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Sample records for liposome gene therapy

  1. Engineering liposomal nanoparticles for targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zylberberg, C; Gaskill, K; Pasley, S; Matosevic, S

    2017-08-01

    Recent mechanistic studies have attempted to deepen our understanding of the process by which liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material occurs. Understanding the interactions between lipid nanoparticles and cells is still largely elusive. Liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material faces systemic obstacles alongside entry into the cell, endosomal escape, lysosomal degradation and nuclear uptake. Rational design approaches for targeted delivery have been developed to reduce off-target effects and enhance transfection. These strategies, which have included the modification of lipid nanoparticles with target-specific ligands to enhance intracellular uptake, have shown significant promise at the proof-of-concept stage. Control of physical and chemical specifications of liposome composition, which includes lipid-to-DNA charge, size, presence of ester bonds, chain length and nature of ligand complexation, is integral to the performance of targeted liposomes as genetic delivery agents. Clinical advances are expected to rely on such systems in the therapeutic application of liposome nanoparticle-based gene therapy. Here, we discuss the latest breakthroughs in the development of targeted liposome-based agents for the delivery of genetic material, paying particular attention to new ligand and cationic lipid design as well as recent in vivo advances.

  2. Cancer gene therapy utilized ultrasound (US)-sensitive liposome as non-viral vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Namai, Eisuke; Nishiie, Norihito; Hirata, Keiichi; Taira, Yuichiro; Utoguchi, Naoki; Negichi, Yoichi; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2010-03-01

    Sonoporation is an attractive technique to develop non-invasive and non-viral gene delivery system. However, simple sonoporation using only ultrasound (US) is not enough to establish effective cancer gene therapy because of low efficiency of gene delivery. Therefore, we improved this problem by the combination of US and novel US-sensitive liposome (Bubble liposome) which was a liposome containing US imaging gas (perfluoropropane). This was an effective gene delivery system with collapse (cavitation) that was induced by US exposure to Bubble liposome. In this study, we assessed the ability of this system in cancer gene therapy using IL-12 cording plasmid DNA. The combination of Bubble liposomes and ultrasound was dramatically suppressed tumor growth. Therefore, we concluded that the combination of Bubble liposomes and ultrasound would be a good non-viral vector system in IL-12 cancer gene therapy.

  3. Assessment of therapeutic efficacy of liposomal nanoparticles mediated gene delivery by molecular imaging for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Manqian; Wang, Lina; Su, Weijun; Tong, Lingling; Liu, Yanhua; Fan, Yan; Luo, Na; Zheng, Yizhou; Zhao, Hui; Xiang, Rong; Li, Zongjin

    2012-10-01

    The inadequate treatment efficacy, suboptimal cancer detection and disease monitoring in anticancer therapies have led to the quest for clinically relevant, innovative multifaceted solutions such as development of targeted and traceable approaches. Molecular imaging technologies with the versatility of liposomal nanoparticles platform offer tangible options to better guide treatment delivery and monitor outcome. In this study, we introduced noninvasive, quantitative and functional imaging techniques with reporter gene methods to probe breast cancer processes with liposomal nanoparticles by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). A breast cancer model was applied for therapy by injecting 5.0 x 10(5) 4T1 cells carrying a reporter system encoding a double fusion reporter gene consisting of firefly luciferase (Fluc) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) into BALB/c mice. Liposomal nanoparticles loaded with a triple fusion gene containing the herpes simplex virus truncated thymidine kinase (HSV-ttk) and renilla luciferase (Rluc) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) were applied by in situ injection for monitoring and evaluating gene therapy. The BALB/c mice were subsequently treated with ganciclovir (GCV) and the growth status of tumor was monitored by bioluminescence imaging of Fluc and the treatment delivery of liposomal nanoparticle was efficiently tracked by Rluc imaging. In fact, TF plasmids were shown to be useful for monitoring and evaluating targeting efficacy and gene therapy by non-invasive molecular imaging. In conclusion, the combination of noninvasive imaging techniques and liposomal nanoparticle can provide a practical and clinically useful way for gene delivery and monitoring the level of gene expression over time and treatment response in patients undergoing gene therapy.

  4. Anti-tumor mechanism in IL-12 Gene therapy using liposomal bubbles and ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Koshima, Risa; Hirata, Keiichi; Nomura, Tetsuya; Negishi, Yoichi; Utoguchi, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    Sonoporation combined with nano/microbubbles is an attractive technique for developing non-invasive and non-viral gene delivery systems. Previously, we developed novel ultrasound sensitive liposomes (Bubble liposomes) which contain the ultrasound imaging gas perfluoropropane. IL-12 corded plasmid DNA delivery into tumor tissue by sonoporation combined with Bubble liposomes was found to suppress tumor growth. In this study, we examined the mechanism of the anti-tumor effect in this IL-12 gene delivery. This therapeutic effect was T-cell dependent, requiring mainly CD8+ T lymphocytes in the effector phase, as confirmed by a mouse in vivo depletion assay. In addition, migration of CD8+ T cells was observed in the mice. These results suggest that CD8+ T lymphocytes play an important role in the anti-tumor effects of this IL-12 gene therapy.

  5. Nonviral gene delivery to mesenchymal stem cells using cationic liposomes for gene and cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Madeira, C; Mendes, R D; Ribeiro, S C; Boura, J S; Aires-Barros, M R; da Silva, C L; Cabral, J M S

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold a great promise for application in several therapies due to their unique biological characteristics. In order to harness their full potential in cell-or gene-based therapies it might be advantageous to enhance some of their features through gene delivery strategies. Accordingly, we are interested in developing an efficient and safe methodology to genetically engineer human bone marrow MSC (BM MSC), enhancing their therapeutic efficacy in Regenerative Medicine. The plasmid DNA delivery was optimized using a cationic liposome-based reagent. Transfection efficiencies ranged from approximately 2% to approximately 35%, resulting from using a Lipid/DNA ratio of 1.25 with a transgene expression of 7 days. Importantly, the number of plasmid copies in different cell passages was quantified for the first time and approximately 20,000 plasmid copies/cell were obtained independently of cell passage. As transfected MSC have shown high viabilities (>90%) and recoveries (>52%) while maintaining their multipotency, this might be an advantageous transfection strategy when the goal is to express a therapeutic gene in a safe and transient way.

  6. Gene delivery using liposome technology.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, H; Suzuki, N; Ebihara, K; Morita, H; Ishii, Y; Kikuchi, A; Sugaya, S; Serikawa, T; Tanaka, K

    1999-11-01

    Development of more reliable liposomal formulations and preparation methods which can be used for gene therapy instead of commonly used viral vectors is expected. We have already developed the freeze-dried empty (non-drug-containing) liposomes (FDEL) method for mass-production of liposomal products. After these freeze-dried empty liposomes are rehydrated with aqueous drug solutions, many kinds of drugs can be encapsulated highly efficiently, and particle size can be controlled well. This study evaluated the usefulness of this FDEL method for preparation of liposomes containing DNA with a particular attention to the stability of DNA. When the liposomes were prepared by the conventional lipid-film method on a relatively large scale with use of a Potter-homogenizer (a teflon homogenizer), significant degradation and conformational change of DNA was observed during homogenization. Loss of DNA was also significant after extrusion for sizing and sterilization; residual DNA in the final preparation was hardly detected. When the FDEL method was used, on the other hand, no degradation, conformational change or loss of DNA was observed, and particle size was easily controlled. Moreover, there was no significant difference in luciferase activity between the lipid-film method used on a small scale with use of a vortex mixer and the FDEL method after transfection of tumor cells (HRA, HEC-1A and Colo320DM) by the liposomes containing DNA (PGV-C). These findings suggest that the FDEL method is very useful for preparation of liposomes containing DNA.

  7. Recent Trends of Polymer Mediated Liposomal Gene Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Soo; George Priya Doss, C.; Yagihara, Shin; Kim, Do-Young

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in the gene delivery system have resulted in clinical successes in gene therapy for patients with several genetic diseases, such as immunodeficiency diseases, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) blindness, thalassemia, and many more. Among various delivery systems, liposomal mediated gene delivery route is offering great promises for gene therapy. This review is an attempt to depict a portrait about the polymer based liposomal gene delivery systems and their future applications. Herein, we have discussed in detail the characteristics of liposome, importance of polymer for liposome formulation, gene delivery, and future direction of liposome based gene delivery as a whole. PMID:25250340

  8. Liposomes in topical photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Dragicevic-Curic, Nina; Fahr, Alfred

    2012-08-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) refers to topical application of a photosensitizer onto the site of skin disease which is followed by illumination and results in death of selected cells. The main problem in topical PDT is insufficient penetration of the photosensitizer into the skin, which limits its use to superficial skin lesions. In order to overcome this problem, recent studies tested liposomes as delivery systems for photosensitizers. This paper reviews the use of different types of liposomes for encapsulating photosensitizers for topical PDT. Liposomes should enhance the photosensitizers' penetration into the skin, while decreasing its absorption into systemic circulation. Only few photosensitizers have currently been encapsulated in liposomes for topical PDT: 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), temoporfin (mTHPC) and methylene blue. Investigated liposomes enhanced the skin penetration of 5-ALA and mTHPC, reduced their systemic absorption and reduced their cytotoxicity compared with free drugs. Their high tissue penetration should enable the treatment of deep and hyperkeratotic skin lesions, which is the main goal of using liposomes. However, liposomes still do not attract enough attention as drug carriers in topical PDT. In vivo studies of their therapeutic effectiveness are needed in order to obtain enough evidence for their potential clinical use as carriers for photosensitizers in topical PDT.

  9. Comparison of cDNA and genomic forms of tyrosine hydroxylase gene therapy of the brain with Trojan horse liposomes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chun-Fang; Chu, Chun; Li, Jianyi; Wang, Yuntao; Zhang, Yun; Boado, Ruben J; Pardridge, William M

    2007-07-01

    The present study examines whether chromosomal derived forms of therapeutic genes can be delivered to brain following intravenous administration. The brain expression of a rat tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) cDNA is compared to the brain expression of a plasmid DNA encoding the 18 kb rat TH gene. TH gene expression is measured in cell culture and in vivo in brain in experimental Parkinson's disease (PD). A total of four eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding rat TH were engineered wherein the size of the TH expression cassette ranged from 1.5 kb, in the case of the cDNA form of the gene, to 17.5 kb, in the case of the largest size genomic construct. The TH expression plasmids were delivered to either cultured cells or to rat brain in vivo with Trojan horse liposomes (THLs), which target the non-viral plasmid DNA to cells via cell membrane receptors. The pattern of TH gene expression in cell culture and in vivo was similar: the cDNA form of the TH gene was fast-acting with short duration of action, and the genomic form of the TH gene was slow-acting with longer duration of action. The most sustained replacement of striatal TH enzyme activity in experimental PD was produced by combination gene therapy where both the cDNA and the genomic forms of the TH gene were administered simultaneously. Eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding genomic forms of therapeutic genes, as large as 18 kb, can be successfully incorporated in THLs and delivered to brain following intravenous administration.

  10. Liposomal insulin promoter-thymidine kinase gene therapy followed by ganciclovir effectively ablates human pancreatic cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, James X; Liu, Shi-He; Nemunaitis, John J; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2015-04-10

    PDX1 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and activates the insulin promoter (IP). Adenoviral IP-thymidine kinase and ganciclovir (TK/GCV) suppresses human pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) in mice, but repeated doses carry significant toxicity. We hypothesized that multiple cycles of liposomal IP-TK/GCV ablate human PDAC in SCID mice with minimal toxicity compared to adenoviral IP-TK/GCV. SCID mice with intraperitoneal human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 tumor implants were given a single cycle of 35 µg iv L-IP-TK, or four cycles of 1, 10, 20, 30, or 35 µg iv L-IP-TK (n = 20 per group), followed by intraperitoneal GCV. Insulin and glucose levels were monitored in mice treated with four cycles of 35 µg iv L-IP-TK. We found that four cycles of 10-35 µg L-IP-TK/GCV ablated more PANC-1 tumor volume compared to a single cycle with 35 µg. Mice that received four cycles of 10 µg L-IP-TK demonstrated the longest survival (P < 0.05), with a median survival of 126 days. In comparison, mice that received a single cycle of 35 µg L-IP-TK/GCV or GCV alone survived a median of 92 days and 68.7 days, respectively. There were no significant changes in glucose or insulin levels following treatment. In conclusion, multiple cycles of liposomal IP-TK/GCV ablate human PDAC in SCID mice with minimal toxicity, suggesting non-viral vectors are superior to adenoviral vectors for IP-gene therapy.

  11. Cationic liposome-mediated CXCR4 gene delivery into hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells: implications for clinical transplantation and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Gul-Uludag, Hilal; Xu, Peng; Marquez-Curtis, Leah A; Xing, James; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Chen, Jie

    2012-07-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α/CXCL12 and its receptor CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) play a crucial role in the homing/engraftment and retention of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) in the bone marrow. It has been shown using the viral gene transfer technique that CXCR4 overexpression on human CD34(+) HSPC significantly improves their engraftment in murine models. However, clinical trials with gene therapy have revealed safety concerns related to the immunogenicity of the viral carriers, due to the random integration of viral genes into the host genome. Therefore, a method for CXCR4 gene delivery into HSPC that is safe, nonviral, and highly efficient is needed to improve clinical transplantation and gene therapies. In this work, we investigated the nonviral CXCR4 gene delivery into HSPC using the cationic liposome agent IBAfect. We used CD34(+) cells from cord blood and the models of immature hematopoietic cells expressing CD34 antigen, namely, leukemic cell lines KG-1a and KG-1. Transfection efficiency was determined by flow cytometric analysis 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after transfection, and the viability of cells analyzed by trypan blue exclusion and MTS assays. The functional response of CXCR4-transfected HSPC toward an SDF-1α gradient was determined by chemotaxis assay. We found that ~25% transfection is achieved for KG-1a and KG-1 cells and 20% for HSPC, and that the viability of CXCR4-transfected HSPC is not significantly altered. More importantly, overexpression of CXCR4 using IBAfect significantly increased the chemotaxis of KG-1 cells and HSPC toward SDF-1α. However, we tested 2 other commercially available cationic liposomes (Lipofectamine 2000 and 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane [DOTAP]) in parallel, and we found that they failed to deliver the CXCR4 gene into cells under the same conditions. These results suggest that IBAfect-mediated in vitro gene delivery to overexpress CXCR4 on HSPC is a safe and efficient

  12. Nanoparticle Stabilized Liposomes for Acne Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Victoria

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease that affects over 40 million people in the United States alone. The main cause of acne vulgaris is Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), resides deep in the pores and follicles of the skin in order to feed on oil produced by the sebaceous glands. The liposome is a lipid based nanoparticle with numerous advantages over free drug molecules as an acne treatment alternative. Bare liposomes loaded with lauric acid (LipoLA) were found to show strong antimicrobial activity against P. acnes while generating minimal toxicity. However, the platform is limited by the spontaneous tendency of liposomes to fuse with each other. Attaching nanoparticles to the surface of liposomes can overcome this challenge by providing steric repulsion and reduce surface tension. Thus, carboxyl-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuC) were attached to the surface of liposomes (AuC-liposomes) loaded with doxycycline, a general tetracycline antibiotic. These particles were found to have a diameter of 120 nm and a zeta potential of 20.0 mV. Both fluorescent and antimicrobial studies demonstrated that based on electrostatic interaction, negatively charged AuC attached to the liposome's positively charged surface and stabilized liposomes in a neutral pH environment (pH = 7.4). Upon entering the skin's acidic environment (pH = 4), AuC detached from the liposome's surface and liposomes could fuse with P. acnes residing in the pores. Furthermore, toxicity studies showed that AuC-liposomes did not induce any significant toxicity, while two of the leading over-the-counter therapies, benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid, generated substantial skin irritation.

  13. Intravesical liposome therapy for interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Kashyap, Mahendra; Majima, Tsuyoshi; Kawamorita, Naoki; Yoshizawa, Tsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2017-04-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been lot of interest in the use of liposomes as lipid-based biocompatible carriers for drugs administered by the intravesical route. The lipidic bilayer structure of liposomes facilitates their adherence to the apical membrane surface of luminal cells in the bladder, and their vesicular shape allows them to co-opt the endocytosis machinery for bladder uptake after instillation. Liposomes have been shown to enhance the penetration of both water-soluble and insoluble drugs, toxins, and oligonucleotides across the bladder epithelium. Empty liposomes composed entirely of the endogenous phospholipid, sphingomyelin, could counter mucosal inflammation and promote wound healing in patients suffering from interstitial cystitis. Recent clinical studies have tested multilamellar liposomes composed entirely of sphingomyelin as a novel intravesical therapy for interstitial cystitis. In addition, liposomes have been used as a delivery platform for the instillation of botulinum toxin in overactive bladder patients. The present review discusses the properties of liposomes that are important for their intrinsic therapeutic effect, summarizes the recently completed clinical studies with intravesical liposomes and covers the latest developments in this field. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  14. Barriers to Liposomal Gene Delivery: from Application Site to the Target

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Mostafa; Moghimi, Hamid Reza; Dass, Crispin R

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a therapeutic approach to deliver genetic material into cells to alter their function in entire organism. One promising form of gene delivery system (DDS) is liposomes. The success of liposome-mediated gene delivery is a multifactorial issue and well-designed liposomal systems might lead to optimized gene transfection particularly in vivo. Liposomal gene delivery systems face different barriers from their site of application to their target, which is inside the cells. These barriers include presystemic obstacles (epithelial barriers), systemic barriers in blood circulation and cellular barriers. Epithelial barriers differ depending on the route of administration. Systemic barriers include enzymatic degradation, binding and opsonisation. Both of these barriers can act as limiting hurdles that genetic material and their vector should overcome before reaching the cells. Finally liposomes should overcome cellular barriers that include cell entrance, endosomal escape and nuclear uptake. These barriers and their impact on liposomal gene delivery will be discussed in this review. PMID:28228799

  15. Liposomal boron delivery for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Tumor cell destruction in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between (10)B and thermal neutrons. The thermal neutrons have an energy of 0.025 eV, clearly below the threshold energy required to ionize tissue components. However, neutron capture by (10)B produces lithium ion and helium (alpha-particles), which are high linear energy transfer (LET) particles, and dissipate their kinetic energy before traveling one cell diameter (5-9 microm) in biological tissues, ensuring their potential for precise cell killing. BNCT has been applied clinically for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, malignant melanoma, head and neck cancer, and hepatoma using two boron compounds: sodium borocaptate (Na(2)(10)B(12)H(11)SH; Na(2)(10)BSH) and l-p-boronophenylalanine (l-(10)BPA). These low molecular weight compounds are cleared easily from the cancer cells and blood. Therefore, high accumulation and selective delivery of boron compounds into tumor tissues are most important to achieve effective BNCT and to avoid damage of adjacent healthy cells. Much attention has been focused on the liposomal drug delivery system (DDS) as an attractive, intelligent technology of targeting and controlled release of (10)B compounds. Two approaches have been investigated for incorporation of (10)B into liposomes: (1) encapsulation of (10)B compounds into liposomes and (2) incorporation of (10)B-conjugated lipids into the liposomal bilayer. Our laboratory has developed boron ion cluster lipids for application of the latter approach. In this chapter, our boron lipid liposome approaches as well as recent developments of the liposomal boron delivery system are summarized.

  16. Modulation of in utero total body irradiation induced newborn mouse growth retardation by maternal manganese superoxide dismutase-plasmid liposome (MnSOD-PL) gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Epperly, M W; Smith, T; Zhang, X; Goff, J P; Franicola, D; Greenberger, B; Komanduri, P; Wang, H; Greenberger, J S

    2011-06-01

    To determine the effects of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) plasmid liposome (PL) maternal radioprotection on fetal mice, timed pregnant female mice (E14 gestation) were irradiated to 3.0 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) dose, and the number, weight and growth and development over 6 months after birth of newborn mice was quantitated compared with irradiated controls. Maternal MnSOD-PL treatment at E13 improved pup survival at birth (5.4±0.9 per litter) compared with non-irradiated 3.0 Gy controls 4.9±1.1. There was no statistically significant difference in newborn abnormalities, male to female ratio in newborn litters, or other evidence of teratogenesis in surviving newborn mice from MnSOD-PL treated compared with irradiated controls. However, E14 3 Gy irradiated pups from gene therapy-treated mothers showed a significant increase in both growth and overall survival over 6 months after birth (P=0.0022). To determine if transgene product crossed the placenta pregnant E13 mice were injected intravenously with hemagglutinin-epitope-tagged MnSOD (100 μg plasmid in 100 μl liposomes), then after 24 h, fetal mice, placentas and maternal tissues were removed and tested by both immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase-PCR for transgene and product. There was no evidence of transgene or product in placenta or any fetal tissue while maternal liver was positive by both assays. The data provide evidence for fetal radioprotection by maternal MnSOD-PL gene therapy before irradiation, which is mediated by an indirect bystander effect and is associated with a significant improvement in both survival at birth and growth and development of newborn mice.

  17. Terpene-loaded Liposomes and Isopropyl Myristate as Chemical Permeation Enhancers Toward Liposomal Gene Delivery in Lung Cancer cells; A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Mostafa; Hoseini Shirazi, Farshad; Moghimi, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is in its development stage as a novel method for cancer treatment. Liposomes look promising as gene delivery vectors; however, investigations have shown that these vesicles are not doing well in some cases. It was decided here to investigate the possibility of augmentation of liposomal gene delivery by chemical penetration enhancers. Cationic liposome containing antisense oligonucleotide (AsODN) against lung cancer was prepared by ethanol injection method. Liposomal cineole and limonene (as enhancers) were prepared by film hydration method. Isopropyl myristate (IPM) was also investigated as penetration enhancer. Liposomes were evaluated for their size, zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency. Cancer cells (A549) were pretreated with liposomal terpenes prior to treatment with liposomal antisense or scrambled oligonucleotide. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. Oligonucleotide -containing liposome showed particle size of about115 nm and zeta potential of 0.6 mV. Liposomal cineole significantly (P<0.05) increased specific activity of liposomal antisense but limonene didn’t show such an effect. IPM increased both specific and non-specific cytotoxicity of Oligonucleotide. These results show that penetration enhancers (such as cineole) may be used for improving liposomal gene delivery and to reduce non-specific toxicity. Concentration and chemical nature of enhancer has prominent effect in their efficacy. PMID:27980561

  18. Gene delivery to periodontal tissue using Bubble liposomes and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sugano, M; Negishi, Y; Endo-Takahashi, Y; Hamano, N; Usui, M; Suzuki, R; Maruyama, K; Aramaki, Y; Yamamoto, M

    2014-06-01

    Periodontitis is the most common inflammatory disease caused by oral biofilm infection. For efficient periodontal treatment, it is important to enhance the outcome of existing regenerative therapies. The physical action of an ultrasound may be able to deliver a therapeutic gene or drugs into the local area of the periodontium being treated for periodontal regeneration. Previously, we developed "Bubble liposomes" as a useful carrier for gene or drug delivery, and reported that delivery efficiency was increased with high-frequency ultrasound in vitro and in vivo. Hence, the aim of the present study was to examine the possibility of delivering genes into gingival tissues using Bubble liposomes and ultrasound. We attempted to deliver naked plasmid DNA encoding luciferase or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into the lower labial gingiva of Wistar rats using Bubble liposomes, with or without ultrasound exposure. Ultrasound parameters were optimized for intensity (0-4.0 W/cm(2) ) and exposure time (0-120 s) to establish the most efficient conditions for exposure. The efficacy and duration of gene expression in the gingiva were investigated using a luciferase assay and fluorescence microscopy. The strongest relative luciferase activity was observed when rats were treated under the following ultrasound conditions: 2.0 W/cm(2) intensity and 30 s of exposure time. Relative luciferase activity, 1 d after gene delivery, was significantly higher in gingiva treated using Bubble liposomes and ultrasound than in gingiva of the other treatment groups. Histological analysis also showed that distinct EGFP-expressing cells were observed in transfected gingiva when rats were treated under optimized conditions. From these results, the combination of Bubble liposomes and ultrasound provides an efficient technique for delivering plasmid DNA into the gingiva. This technique can be applied for the delivery of a variety of therapeutic molecules into target tissue, and may serve as a

  19. Characterisation of gene delivery using liposomal bubbles and ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshima, Risa; Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Hirata, Keiichi; Nomura, Tetsuya; Negishi, Yoichi; Utoguchi, Naoki; Kudo, Nobuki; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    The combination of nano/microbubbles and ultrasound is a novel technique for a non-viral gene deliver. We have previously developed novel ultrasound sensitive liposomes (Bubble liposomes) which contain the ultrasound imaging gas perfluoropropane. In this study, Bubble liposomes were compared with cationic lipid (CL)-DNA complexes as potential gene delivery carriers into tumors in vivo. The delivery of genes by bubble liposomes depended on the intensity of the applied ultrasound. The transfection efficiency plateaued at 0.7 W/cm2 ultrasound intensity. Bubble liposomes efficiently transferred genes into cultured cells even when the cells were exposed to ultrasound for only 1 s. In addition, bubble liposomes were able to introduce the luciferase gene more effectively than CL-DNA complexes into mouse ascites tumor cells. We conclude that the combination of Bubble liposomes and ultrasound is a good method for gene transfer in vivo.

  20. RNAi-mediated gene knockdown and anti-angiogenic therapy of RCCs using a cyclic RGD-modified liposomal-siRNA system.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yu; Hatakeyama, Hiroto; Sato, Yusuke; Hyodo, Mamoru; Akita, Hidetaka; Ohga, Noritaka; Hida, Kyoko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-01-10

    Angiogenesis is one of crucial processes associated with tumor growth and development, and consequently a prime target for cancer therapy. Although tumor endothelial cells (TECs) play a key role in pathological angiogenesis, investigating phenotypical changes in neovessels when a gene expression in TEC is suppressed is a difficult task. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) represents a potential agent due to its ability to silence a gene of interest. We previously developed a system for in vivo siRNA delivery to cancer cells that involves a liposomal-delivery system, a MEND that contains a unique pH-sensitive cationic lipid, YSK05 (YSK-MEND). In the present study, we report on the development of a system that permits the delivery of siRNA to TECs by combining the YSK-MEND and a ligand that is specific to TECs. Cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys) (cRGD) is a well-known ligand to αVβ3 integrin, which is selectively expressed at high levels in TECs. We incorporated cRGD into the YSK-MEND (RGD-MEND) to achieve an efficient gene silencing in TECs. Quantitative RT-PCR and the 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR indicated that the intravenous injection of RGD-MEND at a dose of 4.0mg/kg induced a significant RNAi-mediated gene reduction in TEC but not in endothelial cells of other organs. Finally, we evaluated the therapeutic potency of the RGD-MEND encapsulating siRNA against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. A substantial delay in tumor growth was observed after three sequential RGD-MEND injections on alternate days. In conclusion, the RGD-MEND represents a new approach for the characterization of TECs and for us in anti-angiogenic therapy.

  1. A first step toward liposome-mediated intracellular bacteriophage therapy.

    PubMed

    Nieth, Anita; Verseux, Cyprien; Barnert, Sabine; Süss, Regine; Römer, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria presents a severe challenge to medicine and public health. While bacteriophage therapy is a promising alternative to traditional antibiotics, the general inability of bacteriophages to penetrate eukaryotic cells limits their use against resistant bacteria, causing intracellular diseases like tuberculosis. Bacterial vectors show some promise in carrying therapeutic bacteriophages into cells, but also bring a number of risks like an overload of bacterial antigens or the acquisition of virulence genes from the pathogen. As a first step in the development of a non-bacterial vector for bacteriophage delivery into pathogen-infected cells, we attempted to encapsulate bacteriophages into liposomes. Here we report effective encapsulation of the model bacteriophage λeyfp and the mycobacteriophage TM4 into giant liposomes. Furthermore, we show that liposome-associated bacteriophages are taken up into eukaryotic cells more efficiently than free bacteriophages. These are important milestones in the development of an intracellular bacteriophage therapy that might be useful in the fight against multi-drug-resistant intracellular pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  2. A novel cationic liposome formulation for efficient gene delivery via a pulmonary route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Liu, Donghua; Sun, Xiaoli; Liu, Chunxi; Liu, Yongjun; Zhang, Na

    2011-06-01

    The clinical success of gene therapy for lung cancer is not only dependent on efficient gene carriers but also on a suitable delivery route. A pulmonary delivery route can directly deliver gene vectors to the lung which is more efficient than a systemic delivery route. For gene carriers, cationic liposomes have recently emerged as leading non-viral vectors in worldwide gene therapy clinical trials. However, cytotoxic effects or apoptosis are often observed which is mostly dependent on the cationic lipid used. Therefore, an efficient and safe cationic lipid, 6-lauroxyhexyl lysinate (LHLN), previously synthesized by our group was first used to prepare cationic liposomes. Physicochemical and biological properties of LHLN-liposomes were investigated. LHLN-liposome/DNA complexes showed positive surface charge, spherical morphology, a relatively narrow particle size distribution and strong DNA binding capability. Compared with Lipofectamine2000, the new cationic liposome formulation using LHLN exhibited not only lower cytotoxicity (P < 0.05) but also similar transfection efficiency in A549 and HepG2 lung cancer cells for in vitro tests. When administered by intratracheal instillation into rat lungs for in vivo evaluation, LHLN-liposome/DNA complexes exhibited higher pulmonary gene transfection efficiency than Lipofectamine2000/DNA complexes (P < 0.05). These results suggested that LHLN-liposomes may have great potential for efficient pulmonary gene delivery.

  3. Topical liposome targeting of dyes, melanins, genes, and proteins selectively to hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, R M

    1998-01-01

    For therapeutic and cosmetic modification of hair, we have developed a hair-follicle-selective macromolecule and small molecule targeting system with topical application of phosphatidylcholine-based liposomes. Liposome-entrapped melanins, proteins, genes, and small-molecules have been selectively targeted to the hair follicle and hair shafts of mice. Liposomal delivery of these molecules is time dependent. Negligible amounts of delivered molecules enter the dermis, epidermis, or bloodstream thereby demonstrating selective follicle delivery. Naked molecules are trapped in the stratum corneum and are unable to enter the follicle. The potential of the hair-follicle liposome delivery system for therapeutic use for hair disease as well as for cosmesis has been demonstrated in 3-dimensional histoculture of hair-growing skin and mouse in vivo models. Topical liposome selective delivery to hair follicles has demonstrated the ability to color hair with melanin, the delivery of the active lac-Z gene to hair matrix cells and delivery of proteins as well. Liposome-targeting of molecules to hair follicles has also been achieved in human scalp in histoculture. Liposomes thus have high potential in selective hair follicle targeting of large and small molecules, including genes, opening the field of gene therapy and other molecular therapy of the hair process to restore hair growth, physiologically restore or alter hair pigment, and to prevent or accelerate hair loss.

  4. Application of long-circulating liposomes to cancer photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Oku, N; Saito, N; Namba, Y; Tsukada, H; Dolphin, D; Okada, S

    1997-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a cancer treatment is notable for its quite low side effects in comparison with those of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, the accumulation of porphyrin derivatives used in PDT into tumor tissues is rather low. Since long-circulating liposomes are known to accumulate passively into tumor tissues, we liposomalized a porphyrin derivative, benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA), and used these liposomes to investigate the usefulness of PDT for tumor-bearing mice. BPD-MA was liposomalized into glucuronate-modified liposomes, which are known to be long-circulating. These liposomes were injected i.v. into Balb/c mice bearing Meth A sarcoma, and tumor regression and survival time were monitored after irradiation with laser light. Tumor regression and complete curing of tumor (80% cure rate by the treatment with 6 mg/kg BPD-MA) were observed when long circulating liposomalized BPD-MA was injected and laser-irradiated. In contrast, only a 20% cure rate was obtained when the animals were treated with BPD-MA solution or BPD-MA entrapped in conventional liposomes. These results suggest that a long-circulating liposomal formulation of photo-sensitive agents is useful for PDT.

  5. Liposomal Indocyanine Green for Enhanced Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hwan-Jun; Lee, Hye-Seong; Lim, Ji-Young; Park, Ji-Ho

    2017-02-22

    In this study, we engineered liposomal indocyanine green (ICG) to maximize its photothermal effects while maintaining the fluorescence intensity. Various liposomal formulations of ICG were prepared by varying the lipid composition and the molar ratio between total lipid and ICG, and their photothermal characteristics were evaluated under near-infrared irradiation. We showed that the ICG dispersity in the liposomal membrane and its physical interaction with phospholipids were the main factors determining the photothermal conversion efficiency. In phototherapeutic studies, the optimized formulation of liposomal ICG showed greater anticancer effects in a mouse tumor model compared with other liposomal formulations and the free form of ICG. Furthermore, we utilized liposomal ICG to visualize the metastatic lymph node around the primary tumor under fluorescence imaging guidance and ablate the lymph node with the enhanced photothermal effect, indicating the potential for selective treatment of metastatic lymph node.

  6. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  7. Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your DNA — the code that controls much of your body's form and function, from making you grow taller to regulating your body systems. Genes that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds ...

  8. Development of Liposomal Bubbles with Perfluoropropane Gas as Gene Delivery Carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Kazuo; Suzuki, Ryo; Sawamura, Kaori; Takizawa, Tomoko; Utoguchi, Naoki; Negishi, Yoichi

    2007-05-01

    Liposomes have some advantages as drug, antigen and gene delivery carriers. Their size can be easily controlled and they can be modified to add a targeting function. Based on liposome technology, we developed novel liposomal bubbles (Bubble liposomes) containing the ultrasound imaging gas, perfluoropropane. We assessed the feasibility of Bubble liposomes as carriers for gene delivery after cavitation induced by ultrasound. At first, we investigated their ability to deliver genes with Bubble liposomes and ultrasound to various types of cells such as mouse sarcoma cells, mouse melanoma cells, human T cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The results showed that the Bubble liposomes could deliver plasmid DNA to many cell types without cytotoxicity. In addition, we found that Bubble liposomes could effectively deliver plasmid DNA into mouse femoral artery in vivo. The gene transduction with Bubble liposomes was more effectively than conventional lipofection. We conclude that Bubble liposomes are unique and efficient gene delivery carriers in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Antifungal Lock Therapy with Liposomal Amphotericin B: A Prospective Trial.

    PubMed

    McGhee, William; Michaels, Marian G; Martin, Judith M; Mazariegos, George V; Green, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a prospective pilot study to evaluate the potential role of combined systemic antifungal and liposomal amphotericin B lock therapy in children with intestinal insufficiency with fungal catheter-related bloodstream infections whose central venous catheters had not been removed. Our results provide supportive evidence for the conduct of larger clinical trials to confirm the efficacy and safety of this approach.

  10. Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, E.L.; Krebsbach, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is defined as the treatment of disease by transfer of genetic material into cells. This review will explore methods available for gene transfer as well as current and potential applications for craniofacial regeneration, with emphasis on future development and design. Though non-viral gene delivery methods are limited by low gene transfer efficiency, they benefit from relative safety, low immunogenicity, ease of manufacture, and lack of DNA insert size limitation. In contrast, viral vectors are nature’s gene delivery machines that can be optimized to allow for tissue-specific targeting, site-specific chromosomal integration, and efficient long-term infection of dividing and non-dividing cells. In contrast to traditional replacement gene therapy, craniofacial regeneration seeks to use genetic vectors as supplemental building blocks for tissue growth and repair. Synergistic combination of viral gene therapy with craniofacial tissue engineering will significantly enhance our ability to repair and replace tissues in vivo. PMID:19641145

  11. Intramuscular Injection of Angiogenic Gene with Bubble Liposomes Followed by Ultrasound Exposure to Improve Angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negishi, Yoichi; Matsuo, Keiko; Endo-Takahashi, Yoko; Suzuki, Kentaro; Matsuki, Yuuki; Takagi, Norio; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Aramaki, Yukihiko

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasound (US) in combination with microbubbles has recently engendered much attention as a safe method of gene delivery. Previously, we have developed polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-modified liposomes entrapping echo-contrast gas. We have called the liposomes "Bubble liposomes" (BLs). In this study, to assess the feasibility and the effectiveness of BLs for angiogenic gene delivery in clinical use, we tried to deliver bFGF (an angiogenic factor) expressing plasmid DNA into a mouse hindlimb ischemia model by the combination of BLs and US exposure. After femoral artery ligation, the hindlimb of ischemic mice were treated with BLs and US-mediated intramuscular gene transfer of bFGF expressing plasmid DNA. After the treatment, blood flow was determined over 2 weeks using laser doppler blood flow meter. As a result, the blood flow in the treated groups with BLs and US-mediated the gene transfer was quickly measured, and compared to other treatment groups (non-treated, bFGF alone, or bFGF+US). Furthermore, the number of CD31 positive cells was higher in the treatment groups with BLs and US-mediated the gene transfer than in other treatment groups. These results suggest that intramuscular injection of bFGF as an angiogenic gene with Bubble liposomes followed by ultrasound exposure improved angiogenesis in the ischemic muscle. Thus, gene transfer into the ischemic muscle by the combination of BLs and US exposure is an effective means of angiogenic gene therapy.

  12. Gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Williamson, B

    1982-07-29

    Gene therapy is not yet possible, but may become feasible soon, particularly for well understood gene defects. Although treatment of a patient raises no ethical problems once it can be done well, changing the genes of an early embryo is more difficult, controversial and unlikely to be required clinically.

  13. Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Barb; Takeya, Ryan; Vitelli, Francesca; Swanson, Xin

    2017-03-14

    Gene therapy refers to a rapidly growing field of medicine in which genes are introduced into the body to treat or prevent diseases. Although a variety of methods can be used to deliver the genetic materials into the target cells and tissues, modified viral vectors represent one of the more common delivery routes because of its transduction efficiency for therapeutic genes. Since the introduction of gene therapy concept in the 1970s, the field has advanced considerably with notable clinical successes being demonstrated in many clinical indications in which no standard treatment options are currently available. It is anticipated that the clinical success the field observed in recent years can drive requirements for more scalable, robust, cost effective, and regulatory-compliant manufacturing processes. This review provides a brief overview of the current manufacturing technologies for viral vectors production, drawing attention to the common upstream and downstream production process platform that is applicable across various classes of viral vectors and their unique manufacturing challenges as compared to other biologics. In addition, a case study of an industry-scale cGMP production of an AAV-based gene therapy product performed at 2,000 L-scale is presented. The experience and lessons learned from this largest viral gene therapy vector production run conducted to date as discussed and highlighted in this review should contribute to future development of commercial viable scalable processes for vial gene therapies.

  14. Biosurfactant MEL-A enhances cellular association and gene transfection by cationic liposome.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Saki; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Maitani, Yoshie

    2006-05-30

    Mannnosylerythritol lipid A (MEL-A), a biosurfactant produced by microorganisms, has many biological activities. To enhance the gene transfection efficiency of a cationic liposome, we prepared a MEL-liposome (MEL-L) composed of 3beta-[N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol (DC-Chol), dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and MEL-A, and investigated its transfection efficiency in human cervix carcinoma Hela cells. MEL-L was about 40 nm in size, and the MEL-L/plasmid DNA complex (MEL-lipoplex) remained an injectable size (169 nm). MEL-A induced a significantly higher level of gene expression, compared to commercially available Tfx20 and the liposome without MEL-A (Cont-L). Analysis of flow cytometric profiles clearly indicated that the amount of DNA associated with the cells was rapidly increased and sustained by addition of MEL-A to the liposome. Confocal microscopic observation indicated that the MEL-lipoplex distributed widely in the cytoplasm, and the DNA was detected strongly in the cytoplasm and around the nucleus, compared with Cont-L. These results suggested that MEL-A increased gene expression by enhancing the association of the lipoplexes with the cells in serum. MEL-L might prove a remarkable non-viral vector for gene transfection and gene therapy.

  15. Gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Drugan, A; Miller, O J; Evans, M I

    1987-01-01

    Severe genetic disorders are potentially correctable by the addition of a normal gene into tissues. Although the technical problems involving integration, stable expression, and insertional damage to the treated cell are not yet fully solved, enough scientific progress has already been made to consider somatic cell gene therapy acceptable from both the ethical and scientific viewpoints. The resolutions to problems evolving from somatic cell gene therapy will help to overcome the technical difficulties encountered presently with germ line gene manipulation. This procedure would then become morally permissible as it will cause, in time, a reduction in the pool of abnormal genes in the population. Enhancement genetic engineering is technically feasible but morally unacceptable. Eugenic genetic engineering is not technically possible or ethically permissible in the foreseeable future.

  16. Enhanced combination therapy effect on paclitaxel-resistant carcinoma by chloroquine co-delivery via liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Menghua; Xu, Yuzhen; Qiu, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    A novel composite liposomal system co-encapsulating paclitaxel (PTX) with chloroquine phosphate (CQ) was designed for treating PTX-resistant carcinoma. It was confirmed that liposomal CQ can sensitize PTX by means of autophagy inhibition and competitively binding with multidrug-resistance transporters. Furthermore, according to the in vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis assay, real-time observation of cellular uptake, and in vivo tissue distribution study, co-encapsulation of PTX and CQ in liposomes was validated as superior to the mixture of PTX liposome plus CQ liposome due to the simultaneous delivery and synergetic effect of the two drugs. Consequently, this composite liposome achieved significantly stronger anticancer efficacy in vivo than the PTX liposome plus CQ liposome mixture. This study helps to guide and enlighten ongoing and future clinical trials about the optimal administration modes for drug combination therapy. PMID:26543365

  17. Self-assembled liposomal nanoparticles in photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sadasivam, Magesh; Avci, Pinar; Gupta, Gaurav K.; Lakshmanan, Shanmugamurthy; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Huang, Ying-Ying; Kumar, Raj; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs the combination of non-toxic photosensitizers (PS) together with harmless visible light of the appropriate wavelength to produce reactive oxygen species that kill unwanted cells. Because many PS are hydrophobic molecules prone to aggregation, numerous drug delivery vehicles have been tested to solubilize these molecules, render them biocompatible and enhance the ease of administration after intravenous injection. The recent rise in nanotechnology has markedly expanded the range of these nanoparticulate delivery vehicles beyond the well-established liposomes and micelles. Self-assembled nanoparticles are formed by judicious choice of monomer building blocks that spontaneously form a well-oriented 3-dimensional structure that incorporates the PS when subjected to the appropriate conditions. This self-assembly process is governed by a subtle interplay of forces on the molecular level. This review will cover the state of the art in the preparation and use of self-assembled liposomal nanoparticles within the context of PDT. PMID:24348377

  18. Tumor specific ultrasound enhanced gene transfer in vivo with novel liposomal bubbles.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryo; Takizawa, Tomoko; Negishi, Yoichi; Utoguchi, Naoki; Sawamura, Kaori; Tanaka, Kumiko; Namai, Eisuke; Oda, Yusuke; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2008-01-22

    Bubble liposomes (liposomes which entrap an ultrasound imaging gas) may constitute a unique system for delivering various molecules efficiently into mammalian cells in vitro. In this study, Bubble liposomes were compared with cationic lipid (CL)-DNA complexes as potential gene delivery carriers into tumor in vivo. The delivery of genes by Bubble liposomes depended on the intensity of the applied ultrasound. Transfection efficiency plateaued at 0.7 W/cm(2) ultrasound intensity. Bubble liposomes efficiently transferred genes into cultured cells even when the cells were exposed to ultrasound for only 1 s. In addition, Bubble liposomes could introduce the luciferase gene more effectively than CL-DNA complexes into mouse ascites tumor cells and solid tumor tissue. We conclude that the combination of Bubble liposomes and ultrasound is a minimally-invasive and tumor specific gene transfer method in vivo.

  19. Multifunctional liposomes for enhanced anti-cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcao, Claudio Borges

    2011-12-01

    Macromolecular drugs have great promises for cancer treatment, such as the pro-apoptotic peptide D-(KLAKLAK)2 and the bcl-2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide G3139. However, these macromolecules require efficient drug carriers, like liposomes, to deliver them inside cells. Also, if these macromolecules can be combined in a single liposome, the cancer cell killing will be greater than using just one. With this possibility in mind, cationic liposomes (CLs) were elaborated to encapsulate both macromolecules and deliver them inside cells. Later, surface modification of CLs was investigated through the addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to obtain long-circulating liposomes. CLs were prepared through charge alternation among D-(KLAKLAK)2 , G3139 and DOTAP. These liposomes were characterized with particle size and zeta-potential measurements, antisense entrapment and peptide loading efficiency. The in vitro effects of CL formulations were tested with B16(F10) cells through viability studies, uptake assay and detection of apoptosis. CL formulations were also applied in vivo in B16(F10) tumor-bearing mice through intratumoral injections, and tumor growth inhibition and detection of apoptosis were evaluated. Next, the mechanism of action of the CL formulations was investigated by Western blotting. Later, PEG was incorporated at increasing amounts to the liposomes to determine which concentration can better prevent interactions between PEG-cationic liposomes (PCL) and B16(F10) cells. Next, pH-cleavable PEG was prepared and then added to the liposomes in the same amount that PEG in PCL could decrease interaction with cells. Finally, cell viability studies were performed with CL, PCL and pH-sensitive PCL (pH-PCL) formulations after pre-incubation at pH 7.4 or at pH 5.0. Positively charged CL particles were obtained after encapsulation of negatively charged D-(KLAKLAK)2/G3139 complexes. In vitro , CLs containing D-(KLAKLAK)2/G3139 complexes could reduce B16(F10) cell viability

  20. Dodecaborate lipid liposomes as new vehicles for boron delivery system of neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Manabu; Ban, Hyun Seung; Nakai, Kei; Inomata, Ryu; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Matsumura, Akira; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2010-05-01

    Closo-dodecaborate lipid liposomes were developed as new vehicles for boron delivery system (BDS) of neutron capture therapy. The current approach is unique because the liposome shell itself possesses cytocidal potential in combination with neutron irradiation. The liposomes composed of closo-dodecaborate lipids DSBL and DPBL displayed high cytotoxicity with thermal neutron irradiation. The closo-dodecaborate lipid liposomes were taken up into the cytoplasm by endocytosis without degradation of the liposomes. Boron concentration of 22.7 ppm in tumor was achieved by injection with DSBL-25% PEG liposomes at 20mg B/kg. Promising BNCT effects were observed in the mice injected with DSBL-25% PEG liposomes: the tumor growth was significantly suppressed after thermal neutron irradiation (1.8 x 10(12)neutrons/cm(2)). (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sirolimus encapsulated liposomes for cancer therapy: physicochemical and mechanical characterization of sirolimus distribution within liposome bilayers.

    PubMed

    Onyesom, Ichioma; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Sygellou, Lamprini; Owusu-Ware, Samuel K; Antonijevic, Milan; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Douroumis, Dennis

    2013-11-04

    Sirolimus has recently been introduced as a therapeutic agent for breast and prostate cancer. In the current study, conventional and Stealth liposomes were used as carriers for the encapsulation of sirolimus. The physicochemical characteristics of the sirolimus liposome nanoparticles were investigated including the particle size, zeta potential, stability and membrane integrity. In addition atomic force microscopy was used to study the morphology, surface roughness and mechanical properties such as elastic modulus deformation and deformation. Sirolimus encapsulation in Stealth liposomes showed a high degree of deformation and lower packing density especially for dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) Stealth liposomes compared to unloaded. Similar results were obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies; sirolimus loaded liposomes were found to result in a distorted state of the bilayer. X-ray photon electron (XPS) analysis revealed a uniform distribution of sirolimus in multilamellar DPPC Stealth liposomes compared to a nonuniform, greater outer layer lamellar distribution in distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) Stealth liposomes.

  2. Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Posner, Robert

    2002-09-01

    Robert Posner has 40 years of experience in skin care bench chemistry, product development, and sales and marketing. Working closely with dermatologists and plastic surgeons, Posner is a former member of the NY State Hospital Pharmacists Association, the American Pharmaceutical Association, and the American Association of Hospital Pharmacists. Currently, Posner sits on the Board of Directors of EMDA (Esthetic Manufacturers and Distributors Association). Posner has written numerous articles for Les Nouvelles Esthetiques Magazine, is presently a consultant for Day Spa Magazine, and had been one of only two non-dermatologists on a consultant basis with Cosmetic Dermatology Journal. Posner's company--ABBE Cosmetic Group International in Farmingdale, NY--formulates and manufactures skin care products for many well-known companies in the beauty industry. For many years, both the bench chemist and the dermatologist have been concerned with developing an ideal base for deliverance of 'actives' to the human epidermis. As is common knowledge, the skin is a protective organ which allows very few materials to penetrate. Some bases are unable to work effectively because of their relative inability to penetrate the stratum corneum; for example, some notable actives such as collagen and elastin are molecules too large to penetrate effectively. With the liposome at our command however, we can carry and then release an active into several layers of epidermis. We can release both oil- and water-soluble actives, and at the same time control the feel and effectiveness of a topical application. This article will examine the liposome: what it is, how it works, and how products made with liposomes can benefit dermatology.

  3. Possible mechanism of polycation liposome (PCL)-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Mayu; Matsuura, Mituso; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Kosaka, Jun; Nango, Mamoru; Oku, Naoto

    2004-01-28

    A novel gene transfer system utilizing polycation liposomes (PCLs), obtained by modifying liposomes with cetyl polyethylenimine (PEI), was previously developed (Gene Ther. 7 (2002) 1148). PCLs show notable transfection efficiency with low cytotoxicity. However, the mechanism of PCL-mediated gene transfer is still unclear. In this study, we examined the intracellular trafficking of PCL-DNA complexes by using HT1080 cells, fluorescent probe-labeled materials, and confocal laser scan microscopy. We found that the PCL-DNA complexes were taken up into cells by the endosomal pathway, since both cellular uptake of the complex and gene expression were blocked by wortmannin, an inhibitor of this pathway. We also observed that the plasmid DNA and cetyl PEI complex became detached from the PCL lipids and was preferentially transferred into the nucleus in the form of the complex, whereas the PCL lipids remained in the cytoplasmic area, possibly in the endosomes. In fact, nigericin, which dissipates the pH gradient across the endosomal membrane, inhibited the detachment of lipids from the PCL-DNA complex and subsequent gene expression. Taken together, our data indicate the following mechanism for gene transfer by PCLs: PCLs effectively transfer DNA to endosomes and release cetyl PEI-DNA complexes into the cytosol. Furthermore, cetyl PEI also contributes to gene entry into the nucleus.

  4. Spermidinium closo-dodecaborate-encapsulating liposomes as efficient boron delivery vehicles for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, Shoji; Miyoshi, Tatsuro; Koganei, Hayato; El-Zaria, Mohamed E; Viñas, Clara; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-21

    closo-Dodecaborate-encapsulating liposomes were developed as boron delivery vehicles for neutron capture therapy. The use of spermidinium as a counter cation of closo-dodecaborates was essential not only for the preparation of high boron content liposome solutions but also for efficient boron delivery to tumors.

  5. [Development of high boron content liposomes and their promising antitumor effect for neutron capture therapy].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

      High accumulation and selective delivery of boron into tumor tissue are the most important requirements to achieve the efficient cell-killing effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) that relies on the nuclear reaction of two essentially nontoxic species, boron-10 ((10)B) and thermal neutrons in boron-loaded tissues. Recent development of boron cluster lipids and their liposomal boron delivery system (BDS) are summarized in this article. Boron compounds that have no affinity to tumor can potentially be delivered to tumor tissues by liposomes, therefore, liposomal BDS would be one of the most attractive approaches for efficient BNCT of various cancers. There are two approaches for BDS: encapsulation of boron compounds into liposomes and incorporation of boron-conjugated lipids into the liposomal bilayer. The combination of both approaches has a potential for reduction of the total dose of liposomes without reducing the efficacy of BNCT.

  6. Gold conjugate-based liposomes with hybrid cluster bomb structure for liver cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Huan; Liu, Ai-Yun; Shen, Jia-Jia; Shah, Vishva; Zhang, Can; Hong, Jin; Ding, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid drug delivery system containing both organic and inorganic nanocarriers is expected to achieve its complementary advantages for the aim of improving the performance of antineoplastic drugs in tumor therapy. Here we report the use of liposomes and gold nanoparticles to construct a liposome with a hybrid Cluster Bomb structure and discuss its unique multi-order drug release property for liver tumor treatment. A very simple method is used for the hybrid liposome preparation and involves mixing two solutions containing liposomes loaded with either non-covalent or covalent Paclitaxel (PTX, namely free PTX or PTX-conjugated GNPs, respectively) by different ratio of volume (25:75, 50:50, 25:75, v/v). Various mixed liposomes were tested to determine the optimal conditions for maximum drug delivery. The optimized liposome was then tested using xenograft Heps tumor-bearing mice and showed the best efficacy for chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumor at PTX liposome: PTX-conjugated GNP liposome of 25:75 ratio (v/v). This system allows for simple and easy preparation while providing a more accurate site- and time-release mode for tumor treatment using antitumor drugs.

  7. Engineered liposomes for potential alpha-particle therapy of metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Sofou, Stavroula; Thomas, James L; Lin, Hung-yin; McDevitt, Michael R; Scheinberg, David A; Sgouros, George

    2004-02-01

    Disseminated, metastatic cancer is frequently incurable. Targeted alpha-particle emitters hold great promise as therapeutic agents for disseminated disease. (225)Ac is a radionuclide generator that has a 10-d half-life and results in alpha-emitting daughter elements ((221)Fr, (217)At, (213)Bi) that lead to the emission of a total of 4 alpha-particles. The aim of this study was to develop approaches for stable and controlled targeting of (225)Ac to sites of disseminated tumor metastases. Liposomes with encapsulated (225)Ac were developed to retain the potentially toxic daughters at the tumor site. (225)Ac was passively entrapped in liposomes. To experimentally test the retention of actinium and its daughters by the liposomes, the gamma-emissions of (213)Bi were measured in liposome fractions, which were separated from the parent liposome population and the free radionuclides, at different times. Under equilibrium conditions the decay rate of (213)Bi was used to determine the concentration of (225)Ac. Measurements of the kinetics of (213)Bi activity were performed to estimate the entrapment of (213)Bi, the last alpha-emitting daughter in the decay chain. Stable pegylated phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol liposomes of different sizes and charge were prepared. Multiple (more than 2) (225)Ac atoms were successfully entrapped per liposome. (225)Ac retention by zwitterionic liposomes was more than 88% over 30 d. Retention by cationic liposomes was lower. A theoretical calculation showed that for satisfactory (213)Bi retention (>50%), liposomes of relatively large sizes (>650 nm in diameter) are required. (213)Bi retention was experimentally verified to be liposome-size dependent. For large liposomes, the measured (213)Bi retention was lower than theoretically predicted (less than 10%). This work supports the hypothesis that it may be possible to develop (225)Ac-based therapies by delivering multiple (225)Ac atoms in liposomes. Improvements in the retention of (225)Ac

  8. Preparation of Trojan horse liposomes (THLs) for gene transfer across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2010-04-01

    Nonviral plasmid DNA is delivered to the brain via a transvascular route across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following intravenous administration of DNA encapsulated within Trojan horse liposomes (THLs), also called PEGylated immunoliposomes (PILs). The liposome surface is covered with several thousand strands of polymer (e.g., polyethylene glycol [PEG]), and the tips of 1%-2% of the polymer strands are conjugated with a targeting monoclonal antibody that acts as a molecular Trojan horse (MTH). The MTH binds to a receptor (e.g., for transferrin or insulin) on the BBB and brain cell membrane, triggering receptor-mediated transcytosis of the THL across the BBB in vivo, and receptor-mediated endocytosis into brain cells beyond the BBB. The persistence of transgene expression in the brain is inversely related to the rate of degradation of the episomal plasmid DNA. THL technology enables an exogenous gene to be widely expressed in the majority of cells in adult brain (or other organs) within 1 d of a single intravenous administration. Applications of the THLs include tissue-specific gene expression with tissue-specific promoters, complete normalization of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase in experimental Parkinson's disease following intravenous tyrosine hydroxylase gene therapy, a 100% increase in survival time of mice with brain tumors following weekly intravenous antisense gene therapy using THLs, and a 90% increase in survival time with weekly intravenous RNA interference (RNAi) gene therapy in mice with intracranial brain tumors. This protocol describes the preparation of THLs for use in gene transfer in vitro or in vivo.

  9. The hair follicle as a target for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Domashenko, A; Cotsarelis, G

    2001-01-01

    The hair follicle possesses progenitor cells for continued hair follicle cycling and for epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. These different cell types can be targeted by topical gene delivery to mouse skin. Using a combination of liposomes and DNA, we demonstrated the feasibility of targeting hair follicle cells in human scalp xenografts as well. We defined liposome composition and stage of the hair cycle as important parameters influencing transfection of human hair follicles. Transfection occurred only during anagen onset. Considerations and obstacles for using gene therapy to treat alopecias and skin disease are discussed. A theoretical framework for future gene therapy treatments for cutaneous and systemic disorders is presented.

  10. Formulation and efficacy of liposome-encapsulated antibiotics for therapy of intracellular Mycobacterium avium infection.

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Y K; Nix, D E; Straubinger, R M

    1995-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular pathogen that can invade and multiply within macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Current therapy is not highly effective. Particulate drug carriers that are targeted to the reticuloendothelial system may provide a means to deliver antibiotics more efficiently to M. avium-infected cells. We investigated the formulation of the antibiotics ciprofloxacin and azithromycin in liposomes and tested their antibacterial activities in vitro against M. avium residing within J774, a murine macrophage-like cell line. A conventional passive-entrapment method yielded an encapsulation efficiency of 9% for ciprofloxacin and because of aggregation mediated by the cationic drug, was useful only with liposomes containing < or = 50 mol% negatively charged phospholipid. In contrast, ciprofloxacin was encapsulated with > 90% efficiency, regardless of the content of negatively charged lipids, by a remote-loading technique that utilized both pH and potential gradients to drive drug into preformed liposomes. Both the cellular accumulation and the antimycobacterial activity of ciprofloxacin increased in proportion to the liposome negative charge; the maximal enhancement of potency was 43-fold in liposomes of distearoylphosphatidylglycerol-cholesterol (DSPG-Chol) (10:5). Azithromycin liposomes were prepared as a freeze-dried preparation to avoid chemical instability during storage, and drug could be incorporated at 33 mol% (with respect to phospholipid). Azithromycin also showed enhanced antimycobacterial effect in liposomes, and the potency increased in parallel to the moles percent of negatively charged lipids; azithromycin in DSPG-Chol (10:5) liposomes inhibited intracellular M. avium growth 41-fold more effectively than did free azithromycin. Thus, ciprofloxacin or azithromycin encapsulated in stable liposomes having substantial negative surface charge is superior to nonencapsulated drug in inhibition of M.avium growth within cultured

  11. Photosensitive liposomes as potential drug delivery vehicles for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Christopher G.; Mitchell, A. C.; Chowdhary, R. K.

    1991-11-01

    Light-sensitive liposomes incorporating a photochromic phospholipid (Bis-Azo PC) have been developed which exhibit light-activated release of entrapped contents and intervesicular fusion. The trapping and light-induced release of inorganic ions, fluorescent market dyes, and the antitumor drug methotrexate have been demonstrated. These results are discussed together with some of the potential therapeutic applications of light-sensitive liposomes.

  12. Doxorubicin-loaded photosensitive magnetic liposomes for multi-modal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Saqlain A; Aslam Khan, M U; Arshad, M; Awan, S U; Hashmi, M U; Ahmad, N

    2016-12-01

    Multifunctional magnetic nanosystems have attracted an enormous attention of researchers for their potential applications in cancer diagnostics and therapy. The localized nanotherapies triggered by the external stimuli, like magnetic fields and visible light, are significant in clinical applications. We report a liposomal system that aims to treat cancer by magnetic hyperthermia, photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy simultaneously. The liposomes enclose clinically used photosensitizer m-THPC (Foscan) and anti-cancer drug doxorubicin, in its hydrophobic lipid bilayers, and contains magnetite nanoparticles in hydrophilic core. Three different sizes of magnetic nanoparticles (10, 22 and 30nm) and liposomes (40, 70 and 110nm) were used in this study. Magnetite single domain nanoparticles forming the magnetic core were superparamagnetic but liposomes expressed slight coercivity and hysteresis due to the clustering of nanoparticles in the core. This enhanced the heating efficiency (specific power loss) of the liposomes under an AC field (375kHz, 170Oe). Cell viability and toxicity were studied on HeLa cells using MTT assay and proteomic analysis. Confocal and fluorescence microscopy were used to study the photosensitizer's profile and cells response to combined therapy. It revealed that combined therapy almost completely eliminated the cancer cells as opposed to the separate treatments. Magnetic hyperthermia and photodynamic therapies were almost equally effective whereas chemotherapy showed the least effect.

  13. Combination therapy with caspofungin and liposomal amphotericin B for invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Elanjikal, Ziju; Sörensen, Jan; Schmidt, Helga; Dupuis, Wolfgang; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Jautzke, Günter; Klingebiel, Thomas; Lehrnbecher, Thomas

    2003-07-01

    Ina 24-month-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and invasive aspergillosis, only combination therapy with liposomal amphotericin B and caspofungin achieved a good response. Combination therapy could be a useful treatment option in children with invasive fungal disease, but before it can be routinely recommended, carefully controlled in vivo studies and well-designed randomized clinical trials are needed.

  14. Development of a successive targeting liposome with multi-ligand for efficient targeting gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kun; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Xie, Men; Mao, Chuanbin; Qiu, Liyan; Jin, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background A successful gene delivery system needs to breakthrough several barriers to allow efficient transgenic expression. In the present study, successive targeting liposomes (STL) were constructed by integrating various targeting groups into a nanoparticle to address this issue. Methods Polyethylenimine (PEI) 1800-triamcinolone acetonide (TA) with nuclear targeting capability was synthesized by a two-step reaction. Lactobionic acid was connected with cholesterol to obtain a compound of [(2-lactoylamido) ethylamino]formic acid cholesterol ester (CHEDLA) with hepatocyte-targeting capability. The liposome was modified with PEI 1800-TA and CHEDLA to prepare successive targeting liposome (STL). Its physicochemical properties and transfection efficiency were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results The diameter of STL was approximately 100 nm with 20 mV of potential. The confocal microscopy observation and potential assay verified that lipid bilayer of STL was decorated with PEI 1800-TA. Cytotoxicity of STL was significantly lower than that of PEI 1800-TA and PEI 25K. The transfection efficiency of 10% CHEDLA STL in HepG2 cells was the higher than of the latter two with serum. Its transfection efficiency was greatly reduced with excessive free galactose, indicating that STL was absorbed via galactose receptor-mediated endocytosis. The in vivo study in mice showed that 10% CHEDLA STL had better transgenic expression in liver than the other carriers. Conclusions STL with multi-ligand was able to overcome the various barriers to target nucleus and special cells and present distinctive transgenic expression. Therefore, it has a great potential for gene therapy as a nonviral carrier. PMID:21574214

  15. Effective in vitro and in vivo gene delivery by the combination of liposomal bubbles (bubble liposomes) and ultrasound exposure.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Gene delivery with a physical mechanism using ultrasound (US) and nano/microbubbles is expected as an ideal system in terms of delivering plasmid DNA noninvasively into a specific target site. We developed novel liposomal bubbles (Bubble liposomes (BLs)) containing the lipid nanobubbles of perfluoropropane which were utilized for contrast enhancement in ultrasonography. BLs were smaller in diameter than conventional microbubbles and induced cavitation upon exposure ultrasound. In addition, when coupled with US exposure, BLs could deliver plasmid DNA into various types of cells in vitro and in vivo. The transfection efficiency with BLs and US was higher than that with conventional lipofection method. Therefore, the combination of BLs and US might be an efficient and novel nonviral gene delivery system.

