to be protected.

  6. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Contributes to β-Carotene Uptake in the Maternal Liver

    PubMed Central

    Shete, Varsha; Costabile, Brianna K.; Kim, Youn-Kyung; Quadro, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A regulates many essential mammalian biological processes, including embryonic development. β-carotene is the main source of vitamin A in the human diet. Once ingested, it is packaged into lipoproteins, predominantly low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and transported to different sites within the body, including the liver and developing tissues, where it can either be stored or metabolized to retinoids (vitamin A and its derivatives). The molecular mechanisms of β-carotene uptake by the liver or developing tissues remain elusive. Here, we investigated the role of the LDL receptor (LDLr) in β-carotene uptake by maternal liver, placenta and embryo. We administered a single dose of β-carotene to Ldlr+/− and Ldlr−/− pregnant mice via intraperitoneal injection at mid-gestation and monitored the changes in β-carotene content among maternal lipoproteins and the liver, as well as the accumulation of β-carotene in the placental–fetal unit. We showed an abnormal β-carotene distribution among serum lipoproteins and reduced hepatic β-carotene uptake in Ldlr−/− dams. These data strongly imply that LDLr significantly contributes to β-carotene uptake in the adult mouse liver. In contrast, LDLr does not seem to mediate acquisition of β-carotene by the placental–fetal unit. PMID:27916814

  7. Secreted PCSK9 downregulates low density lipoprotein receptor through receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yue-Wei; Schmidt, Robert J; Zhang, Youyan; Chu, Shaoyou; Lin, Aimin; Wang, He; Wang, Xiliang; Beyer, Thomas P; Bensch, William R; Li, Weiming; Ehsani, Mariam E; Lu, Deshun; Konrad, Robert J; Eacho, Patrick I; Moller, David E; Karathanasis, Sotirios K; Cao, Guoqing

    2007-07-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a protease that regulates low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein levels. The mechanisms of this action, however, remain to be defined. We show here that recombinant human PCSK9 expressed in HEK293 cells was readily secreted into the medium, with the prosegment associated with the C-terminal domain. Secreted PCSK9 mediated cell surface LDLR degradation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner when added to HEK293 cells. Accordingly, cellular LDL uptake was significantly reduced as well. When infused directly into C57B6 mice, purified human PCSK9 substantially reduced hepatic LDLR protein levels and resulted in increased plasma LDL cholesterol. When added to culture medium, fluorescently labeled PCSK9 was endocytosed and displayed endosomal-lysosomal intracellular localization in HepG2 cells, as was demonstrated by colocalization with DiI-LDL. PCSK9 endocytosis was mediated by LDLR as LDLR deficiency (hepatocytes from LDLR null mice), or RNA interference-mediated knockdown of LDLR markedly reduced PCSK9 endocytosis. In addition, RNA interference knockdown of the autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) gene product also significantly reduced PCSK9 endocytosis. Biochemical analysis revealed that the LDLR extracellular domain interacted directly with secreted PCSK9; thus, overexpression of the LDLR extracellular domain was able to attenuate the reduction of cell surface LDLR levels by secreted PCSK9. Together, these results reveal that secreted PCSK9 retains biological activity, is able to bind directly to the LDLR extracellular domain, and undergoes LDLR-ARH-mediated endocytosis, leading to accelerated intracellular degradation of the LDLR.

  8. A green tea catechin extract upregulates the hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor in rats.

    PubMed

    Bursill, Christina A; Roach, Paul D

    2007-07-01

    Green tea extracts have hypocholesterolaemic properties in epidemiological and animal intervention studies. Upregulation of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor may be one mechanism to explain this as it is the main way cholesterol is removed from the circulation. This study aimed to determine if a green tea extract could upregulate the hepatic LDL receptor in vivo in the rat. A green tea extract (GTE) enriched in its anti-oxidant constituents, the catechins, was fed to rats (n = 6) at concentrations of either 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0% (w/w) mixed in with their normal chow along with 0.25% (w/w) cholesterol for 12 days. Administration of the GTE had no effect on plasma total or LDL cholesterol concentrations but high-density lipoprotein significantly increased (41%; p < 0.05). Interestingly, there was a significant increase in LDL receptor binding activity (2.7-fold) and LDL receptor protein (3.4-fold) in the 2% (w/w) treatment group compared to controls. There were also significant reductions in liver total and unesterified cholesterol (40%). Administration of the GTE significantly reduced cholesterol absorption (24%) but did not affect cholesterol synthesis. These results show that, despite no effect on plasma cholesterol, the GTE upregulated the LDL receptor in vivo. This appears to be via a reduction in liver cholesterol concentration and suggests that the green tea extract was able to increase the efflux of cholesterol from liver cells.

  9. Regulation of dopamine presynaptic markers and receptors in the striatum of DJ-1 and Pink1 knockout rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianjun; Kouranova, Evguenia; Cui, Xiaoxia; Mach, Robert H.; Xu, Jinbin

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic autosomal recessive mutations in the DJ-1 (Park7) or the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (Pink1 or PARK6) genes are associated with familial Parkinson’s disease (PD). It is not well known regarding the pathological mechanisms involving the DJ-1 and Pink1 mutations. Here we characterized DJ-1 and Pink1 knockout rats both through expression profiling and using quantitative autoradiography to measure the densities of the dopamine D1, D2, D3 receptors, vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2) and dopamine transporter (DAT) in the striatum of transgenic rats and wild type controls. Expression profiling with a commercially available array of 84 genes known to be involved in PD indicated that only the target gene was significantly downregulated in each transgenic rat model. D1 receptor, VMAT2, and DAT were measured using [3H]SCH23390, [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine, and [3H]WIN35428, respectively. No significant changes were observed in the density of DAT in either model. Although the densities of VMAT2 and D1 receptor were unchanged in Pink1 knockout, but both were increased in DJ-1 knockout rats. The densities of D2 and D3 receptors, determined by mathematical analysis of binding of radioligands [3H]WC-10 and [3H]raclopride, were significantly increased in both knockout models. These distinctive changes in the expression of dopamine presynaptic markers and receptors in the striatum may reflect different compensatory regulation of dopamine system in DJ-1 versus Pink1 knockout rat models of familial PD. PMID:24157858

  10. Homeostatic regulation of synaptic excitability: tonic GABAA receptor currents replace Ih in cortical pyramidal neurons of HCN1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangdong; Shu, Shaofang; Schwartz, Lauren C.; Sun, Chengsan; Kapur, Jaideep; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    Homeostatic control of synaptic efficacy is often mediated by dynamic regulation of excitatory synaptic receptors. Here, we report a novel form of homeostatic synaptic plasticity based on regulation of shunt currents that control dendritosomatic information transfer. In cortical pyramidal neurons from wild type mice, HCN1 channels underlie a dendritic hyperpolarization-activated cationic current (Ih) that serves to limit temporal summation of synaptic inputs. In HCN1 knockout mice, as expected, Ih is reduced in pyramidal neurons and its effects on synaptic summation are strongly diminished. Unexpectedly, we found a markedly enhanced bicuculline- and L-655,708-sensitive background GABAA current in these cells that could be attributed to selective up-regulation of GABAA α5 subunit expression in the cortex of HCN1 knockout mice. Strikingly, despite diminished Ih, baseline sub-linear summation of evoked EPSPs was unchanged in pyramidal neurons from HCN1 knockout mice; however, blocking tonic GABAA currents with bicuculline enhanced synaptic summation more strongly in pyramidal cells from HCN1 knockout mice than in those cells from wild type mice. Increasing tonic GABAA receptor conductance in the context of reduced Ih, using computational or pharmacological approaches, restored normal baseline synaptic summation, as observed in neurons from HCN1 knockout mice. These data indicate that up-regulation of α5 subunit-mediated GABAA receptor tonic current compensates quantitatively for loss of dendritic Ih in cortical pyramidal neurons from HCN1 knockout mice to maintain normal synaptic summation; they further imply that dendritosomatic synaptic efficacy is a controlled variable for homeostatic regulation of cortical neuron excitability in vivo. PMID:20164346

  11. Dopamine D3 receptor knockout mice exhibit abnormal nociception in a sex-different manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Xing, Bo; Chu, Zheng; Liu, Fei; Lei, Gang; Zhu, Li; Gao, Ya; Chen, Teng; Dang, Yong-Hui

    2016-09-26

    Pain is a complex and subjective experience. Previous studies have shown that mice lacking the dopamine D3 receptor (D3RKO) exhibit hypoalgesia, indicating a role of the D3 receptor in modulation of nociception. Given that there are sex differences in pain perception, there may be differences in responses to nociceptive stimuli between male and female D3RKO mice. In the current study, we examined the role of the D3 receptor in modulating nociception in male and female D3RKO mice. Acute thermal pain was modeled by hot-plate test. This test was performed at different temperatures including 52°C, 55°C, and 58°C. The von Frey hair test was applied to evaluate mechanical pain. And persistent pain produced by peripheral tissue injury and inflammation was modeled by formalin test. In the hot-plate test, compared with wild-type (WT) mice, D3RKO mice generally exhibited longer latencies at each of the three temperatures. Specially, male D3RKO mice showed hypoalgesia compared with male WT mice when the temperature was 55°C, while for the female mice, there was a statistical difference between genotypes when the test condition was 52°C. In the von Frey hair test, both male and female D3RKO mice exhibited hypoalgesia. In the formalin test, the male D3RKO mice displayed a similar nociceptive behavior as their sex-matched WT littermates, whereas significantly depressed late-phase formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors were observed in the female mutants. These findings indicated that the D3 receptor affects nociceptive behaviors in a sex-specific manner and that its absence induces more analgesic behavior in the female knockout mice. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout selectively enhances ethanol-, but not beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2005-01-03

    The alpha7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated as a potential site of action for two neurotoxins, ethanol and the Alzheimer's disease related peptide, beta-amyloid. Here, we utilized primary neuronal cultures of cerebral cortex from alpha7 nAChR null mutant mice to examine the role of this receptor in modulating the neurotoxic properties of subchronic, "binge" ethanol and beta-amyloid. Knockout of the alpha7 nAChR gene selectively enhanced ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a gene dosage-related fashion. Susceptibility of cultures to beta-amyloid induced toxicity, however, was unaffected by alpha7 nAChR gene null mutation. Further, beta-amyloid did not inhibit the binding of the highly alpha7-selective radioligand, [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin. On the other hand, in studies in Xenopus oocytes ethanol efficaciously inhibited alpha7 nAChR function. These data suggest that alpha7 nAChRs modulate the neurotoxic effects of binge ethanol, but not the neurotoxicity produced by beta-amyloid. It is hypothesized that inhibition of alpha7 nAChRs by ethanol provides partial protection against the neurotoxic properties of subchronic ethanol.

  13. Hypersomnolence and reduced activity in pan-leptin receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; He, Junyun; Kastin, Abba J; Hsuchou, Hung; Pan, Weihong

    2013-11-01

    Excessive obesity correlates with hypersomnolence and impaired cognitive function, presumably induced by metabolic factors and cytokines. Production of the adipokine leptin correlates with the amount of adiposity, and leptin has been shown to promote sleep. To determine whether leptin plays a major role in the hypersomnolence of obesity, we measured sleep architecture in pan-leptin receptor knockout (POKO) mice that do not respond to leptin because of the production of a mutant, non-signaling receptor. The obese POKO mice had more non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and less waking time than their littermate controls. This was mainly seen during the light span, although increased bouts of rapid eye movement sleep were also seen in the dark span. The increase of NREM sleep correlated with the extent of obesity. The POKO mice also had decreased locomotor activity and more immobility in the open field test, but there was no increase of forced immobility nor reduction of sucrose intake as would be seen in depression. The increased NREM sleep and reduced locomotor activity in the POKO mice suggest that it was obesity, rather than leptin signaling, that played a predominant role in altering sleep architecture and activity.

  14. Dysregulation of Uterine Signaling Pathways in Progesterone Receptor-Cre Knockout of Dicer

    PubMed Central

    Andreu-Vieyra, Claudia V.; Kim, Tae Hoon; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Hodgson, Myles C.; Chen, Ruihong; Creighton, Chad J.; Lydon, John P.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial-stromal interactions in the uterus are required for normal uterine functions such as pregnancy, and multiple signaling pathways are essential for this process. Although Dicer and microRNA (miRNA) have been implicated in several reproductive processes, the specific roles of Dicer and miRNA in uterine development are not known. To address the roles of miRNA in the regulation of key uterine pathways, we generated a conditional knockout of Dicer in the postnatal uterine epithelium and stroma using progesterone receptor-Cre. These Dicer conditional knockout females are sterile with small uteri, which demonstrate significant defects, including absence of glandular epithelium and enhanced stromal apoptosis, beginning at approximately postnatal d 15, with coincident expression of Cre and deletion of Dicer. Specific miRNA (miR-181c, −200b, −101, let-7d) were down-regulated and corresponding predicted proapoptotic target genes (Bcl2l11, Aldh1a3) were up-regulated, reflecting the apoptotic phenomenon. Although these mice had normal serum hormone levels, critical uterine signaling pathways, including progesterone-responsive genes, Indian hedgehog signaling, and the Wnt/β-catenin canonical pathway, were dysregulated at the mRNA level. Importantly, uterine stromal cell proliferation in response to progesterone was absent, whereas uterine epithelial cell proliferation in response to estradiol was maintained in adult uteri. These data implicate Dicer and appropriate miRNA expression as essential players in the regulation of multiple uterine signaling pathways required for uterine development and appropriate function. PMID:22798293

  15. Hematopoietic G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 deficiency decreases atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDL receptor-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Otten, Jeroen J. T.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Seijkens, Tom; Bot, Ilze; Wijnands, Erwin; Beckers, Linda; Westra, Marijke M.; Bot, Martine; Busch, Matthias; Bermudez, Beatriz; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Leukocyte chemotaxis is deemed instrumental in initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. It is mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors (e.g., CCR2 and CCR5), the activity of which is controlled by G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). In this study, we analyzed the effect of hematopoietic deficiency of a potent regulator kinase of chemotaxis (GRK2) on atherogenesis. LDL receptor-deficient (LDLr−/−) mice with heterozygous hematopoietic GRK2 deficiency, generated by bone marrow transplantation (n=15), displayed a dramatic attenuation of plaque development, with 79% reduction in necrotic core and increased macrophage content. Circulating monocytes decreased and granulocytes increased in GRK2+/− chimeras, which could be attributed to diminished granulocyte colony-forming units in bone marrow. Collectively, these data pointed to myeloid cells as major mediators of the impaired atherogenic response in GRK2+/− chimeras. LDLr−/− mice with macrophage/granulocyte-specific GRK2 deficiency (LysM-Cre GRK2flox/flox; n=8) failed to mimic the aforementioned phenotype, acquitting these cells as major responsible subsets for GRK2 deficiency-associated atheroprotection. To conclude, even partial hematopoietic GRK2 deficiency prevents atherosclerotic lesion progression beyond the fatty streak stage, identifying hematopoietic GRK2 as a potential target for intervention in atherosclerosis.—Otten, J. J. T., de Jager, S. C. A., Kavelaars, A., Seijkens, T., Bot, I., Wijnands, E., Beckers, L., Westra, M. M., Bot, M., Busch, M., Bermudez, B., van Berkel, T. J. C., Heijnen, C. J., Biessen, E. A. L. Hematopoietic G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 deficiency decreases atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDL receptor-knockout mice. PMID:23047899

  16. Ovarian wedge resection restores fertility in estrogen receptor beta knockout (ERbeta-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Inzunza, José; Morani, Andrea; Cheng, Guojun; Warner, Margaret; Hreinsson, Julius; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Hovatta, Outi

    2007-01-09

    Ovulation rarely occurs in mice in which the estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) gene has been inactivated (ERbeta-/- mice). Here, we investigated whether this subfertility is due to a defect in the ovary itself or to more general endocrine changes in ERbeta-/- mice. We transplanted ERbeta-/- ovaries into WT mice and WT ovaries into ERbeta-/- mice. Upon mating with ERbeta-/- males, fertility increased from 20% in control intact ERbeta-/- group to 40% in the WT recipients with ERbeta-/- ovaries. The transplantation procedure was not efficient, and when WT ovaries were transplanted into WT mice, fertility was only 36%. Surgical ovarian wedge resection, a procedure which induces ovulation in anovulatory women with polycystic ovarian syndrome, resulted in 100% fertility of ERbeta-/- mice. In ERbeta-/- mice, as the follicles enlarged, the thecal layer remained very compact (revealed by H&E and collagen staining), and there was no increase in vascularization (measured as smooth muscle actin). In addition, there was an increase in PDGF receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha) and a decrease in PDGFbeta expression in the granulosa cells, similar to what has been found in follitropin receptor knockout mice. After wedge resection, expression of both smooth muscle actin and PDGFRs was normalized. During normal follicular development, increased vascularization of the thecal layer is a prerequisite for further follicular growth. We suggest that the defect in ERbeta-/- mouse ovaries is a failure of communication between the granulosa and thecal layers. The follicles do not mature because of insufficient blood supply. This problem is overcome by stimulating neovascularization by simple wedge resection of the ovaries.

  17. Ovarian wedge resection restores fertility in estrogen receptor β knockout (ERβ−/−) mice

    PubMed Central

    Inzunza, José; Morani, Andrea; Cheng, Guojun; Warner, Margaret; Hreinsson, Julius; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Hovatta, Outi

    2007-01-01

    Ovulation rarely occurs in mice in which the estrogen receptor β (ERβ) gene has been inactivated (ERβ−/− mice). Here, we investigated whether this subfertility is due to a defect in the ovary itself or to more general endocrine changes in ERβ−/− mice. We transplanted ERβ−/− ovaries into WT mice and WT ovaries into ERβ−/− mice. Upon mating with ERβ−/− males, fertility increased from 20% in control intact ERβ−/− group to 40% in the WT recipients with ERβ−/− ovaries. The transplantation procedure was not efficient, and when WT ovaries were transplanted into WT mice, fertility was only 36%. Surgical ovarian wedge resection, a procedure which induces ovulation in anovulatory women with polycystic ovarian syndrome, resulted in 100% fertility of ERβ−/− mice. In ERβ−/− mice, as the follicles enlarged, the thecal layer remained very compact (revealed by H&E and collagen staining), and there was no increase in vascularization (measured as smooth muscle actin). In addition, there was an increase in PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα) and a decrease in PDGFβ expression in the granulosa cells, similar to what has been found in follitropin receptor knockout mice. After wedge resection, expression of both smooth muscle actin and PDGFRs was normalized. During normal follicular development, increased vascularization of the thecal layer is a prerequisite for further follicular growth. We suggest that the defect in ERβ−/− mouse ovaries is a failure of communication between the granulosa and thecal layers. The follicles do not mature because of insufficient blood supply. This problem is overcome by stimulating neovascularization by simple wedge resection of the ovaries. PMID:17197418

  18. Sensorimotor gating and spatial learning in α7-nicotinic receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi, E; Typlt, M; Jenkins, B; Schmid, S

    2013-06-01

    The role of acetylcholine and specific nicotinic receptors in sensorimotor gating and higher cognitive function has been controversial. Here, we used a commercially available mouse with a null mutation in the Chrna7(tm1Bay) gene [α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) knockout (KO) mouse] in order to assess the role of the α7-nAChR in sensorimotor gating and spatial learning. We examined prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle and nicotine-induced enhancement of PPI. We also tested short- and long-term habituation of the startle response as well as of locomotor behaviour in order to differentiate the role of this receptor in the habituation of evoked behaviour (startle) vs. motivated behaviour (locomotion). To address higher cognition, mice were also tested in a spatial learning task. Our results showed a mild but consistent PPI deficit in α7-nAChR KO mice. Furthermore, they did not show nicotine-induced enhancement of startle or PPI. Short- and long-term habituation was normal in KO mice for both types of behaviours, evoked or motivated, and they also showed normal learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Thorough analysis of the behavioural data indicated a slightly higher degree of anxiety in α7-nAChR KO mice; however, this could only be partially confirmed in an elevated plus maze test. In summary, our data suggest that α7-nAChRs play a minor role in PPI, but seem to mediate nicotine-induced PPI enhancement. We found no evidence to suggest that they are important for habituation or spatial learning. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  19. Location and regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptors in intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fong, L G; Fujishima, S E; Komaromy, M C; Pak, Y K; Ellsworth, J L; Cooper, A D

    1995-07-01

    The expression, distribution, and some aspects of the regulation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in rat intestinal epithelial cells were examined. Cells prepared by a perfusion technique provided a pure preparation of epithelial cells and could be manipulated to produce crypt-villus units or villi alone. On a total protein basis, the abundance of LDL receptors in villus cell membranes was half that in hepatic membranes. The level of receptors in both tissues was reduced by feeding an atherogenic diet but was increased only in the liver by ethinyl estradiol-induced hypocholesterolemia. The level of LDL receptor mRNA in intestinal epithelial cells was somewhat lower than in liver. Regulation of LDL receptor mRNA was similar to that of protein. Judged by the ratio of mRNA in villus cells to the villus-crypt unit and nuclear run-on assay for LDL receptor gene transcription, we conclude that LDL receptor mRNA is produced in the villus cells. The effect of fat feeding was regulated at the level of transcription. Expression in villus cells in ileum was severalfold higher than in jejunum and higher than in the liver. Together the results suggest serum cholesterol level is not the prime determinant of LDL receptor level in intestine, but LDL degradation in this organ may be regulated by factors in the lumen.

  20. CXC receptor knockout mice: characterization of skeletal features and membranous bone healing in the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, David S; Sakamoto, Taylor; Ishida, Kenji; Makhijani, Nalini S; Gruber, Helen E; Yamaguchi, Dean T

    2011-02-01

    The potential role of CXC chemokines bearing the glu-leu-arg (ELR) motif in bone repair was studied using a cranial defect (CD) model in mice lacking the CXC receptor (mCXCR(-/-) knockout mice), which is homologous to knockout of the human CXC receptor 2 (CXCR2) gene. During the inflammatory stage of bone repair, ELR CXC chemokines are released by inflammatory cells and serve as chemotactic and angiogenic factors. mCXCR(-/-) mice were smaller in weight and length from base of tail to nose tip, compared to WT littermates. DEXA analysis indicated that bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), total area (TA), bone area (BA), and total tissue mass (TTM) were decreased in the mCXCR(-/-) mice at 6, 12, and 18 weeks of age. Trabecular bone characteristics in mCXCR(-/-) (% bone, connectivity, number, and thickness) were reduced, and trabecular spacing was increased as evidenced by μCT. There was no difference in bone formation or resorption indices measured by bone histomorphometry. Trabecular BMD was not altered. Cortical bone volume, BMD, and thickness were reduced; whereas, bone marrow volume was increased in mCXCR(-/-). Decreased polar moment of inertia (J) in the tibias/femurs suggested that the mCXCR(-/-) long bones are weaker. This was confirmed by three-point bending testing of the femurs. CDs created in 6-week-old male mCXCR(-/-) and WT littermates were not completely healed at 12 weeks; WT animals, however, had significantly more bone in-growth than mCXCR(-/-). New bone sites were identified using polarized light and assessed for numbers of osteocyte (OCy) lacunae and blood vessels (BlV) around the original CD. In new bone, the number of BlV in WT was >2× that seen in mCXCR(-/-). Bone histomorphometry parameters in the cranial defect did not show any difference in bone formation or resorption markers. In summary, studies showed that mCXCR(-/-) mice have (1) reduced weight and size; (2) decreased BMD and BMC; (3) decreased amounts of trabecular

  1. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) in sickle cell disease vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingyi; Qiu, Hong; Lin, Xin; Nam, David; Ogbu-Nwobodo, Lucy; Archibald, Hannah; Joslin, Amelia; Wun, Ted; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Green, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an endothelial receptor for oxidized LDL. Increased expression of LOX-1 has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic lesions and diabetic vasculopathy. In this study, we investigate the expression of LOX-1 receptor in sickle cell disease (SCD) vasculopathy. Expression of LOX-1 in brain vascular endothelium is markedly increased and LOX-1 gene expression is upregulated in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells by incubation with SCD erythrocytes. Also, the level of circulating soluble LOX-1 concentration is elevated in the plasma of SCD patients. Increased LOX-1 expression in endothelial cells is potentially involved in the pathogenesis of SCD vasculopathy. Soluble LOX-1 concentration in SCD may provide a novel biomarker for risk stratification of sickle cell vascular complications. PMID:27519944

  2. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) in sickle cell disease vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingyi; Qiu, Hong; Lin, Xin; Nam, David; Ogbu-Nwobodo, Lucy; Archibald, Hannah; Joslin, Amelia; Wun, Ted; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Green, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an endothelial receptor for oxidized LDL. Increased expression of LOX-1 has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic lesions and diabetic vasculopathy. In this study, we investigate the expression of LOX-1 receptor in sickle cell disease (SCD) vasculopathy. Expression of LOX-1 in brain vascular endothelium is markedly increased and LOX-1 gene expression is upregulated in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells by incubation with SCD erythrocytes. Also, the level of circulating soluble LOX-1 concentration is elevated in the plasma of SCD patients. Increased LOX-1 expression in endothelial cells is potentially involved in the pathogenesis of SCD vasculopathy. Soluble LOX-1 concentration in SCD may provide a novel biomarker for risk stratification of sickle cell vascular complications.

  3. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-04-05

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (S(D)) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the S(D) effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the S(D) effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the S(D) effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Remodeling of plasma lipoproteins in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Interleukin-6 receptor-alpha inhibition with tocilizumab.

    PubMed

    Lee, Janet S; Chapman, M John; Piraino, Paolo; Lamerz, Jens; Schindler, Thomas; Cutler, Paul; Dernick, Gregor

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, mediated in part by elevated circulating interleukin-6 levels and proinflammatory changes in plasma lipoproteins. We hypothesized that RA patients acquire inflammation-induced modifications to the protein cargo of circulating lipoproteins that may be reversed by tocilizumab, an interleukin-6 receptor-alpha inhibitor. Size-exclusion chromatography and reverse-phase protein arrays using 29 antibodies against 26 proteins were applied at baseline and after tocilizumab treatment to analyze the distributions of apolipoproteins, enzymes, lipid transfer proteins, and other associated proteins in plasma lipoprotein fractions from 20 women with RA. A 30% reduction in high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated serum amyloid A4 and complement C4 occurred with tocilizumab. Levels of C-reactive protein, associated or comigrating with HDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) peaks, were reduced on treatment by approximately 80% and 24%, respectively. Reductions in lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, lipoprotein (a), and cholesteryl ester transfer protein in the LDL fraction suggest reductions in LDL-associated proatherogenic factors. Elevations in very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) enriched with apolipoprotein E were equally observed. Tocilizumab treatment led to reductions in proinflammatory components and proatherogenic proteins associated with HDL. Whether changes in the proteome of VLDL, LDL, and HDL induced by anti-inflammatory tocilizumab treatment in RA patients modify cardiovascular disease risk requires further investigation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Soy milk versus simvastatin for preventing atherosclerosis and left ventricle remodeling in LDL receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Santos, L; Davel, A P; Almeida, T I R; Almeida, M R; Soares, E A; Fernandes, G J M; Magalhães, S F; Barauna, V G; Garcia, J A D

    2017-02-20

    Functional food intake has been highlighted as a strategy for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases by reducing risk factors. In this study, we compared the effects of oral treatment with soy milk and simvastatin on dyslipidemia, left ventricle remodeling and atherosclerotic lesion of LDL receptor knockout mice (LDLr-/-) fed a hyperlipidic diet. Forty 3-month old male LDLr-/- mice were distributed into four groups: control group (C), in which animals received standard diet; HL group, in which animals were fed a hyperlipidic diet; HL+SM or HL+S groups, in which animals were submitted to a hyperlipidic diet plus soy milk or simvastatin, respectively. After 60 days, both soy milk and simvastatin treatment prevented dyslipidemia, atherosclerotic lesion progression and left ventricle hypertrophy in LDLr-/- mice. These beneficial effects of soy milk and simvastatin were associated with reduced oxidative stress and inflammatory state in the heart and aorta caused by the hyperlipidic diet. Treatment with soy milk was more effective in preventing HDLc reduction and triacylglycerol and VLDLc increase. On the other hand, simvastatin was more effective in preventing an increase in total cholesterol, LDLc and superoxide production in aorta, as well as CD40L both in aorta and left ventricle of LDLr-/-. In conclusion, our results suggest a cardioprotective effect of soy milk in LDLr-/- mice comparable to the well-known effects of simvastatin.

  6. Deficit in acoustic signal-in-noise detection in glycine receptor α3 subunit knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Tziridis, Konstantin; Buerbank, Stefanie; Eulenburg, Volker; Dlugaiczyk, Julia; Schulze, Holger

    2017-02-01

    Hearing is an essential sense for communication in animals and humans. Normal function of the cochlea of higher vertebrates relies on a fine-tuned interplay of afferent and efferent innervation of both inner and outer hair cells. Efferent inhibition is controlled via olivocochlear feedback loops, mediated mainly by acetylcholine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine, and is one of the first sites affected by synapto- and neuropathy in the development of hearing loss. While the functions of acetylcholine, GABA and other inhibitory transmitters within these feedback loops are at least partially understood, especially the function of glycine still remains elusive. To address this question, we investigated hearing in glycine receptor (GlyR) α3 knockout (KO) and wildtype (WT) mice. We found no differences in pure tone hearing thresholds at 11.3 and 16 kHz between the two groups as assessed by auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurements. Detailed analysis of the ABR waves at 11.3 kHz, however, revealed a latency decrease of wave III and an amplitude increase of wave IV in KO compared to WT animals. GlyRα3 KO animals showed significantly impaired prepulse inhibition of the auditory startle response in a noisy environment, indicating that GlyRα3-mediated glycinergic inhibition is important for signal-in-noise detection.

  7. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor knockout mice have altered bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ding; Cheng, Hua; Hamrick, Mark; Zhong, Qing; Ding, Ke-Hong; Correa, Daniel; Williams, Sandra; Mulloy, Anthony; Bollag, Wendy; Bollag, Roni J; Runner, Royce R; McPherson, James C; Insogna, Karl; Isales, Carlos M

    2005-12-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin hormone, which is secreted from endocrine cells in the small intestine after meal ingestion. GIP has been shown to affect osteoblastic function in vitro; however, the in vivo effects of GIP on bone remodeling remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of GIP in modulating bone turnover, by evaluating serum markers of bone turnover, bone density, bone morphology, and changes in biomechanical bone strength over time (one to five months) in GIP receptor knockout mice (GIPR-/- mice). The GIPR-/- mice showed a decreased bone size, lower bone mass, altered bone microarchitecture and biomechanical properties, and altered parameters for bone turnover, especially in bone formation. Moreover, the effects of GIP on bone mass were site-specific and compensatory mechanism developed over time and ameliorated the impact of the loss of GIP signaling on bone mass. Further, GIPR-/- mice had earlier age-related changes than wild-type mice in body composition, including bone mass, lean body mass, and fat percentage. In summary, our results indicate that GIP has an anabolic effect on bone mass and bone quality and suggests that GIP may be a hormonal link between nutrient ingestion and utilization.

  8. Soy milk versus simvastatin for preventing atherosclerosis and left ventricle remodeling in LDL receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Santos, L.; Davel, A.P.; Almeida, T.I.R.; Almeida, M.R.; Soares, E.A.; Fernandes, G.J.M.; Magalhães, S.F.; Barauna, V.G.; Garcia, J.A.D.

    2017-01-01

    Functional food intake has been highlighted as a strategy for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases by reducing risk factors. In this study, we compared the effects of oral treatment with soy milk and simvastatin on dyslipidemia, left ventricle remodeling and atherosclerotic lesion of LDL receptor knockout mice (LDLr-/-) fed a hyperlipidic diet. Forty 3-month old male LDLr-/- mice were distributed into four groups: control group (C), in which animals received standard diet; HL group, in which animals were fed a hyperlipidic diet; HL+SM or HL+S groups, in which animals were submitted to a hyperlipidic diet plus soy milk or simvastatin, respectively. After 60 days, both soy milk and simvastatin treatment prevented dyslipidemia, atherosclerotic lesion progression and left ventricle hypertrophy in LDLr-/- mice. These beneficial effects of soy milk and simvastatin were associated with reduced oxidative stress and inflammatory state in the heart and aorta caused by the hyperlipidic diet. Treatment with soy milk was more effective in preventing HDLc reduction and triacylglycerol and VLDLc increase. On the other hand, simvastatin was more effective in preventing an increase in total cholesterol, LDLc and superoxide production in aorta, as well as CD40L both in aorta and left ventricle of LDLr-/-. In conclusion, our results suggest a cardioprotective effect of soy milk in LDLr-/- mice comparable to the well-known effects of simvastatin. PMID:28225891

  9. Investigation of the cardiomyocyte dysfunction in bradykinin type 2 receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Roman-Campos, Danilo; Duarte, Hugo Leonardo; Gomes, Enéas Ricardo; Castro, Carlos Henrique; Guatimosim, Silvia; Natali, Antonio José; Almeida, Alvair Pinto; Pesquero, João Bosco; Pesquero, Jorge Luiz; Cruz, Jader Santos

    2010-12-18

    Bradykinin type 2 receptor (B(2)R) is the key component to trigger the intracellular signaling pathway in response to bradykinin under physiological conditions. The present study sought to investigate whether the B(2)R gene deletion will have an impact on myocardial function. Isolated cell shortening, patch-clamp technique, Western blot and confocal microscopy. Isolated cell shortening measurements showed significant reduction in B(2)R knockout (B(2)R(-/-)) left ventricular cardiac myocytes' shortening. Whole-cell recordings were used to study the electrophysiological aspects of the left ventricular B(2)R(-/-) cardiomyocytes. Results showed: 1) action potential lengthening; 2) unchanged inwardly rectifying K(+) current; 3) reduced transient outward K(+) (I(to)) and L-type Ca(2+) current densities; 5) changes in kinetic properties related to I(to) and I(Ca,L). In addition, transient sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release was found to be smaller in B(2)R(-/-) cardiomyocytes. Importantly, evidence is provided that NO constitutive production is, at least in part, responsible for the reported electrophysiological modifications observed in cardiomyocytes from B(2)R(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, NO is not involved in the SR Ca(2+) release reduction as demonstrated in the present study. Taken together, our findings indicate that B(2)R plays a fundamental role in the regulation of cardiac function and Ca(2+) homeostasis, probably through a NO dependent pathway. These results may contribute to our understanding of the kinins participation in the control of cardiac function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Novel insight into glucagon receptor action: lessons from knockout and transgenic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Vuguin, P. M.; Charron, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Using knockout and transgenic technology, genetically modified animal models allowed us to understand the role of glucagon signalling in metabolism. Mice with a global deletion of the glucagon receptor gene (Gcgr) were designed using gene targeting. The phenotype of Gcgr−/− mouse provided important clues about the role of Gcgr in foetal growth, pancreatic development and glucose and lipid homeostasis. The lack of Gcgr activation was associated with: (i) hypoglycaemic pregnancies, poor foetal growth and increased foetal–neonatal demise; (ii) altered cytoarchitecture of pancreatic islets; (iii) altered glucose, lipid and hormonal milieu; (iv) reduced gastric emptying; (v) altered body composition and protection from diet-induced obesity; (vi) altered energy state; (vii) impaired hepatocyte survival; (viii) altered metabolic response to prolonged fasting and exercise and (ix) prevented development of diabetes in insulin-deficient mice. In contrast, mice overexpressing the Gcgr on pancreatic β-cells displayed an increase insulin secretion, pancreatic insulin content and β-cell mass, and partially protected against hyperglycaemia and impaired glucose tolerance when fed a high-fat diet. These findings suggest that glucagon signalling plays a significant role in the regulation of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Treatment options designed to block Gcgr activation may have negative implications in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:21824268

  11. P2X7 receptor knockout prevents streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Flávia Sarmento; Nanini, Hayandra Ferreira; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2016-01-05

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by autoimmune destruction of islet of Langerhans β-cells. P2X7 receptors (P2X7R) modulate proinflammatory immune responses by binding extracellular ATP, a classic 'danger signal'. Here, we evaluated whether the P2X7R has a role in T1D development. P2X7(-/-) mice are resistant to TD1 induction by streptozotocin (STZ) treatment, with no increase in blood glucose, decrease in insulin-positive cells, and pancreatic islet reduction, compared to WT (C57BL/6) mice. Also, the levels of proinflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IFN-γ and NO) did not increase after STZ treatment in P2X7(-/-) animals, with reduced infiltration of CD4(+), CD8(+), B220(+), CD11b(+) and CD11c(+) cells in the pancreatic lymph nodes. Treatment with a P2X7 antagonist mimicked the effect of P2X7 knockout, preventing STZ-induced diabetes. Our results show that the absence of the P2X7R provides resistance in the induction of diabetes in this model, and suggest that therapy targeting the P2X7R may be useful against clinical T1D.

  12. Schmallenberg virus infection of adult type I interferon receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Wernike, Kerstin; Breithaupt, Angele; Keller, Markus; Hoffmann, Bernd; Beer, Martin; Eschbaumer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV), a novel orthobunyavirus, was discovered in Europe in late 2011. It causes mild and transient disease in adult ruminants, but fetal infection can lead to abortion or severe malformations. There is considerable demand for SBV research, but in vivo studies in large animals are complicated by their long gestation periods and the cost of high containment housing. The goal of this study was to investigate whether type I interferon receptor knock-out (IFNAR(-/-)) mice are a suitable small animal model for SBV. Twenty IFNAR(-/-) mice were inoculated with SBV, four were kept as controls. After inoculation, all were observed and weighed daily; two mice per day were sacrificed and blood, brain, lungs, liver, spleen, and intestine were harvested. All but one inoculated mouse lost weight, and two mice died spontaneously at the end of the first week, while another two had to be euthanized. Real-time RT-PCR detected large amounts of SBV RNA in all dead or sick mice; the controls were healthy and PCR-negative. IFNAR(-/-) mice are susceptible to SBV infection and can develop fatal disease, making them a handy and versatile tool for SBV vaccine research.

  13. Principal function of mineralocorticoid signaling suggested by constitutive knockout of the mineralocorticoid receptor in medaka fish

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Yoshiki, Madoka; Takahashi, Hideya; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ogino, Yukiko; Ikeuchi, Toshitaka; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Konno, Norifumi; Matsuda, Kouhei; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    As in osmoregulation, mineralocorticoid signaling is implicated in the control of brain-behavior actions. Nevertheless, the understanding of this role is limited, partly due to the mortality of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR)-knockout (KO) mice due to impaired Na+ reabsorption. In teleost fish, a distinct mineralocorticoid system has only been identified recently. Here, we generated a constitutive MR-KO medaka as the first adult-viable MR-KO animal, since MR expression is modest in osmoregulatory organs but high in the brain of adult medaka as for most teleosts. Hyper- and hypo-osmoregulation were normal in MR-KO medaka. When we studied the behavioral phenotypes based on the central MR localization, however, MR-KO medaka failed to track moving dots despite having an increase in acceleration of swimming. These findings reinforce previous results showing a minor role for mineralocorticoid signaling in fish osmoregulation, and provide the first convincing evidence that MR is required for normal locomotor activity in response to visual motion stimuli, but not for the recognition of these stimuli per se. We suggest that MR potentially integrates brain-behavioral and visual responses, which might be a conserved function of mineralocorticoid signaling through vertebrates. Importantly, this fish model allows for the possible identification of novel aspects of mineralocorticoid signaling. PMID:27897263

  14. Ginsenoside Rf, a component of ginseng, regulates lipoprotein metabolism through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunghee; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Yoon, Michung . E-mail: yoon60@mokwon.ac.kr

    2006-01-06

    We investigated whether ginseng regulates lipoprotein metabolism by altering peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha})-mediated pathways, using a PPAR{alpha}-null mouse model. Administration of ginseng extract, ginsenosides, and ginsenoside Rf (Rf) to wild-type mice not only significantly increased basal levels of hepatic apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and C-III mRNA compared with wild-type controls, but also substantially reversed the reductions in mRNA levels of apo A-I and C-III expected following treatment with the potent PPAR{alpha} ligand Wy14,643. In contrast, no effect was detected in the PPAR{alpha}-null mice. Testing of eight main ginsenosides on PPAR{alpha} reporter gene expression indicated that Rf was responsible for the effects of ginseng on lipoprotein metabolism. Furthermore, the inhibition of PPAR{alpha}-dependent transactivation by Rf seems to occur at the level of DNA binding. These results demonstrate that ginseng component Rf regulates apo A-I and C-III mRNA and the actions of Rf on lipoprotein metabolism are mediated via interactions with PPAR{alpha}.

  15. A Potential Neuroprotective Role of Apolipoprotein E-containing Lipoproteins through Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 in Normal Tension Glaucoma*

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hideki; Eguchi, Yuko; Fukuchi-Nakaishi, Yuko; Takeya, Motohiro; Nakagata, Naomi; Tanaka, Kohichi; Vance, Jean E.; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy and the second major cause of blindness worldwide next to cataracts. The protection from retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss, one of the main characteristics of glaucoma, would be a straightforward treatment for this disorder. However, the clinical application of neuroprotection has not, so far, been successful. Here, we report that apolipoprotein E-containing lipoproteins (E-LPs) protect primary cultured RGCs from Ca2+-dependent, and mitochondrion-mediated, apoptosis induced by glutamate. Binding of E-LPs to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 recruited the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor, blocked intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and inactivated glycogen synthase kinase 3β, thereby inhibiting apoptosis. When compared with contralateral eyes treated with phosphate-buffered saline, intravitreal administration of E-LPs protected against RGC loss in glutamate aspartate transporter-deficient mice, a model of normal tension glaucoma that causes glaucomatous optic neuropathy without elevation of intraocular pressure. Although the presence of α2-macroglobulin, another ligand of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, interfered with the neuroprotective effect of E-LPs against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, the addition of E-LPs overcame the inhibitory effect of α2-macroglobulin. These findings may provide a potential therapeutic strategy for normal tension glaucoma by an LRP1-mediated pathway. PMID:22674573

  16. Low density lipoprotein receptor-independent hepatic uptake of a synthetic, cholesterol-scavenging lipoprotein: implications for the treatment of receptor-deficient atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Rahman, I.U.; Donnelly, T.M.; Parker, T.S.; Weinrauch, M.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The metabolism of infused /sup 111/In-labeled phospholipid liposomes was examined in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits, which lack low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and in normal control rabbits. The half-times (t/sub 1/2/) for clearance of /sup 111/In and excess phospholipid from plasma were 20.8 +/- 0.9 hr and 20.3 +/- 4.6 hr in WHHL and 20.0 +/- 0.8 hr and 19.6 +/- 2.2 hr in the normal rabbits. By 6 hr postinfusion, the plasma concentration of unesterified cholesterol increased by 2.2 +/- 0.23 mmol/liter in WHHL and 2.1 +/- 0.04 mmol/liter in normal rabbits, presumably reflecting mobilization of tissue sores. Disappearance of excess plasma cholesterol was > 90% complete in both groups of rabbits by 70 hr postinfusion. By quantitative ..gamma.. camera imaging, hepatic trapping of /sup 111/In-labeled liposomes over time was indistinguishable between the two groups. At autopsy, the liver was the major organ of clearance. Aortic uptake of /sup 111/In was < 0.02%. Thus, mobilization of cholesterol and hepatic uptake of phospholipid liposomes do not require LDL receptors. Because phospholipid infusions produce rapid substantial regression of atherosclerosis in genetically normal animals, the results suggest that phospholipid liposomes or triglyceride phospholipid emulsions (e.g., Intralipid) might reduce atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits and in humans with familial hypercholesterolemia.

  17. Atypical chemokine receptor 1 deficiency reduces atherogenesis in ApoE-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wuzhou; Liu, Qian; Lionakis, Michail S; Marino, Ana Paula M P; Anderson, Stasia A; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Murphy, Philip M

    2015-06-01

    Atypical chemokine receptor 1 (Ackr1; previously known as the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines or Darc) is thought to regulate acute inflammatory responses in part by scavenging inflammatory CC and CXC chemokines; however, evidence for a role in chronic inflammation has been lacking. Here we investigated the role of Ackr1 in chronic inflammation, in particular in the setting of atherogenesis, using the apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mouse model. Ackr1(-/-)ApoE(-/-) and Ackr1(+/+)ApoE(-/-) littermates were obtained by crossing ApoE(-/-) mice and Ackr1(-/-) mice on a C57BL/6J background. Ackr1 (+/+)ApoE(-/-)mice fed a Western diet up-regulated Ackr1 expression in the aorta and had markedly increased atherosclerotic lesion size compared with Ackr1(-/-)ApoE(-/-) mice. This difference was observed in both the whole aorta and the aortic root in both early and late stages of the model. Ackr1 deficiency did not affect serum cholesterol levels or macrophage, collagen or smooth muscle cell content in atherosclerotic plaques, but significantly reduced the expression of Ccl2 and Cxcl1 in the whole aorta of ApoE(-/-) mice. In addition, Ackr1 deficiency resulted in a modest decrease in T cell subset frequency and inflammatory mononuclear phagocyte content in aorta and blood in the model. Ackr1 deficiency appears to be protective in the ApoE knockout model of atherogenesis, but it is associated with only modest changes in cytokine and chemokine expression as well as T-cell subset frequency and inflammatory macrophage content. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. Oxytocin receptor knockout mice display deficits in the expression of autism-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Pobbe, Roger L H; Pearson, Brandon L; Defensor, Erwin B; Bolivar, Valerie J; Young, W Scott; Lee, Heon-Jin; Blanchard, D Caroline; Blanchard, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    A wealth of studies has implicated oxytocin (Oxt) and its receptors (Oxtr) in the mediation of social behaviors and social memory in rodents. It has been suggested that failures in this system contribute to deficits in social interaction that characterize autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the current analyses, we investigated the expression of autism-related behaviors in mice that lack the ability to synthesize the oxytocin receptor itself, Oxtr knockout (KO) mice, as compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. In the visible burrow system, Oxtr KO mice showed robust reductions in frontal approach, huddling, allo-grooming, and flight, with more time spent alone, and in self-grooming, as compared to WT. These results were corroborated in the three-chambered test: unlike WT, Oxtr KO mice failed to spend more time in the side of the test box containing an unfamiliar CD-1 mouse. In the social proximity test, Oxtr KO mice showed clear reductions in nose to nose and anogenital sniff behaviors oriented to an unfamiliar C57BL/6J (B6) mouse. In addition, our study revealed no differences between Oxtr WT and KO genotypes in the occurrence of motor and cognitive stereotyped behaviors. A significant genotype effect was found in the scent marking analysis, with Oxtr KO mice showing a decreased number of scent marks, as compared to WT. Overall, the present data indicate that the profile for Oxtr KO mice, including consistent social deficits, and reduced levels of communication, models multiple components of the ASD phenotype. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Social Behavior.

  19. Attenuation of lithium-induced natriuresis and kaliuresis in P2Y₂ receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Li, Lijun; Kohan, Donald E; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2013-08-01

    Whole body knockout (KO) of the P2Y₂ receptor (P2Y₂R) results in enhanced vasopressin V2 receptor activity and increased renal Na⁺ conservation. We hypothesized that P2Y₂R KO mice would be less sensitive to lithium-induced natriuresis and kaliuresis due to attenuated downregulation of one or more of the major renal Na⁺ or K⁺ transporter/channel proteins. KO and wild-type (WT) mice were fed a control or lithium-added diet (40 mmol/kg food) for 14 days. Lithium-induced natriuresis and kaliuresis were significantly (~25%) attenuated in KO mice. The subunits of the epithelial Na⁺ channel (ENaC) were variably affected by lithium and genotype, but, overall, medullary levels were decreased substantially by lithium (15-60%) in both genotypes. In contrast, cortical, β-, and γ-ENaC were increased by lithium (~50%), but only in WT mice. Moreover, an assessment of ENaC activity by benzamil sensitivity suggested that lithium increased ENaC activity in WT mice but in not KO mice. In contrast, medullary levels of Na⁺-K⁺-2Cl⁻ cotransporter 2 and cortical levels of the renal outer medullary K⁺ channel were not downregulated by lithium and were significantly (15-76%) higher in KO mice under both dietary conditions. In addition, under control conditions, tissue osmolality of the inner medulla as well as furosemide sensitivity were significantly higher in KO mice versus WT mice. Therefore, we suggest that increased expression of these proteins, particularly in the control state, reduces Na⁺ delivery to the distal nephron and provides a buffer to attenuate collecting duct-mediated natriuresis and kaliuresis. Additional studies are warranted to explore the potential therapeutic benefits of purinergic antagonism.

  20. Role of the TNF-α receptor type 1 on prostate carcinogenesis in knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Galheigo, Maria Raquel Unterkircher; Cruz, Amanda Rodrigues; Cabral, Ágata Silva; Faria, Paulo Rogério; Cordeiro, Renato Simões; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; Tomiosso, Tatiana Carla; Gonçalves, Bianca Fachim; Pinto-Fochi, Maria Etelvina; Taboga, Sebastião Roberto; Góes, Rejane Maira; Ribeiro, Daniele Lisboa

    2016-07-01

    TNF-α is a key cytokine involved in prostate carcinogenesis and is mediated by the TNF-α receptor type 1 (TNFR-1). This receptor triggers two opposite pathways: cell death or cell survival and presents a protective or stimulator role in cancer. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of TNF signaling in chemically induced prostate carcinogenesis in mice. C57bl/6 wild type (WT) and p55 TNFR-1 knockout mice (KO) were treated with mineral oil (control) or N-methyl N-nitrosurea (MNU) in association with testosterone (MNU+T, single injection of 40 mg/kg and weekly injection 2 mg/kg, respectively) over the course of 6 months. After this induction period, prostate samples were processed for histological and biochemical analysis. MNU+T treatment led to the development of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adenocarcinoma (PCa) in both WT and KO animals; however, the incidence of PCa was lower in KO group than in WT. Cell proliferation analysis showed that PCNA levels were significantly lower in the KO group, even after carcinogenesis induction. Furthermore, the prostate of KO animals had lower levels of p65 and p-mTOR after treatment with MNU+T than WT. There was also a decrease in prostate androgen receptor levels after induction of carcinogenesis in both KO and WT mice. Regarding the extracellular matrix in the prostate, KO mice had higher levels of fibronectin and lower levels of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) after carcinogenesis. Finally, there was a similar increase in apoptosis in both groups after carcinogenesis, indicating that the TNAFr1 pathway in prostate carcinogenesis presented proliferative, and not apoptotic, stimuli. TNF-α, through its receptor TNFR-1, promoted cell proliferation and cell survival in prostate by activation of the AKT/mTOR and NFKB pathway, which stimulated prostate carcinogenesis in chemically induced mice. Prostate 76: 917-926, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Small changes in bone structure of female α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Lips, Katrin S; Yanko, Özcan; Kneffel, Mathias; Panzer, Imke; Kauschke, Vivien; Madzharova, Maria; Henss, Anja; Schmitz, Peter; Rohnke, Marcus; Bäuerle, Tobias; Liu, Yifei; Kampschulte, Marian; Langheinrich, Alexander C; Dürselen, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Heiss, Christian; Schnettler, Reinhard; Kilian, Olaf

    2015-01-31

    Recently, analysis of bone from knockout mice identified muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype M3 (mAChR M3) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit α2 as positive regulator of bone mass accrual whereas of male mice deficient for α7-nAChR (α7KO) did not reveal impact in regulation of bone remodeling. Since female sex hormones are involved in fair coordination of osteoblast bone formation and osteoclast bone degradation we assigned the current study to analyze bone strength, composition and microarchitecture of female α7KO compared to their corresponding wild-type mice (α7WT). Vertebrae and long bones of female 16-week-old α7KO (n = 10) and α7WT (n = 8) were extracted and analyzed by means of histological, radiological, biomechanical, cell- and molecular methods as well as time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Bone of female α7KO revealed a significant increase in bending stiffness (p < 0.05) and cortical thickness (p < 0.05) compared to α7WT, whereas gene expression of osteoclast marker cathepsin K was declined. ToF-SIMS analysis detected a decrease in trabecular calcium content and an increase in C4H6N(+) (p < 0.05) and C4H8N(+) (p < 0.001) collagen fragments whereas a loss of osteoid was found by means of TEM. Our results on female α7KO bone identified differences in bone strength and composition. In addition, we could demonstrate that α7-nAChRs are involved in regulation of bone remodelling. In contrast to mAChR M3 and nAChR subunit α2 the α7-nAChR favours reduction of bone strength thereby showing similar effects as α7β2-nAChR in male mice. nAChR are able to form heteropentameric receptors containing α- and β-subunits as well as the subunits α7 can be arranged as homopentameric cation channel. The different effects of homopentameric and heteropentameric α7-nAChR on bone need to be analysed in future studies as well as gender effects of cholinergic receptors on

  2. Identification of low density lipoprotein as a regulator of Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, R D; Khoo, M; Lund-Katz, S; Scerbo, L; Esfahani, M

    1990-01-01

    Optimal expression of the high-affinity Fc receptor for IgG (FcRI) by the human monocyte cell line U-937 requires the presence of low density lipoprotein (LDL), and neither cholesterol nor high density lipoprotein can provide the component necessary for optimal FcRI expression. Here we show that FcR-mediated phagocytosis also requires LDL. U-937 cells were cultured in medium containing interferon gamma and either fetal calf serum (FCS) or delipidated FCS (DLFCS). The phagocytosis of IgG-coated erythrocytes was measured by a colorimetric assay. U-937 cells cultured in DLFCS medium had less than 16% of the phagocytic activity of cells cultured in normal FCS medium. Phagocytosis of IgG-coated erythrocytes could be inhibited 85% by the addition of murine IgG2a myeloma protein (5 micrograms/ml). U-937 cells cultured in DLFCS medium supplemented with pure cholesterol in ethanol (10 micrograms/ml) had only 30% of the phagocytic activity of cells grown in FCS medium. Addition of very low density lipoprotein (0.2 mg of protein per ml) to DLFCS medium also failed to increase phagocytosis. However, the addition of LDL (0.2 mg of protein per ml) to DLFCS medium restored 90% of the phagocytic activity. Since neither pure cholesterol nor very low density lipoprotein restored normal phagocytic function to U-937 cells despite a normalization of cellular cholesterol content, the restoration of phagocytosis observed with LDL replacement cannot be explained by mere delivery of cholesterol by LDL. Thus, LDL is required for the expression of FcRI and FcR-mediated phagocytosis by U-937 cells and may be an important regulator of phagocytic activity of monocytes and macrophages in vivo. PMID:2367519

  3. Nicotinic alpha7- or beta2-containing receptor knockout: effects on radial-arm maze learning and long-term nicotine consumption in mice.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D; Petro, Ann; Rezvani, Amir H; Pollard, Ninitia; Christopher, N Channelle; Strauss, Mariel; Avery, Jessica; Nicholson, Jessica; Rose, Jed E

    2009-01-23

    Classically, it has been thought that high-affinity nicotinic receptors-containing beta2 subunits are the most important receptor subtypes for nicotinic involvement in cognitive function and nicotine self-administration, while low affinity alpha7-containing nicotinic receptors have not been thought to be important. In the current study, we found that knockout of either beta2 or alpha7 subunits caused significant deficits in spatial discrimination in mice. The character of the impairment in the two knockouts was different. The beta2 knockout preferentially impaired cognition in males while the alpha7 caused impairment regardless of sex. Both beta2- and alpha7-containing nicotinic receptors also are important for nicotine self-administration, also in different ways. Most animal model studies of nicotine self-administration are relatively short-term whereas the problem of tobacco addiction is considerably longer-term. To better model the impact of nicotinic receptor subtypes on nicotine self-administration over the long-term, we studied the impact of genetic knockout of low affinity alpha7 receptors vs. high-affinity beta2-containing nicotinic receptors. Mice with knockouts of either of these receptors and their wildtype counter parts were given free access to a choice of nicotine-containing and nicotine-free solution in their home cages on a continuous basis over a period of 5 months. During the first few weeks, the beta2-containing nicotinic receptor knockout mice showed a significant decrease in nicotine consumption relative to wildtype mice, whereas the alpha7 knockout mice did not significantly differ from wildtype controls at the beginning of their access to nicotine. Interestingly, in the longer-term after the first few weeks of nicotine access, the beta2 knockout mice returned to wildtype mouse levels of nicotine consumption, whereas the alpha7 knockout mice developed an emergent decrease in nicotine consumption. The alpha7 receptor knockout-induced decrease

  4. Decreased consumption of sweet fluids in mu opioid receptor knockout mice: a microstructural analysis of licking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ostlund, Sean B.; Kosheleff, Alisa; Maidment, Nigel T.; Murphy, Niall P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Rationale Evidence suggests that the palatability of food (i.e., the hedonic impact produced by its sensory features) can promote feeding and may underlie compulsive eating, leading to obesity. Pharmacological studies implicate opioid transmission in the hedonic control of feeding, though these studies often rely on agents lacking specificity for particular opioid receptors. Objectives Here, we investigated the role of mu opioid receptors (MORs) specifically in determining hedonic responses to palatable sweet stimuli. Methods In Experiment 1, licking microstructure when consuming sucrose solution (2 to 20 %) was compared in MOR knockout and wildtype mice as a function of sucrose concentration and level of food deprivation. In Experiment 2, a similar examination was conducted using the palatable but calorie-free stimulus sucralose (0.001 to 1%), allowing study of licking behavior independent of homeostatic variables. Results In Experiment 1, MOR knockout mice exhibited several alterations in sucrose licking. Although wildtype mice exhibited a two-fold increase in the burst length when food deprived, relative to the nondeprived test, this aspect of sucrose licking was generally insensitive to manipulations of food deprivation for MOR knockout mice. Furthermore, during concentration testing, their rate of sucrose licking was less than half that of wildtype mice. During sucralose testing (Experiment 2), MOR knockout mice licked at approximately half the wildtype rate, providing more direct evidence that MOR knockout mice were impaired in processing stimulus palatability. Conclusions These results suggest that transmission through MORs mediates hedonic responses to palatable stimuli, and therefore likely contributes to normal and pathological eating. PMID:23568577

  5. Retinal pigment epithelial acid lipase activity and lipoprotein receptors: effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, Victor M

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show that fish oil-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, delivered to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by circulating low-density lipoproteins (LDL), enhance already considerable RPE lysosomal acid lipase activity, providing for more efficient hydrolysis of intralysosomal RPE lipids, an effect that may help prevent development of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). METHODS: Colorimetric biochemical and histochemical techniques were used to demonstrate RPE acid lipase in situ, in vitro, and after challenge with phagocytic stimuli. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of fluorescently labeled native, aceto-acetylated, and oxidized LDL was studied in vitro and in vivo. LDL effects on RPE lysosomal enzymes were assessed. Lysosomal enzyme activity was compared in RPE cells from monkeys fed diets rich in fish oil to those from control animals and in cultured RPE cells exposed to sera from these monkeys. RESULTS: RPE acid lipase activity was substantial and comparable to that of mononuclear phagocytes. Acid lipase activity increased significantly following phagocytic challenge with photoreceptor outer segment (POS) membranes. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of labeled lipoproteins was determined in vitro. Distinctive uptake of labeled lipoproteins occurred in RPE cells and mononuclear phagocytes in vivo. Native LDL enhanced RPE lysosomal enzyme activity. RPE lysosomal enzymes increased significantly in RPE cells from monkeys fed fish oil-rich diets and in cultured RPE cells exposed to their sera. CONCLUSIONS: RPE cells contain substantial acid lipase for efficient metabolism of lipids imbibed by POS phagocytosis and LDL uptake. Diets rich in fish oil-derived omega-3 fatty acids, by enhancing acid lipase, may reduce RPE lipofuscin accumulation, RPE oxidative damage, and the development of ARMD. PMID:12545699

  6. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Related Proteins as Regulators of Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Landowski, Lila M.; Young, Kaylene M.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a highly organised structure. Many signalling systems work in concert to ensure that neural stem cells are appropriately directed to generate progenitor cells, which in turn mature into functional cell types including projection neurons, interneurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Herein we explore the role of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family, in particular family members LRP1 and LRP2, in regulating the behaviour of neural stem and progenitor cells during development and adulthood. The ability of LRP1 and LRP2 to bind a diverse and extensive range of ligands, regulate ligand endocytosis, recruit nonreceptor tyrosine kinases for direct signal transduction and signal in conjunction with other receptors, enables them to modulate many crucial neural cell functions. PMID:26949399

  7. [Neural stem cell-specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ knockout mice: breeding and genetic identification].

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiaoqi; Zhang, Hongyan; Wang, Zhen; Lin, Lifang; Chen, Lu; Wang, Xuemin

    2014-12-01

    To breed neual stem cell-specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) knockout mice. Two transgenic mouse models, namely B6.PPARγloxp/loxp and B6.Nestin-Cre were interbred, and the first- generation offsprings were backcrossed with B6.PPARγloxp/loxp to obtain the second-generation mice. Genomic DNA was extracted from the second-generation mice for PCR to amplify the loxp and Cre gene fragments followed by agarose gel electrophoresis to verify their sizes. The mice with the PPARγloxp/loxp.Nestin-Cre (KO) genotype were selected as the neural stem cell-specific knockout PPARγ mice, with B6.PPARγloxp/loxp (loxp) mice as the control. Tissue samples were collected from specific regions of the mouse brain and peripheral tissue for detecting the expression of PPARγ mRNA using RT-PCR and real-time quantitative PCR. Genotyping results showed PPARγloxp and Cre bands in the knockout mice, which showed obviously decreased mRNA expression of PPARγ, suggesting successful establishment of neural stem cell-specific PPARγ knockout mice. The two transgenic mice we used were fertile, and their breeding pattern followed the laws of Mendelian inheritance.

  8. Effects of lovastatin on hepatic expression of the low-density lipoprotein receptor in nephrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, L X; Chen, L; Wang, W M; Zhang, X H; Wu, J B; Liang, S F; Shu, G Y

    2014-02-19

    To investigate the effect of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor lovastatin on the expression of the receptor for hepatic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in a rat model with kidney disease, and to identify the mechanisms in statin treatment of nephrotic syndrome with hyperlipidemia, a rat model with nephrotic syndrome was established. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with lovastatin for 2 weeks using gavage. The expression of protein and mRNA of the LDL receptor in the rat liver was detected with Western blot and RT-PCR, respectively, and blood-biochemical indices were also recorded for each group. Compared with the untreated control group, lovastatin treatment significantly decreased the levels of serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and urinary protein. In addition, lovastatin treatment significantly increased the levels of serum albumin and hepatic LDL receptor proteins, but had no effect on the expression of hepatic LDL receptor mRNA. Treatment with lovastatin markedly increased the expression of the hepatic LDL receptor in rats with nephrotic syndrome, which was accompanied by significantly improved hyperlipidemia.

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ regulates the expression and function of very-low-density lipoprotein receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Huan; Aakula, Srikanth; Abumrad, Naji N.

    2010-01-01

    Very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) is a member of the low-density receptor family, highly expressed in adipose tissue, heart, and skeletal muscle. It binds apolipoprotein E-triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and plays a significant role in triglyceride metabolism. PPARγ is a primary regulator of lipid metabolism in adipocytes and controls the expression of an array of genes involved in lipid trafficking in adipocytes. However, it is not known whether VLDLR is also under the control of PPARγ. In this study, we investigated the role of PPARγ in the regulation of VLDLR expression and function in vivo and in vitro. During the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, the levels of VLDLR protein and mRNA increased in parallel with the induction of PPARγ expression and reached maximum in mature adipocytes. Treatment of differentiated adipocytes with PPARγ agonist pioglitazone upregulated VLDLR expression in dose- and time-dependent manners. In contrast, specific inhibition of PPARγ significantly downregulated the protein level of VLDLR. Induction of VLDLR is also demonstrated in vivo in adipose tissue of wild-type (WT) mice treated with pioglitazone. In addition, pioglitazone increased plasma triglyceride-rich lipoprotein clearance and increased epididymal fat mass in WT mice but failed to induce similar effects in vldlr−/− mice. These results were further corroborated by the finding that pioglitazone treatment enhanced adipogenesis and lipid deposition in preadipocytes of WT mice, while its effect in VLDLR-null preadipocytes was significantly blunted. These findings provide direct evidence that VLDLR expression is regulated by PPARγ and contributes in lipid uptake and adipogenesis. PMID:19861583

  10. Familial defective apolipoprotein B-100: low density lipoproteins with abnormal receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Innerarity, T L; Weisgraber, K H; Arnold, K S; Mahley, R W; Krauss, R M; Vega, G L; Grundy, S M

    1987-01-01

    Previous in vivo turnover studies suggested that retarded clearance of low density lipoproteins (LDL) from the plasma of some hypercholesterolemic patients is due to LDL with defective receptor binding. The present study examined this postulate directly by receptor binding experiments. The LDL from a hypercholesterolemic patient (G.R.) displayed a reduced ability to bind to the LDL receptors on normal human fibroblasts. The G.R. LDL possessed 32% of normal receptor binding activity (approximately equal to 9.3 micrograms of G.R. LDL per ml were required to displace 50% of 125I-labeled normal LDL, vs. approximately equal to 3.0 micrograms of normal LDL per ml). Likewise, the G.R. LDL were much less effective than normal LDL in competing with 125I-labeled normal LDL for cellular uptake and degradation and in stimulating intracellular cholesteryl ester synthesis. The defect in LDL binding appears to be due to a genetic abnormality of apolipoprotein B-100: two brothers of the proband possess LDL defective in receptor binding, whereas a third brother and the proband's son have normally binding LDL. Further, the defect in receptor binding does not appear to be associated with an abnormal lipid composition or structure of the LDL: the chemical and physical properties of the particles were normal, and partial delipidation of the LDL did not alter receptor binding activity. Normal and abnormal LDL subpopulations were partially separated from plasma of two subjects by density-gradient ultracentrifugation, a finding consistent with the presence of a normal and a mutant allele. The affected family members appear to be heterozygous for this disorder, which has been designated familial defective apolipoprotein B-100. These studies indicate that the defective receptor binding results in inefficient clearance of LDL and the hypercholesterolemia observed in these patients. PMID:3477815

  11. Aberrant expression of PDGF ligands and receptors in the tumor prone ovary of follitropin receptor knockout (FORKO) mouse.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinlei; Aravindakshan, Jayaprakash; Yang, Yinzhi; Tiwari-Pandey, Rashmi; Sairam, M Ram

    2006-05-01

    Although PDGF family members play a vital role in cell proliferation, motility and chemotaxis via activation of structurally similar alpha- and beta-receptors, little is known of their function in ovarian regulation and induction of tumorigenesis. Microarray analyses of ovaries from young follitropin receptor knockout (FORKO) mice that are prone to late ovarian tumors upon aging have revealed significant imbalances in PDGF ligands and receptors. We hypothesized that FSH/FSH-R signaling may exert effects partly by regulation of PDGF the family. To further understand their implications for ovarian tumorigenesis, we studied FORKO ovaries and hormonal regulation of the PDGF family members in normal mice, by using RT-PCR, Q-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blotting. While PDGF-C and PDGFR-alpha increased, PDGFR-beta mRNA and protein decreased significantly in absence of FSH-R signaling. In the normal ovary, PDGFR-alpha was not affected by gonadotropin (eCG) stimulation but PDGF-C and PDGFR-beta decreased. Administration of estradiol decreased PDGF and their receptors. To further probe the differential regulation of PDGF family members by eCG and estradiol, we co-administered eCG with estrogen antagonist, ICI 182780. Increase in PDGFR-alpha in the absence of estradiol suggests direct effects of FSH signaling. During the estrous cycle in mice PDGF-C, PDGF-D and PDGFR-alpha mRNA levels were higher at the proestrous. By IHC, we report for the first time the localization of PDGF-C, PDGFR-alpha and PDGFR-beta protein in mouse ovarian compartments including the surface epithelium that is also altered in mutants. Immunostaining of PDGFRs increased as the follicle developed to preantral stage and declined thereafter. Thus, FSH modulates PDGF family members, partly via E2, suggesting that loss of FSH-R signaling causes an imbalance of PDGF family members predisposing the abnormal ovarian follicular environment for inducing tumorigenesis in aging FORKO mice.

  12. Impaired coordination of nutrient intake and substrate oxidation in melanocortin-4 receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Albarado, Diana C; McClaine, Jennifer; Stephens, Jacqueline M; Mynatt, Randall L; Ye, Jianping; Bannon, Anthony W; Richards, William G; Butler, Andrew A

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) are associated with obesity. The obesity syndrome observed in humans with MC4R haploinsufficiency is similar to that observed in MC4R knockout mice, including increased longitudinal growth, hyperphagia, and fasting hyperinsulinemia. For comparison with other commonly investigated models of obesity and insulin resistance, we have backcrossed Mc4r-/- mice into the C57BL/6J (B6) background. Female obese Mc4r-/- mice exhibit reduced energy expenditure and an attenuated increase in fatty acid (FA) oxidation after exposure to high-fat diets compared with obese Lepob/Lepob mice. The reduced energy expenditure and FA oxidation correlates with changes in hepatic gene expression. The expression of genes involved in FA oxidation increased in obese Lepob/Lepob mice compared with wild-type and obese Mc4r-/- mice. In contrast, a key lipogenic enzyme, FA synthase (FAS), is increased in obese Mc4r-/- mice compared with obese Lepob/Lepob mice. Hyperinsulinemia, increased FAS mRNA expression and hepatic steatosis appear to be secondary to obesity in B6 Mc4r-/- mice. However, Mc4r-/- mice in a mixed genetic background develop severe hepatic steatosis at an early age. This might suggest an important role of the MC4R in regulating liver FA metabolism that is masked on the B6 background. Interestingly, the 10- to 20-fold increase in liver triglyceride in the outbred strain of Mc4r-/- mice is not always associated with fasting hyperinsulinemia or increased FAS mRNA expression. This observation suggests that changes in liver secondary to triglyceride accumulation lead to hyperinsulinemia and increased hepatic FAS expression in Mc4r-/- mice.

  13. Behavioural phenotype of histamine H4 receptor knockout mice: Focus on central neuronal functions.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Maria Domenica; Ghelardini, Carla; Thurmond, Robin L; Masini, Emanuela; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2017-03-01

    The functional expression of H4 receptors (H4R) within neurons of the central nervous system has been recently reported, but their role is poorly understood. The present study aims to elucidate the role of neuronal H4R by providing the first description of the behavioural phenotype of H4R-deficient (H4R knockout, H4R-KO) mice. Mice lacking H4R underwent behavioural studies to evaluate locomotor activity, pain perception, anxiety, depression, memory and feeding behaviour. H4R-KO mice showed a significant increase in ambulation in an open field as well as in exploratory activity in the absence of any modification of motor coordination. The sensitivity of mutant mice to a thermal or a mechanical stimulus was identical to that of the wild type mice, but H4R-KO showed sensory hypersensitivity toward a condition of neuropathic pain. The lack of H4R is associated with the promotion of anxiety in the light-dark box test. H4R-KO mice showed an increased immobility time in the tail suspension test, experimental procedure used to evaluate the response of H4R deficient mice to a behavioural despair paradigm. Cognitive function parameters of H4R deficient mice, examined using the passive avoidance and the novel object recognition tests, were unaltered showing the lack of influence of H4R on working and recognition memory. Finally, H4R-deficient mice showed an orectic phenotype. These results illustrate that H4R modulates various neurophysiological functions such as locomotor activity, anxiety, nociception and feeding behaviour, confirming the importance of the integrity and functionality of neuronal H4R in the histaminergic regulation of neuronal functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Knockout of the neurokinin-1 receptor reduces cholangiocyte proliferation in bile duct-ligated mice

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Shannon; Gaudio, Eugenio; Renzi, Anastasia; Mancinelli, Romina; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Venter, Julie; White, Mellanie; Kopriva, Shelley; Chiasson, Valorie; DeMorrow, Sharon; Francis, Heather; Meng, Fanyin; Marzioni, Marco; Franchitto, Antonio; Alvaro, Domenico; Supowit, Scott; DiPette, Donald J.; Onori, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    In bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats, cholangiocyte proliferation is regulated by neuroendocrine factors such as α-calcitonin gene-related peptide (α-CGRP). There is no evidence that the sensory neuropeptide substance P (SP) regulates cholangiocyte hyperplasia. Wild-type (WT, +/+) and NK-1 receptor (NK-1R) knockout (NK-1R−/−) mice underwent sham or BDL for 1 wk. Then we evaluated 1) NK-1R expression, transaminases, and bilirubin serum levels; 2) necrosis, hepatocyte apoptosis and steatosis, and the number of cholangiocytes positive by CK-19 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick-end labeling in liver sections; 3) mRNA expression for collagen 1α and α-smooth muscle (α-SMA) actin in total liver samples; and 4) PCNA expression and PKA phosphorylation in cholangiocytes. In cholangiocyte lines, we determined the effects of SP on cAMP and d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate levels, proliferation, and PKA phosphorylation. Cholangiocytes express NK-1R with expression being upregulated following BDL. In normal NK-1R−/− mice, there was higher hepatocyte apoptosis and scattered hepatocyte steatosis compared with controls. In NK-1R −/− BDL mice, there was a decrease in serum transaminases and bilirubin levels and the number of CK-19-positive cholangiocytes and enhanced biliary apoptosis compared with controls. In total liver samples, the expression of collagen 1α and α-SMA increased in BDL compared with normal mice and decreased in BDL NK-1R−/− compared with BDL mice. In cholangiocytes from BDL NK-1R −/− mice there was decreased PCNA expression and PKA phosphorylation. In vitro, SP increased cAMP levels, proliferation, and PKA phosphorylation of cholangiocytes. Targeting of NK-1R may be important in the inhibition of biliary hyperplasia in cholangiopathies. PMID:21596993

  15. Uric acid stones in the urinary bladder of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Ryan; Inzunza, Jose; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2012-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knockout mice raised in the laboratory of Fujii-Kuriyama have been under investigation for several years because of the presence in their urinary bladder of large, yellowish stones. The stones are composed of uric acid and become apparent in the bladders as tiny stones when mice are 10 wk of age. By the time the mice are 6 mo of age, there are usually two or three stones with diameters of 3–4 mm. The urate concentration in the serum was normal but in the urine the concentration was 40–50 mg/dL, which is 10 times higher than that in the WT littermates. There were no apparent histological pathologies in the kidney or joints and the levels of enzymes involved in elimination of purines were normal. The source of the uric acid was therefore judged to be from degradation of nucleic acids due to a high turnover of cells in the bladder itself. The bladder was fibrotic and the luminal side of the bladder epithelium was filled with eosinophilic granules. There was loss of E-cadherin between some epithelial cells, with an enlarged submucosal area filled with immune cells and sometimes invading epithelial cells. We hypothesize that in the absence of AhR there is loss of detoxifying enzymes, which leads to accumulation of unconjugated cytotoxins and carcinogens in the bladder. The presence of bladder toxins may have led to the increased apoptosis and inflammation as well as invasion of epithelial cells in the bladders of older mice. PMID:22232670

  16. Uric acid stones in the urinary bladder of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Butler, Ryan; Inzunza, Jose; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2012-01-24

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knockout mice raised in the laboratory of Fujii-Kuriyama have been under investigation for several years because of the presence in their urinary bladder of large, yellowish stones. The stones are composed of uric acid and become apparent in the bladders as tiny stones when mice are 10 wk of age. By the time the mice are 6 mo of age, there are usually two or three stones with diameters of 3-4 mm. The urate concentration in the serum was normal but in the urine the concentration was 40-50 mg/dL, which is 10 times higher than that in the WT littermates. There were no apparent histological pathologies in the kidney or joints and the levels of enzymes involved in elimination of purines were normal. The source of the uric acid was therefore judged to be from degradation of nucleic acids due to a high turnover of cells in the bladder itself. The bladder was fibrotic and the luminal side of the bladder epithelium was filled with eosinophilic granules. There was loss of E-cadherin between some epithelial cells, with an enlarged submucosal area filled with immune cells and sometimes invading epithelial cells. We hypothesize that in the absence of AhR there is loss of detoxifying enzymes, which leads to accumulation of unconjugated cytotoxins and carcinogens in the bladder. The presence of bladder toxins may have led to the increased apoptosis and inflammation as well as invasion of epithelial cells in the bladders of older mice.

  17. Derivation of rat embryonic stem cells and generation of protease-activated receptor-2 knockout rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Nakata, Mitsugu; Sasada, Reiko; Ooshima, Yuki; Yano, Takashi; Shinozawa, Tadahiro; Tsukimi, Yasuhiro; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Tadatoshi

    2012-08-01

    One of the remarkable achievements in knockout (KO) rat production reported during the period 2008-2010 is the derivation of authentic embryonic stem (ES) cells from rat blastocysts using a novel culture medium containing glycogen synthase kinase 3 and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitors (2i medium). Here, we report gene-targeting technology via homologous recombination in rat ES cells, demonstrating its use through production of a protease-activated receptor-2 gene (Par-2) KO rat. We began by generating germline-competent ES cells from Dark Agouti rats using 2i medium. These ES cells, which differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vitro, can produce chimeras with high ES cell contribution when injected into blastocysts. We then introduced a targeting vector with a neomycin-resistant gene driven by the CAG promoter to disrupt Par-2. After a 7-day drug selection, 489 neomycin-resistant colonies were obtained. Following screening by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) genotyping and quantitative PCR analysis, we confirmed three homologous recombinant clones, resulting in chimeras that transmitted the Par-2 targeted allele to offspring. Par-2 KO rats showed a loss of Par-2 messenger RNA expression in their stomach cells and a lack of PAR-2 mediated smooth muscle relaxation in the aorta as indicated by pharmacological testing. Compared with mice, rats offer many advantages in biomedical research, including a larger body size; consequently, they are widely used in scientific investigation. Thus, the establishment of a gene-targeting technology using rat ES cells will be a valuable tool in human disease model production and drug discovery.

  18. M4 muscarinic receptor knockout mice display abnormal social behavior and decreased prepulse inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the central nervous system (CNS), the muscarinic system plays key roles in learning and memory, as well as in the regulation of many sensory, motor, and autonomic processes, and is thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of several major diseases of the CNS, such as Alzheimer's disease, depression, and schizophrenia. Previous studies reveal that M4 muscarinic receptor knockout (M4R KO) mice displayed an increase in basal locomotor activity, an increase in sensitivity to the prepulse inhibition (PPI)-disrupting effect of psychotomimetics, and normal basal PPI. However, other behaviorally significant roles of M4R remain unclear. Results In this study, to further investigate precise functional roles of M4R in the CNS, M4R KO mice were subjected to a battery of behavioral tests. M4R KO mice showed no significant impairments in nociception, neuromuscular strength, or motor coordination/learning. In open field, light/dark transition, and social interaction tests, consistent with previous studies, M4R KO mice displayed enhanced locomotor activity compared to their wild-type littermates. In the open field test, M4R KO mice exhibited novelty-induced locomotor hyperactivity. In the social interaction test, contacts between pairs of M4R KO mice lasted shorter than those of wild-type mice. In the sensorimotor gating test, M4R KO mice showed a decrease in PPI, whereas in the startle response test, in contrast to a previous study, M4R KO mice demonstrated normal startle response. M4R KO mice also displayed normal performance in the Morris water maze test. Conclusions These findings indicate that M4R is involved in regulation of locomotor activity, social behavior, and sensorimotor gating in mice. Together with decreased PPI, abnormal social behavior, which was newly identified in the present study, may represent a behavioral abnormality related to psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. PMID:22463818

  19. Enhanced induction of Mucin Depleted Foci in Estrogen Receptor β Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saleiro, D.; Murillo, G.; Lubahn, D. B.; Kopelovich, L.; Korach, K. S.; Mehta, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    The role of the estrogen receptor β (ERβ) in the colon has received considerable interest, yet in vivo models are needed to better define its protective actions. In the present study, wild-type (WT), ERα and ERβ knockout (αERKO and βERKO) mice were injected with azoxymethane (AOM), a colon chemical carcinogen. Fourteen weeks after AOM exposure the incidence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) was assessed by methylene blue staining. βERKO mice showed significantly higher incidence (P < 0.001) of ACF (15.0 ± 2.5) as compared to αERKO (3.4 ± 1.0) and WT (4.6 ± 1.0) mice. The colons in several βERKO mice had increased thickness and loss of normal morphology. It has been reported that ERβ plays a role in maintenance of the colonic crypt architecture; this may explain the loss of crypt organization in the colonic epithelium of βERKO mice. The presence of mucin depleted foci (MDF) has been shown, both in humans and in rodents, as an early event in colon cancer. Therefore, in order to surpass the limitations with ACF scoring, we performed alcian blue-neutral red staining to assess the presence of MDF. This assay allowed the assessment of precancerous lesions on all the βERKO mice colons (38.3 ± 4.0; P < 0.001), comparing to WT and αERKO mice (6.6 ± 1.5, and 10.0 ± 1.9, respectively), and served to confirm the ACF results. Together these data support the use of MDF staining as a biomarker for precancerous lesions and the protective role of ERβ in colon carcinogenesis. PMID:20716634

  20. Transport of beta-very low density lipoproteins and chylomicron remnants by macrophages is mediated by the low density lipoprotein receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, J L; Kraemer, F B; Cooper, A D

    1987-02-15

    The receptor-mediated uptake of rat hypercholesterolemic very low density lipoproteins (beta VLDL) and rat chylomicron remnants was studied in monolayer cultures of the J774 and P388D1 macrophage cell lines and in primary cultures of mouse peritoneal macrophages. Uptake of 125I-beta VLDL and 125I-chylomicron remnants was reduced 80-90% in the presence of high concentrations of unlabeled human low density lipoproteins (LDL). Human acetyl-LDL did not significantly compete at any concentration tested. Uptake of 125I-beta VLDL and 125I-chylomicron remnants was also competitively inhibited by specific polyclonal antibodies directed against the estrogen-induced LDL receptor of rat liver. Incubation in the presence of anti-LDL receptor IgG, but not nonimmune IgG, reduced specific uptake greater than 80%. Anti-LDL receptor IgG, 125I-beta VLDL, and 125I-chylomicron remnants bound to two protein components of apparent molecular weights 125,000 and 111,000 on nitrocellulose blots of detergent-solubilized macrophage membranes. Between 70-90% of 125I-lipoprotein binding was confined to the 125,000-Da peptide. Binding of 125I-beta VLDL and 125I-chylomicron remnants to these proteins was competitively inhibited by anti-LDL receptor antibodies. Comparison of anti-LDL receptor IgG immunoblot profiles of detergent-solubilized membranes from mouse macrophages, fibroblasts, and liver, and normal and estrogen-induced rat liver demonstrated that the immunoreactive LDL receptor of mouse cells is of a lower molecular weight than that of rat liver. Incubation of J774 cells with 1.0 micrograms of 25-hydroxycholesterol/ml plus 20 micrograms of cholesterol/ml for 48 h decreased 125I-beta VLDL uptake and immuno- and ligand blotting to the 125,000- and 111,000-Da peptides by only 25%. Taken together, these data demonstrate that uptake of beta VLDL and chylomicron remnants by macrophages is mediated by an LDL receptor that is immunologically related to the LDL receptor of rat liver.

  1. Low density lipoprotein receptor-independent hepatic uptake of a synthetic, cholesterol-scavenging lipoprotein: implications for the treatment of receptor-deficient atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K J; Vallabhajosula, S; Rahman, I U; Donnelly, T M; Parker, T S; Weinrauch, M; Goldsmith, S J

    1988-01-01

    The metabolism of infused 111In-labeled phospholipid liposomes was examined in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits, which lack low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and in normal control rabbits. The half-times (t1/2) for clearance of 111In and excess phospholipid from plasma were 20.8 +/- 0.9 hr and 20.3 +/- 4.6 hr in WHHL and 20.0 +/- 0.8 hr and 19.6 +/- 2.2 hr in the normal rabbits (means +/- SEM; n = 4). By 6 hr postinfusion, the plasma concentration of unesterified cholesterol increased by 2.2 +/- 0.23 mmol/liter in WHHL and 2.1 +/- 0.04 mmol/liter in normal rabbits, presumably reflecting mobilization of tissue stores. Disappearance of excess plasma cholesterol was greater than 90% complete in both groups of rabbits by 70 hr postinfusion. By quantitative gamma camera imaging, hepatic trapping of 111In-labeled liposomes over time was indistinguishable between the two groups. At autopsy, the liver was the major organ of clearance, acquiring 22.0% +/- 1.7% (WHHL) and 16.8% +/- 1.0% (normal of total 111In. Aortic uptake of 111In was less than 0.02%. Thus, mobilization of cholesterol and hepatic uptake of phospholipid liposomes do not require LDL receptors. Because phospholipid infusions produce rapid substantial regression of atherosclerosis in genetically normal animals, our results suggest that phospholipid liposomes or triglyceride phospholipid emulsions (e.g., Intralipid) might reduce atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits and in humans with familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:3422421

  2. Cubilin, the endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B(12) complex, mediates high-density lipoprotein holoparticle endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hammad, S M; Stefansson, S; Twal, W O; Drake, C J; Fleming, P; Remaley, A; Brewer, H B; Argraves, W S

    1999-08-31

    Receptors that endocytose high-density lipoproteins (HDL) have been elusive. Here yolk-sac endoderm-like cells were used to identify an endocytic receptor for HDL. The receptor was isolated by HDL affinity chromatography and identified as cubilin, the recently described endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B(12). Cubilin antibodies inhibit HDL endocytosis by the endoderm-like cells and in mouse embryo yolk-sac endoderm, a prominent site of cubilin expression. Cubilin-mediated HDL endocytosis is inhibitable by HDL(2), HDL(3), apolipoprotein (apo)A-I, apoA-II, apoE, and RAP, but not by low-density lipoprotein (LDL), oxidized LDL, VLDL, apoC-I, apoC-III, or heparin. These findings, coupled with the fact that cubilin is expressed in kidney proximal tubules, suggest a role for this receptor in embryonic acquisition of maternal HDL and renal catabolism of filterable forms of HDL.

  3. Cubilin, the endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complex, mediates high-density lipoprotein holoparticle endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, Samar M.; Stefansson, Steingrimur; Twal, Waleed O.; Drake, Christopher J.; Fleming, Paul; Remaley, Alan; Brewer, H. Bryan; Argraves, W. Scott

    1999-01-01

    Receptors that endocytose high-density lipoproteins (HDL) have been elusive. Here yolk-sac endoderm-like cells were used to identify an endocytic receptor for HDL. The receptor was isolated by HDL affinity chromatography and identified as cubilin, the recently described endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B12. Cubilin antibodies inhibit HDL endocytosis by the endoderm-like cells and in mouse embryo yolk-sac endoderm, a prominent site of cubilin expression. Cubilin-mediated HDL endocytosis is inhibitable by HDL2, HDL3, apolipoprotein (apo)A-I, apoA-II, apoE, and RAP, but not by low-density lipoprotein (LDL), oxidized LDL, VLDL, apoC-I, apoC-III, or heparin. These findings, coupled with the fact that cubilin is expressed in kidney proximal tubules, suggest a role for this receptor in embryonic acquisition of maternal HDL and renal catabolism of filterable forms of HDL. PMID:10468579

  4. Neuronal low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 binds and endocytoses prion fibrils via receptor cluster 4

    PubMed Central

    Jen, Angela; Parkyn, Celia J.; Mootoosamy, Roy C.; Ford, Melanie J.; Warley, Alice; Liu, Qiang; Bu, Guojun; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Moestrup, Søren; McGuinness, Lindsay; Emptage, Nigel; Morris, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    For infectious prion protein (designated PrPSc) to act as a template to convert normal cellular protein (PrPC) to its distinctive pathogenic conformation, the two forms of prion protein (PrP) must interact closely. The neuronal receptor that rapidly endocytoses PrPC is the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We show here that on sensory neurons LRP1 is also the receptor that binds and rapidly endocytoses smaller oligomeric forms of infectious prion fibrils, and recombinant PrP fibrils. Although LRP1 binds two molecules of most ligands independently to its receptor clusters 2 and 4, PrPC and PrPSc fibrils bind only to receptor cluster 4. PrPSc fibrils out-compete PrPC for internalization. When endocytosed, PrPSc fibrils are routed to lysosomes, rather than recycled to the cell surface with PrPC. Thus, although LRP1 binds both forms of PrP, it traffics them to separate fates within sensory neurons. The binding of both to ligand cluster 4 should enable genetic modification of PrP binding without disrupting other roles of LRP1 essential to neuronal viability and function, thereby enabling in vivo analysis of the role of this interaction in controlling both prion and LRP1 biology. PMID:20048341

  5. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Sinnesael, Mieke; Cielen, Nele; Helsen, Christine; Clinckemalie, Liesbeth; Spans, Lien; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Deldicque, Louise; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Androgens have well-established anabolic actions on skeletal muscle, although the direct effects of the androgen receptor (AR) in muscle remain unclear. We generated satellite cell-specific AR-knockout (satARKO) mice in which the AR is selectively ablated in satellite cells, the muscle precursor cells. Total-limb maximal grip strength is decreased by 7% in satARKO mice, with soleus muscles containing ∼10% more type I fibers and 10% less type IIa fibers than the corresponding control littermates. The weight of the perineal levator ani muscle is markedly reduced (-52%). Thus, muscle AR is involved in fiber-type distribution and force production of the limb muscles, while it is a major determinant of the perineal muscle mass. Surprisingly, myostatin (Mstn), a strong inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth, is one of the most androgen-responsive genes (6-fold reduction in satARKO) through direct transcription activation by the AR. Consequently, muscle hypertrophy in response to androgens is augmented in Mstn-knockout mice. Our finding that androgens induce Mstn signaling to restrain their own anabolic actions has implications for the treatment of muscle wasting disorders.-Dubois, V., Laurent, M. R., Sinnesael, M., Cielen, N., Helsen, C., Clinckemalie, L., Spans, L., Gayan-Ramirez, G., Deldicque, L., Hespel, P., Carmeliet, G., Vanderschueren, D., and Claessens, F. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

  6. SEIRA Spectroscopy on a Membrane Receptor Monolayer Using Lipoprotein Particles as Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Zaitseva, Ekaterina; Saavedra, Marcia; Banerjee, Sourabh; Sakmar, Thomas P.; Vogel, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    Surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) difference spectroscopy can probe reactions in a protein monolayer tethered to a nanostructured gold surface. SEIRA studies of membrane proteins, however, remain challenging due to sample stability, effects of the metal surface on function, and the need for a membrane-mimicking environment. Here we demonstrate and characterize a model system for membrane receptor investigations using SEIRA spectroscopy. The system employs nanoscale apolipoprotein bound bilayer (NABB) particles, similar to discoidal high-density lipoprotein particles, as soluble carriers for the G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin. The His-tag of the engineered apolipoprotein allows for selective binding of the NABBs to a Ni-NTA modified surface, while the lipid environment of the particle ensures stability and protection of the embedded receptor. Using SEIRA spectroscopy, we followed specific binding of rhodopsin-loaded NABB particles to the surface and formation of a membrane protein monolayer. Functionality of the photoreceptor in the immobilized NABBs was probed by SEIRA difference spectroscopy confirming protein conformational changes associated with photoactivation. Orientation of the immobilized NABB particles was assessed by comparing SEIRA data with polarized attenuated total reflection-Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Thus, SEIRA difference spectroscopy supported by the NABB technology provides a promising approach for further functional studies of transmembrane receptors. PMID:20923668

  7. Expression of alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and scavenger receptor in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Luoma, J; Hiltunen, T; Särkioja, T; Moestrup, S K; Gliemann, J; Kodama, T; Nikkari, T; Ylä-Herttuala, S

    1994-01-01

    Macrophage- and smooth muscle cell (SMC)-derived foam cells are typical constituents of human atherosclerotic lesions. At least three receptor systems have been characterized that could be involved in the development of foam cells: alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/LDL receptor-related protein (alpha 2 MR/LRP), scavenger receptor, and LDL receptor. We studied the expression of these receptors in human atherosclerotic lesions with in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. An abundant expression of alpha 2MR/LRP mRNA and protein was found in SMC and macrophages in both early and advanced lesions in human aortas. alpha 2MR/LRP was also present in SMC in normal aortas. Scavenger receptor mRNA and protein were expressed in lesion macrophages but no expression was found in lesion SMC. LDL receptor was absent from the lesion area but was expressed in some aortas in medial SMC located near the adventitial border. The results demonstrate that (a) alpha 2MR/LRP is, so far, the only lipoprotein receptor expressed in lesions SMC in vivo; (b) scavenger receptors are expressed only in lesion macrophages; and (c) both receptors may play important roles in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:8182133

  8. Loss of Myocardial Ischemic Postconditioning in Adenosine A1 and Bradykinin B2 Receptors Gene Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Lei; Das, Anindita; Zhao, Zhi-Qing; Merino, Vanessa F.; Bader, Michael; Kukreja, Rakesh C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ischemic postconditioning (PostC) is a recently described cardioprotective modality against reperfusion injury, through series of brief re-flow interruptions applied at the very onset of reperfusion. It is proposed that PostC can activate a complex cellular signaling cascade, in which cell membrane receptors could serve as the upstream triggers of PostC. However, the exact subtypes of such receptors remain controversial or uninvestigated. To this context, the purpose of present study was to determine the definitive role of adenosine A1, bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors in PostC. Methods and Results The hearts isolated from adult male C57BL/6J wild-type mice or the mice lacking adenosine A1, or bradykinin B1 or B2 receptors subjected to zero-flow global ischemia and reperfusion in a Langendorff model. PostC, consisting of 6 cycles of 10 sec of reperfusion and 10 sec of ischemia, demonstrated significantly reduced myocardial infarct size (22.8±3.1%, Mean±SEM) as compared with the non-PostC wild-type controls (35.1±2.8%, P<0.05). The infarct-limiting protection of PostC was absent in adenosine A1 receptor knockout mice (34.9±2.7%) or bradykinin B2 receptor knockout mice (33.3±1.7%) and was partially attenuated in bradykinin B1 receptor deficient mice (25.6±2.9%; P>0.05). On the other hand, PostC did not significantly alter post-ischemic cardiac contractile function and coronary flow. Conclusions With the use of three distinctive strains of gene knockout mice, the current study has provided the first conclusive evidence showing PostC-induced infarct-limiting cardioprotection could be triggered by activation of multiple types of cell membrane receptors, which include adenosine A1 and bradykinin B2 receptors. PMID:18824766

  9. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a novel modulator of radial glia stem cell proliferation, survival and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Safina, Dina; Schlitt, Frederik; Romeo, Ramona; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Pietrzik, Claus U.; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy; Edenhofer, Frank; Faissner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The LDL family of receptors and its member LRP1 have classically been associated with a modulation of lipoprotein metabolism. Current studies, however, indicate diverse functions for this receptor in various aspects of cellular activities, including cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and survival. LRP1 is essential for normal neuronal function in the adult CNS, whereas the role of LRP1 in development remained unclear. Previously we have observed an upregulation of LewisX (LeX) glycosylated LRP1 in the stem cells of the developing cortex and demonstrated its importance for oligodendrocyte differentiation. In the current study we show that LeX-glycosylated LRP1 is also expressed in the stem cell compartment of the developing spinal cord and has broader functions in the developing CNS. We have investigated the basic properties of LRP1 conditional knockout on the neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) from the cortex and the spinal cord, created by means of Cre-loxp mediated recombination in vitro. The functional status of LRP1-deficient cells has been studied using proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis assays. LRP1 deficient NSPCs from both CNS regions demonstrated altered differentiation profiles. Their differentiation capacity towards oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), mature oligodendrocytes and neurons was reduced. In contrast, astrocyte differentiation was promoted. Moreover, LRP1 deletion had a negative effect on NSPCs proliferation and survival. Our observations suggest that LRP1 facilitates NSPCs differentiation via interaction with ApoE. Upon ApoE4 stimulation wild type NSPCs generated more oligodendrocytes, but LRP1 knockout cells showed no response. The effect of ApoE seems to be independent of cholesterol uptake, but is rather mediated by downstream MAPK and Akt activation. PMID:27258849

  10. Familial hypercholesterolemia in a rhesus monkey pedigree: molecular basis of low density lipoprotein receptor deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, M; Li, Z G; Pfaffinger, D; Neven, L; Scanu, A M

    1990-01-01

    We have recently identified a family of rhesus monkeys with members exhibiting a spontaneous hypercholesterolemia associated with a low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) deficiency. By using the polymerase chain reaction, we now show that the affected monkeys are heterozygous for a nonsense mutation in exon 6 of the LDLR gene. This mutation changes the sequence of the codon for amino acid 284 (tryptophan) from TGG to TAG, thereby generating a nonsense codon potentially resulting in a truncated 283-amino acid protein, which needs documentation, however. This G----A mutation also creates a site for the restriction endonuclease Spe I. Using this site as a marker for this nonsense mutation, we have shown that the mutation is present in all of the affected members of the pedigree and absent in unaffected members and that the mutation segregates with the phenotype of spontaneous hypercholesterolemia through three generations. Quantitative analyses of RNA obtained from liver biopsies show that the abundance of the LDLR RNA is also reduced by about 50%. Thus, we have identified a primate model for human familial hypercholesterolemia which will be useful for studying the relationship between the LDLR and lipoprotein metabolism and for assessing the efficacy of diets and drugs in the treatment of human familial hypercholesterolemia. Images PMID:2326270

  11. cDNA cloning of the bovine low density lipoprotein receptor: feedback regulation of a receptor mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, D W; Yamamoto, T; Schneider, W J; Slaughter, C J; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1983-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor belongs to a class of migrant cell surface proteins that mediate endocytosis of macromolecular ligands. No cDNAs for this class of proteins have been isolated to date. In the current paper, we report the isolation of a cDNA clone for the LDL receptor from a bovine adrenal cDNA library. The library was constructed by the Okayama-Berg method from poly(A)+ RNA that had been enriched in receptor mRNA by immunopurification of polysomes. Mixtures of synthetic oligonucleotides encoding the amino acid sequence of two neighboring regions of a single cyanogen bromide fragment were used as hybridization probes to identify a recombinant plasmid containing the LDL receptor cDNA. This plasmid, designated pLDLR-1, contains a 2.8-kilobase (kb) insert that includes a sequence which corresponds to the known amino acid sequence of a 36-residue cyanogen bromide fragment of the receptor. pLDLR-1 hybridized to a mRNA of approximately equal to 5.5 kb in the bovine adrenal gland. This mRNA, like the receptor protein, was 9-fold more abundant in bovine adrenal than in bovine liver. pLDLR-1 cross-hybridized to a mRNA of approximately equal to 5.5 kb in cultured human epidermoid carcinoma A-431 cells. This mRNA was markedly reduced in amount when sterols were added to the culture medium, an observation that explains the previously observed feedback regulation of LDL receptor protein. Southern blot analysis of bovine genomic DNA with 32P-labeled pLDLR-1 revealed a simple pattern of hybridization, consistent with a single-copy gene containing introns. Images PMID:6143315

  12. Sequence analysis of the non-recurring C-terminal domains shows that insect lipoprotein receptors constitute a distinct group of LDL receptor family members.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, Kees W; Smolenaars, Marcel M W; Van Hoof, Dennis; Van der Horst, Dick J

    2006-04-01

    Lipoprotein-mediated delivery of lipids in mammals involves endocytic receptors of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) family. In contrast, in insects, the lipoprotein, lipophorin (Lp), functions as a reusable lipid shuttle in lipid delivery, and these animals, therefore, were not supposed to use endocytic receptors. However, recent data indicate additional endocytic uptake of Lp, mediated by a Lp receptor (LpR) of the LDLR family. The two N-terminal domains of LDLR family members are involved in ligand binding and dissociation, respectively, and are composed of a mosaic of multiple repeats. The three C-terminal domains, viz., the optional O-linked glycosylation domain, the transmembrane domain, and the intracellular domain, are of a non-repetitive sequence. The present classification of newly discovered LDLR family members, including the LpRs, bears no relevance to physiological function. Therefore, as a novel approach, the C-terminal domains of LDLR family members across the entire animal kingdom were used to perform a sequence comparison analysis in combination with a phylogenetic tree analysis. The LpRs appeared to segregate into a specific group distinct from the groups encompassing the other family members, and each of the three C-terminal domains of the insect receptors is composed of unique set of sequence motifs. Based on conservation of sequence motifs and organization of these motifs in the domains, LpR resembles most the groups of the LDLRs, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptors, and vitellogenin receptors. However, in sequence aspects in which LpR deviates from these three receptor groups, it most notably resembles LDLR-related protein-2, or megalin. These features might explain the functional differences disclosed between insect and mammalian lipoprotein receptors.