  16. Chemoradionuclide Therapy with 186Re-Labeled Liposomal Doxorubicin: Toxicity, Dosimetry, and Therapeutic Response

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Anuradha; Bao, Ande; Phillips, William T.; McManus, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This study was performed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and therapeutic effects of rhenium-186 (186Re)-labeled liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil), investigate associated toxicities, and calculate radiation absorbed dose in head and neck tumor xenografts and normal organs. Doxil and control polyethylene glycol (PEG)-liposomes were labeled using 186Re-N,N-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-N′,N′-diethylethylenediamine (BMEDA) method. Tumor-bearing rats received either no therapy (n=6), intravenous Doxil (n=4), or escalating radioactivity of 186Re-Doxil (185–925 MBq/kg) or 186Re-PEG-liposomes (1110–1665 MBq/kg) and were monitored for 28 days. Based on body weight loss and systemic toxicity, MTD for 186Re-Doxil and 186Re-PEG-liposomes were established at injected radioactivity/body weight of 740 and 1480 MBq/kg, respectively. 186Re-injected radioactivity/body weight for therapy studies was determined to be 555 MBq/kg for 186Re-Doxil and 1295 MBq/kg for 186Re-PEG-liposomes. All groups recovered from their body weight loss, leucopenia, and thrombocytopenia by 28 days postinjection. Normalized radiation absorbed dose to tumor was significantly higher for 186Re-Doxil (0.299±0.109 Gy/MBq) compared with 186Re-PEG-liposomes (0.096±0.120 Gy/MBq) (p<0.05). In a separate therapy study, tumor volumes were significantly smaller for 186Re-Doxil (555 MBq/kg) compared with 186Re-PEG-liposomes (1295 MBq/kg) (p<0.01) at 42 days postinjection. In conclusion, combination chemoradionuclide therapy with 186Re-Doxil has promising potential, because good tumor control was achieved with limited associated toxicity. PMID:21834653

  17. Gene therapy for blindness.

    PubMed

    Sahel, José-Alain; Roska, Botond

    2013-07-08

    Sight-restoring therapy for the visually impaired and blind is a major unmet medical need. Ocular gene therapy is a rational choice for restoring vision or preventing the loss of vision because most blinding diseases originate in cellular components of the eye, a compartment that is optimally suited for the delivery of genes, and many of these diseases have a genetic origin or genetic component. In recent years we have witnessed major advances in the field of ocular gene therapy, and proof-of-concept studies are under way to evaluate the safety and efficacy of human gene therapies. Here we discuss the concepts and recent advances in gene therapy in the retina. Our review discusses traditional approaches such as gene replacement and neuroprotection and also new avenues such as optogenetic therapies. We conjecture that advances in gene therapy in the retina will pave the way for gene therapies in other parts of the brain.

  18. Highly Specific Targeting of the TMPRSS2/ERG Fusion Gene in Prostate Cancer Using Liposomal Nanotechnology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    time due to elimination by reticuloendothelial system. To increase stability and blood circulation half- life coating nanoparticles with polymers such...ERG fusion gene in prostate cancer using liposomal nanotechnology PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Bulent Ozpolat, M.D., Ph.D...fusion gene in prostate cancer using liposomal nanotechnology 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0385 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  19. Myocardial gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isner, Jeffrey M.

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy is proving likely to be a viable alternative to conventional therapies in coronary artery disease and heart failure. Phase 1 clinical trials indicate high levels of safety and clinical benefits with gene therapy using angiogenic growth factors in myocardial ischaemia. Although gene therapy for heart failure is still at the pre-clinical stage, experimental data indicate that therapeutic angiogenesis using short-term gene expression may elicit functional improvement in affected individuals.

  20. Cellular uptake and in vitro antitumor efficacy of composite liposomes for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Peters, Tanja; Grunewald, Catrin; Blaickner, Matthias; Ziegner, Markus; Schütz, Christian; Iffland, Dorothee; Hampel, Gabriele; Nawroth, Thomas; Langguth, Peter

    2015-02-22

    Neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma has focused mainly on the use of (10)B as neutron capture isotope. However, (157)Gd offers several advantages over boron, such as higher cross section for thermal neutrons and the possibility to perform magnetic resonance imaging during neutron irradiation, thereby combining therapy and diagnostics. We have developed different liposomal formulations of gadolinium-DTPA (Magnevist®) for application in neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma. The formulations were characterized physicochemically and tested in vitro in a glioma cell model for their effectiveness. Liposomes entrapping gadolinium-DTPA as neutron capture agent were manufactured via lipid/film-extrusion method and characterized with regard to size, entrapment efficiency and in vitro release. For neutron irradiation, F98 and LN229 glioma cells were incubated with the newly developed liposomes and subsequently irradiated at the thermal column of the TRIGA reactor in Mainz. The dose rate derived from neutron irradiation with (157)Gd as neutron capturing agent was calculated via Monte Carlo simulations and set in relation to the respective cell survival. The liposomal Gd-DTPA reduced cell survival of F98 and LN229 cells significantly. Differences in liposomal composition of the formulations led to distinctly different outcome in cell survival. The amount of cellular Gd was not at all times proportional to cell survival, indicating that intracellular deposition of formulated Gd has a major influence on cell survival. The majority of the dose contribution arises from photon cross irradiation compared to a very small Gd-related dose. Liposomal gadolinium formulations represent a promising approach for neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma cells. The liposome composition determines the uptake and the survival of cells following radiation, presumably due to different uptake pathways of liposomes and intracellular deposition of gadolinium-DTPA. Due to the small range of

  1. Liposomal irinotecan in gemcitabine-refractory metastatic pancreatic cancer: efficacy, safety and place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kipps, Emma; Young, Kate; Starling, Naureen

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal disease. The majority of patients are diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic disease with a prognosis of short months. Therapeutic options are limited and until recently, there was no standard second-line chemotherapy option. Liposomal constructs have been engineered to encapsulate chemotherapy thereby preventing premature metabolism, improving distribution and minimizing toxicity. Favourable preclinical data on liposomal irinotecan and early phase trials, led to a recently published phase III trial of liposomal irinotecan in combination with fluorouracil and folinic acid in patients with metastatic PDAC, who progressed after gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. As a direct result, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) have approved the use of liposomal irinotecan in this setting. However, first-line treatment options for this disease now include the combination regimen, FOLFIRINOX, in patients with good performance status, and the role of second-line combination treatment with liposomal irinotecan in this setting is unclear. Recent advances have changed the therapeutic landscape, as clinicians are now able to choose a sequential approach to treatment tailored to the individual patient characteristics. This article reviews current treatment options for metastatic PDAC and focuses on the efficacy, safety and place in therapy of liposomal irinotecan. PMID:28344661

  2. Liposomal irinotecan in gemcitabine-refractory metastatic pancreatic cancer: efficacy, safety and place in therapy.

    PubMed

    Kipps, Emma; Young, Kate; Starling, Naureen

    2017-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal disease. The majority of patients are diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic disease with a prognosis of short months. Therapeutic options are limited and until recently, there was no standard second-line chemotherapy option. Liposomal constructs have been engineered to encapsulate chemotherapy thereby preventing premature metabolism, improving distribution and minimizing toxicity. Favourable preclinical data on liposomal irinotecan and early phase trials, led to a recently published phase III trial of liposomal irinotecan in combination with fluorouracil and folinic acid in patients with metastatic PDAC, who progressed after gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. As a direct result, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) have approved the use of liposomal irinotecan in this setting. However, first-line treatment options for this disease now include the combination regimen, FOLFIRINOX, in patients with good performance status, and the role of second-line combination treatment with liposomal irinotecan in this setting is unclear. Recent advances have changed the therapeutic landscape, as clinicians are now able to choose a sequential approach to treatment tailored to the individual patient characteristics. This article reviews current treatment options for metastatic PDAC and focuses on the efficacy, safety and place in therapy of liposomal irinotecan.

  3. Human endostatin gene transfer, either naked or with liposome, has the same inhibitory effect on growth of mouse liver tumor cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chun-Hong; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Li-Fen; Liu, Hua; Guo, Chun; Liu, Su-Xia; Cao, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Li-Ning; Sun, Wen-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore a safe and efficient strategy of tumor therapy using anti-angiogenetic agents. METHODS: Endostatin gene with a signal sequence of human IgG γ chain was amplified by PCR and cloned into pVAX1 plasmid which was the only vector authorized by FDA in clinical trial to construct a recombinant plasmid named as pVAX-sEN. The recombinant plasmid was detected with Eco I/Kpn I and DNA sequencing. BALB/c mice bearing hepatocarcinoma cell line H22 were treated with naked pVAX-sEN or liposome-DNA complex in which the dose of DNA and the ratio of DNA and liposome were different from each other. To compare the efficiency of gene transfection, expression of endostatin at the treated tumor site was assayed with ELISA. To investigate the effect of pVAX1-sEN on hepatocellular carcinoma, pVAX-sEN either naked or in liposome-DNA complex was injected into BALB/c mice bearing H22, then the diameter of tumors was measured, microvessel density was detected by immunohistochemistry, endostatin expression in vivo was assayed at different time points. RESULTS: DNA sequencing showed the endostatin gene with the signal peptide was correctly cloned. In situ gene expression assay indicated that both the ratio of DNA and liposome and the dose of DNA could affect the gene transfection efficiency. Interestingly, naked pVAX-sEN had a similar in situ endostatin expression to pVAX-sEN with liposome. Animal experiments showed that pVAX-sEN together with pVAX-sEN-liposome complex could efficiently suppress the growth of mouse hepatoma cells. CONCLUSION: Naked endostatin plasmid intratumoral injection can get a similar gene transfection efficiency to liposome-DNA complex when used in situ. PMID:15334690

  4. Development of high boron content liposomes and their promising antitumor effect for neutron capture therapy of cancers.

    PubMed

    Koganei, Hayato; Ueno, Manabu; Tachikawa, Shoji; Tasaki, Lisa; Ban, Hyun Seung; Suzuki, Minoru; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Kawano, Kumi; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Maitani, Yoshie; Ono, Koji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-16

    Mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH)-encapsulating 10% distearoyl boron lipid (DSBL) liposomes were developed as a boron delivery vehicle for neutron capture therapy. The current approach is unique because the liposome shell itself possesses cytocidal potential in addition to its encapsulated agents. BSH-encapsulating 10% DSBL liposomes have high boron content (B/P ratio: 2.6) that enables us to prepare liposome solution with 5000 ppm boron concentration. BSH-encapsulating 10% DSBL liposomes displayed excellent boron delivery efficacy to tumor: boron concentrations reached 174, 93, and 32 ppm at doses of 50, 30, and 15 mg B/kg, respectively. Magnescope was also encapsulated in the 10% DSBL liposomes and the real-time biodistribution of the Magnescope-encapsulating DSBL liposomes was measured in a living body using MRI. Significant antitumor effect was observed in mice injected with BSH-encapsulating 10% DSBL liposomes even at the dose of 15 mg B/kg; the tumor completely disappeared three weeks after thermal neutron irradiation ((1.5-1.8) × 10(12) neutrons/cm(2)). The current results enabled us to reduce the total dose of liposomes to less than one-fifth compared with that of the BSH-encapsulating liposomes without reducing the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

  5. Gene therapy review.

    PubMed

    Moss, Joseph Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The use of genes to treat disease, more commonly known as gene therapy, is a valid and promising tool to manage and treat diseases that conventional drug therapies cannot cure. Gene therapy holds the potential to control a wide range of diseases, including cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and blood diseases. This review assesses the current status of gene therapy, highlighting therapeutic methodologies and applications, terminology, and imaging strategies. This article presents an overview of roadblocks associated with each therapeutic methodology, along with some of the scientific, social, and ethical issues associated with gene therapy.

  6. Development of a DNA-liposome complex for gene delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Rasoulianboroujeni, M; Kupgan, G; Moghadam, F; Tahriri, M; Boughdachi, A; Khoshkenar, P; Ambrose, J J; Kiaie, N; Vashaee, D; Ramsey, J D; Tayebi, L

    2017-06-01

    The association structures formed by cationic liposomes and DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid)-liposome have been effectively utilized as gene carriers in transfection assays. In this research study, cationic liposomes were prepared using a modified lipid film hydration method consisting of a lyophilization step for gene delivery applications. The obtained results demonstrated that the mean particle size had no significant change while the polydispersity (PDI) increased after lyophilization. The mean particle size slightly reduced after lyophilization (520±12nm to 464±25nm) while the PDI increased after lyophilization (0.094±0.017 to 0.220±0.004). In addition. The mean particle size of vesicles increases when DNA is incorporated to the liposomes (673±27nm). According to the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, the spherical shape of liposomes confirmed their successful preservation and reconstitution from the powder. It was found that liposomal formulation has enhanced transfection considerably compared to the naked DNA as negative control. Finally, liposomal formulation in this research had a better function than Lipofectamine® 2000 as a commercialized product because the cellular activity (cellular protein) was higher in the prepared lipoplex than Lipofectamine® 2000. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Boron-containing folate receptor-targeted liposomes as potential delivery agents for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xing Q; Wang, Huaqing; Shukla, Supriya; Sekido, Masaru; Adams, Dianne M; Tjarks, Werner; Barth, Rolf F; Lee, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) depends on the selective delivery of a sufficient number of (10)B atoms to tumor cells to sustain a lethal (10)B(n,alpha)(7)Li reaction. Expression of FR frequently is amplified among human tumors. The goal of the present study was to investigate folate receptor (FR)-targeted liposomes as potential carriers for a series of boron-containing agents. Two highly ionized boron compounds, Na(2)[B(12)H(11)SH] and Na(3) (B(20)H(17)NH(3)), were incorporated into liposomes by passive loading with encapsulation efficiencies of 6% and 15%, respectively. In addition, five weakly basic boronated polyamines were investigated. Two were the spermidine derivatives: N(5)-(4-carboranylbutyl)spermidine.3HCl (SPD-5), N(5)-[4-(2-aminoethyl-o-carboranyl)butyl]spermidine.4HCl (ASPD-5). Three were the spermine derivatives: N(5)-(4-carboranylbutyl)spermine.4HCl (SPM-5), N(5)-[4-(2-aminoethyl-o-carboranyl)butyl]spermine.5HCl (ASPM-5), and N(5),N(10)-bis(4-carboranylbutyl)spermine.4 HCl (SPM-5,10). These were incorporated into liposomes by a pH-gradient-driven remote-loading method with varying loading efficiencies, which were influenced by the specific trapping agent and the structure of the boron compound. Greater loading efficiencies were obtained with lower molecular weight boron derivatives, using ammonium sulfate as the trapping agent, compared to those obtained with sodium citrate. The in vitro uptake of folate-derivatized, boronated liposomes was investigated using human KB squamous epithelial cancer cells, which have amplified FR expression. Higher cellular boron uptake (up to 1584 microg per 10(9) cells) was observed with FR-targeted liposomes than with nontargeted control liposomes (up to 154 microg per 10(9) cells), irrespective of the chemical form of the boron and the method used for liposomal preparation. KB cell binding of the FR-targeted liposomes was saturable and could be blocked by 1 mM free folic acid. Our findings suggest that further

  8. Retained topical delivery of 5-aminolevulinic acid using cationic ultradeformable liposomes for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eun Kyung; Jin, Su-Eon; Kim, Jin-Ki; Park, Jeong-Sook; Park, Youmie; Kim, Chong-Kook

    2011-09-18

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), inducing photodynamic protoporphyrin (PpIX), is a hydrophilic molecule, resulting in leashing the capacity to cross tissue barriers like stratum corneum (SC) of skin. Here, we aimed to develop 5-ALA loaded ultradeformable liposomes (UDL) with different surface charges, and to investigate their physicochemical characteristics and capability for the skin penetration and retention of 5-ALA for topical photodynamic therapy (PDT). The effects of surface charges of UDL on in vitro permeation of 5-ALA and in vivo accumulation of 5-ALA-induced PpIX in viable skin were determined and then compared with conventional neutral liposomes (nLiposome). All UDL showed smaller particle size and better deformability than nLiposome. However, entrapment efficiency of 5-ALA was similar to each vesicle. Among vesicles, the cationic UDL (cUDL) demonstrated higher stability and permeability, and could deliver 5-ALA into deep skin tissue by topical application. Moreover, the 5-ALA loaded in cUDL was long retained, and induced more amount of PpIX in viable skin than those in other UDL and nLiposome. Considering that the conversion of 5-ALA into PpIX occurs preferentially in epidermis, these results suggested that topical delivery of 5-ALA loaded in cUDL could be an interesting proposal to optimize PDT related to 5-ALA.

  9. siRNA-loaded cationic liposomes for cancer therapy: Development, characterization and efficacy evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Bo

    Cancer is a major health problem in the United States and many other parts of the world. However, cancer treatment is severely limited by the lack of highly effective cytotoxic agents and selective delivery methods which can serve as the "magic bullet" (first raised by Dr. Paul Ehrlich, the goal of targeting a specific location without causing harm to surrounding tissues or to more distant regions in the body). The revolutionary finding that tumors cannot grow beyond a microscopic size without dedicated blood supply provided a highly effective alternative for the treatment of cancer. Currently, anti-angiogenic therapy and the discovery of RNA interference makes it possible to treat some conditions by silencing disorder-causing genes of targeting cells which are otherwise difficult to eradicate with more conventional therapies. However, before siRNA technology could be widely used as a therapeutic approach, the construct must be efficiently and safely delivered to target cells. Strategies used for siRNA delivery should minimize uptake by phagocytes, enzymatic degradation by nucleases and should be taken up preferentially, if not specifically, by the intended cell population. Kinesin spindle proteins (KSP) are the motor proteins which play critical roles during mitosis. Different from tubulins which are also present in post-mitotic cells, such as axons, KSP is exclusively expressed in mitotic cells, which makes them the ideal target for anti-mitotics. In the present study, we intend to develop, characterize and evaluate a liposome-based delivery system which can deliver KSP siRNA selectively to the tumor vasculature (thus inhibiting angiogenesis, destroying tumor vasculature and eventually, eradicating tumor growth). We first developed ten different liposome preparation types with different compositions of lipids. Next, the capacity for loading siRNA and efficiency of targeting the tumor vascular supply was evaluated using relevant cellular and tumor models

  10. Systemic anti-tumour effects of local thermally sensitive liposome therapy.

    PubMed

    Viglianti, Benjamin L; Dewhirst, Mark W; Boruta, R J; Park, Ji-Young; Landon, Chelsea; Fontanella, Andrew N; Guo, Jing; Manzoor, Ashley; Hofmann, Christina L; Palmer, Gregory M

    2014-09-01

    There were two primary objectives of this study: (1) to determine whether treatment of a tumour site with systemically administered thermally sensitive liposomes and local hyperthermia (HT) for triggered release would have dual anti-tumour effect on the primary heated tumour as well as an unheated secondary tumour in a distant site, and (2) to determine the ability of non-invasive optical spectroscopy to predict treatment outcome. The optical end points studied included drug levels, metabolic markers flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H), and physiological markers (total haemoglobin (Hb) and Hb oxygen saturation) before and after treatment. Mice were inoculated with SKOV3 human ovarian carcinoma in both hind legs. One tumour was selected for local hyperthermia and subsequent systemic treatment. There were four treatment groups: control, DOXIL (non-thermally sensitive liposomes containing doxorubicin), and two different thermally sensitive liposome formulations containing doxorubicin. Optical spectroscopy was performed prior to therapy, immediately after treatment, and 6, 12, and 24 h post therapy. Tumour growth delay was seen with DOXIL and the thermally sensitive liposomes in the tumours that were heated, similar to previous studies. Tumour growth delay was also seen in the opposing tumour in the thermally sensitive liposome-treated groups. Optical spectroscopy demonstrated correlation between growth delay, doxorubicin (DOX) levels, and changes of NAD(P)H from baseline levels. Hb and Hb saturation were not correlated with growth delay. The study demonstrated that thermally sensitive liposomes affect the primary heated tumour as well as systemic efficacy. Non-invasive optical spectroscopy methods were shown to be useful in predicting efficacy at early time points post-treatment.

  11. Cell and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rajesh C; Zacks, David N

    2014-01-01

    Replacement or repair of a dysfunctional gene combined with promoting cell survival is a two-pronged approach that addresses an unmet need in the therapy of retinal degenerative diseases. In this chapter, we discuss various strategies toward achieving both goals: transplantation of wild-type cells to replace degenerating cells and to rescue gene function, sequential gene and cell therapy, and in vivo reprogramming of rods to cones. These approaches highlight cutting-edge advances in cell and gene therapy, and cellular lineage conversion in order to devise new therapies for various retinal degenerative diseases.

  12. Gene therapy for haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Akshay; Easow Mathew, Manu; Sriganesh, Vasumathi; Neely, Jessica A; Kalipatnapu, Sasank

    2014-11-14

    Haemophilia is a genetic disorder which is characterized by spontaneous or provoked, often uncontrolled, bleeding into joints, muscles and other soft tissues. Current methods of treatment are expensive, challenging and involve regular administration of clotting factors. Gene therapy has recently been prompted as a curative treatment modality. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of gene therapy for treating people with haemophilia A or B. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis & Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 06 November 2014. Eligible trials included randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials, including controlled clinical trials comparing gene therapy (with or without standard treatment) with standard treatment (factor replacement) or other 'curative' treatment such as stem cell transplantation individuals with haemophilia A or B of all ages who do not have inhibitors to factor VIII or IX. No trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were found. No trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were identified. No randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were identified. Thus, we are unable to determine the effects of gene therapy for haemophilia. Gene therapy for haemophilia is still in its nascent stages and there is a need for well-designed clinical trials to assess the long-term feasibility, success and risks of gene therapy for people with haemophilia.

  13. Gene transfer to the retina of rat by liposome eye drops.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Masuda, I; Yasuda, T; Matsuo, N

    1996-02-27

    Gene delivery to the intraocular tissues of the retina is hampered by complicated surgical interventions to administer the gene. Here we showed that instillation as eye drops of an expression plasmid vector for beta-galactosidase gene carried by the specific kinds of liposomes could transfer the gene to the retinal ganglion cells of rat, without causing any inflammation. This non-surgical, convenient way for gene delivery to the retina would facilitate the development of treatment for various intraocular diseases.

  14. Antiangiogenic Eye Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Corydon, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    The idea of treating disease in humans with genetic material was conceived over two decades ago and with that a promising journey involving development and efficacy studies in cells and animals of a large number of novel therapeutic reagents unfolded. In the footsteps of this process, successful gene therapy treatment of genetic conditions in humans has shown clear signs of efficacy. Notably, significant advancements using gene supplementation and silencing strategies have been made in the field of ocular gene therapy, thereby pinpointing ocular gene therapy as one of the compelling "actors" bringing gene therapy to the clinic. Most of all, this success has been facilitated because of (1) the fact that the eye is an effortlessly accessible, exceedingly compartmentalized, and immune-privileged organ offering a unique advantage as a gene therapy target, and (2) significant progress toward efficient, sustained transduction of cells within the retina having been achieved using nonintegrating vectors based on recombinant adeno-associated virus and nonintegrating lentivirus vectors. The results from in vivo experiments and trials suggest that treatment of inherited retinal dystrophies, ocular angiogenesis, and inflammation with gene therapy can be both safe and effective. Here, the progress of ocular gene therapy is examined with special emphasis on the potential use of RNAi- and protein-based antiangiogenic gene therapy to treat exudative age-related macular degeneration.

  15. History of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality.

  16. Human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, J S; Keating, A; Hozumi, N

    1997-01-01

    Human gene therapy and its application for the treatment of human genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, cancer, and other diseases, are discussed. Gene therapy is a technique in which a functioning gene is inserted into a human cell to correct a genetic error or to introduce a new function to the cell. Many methods, including retroviral vectors and non-viral vectors, have been developed for both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer into cells. Vectors need to be developed that efficiently transfer genes to target cells, and promoter systems are required that regulate gene expression according to physiologic needs of the host cell. There are several safety and ethical issues related to manipulating the human genome that need to be resolved. Current gene therapy efforts focus on gene insertion into somatic cells only. Gene therapy has potential for the effective treatment of genetic disorders, and gene transfer techniques are being used for basic research, for example, in cancer, to examine the underlying mechanism of disease. There are still many technical obstacles to be overcome before human gene therapy can become a routine procedure. The current human genome project provides the sequences of a vast number of human genes, leading to the identification, characterization, and understanding of genes that are responsible for many human diseases.

  17. Pre-clinical evaluation of liposomal gene transfer to improve dermal and epidermal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Branski, L K; Masters, O E; Herndon, D N; Mittermayr, R; Redl, H; Traber, D L; Cox, R A; Kita, K; Jeschke, M G

    2010-06-01

    Liposomal gene transfer effectively enhances dermal and epidermal regeneration in burned rodents. To advance this treatment to clinical studies, we investigated the efficacy of liposomal gene transfer in a clinically relevant porcine wound model. Mimicking the clinical scenario, six female Yorkshire pigs (40-50 kg) received up to 12 burns of 50 cm(2) area that were fully excised and covered with skin autograft meshed at 4:1 ratio 24 h post-burn. Animals received control injections (empty liposomes), liposomes (DMRIE-C) containing 1 mg LacZ-cDNA, or liposomes (DMRIE-C) with 1 mg of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-cDNA, or the naked PDGF gene. Serial biopsies were taken from different wound sites at multiple time points up to 12 days post-wounding. Transfection efficacy and transfection rate of LacZ and localization of beta-gal were determined by immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent techniques. RT-PCR and multiplex protein analysis (ELISA) were used to measure levels of growth factor mRNA transcribed and growth factor protein translated. Wound re-epithelialization and graft adhesion was evaluated using planimetric analysis and clinical scores. We found that peak transfection of liposomal beta-galactosidase occurred on day 2, with a fluorescence increase of 154% to baseline (P<0.001). Transfection intensity dropped to 115% above baseline on day 4 (P<0.001) and 109% on day 7. Immunohistochemistry showed a maximum transfection rate of 34% of cells in wound tissue. Gene transfer of liposomal PDGF-cDNA resulted in increased PDGF-mRNA and protein expression on days 2 and 4, and accelerated wound re-epithlialization as well as graft adhesion on day 9 (P<0.05). In this study, we showed that liposomal cDNA gene transfer is possible in a porcine wound model, and by using PDGF-cDNA we further showed that dermal and epidermal regeneration can be improved. These data indicate that liposomal gene transfer can be a new therapeutic approach to improve wound healing in

  18. Properties and evaluation of quaternized chitosan/lipid cation polymeric liposomes for cancer-targeted gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaofei; Li, Xiaoyu; Chang, Jin; Duan, Yourong; Li, Zonghai

    2013-07-09

    Development of high-stability and efficient nonviral vectors with low cytoxicity is important for targeted tumor gene therapy. In this study, cationic polymeric liposomes (CPLs), with similar lipid bilayer structure and high thermal stability, were prepared from polymeric surfactants of quaternized (carboxymethyl)chitosan with different carbon chains (dodecyl, tetradecyl, hexadecyl, and octadecyl). By comparing different factors that influence gene delivery, tetradecyl-quaternized (carboxymethy)chitosan (TQCMC) CPLs, with suitable size (184.4 ± 17.1 nm), ζ potentials (27.5 ± 4.9 mV), and productivity for synthesis TQCMC (weight yield 13.1%), were selected for gene transfection evaluation in various cancer cell lines. Although TQCMC CPLs have lower gene transfection efficiency compared with cationic liposomes (Lipofectamine 2000) in vitro, they displayed higher reporter gene delivery ability for cancer tissues (bearing U87 and SMMC-7721 tumors) in vivo after intravenous injection. TQCMC CPLs also have lower cell cytotoxicity and lower cytokine production or liver injury for BALB/c mice. We conclude that the CPLs are promising gene delivery systems that may be used to target various cancers.

  19. [Gene therapy and ethics].

    PubMed

    Müller, H; Rehmann-Sutter, C

    1995-01-10

    Gene therapy represents a new strategy to treat human disorders. It was originally conceived as a cure for severe monogenetic disorders. Since its conception, the spectrum of possible application for gene therapy has been to include the treatment of acquired diseases, such as various forms of cancer and some viral infections, most notably human immune deficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus. Since somatic gene therapy does not cause substantially new ethical problems, it has gained broad approval. This is by no means the case with germ-line gene therapy. Practically all bodies who were evaluating the related ethical aspects wanted to ban its medical application on grounds of fundamental and pragmatic considerations. In this review, practical and ethical views concerning gene therapy are summarized which were presented at the "Junitagung 1994" of the Swiss Society for Biomedical Ethics in Basle.

  20. Gene Transfer from Targeted Liposomes to Specific Lymphoid Cells by Electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machy, Patrick; Lewis, Florence; McMillan, Lynette; Jonak, Zdenka L.

    1988-11-01

    Large unilamellar liposomes, coated with protein A and encapsulating the gene that confers resistance to mycophenolic acid, were used as a model system to demonstrate gene transfer into specific lymphoid cells. Protein A, which selectively recognizes mouse IgG2a antibodies, was coupled to liposomes to target them specifically to defined cell types coated with IgG2a antibody. Protein A-coated liposomes bound human B lymphoblastoid cells preincubated with a mouse IgG2a anti-HLA monoclonal antibody but failed to adhere to cells challenged with an irrelevant (anti-H-2) antibody of the same isotype or to cells incubated in the absence of antibody. Transfection of target cells bound to protein A-coated liposomes was achieved by electroporation. This step was essential since only electroporated cells survived in a selective medium containing mycophenolic acid. Transfection efficiency with electroporation and targeted liposomes was as efficient as conventional procedures that used unencapsulated plasmids free in solution but, in the latter case, cell selectivity is not possible. This technique provides a methodology for introducing defined biological macromolecules into specific cell types.

  1. NIR responsive liposomal system for rapid release of drugs in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Mao; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Su, Guang-Hao; Song, Fei-Fei; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Qi-Qing

    2017-01-01

    To design a rapid release liposomal system for cancer therapy, a NIR responsive bubble-generating thermosensitive liposome (BTSL) system combined with photothermal agent (Cypate), doxorubicin (DOX), and NH4HCO3 was developed. Cypate/DOX-BTSL exhibited a good aqueous stability, photostability, and photothermal effect. In vitro release suggested that the amounts of DOX released from BTSL were obviously higher than that of (NH4)2SO4 liposomes at 42°C. After NIR irradiation, the hyperthermic temperature induced by Cypate led to the decomposition of NH4HCO3 and the generation of a large number of CO2 bubbles, triggering a rapid release of drugs. Confocal laser scanning microscope and acridine orange staining indicated that Cypate/DOX-BTSL upon irradiation could facilitate to disrupt the lysosomal membranes and realize endolysosomal escape into cytosol, improving the intracellular uptake of DOX clearly. MTT and trypan blue staining implied that the cell damage of Cypate/DOX-BTSL with NIR irradiation was more severe than that in the groups without irradiation. In vivo results indicated that Cypate/DOX-BTSL with irradiation could dramatically increase the accumulation of DOX in tumor, inhibit tumor growth, and reduce systemic side effects of DOX. These data demonstrated that Cypate/DOX-BTSL has the potential to be used as a NIR responsive liposomal system for a rapid release of drugs in thermochemotherapy. PMID:28652729

  2. MRI-visible liposome nanovehicles for potential tumor-targeted delivery of multimodal therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lili; Chen, Shizhen; Li, Haidong; Zhang, Zhiying; Ye, Chaohui; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2015-07-01

    Real-time diagnosis and monitoring of disease development, and therapeutic responses to treatment, are possible by theranostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we report the synthesis of a multifunctional liposome, which contains Gd-DOTA (an MRI probe), paclitaxel and c(RGDyk) (a targeted peptide). This nanoparticle overcame the insolubility of paclitaxel, reduced the side effects of FDA-approved formulation of PTX-Cre (Taxol®) and improved drug delivery efficiency to the tumor. c(RGDyk) modification greatly enhanced the cytotoxicity of the drug in tumor cells A549. The T1 relaxivity in tumor cells treated with the targeted liposome formulation was increased 16-fold when compared with the non-targeted group. In vivo, the tumors in mice were visualized using T1-weighted imaging after administration of the liposome. Also the tumor growth could be inhibited well after the treatment. Fluorescence images in vitro and ex vivo also showed the targeting effect of this liposome in tumor cells, indicating that this nanovehicle could limit the off-target side effects of anticancer drugs and contrast agents. These findings lay the foundation for further tumor inhibition study and application of this delivery vehicle in cancer therapy settings.

  3. Gene therapy for haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Akshay; Easow Mathew, Manu; Sriganesh, Vasumathi; Reiss, Ulrike M

    2016-12-20

    Haemophilia is a genetic disorder characterized by spontaneous or provoked, often uncontrolled, bleeding into joints, muscles and other soft tissues. Current methods of treatment are expensive, challenging and involve regular administration of clotting factors. Gene therapy has recently been prompted as a curative treatment modality. This is an update of a published Cochrane Review. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of gene therapy for treating people with haemophilia A or B. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis & Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 18 August 2016. Eligible trials include randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials, including controlled clinical trials comparing gene therapy (with or without standard treatment) with standard treatment (factor replacement) or other 'curative' treatment such as stem cell transplantation for individuals with haemophilia A or B of all ages who do not have inhibitors to factor VIII or IX. No trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were found. No trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were identified. No randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were identified. Thus, we are unable to determine the safety and efficacy of gene therapy for haemophilia. Gene therapy for haemophilia is still in its nascent stages and there is a need for well-designed clinical trials to assess the long-term feasibility, success and risks of gene therapy for people with haemophilia.

  4. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and photodynamic therapy efficacy of liposomal-delivered hypocrellin A, a potential photosensitizer for tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z J; He, Y Y; Huang, C G; Huang, J S; Huang, Y C; An, J Y; Gu, Y; Jiang, L J

    1999-11-01

    Hypocrellin A, from Hypocrella bambusae, is a novel photosensitizer of high singlet oxygen quantum yield for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Tissue distributions were studied in tumor-bearing mice as a function of time following administration. The tumor model was S-180 sarcoma transplanted into one hind leg of male Kunming mice; hypocrellin A (HA) was delivered to the mice by intravenous injection of 5 mg/kg of body weight as a suspension either as a unilamellar liposome or in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-solubilized saline. The HA was isolated from several tissues and organs, as well as tumors and peritumoral muscles and skin. Quantitation was performed by a high-performance liquid chromatographic technique with detection that utilizes the native fluorescence of HA. Independent of the delivery system, the dye was retained in tumors at higher concentrations than in normal tissues, except for kidney, liver, lung and spleen. The dye retention in tumors was high and was vehicle dependent. For the liposomal system, the maximal accumulation in tumor and maximal ratios of dye in tumor versus peritumoral muscle and skin occurred 12 h postinjection; for the DMSO saline system, the maximal ratio occurred earlier, 6 h postadministration. Liposomal delivery improved the selective accumulation of the dye in tumor with higher maximal levels in tumor and higher ratios of tumor-to-muscle and tumor-to-skin. Levels of dye were very low or not detectable in the brain. The PDT efficacy of HA in the liposome and DMSO saline systems was determined by evaluating the tumor volume regression percent. The PDT efficacy of HA in liposomes was highest when light treatment was performed at 12 h postinjection, consistent with the highest retention of HA in tumors. Similarly, the maximal PDT efficacy in DMSO saline was attained at 6 h postinjection, the highest HA retention point in tumor. Moreover, the peak PDT efficacy of HA in liposomes was much higher than that of HA in DMSO saline and even

  5. Regulated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Breger, Ludivine; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Quintino, Luis; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of monogenic and multifactorial neurological disorders. It can be used to replace a missing gene and mutated gene or downregulate a causal gene. Despite the versatility of gene therapy, one of the main limitations lies in the irreversibility of the process: once delivered to target cells, the gene of interest is constitutively expressed and cannot be removed. Therefore, efficient, safe and long-term gene modification requires a system allowing fine control of transgene expression.Different systems have been developed over the past decades to regulate transgene expression after in vivo delivery, either at transcriptional or post-translational levels. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview on current regulatory system used in the context of gene therapy for neurological disorders. Systems using external regulation of transgenes using antibiotics are commonly used to control either gene expression using tetracycline-controlled transcription or protein levels using destabilizing domain technology. Alternatively, specific promoters of genes that are regulated by disease mechanisms, increasing expression as the disease progresses or decreasing expression as disease regresses, are also examined. Overall, this chapter discusses advantages and drawbacks of current molecular methods for regulated gene therapy in the central nervous system.

  6. Parkinson's disease: gene therapies.

    PubMed

    Coune, Philippe G; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    With the recent development of effective gene delivery systems, gene therapy for the central nervous system is finding novel applications. Here, we review existing viral vectors and discuss gene therapy strategies that have been proposed for Parkinson's disease. To date, most of the clinical trials were based on viral vectors to deliver therapeutic transgenes to neurons within the basal ganglia. Initial trials used genes to relieve the major motor symptoms caused by nigrostriatal degeneration. Although these new genetic approaches still need to prove more effective than existing symptomatic treatments, there is a need for disease-modifying strategies. The investigation of the genetic factors implicated in Parkinson's disease is providing precious insights in disease pathology that, combined with innovative gene delivery systems, will hopefully offer novel opportunities for gene therapy interventions to slow down, or even halt disease progression.

  7. Comparison of 5-aminolevulinic acid-encapsulated liposome versus ethosome for skin delivery for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi-Ping; Tsai, Yi-Hung; Wu, Pao-Chu; Huang, Yaw-Bin

    2008-05-22

    Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is an alternative therapy for many non-melanoma skin cancers. The major limitation of this therapy, however, is the low permeability of ALA through the stratum corneum (SC) of the skin. The objective of the present work was to characterize ethosomes containing ALA and to enhance the skin production of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), compared to traditional liposomes. Results showed that the average particle sizes of the ethosomes were less than those of liposomes. Moreover, the entrapment efficiency of ALA in the ethosome formulations was 8-66% depending on the surfactant added. The particle size of the ethosomes was still approximately <200 nm after 32 days of storage. An in vivo animal study observed the presence of PpIX in the skin by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The results indicated that the penetration ability of ethosomes was greater than that of liposomes. The enhancements of all the formulations were ranging from 11- to 15-fold in contrast to that of control (ALA in an aqueous solution) in terms of PpIX intensity. In addition, colorimetry detected no erythema in the irradiated skin. The results demonstrated that the enhancement ratio of ethosome formulations did not significantly differ between the non-irradiated and irradiated groups except for PE/CH/SS, which may have been due to a photobleaching effect of the PDT-irradiation process.

  8. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Hortelano, G; Chang, P L

    2000-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked genetic disorders caused by deficiency of the coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively. Because of the health hazards and costs of current product replacement therapy, much effort is devoted to the development of gene therapy for these disorders. Approaches to gene therapy for the hemophilias include: ex vivo gene therapy in which cells from the intended recipients are explanted, genetically modified to secrete Factor VIII or IX, and reimplanted into the donor; in vivo gene therapy in which Factor VIII or IX encoding vectors are directly injected into the recipient; and non-autologous gene therapy in which universal cell lines engineered to secrete Factor VIII or IX are enclosed in immuno-protective devices before implantation into recipients. Research into these approaches is aided by the many murine and canine models available. While problems of achieving high and sustained levels of factor delivery, and issues related to efficacy, safety and cost are still to be resolved, progress in gene therapy for the hemophilias has been encouraging and is likely to reach human clinical trial in the foreseeable future.

  9. 'Nano-in-nano' hybrid liposomes increase target specificity and gene silencing efficiency in breast cancer induced SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Dhiraj; Subramanian, Krishnakumar; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2017-10-01

    Gene silencing has immense potential in the treatment of cancer. However, enhancement of its efficiency requires the development of specifically targeted and safe carrier systems. Cationic carriers are generally limited by their immunogenicity. Hence, in this study, we report hybrid liposomes encapsulating Poly (L-lysine)-siRNA complex to silence epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), highly expressed in epithelial cancers. The hybrid liposomes LL1 (Egg PC:DSPE-PEG, 10:0) and hybrid immunoliposomes LL2 (Egg PC:DSPE-PEG, 8:2) linked with EpCAM antibody as the targeting ligand showed an encapsulation efficiency of 70% and 86%, respectively. LL2 liposomes with a zeta potential of -26mV exhibited good colloidal stability in phosphate buffered saline containing bovine serum albumin and fetal bovine serum at 37°C. Cell uptake studies showed increased uptake of the LL2 when compared to LL1 liposomes. Finally, the hybrid immunoliposomes were evaluated for their efficacy in regressing the tumor volume in SCID mice. Eight doses each of 0.15mg/kg, which is among the lowest reported siRNA concentrations, were administered to the animals. About 45% reduction in tumor volume was achieved after 28days in the mice treated with LL2 when compared with the positive control and LL1 treated groups. Thus, our results demonstrate that the 'nano-in-nano' concept of encapsulating poly (l-Lysine) complexed EpCAM siRNA in immunoliposomes may be a promising strategy to treat EpCAM-positive epithelial cancers, especially as an adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Amphotericin B Liposomal Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Amphotericin B liposomal injection is used to treat fungal infections such as cryptococcal meningitis (a fungal infection of the ... infections in people who cannot receive conventional amphotericin B therapy. Amphotericin B liposomal injection is in a ...

  11. [The hair follicle as a target for gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Cotsarelis, G

    2002-05-01

    The hair follicle possesses progenitor cells required for continuous hair follicle cycling and for epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. These different cell types can be the target of topical gene delivery in the skin of the mouse. Using a combination of liposomes and DNA, we demonstrate the feasibility of targeting hair follicle cells in human scalp xenografts. We consider liposome composition and stage of the hair cycle as important parameters influencing transfection of human hair follicles. Transfection is possible only during the early anagen phase. Factors and obstacles for the use of gene therapy in treating alopecia and skin diseases are discussed. A theoretical framework for future treatment of cutaneous and systemic disorders using gene therapy is presented.

  12. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Chuah, M K; Evens, H; VandenDriessche, T

    2013-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders resulting from deficiencies of factor VIII and FIX, respectively. Purified clotting factor concentrates are currently intravenously administered to treat hemophilia, but this treatment is non-curative. Therefore, gene-based therapies for hemophilia have been developed to achieve sustained high levels of clotting factor expression to correct the clinical phenotype. Over the past two decades, different types of viral and non-viral gene delivery systems have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy research with a variety of target cells, particularly hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, skeletal muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Lentiviral and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. In preclinical hemophilia A and B animal models, the bleeding phenotype was corrected with these vectors. Some of these promising preclinical results prompted clinical translation to patients suffering from a severe hemophilic phenotype. These patients receiving gene therapy with AAV vectors showed long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels, which is a major step forwards in this field. Nevertheless, the levels were insufficient to prevent trauma or injury-induced bleeding episodes. Another challenge that remains is the possible immune destruction of gene-modified cells by effector T cells, which are directed against the AAV vector antigens. It is therefore important to continuously improve the current gene therapy approaches to ultimately establish a real cure for hemophilia.

  13. Site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies to liposomes enhances photosensitizer uptake and photodynamic therapy efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broekgaarden, M.; van Vught, R.; Oliveira, S.; Roovers, R. C.; van Bergen En Henegouwen, P. M. P.; Pieters, R. J.; van Gulik, T. M.; Breukink, E.; Heger, M.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy for therapy-resistant cancers will greatly benefit from targeted delivery of tumor photosensitizing agents. In this study, a strategy for the site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies onto liposomes containing the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine was developed and tested.Photodynamic therapy for therapy-resistant cancers will greatly benefit from targeted delivery of tumor photosensitizing agents. In this study, a strategy for the site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies onto liposomes containing the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine was developed and tested. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00014b

  14. The Effectiveness of Raloxifene-Loaded Liposomes and Cochleates in Breast Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ağardan, N Başaran Mutlu; Değim, Zelihagül; Yılmaz, Şükran; Altıntaş, Levent; Topal, Turgut

    2016-08-01

    Liposome (spherical vesicles) and cochleate (multilayer crystalline, spiral structure) formulations containing raloxifene have been developed having dimethyl-β-cyclodextrin (DM-β-CD) or sodium taurocholate (NaTC). Raloxifene was approved initially for the treatment of osteoporosis but it is also effective on breast tissue and endometrial cells. Raloxifene inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) enzyme, which is known to be responsible for tumor invasion and the initiation of angiogenesis during the tumor growth. Therefore, raloxifene was selected as a model drug. A series of raloxifene-loaded liposome and cochleate formulations were prepared. In vitro release studies and in vivo tests were performed. Breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) were also used to find the most effective formulation. Highest antitumor activity was observed, and MMP-2 enzyme was also found to be inhibited with raloxifene-loaded cochleates containing DM-β-CD. These developed formulations can be helpful for further treatment alternatives and new strategies for cancer therapy.

  15. Multi-functional liposomes showing radiofrequency-triggered release and magnetic resonance imaging for tumor multi-mechanism therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bin; Han, Shuping; Li, Hongyan; Zhao, Feifei; Su, Xiangjie; Cao, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-03-01

    Recently, nanoplatforms with multiple functions, such as tumor-targeting drug carriers, MRI, optical imaging, thermal therapy etc., have become popular in the field of cancer research. The present study reports a novel multi-functional liposome for cancer theranostics. A dual targeted drug delivery with radiofrequency-triggered drug release and imaging based on the magnetic field influence was used advantageously for tumor multi-mechanism therapy. In this system, the surface of fullerene (C60) was decorated with iron oxide nanoparticles, and PEGylation formed a hybrid nanosystem (C60-Fe3O4-PEG2000). Thermosensitive liposomes (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC) with DSPE-PEG2000-folate wrapped up the hybrid nanosystem and docetaxel (DTX), which were designed to combine features of biological and physical (magnetic) drug targeting for fullerene radiofrequency-triggered drug release. The magnetic liposomes not only served as powerful tumor diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, but also as powerful agents for photothermal ablation of tumors. Furthermore, a remarkable thermal therapy combined chemotherapy multi-functional liposome nanoplatform converted radiofrequency energy into thermal energy to release drugs from thermosensitive liposomes, which was also observed during both in vitro and in vivo treatment. The multi-functional liposomes also could selectively kill cancer cells in highly localized regions via their excellent active tumor targeting and magnetic targeted abilities.

  16. Cholesterol-Peptide Hybrids to Form Liposome-Like Vesicles for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qiong; Cao, Bin; Wu, Haiyan; Cheng, Gang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, four amphiphilic cholesterol-peptide conjugates (Ch-R5H5, Ch-R3H3, Ch-R5 and Ch-R5) were designed and synthesized, and their properties in gene delivery were evaluated in vitro with an aim of developing more efficient gene delivery carriers. These amphiphilic cholesterol-peptide conjugates are composed of hydrophobic cholesterol and positively charged peptides. They were able to self-assemble into micelles at low concentrations and their critical micelle concentrations in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) are ≤85 µg/mL. Amphiphilic cholesterol-peptide conjugates condensed DNA more efficiently than a hydrophilic cationic oligoarginine (R10) peptide with no hydrophobic segment. Their transfection efficiencies were at least two orders of magnitude greater than that of R10 peptide in HEK-293 cells. Moreover, the introduction of histidine residues in cholesterol-peptide conjugates led to higher gene expression efficiency compared with cholesterol-peptides without histidine (Ch-R5 and Ch-R3), and the luciferase expression level was comparable or even higher than that induced by PEI at its optimal N/P ratio. In particular, Ch-R5H5 condensed DNA into smaller nanoparticles than Ch-R3H3 at higher N/P ratios, and the minimum size of Ch-R5H5/DNA complexes was 180 nm with zeta potential of 23 mV, achieved at the N/P ratio of 30. This liposome-like vesicle may be a promising gene delivery carrier for intravenous therapy. PMID:23382899

  17. Gene therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Singh, Nidhi; Saluja, Mini

    2013-03-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person's genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is 'the use of genes as medicine'. It involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working gene copy into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. Thus it may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. It has a promising era in the field of periodontics. Gene therapy has been used as a mode of tissue engineering in periodontics. The tissue engineering approach reconstructs the natural target tissue by combining four elements namely: Scaffold, signaling molecules, cells and blood supply and thus can help in the reconstruction of damaged periodontium including cementum, gingival, periodontal ligament and bone.

  18. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Ponder, Katherine P

    2006-09-01

    This review will highlight the progress achieved in the past 2 years on using gene therapy to treat hemophilia in animals and humans. There has been substantial progress in using gene therapy to treat animals with hemophilia. Novel approaches for hemophilia A in mice include expression of Factor VIII in blood cells or platelets derived from ex-vivo transduced hematopoietic stem cells, or in-vivo transfer of transposons expressing Factor VIII into endothelial cells or hepatocytes. Advances in large-animal models include the demonstration that neonatal administration of a retroviral vector expressing canine Factor VIII completely corrected hemophilia A in dogs, and that double-stranded adeno-associated virus vectors resulted in expression of Factor IX that is 28-fold that obtained using single-stranded adeno-associated virus vectors. In humans, one hemophilia B patient achieved 10% of normal activity after liver-directed gene therapy with a single-stranded adeno-associated virus vector expressing human Factor IX. Expression fell at 1 month, however, which was likely due to an immune response to the modified cells. Gene therapy has been successful in a patient with hemophilia B, but expression was unstable due to an immune response. Abrogating immune responses is the next major hurdle for achieving long-lasting gene therapy.

  19. Direct intratumoral infusion of liposome encapsulated rhenium radionuclides for cancer therapy: Effects of nonuniform intratumoral dose distribution

    PubMed Central

    Hrycushko, Brian A.; Li, Shihong; Goins, Beth; Otto, Randal A.; Bao, Ande

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Focused radiation therapy by direct intratumoral infusion of lipid nanoparticle (liposome)-carried beta-emitting radionuclides has shown promising results in animal model studies; however, little is known about the impact the intratumoral liposomal radionuclide distribution may have on tumor control. The primary objective of this work was to investigate the effects the intratumoral absorbed dose distributions from this cancer therapy modality have on tumor control and treatment planning by combining dosimetric and radiobiological modeling with in vivo imaging data. Methods:99mTc-encapsulated liposomes were intratumorally infused with a single injection location to human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in nude rats. High resolution in vivo planar imaging was performed at various time points for quantifying intratumoral retention following infusion. The intratumoral liposomal radioactivity distribution was obtained from 1 mm resolution pinhole collimator SPECT imaging coregistered with CT imaging of excised tumors at 20 h postinfusion. Coregistered images were used for intratumoral dosimetric and radiobiological modeling at a voxel level following extrapolation to the therapeutic analogs, 186Re∕188Re liposomes. Effective uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) were used to assess therapy effectiveness and possible methods of improving upon tumor control with this radiation therapy modality. Results: Dosimetric analysis showed that average tumor absorbed doses of 8.6 Gy∕MBq (318.2 Gy∕mCi) and 5.7 Gy∕MBq (209.1 Gy∕mCi) could be delivered with this protocol of radiation delivery for 186Re∕188Re liposomes, respectively, and 37–92 MBq (1–2.5 mCi)∕g tumor administered activity; however, large intratumoral absorbed dose heterogeneity, as seen in dose-volume histograms, resulted in insignificant values of EUD and TCP for achieving tumor control. It is indicated that the use of liposomes encapsulating radionuclides

  20. Direct intratumoral infusion of liposome encapsulated rhenium radionuclides for cancer therapy: Effects of nonuniform intratumoral dose distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Hrycushko, Brian A.; Li Shihong; Goins, Beth; Otto, Randal A.; Bao, Ande

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Focused radiation therapy by direct intratumoral infusion of lipid nanoparticle (liposome)-carried beta-emitting radionuclides has shown promising results in animal model studies; however, little is known about the impact the intratumoral liposomal radionuclide distribution may have on tumor control. The primary objective of this work was to investigate the effects the intratumoral absorbed dose distributions from this cancer therapy modality have on tumor control and treatment planning by combining dosimetric and radiobiological modeling with in vivo imaging data. Methods: {sup 99m}Tc-encapsulated liposomes were intratumorally infused with a single injection location to human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in nude rats. High resolution in vivo planar imaging was performed at various time points for quantifying intratumoral retention following infusion. The intratumoral liposomal radioactivity distribution was obtained from 1 mm resolution pinhole collimator SPECT imaging coregistered with CT imaging of excised tumors at 20 h postinfusion. Coregistered images were used for intratumoral dosimetric and radiobiological modeling at a voxel level following extrapolation to the therapeutic analogs, {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re liposomes. Effective uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) were used to assess therapy effectiveness and possible methods of improving upon tumor control with this radiation therapy modality. Results: Dosimetric analysis showed that average tumor absorbed doses of 8.6 Gy/MBq (318.2 Gy/mCi) and 5.7 Gy/MBq (209.1 Gy/mCi) could be delivered with this protocol of radiation delivery for {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re liposomes, respectively, and 37-92 MBq (1-2.5 mCi)/g tumor administered activity; however, large intratumoral absorbed dose heterogeneity, as seen in dose-volume histograms, resulted in insignificant values of EUD and TCP for achieving tumor control. It is indicated that the use of liposomes encapsulating

  1. Boron-Containing Compounds for Liposome-Mediated Tumor Localization and Application to Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick

    2005-04-07

    Medical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been significantly hindered by the slow development of boron drug-targeting methodologies for the selective delivery of high boron concentration sto malignant cells. We have successfully sought to fill this need by creating liposomes suitable as in vivo boron delivery vehicles for BNCT. Delivery of therapeutic quantities of boron to tumors in murine models has been achieved with small unilamellar boron-rich liposomes. Subsequently, attempts have been made to improve delivery efficiency of liposomes encapsulating boron-containing water-soluble species into their hollow core by incorporating lipophilic boron compounds as addenda to the liposome bilayer, incorporating boron compounds as structural components of the bilayer (which however, poses the risk of sacrificing some stability), and combinations thereof. Regardless of the method, approximately 90% of the total liposome mass remains therapeutically inactive and comprised of the vehicle's construction materials, while less than 5% is boron for neutron targeting. Following this laboratory's intensive study, the observed tumor specificity of certain liposomes has been attributed to their diminutive size of these liposomes (30-150 nm), which enables these small vesicles to pass through the porous, immature vasculature of rapidly growing tumor tissue. We surmised that any amphiphilic nanoparticle of suitable size could possess some tumor selectivity. Consequently, the discovery of a very boron-rich nanoparticle delivery agent with biodistribution performance similar to unilamellar liposomes became one of our goals. Closomers, a new class of polyhedral borane derivatives, attracted us as an alternative BNCT drug-delivery system. We specifically envisioned dodeca (nido-carboranyl)-substituted closomers as possibly having a great potential role in BNCT drug delivery. They could function as extraordinarily boron-rich BNCT drugs since they are amphiphilic

  2. Gene therapy for newborns.

    PubMed

    Kohn, D B; Parkman, R

    1997-07-01

    Application of gene therapy to treat genetic and infectious diseases may have several advantages if performed in newborns. Because of the minimal adverse effect of the underlying disease on cells of the newborn, the relatively small size of infants, and the large amount of future growth, gene therapy may be more successful in newborns than in older children or adults. The presence of umbilical cord blood from newborns provides a unique and susceptible target for the genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells. In our first trial of gene therapy in newborns, we inserted a normal adenosine deaminase gene into umbilical cord blood cells of three neonates with a congenital immune deficiency. The trial demonstrated the successful transduction and engraftment of stem cells, which continue to contribute to leukocyte production more than 3 years later. A similar approach may be taken to insert genes that inhibit replication of HIV-1 into umbilical cord blood cells of HIV-1-infected neonates. Many other metabolic and infectious disorders could be treated by gene therapy during the neonatal period if prenatal diagnoses are made and the appropriate technical and regulatory requirements have been met.

  3. Site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies to liposomes enhances photosensitizer uptake and photodynamic therapy efficacy.

    PubMed

    Broekgaarden, M; van Vught, R; Oliveira, S; Roovers, R C; van Bergen en Henegouwen, P M P; Pieters, R J; Van Gulik, T M; Breukink, E; Heger, M

    2016-03-28

    Photodynamic therapy for therapy-resistant cancers will greatly benefit from targeted delivery of tumor photosensitizing agents. In this study, a strategy for the site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies onto liposomes containing the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine was developed and tested.

  4. Cationic Liposomes Modified with Polyallylamine as a Gene Carrier: Preparation, Characterization and Transfection Efficiency Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi Oskuee, Reza; Mahmoudi, Asma; Gholami, Leila; Rahmatkhah, Alireza; Malaekeh-Nikouei, Bizhan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cationic polymers and cationic liposomes have shown to be effective non-viral gene delivery vectors. In this study, we tried to improve the transfection efficiency by employing the advantages of both. Methods: For this purpose, modified polyallylamines (PAAs) were synthesized. These modifications were done through the reaction of PAA (15 KDa) with acrylate and 6-bromoalkanoic acid derivatives. Liposomes comprising of these cationic polymers and cationic lipid were prepared and extruded through polycarbonate filters to obtain desired size. Liposome-DNA nanocomplexes were prepared in three carrier to plasmid (C/P) ratios. Size, zeta potential and DNA condensation ability of each complex were characterized separately and finally transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity of prepared vectors were evaluated in Neuro2A cell line. Results: The results showed that mean particle size of all these nanocomplexes was lower than 266 nm with surface charge of 22.0 to 33.9 mV. Almost the same condensation pattern was observed in all vectors and complete condensation was occurred at C/P ratio of 1.5. The lipoplexes containing modified PAA 15 kDa with 10% hexyl acrylate showed the highest transfection efficacy and lowest cytotoxicity in C/P ratio of 0.5. Conclusion: In some cases nanocomplexes consisting of cationic liposome and modified PAA showed better transfection activity and lower cytotoxicity compared to PAA. PMID:28101458

  5. In vivo analysis of biodegradable liposome gold nanoparticles as efficient agents for photothermal therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Rengan, Aravind Kumar; Bukhari, Amirali B; Pradhan, Arpan; Malhotra, Renu; Banerjee, Rinti; Srivastava, Rohit; De, Abhijit

    2015-02-11

    We report biodegradable plasmon resonant liposome gold nanoparticles (LiposAu NPs) capable of killing cancer cells through photothermal therapy. The pharmacokinetic study of LiposAu NPs performed in a small animal model indicates in situ degradation in hepatocytes and further getting cleared through the hepato-biliary and renal route. Further, the therapeutic potential of LiposAu NPs tested in mouse tumor xenograft model using NIR laser (750 nm) illumination resulted in complete ablation of the tumor mass, thus prolonging disease-free survival.

  6. Extravasation and transcytosis of liposomes in Kaposi's sarcoma-like dermal lesions of transgenic mice bearing the HIV tat gene.

    PubMed

    Huang, S K; Martin, F J; Jay, G; Vogel, J; Papahadjopoulos, D; Friend, D S

    1993-07-01

    Transgenic mice bearing the HIV tat gene develop dermal lesions resembling a common malignant tumor in AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). To evaluate the permeability characteristics of these lesions and the therapeutic potential of drug-carrying liposomes, we have studied the localization of sterically stabilized liposomes, which show long circulation time in blood and increased accumulation in tumors. Liposomes encapsulating colloidal gold were injected intravenously into transgenic mice bearing KS lesions, and tissues were processed 24 hours later for both electron microscopy and for light microscopy with silver enhancement. Liposomes and silver marker were detected predominantly in the dermis surrounding the early and mature KS lesions, which were characterized by a proliferation of fibroblast-like spindle cells and abnormal blood vessels close to the epidermis. The silver-enhanced gold marker often surrounded vascular channels and scattered erythrocytes. As determined by electron microscopy, some spindle cells and macrophages had ingested intact liposomes. Transendothelial transport of liposomes was observed both through open channels between endothelial cells and also through endothelial cells lining intact vessels. Both extravasation and transcytosis of liposomes through irregular endothelium were much higher in KS lesions than in the adjacent normal skin. The high accumulation of sterically stabilized liposomes in KS lesions and their intracellular uptake by some spindle cells enhances their potential as carriers of chemotherapeutic agents against this neoplasm.

  7. Gene Therapy for Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gorell, Emily; Nguyen, Ngon; Lane, Alfred; Siprashvili, Zurab

    2014-01-01

    The skin possesses qualities that make it desirable for gene therapy, and studies have focused on gene therapy for multiple cutaneous diseases. Gene therapy uses a vector to introduce genetic material into cells to alter gene expression, negating a pathological process. This can be accomplished with a variety of viral vectors or nonviral administrations. Although results are promising, there are several potential pitfalls that must be addressed to improve the safety profile to make gene therapy widely available clinically. PMID:24692191

  8. Alphaviruses in Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors present an attractive approach for gene therapy applications due to the rapid and simple recombinant virus particle production and their broad range of mammalian host cell transduction. Mainly three types of alphavirus vectors, namely naked RNA, recombinant particles and DNA/RNA layered vectors, have been subjected to preclinical studies with the goal of achieving prophylactic or therapeutic efficacy, particularly in oncology. In this context, immunization with alphavirus vectors has provided protection against challenges with tumor cells. Moreover, alphavirus intratumoral and systemic delivery has demonstrated substantial tumor regression and significant prolonged survival rates in various animal tumor models. Recent discoveries of the strong association of RNA interference and disease have accelerated gene therapy based approaches, where alphavirus-based gene delivery can play an important role. PMID:25961488

  9. Cerebrovascular Involvement in Liposome - Induced Cardiopulmonary Distress in Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    expressed as mean ± SD. There was no statistical treament for data on the 24 pigs (Table 1); only percentage values were calculated. All applied...new, promising field for use of liposomes as a vehicle is in the treatment of cerebrovascular disease through gene therapy (Saito et al., 2004; Shi...brain by means of liposomes. Tohoku J. Exp. Med. 136:219-229. Toyoda, K., Chu, Y., Heistad, D. D. (2003). Gene therapy for cerebral vascular disease

  10. Somatostatin receptor targeted liposomes with Diacerein inhibit IL-6 for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Rashmi; Dey, Goutam; Banerjee, Indranil; Dey, Kaushik Kumar; Parida, Sheetal; Kumar, B N Prashanth; Das, Chandan Kanta; Pal, Ipsita; Mukherjee, Manabendra; Misra, Mridula; Pradhan, Anjan K; Emdad, Luni; Das, Swadesh K; Fisher, Paul B; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2017-03-01

    Selective targeting to the tumor niche remains a major challenge in successful cancer therapy. Somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) is overexpressed in breast cancer cells thus making this receptor an attractive target for selective guidance of ligand-conjugated drug liposomes to the tumor site. In this study, a synthetic somatostatin analogue (SST) was used as SSTR2 targeting agent and Diacerein was employed as therapeutic molecule. Diacerein loaded liposomes (DNL) were prepared and they were further decorated with the synthetic and stable analogue of somatostatin (SST-DNL). Fabricated liposomes were nano-size in range and biocompatible. SST-DNL displayed significantly better anti-tumor efficacy as compared to free Diacerein (DN) and DNL in breast cancer models. Enhanced apoptosis in breast cancer cells was detected in SST-DNL treated groups as monitored by cell cycle analysis and changes in expression level of apoptotic/anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved Caspase 3 and PARP. SST-DNL more effectively inhibited the oncogenic IL-6/IL-6R/STAT3/MAPK/Akt signalling pathways as compared to DN or DNL in cancer cells. In addition, SST-DNL effectively suppressed angiogenesis and cancer cell invasion. In vivo tumor growth in a MDA-MB-231 mouse xenograft model was significantly suppressed following SST-DNL treatment. In xenograft model, immunohistochemistry of Ki-67 and CD-31 indicated that SST-DNL improved the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic impacts of Diacerein. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rats showed enhanced circulation time in the DNL or SST-DNL treated groups as compared to free DN. Considering all of these findings, we conclude that SST-DNL provides a novel strategy with better efficacy for breast cancer therapy.