  13. Interaction of apolipoprotein AII with the putative high-density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Vadiveloo, P K; Allan, C M; Murray, B J; Fidge, N H

    1993-09-14

    There is strong evidence to indicate that binding of HDL by cells is due to recognition of apoproteins residing on the surface of the lipoprotein by the putative HDL receptor(s). Although both of the major HDL apoproteins, AI and AII, are recognized by the putative receptor, the nature of the binding interaction and the domains of the apoproteins involved are largely unknown. Previous data from this laboratory led to the proposal of a model to explain how HDL particles containing AII interacted with the HDL receptor in a different manner as compared to HDL particles which contain apoAI but not apoAII [Vadiveloo, P. K., & Fidge, N. H. (1992) Biochem. J. 284, 145-151]. The model predicted that each chain of the apoAII homodimer contained a binding domain capable of interacting with the HDL receptor. This model was tested in the current study by preparing apoAII monomers, complexing them with phospholipid, and determining the ability of these complexes to bind to putative HDL receptors in rat liver plasma membranes (RLPM) and bovine aortic endothelial cell membranes (BAECM) by ligand blotting. The data showed that these complexes were bound by HB1 and HB2 from RLPM, and to the 110-kDa HDL binding protein from BAECM, providing critical evidence to support the model. Further investigation into the binding interaction revealed that apoAII complexed with phospholipid (apoAII-PC) bound more than delipidated apoAII, which bound more than delipidated apoAII monomers. Thus, optimum binding required the presence of lipid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Enhanced response to mouse thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor immunization in TSH receptor-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Mami; Mitsutake, Norisato; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Chen, Chun-Rong; Rapoport, Basil; McLachlan, Sandra M; Nagayama, Yuji

    2010-08-01

    Graves-like hyperthyroidism is induced in BALB/c mice by immunization with adenovirus expressing the human TSH receptor (TSHR) A-subunit (amino acids 1-289). However, because of nonidentity between the human and mouse TSHR ( approximately 87% amino acid homology), we compared the responses of mice immunized with adenoviruses expressing either the mouse or the human TSHR A-subunit. Wild-type (wt) BALB/c mice immunized with the mouse A-subunit developed neither TSHR antibodies (measured by flow cytometry) nor thyroid lymphocytic infiltration. However, wt C57BL/6 mice developed sparse intrathyroidal lymphocyte infiltration without antibody production. Depletion of naturally occurring regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells had little effect. These results indicate the inability to break tolerance to the mouse TSHR in wt mice. In contrast, TSHR knockout (KO) BALB/c mice generated mouse TSHR antibodies in response to mouse A-subunit immunization and augmented human TSHR antibody response to human A-subunit immunization. Thyroid-stimulating antibody titers measured in a functional bioassay were comparable in human A-subunit immunized wt mice and in TSHR KO mice immunized with either the mouse or human A-subunit. In conclusion, immune response to the mouse TSHR is readily induced in TSHR KO but not in wt mice. Only in the former does immunization with adenovirus expressing the mouse A-subunit generate antibodies capable of activating the mouse TSHR. TSHR KO mice are, therefore, of value for future studies dissecting the autoimmune response to the mouse TSHR.

  15. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 determines plasma remnant lipoproteins and accelerates atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Saito, Ryo; Sekiya, Motohiro; Igarashi, Masaki; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Miyahara, Shoko; Koyasu, Saori; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Ishii, Kiyoaki; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yahagi, Naoya; Takekoshi, Kazuhiro; Sone, Hirohito; Yatoh, Shigeru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2011-08-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) is nutritionally regulated and is known to be a key transcription factor regulating lipogenic enzymes. The goal of this study was to evaluate the roles of SREBP-1 in dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis. Transgenic mice that overexpress SREBP-1c in the liver and SREBP-1-deficient mice were crossed with low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice, and the plasma lipids and atherosclerosis were analyzed. Hepatic SREBP-1c overexpression in LDLR-deficient mice caused postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, increased very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, and decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in plasma, which resulted in accelerated aortic atheroma formation. Conversely, absence of SREBP-1 suppressed Western diet-induced hyperlipidemia in LDLR-deficient mice and ameliorated atherosclerosis. In contrast, bone marrow-specific SREBP-1 deficiency did not alter the development of atherosclerosis. The size of nascent VLDL particles secreted from the liver was increased in SREBP-1c transgenic mice and reduced in SREBP-1-deficient mice, accompanied by upregulation and downregulation of phospholipid transfer protein expression, respectively. Hepatic SREBP-1c determines plasma triglycerides and remnant cholesterol and contributes to atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic states. Hepatic SREBP-1c also regulates the size of nascent VLDL particles.

  16. Modifications in low-density lipoprotein receptor expression affects Cyclosporin A cellular uptake and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Leon, Carlos; Jia, Jessica; Qiu, Guosong; Hill, John S; Wasan, Kishor M

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effect of modulating the expression of the human low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) in human embryonic kidney (293T) cells on Cyclosporin A (CsA) cellular uptake and CsA-mediated cytotoxicity. LDLr expression was modulated using RNA interference (RNAi) and an LDLr overexpression plasmid. One of the small-interfering RNA (siRNA) constructs, LDLr-792, showed a 60% decrease in LDLr protein expression. The downregulation effect was specific as transfection with an annexin V (AxV) siRNA construct did not decrease LDLr expression levels. AxV and ABCA1 expression levels were not affected in the cells transfected with LDLr-792 (LDLr(LOW) cells) compared to the controls. At a functional level, fluorescent low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (DiI-LDL) internalization in the LDLr(LOW) cells was decreased (30%) compared to control cells. We tested the dose-dependent cytotoxicity induced by CsA using a respiration assay. We found a decrease in CsA-mediated cytotoxicity in the range of CsA doses studied (1-10 microg/mL) in the LDLr(LOW) cells compared to the pSHAG-transfected cells, reaching a statistical significance at 10 microg/mL CsA. At higher CsA doses we found a significant decrease in LDLr expression. When the control and LDLr(LOW) cells were treated with another cytotoxic drug, gentamycin, there was no difference in the cell viability, suggesting that this effect is specific for CsA. We confirmed the association of LDLr expression levels with CsA uptake by overexpressing the LDLr. The LDLr overexpressing cells showed an enhanced uptake of radiolabelled CsA. Taken together these results suggest that CsA internalization and cytotoxicity are affected by the LDL receptor expression levels.

  17. Liver heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins independently of LDL receptor family members

    PubMed Central

    MacArthur, Jennifer M.; Bishop, Joseph R.; Stanford, Kristin I.; Wang, Lianchun; Bensadoun, André; Witztum, Joseph L.; Esko, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the role of hepatic heparan sulfate in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism by inactivating the biosynthetic gene GlcNAc N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase 1 (Ndst1) in hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system, which resulted in an approximately 50% reduction in sulfation of liver heparan sulfate. Mice were viable and healthy, but they accumulated triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles containing apoB-100, apoB-48, apoE, and apoCI-IV. Compounding the mutation with LDL receptor deficiency caused enhanced accumulation of both cholesterol- and triglyceride-rich particles compared with mice lacking only LDL receptors, suggesting that heparan sulfate participates in the clearance of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins as well. Mutant mice synthesized VLDL normally but showed reduced plasma clearance of human VLDL and a corresponding reduction in hepatic VLDL uptake. Retinyl ester excursion studies revealed that clearance of intestinally derived lipoproteins also depended on hepatocyte heparan sulfate. These findings show that under normal physiological conditions, hepatic heparan sulfate proteoglycans play a crucial role in the clearance of both intestinally derived and hepatic lipoprotein particles. PMID:17200715

  18. [New mutations in low-density lipoprotein receptor gene in familial hypercholesterolemia patients from Petrozavodsk].

    PubMed

    Komarova, T Yu; Golovina, A S; Grudinina, N A; Zakharova, F M; Korneva, V A; Lipovetsky, B M; Serebrenitskaya, M P; Konstantinov, V O; Vasilyev, V B; Mandelshtam, M Yu

    2013-06-01

    Using an automated fluorescent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the entire coding region, promoter zone, and exon-intron junctions of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene, we examined 80 DNA samples of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) from Petrozavodsk. We revealed mutations that might cause FH in five probands, including FH-North Karelia (c.925-931del7) mutation and four previously unknown mutations. These novel mutations included a transversion (c.618T>G (p.S206R), one nucleotide insertion c.195_196insT (p.FsV66:D129X), a complex gene rearrangement c.192del10/ins8 (p.FsS65:D129X), and a single nucleotide deletion c.2191delG (p.FsV731:V736X). Three out of four novel mutations produce an open reading frame shift and the premature termination of translation. An analysis of the cDNA sequence of the LDL receptor showed that this might result in the formation of a transmembrane-domain-deficient receptor that is unable to bind and internalize the ligand. Our results suggest the absence of a strong founder effect associated with FH in the Petrozavodsk population.

  19. Purification and Characterization of a Bovine Acetyl Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Reddy, Pranhitha; Kishimoto, Chiharu; Krieger, Monty

    1988-12-01

    The acetyl low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor is expressed on macrophages and some endothelial cells and mediates macrophage--foam cell formation in culture. A 220-kDa acetyl LDL binding protein was partially purified from bovine liver membranes and was used to make a specific monoclonal antibody. The 220-kDa protein immunoprecipitated by this antibody retained binding activity, and the antibody was used to detect this protein in cells lining bovine liver sinusoids and on the surface of cultured bovine alveolar macrophages. In the human monocytic cell line THP-1, the expression of both acetyl LDL receptor activity and a 220-kDa acetyl LDL binding protein were dramatically induced in parallel after differentiation to a macrophage-like state induced by phorbol ester. The ligand specificity, tissue and cell-type specificity, and coinduction data indicated that this 220-kDa cell-surface binding protein is probably a receptor that mediates acetyl LDL endocytosis. The 220-kDa protein, which was purified 238,000-fold from bovine lung membranes to near homogeneity using monoclonal antibody affinity chromatography, is a trimer of 77-kDa subunits that contain asparagine-linked carbohydrate chains.

  20. Enhanced dihydropyridine receptor calcium channel activity restores muscle strength in JP45/CASQ1 double knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Barbara; Delbono, Osvaldo; Messi, Maria Laura; Bergamelli, Leda; Wang, Zhong-Min; Vukcevic, Mirko; Lopez, Ruben; Treves, Susan; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Paolini, Cecilia; Martini, Marta; Rispoli, Giorgio; Protasi, Feliciano; Zorzato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Muscle strength declines with age in part due to a decline of Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptors (Cav1.1) initiate muscle contraction by activating ryanodine receptors in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Cav1.1 channel activity is enhanced by a retrograde stimulatory signal delivered by the ryanodine receptor. JP45 is a membrane protein interacting with Cav1.1 and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ storage protein calsequestrin (CASQ1). Here we show that JP45 and CASQ1 strengthen skeletal muscle contraction by modulating Cav1.1 channel activity. Using muscle fibres from JP45 and CASQ1 double knockout mice, we demonstrate that Ca2+ transients evoked by tetanic stimulation are the result of massive Ca2+ influx due to enhanced Cav1.1 channel activity, which restores muscle strength in JP45/CASQ1 double knockout mice. We envision that JP45 and CASQ1 may be candidate targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies against decay of skeletal muscle strength caused by a decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content. PMID:23443569

  1. HSL-knockout mouse testis exhibits class B scavenger receptor upregulation and disrupted lipid raft microdomains[S

    PubMed Central

    Casado, María Emilia; Huerta, Lydia; Ortiz, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Crespo, Mirian; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Kraemer, Fredric B.; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    There is a tight relationship between fertility and changes in cholesterol metabolism during spermatogenesis. In the testis, class B scavenger receptors (SR-B) SR-BI, SR-BII, and LIMP II mediate the selective uptake of cholesterol esters from HDL, which are hydrolyzed to unesterified cholesterol by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). HSL is critical because HSL knockout (KO) male mice are sterile. The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of the lack of HSL in testis on the expression of SR-B, lipid raft composition, and related cell signaling pathways. HSL-KO mouse testis presented altered spermatogenesis associated with decreased sperm counts, sperm motility, and infertility. In wild-type (WT) testis, HSL is expressed in elongated spermatids; SR-BI, in Leydig cells and spermatids; SR-BII, in spermatocytes and spermatids but not in Leydig cells; and LIMP II, in Sertoli and Leydig cells. HSL knockout male mice have increased expression of class B scavenger receptors, disrupted caveolin-1 localization in lipid raft plasma membrane microdomains, and activated phospho-ERK, phospho-AKT, and phospho-SRC in the testis, suggesting that class B scavenger receptors are involved in cholesterol ester uptake for steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis. PMID:22988039

  2. Retraction. Clc-2 knockout attenuated experimental temporal lobe epilepsy in mice by tonic inhibition mediated by GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yu-Xing; Tian, Xiang-Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most prevalent form of epilepsy, is often associated with drug-resistant seizures. In TLE, altered function of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors (GABAARs) results in potentiation of excitatory and/or failure of inhibitory neurotransmission, which contributes to seizure induction and propagation. Our previous study suggested that chloride channel-2 (Clc-2) contributed to chronically elevated tonic inhibition mediated by GABAARs in a rat model of TLE. In the present study, we used Clc-2 knockout mice to investigate further the role of Clc-2 and its interaction with tonic GABAergic inhibition in a model of TLE. The results revealed that knockout of Clc-2 decreased tonic seizure protection, latency of clonic seizure, seizure threshold and mortality protection in mice. Clc-2 knockout decreased the action potential (AP)peak and APthreshold, Clc-2 currents and GABAAR-mediated tonic inhibition in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Thus, the voltage-gated chloride channel Clc-2, which was functionally upregulated in CA1 pyramidal cells after seizures, may provide protection against TLE by its regulation of action potentials, Clc-2 currents and GABAARs in the CA1 region of the hippocampus.

  3. Characterization of the retina in the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Marci L.

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are involved in visual processing and are expressed by inner retinal neurons in all species studied to date (Keyser et al., 2000; Dmitrieva et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2009), but their distribution in the mouse retina remains unknown. Reductions in alpha7 nicotinic AChRs (nAChRs) are thought to contribute to memory and visual deficits observed in Alzheimer's and schizophrenia (Coyle et al., 1983; Nordberg et al., 1999; Leonard et al., 2006). However, the alpha7 nAChR knockout (KO) mouse has a mild phenotype (Paylor et al., 1998; Fernandes et al., 2006; Young et al., 2007; Origlia et al., 2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of AChRs in wildtype (WT) mouse retina and to assess whether up-regulation of other AChRs in the alpha7 nAChR KO retina may explain the minimal deficits described in the KO mouse. Reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) showed that mRNA transcripts for alpha2-7, alpha 9, alpha10, beta2-4 nAChR subunits and m1-m5 muscarinic AChR (mAChR) subtypes were present in WT murine retina. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of alpha3-5, alpha9, and m1-m5 AChR proteins and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated nAChR and mAChR proteins expressed by subsets of bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells. This is the first reported expression of alpha9 and alpha10 nAChR transcripts and alpha9 nAChR proteins in the retina of any species. Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) showed changes in AChR transcript expression in the alpha7 nAChR KO mouse retina relative to WT. Within whole retina alpha2, alpha9, alpha10, beta4, m1 and m4 AChR transcripts were up-regulated, while alpha5 nAChR transcripts were down-regulated. However, cell populations showed subtle differences; m4 mAChR transcripts were up-regulated in the ganglion cell layer and outer portion of the inner nuclear layer (oINL),while beta4 nAChR transcript up-regulation was limited to the oINL. Surprisingly, alpha2, alpha9, beta4, m2 and m4 transcripts were

  4. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice display cold allodynia, but enhanced recovery from spared-nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sideris, Alexandra; Piskoun, Boris; Russo, Lori; Norcini, Monica; Blanck, Thomas; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    The function of the Cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Mounting evidence suggest that CB1R expression and activation may contribute to pain. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice (CB1R-/-) generated on a C57Bl/6 background exhibit hypoalgesia in the hotplate assay and formalin test. These findings suggest that Cannabinoid 1 receptor expression mediates the responses to at least some types of painful stimuli. By using this mouse line, we sought to determine if the lack of Cannabinoid 1 receptor unveils a general hypoalgesic phenotype, including protection against the development of neuropathic pain. The acetone test was used to measure cold sensitivity, the electronic von Frey was used to measure mechanical thresholds before and after spared-nerve injury, and analysis of footprint patterns was conducted to determine if motor function is differentially affected after nerve-injury in mice with varying levels of Cannabinoid 1 receptor. At baseline, CB1R-/- mice were hypersensitive in the acetone test, and this phenotype was maintained after spared-nerve injury. Using calcium imaging of lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures, a higher percentage of neurons isolated from CB1R-/- mice were menthol sensitive relative to DRG isolated from wild-type (CB1R+/+) mice. Baseline mechanical thresholds did not differ among genotypes, and mechanical hypersensitivity developed similarly in the first two weeks following spared-nerve injury (SNI). At two weeks post-SNI, CB1R-/- mice recovered significantly from mechanical hypersensitivity, while the CB1R+/+ mice did not. Heterozygous knockouts (CB1R+/-) transiently developed cold allodynia only after injury, but recovered mechanical thresholds to a similar extent as the CB1R-/- mice. Sciatic functional indices, which reflect overall nerve health, and alternation coefficients, which indicate uniformity of strides, were not significantly different among genotypes. Cold allodynia and

  5. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice display cold allodynia, but enhanced recovery from spared-nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Piskoun, Boris; Russo, Lori; Norcini, Monica; Blanck, Thomas; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Background The function of the Cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Mounting evidence suggest that CB1R expression and activation may contribute to pain. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice (CB1R−/−) generated on a C57Bl/6 background exhibit hypoalgesia in the hotplate assay and formalin test. These findings suggest that Cannabinoid 1 receptor expression mediates the responses to at least some types of painful stimuli. By using this mouse line, we sought to determine if the lack of Cannabinoid 1 receptor unveils a general hypoalgesic phenotype, including protection against the development of neuropathic pain. The acetone test was used to measure cold sensitivity, the electronic von Frey was used to measure mechanical thresholds before and after spared-nerve injury, and analysis of footprint patterns was conducted to determine if motor function is differentially affected after nerve-injury in mice with varying levels of Cannabinoid 1 receptor. Results At baseline, CB1R−/− mice were hypersensitive in the acetone test, and this phenotype was maintained after spared-nerve injury. Using calcium imaging of lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures, a higher percentage of neurons isolated from CB1R−/− mice were menthol sensitive relative to DRG isolated from wild-type (CB1R+/+) mice. Baseline mechanical thresholds did not differ among genotypes, and mechanical hypersensitivity developed similarly in the first two weeks following spared-nerve injury (SNI). At two weeks post-SNI, CB1R−/− mice recovered significantly from mechanical hypersensitivity, while the CB1R+/+ mice did not. Heterozygous knockouts (CB1R+/−) transiently developed cold allodynia only after injury, but recovered mechanical thresholds to a similar extent as the CB1R−/− mice. Sciatic functional indices, which reflect overall nerve health, and alternation coefficients, which indicate uniformity of strides, were not significantly different

  6. Lectin-like, oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1-deficient mice show resistance to age-related knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Oda, Yutaka; Nakamura, Fumihisa; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Akagi, Masao

    2017-01-01

    The lectin-like, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1)/ox-LDL system contributes to atherosclerosis and may be involved in cartilage degeneration. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the LOX-1/ox-LDL system contributes to age-related osteoarthritis (OA) in vivo, using LOX-1 knockout (LOX-1 KO) mice. Knee cartilage from 6, 12, and 18-month old (n = 10/group) C57Bl/6 wild-type (WT) and LOX-1 KO mice was evaluated by determining the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) score of Safranin-O stained samples. The prevalence of knee OA in both mouse strains was also investigated. Expression levels of LOX-1, ox-LDL, runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2), type-X collagen (COL X), and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) in the articular chondrocytes were analyzed immunohistologically. No significant difference was observed in the mean scores of WT (2.00±0.61) and LOX-1 KO mice (2.00±0.49) at 6 months of age (P=1.00, n=10). At 12 and 18 months of age, the mean scores of LOX-1 KO mice (3.75±0.93 and 5.50±0.78) were significantly lower than those of WT mice (5.25±1.14 and 9.00±1.01; P<0.001 in both cases; n=10). The prevalence of OA in LOX-1 KO mice was lower than that in WT mice at 12 and 18 months of age (40 vs 70%, 70 vs 90%, respectively; n=10). The expression levels of Runx2, COL X, and MMP-13 in articular chondrocytes significantly decreased in LOX-1 KO, mice compared with those in WT mice. The study indicated that the LOX-1/ox-LDL system in chondrocytes plays a role in the pathogenesis of age-related knee OA, which is potentially a target for preventing OA progression. PMID:28348422

  7. Histamine H1 receptor knockout mice exhibit impaired spatial memory in the eight-arm radial maze.

    PubMed

    Zlomuzica, A; Ruocco, L A; Sadile, A G; Huston, J P; Dere, E

    2009-05-01

    In the mammalian brain, histaminergic neurotransmission is mediated by the postsynaptic histamine H1 and H2 receptors and the presynaptic H3 autoreceptor, which also acts as a heteroreceptor. The H1 receptor has been implicated in spatial learning and memory formation. However, pharmacological and lesion studies have revealed conflicting results. To examine the involvement of histamine H1 receptor in spatial reference and working memory formation, H1 receptor knockout mice (KO) were tested in the eight-arm radial maze. Previously, we found that the H1 receptor-KO mice showed reduced emotionality when confronted with spatial novelty. As it is known that emotions can have an impact on spatial learning and memory performance, we also evaluated H1 receptor-KO mice in terms of emotional behaviour in the light-dark box. Mice lacking the H1 receptor and wild-type mice (WT) were tested for spatial reference and working memory in an eight-arm radial maze with three arms baited and one trial per day. Emotional behaviour was measured using the light-dark test. The H1 receptor-KO mice showed impaired spatial reference and working memory in the radial maze task. No significant differences between H1 receptor-KO and WT mice were observed in the light-dark test. The spatial memory deficits of the H1 receptor-KO mice might be due to the reported changes in cholinergic neurochemical parameters in the frontal cortex and the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus, to impaired synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, and/or to a dysfunctional brain reward/reinforcement system.

  8. Mas receptor deficiency is associated with worsening of lipid profile and severe hepatic steatosis in ApoE-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Analina R; Aguilar, Edenil C; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I; da Silva, Rafaela F; Arantes, Rosa M E; Bader, Michael; Alenina, Natalia; Pelli, Graziano; Lenglet, Sébastien; Galan, Katia; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Mach, François; Santos, Sérgio H S; Santos, Robson A S

    2013-12-01

    The classical renin-angiotensin system pathway has been recently updated with the identification of additional molecules [such as angiotensin converting enzyme 2, ANG-(1-7), and Mas receptor] that might improve some pathophysiological processes in chronic inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we focused on the potential protective role of Mas receptor activation on mouse lipid profile, liver steatosis, and atherogenesis. Mas/apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-double-knockout (DKO) mice (based on C57BL/6 strain of 20 wk of age) were fed under normal diet and compared with aged-matched Mas and ApoE-single-knockout (KO), as well as wild-type mice. Mas/ApoE double deficiency was associated with increased serum levels of atherogenic fractions of cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose compared with wild-type or single KO. Serum levels of HDL or leptin in DKO were lower than in other groups. Hepatic lipid content as well as alanine aminotransferase serum levels were increased in DKO compared with wild-type or single-KO animals. Accordingly, the hepatic protein content of mediators related to atherosclerotic inflammation, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and liver X receptor, was altered in an adverse way in DKO compared with ApoE-KO. On the other hand, DKO mice did not display increased atherogenesis and intraplaque inflammation compared with ApoE-KO group. In conclusion, Mas deletion in ApoE-KO mice was associated with development of severe liver steatosis and dyslipidemia without affecting concomitant atherosclerosis. Mas receptor activation might represent promising strategies for future treatments targeting both hepatic and metabolic alterations in chronic conditions clustering these disorders.

  9. The glutamatergic compounds sarcosine and N-acetylcysteine ameliorate prepulse inhibition deficits in metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Stoker, Astrid; Markou, Athina

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Mice lacking metabotropic glutamate receptors 5 (mGluR5) exhibit reduced glutamatergic function and behavioral abnormalities, including deficits in prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle response that may be relevant to schizophrenia. Thus, these mice are an animal model that may be used for preclinical evaluation of potentially new classes of antipsychotic compounds. Recent clinical studies have suggested several compounds that modulate glutamatergic transmission through distinct mechanisms, such as potentiation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor glycine site, activation of group II mGluR, and activation of glutamate-cysteine antiporters, as being efficacious in the treatment of schizophrenia. Objectives The aim of this work is to evaluate the effects of sarcosine (a selective inhibitor of the glycine transporter 1 [GlyT1]), LY379268 (a group II mGluR agonist), and N-acetylcysteine (a cysteine prodrug that indirectly activates cystine-glutamate antiporters to increase glutamate levels in the extrasynaptic space) on PPI deficits in mGluR5 knockout mice. Results Sarcosine and N-acetylcysteine, but not LY379268, ameliorated PPI deficits in mGluR5 knockout mice. The ability of N-acetylcysteine to restore PPI deficits was not blocked by the group II mGluR antagonist LY341495, indicating that the effects of N-acetylcysteine were not attributable to activation of group II mGluRs by glutamate. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that the interactions between mGluR5 and NMDA receptors are involved in the regulation of PPI and suggest that activation of glutamate receptors, other than group II receptors, by increased endogenous glutamate transmission, may ameliorate the behavioral abnormalities associated with mGluR5 deficiency. PMID:20217053

  10. Pressure overload causes cardiac hypertrophy in beta1-adrenergic and beta2-adrenergic receptor double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Palazzesi, Sergio; Musumeci, Marco; Catalano, Liviana; Patrizio, Mario; Stati, Tonino; Michienzi, Simona; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Mattei, Elisabetta; Vitelli, Luigi; Marano, Giuseppe

    2006-03-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy arises as an adaptive response to increased afterload. Studies in knockout mice have shown that catecholamines, but not alpha1-adrenergic receptors, are necessary for such an adaptation to occur. However, whether beta-adrenergic receptors are critical for the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload is not known at this time. Pressure overload was induced by transverse aortic banding in beta1-adrenergic and beta2-adrenergic receptor double knockout (DbetaKO) mice, in which the predominant cardiac beta-adrenergic receptor subtypes are lacking. Chronic pressure overload for 4 weeks induced cardiac hypertrophy in both DbetaKO and wild-type mice. There were no significant differences between banded mice in left ventricular weight to body weight ratio, in the left ventricular wall thickness, in the cardiomyocyte size or in the expression levels of the load-sensitive cardiac genes such as ANF and beta-MHC. Additionally, the left ventricular systolic pressure, an index of afterload, and cardiac contractility, evaluated as dp/dtmax, the maximal slope of systolic pressure increment, and Ees, end-systolic elastance, were increased at a similar level in both wild-type and DbetaKO banded mice, and were significantly greater than in sham controls. Despite chronic activation of the cardiac beta-adrenergic system being sufficient to induce a pathological hypertrophy, we show that beta1-adrenergic and beta2-adrenergic receptors are not an obligatory component of the signaling pathway that links the increased afterload to the development of cardiac hypertrophy.

  11. Host knockout of E-prostanoid 2 receptors reduces tumor growth and causes major alterations of gene expression in prostaglandin E2-producing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Asting, Annika Gustafsson; Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Nilsberth, Camilla; Smedh, Ulrika; Lundholm, Kent

    2017-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is elevated in a variety of malignant tumors and has been shown to affect several hallmarks of cancer. Accordingly, the PGE2 receptor, E-prostanoid 2 (EP2), has been reported to be associated with patient survival and reduced tumor growth in EP2-knockout mice. Thus, the aim of the present study was to screen for major gene expression alterations in tumor tissue growing in EP2-knockout mice. EP2-knockout mice were bred and implanted with EP2 receptor-expressing and PGE2-producing epithelial-like tumors. Tumor tissue and plasma were collected and used for analyses with gene expression microarrays and multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Tumor growth, acute phase reactions/systemic inflammation and the expression of interleukin-6 were reduced in EP2-knockout tumor-bearing mice. Several hundreds of genes displayed major changes of expression in the tumor tissue when grown in EP2-knockout mice. Such gene alterations involved several different cellular functions, including stemness, migration and cell signaling. Besides gene expression, several long non-coding RNAs were downregulated in the tumors from the EP2-knockout mice. Overall, PGE2 signaling via host EP2 receptors affected a large number of different genes involved in tumor progression based on signaling between host stroma and tumor cells, which caused reduced tumor growth. PMID:28123585

  12. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Signaling Mediates the Triglyceride-Lowering Action of Akkermansia muciniphila in Genetic-Induced Hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing; Tong, Xuedong; Sud, Neetu; Khound, Rituraj; Song, Yongyan; Maldonado-Gomez, Maria X; Walter, Jens; Su, Qiaozhu

    2016-07-01

    Akkermansia muciniphila (A muciniphila) is a mucin-degrading bacterium that resides in the mucus layer whose abundance inversely correlates with body weight and the development of diabetes mellitus in mice and humans. The objective of this study was to explore the regulatory effect of A muciniphila on host lipoprotein metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and hepatic metabolic inflammation. By establishing a novel mouse model that colonized the A muciniphila in the gastrointestinal tract of the cAMP-responsive binding protein H (CREBH)-deficient mouse and in vivo chylomicron assay, we found that increased colonization of A muciniphila in the gastrointestinal tract of wild-type mice protected mice from an acute fat load-induced hyperlipidemia compared with vehicle-treated mice. A muciniphila administration also significantly ameliorated chronic hypertriglyceridemia, improved insulin sensitivity, and prevented overproduction of postprandial chylomicrons in CREBH-null mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that increased A muciniphila colonization induced expression of low-density lipoprotein receptors and apolipoprotein E in the hepatocytes of CREBH-null mice, which facilitated the uptake of intermediate-density lipoprotein via the mediation of apolipoprotein B100 and apolipoprotein E, leading to the increased clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein remnants, chylomicron remnants, and intermediate-density lipoproteins, from the circulation. Treatment with A muciniphila further improved hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and metabolic inflammation in CREBH-null mice. Increased colonization of the disease-protective gut bacteria A muciniphila protected the host from acute and chronic hyperlipidemia by enhancing the low-density lipoprotein receptor expression and alleviating hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and the inflammatory response in CREBH-null mice. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Attenuated Inflammatory Response in Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 2 (TREM2) Knock-Out Mice following Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Martin; Guenther, Madlen; Linnartz-Gerlach, Bettina; Neumann, Harald; Witte, Otto W.; Frahm, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    Background Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM2) is a microglial surface receptor involved in phagocytosis. Clearance of apoptotic debris after stroke represents an important mechanism to re-attain tissue homeostasis and thereby ensure functional recovery. The role of TREM2 following stroke is currently unclear. Methods and Results As an experimental stroke model, the middle cerebral artery of mice was occluded for 30 minutes with a range of reperfusion times (duration of reperfusion: 6 h/12 h/24 h/2 d/7 d/28 d). Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed a greatly increased transcription of TREM2 after stroke. We subsequently analyzed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and their receptors in TREM2-knockout (TREM2-KO) mice via qPCR. Microglial activation (CD68, Iba1) and CD3-positive T-cell invasion were analyzed via qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Functional consequences of TREM2 knockout were assessed by infarct volumetry. The acute inflammatory response (12 h reperfusion) was very similar between TREM2-KO mice and their littermate controls. However, in the sub-acute phase (7 d reperfusion) following stroke, TREM2-KO mice showed a decreased transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1α and IL-1β, associated with a reduced microglial activity (CD68, Iba1). Furthermore, TREM2-KO mice showed a reduced transcription of chemokines CCL2 (MCP1), CCL3 (MIP1α) and the chemokine receptor CX3CR1, followed by a diminished invasion of CD3-positive T-cells. No effect on the lesion size was observed. Conclusions Although we initially expected an exaggerated pro-inflammatory response following ablation of TREM2, our data support a contradictory scenario that the sub-acute inflammatory reaction after stroke is attenuated in TREM2-KO mice. We therefore conclude that TREM2 appears to sustain a distinct inflammatory response after stroke. PMID:23301011

  14. A muscle-specific knockout implicates nuclear receptor coactivator MED1 in the regulation of glucose and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoting; Birsoy, Kivanc; Roeder, Robert G

    2010-06-01

    As conventional transcriptional factors that are activated in diverse signaling pathways, nuclear receptors play important roles in many physiological processes that include energy homeostasis. The MED1 subunit of the Mediator coactivator complex plays a broad role in nuclear receptor-mediated transcription by anchoring the Mediator complex to diverse promoter-bound nuclear receptors. Given the significant role of skeletal muscle, in part through the action of nuclear receptors, in glucose and fatty acid metabolism, we generated skeletal muscle-specific Med1 knockout mice. Importantly, these mice show enhanced insulin sensitivity and improved glucose tolerance as well as resistance to high-fat diet-induced obesity. Furthermore, the white muscle of these mice exhibits increased mitochondrial density and expression of genes specific to type I and type IIA fibers, indicating a fast-to-slow fiber switch, as well as markedly increased expression of the brown adipose tissue-specific UCP-1 and Cidea genes that are involved in respiratory uncoupling. These dramatic results implicate MED1 as a powerful suppressor in skeletal muscle of genetic programs implicated in energy expenditure and raise the significant possibility of therapeutical approaches for metabolic syndromes and muscle diseases through modulation of MED1-nuclear receptor interactions.

  15. Genetic Background Can Result in a Marked or Minimal Effect of Gene Knockout (GPR55 and CB2 Receptor) in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Models of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Samuel J.; Tanner, Carolyn; Ross, Ruth A.; Michael, Gregory J.; Selwood, David L.; Giovannoni, Gavin; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids and some phytocannabinoids bind to CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid one (TRPV1) receptor and the orphan G protein receptor fifty-five (GPR55). Studies using C57BL/10 and C57BL/6 (Cnr2tm1Zim) CB2 cannabinoid receptor knockout mice have demonstrated an immune-augmenting effect in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models of multiple sclerosis. However, other EAE studies in Biozzi ABH mice often failed to show any treatment effect of either CB2 receptor agonism or antagonism on inhibition of T cell autoimmunity. The influence of genetic background on the induction of EAE in endocannabinoid system-related gene knockout mice was examined. It was found that C57BL/6.GPR55 knockout mice developed less severe disease, notably in female mice, following active induction with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 peptide. In contrast C57BL/6.CB2 (Cnr2Dgen) receptor knockout mice developed augmented severity of disease consistent with the genetically and pharmacologically-distinct, Cnr2tm1Zim mice. However, when the knockout gene was bred into the ABH mouse background and EAE induced with spinal cord autoantigens the immune-enhancing effect of CB2 receptor deletion was lost. Likewise CB1 receptor and transient receptor potential vanilloid one knockout mice on the ABH background demonstrated no alteration in immune-susceptibility, in terms of disease incidence and severity of EAE, in contrast to that reported in some C57BL/6 mouse studies. Furthermore the immune-modulating influence of GPR55 was marginal on the ABH mouse background. Whilst sedative doses of tetrahydrocannabinol could induce immunosuppression, this was associated with a CB1 receptor rather than a CB2 receptor-mediated effect. These data support the fact that non-psychoactive doses of medicinal cannabis have a marginal influence on the immune response in MS. Importantly, it adds a note of caution for the translational value of some

  16. Genetic background can result in a marked or minimal effect of gene knockout (GPR55 and CB2 receptor) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sisay, Sofia; Pryce, Gareth; Jackson, Samuel J; Tanner, Carolyn; Ross, Ruth A; Michael, Gregory J; Selwood, David L; Giovannoni, Gavin; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids and some phytocannabinoids bind to CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid one (TRPV1) receptor and the orphan G protein receptor fifty-five (GPR55). Studies using C57BL/10 and C57BL/6 (Cnr2 (tm1Zim)) CB2 cannabinoid receptor knockout mice have demonstrated an immune-augmenting effect in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models of multiple sclerosis. However, other EAE studies in Biozzi ABH mice often failed to show any treatment effect of either CB2 receptor agonism or antagonism on inhibition of T cell autoimmunity. The influence of genetic background on the induction of EAE in endocannabinoid system-related gene knockout mice was examined. It was found that C57BL/6.GPR55 knockout mice developed less severe disease, notably in female mice, following active induction with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 peptide. In contrast C57BL/6.CB2 (Cnr2 (Dgen)) receptor knockout mice developed augmented severity of disease consistent with the genetically and pharmacologically-distinct, Cnr2 (tm1Zim) mice. However, when the knockout gene was bred into the ABH mouse background and EAE induced with spinal cord autoantigens the immune-enhancing effect of CB2 receptor deletion was lost. Likewise CB1 receptor and transient receptor potential vanilloid one knockout mice on the ABH background demonstrated no alteration in immune-susceptibility, in terms of disease incidence and severity of EAE, in contrast to that reported in some C57BL/6 mouse studies. Furthermore the immune-modulating influence of GPR55 was marginal on the ABH mouse background. Whilst sedative doses of tetrahydrocannabinol could induce immunosuppression, this was associated with a CB1 receptor rather than a CB2 receptor-mediated effect. These data support the fact that non-psychoactive doses of medicinal cannabis have a marginal influence on the immune response in MS. Importantly, it adds a note of caution for the translational value of some

  17. Increased brain monoaminergic tone after the NMDA receptor GluN2A subunit gene knockout is responsible for resistance to the hypnotic effect of nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Andrey B; Yamakura, Tomohiro; Kohno, Tatsuro; Sakimura, Kenji; Baba, Hiroshi

    2013-01-05

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors can be inhibited by inhalational anesthetics in vitro at clinically relevant concentrations. Here, to clarify the role of NMDA receptors in anesthetic-induced unconsciousness, we examined the hypnotic properties of isoflurane, sevoflurane and nitrous oxide in NMDA receptor GluN2A subunit knockout mice. The hypnotic properties of inhalational anesthetics were evaluated in mice in the loss of righting reflex (LORR) assay by measuring the 50% concentration for LORR (LORR ED(50)). Knockout mice displayed isoflurane and sevoflurane LORR ED(50) values similar to wild-type controls, indicating no significant contribution of these receptors to the hypnotic action of halogenated anesthetics. However, compared with wild-type controls, mutant mice displayed larger isoflurane LORR ED(50) values in the presence of nitrous oxide, indicating a resistance to this gaseous anesthetic. Knockout mice have enhanced brain monoaminergic activity which occurs secondary to NMDA receptor dysfunction, and the observed resistance to the isoflurane LORR ED(50)-sparing effect of nitrous oxide could be abolished by pretreatment with the dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist droperidol or with the serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist ketanserin. Thus, resistance to nitrous oxide in knockout mice appears to be a secondary phenomenon of monoaminergic origin and not a direct result of impaired NMDA receptor function. Our results indicate that NMDA receptors are not critically involved in the hypnotic action of conventionally-used inhalational anesthetics. Also, they suggest that increased brain monoaminergic tone can diminish the effects of general anesthesia. Finally, they provide further evidence that changes secondary to genetic manipulation can explain the results obtained in global knockouts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Apolipoprotein E mediates enhanced plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol clearance by low-dose streptococcal serum opacity factor via hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Corina; Tang, Daming; Gillard, Baiba K; Courtney, Harry S; Pownall, Henry J

    2011-08-01

    Recombinant streptococcal serum opacity factor (rSOF) mediates the in vitro disassembly of human plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) into lipid-free apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, a neo-HDL that is cholesterol poor, and a cholesteryl ester-rich microemulsion (CERM) containing apoE. Given the occurrence of apoE on the CERM, we tested the hypothesis that rSOF injection into mice would reduce total plasma cholesterol clearance via apoE-dependent hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR). rSOF (4 μg) injection into wild-type C57BL/6J mice formed neo-HDL, CERM, and lipid-free apoA-I, as observed in vitro, and reduced plasma total cholesterol (-43%, t(1/2)=44±18 minutes) whereas control saline injections had a negligible effect. Similar experiments with apoE(-/-) and LDLR(-/-) mice reduced plasma total cholesterol ≈0% and 20%, respectively. rSOF was potent; injection of 0.18 μg of rSOF produced 50% of maximum reduction of plasma cholesterol 3 hours postinjection, corresponding to a ≈0.5-mg human dose. Most cholesterol was cleared hepatically (>99%), with rSOF treatment increasing clearance by 65%. rSOF injection into mice formed a CERM that was cleared via hepatic LDLR that recognize apoE. This reaction could provide an alternative mechanism for reverse cholesterol transport.

  19. Severe Atherosclerosis and Hypercholesterolemia in Mice Lacking Both the Melanocortin Type 4 Receptor and Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Meusel, Andrej; Teupser, Daniel; Ricken, Albert; Thiery, Joachim; Schiller, Jürgen; Huster, Daniel; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of the melanocortin system can result in severe obesity accompanied with dyslipidemia and symptoms of the metabolic syndrome but the effect on vascular atherogenesis is not known. To study the impact of obesity and dyslipidemia on the cardiovascular system, we generated mice double-deficient for the melanocortin type 4 receptor (Mc4rmut mice) and the LDL receptor (Ldlr-/- mice). Mc4rmut mice develop obesity due to hyperphagia. Double-mutant mice (Mc4rmut;Ldlr-/-) exhibited massive increases in body weight, plasma cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels and developed atherosclerosis. Atherosclerotic lesion size was affected throughout the aortic root and brachiocephalic artery not only under semisynthetic, cholesterol-containing diet but also under cholesterol-free standard chow. The Mc4rmut mice developed a hepatic steatosis which contributes to increased plasma cholesterol levels even under cholesterol-free standard chow. Transcripts of cholesterol biosynthesis components and liver cholesterol levels did not significantly differ between wild-type and all mutant mouse strains but RNA sequencing data and biochemical measurements point to an altered bile acid elimination in Mc4rmut;Ldlr-/-. Therefore, the unchanged endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis together with a reduced hepatic VLDL and LDL-cholesterol clearance most likely led to increased plasma lipid levels and consequently to atherosclerosis in this animal model. Our data indicate that dysfunction of the melanocortin-regulated food intake and the resulting obesity significantly add to the proatherogenic lipoprotein profile caused by LDL receptor deficiency and, therefore, can be regarded as relevant risk factor for atherosclerosis. PMID:28030540

  20. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Zabel, Brian A.; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis. PMID:23454129

  1. Homozygous Deletion of the Very Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Causes Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Hypoplasia with Cerebral Gyral Simplification

    PubMed Central

    Boycott, Kym M.; Flavelle, Shauna; Bureau, Alexandre; Glass, Hannah C.; Fujiwara, T. Mary; Wirrell, Elaine; Davey, Krista; Chudley, Albert E.; Scott, James N.; McLeod, D. Ross; Parboosingh, Jillian S.

    2005-01-01

    An autosomal recessive syndrome of nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia and mental retardation is associated with inferior cerebellar hypoplasia and mild cerebral gyral simplification in the Hutterite population. An identity-by-descent mapping approach using eight patients from three interrelated Hutterite families localized the gene for this syndrome to chromosome region 9p24. Haplotype analysis identified familial and ancestral recombination events and refined the minimal region to a 2-Mb interval between markers D9S129 and D9S1871. A 199-kb homozygous deletion encompassing the entire very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) gene was present in all affected individuals. VLDLR is part of the reelin signaling pathway, which guides neuroblast migration in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. To our knowledge, this syndrome represents the first human lipoprotein receptor malformation syndrome and the second human disease associated with a reelin pathway defect. PMID:16080122

  2. Increased excitability of spinal pain reflexes and altered frequency-dependent modulation in the dopamine D3-receptor knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Benjamin E; Baran, Christine A; Brewer, Kori L; Clemens, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    Frequency-dependent modulation and dopamine (DA) receptors strongly modulate neural circuits in the spinal cord. Of the five known DA receptor subtypes, the D3 receptor has the highest affinity to DA, and D3-mediated actions are mainly inhibitory. Using an animal model of spinal sensorimotor dysfunction, the D3 receptor knockout mouse (D3KO), we investigated the physiological consequences of D3 receptor dysfunction on pain-associated signaling pathways in the spinal cord, the initial integration site for the processing of pain signaling. In the D3KO spinal cord, inhibitory actions of DA on the proprioceptive monosynaptic stretch reflex are converted from depression to facilitation, but its effects on longer-latency and pain-associated reflex responses and the effects of FM have not been studied. Using behavioral approaches in vivo, we found that D3KO animals exhibit reduced paw withdrawal latencies to thermal pain stimulation (Hargreaves' test) over wild type (WT) controls. Electrophysiological and pharmacological approaches in the isolated spinal cord in vitro showed that constant current stimulation of dorsal roots at a pain-associated frequency was associated with a significant reduction in the frequency-dependent modulation of longer-latency reflex (LLRs) responses but not monosynaptic stretch reflexes (MSRs) in D3KO. Application of the D1 and D2 receptor agonists and the voltage-gated calcium-channel ligand, pregabalin, but not DA, was able to restore the frequency-dependent modulation of the LLR in D3KO to WT levels. Thus we demonstrate that nociception-associated LLRs and proprioceptive MSRs are differentially modulated by frequency, dopaminergics and the Ca(2+) channel ligand, pregabalin. Our data suggest a role for the DA D3 receptor in pain modulation and identify the D3KO as a possible model for increased nociception. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. IL-1 receptor-antagonist (IL-1Ra) knockout mice show anxiety-like behavior by aging.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Chisato; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Odaka, Haruki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Kiyama, Yuji; Manabe, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2015-07-10

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) plays a critical role in stress responses, and its mRNA is induced in the brain by restraint stress. Previously, we reported that IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) knockout (KO) mice, which lacked IL-1Ra molecules that antagonize the IL-1 receptor, showed anti-depression-like behavior via adrenergic modulation at the age of 8 weeks. Here, we report that IL-1Ra KO mice display an anxiety-like phenotype that is induced spontaneously by aging in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test. This anxiety-like phenotype was improved by the administration of diazepam. The expression of the anxiety-related molecule glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was significantly reduced in 20-week-old but not in 11-week-old IL-1Ra KO mice compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. The expression of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) was not altered between IL-1Ra KO mice and WT littermates at either 11 or 20 weeks old. Analysis of monoamine concentration in the hippocampus revealed that tryptophan, the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), and the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA) were significantly increased in 20-week-old IL-1Ra KO mice compared to littermate WT mice. These findings strongly suggest that the anxiety-like behavior observed in older mice was caused by the complicated alteration of monoamine metabolism and/or GR expression in the hippocampus.

  4. Increased expression of low-density lipoprotein receptors in a Smith-Lemli-Opitz infant with elevated bilirubin levels.

    PubMed

    Ness, G C; Lopez, D; Borrego, O; Gilbert-Barness, E

    1997-01-31

    We report on an infant girl with severe RSH or Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome with hyperbilirubinemia. The infant died at age 2 months. Sterol analysis of liver and brain tissues showed marked elevations of 7-dehydrocholesterol with decreased levels of cholesterol. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated remarkable increases in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in these tissues, indicative of a deficiency in available cholesterol for tissue needs.

  5. Functional coupling, desensitization and internalization of virally expressed mu opioid receptors in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons from mu opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Walwyn, W M; Keith, D E; Wei, W; Tan, A M; Xie, C W; Evans, C J; Kieffer, B L; Maidment, N T

    2004-01-01

    Although mu opioid receptors desensitize in various cell lines in vitro, the relationship of this change in signaling efficacy to the development of tolerance in vivo remains uncertain. It is clear that a system is needed in which functional mu opioid receptor expression is obtained in appropriate neurons so that desensitization can be measured, manipulated, and mutated receptors expressed in this environment. We have developed a recombinant system in which expression of a flag-tagged mu opioid receptor is returned to dorsal root ganglia neurons from mu opioid receptor knockout mice in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis showed that adenoviral-mediated expression of the amino-terminal flag-tagged mu opioid receptor in neurons resulted in approximately 1.3x10(6) receptors/cell. Many mu opioid receptor cell lines express a similar density of receptors but this is approximately 7x greater than the number of endogenous receptors expressed by matched wild-type neurons. Inhibition of the high voltage-activated calcium currents in dorsal root ganglia neurons by the mu agonist, D-Ala(2), N-MePhe(4), Gly(5)-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO), was not different between the endogenous and flag-tagged receptor at several concentrations of DAMGO used. Both receptors desensitized equally over the first 6 h of DAMGO pre-incubation, but after 24 h the response of the endogenous receptor to DAMGO had desensitized further than the flag- tagged receptor (71+/-3 vs 29+/-7% respectively; P<0.002), indicating less desensitization in neurons expressing a higher density of receptor. Using flow cytometry to quantify the percentage of receptors remaining on the neuronal cell surface, the flag-tagged receptor internalized by 17+/-1% after 20 min and 55+/-2% after 24 h of DAMGO. These data indicate that this return of function model in neurons recapitulates many of the characteristics of endogenous mu opioid receptor function previously identified in non-neuronal cell lines.

  6. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein and Apolipoprotein E Expression is Altered in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Andrew Stuart; Thomas, Elizabeth A.; Scarr, Elizabeth; Dean, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Our recent microarray study reported altered mRNA expression of several low density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (LRP) associated with the first 4 years following diagnosis with schizophrenia. Whilst this finding is novel, apolipoprotein E (APOE), which mediates its activity through LRPs, has been reported by several studies to be altered in brains of subjects with schizophrenia. We used qPCR to measure the expression of LRP2, LRP4, LRP6, LRP8, LRP10 and LRP12 mRNA in Brodmann's area (BA) 46 of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in 15 subjects with short duration of illness schizophrenia (SDS) and 15 pair matched controls. We also used Western blotting to measure APOE protein expression in BA46 from these subjects. Amongst the LRPs examined, LRP10 expression was significantly increased (P = 0.03) and LRP12 was significantly decreased (P < 0.01) in SDS. APOE protein expression was also increased in SDS (P = 0.01). No other marker examined in this study was altered with diagnosis. Our data supports a role for distinct members of the LRP family in the pathology of schizophrenia and adds weight to the hypothesis that aberrant apolipoprotein signaling is involved in the early stages of schizophrenia. PMID:21423430

  7. Stabilization of advanced atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice by aspirin.

    PubMed

    Cyrus, Tillmann; Yao, Yuemang; Tung, Liun X; Praticò, Domenico

    2006-01-01

    COX-1-dependent eicosanoid formation accelerates atherogenesis, and low-dose aspirin reduces early atherosclerosis. However, the role of aspirin in modulating progression of vascular atherosclerotic lesions once established is less investigated. We wished to determine the effect of low-dose aspirin on vascular inflammation, plaque composition, and progression of established atherosclerosis. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice (LDLR(-/-)) were fed a high-fat diet for 3 months. At this time, one group of mice underwent baseline analysis. Two additional groups, while continuing the high-fat diet, were randomized to receive placebo or aspirin for additional 3 months. At the end of the study, LDLR(-/-) mice that had received aspirin had suppressed biosynthesis of thromboxane B2, the major products of COX-1 activity, reduced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels compared with controls. Compared with baseline, the placebo group had significant progression of atherosclerosis. In contrast, aspirin treated mice showed a significant reduction in progression of atherosclerosis, and a significant decrease in foam cell content. These results suggest that in murine atherosclerosis, low-dose aspirin retards progression of established and advanced vascular atherosclerotic lesions by suppressing the formation of bioactive lipids and vascular inflammation.

  8. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Varughese, Kottayil I.

    2015-11-01

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential.

  9. Phospholipase A2-modified low-density lipoprotein activates macrophage peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Namgaladze, Dmitry; Morbitzer, Daniel; von Knethen, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard

    2010-02-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors modulating metabolic and inflammatory responses of phagocytes to stimuli such as fatty acids and their metabolites. We studied the role of PPARs in macrophages exposed to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) modified by secretory phospholipase A(2) (PLA). By analyzing PPAR ligand-binding domain luciferase reporter activation, we observed that PLA-LDL transactivates PPARalpha and PPARdelta, but not PPARgamma. We confirmed that PLA-LDL induced PPAR response element reporter activation by endogenous PPARalpha and PPARdelta in human THP-1 macrophages. By using THP-1 cells with a stable knockdown of PPARalpha and PPARdelta, we showed that PLA-LDL-activated PPARdelta altered macrophage gene expression related to lipid metabolism and lipid droplet formation. Although PPARalpha/delta silencing did not affect cholesterol and triglyceride accumulation in PLA-LDL-treated macrophages, PPARdelta activation by PLA-LDL attenuated macrophage inflammatory gene expression induced by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide. PPARdelta activation by PLA-LDL does not influence lipid accumulation in PLA-LDL-treated macrophages. However, it attenuates macrophage inflammatory responses, thus contributing to an anti-inflammatory cell phenotype.

  10. Polymorphism of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene and fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Gang; Gu, Mingyong; Zhou, Zhenyu; Cao, Xuecheng

    2014-01-01

    Several molecular epidemiological studies have been conducted to examine the association between low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (LRP5) Ala1330Val polymorphism and fracture; however, the conclusions remained controversial. We therefore performed an extensive meta-analysis on 10 published studies with 184479 subjects. Electronic databases, including PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, Elsevier Science Direct and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases were searched. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using random-effects models. LRP5 Ala1330Val polymorphism was associated with a significantly increased risk of fracture (OR = 1.10; 95% CI, 1.06-1.14; I(2) = 29%). We also found that this polymorphism increased fracture risk in Caucasians. In the subgroup analysis according to gender, women was significantly associated with risk of fracture. In the subgroup analysis by type of fracture, LRP5 Ala1330Val polymorphism showed increased osteoporotic fracture risk. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that an increased risk of fracture was associated with the LRP5 Ala1330Val polymorphism.

  11. Alpha-2-macroglobulin gene, oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 locus, and sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Colacicco, Anna Maria; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; D'Introno, Alessia; Capurso, Cristiano; Kehoe, Patrick G; Seripa, Davide; Pilotto, Alberto; Santamato, Andrea; Capurso, Antonio; Panza, Francesco

    2009-09-01

    A total sample of 169 AD patients, and 264 age- and sex-matched unrelated caregivers from Apulia, southern Italy, were genotypized for alpha-2-macroglobulin (A2M) Val1000/Ile single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs669), apolipoprotein E (APOE), and SNPs (+1073 and +1071) in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (OLR1) gene on chromosome 12. A2M allele and genotype frequencies were similar between AD patients and controls, also after stratification for late onset (>/=70 years) and early onset (<70 years) or APOE varepsilon4 status. However, there was evidence in support of LD between the OLR1+1071, the OLR1+1073, and the rs669 SNPs, with T-C-A haplotype being associated with significant increased risk of AD in both the whole sample and when we stratified according to early and late onset AD subjects, with the allelic association with AD predominantly from the OLR1+1073 SNP, further supporting the role of OLR1 as a candidate risk gene for sporadic AD.

  12. Polymorphisms in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 gene and risk of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    D'Introno, Alessia; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Colacicco, Anna M; Capurso, Cristiano; Torres, Francesco; Capurso, Sabrina A; Capurso, Antonio; Panza, Francesco

    2005-03-01

    The +1073 C/T polymorphism of the oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (OLR1) gene has been reported to be associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease, whereas for the +1071 T/A polymorphism no association was found. We genotyped 169 sporadic Alzheimer's disease patients and 264 sex- and age-matched nondemented controls from Southern Italy for OLR1 +1073 C/T and +1071 T/A polymorphisms and for apolipoprotein E and LBP-1c/CP2/LSF. We also performed haplotype analysis. For the +1073 C/T polymorphism, the C allele and the CC genotype have been associated with a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease without apolipoprotein E or CP2 interaction. The two polymorphisms were in linkage disequilibrium, with the haplotype T-C at significant increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease in the whole sample and in elderly persons 70 years or older. In our population, the +1073 C/T OLR1 polymorphism exhibited a significant association with Alzheimer's disease, further supporting the role of OLR1 as a candidate risk gene for sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2015-11-18

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential.

  14. Targeting low-density lipoprotein receptors with protein-only nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhikun; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Unzueta, Ugutz; Álamo, Patricia; Pesarrodona, Mireia; Mangues, Ramón; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2015-03-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR) are appealing cell surface targets in drug delivery, as they are expressed in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelium and are able to mediate transcytosis of functionalized drugs for molecular therapies of the central nervous system (CNS). On the other hand, brain-targeted drug delivery is currently limited, among others, by the poor availability of biocompatible vehicles, as most of the nanoparticles under development as drug carriers pose severe toxicity issues. In this context, protein nanoparticles offer functional versatility, easy and cost-effective bioproduction, and full biocompatibility. In this study, we have designed and characterized several chimerical proteins containing different LDLR ligands, regarding their ability to bind and internalize target cells and to self-organize as viral mimetic nanoparticles of about 18 nm in diameter. While the self-assembling of LDLR-binding proteins as nanoparticles positively influences cell penetration in vitro, the nanoparticulate architecture might be not favoring BBB crossing in vivo. These findings are discussed in the context of the use of nanostructured materials as vehicles for the systemic treatment of CNS diseases.

  15. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene polymorphisms and osteoporosis in Thai menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kitjaroentham, Anong; Hananantachai, Hathairad; Phonrat, Benjaluck; Preutthipan, Sangchai; Tungtrongchitr, Rungsunn

    2016-09-01

    Osteoporosis, characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and high bone fracture risk, is prevalent in Thai menopausal women. Genetic factors are known to play a key role in BMD. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), a co-receptor in the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway, is involved in many aspects of bone biology. As coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (cSNPs) of LRP5, including A1330V (rs3736228), and Asian-related Q89R (rs41494349) and N740N (rs2306862), are associated with lowered BMD, this study aimed to determine the relationship between these LRP5 polymorphisms and BMD in 277 Thai menopausal women. Only rs3736228 deviated from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of allele frequency (p = 0.022). The median, range and p value for the BMD related to each SNP parameter were compared (Mann-Whitney U test). Significant differences were observed between wild-type and risk alleles for both rs3736228 (total radial, p = 0.011; and radial 33, p = 0.001) and rs2306862 (radial 33: p = 0.015) SNPs, with no significant difference for rs41494349 SNP. Linkage disequilibrium was strong for both rs3736228 and rs2306862 SNPs. Haplotype analysis identified high CC frequency in both normal and osteopenia/osteoporosis groups, with a significant odds ratio for carrying the TT haplotype; however, this was non-significant after adjusting for age. Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis performed for rs3736228 showed that individuals with a body mass index <25 kg/m(2) had an increased risk of osteoporosis for each decade, but the polymorphism had no effect. This study did not identify LRP5 polymorphisms as a risk factor for osteoporosis in Thai menopausal women. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed to further clarify the role of LRP5 as a genetic determinant of osteoporosis.

  16. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Zabel, Brian A.; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  17. Regulatory functions of limbic Y1 receptors in body weight and anxiety uncovered by conditional knockout and maternal care

    PubMed Central

    Bertocchi, Ilaria; Oberto, Alessandra; Longo, Angela; Mele, Paolo; Sabetta, Marianna; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Palanza, Paola; Sprengel, Rolf; Eva, Carola

    2011-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays an important role in stress, anxiety, obesity, and energy homeostasis via activation of NPY-Y1 receptors (Y1Rs) in the brain. However, global knockout of the Npy1r gene has low or no impact on anxiety and body weight. To uncover the role of limbic Y1Rs, we generated conditional knockout mice in which the inactivation of the Npy1r gene was restricted to excitatory neurons of the forebrain, starting from juvenile stages (Npy1rrfb). Npy1rrfb mice exhibited increased anxiety and reduced body weight, less adipose tissue, and lower serum leptin levels. Npy1rrfb mutants also had a hyperactive hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenocortical axis, as indicated by higher peripheral corticosterone and higher density of NPY immunoreactive fibers and corticotropin releasing hormone immunoreactive cell bodies in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Importantly, through fostering experiments, we determined that differences in phenotype between Npy1rrfb and Npy1r2lox mice became apparent when both genotypes were raised by FVB/J but not by C57BL/6J dams, suggesting that limbic Y1Rs are key targets of maternal care-induced programming of anxiety and energy homeostasis. PMID:22084082

  18. Phenotypic screening of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma} receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdin, Anna Karin; Surve, Vikas V.; Joensson, Marie; Bjursell, Mikael; Edenro, Anne; Schuelke, Meint; Saad, Alaa; Bjurstroem, Sivert; Lundgren, Elisabeth Jensen; Snaith, Michael; Fransson-Steen, Ronny; Toernell, Jan; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad . E-mail: mohammad.bohlooly@astrazeneca.com

    2006-10-20

    Using the mouse as a model organism in pharmaceutical research presents unique advantages as its physiology in many ways resembles the human physiology, it also has a relatively short generation time, low breeding and maintenance costs, and is available in a wide variety of inbred strains. The ability to genetically modify mouse embryonic stem cells to generate mouse models that better mimic human disease is another advantage. In the present study, a comprehensive phenotypic screening protocol is applied to elucidate the phenotype of a novel mouse knockout model of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma}. HNF4-{gamma} is expressed in the kidneys, gut, pancreas, and testis. First level of the screen is aimed at general health, morphologic appearance, normal cage behaviour, and gross neurological functions. The second level of the screen looks at metabolic characteristics and lung function. The third level of the screen investigates behaviour more in-depth and the fourth level consists of a thorough pathological characterisation, blood chemistry, haematology, and bone marrow analysis. When compared with littermate wild-type mice (HNF4-{gamma}{sup +/+}), the HNF4-{gamma} knockout (HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-}) mice had lowered energy expenditure and locomotor activity during night time that resulted in a higher body weight despite having reduced intake of food and water. HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-} mice were less inclined to build nest and were found to spend more time in a passive state during the forced swim test.

  19. Attenuated methamphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization in serotonin transporter knockout mice is restored by serotonin 1B receptor antagonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Igari, Moe; Shen, Hao-Wei; Hagino, Yoko; Fukushima, Setsu; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L; Hall, Frank Scott; Uhl, George R; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Sora, Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Repeated administration of methamphetamine (METH) enhances acute locomotor responses to METH administered in the same context, a phenomenon termed as 'locomotor sensitization'. Although many of the acute effects of METH are mediated by its influences on the compartmentalization of dopamine, serotonin systems have also been suggested to influence the behavioral effects of METH in ways that are not fully understood. The present experiments examined serotonergic roles in METH-induced locomotor sensitization by assessing: (a) the effect of serotonin transporter (SERT; Slc6A4) knockout (KO) on METH-induced locomotor sensitization; (b) extracellular monoamine levels in METH-treated animals as determined by in-vivo microdialysis; and (c) effects of serotonin (5-HT) receptor antagonists on METH-induced behavioral sensitization, with focus on effects of the 5-HT1B receptor antagonist SB 216641 and a comparison with the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin. Repeated METH administration failed to induce behavioral sensitization in homozygous SERT KO (SERT-/-) mice under conditions that produced substantial sensitization in wild-type or heterozygous SERT KO (SERT+/-) mice. The selective 5-HT1B antagonist receptor SB 216641 restored METH-induced locomotor sensitization in SERT-/- mice, whereas ketanserin was ineffective. METH-induced increases in extracellular 5-HT (5-HTex) levels were substantially reduced in SERT-/- mice, although SERT genotype had no effect on METH-induced increases in extracellular dopamine. These experiments demonstrate that 5-HT actions, including those at 5-HT1B receptors, contribute to METH-induced locomotor sensitization. Modulation of 5-HT1B receptors might aid therapeutic approaches to the sequelae of chronic METH use.

  20. Toll-like receptor 4 knockout alleviates paraquat-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction through an autophagy-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyi; Zhu, Xiaoling; Xiong, Lize; Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2016-08-22

    Paraquat, a quarternary nitrogen herbicide, is a toxic prooxidant leading to multi-organ failure including the heart although the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. This study was designed to examine the role of the innate proinflammatory mediator toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in paraquat-induced cardiac contractile anomalies and the underlying mechanisms involved with a focus on autophagy, a conservative machinery governing protein and organelle degradation and recycling for cardiac homeostasis. Wild-type (WT) and TLR4 knockout (TLR4(-/-)) mice were challenged with paraquat (45mg/kg, i.p.) for 48h. Paraquat challenge did not affect mRNA levels of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 in WT mice nor did paraquat treatment alter TREM-1 levels. Paraquat challenge elicited cardiac mechanical defects including compromised cardiomyocyte contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) handling, and overt autophagy as manifested by increased LC3BII-to-LC3BI ratio, Atg5, Atg7 and p62 levels. Interestingly, TLR4 knockout significantly attenuated paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) derangement as well as alterations of autophagy markers. Paraquat-elicited changes in cardiac autophagy markers (LC3BII, LC3BII-to-LC3BI ratio and p62) were augmented by lysosomal inhibition using bafilomycin A1 in WT mice. TLR4 knockout significantly attenuated or negated paraquat-elicited increase in LC3BII, LC3BII-to-LC3BI ratio and p62 levels in the presence of lysosomal inhibition. In addition, paraquat challenge promoted phosphorylation of AMPK while suppressing the phosphorylation of mTOR and ULK1 (the autophagy inhibitory Ser(757)), the effects of which were significantly attenuated by TLR4 ablation. In vitro study revealed that AMPK activation using AICAR or mTOR inhibition using rapamycin effectively negated the beneficial cardiomyocyte mechanical effects of TLR4 inhibition (CLI-095) against paraquat toxicity, supporting a permissive role for AMPK-mTOR in TLR4 inhibition

  1. YQA14: a novel dopamine D3 receptor antagonist that inhibits cocaine self-administration in rats and mice, but not in D3 receptor-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Rui; Yang, Ri-Fang; Wu, Ning; Su, Rui-Bin; Li, Jin; Peng, Xiao-Qing; Li, Xia; Gaál, József; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Gardner, Eliot L.

    2017-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) D3 receptor is posited to be importantly involved in drug reward and addiction, and D3 receptor antagonists have shown extraordinary promise as potential anti-addiction pharmacotherapeutic agents in animal models of drug addiction. SB-277011A is the best characterized D3 receptor antagonist in such models. However, the potential use of SB-277011A in humans is precluded by pharmacokinetic and toxicity problems. We here report a novel D3 receptor antagonist YQA14 that shows similar pharmacological properties as SB-277011A. In vitro receptor binding assays suggest that YQA14 has two binding sites on human cloned D3 receptors with Ki-High (0.68 × 10−4 nM) and Ki-Low (2.11 nM), and displays > 150-fold selectivity for D3 over D2 receptors and > 1000-fold selectivity for D3 over other DA receptors. Systemic administration of YQA14 (6.25–25 mg/kg) or SB-277011A (12.5–25 mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently reduced intravenous cocaine self-administration under both low fixed-ratio and progressive-ratio reinforcement conditions in rats, while failing to alter oral sucrose self-administration and locomotor activity, suggesting a selective inhibition of drug reward. However, when the drug dose was increased to 50 mg/kg, YQA14 and SB-277011A significantly inhibited basal and cocaine-enhanced locomotion in rats. Finally, both D3 antagonists dose-dependently inhibited intravenous cocaine self-administration in wild-type mice, but not in D3 receptor-knockout mice, suggesting that their action is mediated by D3 receptor blockade. These findings suggest that YQA14 has a similar anti-addiction profile as SB-277011A, and deserves further study and development. PMID:21507153

  2. Interactive contribution of NK1 and kinin receptors to the acute inflammatory oedema observed in response to noxious heat stimulation: studies in NK1 receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Rawlingson, Andrew; Gerard, Norma P; Brain, Susan D

    2001-01-01

    Scald injury in Sv129+C57BL/6 mice induced a temperature and time dependent oedema formation as calculated by the extravascular accumulation of [125I]-albumin. Oedema formation was suppressed in NK1 knockout mice compared to wildtypes at 10 (P<0.01) and 30 min (P<0.001). However, at 60 min a similar degree of extravasation was observed in the two groups. Kinin B1 (des-Arg10 Hoe 140; 1 μmol kg−1) and B2 (Hoe 140; 100 nmol kg−1) antagonists caused an inhibition of oedema in wildtype mice at 10 and 30 min (P<0.001), but not at 60 min or at 30 min in NK1 receptor knockout mice. The inhibition of thermic oedema by des-Arg10 Hoe 140 was reversed by des-Arg9 bradykinin (0.1 μmol kg−1; P<0.01) and also observed with a second B1 receptor antagonist (des-Arg9 Leu8 bradykinin; 3 μmol kg−1; P<0.01). Furthermore des-Arg10 Hoe 140 had no effect on capsaicin (200 μg ear−1) ear oedema, but this was significantly reduced with Hoe 140 (P<0.05). Scalding induced a large neutrophil accumulation at 4 h, as assessed by myeloperoxidase assay (P<0.001). This was not suppressed by NK1 receptor deletion or kinin antagonists. These results confirm an essential role for the NK1 receptor in mediating the early, but not the delayed phase of oedema formation or neutrophil accumulation in response to scalding. The results also demonstrate a pivotal link between the kinins and sensory nerves in the microvascular response to burn injury, and for the first time show a rapid involvement of the B1 receptor in murine skin. PMID:11739258

  3. Minimal Effects of Age and Exposure to a Noisy Environment on Hearing in Alpha9 Nicotinic Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Amanda M.

    2017-01-01

    Studies have suggested a role of weakened medial olivocochlear (OC) efferent feedback in accelerated hearing loss and increased susceptibility to noise. The present study investigated the progression of hearing loss with age and exposure to a noisy environment in medial OC-deficient mice. Alpha9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout (α9KO) and wild types were screened for hearing loss using auditory brainstem responses. α9KO mice housed in a quiet environment did not show increased hearing loss compared to wild types in young adulthood and middle age. Challenging the medial OC system by housing in a noisy environment did not increase hearing loss in α9KO mice compared to wild types. ABR wave 1 amplitudes also did not show differences between α9KO mice and wild types. These data suggest that deficient medial OC feedback does not result in early onset of hearing loss. PMID:28626386

  4. Novel Bacterial Lipoprotein Structures Conserved in Low-GC Content Gram-positive Bacteria Are Recognized by Toll-like Receptor 2*

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, Kenji; Ryu, Kyoung-Hwa; Ichikawa, Rie; Masuda, Akiko; Kim, Min-Su; Lee, Hanna; Chae, Jun-Ho; Shimizu, Takashi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Kuwano, Koichi; Akira, Shizuo; Dohmae, Naoshi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Lee, Bok Luel

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins/lipopeptides inducing host innate immune responses are sensed by mammalian Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). These bacterial lipoproteins are structurally divided into two groups, diacylated or triacylated lipoproteins, by the absence or presence of an amide-linked fatty acid. The presence of diacylated lipoproteins has been predicted in low-GC content Gram-positive bacteria and mycoplasmas based on the absence of one modification enzyme in their genomes; however, we recently determined triacylated structures in low-GC Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, raising questions about the actual lipoprotein structure in other low-GC content Gram-positive bacteria. Here, through intensive MS analyses, we identified a novel and unique bacterial lipoprotein structure containing an N-acyl-S-monoacyl-glyceryl-cysteine (named the lyso structure) from low-GC Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus cereus, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Lactobacillus bulgaricus. Two of the purified native lyso-form lipoproteins induced proinflammatory cytokine production from mice macrophages in a TLR2-dependent and TLR1-independent manner but with a different dependence on TLR6. Additionally, two other new lipoprotein structures were identified. One is the “N-acetyl” lipoprotein structure containing N-acetyl-S-diacyl-glyceryl-cysteine, which was found in five Gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus subtilis. The N-acetyl lipoproteins induced the proinflammatory cytokines through the TLR2/6 heterodimer. The other was identified in a mycoplasma strain and is an unusual diacyl lipoprotein structure containing two amino acids before the lipid-modified cysteine residue. Taken together, our results suggest the existence of novel TLR2-stimulating lyso and N-acetyl forms of lipoproteins that are conserved in low-GC content Gram-positive bacteria and provide clear evidence for the presence of yet to be identified key enzymes involved in the bacterial lipoprotein biosynthesis

  5. Chlamydial Lipoproteins Stimulate Toll-Like Receptors 1/2 Mediated Inflammatory Responses through MyD88-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Qiong; Chen, Ding; Guan, Jie; Ma, Linghui; Zhong, Guangming; Shu, Hengping; Wu, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydiae are very important pathogens which could cause several types of diseases in human, but little is known about its pathogenic mechanism. In order to elucidate host inflammatory response and the signal pathway induced by Chlamydial lipoproteins, the predicted lipoproteins of Chlamydia trachomatis were tested for their ability to induce the release of proinflammatory cytokines by mouse macrophages or human TLR (Toll-Like Receptor) expressing cell lines. The results showed that recombinant proteins of C. trachomatis D381, D541, D067, and D775 displayed a strong ability to induce the release of IL-8 in TLR expressing cell line. The signal pathways involved TLR1/2 and TLR2/CD14 but not TLR4. Moreover, except D067, the proinflammatory cytokine induction by D381, D541, and D775 required the thioacylation site (cysteine) for lipid modification and the induction was through MyD88-mediated pathway. Our data supported that lipoproteins played a vital role in pathogenesis of C. trachomatis-induced inflammatory responses via TLR pathway. It was the first study to characterize other chlamydial lipoproteins after identifying the role of MIP (D541) on pathogenesis of Chlamydial diseases. PMID:28184217

  6. Astrocytic leptin-receptor knockout mice show partial rescue of leptin resistance in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Bhavaani; Pan, Weihong; Wang, Yuping; Hsuchou, Hung; Mace, Aurelien; Cornelissen-Guillaume, Germaine G; Mishra, Pramod K; Koza, Robert A; Kastin, Abba J

    2013-03-15

    To determine how astrocytic leptin signaling regulates the physiological response of mice to diet-induced obesity (DIO), we performed metabolic analyses and hypothalamic leptin signaling assays on astrocytic leptin-receptor knockout (ALKO) mice in which astrocytes lack functional leptin receptor (ObR) signaling. ALKO mice and wild-type (WT) littermate controls were studied at different stages of DIO with measurement of body wt, percent fat, metabolic activity, and biochemical parameters. When fed regular chow, the ALKO mice had similar body wt, percent fat, food intake, heat dissipation, respiratory exchange ratio, and activity as their WT littermates. There was no change in blood concentrations of triglyceride, soluble leptin receptor (sObR), mRNA for leptin and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in adipose tissue, and insulin sensitivity. Unexpectedly, in response to a high-fat diet the ALKO mice had attenuated hyperleptinemia and sObR, a lower level of leptin mRNA in subcutaneous fat, and a paradoxical increase in UCP1 mRNA. Thus, ALKO mice did not show the worsening of obesity that occurs with normal WT mice and the neuronal ObR mutation that results in morbid obesity. The findings are consistent with a competing, counterregulatory model between neuronal and astrocytic leptin signaling.

  7. The role of transplanted visceral fat from the long-lived growth hormone receptor knockout mice on insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Bennis, Mohammed T; Schneider, Augusto; Victoria, Berta; Do, Andrew; Wiesenborn, Denise S; Spinel, Lina; Gesing, Adam; Kopchick, John J; Siddiqi, Shadab A; Masternak, Michal M

    2017-02-01

    Growth hormone receptor knockout mice (GHRKO) are characterized by high insulin sensitivity and extended lifespan. Interestingly, the secretory activity of visceral fat in GHRKO mice is altered, stimulating whole body insulin sensitivity. In this study, we transplanted normal (N) mice with visceral fat pads from GHRKO or N mice to determine the role of visceral fat on the insulin signaling. We found that the transplant of visceral fat from GHRKO mice to N mice (N-GHRKO) improved whole body insulin sensitivity when comparing with sham-operated mice (N-S) and with mice that received visceral fat from N mice (N-N). This was associated with increased hepatic insulin sensitivity as observed by the increased phosphorylated insulin receptor and increased hepatic expression of Pparα and Pparγ. In conclusion, we demonstrated that visceral fat transplant from GHRKO mice into normal mice enhanced insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. These results further confirm the differential physiological role played by visceral adipose tissue from GH receptor deficient mice, indicating that the increase of this fat depot can be associated with beneficial effects on insulin signaling and longevity.

  8. P2Y2 receptor knock-out mice display normal NaCl absorption in medullary thick ascending limb.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rita D; Praetorius, Helle A; Leipziger, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Local purinergic signals modulate renal tubular transport. Acute activation of renal epithelial P2 receptors causes inhibition of epithelial transport and thus, should favor increased water and salt excretion by the kidney. So far only a few studies have addressed the effects of extracellular nucleotides on ion transport in the thick ascending limb (TAL). In the medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL), basolateral P2X receptors markedly (~25%) inhibit NaCl absorption. Although this segment does express both apical and basolateral P2Y2 receptors, acute activation of the basolateral P2Y2 receptors had no apparent effect on transepithelial ion transport. Here we studied, if the absence of the P2Y2 receptor causes chronic alterations in mTAL NaCl absorption by comparing basal and AVP-stimulated transepithelial transport rates. We used perfused mouse mTALs to electrically measure NaCl absorption in juvenile (<35 days) and adult (>35 days) male mice. Using microelectrodes, we determined the transepithelial voltage (Vte) and the transepithelial resistance (Rte) and thus, transepithelial NaCl absorption (equivalent short circuit current, I'sc). We find that mTALs from adult wild type (WT) mice have significantly lower NaCl absorption rates when compared to mTALs from juvenile WT mice. This could be attributed to significantly higher Rtevalues in mTALs from adult WT mice. This pattern was not observed in mTALs from P2Y2 receptor knockout (KO) mice. In addition, adult P2Y2 receptor KO mTALs have significantly lower Vtevalues compared to the juvenile. No difference in absolute I'sc was observed when comparing mTALs from WT and KO mice. AVP stimulated the mTALs to similar increases of NaCl absorption irrespective of the absence of the P2Y2 receptor. No difference was observed in the medullary expression level of NKCC2 in between the genotypes. These data indicate that the lack of P2Y2 receptors does not cause substantial differences in resting and AVP-stimulated NaCl absorption

  9. P2Y2 receptor knock-out mice display normal NaCl absorption in medullary thick ascending limb

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Rita D.; Praetorius, Helle A.; Leipziger, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Local purinergic signals modulate renal tubular transport. Acute activation of renal epithelial P2 receptors causes inhibition of epithelial transport and thus, should favor increased water and salt excretion by the kidney. So far only a few studies have addressed the effects of extracellular nucleotides on ion transport in the thick ascending limb (TAL). In the medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL), basolateral P2X receptors markedly (~25%) inhibit NaCl absorption. Although this segment does express both apical and basolateral P2Y2 receptors, acute activation of the basolateral P2Y2 receptors had no apparent effect on transepithelial ion transport. Here we studied, if the absence of the P2Y2 receptor causes chronic alterations in mTAL NaCl absorption by comparing basal and AVP-stimulated transepithelial transport rates. We used perfused mouse mTALs to electrically measure NaCl absorption in juvenile (<35 days) and adult (>35 days) male mice. Using microelectrodes, we determined the transepithelial voltage (Vte) and the transepithelial resistance (Rte) and thus, transepithelial NaCl absorption (equivalent short circuit current, I'sc). We find that mTALs from adult wild type (WT) mice have significantly lower NaCl absorption rates when compared to mTALs from juvenile WT mice. This could be attributed to significantly higher Rtevalues in mTALs from adult WT mice. This pattern was not observed in mTALs from P2Y2 receptor knockout (KO) mice. In addition, adult P2Y2 receptor KO mTALs have significantly lower Vtevalues compared to the juvenile. No difference in absolute I'sc was observed when comparing mTALs from WT and KO mice. AVP stimulated the mTALs to similar increases of NaCl absorption irrespective of the absence of the P2Y2 receptor. No difference was observed in the medullary expression level of NKCC2 in between the genotypes. These data indicate that the lack of P2Y2 receptors does not cause substantial differences in resting and AVP-stimulated NaCl absorption

  10. Differential actions of orexin receptors in brainstem cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons revealed by receptor knockouts: implications for orexinergic signaling in arousal and narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kohlmeier, Kristi A.; Tyler, Christopher J.; Kalogiannis, Mike; Ishibashi, Masaru; Kristensen, Morten P.; Gumenchuk, Iryna; Chemelli, Richard M.; Kisanuki, Yaz Y.; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Leonard, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Orexin neuropeptides influence multiple homeostatic functions and play an essential role in the expression of normal sleep-wake behavior. While their two known receptors (OX1 and OX2) are targets for novel pharmacotherapeutics, the actions mediated by each receptor remain largely unexplored. Using brain slices from mice constitutively lacking either receptor, we used whole-cell and Ca2+ imaging methods to delineate the cellular actions of each receptor within cholinergic [laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT)] and monoaminergic [dorsal raphe (DR) and locus coeruleus (LC)] brainstem nuclei—where orexins promote arousal and suppress REM sleep. In slices from OX−/−2 mice, orexin-A (300 nM) elicited wild-type responses in LDT, DR, and LC neurons consisting of a depolarizing current and augmented voltage-dependent Ca2+ transients. In slices from OX−/−1 mice, the depolarizing current was absent in LDT and LC neurons and was attenuated in DR neurons, although Ca2+-transients were still augmented. Since orexin-A produced neither of these actions in slices lacking both receptors, our findings suggest that orexin-mediated depolarization is mediated by both receptors in DR, but is exclusively mediated by OX1 in LDT and LC neurons, even though OX2 is present and OX2 mRNA appears elevated in brainstems from OX−/−1 mice. Considering published behavioral data, these findings support a model in which orexin-mediated excitation of mesopontine cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons contributes little to stabilizing spontaneous waking and sleep bouts, but functions in context-dependent arousal and helps restrict muscle atonia to REM sleep. The augmented Ca2+ transients produced by both receptors appeared mediated by influx via L-type Ca2+ channels, which is often linked to transcriptional signaling. This could provide an adaptive signal to compensate for receptor loss or prolonged antagonism and may contribute to the reduced severity of narcolepsy in single receptor

  11. Enhanced Histaminergic Neurotransmission and Sleep-Wake Alterations, a Study in Histamine H3-Receptor Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gondard, Elise; Anaclet, Christelle; Akaoka, Hidéo; Guo, Rui-Xian; Zhang, Mei; Buda, Colette; Franco, Patricia; Kotani, Hidehito; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Long-term abolition of a brain arousal system impairs wakefulness (W), but little is known about the consequences of long-term enhancement. The brain histaminergic arousal system is under the negative control of H3-autoreceptors whose deletion results in permanent enhancement of histamine (HA) turnover. In order to determine the consequences of enhancement of the histaminergic system, we compared the cortical EEG and sleep-wake states of H3-receptor knockout (H3R−/−) and wild-type mouse littermates. We found that H3R−/−mice had rich phenotypes. On the one hand, they showed clear signs of enhanced HA neurotransmission and vigilance, i.e., a higher EEG θ power during spontaneous W and a greater extent of W or sleep restriction during behavioral tasks, including environmental change, locomotion, and motivation tests. On the other hand, during the baseline dark period, they displayed deficient W and signs of sleep deterioration, such as pronounced sleep fragmentation and reduced cortical slow activity during slow wave sleep (SWS), most likely due to a desensitization of postsynaptic histaminergic receptors as a result of constant HA release. Ciproxifan (H3-receptor inverse agonist) enhanced W in wild-type mice, but not in H3R−/−mice, indicating a functional deletion of H3-receptors, whereas triprolidine (postsynaptic H1-receptor antagonist) or α-fluoromethylhistidine (HA-synthesis inhibitor) caused a greater SWS increase in H3R−/− than in wild-type mice, consistent with enhanced HA neurotransmission. These sleep-wake characteristics and the obesity phenotypes previously reported in this animal model suggest that chronic enhancement of histaminergic neurotransmission eventually compromises the arousal system, leading to sleep-wake, behavioral, and metabolic disorders similar to those caused by voluntary sleep restriction in humans. PMID:23303066

  12. Enhanced histaminergic neurotransmission and sleep-wake alterations, a study in histamine H3-receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Gondard, Elise; Anaclet, Christelle; Akaoka, Hidéo; Guo, Rui-Xian; Zhang, Mei; Buda, Colette; Franco, Patricia; Kotani, Hidehito; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2013-05-01

    Long-term abolition of a brain arousal system impairs wakefulness (W), but little is known about the consequences of long-term enhancement. The brain histaminergic arousal system is under the negative control of H3-autoreceptors whose deletion results in permanent enhancement of histamine (HA) turnover. In order to determine the consequences of enhancement of the histaminergic system, we compared the cortical EEG and sleep-wake states of H3-receptor knockout (H3R-/-) and wild-type mouse littermates. We found that H3R-/-mice had rich phenotypes. On the one hand, they showed clear signs of enhanced HA neurotransmission and vigilance, i.e., a higher EEG θ power during spontaneous W and a greater extent of W or sleep restriction during behavioral tasks, including environmental change, locomotion, and motivation tests. On the other hand, during the baseline dark period, they displayed deficient W and signs of sleep deterioration, such as pronounced sleep fragmentation and reduced cortical slow activity during slow wave sleep (SWS), most likely due to a desensitization of postsynaptic histaminergic receptors as a result of constant HA release. Ciproxifan (H3-receptor inverse agonist) enhanced W in wild-type mice, but not in H3R-/-mice, indicating a functional deletion of H3-receptors, whereas triprolidine (postsynaptic H1-receptor antagonist) or α-fluoromethylhistidine (HA-synthesis inhibitor) caused a greater SWS increase in H3R-/- than in wild-type mice, consistent with enhanced HA neurotransmission. These sleep-wake characteristics and the obesity phenotypes previously reported in this animal model suggest that chronic enhancement of histaminergic neurotransmission eventually compromises the arousal system, leading to sleep-wake, behavioral, and metabolic disorders similar to those caused by voluntary sleep restriction in humans.

  13. Identification of roles for H264, H306, H439, and H635 in acid-dependent lipoprotein release by the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongyun; Zhao, Zhenze; LeBrun, Drake G; Michaely, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Lipoproteins internalized by the LDL receptor (LDLR) are released from this receptor in endosomes through a process that involves acid-dependent conformational changes in the receptor ectodomain. How acidic pH promotes this release process is not well understood. Here, we assessed roles for six histidine residues for which either genetic or structural data suggested a possible role in the acid-responsiveness of the LDLR. Using assays that measured conformational change, acid-dependent lipoprotein release, LDLR recycling, and net lipoprotein uptake, we show that H635 plays important roles in acid-dependent conformational change and lipoprotein release, while H264, H306, and H439 play ancillary roles in the response of the LDLR to acidic pH. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Dystrophic dendrites in prefrontal cortical pyramidal cells of dopamine D1 and D2 but not D4 receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Dong; Stanwood, Gregg D; Grandy, David K; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2009-12-01

    Recent data indicate that cortical dopamine denervation results in dystrophic changes in the dendrites of pyramidal cells, including decreases in dendritic spine density and length. However, it is not known if the loss of signaling through specific dopamine receptors subserves these dendritic changes. We examined the dendritic structure of layer V pyramidal cells in the prefrontal cortex of D(1), D(2), and D(4) dopamine receptor null mutant mice and their wild-type littermates. Decreased basal dendritic length and spine density were observed in the D(1) knockout mice. Similarly, a decrease in basal dendritic spine density was uncovered in the D(2) knockout mice relative to wild-type littermates. No changes in any dendritic parameter were observed in the D(4) knockout mice. These observations suggest that the dystrophic changes observed in prefrontal cortical pyramidal cell dendrites are due to loss of signaling through D(1) and possibly D(2) receptors. The current data also suggest that caution should be exercised in the interpretation of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical studies of the prefrontal cortex in dopamine receptor knockout mice.

  15. Dystrophic dendrites in prefrontal cortical pyramidal cells of dopamine D1 and D2 but not D4 receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Dong; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Grandy, David K.; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2009-01-01

    Recent data indicate that cortical dopamine denervation results in dystrophic changes in the dendrites of pyramidal cells, including decreases in dendritic spine density and length. However, it is not known if the loss of signaling through specific dopamine receptors subserves these dendritic changes. We examined the dendritic structure of layer V pyramidal cells in the prefrontal cortex of D1, D2, and D4 dopamine receptor null mutant mice and their wild-type littermates. Decreased basal dendritic length and spine density were observed in the D1 knockout mice. Similarly, a decrease in basal dendritic spine density was uncovered in the D2 knockout mice relative to wild-type littermates. No changes in any dendritic parameter were observed in the D4 knockout mice. These observations suggest that the dystrophic changes observed in prefrontal cortical pyramidal cell dendrites are due to loss of signaling through D1 and possibly D2 receptors. The current data also suggest that caution should be exercised in the interpretation of behavioral, physiological and biochemical studies of the PFC in dopamine receptor knockout mice. PMID:19747903

  16. Selective Attention to Visual Stimuli Using Auditory Distractors Is Altered in Alpha-9 Nicotinic Receptor Subunit Knock-Out Mice.

    PubMed

    Terreros, Gonzalo; Jorratt, Pascal; Aedo, Cristian; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Delano, Paul H

    2016-07-06

    During selective attention, subjects voluntarily focus their cognitive resources on a specific stimulus while ignoring others. Top-down filtering of peripheral sensory responses by higher structures of the brain has been proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for selective attention. A prerequisite to accomplish top-down modulation of the activity of peripheral structures is the presence of corticofugal pathways. The mammalian auditory efferent system is a unique neural network that originates in the auditory cortex and projects to the cochlear receptor through the olivocochlear bundle, and it has been proposed to function as a top-down filter of peripheral auditory responses during attention to cross-modal stimuli. However, to date, there is no conclusive evidence of the involvement of olivocochlear neurons in selective attention paradigms. Here, we trained wild-type and α-9 nicotinic receptor subunit knock-out (KO) mice, which lack cholinergic transmission between medial olivocochlear neurons and outer hair cells, in a two-choice visual discrimination task and studied the behavioral consequences of adding different types of auditory distractors. In addition, we evaluated the effects of contralateral noise on auditory nerve responses as a measure of the individual strength of the olivocochlear reflex. We demonstrate that KO mice have a reduced olivocochlear reflex strength and perform poorly in a visual selective attention paradigm. These results confirm that an intact medial olivocochlear transmission aids in ignoring auditory distraction during selective attention to visual stimuli. The auditory efferent system is a neural network that originates in the auditory cortex and projects to the cochlear receptor through the olivocochlear system. It has been proposed to function as a top-down filter of peripheral auditory responses during attention to cross-modal stimuli. However, to date, there is no conclusive evidence of the involvement of olivocochlear

  17. The mu-opioid receptor gene-dose dependent reductions in G-protein activation in the pons/medulla and antinociception induced by endomorphins in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, H; Narita, M; Oji, D E; Suganuma, C; Nagase, H; Sora, I; Uhl, G R; Cheng, E Y; Tseng, L F

    1999-01-01

    There appear to be different relationships between mu-opioid receptor densities and the acute and neuroadaptive mu-opioid agonist-induced responses of the multiple opioid neuronal systems, including important pons/medulla circuits. The recent success in creating mu-opioid receptor knockout mice allows studies of mu-opioid agonist-induced pharmacological and physiological effects in animals that express no, one or two copies of the mu-opioid receptor gene. We now report that the binding of mu-opioid receptor ligand, [3H][D-Ala2,NHPhe4,Gly-ol]enkephalin to membrane preparations of the pons/medulla was reduced by half in heterozygous mu-opioid receptor knockout mice and eliminated in homozygous mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. The endogenous mu-opioid agonist peptides endomorphin-1 and -2 activate G-proteins in the pons/medulla from wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent fashion, as assessed using [35S]guanosine-5'-o-(3-thio)triphosphate binding. This stimulation was reduced to half of the wild-type levels in heterozygous mice and eliminated in homozygous knockout mice. The intracerebroventricular injection of either endomorphin-1 or endomorphin-2 produced marked antinociception in the hot-plate and tail-flick tests in wild-type mice. These antinociceptive actions were significantly reduced in heterozygous mu-opioid receptor knockout mice, and virtually abolished in homozygous knockout mice. The mu-opioid receptors are the principal molecular targets for endomorphin-induced G-protein activation in the pons/medulla and the antinociception caused by the intracerebroventricular administration of mu-opioid agonists. These data support the notion that there are limited physiological mu-opioid receptor reserves for inducing G-protein activation in the pons/medulla and for the nociceptive modulation induced by the central administration of endomorphin-1 and -2.

  18. mRNA for low density lipoprotein receptor in brain and spinal cord of immature and mature rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, S.L.; Russell, D.W.; Goldstein, J.L.; Brown, M.S.

    1987-09-01

    Hybridization studies with (/sup 32/P)cDNA probes revealed detectable amounts of mRNA for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor in the central nervous system (CNS) of rabbits. mRNA levels were highest in the medulla/pons and spinal cord, which were the most heavily myelinated regions that were studied. Lower, but detectable levels were present in cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, and cerebellum. In the medulla/pons and spinal cord, the levels of receptor mRNA were in a range comparable to that detected in the liver. The levels of receptor mRNA in whole brain were constant from 3 days of age to adulthood and, thus, did not vary in proportion to the rate of myelin synthesis. LDL receptor mRNA in the CNS was produced by the same gene that produced the liver and adrenal mRNA as revealed by the demonstration of a deletion in the neural mRNA of Watanabe-heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits identical to the deletion in the LDL receptor gene of these mutant animals. Using antibodies directed against the bovine LDL receptor, the authors showed that LDL receptor protein is present in the medulla/pons of adult cows. The cell types that express LDL receptors in the CNS and the functions of these receptors are unknown.

  19. Reduced Expression of P2Y2 Receptor and Acetylcholinesterase at Neuromuscular Junction of P2Y1 Receptor Knock-out Mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miranda L; Bi, Cathy W C; Cheng, Lily K W; Mak, Shinghung; Yao, Ping; Luk, Wilson K W; Lau, Kitty K M; Cheng, Anthony W M; Tsim, Karl W K

    2015-11-01

    ATP is co-stored and co-released with acetylcholine (ACh) at the pre-synaptic vesicles in vertebrate neuromuscular junction (nmj). Several lines of studies demonstrated that binding of ATP to its corresponding P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors in the muscle regulated post-synaptic gene expressions. To further support the notion that P2Y receptors are playing indispensable role in formation of post-synaptic specifications at the nmj, the knock-out mice of P2Y1 receptor (P2Y1R (-/-)) were employed here for analyses. In P2Y1R (-/-) mice, the expression of P2Y2 receptor in muscle was reduced by over 50 %, as compared to P2Y1R (+/+) mice. In parallel, the expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in muscle was markedly decreased. In the analysis of the expression of anchoring subunits of AChE in P2Y1R (-/-) mice, the proline-rich membrane anchor (PRiMA) subunit was reduced by 60 %; while the collagen tail (ColQ) subunit was reduced by 50 %. AChE molecular forms in the muscle were not changed, except the amount of enzyme was reduced. Immuno-staining of P2Y1R (-/-) mice nmj, both AChE and AChR were still co-localized at the nmj, and the staining was diminished. Taken together our data demonstrated that P2Y1 receptor regulated the nmj gene expression.