  11. Corneal collagen cross-linking and liposomal amphotericin B combination therapy for fungal keratitis in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhao-Qin; Song, Jin-Xin; Pan, Shi-Yin; Zhang, Lin; Cheng, Yan; Liu, Xian-Ning; Wu, Jie; Xiao, Xiang-Hua; Gao, Wei; Zhu, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM To observe the therapeutic effect of corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) in combination with liposomal amphotericin B in fungal corneal ulcers. METHODS New Zealand rabbits were induced fungal corneal ulcers by scratching and randomly divided into 3 groups, i.e. control, treated with CXL, and combined therapy of CXL with 0.25% liposomal amphotericin B (n=5 each). The corneal lesions were documented with slit-lamp and confocal microscopy on 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28d after treatment. The corneas were examined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at 4wk. RESULTS A rabbit corneal ulcer model of Fusarium was successfully established. The corneal epithelium defect areas in the two treatment groups were smaller than that in the control group on 3, 7, 14 and 21d (P<0.05). The corneal epithelium defect areas of the combined group was smaller than that of the CXL group (P<0.05) on 7 and 14d, but there were no statistical differences on 3, 21 and 28d. The corneal epithelium defects of the two treatment groups have been healed by day 21. The corneal epithelium defects of the control group were healed on 28d. The diameters of the corneal collagen fiber bundles (42.960±7.383 nm in the CXL group and 37.040±4.160 nm in the combined group) were thicker than that of the control group (24.900±1.868 nm), but there was no difference between the two treatment groups. Some corneal collagen fiber bundles were distorted and with irregular arrangement, a large number of fibroblasts could be seen among them but no inflammatory cells in both treatment groups. CONCLUSION CXL combined with liposomal amphotericin B have beneficial effects on fungal corneal ulcers. The combined therapy could alleviate corneal inflammattions, accelerate corneal repair, and shorten the course of disease. PMID:27990355

  12. DNA amplification in neutral liposomes for safe and efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmin; Koo, Heebeom; Na, Jin Hee; Lee, Kyung Eun; Jeong, Seo Young; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2014-05-27

    In general, traditional gene carriers contain strong cationic charges to efficiently load anionic genes, but this cationic character also leads to destabilization of plasma membranes and causes severe cytotoxicity. Here, we developed a PCR-based nanofactory as a safe gene delivery system. A few template plasmid DNA can be amplified by PCR inside liposomes about 200 nm in diameter, and the quantity of loaded genes highly increased by more than 8.8-fold. The liposome membrane was composed of neutral lipids free from cationic charges. Consequently, this system is nontoxic, unlike other traditional cationic gene carriers. Intense red fluorescent protein (RFP) expression in CHO-K1 cells showed that the amplified genes could be successfully transfected to cells. Animal experiments with the luciferase gene also showed in vivo gene expression by our system without toxicity. We think that this PCR-based nanofactory system can overcome the toxicity problem that is the critical limitation of current gene delivery to clinical application.

  13. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth > For Parents > Gene Therapy and ... by a "bad" gene. continue Two Types of Gene Therapy The two forms of gene therapy are: Somatic ...

  14. The ethics of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sarah; Harris, John

    2006-10-01

    Recent developments have progressed in areas of science that pertain to gene therapy and its ethical implications. This review discusses the current state of therapeutic gene technologies, including stem cell therapies and genetic modification, and identifies ethical issues of concern in relation to the science of gene therapy and its application, including the ethics of embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning, the risks associated with gene therapy, and the ethics of clinical research in developing new therapeutic technologies. Additionally, ethical issues relating to genetic modification itself are considered: the significance of the human genome, the distinction between therapy and enhancement, and concerns regarding gene therapy as a eugenic practice.

  15. From conventional to stealth liposomes: a new frontier in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cattel, Luigi; Ceruti, Maurizio; Dosio, Franco

    2003-01-01

    myelotoxic than doxorubicin. Typical forms of toxicity associated to it are acute infusion reaction, mucositis and palmar plantar erythrodysesthesia, which occur especially at high doses or short dosing intervals. Active and cell targeted liposomes can be obtained by attaching some antigen-directed monoclonal antibodies (Moab or Moab fragments) or small proteins and molecules (folate, epidermal growth factor, transferrin) to the distal end of polyethylene glycol in pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. The most promising therapeutic application of liposomes is as non-viral vector agents in gene therapy, characterized by the use of cationic phospholipids complexed with the negatively charged DNA plasmid. The use of liposome formulations in local-regional anticancer therapy is also discussed. Finally, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin containing radionuclides are used in clinical trials as tumor-imaging agents or in positron emission tomography.

  16. Enhanced cellular uptake and gene silencing activity of siRNA using temperature-responsive polymer-modified liposome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Ayano, Eri; Maitani, Yoshie; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2017-05-15

    Short interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery systems using nanoparticle carriers have been limited by inefficient intracellular delivery. One drawback is the poor cellular uptake of siRNA/particle complexes through the plasma membrane and release of the nucleic acids into the cytosol. In this study, to develop the temperature-responsive liposome as a novel carrier for siRNA delivery, we prepared lipoplexes and assessed cellular uptake of siRNA and gene silencing activity of target genes, compared with those of a commercial transfection reagent, Lipofectamine RNAiMAX, and non-modified or PEGylated liposomes. The temperature-responsive polymer, N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N,N'-dimethylaminopropylacrylamide [P(NIPAAm-co-DMAPAAm)]-modified liposome induced faster intracellular delivery because P(NIPAAm-co-DMAPAAm) exhibits a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) changing its nature from hydrophilic to hydrophobic above the LCST. The temperature-responsive liposomes showed significantly higher gene silencing activity than other carriers with less cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we showed that the temperature-responsive lipoplexes were internalized mainly via microtubule-dependent transport and also by the clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. This is the first report that temperature-responsive polymer-modified liposomes thermally enhanced silencing activity of siRNA. The dehydrated polymer on the liposomes, and its aggregation caused around the LCST, can probably be attributed to effective cellular uptake of the lipoplexes for gene silencing activity by interaction with the cell membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gene therapy for mucopolysaccharidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ponder, Katherine P; Haskins, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are due to deficiencies in activities of lysosomal enzymes that degrade glycosaminoglycans. Some attempts at gene therapy for MPS in animal models have involved intravenous injection of vectors derived from an adeno-associated virus (AAV), adenovirus, retrovirus or a plasmid, which primarily results in expression in liver and secretion of the relevant enzyme into blood. Most vectors can correct disease in liver and spleen, although correction in other organs including the brain requires high enzyme activity in the blood. Alternative approaches are to transduce hematopoietic stem cells, or to inject a vector locally into difficult-to-reach sites such as the brain. Gene therapy holds great promise for providing a long-lasting therapeutic effect for MPS if safety issues can be resolved. PMID:17727324

  18. Pharmacokinetics and immunomodulatory effects on monocytes during prolonged therapy with liposomal muramyltripeptide.

    PubMed

    Landmann, R; Obrist, R; Denz, H; Ludwig, C; Frost, H; Wesp, M; Rordorf, C; Towbin, H; Gygax, D; Tarcsay, L

    1993-01-01

    The macrophage activator muramyl tripeptide-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (MTP-PE) was infused in liposomal form in 14 metastatic cancer patients (4 mg i.v. during 30 min twice weekly for 12 weeks). Clinical, pharmacokinetic and immunological parameters were studied before and 0.5, 2, 4, 24 and 72h after start of drug infusion in week 1, 4, 8 and 12. No tumor regressions were seen. Tumors progressed in 11 patients, in 4 of them within 2 months; 3 patients had stable disease. The intensity and frequency of side effects (fever and nausea) diminished from week 1 to 12. The rate of disappearance of total and free MTP-PE from blood was rapid and mean serum concentration-time curves remained unchanged throughout 12 study weeks. MTP-PE caused a marked increase of serum TNFa, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) and IL-6 in week 1, but not thereafter. In contrast, MTP-PE caused a persistent, 2-fold increase in serum neopterin and young forms of granulocytes (bands) during week 1 to 12. Before therapy, monocyte tumor cytotoxicity and in-vitro monocyte derived TNFa, IL-1 beta and IL-6 production were low in 9 patients (group L, < 15%) and high in 5 patients (group H, > 40%). Monocyte cytotoxicity and in-vitro cytokine production was transiently enhanced in week 1 in group L, it declined under therapy in group H. In conclusion, MTP-PE induced marked initial immunomodulation; the extent of the ex vivo monocyte cytokine and tumor cytotoxic response was dependent on pre-therapy cell activity. A decrease of the cytokine and IL-1ra response during prolonged therapy contrasted with a persistent increase of neopterin and juvenile blood granulocytes. The long lasting biologic effects may be relevant to direct future clinical studies with liposomal MTP-PE in an adjuvant setting.

  19. Transposons for gene therapy!

    PubMed

    Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2006-10-01

    Gene therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of several inherited and acquired human diseases. Several vector platforms exist for the delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids into cells. Vectors based on viruses are very efficient at introducing gene constructs into cells, but their use has been associated with genotoxic effects of vector integration or immunological complications due to repeated administration in vivo. Non-viral vectors are easier to engineer and manufacture, but their efficient delivery into cells is a major challenge, and the lack of their chromosomal integration precludes long-term therapeutic effects. Transposable elements are non-viral gene delivery vehicles found ubiquitously in nature. Transposon-based vectors have the capacity of stable genomic integration and long-lasting expression of transgene constructs in cells. Molecular reconstruction of Sleeping Beauty, an ancient transposon in fish, represents a cornerstone in applying transposition-mediated gene delivery in vertebrate species, including humans. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art in the application of transposable elements for therapeutic gene transfer, and identifies key targets for the development of transposon-based gene vectors with enhanced efficacy and safety for human applications.

  20. Enhanced loading efficiency and retention of 225Ac in rigid liposomes for potential targeted therapy of micrometastases.

    PubMed

    Chang, Min-Yuan; Seideman, Jonathan; Sofou, Stavroula

    2008-06-01

    Targeted alpha-particle emitters are promising therapeutics for micrometastatic disease. Actinium-225 has a 10-day half-life and generates a total of four alpha-particles per parent decay rendering (225)Ac an attractive candidate for alpha-therapy. For cancer cells with low surface expression levels of molecular targets, targeting strategies of (225)Ac using radiolabeled carriers of low specific radioactivities (such as antibodies) may not deliver enough alpha-particle emitters at the targeted cancer cells to result in killing. We previously proposed and showed using passive (225)Ac entrapment that liposomes can stably retain encapsulated (225)Ac for long time periods, and that antibody-conjugated liposomes (immunoliposomes) with encapsulated (225)Ac can specifically target and become internalized by cancer cells. However, to enable therapeutic use of (225)Ac-containing liposomes, high activities of (225)Ac need to be stably encapsulated into liposomes. In this study, various conditions for active loading of (225)Ac in preformed liposomes (ionophore-type, encapsulated buffer solution, and loading time) were evaluated, and liposomes with up to 73 +/- 9% of the initial activity of (225)Ac (0.2-200 microCi) were developed. Retention of radioactive contents by liposomes was evaluated at 37 degrees C in phosphate buffer and in serum-supplemented media. The main fraction of released (225)Ac from liposomes occurs within the first two hours of incubation. Beyond this two hour point, the encapsulated radioactivity is released from liposomes slowly with an approximate half-life of the order of several days. In some cases, after 30 days, (225)Ac retention as high as 81 +/- 7% of the initially encapsulated radioactivity was achieved. The (225)Ac loading protocol was also applied to immunoliposome loading without significant loss of targeting efficacy. Liposomes with surface-conjugated antibodies that are loaded with (225)Ac overcome the limitations of low specific activity for

  1. Hypoxia-responsive ionizable liposome delivery siRNA for glioma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Ya-Fei; Xie, Yan-Dong; Cai, Yi-Fan; Li, Bai-Yang; Li, Wen; Zeng, Ling-Yu; Li, Yu-Ling; Yu, Ru-Tong

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report the hypoxia-responsive ionizable liposomes to deliver small interference RNA (siRNA) anticancer drugs, which can selectively enhance cellular uptake of the siRNA under hypoxic and low-pH conditions to cure glioma. For this purpose, malate dehydrogenase lipid molecules were synthesized, which contain nitroimidazole groups that impart hypoxia sensitivity and specificity as hydrophobic tails, and tertiary amines as hydrophilic head groups. These malate dehydrogenase molecules, together with DSPE-PEG2000 and cholesterol, were self-assembled into O′1,O1-(3-(dimethylamino)propane-1,2-diyl) 16-bis(2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl) di(hexadecanedioate) liposomes (MLP) to encapsulate siRNA through electrostatic interaction. Our study showed that the MLP could deliver polo-like kinase 1 siRNA (siPLK1) into glioma cells and effectively enhance the cellular uptake of MLP/siPLK1 because of increased positive charges induced by hypoxia and low pH. Moreover, MLP/siPLK1 was shown to be very effective in inhibiting the growth of glioma cells both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, the MLP is a promising siRNA delivery system for tumor therapy. PMID:28223799

  2. Systemic delivery of small interfering RNA by use of targeted polycation liposomes for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kenjo, Eriya; Asai, Tomohiro; Yonenaga, Norihito; Ando, Hidenori; Ishii, Takayuki; Hatanaka, Kentaro; Shimizu, Kosuke; Urita, Yugo; Dewa, Takehisa; Nango, Mamoru; Tsukada, Hideo; Oku, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Novel polycation liposomes decorated with cyclic(Cys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe) peptide (cyclicRGD)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) (RGD-PEG-polycation liposomes (PCL)) were previously developed for cancer therapy based on RNA interference. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to tumors by use of RGD-PEG-PCL in B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice. Pharmacokinetic data obtained by positron emission tomography showed that cholesterol-conjugated siRNA formulated in RGD-PEG-PCL markedly accumulated in the tumors. Delivered by RGD-PEG-PCL, a therapeutic cocktail of siRNAs composed of cholesterol-conjugated siRNAs for c-myc, MDM2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were able to significantly inhibit the growth of B16F10 melanoma both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that targeted delivery of siRNAs by use of RGD-PEG-PCL has considerable potential for cancer treatment.

  3. nanosheets for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Zhongyang; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Renshun; Chen, Huabin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gao, Ling; Wang, Bin; Guo, Zhaoji; Xue, Xiaofeng; Cao, Wei; Guo, Liang

    2014-10-01

    A new class of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 which have fantastic physical and chemical properties, has drawn tremendous attention in different fields recently. Herein, we for the first time take advantage of the great potential of MoS2 with well-engineered surface as a novel type of 2D nanocarriers for gene delivery and therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged MoS2-PEG-PEI is synthesized with lipoic acid-modified polyethylene glycol (LA-PEG) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The amino end of positively charged nanomaterials can bind to the negatively charged small interfering RNA (siRNA). After detection of physical and chemical characteristics of the nanomaterial, cell toxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was investigated as a well-known oncogene, which was a critical regulator of cell cycle transmission at multiple levels. Through knockdown of PLK1 with siRNA carried by novel nanovector, qPCR and Western blot were used to measure the interfering efficiency; apoptosis assay was used to detect the transfection effect of PLK1. All results showed that the novel nanocarrier revealed good biocompatibility, reduced cytotoxicity, as well as high gene-carrying ability without serum interference, thus would have great potential for gene delivery and therapy.

  4. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-10-07

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC by searching the literature published in English using the PubMed database and analyzing clinical trials registered on the Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website (http://www. wiley.co.uk/genmed/ clinical). Viral vectors are main gene delivery tools in gene therapy of cancer, and especially, oncolytic virus shows brighter prospect due to its tumor-targeting property. Efficient therapeutic targets for gene therapy include tumor suppressor gene p53, mutant oncogene K-ras, anti-angiogenesis gene VEGFR, suicide gene HSK-TK, cytosine deaminase and cytochrome p450, multiple cytokine genes and so on. Combining different targets or combination strategies with traditional chemoradiotherapy may be a more effective approach to improve the efficacy of cancer gene therapy. Cancer gene therapy is not yet applied in clinical practice, but basic and clinical studies have demonstrated its safety and clinical benefits. Gene therapy will be a new and promising field for the treatment of PC.

  5. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC by searching the literature published in English using the PubMed database and analyzing clinical trials registered on the Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website (http://www. wiley.co.uk/genmed/ clinical). Viral vectors are main gene delivery tools in gene therapy of cancer, and especially, oncolytic virus shows brighter prospect due to its tumor-targeting property. Efficient therapeutic targets for gene therapy include tumor suppressor gene p53, mutant oncogene K-ras, anti-angiogenesis gene VEGFR, suicide gene HSK-TK, cytosine deaminase and cytochrome p450, multiple cytokine genes and so on. Combining different targets or combination strategies with traditional chemoradiotherapy may be a more effective approach to improve the efficacy of cancer gene therapy. Cancer gene therapy is not yet applied in clinical practice, but basic and clinical studies have demonstrated its safety and clinical benefits. Gene therapy will be a new and promising field for the treatment of PC. PMID:25309069

  6. Cardiac Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chaanine, Antoine H.; Kalman, Jill; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic progressive disorder where frequent and recurrent hospitalizations are associated with high mortality and morbidity. The incidence and the prevalence of this disease will increase with the increase in the number of the aging population of the United States. Understanding the molecular pathology and pathophysiology of this disease will uncover novel targets and therapies that can restore the function or attenuate the damage of malfunctioning cardiomyocytes by gene therapy that becomes an interesting and a promising field for the treatment of heart failure as well as other diseases in the future. Of equal importance is developing vectors and delivery methods that can efficiently transduce the majority of the cardiomyocytes, that can offer a long term expression and that can escape the host immune response. Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors have the potential to become a promising novel therapeutic vehicles for molecular medicine in the future. PMID:21092890

  7. Gene and stem cell therapy of the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    The hair follicle is a highly complex appendage of the skin containing a multiplicity of cell types. The follicle undergoes constant cycling through the life of the organism including growth and resorption with growth dependent on specific stem cells. The targeting of the follicle by genes and stem cells to change its properties, in particular, the nature of the hair shaft is discussed. Hair follicle delivery systems are described such as liposomes and viral vectors for gene therapy. The nature of the hair follicle stem cells is discussed, in particular, its pluripotency.

  8. Gene therapy in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Farjadnia, Mahgol; Naderan, Mohammad; Mohammadpour, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is the most common ectasia of the cornea and is a common reason for corneal transplant. Therapeutic strategies that can arrest the progression of this disease and modify the underlying pathogenesis are getting more and more popularity among scientists. Cumulating data represent strong evidence of a genetic role in the pathogenesis of KC. Different loci have been identified, and certain mutations have also been mapped for this disease. Moreover, Biophysical properties of the cornea create an appropriate candidate of this tissue for gene therapy. Immune privilege, transparency and ex vivo stability are among these properties. Recent advantage in vectors, besides the ability to modulate the corneal milieu for accepting the target gene for a longer period and fruitful translation, make a big hope for stupendous results reasonable. PMID:25709266

  9. The feasibility of targeted selective gene therapy of the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Hoffman, R M

    1995-07-01

    Loss of hair and hair colour is associated with ageing, and when it involves the scalp hair, it can be distressing to both sexes. Hair loss resulting from cancer chemotherapy is particularly distressing. However, safe, effective therapies directed to hair have only just started to be developed. The hair follicle is a complex skin appendage composed of epidermal and dermal tissue, with specialized keratinocytes, the hair matrix cells, forming the hair shaft. Specific therapy of the hair follicle depends on selective targeting of specific cells of the hair follicle. We have developed the histoculture of intact hair-growing skin on sponge-gel matrices. We have recently found in histocultured skin that liposomes can selectively target hair follicles to deliver both small and large molecules. That liposomes can target the hair follicle for delivery has been confirmed independently. Two decades ago we introduced the technique of entrapping DNA in liposomes for use in gene therapy. In this report we describe the selective targeting of the lacZ reporter gene to the hair follicles in mice after topical application of the gene entrapped in liposomes. These results demonstrate that highly selective, safe gene therapy for the hair process is feasible.

  10. An approach to transgene expression in liver endothelial cells using a liposome-based gene vector coated with hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Hashida, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Mai; Hyodo, Mamoru; Ara, Mst Naznin; Ohga, Noritaka; Hida, Kyoko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2013-09-01

    Dysfunctional sinusoidal liver endothelial cells (LECs) are associated with liver diseases, such as liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and portal hypertension. Because of this, gene therapy targeted to LECs would be a useful and productive strategy for directly treating these diseases at the level of genes. Here, we report on the development of a transgene vector that specifically targets LECs. The vector is a liposome-based gene vector coated with hyaluronic acid (HA). HA is a natural ligand for LECs and confers desirable properties on particles, rendering them biodegradable, biocompatible, and nonimmunogenic. In this study, we constructed HA-modified carriers, and evaluated cellular uptake and transfection activity using cultured LECs from KSN nude mice (KSN-LECs). Cellular uptake analyses showed that KSN-LECs recognized the HA-modified carriers more effectively than skin endothelial cells. The transfection assay indicated that the efficient gene expression in KSN-LECs, using the HA-modified carriers, required an adequate lipid composition and a functional device to control intracellular trafficking. This finding contributes to our overall knowledge of transgene expression targeted to LECs.

  11. [Basic principles of gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Vieweg, J

    1996-09-01

    The rapid development of recombinant DNA technology and our enhanced understanding of the genetic basis of human disease has facilitated the development of new molecular therapeutic modalities, termed gene therapy. Gene therapy involves the transfer of functional genes into somatic cells and their expression in target tissues in order to replace absent genes, correct defective genes, or induce antitumoral activity in the tumor-bearing host. Currently, an increasing number of gene therapy strategies are being investigated in experimental and clinical trials. Despite substantial progress, a number of technical and logistical hurdles must still be overcome before gene therapy can be safety and effectively applied in the human patient. Since gene therapy involves complex cell processing and can be time consuming and costly, simplifications or even alternative approaches will be necessary in order to establish this therapy as suitable for clinical use. This report reviews various gene therapy strategies and gene delivery techniques currently under clinical or experimental investigation. Special emphasis is given to cytokine gene therapy using gene-modified tumor vaccines for cancer treatment.

  12. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  13. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  14. Gene regulation in cancer gene therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Ian; Lehouritis, Panos; Niculescu-Duvaz, Ion; Marais, Richard; Springer, Caroline J

    2003-10-01

    Regulation of expression in gene therapy is considered to be a very desirable goal, preventing toxic effects and improving biological efficacy. A variety of systems have been reported in an ever widening range of applications, this paper describes these systems with specific reference to cancer gene therapy.

  15. [Gene therapy. Methods and applications].

    PubMed

    Jonassen, T O; Grinde, B; Orstavik, I

    1994-04-10

    Modern techniques in molecular biology and cell biology will probably make gene therapy, i.e. therapeutic transfer of genes to the patient's cells, available for treatment of many genetic diseases, cancer, cardiovascular diseases and infectious diseases. For genetic diseases the treatment will involve the transfer of a functional copy of the defect gene. The strategy for treatment of cancer may include the transfer of genes that induce the death of cancer cells via toxic molecules, and genes that enhance the immune response to tumour cells. After several years of preclinical studies, the National Institutes of Health in the USA has, up to February 1994, approved 56 protocols for clinical trials in human gene therapy. Most of the protocols include use of viruses to aid gene delivery. This paper briefly reviews the scientific basis for gene therapy, and discusses some clinical applications of somatic gene therapy in humans.

  16. Gene therapy for psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Yaroslav; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy has become of increasing interest in clinical neurosurgery with the completion of numerous clinical trials for Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, and pediatric genetic disorders. With improved understanding of the dysfunctional circuitry mediating various psychiatric disorders, deep brain stimulation for refractory psychiatric diseases is being increasingly explored in human patients. These factors are likely to facilitate development of gene therapy for psychiatric diseases. Because delivery of gene therapy agents would require the same surgical techniques currently being employed for deep brain stimulation, neurosurgeons are likely to lead the development of this field, as has occurred in other areas of clinical gene therapy for neurologic disorders. We review the current state of gene therapy for psychiatric disorders and focus specifically on particular areas of promising research that may translate into human trials for depression, drug addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia. Issues that are relatively unique to psychiatric gene therapy are also discussed.

  17. Gene therapy research in Asia.

    PubMed

    Deng, H-X; Wang, Y; Ding, Q-R; Li, D-L; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2017-09-07

    Gene therapy has shown great potential for the treatment of diseases that previously were either untreatable or treatable but not curable with conventional schemes. Recent progress in clinical gene therapy trials has emerged in various severe diseases, including primary immunodeficiencies, leukodystrophies, Leber's congenital amaurosis, haemophilia, as well as retinal dystrophy. The clinical transformation and industrialization of gene therapy in Asia have been remarkable and continue making steady progress. A total of six gene therapy-based products have been approved worldwide, including two drugs from Asia. This review aims to highlight recent progress in gene therapy clinical trials and discuss the prospects for the future in China and wider Asia.Gene Therapy advance online publication, 7 September 2017; doi:10.1038/gt.2017.62.

  18. Techniques for loading technetium-99m and rhenium-186/188 radionuclides into pre-formed liposomes for diagnostic imaging and radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Goins, Beth; Bao, Ande; Phillips, William T

    2010-01-01

    Liposomes can serve as carriers of radionuclides for diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications. Herein, procedures are outlined for radiolabeling liposomes with the gamma-emitting radionuclide, technetium-99m ((99m)Tc), for non-invasive detection of disease and for monitoring the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of liposomal drugs, and/or with therapeutic beta-emitting radionuclides, rhenium-186/188 ((186/188)Re), for radionuclide therapy. These efficient and practical liposome radiolabeling methods use a post-labeling mechanism to load (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re into pre-formed liposomes prepared in advance of the labeling procedure. For all liposome radiolabeling methods described, a lipophilic chelator is used to transport (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re across the lipid bilayer of the pre-formed liposomes. Once within the liposome interior, the pre-encapsulated glutathione or ammonium sulfate (pH) gradient provides for stable entrapment of the (99m)Tc and (186/188)Re within the liposomes. In the first method, (99m)Tc is transported across the lipid bilayer by the lipophilic chelator, hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) and (99m)Tc-HMPAO becomes trapped by interaction with the pre-encapsulated glutathione within the liposomes. In the second method, (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re is transported across the lipid bilayer by the lipophilic chelator, N,N-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-N',N'-diethylethylenediamine (BMEDA), and (99m)Tc-BMEDA or (186/188)Re-BMEDA becomes trapped by interaction with pre-encapsulated glutathione within the liposomes. In the third method, an ammonium sulfate (pH) gradient loading technique is employed using liposomes with an extraliposomal pH of 7.4 and an interior pH of 5.1. BMEDA, which is lipophilic at pH 7.4, serves as a lipophilic chelator for (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re to transport the radionuclides across the lipid bilayer. Once within the more acidic liposome interior, (99m)Tc/(186/188)Re-BMEDA complex becomes protonated and more hydrophilic, which

  19. Techniques for Loading Technetium-99m and Rhenium-186/188 Radionuclides into Preformed Liposomes for Diagnostic Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Goins, Beth; Bao, Ande; Phillips, William T

    2017-01-01

    Liposomes can serve as carriers of radionuclides for diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications. Herein, procedures are outlined for radiolabeling liposomes with the gamma-emitting radionuclide, technetium-99m ((99m)Tc), for noninvasive detection of disease and for monitoring the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of liposomal drugs, and/or with therapeutic beta-emitting radionuclides, rhenium-186/188 ((186/188)Re), for radionuclide therapy. These efficient and practical liposome radiolabeling methods use a post-labeling mechanism to load (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re into preformed liposomes prepared in advance of the labeling procedure. For all liposome radiolabeling methods described, a lipophilic chelator is used to transport (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re across the lipid bilayer of the preformed liposomes. Once within the liposome interior, the pre-encapsulated glutathione or ammonium sulfate (pH) gradient provides for stable entrapment of the (99m)Tc and (186/188)Re within the liposomes. In the first method, (99m)Tc is transported across the lipid bilayer by the lipophilic chelator, hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) and (99m)Tc-HMPAO becomes trapped by interaction with the pre-encapsulated glutathione within the liposomes. In the second method, (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re is transported across the lipid bilayer by the lipophilic chelator, N,N-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-N',N'-diethylethylenediamine (BMEDA), and (99m)Tc-BMEDA or (186/188)Re-BMEDA becomes trapped by interaction with pre-encapsulated glutathione within the liposomes. In the third method, an ammonium sulfate (pH) gradient loading technique is employed using liposomes with an extraliposomal pH of 7.4 and an interior pH of 5.1. BMEDA, which is lipophilic at pH 7.4, serves as a lipophilic chelator for (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re to transport the radionuclides across the lipid bilayer. Once within the more acidic liposome interior, (99m)Tc/(186/188)Re-BMEDA complex becomes protonated and more hydrophilic, which results

  20. Influence of curcumin-loaded cationic liposome on anticancer activity for cervical cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Saengkrit, Nattika; Saesoo, Somsak; Srinuanchai, Wanwisa; Phunpee, Sarunya; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong

    2014-02-01

    The delivery of curcumin has been explored in the form of liposomal nanoparticles to treat various cancer cells. Since curcumin is water insoluble and an effective delivery route is through encapsulation in liposomes, which were modified with three components of DDAB, cholesterol and non-ionic surfactant. The purpose of this study was to establish a critical role of DDAB in liposomes containing curcumin at cellular response against two types of cell lines (HeLa and SiHa). Here, we demonstrate that DDAB is a potent inducer of cell uptake and cell death in both cell lines. The enhanced cell uptake was found on DDAB-containing liposome, but not on DDAB-free liposome. However, the cytotoxicity of DDAB-containing liposomes was high and needs to be optimized. The cytotoxicity of liposomal curcumin was more pronounced than free curcumin in both cells, suggesting the benefits of using nanocarrier. In addition, the anticancer efficiency and apoptosis effect of the liposomal curcumin formulations with DDAB was higher than those of DDAB-free liposomes. Therefore curcumin loaded liposomes indicate significant potential as delivery vehicles for the treatment of cervical cancers.

  1. Recent Developments of Liposomes as Nanocarriers for Theranostic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Hang; Hwang, Kevin; Lu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Liposomes are nanocarriers comprised of lipid bilayers encapsulating an aqueous core. The ability of liposomes to encapsulate a wide variety of diagnostic and therapeutic agents has led to significant interest in utilizing liposomes as nanocarriers for theranostic applications. In this review, we highlight recent progress in developing liposomes as nanocarriers for a) diagnostic applications to detect proteins, DNA, and small molecule targets using fluorescence, magnetic resonance, ultrasound, and nuclear imaging; b) therapeutic applications based on small molecule-based therapy, gene therapy and immunotherapy; and c) theranostic applications for simultaneous detection and treatment of heavy metal toxicity and cancers. In addition, we summarize recent studies towards understanding of interactions between liposomes and biological components. Finally, perspectives on future directions in advancing the field for clinical translations are also discussed. PMID:27375783

  2. Image guidance, treatment planning and evaluation of cancer interstitial focal therapy using liposomal radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Steve William

    Focally ablative therapy of cancer has gained significant interest recently. Improvements in diagnostic techniques have created possibilities for treatment which were once clinically unfeasible. Imaging must be capable of allowing accurate diagnosis, staging and planning upon initiation of therapy. Recent improvements in MRI and molecular imaging techniques have made it possible to accurately localize lesions and in so doing, improve the accuracy of proposed focal treatments. Using multimodality imaging it is now possible to target, plan and evaluate interstitial focal treatment using liposome encapsulated beta emitting radionuclides in a variety of cancer types. Since most absorbed dose is deposited early and heterogeneously in beta-radionuclide therapy, investigation of the resultant molecular and cellular events during this time is important for evaluating treatment efficacy. Additionally, investigating a multifocal entity such as prostate cancer is helpful for determining whether MRI is capable of discriminating the proper lesion for therapy. Correlation of MRI findings with histopathology can further improve the accuracy of interstitial focal radionuclide therapy by providing non-invasive surrogates for tissue compartment sizes. In the application of such therapies, compartmental sizes are known to heavily influence the distribution of injected agents. This has clear dosimetric implications with the potential to significantly alter the efficacy of treatment. The hypothesis of this project was that multimodality imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), autoradiography (AR), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could be used to target, plan, and evaluate interstitial focal therapy with non-sealed source, liposome-encapsulated 186Re beta emitting radionuclides. The specific aims of this project were to 1) Identify suitable targets for interstitial focal therapy. This was done by retrospectively analyzing MRI data to characterize the tumor

  3. Gene Therapy for Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Shu, Shang-An; Wang, Jinjun; Tao, Mi-Hua; Leung, Patrick S C

    2015-10-01

    Advances in understanding the immunological and molecular basis of autoimmune diseases have made gene therapy a promising approach to treat the affected patients. Gene therapy for autoimmune diseases aims to regulate the levels of proinflammatory cytokines or molecules and the infiltration of lymphocytes to the effected sites through successful delivery and expression of therapeutic genes in appropriate cells. The ultimate goal of gene therapy is to restore and maintain the immune tolerance to the relevant autoantigens and improve clinical outcomes for patients. Here, we summarize the recent progress in identifying genes responsible for autoimmune diseases and present examples where gene therapy has been applied as treatments or prevention in autoimmune diseases both in animal models and the clinical trials. Discussion on the advantages and pitfalls of gene therapy strategies employed is provided. The intent of this review is to inspire further studies toward the development of new strategies for successful treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  4. Model studies directed toward the boron neutron-capture therapy of cancer: boron delivery to murine tumors with liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Shelly, K; Feakes, D A; Hawthorne, M F; Schmidt, P G; Krisch, T A; Bauer, W F

    1992-01-01

    The successful treatment of cancer by boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) requires the selective concentration of boron-10 within malignant tumors. The potential of liposomes to deliver boron-rich compounds to tumors has been assessed by the examination of the biodistribution of boron delivered by liposomes in tumor-bearing mice. Small unilamellar vesicles with mean diameters of 70 nm or less, composed of a pure synthetic phospholipid (distearoyl phosphatidylcholine) and cholesterol, have been found to stably encapsulate high concentrations of water-soluble ionic boron compounds. The hydrolytically stable borane anions B10H10(2-), B12H11SH2-, B20H17OH4-, B20H19(3-), and the normal form and photoisomer of B20H18(2-) were encapsulated in liposomes as their soluble sodium salts. The tissue concentration of boron in tumor-bearing mice was measured at several time points over 48 h after i.v. injection of emulsions of liposomes containing the borane anions. Although the boron compounds used do not exhibit an affinity for tumors and are normally rapidly cleared from the body, liposomes were observed to selectively deliver the borane anions to tumors. The highest tumor concentrations achieved reached the therapeutic range (greater than 15 micrograms of boron per g of tumor) while maintaining high tumor-boron/blood-boron ratios (greater than 3). The most favorable results were obtained with the two isomers of B20H18(2-). These boron compounds have the capability to react with intracellular components after they have been deposited within tumor cells by the liposome, thereby preventing the borane ion from being released into blood. PMID:1409600

  5. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geoffrey L; Herzog, Roland W

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder consisting of two classifications, hemophilia A and hemophilia B, depending on the underlying mutation. Although the disease is currently treatable with intravenous delivery of replacement recombinant clotting factor, this approach represents a significant cost both monetarily and in terms of quality of life. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative approach to the treatment of hemophilia that would ideally provide life-long correction of clotting activity with a single injection. In this review, we will discuss the multitude of approaches that have been explored for the treatment of both hemophilia A and B, including both in vivo and ex vivo approaches with viral and nonviral delivery vectors.

  6. Gene therapy for hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Herzog, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder consisting of two classifications, hemophilia A and hemophilia B, depending on the underlying mutation. Although the disease is currently treatable with intravenous delivery of replacement recombinant clotting factor, this approach represents a significant cost both monetarily and in terms of quality of life. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative approach to the treatment of hemophilia that would ideally provide life-long correction of clotting activity with a single injection. In this review, we will discuss the multitude of approaches that have been explored for the treatment of both hemophilia A and B, including both in vivo and ex vivo approaches with viral and nonviral delivery vectors. PMID:25553466

  7. Gene therapy for deafness.

    PubMed

    Kohrman, D C; Raphael, Y

    2013-12-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans and can result from genetic, environmental or combined etiologies that prevent normal function of the cochlea, the peripheral sensory organ. Recent advances in understanding the genetic pathways that are critical for the development and maintenance of cochlear function, as well as the molecular mechanisms that underlie cell trauma and death, have provided exciting opportunities for modulating these pathways to correct genetic mutations, to enhance the endogenous protective pathways for hearing preservation and to regenerate lost sensory cells with the possibility of ameliorating hearing loss. A number of recent animal studies have used gene-based therapies in innovative ways toward realizing these goals. With further refinement, some of the protective and regenerative approaches reviewed here may become clinically applicable.

  8. Immunotherapy and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Elizabeth

    2004-02-01

    The Immunotherapy and Gene Therapy meeting of the Academy of Medical Sciences reviewed the state-of-the-art and translational prospects for therapeutic interventions aimed at killing tumor cells, correcting genetic defects and developing vaccines for chronic infections. Crucial basic science concepts and information about dendritic cells, the structure and function of T-cell receptors, and manipulation of the immune response by cytokine antagonists and peptides were presented. This information underpins vaccine design and delivery, as well as attempts to immunomodulate autoimmune disease. Results from studies using anticancer DNA vaccines, which include appropriate signals for both the innate and adaptive immune response, were presented in several talks. The vaccines incorporated helper epitopes and cancer target epitopes such as immunoglobulin idiotypes (for lymphomas and myelomas), melanoma-associated antigens (for melanoma and other solid tumors) and minor histocompatibility antigens (for leukemia). The results of using vaccines employing similar principles and designed to reduce viral load in HIV/AIDS patients were also presented. The introduction of suicide genes incorporating the bacterial enzyme nitroreductase gene (ntr) targeted at tumor cells prior to administration of the prodrug CB-1954, converted by ntr into a toxic alkylating agent, was discussed against the background of clinical trials and improved suicide gene design. The introduction into hematopoietic stem cells of missing genes for the common gamma-chain, deficiency of which causes severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), used similar retroviral transduction. The outcome of treating six SCID patients in the UK, and ten in France was successful immune reconstitution in the majority of patients, but in two of the French cases a complication of lymphoproliferative disease due to insertional mutagenesis was observed. The adoptive transfer of T-cells specific for minor histocompatibility antigens (for

  9. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth > For Parents > Gene Therapy ... that don't respond to conventional therapies. About Genes Our genes help make us unique. Inherited from ...

  10. Gene therapy for malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hidehiro; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent and devastating primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current treatment modalities, such as surgical resection followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy, only modest improvements in median survival have been achieved. Frequent recurrence and invasiveness of GBM are likely due to the resistance of glioma stem cells to conventional treatments; therefore, novel alternative treatment strategies are desperately needed. Recent advancements in molecular biology and gene technology have provided attractive novel treatment possibilities for patients with GBM. Gene therapy is defined as a technology that aims to modify the genetic complement of cells to obtain therapeutic benefit. To date, gene therapy for the treatment of GBM has demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy in pre-clinical studies and promising safety profiles in clinical studies. However, while this approach is obviously promising, concerns still exist regarding issues associated with transduction efficiency, viral delivery, the pathologic response of the brain, and treatment efficacy. Tumor development and progression involve alterations in a wide spectrum of genes, therefore a variety of gene therapy approaches for GBM have been proposed. Improved viral vectors are being evaluated, and the potential use of gene therapy alone or in synergy with other treatments against GBM are being studied. In this review, we will discuss the most commonly studied gene therapy approaches for the treatment of GBM in preclinical and clinical studies including: prodrug/suicide gene therapy; oncolytic gene therapy; cytokine mediated gene therapy; and tumor suppressor gene therapy. In addition, we review the principles and mechanisms of current gene therapy strategies as well as advantages and disadvantages of each.

  11. Novel molecular approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tim W. R.; Matthews, David A.; Blair, G. Eric

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of a range of inherited diseases, such as cystic fibrosis. However, efficient delivery and expression of the therapeutic transgene at levels sufficient to result in phenotypic correction of cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease has proved elusive. There are many reasons for this lack of progress, both macroscopically in terms of airway defence mechanisms and at the molecular level with regard to effective cDNA delivery. This review of approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy covers these areas in detail and highlights recent progress in the field. For gene therapy to be effective in patients with cystic fibrosis, the cDNA encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein must be delivered effectively to the nucleus of the epithelial cells lining the bronchial tree within the lungs. Expression of the transgene must be maintained at adequate levels for the lifetime of the patient, either by repeat dosage of the vector or by targeting airway stem cells. Clinical trials of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis have demonstrated proof of principle, but gene expression has been limited to 30 days at best. Results suggest that viral vectors such as adenovirus and adeno-associated virus are unsuited to repeat dosing, as the immune response reduces the effectiveness of each subsequent dose. Nonviral approaches, such as cationic liposomes, appear more suited to repeat dosing, but have been less effective. Current work regarding non-viral gene delivery is now focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in cell entry, endosomal escape and nuclear import of the transgene. There is now increasing evidence to suggest that additional ligands that facilitate endosomal escape or contain a nuclear localization signal may enhance liposome-mediated gene delivery. Much progress in this area has been informed by advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses deliver their genomes to the nuclei of host

  12. The potential of transferrin-pendant-type polyethyleneglycol liposomes encapsulating decahydrodecaborate-{sup 1}B (GB-10) as {sup 1}B-carriers for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro . E-mail: smasuna@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Kasaoka, Satoshi; Maruyama, Kazuo; Nigg, David; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Nagata, Kenji; Suzuki, Minoru; Kinashi, Yuko; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate GB-10-encapsulating transferrin (TF)-pendant-type polyethyleneglycol (PEG) liposomes as tumor-targeting {sup 1}B-carriers for boron neutron capture therapy. Methods and Materials: A free mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate-{sup 1}B (BSH) or decahydrodecaborate-{sup 1}B (GB-10) solution, bare liposomes, PEG liposomes, or TF-PEG liposomes were injected into SCC VII tumor-bearing mice, and {sup 1}B concentrations in the tumors and normal tissues were measured by {gamma}-ray spectrometry. Meanwhile, tumor-bearing mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all intratumor proliferating cells, then injected with these {sup 1}B-carriers containing BSH or GB-10 in the same manner. Right after thermal neutron irradiation, the response of quiescent (Q) cells was assessed in terms of the micronucleus frequency using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The frequency in the total tumor cells was determined from the BrdU nontreated tumors. Results: Transferrin-PEG liposomes showed a prolonged retention in blood circulation, low uptake by reticuloendothelial system, and the most enhanced accumulation of {sup 1}B in solid tumors. In general, the enhancing effects were significantly greater in total cells than Q cells. In both cells, the enhancing effects of GB-10-containing {sup 1}B-carriers were significantly greater than BSH-containing {sup 1}B-carriers, whether loaded in free solution or liposomes. In both cells, whether BSH or GB-10 was employed, the greatest enhancing effect was observed with TF-PEG liposomes followed in decreasing order by PEG liposomes, bare liposomes, and free BSH or GB-10 solution. In Q cells, the decrease was remarkable between PEG and bare liposomes. Conclusions: In terms of biodistribution characteristics and tumor cell-killing effect as a whole, including Q cells, GB-10 TF-PEG liposomes were regarded as promising {sup 1}B-carriers.

  13. A nanomedicine based combination therapy based on QLPVM peptide functionalized liposomal tamoxifen and doxorubicin against Luminal A breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyou; Chen, Xianhui; Yang, Xiucong; Gao, Wei; He, Bing; Dai, Wenbing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Dai, Zhifei; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Though combination chemotherapy or antitumor nanomedicine is extensively investigated, their combining remains in infancy. Additionally, enhanced delivery of estrogen or its analogs to tumor with highly-expressed estrogen-receptor (ER) is seldom considered, despite its necessity for ER-positive breast cancer treatment. Here, nanomedicine based combination therapy using QLPVM conjugated liposomal tamoxifen (TAM) and doxorubicin (DOX) was designed and testified, where the penta-peptide was derived from Ku70 Bax-binding domain. Quantitative, semi-quantitative and qualitative approaches demonstrated the enhanced endocytosis and cytotoxicity of QLPVM conjugated sterically stabilized liposomes (QLPVM-SSLs) in vitro and in vivo. Mechanism studies of QLPVM excluded the possible electrostatic, hydrophobic or receptor-ligand interactions. However, as a weak cell-penetrating peptide, QLPVM significantly induced drug release from QLPVM-SSLs during their interaction with cells, which was favorable for drug internalization. These findings suggested that the nanomedicine based combination therapy using QLPVM-SSL-TAM and QLPVM-SSL-DOX might provide a rational strategy for Luminal A breast cancer. Breast cancer remains a leading cause of mortality in women worldwide. Although combined therapy using hormonal antagonist and chemotherapy is the norm nowadays, the use of these agents together in a single delivery system has not been tested. Here, the authors investigated this approach using QLPVM conjugated liposomes in in-vitro and in-vivo models. The positive findings may provide a novel direction for breast cancer treatment in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Gene therapy in metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sevin, C; Cartier-Lacave, N; Aubourg, P

    2009-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase A. Deficiency of this enzyme results in intralysosomal storage of sphingolipid cerebroside 3-sulfates (sulfatides), which are abundant in myelin and neurons. A pathological hallmark of MLD is demyelination and neurodegeneration, causing various and ultimately lethal neurological symptoms. This review discusses the potential therapeutic application of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy and intracerebral gene transfer (brain gene therapy) in patients with MLD.

  15. Targeted Therapy for Acute Autoimmune Myocarditis with Nano-Sized Liposomal FK506 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Takashi; Araki, Ryo; Tsuchida, Shota; Thanikachalam, Punniyakoti V.; Fukuta, Tatsuya; Asai, Tomohiro; Yamato, Masaki; Sanada, Shoji; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Asano, Yoshihiro; Asakura, Masanori; Hanawa, Haruo; Hao, Hiroyuki; Oku, Naoto; Takashima, Seiji; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Sakata, Yasushi; Minamino, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents are used for the treatment of immune-mediated myocarditis; however, the need to develop a more effective therapeutic approach remains. Nano-sized liposomes may accumulate in and selectively deliver drugs to an inflammatory lesion with enhanced vascular permeability. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution of liposomal FK506, an immunosuppressive drug encapsulated within liposomes, and the drug’s effects on cardiac function in a rat experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model. We prepared polyethylene glycol-modified liposomal FK506 (mean diameter: 109.5 ± 4.4 nm). We induced EAM by immunization with porcine myosin and assessed the tissue distribution of the nano-sized beads and liposomal FK506 in this model. After liposomal or free FK506 was administered on days 14 and 17 after immunization, the cytokine expression in the rat hearts along with the histological findings and hemodynamic parameters were determined on day 21. Ex vivo fluorescent imaging revealed that intravenously administered fluorescent-labeled nano-sized beads had accumulated in myocarditic but not normal hearts on day 14 after immunization and thereafter. Compared to the administration of free FK506, FK506 levels were increased in both the plasma and hearts of EAM rats when liposomal FK506 was administered. The administration of liposomal FK506 markedly suppressed the expression of cytokines, such as interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, and reduced inflammation and fibrosis in the myocardium on day 21 compared to free FK506. The administration of liposomal FK506 also markedly ameliorated cardiac dysfunction on day 21 compared to free FK506. Nano-sized liposomes may be a promising drug delivery system for targeting myocarditic hearts with cardioprotective agents. PMID:27501378

  16. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase IIB clinical trial of repeated application of gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Alton, Eric W F W; Boyd, A Christopher; Cheng, Seng H; Cunningham, Steve; Davies, Jane C; Gill, Deborah R; Griesenbach, Uta; Higgins, Tracy; Hyde, Stephen C; Innes, J Alastair; Murray, Gordon D; Porteous, David J

    2013-11-01

    The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium has been working towards clinical gene therapy for patients with cystic fibrosis for several years. We have recently embarked on a large, multi-dose clinical trial of a non-viral, liposome-based formulation powered for the first time to detect clinical benefit. The article describes the details of the protocol.

  17. Gene therapy: progress and predictions.

    PubMed

    Collins, Mary; Thrasher, Adrian

    2015-12-22

    The first clinical gene delivery, which involved insertion of a marker gene into lymphocytes from cancer patients, was published 25 years ago. In this review, we describe progress since then in gene therapy. Patients with some inherited single-gene defects can now be treated with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been engineered with a viral vector carrying the missing gene. Patients with inherited retinopathies and haemophilia B can also be treated by local or systemic injection of viral vectors. There are also a number of promising gene therapy approaches for cancer and infectious disease. We predict that the next 25 years will see improvements in safety, efficacy and manufacture of gene delivery vectors and introduction of gene-editing technologies to the clinic. Gene delivery may also prove a cost-effective method for the delivery of biological medicines. © 2015 The Authors.

  18. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, melphalan and prednisone therapy for elderly patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    García-Sanz, R; Hernández, J M; Sureda, A; García-Laraña, J; Prósper, F; Alegre, A; Bárez, A; Mateos, M V; San Miguel, J F

    2006-12-01

    Melphalan & Prednisone (MP) is considered as the standard therapy for Multiple Myeloma (MM) patients not eligible for high-dose therapy. Here, we report the results of a phase I-II study to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the association of PLD to the conventional MP regimen during the first six cycles of the front-line therapy for untreated MM patients older than 70. Thirty patients were included in the study with a median age of 77 years (71-84) and a M/F ratio of 17/13. The phase I of the study demonstrated that the maximum tolerable dose of PLD in this setting was 30 mg/m(2), so it was the final dose evaluated in the study. Twenty-nine patients were valuable for response, which was: complete in 4 (14%) partial in 15 (52%) minor/no changes in 7 (24%) and progressive in 3 (10%). The median progression free survival (PFS) was 24 months. The median overall survival (OS) has not been reached yet, with a 3-year probability for OS and PFS of 52 and 37%, respectively. Haematological toxicity was frequent but usually weak/moderate (grades 1 & 2 of the WHO scale) and it was resolved only with dose delays. Infection was a relatively frequent event (30% of patients), but only in 4 cases it was of grade 3. No cases of palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia were observed. In conclusion, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin can be safely added to the other chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of elderly MM patients, which can be very useful for patients in whom novel agents are not tolerated or inefficient.

  19. Nanoparticles for Retinal Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Shannon M.; Naash, Muna I.

    2010-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy is becoming a well-established field. Viral gene therapies for the treatment of Leber’s congentinal amaurosis (LCA) are in clinical trials, and many other gene therapy approaches are being rapidly developed for application to diverse ophthalmic pathologies. Of late, development of non-viral gene therapies has been an area of intense focus and one technology, polymer-compacted DNA nanoparticles, is especially promising. However, development of pharmaceutically and clinically viable therapeutics depends not only on having an effective and safe vector but also on a practical treatment strategy. Inherited retinal pathologies are caused by mutations in over 220 genes, some of which contain over 200 individual disease-causing mutations, which are individually very rare. This review will focus on both the progress and future of nanoparticles and also on what will be required to make them relevant ocular pharmaceutics. PMID:20452457

  20. α, ω-Cholesterol-functionalized low molecular weight polyethylene glycol as a novel modifier of cationic liposomes for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cui-Cui; He, Zhi-Yao; Xia, Shan; Ren, Ke; Hui, Li-Wei; Qin, Han-Xiao; Tang, Ming-Hai; Zeng, Jun; Song, Xiang-Rong

    2014-11-06

    Here, three novel cholesterol (Ch)/low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugates, termed α, ω-cholesterol-functionalized PEG (Ch2-PEGn), were successfully synthesized using three kinds of PEG with different average molecular weight (PEG600, PEG1000 and PEG2000). The purpose of the study was to investigate the potential application of novel cationic liposomes (Ch2-PEGn-CLs) containing Ch2-PEGn in gene delivery. The introduction of Ch2-PEGn affected both the particle size and zeta potential of cationic liposomes. Ch2-PEG2000 effectively compressed liposomal particles and Ch2-PEG2000-CLs were of the smallest size. Ch2-PEG1000 and Ch2-PEG2000 significantly decreased zeta potentials of Ch2-PEGn-CLs, while Ch2-PEG600 did not alter the zeta potential due to the short PEG chain. Moreover, the in vitro gene transfection efficiencies mediated by different Ch2-PEGn-CLs also differed, in which Ch2-PEG600-CLs achieved the strongest GFP expression than Ch2-PEG1000-CLs and Ch2-PEG2000-CLs in SKOV-3 cells. The gene delivery efficacy of Ch2-PEGn-CLs was further examined by addition of a targeting moiety (folate ligand) in both folate-receptor (FR) overexpressing SKOV-3 cells and A549 cells with low expression of FR. For Ch2-PEG1000-CLs and Ch2-PEG2000-CLs, higher molar ratios of folate ligand resulted in enhanced transfection efficacies, but Ch2-PEG600-CLs had no similar in contrast. Additionally, MTT assay proved the reduced cytotoxicities of cationic liposomes after modification by Ch2-PEGn. These findings provide important insights into the effects of Ch2-PEGn on cationic liposomes for delivering genes, which would be beneficial for the development of Ch2-PEGn-CLs-based gene delivery system.

  1. α, ω-Cholesterol-Functionalized Low Molecular Weight Polyethylene Glycol as a Novel Modifier of Cationic Liposomes for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cui-Cui; He, Zhi-Yao; Xia, Shan; Ren, Ke; Hui, Li-Wei; Qin, Han-Xiao; Tang, Ming-Hai; Zeng, Jun; Song, Xiang-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Here, three novel cholesterol (Ch)/low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugates, termed α, ω-cholesterol-functionalized PEG (Ch2-PEGn), were successfully synthesized using three kinds of PEG with different average molecular weight (PEG600, PEG1000 and PEG2000). The purpose of the study was to investigate the potential application of novel cationic liposomes (Ch2-PEGn-CLs) containing Ch2-PEGn in gene delivery. The introduction of Ch2-PEGn affected both the particle size and zeta potential of cationic liposomes. Ch2-PEG2000 effectively compressed liposomal particles and Ch2-PEG2000-CLs were of the smallest size. Ch2-PEG1000 and Ch2-PEG2000 significantly decreased zeta potentials of Ch2-PEGn-CLs, while Ch2-PEG600 did not alter the zeta potential due to the short PEG chain. Moreover, the in vitro gene transfection efficiencies mediated by different Ch2-PEGn-CLs also differed, in which Ch2-PEG600-CLs achieved the strongest GFP expression than Ch2-PEG1000-CLs and Ch2-PEG2000-CLs in SKOV-3 cells. The gene delivery efficacy of Ch2-PEGn-CLs was further examined by addition of a targeting moiety (folate ligand) in both folate-receptor (FR) overexpressing SKOV-3 cells and A549 cells with low expression of FR. For Ch2-PEG1000-CLs and Ch2-PEG2000-CLs, higher molar ratios of folate ligand resulted in enhanced transfection efficacies, but Ch2-PEG600-CLs had no similar in contrast. Additionally, MTT assay proved the reduced cytotoxicities of cationic liposomes after modification by Ch2-PEGn. These findings provide important insights into the effects of Ch2-PEGn on cationic liposomes for delivering genes, which would be beneficial for the development of Ch2-PEGn-CLs-based gene delivery system. PMID:25383677

  2. The potential of liposome-encapsulated ciprofloxacin as a tularemia therapy.

    PubMed

    Hamblin, Karleigh A; Wong, Jonathan P; Blanchard, James D; Atkins, Helen S

    2014-01-01

    Liposome-encapsulation has been suggested as method to improve the efficacy of ciprofloxacin against the intracellular pathogen, Francisella tularensis. Early work with a prototype formulation, evaluated for use against the F. tularensis live vaccine strain, showed that a single dose of liposomal ciprofloxacin given by the intranasal or inhalational route could provide protection in a mouse model of pneumonic tularemia. Liposomal ciprofloxacin offered better protection than ciprofloxacin given by the same routes. Liposomal ciprofloxacin has been further developed by Aradigm Corporation for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. This advanced development formulation is safe, effective and well tolerated in human clinical trials. Further evaluation of the advanced liposomal ciprofloxacin formulation against the highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 strain has shown that aerosolized CFI (Ciprofloxacin encapsulated in liposomes for inhalation) provides significantly better protection than oral ciprofloxacin. Thus, liposomal ciprofloxacin is a promising treatment for tularemia and further research with the aim of enabling licensure under the animal rule is warranted.

  3. Gene Therapy for Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bunnell, Bruce A.; Morgan, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Gene therapy is being investigated as an alternative treatment for a wide range of infectious diseases that are not amenable to standard clinical management. Approaches to gene therapy for infectious diseases can be divided into three broad categories: (i) gene therapies based on nucleic acid moieties, including antisense DNA or RNA, RNA decoys, and catalytic RNA moieties (ribozymes); (ii) protein approaches such as transdominant negative proteins and single-chain antibodies; and (iii) immunotherapeutic approaches involving genetic vaccines or pathogen-specific lymphocytes. It is further possible that combinations of the aforementioned approaches will be used simultaneously to inhibit multiple stages of the life cycle of the infectious agent. PMID:9457428

  4. Gene therapy: proceed with caution.

    PubMed

    Grobstein, C; Flower, M

    1984-04-01

    On 6 February 1984 the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee of the National Institutes of Health approved a recommendation that the committee provide prior review of research protocols involving human gene therapy. Grobstein and Flower trace the development of public policy in response to concerns about the dangers of gene therapy, especially as it applies to germ line alteration. They offer guidelines and propose principles for an oversight body to confront the immediate and long term technical, social, and ethical implications of human genetic modification. An accompanying article presents a plea for the development of gene therapy by the mother of three children who have sickle cell anemia.

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Modified Adenoviral Vectors for Gene Therapy: A View through Animal Models Tested.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Lopez, M E; Garza-Veloz, I; Lopez-Hernandez, Y; Barbosa-Cisneros, O Y; Martinez-Fierro, M L

    2016-07-01

    The central dogma of gene therapy relies on the application of novel therapeutic genes to treat or prevent diseases. The main types of vectors used for gene transfer are adenovirus, retrovirus, lentivirus, liposome, and adeno-associated virus vectors. Gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The main targets are cytokines, co-stimulatory molecules, and different types of cells from hematological and mesenchymal sources. In this review, we focus on molecules with anti-inflammatory effects used for in vivo gene therapy mediated by adenoviral gene transfer in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, with particular emphasis on autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  6. CXCR4-antagonist Peptide R-liposomes for combined therapy against lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ieranò, Caterina; Portella, Luigi; Lusa, Sara; Salzano, Giuseppina; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Napolitano, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Macchia, Daniele; Spada, Massimo; Barbieri, Antonio; Luciano, Antonio; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Gabriele, Lucia; Caraglia, Michele; Arra, Claudio; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Scala, Stefania

    2016-04-14

    The chemokine CXCL12 activates CXCR4, initiating multiple pathways that control immune cell trafficking, angiogenesis and embryogenesis; CXCR4 is also overexpressed in multiple tumors affecting metastatic dissemination. While there has been great enthusiasm for exploiting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis as a target in cancer therapy, to date the promise has yet to be fulfilled. A new class of CXCR4-antagonist cyclic peptides was recently developed and the compound named Peptide R was identified as the most active. With the intent to improve the efficacy and biodistribution of Peptide R, stealth liposomes decorated with Peptide R were developed (PL-Peptide R). In vitro PL-Peptide R efficiently inhibited CXCR4-dependent migration and in vivo it significantly reduced lung metastases and increased overall survival in B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice. To evaluate if PL-Peptide R could also be a drug delivery system for CXCR4 expressing tumors, the PL-Peptide R was loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) (PL-Peptide R-DOX). PL-Peptide R-DOX efficiently delivered DOX to CXCR4 expressing cell lines with a consequent decrease in the DOX IC50 efficient dose. In vivo, B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice treated with PL-Peptide R-DOX developed fewer lung metastases compared to PL-DOX treated mice. This work provides the proof-of-concept to prevent metastasis by using combined nanomedicine.

  7. The promise of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pergament, Eugene

    2016-04-01

    The promise of gene therapy performed in the preimplantation and prenatal periods of pregnancy is rapidly becoming a reality. New technologies capable of making designed changes in single nucleotides make germline gene therapy possible. The article reviews the ethical and technical challenges of germline gene therapy. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and related technologies are capable of deleting and inserting specific DNA sequences in mutated genes so as to correct the targeted DNA. The ability to target specific gene mutations will offer unique opportunities to at risk families, particularly those whose genotypes prevent any chance of a normal pregnancy outcome. Other applications of gene-modifying technologies on gametes, zygotes, and embryos are likely in the near future. There will be renewed debates on the potentially controversial applications of these technologies because of their capability to genetically alter the human germline and thereby future generations.

  8. Synergistic effects of co-administration of suicide gene expressing mesenchymal stem cells and prodrug-encapsulated liposome on aggressive lung melanoma metastases in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Huang, Bing; Wu, Hai-Bin; Wu, Jia-He; Li, Li-Ming; Li, Yan-Xin; Hu, Yu-Lan; Han, Min; Shen, You-Qing; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2015-07-10

    The success of conventional suicide gene therapy for cancer treatment is still limited because of lack of efficient delivery methods, as well as poor penetration into tumor tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have recently emerged as potential vehicles in improving delivery issues. However, these stem cells are usually genetically modified using viral gene vectors for suicide gene overexpression to induce sufficient therapeutic efficacy. This approach may result in safety risks for clinical translation. Therefore, we designed a novel strategy that uses non-viral gene vector in modifying MSCs with suicide genes to reduce risks. In addition, these cells were co-administrated with prodrug-encapsulated liposomes for synergistic anti-tumor effects. Results demonstrate that this strategy is effective for gene and prodrug delivery, which co-target tumor tissues, to achieve a significant decrease in tumor colonization and a subsequent increase in survival in a murine melanoma lung metastasis model. Moreover, for the first time, we demonstrated the permeability of MSCs within tumor nests by using an in vitro 3D tumor spheroid model. Thus, the present study provides a new strategy to improve the delivery problem in conventional suicide gene therapy and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. Furthermore, this study also presents new findings to improve our understanding of MSCs in tumor-targeted gene delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multifunctional gold coated thermo-sensitive liposomes for multimodal imaging and photo-thermal therapy of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengan, Aravind Kumar; Jagtap, Madhura; de, Abhijit; Banerjee, Rinti; Srivastava, Rohit

    2013-12-01

    Plasmon resonant gold nanoparticles of various sizes and shapes have been extensively researched for their applications in imaging, drug delivery and photothermal therapy (PTT). However, their ability to degrade after performing the required function is essential for their application in healthcare. When combined with biodegradable liposomes, they appear to have better degradation capabilities. They degrade into smaller particles of around 5 nm that are eligible candidates for renal clearance. Distearoyl phosphatidyl choline : cholesterol (DSPC : CHOL, 8 : 2 wt%) liposomes have been synthesized and coated with gold by in situ reduction of chloro-auric acid. These particles of size 150-200 nm are analyzed for their stability, degradation capacity, model drug-release profile, biocompatibility and photothermal effects on cancer cells. It is observed that when these particles are subjected to low power continuous wave near infra-red (NIR) laser for more than 10 min, they degrade into small gold nanoparticles of size 5 nm. Also, the gold coated liposomes appear to have excellent biocompatibility and high efficiency to kill cancer cells through photothermal transduction. These novel materials are also useful in imaging using specific NIR dyes, thus exhibiting multifunctional properties for theranostics of cancer.Plasmon resonant gold nanoparticles of various sizes and shapes have been extensively researched for their applications in imaging, drug delivery and photothermal therapy (PTT). However, their ability to degrade after performing the required function is essential for their application in healthcare. When combined with biodegradable liposomes, they appear to have better degradation capabilities. They degrade into smaller particles of around 5 nm that are eligible candidates for renal clearance. Distearoyl phosphatidyl choline : cholesterol (DSPC : CHOL, 8 : 2 wt%) liposomes have been synthesized and coated with gold by in situ reduction of chloro-auric acid. These

  10. Gene Therapy in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fargnoli, Anthony S; Katz, Michael G; Bridges, Charles R; Hajjar, Roger J

    2016-10-28

    Heart failure is a significant burden to the global healthcare system and represents an underserved market for new pharmacologic strategies, especially therapies which can address root cause myocyte dysfunction. Modern drugs, surgeries, and state-of-the-art interventions are costly and do not improve survival outcome measures. Gene therapy is an attractive strategy, whereby selected gene targets and their associated regulatory mechanisms can be permanently managed therapeutically in a single treatment. This in theory could be sustainable for the patient's life. Despite the promise, however, gene therapy has numerous challenges that must be addressed together as a treatment plan comprising these key elements: myocyte physiologic target validation, gene target manipulation strategy, vector selection for the correct level of manipulation, and carefully utilizing an efficient delivery route that can be implemented in the clinic to efficiently transfer the therapy within safety limits. This chapter summarizes the key developments in cardiac gene therapy from the perspective of understanding each of these components of the treatment plan. The latest pharmacologic gene targets, gene therapy vectors, delivery routes, and strategies are reviewed.