  20. The role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor in breast cancer and directing breast cancer cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Reaves, Denise K; Fagan-Solis, Katerina D; Dunphy, Karen; Oliver, Shannon D; Scott, David W; Fleming, Jodie M

    2014-01-01

    The claudin-low molecular subtype of breast cancer is of particular interest for clinically the majority of these tumors are poor prognosis, triple negative, invasive ductal carcinomas. Claudin-low tumors are characterized by cancer stem cell-like features and low expression of cell junction and adhesion proteins. Herein, we sought to define the role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) in breast cancer and cancer cell behavior as LSR was recently correlated with tumor-initiating features. We show that LSR was expressed in epithelium, endothelium, and stromal cells within the healthy breast tissue, as well as in tumor epithelium. In primary breast tumor bioposies, LSR expression was significantly correlated with invasive ductal carcinomas compared to invasive lobular carcinomas, as well as ERα positive tumors and breast cancer cell lines. LSR levels were significantly reduced in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines and functional studies illustrated that re-introduction of LSR into a claudin-low cell line suppressed the EMT phenotype and reduced individual cell migration. However, our data suggest that LSR may promote collective cell migration. Re-introduction of LSR in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines reestablished tight junction protein expression and correlated with transepithelial electrical resistance, thereby reverting claudin-low lines to other intrinsic molecular subtypes. Moreover, overexpression of LSR altered gene expression of pathways involved in transformation and tumorigenesis as well as enhanced proliferation and survival in anchorage independent conditions, highlighting that reestablishment of LSR signaling promotes aggressive/tumor initiating cell behaviors. Collectively, these data highlight a direct role for LSR in driving aggressive breast cancer behavior.

  1. Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 and 6 gene variants and ischaemic stroke risk.

    PubMed

    Harriott, A M; Heckman, M G; Rayaprolu, S; Soto-Ortolaza, A I; Diehl, N N; Kanekiyo, T; Liu, C-C; Bu, G; Malik, R; Cole, J W; Meschia, J F; Ross, O A

    2015-08-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor related proteins (LRPs) 1 and 6 have been implicated in cerebral ischaemia. In addition, genetic variation in LRP1 and LRP6 has been linked with various factors that are related to risk of ischaemic stroke. The aim of this study was to examine the association of LRP1 and LRP6 gene variants with risk of ischaemic stroke as part of the Ischemic Stroke Genetics Study (ISGS). A Caucasian series (434 stroke patients, 319 controls) and an African American series (161 stroke patients, 116 controls) were included. Fourteen LRP6 variants and three LRP1 variants were genotyped and assessed for association with ischaemic stroke. In the Caucasian series, significant associations with ischaemic stroke were observed for LRP6 rs2075241 [odds ratio (OR) 0.42, P = 0.023], rs2302685 (OR 0.44, P = 0.049), rs7975614 (OR 0.07, P = 0.017), rs10492120 (OR 0.62, P = 0.036) and rs10743980 (OR 0.66, P = 0.037). Risk of ischaemic stroke was significantly lower for carriers of any of these five protective LRP6 variants (24.0% of subjects) compared to non-carriers (OR 0.57, P = 0.003). The protective association for LRP6 rs2075241 was observed at a similar magnitude across ischaemic stroke subtypes, whilst the effects of rs23022685, rs10492120 and rs10743980 were most apparent for cardioembolic and large vessel stroke. In the African American series, LRP1 rs11172113 was associated with an increased risk of stroke (OR 1.89, P = 0.006). The results of our preliminary study provide evidence that LRP6 and LRP1 variants may be associated with risk of ischaemic stroke. Validation in larger studies is warranted. © 2015 EAN.

  2. Streptococcus gordonii induces nitric oxide production through its lipoproteins stimulating Toll-like receptor 2 in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Young; Baik, Jung Eun; Ahn, Ki Bum; Seo, Ho Seong; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, a Gram-positive commensal in the oral cavity, is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause endodontic and systemic infections resulting in infective endocarditis. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipoprotein are major virulence factors of Gram-positive bacteria that are preferentially recognized by Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) on immune cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of S. gordonii LTA and lipoprotein on the production of the representative inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO) by the mouse macrophages. Heat-killed S. gordonii wild-type and an LTA-deficient mutant (ΔltaS) but not a lipoprotein-deficient mutant (Δlgt) induced NO production in mouse primary macrophages and the cell line, RAW 264.7. S. gordonii wild-type and ΔltaS also induced the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) at the mRNA and protein levels. In contrast, the Δlgt mutant showed little effect under the same condition. Furthermore, S. gordonii wild-type and ΔltaS induced NF-κB activation, STAT1 phosphorylation, and IFN-β expression, which are important for the induction of iNOS gene expression, with little activation by Δlgt. S. gordonii wild-type and ΔltaS showed an increased adherence and internalization to RAW 264.7 cells compared to Δlgt. In addition, S. gordonii wild-type and ΔltaS, but not Δlgt, substantially increased TLR2 activation while none of these induced NO production in TLR2-deficient macrophages. Triton X-114-extracted lipoproteins from S. gordonii were sufficient to induce NO production. Collectively, we suggest that lipoprotein is an essential cell wall component of S. gordonii to induce NO production in macrophages through TLR2 triggering NF-κB and STAT1 activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors on lipoprotein metabolism and glucose control in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rosenson, Robert S

    2007-02-19

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are central regulators of lipoprotein metabolism and glucose homeostasis that are considered particularly useful for improving glycemic control and comorbidities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clinical trials of PPAR-alpha agonists have demonstrated efficacy in reducing cardiovascular events; however, these benefits have been confined to subgroups of patients with low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or high levels of triglycerides. While activators of PPAR-gamma reduce early atherosclerotic lesions and reduce cardiovascular events, these agents have the effect of increasing fluid retention in patients, which results in more hospitalizations for congestive heart failure. Future studies of PPAR-gamma agonists or dual PPAR-alpha/gamma agonists will require further delineation of the risk profile to avoid adverse outcomes in susceptible patients.

  4. FERM-dependent E3 ligase recognition is a conserved mechanism for targeted degradation of lipoprotein receptors

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna C.; Goult, Benjamin T.; Zhang, Li; Fairall, Louise; Hong, Cynthia; Schwabe, John W. R.; Tontonoz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL (inducible degrader of the LDL receptor) regulates LDL receptor (LDLR)-dependent cholesterol uptake, but its mechanism of action, including the molecular basis for its stringent specificity, is poorly understood. Here we show that IDOL uses a singular strategy among E3 ligases for target recognition. The IDOL FERM domain binds directly to a recognition sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of lipoprotein receptors. This physical interaction is independent of IDOL's really interesting new gene (RING) domain E3 ligase activity and its capacity for autoubiquitination. Furthermore, IDOL controls its own stability through autoubiquitination of a unique FERM subdomain fold not present in other FERM proteins. Key residues defining the IDOL–LDLR interaction and IDOL autoubiquitination are functionally conserved in their insect homologs. Finally, we demonstrate that target recognition by IDOL involves a tripartite interaction between the FERM domain, membrane phospholipids, and the lipoprotein receptor tail. Our data identify the IDOL–LDLR interaction as an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for the regulation of lipid uptake and suggest that this interaction could potentially be exploited for the pharmacologic modulation of lipid metabolism. PMID:22109552

  5. FERM-dependent E3 ligase recognition is a conserved mechanism for targeted degradation of lipoprotein receptors.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Goult, Benjamin T; Zhang, Li; Fairall, Louise; Hong, Cynthia; Schwabe, John W R; Tontonoz, Peter

    2011-12-13

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL (inducible degrader of the LDL receptor) regulates LDL receptor (LDLR)-dependent cholesterol uptake, but its mechanism of action, including the molecular basis for its stringent specificity, is poorly understood. Here we show that IDOL uses a singular strategy among E3 ligases for target recognition. The IDOL FERM domain binds directly to a recognition sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of lipoprotein receptors. This physical interaction is independent of IDOL's really interesting new gene (RING) domain E3 ligase activity and its capacity for autoubiquitination. Furthermore, IDOL controls its own stability through autoubiquitination of a unique FERM subdomain fold not present in other FERM proteins. Key residues defining the IDOL-LDLR interaction and IDOL autoubiquitination are functionally conserved in their insect homologs. Finally, we demonstrate that target recognition by IDOL involves a tripartite interaction between the FERM domain, membrane phospholipids, and the lipoprotein receptor tail. Our data identify the IDOL-LDLR interaction as an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for the regulation of lipid uptake and suggest that this interaction could potentially be exploited for the pharmacologic modulation of lipid metabolism.

  6. Decreased Incentive Motivation Following Knockout or Acute Blockade of the Serotonin Transporter: Role of the 5-HT2C Receptor.

    PubMed

    Browne, Caleb J; Fletcher, Paul J

    2016-09-01

    Acute pharmacological elevation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) activity decreases operant responding for primary reinforcers, suggesting that 5-HT reduces incentive motivation. The mechanism by which 5-HT alters incentive motivation is unknown, but parallel evidence that 5-HT2C receptor agonists also reduce responding for primary reinforcers implicates this receptor as a potential candidate. These experiments examined whether chronic and acute disruptions of serotonin transporter (SERT) activity altered incentive motivation, and whether the 5-HT2C receptor mediated the effects of elevated 5-HT on behavior. To assess incentive motivation, we measured responding for three different reinforcers: a primary reinforcer (saccharin), a conditioned reinforcer (CRf), and an unconditioned sensory reinforcer (USRf). In the chronic condition, responding was compared between SERT knockout (SERT-KO) mice and their wild-type littermates. In the acute condition, responding was examined in wild-type mice following treatment with 10 or 20 mg/kg citalopram, or its vehicle. The ability of the selective 5-HT2C antagonist SB 242084 to prevent the effects of SERT-KO and citalopram on responding was subsequently examined. Both SERT-KO and citalopram reduced responding for saccharin, a CRf, and a USRf. Treatment with SB 242084 enhanced responding for a CRf and a USRf in SERT-KO mice and blocked the effects of citalopram on CRf and USRf responding. However, SB 242084 was unable to prevent the effects of SERT-KO or citalopram on responding for saccharin. These results support a powerful inhibitory function for 5-HT in the control of incentive motivation, and indicate that the 5-HT2C receptor mediates these effects of 5-HT in a reinforcer-dependent manner.

  7. The endogenous opioid system in cocaine addiction: what lessons have opioid peptide and receptor knockout mice taught us?

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine addiction has become a major concern in the UK as Britain tops the European ‘league table’ for cocaine abuse. Despite its devastating health and socio-economic consequences, no effective pharmacotherapy for treating cocaine addiction is available. Identifying neurochemical changes induced by repeated drug exposure is critical not only for understanding the transition from recreational drug use towards compulsive drug abuse but also for the development of novel targets for the treatment of the disease and especially for relapse prevention. This article focuses on the effects of chronic cocaine exposure and withdrawal on each of the endogenous opioid peptides and receptors in rodent models. In addition, we review the studies that utilized opioid peptide or receptor knockout mice in order to identify and/or clarify the role of different components of the opioid system in cocaine-addictive behaviours and in cocaine-induced alterations of brain neurochemistry. The review of these studies indicates a region-specific activation of the µ-opioid receptor system following chronic cocaine exposure, which may contribute towards the rewarding effect of the drug and possibly towards cocaine craving during withdrawal followed by relapse. Cocaine also causes a region-specific activation of the κ-opioid receptor/dynorphin system, which may antagonize the rewarding effect of the drug, and at the same time, contribute to the stress-inducing properties of the drug and the triggering of relapse. These conclusions have important implications for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for the treatment of cocaine addiction and the prevention of relapse. PMID:22428846

  8. Enzymatically Modified Low-Density Lipoprotein Promotes Foam Cell Formation in Smooth Muscle Cells via Macropinocytosis and Enhances Receptor-Mediated Uptake of Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chellan, Bijoy; Reardon, Catherine A; Getz, Godfrey S; Hofmann Bowman, Marion A

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme-modified nonoxidized low-density lipoprotein (ELDL) is present in human atherosclerotic lesions. Our objective is to understand the mechanisms of ELDL uptake and its effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Transformation of murine aortic SMCs into foam cells in response to ELDL was analyzed. ELDL, but not acetylated or oxidized LDL, was potent in inducing SMC foam cell formation. Inhibitors of macropinocytosis (LY294002, wortmannin, amiloride) attenuated ELDL uptake. In contrast, inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis (dynasore, sucrose) and inhibitor of caveolae-/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis (filipin) had no effect on ELDL uptake in SMC, suggesting that macropinocytosis is the main mechanism of ELDL uptake by SMC. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is not obligatory for ELDL-induced SMC foam cell formation, but primes SMC for the uptake of oxidized LDL in a RAGE-dependent manner. ELDL increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, cytosolic calcium, and expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in wild-type SMC but not in RAGE(-/-) SMC. The macropinocytotic uptake of ELDL is regulated predominantly by intracellular calcium because ELDL uptake was completely inhibited by pretreatment with the calcium channel inhibitor lacidipine in wild-type and RAGE(-/-) SMC. This is in contrast to pretreatment with PI3 kinase inhibitors which completely prevented ELDL uptake in RAGE(-/-) SMC, but only partially in wild-type SMC. ELDL is highly potent in inducing foam cells in murine SMC. ELDL endocytosis is mediated by calcium-dependent macropinocytosis. Priming SMC with ELDL enhances the uptake of oxidized LDL. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Role of dopamine D1-like receptors in methamphetamine locomotor responses of D2 receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, M. A.; Low, M. J.; Rubinstein, M.; Phillips, T. J.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants manifests as an increased locomotor response with repeated administration. Dopamine systems are accepted to play a fundamental role in sensitization, but the role of specific dopamine receptor subtypes has not been completely defined. This study used the combination of dopamine D2 receptor-deficient mice and a D1-like antagonist to examine dopamine D1 and D2 receptor involvement in acute and sensitized locomotor responses to methamphetamine. Absence of the dopamine D2 receptor resulted in attenuation of the acute stimulant effects of methamphetamine. Mutant and wild-type mice exhibited sensitization that lasted longer within the time period of the challenge test in the mutant animals. Pretreatment with the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH 23390 produced more potent reductions in the acute and sensitized locomotor responses to methamphetamine in D2 receptor-deficient mice than in wild-type mice; however, the expression of locomotor sensitization when challenged with methamphetamine alone was equivalently attenuated by previous treatment with SCH 23390. These data suggest that dopamine D2 receptors play a key role in the acute stimulant and sensitizing effects of methamphetamine and act in concert with D1-like receptors to influence the acquisition of methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization, traits that may influence continued methamphetamine use. PMID:18363855

  10. Hypoplasia of spiral and Scarpa's ganglion cells in GABA(A) receptor beta(3) subunit knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ja-Won; Homanics, Gregg E; Balaban, Carey D

    2002-05-01

    This study documents morphologic alterations in the spiral ganglion and Scarpa's ganglion from gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptor beta(3) subunit null mutant mice. The ganglion cells of the mutant mice were hypoplastic in hematoylin&eosin-stained sections. Hypoplasia was observed at every location of the spiral ganglion and Scarpa's ganglion except the apical cochlear turn. Calretinin immunostaining demonstrated a selective hypoplasia of calretinin-negative cells at every location of spiral and Scarpa's ganglion cells, while the soma area of calretinin-positive cells was not affected by the gene deletion. Meanwhile, in the spiral ganglion of both wild type and knockout mice, there were apical to basal gradients in the soma size and the proportion of calretinin-positive cells. The absence of statistically significant hypoplasia in hematoylin&eosin sections through the apical turn of the cochlea can be explained by the relatively higher proportion of calretinin-positive ganglion cells, which were unaffected by the gene deletion. These findings suggest that GABA(A) receptor isoforms containing the beta(3) subunit may play an important role in the development and differentiation of non-calyceal terminals of Scarpa's ganglion cells and type II and smaller type I spiral ganglion cells.

  11. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging and quantification of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Oliver T; Ittrich, Harald; Peldschus, Kersten; Kaul, Michael G; Tromsdorf, Ulrich I; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Nikolic, Marija S; Mollwitz, Birgit; Merkel, Martin; Bigall, Nadja C; Sapra, Sameer; Reimer, Rudolph; Hohenberg, Heinz; Weller, Horst; Eychmüller, Alexander; Adam, Gerhard; Beisiegel, Ulrike; Heeren, Joerg

    2009-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals have physical properties that are well suited for biomedical imaging. Previously, we have shown that iron oxide nanocrystals embedded within the lipid core of micelles show optimized characteristics for quantitative imaging. Here, we embed quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of lipoproteins--micelles that transport lipids and other hydrophobic substances in the blood--and show that it is possible to image and quantify the kinetics of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using fluorescence and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. The lipoproteins were taken up by liver cells in wild-type mice and displayed defective clearance in knock-out mice lacking a lipoprotein receptor or its ligand, indicating that the nanocrystals did not influence the specificity of the metabolic process. Using this strategy it is possible to study the clearance of lipoproteins in metabolic disorders and to improve the contrast in clinical imaging.

  12. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging and quantification of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Oliver T.; Ittrich, Harald; Peldschus, Kersten; Kaul, Michael G.; Tromsdorf, Ulrich I.; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Nikolic, Marija S.; Mollwitz, Birgit; Merkel, Martin; Bigall, Nadja C.; Sapra, Sameer; Reimer, Rudolph; Hohenberg, Heinz; Weller, Horst; Eychmüller, Alexander; Adam, Gerhard; Beisiegel, Ulrike; Heeren, Joerg

    2009-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals have physical properties that are well suited for biomedical imaging. Previously, we have shown that iron oxide nanocrystals embedded within the lipid core of micelles show optimized characteristics for quantitative imaging. Here, we embed quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of lipoproteins-micelles that transport lipids and other hydrophobic substances in the blood-and show that it is possible to image and quantify the kinetics of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using fluorescence and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. The lipoproteins were taken up by liver cells in wild-type mice and displayed defective clearance in knock-out mice lacking a lipoprotein receptor or its ligand, indicating that the nanocrystals did not influence the specificity of the metabolic process. Using this strategy it is possible to study the clearance of lipoproteins in metabolic disorders and to improve the contrast in clinical imaging.

  13. The association between soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 levels and patients with isolated coronary artery ectasia.

    PubMed

    Balin, Mehmet; Celik, Ahmet; Kobat, M Ali

    2012-04-01

    Some evidence suggests that chronic inflammation plays a critical role in the development and progression of coronary artery ectasia. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 is involved in multiple phases of vascular dysfunction, including endothelial dysfunction, atherogenesis, initiation of plaque rupture, and restenosis. The objectives was to study the purpose of the current study was to determine whether soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 is associated with isolated coronary artery ectasia patients. Forty-six patients with isolated coronary artery ectasia without stenosis and 46 control subjects with angiographically normal coronary arteries were included in this study. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 levels were measured in serum by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar. Plasma levels of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 were significantly higher in the coronary artery ectasia group than normal coronary artery group (1.7 ± 0.8 ng/ml vs. 1.1 ± 0.3 ng/ml, P < 0.001, respectively). No correlation was found between plasma soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 levels and different types of ectasia in patients with coronary artery ectasia. In this study, we found significantly higher levels of soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 in coronary artery ectasia patients when compared to control subjects with normal coronary arteries, suggesting that soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of coronary artery ectasia.

  14. Expression of the very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-r), an apolipoprotein-E receptor, in the central nervous system and in Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, R.H.; Chung, Haeyong; Rebeck, G.W.; Hyman, B.T.

    1996-04-01

    The very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-r) is a cell-surface molecule specialized for the internalization of multiple diverse ligands, including apolipoprotein E (apoE)-containing lipoprotein particles, via clathrin-coated pits. Its structure is similar to the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-r), although the two have substantially different systemic distributions and regulatory pathways. The present work examines the distribution of VLDL-r in the central nervous system (CNS) and in relation to senile plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD). VLDL-r is present on resting and activated microglia, particularly those associated with senile plaques (SPs). VLDL-r immunoreactivity is also found in cortical neurons. Two exons of VLDL-r mRNA are differentially spliced in the mature receptor mRNA. One set of splice forms gives rise to receptors containing (or lacking) an extracellular O-linked glycosylation domain near the transmembrane portion of the molecule. The other set of splice forms appears to be brain-specific, and is responsible for the presence or absence of one of the cysteine-rich repeat regions in the binding region of the molecule. Ratios of the receptor variants generated from these splice forms do not differ substantially across different cortical areas or in AD. We hypothesize that VLDL-r might contribute to metabolism of apoE and apoE/A{beta} complexes in the brain. Further characterization of apoE receptors in Alzheimer brain may help lay the groundwork for understanding the role of apoE in the CNS and in the pathophysiology of AD. 43 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Transgenic Expression of the Vitamin D Receptor Restricted to the Ileum, Cecum and Colon of Vitamin D Receptor Knockout Mice Rescues Vitamin D Receptor Dependent Rickets.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Puneet; Veldurthy, Vaishali; Yehia, Ghassan; Hsaio, Connie; Porta, Angela; Kim, Ki-In; Patel, Nishant; Lieben, Liesbet; Verlinden, Lieve; Carmeliet, Geert; Christakos, Sylvia

    2017-09-11

    Although the intestine plays the major role in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) action on calcium homeostasis, the mechanisms involved remain incompletely understood. The established model of 1,25(OH)2D3 regulated intestinal calcium absorption postulates a critical role for the duodenum. However it is the distal intestine where 70 -80% of the ingested calcium is absorbed. In order to test directly the role of 1,25(OH)2D3 and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the distal intestine, 3 independent knockout (KO) /transgenic (TG) lines expressing VDR exclusively in the ileum, cecum and colon were generated by breeding VDR KO mice with TG mice expressing human (h)VDR under the control of the 9.5kb CDX2 promoter. Mice from one TG line (KO/TG3) showed low VDR expression in distal intestine (<50% of the levels observed in KO/TG1, KO/TG2 and WT mice). In the KO/TG mice hVDR was not expressed in duodenum, jejunum, kidney or other tissues. Growth arrest, elevated parathyroid hormone and hypocalcemia of the VDR KO mice were prevented in mice from KO/TG lines 1 and 2. µCT analysis revealed that the expression of hVDR in the distal intestine of KO/TG1 and KO/TG2 mice rescued the bone defects associated with systemic VDR deficiency, including growth plate abnormalities and altered trabecular and cortical parameters. KO/TG3 mice showed rickets, yet less severely compared to VDR KO mice. These findings show that expression of VDR exclusively in the distal intestine can prevent abnormalities in calcium homeostasis and bone mineralization associated with systemic VDR deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  16. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and pro-NGF increase low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in neuronal cells partly by different mechanisms: role of LDL in neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Do, Hai Thi; Bruelle, Céline; Pham, Dan Duc; Jauhiainen, Matti; Eriksson, Ove; Korhonen, Laura T; Lindholm, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) mediate the uptake of lipoprotein particles into cells, as studied mainly in peripheral tissues. Here, we show that nerve growth factor (NGF) increases LDLR levels in PC6.3 cells and in cultured septal neurons from embryonic rat brain. Study of the mechanisms showed that NGF enhanced transcription of the LDLR gene, acting mainly via Tropomyosin receptor kinase A receptors. Simvastatin, a cholesterol-lowering drug, also increased the LDLR expression in PC6.3 cells. In addition, pro-NGF and pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor, acting via the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) also increased LDLRs. We further observed that Myosin Regulatory Light Chain-Interacting Protein/Inducible Degrader of the LDLR (Mylip/Idol) was down-regulated by pro-NGF, whereas the other LDLR regulator, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) was not significantly changed. On the functional side, NGF and pro-NGF increased lipoprotein uptake by neuronal cells as shown using diacetyl-labeled LDL. The addition of serum-derived lipoprotein particles in conjunction with NGF or simvastatin enhanced neurite outgrowth. Collectively, these results show that NGF and simvastatin are able to stimulate lipoprotein uptake by neurons with a positive effect on neurite outgrowth. Increases in LDLRs and lipoprotein particles in neurons could play a functional role during brain development, in neuroregeneration and after brain injuries. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and pro-NGF induce the expression of low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) in neuronal cells leading to increased LDLR levels. Pro-NGF also down-regulated myosin regulatory light chain-interacting protein/inducible degrader of the LDLR (Mylip/Idol) that is involved in the degradation of LDLRs. NGF acts mainly via Tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) receptors, whereas pro-NGF stimulates p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). Elevated LDLRs upon NGF and pro-NGF treatments enhanced lipoprotein uptake

  17. Altered gene expression and functional activity of opioid receptors in the cerebellum of CB1 cannabinoid receptor knockout mice after acute treatments with cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Páldyová, Estera; Bereczki, E; Sántha, M; Wenger, T; Borsodi, Anna; Benyhe, S

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown functional links between the cannabinoid and opioid systems. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether acute treatments by endogenous cannabinoid agonist, selective CB1 or CB2 receptor antagonists modulate the expression of mu- (MOR) and delta- (DOR) opioid receptor mRNA levels and functional activity in the cerebellum of transgenic mice deficient in the CB1 type of cannabis receptors. We examined the effect of noladin ether (endogenous cannabinoid agonist) pretreatment on MOR and DOR mRNA expression by using reverse transcription and real-time polimerase chain reaction (PCR) and the ability of subsequent application of the opioid agonists to activate G-proteins, as measured by [35S]GTPgammaS binding, in wild-type (CB1+/+) and CB1 cannabinoid receptor deficient (CB1-/-, 'knockout', K.O.) mice. The acute administration of noladin ether markedly reduced MOR-mediated G-protein activation and caused a significant increase in the level of MOR mRNAs in the cerebella of wildtype, but not in the CB1-/- mice. No significant differences were observed in DOR functional activity and mRNA expression in wild-type animals. In CB1-/- mice the expression of DOR mRNA increased after noladin ether treatment, but no changes were found in DOR functional activity. In addition, Rimonabant (selective central cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist) and SR144528 (selective peripheral cannabinoid CB2 receptor antagonist) caused significant potentiation in MOR functional activity in the wild-type animals, whereas DOR mediated G-protein activation was increased in the CB1-/- mice. In contrast, Rimonabant and SR144528 decreased the MOR and DOR mRNA expressions in both CB1+/+ and CB1-/- mice. Taken together, these results indicate that acute treatment with cannabinoids causes alterations in MOR and DOR mRNA expression and functional activity in the cerebella of wild-type and CB1 knockout mice indicating indirect interactions between these two signaling systems.

  18. Increased novelty-induced motor activity and reduced depression-like behavior in neuropeptide Y (NPY)-Y4 receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Tasan, R O; Lin, S; Hetzenauer, A; Singewald, N; Herzog, H; Sperk, G

    2009-02-18

    There is growing evidence that neuropeptide Y (NPY) acting through Y1 and Y2 receptors has a prominent role in modulating anxiety- and depression-like behavior in rodents. However, a role of other Y-receptors like that of Y4 receptors in this process is poorly understood. We now investigated male Y2, Y4 single and Y2/Y4 double knockout mice in behavioral paradigms for changes in motor activity, anxiety and depression-like behavior. Motor activity was increased in Y2, Y4 and Y2/Y4 knockout mice under changing and stressful conditions, but not altered in a familiar environment. Y4 and Y2 knockout mice revealed an anxiolytic phenotype in the light/dark test, marble burying test and in stress-induced hyperthermia, and reduced depression-like behavior in the forced swim and tail suspension tests. In Y2/Y4 double knockout mice, the response in the light/dark test and in the forced swim test was further enhanced compared with Y4 and Y2 knockout mice, respectively. High levels of Y4 binding sites were observed in brain stem nuclei including nucleus of solitary tract and area postrema. Lower levels were found in the medial amygdala and hypothalamus. Peripheral administration of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) induced Y4 receptor-dependent c-Fos expression in brain stem, hypothalamus and amygdala. PP released peripherally from the pancreas in response to food intake, may act not only as a satiety signal but also modulate anxiety-related locomotion.

  19. Knockout of toll-like receptor-4 attenuates the pro-inflammatory state of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, Sridevi; Tobias, Peter; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2011-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is associated with increased vascular complications and is a pro-inflammatory state. Recent findings have shown increased TLR2 and 4 expression, signaling, ligands, and functional activation in T1DM subjects compared to controls and further accentuated in T1DM with microvascular complications. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine if genetic deficiency of TLR4 attenuates the increased inflammation associated with T1DM using the streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model. C57BL/6 and TLR4(-/-) mice were obtained and studied in the native state and following induction of diabetes using streptozotocin. Diabetic (WT+STZ) mice had increased expression of both TLR2 and TLR4, while TLR4(-/-) STZ mice had increased expression only of TLR2, but not TLR4 compared to the non-diabetic mice TLR2 expression was significantly increased with STZ-induced diabetes and was unaffected by knockout of TLR4. Also, levels of MyD88, IRAK-1 protein phosphorylation, Trif, IRF3, and NF-κB activity were significantly reduced in TLR4(-/-) +STZ mice compared to the WT+STZ mice. WT+STZ mice exhibited significantly increased levels of serum and macrophage IL-1β, IL-6, KC/IL-8, IP-10, MCP-1, IFN beta and TNF-α compared to WT mice and this was significantly attenuated in TLR4(-/-) +STZ mice (P<0.01). Thus, TLR4 contributes to the pro-inflammatory state and TLR4KO attenuates inflammation in diabetes.

  20. Inflammatory Bone Loss in Experimental Periodontitis Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, A.; Mizutani, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Goto, H.; Okabe, E.; Takeda, H.; Ozawa, Y.; Kamiya, Y.; Sugita, Y.; Kubo, K.; Kamei, H.; Kikuchi, T.; Mitani, A.; Hayashi, J.; Nishihara, T.; Maeda, H.; Noguchi, T.

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) binds to IL-1 receptors and inhibits IL-1 activity. However, it is not clear whether IL-1Ra plays a protective role in periodontal disease. This study was undertaken to compare experimental periodontitis induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in IL-1Ra knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Computed tomography (CT) analysis and hematoxylin-and-eosin (H&E) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining were performed. In addition, osteoblasts were isolated; the mRNA expression of relevant genes was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR); and calcification was detected by Alizarin Red staining. Infected IL-1Ra KO mice exhibited elevated (P, <0.05) levels of antibody against A. actinomycetemcomitans, bone loss in furcation areas, and alveolar fenestrations. Moreover, protein for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-6, mRNA for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in IL-1Ra KO mouse osteoblasts stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans were increased (P, <0.05) compared to in WT mice. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteocalcin (OCN)/bone gla protein (BGP), and runt-related gene 2 (Runx2) mRNA levels were decreased (P, <0.05). IL-1α mRNA expression was increased, and calcification was not observed, in IL-1 Ra KO mouse osteoblasts. In brief, IL-1Ra deficiency promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines beyond IL-1 and altered the expression of genes involved in bone resorption in A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected osteoblasts. Alterations consistent with rapid bone loss in infected IL-Ra KO mice were also observed for genes expressed in bone formation and calcification. In short, these data suggest that IL-1Ra may serve as a potential therapeutic drug for periodontal disease. PMID:24566623

  1. CCR2 knockout exacerbates cerulein-induced chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia via decreased GLP-1 receptor expression and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuji; Kanai, Takanori; Saeki, Keita; Takabe, Miho; Irie, Junichiro; Miyoshi, Jun; Mikami, Yohei; Teratani, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Takahiro; Miyata, Naoteru; Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Yamagishi, Yoshiyuki; Higuchi, Hajime; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Hozawa, Shigenari; Saito, Hidetsugu; Itoh, Hiroshi; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) promotes insulin release; however, the relationship between the GLP-1 signal and chronic pancreatitis is not well understood. Here we focus on chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and its receptor (CCR2) axis, which regulates various immune cells, including macrophages, to clarify the mechanism of GLP-1-mediated insulin secretion in chronic pancreatitis in mice. One and multiple series of repetitive cerulein administrations were used to induce acute and chronic cerulein pancreatitis, respectively. Acute cerulein-administered CCR2-knockout (KO) mice showed suppressed infiltration of CD11b(+)Gr-1(low) macrophages and pancreatic inflammation and significantly upregulated insulin secretion compared with paired wild-type (WT) mice. However, chronic cerulein-administered CCR2-KO mice showed significantly increased infiltration of CD11b(+)/Gr-1(-) and CD11b(+)/Gr-1(high) cells, but not CD11b(+)/Gr-1(low) cells, in pancreas with severe inflammation and significantly decreased insulin secretion compared with their WT counterparts. Furthermore, although serum GLP-1 levels in chronic cerulein-administered WT and CCR2-KO mice were comparably upregulated after cerulein administrations, GLP-1 receptor levels in pancreases of chronic cerulein-administered CCR2-KO mice were significantly lower than in paired WT mice. Nevertheless, a significantly higher hyperglycemia level in chronic cerulein-administered CCR2-KO mice was markedly restored by treatment with a GLP-1 analog to a level comparable to the paired WT mice. Collectively, the CCR2/CCL2 axis-mediated CD11b(+)-cell migration to the pancreas is critically involved in chronic pancreatitis-mediated hyperglycemia through the modulation of GLP-1 receptor expression and insulin secretion.

  2. Ghrelin receptor-knockout mice display alterations in circadian rhythms of activity and feeding under constant lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Lamont, E Waddington; Bruton, J; Blum, I D; Abizaid, A

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach. Ghrelin, however, may also be a modulator of the circadian system given that ghrelin receptors are expressed in the master clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and several outputs of this region. To investigate this, we performed analyses of running wheel activity and neuronal activation in wild type (WT) and growth hormone secretagogue receptor-knockout (GHSR-KO) mice under various lighting conditions. GHSR-KO and WT mice were maintained under constant dark (DD) or constant light (LL) with ad libitum access to food before being placed on a schedule of temporally restricted access to food (4 h/day) for 2 weeks. There were no differences between KO and WT mice in free-running period under DD, but GHSR-KO mice required more days to develop a high level of food anticipatory activity, and this was lower than that observed in WT mice. Under LL, GHSR-KO mice showed greater activity overall, lengthening of their circadian period, and more resistance to the disorganisational effects of LL. Furthermore, GHSR-KO mice showed greater activity overall, and greater activity in anticipation of a scheduled meal under LL. These behavioral effects were not correlated with changes in the circadian expression of the Fos, Per1 or Per2 proteins under any lighting conditions. These results suggest that the ghrelin receptor plays a role in modulating the activity of the circadian system under normal conditions and under restricted feeding schedules, but does so through mechanisms that remain to be determined.

  3. Age-related changes of anandamide metabolism in CB1 cannabinoid receptor knockout mice: correlation with behaviour.

    PubMed

    Maccarrone, Mauro; Valverde, Olga; Barbaccia, Maria L; Castañé, Anna; Maldonado, Rafael; Ledent, Catherine; Parmentier, Marc; Finazzi-Agrò, Alessandro

    2002-04-01

    Anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) are the most active endocannabinoids at brain (CB1) cannabinoid receptors. CD1 mice lacking the CB1 receptors ("knockout" [KO] mutants) were compared with wildtype (WT) littermates for their ability to degrade AEA through an AEA membrane transporter (AMT) and an AEA hydrolase (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH). The age dependence of AMT and FAAH activity were investigated in 1- or 4-month-old WT and KO animals, and found to increase with age in KO, but not WT, mice and to be higher in the hippocampus than in the cortex of all animals. AEA and 2-AG were detected in nmol/mg protein (microm) concentrations in both regions, though the hippocampus showed approximately twice the amount found in the cortex. In the same regions, 2-AG failed to change across groups, while AEA was significantly decreased (approximately 30%) in hippocampus, but not in cortex, of old KO mice, when compared with young KO or age-matched WT animals. In the open-field test under bright light and in the lit-dark exploration model of anxiety, young KO mice, compared with old KO, exhibited a mild anxiety-related behaviour. In contrast, neither the increase in memory performance assessed by the object recognition test, nor the reduction of morphine withdrawal symptoms, showed age dependence in CB1 KO mice. These results suggest that invalidation of the CB1 receptor gene is associated with age-dependent adaptive changes of endocannabinoid metabolism which appear to correlate with the waning of the anxiety-like behaviour exhibited by young CB1 KO mice.

  4. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 variants and dietary fatty acids: meta-analysis of European origin and African American studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Low-density lipoprotein-related receptor protein 1 (LRP1) is a multi-functional endocytic receptor and signaling molecule that is expressed in adipose and the hypothalamus. Evidence for a role of LRP1 in adiposity is accumulating from animal and in vitro models, but data from human studies are limit...

  5. LDL receptor/lipoprotein recognition: endosomal weakening of ApoB and ApoE binding to the convex face of the LR5 repeat.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Oliván, Juan; Arias-Moreno, Xabier; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrián; Millet, Oscar; Sancho, Javier

    2014-03-01

    The molecular mechanism of lipoprotein binding by the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) is poorly understood, one reason being that structures of lipoprotein-receptor complexes are not available. LDLR uses calcium-binding repeats (LRs) to interact with apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein E (ApoB and ApoE). We have used NMR and SPR to characterize the complexes formed by LR5 and three peptides encompassing the putative binding regions of ApoB (site A and site B) and ApoE. The three peptides bind at the hydrophilic convex face of LR5, forming complexes that are weakened at low [Ca(2+) ] and low pH. Thus, endosomal conditions favour dissociation of LDLR/lipoprotein complexes regardless of whether active displacement of bound lipoproteins by the β-propeller in LDLR takes place. The multiple ApoE copies in β very low density lipoproteins (β-VLDLs), and the presence of two competent binding sites (A and B) in LDLs, suggest that LDLR chelates lipoproteins and enhances complex affinity by using more than one LR.

  6. Attenuated sensitivity to neuroactive steroids in γ-aminobutyrate type A receptor delta subunit knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Mihalek, Robert M.; Banerjee, Pradeep K.; Korpi, Esa R.; Quinlan, Joseph J.; Firestone, Leonard L.; Mi, Zhi-Ping; Lagenaur, Carl; Tretter, Verena; Sieghart, Werner; Anagnostaras, Stephan G.; Sage, Jennifer R.; Fanselow, Michael S.; Guidotti, Alessandro; Spigelman, Igor; Li, Zhiwei; DeLorey, Timothy M.; Olsen, Richard W.; Homanics, Gregg E.

    1999-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors mediate fast inhibitory synaptic transmission and have been implicated in responses to sedative/hypnotic agents (including neuroactive steroids), anxiety, and learning and memory. Using gene targeting technology, we generated a strain of mice deficient in the δ subunit of the GABA type A receptors. In vivo testing of various behavioral responses revealed a strikingly selective attenuation of responses to neuroactive steroids, but not to other modulatory drugs. Electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal slices revealed a significantly faster miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current decay time in null mice, with no change in miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current amplitude or frequency. Learning and memory assessed with fear conditioning were normal. These results begin to illuminate the novel contributions of the δ subunit to GABA pharmacology and sedative/hypnotic responses and behavior and provide insights into the physiology of neurosteroids. PMID:10536021

  7. Knockout of Angiotensin AT2 receptors accelerates healing but impairs quality

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Mahya; Hosseini, Sayed M.; Smith, Barbara; Ansari, Amir Mehdi.; Lay, Frank; Ahmed, Ali Karim; Inagami, Tedashi; Marti, Guy P.; Harmon, John W.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Abadir, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Wounds are among the most common, painful, debilitating and costly conditions in older adults. Disruption of the angiotensin type 1 receptors (AT1R), has been associated with impaired wound healing, suggesting a critical role for AT1R in this repair process. Biological functions of angiotensin type 2 receptors (AT2R) are less studied. We investigated effects of genetically disrupting AT2R on rate and quality of wound healing. Our results suggest that AT2R effects on rate of wound closure depends on the phase of wound healing. We observed delayed healing during early phase of wound healing (inflammation). An accelerated healing rate was seen during later stages (proliferation and remodeling). By day 12, fifty percent of AT2R−/− mice had complete wound closure as compared to none in either C57/BL6 or AT1R−/− mice. There was a significant increase in AT1R, TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 expression during the proliferative and remodeling phases in AT2R−/− mice. Despite the accelerated closure rate, AT2R−/− mice had more fragile healed skin. Our results suggest that in the absence of AT2R, wound healing rate is accelerated, but yielded worse skin quality. Elucidating the contribution of both of the angiotensin receptors may help fine tune future intervention aimed at wound repair in older individuals. PMID:26727887

  8. Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 (PCSK9) Single Domain Antibodies Are Potent Inhibitors of Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Degradation.

    PubMed

    Weider, Elodie; Susan-Resiga, Delia; Essalmani, Rachid; Hamelin, Josée; Asselin, Marie-Claude; Nimesh, Surendra; Ashraf, Yahya; Wycoff, Keith L; Zhang, Jianbing; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G

    2016-08-05

    Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) correspond to the antigen-binding domains of camelid antibodies. They have the same antigen-binding properties and specificity as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) but are easier and cheaper to produce. We report here the development of sdAbs targeting human PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) as an alternative to anti-PCSK9 mAbs. After immunizing a llama with human PCSK9, we selected four sdAbs that bind PCSK9 with a high affinity and produced them as fusion proteins with a mouse Fc. All four sdAb-Fcs recognize the C-terminal Cys-His-rich domain of PCSK9. We performed multiple cellular assays and demonstrated that the selected sdAbs efficiently blocked PCSK9-mediated low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) degradation in cell lines, in human hepatocytes, and in mouse primary hepatocytes. We further showed that the sdAb-Fcs do not affect binding of PCSK9 to the LDLR but rather block its induced cellular LDLR degradation. Pcsk9 knock-out mice expressing a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgene were generated, resulting in plasma levels of ∼300 ng/ml human PCSK9. Mice were singly or doubly injected with the best sdAb-Fc and analyzed at day 4 or 11, respectively. After 4 days, mice exhibited a 32 and 44% decrease in the levels of total cholesterol and apolipoprotein B and ∼1.8-fold higher liver LDLR protein levels. At 11 days, the equivalent values were 24 and 46% and ∼2.3-fold higher LDLR proteins. These data constitute a proof-of-principle for the future usage of sdAbs as PCSK9-targeting drugs that can efficiently reduce LDL-cholesterol, and as tools to study the Cys-His-rich domain-dependent sorting the PCSK9-LDLR complex to lysosomes.

  9. Cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein-1 receptor function by membrane raft disruption.

    PubMed

    Matarazzo, Sara; Quitadamo, Maria Chiara; Mango, Ruggiero; Ciccone, Sarah; Novelli, Giuseppe; Biocca, Silvia

    2012-08-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LOX-1), the primary receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in endothelial cells, is up-regulated in atherosclerotic lesions. Statins are the principal therapeutic agents for cardiovascular diseases and are known to down-regulate LOX-1 expression. Whether the effect on the LOX-1 receptor is related to statin-mediated cholesterol-lowering activity is unknown. We investigate the requirement of cholesterol for LOX-1-mediated lipid particle internalization, trafficking, and processing and the role of statins as inhibitors of LOX-1 function. Disruption of cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains by acute exposure of cells to methyl-β-cyclodextrin or chronic exposure to different statins (lovastatin and atorvastatin) led to a spatial disorganization of LOX-1 in plasma membranes and a marked loss of specific LOX-1 function in terms of ox-LDL binding and internalization. Subcellular fractionation and immunochemical studies indicate that LOX-1 is naturally present in caveolae-enriched lipid rafts and, by cholesterol reduction, the amount of LOX-1 in this fraction is highly decreased (≥60%). In contrast, isoprenylation inhibition had no effect on the distribution and function of LOX-1 receptors. Furthermore, in primary cultures from atherosclerotic human aorta lesions, we confirm the presence of LOX-1 in caveolae-enriched lipid rafts and demonstrate that lovastatin treatment led to down-regulation of LOX-1 in lipid rafts and rescue of the ox-LDL-induced apoptotic phenotype. Taken together, our data reveal a previously unrecognized essential role of membrane cholesterol for LOX-1 receptor activity and suggest that statins protect vascular endothelium against the adverse effect of ox-LDL by disruption of membrane rafts and impairment of LOX-1 receptor function.

  10. Characterization of adult ghrelin and ghrelin receptor knockout mice under positive and negative energy balance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuxiang; Butte, Nancy F; Garcia, Jose M; Smith, Roy G

    2008-02-01

    Ghrelin and the ghrelin receptor (GH secretagogue receptor, GHS-R), are believed to have important roles in energy homeostasis. We describe results from the first studies to be conducted in congenic (N10) adult ghrelin(-/-) and Ghsr(-/-) mice under conditions of both positive (high-fat diet) and negative (caloric restriction) energy balance. In contrast to results from young N2 mutant mice, changes in body weight and energy expenditure are not clearly distinguishable across genotypes. Although respiratory quotient was lower in mice fed a high-fat diet, no differences were evident between littermate wild-type and null genotypes. With normal chow, a modest decrease trend in respiratory quotient was detected in ghrelin(-/-) mice but not in Ghsr(-/-) mice. Under caloric restriction, the weight loss of ghrelin(-/-) and Ghsr(-/-) mice was identical to wild-type littermates, but blood glucose levels were significantly lower. We conclude that adult congenic ghrelin(-/-) and Ghsr(-/-) mice are not resistant to diet-induced obesity but under conditions of negative energy balance show impairment in maintaining glucose homeostasis. These results support our hypothesis that the primary metabolic function of ghrelin in adult mice is to modulate glucose sensing and insulin sensitivity, rather than directly regulate energy intake and energy expenditure.

  11. Deletion of the UT receptor gene results in the selective loss of urotensin-II contractile activity in aortae isolated from UT receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Behm, David J; Harrison, Stephen M; Ao, Zhaohui; Maniscalco, Kristeen; Pickering, Susan J; Grau, Evelyn V; Woods, Tina N; Coatney, Robert W; Doe, Christopher P A; Willette, Robert N; Johns, Douglas G; Douglas, Stephen A

    2003-01-01

    Urotensin-II (U-II) is among the most potent mammalian vasoconstrictors identified and may play a role in the aetiology of essential hypertension. Currently, only one mouse U-II receptor (UT) gene has been cloned. It is postulated that this protein is solely responsible for mediating U-II-induced vasoconstriction. This hypothesis has been investigated in the present study, which assessed basal haemodynamics and vascular reactivity to hU-II in wild-type (UT(+/+)) and UT receptor knockout (UT(−/−)) mice. Basal left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes/pressures, stroke volumes, mean arterial blood pressures, heart rates, cardiac outputs and ejection fractions in UT(+/+) mice and in UT(−/−) mice were similar. Relative to UT(+/+) mouse isolated thoracic aorta, where hU-II was a potent spasmogen (pEC50=8.26±0.08) that evoked relatively little vasoconstriction (17±2% 60 mM KCl), vessels isolated from UT(−/−) mice did not respond to hU-II. However, in contrast, the superior mesenteric artery isolated from both the genotypes did not contract in the presence of hU-II. Reactivity to unrelated vasoconstrictors (phenylephrine, endothelin-1, KCl) and endothelium-dependent/independent vasodilator agents (carbachol, sodium nitroprusside) was similar in the aorta and superior mesenteric arteries isolated from both the genotypes. The present study is the first to directly link hU-II-induced vasoconstriction with the UT receptor. Deletion of the UT receptor gene results in loss of hU-II contractile action with no ‘nonspecific' alterations in vascular reactivity. However, as might be predicted based on the limited contractile efficacy recorded in vitro, the contribution that hU-II and its receptor make to basal systemic haemodynamics appears to be negligible in this species. PMID:12770952

  12. Upregulation of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptors in Dopamine D2 Receptor Knockout Mice Is Reversed by Chronic Forced Ethanol Consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Gopez, V.; Delis, F.; Michaelides, M.; Grand, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Kunos, G.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-01-01

    The anatomical proximity of the cannabinoid type 1 (CNR1/CB1R) and the dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2), their ability to form CB1R-DRD2 heteromers, their opposing roles in locomotion, and their involvement in ethanol's reinforcing and addictive properties prompted us to study the levels and distribution of CB1R after chronic ethanol intake, in the presence and absence of DRD2. We monitored the drinking patterns and locomotor activity of Drd2+/+ and Drd2-/- mice consuming either water or a 20% (v/v) ethanol solution (forced ethanol intake) for 6 months and used the selective CB1 receptor antagonist [{sup 3}H]SR141716A to quantify CB1R levels in different brain regions with in vitro receptor autoradiography. We found that the lack of DRD2 leads to a marked upregulation (approximately 2-fold increase) of CB1R in the cerebral cortex, the caudate-putamen, and the nucleus accumbens, which was reversed by chronic ethanol intake. The results suggest that DRD2-mediated dopaminergic neurotransmission and chronic ethanol intake exert an inhibitory effect on cannabinoid receptor expression in cortical and striatal regions implicated in the reinforcing and addictive properties of ethanol.

  13. Development and application of a nonradioactive binding assay of oxidized low-density lipoprotein to macrophage scavenger receptors

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Erica N.; Boullier, Agnès; Almazan, Felicidad; Binder, Christoph J.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Hartvigsen, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherogenesis in part through excessive uptake of oxidized LDL (OxLDL) via scavenger receptors. Binding of OxLDL to macrophages has traditionally been assessed using radiolabeled OxLDL. To allow more efficient and convenient measurements, we developed a nonradioactive binding assay in which biotinylated OxLDL (Bt-OxLDL) is added to macrophages in 96-well microtiter culture plates under various conditions and the extent of binding is determined using solid phase chemiluminescent immunoassay techniques. As examples, we show that Bt-OxLDL displayed high and saturable binding to macrophages in contrast to Bt-LDL, which showed very low binding. In competition assays, unlabeled OxLDL and the anti-OxLDL monoclonal antibody E06 inhibited Bt-OxLDL binding to macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Specific binding of Bt-OxLDL to ApoE/SR-A/CD36 triple knockout macrophages was reduced by 80% as compared with binding to macrophages from ApoE knockout mice. Binding of Bt-OxLDL to CD36 transfected COS-7 cells showed enhanced saturable binding compared with mock-transfected cells. This assay avoids the use of radioactivity and uses small amounts of materials. It can be used to study binding of OxLDL to macrophages and factors that influence this binding. The techniques described should be readily adaptable to study of other ligands, receptors, and cell types. PMID:23997238

  14. Progesterone receptor knockout mice have an improved glucose homeostasis secondary to -cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Frédéric; Wanatabe, Mitsuhiro; Schoonjans, Kristina; Lydon, John; O'Malley, Bert W.; Auwerx, Johan

    2002-11-01

    Gestational diabetes coincides with elevated circulating progesterone levels. We show that progesterone accelerates the progression of diabetes in female db/db mice. In contrast, RU486, an antagonist of the progesterone receptor (PR), reduces blood glucose levels in both female WT and db/db mice. Furthermore, female, but not male, PR-/- mice had lower fasting glycemia than PR+/+ mice and showed higher insulin levels on glucose injection. Pancreatic islets from female PR-/- mice were larger and secreted more insulin consequent to an increase in -cell mass due to an increase in -cell proliferation. These findings demonstrate an important role of progesterone signaling in insulin release and pancreatic function and suggest that it affects the susceptibility to diabetes.

  15. Sensitivity to MK-801 in phospholipase C-β1 knockout mice reveals a specific NMDA receptor deficit.

    PubMed

    Gray, Laura; McOmish, Caitlin E; Scarr, Elizabeth; Dean, Brian; Hannan, Anthony J

    2009-08-01

    Phospholipase C-β1 (PLC-β1) is a critical component of multiple signalling pathways downstream of neurotransmitter receptors. Mice lacking this enzyme display a striking behavioural phenotype with relevance to human psychiatric disease. Glutamatergic dysfunction is strongly associated with several abnormal behavioural states and may underlie part of the phenotype of the phospholipase C-β1 knockout (KO) mouse. A heightened response to glutamatergic psychotomimetic drugs is a critical psychosis-related endophenotype, and in this study it was employed as a correlate of glutamatergic dysfunction. Control (n=8) and PLC-β1 KO mice (n=6) were treated with MK-801, a NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, following either standard housing or environmental enrichment, and the motor function and locomotor activity thus evoked was assessed. In addition, MK-801 binding to the NMDAR was evaluated through radioligand autoradiography in post-mortem tissue (on a drug-naive cohort). We have demonstrated a significantly increased sensitivity to the effects of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 in the PLC-β1 KO mouse. In addition, we found that this mouse line displays reduced hippocampal NMDAR expression, as measured by radioligand binding. We previously documented a reversal of specific phenotypes in this mouse line following housing in an enriched environment. Enrichment did not alter this heightened MK-801 response, nor NMDAR expression, indicating that this therapeutic intervention works on specific pathways only. These findings demonstrate the critical role of the glutamatergic system in the phenotype of the PLC-β1 KO mouse and highlight the role of these interconnected signalling pathways in schizophrenia-like behavioural disruption. These results also shed further light on the capacity of environmental factors to modulate subsets of these phenotypes.

  16. A live attenuated Bordetella pertussis candidate vaccine does not cause disseminating infection in gamma interferon receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Skerry, Ciaran M; Cassidy, Joseph P; English, Karen; Feunou-Feunou, Pascal; Locht, Camille; Mahon, Bernard P

    2009-09-01

    Bordetella pertussis is the cause of whooping cough and responsible for 300,000 infant deaths per annum. Current vaccines require 6 months to confer optimal immunity on infants, the population at highest risk. Recently, an attenuated strain of B. pertussis (BPZE1) has been developed to be used as a low-cost, live, intranasal, single-dose vaccine for newborns. Preclinical proof of concept has been established; however, it is necessary to evaluate the safety of BPZE1, especially in immunodeficient models, prior to human clinical trials. Here, the preclinical safety of BPZE1 was examined in well-characterized murine models. Immunocompetent and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) receptor knockout mice were challenged by aerosol with either virulent B. pertussis or BPZE1. The two strains colonized the lung at equal levels, but inflammation was associated with carriage of only virulent bacteria. Virulent bacteria disseminated to the liver of IFN-gamma receptor-deficient mice, resulting in atypical pathology. In contrast, attenuated BPZE1 did not disseminate in either immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice and did not induce atypical pathology. In neonatal challenge models, virulent B. pertussis infection resulted in significant mortality of both immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice, whereas no mortality was observed for any neonatal mice challenged with BPZE1. BPZE1 was shown to elicit strong IFN-gamma responses in mice, equivalent to those elicited by the virulent streptomycin-resistant B. pertussis Tohama I derivative BPSM, also inducing immunoglobulin G2a, a process requiring TH1 cytokines in mice. These data indicate that a live attenuated whooping cough vaccine candidate shows no signs of disseminating infection in preclinical models but rather evokes an immunological profile associated with optimal protection against disease.

  17. Abnormal Mitochondrial Function and Impaired Granulosa Cell Differentiation in Androgen Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruey-Sheng; Chang, Heng-Yu; Kao, Shu-Huei; Kao, Cheng-Heng; Wu, Yi-Chen; Yeh, Shuyuan; Tzeng, Chii-Reuy; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-01-01

    In the ovary, the paracrine interactions between the oocyte and surrounded granulosa cells are critical for optimal oocyte quality and embryonic development. Mice lacking the androgen receptor (AR−/−) were noted to have reduced fertility with abnormal ovarian function that might involve the promotion of preantral follicle growth and prevention of follicular atresia. However, the detailed mechanism of how AR in granulosa cells exerts its effects on oocyte quality is poorly understood. Comparing in vitro maturation rate of oocytes, we found oocytes collected from AR−/− mice have a significantly poor maturating rate with 60% reached metaphase II and 30% remained in germinal vesicle breakdown stage, whereas 95% of wild-type AR (AR+/+) oocytes had reached metaphase II. Interestingly, we found these AR−/− female mice also had an increased frequency of morphological alterations in the mitochondria of granulosa cells with reduced ATP generation (0.18 ± 0.02 vs. 0.29 ± 0.02 µM/mg protein; p < 0.05) and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis. Mechanism dissection found loss of AR led to a significant decrease in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) co-activator 1-β (PGC1-β) and its sequential downstream genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), in controlling mitochondrial biogenesis. These results indicate that AR may contribute to maintain oocyte quality and fertility via controlling the signals of PGC1-β-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis in granulosa cells. PMID:25941928

  18. Small heterodimer partner overexpression partially protects against liver tumor development in farnesoid X receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guodong; Kong, Bo; Zhu, Yan; Zhan, Le; Williams, Jessica A.; Tawfik, Ossama; Kassel, Karen M.; Luyendyk, James P.; Wang, Li; Guo, Grace L.

    2013-10-15

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, Nr1h4) and small heterodimer partner (SHP, Nr0b2) are nuclear receptors that are critical to liver homeostasis. Induction of SHP serves as a major mechanism of FXR in suppressing gene expression. Both FXR{sup −/−} and SHP{sup −/−} mice develop spontaneous hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SHP is one of the most strongly induced genes by FXR in the liver and is a tumor suppressor, therefore, we hypothesized that deficiency of SHP contributes to HCC development in the livers of FXR{sup −/−} mice and therefore, increased SHP expression in FXR{sup −/−} mice reduces liver tumorigenesis. To test this hypothesis, we generated FXR{sup −/−} mice with overexpression of SHP in hepatocytes (FXR{sup −/−}/SHP{sup Tg}) and determined the contribution of SHP in HCC development in FXR{sup −/−} mice. Hepatocyte-specific SHP overexpression did not affect liver tumor incidence or size in FXR{sup −/−} mice. However, SHP overexpression led to a lower grade of dysplasia, reduced indicator cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. All tumor-bearing mice had increased serum bile acid levels and IL-6 levels, which was associated with activation of hepatic STAT3. In conclusion, SHP partially protects FXR{sup −/−} mice from HCC formation by reducing tumor malignancy. However, disrupted bile acid homeostasis by FXR deficiency leads to inflammation and injury, which ultimately results in uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in the liver. - Highlights: • SHP does not prevent HCC incidence nor size in FXR KO mice but reduces malignancy. • Increased SHP promotes apoptosis. • Bile acids and inflammation maybe critical for HCC formation with FXR deficiency.

  19. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 8 gene association with egg traits in dwarf chickens.

    PubMed

    Yao, J F; Chen, Z X; Xu, G Y; Wang, X L; Ning, Z H; Zheng, J X; Qu, L J; Yang, N

    2010-05-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 8 (LRP8), a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene family with a role in clusterin processing, was investigated as a candidate gene for egg quality-related traits. One SNP from C to T at position 1623 of the open reading frame of LRP8 was identified and genotyped by a high-throughput genotyping method, matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in 747 egg-type dwarf layers from 44 sire families. There were no significant differences among genotypes for any interior egg traits measured, except for yolk color, in which color was deeper for the TT genotype than CC or CT (P < 0.05). For shell traits, strength and thickness were greater for TT than CC (P < 0.05), with CT intermediate and not different from either. Shape index was lower for CT than either TT or CC, which did not differ, whereas for shell color, CT was intermediate to the homozygotes, which differed (CC > TT). The present results indicated that LRP8, as a new member of eggshell matrix protein, may be a candidate gene associated with eggshell traits.

  20. Glucose-regulated protein 78 inhibits scavenger receptor A-mediated internalization of acetylated low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ben, Jingjing; Gao, Song; Zhu, Xudong; Zheng, Yuan; Zhuang, Yan; Bai, Hui; Xu, Yong; Ji, Yong; Sha, Jiahao; He, Zhigang; Chen, Qi

    2009-11-01

    Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) plays an important role in foam cell formation. However, the mechanism underlying the internalization of the receptor-ligand complexes remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanism to regulate SR-A-mediated intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. A pull-down assay was performed and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) was identified to bind with the cytoplasmic domain of SR-A (CSR-A). Immunoprecipitation and artificially expressed protein binding assay demonstrated the direct specific binding of GRP78 with SR-A in cells. Indirect immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis showed their co-localization in membrane and cytoplasm. Over-expression of GRP78 specifically inhibited SR-A-mediated uptake of fluorescent acetylated low-density lipoprotein, a specific ligand for SR-A, without altering cellular SR-A expression and binding ability, and significantly inhibited cholesterol ester accumulation in cells, which can be partly attributed to the suppression of c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinase signaling pathway. These results suggest that GRP78 may act as an inhibitor of SR-A-mediated internalization of modified low-density lipoprotein into macrophages.

  1. Nerve growth factor induces rapid increases in functional cell surface low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    PubMed

    Bu, G; Sun, Y; Schwartz, A L; Holtzman, D M

    1998-05-22

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is a large endocytic receptor that binds multiple ligands and is highly expressed in neurons. Several LRP ligands, including apolipoprotein E/lipoproteins and amyloid precursor protein, have been shown to participate either in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis or pathology. However, factors that regulate LRP expression in neurons are unknown. In the current study, we analyzed the effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) treatment on LRP expression, distribution, and function within neurons in two neuronal cell lines. Our results show that NGF induces a rapid increase of cell surface LRP expression in a central nervous system-derived neuronal cell line, GT1-1 Trk, which was seen within 10 min and reached a maximum at about 1 h of NGF treatment. This increase of cell surface LRP expression is concomitant with an increase in the endocytic activity of LRP as measured via ligand uptake and degradation assays. We also found that the cytoplasmic tail of LRP is phosphorylated and that NGF rapidly increases the amount of phosphorylation. Furthermore, we detected a significant increase of LRP expression at the messenger RNA level following 24 h of NGF treatment. Both rapid and long term induction of LRP expression were also detected in peripheral nervous system-derived PC12 cells following NGF treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NGF regulates LRP expression in neuronal cells.

  2. Essential role of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in vascular smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghe; Lu, Wenyan; Bu, Guojun

    2003-12-04

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is a multifunctional cell surface receptor highly expressed in human aortic smooth muscle cells. In the present study, we used the short interfering RNA (siRNA) technique to explore the role of LRP in smooth muscle cell migration. We identified an LRP-specific siRNA that selective silences LRP expression in human aortic smooth muscle cells. As a consequence, LRP-mediated ligand degradation was significantly reduced. More important, we found that platelet-derived growth factor-dependent cell migration was inhibited in cells transfected with LRP siRNA. These results demonstrate an important role of LRP in smooth muscle cell migration.

  3. Knockout of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor results in distinct hepatic and renal phenotypes in rats and mice

    SciTech Connect

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Hukkanen, Renee R.; Lawson, Marie; Martin, Greg; Gilger, Brian; Soldatow, Valerie; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Budinsky, Robert A.; Rowlands, J. Craig; Thomas, Russell S.

    2013-10-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor which plays a role in the development of multiple tissues and is activated by a large number of ligands, including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). In order to examine the roles of the AHR in both normal biological development and response to environmental chemicals, an AHR knockout (AHR-KO) rat model was created and compared with an existing AHR-KO mouse. AHR-KO rats harboring either 2-bp or 29-bp deletion mutation in exon 2 of the AHR were created on the Sprague–Dawley genetic background using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology. Rats harboring either mutation type lacked expression of AHR protein in the liver. AHR-KO rats were also insensitive to thymic involution, increased hepatic weight and the induction of AHR-responsive genes (Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Ahrr) following acute exposure to 25 μg/kg TCDD. AHR-KO rats had lower basal expression of transcripts for these genes and also accumulated ∼ 30–45-fold less TCDD in the liver at 7 days post-exposure. In untreated animals, AHR-KO mice, but not AHR-KO rats, had alterations in serum analytes indicative of compromised hepatic function, patent ductus venosus of the liver and persistent hyaloid arteries in the eye. AHR-KO rats, but not AHR-KO mice, displayed pathological alterations to the urinary tract: bilateral renal dilation (hydronephrosis), secondary medullary tubular and uroepithelial degenerative changes and bilateral ureter dilation (hydroureter). The present data indicate that the AHR may play significantly different roles in tissue development and homeostasis and toxicity across rodent species. - Highlights: • An AHR knockout rat was generated on a Sprague–Dawley outbred background. • AHR-KO rats lack expression of AHR protein. • AHR-KO rats are insensitive to TCDD-mediated effects. • Data suggests difference in the role of AHR in tissue development of rats and mice. • Abnormalities in vascular

  4. Uncoupling dendrite growth and patterning: single-cell knockout analysis of NMDA receptor 2B.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, J Sebastian; Wheeler, Damian G; Tsien, Richard W; Luo, Liqun

    2009-04-30

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) play important functions in neural development. NR2B is the predominant NR2 subunit of NMDAR in the developing brain. Here we use mosaic analysis with double markers (MADM) to knock out NR2B in isolated single cells and analyze its cell-autonomous function in dendrite development. NR2B mutant dentate gyrus granule cells (dGCs) and barrel cortex layer 4 spiny stellate cells (bSCs) have similar dendritic growth rates, total length, and branch number as control cells. However, mutant dGCs maintain supernumerary primary dendrites resulting from a pruning defect. Furthermore, while control bSCs restrict dendritic growth to a single barrel, mutant bSCs maintain dendritic growth in multiple barrels. Thus, NR2B functions cell autonomously to regulate dendrite patterning to ensure that sensory information is properly represented in the cortex. Our study also indicates that molecular mechanisms that regulate activity-dependent dendrite patterning can be separated from those that control general dendrite growth and branching.

  5. Increased cardiac remodeling in cardiac-specific Flt-1 receptor knockout mice with pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Mei, Liqin; Huang, Yinqing; Lin, Jiafeng; Chu, Maoping; Hu, Chaohui; Zhou, Ning; Wu, Lianpin

    2015-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition has previously been shown to have damaging effects on the heart. Because the role of Flt-1 (a phosphotyrosine kinase receptor for VEGF) in cardiac function and hypertrophy is unclear, we generated mice lacking Flt-1 only in their cardiomyocytes (Flt-1 KO). The hearts from 8- to 10-week-old mice were measured by using echocardiography and histology. No significant differences were seen in fraction shortening, cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes, and interstitial collagen fraction between littermate controls and KO mice at baseline. To test the hypothesis that Flt-1 is involved in cardiac remodeling, we performed transverse aorta constriction (TAC) by ligating the transverse ascending aorta. Four weeks after TAC, echocardiography of the mice was performed, and the hearts were excised for pathological analysis and Western blotting. No difference in mortality was found between Flt-1 KO mice and controls; however, KO mice showed a greater cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area and interstitial collagen fraction than controls. Western blotting indicated that AKT was activated less in Flt-1 KO hearts after TAC compared with that in control hearts. Thus, Flt-1 deletion in cardiomyocytes increased hypertrophy, fibrosis, and regression of AKT phosphorylation. Our study suggests that Flt-1 plays a critical role in cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload via the activation of AKT, which seems to be cardioprotective.

  6. Adenosine Receptor Antagonists and Behavioral Activation in NF-κB p50 Subunit Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaobin; Mhaskar, Yashanad; Arbogast, Lydia A.; Trammell, Rita A.; Hughes, Larry F.; Toth, Linda A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Our previous work revealed that mice lacking the p50 subunit of transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) (p50 KO mice) and genetically intact F2 mice have similar locomotion under basal conditions, yet p50 KO mice show greater locomotor activation after caffeine ingestion. In this report, we test whether KO mice display altered caffeine pharmacokinetics or increased caffeine-induced DA turnover relative to F2 mice, and evaluate the impact of intraperitoneal administration of specific adenosine and DA receptor antagonists on locomotor activity. Main methods Concentrations of DA and caffeine were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. DA turnover was measured after treatment of mice with an inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase. Locomotor activity was measured using telemetry. Key findings The data reveal that 1) caffeine concentrations in blood and brain are similar in KO and F2 mice after oral or intraperitoneal administration; 2) KO mice show greater DA turnover under basal conditions, but turnover is similar in both strains after caffeine administration; 3) the specific A2AAR antagonist SCH 58261 induces greater locomotion in KO versus F2 mice; and 4) the activating effect of SCH 58261 in KO mice is prevented by prior treatment with the D2R antagonist raclopride. Significance These findings support the conclusions that 1) A2AAR has a major impact on behavioral activation of p50 KO mice, and 2) D2R mediated neurotransmission is critical to this effect. PMID:19508875

  7. Adenosine receptor antagonists and behavioral activation in NF-kappaB p50 subunit knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaobin; Mhaskar, Yashanad; Arbogast, Lydia A; Trammell, Rita A; Hughes, Larry F; Toth, Linda A

    2009-07-31

    Our previous work revealed that mice lacking the p50 subunit of transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) (p50 KO mice) and genetically intact F2 mice have similar locomotion under basal conditions, yet p50 KO mice show greater locomotor activation after caffeine ingestion. In this report, we test whether KO mice display altered caffeine pharmacokinetics or increased caffeine-induced DA turnover relative to F2 mice, and evaluate the impact of intraperitoneal administration of specific adenosine and DA receptor antagonists on locomotor activity. Concentrations of DA and caffeine were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. DA turnover was measured after treatment of mice with an inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase. Locomotor activity was measured using telemetry. The data reveal that 1) caffeine concentrations in blood and brain are similar in KO and F2 mice after oral or intraperitoneal administration; 2) KO mice show greater DA turnover under basal conditions, but turnover is similar in both strains after caffeine administration; 3) the specific A2AAR antagonist SCH 58261 induces greater locomotion in KO versus F2 mice; and 4) the activating effect of SCH 58261 in KO mice is prevented by prior treatment with the D2R antagonist raclopride. These findings support the conclusions that 1) A2AAR has a major impact on behavioral activation of p50 KO mice, and 2) D2R mediated neurotransmission is important to this effect.

  8. Uncoupling Dendrite Growth and Patterning: Single Cell Knockout Analysis of NMDA Receptor 2B

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, J. Sebastian; Wheeler, Damian G.; Tsien, Richard W.; Luo, Liqun

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) play important functions in neural development. NR2B is the predominant NR2 subunit of NMDAR in the developing brain. Here we use MADM (Mosaic Analysis with Double Markers) to knock out NR2B in isolated single cells and analyze its cell-autonomous function in dendrite development. NR2B mutant dentate gyrus granule cells (dGCs) and barrel cortex layer 4 spiny stellate cells (bSCs) have similar dendritic growth rates, total length and branch number as control cells. However, mutant dGCs maintain supernumerary primary dendrites resulting from a pruning defect. Furthermore, while control bSCs restrict dendritic growth to a single barrel, mutant bSCs maintain dendritic growth in multiple barrels. Thus, NR2B functions cell-autonomously to regulate dendrite patterning to ensure that sensory information is properly represented in the cortex. Our study also indicates that molecular mechanisms that regulate activity-dependent dendrite patterning can be separated from those that control general dendrite growth and branching. PMID:19409266

  9. Glucagon receptor knockout mice are protected against acute olanzapine-induced hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Laura N; Peppler, Willem T; Sutton, Charles D; Whitfield, Jamie; Charron, Maureen J; Wright, David C

    2017-08-01

    To determine if glucagon is involved in mediating the increase in blood glucose levels caused by the second-generation antipsychotic drug olanzapine. Whole body glucagon receptor deficient mice (Gcgr(-/-)) or WT littermate controls were injected with olanzapine (5mg/kg BW IP) and changes in blood glucose measured over the following 120min. Separate cohorts of mice were treated with olanzapine and changes in pyruvate tolerance, insulin tolerance and whole body substrate oxidation were determined. Olanzapine treatment increased serum glucagon and lead to rapid increases in blood glucose concentrations in WT mice. Gcgr(-/-) mice were protected against olanzapine-induced increases in blood glucose but this was not explained by differences in terminal serum insulin concentrations, enhanced AKT phosphorylation in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue or liver or differences in RER. In both genotypes olanzapine induced an equivalent degree of insulin resistance as measured using an insulin tolerance test. Olanzapine treatment led to an exaggerated glucose response to a pyruvate challenge in WT but not Gcgr(-/-) mice and this was paralleled by reductions in the protein content of PEPCK and G6Pase in livers from Gcgr(-/-) mice. Gcgr(-/-) mice are protected against olanzapine-induced increases in blood glucose. This is likely a result of reductions in liver glucose output, perhaps secondary to decreases in PEPCK and G6Pase protein content. Our findings highlight the central role of the liver in mediating olanzapine-induced disturbances in glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sleep architecture of the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Adamantidis, Antoine; Salvert, Denise; Goutagny, Romain; Lakaye, Bernard; Gervasoni, Damien; Grisar, Thierry; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice

    2008-04-01

    Growing amounts of data indicate involvement of the posterior hypothalamus in the regulation of sleep, especially paradoxical sleep (PS). Accordingly, we previously showed that the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-producing neurons of the rat hypothalamus are selectively activated during a PS rebound. In addition, intracerebroventricular infusion of MCH increases total sleep duration, suggesting a new role for MCH in sleep regulation. To determine whether activation of the MCH system promotes sleep, we studied spontaneous sleep and its homeostatic regulation in mice with deletion of the MCH-receptor 1 gene (MCH-R1-/- vs. MCH-R1+/+) and their behavioural response to modafinil, a powerful antinarcoleptic drug. Here, we show that the lack of functional MCH-R1 results in a hypersomniac-like phenotype, both in basal conditions and after total sleep deprivation, compared to wild-type mice. Further, we found that modafinil was less potent at inducing wakefulness in MCH-R1-/- than in MCH-R1+/+ mice. We report for the first time that animals with genetically inactivated MCH signaling exhibit altered vigilance state architecture and sleep homeostasis. This study also suggests that the MCH system may modulate central pathways involved in the wake-promoting effect of modafinil.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein LprG (Rv1411c) binds triacylated glycolipid agonists of Toll-like receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drage, Michael G.; Tsai, Han-Chun; Pecora, Nicole D.; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Arida, Ahmad R.; Shukla, Supriya; Rojas, Roxana E.; Seshadri, Chetan; Moody, D. Branch; Boom, W. Henry; Sacchettini, James C.; Harding, Clifford V.

    2010-09-27

    Knockout of lprG results in decreased virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in mice. MTB lipoprotein LprG has TLR2 agonist activity, which is thought to be dependent on its N-terminal triacylation. Unexpectedly, here we find that nonacylated LprG retains TLR2 activity. Moreover, we show LprG association with triacylated glycolipid TLR2 agonists lipoarabinomannan, lipomannan and phosphatidylinositol mannosides (which share core structures). Binding of triacylated species was specific to LprG (not LprA) and increased LprG TLR2 agonist activity; conversely, association of glycolipids with LprG enhanced their recognition by TLR2. The crystal structure of LprG in complex with phosphatidylinositol mannoside revealed a hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the three alkyl chains of the ligand. In conclusion, we demonstrate a glycolipid binding function of LprG that enhances recognition of triacylated MTB glycolipids by TLR2 and may affect glycolipid assembly or transport for bacterial cell wall biogenesis.

  12. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor knock-out exacerbates choroidal neovascularization via multiple pathogenic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Mayur; Kazmin, Dmitri; Hu, Peng; Thomas, Russell S; McDonnell, Donald P; Malek, Goldis

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a heterodimeric transcriptional regulator with pleiotropic functions in xenobiotic metabolism and detoxification, vascular development and cancer. Herein, we report a previously undescribed role for the AhR signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of the wet, neovascular subtype of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly in the Western world. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of aged AhR−/− and wild-type (wt) mice, using high-throughput RNA sequencing, revealed differential modulation of genes belonging to several AMD-related pathogenic pathways, including inflammation, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix regulation. To investigate AhR regulation of these pathways in wet AMD, we experimentally induced choroidal neovascular lesions in AhR−/− mice and found that they measured significantly larger in area and volume compared to age-matched wt mice. Furthermore, these lesions displayed a higher number of ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1-positive (Iba1+) microglial cells and a greater amount of collagen type IV deposition, events also seen in human wet AMD pathology specimens. Consistent with our in vivo observations, AhR knock-down was sufficient to increase choroidal endothelial cell migration and tube formation in vitro. Moreover, AhR knock-down caused an increase in collagen type IV production and secretion in both retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and choroidal endothelial cell cultures, increased expression of angiogenic and inflammatory molecules, including vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in RPE cells, and increased expression of secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1) in choroidal endothelial cells. Collectively, our findings identify AhR as a regulator of multiple pathogenic pathways in experimentally induced choroidal neovascularization, findings that

  13. Endothelium dysfunction in LDL receptor knockout mice: a role for H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo, Luíza A; Cortes, Steyner F; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I; Lemos, Virgínia S

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the role of endogenous H2O2 as an endothelium-dependent relaxant factor was characterised in aortas from C57BL/6J and LDL receptor-deficient mice (LDLR−/−). Aortic rings from LDLR−/− mice showed impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh; 0.001–100 μM) and to the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 (0.001–3 μM) compared with aortic rings from control mice. Endothelium-independent relaxation produced by the NO donor, 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1) was not different between strains. Pretreatment of vessels with L-NNA (100 μM) or L-NNA (100 μM) plus L-NAME (300 μM) plus haemoglobin (10 μM) markedly decreased, but did not abolish the relaxation to ACh in control mice. In the aortas from LDLR−/− mice treated with L-NNA (100 μM), ACh induced a contractile effect. Catalase (800 and 2400 U ml−1) shifted to the right the endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh in aortas from control but not from LDLR−/− mice. Aminotriazole (50 mM), which inhibits catalase, abolished its effect on control mice. Treatment of vessels with L-NNA and catalase abolished vasorelaxation induced by ACh. Indomethacin (10 μM) did not modify the concentration–response curve to ACh. Superoxide dismutase (300 U ml−1) did not change ACh-induced relaxation in both strains. Exogenous H2O2 produced a concentration-dependent relaxation in endothelium-denuded aortic rings, which was not different between strains. It is concluded that H2O2 greatly contributes to relaxation to ACh in aorta from control mice. Endothelial-dependent relaxation to ACh is impaired in LDLR−/− mice. Reduced biosynthesis or increased inactivation of H2O2 is the possible mechanism responsible for endothelial dysfunction in aortas of atherosclerosis-susceptible LDLR−/− mice. PMID:12711621

  14. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor knock-out exacerbates choroidal neovascularization via multiple pathogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mayur; Kazmin, Dmitri; Hu, Peng; Thomas, Russell S; McDonnell, Donald P; Malek, Goldis

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a heterodimeric transcriptional regulator with pleiotropic functions in xenobiotic metabolism and detoxification, vascular development and cancer. Herein, we report a previously undescribed role for the AhR signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of the wet, neovascular subtype of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly in the Western world. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of aged AhR(-/-) and wild-type (wt) mice, using high-throughput RNA sequencing, revealed differential modulation of genes belonging to several AMD-related pathogenic pathways, including inflammation, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix regulation. To investigate AhR regulation of these pathways in wet AMD, we experimentally induced choroidal neovascular lesions in AhR(-/-) mice and found that they measured significantly larger in area and volume compared to age-matched wt mice. Furthermore, these lesions displayed a higher number of ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1-positive (Iba1(+) ) microglial cells and a greater amount of collagen type IV deposition, events also seen in human wet AMD pathology specimens. Consistent with our in vivo observations, AhR knock-down was sufficient to increase choroidal endothelial cell migration and tube formation in vitro. Moreover, AhR knock-down caused an increase in collagen type IV production and secretion in both retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and choroidal endothelial cell cultures, increased expression of angiogenic and inflammatory molecules, including vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in RPE cells, and increased expression of secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1) in choroidal endothelial cells. Collectively, our findings identify AhR as a regulator of multiple pathogenic pathways in experimentally induced choroidal neovascularization, findings that

  15. The role of habituation in hippocampus-dependent spatial working memory tasks: evidence from GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, David J; Bannerman, David M

    2012-05-01

    Spatial alternation, win-shift behavior has been claimed to be a test of working memory in rodents that requires active maintenance of relevant, trial-specific information. In this review, we describe work with GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit knockout mice that show impaired spatial alternation, but normal spatial reference memory. Due to their selective impairment on spatial alternation, GluA1 knockout mice provide a means by which the psychological processes underlying alternation can be examined. We now argue that the spatial alternation deficit in GluA1 knockout mice is due to an inability to show stimulus-specific, short-term habituation to recently experienced stimuli. Short-term habituation involves a temporary reduction in attention paid to recently presented stimuli, and is thus a distinct process from those that are involved in working memory in humans. We have recently demonstrated that GluA1 knockout mice show impaired short-term habituation, but, surprisingly, show enhanced long-term spatial habituation. Thus, GluA1 deletion reveals that there is competition between short-term and long-term processes in memory.

  16. Neutral glycosphingolipids in human blood: a precise mass spectrometry analysis with special reference to lipoprotein-associated Shiga toxin receptors[S

    PubMed Central

    Schweppe, Christian H.; Hoffmann, Petra; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch; Pohlentz, Gottfried; Mormann, Michael; Karch, Helge; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Müthing, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli are the leading cause of hemorrhagic colitis and life-threatening extraintestinal complications in humans. Stx1 and Stx2 are transferred by yet to be delineated mechanisms from the intestine to the circulation where they injure microvascular endothelial cells. The resulting vascular lesions cause renal failure and brain damage. Because lipoproteins are potential carriers of Stx through the circulation, we investigated human lipoprotein-associated neutral glycosphingolipids (GSLs) with emphasis on high (globotriaosylceramide) and low (globotetraosylceramide) affinity Stx-receptors. TLC overlay employing Stx1, Stx2, and anti-GSL antibodies demonstrated preferential distribution of globo-series GSLs to very low- and low-density lipoproteins compared with minor association with high-density lipoproteins. Electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry portrayed C24:0/C24:1 and C16:0 as the major fatty acid of the ceramide moieties of Stx-receptors carrying nonvarying d18:1 sphingosine. This structural heterogeneity was also found in precursor lactosylceramide, glucosylceramide, and galactosylceramide, the last showing an exceptionally high degree of hydroxylated C24 fatty acids. Our findings provide the basis for exploring the functional role of lipoprotein-associated Stx-receptors in human blood. PMID:20444989

  17. Chlordecone, a mixed pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) agonist, alters cholesterol homeostasis and lipoprotein metabolism in C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junga; Scheri, Richard C.; Zhang Yuan; Curtis, Lawrence R.

    2008-12-01

    Chlordecone (CD) is one of many banned organochlorine (OC) insecticides that are widespread persistent organic pollutants. OC insecticides alter lipid homeostasis in rodents at doses that are not neurotoxic or carcinogenic. Pretreatment of mice or rats with CD altered tissue distribution of a subsequent dose of [{sup 14}C]CD or [{sup 14}C]cholesterol (CH). Nuclear receptors regulate expression of genes important in the homeostasis of CH and other lipids. In this study, we report that CD suppresses in vitro reporter systems for human liver X receptors (LXRs) and activates those for human farnesoid X receptor (FXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) in a concentration-dependent manner (0-50 {mu}M). Consistent with human PXR activation in vitro, three days after a single dose of CD (15 mg/kg) hepatic microsomal CYP3A11 protein increases in C57BL/6 mice. CD decreases hepatic CH ester content without altering total CH concentration. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) contents of hepatic lipoprotein-rich and microsomal fractions of CD-treated mice are higher than controls. There is a significant reduction in non-high density lipoprotein CH but not apolipoprotein B-48/100 (apoB-48/100) in plasma from CD-treated mice after a 4 h fast. At 14 days after 15 mg CD/kg apoA-I and apoB-100 proteins but not CYP3A11 protein in hepatic microsomes are similar to controls. This work indicates that altered CH homeostasis is a mode of OC insecticide action of relevance after a single dose. This at least partially explains altered CH tissue distribution in CD-pretreated mice.

  18. Selective uptake of a toxic lipophilic anthracycline derivative by the low-density lipoprotein receptor pathway in cultured fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Vitols, S.G.; Masquelier, M.; Peterson, C.O.

    1985-04-01

    N-(N-Retinoyl)-L-leucyldoxorubicin 14-linoleate (r11-DOX), a new lipophilic derivative of doxorubicin, was synthesized and incorporated into low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The drug-LDL complex contained 100- 200 drug molecules/LDL particle. When cultured normal human fibroblasts were incubated with /sup 125/I-LDL-incorporated drug, there was a perfect correlation between the cellular uptake plus degradation of /sup 125/I-LDL and the cellular drug accumulation. The presence of excess native LDL inhibited the cellular uptake and degradation of /sup 125/I-LDL and the drug accumulation to the same extent. In contrast, methylated LDL, which does not bind to the LDL receptor, did not alter the cellular uptake and degradation of /sup 125/I-LDL nor did it alter the drug accumulation. When LDL receptor negative fibroblasts from a patient with the homozygous form of familial hypercholesterolemia were incubated with the drug-/sup 125/I-LDL complex, cellular drug accumulation was very low. The drug-LDL complex inhibited the growth of cultured normal human fibroblasts. The drug incorporated into methylated LDL was much less toxic. These findings suggest that r11-DOX incorporated into LDL is delivered to cells selectively by the LDL receptor pathway. This might be of value in the treatment of leukemia, since it has been previously found that leukemic cells exhibit higher LDL receptor activity than white blood cells and bone marrow cells from healthy subjects.

  19. Chlamydial infection in vitamin D receptor knockout mice is more intense and prolonged than in wild-type mice

    PubMed Central

    He, Qing; Ananaba, Godwin A.; Patrickson, John; Pitts, Sidney; Yi, Yeming; Yan, Fengxia; Eko, Francis O.; Lyn, Deborah; Black, Carolyn M.; Igietseme, Joseph U.; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D hormone (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) is involved in innate immunity and induces host defense peptides in epithelial cells, suggesting its involvement in mucosal defense against infections. Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of bacterial sexually transmitted disease worldwide. We tested the hypothesis that the vitamin D endocrine system would attenuate chlamydial infection. Vitamin D receptor knock-out mice (VDR−/−) and wild-type mice (VDR+/+) were infected with 103 inclusion forming units of Chlamydia muridarum and cervical epithelial cells (HeLa cells) were infected with C. muridarum at multiplicity of infection 5:1 in the presence and absence of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.VDR−/− mice exhibited significantly higher bacterial loading than wild-type VDR+/+ mice (P<0.01) and cleared the chlamydial infection in 39 days, compared with 18 days for VDR+/+ mice. Monocytes and neutrophils were more numerous in the uterus and oviduct of VDR−/− mice than in VDR+/+ mice (P< 0.05) at d 45 after infection. Pre-treatment of HeLa cells with 10nM or 100nM 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 decreased the infectivity of C. muridarum (P< 0.001). Several differentially expressed protein spots were detected by proteomic analysis of chlamydial-infected HeLa cells pre-treated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Leukocyte elastase inhibitor (LEI), an anti-inflammatory protein, was up-regulated. Expression of LEI in the ovary and oviduct of infected VDR+/+ mice was greater than that of infected VDR−/− mice. We conclude that the vitamin D endocrine system reduces the risk for prolonged chlamydial infections through regulation of several proteins and that LEI is involved in its anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:23201171

  20. Knockout of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor results in distinct hepatic and renal phenotypes in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Harrill, Joshua A; Hukkanen, Renee R; Lawson, Marie; Martin, Greg; Gilger, Brian; Soldatow, Valerie; Lecluyse, Edward L; Budinsky, Robert A; Rowlands, J Craig; Thomas, Russell S

    2013-10-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor which plays a role in the development of multiple tissues and is activated by a large number of ligands, including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). In order to examine the roles of the AHR in both normal biological development and response to environmental chemicals, an AHR knockout (AHR-KO) rat model was created and compared with an existing AHR-KO mouse. AHR-KO rats harboring either 2-bp or 29-bp deletion mutation in exon 2 of the AHR were created on the Sprague-Dawley genetic background using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology. Rats harboring either mutation type lacked expression of AHR protein in the liver. AHR-KO rats were also insensitive to thymic involution, increased hepatic weight and the induction of AHR-responsive genes (Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Ahrr) following acute exposure to 25 μg/kg TCDD. AHR-KO rats had lower basal expression of transcripts for these genes and also accumulated ~30-45-fold less TCDD in the liver at 7 days post-exposure. In untreated animals, AHR-KO mice, but not AHR-KO rats, had alterations in serum analytes indicative of compromised hepatic function, patent ductus venosus of the liver and persistent hyaloid arteries in the eye. AHR-KO rats, but not AHR-KO mice, displayed pathological alterations to the urinary tract: bilateral renal dilation (hydronephrosis), secondary medullary tubular and uroepithelial degenerative changes and bilateral ureter dilation (hydroureter). The present data indicate that the AHR may play significantly different roles in tissue development and homeostasis and toxicity across rodent species.

  1. Knockout of NMDA-receptors from parvalbumin interneurons sensitizes to schizophrenia-related deficits induced by MK-801.

    PubMed

    Bygrave, A M; Masiulis, S; Nicholson, E; Berkemann, M; Barkus, C; Sprengel, R; Harrison, P J; Kullmann, D M; Bannerman, D M; Kätzel, D

    2016-04-12

    It has been suggested that a functional deficit in NMDA-receptors (NMDARs) on parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons (PV-NMDARs) is central to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Supportive evidence come from examination of genetically modified mice where the obligatory NMDAR-subunit GluN1 (also known as NR1) has been deleted from PV interneurons by Cre-mediated knockout of the corresponding gene Grin1 (Grin1(ΔPV) mice). Notably, such PV-specific GluN1 ablation has been reported to blunt the induction of hyperlocomotion (a surrogate for psychosis) by pharmacological NMDAR blockade with the non-competitive antagonist MK-801. This suggests PV-NMDARs as the site of the psychosis-inducing action of MK-801. In contrast to this hypothesis, we show here that Grin1(ΔPV) mice are not protected against the effects of MK-801, but are in fact sensitized to many of them. Compared with control animals, Grin1(ΔPV)mice injected with MK-801 show increased stereotypy and pronounced catalepsy, which confound the locomotor readout. Furthermore, in Grin1(ΔPV)mice, MK-801 induced medial-prefrontal delta (4 Hz) oscillations, and impaired performance on tests of motor coordination, working memory and sucrose preference, even at lower doses than in wild-type controls. We also found that untreated Grin1(ΔPV)mice are largely normal across a wide range of cognitive functions, including attention, cognitive flexibility and various forms of short-term memory. Taken together these results argue against PV-specific NMDAR hypofunction as a key starting point of schizophrenia pathophysiology, but support a model where NMDAR hypofunction in multiple cell types contribute to the disease.

  2. Knockout of NMDA-receptors from parvalbumin interneurons sensitizes to schizophrenia-related deficits induced by MK-801

    PubMed Central

    Bygrave, A M; Masiulis, S; Nicholson, E; Berkemann, M; Barkus, C; Sprengel, R; Harrison, P J; Kullmann, D M; Bannerman, D M; Kätzel, D

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that a functional deficit in NMDA-receptors (NMDARs) on parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons (PV-NMDARs) is central to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Supportive evidence come from examination of genetically modified mice where the obligatory NMDAR-subunit GluN1 (also known as NR1) has been deleted from PV interneurons by Cre-mediated knockout of the corresponding gene Grin1 (Grin1ΔPV mice). Notably, such PV-specific GluN1 ablation has been reported to blunt the induction of hyperlocomotion (a surrogate for psychosis) by pharmacological NMDAR blockade with the non-competitive antagonist MK-801. This suggests PV-NMDARs as the site of the psychosis-inducing action of MK-801. In contrast to this hypothesis, we show here that Grin1ΔPV mice are not protected against the effects of MK-801, but are in fact sensitized to many of them. Compared with control animals, Grin1ΔPVmice injected with MK-801 show increased stereotypy and pronounced catalepsy, which confound the locomotor readout. Furthermore, in Grin1ΔPVmice, MK-801 induced medial-prefrontal delta (4 Hz) oscillations, and impaired performance on tests of motor coordination, working memory and sucrose preference, even at lower doses than in wild-type controls. We also found that untreated Grin1ΔPVmice are largely normal across a wide range of cognitive functions, including attention, cognitive flexibility and various forms of short-term memory. Taken together these results argue against PV-specific NMDAR hypofunction as a key starting point of schizophrenia pathophysiology, but support a model where NMDAR hypofunction in multiple cell types contribute to the disease. PMID:27070406

  3. Inhibition of p38 pathway-dependent MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in estrogen receptor alpha knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chul Ju; Choi, Dong-Young; Jung, Yu Yeon; Lee, Young-Jung; Yun, Jae Suk; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang-Bae; Oh, Seikwan; Park, Mi Hee; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-04-01

    Approximately, 7-10 million people in the world suffer from Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, increasing evidence has suggested the protective effect of estrogens against nigrostriatal dopaminergic damage in PD. In this study, we investigated whether estrogen affects 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced behavioral impairment in estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-deficient mice. MPTP (15mg/kg, four times with 1.5-h interval)-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration was evaluated in ERα wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice. Larger dopamine depletion, behavioral impairments (Rotarod test, Pole test, and Gait test), activation of microglia and astrocytes, and neuroinflammation after MPTP injection were observed in ERα KO mice compared to those in WT mice. Immunostaining for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) after MPTP injection showed fewer TH-positive neurons in ERα KO mice than WT mice. Levels of dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC, metabolite of dopamine) were also lowered in ERα KO mice after MPTP injection. Interestingly, a higher immunoreactivity for monoamine oxidase (MAO) B was found in the substantia nigra and striatum of ERα KO mice after MPTP injection. We also found an increased activation of p38 kinase (which positively regulates MAO B expression) in ERα KO mice. In vitro estrogen treatment inhibited neuroinflammation in 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridium (MPP+)-treated cultured astrocyte cells; however, these inhibitory effects were removed by p38 inhibitor. These results indicate that ERα might be important for dopaminergic neuronal survival through inhibition of p38 pathway.

  4. In vivo assessment of coronary flow and cardiac function after bolus adenosine injection in adenosine receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Teng, Bunyen; Tilley, Stephen L; Ledent, Catherine; Mustafa, S Jamal

    2016-06-01

    Bolus injections of adenosine and the A2A adenosine receptor (AR) selective agonist (regadenoson) are used clinically as a substitute for a stress test in people who cannot exercise. Using isolated tissue preparations, our lab has shown that coronary flow and cardiac effects of adenosine are mostly regulated by the AR subtypes A1, A2A, and A2B In this study, we used ultrasound imaging to measure the in vivo effects of adenosine on coronary blood flow (left coronary artery) and cardiac function in anesthetized wild-type, A1 knockout (KO), A2AKO, A2BKO, A3KO, A1, and A3 double KO (A1/3 DKO) and A2A and A2B double KO (A2A/2B DKO) mice in real time. Echocardiographic and Doppler studies were performed using a Visualsonic Vevo 2100 ultrasound system. Coronary blood flow (CBF) baseline data were obtained when animals were anesthetized with 1% isoflourane. Diameter (D) and velocity time integral (VTI) were measured on the left coronary arteries (CBF = ((π/4) × D(2) × VTI × HR)/1000). CBF changes were the highest within 2 min of injection (about 10 mg/kg). Heart rate, cardiac output, and stroke volume were measured by tracing the left ventricle long axis. Our data support a role for the A2 AR in CBF and further support our conclusions of previous studies from isolated tissues. Adenosine-mediated decreases in cardiac output and stroke volume may be A2B and/or A3 AR-mediated; however, the A1 and A2 ARs also play roles in overall cardiac function. These data further provide a powerful translational tool in studying the cardiovascular effects of adenosine in disease states.

  5. Analysis of sequence variations in low-density lipoprotein receptor gene among Malaysian patients with familial hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolemia is a genetic disorder mainly caused by defects in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene. Few and limited analyses of familial hypercholesterolemia have been performed in Malaysia, and the underlying mutations therefore remain largely unknown. We studied a group of 154 unrelated FH patients from a northern area of Malaysia (Kelantan). The promoter region and exons 2-15 of the LDLR gene were screened by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography to detect short deletions and nucleotide substitutions, and by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to detect large rearrangements. Results A total of 29 gene sequence variants were reported in 117(76.0%) of the studied subjects. Eight different mutations (1 large rearrangement, 1 short deletion, 5 missense mutations, and 1 splice site mutation), and 21 variants. Eight gene sequence variants were reported for the first time and they were noticed in familial hypercholesterolemic patients, but not in controls (p.Asp100Asp, p.Asp139His, p.Arg471Gly, c.1705+117 T>G, c.1186+41T>A, 1705+112C>G, Dup exon 12 and p.Trp666ProfsX45). The incidence of the p.Arg471Gly variant was 11%. Patients with pathogenic mutations were younger, had significantly higher incidences of cardiovascular disease, xanthomas, and family history of hyperlipidemia, together with significantly higher total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels than patients with non-pathogenic variants. Conclusions Twenty-nine gene sequence variants occurred among FH patients; those with predicted pathogenicity were associated with higher incidences of cardiovascular diseases, tendon xanthomas, and higher total and low density lipoprotein levels compared to the rest. These results provide preliminary information on the mutation spectrum of this gene among patients with FH in Malaysia. PMID:21418584

  6. Analysis of sequence variations in low-density lipoprotein receptor gene among Malaysian patients with familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Al-Khateeb, Alyaa; Zahri, Mohd K; Mohamed, Mohd S; Sasongko, Teguh H; Ibrahim, Suhairi; Yusof, Zurkurnai; Zilfalil, Bin A

    2011-03-19

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a genetic disorder mainly caused by defects in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene. Few and limited analyses of familial hypercholesterolemia have been performed in Malaysia, and the underlying mutations therefore remain largely unknown.We studied a group of 154 unrelated FH patients from a northern area of Malaysia (Kelantan). The promoter region and exons 2-15 of the LDLR gene were screened by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography to detect short deletions and nucleotide substitutions, and by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to detect large rearrangements. A total of 29 gene sequence variants were reported in 117(76.0%) of the studied subjects. Eight different mutations (1 large rearrangement, 1 short deletion, 5 missense mutations, and 1 splice site mutation), and 21 variants. Eight gene sequence variants were reported for the first time and they were noticed in familial hypercholesterolemic patients, but not in controls (p.Asp100Asp, p.Asp139His, p.Arg471Gly, c.1705+117 T>G, c.1186+41T>A, 1705+112C>G, Dup exon 12 and p.Trp666ProfsX45). The incidence of the p.Arg471Gly variant was 11%. Patients with pathogenic mutations were younger, had significantly higher incidences of cardiovascular disease, xanthomas, and family history of hyperlipidemia, together with significantly higher total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels than patients with non-pathogenic variants. Twenty-nine gene sequence variants occurred among FH patients; those with predicted pathogenicity were associated with higher incidences of cardiovascular diseases, tendon xanthomas, and higher total and low density lipoprotein levels compared to the rest. These results provide preliminary information on the mutation spectrum of this gene among patients with FH in Malaysia.