  11. Gene therapy on the move

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Büning, Hildegard; Galy, Anne; Schambach, Axel; Grez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The first gene therapy clinical trials were initiated more than two decades ago. In the early days, gene therapy shared the fate of many experimental medicine approaches and was impeded by the occurrence of severe side effects in a few treated patients. The understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to treatment- and/or vector-associated setbacks has resulted in the development of highly sophisticated gene transfer tools with improved safety and therapeutic efficacy. Employing these advanced tools, a series of Phase I/II trials were started in the past few years with excellent clinical results and no side effects reported so far. Moreover, highly efficient gene targeting strategies and site-directed gene editing technologies have been developed and applied clinically. With more than 1900 clinical trials to date, gene therapy has moved from a vision to clinical reality. This review focuses on the application of gene therapy for the correction of inherited diseases, the limitations and drawbacks encountered in some of the early clinical trials and the revival of gene therapy as a powerful treatment option for the correction of monogenic disorders. PMID:24106209

  12. Chemoradionuclide therapy with 186Re-labeled liposomal doxorubicin in combination with radiofrequency ablation for effective treatment of head and neck cancer in a nude rat tumor xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Anuradha; Dodd, Gerald D; Bao, Ande; Phillips, William T; McManus, Linda M; Prihoda, Thomas J; Goins, Beth A

    2011-12-01

    To determine the therapeutic efficacy of rhenium 186 ((186)Re)-labeled PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin ((186)Re-liposomal doxorubicin) in combination with radiofrequency (RF) ablation of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft in nude rats. This investigation was approved by the animal care committee. Sixty nude rats with subcutaneously implanted HNSCC xenografts (six per group) were treated with (a) RF ablation (70 °C for 5 minutes), (b) PEGylated liposomes, (c) liposomal doxorubicin, (d) (186)Re-PEGylated liposomes (1295 MBq/kg), (e) (186)Re-liposomal doxorubicin (555 MBq/kg), (f) PEGylated liposomes plus RF ablation, (g) liposomal doxorubicin plus RF ablation, (h) (186)Re-PEGylated liposomes plus RF ablation, or (i) (186)Re-liposomal doxorubicin plus RF ablation. Six rats did not receive any treatment (control group). Tumor uptake in (186)Re therapy groups was monitored with small-animal single photon emission computed tomography for 5 days. Therapeutic efficacy was monitored for 6 weeks with measurement of tumor volume, calculation of the percentage injected dose of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in tumor from small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) images, and determination of viable tumor volume at histopathologic examination. Significant differences between groups were determined with analysis of variance. The average tumor volume (± standard deviation) on the day of therapy was 1.32 cm(3) ± 0.17. At 6 weeks after therapy, control of tumor growth was better with (186)Re-liposomal doxorubicin than with liposomal doxorubicin alone (tumor volume, 2.26 cm(3) ± 0.89 vs 5.43 cm(3) ± 0.93, respectively; P < .01). The use of RF ablation with liposomal doxorubicin and (186)Re-liposomal doxorubicin further improved tumor control (tumor volume, 2.05 cm(3) ± 1.36 and 1.49 cm(3) ± 1.47, respectively). The tumor growth trend correlated with change in percentage of injected dose of FDG in tumor for all groups (R(2) = 0.85, P

  13. Architectonics of phage-liposome nanowebs as optimized photosensitizer vehicles for photodynamic cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Narayan, Shoba; Gopal, Abbineni; Hayhurst, Andrew; Mao, Chuanbin

    2010-01-01

    Filamentous M13 phage can be engineered to display cancer cell-targeting or tumor-homing peptides through phage display. It would be highly desirable if the tumor targeting phage can also carry anti-cancer drugs to deliver them to the cancer cells. We studied the evolution of structures of the complexes between anionic filamentous M13 phage and cationic serum-stable liposomes which encapsulate the monomeric photosensitizer, zinc naphthalocyanine. At specific phage-liposome ratios, multiple phage nanofibers and liposomes are interwoven into a “nanoweb”. The chemical and biological properties of the phage-liposome nanoweb were evaluated for possible application in drug delivery. This study highlights the ability of phageliposome nanowebs to serve as efficient carriers to transport photosensitizers to cancer cells. PMID:20807781

  14. Gene Therapy for Childhood Neurofibromatosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0101 TITLE: Gene Therapy for Childhood ...May 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gene Therapy for Childhood Neurofibromatosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0101 5c...technology. This approach still represents a plausible and very different way to treat childhood neurofibromatosis, as well as other solid tumors

  15. Gene Therapy for Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Seilicovich, Adriana; Pisera, Daniel; Sciascia, Sandra A.; Candolfi, Marianela; Puntel, Mariana; Xiong, Weidong; Jaita, Gabriela; Castro, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms. Although most pituitary tumors are considered typically benign, others can cause severe and progressive disease. The principal aims of pituitary tumor treatment are the elimination or reduction of the tumor mass, normalization of hormone secretion and preservation of remaining pituitary function. In spite of major advances in the therapy of pituitary tumors, for some of the most difficult tumors, current therapies that include medical, surgical and radiotherapeutic methods are often unsatisfactory and there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Gene therapy, which uses nucleic acids as drugs, has emerged as an attractive therapeutic option for the treatment of pituitary tumors that do not respond to classical treatment strategies if the patients become intolerant to the therapy. The development of animal models for pituitary tumors and hormone hypersecretion has proven to be critical for the implementation of novel treatment strategies and gene therapy approaches. Preclinical trials using several gene therapy approaches for the treatment of anterior pituitary diseases have been successfully implemented. Several issues need to be addressed before clinical implementation becomes a reality, including the development of more effective and safer viral vectors, uncovering novel therapeutic targets and development of targeted expression of therapeutic transgenes. With the development of efficient gene delivery vectors allowing long-term transgene expression with minimal toxicity, gene therapy will become one of the most promising approaches for treating pituitary adenomas. PMID:16457646

  16. Liposomal amphotericin B: a review of its use as empirical therapy in febrile neutropenia and in the treatment of invasive fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Moen, Marit D; Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A; Scott, Lesley J

    2009-01-01

    Liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome) is a lipid-associated formulation of the broad-spectrum polyene antifungal agent amphotericin B. It is active against clinically relevant yeasts and moulds, including Candida spp., Aspergillus spp. and filamentous moulds such as Zygomycetes, and is approved for the treatment of invasive fungal infections in many countries worldwide. It was developed to improve the tolerability profile of amphotericin B deoxycholate, which was for many decades considered the gold standard of antifungal treatment, despite being associated with infusion-related events and nephrotoxicity. In well controlled trials, liposomal amphotericin B had similar efficacy to amphotericin B deoxycholate and amphotericin B lipid complex as empirical therapy in adult and paediatric patients with febrile neutropenia. In addition, caspofungin was noninferior to liposomal amphotericin B as empirical therapy in adult patients with febrile neutropenia. For the treatment of confirmed invasive fungal infections, liposomal amphotericin B was more effective than amphotericin B deoxycholate treatment in patients with disseminated histoplasmosis and AIDS, and was noninferior to amphotericin B deoxycholate in patients with acute cryptococcal meningitis and AIDS. In adults, micafungin was shown to be noninferior to liposomal amphotericin B for the treatment of candidaemia and invasive candidiasis. Data from animal studies suggested that higher dosages of liposomal amphotericin B might improve efficacy; however, in the AmBiLoad trial in patients with invasive mould infection, there was no statistical difference in efficacy between the standard dosage of liposomal amphotericin B 3 mg/kg/day and a higher 10 mg/kg/day dosage, although the standard dosage was better tolerated. Despite being associated with fewer infusion-related adverse events and less nephrotoxicity than amphotericin B deoxycholate and amphotericin B lipid complex, liposomal amphotericin B use is still limited to

  17. Physics Applied to Biological Systems: Theory and Experiments for a Gene Therapy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Marcia C.; Levin, Yan; Ravazzolo, Ana Paula; von Groll, Andrea

    2005-10-01

    Efficient transfection of eukaryotic cells is an essential step of optimizing gene expression for genetic therapy and for stimulating the immune response induced by the DNA vaccination. The DNA topology and the vehicle used to deliver it are the two aspects explored in this work. A plasmid expressing the ?-galactosidase enzyme was used to transfect Vero cells in order to evaluate liposome-mediated transfection of circular and linear DNA. The results showed a low efficiency of linear DNA:liposome complexes in transfecting the cells, probably due to an impaired association between the two components. Atomic force microscopy has confirmed the difference in the complex size: circular topology leads to larger complexes than the linear one. Based on an analytic theory, low concentrations of amphiphilic molecules were used to neutralize the linearized plasmid. We were able to obtain an increased transgene expression without the toxicity observed with the usual linear DNA liposome delivery methods.

  18. Cell death mechanistic study of photodynamic therapy against breast cancer cells utilizing liposomal delivery of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(benzo[b]thiophene) porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Nam, Geewoo; Rangasamy, Sabarinathan; Ju, Hee; Samson, Annie Agnes Suganya; Song, Joon Myong

    2017-01-01

    5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(benzo[b]thiophene) porphyrin (BTP) is a newly synthesized hydrophobic photosensitizer with fluorescence quantum yield in toluene: ΦF=0.062. Previously, its limitations in solubility had hindered scientific experimentation regarding its photodynamic effects on cancer cells. By utilizing various compositions of liposomes in order to alter the solubility of BTP, the photocytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species generation, and subcellular localization of the liposomal BTP were identified in this work. DNA fragmentation and high content screening assays were performed in order to shed light on the tumoricidal mechanism of the liposomal photosensitizer. The MTT assay results showed promising results in the irradiation specific PDT activity against MCF-7 cells in all liposomal compositions. Production of ROS was confirmed in the liposomal BTP treated MCF-7 cells after irradiation in a concentration dependent manner. The subcellular localization assays revealed that the localization of BTP was dependent on both the photosensitizer's chemical properties and the properties of the delivery agent encapsulating aforesaid substance. Significant DNA fragmentation was observed in both nucleus localizing liposomal BTP, BTP encapsulated DOPC and DOPE (DOPC-BTP and DOPE-BTP), treated MCF-7 cells. All liposomal-BTPs were successful in inducing mitochondrial permeability transition, an increase in the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane, and activating caspase-3/7. ER localizing BTP were able to significantly increase the cytosolic calcium levels by photodynamic therapy, confirming the photodynamic ability of ER localized BTP to damage the ER membrane. The application of liposomes in delivering a novel hydrophobic photosensitizer, BTP, and photodynamic therapy treatment against MCF-7 cells were successful. It was confirmed that the MCF-7 cell death pathway via photodynamic therapy was altered in a controlled manner by controlling the intracellular localization

  19. Vectors for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Russell, S J

    1996-09-01

    Many viral and non-viral vector systems have now been developed for gene therapy applications. In this article, the pros and cons of these vector systems are discussed in relation to the different cancer gene therapy strategies. The protocols used in cancer gene therapy can be broadly divided into six categories including gene transfer to explanted cells for use as cell-based cancer vaccines; gene transfer to a small number of tumour cells in situ to achieve a vaccine effect; gene transfer to vascular endothelial cells (VECs) lining the blood vessels of the tumour to interfere with tumour angiogenesis; gene transfer to T lymphocytes to enhance their antitumour effector capability; gene transfer to haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to enhance their resistance to cytotoxic drugs and gene transfer to a large number of tumour cells in situ to achieve nonimmune tumour reduction with or without bystander effect. Each of the six strategies makes unique demands on the vector system and these are discussed with reference to currently available vectors. Aspects of vector biology that are in need of further development are discussed in some detail. The final section points to the potential use of replicating viruses as delivery vehicles for efficient in vivo gene transfer to disseminated cancers.

  20. Gene transfection efficiency into dendritic cells is influenced by the size of cationic liposomes/DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Nagai, Mie; Matsushita, Kayo; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Furuno, Tadahide

    2017-05-01

    Cationic liposomes have attracted recent attention as DNA vaccine carriers that can target dendritic cells (DCs). In general, cationic liposome/DNA complexes (lipoplexes) are taken up by various cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, caveolae-mediated endocytosis, macropinocytosis, or phagocytosis, with the mode of endocytosis determining further intracellular trafficking pathways. Moreover, the physicochemical properties of cationic lipoplexes, including lipid composition, shape, size, and charge, influence transfection efficiency, affecting uptake and subsequent intracellular pathways. To develop cationic liposomes as potential DNA vaccine carriers, the objective of this study was to study the effect of lipoplex size on DNA transfection efficiency in DCs. We explored the size-dependent endocytosis pathway and the intracellular trafficking of cationic lipoplexes using bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Our results indicated that small-sized lipoplexes (approximately 270nm diameter) were taken up by BMDCs via caveolae-mediated endocytosis, which led to a non-degradative pathway, whereas larger-sized lipoplexes (approximately 500nm diameter) were taken up by BMDCs via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and micropinocytosis, which led to a lysosomal degradation pathway. These findings suggest that, by regulating the size of lipoplexes, it may be possible to develop cationic liposomes as DNA vaccine therapies for targeting DCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined gene and stem cell therapy for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gauglitz, Gerd G; Jeschke, Marc G

    2011-10-03

    In current medical practice, wound therapy remains a clinical challenge and much effort has been focused on the development of novel therapeutic approaches for wound treatment. Gene therapy, initially developed for treatment of congenital defects, represents a promising option for enhancing wound repair. In order to accelerate wound closure, genes encoding for growth factors or cytokines have shown the most potential. The majority of gene delivery systems are based on viral transfection, naked DNA application, high pressure injection, and liposomal vectors. Besides advances stemming from breakthroughs in recombinant growth factors and bioengineered skin, there has been a significant increase in the understanding of stem cell biology in the field of cutaneous wound healing. A variety of sources, such as bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, adipose tissue and skin/hair follicles, have been utilized to isolate stem cells and to modulate the healing response of acute and chronic wounds. Recent data have demonstrated the feasibility of autologous adult stem cell therapy in cutaneous repair and regeneration. Very recently, stem cell based skin engineering in conjunction with gene recombination, in which the stem cells act as both the seed cells and the vehicle for gene delivery to the wound site, represents the most attractive field for generating a regenerative strategy for wound therapy. The aim of this article is to discuss the use and the potential of these novel technologies in order to improve wound healing capacities.

  2. Liposomal delivery of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene in glioma: improvement of cell sensitization to ganciclovir.

    PubMed

    Zerrouqi, A; Rixe, O; Ghoumari, A M; Yarovoi, S V; Mouawad, R; Khayat, D; Soubrane, C

    1996-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the regulation and the copy number of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene increased the sensitization to ganciclovir (GCV) of glioma cell lines (Rat C6 and human U118-MG) using liposome-mediated gene transfer. Three recombinant plasmids carrying the HSVtk gene driven by the thymidine kinase promoter in single (pAGo) and double copy (pYED) or by the human cytomegalovirus promoter (pCMVtk) were used for the transfection. The DNA delivery was optimized by screening a panel of cationic liposomes using Lac-Z and luciferase as reporter genes. The efficiency of transfection reached 33% to 36% in vitro but only 18.6% in vivo after an intratumoral injection of DNA-liposome complexes. Moreover, after transfection of the three plasmids, the cell-killing effect of GCV was evaluated. A significant enhancement (four- to fivefold) of the cell sensitivity to GCV was shown in pCMVtk and pYED as compared with pAGo-transfected cells in both cell lines. According to the plasmid, the effect of the HSVtk/GCV system was confirmed by in vivo experiments and was objectified by a higher tumor weight reduction with pCMVtk (49%) than pAGo (27%). From these results, we conclude that (1) the gene transfer can be achieved by cationic liposomes both in vitro and in vivo and that (2) using this type of vector, the antitumor effect of the HSVtk/GCV system could be potentiated by the up-regulation of HSVtk gene duplication.

  3. Design of multifunctional magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/mitoxantrone-loaded liposomes for both magnetic resonance imaging and targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingna; Zhang, Linhua; Zhu, Dunwan; Song, Cunxian

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-targeting multifunctional liposomes simultaneously loaded with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent and anticancer drug, mitoxantrone (Mit), were developed for targeted cancer therapy and ultrasensitive MRI. The gonadorelin-functionalized MION/Mit-loaded liposome (Mit-GML) showed significantly increased uptake in luteinizing hormone–releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor overexpressing MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7) breast cancer cells over a gonadorelin-free MION/Mit-loaded liposome (Mit-ML) control, as well as in an LHRH receptor low-expressing Sloan-Kettering HER2 3+ Ovarian Cancer (SK-OV-3) cell control, thereby leading to high cytotoxicity against the MCF-7 human breast tumor cell line. The Mit-GML formulation was more effective and less toxic than equimolar doses of free Mit or Mit-ML in the treatment of LHRH receptors overexpressing MCF-7 breast cancer xenografts in mice. Furthermore, the Mit-GML demonstrated much higher T2 enhancement than did Mit-ML controls in vivo. Collectively, the study indicates that the integrated diagnostic and therapeutic design of Mit-GML nanomedicine potentially allows for the image-guided, target-specific treatment of cancer. PMID:25187709

  4. Design of multifunctional magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/mitoxantrone-loaded liposomes for both magnetic resonance imaging and targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    He, Yingna; Zhang, Linhua; Zhu, Dunwan; Song, Cunxian

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-targeting multifunctional liposomes simultaneously loaded with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent and anticancer drug, mitoxantrone (Mit), were developed for targeted cancer therapy and ultrasensitive MRI. The gonadorelin-functionalized MION/Mit-loaded liposome (Mit-GML) showed significantly increased uptake in luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor overexpressing MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7) breast cancer cells over a gonadorelin-free MION/Mit-loaded liposome (Mit-ML) control, as well as in an LHRH receptor low-expressing Sloan-Kettering HER2 3+ Ovarian Cancer (SK-OV-3) cell control, thereby leading to high cytotoxicity against the MCF-7 human breast tumor cell line. The Mit-GML formulation was more effective and less toxic than equimolar doses of free Mit or Mit-ML in the treatment of LHRH receptors overexpressing MCF-7 breast cancer xenografts in mice. Furthermore, the Mit-GML demonstrated much higher T2 enhancement than did Mit-ML controls in vivo. Collectively, the study indicates that the integrated diagnostic and therapeutic design of Mit-GML nanomedicine potentially allows for the image-guided, target-specific treatment of cancer.

  5. Gene Therapy for Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Randy J.; Venditti, Charles P.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Gene therapy has recently shown great promise as an effective treatment for a number of metabolic diseases caused by genetic defects in both animal models and human clinical trials. Most of the current success has been achieved using a viral mediated gene addition approach, but gene-editing technology has progressed rapidly and gene modification is being actively pursued in clinical trials. This review focuses on viral mediated gene addition approaches, because most of the current clinical trials utilize this approach to treat metabolic diseases. PMID:27853673

  6. Gene Therapy in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vinge, Leif Erik; Raake, Philip W.; Koch, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    With increasing knowledge of basic molecular mechanisms governing the development of heart failure (HF), the possibility of specifically targeting key pathological players is evolving. Technology allowing for efficient in vivo transduction of myocardial tissue with long-term expression of a transgene enables translation of basic mechanistic knowledge into potential gene therapy approaches. Gene therapy in HF is in its infancy clinically with the predominant amount of experience being from animal models. Nevertheless, this challenging and promising field is gaining momentum as recent preclinical studies in larger animals have been carried out and, importantly, there are 2 newly initiated phase I clinical trials for HF gene therapy. To put it simply, 2 parameters are needed for achieving success with HF gene therapy: (1) clearly identified detrimental/beneficial molecular targets; and (2) the means to manipulate these targets at a molecular level in a sufficient number of cardiac cells. However, several obstacles do exist on our way to efficient and safe gene transfer to human myocardium. Some of these obstacles are discussed in this review; however, it primarily focuses on the molecular target systems that have been subjected to intense investigation over the last decade in an attempt to make gene therapy for human HF a reality. PMID:18566312

  7. CXCR4-antagonist Peptide R-liposomes for combined therapy against lung metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieranò, Caterina; Portella, Luigi; Lusa, Sara; Salzano, Giuseppina; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Napolitano, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Macchia, Daniele; Spada, Massimo; Barbieri, Antonio; Luciano, Antonio; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Gabriele, Lucia; Caraglia, Michele; Arra, Claudio; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Scala, Stefania

    2016-03-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 activates CXCR4, initiating multiple pathways that control immune cell trafficking, angiogenesis and embryogenesis; CXCR4 is also overexpressed in multiple tumors affecting metastatic dissemination. While there has been great enthusiasm for exploiting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis as a target in cancer therapy, to date the promise has yet to be fulfilled. A new class of CXCR4-antagonist cyclic peptides was recently developed and the compound named Peptide R was identified as the most active. With the intent to improve the efficacy and biodistribution of Peptide R, stealth liposomes decorated with Peptide R were developed (PL-Peptide R). In vitro PL-Peptide R efficiently inhibited CXCR4-dependent migration and in vivo it significantly reduced lung metastases and increased overall survival in B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice. To evaluate if PL-Peptide R could also be a drug delivery system for CXCR4 expressing tumors, the PL-Peptide R was loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) (PL-Peptide R-DOX). PL-Peptide R-DOX efficiently delivered DOX to CXCR4 expressing cell lines with a consequent decrease in the DOX IC50 efficient dose. In vivo, B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice treated with PL-Peptide R-DOX developed fewer lung metastases compared to PL-DOX treated mice. This work provides the proof-of-concept to prevent metastasis by using combined nanomedicine.The chemokine CXCL12 activates CXCR4, initiating multiple pathways that control immune cell trafficking, angiogenesis and embryogenesis; CXCR4 is also overexpressed in multiple tumors affecting metastatic dissemination. While there has been great enthusiasm for exploiting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis as a target in cancer therapy, to date the promise has yet to be fulfilled. A new class of CXCR4-antagonist cyclic peptides was recently developed and the compound named Peptide R was identified as the most active. With the intent to improve the efficacy and biodistribution of Peptide R, stealth liposomes decorated with Peptide

  8. [Liposome-mediated human CD40 gene transfection and human umbilical vein endothelial ECV-304 cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-rong; Lin, Rong; Yang, Yu-cong; Gan, Wei-jie; Liu, Jun-tian; Lü, She-min

    2005-12-01

    To construct an eukaryotic expression vector containing human CD40 gene for its efficient, continuous and stable expression in human umbilical vein endothelial ECV-304 cells. The recombinant plasmid pUCD40 was digested with endonucleases to obtain human CD40 gene fragment, which was cloned into pCDNA3.1 vector to construct recombinant eukaryotic expression vector pCDNA3.1(+)/CD40. The recombinant vector was identified by enzyme digestion before introduced into ECV-304 cells via liposome, with the positive cell clones selected with G418. The stable transfection and expression of CD40 in ECV-304 cells were identified by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, Western blotting and flow cytometry, respectively. Enzyme digestion analysis showed that target gene had been cloned into the recombinant vector. The transfected ECV-304 cells successfully expressed human CD40 as determined by RT-PCR and Western-blotting, and 95% of the cells were CD40-positive as shown by flow cytometry. The recombinant eukaryotic expression vector pCDNA3.1(+)/CD40 has been successfully constructed, which is capable of stable transfection and expression of CD40 in ECV-304 cells to facilitate further investigation of the roles of CD40 molecule in antiatherosclerotic drug development.

  9. Cell-Free Phospholipid Biosynthesis by Gene-Encoded Enzymes Reconstituted in Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Andrew; Noga, Marek J.; de Graaf, Paul; Westerlaken, Ilja; Yildirim, Esengul; Danelon, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The goal of bottom-up synthetic biology culminates in the assembly of an entire cell from separate biological building blocks. One major challenge resides in the in vitro production and implementation of complex genetic and metabolic pathways that can support essential cellular functions. Here, we show that phospholipid biosynthesis, a multiple-step process involved in cell membrane homeostasis, can be reconstituted starting from the genes encoding for all necessary proteins. A total of eight E. coli enzymes for acyl transfer and headgroup modifications were produced in a cell-free gene expression system and were co-translationally reconstituted in liposomes. Acyl-coenzyme A and glycerol-3-phosphate were used as canonical precursors to generate a variety of important bacterial lipids. Moreover, this study demonstrates that two-step acyl transfer can occur from enzymes synthesized inside vesicles. Besides clear implications for growth and potentially division of a synthetic cell, we postulate that gene-based lipid biosynthesis can become instrumental for ex vivo and protein purification-free production of natural and non-natural lipids. PMID:27711229

  10. Gene therapy in the cornea.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Rajiv R; Sharma, Ajay; Netto, Marcelo V; Sinha, Sunilima; Wilson, Steven E

    2005-09-01

    Technological advances in the field of gene therapy has prompted more than three hundred phase I and phase II gene-based clinical trials for the treatment of cancer, AIDS, macular degeneration, cardiovascular, and other monogenic diseases. Besides treating diseases, gene transfer technology has been utilized for the development of preventive and therapeutic vaccines for malaria, tuberculosis, hepatitis A, B and C viruses, AIDS, and influenza. The potential therapeutic applications of gene transfer technology are enormous. The cornea is an excellent candidate for gene therapy because of its accessibility and immune-privileged nature. In the last two decades, various viral vectors, such as adeno, adeno-associated, retro, lenti, and herpes simplex, as well as non-viral methods, were examined for introducing DNA into corneal cells in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo. Most of these studies used fluorescent or non-fluorescent marker genes to track the level and duration of transgene expression in corneal cells. However, limited studies were directed to evaluate prospects of gene-based interventions for corneal diseases or disorders such as allograft rejection, laser-induced post-operative haze, herpes simplex keratitis, and wound healing in animal models. We will review the successes and obstacles impeding gene therapy approaches used for delivering genes into the cornea.

  11. Apoptotic genes in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Opalka, Bertram; Dickopp, Alexandra; Kirch, Hans-Christoph

    2002-01-01

    Induction of apoptosis in malignant cells is a major goal of cancer therapy in general and of certain cancer gene therapy strategies in particular. Numerous apoptosis-regulating genes have been evaluated for this purpose. Besides the most prominent p53 gene others include p16, p21, p27, E2F genes, FHIT, PTEN and CASPASE genes. Recently, the potential for therapy of an adenoviral gene, E1A, known for a long time for its apoptosis-inducing activity, has been discovered. In experimental settings, these genes have proven their tumor-suppressive and apoptosis-inducing activity. Clinical trials are currently being performed with selected genes. By far the most studies transfer the p53 gene using retro- or adenoviral vectors. Disease stabilization or other benefits were observed in a limited number of patients when p53 was applied alone or in combination with cytotoxic drugs. A second proapoptotic gene that has entered clinical trials is adenovirus E1A. Here, too, disease stabilization as well as/or local regression in one case have been demonstrated in selected patients. In all cases, side effects were tolerable. To further improve E1A as a therapeutic transgene, we have deleted transforming domains from the adenovirus 5 and 12 13S cDNAs. Mutants were derived which had completely lost their transforming activity in combination with the E1B oncogene but retained a pronounced tumor-suppressive activity. Cells transduced with these constructs showed a highly reduced ability to grow in soft agar, and tumor growth in nude mice could be substantially suppressed. Outgrowing tumors had lost E1A expression when analyzed in Western blots. These E1A constructs may represent valuable tools for cancer gene therapy in the future.

  12. Gene therapy for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jeffrey; Sun, Michael H; Kang, Quan; Peng, Ying; Jiang, Wei; Luu, Hue H; Luo, Qing; Park, Jae Yoon; Li, Yien; Haydon, Rex C; He, Tong-Chuan

    2005-04-01

    Efficacious bone regeneration could revolutionize the clinical management of many bone and musculoskeletal disorders. Bone has the unique ability to regenerate and continuously remodel itself throughout life. However, clinical situations arise when bone is unable to heal itself, as with segmental bone loss, fracture non-union, and failed spinal fusion. This leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Current attempts at improved bone healing have been met with limited success, fueling the development of improved techniques. Gene therapy in many ways represents an ideal approach for augmenting bone regeneration. Gene therapy allows specific gene products to be delivered to a precise anatomic location. In addition, the level of transgene expression as well as the duration of expression can be regulated with current techniques. For bone regeneration, the gene of interest should be delivered to the fracture site, expressed at appropriate levels, and then deactivated once the fracture has healed. Delivery of biological factors, mostly bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), has yielded promising results both in animal and clinical studies. There has also been tremendous work on discovering new growth factors and exploring previously defined ones. Finally, significant advances are being made in the delivery systems of the genes, ranging from viral and non-viral vectors to tissue engineering scaffolds. Despite some public hesitation to gene therapy, its use has great potential to expand our ability to treat a variety of human bone and musculoskeletal disorders. It is conceivable that in the near future gene therapy can be utilized to induce bone formation in virtually any region of the body in a minimally invasive manner. As bone biology and gene therapy research progresses, the goal of successful human gene transfer for augmentation of bone regeneration draws nearer.

  13. Delivery systems for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Mali, Shrikant

    2013-01-01

    The structure of DNA was unraveled by Watson and Crick in 1953, and two decades later Arber, Nathans and Smith discovered DNA restriction enzymes, which led to the rapid growth in the field of recombinant DNA technology. From expressing cloned genes in bacteria to expressing foreign DNA in transgenic animals, DNA is now slated to be used as a therapeutic agent to replace defective genes in patients suffering from genetic disorders or to kill tumor cells in cancer patients. Gene therapy provides modern medicine with new perspectives that were unthinkable two decades ago. Progress in molecular biology and especially, molecular medicine is now changing the basics of clinical medicine. A variety of viral and non-viral possibilities are available for basic and clinical research. This review summarizes the delivery routes and methods for gene transfer used in gene therapy.

  14. Tumor growth suppression by gadolinium-neutron capture therapy using gadolinium-entrapped liposome as gadolinium delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Zhu, Haito; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Sekino, Masaki; Sakurai, Yuriko; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Iyomoto, Naoko; Nagasaki, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is a promising non-invasive cancer therapy approach and some recent NCT research has focused on using compounds containing gadolinium as an alternative to currently used boron-10 considering several advantages that gadolinium offers compared to those of boron. In this study, we evaluated gadolinium-entrapped liposome compound as neutron capture therapy agent by in vivo experiment on colon-26 tumor-bearing mice. Gadolinium compound were injected intravenously via tail vein and allowed to accumulate into tumor site. Tumor samples were taken for quantitative analysis by ICP-MS at 2, 12, and 24 h after gadolinium compound injection. Highest gadolinium concentration was observed at about 2 h after gadolinium compound injection with an average of 40.3 μg/g of wet tumor tissue. We performed neutron irradiation at JRR-4 reactor facility of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in Tokaimura with average neutron fluence of 2×10¹² n/cm². The experimental results showed that the tumor growth suppression of gadolinium-injected irradiated group was revealed until about four times higher compared to the control group, and no significant weight loss were observed after treatment suggesting low systemic toxicity of this compound. The gadolinium-entrapped liposome will become one of the candidates for Gd delivery system on NCT.

  15. Human germline gene therapy reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Resnik, D B; Langer, P J

    2001-07-20

    This paper reevaluates the notion of human germline gene therapy (HGLGT) in light of developments in biomedicine, biotechnology, and ethical and policy analysis. The essay makes the following key points. First, because the distinction among "therapy," "prevention," and "enhancement" is not clear in human genetics, "gene therapy" is an inadequate descriptor of the process and goals of germline genetic alterations. The alternate use of the phrase "human germline genome modification" (HGLGM) could avoid a misleading label. Second, procedures that could be construed as genetic "enhancement" may not be as morally problematic as some have supposed, once one understands that the boundaries between therapy, prevention, and enhancement are not obvious in genetic medicine. Third, HGLGM might be the medically and morally most appropriate way of avoiding the birth of a child with a genetic disease in only a small range of cases. Fourth, there are still many ethical and scientific problems relating to the safety and efficacy of HGLGM.

  16. [Gene therapy and hospital strategy].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, B

    1993-10-01

    Gene therapy raises strong interrogations among hospital managers. Actually, hospital environment is disturbed and moving as well in a legislative political and statutory level as in an economical (competition, consumerism, proximity of the establishments) and demographic one (ageing, new pathologies). The fast development of medical technologies amplifies this disturbance. In front of that environment, the hospital has to anticipate the arriving of gene therapy without underestimating the deontological, medical, economical and judicial risks. The decisions of implantation have to be taken in a collective way, and seriously planned and estimated on a medical and economical level. The way to train people and to forecast their careers don't have to be underestimated in consideration of the challenge which is represented by the gene therapy.

  17. Gene Therapy in Corneal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Yureeda; Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most commonly performed organ transplantation. Immune privilege of the cornea is widely recognized, partly because of the relatively favorable outcome of corneal grafts. The first-time recipient of corneal allografts in an avascular, low-risk setting can expect a 90% success rate without systemic immunosuppressive agents and histocompatibility matching. However, immunologic rejection remains the major cause of graft failure, particularly in patients with a high risk for rejection. Corticosteroids remain the first-line therapy for the prevention and treatment of immune rejection. However, current pharmacological measures are limited in their side-effect profiles, repeated application, lack of targeted response, and short duration of action. Experimental ocular gene therapy may thus present new horizons in immunomodulation. From efficient viral vectors to sustainable alternative splicing, we discuss the progress of gene therapy in promoting graft survival and postulate further avenues for gene-mediated prevention of allogeneic graft rejection. PMID:24138037

  18. Gene therapy for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fillat, Cristina; Altafaj, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    The presence of an additional copy of HSA21 chromosome in Down syndrome (DS) individuals leads to the overexpression of 30-50% of HSA21 genes. This upregulation can, in turn, trigger a deregulation on the expression of non-HSA21 genes. Moreover, the overdose of HSA21 microRNAs (miRNAs) may result in the downregulation of its target genes. Additional complexity can also arise from epigenetic changes modulating gene expression. Thus, a myriad of transcriptional and posttranscriptional alterations participate to produce abnormal phenotypes in almost all tissues and organs of DS individuals. The study of the physiological roles of genes dysregulated in DS, as well as their characterization in murine models with gene(s) dosage imbalance, pointed out several genes, and functional noncoding elements to be particularly critical in the etiology of DS. Recent findings indicate that gene therapy strategies-based on the introduction of genetic elements by means of delivery vectors-toward the correction of phenotypic abnormalities in DS are also very promising tool to identify HSA21 and non-HSA21 gene candidates, contributing to DS phenotype. In this chapter, we focus on the impact of normalizing the expression levels of up or downregulated genes to rescue particular phenotypes of DS. Attempts toward gene-based treatment approaches in mouse models will be discussed as new opportunities to ameliorate DS alterations.

  19. pH-sensitive polymer-liposome-based antigen delivery systems potentiated with interferon-γ gene lipoplex for efficient cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yuba, Eiji; Kanda, Yuhei; Yoshizaki, Yuta; Teranishi, Ryoma; Harada, Atsushi; Sugiura, Kikuya; Izawa, Takeshi; Yamate, Jyoji; Sakaguchi, Naoki; Koiwai, Kazunori; Kono, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    Potentiation of pH-sensitive liposome-based antigen carriers with IFN-γ gene lipoplexes was attempted to achieve efficient induction of tumor-specific immunity. 3-Methylglutarylated poly(glycidol) (MGluPG)-modified liposomes and cationic liposomes were used, respectively, for the delivery of antigenic protein ovalbumin (OVA) and IFN-γ-encoding plasmid DNA (pDNA). The MGluPG-modified liposomes and the cationic liposome-pDNA complexes (lipoplexes) formed hybrid complexes via electrostatic interactions after their mixing in aqueous solutions. The hybrid complexes co-delivered OVA and IFN-γ-encoding pDNA into DC2.4 cells, a murine dendritic cell line, as was the case of MGluPG-modified liposomes for OVA or the lipoplexes for pDNA. Both the lipoplexes and the hybrid complexes transfected DC2.4 cells and induced IFN-γ protein production, but transfection activities of the hybrid complexes were lower than those of the parent lipoplexes. Subcutaneous administration of hybrid complexes to mice bearing E.G7-OVA tumor reduced tumor volumes, which might result from the induction of OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, the hybrid complex-induced antitumor effect was the same level of the MGluPG-modified liposome-mediated antitumor immunity. In contrast, an extremely strong antitumor immune response was derived when these liposomes and lipoplexes without complexation were injected subcutaneously at the same site of tumor-bearing mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections revealed that immunization through the liposome-lipoplex combination promoted the infiltration of CTLs to tumors at an early stage of treatment compared with liposomes, resulting in strong therapeutic effects.

  20. Cost analysis of voriconazole versus liposomal amphotericin B for primary therapy of invasive aspergillosis among patients with haematological disorders in Germany and Spain.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Helmut; Solano, Carlos; Jarque, Isidro; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Gao, Xin; Barrueta, Jon Andoni; De Salas-Cansado, Marina; Stephens, Jennifer; Xue, Mei; Weber, Bertram; Charbonneau, Claudie

    2014-09-24

    The current healthcare climate demands pharmacoeconomic evaluations for different treatment strategies incorporating drug acquisition costs, costs incurred for hospitalisation, drug administration and preparation, diagnostic and laboratory testing and drug-related adverse events (AEs). Here we evaluate the pharmacoeconomics of voriconazole versus liposomal amphotericin B as first-line therapies for invasive aspergillosis (IA) in patients with haematological malignancy and prolonged neutropenia or who were undergoing haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in Germany or Spain. A decision analytic model based on a decision tree was constructed to estimate the potential treatment costs of voriconazole versus liposomal amphotericin B. Each model pathway was defined by the probability of an event occurring and the costs of clinical outcomes. Outcome probabilities and cost inputs were derived from the published literature, clinical trials, expert panels and local database costs. In the base case, patients who failed to respond to first-line therapy were assumed to experience a single switch between comparator drugs or the other drug was added as second-line treatment. Base-case evaluation included only drug-management costs and additional hospitalisation costs due to severe AEs associated with first- and second-line therapies. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the robustness of the results. Cost estimates were inflated to 2011 euros (€). Based on clinical trial success rates of 52.8% (voriconazole) and 50.0% (liposomal amphotericin B), voriconazole had lower total treatment costs compared with liposomal amphotericin B in both Germany (€ 12,256 versus € 18,133; length of therapy [LOT] = 10-day intravenous [IV] + 5-day oral voriconazole and 15-day IV liposomal amphotericin B) and Spain (€ 8,032 versus € 10,516; LOT = 7-day IV + 8-day oral voriconazole and 15-day IV liposomal amphotericin B). Assuming the same efficacy (50.0%) in first

  1. Cost analysis of voriconazole versus liposomal amphotericin B for primary therapy of invasive aspergillosis among patients with haematological disorders in Germany and Spain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The current healthcare climate demands pharmacoeconomic evaluations for different treatment strategies incorporating drug acquisition costs, costs incurred for hospitalisation, drug administration and preparation, diagnostic and laboratory testing and drug-related adverse events (AEs). Here we evaluate the pharmacoeconomics of voriconazole versus liposomal amphotericin B as first-line therapies for invasive aspergillosis (IA) in patients with haematological malignancy and prolonged neutropenia or who were undergoing haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in Germany or Spain. Methods A decision analytic model based on a decision tree was constructed to estimate the potential treatment costs of voriconazole versus liposomal amphotericin B. Each model pathway was defined by the probability of an event occurring and the costs of clinical outcomes. Outcome probabilities and cost inputs were derived from the published literature, clinical trials, expert panels and local database costs. In the base case, patients who failed to respond to first-line therapy were assumed to experience a single switch between comparator drugs or the other drug was added as second-line treatment. Base-case evaluation included only drug-management costs and additional hospitalisation costs due to severe AEs associated with first- and second-line therapies. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the robustness of the results. Cost estimates were inflated to 2011 euros (€). Results Based on clinical trial success rates of 52.8% (voriconazole) and 50.0% (liposomal amphotericin B), voriconazole had lower total treatment costs compared with liposomal amphotericin B in both Germany (€12,256 versus €18,133; length of therapy [LOT] = 10-day intravenous [IV] + 5-day oral voriconazole and 15-day IV liposomal amphotericin B) and Spain (€8,032 versus €10,516; LOT = 7-day IV + 8-day oral voriconazole and 15-day IV liposomal amphotericin B). Assuming the same

  2. Magnetic liposomes for colorectal cancer cells therapy by high-frequency magnetic field treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardiansyah, Andri; Huang, Li-Ying; Yang, Ming-Chien; Liu, Ting-Yu; Tsai, Sung-Chen; Yang, Chih-Yung; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Chan, Tzu-Yi; Zou, Hui-Ming; Lian, Wei-Nan; Lin, Chi-Hung

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we developed the cancer treatment through the combination of chemotherapy and thermotherapy using doxorubicin-loaded magnetic liposomes. The citric acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CAMNP, ca. 10 nm) and doxorubicin were encapsulated into the liposome (HSPC/DSPE/cholesterol = 12.5:1:8.25) by rotary evaporation and ultrasonication process. The resultant magnetic liposomes ( ca. 90 to 130 nm) were subject to characterization including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer, and fluorescence microscope. In vitro cytotoxicity of the drug carrier platform was investigated through 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay using L-929 cells, as the mammalian cell model. In vitro cytotoxicity and hyperthermia (inductive heating) studies were evaluated against colorectal cancer (CT-26 cells) with high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF) exposure. MTT assay revealed that these drug carriers exhibited no cytotoxicity against L-929 cells, suggesting excellent biocompatibility. When the magnetic liposomes with 1 μM doxorubicin was used to treat CT-26 cells in combination with HFMF exposure, approximately 56% cells were killed and found to be more effective than either hyperthermia or chemotherapy treatment individually. Therefore, these results show that the synergistic effects between chemotherapy (drug-controlled release) and hyperthermia increase the capability to kill cancer cells.

  3. Improved in vivo delivery of m-THPC via pegylated liposomes for use in photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bovis, Melissa J; Woodhams, Josephine H; Loizidou, Marilena; Scheglmann, Dietrich; Bown, Stephen G; Macrobert, Alexander J

    2012-01-30

    Pegylated liposomal nanocarriers have been developed with the aim of achieving improved uptake of the clinical PDT photosensitiser, m-THPC, into target tissues through increased circulation time and bioavailability. This study investigates the biodistribution and PDT efficacy of m-THPC in its standard formulation (Foscan®) compared to m-THPC incorporated in liposomes with different degrees of pegylation (FosPEG 2% and FosPEG 8%), following i.v. administration to normal and tumour bearing rats. The plasma pharmacokinetics were described using a three compartmental analysis and gave elimination half lives of 90 h, 99 h and 138 h for Foscan®, FosPEG 2% and 8% respectively. The accumulation of m-THPC in tumour and normal tissues, including skin, showed that maximal tumour to skin ratios were observed at ≤ 24 h with FosPEG 2% and 8%, whilst skin photosensitivity studies showed Foscan® induces more damage compared to the liposomes at drug-light intervals of 96 and 168 h. PDT treatment at 24h post-administration (0.05 mg kg⁻¹) showed higher tumour necrosis using pegylated liposomal formulations in comparison to Foscan®, which is attributed to the higher tumour uptake and blood plasma concentrations. Clinically, this improved selectivity has the potential to reduce not only normal tissue damage, but the drug dose required and cutaneous photosensitivity.

  4. Revisiting the use of sPLA2-sensitive liposomes in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pourhassan, Houman; Clergeaud, Gael; Hansen, Anders E; Østrem, Ragnhild G; Fliedner, Frederikke P; Melander, Fredrik; Nielsen, Ole L; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Kjær, Andreas; Andresen, Thomas L

    2017-09-10

    The first developed secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) sensitive liposomal cisplatin formulation (LiPlaCis®) is currently undergoing clinical evaluation. In the present study we revisit and evaluate critical preclinical parameters important for the therapeutic potential and safety of platinum drugs, here oxaliplatin (L-OHP), formulated in sPLA2 sensitive liposomes. We show the mole percentage of negatively charged phospholipid needed to obtain enzyme-sensitivity for saturated systems is ≥25% for 16-carbon chain lipid membranes, and >40% for 18-chain lipid membranes, which was surprising as 25% is used clinically in LiPlaCis®. Efficient sPLA2-dependent growth inhibition of colorectal cancer cells was demonstrated in vitro, where cell membrane degradation and cytolysis depends on the sensitivity of the formulation towards the enzyme and is governed by the amount of lysolipids generated and the presence of serum proteins. We found that serum proteins did not affect the lipase activity of the enzyme towards the membranes but instead sequester the lysolipid byproducts consequently inhibiting their detergent-like cytotoxic properties. In vivo therapeutic potential and safety of the liposomes was investigated in nude mice bearing sPLA2-deficient FaDu squamous carcinoma and sPLA2-expressing Colo205 colorectal adenocarcinoma. After intravenous injections, the tumor growth was suppressed for liposomal L-OHP relative to free drug, but only a weak response was observed for both slow- and fast-releasing sPLA2-sensitive formulations compared to non-sensitive liposomes. Also, the mice did not show longer survival. In turn, for the highly sPLA2-sensitive liposomes, multiple high doses caused petechial cutaneous hemorrhages, along with multifocal hepatonecrotic lesions, suggestive of premature activation in skin and liver irrespective of sPLA2-status of the tumor engraft. These results indicate that although liposomal carriers can improve the antitumor efficacy of platinum

  5. Liposomes as Delivery System of a Sn(IV) Complex for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Corvo, M Luísa; Mendo, Ana Soraia; Figueiredo, Sara; Gaspar, Rogério; Larguinho, Miguel; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Baptista, Pedro Viana; Fernandes, Alexandra R

    2016-06-01

    Tin complexes demonstrate antiproliferative activities in some case higher than cisplatin, with IC50 at the low micromolar range. We have previously showed that the cyclic trinuclear complex of Sn(IV) bearing an aromatic oximehydroxamic acid group [nBu2Sn(L)]3 (L=N,2-dihydroxy-5-[N-hydroxyethanimidoyl]benzamide) (MG85) shows high anti-proliferative activity, induces apoptosis and oxidative stress, and causes destabilization of tubulin microtubules, particularly in colorectal carcinoma cells. Despite the great efficacy towards cancer cells, this complex still shows some cytotoxicity to healthy cells. Targeted delivery of this complex specifically towards cancer cells might foster cancer treatment. MG85 complex was encapsulated into liposomal formulation with and without an active targeting moiety and cancer and healthy cells cytotoxicity was evaluated. Encapsulation of MG85 complex in targeting PEGylated liposomes enhanced colorectal carcinoma (HCT116) cancer cell death when compared to free complex, whilst decreasing cytotoxicity in non-tumor cells. Labeling of liposomes with Rhodamine allowed assessing internalization in cells, which showed significant cell uptake after 6 h of incubation. Cetuximab was used as targeting moiety in the PEGylated liposomes that displayed higher internalization rate in HCT116 cells when compared with non-targeted liposomes, which seems to internalize via active binding of Cetuximab to cells. The proposed formulation open new avenues in the design of innovative transition metal-based vectorization systems that may be further extended to other novel metal complexes towards the improvement of their anti-cancer efficacy, which is usually hampered by solubility issues and/or toxicity to healthy tissues.

  6. Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stu

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the highlights of a press conference featuring biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends. The opposing points of view of these two speakers serve to outline the pros and cons of the gene therapy issue. (CW)

  7. Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stu

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the highlights of a press conference featuring biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends. The opposing points of view of these two speakers serve to outline the pros and cons of the gene therapy issue. (CW)

  8. Ultrasound-Mediated Gene and Drug Delivery Using a Microbubble-Liposome Particle System

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young Il; Kwon, Yong-Su; Cho, Hee-Sang; Heo, Sun-Hee; Park, Kyeong Soon; Park, Sang Gyu; Lee, Soo-Hong; Hwang, Seung Il; Kim, Young Il; Jae, Hwan Jun; Ahn, Gook-Jun; Cho, Young-Seok; Lee, Hakho; Lee, Hak Jong; Yoon, Tae-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Theranostic agents present a promising clinical approach for cancer detection and treatment. We herein introduce a microbubble and liposome complex (MB-Lipo) developed for ultrasound (US) imaging and activation. The MB-Lipo particles have a hybrid structure consisting of a MB complexed with multiple Lipos. The MB components are used to generate high echo signals in US imaging, while the Lipos serve as a versatile carrier of therapeutic materials. MB-Lipo allows high contrast US imaging of tumor sites. More importantly, the application of high acoustic pressure bursts MBs, which releases therapeutic Lipos and further enhances their intracellular delivery through sonoporation effect. Both imaging and drug release could thus be achieved by a single US modality, enabling in situ treatment guided by real-time imaging. The MB-Lipo system was applied to specifically deliver anti-cancer drug and genes to tumor cells, which showed enhanced therapeutic effect. We also demonstrate the clinical potential of MB-Lipo by imaging and treating tumor in vivo. PMID:25250094

  9. Cationic Liposome-DNA Complexes: From supramolecular assembly toward gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Heather M.; Ahmad, A.; Ewert, K.; Martin, A.; Safinya, Cr

    2003-03-01

    Cationic liposomes (CL) present a viable alternative to viral delivery of therapeutic DNA and peptides to cells. We complex CL with DNA to deliver foreign DNA (genes) to cells. Typical self-assembly of CL-DNA shown by x-ray diffraction reveals multilamellar lipids with DNA intercalated between the lipid layers, having a DNA interaxial spacing d(DNA)[1]. The length d(DNA) can be tuned at the subnanometer level (from 35 down to 5 angstroms) by control of the membrane charge density and other parameters. Three distinct DNA-DNA interaction regimes were found due to repulsive long-range electrostatic forces, repulsive short-range hydration forces, and a polymer induced attractive depletion force [2-4]. We correlate d(DNA) to transfection in mammalian cells. These compact DNA structures suggest use for high density storage of genetic information, as well as for biological templates. Supported by NSF DMR-0203755, NIH GM59288. 1. J Radler et al, Science 275, 810 (1997). 2. AJ Lin et al, Biophys. J. (in press). 3. K Ewert, A Ahmad, H Evans et al, J. Med. Chem. 45, 5023 (2002). 4. A Martin et al, (submitted).

  10. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Adrian J

    2008-05-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are a group of disorders that are highly amenable to gene therapy because of their defined pathophysiology and the accessibility of the hematopoietic system to molecular intervention. The development of this new therapeutic modality has been driven by the established morbidity and mortality associated with conventional allogeneic stem cell transplantation, particularly in the human leukocyte antigen-mismatched setting. Recently, several clinical studies have shown that gamma retroviral gene transfer technology can produce major beneficial therapeutic effects, but, as for all cellular and pharmacologic treatment approaches, with a finite potential for toxicity. Newer developments in vector design showing promise in overcoming these issues are likely to establish gene therapy as an efficacious strategy for many forms of primary immunodeficiencies.

  11. [Gene therapy and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Li, Wenwen; Zhou, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the presence of extracellular β-amyloid in the senile plaques, intracellular aggregates of abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein in the neurofibrillary tangles, neuronal loss and cerebrovascular amyloidosis. The manifestations of clinical symptoms include memory impairment, cognitive decline, altered behavior and language deficit. Currently available drugs in AD therapy consist of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, NMDA receptor antagonists, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, etc. These drugs can only alleviate the symptoms of AD. Gene therapy is achieved by vector-mediated gene transfer technology, which can delivery DNA or RNA into target cells to promote the expression of a protective or therapeutic protein and silence certain virulence genes.

  12. Complications mimicking lupus flare-up in a uremic patient undergoing pegylated liposomal doxorubicin therapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jeng-Yi; Wu, Ching-Herng; Shih, I-Hsin; Lai, Ping-Chin

    2004-03-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have an increased risk for malignancy and end-stage renal disease itself might further augment the risk. Treating uremic patients with cervical cancer by cisplatin-based chemotherapy combined with radiation is hampered by the reduced renal excretion of cisplatin. Doxorubicin, a potential radiosensitizer with an established effect on carcinomas that arise in the ovary, uterine cervix and endometrium, might be applied in these cases. We describe a 36-year-old woman, who had a 9-year history of SLE and was maintained on dialysis, and who developed severe drug reaction manifesting as fever, skin rash and exfoliative dermatitis with positive lupus band test after infusion of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin therapy for advanced cervical cancer. These skin manifestations improved after i.v. methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  13. Anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles containing IL12 and salmosin genes for targeted cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Seok; Kang, Seong Jae; Jeong, Hwa Yeon; Kim, Min Woo; Park, Sang Il; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Hong Sung; Kim, Keun Sik; Park, Yong Serk

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-directed gene delivery is of major interest in the field of cancer gene therapy. Varied functionalizations of non-viral vectors have been suggested to enhance tumor targetability. In the present study, we prepared two different types of anti-EGF receptor (EGFR) immunonanoparticles containing pDNA, neutrally charged liposomes and cationic lipoplexes, for tumor-directed transfection of cancer therapeutic genes. Even though both anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles had a high binding affinity to the EGFR-positive cancer cells, the anti-EGFR immunolipoplex formulation exhibited approximately 100-fold higher transfection to the target cells than anti-EGFR immunoliposomes. The lipoplex formulation also showed a higher transfection to SK-OV-3 tumor xenografts in mice. Thus, IL12 and/or salmosin genes were loaded in the anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes and intravenously administered to mice carrying SK-OV-3 tumors. Co-transfection of IL12 and salmosin genes using anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes significantly reduced tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. Furthermore, combinatorial treatment with doxorubicin synergistically inhibited tumor growth. These results suggest that anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes containing pDNA encoding therapeutic genes could be utilized as a gene-transfer modality for cancer gene therapy.

  14. Design, synthesis, and transfection biology of novel cationic glycolipids for use in liposomal gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Mahidhar, Y V; Chaudhuri, A; Gopal, V; Rao, N M

    2001-11-22

    The molecular structure of the cationic lipids used in gene transfection strongly influences their transfection efficiency. High transfection efficiencies of non-glycerol-based simple monocationic transfection lipids with hydroxyethyl headgroups recently reported by us (Banerjee et al. J. Med. Chem. 1999, 42, 4292-4299) are consistent with the earlier observations that the presence of hydroxyl functionalities in the headgroup region of a cationic lipid contributes favorably in liposomal gene delivery. Using simple sugar molecules as the source of multiple hydroxyl functionalities in the headgroup region of the transfection lipids, we have synthesized four novel simple monocationic transfection lipids, namely, 1-deoxy-1-[dihexadecyl(methyl)ammonio]-D-xylitol (1), 1-deoxy-1-[methyl(ditetradecyl)ammonio]-D-arabinitol (2), 1-deoxy-1-[dihexadecyl(methyl)ammonio]-D-arabinitol (3) and 1-deoxy-1-[methyl(dioctadecyl)ammonio]-D-arabinitol (4), containing hydrophobic aliphatic tails and the hydrophilic arabinosyl or xylose sugar groups linked directly to the positively charged nitrogen atom. Syntheses, chemical characterizations, and the transfection biology of these novel transfection lipids 1-4 are described in this paper. Lipid 1, the xylosyl derivative, showed maximum transfection on COS-1 cells. All the lipids showed transfection with cholesterol as colipid and not with dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Radioactive quantitation of free and complexed DNA combined with ethidium bromide exclusion measurements suggest that though nearly 70% of the DNA exists as complexed DNA, the DNA may not have condensed as was observed with other cationic lipids. Presence of additional (more than two) hydroxyl functionalities in the headgroup of the cationic lipids appears to have improved the transfection efficiency and made these lipids less cytotoxic compared to two-hydroxyl derivatives.

  15. Co-liposomes having anisamide tagged lipid and cholesteryl tryptophan trigger enhanced gene transfection in sigma receptor positive cells.

    PubMed

    Misra, Santosh K; Moitra, Parikshit; Kondaiah, Paturu; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2016-06-01

    Selective gene transfection could be strategy of interest for reducing off-target gene expression and toxicity. In this respect, sigma receptors are found to be over-expressed in many human tumors and liposomal formulations with ability to target these sigma receptors may improve the transfection efficiency to a significant level. To this direction, six novel lipids have been synthesized with different hydrophobic segments such as a long hydrophobic chain or a cholesteryl group and L-tryptophan as the head group. Three of them, Lipid 1, 3 and 5 possessed cationic Me3N(+) moiety at the distal end. In contrast each of the other three Lipid 2, 4 and 6 possessed sigma receptor targeting anisamide group with no cationic charge. Mixing of cationic and anisamide counterparts of the same lipid in a molar ratio of 1:1 produced co-liposomes L-M-1 (Lipid 1+2), L-M-2 (Lipid 3+4) and L-M-3 (Lipid 5+6). These co-liposomes, while keeping the sigma targeting anisamide tag intact, showed good DNA binding and release which were optimized from EB intercalation and gel electrophoresis assays. Inclusion of a zwitterionic, fusogenic natural lipid, DOPE, into the co-liposomes further improved the binding efficiencies of the lipid mixtures with DNA. These co-liposomes having cationic and anisamide lipids and DOPE were highly selective toward sigma positive HEK293 and HEK293T cells compared to the sigma negative HeLa cells. As evidenced from both FACS and luciferase assay, a lipid mixture comprising Lipid 3, 4 and DOPE in a molar ratio of 1:1:1 (L-M-2D1) was the best for transfection of reporter pEGFP-C3 and functional pCEP4-p53 gene plasmids. Anisamide mediated sigma receptor selectivity was further probed by pre-incubating the transfecting cells with lipids possessing anisamide and by quantification of the un-transfected plasmid DNA. Also each formulation was highly non-toxic in the cell lines examined. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163824.html Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma Over one-third of patients appeared disease- ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental gene therapy for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma beat back more than a ...

  17. Stavudine loaded gelatin liposomes for HIV therapy: Preparation, characterization and in vitro cytotoxic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Debasis; Boxi, Ankita; Ashe, Sarbani; Thathapudi, Neethi Chandra; Nayak, Bismita

    2017-04-01

    Despite continuous research and availability of 25 different active compounds for treating chronic HIV-1 infection, there is no absolute cure for this deadly disease. Primarily, the residual viremia remains hidden in latently infected reservoir sites and persistently release the viral RNA into the blood stream. The study proposes the dual utilization of the prepared stavudine-containing nanoformulations to control the residual viremia as well as target the reservoir sites. Gelatin nanoformulations containing very low dosage of stavudine were prepared through classical desolvation process and were later loaded in soya lecithin-liposomes. The nanoformulations were characterized through dynamic light scattering (DLS), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and ATR-FTIR. All the formulations were in nano regime with high hemocompatibility and exhibited dose-dependent cytotoxicity towards Raw 264.7 macrophages. Among the various formulations, SG-3 (Stavudine-Gelatin Nanoformulation sample 3) and SG-LP-3 (Stavudine-Gelatin Nano-Liposome formulation sample 3) showed the best results in terms of yield, size, charge, encapsulation efficiency, hemocompatibility and % cell viability. For the first time, liposomal delivery of antiretroviral drugs using nanocarriers has been demonstrated using very low dosage (lower than the recommended WHO dosage) showing the prominent linear release of stavudine for up to 12h which would reduce the circulatory viremia as well as reach the sanctuary reservoir sites due to their nanosize. This method of liposomal delivery of antiretroviral drugs in very low concentrations using nanocarriers could provide a novel therapeutic alternative to target HIV reservoir sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Liposome-Encapsulated Bacteriophages for Enhanced Oral Phage Therapy against Salmonella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Colom, Joan; Cano-Sarabia, Mary; Otero, Jennifer; Cortés, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages UAB_Phi20, UAB_Phi78, and UAB_Phi87 were encapsulated in liposomes, and their efficacy in reducing Salmonella in poultry was then studied. The encapsulated phages had a mean diameter of 309 to 326 nm and a positive charge between +31.6 and +35.1 mV (pH 6.1). In simulated gastric fluid (pH 2.8), the titer of nonencapsulated phages decreased by 5.7 to 7.8 log units, whereas encapsulated phages were significantly more stable, with losses of 3.7 to 5.4 log units. The liposome coating also improved the retention of bacteriophages in the chicken intestinal tract. When cocktails of the encapsulated and nonencapsulated phages were administered to broilers, after 72 h the encapsulated phages were detected in 38.1% of the animals, whereas the nonencapsulated phages were present in only 9.5%. The difference was significant. In addition, in an in vitro experiment, the cecal contents of broilers promoted the release of the phages from the liposomes. In broilers experimentally infected with Salmonella, the daily administration of the two cocktails for 6 days postinfection conferred similar levels of protection against Salmonella colonization. However, once treatment was stopped, protection by the nonencapsulated phages disappeared, whereas that provided by the encapsulated phages persisted for at least 1 week, showing the enhanced efficacy of the encapsulated phages in protecting poultry against Salmonella over time. The methodology described here allows the liposome encapsulation of phages of different morphologies. The preparations can be stored for at least 3 months at 4°C and could be added to the drinking water and feed of animals. PMID:25956778

  19. Liposome-Encapsulated Bacteriophages for Enhanced Oral Phage Therapy against Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Colom, Joan; Cano-Sarabia, Mary; Otero, Jennifer; Cortés, Pilar; Maspoch, Daniel; Llagostera, Montserrat

    2015-07-01

    Bacteriophages UAB_Phi20, UAB_Phi78, and UAB_Phi87 were encapsulated in liposomes, and their efficacy in reducing Salmonella in poultry was then studied. The encapsulated phages had a mean diameter of 309 to 326 nm and a positive charge between +31.6 and +35.1 mV (pH 6.1). In simulated gastric fluid (pH 2.8), the titer of nonencapsulated phages decreased by 5.7 to 7.8 log units, whereas encapsulated phages were significantly more stable, with losses of 3.7 to 5.4 log units. The liposome coating also improved the retention of bacteriophages in the chicken intestinal tract. When cocktails of the encapsulated and nonencapsulated phages were administered to broilers, after 72 h the encapsulated phages were detected in 38.1% of the animals, whereas the nonencapsulated phages were present in only 9.5%. The difference was significant. In addition, in an in vitro experiment, the cecal contents of broilers promoted the release of the phages from the liposomes. In broilers experimentally infected with Salmonella, the daily administration of the two cocktails for 6 days postinfection conferred similar levels of protection against Salmonella colonization. However, once treatment was stopped, protection by the nonencapsulated phages disappeared, whereas that provided by the encapsulated phages persisted for at least 1 week, showing the enhanced efficacy of the encapsulated phages in protecting poultry against Salmonella over time. The methodology described here allows the liposome encapsulation of phages of different morphologies. The preparations can be stored for at least 3 months at 4°C and could be added to the drinking water and feed of animals.

  20. Photodynamic therapy of human bladder carcinoma cells in vitro with liposomes as a carrier for protoporphyrindisodiumsalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Karina; Wenderoth, Ulrich K.; Reich, Ella D.; Hautmann, Richard E.

    1995-01-01

    In vitro experiments were performed on human bladder carcinoma cells to evaluate the efficiency of photodynamic activity of protoporphyrindisodiumsalt encapsulated within liposomes. The bladder carcinoma cell line EJ 28, (Tumorba-nk Heidelberg) was grown on DMEM + 10% FCS + 2% Glutamine + 1% Penicillin/Streptomycin as a monolayer culture. In the log phase, cells were trypsinized, counted and inoculated into 35 mm-diameter multiwells at 105 cells/well and allowed to grow for 24 h. The cells were incubated for 1 h with 5, 10, 20 (mu) g/ml protoporphyrindisodiumsalt in liposomes. (DPPC/Cholesterol 7:3). After incubation cells were refed with complete medium and irradiated with 3 and 6 J/cm2. After irradiation, the cells were incubated for 2 days at 37 degree(s)C, then fixed, stained, counted and compared to the control group. Mean survival rates of 7.21%, 2.99%, 1.33% after irradiation with 3 J/cm2 and 4.3%, 1.48% and 0.88% after irradiation with 6 J/cm2 were found. By using a fluorescence microscope, we evaluated the intracellular uptake of protoporphyrindisodiumsalt in liposomes. The vesicular fluorescence pattern exhibited a concentration of photosensitizer in the nuclear membrane and adjacent parts of the cytoplasm as well as in the plasma membrane. By transmission electron microscopy marked changes were observed at the mitochondria with dissolution of the cristae and development of vacuols.

  1. Comparison of ethosomes and liposomes for skin delivery of psoralen for psoriasis therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Tai; Shen, Li-Na; Wu, Zhong-Hua; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2014-08-25

    Recent reports have indicated that psoriasis may be caused by malfunctioning dermal immune cells, and psoralen ultraviolet A (PUVA) is an effective treatment for this chronic disease. However, conventional topical formulations achieve poor drug delivery across patches of psoriasis to their target sites. The present study describes the development of a novel psoralen transdermal delivery system employing ethosomes, flexible vesicles that can penetrate the stratum corneum and target deep skin layers. An in vitro skin permeation study showed that the permeability of psoralen-loaded ethosomes was superior to that of liposomes. Using ethosomes, psoralen transdermal flux and skin deposition were 38.89±0.32 μg/cm(2)/h and 3.87±1.74 μg/cm(2), respectively, 3.50 and 2.15 times those achieved using liposomes, respectively. The ethosomes and liposomes were found to be safe following daily application to rat skin in vivo, for 7 days. The ethosomes showed better biocompatibility with human embryonic skin fibroblasts than did an equivalent ethanol solution, indicating that the phosphatidylcholine present in ethosome vesicles improved their biocompatibility. These findings indicated that ethosomes could potentially improve the dermal and transdermal delivery of psoralen and possibly of other drugs requiring deep skin delivery.

  2. Liposomal melatonin rescues methamphetamine-elicited mitochondrial burdens, pro-apoptosis, and dopaminergic degeneration through the inhibition PKCδ gene.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Lee, Jaehwi; Shin, Eun-Joo; Dang, Duy-Khanh; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Nguyen, Thuy-Ty Lan; Nam, Yunsung; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Lee, Jae-Chul; Park, Dae Hun; Jang, Choon-Gon; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that mitochondrial oxidative damage and PKCδ overexpression contribute to methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic degeneration. Although it is recognized that antioxidant melatonin is effective in preventing neurotoxicity induced by methamphetamine, its precise mechanism remains elusive. C57BL/6J wild-type mice exhibited a similar degree of dopaminergic deficit when methamphetamine was administered during light and dark phases. Furthermore, dopaminergic neuroprotection by genetic inhibition of PKCδ during the light phase was comparable to that during the dark phase. Thus, we have focused on the light phase to examine whether melatonin modulates PKCδ-mediated neurotoxic signaling after multiple high doses of methamphetamine. To enhance the bioavailability of melatonin, we applied liposomal melatonin. Treatment with methamphetamine resulted in hyperthermia, mitochondrial translocation of PKCδ, oxidative damage (mitochondria > cytosol), mitochondrial dysfunction, pro-apoptotic changes, ultrastructural mitochondrial degeneration, dopaminergic degeneration, and behavioral impairment in wild-type mice. Treatment with liposomal melatonin resulted in a dose-dependent attenuation against degenerative changes induced by methamphetamine in wild-type mice. Attenuation by liposomal melatonin might be comparable to that by genetic inhibition (using PKCδ((-/-)) mice or PKCδ antisense oligonucleotide). However, liposomal melatonin did not show any additional protective effects on the attenuation by genetic inhibition of PKCδ. Our results suggest that the circadian cycle cannot be a key factor in modulating methamphetamine toxicity under the current experimental condition and that PKCδ is one of the critical target genes for melatonin-mediated protective effects against mitochondrial burdens (dysfunction), oxidative stress, pro-apoptosis, and dopaminergic degeneration induced by methamphetamine.

  3. Gene therapy: Myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has become a reality, although still a fragile one. Clinical benefit has been achieved over the last 17years in a limited number of medical conditions for which pathophysiological studies determined that they were favorable settings. They include inherited disorders of the immune system, leukodystrophies, possibly hemoglobinopathies, hemophilia B, and retinal dystrophies. Advances in the treatment of B-cell leukemias and lymphomas have also been achieved. Advances in vector development and possible usage of gene editing may lead to significant advances over the next years.

  4. Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    From the studies performed during the last one year, we determined the effects of AAV-mediated anti-angiogenic gene therapy as a combination therapy...angiogenic gene therapy in combination with chemotherapy. In the next year, we will determine whether such a combination therapy would provide regression of established tumors.

  5. Gene Therapy for Primary Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Rivat, Christine; Santilli, Giorgia; Gaspar, H. Bobby

    2012-01-01

    Abstract For over 40 years, primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) have featured prominently in the development and refinement of human allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. More recently, ex vivo somatic gene therapy using autologous cells has provided remarkable evidence of clinical efficacy in patients without HLA-matched stem cell donors and in whom toxicity of allogeneic procedures is likely to be high. Together with improved preclinical models, a wealth of information has accumulated that has allowed development of safer, more sophisticated technologies and protocols that are applicable to a much broader range of diseases. In this review we summarize the status of these gene therapy trials and discuss the emerging application of similar strategies to other PIDs. PMID:22691036

  6. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join ASGCT! Job Bank Donate Media The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy is the primary professional membership organization for gene and cell therapy. The Society's members are scientists, physicians, patient advocates, and other ...

  7. Safe Gene Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    Safe Gene Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Massimo Trucco, M.D...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Safe Gene Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes New Advanced Technology to Improve Prediction and Prevention 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...scientific skepticism, the prospect of gene therapy -based treatments remains intriguing and the use of human stem cell research carries with it enor- mous

  8. Gene therapy of benign gynecological diseases☆

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Memy H.; Othman, Essam E.; Hornung, Daniela; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is the introduction of genetic material into patient’s cells to achieve therapeutic benefit. Advances in molecular biology techniques and better understanding of disease pathogenesis have validated the use of a variety of genes as potential molecular targets for gene therapy based approaches. Gene therapy strategies include: mutation compensation of dysregulated genes; replacement of defective tumor-suppressor genes; inactivation of oncogenes; introduction of suicide genes; immunogenic therapy and antiangiogenesis based approaches. Preclinical studies of gene therapy for various gynecological disorders have not only shown to be feasible, but also showed promising results in diseases such as uterine leiomyomas and endometriosis. In recent years, significant improvement in gene transfer technology has led to the development of targetable vectors, which have fewer side-effects without compromising their efficacy. This review provides an update on developing gene therapy approaches to treat common gynecological diseases such as uterine leiomyoma and endometriosis. PMID:19446586

  9. [Targeting therapy of magnetic doxorubicin liposome in nude mice bearing colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping-hong; Yao, Li-qing; Qin, Xin-yu; Shen, Xi-zhong; Liu, Yi-shu; Lu, Wei-yue; Yao, Ming

    2003-12-10

    To investigate the effect of magnetic doxorubicin liposome (MDL) in the targeting treatment of nude mice bearing colon cancer. Human colon cancer line LoVo cells were implanted hypodermically into nude mouse. Two weeks after the mouse was killed and the tumor was taken out and cut into small pieces to be retransplanted into nude mice so as to establish an experimental model. MDL was prepared by reverse-phase evaporation method. The particle size and structure of MDL were evaluated. Eighteen nude mice with colon cancer were divided into 3 groups of 3 mice: free DOX group, MDL (-) group (no magnetic field was added to the tumor surface), and MDL (+) group (magnetic field with the strength of 4,500 G was added). DOX of the dosage of 5 mg/kg was injected through the caudal vein in these 3 groups. Then the mice were killed 30 minutes after. Fluorescence spectrophotometry was used to examine the concentrations of DOX in the tissues and plasma. Another 36 nude mice with colon cancer were divided into 6 groups of 6 mice: normal saline group (as controls), DOX group, blank liposome group, magnetic liposome group, MDL (-) group (non-magnetic alloy was implanted into the tumor), and MDL (+) group (rare earth magnet was implanted into the tumor). The body weight, longest diameter of tumor, and short diameter vertical to the longest diameter were calculated regularly. The mice were killed 11 days after. The tumors were taken out to undergo staining and light microscopy. Flow cytometry was used to examine the apoptosis of tumor cells. The particle size of MDL was 230 nm and the magnetic particles (Fe(3)O(4)) were evenly distributed within the liposome. The DOX concentration in tumor tissue of the MDL (+) group was remarkably higher than those of the DOX and MDL (-) groups (both P < 0.05). The DOX concentration in heart and kidney of the DOX group were higher than those of the other 2 groups, and the plasma DOX concentrations of the DOX group was significantly lower than those of

  10. A new colloidal lipidic system for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Fahr, A; Müller, K; Nahde, Th; Müller, Rolf; Brüsselbach, Sabine

    2002-01-01

    A novel type of liposomal vector for gene therapy is described (Artificial Virus Particles; AVPs). This vector is based on the composition of retroviral envelopes, serum-resistant and non-toxic and smaller than 200 nm in size. The DNA is condensed using low molecular weight branched PEI. Equipment of these particles with a cyclic RGD peptide ligand as targeting device renders them selective for tumor endothelial and melanoma cells expressing high levels of alphavbeta3-integrins, and allows for an efficient delivery of the enclosed genetic material. The specificity of the vector system for melanoma cells could be further improved by using a melanocyte-specific tyrosinase promoter to drive transgene expression.

  11. Alphavirus vectors for vaccine production and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2003-06-01

    Alphavirus vectors demonstrate high expression of heterologous proteins in a broad range of host cells. Replication-deficient as well as replication-competent variants exist. Systemic delivery of many viral antigens has elicited strong antibody responses in immunized mice and primates, and protection against challenges with lethal viruses was obtained. Similarly, prophylactic vaccination was established against tumor challenges. Attention has been paid to the engineering of improved targeting to immunologically active cells, such as dendritic cells. In the area of gene therapy, intratumoral injections of alphavirus vectors have resulted in potentially promising tumor rejection. Moreover, encapsulation of alphavirus particles into liposomes demonstrated efficient tumor targeting in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency, which permitted the initiation of clinical trials for patients with advanced kidney carcinoma and melanoma.

  12. Orthopedic Gene Therapy in 2008

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H; Ghivizzani, Steven C; Robbins, Paul D

    2008-01-01

    Orthopedic disorders, although rarely fatal, are the leading cause of morbidity and impose a huge socioeconomic burden. Their prevalence will increase dramatically as populations age and gain weight. Many orthopedic conditions are difficult to treat by conventional means; however, they are good candidates for gene therapy. Clinical trials have already been initiated for arthritis and the aseptic loosening of prosthetic joints, and the development of bone-healing applications is at an advanced, preclinical stage. Other potential uses include the treatment of Mendelian diseases and orthopedic tumors, as well as the repair and regeneration of cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. Many of these goals should be achievable with existing technologies. The main barriers to clinical application are funding and regulatory issues, which in turn reflect major safety concerns and the opinion, in some quarters, that gene therapy should not be applied to nonlethal, nongenetic diseases. For some indications, advances in nongenetic treatments have also diminished enthusiasm. Nevertheless, the preclinical and early clinical data are impressive and provide considerable optimism that gene therapy will provide straightforward, effective solutions to the clinical management of several common debilitating disorders that are otherwise difficult and expensive to treat. PMID:19066598

  13. Liposomal chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Emanuela; Cilurzo, Felisa; Di Marzio, Luisa; Carafa, Maria; Ventura, Cinzia Anna; Wolfram, Joy; Paolino, Donatella; Celia, Christian

    2013-12-01

    Currently, six liposomal chemotherapeutics have received clinical approval and many more are in clinical trials or undergoing preclinical evaluation. Liposomes exhibit low toxicity and improve the biopharmaceutical features and therapeutic index of drugs, thereby increasing efficacy and reducing side effects. In this review we discuss the advantages of using liposomes for the delivery of chemotherapeutics. Gemcitabine and paclitaxel have been chosen as examples to illustrate how the performance of a metabolically unstable or poorly water-soluble drug can be greatly improved by liposomal incorporation. We look at the beneficial effects of liposomes in a variety of solid and blood-borne tumors, including thyroid cancer, pancreatic cancer, breast cancer and multiple myeloma.

  14. Cancer gene therapy: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Kevin J

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of human disease has been the corner-stone of rationally designed molecular therapies. Medicine has a long history of treating patients with cell therapies (i.e., blood transfusions) and protein therapies (i.e., growth factors and cytokines). Gene therapies are the newest therapeutic strategy for treating human diseases. Where will gene therapy be in five years after the euphoria and frustrations of the last 14 years? This is a complex question, but the primary challenge for gene therapy will be to successfully deliver an efficacious dose of a therapeutic gene to the defective tissue. Will the delivery systems return to the early clinical trials of ex vivo gene therapy or will there still be a high demand for systemic therapy? Will systemic therapy continue to depend on viral vectors, or will non-viral and nano-particles become the new mode for gene delivery? The future success of gene therapy will be built on achievements in other fields, such as medical devices, cell therapy, protein therapy and nano-particle technology. This review describes the advances being made in the gene therapy field, as well as addressing the challenges of the near future for cancer gene therapy.

  15. Association with Amino Acids Does Not Enhance Efficacy of Polymerized Liposomes As a System for Lung Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bandeira, Elga; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Chiaramoni, Nadia; Ferreira, Débora; Fernandez-Ruocco, Maria J.; Prieto, Maria J.; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Perrotta, Ramiro M.; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Rocco, Patricia R. M.; Alonso, Silvia del Valle; Morales, Marcelo M.

    2016-01-01

    Development of improved drug and gene delivery systems directly into the lungs is highly desirable given the important burden of respiratory diseases. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of liposomes composed of photopolymerized lipids [1,2-bis-(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine] associated with amino acids as vectors for gene delivery into the lungs of healthy animals. Lipopolymer vesicles, in particular, are more stable than other types of liposomes. In this study, lipopolymers were associated with l-arginine, l-tryptophan, or l-cysteine. We hypothesized that the addition of these amino acids would enhance the efficacy of gene delivery to the lungs by the lipopolymers. l-Arginine showed the highest association efficiency due to its positive charge and better surface interactions. None of the formulations caused inflammation or altered lung mechanics, suggesting that these lipopolymers can be safely administered as aerosols. All formulations were able to induce eGFP mRNA expression in lung tissue, but the addition of amino acids reduced delivery efficacy when compared with the simple lipopolymer particle. These results indicate that this system could be further explored for gene or drug delivery targeting lung diseases. PMID:27199766

  16. PEGylated hyaluronic acid-modified liposomal delivery system with anti-γ-glutamylcyclotransferase siRNA for drug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ran, Rui; Liu, Yayuan; Gao, Huile; Kuang, Qifang; Zhang, Qianyu; Tang, Jie; Fu, Han; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2015-02-01

    Human chromosome 7 open reading frame 24 has been identified as a tumor-related protein, and later it was shown to be γ-glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT). This protein is upregulated in various types of cancer and is proved to be associated with cellular proliferation. RNA interference is an effective method to achieve highly specific gene regulation. In this study, the anti-GGCT siRNA was incorporated into a comprehensively evaluated polyethylene glycol-hyaluronic acid-modified liposomal siRNA delivery system (PEG-HA-NP) for drug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer therapy by systemic administration. The PEG-HA-NP had a diameter of 216 nm and a zeta potential of -17.4 mV. Transfection of anti-GGCT siRNA-loaded PEG-HA-NP could achieve effective GGCT downregulation and induce the subsequent cell cytotoxicity against MCF-7/ADR cells. Systemic administration of PEG-HA-NP at 0.35 mg/kg siRNA could retard the tumor growth and induce necrosis of tumor tissue while showing no obvious toxicity to normal tissues. Therefore, systemic administration of anti-GGCT-loaded PEG-HA-NP was proved to be a promising strategy for drug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer therapy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  17. Gene therapy on demand: site specific regulation of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jazwa, Agnieszka; Florczyk, Urszula; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2013-08-10

    Since 1990 when the first clinical gene therapy trial was conducted, much attention and considerable promise have been given to this form of treatment. Gene therapy has been used with success in patients suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes (X-SCID and ADA-deficiency), Leber's congenital amaurosis, hemophilia, β-thalassemia and adrenoleukodystrophy. Last year, the first therapeutic vector (Glybera) for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency has been registered in the European Union. Nevertheless, there are still several numerous issues that need to be improved to make this technique more safe, effective and easily accessible for patients. Introduction of the therapeutic gene to the given cells should provide the level of expression which will restore the production of therapeutic protein to normal values or will provide therapeutic efficacy despite not fully physiological expression. However, in numerous diseases the expression of therapeutic genes has to be kept at certain level for some time, and then might be required to be switched off to be activated again when worsening of the symptoms may aggravate the risk of disease relapse. In such cases the promoters which are regulated by local conditions may be more required. In this article the special emphasis is to discuss the strategies of regulation of gene expression by endogenous stimuli. Particularly, the hypoxia- or miRNA-regulated vectors offer the possibilities of tight but, at the same time, condition-dependent and cell-specific expression. Such means have been already tested in certain pathophysiological conditions. This creates the chance for the translational approaches required for development of effective treatments of so far incurable diseases.

  18. Gene therapy for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Barry

    2017-04-01

    Novel strategies are needed to treat the growing population of heart failure patients. While new drug and device based therapies have improved outcomes over the past several decades, heart failure patients continue to experience amongst the lowest quality of life of any chronic disease, high likelihood of being hospitalized and marked reduction in survival. Better understanding of many of the basic mechanisms involved in the development of heart failure has helped identify abnormalities that could potentially be targeted by gene transfer. Despite success in experimental animal models, translating gene transfer strategies from the laboratory to the clinic remains at an early stage. This review provides an introduction to gene transfer as a therapy for treating heart failure, describes some of the many factors that need to be addressed in order for it to be successful and discusses some of the recent studies that have been carried out in heart failure patients. Insights from these studies highlight both the enormous promise of gene transfer and the obstacles that still need to be overcome for this treatment approach to be successful. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene therapy for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Barry

    2015-09-01

    Heart failure is a major public health problem throughout the world and it is likely that its prevalence will continue to grow over the next several decades. Despite advances in the treatment of heart failure, morbidity and mortality remain unacceptably high. Gene transfer therapy provides a novel strategy for targeting abnormalities in cardiac cells that adversely affect cardiac function. New vectors for gene delivery, mainly adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) that are preferentially taken up by cardiomyocytes, can result in sustained transgene expression. The cardiac isoform of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPase (SERCA2a) plays a major role in regulating calcium levels in cardiomyocytes. Abnormal calcium handling by the failing heart caused by a reduction in SERCA2a activity adversely affects both systolic and diastolic function. The Calcium Upregulation by Percutaneous Administration of Gene Therapy in Cardiac Disease (CUPID) study was a Phase 2a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-finding study that was performed in patients with advanced heart failure due to systolic dysfunction. Eligible patients received AAV/SERCA2a or placebo by direct antegrade infusion into the coronary circulation. At the end of 12 months, patients receiving high-dose therapy (i.e. 1×10(13) DNase Resistant Particles) had evidence of favorable changes in several clinically relevant domains compared to patients treated with placebo. There were no safety concerns at any dose of AAV/SERCA2a. Patients treated with AAV/SERCA2a exhibited a striking reduction in cardiovascular events that persisted through 36 months of follow-up compared to patients who received placebo. Transgene expression was detected in the myocardium of patients receiving AAV/SERCA2a gene therapy as long as 31 months after delivery. A second Phase 2b study, CUPID 2, designed to confirm this favorable effect on heart failure events, is currently underway with the results expected to be presented later in

  20. Suicide Gene Therapy for Cancer – Current Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Sakkas, Antonios; Yarmus, Lonny; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Freitag, Lutz; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Malecki, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Current cancer treatments may create profound iatrogenic outcomes. The adverse effects of these treatments still remain, as the serious problems that practicing physicians have to cope with in clinical practice. Although, non-specific cytotoxic agents constitute an effective treatment modality against cancer cells, they also tend to kill normal, quickly dividing cells. On the other hand, therapies targeting the genome of the tumors are both under investigation, and some others are already streamlined to clinical practice. Several approaches have been investigated in order to find a treatment targeting the cancer cells, while not affecting the normal cells. Suicide gene therapy is a therapeutic strategy, in which cell suicide inducing transgenes are introduced into cancer cells. The two major suicide gene therapeutic strategies currently pursued are: cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine and the herpes simplex virus/ganciclovir. The novel strategies include silencing gene expression, expression of intracellular antibodies blocking cells’ vital pathways, and transgenic expression of caspases and DNases. We analyze various elements of cancer cells’ suicide inducing strategies including: targets, vectors, and mechanisms. These strategies have been extensively investigated in various types of cancers, while exploring multiple delivery routes including viruses, non-viral vectors, liposomes, nanoparticles, and stem cells. We discuss various stages of streamlining of the suicide gene therapy into clinical oncology as applied to different types of cancer. Moreover, suicide gene therapy is in the center of attention as a strategy preventing cancer from developing in patients participating in the clinical trials of regenerative medicine. In oncology, these clinical trials are aimed at regenerating, with the aid of stem cells, of the patients’ organs damaged by pathologic and/or iatrogenic factors. However, the stem cells carry the risk of neoplasmic transformation. We

  1. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Stoff-Khalili, MA; Dall, P; Curiel, DT

    2007-01-01

    In view of the limited success of available treatment modalities for breast cancer, alternative and complementary strategies need to be developed. The delineation of the molecular basis of breast cancer provides the possibility of specific intervention by gene therapy through the introduction of genetic material for therapeutic purposes. In this regard, several gene therapy approaches for carcinoma of the breast have been developed. These approaches can be divided into six broad categories: (1) mutation compensation, (2) molecular chemotherapy, (3) proapoptotic gene therapy, (4) antiangiogenic gene therapy, (5) genetic immunopotentiation, and (6) genetic modulation of resistance/sensitivity. Clinical trials for breast cancer have been initiated to evaluate safety, toxicity, and efficacy. Combined modality therapy with gene therapy and chemotherapy or radiation therapy has shown promising results. It is expected that as new therapeutic targets and approaches are identified and advances in vector design are realized, gene therapy will play an increasing role in clinical breast cancer treatment. PMID:16410823

  2. Randomized trial of radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis comparing intrathecal triple therapy with liposomal cytarabine in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bassan, Renato; Masciulli, Arianna; Intermesoli, Tamara; Audisio, Ernesta; Rossi, Giuseppe; Pogliani, Enrico Maria; Cassibba, Vincenzo; Mattei, Daniele; Romani, Claudio; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Corti, Consuelo; Scattolin, Anna Maria; Spinelli, Orietta; Tosi, Manuela; Parolini, Margherita; Marmont, Filippo; Borlenghi, Erika; Fumagalli, Monica; Cortelazzo, Sergio; Gallamini, Andrea; Marfisi, Rosa Maria; Oldani, Elena; Rambaldi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Developing optimal radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis is a desirable goal in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, to avoid the long-term toxicity associated with cranial irradiation. In a randomized, phase II trial enrolling 145 adult patients, we compared intrathecal liposomal cytarabine (50 mg: 6/8 injections in B-/T-cell subsets, respectively) with intrathecal triple therapy (methotrexate/cytarabine/prednisone: 12 injections). Systemic therapy included methotrexate plus cytarabine or L-asparaginase courses, with methotrexate augmented to 2.5 and 5 g/m2 in Philadelphia-negative B- and T-cell disease, respectively. The primary study objective was the comparative assessment of the risk/benefit ratio, combining the analysis of feasibility, toxicity and efficacy. In the liposomal cytarabine arm 17/71 patients (24%) developed grade 3–4 neurotoxicity compared to 2/74 (3%) in the triple therapy arm (P=0.0002), the median number of episodes of neurotoxicity of any grade was one per patient compared to zero, respectively (P=0.0001), and even though no permanent disabilities or deaths were registered, four patients (6%) discontinued intrathecal prophylaxis on account of these toxic side effects (P=0.06). Neurotoxicity worsened with liposomal cytarabine every 14 days (T-cell disease), and was improved by the adjunct of intrathecal dexamethasone. Two patients in the liposomal cytarabine arm suffered from a meningeal relapse (none with T-cell disease, only one after high-dose chemotherapy) compared to four in the triple therapy arm (1 with T-cell disease). While intrathecal liposomal cytarabine could contribute to improved, radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis, the toxicity reported in this trial does not support its use at 50 mg and prompts the investigation of a lower dosage. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT-00795756). PMID:25749825

  3. Randomized trial of radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis comparing intrathecal triple therapy with liposomal cytarabine in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bassan, Renato; Masciulli, Arianna; Intermesoli, Tamara; Audisio, Ernesta; Rossi, Giuseppe; Pogliani, Enrico Maria; Cassibba, Vincenzo; Mattei, Daniele; Romani, Claudio; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Corti, Consuelo; Scattolin, Anna Maria; Spinelli, Orietta; Tosi, Manuela; Parolini, Margherita; Marmont, Filippo; Borlenghi, Erika; Fumagalli, Monica; Cortelazzo, Sergio; Gallamini, Andrea; Marfisi, Rosa Maria; Oldani, Elena; Rambaldi, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Developing optimal radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis is a desirable goal in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, to avoid the long-term toxicity associated with cranial irradiation. In a randomized, phase II trial enrolling 145 adult patients, we compared intrathecal liposomal cytarabine (50 mg: 6/8 injections in B-/T-cell subsets, respectively) with intrathecal triple therapy (methotrexate/cytarabine/prednisone: 12 injections). Systemic therapy included methotrexate plus cytarabine or L-asparaginase courses, with methotrexate augmented to 2.5 and 5 g/m(2) in Philadelphia-negative B- and T-cell disease, respectively. The primary study objective was the comparative assessment of the risk/benefit ratio, combining the analysis of feasibility, toxicity and efficacy. In the liposomal cytarabine arm 17/71 patients (24%) developed grade 3-4 neurotoxicity compared to 2/74 (3%) in the triple therapy arm (P=0.0002), the median number of episodes of neurotoxicity of any grade was one per patient compared to zero, respectively (P=0.0001), and even though no permanent disabilities or deaths were registered, four patients (6%) discontinued intrathecal prophylaxis on account of these toxic side effects (P=0.06). Neurotoxicity worsened with liposomal cytarabine every 14 days (T-cell disease), and was improved by the adjunct of intrathecal dexamethasone. Two patients in the liposomal cytarabine arm suffered from a meningeal relapse (none with T-cell disease, only one after high-dose chemotherapy) compared to four in the triple therapy arm (1 with T-cell disease). While intrathecal liposomal cytarabine could contribute to improved, radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis, the toxicity reported in this trial does not support its use at 50 mg and prompts the investigation of a lower dosage. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT-00795756).

  4. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Qing-Tao; Liu, He; Zhang, Zhen-Zhu; Huang, Wen-Lin

    2011-03-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucleotides and RNA interference) approaches. In addition, immune response-based strategies (dendritic cell- and T cell-based therapy) are also under investigation in tumor gene therapy. This review highlights the progress and recent developments in gene delivery systems, therapeutic strategies, and possible clinical directions for gene therapy.

  5. Liposome-like nanocapsules of dual drug-tailed betaine for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shuo; Niu, Yuge; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yemin; Yu, Liangli; Zhang, Yingyi; Li, Xinsong

    2015-09-30

    A novel dual drug-tailed betaine conjugate amphiphile has been firstly synthesized in which the polar headgroup is derived from glycine betaine and the hydrophobic tails are chlorambucil molecules. The newly prepared conjugate undergoes self-assembly to form stable liposome-like nanocapsules as an effective carrier with high drug loading capacity. The nanocapsules showed higher cytotoxic effects to cancer cell lines than those of free chlorambucil in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth effectively in vivo. This strategy that utilizes new dual drug-tailed betaine conjugate amphiphile to construct a self-assembled nanoparticle drug delivery system may have great potential in cancer chemotherapy.

  6. [The effect of gene therapy with the APOE3 Gene on structural and functional manifestations of secondary hippocampal damages in experimental traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Pedachenko, E G; Biloshytsky, V V; Mikhal'sky, S A; Gridina, N Ya; Kvitnitskaya-Ryzhova, T Yu

    2015-01-01

    to study the efficiency of gene therapy following traumatic brain injury (TBI) by evaluating the influences of liposomal transfection of the brain tissue by APOE3-containing plasmid vector on the structural and functional manifestations of development of secondary brain injuries after acute experimental TBI in the rats of different age. Severe diffuse TBI in rats was inflicted under overall anesthesia by free load weighing 450 g, falling from a 1.5 m elevation. The mixture of DOTAP liposome and 25 μg of plasmid vector pCMV·SPORT6 with cDNA of APOE3 gene was infused intraventricularly using ALZET osmotic pumps. Combined morphological, electron microscopic, immunohistochemical and morphometric studies of СА1 hippocampal region were conducted in rats at days 5 and 10 following TBI and gene therapy after investigation of motor functions (using composite neurological motor score) and cognitive functions in Morris water maze. Significant changes in the morphofunctional state of hippocampus, as well as in the neurological and cognitive functions were shown on the model of severe TBI in the adult and old Wistar rats. Gene therapy, specifically cationic-liposome mediated APOE3 gene transfer to the CNS cells by plasmid vector, decreased a TBI-induced death of neurons and improved qualitative composition of neuronal population, normalized neuron-glial relations, decreased gliosis and microglial activation, axonal damage, myelin destruction and lipofuscin accumulation, all these having age-related peculiarities. After gene therapy observed in the animal brain was a lower intensity of the processes of apoptosis and a decrease of its rate in old animals. The above changes were accompanied with a more fast and expressed regress of neurological and cognitive disturbances typical for TBI. Administration of plasmid vector after TBI resulted in an increase of survival rate of old animals vs. old animals which got no gene therapy. APOE3 gene therapy has therapeutic potential in

  7. Episomal vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Anja; Haase, Rudolf; Schepers, Aloys; Deutsch, Manuel J; Lipps, Hans Joachim; Baiker, Armin

    2008-06-01

    The increasing knowledge of the molecular and genetic background of many different human diseases has led to the vision that genetic engineering might be used one day for their phenotypic correction. The main goal of gene therapy is to treat loss-of-function genetic disorders by delivering correcting therapeutic DNA sequences into the nucleus of a cell, allowing its long-term expression at physiologically relevant levels. Manifold different vector systems for the therapeutic gene delivery have been described over the recent years. They all have their individual advantages but also their individual limitations and must be judged on a careful risk/benefit analysis. Integrating vector systems can deliver genetic material to a target cell with high efficiency enabling long-term expression of an encoded transgene. The main disadvantage of integrating vector systems, however, is their potential risk of causing insertional mutagenesis. Episomal vector systems have the potential to avoid these undesired side effects, since they behave as separate extrachromosomal elements in the nucleus of a target cell. Within this article we present a comprehensive survey of currently available episomal vector systems for the genetic modification of mammalian cells. We will discuss their advantages and disadvantages and their applications in the context of basic research, biotechnology and gene therapy.

  8. Stem cell directed gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Engel, B C; Kohn, D B

    1999-05-01

    A potential therapeutic approach to HIV-1 infection is the genetic modification of cells of a patient to make them resistant to HIV-1. Hematopoietic stem cells are an attractive target for gene therapy of AIDS because of their ability to generate a broad repertoire of mature T lymphocytes, as well as the monocytic cells (macrophages, dendritic cells and microglia) which are also involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis. A number of synthetic "anti-HIV-1 genes" have been developed which inhibit HIV-1 replication. However, current methods for gene transfer into human hematopoietic stem cells, using retroviral vectors derived from the Moloney murine leukemia virus, have been minimally effective. Clinical trials performed to date in which hematopoietic cells from HIV-1-positive patients have been transduced with retroviral vectors and then reinfused have produced low to undetectable levels of gene-containing peripheral blood leukocytes. New vector delivery systems, such as lentiviral vectors, need to be developed to ensure efficient gene transfer and persistent transgene expression to provide life-long resistance to the cells targeted by HIV-1.

  9. Mono-cationic detergents play a critical role in the development of liposome-based gene vector via controlling its lamellarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryosuke; Yamada, Yuma; Kawamura, Eriko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Controlling the number of lipid bilayers, the lamellarity, in a liposome is a major factor in the in vivo/in vitro pharmacokinetics of drug delivery using liposome-based nanocarriers. Findings reported in a previous study indicated that a mono-cationic detergent (MCD) could be useful in controlling liposomal size via interaction with the lipid envelope. Here, we investigated controlling the lamellarity of the liposomal gene vector by MCD, using a multifunctional envelope-type nano device (MEND). The MEND consisted of a condensed plasmid DNA core and lipid envelopes. The size of the MCD-contained MEND (MCD-MEND) decreased as a function of the amount of MCD, indicating that MCD can be used to control the number of the lipid bilayers. We also developed a triple-layered MEND (TL-MEND) by packaging a di-lamellar MEND into an MCD-containing lipid bilayer. We hypothesized that the TL-MEND would efficiently deliver a gene to the nucleus, when the outer single bilayer fused with the plasma membrane and the inner double membranes then fused with the nuclear double membranes. Transfection assays showed that the TL-MEND had a high transfection activity in JAWS II cells, non-dividing cells. These results indicate that MCD has the potential for enhancing the gene delivery by controlling liposomal lamellarity.

  10. Combination Therapy using Co-encapsulated Resveratrol and Paclitaxel in Liposomes for Drug Resistance Reversal in Breast Cancer Cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jie; Guo, Fangqin; Xu, Haiyan; Liang, Wei; Wang, Chen; Yang, Xian-Da

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major impediment to cancer treatment. A promising strategy for treating MDR is the joint delivery of combined anticancer agents to tumor cells in a single nanocarrier. Here, for the first time, Resveratrol (Res) was co-encapsulated with paclitaxel (PTX) in a PEGylated liposome to construct a carrier-delivered form of combination therapy for drug-resistant tumors. The composite liposome had an average diameter of 50 nm with encapsulated efficiencies of above 50%. The studies demonstrated that the composite liposome could generate potent cytotoxicity against the drug-resistant MCF-7/Adr tumor cells in vitro and enhance the bioavailability and the tumor-retention of the drugs in vivo. Moreover, systemic therapy with the composite liposome effectively inhibited drug-resistant tumor in mice (p < 0.01), without any notable increase in the toxicity. These results suggested that the co-delivery of Res and a cytotoxic agent in a nanocarrier may potentially improve the treatment of drug-resistant tumors. PMID:26947928

  11. Model studies directed toward the application of boron neutron capture therapy to rheumatoid arthritis: Boron delivery by liposomes in rat collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Watson-Clark, Rachel A.; Banquerigo, Mona Lisa; Shelly, Kenneth; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Brahn, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    The application of boron neutron capture therapy to rheumatoid arthritis requires the selective delivery of the boron-10 isotope to the synovitic tissue. The use of liposomes as a boron delivery method has been explored through the measurement of the time course biodistribution of boron in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Small unilamellar vesicles were composed of a 1:1 mixture of distearoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, incorporated K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] as an addend in the lipid bilayer and encapsulated Na3[a2-B20H17NH2CH2CH2NH2] in the aqueous core. The tissue concentration of boron delivered by liposomes was determined by inductively coupled plasma–atomic emission spectroscopy after intravenous injection of liposome suspensions into Louvain rats with CIA. With the low injected doses of boron used [13–18 mg of boron per kg (body weight)], the peak boron concentration observed in arthritic synovium was 29 μg of boron per g of tissue. The highest synovium/blood boron ratio observed was 3.0, when the synovial boron concentration was 22 μg of boron per g of tissue. In an attempt to increase the synovium/blood boron ratio by lowering the blood boron concentration, a liposomal formulation characterized by a shorter blood clearance time was examined. Thus, the biodistribution of liposomes with additional K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] incorporated in the vesicle membrane not only demonstrated more rapid blood clearance and slightly higher synovium/blood boron ratios but also exhibited reduced boron uptake in synovial tissue. These studies with boron neutron capture therapy for CIA suggest that this form of therapy may be feasible in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:9482920

  12. Site-specific antibody-liposome conjugation through copper-free click chemistry: a molecular biology approach for targeted photodynamic therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaid, Girgis; Wang, Yucheng; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Broekgaarden, Mans; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Hui, James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Nanocarriers, such as liposomes, have the ability to potentiate photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment regimens by the encapsulation of high payloads of photosensitizers and enhance their passive delivery to tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. By conjugating targeting moieties to the surface of the liposomal nanoconstructs, cellular selectivity is imparted on them and PDT-based therapies can be performed with significantly higher dose tolerances, as off-target toxicity is simultaneously reduced.1 However, the maximal benefits of conventional targeted nanocarriers, including liposomes, are hindered by practical limitations including chemical instability, non-selective conjugation chemistry, poor control over ligand orientation, and loss of ligand functionality following conjugation, amongst others.2 We have developed a robust, physically and chemically stable liposomal nanoplatform containing benzoporphyrin derivative photosensitizer molecules within the phospholipid bilayer and an optimized surface density of strained cyclooctyne moieties for `click' conjugation to azido-functionalized antibodies.3 The clinical chimeric anti-EGFR antibody Cetuximab is site-specifically photocrosslinked to a recombinant bioengineered that recognizes the antibody's Fc region, containing a terminal azide.4 The copper-free click conjugation of the bioengineered Cetuximab derivative to the optimized photosensitizing liposome provides exceptional control over the antibody's optimal orientation for cellular antigen binding. Importantly, the reaction occurs rapidly under physiological conditions, bioorthogonally (selectively in the presence of other biomolecules) and without the need for toxic copper catalysis.3 Such state-of-the-art conjugation strategies push the boundaries of targeted photodynamic therapy beyond the limitations of traditional chemical coupling techniques to produce more robust and effective targeted therapeutics with applications beyond

  13. Liposomes: technologies and analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Jesorka, Aldo; Orwar, Owe

    2008-01-01

    Liposomes are structurally and functionally some of the most versatile supramolecular assemblies in existence. Since the beginning of active research on lipid vesicles in 1965, the field has progressed enormously and applications are well established in several areas, such as drug and gene delivery. In the analytical sciences, liposomes serve a dual purpose: Either they are analytes, typically in quality-assessment procedures of liposome preparations, or they are functional components in a variety of new analytical systems. Liposome immunoassays, for example, benefit greatly from the amplification provided by encapsulated markers, and nanotube-interconnected liposome networks have emerged as ultrasmall-scale analytical devices. This review provides information about new developments in some of the most actively researched liposome-related topics.

  14. Liposomes: Technologies and Analytical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesorka, Aldo; Orwar, Owe

    2008-07-01

    Liposomes are structurally and functionally some of the most versatile supramolecular assemblies in existence. Since the beginning of active research on lipid vesicles in 1965, the field has progressed enormously and applications are well established in several areas, such as drug and gene delivery. In the analytical sciences, liposomes serve a dual purpose: Either they are analytes, typically in quality-assessment procedures of liposome preparations, or they are functional components in a variety of new analytical systems. Liposome immunoassays, for example, benefit greatly from the amplification provided by encapsulated markers, and nanotube-interconnected liposome networks have emerged as ultrasmall-scale analytical devices. This review provides information about new developments in some of the most actively researched liposome-related topics.

  15. Gene therapy in the cornea: 2005--present.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Rajiv R; Tovey, Jonathan C K; Sharma, Ajay; Tandon, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    Successful restoration of vision in human patients with gene therapy affirmed its promise to cure ocular diseases and disorders. The efficacy of gene therapy is contingent upon vector and mode of therapeutic DNA introduction into targeted cells/tissues. The cornea is an ideal tissue for gene therapy due to its ease of access and relative immune-privilege. Considerable progress has been made in the field of corneal gene therapy in last 5 years. Several new gene transfer vectors, techniques and approaches have evolved. Although corneal gene therapy is still in its early stages of development, the potential of gene-based interventions to treat corneal abnormalities has begun to surface. Identification of next generation viral and nanoparticle vectors, characterization of delivered gene levels, localization, and duration in the cornea, and significant success in controlling corneal disorders, particularly fibrosis and angiogenesis, in experimental animal disease models, with no major side effects have propelled gene therapy a step closer toward establishing gene-based therapies for corneal blindness. Recently, researchers have assessed the delivery of therapeutic genes for corneal diseases and disorders due to trauma, infections, chemical, mechanical, and surgical injury, and/or abnormal wound healing. This review provides an update on the developments in gene therapy for corneal diseases and discusses the barriers that hinder its utilization for delivering genes in the cornea.

  16. Gene Therapy in the Cornea: 2005-present

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rajiv R.; Tovey, Jonathan C.K.; Sharma, Ajay; Tandon, Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Successful restoration of vision in human patients with gene therapy affirmed its promise to cure ocular diseases and disorders. The efficacy of gene therapy is contingent upon vector and mode of therapeutic DNA introduction into targeted cells/tissues. The cornea is an ideal tissue for gene therapy due to its ease of access and relative immune-privilege. Considerable progress has been made in the field of corneal gene therapy in last 5 years. Several new gene transfer vectors, techniques and approaches have evolved. Although corneal gene therapy is still in its early stages of development, the potential of gene-based interventions to treat corneal abnormalities have begun to surface. Identification of next generation viral and nanoparticle vectors, characterization of delivered gene levels, localization, and duration in the cornea, and significant success in controlling corneal disorders, particularly fibrosis and angiogenesis, in experimental animal disease models, with no major side effects have propelled gene therapy a step closer towards establishing gene-based therapies for corneal blindness. Recently, researchers have assessed the delivery of therapeutic genes for corneal diseases and disorders due to trauma, infections, chemical, mechanical, and surgical injury, and/or abnormal wound healing. This review provides an update on the developments in gene therapy for corneal diseases and discusses the barriers that hinder its utilization for delivering genes in the cornea. PMID:21967960

  17. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Korashon Lynn; Adair, Jennifer; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy remains a highly attractive treatment option for many disorders including hematologic conditions, immunodeficiencies including HIV/AIDS, and other genetic disorders like lysosomal storage diseases, among others. In this review, we discuss the successes, side effects, and limitations of current gene therapy protocols. In addition, we describe the opportunities presented by implementing ex vivo expansion of gene-modified HSCs, as well as summarize the most promising ex vivo expansion techniques currently available. We conclude by discussing how some of the current limitations of HSC gene therapy could be overcome by combining novel HSC expansion strategies with gene therapy. PMID:21999373

  18. Gene therapy for bone healing.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher H

    2010-06-23

    Clinical problems in bone healing include large segmental defects, spinal fusions, and the nonunion and delayed union of fractures. Gene-transfer technologies have the potential to aid healing by permitting the local delivery and sustained expression of osteogenic gene products within osseous lesions. Key questions for such an approach include the choice of transgene, vector and gene-transfer strategy. Most experimental data have been obtained using cDNAs encoding osteogenic growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), BMP-4 and BMP-7, in conjunction with both nonviral and viral vectors using in vivo and ex vivo delivery strategies. Proof of principle has been convincingly demonstrated in small-animal models. Relatively few studies have used large animals, but the results so far are encouraging. Once a reliable method has been developed, it will be necessary to perform detailed pharmacological and toxicological studies, as well as satisfy other demands of the regulatory bodies, before human clinical trials can be initiated. Such studies are very expensive and often protracted. Thus, progress in developing a clinically useful gene therapy for bone healing is determined not only by scientific considerations, but also by financial constraints and the ambient regulatory environment.

  19. Gene therapy for bone healing

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical problems in bone healing include large segmental defects, nonunion and delayed union of fractures, and spinal fusions. Gene-transfer technologies have the potential to aid healing by permitting the local delivery and sustained expression of osteogenic gene products within osseous lesions. Key questions for such an approach include the choice of transgene, vector and gene-transfer strategy. Most experimental data have been obtained using cDNAs encoding osteogenic growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), BMP-4 and BMP-7, in conjunction with both nonviral and viral vectors using in vivo and ex vivo delivery strategies. Proof of principle has been convincingly demonstrated in small-animal models. Relatively few studies have used large animals, but the results so far are encouraging. Once a reliable method has been developed, it will be necessary to perform detailed pharmacological and toxicological studies, as well as satisfy other demands of the regulatory bodies, before human clinical trials can be initiated. Such studies are very expensive and often protracted. Thus, progress in developing a clinically useful gene therapy for bone healing is determined not only by scientific considerations, but also by financial constraints and the ambient regulatory environment. PMID:20569532

  20. [Synergistic role between rhIL-2 and adriamycin long circulating temperature-sensitive liposome in targeting therapy on tumor].

    PubMed

    Dong, Lan-feng; Mei, He-shan; Song, Shu-xia; Lu, Zhan-jun

    2005-05-01

    To observe the synergistic role between rhIL-2 and adriamycin long circulating temperature-sensitive liposome (ALTSL) in targeting therapy of H22 tumor-bearing mice and explore their anti-tumor mechanism. The antitumor activity was evaluated by using the tumor's weight as an index. The prolongation rate of mouse life was calculated according to the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice. The killer activity of NK cells and the lymphocyte transformation rate were detected by the LDH and MTT colorimetry, respectively. The apoptosis of tumor cells and the expression of p53, Fas, Fas-L and Caspase-3 were analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM). The expression of IL-2 mRNA and IL-12 mRNA in splenocytes was determined by RT-PCR. The pathologic changes of tumor, heart, liver and kidney tissues of the tumor-bearing mice were observed under light microscope. The tumoristatic rate of rhIL-2+ALTSL (73.5%) was higher than that of adriamycin liposome (ADML) group (67.0%). The survival time of tumor-bearing mice in ALTSL and rhIL-2+ALTSL groups was significantly extended as compared with the NS group (treated with normal saline) and the free ADM group (P <0.01 or P <0.05). The killer activities of NK cells of ALTSL group and rhIL-2+ALTSL group were higher than those of the NS and free ADM groups, and was highest in rhIL-2+ALTSL group. The lymphocyte transformation rate of ALTSL+rhIL-2 group markedly increased ( P <0.01) as compared with the free ADM group. The result of RT-PCR indicated that the expression of IL-2 mRNA and IL-12 mRNA in splenocytes in the adriamycin long circulating liposome (ALCL) group was significantly higher than that in the free ADM group. The enhancement of rhIL-2+ALTSL on expression of IL-2 mRNA and IL-12 mRNA was much stronger than that of ALTSL alone. The pathological examination indicated that in rhIL-2+ALTSL group, the tumor cells were mostly destroyed, and a large amount of lymphocytes and monocytes were found in tumor tissue. ALTSL can increase the anti

  1. Gene therapy for obesity: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2014-06-01

    Advances in understanding the molecular basis of obesity and obesity-associated diseases have made gene therapy a vital approach in coping with this world-wide epidemic. Gene therapy for obesity aims to increase or decrease gene product in favor of lipolysis and energy expenditure, leading toward fat reduction and loss of body weight. It involves successful delivery and expression of therapeutic genes in appropriate cells. The ultimate goal of gene therapy is to restore and maintain energy homeostasis. Here we summarize progress made in recent years in identifying genes responsible for obesity and present examples where the gene therapy approach has been applied to treating or preventing obesity. Discussion on advantages and limitations of gene therapy strategies employed is provided. The intent of this review is to inspire further studies toward the development of new strategies for successful treatment of obesity and obesity-associated diseases.

  2. Gene therapy for allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Wu, Si-Jie; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2009-06-01

    Allergic diseases, such as allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, conjunctivitis, urticaria, food allergy, and/or anaphylaxis, are associated with the skewing of immune responses towards a T helper 2 (TH2) phenotype, resulting in eosinophilic inflammation. TH2 cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13, promote IgE production, mast cell differentiation, and eosinophil growth, migration and activation which then lead to the pathologic abnormalities in allergic diseases. Moreover, the impaired function of regulatory T cells has been noted in allergic diseases. To date, treatments for allergic diseases, such as antihistamines, corticosteroids, bronchodilators and some allergen-specific immunotherapy, are effective but costly and require long-term and recurrent drug administration. Gene therapy has been shown to be an easy, effective, and convenient treatment by delivering the allergen or the therapeutic protein in the form of plasmid DNA in vivo to modulate allergic immune responses. We summarize here the recent advances of gene therapy in allergic diseases and discuss the challenges in clinical application.

  3. Boron neutron capture therapy demonstrated in mice bearing EMT6 tumors following selective delivery of boron by rationally designed liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kueffer, Peter J.; Maitz, Charles A.; Khan, Aslam A.; Schuster, Seth A.; Shlyakhtina, Natalia I.; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Brockman, John D.; Nigg, David W.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick

    2013-01-01

    The application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) following liposomal delivery of a 10B-enriched polyhedral borane and a carborane against mouse mammary adenocarcinoma solid tumors was investigated. Unilamellar liposomes with a mean diameter of 134 nm or less, composed of an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and incorporating Na3[1-(2′-B10H9)-2-NH3B10H8] in the aqueous interior and K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer, were injected into the tail veins of female BALB/c mice bearing right flank EMT6 tumors. Biodistribution studies indicated that two identical injections given 24 h apart resulted in tumor boron levels exceeding 67 µg/g tumor at 54 h—with tumor/blood boron ratios being greatest at 96 h (5.68:1; 43 µg boron/g tumor)—following the initial injection. For BNCT experiments, tumor-bearing mice were irradiated 54 h after the initial injection for 30 min with thermal neutrons, resulting in a total fluence of 1.6 × 1012 neutrons per cm2 (±7%). Significant suppression of tumor growth was observed in mice given BNCT vs. control mice (only 424% increase in tumor volume at 14 d post irradiation vs. 1551% in untreated controls). In a separate experiment in which mice were given a second injection/irradiation treatment 7 d after the first, the tumor growth was vastly diminished (186% tumor volume increase at 14 d). A similar response was obtained for mice irradiated for 60 min (169% increase at 14 d), suggesting that neutron fluence was the limiting factor controlling BNCT efficacy in this study. PMID:23536304

  4. Boron neutron capture therapy demonstrated in mice bearing EMT6 tumors following selective delivery of boron by rationally designed liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kueffer, Peter J; Maitz, Charles A; Khan, Aslam A; Schuster, Seth A; Shlyakhtina, Natalia I; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Brockman, John D; Nigg, David W; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2013-04-16

    The application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) following liposomal delivery of a (10)B-enriched polyhedral borane and a carborane against mouse mammary adenocarcinoma solid tumors was investigated. Unilamellar liposomes with a mean diameter of 134 nm or less, composed of an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and incorporating Na3[1-(2'-B10H9)-2-NH3B10H8] in the aqueous interior and K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer, were injected into the tail veins of female BALB/c mice bearing right flank EMT6 tumors. Biodistribution studies indicated that two identical injections given 24 h apart resulted in tumor boron levels exceeding 67 µg/g tumor at 54 h--with tumor/blood boron ratios being greatest at 96 h (5.68:1; 43 µg boron/g tumor)--following the initial injection. For BNCT experiments, tumor-bearing mice were irradiated 54 h after the initial injection for 30 min with thermal neutrons, resulting in a total fluence of 1.6 × 10(12) neutrons per cm(2) (±7%). Significant suppression of tumor growth was observed in mice given BNCT vs. control mice (only 424% increase in tumor volume at 14 d post irradiation vs. 1551% in untreated controls). In a separate experiment in which mice were given a second injection/irradiation treatment 7 d after the first, the tumor growth was vastly diminished (186% tumor volume increase at 14 d). A similar response was obtained for mice irradiated for 60 min (169% increase at 14 d), suggesting that neutron fluence was the limiting factor controlling BNCT efficacy in this study.

  5. Nanoparticle-based Technologies for Retinal Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Adijanto, Jeffrey; Naash, Muna I

    2015-01-01

    For patients with hereditary retinal diseases, retinal gene therapy offers significant promise for the prevention of retinal degeneration. While adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based systems remain the most popular gene delivery method due to their high efficiency and successful clinical results, other delivery systems, such as non-viral nanoparticles (NPs) are being developed as additional therapeutic options. NP technologies come in several categories (e.g., polymer, liposomes, peptide compacted DNA), several of which have been tested in mouse models of retinal disease. Here, we discuss the key biochemical features of the different NPs that influence how they are internalized into cells, escape from endosomes, and are delivered into the nucleus. We review the primary mechanism of NP uptake by retinal cells and highlight various NPs that have been successfully used for in vivo gene delivery to the retina and RPE. Finally, we consider the various strategies that can be implemented in the plasmid DNA to generate persistent, high levels of gene expression. PMID:25592325

  6. Synthesis and characterization of ultrasound imageable heat-sensitive liposomes for HIFU therapy

    PubMed Central

    Maples, Danny; Mclean, Kevin; Sahoo, Kaustuv; Newhardt, Ryan; Venkatesan, Perumal; Wood, Bradford; Ranjan, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective Novel approaches allowing efficient, readily-translatable image-guided drug delivery (IGDD) against solid tumors is needed. The objectives of this study were to: 1) develop echogenic low temperature sensitive liposomes (E-LTSLs) loaded with an ultrasound (US) contrast agent (perfluoropentane, PFP), 2) determine the in vitro and in vivo stability of contrast agent encapsulation, 3) co-encapsulate and characterize doxorubicin (Dox) E-LTSL, and cellular uptake and cytotoxicity in combination with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Method E-LTSLs were loaded passively with PFP and actively with Dox. PFP encapsulation in E-LTSL was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and US imageability was determined in tissue mimicking phantoms and mouse tumor model. Dox release from E-LTSL in physiological buffer was quantified by fluorescence spectroscopy. Cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of E-LTSL in presence of HIFU-induced mild hyperthermia (~40–42°C) was determined in a 3D-tumor spheroid model. Results TEM & US confirmed that the PFP emulsion was contained within LTSLs. Phantom and animal studies showed that the E-LTSLs were echogenic. Temperature versus size increase and Dox release kinetics of E-LTSLs demonstrated no difference compared to LTSL alone. Dox release was < 5% within 1 h at baseline (25 °C) and body (37°C) temperatures, and was > 99% under hyperthermia. E-LTSL plus HIFU achieved significantly greater Dox uptake in spheroids and cytotoxicity compared to body temperature. Conclusion A stable US-imageable liposome co-loaded with Dox and PFP for in vivo IGDD was developed. Data suggest that HIFU can induce cellular uptake and toxicity with E-LTSLs. PMID:26185910

  7. Recent progress in cerebrovascular gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoyuki; Shimamura, Munehisa; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2005-07-01

    Gene therapy provides a potential strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular disease such as peripheral arterial disease, myocardial infarction, restenosis after angioplasty, and vascular bypass graft occlusion. Currently, more than 20 clinical studies of gene therapy for cardiovascular disease are in progress. Although cerebrovascular gene therapy has not proceeded to clinical trials, in contrast to cardiovascular gene therapy, there have been several trials in experimental models. Three major potential targets for cerebrovascular gene therapy are vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), ischemic cerebrovascular disease, and restenosis after angioplasty, for which current therapy is often inadequate. In experimental SAH models, strategies using genes encoding a vasodilating protein or decoy oligodeoxynucleotides have been reported to be effective against vasospasm after SAH. In experimental ischemic cerebrovascular disease, gene therapy using growth factors, such as Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), or Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), has been reported to be effective for neuroprotection and angiogenesis. Nevertheless, cerebrovascular gene therapy for clinical human treatment still has some problems, such as transfection efficiency and the safety of vectors. Development of an effective and safe delivery system for a target gene will make human cerebrovascular gene therapy possible.

  8. Immunomodulatory gene therapy in lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Kishnani, Priya S

    2009-12-01

    Significant advances in therapy for lysosomal storage disorders have occurred with an accelerating pace over the past decade. Although enzyme replacement therapy has improved the outcome of lysosomal storage disorders, antibody responses have occurred and sometimes prevented efficacy, especially in cross-reacting immune material negative patients with Pompe disease. Preclinical gene therapy experiments have revealed the relevance of immune responses to long-term efficacy. The choice of regulatory cassette played a critical role in evading humoral and cellular immune responses to gene therapy in knockout mouse models, at least in adult animals. Liver-specific regulatory cassettes prevented antibody formation and enhanced the efficacy of gene therapy. Regulatory T cells prevented transgene directed immune responses, as shown by adoptive transfer of antigen-specific immune tolerance to enzyme therapy. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a very low vector dose could enhance the efficacy of enzyme therapy in Pompe disease and other lysosomal storage disorders.

  9. Immunomodulatory gene therapy in lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Koeberl, D.D.; Kishnani, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Significant advances in therapy for lysosomal storage disorders have occurred with an accelerating pace over the past decade. Although enzyme replacement therapy has improved the outcome of lysosomal storage disorders, antibody responses have occurred and sometimes prevented efficacy, especially in cross-reacting immune material negative patients with Pompe disease. Preclinical gene therapy experiments have revealed the relevance of immune responses to long-term efficacy. The choice of regulatory cassette played a critical role in evading humoral and cellular immune responses to gene therapy in knockout mouse models, at least in adult animals. Liver-specific regulatory cassettes prevented antibody formation and enhanced the efficacy of gene therapy. Regulatory T cells prevented transgene directed immune responses, as shown by adoptive transfer of antigen-specific immune tolerance to enzyme therapy. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a very low vector dose could enhance the efficacy of enzyme therapy in Pompe disease and other lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:19807648

  10. Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    AD AWARD NUMBER DAMD17-97-1-7232 TITLE: Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jinha M. Park CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...FUNDING NUMBERS Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer DAMD17-97-1-7232 6. AUTHOR(S) Jinha M. Park 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...of surface mAb has been internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis. These mAbs show promise in the specific delivery of gene therapy vectors

  11. Cardiac gene therapy: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Matkar, P N; Leong-Poi, H; Singh, K K

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing throughout the world and is associated with elevated morbidity and mortality. Gene therapy to treat cardiac dysfunction is gaining importance because of the limited therapeutic benefit offered by pharmacotherapies. The growing knowledge of the complex signaling pathways and the development of sophisticated vectors and delivery systems, are facilitating identification and targeting of specific molecular candidates involved in initiation and progression of CVDs. Several preclinical and clinical studies have shown the therapeutic efficiency of gene therapy in different disease models and patients. Hence, gene therapy might plausibly become an unconventional treatment modality for CVD patients. In this review, we summarize the gene delivery carriers, modes of delivery, recent preclinical/clinical studies and potential therapeutic targets. We also briefly discuss the existing limitations of gene therapy, technical challenges surrounding gene carriers and delivery systems, and some approaches to overcome these limitations for bringing CVD gene therapy one step closer to reality.

  12. Update on clinical gene therapy in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Waseem; Gaspar, H Bobby; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2007-01-01

    The successful use of gene therapy to correct rare immune system disorders has highlighted the enormous potential of such therapies. We review the current state of gene therapy for childhood immune system disorders, and consider why these conditions have been particularly amenable to genetic correction. As with all emerging therapies, there have been unexpected side effects and their underlying mechanisms are the subject of intense research. Minimising such risks through improved vector design will play an important role in developing the next generation of gene based therapies and extending their applicability. PMID:17954483

  13. Enhanced gene delivery efficiency of cationic liposomes coated with PEGylated hyaluronic acid for anti P-glycoprotein siRNA: a potential candidate for overcoming multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Ran, Rui; Liu, Yayuan; Gao, Huile; Kuang, Qifang; Zhang, Qianyu; Tang, Jie; Huang, Kai; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2014-12-30

    RNA interference is an effective method to achieve highly specific gene regulation. However, the commonly used cationic liposomes have poor biocompatibility, which may lead to systematic siRNA delivery of no avail. PEGylation is a good strategy in shielding the positive charge of cationic liposomes, but the enhanced serum stability is often in company with compromised cellular uptake and endosome escape. In this study, PEG was covalently linked to negatively charged hyaluronic acid and it was used to coat the liposome-siRNA nanoparticles. The resulting PEG-HA-NP complex had a diameter of 188.6 ± 10.8 nm and a dramatically declined zeta-potential from +34.9 ± 4.0 mV to -18.2 ± 2.2 mV. Owing to the reversed surface charge, PEG-HA-NP could remain stable in fetal bovine serum (FBS) to up to 24h. In contrast with normal PEGylation, hyaluronic acid and PEG co-modified PEG-HA-NP provided comparable cellular uptake and P-glycoprotein downregulation efficacy in MCF-7/ADR cells compared with Lipofectamine RNAiMAX and naked NP regardless of its anionic charged surface. Because of its good biocompatibility in serum, PEG-HA-NP possessed the best tumor accumulation, cellular uptake and subsequently the strongest P-glycoprotein silencing capability in tumor bearing mice compared with naked NP and HA-NP after i.v. injection, with a 34% P-glycoprotein downregulation. Therefore, PEG-HA coated liposomal complex was demonstrated to be a promising siRNA delivery system in adjusting solid tumor P-glycoprotein expression, which may become a potential carrier in reversing MDR for breast cancer therapy.

  14. Gene based therapies for kidney regeneration.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Manoe J; Arcolino, Fanny O; Schoor, Perry; Kok, Robbert Jan; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-11-05

    In this review we provide an overview of the expanding molecular toolbox that is available for gene based therapies and how these therapies can be used for a large variety of kidney diseases. Gene based therapies range from restoring gene function in genetic kidney diseases to steering complex molecular pathways in chronic kidney disorders, and can provide a treatment or cure for diseases that otherwise may not be targeted. This approach involves the delivery of recombinant DNA sequences harboring therapeutic genes to improve cell function and thereby promote kidney regeneration. Depending on the therapy, the recombinant DNA will express a gene that directly plays a role in the function of the cell (gene addition), that regulates the expression of an endogenous gene (gene regulation), or that even changes the DNA sequence of endogenous genes (gene editing). Some interventions involve permanent changes in the genome whereas others are only temporary and leave no trace. Efficient and safe delivery are important steps for all gene based therapies and also depend on the mode of action of the therapeutic gene. Here we provide examples on how the different methods can be used to treat various diseases, which technologies are now emerging (such as gene repair through CRISPR/Cas9) and what the opportunities, perspectives, potential and the limitations of these therapies are for the treatment of kidney diseases.

  15. Increased liposome-mediated gene transfer into haematopoietic cells grown in adhesion to stromal or fibroblast cell line monolayers.

    PubMed

    Marit, G; Cao, Y; Froussard, P; Ripoche, J; Dupouy, M; Elandaloussi, A; Lacombe, F; Mahon, F X; Keller, H; Pla, M; Reiffers, J; Theze, J

    2000-01-01

    We investigated transfection rates of CD34+ haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) or haematopoietic cell lines (TF-1, KG1a and K562) using the LacZ gene as a reporter and cationic liposomes. The transfection efficiency of CD34+ haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) or TF-1, KG1a and K562 grown in suspension is very low (average percentage of 0.013 for HPC and 0.03 for cell lines). Adhesion of HPC or cell lines to plates by immunological or physical methods significantly enhances transfection efficiency; however, the percentage of transfected cells still remained low. We found that adhesion of TF-1, KG1a and K562 HC to MS-5 stroma cells or NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells increased transfection efficiency. Under these conditions transfection is achieved in 11.2-25% (mean 18.30%) for the cell lines and 13.6% (range 8.2-24.2%) for CD34+ HPC. These results indicate that liposome-mediated transfection of HC is significantly increased when cells are grown in adherence to stroma or fibroblast monolayers.

  16. Gene therapy returns to centre stage.

    PubMed

    Naldini, Luigi

    2015-10-15

    Recent clinical trials of gene therapy have shown remarkable therapeutic benefits and an excellent safety record. They provide evidence for the long-sought promise of gene therapy to deliver 'cures' for some otherwise terminal or severely disabling conditions. Behind these advances lie improved vector designs that enable the safe delivery of therapeutic genes to specific cells. Technologies for editing genes and correcting inherited mutations, the engagement of stem cells to regenerate tissues and the effective exploitation of powerful immune responses to fight cancer are also contributing to the revitalization of gene therapy.

  17. Towards gene therapy for deafness.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Marina; Ricciardi, Carmela; Martone, Tiziana; Mazzarella, Nicoletta; Cassandro, Claudia; Chiarella, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Luigi; Cassandro, Ettore

    2011-10-01

    Many hearing disorders are associated with the damage or loss of sensory hair cells (HC) which can produce a profound and irreversible deafness. Apoptosis pathway is reported to play an important role leading to rapid expansion of the HC lesion after exposure to intense noise. Furthermore, progress made over the last year in understanding molecular mechanisms involved in the proliferative and regenerative capacity of sensory cells in the mammalian inner ear has raised the possibility that targeted therapies might prevent the loss of these cells and preserve the patient's hearing. A first step towards the successful therapeutic exploitation is a better understanding of the different pathways that control survival and proliferation of sensory cells. In this review, we provide an overview of recent findings concerning the possibility to prevent apoptosis in auditory cells. We also show the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in the potential regenerative behavior of these cells and the progress of gene therapy to prevent deafness noise-induced.