  7. Double incretin receptor knockout (DIRKO) mice reveal an essential role for the enteroinsular axis in transducing the glucoregulatory actions of DPP-IV inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hansotia, Tanya; Baggio, Laurie L; Delmeire, Dominique; Hinke, Simon A; Yamada, Yuichiro; Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Seino, Yutaka; Holst, Jens J; Schuit, Frans; Drucker, D J

    2004-05-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) are gut-derived incretins that potentiate glucose clearance following nutrient ingestion. Elimination of incretin receptor action in GIPR(-/-) or GLP-1R(-/-) mice produces only modest impairment in glucose homeostasis, perhaps due to compensatory upregulation of the remaining incretin. We have now studied glucose homeostasis in double incretin receptor knockout (DIRKO) mice. DIRKO mice exhibit normal body weight and fail to exhibit an improved glycemic response after exogenous administration of GIP or the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4. Plasma glucagon and the hypoglycemic response to exogenous insulin were normal in DIRKO mice. Glycemic excursion was abnormally increased and levels of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were decreased following oral but not intraperitoneal glucose challenge in DIRKO compared with GIPR(-/-) or GLP-1R(-/-) mice. Similarly, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and the response to forskolin were well preserved in perifused DIRKO islets. Although the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors valine pyrrolidide (Val-Pyr) and SYR106124 lowered glucose and increased plasma insulin in wild-type and single incretin receptor knockout mice, the glucose-lowering actions of DPP-IV inhibitors were eliminated in DIRKO mice. These findings demonstrate that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is maintained despite complete absence of both incretin receptors, and they delineate a critical role for incretin receptors as essential downstream targets for the acute glucoregulatory actions of DPP-IV inhibitors.

  8. Impact of high-fat diet and voluntary running on body weight and endothelial function in LDL receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Langbein, Heike; Hofmann, Anja; Brunssen, Coy; Goettsch, Winfried; Morawietz, Henning

    2015-05-01

    Obesity and physical inactivity are important cardiovascular risk factors. Regular physical exercise has been shown to mediate beneficial effects in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. However, the impact of physical exercise on endothelial function in proatherosclerotic low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice has not been studied so far. Six-week-old male LDLR(-/-) mice were fed a standard diet or a high-fat diet (39 kcal% fat diet) for 20 weeks. The impact of high-fat diet and voluntary running on body weight and amount of white adipose tissue was monitored. Basal tone and endothelial function was investigated in aortic rings using a Mulvany myograph. LDLR(-/-) mice on high-fat diet had increased cumulative food energy intake, but also higher physical activity compared to mice on control diet. Body weight and amount of visceral and retroperitoneal white adipose tissue of LDLR(-/-) mice were significantly increased by high-fat diet and partially reduced by voluntary running. Endothelial function in aortae of LDLR(-/-) mice was impaired after 20 weeks on standard and high-fat diet and could not be improved by voluntary running. Basal tone showed a trend to be increased by high-fat diet. Voluntary running reduced body weight and amount of white adipose tissue in LDLR(-/-) mice. Endothelial dysfunction in LDLR(-/-) mice could not be improved by voluntary running. In a clinical context, physical exercise alone might not have an influence on functional parameters and LDL-C levels in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. However, physical activity in these patients may be in general beneficial and should be performed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fasting induces hyperlipidemia in mice overexpressing proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9: lack of modulation of very-low-density lipoprotein hepatic output by the low-density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Gilles; Jarnoux, Anne-Laure; Pineau, Thierry; Pape, Olivier; Chetiveaux, Maud; Laboisse, Christian; Krempf, Michel; Costet, Philippe

    2006-10-01

    Several proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) mutations lead to familial hypercholesterolemia by virtue of its role as a negative modulator of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr). Here, we uncover that upon dietary challenge, the down-regulation of the LDLr is also a key mechanism by which PCSK9 modulates the hepatic production of apolipoprotein-B-containing lipoproteins. Thus, adenoviral-mediated overexpression of PCSK9 in 24-h fasted mice results in massive hyperlipidemia, due to a striking increase in very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) triglycerides and apolipoprotein B100 hepatic output. Similar studies in LDLr (-/-) mice demonstrate that PCSK9-mediated alteration of VLDL output in the fasted state requires the LDLr. This increased production of VLDL was associated with a concomitant reduction of intrahepatic lipid stores as well as a lack of down-regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha activity and target genes expression. Finally, we show that PCSK9 hepatic expression is inhibited by the hypotriglyceridemic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha agonist fenofibrate. In summary, the negative modulation of LDLr expression by PCSK9, which decreases plasma LDL clearance, also promotes an overproduction of nascent VLDL in vivo upon fasting.

  10. Structure of an LDLR-RAP Complex Reveals a General Mode for Ligand Recognition by Lipoprotein Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher,C.; Beglova, N.; Blacklow, s.

    2006-01-01

    Proteins of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family are remarkable in their ability to bind an extremely diverse range of protein and lipoprotein ligands, yet the basis for ligand recognition is poorly understood. Here, we report the 1.26 Angstroms X-ray structure of a complex between a two-module region of the ligand binding domain of the LDLR and the third domain of RAP, an escort protein for LDLR family members. The RAP domain forms a three-helix bundle with two docking sites, one for each LDLR module. The mode of recognition at each site is virtually identical: three conserved, calcium-coordinating acidic residues from each LDLR module encircle a lysine side chain protruding from the second helix of RAP. This metal-dependent mode of electrostatic recognition, together with avidity effects resulting from the use of multiple sites, represents a general binding strategy likely to apply in the binding of other basic ligands to LDLR family proteins.

  11. Antagonism of Secreted PCSK9 Increases Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Expression in HepG2 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, Markey C.; Kwon, Hyock Joo; Chen, Chiyuan; Chen, Justin R.; Horton, Jay D.; Lagace, Thomas A.

    2009-07-10

    PCSK9 is a secreted protein that degrades low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) in liver by binding to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A (EGF-A) domain of the LDLR. It is not known whether PCSK9 causes degradation of LDLRs within the secretory pathway or following secretion and reuptake via endocytosis. Here we show that a mutation in the LDLR EGF-A domain associated with familial hypercholesterolemia, H306Y, results in increased sensitivity to exogenous PCSK9-mediated cellular degradation because of enhanced PCSK9 binding affinity. The crystal structure of the PCSK9-EGF-A(H306Y) complex shows that Tyr-306 forms a hydrogen bond with Asp-374 in PCSK9 at neutral pH, which strengthens the interaction with PCSK9. To block secreted PCSK9 activity, LDLR (H306Y) subfragments were added to the medium of HepG2 cells stably overexpressing wild-type PCSK9 or gain-of-function PCSK9 mutants associated with hypercholesterolemia (D374Y or S127R). These subfragments blocked secreted PCSK9 binding to cell surface LDLRs and resulted in the recovery of LDLR levels to those of control cells. We conclude that PCSK9 acts primarily as a secreted factor to cause LDLR degradation. These studies support the concept that pharmacological inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR interaction extracellularly will increase hepatic LDLR expression and lower plasma low density lipoprotein levels.

  12. Antagonism of secreted PCSK9 increases low density lipoprotein receptor expression in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    McNutt, Markey C; Kwon, Hyock Joo; Chen, Chiyuan; Chen, Justin R; Horton, Jay D; Lagace, Thomas A

    2009-04-17

    PCSK9 is a secreted protein that degrades low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) in liver by binding to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A (EGF-A) domain of the LDLR. It is not known whether PCSK9 causes degradation of LDLRs within the secretory pathway or following secretion and reuptake via endocytosis. Here we show that a mutation in the LDLR EGF-A domain associated with familial hypercholesterolemia, H306Y, results in increased sensitivity to exogenous PCSK9-mediated cellular degradation because of enhanced PCSK9 binding affinity. The crystal structure of the PCSK9-EGF-A(H306Y) complex shows that Tyr-306 forms a hydrogen bond with Asp-374 in PCSK9 at neutral pH, which strengthens the interaction with PCSK9. To block secreted PCSK9 activity, LDLR (H306Y) subfragments were added to the medium of HepG2 cells stably overexpressing wild-type PCSK9 or gain-of-function PCSK9 mutants associated with hypercholesterolemia (D374Y or S127R). These subfragments blocked secreted PCSK9 binding to cell surface LDLRs and resulted in the recovery of LDLR levels to those of control cells. We conclude that PCSK9 acts primarily as a secreted factor to cause LDLR degradation. These studies support the concept that pharmacological inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR interaction extracellularly will increase hepatic LDLR expression and lower plasma low density lipoprotein levels.

  13. The intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin, is a high-affinity apolipoprotein A-I receptor facilitating endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Kozyraki, R; Fyfe, J; Kristiansen, M; Gerdes, C; Jacobsen, C; Cui, S; Christensen, E I; Aminoff, M; de la Chapelle, A; Krahe, R; Verroust, P J; Moestrup, S K

    1999-06-01

    Cubilin is the intestinal receptor for the endocytosis of intrinsic factor-vitamin B12. However, several lines of evidence, including a high expression in kidney and yolk sac, indicate it may have additional functions. We isolated apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), the main protein of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), using cubilin affinity chromatography. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated a high-affinity binding of apoA-I and HDL to cubilin, and cubilin-expressing yolk sac cells showed efficient 125I-HDL endocytosis that could be inhibited by IgG antibodies against apoA-I and cubilin. The physiological relevance of the cubilin-apoA-I interaction was further emphasized by urinary apoA-I loss in some known cases of functional cubilin deficiency. Therefore, cubilin is a receptor in epithelial apoA-I/HDL metabolism.

  14. Baculovirus-mediated expression of human apolipoprotein E in Manduca sexta larvae generates particles that bind to the low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gretch, D G; Sturley, S L; Friesen, P D; Beckage, N E; Attie, A D

    1991-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a ligand for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and mediates the catabolism of several classes of lipoprotein particles. Binding of apoE to the LDL receptor requires association of apoE with lipid in a vesicle or a lipoprotein particle. Because of this requirement, purified apoE or apoE derived directly from bacterial expression systems does not bind to the LDL receptor. To overcome this problem and to facilitate analysis of apoE structure, recombinant baculoviruses containing the human apoE cDNA fused to the polyhedrin promoter of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus were constructed. The recombinant viruses were used to infect larvae of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta in vivo. High levels of lipoprotein particles containing human apoE were present in the hemolymph of infected larvae. In contrast to apoE produced by recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells in vitro, these particles were excellent ligands for the LDL receptor. Images PMID:1924311

  15. [PCSK9: Structure and function. PCSK9 and low-density lipoprotein receptor. Mutations and their effects].

    PubMed

    Pedro-Botet, Juan; Badimón, Lina

    2016-05-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) binds to the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) and then targets it for lysosomal degradation in cells, thus preventing LDLr from recycling back to the hepatocyte surface, with a consequent decrease in LDLr density and clearance of LDL-cholesterol (LDLc). There have been reports of both gain-of-function mutations in the PCSK9 gene that cause a marked increase in LDLc conentrations and loss-of-function mutations, which lead to modest reductions in LDLc and low rates of coronary heart disease. The PCSK9 gene has become a promising therapeutic target to reduce blood cholesterol levels. This review discusses the most interesting recent data on PCSK9 regulation and its molecular function in cholesterol homeostasis.

  16. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein promotes macrophage lipid accumulation via the toll-like receptor 4-Src pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke; Wang, Xiaoqun; Liu, Zhuhui; Lu, Lin; Mao, Jinyan; Meng, Hua; Wang, Yanan; Hu, Yong; Zeng, Ying; Zhang, Xiaojie; Chen, Qiujing; Liu, Yan; Shen, Weifeng

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) by macrophages is recognized as a crucial step in the development of atherosclerosis, whereas the precise molecular mechanisms involving it remain to be elucidated. This study focused on determining the role of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and Src kinase in macrophage lipid accumulation. oxLDL significantly enhanced Src kinase activity and intracellular lipid contents in RAW264.7 macrophages, whereas the small interference RNA-mediated knockdown of TLR4 and Src or chemical inhibition of Src activity blocked oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that TLR4 was associated with Src on the plasma membrane upon oxLDL stimulation. The results of the present study suggest an essential role of TLR4-Src signaling in macrophages in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  17. Vaccination with recombinant adenoviruses expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein elicits protection in the interferon alpha/beta receptor knock-out mouse.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Lyn M; Stokes, Margaret G; Lonsdale, Stephen G; Maslowski, David R; Smither, Sophie J; Lever, Mark S; Laws, Thomas R; Perkins, Stuart D

    2014-03-01

    The resistance of adult immunocompetent mice to infection with ebolaviruses has led to the development of alternative small animal models that utilise immunodeficient mice, for example the interferon α/β receptor knock-out mouse (IFNR(-/-)). IFNR(-/-) mice have been shown to be susceptible to infection with ebolaviruses by multiple routes but it is not known if this murine model is suitable for testing therapeutics that rely on the generation of an immune response for efficacy. We have tested recombinant adenovirus vectors for their ability to protect IFNR(-/-) mice from challenge with Ebola virus and have analysed the humoral response generated after immunisation. The recombinant vaccines elicited good levels of protection in the knock-out mouse and the antibody response in IFNR(-/-) mice was similar to that observed in vaccinated wild-type mice. These results indicate that the IFNR(-/-) mouse is a relevant small animal model for studying ebolavirus-specific therapeutics.

  18. Low density lipoprotein receptor-binding activity in human tissues: Quantitative importance of hepatic receptors and evidence for regulation of their expression in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rudling, M.J. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm ); Reihner, E.; Einarsson, K.; Ewerth, S.; Angelin, B. )

    1990-05-01

    The heparin-sensitive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to homogenates from 18 different normal human tissues and some solid tumors was determined. The binding to adrenal and liver homogenates fulfilled criteria established for the binding of LDL to its receptor--namely, (i) saturability, (ii) sensitivity to proteolytic destruction, (iii) inhibition by EDTA, and (iv) heat sensitivity. When the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled LDL was assayed at a constant concentration, the adrenal gland and the ovary had the highest binding of normal tissues. The highest binding per g of tissue overall was obtained in homogenates of a gastric carcinoma and a parotid adenoma. When the weights of the parenchymatous organs were considered, the major amount of LDL receptors was contained in the liver. To study the possible regulation of hepatic LDL-receptor expression, 11 patients were pretreated with cholestyramine. Increased binding activity was obtained in homogenates from liver biopsies from the cholestyramine-treated patients as compared with 12 untreated controls. It is concluded that the liver is the most important organ for LDL catabolism in humans and that the receptor activity in this organ can be regulated upon pharmacologic intervention. Further studies are needed to confirm the possibility that certain solid tumors can exhibit high numbers of LDL receptors.

  19. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor inhibition by an apolipoprotein E-derived peptide relies on low-density lipoprotein receptor-associated protein

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhenyu; Prorok, Mary; Brown, Brigid E.; Castellino, Francis J.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a synthetic apoE1 peptide, viz., residues 133–149 (apoE[133–149]), a mimetic that comprises the apoE receptor-binding domain, on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)/glycine-induced ion flow through NMDA receptor (NMDAR) channels, has been investigated. The activity of apoE[133–149] was found to depend on the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). Competition experiments with receptor associated protein (RAP) and activated α2macroglobulin (α2M*), two proteins that compete for apoE binding to LRP, demonstrate that apoE[133–149] inhibition of NMDAR function is mediated at a locus in LRP that overlaps with the binding sites of RAP and α2M*. A co-receptor of LRP, cell-surface heparin sulfate proteoglycan, did not function in this system. Additional electrophysiology experiments demonstrated that the inhibitory potency of apoE[133–149] was 3-fold greater for NMDAR-transfected wild-type Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO) cells compared with NMDAR-transfected CHO cells deficient in LRP. Studies with truncation and replacement variants of the apoE peptide demonstrated that the NMDAR-inhibitory properties of these peptides correlate with their binding affinities for LRP. These novel results indicate that apoE functions as an inhibitor of NMDAR ion channels indirectly via LRP, and are suggestive of a participatory role for LRP in NMDAR-based neuropathies. PMID:18602124

  20. Anorexia and cachexia in prostaglandin EP1 and EP3 subtype receptor knockout mice bearing a tumor with high intrinsic PGE2 production and prostaglandin related cachexia.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Andersson, M; Lönnroth, C; Svanberg, E; Lundholm, K

    2005-03-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have suggested that prostaglandin (PG) E2 is involved in anorexia/cachexia development in MCG 101 tumor-bearing mice. However, the role of COX pathways in the pathogenesis of cancer anorexia/cachexia is not fully resolved. In the present study, we investigated the role of PGE receptors subtype EP1 and EP3 on the development of anorexia in MCG 101-bearing mice. Our results show that the absence of host EP1 or EP3 receptors did not alter the magnitude of anorexia in tumor-bearers. However, anorexia in tumor-bearing EP1 and EP3 knockouts was not improved by indomethacin treatment as observed in wild type tumor-bearers. By contrast, indomethacin improved body composition similar in EP1 and EP3 knockouts as well as in wild type tumor-bearing animals and tumor growth was retarded in EP1 and promoted in EP3 knock outs. Our results demonstrate that host EP1 and EP3 receptors are involved in the control of local tumor growth, which translates into anorexia, this being the main cause of metabolic adaptive alterations to explain weight loss in this model. Brain EP1 and EP3 subtype receptors do not seem to directly control anorexia, which leaves EP2 and EP4 as potential candidates.

  1. Modulation of hepatic apolipoprotein B, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor mRNA and plasma lipoprotein concentrations by defined dietary fats. Comparison of trimyristin, tripalmitin, tristearin and triolein.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, A J; Billett, M A; Salter, A M; Mangiapane, E H; Bruce, J S; Anderton, K L; Marenah, C B; Lawson, N; White, D A

    1995-01-01

    Different dietary fatty acids exert specific effects on plasma lipids but the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Hamsters were fed on low-cholesterol diets containing triacylglycerols enriched in specific saturated fatty acids, and effects on plasma lipids and the expression of genes involved in hepatic lipoprotein metabolism were measured. Trimyristin and tripalmitin caused significant rises in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol which were accompanied by significant reductions in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. Tripalmitin also increased hepatic expression of the apolipoprotein B gene, implying an increased production of LDL via very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and decreased removal of LDL in animals fed this fat. Hepatic levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA did not vary significantly between the groups. Compared with triolein, tristearin had little effect on hepatic gene expression or total plasma cholesterol. However, it caused a marked decrease in VLDL cholesterol and a rise in LDL cholesterol such that overall it appeared to be neutral. Lipid analysis suggested a rapid desaturation of much of the dietary stearate. The differential changes in plasma lipids and hepatic mRNA levels induced by specific dietary fats suggests a role for fatty acids or a metabolite thereof in the regulation of the expression of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism. PMID:7575449

  2. Characterization of the role of EGF-A of low density lipoprotein receptor in PCSK9 binding

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hong-mei; Adijiang, Ayinuer; Mah, Matthew; Zhang, Da-wei

    2013-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin-like 9 (PCSK9) promotes the degradation of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and plays an important role in regulating plasma LDL-cholesterol levels. We have shown that the epidermal growth factor precursor homology domain A (EGF-A) of the LDLR is critical for PCSK9 binding at the cell surface (pH 7.4). Here, we further characterized the role of EGF-A in binding of PCSK9 to the LDLR. We found that PCSK9 efficiently bound to the LDLR but not to other LDLR family members. Replacement of EGF-A in the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) with EGF-A of the LDLR promoted the degradation of the mutant VLDLR induced by PCSK9. Furthermore, we found that PCSK9 bound to recombinant EGF-A in a pH-dependent manner with stronger binding at pH 6.0. We also identified amino acid residues in EGF-A of the LDLR important for PCSK9 binding. Mutations G293H, D299V, L318D, and L318H reduced PCSK9 binding to the LDLR at neutral pH without effect at pH 6.0, while mutations R329P and E332G reduced PCSK9 binding at both pH values. Thus, our findings reveal that EGF-A of the LDLR is critical for PCSK9 binding at the cell surface (neutral pH) and at the acidic endosomal environment (pH 6.0), but different determinants contribute to efficient PCSK9 binding in different pH environments. PMID:24103783

  3. Characterization of the role of EGF-A of low density lipoprotein receptor in PCSK9 binding.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hong-mei; Adijiang, Ayinuer; Mah, Matthew; Zhang, Da-wei

    2013-12-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin-like 9 (PCSK9) promotes the degradation of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and plays an important role in regulating plasma LDL-cholesterol levels. We have shown that the epidermal growth factor precursor homology domain A (EGF-A) of the LDLR is critical for PCSK9 binding at the cell surface (pH 7.4). Here, we further characterized the role of EGF-A in binding of PCSK9 to the LDLR. We found that PCSK9 efficiently bound to the LDLR but not to other LDLR family members. Replacement of EGF-A in the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) with EGF-A of the LDLR promoted the degradation of the mutant VLDLR induced by PCSK9. Furthermore, we found that PCSK9 bound to recombinant EGF-A in a pH-dependent manner with stronger binding at pH 6.0. We also identified amino acid residues in EGF-A of the LDLR important for PCSK9 binding. Mutations G293H, D299V, L318D, and L318H reduced PCSK9 binding to the LDLR at neutral pH without effect at pH 6.0, while mutations R329P and E332G reduced PCSK9 binding at both pH values. Thus, our findings reveal that EGF-A of the LDLR is critical for PCSK9 binding at the cell surface (neutral pH) and at the acidic endosomal environment (pH 6.0), but different determinants contribute to efficient PCSK9 binding in different pH environments.

  4. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C l...

  5. Low-density lipoprotein receptor represents an apolipoprotein E-independent pathway of Aβ uptake and degradation by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Basak, Jacob M; Verghese, Philip B; Yoon, Hyejin; Kim, Jungsu; Holtzman, David M

    2012-04-20

    Accumulation of the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide within the brain is hypothesized to be one of the main causes underlying the pathogenic events that occur in Alzheimer disease (AD). Consequently, identifying pathways by which Aβ is cleared from the brain is crucial for better understanding of the disease pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutics. Cellular uptake and degradation by glial cells is one means by which Aβ may be cleared from the brain. In the current study, we demonstrate that modulating levels of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), a cell surface receptor that regulates the amount of apolipoprotein E (apoE) in the brain, altered both the uptake and degradation of Aβ by astrocytes. Deletion of LDLR caused a decrease in Aβ uptake, whereas increasing LDLR levels significantly enhanced both the uptake and clearance of Aβ. Increasing LDLR levels also enhanced the cellular degradation of Aβ and facilitated the vesicular transport of Aβ to lysosomes. Despite the fact that LDLR regulated the uptake of apoE by astrocytes, we found that the effect of LDLR on Aβ uptake and clearance occurred in the absence of apoE. Finally, we provide evidence that Aβ can directly bind to LDLR, suggesting that an interaction between LDLR and Aβ could be responsible for LDLR-mediated Aβ uptake. Therefore, these results identify LDLR as a receptor that mediates Aβ uptake and clearance by astrocytes, and provide evidence that increasing glial LDLR levels may promote Aβ degradation within the brain.

  6. Prickly pear (Opuntia sp.) pectin reverses low density lipoprotein receptor suppression induced by a hypercholesterolemic diet in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M L; Lin, E C; Trejo, A; McNamara, D J

    1992-12-01

    The effects of prickly pear pectin on plasma LDL metabolism were investigated by feeding guinea pigs either a diet containing 15 g/100 g lard and 0.25 g/100 g cholesterol (LC diet) or the LC diet in which cellulose was partially replaced (2.5 g/100 g) by prickly pear pectin (LC-P diet). The LC-P diet lowered plasma LDL cholesterol concentrations by 33% (P < 0.001). Low density lipoprotein composition was modified by intake of prickly pear pectin; the relative percentages of free and esterified cholesterol were lower and triglycerides were higher in LDL from animals fed the LC-P diet (P < 0.05). Intake of prickly pear pectin did not affect hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity; however, hepatic free and esterified cholesterol concentrations were lowered by 46 and 64%, respectively. Hepatic apolipoprotein B/E receptor expression (Bmax) was 60% higher in animals fed the LC-P diet (P < 0.01). Similar to the in vitro data, receptor-mediated LDL fractional catabolic rates were 190% higher in animals fed the LC-P diet (P < 0.05), whereas apolipoprotein LDL flux rates were not affected. Apolipoprotein LDL pool size and fractional catabolic rates exhibited a significant correlation (r = -0.52, P < 0.01). These data indicate that an increase in apolipoprotein B/E receptor expression is a major metabolic response by which intake of prickly pear pectin decreases plasma LDL concentrations.

  7. Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor Represents an Apolipoprotein E-independent Pathway of Aβ Uptake and Degradation by Astrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Jacob M.; Verghese, Philip B.; Yoon, Hyejin; Kim, Jungsu; Holtzman, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide within the brain is hypothesized to be one of the main causes underlying the pathogenic events that occur in Alzheimer disease (AD). Consequently, identifying pathways by which Aβ is cleared from the brain is crucial for better understanding of the disease pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutics. Cellular uptake and degradation by glial cells is one means by which Aβ may be cleared from the brain. In the current study, we demonstrate that modulating levels of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), a cell surface receptor that regulates the amount of apolipoprotein E (apoE) in the brain, altered both the uptake and degradation of Aβ by astrocytes. Deletion of LDLR caused a decrease in Aβ uptake, whereas increasing LDLR levels significantly enhanced both the uptake and clearance of Aβ. Increasing LDLR levels also enhanced the cellular degradation of Aβ and facilitated the vesicular transport of Aβ to lysosomes. Despite the fact that LDLR regulated the uptake of apoE by astrocytes, we found that the effect of LDLR on Aβ uptake and clearance occurred in the absence of apoE. Finally, we provide evidence that Aβ can directly bind to LDLR, suggesting that an interaction between LDLR and Aβ could be responsible for LDLR-mediated Aβ uptake. Therefore, these results identify LDLR as a receptor that mediates Aβ uptake and clearance by astrocytes, and provide evidence that increasing glial LDLR levels may promote Aβ degradation within the brain. PMID:22383525

  8. Silencing Triggering Receptors Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 Impaired the Inflammatory Response to Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Houxuan; Hong, Feifei; Pan, Shengbo; Lei, Lang; Yan, Fuhua

    2016-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of lipid contents in arterial walls. Previous studies suggest participation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in lipid deposition and inflammatory response in vascular wall. The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) is a cell surface receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which amplifies signal transduction of TLR pathway and enhances immune response to microbial infections. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) on the expression of the TREM-1, as well as its engagement in proinflammatory cytokine production and foam cell formation in RAW264.7 mice macrophages. oxLDL enhanced TREM-1 and TLR-4, but not TLR-2 gene expression in macrophages; furthermore, silencing TREM-1 expression by short hairpin interfering RNA inhibited lipid phagocytosis and proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in macrophages; moreover, application of synthetic antagonist, LP-17 polypeptide, reduced IL-6 production upon oxLDL stimulation in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, in macrophages, oxLDL enhanced expression of TREM-1, which amplifies the innate immune response of TLR pathway; activation of TREM-1 contributes to atherogenesis process by enhancing proinflammatory cytokine production and foam cell formation.

  9. Altered sleep-wake characteristics and lack of arousal response to H3 receptor antagonist in histamine H1 receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi-Li; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Qu, Wei-Min; Hong, Zong-Yuan; Watanabe, Takeshi; Urade, Yoshihiro; Hayaishi, Osamu

    2006-03-21

    Histaminergic neurons play an important role in the regulation of sleep-wake behavior through histamine H(1) receptors (H(1)R). Blockade of the histamine H(3) receptor (H(3)R) is proposed to induce wakefulness by regulating the release of various wake-related transmitters, not only histamine. In the present study, we characterized sleep-wake cycles of H(1)R knockout (KO) mice and their arousal responses to an H(3)R antagonist. Under baseline conditions, H(1)R KO mice showed sleep-wake cycles essentially identical to those of WT mice but with fewer incidents of brief awakening (<16-sec epoch), prolonged durations of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep episodes, a decreased number of state transitions between NREM sleep and wakefulness, and a shorter latency for initiating NREM sleep after an i.p. injection of saline. The H(1)R antagonist pyrilamine mimicked these effects in WT mice. When an H(3)R antagonist, ciproxifan, was administered i.p., wakefulness increased in WT mice in a dose-dependent manner but did not increase at all in H(1)R KO mice. In vivo microdialysis revealed that the i.p. application of ciproxifan increased histamine release from the frontal cortex in both genotypes of mice. These results indicate that H(1)R is involved in the regulation of behavioral state transitions from NREM sleep to wakefulness and that the arousal effect of the H(3)R antagonist completely depends on the activation of histaminergic systems through H(1)R.

  10. Antinociceptive and hypothermic effects of Salvinorin A are abolished in a novel strain of kappa-opioid receptor-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ansonoff, Michael A; Zhang, Jiwen; Czyzyk, Traci; Rothman, Richard B; Stewart, Jeremy; Xu, Heng; Zjwiony, Jordan; Siebert, Daniel J; Yang, Feng; Roth, Bryan L; Pintar, John E

    2006-08-01

    Salvia divinorum is a natural occurring hallucinogen that is traditionally used by the Mazatec Indians of central Mexico. The diterpene salvinorin A was identified as an active component of S. divinorum over 20 years ago, but only recently has biochemical screening indicated that a molecular target of salvinorin A in vitro is the kappa-opioid receptor. We have examined whether salvinorin A, the C2-substituted derivative salvinorinyl-2-propionate, and salvinorin B can act as kappa-opioid receptor agonists in vivo. We found that following intracerebroventricular injection over a dose range of 1 to 30 microg of both salvinorin A and salvinorinyl-2-propionate produces antinociception in wild-type mice but not in a novel strain of kappa-opioid receptor knockout mice. Moreover, both salvinorin A and salvinorinyl-2-propionate reduce rectal body temperature, similar to conventional kappa-opioid receptor agonists, in a genotype-dependent manner. In addition, we determined that salvinorin A has high affinity for kappa 1- but not kappa 2-opioid receptors, demonstrating selectivity for this receptor subclass. Finally, treatment over the same dose range with salvinorin B, which is inactive in vitro, produced neither antinociceptive nor hypothermic effects in wild-type mice. These data demonstrate that salvinorin A is the active component of S. divinorum, selective for kappa(1)-opioid receptors, and that salvinorin A and specific structurally related analogs produce behavioral effects that require the kappa-opioid receptor.

  11. Knockout of Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 Prevents Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trentin-Sonoda, Mayra; da Silva, Rogério Cirino; Kmit, Fernanda Vieira; Abrahão, Mariana Vieira; Monnerat Cahli, Gustavo; Brasil, Guilherme Visconde; Muzi-Filho, Humberto; Silva, Paulo André; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda Freire; Vieyra, Adalberto; Medei, Emiliano; Carneiro-Ramos, Marcela Sorelli

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether the pathways linked to Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLRs) are involved in renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Wild type (WT) C57BL/6J, TLR2-/- and TLR4-/- mice were subjected to left kidney ischemia for 60 min followed by reperfusion for 5, 8, 12 and 15 days. Proton density magnetic resonance showed alterations in the injured kidney from WT mice, together with signs of parenchymal edema and higher levels of vimentin mRNA, accompanied by: (i) small, but significant, increase in serum urea after 24 h, (ii) 100% increase in serum creatinine at 24 h. A serum peak of inflammatory cytokines occurred after 5 days of reperfusion. Heart weight/body weight and heart weight/tibia length ratios increased after 12 and 15 days of reperfusion, respectively. Cardiac hypertrophy markers, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and α-actin, left ventricle mass, cardiac wall thickness and myocyte width increased after 15 days of reperfusion, together with longer QTc and action potential duration. Cardiac TLRs, MyD88, HSP60 and HSP70 mRNA levels also increased. After 15 days of reperfusion, absence of TLRs prevented cardiac hypertrophy, as reflected by similar values of left ventricular cardiac mass and heart weight/body weight ratio compared to the transgenic Sham. Renal tissular injury also ameliorated in both knockout mice, as revealed by the comparison of their vimentin mRNA levels with those found in the WT on the same day after I/R. The I/R TLR2-/- group had TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-1β levels similar to the non-I/R group, whereas the TLR4-/- group conserved the p-NF-κB/NF- κB ratio contrasting with that found in TLR2-/-. We conclude: (i) TLRs are involved in renal I/R-induced cardiac hypertrophy; (ii) absence of TLRs prevents I/R-induced cardiac hypertrophy, despite renal lesions seeming to evolve towards those of chronic disease; (iii) TLR2 and TLR4 selectively regulate the systemic inflammatory profile and NF- κB activation. PMID

  12. Knockout of Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 Prevents Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Trentin-Sonoda, Mayra; da Silva, Rogério Cirino; Kmit, Fernanda Vieira; Abrahão, Mariana Vieira; Monnerat Cahli, Gustavo; Brasil, Guilherme Visconde; Muzi-Filho, Humberto; Silva, Paulo André; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda Freire; Vieyra, Adalberto; Medei, Emiliano; Carneiro-Ramos, Marcela Sorelli

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether the pathways linked to Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLRs) are involved in renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Wild type (WT) C57BL/6J, TLR2-/- and TLR4-/- mice were subjected to left kidney ischemia for 60 min followed by reperfusion for 5, 8, 12 and 15 days. Proton density magnetic resonance showed alterations in the injured kidney from WT mice, together with signs of parenchymal edema and higher levels of vimentin mRNA, accompanied by: (i) small, but significant, increase in serum urea after 24 h, (ii) 100% increase in serum creatinine at 24 h. A serum peak of inflammatory cytokines occurred after 5 days of reperfusion. Heart weight/body weight and heart weight/tibia length ratios increased after 12 and 15 days of reperfusion, respectively. Cardiac hypertrophy markers, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and α-actin, left ventricle mass, cardiac wall thickness and myocyte width increased after 15 days of reperfusion, together with longer QTc and action potential duration. Cardiac TLRs, MyD88, HSP60 and HSP70 mRNA levels also increased. After 15 days of reperfusion, absence of TLRs prevented cardiac hypertrophy, as reflected by similar values of left ventricular cardiac mass and heart weight/body weight ratio compared to the transgenic Sham. Renal tissular injury also ameliorated in both knockout mice, as revealed by the comparison of their vimentin mRNA levels with those found in the WT on the same day after I/R. The I/R TLR2-/- group had TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-1β levels similar to the non-I/R group, whereas the TLR4-/- group conserved the p-NF-κB/NF- κB ratio contrasting with that found in TLR2-/-. We conclude: (i) TLRs are involved in renal I/R-induced cardiac hypertrophy; (ii) absence of TLRs prevents I/R-induced cardiac hypertrophy, despite renal lesions seeming to evolve towards those of chronic disease; (iii) TLR2 and TLR4 selectively regulate the systemic inflammatory profile and NF- κB activation.

  13. Modification of female and male social behaviors in estrogen receptor beta knockout mice by neonatal maternal separation

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Mumeko C.; Yamaguchi, Naoko; Nakata, Mariko; Ogawa, Sonoko

    2014-01-01

    Maternal separation (MS) is an animal model mimicking the effects of early life stress on the development of emotional and social behaviors. Recent studies revealed that MS stress increased social anxiety levels in female mice and reduced peri-pubertal aggression in male mice. Estrogen receptor (ER) β plays a pivotal role in the regulation of stress responses and anxiety-related and social behaviors. Behavioral studies using ERβ knockout (βERKO) mice reported increased social investigation and decreased social anxiety in βERKO females, and elevated aggression levels in βERKO males compared to wild-type (WT) mice. In the present study, using βERKO and WT mice, we examined whether ERβ contributes to MS effects on anxiety and social behaviors. βERKO and WT mice were separated from their dam daily (4 h) from postnatal day 1–14 and control groups were left undisturbed. First, MS and ERβ gene deletion individually increased anxiety-related behaviors in the open field test, but only in female mice. Anxiety levels were not further modified in βERKO female mice subjected to MS stress. Second, βERKO female mice showed higher levels of social investigation compared with WT in the social investigation test and long-term social preference test. However, MS greatly reduced social investigation duration and elevated number of stretched approaches in WT and βERKO females in the social investigation test, suggesting elevated levels of social anxiety in both genotypes. Third, peri-pubertal and adult βERKO male mice were more aggressive than WT mice as indicated by heightened aggression duration. On the other hand, MS significantly decreased aggression duration in both genotypes, but only in peri-pubertal male mice. Altogether, these results suggest that βERKO mice are sensitive to the adverse effects of MS stress on subsequent female and male social behaviors, which could then have overrode the ERβ effects on female social anxiety and male aggression. PMID:25228857

  14. Very low density lipoprotein receptor promotes adipocyte differentiation and mediates the proadipogenic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists.

    PubMed

    Tao, Huan; Hajri, Tahar

    2011-12-15

    Very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) is a member of the low density receptor family, expressed mostly in adipose tissue, heart, and skeletal muscles. VLDLR binds apolipoprotein-E-triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and plays a key role in lipid metabolism. In adipocytes, VLDLR expression increases with differentiation but it is not known whether it plays a role in the adipogenesis. Here we report that VLDLR expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes is upregulated by PPARγ agonist 15-deoxy-delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) in dose- and time-dependant manners. Knockdown of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) with siRNA abolished pioglitazone- and 15d-PGJ(2)-induced VLDLR expression and simultaneously reduced VLDL uptake in adipocytes. In addition, PPARγ-agonist treatment of control mouse adipocytes (vldlr(+/+)) enhanced adipogenesis and VLDL uptake concurrently with the induction of VLDLR expression. However, vldlr deficiency (vldlr(-/-)) significantly blunted the proadipogenic effects of PPARγ agonists. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of a putative PPARγ responsive sequence (PPRE) within the vldlr promoter, which is responsive to natural (15d-PGJ(2)) and synthetic (pioglitazone) PPARγ agonists. Reporter gene assays using serial deletion of the 5'-flanking region showed that this putative PPRE site induced promoter transactivation, while a site-targeted mutation abolished transactivation. Moreover, electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatic immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed the specific binding of PPARγ to the PPRE sequence. Together, these results support a crucial function for VLDLR in adipocyte differentiation and mediation of the proadipogenic effect of PPARγ. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Human degenerative valve disease is associated with up-regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 receptor-mediated bone formation.

    PubMed

    Caira, Frank C; Stock, Stuart R; Gleason, Thomas G; McGee, Edwin C; Huang, Jie; Bonow, Robert O; Spelsberg, Thomas C; McCarthy, Patrick M; Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H; Rajamannan, Nalini M

    2006-04-18

    The goal of this research was to define the cellular mechanisms involved in myxomatous mitral valve disease and calcific aortic valve disease and to redefine the term degenerative valve disease in terms of an active cellular biology. "Degenerative" valvular heart disease is the primary cause of regurgitant and stenotic valvular lesion in the U.S. However, the signaling pathways are not known. We hypothesize that valve degeneration occurs due to an osteoblastic differentiation process mediated by the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5) signaling pathway to cause valve thickening. We examined human diseased valves: myxomatous mitral valves (n = 23), calcified tricuspid aortic valves (n = 27), calcified bicuspid aortic valves (n = 23), and control tissue from mitral and aortic valves (n = 40). The valves were examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry for signaling markers important in osteoblast differentiation: Sox9 and Cbfa1 (transcription factors for osteoblast differentiation); Lrp5 and Wnt3 (osteoblast differentiation signaling marker), osteopontin and osteocalcin (osteoblast endochrondral bone matrix proteins), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (a marker of cell proliferation). Cartilage development and bone formation was measured by Alcian blue stain and Alizarin red stain. Computed Scano MicroCT-40 (Bassersdorf, Switzerland) analysis measured calcium burden. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5, osteocalcin, and other osteochrondrogenic differentiation markers were increased in the calcified aortic valves by protein and gene expression (p > 0.001). Sox9, Lrp5 receptor, and osteocalcin were increased in myxomatous mitral valves by protein and gene expression (p > 0.001). MicroCT was positive in the calcified aortic valves and negative in the myxomatous mitral valves. The mechanism of valvular heart disease involves an endochondral bone process that is expressed as

  16. MicroRNA-144 regulates hepatic ATP binding cassette transporter A1 and plasma high-density lipoprotein after activation of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q; Tarling, Elizabeth J; Kim, Tammy; Civelek, Mete; Baldán, Ángel; Esau, Christine; Edwards, Peter A

    2013-06-07

    The bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates many aspects of lipid metabolism by variouscomplex and incompletely understood molecular mechanisms. We set out to investigate the molecular mechanisms for FXR-dependent regulation of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. To identify FXR-regulated microRNAs that were subsequently involved in regulating lipid metabolism. ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a major determinant of plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels. Here, we show that activation of the nuclear receptor FXR in vivo increases hepatic levels of miR-144, which in turn lowers hepatic ABCA1 and plasma HDL levels. We identified 2 complementary sequences to miR-144 in the 3' untranslated region of ABCA1 mRNA that are necessary for miR-144-dependent regulation. Overexpression of miR-144 in vitro decreased both cellular ABCA1 protein and cholesterol efflux to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I protein, whereas overexpression in vivo reduced hepatic ABCA1 protein and plasma HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, silencing miR-144 in mice increased hepatic ABCA1 protein and HDL-cholesterol. In addition, we used tissue-specific FXR-deficient mice to show that induction of miR-144 and FXR-dependent hypolipidemia requires hepatic, but not intestinal, FXR. Finally, we identified functional FXR response elements upstream of the miR-144 locus, consistent with direct FXR regulation. We have identified a novel pathway involving FXR, miR-144, and ABCA1 that together regulate plasma HDL-cholesterol.

  17. Enhanced effects of amphetamine but reduced effects of the hallucinogen, 5-MeO-DMT, on locomotor activity in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice: implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    van den Buuse, Maarten; Ruimschotel, Emma; Martin, Sally; Risbrough, Victoria B; Halberstadt, Adam L

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin-1A (5-HT(1A)) receptors may play a role in schizophrenia and the effects of certain antipsychotic drugs. However, the mechanism of interaction of 5-HT(1A) receptors with brain systems involved in schizophrenia, remains unclear. Here we show that 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice display enhanced locomotor hyperactivity to acute treatment with amphetamine, a widely used animal model of hyperdopaminergic mechanisms in psychosis. In contrast, the effect of MK-801 on locomotor activity, modeling NMDA receptor hypoactivity, was unchanged in the knockouts. The effect of the hallucinogen 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) was markedly reduced in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice. There were no changes in apomorphine-induced disruption of PPI, a model of sensory gating deficits seen in schizophrenia. Similarly, there were no major changes in density of dopamine transporters (DAT) or dopamine D(1) or D(2) receptors which could explain the behavioural changes observed in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice. These results extend our insight into the possible role of these receptors in aspects of schizophrenia. As also suggested by previous studies using agonist and antagonist drugs, 5-HT(1A) receptors may play an important role in hallucinations and to modulate dopaminergic activity in the brain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Proteins in a Novel Mechanism of Axon Guidance and Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Landowski, Lila M; Pavez, Macarena; Brown, Lachlan S; Gasperini, Robert; Taylor, Bruce V; West, Adrian K; Foa, Lisa

    2016-01-15

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein receptors 1 and 2 (LRP1 and LRP2) are emerging as important cell signaling mediators in modulating neuronal growth and repair. We examined whether LRP1 and LRP2 are able to mediate a specific aspect of neuronal growth: axon guidance. We sought to identify LRP1 and LRP2 ligands that could induce axonal chemoattraction, which might have therapeutic potential. Using embryonic sensory neurons (rat dorsal root ganglia) in a growth cone turning assay, we tested a range of LRP1 and LRP2 ligands for the ability to guide growth cone navigation. Three ligands were chemorepulsive: α-2-macroglobulin, tissue plasminogen activator, and metallothionein III. Conversely, only one LRP ligand, metallothionein II, was found to be chemoattractive. Chemoattraction toward a gradient of metallothionein II was calcium-dependent, required the expression of both LRP1 and LRP2, and likely involves further co-receptors such as the tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) receptor. The potential for LRP-mediated chemoattraction to mediate axonal regeneration was examined in vivo in a model of chemical denervation in adult rats. In these in vivo studies, metallothionein II was shown to enhance epidermal nerve fiber regeneration so that it was complete within 7 days compared with 14 days in saline-treated animals. Our data demonstrate that both LRP1 and LRP2 are necessary for metallothionein II-mediated chemotactic signal transduction and that they may form part of a signaling complex. Furthermore, the data suggest that LRP-mediated chemoattraction represents a novel, non-classical signaling system that has therapeutic potential as a disease-modifying agent for the injured peripheral nervous system.

  19. Targeting mannose receptor expression on macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques of apolipoprotein E-knockout mice using (111)In-tilmanocept.

    PubMed

    Varasteh, Zohreh; Hyafil, Fabien; Anizan, Nadège; Diallo, Devy; Aid-Launais, Rachida; Mohanta, Sarajo; Li, Yuanfang; Braeuer, Miriam; Steiger, Katja; Vigne, Jonathan; Qin, Zhengtao; Nekolla, Stephan G; Fabre, Jean-Etienne; Döring, Yvonne; Le Guludec, Dominique; Habenicht, Andreas; Vera, David R; Schwaiger, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque phenotypes are classified based on the extent of macrophage infiltration into the lesions, and the presence of certain macrophage subsets might be a sign for plaque vulnerability. The mannose receptor (MR) is over-expressed in activated macrophages. Tilmanocept is a tracer that targets MR and is approved in Europe and the USA for the detection of sentinel lymph nodes. In this study, our aim was to evaluate the potential of (111)In-labelled tilmanocept for the detection of MR-positive macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques of apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE-KO) mouse model. Tilmanocept was labelled with (111)In. The labelling stability and biodistribution of the tracer was first evaluated in control mice (n = 10) 1 h post injection (p.i.). For in vivo imaging studies, (111)In-tilmanocept was injected into ApoE-KO (n = 8) and control (n = 8) mice intravenously (i.v.). The mice were scanned 90 min p.i. using a dedicated animal SPECT/CT. For testing the specificity of (111)In-tilmanocept uptake in plaques, a group of ApoE-KO mice was co-injected with excess amount of non-labelled tilmanocept. For ex vivo imaging studies, the whole aortas (n = 9 from ApoE-KO and n = 4 from control mice) were harvested free from adventitial tissue for Sudan IV staining and autoradiography. Cryosections were prepared for immunohistochemistry (IHC). (111)In radiolabelling of tilmanocept provided a yield of greater than 99%. After i.v. injection, (111)In-tilmanocept accumulated in vivo in MR-expressing organs (i.e. liver and spleen) and showed only low residual blood signal 1 h p.i. MR-binding specificity in receptor-positive organs was demonstrated by a 1.5- to 3-fold reduced uptake of (111)In-tilmanocept after co-injection of a blocking dose of non-labelled tilmanocept. Focal signal was detected in atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE-KO mice, whereas no signal was detected in the aortas of control mice. (111)In-tilmanocept uptake was detected in

  20. Research tool: Validation of floxed α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor conditional knockout mice using in vitro and in vivo approaches.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Caterina M; Cortez, Ibdanelo; Gu, Zhenglin; Colón-Sáez, José O; Lamb, Patricia W; Wakamiya, Maki; Yakel, Jerrel L; Dineley, Kelly T

    2014-08-01

    There is much interest in α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in CNS function since they are found throughout peripheral tissues as well as being highly expressed in brain regions implicated in attention, learning and memory. As such, the role of these receptors in many aspects of CNS function and disease is being actively investigated. To date, only one null mouse model (A7KO) is available which is non-conditional and constitutive. Since α7 nAChRs are present on neurons and glia (including astrocytes), as well as being developmentally regulated, there is an unmet need for the technical capability to control α7 nAChR gene expression. Therefore we have generated mice in which the fourth exon of the α7 nAChR gene (Chrna7) is flanked by loxP sites (B6-Chrna7(LBDEx4007Ehs)) which we refer to as floxed α7 nAChR conditional knockout or α7nAChR(flox). We validated the chosen approach by mating α7nAChR(flox) with mice expressing Cre recombinase driven by the glial acidic fibrillary protein (GFAP)-Cre promoter (GFAP-A7KO) to test whether α7nAChR(flox), GFAP-A7KO and appropriate littermate controls performed equally in our standard Rodent In Vivo Assessment Core battery to assess general health, locomotion, emotional and cognitive behaviours. Neither α7nAChR(flox) nor GFAP-A7KO exhibited significant differences from littermate controls in any of the baseline behavioural assessments we conducted, similar to the 'first generation' non-conditional A7KO mice. We also determined that α7 nAChR binding sites were absent on GFAP-positive astrocytes in hippocampal slices obtained from GFAP-A7KO offspring from α7nAChR(flox) and GFAP-Cre crosses. Finally, we validated that Cre recombinase (Cre)-mediated excision led to functional, cell- and tissue-specific loss of α7 nAChRs by demonstrating that choline-induced α7 nAChR currents were present in Cre-negative, but not synapsin promoter-driven Cre-positive, CA1 pyramidal neurons. Additionally, electrophysiological

  1. Steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone regulation of the very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL) receptor phosphorylation for VHDL uptake.