  18. A gold nanoshell with a silica inner shell synthesized using liposome templates for doxorubicin loading and near-infrared photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Congyu; Yu, Cong; Chu, Maoquan

    2011-01-01

    Gold (Au) nanoshells with solid silica cores have great potential for cancer photothermal therapy. However, this nanostructure cannot carry enough drugs. Here, we report a Au nanoshell with a hollow silica core for drug loading and cancer therapy. The silica shells were synthesized using nanoliposome templates, and then Au nanoshells were grown on the outer surface of the silica shells. Transmission-electron and scanning-electron microscopy showed that the Au nanoshells were successfully fabricated, and that the liposome/SiO(2)/Au core-shell nanocomposites were spherical with a narrow size distribution. Images of several broken spheres, and the fact that hollow templates (liposomes) were used, suggest that the fabricated Au nanoshells were hollow. After doxorubicin (DOX) was incorporated into liposome/SiO(2)/Au, the DOX-loaded Au nanoshells killed cancer cells with high therapeutic efficacy when irradiated with near-infrared light, suggesting that the Au nanoshells delivered both DOX chemotherapy and photothermal therapy with a synergistic effect.

  19. NIR-Laser-Controlled Drug Release from DOX/IR-780-Loaded Temperature-Sensitive-Liposomes for Chemo-Photothermal Synergistic Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Duan, Wanlu; Li, Yekuo; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Yuli; Pan, Min; Liu, Hongmei; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-01-01

    NIR laser-induced photothermal therapy (PTT) through near-infrared agents has demonstrated the great potential in solid tumor ablation. However, the nonuniform heat distribution over tumors from PTT makes it insufficient to kill all tumor cells, resulting in tumor recurrence and inferior outcomes. To improve the tumor treatment efficacy, it is highly desirable to develop the combinational treatment of PTT with other modalities, especially with chemotherapeutic agents. Here we report a smart DOX/IR-780-loaded temperature-sensitive-liposome (DITSL) which can achieve NIR-laser-controlled drug release for chemo-photothermal synergistic tumor therapy. In this system, the liposoluble IR-780 was incorporated into the temperature-sensitive lipid bilayer and the soluble chemotherapeutic doxorubicin (DOX) was encapsulated in the hydrophilic core. The resulting DITSL is proved to be physiologically stable and can provide a fast and laser irradiation-controllable DOX release in the PBS and cellular conditions. We further employed this nanoparticle for tumor treatment, demonstrating significantly higher tumor inhibition efficacy than that of DOX-loaded temperature-sensitive-liposome (DTSL) or IR780-loaded temperature-sensitive-liposome (ITSL) in the in vitro cells and in vivo animals. Histological analysis further revealed much more apoptotic cells, confirming the advantageous anti-tumor effect of DITSL over DTSL or ITSL. Our study provides a promising strategy to realize chemo-photothermal synergistic combination therapy for breast tumors. PMID:27877239

  20. Strategies used in the clinical trials of gene therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil Ananthanarayanan

    2015-01-01

    Advances in understanding and manipulating genes have set the stage for scientists to alter a person's genetic material to prevent or treat diseases. Over the past decade, somatic gene therapy has been increasingly applied in clinical trials where the genetic material (DNA and RNA) introduced into a person's cell. Mutation and inactivation of the tumor suppressor genes are the unified concept of the development of tumor in humans. Therefore, researchers have discovered potential of gene therapies in the treatment of cancer. Among the clinical trials of gene therapy conducted so far, approximately 66% were for the treatment of cancer which includes cancer of prostate, head and neck, kidneys, lungs, breast and skin. Introducing a wild type p53 gene, enhancing the immune system to protect against the cancer cells, enhancing the apoptosis of cancer cells and inhibiting the process of angiogenesis in the tumor are some of the clinical trials that are achieved through the gene therapy. Broad spectrum of delivery constructs, including viral vectors, liposomes, cationic polymers and dendrimers, cell-penetrating peptides, semiconductor quantum dots, and gold and magnetic nanoparticles have been investigated. A well designed vector is the most forward approach to increase the safety of gene therapy. Though, Gendicine and Oncorine have been marketed, gene therapy is still in its infancy stages in cancer research. More experimental and clinical trials using well-designed and effective doses of vectors are needed to ensure the therapeutic efficacy of gene therapy for its clinical use against a wide variety of cancers. This review article discuses about the various strategies used in clinical trials of gene therapy for cancer.

  1. Approaches to mitochondrial gene therapy.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Gerard G M; Weissig, Volkmar

    2004-09-01

    Since their discovery during the end of the 80's the number of diseases found to be associated with defects in the mitochondrial genome has grown significantly. Organs affected by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) include in decreasing order of vulnerability the brain, skeletal muscle, heart, kidney and liver. Hence neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases represent the two largest groups of mtDNA diseases. Despite major advances in understanding mtDNA defects at the genetic and biochemical level, there is however no satisfactory treatment available to the vast majority of patients. This is largely due to the fact that most of these patients have respiratory chain defects, i.e. defects that involve the final common pathway of oxidative metabolism, making it impossible to bypass the defect by administering alternative metabolic carriers of energy. Conventional biochemical treatment having reached an impasse, the exploration of gene therapeutic approaches for patients with mtDNA defects is warranted. For now mitochondrial gene therapy appears to be only theoretical and speculative. Any possibility for gene replacement is dependent on the development of an efficient mitochondrial transfection vector. In this review we describe the current state of the development of mitochondria-specific DNA delivery systems. We summarize our own efforts in exploring the properties of dequalinium and other similar cationic bolaamphiphiles with delocalized charge centers, for the design of a vector suited for the transport of DNA to mitochondria in living cells. Further, we outline some unique hurdles that need to be overcome if the development of such delivery systems is to progress.

  2. Gene therapy oversight: lessons for nanobiotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Susan M; Gupta, Rishi; Kohlhepp, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Oversight of human gene transfer research ("gene therapy") presents an important model with potential application to oversight of nanobiology research on human participants. Gene therapy oversight adds centralized federal review at the National Institutes of Health's Office of Biotechnology Activities and its Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee to standard oversight of human subjects research at the researcher's institution (by the Institutional Review Board and, for some research, the Institutional Biosafety Committee) and at the federal level by the Office for Human Research Protections. The Food and Drug Administration's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research oversees human gene transfer research in parallel, including approval of protocols and regulation of products. This article traces the evolution of this dual oversight system; describes how the system is already addressing nanobiotechnology in gene transfer: evaluates gene therapy oversight based on public opinion, the literature, and preliminary expert elicitation; and offers lessons of the gene therapy oversight experience for oversight of nanobiotechnology.

  3. Correction of renal tubular acidosis in carbonic anhydrase II-deficient mice with gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, L W; Chan, D M; Erickson, R P; Hsu, S J; Lien, Y H

    1998-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) deficiency in humans is associated with a syndrome of renal tubular acidosis, osteopetrosis, and cerebral calcification. A strain of mice of CAII deficiency due to a point mutation also manifests renal tubular acidosis. We report here that retrograde injection of cationic liposome complexed with a CAII chimeric gene, using a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter/enhancer as an expression cassette to drive human CAII cDNA, into the renal pelvis of CAII-deficient mice results in expression of CAII in the kidney. The levels of both the CAII gene and its corresponding mRNA were highest by day 3 after treatment, diminishing thereafter, but remaining detectable by 1 mo. After gene therapy, CAII-deficient mice restored the ability to acidify urine after oral administration of ammonium chloride. The ability to acidify urine was maintained at 3 wk after gene therapy, and was eventually lost by 6 wk. Immunohistochemistry studies using anti-CAII antibodies showed that CAII was expressed in tubular cells of the outer medulla and corticomedullary junction. The gene therapy was not associated with nephrotoxicity as assessed by blood urea nitrogen levels and renal histology. To our knowledge, this is the first successful gene therapy of a genetic renal disease. Our results demonstrate the potential of gene therapy as a novel treatment for hereditary renal tubular defects. PMID:9525974

  4. Current status of gene therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Walther, Wolfgang; Schlag, Peter M

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, remarkable progress has been made in the development of cancer gene therapy into an applicable treatment modality for immunogene, suicide, gene correction and oncolytic therapies. New exciting developments for gene suppression or miRNA therapies are under way. The efforts are focused on more efficient and specific attack at known and novel targets, improvement of vector delivery and therapeutic efficacy. In this review, promising and new gene therapy approaches and clinical studies are briefly discussed to highlight important future directions of preclinical and clinical efforts. Apart from progress for vector development and even more important, improvements for suicide, T-cell-based, oncolytic virus therapies were achieved. In addition, new emerging therapies are successfully developed, which are particularly promising for siRNA-based technologies applied to gene suppression therapy. Novel approaches, such as transcription factor ODN-based decoy, complement the spectrum of current cancer gene therapy. In summary, cancer gene therapy has made remarkable progress in the improvement/refinement of existing strategies and delivery systems. The field is moving toward a therapeutic option, which will also be applicable for the treatment of disseminated metastases. Furthermore, numerous new approaches are about to be translated in clinical trials.

  5. Therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy mediated by boron-rich liposomes for oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model.

    PubMed

    Heber, Elisa M; Hawthorne, M Frederick; Kueffer, Peter J; Garabalino, Marcela A; Thorp, Silvia I; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Maitz, Charles A; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Nigg, David W; Curotto, Paula; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2014-11-11

    The application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) mediated by liposomes containing (10)B-enriched polyhedral borane and carborane derivatives for the treatment of head and neck cancer in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model is presented. These liposomes are composed of an equimolar ratio of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] (MAC) in the bilayer membrane while encapsulating the hydrophilic species Na3[ae-B20H17NH3] (TAC) in the aqueous core. Unilamellar liposomes with a mean diameter of 83 nm were administered i.v. in hamsters. After 48 h, the boron concentration in tumors was 67 ± 16 ppm whereas the precancerous tissue contained 11 ± 6 ppm, and the tumor/normal pouch tissue boron concentration ratio was 10:1. Neutron irradiation giving a 5-Gy dose to precancerous tissue (corresponding to 21 Gy in tumor) resulted in an overall tumor response (OR) of 70% after a 4-wk posttreatment period. In contrast, the beam-only protocol gave an OR rate of only 28%. Once-repeated BNCT treatment with readministration of liposomes at an interval of 4, 6, or 8 wk resulted in OR rates of 70-88%, of which the complete response ranged from 37% to 52%. Because of the good therapeutic outcome, it was possible to extend the follow-up of BNCT treatment groups to 16 wk after the first treatment. No radiotoxicity to normal tissue was observed. A salient advantage of these liposomes was that only mild mucositis was observed in dose-limiting precancerous tissue with a sustained tumor response of 70-88%.

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy mediated by boron-rich liposomes for oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model

    PubMed Central

    Heber, Elisa M.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Kueffer, Peter J.; Garabalino, Marcela A.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Pozzi, Emiliano C. C.; Hughes, Andrea Monti; Maitz, Charles A.; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Nigg, David W.; Curotto, Paula; Trivillin, Verónica A.; Schwint, Amanda E.

    2014-01-01

    The application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) mediated by liposomes containing 10B-enriched polyhedral borane and carborane derivatives for the treatment of head and neck cancer in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model is presented. These liposomes are composed of an equimolar ratio of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] (MAC) in the bilayer membrane while encapsulating the hydrophilic species Na3[ae-B20H17NH3] (TAC) in the aqueous core. Unilamellar liposomes with a mean diameter of 83 nm were administered i.v. in hamsters. After 48 h, the boron concentration in tumors was 67 ± 16 ppm whereas the precancerous tissue contained 11 ± 6 ppm, and the tumor/normal pouch tissue boron concentration ratio was 10:1. Neutron irradiation giving a 5-Gy dose to precancerous tissue (corresponding to 21 Gy in tumor) resulted in an overall tumor response (OR) of 70% after a 4-wk posttreatment period. In contrast, the beam-only protocol gave an OR rate of only 28%. Once-repeated BNCT treatment with readministration of liposomes at an interval of 4, 6, or 8 wk resulted in OR rates of 70–88%, of which the complete response ranged from 37% to 52%. Because of the good therapeutic outcome, it was possible to extend the follow-up of BNCT treatment groups to 16 wk after the first treatment. No radiotoxicity to normal tissue was observed. A salient advantage of these liposomes was that only mild mucositis was observed in dose-limiting precancerous tissue with a sustained tumor response of 70–88%. PMID:25349432

  7. Intracellular trafficking mechanism of cationic phospholipids including cationic liposomes in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Un, K; Sakai-Kato, K; Goda, Y

    2014-07-01

    The development of gene delivery methods is essential for the achievement of effective gene therapy. Elucidation of the intracellular transfer mechanism for cationic carriers is in progress, but there are few reports regarding the intracellular trafficking processes of the cationic phospholipids taken up into cells. In the present work, the trafficking processes of a cationic phospholipid (1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, DOTAP) were investigated from intracellular uptake to extracellular efflux using cationic liposomes in vitro. Following intracellular transport of liposomes via endocytosis, DOTAP was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and mitochondria. Moreover, the proteins involved in DOTAP intracellular trafficking and extracellular efflux were identified. In addition, helper lipids of cationic liposomes were found to partially affect this intracellulartrafficking. These findings might provide valuable information for designing cationic carriers and avoiding unexpected toxic side effects derived from cationic liposomal components.

  8. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    PubMed

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  9. Gene therapy for high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Natsume, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of high-grade gliomas remains difficult despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. True advances may emerge from the increasing understanding in molecular biology and discovery of novel mechanisms for the delivery of tumoricidal agents. In an attempt to overcome this formidable neoplasm, molecular approaches using gene therapy have been investigated clinically since 1992. The clinical trials have mainly been classified into three approaches: suicide gene therapy, immune gene therapy and oncolytic viral therapy. In this article, we review these approaches, which have been studied in previous and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:19262115

  10. Preparation and characterization of gemcitabine liposome injections.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinmei; Liu, Liucheng; Zhang, Dengshan; Fan, Xingfeng

    2012-10-01

    Gemcitabine liposome injection (stealth liposomes) has facilitated the targeting of gemcitabine for cancer treatment. We systemically review liposome-based drug-delivery systems, which can improve pharmacokinetics, reduce side effects and potentially increase tumor uptake, for pancreatic cancer therapy. A novel liposomal formulation, which allows for higher tumor targeting efficiencies and can be used in current clinical trials to treat this challenging disease, has gained great popularity and attention. In this study, since extrusion technology was used to make sterile preparation of liposomes, the process included aseptic production process and sterile filtration. During the preparation, it has been found that the lipid concentration, emulsification speed and time, the homogenization times and pattern, the lipid solution temperature are all critical parameters for the character of the gemcitabine liposome injection. The particle size method and zeta potential method to characterize a PEGylated liposomal drug formulation of the anti-cancer agent gemcitabine was developed. The methods are specific, precise, reproducible and sensitive, therefore they are suitable for the determination of particle size and zeta potential of gemcitabine liposome injection. Negative staining technology of transmission electron microscopy revealed that gemcitabine liposome injection has a typical morphology, which enables liposomal surfaces could be seen so additional visual information on the stealth liposome can be routinely obtained in a fast and reliable manner. Moreover, the above three methods are simple, fast and would be used for continuous quality control of gemcitabine liposome injection when it moves to cGMP production scale.

  11. Engineering Factor Viii for Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sean A.; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni A.; Moore, Andrea R.; Sang, Nianli; Xiao, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A by intravenous infusion of factor VIII (fVIII) concentrates is very costly and has a potential adverse effect of developing inhibitors. Gene therapy, on the other hand, can potentially overcome these limitations associated with fVIII replacement therapy. Although hemophilia B gene therapy has achieved promising outcomes in human clinical trials, hemophilia A gene therapy lags far behind. Compared to factor IX, fVIII is a large protein which is difficult to express at sustaining therapeutic levels when delivered by either viral or non-viral vectors. To improve fVIII gene delivery, numerous strategies have been exploited to engineer the fVIII molecule and overcome the hurdles preventing long term and high level expression. Here we reviewed these strategies, and discussed their pros and cons in human gene therapy of hemophilia A. PMID:23565342

  12. Cancer gene therapy targeting cellular apoptosis machinery.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin-Tao; Chen, Si-Yi; Yang, An-Gang

    2012-11-01

    The unraveling of cellular apoptosis machinery provides novel targets for cancer treatment, and gene therapy targeting this suicidal system has been corroborated to cause inflammation-free autonomous elimination of neoplastic cells. The apoptotic machinery can be targeted by introduction of a gene encoding an inducer, mediator or executioner of apoptotic cell death or by inhibition of anti-apoptotic gene expression. Strategies targeting cancer cells, which are achieved by selective gene delivery, specific gene expression or secretion of target proteins via genetic modification of autologous cells, dictate the outcome of apoptosis-based cancer gene therapy. Despite so far limited clinical success, gene therapy targeting the apoptotic machinery has great potential to benefit patients with threatening malignancies provided the availability of efficient and specific gene delivery and administration systems.

  13. Using PG-Liposome-Based System to Enhance Puerarin Liver-Targeted Therapy for Alcohol-Induced Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Zhang, Lu; Gupta, Pardeep K; Tian, Fu-Rong; Mao, Kai-Li; Qiu, Kai-Yan; Yang, Wei; Lv, Chuan-Zhu; Lu, Cui-Tao

    2016-12-01

    A critical issue for alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD) therapeutics is the lack of a highly efficient delivery system. In this study, a Puerarin-propylene glycol-liposome system was prepared for the purpose of targeting puerarin, an isoflavon, to the liver. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) results showed the liposomes to be spherical in shape with an average diameter of 182 nm with a polydispersity index of 0.239. The zeta potential of the particles was about -30 mV. The entrapment efficiency of puerarin was above 90%. MTT-based assay in HpeG2 cells showed no significant cytotoxicity in the presence of up to 25% concentration of the system containing 3% puerarin. In vivo performance of this system was studied in mice. Pharmacokinetics and distribution of puerarin-PG-liposome system was studied relative to puerarin solution at the same dose levels. The results show that puerarin-PG-liposome prolonged drug retention time and decreased elimination of puerarin in mice (AUC of liposome system and solution was 9.5 and 4.0 mg h L(-1), respectively). Furthermore, propylene glycol (PG)-liposome system enhanced puerarin distribution into liver and spleen, while decreasing puerarin distribution in other tissues. Overall, the puerarin-PG-liposome system showed enhanced therapeutic effect in mice with ALD.

  14. Codelivery of paclitaxel and small interfering RNA by octadecyl quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan-modified cationic liposome for combined cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ran; Wang, Shi-Bin; Chen, Ai-Zheng; Chen, Wei-Guang; Liu, Yuan-Gang; Wu, Wen-Guo; Kang, Yong-Qiang; Ye, Shi-Fu

    2015-09-01

    Conventional therapeutic approaches for cancer are limited by cancer cell resistance, which has impeded their clinical applications. The main goal of this work was to investigate the combined antitumor effect of paclitaxel with small interfering RNA modified by cationic liposome formed from modified octadecyl quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan. The cationic liposome was composed of 3β-[N-(N', N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]-cholesterol, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine, and octadecyl quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan. The cationic liposome properties were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and gel retardation assay. The cationic liposome exhibited good properties, such as a small particle size, a narrow particle size distribution, a good spherical shape, a smooth surface, and a good binding ability with small interfering RNA. Most importantly, when combined with paclitaxel and small interfering RNA, the composite cationic liposome induced a great enhancement in the antitumor activity, which showed a significantly higher in vitro cytotoxicity in Bcap-37 cells than liposomal paclitaxel or small interfering RNA alone. In conclusion, the results indicate that cationic liposome could be further developed as a codelivery system for chemotherapy drugs and therapeutic small interfering RNAs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Gene therapy for childhood immunological diseases.

    PubMed

    Kohn, D B

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy using autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that are corrected with the normal gene may have a beneficial effect on blood cell production or function, without the immunologic complications of allogeneic HSC transplantation. Childhood immunological diseases are highly favorable candidates for responses to gene therapy using HSC. Hemoglobinopathies, lysosomal and metabolic disorders and defects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells should also be ameliorated by gene therapy using autologous HSC. At present, gene therapy has been beneficial for patients with XSCID, ADA-deficient SCID and chronic granulomatous disease. The principle that partial marrow conditioning increases engraftment of gene-corrected HSC has been demonstrated. Clinical trials are being developed in Europe and the United States to treat several other genetic blood cell disorders. This progress is tempered by the serious complication observed in XSCID patients developing T lymphoproliferative disease. New methods for gene transfer (lentiviral and foamy viral vectors, semi-viral systems and gene correction) may retain or further increase the efficacy and decrease the risks from gene therapy using HSC. Ultimately, the relative benefits and risks of autologous gene therapy will be weighed against other available options (for example, allogeneic HSCT) to determine the treatment of choice.

  16. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin as Adjuvant Therapy for Stage I-III Operable Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin-Che; Ou-Yang, F U; Hsieh, Chia-Ming; Chang, King-Jen; Chen, Dar-Ren; Tu, Chi-Wen; Wang, Hwei-Chung; Hou, Ming-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Conventional anthracyclines play an essential role for the treatment of breast cancer and have potent cytotoxic activity, but are associated with severe toxicity. In metastatic breast cancer, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) is a formulation with efficacy similar to conventional doxorubicin but with reduced toxicity. This multicenter study evaluated the efficacy and safety of PLD-based adjuvant chemotherapy for women with stage I-III operable breast cancer. One hundred and eighty women with stage I-III breast cancer who received PLD-based adjuvant chemotherapy at six different Institutions in Taiwan from February 2002 to March 2008 were included and followed-up until April 2015. Treatment efficacy was determined by disease-free survival (DFS) rate and safety was evaluated by adverse events. The 5- and 10-year DFS rates were 76.3 and 72.6%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that tumor size >5 cm (p=0.045; hazard ratio=3.31) and stage III (hazard ratio=3.54; p=0.019) were each associated with shorter DFS. Only stage III (hazard ratio=5.60; p=0.018) retained statistical significance with regard to DFS in the multivariate analysis. Grade 3/4 hematological toxicity was neutropenia (n=13; 7.2%). The women receiving PLD had low-grade 3 or 4 nausea/vomiting, mucositis, and alopecia. Grade 3 hand-foot syndrome occurred in three patients (1.7%). PLD could be considered an effective and safe alternative to conventional anthracyclines in the treatment of stage I-III operable breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. Disseminated Mucormycosis With Cerebral Involvement Owing to Rhizopus Microsporus in a Kidney Recipient Treated With Combined Liposomal Amphotericin B and Posaconazole Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ville, Simon; Talarmin, Jean Philippe; Gaultier-Lintia, Alina; Bouquié, Régis; Sagan, Christine; Le Pape, Patrice; Giral, Magali; Morio, Florent

    2016-02-01

    Three months after a kidney transplant, a man experienced an internuclear ophthalmoplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging found a punctuate hyperintensity of the brainstem. Afterwards, the patient presented with peripheral facial paralysis. A complete morphologic assessment showed an increase of the brainstem lesion, together with an excavated pulmonary nodule. Combination therapy with high-dose liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole was begun for the putative aspergillosis. Owing to its atypical clinical presentation and negative detection of Aspergillus galactomannan antigen on sera, a biopsy specimen of the lung lesion was obtained. Histopathological and mycological investigations allowed the diagnosis of mucormycosis owing to Rhizopus microsporus. Accordingly, voriconazole was replaced with posaconazole. After 5 months, regression of the cerebral lesion was noted. Disseminated mucormycosis in solid-organ recipients is uncommon and mycological diagnosis is challenging. Mortality is high and is increased by diagnostic delay. Treating mucormycosis requires surgical debridement and appropriate antifungal therapy (usually intravenous liposomal amphotericin B). This report suggests that a combination of liposomal amphotericin B and posaconazole can be a therapeutic option in patients with a poor prognosis.

  18. Candidate diseases for prenatal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    David, Anna L; Waddington, Simon N

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal gene therapy aims to deliver genes to cells and tissues early in prenatal life, allowing correction of a genetic defect, before irreparable tissue damage has occurred. In contrast to postnatal gene therapy, prenatal application may target genes to a large population of stem cells, and the smaller fetal size allows a higher vector to target cell ratio to be achieved. Early gestation delivery may allow the development of immune tolerance to the transgenic protein, which would facilitate postnatal repeat vector administration if needed. Moreover, early delivery would avoid anti-vector immune responses which are often acquired in postnatal life. The NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee considered that a candidate disease for prenatal gene therapy should pose serious morbidity and mortality risks to the fetus or neonate, and not have any effective postnatal treatment. Prenatal gene therapy would therefore be appropriate for life-threatening disorders, in which prenatal gene delivery maintains a clear advantage over cell transplantation or postnatal gene therapy. If deemed safer and more efficacious, prenatal gene therapy may be applicable for nonlethal conditions if adult gene transfer is unlikely to be of benefit. Many candidate diseases will be inherited congenital disorders such as thalassaemia or lysosomal storage disorders. However, obstetric conditions such as fetal growth restriction may also be treated using a targeted gene therapy approach. In each disease, the condition must be diagnosed prenatally, either via antenatal screening and prenatal diagnosis, for example, in the case of hemophilias, or by ultrasound assessment of the fetus, for example, congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In this chapter, we describe some examples of the candidate diseases and discuss how a prenatal gene therapy approach might work.

  19. Recent advances in fetal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Suzanne M K; Rahim, Ahad A; Chan, Jerry K Y; David, Anna L; Peebles, Donald M; Coutelle, Charles; Waddingtont, Simon N

    2011-04-01

    Over the first decade of this new millennium gene therapy has demonstrated clear clinical benefits in several diseases for which conventional medicine offers no treatment. Clinical trials of gene therapy for single gene disorders have recruited predominantly young patients since older subjects may have suffered irrevocablepathological changes or may not be available because the disease is lethal relatively early in life. The concept of fetal gene therapy is an extension of this principle in that diseases in which irreversible changes occur at or beforebirth can be prevented by gene supplementation or repair in the fetus or associated maternal tissues. This article ccnsiders the enthusiasm and skepticism held for fetal gene therapy and its potential for clinical application. It coversa spectrum of candidate diseases for fetal gene therapy including Pompe disease, Gaucher disease, thalassemia, congenital protein C deficiency and cystic fibrosis. It outlines successful and not-so-successful examples of fetal gene therapy in animal models. Finally the application and potential of fetal gene transfer as a fundamental research tool for developmental biology and generation of somatic transgenic animals is surveyed.

  20. Gene therapy for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Olowoyeye, Abiola; Okwundu, Charles I

    2016-11-14

    Sickle cell disease encompasses a group of genetic disorders characterized by the presence of at least one hemoglobin S (Hb S) allele, and a second abnormal allele that could allow abnormal hemoglobin polymerisation leading to a symptomatic disorder.Autosomal recessive disorders (such as sickle cell disease) are good candidates for gene therapy because a normal phenotype can be restored in diseased cells with only a single normal copy of the mutant gene. This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review. The objectives of this review are:to determine whether gene therapy can improve survival and prevent symptoms and complications associated with sickle cell disease;to examine the risks of gene therapy against the potential long-term gain for people with sickle cell disease. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, which comprises of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and searching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 15 August 2016. All randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials (including any relevant phase 1, 2 or 3 trials) of gene therapy for all individuals with sickle cell disease, regardless of age or setting. No trials of gene therapy for sickle cell disease were found. No trials of gene therapy for sickle cell disease were reported. No randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials of gene therapy for sickle cell disease were reported. Thus, no objective conclusions or recommendations in practice can be made on gene therapy for sickle cell disease. This systematic review has identified the need for well-designed, randomised controlled trials to assess the benefits and risks of gene therapy for sickle cell disease.

  1. Liposomal daunorubicin, fludarabine, and cytarabine (FLAD) as bridge therapy to stem cell transplant in relapsed and refractory acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    De Astis, Enrico; Clavio, Marino; Raiola, Anna Maria; Ghiso, Anna; Guolo, Fabio; Minetto, Paola; Galaverna, Federica; Miglino, Maurizio; Di Grazia, Carmen; Ballerini, Filippo; Marani, Carlo; Pastori, Giordana; Mitscheunig, Laura; Cruciani, Fabio; Lovera, Davide; Varaldo, Riccardo; Ghiggi, Chiara; Lemoli, Roberto Massimo; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Gobbi, Marco

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with relapsed or refractory acute leukemia are still undefined and often unsatisfactory. We report the outcome of 79 patients with relapsed-refractory acute leukemia treated with fludarabine, cytarabine, and liposomal daunorubicin (FLAD regimen) followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), when clinically indicated, between May 2000 and January 2013. Forty-one patients had acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and 38 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Two patients with myeloid blast crises of CML and three with lymphoid blast crises were included in the AML and ALL subgroups, respectively. Median age was 48 years (range 13-77). FLAD was well tolerated with negligible, nonhematological toxicity. Six patients (7.5 %) died before response evaluation. Forty-seven patients achieved hematologic complete response (CR). Complete remission rate was 53 and 65 % among AML and ALL patients, respectively. No CR was recorded among 11 refractory AML patients. Twenty-four patients (30 %) underwent HSCT. Nine patients received stem cells from an HLA identical sibling, and 15 from an alternative donor (3 unrelated matched, 12 haploidentical sibling). Median overall survival in AML and ALL patients receiving FLAD therapy was 9 and 8 months, respectively. A 5-year projected OS for patients receiving the whole program (FLAD + HSCT) was 24 % for AML patients (median survival 43 months), 28 % for ALL patients treated in relapse (median survival 15 months), and 0 % for ALL patients treated for refractory disease. In this paper, we show that FLAD seems to be an effective bridge therapy to HSCT for a part of poor prognosis acute leukemia patients. However, prospective studies are needed to confirm our results.

  2. [Gene therapy of neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Kahn, A; Haase, G; Akli, S; Guidotti, J E

    1996-01-01

    transgenes transferred through adenoviral vectors, we have constructed vectors with cDNAs or genes for various neutrophic factors: CNTF, NT3, BDNF and GDNF. These vectors were biologically active on target cells, ex vivo and in vivo. In the pmn mouse model of progressive motor neuronal degeneration, some of these vectors, alone or combined, allowed for prolongation of life of homozygous animals by more than two fold, and for decrease in the demyelination of phrenic nerve axons. Finally, we have also constructed an adenoviral vector carrying the alpha-hexosaminidase cDNA, encoding the enzyme subunit deficient in Tay Sachs patients. This vector permitted to normalize ganglioside metabolism in Tay Sachs fibroblasts and is currently tested in knock out mice deficient in hexosaminidase A. In spite of all these encouraging results, we are nevertheless aware that progress in vector design and delivery strategies will be needed before gene therapy can become a realistic therapeutical strategy in humans.

  3. Monodisperse Uni- and Multicompartment Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Nan-Nan; Yelleswarapu, Maaruthy; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2016-06-22

    Liposomes are self-assembled phospholipid vesicles with great potential in fields ranging from targeted drug delivery to artificial cells. The formation of liposomes using microfluidic techniques has seen considerable progress, but the liposomes formation process itself has not been studied in great detail. As a result, high throughput, high-yielding routes to monodisperse liposomes with multiple compartments have not been demonstrated. Here, we report on a surfactant-assisted microfluidic route to uniform, single bilayer liposomes, ranging from 25 to 190 μm, and with or without multiple inner compartments. The key of our method is the precise control over the developing interfacial energies of complex W/O/W emulsion systems during liposome formation, which is achieved via an additional surfactant in the outer water phase. The liposomes consist of single bilayers, as demonstrated by nanopore formation experiments and confocal fluorescence microscopy, and they can act as compartments for cell-free gene expression. The microfluidic technique can be expanded to create liposomes with a multitude of coupled compartments, opening routes to networks of multistep microreactors.

  4. Gene therapy for B cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Fielding, A K; Russell, S J

    1997-01-01

    The use of genes or genetically modified cells for therapeutic benefit is likely to have a significant therapeutic role for patients with B cell lymphomas in the future. To date, most gene therapy strategies applicable to the therapy of these diseases have not reached the point of clinical study. Adoptive immunotherapy using donor leucocyte infusion to treat aggressive B cell neoplasms in immunosuppressed patients has, however, shown great promise clinically, and studies of idiotypic vaccination in patients with low grade B cell neoplasms are also under way. Results from in vitro and animal studies continue to suggest that it may become possible to use the immune system for therapeutic benefit, and many current basic research strategies in the gene therapy of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are based on immune modulation of T cells or tumour cells themselves. Other major approaches to gene therapy for B cell malignancies include the introduction of directly toxic or "suicide genes" into B cells or the chemoprotection of haemopoietic stem cells by the introduction of drug resistance genes. All of these approaches require efficient and accurate gene transfer as well as correct expression of the gene product within the target cell. Although some way from therapeutic use, specific targeting of gene delivery is an area of active investigation and will be of value in many of the gene therapy strategies applicable to B cell lymphomas.

  5. Treatment of ocular disorders by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Solinís, M Ángeles; del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Apaolaza, Paola S; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia

    2015-09-01

    Gene therapy to treat ocular disorders is still starting, and current therapies are primarily experimental, with most human clinical trials still in research state, although beginning to show encouraging results. Currently 33 clinical trials have been approved, are in progress, or have been completed. The most promising results have been obtained in clinical trials of ocular gene therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis, which have prompted the study of several ocular diseases that are good candidates to be treated with gene therapy: glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, or choroideremia. The success of gene therapy relies on the efficient delivery of the genetic material to target cells, achieving optimum long-term gene expression. Although viral vectors have been widely used, their potential risk associated mainly with immunogenicity and mutagenesis has promoted the design of non-viral vectors. In this review, the main administration routes and the most studied delivery systems, viral and non-viral, for ocular gene therapy are presented. The primary ocular disease candidates to be treated with gene therapy have been also reviewed, including the genetic basis and the most relevant preclinical and clinical studies.

  6. Vectors--shuttle vehicles for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J M

    1997-01-01

    Gene therapy is being considered for the treatment of various inherited and acquired disorders. The basic premise of this new therapeutic modality is manipulation of gene expression towards a therapeutic end. The early development of the field focused on a technique called ex vivo gene therapy in which autologous cells are genetically manipulated in culture prior to transplantation. Recent advances have stimulated the development of in vivo gene therapy approaches based on direct delivery of the therapeutic gene to cells in vivo. The rate-limiting technologies of gene therapy are the gene delivery vehicles, called vectors, used to accomplish gene transfer. The most efficient vectors are based on recombinant versions of viruses with retroviral vectors serving as prototypes. This viral vector system has been exploited in ex vivo approaches of gene therapy in which cultured, dividing cells are transduced with the recombinant virus resulting in integration of the proviral DNA into the chromosomal DNA of the recipient cell. The use of retroviral vectors in gene therapy has been restricted to ex vivo approaches because of difficulties in purifying the virion and the requirement that the target cell is dividing at the time of transduction. More recently, vectors based on adenoviruses have been developed for in vivo gene therapy. These viruses can be grown in large quantities and highly purified. Importantly, they efficiently transduce the recombinant genome into non-dividing cells. Applications include in vivo gene delivery to a variety of targets such as muscle, lung, liver and the central nervous system. Clinical trials of in vivo delivery with adenoviruses have been undertaken for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  7. Noncoding RNA for Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaomin; Zhang, Dongmei; Xiong, Minmin; Zhang, Lin

    Gene therapy is a prospective strategy to modulate gene expression level in specific cells to treat human inherited diseases, cancers, and acquired disorders. A subset of noncoding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interference RNAs (siRNAs), compose an important class of widely used effectors for gene therapy, especially in cancer treatment. Functioning through the RNA interference (RNAi) mechanism, miRNA and siRNA show potent ability in silencing oncogenic factors for cancer gene therapy. For a better understanding of this field, we reviewed the mechanism and biological function, the principles of design and synthesis, and the delivery strategies of noncoding RNAs with clinical potentials in cancer gene therapy.

  8. Doxorubicin-loaded nanocarriers: A comparative study of liposome and nanostructured lipid carrier as alternatives for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Renata S; Silva, Juliana O; Monteiro, Liziane O F; Leite, Elaine A; Cassali, Geovanni D; Rubello, Domenico; Cardoso, Valbert N; Ferreira, Lucas A M; Oliveira, Mônica C; de Barros, André L B

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays cancer is one of the most common causes of deaths worldwide. Conventional antitumor agents still present various problems related to specificity for tumor cells often leading to therapeutic failure. Nanoscale particles are considered potential alternative to direct access of drugs into tumor cells, therefore increasing the drug accumulation and performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antitumor activity of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) versus liposomes against a breast cancer animal experimental model. NLC-DOX and liposomes-DOX were successfully prepared and characterized. Tumor-bearing mice were divided into five groups (blank-NLC, blank-liposome, DOX, NLC-DOX, liposome-DOX). Each animal received by the tail vein four doses of antitumoral drugs (total dose, 16mg/kg), every 3 days. Antitumor efficacy was assessed by measuring 1) tumor volume, calculating the inhibitory ratio (TV-IR, see after) and 2) acquiring scintigraphic images of the tumor using doxorubicin radiolabeled with technetium-99m as an imaging tumor probe. Liposome-DOX and free DOX did not showed differences in the tumor mean volume, whereas NLC-DOX proved to be the best treatments in controlling the tumor growth. NLC-DOX showed an inhibition ration (TV-IR) of 73.5% while free DOX and liposome-DOX decreased TV-RI of 48.8% and 68.0%, respectively. Tumor was clearly visualized in controls, DOX, and liposome-DOX groups. Yet, regarding the NLC-DOX group, tumor was barely identified by the image, indicating antitumor efficacy. Moreover, both NLC and liposomes proved to be able to delay the occurrence of lung metastasis. In conclusion, results of this study indicated that NLC-DOX might be an alternative strategy to achieve an efficient antitumor activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. In Vivo Noninvasive Imaging for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Gene therapy is reaching a stage where some clinical benefits have been demonstrated on patients involved in phase I/II clinical trials. However, in many cases, the clinical benefit is hardly measurable and progress in the improvement of gene therapy formulations is hampered by the lack of objective clinical endpoints to measure transgene delivery and to quantitate transgene expression. However, these endpoints rely almost exclusively on the analysis of biopsies by molecular and histopathological methods. These methods provide only a limited picture of the situation. Therefore, there is a need for a technology that would allow precise, spacio-temporal measurement of gene expression on a whole body scale upon administration of the gene delivery vector. In the field of gene therapy, a considerable effort is being invested in the development of noninvasive imaging of gene expression and this review presents the various strategies currently being developed. PMID:12721514

  10. Gene Therapy Techniques for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, Hannu I.; Maekinen, Kimmo

    2002-03-15

    Somatic gene therapy is the introduction of new genetic material into selective somatic cells with resulting therapeutic benefits. Vascular wall and, subsequently, cardiovascular diseases have become an interesting target for gene therapy studies.Arteries are an attractive target for gene therapy since vascular interventions, both open surgical and endovascular, are well suited for minimally invasive, easily monitored gene delivery. Promising therapeutic effects have been obtained in animal models in preventing post-angioplasty restenosis and vein graft thickening, as well as increasing blood flow and collateral development in ischemic limbs.First clinical trials suggest a beneficial effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in achieving therapeutic angiogenesis in chronic limb ischemia and the efficacy of decoy oligonucleotides to prevent infrainguinal vein graft stenosis. However, further studies are mandatory to clarify the safety issues, to develop better gene delivery vectors and delivery catheters, to improve transgene expression, as well as to find the most effective and safe treatment genes.

  11. [Gene therapy: current status and promise].

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Y

    2001-04-01

    As of summer 2000, more than 400 protocols developed for human gene therapy have been reported, and there have been recent successful applications in some diseases such as arteriosclerosis obliterance, immunodeficiency X-1 (SCID-X1) and hemophilia B. However, complications have also occurred. Successful gene therapy is dependent on the development of an effective gene delivery system. One approach is development of chimeric vector systems that combine at least two different vector systems. However, a perfect vector system has not yet been constructed. Difficulties of in vivo gene transfer appear to result from resistance of living cells to invasion by foreign materials and from interference of cellular functions. We should reevaluate what barriers in tissues affect in vivo gene transfection and how to solve these problems for gene therapy. Moreover, in Japan, there should be more extensive preparation of social systems to promote clinical trials based on basic research.

  12. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; He, Wen-Jie; Chiang, Chiao-Hsi; Hong, Po-Da; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Domb, Abraham J.; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2013-07-01

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes.

  13. State-of-the-art human gene therapy: part II. Gene therapy strategies and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-09-01

    In Part I of this Review (Wang and Gao, 2014), we introduced recent advances in gene delivery technologies and explained how they have powered some of the current human gene therapy applications. In Part II, we expand the discussion on gene therapy applications, focusing on some of the most exciting clinical uses. To help readers to grasp the essence and to better organize the diverse applications, we categorize them under four gene therapy strategies: (1) gene replacement therapy for monogenic diseases, (2) gene addition for complex disorders and infectious diseases, (3) gene expression alteration targeting RNA, and (4) gene editing to introduce targeted changes in host genome. Human gene therapy started with the simple idea that replacing a faulty gene with a functional copy can cure a disease. It has been a long and bumpy road to finally translate this seemingly straightforward concept into reality. As many disease mechanisms unraveled, gene therapists have employed a gene addition strategy backed by a deep knowledge of what goes wrong in diseases and how to harness host cellular machinery to battle against diseases. Breakthroughs in other biotechnologies, such as RNA interference and genome editing by chimeric nucleases, have the potential to be integrated into gene therapy. Although clinical trials utilizing these new technologies are currently sparse, these innovations are expected to greatly broaden the scope of gene therapy in the near future.

  14. STATE-OF-THE-ART HUMAN GENE THERAPY: PART II. GENE THERAPY STRATEGIES AND APPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2015-01-01

    In Part I of this Review, we introduced recent advances in gene delivery technologies and explained how they have powered some of the current human gene therapy applications. In Part II, we expand the discussion on gene therapy applications, focusing on some of the most exciting clinical uses. To help readers to grasp the essence and to better organize the diverse applications, we categorize them under four gene therapy strategies: (1) gene replacement therapy for monogenic diseases, (2) gene addition for complex disorders and infectious diseases, (3) gene expression alteration targeting RNA, and (4) gene editing to introduce targeted changes in host genome. Human gene therapy started with the simple idea that replacing a faulty gene with a functional copy can cure a disease. It has been a long and bumpy road to finally translate this seemingly straightforward concept into reality. As many disease mechanisms unraveled, gene therapists have employed a gene addition strategy backed by a deep knowledge of what goes wrong in diseases and how to harness host cellular machinery to battle against diseases. Breakthroughs in other biotechnologies, such as RNA interference and genome editing by chimeric nucleases, have the potential to be integrated into gene therapy. Although clinical trials utilizing these new technologies are currently sparse, these innovations are expected to greatly broaden the scope of gene therapy in the near future. PMID:25227756

  15. Cancer suicide gene therapy: a patent review.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Saúl Abenhamar; Carrillo, Esmeralda; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Martín, Ana; Perán, Macarena; Marchal, Juan Antonio; Boulaiz, Houria

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is considered the second leading cause of death worldwide despite the progress made in early detection and advances in classical therapies. Advancing in the fight against cancer requires the development of novel strategies, and the suicide gene transfer to tumor cells is providing new possibilities for cancer therapy. In this manuscript, authors present an overview of suicide gene systems and the latest innovations done to enhance cancer suicide gene therapy strategies by i) improving vectors for targeted gene delivery using tissue specific promoter and receptors; ii) modification of the tropism; and iii) combining suicide genes and/or classical therapies for cancer. Finally, the authors highlight the main challenges to be addressed in the future. Even if many efforts are needed for suicide gene therapy to be a real alternative for cancer treatment, we believe that the significant progress made in the knowledge of cancer biology and characterization of cancer stem cells accompanied by the development of novel targeted vectors will enhance the effectiveness of this type of therapeutic strategy. Moreover, combined with current treatments, suicide gene therapy will improve the clinical outcome of patients with cancer in the future.

  16. Fluorescence Characterization of Gold Modified Liposomes with Antisense N-myc DNA Bound to the Magnetisable Particles with Encapsulated Anticancer Drugs (Doxorubicin, Ellipticine and Etoposide)

    PubMed Central

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Nejdl, Lukas; Kudr, Jiri; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Jimenez Jimenez, Ana Maria; Kopel, Pavel; Kremplova, Monika; Masarik, Michal; Stiborova, Marie; Eckschlager, Tomas; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Liposome-based drug delivery systems hold great potential for cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to design a nanodevice for targeted anchoring of liposomes (with and without cholesterol) with encapsulated anticancer drugs and antisense N-myc gene oligonucleotide attached to its surface. To meet this main aim, liposomes with encapsulated doxorubicin, ellipticine and etoposide were prepared. They were further characterized by measuring their fluorescence intensity, whereas the encapsulation efficiency was estimated to be 16%. The hybridization process of individual oligonucleotides forming the nanoconstruct was investigated spectrophotometrically and electrochemically. The concentrations of ellipticine, doxorubicin and etoposide attached to the nanoconstruct in gold nanoparticle-modified liposomes were found to be 14, 5 and 2 µg·mL−1, respectively. The study succeeded in demonstrating that liposomes are suitable for the transport of anticancer drugs and the antisense oligonucleotide, which can block the expression of the N-myc gene. PMID:26927112

  17. Targeted Gene Therapies: Tools, Applications, Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Olivier; Davis, Luther; Maizels, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Many devastating human diseases are caused by mutations in a single gene that prevent a somatic cell from carrying out its essential functions, or by genetic changes acquired as a result of infectious disease or in the course of cell transformation. Targeted gene therapies have emerged as potential strategies for treatment of such diseases. These therapies depend upon rare-cutting endonucleases to cleave at specific sites in or near disease genes. Targeted gene correction provides a template for homology-directed repair, enabling the cell's own repair pathways to erase the mutation and replace it with the correct sequence. Targeted gene disruption ablates the disease gene, disabling its function. Gene targeting can also promote other kinds of genome engineering, including mutation, insertion, or gene deletion. Targeted gene therapies present significant advantages compared to approaches to gene therapy that depend upon delivery of stably expressing transgenes. Recent progress has been fueled by advances in nuclease discovery and design, and by new strategies that maximize efficiency of targeting and minimize off-target damage. Future progress will build on deeper mechanistic understanding of critical factors and pathways. PMID:22530743

  18. Challenges in neuroprotective nanomedicine development: progress towards noninvasive gene therapy of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Alqawlaq, Samih; Huzil, J Torin; Ivanova, Marina V; Foldvari, Marianna

    2012-07-01

    Over the past decade the application of gene therapy of retinal diseases such as glaucoma has produced promising results. However, optic nerve regeneration and restoration of vision in patients with glaucoma is still far from reality. Neuroprotective approaches in the form of gene therapy may provide significant advantages, but are still limited by many factors both at the organ and cellular levels. In general, gene delivery systems for eye diseases range from simple eye drops and ointments to more advanced bio- and nanotechnology-based systems such as muco-adhesive systems, polymers, liposomes and ocular inserts. Most of these technologies were developed for front-of-the-eye ophthalmic therapies and are not applicable as back-of-the-eye delivery systems. Currently, only the invasive intravitreal injections are capable of successfully delivering genes to the retina. Here we review the challenges and possible strategies for the noninvasive gene therapy of glaucoma including the barriers in the eye and in neural cells, and present a cross-sectional view of gene delivery as it pertains to the prevention and treatment of glaucoma.

  19. Mechanisms of co-modified liver-targeting liposomes as gene delivery carriers based on cellular uptake and antigens inhibition effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Rong Qi, Xian; Gao, Yan; Wei, Lai; Maitani, Yoshie; Nagai, Tsuneji

    2007-02-12

    In order to deliver antisense oligonucleotides (asODN) into hepatocytes orientedly in the treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, the liver-targeting cationic liposomes was developed as a gene carrier, which was co-modified with the ligand of the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), beta-sitosterol-beta-d-glucoside (sito-G) and the nonionic surfactant, Brij 35. Flow cytometry (FCM) analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed that the asODN-encapsulating cationic liposomes exhibited high transfection efficiency and strong antigens inhibition effect in primary rat hepatocytes and HepG2.2.15 cells, respectively. With the help of several inhibitors acting on different steps during the targeting lipofection, the cellular uptake mechanisms of the co-modified liver-targeting cationic liposomes were investigated through antigens inhibition effect assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis. The cellular uptake with high transfection efficiency seemed to involve both endocytosis and membrane fusion. The ligand sito-G was confirmed to be able to enhance ASGPR-mediated endocytosis, the nonionic surfactant Brij 35 seemed to be able to facilitate membrane fusion, and the co-modification resulted in the most efficient transfection but no enhanced cytotoxicity. These results suggested that the co-modified liver-targeting cationic liposomes would be a specific and effective carrier to transfer asODN into hepatocytes infected with HBV orientedly.

  20. Clinical applications of retinal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Thake, Miriam; MacLaren, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Many currently incurable forms of blindness affecting the retina have a genetic etiology and several others, such as those resulting from retinal vascular disturbances, respond to repeated, potentially indefinite administration of molecular based treatments. The recent clinical advances in retinal gene therapy have shown that viral vectors can deliver genes safely to the retina and the promising initial results from a number of clinical trials suggest that certain diseases may potentially be treatable. Gene therapy provides a means of expressing proteins within directly transduced cells with far greater efficacy than might be achieved by traditional systemic pharmacological approaches. Recent developments have demonstrated how vector gene expression may be regulated and further improvements to vector design have limited side effects and improved safety profiles. These recent steps have been most significant in bringing gene therapy into the mainstream of ophthalmology. Nevertheless translating retinal gene therapy from animal research into clinical trials is still a lengthy process, including complexities in human retinal diseases that have been difficult to model in the laboratory. The focus of this review is to summarize the genetic background of the most common retinal diseases, highlight current concepts of gene delivery technology, and relate those technologies to pre-clinical and clinical gene therapy studies.

  1. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (ADA-SCID) ADA- ... in preclinical animal models of this disease. Other genetic disorders After many years of laboratory and preclinical ...

  2. Gene Therapy: A Paradigm Shift in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Nida; Raza, Hira; Ahmed, Sehrish; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds a promising future for bridging the gap between the disciplines of medicine and clinical dentistry. The dynamic treatment approaches of gene therapy have been advancing by leaps and bounds. They are transforming the conventional approaches into more precise and preventive ones that may limit the need of using drugs and surgery. The oral cavity is one of the most accessible areas for the clinical applications of gene therapy for various oral tissues. The idea of genetic engineering has become more exciting due to its advantages over other treatment modalities. For instance, the body is neither subjected to an invasive surgery nor deep wounds, nor is it susceptible to systemic effects of drugs. The aim of this article is to review the gene therapy applications in the field of dentistry. In addition, therapeutic benefits in terms of treatment of diseases, minimal invasion and maximum outcomes have been discussed. PMID:27834914

  3. Gene Therapy: A Paradigm Shift in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Nida; Raza, Hira; Ahmed, Sehrish; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2016-11-10

    Gene therapy holds a promising future for bridging the gap between the disciplines of medicine and clinical dentistry. The dynamic treatment approaches of gene therapy have been advancing by leaps and bounds. They are transforming the conventional approaches into more precise and preventive ones that may limit the need of using drugs and surgery. The oral cavity is one of the most accessible areas for the clinical applications of gene therapy for various oral tissues. The idea of genetic engineering has become more exciting due to its advantages over other treatment modalities. For instance, the body is neither subjected to an invasive surgery nor deep wounds, nor is it susceptible to systemic effects of drugs. The aim of this article is to review the gene therapy applications in the field of dentistry. In addition, therapeutic benefits in terms of treatment of diseases, minimal invasion and maximum outcomes have been discussed.

  4. Gene Therapy for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    chronic, degenerative, often crippling disease that primarily affects large weight bearing joints. There is strong evidence that interleukin - 1 (IL- 1 ) is a...Osteoarthritis (OA) Gene Therapy Equine Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Interleukin - 1 Receptor Antagonist (IL-1Ra) Post-traumatic OA (PTOA) Self...AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14- 1 -0498 TITLE: Gene Therapy for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven C

  5. Magnetic nanoparticles: Applications in gene delivery and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Majidi, Sima; Zeinali Sehrig, Fatemeh; Samiei, Mohammad; Milani, Morteza; Abbasi, Elham; Dadashzadeh, Kianoosh; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-06-01

    Gene therapy is defined as the direct transfer of genetic material to tissues or cells for the treatment of inherited disorders and acquired diseases. For gene delivery, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are typically combined with a delivery platform to encapsulate the gene, and promote cell uptake. Delivery technologies that have been used with MNPs contain polymeric, viral, as well as non-viral platforms. In this review, we focus on targeted gene delivery using MNPs.

  6. Gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations.

    PubMed

    Dalkara, Deniz; Sahel, José-Alain

    2014-03-01

    Gene therapy is quickly becoming a reality applicable in the clinic for inherited retinal diseases. Progress over the past decade has moved proof-of-concept gene therapies from bench to bedside. The remarkable success in safety and efficacy, in the phase I/II clinical trials for the form of the severe childhood-onset blindness, Leber's Congenital Amaurosis (LCA) type II (due to mutations in the RPE65 gene) generated significant interest and opened up possibilities for a new era of retinal gene therapies. Success in these clinical trials was due to combining the favorable features of both the retina as a target organ and adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a vector. The retina offers several advantages for gene therapy approaches. It is an anatomically defined structure that is readily accessible for therapy and has some degree of immune privilege, making it suitable for application of viral vectors. AAV, on the other hand, is a non-pathogenic helper dependent virus that has little immunogenicity. This viral vector transduces quiescent cells efficiently and thanks to its small size diffuses well in the interneural matrix, making it suitable for applications in neural tissue. Building on this initial clinical success with LCA II, we have now many opportunities to extend this proof-of-concept to other retinal diseases. This article will discuss what are some of the most imminent targets for such therapies and what are the challenges that we face in moving these therapies to the clinic.

  7. Human Studies of Angiogenic Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajesh; Tongers, Jörn; Losordo, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite significant advances in medical, interventional, and surgical therapy for coronary and peripheral arterial disease, the burden of these illnesses remains high. To address this unmet need, the science of therapeutic angiogenesis has been evolving for almost two decades. Early pre-clinical studies and phase I clinical trials achieved promising results with growth factors administered as recombinant proteins or as single-agent gene therapies, and data accumulated through 10 years of clinical trials indicate that gene therapy has an acceptable safety profile. However, more rigorous phase II and phase III clinical trials have failed to unequivocally demonstrate that angiogenic agents are beneficial under the conditions and in the patients studied to date. Investigators have worked to understand the biology of the vascular system and to incorporate their findings into new treatments for patients with ischemic disease. Recent gene- and cell-therapy trials have demonstrated the bioactivity of several new agents and treatment strategies. Collectively, these observations have renewed interest in the mechanisms of angiogenesis and deepened our understanding of the complexity of vascular regeneration. Gene therapy that incorporates multiple growth factors, approaches that combine cell and gene therapy, and the administration of "master switch" agents that activate numerous downstream pathways are among the credible and plausible steps forward. In this review, we will examine the clinical development of angiogenic therapy, summarize several of the lessons learned during the conduct of these trials, and suggest how this prior experience may guide the conduct of future preclinical investigations and clinical trials. PMID:19815827

  8. Gene therapy for human genetic disease?

    PubMed

    Friedmann, T; Roblin, R

    1972-03-03

    In our view, gene therapy may ameliorate some human genetic diseases in the future. For this reason, we believe that research directed at the development of techniques for gene therapy should continue. For the foreseeable future, however, we oppose any further attempts at gene therapy in human patients because (i) our understanding of such basic processes as gene regulation and genetic recombination in human cells is inadequate; (ii) our understanding of the details of the relation between the molecular defect and the disease state is rudimentary for essentially all genetic diseases; and (iii) we have no information on the short-range and long-term side effects of gene therapy. We therefore propose that a sustained effort be made to formulate a complete set of ethicoscientific criteria to guide the development and clinical application of gene therapy techniques. Such an endeavor could go a long way toward ensuring that gene therapy is used in humans only in those instances where it will prove beneficial, and toward preventing its misuse through premature application. Two recent papers have provided new demonstrations of directed genetic modification of mammalian cells. Munyon et al. (44) restored the ability to synthesize the enzyme thymidine kinase to thymidine kinase-deficient mouse cells by infection with ultraviolet-irradiated herpes simplex virus. In their experiments the DNA from herpes simplex virus, which contains a gene coding for thymidine kinase, may have formed a hereditable association with the mouse cells. Merril et al. (45) reported that treatment of fibroblasts from patients with galactosemia with exogenous DNA caused increased activity of a missing enzyme, alpha-D-galactose-l-phosphate uridyltransferase. They also provided some evidence that the change persisted after subculturing the treated cells. If this latter report can be confirmed, the feasibility of directed genetic modification of human cells would be clearly demonstrated, considerably

  9. Cardiovascular gene therapy for myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Scimia, Maria C; Gumpert, Anna M; Koch, Walter J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular gene therapy is the third most popular application for gene therapy, representing 8.4% of all gene therapy trials as reported in 2012 estimates. Gene therapy in cardiovascular disease is aiming to treat heart failure from ischemic and non-ischemic causes, peripheral artery disease, venous ulcer, pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis and monogenic diseases, such as Fabry disease. Areas covered In this review, we will focus on elucidating current molecular targets for the treatment of ventricular dysfunction following myocardial infarction (MI). In particular, we will focus on the treatment of i) the clinical consequences of it, such as heart failure and residual myocardial ischemia and ii) etiological causes of MI (coronary vessels atherosclerosis, bypass venous graft disease, in-stent restenosis). Expert opinion We summarise the scheme of the review and the molecular targets either already at the gene therapy clinical trial phase or in the pipeline. These targets will be discussed below. Following this, we will focus on what we believe are the 4 prerequisites of success of any gene target therapy: safety, expression, specificity and efficacy (SESE). PMID:24328708

  10. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy. PMID:24202446

  11. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    Over 60 patients affected by SCID due to IL2RG deficiency (SCID-X1) or adenosine deaminase (ADA)-SCID have received hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in the past 15 years using gammaretroviral vectors, resulting in immune reconstitution and clinical benefit in the majority of them. However, the occurrence of insertional oncogenesis in the SCID-X1 trials has led to the development of new clinical trials based on integrating vectors with improved safety design as well as investigation on new technologies for highly efficient gene targeting and site-specific gene editing. Here we will present the experience and perspectives of gene therapy for SCID-X1 and ADA-SCID and discuss the pros and cons of gene therapy in comparison to allogeneic transplantation.

  12. Targeted delivery of chemically modified anti-miR-221 to hepatocellular carcinoma with negatively charged liposomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wendian; Peng, Fangqi; Zhou, Taotao; Huang, Yifei; Zhang, Li; Ye, Peng; Lu, Miao; Yang, Guang; Gai, Yongkang; Yang, Tan; Ma, Xiang; Xiang, Guangya

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Gene therapy was established as a new strategy for treating HCC. To explore the potential delivery system to support the gene therapy of HCC, negatively charged liposomal delivery system was used to deliver miR-221 antisense oligonucleotide (anti-miR-221) to the transferrin (Tf) receptor over expressed HepG2 cells. The liposome exhibited a mean particle size of 122.5 nm, zeta potential of -15.74 mV, anti-miR-221 encapsulation efficiency of 70%, and excellent colloidal stability at 4°C. Anti-miR-221-encapsulated Tf-targeted liposome demonstrated a 15-fold higher delivery efficiency compared to nontargeted liposome in HepG2 cells in vitro. Anti-miR-221 Tf-targeted liposome effectively delivered anti-miR-221 to HepG2 cells, upregulated miR-221 target genes PTEN, P27(kip1), and TIMP3, and exhibited greater silencing efficiency over nontargeted anti-miR-221 liposome. After intravenous injection into HepG2 tumor-bearing xenografted mice with Cy3-labeled anti-miR-221 Tf-targeted liposome, Cy3-anti-miR-221 was successfully delivered to the tumor site and increased the expressions of PTEN, P27(kip1), and TIMP3. Our results demonstrate that the Tf-targeted negatively charged liposome could be a potential therapeutic modality in the gene therapy of human HCC.

  13. In vitro evaluation of inhalable isoniazid-loaded surfactant liposomes as an adjunct therapy in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chimote, G; Banerjee, R

    2010-07-01

    In this study, exogenous pulmonary surfactant was evaluated as an inhalable drug carrier for antitubercular drug isoniazid (INH). Isoniazid-entrapped liposomes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) (the most abundant lipid of lung surfactant and exogenous surfactant) were developed and evaluated for size, drug entrapment, release, in vitro alveolar deposition, biocompatibility, antimycobacterial activity, and pulmonary surfactant action. Isoniazid-entrapped DPPC liposomes were about 750 nm in diameter and had entrapment efficiency of 36.7% +/- 1.8%. Sustained release of INH from DPPC liposomes was observed over 24 h. In vitro alveolar deposition efficiency using the twin impinger exhibited approximately 25-27% INH deposition in the alveolar chamber upon one minute nebulization using a jet nebulizer. At 37 degrees C, the formulation had better pulmonary surfactant function with quicker reduction of surface tension on adsorption (36.7 +/- 0.4 mN/m) than DPPC liposomes (44.7 +/- 0.6 mN/m) and 87% airway patency was exhibited by the formulation in a capillary surfactometer. The formulation was biocompatible and had antimycobacterial activity. The isoniazid-entrapped DPPC liposomes could fulfill the dual purpose of pulmonary drug delivery and alveolar stabilization due to antiatelectatic effect of the surfactant action which can improve the reach of antitubercular drug INH to the alveoli.

  14. Cyclic-RGDyC functionalized liposomes for dual-targeting of tumor vasculature and cancer cells in glioblastoma: An in vitro boron neutron capture therapy study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Weirong; Svirskis, Darren; Sarojini, Vijayalekshmi; McGregor, Ailsa L.; Bevitt, Joseph; Wu, Zimei

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy depends on the selective delivery of 10B to the target. Integrins αvβ3 are transmembrane receptors over-expressed in both glioblastoma cells and its neovasculature. In this study, a novel approach to dual-target glioblastoma vasculature and tumor cells was investigated. Liposomes (124 nm) were conjugated with a αvβ3 ligand, cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-tyrosine-cysteine peptide (c(RGDyC)-LP) (1% molar ratio) through thiol-maleimide coupling. Expression of αvβ3 in glioblastoma cells (U87) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), representing tumor angiogenesis, was determined using Western Blotting with other cells as references. The results showed that both U87 and HUVEC had stronger expression of αvβ3 than other cell types, and the degree of cellular uptake of c(RGDyC)-LP correlated with the αvβ3-expression levels of the cells. In contrast, control liposomes without c(RGDyC) showed little cellular uptake, regardless of cell type. In an in vitro boron neutron capture therapy study, the c(RGDyC)-LP containing sodium borocaptate generated more rapid and significant lethal effects to both U87 and HUVEC than the control liposomes and drug solution. Interestingly, neutron irradiated U87 and HUVEC showed different types of subsequent cell death. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated the potential of a new dual-targeting strategy using c(RGDyC)-LP to improve boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma. PMID:28402271

  15. Progress in gene therapy for neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Simonato, Michele; Bennett, Jean; Boulis, Nicholas M; Castro, Maria G; Fink, David J; Goins, William F; Gray, Steven J; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wilson, Thomas J; Wolfe, John H; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2013-05-01

    Diseases of the nervous system have devastating effects and are widely distributed among the population, being especially prevalent in the elderly. These diseases are often caused by inherited genetic mutations that result in abnormal nervous system development, neurodegeneration, or impaired neuronal function. Other causes of neurological diseases include genetic and epigenetic changes induced by environmental insults, injury, disease-related events or inflammatory processes. Standard medical and surgical practice has not proved effective in curing or treating these diseases, and appropriate pharmaceuticals do not exist or are insufficient to slow disease progression. Gene therapy is emerging as a powerful approach with potential to treat and even cure some of the most common diseases of the nervous system. Gene therapy for neurological diseases has been made possible through progress in understanding the underlying disease mechanisms, particularly those involving sensory neurons, and also by improvement of gene vector design, therapeutic gene selection, and methods of delivery. Progress in the field has renewed our optimism for gene therapy as a treatment modality that can be used by neurologists, ophthalmologists and neurosurgeons. In this Review, we describe the promising gene therapy strategies that have the potential to treat patients with neurological diseases and discuss prospects for future development of gene therapy.

  16. Progress in gene therapy for neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Simonato, Michele; Bennett, Jean; Boulis, Nicholas M.; Castro, Maria G.; Fink, David J.; Goins, William F.; Gray, Steven J.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Wilson, Thomas J.; Wolfe, John H.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Diseases of the nervous system have devastating effects and are widely distributed among the population, being especially prevalent in the elderly. These diseases are often caused by inherited genetic mutations that result in abnormal nervous system development, neurodegeneration, or impaired neuronal function. Other causes of neurological diseases include genetic and epigenetic changes induced by environmental insults, injury, disease-related events or inflammatory processes. Standard medical and surgical practice has not proved effective in curing or treating these diseases, and appropriate pharmaceuticals do not exist or are insufficient to slow disease progression. Gene therapy is emerging as a powerful approach with potential to treat and even cure some of the most common diseases of the nervous system. Gene therapy for neurological diseases has been made possible through progress in understanding the underlying disease mechanisms, particularly those involving sensory neurons, and also by improvement of gene vector design, therapeutic gene selection, and methods of delivery. Progress in the field has renewed our optimism for gene therapy as a treatment modality that can be used by neurologists, ophthalmologists and neurosurgeons. In this Review, we describe the promising gene therapy strategies that have the potential to treat patients with neurological diseases and discuss prospects for future development of gene therapy. PMID:23609618

  17. Enhancing siRNA-based cancer therapy using a new pH-responsive activatable cell-penetrating peptide-modified liposomal system

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Bai; Jia, Xue-Li; Qi, Jin-Long; Yang, Li-Ping; Sun, Wei-Hong; Yan, Xiao; Yang, Shao-Kun; Cao, De-Ying; Du, Qing; Qi, Xian-Rong

    2017-01-01

    As a potent therapeutic agent, small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been exploited to silence critical genes involved in tumor initiation and progression. However, development of a desirable delivery system is required to overcome the unfavorable properties of siRNA such as its high degradability, molecular size, and negative charge to help increase its accumulation in tumor tissues and promote efficient cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape of the nucleic acids. In this study, we developed a new activatable cell-penetrating peptide (ACPP) that is responsive to an acidic tumor microenvironment, which was then used to modify the surfaces of siRNA-loaded liposomes. The ACPP is composed of a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), an acid-labile linker (hydrazone), and a polyanionic domain, including glutamic acid and histidine. In the systemic circulation (pH 7.4), the surface polycationic moieties of the CPP (polyarginine) are “shielded” by the intramolecular electrostatic interaction of the inhibitory domain. When exposed to a lower pH, a common property of solid tumors, the ACPP undergoes acid-catalyzed breakage at the hydrazone site, and the consequent protonation of histidine residues promotes detachment of the inhibitory peptide. Subsequently, the unshielded CPP would facilitate the cellular membrane penetration and efficient endosomal/lysosomal evasion of liposomal siRNA. A series of investigations demonstrated that once exposed to an acidic pH, the ACPP-modified liposomes showed elevated cellular uptake, downregulated expression of polo-like kinase 1, and augmented cell apoptosis. In addition, favorable siRNA avoidance of the endosome/lysosome was observed in both MCF-7 and A549 cells, followed by effective cytoplasmic release. In view of its acid sensitivity and therapeutic potency, this newly developed pH-responsive and ACPP-mediated liposome system represents a potential platform for siRNA-based cancer treatment. PMID:28405163

  18. Gene therapy: a primer for neurosurgeons.

    PubMed

    Chiocca, E Antonio

    2003-08-01

    Gene therapy involves the transfer of genes into cells with therapeutic intent. Although several methods can accomplish this, vectors based on viruses still provide the most efficient approach. For neurosurgical purposes, preclinical and clinical applications in the areas of glioma therapy, spinal neurosurgery, and neuroprotection for treatment of Parkinson's disease and cerebral ischemia are reviewed. In general, therapies applied in the neurosurgical realm have proven relatively safe, despite occasional, well-publicized cases of morbidity and death in non-neurosurgical trials. However, continued clinical and preclinical research in this area is critical, to fully elucidate potential toxicities and to generate truly effective treatments that can be applied in neurological diseases.

  19. Viral vectors for vascular gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Lukas; Preis, Meir; Weisz, Anat; Koren, Belly; Lewis, Basil S; Flugelman, Moshe Y

    2002-01-01

    Vascular gene therapy is the focus of multiple experimental and clinical research efforts. While several genes with therapeutic potential have been identified, the best method of gene delivery is unknown. Viral vectors have the capacity to transfer genes at high efficiency rates. Several viral-based vectors have been used in experimental vascular gene therapy for in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer. Adenoviral-based vectors are being used for the induction of angiogenesis in phase 1 and 2 clinical trials. In the present review, the characteristics of the ‘ideal’ viral vector are discussed and the major types of viral vectors used in vascular gene transfer are reviewed. Basic knowledge of the use of viral vectors for direct in vivo gene transfer (adenoviral-based vectors, etc) and for ex vivo gene transfer (retroviral-based vectors) is provided. New developments in the field of viral vectorology, such as pseudotyping of retroviral vectors and targeting of other viral vectors to a specific cell type, will enhance the more rapid transition of vascular gene therapy from the experimental arena to the clinical setting. PMID:19649233

  20. Gene and Cell Therapy for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac gene and cell therapy have both entered clinical trials aimed at ameliorating ventricular dysfunction in patients with chronic congestive heart failure. The transduction of myocardial cells with viral constructs encoding a specific cardiomyocyte Ca2+ pump in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), SRCa2+-ATPase has been shown to correct deficient Ca2+ handling in cardiomyocytes and improvements in contractility in preclinical studies, thus leading to the first clinical trial of gene therapy for heart failure. In cell therapy, it is not clear whether beneficial effects are cell-type specific and how improvements in contractility are brought about. Despite these uncertainties, a number of clinical trials are under way, supported by safety and efficacy data from trials of cell therapy in the setting of myocardial infarction. Safety concerns for gene therapy center on inflammatory and immune responses triggered by viral constructs, and for cell therapy with myoblast cells, the major concern is increased incidence of ventricular arrhythmia after cell transplantation. Principles and mechanisms of action of gene and cell therapy for heart failure are discussed, together with the potential influence of reactive oxygen species on the efficacy of these treatments and the status of myocardial-delivery techniques for viral constructs and cells. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 2025–2042. PMID:19416058

  1. Novel Cell and Gene Therapies for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hoxie, James A.; June, Carl H.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy dramatically improves survival in HIV-infected patients. However, persistence of HIV in reservoirs has necessitated lifelong treatment that can be complicated by cumulative toxicities, incomplete immune restoration, and the emergence of drug-resistant escape mutants. Cell and gene therapies offer the promise of preventing progressive HIV infection by interfering with HIV replication in the absence of chronic antiviral therapy. Individuals homozygous for a deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5Δ32) are largely resistant to infection from R5-topic HIV-1 strains, which are most commonly transmitted. A recent report that an HIV-infected patient with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia was effectively cured from HIV infection after transplantation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC) from a CCR5Δ32 homozygous donor has generated renewed interest in developing treatment strategies that target viral reservoirs and generate HIV resistance in a patient’s own cells. Although the development of cell-based and gene transfer therapies has been slow, progress in a number of areas is evident. Advances in the fields of gene-targeting strategies, T-cell-based approaches, and HSCs have been encouraging, and a series of ongoing and planned trials to establish proof of concept for strategies that could lead to successful cell and gene therapies for HIV are under way. The eventual goal of these studies is to eliminate latent viral reservoirs and the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy. PMID:23028130

  2. Human gene therapy and slippery slope arguments.

    PubMed Central

    McGleenan, T

    1995-01-01

    Any suggestion of altering the genetic makeup of human beings through gene therapy is quite likely to provoke a response involving some reference to a 'slippery slope'. In this article the author examines the topography of two different types of slippery slope argument, the logical slippery slope and the rhetorical slippery slope argument. The logical form of the argument suggests that if we permit somatic cell gene therapy then we are committed to accepting germ line gene therapy in the future because there is no logically sustainable distinction between them. The rhetorical form posits that allowing somatic cell therapy now will be taking the first step on a slippery slope which will ultimately lead to the type of genocide perpetrated by the Nazis. The author tests the validity of these lines of argument against the facts of human gene therapy and concludes that because of their dependence on probabilities that cannot be empirically proven they should be largely disregarded in the much more important debate on moral line-drawing in gene therapy. PMID:8778459

  3. [Gene therapy--hopes and fears].

    PubMed

    Pietrzyk, J J

    1998-01-01

    Gene therapy assumes the correction of a genetic defect by the delivery of a correct DNA sequence to the target cells. Depending on the target cells two types gene therapy have been defined: somatic and germinal. By July 1998, 351 protocols of somatic therapy were approved by the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee. The majority of protocols focus on cancer therapy and monogenic diseases. By now, still there is more unfulfilled expectation than clinically sound achievements, since no effective prevention or successful treatment for genetic diseases or cancer have been developed. Germline genetic modification is considered as the treatment of choice for such a diseases like retinoblastoma. Tay-Sachs, Lesch-Nyhan and metachromatic leuko-dystrophy. This approach which is still illegal or prohibited by rules in many European countries, is gathering more and more advocates. Once we learn how to control gene expression the perspectives for clinical application of gene therapy might be enormous. The safety of genetic modification of gametes or embryonal stem cells remains to be properly addressed and successfully solved. The ethical issues of germinal gene therapy are still the subject of controversial opinions among the scientists, lawyers and philosophers.

  4. Human gene therapy and slippery slope arguments.

    PubMed

    McGleenan, T

    1995-12-01

    Any suggestion of altering the genetic makeup of human beings through gene therapy is quite likely to provoke a response involving some reference to a 'slippery slope'. In this article the author examines the topography of two different types of slippery slope argument, the logical slippery slope and the rhetorical slippery slope argument. The logical form of the argument suggests that if we permit somatic cell gene therapy then we are committed to accepting germ line gene therapy in the future because there is no logically sustainable distinction between them. The rhetorical form posits that allowing somatic cell therapy now will be taking the first step on a slippery slope which will ultimately lead to the type of genocide perpetrated by the Nazis. The author tests the validity of these lines of argument against the facts of human gene therapy and concludes that because of their dependence on probabilities that cannot be empirically proven they should be largely disregarded in the much more important debate on moral line-drawing in gene therapy.

  5. Alphavirus vectors for cancer gene therapy (review).

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Ryuya

    2004-04-01

    Alphaviruses have several characteristics that make them attractive as gene therapy vectors such as transient and high-level expression of a heterologous gene. Alphavirus vectors, Semliki Forest virus (SFV), Sindbis virus (SIN) and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) have been developed as gene expression vectors. Alphaviruses are positive-strand RNA viruses that can mediate efficient cytoplasmic gene expression in mammalian cells. The alphavirus RNA replication machinery has been engineered for high level heterologous gene expression. Since an RNA virus vector cannot integrate into chromosomal DNA, concerns about cell transformation are reduced. Alphavirus vectors demonstrate promise for the safe tumor-killing and tumor-specific immune responses. Recombinant alphavirus RNA replicons may facilitate gene therapy of cancer.

  6. Target Nanoparticles for Therapy - SANS and DLS of Drug Carrier Liposomes and Polymer Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, T.; Johnson, R.; Krebs, L.; Khoshakhlagh, P.; Langguth, P.; Hellmann, N.; Goerigk, G.; Boesecke, P.; Bravin, A.; Le Duc, G.; Szekely, N.; Schweins, R.

    2016-09-01

    T arget Nano-Pharmaceutics shall improve therapy and diagnosis of severe diseases, e.g. cancer, by individual targeting of drug-loaded nano-pharmaceuticals towards cancer cells, and drug uptake receptors in other diseases. Specific ligands, proteins or cofactors, which are recognized by the diseased cells or cells of food and drug uptake, are bound to the nanoparticle surface, and thus capable of directing the drug carriers. The strategy has two branches: a) for parenteral cancer medicine a ligand set (2-5 different, surface-linked) are selected according to the biopsy analysis of the patient tissue e.g. from tumor.; b) in the oral drug delivery part the drug transport is enforced by excipients/ detergents in combination with targeting materials for cellular receptors resulting in an induced drug uptake. Both targeting nanomaterials are characterized by a combination of SANS + DLS and SAXS or ASAXS in a feedback process during development by synthesis, nanoparticle assembly and formulation.

  7. Co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin liposomes: Development, characterization and in vitro and in vivo evaluation for breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eloy, Josimar O.; Petrilli, Raquel; Topan, José Fernando; Antonio, Heriton Marcelo Ribeiro; Barcellos, Juliana Palma Abriata; Chesca, Deise L.; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Tiezzi, Daniel G.; Lee, Robert J.; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel and rapamycin have been reported to act synergistically to treat breast cancer. Albeit paclitaxel is available for breast cancer treatment, the most commonly used formulation in the clinic presents side effects, limiting its use. Furthermore, both drugs present pharmacokinetics drawbacks limiting their in vivo efficacy and clinic combination. As an alternative, drug delivery systems, particularly liposomes, emerge as an option for drug combination, able to simultaneously deliver co-loaded drugs with improved therapeutic index. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop and characterize a co-loaded paclitaxel and rapamycin liposome and evaluate it for breast cancer efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that a SPC/Chol/DSPE-PEG (2000) liposome was able to co-encapsulate paclitaxel and rapamycin with suitable encapsulation efficiency values, nanometric particle size, low polydispersity and neutral zeta potential. Taken together, FTIR and thermal analysis evidenced drug conversion to the more bioavailable molecular and amorphous forms, respectively, for paclitaxel and rapamycin. The pegylated liposome exhibited excellent colloidal stability and was able to retain drugs encapsulated, which were released in a slow and sustained fashion. Liposomes were more cytotoxic to 4T1 breast cancer cell line than the free drugs and drugs acted synergistically, particularly when co-loaded. Finally, in vivo therapeutic evaluation carried out in 4T1-tumor-bearing mice confirmed the in vitro results. The co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin pegylated liposome better controlled tumor growth compared to the solution. Therefore, we expect that the formulation developed herein might be a contribution for future studies focusing on the clinical combination of paclitaxel and rapamycin. PMID:26836480

  8. Co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin liposomes: Development, characterization and in vitro and in vivo evaluation for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Eloy, Josimar O; Petrilli, Raquel; Topan, José Fernando; Antonio, Heriton Marcelo Ribeiro; Barcellos, Juliana Palma Abriata; Chesca, Deise L; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Tiezzi, Daniel G; Lee, Robert J; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2016-05-01

    Paclitaxel and rapamycin have been reported to act synergistically to treat breast cancer. Albeit paclitaxel is available for breast cancer treatment, the most commonly used formulation in the clinic presents side effects, limiting its use. Furthermore, both drugs present pharmacokinetics drawbacks limiting their in vivo efficacy and clinic combination. As an alternative, drug delivery systems, particularly liposomes, emerge as an option for drug combination, able to simultaneously deliver co-loaded drugs with improved therapeutic index. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop and characterize a co-loaded paclitaxel and rapamycin liposome and evaluate it for breast cancer efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that a SPC/Chol/DSPE-PEG (2000) liposome was able to co-encapsulate paclitaxel and rapamycin with suitable encapsulation efficiency values, nanometric particle size, low polydispersity and neutral zeta potential. Taken together, FTIR and thermal analysis evidenced drug conversion to the more bioavailable molecular and amorphous forms, respectively, for paclitaxel and rapamycin. The pegylated liposome exhibited excellent colloidal stability and was able to retain drugs encapsulated, which were released in a slow and sustained fashion. Liposomes were more cytotoxic to 4T1 breast cancer cell line than the free drugs and drugs acted synergistically, particularly when co-loaded. Finally, in vivo therapeutic evaluation carried out in 4T1-tumor-bearing mice confirmed the in vitro results. The co-loaded paclitaxel/rapamycin pegylated liposome better controlled tumor growth compared to the solution. Therefore, we expect that the formulation developed herein might be a contribution for future studies focusing on the clinical combination of paclitaxel and rapamycin.

  9. Gene replacement therapy for hereditary emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Skolnick, A.

    1989-11-10

    Investigators suggest that human trials of gene therapy to correct a genetic disorder that usually leads to emphysema early in life may be only a few years away. Speaking at the American Lung Association's Second Annual Science Writers' Forum, R. G. Crystal, chief of the Pulmonary Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute offered an explanation of how hereditary emphysema may be more amenable to genetic therapy than other such diseases. In persons who lack a functioning gene for alpha{sup 1}-antitrypsin, a proteolytic enzyme, neutrophil elastase, attacks the walls of the lungs' alveoli, eventually leading to progressive pulmonary function loss. Two animal models of gene insertion are described.

  10. Why commercialization of gene therapy stalled; examining the life cycles of gene therapy technologies.

    PubMed

    Ledley, F D; McNamee, L M; Uzdil, V; Morgan, I W

    2014-02-01

    This report examines the commercialization of gene therapy in the context of innovation theories that posit a relationship between the maturation of a technology through its life cycle and prospects for successful product development. We show that the field of gene therapy has matured steadily since the 1980s, with the congruent accumulation of >35 000 papers, >16 000 US patents, >1800 clinical trials and >$4.3 billion in capital investment in gene therapy companies. Gene therapy technologies comprise a series of dissimilar approaches for gene delivery, each of which has introduced a distinct product architecture. Using bibliometric methods, we quantify the maturation of each technology through a characteristic life cycle S-curve, from a Nascent stage, through a Growing stage of exponential advance, toward an Established stage and projected limit. Capital investment in gene therapy is shown to have occurred predominantly in Nascent stage technologies and to be negatively correlated with maturity. Gene therapy technologies are now achieving the level of maturity that innovation research and biotechnology experience suggest may be requisite for efficient product development. Asynchrony between the maturation of gene therapy technologies and capital investment in development-focused business models may have stalled the commercialization of gene therapy.

  11. The case for intrauterine gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Citra N; Waddington, Simon N; Biswas, Arijit; Davidoff, Andrew M; Choolani, Mahesh; Chan, Jerry K Y; Nathwani, Amit C

    2012-10-01

    Single-gene disorders can cause perinatal mortality or severe permanent morbidity. Intrauterine gene therapy seeks to correct the genetic defect in the early stages of pathogenesis through delivery of a vector system expressing the therapeutic transgene to the fetus. Advantages of intrauterine gene therapy include prevention of irreversible organ damage, potentially inducing central tolerance and wider bio-distribution, including the brain after delivery of vector. Already, proof-of-cure has been demonstrated in knockout animal models for several diseases. Long-term outcomes pertaining to efficacy and durability of transgene expression and safety are under investigation in clinically relevant non-human primate models. Bystander effects in the mother from transplacental vector trafficking require further assessment. In this chapter, we discuss the candidate diseases amenable to intrauterine gene therapy, current state-of-the-art evidence, and potential clinical applications.

  12. Update on gene therapy for immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Donald B

    2010-05-01

    Primary immune deficiencies (PID) are due to blood cell defects and can be treated with transplantation of normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) from another person (allogeneic). Gene therapy in which a patient's autologous HSC are genetically corrected represents an alternative treatment for patients with PID, which could avoid the immunologic risks of allogeneic HSCT and confer similar benefits. Recent clinical trials using gene therapy have led to immune restoration in patients with X-linked severe combined immune deficiency (XSCID), adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient SCID and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). However, severe complications arose in several of the patients in whom the integrated retroviral vectors led to leukoproliferative disorders. New approaches using safer integrating vectors or direct correction of the defective gene underlying the PID are being developed and may lead to safer and effective gene therapy for PID.

  13. What Is Next for Retinal Gene Therapy?

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, Luk H

    2015-04-15

    The field of gene therapy for retinal blinding disorders is experiencing incredible momentum, justified by hopeful results in early stage clinical trials for inherited retinal degenerations. The premise of the use of the gene as a drug has come a long way, and may have found its niche in the treatment of retinal disease. Indeed, with only limited treatment options available for retinal indications, gene therapy has been proven feasible, safe, and effective and may lead to durable effects following a single injection. Here, we aim at putting into context the promise and potential, the technical, clinical, and economic boundaries limiting its application and development, and speculate on a future in which gene therapy is an integral component of ophthalmic clinical care. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  14. Targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Wilson, David R.; Zamboni, Camila G.; Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, advances in designing polymeric nanoparticles for targeted cancer gene therapy are reviewed. Characterization and evaluation of biomaterials, targeting ligands, and transcriptional elements are each discussed. Advances in biomaterials have driven improvements to nanoparticle stability and tissue targeting, conjugation of ligands to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles enable binding to specific cancer cells, and the design of transcriptional elements has enabled selective DNA expression specific to the cancer cells. Together, these features have improved the performance of polymeric nanoparticles as targeted non-viral gene delivery vectors to treat cancer. As polymeric nanoparticles can be designed to be biodegradable, non-toxic, and to have reduced immunogenicity and tumorigenicity compared to viral platforms, they have significant potential for clinical use. Results of polymeric gene therapy in clinical trials and future directions for the engineering of nanoparticle systems for targeted cancer gene therapy are also presented. PMID:26061296

  15. Employment of Salmonella in Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary limitations of cancer gene therapy is lack of selectivity of the therapeutic gene to tumor cells. Current efforts are focused on discovering and developing tumor-targeting vectors that selectively target only cancer cells but spare normal cells to improve the therapeutic index. The use of preferentially tumor-targeting bacteria as vectors is one of the innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer. This is based on the observation that some obligate or facultative-anaerobic bacteria are capable of multiplying selectively in tumors and inhibiting their growth. In this study, we exploited attenuated Salmonella as a tumoricidal agent and a vector to deliver genes for tumor-targeted gene therapy. Attenuated Salmonella, carrying a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding an anti-angiogenic gene, was used to evaluate its' ability for tumor targeting and gene delivery in murine tumor models. We also investigated the use of a polymer to modify or shield Salmonella from the pre-existing immune response in the host in order to improve gene delivery to the tumor. These results suggest that tumor-targeted gene therapy using Salmonella carrying a therapeutic gene, which exerts tumoricidal and anti-angiogenic activities, represents a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors.

  16. Development of HVJ envelope vector and its application to gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Yasufumi; Yamamoto, Seiji; Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2005-01-01

    To create a highly efficient vector system that is minimally invasive, we initially developed liposomes that contained fusion proteins from the hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ; Sendai virus). These HVJ-liposomes delivered genes and drugs to cultured cells and tissues. To simplify the vector system and develop more efficient vectors, the next approach was to convert viruses to non-viral vectors. Based on this concept, we recently developed the HVJ envelope vector. HVJ with robust fusion activity was inactivated, and exogenous DNA was incorporated into the viral envelope by detergent treatment and centrifugation. The resulting HVJ envelope vector introduced plasmid DNA efficiently and rapidly into both cultured cells in vitro and organs in vivo. Furthermore, proteins, synthetic oligonucleotides, and drugs have also been effectively introduced into cells using the HVJ envelope vector. The HVJ envelope vector is a promising tool for both ex vivo and in vivo gene therapy experiments. Hearing impairment in rats was prevented and treated by hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer to cerebrospinal fluid using HVJ envelope vector. For cancer treatment, tumor-associated antigen genes were delivered efficiently to mouse dendritic cells to evoke an anti-cancer immune response. HVJ envelope vector fused dendritic cells and tumor cells and simultaneously delivered cytokine genes, such as IL-12, to the hybrid cells. This strategy successfully prevented and treated cancers in mice by stimulating the presentation of tumor antigens and the maturation of T cells. For human gene therapy, a pilot plant to commercially produce clinical grade HVJ envelope vector has been established.

  17. Molecular imaging and cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Saadatpour, Z; Bjorklund, G; Chirumbolo, S; Alimohammadi, M; Ehsani, H; Ebrahiminejad, H; Pourghadamyari, H; Baghaei, B; Mirzaei, H R; Sahebkar, A; Mirzaei, H; Keshavarzi, M

    2016-11-18

    Gene therapy is known as one of the most advanced approaches for therapeutic prospects ranging from tackling genetic diseases to combating cancer. In this approach, different viral and nonviral vector systems such as retrovirus, lentivirus, plasmid and transposon have been designed and employed. These vector systems are designed to target different therapeutic genes in various tissues and cells such as tumor cells. Therefore, detection of the vectors containing therapeutic genes and monitoring of response to the treatment are the main issues that are commonly faced by researchers. Imaging techniques have been critical in guiding physicians in the more accurate and precise diagnosis and monitoring of cancer patients in different phases of malignancies. Imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are non-invasive and powerful tools for monitoring of the distribution of transgene expression over time and assessing patients who have received therapeutic genes. Here, we discuss most recent advances in cancer gene therapy and molecular approaches as well as imaging techniques that are utilized to detect cancer gene therapeutics and to monitor the patients' response to these therapies worldwide, particularly in Iranian Academic Medical Centers and Hospitals.Cancer Gene Therapy advance online publication, 18 November 2016; doi:10.1038/cgt.2016.62.

  18. Nonviral gene therapy approaches to hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vargas, Andrew; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2004-04-01

    The goal of hemophilia gene therapy is to obtain long-term therapeutic levels of factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX) without stimulating an immune response against the transgene product or the vector. The success of gene therapy is largely dependent on the development of appropriate gene delivery vectors. Both viral vectors and nonviral vectors have been considered for the development of hemophilia gene therapy. In general, viral vectors are far more efficient than nonviral gene delivery approaches and resulted in long-term therapeutic levels of FVIII or FIX in preclinical animal models. However, there are several reasons why a nonviral treatment would still be desirable, particularly because some viral vectors are associated with inflammatory reactions, that render transgene expression transient, or with an increased risk of insertional oncogenesis when random integrating vectors are used. Nonviral vectors may obviate some of these concerns. Since nonviral vectors are typically assembled in cell-free systems from well-defined components, they have significant manufacturing advantages over viral vectors. The continued development of improved nonviral gene delivery approaches offers new perspectives for gene therapy of chronic diseases including hemophilia.

  19. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Green, Andrew E; Rose, Peter G

    2006-01-01

    Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin is a formulation of doxorubicin in which the molecule itself is packaged in a liposome made of various lipids with an outer coating of polyethylene glycol. Liposomal technology is being used in increasing amounts in the therapy of a variety of cancers, including ovarian cancers. This article reviews the mechanistic actions of this formulation, the Phase II and Phase III data that helped define the role of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in recurrent ovarian cancer, as well as a discussion of some of the side-effects and their management. PMID:17717964

  20. Current status of haemophilia gene therapy.

    PubMed

    High, K H; Nathwani, A; Spencer, T; Lillicrap, D

    2014-05-01

    After many reports of successful gene therapy studies in small and large animal models of haemophilia, we have, at last, seen the first signs of success in human patients. These very encouraging results have been achieved with the use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors in patients with severe haemophilia B. Following on from these initial promising studies, there are now three ongoing trials of AAV-mediated gene transfer in haemophilia B all aiming to express the factor IX gene from the liver. Nevertheless, as discussed in the first section of this article, there are still a number of significant hurdles to overcome if haemophilia B gene therapy is to become more widely available. The second section of this article deals with the challenges relating to factor VIII gene transfer. While the recent results in haemophilia B are extremely encouraging, there is, as yet, no similar data for factor VIII gene therapy. It is widely accepted that this therapeutic target will be significantly more problematic for a variety of reasons including accommodating the larger factor VIII cDNA, achieving adequate levels of transgene expression and preventing the far more frequent complication of antifactor VIII immunity. In the final section of the article, the alternative approach of lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer is discussed. While AAV-mediated approaches to transgene delivery have led the way in clinical haemophilia gene therapy, there are still a number of potential advantages of using an alternative delivery vehicle including the fact that ex vivo host cell transduction will avoid the likelihood of immune responses to the vector. Overall, these are exciting times for haemophilia gene therapy with the likelihood of further clinical successes in the near future. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Cell transfection in vitro and in vivo with nontoxic TAT peptide-liposome-DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Levchenko, Tatyana S.; Rammohan, Ram; Volodina, Natalia; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; D'Souza, Gerard G. M.

    2003-02-01

    Liposomes modified with TAT peptide (TATp-liposomes) showed fast and efficient translocation into the cell cytoplasm with subsequent migration into the perinuclear zone. TATp-liposomes containing a small quantity (10 mol %) of a cationic lipid formed firm noncovalent complexes with DNA. Here, we present results demonstrating both in vitro and in vivo transfection with TATp-liposome-DNA complexes. Mouse NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and rat H9C2 cardiomyocytes were transfected with such complexes in vitro. The transfection with the TATp-liposome-associated pEGFP-N1 plasmid encoding for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was high, whereas the cytotoxicity was lower than that of commonly used cationic lipid-based gene-delivery systems. Intratumoral injection of TATp-liposome-DNA complexes into the Lewis lung carcinoma tumor of mice also resulted in an expression of GFP in tumor cells. This transfection system should be useful for various protocols of cell treatment in vitro or ex vivo as well as for localized in vivo gene therapy.

  2. Gene therapy legislation in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Bleijs, D A; Haenen, I T W C; Bergmans, J E N

    2007-10-01

    Several regulatory organisations are involved in the assessment of clinical gene therapy trials involving genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in The Netherlands. Medical, ethical and scientific aspects are, for instance, evaluated by the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CCMO). The Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment (VROM) is the competent authority for the environmental risk assessment according to the deliberate release Directive 2001/18/EC. A Gene Therapy Office has been established in order to streamline the different national review processes and to enable the official procedures to be completed as quickly as possible. Although the Gene Therapy Office improved the application process at the national level, there is a difference of opinion between the EU member states with respect to the EU Directive according to which gene therapy trials are assessed, that urges for harmonisation. This review summarises the gene therapy legislation in The Netherlands and in particular The Netherlands rationale to follow Directive 2001/18/EC for the environmental risk assessment.

  3. Stem cell based cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Cihova, Marina; Altanerova, Veronika; Altaner, Cestmir

    2011-10-03

    The attractiveness of prodrug cancer gene therapy by stem cells targeted to tumors lies in activating the prodrug directly within the tumor mass, thus avoiding systemic toxicity. Suicide gene therapy using genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells has the advantage of being safe, because prodrug administration not only eliminates tumor cells but consequently kills the more resistant therapeutic stem cells as well. This review provides an explanation of the stem cell-targeted prodrug cancer gene therapy principle, with focus on the choice of prodrug, properties of bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem and neural stem cells as well as the mechanisms of their tumor homing ability. Therapeutic achievements of the cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine prodrug system and Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir are discussed. In addition, delivery of immunostimulatory cytokines, apoptosis inducing genes, nanoparticles and antiangiogenic proteins by stem cells to tumors and metastases is discussed as a promising approach for antitumor therapy. Combinations of traditional, targeted and stem cell-directed gene therapy could significantly advance the treatment of cancer.

  4. A Comprehensive Review of Retinal Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boye, Shannon E; Boye, Sanford L; Lewin, Alfred S; Hauswirth, William W

    2013-01-01

    Blindness, although not life threatening, is a debilitating disorder for which few, if any treatments exist. Ocular gene therapies have the potential to profoundly improve the quality of life in patients with inherited retinal disease. As such, tremendous focus has been given to develop such therapies. Several factors make the eye an ideal organ for gene-replacement therapy including its accessibility, immune privilege, small size, compartmentalization, and the existence of a contralateral control. This review will provide a comprehensive summary of (i) existing gene therapy clinical trials for several genetic forms of blindness and (ii) preclinical efficacy and safety studies in a variety of animal models of retinal disease which demonstrate strong potential for clinical application. To be as comprehensive as possible, we include additional proof of concept studies using gene replacement, neurotrophic/neuroprotective, optogenetic, antiangiogenic, or antioxidative stress strategies as well as a description of the current challenges and future directions in the ocular gene therapy field to this review as a supplement. PMID:23358189

  5. Fetal gene therapy: opportunities and risks.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anna M; Schoeberlein, Andreina; Surbek, Daniel

    2009-08-10

    Advances in human prenatal medicine and molecular genetics have allowed the diagnosis of many genetic diseases early in gestation. In-utero transplantation of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has been successfully used as a therapy in different animal models and recently also in human fetuses. Unfortunately, clinical success of this novel treatment is limited by the lack of donor cell engraftment in non-immunocompromised hosts and is thus restricted to diseases where the fetus is affected by severe immunodeficiency. Gene therapy using genetically modified autologous HSC circumvents allogeneic HLA barriers and constitutes one of the most promising new approaches to correct genetic deficits in the fetus. Recent developments of strategies to overcome failure of efficient transduction of quiescent hematopoietic cells include the use of new vector constructs and transduction protocols. These improvements open new perspectives for gene therapy in general and for prenatal gene transfer in particular. The fetus may be especially susceptible for successful gene therapy due to the immunologic naiveté of the immature hematopoietic system during gestation, precluding an immune reaction towards the transgene. Ethical issues, in particular those regarding treatment safety, must be taken into account before clinical trials with fetal gene therapy in human pregnancies can be initiated.

  6. New tools in regenerative medicine: gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Ruiz, Miguel; Regueiro, José R

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy aims to transfer genetic material into cells to provide them with new functions. A gene transfer agent has to be safe, capable of expressing the desired gene for a sustained period of time in a sufficiently large population of cells to produce a biological effect. Identifying a gene transfer tool that meets all of these criteria has proven to be a difficult objective. Viral and nonviral vectors, in vivo, ex vivo and in situ strategies co-exist at present, although ex vivo lenti-or retroviral vectors are presently the most popular.Natural stem cells (from embryonic, hematopoietic, mesenchymal, or adult tissues) or induced progenitor stem (iPS) cells can be modified by gene therapy for use in regenerative medicine. Among them, hematopoietic stem cells have shown clear clinical benefit, but iPS cells hold humongous potential with no ethical concerns.

  7. Sequential or combination antifungal therapy with voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B in a Guinea pig model of invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, William R; Coco, Brent J; Patterson, Thomas F

    2006-04-01

    We evaluated combinations of voriconazole (VRC) and liposomal amphotericin B (L-AMB) in a guinea pig invasive aspergillosis model. Simultaneous VRC and L-AMB was most effective, although VRC monotherapy was also effective. These regimens as well as sequential L-AMB followed by VRC were more effective than L-AMB alone or VRC followed by L-AMB.

  8. Therapeutic genes for anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bovolenta, Chiara; Porcellini, Simona; Alberici, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The multiple therapeutic approaches developed so far to cope HIV-1 infection, such as anti-retroviral drugs, germicides and several attempts of therapeutic vaccination have provided significant amelioration in terms of life-quality and survival rate of AIDS patients. Nevertheless, no approach has demonstrated efficacy in eradicating this lethal, if untreated, infection. The curative power of gene therapy has been proven for the treatment of monogenic immunodeficiensies, where permanent gene modification of host cells is sufficient to correct the defect for life-time. No doubt, a similar concept is not applicable for gene therapy of infectious immunodeficiensies as AIDS, where there is not a single gene to be corrected; rather engineered cells must gain immunotherapeutic or antiviral features to grant either short- or long-term efficacy mostly by acquisition of antiviral genes or payloads. Anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy is one of the most promising strategy, although challenging, to eradicate HIV-1 infection. In fact, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with one or multiple therapeutic genes is expected to originate blood cell progenies resistant to viral infection and thereby able to prevail on infected unprotected cells. Ultimately, protected cells will re-establish a functional immune system able to control HIV-1 replication. More than hundred gene therapy clinical trials against AIDS employing different viral vectors and transgenes have been approved or are currently ongoing worldwide. This review will overview anti-HIV-1 infection gene therapy field evaluating strength and weakness of the transgenes and payloads used in the past and of those potentially exploitable in the future.

  9. Evolving Gene Therapy in Primary Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Adrian J; Williams, David A

    2017-05-03

    Prior to the first successful bone marrow transplant in 1968, patients born with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) invariably died. Today, with a widening availability of newborn screening, major improvements in the application of allogeneic procedures, and the emergence of successful hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC/P) gene therapy, the majority of these children can be identified and cured. Here, we trace key steps in the development of clinical gene therapy for SCID and other primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs), and review the prospects for adoption of new targets and technologies. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. NIH modifies gene therapy research guidelines.

    PubMed

    Levine, Carol

    1985-06-01

    In response to public comments on the first draft of its "Points to Consider in the Design and Submission of Human Somatic-Cell Gene Therapy Protocols," the Working Group on Human Gene Therapy of the National Institutes of Health has issued a revised set of guidelines for researchers. This second draft spells out the need for public review of gene therapy protocols, the Working Group's willingness to review selected protocols before the completion of animal studies, and requirements for informed consent to long-term follow-up and to autopsy in the event of death. The document also expresses the Working Group's concern that researchers and the public be kept fully informed of the results of such studies.

  11. Gene Therapy for Fracture Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    chemotactic factor for human mast cells. J. Immunol. 153: 3717-3723. 36 41. Ono I, Yamashita T, Hida T, Jin HY, Ito Y, Hamada H, Akasaka Y, Ishii T...1994;153:3717–23. [37] Ono I, Yamashita T, Hida T, Jin HY, Ito Y, Hamada H, et al. Local administration of hepatocyte growth factor gene enhances the

  12. A review of therapeutic prospects of non-viral gene therapy in the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Koirala, Adarsha; Conley, Shannon M.; Naash, Muna I.

    2013-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy has been extensively explored in recent years as a therapeutic avenue to target diseases of the cornea, retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy has shown promise in several RPE clinical trials but AAVs have limited payload capacity and potential immunogenicity. Traditionally however, non-viral alternatives have been plagued by low transfection efficiency, short-term expression and low expression levels. Recently, these drawbacks have begun to be overcome by the use of specialty carriers such as polylysine, liposomes, or polyethyleneimines, and by inclusion of suitable DNA elements to enhance gene expression and longevity. Recent advancements in the field have yielded non-viral vectors that have favorable safety profiles, lack immunogenicity, exhibit long-term elevated gene expression, and show efficient transfection in the retina and RPE, making them poised to transition to clinical applications. Here we discuss the advancements in nanotechnology and vector engineering that have improved the prospects for clinical application of non-viral gene therapy in the RPE. PMID:23796578

  13. Computed tomography imaging of transferrin targeting liposomes encapsulating both boron and iodine contrast agents by convection-enhanced delivery to F98 rat glioma for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shiro; Kawabata, Shinji; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Doi, Atsushi; Ikeda, Naokado; Yamashita, Taro; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Kasaoka, Satoshi; Maruyama, Kazuo; Miyatake, Shin-ichi

    2011-05-01

    To achieve potent tumor-selective antitumor efficacy by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), it is important to have a significant differential uptake of 10B between tumor cells and normal cells. This should enable BNCT to reduce damage to normal tissues compared with other radiation therapies. To augment the therapeutic efficacy of BNCT, we used transferrin-conjugated polyethylene glycol (PEG) (TF-PEG) liposome encapsulating sodium borocaptate and Iomeprol, an iodine contrast agent, with intratumoral convection-enhanced delivery (CED) in a rat glioma tumor model. The in vitro (10)B concentration of F98 rat glioma cells was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after incubation with either TF-PEG or PEG liposomes. For in vivo biodistribution studies, (10)B concentrations within blood, normal brain tissue, and intracerebrally transplanted F98 cells were measured with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry after CED of the compounds, and computed tomography was performed at selected time intervals. (10)B concentrations of F98 cultured glioma cells in vitro 6 hours after exposure to PEG and TF-PEG liposome were 16.1 and 51.9 ng (10)B/10(6) cells, respectively. (10)B concentrations in F98 glioma tissue 24 hours after CED were 22.5 and 82.2 μg/g, by PEG and TF-PEG liposome, respectively, with lower (10)B concentrations in blood and normal brain. Iomeprol provided vivid and stable enhanced computed tomography imaging of the transplanted tumor even 72 hours after CED by TF-PEG liposome. Conversely, tissue enhancement had already washed out at 24 hours after CED of the PEG liposomes. The combination of TF-PEG liposome encapsulating sodium borocaptate and Iomeprol and intratumoral CED enables not only a precise and potent targeting of boron delivery to the tumor tissue, but also the ability to follow the trace of boron delivery administered intratumorally by real-time computed tomography.

  14. Engineering targeted viral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Waehler, Reinhard; Russell, Stephen J; Curiel, David T

    2007-08-01

    To achieve therapeutic success, transfer vehicles for gene therapy must be capable of transducing target cells while avoiding impact on non-target cells. Despite the high transduction efficiency of viral vectors, their tropism frequently does not match the therapeutic need. In the past, this lack of appropriate targeting allowed only partial exploitation of the great potential of gene therapy. Substantial progress in modifying viral vectors using diverse techniques now allows targeting to many cell types in vitro. Although important challenges remain for in vivo applications, the first clinical trials with targeted vectors have already begun to take place.

  15. Radiopharmaceutical and Gene Therapy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2006-02-09

    The objective of our research program was to determine whether novel receptors can be induced in solid cancers as a target for therapy with radiolabeled unmodified peptides that bind to the receptors. The hypothesis was that induction of a high number of receptors on the surface of these cancer cells would result in an increased uptake of the radiolabeled monomeric peptides as compared to published results with radiolabeled antibodies or peptides to naturally expressed antigens or receptors, and therefore a better therapeutic outcome. The following is a summary of published results.

  16. Haemophilia gene therapy: Progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lheriteau, Elsa; Davidoff, Andrew M; Nathwani, Amit C

    2015-09-01

    Current treatment for haemophilia entails life-long intravenous infusion of clotting factor concentrates. This is highly effective at controlling and preventing haemorrhage and its associated complications. Clotting factor replacement therapy is, however, demanding, exceedingly expensive and not curative. In contrast, gene therapy for haemophilia offers the potential of a cure as a result of continuous endogenous expression of biologically active factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX) proteins following stable transfer of a normal copy of the respective gene. Our group has recently established the first clear proof-of-concept for a gene therapy approach to the treatment of severe haemophilia B. This entails a single intravenous administration of an adeno-associated virus vector encoding an optimised FIX gene, resulting in a long-term (>4 years) dose dependent increase in plasma FIX levels at therapeutic levels without persistent or late toxicity. Gene therapy therefore has the potential to change the treatment paradigm for haemophilia but several hurdles need to be overcome before this can happen. This review provides a summary of the progress made to date and discusses the remaining changes.

  17. Doped colorimetric assay liposomes

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides compositions comprising colorimetric assay liposomes. The present invention also provides methods for producing colorimetric liposomes and calorimetric liposome assay systems. In preferred embodiments, these calorimetric liposome systems provide high levels of sensitivity through the use of dopant molecules. As these dopants allow the controlled destabilization of the liposome structure, upon exposure of the doped liposomes to analyte(s) of interest, the indicator color change is facilitated and more easily recognized.

  18. Gene repair and transposon-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Paul D; Augustin, Lance B; Kren, Betsy T; Steer, Clifford J

    2002-01-01

    The main strategy of gene therapy has traditionally been focused on gene augmentation. This approach typically involves the introduction of an expression system designed to express a specific protein in the transfected cell. Both the basic and clinical sciences have generated enough information to suggest that gene therapy would eventually alter the fundamental practice of modern medicine. However, despite progress in the field, widespread clinical applications and success have not been achieved. The myriad deficiencies associated with gene augmentation have resulted in the development of alternative approaches to treat inherited and acquired genetic disorders. One, derived primarily from the pioneering work of homologous recombination, is gene repair. Simply stated, the process involves targeting the mutation in situ for gene correction and a return to normal gene function. Site-specific genetic repair has many advantages over augmentation although it too is associated with significant limitations. This review outlines the advantages and disadvantages of gene correction. In particular, we discuss technologies based on chimeric RNA/DNA oligonucleotides, single-stranded and triplex-forming oligonucleotides, and small fragment homologous replacement. While each of these approaches is different, they all share a number of common characteristics, including the need for efficient delivery of nucleic acids to the nucleus. In addition, we review the potential application of a novel and exciting nonviral gene augmentation strategy--the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

  19. Genome editing for human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Torsten B; Mandal, Pankaj K; Ferreira, Leonardo M R; Rossi, Derrick J; Cowan, Chad A

    2014-01-01

    The rapid advancement of genome-editing techniques holds much promise for the field of human gene therapy. From bacteria to model organisms and human cells, genome editing tools such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZNFs), TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 have been successfully used to manipulate the respective genomes with unprecedented precision. With regard to human gene therapy, it is of great interest to test the feasibility of genome editing in primary human hematopoietic cells that could potentially be used to treat a variety of human genetic disorders such as hemoglobinopathies, primary immunodeficiencies, and cancer. In this chapter, we explore the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for the efficient ablation of genes in two clinically relevant primary human cell types, CD4+ T cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. By using two guide RNAs directed at a single locus, we achieve highly efficient and predictable deletions that ablate gene function. The use of a Cas9-2A-GFP fusion protein allows FACS-based enrichment of the transfected cells. The ease of designing, constructing, and testing guide RNAs makes this dual guide strategy an attractive approach for the efficient deletion of clinically relevant genes in primary human hematopoietic stem and effector cells and enables the use of CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy.

  20. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life.

  1. The Mucus Barrier to Inhaled Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gregg A; Jung, James; Hanes, Justin; Suk, Jung Soo

    2016-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the airway mucus gel layer may be impermeable to the viral and synthetic gene vectors used in past inhaled gene therapy clinical trials for diseases like cystic fibrosis. These findings support the logic that inhaled gene vectors that are incapable of penetrating the mucus barrier are unlikely to provide meaningful benefit to patients. In this review, we discuss the biochemical and biophysical features of mucus that contribute its barrier function, and how these barrier properties may be reinforced in patients with lung disease. We next review biophysical techniques used to assess the potential ability of gene vectors to penetrate airway mucus. Finally, we provide new data suggesting that fresh human airway mucus should be used to test the penetration rates of gene vectors. The physiological barrier properties of spontaneously expectorated CF sputum remained intact up to 24 hours after collection when refrigerated at 4 °C. Conversely, the barrier properties were significantly altered after freezing and thawing of sputum samples. Gene vectors capable of overcoming the airway mucus barrier hold promise as a means to provide the widespread gene transfer throughout the airway epithelium required to achieve meaningful patient outcomes in inhaled gene therapy clinical trials.

  2. Renal diseases as targets of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brett; Giannoukakis, Nick; Trucco, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    A number of renal pathologies exist that have seen little or no improvement in treatment methods over the past 20 years. These pathologies include acute and chronic kidney diseases as well as posttransplant kidney survival and host rejection. A novel approach to treatment methodology may provide new insight to further progress our understanding of the disease and overall patient outcome. Recent advances in human genomics and gene delivery systems have opened the door to possible cures through the direct modulation of cellular genes. These techniques of gene therapy have not been extensively applied to renal pathologies, but clinical trials on other organ systems and kidney research in animal models hold promise. Techniques have employed viral and nonviral vectors to deliver gene modulating compounds directly into the cell. These vectors have the capability to replace defective alleles, express novel genes, or suppress the expression of pathogenic genes in a wide variety of kidney cell types. Focus has also been placed on ex vivo modification of kidney tissue to promote allograft survival and limit the resulting immune response to the transplanted organ. This could prove a valuable alternative to current immunosuppressive drugs and their deleterious effects on patients. While continued research and clinical trials are needed to identify a robust system of gene delivery, gene therapy techniques have great potential to treat kidney disease at the cellular level and improve patient quality of life.

  3. Gene Therapy for Fracture Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    relative transgene expression efficiencies for the MLV-based and lentiviral-based vectors, the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) was used as...for both Cy3 and Cy5 2,-15i Hybridized to to Aigilent Rat -s 2-- Gene Chip - iGnTrr. . tea 2 ug universal RNAw silx sl59 (?es) Cy310-0 (control) 1...fractures were also examined at sacrifice for evidence of fibrosis due to irritation or migration of the stabilizing pin. None was observed and the fracture

  4. [Developments in gene delivery vectors for ocular gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Khabou, Hanen; Dalkara, Deniz

    2015-05-01

    Gene therapy is quickly becoming a reality applicable in the clinic for inherited retinal diseases. Its remarkable success in safety and efficacy, in clinical trials for Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) type II generated significant interest and opened up possibilities for a new era of retinal gene therapies. Success in these clinical trials was mainly due to the favorable characteristics of the retina as a target organ. The eye offers several advantages as it is readily accessible and has some degree of immune privilege making it suitable for application of viral vectors. The viral vectors most frequently used for retinal gene delivery are lentivirus, adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV). Here we will discuss the use of these viral vectors in retinal gene delivery with a strong focus on favorable properties of AAV. Thanks to its small size, AAV diffuses well in the inter-neural matrix making it suitable for applications in neural retina. Building on this initial clinical success with LCA II, we have now many opportunities to extend this proof-of-concept to other retinal diseases using AAV as a vector. This article will discuss what are some of the most imminent cellular targets for such therapies and the AAV toolkit that has been built to target these cells successfully. We will also discuss some of the challenges that we face in translating AAV-based gene therapies to the clinic.

  5. Liposomes versus metallic nanostructures: differences in the process of knowledge translation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, David; Duran, Luis; Moreno, Laura; Ochoa, Héctor; Castaño, Víctor M

    2014-01-01

    This research maps the knowledge translation process for two different types of nanotechnologies applied to cancer: liposomes and metallic nanostructures (MNs). We performed a structural analysis of citation networks and text mining supported in controlled vocabularies. In the case of liposomes, our results identify subnetworks (invisible colleges) associated with different therapeutic strategies: nanopharmacology, hyperthermia, and gene therapy. Only in the pharmacological strategy was an organized knowledge translation process identified, which, however, is monopolized by the liposomal doxorubicins. In the case of MNs, subnetworks are not differentiated by the type of therapeutic strategy, and the content of the documents is still basic research. Research on MNs is highly focused on developing a combination of molecular imaging and photothermal therapy.

  6. Liposomes versus metallic nanostructures: differences in the process of knowledge translation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo-Ortiz, David; Duran, Luis; Moreno, Laura; Ochoa, Héctor; Castaño, Víctor M

    2014-01-01

    This research maps the knowledge translation process for two different types of nanotechnologies applied to cancer: liposomes and metallic nanostructures (MNs). We performed a structural analysis of citation networks and text mining supported in controlled vocabularies. In the case of liposomes, our results identify subnetworks (invisible colleges) associated with different therapeutic strategies: nanopharmacology, hyperthermia, and gene therapy. Only in the pharmacological strategy was an organized knowledge translation process identified, which, however, is monopolized by the liposomal doxorubicins. In the case of MNs, subnetworks are not differentiated by the type of therapeutic strategy, and the content of the documents is still basic research. Research on MNs is highly focused on developing a combination of molecular imaging and photothermal therapy. PMID:24920900

  7. Gene Insertion Into Genomic Safe Harbors for Human Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Schambach, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Genomic safe harbors (GSHs) are sites in the genome able to accommodate the integration of new genetic material in a manner that ensures that the newly inserted genetic elements: (i) function predictably and (ii) do not cause alterations of the host genome posing a risk to the host cell or organism. GSHs are thus ideal sites for transgene insertion whose use can empower functional genetics studies in basic research and therapeutic applications in human gene therapy. Currently, no fully validated GSHs exist in the human genome. Here, we review our formerly proposed GSH criteria and discuss additional considerations on extending these criteria, on strategies for the identification and validation of GSHs, as well as future prospects on GSH targeting for therapeutic applications. In view of recent advances in genome biology, gene targeting technologies, and regenerative medicine, gene insertion into GSHs can potentially catalyze nearly all applications in human gene therapy. PMID:26867951

  8. Rapid delivery of small interfering RNA by biosurfactant MEL-A-containing liposomes.

    PubMed

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2011-10-28

    The downregulation of gene expression by RNA interference holds great potential for genetic analysis and gene therapy. However, a more efficient delivery system for small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the target cells is required for wide fields such as cell biology, physiology, and clinical application. Non-viral vectors are stronger candidates than viral vectors because they are safer and easier to prepare. We have previously used a new method for gene transfection by combining cationic liposomes with the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A). The novel MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes rapidly delivered DNA (plasmids and oligonucleotides) into the cytosol and nucleus through membrane fusion between liposomes and the plasma membrane, and consequently, enhanced the gene transfection efficiency. In this study, we determined the efficiency of MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. We observed that exogenous and endogenous protein expression was suppressed by approximately 60% at 24h after brief (30 min) incubation of target cells with MEL-A-containing cationic liposome/siRNA complexes. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that suppression of protein expression was caused by rapid siRNA delivery into the cytosol. We found that the MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes directly delivered siRNA into the cytoplasm by the membrane fusion in addition to endocytotic pathway whereas Lipofectamine RNAiMax delivered siRNA only by the endocytotic pathway. It seems that the ability to rapidly and directly deliver siRNA into the cytosol using MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes is able to reduce immune responses, cytotoxicity, and other side effects caused by viral vectors in clinical applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural Characterization of Cationic Liposomes Loaded with Sugar-Based Carboranes

    PubMed Central

    Ristori, Sandra; Oberdisse, Julian; Grillo, Isabelle; Donati, Alessandro; Spalla, Olivier

    2005-01-01

    In this article we report the physicochemical characterization of cationic liposomes loaded with orthocarborane and two of its sugar-containing derivatives. Carboranes are efficient boron delivery agents in boron neutron capture therapy, an anti-cancer treatment based on neutron absorption by 10B nuclei. Cationic liposomes were prepared using the positively charged DOTAP and the zwitterionic DOPE, as a helper lipid. These liposomes are currently used in gene therapy for their ability in targeting the cell nucleus; therefore they can be considered appropriate vectors for boron neutron capture therapy, in the quest of reducing the high boron amount that is necessary for successful cancer treatment. Boron uptake was determined by an original in situ method, based on neutron absorption. The structural properties of the loaded liposomes were studied in detail by the combined use of small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering. These techniques established the global shape and size of liposomes and their bilayer composition. The results were discussed in term of molecular properties of the hosted drugs. Differences found in the insertion modality were correlated with the preparation procedure or with the specific shape and lipophilic-hydrophilic balance of each carborane. PMID:15489297

  10. Cancer gene therapy using mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Uchibori, Ryosuke; Tsukahara, Tomonori; Ohmine, Ken; Ozawa, Keiya

    2014-04-01

    Cellular and gene therapies represent promising treatment strategies at the frontier of medicine. Hematopoietic stem cells, lymphocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can all serve as sources of cells for use in such therapies. Strategies for gene therapy are often based on those of cell therapy, and it is anticipated that some examples will be put to practical use in the near future. Given their ability to support hematopoiesis, MSCs may be useful for the enhancement of stem cell engraftment, and the acceleration of hematopoietic reconstitution. Furthermore, MSCs may advance the treatment of severe graft-versus-host disease, based on their immunosuppressive ability. This application is also based on the homing behavior of MSCs to sites of injury and inflammation. Interestingly, MSCs possess tumor-homing ability, opening up the possibility of applications in the targeted delivery of anti-cancer genes to tumors. Many reports have indicated that MSCs can be utilized to target tumors and to deliver anti-cancer molecules locally, as tumors are recognized as non-healing wounds with inflammatory tissue. Here, we review both the potential of MSCs as cellular vehicles for targeted cancer therapy and the molecular mechanisms underlying MSC accumulation at tumor sites.

  11. Clinical adenoviral gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Ellen; Essand, Magnus; Bangma, Chris H; Barber, Chris; Behr, Jean-Paul; Briggs, Simon; Carlisle, Robert; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Danielsson, Angelika; Dautzenberg, Iris J C; Dzojic, Helena; Erbacher, Patrick; Fisher, Kerry; Frazier, April; Georgopoulos, Lindsay J; Hoeben, Rob; Kochanek, Stefan; Koppers-Lalic, Daniela; Kraaij, Robert; Kreppel, Florian; Lindholm, Leif; Magnusson, Maria; Maitland, Norman; Neuberg, Patrick; Nilsson, Berith; Ogris, Manfred; Remy, Jean-Serge; Scaife, Michelle; Schooten, Erik; Seymour, Len; Totterman, Thomas; Uil, Taco G; Ulbrich, Karel; Veldhoven-Zweistra, Joke L M; de Vrij, Jeroen; van Weerden, Wytske; Wagner, Ernst; Willemsen, Ralph

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is at present the most common malignancy in men in the Western world. When localized to the prostate, this disease can be treated by curative therapy such as surgery and radiotherapy. However, a substantial number of patients experience a recurrence, resulting in spreading of tumor cells to other parts of the body. In this advanced stage of the disease only palliative treatment is available. Therefore, there is a clear clinical need for new treatment modalities that can, on the one hand, enhance the cure rate of primary therapy for localized prostate cancer and, on the other hand, improve the treatment of metastasized disease. Gene therapy is now being explored in the clinic as a treatment option for the various stages of prostate cancer. Current clinical experiences are based predominantly on trials with adenoviral vectors. As the first of a trilogy of reviews on the state of the art and future prospects of gene therapy in prostate cancer, this review focuses on the clinical experiences and progress of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy for this disease.

  12. ORTHOPAEDIC GENE THERAPY – LOST IN TRANSLATION?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C.H.; Ghivizzani, S.C.; Robbins, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Orthopaedic gene therapy has been the topic of considerable research for two decades. The preclinical data are impressive and many orthopaedic conditions are well suited to genetic therapies. But there have been few clinical trials and no FDA-approved product exists. This paper examines why this is so. The reasons are multifactorial. Clinical translation is expensive and difficult to fund by traditional academic routes. Because gene therapy is viewed as unsafe and risky, it does not attract major funding from the pharmaceutical industry. Start-up companies are burdened by the complex intellectual property environment and difficulties in dealing with the technology transfer offices of major universities. Successful translation requires close interactions between scientists, clinicians and experts in regulatory and compliance issues. It is difficult to create such a favourable translational environment. Other promising fields of biological therapy have contemplated similar frustrations approximately 20 years after their founding, so there seem to be more general constraints on translation that are difficult to define. Gene therapy has noted some major clinical successes in recent years, and a sense of optimism is returning to the field. We hope that orthopaedic applications will benefit collaterally from this upswing and move expeditiously into advanced clinical trials. PMID:21948071

  13. Orthopedic gene therapy--lost in translation?

    PubMed

    Evans, C H; Ghivizzani, S C; Robbins, P D

    2012-02-01

    Orthopedic gene therapy has been the topic of considerable research for two decades. The preclinical data are impressive and many orthopedic conditions are well suited to genetic therapies. But there have been few clinical trials and no FDA-approved product exists. This paper examines why this is so. The reasons are multifactorial. Clinical translation is expensive and difficult to fund by traditional academic routes. Because gene therapy is viewed as unsafe and risky, it does not attract major funding from the pharmaceutical industry. Start-up companies are burdened by the complex intellectual property environment and difficulties in dealing with the technology transfer offices of major universities. Successful translation requires close interactions between scientists, clinicians and experts in regulatory and compliance issues. It is difficult to create such a favorable translational environment. Other promising fields of biological therapy have contemplated similar frustrations approximately 20 years after their founding, so there seem to be more general constraints on translation that are difficult to define. Gene therapy has noted some major clinical successes in recent years, and a sense of optimism is returning to the field. We hope that orthopedic applications will benefit collaterally from this upswing and move expeditiously into advanced clinical trials. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Review: Stem cells and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Alenzi, Faris Q; Lotfy, Mahmoud; Tamimi, Waleed G; Wyse, Richard K H

    2010-09-01

    Both stem cell and gene therapy research are currently the focus of intense research in institutions and companies around the world. Both approaches hold great promise by offering radical new and successful ways of treating debilitating and incurable diseases effectively. Gene therapy is an approach to treat, cure, or ultimately prevent disease by changing the pattern of gene expression. It is mostly experimental, but a number of clinical human trials have already been conducted. Gene therapy can be targeted to somatic or germ cells; the most common vectors are viruses. Scientists manipulate the viral genome and thus introduce therapeutic genes to the target organ. Viruses, in this context, can cause adverse events such as toxicity, immune and inflammatory responses, as well as gene control and targeting issues. Alternative modalities being considered are complexes of DNA with lipids and proteins. Stem cells are primitive cells that have the capacity to self renew as well as to differentiate into 1 or more mature cell types. Pluripotent embryonic stem cells derived from the inner cell mass can develop into more than 200 different cells and differentiate into cells of the 3 germ cell layers. Because of their capacity of unlimited expansion and pluripotency, they are useful in regenerative medicine. Tissue or adult stem cells produce cells specific to the tissue in which they are found. They are relatively unspecialized and predetermined to give rise to specific cell types when they differentiate. The current review provides a summary of our current knowledge of stem cells and gene therapy as well as their clinical implications and related therapeutic options.

  15. Aptamer-mediated cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Qiao, Greg; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Li, Yong; Wei, Ming Q; Qiao, Liang; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Zhu, Yimin; Zheng, Conglong; Pu, Chunwen; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Cancer as a genetic disorder is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Conventional anticancer options such as chemo- and/or radio-therapy have their own drawbacks and could not provide a cure in most cases at present. More effective therapeutic strategies with less side effects are urgently needed. Aptamers, also known as chemical antibodies, are single strand DNA or RNA molecules that can bind to their target molecules with high affinity and specificity. Such site-specific binding ability of aptamers facilitates the delivery and interaction of exogenous nucleic acids with diseased genes. Thus, aptamer-guided gene therapy has emerged as a promising anticancer strategy in addition to the classic treatment regimen. Aptamers can directly deliver anti-cancer nucleic acids, e.g. small interfering RNA, micro RNA, antimicroRNA and small hairpin RNA, to cancer cells or function as a targeting ligand to guide nanoparticles containing therapeutic nucleic acids. This review focuses on recent progress in aptamer-mediated gene therapy for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and other types of cancers, shedding light on the potential of this novel approach of targeted cancer gene therapy.

  16. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2011-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:21453286

  17. Gene and cell therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hans Martin; Ungerechts, Guy; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M

    2015-04-01

    The clinical outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer are poor, and the limited success of classical chemotherapy underscores the need for new, targeted approaches for this disease. The delivery of genetic material to cells allows for a variety of therapeutic concepts. Engineered agents based on synthetic biology are under clinical investigation in various cancers, including pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on Phase I - III clinical trials of gene and cell therapy for pancreatic cancer and on future implications of recent translational research. Trials available in the US National Library of Medicine (www.clinicaltrials.gov) until February 2014 were reviewed and relevant published results of preclinical and clinical studies were retrieved from www.pubmed.gov . In pancreatic cancer, gene and cell therapies are feasible and may have synergistic antitumor activity with standard treatment and/or immunotherapy. Challenges are related to application safety, manufacturing costs, and a new spectrum of adverse events. Further studies are needed to evaluate available agents in carefully designed protocols and combination regimens. Enabling personalized cancer therapy, insights from molecular diagnostic technologies will guide the development and selection of new gene-based drugs. The evolving preclinical and clinical data on gene-based therapies can lay the foundation for future avenues improving patient care in pancreatic cancer.

  18. Gene therapy and targeted toxins for glioma.

    PubMed

    Castro, Maria G; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D; Curtin, James F; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Ghulam Muhammad, A K M; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2011-06-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of 15-18 months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors.

  19. Gene therapy in dentistry: present and future.

    PubMed

    Baum, Bruce J

    2014-12-01

    Gene therapy is one of several novel biological treatments under active study for a wide variety of clinical applications, including many relevant to dentistry. This review will provide some background on this therapeutic approach, assess the current state of its applications generally, and in the oral cavity, and suggest the implications for its use in the next 25 years.

  20. Gene Therapy for "Bubble Boy" Disease.

    PubMed

    Hoggatt, Jonathan

    2016-07-14

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency results in the accumulation of toxic metabolites that destroy the immune system, causing severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), often referred to as the "bubble boy" disease. Strimvelis is a European Medicines Agency approved gene therapy for ADA-SCID patients without a suitable bone marrow donor.