    PubMed

    Dong, Du-Juan; Liu, Wen; Cai, Mei-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2013-04-01

    During the metamorphic stage of holometabolous insects, the biosynthetic precursors needed for the synthesis of a large number of adult proteins are acquired from the selective absorption of storage proteins. The very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL), a non-hexameric storage protein, is consumed by the fat body from the hemolymph through VHDL receptor (VHDL-R)-mediated endocytosis. However, the mechanism of the uptake of VHDL by a VHDL-R remains unclear. In this study, a VHDL-R from Helicoverpa armigera was found to be involved in 20E-regulated VHDL uptake through the regulation of steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). The transcripts of VHDL-R were detected mainly in the fat body and integument during the wandering stage. The transcription of VHDL-R was upregulated by 20E through the ecdysteroid receptor (EcRB1) and Ultraspiracle (USP1). In addition, 20E stimulates the phosphorylation of VHDL-R through protein kinase C for ligand binding. VHDL-R knockdown in larvae results the inhibition of development to adulthood. These data imply that 20E regulates VHDL-R on both transcriptional and posttranslational levels for VHDL absorption.

  2. Disrupted recycling of the low density lipoprotein receptor by PCSK9 is not mediated by residues of the cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Strøm, Thea Bismo; Holla, Øystein L; Tveten, Kristian; Cameron, Jamie; Berge, Knut Erik; Leren, Trond P

    2010-09-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) post-translationally regulates the number of cell-surface low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR). This is accomplished by the ability of PCSK9 to mediate degradation of the LDLR. The underlying mechanism involves binding of secreted PCSK9 to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A of the extracellular domain of the LDLR at the cell surface, followed by lysosomal degradation of the internalized LDLR:PCSK9 complex. However, the mechanism by which the normal recycling of the LDLR is disrupted by PCSK9, remains to be determined. In this study we have investigated the role of the cytoplasmic domain of the LDLR for this process. This has been done by studying the ability of a mutant LDLR (K811X-LDLR) which lacks the cytoplasmic domain, to be degraded by PCSK9. We show that this mutant receptor is degraded by PCSK9. Thus, the machinery which directs the LDLR:PCSK9 complex to the lysosomes for degradation, does not interact with the cytoplasmic domain of the LDLR.

  3. Bovine Lactoferrin Inhibits Dengue Virus Infectivity by Interacting with Heparan Sulfate, Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor, and DC-SIGN.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jo-Mei; Fan, Yi-Chin; Lin, Jen-Wei; Chen, Yi-Ying; Hsu, Wei-Li; Chiou, Shyan-Song

    2017-09-12

    Bovine lactoferrin (bLF) presents in milk and has been shown to inhibit several viral infections. Effective drugs are unavailable for the treatment of dengue virus (DENV) infection. In this study, we evaluated the antiviral effect of bLF against DENV infection in vivo and in vitro. Bovine LF significantly inhibited the infection of the four serotypes of DENV in Vero cells. In the time-of-drug addition test, DENV-2 infection was remarkably inhibited when bLF was added during or prior to the occurrence of virus attachment. We also revealed that bovine LF blocks binding between DENV-2 and the cellular membrane by interacting with heparan sulfate (HS), dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), and low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR). In addition, bLF inhibits DENV-2 infection and decreases morbidity in a suckling mouse challenge model. This study supports the finding that bLF may inhibit DENV infection by binding to the potential DENV receptors.

  4. Significance of the variant and full-length forms of the very low density lipoprotein receptor in brain.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Yamamoto, M; Kumamaru, E

    2001-12-20

    The very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) is a newly described receptor which binds to apolipoprotein E (apoE) specifically. The authors designed a synthetic peptide of 17 amino acids representing the N-terminus of the putative first ligand binding domain of human VLDLR, this being a unique domain for VLDLR. When the synthetic peptide was used as the antigen, two different monoclonal antibodies were obtained (anti-VLDLR1 and anti-VLDLR2). Expressional cloning revealed that anti-VLDLR1 recognized the variant form of VLDLR which lacks 84 bp of O-linked sugar domain and anti-VLDLR2 recognized the full length form of VLDLR. The variant VLDLR was expressed in neuroblasts as well as matrix cells and Cajal-Retzius cells in the early stages of the developing human brain; later its expression was sequentially found in glioblasts, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and finally in myelin. The expression of a full length form of VLDLR was detected in senile plaques and some neurons and satellite glia in aged and Alzheimer brains. This suggests that the variant VLDLR is important for the developing human brain and the full length VLDLR has modified functions in aged and Alzheimer brains.

  5. Pharmaceutical stabilization of mast cells attenuates experimental atherogenesis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Sjöberg, Sara; Tia, Viviane; Secco, Blandine; Chen, Han; Yang, Min; Sukhova, Galina K.; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) contribute to atherogenesis by releasing pro-inflammatory mediators to activate vascular cells and other inflammatory cells. This study examined whether MC activation or stabilization affects diet-induced atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr−/−) mice. When Ldlr−/− mice consumed an atherogenic diet for 3 or 6 months, MC activation with compound 48/80 (C48/80) increased aortic arch intima and total lesion areas, and plasma total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride levels, whereas MC stabilization with cromolyn reduced these parameters. There were significant differences in arch intima and total lesion areas, and plasma total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride levels between C48/80-treated and cromolyn-treated mice. To examine a therapeutic application of cromolyn in atherosclerosis, we fed Ldlr−/− mice an atherogenic diet for 3 months followed by giving mice cromolyn for additional 3 months. Cromolyn did not affect aortic arch intima area, but significantly reduced lipid deposition in the thoracic-abdominal aortas. In aortic arches, however, cromolyn treatment significantly reduced lesion contents of Mac-3+ macrophages, CD4+ T cells, activated MCs, and lesion cell proliferation. While plasma total cholesterol and LDL levels increased and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels decreased from 3 months to 6 months of an atherogenic diet, cromolyn treatment decreased significantly plasma total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride levels and increased HDL levels above those of 3-month time point. These observations demonstrate that MC stabilization reduces lesion inflammation, ameliorates plasma lipid profiles, and may serve as a potential therapy for this cardiovascular disease. PMID:23880180

  6. Interplay between basic residues of hepatitis C virus glycoprotein E2 with viral receptors, neutralizing antibodies and lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Koutsoudakis, George; Dragun, Jakub; Pérez-Del-Pulgar, Sofia; Coto-Llerena, Mairene; Mensa, Laura; Crespo, Gonzalo; González, Patricia; Navasa, Miquel; Forns, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Positively-charged amino acids are located at specific positions in the envelope glycoprotein E2 of the hepatitis C virus (HCV): two histidines (H) and four arginines (R) in two conserved WHY and one RGERCDLEDRDR motifs, respectively. Additionally, the E2 hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) is rich in basic amino acids. To investigate the role(s) of these residues in HCV entry, we subjected to comparative infection and sedimentation analysis cell culture-produced (HCVcc, genotype 2a) wild type virus, a panel of alanine single-site mutants and a HVR1-deletion variant. Initially, we analyzed the effects of these mutations on E2-heparan sulfate (HS) interactions. The positive milieu of the HVR1, formulated by its basic amino acids (key residues the conserved H³⁸⁶ and R⁴⁰⁸), and the two highly conserved basic residues H⁴⁸⁸ and R⁶⁴⁸ contributed to E2-HS interactions. Mutations in these residues did not alter the HCVcc-CD81 entry, but they modified the HCVcc-scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) dependent entry and the neutralization by anti-E2 or patients IgG. Finally, separation by density gradients revealed that mutant viruses abolished partially or completely the infectivity of low density particles, which are believed to be associated with lipoproteins. This study shows that there exists a complex interplay between the basic amino acids located in HVR1 and other conserved E2 motifs with the HS, the SR-BI, and neutralizing antibodies and suggests that HCV-associated lipoproteins are implicated in these interactions.

  7. Glycosaminoglycan-lipoprotein interaction.

    PubMed

    Olsson, U; Ostergren-Lundén, G; Moses, J

    2001-10-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) bound to various proteoglycans (PGs) present in the cardiovascular system have been proposed to perform a wide range of functions. These include conferring viscoelastic properties; interacting with and modulating growth factors and enzymes; and as receptors and co-receptors in lipoprotein metabolism. Binding of apoB-100 lipoproteins, particularly low density lipoproteins (LDL), to GAGs of extracellular matrix PGs in arteries has been proposed to be an initiating event in development of atherosclerosis. This study was initiated with the aim of getting an overview of the binding patterns of different lipoprotein subclasses with individual GAG categories. We thus evaluated the interaction of lipoproteins with GAGs commonly found in the cardiovascular system using a gel mobility-shift assay developed for this purpose. The same procedure was used to measure lipoproteins binding to metabolically [(35)S]-labeled whole PGs prepared from three cell types, arterial smooth muscle cells, THP-1 macrophages and from HepG2 cells. The effect of GAG composition on PGs on lipoprotein binding was evaluated by enzymatic degradation of the carbohydrate chains. Heparan sulfate was found to bind beta very low density lipoproteins (beta-VLDL) and a chylomicron remnant model (beta-VLDL+apoE), but not LDL. Dermatan sulfate was found to bind LDL, but not beta-VLDL or the chylomicron remnant model. Chondroitin sulfate and heparin were found to bind all lipoproteins tested (LDL, beta-VLDL and beta-VLDL+apoE) although with different affinities. We can conclude that each lipoprotein subclass tested binds a specific assortment of the GAGs tested. The observations made contribute to the understanding of new and complex mechanisms by which carbohydrate and lipid metabolism may be linked.

  8. Reduced immobilizing properties of isoflurane and nitrous oxide in mutant mice lacking the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor GluR(epsilon)1 subunit are caused by the secondary effects of gene knockout.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Andrey B; Yamakura, Tomohiro; Kohno, Tatsuro; Sakimura, Kenji; Baba, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    Until recently, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was considered to possibly mediate the immobility produced by inhaled anesthetics such as isoflurane and nitrous oxide. However, new evidence suggests that the role of this receptor in abolition of the movement response may be less important than previously thought. To provide further evidence supporting or challenging this view, we examined the anesthetic potencies of isoflurane and nitrous oxide in genetically modified animals with established NMDA receptor dysfunction caused by GluRepsilon1 subunit knockout. The immobilizing properties of inhaled anesthetics in mice quantitated by the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) were evaluated using the classic tail clamp method. Compared with wild-type controls, NMDA receptor GluRepsilon1 subunit knockout mice displayed larger isoflurane MAC values indicating a resistance to the immobilizing action of isoflurane. Knockout mice were previously shown to have enhanced monoaminergic tone as a result of genetic manipulation, and this increase in MAC could be abolished in our experiments by pretreatment with the serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine type 2A receptor antagonist ketanserin or with the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist droperidol at doses that did not affect MAC values in wild-type animals. Mutant mice also displayed resistance to the isoflurane MAC-sparing effect of nitrous oxide, but this resistance was similarly abolished by ketanserin and droperidol. Thus, resistance to the immobilizing action of inhaled anesthetics in knockout mice seems to be secondary to increased monoaminergic activation after knockout rather than a direct result of impaired NMDA receptor function. Our results confirm recent findings indicating no critical contribution of NMDA receptors to the immobility induced by isoflurane and nitrous oxide. In addition, they demonstrate the ability of changes secondary to genetic manipulation to affect the results obtained in global knockout

  9. Up-regulation of ATP Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Expression by Very Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor and Apolipoprotein E Receptor 2*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinping; Guo, Zhongmao; Okoro, Emmanuel U.; Zhang, Hongfeng; Zhou, LiChun; Lin, Xinhua; Rollins, Allman T.; Yang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Activation of very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) and apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2) results in either pro- or anti-atherogenic effects depending on the ligand. Using reelin and apoE as ligands, we studied the impact of VLDLR- and apoER2-mediated signaling on the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and cholesterol efflux using RAW264.7 cells. Treatment of these mouse macrophages with reelin or human apoE3 significantly increased ABCA1 mRNA and protein levels, and apoAI-mediated cholesterol efflux. In addition, both reelin and apoE3 significantly increased phosphorylated disabled-1 (Dab1), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ), and specificity protein 1 (Sp1). This reelin- or apoER2-mediated up-regulation of ABCA1 expression was suppressed by 1) knockdown of Dab1, VLDLR, and apoER2 with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), 2) inhibition of PI3K and PKC with kinase inhibitors, 3) overexpression of kinase-dead PKCζ, and 4) inhibition of Sp1 DNA binding with mithramycin A. Activation of the Dab1-PI3K signaling pathway has been implicated in VLDLR- and apoER2-mediated cellular functions, whereas the PI3K-PKCζ-Sp1 signaling cascade has been implicated in the regulation of ABCA1 expression induced by apoE/apoB-carrying lipoproteins. Taken together, these data support a model in which activation of VLDLR and apoER2 by reelin and apoE induces ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux via a Dab1-PI3K-PKCζ-Sp1 signaling cascade. PMID:22170052

  10. The effect of neuronal conditional knock-out of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mounsey, R B; Martin, H L; Nelson, M C; Evans, R M; Teismann, P

    2015-08-06

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), namely PPARγ and PPARδ, has been shown to provide neuroprotection in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease (PD). The observed neuroprotective effects in experimental models of PD have been linked to anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. This study aimed to analyze the full influence of these receptors in neuroprotection by generating a nerve cell-specific conditional knock-out of these receptors and subjecting these genetically modified mice to the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxin to model dopaminergic degeneration. Mice null for both receptors show the lowest levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cell bodies following MPTP administration. Presence of one or both these receptors show a trend toward protection against this degeneration, as higher dopaminergic cell immunoreactivity and striatal monoamine levels are evident. These data supplement recent studies that have elected to use agonists of the receptors to regulate immune responses. The results place further importance on the activation of PPARs and the neuroprotective roles these have in inflammatory processes linked to neurodegenerative processes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of neuronal conditional knock-out of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Mounsey, R.B.; Martin, H.L.; Nelson, M.C.; Evans, R.M.; Teismann, P.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), namely PPARγ and PPARδ, has been shown to provide neuroprotection in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease (PD). The observed neuroprotective effects in experimental models of PD have been linked to anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. This study aimed to analyze the full influence of these receptors in neuroprotection by generating a nerve cell-specific conditional knock-out of these receptors and subjecting these genetically modified mice to the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxin to model dopaminergic degeneration. Mice null for both receptors show the lowest levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cell bodies following MPTP administration. Presence of one or both these receptors show a trend toward protection against this degeneration, as higher dopaminergic cell immunoreactivity and striatal monoamine levels are evident. These data supplement recent studies that have elected to use agonists of the receptors to regulate immune responses. The results place further importance on the activation of PPARs and the neuroprotective roles these have in inflammatory processes linked to neurodegenerative processes. PMID:26028469

  12. mRNA levels of low-density lipoprotein receptors are overexpressed in the foci of deep bowel endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Gibran, Luciano; Maranhão, Raul C; Tavares, Elaine R; Carvalho, Priscila O; Abrão, Maurício S; Podgaec, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Is mRNA expression of LDL receptors altered in deep bowel endometriotic foci? SUMMARY ANSWER: mRNA expression of LDL receptors is up-regulated in deep bowel endometriotic foci of patients with endometriosis. Several studies have demonstrated the overexpression of low-density lipoprotein receptors in various tumour cell lines and endometriosis has similar aspects to cancer, mainly concerning the pathogenesis of both diseases. This is the first study we know of to investigate lipoprotein receptors expression in deep endometriosis with bowel involvement. During 2014-2015, an exploratory case-control study was conducted with 39 patients, including 20 women with a histological diagnosis of deep endometriosis compromising the bowel and 19 women without endometriosis who underwent laparoscopic tubal ligation. Peripheral blood samples were collected on the day of surgery for lipid profile analysis, and samples of endometrial tissue and of bowel endometriotic lesions were also collected. The tissue samples were sent for histopathological analysis and for LDL-R and LRP-1 gene expression screening using quantitative real-time PCR. Patients with deep endometriosis had lower LDL-cholesterol than patients without the disease (119 ± 23 versus 156 ± 35; P = 0.001). Gene expression analysis of LDL receptors revealed that LDL-R was more highly expressed in endometriotic lesions when compared to the endometrium of the same patient but not more than in the endometrium of women without endometriosis (0.027 ± 0.022 versus 0.012 ± 0.009 versus 0.019 ± 0.01, respectively; P < 0.001). LRP-1 was more highly expressed in endometriotic lesions, both when compared with the endometrium of the same patient and when compared with the endometrium of patients without the disease (0.307 ± 0.207 versus 0.089 ± 0.076 and versus 0.126 ± 0.072, respectively; P < 0.001). The study also showed that LDL-R gene expression in the endometrium of women with endometriosis was higher during the

  13. Factor VIII Interacts with the Endocytic Receptor Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 via an Extended Surface Comprising “Hot-Spot” Lysine Residues♦

    PubMed Central

    van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Madsen, Jesper J.; Faber, Johan H.; Zuurveld, Marleen G.; van der Zwaan, Carmen; Olsen, Ole H.; Stennicke, Henning R.; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2015-01-01

    Lysine residues are implicated in driving the ligand binding to the LDL receptor family. However, it has remained unclear how specificity is regulated. Using coagulation factor VIII as a model ligand, we now study the contribution of individual lysine residues in the interaction with the largest member of the LDL receptor family, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1). Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and SPR interaction analysis on a library of lysine replacement variants as two independent approaches, we demonstrate that the interaction between factor VIII (FVIII) and LRP1 occurs over an extended surface containing multiple lysine residues. None of the individual lysine residues account completely for LRP1 binding, suggesting an additive binding model. Together with structural docking studies, our data suggest that FVIII interacts with LRP1 via an extended surface of multiple lysine residues that starts at the bottom of the C1 domain and winds around the FVIII molecule. PMID:25903134

  14. The erythroid function of transferrin receptor 2 revealed by Tmprss6 inactivation in different models of transferrin receptor 2 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Nai, Antonella; Pellegrino, Rosa M.; Rausa, Marco; Pagani, Alessia; Boero, Martina; Silvestri, Laura; Saglio, Giuseppe; Roetto, Antonella; Camaschella, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed in the liver and in the erythroid compartment, mutated in a form of hereditary hemochromatosis. Hepatic TFR2, together with HFE, activates the transcription of the iron-regulator hepcidin, while erythroid TFR2 is a member of the erythropoietin receptor complex. The TMPRSS6 gene, encoding the liver-expressed serine protease matriptase-2, is the main inhibitor of hepcidin and inactivation of TMPRSS6 leads to iron deficiency with high hepcidin levels. Here we evaluate the phenotype resulting from the genetic loss of Tmprss6 in Tfr2 total (Tfr2−/−) and liver-specific (Tfr2LCKO) knockout mice. Tmprss6−/−Tfr2−/− and Tmprss6−/−Tfr2LCKO mice have increased hepcidin levels and show iron-deficiency anemia like Tmprss6−/−mice. However, while Tmprss6−/−Tfr2LCKO are phenotypically identical to Tmprss6−/− mice, Tmprss6−/−Tfr2−/− mice have increased red blood cell count and more severe microcytosis than Tmprss6−/− mice. In addition hepcidin expression in Tmprss6−/−Tfr2−/− mice is higher than in the wild-type animals, but lower than in Tmprss6−/− mice, suggesting partial inhibition of the hepcidin activating pathway. Our results prove that hepatic TFR2 acts upstream of TMPRSS6. In addition Tfr2 deletion causes a relative erythrocytosis in iron-deficient mice, which likely attenuates the effect of over-expression of hepcidin in Tmprss6−/− mice. Since liver-specific deletion of Tfr2 in Tmprss6−/− mice does not modify the erythrocyte count, we speculate that loss of Tfr2 in the erythroid compartment accounts for the hematologic phenotype of Tmprss6−/−Tfr2−/− mice. We propose that TFR2 is a limiting factor for erythropoiesis, particularly in conditions of iron restriction. PMID:24658816

  15. A two-step binding model of PCSK9 interaction with the low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Taichi; Lu, Christine; Ryan, Robert O

    2011-02-18

    PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin-like/kexin type 9) is an emerging target for pharmaceutical intervention. This multidomain protein interacts with the LDL receptor (LDLR), promoting receptor degradation. Insofar as PCSK9 inhibition induces a decrease in plasma cholesterol levels, understanding the nature of the binding interaction between PCSK9 and the LDLR is of critical importance. In this study, the ability of PCSK9 to compete with apoE3 N-terminal domain-containing reconstituted HDL for receptor binding was examined. Whereas full-length PCSK9 was an effective competitor, the N-terminal domain (composed of the prodomain and catalytic domain) was not. Surprisingly, the C-terminal domain (CT domain) of PCSK9 was able to compete. Using a direct binding interaction assay, we show that the PCSK9 CT domain bound to the LDLR in a calcium-dependent manner and that co-incubation with the prodomain and catalytic domain had no effect on this binding. To further characterize this interaction, two LDLR fragments, the classical ligand-binding domain (LBD) and the EGF precursor homology domain, were expressed in stably transfected HEK 293 cells and isolated. Binding assays showed that the PCSK9 CT domain bound to the LBD at pH 5.4. Thus, CT domain interaction with the LBD of the LDLR at endosomal pH constitutes a second step in the PCSK9-mediated LDLR binding that leads to receptor degradation.

  16. What are lipoproteins doing in the brain?

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Eckel, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Lipoproteins in plasma transport lipids between tissues, however, only high-density lipoproteins (HDL) appear to traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB); thus, lipoproteins found in the brain must be produced within the central nervous system. Apolipoproteins E (ApoE) and ApoJ are the most abundant apolipoproteins in the brain, are mostly synthesized by astrocytes, and are found on HDL. In the hippocampus and other brain regions, lipoproteins help to regulate neurobehavioral functions by processes that are lipoprotein receptor-mediated. Moreover, lipoproteins and their receptors also have roles in the regulation of body weight and energy balance, acting through lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (LRP). Thus, understanding lipoproteins and their metabolism in the brain provides a new opportunity with potential therapeutic relevance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Electric field-induced redistribution and postfield relaxation of low density lipoprotein receptors on cultured human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The lateral mobility of unliganded low density lipoprotein-receptor (LDL-R) on the surface of human fibroblasts has been investigated by studying the generation and relaxation of concentration differences induced by exposure of the cultured cells to steady electric fields. The topographic distribution of receptors was determined by fluorescence microscopy of cells labeled with the intensely fluorescent, biologically active LDL derivative dioctadecylindolcarbocyanine LDL (dil(3)-LDL), or with native LDL and anti-LDL indirect immunofluorescence. Exposure of the LDL-receptor- internalization defective J. D. cells (GM2408A) to an electric field of 10 V/cm for 1 h at 22 degrees C causes greater than 80% of the cells to have an asymmetric distribution of LDL-R; receptors accumulate at the more negative pole of the cell. In contrast, only 20% of LDL- internalization normal GM3348 cells exposed to identical conditions have asymmetrical distributions. Phase micrographs taken during electric-field exposure rule out cell movement as the responsible mechanism for the effect. In both cell types, postfield labeling with the F-actin-specific fluorescent probe nitrobenzoxadiazole-phallacidin shows that no topographic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton accompanies the redistribution of cell surface LDL-Rs, and indirect immunofluorescence labeling of the coat protein clathrin shows that coated pits do not redistribute asymmetrically. Measurements of the postfield relaxation in the percentage of GM2408A cells showing an asymmetric distribution allow an estimate of the effective postfield diffusion coefficient of the unliganded LDL-R. At 37 degrees C, D = 2.0 X 10(-9) cm2/s, decreasing to 1.1 X 10(-9) cm2/s at 22 degrees C, and D = 3.5 X 10(-10) cm2/s at 10 degrees C. These values are substantially larger than those measured by photobleaching methods for the LDL-R complexed with dil(3)-LDL on intact cells, but are comparable to those measured on membrane blebs, and are consistent

  18. Reduced Acetylcholine Receptor Density, Morphological Remodeling, and Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Can Sustain Muscle Function in Acetylcholinesterase Knockout Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    superior catalytic activity for mouse chow and water ad libitum and were 53 + 4 ACh hydrolysis, AChE is the dominant enzyme, days old at the time of...were analyzed using a two-tailed gain, 1593; scan time , 16 s). Endplates in the same Student’s t- test , whereas comparisons between three focal plane...amplitudes and prolonged knockout mice , this enzyme appears to exert a prom- rise and relaxation times similar to those observed in inent role in

  19. Low-density lipoprotein receptor genetic polymorphism in chronic hepatitis C virus Egyptian patients affects treatment response.

    PubMed

    Naga, Mazen; Amin, Mona; Algendy, Dina; Elbadry, Ahmed; Fawzi, May; Foda, Ayman; Esmat, Serag; Sabry, Dina; Rashed, Laila; Gabal, Samia; Kamal, Manal

    2015-10-21

    To correlate a genetic polymorphism of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor with antiviral responses in Egyptian chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. Our study included 657 HCV-infected patients with genotype 4 who received interferon-based combination therapy. Patients were divided into two groups based on their response to therapy: 356 were responders, and 301 were non-responders. Patients were compared to 160 healthy controls. All patients and controls underwent a thorough physical examination, measurement of body mass index (BMI) and the following laboratory tests: serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, albumin, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, prothrombin time, prothrombin concentration, INR, complete blood count, serum creatinine, fasting blood sugar, HCV antibody, and hepatitis B surface antigen. All HCV patients were further subjected to the following laboratory tests: HCV-RNA using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), antinuclear antibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone, an LDL receptor (LDLR) genotype study of LDLR exon8c.1171G>A and exon10c.1413G>A using real-time PCR-based assays, abdominal ultrasonography, ultrasonographic-guided liver biopsy, and histopathological examination of liver biopsies. Correlations of LDL receptor polymorphisms with HAI, METAVIR score, presence of steatosis, and BMI were performed in all cases. There were no statistically significant differences in response rates between the different types of interferon used or LDLR exon10c.1413G>A. However, there was a significant difference in the frequency of the LDL receptor exon8c.1171G>A genotype between cases (AA: 25.9%, GA: 22.2%, GG: 51.9%) and controls (AA: 3.8%, GA: 53.1% and GG: 43.1%) (P < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the frequency of the LDLR exon 8C:1171 G>A polymorphism between responders (AA: 3.6%, GA: 15.2%, GG: 81.2%) and non-responders (AA: 52.2%, GA: 30.6%, GG: 17.2%) (P < 0

  20. Low-density lipoprotein receptor genetic polymorphism in chronic hepatitis C virus Egyptian patients affects treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Naga, Mazen; Amin, Mona; Algendy, Dina; Elbadry, Ahmed; Fawzi, May; Foda, Ayman; Esmat, Serag; Sabry, Dina; Rashed, Laila; Gabal, Samia; Kamal, Manal

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To correlate a genetic polymorphism of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor with antiviral responses in Egyptian chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. METHODS: Our study included 657 HCV-infected patients with genotype 4 who received interferon-based combination therapy. Patients were divided into two groups based on their response to therapy: 356 were responders, and 301 were non-responders. Patients were compared to 160 healthy controls. All patients and controls underwent a thorough physical examination, measurement of body mass index (BMI) and the following laboratory tests: serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, albumin, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, prothrombin time, prothrombin concentration, INR, complete blood count, serum creatinine, fasting blood sugar, HCV antibody, and hepatitis B surface antigen. All HCV patients were further subjected to the following laboratory tests: HCV-RNA using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), antinuclear antibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone, an LDL receptor (LDLR) genotype study of LDLR exon8c.1171G>A and exon10c.1413G>A using real-time PCR-based assays, abdominal ultrasonography, ultrasonographic-guided liver biopsy, and histopathological examination of liver biopsies. Correlations of LDL receptor polymorphisms with HAI, METAVIR score, presence of steatosis, and BMI were performed in all cases. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in response rates between the different types of interferon used or LDLR exon10c.1413G>A. However, there was a significant difference in the frequency of the LDL receptor exon8c.1171G>A genotype between cases (AA: 25.9%, GA: 22.2%, GG: 51.9%) and controls (AA: 3.8%, GA: 53.1% and GG: 43.1%) (P < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the frequency of the LDLR exon 8C:1171 G>A polymorphism between responders (AA: 3.6%, GA: 15.2%, GG: 81.2%) and non-responders (AA: 52.2%, GA: 30

  1. Scavenger receptor CD36 mediates uptake of high density lipoproteins in mice and by cultured cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Brundert, May; Heeren, Joerg; Merkel, Martin; Carambia, Antonella; Herkel, Johannes; Groitl, Peter; Dobner, Thomas; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Moore, Kathryn J.; Rinninger, Franz

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of HDL-mediated cholesterol transport from peripheral tissues to the liver are incompletely defined. Here the function of scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) for HDL uptake by the liver was investigated. CD36 knockout (KO) mice, which were the model, have a 37% increase (P = 0.008) of plasma HDL cholesterol compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. To explore the mechanism of this increase, HDL metabolism was investigated with HDL radiolabeled in the apolipoprotein (125I) and cholesteryl ester (CE, [3H]) moiety. Liver uptake of [3H] and 125I from HDL decreased in CD36 KO mice and the difference, i. e. hepatic selective CE uptake ([3H]125I), declined (–33%, P = 0.0003) in CD36 KO compared with WT mice. Hepatic HDL holo-particle uptake (125I) decreased (–29%, P = 0.0038) in CD36 KO mice. In vitro, uptake of 125I-/[3H]HDL by primary liver cells from WT or CD36 KO mice revealed a diminished HDL uptake in CD36-deficient hepatocytes. Adenovirus-mediated expression of CD36 in cells induced an increase in selective CE uptake from HDL and a stimulation of holo-particle internalization. In conclusion, CD36 plays a role in HDL uptake in mice and by cultured cells. A physiologic function of CD36 in HDL metabolism in vivo is suggested. PMID:21217164

  2. Orofacial movements in phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein-1/2 double knockout mice: Effect of the GABAergic agent diazepam and the D(1) dopamine receptor agonist SKF 83959.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Katsunori; Song, Liqiu; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Kinsella, Anthony; Kanematsu, Takashi; Hirata, Masato; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Waddington, John L

    2010-09-01

    Orofacial movements are regulated by D(1)-like dopamine receptors interacting with additional mechanisms. Phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP) regulates cell surface expression of GABA(A) receptors containing a gamma2 subunit. Mutant mice with double knockout of PRIP-1 and PRIP-2 were used to investigate aspects of GABAergic regulation of orofacial movements and interactions with D(1) mechanisms. Vertical jaw movements, tongue protrusions and movements of the head and vibrissae were reduced in PRIP-1/2 double knockouts. The GABA(A)ergic agent diazepam reduced movements of the head and vibrissae; these effects were unaltered in PRIP-1/2 double knockouts. The D(1)-like agonist SKF 83959 induced vertical jaw movements, incisor chattering, and movements of the head and vibrissae that were unaltered in PRIP-1/2 double knockouts. However, SKF 83959-induced tongue protrusions were reduced in PRIP-1/2 double knockouts. PRIP-mediated regulation of GABA(A)ergic receptor mechanisms influences topographically distinct aspects of orofacial movement and interacts with D(1) receptor systems.

  3. Genetic alterations of IL-1 receptor antagonist in mice affect plasma cholesterol level and foam cell lesion size.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Cecilia M; Kuriakose, George; Hirsch, Emmet; Tabas, Ira

    2002-04-30

    Inflammatory cytokines have been linked to atherosclerosis by using cell culture models and acute inflammation in animals. The goal of this study was to examine lipoprotein levels and early atherosclerosis in chronic animal models of altered IL-1 physiology by using mice with deficient or excess IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). IL-1ra knockout C57BL/6J mice fed a cholesterol/cholate diet for 3 mo had a 3-fold decrease in non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a trend toward increased foam-cell lesion area compared to wild-type littermate controls. IL-1ra transgenic/low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) knockout mice fed a cholesterol-saturated fat diet for 10 wk showed a 40% increase in non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, consistent with the IL-1ra knockout data, although there was no change in lesion size. When these IL1-ra overexpressing transgenic mice on the LDLR knockout background were fed a high-cholesterol/high-fat diet containing cholate, however, a statistically significant 40% decrease in lesion area was observed compared to LDLR knockout mice lacking the transgene. By immunohistochemistry, IL-1ra was present in C57BL/6J and LDLR knockout aortae, absent in IL-1ra knockout aortae, and present at high levels in LDLR knockout/IL-1ra transgene aortae. In summary, IL-1ra tended to increase plasma lipoprotein levels and, when fed a cholate-containing diet, decrease foam-cell lesion size. These data demonstrate that in selected models of murine atherosclerosis, chronic IL-1ra depletion or overexpression has potentially important effects on lipoprotein metabolism and foam-cell lesion development.

  4. Induction of Experimental Arthritis by Borrelial Lipoprotein and CpG Motifs: Are Toll-Like Receptors 2, 4, 9 or CD-14 Involved?

    SciTech Connect

    Batsford, S.; Dunn, J.; Mihatsch, M.

    2011-06-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins and CpG-DNA are ligands for Toll-Like-Receptors (TLR) 2 and 9 respectively. Both classes of molecules were reported to induce experimental arthritis in rodents following direct intra-articular injection. Here we studied: (1) whether arthritis induction by Outer surface (Lipo)protein A (OspA) (B.burgdorferi) involved the TLR-2 as well as the TLR-4 or the CD-14 receptors in addition, and (2) re-examined the arthritogenic potential of CpG-DNA motifs in mice. Following intra-articular injection of the test substances [20 {micro}g recombinant, lipidated OspA; 1nM(6 {micro}g) to 10nM(60 {micro}g) synthetic CpG-DNA], inflammation was monitored by {sup 99}Tc scintigraphy (ratio left/right knee joint uptake > 1.1 indicates inflammation) and by histology. Lipoprotein OspA induced severe, acute arthritis in TLR-2{sup +/+} w.t. but not in TLR-2{sup -/-} mice (p<0.01). There were no significant differences in the severity of arthritis induced in TLR-4{sup +/+} w.t. and TLR-4{sup -/-} mutant mice, or between CD14{sup +/+} w.t. and CD14{sup -/-} mice. CpG-DNA (1or 10 nM) did not cause notable inflammation in C57BL/6 mice; {sup 99}Tc ratios were < 1.0 and histology showed only minimal changes. Induction of arthritis by the OspA lipoprotein of B.burgdorferi involves the TLR-2 receptor, no evidence for additional participation of TLR-4 or CD14 receptors was found. Intra-articular injection of CpG-DNA did not produce manifest joint injury in mice, at variance with previous reports.

  5. Common genetic variation within the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 6 and late-onset Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    De Ferrari, Giancarlo V.; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Biechele, Travis; Wavrant De-Vrieze, Fabienne; Avila, Miguel E.; Major, Michael B.; Myers, Amanda; Sáez, Katia; Henríquez, Juan P.; Zhao, Alice; Wollmer, M. Axel; Nitsch, Roger M.; Hock, Christoph; Morris, Chris M.; Hardy, John; Moon, Randall T.

    2007-01-01

    Genome-wide linkage studies have defined a broad susceptibility region for late-onset Alzheimer's disease on chromosome 12, which contains the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 6 (LRP6) gene, a coreceptor for Wnt signaling. Here, we report the association between common LRP6 variants and late-onset Alzheimer's disease in a multicenter case-control series as well as in a large family-based series ascertained by the National Institute of Mental Health–National Institute on Aging Genetics Initiative. As shown in the genome-wide linkage studies, our association depends mainly on apolipoprotein E-ε4 (APOE-ε4) carrier status. Haplotype tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with a set of seven allelic variants of LRP6 identified a putative risk haplotype, which includes a highly conserved coding sequence SNP: Ile-1062 → Val. Functional analyses revealed that the associated allele Val-1062, an allele previously linked to low bone mass, has decreased β-catenin signaling in HEK293T cells. Our study unveils a genetic relationship between LRP6 and APOE and supports the hypothesis that altered Wnt/β-catenin signaling may be involved in this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:17517621

  6. Protein interactions among Fe65, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein, and the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Melinda M; Guttman, Miklos; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2011-07-19

    The adapter protein Fe65 has been proposed to be the link between the intracellular domains of the amyloid precursor protein, APP (AICD), and the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP-CT). Functional linkage between these two proteins has been established, and mutations within LRP-CT affect the amount of Aβ produced from APP. Previous work showed that AICD binds to protein interaction domain 2 (PID2) of Fe65. Although the structure of PID1 was determined recently, all attempts to demonstrate LRP-CT binding to this domain failed. We used biophysical experiments and binding studies to investigate the binding among these three proteins. Full-length Fe65 bound more weakly to AICD than did N-terminally truncated forms; however, the intramolecular domain-domain interactions that had been proposed to inhibit binding could not be observed using amide H-D exchange. Surprisingly, when LRP-CT is phosphorylated at Tyr4507, it bound to Fe65 PID1 despite the fact that this domain belongs to the Dab-like subclass of PIDs that are not supposed to be phosphorylation-dependent. Mutation of a critical arginine abolished binding, providing further proof of the phosphorylation dependence. Fe65 PID1 thus provides a link between the Dab-like class and the IRS-like class of PIDs and is the first Dab-like family member to show phosphorylation-dependent binding.

  7. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction improves the low density lipoprotein receptor gene expression in HepG{sub 2} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Dongping; Li Xiaoyu; Sun, Ping; Tang Yibo; Chen Xiuying; Chen Qi; Fan Leming . E-mail: lmfan@njmu.edu.cn; Zang Bin; Shao Lizheng; Li Xiaorong

    2006-05-05

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction had been employed in gene delivery and promised great potential. Liver has unique features that make it attractive for gene therapy. However, it poses formidable obstacles to hepatocyte-specific gene delivery. This study was designed to test the efficiency of therapeutic gene transfer and expression mediated by ultrasound/microbubble strategy in HepG{sub 2} cell line. Air-filled albumin microbubbles were prepared and mixed with plasmid DNA encoding low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and green fluorescent protein. The mixture of the DNA and microbubbles was administer to cultured HepG{sub 2} cells under variable ultrasound conditions. Transfection rate of the transferred gene and cell viability were assessed by FACS analysis, confocal laser scanning microscopy, Western blot analysis and Trypan blue staining. The result demonstrated that microbubbles with ultrasound irradiation can significantly elevate exogenous LDLR gene expression and the expressed LDLRs were functional and active to uptake their ligands. We conclude that ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction has the potential to promote safe and efficient LDLR gene transfer into hepatocytes. With further refinement, it may represent an effective nonviral avenue of gene therapy for liver-involved genetic diseases.

  8. Near-infrared fluorescent imaging of metastatic ovarian cancer using folate receptor-targeted high-density lipoprotein nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Ian R; Ng, Kenneth K; Ding, Lili; Jurisicova, Andrea; Zheng, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Aim The targeting efficiency of folate receptor-α (FR-α)-targeted high-density lipoprotein nanoparticles (HDL NPs) was evaluated in a syngeneic mouse model of ovarian cancer. Materials & methods Folic acid was conjugated to the surface of fluorescent-labeled HDL NPs. In vivo tumor targeting of folic acid-HDL NPs and HDL NPs were evaluated in mice with metastatic ovarian cancer following intravenous or intraperitoneal (ip.) administration. Results & discussion Intravenous FR-α-targeted HDL resulted in high uptake of the fluorescent nanoparticle in host liver and spleen. The ip. injection of fluorescent HDL produced moderate fluorescence throughout the abdomen. Conversely, animals receiving the ip. FR-α-targeted HDL showed a high fluorescence signal in ovarian tumors, surpassing that seen in all of the host tissues. Conclusion The authors' findings demonstrate that the combination of local–regional ip. administration and FR-α-directed nanoparticles provides an enhanced approach to selectively targeting ovarian cancer cells for drug treatment. PMID:23067398

  9. Intermittent hypoxia and hypercapnia induce pulmonary artery atherosclerosis and ventricular dysfunction in low density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Robert M; Bowden, Karen; Pattison, Jennifer; Peterson, Alexander B; Juliano, Joseph; Dalton, Nancy D; Gu, Yusu; Alvarez, Erika; Imamura, Toshihiro; Peterson, Kirk L; Witztum, Joseph L; Haddad, Gabriel G; Li, Andrew C

    2013-12-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea, who experience episodic hypoxia and hypercapnia during sleep, often demonstrate increased inflammation, oxidative stress, and dyslipidemia. We hypothesized that sleep apnea patients would be predisposed to the development of atherosclerosis. To dissect the mechanisms involved, we developed an animal model in mice whereby we expose mice to intermittent hypoxia/hypercapnia (IHH) in normobaric environments. Two- to three-month-old low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice were fed a high-fat diet for 8 or 16 wk while being exposed to IHH for either 10 h/day or 24 h/day. Plasma lipid levels, pulmonary artery and aortic atherosclerotic lesions, and cardiac function were then assayed. Surprisingly, atherosclerosis in the aorta of IHH mice was similar compared with controls. However, in IHH mice, atherosclerosis was markedly increased in the trunk and proximal branches of the pulmonary artery of exposed mice; even though plasma cholesterol and triglycerides were lower than in controls. Hemodynamic analysis revealed that right ventricular maximum pressure and isovolumic relaxation constant were significantly increased in IHH exposed mice and left ventricular % fractional shortening was reduced. In conclusion, 1) Intermittent hypoxia/hypercapnia remarkably accelerated atherosclerotic lesions in the pulmonary artery of Ldlr(-/-) mice and 2) increased lesion formation in the pulmonary artery was associated with right and left ventricular dysfunction. These findings raise the possibility that patients with obstructive sleep apnea may be susceptible to atherosclerotic disease in the pulmonary vasculature, an observation that has not been previously recognized.

  10. Dysregulation of the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Pathway Is Involved in Lipid Disorder-Mediated Organ Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Ma, Kun Ling; Ruan, Xiong Zhong; Liu, Bi Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) pathway is a negative feedback system that plays important roles in the regulation of plasma and intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. To maintain a cholesterol homeostasis, LDLR expression is tightly regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) and SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) in transcriptional level and by proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in posttranscriptional level. The dysregulation of LDLR expression results in abnormal lipid accumulation in cells and tissues, such as vascular smooth muscle cells, hepatic cells, renal mesangial cells, renal tubular cells and podocytes. It has been demonstrated that inflammation, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation, and hyperglycemia induce the disruption of LDLR pathway, which might contribute to lipid disorder-mediated organ injury (atherosclerosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, kidney fibrosis, etc). The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a critical mediator in the disruption of LDLR pathway caused by pathogenic factors. The mTOR complex1 activation upregulates LDLR expression at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, consequently resulting in lipid deposition. This paper mainly reviews the mechanisms for the dysregulation of LDLR pathway and its roles in lipid disorder-mediated organ injury under various pathogenic conditions. Understanding these mechanisms leading to the abnormality of LDLR expression contributes to find potential new drug targets in lipid disorder-mediated diseases. PMID:27019638

  11. Serum soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 levels in patients with restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Halac, G; Kilic, E; Cikrikcioglu, M A; Celik, K; Toprak-Erek, A; Keskin, S; Gultepe, I; Celik, R S; Ozaras, N; Yildiz, A; Aydin, S; Akan, O; Karatoprak, C; Sekin, Y; Asil, T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the predisposition for atherosclerosis in patients with RLS through serum sLOX-1 (serum Lectin-Like Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-1) measurements. Recent epidemiological studies have suggested an association of RLS with certain chronic conditions such as diabetes mellitus (DM), obesity, hypertension (HT), and hyperlipidemia. LOX-1 is expressed in endothelial cells, macrophages, and in smooth muscle cells under the effect of proatherogenic conditions. This study was a prospective, cross-sectional, case-controlled. We measured the serum sLOX-1 levels in 37 restless legs syndrome patients and 38 controls. Serum sLOX-1 level was significantly lower in the patient group. The two groups were similar in glucose, HbA1c, creatinine, LDL cholesterol, TG, HDL, total protein, albumin, AST, ALT, GGT, ALP, HGB, HCT, MCV, transferrin saturation rate (TSR), ferritin, CRP, TSH, FT4, FT3, B12, and folic acid levels. Also the two groups were similar with respect to age at menarche, number of previous births, number of abortions and/or curettage, total duration of breastfeeding, percentage of patients in menopause, and age at menopause. Our results may suggest a lower atherosclerotic risk among RLS patients as compared to the general population (Tab. 3, Ref. 33).

  12. Novel mechanism by which probucol lowers low density lipoprotein levels demonstrated in the LDL receptor-deficient rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Naruszewicz, M.; Carew, T.E.; Pittman, R.C.; Witztum, J.L.; Steinberg, D.

    1984-11-01

    Treatment of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-deficient rabbits (WHHL rabbits) with probucol (1% w/w in a chow diet) lowered their LDL-cholesterol levels by 36%, consonant with the reported effectiveness of the drug in patients deficient in the LDL receptor. Initial studies of LDL fractional catabolic rate (FCR) using /sup 125/I-labeled LDL prepared from the serum of untreated WHHL rabbits showed no difference between probucol-treated WHHL rabbits and untreated WHHL rabbits. When, however, /sup 125/I-labeled LDL was prepared from donor WHHL rabbits under treatment with probucol and injected back into them, the FCR was found to be increased by about 50% above that measured simultaneously using /sup 131/I-labeled LDL prepared from untreated WHHL donors. The labeled LDL from probucol-treated donors was also metabolized more rapidly than that from untreated donors when injected into untreated WHHL rabbits or into untreated wild-type New Zealand White rabbits. Finally, it was shown that rabbit skin fibroblasts in culture degraded labeled LDL prepared from probucol-treated WHHL rabbits more rapidly than that prepared from untreated WHHL donors. This was true both for normal rabbit fibroblasts and also for WHHL skin fibroblasts, although the absolute degradation rates in the latter were, of course, much lower for both forms of LDL. The data indicate that a major mechanism by which probucol lowers LDL levels relates not to changes in the cellular mechanisms for LDL uptake or to changes in LDL production but rather to intrinsic changes in the structure and metabolism of the plasma LDL of the probucol-treated animal.

  13. F-spondin inhibits differentiation of clastic precursors via lipoprotein receptor-related protein 8 (LRP8).

    PubMed

    Oka, Hiroko; Kitagawa, Masae; Takata, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    F-spondin, known to be a secreted neuronal glycoprotein, is highly expressed on the tooth root surface. The authors previously reported that F-spondin is one of the specific markers of cementoblasts in periodontal tissue. In chronic periodontitis, significant cemental resorption rarely occurs on the root side, although alveolar bone resorption by osteoclasts is one of the major pathologic changes. Thus, it was hypothesized that secretory F-spondin from cementoblasts might be involved in differentiation of clastic cells on the root surface. The authors studied effects of secretory F-spondin from F-spondin-expressing cells and its pathway on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated differentiation of clastic cells. Osteoclast precursors were used in this study. With a chamber assay, the authors examined effects of secretory molecules from F-spondin-expressing cells of transgenic mice on RANKL-induced clastic cell differentiation. Secretory molecules from F-spondin-overexpressing cells significantly inhibited the RANKL-mediated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells from primary progenitor cells with the chamber system. F-spondin suppressed RANKL-mediated nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1); TRAP; cathepsin K; and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP) expression in the cells. The suppressive effect of F-spondin on RANKL-induced differentiation of clastic cells was partially blocked by knockdown of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 8 (LRP8). These findings indicate that secretory factors from F-spondin-expressing cells, including F-spondin, downregulate differentiation of clastic precursors. Moreover, F-spondin inhibits RANKL-mediated differentiation of clastic cells partially via LRP8. It is suggested that secretory F-spondin may act protectively from cemental resorption partially via LRP8 in periodontal tissue.

  14. Deubiquitylase Inhibition Reveals Liver X Receptor-independent Transcriptional Regulation of the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase IDOL and Lipoprotein Uptake*

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jessica Kristine; Cook, Emma Clare Laura; Loregger, Anke; Hoeksema, Marte