  1. Foamy Virus Vectors for HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Olszko, Miles E.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2013-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has vastly improved outcomes for patients infected with HIV, yet it is a lifelong regimen that is expensive and has significant side effects. Retroviral gene therapy is a promising alternative treatment for HIV/AIDS; however, inefficient gene delivery to hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has so far limited the efficacy of this approach. Foamy virus (FV) vectors are derived from non-pathogenic viruses that are not endemic to the human population. FV vectors have been used to deliver HIV-inhibiting transgenes to human HSCs, and they have several advantages relative to other retroviral vectors. These include an attractive safety profile, broad tropism, a large transgene capacity, and the ability to persist in quiescent cells. In addition, the titers of FV vectors are not reduced by anti-HIV transgenes that affect the production of lentivirus (LV) vectors. Thus FV vectors are very promising for anti-HIV gene therapy. This review covers the advantages of FV vectors and describes their preclinical development for anti-HIV gene therapy. PMID:24153061

  2. Efficacy of combination antifungal therapy with intraperitoneally administered micafungin and aerosolized liposomal amphotericin B against murine invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Takazono, Takahiro; Izumikawa, Koichi; Mihara, Tomo; Kosai, Kosuke; Saijo, Tomomi; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Seki, Masafumi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru

    2009-08-01

    Targeted intrapulmonary delivery of drugs may reduce systemic toxicity and improve treatment efficacy. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of a combination treatment consisting of inhalation of aerosolized liposomal amphotericin B (L-AMB) with intraperitoneal administration of micafungin (MCFG) against murine invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. The combination of aerosolized L-AMB with intraperitoneal MCFG significantly improved the survival rate, and the fungal burdens and histopathology findings after this treatment were superior to those of the control and both monotherapy groups.

  3. Cardiac gene therapy: optimization of gene delivery techniques in vivo.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michael G; Swain, JaBaris D; White, Jennifer D; Low, David; Stedman, Hansell; Bridges, Charles R

    2010-04-01

    Vector-mediated cardiac gene therapy holds tremendous promise as a translatable platform technology for treating many cardiovascular diseases. The ideal technique is one that is efficient and practical, allowing for global cardiac gene expression, while minimizing collateral expression in other organs. Here we survey the available in vivo vector-mediated cardiac gene delivery methods--including transcutaneous, intravascular, intramuscular, and cardiopulmonary bypass techniques--with consideration of the relative merits and deficiencies of each. Review of available techniques suggests that an optimal method for vector-mediated gene delivery to the large animal myocardium would ideally employ retrograde and/or anterograde transcoronary gene delivery,extended vector residence time in the coronary circulation, an increased myocardial transcapillary gradient using physical methods, increased endothelial permeability with pharmacological agents, minimal collateral gene expression by isolation of the cardiac circulation from the systemic, and have low immunogenicity.

  4. Cardiac Gene Therapy: Optimization of Gene Delivery Techniques In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Swain, JaBaris D.; White, Jennifer D.; Low, David; Stedman, Hansell

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Vector-mediated cardiac gene therapy holds tremendous promise as a translatable platform technology for treating many cardiovascular diseases. The ideal technique is one that is efficient and practical, allowing for global cardiac gene expression, while minimizing collateral expression in other organs. Here we survey the available in vivo vector-mediated cardiac gene delivery methods—including transcutaneous, intravascular, intramuscular, and cardiopulmonary bypass techniques—with consideration of the relative merits and deficiencies of each. Review of available techniques suggests that an optimal method for vector-mediated gene delivery to the large animal myocardium would ideally employ retrograde and/or anterograde transcoronary gene delivery,extended vector residence time in the coronary circulation, an increased myocardial transcapillary gradient using physical methods, increased endothelial permeability with pharmacological agents, minimal collateral gene expression by isolation of the cardiac circulation from the systemic, and have low immunogenicity. PMID:19947886

  5. Optimizing ribozymes for somatic cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Branch, A D; Klotman, P E

    1998-01-01

    Therapeutic ribozymes are created through a multistep process that requires trial and error. There are few established rules governing ribozyme design, but guidelines are emerging. It is not yet known whether hammerheads and hairpins, the two ribozymes most widely studied as potential gene therapy agents, have the inherent capability to ablate single genes. Their capacity for specificity and selectivity remains to be explored through rigorous experimentation. These experiments require a battery of control molecules, the characteristics of which are outlined here. Methods for completing the steps in the ribozyme development process, from the selection of a target gene to the quantitation of RNA levels, are also presented and discussed.

  6. Growth factor gene therapy for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Mark H; U, Hoi Sang; Alksne, John; Bakay, Roy A; Pay, Mary Margaret; Merrill, David; Thal, Leon J

    2002-11-15

    The capacity to prevent neuronal degeneration and death during the course of progressive neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD) would represent a significant advance in therapy. Nervous system growth factors are families of naturally produced proteins that, in animal models, exhibit extensive potency in preventing neuronal death due to a variety of causes, reversing age-related atrophy of neurons, and ameliorating functional deficits. The main challenge in translating growth factor therapy to the clinic has been delivery of growth factors to the brain in sufficient concentrations to influence neuronal function. One means of achieving growth factor delivery to the central nervous system in a highly targeted, effective manner may be gene therapy. In this article the authors summarize the development and implementation of nerve growth factor gene delivery as a potential means of reducing cell loss in AD.

  7. Gene Therapy and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Eming, Sabine A.; Krieg, Thomas; Davidson, Jeffrey M

    2007-01-01

    Wound repair involves the sequential interaction of various cell types, extracellular matrix molecules, and soluble mediators. During the past 10 years, much new information on signals controlling wound cell behavior has emerged. This knowledge has led to a number of novel_therapeutic strategies. In particular, the local delivery of pluripotent growth factor molecules to the injured tissue has been intensively investigated over the past decade. Limited success of clinical trails indicates that a crucial aspect of the growth factor wound-healing strategy is the effective delivery of these polypeptides to the wound site. A molecular approach in which genetically modified cells synthesize and deliver the desired growth factor in regulated fashion has been used to overcome the limitations associated with the (topical) application of recombinant growth factor proteins. We have summarized the molecular and cellular basis of repair mechanisms and their failure, and we give an overview of techniques and studies applied to gene transfer in tissue repair. PMID:17276205

  8. Gene therapy used for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Heyde, Mieke; Partridge, Kris A; Oreffo, Richard O C; Howdle, Steven M; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Garnett, Martin C

    2007-03-01

    This review highlights the advances at the interface between tissue engineering and gene therapy. There are a large number of reports on gene therapy in tissue engineering, and these cover a huge range of different engineered tissues, different vectors, scaffolds and methodology. The review considers separately in-vitro and in-vivo gene transfer methods. The in-vivo gene transfer method is described first, using either viral or non-viral vectors to repair various tissues with and without the use of scaffolds. The use of a scaffold can overcome some of the challenges associated with delivery by direct injection. The ex-vivo method is described in the second half of the review. Attempts have been made to use this therapy for bone, cartilage, wound, urothelial, nerve tissue regeneration and for treating diabetes using viral or non-viral vectors. Again porous polymers can be used as scaffolds for cell transplantation. There are as yet few comparisons between these many different variables to show which is the best for any particular application. With few exceptions, all of the results were positive in showing some gene expression and some consequent effect on tissue growth and remodelling. Some of the principal advantages and disadvantages of various methods are discussed.

  9. Human embryonic stem cells and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Strulovici, Yael; Leopold, Philip L; O'Connor, Timothy P; Pergolizzi, Robert G; Crystal, Ronald G

    2007-05-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) theoretically represent an unlimited supply of normal differentiated cells to engineer diseased tissues to regain normal function. However, before hESCs can be useful as human therapeutics, technologies must be developed to provide them with the specific signals required to differentiate in a controlled fashion, to regulate and/or shut down the growth of hESCs and their progeny once they have been transferred to the recipient, and to circumvent the recognition of non-autologous hESC-derived cells as foreign. In the context that gene therapy technologies represent strategies to deliver biological signals to address all of these challenges, this review sets out a framework for combined gene transfer/hESC therapies. We discuss how hESCs are derived, characterized, and differentiated into specific cell lineages, and we summarize the characteristics of the 500 hESC lines reported to date. The successes and failures of gene transfer to hESCs are reviewed for both non-viral and viral vectors, as are the challenges to successful use of gene transfer in developing hESC therapy. We also consider gene transfer as a means of facilitating growth and isolation of genetically modified hESCs and as a mechanism for mitigating adverse effects associated with administration of hESCs or their derivatives. Finally, we evaluate the challenges that are likely to be encountered in translating the promise of hESCs to the clinic.

  10. A controllable gene expression system in liposomes that includes a positive feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Shungo; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Kazuta, Yasuaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2013-06-01

    We introduced a positive feedback loop into a LacI-dependent gene expression system in lipid vesicles, producing a cell-like system that senses and responds to an external signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. This fully reconstituted system will be a useful tool in future applications in in vitro synthetic biology.

  11. The gene therapy revolution in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saikhan, Fahad I.

    2013-01-01

    The advances in gene therapy hold significant promise for the treatment of ophthalmic conditions. Several studies using animal models have been published. Animal models on retinitis pigmentosa, Leber’s Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), and Stargardt disease have involved the use of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver functional genes into mice and canines. Mice models have been used to show that a mutation in cGMP phosphodiesterase that results in retinitis pigmentosa can be corrected using rAAV vectors. Additionally, rAAV vectors have been successfully used to deliver ribozyme into mice with a subsequent improvement in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. By using dog models, researchers have made progress in studying X-linked retinitis pigmentosa which results from a RPGR gene mutation. Mouse and canine models have also been used in the study of LCA. The widely studied form of LCA is LCA2, resulting from a mutation in the gene RPE65. Mice and canines that were injected with normal copies of RPE65 gene showed signs such as improved retinal pigment epithelium transduction, visual acuity, and functional recovery. Studies on Stargardt disease have shown that mutations in the ABCA4 gene can be corrected with AAV vectors, or nanoparticles. Gene therapy for the treatment of red–green color blindness was successful in squirrel monkeys. Plans are at an advanced stage to begin clinical trials. Researchers have also proved that CD59 can be used with AMD. Gene therapy is also able to treat primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in animal models, and studies show it is economically viable. PMID:24227970

  12. The gene therapy revolution in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Al-Saikhan, Fahad I

    2013-04-01

    The advances in gene therapy hold significant promise for the treatment of ophthalmic conditions. Several studies using animal models have been published. Animal models on retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), and Stargardt disease have involved the use of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver functional genes into mice and canines. Mice models have been used to show that a mutation in cGMP phosphodiesterase that results in retinitis pigmentosa can be corrected using rAAV vectors. Additionally, rAAV vectors have been successfully used to deliver ribozyme into mice with a subsequent improvement in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. By using dog models, researchers have made progress in studying X-linked retinitis pigmentosa which results from a RPGR gene mutation. Mouse and canine models have also been used in the study of LCA. The widely studied form of LCA is LCA2, resulting from a mutation in the gene RPE65. Mice and canines that were injected with normal copies of RPE65 gene showed signs such as improved retinal pigment epithelium transduction, visual acuity, and functional recovery. Studies on Stargardt disease have shown that mutations in the ABCA4 gene can be corrected with AAV vectors, or nanoparticles. Gene therapy for the treatment of red-green color blindness was successful in squirrel monkeys. Plans are at an advanced stage to begin clinical trials. Researchers have also proved that CD59 can be used with AMD. Gene therapy is also able to treat primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in animal models, and studies show it is economically viable.

  13. Transcriptional Targeting in Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy has been one of the most exciting areas of therapeutic research in the past decade. In this review, we discuss strategies to restrict transcription of transgenes to tumour cells. A range of promoters which are tissue-specific, tumour-specific, or inducible by exogenous agents are presented. Transcriptional targeting should prevent normal tissue toxicities associated with other cancer treatments, such as radiation and chemotherapy. In addition, the specificity of these strategies should provide improved targeting of metastatic tumours following systemic gene delivery. Rapid progress in the ability to specifically control transgenes will allow systemic gene delivery for cancer therapy to become a real possibility in the near future. PMID:12721516

  14. Treating Immunodeficiency through HSC Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Booth, Claire; Gaspar, H Bobby; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2016-04-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy has been successfully employed as a therapeutic option to treat specific inherited immune deficiencies, including severe combined immune deficiencies (SCID) over the past two decades. Initial clinical trials using first-generation gamma-retroviral vectors to transfer corrective DNA demonstrated clinical benefit for patients, but were associated with leukemogenesis in a number of cases. Safer vectors have since been developed, affording comparable efficacy with an improved biosafety profile. These vectors are now in Phase I/II clinical trials for a number of immune disorders with more preclinical studies underway. Targeted gene editing allowing precise DNA correction via platforms such as ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 may now offer promising strategies to improve the safety and efficacy of gene therapy in the future.

  15. Liposomes bi-functionalized with phosphatidic acid and an ApoE-derived peptide affect Aβ aggregation features and cross the blood-brain-barrier: implications for therapy of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Bana, Laura; Minniti, Stefania; Salvati, Elisa; Sesana, Silvia; Zambelli, Vanessa; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Orlando, Antonina; Cazzaniga, Emanuela; Zwart, Rob; Scheper, Wiep; Masserini, Massimo; Re, Francesca

    2014-10-01

    Targeting amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) within the brain is a strategy actively sought for therapy of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the ability of liposomes bi-functionalized with phosphatidic acid and with a modified ApoE-derived peptide (mApoE-PA-LIP) to affect Aβ aggregation/disaggregation features and to cross in vitro and in vivo the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Surface plasmon resonance showed that bi-functionalized liposomes strongly bind Aβ (kD=0.6 μM), while Thioflavin-T and SDS-PAGE/WB assays show that liposomes inhibit peptide aggregation (70% inhibition after 72 h) and trigger the disaggregation of preformed aggregates (60% decrease after 120 h incubation). Moreover, experiments with dually radiolabelled LIP suggest that bi-functionalization enhances the passage of radioactivity across the BBB either in vitro (permeability=2.5×10(-5) cm/min, 5-fold higher with respect to mono-functionalized liposomes) or in vivo in healthy mice. Taken together, our results suggest that mApoE-PA-LIP are valuable nanodevices with a potential applicability in vivo for the treatment of AD. From the clinical editor: Bi-functionalized liposomes with phosphatidic acid and a modified ApoE-derived peptide were demonstrated to influence Aβ aggregation/disaggregation as a potential treatment in an Alzheimer's model. The liposomes were able to cross the blood-brain barrier in vitro and in vivo. Similar liposomes may become clinically valuable nanodevices with a potential applicability for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Recent progress in gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Marinee K; Nair, Nisha; VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2012-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders caused by deficiencies in coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX), respectively. Current treatment for hemophilia involves intravenous infusion of clotting factor concentrates. However, this does not constitute a cure, and the development of gene-based therapies for hemophilia to achieve prolonged high level expression of clotting factors to correct the bleeding diathesis are warranted. Different types of viral and nonviral gene delivery systems and a wide range of different target cells, including hepatocytes, skeletal muscle cells, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and endothelial cells, have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based and lentiviral vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. Stable correction of the bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia A and B was achieved in murine and canine models, and these promising preclinical studies prompted clinical trials in patients suffering from severe hemophilia. These studies recently resulted in the first demonstration that long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels could be achieved in patients undergoing gene therapy. Despite this progress, there are still a number of hurdles that need to be overcome. In particular, the FIX levels obtained were insufficient to prevent bleeding induced by trauma or injury. Moreover, the gene-modified cells in these patients can become potential targets for immune destruction by effector T cells, specific for the AAV vector antigens. Consequently, more efficacious approaches are needed to achieve full hemostatic correction and to ultimately establish a cure for hemophilia A and B.

  17. Gene Therapy: Implications for Craniofacial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, Erica L.; Villa-Diaz, Luis G; Krebsbach, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy in the craniofacial region provides a unique tool for delivery of DNA to coordinate protein production in both time and space. The drive to bring this technology to the clinic is derived from the fact that over 85% of the global population may at one time require repair or replacement of a craniofacial structure. This need ranges from mild tooth decay and tooth loss to temporomandibular joint disorders and large-scale reconstructive surgery. Our ability to insert foreign DNA into a host cell has been developing since early uses of gene therapy to alter bacterial properties for waste cleanup in the 1980s followed by successful human clinical trials in the 1990s to treat severe combined immunodeficiency. In the past twenty years the emerging field of craniofacial tissue engineering has adopted these techniques to enhance regeneration of mineralized tissues, salivary gland, periodontium, and to reduce tumor burden of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Studies are currently pursuing research on both biomaterial-mediated gene delivery as well as more clinically efficacious, though potentially more hazardous, viral methods. Though hundreds of gene therapy clinical trials have taken place in the past twenty years, we must still work to ensure an ideal safety profile for each gene and delivery method combination. With adequate genotoxicity testing, we can expect gene therapy to augment protein delivery strategies and potentially allow for tissue-specific targeting, delivery of multiple signals, and increased spatial and temporal control with the goal of natural tissue replacement in the craniofacial complex. PMID:22337437

  18. Use of liposomes as injectable-drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ostro, M J; Cullis, P R

    1989-08-01

    The formation of liposomes and their application as delivery systems for injectable drugs are described. Liposomes are microscopic vesicles composed of one or more lipid membranes surrounding discrete aqueous compartments. These vesicles can encapsulate water-soluble drugs in their aqueous spaces and lipid-soluble drugs within the membrane itself. Liposomes release their contents by interacting with cells in one of four ways: adsorption, endocytosis, lipid exchange, or fusion. Liposome-entrapped drugs are distributed within the body much differently than free drugs; when administered intravenously to healthy animals and humans, most of the injected vesicles accumulate in the liver, spleen, lungs, bone marrow, and lymph nodes. Liposomes also accumulate preferentially at the sites of inflammation and infection and in some solid tumors; however, the reason for this accumulation is not clear. Four major factors influence liposomes' in vivo behavior and biodistribution: (1) liposomes tend to leak if cholesterol is not included in the vesicle membrane, (2) small liposomes are cleared more slowly than large liposomes, (3) the half-life of a liposome increases as the lipid dose increases, and (4) charged liposomal systems are cleared more rapidly than uncharged systems. The most advanced application of liposome-based therapy is in the treatment of systemic fungal infections, especially with amphotericin B. Liposomes are also under investigation for treatment of neoplastic disorders. Liposomes' uses in cancer therapy include encapsulation of known antineoplastic agents such as doxorubicin and methotrexate, delivery of immune modulators such as N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine-D-isoglutamine, and encapsulation of new chemical entities that are synthesized with lipophilic segments tailored for insertion into lipid bilayers. Liposomal formulations of injectable antimicrobial agents and antineoplastic agents already are undergoing clinical testing, and most probably will receive

  19. New Transfection Agents Based on Liposomes Containing Biosurfactant MEL-A.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Mamoru; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide

    2013-08-16

    Nano vectors are useful tools to deliver foreign DNAs, oligonucleotides, and small interfering double-stranded RNAs (siRNAs) into mammalian cells with gene transfection and gene regulation. In such experiments we have found the liposomes with a biosurfacant mannosylerythriol lipid (MEL-A) are useful because of their high transfer efficiency, and their unique mechanism to transfer genes to target cells with the lowest toxicity. In the present review we will describe our current work, which may contribute to the great advance of gene transfer to target cells and gene regulations. For more than two decades, the liposome technologies have changed dramatically and various methods have been proposed in the fields of biochemistry, cell biology, biotechnology, and so on. In addition, they were towards to pharmaceutics and clinical applications. The liposome technologies were expected to use gene therapy, however, they have not reached a requested goal as of yet. In the present paper we would like to present an approach using a biosurfactant, MEL-A, which is a surface-active compound produced by microorganisms growing on water-insoluble substrates and increases efficiency in gene transfection. The present work shows new transfection agents based on liposomes containing biosurfactant MEL-A.

  20. Bubble liposomes and ultrasound exposure improve localized morpholino oligomer delivery into the skeletal muscles of dystrophic mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Yoichi; Ishii, Yuko; Shiono, Hitomi; Akiyama, Saki; Sekine, Shoko; Kojima, Takuo; Mayama, Sayaka; Kikuchi, Taiki; Hamano, Nobuhito; Endo-Takahashi, Yoko; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Aramaki, Yukihiko

    2014-03-03

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder that is caused by mutations in the DMD gene that lead to an absence of functional protein. The mdx dystrophic mouse contains a nonsense mutation in exon 23 of the dystrophin gene; a phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) designed to skip this mutated exon in the mRNA induces dystrophin expression. However, an efficient PMO delivery method is needed to improve treatment strategies for DMD. We previously developed polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified liposomes (Bubble liposomes) that entrap ultrasound contrast gas and demonstrated that the combination of Bubble liposomes with ultrasound exposure is an effective gene delivery tool in vitro and in vivo. In this study, to evaluate the ability of Bubble liposomes as a PMO delivery tool, we tested the potency of the Bubble liposomes combined with ultrasound exposure to boost the delivery of PMO and increase the skipping of the mutated exon in the mdx mouse. The results indicated that the combination of Bubble liposomes and ultrasound exposure increased the uptake of the PMO targeting a nonsense mutation in exon 23 of the dystrophin gene and consequently increased the PMO-mediated exon-skipping efficiency compared with PMO injection alone, leading to significantly enhanced dystrophin expression. This increased efficiency indicated the potential of the combination of Bubble liposomes with ultrasound exposure to enhance PMO delivery for treating DMD. Thus, this ultrasound-mediated Bubble liposome technique may provide an effective, noninvasive, nonviral method for PMO therapy for DMD muscle as well as for other muscular dystrophies.

  1. Progress in gene targeting and gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, M.M.; Erven, A.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we localized disease genes involved in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited retinal degeneration, close to the rhodopsin and peripherin genes on 3q and 6p. Subsequently, we and others identified mutations in these genes in RP patients. Currently animal models for human retinopathies are being generated using gene targeting by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Genomic clones for retinal genes including rhodopsin and peripherin have been obtained from a phage library carrying mouse DNA isogenic with the ES cell line (CC1.2). The peripherin clone has been sequenced to establish the genomic structure of the mouse gene. Targeting vectors for rhodopsin and peripherin including a neomycin cassette for positive selection and thymidine kinase genes enabling selection against random intergrants are under construction. Progress in vector construction will be presented. Simultaneously we are developing systems for delivery of gene therapies to retinal tissues utilizing replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5). Efficacy of infection subsequent to various methods of intraocular injection and with varying viral titers is being assayed using an adenovirus construct containing a CMV promoter LacZ fusion as reporter and the range of tissues infected and the level of duration of LacZ expression monitored. Viral constructs with the LacZ reporter gene under the control of retinal specific promoters such as rhodopsin and IRBP cloned into pXCJL.1 are under construction. An update on developments in photoreceptor cell-directed expression of virally delivered genes will be presented.

  2. Rapid delivery of small interfering RNA by biosurfactant MEL-A-containing liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes can efficiently and rapidly deliver siRNA into the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapid delivery of siRNA is due to the membrane fusion between liposomes and plasma membrane. -- Abstract: The downregulation of gene expression by RNA interference holds great potential for genetic analysis and gene therapy. However, a more efficient delivery system for small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the target cells is required for wide fields such as cell biology, physiology, and clinical application. Non-viral vectors are stronger candidates than viral vectors because they are safer and easier to prepare. We have previously used a new method for gene transfection by combining cationic liposomes with the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A). The novel MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes rapidly delivered DNA (plasmids and oligonucleotides) into the cytosol and nucleus through membrane fusion between liposomes and the plasma membrane, and consequently, enhanced the gene transfection efficiency. In this study, we determined the efficiency of MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. We observed that exogenous and endogenous protein expression was suppressed by approximately 60% at 24 h after brief (30 min) incubation of target cells with MEL-A-containing cationic liposome/siRNA complexes. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that suppression of protein expression was caused by rapid siRNA delivery into the cytosol. We found that the MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes directly delivered siRNA into the cytoplasm by the membrane fusion in addition to endocytotic pathway whereas Lipofectamine Trade-Mark-Sign RNAiMax delivered siRNA only by the endocytotic pathway. It seems that the ability to rapidly and directly deliver siRNA into the cytosol using MEL-A-containing cationic

  3. Durable Expression of Minicircle DNA-Liposome-Delivered Androgen Receptor cDNA in Mice with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tian-You; Chung, Chin-Ying; Chuang, Wei-Min; Li, Long-Yuan; Jeng, Long-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background. The most common gene-based cancer therapies involve the suppression of oncogenic molecules and enhancement of the expression of tumor-suppressor genes. Studies in noncancer disease animal models have shown that minicircle (MC) DNA vectors are easy to deliver and that the proteins from said MC-carrying DNA vectors are expressed over a long period of time. However, delivery of therapeutic genes via a liposome-mediated, MC DNA complex has never been tested in vascular-rich hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Liposome-mediated DNA delivery exhibits high in vivo transfection efficiency and minimal systemic immune response, thereby allowing for repetitive interventions. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of delivering an MC-liposome vector containing a 3.2 kb androgen receptor (AR; HCC metastasis suppressor) cDNA into Hepatitis B Virus- (HBV-) induced HCC mouse livers. Results. Protein expression and promoter luciferase assays revealed that liposome-encapsulated MC-AR resulted in abundant functional expression of AR protein (100 kD) for up to two weeks. The AR cDNA was also successfully delivered into normal livers and diseased livers, where it was persistently expressed. In both normal livers and livers with tumors, the expression of AR was detectable for up to 60 days. Conclusion. Our results show that an MC/liposome delivery system might improve the efficacy of gene therapy in patients with HCC. PMID:24734226

  4. Noninvasive tracking of gene transcript and neuroprotection after gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Chen, Y I; Liu, C H; Chen, P-C; Prentice, H; Wu, J-Y; Liu, P K

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) complimentary DNA (cDNA) encoded in self-complementary adeno-associated virus-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer's dementia, Parkinson's disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine.

  5. Fetal muscle gene therapy/gene delivery in large animals.

    PubMed

    Abi-Nader, Khalil N; David, Anna L

    2011-01-01

    Gene delivery to the fetal muscles is a potential strategy for the early treatment of muscular dystrophies. In utero muscle gene therapy can also be used to treat other genetic disorders such as hemophilia, where the missing clotting proteins may be secreted from the treated muscle. In the past few years, studies in small animal models have raised the hopes that a phenotypic cure can be obtained after fetal application of gene therapy. Studies of efficacy and safety in large animals are, however, essential before clinical application can be considered in the human fetus. For this reason, the development of clinically applicable strategies for the delivery of gene therapy to the fetal muscles is of prime importance. In this chapter, we describe the protocols for in utero ultrasound-guided gene delivery to the ovine fetal muscle in early gestation. In particular, procedures to inject skeletal muscle groups such as the thigh and thoracic musculature and targeting the diaphragm in the fetus are described in detail.

  6. Newer gene editing technologies toward HIV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, N; Yi, Guohua; Dang, Ying; Shankar, Premlata

    2013-11-14

    Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called "Berlin patient" who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  7. Gene therapy, bioengineered clotting factors and novel technologies for hemophilia treatment.

    PubMed

    Pierce, G F; Lillicrap, D; Pipe, S W; Vandendriessche, T

    2007-05-01

    The World Federation of Hemophilia estimates that of the 400,000 individuals worldwide with hemophilia, 300,000 receive either no, or very sporadic, treatment. Thus, considerable innovation will be required to provide cost-effective therapies/cures for all affected individuals. The high cost of prophylactic regimens hampers their widespread use, which further justifies the search for novel cost-effective therapies and ultimately a cure. Five gene transfer phase I clinical trials have been conducted using either direct in vivo gene delivery with viral vectors or ex vivo plasmid transfections and reimplantation of gene-engineered cells. Although there was evidence of gene transfer and therapeutic effects in some of these trials, stable expression of therapeutic factor VIII or FIX levels has not yet been obtained. Further improvements of the vectors and a better understanding of the immune consequences of gene transfer is warranted, as new trials are being initiated. Bioengineered clotting factors with increased stability and/or activity are being validated further in preclinical studies. Novel clotting factor formulations based on PEGylated liposomes with prolonged activities are being tested in the clinic, and are yielding encouraging results.

  8. [Application of gene therapy to oncologic ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Philiponnet, A; Grange, J-D; Baggetto, L G

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of the structure of DNA in 1953 by Watson and Crick, our understanding of the genetic causes and the regulations involved in tumor development have hugely increased. The important amount of research developed since then has led to the development of gene therapy, which specifically targets and treats cancer cells by interacting with, and correcting their genetic material. This study is a review of the most accomplished research using gene therapy aimed at treating malignant ophthalmologic diseases, and focuses more specifically on uveal melanoma and retinoblastoma. Such approaches are remarkable regarding the efficiency and the cellular targeting specificity. However, gene therapy-based treatments are so recent that many long-term interrogations subsist. The majority of the reviewed studies are conducted in vitro or in murine models, thereby requiring several years before the resulting therapies become part of the daily ophthalmologists' arsenal. However, the recent spectacular developments based on advanced scientific knowledge justify an up-to-date review that would benefit the ophthalmologist community.

  9. Gene Therapy Applications to Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Over the past ten years significant advances have been made in the fields of gene therapy and tumour immunology, such that there now exists a considerable body of evidence validating the proof in the principle of gene therapy based cancer vaccines. While clinical benefit has so far been marginal, data from preclinical and early clinical trials of gene therapy combined with standard therapies are strongly suggestive of additional benefit. Many reasons have been proposed to explain the paucity of clinical responses to single agent vaccination strategies including the poor antigenicity of tumour cells and the development of tolerance through down-regulation of MHC, costimulatory, signal transduction, and other molecules essential for the generation of strong immune responses. In addition, there is now evidence from animal models that the growing tumour may actively inhibit the host immune response. Removal of the primary tumour prior to T cell transfer from the spleen of cancer bearing animals, led to effective tumour cell line specific immunity in the recipient mouse suggesting that there is an ongoing tumour-host interaction. This model also illustrates the potential difficulties of clinical vaccine trials in patients with advanced stage disease. PMID:12686721

  10. Alternative Strategies for Gene Therapy of Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Robert R.; Shi, Qizhen

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are monogenic disorders that were felt to be ideal targets for initiation of gene therapy. Although the first hemophilia gene therapy trial has been over 10 years ago, few trials are currently actively recruiting. Although preclinical studies in animals were promising, levels achieved in humans did not achieve long-term expression at adequate levels to achieve cures. Transplantation as a source of cellular replacement therapy for both hemophilia A and B have been successful following liver transplantation in which the recipient produces normal levels of either factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX). Most of these transplants have been conducted for the treatment of liver failure rather than for “curing” hemophilia. There are a variety of new strategies for delivering the missing clotting factor through ectopic expression of the deficient protein. One approach uses hematopoietic stem cells using either a nonspecific promoter or using a lineage-specific promoter. An alternative strategy includes enhanced expression in endothelial cells or blood-outgrowth endothelial cells. An additional approach includes the expression of FVIII or FIX intraarticularly to mitigate the intraarticular bleeding that causes much of the disability for hemophilia patients. Because activated factor VII (FVIIa) can be used to treat patients with inhibitory antibodies to replacement clotting factors, preclinical gene therapy has been performed using platelet- or liver-targeted FVIIa expression. All of these newer approaches are just beginning to be explored in large animal models. Whereas improved recombinant replacement products continue to be the hallmark of hemophilia therapy, the frequency of replacement therapy is beginning to be addressed through longer-acting replacement products. A safe cure of hemophilia is still the desired goal, but many barriers must still be overcome. PMID:21239794

  11. Alternative strategies for gene therapy of hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Robert R; Shi, Qizhen

    2010-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are monogenic disorders that were felt to be ideal targets for initiation of gene therapy. Although the first hemophilia gene therapy trial has been over 10 years ago, few trials are currently actively recruiting. Although preclinical studies in animals were promising, levels achieved in humans did not achieve long-term expression at adequate levels to achieve cures. Transplantation as a source of cellular replacement therapy for both hemophilia A and B have been successful following liver transplantation in which the recipient produces normal levels of either factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX). Most of these transplants have been conducted for the treatment of liver failure rather than for "curing" hemophilia. There are a variety of new strategies for delivering the missing clotting factor through ectopic expression of the deficient protein. One approach uses hematopoietic stem cells using either a nonspecific promoter or using a lineage-specific promoter. An alternative strategy includes enhanced expression in endothelial cells or blood-outgrowth endothelial cells. An additional approach includes the expression of FVIII or FIX intraarticularly to mitigate the intraarticular bleeding that causes much of the disability for hemophilia patients. Because activated factor VII (FVIIa) can be used to treat patients with inhibitory antibodies to replacement clotting factors, preclinical gene therapy has been performed using platelet- or liver-targeted FVIIa expression. All of these newer approaches are just beginning to be explored in large animal models. Whereas improved recombinant replacement products continue to be the hallmark of hemophilia therapy, the frequency of replacement therapy is beginning to be addressed through longer-acting replacement products. A safe cure of hemophilia is still the desired goal, but many barriers must still be overcome.

  12. Gene Therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Julian; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a relatively common inherited disorder caused by defective expression of the protein dystrophin. The most direct approach to treating this disease would be to restore dystrophin production in muscle. Recent progress has greatly increased the prospects for successful gene therapy of DMD, and here we summarize the most promising developments. Areas Covered Gene transfer using vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a promising method to restore dystrophin production in muscles bodywide, and represents a treatment option applicable to all DMD patients. Using information gleaned from PubMed searches of the literature, attendance at scientific conferences and results from our own lab, we provide an overview of the potential for gene therapy of DMD using AAV vectors including a summary of promising developments and issues that need to be resolved prior to large-scale therapeutic implementation. Expert Opinion Of the many approaches being pursued to treat DMD and BMD, gene therapy based on AAV-mediated delivery of microdystrophin is the most direct and promising method to treat the cause of the disorder. The major challenges to this approach are ensuring that microdystrophin can be delivered safely and efficiently without eliciting an immune response. PMID:26594599

  13. Engineering HSV-1 vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Goins, William F; Huang, Shaohua; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    Virus vectors have been employed as gene transfer vehicles for various preclinical and clinical gene therapy applications, and with the approval of Glybera (alipogene tiparvovec) as the first gene therapy product as a standard medical treatment (Yla-Herttuala, Mol Ther 20: 1831-1832, 2013), gene therapy has reached the status of being a part of standard patient care. Replication-competent herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors that replicate specifically in actively dividing tumor cells have been used in Phase I-III human trials in patients with glioblastoma multiforme, a fatal form of brain cancer, and in malignant melanoma. In fact, T-VEC (talimogene laherparepvec, formerly known as OncoVex GM-CSF) displayed efficacy in a recent Phase III trial when compared to standard GM-CSF treatment alone (Andtbacka et al. J Clin Oncol 31: sLBA9008, 2013) and may soon become the second FDA-approved gene therapy product used in standard patient care. In addition to the replication-competent oncolytic HSV vectors like T-VEC, replication-defective HSV vectors have been employed in Phase I-II human trials and have been explored as delivery vehicles for disorders such as pain, neuropathy, and other neurodegenerative conditions. Research during the last decade on the development of HSV vectors has resulted in the engineering of recombinant vectors that are totally replication defective, nontoxic, and capable of long-term transgene expression in neurons. This chapter describes methods for the construction of recombinant genomic HSV vectors based on the HSV-1 replication-defective vector backbones, steps in their purification, and their small-scale production for use in cell culture experiments as well as preclinical animal studies.

  14. AAV-mediated gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Couto, Linda B; Pierce, Glenn F

    2003-10-01

    Gene therapy for hemophilia has been contemplated since the coagulation Factor genes responsible for the disease were cloned 20 years ago. Multiple approaches towards the delivery of Factors VIII or IX, the defective genes in the most common forms of hemophilia, have resulted in positive results in animals, and largely equivocal results in human clinical testing. Use of vectors based on adeno-associated virus has led to robust and sustained cures in hemophilic mice and dogs, and intriguing preliminary results in small or ongoing clinical trials. As more clinical experience is gained, solving delivery issues will be of paramount importance and will lead to more clinical success. This success will permit hemophilia to be cured following a single injection of the normal gene.

  15. Methods to monitor gene therapy with molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Waerzeggers, Yannic; Monfared, Parisa; Viel, Thomas; Winkeler, Alexandra; Voges, Jürgen; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2009-06-01

    Recent progress in scientific and clinical research has made gene therapy a promising option for efficient and targeted treatment of several inherited and acquired disorders. One of the most critical issues for ensuring success of gene-based therapies is the development of technologies for non-invasive monitoring of the distribution and kinetics of vector-mediated gene expression. In recent years many molecular imaging techniques for safe, repeated and high-resolution in vivo imaging of gene expression have been developed and successfully used in animals and humans. In this review molecular imaging techniques for monitoring of gene therapy are described and specific use of these methods in the different steps of a gene therapy protocol from gene delivery to assessment of therapy response is illustrated. Linking molecular imaging (MI) to gene therapy will eventually help to improve the efficacy and safety of current gene therapy protocols for human application and support future individualized patient treatment.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of temoporfin-loaded liposome formulations: correlation of liposome and temoporfin blood concentration.

    PubMed

    Decker, Christiane; Schubert, Harald; May, Sylvio; Fahr, Alfred

    2013-03-28

    Liposomal formulations of the highly hydrophobic photosensitizer temoporfin were developed in order to overcome solubility-related problems associated with the current therapy scheme. We have incorporated temoporfin into liposomes of varying membrane composition, cholesterol content, and vesicle size. Specifically, two phosphatidyl oligoglycerols were compared to PEG2000-DSPE with respect to the ability to prolong circulation half life of the liposomal carrier. We measured the resulting pharmacokinetic profile of the liposomal carrier and the incorporated temoporfin in a rat model employing a radioactive lipid label and (14)C-temoporfin. The data for the removal of liposomes and temoporfin were analyzed in terms of classical pharmacokinetic theory assuming a two-compartment model. This model, however, does not allow in a straightforward manner to distinguish between temoporfin eliminated together with the liposomal carrier and temoporfin that is first transferred to other blood components (e. g. plasma proteins) before being eliminated from the blood. We therefore additionally analyzed the data based on two separate one-compartment models for the liposomes and temoporfin. The model yields the ratio of the rate constant of temoporfin elimination together with the liposomal carrier and the rate constant of temoporfin elimination following the transfer to e. g. plasma proteins. Our analysis using this model demonstrates that a fraction of temoporfin is released from the liposomes prior to being eliminated from the blood. In case of unmodified liposomes this temoporfin release was observed to increase with decreasing bilayer fluidity, indicating an accelerated temoporfin transfer from gel-phase liposomes to e. g. plasma proteins. Interestingly, liposomes carrying either one of the three investigated surface-modifying agents did not adhere to the tendencies observed for unmodified liposomes. Although surface-modified liposomes exhibited improved pharmacokinetic

  17. [New possibilities will open up in human gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Portin, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is divided into somatic and germ line therapy. The latter involves reproductive cells or their stem cells, and its results are heritable. The effects of somatic gene therapy are generally restricted to a single tissue of the patient in question. Until now, all gene therapies in the world have belonged to the regime of somatic therapy, germ line therapy having been a theoretical possibility only. Very recently, however, a method has been developed which is applicable to germ line therapy as well. In addition to technical challenges, severe ethical problems are associated with germ line therapy, demanding opinion statement.

  18. Efficacy of combined therapy with liposome-encapsulated meglumine antimoniate and allopurinol in treatment of canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Sydnei M; Amorim, Izabela F G; Ribeiro, Raul R; Azevedo, Erly G; Demicheli, Cynthia; Melo, Maria N; Tafuri, Wagner L; Gontijo, Nelder F; Michalick, Marilene S M; Frézard, Frédéric

    2012-06-01

    An innovative liposomal formulation of meglumine antimoniate (LMA) was recently reported to promote both long-term parasite suppression and reduction of infectivity to sand flies in dogs with visceral leishmaniasis. However, 5 months after treatment, parasites were still found in the bone marrow of all treated dogs. In order to improve treatment with LMA, the present study aimed to evaluate its efficacy in combination with allopurinol. Mongrel dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum were treated with six doses of LMA (6.5 mg Sb/kg of body weight/dose) given at 4-day intervals, plus allopurinol (20 mg/kg/24 h per os) for 140 days. Comparison was made with groups treated with LMA, allopurinol, empty liposomes plus allopurinol, empty liposomes, and saline. Dogs remained without treatment from day 140 to 200 after the start of treatment. The drug combination promoted both clinical improvement of dogs and significant reduction in the parasitic load in bone marrow and spleen on days 140 and 200 compared to these parameters in the pretreatment period. This is in contrast with the other protocols, which did not result in significant reduction of the bone marrow parasite load on day 200. Strikingly, the combined treatment, in contrast to the other regimens, induced negative quantitative PCR (qPCR) results in the liver of 100% of the dogs. Both xenodiagnosis and skin parasite determination by qPCR indicated that the drug combination was effective in blocking the transmission of skin parasites to sand flies. Based on all of the parasitological tests performed on day 200, 50% of the animals that received the combined treatment were considered cured.

  19. Efficacy of Combined Therapy with Liposome-Encapsulated Meglumine Antimoniate and Allopurinol in Treatment of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Sydnei M.; Amorim, Izabela F. G.; Ribeiro, Raul R.; Azevedo, Erly G.; Demicheli, Cynthia; Melo, Maria N.; Tafuri, Wagner L.; Gontijo, Nelder F.; Michalick, Marilene S. M.

    2012-01-01

    An innovative liposomal formulation of meglumine antimoniate (LMA) was recently reported to promote both long-term parasite suppression and reduction of infectivity to sand flies in dogs with visceral leishmaniasis. However, 5 months after treatment, parasites were still found in the bone marrow of all treated dogs. In order to improve treatment with LMA, the present study aimed to evaluate its efficacy in combination with allopurinol. Mongrel dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum were treated with six doses of LMA (6.5 mg Sb/kg of body weight/dose) given at 4-day intervals, plus allopurinol (20 mg/kg/24 h per os) for 140 days. Comparison was made with groups treated with LMA, allopurinol, empty liposomes plus allopurinol, empty liposomes, and saline. Dogs remained without treatment from day 140 to 200 after the start of treatment. The drug combination promoted both clinical improvement of dogs and significant reduction in the parasitic load in bone marrow and spleen on days 140 and 200 compared to these parameters in the pretreatment period. This is in contrast with the other protocols, which did not result in significant reduction of the bone marrow parasite load on day 200. Strikingly, the combined treatment, in contrast to the other regimens, induced negative quantitative PCR (qPCR) results in the liver of 100% of the dogs. Both xenodiagnosis and skin parasite determination by qPCR indicated that the drug combination was effective in blocking the transmission of skin parasites to sand flies. Based on all of the parasitological tests performed on day 200, 50% of the animals that received the combined treatment were considered cured. PMID:22411610

  20. Development of edge-activated liposomes for siRNA delivery to human basal epidermis for melanoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Dorrani, Mania; Garbuzenko, Olga B; Minko, Tamara; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena

    2016-04-28

    Delivery of macromolecules such as siRNA into cells that reside in the basal epidermis of the skin is a major challenge due to the transport barriers that need to be overcome. siRNAs have potential therapeutic applications in various dermatological diseases such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and cancer. Unfortunately, a low permeability of siRNA through the stratum corneum and epidermis has significantly limited its use for topical application. The objective of this study was to develop a topical siRNA delivery system that can permeate through the stratum corneum and viable epidermis and efficiently deposit therapeutic levels of siRNA to the basal epidermis/upper dermis where melanoma cells reside. To achieve this objective, a series of liposome compositions that contained various concentrations of edge activator in their structures were prepared and then complexed with siRNA at different ratios to generate a small library of liposome-siRNA complexes (lipoplexes) with different physicochemical properties. In this study we used melanoma as a disease model. Through use of quantitative imaging analysis, we identified the necessary design parameters for effective permeation of lipoplexes through the skin layers and deposition at the upper dermis. The ability of the formulated lipoplexes to internalize into melanoma cells, knockdown the expression of the BRAF protein and induce cell death in melanoma cells was studied by fluorescent microscopy, in-cell immunofluorescence assay and WST-1 cell proliferation assay. By providing direct quantitative and qualitative microscopy evidence, the results of this study demonstrate for the first time that the passive delivery of an edge-activated liposomal formulation can effectively carry siRNA through the stratum corneum and deposit it at the lower epidermis/upper dermis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Validation and Comparison of the Therapeutic Efficacy of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Mediated By Boron-Rich Liposomes in Multiple Murine Tumor Models

    DOE PAGES

    Maitz, Charles A.; Khan, Aslam A.; Kueffer, Peter J.; ...

    2017-07-03

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was performed at the University of Missouri Research Reactor in mice bearing CT26 colon carcinoma flank tumors and the results were compared with previously performed studies with mice bearing EMT6 breast cancer flank tumors. We implanted mice with CT26 tumors subcutaneously in the caudal flank and were given two separate tail vein injections of unilamellar liposomes composed of cholesterol, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycer-3-phosphocholine, and K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15–7,8-C2B9H11] in the lipid bilayer and encapsulated Na3[1-(2`-B10H9)-2-NH3B10H8] within the liposomal core. Mice were irradiated 30 hours after the second injection in a thermal neutron beam for various lengths of time. The tumor sizemore » was monitored daily for 72 days. In spite of relatively lower tumor boron concentrations, as compared to EMT6 tumors, a 45 minute neutron irradiation BNCT resulted in complete resolution of the tumors in 50% of treated mice, 50% of which never recurred. Median time to tumor volume tripling was 38 days in BNCT treated mice, 17 days in neutron-irradiated mice given no boron compounds, and 4 days in untreated controls. Tumor response in mice with CT26 colon carcinoma was markedly more pronounced than in previous reports of mice with EMT6 tumors, a difference which increased with dose. The slope of the dose response curve of CT26 colon carcinoma tumors is 1.05 times tumor growth delay per Gy compared to 0.09 times tumor growth delay per Gy for EMT6 tumors, indicating that inherent radiosensitivity of tumors plays a role in boron neutron capture therapy and should be considered in the development of clinical applications of BNCT in animals and man.« less

  2. Validation and Comparison of the Therapeutic Efficacy of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Mediated By Boron-Rich Liposomes in Multiple Murine Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Maitz, Charles A; Khan, Aslam A; Kueffer, Peter J; Brockman, John D; Dixson, Jonathan; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Nigg, David W; Everett, Thomas A; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2017-08-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was performed at the University of Missouri Research Reactor in mice bearing CT26 colon carcinoma flank tumors and the results were compared with previously performed studies with mice bearing EMT6 breast cancer flank tumors. Mice were implanted with CT26 tumors subcutaneously in the caudal flank and were given two separate tail vein injections of unilamellar liposomes composed of cholesterol, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycer-3-phosphocholine, and K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the lipid bilayer and encapsulated Na3[1-(2`-B10H9)-2-NH3B10H8] within the liposomal core. Mice were irradiated 30 hours after the second injection in a thermal neutron beam for various lengths of time. The tumor size was monitored daily for 72 days. Despite relatively lower tumor boron concentrations, as compared to EMT6 tumors, a 45 minute neutron irradiation BNCT resulted in complete resolution of the tumors in 50% of treated mice, 50% of which never recurred. Median time to tumor volume tripling was 38 days in BNCT treated mice, 17 days in neutron-irradiated mice given no boron compounds, and 4 days in untreated controls. Tumor response in mice with CT26 colon carcinoma was markedly more pronounced than in previous reports of mice with EMT6 tumors, a difference which increased with dose. The slope of the dose response curve of CT26 colon carcinoma tumors is 1.05 times tumor growth delay per Gy compared to 0.09 times tumor growth delay per Gy for EMT6 tumors, indicating that inherent radiosensitivity of tumors plays a role in boron neutron capture therapy and should be considered in the development of clinical applications of BNCT in animals and man. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Gene therapy for vision loss -- recent developments.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Knut; Lorenz, Birgit

    2010-11-01

    Retinal gene therapy mediated by adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene transfer was recently proven to improve photoreceptor function in one form of inherited retinal blinding disorder associated with mutations in the RPE65 gene. Several clinical trials are currently ongoing, and more than 30 patients have been treated to date. Even though only a very limited number of patients will greatly benefit from this still experimental treatment protocol, the technique itself has been shown to be safe and will likely be used in other retinal disorders in the near future. A canine model for achromatopsia has been treated successfully as well as mouse models for different forms of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). For patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), a combined gene knockdown and gene addition therapy is being developed using RNA interference to block mRNA of the mutant allele. For those patients suffering from RP with unknown mutations, an AAV based transfer of bacterial forms of rhodopsin in the central retina might be an option to reactivate residual cones in the future.

  4. Is cancer gene therapy an empty suit?

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Malcolm K; Gottschalk, Stephen; Leen, Ann M; Vera, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy as a treatment for cancer is regarded as high in promise, but low in delivery, a deficiency that has become more obvious with ever-increasing reports of the successful correction of monogenic disorders by this approach. We review the commercial and scientific obstacles that have led to these delays and describe how they are progressively being overcome. Recent and striking successes and correspondingly increased commercial involvement suggest that gene transfer could finally become a powerful method for development of safe and effective cancer therapeutic drugs. PMID:24079872

  5. Gene therapy: X-SCID transgene leukaemogenicity.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby; Baum, Christopher; Modlich, Ute; Schambach, Axel; Candotti, Fabio; Otsu, Makoto; Sorrentino, Brian; Scobie, Linda; Cameron, Ewan; Blyth, Karen; Neil, Jim; Abina, Salima Hacein-Bey; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Fischer, Alain

    2006-09-21

    Gene therapy has been remarkably effective for the immunological reconstitution of patients with severe combined immune deficiency, but the occurrence of leukaemia in a few patients has stimulated debate about the safety of the procedure and the mechanisms of leukaemogenesis. Woods et al. forced high expression of the corrective therapeutic gene IL2RG, which encodes the gamma-chain of the interleukin-2 receptor, in a mouse model of the disease and found that tumours appeared in a proportion of cases. Here we show that transgenic IL2RG does not necessarily have potent intrinsic oncogenic properties, and argue that the interpretation of this observation with respect to human trials is overstated.

  6. Cocaine hydrolase gene therapy for cocaine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Rapid progress in the past decade with re-engineering of human plasma butyrylcholinesterase has led to enzymes that destroy cocaine so efficiently that they prevent or interrupt drug actions in the CNS even though confined to the blood stream. Over the same time window, improved gene-transfer technology has made it possible to deliver such enzymes by endogenous gene transduction at high levels for periods of a year or longer after a single treatment. This article reviews recent advances in this field and considers prospects for development of a robust therapy aimed at aiding recovering drug users avoid addiction relapse. PMID:22300095

  7. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Simara, Pavel; Motl, Jason A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an accessible cell source for novel cell-based clinical research and therapies. With the realization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), it is possible to produce almost any desired cell type from any patient's cells. Current developments in gene modification methods have opened the possibility for creating genetically corrected human iPSCs for certain genetic diseases that could be used later in autologous transplantation. Promising preclinical studies have demonstrated correction of disease-causing mutations in a number of hematological, neuronal and muscular disorders. This review aims to summarize these recent advances with a focus on iPSC generation techniques, as well as gene modification methods. We will then further discuss some of the main obstacles remaining to be overcome before successful application of human pluripotent stem cell-based therapy arrives in the clinic and what the future of stem cell research may look like. PMID:23353080

  8. Targeting tumor suppressor genes for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunhua; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Han, Cecil; Wang, Liana; Zhang, Xinna; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer drugs are broadly classified into two categories: cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies that specifically modulate the activity of one or more proteins involved in cancer. Major advances have been achieved in targeted cancer therapies in the past few decades, which is ascribed to the increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules have been developed to interfere with a specific molecular oncogenic target. Targeting gain-of-function mutations, in general, has been productive. However, it has been a major challenge to use standard pharmacologic approaches to target loss-of-function mutations of tumor suppressor genes. Novel approaches, including synthetic lethality and collateral vulnerability screens, are now being developed to target gene defects in p53, PTEN, and BRCA1/2. Here, we review and summarize the recent findings in cancer genomics, drug development, and molecular cancer biology, which show promise in targeting tumor suppressors in cancer therapeutics.

  9. Cardiac gene therapy: from concept to reality.

    PubMed

    Kratlian, Razmig Garo; Hajjar, Roger J

    2012-03-01

    Heart failure is increasing in incidence throughout the world, especially in industrialized countries. Although the current therapeutic modalities have been successful in stabilizing the course of heart failure, morbidity and mortality remain quite high and there remains a great need for innovative breakthroughs that will offer new treatment strategies for patients with advanced forms of the disease. The past few years have witnessed a greater understanding of the molecular underpinnings of the failing heart, paving the way for novel strategies in modulating the cellular environment. As such, gene therapy has recently emerged as a powerful tool offering the promise of a new paradigm for alleviating heart failure. Current gene therapy research for heart failure is focused on exploring potential cellular targets and preclinical and clinical studies are ongoing toward the realization of this goal. Efforts also include the development of sophisticated viral vectors and vector delivery methods for efficient transduction of cardiomyocytes.

  10. Advances of gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Candotti, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    In the recent past, the gene therapy field has witnessed a remarkable series of successes, many of which have involved primary immunodeficiency diseases, such as X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. While such progress has widened the choice of therapeutic options in some specific cases of primary immunodeficiency, much remains to be done to extend the geographical availability of such an advanced approach and to increase the number of diseases that can be targeted. At the same time, emerging technologies are stimulating intensive investigations that may lead to the application of precise genetic editing as the next form of gene therapy for these and other human genetic diseases. PMID:27508076

  11. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide

  12. [The return of germline gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of a powerful and flexible genome editing technique (the CRISP-cas9 method) accelerates tremendously the production of animal models and will significantly enhance the perspectives of (somatic) gene therapy. However, it also raises a real possibility of germline modifications in humans, with therapeutic aims or for "improvement": this raises thorny ethical questions that are no longer theoretical (as in the 1990s) but will have to be faced in the very near future.

  13. Disposition of aerosolized liposomal amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Lambros, M P; Bourne, D W; Abbas, S A; Johnson, D L

    1997-09-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is an important drug for the treatment of fungal infection, but toxicity limits the lung tissue doses which may be achieved through intravenous administration. Although incorporation of AmB in liposomes reduces these effects and increases the therapeutic index for intravenous administration, targeted delivery to lung tissues via inhaled liposomal AmB aerosol may be a more effective approach. Aerosolization of liposomal amphotericin B targets the lungs, the organs first infested by many fungi. Development of optimal aerosolized liposomal AmB therapies requires a better understanding of the effect that liposome surface charge has on lung clearance kinetics. In this work we evaluated the clearance kinetics and organ distribution of inhaled liposomal AmB in male Balb/C mice. Mice were exposed via nose only to AmB-containing liposomal aerosols having positive, negative, or neutral surface charge characteristics. The formulations were aerosolized using a Collison nebulizer. Groups of animals were euthanized at predetermined times and the lungs and other organs were analyzed for AmB. AmB was not detected in serum and other organs such as kidneys, liver, and brain. The disposition of neutral and positive liposomal amphotericin B in lungs followed biexponential kinetics. The alpha and beta phase half-lives for positive liposomes were 1.3 and 15.1 days, respectively, and 2.3 and 22 days for neutral liposomes. AmB delivered via negative liposomes exhibited monoexponential clearance with a half-life of 4.5 days. These results suggest that toxic side effects in nontarget tissues are minimal and may indicate a potential for long term protection against fungal infections.

  14. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called "tumor microenvironment (TME)", in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  15. Gene Therapy in Thalassemia and Hemoglobinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Breda, Laura; Gambari, Roberto; Rivella, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) and ß-thalassemia represent the most common hemoglobinopathies caused, respectively, by the alteration of structural features or deficient production of the ß-chain of the Hb molecule. Other hemoglobinopathies are characterized by different mutations in the α- or ß-globin genes and are associated with anemia and might require periodic or chronic blood transfusions. Therefore, ß-thalassemia, SCD and other hemoglobinopathies are excellent candidates for genetic approaches since they are monogenic disorders and, potentially, could be cured by introducing or correcting a single gene into the hematopoietic compartment or a single stem cell. Initial attempts at gene transfer of these hemoglobinopathies have proved unsuccessful due to limitations of available gene transfer vectors. With the advent of lentiviral vectors many of the initial limitations have been overcame. New approaches have also focused on targeting the specific mutation in the ß-globin genes, correcting the DNA sequence or manipulating the fate of RNA translation and splicing to restore ß-globin chain synthesis. These techniques have the potential to correct the defect into hematopoietic stem cells or be utilized to modify stem cells generated from patients affected by these disorders. This review discusses gene therapy strategies for the hemoglobinopathies, including the use of lentiviral vectors, generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) cells, gene targeting, splice-switching and stop codon readthrough. PMID:21415990

  16. Natural gene therapy in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, Peter C; Nijenhuis, Miranda; Meijer, Gonnie; Hofstra, Robert M W; Jonkman, Marcel F; Pasmooij, Anna M G

    2012-02-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a genetic blistering disorder caused by mutations in the type VII collagen gene, COL7A1. In revertant mosaicism, germline mutations are corrected by somatic events resulting in a mosaic disease distribution. This "natural gene therapy" phenomenon long has been recognized in other forms of epidermolysis bullosa but only recently in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. We describe a 21-year-old man with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa carrying the homozygous c.6508C>T (p.Gln2170X) nonsense mutation who reported an unaffected skin patch on his neck where blisters never had occurred. Immunofluorescent type VII collagen staining was normal in 80% of the unaffected skin biopsy; however, it was strongly reduced in the affected skin. In the unaffected skin, the somatic nucleotide substitution c.6510G>T reverted the germline nonsense codon to tyrosine (p.Gln2170Tyr), thereby restoring functional protein production. Revertant mosaicism is considered rare in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. However, it might be more common than previously anticipated because our patient is the third in whom revertant mosaicism was identified in a short period of time. The correction mechanism is different than that previously reported. Systematic examination of patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, therefore, will likely reveal more patients with revertant patches. This is important because the natural gene therapy phenomenon may provide opportunities for revertant cell therapy.

  17. Ex vivo gene therapy and vision.

    PubMed

    Gregory-Evans, Kevin; Bashar, A M A Emran; Tan, Malcolm

    2012-04-01

    Ex vivo gene therapy, a technique where genetic manipulation of cells is undertaken remotely and more safely since it is outside the body, is an emerging therapeutic strategy particularly well suited to targeting a specific organ rather than for treating a whole organism. The eye and visual pathways therefore make an attractive target for this approach. With blindness still so prevalent worldwide, new approaches to treatment would also be widely applicable and a significant advance in improving quality of life. Despite being a relatively new approach, ex vivo gene therapy has already achieved significant advances in the treatment of blindness in pre-clinical trials. In particular, advances are being achieved in corneal disease, glaucoma, retinal degeneration, stroke and multiple sclerosis through genetic re-programming of cells to replace degenerate cells and through more refined neuroprotection, modulation of inflammation and replacement of deficient protein. In this review we discuss the latest developments in ex vivo gene therapy relevant to the visual pathways and highlight the challenges that need to be overcome for progress into clinical trials.

  18. [Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Yukio; Ariga, Tadashi; Ohtsu, Makoto

    2005-03-01

    A four year-old boy with adenosine deaminase (ADA-) deficient severe combined immunodeficiency(SCID) receiving PEG-ADA was treated under a gene therapy protocol targeting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) in 1995. After eleven infusions of autologous PBLs transduced with retroviral vector LASN encoding ADAcDNA, he exhibited increased levels of the CD8+ T lymphocytes, serum immunoglobulin, specific antibodies and delayed type hypersensitivity skin tests. Follow-up studies also provided evidence of long-term persistence and function of transduced PBLs with improvement in the immune function. However, the therapeutic effect of this gene therapy has been difficult to assess because of the concomitant treatment of PEG-ADA. Two ADA-SCID patients have been currently treated with autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells engineered with a retroviral vector GCsapM-ADA after discontinuation of PEG-ADA. The restoration of intracellular ADA enzymatic activity in lymphocytes and granulocytes resulted in correction of the systemic toxicity and liver function in the absence of PEG-ADA treatment. Both patients are at home where they are clinically well, and they do not experience adversed effect, with follow up being 12 months after CD34+ cells gene therapy.

  19. [Gene therapy--current status and outlook].

    PubMed

    Hantzopoulos, P A; Gänsbacher, B

    1996-10-01

    None of the human gene transfer studies to date has shown definitive proof of clinical efficacy, despite more than 100 clinical protocols involving nearly 600 patients. In spite of the lack of positive results, tremendous hope permeates the field, biotechnology companies are getting started and raising millions of dollars from venture capital, and patients all over the world are agreeing to enroll in protocols involving this technology. Critics of the field claim that gene therapy has been overemphasized by researchers in academia, government and industry and by the scientific and popular media. Supporters of the field argue that the state of gene therapy is no different than other experimental therapies in its early stages. During the early stages of chemotherapy, agents were tested on hundreds of patients, often with a similar level of hope and no clinical effects. Despite the many controversies, one issue is shared by both groups: all of them recognize the tremendous potential of this technology to have an impact on human disease and share hope for long-term results.

  20. [Prospects of gene therapy in mucoviscidosis using viral infection of the airway epithelium].

    PubMed

    Bayle, J Y; Boucher, R C

    1994-01-01

    Mucoviscidosis is the most common severe inherited autosomal recessive disease. Since the gene has been recognised (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene) (CFTR) the technique of genetic transfer has been applied to the airway epithelium. The prospect for gene therapy to treat the consequences of bronchopulmonary mucoviscidosis is now evident. The in vitro introduction of the normal CFTR human gene in epithelial cells has been obtained using recombinant retrovirus, adenovirus and parvovirus rendered defective for replication. The abnormal bioelectric phenotype of the cells from patients with mucoviscidosis has been corrected. Of these, only adenovirus and parvovirus have been capable of assuring effective genetic transfer by direct introduction into the airways. This data has been considered sufficient to justify starting clinical trials in man with adenovirus; the preliminary results confirm the possibility of correcting the chloride transport. Nevertheless the observation of an immune response and secondary inflammation raises ethical questions relative to the safety of such trials. This observation justifies research into an alternative non-viral technique such as employing liposomes. The authors have made a review of the data which may be established as a basis for genetic therapy for mucoviscidosis.

  1. Tripartite meeting in gene and cell therapy, 2008: Irish Society for Gene and Cell Therapy, British Society for Gene Therapy, and International Society for Cell and Gene Therapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Guinn, Barbara; Casey, Garrett; Collins, Sara; O'Brien, Tim; Alexander, M Yvonne; Tangney, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The second annual meeting of the Irish Society for Gene and Cell Therapy was held in Cork, Ireland on May 15 and 16, 2008 (http://crr.ucc.ie/isgct/). The meeting was jointly organized with the British Society for Gene Therapy and the International Society for Cell and Gene Therapy of Cancer. Because of the location of the conference and the co-organization of this meeting with the British and International Gene Therapy societies, the meeting enjoyed a range of talks from some of the major leaders in the field. Particularly notable were the talented molecular and cell biologists from Ireland who have contributed cutting edge science to the field of gene therapy. Topics including cardiovascular disease, repair of single-gene disorders, and cancer gene therapy were discussed with presentations ranging from basic research to translation into the clinic. Here we describe some of the most exciting presentations and their potential impact on imminent clinical gene therapy trials.

  2. Gemcitabine and γ-cyclodextrin/docetaxel inclusion complex-loaded liposome for highly effective combinational therapy of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Qing-Hu; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-15

    The aim of the present investigation was to formulate a docetaxel (DTX) and gemcitabine (GEM) co-loaded PEGylated liposome (DTX/GEM-L) to increase the therapeutic efficacy in osteosarcoma (OS). 2-Hydroxypropyl-γ-cyclodextrin/DTX inclusion complex was made to increase DTX aqueous solubility. DTX/GEM-L was characterized for morphological shape and size parameters. Release study showed a sustained release pattern for both the drugs. The nanocarriers based combinational drug significantly increased the cytotoxic effect than the free drug combination at the same concentration. The cell cycle analysis showed a predominant G2/M phase arrest for combinational drug. Importantly, more than 20% of cells were in late apoptosis chamber for DTX/GEM-L treatment with significant proportion of cells in the early apoptosis and necrotic phases. The antitumor efficacy was tested in MG63 cancer cell bearing xenograft nude mice. Results showed that DTX/GEM-L significantly reduced the tumor burden comparing to that of free combination cocktail. The PEGylated liposome successfully delivered the anticancer drugs in the osteosarcoma tumor interstitial spaces via EPR effect. DTX/GEM-L showed excellent safety profile along with the remarkable tumor suppression ability. Overall, results suggest that nanocarriers-based delivery system remarkably enhanced the apoptosis and cytotoxicity and increased the pote